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Sample records for binding energy dependency

  1. Systematic studies of binding energy dependence of neutron-proton momentum correlation function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Y B; Ma, Y G; Shen, W Q; Ma, G L; Wang, K; Cai, X Z; Zhong, C; Guo, W; Chen, J G; Fang, D Q; Tian, W D; Zhou, X F

    2004-01-01

    Hanbury Brown-Twiss (HBT) results of the neutron-proton correlation function have been systematically investigated for a series of nuclear reactions with light projectiles with the help of the isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics model. The relationship between the binding energy per nucleon of the projectiles and the strength of the neutron-proton HBT at small relative momentum has been obtained. Results show that neutron-proton HBT results are sensitive to the binding energy per nucleon

  2. Computational scheme for pH-dependent binding free energy calculation with explicit solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juyong; Miller, Benjamin T; Brooks, Bernard R

    2016-01-01

    We present a computational scheme to compute the pH-dependence of binding free energy with explicit solvent. Despite the importance of pH, the effect of pH has been generally neglected in binding free energy calculations because of a lack of accurate methods to model it. To address this limitation, we use a constant-pH methodology to obtain a true ensemble of multiple protonation states of a titratable system at a given pH and analyze the ensemble using the Bennett acceptance ratio (BAR) method. The constant pH method is based on the combination of enveloping distribution sampling (EDS) with the Hamiltonian replica exchange method (HREM), which yields an accurate semi-grand canonical ensemble of a titratable system. By considering the free energy change of constraining multiple protonation states to a single state or releasing a single protonation state to multiple states, the pH dependent binding free energy profile can be obtained. We perform benchmark simulations of a host-guest system: cucurbit[7]uril (CB[7]) and benzimidazole (BZ). BZ experiences a large pKa shift upon complex formation. The pH-dependent binding free energy profiles of the benchmark system are obtained with three different long-range interaction calculation schemes: a cutoff, the particle mesh Ewald (PME), and the isotropic periodic sum (IPS) method. Our scheme captures the pH-dependent behavior of binding free energy successfully. Absolute binding free energy values obtained with the PME and IPS methods are consistent, while cutoff method results are off by 2 kcal mol(-1) . We also discuss the characteristics of three long-range interaction calculation methods for constant-pH simulations. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  3. Pressure-dependent shallow donor binding energy in InGaN/GaN square QWWs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghazi, Haddou El; Jorio, Anouar; Zorkani, Izeddine

    2013-01-01

    Using a variational approach, we perform a theoretical study of hydrostatic pressure effect on the ground-state of axial hydrogenic shallow-donor impurity binding energy in InGaN/GaN square quantum well wire (SQWWs) as a function of the side length within the effective-mass scheme and finite potential barrier. The pressure dependence of wire length, effective mass, dielectric constant and potential barrier are taken into account. Numerical results show that: (i) the binding energy is strongly affected by the wire length and the external applied pressure and (ii) its maximum moves to the narrow wire in particular for height pressure.

  4. Role of codeposited impurities during growth. II. Dependence of morphology on binding and barrier energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathiyanarayanan, Rajesh; Hamouda, Ajmi Bh.; Pimpinelli, A.; Einstein, T. L.

    2011-01-01

    In an accompanying article we showed that surface morphologies obtained through codeposition of a small quantity (2%) of impurities with Cu during growth (step-flow mode, θ = 40 ML) significantly depends on the lateral nearest-neighbor binding energy (ENN) to Cu adatom and the diffusion barrier (Ed) of the impurity atom on Cu(0 0 1). Based on these two energy parameters, ENN and Ed, we classify impurity atoms into four sets. We study island nucleation and growth in the presence of codeposited impurities from different sets in the submonolayer (θ⩽ 0.7 ML) regime. Similar to growth in the step-flow mode, we find different nucleation and growth behavior for impurities from different sets. We characterize these differences through variations of the number of islands (Ni) and the average island size with coverage (θ). Further, we compute the critical nucleus size (i) for all of these cases from the distribution of capture-zone areas using the generalized Wigner distribution.

  5. Magnetic field-dependent of binding energy in GaN/InGaN/GaN spherical QDQW nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Ghazi, Haddou; Jorio, Anouar; Zorkani, Izeddine

    2013-01-01

    Simultaneous study of magnetic field and impurity's position effects on the ground-state shallow-donor binding energy in GaN|InGaN|GaN (core|well|shell) spherical quantum dot–quantum well (SQDQW) as a function of the ratio of the inner and the outer radius is reported. The calculations are investigated within the framework of the effective-mass approximation and an infinite deep potential describing the quantum confinement effect. A Ritz variational approach is used taking into account of the electron-impurity correlation and the magnetic field effect in the trial wave-function. It appears that the binding energy depends strongly on the external magnetic field, the impurity's position and the structure radius. It has been found that: (i) the magnetic field effect is more marked in large layer than in thin layer and (ii) it is more pronounced in the spherical layer center than in its extremities

  6. Binding energies of cluster ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parajuli, R.; Matt, S.; Scheier, P.; Echt, O.; Stamatovic, A.; Maerk, T.D.

    2002-01-01

    The binding energy of charged clusters may be measured by analyzing the kinetic energy released in the metastable decay of mass selected parent ions. Using finite heat bath theory to determine the binding energies of argon, neon, krypton, oxygen and nitrogen from their respective average kinetic energy released were carried out. A high-resolution double focussing two-sector mass spectrometer of reversed Nier-Johnson type geometry was used. MIKE ( mass-analysed ion kinetic energy) were measured to investigate decay reactions of mass-selected ions. For the inert gases neon (Ne n + ), argon (Ar n + ) and krypton (Kr n + ), it is found that the binding energies initially decrease with increasing size n and then level off at a value above the enthalpy of vaporization of the condensed phase. Oxygen cluster ions shown a characteristic dependence on cluster size (U-shape) indicating a change in the metastable fragmentation mechanism when going from the dimer to the decamer ion. (nevyjel)

  7. Hydrogenic-Donor Impurity Binding Energy Dependence of the Electric Field in GaAs/AlxGa1−xAs Quantum Rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangxin Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a variational method with two-parameter trial wave function and the effective mass approximation, the binding energy of a donor impurity in GaAs/AlxGa1−xAs cylindrical quantum ring (QR subjected to an external field is calculated. It is shown that the donor impurity binding energy is highly dependent on the QR structure parameters (radial thickness and height, impurity position, and external electric field. The binding energy increases inchmeal as the QR parameters (radial thickness and height decrease until a maximum value for a central impurity and then begins to drop quickly. The applied electric field can significantly modify the spread of electronic wave function in the QR and shift electronic wave function from the donor position and then leads to binding energy changes. In addition, results for the binding energies of a hydrogenic donor impurity as functions of the impurity position and applied electric field are also presented.

  8. Magnetic field-dependent of binding energy in GaN/InGaN/GaN spherical QDQW nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Ghazi, Haddou, E-mail: hadghazi@gmail.com [Solid State Laboratory, Faculty of science, Dhar EL Mehrez, BP 1796 Fes-Atlas (Morocco); Special mathematics, CPGE Kénitra, Chakib Arsalane Street (Morocco); Jorio, Anouar; Zorkani, Izeddine [Solid State Laboratory, Faculty of science, Dhar EL Mehrez, BP 1796 Fes-Atlas (Morocco)

    2013-10-15

    Simultaneous study of magnetic field and impurity's position effects on the ground-state shallow-donor binding energy in GaN|InGaN|GaN (core|well|shell) spherical quantum dot–quantum well (SQDQW) as a function of the ratio of the inner and the outer radius is reported. The calculations are investigated within the framework of the effective-mass approximation and an infinite deep potential describing the quantum confinement effect. A Ritz variational approach is used taking into account of the electron-impurity correlation and the magnetic field effect in the trial wave-function. It appears that the binding energy depends strongly on the external magnetic field, the impurity's position and the structure radius. It has been found that: (i) the magnetic field effect is more marked in large layer than in thin layer and (ii) it is more pronounced in the spherical layer center than in its extremities.

  9. Stark effect-dependent of ground-state donor binding energy in InGaN/GaN parabolic QWW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Ghazi, Haddou; Zorkani, Izeddine; Jorio, Anouar

    2013-01-01

    Using the finite-difference method within the quasi-one-dimensional effective potential model and effective mass approximation, the ground-state binding energy of hydrogenic shallow-donor impurity in wurtzite (WZ) (In,Ga)N/GaN parabolic transversal-section quantum-well wires (PQWWs) subjected to external electric field is investigated. An effective radius of a cylindrical QWW describing the strength of the lateral confinement is introduced. The results show that (i) the position of the largest electron probability density in x–y plane is located at a point and it is pushed along the negative sense by the electric field directed along the positive sense, (ii) the ground-state binding energy is largest for the impurity located at this point and starts to decrease when the impurity is away from this point, (iii) the ground-state binding energy decreases with increase in the external electric field and effective radius, and (iv) the Stark-shift increases with the increase of the external electric field and the effective radius

  10. Skyrmions with low binding energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillard, Mike, E-mail: m.n.gillard@leeds.ac.uk; Harland, Derek, E-mail: d.g.harland@leeds.ac.uk; Speight, Martin, E-mail: speight@maths.leeds.ac.uk

    2015-06-15

    Nuclear binding energies are investigated in two variants of the Skyrme model: the first replaces the usual Skyrme term with a term that is sixth order in derivatives, and the second includes a potential that is quartic in the pion fields. Solitons in the first model are shown to deviate significantly from ansätze previously assumed in the literature. The binding energies obtained in both models are lower than those obtained from the standard Skyrme model, and those obtained in the second model are close to the experimental values.

  11. Skyrmions with low binding energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillard, Mike; Harland, Derek; Speight, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear binding energies are investigated in two variants of the Skyrme model: the first replaces the usual Skyrme term with a term that is sixth order in derivatives, and the second includes a potential that is quartic in the pion fields. Solitons in the first model are shown to deviate significantly from ansätze previously assumed in the literature. The binding energies obtained in both models are lower than those obtained from the standard Skyrme model, and those obtained in the second model are close to the experimental values

  12. Skyrmions with low binding energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Gillard

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear binding energies are investigated in two variants of the Skyrme model: the first replaces the usual Skyrme term with a term that is sixth order in derivatives, and the second includes a potential that is quartic in the pion fields. Solitons in the first model are shown to deviate significantly from ansätze previously assumed in the literature. The binding energies obtained in both models are lower than those obtained from the standard Skyrme model, and those obtained in the second model are close to the experimental values.

  13. Universal dependence of hydrogen oxidation and evolution reaction activity of platinum-group metals on pH and hydrogen binding energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jie; Sheng, Wenchao; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Xu, Bingjun; Yan, Yushan

    2016-03-01

    Understanding how pH affects the activity of hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is key to developing active, stable, and affordable HOR/HER catalysts for hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells and electrolyzers. A common linear correlation between hydrogen binding energy (HBE) and pH is observed for four supported platinum-group metal catalysts (Pt/C, Ir/C, Pd/C, and Rh/C) over a broad pH range (0 to 13), suggesting that the pH dependence of HBE is metal-independent. A universal correlation between exchange current density and HBE is also observed on the four metals, indicating that they may share the same elementary steps and rate-determining steps and that the HBE is the dominant descriptor for HOR/HER activities. The onset potential of CO stripping on the four metals decreases with pH, indicating a stronger OH adsorption, which provides evidence against the promoting effect of adsorbed OH on HOR/HER.

  14. Energy India 'dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cygler, C.

    2007-01-01

    India has an economic growth between 8 to 10 % by year. To become a great country of the twenty first century and to stop poverty it is necessary to keep this growth but the growth of India is dependant of its ability to supply electric power necessary to increase the industrial production. The country has to multiply by four its energy production. The electric production comes from thermal power plants for 65%, 26% from hydroelectric power plants, 6% from renewable energy sources and 3% from nuclear energy. Between solar energy ( India has three hundred solar days by years) and nuclear energy using thorium that can be increased India has to choose an energy policy to answer its energy demand and independence need. (N.C.)

  15. Conformational Transitions and Convergence of Absolute Binding Free Energy Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapelosa, Mauro; Gallicchio, Emilio; Levy, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01

    The Binding Energy Distribution Analysis Method (BEDAM) is employed to compute the standard binding free energies of a series of ligands to a FK506 binding protein (FKBP12) with implicit solvation. Binding free energy estimates are in reasonably good agreement with experimental affinities. The conformations of the complexes identified by the simulations are in good agreement with crystallographic data, which was not used to restrain ligand orientations. The BEDAM method is based on λ -hopping Hamiltonian parallel Replica Exchange (HREM) molecular dynamics conformational sampling, the OPLS-AA/AGBNP2 effective potential, and multi-state free energy estimators (MBAR). Achieving converged and accurate results depends on all of these elements of the calculation. Convergence of the binding free energy is tied to the level of convergence of binding energy distributions at critical intermediate states where bound and unbound states are at equilibrium, and where the rate of binding/unbinding conformational transitions is maximal. This finding mirrors similar observations in the context of order/disorder transitions as for example in protein folding. Insights concerning the physical mechanism of ligand binding and unbinding are obtained. Convergence for the largest FK506 ligand is achieved only after imposing strict conformational restraints, which however require accurate prior structural knowledge of the structure of the complex. The analytical AGBNP2 model is found to underestimate the magnitude of the hydrophobic driving force towards binding in these systems characterized by loosely packed protein-ligand binding interfaces. Rescoring of the binding energies using a numerical surface area model corrects this deficiency. This study illustrates the complex interplay between energy models, exploration of conformational space, and free energy estimators needed to obtain robust estimates from binding free energy calculations. PMID:22368530

  16. Nuclear three-body problem and energy-dependent potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdurakhmanov, A.; Akhmadkhodzhaev, B.; Zubarev, A.L.; Irgaziev, B.F.

    1985-01-01

    Energy-dependent potentials in the three-body problem are being considered. Three-particle equations for the case of pairing energy-dependent potentials are generalized and the problems related to this ambiguous generalization are investigated. In terms of the equations obtained the tritium binding energy and vertex coupling constants (Tdn) and (Tdν) are evaluated. The binding energy and, especially, coupling constants are shown to be sensitive to a shape of the energy-dependent potential

  17. P-shell hyperon binding energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koetsier, D.; Amos, K.

    1991-01-01

    A shell model for lambda hypernuclei has been used to determine the binding energy of the hyperon in nuclei throughout the p shell. Conventional (Cohen and Kurath) potential energies for nucleon-nucleon interactions were used with hyperon-nucleon interactions taken from Nijmegen one boson exchange potentials. The hyperon binding energies calculated from these potentials compare well with measured values. 7 refs., 2 figs

  18. Size-dependent binding energies and fine-structure splitting of excitonic complexes in single InAs/GaAs quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodt, S.; Seguin, R.; Schliwa, A.; Guffarth, F.; Poetschke, K.; Pohl, U.W.; Bimberg, D.

    2007-01-01

    A systematic study of excitonic complexes confined in single InAs/GaAs quantum dots is presented. Emphasis is placed on the recombination energies of the excitonic complexes and on the fine-structure splitting of the bright exciton ground state. The values depend in a characteristic way on the size of the respective quantum dot which controls the number of bound hole states and the piezoelectric potential

  19. Binding energy effects in cascade evolution and sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, M.T.

    1995-06-01

    The MARLOWE model was extended to include a binding energy dependent on the local crystalline order, so that atoms are bound less strongly to their lattice sites near surfaces or associated damage. Sputtering and cascade evolution were studied on the examples of self-ion irradiations of Cu and Au monocrystals. In cascades, the mean binding energy is reduced ∼8% in Cu with little dependence on the initial recoil energy; in Au, it is reduced ∼9% at 1 keV and ∼15% at 100 keV. In sputtering, the mean binding energy is reduced ∼8% in Cu and ∼15% in Au with little energy dependence; the yields are increased about half as much. Most sites from which sputtered atoms originate are isolated in both metals. Small clusters of such sites occur in Cu, but there are some large clusters in Au, especially in [111] targets. There are always more large clusters with damage-dependent binding than with a constant binding energy, but only a few clusters are compact enough to be regarded as pits

  20. Exciton Binding Energy of Monolayer WS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bairen; Chen, Xi; Cui, Xiaodong

    2015-03-01

    The optical properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDC) feature prominent excitonic natures. Here we report an experimental approach to measuring the exciton binding energy of monolayer WS2 with linear differential transmission spectroscopy and two-photon photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy (TP-PLE). TP-PLE measurements show the exciton binding energy of 0.71 +/- 0.01 eV around K valley in the Brillouin zone.

  1. Binding energy of two-dimensional biexcitons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Jai; Birkedal, Dan; Vadim, Lyssenko

    1996-01-01

    Using a model structure for a two-dimensional (2D) biexciton confined in a quantum well, it is shown that the form of the Hamiltonian of the 2D biexciton reduces into that of an exciton. The binding energies and Bohr radii of a 2D biexciton in its various internal energy states are derived...... analytically using the fractional dimension approach. The ratio of the binding energy of a 2D biexciton to that of a 2D exciton is found to be 0.228, which agrees very well with the recent experimental value. The results of our approach are compared with those of earlier theories....

  2. Binding energies of hypernuclei and hypernuclear interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodmer, A.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Physics; Murali, S.; Usmani, Q.N. [Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi (India). Dept. of Physics

    1996-05-01

    In part 1 the effect of nuclear core dynamics on the binding energies of {Lambda} hypernuclei is discussed in the framework of variational correlated wave functions. In particular, the authors discuss a new rearrangement energy contribution and its effect on the core polarization. In part 2 they consider the interpretation of the {Lambda} single-particle energy in terms of basic {Lambda}-nuclear interactions using a local density approximation based on a Fermi hypernetted chain calculation of the A binding to nuclear matter. To account for the data strongly repulsive 3-body {Lambda}NN forces are required. Also in this framework they discuss core polarization for medium and heavier hypernuclei.

  3. Binding energies of hypernuclei and hypernuclear interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodmer, A.R.; Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL; Murali, S.; Usmani, Q.N.

    1996-01-01

    In part 1 the effect of nuclear core dynamics on the binding energies of Λ hypernuclei is discussed in the framework of variational correlated wave functions. In particular, the authors discuss a new rearrangement energy contribution and its effect on the core polarization. In part 2 they consider the interpretation of the Λ single-particle energy in terms of basic Λ-nuclear interactions using a local density approximation based on a Fermi hypernetted chain calculation of the A binding to nuclear matter. To account for the data strongly repulsive 3-body ΛNN forces are required. Also in this framework they discuss core polarization for medium and heavier hypernuclei

  4. Uranium energy dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erkes, P.

    1981-06-01

    Uranium supply and demand as projected by the Uranium Institute is discussed. It is concluded that for the industrialized countries, maximum energy independence is a necessity. Hence it is necessary to achieve assurance of supply for uranium used in thermal power reactors in current programs and eventually to move towards breeders

  5. Effect of isovector coupling channel on the macroscopic part of the nuclear binding energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddad, S.

    2011-04-01

    The effect of the isovector coupling channel on the macroscopic part of the nuclear binding energy is determined utilizing the relativistic density dependent Thomas-Fermi approach for the calculation of the macroscopic part of the nuclear binding energy, and the dependency of this effect on the numbers of neutrons and protons is studied. The isovector coupling channel leads to increased nuclear binding energy, and this effect sharpens with growing excess of the number of neutrons on the number of protons. (author)

  6. Binding Energy, Vapor Pressure and Melting Point of Semiconductor Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    H. H. Farrell; C. D. Van Siclen

    2007-01-01

    Current models for the cohesive energy of nanoparticles generally predict a linear dependence on the inverse particle diameter for spherical clusters, or, equivalently, on the inverse of the cube root of the number of atoms in the cluster. Although this is generally true for metals, we find that for the group IV semiconductors, C, Si and Ge, this linear dependence does not hold. Instead, using first principles, density functional theory calculations to calculate the binding energy of these materials, we find a quadratic dependence on the inverse of the particle size. Similar results have also been obtained for the metallic group IV elements Sn and Pb. This is in direct contradiction to current assumptions. Further, as a consequence of this quadratic behavior, the vapor pressure of semiconductor nanoparticles rises more slowly with decreasing size than would be expected. In addition, the melting point of these nanoparticles will experience less suppression than experienced by metal nanoparticles with comparable bulk binding energies. This non-linearity also affects sintering or Ostwald ripening behavior of these nanoparticles as well as other physical properties that depend on the nanoparticle binding energy. The reason for this variation in size dependence involves the covalent nature of the bonding in semiconductors, and even in the 'poor' metals. Therefore, it is expected that this result will hold for compound semiconductors as well as the elemental semiconductors

  7. Binding Energy and Equilibrium of Compact Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germano M.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical analysis of the existence of a limit mass for compact astronomic ob- jects requires the solution of the Einstein’s equations of g eneral relativity together with an appropriate equation of state. Analytical solutions exi st in some special cases like the spherically symmetric static object without energy sou rces that is here considered. Solutions, i.e. the spacetime metrics, can have a singular m athematical form (the so called Schwarzschild metric due to Hilbert or a nonsingula r form (original work of Schwarzschild. The former predicts a limit mass and, conse quently, the existence of black holes above this limit. Here it is shown that, the origi nal Schwarzschild met- ric permits compact objects, without mass limit, having rea sonable values for central density and pressure. The lack of a limit mass is also demonst rated analytically just imposing reasonable conditions on the energy-matter densi ty, of positivity and decreas- ing with radius. Finally the ratio between proper mass and to tal mass tends to 2 for high values of mass so that the binding energy reaches the lim it m (total mass seen by a distant observer. As it is known the negative binding energ y reduces the gravitational mass of the object; the limit of m for the binding energy provides a mechanism for stable equilibrium of any amount of mass to contrast the gravitatio nal collapse.

  8. Temperature-dependent binding of cyclosporine to an erythrocyte protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, R.P.; Threatte, G.A.; McPherson, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    In this competitive binding assay to measure endogenous binding capacity for cyclosporine (CsA) in erythrocyte lysates, a fixed amount of [ 3 H]CsA plus various concentrations of unlabeled CsA is incubated with aliquots of a test hemolysate. Free CsA is then adsorbed onto charcoal and removed by centrifugation; CsA complexed with a cyclosporine-binding protein (CsBP) remains in the supernate. We confirmed the validity of this charcoal-separation mode of binding analysis by comparison with equilibrium dialysis. Scatchard plot analysis of the results at 4 degrees C yielded a straight line with slope corresponding to a binding constant of 1.9 X 10(7) L/mol and a saturation capacity of approximately 4 mumol per liter of packed erythrocytes. Similar analysis of binding data at 24 degrees C and 37 degrees C showed that the binding constant decreased with increasing temperature, but the saturation capacity did not change. CsBP was not membrane bound but appeared to be freely distributed within erythrocytes. 125 I-labeled CsA did not complex with the erythrocyte CsBP. Several antibiotics and other drugs did not inhibit binding between CsA and CsBP. These findings may explain the temperature-dependent uptake of CsA by erythrocytes in whole blood and suggest that measurement of CsBP in erythrocytes or lymphocytes may help predict therapeutic response or toxicity after administration of CsA

  9. Italy's recurrent energy dependency dilemma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ippolito, F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper first critically assesses the objectives of Italy's 1988 National Energy Plan which, in light of the moratorium on nuclear energy, called for moderate but steady reductions in imported energy supplies through the implementation of energy conservation programs and the development of available domestic conventional and renewable energy sources. The economics and energy analyses evidence that, in view this nation's current troubled economic situation, the Energy Plan's target for the year 2000 of a 76% dependency on foreign oil is just not good enough and not in line with stricter European environmental normatives limiting carbon dioxide emissions. It is argued that in order to effectively reduce the nation's excessively high energy costs, keep pace with other industrialized countries in a highly competitive market (Italy's energy tariffs are almost 55% greater than those of Germany and France), and to respect new European anti-pollution laws, Italy must restart its nuclear program and take advantage of the recent advances being made in passive reactor safety systems

  10. Effect of binding in cyclic phosphorylation-dephosphorylation process and in energy transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, A; Beard, D A; Franza, B R

    2006-07-01

    The effects of binding on the phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle (PDPC) - one of the key components of the signal transduction processes - is analyzed based on a mathematical model. The model shows that binding of proteins, forming a complex, diminishes the ultrasensitivity of the PDPC to the differences in activity between kinase and phosphatase in the cycle. It is also found that signal amplification depends upon the strength of the binding affinity of the protein (phosphorylated or dephosphorylated) to other proteins . It is also observed that the amplification of signal is not only dependent on phosphorylation potential but also on binding properties and resulting adjustments in binding energies.

  11. Fricke xylenol gel energy dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Rosangela T.; Moreira, Marcos V.; Almeida, Adelaide de

    2009-01-01

    The advancement of technology has increasingly use the of ionizing radiation mainly in the areas of medicine, industry and research. The development of instruments and methods for an effective performance for detection and measurement of each radiation area was crucial. The literature have demonstrated the effectiveness of the Fricke Xylenol Gel (FXG) as an adequate chemical sensor to be used for dosimetry, once its effective atomic number and density are near to those of the soft tissue. The use of photon beams for therapeutic purpose requires knowledge of their characteristics that can vary for each equipment. Therefore, is important to know all parameters involved for the patient irradiation as the total geometry involved, type of radiation, target material composition and beam energy, that have to be taken into account in the beam dosimetry for the treatment success being the energy parameter is one of the most important. This work was developed to study the energetic dependence of the FXG dosimeter. This chemical solution is made with gelatine 300 Bloom, ferrous ammonium sulfate, xylenol orange, sulfuric acid and Milli-Q water and is based on the Fe +2 oxidation to Fe +3 , due to the ionizing radiation leading to the xylenol orange - ferric complex formation, that is linear depend on the absorbed dose. The FXG samples were irradiated with photons of different energies and the absorbance measurements were done with the spectrophotometric technique at the 585 nm, FXG highest absorption peak. The energetic dependence results presented a stronger dependence for low energies and almost independence for high energies, as expected by the interaction of radiation with matter. (author)

  12. How to deal with multiple binding poses in alchemical relative protein-ligand binding free energy calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaus, Joseph W; Harder, Edward; Lin, Teng; Abel, Robert; McCammon, J Andrew; Wang, Lingle

    2015-06-09

    Recent advances in improved force fields and sampling methods have made it possible for the accurate calculation of protein–ligand binding free energies. Alchemical free energy perturbation (FEP) using an explicit solvent model is one of the most rigorous methods to calculate relative binding free energies. However, for cases where there are high energy barriers separating the relevant conformations that are important for ligand binding, the calculated free energy may depend on the initial conformation used in the simulation due to the lack of complete sampling of all the important regions in phase space. This is particularly true for ligands with multiple possible binding modes separated by high energy barriers, making it difficult to sample all relevant binding modes even with modern enhanced sampling methods. In this paper, we apply a previously developed method that provides a corrected binding free energy for ligands with multiple binding modes by combining the free energy results from multiple alchemical FEP calculations starting from all enumerated poses, and the results are compared with Glide docking and MM-GBSA calculations. From these calculations, the dominant ligand binding mode can also be predicted. We apply this method to a series of ligands that bind to c-Jun N-terminal kinase-1 (JNK1) and obtain improved free energy results. The dominant ligand binding modes predicted by this method agree with the available crystallography, while both Glide docking and MM-GBSA calculations incorrectly predict the binding modes for some ligands. The method also helps separate the force field error from the ligand sampling error, such that deviations in the predicted binding free energy from the experimental values likely indicate possible inaccuracies in the force field. An error in the force field for a subset of the ligands studied was identified using this method, and improved free energy results were obtained by correcting the partial charges assigned to the

  13. How To Deal with Multiple Binding Poses in Alchemical Relative Protein–Ligand Binding Free Energy Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in improved force fields and sampling methods have made it possible for the accurate calculation of protein–ligand binding free energies. Alchemical free energy perturbation (FEP) using an explicit solvent model is one of the most rigorous methods to calculate relative binding free energies. However, for cases where there are high energy barriers separating the relevant conformations that are important for ligand binding, the calculated free energy may depend on the initial conformation used in the simulation due to the lack of complete sampling of all the important regions in phase space. This is particularly true for ligands with multiple possible binding modes separated by high energy barriers, making it difficult to sample all relevant binding modes even with modern enhanced sampling methods. In this paper, we apply a previously developed method that provides a corrected binding free energy for ligands with multiple binding modes by combining the free energy results from multiple alchemical FEP calculations starting from all enumerated poses, and the results are compared with Glide docking and MM-GBSA calculations. From these calculations, the dominant ligand binding mode can also be predicted. We apply this method to a series of ligands that bind to c-Jun N-terminal kinase-1 (JNK1) and obtain improved free energy results. The dominant ligand binding modes predicted by this method agree with the available crystallography, while both Glide docking and MM-GBSA calculations incorrectly predict the binding modes for some ligands. The method also helps separate the force field error from the ligand sampling error, such that deviations in the predicted binding free energy from the experimental values likely indicate possible inaccuracies in the force field. An error in the force field for a subset of the ligands studied was identified using this method, and improved free energy results were obtained by correcting the partial charges assigned to the

  14. First calculation of the deuteron binding energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaegger, B.

    2012-01-01

    No universal constant characterizing the nuclear force has yet been found as for gravity and electromagnetism. The neutron is globally neutral with a zero net charge. The charges contained in a neutron may be separated by the electric field of a nearby proton and therefore being attracted by electrostatic induction in the same way as a rubbed plastic pen attracts small pieces of paper. There is also a magnetic force that may repel the nucleons like magnets in the proper relative orientation. In the deuteron, the heavy hydrogen nucleus, the induced electrostatic attraction is equilibrated by the magnetic repulsion between the opposite and colinear moments of the nucleons. Equilibrium is calculated by minimizing the electromagnetic interaction potential, giving a binding energy of 1.6 MeV, not much lower than the experimental value, 2.2 MeV. No fitting parameter is used: it is a true ab initio calculation

  15. Evaluation of binding energies by using quantum mechanical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postolache, Cristian; Matei, Lidia; Postolache, Carmen

    2002-01-01

    Evaluation of binding energies (BE) in molecular structure is needed for modelling chemical and radiochemical processes by quantum-chemical methods. An important field of application is evaluation of radiolysis and autoradiolysis stability of organic and inorganic compounds as well as macromolecular structures. The current methods of calculation do not allow direct determination of BE but only of total binding energies (TBE) and enthalpies. BEs were evaluated indirectly by determining the homolytic dissociation energies. The molecular structures were built and geometrically optimized by the molecular mechanics methods MM+ and AMBER. The energy minimizations were refined by semi-empirical methods. Depending on the chosen molecular structure, the CNDO, INDO, PM3 and AM1 methods were used. To reach a high confidence level the minimizations were done for gradients lower than 10 -3 RMS. The energy values obtained by the difference of the fragment TBLs, of the transition states and initial molecular structures, respectively, were associated to the hemolytic fragmentation energy and BE, respectively. In order to evaluate the method's accuracy and to establish the application fields of the evaluation methods, the obtained values of BEs were compared with the experimental data taken from literature. To this goal there were built, geometrically optimized by semi-empirical methods and evaluated the BEs for 74 organic and inorganic compounds (alkanes, alkene, alkynes, halogenated derivatives, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, nitrogen and sulfur compounds, water, hydrogen peroxide, ammonia, hydrazine, etc. (authors)

  16. Measuring Intermolecular Binding Energies by Laser Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knochenmuss, Richard; Maity, Surajit; Féraud, Géraldine; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2017-02-22

    The ground-state dissociation energy, D0(S0), of isolated intermolecular complexes in the gas phase is a fundamental measure of the interaction strength between the molecules. We have developed a three-laser, triply resonant pump-dump-probe technique to measure dissociation energies of jet-cooled M•S complexes, where M is an aromatic chromophore and S is a closed-shell 'solvent' molecule. Stimulated emission pumping (SEP) via the S0→S1 electronic transition is used to precisely 'warm' the complex by populating high vibrational levels v" of the S0 state. If the deposited energy E(v") is less than D0(S0), the complex remains intact, and is then mass- and isomer-selectively detected by resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) with a third (probe) laser. If the pumped level is above D0(S0), the hot complex dissociates and the probe signal disappears. Combining the fluorescence or SEP spectrum of the cold complex with the SEP breakoff of the hot complex brackets D0(S0). The UV chromophores 1-naphthol and carbazole were employed; these bind either dispersively via the aromatic rings, or form a hydrogen bond via the -OH or -NH group. Dissociation energies have been measured for dispersively bound complexes with noble gases (Ne, Kr, Ar, Xe), diatomics (N2, CO), alkanes (methane to n-butane), cycloalkanes (cyclopropane to cycloheptane), and unsaturated compounds (ethene, benzene). Hydrogen-bond dissociation energies have been measured for H2O, D2O, methanol, ethanol, ethers (oxirane, oxetane), NH3 and ND3.

  17. Fitting theories of nuclear binding energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertsch, G.F.; Sabbey, B.; Uusnaekki, M.

    2005-01-01

    In developing theories of nuclear binding energy such as density-functional theory, the effort required to make a fit can be daunting because of the large number of parameters that may be in the theory and the large number of nuclei in the mass table. For theories based on the Skyrme interaction, the effort can be reduced considerably by using the singular value decomposition to reduce the size of the parameter space. We find that the sensitive parameters define a space of dimension four or so, and within this space a linear refit is adequate for a number of Skyrme parameters sets from the literature. We find no marked differences in the quality of the fit among the SLy4, the BSk4, and SkP parameter sets. The root-mean-square residual error in even-even nuclei is about 1.5 MeV, half the value of the liquid drop model. We also discuss an alternative norm for evaluating mass fits, the Chebyshev norm. It focuses attention on the cases with the largest discrepancies between theory and experiment. We show how it works with the liquid drop model and make some applications to models based on Skyrme energy functionals. The Chebyshev norm seems to be more sensitive to new experimental data than the root-mean-square norm. The method also has the advantage that candidate improvements to the theories can be assessed with computations on smaller sets of nuclei

  18. Binding-energy distribution and dephasing of localized biexcitons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langbein, Wolfgang Werner; Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Umlauff, M.

    1997-01-01

    We report on the binding energy and dephasing of localized biexciton states in narrow ZnSe multiple quantum wells. The measured binding-energy distribution of the localized biexcitons shows a width of 2.2 meV centered at 8.5 meV, and is fairly independent of the exciton localization energy. In fo...

  19. An Energy Conservation Approach to Adsorbate-Induced Surface Stress and the Extraction of Binding Energy Using Nanomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinnaduwage, Lal A [ORNL; Boiadjiev, Vassil I [ORNL; Fernando, G. W. [University of Connecticut, Storrs; Hawk, J. E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Wijewardhana, L.C. R. [University of Cincinnati; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    Microcantilevers are ideally-suited for the study of surface phenomena due to their large surface-to-volume ratios, which amplify surface effects. We show that when guest molecules bind to atoms/molecules on a microcantilever surface, the released binding energy is retained in the host surface, leading to a metastable state where the excess energy on the surface is manifested as an increase in surface stress leading to the bending of the microcantilever. When the excess energy is released, the microcantilever relaxes back to the original state, and the relaxation time depends on the particular binding process involved. Such experiments were conducted for three binding processes in vapor phase experiments: physisorption, hydrogen bonding, and chemisorption. To our knowledge, such an energy conservation approach has not been taken into account in adsorbate-induced surface effect investigations. Furthermore, these experiments illustrate that detailed molecular-level information on binding energies can be extracted from this simple micromechanical sensor.

  20. Implicit ligand theory for relative binding free energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Trung Hai; Minh, David D. L.

    2018-03-01

    Implicit ligand theory enables noncovalent binding free energies to be calculated based on an exponential average of the binding potential of mean force (BPMF)—the binding free energy between a flexible ligand and rigid receptor—over a precomputed ensemble of receptor configurations. In the original formalism, receptor configurations were drawn from or reweighted to the apo ensemble. Here we show that BPMFs averaged over a holo ensemble yield binding free energies relative to the reference ligand that specifies the ensemble. When using receptor snapshots from an alchemical simulation with a single ligand, the new statistical estimator outperforms the original.

  1. Exciton binding energy in a pyramidal quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitha, A.; Arulmozhi, M.

    2018-05-01

    The effects of spatially dependent effective mass, non-parabolicity of the conduction band and dielectric screening function on exciton binding energy in a pyramid-shaped quantum dot of GaAs have been investigated by variational method as a function of base width of the pyramid. We have assumed that the pyramid has a square base with area a× a and height of the pyramid H=a/2. The trial wave function of the exciton has been chosen according to the even mirror boundary condition, i.e. the wave function of the exciton at the boundary could be non-zero. The results show that (i) the non-parabolicity of the conduction band affects the light hole (lh) and heavy hole (hh) excitons to be more bound than that with parabolicity of the conduction band, (ii) the dielectric screening function (DSF) affects the lh and hh excitons to be more bound than that without the DSF and (iii) the spatially dependent effective mass (SDEM) affects the lh and hh excitons to be less bound than that without the SDEM. The combined effects of DSF and SDEM on exciton binding energy have also been calculated. The results are compared with those available in the literature.

  2. Perturbation method for calculating impurity binding energy in an ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nilanjan Sil

    2017-12-18

    Dec 18, 2017 ... Abstract. In the present paper, we have studied the binding energy of the shallow donor hydrogenic impurity, which is confined in an inhomogeneous cylindrical quantum dot (CQD) of GaAs-AlxGa1−xAs. Perturbation method is used to calculate the binding energy within the framework of effective mass ...

  3. Extrapolations of nuclear binding energies from new linear mass relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove, D.; Jensen, A. S.; Riisager, K.

    2013-01-01

    We present a method to extrapolate nuclear binding energies from known values for neighboring nuclei. We select four specific mass relations constructed to eliminate smooth variation of the binding energy as function nucleon numbers. The fast odd-even variations are avoided by comparing nuclei...

  4. An energy conservation approach to adsorbate-induced surface stress and the extraction of binding energy using nanomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnaduwage, Lal A.; Boiadjiev, Vassil I.; Hawk, John E.; Gehl, Anthony C.; Fernando, Gayanath W.; Rohana Wijewardhana, L. C.

    2008-03-01

    Surface stress induced by molecular adsorption in three different binding processes has been studied experimentally using a microcantilever sensor. A comprehensive free-energy analysis based on an energy conservation approach is proposed to explain the experimental observations. We show that when guest molecules bind to atoms/molecules on a microcantilever surface, the released binding energy is retained in the host surface, leading to a metastable state where the excess energy on the surface is manifested as an increase in surface stress leading to the bending of the microcantilever. The released binding energy appears to be almost exclusively channeled to the surface energy, and energy distribution to other channels, including heat, appears to be inactive for this micromechanical system. When this excess surface energy is released, the microcantilever relaxes back to the original state, and the relaxation time depends on the particular binding process involved. Such vapor phase experiments were conducted for three binding processes: physisorption, hydrogen bonding, and chemisorption. Binding energies for these three processes were also estimated.

  5. An energy conservation approach to adsorbate-induced surface stress and the extraction of binding energy using nanomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinnaduwage, Lal A; Boiadjiev, Vassil I; Hawk, John E; Gehl, Anthony C [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6122 (United States); Fernando, Gayanath W [Physics Department, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); Wijewardhana, L C Rohana [Physics Department, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States)

    2008-03-12

    Surface stress induced by molecular adsorption in three different binding processes has been studied experimentally using a microcantilever sensor. A comprehensive free-energy analysis based on an energy conservation approach is proposed to explain the experimental observations. We show that when guest molecules bind to atoms/molecules on a microcantilever surface, the released binding energy is retained in the host surface, leading to a metastable state where the excess energy on the surface is manifested as an increase in surface stress leading to the bending of the microcantilever. The released binding energy appears to be almost exclusively channeled to the surface energy, and energy distribution to other channels, including heat, appears to be inactive for this micromechanical system. When this excess surface energy is released, the microcantilever relaxes back to the original state, and the relaxation time depends on the particular binding process involved. Such vapor phase experiments were conducted for three binding processes: physisorption, hydrogen bonding, and chemisorption. Binding energies for these three processes were also estimated.

  6. On binding energy of trions in bulk materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filikhin, Igor; Kezerashvili, Roman Ya.; Vlahovic, Branislav

    2018-03-01

    We study the negatively T- and positively T+ charged trions in bulk materials in the effective mass approximation within the framework of a potential model. The binding energies of trions in various semiconductors are calculated by employing Faddeev equation in configuration space. Results of calculations of the binding energies for T- are consistent with previous computational studies and are in reasonable agreement with experimental measurements, while the T+ is unbound for all considered cases. The mechanism of formation of the binding energy of trions is analyzed by comparing contributions of a mass-polarization term related to kinetic energy operators and a term related to the Coulomb repulsion of identical particles.

  7. Exactly solvable energy-dependent potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Martinez, J.; Garcia-Ravelo, J.; Pena, J.J.; Schulze-Halberg, A.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a method for constructing exactly-solvable Schroedinger equations with energy-dependent potentials. Our method is based on converting a general linear differential equation of second order into a Schroedinger equation with energy-dependent potential. Particular examples presented here include harmonic oscillator, Coulomb and Morse potentials with various types of energy dependence.

  8. Multiple binding modes of ibuprofen in human serum albumin identified by absolute binding free energy calculations

    KAUST Repository

    Evoli, Stefania

    2016-11-10

    Human serum albumin possesses multiple binding sites and transports a wide range of ligands that include the anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen. A complete map of the binding sites of ibuprofen in albumin is difficult to obtain in traditional experiments, because of the structural adaptability of this protein in accommodating small ligands. In this work, we provide a set of predictions covering the geometry, affinity of binding and protonation state for the pharmaceutically most active form (S-isomer) of ibuprofen to albumin, by using absolute binding free energy calculations in combination with classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and molecular docking. The most favorable binding modes correctly reproduce several experimentally identified binding locations, which include the two Sudlow\\'s drug sites (DS2 and DS1) and the fatty acid binding sites 6 and 2 (FA6 and FA2). Previously unknown details of the binding conformations were revealed for some of them, and formerly undetected binding modes were found in other protein sites. The calculated binding affinities exhibit trends which seem to agree with the available experimental data, and drastically degrade when the ligand is modeled in a protonated (neutral) state, indicating that ibuprofen associates with albumin preferentially in its charged form. These findings provide a detailed description of the binding of ibuprofen, help to explain a wide range of results reported in the literature in the last decades, and demonstrate the possibility of using simulation methods to predict ligand binding to albumin.

  9. Structure-function relationships of Na+, K+, ATP, or Mg2+ binding and energy transduction in Na,K-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Peter L.; Pedersen, Per Amstrup

    2000-01-01

    Na,K-ATPase; Mutagenesis; Na+ binding; K+ binding; Tl+ binding; Mg2+ binding; ATP binding; Cation binding site; Energy transduction......Na,K-ATPase; Mutagenesis; Na+ binding; K+ binding; Tl+ binding; Mg2+ binding; ATP binding; Cation binding site; Energy transduction...

  10. Using the fast fourier transform in binding free energy calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Trung Hai; Zhou, Huan-Xiang; Minh, David D L

    2018-04-30

    According to implicit ligand theory, the standard binding free energy is an exponential average of the binding potential of mean force (BPMF), an exponential average of the interaction energy between the unbound ligand ensemble and a rigid receptor. Here, we use the fast Fourier transform (FFT) to efficiently evaluate BPMFs by calculating interaction energies when rigid ligand configurations from the unbound ensemble are discretely translated across rigid receptor conformations. Results for standard binding free energies between T4 lysozyme and 141 small organic molecules are in good agreement with previous alchemical calculations based on (1) a flexible complex ( R≈0.9 for 24 systems) and (2) flexible ligand with multiple rigid receptor configurations ( R≈0.8 for 141 systems). While the FFT is routinely used for molecular docking, to our knowledge this is the first time that the algorithm has been used for rigorous binding free energy calculations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. ATP binding cassette G1-dependent cholesterol efflux during inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beer, Maria C; Ji, Ailing; Jahangiri, Anisa; Vaughan, Ashley M; de Beer, Frederick C; van der Westhuyzen, Deneys R; Webb, Nancy R

    2011-02-01

    ATP binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1) mediates the transport of cellular cholesterol to HDL, and it plays a key role in maintaining macrophage cholesterol homeostasis. During inflammation, HDL undergoes substantial remodeling, acquiring lipid changes and serum amyloid A (SAA) as a major apolipoprotein. In the current study, we investigated whether remodeling of HDL that occurs during acute inflammation impacts ABCG1-dependent efflux. Our data indicate that lipid free SAA acts similarly to apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) in mediating sequential efflux from ABCA1 and ABCG1. Compared with normal mouse HDL, acute phase (AP) mouse HDL containing SAA exhibited a modest but significant 17% increase in ABCG1-dependent efflux. Interestingly, AP HDL isolated from mice lacking SAA (SAAKO mice) was even more effective in promoting ABCG1 efflux. Hydrolysis with Group IIA secretory phospholipase A(2) (sPLA(2)-IIA) significantly reduced the ability of AP HDL from SAAKO mice to serve as a substrate for ABCG1-mediated cholesterol transfer, indicating that phospholipid (PL) enrichment, and not the presence of SAA, is responsible for alterations in efflux. AP human HDL, which is not PL-enriched, was somewhat less effective in mediating ABCG1-dependent efflux compared with normal human HDL. Our data indicate that inflammatory remodeling of HDL impacts ABCG1-dependent efflux independent of SAA.

  12. Predicting accurate absolute binding energies in aqueous solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jan Halborg

    2015-01-01

    Recent predictions of absolute binding free energies of host-guest complexes in aqueous solution using electronic structure theory have been encouraging for some systems, while other systems remain problematic. In this paper I summarize some of the many factors that could easily contribute 1-3 kcal......-represented by continuum models. While I focus on binding free energies in aqueous solution the approach also applies (with minor adjustments) to any free energy difference such as conformational or reaction free energy differences or activation free energies in any solvent....

  13. Hydrostatic-pressure effects on the donor binding energy in GaAs-(Ga, Al)As quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Merchancano, S T; Paredes-Gutierrez, H; Silva-Valencia, J

    2007-01-01

    The binding energy of shallow hydrogenic impurities in a spherical quantum dot under isotropic hydrostatic pressure is calculated using a variational approach within the effective mass approximation. The binding energy is computed as a function of hydrostatic pressure, dot size and impurity position. The results show that the impurity binding energy increases with the pressure for any position of the impurity. Also, we have found that the binding energy depends on the location of the impurity and the pressure effects are less pronounced for impurities on the edge

  14. US oil dependency and energy security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noel, P.

    2002-01-01

    The three papers of this document were written in the framework of a seminar organized the 30 may 2002 by the IFRI in the framework of its program Energy and Climatic Change. The first presentation deals with the american oil policy since 1980 (relation between the oil dependence and the energy security, the Reagan oil policy, the new oil policy facing the increase of the dependence). The second one deals with the US energy security (oil security, domestic energy security, policy implications). The last presentation is devoted to the US oil dependence in a global context and the problems and policies of international energy security. (A.L.B.)

  15. Binding energy and single-particle energies in the 16O Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiase, J.O.; Sharma, L.K.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we present the binding energy of 16 O together with single-particle energies in the oxygen region by folding together a Hamiltonian in the rest-frame of the nucleus with two-body correlation functions based on the Nijmegen potential. We have found that the binding energies are very sensitive to the core radius rc and that the effects of tensor correlations are non-negligible.Our calculated binding energy, E B = - 127.8 MeV with r c = 0.241 fm compares well with the experimental binding energy, E B = - 127.6 MeV

  16. Density and starting-energy dependent effective interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Norio; Nagata, Sinobu; Kasuga, Teruo

    1979-01-01

    A new effective potential constructed from the reaction matrix calculation of nuclear matters is proposed, taking three-body effects into account. Starting from the two-body scattering equation for nuclear matters, an equation with averaged momentum is introduced as the definition of effective interaction. The parameters in the equation are the Fermi momentum and the starting energy. The nuclear density dependence and the starting energy dependence are independently treated in the potential. The effective interactions including three-body effects were calculated. The dependence on the starting energy is large. The effective interaction is more attractive in the triplet E state, and assures overall saturation without any artificial renormalization. The reaction matrix calculation can be well reproduced by the calculation with this effective potential. The results of calculation for the binding energy of He-4 and O-16 and the shell model matrix elements of O-16 are represented. (Kato, T.)

  17. Funnel metadynamics as accurate binding free-energy method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limongelli, Vittorio; Bonomi, Massimiliano; Parrinello, Michele

    2013-01-01

    A detailed description of the events ruling ligand/protein interaction and an accurate estimation of the drug affinity to its target is of great help in speeding drug discovery strategies. We have developed a metadynamics-based approach, named funnel metadynamics, that allows the ligand to enhance the sampling of the target binding sites and its solvated states. This method leads to an efficient characterization of the binding free-energy surface and an accurate calculation of the absolute protein–ligand binding free energy. We illustrate our protocol in two systems, benzamidine/trypsin and SC-558/cyclooxygenase 2. In both cases, the X-ray conformation has been found as the lowest free-energy pose, and the computed protein–ligand binding free energy in good agreement with experiments. Furthermore, funnel metadynamics unveils important information about the binding process, such as the presence of alternative binding modes and the role of waters. The results achieved at an affordable computational cost make funnel metadynamics a valuable method for drug discovery and for dealing with a variety of problems in chemistry, physics, and material science. PMID:23553839

  18. Study of heavy quarkonium with energy dependent potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Pramila; Mehrotra, I

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that charmonium and bottonium states can be calculated by using a nonrelativistic Schrodinger equation. The basic reasons are: 1) the mass of charm and bottom quarks is much larger than QCD scale, which makes this system free of strong normalization effects and 2) the binding energy is small compared to the mass energy ψ and γ states in terms of nonrelativistic qq system governed by more or less phenomenological potentials. In the present work we have studied mass spectra of charmonium and bottonium using the following energy dependent model in the framework of nonrelativistic Schrodinger equation

  19. Exciton binding energy in a pyramidal quantum dot

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A ANITHA

    2018-03-27

    Mar 27, 2018 ... screening function on exciton binding energy in a pyramid-shaped quantum dot of ... tures may generate unique properties and they show .... where Ee is the ground-state energy of the electron in ... Figure 1. The geometry of the pyramidal quantum dot. base and H is the height of the pyramid which is taken.

  20. Semiphenomenological studies of the ground state binding energies of hypernuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mian, M.

    1987-01-01

    We show that the binding energies of /sub Λ/ 5 He and p-shell hypernuclei can be satisfactorily explained in the folding model approach using a density dependent effective ΛN interaction. Our analysis predicts a very reasonable value of the range of the ΛN interaction. The calculated value of B/sub Λ/ of /sub Λ/ 7 Li using the cluster model density for 6 Li and the best fit parameters of this potential supports the view that 6 Li possesses an α-d cluster structure. Using this potential we also determine the average size parameter (a 0 ) of the oscillator shell model density of nucleons in Nnot =Z core nuclei from fitting the B/sub Λ/ values of the corresponding hypernuclei. The effect of different forms of density distribution of core nuclei on the values of potential parameters is investigated and is found to be very small. As regards the form of density dependence, a rho/sup 2/3/ form is found to be the most appropriate for this purpose and is used throughout this work. Other forms do not give a satisfactory account of the data

  1. Analysis of binding energy activity of TIBO and HIV-RT based on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tetrahydro-imidazo[4,5,l-jk][1,4]-benzodiazepin-2 (1 H)one (TIBO) is a noncompetitive non nucleotide antiretroviral drug with a specific allosteric binding site of HIV-1 RT. The conformational analysis shows that the effect of the drug depends on the potential energy which varied due to the beta rotatable dihedral angles (N6 ...

  2. Analysis of experimental positron-molecule binding energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danielson, J R; Surko, C M; Young, J A

    2010-01-01

    Experiments show that positron annihilation on molecules frequently occurs via capture into vibrational Feshbach resonances. In these cases, the downshifts in the annihilation spectra from the vibrational mode spectra provide measures of the positron-molecule binding energies. An analysis of these binding energy data is presented in terms of the molecular dipole polarizability, the permanent dipole moment, and the number of π bonds in aromatic molecules. The results of this analysis are in reasonably good agreement with other information about positron-molecule bound states. Predictions for other targets and promising candidate molecules for further investigation are discussed.

  3. Inter-dependence not Over-dependence: Reducing Urban Transport Energy Dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, Michael James; Rodrigues da Silva, Antonio Nelson

    2007-07-01

    A major issue of concern in today's world is urban transport energy dependence and energy supply security. In an energy inter-dependent world, energy over-dependence brings risks to urban transport systems. Many urban areas are over-dependent on finite petroleum resources for transport. New technology and the development and integration of renewable resources into transport energy systems may reduce some of the current transport energy dependence of urban areas. However, the most effective means of reducing energy dependence is to first design urban areas for this condition. An urban policy framework is proposed that requires transport energy dependence to be measured and controlled in the urban development process. A new tool has been created for this purpose, the Transport Energy Specification (TES), which measures transport energy dependence of urban areas. This creates the possibility for cities to regulate urban development with respect to energy dependence. Trial assessments were performed in Germany, New Zealand and Brazil; initial analysis by transport and government professionals shows promise of this tool being included into urban policy. The TES combined with a regulatory framework has the potential to significantly reduce transport energy consumption and dependence in urban areas in the future. (auth)

  4. Binding energy of impurity states in an inverse parabolic quantum well under magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasapoglu, E.; Sari, H.; Soekmen, I.

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of the magnetic field which is directed perpendicular to the well on the binding energy of the hydrogenic impurities in an inverse parabolic quantum well (IPQW) with different widths as well as different Al concentrations at the well center. The Al concentration at the barriers was always x max =0.3. The calculations were performed within the effective mass approximation, using a variational method. We observe that IPQW structure turns into parabolic quantum well with the inversion effect of the magnetic field and donor impurity binding energy in IPQW strongly depends on the magnetic field, Al concentration at the well center and well dimensions

  5. Nuclear Cartography: Patterns in Binding Energies and Subatomic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, E. C.; Shelley, M.

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear masses and binding energies are some of the first nuclear properties met in high school physics, and can be used to introduce radioactive decays, fusion, and fission. With relatively little extension, they can also illustrate fundamental concepts in nuclear physics, such as shell structure and pairing, and to discuss how the elements…

  6. Polaron binding energy in polymers: poly[methyl(phenyl)silylene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nožár, Juraj; Nešpůrek, Stanislav; Šebera, Jakub

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 2 (2012), s. 623-629 ISSN 1610-2940 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN400720701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : polaron * polaron binding energy * polysilane Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.984, year: 2012

  7. Binding energy and formation heat of UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, M.R. de; Veado, J.T.; Siqueira, M.L. de

    The Born-Haber cycle is utilized for the calculation of the heat of formation of UO 2 , on the assumption that the binding energy is predominantly ionic in character. The ionization potentials of U and the repulsion energy are two critical values that influence calculations. Calculations of the ionization potentials with non-relativistic Hartree-Fock-Gaspar-Kohn-Sham approximation are presented [pt

  8. Alternate Energy Sources for Thermalplastic Binding Agent Consolidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frame, B.J.

    1999-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate microwave and electron beam technologies as alternate energy sources to consolidate fiber coated with a thermoplastic binding agent into preforms for composite molding applications. Bench experiments showed that both microwave and electron beam energy can produce heat sufficient to melt and consolidate a thermoplastic binding agent applied to fiberglass mat, and several two- and three-dimensional fiberglass preforms were produced with each method. In both cases, it is postulated that the heating was accomplished by the effective interaction of the microwave or electron beam energy with the combination of the mat preform and the tooling used to shape the preform. Both methods contrast with conventional thermal energy applied via infrared heaters or from a heated tool in which the heat to melt the thermoplastic binding agent must diffuse over time from the outer surface of the preform toward its center under a thermal gradient. For these reasons, the microwave and electron beam energy techniques have the potential to rapidly consolidate thick fiber preforms more efficiently than the thermal process. With further development, both technologies have the potential to make preform production more cost effective by decreasing cycle time in the preform tool, reducing energy costs, and by enabling the use of less expensive tooling materials. Descriptions of the microwave and electron beam consolidation experiments and a summary of the results are presented in this report.

  9. Estimating Atomic Contributions to Hydration and Binding Using Free Energy Perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Benedict W J; Huggins, David J

    2018-05-08

    We present a general method called atom-wise free energy perturbation (AFEP), which extends a conventional molecular dynamics free energy perturbation (FEP) simulation to give the contribution to a free energy change from each atom. AFEP is derived from an expansion of the Zwanzig equation used in the exponential averaging method by defining that the system total energy can be partitioned into contributions from each atom. A partitioning method is assumed and used to group terms in the expansion to correspond to individual atoms. AFEP is applied to six example free energy changes to demonstrate the method. Firstly, the hydration free energies of methane, methanol, methylamine, methanethiol, and caffeine in water. AFEP highlights the atoms in the molecules that interact favorably or unfavorably with water. Finally AFEP is applied to the binding free energy of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease to lopinavir, and AFEP reveals the contribution of each atom to the binding free energy, indicating candidate areas of the molecule to improve to produce a more strongly binding inhibitor. FEP gives a single value for the free energy change and is already a very useful method. AFEP gives a free energy change for each "part" of the system being simulated, where part can mean individual atoms, chemical groups, amino acids, or larger partitions depending on what the user is trying to measure. This method should have various applications in molecular dynamics studies of physical, chemical, or biochemical phenomena, specifically in the field of computational drug discovery.

  10. European Union concerns with its energy dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Commeau, N.

    2001-01-01

    European Union (E.U.) produces only half its needs concerning energy. It is expected that by 2030, the energy balance will be 86% for fossil energies, 8% for renewable energies and 6% for nuclear energy. Different scenario show that the dependence of E.U will worsen and reach 70% unless a common strategy is launched to curb the tendency. E.U is elaborating a common policy concerning energy, this policy rests on 4 axis: 1) monitoring the increase of the energy consumption by promoting energy savings in housing and transport, 2) directing the energy demand towards less polluting energy by using taxes, public funding and European regulations as incentive tools, 3) sustaining a constant dialogues with energy exporting countries in order to get a more stable energy market and have a benefiting influence on prices, and 4) developing new routes of importation of energy by for instance contributing to the construction of new oil or gas pipeline networks. (A.C.)

  11. Proton energy dependence of slow neutron intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teshigawara, Makoto; Harada, Masahide; Watanabe, Noboru; Kai, Tetsuya; Sakata, Hideaki; Ikeda, Yujiro

    2001-01-01

    The choice of the proton energy is an important issue for the design of an intense-pulsed-spallation source. The optimal proton beam energy is rather unique from a viewpoint of the leakage neutron intensity but no yet clear from the slow-neutron intensity view point. It also depends on an accelerator type. Since it is also important to know the proton energy dependence of slow-neutrons from the moderators in a realistic target-moderator-reflector assembly (TMRA). We studied on the TMRA proposed for Japan Spallation Neutron Source. The slow-neutron intensities from the moderators per unit proton beam power (MW) exhibit the maximum at about 1-2 GeV. At higher proton energies the intensity per MW goes down; at 3 and 50 GeV about 0.91 and 0.47 times as low as that at 1 GeV. The proton energy dependence of slow-neutron intensities was found to be almost the same as that of total neutron yield (leakage neutrons) from the same bare target. It was also found that proton energy dependence was almost the same for the coupled and decoupled moderators, regardless the different moderator type, geometry and coupling scheme. (author)

  12. Detection unit with corrected energy dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viererbl, L.

    1989-01-01

    The detection unit consists of a plastic scintillator with a layer of a powder semicrystalline scintillator deposited on its surface. An inorgaic monocrystalline scintillator is placed inside the plastic scintillator and surrounded with an absorption layer, except for the window. The advantage of the detection unit is a reduced energy dependence of response, especially in the energy range 100 to 400 keV. (E.J.). 3 figs

  13. Energy dependence corrections to MOSFET dosimetric sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, T.; Yu, P.K.N.; Butson, M.J.; Illawarra Cancer Care Centre, Crown St, Wollongong

    2009-01-01

    Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFET's) are dosimeters which are now frequently utilized in radiotherapy treatment applications. An improved MOSFET, clinical semiconductor dosimetry system (CSDS) which utilizes improved packaging for the MOSFET device has been studied for energy dependence of sensitivity to x-ray radiation measurement. Energy dependence from 50 kVp to 10 MV x-rays has been studied and found to vary by up to a factor of 3.2 with 75 kVp producing the highest sensitivity response. The detectors average life span in high sensitivity mode is energy related and ranges from approximately 100 Gy for 75 kVp x-rays to approximately 300 Gy at 6MV x-ray energy. The MOSFET detector has also been studied for sensitivity variations with integrated dose history. It was found to become less sensitive to radiation with age and the magnitude of this effect is dependant on radiation energy with lower energies producing a larger sensitivity reduction with integrated dose. The reduction in sensitivity is however approximated reproducibly by a slightly non linear, second order polynomial function allowing corrections to be made to reading to account for this effect to provide more accurate dose assessments both in phantom and in-vivo.

  14. Energy dependence corrections to MOSFET dosimetric sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, T; Butson, M J; Yu, P K N

    2009-03-01

    Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFET's) are dosimeters which are now frequently utilized in radiotherapy treatment applications. An improved MOSFET, clinical semiconductor dosimetry system (CSDS) which utilizes improved packaging for the MOSFET device has been studied for energy dependence of sensitivity to x-ray radiation measurement. Energy dependence from 50 kVp to 10 MV x-rays has been studied and found to vary by up to a factor of 3.2 with 75 kVp producing the highest sensitivity response. The detectors average life span in high sensitivity mode is energy related and ranges from approximately 100 Gy for 75 kVp x-rays to approximately 300 Gy at 6 MV x-ray energy. The MOSFET detector has also been studied for sensitivity variations with integrated dose history. It was found to become less sensitive to radiation with age and the magnitude of this effect is dependant on radiation energy with lower energies producing a larger sensitivity reduction with integrated dose. The reduction in sensitivity is however approximated reproducibly by a slightly non linear, second order polynomial function allowing corrections to be made to readings to account for this effect to provide more accurate dose assessments both in phantom and in-vivo.

  15. Investigation on the pH-dependent binding of Eosin Y and bovine serum albumin by spectral methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Dejiang; Tian Yuan; Liang Fanghui; Jin Danhong; Chen Yanhua; Zhang Hanqi; Yu Aimin

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the pH-dependent binding of Eosin Y and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated by spectral methods, including resonance light scattering (RLS), absorption and fluorescence spectrometry. Due to the pH-dependent structure of Eosin Y and BSA, the interaction of BSA and Eosin Y depended on the solution pH value. Especially at pH 2.6 and 9.2, the RLS intensity of BSA was obviously enhanced in the presence of Eosin Y. However, the fluorescence intensity of BSA was quenched in the presence of Eosin Y. To fully understand the pH-dependent binding of BSA and Eosin Y, fluorescence quenching technique was introduced. Based on the fluorescence data obtained, the style of binding, the binding constant, the binding site number and the thermodynamic parameters for the interaction of BSA and Eosin Y were studied. Based on Foerster non-radiation energy transfer theory, the distance between donor BSA and acceptor Eosin Y was obtained

  16. Investigation on the pH-dependent binding of Eosin Y and bovine serum albumin by spectral methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao Dejiang; Tian Yuan [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Liang Fanghui; Jin Danhong [Changchun Medical College, Changchun 130031 (China); Chen Yanhua; Zhang Hanqi [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Yu Aimin [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)], E-mail: analchem@mail.jlu.edu.cn

    2007-12-15

    In this paper, the pH-dependent binding of Eosin Y and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated by spectral methods, including resonance light scattering (RLS), absorption and fluorescence spectrometry. Due to the pH-dependent structure of Eosin Y and BSA, the interaction of BSA and Eosin Y depended on the solution pH value. Especially at pH 2.6 and 9.2, the RLS intensity of BSA was obviously enhanced in the presence of Eosin Y. However, the fluorescence intensity of BSA was quenched in the presence of Eosin Y. To fully understand the pH-dependent binding of BSA and Eosin Y, fluorescence quenching technique was introduced. Based on the fluorescence data obtained, the style of binding, the binding constant, the binding site number and the thermodynamic parameters for the interaction of BSA and Eosin Y were studied. Based on Foerster non-radiation energy transfer theory, the distance between donor BSA and acceptor Eosin Y was obtained.

  17. Experimental electron binding energies for thulium in different matrices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Inoyatov, A. K.; Kovalík, Alojz; Filosofov, D. V.; Ryšavý, Miloš; Perevoshchikov, L. L.; Yushkevich, Yu. V.; Zbořil, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 202, JUL (2015), s. 46-55 ISSN 0368-2048 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG14004; GA ČR(CZ) GAP203/12/1896 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Tm-169 * (169)yb * atomic environment * electron binding energy * chemical shift * natural atomic level width Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.561, year: 2015

  18. Energy dependence of pMOS dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savic, Z.; Stankovic, S.; Kovacevic, M.; Petrovic, M.

    1996-01-01

    The results are presented of experimental work and numerical simulations of the energy response for pMOS dosimetric transistors in their custom packages. Specially produced radiation soft pMOS transistors were used in this experimental work. The irradiation of pMOS dosemeters was done using 60 Co and 137 Cs sources, a dosimetric X ray unit, and a radiotherapeutic linear accelerator in the range of photon energies from 21 keV to 8 MeV. The results show that package geometry and materials can significantly affect and smooth the energy dependence of pMOS transistors and that in custom transistor packages they are not tissue-equivalent dosemeters. Their response in the photon energy range of 45 to 250 keV is significantly larger than it should be (maximum dose enhancement factor can be as high as 8) and some energy compensation techniques must be used in order to fulfill the requirements of corresponding standards. (Author)

  19. Energy dependence of nonlocal optical potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, A. E.; Bacq, P.-L.; Capel, P.; Nunes, F. M.; Titus, L. J.

