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Sample records for binding constant kd

  1. Thermodynamic binding constants for gallium transferrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, W.R.; Pecoraro, V.L.

    1983-01-18

    Gallium-67 is widely used as an imaging agent for tumors and inflammatory abscesses. It is well stablished that Ga/sup 3 +/ travels through the circulatory system bound to the serum iron transport protein transferrin and that this protein binding is an essential step in tumor localization. However, there have been conflicting reports on the magnitude of the gallium-transferrin binding constants. Therefore, thermodynamic binding constants for gallium complexation at the two specific metal binding sites of human serum transferrin at pH 7.4 and 5 mM NaHCO/sub 3/ have been determined by UV difference spectroscopy. The conditional constants calculated for 27 mM NaHCO/sub 3/ are log K/sub 1/* = 20.3 and log K/sub 2/* = 19.3. These results are discussed in relation to the thermodynamics of transferrin binding of Fe/sup 3 +/ and to previous reports on gallium binding. The strength of transferrin complexation is also compared to that of a series of low molecular weight ligands by using calculated pM values (pM = -log (Ga(H/sub 2/O)/sub 6/)) to express the effective binding strength at pH 7.4.

  2. Rate Constants and Mechanisms of Protein-Ligand Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiaodong; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2017-05-22

    Whereas protein-ligand binding affinities have long-established prominence, binding rate constants and binding mechanisms have gained increasing attention in recent years. Both new computational methods and new experimental techniques have been developed to characterize the latter properties. It is now realized that binding mechanisms, like binding rate constants, can and should be quantitatively determined. In this review, we summarize studies and synthesize ideas on several topics in the hope of providing a coherent picture of and physical insight into binding kinetics. The topics include microscopic formulation of the kinetic problem and its reduction to simple rate equations; computation of binding rate constants; quantitative determination of binding mechanisms; and elucidation of physical factors that control binding rate constants and mechanisms.

  3. Distribution of a 69-kD laminin-binding protein in aortic and microvascular endothelial cells: modulation during cell attachment, spreading, and migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yannariello-Brown, J; Wewer, U; Liotta, L

    1988-01-01

    , with a granular perinuclear distribution and in linear arrays throughout the cell. During migration a redistribution from diffuse to predominanately linear arrays that co-distributed with actin microfilaments was noted in double-label experiments. The 69-kD laminin-binding protein colocalized with actin filaments...... actively synthesizing matrix. Endothelial cells express a 69-kD laminin-binding protein that is membrane associated and appears to colocalize with actin microfilaments. The topological distribution of 69 kD and its cytoskeletal associations can be modulated by the cell during cell migration and growth...

  4. Tomato FK506 Binding Protein 12KD (FKBP12) Mediates the Interaction between Rapamycin and Target of Rapamycin (TOR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Fangjie; Dong, Pan; Liu, Mei; Xie, Gengxin; Wang, Kai; Zhuo, Fengping; Feng, Li; Yang, Lu; Li, Zhengguo; Ren, Maozhi

    2016-01-01

    Target of Rapamycin (TOR) signaling is an important regulator in multiple organisms including yeast, plants, and animals. However, the TOR signaling in plants is much less understood as compared to that in yeast and animals. TOR kinase can be efficiently suppressed by rapamycin in the presence of functional FK506 Binding Protein 12 KD (FKBP12) in yeast and animals. In most examined higher plants rapamycin fails to inhibit TOR kinase due to the non-functional FKBP12. Here we find that tomato plants showed obvious growth inhibition when treated with rapamycin and the inhibitory phenotype is similar to suppression of TOR causing by active-site TOR inhibitors (asTORis) such as KU63794, AZD8055, and Torin1. The chemical genetic assays using TOR inhibitors and heterologous expressing SlFKBP12 in Arabidopsis indicated that the TOR signaling is functional in tomato. The protein gel shifting and TOR inhibitors combination assays showed that SlFKBP12 can mediate the interaction between rapamycin and TOR. Furthermore, comparative expression profile analysis between treatments with rapamycin and KU63794 identified highly overlapped Differentially Expressed Genes (DEGs) which are involved in many anabolic and catabolic processes, such as photosynthesis, cell wall restructuring, and senescence in tomato. These observations suggest that SlFFBP12 is functional in tomato. The results provided basic information of TOR signaling in tomato, and also some new insights into how TOR controls plant growth and development through reprogramming the transcription profiles.

  5. Simultaneous Determination of Binding Constants for Multiple Carbohydrate Hosts in Complex Mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Sebastian; Beeren, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    We describe a simple method for the simultaneous determination of association constants for a guest binding to seven different hosts in a mixture of more than 20 different oligosaccharides. If the binding parameters are known for one component in the mixture, a single NMR titration suffices...

  6. Antibody binding constants from Farr test and other radioimmunoassays. A theoretical and experimental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, J.; Schalch, W.

    1980-01-01

    For the reaction of monovalently reacting antibody (116-700pIEF) with its antigen (streptococcal group A-variant polysaccharide), an apparent binding constant Ksub(a) was derived by the ammonium sulfate precipitation technique (Farr assay) which was 40 times larger than the true binding constant K = 10 6 M -1 determined by fluorescence titration and equilibrium dialysis. For monovalently reacting antibodies the time needed for re-equilibration of the binding reaction is short as compared to the time of ammonium sulfate incubation. A thermodynamic analysis was therefore performed for the case of complete equilibration of all components in solution and in the ammonium sulfate precipitate. It was found that in this limiting case Ksub(a)/K is equal to the ratio of the solubilities of the antibody and the antibody complex corrected by the activity coefficients of the components in the precipitate. For other antibody-antigen reactions in which the antibody reacts with both binding sites to the same antigen molecule, re-equilibration of the binding reaction in solution is much slower. For such systems a disturbance of the binding reaction by the precipitation is less likely and correct binding constants may be obtained by the Farr technique or other radioimmunoassays involving precipitation. (author)

  7. Binding constants of Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus Coat Protein with ferulic acid derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longlu Ran

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The data present binding constants between ferulic acid derivatives and the Coat Protein (P10 by fluorescence titration in this article, which is hosted in the research article entitled “Interaction Research on an Antiviral Molecule that Targets the Coat Protein of Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus’’ (Ran et al., 2017 [1]. The data include fluorescence quenching spectrum, Stern–Volmer quenching constants, and binding parameters. In this article, a more comprehensive data interpretation and analysis is explained.

  8. Palmitate and stearate binding to human serum albumin. Determination of relative binding constants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorum, H; Fisker, K; Honoré, B

    1997-01-01

    Multiple binding equilibria of two apparently insoluble ligands, palmitate and stearate, to defatted human serum albumin were studied in a 66 mM sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) at 37 degrees C, by determination of dialytic exchange rates of ligands among identical equilibrium solutions...

  9. Low Levels of the 150-kD Insulin -Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3 Ternary complex in Patients with Anorexia nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støving, René K; Hangaard, Jørgen; Hagen, Claus

    2003-01-01

    on the ternary complex formation. Despite GH hypersecretion, serum IGF-I, IGFBP-3, and ALS levels have all been reported to be low in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN), while the degree of ternary complex formation in AN is unknown. METHODS: Serum ALS and 150-kD ternary complex formation were measured in 6...

  10. Mathematical model for determining the binding constants between immunoglobulins, bivalent ligands, and monovalent ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Eric T; Cummings, Linda; Perez-Castillejos, Raquel

    2011-02-01

    This paper analyzes the equilibria between immunoglobulins (R(2)), homo-bifunctional ligands (L(2)), monovalent ligands (I), and their complexes. We present a mathematical model that can be used to estimate the concentration of each species present in a mixture of R(2), L(2), and I, given the initial conditions defining the total concentration of R(2), L(2), I, and four dissociation constants (K(d)(inter), K(d)(intra), K(d)(mono), and α). This model is based on fewer assumptions than previous models and can be used to describe exactly a broad range of experimental conditions. A series of curves illustrates the dependence of the equilibria upon the total concentrations of receptors and ligands, and the dissociation constants. We provide a set of guidelines for the design and analysis of experiments with a focus on estimating the binding constants from experimental binding isotherms. Two analytical equations relate the conditions for maximum aggregation in this system to the binding constants. This model is a tool to quantify the binding of immunoglobulins to antigens and a guide to understanding and predicting the experimental data of assays and techniques that employ immunoglobulins.

  11. Prediction and dissection of widely-varying association rate constants of actin-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiaodong; Zhou, Kenneth H; Qin, Sanbo; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Actin is an abundant protein that constitutes a main component of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. Its polymerization and depolymerization are regulated by a variety of actin-binding proteins. Their functions range from nucleation of actin polymerization to sequestering G-actin in 1∶1 complexes. The kinetics of forming these complexes, with rate constants varying at least three orders of magnitude, is critical to the distinct regulatory functions. Previously we have developed a transient-complex theory for computing protein association mechanisms and association rate constants. The transient complex refers to an intermediate in which the two associating proteins have near-native separation and relative orientation but have yet to form short-range specific interactions of the native complex. The association rate constant is predicted as k(a) = k(a0) e(-ΔG(el*)/k(B)T), where k(a0) is the basal rate constant for reaching the transient complex by free diffusion, and the Boltzmann factor captures the bias of long-range electrostatic interactions. Here we applied the transient-complex theory to study the association kinetics of seven actin-binding proteins with G-actin. These proteins exhibit three classes of association mechanisms, due to their different molecular shapes and flexibility. The 1000-fold k(a) variations among them can mostly be attributed to disparate electrostatic contributions. The basal rate constants also showed variations, resulting from the different shapes and sizes of the interfaces formed by the seven actin-binding proteins with G-actin. This study demonstrates the various ways that actin-binding proteins use physical properties to tune their association mechanisms and rate constants to suit distinct regulatory functions.

  12. Interactions of poly(amidoamine) dendrimers with human serum albumin: binding constants and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Jyotsnendu; Diallo, Mamadou S; Simpson, André J; Liu, Yi; Goddard, William A; Kumar, Rajeev; Woods, Gwen C

    2011-05-24

    The interactions of nanomaterials with plasma proteins have a significant impact on their in vivo transport and fate in biological fluids. This article discusses the binding of human serum albumin (HSA) to poly(amidoamine) [PAMAM] dendrimers. We use protein-coated silica particles to measure the HSA binding constants (K(b)) of a homologous series of 19 PAMAM dendrimers in aqueous solutions at physiological pH (7.4) as a function of dendrimer generation, terminal group, and core chemistry. To gain insight into the mechanisms of HSA binding to PAMAM dendrimers, we combined (1)H NMR, saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR, and NMR diffusion ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) of dendrimer-HSA complexes with atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of dendrimer conformation in aqueous solutions. The binding measurements show that the HSA binding constants (K(b)) of PAMAM dendrimers depend on dendrimer size and terminal group chemistry. The NMR (1)H and DOSY experiments indicate that the interactions between HSA and PAMAM dendrimers are relatively weak. The (1)H NMR STD experiments and MD simulations suggest that the inner shell protons of the dendrimers groups interact more strongly with HSA proteins. These interactions, which are consistently observed for different dendrimer generations (G0-NH(2)vs G4-NH(2)) and terminal groups (G4-NH(2)vs G4-OH with amidoethanol groups), suggest that PAMAM dendrimers adopt backfolded configurations as they form weak complexes with HSA proteins in aqueous solutions at physiological pH (7.4).

  13. Iron hexacyanide/cytochrome-C - intramolecular electron transfer and binding constants - (pulse radiolytic study). Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilan, Y.; Shafferman, A.

    Internal oxidation and reduction rates of horse cytochrome-c in the complexes, CII.Fe/sup III/(CN) -3 6 and CIII.Fe/sup II/(CN) -4 6 , are 4.6.10 4 s -1 and 3.3.10 2 s -1 , respectively. The binding sites of the iron hexacyanide ions on either CII or CIII are kinetically almost indistinguishable; binding constants range from 0.87.10 3 to 2.10 3 M -1 . The present pulse radiolytic kinetic data are compared with that from N.M.R, T-jump and equilibrium dialysis studies

  14. Computational Approaches to the Chemical Equilibrium Constant in Protein-ligand Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalvo-Acosta, Joel José; Cecchini, Marco

    2016-12-01

    The physiological role played by protein-ligand recognition has motivated the development of several computational approaches to the ligand binding affinity. Some of them, termed rigorous, have a strong theoretical foundation but involve too much computation to be generally useful. Some others alleviate the computational burden by introducing strong approximations and/or empirical calibrations, which also limit their general use. Most importantly, there is no straightforward correlation between the predictive power and the level of approximation introduced. Here, we present a general framework for the quantitative interpretation of protein-ligand binding based on statistical mechanics. Within this framework, we re-derive self-consistently the fundamental equations of some popular approaches to the binding constant and pinpoint the inherent approximations. Our analysis represents a first step towards the development of variants with optimum accuracy/efficiency ratio for each stage of the drug discovery pipeline. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Calculation of elastic constants of BCC transition metals: tight-binding recursion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, K.; Hamada, N.; Terakura, K.

    1984-01-01

    The elastic constants of BCC transition metals (Fe, Nb, Mo and W) are calculated by using the tight-binding d band and the Born-Mayer repulsive potential. Introducing a small distortion characteristic to C 44 (or C') elastic deformation and calculating the energy change up to second order in the atomic displacement, the shear elastic constants C 44 and C' are determined. The elastic constants C 11 and C 12 are then calculated by using the relations B=1/3(C 11 + 2C 12 ) and C'=1/2(C 11 -C 12 ), where B is the bulk modulus. In general, the agreement between the present results and the experimental values is satisfactory. The characteristic elasticity behaviour, i.e. the strong Nsub(d) (number of d electrons) dependence of the observed anisotropy factor A=C 44 /C', will also be discussed. (author)

  16. Determining the binding mode and binding affinity constant of tyrosine kinase inhibitor PD153035 to DNA using optical tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Chih-Ming [School of Dental Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30043, Taiwan (China); Lee, Yuarn-Jang [Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Wang, Wei-Ting [School of Dental Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Chien-Ting [Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Jing-Shin [School of Dental Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chien-Ming [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30043, Taiwan (China); Ou, Keng-Liang [Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); and others

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} PD153035 is a DNA intercalator and intercalation occurs only under very low salt concentration. {yields} The minimum distance between adjacent bound PD153035 {approx} 11 bp. {yields} Binding affinity constant for PD153035 is 1.18({+-}0.09) x 10{sup 4} (1/M). {yields} The change of binding free energy of PD153035-DNA interaction is -5.49 kcal mol{sup -1} at 23 {+-} 0.5 {sup o}C. -- Abstract: Accurately predicting binding affinity constant (K{sub A}) is highly required to determine the binding energetics of the driving forces in drug-DNA interactions. Recently, PD153035, brominated anilinoquinazoline, has been reported to be not only a highly selective inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor but also a DNA intercalator. Here, we use a dual-trap optical tweezers to determining K{sub A} for PD153035, where K{sub A} is determined from the changes in B-form contour length (L) of PD153035-DNA complex. Here, L is fitted using a modified wormlike chain model. We found that a noticeable increment in L in 1 mM sodium cacodylate was exhibited. Furthermore, our results showed that K{sub A} = 1.18({+-}0.09) x 10{sup 4} (1/M) at 23 {+-} 0.5 {sup o}C and the minimum distance between adjacent bound PD153035 {approx} 11 bp. We anticipate that by using this approach we can determine the complete thermodynamic profiles due to the presence of DNA intercalators.

  17. Signatures of van der Waals binding: A coupling-constant scaling analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yang; Schröder, Elsebeth; Hyldgaard, Per

    2018-02-01

    The van der Waals (vdW) density functional (vdW-DF) method [Rep. Prog. Phys. 78, 066501 (2015), 10.1088/0034-4885/78/6/066501] describes dispersion or vdW binding by tracking the effects of an electrodynamic coupling among pairs of electrons and their associated exchange-correlation holes. This is done in a nonlocal-correlation energy term Ecnl, which permits density functional theory calculation in the Kohn-Sham scheme. However, to map the nature of vdW forces in a fully interacting materials system, it is necessary to also account for associated kinetic-correlation energy effects. Here, we present a coupling-constant scaling analysis, which permits us to compute the kinetic-correlation energy Tcnl that is specific to the vdW-DF account of nonlocal correlations. We thus provide a more complete spatially resolved analysis of the electrodynamical-coupling nature of nonlocal-correlation binding, including vdW attraction, in both covalently and noncovalently bonded systems. We find that kinetic-correlation energy effects play a significant role in the account of vdW or dispersion interactions among molecules. Furthermore, our mapping shows that the total nonlocal-correlation binding is concentrated to pockets in the sparse electron distribution located between the material fragments.

  18. Completion of proteomic data sets by Kd measurement using cell-free synthesis of site-specifically labeled proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Majkut

    Full Text Available The characterization of phosphotyrosine mediated protein-protein interactions is vital for the interpretation of downstream pathways of transmembrane signaling processes. Currently however, there is a gap between the initial identification and characterization of cellular binding events by proteomic methods and the in vitro generation of quantitative binding information in the form of equilibrium rate constants (Kd values. In this work we present a systematic, accelerated and simplified approach to fill this gap: using cell-free protein synthesis with site-specific labeling for pull-down and microscale thermophoresis (MST we were able to validate interactions and to establish a binding hierarchy based on Kd values as a completion of existing proteomic data sets. As a model system we analyzed SH2-mediated interactions of the human T-cell phosphoprotein ADAP. Putative SH2 domain-containing binding partners were synthesized from a cDNA library using Expression-PCR with site-specific biotinylation in order to analyze their interaction with fluorescently labeled and in vitro phosphorylated ADAP by pull-down. On the basis of the pull-down results, selected SH2's were subjected to MST to determine Kd values. In particular, we could identify an unexpectedly strong binding of ADAP to the previously found binding partner Rasa1 of about 100 nM, while no evidence of interaction was found for the also predicted SH2D1A. Moreover, Kd values between ADAP and its known binding partners SLP-76 and Fyn were determined. Next to expanding data on ADAP suggesting promising candidates for further analysis in vivo, this work marks the first Kd values for phosphotyrosine/SH2 interactions on a phosphoprotein level.