    2017-11-01

    Recently, a variety of studies have shown the importance of including nonlocality in the description of reactions. The goal of this work is to revisit the phenomenological approach to determining nonlocal optical potentials from elastic scattering. We perform a χ2 analysis of neutron elastic scattering data off 40Ca, 90Zr, and 208Pb at energies E ≈5 -40 MeV, assuming a Perey and Buck [Nucl. Phys. 32, 353 (1962), 10.1016/0029-5582(62)90345-0] or Tian et al. [Int. J. Mod. Phys. E 24, 1550006 (2015), 10.1142/S0218301315500068] nonlocal form for the optical potential. We introduce energy and asymmetry dependencies in the imaginary part of the potential and refit the data to obtain a global parametrization. Independently of the starting point in the minimization procedure, an energy dependence in the imaginary depth is required for a good description of the data across the included energy range. We present two parametrizations, both of which represent an improvement over the original potentials for the fitted nuclei as well as for other nuclei not included in our fit. Our results show that, even when including the standard Gaussian nonlocality in optical potentials, a significant energy dependence is required to describe elastic-scattering data.

  20. Energy dependence of polymer gels in the orthovoltage energy range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Roed

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Ortho-voltage energies are often used for treatment of patients’ superficial lesions, and also for small- animal irradiations. Polymer-Gel dosimeters such as MAGAT (Methacrylic acid Gel and THPC are finding increasing use for 3-dimensional verification of radiation doses in a given treatment geometry. For mega-voltage beams, energy dependence of MAGAT has been quoted as nearly energy-independent. In the kilo-voltage range, there is hardly any literature to shade light on its energy dependence.Methods: MAGAT was used to measure depth-dose for 250 kVp beam. Comparison with ion-chamber data showed a discrepancy increasing significantly with depth. An over-response as much as 25% was observed at a depth of 6 cm.Results and Conclusion: Investigation concluded that 6 cm water in the beam resulted in a half-value-layer (HVL change from 1.05 to 1.32 mm Cu. This amounts to an effective-energy change from 81.3 to 89.5 keV. Response measurements of MAGAT at these two energies explained the observed discrepancy in depth-dose measurements. Dose-calibration curves of MAGAT for (i 250 kVp beam, and (ii 250 kVp beam through 6 cm of water column are presented showing significant energy dependence.-------------------Cite this article as: Roed Y, Tailor R, Pinksy L, Ibbott G. Energy dependence of polymer gels in the orthovoltage energy range. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(2:020232. DOI: 10.14319/ijcto.0202.32 

  1. Time-dependent density-functional tight-binding method with the third-order expansion of electron density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Yoshio

    2015-09-07

    We develop a formalism for the calculation of excitation energies and excited state gradients for the self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding method with the third-order contributions of a Taylor series of the density functional theory energy with respect to the fluctuation of electron density (time-dependent density-functional tight-binding (TD-DFTB3)). The formulation of the excitation energy is based on the existing time-dependent density functional theory and the older TD-DFTB2 formulae. The analytical gradient is computed by solving Z-vector equations, and it requires one to calculate the third-order derivative of the total energy with respect to density matrix elements due to the inclusion of the third-order contributions. The comparison of adiabatic excitation energies for selected small and medium-size molecules using the TD-DFTB2 and TD-DFTB3 methods shows that the inclusion of the third-order contributions does not affect excitation energies significantly. A different set of parameters, which are optimized for DFTB3, slightly improves the prediction of adiabatic excitation energies statistically. The application of TD-DFTB for the prediction of absorption and fluorescence energies of cresyl violet demonstrates that TD-DFTB3 reproduced the experimental fluorescence energy quite well.

  2. A = 4 0+ - 1+ binding-energy difference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, B.F.; Lehman, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    The A = 4 Λ-hypernuclei provide a rich source of information about the s-wave properties of the fundamental hyperon-nucleon (YN) force as well as offer a unique opportunity to investigate the complications that arise in calculations of the properties of bound systems in which one baryon (here the Λ) with a given isospin couples strongly to another (the Σ) with a different isospin. The Λ 4 H - Λ 4 He isodoublet ground-state energies are not consistent with a charge symmetry hypothesis for the YN interaction. The (spin-flip) excitation energies are quite sensitive to the ΛN - ΣN coupling of the YN interaction. In particular, when one represents the free YN interaction in terms of one-channel effective ΛN potentials, the resulting 0 + (ground) state and 1 + (excited) spin-flip state are inversely ordered in terms of binding energies, the 1 + state being more bound. It is the Σ suppression that results from the reduced strength of the ΛN - ΣN off-diagonal coupling potential when the trinucleon core is restricted to isospin-1/2 which we study here. We find this spin-isospin suppression of the Λ-Σ conversion, which is due to the composite nature of the nuclear cores of the Λ 4 H and Λ 4 He hypernuclei, to be a significant factor in understanding the 0 + - 1 + binding energy relationship

  3. Sampling and energy evaluation challenges in ligand binding protein design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Jiayi; Doyle, Lindsey; Jr Greisen, Per; Schena, Alberto; Park, Hahnbeom; Johnsson, Kai; Stoddard, Barry L; Baker, David

    2017-12-01

    The steroid hormone 17α-hydroxylprogesterone (17-OHP) is a biomarker for congenital adrenal hyperplasia and hence there is considerable interest in development of sensors for this compound. We used computational protein design to generate protein models with binding sites for 17-OHP containing an extended, nonpolar, shape-complementary binding pocket for the four-ring core of the compound, and hydrogen bonding residues at the base of the pocket to interact with carbonyl and hydroxyl groups at the more polar end of the ligand. Eight of 16 designed proteins experimentally tested bind 17-OHP with micromolar affinity. A co-crystal structure of one of the designs revealed that 17-OHP is rotated 180° around a pseudo-two-fold axis in the compound and displays multiple binding modes within the pocket, while still interacting with all of the designed residues in the engineered site. Subsequent rounds of mutagenesis and binding selection improved the ligand affinity to nanomolar range, while appearing to constrain the ligand to a single bound conformation that maintains the same "flipped" orientation relative to the original design. We trace the discrepancy in the design calculations to two sources: first, a failure to model subtle backbone changes which alter the distribution of sidechain rotameric states and second, an underestimation of the energetic cost of desolvating the carbonyl and hydroxyl groups of the ligand. The difference between design model and crystal structure thus arises from both sampling limitations and energy function inaccuracies that are exacerbated by the near two-fold symmetry of the molecule. © 2017 The Authors Protein Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Protein Society.

  4. Cooper-pair size and binding energy for unconventional superconducting systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinóla Neto, F.; Neto, Minos A.; Salmon, Octavio D. Rodriguez

    2018-06-01

    The main proposal of this paper is to analyze the size of the Cooper pairs composed by unbalanced mass fermions from different electronic bands along the BCS-BEC crossover and study the binding energy of the pairs. We are considering an interaction between fermions with different masses leading to an inter-band pairing. In addiction to the attractive interaction we have an hybridization term to couple both bands, which in general acts unfavorable for the pairing between the electrons. We get first order phase transitions as the hybridization breaks the Cooper pairs for the s-wave symmetry of the gap amplitude. The results show the dependence of the Cooper-pair size as a function of the hybridization for T = 0 . We also propose the structure of the binding energy of the inter-band system as a function of the two-bands quasi-particle energies.

  5. Insight into temperature dependence of GTPase activity in human guanylate binding protein-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjana Rani

    Full Text Available Interferon-γ induced human guanylate binding protein-1(hGBP1 belongs to a family of dynamin related large GTPases. Unlike all other GTPases, hGBP1 hydrolyzes GTP to a mixture of GDP and GMP with GMP being the major product at 37°C but GDP became significant when the hydrolysis reaction was carried out at 15°C. The hydrolysis reaction in hGBP1 is believed to involve with a number of catalytic steps. To investigate the effect of temperature in the product formation and on the different catalytic complexes of hGBP1, we carried out temperature dependent GTPase assays, mutational analysis, chemical and thermal denaturation studies. The Arrhenius plot for both GDP and GMP interestingly showed nonlinear behaviour, suggesting that the product formation from the GTP-bound enzyme complex is associated with at least more than one step. The negative activation energy for GDP formation and GTPase assay with external GDP together indicate that GDP formation occurs through the reversible dissociation of GDP-bound enzyme dimer to monomer, which further reversibly dissociates to give the product. Denaturation studies of different catalytic complexes show that unlike other complexes the free energy of GDP-bound hGBP1 decreases significantly at lower temperature. GDP formation is found to be dependent on the free energy of the GDP-bound enzyme complex. The decrease in the free energy of this complex at low temperature compared to at high is the reason for higher GDP formation at low temperature. Thermal denaturation studies also suggest that the difference in the free energy of the GTP-bound enzyme dimer compared to its monomer plays a crucial role in the product formation; higher stability favours GMP but lower favours GDP. Thus, this study provides the first thermodynamic insight into the effect of temperature in the product formation of hGBP1.

  6. Accurate Estimation of the Standard Binding Free Energy of Netropsin with DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA is the target of chemical compounds (drugs, pollutants, photosensitizers, etc., which bind through non-covalent interactions. Depending on their structure and their chemical properties, DNA binders can associate to the minor or to the major groove of double-stranded DNA. They can also intercalate between two adjacent base pairs, or even replace one or two base pairs within the DNA double helix. The subsequent biological effects are strongly dependent on the architecture of the binding motif. Discriminating between the different binding patterns is of paramount importance to predict and rationalize the effect of a given compound on DNA. The structural characterization of DNA complexes remains, however, cumbersome at the experimental level. In this contribution, we employed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to determine the standard binding free energy of DNA with netropsin, a well-characterized antiviral and antimicrobial drug, which associates to the minor groove of double-stranded DNA. To overcome the sampling limitations of classical molecular dynamics simulations, which cannot capture the large change in configurational entropy that accompanies binding, we resort to a series of potentials of mean force calculations involving a set of geometrical restraints acting on collective variables.

  7. Binding energy and single–particle Energies in the 16 0 region ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... single-particle energies in the oxygen region by folding together a Hamiltonian in the rest-frame of the nucleus with two-body correlation functions based on the Njimegen potential. We have found that the binding energies are very sensitive to the core radius rc and that the effects of tensor correlations are non-negligible.

  8. Experimental energy-dependent nuclear spin distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egidy, T. von; Bucurescu, D.

    2009-01-01

    A new method is proposed to determine the energy-dependent spin distribution in experimental nuclear-level schemes. This method compares various experimental and calculated moments in the energy-spin plane to obtain the spin-cutoff parameter σ as a function of mass A and excitation energy using a total of 7202 levels with spin assignment in 227 nuclei between F and Cf. A simple formula, σ 2 =0.391 A 0.675 (E-0.5Pa ' ) 0.312 , is proposed up to about 10 MeV that is in very good agreement with experimental σ values and is applied to improve the systematics of level-density parameters.

  9. Measurement of Exciton Binding Energy of Monolayer WS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Zhu, Bairen; Cui, Xiaodong

    Excitonic effects are prominent in monolayer crystal of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) because of spatial confinement and reduced Coulomb screening. Here we use linear differential transmission spectroscopy and two-photon photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy (TP-PLE) to measure the exciton binding energy of monolayer WS2. Peaks for excitonic absorptions of the direct gap located at K valley of the Brillouin zone and transitions from multiple points near Γ point of the Brillouin zone, as well as trion side band are shown in the linear absorption spectra of WS2. But there is no gap between distinct excitons and the continuum of the interband transitions. Strong electron-phonon scattering, overlap of excitons around Γ point and the transfer of the oscillator strength from interband continuum to exciton states make it difficult to resolve the electronic interband transition edge even down to 10K. The gap between excited states of the band-edge exciton and the single-particle band is probed by TP-PLE measurements. And the energy difference between 1s exciton and the single-particle gap gives the exciton binding energy of monolayer WS2 to be about 0.71eV. The work is supported by Area of excellency (AoE/P-04/08), CRF of Hong Kong Research Grant Council (HKU9/CRF/13G) and SRT on New Materials of The University of Hong Kong.

  10. Charge compensation and binding energy referencing in XPS analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metson, J.B.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The past decade has seen a number of significant advances in the capabilities of commercial X-ray Photoelectron spectrometers. Of note have been the near universal adoption of monochromatised X-ray sources, very useful advances in spatial resolution, particularly in spectroscopy, and radical developments in sample handling and automation. However one of the most significant advances has been the development of several relatively new concepts in charge compensation. Throughout the evolution of XPS, the ability to compensate for surface charging and accurately determine binding energies, particularly with electrically inhomogenous samples, has remained one of the most intractable problems. Beginning perhaps with the Kratos, 'in the lens' electrostatic mirror/electron source coupled with a magnetic snorkel lens, a number of concepts have been advanced which take a quite different conceptual approach to charge compensation. They differ in a number of quite fundamental ways to the electron flood type compensators widely used and absolutely essential with instruments based on monochromatised sources. The concept of the local return of secondary electrons to their point of emission, largely negates the problems associated with differential charging across different regions of the surface, and suggests the possibility of overcoming one of the central limitations of XPS, that is the inability to compare absolute binding energies of species in different electrical as well as chemical environments. The general status of charge compensation and the use of internal binding energy references in XPS will be reviewed, along with some practical examples of where these techniques work, and where there is clearly still room for further development. Copyright (1999) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc

  11. Incident energy dependence of pt correlations at relativistic energies

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, J; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bharadwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhatia, V S; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca-Sanchez, M; Castillo, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Daugherity, M; De Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; Derevshchikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dogra, S M; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta, M R; Mazumdar; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Yu; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Gans, J; Ganti, M S; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; González, J E; Gos, H; Grachov, O; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D P; Guertin, S M; Guo, Y; Sen-Gupta, A; Gutíerrez, T D; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Hepplemann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jedynak, M; Jiang, H; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kowalik, K L; Krämer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krüger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kutuev, R K; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lehocka, S; Le Vine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, L; Liu, Q J; Liu, Z; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; López-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J N; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnik, Yu M; Meschanin, A; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnár, L; Moore, C F; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, Grazyna Janina; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Yu A; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevozchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M V; Potrebenikova, E V; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C A; Putschke, J; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D M; Reid, J G; Reinnarth, J; Renault, G; Retière, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Savin, I; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Shao, W; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shestermanov, K E; Shimansky, S S; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sørensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M N; Stringfellow, B C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E R; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Swanger, M; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T J; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; Van Leeuwen, M; Van der Molen, A M; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasilev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, E; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N

    2005-01-01

    We present results for two-particle transverse momentum correlations, , as a function of event centrality for Au+Au collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 20, 62, 130, and 200 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. We observe correlations decreasing with centrality that are similar at all four incident energies. The correlations multiplied by the multiplicity density increase with incident energy and the centrality dependence may show evidence of processes such as thermalization, minijet production, or the saturation of transverse flow. The square root of the correlations divided by the event-wise average transverse momentum per event shows little or no beam energy dependence and generally agrees with previous measurements at the Super Proton Synchrotron.

  12. Free energies of binding from large-scale first-principles quantum mechanical calculations: application to ligand hydration energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Stephen J; Pittock, Chris; Tautermann, Christofer S; Fox, Thomas; Christ, Clara; Malcolm, N O J; Essex, Jonathan W; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton

    2013-08-15

    Schemes of increasing sophistication for obtaining free energies of binding have been developed over the years, where configurational sampling is used to include the all-important entropic contributions to the free energies. However, the quality of the results will also depend on the accuracy with which the intermolecular interactions are computed at each molecular configuration. In this context, the energy change associated with the rearrangement of electrons (electronic polarization and charge transfer) upon binding is a very important effect. Classical molecular mechanics force fields do not take this effect into account explicitly, and polarizable force fields and semiempirical quantum or hybrid quantum-classical (QM/MM) calculations are increasingly employed (at higher computational cost) to compute intermolecular interactions in free-energy schemes. In this work, we investigate the use of large-scale quantum mechanical calculations from first-principles as a way of fully taking into account electronic effects in free-energy calculations. We employ a one-step free-energy perturbation (FEP) scheme from a molecular mechanical (MM) potential to a quantum mechanical (QM) potential as a correction to thermodynamic integration calculations within the MM potential. We use this approach to calculate relative free energies of hydration of small aromatic molecules. Our quantum calculations are performed on multiple configurations from classical molecular dynamics simulations. The quantum energy of each configuration is obtained from density functional theory calculations with a near-complete psinc basis set on over 600 atoms using the ONETEP program.

  13. LRRK2 kinase activity is dependent on LRRK2 GTP binding capacity but independent of LRRK2 GTP binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marc Taymans

    Full Text Available Leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2 is a Parkinson's disease (PD gene that encodes a large multidomain protein including both a GTPase and a kinase domain. GTPases often regulate kinases within signal transduction cascades, where GTPases act as molecular switches cycling between a GTP bound "on" state and a GDP bound "off" state. It has been proposed that LRRK2 kinase activity may be increased upon GTP binding at the LRRK2 Ras of complex proteins (ROC GTPase domain. Here we extensively test this hypothesis by measuring LRRK2 phosphorylation activity under influence of GDP, GTP or non-hydrolyzable GTP analogues GTPγS or GMPPCP. We show that autophosphorylation and lrrktide phosphorylation activity of recombinant LRRK2 protein is unaltered by guanine nucleotides, when co-incubated with LRRK2 during phosphorylation reactions. Also phosphorylation activity of LRRK2 is unchanged when the LRRK2 guanine nucleotide binding pocket is previously saturated with various nucleotides, in contrast to the greatly reduced activity measured for the guanine nucleotide binding site mutant T1348N. Interestingly, when nucleotides were incubated with cell lysates prior to purification of LRRK2, kinase activity was slightly enhanced by GTPγS or GMPPCP compared to GDP, pointing to an upstream guanine nucleotide binding protein that may activate LRRK2 in a GTP-dependent manner. Using metabolic labeling, we also found that cellular phosphorylation of LRRK2 was not significantly modulated by nucleotides, although labeling is significantly reduced by guanine nucleotide binding site mutants. We conclude that while kinase activity of LRRK2 requires an intact ROC-GTPase domain, it is independent of GDP or GTP binding to ROC.

  14. Integrating water exclusion theory into βcontacts to predict binding free energy changes and binding hot spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Binding free energy and binding hot spots at protein-protein interfaces are two important research areas for understanding protein interactions. Computational methods have been developed previously for accurate prediction of binding free energy change upon mutation for interfacial residues. However, a large number of interrupted and unimportant atomic contacts are used in the training phase which caused accuracy loss. Results This work proposes a new method, βACV ASA , to predict the change of binding free energy after alanine mutations. βACV ASA integrates accessible surface area (ASA) and our newly defined β contacts together into an atomic contact vector (ACV). A β contact between two atoms is a direct contact without being interrupted by any other atom between them. A β contact’s potential contribution to protein binding is also supposed to be inversely proportional to its ASA to follow the water exclusion hypothesis of binding hot spots. Tested on a dataset of 396 alanine mutations, our method is found to be superior in classification performance to many other methods, including Robetta, FoldX, HotPOINT, an ACV method of β contacts without ASA integration, and ACV ASA methods (similar to βACV ASA but based on distance-cutoff contacts). Based on our data analysis and results, we can draw conclusions that: (i) our method is powerful in the prediction of binding free energy change after alanine mutation; (ii) β contacts are better than distance-cutoff contacts for modeling the well-organized protein-binding interfaces; (iii) β contacts usually are only a small fraction number of the distance-based contacts; and (iv) water exclusion is a necessary condition for a residue to become a binding hot spot. Conclusions βACV ASA is designed using the advantages of both β contacts and water exclusion. It is an excellent tool to predict binding free energy changes and binding hot spots after alanine mutation. PMID:24568581

  15. Energy dependence of pMOS dosemeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savic, Z. [Military Technical Institute, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Stankovic, S.; Kovacevic, M.; Petrovic, M. [Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Yugoslavia). Radiation Protection Dept.

    1996-10-01

    The results are presented of experimental work and numerical simulations of the energy response for pMOS dosimetric transistors in their custom packages. Specially produced radiation soft pMOS transistors were used in this experimental work. The irradiation of pMOS dosemeters was done using {sup 60}Co and {sup 137}Cs sources, a dosimetric X ray unit, and a radiotherapeutic linear accelerator in the range of photon energies from 21 keV to 8 MeV. The results show that package geometry and materials can significantly affect and smooth the energy dependence of pMOS transistors and that in custom transistor packages they are not tissue-equivalent dosemeters. Their response in the photon energy range of 45 to 250 keV is significantly larger than it should be (maximum dose enhancement factor can be as high as 8) and some energy compensation techniques must be used in order to fulfill the requirements of corresponding standards. (Author).

  16. An Accurate Redetermination of the $^{118}Sn$ Binding Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Borzakov, S B; Faikow-Stanczyk, H; Grigoriev, Yu V; Panteleev, T; Pospísil, S; Smotritsky, L M; Telezhnikov, S A

    2001-01-01

    The energy of well-known strong {gamma}-line from {{^198}Au}, the "gold standard", has been modified in the light of new adjustments in the fundamental constants and the value of 411.80176(12) keV was determined which is 0.29 eV lower than the latest 1999 value. An energy calibration procedure for determining the neutron binding energy, {B_n}, from complicated {(n , gamma)}-spectra has been developed. A mathematically simple minimization function consisting only of terms having as parameters the coefficients of the energy calibration curve (polynomial) is used. A priori information about the relationships among the energies of different peaks on the spectrum is taking into account by a Monte Carlo simulation. The procedure was used in obtaining of {B_n} for {{^118}Sn} and {{^64}Cu}. The {gamma}-ray spectrum from thermal neutron radiative capture by {{^117}Sn} has been measured on the IBR-2 pulsed reactor. {gamma}-rays were detected by a 72 cm^3 HPGe-detector. {B_n} for {{^64}Cu} was obtained from two {gamma}-...

  17. Non-abelian binding energies from the lightcone bootstrap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Daliang [Department of Physics, Yale University,New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University,Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Meltzer, David [Department of Physics, Yale University,New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Poland, David [Department of Physics, Yale University,New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study,Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2016-02-23

    We analytically study the lightcone limit of the conformal bootstrap for 4-point functions containing scalars charged under global symmetries. We show the existence of large spin double-twist operators in various representations of the global symmetry group. We then compute their anomalous dimensions in terms of the central charge C{sub T}, current central charge C{sub J}, and the OPE coefficients of low dimension scalars. In AdS, these results correspond to the binding energy of two-particle states arising from the exchange of gravitons, gauge bosons, and light scalar fields. Using unitarity and crossing symmetry, we show that gravity is universal and attractive among different types of two-particle states, while the gauge binding energy can have either sign as determined by the representation of the two-particle state, with universal ratios fixed by the symmetry group. We apply our results to 4D N=1 SQCD and the 3D O(N) vector models. We also show that in a unitary CFT, if the current central charge C{sub J} stays finite when the global symmetry group becomes infinitely large, such as the N→∞ limit of the O(N) vector model, then the theory must contain an infinite number of higher spin currents.

  18. Rifampicin-dependent antibodies bind a similar or identical epitope to glycoprotein IX-specific quinine-dependent antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgess, Janette K.; Lopez, Jose A.; Gaudry, Leonie E.; Chong, Beng H.

    2000-01-01

    The drug-dependent antibody of a patient with rifampicin-induced thrombocytopenia was characterized using the antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (MAIPA assay), flow cytometry, and immunoprecipitation. The antibody was found to bind glycoprotein (GP) Ib-IX but not GPIIb-IIIa because

  19. US oil dependency and energy security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noel, P.

    2002-12-01

    As an introduction to the seminar of the 30 May 2002 on the US oil dependency and energy security, the author analyzes the different factors which characterize the american petroleum market situation today. A special interest is thus done to the price increase of 1999-2000 due to the legislation evolution, the gas market tensions, the impact and the power of the OPEC on the international markets, the 11 September 2001 attempts and their political and military consequences. The author also discusses about three papers written after the seminar. (A.L.B.)

  20. Energy dependence of double photoionization in He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berrah, N.; Wehlitz, R.; Levin, J.; Whitfield, S.B.; Viefhaus, J.; Sellin, I.A.; Becker, U.

    1993-01-01

    The ratio of double-to-single ionization of He has been measured between 280 eV and 1210 eV to investigate its energy dependence in the intermediate region. The new intermediate energy measurement, compared with the most recent theories of Pan and Kelly and of Hino and Hino et al., show the importance of including not only ground state but also final state correlations. They also appear to indicate the importance of including higher-order effects in the theory. The previously reported high energy measurements between 2-12 keV give a ratio of 1.5 (2)% in good agreement with older shake calculations of Byron and Joachain and of Aberg, as well as with recent many-body perturbation theory of Ishihara et al., calculations of Dalgarno and Sadeghpour, and of Andersson and Burgdoerfer. In contrast to the intermediate energy behavior, consideration of final state correlations proves inessential as discussed by Dalgarno and Sadeghpour. (orig.)

  1. Energy-dependent proton damage in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donegani, Elena Maria

    2017-09-29

    Non Ionizing Energy Loss (NIEL) in the sensor bulk is a limiting factor for the lifetime of silicon detectors. In this work, the proton-energy dependent bulkdamage is studied in n- and p-type silicon pad diodes. The samples are thin (200 μm thick), and oxygen enriched (bulk material types: MCz, standard or deepdiffused FZ). Irradiations are performed with 23 MeV, 188 MeV and 23 GeV protons; the 1 MeV neutron equivalent fluence assumes selected values in the range [0.1,3].10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}. In reverse bias, Current-Voltage (IV) and Capacitance-Voltage (CV) measurements are performed to electrically characterise the samples; in forward bias, IV and CV measurements point out the transition from lifetime to relaxationlike semiconductor after irradiation. By means of Thermally Stimulated Current (TSC) measurements, 13 bulk defects have been found after proton irradiation. Firstly, TSC spectra are analysed to obtain defect concentrations after defect filling at the conventional temperature T{sub fill} =10 K. Secondly, temperature dependent capture coefficients of bulk defects are explained, according to the multi-phonon process, from the analysis of TSC measurements at higher filling temperatures (T{sub fill}<130 K). Thirdly, a new method based on the SRH statistics and accounting for cluster-induced shift in activation energy is proposed; it allows to fully characterise bulk defects (in terms of activation energy, concentration and majority capture cross-section) and to distinguish between point- and cluster-like defects. A correlation is noted between the leakage current and the concentration of three deep defects (namely the V{sub 2}, V{sub 3} and H(220K) defects), for all the investigated bulk materials and types, and after all the considered proton energies and fluences. At least five defects are found to be responsible for the space charge, with positive contributions from the E(30K) and B{sub i}O{sub i} defects, or negative contributions from three deep

  2. Energy-dependent proton damage in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donegani, Elena Maria

    2017-01-01

    Non Ionizing Energy Loss (NIEL) in the sensor bulk is a limiting factor for the lifetime of silicon detectors. In this work, the proton-energy dependent bulkdamage is studied in n- and p-type silicon pad diodes. The samples are thin (200 μm thick), and oxygen enriched (bulk material types: MCz, standard or deepdiffused FZ). Irradiations are performed with 23 MeV, 188 MeV and 23 GeV protons; the 1 MeV neutron equivalent fluence assumes selected values in the range [0.1,3].10 14 cm -2 . In reverse bias, Current-Voltage (IV) and Capacitance-Voltage (CV) measurements are performed to electrically characterise the samples; in forward bias, IV and CV measurements point out the transition from lifetime to relaxationlike semiconductor after irradiation. By means of Thermally Stimulated Current (TSC) measurements, 13 bulk defects have been found after proton irradiation. Firstly, TSC spectra are analysed to obtain defect concentrations after defect filling at the conventional temperature T fill =10 K. Secondly, temperature dependent capture coefficients of bulk defects are explained, according to the multi-phonon process, from the analysis of TSC measurements at higher filling temperatures (T fill <130 K). Thirdly, a new method based on the SRH statistics and accounting for cluster-induced shift in activation energy is proposed; it allows to fully characterise bulk defects (in terms of activation energy, concentration and majority capture cross-section) and to distinguish between point- and cluster-like defects. A correlation is noted between the leakage current and the concentration of three deep defects (namely the V 2 , V 3 and H(220K) defects), for all the investigated bulk materials and types, and after all the considered proton energies and fluences. At least five defects are found to be responsible for the space charge, with positive contributions from the E(30K) and B i O i defects, or negative contributions from three deep acceptors H(116K), H(140K) and H(152K).

  3. Universal binding energy relation for cleaved and structurally relaxed surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srirangarajan, Aarti; Datta, Aditi; Gandi, Appala Naidu; Ramamurty, U; Waghmare, U V

    2014-01-01

    The universal binding energy relation (UBER), derived earlier to describe the cohesion between two rigid atomic planes, does not accurately capture the cohesive properties when the cleaved surfaces are allowed to relax. We suggest a modified functional form of UBER that is analytical and at the same time accurately models the properties of surfaces relaxed during cleavage. We demonstrate the generality as well as the validity of this modified UBER through first-principles density functional theory calculations of cleavage in a number of crystal systems. Our results show that the total energies of all the relaxed surfaces lie on a single (universal) energy surface, that is given by the proposed functional form which contains an additional length-scale associated with structural relaxation. This functional form could be used in modelling the cohesive zones in crack growth simulation studies. We find that the cohesive law (stress–displacement relation) differs significantly in the case where cracked surfaces are allowed to relax, with lower peak stresses occurring at higher displacements. (paper)

  4. Universal binding energy relation for cleaved and structurally relaxed surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srirangarajan, Aarti; Datta, Aditi; Gandi, Appala Naidu; Ramamurty, U; Waghmare, U V

    2014-02-05

    The universal binding energy relation (UBER), derived earlier to describe the cohesion between two rigid atomic planes, does not accurately capture the cohesive properties when the cleaved surfaces are allowed to relax. We suggest a modified functional form of UBER that is analytical and at the same time accurately models the properties of surfaces relaxed during cleavage. We demonstrate the generality as well as the validity of this modified UBER through first-principles density functional theory calculations of cleavage in a number of crystal systems. Our results show that the total energies of all the relaxed surfaces lie on a single (universal) energy surface, that is given by the proposed functional form which contains an additional length-scale associated with structural relaxation. This functional form could be used in modelling the cohesive zones in crack growth simulation studies. We find that the cohesive law (stress-displacement relation) differs significantly in the case where cracked surfaces are allowed to relax, with lower peak stresses occurring at higher displacements.

  5. An accurate redetermination of the 118Sn binding energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borzakov, S.B.; Panteleev, Ts.Ts.; Telezhnikov, S.A.; Chrien, R.E.; Faikow-Stanczyk, H.; Grigor'ev, Yu.V.; Pospisil, S.; Smotritskij, L.M.

    2001-01-01

    The energy of well-known strong γ-line from 198 Au, the 'gold standard', has been modified in the light of new adjustments in the fundamental constants and the value of 411.80176(12) keV was determined which is 0.29 eV lower than the latest 1999 value. An energy calibration procedure for determining the neutron binding energy, B n , from complicated (n,γ)-spectra has been developed. A mathematically simple minimization function consisting only of terms having as parameters the coefficients of the energy calibration curve (polynomial) is used. A priori information about the relationships among the energies of different peaks on the spectrum was taken into account by a Monte Carlo simulation. The procedure was used in obtaining of B n for 118 Sn and 64 Cu. The γ-ray spectrum from thermal neutron radiative capture by 117 Sn has been measured on the IBR-2 pulsed reactor. γ-rays were detected by a 72 cm 2 HPGe-detector. B n for 64 Cu was obtained from two γ-spectra. One spectrum was measured on the IBR-2 by the same detector. The other spectrum was measured with a pair spectrometer at the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor. From these two spectra B n for 64 Cu was determined equal to 7915.52(8) keV. The mean value of two most precise results of B n for 118 Sn was determined to be 9326.35(9) keV. The B n for 57Fe was determined to be 7646.08(9) keV

  6. Large scale free energy calculations for blind predictions of protein-ligand binding: the D3R Grand Challenge 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Nanjie; Flynn, William F; Xia, Junchao; Vijayan, R S K; Zhang, Baofeng; He, Peng; Mentes, Ahmet; Gallicchio, Emilio; Levy, Ronald M

    2016-09-01

    We describe binding free energy calculations in the D3R Grand Challenge 2015 for blind prediction of the binding affinities of 180 ligands to Hsp90. The present D3R challenge was built around experimental datasets involving Heat shock protein (Hsp) 90, an ATP-dependent molecular chaperone which is an important anticancer drug target. The Hsp90 ATP binding site is known to be a challenging target for accurate calculations of ligand binding affinities because of the ligand-dependent conformational changes in the binding site, the presence of ordered waters and the broad chemical diversity of ligands that can bind at this site. Our primary focus here is to distinguish binders from nonbinders. Large scale absolute binding free energy calculations that cover over 3000 protein-ligand complexes were performed using the BEDAM method starting from docked structures generated by Glide docking. Although the ligand dataset in this study resembles an intermediate to late stage lead optimization project while the BEDAM method is mainly developed for early stage virtual screening of hit molecules, the BEDAM binding free energy scoring has resulted in a moderate enrichment of ligand screening against this challenging drug target. Results show that, using a statistical mechanics based free energy method like BEDAM starting from docked poses offers better enrichment than classical docking scoring functions and rescoring methods like Prime MM-GBSA for the Hsp90 data set in this blind challenge. Importantly, among the three methods tested here, only the mean value of the BEDAM binding free energy scores is able to separate the large group of binders from the small group of nonbinders with a gap of 2.4 kcal/mol. None of the three methods that we have tested provided accurate ranking of the affinities of the 147 active compounds. We discuss the possible sources of errors in the binding free energy calculations. The study suggests that BEDAM can be used strategically to discriminate

  7. Hypernuclear interactions and the binding energies of and hypernuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodmer, A.R.; Usmani, Q.N.

    1988-01-01

    By use of variational calculations a reasonable hadronic description is obtained of the s-shell hypernuclei, of /sub /ZBe, and of the well depth, with N forces which are consistent with p scattering and which are quite strongly spin-dependent, with reasonable TPE NN forces with strongly repulsive dispersive-type NN forces. For the latter we also consider a spin-dependent version which is somewhat favored by our analysis. /sub /ZBe is treated as a 2ed + system and is significantly overbound, approx. =1 MeV, if only ed ed and ed potentials are used. An ed ed potential obtained from the NN forces nicely accounts for this overbinding. The hypernuclei /sub /WHe and /sub / Be are treated as ed + 2 and 2ed + 2 systems. Use of the /sub / Be event gives approx. =1.5 MeV too little binding for /sub /WHe. The S0 potential obtained from /sub / Be is quite strongly attractive, comparable to the N and also to the NN potential without OPE. 18 refs.

  8. Energy spectrum of two-dimensional tight-binding electrons in a spatially varying magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, G.Y.; Lee, M.H.

    1996-01-01

    The electronic energy spectrum of a two-dimensional lattice in a spatially varying magnetic field is studied within the framework of the tight-binding model by using the scheme of the transfer matrix. It is found that, in comparison with the case of a uniform magnetic field, the energy spectrum exhibits more complicated behavior; band broadening (or gap closing) and band splitting (or gap opening) occur depending on characteristic parameters of the lattice. The origin of these phenomena lies in the existence of direct touching and indirect overlapping between neighboring subbands. Dependence of direct touching and indirect overlapping, and thus the electronic band structure together with the density of states, on characteristic parameters of the lattice is elucidated in detail. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  9. Transport Gap and exciton binding energy determination in organic semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Stefan; Schoell, Achim; Reinert, Friedrich; Umbach, Eberhard [University of Wuerzburg (Germany). Experimental Physics II; Casu, Benedetta [Inst. f. Physik. u. Theor. Chemie, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The transport gap of an organic semiconductor is defined as the energy difference between the HOMO and LUMO levels in the presence of a hole or electron, respectively, after relaxation has occurred. Its knowledge is mandatory for the optimisation of electronic devices based on these materials. UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and inverse photoelectron spectroscopy (IPES) are routinely applied to measure these molecular levels. However, the precise determination of the transport gap on the basis of the respective data is not an easy task. It involves fundamental questions about the properties of organic molecules and their condensates, about their reaction on the experimental probe, and on the evaluation of the spectroscopic data. In particular electronic relaxation processes, which occur on the time scale of the photo excitation, have to be considered adequately. We determined the transport gap for the organic semiconductors PTCDA, Alq3, DIP, CuPc, and PBI-H4. After careful data analysis and comparison to the respective values for the optical gap we obtain values for the exciton binding energies between 0.1-0.5 eV. This is considerably smaller than commonly believed and indicates a significant delocalisation of the excitonic charge over various molecular units.

  10. Folding model analysis of Λ binding energies and three-body ΛNN force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mian, M.; Rahman Khan, M.Z.

    1988-02-01

    Working within the framework of the folding model, we analyze the Λ binding energy data of light hypernuclei with effective two-body ΛN plus three-body ΛNN interaction. The two-body density for the core nucleus required for evaluating the three-body force contribution is obtained in terms of the centre of mass pair correlation. It is found that except for Λ 5 He the data are fairly well explained. The three-body force seems to account for the density dependence of the effective two-body ΛN interaction proposed earlier. (author). 13 refs, 2 tabs

  11. Electrostatics, structure prediction, and the energy landscapes for protein folding and binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Min-Yeh; Zheng, Weihua; Balamurugan, D; Schafer, Nicholas P; Kim, Bobby L; Cheung, Margaret S; Wolynes, Peter G

    2016-01-01

    While being long in range and therefore weakly specific, electrostatic interactions are able to modulate the stability and folding landscapes of some proteins. The relevance of electrostatic forces for steering the docking of proteins to each other is widely acknowledged, however, the role of electrostatics in establishing specifically funneled landscapes and their relevance for protein structure prediction are still not clear. By introducing Debye-Hückel potentials that mimic long-range electrostatic forces into the Associative memory, Water mediated, Structure, and Energy Model (AWSEM), a transferable protein model capable of predicting tertiary structures, we assess the effects of electrostatics on the landscapes of thirteen monomeric proteins and four dimers. For the monomers, we find that adding electrostatic interactions does not improve structure prediction. Simulations of ribosomal protein S6 show, however, that folding stability depends monotonically on electrostatic strength. The trend in predicted melting temperatures of the S6 variants agrees with experimental observations. Electrostatic effects can play a range of roles in binding. The binding of the protein complex KIX-pKID is largely assisted by electrostatic interactions, which provide direct charge-charge stabilization of the native state and contribute to the funneling of the binding landscape. In contrast, for several other proteins, including the DNA-binding protein FIS, electrostatics causes frustration in the DNA-binding region, which favors its binding with DNA but not with its protein partner. This study highlights the importance of long-range electrostatics in functional responses to problems where proteins interact with their charged partners, such as DNA, RNA, as well as membranes. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  12. Vibrationally resolved UV/Vis spectroscopy with time-dependent density functional based tight binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruger, R.; Niehaus, T.; van Lenthe, E.; Heine, T.; Visscher, L.

    2016-01-01

    We report a time-dependent density functional based tight-binding (TD-DFTB) scheme for the calculation of UV/Vis spectra, explicitly taking into account the excitation of nuclear vibrations via the adiabatic Hessian Franck-Condon method with a harmonic approximation for the nu- clear wavefunction.

  13. On the binding energy of double Λ hypernuclei in the relativistic mean field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcos, S.; Lombard, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    The binding energy of two Λ hyperons bound to a nuclear core is calculated within the relativistic mean field theory. The starting point is a two body relativistic equation of the Breit type suggested by the RMFT, and corrected for the two-particle interaction. The 2 Λ correlation energy is evaluated and the contribution of the δ and φ mesons, acting solely between hyperons, to the bond energy σB ΛΛ of ( ΛΛ ) 6 He, ( ΛΛ ) 10 Be and ( ΛΛ ) 13 B is calculated. Predictions of the ΔB ΛΛ A dependence are made for heavier Λ-hypernuclei. (K.A.)

  14. Photo-isomerization and oxidation of bilirubin in mammals is dependent on albumin binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharova, Iryna; Jašprová, Jana; Vítek, Libor; Urbanová, Marie

    2015-12-01

    The bilirubin (BR) photo-conversion in the human body is a protein-dependent process; an effective photo-isomerization of the potentially neurotoxic Z,Z-BR as well as its oxidation to biliverdin in the antioxidant redox cycle is possible only when BR is bound on serum albumin. We present a novel analytical concept in the study of linear tetrapyrroles metabolic processes based on an in-depth mapping of binding sites in the structure of human serum albumin (HSA). A combination of fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and molecular modeling methods was used for recognition of the binding site for BR, its derivatives (mesobilirubin and bilirubin ditaurate), and the products of the photo-isomerization and oxidation (lumirubin, biliverdin, and xanthobilirubic acid) on HSA. The CD spectra and fluorescent quenching of the Trp-HSA were used to calculate the binding constants. The results of the CD displacement experiments performed with hemin were interpreted together with the findings of molecular docking performed on the pigment-HSA complexes. We estimated that Z,Z-BR and its metabolic products bind on two independent binding sites. Our findings support the existence of a reversible antioxidant redox cycle for BR and explain an additional pathway of the photo-isomerization process (increase of HSA binding capacity; the excess free [unbound] BR can be converted and also bound to HSA). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Oxygen dependency of epidermal growth factor receptor binding and DNA synthesis of rat hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Tetsuro; Terajima, Hiroaki; Yamauchi, Akira

    1997-01-01

    Background/Aims: Changes in oxygen availability modulate replicative responses in several cell types, but the effects on hepatocyte replication remain unclear. We have studied the effects of transient nonlethal hypoxia on epidermal growth factor receptor binding and epidermal growth factor-induced DNA synthesis of rat hepatocytes. Methods: Lactate dehydrogenase activity in culture supernatant, intracellular adenosine triphosphate content, 125 I-epidermal growth factor specific binding, epidermal growth factor receptor protein expression, and 3 H-thymidine incorporation were compared between hepatocytes cultured in hypoxia and normoxia. Results: Hypoxia up to 3 h caused no significant increase in lactate dehydrogenase activity in the culture supernatant, while intracellular adenosine triphosphate content decreased time-dependently and was restored to normoxic levels by reoxygenation (nonlethal hypoxia). Concomitantly, 125 I-epidermal growth factor specific binding to hepatocytes decreased time-dependently (to 54.1% of normoxia) and was restored to control levels by reoxygenation, although 125 I-insulin specific binding was not affected. The decrease in 125 I-epidermal growth factor specific binding was explained by the decrease in the number or available epidermal growth factor receptors (21.37±3.08 to 12.16±1.42 fmol/10 5 cells), while the dissociation constant of the receptor was not affected. The change in the number of available receptors was not considered to be due to receptor degradation-resynthesis, since immuno-detection of the epidermal growth factor receptor revealed that the receptor protein expression did not change during hypoxia and reoxygenation, and since neither actinomycin D nor cycloheximide affected the recovery of 125 I-epidermal growth factor binding by reoxygenation. Inhibition of epidermal growth factor-induced DNA synthesis after hypoxia (to 75.4% of normoxia by 3 h hypoxia) paralleled the decrease in 125 I-epidermal growth factor binding

  16. Effect of non-parabolicity on the binding energy of a hydrogenic donor in quantum well with a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, K.; Balasubramanian, S.; Tomak, M.

    1985-08-01

    A hydrogenic donor in a quantum well in the presence of a magnetic field perpendicular to the barrier is considered in the effective mass approximation. The non-parabolicity of the subband is included in the Hamiltonian by an energy-dependent effective mass. The donor binding energy is calculated variationally for different well widths and the effect of non-parabolicity is discussed in the light of recent experimental results. (author)

  17. Influence of host matrices on krypton electron binding energies and KLL Auger transition energies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Inoyatov, A. K.; Perevoshchikov, L. L.; Kovalík, Alojz; Filosofov, D. V.; Yushkevich, Yu. V.; Ryšavý, Miloš; Lee, B. Q.; Kibédi, T.; Stuchbery, A. E.; Zhdanov, V. S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 197, DEC (2014), s. 64-71 ISSN 0368-2048 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP203/12/1896; GA MŠk LG14004 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Kr-83 * Rb-83 * Sr-83 * electron binding energy * KLL transitions * natural atomic level width * multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculations Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.436, year: 2014

  18. Phosphopeptide binding by Sld3 links Dbf4-dependent kinase to MCM replicative helicase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Tom D; Yeeles, Joseph Tp; Diffley, John Fx

    2016-05-02

    The initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication requires the assembly of active CMG (Cdc45-MCM-GINS) helicases at replication origins by a set of conserved and essential firing factors. This process is controlled during the cell cycle by cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) and Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK), and in response to DNA damage by the checkpoint kinase Rad53/Chk1. Here we show that Sld3, previously shown to be an essential CDK and Rad53 substrate, is recruited to the inactive MCM double hexamer in a DDK-dependent manner. Sld3 binds specifically to DDK-phosphorylated peptides from two MCM subunits (Mcm4, 6) and then recruits Cdc45. MCM mutants that cannot bind Sld3 or Sld3 mutants that cannot bind phospho-MCM or Cdc45 do not support replication. Moreover, phosphomimicking mutants in Mcm4 and Mcm6 bind Sld3 without DDK and facilitate DDK-independent replication. Thus, Sld3 is an essential "reader" of DDK phosphorylation, integrating signals from three distinct protein kinase pathways to coordinate DNA replication during S phase. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  19. Calculation of Relative Binding Free Energy in the Water-Filled Active Site of Oligopeptide-Binding Protein A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Manuela; de Beer, Stephanie B A; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2016-04-15

    The periplasmic oligopeptide binding protein A (OppA) represents a well-known example of water-mediated protein-ligand interactions. Here, we perform free-energy calculations for three different ligands binding to OppA, using a thermodynamic integration approach. The tripeptide ligands share a high structural similarity (all have the sequence KXK), but their experimentally-determined binding free energies differ remarkably. Thermodynamic cycles were constructed for the ligands, and simulations conducted in the bound and (freely solvated) unbound states. In the unbound state, it was observed that the difference in conformational freedom between alanine and glycine leads to a surprisingly slow convergence, despite their chemical similarity. This could be overcome by increasing the softness parameter during alchemical transformations. Discrepancies remained in the bound state however, when comparing independent simulations of the three ligands. These difficulties could be traced to a slow relaxation of the water network within the active site. Fluctuations in the number of water molecules residing in the binding cavity occur mostly on a timescale larger than the simulation time along the alchemical path. After extensive simulations, relative binding free energies that were converged to within thermal noise could be obtained, which agree well with available experimental data.

  20. Electron transfer in organic glass. Distance and energy dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krongauz, V.V.

    1992-01-01

    The authors have investigated the distance and energy dependence of electron transfer in rigid organic glasses containing randomly dispersed electron donor and electron acceptor molecules. Pulsed radiolysis by an electron beam from a linear accelerator was used for ionization resulting in charge deposition on donor molecules. The disappearance kinetics of donor radical anions due to electron transfer to acceptor was monitored spectroscopically by the change in optical density at the wavelength corresponding to that of donor radical anion absorbance. It was found that the rate of the electron transfer observed experimentally was higher than that computed using the Marcus-Levich theory assuming that the electron-transfer activation barrier is equal to the binding energy of electron on the donor molecule. This discrepancy between the experimental and computed results suggests that the open-quotes inertclose quotes media in which electron-transfer reaction takes place may be participating in the process, resulting in experimentally observed higher electron-transfer rates. 32 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Calcium-dependent binding of Escherichia coli alpha-hemolysin to erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, D.F.

    1989-01-01

    Alpha hemolysin (AH), a protein secreted by certain strains of Escherichia coli, causes lysis of erythrocytes (RBCs) and is cytotoxic for other cells. The primary structure of AH contains an eight amino acid sequence tandemly repeated 13 times near the C-terminus. These repeated sequences are essential for hemolytic activity. AH also requires an unknown modification by an accessory protein, Hly C, for hemolytic activity. The role of calcium in the interaction of Ah with RBCs was investigated using recombinant strains which produced active and inactive forms of the toxin. Hemolytic activity was calcium-dependent. Osmotic protection experiments and immunoblots of SDS-PAGE separated proteins from washed, toxin-treated RBCs showed that the binding of active AH to RBCs was calcium-dependent. Binding of active AH to RBCs increased the calcium permeability of RBC membranes and resulted in changes in membrane protein profiles. The changes in membrane proteins did not cause the lysis of the cells. These results were consistent with a mechanism of lysis involving the formation of cation-selective pores in the membranes of target cells. 45 Ca-autoradiography of the recombinant hemolysins separated by SDS-PAGE and transferred to nitrocellulose showed that active AH bound calcium. The domain involved in binding calcium was identified as the tandemly repeated sequences since a deletion hemolysin missing 11 of the 13 repeated sequences did not bind calcium. This deletion hemolysin was non-hemolytic and did not bind to RBC membranes. Hemolysin lacking the Hly C modification was also non-hemolytic and did not bind to RBC membranes. This unmodified AH contained the repeated sequences and bound calcium as efficiently as active AH

  2. Multiple binding modes of ibuprofen in human serum albumin identified by absolute binding free energy calculations

    KAUST Repository

    Evoli, Stefania; Mobley, David L.; Guzzi, Rita; Rizzuti, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    experiments, because of the structural adaptability of this protein in accommodating small ligands. In this work, we provide a set of predictions covering the geometry, affinity of binding and protonation state for the pharmaceutically most active form (S

  3. Rearrangements under confinement lead to increased binding energy of Synaptotagmin-1 with anionic membranes in Mg2+ and Ca2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruget, Clémence; Coleman, Jeff; Bello, Oscar; Krishnakumar, Shyam S; Perez, Eric; Rothman, James E; Pincet, Frederic; Donaldson, Stephen H

    2018-05-01

    Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1) is the primary calcium sensor (Ca 2+ ) that mediates neurotransmitter release at the synapse. The tandem C2 domains (C2A and C2B) of Syt1 exhibit functionally critical, Ca 2+ -dependent interactions with the plasma membrane. With the surface forces apparatus, we directly measure the binding energy of membrane-anchored Syt1 to an anionic membrane and find that Syt1 binds with ~6 k B T in EGTA, ~10 k B T in Mg 2+ and ~18 k B T in Ca 2+ . Molecular rearrangements measured during confinement are more prevalent in Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ and suggest that Syt1 initially binds through C2B, then reorients the C2 domains into the preferred binding configuration. These results provide energetic and mechanistic details of the Syt1 Ca 2+ -activation process in synaptic transmission. © 2018 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  4. Environment-dependent crystal-field tight-binding based on density-functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    systematic derivation of Slater-Koster parameters from the results of DFT calculations. In our approach, the DFT wave functions (Kohn-Sham orbitals) in a numerically converged basis of atom-centered functions and plane waves are mapped onto a minimal basis of atomic orbitals (AOs) using a projection formalism. This allows the computation of the minimal basis representation of the converged DFT Hamiltonian. The quality of TB parameters obtained using the projection methodology crucially depends on the choice of the minimal AO basis. We have therefore developed several schemes for the optimization of AO basis sets, which are discussed in detail in this thesis. The projection formalism described above is not limited to the calculation of conventional TB parameters, i.e., to bond and overlap integrals over two orbitals that are located at two different atomic sites. It also can be used to analyze crystal field interactions. We introduce an extended crystal-field tight-binding (CF-TB) method, which includes an environment-dependent on-site parametrization. It is demonstrated that the CF-TB method is substantially more accurate for low-symmetry structures. A common potential energy reference is a necessary condition to be able to compare Hamilton matrices and eigenvalues from different structures. We point out that the structure-dependent on-site parameters of a CF-TB model are suitable to gauge eigenvalues and bond integrals of different atomic and molecular structures. Most importantly, with an appropriate choice of potential energy reference, the structure sensitivity of bond integrals can be significantly reduced, thus leading to a substantial increase of the transferability of the TB models. In addition to the Slater-Koster parametrization of the electronic structure, for the calculation of cohesion energies and atomic forces in TB, a description of the ionic core repulsion and the double-counting corrections is required. We have explored various options for the partitioning

  5. Anisotropic Lithium Insertion Behavior in Silicon Nanowires: Binding Energy, Diffusion Barrier, and Strain Effect

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Qianfan; Cui, Yi; Wang, Enge

    2011-01-01

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) have recently been shown to be promising as high capacity lithium battery anodes. SiNWs can be grown with their long axis along several different crystallographic directions. Due to distinct atomic configuration and electronic structure of SiNWs with different axial orientations, their lithium insertion behavior could be different. This paper focuses on the characteristics of single Li defects, including binding energy, diffusion barriers, and dependence on uniaxial strain in [110], [100], [111], and [112] SiNWs. Our systematic ab initio study suggests that the Si-Li interaction is weaker when the Si-Li bond direction is aligned close to the SiNW long axis. This results in the [110] and [111] SiNWs having the highest and lowest Li binding energy, respectively, and it makes the diffusion barrier along the SiNW axis lower than other pathways. Under external strain, it was found that [110] and [001] SiNWs are the most and least sensitive, respectively. For diffusion along the axial direction, the barrier increases (decreases) under tension (compression). This feature results in a considerable difference in the magnitude of the energy barrier along different diffusion pathways. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  6. Anisotropic Lithium Insertion Behavior in Silicon Nanowires: Binding Energy, Diffusion Barrier, and Strain Effect

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Qianfan

    2011-05-19

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) have recently been shown to be promising as high capacity lithium battery anodes. SiNWs can be grown with their long axis along several different crystallographic directions. Due to distinct atomic configuration and electronic structure of SiNWs with different axial orientations, their lithium insertion behavior could be different. This paper focuses on the characteristics of single Li defects, including binding energy, diffusion barriers, and dependence on uniaxial strain in [110], [100], [111], and [112] SiNWs. Our systematic ab initio study suggests that the Si-Li interaction is weaker when the Si-Li bond direction is aligned close to the SiNW long axis. This results in the [110] and [111] SiNWs having the highest and lowest Li binding energy, respectively, and it makes the diffusion barrier along the SiNW axis lower than other pathways. Under external strain, it was found that [110] and [001] SiNWs are the most and least sensitive, respectively. For diffusion along the axial direction, the barrier increases (decreases) under tension (compression). This feature results in a considerable difference in the magnitude of the energy barrier along different diffusion pathways. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  7. Species dependence of [64Cu]Cu-Bis(thiosemicarbazone) radiopharmaceutical binding to serum albumins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basken, Nathan E.; Mathias, Carla J.; Lipka, Alexander E.; Green, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Interactions of three copper(II) bis(thiosemicarbazone) positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals with human serum albumin, and the serum albumins of four additional mammalian species, were evaluated. Methods: 64 Cu-labeled diacetyl bis(N 4 -methylthiosemicarbazonato)copper(II) (Cu-ATSM), pyruvaldehyde bis(N 4 -methylthiosemicarbazonato)copper(II) (Cu-PTSM) and ethylglyoxal bis(thiosemicarbazonato)copper(II) (Cu-ETS) were synthesized and their binding to human, canine, rat, baboon and porcine serum albumins quantified by ultrafiltration. Protein binding was also measured for each tracer in human, porcine, rat and mouse serum. Results: The interaction of these neutral, lipophilic copper chelates with serum albumin is highly compound- and species-dependent. Cu-PTSM and Cu-ATSM exhibit particularly high affinity for human serum albumin (HSA), while the albumin binding of Cu-ETS is relatively insensitive to species. At HSA concentrations of 40 mg/ml, '% free' (non-albumin-bound) levels of radiopharmaceutical were 4.0±0.1%, 5.3±0.2% and 38.6±0.8% for Cu-PTSM, Cu-ATSM and Cu-ETS, respectively. Conclusions: Species-dependent variations in radiopharmaceutical binding to serum albumin may need to be considered when using animal models to predict the distribution and kinetics of these compounds in humans

  8. Species dependence of [{sup 64}Cu]Cu-Bis(thiosemicarbazone) radiopharmaceutical binding to serum albumins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basken, Nathan E. [Division of Nuclear Pharmacy, Department of Industrial and Physical Pharmacy, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)], E-mail: nbasken@purdue.edu; Mathias, Carla J. [Division of Nuclear Pharmacy, Department of Industrial and Physical Pharmacy, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Lipka, Alexander E. [Department of Statistics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Green, Mark A. [Division of Nuclear Pharmacy, Department of Industrial and Physical Pharmacy, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)], E-mail: magreen@purdue.edu

    2008-04-15

    Introduction: Interactions of three copper(II) bis(thiosemicarbazone) positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals with human serum albumin, and the serum albumins of four additional mammalian species, were evaluated. Methods: {sup 64}Cu-labeled diacetyl bis(N{sup 4}-methylthiosemicarbazonato)copper(II) (Cu-ATSM), pyruvaldehyde bis(N{sup 4}-methylthiosemicarbazonato)copper(II) (Cu-PTSM) and ethylglyoxal bis(thiosemicarbazonato)copper(II) (Cu-ETS) were synthesized and their binding to human, canine, rat, baboon and porcine serum albumins quantified by ultrafiltration. Protein binding was also measured for each tracer in human, porcine, rat and mouse serum. Results: The interaction of these neutral, lipophilic copper chelates with serum albumin is highly compound- and species-dependent. Cu-PTSM and Cu-ATSM exhibit particularly high affinity for human serum albumin (HSA), while the albumin binding of Cu-ETS is relatively insensitive to species. At HSA concentrations of 40 mg/ml, '% free' (non-albumin-bound) levels of radiopharmaceutical were 4.0{+-}0.1%, 5.3{+-}0.2% and 38.6{+-}0.8% for Cu-PTSM, Cu-ATSM and Cu-ETS, respectively. Conclusions: Species-dependent variations in radiopharmaceutical binding to serum albumin may need to be considered when using animal models to predict the distribution and kinetics of these compounds in humans.

  9. Simultaneous effects of hydrostatic pressure and electric field on impurity binding energy and polarizability in coupled InAs/GaAs quantum wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tangarife, E.; Duque, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    This work is concerned with the theoretical study of the combined effects of applied electric field and hydrostatic pressure on the binding energy and impurity polarizability of a donor impurity in laterally coupled double InAs/GaAs quantum-well wires. Calculations have been made in the effective mass and parabolic band approximations and using a variational method. The results are reported for different configurations of wire and barriers widths, impurity position, and electric field and hydrostatic pressure strengths. Our results show that for symmetrical structures the binding energy is an even function of the impurity position along the growth direction of the structure. Also, we found that for hydrostatic pressure strength up to 38 kbar, the binding energy increases linearly with hydrostatic pressure, while for larger values of hydrostatic pressure the binding energy has a non-linear behavior. Finally, we found that the hydrostatic pressure can increase the coupling between the two parallel quantum-well wires. -- Research highlights: → Binding energy for donor impurity in coupled wires strongly depends on the confinement potential. → Polarizability for donor impurity in coupled wires strongly depends on the confinement potential. → Binding energy strongly depends on the direction of the applied electric field. → Polarizability strongly depends on the direction of the applied electric field. → The coupling between the two parallel wires increases with the hydrostatic pressure.

  10. Nuclear symmetry energy in density dependent hadronic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddad, S.

    2008-12-01

    The density dependence of the symmetry energy and the correlation between parameters of the symmetry energy and the neutron skin thickness in the nucleus 208 Pb are investigated in relativistic Hadronic models. The dependency of the symmetry energy on density is linear around saturation density. Correlation exists between the neutron skin thickness in the nucleus 208 Pb and the value of the nuclear symmetry energy at saturation density, but not with the slope of the symmetry energy at saturation density. (author)

  11. 4He binding energy calculation including full tensor-force effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, A. C.

    1989-09-01

    The four-body equations of Alt, Grassberger, and Sandhas are solved in the version where the (2)+(2) subamplitudes are treated exactly by convolution, using one-term separable Yamaguchy nucleon-nucleon potentials in the 1S0 and 3S1-3D1 channels. The resulting jp=1/2+ and (3/2+ three-body subamplitudes are represented in a separable form using the energy-dependent pole expansion. Converged bound-state results are calculated for the first time using the full interaction, and are compared with those obtained from a simplified treatment of the tensor force. The Tjon line that correlates three-nucleon and four-nucleon binding energies is shown using different nucleon-nucleon potentials. In all calculations the Coulomb force has been neglected.

  12. Reversibly Switchable, pH-Dependent Peptide Ligand Binding via 3,5-Diiodotyrosine Substitutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngambenjawong, Chayanon; Sylvestre, Meilyn; Gustafson, Heather H; Pineda, Julio Marco B; Pun, Suzie H

    2018-04-20

    Cell type-specific targeting ligands utilized in drug delivery applications typically recognize receptors that are overexpressed on the cells of interest. Nonetheless, these receptors may also be expressed, to varying extents, on off-target cells, contributing to unintended side effects. For the selectivity profile of targeting ligands in cancer therapy to be improved, stimuli-responsive masking of these ligands with acid-, redox-, or enzyme-cleavable molecules has been reported, whereby the targeting ligands are exposed in specific environments, e.g., acidic tumor hypoxia. One possible drawback of these systems lies in their one-time, permanent trigger, which enables the "demasked" ligands to bind off-target cells if released back into the systemic circulation. A promising strategy to address the aforementioned problem is to design ligands that show selective binding based on ionization state, which may be microenvironment-dependent. In this study, we report a systematic strategy to engineer low pH-selective targeting peptides using an M2 macrophage-targeting peptide (M2pep) as an example. 3,5-Diiodotyrosine mutagenesis into native tyrosine residues of M2pep confers pH-dependent binding behavior specific to acidic environment (pH 6) when the amino acid is protonated into the native tyrosine-like state. At physiological pH of 7.4, the hydroxyl group of 3,5-diiodotyrosine on the peptide is deprotonated leading to interruption of the peptide native binding property. Our engineered pH-responsive M2pep (Ac-Y-Î-Î) binds target M2 macrophages more selectively at pH 6 than at pH 7.4. In addition, 3,5-diiodotyrosine substitutions also improve serum stability of the peptide. Finally, we demonstrate pH-dependent reversibility in target binding via a postbinding peptide elution study. The strategy presented here should be applicable for engineering pH-dependent functionality of other targeting peptides with potential applications in physiology-dependent in vivo targeting

  13. Photoelectron spectroscopy on the charge reorganization energy and small polaron binding energy of molecular film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kera, Satoshi, E-mail: kera@ims.ac.jp [Institute for Molecular Science, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); Department of Nanomaterial Science, Graduate School of Advanced Integration Science, Chiba University, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Ueno, Nobuo [Department of Nanomaterial Science, Graduate School of Advanced Integration Science, Chiba University, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan)

    2015-10-01

    Understanding of electron-phonon coupling as well as intermolecular interaction is required to discuss the mobility of charge carrier in functional molecular solids. This article summarizes recent progress in direct measurements of valence hole-vibration coupling in ultrathin films of organic semiconductors by using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The experimental study of hole-vibration coupling of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) state in ordered monolayer film by UPS is essential to comprehend hole-hopping transport and small-polaron related transport in organic semiconductors. Only careful measurements can attain the high-resolution spectra and provide key parameters in hole-transport dynamics, namely the charge reorganization energy and small polaron binding energy. Analyses methods of the UPS HOMO fine feature and resulting charge reorganization energy and small polaron binding energy are described for pentacene and perfluoropentacene films. Difference between thin-film and gas-phase results is discussed by using newly measured high-quality gas-phase spectra of pentacene. Methodology for achieving high-resolution UPS measurements for molecular films is also described.

  14. Binding energies of hypernuclei and Λ-nuclear interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodmer, A.R.; Usmani, Q.N.

    1985-01-01

    Variational Monte Carlo calculations have been made for the s-shell hypernuclei and also of 9 Be hypernuclei with a 2α + Λ model. The well depth is calculated variationally with the Fermi hypernetted chain method. A satisfactory description of all the relevant experimental Λ separation energies and also of the Λp scattering can be obtained with reasonable TPE ΛN and ΛNN forces and strongly repulsive dispersive ΛNN forces which are preferred to be spin dependent. We discuss variational calculations for 6 He and 10 Be hypernuclei with α + 2Λ and 2α + 2Λ models, and the results obtained for the ΛΛ interaction and for 6 He hypernuclei from analysis of 10 Be hypernuclei Coulomb effects and charge symmetry breaking in the A = 4 hypernuclei are discussed. 24 refs., 5 figs

  15. Binding energies of hypernuclei and. lambda. -nuclear interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodmer, A.R.; Usmani, Q.N.