  19. The –SH Protection Method for Determining Accurate Kd Values for Enzyme-Coenzyme Complexes of NAD+-Dependent Glutamate Dehydrogenase and Engineered Mutants: Evidence for Nonproductive NADPH Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Griffin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Inactivation rates have been measured for clostridial glutamate dehydrogenase and several engineered mutants at various DTNB concentrations. Analysis of rate constants allowed determination of Kd for each non-covalent enzyme-DTNB complex and the rate constant for reaction to form the inactive enzyme-thionitrobenzoate adduct. Both parameters are sensitive to the mutations F238S, P262S, the double mutation F238S/P262S, and D263K, all in the coenzyme binding site. Study of the effects of NAD+, NADH and NADPH at various concentrations in protecting against inactivation by 200 μM DTNB allowed determination of Kd values for binding of these coenzymes to each protein, yielding surprising results. The mutations were originally devised to lessen discrimination against the disfavoured coenzyme NADP(H, and activity measurements showed this was achieved. However, the Kd determinations indicated that, although Kd values for NAD+ and NADH were increased considerably, Kd for NADPH was increased even more than for NADH, so that discrimination against binding of NADPH was not decreased. This apparent contradiction can only be explained if NADPH has a nonproductive binding mode that is not weakened by the mutations, and a catalytically productive mode that, though strengthened, is masked by the nonproductive binding. Awareness of the latter is important in planning further mutagenesis.

  20. Binding Constant of Amines to Water/AOT/n-Hexene Reverse Micelles. Influence of the Chemical Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Silber

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of different amines between n-hexane bulk and the micellar pseudophase of AOT reverse micelles were measured by a fluorometric method. An independent method was used to corroborate the incorporation of the amines to the interface. The effect of the amine structure on the binding constant was analysed.

  1. Estimation of apparent binding constant of complexes of selected acyclic nucleoside phosphonates with beta-cyclodextrin by affinity capillary electrophoresis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šolínová, Veronika; Mikysková, Hana; Kaiser, Martin Maxmilian; Janeba, Zlatko; Holý, Antonín; Kašička, Václav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 2 (2016), s. 239-247 ISSN 0173-0835 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-17224S; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-01948S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : acyclic nucleoside phosphonates * affinity capillary electrophoresis * binding constant * nucleotide analogs * beta-cyclodextrin Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.744, year: 2016

  2. Binding constants of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands: A general theory corroborated by Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guang-Kui; Hu, Jinglei; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Weikl, Thomas R

    2015-12-28

    Adhesion processes of biological membranes that enclose cells and cellular organelles are essential for immune responses, tissue formation, and signaling. These processes depend sensitively on the binding constant K2D of the membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins that mediate adhesion, which is difficult to measure in the "two-dimensional" (2D) membrane environment of the proteins. An important problem therefore is to relate K2D to the binding constant K3D of soluble variants of the receptors and ligands that lack the membrane anchors and are free to diffuse in three dimensions (3D). In this article, we present a general theory for the binding constants K2D and K3D of rather stiff proteins whose main degrees of freedom are translation and rotation, along membranes and around anchor points "in 2D," or unconstrained "in 3D." The theory generalizes previous results by describing how K2D depends both on the average separation and thermal nanoscale roughness of the apposing membranes, and on the length and anchoring flexibility of the receptors and ligands. Our theoretical results for the ratio K2D/K3D of the binding constants agree with detailed results from Monte Carlo simulations without any data fitting, which indicates that the theory captures the essential features of the "dimensionality reduction" due to membrane anchoring. In our Monte Carlo simulations, we consider a novel coarse-grained model of biomembrane adhesion in which the membranes are represented as discretized elastic surfaces, and the receptors and ligands as anchored molecules that diffuse continuously along the membranes and rotate at their anchor points.

  3. Measurement of Nanomolar Dissociation Constants by Titration Calorimetry and Thermal Shift Assay – Radicicol Binding to Hsp90 and Ethoxzolamide Binding to CAII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilma Michailovienė

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of tight protein-ligand binding reactions by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC and thermal shift assay (TSA is presented. The binding of radicicol to the N-terminal domain of human heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90aN and the binding of ethoxzolamide to human carbonic anhydrase (hCAII were too strong to be measured accurately by direct ITC titration and therefore were measured by displacement ITC and by observing the temperature-denaturation transitions of ligand-free and ligand-bound protein. Stabilization of both proteins by their ligands was profound, increasing the melting temperature by more than 10 ºC, depending on ligand concentration. Analysis of the melting temperature dependence on the protein and ligand concentrations yielded dissociation constants equal to 1 nM and 2 nM for Hsp90aN-radicicol and hCAII-ethoxzolamide, respectively. The ligand-free and ligand-bound protein fractions melt separately, and two melting transitions are observed. This phenomenon is especially pronounced when the ligand concentration is equal to about half the protein concentration. The analysis compares ITC and TSA data, accounts for two transitions and yields the ligand binding constant and the parameters of protein stability, including the Gibbs free energy and the enthalpy of unfolding.

  4. Constant domains influence binding of mouse–human chimeric antibodies to the capsular polypeptide of Bacillus anthracis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Mark A; Thorkildson, Peter; Kozel, Thomas R; AuCoin, David P

    2013-01-01

    Our laboratory previously described the binding characteristics of the murine IgG3 monoclonal antibody (MuAb) F26G3. This antibody binds the poly-glutamic acid capsule (PGA) of Bacillus anthracis, an essential virulence factor in the progression of anthrax. F26G3 IgG3 MuAb binds PGA with a relatively high functional affinity (10 nM), produces a distinct “rim” quellung reaction, and is protective in a murine model of pulmonary anthrax. This study engineered an IgG subclass family of F26G3 mouse–human chimeric antibodies (ChAb). The F26G3 ChAbs displayed 9- to 20-fold decreases in functional affinity, as compared with the parent IgG3 MuAb. Additionally, the quellung reactions that were produced by the ChAbs all differed from the parent IgG3 MuAb in that they appeared “puffy” in nature. This study demonstrates that human constant domains may influence multiple facets of antibody binding to microbial capsular antigens despite their spatial separation from the traditional antigen-binding site. PMID:23863605

  5. Constant domains influence binding of mouse-human chimeric antibodies to the capsular polypeptide of Bacillus anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Mark A; Thorkildson, Peter; Kozel, Thomas R; AuCoin, David P

    2013-08-15

    Our laboratory previously described the binding characteristics of the murine IgG3 monoclonal antibody (MuAb) F26G3. This antibody binds the poly-glutamic acid capsule (PGA) of Bacillus anthracis, an essential virulence factor in the progression of anthrax. F26G3 IgG3 MuAb binds PGA with a relatively high functional affinity (10 nM), produces a distinct "rim" quellung reaction, and is protective in a murine model of pulmonary anthrax. This study engineered an IgG subclass family of F26G3 mouse-human chimeric antibodies (ChAb). The F26G3 ChAbs displayed 9- to 20-fold decreases in functional affinity, as compared with the parent IgG3 MuAb. Additionally, the quellung reactions that were produced by the ChAbs all differed from the parent IgG3 MuAb in that they appeared "puffy" in nature. This study demonstrates that human constant domains may influence multiple facets of antibody binding to microbial capsular antigens despite their spatial separation from the traditional antigen-binding site.

  6. Improved estimation of receptor density and binding rate constants using a single tracer injection and displacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syrota, A.; Delforge, J.; Mazoyer, B.M.

    1988-01-01

    The possibility of improving receptor model parameter estimation using a displacement experiment in which an excess of an unlabeled ligand (J) is injected after a delay (t D ) following injection of trace amounts of the β + - labeled ligand (J*) is investigated. The effects of varying t D and J/J* on parameter uncertainties are studied in the case of 11 C-MQNB binding to myocardial acetycholine receptor using parameters identified in a dog experiment

  7. dimensional KdV equation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    is to study the interaction properties between the periodic waves. Here, we take the (2+1)-dimensional KdV equation .... In fact, such limit for the present family of doubly periodic waves is especially rich, since one can proceed with the long .... ematical Society, Providence, 1997). [11] K Chandrasekharan, Elliptic functions ...

  8. SP-A binds alpha1-antitrypsin in vitro and reduces the association rate constant for neutrophil elastase

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    Carrabino Natalia

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background α1-antitrypsin and surfactant protein-A (SP-A are major lung defense proteins. With the hypothesis that SP-A could bind α1-antitrypsin, we designed a series of in vitro experiments aimed at investigating the nature and consequences of such an interaction. Methods and results At an α1-antitrypsin:SP-A molar ratio of 1:1, the interaction resulted in a calcium-dependent decrease of 84.6% in the association rate constant of α1-antitrypsin for neutrophil elastase. The findings were similar when SP-A was coupled with the Z variant of α1-antitrypsin. The carbohydrate recognition domain of SP-A appeared to be a major determinant of the interaction, by recognizing α1-antitrypsin carbohydrate chains. However, binding of SP-A carbohydrate chains to the α1-antitrypsin amino acid backbone and interaction between carbohydrates of both proteins are also possible. Gel filtration chromatography and turnover per inactivation experiments indicated that one part of SP-A binds several molar parts of α1-antitrypsin. Conclusion We conclude that the binding of SP-A to α1-antitrypsin results in a decrease of the inhibition of neutrophil elastase. This interaction could have potential implications in the physiologic regulation of α1-antitrypsin activity, in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema, and in the defense against infectious agents.

  9. Simple and rapid quantification of serotonin transporter binding using [11C]DASB bolus plus constant infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryglewski, G; Rischka, L; Philippe, C; Hahn, A; James, G M; Klebermass, E; Hienert, M; Silberbauer, L; Vanicek, T; Kautzky, A; Berroterán-Infante, N; Nics, L; Traub-Weidinger, T; Mitterhauser, M; Wadsak, W; Hacker, M; Kasper, S; Lanzenberger, R

    2017-04-01

    In-vivo quantification of serotonin transporters (SERT) in human brain has been a mainstay of molecular imaging in the field of neuropsychiatric disorders and helped to explore the underpinnings of several medical conditions, therapeutic and environmental influences. The emergence of PET/MR hybrid systems and the heterogeneity of SERT binding call for the development of efficient methods making the investigation of larger or vulnerable populations with limited scanner time and simultaneous changes in molecular and functional measures possible. We propose [ 11 C]DASB bolus plus constant infusion for these applications and validate it against standard analyses of dynamic PET data. [ 11 C]DASB bolus/infusion optimization was performed on data acquired after [ 11 C]DASB bolus in 8 healthy subjects. Subsequently, 16 subjects underwent one scan using [ 11 C]DASB bolus plus constant infusion with K bol 160-179min and one scan after [ 11 C]DASB bolus for inter-method reliability analysis. Arterial blood sampling and metabolite analysis were performed for all scans. Distribution volumes (V T ) were obtained using Logan plots for bolus scans and ratios between tissue and plasma parent activity for bolus plus infusion scans for different time spans of the scan (V T-70 for 60-70min after start of tracer infusion, V T-90 for 75-90min, V T-120 for 100-120min) in 9 subjects. Omitting blood data, binding potentials (BP ND ) obtained using multilinear reference tissue modeling (MRTM2) and cerebellar gray matter as reference region were compared in 11 subjects. A K bol of 160min was observed to be optimal for rapid equilibration in thalamus and striatum. V T-70 showed good intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) of 0.61-0.70 for thalamus, striatal regions and olfactory cortex with bias ≤5.1% compared to bolus scans. ICCs increased to 0.72-0.78 for V T-90 and 0.77-0.93 for V T-120 in these regions. BP ND-90 had negligible bias ≤2.5%, low variability ≤7.9% and ICCs of 0

  10. Comparative study of binding constants from Love wave surface acoustic wave and surface plasmon resonance biosensors using kinetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangdae; Kim, Yong-Il; Kim, Ki-Bok

    2013-11-01

    Biosensors are used in a variety of fields for early diagnosis of diseases, measurement of toxic contaminants, quick detection of pathogens, and separation of specific proteins or DNA. In this study, we fabricated and evaluated the capability of a high sensitivity Love wave surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor. The experimental setup was composed of the fabricated 155-MHz Love wave SAW biosensor, a signal measurement system, a liquid flow system, and a temperature-control system. Subsequently, we measured the lower limit of detection (LOD) of the 155-MHz Love wave SAW biosensor, and calculated the association and dissociation constants between protein G and anti-mouse IgG using kinetic analysis. We compared these results with those obtained using a commercial surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor. We found that the LOD of the SAW biosensor for anti-mouse IgG and mouse IgG was 0.5 and 1 microg/ml, respectively, and the resultant equilibrium association and dissociation constants were similar to the corresponding values obtaining using the commercial SPR biosensor. Thus, we conclude that the fabricated 155-MHz Love wave SAW biosensor exhibited the high sensitivity of the commercial SPR biosensor and was able to analyze the binding properties of the ligand and receptor by kinetic analysis similarly to the commercial SPR biosensor.

  11. Measurement of the Dissociation-Equilibrium Constants for Low Affinity Antibiotic Binding Interaction with Bacterial Ribosomes by the T2 (CPMG) and Line-Broadening Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdier, L.; Gharbi-Benarous, J.; Bertho, G.; Mauvais, P.; Girault, J.-P.

    1999-10-01

    In this study the dissociation constants of the low antibiotic-ribosomes interaction were determined by the T2 (CPMG), the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill spin-echo decay rate and the line-broadening methods. Three MLSB antibiotics were studied, a macrolide roxithromycin, a ketolide HMR 3647 and a lincosamide clindamycin for their weak interaction with three bacterial ribosomes, E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus sensitive and resistant to erythromycin. Nous avons mesuré la constante de dissociation, Kd correspondant à l'interaction faible antibiotique-ribosome bactérien pour des antibiotiques de différentes classes, un macrolide (roxithromycine), un kétolide (HMR 3647) et une lincosamide (clindamycine) avec des ribosomes de différentes souches bactériennes (E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus sensible ou résistant à l'erythromycin) par deux méthodes : l'une basée sur la variation des largeurs de raies et l'autre sur les temps de relaxation transversaux T2 en utilisant une séquence CPMG.

  12. Variation in DNA binding constants with a change in geometry of ternary copper(II) complexes with N2O donor Schiff base and cyanate or dicyanamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Subrata; Santra, Ramesh Chandra; Das, Saurabh; Chattopadhyay, Shouvik

    2014-09-01

    Two new copper(II) complexes, [Cu(L)(OCN)] (1) and [CuL(dca)]n (2), where HL = 2-(-(2-(diethylamino)ethylimino)methyl)naphthalen-1-ol, dca = N(CN)2-, have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-VIS spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Complex 1 has square planar and complex 2 square pyramidal geometries in solid state around metal centre. Interactions of the complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) were studied by UV-VIS spectroscopy. Binding constant and site size of interaction were determined. Binding site size and intrinsic binding constant K revealed complex 1 interacted with calf thymus DNA better than complex 2.

  13. Bihamiltonian Cohomology of KdV Brackets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carlet, G.; Posthuma, H.; Shadrin, S.

    2016-01-01

    Using spectral sequences techniques we compute the bihamiltonian cohomology groups of the pencil of Poisson brackets of dispersionless KdV hierarchy. In particular, this proves a conjecture of Liu and Zhang about the vanishing of such cohomology groups.

  14. Effect of halo-substituted aromatic salts on counterion binding constants obtained from cationic nanoparticle catalyzed reactions of piperidine and phenyl salicylate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagge, Ibrahim I.; Yusof, Nor Saadah M.; Zain, Sharifuddin Md; Khan, M. Niyaz

    2017-12-01

    Halo-substitutions at 3-position of benzene ring of the salts of aromatic carboxylate, MX, revealed the effect of two different halide ions (Br- and Cl-) on the counterion binding constants obtained from cationic nanoparticle catalyzed piperidinolysis of ionized phenyl salicylate (PhS-). The values of observed rate constant, kobs, determined at a constant total concentration of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, [CTABr]T, piperidine, ([P]T), [PhS-]T, NaOH, and various concentration of MX (MX = 3-BrC6H4CO2Na and 3-ClC6H4CO2Na), were determined using UV-visible X spectrophotometric technique at 35 °C and 370 nm. The average value of nanoparticle binding constant, KXBr, for X- = 3-BrC6H4CO2- (RXBr = 57) was found to be about 2-fold larger than that for X- = 3-ClC6H4CO2- (RXBr = 30). These XX values were dependent of substituents 3-Br and 3-Cl, and independent of [CTABr]T. Both are related to the presence of different extent of viscoelastic worm-like nanoparticles formation in the [CTABr]T of 6 and 10 mM.

  15. Size-exclusion chromatographic reconstitution of the bovine brain benzodiazepine receptor : Effects of lipid environment on the binding characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Viel, G.T; Yang, Q; Lundahl, P; Ensing, K; de Zeeuw, R.A

    1997-01-01

    The benzodiazepine receptor from calf brain was solubilized with sodium deoxycholate (2 mg/ml) in the presence of 0.5 M KCl and protease inhibitors, and bound flunitrazepam with an equilibrium dissociation constant (K-d) of 2.7+/-1.2 nM and with 0.40+/-0.04 pmol binding sites per mg protein (B-max).

  16. Single-experiment displacement assay for quantifying high-affinity binding by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainer, Georg; Keller, Sandro

    2015-04-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is the gold standard for dissecting the thermodynamics of a biomolecular binding process within a single experiment. However, reliable determination of the dissociation constant (KD) from a single titration is typically limited to the range 100 μM>KD>1 nM. Interactions characterized by a lower KD can be assessed indirectly by so-called competition or displacement assays, provided that a suitable competitive ligand is available whose KD falls within the directly accessible window. However, this protocol is limited by the fact that it necessitates at least two titrations to characterize one high-affinity inhibitor, resulting in considerable consumption of both sample material and time. Here, we introduce a fast and efficient ITC displacement assay that allows for the simultaneous characterization of both a high-affinity ligand and a moderate-affinity ligand competing for the same binding site on a receptor within a single experiment. The protocol is based on a titration of the high-affinity ligand into a solution containing the moderate-affinity ligand bound to the receptor present in excess. The resulting biphasic binding isotherm enables accurate and precise determination of KD values and binding enthalpies (ΔH) of both ligands. We discuss the theoretical background underlying the approach, demonstrate its practical application to metal ion chelation, explore its potential and limitations with the aid of simulations and statistical analyses, and elaborate on potential applications to protein-inhibitor interactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Solving (1,q) KdV gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montano, D.; Rivlis, G.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we explicitly compute the correlation functions of the (1, q) series of the KdV hierarchy, i.e. models with q-1 primary fields. We also find from algebraic considerations a ghost number conservation law for the (1, q) models. All the results in this paper follow from the algebraic properties of the KdV hierarchy without using any extraneous information from a field theory interpretation. We find the interesting result that some correlation functions vanish even when they conserve ghost number. This is an indication for further selection rules. (orig.)

  18. A model of mitochondrial creatine kinase binding to membranes: adsorption constants, essential amino acids and the effect of ionic strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedosov, Sergey; Belousova, Lubov; Plesner, Igor

    1993-01-01

    of mitCK adsorption capacity by another method at pH 7.4, when the enzyme is almost protonated, gave View the MathML source. The effect of ionic strength on mitCK adsorption may be described in terms of Debye-Hückel's theory for activity coefficients assuming the charges of the interacting species......The quantitative aspects of mitochondrial creatinekinase (mitCK) binding to mitochondrial membranes were investigated. A simple adsorption and binding model was used for data fitting, taking into account the influence of protein concentration, pH, ionic strength and substrate concentration...... on the enzyme adsorption. An analysis of our own data as well as of the data from the literature is consistent with the adsorption site of the octameric mitCK being composed of 4 amino acid residues with pK = 8.8 in the free enzyme. The pK value changes to 9.8 upon binding of the protein to the membrane. Lysine...

  19. HypCal, a general-purpose computer program for the determination of standard reaction enthalpy and binding constant values by means of calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Giuseppe; Gans, Peter; Sgarlata, Carmelo

    2016-09-01

    The program HypCal has been developed to provide a means for the simultaneous determination, from data obtained by isothermal titration calorimetry, of both standard enthalpy of reaction and binding constant values. The chemical system is defined in terms of species of given stoichiometry rather than in terms of binding models (e.g., independent or cooperative). The program does not impose any limits on the complexity of the chemical systems that can be treated, including competing ligand systems. Many titration curves may be treated simultaneously. HypCal can also be used as a simulation program when designing experiments. The use of the program is illustrated with data obtained with nicotinic acid (niacin, pyridine-3 carboxylic acid). Preliminary experiments were used to establish the rather different titration conditions for the two sets of titration curves that are needed to determine the parameters for protonation of the carboxylate and amine groups.

  20. Fast enantiomeric separation of uniconazole and diniconazole by electrokinetic chromatography using an anionic cyclodextrin: application to the determination of analyte-selector apparent binding constants for enantiomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Biosca, Y; García-Ruiz, C; Marina, M L

    2000-09-01

    The enantiomeric resolution of the fungicides uniconazole and diniconazole was performed using electrokinetic chromatography with cyclodextrins as pseudostationary phase (CD-EKC). A systematic evaluation of several chiral selectors was made. The anionic derivative carboxymethylated-gamma-cyclodextrin (CM-gamma-CD) was found to be the most appropriate for the enantioseparation of fungicides among all cyclodextrins tested. The influence of some experimental conditions such as nature and buffer pH, chiral selector concentration, and temperature on the enantiomeric separation of the compounds studied was also investigated. The use of a 50 mM phosphate buffer (pH 6.5) containing 5 mM CM-gamma-CD and a temperature of 50 degrees C enabled the baseline enantioresolution of mixtures of uniconazole and diniconazole in less than 5 min. In addition, apparent binding constants for each enantiomer-CM-gamma-CD pair at several temperatures, as well as thermodynamic parameters for binding were calculated.

  1. Vertical diffuse attenuation coefficient (Kd) based optical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    The optical classification of the different water types provides vital input for studies related to primary productivity, water clarity and determination of euphotic depth. Image data of the IRS-. P3 MOS-B, for Path 90 of 27th February, 1998 was used for deriving vertical diffuse attenuation coefficient (Kd) and an optical ...

  2. Isothermal titration calorimetry for drug design: Precision of the enthalpy and binding constant measurements and comparison of the instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkuvienė, Vaida; Krainer, Georg; Chen, Wen-Yih; Matulis, Daumantas

    2016-12-15

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is one of the most robust label- and immobilization-free techniques used to measure protein - small molecule interactions in drug design for the simultaneous determination of the binding affinity (ΔG) and the enthalpy (ΔH), both of which are important parameters for structure-thermodynamics correlations. It is important to evaluate the precision of the method and of various ITC instrument models by performing a single well-characterized reaction. The binding between carbonic anhydrase II and acetazolamide was measured by four ITC instruments - PEAQ-ITC, iTC200, VP-ITC, and MCS-ITC and the standard deviation of ΔG and ΔH was determined. Furthermore, the limit of an approach to reduce the protein concentration was studied for a high-affinity reaction (K d  = 0.3 nM), too tight to be measured by direct (non-displacement) ITC. Chemical validation of the enthalpy measurements is discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Adiabatic invariants of the extended KdV equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karczewska, Anna [Faculty of Mathematics, Computer Science and Econometrics, University of Zielona Góra, Szafrana 4a, 65-246 Zielona Góra (Poland); Rozmej, Piotr, E-mail: p.rozmej@if.uz.zgora.pl [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, University of Zielona Góra, Szafrana 4a, 65-246 Zielona Góra (Poland); Infeld, Eryk [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Hoża 69, 00-681 Warszawa (Poland); Rowlands, George [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7A (United Kingdom)

    2017-01-30

    When the Euler equations for shallow water are taken to the next order, beyond KdV, momentum and energy are no longer exact invariants. (The only one is mass.) However, adiabatic invariants (AI) can be found. When the KdV expansion parameters are zero, exact invariants are recovered. Existence of adiabatic invariants results from general theory of near-identity transformations (NIT) which allow us to transform higher order nonintegrable equations to asymptotically equivalent (when small parameters tend to zero) integrable form. Here we present a direct method of calculations of adiabatic invariants. It does not need a transformation to a moving reference frame nor performing a near-identity transformation. Numerical tests show that deviations of AI from constant values are indeed small. - Highlights: • We suggest a new and simple method for calculating adiabatic invariants of second order wave equations. • It is easy to use and we hope that it will be useful if published. • Interesting numerics included.

  4. The effect of dielectric constant on binding energy and impurity self-polarization in a GaAs-Ga1- x Al x As spherical quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mese, A. I.; Cicek, E.; Erdogan, I.; Akankan, O.; Akbas, H.

    2017-03-01

    The ground state, 1s, and the excited state, 2p, energies of a hydrogenic impurity in a GaAs-Ga1- x Al x As spherical quantum dot, are computed as a function of the donor positions. We study how the impurity self-polarization depends on the location of the impurity and the dielectric constant. The excited state anomalous impurity self-polarization in the quantum dot is found to be present in the absence of any external influence and strongly depends on the impurity position and the radius of the dot. Therefore, the excited state anomalous impurity self-polarization can give information about the impurity position in the system. Also, the variation of E_{b1s} and E_{b2p} with the dielectric constant can be utilized as a tool for finding out the correct dielectric constant of the dot material by measuring the 1s or 2p state binding energy for a fixed dot radius and a fixed impurity position.

  5. Characterizing low affinity epibatidine binding to α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Person Alexandra M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Along with high affinity binding of epibatidine (Kd1≈10 pM to α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR, low affinity binding of epibatidine (Kd2≈1-10 nM to an independent binding site has been reported. Studying this low affinity binding is important because it might contribute understanding about the structure and synthesis of α4β2 nAChR. The binding behavior of epibatidine and α4β2 AChR raises a question about interpreting binding data from two independent sites with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding, both of which can affect equilibrium binding of [3H]epibatidine and α4β2 nAChR. If modeled incorrectly, ligand depletion and nonspecific binding lead to inaccurate estimates of binding constants. Fitting total equilibrium binding as a function of total ligand accurately characterizes a single site with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding. The goal of this study was to determine whether this approach is sufficient with two independent high and low affinity sites. Results Computer simulations of binding revealed complexities beyond fitting total binding for characterizing the second, low affinity site of α4β2 nAChR. First, distinguishing low-affinity specific binding from nonspecific binding was a potential problem with saturation data. Varying the maximum concentration of [3H]epibatidine, simultaneously fitting independently measured nonspecific binding, and varying α4β2 nAChR concentration were effective remedies. Second, ligand depletion helped identify the low affinity site when nonspecific binding was significant in saturation or competition data, contrary to a common belief that ligand depletion always is detrimental. Third, measuring nonspecific binding without α4β2 nAChR distinguished better between nonspecific binding and low-affinity specific binding under some circumstances of competitive binding than did presuming nonspecific binding to be residual [3H]epibatidine binding after

  6. Quantification of transcription factor-DNA binding affinity in a living cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belikov, Sergey; Berg, Otto G; Wrange, Örjan

    2016-04-20

    The apparent dissociation constant (Kd) for specific binding of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and androgen receptor (AR) to DNA was determined in vivo in Xenopus oocytes. The total nuclear receptor concentration was quantified as specifically retained [(3)H]-hormone in manually isolated oocyte nuclei. DNA was introduced by nuclear microinjection of single stranded phagemid DNA, chromatin is then formed during second strand synthesis. The fraction of DNA sites occupied by the expressed receptor was determined by dimethylsulphate in vivo footprinting and used for calculation of the receptor-DNA binding affinity. The forkhead transcription factor FoxA1 enhanced the DNA binding by GR with an apparent Kd of ∼1 μM and dramatically stimulated DNA binding by AR with an apparent Kd of ∼0.13 μM at a composite androgen responsive DNA element containing one FoxA1 binding site and one palindromic hormone receptor binding site known to bind one receptor homodimer. FoxA1 exerted a weak constitutive- and strongly cooperative DNA binding together with AR but had a less prominent effect with GR, the difference reflecting the licensing function of FoxA1 at this androgen responsive DNA element. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Effect of physical properties of nanogel particles on the kinetic constants of multipoint protein recognition process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamoto, Masahiko; Hoshino, Yu; Miura, Yoshiko

    2014-02-10

    We report the effect of physical properties, such as flexibility and polymer density, of nanogel particles (NPs) on the association/dissociation rates constant (kon and koff) and equilibrium constants (Kd) of multipoint protein recognition process. NPs having different flexibilities and densities at 25 °C were synthesized by tuning cross-linking degrees and the volume phase transition (VPT) temperature. Rate constants were quantified by analyzing time course of protein binding process on NPs monitored by a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Both kon and koff of swollen phase NPs increased with decreasing cross-linking degree, whereas cross-linking degree did not affect kon and koff of the collapsed phase NPs, indicating that polymer density of NPs governs kon and koff. The results also suggest that the mechanical flexibility of NPs, defined as the Young's modulus, does not always have crucial roles in the multipoint molecular recognition process. On the other hand, Kd was independent of the cross-linking degree and depended only on the phase of NPs, indicating that molecular-scale flexibility, such as side-chain and segmental-mode mobility, as well as the conformation change, of polymer chains assist the formation of stable binding sites in NPs. Our results reveal the rationale for designing NPs having desired affinity and binding kinetics to target molecules.

  8. Acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) can mediate intermembrane acyl-CoA transport and donate acyl-CoA for beta-oxidation and glycerolipid synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, J T; Færgeman, Nils J.; Kristiansen, K

    1994-01-01

    The dissociation constants for octanoyl-CoA, dodecanoyl-CoA and hexadecanoyl-CoA binding to acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) were determined by using titration microcalorimetry. The KD values obtained, (0.24 +/- 0.02) x 10(-6) M, (0.65 +/- 0.2) x 10(-8) M and (0.45 +/- 0.2) x 10(-13) M respectivel...

  9. 2[125I]Iodomelatonin binding sites in spleens of guinea pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poon, A.M.S.; Pang, S.F.

    1992-01-01

    2-[ 125 I]Iodomelatonin was found to bind specifically to the membrane preparations of the spleens of guinea pigs with high affinity. The binding was rapid, stable, saturable and reversible. Scatchard analysis of the binding assays revealed an equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) of 49.8±4.12 pmol/l and binding site density (Bmax) of 0.69±0.082 fmol/mg protein at mid-light. There was no significant change in the Kd or the Bmax at mid-dark. Kinetic analysis showed a Kd of 23.13±4.81 pmol/l, in agreement to that derived from the saturation studies. The 2-[ 125 I]iodomelatonin binding sites have the following order of potency: 2-iodomelatonin > melatonin > 6-chloromelatonin much-gt N-acetylserotonin, 6-hydroxymelatonin > 5-methoxytryptamine, 5-methoxytryptophol > serotonin, 5-methoxyindole-3-acetic acid > 5-hydroxytryptophol, 3-acetylindole, 1-acetylindole-3-carboxyaldehyde, L-tryptophan > tryptamine, 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid. Differential centrifugation studies showed that the binding sites are localized mainly in the nuclear fraction, the rest are distributed in the microsomal fraction, mitochondrial fraction and cytosolic fraction. The demonstration of 2-[ 125 I]iodomelatonin binding sites in the spleen suggests the presence of melatonin receptors and a direct mechanism of action of melatonin on the immune system

  10. Vitelline coat of Unio elongatulus: III. Glycan chain analysis of the 220- and 180-kD components by means of lectins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focarelli, R; Leotta, F; Lampariello, R; Rosati, F

    1995-02-01

    Lectins of different binding specificity were used to analyze the oligosaccharide chains of the 220- and 180-kD proteins of the Unio elongatulus egg vitelline coat (vc). The lectins ConA and RCA1 reacted with both glycoproteins, and four other lectins reacted with one or other vc components. The lectin from Galanthus nivalis, which recognizes terminal mannose residues of N-linked high mannose type oligosaccharide chains, bound specifically to the 180-kD protein. Binding sites for this lectin were found throughout the vc of the differentiating oocyte and the mature egg. Lectins specific for the O-linked oligosaccharide chains, such as AIA and PNA, reacted only with the 220-kD protein species. Binding sites for these lectins were found only in the crater region. The presence of fucosyl residues on the glycan chains was investigated with lectins from Lotus tetragonolobus and Aleuria aurantia. The latter was positive on both glycoproteins, whereas LTA was only positive to the 220-kD species. The binding sites of both these lectins were in the same areas as those of PNA and AIA. These results suggest that while the 180-kD protein is part of the entire vc structure, the 220-kD protein is prevalently accumulated in the crater region. Since this is where sperm recognition and interaction take place, it has been suggested the 220-kD protein acts as a ligand molecule in the sperm-egg interaction.

  11. Simultaneous quantitation of 5- and 7-hydroxyflavone antioxidants and their binding constants with BSA using dual chiral capillary electrophoresis (dCCE) and HPLC with fluorescent detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo Markeb, Ahmad; Abo El-Maali, Nagwa

    2014-02-01

    In this article we present two novel uses of the sensitive techniques HPLC fluorescence and dCCE for both the quantitation and binding studies of the 5- and 7-HFs extracted from the plant Alfalfa with Albumin. Ultrasonic extraction method as an extra energy source is used to enhance the extraction efficiency and speed up. The two antioxidants could be easily separated and quantified after a 10.0-min run time. Multiple calibration curves for their analysis exhibited consistent linearity and reproducibility in the range of 0.20-2.00 mg L(-1) for 5-HF (r >0.9979) and 0.01-0.10 mg L(-1) for 7-HF (r >0.9999). Limits of Detection were 0.500 µg L(-1) and 0.025 µg L(-1) for 5-HF and 7-HF respectively. Lower Limits of Quantification were 131.600 µg L(-1) for 5-HF and 6.579 µg L(-1) for 7-HF. Inter-assay imprecision was <10% for both flavones. Mean recovery was 104.76% (range 90%-110%) for 5-HF and 93.18% (range 90%-110%) for 7-HF. Since the intermolecular hydrogen atom transfer in the excited triplet state as well as in the excited singlet state might play an important role in the quenching process of photo-excited molecules in biological systems, the binding constants of these HFs with serum albumin have been also estimated to be 1.910 - 2.019 × 10(5) L mol(-1) and 2.390 - 2.500 × 10(5) L mol(-1) for 5-HF and 7-HF respectively. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Variational iteration method for solving coupled-KdV equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assas, Laila M.B.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the He's variational iteration method is applied to solve the non-linear coupled-KdV equations. This method is based on the use of Lagrange multipliers for identification of optimal value of a parameter in a functional. This technique provides a sequence of functions which converge to the exact solution of the coupled-KdV equations. This procedure is a powerful tool for solving coupled-KdV equations

  13. Study of isomeric pentacyclic triterpene acids in traditional Chinese medicine of Forsythiae Fructus and their binding constants with β-cyclodextrin by capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Tingjun; Xu, Zhongqi

    2018-01-05

    In this study, a capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) method was first developed to identify three microconstituents of isomeric pentacyclic triterpene acids (PTAs including oleanolic acid (OA), ursolic acid (UA) and betulinic acid (BA)) in Forsythiae Fructus (FF). The baseline separation of PTAs by CZE were eventually achieved in a background electrolyte (BGE) containing 50.0 mmol/L borax and 0.5 mmol/L β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) at pH 9.5 within 13.0 min. Herein, it was not only the compositions of BGE were detail investigated for rapid and good separation, but also the binding ratio and the equilibrium constants (K) for OA, UA and BA with β-CD was estimated by double reciprocal equation to well understand the separation mechanism. The proposed method allowed the LODs of PTAs were averaged at 1.50 μg/mL with UV detection (at 200 nm). The interday RSD of migration time and peak area were around 2.0 and 4.7% (n = 5), respectively. Thus, the content of PTAs in 19 FF real samples distinguished from maturation stages and geographical areas in China was quantified with the proposed method. Depending on the amount of each PTA in FF, it was demonstrated these microconstituents might benefit to identify their harvested time even qualities. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Exact solutions for the Wick-type stochastic Kersten-Krasil'shchik coupled KdV-mKdV equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S.; Saha Ray, S.

    2017-11-01

    In this article, exact solutions of Wick-type stochastic Kersten-Krasil'shchik coupled KdV-mKdV equations have been obtained by using the Jacobian elliptic function expansion method. We have used the Hermite transform for transforming the Wick-type stochastic Kersten-Krasil'shchik coupled KdV-mKdV equation into a deterministic partial differential equation. Also, we have applied the inverse Hermite transform for obtaining a set of stochastic solutions in the white noise space.