    1985-01-01

    Variational Monte Carlo calculations have been made for the s-shell hypernuclei and also of /sup 9/Be hypernuclei with a 2..cap alpha.. + ..lambda.. model. The well depth is calculated variationally with the Fermi hypernetted chain method. A satisfactory description of all the relevant experimental ..lambda.. separation energies and also of the ..lambda..p scattering can be obtained with reasonable TPE ..lambda..N and ..lambda..NN forces and strongly repulsive dispersive ..lambda..NN forces which are preferred to be spin dependent. We discuss variational calculations for /sup 6/He and /sup 10/Be hypernuclei with ..cap alpha.. + 2..lambda.. and 2..cap alpha.. + 2..lambda.. models, and the results obtained for the ..lambda lambda.. interaction and for /sup 6/He hypernuclei from analysis of /sup 10/Be hypernuclei Coulomb effects and charge symmetry breaking in the A = 4 hypernuclei are discussed. 24 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Binding energy and dephasing of biexcitons in In0.18Ga0.82As/GaAs single quantum wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borri, Paola; Langbein, Wolfgang Werner; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1999-01-01

    Biexciton binding energies and biexciton dephasing in In0.18Ga0.82As/GaAs single quantum wells have been measured by time-integrated and spectrally resolved four-wave mixing. The biexciton binding energy increases from 1.5 to 2.6 meV for well widths increasing from 1 to 4 nm. The ratio between...... exciton and biexciton binding energy changes from 0.23 to 0.3 with increasing inhomogeneous broadening, corresponding to increasing well width. From the temperature dependence of the exciton and biexciton four-wave mixing signal decay, we have deduced the acoustic-phonon scattering of the exciton...

  17. Conformational Dynamics and Binding Free Energies of Inhibitors of BACE-1: From the Perspective of Protonation Equilibria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Olivia Kim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACE-1 is the β-secretase responsible for the initial amyloidogenesis in Alzheimer's disease, catalyzing hydrolytic cleavage of substrate in a pH-sensitive manner. The catalytic mechanism of BACE-1 requires water-mediated proton transfer from aspartyl dyad to the substrate, as well as structural flexibility in the flap region. Thus, the coupling of protonation and conformational equilibria is essential to a full in silico characterization of BACE-1. In this work, we perform constant pH replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations on both apo BACE-1 and five BACE-1-inhibitor complexes to examine the effect of pH on dynamics and inhibitor binding properties of BACE-1. In our simulations, we find that solution pH controls the conformational flexibility of apo BACE-1, whereas bound inhibitors largely limit the motions of the holo enzyme at all levels of pH. The microscopic pKa values of titratable residues in BACE-1 including its aspartyl dyad are computed and compared between apo and inhibitor-bound states. Changes in protonation between the apo and holo forms suggest a thermodynamic linkage between binding of inhibitors and protons localized at the dyad. Utilizing our recently developed computational protocol applying the binding polynomial formalism to the constant pH molecular dynamics (CpHMD framework, we are able to obtain the pH-dependent binding free energy profiles for various BACE-1-inhibitor complexes. Our results highlight the importance of correctly addressing the binding-induced protonation changes in protein-ligand systems where binding accompanies a net proton transfer. This work comprises the first application of our CpHMD-based free energy computational method to protein-ligand complexes and illustrates the value of CpHMD as an all-purpose tool for obtaining pH-dependent dynamics and binding free energies of biological systems.

  18. Atom-solid binding energy shifts for K 2p and Rb 3d sublevels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holappa, M.; Aksela, S.; Patanen, M.; Urpelainen, S.; Aksela, H.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Binding energy shifts between atom and solid. K 2p and Rb 3d sublevels were studied. → Simultaneous measurements give accurate results. → Results can be used as a reference for cluster studies. - Abstract: Binding energy shifts between free and solid state atoms for K 2p and Rb 3d photolines have been determined by measuring the vapor and solid state spectra simultaneously in similar experimental conditions applying synchrotron radiation excited photoelectron spectroscopy. This method has the important benefit that the work function is not needed to correct for different reference energy levels, therefore much more accurate values for binding energy shifts are obtained.

  19. Identification of DNA-binding protein target sequences by physical effective energy functions: free energy analysis of lambda repressor-DNA complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caselle Michele

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Specific binding of proteins to DNA is one of the most common ways gene expression is controlled. Although general rules for the DNA-protein recognition can be derived, the ambiguous and complex nature of this mechanism precludes a simple recognition code, therefore the prediction of DNA target sequences is not straightforward. DNA-protein interactions can be studied using computational methods which can complement the current experimental methods and offer some advantages. In the present work we use physical effective potentials to evaluate the DNA-protein binding affinities for the λ repressor-DNA complex for which structural and thermodynamic experimental data are available. Results The binding free energy of two molecules can be expressed as the sum of an intermolecular energy (evaluated using a molecular mechanics forcefield, a solvation free energy term and an entropic term. Different solvation models are used including distance dependent dielectric constants, solvent accessible surface tension models and the Generalized Born model. The effect of conformational sampling by Molecular Dynamics simulations on the computed binding energy is assessed; results show that this effect is in general negative and the reproducibility of the experimental values decreases with the increase of simulation time considered. The free energy of binding for non-specific complexes, estimated using the best energetic model, agrees with earlier theoretical suggestions. As a results of these analyses, we propose a protocol for the prediction of DNA-binding target sequences. The possibility of searching regulatory elements within the bacteriophage λ genome using this protocol is explored. Our analysis shows good prediction capabilities, even in absence of any thermodynamic data and information on the naturally recognized sequence. Conclusion This study supports the conclusion that physics-based methods can offer a completely complementary

  20. Temperature dependence of grain boundary free energy and elastic constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foiles, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    This work explores the suggestion that the temperature dependence of the grain boundary free energy can be estimated from the temperature dependence of the elastic constants. The temperature-dependent elastic constants and free energy of a symmetric Σ79 tilt boundary are computed for an embedded atom method model of Ni. The grain boundary free energy scales with the product of the shear modulus times the lattice constant for temperatures up to about 0.75 the melting temperature.

  1. Impact of domain knowledge on blinded predictions of binding energies by alchemical free energy calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mey, Antonia S. J. S.; Jiménez, Jordi Juárez; Michel, Julien

    2018-01-01

    The Drug Design Data Resource (D3R) consortium organises blinded challenges to address the latest advances in computational methods for ligand pose prediction, affinity ranking, and free energy calculations. Within the context of the second D3R Grand Challenge several blinded binding free energies predictions were made for two congeneric series of Farsenoid X Receptor (FXR) inhibitors with a semi-automated alchemical free energy calculation workflow featuring FESetup and SOMD software tools. Reasonable performance was observed in retrospective analyses of literature datasets. Nevertheless, blinded predictions on the full D3R datasets were poor due to difficulties encountered with the ranking of compounds that vary in their net-charge. Performance increased for predictions that were restricted to subsets of compounds carrying the same net-charge. Disclosure of X-ray crystallography derived binding modes maintained or improved the correlation with experiment in a subsequent rounds of predictions. The best performing protocols on D3R set1 and set2 were comparable or superior to predictions made on the basis of analysis of literature structure activity relationships (SAR)s only, and comparable or slightly inferior, to the best submissions from other groups.

  2. MIT domain of Vps4 is a Ca2+-dependent phosphoinositide-binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaya, Naoko; Takasu, Hirotoshi; Goda, Natsuko; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Tanaka, Toshiki; Hamada, Daizo; Hiroaki, Hidekazu

    2013-05-01

    The microtubule interacting and trafficking (MIT) domain is a small protein module that is conserved in proteins of diverged function, such as Vps4, spastin and sorting nexin 15 (SNX15). The molecular function of the MIT domain is protein-protein interaction, in which the domain recognizes peptides containing MIT-interacting motifs. Recently, we identified an evolutionarily related domain, 'variant' MIT domain at the N-terminal region of the microtubule severing enzyme katanin p60. We found that the domain was responsible for binding to microtubules and Ca(2+). Here, we have examined whether the authentic MIT domains also bind Ca(2+). We found that the loop between the first and second α-helices of the MIT domain binds a Ca(2+) ion. Furthermore, the MIT domains derived from Vps4b and SNX15a showed phosphoinositide-binding activities in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. We propose that the MIT domain is a novel membrane-associating domain involved in endosomal trafficking.

  3. A fluorescent glycolipid-binding peptide probe traces cholesterol dependent microdomain-derived trafficking pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Steinert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The uptake and intracellular trafficking of sphingolipids, which self-associate into plasma membrane microdomains, is associated with many pathological conditions, including viral and toxin infection, lipid storage disease, and neurodegenerative disease. However, the means available to label the trafficking pathways of sphingolipids in live cells are extremely limited. In order to address this problem, we have developed an exogenous, non-toxic probe consisting of a 25-amino acid sphingolipid binding domain, the SBD, derived from the amyloid peptide Abeta, and conjugated by a neutral linker with an organic fluorophore. The current work presents the characterization of the sphingolipid binding and live cell trafficking of this novel probe, the SBD peptide. SBD was the name given to a motif originally recognized by Fantini et al in a number of glycolipid-associated proteins, and was proposed to interact with sphingolipids in membrane microdomains. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In accordance with Fantini's model, optimal SBD binding to membranes depends on the presence of sphingolipids and cholesterol. In synthetic membrane binding assays, SBD interacts preferentially with raft-like lipid mixtures containing sphingomyelin, cholesterol, and complex gangliosides in a pH-dependent manner, but is less glycolipid-specific than Cholera toxin B (CtxB. Using quantitative time-course colocalization in live cells, we show that the uptake and intracellular trafficking route of SBD is unlike that of either the non-raft marker Transferrin or the raft markers CtxB and Flotillin2-GFP. However, SBD traverses an endolysosomal route that partially intersects with raft-associated pathways, with a major portion being diverted at a late time point to rab11-positive recycling endosomes. Trafficking of SBD to acidified compartments is strongly disrupted by cholesterol perturbations, consistent with the regulation of sphingolipid trafficking by cholesterol

  4. Occupation number dependence of molecular energy levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giambiagi, M.S. de; Giambiagi, M.; Ferreira, R.

    1977-08-01

    The Roothaan expression for the energy of a closed-shell molecular system is generalized in order to apply to open shells. A continuous variation from 0 to 2 is supposed for each level's occupation number, extending to this range tbe correction due to the spurious repulsion appearing in the half-electron method. The characteristic equations of the Xα method are applied to the energy expressions. The one level case is discussed in detail. Ionic and excited states of the 1,3 transbutadiene π system are analyzed

  5. Nonspecific DNA Binding and Bending by HUαβ: Interfaces of the Three Binding Modes Characterized by Salt Dependent Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Junseock; Shkel, Irina; Saecker, Ruth M.; Record, M. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Previous ITC and FRET studies demonstrated that Escherichia coli HUαβ binds nonspecifically to duplex DNA in three different binding modes: a tighter-binding 34 bp mode which interacts with DNA in large (>34 bp) gaps between bound proteins, reversibly bending it 140° and thereby increasing its flexibility, and two weaker, modestly cooperative small-site-size modes (10 bp, 6 bp) useful for filling gaps between bound proteins shorter than 34 bp. Here we use ITC to determine the thermodynamics of these binding modes as a function of salt concentration, and deduce that DNA in the 34 bp mode is bent around but not wrapped on the body of HU, in contrast to specific binding of IHF. Analyses of binding isotherms (8, 15, 34 bp DNA) and initial binding heats (34, 38, 160 bp DNA) reveal that all three modes have similar log-log salt concentration derivatives of the binding constants (Ski) even though their binding site sizes differ greatly; most probable values of Ski on 34 bp or larger DNA are − 7.5 ± 0.5. From the similarity of Ski values, we conclude that binding interfaces of all three modes involve the same region of the arms and saddle of HU. All modes are entropy-driven, as expected for nonspecific binding driven by the polyelectrolyte effect. The bent-DNA 34 bp mode is most endothermic, presumably because of the cost of HU-induced DNA bending, while the 6 bp mode is modestly exothermic at all salt concentrations examined. Structural models consistent with the observed Ski values are proposed. PMID:21513716

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations of netropsin and distamycin binding to an AAAAA DNA binding site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenc, Jožica; Oostenbrink, Chris; Koller, Jože; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F.

    2005-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed on netropsin in two different charge states and on distamycin binding to the minor groove of the DNA duplex d(CGCGAAAAACGCG)·d(CGCGTTTTTCGCG). The relative free energy of binding of the two non-covalently interacting ligands was calculated using the thermodynamic integration method and reflects the experimental result. From 2 ns simulations of the ligands free in solution and when bound to DNA, the mobility and the hydrogen-bonding patterns of the ligands were studied, as well as their hydration. It is shown that even though distamycin is less hydrated than netropsin, the loss of ligand–solvent interactions is very similar for both ligands. The relative mobilities of the ligands in their bound and free forms indicate a larger entropic penalty for distamycin when binding to the minor groove compared with netropsin, partially explaining the lower binding affinity of the distamycin molecule. The detailed structural and energetic insights obtained from the molecular dynamics simulations allow for a better understanding of the factors determining ligand–DNA binding. PMID:15687382

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations of netropsin and distamycin binding to an AAAAA DNA binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenc, Jozica; Oostenbrink, Chris; Koller, Joze; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2005-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed on netropsin in two different charge states and on distamycin binding to the minor groove of the DNA duplex d(CGCGAAAAACGCG).d(CGCGTTTTTCGCG). The relative free energy of binding of the two non-covalently interacting ligands was calculated using the thermodynamic integration method and reflects the experimental result. From 2 ns simulations of the ligands free in solution and when bound to DNA, the mobility and the hydrogen-bonding patterns of the ligands were studied, as well as their hydration. It is shown that even though distamycin is less hydrated than netropsin, the loss of ligand-solvent interactions is very similar for both ligands. The relative mobilities of the ligands in their bound and free forms indicate a larger entropic penalty for distamycin when binding to the minor groove compared with netropsin, partially explaining the lower binding affinity of the distamycin molecule. The detailed structural and energetic insights obtained from the molecular dynamics simulations allow for a better understanding of the factors determining ligand-DNA binding.

  8. Exciton binding energy in GaAsBiN spherical quantum dot heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Subhasis; Dhar, S.

    2017-03-01

    The ground state exciton binding energies (EBE) of heavy hole excitons in GaAs1-x-yBixNy - GaAs spherical quantum dots (QD) are calculated using a variational approach under 1s hydrogenic wavefunctions within the framework of effective mass approximation. Both the nitrogen and the bismuth content in the material are found to affect the binding energy, in particular for larger nitrogen content and lower dot radii. Calculations also show that the ground state exciton binding energies of heavy holes increase more at smaller dot sizes as compared to that for the light hole excitons.

  9. Gate dielectric strength dependent performance of CNT MOSFET and CNT TFET: A tight binding study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Shamim Sarker

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comparative study between CNT MOSFET and CNT TFET taking into account of different dielectric strength of gate oxide materials. Here we have studied the transfer characteristics, on/off current (ION/IOFF ratio and subthreshold slope of the device using Non Equilibrium Greens Function (NEGF formalism in tight binding frameworks. The results are obtained by solving the NEGF and Poisson’s equation self-consistently in NanoTCADViDES environment and found that the ON state performance of CNT MOSFET and CNT TFET have significant dependency on the dielectric strength of the gate oxide materials. The figure of merits of the devices also demonstrates that the CNT TFET is promising for high-speed and low-power logic applications. Keywords: CNT TFET, Subthreshold slop, Barrier width, Conduction band (C.B and Valance band (V.B, Oxide dielectric strength, Tight binding approach

  10. Scale Dependence of Dark Energy Antigravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perivolaropoulos, L.

    2002-09-01

    We investigate the effects of negative pressure induced by dark energy (cosmological constant or quintessence) on the dynamics at various astrophysical scales. Negative pressure induces a repulsive term (antigravity) in Newton's law which dominates on large scales. Assuming a value of the cosmological constant consistent with the recent SnIa data we determine the critical scale $r_c$ beyond which antigravity dominates the dynamics ($r_c \\sim 1Mpc $) and discuss some of the dynamical effects implied. We show that dynamically induced mass estimates on the scale of the Local Group and beyond are significantly modified due to negative pressure. We also briefly discuss possible dynamical tests (eg effects on local Hubble flow) that can be applied on relatively small scales (a few $Mpc$) to determine the density and equation of state of dark energy.

  11. US oil dependency and energy security; Dependance petroliere et securite energetique americaine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel, P [Institut francais des Relations Internationals, 75 - Paris (France); [Universite Pierre Mendes-France-IEPE-CNRS, 38 - Grenoble (France)

    2002-07-01

    The three papers of this document were written in the framework of a seminar organized the 30 may 2002 by the IFRI in the framework of its program Energy and Climatic Change. The first presentation deals with the american oil policy since 1980 (relation between the oil dependence and the energy security, the Reagan oil policy, the new oil policy facing the increase of the dependence). The second one deals with the US energy security (oil security, domestic energy security, policy implications). The last presentation is devoted to the US oil dependence in a global context and the problems and policies of international energy security. (A.L.B.)

  12. Magnetic field dependence of vortex activation energy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... the resistance as a function of temperature and magnetic field in clean polycrystalline samples of NbSe2, MgB2 and Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10 (BSCCO) superconductors. Thermally activated flux flow behaviour is seen in all the three systems and clearly identified in bulk MgB2. While the activation energy at low fields for MgB2 ...

  13. Coordination-resolved local bond relaxation, electron binding-energy shift, and Debye temperature of Ir solid skins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bo, Maolin [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Ministry of Education, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China); Wang, Yan [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Ministry of Education, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China); School of Information and Electronic Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan, Hunan 411201 (China); Huang, Yongli, E-mail: huangyongli@xtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Ministry of Education, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China); Yang, Xuexian [Department of Physics, Jishou University, Jishou, Hunan 416000 (China); Yang, Yezi [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Ministry of Education, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China); Li, Can [Center for Coordination Bond Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 330018 (China); Sun, Chang Q., E-mail: ecqsun@ntu.edu.sg [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Ministry of Education, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China); NOVITAS, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • Cohesive energy of the representative bond determines the core-level shift. • XPS derives the energy level of an isolated atom and its bulk shift. • XPS derives the local bond length, bond energy, binding energy density. • Thermal XPS resolves the Debye temperature and atomic cohesive energy. - Abstract: Numerical reproduction of the measured 4f{sub 7/2} energy shift of Ir(1 0 0), (1 1 1), and (2 1 0) solid skins turns out the following: (i) the 4f{sub 7/2} level of an isolated Ir atom shifts from 56.367 eV to 60.332 eV by 3.965 eV upon bulk formation; (ii) the local energy density increases by up to 130% and the atomic cohesive energy decreases by 70% in the skin region compared with the bulk values. Numerical match to observation of the temperature dependent energy shift derives the Debye temperature that varies from 285.2 K (Surface) to 315.2 K (Bulk). We clarified that the shorter and stronger bonds between under-coordinated atoms cause local densification and quantum entrapment of electron binding energy, which perturbs the Hamiltonian and the core shifts in the skin region.

  14. Constraints on cosmological birefringence energy dependence from CMB polarization data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubitosi, G.; Paci, F.

    2013-01-01

    We study the possibility of constraining the energy dependence of cosmological birefringence by using CMB polarization data. We consider four possible behaviors, characteristic of different theoretical scenarios: energy-independent birefringence motivated by Chern-Simons interactions of the electromagnetic field, linear energy dependence motivated by a 'Weyl' interaction of the electromagnetic field, quadratic energy dependence, motivated by quantum gravity modifications of low-energy electrodynamics, and inverse quadratic dependence, motivated by Faraday rotation generated by primordial magnetic fields. We constrain the parameters associated to each kind of dependence and use our results to give constraints on the models mentioned. We forecast the sensitivity that Planck data will be able to achieve in this respect

  15. Binding energy and mechanical stability of single- and multi-walled carbon nanotube serpentines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Junhua; Lu, Lixin; Rabczuk, Timon

    2014-01-01

    Recently, Geblinger et al. [Nat. Nanotechnol. 3, 195 (2008)] and Machado et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 105502 (2013)] reported the experimental and molecular dynamics realization of S-like shaped single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs), the so-called CNT serpentines. We reported here results from continuum modeling of the binding energy γ between different single- and multi-walled CNT serpentines and substrates as well as the mechanical stability of the CNT serpentine formation. The critical length for the mechanical stability and adhesion of different CNT serpentines are determined in dependence of E i I i , d, and γ, where E i I i and d are the CNT bending stiffness and distance of the CNT translation period. Our continuum model is validated by comparing its solution to full-atom molecular dynamics calculations. The derived analytical solutions are of great importance for understanding the interaction mechanism between different single- and multi-walled CNT serpentines and substrates

  16. Spin assignments of nuclear levels above the neutron binding energy in $^{88}$Sr

    CERN Multimedia

    Neutron resonances reveal nuclear levels in the highly excited region of the nucleus around the neutron binding energy. Nuclear level density models are therefore usually calibrated to the number of observed levels in neutron-induced reactions. The gamma-ray cascade from the decay of the highly excited compound nucleus state to the ground state show dierences dependent on the initial spin. This results in a dierence in the multiplicity distribution which can be exploited. We propose to use the 4${\\pi}$ total absorption calorimeter (TAC) at the n TOF facility to determine the spins of resonances formed by neutrons incident on a metallic $^{87}$Sr sample by measuring the gamma multiplicity distributions for the resolved resonances. In addition we would like to use the available enriched $^{87}$Sr target for cross section measurements with the C$\\scriptscriptstyle{6}$D$\\scriptscriptstyle{6}$ detector setup.

  17. Core-level binding energy shifts in Pt Ru nanoparticles: A puzzle resolved

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewera, Adam; Zhou, Wei Ping; Hunger, Ralf; Jaegermann, Wolfram; Wieckowski, Andrzej; Yockel, Scott; Bagus, Paul S.

    2007-10-01

    Synchrotron measurements of Pt and Ru core-level binding energies, BE's, in Pt-Ru nanoparticles, as a function of Pt content, quantify earlier indications that the Pt 4f BE shift is much larger than the Ru 3d BE shift. A complementary theoretical analysis relates the BE shifts to changes in the metal-metal distances as the composition of the nanoparticle changes. We establish that the large Pt and small Ru BE shifts arise from the different response of these metals to changes in the bond distances, an unexpected result. Our results give evidence that the magnitudes of the BE shifts depend on whether the d band is open, as for Ru, or essentially filled, as for Pt.

  18. Calculation of absolute protein-ligand binding free energy using distributed replica sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodinger, Tomas; Howell, P Lynne; Pomès, Régis

    2008-10-21

    Distributed replica sampling [T. Rodinger et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2, 725 (2006)] is a simple and general scheme for Boltzmann sampling of conformational space by computer simulation in which multiple replicas of the system undergo a random walk in reaction coordinate or temperature space. Individual replicas are linked through a generalized Hamiltonian containing an extra potential energy term or bias which depends on the distribution of all replicas, thus enforcing the desired sampling distribution along the coordinate or parameter of interest regardless of free energy barriers. In contrast to replica exchange methods, efficient implementation of the algorithm does not require synchronicity of the individual simulations. The algorithm is inherently suited for large-scale simulations using shared or heterogeneous computing platforms such as a distributed network. In this work, we build on our original algorithm by introducing Boltzmann-weighted jumping, which allows moves of a larger magnitude and thus enhances sampling efficiency along the reaction coordinate. The approach is demonstrated using a realistic and biologically relevant application; we calculate the standard binding free energy of benzene to the L99A mutant of T4 lysozyme. Distributed replica sampling is used in conjunction with thermodynamic integration to compute the potential of mean force for extracting the ligand from protein and solvent along a nonphysical spatial coordinate. Dynamic treatment of the reaction coordinate leads to faster statistical convergence of the potential of mean force than a conventional static coordinate, which suffers from slow transitions on a rugged potential energy surface.

  19. Photoionization cross section and binding energy of single dopant in hollow cylindrical core/shell quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feddi, E.; El-Yadri, M.; Dujardin, F.; Restrepo, R. L.; Duque, C. A.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we have investigated the confined donor impurity in a hollow cylindrical-shell quantum dot. The charges are assumed to be completely confined to the interior of the shell with rigid walls. Within the framework of the effective-mass approximation and by using a simple variational approach, we have computed the donor binding energy as a function of the shell sizes in order to study the behavior of the electron-impurity attraction for a very small thickness. Our results show that the binding energy of a donor impurity placed at the center of cylindrical core/shell dots depends strongly on the shell size. The binding energy increases when the shell-wideness becomes smaller and shows the same behavior as in a simple cylindrical quantum dot. A special case has been studied, which corresponds to the ratio between the inner and outer radii near to one (a/b → 1) for which our model gives a non-significant behavior of the impurity binding energy. This fact implies the existence of a critical value (a/b) for which the binding energy of the donor impurity tends to the limit value of 4 effective Rydbergs as in a 2D quantum well. We also analyse the photoionization cross section considering only the in-plane incident radiation polarization. We determine its behavior as a function of photon energy, shell size, and donor position. The measurement of photoionization in such systems would be of great interest to understand the optical properties of carriers in quantum dots.

  20. Binding free energy analysis of protein-protein docking model structures by evERdock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Kazuhiro; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki; Kitao, Akio

    2018-03-14

    To aid the evaluation of protein-protein complex model structures generated by protein docking prediction (decoys), we previously developed a method to calculate the binding free energies for complexes. The method combines a short (2 ns) all-atom molecular dynamics simulation with explicit solvent and solution theory in the energy representation (ER). We showed that this method successfully selected structures similar to the native complex structure (near-native decoys) as the lowest binding free energy structures. In our current work, we applied this method (evERdock) to 100 or 300 model structures of four protein-protein complexes. The crystal structures and the near-native decoys showed the lowest binding free energy of all the examined structures, indicating that evERdock can successfully evaluate decoys. Several decoys that show low interface root-mean-square distance but relatively high binding free energy were also identified. Analysis of the fraction of native contacts, hydrogen bonds, and salt bridges at the protein-protein interface indicated that these decoys were insufficiently optimized at the interface. After optimizing the interactions around the interface by including interfacial water molecules, the binding free energies of these decoys were improved. We also investigated the effect of solute entropy on binding free energy and found that consideration of the entropy term does not necessarily improve the evaluations of decoys using the normal model analysis for entropy calculation.

  1. Energy dependence of ion guiding through nanocapillaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiessl, K.; Lemell, C.; Burgdoerfer, J.; Toekesi, K.

    2008-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. In this work, we model the transmission of Ne 7+ ions with varying kinetic energies ranging from 2 to 9 keV through Polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) nanocapillaries with a diameter of 200 nm (see Fig. 1). We have simulated the ion transmission through insulating nanocapillaries using a mean-field classical-transport theory (see Fig. 2.). Ion trajectories are propagated in the combined fields of charges deposited on the capillary wall, their polarization charges, the projectile image charge, and the macroscopic field from neighboring capillaries. The simulation avoids any freely adjustable parameters in order to be predictive and to provide qualitative insights into underlying mechanisms. We have varied projectile energy and angle of incidence and have tested different models of dielectric shielding. Best agreement with experimental data is found for dielectrically screened surfaces charges. Response and transport employs linear response only. Reasonable agreement with data could be found employing only macroscopic material parameters of PET like dielectric constant, surface and bulk conductivity

  2. Structure-dependent binding and activation of perfluorinated compounds on human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lianying [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, 18 Shuangqing Road, Beijing 100085 (China); College of Life Science, Dezhou University, Dezhou 253023 (China); Ren, Xiao-Min; Wan, Bin [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, 18 Shuangqing Road, Beijing 100085 (China); Guo, Liang-Hong, E-mail: LHGuo@rcees.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, 18 Shuangqing Road, Beijing 100085 (China)

    2014-09-15

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) have been shown to disrupt lipid metabolism and even induce cancer in rodents through activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). Lines of evidence showed that PPARα was activated by PFCs. However, the information on the binding interactions between PPARγ and PFCs and subsequent alteration of PPARγ activity is still limited and sometimes inconsistent. In the present study, in vitro binding of 16 PFCs to human PPARγ ligand binding domain (hPPARγ-LBD) and their activity on the receptor in cells were investigated. The results showed that the binding affinity was strongly dependent on their carbon number and functional group. For the eleven perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs), the binding affinity increased with their carbon number from 4 to 11, and then decreased slightly. The binding affinity of the three perfluorinated sulfonic acids (PFSAs) was stronger than their PFCA counterparts. No binding was detected for the two fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs). Circular dichroim spectroscopy showed that PFC binding induced distinctive structural change of the receptor. In dual luciferase reporter assays using transiently transfected Hep G2 cells, PFCs acted as hPPARγ agonists, and their potency correlated with their binding affinity with hPPARγ-LBD. Molecular docking showed that PFCs with different chain length bind with the receptor in different geometry, which may contribute to their differences in binding affinity and transcriptional activity. - Highlights: • Binding affinity between PFCs and PPARγ was evaluated for the first time. • The binding strength was dependent on fluorinated carbon chain and functional group. • PFC binding induced distinctive structural change of the receptor. • PFCs could act as hPPARγ agonists in Hep G2 cells.

  3. Energy dependence of opaqueness for pp collisions at high energies

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, T T

    1978-01-01

    Opaqueness of pp collisions is evaluated at three CERN-ISR energies. Comparisons with predictions of the factorisable eikonal models and the scaling hypothesis are made. It appears that results are in favour of the factorisable models. (20 refs).

  4. Effect of magnetic field on the impurity binding energy of the excited ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of external magnetic field on the excited state energies in a spherical quantum dot was studied. The impurity energy and binding energy were calculated using the variational method within the effective mass approximation and finite barrier potential. The results showed that by increasing the magnetic field, the ...

  5. Effect of magnetic field on the impurity binding energy of the excited ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The effect of external magnetic field on the excited state energies in a spher- ical quantum dot was studied. The impurity energy and binding energy were calculated using the variational method within the effective mass approximation and finite barrier potential. The results showed that by increasing the magnetic ...

  6. Heparin-independent, PF4-dependent binding of HIT antibodies to platelets: implications for HIT pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanabhan, Anand; Jones, Curtis G; Bougie, Daniel W; Curtis, Brian R; McFarland, Janice G; Wang, Demin; Aster, Richard H

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies specific for platelet factor 4 (PF4)/heparin complexes are the hallmark of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and thrombosis (HIT), but many antibody-positive patients have normal platelet counts. The basis for this is not fully understood, but it is believed that antibodies testing positive in the serotonin release assay (SRA) are the most likely to cause disease. We addressed this issue by characterizing PF4-dependent binding of HIT antibodies to intact platelets and found that most antibodies testing positive in the SRA, but none of those testing negative, bind to and activate platelets when PF4 is present without any requirement for heparin (P HIT antibodies recognize PF4 in a complex with heparin, only a subset of these antibodies recognize more subtle epitopes induced in PF4 when it binds to CS, the major platelet glycosaminoglycan. Antibodies having this property could explain "delayed HIT" seen in some individuals after discontinuation of heparin and the high risk for thrombosis that persists for weeks in patients recovered from HIT. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  7. Circadian clock protein KaiC forms ATP-dependent hexameric rings and binds DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Tetsuya; Saveliev, Sergei V; Xu, Yao; Stafford, Walter F; Cox, Michael M; Inman, Ross B; Johnson, Carl H

    2002-12-24

    KaiC from Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 (KaiC) is an essential circadian clock protein in cyanobacteria. Previous sequence analyses suggested its inclusion in the RecADnaB superfamily. A characteristic of the proteins of this superfamily is that they form homohexameric complexes that bind DNA. We show here that KaiC also forms ring complexes with a central pore that can be visualized by electron microscopy. A combination of analytical ultracentrifugation and chromatographic analyses demonstrates that these complexes are hexameric. The association of KaiC molecules into hexamers depends on the presence of ATP. The KaiC sequence does not include the obvious DNA-binding motifs found in RecA or DnaB. Nevertheless, KaiC binds forked DNA substrates. These data support the inclusion of KaiC into the RecADnaB superfamily and have important implications for enzymatic activity of KaiC in the circadian clock mechanism that regulates global changes in gene expression patterns.

  8. Calcium binding properties of calcium dependent protein kinase 1 (CaCDPK1) from Cicer arietinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Ajay Kumar; Jayabaskaran, Chelliah

    2015-05-01

    Calcium plays a crucial role as a secondary messenger in all aspects of plant growth, development and survival. Calcium dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are the major calcium decoders, which couple the changes in calcium level to an appropriate physiological response. The mechanism by which calcium regulates CDPK protein is not well understood. In this study, we investigated the interactions of Ca(2+) ions with the CDPK1 isoform of Cicer arietinum (CaCDPK1) using a combination of biophysical tools. CaCDPK1 has four different EF hands as predicted by protein sequence analysis. The fluorescence emission spectrum of CaCDPK1 showed quenching with a 5 nm red shift upon addition of calcium, indicating conformational changes in the tertiary structure. The plot of changes in intensity against calcium concentrations showed a biphasic curve with binding constants of 1.29 μM and 120 μM indicating two kinds of binding sites. Isothermal calorimetric (ITC) titration with CaCl2 also showed a biphasic curve with two binding constants of 0.027 μM and 1.7 μM. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra showed two prominent peaks at 208 and 222 nm indicating that CaCDPK1 is a α-helical rich protein. Calcium binding further increased the α-helical content of CaCDPK1 from 75 to 81%. Addition of calcium to CaCDPK1 also increased fluorescence of 8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (ANS) indicating exposure of hydrophobic surfaces. Thus, on the whole this study provides evidence for calcium induced conformational changes, exposure of hydrophobic surfaces and heterogeneity of EF hands in CaCDPK1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. SAAMBE: Webserver to Predict the Charge of Binding Free Energy Caused by Amino Acids Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petukh, Marharyta; Dai, Luogeng; Alexov, Emil

    2016-04-12

    Predicting the effect of amino acid substitutions on protein-protein affinity (typically evaluated via the change of protein binding free energy) is important for both understanding the disease-causing mechanism of missense mutations and guiding protein engineering. In addition, researchers are also interested in understanding which energy components are mostly affected by the mutation and how the mutation affects the overall structure of the corresponding protein. Here we report a webserver, the Single Amino Acid Mutation based change in Binding free Energy (SAAMBE) webserver, which addresses the demand for tools for predicting the change of protein binding free energy. SAAMBE is an easy to use webserver, which only requires that a coordinate file be inputted and the user is provided with various, but easy to navigate, options. The user specifies the mutation position, wild type residue and type of mutation to be made. The server predicts the binding free energy change, the changes of the corresponding energy components and provides the energy minimized 3D structure of the wild type and mutant proteins for download. The SAAMBE protocol performance was tested by benchmarking the predictions against over 1300 experimentally determined changes of binding free energy and a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.62 was obtained. How the predictions can be used for discriminating disease-causing from harmless mutations is discussed. The webserver can be accessed via http://compbio.clemson.edu/saambe_webserver/.

  10. Ion Binding Energies Determining Functional Transport of ClC Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tao; Guo, Xu; Zou, Xian-Wu; Sang, Jian-Ping

    2014-06-01

    The ClC-type proteins, a large family of chloride transport proteins ubiquitously expressed in biological organisms, have been extensively studied for decades. Biological function of ClC proteins can be reflected by analyzing the binding situation of Cl- ions. We investigate ion binding properties of ClC-ec1 protein with the atomic molecular dynamics simulation approach. The calculated electrostatic binding energy results indicate that Cl- at the central binding site Scen has more binding stability than the internal binding site Sint. Quantitative comparison between the latest experimental heat release data isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and our calculated results demonstrates that chloride ions prefer to bind at Scen than Sint in the wild-type ClC-ec1 structure and prefer to bind at Sext and Scen than Sint in mutant E148A/E148Q structures. Even though the chloride ions make less contribution to heat release when binding to Sint and are relatively unstable in the Cl- pathway, they are still part contributors for the Cl- functional transport. This work provides a guide rule to estimate the importance of Cl- at the binding sites and how chloride ions have influences on the function of ClC proteins.

  11. Energy-dependent inversion of p+16O scattering data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, S.G.

    1997-01-01

    A fast iterative procedure is developed to determine potentials by inversion from elastic cross section, analysing powers and reaction cross-section measurements covering a wide energy range. The procedure incorporates both energy and parity dependence. The method is applied to extensive p+ 16 O scattering data for an energy range from 27.3 to 46.1 MeV, giving a solution which simultaneously reproduces the data at all energies. The wide angle data is well reproduced by including parity dependence and a linear energy dependence is established for the real potential, including the parity-dependent component. The real terms agree qualitatively with potentials derived from the single channel RGM, but the central and spin-orbit imaginary components have distinct features strongly suggestive of further non-local contributions, possibly arising from channel coupling. The large data set is found essential to reduce the potential ambiguities present when fitting scattering data. (orig.)

  12. Polarizability and binding energy of a shallow donor in spherical quantum dot-quantum well (QD-QW)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, K.; Chrafih, Y.; M’Zred, S.; Janati, S.; Zorkani, I.; Jorio, A.; Mmadi, A.

    2018-03-01

    The polarizability and the binding energy is estimated for a shallow donor confined to move in inhomogeneous quantum dots (CdS/HgS/CdS). In this work, the Hass variational method within the effective mass approximation in used in the case of an infinitely deep well. The polarizability and the binding energy depend on the inner and the outer radius of the QDQW, also it depends strongly on the donor position. It’s found that the stark effect is more important when the impurity is located at the center of the (QDQW) and becomes less important when the donor moves toward the extremities of the spherical layer. When the electric field increases, the binding energy and the polarizability decreases. Its effects is more pronounced when the impurity is placed on the center of the spherical layer and decrease when the donor move toward extremities of this spherical layer. We have demonstrated the existence of a critical value {≤ft( {{{{R_1}} \\over {{R_2}}}} \\right)cri} which can be used to distinguish the tree dimension confinement from the spherical surface confinement and it’s may be important for the nanofabrication techniques.

  13. Accurate determination of the binding energy of the formic acid dimer: The importance of geometry relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalescky, Robert; Kraka, Elfi; Cremer, Dieter

    2014-02-01

    The formic acid dimer in its C2h-symmetrical cyclic form is stabilized by two equivalent H-bonds. The currently accepted interaction energy is 18.75 kcal/mol whereas the experimental binding energy D0 value is only 14.22 ±0.12 kcal/mol [F. Kollipost, R. W. Larsen, A. V. Domanskaya, M. Nörenberg, and M. A. Suhm, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 151101 (2012)]. Calculation of the binding energies De and D0 at the CCSD(T) (Coupled Cluster with Single and Double excitations and perturbative Triple excitations)/CBS (Complete Basis Set) level of theory, utilizing CCSD(T)/CBS geometries and the frequencies of the dimer and monomer, reveals that there is a 3.2 kcal/mol difference between interaction energy and binding energy De, which results from (i) not relaxing the geometry of the monomers upon dissociation of the dimer and (ii) approximating CCSD(T) correlation effects with MP2. The most accurate CCSD(T)/CBS values obtained in this work are De = 15.55 and D0 = 14.32 kcal/mol where the latter binding energy differs from the experimental value by 0.1 kcal/mol. The necessity of employing augmented VQZ and VPZ calculations and relaxing monomer geometries of H-bonded complexes upon dissociation to obtain reliable binding energies is emphasized.

  14. Calcium-dependent and -independent binding of the pentraxin serum amyloid P component to glycosaminoglycans and amyloid proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, B; Sørensen, I J; Nybo, Mads

    1997-01-01

    precursor protein beta2M was observed. This binding was also enhanced at slightly acid pH, most pronounced at pH 5.0. The results of this study indicate that SAP can exhibit both Ca2(+)-dependent and -independent binding to ligands involved in amyloid fibril formation and that the binding is enhanced under...... and beta2M) by ELISA. An increase in the dose-dependent binding of SAP to heparan sulfate, AA-protein and beta2M was observed as the pH decreased from 8.0 to 5.0. Furthermore, a lower, but significant Ca2(+)-independent binding of SAP to heparan sulfate, dermatan sulfate, AA protein and the amyloid...

  15. Hemin binding by Porphyromonas gingivalis strains is dependent on the presence of A-LPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangarajan, M; Aduse-Opoku, J; Paramonov, N A; Hashim, A; Curtis, M A

    2017-10-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative black pigmenting anaerobe that is unable to synthesize heme [Fe(II)-protoporphyrin IX] or hemin [Fe(III)-protoporphyrin IX-Cl], which are important growth/virulence factors, and must therefore derive them from the host. Porphyromonas gingivalis expresses several proteinaceous hemin-binding sites, which are important in the binding/transport of heme/hemin from the host. It also synthesizes several virulence factors, namely cysteine-proteases Arg- and Lys-gingipains and two lipopolysaccharides (LPS), O-LPS and A-LPS. The gingipains are required for the production of the black pigment, μ-oxo-bisheme {[Fe(III)PPIX] 2 O}, which is derived from hemoglobin and deposited on the bacterial cell-surface leading to the characteristic black colonies when grown on blood agar. In this study we investigated the role of LPS in the deposition of μ-oxo-bisheme on the cell-surface. A P. gingivalis mutant defective in the biosynthesis of Arg-gingipains, namely rgpA/rgpB, produces brown colonies on blood agar and mutants defective in Lys-gingipain (kgp) and LPS biosynthesis namely porR, waaL, wzy, and pg0129 (α-1, 3-mannosyltransferase) produce non-pigmented colonies. However, only those mutants lacking A-LPS showed reduced hemin-binding when cells in suspension were incubated with hemin. Using native, de-O-phosphorylated and de-lipidated LPS from P. gingivalis W50 and porR strains, we demonstrated that hemin-binding to O-polysaccharide (PS) and to the lipid A moiety of LPS was reduced compared with hemin-binding to A-PS. We conclude that A-LPS in the outer-membrane of P. gingivalis serves as a scaffold/anchor for the retention of μ-oxo-bisheme on the cell surface and pigmentation is dependent on the presence of A-LPS. © 2017 The Authors. Molecular Oral Microbiology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Tackling Dependency: The EU and its Energy Security Challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, Robert L.

    2007-10-15

    Europe is facing a future of augmenting energy demands, domestic depletion, high prices and other energy-political challenges. Climate change, infrastructure resilience, producers' coercive energy policy and the EU's internal market failures have put stress on the EU's emerging energy policy and inspired the union to address its challenges with greater enthusiasm than before. Some of the EU's challenges call for strategic choices of a magnitude that EU is not used to handle. The aim of this report is therefore to identify, analyse and assess the political side of Europe's energy predicament and import dependency. Against the background of increasing dependence on energy imports, the report tries to answer questions: what are the key dimensions of Europe's energy security and what are their consequences?

  17. Tackling Dependency: The EU and its Energy Security Challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, Robert L

    2007-10-15

    Europe is facing a future of augmenting energy demands, domestic depletion, high prices and other energy-political challenges. Climate change, infrastructure resilience, producers' coercive energy policy and the EU's internal market failures have put stress on the EU's emerging energy policy and inspired the union to address its challenges with greater enthusiasm than before. Some of the EU's challenges call for strategic choices of a magnitude that EU is not used to handle. The aim of this report is therefore to identify, analyse and assess the political side of Europe's energy predicament and import dependency. Against the background of increasing dependence on energy imports, the report tries to answer questions: what are the key dimensions of Europe's energy security and what are their consequences?

  18. Tackling Dependency: The EU and its Energy Security Challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, Robert L.

    2007-10-01

    Europe is facing a future of augmenting energy demands, domestic depletion, high prices and other energy-political challenges. Climate change, infrastructure resilience, producers' coercive energy policy and the EU's internal market failures have put stress on the EU's emerging energy policy and inspired the union to address its challenges with greater enthusiasm than before. Some of the EU's challenges call for strategic choices of a magnitude that EU is not used to handle. The aim of this report is therefore to identify, analyse and assess the political side of Europe's energy predicament and import dependency. Against the background of increasing dependence on energy imports, the report tries to answer questions: what are the key dimensions of Europe's energy security and what are their consequences?

  19. DNA Binding in High Salt: Analysing the Salt Dependence of Replication Protein A3 from the Halophile Haloferax volcanii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jody A. Winter

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Halophilic archaea maintain intracellular salt concentrations close to saturation to survive in high-salt environments and their cellular processes have adapted to function under these conditions. Little is known regarding halophilic adaptation of the DNA processing machinery, particularly intriguing since protein-DNA interactions are classically salt sensitive. To investigate such adaptation, we characterised the DNA-binding capabilities of recombinant RPA3 from Haloferax volcanii (HvRPA3. Under physiological salt conditions (3 M KCl, HvRPA3 is monomeric, binding 18 nucleotide ssDNA with nanomolar affinity, demonstrating that RPAs containing the single OB-fold/zinc finger architecture bind with broadly comparable affinity to two OB-fold/zinc finger RPAs. Reducing the salt concentration to 1 M KCl induces dimerisation of the protein, which retains its ability to bind DNA. On circular ssDNA, two concentration-dependent binding modes are observed. Conventionally, increased salt concentration adversely affects DNA binding but HvRPA3 does not bind DNA in 0.2 M KCl, although multimerisation may occlude the binding site. The single N-terminal OB-fold is competent to bind DNA in the absence of the C-terminal zinc finger, albeit with reduced affinity. This study represents the first quantitative characterisation of DNA binding in a halophilic protein in extreme salt concentrations.

  20. Variation in one residue associated with the metal ion-dependent adhesion site regulates αIIbβ3 integrin ligand binding affinity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Raborn

    Full Text Available The Asp of the RGD motif of the ligand coordinates with the β I domain metal ion dependent adhesion site (MIDAS divalent cation, emphasizing the importance of the MIDAS in ligand binding. There appears to be two distinct groups of integrins that differ in their ligand binding affinity and adhesion ability. These differences may be due to a specific residue associated with the MIDAS, particularly the β3 residue Ala(252 and corresponding Ala in the β1 integrin compared to the analogous Asp residue in the β2 and β7 integrins. Interestingly, mutations in the adjacent to MIDAS (ADMIDAS of integrins α4β7 and αLβ2 increased the binding and adhesion abilities compared to the wild-type, while the same mutations in the α2β1, α5β1, αVβ3, and αIIbβ3 integrins demonstrated decreased ligand binding and adhesion. We introduced a mutation in the αIIbβ3 to convert this MIDAS associated Ala(252 to Asp. By combination of this mutant with mutations of one or two ADMIDAS residues, we studied the effects of this residue on ligand binding and adhesion. Then, we performed molecular dynamics simulations on the wild-type and mutant αIIbβ3 integrin β I domains, and investigated the dynamics of metal ion binding sites in different integrin-RGD complexes. We found that the tendency of calculated binding free energies was in excellent agreement with the experimental results, suggesting that the variation in this MIDAS associated residue accounts for the differences in ligand binding and adhesion among different integrins, and it accounts for the conflicting results of ADMIDAS mutations within different integrins. This study sheds more light on the role of the MIDAS associated residue pertaining to ligand binding and adhesion and suggests that this residue may play a pivotal role in integrin-mediated cell rolling and firm adhesion.

  1. Role of Electrostatics in Protein-RNA Binding: The Global vs the Local Energy Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaemi, Zhaleh; Guzman, Irisbel; Gnutt, David; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida; Gruebele, Martin

    2017-09-14

    U1A protein-stem loop 2 RNA association is a basic step in the assembly of the spliceosomal U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein. Long-range electrostatic interactions due to the positive charge of U1A are thought to provide high binding affinity for the negatively charged RNA. Short range interactions, such as hydrogen bonds and contacts between RNA bases and protein side chains, favor a specific binding site. Here, we propose that electrostatic interactions are as important as local contacts in biasing the protein-RNA energy landscape toward a specific binding site. We show by using molecular dynamics simulations that deletion of two long-range electrostatic interactions (K22Q and K50Q) leads to mutant-specific alternative RNA bound states. One of these states preserves short-range interactions with aromatic residues in the original binding site, while the other one does not. We test the computational prediction with experimental temperature-jump kinetics using a tryptophan probe in the U1A-RNA binding site. The two mutants show the distinct predicted kinetic behaviors. Thus, the stem loop 2 RNA has multiple binding sites on a rough RNA-protein binding landscape. We speculate that the rough protein-RNA binding landscape, when biased to different local minima by electrostatics, could be one way that protein-RNA interactions evolve toward new binding sites and novel function.

  2. Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics modeling of photoelectron spectra: the carbon 1s core-electron binding energies of ethanol-water solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löytynoja, T; Niskanen, J; Jänkälä, K; Vahtras, O; Rinkevicius, Z; Ågren, H

    2014-11-20

    Using ethanol-water solutions as illustration, we demonstrate the capability of the hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) paradigm to simulate core photoelectron spectroscopy: the binding energies and the chemical shifts. An integrated approach with QM/MM binding energy calculations coupled to preceding molecular dynamics sampling is adopted to generate binding energies averaged over the solute-solvent configurations available at a particular temperature and pressure and thus allowing for a statistical assessment with confidence levels for the final binding energies. The results are analyzed in terms of the contributions in the molecular mechanics model-electrostatic, polarization, and van der Waals-with atom or bond granulation of the corresponding MM charge and polarizability force-fields. The role of extramolecular charge transfer screening of the core-hole and explicit hydrogen bonding is studied by extending the QM core to cover the first solvation shell. The results are compared to those obtained from pure electrostatic and polarizable continuum models. Particularly, the dependence of the carbon 1s binding energies with respect to the ethanol concentration is studied. Our results indicate that QM/MM can be used as an all-encompassing model to study photoelectron binding energies and chemical shifts in solvent environments.

  3. Contribution of charge symmetry breaking interactions in binding energy difference of mirror nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asghari, M.

    2006-01-01

    Nolen-Schiffer Anomaly in mirror nuclei due to the NN interactions with isospin mixing between T=0 and T=1 mesons of the same spin and parity are investigated. With the computation of coulomb energy along with the charge symmetry breaking effects provide a reasonably accurate description of binding energy differences between 39 Ca- 39 K , 41 Sc- 41 Ca mirror nuclei

  4. A random energy model for size dependence : recurrence vs. transience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Külske, Christof

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the size dependence of disordered spin models having an infinite number of Gibbs measures in the framework of a simplified 'random energy model for size dependence'. We introduce two versions (involving either independent random walks or branching processes), that can be seen as

  5. Nuclear size is sensitive to NTF2 protein levels in a manner dependent on Ran binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuković, Lidija D.; Jevtić, Predrag; Zhang, Zhaojie; Stohr, Bradley A.; Levy, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Altered nuclear size is associated with many cancers, and determining whether cancer-associated changes in nuclear size contribute to carcinogenesis necessitates an understanding of mechanisms of nuclear size regulation. Although nuclear import rates generally positively correlate with nuclear size, NTF2 levels negatively affect nuclear size, despite the role of NTF2 (also known as NUTF2) in nuclear recycling of the import factor Ran. We show that binding of Ran to NTF2 is required for NTF2 to inhibit nuclear expansion and import of large cargo molecules in Xenopus laevis egg and embryo extracts, consistent with our observation that NTF2 reduces the diameter of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) in a Ran-binding-dependent manner. Furthermore, we demonstrate that ectopic NTF2 expression in Xenopus embryos and mammalian tissue culture cells alters nuclear size. Finally, we show that increases in nuclear size during melanoma progression correlate with reduced NTF2 expression, and increasing NTF2 levels in melanoma cells is sufficient to reduce nuclear size. These results show a conserved capacity for NTF2 to impact on nuclear size, and we propose that NTF2 might be a new cancer biomarker. PMID:26823604

  6. Binding Energy and Compression Modulus of Infinite Nuclear Matter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... MeV at the normal nuclear matter saturation density consistent with the best available density-dependent potentials derived from the G-matrix approach. The results of the incompressibility modulus, k∞ is in excellent agreement with the results of other workers. Journal of the Nigerian Association of Mathematical Physics, ...

  7. Energy-dependent collisional deactivation of vibrationally excited azulene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, J.; Barker, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    Collisional energy transfer parameters for highly vibrationally excited azulene have been deduced from new infrared fluorescence (IRF) emission lifetime data with an improved calibration relating IRF intensity to vibrational energy [J. Shi, D. Bernfeld, and J. R. Barker, J. Chem. Phys. 88, XXXX (1988), preceding paper]. In addition, data from previous experiments [M. J. Rossi, J. R. Pladziewicz, and J. R. Barker, J. Chem. Phys. 78, 6695 (1983)] have been reanalyzed based on the improved calibration. Inversion of the IRF decay curves produced plots of energy decay, which were analyzed to determine , the average energy transferred per collision. Master equation simulations reproduced both the original IRF decays and the deduced energy decays. A third (simple) method of determination agrees well with the other two. The results show to be nearly directly proportional to the vibrational energy of the excited azulene from ∼8000 to 33 000 cm -1 . At high energies, there are indications that the energy dependence may be slightly reduced

  8. Equivalence between deep energy-dependent and shallow angular momentum dependent potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiedeldey, H.; Sofianos, S.A.; Papastylianos, A.; Amos, K.A.; Allen, L.J.

    1989-01-01

    Recently Baye showed that supersymmetry can be applied to determine a shallow l-dependent potential phase equivalent to a deep potential, assumed to be energy-independent and have Panli forbidden states (PFS), for α-α scattering. The PFS are eliminated by this procedure. Such deep potentials are generated as equivalent local potentials (ELP) to the Resonating Group Model (RGM) and are generally energy-dependent. To eliminate this E-dependence as required for the application of Baye's method, l-dependent, but E-independent, deep local potentials were generated by the exact inversion method of Marchenko. Subsequently, the supersymmetric method was used to eliminate the PFS, ensuring that the generalized Levinson theorem is satisfied. As an example, the method was applied to the simple model of two dineutrons scattering in the RGM, where the deep ELP of Horiuchi has a substantial energy-dependence and one PFS only for l=O. 16 refs., 5 figs

  9. Role of renewable energy policies in energy dependency in Finland: System dynamics approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslani, Alireza; Helo, Petri; Naaranoja, Marja

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A system dynamics model for evaluating renewable energy policies on dependency is proposed. • The model considers the role of diversification on dependency and security of energy supply in Finland. • Dependency on imported sources will decrease depends on the defined scenarios in Finland. - Abstract: Objective: We discuss the role of diversification on dependency and security of energy supply. A system dynamics model with especial focus on the role of renewable energy resources (as a portfolio) on Finland’s energy dependency is developed. The purpose is also to cover a part of research gap exists in the system dynamics modeling of energy security investigations. Methods: A causal loops diagram and a system dynamics model evaluate Finnish scenarios of renewable energy policies. The analysis describes the relationship between dynamic factors such as RE encouragement packages, dependency, and energy demand. Results: A causal loops diagram and a system dynamics model evaluate three different Finnish scenarios of renewable energy policies by 2020. Conclusion: Analysis shows that despite 7% electricity/heat consumption growth by 2020 in Finland, dependency on imported sources will decrease between 1% and 7% depend on the defined scenarios. Practice Implications: The proposed model not only helps decision makers to test their scenarios related to renewable energy polices, it can be implemented by other countries

  10. Polaron binding energy and effective mass in the GaAs film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Zhenhua; Yan Liangxing; Tian Qiang; Li Hua; Liu Bingcan

    2012-01-01

    The binding energy and effective mass of a polaron in a GaAs film deposited on the Al 0.3 Ga 0.7 As substrate are studied theoretically by using the fractional-dimensional space approach. Our calculations show that the polaron binding energy and mass shift decrease monotonously with increasing the film thickness. For the film thicknesses with L w ≤ 70Å and the substrate thicknesses with L b ≤ 200Å, the different values of the substrate thickness influence the polaron binding energy and mass shift in the GaAs film. The polaron binding energy and mass shift increase monotonously with increasing the substrate thickness. For the film thickness with L w ≥ 70Å or the substrate thicknesses with L b ≤ 200Å, the different values of the substrate thickness have no significant influence on the polaron binding energy and mass shift in the GaAs film deposited on the Al 0.3 Ga 0.7 As substrate.

  11. BFEE: A User-Friendly Graphical Interface Facilitating Absolute Binding Free-Energy Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Haohao; Gumbart, James C; Chen, Haochuan; Shao, Xueguang; Cai, Wensheng; Chipot, Christophe

    2018-03-26

    Quantifying protein-ligand binding has attracted the attention of both theorists and experimentalists for decades. Many methods for estimating binding free energies in silico have been reported in recent years. Proper use of the proposed strategies requires, however, adequate knowledge of the protein-ligand complex, the mathematical background for deriving the underlying theory, and time for setting up the simulations, bookkeeping, and postprocessing. Here, to minimize human intervention, we propose a toolkit aimed at facilitating the accurate estimation of standard binding free energies using a geometrical route, coined the binding free-energy estimator (BFEE), and introduced it as a plug-in of the popular visualization program VMD. Benefitting from recent developments in new collective variables, BFEE can be used to generate the simulation input files, based solely on the structure of the complex. Once the simulations are completed, BFEE can also be utilized to perform the post-treatment of the free-energy calculations, allowing the absolute binding free energy to be estimated directly from the one-dimensional potentials of mean force in simulation outputs. The minimal amount of human intervention required during the whole process combined with the ergonomic graphical interface makes BFEE a very effective and practical tool for the end-user.

  12. Binding-dependent disorder-order transition in PKI alpha: a fluorescence anisotropy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauer, J A; Taylor, S S; Johnson, D A

    1999-05-25

    The conformational flexibility of peptidyl ligands may be an essential element of many peptide-macromolecular interactions. Consequently, the alpha-carbonyl backbone flexibility of the 8 kDa protein kinase inhibitor (PKI alpha) peptide of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (cAPK) free in solution and bound to cAPK was assessed by time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy. Specifically, three full-length, single-site PKI alpha mutants (V3C, S28C, and S59C) were prepared, and fluorescein iodoacetamide (FI) was selectively conjugated to the side chains of each substituted cysteine. The time-resolved anisotropy decay profiles of the labeled mutants were well fit to a model-free nonassociative biexponential equation. Free in solution, the three labeled proteins had very similar anisotropy decays arising primarily from local alpha-carbonyl backbone movements. Only a small fraction of the anisotropy decay was associated with slower, whole-body tumbling, confirming that PKI alpha is highly disordered at all three locations. Complexation of the mutants with the catalytic (C) subunit of cAPK decreased the rate of whole-body tumbling for all three mutants. The effects on the rapid decay processes, however, were dependent upon the site of conjugation. The anisotropy decay profiles of both FI-V3C- and FI-S28C-PKI alpha were associated with significantly reduced contributions from the fast decay processes, while that of FI-S59C-PKI alpha was largely unaffected by binding to the C-subunit. The results suggest that the cAPK-binding domain of PKI alpha extends from the its N-terminus to residues beyond Ser28 but does not include the segment around Ser59, which is still part of a highly flexible domain when bound to the C-subunit.

  13. Temperature dependence and GABA modulation of [3H]triazolam binding in the rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earle, M.E.; Concas, A.; Wamsley, J.K.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1987-01-01

    The hypnotic triazolam (TZ), a triazolobenzodiazepine displays a short physiological half life and has been used for the treatment of insomnia related to anxiety states. The authors major objectives were the direct measurement of the temperature dependence and the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) effect of [ 3 H]TZ binding in the rat brain. Saturation studies showed a shift to lower affinity with increasing temperatures (K/sub d/ = 0.27 +/- 08 nM at 0 0 C; K/sub d/ = 1.96 +/- 0.85 nM at 37 0 C) while the B/sub max/ values remained unchanged (1220 +/- 176 fmoles/mg protein at 0 0 C and 1160 +/- 383 fmoles/mg protein at 37 0 C). Saturation studies of [ 3 H]TZ binding in the presence or absence of GABA (100μM) showed a GABA-shift. At 0 0 C the K/sub d/ values were (K/sub d/ = 0.24 +/- 0.03 nM/-GABA; K/sub d/ = 0.16 +/- 0.04/+GABA) and at 37 0 C the K/sub d/ values were (K/sub d/ = 1.84 +/- 0.44 nM/-GABA; K/sub d/ = 0.95 +/- 0.29 nM/+GABA). In contrast to reported literature, the authors findings show that TZ interacts with benzodiazepine receptors with a temperature dependence and GABA-shift consistent with predicted behavior for benzodiazepine agonists. 20 references, 3 tables

  14. Energy-dependent point interactions in one dimension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutinho, F A B; Nogami, Y; Tomio, Lauro; Toyama, F M

    2005-01-01

    We consider a new type of point interaction in one-dimensional quantum mechanics. It is characterized by a boundary condition at the origin that involves the second and/or higher order derivatives of the wavefunction. The interaction is effectively energy dependent. It leads to a unitary S-matrix for the transmission-reflection problem. The energy dependence of the interaction can be chosen such that any given unitary S-matrix (or the transmission and reflection coefficients) can be reproduced at all energies. Generalization of the results to coupled-channel cases is discussed

  15. Study of excitation energy dependence of nuclear level density parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanto, G.; Nayak, B.K.; Saxena, A.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we have populated CN by fusion reaction and excitation energy of the intermediate nuclei is determined after first chance α-emission to investigate excitation energy dependence of the NLD parameter. Evaporated neutron spectra were measured following alpha evaporation for obtaining NLD parameter for the reaction 11 B + 197 Au, populating CN 208 Po. This CN after evaporating an α-particle populates intermediate nucleus 204 Pb. The 204 Pb has magic number of Z=82. Our aim is to study the excitation energy dependence of NLD parameter for closed shell nuclei

  16. Lanthanide 4f-electron binding energies and the nephelauxetic effect in wide band gap compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorenbos, Pieter

    2013-01-01

    Employing data from luminescence spectroscopy, the inter 4f-electron Coulomb repulsion energy U(6, A) in Eu 2+/3+ impurities together with the 5d-centroid energy shift ϵ c (1,3+,A) in Ce 3+ impurities in 40 different fluoride, chloride, bromide, iodide, oxide, sulfide, and nitride compounds has been determined. This work demonstrates that the chemical environment A affects the two energies in a similar fashion; a fashion that follows the anion nephelauxetic sequence F, O, Cl, Br, N, I, S, Se. One may then calculate U(6, A) from well established and accurate ϵ c (1,3+,A) values which are then used as input to the chemical shift model proposed in Dorenbos (2012) [19]. As output it provides the chemical shift of 4f-electron binding energy and therewith the 4f-electron binding energy relative to the vacuum energy. In addition this method provides a tool to routinely establish the binding energy of electrons at the top of the valence band (work function) and the bottom of the conduction band (electron affinity) throughout the entire family of inorganic compounds. How the electronic structure of the compound and lanthanide impurities therein change with type of compound and type of lanthanide is demonstrated. -- Highlights: ► A relationship between 5d centroid shift and 4f-electron Coulomb repulsion energy is established. ► Information on the absolute 4f-electron binding energy of lanthanides in 40 compounds is provided. ► A new tool to determine absolute binding energies of electrons in valence and conduction bands is demonstrated

  17. DEPENDENCE OF ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND COST OF PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Sklyarov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Economic systems exist on condition of receipt and spending of energy. Energy consumption is a necessary condition for the existence and functioning of the economic systems of any scale: macroeconomics, microeconomics, regional economy or the world economy.The economic system operates on the scale at which it is able to produce energy and get access to energy. Moreover, receipt and consumption of energy in the operation of the economic system is mainly determined by, the level of energy production from energy sources, since this level is determined by the level of energy consumption by industries and enterprises of the economy.Currently, the economic system does not produce energy in reserve. Thus, the question of energy effi ciency and energy saving was always acute.The article describes the energy efficiency and energy saving effect on the cost of production. Were used two methods: “costs and release” matrix and “price - value added” matrix. The result is the equation of dependence of energy efficiency and costs.

  18. Formation Mechanism and Binding Energy for Body-Centred Regular Icosahedral Structure of Li13 Cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Weina; Li Ping; Gou Qingquan; Zhao Yanping

    2008-01-01

    The formation mechanism for the body-centred regular icosahedral structure of Li 13 cluster is proposed. The curve of the total energy versus the separation R between the nucleus at the centre and nuclei at the apexes for this structure of Li 13 has been calculated by using the method of Gou's modified arrangement channel quantum mechanics (MACQM). The result shows that the curve has a minimal energy of -96.951 39 a.u. at R = 5.46a 0 . When R approaches to infinity, the total energy of thirteen lithium atoms has the value of -96.564 38 a.u. So the binding energy of Li 13 with respect to thirteen lithium atoms is 0.387 01 a.u. Therefore the binding energy per atom for Li 13 is 0.029 77 a.u. or 0.810 eV, which is greater than the binding energy per atom of 0.453 eV for Li 2 , 0.494 eV for Li 3 , 0.7878 eV for Li 4 , 0.632 eV for Li 5 , and 0.674 eV for Li 7 calculated by us previously. This means that the Li 13 cluster may be formed stably in a body-centred regular icosahedral structure with a greater binding energy

  19. Binding energies of hypernuclei and Λ-nuclear interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodmer, A.R.; Usmani, Q.N.

    1984-01-01

    Variational calculations indicate that a reasonable description of Λp scattering and of Λ separation energies can be obtained in terms of ΛN plus dispersive and TPE ΛNN forces. Results for the ΛΛ interaction and for 6 /sub Λ/He obtained from an analysis of 10 /sub ΛΛ/Be are discussed. Coulomb and ΛN charge symmetry breaking effects in the A = 4 hypernuclei are discussed

  20. Towards Automated Binding Affinity Prediction Using an Iterative Linear Interaction Energy Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Ruben Vosmeer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Binding affinity prediction of potential drugs to target and off-target proteins is an essential asset in drug development. These predictions require the calculation of binding free energies. In such calculations, it is a major challenge to properly account for both the dynamic nature of the protein and the possible variety of ligand-binding orientations, while keeping computational costs tractable. Recently, an iterative Linear Interaction Energy (LIE approach was introduced, in which results from multiple simulations of a protein-ligand complex are combined into a single binding free energy using a Boltzmann weighting-based scheme. This method was shown to reach experimental accuracy for flexible proteins while retaining the computational efficiency of the general LIE approach. Here, we show that the iterative LIE approach can be used to predict binding affinities in an automated way. A workflow was designed using preselected protein conformations, automated ligand docking and clustering, and a (semi-automated molecular dynamics simulation setup. We show that using this workflow, binding affinities of aryloxypropanolamines to the malleable Cytochrome P450 2D6 enzyme can be predicted without a priori knowledge of dominant protein-ligand conformations. In addition, we provide an outlook for an approach to assess the quality of the LIE predictions, based on simulation outcomes only.