  15. Integrating a Smartphone and Molecular Modeling for Determining the Binding Constant and Stoichiometry Ratio of the Iron(II)-Phenanthroline Complex: An Activity for Analytical and Physical Chemistry Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Morais, Camilo de L. M.; Silva, Se´rgio R. B.; Vieira, Davi S.; Lima, Ka´ssio M. G.

    2016-01-01

    The binding constant and stoichiometry ratio for the formation of iron(II)-(1,10-phenanthroline) or iron(II)-o-phenanthroline complexes has been determined by a combination of a low-cost analytical method using a smartphone and a molecular modeling method as a laboratory experiment designed for analytical and physical chemistry courses. Intensity…

  16. Division algebras and extended super KdVs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toppan, F. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao de Teoria de Campos e Particulas]. E-mail: toppan@cbpf.br

    2001-05-01

    The division algebras R, C, H, O are used to construct and analyze the N = 1, 2, 4, 8 supersymmetric extensions of the KdV hamiltonian equation. In particular a global N = 8 super-KdV system is introduced and shown to admit a Poisson bracket structure given by the 'Non-Associate N = 8 Superconformal Algebra'. (author)

  17. On complexly coupled modified KdV equations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We introduced complexly coupled modified KdV (ccmKdV) equations, which could be derived from a two-layer fluid model [Yang and Mao, Chin. Phys. Lett. 25, 1527. (2008); Hu, J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 43, 185207 (2009)], and used the Miura transforma- tion to construct expressions for their alternative Lax pair ...

  18. Division algebras and extended super KdVs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toppan, F.

    2001-05-01

    The division algebras R, C, H, O are used to construct and analyze the N = 1, 2, 4, 8 supersymmetric extensions of the KdV hamiltonian equation. In particular a global N = 8 super-KdV system is introduced and shown to admit a Poisson bracket structure given by the 'Non-Associate N = 8 Superconformal Algebra'. (author)

  19. Cardiospect (CS) in Pediatrics. Kawasaki Disease (KD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arevalo, J.S.; Gutierrez, C.T.; Palacio, G.; Lancheros, L.H.; Manosalva, J.O.

    2008-01-01

    The first publication of the EK was in the year 1967, by T. Kawasaki, referring to 50 cases and establishing clinical diagnostic criteria of the disease, including cardiac involvement. In 1968 T. Yamamoto published a series of cases of EK, in which 48% had electrocardiographic abnormalities, establishing that the cardiac involvement was a common occurrence in this disease. The international incidence is between 1 and 5 per 100 000 and mortality between 0.1% and 5% difference related to the study and better recognition and hence early and appropriate treatment in countries where EK is more frequent. Mortality is higher in men and in children under one year old. The cardiac manifestations are one of the most important EK: approximately 15-25% of untreated children develop coronary abnormalities, acute myocardial infarction and myocarditis. Studies of CS can be used to assess myocardial ischemia or viability within the context of stress with dipyridamole or rest study in patients with acute symptoms or follow-up post revascularization. Thus it follows a forecast or defining complications. We present the cases of three patients with KD seen in the past year at our institution who had related heart disease and who underwent CS studies. It describes the technical findings and local acquisition, processing and diagnostic and clinical relevance. (author) [es

  20. Side-chain interactions form late and cooperatively in the binding reaction between disordered peptides and PDZ domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haq, S Raza; Chi, Celestine N; Bach, Anders

    2012-01-01

    -limiting barrier for binding, in a cooperative fashion. This finding suggests that these disordered peptides first form a weak encounter complex with non-native interactions. The data do not support the recent notion that the affinities of intrinsically disordered proteins towards their targets are generally...... governed by their association rate constants. Instead, we observe the opposite for peptide-PDZ interactions, namely that changes in Kd correlate with changes in koff....

  1. Synthesis of Sulochrin-125I and Its Binding Affinity as α-Glucosidase Inhibitor using Radioligand Binding Assay (RBA Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Lestari

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Most of diabetics patients have type 2 diabetes mellitus or non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. Treatment type 2 diabetes mellitus can be done by inhibiting α-glucosidase enzyme which converts carbohydrates into glucose. Sulochrin is one of the potential compounds which can inhibit the function of α-glucosidase enzyme. This study was carried out to obtain data of sulochrin binding with α-glucosidase enzyme as α-glucosidase inhibitor using Radioligand Binding Assay (RBA method. Primary reagent required in RBA method is labeled radioactive ligand (radioligand. In this study, the radioligand was sulochrin-125I and prior to sulochrin-125I synthesis, the sulochrin-I was synthesized. Sulochrin-I and sulochrin-125I were synthesized and their bindings were studied using Radioligand Binding Assay method. Sulochrin-I was synthesized with molecular formula C17H15O7I and molecular weight 457.9940. Sulochrin-125I was synthesized from sulochrin-I by isotope exchange method. From the RBA method, dissociation constant (Kd and maximum binding (Bmax were obtained 26.316 nM and Bmax 9.302 nM respectively. This low Kd indicated that sulochrin was can bind to α-glucosidase

  2. The Calcium-Binding Activity of a Vacuole-Associated, Dehydrin-Like Protein Is Regulated by Phosphorylation1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyen, Bruce J.; Alsheikh, Muath K.; Smith, Elizabeth A.; Torvik, Carl F.; Seals, Darren F.; Randall, Stephen K.

    2002-01-01

    A vacuole membrane-associated calcium-binding protein with an apparent mass of 45 kD was purified from celery (Apium graveolens). This protein, VCaB45, is enriched in highly vacuolate tissues and is located within the lumen of vacuoles. Antigenically related proteins are present in many dicotyledonous plants. VCaB45 contains significant amino acid identity with the dehydrin family signature motif, is antigenically related to dehydrins, and has a variety of biochemical properties similar to dehydrins. VCaB45 migrates anomalously in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis having an apparent molecular mass of 45 kD. The true mass as determined by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization time of flight was 16.45 kD. VCaB45 has two characteristic dissociation constants for calcium of 0.22 ± 0.142 mm and 0.64 ± 0.08 mm, and has an estimated 24.7 ± 11.7 calcium-binding sites per protein. The calcium-binding properties of VCaB45 are modulated by phosphorylation; the phosphorylated protein binds up to 100-fold more calcium than the dephosphorylated protein. VCaB45 is an “in vitro” substrate of casein kinase II (a ubiquitous eukaryotic kinase), the phosphorylation resulting in a partial activation of calcium-binding activity. The vacuole localization, calcium binding, and phosphorylation of VCaB45 suggest potential functions. PMID:12376635

  3. Numerical simulation of a solitonic gas in KdV and KdV–BBM equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutykh, Denys, E-mail: Denys.Dutykh@univ-savoie.fr [LAMA, UMR 5127 CNRS, Université de Savoie, Campus Scientifique, 73376 Le Bourget-du-Lac Cedex (France); Pelinovsky, Efim, E-mail: pelinovsky@hydro.appl.sci-nnov.ru [Department of Nonlinear Geophysical Processes, Institute of Applied Physics, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Department of Applied Mathematics, Nizhny Novgorod State Technical University (Russian Federation); National Research University – Higher School of Economics (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-28

    The collective behaviour of soliton ensembles (i.e. the solitonic gas) is studied using the methods of the direct numerical simulation. Traditionally this problem was addressed in the context of integrable models such as the celebrated KdV equation. We extend this analysis to non-integrable KdV–BBM type models. Some high resolution numerical results are presented in both integrable and nonintegrable cases. Moreover, the free surface elevation probability distribution is shown to be quasi-stationary. Finally, we employ the asymptotic methods along with the Monte Carlo simulations in order to study quantitatively the dependence of some important statistical characteristics (such as the kurtosis and skewness) on the Stokes–Ursell number (which measures the relative importance of nonlinear effects compared to the dispersion) and also on the magnitude of the BBM term. - Highlights: • High-resolution simulations of a solitonic gas are presented. • Integrable and non-integrable cases are considered. • The effect of integrability was shown to be negligible. • Dependence of the statistical characteristics on the model parameters was studied.

  4. Lagrangian Approach to Dispersionless KdV Hierarchy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitava Choudhuri

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available We derive a Lagrangian based approach to study the compatible Hamiltonian structure of the dispersionless KdV and supersymmetric KdV hierarchies and claim that our treatment of the problem serves as a very useful supplement of the so-called r-matrix method. We suggest specific ways to construct results for conserved densities and Hamiltonian operators. The Lagrangian formulation, via Noether's theorem, provides a method to make the relation between symmetries and conserved quantities more precise. We have exploited this fact to study the variational symmetries of the dispersionless KdV equation.

  5. A 62-kD protein required for mitotic progression is associated with the mitotic apparatus during M-phase and with the nucleus during interphase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, J A; Sloboda, R D

    1992-11-01

    A protein of 62 kD is a substrate of a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase, and both proteins copurify with isolated mitotic apparatuses (Dinsmore, J. H., and R. D. Sloboda. 1988. Cell. 53:769-780). Phosphorylation of the 62-kD protein increases after fertilization; maximum incorporation of phosphate occurs during late metaphase and anaphase and correlates directly with microtubule disassembly as determined by in vitro experiments with isolated mitotic apparatuses. Because 62-kD protein phosphorylation occurs in a pattern similar to the accumulation of the mitotic cyclin proteins, experiments were performed to determine the relationship between cyclin and the 62-kD protein. Continuous labeling of marine embryos with [35S]methionine, as well as immunoblots of marine embryo proteins using specific antibodies, were used to identify both cyclin and the 62-kD protein. These results clearly demonstrate that the 62-kD protein is distinct from cyclin and, unlike cyclin, is a constant member of the cellular protein pool during the first two cell cycles in sea urchin and surf clam embryos. Similar results were obtained using immunofluorescence microscopy of intact eggs and embryos. In addition, immunogold electron microscopy reveals that the 62-kD protein associates with the microtubules of the mitotic apparatus in dividing cells. Interestingly, the protein changes its subcellular distribution with respect to microtubules during the cell cycle. Specifically, during mitosis the 62-kD protein associates with the mitotic apparatus; before nuclear envelope breakdown, however, the 62-kD protein is confined to the nucleus. After anaphase, the 62-kD protein returns to the nucleus, where it resides until nuclear envelope disassembly of the next cell cycle.

  6. Platelet [3H]imipramine binding in affective disorders: trait versus state characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, M.; Barkai, A.; Gruen, R.; Peselow, E.; Fieve, R.R.; Quitkin, F.

    1986-01-01

    Platelet [3H]imipramine binding (Bmax) was determined in 67 patients with major affective illness (33 euthymic bipolar, 34 depressed unipolar) and 58 normal control subjects. Bipolar patients had significantly lower Bmax values than did control subjects. The mean Bmax in the unipolar patients was lower than in the control subjects, but the difference was not statistically significant. Dissociation constant (Kd) values did not distinguish patients in either category from control subjects. The significantly lower Bmax in euthymic bipolar patients and the apparent state independence of Bmax in some but not all unipolar patients suggest that platelet imipramine binding may be a trait marker in a subset of affective disorders

  7. K&D Landscaping and Construction Information Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    K&D Landscaping and Construction (the Company) is located in Cazenovia, New York. The settlement involves renovation activities conducted at property constructed prior to 1978, located in Rochester, New York.

  8. Self-similar solutions for some nonlinear evolution equations: KdV, mKdV and Burgers equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. El-Wakil

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A method for solving three types of nonlinear evolution equations namely KdV, modified KdV and Burgers equations, with self-similar solutions is presented. The method employs ideas from symmetry reduction to space and time variables and similarity reductions for nonlinear evolution equations are performed. The obtained self-similar solutions of KdV and mKdV equations are related to Bessel and Airy functions whereas those of Burgers equation are related to the error and Hermite functions. These solutions appear as new types of solitary, shock and periodic waves. Also, the method can be applied to other nonlinear evolution equations in mathematical physics.

  9. Reactive transport model and apparent Kd of Ni in the near field of a HLW repository in granite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chuanhe; Samper, Javier; Luis Cormenzana, José; Ma, Hongyun; Montenegro, Luis; Ángel Cuñado, Miguel

    2012-12-01

    Current performance assessment models for radionuclide migration through the near field of high-level radioactive waste repositories often rely on the assumption of a constant Kd for sorption. The validity of such assumption is evaluated here with a reactive transport model for Ni2+ in the near field of a repository in granite. Model results show that Ni2+ sorbs mainly by surface complexation on weak sorption sites. The apparent Kd of Ni2+, Kda, depends on the concentration of dissolved Ni and pH and is constant only when the concentration of dissolved Ni is smaller than 10-6 mol/L. The results of the sensitivity runs show that Kda is sensitive to the water flux at the bentonite-granite interface, the effective diffusion of the bentonite and the concentration of weak sorption sites of the bentonite. The competition of other nuclides such as Cs+ on Ni2+ sorption is not important. Corrosion products, however, affect significantly the sorption of Ni2+ on the bentonite. The model with a constant Kd does not reproduce the release rates of Ni2+ from the bentonite into the granite. A model with a variable Kd which depends on the concentration of dissolved Ni2+ and pH may provide an acceptable surrogate of the multicomponent reactive transport model for the conditions of the repository considered in our model. Simulations using the Kd-approach were performed with GoldSim based on the interpolation in the pH and concentration table, while the reactive transport model simulations were performed with CORE2D which incorporates multisite surface complexation.

  10. Equilibrium and kinetics of Sin Nombre hantavirus binding at DAF/CD55 functionalized bead surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buranda, Tione; Swanson, Scarlett; Bondu, Virginie; Schaefer, Leah; Maclean, James; Mo, Zhenzhen; Wycoff, Keith; Belle, Archana; Hjelle, Brian

    2014-03-10

    Decay accelerating factor (DAF/CD55) is targeted by many pathogens for cell entry. It has been implicated as a co-receptor for hantaviruses. To examine the binding of hantaviruses to DAF, we describe the use of Protein G beads for binding human IgG Fc domain-functionalized DAF ((DAF)₂-Fc). When mixed with Protein G beads the resulting DAF beads can be used as a generalizable platform for measuring kinetic and equilibrium binding constants of DAF binding targets. The hantavirus interaction has high affinity (24-30 nM; k(on) ~ 10⁵ M⁻¹ s⁻¹, k(off) ~ 0.0045 s⁻¹). The bivalent (DAF)₂-Fc/SNV data agree with hantavirus binding to DAF expressed on Tanoue B cells (K(d) = 14.0 nM). Monovalent affinity interaction between SNV and recombinant DAF of 58.0 nM is determined from competition binding. This study serves a dual purpose of presenting a convenient and quantitative approach of measuring binding affinities between DAF and the many cognate viral and bacterial ligands and providing new data on the binding constant of DAF and Sin Nombre hantavirus. Knowledge of the equilibrium binding constant allows for the determination of the relative fractions of bound and free virus particles in cell entry assays. This is important for drug discovery assays for cell entry inhibitors.

  11. Nuclear constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foos, J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper is written in two tables. The first one describes the different particles (bosons and fermions). The second one gives the isotopes nuclear constants of the different elements, for Z = 1 to 56. (A.L.B.)

  12. Nuclear constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foos, J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper is written in two tables. The first one describes the different particles (bosons and fermions). The second one gives the isotopes nuclear constants of the different elements, for Z = 56 to 68. (A.L.B.)

  13. Nuclear constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foos, J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper is made of two tables. The first table describes the different particles (bosons and fermions) while the second one gives the nuclear constants of isotopes from the different elements with Z = 1 to 25. (J.S.)

  14. Nuclear constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foos, J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper is written in two tables. The first one describes the different particles (bosons and fermions). The second one gives the isotopes nuclear constants of the different elements, for Z = 56 to 68. (A.L.B.)

  15. Tissue specificity of endothelin binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolger, G.T.; Liard, F.; Krogsrud, R.; Thibeault, D.; Jaramillo, J. (BioMega, Inc., Laval, Quebec (Canada))

    1990-09-01

    A measurement was made of the binding of 125I-labeled endothelin (125I-ET) to crude membrane fractions prepared from rat aorta, atrium, ventricle, portal vein, trachea, lung parenchyma, vas deferens, ileum, bladder, and guinea-pig taenia coli and lung parenchyma. Scatchard analysis of 125I-ET binding in all tissues indicated binding to a single class of saturable sites. The affinity and density of 125I-ET binding sites varied between tissues. The Kd of 125I-ET binding was approximately 0.5 nM for rat aorta, trachea, lung parenchyma, ventricle, bladder, and vas deferens, and guinea-pig taenia coli and lung parenchyma, 1.8 nM for rat portal vein and atrium, and 3.3 nM for ileum. The Bmax of 125I-ET binding had the following rank order of density in rat tissues: trachea greater than lung parenchyma = vas deferens much greater than aorta = portal vein = atrium greater than bladder greater than ventricle = ileum. The properties of 125I-ET endothelin binding were characterized in rat ventricular membranes. 125I-ET binding was time dependent, reaching a maximum within 45-60 min at 25 degrees C. The calculated microassociation constant was 9.67 x 10(5) s-1 M-1. Only 15-20% of 125I-ET dissociated from its binding site even when dissociation was studied as long as 3 h. Preincubation of ventricular membranes with ET prevented binding of 125I-ET. 125I-ET binding was destroyed by boiling of ventricular membranes and was temperature, pH, and cation (Ca2+, Mg2+, and Na+) dependent.

  16. Quantifying high-affinity binding of hydrophobic ligands by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainer, Georg; Broecker, Jana; Vargas, Carolyn; Fanghänel, Jörg; Keller, Sandro

    2012-12-18

    A fast and reliable quantification of the binding thermodynamics of hydrophobic high-affinity ligands employing a new calorimetric competition experiment is described. Although isothermal titration calorimetry is the method of choice for a quantitative characterization of intermolecular interactions in solution, a reliable determination of a dissociation constant (K(D)) is typically limited to the range 100 μM > K(D) > 1 nM. Interactions displaying higher or lower K(D) values can be assessed indirectly, provided that a suitable competing ligand is available whose K(D) falls within the directly accessible affinity window. This established displacement assay, however, requires the high-affinity ligand to be soluble at high concentrations in aqueous buffer and, consequently, poses serious problems in the study of protein binding involving small-molecule ligands dissolved in organic solvents--a familiar case in many drug-discovery projects relying on compound libraries. The calorimetric competition assay introduced here overcomes this limitation, thus allowing for a detailed thermodynamic description of high-affinity receptor-ligand interactions involving poorly water-soluble compounds. Based on a single titration of receptor into a dilute mixture of the two competing ligands, this competition assay provides accurate and precise values for the dissociation constants and binding enthalpies of both high- and moderate-affinity ligands. We discuss the theoretical background underlying the approach, demonstrate its practical application to metal ion chelation and high-affinity protein-inhibitor interactions, and explore its potential and limitations with the aid of simulations and statistical analyses.

  17. The C-terminal portion of BM-40 (SPARC/osteonectin) is an autonomously folding and crystallisable domain that binds calcium and collagen IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, P; Hohenadl, C; Hohenester, E; Göhring, W; Timpl, R; Engel, J

    1995-10-20

    The extracellular glycoprotein BM-40 consists of three domains, an acidic domain I, a follistatin (FS)-like domain II and a calcium-binding EC domain with an EF-hand related motif. BM-40 and several other related proteins (QR1, SC1/hevin, testican and tsc-36/FRP) are members of a novel modular protein family that share the FS domain followed by an EC domain. We have expressed this pair of FS and EC domains (mutant delta I) and the calcium-binding EC domain alone (mutant delta I, II) of human BM-40 as recombinant proteins in human 293 cells. Circular dichroism demonstrated that both mutants were obtained as folded proteins with a distinct three-dimensional conformation. In addition, mutant delta I, II could be readily crystallized and diffraction patterns with a resolution limit of 2.4 A resolution were obtained. Calcium binding to this fragment was ten times weaker (Kd = 0.8 microM) than for the wild-type protein. Identical reversible increases in alpha-helicity upon calcium binding were observed for the 150-residue long mutant delta I, II and for BM-40 (286 residues). A 26-residue synthetic peptide corresponding to the EF-hand related motif exhibited much weaker calcium binding. The apparent dissociation constant decreased with increasing peptide concentration (from Kd 2.4 mM at 1 microM, to Kd 0.3 mM at 100 microM peptide concentration) and calcium binding was accompanied by dimerization of the peptide. This suggests that for strong calcium binding the EF-hand related motif has to be embedded into a larger protein domain that can form an autonomously folding protein module. The EC domain was also shown by surface plasmon resonance assay to be responsible for calcium-dependent binding to collagen IV with an affinity (Kd = 19 microM) only sixfold lower than that of intact human BM-40.

  18. Efficient Delaunay Tessellation through K-D Tree Decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morozov, Dmitriy; Peterka, Tom

    2017-08-21

    Delaunay tessellations are fundamental data structures in computational geometry. They are important in data analysis, where they can represent the geometry of a point set or approximate its density. The algorithms for computing these tessellations at scale perform poorly when the input data is unbalanced. We investigate the use of k-d trees to evenly distribute points among processes and compare two strategies for picking split points between domain regions. Because resulting point distributions no longer satisfy the assumptions of existing parallel Delaunay algorithms, we develop a new parallel algorithm that adapts to its input and prove its correctness. We evaluate the new algorithm using two late-stage cosmology datasets. The new running times are up to 50 times faster using k-d tree compared with regular grid decomposition. Moreover, in the unbalanced data sets, decomposing the domain into a k-d tree is up to five times faster than decomposing it into a regular grid.

  19. Alpha-amylase inhibitor, CS-1036 binds to serum amylase in a concentration-dependent and saturable manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Tomohiro; Kaneno-Urasaki, Yoko; Ito, Takashi; Kimura, Takako; Matsushima, Nobuko; Okabe, Hiromi; Yamasaki, Atsushi; Izumi, Takashi

    2014-03-01

    (2R,3R,4R)-4-hydroxy-2-(hydroxymethyl)pyrrolidin-3-yl 4-O-(6-deoxy-β-D-glucopyranosyl)-α-D-glucopyranoside (CS-1036), which is an α-amylase inhibitor, exhibited biphasic and sustained elimination with a long t1/2 (18.4-30.0 hours) in rats and monkeys, but exhibited a short t1/2 (3.7-7.9 hours) in humans. To clarify the species differences in the t1/2, the plasma protein binding of CS-1036 was evaluated by ultrafiltration. A concentration-dependent and saturable plasma protein binding of CS-1036 was observed in rats and monkeys with the dissociation rate constant (KD) of 8.95 and 27.2 nM, and maximal binding capacity (Bmax) of 52.8 and 22.1 nM, respectively. By the assessments of the recombinant amylase and immunoprecipitation, the major binding protein of CS-1036 in rats was identified as salivary amylase (KD 5.64 nM). CS-1036 also showed concentration-dependent and saturable binding to human salivary and pancreatic amylase, with similar binding affinity in rats. However, the protein binding of CS-1036 was constant in human plasma (≤10.2%) due to the lower serum amylase level compared with rats and monkeys. From the calculation of the unbound fraction (fu) in plasma based on in vitro KD and Bmax, the dose-dependent increase in fu after oral administration is speculated to lead to a dose-dependent increase in total body clearance and a high area under the curve/dose at lower doses, such as 0.3 mg/kg in rats.

  20. Kinetics of leptin binding to the Q223R leptin receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Verkerke

    Full Text Available Studies in human populations and mouse models of disease have linked the common leptin receptor Q223R mutation to obesity, multiple forms of cancer, adverse drug reactions, and susceptibility to enteric and respiratory infections. Contradictory results cast doubt on the phenotypic consequences of this variant. We set out to determine whether the Q223R substitution affects leptin binding kinetics using surface plasmon resonance (SPR, a technique that allows sensitive real-time monitoring of protein-protein interactions. We measured the binding and dissociation rate constants for leptin to the extracellular domain of WT and Q223R murine leptin receptors expressed as Fc-fusion proteins and found that the mutant receptor does not significantly differ in kinetics of leptin binding from the WT leptin receptor. (WT: ka 1.76×106±0.193×106 M-1 s-1, kd 1.21×10-4±0.707×10-4 s-1, KD 6.47×10-11±3.30×10-11 M; Q223R: ka 1.75×106±0.0245×106 M-1 s-1, kd 1.47×10-4±0.0505×10-4 s-1, KD 8.43×10-11±0.407×10-11 M. Our results support earlier findings that differences in affinity and kinetics of leptin binding are unlikely to explain mechanistically the phenotypes that have been linked to this common genetic variant. Future studies will seek to elucidate the mechanism by which this mutation influences susceptibility to metabolic, infectious, and malignant pathologies.

  1. Using nonequilibrium capillary electrophoresis of equilibrium mixtures (NECEEM) for simultaneous determination of concentration and equilibrium constant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanoatov, Mirzo; Galievsky, Victor A; Krylova, Svetlana M; Cherney, Leonid T; Jankowski, Hanna K; Krylov, Sergey N

    2015-03-03

    Nonequilibrium capillary electrophoresis of equilibrium mixtures (NECEEM) is a versatile tool for studying affinity binding. Here we describe a NECEEM-based approach for simultaneous determination of both the equilibrium constant, K(d), and the unknown concentration of a binder that we call a target, T. In essence, NECEEM is used to measure the unbound equilibrium fraction, R, for the binder with a known concentration that we call a ligand, L. The first set of experiments is performed at varying concentrations of T, prepared by serial dilution of the stock solution, but at a constant concentration of L, which is as low as its reliable quantitation allows. The value of R is plotted as a function of the dilution coefficient, and dilution corresponding to R = 0.5 is determined. This dilution of T is used in the second set of experiments in which the concentration of T is fixed but the concentration of L is varied. The experimental dependence of R on the concentration of L is fitted with a function describing their theoretical dependence. Both K(d) and the concentration of T are used as fitting parameters, and their sought values are determined as the ones that generate the best fit. We have fully validated this approach in silico by using computer-simulated NECEEM electropherograms and then applied it to experimental determination of the unknown concentration of MutS protein and K(d) of its interactions with a DNA aptamer. The general approach described here is applicable not only to NECEEM but also to any other method that can determine a fraction of unbound molecules at equilibrium.

  2. On the nonlinear stability of mKdV breathers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alejo Plana, Miguel Angel; Muñoz, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Breather modes of the mKdV equation on the real line are known to be elastic under collisions with other breathers and solitons. This fact indicates very strong stability properties of breathers. In this communication we describe a rigorous, mathematical proof of the stability of breathers under...

  3. Use of the harmonic mean to the determination of dissociation constants of stereoisomeric mixtures of biologically active compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara-Salazar, J Alberto; Quintana-Zavala, Delia; Jiménez-Vázquez, Hugo A; Trujillo-Ferrara, José

    2014-12-01

    Herein we introduce the derivation of a mathematical expression to evaluate the dissociation constant of a mixture of stereoisomers in equal amounts (KdMIX), when the corresponding dissociation constants (Kd) or medium response (MR50) of the pure stereoisomers are known; the final equation takes the form of the harmonic mean. In order to validate the equation, we carried out a bibliographic search of experimental data of enantiomeric molecules with biological activity, considering the Kd's or MR50's of the isolated enantiomers as well as that of the racemate. The comparisons between the experimental dissociation constants of the mixtures (KdEXP or MR50EXP) and the calculated values (KdMIX or MR50MIX) were consistent; the similarity between these values is supported through statistical analyses of group comparison and simple linear correlation. The equation we obtained, which corresponds to the harmonic mean, was used to predict the values of KdMIX (or MR50MIX) or Kd (or MR50) in systems when only two of the experimental values are known: either the dissociation constants of both enantiomers or the Kd (or MR50) of one of the enantiomers and dissociation constant of the racemate.

  4. Effects of sodium on cell surface and intracellular 3H-naloxone binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollack, A.E.; Wooten, G.F.

    1987-01-01

    The binding of the opiate antagonist 3 H-naloxone was examined in rat whole brain homogenates and in crude subcellular fractions of these homogenates (nuclear, synaptosomal, and mitochondrial fractions) using buffers that approximated intra- (low sodium concentration) and extracellular (high sodium concentration) fluids. Saturation studies showed a two-fold decrease in the dissociation constant (Kd) in all subcellular fractions examined in extracellular buffer compared to intracellular buffer. In contrast, there was no significant effect of the buffers on the Bmax. Thus, 3 H-naloxone did not distinguish between binding sites present on cell surface and intracellular tissues in these two buffers. These results show that the sodium effect of opiate antagonist binding is probably not a function of altered selection of intra- and extracellular binding sites. 17 references, 2 tables

  5. Cosmological constant as integration constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treder, H.-J.

    1994-08-01

    Einstein's field theory of elementary particles (Einstein 1919) yields black holes with a mass M approximately G-1 Lambda-1/2 c2 and a charge Q approximately G-1/2 Lambda-1/2 c2, their curvature radius is Lambda-1/2. Here Lambda is an integration constant of Einstein's 'trace-less' gravitation equations. The choice Lambda = G-1 h-1 c3 for this constant defines Planck ions and implies 'strong-gravity'. The choice Lambda = lambda = 3Hinf exp 2 c-2 (where Hinf means the Hubble parameter of a final de Sitter cosmos) involves 'weak-gravity' and describes an electro-vac spherical universe.

  6. Evidence that TP_0144 of Treponema pallidum is a thiamine-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Jiang; Tu, Youbin; Wang, Song-Mei; Wang, Xuan-Yi; Li, Chunhao

    2015-04-01

    Thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), the biologically active form of thiamine (also known as vitamin B1), is an essential cofactor for several important enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism, and therefore, it is required for all living organisms. We recently found that a thiamine-binding protein (TDE_0143) is essential for the survival of Treponema denticola, an important bacterial pathogen that is associated with human periodontitis. In this report, we provide experimental evidence showing that TP_0144, a homolog of TDE_0143 from the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum, is a thiamine-binding protein that has biochemical features and functions that are similar to those of TDE_0143. First, structural modeling analysis reveal that both TDE_0143 and TP_0144 contain a conserved TPP-binding site and share similar structures to the thiamine-binding protein of Escherichia coli. Second, biochemical analysis shows that these two proteins bind to TPP with similar dissociation constant (Kd) values (TDE_0143, Kd of 36.50 nM; TP_0144, Kd of 32.62 nM). Finally, heterologous expression of TP_0144 in a ΔTDE_0143 strain, a previously constructed TDE_0143 mutant of T. denticola, fully restores its growth and TPP uptake when exogenous thiamine is limited. Collectively, these results indicate that TP_0144 is a thiamine-binding protein that is indispensable for T. pallidum to acquire exogenous thiamine, a key nutrient for bacterial survival. In addition, the studies shown in this report further underscore the feasibility of using T. denticola as a platform to study the biology and pathogenicity of T. pallidum and probably other uncultivable treponemal species as well. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Characterization of melatonin binding sites in the Harderian gland and median eminence of the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Gonzalez, M.A.; Calvo, J.R.; Rubio, A.; Goberna, R.; Guerrero, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    The characterization of specific melatonin binding sites in the Harderian gland (HG) and median eminence (ME) of the rat was studied using [ 125 I]melatonin. Binding of melatonin to membrane crude preparations of both tissues was dependent on time and temperature. Thus, maximal binding was obtained at 37 degree C after 30-60 min incubation. Binding was also dependent on protein concentration. The specific binding of [ 125 I]melatonin was saturable, exhibiting only the class of binding sites in both tissues. The dissociation constants (Kd) were 170 and 190 pM for ME and HG, respectively. The concentration of the binding sites in ME was 8 fmol/mg protein, and in the HG 4 fmol/mg protein. In competition studies, binding of [ 125 I]melatonin to ME or HG was inhibited by increasing concentration of native melatonin; 50% inhibition was observed at about 702 and 422 nM for ME and HG, respectively. Additionally, the [ 125 I]melatonin binding to the crude membranes was not affected by the addition of different drugs such as norepinephrine, isoproterenol, phenylephrine, propranolol, or prazosin. The results confirm the presence of melatonin binding sites in median eminence and show, for the first time, the existence of melatonin binding sites in the Harderian gland

  8. A 39-kD plasma membrane protein (IP39) is an anchor for the unusual membrane skeleton of Euglena gracilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosiere, T.K.; Marrs, J.A.; Bouck, G.B.

    1990-01-01

    The major integral plasma membrane protein (IP39) of Euglena gracilis was radiolabeled, peptide mapped, and dissected with proteases to identify cytoplasmic domains that bind and anchor proteins of the cell surface. When plasma membranes were radioiodinated and extracted with octyl glucoside, 98% of the extracted label was found in IP39 or the 68- and 110-kD oligomers of IP39. The octyl glucoside extracts were incubated with unlabeled cell surface proteins immobilized on nitrocellulose (overlays). Radiolabel from the membrane extract bound one (80 kD) of the two (80 and 86 kD) major membrane skeletal protein bands. Resolubilization of the bound label yielded a radiolabeled polypeptide identical in Mr to IP39. Intact plasma membranes were also digested with papain before or after radioiodination, thereby producing a cytoplasmically truncated IP39. The octyl glucoside extract of truncated IP39 no longer bound to the 80-kD membrane skeletal protein in the nitrocellulose overlays. EM of intact or trypsin digested plasma membranes incubated with membrane skeletal proteins under stringent conditions similar to those used in the nitrocellulose overlays revealed a partially reformed membrane skeletal layer. Little evidence of a membrane skeletal layer was found, however, when plasma membranes were predigested with papain before reassociation. A candidate 80-kD binding domain of IP39 has been tentatively identified as a peptide fragment that was present after trypsin digestion of plasma membranes, but was absent after papain digestion in two-dimensional peptide maps of IP39. Together, these data suggest that the unique peripheral membrane skeleton of Euglena binds to the plasma membrane through noncovalent interactions between the major 80-kD membrane skeletal protein and a small, papain sensitive cytoplasmic domain of IP39

  9. Differential changes in atrial natriuretic peptide and vasopressin receptor bindings in kidney of spontaneously hypertensive rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogura, T.; Mitsui, T.; Yamamoto, I.; Katayama, E.; Ota, Z.; Ogawa, N.