  1. Energy-dependent effects of resveratrol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrigal-Perez, Luis Alberto; Canizal-Garcia, Melina; González-Hernández, Juan Carlos; Reynoso-Camacho, Rosalia; Nava, Gerardo M; Ramos-Gomez, Minerva

    2016-06-01

    The metabolic effects induced by resveratrol have been associated mainly with the consumption of high-calorie diets; however, its effects with standard or low-calorie diets remain unclear. To better understand the interactions between resveratrol and cellular energy levels, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model. Herein it is shown that resveratrol: (a) decreased cell viability in an energy-dependent manner; (b) lessening of cell viability occurred specifically when cells were under cellular respiration; and (c) inhibition of oxygen consumption in state 4 occurred at low and standard energy levels, whereas at high energy levels oxygen consumption was promoted. These findings indicate that the effects of resveratrol are dependent on the cellular energy status and linked to metabolic respiration. Importantly, our study also revealed that S. cerevisiae is a suitable and useful model to elucidate the molecular targets of resveratrol under different nutritional statuses. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Limit on possible energy-dependent velocities for massless particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haines, T.J.; Alexandreas, D.E.; Allen, R.C.; Biller, S.; Berley, D.; Burman, R.L.; Cady, D.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Dingus, B.L.; Dion, G.M.; Ellsworth, R.W.; Goodman, J.A.; Hoffman, C.M.; Lloyd-Evans, J.; Nagle, D.E.; Potter, M.; Sandberg, V.D.; Wilkinson, C.A.; Yodh, G.B.

    1990-01-01

    A basic tenet of special relativity is that all massless particles travel at a constant, energy-independent velocity. Astrophysical data, including observation of the Crab pulsar at ∼100 MeV and the recent detection of the pulsar in Hercules X-1 at energies ≥100 TeV, are used to place new experimental constraints on energy-dependent deviations from constant velocity for massless particles. Previous experiments reached energies ∼10 GeV; this analysis improves the previous constraints by 7 orders of magnitude

  3. Distribution of binding energies of a water molecule in the water liquid-vapor interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chempath, Shaji [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pratt, Lawrence R [TULANE UNIV

    2008-01-01

    Distributions of binding energies of a water molecule in the water liquid-vapor interface are obtained on the basis of molecular simulation with the SPC/E model of water. These binding energies together with the observed interfacial density profile are used to test a minimally conditioned Gaussian quasi-chemical statistical thermodynamic theory. Binding energy distributions for water molecules in that interfacial region clearly exhibit a composite structure. A minimally conditioned Gaussian quasi-chemical model that is accurate for the free energy of bulk liquid water breaks down for water molecules in the liquid-vapor interfacial region. This breakdown is associated with the fact that this minimally conditioned Gaussian model would be inaccurate for the statistical thermodynamics of a dilute gas. Aggressive conditioning greatly improves the performance of that Gaussian quasi-chemical model. The analogy between the Gaussian quasi-chemical model and dielectric models of hydration free energies suggests that naive dielectric models without the conditioning features of quasi-chemical theory will be unreliable for these interfacial problems. Multi-Gaussian models that address the composite nature of the binding energy distributions observed in the interfacial region might provide a mechanism for correcting dielectric models for practical applications.

  4. Energy drink consumption and increased risk for alcohol dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arria, Amelia M; Caldeira, Kimberly M; Kasperski, Sarah J; Vincent, Kathryn B; Griffiths, Roland R; O'Grady, Kevin E

    2011-02-01

    Energy drinks are highly caffeinated beverages that are increasingly consumed by young adults. Prior research has established associations between energy drink use and heavier drinking and alcohol-related problems among college students. This study investigated the extent to which energy drink use might pose additional risk for alcohol dependence over and above that from known risk factors. Data were collected via personal interview from 1,097 fourth-year college students sampled from 1 large public university as part of an ongoing longitudinal study. Alcohol dependence was assessed according to DSM-IV criteria. After adjustment for the sampling design, 51.3%(wt) of students were classified as "low-frequency" energy drink users (1 to 51 days in the past year) and 10.1%(wt) as "high-frequency" users (≥52 days). Typical caffeine consumption varied widely depending on the brand consumed. Compared to the low-frequency group, high-frequency users drank alcohol more frequently (141.6 vs. 103.1 days) and in higher quantities (6.15 vs. 4.64 drinks/typical drinking day). High-frequency users were at significantly greater risk for alcohol dependence relative to both nonusers (AOR = 2.40, 95% CI = 1.27 to 4.56, p = 0.007) and low-frequency users (AOR = 1.86, 95% CI = 1.10, 3.14, p = 0.020), even after holding constant demographics, typical alcohol consumption, fraternity/sorority involvement, depressive symptoms, parental history of alcohol/drug problems, and childhood conduct problems. Low-frequency energy drink users did not differ from nonusers on their risk for alcohol dependence. Weekly or daily energy drink consumption is strongly associated with alcohol dependence. Further research is warranted to understand the possible mechanisms underlying this association. College students who frequently consume energy drinks represent an important target population for alcohol prevention. Copyright © 2010 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  5. A fluorescence polarization binding assay to identify inhibitors of flavin-dependent monooxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jun; Kizjakina, Karina; Robinson, Reeder; Tolani, Karishma; Sobrado, Pablo

    2012-06-01

    N-Hydroxylating monooxygenases (NMOs) are essential for pathogenesis in fungi and bacteria. NMOs catalyze the hydroxylation of sine and ornithine in the biosynthesis of hydroxamate-containing siderophores. Inhibition of kynurenine monooxygenase (KMO), which catalyzes the conversion of kynurenine to 3-hydroxykynurenine, alleviates neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's and Alzheimer's diseases and brain infections caused by the parasite Trypanosoma brucei. These enzymes are examples of flavin-dependent monooxygenases, which are validated drug targets. Here, we describe the development and optimization of a fluorescence polarization assay to identify potential inhibitors of flavin-dependent monooxygenases. Fluorescently labeled ADP molecules were synthesized and tested. An ADP-TAMRA chromophore bound to KMO with a K(d) value of 0.60 ± 0.05 μM and to the NMOs from Aspergillus fumigatus and Mycobacterium smegmatis with K(d) values of 2.1 ± 0.2 and 4.0 ± 0.2 μM, respectively. The assay was tested in competitive binding experiments with substrates and products of KMO and an NMO. Furthermore, we show that this assay can be used to identify inhibitors of NMOs. A Z' factor of 0.77 was calculated, and we show that the assay exhibits good tolerance to temperature, incubation time, and dimethyl sulfoxide concentration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Biexciton binding energy in ZnSe quantum wells and quantum wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Hans-Peter; Langbein, Wolfgang; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2002-01-01

    The biexciton binding energy E-XX is investigated in ZnSe/ZnMgSe quantum wells and quantum wires as a function of the lateral confinement by transient four-wave mixing. In the quantum wells one observes for decreasing well width a significant increase in the relative binding energy, saturating...... for well widths less than 8 nm. In the quantum wires an increase of 30% is found in the smallest quantum wire structures compared to the corresponding quantum well value. A simple analytical model taking into account the quantum confinement in these low-dimensional systems is used to explain...

  7. Simple method for determining binding energies of fullerene and complex atomic negative ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felfli, Zineb; Msezane, Alfred

    2017-04-01

    A robust potential which embeds fully the vital core polarization interaction has been used in the Regge pole method to explore low-energy electron scattering from C60, Eu and Nb through the total cross sections (TCSs) calculations. From the characteristic dramatically sharp resonances in the TCSs manifesting negative ion formation in these systems, we extracted the binding energies for the C60, Euand Nbanions they are found to be in outstanding agreement with the measured electron affinities of C60, Eu and Nb. Common among these considered systems, including the standard atomic Au is the formation of their ground state negative ions at the second Ramsauer-Townsend (R-T) minima of their TCSs. Indeed, this is a signature of all the fullerenes and complex atoms considered thus far. Shape resonances, R-T minima and binding energies of the resultant anions are presented. This work was supported by U.S. DOE, Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Energy Research.

  8. Structure-based prediction of free energy changes of binding of PTP1B inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Ling Chan, Shek; Ramnarayan, Kal

    2003-08-01

    The goals were (1) to understand the driving forces in the binding of small molecule inhibitors to the active site of PTP1B and (2) to develop a molecular mechanics-based empirical free energy function for compound potency prediction. A set of compounds with known activities was docked onto the active site. The related energy components and molecular surface areas were calculated. The bridging water molecules were identified and their contributions were considered. Linear relationships were explored between the above terms and the binding free energies of compounds derived based on experimental inhibition constants. We found that minimally three terms are required to give rise to a good correlation (0.86) with predictive power in five-group cross-validation test (q2 = 0.70). The dominant terms are the electrostatic energy and non-electrostatic energy stemming from the intra- and intermolecular interactions of solutes and from those of bridging water molecules in complexes.

  9. Mechanistic Inferences from the Binding of Ligands to LpxC, A Metal-Dependent Deacetylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gennadios, H.; Whittington, D.; Li, X.; Fierke, C.; Christianson, D.

    2006-01-01

    The metal-dependent deacetylase LpxC catalyzes the first committed step of lipid A biosynthesis in Gram-negative bacteria. Accordingly, LpxC is an attractive target for the development of inhibitors that may serve as potential new antibiotics for the treatment of Gram-negative bacterial infections. Here, we report the 2.7 Angstroms resolution X-ray crystal structure of LpxC complexed with the substrate analogue inhibitor TU-514 and the 2.0 Angstroms resolution structure of LpxC complexed with imidazole. The X-ray crystal structure of LpxC complexed with TU-514 allows for a detailed examination of the coordination geometry of the catalytic zinc ion and other enzyme-inhibitor interactions in the active site. The hydroxamate group of TU-514 forms a bidentate chelate complex with the zinc ion and makes hydrogen bond interactions with conserved active site residues E78, H265, and T191. The inhibitor C-4 hydroxyl group makes direct hydrogen bond interactions with E197 and H58. Finally, the C-3 myristate moiety of the inhibitor binds in the hydrophobic tunnel of the active site. These intermolecular interactions provide a foundation for understanding structural aspects of enzyme-substrate and enzyme-inhibitor affinity. Comparison of the TU-514 complex with cacodylate and imidazole complexes suggests a possible substrate diphosphate binding site and highlights residues that may stabilize the tetrahedral intermediate and its flanking transition states in catalysis. Evidence of a catalytic zinc ion in the native zinc enzyme coordinated by H79, H238, D242, and two water molecules with square pyramidal geometry is also presented. These results suggest that the native state of this metallohydrolase may contain a pentacoordinate zinc ion, which contrasts with the native states of archetypical zinc hydrolases such as thermolysin and carboxypeptidase A

  10. Calcium ion binding properties of Medicago truncatula calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swainsbury, David J K; Zhou, Liang; Oldroyd, Giles E D; Bornemann, Stephen

    2012-09-04

    A calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is essential in the interpretation of calcium oscillations in plant root cells for the establishment of symbiotic relationships with rhizobia and mycorrhizal fungi. Some of its properties have been studied in detail, but its calcium ion binding properties and subsequent conformational change have not. A biophysical approach was taken with constructs comprising either the visinin-like domain of Medicago truncatula CCaMK, which contains EF-hand motifs, or this domain together with the autoinhibitory domain. The visinin-like domain binds three calcium ions, leading to a conformational change involving the exposure of hydrophobic surfaces and a change in tertiary but not net secondary or quaternary structure. The affinity for calcium ions of visinin-like domain EF-hands 1 and 2 (K(d) = 200 ± 50 nM) was appropriate for the interpretation of calcium oscillations (~125-850 nM), while that of EF-hand 3 (K(d) ≤ 20 nM) implied occupancy at basal calcium ion levels. Calcium dissociation rate constants were determined for the visinin-like domain of CCaMK, M. truncatula calmodulin 1, and the complex between these two proteins (the slowest of which was 0.123 ± 0.002 s(-1)), suggesting the corresponding calcium association rate constants were at or near the diffusion-limited rate. In addition, the dissociation of calmodulin from the protein complex was shown to be on the same time scale as the dissociation of calcium ions. These observations suggest that the formation and dissociation of the complex between calmodulin and CCaMK would substantially mirror calcium oscillations, which typically have a 90 s periodicity.

  11. Feline leukemia virus infection requires a post-receptor binding envelope-dependent cellular component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Naveen; Thickett, Kelly R; Na, Hong; Leung, Cherry; Tailor, Chetankumar S

    2011-12-01

    Gammaretrovirus receptors have been suggested to contain the necessary determinants to mediate virus binding and entry. Here, we show that murine NIH 3T3 and baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells overexpressing receptors for subgroup A, B, and C feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) are weakly susceptible (10(1) to 10(2) CFU/ml) to FeLV pseudotype viruses containing murine leukemia virus (MLV) core (Gag-Pol) proteins, whereas FeLV receptor-expressing murine Mus dunni tail fibroblast (MDTF) cells are highly susceptible (10(4) to 10(6) CFU/ml). However, NIH 3T3 cells expressing the FeLV subgroup B receptor PiT1 are highly susceptible to gibbon ape leukemia virus pseudotype virus, which differs from the FeLV pseudotype viruses only in the envelope protein. FeLV resistance is not caused by a defect in envelope binding, low receptor expression levels, or N-linked glycosylation. Resistance is not alleviated by substitution of the MLV core in the FeLV pseudotype virus with FeLV core proteins. Interestingly, FeLV resistance is alleviated by fusion of receptor-expressing NIH 3T3 and BHK cells with MDTF or human TE671 cells, suggesting the absence of an additional cellular component in NIH 3T3 and BHK cells that is required for FeLV infection. The putative FeLV-specific cellular component is not a secreted factor, as MDTF conditioned medium does not alleviate the block to FeLV infection. Together, our findings suggest that FeLV infection requires an additional envelope-dependent cellular component that is absent in NIH 3T3 and BHK cells but that is present in MDTF and TE671 cells.

  12. Energy based model for temperature dependent behavior of ferromagnetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sah, Sanjay; Atulasimha, Jayasimha

    2017-01-01

    An energy based model for temperature dependent anhysteretic magnetization curves of ferromagnetic materials is proposed and benchmarked against experimental data. This is based on the calculation of macroscopic magnetic properties by performing an energy weighted average over all possible orientations of the magnetization vector. Most prior approaches that employ this method are unable to independently account for the effect of both inhomogeneity and temperature in performing the averaging necessary to model experimental data. Here we propose a way to account for both effects simultaneously and benchmark the model against experimental data from ~5 K to ~300 K for two different materials in both annealed (fewer inhomogeneities) and deformed (more inhomogeneities) samples. This demonstrates that this framework is well suited to simulate temperature dependent experimental magnetic behavior. - Highlights: • Energy based model for temperature dependent ferromagnetic behavior. • Simultaneously accounts for effect of temperature and inhomogeneities. • Benchmarked against experimental data from 5 K to 300 K.

  13. Energy dependence on the electric activities of a neuron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Xin-Lin; Ma Jun; Jin Wu-Yin

    2015-01-01

    A nonlinear circuit can be designed by using inductor, resistor, capacitor and other electric devices, and the electromagnetic field energy can be released from the circuit in the oscillating state. The generation of spikes or bursting states in neurons could be energetically a costly process. Based on the Helmholtz’s theorem, a Hamilton energy function is defined to detect the energy shift induced by transition of electric modes in a Hindmarsh–Rose neuron. It is found that the energy storage is dependent on the external forcing, and energy release is associated with the electric mode. As a result, the bursting state and chaotic state could be helpful to release the energy in the neuron quickly. (paper)

  14. The dielectric environment dependent exchange self-energy of the energy structure in graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, C.H.; Xu, W.

    2010-01-01

    We theoretically calculate the energy dispersion in the presence of the screened exchange self-energy in extrinsic monolayer graphene. It is found that the exchange self-energy enhances the renormalized Fermi velocity. With decreasing the dielectric constant, the screening effect and the electron correlation effect increase which induces the Fermi velocity increasing. The screened exchange energy has an energy shift at the Dirac points. The self-energy from the valance band carriers gives the main contribution to the effective energy. We also discuss the electron density dependence of the self-energy.

  15. The dielectric environment dependent exchange self-energy of the energy structure in graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, C.H., E-mail: chyang@nuist.edu.c [Faculty of Maths and Physics, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044 (China); Xu, W. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2010-10-01

    We theoretically calculate the energy dispersion in the presence of the screened exchange self-energy in extrinsic monolayer graphene. It is found that the exchange self-energy enhances the renormalized Fermi velocity. With decreasing the dielectric constant, the screening effect and the electron correlation effect increase which induces the Fermi velocity increasing. The screened exchange energy has an energy shift at the Dirac points. The self-energy from the valance band carriers gives the main contribution to the effective energy. We also discuss the electron density dependence of the self-energy.

  16. GTP-dependent binding and nuclear transport of RNA polymerase II by Npa3 protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staresincic, Lidija; Walker, Jane; Dirac-Svejstrup, A Barbara

    2011-01-01

    in yeast extracts. Indeed, Npa3 depletion in vivo affects nuclear localization of RNAPII; the polymerase accumulates in the cytoplasm. Npa3 is a member of the GPN-LOOP family of GTPases. Npa3 mutants that either cannot bind GTP or that bind but cannot hydrolyze it are inviable and unable to support nuclear...... transport of RNAPII. Surprisingly, we were unable to detect interactions between Npa3 and proteins in the classical importin a/ß pathway for nuclear import. Interestingly, Npa3-RNAPII binding is significantly increased by the addition of GTP or its slowly hydrolyzable analogue guanosine 5'-3-O......-(thio)triphosphate (GTP¿S). Moreover, the Npa3 mutant that binds GTP, but cannot hydrolyze it, binds RNAPII even in the absence of added GTP, whereas the mutant that cannot bind GTP is unable to bind the polymerase. Together, our data suggest that Npa3 defines an unconventional pathway for nuclear import of RNAPII, which...

  17. Normalization of energy-dependent gamma survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whicker, Randy; Chambers, Douglas

    2015-05-01

    Instruments and methods for normalization of energy-dependent gamma radiation survey data to a less energy-dependent basis of measurement are evaluated based on relevant field data collected at 15 different sites across the western United States along with a site in Mongolia. Normalization performance is assessed relative to measurements with a high-pressure ionization chamber (HPIC) due to its "flat" energy response and accurate measurement of the true exposure rate from both cosmic and terrestrial radiation. While analytically ideal for normalization applications, cost and practicality disadvantages have increased demand for alternatives to the HPIC. Regression analysis on paired measurements between energy-dependent sodium iodide (NaI) scintillation detectors (5-cm by 5-cm crystal dimensions) and the HPIC revealed highly consistent relationships among sites not previously impacted by radiological contamination (natural sites). A resulting generalized data normalization factor based on the average sensitivity of NaI detectors to naturally occurring terrestrial radiation (0.56 nGy hHPIC per nGy hNaI), combined with the calculated site-specific estimate of cosmic radiation, produced reasonably accurate predictions of HPIC readings at natural sites. Normalization against two to potential alternative instruments (a tissue-equivalent plastic scintillator and energy-compensated NaI detector) did not perform better than the sensitivity adjustment approach at natural sites. Each approach produced unreliable estimates of HPIC readings at radiologically impacted sites, though normalization against the plastic scintillator or energy-compensated NaI detector can address incompatibilities between different energy-dependent instruments with respect to estimation of soil radionuclide levels. The appropriate data normalization method depends on the nature of the site, expected duration of the project, survey objectives, and considerations of cost and practicality.

  18. Cu(II) bis(thiosemicarbazone) radiopharmaceutical binding to serum albumin: further definition of species dependence and associated substituent effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basken, Nathan E.; Green, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The pyruvaldehyde bis(N 4 -methylthiosemicarbazonato)copper(II) (Cu-PTSM) and diacetyl bis(N 4 -methylthiosemicarbazonato)copper(II) (Cu-ATSM) radiopharmaceuticals exhibit strong, species-dependent binding to the IIA site of human serum albumin (HSA), while the related ethylglyoxal bis(thiosemicarbazonato)copper(II) (Cu-ETS) radiopharmaceutical appears to exhibit only nonspecific binding to HSA and animal serum albumins. Methods: To further probe the structural basis for the species dependence of this albumin binding interaction, we examined protein binding of these three radiopharmaceuticals in solutions of albumin and/or serum from a broader array of mammalian species (rat, sheep, donkey, rabbit, cow, pig, dog, baboon, mouse, cat and elephant). We also evaluated the albumin binding of several copper(II) bis(thiosemicarbazone) chelates offering more diverse substitution of the ligand backbone. Results: Cu-PTSM and Cu-ATSM exhibit a strong interaction with HSA that is not apparent with the albumins of other species, while the binding of Cu-ETS to albumin is much less species dependent. The strong interaction of Cu-PTSM with HSA does not appear to simply correlate with variation, relative to the animal albumins, of a single amino acid lining HSA's IIA site. Those agents that selectively interact with HSA share the common feature of only methyl or hydrogen substitution at the carbon atoms of the diimine fragment of the ligand backbone. Conclusions: The interspecies variations in albumin binding of Cu-PTSM and Cu-ATSM are not simply explained by unique amino acid substitutions in the IIA binding pocket of the serum albumins. However, the specific affinity for this region of HSA is disrupted when substituents bulkier than a methyl group appear on the imine carbons of the copper bis(thiosemicarbazone) chelate.

  19. Cu(II) bis(thiosemicarbazone) radiopharmaceutical binding to serum albumin: further definition of species dependence and associated substituent effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basken, Nathan E. [Division of Nuclear Pharmacy, Department of Industrial and Physical Pharmacy, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Green, Mark A. [Division of Nuclear Pharmacy, Department of Industrial and Physical Pharmacy, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)], E-mail: magreen@purdue.edu

    2009-07-15

    Introduction: The pyruvaldehyde bis(N{sup 4}-methylthiosemicarbazonato)copper(II) (Cu-PTSM) and diacetyl bis(N{sup 4}-methylthiosemicarbazonato)copper(II) (Cu-ATSM) radiopharmaceuticals exhibit strong, species-dependent binding to the IIA site of human serum albumin (HSA), while the related ethylglyoxal bis(thiosemicarbazonato)copper(II) (Cu-ETS) radiopharmaceutical appears to exhibit only nonspecific binding to HSA and animal serum albumins. Methods: To further probe the structural basis for the species dependence of this albumin binding interaction, we examined protein binding of these three radiopharmaceuticals in solutions of albumin and/or serum from a broader array of mammalian species (rat, sheep, donkey, rabbit, cow, pig, dog, baboon, mouse, cat and elephant). We also evaluated the albumin binding of several copper(II) bis(thiosemicarbazone) chelates offering more diverse substitution of the ligand backbone. Results: Cu-PTSM and Cu-ATSM exhibit a strong interaction with HSA that is not apparent with the albumins of other species, while the binding of Cu-ETS to albumin is much less species dependent. The strong interaction of Cu-PTSM with HSA does not appear to simply correlate with variation, relative to the animal albumins, of a single amino acid lining HSA's IIA site. Those agents that selectively interact with HSA share the common feature of only methyl or hydrogen substitution at the carbon atoms of the diimine fragment of the ligand backbone. Conclusions: The interspecies variations in albumin binding of Cu-PTSM and Cu-ATSM are not simply explained by unique amino acid substitutions in the IIA binding pocket of the serum albumins. However, the specific affinity for this region of HSA is disrupted when substituents bulkier than a methyl group appear on the imine carbons of the copper bis(thiosemicarbazone) chelate.

  20. Positive XPS binding energy shift of supported Cu{sub N}-clusters governed by initial state effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, S.; Peredkov, S. [Technische Universität Berlin, IOAP, Strasse des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Al-Hada, M. [Department of Physics, College of Education and Linguistics, University of Amran (Yemen); Neeb, M., E-mail: matthias.neeb@helmholtz-berlin.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Wilhelm-Conrad-Röntgen-Campus Adlershof, Elektronenspeicherring BESSY II, Albert-Einstein-Straße 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Eberhardt, W. [Technische Universität Berlin, IOAP, Strasse des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany); DESY, Center for Free Electron Laser Science (CFEL), Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Size dependent initial and final state effects of mass-selected deposited clusters. • Initial state effect dominates positive XPS shift in supported Cu-clusters. • Size dependent Coulomb correlation shift in the Auger final state of Cu cluster. • Size-dependent Auger parameter analysis. • Positive XPS shift differs from negative surface core level shift in crystalline copper. - Abstract: An initial state effect is established as origin for the positive 2p core electron binding energy shift found for Cu{sub N}-clusters supported by a thin silica layer of a p-doped Si(1 0 0) wafer. Using the concept of the Auger parameter and taking into account the usually neglected Coulomb correlation shift in the Auger final state (M{sub 4,5}M{sub 4,5}) it is shown that the initial state shift is comparable to the measured XPS shift while the final state relaxation shift contributes only marginally to the binding energy shift. The cluster results differ from the negative surface core-level shift of crystalline copper which has been explained in terms of a final state relaxation effect.

  1. Energy-dependent losses in pulsed-feedback preamplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landis, D.A.; Madden, N.W.; Goulding, F.S.

    1978-11-01

    Energy dependent counting losses occur in most pulsed-feedback preamplifiers due to the loss of those pulses which activate the recharge system. A pulsed-feedback system that overcomes this inefficiency is described. Pulsed-light feedback as used with germanium gamma-ray spectrometers is discussed as used at high energies and high rates where those losses become significant. Experimental results are presented

  2. Ideal gas scattering kernel for energy dependent cross-sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothenstein, W.; Dagan, R.

    1998-01-01

    A third, and final, paper on the calculation of the joint kernel for neutron scattering by an ideal gas in thermal agitation is presented, when the scattering cross-section is energy dependent. The kernel is a function of the neutron energy after scattering, and of the cosine of the scattering angle, as in the case of the ideal gas kernel for a constant bound atom scattering cross-section. The final expression is suitable for numerical calculations

  3. Alpha-amylase inhibitor, CS-1036 binds to serum amylase in a concentration-dependent and saturable manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Tomohiro; Kaneno-Urasaki, Yoko; Ito, Takashi; Kimura, Takako; Matsushima, Nobuko; Okabe, Hiromi; Yamasaki, Atsushi; Izumi, Takashi

    2014-03-01

    (2R,3R,4R)-4-hydroxy-2-(hydroxymethyl)pyrrolidin-3-yl 4-O-(6-deoxy-β-D-glucopyranosyl)-α-D-glucopyranoside (CS-1036), which is an α-amylase inhibitor, exhibited biphasic and sustained elimination with a long t1/2 (18.4-30.0 hours) in rats and monkeys, but exhibited a short t1/2 (3.7-7.9 hours) in humans. To clarify the species differences in the t1/2, the plasma protein binding of CS-1036 was evaluated by ultrafiltration. A concentration-dependent and saturable plasma protein binding of CS-1036 was observed in rats and monkeys with the dissociation rate constant (KD) of 8.95 and 27.2 nM, and maximal binding capacity (Bmax) of 52.8 and 22.1 nM, respectively. By the assessments of the recombinant amylase and immunoprecipitation, the major binding protein of CS-1036 in rats was identified as salivary amylase (KD 5.64 nM). CS-1036 also showed concentration-dependent and saturable binding to human salivary and pancreatic amylase, with similar binding affinity in rats. However, the protein binding of CS-1036 was constant in human plasma (≤10.2%) due to the lower serum amylase level compared with rats and monkeys. From the calculation of the unbound fraction (fu) in plasma based on in vitro KD and Bmax, the dose-dependent increase in fu after oral administration is speculated to lead to a dose-dependent increase in total body clearance and a high area under the curve/dose at lower doses, such as 0.3 mg/kg in rats.

  4. Characterization of little skate (Leucoraja erinacea) recombinant transthyretin: Zinc-dependent 3,3',5-triiodo-l-thyronine binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shunsuke; Kasai, Kentaro; Yamauchi, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) diverged from an ancestral 5-hydroxyisourate hydrolase (HIUHase) by gene duplication at some early stage of chordate evolution. To clarify how TTR had participated in the thyroid system as an extracellular thyroid hormone (TH) binding protein, TH binding properties of recombinant little skate Leucoraja erinacea TTR was investigated. At the amino acid level, skate TTR showed 37-46% identities with the other vertebrate TTRs. Because the skate TTR had a unique histidine-rich segment in the N-terminal region, it could be purified by Ni-affinity chromatography. The skate TTR was a 46-kDa homotetramer of 14.5kDa subunits, and had one order of magnitude higher affinity for 3,3',5-triiodo-l-thyronine (T3) and some halogenated phenols than for l-thyroxine. However, the skate TTR had no HIUHase activity. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) treatment inhibited [(125)I]T3 binding activity whereas the addition of Zn(2+) to the EDTA-treated TTR recovered [(125)I]T3 binding activity in a Zn(2+) concentration-dependent manner. Scatchard analysis revealed the presence of two classes of binding site for T3, with dissociation constants of 0.24 and 17nM. However, the high-affinity sites were completely abolished with 1mM EDTA, whereas the remaining low-affinity sites decreased binding capacity. The number of zinc per TTR was quantified to be 4.5-6.3. Our results suggest that skate TTR has tight Zn(2+)-binding sites, which are essential for T3 binding to at least the high-affinity sites. Zn(2+) binding to the N-terminal histidine-rich segment may play an important role in acquisition or reinforcement of TH binding ability during early evolution of TTR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Orbital momentum profiles and binding energy spectra for the complete valence shell of molecular fluorine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Y.; Brion, C.E.; Brunger, M.J.; Zhao, K.; Grisogono, A.M.; Braidwood, S.; Weigold, E.; Chakravorty, S.J.; Davidson, E.R.; Sgamellotti, A.; von Niessen, W.

    1996-01-01

    The first electronic structural study of the complete valence shell binding energy spectrum of molecular fluorine, encompassing both the outer and inner valence regions, is reported. These binding energy spectra as well as the individual orbital momentum profiles have been measured using an energy dispersive multichannel electron momentum spectrometer at a total energy of 1500 eV, with an energy resolution of 1.5 eV and a momentum resolution of 0.1 a.u. The measured binding energy spectra in the energy range of 14-60 eV are compared with the results of ADC(4) many-body Green's function and also direct-Configuration Interaction (CI) and MRSD-CI calculations. The experimental orbital electron momentum profiles are compared with SCF theoretical profiles calculated using the target Hartree-Fock approximation with a range of basis sets and with Density Functional Theory predictions in the target Kohn-Sham approximation with non-local potentials. The truncated (aug-cc-pv5z) Dunning basis sets were used for the Density Functional Theory calculations which also include some treatment of correlation via the exchange and correlation potentials. Comparisons are also made with the full ion-neutral overlap amplitude calculated with MRSD-CI wave functions. Large, saturated basis sets (199-GTO) were employed for both the high level SCF near Hartree-Fock limit and MRSD-CI calculations to investigate the effects of electron correlation and relaxation. 66 refs., 9 tabs., 9 figs

  6. Metastable decay and binding energies of van der Waals cluster ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernstberger, B.; Krause, H.; Neusser, H.J.

    1991-01-01

    In this work the appearance potentials for the metastable decay channel of a series of van der Waals dimer ions are presented. Ionization and metastable dissociation is achieved by resonance-enhanced two-photon absorption in a linear reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer. From the appearance potentials the binding energy of the neutral dimers is obtained and from the additionally measured ionization potentials binding energies of the dimer cations are achieved. The contribution of charge transfer resonance interaction to the binding in cluster ions is evaluated by investigation of several homo- and heterodimers of aromatic components and the heterodimer benzene/cyclohexane as an example for a dimer consisting of an aromatic and a nonaromatic component. (orig.)

  7. Incremental binding free energies of aluminum (III) vs. magnesium (II) complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercero, Jose M.; Mujika, Jon I.; Matxain, Jon M.; Lopez, Xabier; Ugalde, Jesus M.

    2003-01-01

    A sequential ligand addition to the aluminum (III) cation has been studied using the B3LYP functional and a combined all-electron/pseudopotentials basis set. The aluminum complexes are compared with analogous magnesium (II) complexes. Different thermodynamical data, such as incremental binding energies, enthalpies, entropies and free energies, are presented for these addition reactions. While the magnesium (II) cation can only accommodate three negatively charged ligands, aluminum (III) accommodates four even after including bulk solvent effects. The main differences between both cations complexing with the neutral ligands, is that aluminum (III) is not able to form complexes with methanol until the number of methanol ligands is equal to 3. Magnesium (II) prefers to bind methanol and formamide when the number of ligands is small, while aluminum prefers formamide. For the largest complexes both cations prefer to bind water

  8. Core electron binding energy shifts of AlBr3 and Al2Br6 vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Astrid M.; Plenge, Juergen; Leone, Stephen R.; Canton, Sophie E.; Rude, Bruce S.; Bozek, John D.

    2006-01-01

    The Al 2p and Br 3d inner-shell photoelectron spectra of aluminum tribromide monomer and dimer vapor were measured at 90 and 95 eV photon energy, respectively, to determine the core electron binding energies of the atoms in the two molecular species. While AlBr 3 has three identical Br atoms, Al 2 Br 6 exhibits four terminal and two bridging Br atoms. The species are identified by their distinct valence photoelectron spectra. Comparison of the observed Al 2p 1/2 and Al 2p 3/2 electron binding energies of AlBr 3 with those of Al 2 Br 6 shows that there is a chemical shift of (0.15 ± 0.03) eV to lower energy in the dimer. In Al 2 Br 6 , an assignment is proposed in which the Br 3d 3/2 and Br 3d 5/2 binding energies of terminal Br atoms are (1.18 ± 0.03) eV lower than those of bridging Br atoms. This assignment assumes that both types of Br atoms have similar cross-sections for ionization. With this result, the Br 3d 3/2 and Br 3d 5/2 binding energies of Br atoms in AlBr 3 are (0.81 ± 0.03) eV lower than those of bridging Br atoms of the dimer but (0.37 ± 0.03) eV higher than those of terminal Br atoms of the dimer. The obtained chemical shifts are considered in terms of the binding relations and electron density distributions in both molecules. Chemical shifts that are larger than a few hundred millielectron volts, as observed in the Al 2 Br 6 /AlBr 3 system, offer potential to study the dissociation dynamics of the dimer in a femtosecond visible or ultraviolet-pump/XUV-probe experiment

  9. Temperature dependent energy levels of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Benjamin J.; Marlowe, Daniel L.; Sun, Keye; Saidi, Wissam A.; Scudiero, Louis; Gupta, Mool C.; Choi, Joshua J.

    2015-06-01

    Temperature dependent energy levels of methylammonium lead iodide are investigated using a combination of ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy and optical spectroscopy. Our results show that the valence band maximum and conduction band minimum shift down in energy by 110 meV and 77 meV as temperature increases from 28 °C to 85 °C. Density functional theory calculations using slab structures show that the decreased orbital splitting due to thermal expansion is a major contribution to the experimentally observed shift in energy levels. Our results have implications for solar cell performance under operating conditions with continued sunlight exposure and increased temperature.

  10. Temperature dependent energy levels of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, Benjamin J.; Marlowe, Daniel L.; Choi, Joshua J., E-mail: jjc6z@virginia.edu, E-mail: mgupta@virginia.edu, E-mail: scudiero@wsu.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Sun, Keye; Gupta, Mool C., E-mail: jjc6z@virginia.edu, E-mail: mgupta@virginia.edu, E-mail: scudiero@wsu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Saidi, Wissam A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261 (United States); Scudiero, Louis, E-mail: jjc6z@virginia.edu, E-mail: mgupta@virginia.edu, E-mail: scudiero@wsu.edu [Chemistry Department and Materials Science and Engineering Program, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Temperature dependent energy levels of methylammonium lead iodide are investigated using a combination of ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy and optical spectroscopy. Our results show that the valence band maximum and conduction band minimum shift down in energy by 110 meV and 77 meV as temperature increases from 28 °C to 85 °C. Density functional theory calculations using slab structures show that the decreased orbital splitting due to thermal expansion is a major contribution to the experimentally observed shift in energy levels. Our results have implications for solar cell performance under operating conditions with continued sunlight exposure and increased temperature.

  11. Dependence of the giant dipole strength function on excitation energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draper, J.E.; Newton, J.O.; Sobotka, L.G.; Lindenberger, H.; Wozniak, G.J.; Moretto, L.G.; Stephens, F.S.; Diamond, R.M.; McDonald, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    Spectra of γ rays associated with deep-inelastic products from the 1150-MeV 136 Xe+ 181 Ta reaction have been measured. The yield of 10--20-MeV γ rays initially increases rapidly with the excitation energy of the products and then more slowly for excitation energies in excess of 120 MeV. Statistical-model calculations with ground-state values of the giant dipole strength function fail to reproduce the shape of the measured γ-ray spectra. This suggests a dependence of the giant dipole strength function on excitation energy

  12. Comparison of experimental and theoretical binding and transition energies in the actinide region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, M.O.; Nestor, C.W. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The status of experimental and theoretical binding and transition energy determinations is reviewed extending the comparison between experiment and theory to encompass representative series of data for all actinides. This comprehensive comparison reveals areas where improvements may be indicated, showing whether theoretical treatments including all known contributions to the lowest order would be adequate in all instances. 45 references

  13. A test of Wigner's spin-isospin symmetry from double binding energy differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Isacker, P.; Warner, D.D.; Brenner, D.S.

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that the anomalously large double binding energy differences for even-even N = Z nuclei are a consequence of Wigner's SU(4) symmetry. These, and similar quantities for odd-mass and odd-odd nuclei, provide a simple and distinct signature of this symmetry in N ≅ Z nuclei. (authors). 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  14. Exciton binding energy in wurtzite InGaN/GaN quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seoung-Hwan; Kim, Jong-Jae; Kim, Hwa-Min

    2004-01-01

    The internal field and carrier density effects on the exciton binding energies in wurtzite (WZ) InGaN/GaN quantum-well (QW) structures are investigated using the multiband effective-mass theory, and are compared with those obtained from the at-band model and with those of GaN/AlGaN QW structures. The exciton binding energy is significantly reduced with increasing sheet carrier density, suggesting that excitons are nearly bleached at densities around 10 12 cm -2 for both InGaN/GaN and GaN/AlGaN QW structures. With the inclusion of the internal field, the exciton binding energy is substantialy reduced compared to that of the at-band model in the investigated region of the wells. This can be explained by a decrease in the momentum matrix element and an increase in the inverse screening length due to the internal field. The exciton binding energy of the InGaN/GaN structure is smaller than that of the GaN/AlGaN structure because InGaN/GaN structures have a smaller momentum matrix element and a larger inverse screening length than GaN/AlGaN structures.

  15. Time-dependent recovery of in vivo binding sites after drug dosing: A method for radiotracer evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilbourn, Michael R.

    1997-01-01

    The recovery of in vivo binding sites for (±)-α-[ 11 C]methoxytetrabenazine, a radioligand for the monoamine vesicular transporter (VMAT2), was determined in mouse brain at various times following a pharmacological dose of tetrabenazine. Concentrations of in vivo radioligand binding sites progressively increased and had reached control values by 8.5 h, and this recovery was consistent with the pharmacokinetics of the competing drug tetrabenazine and its active metabolite, dihydrotetrabenazine. This study demonstrates a simple experimental protocol of using a single dose of a reversible competing drug and time-dependent measurements of in vivo binding of a radioligand. This protocol is suitable for testing the sensitivity of an in vivo radiotracer for measurement of varying concentrations of in vivo binding sites

  16. Dependability of wind energy generators with short-term energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, B

    1976-11-26

    Power fluctuations and power duration curves for wind energy generators, including energy storage facilities of a certain capacity, are compared to those of typical nuclear reactors. A storage system capable of delivering the yearly average power output for about 10 hours already makes the dependability of the wind energy system comparable to that of a typical nuclear plant.

  17. The three body problem with energy dependent potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.E.; McKay, C.M.; McKellar, B.H.J.

    1975-10-01

    It is shown how to generalize the three body equations of Faddeev, and of Karlsson and Zeiger, to include the case when the two body potential is energy dependent. Such generalizations will prove useful in the three nucleon problem and in three body models of nuclear reactions. (author)

  18. Inelastic surface vibrations versus energy-dependent nucleus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Limitations of the static Woods–Saxon potential and the applicability of the energy dependent Woods–Saxon potential (EDWSP) model within the framework of one-dimensional Wong formula to explore the sub-barrier fusion data are highlighted. The inelastic surface excitations of the fusing nuclei are found to be ...

  19. Inelastic surface vibrations versus energy-dependent nucleus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Limitations of the static Woods–Saxon potential and the applicability of the energy- dependent Woods–Saxon potential (EDWSP) model within the framework of one-dimensional. Wong formula to explore the sub-barrier fusion data are highlighted. The inelastic surface exci- tations of the fusing nuclei are found to ...

  20. Simultaneous fluorescence light-up and selective multicolor nucleobase recognition based on sequence-dependent strong binding of berberine to DNA abasic site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fei; Shao, Yong; Ma, Kun; Cui, Qinghua; Liu, Guiying; Xu, Shujuan

    2012-04-28

    Label-free DNA nucleobase recognition by fluorescent small molecules has received much attention due to its simplicity in mutation identification and drug screening. However, sequence-dependent fluorescence light-up nucleobase recognition and multicolor emission with individual emission energy for individual nucleobases have been seldom realized. Herein, an abasic site (AP site) in a DNA duplex was employed as a binding field for berberine, one of isoquinoline alkaloids. Unlike weak binding of berberine to the fully matched DNAs without the AP site, strong binding of berberine to the AP site occurs and the berberine's fluorescence light-up behaviors are highly dependent on the target nucleobases opposite the AP site in which the targets thymine and cytosine produce dual emission bands, while the targets guanine and adenine only give a single emission band. Furthermore, more intense emissions are observed for the target pyrimidines than purines. The flanking bases of the AP site also produce some modifications of the berberine's emission behavior. The binding selectivity of berberine at the AP site is also confirmed by measurements of fluorescence resonance energy transfer, excited-state lifetime, DNA melting and fluorescence quenching by ferrocyanide and sodium chloride. It is expected that the target pyrimidines cause berberine to be stacked well within DNA base pairs near the AP site, which results in a strong resonance coupling of the electronic transitions to the particular vibration mode to produce the dual emissions. The fluorescent signal-on and emission energy-modulated sensing for nucleobases based on this fluorophore is substantially advantageous over the previously used fluorophores. We expect that this approach will be developed as a practical device for differentiating pyrimidines from purines by positioning an AP site toward a target that is available for readout by this alkaloid probe. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  1. Energy dependence of critical state of single-component systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volchenkova, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Equations of critical states of the single-component systems: Psub(cr)(/Psub(o)=(Tsub(cr)/Tsub(o))x0.73, Tsub(cr)=K(Tsub(boil))sup(1.116) and Hsub(cr)(/Hsub(B)=Tsub(sr)/Tsub(B))sup(1.48) where Tsub(B)=1K, Hsub(B)-2 kcal/g-at, K-dimension factor are presented. It is shown that the revealed dependence Hsub(cr)=H(Tsub(cr)) is an energy boundary of a liquid-vapour phase state of the single-component systems beyond limits of which difference between liquid and vapour phases vanishes in increasing the system energy content. The given equations of state are true for all the single-component systems and permit to consider physicomechanical properties of substances in dynamic state depending on external conditions. Critical temperatures and dependences for elements from the most fusible He to infusible W and Re have been calculated

  2. Involvement of histidine residues in the pH-dependent β-galactoside binding activity of human galectin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Hirotsugu; Takeuchi, Katsuyuki; Takeuchi, Hideo

    2013-04-02

    The pH dependence of the β-galactoside binding activity of human galectin-1 (hGal-1) was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy using lactose as a ligand. The obtained binding constant Kb was 2.94 ± 0.10 mM(-1) at pH 7.5. The Kb value decreased at acidic pH with a midpoint of transition at pH 6.0 ± 0.1. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of the pH dependence, we investigated the structures of hGal-1 and its two His mutants (H44Q and H52Q) using fluorescence, circular dichroism, UV absorption, and UV resonance Raman spectroscopy. Analysis of the spectra has shown that the pKa values of His44 and His52 are 5.7 ± 0.2 and 6.3 ± 0.1, respectively. The protonation of His52 below pH 6.3 induces a small change in secondary structure and partly reduces the galactoside binding activity. On the other hand, the protonation of His44 below pH 5.7 exerts a cation-π interaction with Trp68 and largely diminishes the galactoside binding activity. With reference to the literature X-ray structures at pH 7.0 and 5.6, protonated His52 is proposed to move slightly away from the galactoside-binding region with a partial unfolding of the β-strand containing His52. On the other hand, protonated His44 becomes unable to form a hydrogen bond with galactoside and additionally induces a reorientation and/or displacement of Trp68 through cation-π interaction, leading to a loosening of the galactoside-binding pocket. These structural changes associated with His protonation are likely to be the origin of the pH dependence of the galactoside binding activity of hGal-1.

  3. Towards accurate free energy calculations in ligand protein-binding studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbrecher, Thomas; Labahn, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Cells contain a multitude of different chemical reaction paths running simultaneously and quite independently next to each other. This amazing feat is enabled by molecular recognition, the ability of biomolecules to form stable and specific complexes with each other and with their substrates. A better understanding of this process, i.e. of the kinetics, structures and thermodynamic properties of biomolecule binding, would be invaluable in the study of biological systems. In addition, as the mode of action of many pharmaceuticals is based upon their inhibition or activation of biomolecule targets, predictive models of small molecule receptor binding are very helpful tools in rational drug design. Since the goal here is normally to design a new compound with a high inhibition strength, one of the most important thermodynamic properties is the binding free energy DeltaG(0). The prediction of binding constants has always been one of the major goals in the field of computational chemistry, because the ability to reliably assess a hypothetical compound's binding properties without having to synthesize it first would save a tremendous amount of work. The different approaches to this question range from fast and simple empirical descriptor methods to elaborate simulation protocols aimed at putting the computation of free energies onto a solid foundation of statistical thermodynamics. While the later methods are still not suited for the screenings of thousands of compounds that are routinely performed in computational drug design studies, they are increasingly put to use for the detailed study of protein ligand interactions. This review will focus on molecular mechanics force field based free energy calculations and their application to the study of protein ligand interactions. After a brief overview of other popular methods for the calculation of free energies, we will describe recent advances in methodology and a variety of exemplary studies of molecular dynamics

  4. Computing more proper covariances of energy dependent nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhanen, R.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We present conditions for covariances of energy dependent nuclear data to be proper. • We provide methods to detect non-positive and inconsistent covariances in ENDF-6 format. • We propose methods to find nearby more proper covariances. • The methods can be used as a part of a quality assurance program. - Abstract: We present conditions for covariances of energy dependent nuclear data to be proper in the sense that the covariances are positive, i.e., its eigenvalues are non-negative, and consistent with respect to the sum rules of nuclear data. For the ENDF-6 format covariances we present methods to detect non-positive and inconsistent covariances. These methods would be useful as a part of a quality assurance program. We also propose methods that can be used to find nearby more proper energy dependent covariances. These methods can be used to remove unphysical components, while preserving most of the physical components. We consider several different senses in which the nearness can be measured. These methods could be useful if a re-evaluation of improper covariances is not feasible. Two practical examples are processed and analyzed. These demonstrate some of the properties of the methods. We also demonstrate that the ENDF-6 format covariances of linearly dependent nuclear data should usually be encoded with the derivation rules.

  5. Bremsstrahlung of La and its dependence on electron energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riehle, F.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of La-bremsstrahlung isocromates with high resolution for quantum energies between 135 eV and 1867 eV are presented and discussed. In the whole energy range investigated, the isocromate structure, identified with the 4f band of La, is placed 5,45 +- 10,1 eV above the Fermi level. This is in contradiction with a calculation of Gloetzel, which predicts the 4f band maximum about 3eV above the Fermi level. This discrepancy is explained in the present work by the fact that the La electronic density of states depends on the occupation number of the states. The bremsstrahlung isocromate has to be considered as a direct copy of the La ion density of states, consisting of the La-atom and the additional primary electron. Resonance like intensity modulations of the x-ray radiation, resulting from transitions of the primary electron in f-like final states, are observed in an analysis of the La-bremsstrahlung isochromate energy dependence. For transitions of the primary electron in d-like final states, no resonances have been found. The energy dependence of the scattering probability in f-like final states can be explained by a model which assumes the final state as composed by a continuum state and a discrete state. (orig.) [de

  6. Converging ligand-binding free energies obtained with free-energy perturbations at the quantum mechanical level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Martin A; Söderhjelm, Pär; Ryde, Ulf

    2016-06-30

    In this article, the convergence of quantum mechanical (QM) free-energy simulations based on molecular dynamics simulations at the molecular mechanics (MM) level has been investigated. We have estimated relative free energies for the binding of nine cyclic carboxylate ligands to the octa-acid deep-cavity host, including the host, the ligand, and all water molecules within 4.5 Å of the ligand in the QM calculations (158-224 atoms). We use single-step exponential averaging (ssEA) and the non-Boltzmann Bennett acceptance ratio (NBB) methods to estimate QM/MM free energy with the semi-empirical PM6-DH2X method, both based on interaction energies. We show that ssEA with cumulant expansion gives a better convergence and uses half as many QM calculations as NBB, although the two methods give consistent results. With 720,000 QM calculations per transformation, QM/MM free-energy estimates with a precision of 1 kJ/mol can be obtained for all eight relative energies with ssEA, showing that this approach can be used to calculate converged QM/MM binding free energies for realistic systems and large QM partitions. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Converging ligand‐binding free energies obtained with free‐energy perturbations at the quantum mechanical level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Martin A.; Söderhjelm, Pär

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the convergence of quantum mechanical (QM) free‐energy simulations based on molecular dynamics simulations at the molecular mechanics (MM) level has been investigated. We have estimated relative free energies for the binding of nine cyclic carboxylate ligands to the octa‐acid deep‐cavity host, including the host, the ligand, and all water molecules within 4.5 Å of the ligand in the QM calculations (158–224 atoms). We use single‐step exponential averaging (ssEA) and the non‐Boltzmann Bennett acceptance ratio (NBB) methods to estimate QM/MM free energy with the semi‐empirical PM6‐DH2X method, both based on interaction energies. We show that ssEA with cumulant expansion gives a better convergence and uses half as many QM calculations as NBB, although the two methods give consistent results. With 720,000 QM calculations per transformation, QM/MM free‐energy estimates with a precision of 1 kJ/mol can be obtained for all eight relative energies with ssEA, showing that this approach can be used to calculate converged QM/MM binding free energies for realistic systems and large QM partitions. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27117350

  8. A Central Nervous System-Dependent Intron-Embedded Gene Encodes a Novel Murine Fyn Binding Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Khalaf, Noureddine; Taha, Safa; Bakhiet, Moiz; Fathallah, M Dahmani

    2016-01-01

    The interplay between the nervous and immune systems is gradually being unraveled. We previously reported in the mouse the novel soluble immune system factor ISRAA, whose activation in the spleen is central nervous system-dependent. We also showed that ISRAA plays a role in modulating anti-infection immunity. Herein, we report the genomic description of the israa locus, along with some insights into the structure-function relationship of the protein. Our findings revealed that israa is nested within intron 6 of the mouse zmiz1 gene. Protein sequence analysis revealed a typical SH2 binding motif (Y102TEV), with Fyn being the most likely binding partner. Docking simulation showed a favorable conformation for the ISRAA-Fyn complex, with a specific binding mode for the binding of the YTEV motif to the SH2 domain. Experimental studies showed that in vitro, recombinant ISRAA is phosphorylated by Fyn at tyrosine 102. Cell transfection and pull-down experiments revealed Fyn as a binding partner of ISRAA in the EL4 mouse T-cell line. Indeed, we demonstrated that ISRAA downregulates T-cell activation and the phosphorylation of an activation tyrosine (Y416) of Src-family kinases in mouse splenocytes. Our observations highlight ISRAA as a novel Fyn binding protein that is likely to be involved in a signaling pathway driven by the nervous system.

  9. A Central Nervous System-Dependent Intron-Embedded Gene Encodes a Novel Murine Fyn Binding Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noureddine Ben Khalaf

    Full Text Available The interplay between the nervous and immune systems is gradually being unraveled. We previously reported in the mouse the novel soluble immune system factor ISRAA, whose activation in the spleen is central nervous system-dependent. We also showed that ISRAA plays a role in modulating anti-infection immunity. Herein, we report the genomic description of the israa locus, along with some insights into the structure-function relationship of the protein. Our findings revealed that israa is nested within intron 6 of the mouse zmiz1 gene. Protein sequence analysis revealed a typical SH2 binding motif (Y102TEV, with Fyn being the most likely binding partner. Docking simulation showed a favorable conformation for the ISRAA-Fyn complex, with a specific binding mode for the binding of the YTEV motif to the SH2 domain. Experimental studies showed that in vitro, recombinant ISRAA is phosphorylated by Fyn at tyrosine 102. Cell transfection and pull-down experiments revealed Fyn as a binding partner of ISRAA in the EL4 mouse T-cell line. Indeed, we demonstrated that ISRAA downregulates T-cell activation and the phosphorylation of an activation tyrosine (Y416 of Src-family kinases in mouse splenocytes. Our observations highlight ISRAA as a novel Fyn binding protein that is likely to be involved in a signaling pathway driven by the nervous system.

  10. Binding Energy and Lifetime of Excitons in InxGa1-xAs/GaAs Quantum Wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orani, D.; Polimeni, A.; Patane, A.

    1997-01-01

    We report a systematic study of exciton binding energies and lifetimes in InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells. The experimental binding energies have been deduced from photoluminescence excitation measurements taking into account the contribution of the 2s state of the exciton and the line broadening...

  11. Por secretion system-dependent secretion and glycosylation of Porphyromonas gingivalis hemin-binding protein 35.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikio Shoji

    Full Text Available The anaerobic Gram-negative bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis is a major pathogen in severe forms of periodontal disease and refractory periapical perodontitis. We have recently found that P. gingivalis has a novel secretion system named the Por secretion system (PorSS, which is responsible for secretion of major extracellular proteinases, Arg-gingipains (Rgps and Lys-gingipain. These proteinases contain conserved C-terminal domains (CTDs in their C-termini. Hemin-binding protein 35 (HBP35, which is one of the outer membrane proteins of P. gingivalis and contributes to its haem utilization, also contains a CTD, suggesting that HBP35 is translocated to the cell surface via the PorSS. In this study, immunoblot analysis of P. gingivalis mutants deficient in the PorSS or in the biosynthesis of anionic polysaccharide-lipopolysaccharide (A-LPS revealed that HBP35 is translocated to the cell surface via the PorSS and is glycosylated with A-LPS. From deletion analysis with a GFP-CTD[HBP35] green fluorescent protein fusion, the C-terminal 22 amino acid residues of CTD[HBP35] were found to be required for cell surface translocation and glycosylation. The GFP-CTD fusion study also revealed that the CTDs of CPG70, peptidylarginine deiminase, P27 and RgpB play roles in PorSS-dependent translocation and glycosylation. However, CTD-region peptides were not found in samples of glycosylated HBP35 protein by peptide map fingerprinting analysis, and antibodies against CTD-regions peptides did not react with glycosylated HBP35 protein. These results suggest both that the CTD region functions as a recognition signal for the PorSS and that glycosylation of CTD proteins occurs after removal of the CTD region. Rabbits were used for making antisera against bacterial proteins in this study.

  12. Endogenously generated plasmin at the vascular wall injury site amplifies lysine binding site-dependent plasminogen accumulation in microthrombi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Brzoska

    Full Text Available The fibrinolytic system plays a pivotal role in the regulation of hemostasis; however, it remains unclear how and when the system is triggered to induce thrombolysis. Using intra-vital confocal fluorescence microscopy, we investigated the process of plasminogen binding to laser-induced platelet-rich microthrombi generated in the mesenteric vein of transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP. The accumulation of GFP-expressing platelets as well as exogenously infused Alexa Fluor 568-labeled Glu-plasminogen (Glu-plg on the injured vessel wall was assessed by measuring the increase in the corresponding fluorescence intensities. Glu-plg accumulated in a time-dependent manner in the center of the microthrombus, where phosphatidylserine is exposed on platelet surfaces and fibrin formation takes place. The rates of binding of Glu-plg in the presence of ε-aminocaproic acid and carboxypeptidase B, as well as the rates of binding of mini-plasminogen lacking kringle domains 1-4 and lysine binding sites, were significantly lower than that of Glu-plg alone, suggesting that the binding was dependent on lysine binding sites. Furthermore, aprotinin significantly suppressed the accumulation of Glu-plg, suggesting that endogenously generated plasmin activity is a prerequisite for the accumulation. In spite of the endogenous generation of plasmin and accumulation of Glu-plg in the center of microthrombi, the microthrombi did not change in size during the 2-hour observation period. When human tissue plasminogen activator was administered intravenously, Glu-plg further accumulated and the microthrombi were lysed. Glu-plg appeared to accumulate in the center of microthrombi in the early phase of microthrombus formation, and plasmin activity and lysine binding sites were required for this accumulation.

  13. Generalized Energy-Dependent Q Values for Fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, R

    2010-03-31

    We extend Madland's parameterization of the energy release in fission to obtain the dependence of the fission Q value for major and minor actinides on the incident neutron energies in the range 0 {le} E{sub n} {le} 20 MeV. Our parameterization is based on the actinide evaluations recommended for the ENDF/B-VII.1 release. This paper describes the calculation of energydependent fission Q values based on the calculation of the prompt energy release in fission by Madland. This calculation was adopted for use in the LLNL ENDL database and then generalized to obtain the prompt fission energy release for all actinides. Here the calculation is further generalized to the total energy release in fission. There are several stages in a fission event, depending on the time scale. Neutrons and gammas may be emitted at any time during the fission event.While our discussion here is focussed on compound nucleus creation by an incident neutron, similar parameterizations could be obtained for incident gammas or spontaneous fission.

  14. Getting to Grips Again with Dependency. Japan's Energy Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrisstoffels, J.H.

    2007-08-01

    Japan has had to deal with a high level of dependency on energy imports for many decades. Today the country faces an increasingly competitive global energy market that forces it to reinvent its traditional security of supply policies. Unfortunately for Japan, the rise of China and India is increasing the competition for scarce energy supplies among consumer countries, whereas in the past supplier countries competed for access to the attractive Japanese market. To confront the challenges of the new environment the Japanese government has drafted a New National Energy Strategy. This paper analyses the strength of the strategy's proposals and targets, in particular those aimed at improving security of oil and gas supply. To assess the impact of the strategy we place it firmly against the background of Japan's history of energy security policy, as well as Japan's recent experiences with 'strategic resource projects'. This paper finds that Japan's policies in post-1973 history have been impeded by a complex set of factors. Traditionally this set has included Japan's troubled bilateral relations with Russia and China, and Japan's security dependence on the United States. Other factors are Japan's inability to synchronise national and corporate interests, and a lack of cooperation between domestic energy companies. More recently, rising oil prices, growing resource competition with China and lacklustre domestic demand-growth for energy have increased anxiety about security of supply amongst policymakers in Tokyo. In three case studies the paper illustrates in detail how these factors - in combination or by themselves - have structurally compromised Japanese initiatives to improve security of supply. The case studies discuss the Azadegan oil development project in Iran, plans for a pan-Siberian oil pipeline, and the oil and gas projects on Russia's Sakhalin Island. Our analysis of the New National Energy Strategy confirms that energy security is back on Japan's policy

  15. Study of energy dependence of a extrapolation chamber in low energy X-rays beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastos, Fernanda M.; Silva, Teogenes A. da

    2014-01-01

    This work was with the main objective to study the energy dependence of extrapolation chamber in low energy X-rays to determine the value of the uncertainty associated with the variation of the incident radiation energy in the measures in which it is used. For studying the dependence of energy, were conducted comparative ionization current measurements between the extrapolation chamber and two ionization chambers: a chamber mammography, RC6M model, Radcal with energy dependence less than 5% and a 2575 model radioprotection chamber NE Technology; both chambers have very thin windows, allowing its application in low power beams. Measurements were made at four different depths of 1.0 to 4.0 mm extrapolation chamber, 1.0 mm interval, for each reference radiation. The study showed that there is a variable energy dependence on the volume of the extrapolation chamber. In other analysis, it is concluded that the energy dependence of extrapolation chamber becomes smaller when using the slope of the ionization current versus depth for the different radiation reference; this shows that the extrapolation technique, used for the absorbed dose calculation, reduces the uncertainty associated with the influence of the response variation with energy radiation

  16. Cyclophilin B binding to platelets supports calcium-dependent adhesion to collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allain, F; Durieux, S; Denys, A; Carpentier, M; Spik, G

    1999-08-01

    We have recently reported that cyclophilin B (CyPB), a secreted cyclosporine-binding protein, could bind to T lymphocytes through interactions with two types of binding sites. The first ones, referred to as type I, involve interactions with the conserved domain of CyPB and promote the endocytosis of surface-bound ligand, while the second type of binding sites, termed type II, are represented by glycosaminoglycans (GAG). Here, we further investigated the interactions of CyPB with blood cell populations. In addition to lymphocytes, CyPB was found to interact mainly with platelets. The binding is specific, with a dissociation constant (kd) of 9 +/- 3 nmol/L and the number of sites estimated at 960 +/- 60 per cell. Platelet glycosaminoglycans are not required for the interactions, but the binding is dramatically reduced by active cyclosporine derivatives. We then analyzed the biologic effects of CyPB and found a significant increase in platelet adhesion to collagen. Concurrently, CyPB initiates a transmembranous influx of Ca(2+) and induces the phosphorylation of the P-20 light chains of myosin. Taken together, the present results demonstrate for the first time that extracellular CyPB specifically interacts with platelets through a functional receptor related to the lymphocyte type I binding sites and might act by regulating the activity of a receptor-operated membrane Ca(2+) channel.

  17. Model dependence of energy-weighted sum rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirson, M.W.

    1977-01-01

    The contribution of the nucleon-nucleon interaction to energy-weighted sum rules for electromagnetic multipole transitions is investigated. It is found that only isoscalar electric transitions might have model-independent energy-weighted sum rules. For these transitions, explicit momentum and angular momentum dependence of the nuclear force give rise to corrections to the sum rule which are found to be negligibly small, thus confirming the model independence of these specific sum rules. These conclusions are unaffected by correlation effects. (author)

  18. Activity of cAMP-dependent protein kinases and cAMP-binding proteins of rat kidney cytosol during dehydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelenina, M.N.; Solenov, E.I.; Ivanova, L.N.

    1985-01-01

    The activity of cAMP-dependent protein kinases, the binding of cAMP, and the spectrum of cAMP-binding proteins in the cytosol of the renal papilla was studied in intact rats and in rats after 24 h on a water-deprived diet. It was found that the activation of protein kinases by 10 -6 M cAMP is significantly higher in the experimental animals than in the intact animals. In chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, the positions of the peaks of specific reception of cAMP corresponded to the peaks of the regulatory subunits of cAMP-dependent protein kinases of types I and II. In this case, in intact animals more than 80% of the binding activity was detected in peaks II, whereas in rats subjected to water deprivation, more than 60% of the binding was observed in peak I. The general regulatory activity of the cytosol was unchanged in the experimental animals in comparison with intact animals. It is suggested that during dehydration there is an induction of the synthesis of the regulatory subunit of type I cAMP-dependent protein kinase in the renal papilla

  19. Energy dependence of the optical model of neutron scattering from niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Lawson, R.D.

    1985-05-01

    Neutron differential-elastic-scattering cross sections of niobium were measured from 1.5 to 10.0 MeV at intervals of less than or equal to200 keV below 4.0 MeV, and of approx. =500 keV from 4.0 to 10.0 MeV. Ten to more than fifty differential-cross-section values were determined at each incident energy, distributed over the angular range approx. =20 to 160 0 . The observed values were interpreted in the context of the spherical optical-statistical model. It was found that the volume integral of the real potential decreased with energy whereas the integral of the imaginary part increased. The energy dependence in both cases was consistent with a linear variation. There is a dispersion relationship between the real and imaginary potentials, and when this was used, in conjunction with the experimental imaginary potential, it was possible to predict the observed energy dependence of the real potential to a good degree of accuracy, thus supporting the consistency of the data and its analysis. The real-potential well depths needed to give the correct binding energies of the 2d/sub 5/2/, 3s/sub 1/2/, 2d/sub 3/2/ and 1g/sub 7/2/ particle states and of the 1g/sub 9/2/ hole state are in reasonable agreement with those given by a linear extrapolation of the scattering potential. However, the well depths needed to give the observed binding of the 2p/sub 3/2/, 1f/sub 5/2/ and 2p/sub 1/2/ hole states are about 10% less than the extrapolated values. 40 refs., 5 figs

  20. Binding free energy calculations to rationalize the interactions of huprines with acetylcholinesterase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Érica C M; Oliva, Mónica; Andrés, Juan

    2018-05-01

    In the present study, the binding free energy of a family of huprines with acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is calculated by means of the free energy perturbation method, based on hybrid quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics potentials. Binding free energy calculations and the analysis of the geometrical parameters highlight the importance of the stereochemistry of huprines in AChE inhibition. Binding isotope effects are calculated to unravel the interactions between ligands and the gorge of AChE. New chemical insights are provided to explain and rationalize the experimental results. A good correlation with the experimental data is found for a family of inhibitors with moderate differences in the enzyme affinity. The analysis of the geometrical parameters and interaction energy per residue reveals that Asp72, Glu199, and His440 contribute significantly to the network of interactions between active site residues, which stabilize the inhibitors in the gorge. It seems that a cooperative effect of the residues of the gorge determines the affinity of the enzyme for these inhibitors, where Asp72, Glu199, and His440 make a prominent contribution.