    1987-01-01

    To elucidate the role of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and vasopressin (VP) in a hypertensive state, ANP and VP receptor bindings in spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) kidney were analyzed using the radiolabeled receptor assay (RRA) technique. Systolic blood pressure of SHR aged 12 weeks was statistically higher than that of age-matched Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. Maximum binding capacity (Bmax) of [ 125 I]-ANP binding to the SHR kidney membrane preparations was statistically lower than that of WKY rats, but dissociation constant (Kd) was not significantly different. On the other hand, Bmax of [ 3 H]-VP binding to the SHR kidney membrane preparations was statistically higher than that of WKY rats, but Kd were similar. Since the physiological action of ANP is natriuresis and VP is the most important antidiuretic hormone in mammalia, these opposite changes of ANP and VP receptor bindings in SHR kidney suggested that these peptides may play an important role in the pathophysiology of the hypertensive state, although it has not been confirmed as yet

  10. Affine Malcev algebra and N=8 KdV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toppan, F. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao de Teoria de Campos e Particulas]. E-mail: toppan@cbpf.br

    2001-09-01

    In this talk I report the results of two recent papers concerning the realization of the N = 8 supersymmetry from the division algebra of the octonions. At first I discuss a Sugawara realization for the 'Non-associative N = 8 SCA' in terms of a superaffinization of the algebra of octonions. Next, I discuss the fact that the N = 8 SCA provides a generalized Poisson brackets structure for an N = 8 super-KdV. (author)

  11. Ligand-receptor binding affinities from saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy: the binding isotherm of STD initial growth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, Jesús; Enríquez-Navas, Pedro M; Nieto, Pedro M

    2010-07-12

    The direct evaluation of dissociation constants (K(D)) from the variation of saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy values with the receptor-ligand ratio is not feasible due to the complex dependence of STD intensities on the spectral properties of the observed signals. Indirect evaluation, by competition experiments, allows the determination of K(D), as long as a ligand of known affinity is available for the protein under study. Herein, we present a novel protocol based on STD NMR spectroscopy for the direct measurements of receptor-ligand dissociation constants (K(D)) from single-ligand titration experiments. The influence of several experimental factors on STD values has been studied in detail, confirming the marked impact on standard determinations of protein-ligand affinities by STD NMR spectroscopy. These factors, namely, STD saturation time, ligand residence time in the complex, and the intensity of the signal, affect the accumulation of saturation in the free ligand by processes closely related to fast protein-ligand rebinding and longitudinal relaxation of the ligand signals. The proposed method avoids the dependence of the magnitudes of ligand STD signals at a given saturation time on spurious factors by constructing the binding isotherms using the initial growth rates of the STD amplification factors, in a similar way to the use of NOE growing rates to estimate cross relaxation rates for distance evaluations. Herein, it is demonstrated that the effects of these factors are cancelled out by analyzing the protein-ligand association curve using STD values at the limit of zero saturation time, when virtually no ligand rebinding or relaxation takes place. The approach is validated for two well-studied protein-ligand systems: the binding of the saccharides GlcNAc and GlcNAcbeta1,4GlcNAc (chitobiose) to the wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) lectin, and the interaction of the amino acid L-tryptophan to bovine serum albumin (BSA). In all cases, the

  12. Identification, characterization, and cloning of a complementary DNA encoding a 60-kd house dust mite allergen (Der f 18) for human beings and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Eric; Hunter, Shirley; Stedman, Kim; Dreitz, Steve; Olivry, Thierry; Hillier, Andrew; McCall, Catherine

    2003-07-01

    House dust mites of the Dermatophagoides genus are the most important cause of perennial allergic disease in both humans and companion animals. Although the major mite allergens for humans are proteins of relatively low molecular weight, this is not the case for dogs. Western blotting shows that canine anti-mite IgE responses are directed primarily toward proteins in the molecular weight range of 50 to 120 kd. The objectives of this study were to characterize a D farinae allergen with a molecular weight of approximately 60 kd and to isolate the cDNA coding for this allergen. A protein of apparent molecular weight of 60 kd was identified by Western blotting by using canine serum IgE from house dust mite-sensitized atopic dogs. The protein was purified from homogenized D farinae mite bodies by ammonium sulfate precipitation, followed by gel filtration and cation exchange HPLC. The presence of IgE directed to the 60-kd protein in sera from humans and dogs with dust mite allergy was measured by FcepsilonRIalpha-based ELISA. A cDNA encoding a full-length 60-kd protein was isolated from a D farinae cDNA library by a combination of both PCR amplification and hybridization screening. A panel of mAbs specific for the 60-kd protein was generated and used to localize the protein in whole body sections of D farinae mites. ELISA showed that the purified protein bound IgE in 54% of the sera from patients with D farinae allergy. In addition, the 60-kd protein was able to bind IgE in 57% to 77% of D farinae -sensitized dogs. A cDNA was isolated that encoded a protein of 462 amino acids, consisting of a 25 amino acid signal sequence and a 437 amino acid mature protein. The calculated molecular weight of the mature protein is 50 kd, and the amino acid sequence contains a single N-glycosylation site. A protein database search showed homology with multiple chitinases. A mAb specific for the 60-kd chitinase recognized the allergen in the mite digestive system, but fecal pellets did not

  13. Plasmon waveguide resonance spectroscopic evidence for differential binding of oxidized and reduced rhodobacter capsulatus cytochrome c(2) to the cytochrome bc(1) complex mediated by the conformation of the rieske iron-sulfur protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devanathan, S.; Salamon, Z.; Tollin, G.; Fitch, J.C.; Meyer, T.E.; Berry, E.A.; Cusanovich, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    The dissociation constants for the binding of Rhodobacter capsulatus cytochrome c2 and its K93P mutant to the cytochrome bc1 complex embedded in a phospholipid bilayer were measured by plasmon waveguide resonance spectroscopy in the presence and absence of the inhibitor stigmatellin. The reduced form of cytochrome c2 strongly binds to reduced cytochrome bc1 (Kd = 0.02 M) but binds much more weakly to the oxidized form (Kd = 3.1 M). In contrast, oxidized cytochrome c2 binds to oxidized cytochrome bc1 in a biphasic fashion with Kd values of 0.11 and 0.58 M. Such a biphasic interaction is consistent with binding to two separate sites or conformations of oxidized cytochrome c2 and/or cytochrome bc1. However, in the presence of stigmatellin, we find that oxidized cytochrome c2 binds to oxidized cytochrome bc1 in a monophasic fashion with high affinity (Kd = 0.06 M) and reduced cytochrome c2 binds less strongly (Kd = 0.11 M) but ∼30-fold more tightly than in the absence of stigmatellin. Structural studies with cytochrome bc1, with and without the inhibitor stigmatellin, have led to the proposal that the Rieske protein is mobile, moving between the cytochrome b and cytochrome c1 components during turnover. In one conformation, the Rieske protein binds near the heme of cytochrome c1, while the cytochrome c2 binding site is also near the cytochrome c1 heme but on the opposite side from the Rieske site, where cytochrome c2 cannot directly interact with Rieske. However, the inhibitor, stigmatellin, freezes the Rieske protein iron-sulfur cluster in a conformation proximal to cytochrome b and distal to cytochrome c1. We conclude from this that the dual conformation of the Rieske protein is primarily responsible for biphasic binding of oxidized cytochrome c2 to cytochrome c1. This optimizes turnover by maximizing binding of the substrate, oxidized cytochrome c2, when the iron-sulfur cluster is proximal to cytochrome b and minimizing binding of the product, reduced cytochrome c

  14. Characterization of heme binding to recombinant α1-microglobulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena eKarnaukhova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alpha-1-microglobulin (A1M, a small lipocalin protein found in plasma and tissues, has been identified as a heme and radical scavenger that may participate in the mitigation of toxicities caused by degradation of hemoglobin. The objective of this work was to investigate heme interactions with A1M in vitro using various analytical techniques and to optimize analytical methodology suitable for rapid evaluation of the ligand binding properties of recombinant A1M versions. Methods: To examine heme binding properties of A1M we utilized UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy, visible circular dichroism (CD, catalase-like activity, migration shift electrophoresis, and surface plasmon resonance (SPR, which was specifically developed for the assessment of His-tagged A1M. Results: The results of this study confirm that A1M is a heme binding protein that can accommodate heme at more than one binding site and/or in coordination with different amino acid residues depending upon heme concentration and ligand-to-protein molar ratio. UV/Vis titration of A1M with heme revealed an unusually large bathochromic shift, up to 38 nm, observed for heme binding to a primary binding site. UV/Vis spectroscopy, visible CD and catalase-like activity suggested that heme is accommodated inside His-tagged (tgA1M and tagless A1M (ntA1M in a rather similar fashion although the His-tag is very likely involved into coordination with iron of the heme molecule. SPR data indicated kinetic rate constants and equilibrium binding constants with KD values in a uM range. Conclusions: This study provided experimental evidence of the A1M heme binding properties by aid of different techniques and suggested an analytical methodology for a rapid evaluation of ligand-binding properties of recombinant A1M versions, also suitable for other His-tagged proteins.

  15. Automated evaluation of protein binding affinity of anti-inflammatory choline based ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Rosa; Pinto, Paula C A G; Azevedo, Ana M O; Bica, Katharina; Ressmann, Anna K; Reis, Salette; Saraiva, M Lúcia M F S

    2016-04-01

    In this work, an automated system for the study of the interaction of drugs with human serum albumin (HSA) was developed. The methodology was based on the quenching of the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA by binding of the drug to one of its binding sites. The fluorescence quenching assay was implemented in a sequential injection analysis (SIA) system and the optimized assay was applied to ionic liquids based on the association of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with choline (IL-API). In each cycle, 100 µL of HSA and 100 µL of IL-API (variable concentration) were aspirated at a flow rate of 1 mL min(-1) and then sent through the reaction coil to the detector where the fluorescence intensity was measured. In the optimized conditions the effect of increasing concentrations of choline ketoprofenate and choline naproxenate (and respective starting materials: ketoprofen and naproxen) on the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA was studied and the dissociation constants (Kd) were calculated by means of models of drug-protein binding in the equilibrium. The calculated Kd showed that all the compounds bind strongly to HSA (Kd<100 µmol L(-1)) and that the use of the drugs in the IL format does not affect or can even improve their HSA binding. The obtained results were compared with those provided by a conventional batch assay and the relative errors were lower than 4.5%. The developed SIA methodology showed to be robust and exhibited good repeatability in all the assay conditions (rsd<6.5%). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Generalized Miura transformations, two-bosons KP hierarchies and their reduction to KdV hierarchies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aratyn, H.; Ferreira, L.A.; Gomes, J.F.; Medeiros, R.T.; Zimerman, A.H.

    1993-02-01

    Bracket preserving gauge equivalence is established between several two-boson generated KP type of hierarchies. These KP hierarchies reduce under symplectic reduction (via Dirac constraints) to KdV and Schwarzian KdV hierarchies. Under this reduction the gauge equivalence is taking form of the conventional Miura maps between the above KdV type of hierarchies. (author). 16 refs

  17. A motion of spacelike curves in the Minkowski 3-space and the KdV equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Qing; Wang Wei; Wang Youde

    2010-01-01

    This Letter shows that soliton solutions to KdV equation describe a motion of spacelike curves in R 2,1 with initial data being suitably restricted. This gives a different geometric interpretation of KdV from that given recently by Musso and Nicolodi, and gives a unified geometric explanation for KdV and MKdV.

  18. Chicken liver TGGCA protein purified by preparative mobility shift electrophoresis (PMSE) shows a 36.8 to 29.8 kd microheterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, R A; Sippel, A E

    1987-12-10

    The TGGCA protein, the chicken homologue of HeLa cell NF-I, was purified to homogeneity from liver tissue by a procedure which includes preparative mobility shift electrophoresis (PMSE) as the final step. PMSE was here adjusted for the isolation of the TGGCA protein, but can be used as a general method to characterize the protein moiety of specific DNA-binding proteins. The TGGCA protein is a family of 6 protein species, which show minor differences in molecular weight from 36.8kd to 29.8kd. This microheterogeneity differs from the size distribution reported for HeLa cell NF-I polypeptides. All species of the TGGCA protein bind identically to a synthetic DNA-binding site and appear to be highly related in primary structure. We discuss the possible functional importance of this microheterogeneity.

  19. Binding of (/sup 3/H)imipramine to human platelet membranes with compensation for saturable binding to filters and its implication for binding studies with brain membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, O.M.; Wood, K.M.; Williams, D.C.

    1984-08-01

    Apparent specific binding of (/sup 3/H)imipramine to human platelet membranes at high concentrations of imipramine showed deviation from that expected of a single binding site, a result consistent with a low-affinity binding site. The deviation was due to displaceable, saturable binding to the glass fibre filters used in the assays. Imipramine, chloripramine, desipramine, and fluoxetine inhibited binding to filters whereas 5-hydroxytryptamine and ethanol were ineffective. Experimental conditions were developed that eliminated filter binding, allowing assay of high- and low-affinity binding to membranes. Failure to correct for filter binding may lead to overestimation of binding parameters, Bmax and KD for high-affinity binding to membranes, and may also be misinterpreted as indicating a low-affinity binding component in both platelet and brain membranes. Low-affinity binding (KD less than 2 microM) of imipramine to human platelet membranes was demonstrated and its significance discussed.

  20. Na-K pump site density and ouabain binding affinity in cultured chick heart cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobaugh, L.A.; Lieberman, M.

    1987-01-01

    The possible existence of multiple [ 3 H]ouabain binding sites and the relationship between ouabain binding and Na-K pump inhibition in cardiac muscle were studied using cultured embryonic chick heart cells. [ 3 H]ouabain bound to a single class of sites in 0.5 mM K (0.5 Ko) with an association rate constant (k+1) of 3.4 X 10(4) M-1.s-1 and a dissociation rate constant (k-1) of 0.0095 s. Maximal specific [ 3 H]ouabain binding RT to myocyte-enriched cultures is 11.7 pmol/mg protein and Kd is 0.43 microM in 0.5 Ko, whereas Kd,apparent is 6.6 microM in 5.4 Ko. The number of binding sites per myocyte was calculated by correcting for the contribution of fibroblasts in myocyte-enriched cultures using data from homogeneous fibroblast cultures (RT = 3.3 pmol/mg protein; Kd = 0.19 microM in 0.5 Ko). Equivalence of [ 3 H]ouabain binding sites and Na-K pumps was implied by agreement between maximal specific binding of [ 3 H]ouabain and 125 I-labeled monoclonal antibody directed against Na+-K+-ATPase (approximately 2 X 10(6) sites/cell). However, [ 3 H]ouabain binding occurred at lower concentrations than inhibition of ouabain-sensitive 42 K uptake in 0.5 Ko. Further studies in both 0.5 K and 5.4 Ko showed that ouabain caused cell Na content Nai to increase over the same range of concentrations that binding occurred, implying that increased Nai may stimulate unbound Na-K pumps and prevent a proportional decrease in 42 K uptake rate. The results show that Na-K pump inhibition occurs as a functional consequence of specific ouabain binding and indicate that the Na-K pump is the cardiac glycoside receptor in cultured heart cells

  1. Characterization of (/sup 3/H)paroxetine binding in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcusson, J.O.; Bergstroem, M.E.; Eriksson, K.; Ross, S.B.

    1988-06-01

    The binding of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin) uptake inhibitor (3H)paroxetine to rat cortical homogenates has been characterized. The effect of tissue concentration was examined and, with 0.75 mg wet weight tissue/ml in a total volume of 1,600 microliter, the binding was optimized with an apparent dissociation constant (KD) of 0.03-0.05 nM. Competition experiments with 5-HT, citalopram, norzimeldine, and desipramine revealed a high (90%) proportion of displaceable binding that fitted a single-site binding model. Fluoxetine and imipramine revealed, in addition to a high-affinity (nanomolar) site, also a low-affinity (micromolar) site representing approximately 10% of the displaceable binding. The specificity of the (3H)paroxetine binding was emphasized by the fact that 5-HT was the only active neurotransmitter bound and that the serotonin S1 and S2 antagonist methysergide was without effect on the binding. Both 5-HT- and fluoxetine-sensitive (3H)paroxetine binding was completely abolished after protease treatment, suggesting that the binding site is of protein nature. Saturation studies with 5-HT (100 microM) sensitive (3H)paroxetine binding were also consistent with a single-site binding model, and the binding was competitively inhibited by 5-HT and imipramine. The number of binding sites (Bmax) for 5-HT-sensitive (3H)paroxetine and (3H)imipramine binding was the same, indicating that the radioligands bind to the same sites. Lesion experiments with p-chloroamphetamine resulted in a binding in frontal and parietal cortices becoming undetectable and a greater than 60% reduction in the striatum and hypothalamus, indicating a selective localization on 5-HT terminals. Together these findings suggest that (3H)paroxetine specifically and selectively labels the substrate recognition site for 5-HT uptake in rat brain.

  2. CONSTANT LEVERAGE AND CONSTANT COST OF CAPITAL: A COMMON KNOWLEDGE HALF-TRUTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IGNACIO VÉLEZ-PAREJA

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Un enfoque típico para valorar flujos de caja finitos es suponer que el endeudamiento es constante (generalmente como un endeudamiento objetivo o deseado y que por tanto, el costo del patrimonio, Ke y el costo promedio ponderado de capital CPPC, también son constantes. Para los flujos de caja perpetuos, y con el costo de la deuda, Kd como la tasa de descuento para el ahorro en impuestos o escudo fiscal, Ke y el CPPC aplicado al flujo de caja libre FCL son constantes si el endeudamiento es constante. Sin embargo esto no es verdad para los flujos de caja finitos. En este documento mostramos que para flujos de caja finitos, Ke y por lo tanto el CPPC dependen de la tasa de descuento que se utiliza para valorar el ahorro en impuestos, AI y según lo esperado, Ke y el CPPC no son constantes con Kd como la tasa de descuento para el ahorro en impuestos, aunque el endeudamiento sea constante. Ilustramos esta situación con un ejemplo simple. Analizamos cinco métodos: el flujo de caja descontado, FCD, usando APV, el FCD y la formulación tradicional y general del CPPC, el valor presente del flujo de caja del accionista, FCA más deuda y el flujo de caja de capital, FCC.

  3. Evaluation of images in a DR system (KD-1000) with new photostimulable phosphors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshita, Hisashi; Kuranishi, Makoto; Nakamura, Mamoru; Kato, Syosuke; Matsui, Mitate.

    1994-01-01

    The Konica Direct Digitizer KD-1000 is a compact chest acquisition unit in digital radiography. The KD-1000 system uses a photostimulable phosphor detector (RbBr: Tl) and directly converts X-ray quantum into digitized information. We have studied the physical characteristics of the KD-1000, which consists of input-output relationship, spatial resolution and noise. Additionally, we have made a comparison of visual detectability between images from the KD-1000 system and those from a film/screen system (KO-380/HRL), which is used for chest radiography. We have quantified these basic characteristics and established the advantage of the KD-1000 system. (author)

  4. Evaluation of images in a DR system (KD-1000) with new photostimulable phosphors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshita, Hisashi; Kuranishi, Makoto; Nakamura, Mamoru; Kato, Syosuke (Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical Univ. (Japan). Hospital); Matsui, Mitate

    1994-01-01

    The Konica Direct Digitizer KD-1000 is a compact chest acquisition unit in digital radiography. The KD-1000 system uses a photostimulable phosphor detector (RbBr: Tl) and directly converts X-ray quantum into digitized information. We have studied the physical characteristics of the KD-1000, which consists of input-output relationship, spatial resolution and noise. Additionally, we have made a comparison of visual detectability between images from the KD-1000 system and those from a film/screen system (KO-380/HRL), which is used for chest radiography. We have quantified these basic characteristics and established the advantage of the KD-1000 system. (author).

  5. A finite element method for extended KdV equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karczewska Anna

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The finite element method (FEM is applied to obtain numerical solutions to a recently derived nonlinear equation for the shallow water wave problem. A weak formulation and the Petrov–Galerkin method are used. It is shown that the FEM gives a reasonable description of the wave dynamics of soliton waves governed by extended KdV equations. Some new results for several cases of bottom shapes are presented. The numerical scheme presented here is suitable for taking into account stochastic effects, which will be discussed in a subsequent paper.