  1. Binding free energy calculations to rationalize the interactions of huprines with acetylcholinesterase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Érica C. M.; Oliva, Mónica; Andrés, Juan

    2018-05-01

    In the present study, the binding free energy of a family of huprines with acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is calculated by means of the free energy perturbation method, based on hybrid quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics potentials. Binding free energy calculations and the analysis of the geometrical parameters highlight the importance of the stereochemistry of huprines in AChE inhibition. Binding isotope effects are calculated to unravel the interactions between ligands and the gorge of AChE. New chemical insights are provided to explain and rationalize the experimental results. A good correlation with the experimental data is found for a family of inhibitors with moderate differences in the enzyme affinity. The analysis of the geometrical parameters and interaction energy per residue reveals that Asp72, Glu199, and His440 contribute significantly to the network of interactions between active site residues, which stabilize the inhibitors in the gorge. It seems that a cooperative effect of the residues of the gorge determines the affinity of the enzyme for these inhibitors, where Asp72, Glu199, and His440 make a prominent contribution.

  2. Computational identification of binding energy hot spots in protein-RNA complexes using an ensemble approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yuliang; Wang, Zixiang; Zhan, Weihua; Deng, Lei

    2018-05-01

    Identifying RNA-binding residues, especially energetically favored hot spots, can provide valuable clues for understanding the mechanisms and functional importance of protein-RNA interactions. Yet, limited availability of experimentally recognized energy hot spots in protein-RNA crystal structures leads to the difficulties in developing empirical identification approaches. Computational prediction of RNA-binding hot spot residues is still in its infant stage. Here, we describe a computational method, PrabHot (Prediction of protein-RNA binding hot spots), that can effectively detect hot spot residues on protein-RNA binding interfaces using an ensemble of conceptually different machine learning classifiers. Residue interaction network features and new solvent exposure characteristics are combined together and selected for classification with the Boruta algorithm. In particular, two new reference datasets (benchmark and independent) have been generated containing 107 hot spots from 47 known protein-RNA complex structures. In 10-fold cross-validation on the training dataset, PrabHot achieves promising performances with an AUC score of 0.86 and a sensitivity of 0.78, which are significantly better than that of the pioneer RNA-binding hot spot prediction method HotSPRing. We also demonstrate the capability of our proposed method on the independent test dataset and gain a competitive advantage as a result. The PrabHot webserver is freely available at http://denglab.org/PrabHot/. leideng@csu.edu.cn. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  3. Analysis of oxygen binding-energy variations for BaO on W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, G. A.; Shih, A.; Mueller, D.; Thomas, R. E.

    Interatomic Auger analyses have been made of different forms of BaO layers on W substrates. Variations in Auger spectroscopy energies of the Ba4dBa5pO2p interatomic Auger transition were found to be largely governed by the O2p binding energy of the BaO adsorbate. This was illustrated by comparing results of the Auger data values with values derived from O2p binding energies using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. Very good agreement was observed not only for the W substrate but also for the W substrate which showed two oxygen-induced electronics state. Variations in binding energy were noted for different states of BaO lattice formation and for different amounts of oxidation, ranging from the transition of Ba to BaO and continuing to the BaO 2 stoichiometry and beyond. Effects were also reported for adsorbate alignment and thermal activation (i.e., reduction) of the oxidized state. An empirical relationship was found suggesting that the more tightly bound the O2p states of the BaO adsorbate were, the lower its work function would be. This link between binding energy and work function was observed to be valid not only for cases of poisoning by oxidation, but held as well during reactivation by the subsequent reduction of the oxide. In addition, this relationship also appeared to predict the low work function obtained through the introduction of substances such as Sc to the BaO-W system. Possible qualitative reasons which might contribute to this are discussed in terms of enhanced dipole effects and shifts in band structure.

  4. Possible energy dependence of Θ13 in neutrino oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinkhamer, Frans R.

    2005-01-01

    A simple three-flavor neutrino-oscillation model is discussed which has both nonzero mass differences and timelike Fermi-point splittings, together with a combined bi-maximal and trimaximal mixing pattern. One possible consequence would be new effects in ν μ →ν e oscillations, characterized by an energy-dependent effective mixing angle Θ 13 . Future experiments such as T2K and NOνA, and perhaps even the current MINOS experiment, could look for these effects

  5. Free energy profiles of cocaine esterase-cocaine binding process by molecular dynamics and potential of mean force simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuxin; Huang, Xiaoqin; Han, Keli; Zheng, Fang; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2016-11-25

    The combined molecular dynamics (MD) and potential of mean force (PMF) simulations have been performed to determine the free energy profile of the CocE)-(+)-cocaine binding process in comparison with that of the corresponding CocE-(-)-cocaine binding process. According to the MD simulations, the equilibrium CocE-(+)-cocaine binding mode is similar to the CocE-(-)-cocaine binding mode. However, based on the simulated free energy profiles, a significant free energy barrier (∼5 kcal/mol) exists in the CocE-(+)-cocaine binding process whereas no obvious free energy barrier exists in the CocE-(-)-cocaine binding process, although the free energy barrier of ∼5 kcal/mol is not high enough to really slow down the CocE-(+)-cocaine binding process. In addition, the obtained free energy profiles also demonstrate that (+)-cocaine and (-)-cocaine have very close binding free energies with CocE, with a negligible difference (∼0.2 kcal/mol), which is qualitatively consistent with the nearly same experimental K M values of the CocE enzyme for (+)-cocaine and (-)-cocaine. The consistency between the computational results and available experimental data suggests that the mechanistic insights obtained from this study are reasonable. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Calculation of positron binding energies using the generalized any particle propagator theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, Jonathan; Charry, Jorge A.; Flores-Moreno, Roberto; Varella, Márcio T. do N.; Reyes, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    We recently extended the electron propagator theory to any type of quantum species based in the framework of the Any-Particle Molecular Orbital (APMO) approach [J. Romero, E. Posada, R. Flores-Moreno, and A. Reyes, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 074105 (2012)]. The generalized any particle molecular orbital propagator theory (APMO/PT) was implemented in its quasiparticle second order version in the LOWDIN code and was applied to calculate nuclear quantum effects in electron binding energies and proton binding energies in molecular systems [M. Díaz-Tinoco, J. Romero, J. V. Ortiz, A. Reyes, and R. Flores-Moreno, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 194108 (2013)]. In this work, we present the derivation of third order quasiparticle APMO/PT methods and we apply them to calculate positron binding energies (PBEs) of atoms and molecules. We calculated the PBEs of anions and some diatomic molecules using the second order, third order, and renormalized third order quasiparticle APMO/PT approaches and compared our results with those previously calculated employing configuration interaction (CI), explicitly correlated and quantum Montecarlo methodologies. We found that renormalized APMO/PT methods can achieve accuracies of ∼0.35 eV for anionic systems, compared to Full-CI results, and provide a quantitative description of positron binding to anionic and highly polar species. Third order APMO/PT approaches display considerable potential to study positron binding to large molecules because of the fifth power scaling with respect to the number of basis sets. In this regard, we present additional PBE calculations of some small polar organic molecules, amino acids and DNA nucleobases. We complement our numerical assessment with formal and numerical analyses of the treatment of electron-positron correlation within the quasiparticle propagator approach

  7. Dependence of balance energy on isospin degrees of freedom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautam, S.; Sood, Aman D.; Puri, Rajeev K.; Hartnack, Ch.; Aichelin, J.

    2009-01-01

    Collective transverse in-plane flow in heavy ion collisions has been a subject of intensive theoretical and experimental studies, as it can provide information about the nuclear matter equation of state (EOS) as well as in medium nucleon-nucleon (nn) cross section. The study of dependence of collective transverse flow on various entrance channel parameters as beam energy and impact parameter has revealed much interesting physics about the origin and properties of the collective flow. From these studies, it has been found that the transverse in plane flow disappears at an incident energy termed as balance energy (E bal ), where attractive part of the nuclear interactions balances the repulsive part. Presently, due to availability of the radioactive beams, role of isospin degrees of freedom in EOS can be studied. The collective transverse in-plane flow has been found to depend on isospin of the colliding system. Here, we aim to study the dependence of E bal on N/Z ratio of the colliding system using IQMD model

  8. New Parameters for Higher Accuracy in the Computation of Binding Free Energy Differences upon Alanine Scanning Mutagenesis on Protein-Protein Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Inês C M; Costa, Inês P D; Coimbra, João T S; Ramos, Maria J; Fernandes, Pedro A

    2017-01-23

    Knowing how proteins make stable complexes enables the development of inhibitors to preclude protein-protein (P:P) binding. The identification of the specific interfacial residues that mostly contribute to protein binding, denominated as hot spots, is thus critical. Here, we refine an in silico alanine scanning mutagenesis protocol, based on a residue-dependent dielectric constant version of the Molecular Mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area method. We have used a large data set of structurally diverse P:P complexes to redefine the residue-dependent dielectric constants used in the determination of binding free energies. The accuracy of the method was validated through comparison with experimental data, considering the per-residue P:P binding free energy (ΔΔG binding ) differences upon alanine mutation. Different protocols were tested, i.e., a geometry optimization protocol and three molecular dynamics (MD) protocols: (1) one using explicit water molecules, (2) another with an implicit solvation model, and (3) a third where we have carried out an accelerated MD with explicit water molecules. Using a set of protein dielectric constants (within the range from 1 to 20) we showed that the dielectric constants of 7 for nonpolar and polar residues and 11 for charged residues (and histidine) provide optimal ΔΔG binding predictions. An overall mean unsigned error (MUE) of 1.4 kcal mol -1 relative to the experiment was achieved in 210 mutations only with geometry optimization, which was further reduced with MD simulations (MUE of 1.1 kcal mol -1 for the MD employing explicit solvent). This recalibrated method allows for a better computational identification of hot spots, avoiding expensive and time-consuming experiments or thermodynamic integration/ free energy perturbation/ uBAR calculations, and will hopefully help new drug discovery campaigns in their quest of searching spots of interest for binding small drug-like molecules at P:P interfaces.

  9. Item-location binding in working memory: is it hippocampus-dependent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Richard J; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh; Baddeley, Alan D

    2014-07-01

    A general consensus is emerging that the hippocampus has an important and active role in the creation of new long-term memory representations of associations or bindings between elements. However, it is less clear whether this contribution can be extended to the creation of temporary bound representations in working memory, involving the retention of small numbers of items over short delays. We examined this by administering a series of recognition and recall tests of working memory for colour-location binding and object-location binding to a patient with highly selective hippocampal damage (Jon), and groups of control participants. Jon achieved high levels of accuracy in all working memory tests of recognition and recall binding across retention intervals of up to 10s. In contrast, Jon performed at chance on an unexpected delayed test of the same object-location binding information. These findings indicate a clear dissociation between working memory and long-term memory, with no evidence for a critical hippocampal contribution to item-location binding in working memory. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Biomass energy from wood chips: Diesel fuel dependence?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmons, Dave; Mejia, Cesar Viteri

    2010-01-01

    Most renewable energy sources depend to some extent on use of other, non-renewable sources. In this study we explore use of diesel fuel in producing and transporting woody biomass in the state of New Hampshire, USA. We use two methods to estimate the diesel fuel used in woody biomass production: 1) a calculation based on case studies of diesel consumption in different parts of the wood chip supply chain, and 2) to support extrapolating those results to a regional system, an econometric study of the variation of wood-chip prices with respect to diesel fuel prices. The econometric study relies on an assumption of fixed demand, then assesses variables impacting supply, with a focus on how the price of diesel fuel affects price of biomass supplied. The two methods yield similar results. The econometric study, representing overall regional practices, suggests that a $1.00 per liter increase in diesel fuel price is associated with a $5.59 per Mg increase in the price of wood chips. On an energy basis, the diesel fuel used directly in wood chip production and transportation appears to account for less than 2% of the potential energy in the wood chips. Thus, the dependence of woody biomass energy production on diesel fuel does not appear to be extreme. (author)

  11. Orbital momentum profiles and binding energy spectra for the complete valence shell of molecular fluorine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Y.; Brion, C.E. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry; Brunger, M.J.; Zhao, K.; Grisogono, A.M.; Braidwood, S.; Weigold, E. [Flinders Univ. of South Australia, Adelaide, SA (Australia). Electronic Structure of Materials Centre; Chakravorty, S.J.; Davidson, E.R. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Sgamellotti, A. [Univ di Perugia (Italy). Dipartimento di Chimica; von Niessen, W. [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Inst fuer Physikalische

    1996-01-01

    The first electronic structural study of the complete valence shell binding energy spectrum of molecular fluorine, encompassing both the outer and inner valence regions, is reported. These binding energy spectra as well as the individual orbital momentum profiles have been measured using an energy dispersive multichannel electron momentum spectrometer at a total energy of 1500 eV, with an energy resolution of 1.5 eV and a momentum resolution of 0.1 a.u. The measured binding energy spectra in the energy range of 14-60 eV are compared with the results of ADC(4) many-body Green`s function and also direct-Configuration Interaction (CI) and MRSD-CI calculations. The experimental orbital electron momentum profiles are compared with SCF theoretical profiles calculated using the target Hartree-Fock approximation with a range of basis sets and with Density Functional Theory predictions in the target Kohn-Sham approximation with non-local potentials. The truncated (aug-cc-pv5z) Dunning basis sets were used for the Density Functional Theory calculations which also include some treatment of correlation via the exchange and correlation potentials. Comparisons are also made with the full ion-neutral overlap amplitude calculated with MRSD-CI wave functions. Large, saturated basis sets (199-GTO) were employed for both the high level SCF near Hartree-Fock limit and MRSD-CI calculations to investigate the effects of electron correlation and relaxation. 66 refs., 9 tabs., 9 figs.

  12. Relative Binding Free Energy Calculations in Drug Discovery: Recent Advances and Practical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cournia, Zoe; Allen, Bryce; Sherman, Woody

    2017-12-26

    Accurate in silico prediction of protein-ligand binding affinities has been a primary objective of structure-based drug design for decades due to the putative value it would bring to the drug discovery process. However, computational methods have historically failed to deliver value in real-world drug discovery applications due to a variety of scientific, technical, and practical challenges. Recently, a family of approaches commonly referred to as relative binding free energy (RBFE) calculations, which rely on physics-based molecular simulations and statistical mechanics, have shown promise in reliably generating accurate predictions in the context of drug discovery projects. This advance arises from accumulating developments in the underlying scientific methods (decades of research on force fields and sampling algorithms) coupled with vast increases in computational resources (graphics processing units and cloud infrastructures). Mounting evidence from retrospective validation studies, blind challenge predictions, and prospective applications suggests that RBFE simulations can now predict the affinity differences for congeneric ligands with sufficient accuracy and throughput to deliver considerable value in hit-to-lead and lead optimization efforts. Here, we present an overview of current RBFE implementations, highlighting recent advances and remaining challenges, along with examples that emphasize practical considerations for obtaining reliable RBFE results. We focus specifically on relative binding free energies because the calculations are less computationally intensive than absolute binding free energy (ABFE) calculations and map directly onto the hit-to-lead and lead optimization processes, where the prediction of relative binding energies between a reference molecule and new ideas (virtual molecules) can be used to prioritize molecules for synthesis. We describe the critical aspects of running RBFE calculations, from both theoretical and applied perspectives

  13. Energy-dependent pole expansions for the effective potentials in the four-body integral equations with tensor forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofianos, S.; Fiedeldey, H.; Haberzettl, H.

    1980-01-01

    We investigate the accuracy of the energy-dependent pole expansion for the (3+1) and (2+2) subamplitudes in the calculation of the binding energy of the α particle, E/sub α/, for separable NN potentials with tensor components. We employ the truncated t-matrix (t 00 ) approximation and compare our results for E/sub α/ to those obtained, independent of any separable expansion, by Gibson and Lehman and to the results for E/sub α/ obtained with the Hilbert-Schmidt expansion of the subamplitudes. It is shown that the energy-dependent pole expansion is both more economical and converges faster than the Hilbert-Schmidt expansion, even one term of the energy-dependent pole approximation already being accurate to better than 1.5%

  14. Quantum confinement effect and exciton binding energy of layered perovskite nanoplatelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We report the preparation of monolayer (n = 1, few-layer (n = 2–5 and 3D (n = ∞ organic lead bromide perovskite nanoplatelets (NPLs by tuning the molar ratio of methylammonium bromide (MABr and hexadecammonium bromide (HABr. The absorption spectrum of the monolayer (HA2PbBr4 perovskite NPLs shows about 138 nm blue shift from that of 3D MAPbBr3 perovskites, which is attributed to strong quantum confinement effect. We further investigate the two-photon photoluminescence (PL of the NPLs and measure the exciton binding energy of monolayer perovskite NPLs using linear absorption and two-photon PL excitation spectroscopy. The exciton binding energy of monolayer perovskite NPLs is about 218 meV, which is far larger than tens of meV in 3D lead halide perovskites.

  15. Relativistic deformed mean-field calculation of binding energy differences of mirror nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koepf, W.; Barreiro, L.A.

    1996-01-01

    Binding energy differences of mirror nuclei for A=15, 17, 27, 29, 31, 33, 39 and 41 are calculated in the framework of relativistic deformed mean-field theory. The spatial components of the vector meson fields and the photon are fully taken into account in a self-consistent manner. The calculated binding energy differences are systematically smaller than the experimental values and lend support to the existence of the Okamoto-Nolen-Schiffer anomaly found decades ago in nonrelativistic calculations. For the majority of the nuclei studied, however, the results are such that the anomaly is significantly smaller than the one obtained within state-of-the-art nonrelativistic calculations. (author). 35 refs

  16. Binding energies of double-Λ hypernuclei and ΛΛ G-matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himeno, Hiroyuki; Sakuda, Toshimi; Nagata, Sinobu; Yamamoto, Yasuo.

    1993-01-01

    Binding energies of double-Λ hypernuclei ΛΛ 10 Be, ΛΛ 13 B and ΛΛ 6 He are calculated on the basis of G-matrix theory in finite nuclei. The core + Λ + Λ three-body model is adopted and the G-matrix for ΛΛ interaction is treated consistently with the model space. As the bare interaction the Nijmegen model D and model F are used. It is discussed that the consistency of the interaction with the model space is very important to calculate reliably the binding energies. It is shown that if the new event of double-Λ hypernuclei is interpreted as ΛΛ 13 B, model D reproduces the experimental data very well, whereas model F does not. (author)

  17. Binding energies of sd-shell nuclei with a realistic effective Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalton, B.J.; Vary, J.P.; Baldridge, W.J.

    1977-01-01

    The nuclear shell model with a second-order effective Hamiltonian derived within Brueckner theory from the free nucleon-nucleon interaction is shown to yield accurate binding energies of nuclei with 16 < A < 40. This agreement is obtained by choosing the spectrum of low-lying unoccupied orbitals in a justified manner and, when necessary, by employing a statistical method to approximate the lowest eigenvalue of very large shell-model diagonalizations

  18. Prediction of trypsin/molecular fragment binding affinities by free energy decomposition and empirical scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Mark L.; Faver, John C.; Ucisik, Melek N.; Dashti, Danial S.; Zheng, Zheng; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2012-05-01

    Two families of binding affinity estimation methodologies are described which were utilized in the SAMPL3 trypsin/fragment binding affinity challenge. The first is a free energy decomposition scheme based on a thermodynamic cycle, which included separate contributions from enthalpy and entropy of binding as well as a solvent contribution. Enthalpic contributions were estimated with PM6-DH2 semiempirical quantum mechanical interaction energies, which were modified with a statistical error correction procedure. Entropic contributions were estimated with the rigid-rotor harmonic approximation, and solvent contributions to the free energy were estimated with several different methods. The second general methodology is the empirical score LISA, which contains several physics-based terms trained with the large PDBBind database of protein/ligand complexes. Here we also introduce LISA+, an updated version of LISA which, prior to scoring, classifies systems into one of four classes based on a ligand's hydrophobicity and molecular weight. Each version of the two methodologies (a total of 11 methods) was trained against a compiled set of known trypsin binders available in the Protein Data Bank to yield scaling parameters for linear regression models. Both raw and scaled scores were submitted to SAMPL3. Variants of LISA showed relatively low absolute errors but also low correlation with experiment, while the free energy decomposition methods had modest success when scaling factors were included. Nonetheless, re-scaled LISA yielded the best predictions in the challenge in terms of RMS error, and six of these models placed in the top ten best predictions by RMS error. This work highlights some of the difficulties of predicting binding affinities of small molecular fragments to protein receptors as well as the benefit of using training data.

  19. Effect of the dielectric constant of mesoscopic particle on the exciton binding energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai Zuyou; Gu Shiwei

    1991-09-01

    For materials with big exciton reduced mass and big dielectric constant, such as TiO 2 , the variation of dielectric constant with the radius of an ultrafine particle (UFP) is important for determining the exciton binding energy. For the first time a phenomenological formula of the dielectric constant of a UFP with its radius in mesoscopic range is put forward in order to explain the optical properties of TiO 2 UFP. (author). 22 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab

  20. Visualizing double-stranded RNA distribution and dynamics in living cells by dsRNA binding-dependent fluorescence complementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Xiaofei; Deng, Ping; Cui, Hongguang; Wang, Aiming

    2015-01-01

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is an important type of RNA that plays essential roles in diverse cellular processes in eukaryotic organisms and a hallmark in infections by positive-sense RNA viruses. Currently, no in vivo technology has been developed for visualizing dsRNA in living cells. Here, we report a dsRNA binding-dependent fluorescence complementation (dRBFC) assay that can be used to efficiently monitor dsRNA distribution and dynamics in vivo. The system consists of two dsRNA-binding proteins, which are fused to the N- and C-terminal halves of the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Binding of the two fusion proteins to a common dsRNA brings the split YFP halves in close proximity, leading to the reconstitution of the fluorescence-competent structure and restoration of fluorescence. Using this technique, we were able to visualize the distribution and trafficking of the replicative RNA intermediates of positive-sense RNA viruses in living cells. - Highlights: • A live-cell imaging system was developed for visualizing dsRNA in vivo. • It uses dsRNA binding proteins fused with two halves of a fluorescent protein. • Binding to a common dsRNA enables the reporter to become fluorescent. • The system can efficiently monitor viral RNA replication in living cells.

  1. Visualizing double-stranded RNA distribution and dynamics in living cells by dsRNA binding-dependent fluorescence complementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Xiaofei [Southern Crop Protection and Food Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, Ontario N5V 4T3 (Canada); College of Life and Environmental Sciences, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310036 (China); Deng, Ping; Cui, Hongguang [Southern Crop Protection and Food Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, Ontario N5V 4T3 (Canada); Wang, Aiming, E-mail: aiming.wang@agr.gc.ca [Southern Crop Protection and Food Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, Ontario N5V 4T3 (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is an important type of RNA that plays essential roles in diverse cellular processes in eukaryotic organisms and a hallmark in infections by positive-sense RNA viruses. Currently, no in vivo technology has been developed for visualizing dsRNA in living cells. Here, we report a dsRNA binding-dependent fluorescence complementation (dRBFC) assay that can be used to efficiently monitor dsRNA distribution and dynamics in vivo. The system consists of two dsRNA-binding proteins, which are fused to the N- and C-terminal halves of the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Binding of the two fusion proteins to a common dsRNA brings the split YFP halves in close proximity, leading to the reconstitution of the fluorescence-competent structure and restoration of fluorescence. Using this technique, we were able to visualize the distribution and trafficking of the replicative RNA intermediates of positive-sense RNA viruses in living cells. - Highlights: • A live-cell imaging system was developed for visualizing dsRNA in vivo. • It uses dsRNA binding proteins fused with two halves of a fluorescent protein. • Binding to a common dsRNA enables the reporter to become fluorescent. • The system can efficiently monitor viral RNA replication in living cells.

  2. Binding mode and free energy prediction of fisetin/β-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodee Nutho

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, our aim is to investigate the preferential binding mode and encapsulation of the flavonoid fisetin in the nano-pore of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD at the molecular level using various theoretical approaches: molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD simulations and binding free energy calculations. The molecular docking suggested four possible fisetin orientations in the cavity through its chromone or phenyl ring with two different geometries of fisetin due to the rotatable bond between the two rings. From the multiple MD results, the phenyl ring of fisetin favours its inclusion into the β-CD cavity, whilst less binding or even unbinding preference was observed in the complexes where the larger chromone ring is located in the cavity. All MM- and QM-PBSA/GBSA free energy predictions supported the more stable fisetin/β-CD complex of the bound phenyl ring. Van der Waals interaction is the key force in forming the complexes. In addition, the quantum mechanics calculations with M06-2X/6-31G(d,p clearly showed that both solvation effect and BSSE correction cannot be neglected for the energy determination of the chosen system.

  3. Precision measurements of high-energy conversion electron lines and determination of neutron binding energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braumandl, F.

    1979-01-01

    The paper first discusses the energy accuracy of the BILL conversion electron spectrometer at the Grenoble high flux reactor. With an improved temperature stabilisation of the magnets, an energy accuracy of ΔE/E -5 can be reached. After this, highly exact measurements of high-energy conversion electron lines of the 200 Hg, 114 Cd, 165 Dy, 168 Er, 239 U nuclei and the 13 C, 28 Al 3 H and 92 Zr photoelectron lines were carried out. Energy calibration of the spectrometer was carried out in the 1.5 MeV to 6.5 MeV range with intensive high-energy transitions of the 200 Hg nucleus. Systematic calibration errors could be investigated by means of combinations between the calibration lines. A calibration for absolute energies was obtained by comparing low-energy gamma transitions of 200 Hg with the 411.8 keV gold standard. (orig.) [de

  4. Cation binding to 15-TBA quadruplex DNA is a multiple-pathway cation-dependent process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetnikov, Roman V; Sponer, Jiri; Rassokhina, Olga I; Kopylov, Alexei M; Tsvetkov, Philipp O; Makarov, Alexander A; Golovin, Andrey V

    2011-12-01

    A combination of explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulation (30 simulations reaching 4 µs in total), hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics approach and isothermal titration calorimetry was used to investigate the atomistic picture of ion binding to 15-mer thrombin-binding quadruplex DNA (G-DNA) aptamer. Binding of ions to G-DNA is complex multiple pathway process, which is strongly affected by the type of the cation. The individual ion-binding events are substantially modulated by the connecting loops of the aptamer, which play several roles. They stabilize the molecule during time periods when the bound ions are not present, they modulate the route of the ion into the stem and they also stabilize the internal ions by closing the gates through which the ions enter the quadruplex. Using our extensive simulations, we for the first time observed full spontaneous exchange of internal cation between quadruplex molecule and bulk solvent at atomistic resolution. The simulation suggests that expulsion of the internally bound ion is correlated with initial binding of the incoming ion. The incoming ion then readily replaces the bound ion while minimizing any destabilization of the solute molecule during the exchange. © The Author(s) 2011. Published by Oxford University Press.

  5. Cation binding to 15-TBA quadruplex DNA is a multiple-pathway cation-dependent process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetnikov, Roman V.; Sponer, Jiri; Rassokhina, Olga I.; Kopylov, Alexei M.; Tsvetkov, Philipp O.; Makarov, Alexander A.; Golovin, Andrey V.

    2011-01-01

    A combination of explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulation (30 simulations reaching 4 µs in total), hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics approach and isothermal titration calorimetry was used to investigate the atomistic picture of ion binding to 15-mer thrombin-binding quadruplex DNA (G-DNA) aptamer. Binding of ions to G-DNA is complex multiple pathway process, which is strongly affected by the type of the cation. The individual ion-binding events are substantially modulated by the connecting loops of the aptamer, which play several roles. They stabilize the molecule during time periods when the bound ions are not present, they modulate the route of the ion into the stem and they also stabilize the internal ions by closing the gates through which the ions enter the quadruplex. Using our extensive simulations, we for the first time observed full spontaneous exchange of internal cation between quadruplex molecule and bulk solvent at atomistic resolution. The simulation suggests that expulsion of the internally bound ion is correlated with initial binding of the incoming ion. The incoming ion then readily replaces the bound ion while minimizing any destabilization of the solute molecule during the exchange. PMID:21893589

  6. Binding energy and optical properties of an off-center hydrogenic donor impurity in a spherical quantum dot placed at the center of a cylindrical nano-wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safarpour, Gh.; Barati, M.; Zamani, A.; Niknam, E.

    2014-01-01

    The binding energy as well as the linear, third-order nonlinear and total optical absorption coefficient and refractive index changes of an off-center hydrogenic donor impurity in an InAs spherical quantum dot placed at the center of a GaAs cylindrical nano-wire have been investigated. In this regard, the effective-mass approximation approach is considered and eigenvalues and corresponding eigenfunctions are calculated via the finite element method. The binding energy is plotted as a function of the dot size and impurity position along with optical properties as a function of photon energy. In this study two different directions have been considered for impurity position, along the nano-wire axis and perpendicular to it. It has been found that the binding energy, absorption coefficient and refractive index changes are impressively affected not only by the dot radius but also by the position of the impurity and its direction. Additionally, the optical saturation can be tuned by the direction of the impurity and incident optical intensity. -- Highlights: • We consider spherical quantum dot located at the center of a cylindrical nano-wire. • An off-center hydrogenic donor impurity is considered in the system. • Binding energy is affected by orientation of impurity and its distance from center. • Saturation depends on the orientation of impurity position. • By shifting impurity position, orientation and dot radius blue- and red-shifts appear

  7. Vacancy migration energy dependence on local chemical environment in Fe–Cr alloys: A Density Functional Theory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, D., E-mail: davide.costa.ge@gmail.com [Unité Matériaux et Transformations, CNRS UMR8207, Université de Lille 1, F-59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cédex (France); EDF-R and D Département MMC, Les Renardières, F-77818 Moret sur Loing Cédex (France); Laboratoire commun (EDF–CNRS): Etude et Modélisation des Microstructures pour le Vieillissement des Matériaux (EM2VM) (France); Adjanor, G. [EDF-R and D Département MMC, Les Renardières, F-77818 Moret sur Loing Cédex (France); Laboratoire commun (EDF–CNRS): Etude et Modélisation des Microstructures pour le Vieillissement des Matériaux (EM2VM) (France); Becquart, C.S. [Unité Matériaux et Transformations, CNRS UMR8207, Université de Lille 1, F-59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cédex (France); Laboratoire commun (EDF–CNRS): Etude et Modélisation des Microstructures pour le Vieillissement des Matériaux (EM2VM) (France); Olsson, P. [Laboratoire commun (EDF–CNRS): Etude et Modélisation des Microstructures pour le Vieillissement des Matériaux (EM2VM) (France); KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Reactor Physics, Roslagstullsbacken 21, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); and others

    2014-09-15

    The first step towards the understanding and the modelling of the Fe–Cr alloy kinetic properties consists in estimating the migration energies related to the processes that drive the microstructure evolution. The vacancy’s migration barrier is expected to depend on the vacancy–migrating atom pair atomic environment as pointed out by Nguyen-Manh et al. or Bonny et al. In this paper, we address the issue of the dependence on the vacancy’s local atomic environment of both the vacancy migration energy and the configurational energy change ΔE that occurs when the vacancy jumps towards one of its nearest neighbour sites. A DFT approach is used to determine the ground state energy associated to a given configuration of the system. The results are interpreted in the light of the chromium–chromium and chromium–vacancy binding energies as well as the substitutional chromium atoms magnetic properties.

  8. Momentum distributions and binding energies for the valence orbitals of methanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minchinton, A.; Brion, C.E.; Weigold, E.

    1981-06-01

    Methanol has been studied by binary (e,2e) coincidence spectroscopy at 1200 eV using symmetric non-coplanar geometry. The binding energy spectrum has been determined in the energy range up to 46eV at azimuthal angles of 0 deg. and 7 deg. Momentum distributions measured for the valence orbitals are compared with calculations using the wave functions (essentially double-zeta quality) reported by Snyder and Basch. Agreement is generally quite good except for the outermost orbitals and the 5a' orbital which all show somewhat larger low momentum components than predicted by the calculations. This is indicative of a more spatially extended orbital than is predicted

  9. First-principles investigation on the electronic efficiency and binding energy of the contacts formed by graphene and poly-aromatic hydrocarbon anchoring groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yang; Tu, Xingchen; Wang, Hao; Hou, Shimin, E-mail: smhou@pku.edu.cn [Centre for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Key Laboratory for the Physics and Chemistry of Nanodevices, Department of Electronics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Sanvito, Stefano [School of Physics, AMBER and CRANN Institute, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2015-04-28

    The electronic efficiency and binding energy of contacts formed between graphene electrodes and poly-aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) anchoring groups have been investigated by the non-equilibrium Green’s function formalism combined with density functional theory. Our calculations show that PAH molecules always bind in the interior and at the edge of graphene in the AB stacking manner, and that the binding energy increases following the increase of the number of carbon and hydrogen atoms constituting the PAH molecule. When we move to analyzing the electronic transport properties of molecular junctions with a six-carbon alkyne chain as the central molecule, the electronic efficiency of the graphene-PAH contacts is found to depend on the energy gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of the corresponding PAH anchoring group, rather than its size. To be specific, the smaller is the HOMO-LUMO gap of the PAH anchoring group, the higher is the electronic efficiency of the graphene-PAH contact. Although the HOMO-LUMO gap of a PAH molecule depends on its specific configuration, PAH molecules with similar atomic structures show a decreasing trend for their HOMO-LUMO gap as the number of fused benzene rings increases. Therefore, graphene-conjugated molecule-graphene junctions with high-binding and high-conducting graphene-PAH contacts can be realized by choosing appropriate PAH anchor groups with a large area and a small HOMO-LUMO gap.

  10. First-principles investigation on the electronic efficiency and binding energy of the contacts formed by graphene and poly-aromatic hydrocarbon anchoring groups

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yang; Tu, Xingchen; Wang, Hao; Sanvito, Stefano; Hou, Shimin

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 AIP Publishing LLC. The electronic efficiency and binding energy of contacts formed between graphene electrodes and poly-aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) anchoring groups have been investigated by the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism combined with density functional theory. Our calculations show that PAH molecules always bind in the interior and at the edge of graphene in the AB stacking manner, and that the binding energy increases following the increase of the number of carbon and hydrogen atoms constituting the PAH molecule. When we move to analyzing the electronic transport properties of molecular junctions with a six-carbon alkyne chain as the central molecule, the electronic efficiency of the graphene-PAH contacts is found to depend on the energy gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of the corresponding PAH anchoring group, rather than its size. To be specific, the smaller is the HOMO-LUMO gap of the PAH anchoring group, the higher is the electronic efficiency of the graphene-PAH contact. Although the HOMO-LUMO gap of a PAH molecule depends on its specific configuration, PAH molecules with similar atomic structures show a decreasing trend for their HOMO-LUMO gap as the number of fused benzene rings increases. Therefore, graphene-conjugated molecule-graphene junctions with high-binding and high-conducting graphene-PAH contacts can be realized by choosing appropriate PAH anchor groups with a large area and a small HOMO-LUMO gap.

  11. Benchmark calculations with correlated molecular wave functions. VII. Binding energy and structure of the HF dimer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, K.A.; Dunning, T.H. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The hydrogen bond energy and geometry of the HF dimer have been investigated using the series of correlation consistent basis sets from aug-cc-pVDZ to aug-cc-pVQZ and several theoretical methods including Moller--Plesset perturbation and coupled cluster theories. Estimates of the complete basis set (CBS) limit have been derived for the binding energy of (HF) 2 at each level of theory by utilizing the regular convergence characteristics of the correlation consistent basis sets. CBS limit hydrogen bond energies of 3.72, 4.53, 4.55, and 4.60 kcal/mol are estimated at the SCF, MP2, MP4, and CCSD(T) levels of theory, respectively. CBS limits for the intermolecular F--F distance are estimated to be 2.82, 2.74, 2.73, and 2.73 A, respectively, for the same correlation methods. The effects of basis set superposition error (BSSE) on both the binding energies and structures have also been investigated for each basis set using the standard function counterpoise (CP) method. While BSSE has a negligible effect on the intramolecular geometries, the CP-corrected F--F distance and binding energy differ significantly from the uncorrected values for the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set; these differences decrease regularly with increasing basis set size, yielding the same limits in the CBS limit. Best estimates for the equilibrium properties of the HF dimer from CCSD(T) calculations are D e =4.60 kcal/mol, R FF =2.73 A, r 1 =0.922 A, r 2 =0.920 A, Θ 1 =7 degree, and Θ 2 =111 degree

  12. Locating Temporal Functional Dynamics of Visual Short-Term Memory Binding using Graph Modular Dirichlet Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Keith; Ricaud, Benjamin; Shahid, Nauman; Rhodes, Stephen; Starr, John M.; Ibáñez, Augustin; Parra, Mario A.; Escudero, Javier; Vandergheynst, Pierre

    2017-02-01

    Visual short-term memory binding tasks are a promising early marker for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). To uncover functional deficits of AD in these tasks it is meaningful to first study unimpaired brain function. Electroencephalogram recordings were obtained from encoding and maintenance periods of tasks performed by healthy young volunteers. We probe the task’s transient physiological underpinnings by contrasting shape only (Shape) and shape-colour binding (Bind) conditions, displayed in the left and right sides of the screen, separately. Particularly, we introduce and implement a novel technique named Modular Dirichlet Energy (MDE) which allows robust and flexible analysis of the functional network with unprecedented temporal precision. We find that connectivity in the Bind condition is less integrated with the global network than in the Shape condition in occipital and frontal modules during the encoding period of the right screen condition. Using MDE we are able to discern driving effects in the occipital module between 100-140 ms, coinciding with the P100 visually evoked potential, followed by a driving effect in the frontal module between 140-180 ms, suggesting that the differences found constitute an information processing difference between these modules. This provides temporally precise information over a heterogeneous population in promising tasks for the detection of AD.

  13. Rapidity dependence of strangeness enhancement factor at FAIR energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, Kalyan; Bhattacharjee, B.

    2014-01-01

    Strange particles are produced only at the time of collisions and thus expected to carry important information of collision dynamics. Strangeness enhancement is considered to be one of the traditional signatures of formation of Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). Due to the limitation of the detector acceptance, the past and ongoing heavy ion experiments could measure the strangeness enhancement at midrapidity only. But the future heavy ion experiment CBM at FAIR will have the access to the entire forward rapidity hemisphere and thus the experimental determination of rapidity dependent strangeness enhancement is a possibility. In this work, an attempt has therefore been made to study the rapidity dependent strangeness enhancement at FAIR energies with the help of a string based hadronic model (UrQMD). A sum of 93 million minimum biased UrQMD events have been used for the present analysis

  14. Energy dependence of strangeness production and event-byevent fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rustamov Anar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the energy dependence of strangeness production in nucleus-nucleus collisions and contrast it with the experimental observations in pp and p-A collisions at LHC energies as a function of the charged particle multiplicities. For the high multiplicity final states the results from pp and p-Pb reactions systematically approach the values obtained from Pb-Pb collisions. In statistical models this implies an approach to the thermodynamic limit, where differences of mean multiplicities between various formalisms, such as Canonical and Grand Canonical Ensembles, vanish. Furthermore, we report on event-by-event net-proton fluctuations as measured by STAR at RHIC/BNL and by ALICE at LHC/CERN and discuss various non-dynamical contributions to these measurements, which should be properly subtracted before comparison to theoretical calculations on dynamical net-baryon fluctuations.

  15. RNA-binding protein PSPC1 promotes the differentiation-dependent nuclear export of adipocyte RNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jiexin; Rajbhandari, Prashant; Damianov, Andrey

    2017-01-01

    A highly orchestrated gene expression program establishes the properties that define mature adipocytes, but the contribution of posttranscriptional factors to the adipocyte phenotype is poorly understood. Here we have shown that the RNA-binding protein PSPC1, a component of the paraspeckle complex...

  16. Mycobacterial laminin-binding histone-like protein mediates collagen-dependent cytoadherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Alves Dias

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available When grown in the presence of exogenous collagen I, Mycobacterium bovis BCG was shown to form clumps. Scanning electron microscopy examination of these clumps revealed the presence of collagen fibres cross-linking the bacilli. Since collagen is a major constituent of the eukaryotic extracellular matrices, we assayed BCG cytoadherence in the presence of exogenous collagen I. Collagen increased the interaction of the bacilli with A549 type II pneumocytes or U937 macrophages, suggesting that BCG is able to recruit collagen to facilitate its attachment to host cells. Using an affinity chromatography approach, we have isolated a BCG collagen-binding protein corresponding to the previously described mycobacterial laminin-binding histone-like protein (LBP/Hlp, a highly conserved protein associated with the mycobacterial cell wall. Moreover, Mycobacterium leprae LBP/Hlp, a well-characterized adhesin, was also able to bind collagen I. Finally, using recombinant fragments of M. leprae LBP/Hlp, we mapped the collagen-binding activity within the C-terminal domain of the adhesin. Since this protein was already shown to be involved in the recognition of laminin and heparan sulphate-containing proteoglycans, the present observations reinforce the adhesive activities of LBP/Hlp, which can be therefore considered as a multifaceted mycobacterial adhesin, playing an important role in both leprosy and tuberculosis pathogenesis.

  17. Deciphering the binding behavior of flavonoids to the cyclin dependent kinase 6/cyclin D complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxiao Zhang

    Full Text Available Flavonoids, a class of natural compounds with variable phenolic structures, have been found to possess anti-cancer activities by modulating different enzymes and receptors like CDK6. To understand the binding behavior of flavonoids that inhibit the active CDK6, molecular dynamics (MD simulations were performed on six inhibitors, chrysin (M01, fisetin (M03, galangin (M04, genistein (M05, quercetin (M06 and kaempferol (M07, complexed with CDK6/cyclin D. For all six flavonoids, the 3'-OH and 4'-OH of B-ring were found to be favorable for hydrogen bond formation, but the 3-OH on the C-ring and 5-OH on the A-ring were unfavorable, which were confirmed by the MD simulation results of the test molecule, 3', 4', 7-trihydroxyflavone (M15. The binding efficiencies of flavonoids against the CDK6/cyclin D complex were mainly through the electrostatic (especially the H-bond force and vdW interactions with residues ILE19, VAL27, ALA41, GLU61, PHE98, GLN103, ASP163 and LEU152. The order of binding affinities of these flavonoids toward the CDK6/cyclin D was M03 > M01 > M07 > M15 > M06 > M05 > M04. It is anticipated that the binding features of flavonoid inhibitors studied in the present work may provide valuable insights for the development of CDK6 inhibitors.

  18. High-Throughput Testing of Antibody-Dependent Binding Inhibition of Placental Malaria Parasites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten A; Salanti, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The particular virulence of Plasmodium falciparum manifests in diverse severe malaria syndromes as cerebral malaria, severe anemia and placental malaria. The cause of both the severity and the diversity of infection outcome, is the ability of the infected erythrocyte (IE) to bind a range......-throughput assay used in the preclinical and clinical development of a VAR2CSA based vaccine against placental malaria....

  19. Serum albumin promotes ATP-binding cassette transporter-dependent sterol uptake in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marek, Magdalena; Silvestro, Daniele; Fredslund, Maria D.

    2014-01-01

    Sterol uptake in fungi is a multistep process that involves interaction between external sterols and the cell wall, incorporation of sterol molecules into the plasma membrane, and subsequent integration into intracellular membranes for turnover. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters have been...

  20. The energy dependence of neutron-proton charge exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouquet, A.; Diu, R.

    1978-01-01

    The new Fermilab data on up charge exchange are analysed phenomenologically, to determine the energy dependence of the amplitudes in the corresponding domain (60 2 trajectories. If one imposes the presence of standard rho-A 2 terms (three-component analysis), one has to introduce a pomeronlike contribution, with a trajectory α approximately equal to 1.0+0.25t. In both cases, the resulting parametrization gives a good description of the data from Psub(lab)=1GeV/c up to 300GeV/c

  1. Criticality problems in energy dependent neutron transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Victory, H.D. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The criticality problem is considered for energy dependent neutron transport in an isotropically scattering, homogeneous slab. Under a positivity assumption on the scattering kernel, an expression can be found relating the thickness of the slab to a parameter characterizing production by fission. This is accomplished by exploiting the Perron-Frobenius-Jentsch characterization of positive operators (i.e. those leaving invariant a normal, reproducing cone in a Banach space). It is pointed out that those techniques work for classes of multigroup problems were the Case singular eigenfunction approach is not as feasible as in the one-group theory, which is also analyzed

  2. Energy-dependent applications of the transfer matrix method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oeztunali, O.I.; Aronson, R.

    1975-01-01

    The transfer matrix method is applied to energy-dependent neutron transport problems for multiplying and nonmultiplying media in one-dimensional plane geometry. Experimental cross sections are used for total, elastic, and inelastic scattering and fission. Numerical solutions are presented for the problem of a unit point isotropic source in an infinite medium of water and for the problem of the critical 235 U slab with finite water reflectors. No iterations were necessary in this method. Numerical results obtained are consistent with physical considerations and compare favorably with the moments method results for the problem of the unit point isotropic source in an infinite water medium. (U.S.)

  3. Action dependent heuristic dynamic programming based residential energy scheduling with home energy inter-exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Yancai; Liu, Derong; Wei, Qinglai

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The algorithm is developed in the two-household energy management environment. • We develop the absent energy penalty cost for the first time. • The algorithm has ability to keep adapting in real-time operations. • Its application can lower total costs and achieve better load balancing. - Abstract: Residential energy scheduling is a hot topic nowadays in the background of energy saving and environmental protection worldwide. To achieve this objective, a new residential energy scheduling algorithm is developed for energy management, based on action dependent heuristic dynamic programming. The algorithm works under the circumstance of residential real-time pricing and two adjacent housing units with energy inter-exchange, which can reduce the overall cost and enhance renewable energy efficiency after long-term operation. It is designed to obtain the optimal control policy to manage the directions and amounts of electricity energy flux. The algorithm’s architecture is mainly constructed based on neural networks, denoting the learned characteristics in the linkage of layers. To get close to real situations, many constraints such as maximum charging/discharging power of batteries are taken into account. The absent energy penalty cost is developed for the first time as a part of the performance index function. When the environment changes, the residential energy scheduling algorithm gains new features and keeps adapting in real-time operations. Simulation results show that the developed algorithm is beneficial to energy conversation

  4. Clostridium Perfringens Epsilon Toxin Binds to Membrane Lipids and Its Cytotoxic Action Depends on Sulfatide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carles Gil

    Full Text Available Epsilon toxin (Etx is one of the major lethal toxins produced by Clostridium perfringens types B and D, being the causal agent of fatal enterotoxemia in animals, mainly sheep and goats. Etx is synthesized as a non-active prototoxin form (proEtx that becomes active upon proteolytic activation. Etx exhibits a cytotoxic effect through the formation of a pore in the plasma membrane of selected cell targets where Etx specifically binds due to the presence of specific receptors. However, the identity and nature of host receptors of Etx remain a matter of controversy. In the present study, the interactions between Etx and membrane lipids from the synaptosome-enriched fraction from rat brain (P2 fraction and MDCK cell plasma membrane preparations were analyzed. Our findings show that both Etx and proEtx bind to lipids extracted from lipid rafts from the two different models as assessed by protein-lipid overlay assay. Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids. Binding of proEtx to sulfatide, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol (3-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol (5-phosphate was detected. Removal of the sulphate groups via sulfatase treatment led to a dramatic decrease in Etx-induced cytotoxicity, but not in proEtx-GFP binding to MDCK cells or a significant shift in oligomer formation, pointing to a role of sulfatide in pore formation in rafts but not in toxin binding to the target cell membrane. These results show for the first time the interaction between Etx and membrane lipids from host tissue and point to a major role for sulfatides in C. perfringens epsilon toxin pathophysiology.

  5. Effect of trastuzumab interchain disulfide bond cleavage on Fcγ receptor binding and antibody-dependent tumour cell phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Mami; Yamanoi, Ayaka; Machino, Yusuke; Ootsubo, Michiko; Izawa, Ken-ichi; Kohroki, Junya; Masuho, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    The Fc domain of human IgG1 binds to Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) to induce effector functions such as phagocytosis. There are four interchain disulfide bonds between the H and L chains. In this study, the disulfide bonds within the IgG1 trastuzumab (TRA), which is specific for HER2, were cleaved by mild S-sulfonation or by mild reduction followed by S-alkylation with three different reagents. The cleavage did not change the binding activities of TRA to HER2-bearing SK-BR-3 cells. The binding activities of TRA to FcγRIIA and FcγRIIB were greatly enhanced by modification with mild reduction and S-alkylation with ICH2CONH2 or N-(4-aminophenyl) maleimide, while the binding activities of TRA to FcγRI and FcγRIIIA were decreased by any of the four modifications. However, the interchain disulfide bond cleavage by the different modifications did not change the antibody-dependent cell-mediated phagocytosis (ADCP) of SK-BR-3 cells by activated THP-1 cells. The order of FcγR expression levels on the THP-1 cells was FcγRII > FcγRI > FcγRIII and ADCP was inhibited by blocking antibodies against FcγRI and FcγRII. These results imply that the effect of the interchain disulfide bond cleavage on FcγRs binding and ADCP is dependent on modifications of the cysteine residues and the FcγR isotypes. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  6. Photoaffinity labeling with cholesterol analogues precisely maps a cholesterol-binding site in voltage-dependent anion channel-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budelier, Melissa M; Cheng, Wayland W L; Bergdoll, Lucie; Chen, Zi-Wei; Janetka, James W; Abramson, Jeff; Krishnan, Kathiresan; Mydock-McGrane, Laurel; Covey, Douglas F; Whitelegge, Julian P; Evers, Alex S

    2017-06-02

    Voltage-dependent anion channel-1 (VDAC1) is a highly regulated β-barrel membrane protein that mediates transport of ions and metabolites between the mitochondria and cytosol of the cell. VDAC1 co-purifies with cholesterol and is functionally regulated by cholesterol, among other endogenous lipids. Molecular modeling studies based on NMR observations have suggested five cholesterol-binding sites in VDAC1, but direct experimental evidence for these sites is lacking. Here, to determine the sites of cholesterol binding, we photolabeled purified mouse VDAC1 (mVDAC1) with photoactivatable cholesterol analogues and analyzed the photolabeled sites with both top-down mass spectrometry (MS), and bottom-up MS paired with a clickable, stable isotope-labeled tag, FLI -tag. Using cholesterol analogues with a diazirine in either the 7 position of the steroid ring (LKM38) or the aliphatic tail (KK174), we mapped a binding pocket in mVDAC1 localized to Thr 83 and Glu 73 , respectively. When Glu 73 was mutated to a glutamine, KK174 no longer photolabeled this residue, but instead labeled the nearby Tyr 62 within this same binding pocket. The combination of analytical strategies employed in this work permits detailed molecular mapping of a cholesterol-binding site in a protein, including an orientation of the sterol within the site. Our work raises the interesting possibility that cholesterol-mediated regulation of VDAC1 may be facilitated through a specific binding site at the functionally important Glu 73 residue. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Human IGF-I propeptide A promotes articular chondrocyte biosynthesis and employs glycosylation-dependent heparin binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shuiliang; Kelly, Brian J; Wang, Congrong; Klingler, Ken; Chan, Albert; Eckert, George J; Trippel, Stephen B

    2018-03-01

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) is a key regulator of chondrogenesis, but its therapeutic application to articular cartilage damage is limited by rapid elimination from the repair site. The human IGF-I gene gives rise to three IGF-I propeptides (proIGF-IA, proIGF-IB and proIGF-IC) that are cleaved to create mature IGF-I. In this study, we elucidate the processing of IGF-I precursors by articular chondrocytes, and test the hypotheses that proIGF-I isoforms bind to heparin and regulate articular chondrocyte biosynthesis. Human IGF-I propeptides and mutants were overexpressed in bovine articular chondrocytes. IGF-I products were characterized by ELISA, western blot and FPLC using a heparin column. The biosynthetic activity of IGF-I products on articular chondrocytes was assayed for DNA and glycosaminoglycan that the cells produced. Secreted IGF-I propeptides stimulated articular chondrocyte biosynthetic activity to the same degree as mature IGF-I. Of the three IGF-I propeptides, only one, proIGF-IA, strongly bound to heparin. Interestingly, heparin binding of proIGF-IA depended on N-glycosylation at Asn92 in the EA peptide. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that N-glycosylation determines the binding of a heparin-binding protein to heparin. The biosynthetic and heparin binding abilities of proIGF-IA, coupled with its generation of IGF-I, suggest that proIGF-IA may have therapeutic value for articular cartilage repair. These data identify human pro-insulin-like growth factor IA as a bifunctional protein. Its combined ability to bind heparin and augment chondrocyte biosynthesis makes it a promising therapeutic agent for cartilage damage due to trauma and osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Tight-binding approximations to time-dependent density functional theory — A fast approach for the calculation of electronically excited states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rüger, Robert, E-mail: rueger@scm.com [Scientific Computing & Modelling NV, De Boelelaan 1083, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Theoretical Chemistry, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1083, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wilhelm-Ostwald-Institut für Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Linnéstr. 2, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Lenthe, Erik van [Scientific Computing & Modelling NV, De Boelelaan 1083, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Heine, Thomas [Wilhelm-Ostwald-Institut für Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Linnéstr. 2, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Visscher, Lucas [Department of Theoretical Chemistry, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1083, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-05-14

    We propose a new method of calculating electronically excited states that combines a density functional theory based ground state calculation with a linear response treatment that employs approximations used in the time-dependent density functional based tight binding (TD-DFTB) approach. The new method termed time-dependent density functional theory TD-DFT+TB does not rely on the DFTB parametrization and is therefore applicable to systems involving all combinations of elements. We show that the new method yields UV/Vis absorption spectra that are in excellent agreement with computationally much more expensive TD-DFT calculations. Errors in vertical excitation energies are reduced by a factor of two compared to TD-DFTB.

  9. Effects of symmetry energy and momentum dependent interaction on low-energy reaction mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the dipole response associated with the Pygmy Dipole Resonance (PDR and the Isovector Giant Dipole Resonance (IVGDR, in connection with specific properties of the nuclear effective interaction (symmetry energy and momentum dependence, in the neutron-rich systems 68Ni, 132Sn and 208Pb. We perform our investigation within a microscopic transport model based on the Landau-Vlasov kinetic equation.We observe that the peak energies of PDR and IVGDR are shifted to higher values when employing momentum dependent interactions, with respect to the results obtained neglecting momentum dependence. The calculated energies are close to the experimental values and similar to the results obtained in Hartree-Fock (HF with Random Phase Approximation (RPA calculations.

  10. Hydrogenic impurity binding energy in vertically coupled Ga1-xAlxAs quantum-dots under hydrostatic pressure and applied electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duque, C.M.; Barseghyan, M.G.; Duque, C.A.

    2009-01-01

    This work deals with a theoretical study, using a variational method and the effective mass approximation, of the ground state binding energy of a hydrogenic donor impurity in a vertically coupled multiple quantum dot structure under the effects of hydrostatic pressure and in-growth direction applied electric field. The low dimensional structure consists of three cylindrical shaped GaAs quantum dots coupled by Ga 1-x Al x As barriers. For the hydrostatic pressure has been considered the Γ-X crossover in the Ga 1-x Al x As material. As a general, the results show that: (1) the binding energy as a function of the impurity position has a similar shape to that shown by the electron wave function without the Coulomb interaction, (2) the presence of the electric field changes dramatically the binding energy profile destroying (favoring) the symmetry in the structures, and (3) depending on the impurity position the binding energy can increase or decrease with the hydrostatic pressure mainly due to increases or decreases of the carrier-wave function symmetry by changing the height of the potential barrier.

  11. Low energy neutron scattering for energy dependent cross sections. General considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothenstein, W; Dagan, R [Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa (Israel). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1996-12-01

    We consider in this paper some aspects related to neutron scattering at low energies by nuclei which are subject to thermal agitation. The scattering is determined by a temperature dependent joint scattering kernel, or the corresponding joint probability density, which is a function of two variables, the neutron energy after scattering, and the cosine of the angle of scattering, for a specified energy and direction of motion of the neutron, before the interaction takes place. This joint probability density is easy to calculate, when the nucleus which causes the scattering of the neutron is at rest. It can be expressed by a delta function, since there is a one to one correspondence between the neutron energy change, and the cosine of the scattering angle. If the thermal motion of the target nucleus is taken into account, the calculation is rather more complicated. The delta function relation between the cosine of the angle of scattering and the neutron energy change is now averaged over the spectrum of velocities of the target nucleus, and becomes a joint kernel depending on both these variables. This function has a simple form, if the target nucleus behaves as an ideal gas, which has a scattering cross section independent of energy. An energy dependent scattering cross section complicates the treatment further. An analytic expression is no longer obtained for the ideal gas temperature dependent joint scattering kernel as a function of the neutron energy after the interaction and the cosine of the scattering angle. Instead the kernel is expressed by an inverse Fourier Transform of a complex integrand, which is averaged over the velocity spectrum of the target nucleus. (Abstract Truncated)

  12. The HTLV-1 Tax protein binding domain of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4 includes the regulatory PSTAIRE helix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grassmann Ralph

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Tax oncoprotein of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is leukemogenic in transgenic mice and induces permanent T-cell growth in vitro. It is found in active CDK holoenzyme complexes from adult T-cell leukemia-derived cultures and stimulates the G1- to-S phase transition by activating the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK CDK4. The Tax protein directly and specifically interacts with CDK4 and cyclin D2 and binding is required for enhanced CDK4 kinase activity. The protein-protein contact between Tax and the components of the cyclin D/CDK complexes increases the association of CDK4 and its positive regulatory subunit cyclin D and renders the complex resistant to p21CIP inhibition. Tax mutants affecting the N-terminus cannot bind cyclin D and CDK4. Results To analyze, whether the N-terminus of Tax is capable of CDK4-binding, in vitro binding -, pull down -, and mammalian two-hybrid analyses were performed. These experiments revealed that a segment of 40 amino acids is sufficient to interact with CDK4 and cyclin D2. To define a Tax-binding domain and analyze how Tax influences the kinase activity, a series of CDK4 deletion mutants was tested. Different assays revealed two regions which upon deletion consistently result in reduced binding activity. These were isolated and subjected to mammalian two-hybrid analysis to test their potential to interact with the Tax N-terminus. These experiments concurrently revealed binding at the N- and C-terminus of CDK4. The N-terminal segment contains the PSTAIRE helix, which is known to control the access of substrate to the active cleft of CDK4 and thus the kinase activity. Conclusion Since the N- and C-terminus of CDK4 are neighboring in the predicted three-dimensional protein structure, it is conceivable that they comprise a single binding domain, which interacts with the Tax N-terminus.

  13. Constraining the gravitational binding energy of PSR J0737-3039B using terrestrial nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, W. G.; Li Baoan

    2009-01-01

    We show that the gravitational binding energy of a neutron star of a given mass is correlated with the slope of the nuclear symmetry energy at 1-2 times nuclear saturation density for equations of state without significant softening (i.e., those that predict maximum masses M max >1.44M · in line with the largest accurately measured neutron star mass). Applying recent laboratory constraints on the slope of the symmetry energy to this correlation we extract a constraint on the baryon mass of the lower mass member of the double pulsar binary system, PSR J0737-3039B. We compare with independent constraints derived from modeling the progenitor star of J0737-3039B up to and through its collapse under the assumption that it formed in an electron capture supernova. The two sets of constraints are consistent only if L < or approx. 70 MeV.

  14. Energy and zenith angle dependence of atmospheric muons

    CERN Document Server

    Maeda, K

    1973-01-01

    The recently proposed new process for energetic-muon production in the atmosphere should be tested at Mt. Chacaltaya. Rigorous calculations of zenith-angle distribution of atmospheric muons have been made for the altitude of 5200 m above sea level with energy range from 100 GeV to 100 TeV and for zenith angles from 0 degrees to 92.3 degrees . Calculations are based on the extension of the Chapman function to the case of a non-isothermal atmosphere, taking into account (i) energy- dependent nuclear-interaction mean free path of cosmic-ray hadrons in air, (ii) different magnitudes of photonuclear cross-section in the energy-loss process of muons in the atmosphere, (iii) contributions of atmospheric muons arriving below the horizontal directions, and (iv) atmospheric structure and geomagnetic deflection. Results are compared with those corresponding to sea level. Range straggling, particularly its effect on horizontally incident muons, is investigated by Monte Carlo calculation, indicating that its effects and t...

  15. Energy dependence of radiation interaction parameters of some organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mohinder; Tondon, Akash; Sandhu, B. S.; Singh, Bhajan

    2018-04-01

    Gamma rays interact with a material through photoelectric absorption, Compton scattering, Rayleigh scattering and Pair production in the intermediate energy range. The probability of occurrence of a particular type of process depends on the energy of incident gamma rays, atomic number of the material, scattering angle and geometrical conditions. Various radiological parameters for organic compounds, namely ethylene glycol (C2H6O2), propylene glycol (C3H8O2), glycerin (C3H8O3), isoamyl alcohol (C5H12O), butanone (C4H8O), acetophenone (C8H8O2), cyclohexanone (C6H10O), furfural (C5H4O2), benzaldehyde (C7H6O), cinnamaldehyde (C9H8O), glutaraldehyde (C5H8O2), aniline (C6H7N), benzyl amine (C6H7N), nitrobenzene (C6H5NO2), ethyl benzene (C8H10), ethyl formate (C3H6O2) and water (H2O) are presented at 81, 122, 356 and 511 keV energies employing NaI(Tl) scintillation detector in narrow-beam transmission geometry. The radiation interaction parameters such as mass attenuation, molar extinction and mass energy absorption coefficients, half value layer, total atomic and effective electronic cross-sections and CT number have been evaluated for these organic compounds. The general trend of values of mass attenuation coefficients, half value layer, molar extinction coefficients, total atomic and effective electronic cross-sections and mass energy absorption coefficients shows a decrease with increase in incident gamma photon energy. The values of CT number are found to increases linearly with increase of effective atomic number (Zeff). The variation in CT number around Zeff ≈ 3.3 shows the peak like structure with respect to water and the correlation between CT number and linear attenuation coefficient is about 0.99. Appropriate equations are fitted to these experimentally determined parameters for the organic compounds at incident photon energy ranging from 81 keV to 511 keV used in the present study. Experimental values are compared with the theoretical data obtained using Win

  16. An extension of the fenske-hall LCAO method for approximate calculations of inner-shell binding energies of molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwanziger, Ch.; Reinhold, J.

    1980-02-01

    The approximate LCAO MO method of Fenske and Hall has been extended to an all-election method allowing the calculation of inner-shell binding energies of molecules and their chemical shifts. Preliminary results are given.

  17. Prediction of binding free energy for adsorption of antimicrobial peptide lactoferricin B on a POPC membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivcharuk, Victor; Tomberli, Bruno; Tolokh, Igor S.; Gray, C. G.

    2008-03-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to study the interaction of a zwitterionic palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayer with the cationic antimicrobial peptide bovine lactoferricin (LFCinB) in a 100 mM NaCl solution at 310 K. The interaction of LFCinB with POPC is used as a model system for studying the details of membrane-peptide interactions, with the peptide selected because of its antimicrobial nature. Seventy-two 3 ns MD simulations, with six orientations of LFCinB at 12 different distances from a POPC membrane, are carried out to determine the potential of mean force (PMF) or free energy profile for the peptide as a function of the distance between LFCinB and the membrane surface. To calculate the PMF for this relatively large system a new variant of constrained MD and thermodynamic integration is developed. A simplified method for relating the PMF to the LFCinB-membrane binding free energy is described and used to predict a free energy of adsorption (or binding) of -1.05±0.39kcal/mol , and corresponding maximum binding force of about 20 pN, for LFCinB-POPC. The contributions of the ions-LFCinB and the water-LFCinB interactions to the PMF are discussed. The method developed will be a useful starting point for future work simulating peptides interacting with charged membranes and interactions involved in the penetration of membranes, features necessary to understand in order to rationally design peptides as potential alternatives to traditional antibiotics.

  18. The molecular basis of FHA domain:phosphopeptide binding specificity and implications for phospho-dependent signaling mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durocher, D; Taylor, I A; Sarbassova, D; Haire, L F; Westcott, S L; Jackson, S P; Smerdon, S J; Yaffe, M B

    2000-11-01

    Forkhead-associated (FHA) domains are a class of ubiquitous signaling modules that appear to function through interactions with phosphorylated target molecules. We have used oriented peptide library screening to determine the optimal phosphopeptide binding motifs recognized by several FHA domains, including those within a number of DNA damage checkpoint kinases, and determined the X-ray structure of Rad53p-FHA1, in complex with a phospho-threonine peptide, at 1.6 A resolution. The structure reveals a striking similarity to the MH2 domains of Smad tumor suppressor proteins and reveals a mode of peptide binding that differs from SH2, 14-3-3, or PTB domain complexes. These results have important implications for DNA damage signaling and CHK2-dependent tumor suppression, and they indicate that FHA domains play important and unsuspected roles in S/T kinase signaling mechanisms in prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

  19. Dynamic regulation of GDP binding to G proteins revealed by magnetic field-dependent NMR relaxation analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Yuki; Kano, Hanaho; Mase, Yoko; Yokogawa, Mariko; Osawa, Masanori; Shimada, Ichio

    2017-02-22

    Heterotrimeric guanine-nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) serve as molecular switches in signalling pathways, by coupling the activation of cell surface receptors to intracellular responses. Mutations in the G protein α-subunit (Gα) that accelerate guanosine diphosphate (GDP) dissociation cause hyperactivation of the downstream effector proteins, leading to oncogenesis. However, the structural mechanism of the accelerated GDP dissociation has remained unclear. Here, we use magnetic field-dependent nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation analyses to investigate the structural and dynamic properties of GDP bound Gα on a microsecond timescale. We show that Gα rapidly exchanges between a ground-state conformation, which tightly binds to GDP and an excited conformation with reduced GDP affinity. The oncogenic D150N mutation accelerates GDP dissociation by shifting the equilibrium towards the excited conformation.