  6. Constant Leverage And Constant Cost Of Capital: A Common Knowledge Half-Truth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Vélez–Pareja

    2008-04-01

    In this document we show that for finite cash flows, Ke and hence WACC depend on the discount rate that is used to value the tax shield, TS and as expected, Ke and WACC are not constant with Kd as the discount rate for the tax shield, even if the leverage is constant. We illustrate this situation with a simple example. We analyze five methods: DCF using APV, FCF and traditional and general formulation for WACC, present value of CFE plus debt and Capital Cash Flow, CCF.

  7. Abundant traveling wave solutions of the compound KdV-Burgers equation via the improved (G′/G-expansion method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasibun Naher

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we investigate the compound KdV-Burgers equation involving parameters by applying the improved (G′/G-expansion method for constructing some new exact traveling wave solutions including solitons and periodic solutions. The second order linear ordinary differential equation with constant coefficients is used, in this method. The obtained solutions are presented through the hyperbolic, the trigonometric and the rational functions. Further, it is significant to point out that some of our solutions are in good agreement for special cases with the existing results which validates our other solutions. Moreover, some of the obtained solutions are described in the figures.

  8. Binding of (3H)dihydroergocryptine to an alpha-adrenergic site in the stalk median eminence of the steer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H.T.; Roberts, J.M.; Weiner, R.I.

    1981-12-01

    Dihydroergocryptine (DHE), a potent dopamine agonist and alpha-adrenergic antagonist, has been used as a radioligand to characterize both dopamine and alpha-adrenergic receptors. In the present study, the binding of (3H)DHE to particulate fractions of the steer stalk median eminence was characterized using a filtration assay. Specific binding was defined by the presence of 10 microM phentolamine or by an iterative nonlinear hyperbolic curve-fitting program. Scatchard analysis of equilibrium isotherms of specific binding defined a single high affinity (Kd . 1.78 +/- 0.22 nM), saturable (maximum binding, 481 +/- 39 fmol/mg protein), stereoselective binding site. The Kd, calculated from the ratio of the rate constants k2 and k1, was 2.8 +/- 0.14 nM. The rank order of potency of agonists to compete for (3H)DHE binding (l-epinephrine greater than l-norepinephrine greater than dopamine greater than l-isoproterenol) was consistent with interactions at an alpha-adrenergic site. The rank order of potency of alpha-antagonists (phentolamine greater than yohimbine greater than prazosin) suggested that this was an alpha 2-adrenergic receptor. The affinity of dopamine agonists for the (3H)DHE-binding site was 10-fold lower relative to their potency at known dopamine receptors, while the affinity of dopaminergic antagonists was 100-fold lower. Furthermore, Scatchard analysis of specific (3H)DHE binding in the presence of a concentration of spiperone which should saturate dopamine receptors, only decreased the number of binding sites by 9%. These data demonstrate the presence of large numbers of alpha-adrenergic receptors in the stalk median eminence of the steer. Only a small number of dopaminergic binding sites for (3H)DHE appeared to be present.

  9. Germline transcription and switch recombination of a transgene containing the entire H chain constant region locus: effect of a mutation in a STAT6 binding site in the gamma 1 promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunnick, Wesley A; Shi, Jian; Graves, Kevin A; Collins, John T

    2004-11-01

    The switch (S) in H chain class is preceded by germline transcription and then mediated by a DNA recombination event. One of the impediments toward understanding the mechanism is the lack of a system in which a recombinant DNA molecule undergoes cytokine-regulated class S recombination. To study class S recombination, we used transgenic mice with a 230-kb bacterial artificial chromosome that included a rearranged VDJ gene and the entire murine H chain constant region locus. We found that both germline transcription and S recombination to the transgenic gamma1 H chain gene were regulated by IL-4 like that of the endogenous genes. In mice with two or more copies of the H chain locus transgene, both germline transcripts and S recombination took place at levels comparable to those from the endogenous loci. We also prepared a version of the transgene with a 4-bp mutation in a STAT6 binding site in the gamma1 promoter region. On the average, this mutation reduced germline transcription by 80%, but did not change the amount of S recombination in vitro. Among both the wild-type and mutant transgenes, we found no significant correlation between the amount of germline transcripts and the amount of S recombination. We infer that the physiologic level of germline transcription of the gamma1 gene is in excess over the amount required for efficient S recombination.

  10. High Affinity Binding of Indium and Ruthenium Ions by Gastrins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham S Baldwin

    Full Text Available The peptide hormone gastrin binds two ferric ions with high affinity, and iron binding is essential for the biological activity of non-amidated forms of the hormone. Since gastrins act as growth factors in gastrointestinal cancers, and as peptides labelled with Ga and In isotopes are increasingly used for cancer diagnosis, the ability of gastrins to bind other metal ions was investigated systematically by absorption spectroscopy. The coordination structures of the complexes were characterized by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS spectroscopy. Changes in the absorption of gastrin in the presence of increasing concentrations of Ga3+ were fitted by a 2 site model with dissociation constants (Kd of 3.3 x 10-7 and 1.1 x 10-6 M. Although the absorption of gastrin did not change upon the addition of In3+ ions, the changes in absorbance on Fe3+ ion binding in the presence of indium ions were fitted by a 2 site model with Kd values for In3+ of 6.5 x 10-15 and 1.7 x 10-7 M. Similar results were obtained with Ru3+ ions, although the Kd values for Ru3+ of 2.6 x 10-13 and 1.2 x 10-5 M were slightly larger than observed for In3+. The structures determined by EXAFS all had metal:gastrin stoichiometries of 2:1 but, while the metal ions in the Fe, Ga and In complexes were bridged by a carboxylate and an oxygen with a metal-metal separation of 3.0-3.3 Å, the Ru complex clearly demonstrated a short range Ru-Ru separation, which was significantly shorter, at 2.4 Å, indicative of a metal-metal bond. We conclude that gastrin selectively binds two In3+ or Ru3+ ions, and that the affinity of the first site for In3+ or Ru3+ ions is higher than for ferric ions. Some of the metal ion-gastrin complexes may be useful for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  11. Painleve analysis and new analytical solutions for compound KdV-Burgers equation with variable coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abourabia, A.M.; Hassan, K.M.; Selima, E.S.

    2010-01-01

    We consider the solutions of the compound Korteweg-de Vries (KdV)-Burgers equation with variable coefficients (vccKdV-B) that describe the propagation of undulant bores in shallow water with certain dissipative effects. The Weiss-Tabor-Carnevale (WTC)-Kruskal algorithm is applied to study the integrability of the vccKdV-B equation. We found that the vccKdV-B equation is not Painleve integrable unless the variable coefficients satisfy certain constraints. We used the outcome of the truncated Painleve expansion to construct the Backlund transformation, and three families of new analytical solutions for the vccKdV-B equation are obtained. The dispersion relation and its characteristics are illustrated. The stability for the vccKdV-B equation is analyzed by using the phase portrait method. (author)

  12. Painleve analysis and new analytical solutions for compound KdV-Burgers equation with variable coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abourabia, A.M.; Hassan, K.M.; Selima, E.S., E-mail: am_abourabia@yahoo.com [Menoufiya Univ., Faculty of Science, Dept. of Mathematics, Shebin El-koom (Egypt)

    2010-03-15

    We consider the solutions of the compound Korteweg-de Vries (KdV)-Burgers equation with variable coefficients (vccKdV-B) that describe the propagation of undulant bores in shallow water with certain dissipative effects. The Weiss-Tabor-Carnevale (WTC)-Kruskal algorithm is applied to study the integrability of the vccKdV-B equation. We found that the vccKdV-B equation is not Painleve integrable unless the variable coefficients satisfy certain constraints. We used the outcome of the truncated Painleve expansion to construct the Backlund transformation, and three families of new analytical solutions for the vccKdV-B equation are obtained. The dispersion relation and its characteristics are illustrated. The stability for the vccKdV-B equation is analyzed by using the phase portrait method. (author)

  13. A Super mKdV Equation: Bosonization, Painlevé Property and Exact Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Bo; Lou, Sen-Yue

    2018-04-01

    The symmetry of the fermionic field is obtained by means of the Lax pair of the mKdV equation. A new super mKdV equation is constructed by virtue of the symmetry of the fermionic form. The super mKdV system is changed to a system of coupled bosonic equations with the bosonization approach. The bosonized SmKdV (BSmKdV) equation admits Painlevé property by the standard singularity analysis. The traveling wave solutions of the BSmKdV system are presented by the mapping and deformation method. We also provide other ideas to construct new super integrable systems. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11775146, 11435005, and 11472177, Shanghai Knowledge Service Platform for Trustworthy Internet of Things under Grant No. ZF1213 and K. C. Wong Magna Fund in Ningbo University

  14. Motion of curves and solutions of two multi-component mKdV equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Ruoxia; Qu Changzheng; Li Zhibin

    2005-01-01

    Two classes of multi-component mKdV equations have been shown to be integrable. One class called the multi-component geometric mKdV equation is exactly the system for curvatures of curves when the motion of the curves is governed by the mKdV flow. In this paper, exact solutions including solitary wave solutions of the two- and three-component mKdV equations are obtained, the symmetry reductions of the two-component geometric mKdV equation to ODE systems corresponding to it's Lie point symmetry groups are also given. Curves and their behavior corresponding to solitary wave solutions of the two-component geometric mKdV equation are presented

  15. Measurement of binding of ascorbic acid to myrosinase by rate of dialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtsuru, Masaru; Hata, Tadao

    1975-01-01

    The activation mechanism of myrosinase by L-ascorbic acid depends on the slight conformational change of enzyme protein induced by ascorbic acid. Ascorbic acid binds to enzyme like Michaelis-complex, and then the value of Km had been evaluated to be 1 x 10 -3 M. The authors determined the binding constant and the number of binding sites using dialysis rate technique. Rate dialysis was carried out with a dialysis cell, and the ordinary cellophane tubing membrane was used. ( 14 C) - ascorbic acid was added, and counted by liquid scintillation counting. By the time course of two dialysis rate measurement with and without enzyme. The concentrations of free and bound ascorbic acids were counted. From the results, the enzyme was activated to the maximum level at 10 -3 M of ascorbic acid, and four molecules of ascorbic acid bound to the enzyme on Kd=0.1x10 -4 M. However, when more than 4 molecules of L-ascorbic acid bound to the enzyme, Kd increased to 0.9x10 -4 M, and L-ascorbic acid acted as an inhibitor. (Kubatake, H.)

  16. Predicting Allosteric Effects from Orthosteric Binding in Hsp90-Ligand Interactions: Implications for Fragment-Based Drug Design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Chandramohan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A key question in mapping dynamics of protein-ligand interactions is to distinguish changes at binding sites from those associated with long range conformational changes upon binding at distal sites. This assumes a greater challenge when considering the interactions of low affinity ligands (dissociation constants, KD, in the μM range or lower. Amide hydrogen deuterium Exchange mass spectrometry (HDXMS is a robust method that can provide both structural insights and dynamics information on both high affinity and transient protein-ligand interactions. In this study, an application of HDXMS for probing the dynamics of low affinity ligands to proteins is described using the N-terminal ATPase domain of Hsp90. Comparison of Hsp90 dynamics between high affinity natural inhibitors (KD ~ nM and fragment compounds reveal that HDXMS is highly sensitive in mapping the interactions of both high and low affinity ligands. HDXMS reports on changes that reflect both orthosteric effects and allosteric changes accompanying binding. Orthosteric sites can be identified by overlaying HDXMS onto structural information of protein-ligand complexes. Regions distal to orthosteric sites indicate long range conformational changes with implications for allostery. HDXMS, thus finds powerful utility as a high throughput method for compound library screening to identify binding sites and describe allostery with important implications for fragment-based ligand discovery (FBLD.

  17. An application of the decomposition method for the generalized KdV and RLW equations

    CERN Document Server

    Kaya, D

    2003-01-01

    We consider solitary-wave solutions of the generalized regularized long-wave (RLW) and Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations. We prove the convergence of Adomian decomposition method applied to the generalized RLW and KdV equations. Then we obtain the exact solitary-wave solutions and numerical solutions of the generalized RLW and KdV equations for the initial conditions. The numerical solutions are compared with the known analytical solutions. Their remarkable accuracy are finally demonstrated for the generalized RLW and KdV equations.

  18. Extending the field of view of KD/asterisk/P electrooptic modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, E. A.

    1978-01-01

    The use of KD(asterisk)P as a polarization rotator has been limited to small field of view instruments. To investigate this limitation, the index ellipsoid is used to describe the optical properties of KD(asterisk)P and to calculate the retardance and fast axis as a function of the angle of incidence and voltage. Computed converging light patterns are then compared with observed intensity patterns formed by KD(asterisk)P. Finally, computed intensity patterns are used to demonstrate how the field of view of KD(asterisk)P can be increased when properly aligned with a positive uniaxial crystal.

  19. Over-expression of KdSOC1 gene affected plantlet morphogenesis in Kalanchoe daigremontiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chen; Wang, Li; Chen, Jinhua; Liu, Chenglan; Zeng, Huiming; Wang, Huafang

    2017-07-17

    Kalanchoe daigremontiana reproduces asexually by producing plantlets along the leaf margin. The aim of this study was to identify the function of the SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS 1 gene in Kalanchoe daigremontiana (KdSOC1) during plantlet morphogenesis. In this study, KdSOC1 gene expression was detected at stem cell niche during in vitro somatic embryogenesis and plantlet morphogenesis. Disrupting endogenous auxin transportation suppressed the KdSOC1 gene response. Knockdown of the KdSOC1 gene caused a defect in cotyledon formation during the early heart stage of somatic embryogenesis. Over-expression (OE) of the KdSOC1 gene resulted in asymmetric plantlet distribution, a reduced number of plantlets, thicker leaves, and thicker vascular fibers. Higher KdPIN1 gene expression and auxin content were found in OE plant compared to those of wild-type plant leaves, which indicated possible KdSOC1 gene role in affecting auxin distribution and accumulation. KdSOC1 gene OE in DR5-GUS Arabidopsis reporting lines resulted in an abnormal auxin response pattern during different stages of somatic embryogenesis. In summary, the KdSOC1 gene OE might alter auxin distribution and accumulation along leaf margin to initiate plantlet formation and distribution, which is crucial for plasticity during plantlet formation under various environmental conditions.

  20. Evaluation of kinetic constants of biomolecular interaction on optical surface plasmon resonance sensor with Newton Iteration Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Guoliang; Hu, Jiandong; Hu, Fengjiang; Wei, Jianguang; Shi, Liang

    2010-10-01

    In the immunology, there are two important types of biomolecular interaction: antigens-antibodies and receptors-ligands. Monitoring the response rate and affinity of biomolecular interaction can help analyze the protein function, drug discover, genomics and proteomics research. Moreover the association rate constant and dissociation rate constant of receptors-ligands are the important parameters for the study of signal transmission between cells. Recent advances in bioanalyzer instruments have greatly simplified the measurement of the kinetics of molecular interactions. Non-destructive and real-time monitoring the response to evaluate the parameters between antigens and antibodies can be performed by using optical surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor technology. This technology provides a quantitative analysis that is carried out rapidly with label-free high-throughput detection using the binding curves of antigens-antibodies. Consequently, the kinetic parameters of interaction between antigens and antibodies can be obtained. This article presents a low cost integrated SPR-based bioanalyzer (HPSPR-6000) designed by ourselves. This bioanalyzer is mainly composed of a biosensor TSPR1K23, a touch-screen monitor, a microprocessor PIC24F128, a microflow cell with three channels, a clamp and a photoelectric conversion device. To obtain the kinetic parameters, sensorgrams may be modeled using one of several binding models provided with BIAevaluation software 3.0, SensiQ or Autolab. This allows calculation of the association rate constant (ka) and the dissociation rate constant (kd). The ratio of ka to kd can be used to estimate the equilibrium constant. Another kind is the analysis software OriginPro, which can process the obtained data by nonlinear fitting and then get some correlative parameters, but it can't be embedded into the bioanalyzer, so the bioanalyzer don't support the use of OriginPro. This paper proposes a novel method to evaluate the kinetic parameters

  1. Circumsporozoite Protein-Specific Kd-Restricted CD8+ T Cells Mediate Protective Antimalaria Immunity in Sporozoite-Immunized MHC-I-Kd Transgenic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the roles of CD8+ T cells and a major preerythrocytic antigen, the circumsporozoite (CS protein, in contributing protective antimalaria immunity induced by radiation-attenuated sporozoites, have been shown by a number of studies, the extent to which these players contribute to antimalaria immunity is still unknown. To address this question, we have generated C57BL/6 (B6 transgenic (Tg mice, expressing Kd molecules under the MHC-I promoter, called MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice. In this study, we first determined that a single immunizing dose of IrPySpz induced a significant level of antimalaria protective immunity in MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice but not in B6 mice. Then, by depleting various T-cell subsets in vivo, we determined that CD8+ T cells are the main mediator of the protective immunity induced by IrPySpz. Furthermore, when we immunized (MHC-I-Kd-Tg × CS-Tg F1 mice with IrPySpz after crossing MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice with PyCS-transgenic mice (CS-Tg, which are unable to mount PyCS-specific immunity, we found that IrPySpz immunization failed to induce protective antimalaria immunity in (MHC-I-Kd-Tg × CS-Tg F1 mice, thus indicating the absence of PyCS antigen-dependent immunity in these mice. These results indicate that protective antimalaria immunity induced by IrPySpz in MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice is mediated by CS protein-specific, Kd-restricted CD8+ T cells.

  2. Anomalous DNA binding by E2 regulatory protein driven by spacer sequence TATA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Zhiqun; Zhang, Yongli; Hegde, Rashmi S; Shakked, Zippora; Crothers, Donald M

    2010-06-01

    We have investigated the anomalously weak binding of human papillomavirus (HPV) regulatory protein E2 to a DNA target containing the spacer sequence TATA. Experiments in magnesium (Mg(2+)) and calcium (Ca(2+)) ion buffers revealed a marked reduction in cutting by DNase I at the CpG sequence in the protein-binding site 3' to the TATA spacer sequence, Studies of the cation dependence of DNA-E2 affinities showed that upon E2 binding the TATA sequence releases approximately twice as many Mg(2+) ions as the average of the other spacer sequences. Binding experiments for TATA spacer relative to ATAT showed that in potassium ion (K(+)) the E2 affinity of the two sequences is nearly equal, but the relative dissociation constant (K(d)) for TATA increases in the order K(+ )TATA relative to ATAT is independent of ion concentration, whereas for Mg(2+) the affinity for TATA drops sharply as ion concentration increases. Thus, ions of increasing positive charge density increasingly distort the E2 binding site, weakening the affinity for protein. In the case of Mg(2+), additional ions are bound to TATA that require displacement for protein binding. We suggest that the TATA sequence may bias the DNA structure towards a conformation that binds the protein relatively weakly.