  20. Molecular Binding Contributes to Concentration Dependent Acrolein Deposition in Rat Upper Airways: CFD and Molecular Dynamics Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxiang Xi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Existing in vivo experiments show significantly decreased acrolein uptake in rats with increasing inhaled acrolein concentrations. Considering that high-polarity chemicals are prone to bond with each other, it is hypothesized that molecular binding between acrolein and water will contribute to the experimentally observed deposition decrease by decreasing the effective diffusivity. The objective of this study is to quantify the probability of molecular binding for acrolein, as well as its effects on acrolein deposition, using multiscale simulations. An image-based rat airway geometry was used to predict the transport and deposition of acrolein using the chemical species model. The low Reynolds number turbulence model was used to simulate the airflows. Molecular dynamic (MD simulations were used to study the molecular binding of acrolein in different media and at different acrolein concentrations. MD results show that significant molecular binding can happen between acrolein and water molecules in human and rat airways. With 72 acrolein embedded in 800 water molecules, about 48% of acrolein compounds contain one hydrogen bond and 10% contain two hydrogen bonds, which agreed favorably with previous MD results. The percentage of hydrogen-bonded acrolein compounds is higher at higher acrolein concentrations or in a medium with higher polarity. Computational dosimetry results show that the size increase caused by the molecular binding reduces the effective diffusivity of acrolein and lowers the chemical deposition onto the airway surfaces. This result is consistent with the experimentally observed deposition decrease at higher concentrations. However, this size increase can only explain part of the concentration-dependent variation of the acrolein uptake and acts as a concurrent mechanism with the uptake-limiting tissue ration rate. Intermolecular interactions and associated variation in diffusivity should be considered in future dosimetry modeling of

  1. Molecular Binding Contributes to Concentration Dependent Acrolein Deposition in Rat Upper Airways: CFD and Molecular Dynamics Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Jinxiang; Hu, Qin; Zhao, Linlin; Si, Xiuhua April

    2018-03-27

    Existing in vivo experiments show significantly decreased acrolein uptake in rats with increasing inhaled acrolein concentrations. Considering that high-polarity chemicals are prone to bond with each other, it is hypothesized that molecular binding between acrolein and water will contribute to the experimentally observed deposition decrease by decreasing the effective diffusivity. The objective of this study is to quantify the probability of molecular binding for acrolein, as well as its effects on acrolein deposition, using multiscale simulations. An image-based rat airway geometry was used to predict the transport and deposition of acrolein using the chemical species model. The low Reynolds number turbulence model was used to simulate the airflows. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations were used to study the molecular binding of acrolein in different media and at different acrolein concentrations. MD results show that significant molecular binding can happen between acrolein and water molecules in human and rat airways. With 72 acrolein embedded in 800 water molecules, about 48% of acrolein compounds contain one hydrogen bond and 10% contain two hydrogen bonds, which agreed favorably with previous MD results. The percentage of hydrogen-bonded acrolein compounds is higher at higher acrolein concentrations or in a medium with higher polarity. Computational dosimetry results show that the size increase caused by the molecular binding reduces the effective diffusivity of acrolein and lowers the chemical deposition onto the airway surfaces. This result is consistent with the experimentally observed deposition decrease at higher concentrations. However, this size increase can only explain part of the concentration-dependent variation of the acrolein uptake and acts as a concurrent mechanism with the uptake-limiting tissue ration rate. Intermolecular interactions and associated variation in diffusivity should be considered in future dosimetry modeling of high

  2. Evolution of Structure in Nuclei: Meditation by Sub-Shell Modifications and Relation to Binding Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casten, R. F.; Cakirli, R. B.

    2009-03-01

    Understanding the development of configuration mixing, coherence, collectivity, and deformation in nuclei is one of the crucial challenges in nuclear structure physics, and one which has become all the more important with the advent of next generation facilities for the study of exotic nuclei. We will discuss recent work on phase/shape transitional behavior in nuclei, and the role of changes in sub-shell structure in mediating such transitional regions. We will also discuss a newly found, much deeper, link between nuclear structure and nuclear binding energies.

  3. Simulation of core-level binding energy shifts in germanium-doped lead telluride crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zyubin, A.S.; Dedyulin, S.N.; Yashina, L.V.; Shtanov, V.I.

    2007-01-01

    To simulate the changes in core-level binding energies in germanium-doped lead telluride, cluster calculations of the changes in the electrostatic potential at the corresponding centers have been performed. Different locations of the Ge atom in the crystal bulk have been considered: near vacancies, near another dopant site, and near the surface. For calculating the potential in the clusters that model the bulk and the surface of the lead telluride crystal (c-PbTe), the electron density obtained in the framework of the Hartree-Fock and hybrid density functional theory (DFT) methods has been used [ru

  4. Accurate core-electron binding energy shifts from density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahata, Yuji; Marques, Alberto Dos Santos

    2010-01-01

    Current review covers description of density functional methods of calculation of accurate core-electron binding energy (CEBE) of second and third row atoms; applications of calculated CEBEs and CEBE shifts (ΔCEBEs) in elucidation of topics such as: hydrogen-bonding, peptide bond, polymers, DNA bases, Hammett substituent (σ) constants, inductive and resonance effects, quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR), and solid state effect (WD). This review limits itself to works of mainly Chong and his coworkers for the period post-2002. It is not a fully comprehensive account of the current state of the art.

  5. Free energy calculations on Transthyretin dissociation and ligand binding from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper; Hamelberg, Donald; McCammon, J. Andrew

    experimental results have helped to explain this aberrant behavior of TTR, however, structural insights of the amyloidgenic process are still lacking. Therefore, we have used all-atom molecular dynamics simulation and free energy calculations to study the initial phase of this process. We have calculated......Many questions about the nature of aggregation and the proteins that are involved in these events are still left unanswered. One of the proteins that is known to form amyloids is Transthyretine (TTR), the secondary transporter of thyroxine and transporter of retinol-binding-protein. Several...

  6. Supervised machine learning techniques to predict binding affinity. A study for cyclin-dependent kinase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ávila, Maurício Boff; Xavier, Mariana Morrone; Pintro, Val Oliveira; de Azevedo, Walter Filgueira

    2017-12-09

    Here we report the development of a machine-learning model to predict binding affinity based on the crystallographic structures of protein-ligand complexes. We used an ensemble of crystallographic structures (resolution better than 1.5 Å resolution) for which half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) data is available. Polynomial scoring functions were built using as explanatory variables the energy terms present in the MolDock and PLANTS scoring functions. Prediction performance was tested and the supervised machine learning models showed improvement in the prediction power, when compared with PLANTS and MolDock scoring functions. In addition, the machine-learning model was applied to predict binding affinity of CDK2, which showed a better performance when compared with AutoDock4, AutoDock Vina, MolDock, and PLANTS scores. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Revealing kinetics and state-dependent binding properties of IKur-targeting drugs that maximize atrial fibrillation selectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellinwood, Nicholas; Dobrev, Dobromir; Morotti, Stefano; Grandi, Eleonora

    2017-09-01

    The KV1.5 potassium channel, which underlies the ultra-rapid delayed-rectifier current (IKur) and is predominantly expressed in atria vs. ventricles, has emerged as a promising target to treat atrial fibrillation (AF). However, while numerous KV1.5-selective compounds have been screened, characterized, and tested in various animal models of AF, evidence of antiarrhythmic efficacy in humans is still lacking. Moreover, current guidelines for pre-clinical assessment of candidate drugs heavily rely on steady-state concentration-response curves or IC50 values, which can overlook adverse cardiotoxic effects. We sought to investigate the effects of kinetics and state-dependent binding of IKur-targeting drugs on atrial electrophysiology in silico and reveal the ideal properties of IKur blockers that maximize anti-AF efficacy and minimize pro-arrhythmic risk. To this aim, we developed a new Markov model of IKur that describes KV1.5 gating based on experimental voltage-clamp data in atrial myocytes from patient right-atrial samples in normal sinus rhythm. We extended the IKur formulation to account for state-specificity and kinetics of KV1.5-drug interactions and incorporated it into our human atrial cell model. We simulated 1- and 3-Hz pacing protocols in drug-free conditions and with a [drug] equal to the IC50 value. The effects of binding and unbinding kinetics were determined by examining permutations of the forward (kon) and reverse (koff) binding rates to the closed, open, and inactivated states of the KV1.5 channel. We identified a subset of ideal drugs exhibiting anti-AF electrophysiological parameter changes at fast pacing rates (effective refractory period prolongation), while having little effect on normal sinus rhythm (limited action potential prolongation). Our results highlight that accurately accounting for channel interactions with drugs, including kinetics and state-dependent binding, is critical for developing safer and more effective pharmacological anti

  8. Beam energy dependence of d and d ‾ production in Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ning; STAR Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    The binding energy of light nuclei is small compared to the temperature of the system created in heavy-ion collisions. Consequently, the yields of light nuclei can be used to probe the freeze-out properties, such as correlation volume and local baryon density of the medium created in high-energy nuclear collisions. In this paper, we report the results of deuteron and anti-deuteron production in Au+Au collision at √{sNN} = 7.7, 11.5, 14.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4, and 200 GeV, measured by STAR at RHIC. The collision energy, centrality and transverse momentum dependence of the coalescence parameter B2 for deuteron and anti-deuteron production are discussed. We find the values of B2 for anti-deuterons are systematically lower than those for deuterons indicating the correlation volume of anti-baryon are larger than that of baryon. In addition, the values of B2 are found to vary with collision energy and show a broad minimum around √{sNN} = 20GeV, implying a change of the equation of state of the medium in these collisions.

  9. Reaction of hydrogen with Ag(111): binding states, minimum energy paths, and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Alejandro; Schlunke, Anna; Haynes, Brian S

    2006-08-31

    The interaction of atomic and molecular hydrogen with the Ag(111) surface is studied using periodic density functional total-energy calculations. This paper focuses on the site preference for adsorption, ordered structures, and energy barriers for H diffusion and H recombination. Chemisorbed H atoms are unstable with respect to the H(2) molecule in all adsorption sites below monolayer coverage. The three-hollow sites are energetically the most favorable for H chemisorption. The binding energy of H to the surface decreases slightly up to one monolayer, suggesting a small repulsive H-H interaction on nonadjacent sites. Subsurface and vacancy sites are energetically less favorable for H adsorption than on-top sites. Recombination of chemisorbed H atoms leads to the formation of gas-phase H(2) with no molecular chemisorbed state. Recombination is an exothermic process and occurs on the bridge site with a pronounced energy barrier. This energy barrier is significantly higher than that inferred from experimental temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) studies. However, there is significant permeability of H atoms through the recombination energy barrier at low temperatures, thus increasing the rate constant for H(2) desorption due to quantum tunneling effects, and improving the agreement between experiment and theory.

  10. Personnel β-dosimetry method for reducing energy dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gesell, T.F.; Jones, D.E.; Gupta, V.P.; Kalbeitzer, F.L.; Cusimano, J.P.

    1979-03-01

    Current practices for the measurement of skin dose are reviewed and found to be inadequate. The current INEL dosimeter was examined for systematic and random error. Systematic (i.e., variation with energy) error was found to range over a factor of 10 while the random error was reasonably small for the larger β/γ ratios. Other designs with thicker windows as is more common would show even larger systematic errors. Various methods for improving beta dosimetry were reviewed. A new dosimeter design utilizing three chips, each having a window of difference thickness, was proposed. According to the calculations, this dosimeter should markedly reduce systematic error but will introduce somewhat more random error. Preliminary measurements were carried out related to angular dependence and charged particle equilibrium. The proposed dosimeter design was tested with betas from a uranium slab. The average of the seven results was in excellent agreement with the known dose rate and the standard deviation of the result was 16%

  11. Dose energy dependence in proton imaging with thin detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denyak, V.V., E-mail: denyak@gmail.com [National Science Centre Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, St. Akademicheskaya 1, Kharkov 61108 (Ukraine); Federal University of Technology - Parana, Av. Sete de Setembro 3165, Curitiba 80230-901 (Brazil); Schelin, H.R. [Pele Pequeno Principe Research Institute, Av. Silva Jardim 1632, Curitiba 80250-200 (Brazil); Federal University of Technology - Parana, Av. Sete de Setembro 3165, Curitiba 80230-901 (Brazil); Silva, R.C.L.; Kozuki, C.; Paschuk, S.A.; Milhoretto, E. [Federal University of Technology - Parana, Av. Sete de Setembro 3165, Curitiba 80230-901 (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    Since the earliest works proposing the use of protons for imaging, the main advantage of protons over X-rays was expected to be a result of the specific property of the proton flux dropping off very steeply at the end of the particle range. This idea was declared but was not checked. In the present work, this assumption was investigated using the Monte Carlo simulation for the case of registration of protons with a thin detector. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Principal idea of proton imaging 'to work at the end of the range' was tested. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The case of thin detector was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dose energy dependence was calculated using computer simulation.

  12. Dependable Benchmarking for Storage Systems in High-Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Fleri Soler, Edward

    2017-01-01

    In high-energy physics, storage systems play a crucial role to store and secure very valuable data produced by complex experiments. The effectiveness and efficiency of data acquisition systems of such experiments depends directly on those of these storage systems. Coping with present day rates and reliability requirements of such experiments implies operating high-performance hardware under the best possible conditions, with a broad set of hardware and software parameters existing along the hierarchical levels, from networks down to drives. An extensive number of tests are required for the tuning of parameters to achieve optimised I/O operations. Current approaches to I/O optimisation generally consist of manual test execution and result taking. This approach lacks appropriate modularity, durability and reproducibility, attainable through dedicated testing facilities. The aim of this project is to conceive a user-friendly, dedicated storage benchmarking tool for the improved comparison of I/O parameters in re...

  13. Directional dependence of the threshold displacement energies in metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, Benjamin J.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2017-12-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to investigate the directional dependence and the values of the threshold energies (TDEs) for the displacements of the oxygen and metal atoms and for producing stable Frenkel pairs in five metal oxides of Cr2O3, Al2O3, TiO2, SiO2, and MgO. The TDEs for the Frenkel pairs and atoms displacement are calculated in 66 crystallographic directions, on both the anion and cation sublattices. The performed simulations are for metal and oxygen PKA energies up to 350 and 400 eV, respectively. The calculated probability distributions for the atoms displacement and average number of Frenkel pairs produced in the different oxides are compared. The results revealed unique symmetrical patterns of the TDEs for the displacement of the atoms and the formation of stable Frenkel pairs, confirming the strong dependence on the direction and the crystalline structure of the oxides. Results also showed that the formation of stable Frenkel pairs is associated with the displacements of the PKAs and/or of the SKAs. The probabilities of the TDEs for the displacement of the oxygen and metal PKAs are consistently lower than those of the atoms in the crystal. In SiO2, TDEs for the displacement of oxygen and metal atoms and those for the formation of stable Frenkel pairs are the lowest, while those in TiO2 are among the highest. The results for Cr2O3 and Al2O3, which have the same crystal structure, are similar. The calculated TDEs for MgO, Al2O3 and TiO2 are generally in good agreement with the experimental values and the probability distributions of the TDEs for the PKAs in TiO2 are in good agreement with reported MD simulation results.

  14. Carbohydrate-dependent binding of langerin to SodC, a cell wall glycoprotein of Mycobacterium leprae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Jin; Brennan, Patrick J; Heaslip, Darragh; Udey, Mark C; Modlin, Robert L; Belisle, John T

    2015-02-01

    Langerhans cells participate in the immune response in leprosy by their ability to activate T cells that recognize the pathogen, Mycobacterium leprae, in a langerin-dependent manner. We hypothesized that langerin, the distinguishing C-type lectin of Langerhans cells, would recognize the highly mannosylated structures in pathogenic Mycobacterium spp. The coding region for the extracellular and neck domain of human langerin was cloned and expressed to produce a recombinant active trimeric form of human langerin (r-langerin). Binding assays performed in microtiter plates, by two-dimensional (2D) Western blotting, and by surface plasmon resonance demonstrated that r-langerin possessed carbohydrate-dependent affinity to glycoproteins in the cell wall of M. leprae. This lectin, however, yielded less binding to mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan (ManLAM) and even lower levels of binding to phosphatidylinositol mannosides. However, the superoxide dismutase C (SodC) protein of the M. leprae cell wall was identified as a langerin-reactive ligand. Tandem mass spectrometry verified the glycosylation of a recombinant form of M. leprae SodC (rSodC) produced in Mycobacterium smegmatis. Analysis of r-langerin affinity by surface plasmon resonance revealed a carbohydrate-dependent affinity of rSodC (equilibrium dissociation constant [KD] = 0.862 μM) that was 20-fold greater than for M. leprae ManLAM (KD = 18.69 μM). These data strongly suggest that a subset of the presumptively mannosylated M. leprae glycoproteins act as ligands for langerin and may facilitate the interaction of M. leprae with Langerhans cells. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Hydrostatic pressure and temperature effects on the binding energy and optical absorption of a multilayered quantum dot with a parabolic confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortakaya, Sami; Kirak, Muharrem

    2016-01-01

    The influence of hydrostatic pressure, temperature, and impurity on the electronic and optical properties of spherical core/shell/well/shell (CSWS) nanostructure with parabolic confinement potential is investigated theoretically. The energy levels and wave functions of the structure are calculated by using shooting method within the effective-mass approximation. The numerical results show that the ground state donor binding energy as a function layer thickness very sensitively depends on the magnitude of pressure and temperature. Also, we investigate the probability distributions to understand clearly electronic properties. The obtained results show that the existence of the pressure and temperature has great influence on the electronic and optical properties. (paper)

  16. Density dependence of the nuclear energy-density functional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papakonstantinou, Panagiota; Park, Tae-Sun; Lim, Yeunhwan; Hyun, Chang Ho

    2018-01-01

    Background: The explicit density dependence in the coupling coefficients entering the nonrelativistic nuclear energy-density functional (EDF) is understood to encode effects of three-nucleon forces and dynamical correlations. The necessity for the density-dependent coupling coefficients to assume the form of a preferably small fractional power of the density ρ is empirical and the power is often chosen arbitrarily. Consequently, precision-oriented parametrizations risk overfitting in the regime of saturation and extrapolations in dilute or dense matter may lose predictive power. Purpose: Beginning with the observation that the Fermi momentum kF, i.e., the cubic root of the density, is a key variable in the description of Fermi systems, we first wish to examine if a power hierarchy in a kF expansion can be inferred from the properties of homogeneous matter in a domain of densities, which is relevant for nuclear structure and neutron stars. For subsequent applications we want to determine a functional that is of good quality but not overtrained. Method: For the EDF, we fit systematically polynomial and other functions of ρ1 /3 to existing microscopic, variational calculations of the energy of symmetric and pure neutron matter (pseudodata) and analyze the behavior of the fits. We select a form and a set of parameters, which we found robust, and examine the parameters' naturalness and the quality of resulting extrapolations. Results: A statistical analysis confirms that low-order terms such as ρ1 /3 and ρ2 /3 are the most relevant ones in the nuclear EDF beyond lowest order. It also hints at a different power hierarchy for symmetric vs. pure neutron matter, supporting the need for more than one density-dependent term in nonrelativistic EDFs. The functional we propose easily accommodates known or adopted properties of nuclear matter near saturation. More importantly, upon extrapolation to dilute or asymmetric matter, it reproduces a range of existing microscopic

  17. Resonance energy transfer study on the proximity relationship between the GTP binding site and the rifampicin binding site of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, K.P.; Chatterji, D.

    1990-01-01

    Terbium(III) upon complexation with guanosine 5'-triphosphate showed remarkable enhancement of fluorescence emission at 488 and 545 nm when excited at 295 nm. Analysis of the binding data yielded a value for the mean K d between Tb(III) and GTP of 0.2 μM, with three binding sites for TB(III) on GTP. 31 P and 1 H NMR measurements revealed that Tb(III) mainly binds the phosphate moiety of GTP. Fluorescence titration of the emission signals of the TbGTP complex with varying concentrations of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase resulted in a K d values of 4 μM between the TbGTP and the enzyme. It was observed that TbGTP can be incorporated in the place of GTP during E. coli RNA polymerase catalyzed abortive synthesis of dinucleotide tetraphosphate at T7A2 promoter. Both the substrate TbGTP and the inhibitor of the initiation of transcription rifampicin bind to the β-subunit of E. coli RNA polymerase. This allows the measurement of the fluorescence excited-state energy transfer from the donor TbGTP-RNA polymerase to the acceptor rifampicin. Both emission bands of Tb(III) overlap with the rifampicin absorption, and the distances at 50% efficiency of energy transfer were calculated to be 28 and 24 angstrom for the 488- and 545-nm emission bands, respectively. The distance between the substrate binding site and the rifampicin binding site on the β-subunit of E. coli RNA polymerase was measured to be around 30 angstrom. This suggest that the nature of inhibition of transcription by rifampicin is essentially noncompetitive with the substrate

  18. Effect of geometry on the pressure induced donor binding energy in semiconductor nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalpana, P.; Jayakumar, K.; Nithiananthi, P.

    2015-09-01

    The effect of geometry on an on-center hydrogenic donor impurity in a GaAs/(Ga,Al)As quantum wire (QWW) and quantum dot (QD) under the influence of Γ-X band mixing due to an applied hydrostatic pressure is theoretically studied. Numerical calculations are performed in an effective mass approximation. The ground state impurity energy is obtained by variational procedure. Both the effects of pressure and geometry are to exert an additional confinement on the impurity inside the wire as well as dot. We found that the donor binding energy is modified by the geometrical effects as well as by the confining potential when it is subjected to external pressure. The results are presented and discussed.

  19. The role of extra-atomic relaxation in determining Si2p binding energy shifts at silicon/silicon oxide interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, K.Z.; Greeley, J.N.; Banaszak Holl, M.M.; McFeely, F.R.

    1997-01-01

    The observed binding energy shift for silicon oxide films grown on crystalline silicon varies as a function of film thickness. The physical basis of this shift has previously been ascribed to a variety of initial state effects (Si endash O ring size, strain, stoichiometry, and crystallinity), final state effects (a variety of screening mechanisms), and extrinsic effects (charging). By constructing a structurally homogeneous silicon oxide film on silicon, initial state effects have been minimized and the magnitude of final state stabilization as a function of film thickness has been directly measured. In addition, questions regarding the charging of thin silicon oxide films on silicon have been addressed. From these studies, it is concluded that initial state effects play a negligible role in the thickness-dependent binding energy shift. For the first ∼30 Angstrom of oxide film, the thickness-dependent binding energy shift can be attributed to final state effects in the form of image charge induced stabilization. Beyond about 30 Angstrom, charging of the film occurs. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  20. Estimation of the Binding Free Energy of AC1NX476 to HIV-1 Protease Wild Type and Mutations Using Free Energy Perturbation Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Son Tung; Mai, Binh Khanh; Hiep, Dinh Minh; Li, Mai Suan

    2015-10-01

    The binding mechanism of AC1NX476 to HIV-1 protease wild type and mutations was studied by the docking and molecular dynamics simulations. The binding free energy was calculated using the double-annihilation binding free energy method. It is shown that the binding affinity of AC1NX476 to wild type is higher than not only ritonavir but also darunavir, making AC1NX476 become attractive candidate for HIV treatment. Our theoretical results are in excellent agreement with the experimental data as the correlation coefficient between calculated and experimentally measured binding free energies R = 0.993. Residues Asp25-A, Asp29-A, Asp30-A, Ile47-A, Gly48-A, and Val50-A from chain A, and Asp25-B from chain B play a crucial role in the ligand binding. The mutations were found to reduce the receptor-ligand interaction by widening the binding cavity, and the binding propensity is mainly driven by the van der Waals interaction. Our finding may be useful for designing potential drugs to combat with HIV. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. An accurate redetermination of the sup 1 sup 1 sup 8 Sn binding energy

    CERN Document Server

    Borzakov, S B; Faikow-Stanczyk, H; Grigoriev, Y V; Panteleev, T; Pospísil, S; Smotritsky, L M; Telezhnikov, S A

    2002-01-01

    The energy of well-known strong gamma line from sup 1 sup 9 sup 8 Au, the 'gold standard', has been modified in the light of new adjustments in the fundamental constants and the value of 411.80176(12) keV was determined, which is 0.29 eV lower than the latest 1999 value. An energy calibration procedure for determining the neutron binding energy, B sub n , from complicated (n, gamma) spectra has been developed. A mathematically simple minimization function consisting only of terms having as parameters the coefficients of the energy calibration curve (polynomial) is used. A priori information about the relationships among the energies of different peaks on the spectrum is taken into account by a Monte-Carlo simulation. The procedure was used in obtaining B sub n for sup 1 sup 1 sup 8 Sn. The gamma-ray spectrum from thermal neutron radiative capture by sup 1 sup 1 sup 7 Sn has been measured on the IBR-2 pulsed reactor. gamma-rays were detected by a 72 cm sup 3 HPGe detector. For a better determination of B sub n...

  2. CaFE: a tool for binding affinity prediction using end-point free energy methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Hou, Tingjun

    2016-07-15

    Accurate prediction of binding free energy is of particular importance to computational biology and structure-based drug design. Among those methods for binding affinity predictions, the end-point approaches, such as MM/PBSA and LIE, have been widely used because they can achieve a good balance between prediction accuracy and computational cost. Here we present an easy-to-use pipeline tool named Calculation of Free Energy (CaFE) to conduct MM/PBSA and LIE calculations. Powered by the VMD and NAMD programs, CaFE is able to handle numerous static coordinate and molecular dynamics trajectory file formats generated by different molecular simulation packages and supports various force field parameters. CaFE source code and documentation are freely available under the GNU General Public License via GitHub at https://github.com/huiliucode/cafe_plugin It is a VMD plugin written in Tcl and the usage is platform-independent. tingjunhou@zju.edu.cn. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Photoelectron binding energy shifts observed during oxidation of group IIA, IIIA and IVA elemental surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heide, P.A.W. van der

    2006-01-01

    An extensive re-evaluation of XPS binding energies (BE's) and binding energy shifts (ΔBE's) from metals, oxides and the carbonates of the group II, III and IVA elements (exceptions are Be, Mg and Hf) has been carried out using a substrate specific BE referencing approach. From this, O-1s BE's are found to fall into surface oxide, bulk oxide and carbonate groupings, with bulk oxides showing the lowest BE's followed by surface oxides (+∼1.5 eV) and then carbonates (+∼3.0 eV). The O-1s BE's from the bulk oxides also appear to scale with 1/d, where d is inter-atomic distance. The same is noted in the ΔBE's observed from the metallic counterparts during oxidation of the elemental surfaces. This, and the decreasing BE exhibited by Ca, Sr and Ba on oxidation is explained within the charge potential model as resulting from competing inter- and intra-atomic effects, and is shown to be consistent with partial covalency arguments utilizing Madulung potentials. The ΔBE's also fall into groups according to the elements location in the periodic table, i.e. s, p or d block. These trends open up the possibility of approximating ΔBE's arising from initial and final state effects, and bond distances

  4. PICK1 regulates the trafficking of ASIC1a and acidotoxicity in a BAR domain lipid binding-dependent manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Wenying

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acid-sensing ion channel 1a (ASIC1a is the major ASIC subunit determining acid-activated currents in brain neurons. Recent studies show that ASIC1a play critical roles in acid-induced cell toxicity. While these studies raise the importance of ASIC1a in diseases, mechanisms for ASIC1a trafficking are not well understood. Interestingly, ASIC1a interacts with PICK1 (protein interacting with C-kinase 1, an intracellular protein that regulates trafficking of several membrane proteins. However, whether PICK1 regulates ASIC1a surface expression remains unknown. Results Here, we show that PICK1 overexpression increases ASIC1a surface level. A BAR domain mutant of PICK1, which impairs its lipid binding capability, blocks this increase. Lipid binding of PICK1 is also required for PICK1-induced clustering of ASIC1a. Consistent with the effect on ASIC1a surface levels, PICK1 increases ASIC1a-mediated acidotoxicity and this effect requires both the PDZ and BAR domains of PICK1. Conclusions Taken together, our results indicate that PICK1 regulates trafficking and function of ASIC1a in a lipid binding-dependent manner.

  5. Binding and distribution studies in the SENCAR mouse of compounds demonstrating a route-dependent tumorigenic effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.P.; Fossa, A.A.; Morse, M.A.; Weaver, P.M.

    1986-01-01

    Previous investigators have determined that benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P] was much more effective in causing skin papillomas if applied topically than when administered orally in the initiation-promotion assay in SENCAR mouse. Conversely, urethane and acrylamide caused a higher percentage of mice to develop papillomas and induced more tumors per mouse when given orally. In an attempt to understand the reason for this discrepancy in route dependency, 3 H-benzo(a)pyrene, 14 C-acrylamide were administered as single doses orally or topically to male SENCAR mice. Distribution in skin, stomach, liver, and lung was determined for time periods up to 48 hr. The binding of these compounds to DNA, RNA, and protein in these tissues was determined 6 and 48 hr after administration. For all three compounds, high concentrations were found in the skin following topical application, but very little material reached this target organ following oral administration. In contrast, the internal organs generally contained more material after oral administration. The binding of label compounds to DNA, RNA, and protein generally reflected the distribution data, thus more compound was bound in the stomach, liver, and lung after oral administration compared to topical application, whereas the opposite was true for the skin. This finding was particularly evident for B(a)P. The results suggest that differences in distribution to the skin and binding to macromolecules following oral or topical administration cannot explain the greater tumorigenicity of urethane and acrylamide after oral administration in the SENCAR mouse

  6. Energy dependence of ulrathin LiF-dosemeters for high energy electrons and high energy X-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupfer, T.

    1977-02-01

    The energy dependence of ultrathin LiF-dosemeters for high energy electrons (5-40 MeV) and high energy X-radiation (6 MV, 42 MV) is experimentally determined. The experimental values are compared to values calculted earlier by other authors. The influence of the thickness of the dosemeters have been considered by comparison of experimental values for 0.03 mm thick dosemeters and theoretical values for 0.13 mm and 0.38 mm thick ones. Also different commersially available dosemeters have been compared by experiments. It is difficult to draw any other conclutions about the energy dependence than that the variation of the relative responce is within +- 3 percent (2S). However the results seems to be sulficient for clinical applications

  7. EXPRESSION OF CALCIUM-BINDING PROTEINS IN THE NEUROTROPHIN-3-DEPENDENT SUBPOPULATION OF RAT EMBRYONIC DORSAL-ROOT GANGLION-CELLS IN CULTURE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    COPRAY, JCVM; MANTINGHOTTER, IJ; BROUWER, N

    1994-01-01

    In this study we have examined the calcium-binding protein expression in rat embryonic (E16) dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons in vitro in the presence of neurotrophin-3 (NT-3). A comparison was made with the expression of calcium-binding proteins in DRG subpopulations that depended in vitro on

  8. Energy dependent response of plastic scintillation detectors to photon radiation of low to medium energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebenau, Melanie; Radeck, Désirée; Bambynek, Markus; Sommer, Holger; Flühs, Dirk; Spaan, Bernhard; Eichmann, Marion

    2016-08-01

    Plastic scintillation detectors are promising candidates for the dosimetry of low- to medium-energy photons but quantitative knowledge of their energy response is a prerequisite for their correct use. The purpose of this study was to characterize the energy dependent response of small scintillation detectors (active volume <1 mm(3)) made from the commonly used plastic scintillator BC400. Different detectors made from BC400 were calibrated at a number of radiation qualities ranging from 10 to 280 kV and at a (60)Co beam. All calibrations were performed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, the National Metrology Institute of Germany. The energy response in terms of air kerma, dose to water, and dose to the scintillator was determined. Conversion factors from air kerma to dose to water and to dose to the scintillator were derived from Monte Carlo simulations. In order to quantitatively describe the energy dependence, a semiempirical model known as unimolecular quenching or Birks' formula was fitted to the data and from this the response to secondary electrons generated within the scintillator material BC400 was derived. The detector energy response in terms of air kerma differs for different scintillator sizes and different detector casings. It is therefore necessary to take attenuation within the scintillator and in the casing into account when deriving the response in terms of dose to water from a calibration in terms of air kerma. The measured energy response in terms of dose to water for BC400 cannot be reproduced by the ratio of mean mass energy-absorption coefficients for polyvinyl toluene to water but shows evidence of quenching. The quenching parameter kB in Birks' formula was determined to be kB = (12.3 ± 0.9) mg MeV(-1) cm(-2). The energy response was quantified relative to the response to (60)Co which is the common radiation quality for the calibration of therapy dosemeters. The observed energy dependence could be well explained with the

  9. Energy dependent response of plastic scintillation detectors to photon radiation of low to medium energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebenau, Melanie, E-mail: melanie.ebenau@tu-dortmunde.de; Sommer, Holger; Spaan, Bernhard; Eichmann, Marion [Fakultät Physik, Technische Universität Dortmund, Otto-Hahn Str. 4a, 44221 Dortmund (Germany); Radeck, Désirée; Bambynek, Markus [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany); Flühs, Dirk [Universitätsklinikum Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, 45147 Essen (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: Plastic scintillation detectors are promising candidates for the dosimetry of low- to medium-energy photons but quantitative knowledge of their energy response is a prerequisite for their correct use. The purpose of this study was to characterize the energy dependent response of small scintillation detectors (active volume <1 mm{sup 3}) made from the commonly used plastic scintillator BC400. Methods: Different detectors made from BC400 were calibrated at a number of radiation qualities ranging from 10 to 280 kV and at a {sup 60}Co beam. All calibrations were performed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, the National Metrology Institute of Germany. The energy response in terms of air kerma, dose to water, and dose to the scintillator was determined. Conversion factors from air kerma to dose to water and to dose to the scintillator were derived from Monte Carlo simulations. In order to quantitatively describe the energy dependence, a semiempirical model known as unimolecular quenching or Birks’ formula was fitted to the data and from this the response to secondary electrons generated within the scintillator material BC400 was derived. Results: The detector energy response in terms of air kerma differs for different scintillator sizes and different detector casings. It is therefore necessary to take attenuation within the scintillator and in the casing into account when deriving the response in terms of dose to water from a calibration in terms of air kerma. The measured energy response in terms of dose to water for BC400 cannot be reproduced by the ratio of mean mass energy-absorption coefficients for polyvinyl toluene to water but shows evidence of quenching. The quenching parameter kB in Birks’ formula was determined to be kB = (12.3 ± 0.9) mg MeV{sup −1} cm{sup −2}. Conclusions: The energy response was quantified relative to the response to {sup 60}Co which is the common radiation quality for the calibration of therapy dosemeters. The

  10. Interaction Entropy: A New Paradigm for Highly Efficient and Reliable Computation of Protein-Ligand Binding Free Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Lili; Liu, Xiao; Zhang, John Z H

    2016-05-04

    Efficient and reliable calculation of protein-ligand binding free energy is a grand challenge in computational biology and is of critical importance in drug design and many other molecular recognition problems. The main challenge lies in the calculation of entropic contribution to protein-ligand binding or interaction systems. In this report, we present a new interaction entropy method which is theoretically rigorous, computationally efficient, and numerically reliable for calculating entropic contribution to free energy in protein-ligand binding and other interaction processes. Drastically different from the widely employed but extremely expensive normal mode method for calculating entropy change in protein-ligand binding, the new method calculates the entropic component (interaction entropy or -TΔS) of the binding free energy directly from molecular dynamics simulation without any extra computational cost. Extensive study of over a dozen randomly selected protein-ligand binding systems demonstrated that this interaction entropy method is both computationally efficient and numerically reliable and is vastly superior to the standard normal mode approach. This interaction entropy paradigm introduces a novel and intuitive conceptual understanding of the entropic effect in protein-ligand binding and other general interaction systems as well as a practical method for highly efficient calculation of this effect.

  11. Charge-dependent and A-dependent effects in isotope shifts of Coulomb displacement energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherr, R.

    1977-01-01

    Coulomb displacement energies in a series of isotopes generally decrease with A. This decrease can arise from an increase with A of the average distance of interaction between pairs of protons. In the shell model a decrease can also result from charge-independence-breaking effects if the neutron-proton interaction for the valence nucleons is more attractive than the neutron-neutron interaction. Using the model recently proposed by Sherr and Talmi for the 1d/sub 3/2/ shell, existing data for this shell and also the 1d/sub 5/2/ and 1f/sub 7/2/ shells were analyzed allowing all matrix elements to vary as A/sup -lambda/3/. Least squares calculations of the rms deviation sigma were carried out for varying values of lambda from -2 to +2. It was found that although there was a minimum in sigma vs lambda it was too shallow to exclude any lambda for -1 to +1 in the 1d/sub 3/2/ and 1f/sub 7/2/ shells or 0 to +1 in the 1d/sub 5/2/ shell. It is therefore not possible to distinguish between A dependence and charge dependence in this model. The magnitude of the latter as expressed in terms of (np-nn) matrix elements depends strongly on the former. As lambda increases from -1 to +1, these (np-nn) matrix elements decrease roughly linearly in absolute magnitude and eventually change sign. For lambda = 0 they have appreciable and reasonable magnitudes for the 1d/sub 3/2/ and 1f/sub 7/2/ shells but for the 1d/sub 5/2/ shell the values are too small to be considered significant

  12. Extrastriatal binding of [123I]FP-CIT in the thalamus and pons: gender and age dependencies assessed in a European multicentre database of healthy controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, Walter; Unterrainer, Marcus; Xiong, Guoming; Bartenstein, Peter; Diemling, Markus; Varrone, Andrea; Dickson, John C.; Tossici-Bolt, Livia; Sera, Terez; Asenbaum, Susanne; Booij, Jan; Kapucu, Ozlem L.; Kluge, Andreas; Ziebell, Morten; Darcourt, Jacques; Nobili, Flavio; Pagani, Marco; Hesse, Swen; Borght, Thierry Vander; Laere, Koen van; Tatsch, Klaus; La Fougere, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Apart from binding to the dopamine transporter (DAT), [ 123 I]FP-CIT shows moderate affinity for the serotonin transporter (SERT), allowing imaging of both monoamine transporters in a single imaging session in different brain areas. The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate extrastriatal binding (predominantly due to SERT) and its age and gender dependencies in a large cohort of healthy controls. SPECT data from 103 healthy controls with well-defined criteria of normality acquired at 13 different imaging centres were analysed for extrastriatal binding using volumes of interest analysis for the thalamus and the pons. Data were examined for gender and age effects as well as for potential influence of striatal DAT radiotracer binding. Thalamic binding was significantly higher than pons binding. Partial correlations showed an influence of putaminal DAT binding on measured binding in the thalamus but not on the pons. Data showed high interindividual variation in extrastriatal binding. Significant gender effects with 31 % higher binding in women than in men were observed in the thalamus, but not in the pons. An age dependency with a decline per decade (±standard error) of 8.2 ± 1.3 % for the thalamus and 6.8 ± 2.9 % for the pons was shown. The potential to evaluate extrastriatal predominant SERT binding in addition to the striatal DAT in a single imaging session was shown using a large database of [ 123 I]FP-CIT scans in healthy controls. For both the thalamus and the pons, an age-related decline in radiotracer binding was observed. Gender effects were demonstrated for binding in the thalamus only. As a potential clinical application, the data could be used as a reference to estimate SERT occupancy in addition to nigrostriatal integrity when using [ 123 I]FP-CIT for DAT imaging in patients treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. (orig.)

  13. Extrastriatal binding of [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT in the thalamus and pons: gender and age dependencies assessed in a European multicentre database of healthy controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Walter; Unterrainer, Marcus; Xiong, Guoming; Bartenstein, Peter [University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Diemling, Markus [Hermes Medical Solutions, Stockholm (Sweden); Varrone, Andrea [Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Centre for Psychiatry Research, Stockholm (Sweden); Dickson, John C. [UCLH NHS Foundation Trust and University College, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Tossici-Bolt, Livia [University Hospitals Southampton NHS Trust, Department of Medical Physics, Southampton (United Kingdom); Sera, Terez [University of Szeged, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Euromedic Szeged, Szeged (Hungary); Asenbaum, Susanne [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Neurology, Vienna (Austria); Booij, Jan [University of Amsterdam, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kapucu, Ozlem L. [Gazi University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Kluge, Andreas [ABX-CRO, Dresden (Germany); Ziebell, Morten [Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Neurobiology Research Unit, Copenhagen (Denmark); Darcourt, Jacques [University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Nuclear Medicine Department, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France); Nobili, Flavio [University of Genoa, Clinical Neurology Unit, Department of Neuroscience (DINOGMI), Genoa (Italy); Pagani, Marco [CNR, Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies, Rome (Italy); Karolinska Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Hesse, Swen [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Leipzig University Medical Centre, Molecular Neuroimaging IFB Adiposity Diseases, Leipzig (Germany); Borght, Thierry Vander [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Nuclear Medicine Division, CHU Dinant Godinne, Yvoir (Belgium); Laere, Koen van [University Hospital and K.U. Leuven, Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); Tatsch, Klaus [Staedtisches Klinikum Karlsruhe, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Karlsruhe (Germany); La Fougere, Christian [University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); University of Tuebingen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    Apart from binding to the dopamine transporter (DAT), [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT shows moderate affinity for the serotonin transporter (SERT), allowing imaging of both monoamine transporters in a single imaging session in different brain areas. The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate extrastriatal binding (predominantly due to SERT) and its age and gender dependencies in a large cohort of healthy controls. SPECT data from 103 healthy controls with well-defined criteria of normality acquired at 13 different imaging centres were analysed for extrastriatal binding using volumes of interest analysis for the thalamus and the pons. Data were examined for gender and age effects as well as for potential influence of striatal DAT radiotracer binding. Thalamic binding was significantly higher than pons binding. Partial correlations showed an influence of putaminal DAT binding on measured binding in the thalamus but not on the pons. Data showed high interindividual variation in extrastriatal binding. Significant gender effects with 31 % higher binding in women than in men were observed in the thalamus, but not in the pons. An age dependency with a decline per decade (±standard error) of 8.2 ± 1.3 % for the thalamus and 6.8 ± 2.9 % for the pons was shown. The potential to evaluate extrastriatal predominant SERT binding in addition to the striatal DAT in a single imaging session was shown using a large database of [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT scans in healthy controls. For both the thalamus and the pons, an age-related decline in radiotracer binding was observed. Gender effects were demonstrated for binding in the thalamus only. As a potential clinical application, the data could be used as a reference to estimate SERT occupancy in addition to nigrostriatal integrity when using [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT for DAT imaging in patients treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. (orig.)

  14. Dishevelled binds the Discs large 'Hook' domain to activate GukHolder-dependent spindle positioning in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua D Garcia

    Full Text Available Communication between cortical cell polarity cues and the mitotic spindle ensures proper orientation of cell divisions within complex tissues. Defects in mitotic spindle positioning have been linked to various developmental disorders and have recently emerged as a potential contributor to tumorigenesis. Despite the importance of this process to human health, the molecular mechanisms that regulate spindle orientation are not fully understood. Moreover, it remains unclear how diverse cortical polarity complexes might cooperate to influence spindle positioning. We and others have demonstrated spindle orientation roles for Dishevelled (Dsh, a key regulator of planar cell polarity, and Discs large (Dlg, a conserved apico-basal cell polarity regulator, effects which were previously thought to operate within distinct molecular pathways. Here we identify a novel direct interaction between the Dsh-PDZ domain and the alternatively spliced "I3-insert" of the Dlg-Hook domain, thus establishing a potential convergent Dsh/Dlg pathway. Furthermore, we identify a Dlg sequence motif necessary for the Dsh interaction that shares homology to the site of Dsh binding in the Frizzled receptor. Expression of Dsh enhanced Dlg-mediated spindle positioning similar to deletion of the Hook domain. This Dsh-mediated activation was dependent on the Dlg-binding partner, GukHolder (GukH. These results suggest that Dsh binding may regulate core interdomain conformational dynamics previously described for Dlg. Together, our results identify Dlg as an effector of Dsh signaling and demonstrate a Dsh-mediated mechanism for the activation of Dlg/GukH-dependent spindle positioning. Cooperation between these two evolutionarily-conserved cell polarity pathways could have important implications to both the development and maintenance of tissue homeostasis in animals.

  15. Binding energies and chemical shifts of least bound core electron excitations in cubic Asub(N)Bsub(8-N) semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechstedt, F.; Enderlein, R.; Wischnewski, R.

    1981-01-01

    Core electron binding energies Esup(B) with respect to the vacuum level and their chemical shifts are calculated for the least bound core levels of cations and anions of cubic Asub(N)Bsub(8-N) semiconductors. Starting from the HF-binding energy of the free atom absolute values of Esup(B) are obtained by adding core level shifts and relaxation energies. Core level shifts are calculated by means of an electrostatic model with ionic and bond charges according to Phillips' bond charge model. For the calculation of relaxation energies the linear dielectric theory of electronic polarization is applied. Valence and core electrons, and diagonal and non-diagonal screening are taken into account. The theoretical results for chemical shifts of binding energies are compared with experimental values from XPS-measurements corrected by work function data. Good agreement is obtained in all cases within the error limit of about one eV. Chemical and atomic trends of core level shifts, relaxation energies, and binding energies are discussed in terms of changes of atomic and solid state parameters. Chemical shifts and relaxation energies are predicted for various ternary Asub(N)Bsub(8-N) compounds. (author)

  16. Relation between heat of vaporization, ion transport, molar volume, and cation-anion binding energy for ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodin, Oleg

    2009-09-10

    A number of correlations between heat of vaporization (H(vap)), cation-anion binding energy (E(+/-)), molar volume (V(m)), self-diffusion coefficient (D), and ionic conductivity for 29 ionic liquids have been investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations that employed accurate and validated many-body polarizable force fields. A significant correlation between D and H(vap) has been found, while the best correlation was found for -log(DV(m)) vs H(vap) + 0.28E(+/-). A combination of enthalpy of vaporization and a fraction of the cation-anion binding energy was suggested as a measure of the effective cohesive energy for ionic liquids. A deviation of some ILs from the reported master curve is explained based upon ion packing and proposed diffusion pathways. No general correlations were found between the ion diffusion coefficient and molecular volume or the diffusion coefficient and cation/anion binding energy.

  17. Exploring the binding energy profiles of full agonists, partial agonists, and antagonists of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Nargis; Ma, Qianyun; Wu, Guanzhao; Jiang, Tao; Yu, Rilei

    2017-09-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) belong to the Cys-loop receptor family and are important drug targets for the treatment of neurological diseases. However, the precise determinants of the binding efficacies of ligands for these receptors are unclear. Therefore, in this study, the binding energy profiles of various ligands (full agonists, partial agonists, and antagonists) were quantified by docking those ligands with structural ensembles of the α7 nAChR exhibiting different degrees of C-loop closure. This approximate treatment of interactions suggested that full agonists, partial agonists, and antagonists of the α7 nAChR possess distinctive binding energy profiles. Results from docking revealed that ligand binding efficacy may be related to the capacity of the ligand to stabilize conformational states with a closed C loop.

  18. Angle and frequency dependence of self-energy from spin fluctuation mediated d-wave pairing for high temperature superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seung Hwan; Choi, Han-Yong

    2013-09-11

    We investigated the characteristics of spin fluctuation mediated superconductivity employing the Eliashberg formalism. The effective interaction between electrons was modeled in terms of the spin susceptibility measured by inelastic neutron scattering experiments on single crystal La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4 superconductors. The diagonal self-energy and off-diagonal self-energy were calculated by solving the coupled Eliashberg equation self-consistently for the chosen spin susceptibility and tight-binding dispersion of electrons. The full momentum and frequency dependence of the self-energy is presented for optimally doped, overdoped, and underdoped LSCO cuprates in a superconductive state. These results may be compared with the experimentally deduced self-energy from ARPES experiments.

  19. Developmental pathways from child maltreatment to adolescent marijuana dependence: Examining moderation by FK506 binding protein 5 gene (FKBP5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Elizabeth D; Rogosch, Fred A; Cicchetti, Dante

    2015-11-01

    The current study examined the prospective association between child maltreatment and the development of substance use disorder in adolescence with the aim of investigating pathways underlying this relation, as well as genetic moderation of these developmental mechanisms. Specifically, we tested whether youth who experienced maltreatment prior to age 8 were at risk for the development of marijuana dependence in adolescence by way of a childhood externalizing pathway and a childhood internalizing pathway. Moreover, we tested whether variation in FK506 binding protein 5 gene (FKBP5) CATT haplotype moderated these pathways. The participants were 326 children (n =179 maltreated; n = 147 nonmaltreated) assessed across two waves of data collection (childhood: ages 7-9 and adolescence: ages 15-18). Results indicated that higher levels of child externalizing symptoms significantly mediated the effect of child maltreatment on adolescent marijuana dependence symptoms for individuals with one or two copies of the FKBP5 CATT haplotype only. We did not find support for an internalizing pathway from child maltreatment to adolescent marijuana dependence, nor did we find evidence of moderation of the internalizing pathway by FKBP5 haplotype variation. Findings extend previous research by demonstrating that whether a maltreated child will traverse an externalizing pathway toward substance use disorder in adolescence is dependent on FKBP5 genetic variation.

  20. Decipher the mechanisms of protein conformational changes induced by nucleotide binding through free-energy landscape analysis: ATP binding to Hsp70.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Nicolaï

    Full Text Available ATP regulates the function of many proteins in the cell by transducing its binding and hydrolysis energies into protein conformational changes by mechanisms which are challenging to identify at the atomic scale. Based on molecular dynamics (MD simulations, a method is proposed to analyze the structural changes induced by ATP binding to a protein by computing the effective free-energy landscape (FEL of a subset of its coordinates along its amino-acid sequence. The method is applied to characterize the mechanism by which the binding of ATP to the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD of Hsp70 propagates a signal to its substrate-binding domain (SBD. Unbiased MD simulations were performed for Hsp70-DnaK chaperone in nucleotide-free, ADP-bound and ATP-bound states. The simulations revealed that the SBD does not interact with the NBD for DnaK in its nucleotide-free and ADP-bound states whereas the docking of the SBD was found in the ATP-bound state. The docked state induced by ATP binding found in MD is an intermediate state between the initial nucleotide-free and final ATP-bound states of Hsp70. The analysis of the FEL projected along the amino-acid sequence permitted to identify a subset of 27 protein internal coordinates corresponding to a network of 91 key residues involved in the conformational change induced by ATP binding. Among the 91 residues, 26 are identified for the first time, whereas the others were shown relevant for the allosteric communication of Hsp70 s in several experiments and bioinformatics analysis. The FEL analysis revealed also the origin of the ATP-induced structural modifications of the SBD recently measured by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance. The pathway between the nucleotide-free and the intermediate state of DnaK was extracted by applying principal component analysis to the subset of internal coordinates describing the transition. The methodology proposed is general and could be applied to analyze allosteric communication in

  1. Distinct roles of beta1 metal ion-dependent adhesion site (MIDAS), adjacent to MIDAS (ADMIDAS), and ligand-associated metal-binding site (LIMBS) cation-binding sites in ligand recognition by integrin alpha2beta1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdramidou, Dimitra; Humphries, Martin J; Mould, A Paul

    2008-11-21

    Integrin-ligand interactions are regulated in a complex manner by divalent cations, and previous studies have identified ligand-competent, stimulatory, and inhibitory cation-binding sites. In collagen-binding integrins, such as alpha2beta1, ligand recognition takes place exclusively at the alpha subunit I domain. However, activation of the alphaI domain depends on its interaction with a structurally similar domain in the beta subunit known as the I-like or betaI domain. The top face of the betaI domain contains three cation-binding sites: the metal-ion dependent adhesion site (MIDAS), the ADMIDAS (adjacent to MIDAS), and LIMBS (ligand-associated metal-binding site). The role of these sites in controlling ligand binding to the alphaI domain has yet to be elucidated. Mutation of the MIDAS or LIMBS completely blocked collagen binding to alpha2beta1; in contrast mutation of the ADMIDAS reduced ligand recognition but this effect could be overcome by the activating monoclonal antibody TS2/16. Hence, the MIDAS and LIMBS appear to be essential for the interaction between alphaI and betaI, whereas occupancy of the ADMIDAS has an allosteric effect on the conformation of betaI. An activating mutation in the alpha2 I domain partially restored ligand binding to the MIDAS and LIMBS mutants. Analysis of the effects of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and Mn(2+) on ligand binding to these mutants showed that the MIDAS is a ligand-competent site through which Mn(2+) stimulates ligand binding, whereas the LIMBS is a stimulatory Ca(2+)-binding site, occupancy of which increases the affinity of Mg(2+) for the MIDAS.

  2. A Simple PB/LIE Free Energy Function Accurately Predicts the Peptide Binding Specificity of the Tiam1 PDZ Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panel, Nicolas; Sun, Young Joo; Fuentes, Ernesto J; Simonson, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    PDZ domains generally bind short amino acid sequences at the C-terminus of target proteins, and short peptides can be used as inhibitors or model ligands. Here, we used experimental binding assays and molecular dynamics simulations to characterize 51 complexes involving the Tiam1 PDZ domain and to test the performance of a semi-empirical free energy function. The free energy function combined a Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) continuum electrostatic term, a van der Waals interaction energy, and a surface area term. Each term was empirically weighted, giving a Linear Interaction Energy or "PB/LIE" free energy. The model yielded a mean unsigned deviation of 0.43 kcal/mol and a Pearson correlation of 0.64 between experimental and computed free energies, which was superior to a Null model that assumes all complexes have the same affinity. Analyses of the models support several experimental observations that indicate the orientation of the α 2 helix is a critical determinant for peptide specificity. The models were also used to predict binding free energies for nine new variants, corresponding to point mutants of the Syndecan1 and Caspr4 peptides. The predictions did not reveal improved binding; however, they suggest that an unnatural amino acid could be used to increase protease resistance and peptide lifetimes in vivo . The overall performance of the model should allow its use in the design of new PDZ ligands in the future.

  3. A Simple PB/LIE Free Energy Function Accurately Predicts the Peptide Binding Specificity of the Tiam1 PDZ Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Panel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available PDZ domains generally bind short amino acid sequences at the C-terminus of target proteins, and short peptides can be used as inhibitors or model ligands. Here, we used experimental binding assays and molecular dynamics simulations to characterize 51 complexes involving the Tiam1 PDZ domain and to test the performance of a semi-empirical free energy function. The free energy function combined a Poisson-Boltzmann (PB continuum electrostatic term, a van der Waals interaction energy, and a surface area term. Each term was empirically weighted, giving a Linear Interaction Energy or “PB/LIE” free energy. The model yielded a mean unsigned deviation of 0.43 kcal/mol and a Pearson correlation of 0.64 between experimental and computed free energies, which was superior to a Null model that assumes all complexes have the same affinity. Analyses of the models support several experimental observations that indicate the orientation of the α2 helix is a critical determinant for peptide specificity. The models were also used to predict binding free energies for nine new variants, corresponding to point mutants of the Syndecan1 and Caspr4 peptides. The predictions did not reveal improved binding; however, they suggest that an unnatural amino acid could be used to increase protease resistance and peptide lifetimes in vivo. The overall performance of the model should allow its use in the design of new PDZ ligands in the future.

  4. Scaling Universality between Band Gap and Exciton Binding Energy of Two-Dimensional Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zeyu; Liu, Zhirong; Li, Yuanchang; Duan, Wenhui

    2017-06-01

    Using first-principles G W Bethe-Salpeter equation calculations and the k .p theory, we unambiguously show that for two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors, there exists a robust linear scaling law between the quasiparticle band gap (Eg) and the exciton binding energy (Eb), namely, Eb≈Eg/4 , regardless of their lattice configuration, bonding characteristic, as well as the topological property. Such a parameter-free universality is never observed in their three-dimensional counterparts. By deriving a simple expression for the 2D polarizability merely with respect to Eg, and adopting the screened hydrogen model for Eb, the linear scaling law can be deduced analytically. This work provides an opportunity to better understand the fantastic consequence of the 2D nature for materials, and thus offers valuable guidance for their property modulation and performance control.

  5. Improving density functional tight binding predictions of free energy surfaces for peptide condensation reactions in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroonblawd, Matthew; Goldman, Nir

    First principles molecular dynamics using highly accurate density functional theory (DFT) is a common tool for predicting chemistry, but the accessible time and space scales are often orders of magnitude beyond the resolution of experiments. Semi-empirical methods such as density functional tight binding (DFTB) offer up to a thousand-fold reduction in required CPU hours and can approach experimental scales. However, standard DFTB parameter sets lack good transferability and calibration for a particular system is usually necessary. Force matching the pairwise repulsive energy term in DFTB to short DFT trajectories can improve the former's accuracy for chemistry that is fast relative to DFT simulation times (Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Improving Density Functional Tight Binding Predictions of Free Energy Surfaces for Slow Chemical Reactions in Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroonblawd, Matthew; Goldman, Nir

    2017-06-01

    First principles molecular dynamics using highly accurate density functional theory (DFT) is a common tool for predicting chemistry, but the accessible time and space scales are often orders of magnitude beyond the resolution of experiments. Semi-empirical methods such as density functional tight binding (DFTB) offer up to a thousand-fold reduction in required CPU hours and can approach experimental scales. However, standard DFTB parameter sets lack good transferability and calibration for a particular system is usually necessary. Force matching the pairwise repulsive energy term in DFTB to short DFT trajectories can improve the former's accuracy for reactions that are fast relative to DFT simulation times (Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. Mechanical Control of ATP Synthase Function: Activation Energy Difference between Tight and Loose Binding Sites

    KAUST Repository

    Beke-Somfai, Tamás

    2010-01-26

    Despite exhaustive chemical and crystal structure studies, the mechanistic details of how FoF1-ATP synthase can convert mechanical energy to chemical, producing ATP, are still not fully understood. On the basis of quantum mechanical calculations using a recent highresolution X-ray structure, we conclude that formation of the P-O bond may be achieved through a transition state (TS) with a planar PO3 - ion. Surprisingly, there is a more than 40 kJ/mol difference between barrier heights of the loose and tight binding sites of the enzyme. This indicates that even a relatively small change in active site conformation, induced by the γ-subunit rotation, may effectively block the back reaction in βTP and, thus, promote ATP. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  8. Orbital momentum distribution and binding energies for the complete valence shell of molecular bromine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, L.; Grisogono, A.M.; Weigold, E.

    1987-08-01

    The binding energy spectrum of Br 2 has been recorded in both the outer and inner valence regions using electron momentum spectroscopy. The measurements are compared with the results of several Green's function calculations using different approximations and based on both polarized and unpolarized wave functions. The inner valence region, observed for the first time, is found to exhibit complex structure that is shown to be due to many-body effects, thus indicating a breakdown of the simple MO picture for ionization in this region. Momentum distributions for the three outer valence orbitals are also measured and compared with spherically averaged calculations using the target Hartree-Fock and plane wave impulse approximations. The effect of polarization functions in the basis set is investigated. Orbital density maps in both momentum and position space have been calculated and compared with the experimental measurements

  9. Orbital momentum distributions and binding energies for the complete valence shell of molecular iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisogono, A.M.; Pascual, R.; Weigold, E.

    1988-03-01

    The complete valence shell binding energy spectrum (8-43eV) of I 2 has been measured by using electron momentum spectroscopy at 1000eV. The complete inner valence region, corresponding to ionization from the 10 σ u and 10 σ g orbitals, has been measured for the first time and shows extensive splitting of the ionization strength due to electron correlation effects in the ion. Many-body calculations using the Green's function method have been carried out and are compared with the data. Momentum distributions, measured in both the outer and inner valence regions, are compared with those given by SCF orbital wave functions calculated with a number of different basis sets. Computed orbital position and momentum density maps for oriented I 2 molecules are discussed in comparison with the measured and calculated spherically averaged momentum distributions

  10. Observation of core-level binding energy shifts between (100) surface and bulk atoms of epitaxial CuInSe{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, A.J. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Berry, G.; Rockett, A. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Core-level and valence band photoemission from semiconductors has been shown to exhibit binding energy differences between surface atoms and bulk atoms, thus allowing one to unambiguously distinguish between the two atomic positions. Quite clearly, surface atoms experience a potential different from the bulk due to the lower coordination number - a characteristic feature of any surface is the incomplete atomic coordination. Theoretical accounts of this phenomena are well documented in the literature for III-V and II-VI semiconductors. However, surface state energies corresponding to the equilibrium geometry of (100) and (111) surfaces of Cu-based ternary chalcopyrite semiconductors have not been calculated or experimental determined. These compounds are generating great interest for optoelectronic and photovoltaic applications, and are an isoelectronic analog of the II-VI binary compound semiconductors. Surface core-level binding energy shifts depend on the surface cohesive energies, and surface cohesive energies are related to surface structure. For ternary compound semiconductor surfaces, such as CuInSe{sub 2}, one has the possibility of variations in surface stoichiometry. Applying standard thermodynamical calculations which consider the number of individual surface atoms and their respective chemical potentials should allow one to qualitatively determine the magnitude of surface core-level shifts and, consequently, surface state energies.

  11. Observation of core-level binding energy shifts between (100) surface and bulk atoms of epitaxial CuInSe2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, A.J.; Berry, G.; Rockett, A.

    1997-01-01

    Core-level and valence band photoemission from semiconductors has been shown to exhibit binding energy differences between surface atoms and bulk atoms, thus allowing one to unambiguously distinguish between the two atomic positions. Quite clearly, surface atoms experience a potential different from the bulk due to the lower coordination number - a characteristic feature of any surface is the incomplete atomic coordination. Theoretical accounts of this phenomena are well documented in the literature for III-V and II-VI semiconductors. However, surface state energies corresponding to the equilibrium geometry of (100) and (111) surfaces of Cu-based ternary chalcopyrite semiconductors have not been calculated or experimental determined. These compounds are generating great interest for optoelectronic and photovoltaic applications, and are an isoelectronic analog of the II-VI binary compound semiconductors. Surface core-level binding energy shifts depend on the surface cohesive energies, and surface cohesive energies are related to surface structure. For ternary compound semiconductor surfaces, such as CuInSe 2 , one has the possibility of variations in surface stoichiometry. Applying standard thermodynamical calculations which consider the number of individual surface atoms and their respective chemical potentials should allow one to qualitatively determine the magnitude of surface core-level shifts and, consequently, surface state energies

  12. Comparison of experimental and theoretical binding and transition energies in the actinide region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, M. O.; NESTOR, JR., C. W. [OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LAB., TENN. (USA)

    1977-11-15

    The present status of experimental and theoretical binding and transition energy determinations is reviewed. Experimental data and the most recent theoretical predictions are compared for the energies of K..cap alpha../sub 1/ X-rays, M series X-rays, K-LL Auger electrons, K, L/sub 3/, M and N levels, and the 4f spin-orbit splitting. In addition, the K..cap alpha../sub 1/ and L/sub 3/ data are fitted by Moseley-type diagrams, and data on the shallow levels and the valence bands of actinide oxides are discussed. Comparison shows that the single-particle Dirac-Fock theory and the inclusion of quantum-electrodynamic contributions predicts energies of the innermost levels generally within the accuracy of data, that is in the order of magnitude of 1 eV. However, in the N, O... shells large deviations do occur presumably due to strong many-electron interactions. The inclusion of many-electron effects in the relativistic theory remains a challenge, as do experimental investigations affording an accuracy of better than 1 eV for the various electronic levels.

  13. First lattice calculation of the B-meson binding and kinetic energies

    CERN Document Server

    Crisafulli, M; Martinelli, G; Sachrajda, Christopher T C

    1995-01-01

    We present the first lattice calculation of the B-meson binding energy \\labar and of the kinetic energy -\\lambda_1/2 m_Q of the heavy-quark inside the pseudoscalar B-meson. This calculation has required the non-perturbative subtraction of the power divergences present in matrix elements of the Lagrangian operator \\bar h D_4 h and of the kinetic energy operator \\bar h \\vec D^2 h. The non-perturbative renormalisation of the relevant operators has been implemented by imposing suitable renormalisation conditions on quark matrix elements, in the Landau gauge. Our numerical results have been obtained from several independent numerical simulations at \\beta=6.0 and 6.2, and using, for the meson correlators, the results obtained by the APE group at the same values of \\beta. Our best estimate, obtained by combining results at different values of \\beta, is \\labar =190 \\err{50}{30} MeV. For the \\overline{MS} running mass, we obtain \\overline {m}_b(\\overline {m}_b) =4.17 \\pm 0.06 GeV, in reasonable agreement with previous...

  14. First-principles investigation on the electronic efficiency and binding energy of the contacts formed by graphene and poly-aromatic hydrocarbon anchoring groups

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yang

    2015-04-28

    © 2015 AIP Publishing LLC. The electronic efficiency and binding energy of contacts formed between graphene electrodes and poly-aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) anchoring groups have been investigated by the non-equilibrium Green\\'s function formalism combined with density functional theory. Our calculations show that PAH molecules always bind in the interior and at the edge of graphene in the AB stacking manner, and that the binding energy increases following the increase of the number of carbon and hydrogen atoms constituting the PAH molecule. When we move to analyzing the electronic transport properties of molecular junctions with a six-carbon alkyne chain as the central molecule, the electronic efficiency of the graphene-PAH contacts is found to depend on the energy gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of the corresponding PAH anchoring group, rather than its size. To be specific, the smaller is the HOMO-LUMO gap of the PAH anchoring group, the higher is the electronic efficiency of the graphene-PAH contact. Although the HOMO-LUMO gap of a PAH molecule depends on its specific configuration, PAH molecules with similar atomic structures show a decreasing trend for their HOMO-LUMO gap as the number of fused benzene rings increases. Therefore, graphene-conjugated molecule-graphene junctions with high-binding and high-conducting graphene-PAH contacts can be realized by choosing appropriate PAH anchor groups with a large area and a small HOMO-LUMO gap.

  15. Protection against Mitochondrial and Metal Toxicity Depends on Functional Lipid Binding Sites in ATP13A2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun Martin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The late endo-/lysosomal P-type ATPase ATP13A2 (PARK9 is implicated in Parkinson’s disease (PD and Kufor-Rakeb syndrome, early-onset atypical Parkinsonism. ATP13A2 interacts at the N-terminus with the signaling lipids phosphatidic acid (PA and phosphatidylinositol (3,5 bisphosphate (PI(3,5P2, which modulate ATP13A2 activity under cellular stress conditions. Here, we analyzed stable human SHSY5Y cell lines overexpressing wild-type (WT or ATP13A2 mutants in which three N-terminal lipid binding sites (LBS1–3 were mutated. We explored the regulatory role of LBS1–3 in the cellular protection by ATP13A2 against mitochondrial stress induced by rotenone and found that the LBS2-3 mutants displayed an abrogated protective effect. Moreover, in contrast to WT, the LBS2 and LBS3 mutants responded poorly to pharmacological inhibition of, respectively, PI(3,5P2 and PA formation. We further demonstrate that PA and PI(3,5P2 are also required for the ATP13A2-mediated protection against the toxic metals Mn2+, Zn2+, and Fe3+, suggesting a general lipid-dependent activation mechanism of ATP13A2 in various PD-related stress conditions. Our results indicate that the ATP13A2-mediated protection requires binding of PI(3,5P2 to LBS2 and PA to LBS3. Thus, targeting the N-terminal lipid binding sites of ATP13A2 might offer a therapeutic approach to reduce cellular toxicity of various PD insults including mitochondrial stress.

  16. Vitamin D-dependent rat renal calcium-binding protein: development of a radioimmunoassay, tissue distribution, and immunologic identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnenberg, J.; Pansini, A.R.; Christakos, S.

    1984-01-01

    A sensitive double antibody RIA has been developed for the 28,000 mol wt rat renal vitamin D-dependent calcium-binding protein. Using this assay, concentrations of calcium-binding protein (CaBP) as low as 30 ng can be measured. The assay is precise (intraassay variability, 5.0%) and reproductible (interassay variability, 8.2%). Measurements of renal CaBP by RIA showed a good correlation with measurements of CaBP by the chelex resin assay and by polyacrylamide gel analysis by densitometric tracing using a purified CaBP marker. The concentration of CaBP in the vitamin D-replete rat kidney is 7.3 +/- 1.0 (mean +/- SEM) micrograms/mg protein. In vitamin D-deficient rats the level of renal CaBP is 2.6 +/- 0.3 micrograms/mg protein. Tissue distribution of immunoreactive rat renal CaBP showed the highest concentration of CaBP in the rat cerebellum (38.3 +/- 5.1 micrograms/mg protein). Lower concentrations of immunoreactive CaBP were detected in several other rat tissues. No immunoreactive CaBP was detected in rat or human serum. In necropsy human kidney and cerebellum, high levels of immunoreactive CaBP were also detected (1.5 +/- 0.1 and 27.3 +/- 2.1 micrograms/mg protein, respectively). When extracts of rat kidney and brain and human cerebellum and kidney were assayed at several dilutions, immunodisplacement curves parallel to that of pure renal CaBP were observed, indicating immunochemical similarity. Fractionation of extracts of rat cerebellum, human kidney, and human cerebellum on Sephadex G-100 revealed immunoreactivity and calcium-binding activity in the 28,000 mol wt region similar to rat kidney

  17. Maximizing in vivo target clearance by design of pH-dependent target binding antibodies with altered affinity to FcRn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Danlin; Giragossian, Craig; Castellano, Steven; Lasaro, Marcio; Xiao, Haiguang; Saraf, Himanshu; Hess Kenny, Cynthia; Rybina, Irina; Huang, Zhong-Fu; Ahlberg, Jennifer; Bigwarfe, Tammy; Myzithras, Maria; Waltz, Erica; Roberts, Simon; Kroe-Barrett, Rachel; Singh, Sanjaya

    2017-10-01

    Antibodies with pH-dependent binding to both target antigens and neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) provide an alternative tool to conventional neutralizing antibodies, particularly for therapies where reduction in antigen level is challenging due to high target burden. However, the requirements for optimal binding kinetic framework and extent of pH dependence for these antibodies to maximize target clearance from circulation are not well understood. We have identified a series of naturally-occurring high affinity antibodies with pH-dependent target binding properties. By in vivo studies in cynomolgus monkeys, we show that pH-dependent binding to the target alone is not sufficient for effective target removal from circulation, but requires Fc mutations that increase antibody binding to FcRn. Affinity-enhanced pH-dependent FcRn binding that is double-digit nM at pH 7.4 and single-digit nM at pH 6 achieved maximal target reduction when combined with similar target binding affinities in reverse pH directions. Sustained target clearance below the baseline level was achieved 3 weeks after single-dose administration at 1.5 mg/kg. Using the experimentally derived mechanistic model, we demonstrate the essential kinetic interplay between target turnover and antibody pH-dependent binding during the FcRn recycling, and identify the key components for achieving maximal target clearance. These results bridge the demand for improved patient dosing convenience with the "know-how" of therapeutic modality by design.

  18. Computational prediction of binding affinity for CYP1A2-ligand complexes using empirical free energy calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poongavanam, Vasanthanathan; Olsen, Lars; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen

    2010-01-01

    , and methods based on statistical mechanics. In the present investigation, we started from an LIE model to predict the binding free energy of structurally diverse compounds of cytochrome P450 1A2 ligands, one of the important human metabolizing isoforms of the cytochrome P450 family. The data set includes both...... substrates and inhibitors. It appears that the electrostatic contribution to the binding free energy becomes negligible in this particular protein and a simple empirical model was derived, based on a training set of eight compounds. The root mean square error for the training set was 3.7 kJ/mol. Subsequent......Predicting binding affinities for receptor-ligand complexes is still one of the challenging processes in computational structure-based ligand design. Many computational methods have been developed to achieve this goal, such as docking and scoring methods, the linear interaction energy (LIE) method...

  19. Theoretical investigation of stark effect on shallow donor binding energy in InGaN spherical QD-QW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Ghazi, Haddou, E-mail: hadghazi@gmail.com [Solid State Physics Laboratory, Faculty of Science, Dhar EL Mehrez, BP 1796 Fes-Atlas (Morocco); Mathématiques spéciales, CPGE Kénitra, Chakib Arsalane Street (Morocco); Jorio, Anouar; Zorkani, Izeddine [Solid State Physics Laboratory, Faculty of Science, Dhar EL Mehrez, BP 1796 Fes-Atlas (Morocco)

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, a simultaneous study of electric field and impurity's position effects on the ground-state shallow-donor binding energy in GaN|InGaN|GaN spherical quantum dot-quantum well (SQD-QW) as a function of the ratio of the inner and the outer radius is reported. The calculations are investigated using variational approach within the framework of the effective-mass approximation. The numerical results show that: (i) the binding energy is strongly affected by the external electric field and the SQD-QW dimension, (ii) a critical value of spherical system's radius is obtained constituting the limit of three dimension confinement and spherical thin layer confinement and (iii) the Stark shift increases with increasing electric field and it is more pronounced around the position of the impurity corresponding to the binding energy maxima than in the spherical layer extremities.

  20. Theoretical investigation of stark effect on shallow donor binding energy in InGaN spherical QD-QW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Ghazi, Haddou; Jorio, Anouar; Zorkani, Izeddine

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a simultaneous study of electric field and impurity's position effects on the ground-state shallow-donor binding energy in GaN|InGaN|GaN spherical quantum dot-quantum well (SQD-QW) as a function of the ratio of the inner and the outer radius is reported. The calculations are investigated using variational approach within the framework of the effective-mass approximation. The numerical results show that: (i) the binding energy is strongly affected by the external electric field and the SQD-QW dimension, (ii) a critical value of spherical system's radius is obtained constituting the limit of three dimension confinement and spherical thin layer confinement and (iii) the Stark shift increases with increasing electric field and it is more pronounced around the position of the impurity corresponding to the binding energy maxima than in the spherical layer extremities

  1. pH-dependent kinetics of copper ions binding to amyloid-β peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin, Yannan; Chen, Shu; Xiang, Juan

    2013-02-01

    Interactions of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) with Cu(2+) are known to be pH-dependent and believed to play a crucial role in the neurotoxicity of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Some research has revealed that injured brains with lowered pH have higher risks of developing AD. However, reported experiments were performed under neutral or mildly acidic conditions, and no reports about the affinity of Aβ-Cu(2+) below pH6.0. In this study, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor with immobilized Aβ was used to investigate the formation of Aβ-Cu(2+) complexes under acidic pH conditions. Dissociation constants were calculated and shown to be pH-dependent, ranging from 3.5×10(-8)M to 8.7×10(-3)M in the pH range from 7.0 to 4.0. The physiological significance of K(d) was preliminarily investigated by monitoring the generation of OH() in aerobic solutions containing Aβ-Cu(2+) and Cu(2+). The results imply that acidic conditions could aggravate the oxidative stress in the presence of Cu(2+), and the weak affinities of Aβ-Cu(2+) under mildly acidic pH of 5.0-6.0 could further enhance the oxidative damage. However, the oxidative stress effect of Aβ is negligible due to the suppressed formation of Aβ-Cu(2+) below pH5.0. This work is useful for the in-depth understanding of the role of Aβ-Cu(2+) in AD neuropathology. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The Potato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat (NLR) Immune Receptor Rx1 Is a Pathogen-dependent DNA-deforming Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenyk, Stepan; Townsend, Philip D; Dixon, Christopher H; Spies, Gerhard B; de San Eustaquio Campillo, Alba; Slootweg, Erik J; Westerhof, Lotte B; Gawehns, Fleur K K; Knight, Marc R; Sharples, Gary J; Goverse, Aska; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L W; Cann, Martin J

    2015-10-09

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable cells to respond to pathogen attack. Several NLRs act in the nucleus; however, conserved nuclear targets that support their role in immunity are unknown. Previously, we noted a structural homology between the nucleotide-binding domain of NLRs and DNA replication origin-binding Cdc6/Orc1 proteins. Here we show that the NB-ARC (nucleotide-binding, Apaf-1, R-proteins, and CED-4) domain of the Rx1 NLR of potato binds nucleic acids. Rx1 induces ATP-dependent bending and melting of DNA in vitro, dependent upon a functional P-loop. In situ full-length Rx1 binds nuclear DNA following activation by its cognate pathogen-derived effector protein, the coat protein of potato virus X. In line with its obligatory nucleocytoplasmic distribution, DNA binding was only observed when Rx1 was allowed to freely translocate between both compartments and was activated in the cytoplasm. Immune activation induced by an unrelated NLR-effector pair did not trigger an Rx1-DNA interaction. DNA binding is therefore not merely a consequence of immune activation. These data establish a role for DNA distortion in Rx1 immune signaling and define DNA as a molecular target of an activated NLR. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. The Potato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat (NLR) Immune Receptor Rx1 Is a Pathogen-dependent DNA-deforming Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenyk, Stepan; Townsend, Philip D.; Dixon, Christopher H.; Spies, Gerhard B.; de San Eustaquio Campillo, Alba; Slootweg, Erik J.; Westerhof, Lotte B.; Gawehns, Fleur K. K.; Knight, Marc R.; Sharples, Gary J.; Goverse, Aska; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L. W.; Cann, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable cells to respond to pathogen attack. Several NLRs act in the nucleus; however, conserved nuclear targets that support their role in immunity are unknown. Previously, we noted a structural homology between the nucleotide-binding domain of NLRs and DNA replication origin-binding Cdc6/Orc1 proteins. Here we show that the NB-ARC (nucleotide-binding, Apaf-1, R-proteins, and CED-4) domain of the Rx1 NLR of potato binds nucleic acids. Rx1 induces ATP-dependent bending and melting of DNA in vitro, dependent upon a functional P-loop. In situ full-length Rx1 binds nuclear DNA following activation by its cognate pathogen-derived effector protein, the coat protein of potato virus X. In line with its obligatory nucleocytoplasmic distribution, DNA binding was only observed when Rx1 was allowed to freely translocate between both compartments and was activated in the cytoplasm. Immune activation induced by an unrelated NLR-effector pair did not trigger an Rx1-DNA interaction. DNA binding is therefore not merely a consequence of immune activation. These data establish a role for DNA distortion in Rx1 immune signaling and define DNA as a molecular target of an activated NLR. PMID:26306038

  4. Optimizing the Binding Energy of Hydrogen on Nanostructured Carbon Materials through Structure Control and Chemical Doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jie Liu

    2011-02-01

    The DOE Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE) was formed in 2005 to develop materials for hydrogen storage systems to be used in light-duty vehicles. The HSCoE and two related centers of excellence were created as follow-on activities to the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s (EERE’s) Hydrogen Storage Grand Challenge Solicitation issued in FY 2003. The Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE) focuses on developing high-capacity sorbents with the goal to operate at temperatures and pressures approaching ambient and be efficiently and quickly charged in the tank with minimal energy requirements and penalties to the hydrogen fuel infrastructure. The work was directed at overcoming barriers to achieving DOE system goals and identifying pathways to meet the hydrogen storage system targets. To ensure that the development activities were performed as efficiently as possible, the HSCoE formed complementary, focused development clusters based on the following four sorption-based hydrogen storage mechanisms: 1. Physisorption on high specific surface area and nominally single element materials 2. Enhanced H2 binding in Substituted/heterogeneous materials 3. Strong and/or multiple H2 binding from coordinated but electronically unsatruated metal centers 4. Weak Chemisorption/Spillover. As a member of the team, our group at Duke studied the synthesis of various carbon-based materials, including carbon nanotubes and microporous carbon materials with controlled porosity. We worked closely with other team members to study the effect of pore size on the binding energy of hydrogen to the carbon –based materials. Our initial project focus was on the synthesis and purification of small diameter, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with well-controlled diameters for the study of their hydrogen storage properties as a function of diameters. We developed a chemical vapor deposition method that synthesized gram quantities of carbon nanotubes with

  5. Cuz1/Ynl155w, a Zinc-dependent Ubiquitin-binding Protein, Protects Cells from Metalloid-induced Proteotoxicity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, John; Waterman, David; Isasa, Marta; Elsasser, Suzanne; Shi, Yuan; Gygi, Steven; Finley, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Protein misfolding is a universal threat to cells. The ubiquitin-proteasome system mediates a cellular stress response capable of eliminating misfolded proteins. Here we identify Cuz1/Ynl155w as a component of the ubiquitin system, capable of interacting with both the proteasome and Cdc48. Cuz1/Ynl155w is regulated by the transcription factor Rpn4, and is required for cells to survive exposure to the trivalent metalloids arsenic and antimony. A related protein, Yor052c, shows similar phenotypes, suggesting a multicomponent stress response pathway. Cuz1/Ynl155w functions as a zinc-dependent ubiquitin-binding protein. Thus, Cuz1/Ynl155w is proposed to protect cells from metalloid-induced proteotoxicity by delivering ubiquitinated substrates to Cdc48 and the proteasome for destruction. PMID:24297164

  6. Ebselen and congeners inhibit NADPH oxidase 2-dependent superoxide generation by interrupting the binding of regulatory subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Susan M E; Min, Jaeki; Ganesh, Thota; Diebold, Becky; Kawahara, Tsukasa; Zhu, Yerun; McCoy, James; Sun, Aiming; Snyder, James P; Fu, Haian; Du, Yuhong; Lewis, Iestyn; Lambeth, J David

    2012-06-22

    NADPH oxidases (Nox) are a primary source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which function in normal physiology and, when overproduced, in pathophysiology. Recent studies using mice deficient in Nox2 identify this isoform as a novel target against Nox2-implicated inflammatory diseases. Nox2 activation depends on the binding of the proline-rich domain of its heterodimeric partner p22phox to p47phox. A high-throughput screen that monitored this interaction via fluorescence polarization identified ebselen and several of its analogs as inhibitors. Medicinal chemistry was performed to explore structure-activity relationships and to optimize potency. Ebselen and analogs potently inhibited Nox1 and Nox2 activity but were less effective against other isoforms. Ebselen also blocked translocation of p47phox to neutrophil membranes. Thus, ebselen and its analogs represent a class of compounds that inhibit ROS generation by interrupting the assembly of Nox2-activating regulatory subunits. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Magnetic field effect on the ground-state binding energy in InGaN/GaN parabolic QWW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Ghazi, Haddou; Jorio, Anouar; Zorkani, Izeddine

    2013-01-01

    Within the framework of the effective mass scheme, the ground-state binding energy of hydrogenic shallow-donor impurity in wurtzite (WZ) (In,Ga)N/GaN parabolic transversal-section quantum-well wire (PQWW) subjected to magnetic field is investigated. The finite-difference method within the quasi-one-dimensional effective potential model is used. A cylindrical QWW effective radius is introduced to describe the lateral confinement strength. The results show that: (i) the binding energy is the largest for the impurity located at a point corresponding to the largest electron probability density and (ii) it increases with increasing external magnetic field

  8. Magnetic field effect on the ground-state binding energy in InGaN/GaN parabolic QWW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Ghazi, Haddou, E-mail: hadghazi@gmail.com [LPS, Faculty of sciences, Dhar EL Mehrez, B.P 1796 Atlas Fez (Morocco); Specials Mathematics, CPGE Kénitra, Chakib Arsalane Street, Kénitra (Morocco); Jorio, Anouar; Zorkani, Izeddine [LPS, Faculty of sciences, Dhar EL Mehrez, B.P 1796 Atlas Fez (Morocco)

    2013-07-15

    Within the framework of the effective mass scheme, the ground-state binding energy of hydrogenic shallow-donor impurity in wurtzite (WZ) (In,Ga)N/GaN parabolic transversal-section quantum-well wire (PQWW) subjected to magnetic field is investigated. The finite-difference method within the quasi-one-dimensional effective potential model is used. A cylindrical QWW effective radius is introduced to describe the lateral confinement strength. The results show that: (i) the binding energy is the largest for the impurity located at a point corresponding to the largest electron probability density and (ii) it increases with increasing external magnetic field.

  9. Thermodynamics of cooperative binding of FAD to human NQO1: Implications to understanding cofactor-dependent function and stability of the flavoproteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavería-Gimeno, Rafael; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian; Pey, Angel Luis

    2017-12-15

    The stability of human flavoproteins strongly depends on flavin levels, although the structural and energetic basis of this relationship is poorly understood. Here, we report an in-depth analysis on the thermodynamics of FAD binding to one of the most representative examples of such relationship, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1). NQO1 is a dimeric enzyme that tightly binds FAD, which triggers large structural changes upon binding. A common cancer-associated polymorphism (P187S) severely compromises FAD binding. We show that FAD binding is described well by a thermodynamic model explicitly incorporating binding cooperativity when applied to different sets of calorimetric analyses and NQO1 variants, thus providing insight on the effects in vitro and in cells of cancer-associated P187S, its suppressor mutation H80R and the role of NQO1 C-terminal domain to modulate binding cooperativity and energetics. Furthermore, we show that FAD binding to NQO1 is very sensitive to physiologically relevant environmental conditions, such as the presence of phosphate buffer and salts. Overall, our results contribute to understanding at the molecular level the link between NQO1 stability and fluctuations of FAD levels intracellularly, and supports the notion that FAD binding energetics and cooperativity are fundamentally linked with the dynamic nature of apo-NQO1 conformational ensemble. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Selective binding of pyrene in subdomain IB of human serum albumin: Combining energy transfer spectroscopy and molecular modelling to understand protein binding flexibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Irene; Taha, Mohamed; Al-Sharji, Nada A.; Abou-Zied, Osama K.

    2018-04-01

    The ability of human serum albumin (HSA) to bind medium-sized hydrophobic molecules is important for the distribution, metabolism, and efficacy of many drugs. Herein, the interaction between pyrene, a hydrophobic fluorescent probe, and HSA was thoroughly investigated using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques, ligand docking, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A slight quenching of the fluorescence signal from Trp214 (the sole tryptophan residue in the protein) in the presence of pyrene was used to determine the ligand binding site in the protein, using Förster's resonance energy transfer (FRET) theory. The estimated FRET apparent distance between pyrene and Trp214 was 27 Å, which was closely reproduced by the docking analysis (29 Å) and MD simulation (32 Å). The highest affinity site for pyrene was found to be in subdomain IB from the docking results. The calculated equilibrium structure of the complex using MD simulation shows that the ligand is largely stabilized by hydrophobic interaction with Phe165, Phe127, and the nonpolar moieties of Tyr138 and Tyr161. The fluorescence vibronic peak ratio I1/I3 of bound pyrene inside HSA indicates the presence of polar effect in the local environment of pyrene which is less than that of free pyrene in buffer. This was clarified by the MD simulation results in which an average of 5.7 water molecules were found within 0.5 nm of pyrene in the binding site. Comparing the fluorescence signals and lifetimes of pyrene inside HSA to that free in buffer, the high tendency of pyrene to form dimer was almost completely suppressed inside HSA, indicating a high selectivity of the binding pocket toward pyrene monomer. The current results emphasize the ability of HSA, as a major carrier of several drugs and ligands in blood, to bind hydrophobic molecules in cavities other than subdomain IIA which is known to bind most hydrophobic drugs. This ability stems from the nature of the amino acids forming the binding

  11. Hypernuclear interactions and the binding energies of Λ and ΛΛ hypernuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodmer, A.R.; Usmani, Q.N.

    1988-01-01

    By use of variational calculations a reasonable hadronic description is obtained of the s-shell hypernuclei, of /sub Λ/ 9 Be, and of the well depth, with ΛN forces which are consistent with Λp scattering and which are quite strongly spin-dependent, with reasonable TPE ΛNN forces with strongly repulsive dispersive-type ΛNN forces. For the latter we also consider a spin-dependent version which is somewhat favored by our analysis. /sub Λ/ 9 Be is treated as a 2α + Λ system and is significantly overbound, ≅1 MeV, if only αα and αΛ potentials are used. An ααΛ potential obtained from the ΛNN forces nicely accounts for this overbinding. The ΛΛ hypernuclei /sub ΛΛ/ 6 He and /sub ΛΛ/ 10 Be are treated as α + 2Λ and 2α + 2Λ systems. Use of the /sub ΛΛ/ 10 Be event gives ≅1.5 MeV too little binding for /sub ΛΛ/ 6 He. The 1 S 0 ΛΛ potential obtained from /sub ΛΛ/ 10 Be is quite strongly attractive, comparable to the ΛN and also to the NN potential without OPE. 18 refs

  12. Energy-dependent dissociation of ATP from high affinity catalytic sites of beef heart mitochondrial adenosine triphosphatase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penefsky, H.S.

    1985-01-01

    Incubation of [gamma- 32 P]ATP with a molar excess of the membrane-bound form of mitochondrial ATPase (F1) results in binding of the bulk of the radioactive nucleotide in high affinity catalytic sites (Ka = 10(12) M-1). Subsequent initiation of respiration by addition of succinate or NADH is accompanied by a profound decrease in the affinity for ATP. About one-third of the bound radioactive ATP appears to dissociate, that is, the [gamma- 32 P]ATP becomes accessible to hexokinase. The NADH-stimulated dissociation of [gamma- 32 P]ATP is energy-dependent since the stimulation is inhibited by uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation and is prevented by respiratory chain inhibitors. The rate of the energy-dependent dissociation of ATP that occurs in the presence of NADH, ADP, and Pi is commensurate with the measured initial rate of ATP synthesis in NADH-supported oxidative phosphorylation catalyzed by the same submitochondrial particles. Thus, the rate of dissociation of ATP from the high affinity catalytic site of submitochondrial particles meets the criterion of kinetic competency under the conditions of oxidative phosphorylation. These experiments provide evidence in support of the argument that energy conserved during the oxidation of substrates by the respiratory chain can be utilized to reduce the very tight binding of product ATP in high affinity catalytic sites and to promote dissociation of the nucleotide

  13. Is there dependence and systemic risk between oil and renewable energy stock prices?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reboredo, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    We study systemic risk and dependence between oil and renewable energy markets using copulas to characterize the dependence structure and to compute the conditional value-at-risk as a measure of systemic risk. We found significant time-varying average and symmetric tail dependence between oil returns and several global and sectoral renewable energy indices. Our evidence on systemic risk indicates that oil price dynamics significantly contributes around 30% to downside and upside risk of renewable energy companies. These results have important implications for risk management and renewable energy policies. - Highlights: • We study systemic risk and dependence between oil and renewable energy markets. • Dependence and conditional value-at-risk is obtained through copulas. • Oil and renewable energy displayed time-varying average and symmetric tail dependence. • Oil price contribution to the downside and upside risks of renewable energy companies was around 30%

  14. Infrared Dielectric Screening Determines the Low Exciton Binding Energy of Metal-Halide Perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umari, Paolo; Mosconi, Edoardo; De Angelis, Filippo

    2018-02-01

    The performance of lead-halide perovskites in optoelectronic devices is due to a unique combination of factors, including highly efficient generation, transport, and collection of photogenerated charge carriers. The mechanism behind efficient charge generation in lead-halide perovskites is still largely unknown. Here, we investigate the factors that influence the exciton binding energy (E b ) in a series of metal-halide perovskites using accurate first-principles calculations based on solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation, coupled to ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. We find that E b is strongly modulated by screening from low-energy phonons, which account for a factor ∼2 E b reduction, while dynamic disorder and rotational motion of the organic cations play a minor role. We calculate E b = 15 meV for MAPbI 3 , in excellent agreement with recent experimental estimates. We then explore how different material combinations (e.g., replacing Pb → Pb:Sn→ Sn; and MA → FA → Cs) may lead to different E b values and highlight the mechanisms underlying E b tuning.

  15. Hydrostatic pressure and conduction band non-parabolicity effects on the impurity binding energy in a spherical quantum dot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivakami, A.; Mahendran, M.

    2010-01-01

    The binding energy of a shallow hydrogenic impurity in a spherical quantum dot under hydrostatic pressure with square well potential is calculated using a variational approach within the effective mass approximation. The effect of conduction band non-parabolicity on these energies is also estimated. The binding energy is computed for GaAs spherical quantum dot as a function of dot size, hydrostatic pressure both in the presence and absence of the band non-parabolicity effect. Our results show that (i) the hydrostatic pressure increases the impurity binding energy when dot radius increases for a given pressure, (ii) the hydrostatic pressure with the band non-parabolicity effect effectively increases the binding energy such that the variation is large for smaller dots and (iii) the maximum contribution by the non-parabolicity effect is about 15% for narrow dots. Our results are in good agreement with Perez-Merchancano et al. [J. Phys. Condens. Matter 19 (2007) 026225] who have not considered the conduction band non-parabolicity effect.

  16. Predicting Binding Free Energy Change Caused by Point Mutations with Knowledge-Modified MM/PBSA Method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marharyta Petukh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A new methodology termed Single Amino Acid Mutation based change in Binding free Energy (SAAMBE was developed to predict the changes of the binding free energy caused by mutations. The method utilizes 3D structures of the corresponding protein-protein complexes and takes advantage of both approaches: sequence- and structure-based methods. The method has two components: a MM/PBSA-based component, and an additional set of statistical terms delivered from statistical investigation of physico-chemical properties of protein complexes. While the approach is rigid body approach and does not explicitly consider plausible conformational changes caused by the binding, the effect of conformational changes, including changes away from binding interface, on electrostatics are mimicked with amino acid specific dielectric constants. This provides significant improvement of SAAMBE predictions as indicated by better match against experimentally determined binding free energy changes over 1300 mutations in 43 proteins. The final benchmarking resulted in a very good agreement with experimental data (correlation coefficient 0.624 while the algorithm being fast enough to allow for large-scale calculations (the average time is less than a minute per mutation.

  17. Conservation law of plants' energy value dependence of plants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The plants differences in biochemical composition are analyzed, and the conservation law of energy value in plants is obtained. The link between the need for the nutrients and the plants biochemical composition is examined, Liebig's law is specified. Keywords: plant's biochemical composition, biochemistry, energy value in ...

  18. Neutron-energy-dependent cell survival and oncogenic transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R C; Marino, S A; Martin, S G; Komatsu, K; Geard, C R; Brenner, D J; Hall, E J

    1999-12-01

    Both cell lethality and neoplastic transformation were assessed for C3H10T1/2 cells exposed to neutrons with energies from 0.040 to 13.7 MeV. Monoenergetic neutrons with energies from 0.23 to 13.7 MeV and two neutron energy spectra with average energies of 0.040 and 0.070 MeV were produced with a Van de Graaff accelerator at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) in the Center for Radiological Research of Columbia University. For determination of relative biological effectiveness (RBE), cells were exposed to 250 kVp X rays. With exposures to 250 kVp X rays, both cell survival and radiation-induced oncogenic transformation were curvilinear. Irradiation of cells with neutrons at all energies resulted in linear responses as a function of dose for both biological endpoints. Results indicate a complex relationship between RBEm and neutron energy. For both survival and transformation, RBEm was greatest for cells exposed to 0.35 MeV neutrons. RBEm was significantly less at energies above or below 0.35 MeV. These results are consistent with microdosimetric expectation. These results are also compatible with current assessments of neutron radiation weighting factors for radiation protection purposes. Based on calculations of dose-averaged LET, 0.35 MeV neutrons have the greatest LET and therefore would be expected to be more biologically effective than neutrons of greater or lesser energies.

  19. Phospho-dependent binding of the clathrin AP2 adaptor complex to GABAA receptors regulates the efficacy of inhibitory synaptic transmission

    OpenAIRE

    Kittler, Josef T.; Chen, Guojun; Honing, Stephan; Bogdanov, Yury; McAinsh, Kristina; Arancibia-Carcamo, I. Lorena; Jovanovic, Jasmina N.; Pangalos, Menelas N.; Haucke, Volker; Yan, Zhen; Moss, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    The efficacy of synaptic inhibition depends on the number of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABAARs) expressed on the cell surface of neurons. The clathrin adaptor protein 2 (AP2) complex is a critical regulator of GABAAR endocytosis and, hence, surface receptor number. Here, we identify a previously uncharacterized atypical AP2 binding motif conserved within the intracellular domains of all GABAAR β subunit isoforms. This AP2 binding motif (KTHLRRRSSQLK in the β3 subunit) incorporates...

  20. Response and binding elements for ligand-dependent positive transcription factors integrate positive and negative regulation of gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenfeld, M.G.; Glass, C.K.; Adler, S.; Crenshaw, E.B. III; He, X.; Lira, S.A.; Elsholtz, H.P.; Mangalam, H.J.; Holloway, J.M.; Nelson, C.; Albert, V.R.; Ingraham, H.A.

    1988-01-01

    Accurate, regulated initiation of mRNA transcription by RNA polymerase II is dependent on the actions of a variety of positive and negative trans-acting factors that bind cis-acting promoter and enhancer elements. These transcription factors may exert their actions in a tissue-specific manner or function under control of plasma membrane or intracellular ligand-dependent receptors. A major goal in the authors' laboratory has been to identify the molecular mechanisms responsible for the serial activation of hormone-encoding genes in the pituitary during development and the positive and negative regulation of their transcription. The anterior pituitary gland contains phenotypically distinct cell types, each of which expresses unique trophic hormones: adrenocorticotropic hormone, thyroid-stimulating hormone, prolactin, growth hormone, and follicle-stimulating hormone/luteinizing hormone. The structurally related prolactin and growth hormone genes are expressed in lactotrophs and somatotrophs, respectively, with their expression virtually limited to the pituitary gland. The reported transient coexpression of these two structurally related neuroendocrine genes raises the possibility that the prolactin and growth hormone genes are developmentally controlled by a common factor(s)

  1. A Critical Review of Validation, Blind Testing, and Real- World Use of Alchemical Protein-Ligand Binding Free Energy Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Robert; Wang, Lingle; Mobley, David L; Friesner, Richard A

    2017-01-01

    Protein-ligand binding is among the most fundamental phenomena underlying all molecular biology, and a greater ability to more accurately and robustly predict the binding free energy of a small molecule ligand for its cognate protein is expected to have vast consequences for improving the efficiency of pharmaceutical drug discovery. We briefly reviewed a number of scientific and technical advances that have enabled alchemical free energy calculations to recently emerge as a preferred approach, and critically considered proper validation and effective use of these techniques. In particular, we characterized a selection bias effect which may be important in prospective free energy calculations, and introduced a strategy to improve the accuracy of the free energy predictions. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Dependence of Interaction Free Energy between Solutes on an External Electrostatic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Kun Yang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available To explore the athermal effect of an external electrostatic field on the stabilities of protein conformations and the binding affinities of protein-protein/ligand interactions, the dependences of the polar and hydrophobic interactions on the external electrostatic field, −Eext, were studied using molecular dynamics (MD simulations. By decomposing Eext into, along, and perpendicular to the direction formed by the two solutes, the effect of Eext on the interactions between these two solutes can be estimated based on the effects from these two components. Eext was applied along the direction of the electric dipole formed by two solutes with opposite charges. The attractive interaction free energy between these two solutes decreased for solutes treated as point charges. In contrast, the attractive interaction free energy between these two solutes increased, as observed by MD simulations, for Eext = 40 or 60 MV/cm. Eext was applied perpendicular to the direction of the electric dipole formed by these two solutes. The attractive interaction free energy was increased for Eext = 100 MV/cm as a result of dielectric saturation. The force on the solutes along the direction of Eext computed from MD simulations was greater than that estimated from a continuum solvent in which the solutes were treated as point charges. To explore the hydrophobic interactions, Eext was applied to a water cluster containing two neutral solutes. The repulsive force between these solutes was decreased/increased for Eext along/perpendicular to the direction of the electric dipole formed by these two solutes.

  3. An environment-dependent semi-empirical tight binding model suitable for electron transport in bulk metals, metal alloys, metallic interfaces, and metallic nanostructures. I. Model and validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegde, Ganesh, E-mail: ghegde@purdue.edu; Povolotskyi, Michael; Kubis, Tillmann; Klimeck, Gerhard, E-mail: gekco@purdue.edu [Network for Computational Nanotechnology (NCN), Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Boykin, Timothy [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alabama, Huntsville, Alabama (United States)

    2014-03-28

    Semi-empirical Tight Binding (TB) is known to be a scalable and accurate atomistic representation for electron transport for realistically extended nano-scaled semiconductor devices that might contain millions of atoms. In this paper, an environment-aware and transferable TB model suitable for electronic structure and transport simulations in technologically relevant metals, metallic alloys, metal nanostructures, and metallic interface systems are described. Part I of this paper describes the development and validation of the new TB model. The new model incorporates intra-atomic diagonal and off-diagonal elements for implicit self-consistency and greater transferability across bonding environments. The dependence of the on-site energies on strain has been obtained by appealing to the Moments Theorem that links closed electron paths in the system to energy moments of angular momentum resolved local density of states obtained ab initio. The model matches self-consistent density functional theory electronic structure results for bulk face centered cubic metals with and without strain, metallic alloys, metallic interfaces, and metallic nanostructures with high accuracy and can be used in predictive electronic structure and transport problems in metallic systems at realistically extended length scales.

  4. An environment-dependent semi-empirical tight binding model suitable for electron transport in bulk metals, metal alloys, metallic interfaces, and metallic nanostructures. I. Model and validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegde, Ganesh; Povolotskyi, Michael; Kubis, Tillmann; Klimeck, Gerhard; Boykin, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Semi-empirical Tight Binding (TB) is known to be a scalable and accurate atomistic representation for electron transport for realistically extended nano-scaled semiconductor devices that might contain millions of atoms. In this paper, an environment-aware and transferable TB model suitable for electronic structure and transport simulations in technologically relevant metals, metallic alloys, metal nanostructures, and metallic interface systems are described. Part I of this paper describes the development and validation of the new TB model. The new model incorporates intra-atomic diagonal and off-diagonal elements for implicit self-consistency and greater transferability across bonding environments. The dependence of the on-site energies on strain has been obtained by appealing to the Moments Theorem that links closed electron paths in the system to energy moments of angular momentum resolved local density of states obtained ab initio. The model matches self-consistent density functional theory electronic structure results for bulk face centered cubic metals with and without strain, metallic alloys, metallic interfaces, and metallic nanostructures with high accuracy and can be used in predictive electronic structure and transport problems in metallic systems at realistically extended length scales

  5. An environment-dependent semi-empirical tight binding model suitable for electron transport in bulk metals, metal alloys, metallic interfaces, and metallic nanostructures. I. Model and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Ganesh; Povolotskyi, Michael; Kubis, Tillmann; Boykin, Timothy; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2014-03-01

    Semi-empirical Tight Binding (TB) is known to be a scalable and accurate atomistic representation for electron transport for realistically extended nano-scaled semiconductor devices that might contain millions of atoms. In this paper, an environment-aware and transferable TB model suitable for electronic structure and transport simulations in technologically relevant metals, metallic alloys, metal nanostructures, and metallic interface systems are described. Part I of this paper describes the development and validation of the new TB model. The new model incorporates intra-atomic diagonal and off-diagonal elements for implicit self-consistency and greater transferability across bonding environments. The dependence of the on-site energies on strain has been obtained by appealing to the Moments Theorem that links closed electron paths in the system to energy moments of angular momentum resolved local density of states obtained ab initio. The model matches self-consistent density functional theory electronic structure results for bulk face centered cubic metals with and without strain, metallic alloys, metallic interfaces, and metallic nanostructures with high accuracy and can be used in predictive electronic structure and transport problems in metallic systems at realistically extended length scales.

  6. Temperature effects on the nuclear symmetry energy and symmetry free energy with an isospin and momentum dependent interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Jun; Ma, Hong-Ru; Chen, Lie-Wen; Li, Bao-An

    2007-01-01

    Within a self-consistent thermal model using an isospin and momentum dependent interaction (MDI) constrained by the isospin diffusion data in heavy-ion collisions, we investigate the temperature dependence of the symmetry energy E sym (ρ,T) and symmetry free energy F sym (ρ,T) for hot, isospin asymmetric nuclear matter. It is shown that the symmetry energy E sym (ρ,T) generally decreases with increasing temperature while the symmetry free energy F sym (ρ,T) exhibits opposite temperature dependence. The decrement of the symmetry energy with temperature is essentially due to the decrement of the potential energy part of the symmetry energy with temperature. The difference between the symmetry energy and symmetry free energy is found to be quite small around the saturation density of nuclear matter. While at very low densities, they differ significantly from each other. In comparison with the experimental data of temperature dependent symmetry energy extracted from the isotopic scaling analysis of intermediate mass fragments (IMF's) in heavy-ion collisions, the resulting density and temperature dependent symmetry energy E sym (ρ,T) is then used to estimate the average freeze-out density of the IMF's

  7. Phospho-dependent binding of the clathrin AP2 adaptor complex to GABAA receptors regulates the efficacy of inhibitory synaptic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittler, Josef T; Chen, Guojun; Honing, Stephan; Bogdanov, Yury; McAinsh, Kristina; Arancibia-Carcamo, I Lorena; Jovanovic, Jasmina N; Pangalos, Menelas N; Haucke, Volker; Yan, Zhen; Moss, Stephen J

    2005-10-11

    The efficacy of synaptic inhibition depends on the number of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABA(A)Rs) expressed on the cell surface of neurons. The clathrin adaptor protein 2 (AP2) complex is a critical regulator of GABA(A)R endocytosis and, hence, surface receptor number. Here, we identify a previously uncharacterized atypical AP2 binding motif conserved within the intracellular domains of all GABA(A)R beta subunit isoforms. This AP2 binding motif (KTHLRRRSSQLK in the beta3 subunit) incorporates the major sites of serine phosphorylation within receptor beta subunits, and phosphorylation within this site inhibits AP2 binding. Furthermore, by using surface plasmon resonance, we establish that a peptide (pepbeta3) corresponding to the AP2 binding motif in the GABA(A)R beta3 subunit binds to AP2 with high affinity only when dephosphorylated. Moreover, the pepbeta3 peptide, but not its phosphorylated equivalent (pepbeta3-phos), enhanced the amplitude of miniature inhibitory synaptic current and whole cell GABA(A)R current. These effects of pepbeta3 on GABA(A)R current were occluded by inhibitors of dynamin-dependent endocytosis supporting an action of pepbeta3 on GABA(A)R endocytosis. Therefore phospho-dependent regulation of AP2 binding to GABA(A)Rs provides a mechanism to specify receptor cell surface number and the efficacy of inhibitory synaptic transmission.

  8. Extended fenske-hall calculation of inner-shell binding energies using ( Z + 1)-bazis sets: Sulfur-containing molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwanziger, Ch.; Zwanziger, H.; Szargan, R.; Reinhold, J.

    1981-08-01

    It is shown that the S1s and S2p binding energies and their chemical shifts in the molecules H 2S, SO 2, SF 6 and COS obtained with hole-state calculations using an extended Fenske-Hall method are in good agreement with experimental values if mixed ( Z + 1)-basis sets are applied.

  9. Investigating the relative influences of molecular dimensions and binding energies on diffusivities of guest species inside nanoporous crystalline materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krishna, R.; van Baten, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of this article is to investigate the relative influences of molecular dimensions and adsorption binding energies on unary diffusivities of guest species inside nanoporous crystalline materials such as zeolites and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The investigations are based

  10. Impact of density-dependent symmetry energy and Coulomb ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-03-07

    Mar 7, 2014 ... The IMF production increases with the stiffness of symmetry energy. .... to clusterization using minimum spanning tree MST(M) method .... To understand the direct role of Coulomb interactions, we display in figure 4 the mean.

  11. Energy dependence of isotopic spectra from spallation residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audouin, L.

    2003-09-01

    Spallation reactions are collisions between heavy nuclei and light particle with an energy of a few hundreds MeV. The y are considered as a suitable way to create high- flux neutrons sources, which may used for example for the transmutation of nuclear wastes (hybrid reactors). The study of the residues from such reactions is both a way to understand the physics of the spallation and to provide information required for the design of industrial targets. The residues from the spallation of lead by proton at 500 MeV have been measured using the inverse kinematics technique in the FRS (fragments recoil separator). spectrometer from GSI (Barmstadt). This low energy required the use of new technique, for the experimental setup as well as during the analysis. The fragments were identified in-flight, prior to β decay. Complete isotopic distributions are obtained with an accuracy ranging between 10 and 30%. Detailed information on the reaction kinematics are also obtained. Data are in excellent agreement with radio-chemical measurements, and bring new insights about the spallation process. The comparison with data measured on the same system with an incident energy of 1 GeV allows to discuss the influence of the projectile energy on the residues formation. It is concluded that the independence of the shape of the isobaric production cross sections regarding mass and energy of the projectile is preserved at low incident energies. The behaviour of Monte-Carlo codes is discussed with respect to those sets of data. The calculations show an improving agreement with decreasing energy, indicating that high-energy phenomena, for which some common assumptions become questionable, are the main reason for the observed discrepancies. (author)

  12. Whole blood-oxygen binding properties of four cold-temperate marine fishes: blood affinity is independent of pH-dependent binding, routine swimming performance, and environmental hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbert, Neill A; Skov, Peter V; Wells, Rufus M G

    2006-01-01

    performance and the predicted low O(2) response of each species. The ecotype of the four marine species was also unrelated to pH-dependent binding because no difference in the Bohr effect was apparent ( Phi varied insignificantly from -0.90 to -1.06), and differences in the magnitude of the cooperative...

  13. Acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi in a ligand-dependent manner in mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper S; Færgeman, Nils J; Kragelund, Birthe B

    2008-01-01

    showed that ACBP targeted to the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) and Golgi in a ligand-binding-dependent manner. A variant Y28F/K32A-FACI-50, which is unable to bind acyl-CoA, did no longer show association with the ER and became segregated from the Golgi, as analysed by intensity correlation calculations....... Depletion of fatty acids from cells by addition of FAFBSA (fatty-acid-free BSA) significantly decreased FACI-50 association with the Golgi, whereas fatty acid overloading increased Golgi association, strongly supporting that ACBP associates with the Golgi in a ligand-dependent manner. FRAP (fluorescence...... recovery after photobleaching) showed that the fatty-acid-induced targeting of FACI-50 to the Golgi resulted in a 5-fold reduction in FACI-50 mobility. We suggest that ACBP is targeted to the ER and Golgi in a ligand-binding-dependent manner in living cells and propose that ACBP may be involved...

  14. Free energy calculations offer insights into the influence of receptor flexibility on ligand-receptor binding affinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenc, Jožica; Riniker, Sereina; Gaspari, Roberto; Daura, Xavier; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2011-08-01

    Docking algorithms for computer-aided drug discovery and design often ignore or restrain the flexibility of the receptor, which may lead to a loss of accuracy of the relative free enthalpies of binding. In order to evaluate the contribution of receptor flexibility to relative binding free enthalpies, two host-guest systems have been examined: inclusion complexes of α-cyclodextrin (αCD) with 1-chlorobenzene (ClBn), 1-bromobenzene (BrBn) and toluene (MeBn), and complexes of DNA with the minor-groove binding ligands netropsin (Net) and distamycin (Dist). Molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations reveal that restraining of the flexibility of the receptor can have a significant influence on the estimated relative ligand-receptor binding affinities as well as on the predicted structures of the biomolecular complexes. The influence is particularly pronounced in the case of flexible receptors such as DNA, where a 50% contribution of DNA flexibility towards the relative ligand-DNA binding affinities is observed. The differences in the free enthalpy of binding do not arise only from the changes in ligand-DNA interactions but also from changes in ligand-solvent interactions as well as from the loss of DNA configurational entropy upon restraining.

  15. Asymptotic theory of charge exchange for relativistic velocities and binding energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demkov, Yu.N.; Ostrovskij, V.N.; Shevchenko, S.I.

    1983-01-01

    The asymptotic theory of charge exchange (ATCE) at a large shock parameter rho is applied to the case of relativistic velocities and binding energies. The charge exchange reaction (1+e)+2 → 1+(e+2), when an electron from the bound 1Ssub(1/2) state on one particle transforms to the 1Ssub(1/2) state on the other, is considered. Oasic features of the method are as follows: 1) the representation of the transition amplitude in the form of multidimensional integral over some hypersurface; 2) the use of the saddle-point method for calculating necessary multidimensional integrals; 3) the refinement of wave functions as compared with the case of the absence of the interaction. The ATCE (at rho → infinity) makes it possible to obtain analytical results whose accuracy is determined solely with the shock parameter rho. A basic term of charge exchange amplitude asymptotics for 1Ssub(1/2) → 1Ssub(1/2) transitions has been calculated. It is possible to consider the ATCE as a peculiar reference with which theoretical and experimental results can be compared as well as to use the ATCE as boundary conditions during numerical calculations

  16. Electron momentum distributions and binding energies for the valence orbitals of hydrogen bromide and hydrogen iodide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brion, C.E.; McCarthy, I.E.; Suzuki, I.H.; Weigold, E.; Williams, G.R.J.; Bedford, K.L.; Kunz, A.B.; Weidman, R.

    1981-12-01

    The electron binding energy spectra and momentum distributions have been obtained for the valence orbitals of HBr and HI using noncoplanar symmetric electron coincidence spectroscopy at 1200eV. The weakly bonding inner valence ns orbitals, which have not been previously observed, have their spectroscopic (pole) strength severely split among a number of ion states. For HBr the strength of the main inner valence (ns) transition is 0.42 0.03 whereas for HI it is 0.37 0.04, in close agreement with that observed for the valence s orbitals of the corresponding isoelectronic inert gas atoms. The spectroscopic strength for the two outermost orbitals is found to be close to unity, in agreement with many body Green's function calculations. The measured momentum distributions are compared with several spherically averaged MO momentum distributions, as well as (for HBr) with a Green's function calculation of the generalized overlap amplitude (GOA). The GOA momentum distributions are in excellent agreement with the HBr data, both in shape and relative magnitude. Not all of the MO momentum distributions are in reasonable agreement with the data. Comparison is also made with the calculated momentum distributions for Kr, Br, Xe and I

  17. Image Dependent Energy-Constrained Local Backlight Dimming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burini, Nino; Nadernejad, Ehsan; Korhonen, Jari

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we consider and propose two extensions to an optimization-based image dependent backlight dimming algorithm. The first extension introduces error weighting based on human perception of luminance, aiming to improve the perceived image quality; the second extension adds an adjustable ...

  18. Magnetic field dependence of vortex activation energy: A ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    follows a parabolic behaviour unlike a power-law dependence seen in Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10. ..... SP thanks Department of Science of Technology, India and SDK thanks. Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, India for financial support.

  19. Changes in the Zero-Point Energy of the Protons as the Source of the Binding Energy of Water to A-Phase DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiter, G. F.; Senesi, R.; Mayers, J.

    2010-01-01

    The measured changes in the zero-point kinetic energy of the protons are entirely responsible for the binding energy of water molecules to A phase DNA at the concentration of 6 water molecules/base pair. The changes in kinetic energy can be expected to be a significant contribution to the energy balance in intracellular biological processes and the properties of nano-confined water. The shape of the momentum distribution in the dehydrated A phase is consistent with coherent delocalization of some of the protons in a double well potential, with a separation of the wells of 0.2 Angst .

  20. Changes in the zero-point energy of the protons as the source of the binding energy of water to A-phase DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, G F; Senesi, R; Mayers, J

    2010-10-01

    The measured changes in the zero-point kinetic energy of the protons are entirely responsible for the binding energy of water molecules to A phase DNA at the concentration of 6  water molecules/base pair. The changes in kinetic energy can be expected to be a significant contribution to the energy balance in intracellular biological processes and the properties of nano-confined water. The shape of the momentum distribution in the dehydrated A phase is consistent with coherent delocalization of some of the protons in a double well potential, with a separation of the wells of 0.2 Å.

  1. Are automated molecular dynamics simulations and binding free energy calculations realistic tools in lead optimization? An evaluation of the linear interaction energy (LIE) method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stjernschantz, E.M.; Marelius, J.; Medina, C.; Jacobsson, M.; Vermeulen, N.P.E.; Oostenbrink, C.

    2006-01-01

    An extensive evaluation of the linear interaction energy (LIE) method for the prediction of binding affinity of docked compounds has been performed, with an emphasis on its applicability in lead optimization. An automated setup is presented, which allows for the use of the method in an industrial

  2. Contact angle dependence on the fluid-wall dispersive energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horsch, M.; Heitzig, M.; Dan, C.M.; Harting, J.D.R.; Hasse, H.; Vrabec, J.

    2010-01-01

    Menisci of the truncated and shifted Lennard-Jones fluid between parallel planar walls are investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. Thereby, the characteristic energy of the unlike dispersive interaction between fluid molecules and wall atoms is systematically varied to determine its influence

  3. Energy dependence of the molecular effect in sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliva-Florio, A.R.; Alonso, E.V.; Baragiola, R.A.; Ferron, J.; Jakas, M.M.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements are reported of sputtering yields of Au for Xe + and Xe 2 + impact in the energy range 1 to 50 keV. It was found that non-linear effects exist well outside the range predicted in a recent thermal spike model. (author)

  4. Energy dependence of the molecular effect in sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliva-Florio, A.R.; Alonso, E.V.; Baragiola, R.A.; Ferron, J.; Jakas, M.M.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements of sputtering yields of Au for Xe + and Xe + 2 impact in the energy range 1-50 keV are given. It was found that non-linear effects exist well outside the range predicted in a recent thermal spike model. (author)

  5. Energy dependence of the emittance of damping ring beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiening, R.

    1985-01-01

    The energy at which the SLC damping rings are operated was chosen to be 1.21 GeV. At the time that that specification was made, the repetition rate of the SLC was expected to be 180 Hz. It is now anticipated that the repetition rate during the initial year of operation of the SLC will be 120 Hz. The following curves which show the output emittance of the damping rings as a function of input emittance and energy suggest that there is a range of energies over which the rings can be operated without changing the SLC luminosity. It should be noted that in the era of polarized beams, the damping ring energy will be fixed at the design value on account of the spin precession required in the LTR and RTL transport lines. The SLC design output emittance of the damping rings is 3 x 10 -5 radian-meters. Because of space charge disruption and quantum emission downstream of the damping rings, much lower values than the design value may not have a large beneficial effect on the luminosity. 3 figures

  6. Generating energy dependent neutron flux maps for effective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For activation analysis and irradiation scheme of miniature neutron source reactor, designers or engineers usually require information on thermal neutron flux levels and other energy group flux levels (such as fast, resonance and epithermal). A methodology for readily generating such flux maps and flux profiles for any ...

  7. Energy dependence of isotopic spectra from spallation residues; Dependance en energie des spectres isotopiques de residus de spallation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audouin, L

    2003-09-01

    Spallation reactions are collisions between heavy nuclei and light particle with an energy of a few hundreds MeV. The y are considered as a suitable way to create high- flux neutrons sources, which may used for example for the transmutation of nuclear wastes (hybrid reactors). The study of the residues from such reactions is both a way to understand the physics of the spallation and to provide information required for the design of industrial targets. The residues from the spallation of lead by proton at 500 MeV have been measured using the inverse kinematics technique in the FRS (fragments recoil separator). spectrometer from GSI (Barmstadt). This low energy required the use of new technique, for the experimental setup as well as during the analysis. The fragments were identified in-flight, prior to {beta} decay. Complete isotopic distributions are obtained with an accuracy ranging between 10 and 30%. Detailed information on the reaction kinematics are also obtained. Data are in excellent agreement with radio-chemical measurements, and bring new insights about the spallation process. The comparison with data measured on the same system with an incident energy of 1 GeV allows to discuss the influence of the projectile energy on the residues formation. It is concluded that the independence of the shape of the isobaric production cross sections regarding mass and energy of the projectile is preserved at low incident energies. The behaviour of Monte-Carlo codes is discussed with respect to those sets of data. The calculations show an improving agreement with decreasing energy, indicating that high-energy phenomena, for which some common assumptions become questionable, are the main reason for the observed discrepancies. (author)

  8. Subsite binding energies of an exo-polygalacturonase using isothermal titration calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thermodynamic parameters for binding of a series of galacturonic acid oligomers to an exo-polygalacturonase, RPG16 from Rhizopus oryzae, were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. Binding of oligomers varying in chain length from two to five galacturonic acid residues is an exothermic proc...

  9. Collisional energy dependence of molecular ionization by metastable rare gas atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.M.; Parr, T.P.

    1979-01-01

    The collisional energy dependence of several molecular total ionization cross sections by metastable rare gas atoms was studied over the thermal energy region using the crossed molecular beam time-of-flight method. Results are reported for the collision systems He, Ne, and Ar ionizing the geometric isomers cis- and trans-dichloroethylene and ortho- and para-dichlorobenzene. The He ionization cross sections oscillate about an energy dependence of E/sup -1/2/ over the energy range 0.004--1.0 eV, and the Ar*+para-dichlorobenzene cross section oscillates about an energy dependence of E/sup -2/5/ over the energy range 0.011--0.64 eV. The remaining systems are characterized by ''bent'' E/sup -m/ dependences with m values of 0.56--0.70 at low energies changing to 0.07--0.29 at higher energies. Comparison with the slopes of the He* systems and the Ar*+para-dichlorobenzene system shows that the ''bent'' and ''oscillating'' energy dependences are similar except for the form of the cross section functions at the lowest energies. No systematic differences are found between the cross section energy dependences for ionization of different geometric isomers or for ionization by the different metastable rare gas atoms

  10. Motif III in superfamily 2 "helicases" helps convert the binding energy of ATP into a high-affinity RNA binding site in the yeast DEAD-box protein Ded1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banroques, Josette; Doère, Monique; Dreyfus, Marc; Linder, Patrick; Tanner, N Kyle

    2010-03-05

    Motif III in the putative helicases of superfamily 2 is highly conserved in both its sequence and its structural context. It typically consists of the sequence alcohol-alanine-alcohol (S/T-A-S/T). Historically, it was thought to link ATPase activity with a "helicase" strand displacement activity that disrupts RNA or DNA duplexes. DEAD-box proteins constitute the largest family of superfamily 2; they are RNA-dependent ATPases and ATP-dependent RNA binding proteins that, in some cases, are able to disrupt short RNA duplexes. We made mutations of motif III (S-A-T) in the yeast DEAD-box protein Ded1 and analyzed in vivo phenotypes and in vitro properties. Moreover, we made a tertiary model of Ded1 based on the solved structure of Vasa. We used Ded1 because it has relatively high ATPase and RNA binding activities; it is able to displace moderately stable duplexes at a large excess of substrate. We find that the alanine and the threonine in the second and third positions of motif III are more important than the serine, but that mutations of all three residues have strong phenotypes. We purified the wild-type and various mutants expressed in Escherichia coli. We found that motif III mutations affect the RNA-dependent hydrolysis of ATP (k(cat)), but not the affinity for ATP (K(m)). Moreover, mutations alter and reduce the affinity for single-stranded RNA and subsequently reduce the ability to disrupt duplexes. We obtained intragenic suppressors of the S-A-C mutant that compensate for the mutation by enhancing the affinity for ATP and RNA. We conclude that motif III and the binding energy of gamma-PO(4) of ATP are used to coordinate motifs I, II, and VI and the two RecA-like domains to create a high-affinity single-stranded RNA binding site. It also may help activate the beta,gamma-phosphoanhydride bond of ATP. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Transformation of cooperative free energies between ligation systems of hemoglobin: resolution of the carbon monoxide binding intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y; Ackers, G K

    1996-01-23

    A strategy has been developed for quantitatively "translating" the distributions of cooperative free energy between different oxygenation analogs of hemoglobin (Hb). The method was used to resolve the cooperative free energies of all eight carbon monoxide binding intermediates. These parameters of the FeCOHb system were determined by thermodynamic transformation of corresponding free energies obtained previously for all species of the Co/FeCO system, i.e., where cobalt-substituted hemes comprise the unligated sites [Speros, P. C., et al. (1991) Biochemistry 30, 7254-7262]. Using hybridized combinations of normal and cobalt-substituted Hb, ligation analog systems Co/FeX (X = CO, CN) were constructed and experimentally quantified. Energetics of cobalt-induced structural perturbation were determined for all species of both the "mixed metal" Co/Fe system and also the ligated Co/FeCN system. It was found that major energetic perturbations of the Co/Fe hybrid species originate from a pure cobalt substitution effect on the alpha subunits. These perturbations are transduced to the beta subunit within the same dimeric half-tetramer, resulting in alteration of the free energies for binding at the nonsubstituted (Fe) sites. Using the linkage strategy developed in this study along with the determined energetics of these couplings, the experimental assembly free energies for the Co/FeCO species were transformed into cooperative free energies of the 10 Fe/FeCO species. The resulting values were found to distribute according to predictions of a symmetry rule mechanism proposed previously [Ackers, G. K., et al. (1992) Science 255, 54-63]. Their distribution is consistent with accurate CO binding data of normal Hb [Perrella, M., et al. (1990b) Biophys. Chem. 37, 211-223] and also with accurate O2 binding data obtained under the same conditions [Chu, A. H., et al. (1984) Biochemistry 23, 604-617].

  12. Efficiency calibration of x-ray HPGe detectors for photons with energies above the Ge K binding energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maidana, Nora L., E-mail: nmaidana@if.usp.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, Travessa R 187, Cidade Universitária, CEP:05508-900 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Vanin, Vito R.; Jahnke, Viktor [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, Travessa R 187, Cidade Universitária, CEP:05508-900 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fernández-Varea, José M. [Facultat de Física (ECM and ICC), Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 645, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Martins, Marcos N. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, Travessa R 187, Cidade Universitária, CEP:05508-900 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Brualla, Lorenzo [NCTeam, Strahlenklinik, Universitätsklinikum Essen, Hufelandstraße 55, D-45122 Essen (Germany)

    2013-11-21

    We report on the efficiency calibration of a HPGe x-ray detector using radioactive sources and an analytical expression taken from the literature, in two different arrangements, with and without a broad-angle collimator. The frontal surface of the Ge crystal was scanned with pencil beams of photons. The Ge dead layer was found to be nonuniform, with central and intermediate regions that have thin (μm range) and thick (mm range) dead layers, respectively, surrounded by an insensitive ring. We discuss how this fact explains the observed efficiency curves and generalize the adopted model. We show that changes in the thickness of the Ge-crystal dead layer affect the efficiency of x-ray detectors, but the use of an appropriate broad-beam external collimator limiting the photon flux to the thin dead layer in the central region leads to the expected efficiency dependence with energy and renders the calibration simpler.

  13. Energy dependence of the Cronin effect from nonlinear QCD evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albacete, Javier L.; Armesto, Nestor; Salgado, Carlos A.; Wiedemann, Urs Achim; Kovner, Alex

    2004-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of dense partonic systems has been suggested as a novel physics mechanism relevant for the dynamics of p-A and A-A collisions at collider energies. Here we study to what extent the description of Cronin enhancement in the framework of this nonlinear evolution is consistent with the recent observation in √(s)=200 GeV d-Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. We solve the Balitsky-Kovchegov evolution equation numerically for several initial conditions encoding Cronin enhancement. We find that the properly normalized nuclear gluon distribution is suppressed at all momenta relative to that of a single nucleon. For the resulting spectrum of produced gluons in p-A and A-A collisions, the nonlinear QCD evolution is unable to generate a Cronin-type enhancement, and it quickly erases any such enhancement which may be present at lower energies

  14. Probing Temperature- and pH-Dependent Binding between Quantum Dots and Bovine Serum Albumin by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zonghua Wang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Luminescent quantum dots (QDs with unique optical properties have potential applications in bio-imaging. The interaction between QDs and bio-molecules is important to the biological effect of QDs in vivo. In this paper, we have employed fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS to probe the temperature- and pH-dependent interactions between CdSe QDs with carboxyl (QDs-COOH and bovine serum albumin (BSA in buffer solutions. The results have shown that microscopic dissociation constant K′D is in the range of (1.5 ± 0.2 × 10−5 to (8.6 ± 0.1 × 10−7 M, the Hill coefficient n is from 0.4 to 2.3, and the protein corona thickness is from 3.0 to 9.4 nm. Variable-temperature measurements have shown both negative values of ∆H and ∆S for BSA adsorption on QDs-COOH, while pH has a profound effect on the adsorption. Additional, FCS measurement QDs-COOH and proteins in whole mice serum and plasma samples has also been conducted. Finally, simulation results have shown four favored QD binding sites in BSA.

  15. Inhibition of herpes simplex virus infection by lactoferrin is dependent on interference with the virus binding to glycosaminoglycans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchetti, Magda; Trybala, Edward; Superti, Fabiana; Johansson, Maria; Bergstroem, Tomas

    2004-01-01

    Previous reports have indicated that lactoferrin inhibits herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection during the very early phases of the viral replicative cycle. In the present work we investigated the mechanism of the antiviral activity of lactoferrin in mutant glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-deficient cells. Bovine lactoferrin (BLf) was a strong inhibitor of HSV-1 infection in cells expressing either heparan sulfate (HS) or chondroitin sulfate (CS) or both, but was ineffective or less efficient in GAG-deficient cells or in cells treated with GAG-degrading enzymes. In contrast to wild-type HSV-1, virus mutants devoid of glycoprotein C (gC) were significantly less inhibited by lactoferrin in GAG-expressing cells, indicating that lactoferrin interfered with the binding of viral gC to cell surface HS and/or CS. Finally, we demonstrated that lactoferrin bound directly to both HS and CS isolated from surfaces of the studied cells, as well as to commercial preparations of GAG chains. The results support the hypothesis that the inhibition of HSV-1 infectivity by lactoferrin is dependent on its interaction with cell surface GAG chains of HS and CS

  16. Domain shape dependence of semiclassical corrections to energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiatkowski, Grzegorz

    2017-01-01

    Stationary solution of a one-dimensional sine-Gordon system is embedded in a multidimensional theory with an explicitly finite domain in the added spatial dimensions. Semiclassical corrections to energy are calculated for a static kink solution with emphasis on the impact of the scale of the domain as well as the choice of boundary conditions on the results for a rectangular cross-section. (paper)

  17. Energy dependence of fast neutron dosimetry using electrochemical etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, S.J.; Morgan, K.Z.

    1978-01-01

    Registration of fast-neutron induced recoil tracks by the electrochemical etching technique as applied to sensitive Lexan polycarbonate foils provides a simple and inexpensive means of fast neutron personnel dosimetry. The sensitivity (tracks/neutron) of recoil particle registration is given as a function of neutron energy. Neutrons of 7 Li (p,n) 7 Be, 3 T (d,n) 4 He and 9 B, respectively. Results are compared with other studies using other neutron sources and conventional etching method

  18. Quasiparticle Lagrangian for the binding energies and self-consistent fields of nuclei in the Fermi-liquid approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapershtein, E.E.; Khodel', V.A.

    1981-01-01

    The problem of calculating the binding energy and self-consistent field of a nucleus in terms of the effective interaction of quasiparticles at the Fermi surface is solved. It is shown that for this one can go over from the system of N Fermi particles to a system of N interacting quasiparticles described by an effective quasiparticle Lagrangian L/sub q/. It is shown that the corresponding quasiparticle energy is equal to the ground-state energy of the system. The connection between the parameters of the effective Lagrangian and the constants of the quasiparticle interaction introduced in the theory of finite Fermi systems is established

  19. Energy Analysis of the Danish Food Production System: Food-EROI and Fossil Fuel Dependency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Mads Ville; Østergård, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    Modern food production depends on limited natural resources for providing energy and fertilisers. We assess the fossil fuel dependency for the Danish food production system by means of Food Energy Returned on fossil Energy Invested (Food-EROI) and by the use of energy intensive nutrients from....... Furthermore, nutrients in commercial fertiliser and imported feed account for 84%, 90% and 90% of total supply of N, P and K, respectively. We conclude that the system is unsustainable because it is embedded in a highly fossil fuel dependent system based on a non-circular flow of nutrients. As energy and thus...... imported livestock feed and commercial fertilisers. The analysis shows that the system requires 221 PJ of fossil energy per year and that for each joule of fossil energy invested in farming, processing and transportation, 0.25 J of food energy is produced; 0.28 when crediting for produced bioenergy...

  20. Effect of temperature-dependent energy-level shifts on a semiconductor's Peltier heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emin, D.

    1984-01-01

    The Peltier heat of a charge carrier in a semiconductor is calculated for the situation in which the electronic energy levels are temperature dependent. The temperature dependences of the electronic energy levels, generally observed optically, arise from their dependences on the vibrational energy of the lattice (e.g., as caused by thermal expansion). It has been suggested that these temperature dependences will typically have a major effect on the Peltier heat. The Peltier heat associated with a given energy level is a thermodynamic quantity; it is the product of the temperature and the change of the entropy of the system when a carrier is added in that level. As such, the energy levels cannot be treated as explicitly temperature dependent. The electron-lattice interaction causing the temperature dependence must be expressly considered. It is found that the carrier's interaction with the atomic vibrations lowers its electronic energy. However, the interaction of the carrier with the atomic vibrations also causes an infinitesimal lowering (approx.1/N) of each of the N vibrational frequencies. As a result, there is a finite carrier-induced increase in the average vibrational energy. Above the Debye temperature, this cancels the lowering of the carrier's electronic energy. Thus, the standard Peltier-heat formula, whose derivation generally ignores the temperature dependence of the electronic energy levels, is regained. This explains the apparent success of the standard formula in numerous analyses of electronic transport experiments

  1. Energy dependence of a local equivalent potential for RGM phase shifts for 16O + 16O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ait-Tahar, S.; Mackintosh, R.S.; Cooper, S.G.; Wada, T.

    1993-01-01

    We have found, using the IP inversion method, the local representation of a potential that in S(l) equivalent to the RGM nonlocal potential of Wada and Horiuchi. Phase shifts corresponding to RGM calculations at laboratory energies 30, 41, 49, 59, 150, 350 and 500 MeV were inverted and the resulting local potentials compared with the local (but l-dependent) potentials obtained previously in the WKB-RGM scheme. The present l-independent potentials exhibit a smooth radial variation and show marked differences from previous results. The energy dependence arises from that of the exchange term and from the conversion of the l-dependence into an additional energy dependence. In particular, we show that the energy dependence of the volume integrals in this energy region is different from earlier WKB-RGM predictions. (orig.)

  2. Energy dependences of absorption in beryllium windows and argon gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chantler, C.T.; Staudenmann, J-P.

    1994-01-01

    In part of an ongoing work on x-ray form factors, new absorption coefficients are being evaluated for all elements, across the energy range from below 100 eV to above 100 keV. These new coefficients are applied herein to typical problems in synchrotron radiation stations, namely the use of beryllium windows and argon gas detectors. Results are compared with those of other authors. The electron-ion pair production process in ionization chambers is discussed, and the effects of 3d-element impurities are indicated. 15 refs., 6 figs

  3. Interatomic scattering in energy dependent photoelectron spectra of Ar clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patanen, M.; Benkoula, S.; Nicolas, C.; Goel, A. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, BP 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Antonsson, E. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, BP 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie Institut für Chemie und Biochemie, Fachbereich Biologie, Chemie, Pharmazie, Freie Universität Berlin, Takustrasse 3, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Neville, J. J. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, BP 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Department of Chemistry, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick E3B 6E2 (Canada); Miron, C., E-mail: Catalin.Miron@synchrotron-soleil.fr [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, BP 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP), ‘Horia Hulubei’ National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, 30 Reactorului Street, RO-077125 Măgurele, Jud. Ilfov (Romania)

    2015-09-28

    Soft X-ray photoelectron spectra of Ar 2p levels of atomic argon and argon clusters are recorded over an extended range of photon energies. The Ar 2p intensity ratios between atomic argon and clusters’ surface and bulk components reveal oscillations similar to photoelectron extended X-ray absorption fine structure signal (PEXAFS). We demonstrate here that this technique allows us to analyze separately the PEXAFS signals from surface and bulk sites of free-standing, neutral clusters, revealing a bond contraction at the surface.

  4. pH-dependence of the specific binding of Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions to the amyloid-β peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghalebani, Leila; Wahlström, Anna; Danielsson, Jens; Wärmländer, Sebastian K.T.S.; Gräslund, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Cu(II) and Zn(II) display pH-dependent binding to the Aβ(1–40) peptide. ► At pH 7.4 both metal ions display residue-specific binding to the Aβ peptide. ► At pH 5.5 the binding specificity is lost for Zn(II). ► Differential Cu(II) and Zn(II) binding may help explain metal-induced AD toxicity. -- Abstract: Metal ions like Cu(II) and Zn(II) are accumulated in Alzheimer’s disease amyloid plaques. The amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide involved in the disease interacts with these metal ions at neutral pH via ligands provided by the N-terminal histidines and the N-terminus. The present study uses high-resolution NMR spectroscopy to monitor the residue-specific interactions of Cu(II) and Zn(II) with 15 N- and 13 C, 15 N-labeled Aβ(1–40) peptides at varying pH levels. At pH 7.4 both ions bind to the specific ligands, competing with one another. At pH 5.5 Cu(II) retains its specific histidine ligands, while Zn(II) seems to lack residue-specific interactions. The low pH mimics acidosis which is linked to inflammatory processes in vivo. The results suggest that the cell toxic effects of redox active Cu(II) binding to Aβ may be reversed by the protective activity of non-redox active Zn(II) binding to the same major binding site under non-acidic conditions. Under acidic conditions, the protective effect of Zn(II) may be decreased or changed, since Zn(II) is less able to compete with Cu(II) for the specific binding site on the Aβ peptide under these conditions.

  5. NEUTRON-PROTON EFFECTIVE RANGE PARAMETERS AND ZERO-ENERGY SHAPE DEPENDENCE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HACKENBURG, R.W.

    2005-06-01

    A completely model-independent effective range theory fit to available, unpolarized, np scattering data below 3 MeV determines the zero-energy free proton cross section {sigma}{sub 0} = 20.4287 {+-} 0.0078 b, the singlet apparent effective range r{sub s} = 2.754 {+-} 0.018{sub stat} {+-} 0.056{sub syst} fm, and improves the error slightly on the parahydrogen coherent scattering length, a{sub c} = -3.7406 {+-} 0.0010 fm. The triplet and singlet scattering lengths and the triplet mixed effective range are calculated to be a{sub t} = 5.4114 {+-} 0.0015 fm, a{sub s} = -23.7153 {+-} 0.0043 fm, and {rho}{sub t}(0,-{epsilon}{sub t}) = 1.7468 {+-} 0.0019 fm. The model-independent analysis also determines the zero-energy effective ranges by treating them as separate fit parameters without the constraint from the deuteron binding energy {epsilon}{sub t}. These are determined to be {rho}{sub t}(0,0) = 1.705 {+-} 0.023 fm and {rho}{sub s}(0,0) = 2.665 {+-} 0.056 fm. This determination of {rho}{sub t}(0,0) and {rho}{sub s}(0,0) is most sensitive to the sparse data between about 20 and 600 keV, where the correlation between the determined values of {rho}{sub t}(0,0) and {rho}{sub s}(0,0) is at a minimum. This correlation is responsible for the large systematic error in r{sub s}. More precise data in this range are needed. The present data do not event determine (with confidence) that {rho}{sub t}(0,0) {ne} {rho}{sub t}(0, -{epsilon}{sub t}), referred to here as ''zero-energy shape dependence''. The widely used measurement of {sigma}{sub 0} = 20.491 {+-} 0.014 b from W. Dilg, Phys. Rev. C 11, 103 (1975), is argued to be in error.

  6. Blinded evaluation of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) ligands binding using molecular docking and free energy calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selwa, Edithe; Elisée, Eddy; Zavala, Agustin; Iorga, Bogdan I.

    2018-01-01

    Our participation to the D3R Grand Challenge 2 involved a protocol in two steps, with an initial analysis of the available structural data from the PDB allowing the selection of the most appropriate combination of docking software and scoring function. Subsequent docking calculations showed that the pose prediction can be carried out with a certain precision, but this is dependent on the specific nature of the ligands. The correct ranking of docking poses is still a problem and cannot be successful in the absence of good pose predictions. Our free energy calculations on two different subsets provided contrasted results, which might have the origin in non-optimal force field parameters associated with the sulfonamide chemical moiety.

  7. Mass- and energy-dependence of (π+,π-) double isobaric analog transitions at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderl, T.

    1988-01-01

    Transitions to double isobaric analog states (DIAT) have been measured in the double charge exchange (DCX) reaction (π + ,π - ) for the nuclei 26 Mg, 56 Fe at Tsub(π+) = 49 MeV and for 18 O at Tsub(π+) = 24 MeV, 33 MeV, 49 MeV, 64 MeV and 79 MeV for several angles. The experiments have been performed at the pion channels M13 and M11 of TRIUMF using the low energy pion spectrometer QQD. The forward angle cross sections for 18 O can be understood in a quark model as well as in conventional models where the reaction is mainly proceeding through intermediate deltas or low lying excited states of the intermediate nucleus. The angular distribution of 26 Mg at 49 MeV is found to be almost identical to those of 14 C and 18 O while the cross section remarkedly drops for 56 Fe. The forward angle excitation function of 18 O exhibits a maximum at around 35 MeV. The present results are compared to theoretical predictions. Two approaches for a unified study of SCX and DCX at energies ranging from 20 MeV up to 300 MeV are presented. The first is carried out in a mean free path model for investigations of geometry effects in the reaction. For the second, the optical model code PIESDEX is employed. Both studies indicate that the observed mass dependence for DCX at 50 MeV can be explained partly by geometry considerations and partly by details in the nuclear matter distributions of core neutrons and valence neutrons. Furthermore, the optical model investigation reveals the need of shifting the free πN-SCX amplitude down by 30 MeV in order to achieve good agreement with experimental data. (orig.)

  8. Energy decay of a variable-coefficient wave equation with nonlinear time-dependent localized damping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieqiong Wu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We study the energy decay for the Cauchy problem of the wave equation with nonlinear time-dependent and space-dependent damping. The damping is localized in a bounded domain and near infinity, and the principal part of the wave equation has a variable-coefficient. We apply the multiplier method for variable-coefficient equations, and obtain an energy decay that depends on the property of the coefficient of the damping term.

  9. Host factor I, Hfq, binds to Escherichia coli ompA mRNA in a growth rate-dependent fashion and regulates its stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vytvytska, O; Jakobsen, J S; Balcunaite, G

    1998-01-01

    RNA. In hfq mutant cells with a deficient Hfq gene product, the RNA-binding activity is missing, and analysis of the ompA mRNA showed that the growth-rate dependence of degradation is lost. Furthermore, the half-life of the ompA mRNA is prolonged in the mutant cells, irrespective of growth rate. Hfq has...

  10. Dark energy as consequence of release of cosmological nuclear binding-energy, and its further extension towards a new theory of inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.C.; Pradhan, Anirudh; Gupta, Sushant

    2012-01-01

    Comparatively recent observations on Type-Ia supernovae and low density (Um = 0.3) measurement of matter including dark matter suggest that the present day universe consists mainly of repulsive-gravity type 'exotic matter' with negative-pressure often said 'dark energy' (Ux = O7). But the nature of dark energy is mysterious and its puzzling questions, such as why, how, where and when about the dark energy, are intriguing. In the present paper the authors attempt to answer these questions while making an effort to reveal the genesis of dark energy, and suggest that the cosmological nuclear binding energy liberated during primordial nucleo-synthesis remains trapped dormant for a long time and then is released free which manifests itself as dark energy in the universe. It is also explained why for dark energy the parameter w = -2/3. Noting that w = 1 for stiff matter and w = 1/3 for radiation; w = -2/3 is for dark energy because '- 1' is due to 'deficiency of stiff- nuclear-matter' and that this binding energy is ultimately released as 'radiation' contributing '+ 1/3', making w = -1+ 1/3 = -2/3. When dark energy is released free at Z = 80, w = -2/3. But as on present day at Z = 0 when radiation strength has diminished to ä ? 0, the parameter w = -1 + ä 1/3 = -1. This, thus almost solves the dark- energy mystery of negative pressure and repulsive-gravity. The proposed theory makes several estimates/predictions which agree reasonably well with the astrophysical constraints and observations. Though there are many candidate-theories, the proposed model of this paper presents an entirely new approach (cosmological nuclear energy) as a possible candidate for dark energy. The secret of acceleration of big-universe is hidden in the small-nucleus. (author)

  11. An efficient and accurate method to obtain the energy-dependent Green function for general potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, T; Heller, E J; Parrott, R E

    2008-01-01

    Time-dependent quantum mechanics provides an intuitive picture of particle propagation in external fields. Semiclassical methods link the classical trajectories of particles with their quantum mechanical propagation. Many analytical results and a variety of numerical methods have been developed to solve the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. The time-dependent methods work for nearly arbitrarily shaped potentials, including sources and sinks via complex-valued potentials. Many quantities are measured at fixed energy, which is seemingly not well suited for a time-dependent formulation. Very few methods exist to obtain the energy-dependent Green function for complicated potentials without resorting to ensemble averages or using certain lead-in arrangements. Here, we demonstrate in detail a time-dependent approach, which can accurately and effectively construct the energy-dependent Green function for very general potentials. The applications of the method are numerous, including chemical, mesoscopic, and atomic physics

  12. Energy dependency and sustainable regional development in the Baltic states: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štreimikienė Dalia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy security is one of the most important indicators of sustainable regional development and 'green' growth in implementation of EU strategy Europe 2020. It can provide the harmonized development and cohesion of 'old' and 'new' EU member states. Our paper conducts a comparative study of energy dependency and energy security indicators in the Baltic States. The Baltic countries achieved enormous progress in the use of renewable energy sources and energy efficiency since their EU accession in 2004. The increase of renewable energy capacities in Baltic States also contributed to the reduction of energy intensity and carbon intensity of economy and energy import dependency. Our results show that amongst all three states, it was Estonia that had achieved the best results in increased use of renewables and energy efficiency improvements and had distinguished itself with the best indicators and economic and regional policy outcomes.

  13. Derivation of binding energies on the basis of fundamental nuclear theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouki, Tuomo.

    1975-10-01

    An attempt to assess the degree of consistency between the underlying ideas of two different approaches to nuclear energy relations is described. The fundamental approach in the form of density dependent Hartree-Fock theory, as well as the method of renormalizing shell model energies have both met with fair success. Whereas the former method is based on nuclear matter theory, the latter's central idea is to combine shell structure with an average liquid drop behaviour. The shell smoothing procedure employed there has been subject to intense theoretical study. Only little attention has been paid to the liquid drop aspect of the method. It is purposed to derive the liquid drop mass formula by means of a model force fitted to results of some nuclear matter calculations. Moreover, the force is tested by applying it to finite nuclei. Because of this, the present work could also be regarded as an attempt to find a very direct way of relating nuclear matter properties to those of finite nuclei. As the results in this respect are worse than expected, we conclude with a discussion of possible directions of improvement. (author)

  14. Importance of the energy-dependent geometry in the 16O+ 16O optical model potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantis, G.; Ioannidis, K.; Poirier, P.

    1985-01-01

    Optical model potentials with various forms of energy-dependent geometry have been considered for the description of 16 O+ 16 O elastic scattering. It is shown that the variation with energy of the imaginary radius leads to a reasonable fit of the cross-section data, throughout the energy range

  15. Evaluation of B3LYP, X3LYP, and M06-class density functionals for predicting the binding energies of neutral, protonated, and deprotonated water clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S.; Diallo, Mamadou S.; van Duin, Adri C. T.; Goddard, William A., III

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we assess the accuracy of the B3LYP, X3LYP, and newly developed M06-L, M06-2X, and M06 functionals to predict the binding energies of neutral and charged water clusters including (H_2O)_n, n = 2−8, 20), H_3O+(H_2O_)n, n = 1−6, and OH−(H_2O)_n, n = 1−6. We also compare the predicted energies of two ion hydration and neutralization reactions on the basis of the calculated binding energies. In all cases, we use as benchmarks calculated binding energies of water clusters extrapolate...

  16. Comparison of gas-solid chromatography and MM2 force field molecular binding energies for greenhouse gases on a carbonaceous surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybolt, Thomas R; Bivona, Kevin T; Thomas, Howard E; O'Dell, Casey M

    2009-10-01

    Gas-solid chromatography was used to determine B(2s) (gas-solid virial coefficient) values for eight molecular adsorbates interacting with a carbon powder (Carbopack B, Supelco). B(2s) values were determined by multiple size variant injections within the temperature range of 313-553 K. The molecular adsorbates included: carbon dioxide (CO(2)); tetrafluoromethane (CF(4)); hexafluoroethane (C(2)F(6)); 1,1-difluoroethane (C(2)H(4)F(2)); 1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane (C(2)H(3)ClF(2)); dichlorodifluoromethane (CCl(2)F(2)); trichlorofluoromethane (CCl(3)F); and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (C(2)H(3)Cl(3)). Two of these molecules are of special interest because they are "super greenhouse gases". The global warming potential, GWP, for CF(4) is 6500 and for C(2)F(6) is 9200 relative to the reference value of 1 for CO(2). The GWP index considers both radiative blocking and molecular lifetime. For these and other industrial greenhouse gases, adsorptive trapping on a carbonaceous solid, which depends on molecule-surface binding energy, could avoid atmospheric release. The temperature variations of the gas-solid virial coefficients in conjunction with van't Hoff plots were used to find the experimental adsorption energy or binding energy values (E(*)) for each adsorbate. A molecular mechanics based, rough-surface model was used to calculate the molecule-surface binding energy (Ecal(*)) using augmented MM2 parameters. The surface model consisted of parallel graphene layers with two separated nanostructures each containing 17 benzene rings arranged in linear strips. The separation of the parallel nanostructures had been optimized in a prior study to appropriately represent molecule-surface interactions for Carbopack B. Linear regressions of E(*) versus Ecal(*) for the current data set of eight molecules and the same surface model gave E(*)=0.926 Ecal(*) and r(2)=0.956. A combined set of the current and prior Carbopack B adsorbates studied (linear alkanes, branched alkanes, cyclic alkanes

  17. Absence of a Scott correction for the total binding energy of noninteracting fermions in a smooth potential well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huxtable, B.D.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown, for V in a particular class of smooth functions, that the total binding energy, E(Z), of Z noninteracting Fermions in the potential well Z 4/3 V(Z 1/3 X) obeys E(Z) = c TF (V)Z 7/3 + O(Z 5/3 ) as Z → ∞. Here c TF (V) is the coefficient predicted by Thomas-Fermi theory. This result is consistent with the conjectured Scott correction, which occurs at order Z 2 , to the total binding energy of an atomic number Z. This correction is thought to arise only because V(x)∼ - |x| -1 near x = 0 in the atomic problem, and so V is not a smooth function

  18. The effect of including tensor forces in nucleon-nucleon interaction on three-nucleon binding energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, A.; Ramadan, S.

    1986-01-01

    Separable two-body interactions are used in considering the three-nucleon problem. The nucleon-nucleon potentials are taken to include attraction and repulsion as well as tensor forces. The separable approximation is used in order to investigate the effect of the tensor forces. The separable expansion is introduced in the three-nucleon problem, by which the Faddeev equations are reduced to a well-behaved set of coupled integral equations. Numerical calculations are carried out for the obtained integral equations using potential functions of the Yamaguchi, Gaussian, Takabin, Mongan and Reid forms. The present calculated values of the binding energies of the 3 H and 3 He nuclei are in good agreement with the experimental values. The effect of including the tensor forces in the nucleon-nucleon interactions is found to improve the three-nucleon binding energy by about 4.490% to 8.324%. 37 refs., 2 tabs. (author)

  19. Application of the step-wise regression procedure to the semi-empirical formulae of the nuclear binding energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eissa, E.A.; Ayad, M.; Gashier, F.A.B.

    1984-01-01

    Most of the binding energy semi-empirical terms without the deformation corrections used by P.A. Seeger are arranged in a multiple linear regression form. The stepwise regression procedure with 95% confidence levels for acceptance and rejection of variables is applied for seeking a model for calculating binding energies of even-even (E-E) nuclei through a significance testing of each basic term. Partial F-values are taken as estimates for the significance of each term. The residual standard deviation and the overall F-value are used for selecting the best linear regression model. (E-E) nuclei are taken into sets lying between two successive proton and neutron magic numbers. The present work is in favour of the magic number 126 followed by 164 for the neutrons and indecisive in supporting the recently predicted proton magic number 114 rather than the previous one, 126. (author)

  20. Lowest excited-state impurity binding energy in InGaN/GaN parabolic QWW: magnetic field effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddou El Ghazi; Anouar Jorio; Izeddine Zorkani

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the magnetic field effect on the lowest excited-state binding energy of hydrogenic shallow-donor impurity in wurtzite (In,Ga)N/GaN parabolic transversal-section quantum-well wire (PQWW) using the finite-difference method within the quasi-one-dimensional effective potential model. The calculations are performed within the framework of the effective mass approximation. A cylindrical QWW effective radius is taken into account to describe the lateral confinement strength. The numerical results show that: (i) the probability density is the largest on a circularity whose radius is the effective radius and (ii) the lowest excited-state binding energy is the largest when an impurity is located on this circularity while it starts to decrease as the impurity is away from the circularity. (author)

  1. Total-energy Assisted Tight-binding Method Based on Local Density Approximation of Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Takeo; Nishino, Shinya; Yamamoto, Susumu; Suzuki, Takashi; Ikeda, Minoru; Ohtani, Yasuaki

    2018-06-01

    A novel tight-binding method is developed, based on the extended Hückel approximation and charge self-consistency, with referring the band structure and the total energy of the local density approximation of the density functional theory. The parameters are so adjusted by computer that the result reproduces the band structure and the total energy, and the algorithm for determining parameters is established. The set of determined parameters is applicable to a variety of crystalline compounds and change of lattice constants, and, in other words, it is transferable. Examples are demonstrated for Si crystals of several crystalline structures varying lattice constants. Since the set of parameters is transferable, the present tight-binding method may be applicable also to molecular dynamics simulations of large-scale systems and long-time dynamical processes.

  2. A tandem sequence motif acts as a distance-dependent enhancer in a set of genes involved in translation by binding the proteins NonO and SFPQ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roepcke Stefan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bioinformatic analyses of expression control sequences in promoters of co-expressed or functionally related genes enable the discovery of common regulatory sequence motifs that might be involved in co-ordinated gene expression. By studying promoter sequences of the human ribosomal protein genes we recently identified a novel highly specific Localized Tandem Sequence Motif (LTSM. In this work we sought to identify additional genes and LTSM-binding proteins to elucidate potential regulatory mechanisms. Results Genome-wide analyses allowed finding a considerable number of additional LTSM-positive genes, the products of which are involved in translation, among them, translation initiation and elongation factors, and 5S rRNA. Electromobility shift assays then showed specific signals demonstrating the binding of protein complexes to LTSM in ribosomal protein gene promoters. Pull-down assays with LTSM-containing oligonucleotides and subsequent mass spectrometric analysis identified the related multifunctional nucleotide binding proteins NonO and SFPQ in the binding complex. Functional characterization then revealed that LTSM enhances the transcriptional activity of the promoters in dependency of the distance from the transcription start site. Conclusions Our data demonstrate the power of bioinformatic analyses for the identification of biologically relevant sequence motifs. LTSM and the here found LTSM-binding proteins NonO and SFPQ were discovered through a synergistic combination of bioinformatic and biochemical methods and are regulators of the expression of a set of genes of the translational apparatus in a distance-dependent manner.

  3. Eigenvalue-dependent neutron energy spectra: Definitions, analyses, and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacuci, D.G.; Ronen, Y.; Shayer, Z.; Wagschal, J.J.; Yeivin, Y.

    1982-01-01

    A general qualitative analysis of spectral effects that arise from solving the kappa-, α-, γ-, and sigma-eigenvalue formulations of the neutron transport equation for nuclear systems that deviate (to first order) from criticality is presented. Hierarchies of neutron spectra softness are established and expressed concisely in terms of the newly introduced spatialdependent local spectral indices for the core and for the reflector. It is shown that each hierarchy is preserved, regardless of the nature of the specific physical mechanism that cause the system to deviate from criticality. Qualitative conclusions regarding the general behavior of the spectrum-dependent integral spectral indices and ICRs corresponding to the kappa-, α-, γ-, and sigma-eigenvalue formalisms are also presented. By defining spectral indices separately for the core and for the reflector, it is possible to account for the characteristics of neutron spectra in both the core and the reflector. The distinctions between the spectra in the core and in the reflector could not have been accounted for by using a single type of spectral index (e.g., a spectral index for the entire system or a spectral index solely for the core)

  4. Binding energy and photoionization cross-section of hydrogen-like impurity in a Poschl-Teller quantum well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakimifard, A.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of the donor impurity position and the form of confining potential on the binding energy and the photoionization cross-section if a semiconductor quantum well with Poschl-Teller potential is investigated. An analytical expression for the photoionization cross-section is obtained for the case when the polarization vector of light wave is directed along the direction of size quantization. It is shown that the photoionization cross-section has a threshold behavior

  5. Shedding Light on the EOS-Gravity Degeneracy and Constraining the Nuclear Symmetry Energy from the Gravitational Binding Energy of Neutron Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Xiao-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A thorough understanding of properties of neutron stars requires both a reliable knowledge of the equation of state (EOS of super-dense nuclear matter and the strong-field gravity theories simultaneously. To provide information that may help break this EOS-gravity degeneracy, we investigate effects of nuclear symmetry energy on the gravitational binding energy of neutron stars within GR and the scalar-tensor subset of alternative gravity models. We focus on effects of the slope L of nuclear symmetry energy at saturation density and the high-density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy. We find that the variation of either the density slope L or the high-density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy leads to large changes in the binding energy of neutron stars. The difference in predictions using the GR and the scalar-tensor theory appears only for massive neutron stars, and even then is significantly smaller than the difference resulting from variations in the symmetry energy.

  6. HTLV-1 Tax Oncoprotein Subverts the Cellular DNA Damage Response via Binding to DNA-dependent Protein Kinase*S⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durkin, Sarah S.; Guo, Xin; Fryrear, Kimberly A.; Mihaylova, Valia T.; Gupta, Saurabh K.; Belgnaoui, S. Mehdi; Haoudi, Abdelali; Kupfer, Gary M.; Semmes, O. John

    2008-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 is the causative agent for adult T-cell leukemia. Previous research has established that the viral oncoprotein Tax mediates the transformation process by impairing cell cycle control and cellular response to DNA damage. We showed previously that Tax sequesters huChk2 within chromatin and impairs the response to ionizing radiation. Here we demonstrate that DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a member of the Tax·Chk2 nuclear complex. The catalytic subunit, DNA-PKcs, and the regulatory subunit, Ku70, were present. Tax-containing nuclear extracts showed increased DNA-PK activity, and specific inhibition of DNA-PK prevented Tax-induced activation of Chk2 kinase activity. Expression of Tax induced foci formation and phosphorylation of H2AX. However, Tax-induced constitutive signaling of the DNA-PK pathway impaired cellular response to new damage, as reflected in suppression of ionizing radiation-induced DNA-PK phosphorylation and γH2AX stabilization. Tax co-localized with phospho-DNA-PK into nuclear speckles and a nuclear excluded Tax mutant sequestered endogenous phospho-DNA-PK into the cytoplasm, suggesting that Tax interaction with DNA-PK is an initiating event. We also describe a novel interaction between DNA-PK and Chk2 that requires Tax. We propose that Tax binds to and stabilizes a protein complex with DNA-PK and Chk2, resulting in a saturation of DNA-PK-mediated damage repair response. PMID:18957425

  7. Energy Dependence of Proton Radiation Damage in Si-Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2084399; Neubüser, C.

    2014-01-01

    Irradiation experiments on silicon sensors are used to mimic the radiation environment at collider experiments with the aim to forecast the change of the electrical properties of a detector with irradiation. Measurements on irradiated sensors are invaluable in choosing a material well suited for a silicon tracking detector. This is especially true for the upgraded detectors to be used in the high-luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC), where silicon sensors as currently used would suffer severe loss in signal from irradiation with charged and neutral hadrons.\\\\ The CMS Tracker Collaboration has initiated irradiation studies with protons with energies ranging from 23 MeV to 23 GeV. They are often used instead of charged hadrons, their radiation induced damage to the silicon being rather similar. However, in oxygen rich silicon, NIEL violation concerning the full depletion voltage has been observed.\\\\ In this paper results from investigations on bulk defects compared to the change of the electrical properties of ...

  8. Binding energy, phonon spectra and thermodynamic properties of elements with type structures A1 (Al, Cu), A2 (V, Ti2), A3 (Mg, Tiβ), A4 (Si, Sn)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirota, N.N.; Soshnina, T.M.; Sirota, I.M.; Sokolovskij, T.D.

    2001-01-01

    One calculated dependences of binding energy on spacing between the nearest atoms of Al and Cu elements with A 1 type structure, of V and Ti α elements with A 2 type structure, of Mg and Ti β elements with A 3 type structure, Si and Sn elements with A 4 type structure. To calculate one applied the methods based on the Thomas-Fermi statistic theory of atom. The derived dependences were approximated using the expression in the form of the Mie-Grueneisen potential. On the basis of the Born-von-Karman model of solid body one calculated the phonon spectra using which one determined temperature dependences of specific heat, free and internal energy of the investigated elements. The calculated values of energy of atomization, equilibrium closest interatomic spacing and temperature dependences of specific heat are in compliance with the experimental data [ru

  9. Approximate calculation of electronic energy levels of axially symmetric quantum dot and quantum ring by using energy dependent effective mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu-Min, Liu; Zhong-Yuan, Yu; Xiao-Min, Ren

    2009-01-01

    Calculations of electronic structures about the semiconductor quantum dot and the semiconductor quantum ring are presented in this paper. To reduce the calculation costs, for the quantum dot and the quantum ring, their simplified axially symmetric shapes are utilized in our analysis. The energy dependent effective mass is taken into account in solving the Schrödinger equations in the single band effective mass approximation. The calculated results show that the energy dependent effective mass should be considered only for relatively small volume quantum dots or small quantum rings. For large size quantum materials, both the energy dependent effective mass and the parabolic effective mass can give the same results. The energy states and the effective masses of the quantum dot and the quantum ring as a function of geometric parameters are also discussed in detail. (general)

  10. Management of solar energy in microgrids using IoT-based dependable control

    OpenAIRE

    Phung, Manh Duong; De La Villefromoy, Michel; Ha, Quang

    2017-01-01

    Solar energy generation requires efficient monitoring and management in moving towards technologies for net-zero energy buildings. This paper presents a dependable control system based on the Internet of Things (IoT) to control and manage the energy flow of renewable energy collected by solar panels within a microgrid. Data for optimal control include not only measurements from local sensors but also meteorological information retrieved in real-time from online sources. For system fault toler...

  11. Linker length dependent binding of a focal adhesion kinase derived peptide to the Src SH3-SH2 domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindfors, Hanna E; Venkata, Bharat Somireddy; Drijfhout, Jan W; Ubbink, Marcellus

    2011-02-18

    The interaction between a peptide encompassing the SH3 and SH2 binding motifs of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and the Src SH3-SH2 domains has been investigated with NMR spectroscopy and calorimetry. The binding to both motifs is anti-cooperative. Reduction of the long linker connecting the motifs does not lead to cooperativity. Short linkers that do not allow simultaneous intramolecular binding of the peptide to both motifs cause peptide-mediated dimerisation, even with a linker of only three amino acids. The role of the SH3 binding motif is discussed in view of the independent nature of the SH interactions. Copyright © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. External electric field effect on the binding energy of a hydrogenic donor impurity in InGaAsP/InP concentric double quantum rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Min; Wang, Hailong; Gong, Qian; Wang, Shumin

    2018-04-01

    Within the framework of effective-mass envelope-function theory, the ground state binding energy of a hydrogenic donor impurity is calculated in the InGaAsP/InP concentric double quantum rings (CDQRs) using the plane wave method. The effects of geometry, impurity position, external electric field and alloy composition on binding energy are considered. It is shown that the peak value of the binding energy appears in two rings with large gap as the donor impurity moves along the radial direction. The binding energy reaches the peak value at the center of ring height when the donor impurity moves along the axial direction. The binding energy shows nonlinear variation with the increase of ring height. With the external electric field applied along the z-axis, the binding energy of the donor impurity located at zi ≥ 0 decreases while that located at zi < 0 increases. In addition, the binding energy decreases with increasing Ga composition, but increases with the increasing As composition.

  13. Conserved epitope on several human vitamin K-dependent proteins: location of the antigenic site and influence of metal ions on antibody binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Church, W.R.; Messier, T.; Howard, P.R.; Amiral, J.; Meyer, D.; Mann, K.G.

    1988-01-01

    A murine monoclonal antibody (designated H-11) produced by injecting mice with purified human protein C was found to bind several human vitamin K-dependent proteins. Using a solid-phase competitive radioimmunoassay with antibody immobilized onto microtiter plates, binding of 125 I-labeled protein C to the antibody was inhibited by increasing amounts of protein C, prothrombin, and Factors X and VII over a concentration range of 1 x 10 -8 to 1 x 10 -6 M. Chemical treatment of prothrombin with a variety of agents did not destroy the antigenic site recognized by the antibody as measured by immunoblotting of prothrombin or prothrombin derivative immobilized onto nitrocellulose. Immunoblotting of purified vitamin K-dependent polypeptides with the monoclonal antibody following sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and electrophoretic transfer to nitrocellulose indicated that the antigenic site was found on the light chains of protein C and Factor X. The exact location of the antigenic determinant for antibody H-11 was established using synthetic peptides. Comparison of protein sequences of bovine and human vitamin K-dependent proteins suggests that the sequence Phe-Leu-Glu-Glu-Xaa-Arg/Lys is required for antibody binding. Increasing concentrations of Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ , or Mn 2+ partially inhibited binding of 125 I-protein C to the antibody in a solid-phase assay system with half-maximal binding observed at divalent metal ion concentrations of 2, 4, and 0.6 mM, respectively. The antigenic site thus recognized by monoclonal antibody H-11 is located at the amino-terminal region in the highly conserved γ-carboxyglutamic acid-containing domains of several, but not all, vitamin K-dependent proteins

  14. FcγRII-binding Centyrins mediate agonism and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis when fused to an anti-OX40 antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Di; Whitaker, Brian; Derebe, Mehabaw G; Chiu, Mark L

    2018-04-01

    Immunostimulatory antibodies against the tumor necrosis factor receptors (TNFR) are emerging as promising cancer immunotherapies. The agonism activity of such antibodies depends on crosslinking to Fc gamma RIIB receptor (FcγRIIB) to enable the antibody multimerization that drives TNFR activation. Previously, Fc engineering was used to enhance the binding of such antibodies to Fcγ receptors. Here, we report the identification of Centyrins as alternative scaffold proteins with binding affinities to homologous FcγRIIB and FcγRIIA, but not to other types of Fcγ receptors. One Centyrin, S29, was engineered at distinct positions of an anti-OX40 SF2 antibody to generate bispecific and tetravalent molecules named as mAbtyrins. Regardless of the position of S29 on the SF2 antibody, SF2-S29 mAbtyrins could bind FcγRIIB and FcγRIIA specifically while maintaining binding to OX40 receptors. In a NFκB reporter assay, attachment of S29 Centyrin molecules at the C-termini, but not the N-termini, resulted in SF2 antibodies with increased agonism owing to FcγRIIB crosslinking. The mAbtyrins also showed agonism in T-cell activation assays with immobilized FcγRIIB and FcγRIIA, but this activity was confined to mAbtyrins with S29 specifically at the C-termini of antibody heavy chains. Furthermore, regardless of the position of the molecule, S29 Centyrin could equip an otherwise Fc-silent antibody with antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis activity without affecting the antibody's intrinsic antibody-dependent cell-meditated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity. In summary, the appropriate adoption FcγRII-binding Centyrins as functional modules represents a novel strategy to engineer therapeutic antibodies with improved functionalities.

  15. Pd and S binding energies and Auger parameters on a model silica-supported Suzuki–Miyaura catalyst: Insights into catalyst activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanif, Mohammad A.; Ebralidze, Iraklii I.; Horton, J. Hugh

    2013-01-01

    Model Suzuki–Miyaura reaction catalysts have been developed by immobilizing palladium on a mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS) functionalized Si substrate. Two types of Pd species were found on the fresh catalysts that may be attributed to a S-bound Pd (II) species and Pd nanoparticles. The binding energy of the nanoparticles is strongly size dependent, and is higher than that of metallic Pd. A sulfur species that has not been previously reported on this class of catalysts has also been observed. A systematic investigation of various palladium/sulfur complexes using XPS was carried out to identify this species, which may be assigned to high oxidation state sulfur formed by oxidation of thiol during the reduction of the Pd(OAc) 2 used to load the catalyst with Pd. Shifts in binding energy observed for both Pd and S spectra of the used catalysts were examined in order to probe the change of electronic environment of reactive palladium center and the thiol ligand during the reaction. Electron and atomic force microscopic imaging of the surfaces demonstrates the formation of Pd nanoparticles on fresh catalysts and subsequent size reduction of the Pd nano-particles following reaction.

  16. Photoelectron spectrum of valence anions of uracil and first-principles calculations of excess electron binding energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachorz, Rafał A; Klopper, Wim; Gutowski, Maciej; Li, Xiang; Bowen, Kit H

    2008-08-07

    The photoelectron spectrum (PES) of the uracil anion is reported and discussed from the perspective of quantum chemical calculations of the vertical detachment energies (VDEs) of the anions of various tautomers of uracil. The PES peak maximum is found at an electron binding energy of 2.4 eV, and the width of the main feature suggests that the parent anions are in a valence rather than a dipole-bound state. The canonical tautomer as well as four tautomers that result from proton transfer from an NH group to a C atom were investigated computationally. At the Hartree-Fock and second-order Moller-Plesset perturbation theory levels, the adiabatic electron affinity (AEA) and the VDE have been converged to the limit of a complete basis set to within +/-1 meV. Post-MP2 electron-correlation effects have been determined at the coupled-cluster level of theory including single, double, and noniterative triple excitations. The quantum chemical calculations suggest that the most stable valence anion of uracil is the anion of a tautomer that results from a proton transfer from N1H to C5. It is characterized by an AEA of 135 meV and a VDE of 1.38 eV. The peak maximum is as much as 1 eV larger, however, and the photoelectron intensity is only very weak at 1.38 eV. The PES does not lend support either to the valence anion of the canonical tautomer, which is the second most stable anion, and whose VDE is computed at about 0.60 eV. Agreement between the peak maximum and the computed VDE is only found for the third most stable tautomer, which shows an AEA of approximately -0.1 eV and a VDE of 2.58 eV. This tautomer results from a proton transfer from N3H to C5. The results illustrate that the characteristics of biomolecular anions are highly dependent on their tautomeric form. If indeed the third most stable anion is observed in the experiment, then it remains an open question why and how this species is formed under the given conditions.

  17. Characterization of the energy-dependent uncertainty and correlation in silicon neutron displacement damage metrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griffin Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A rigorous treatment of the uncertainty in the underlying nuclear data on silicon displacement damage metrics is presented. The uncertainty in the cross sections and recoil atom spectra are propagated into the energy-dependent uncertainty contribution in the silicon displacement kerma and damage energy using a Total Monte Carlo treatment. An energy-dependent covariance matrix is used to characterize the resulting uncertainty. A strong correlation between different reaction channels is observed in the high energy neutron contributions to the displacement damage metrics which supports the necessity of using a Monte Carlo based method to address the nonlinear nature of the uncertainty propagation.

  18. Nature of the high-binding-energy dip in the low-temperature photoemission spectra of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dessau, D.S.; Shen, Z.; Wells, B.O.; King, D.M.; Spicer, W.E.; Arko, A.J.; Lombardo, L.W.; Mitzi, D.B.; Kapitulnik, A.

    1992-01-01

    At the transition to superconductivity, an anomalous high-binding-energy (∼-90 meV) dip appears in the low-temperature photoemission spectra taken along the Γ-bar M high-symmetry direction of Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+δ . This paper details experiments which further characterize the energy and k-space dependence of this dip structure. The dip occurs over a wide portion of the Γ-bar M zone diagonal (110), yet shows minimal energy dispersion. In the spectra taken along the Γ-X zone edge (100), the dip is very weak or not present. We show that these results imply that the dip is not an artifact dependent on the experiment or special features of the band structure and therefore is an intrinsic feature of the superconducting state of Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+δ . The behavior of the normal-state bands along Γ-bar M in relation to the local-density-approximation prediction of a Bi-O-based electron ''pocket'' is also discussed, with our data explained most naturally if the Bi-O band remains above the Fermi level for all k

  19. SU-F-T-561: Energy Dependence of a Scintillation Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volotskova, O; Xu, A; Jozsef, G [NYU Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the response and dose rate dependence of a scintillation detector over a wide energy range. Methods: The energy dependence of W1 scintillation detector was tested with: 1) 50–225 keV beams generated by an animal irradiator, 2) a Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion Co-60 source, 3) 6MV, 6FFF, 10FFF and 15MV photon beams, and 4) 6–20MeV electron beams from a linac. Calibrated linac beams were used to deliver 100 cGy to the detector at dmax in water under reference conditions. The gamma-knife measurement was performed in solid water (100 cGy with 16mm collimator). The low energy beams were calibrated with an ion chamber in air (TG-61), and the scintillation detector was placed at the same location as the ionization chamber during calibration. For the linac photon and electron beams, dose rate dependence was tested for 100–2400 and 100–800 MU/min. Results: The scintillation detector demonstrated strong energy dependence in the range of 50–225keV. The measured values were lower than the delivered dose and increased as the energy increased. Therapeutic photon beams showed energy independence with variations less than 1%. Therapeutic electron beams displayed the same sensitivity of ∼2–3% at their corresponding dmax depths. The change in dose-rate of photon and electron beams within the therapeutic energy range did not affect detector output (<0.5%). Measurements acquired with the gamma knife showed that the output data agreed with the delivered dose up to 3%. Conclusion: W1 scintillation detector output has a strong energy dependence in the diagnostic and orthovoltage energy range. Therapeutic photon beams exhibited energy independence with no observable dose-rate dependence. This study may aid in the implementation of a scintillation detector in QA programs by providing energy calibration factors.

  20. On the atomic-number similarity of the binding energies of electrons in filled shells of elements of the periodic table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, V. Ya.; Shpatakovskaya, G. V.

    2017-03-01

    An expression for the binding energies of electrons in the ground state of an atom is derived on the basis of the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization rule within the Thomas-Fermi model. The validity of this relation for all elements from neon to uranium is tested within a more perfect quantum-mechanical model with and without the inclusion of relativistic effects, as well as with experimental binding energies. As a result, the ordering of electronic levels in filled atomic shells is established, manifested in an approximate atomic-number similarity. It is proposed to use this scaling property to analytically estimate the binding energies of electrons in an arbitrary atom.

  1. On the atomic-number similarity of the binding energies of electrons in filled shells of elements of the periodic table

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpov, V. Ya. [Bruk Institute of Electronic Control Machines (Russian Federation); Shpatakovskaya, G. V., E-mail: shpagalya@yandex.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    An expression for the binding energies of electrons in the ground state of an atom is derived on the basis of the Bohr–Sommerfeld quantization rule within the Thomas–Fermi model. The validity of this relation for all elements from neon to uranium is tested within a more perfect quantum-mechanical model with and without the inclusion of relativistic effects, as well as with experimental binding energies. As a result, the ordering of electronic levels in filled atomic shells is established, manifested in an approximate atomic-number similarity. It is proposed to use this scaling property to analytically estimate the binding energies of electrons in an arbitrary atom.

  2. Energy dependence of contrast-detail-dose and object-detectability-dose curves for CT scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, L.K.; Cohen, G.

    1982-01-01

    The energy dependence of contrast-detail-dose (CdD) and object-detectability-dose (OdD) curves for computed tomographic scanners is investigated. The effects of changes in beam energy on perceptibility are shown to be due to changes in signal-to-noise ratio resulting from changes in contrast and photon statistics. Energy-dependence analysis of OdD curves is shown to depend on the atomic composition of the phantom used to generate the curves, while such an analysis of CdD curves is independent of the atomic composition of the phantom. It is also shown that any OdD curve can be generated from CdD curves and that use of this fact rectifies any potential energy-dependent interpretation of CdD curves

  3. Temperature and doping dependence of the high-energy kink in cuprates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemljic, M M; Prelovsek, P; Tohyama, T

    2008-01-25

    It is shown that spectral functions within the extended t-J model, evaluated using the finite-temperature diagonalization of small clusters, exhibit the high-energy kink in single-particle dispersion consistent with recent angle-resolved photoemission results on hole-doped cuprates. The kink and waterfall-like features persist up to large doping and to temperatures beyond J; hence, the origin can be generally attributed to strong correlations and incoherent hole propagation at large binding energies. In contrast, our analysis predicts that electron-doped cuprates do not exhibit these phenomena in photoemission.

  4. Binding mode prediction and MD/MMPBSA-based free energy ranking for agonists of REV-ERBα/NCoR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermaier, Yvonne; Ruiz-Carmona, Sergio; Theret, Isabelle; Perron-Sierra, Françoise; Poissonnet, Guillaume; Dacquet, Catherine; Boutin, Jean A; Ducrot, Pierre; Barril, Xavier

    2017-08-01

    The knowledge of the free energy of binding of small molecules to a macromolecular target is crucial in drug design as is the ability to predict the functional consequences of binding. We highlight how a molecular dynamics (MD)-based approach can be used to predict the free energy of small molecules, and to provide priorities for the synthesis and the validation via in vitro tests. Here, we study the dynamics and energetics of the nuclear receptor REV-ERBα with its co-repressor NCoR and 35 novel agonists. Our in silico approach combines molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD), solvent-accessible surface area (SASA) and molecular mechanics poisson boltzmann surface area (MMPBSA) calculations. While docking yielded initial hints on the binding modes, their stability was assessed by MD. The SASA calculations revealed that the presence of the ligand led to a higher exposure of hydrophobic REV-ERB residues for NCoR recruitment. MMPBSA was very successful in ranking ligands by potency in a retrospective and prospective manner. Particularly, the prospective MMPBSA ranking-based validations for four compounds, three predicted to be active and one weakly active, were confirmed experimentally.

  5. ENERGY-DEPENDENT TIME LAGS IN THE SEYFERT 1 GALAXY NGC 4593

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriram, K.; Agrawal, V. K.; Rao, A. R.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the energy-time lag dependence of the source NGC 4593 using XMM-Newton/EPIC pn data. We found that the time lag dependency is linear in nature with respect to the logarithm of different energy bands. We also investigate the frequency-dependent time lags and identify that at some frequency range (5 x 10 -5 Hz to 2 x 10 -4 Hz) the X-ray emission is highly coherent, mildly frequency dependent, and very strongly energy dependent. These observations can be explained in the framework of the thermal Comptonization process, and they indicate a truncated accretion disk very close to the black hole. We discuss the plausible spectral state to explain the phenomenon and conclude that the observed properties bear a close resemblance to the intermediate state or the steep power-law state, found in galactic black hole sources.

  6. Identification of a phosphorylation-dependent nuclear localization motif in interferon regulatory factor 2 binding protein 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen C T Teng

    Full Text Available Interferon regulatory factor 2 binding protein 2 (IRF2BP2 is a muscle-enriched transcription factor required to activate vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGFA expression in muscle. IRF2BP2 is found in the nucleus of cardiac and skeletal muscle cells. During the process of skeletal muscle differentiation, some IRF2BP2 becomes relocated to the cytoplasm, although the functional significance of this relocation and the mechanisms that control nucleocytoplasmic localization of IRF2BP2 are not yet known.Here, by fusing IRF2BP2 to green fluorescent protein and testing a series of deletion and site-directed mutagenesis constructs, we mapped the nuclear localization signal (NLS to an evolutionarily conserved sequence (354ARKRKPSP(361 in IRF2BP2. This sequence corresponds to a classical nuclear localization motif bearing positively charged arginine and lysine residues. Substitution of arginine and lysine with negatively charged aspartic acid residues blocked nuclear localization. However, these residues were not sufficient because nuclear targeting of IRF2BP2 also required phosphorylation of serine 360 (S360. Many large-scale phosphopeptide proteomic studies had reported previously that serine 360 of IRF2BP2 is phosphorylated in numerous human cell types. Alanine substitution at this site abolished IRF2BP2 nuclear localization in C(2C(12 myoblasts and CV1 cells. In contrast, substituting serine 360 with aspartic acid forced nuclear retention and prevented cytoplasmic redistribution in differentiated C(2C(12 muscle cells. As for the effects of these mutations on VEGFA promoter activity, the S360A mutation interfered with VEGFA activation, as expected. Surprisingly, the S360D mutation also interfered with VEGFA activation, suggesting that this mutation, while enforcing nuclear entry, may disrupt an essential activation function of IRF2BP2.Nuclear localization of IRF2BP2 depends on phosphorylation near a conserved NLS. Changes in phosphorylation status

  7. Quantum models with energy-dependent potentials solvable in terms of exceptional orthogonal polynomials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze-Halberg, Axel; Roy, Pinaki

    2017-01-01

    We construct energy-dependent potentials for which the Schrödinger equations admit solutions in terms of exceptional orthogonal polynomials. Our method of construction is based on certain point transformations, applied to the equations of exceptional Hermite, Jacobi and Laguerre polynomials. We present several examples of boundary-value problems with energy-dependent potentials that admit a discrete spectrum and the corresponding normalizable solutions in closed form.

  8. Quantum models with energy-dependent potentials solvable in terms of exceptional orthogonal polynomials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze-Halberg, Axel, E-mail: axgeschu@iun.edu [Department of Mathematics and Actuarial Science, Indiana University Northwest, 3400 Broadway, Gary IN 46408 (United States); Department of Physics, Indiana University Northwest, 3400 Broadway, Gary IN 46408 (United States); Roy, Pinaki, E-mail: pinaki@isical.ac.in [Physics and Applied Mathematics Unit, Indian Statistical Institute, Kolkata 700108 (India)

    2017-03-15

    We construct energy-dependent potentials for which the Schrödinger equations admit solutions in terms of exceptional orthogonal polynomials. Our method of construction is based on certain point transformations, applied to the equations of exceptional Hermite, Jacobi and Laguerre polynomials. We present several examples of boundary-value problems with energy-dependent potentials that admit a discrete spectrum and the corresponding normalizable solutions in closed form.

  9. Energy-dependent microscopic optical potential for scattering of nucleons on light nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farag, M.Y.H.; Esmael, E.H. [Cairo University, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Giza (Egypt); Maridi, H.M. [Cairo University, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Giza (Egypt); Taiz University, Physics Department, Faculty of Applied Science, Taiz (Yemen)

    2014-06-15

    We present an energy-dependent microscopic optical model potential for elastic scattering of nucleons on light nuclei. The single-folding model is used for the real part of the optical potential (OP), while the imaginary part is derived within the high-energy approximation theory. The energy dependence of the OP is determined from the parameterization of the volume integrals those calculated from the best-fit OP that fit the experimental data of the cross sections and analyzing powers. This energy-dependent OP is successfully applied to analyze the proton elastic scattering of {sup 4,6,i8}He, {sup 6,7}Li, and {sup 9,10}Be nuclei at low and intermediate incident energies up to 200MeV/nucleon. (orig.)

  10. Absolute binding free energy calculations of CBClip host–guest systems in the SAMPL5 blind challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofoleanu, Florentina; Pickard, Frank C.; König, Gerhard; Huang, Jing; Damjanović, Ana; Baek, Minkyung; Seok, Chaok; Brooks, Bernard R.

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report the absolute binding free energy calculations of CBClip complexes in the SAMPL5 blind challenge. Initial conformations of CBClip complexes were obtained using docking and molecular dynamics simulations. Free energy calculations were performed using thermodynamic integration (TI) with soft-core potentials and Bennett’s acceptance ratio (BAR) method based on a serial insertion scheme. We compared the results obtained with TI simulations with soft-core potentials and Hamiltonian replica exchange simulations with the serial insertion method combined with the BAR method. The results show that the difference between the two methods can be mainly attributed to the van der Waals free energies, suggesting that either the simulations used for TI or the simulations used for BAR, or both are not fully converged and the two sets of simulations may have sampled difference phase space regions. The penalty scores of force field parameters of the 10 guest molecules provided by CHARMM Generalized Force Field can be an indicator of the accuracy of binding free energy calculations. Among our submissions, the combination of docking and TI performed best, which yielded the root mean square deviation of 2.94 kcal/mol and an average unsigned error of 3.41 kcal/mol for the ten guest molecules. These values were best overall among all participants. However, our submissions had little correlation with experiments. PMID:27677749

  11. The C-terminus of H-Ras as a target for the covalent binding of reactive compounds modulating Ras-dependent pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara L Oeste

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ras proteins are crucial players in differentiation and oncogenesis and constitute important drug targets. The localization and activity of Ras proteins are highly dependent on posttranslational modifications at their C-termini. In addition to an isoprenylated cysteine, H-Ras, but not other Ras proteins, possesses two cysteine residues (C181 and C184 in the C-terminal hypervariable domain that act as palmitoylation sites in cells. Cyclopentenone prostaglandins (cyPG are reactive lipidic mediators that covalently bind to H-Ras and activate H-Ras dependent pathways. Dienone cyPG, such as 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14-PGJ(2 (15d-PGJ(2 and Δ(12-PGJ(2 selectively bind to the H-Ras hypervariable domain. Here we show that these cyPG bind simultaneously C181 and C184 of H-Ras, thus potentially altering the conformational tendencies of the hypervariable domain. Based on these results, we have explored the capacity of several bifunctional cysteine reactive small molecules to bind to the hypervariable domain of H-Ras proteins. Interestingly, phenylarsine oxide (PAO, a widely used tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, and dibromobimane, a cross-linking agent used for cysteine mapping, effectively bind H-Ras hypervariable domain. The interaction of PAO with H-Ras takes place in vitro and in cells and blocks modification of H-Ras by 15d-PGJ(2. Moreover, PAO treatment selectively alters H-Ras membrane partition and the pattern of H-Ras activation in cells, from the plasma membrane to endomembranes. These results identify H-Ras as a novel target for PAO. More importantly, these observations reveal that small molecules or reactive intermediates interacting with spatially vicinal cysteines induce intramolecular cross-linking of H-Ras C-terminus potentially contributing to the modulation of Ras-dependent pathways.

  12. Coordination-resolved local bond contraction and electron binding-energy entrapment of Si atomic clusters and solid skins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bo, Maolin; Huang, Yongli; Zhang, Ting [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Wang, Yan, E-mail: ywang8@hnust.edu.cn, E-mail: ecqsun@ntu.edu.sg [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); School of Information and Electronic Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Hunan 411201 (China); Zhang, Xi [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Li, Can [Center for Coordination Bond Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 330018 (China); Sun, Chang Q., E-mail: ywang8@hnust.edu.cn, E-mail: ecqsun@ntu.edu.sg [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Center for Coordination Bond Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 330018 (China)

    2014-04-14

    Consistency between x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements and density-function theory calculations confirms our bond order-length-strength notation-incorporated tight-binding theory predictions on the quantum entrapment of Si solid skin and atomic clusters. It has been revealed that bond-order deficiency shortens and strengthens the Si-Si bond, which results in the local densification and quantum entrapment of the core and valence electrons. Unifying Si clusters and Si(001) and (111) skins, this mechanism has led to quantification of the 2p binding energy of 96.089 eV for an isolated Si atom, and their bulk shifts of 2.461 eV. Findings evidence the significance of atomic undercoordination that is of great importance to device performance.

  13. Dynamics of α-Hb chain binding to its chaperone AHSP depends on heme coordination and redox state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiger, Laurent; Vasseur, Corinne; Domingues-Hamdi, Elisa; Truan, Gilles; Marden, Michael C; Baudin-Creuza, Véronique

    2014-01-01

    AHSP is an erythroid molecular chaperone of the α-hemoglobin chains (α-Hb). Upon AHSP binding, native ferric α-Hb undergoes an unprecedented structural rearrangement at the heme site giving rise to a 6th coordination bond with His(E7). Recombinant AHSP, WT α-Hb:AHSP and α-Hb(HE7Q):AHSP complexes were expressed in Escherichia coli. Thermal denaturation curves were measured by circular dichroism for the isolated α-Hb and bound to AHSP. Kinetics of ligand binding and redox reactions of α-Hb bound to AHSP as well as α-Hb release from the α-Hb:AHSP complex were measured by time-resolved absorption spectroscopy. AHSP binding to α-Hb is kinetically controlled to prevail over direct binding with β-chains and is also thermodynamically controlled by the α-Hb redox state and not the liganded state of the ferrous α-Hb. The dramatic instability of isolated ferric α-Hb is greatly decreased upon AHSP binding. Removing the bis-histidyl hexacoordination in α-HbH58(E7)Q:AHSP complex reduces the stabilizing effect of AHSP binding. Once the ferric α-Hb is bound to AHSP, the globin can be more easily reduced by several chemical and enzymatic systems compared to α-Hb within the Hb-tetramer. α-Hb reduction could trigger its release from AHSP toward its final Hb β-chain partner producing functional ferrous Hb-tetramers. This work indicates a preferred kinetic pathway for Hb-synthesis. The cellular redox balance in Hb-synthesis should be considered as important as the relative proportional synthesis of both Hb-subunits and their heme cofactor. The in vivo role of AHSP is discussed in the context of the molecular disorders observed in thalassemia. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Dynamic temperature dependence patterns in future energy demand models in the context of climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hekkenberg, M.; Moll, H.C.; Uiterkamp, A.J.M. Schoot

    2009-01-01

    Energy demand depends on outdoor temperature in a 'u' shaped fashion. Various studies have used this temperature dependence to investigate the effects of climate change on energy demand. Such studies contain implicit or explicit assumptions to describe expected socio-economic changes that may affect future energy demand. This paper critically analyzes these implicit or explicit assumptions and their possible effect on the studies' outcomes. First we analyze the interaction between the socio-economic structure and the temperature dependence pattern (TDP) of energy demand. We find that socio-economic changes may alter the TDP in various ways. Next we investigate how current studies manage these dynamics in socio-economic structure. We find that many studies systematically misrepresent the possible effect of socio-economic changes on the TDP of energy demand. Finally, we assess the consequences of these misrepresentations in an energy demand model based on temperature dependence and climate scenarios. Our model results indicate that expected socio-economic dynamics generally lead to an underestimation of future energy demand in models that misrepresent such dynamics. We conclude that future energy demand models should improve the incorporation of socio-economic dynamics. We propose dynamically modeling several key parameters and using direct meteorological data instead of degree days. (author)

  15. Identification of an hexapeptide that binds to a surface pocket in cyclin A and inhibits the catalytic activity of the complex cyclin-dependent kinase 2-cyclin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canela, Núria; Orzáez, Mar; Fucho, Raquel; Mateo, Francesca; Gutierrez, Ricardo; Pineda-Lucena, Antonio; Bachs, Oriol; Pérez-Payá, Enrique

    2006-11-24

    The protein-protein complexes formed between different cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are central to cell cycle regulation. These complexes represent interesting points of chemical intervention for the development of antineoplastic molecules. Here we describe the identification of an all d-amino acid hexapeptide, termed NBI1, that inhibits the kinase activity of the cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (cdk2)-cyclin A complex through selective binding to cyclin A. The mechanism of inhibition is non-competitive for ATP and non-competitive for protein substrates. In contrast to the existing CDKs peptide inhibitors, the hexapeptide NBI1 interferes with the formation of the cdk2-cyclin A complex. Furthermore, a cell-permeable derivative of NBI1 induces apoptosis and inhibits proliferation of tumor cell lines. Thus, the NBI1-binding site on cyclin A may represent a new target site for the selective inhibition of activity cdk2-cyclin A complex.

  16. The effect of ν-bar(E) energy dependence at E 239Pu in the lower energy groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusejnov, A.G.; Gusejnov, M.A.; Rabotnov, N.S.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of the energy dependence of the average number of prompt neutrons on the 239 Pu fission BNAB-26 group cross-sections has been estimated. It was also found that the values of ν-bar(E) are lowered by approximately 1% when the temperature increases from 300 deg. K to 2000 deg. K. Taking this dependence into account may improve the predictability of the plutonium-fueled reactor characteristics. (author). 7 refs, 1 fig., 2 tabs

  17. Processivity and Subcellular Localization of Glycogen Synthase Depend on a Non-catalytic High Affinity Glycogen-binding Site*

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz, Adelaida; Martínez-Pons, Carlos; Fita, Ignacio; Ferrer, Juan C.; Guinovart, Joan J.

    2011-01-01

    Glycogen synthase, a central enzyme in glucose metabolism, catalyzes the successive addition of α-1,4-linked glucose residues to the non-reducing end of a growing glycogen molecule. A non-catalytic glycogen-binding site, identified by x-ray crystallography on the surface of the glycogen synthase from the archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi, has been found to be functionally conserved in the eukaryotic enzymes. The disruption of this binding site in both the archaeal and the human muscle glycogen synth...

  18. Modelling Reliability of Supply and Infrastructural Dependency in Energy Distribution Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Helseth, Arild

    2008-01-01

    This thesis presents methods and models for assessing reliability of supply and infrastructural dependency in energy distribution systems with multiple energy carriers. The three energy carriers of electric power, natural gas and district heating are considered. Models and methods for assessing reliability of supply in electric power systems are well documented, frequently applied in the industry and continuously being subject to research and improvement. On the contrary, there are compar...

  19. Phospholipid-binding protein EhC2A mediates calcium-dependent translocation of transcription factor URE3-BP to the plasma membrane of Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Heriberto; Linford, Alicia S; Gilchrist, Carol A; Petri, William A

    2010-05-01

    The Entamoeba histolytica upstream regulatory element 3-binding protein (URE3-BP) is a transcription factor that binds DNA in a Ca(2+)-inhibitable manner. The protein is located in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm but has also been found to be enriched in the plasma membrane of amebic trophozoites. We investigated the reason for the unusual localization of URE3-BP at the amebic plasma membrane. Here we identify and characterize a 22-kDa Ca(2+)-dependent binding partner of URE3-BP, EhC2A, a novel member of the C2-domain superfamily. Immunoprecipitations of URE3-BP and EhC2A showed that the proteins interact and that such interaction was enhanced in the presence of Ca(2+). Recombinant and native EhC2A bound phospholipid liposomes in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner, with half-maximal binding occurring at 3.4 muM free Ca(2+). A direct interaction between EhC2A and URE3-BP was demonstrated by the ability of recombinant EhC2A to recruit recombinant URE3-BP to phospholipid liposomes in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. URE3-BP and EhC2A were observed to translocate to the amebic plasma membrane upon an increase in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration of trophozoites, as revealed by subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescent staining. Short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of EhC2A protein expression significantly modulated the mRNA levels of URE3-BP-regulated transcripts. Based on these results, we propose a model for EhC2A-mediated regulation of the transcriptional activities of URE3-BP via Ca(2+)-dependent anchoring of the transcription factor to the amebic plasma membrane.

  20. Using docking and alchemical free energy approach to determine the binding mechanism of eEF2K inhibitors and prioritizing the compound synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiantao; Edupuganti, Ramakrishna; Tavares, Clint D J; Dalby, Kevin N; Ren, Pengyu

    2015-01-01

    A-484954 is a known eEF2K inhibitor with submicromolar IC50 potency. However, the binding mechanism and the crystal structure of the kinase remains unknown. Here, we employ a homology eEF2K model, docking and alchemical free energy simulations to probe the binding mechanism of eEF2K, and in turn, guide the optimization of potential lead compounds. The inhibitor was docked into the ATP-binding site of a homology model first. Three different binding poses, hypothesis 1, 2, and 3, were obtained and subsequently applied to molecular dynamics (MD) based alchemical free energy simulations. The calculated relative binding free energy of the analogs of A-484954 using the binding pose of hypothesis 1 show a good correlation with the experimental IC50 values, yielding an r (2) coefficient of 0.96 after removing an outlier (compound 5). Calculations using another two poses show little correlation with experimental data, (r (2) of less than 0.5 with or without removing any outliers). Based on hypothesis 1, the calculated relative free energy suggests that bigger cyclic groups, at R1 e.g., cyclobutyl and cyclopentyl promote more favorable binding than smaller groups, such as cyclopropyl and hydrogen. Moreover, this study also demonstrates the ability of the alchemical free energy approach in combination with docking and homology modeling to prioritize compound synthesis. This can be an effective means of facilitating structure-based drug design when crystal structures are not available.