  3. Ligand binding study of human PEBP1/RKIP: interaction with nucleotides and Raf-1 peptides evidenced by NMR and mass spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurette Tavel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human Phosphatidylethanolamine binding protein 1 (hPEBP1 also known as Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP, affects various cellular processes, and is implicated in metastasis formation and Alzheimer's disease. Human PEBP1 has also been shown to inhibit the Raf/MEK/ERK pathway. Numerous reports concern various mammalian PEBP1 binding ligands. However, since PEBP1 proteins from many different species were investigated, drawing general conclusions regarding human PEBP1 binding properties is rather difficult. Moreover, the binding site of Raf-1 on hPEBP1 is still unknown. METHODS/FINDINGS: In the present study, we investigated human PEBP1 by NMR to determine the binding site of four different ligands: GTP, FMN, and one Raf-1 peptide in tri-phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated forms. The study was carried out by NMR in near physiological conditions, allowing for the identification of the binding site and the determination of the affinity constants K(D for different ligands. Native mass spectrometry was used as an alternative method for measuring K(D values. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study demonstrates and/or confirms the binding of hPEBP1 to the four studied ligands. All of them bind to the same region centered on the conserved ligand-binding pocket of hPEBP1. Although the affinities for GTP and FMN decrease as pH, salt concentration and temperature increase from pH 6.5/NaCl 0 mM/20°C to pH 7.5/NaCl 100 mM/30°C, both ligands clearly do bind under conditions similar to what is found in cells regarding pH, salt concentration and temperature. In addition, our work confirms that residues in the vicinity of the pocket rather than those within the pocket seem to be required for interaction with Raf-1.

  4. [Romanowsky dyes and the Romanowsky-Giemsa effect. 4. Binding of azure B to DNA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Walz, R; Zimmermann, H W

    1987-01-01

    We investigated the binding of azure B to DNA (calf thymus) over a wide range of concentrations of the dye (CF) and the nucleic acid (CN) using absorption spectroscopy [CF and CN represent the total concentrations of the ye (F) and the mononucleotide units (N) of the DNA, respectively]. The binding isotherms of the dye to DNA in aqueous solutions were determined. In addition, we analysed the composition of insoluble DNA/azure B precipitates that are formed in presence of an excess of azure B. These precipitates are of particular interest, because Giemsa staining is usually performed using high dye concentrations. Azure B easily forms dimers in aqueous solutions. When determining the binding isotherms, the equilibrium between free monomers and dimers must be taken into account. Therefore, we determined the dimerisation constant (Kd) of azure B from the concentration dependency of its absorption spectra in water at the standard temperature T = 298 K (25 degrees C), Kd = 6.5 X 10(3) M-1 (experimental conditions: tris buffer, pH 7.2; concentration of Na ions, CNa = 0.002 M). As the CNa value increases, the dimerisation constant rises rapidly. When the azure B concentration is very low and there is an excess of DNA, ordinary Scatchard and Langmuir isotherms are observed. Monomer dye cations are bound to DNA, these cations being in equilibrium with free monomers in the solution. In order to obtain the Scatchard binding constant (Ks) and the binding parameter (n) spectroscopically, it is necessary to determine the extinction coefficient (epsilon Fb) of the monomer bound (b) dye molecules (F) at one analytical wave number (upsilon a). The three constants can be determined simultaneously using an iterative technique that combines Scatchard isotherms and the Benesi-Hildebrand extrapolation, CN----infinity. We obtained Ks = 1.8 X 10(5) M-1 and n = 0.18 (25 degrees C; tris buffer, pH 7.2; CNa = 0.002 M). At very low dye (CF) and competitor (CNa) concentrations, only 18% of the

  5. Vanishing of T sub c and appearance of quantum paraelectricity in KD sub 2 PO sub 4 and KH sub 2 PO sub 4 under high pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Endo, S; Tokunaga, M

    2002-01-01

    The temperature dependences of the dielectric constants of the hydrogen-bond ferroelectrics KH sub 2 PO sub 4 (KDP) and KD sub 2 PO sub 4 (DKDP) were measured under high hydrostatic pressure. Their ferroelectric transition temperatures T sub c monotonically decreased with increasing pressure and the ferroelectric state vanished at p sub c : 1.7 GPa for KDP and 6.1 GPa for DKDP. On the other hand, the Curie constant remained finite at p sub c , which indicates that the ferroelectric phase transition at high pressure is of displacive type. At pressures around p sub c , quantum paraelectricity was observed in KDP and DKDP.

  6. Fractional rate of degradation (kd) of starch in the rumen and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fractional rate of degradation (kd) of fermentable nutrients in the rumen is an important parameter in modern feed evaluation systems based on mechanistic models. Estimates of kd for starch was obtained on 19 starch sources originating from barley, wheat, oat, maize and peas and treated in different ways both chemically ...

  7. Hyperbolic white noise functional solutions of Wick-type stochastic compound KdV-Burgers equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Xiu; Xie Yingchao

    2009-01-01

    Variable coefficient and Wick-type stochastic compound KdV-Burgers equations are investigated. By using white noise analysis, Hermite transform and the hyperbolic function method, we obtain a number of Wick versions of hyperbolic white noise functional solutions and hyperbolic function solutions for Wick-type stochastic and variable coefficient compound KdV-Burgers equations, respectively.

  8. Estimation of rate of degradation (Kd) of starch in the rumen and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Torben Hvelplund

    Abstract. Fractional rate of degradation (kd) of fermentable nutrients in the rumen is an important parameter in modern feed evaluation systems based on mechanistic models. Estimates of kd for starch was obtained on 19 starch sources originating from barley, wheat, oat, maize and peas and treated in different ways both.

  9. New exact solutions for a generalized variable coefficients 2D KdV equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elwakil, S.A.; El-labany, S.K.; Zahran, M.A. E-mail: m_zahran1@mans.edu.eg; Sabry, R. E-mail: refaatsabry@mans.edu.eg

    2004-03-01

    Using homogeneous balance method an auto-Baecklund transformation for a generalized variable coefficients 2D KdV equation is obtained. Then new exact solutions are found which include solitary one. Also, we have found certain new analytical soliton-typed solution in terms of the variable coefficients of the studied 2D KdV equation.

  10. Exact travelling wave solutions of the (3+1)-dimensional mKdV-ZK ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper, the new generalized (G /G)-expansion method is executed to find the travelling wave solutions of the (3+1)-dimensional mKdV-ZK equation and the (1+1)-dimensional compound KdVB equation. The efficiency of this method for finding exact and travelling wave solu- tions has been demonstrated.

  11. Exact travelling wave solutions of the (3+1)-dimensional mKdV-ZK ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, the new generalized (′/)-expansion method is executed to find the travelling wave solutions of the (3+1)-dimensional mKdV-ZK equation and the (1+1)-dimensional compound KdVB equation. The efficiency of this method for finding exact and travelling wave solutions has been demonstrated. It is shown ...

  12. KD901G X-ray system to reject contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Hachiro

    1995-01-01

    Among the complaints to the foods that consumers bought, the proportion of the mixing of alien substances is more than 20%. The number of the cases classified by the kinds of alien substances, and that of minerals and animal substances are shown. The causes of the mixing of alien substances are classified into those due to the mixing in raw materials, production places, processing machines and workers. In case of using primary products as raw materials, the alien substances closely related to those raw materials are difficult to detect, such as bones and hairs in animal meat, fish bones, egg shells and fruit seeds. There are problems and limitation in the inspection of alien substance mixing by visual or touching inspection, metal detectors and the visual inspection of X-ray radiographs. The judgement of the presence of alien substances by automatically processing X-ray radiograph information has been tried one or two-dimensionally. The X-ray alien substance detector KD901G adopted the one-dimensional line sensor type, and its features are shown. The effective introduction of the X-ray alien substance detector, its comparison with metal detectors, and the safety of workers against radiation exposure and the safety of inspected foods are discussed. (K.I.)

  13. SOUL in mouse eyes is a new hexameric heme-binding protein with characteristic optical absorption, resonance Raman spectral, and heme-binding properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Emiko; Sagami, Ikuko; Uchida, Takeshi; Sato, Akira; Kitagawa, Teizo; Igarashi, Jotaro; Shimizu, Toru

    2004-11-09

    SOUL is specifically expressed in the retina and pineal gland and displays more than 40% sequence homology with p22HBP, a heme protein ubiquitously expressed in numerous tissues. SOUL was purified as a dimer in the absence of heme from the Escherichia coli expression system but displayed a hexameric structure upon heme binding. Heme-bound SOUL displayed optical absorption and resonance Raman spectra typical of 6-coordinate low-spin heme protein, with one heme per monomeric unit for both the Fe(III) and Fe(II) complexes. Spectral data additionally suggest that one of the axial ligands of the Fe(III) heme complex is His. Mutation of His42 (the only His of SOUL) to Ala resulted in loss of heme binding, confirming that this residue is an axial ligand of SOUL. The K(d) value of heme for SOUL was estimated as 4.8 x 10(-9) M from the association and dissociation rate constants, suggesting high binding affinity. On the other hand, p22HBP was obtained as a monomer containing one heme per subunit, with a K(d) value of 2.1 x 10(-11) M. Spectra of heme-bound p22HBP were different from those of SOUL but similar to those of heme-bound bovine serum albumin in which heme bound to a hydrophobic cavity with no specific axial ligand coordination. Therefore, the heme-binding properties and coordination structure of SOUL are distinct from those of p22HBP, despite high sequence homology. The physiological role of the new heme-binding protein, SOUL, is further discussed in this report.

  14. Identification and characterization of the DNA-binding domain of the multifunctional PutA flavoenzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Dan; Zhou, Yuzhen; Kallhoff, Verena; Baban, Berevan; Tanner, John J; Becker, Donald F

    2004-07-23

    The PutA flavoprotein from Escherichia coli is a transcriptional repressor and a bifunctional enzyme that regulates and catalyzes proline oxidation. PutA represses transcription of genes putA and putP by binding to the control DNA region of the put regulon. The objective of this study is to define and characterize the DNA binding domain of PutA. The DNA binding activity of PutA, a 1320 amino acid polypeptide, has been localized to N-terminal residues 1-261. After exploring a potential DNA-binding region and an N-terminal deletion mutant of PutA, residues 1-90 (PutA90) were determined to contain DNA binding activity and stabilize the dimeric structure of PutA. Cell-based transcriptional assays demonstrate that PutA90 functions as a transcriptional repressor in vivo. The dissociation constant of PutA90 with the put control DNA was estimated to be 110 nm, which is slightly higher than that of the PutA-DNA complex (K(d) approximately 45 nm). Primary and secondary structure analysis of PutA90 suggested the presence of a ribbon-helix-helix DNA binding motif in residues 1-47. To test this prediction, we purified and characterized PutA47. PutA47 is shown to purify as an apparent dimer, to exhibit in vivo transcriptional activity, and to bind specifically to the put control DNA. In gel-mobility shift assays, PutA47 was observed to bind cooperatively to the put control DNA with an overall dissociation constant of 15 nm for the PutA47-DNA complex. Thus, N-terminal residues 1-47 are critical for DNA-binding and the dimeric structure of PutA. These results are consistent with the ribbon-helix-helix family of transcription factors.

  15. Molybdate binding by ModA, the periplasmic component of the Escherichia coli mod molybdate transport system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperial, J; Hadi, M; Amy, N K

    1998-03-13

    ModA, the periplasmic-binding protein of the Escherichia coli mod transport system was overexpressed and purified. Binding of molybdate and tungstate to ModA was found to modify the UV absorption and fluorescence emission spectra of the protein. Titration of these changes showed that ModA binds molybdate and tungstate in a 1:1 molar ratio. ModA showed an intrinsic fluorescence emission spectrum attributable to its three tryptophanyl residues. Molybdate binding caused a conformational change in the protein characterized by: (i) a shift of tryptophanyl groups to a more hydrophobic environment; (ii) a quenching (at pH 5.0) or enhancement (at pH 7.8) of fluorescence; and (iii) a higher availability of tryptophanyl groups to the polar quencher acrylamide. The tight binding of molybdate did not allow an accurate estimation of the binding constants by these indirect methods. An isotopic binding method with 99MoO42- was used for accurate determination of KD (20 nM) and stoichiometry (1:1 molar ratio). ModA bound tungstate with approximately the same affinity, but did not bind sulfate or phosphate. These KDs are 150- to 250-fold lower than those previously reported, and compatible with the high molybdate transport affinity of the mod system. The affinity of ModA for molybdate was also determined in vivo and found to be similar to that determined in vitro. Copyright 1998 Elsevier Science B.V.

  16. MODELLING SOLUTIONS TO THE KdV-BURGERS EQUATION IN THE CASE OF NONHOMOGENEOUS DISSIPATIVE MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Samokhin Alexey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of the soliton type solutions to the KdV-Burgers equation is studied numerically in the case of non- homogeneous dissipative media. A soliton moves from left to right and it does not change its form. The solitons with great- er amplitude are narrower and move faster. The aim of the presented research is to study the behavior of the soliton that, while moving in nondissipative medium encounters a barrier (finite or infinite with finite constant dissipation; one may imagine an impulse of light meeting on its way a partially absorbing layer. The modelling included the case of a finite dis- sipative layer similar to a wave passing through the air-glass-air as well as a wave passing from a nondissipative layer into a dissipative one (similar to the passage of light from air to water. The present paper is a continuation of the authors’ pub- lications. New results include a numerical model of the wave’s behavior for different types of the media non-homogeneity. The dissipation predictably results in reducing the soliton’s amplitude, but some new effects occur in the case of finite piecewise constant barrier on the soliton path: after the wave leaves the dissipative barrier it retains, on the whole, a soliton form yet some small and rapidly decreasing oscillations arises in front of the soliton. These oscillations are getting larger and spread as the soliton is moving of the barrier; the distance between the soliton and the oscillation grows. That is, the oscillations are faster than the soliton. The modelling used the Maple software PDETools packet; these activities were time and resources consuming.

  17. Adhalin, the 50 kD dystrophin associated protein, is not the locus for severe childhood autosomal recessive dystrophy (SCARMD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNally, E.M.; Selig, S.; Kunkel, L.M. [Children`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Mutations in the carboxyl-terminus in dystrophin are normally sufficient to produce severely dystrophic muscle. This portion of dystrophin binds a complex of dystrophin-associated glycoproteins (DAGs). The genes encoding these DAGs are candidate genes for causing neuromuscular disease. Immunoreactivity for adhalin, the 50 kD DAG, is absent in muscle biopsies from patients with SCARMD, a form of dystrophy clinically similar Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Prior linkage analysis in SCARMD families revealed that the disease gene segregates with markers on chromosome 13. To determine the molecular role that adhalin may play in SCARMD, human cDNA and genomic sequences were isolated. Primers were designed based on predicted areas of conservation in rabbit adhalin and used in RT-PCR with human skeletal and cardiac muscle. RT-PCR products were confirmed by sequence as human adhalin and then used as probes for screening human cDNA and genomic libraries. Human and rabbit adhalin are 90% identical, and among the cDNAs, a novel splice form of adhalin was seen which may encode part of the 35 kD component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. To our surprise, only human/rodent hybrids containing human chromosome 17 amplified adhalin sequences in a PCR analysis. FISH analysis with three overlapping genomic sequences confirmed the chromosome 17 location and further delineated the map position to 17q21. Therefore, adhalin is excluded as the gene causing SCARMD.

  18. Fluorescence emission and polarization analyses for evaluating binding of ruthenium metalloglycocluster to lectin and tetanus toxin c-fragment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Tomoko; Minoura, Norihiko

    2010-02-01

    We have developed a fluorescent ruthenium metalloglycocluster as a powerful molecular probe for evaluating a binding event between carbohydrates and lectins by fluorescence emission (FE) and fluorescence polarization (FP) analysis. The fluorescent ruthenium metalloglycoclusters, [Ru(bpy-2Gal)3] and [Ru(bpy-2Glc)3], possess clustered galactose and glucose surrounding the ruthenium center. Changes in FE and FP of these metalloglycoclusters were measured by adding each lectin (Peanut agglutinin (PNA), Ricinus communis agglutinin 120 (RCA), Concanavalin A (ConA), or Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)) or tetanus toxin c-fragment (TCF). Following the addition of PNA, the FE spectrum of [Ru(bpy- 2Gal)3] showed new emission peak and the FP value of [Ru(bpy-2Gal)3] increased. Similarly, the FE spectrum of [Ru(bpy-2Glc)3] showed new emission peak and the FP value increased following the addition of ConA. Since other combinations of the metalloglycoclusters and lectin caused little change, specific bindings of galactose to PNA and glucose to ConA were proved by the FE and FP measurement. From nonlinear least-squares fitting, dissociation constants (Kd) of [Ru(bpy-2Gal)3] to PNA was 6.1 μM, while the Kd values of [Ru(bpy)2(bpy-2Gal)] to PNA was ca. 10-4 M. Therefore, the clustered carbohydrates were proved to increase affinity to lectins. Furthermore, the FP measurements proved specific binding of [Ru(bpy-2Gal)3] to TCF.

  19. Designing binding kinetic assay on the bio-layer interferometry (BLI) biosensor to characterize antibody-antigen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Vishal; Rafique, Ashique

    2017-11-01

    The Octet biosensors provide a high-throughput alternative to the well-established surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and SPR imaging (SPRi) biosensors to characterize antibody-antigen interactions. However, the utility of the Octet biosensors for accurate and reproducible measurement of binding rate constants of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is limited due to challenges such as analyte rebinding, and mass transport limitation (MTL). This study focuses on addressing these challenges and provides experimental conditions to reliably measure kinetics of mAb-antigen interactions. The mAb capture density of less than 0.6 nm was found to be optimal to measure a wide range of binding affinities on Octet HTX biosensor. The titration kinetic and single cycle kinetic assays performed on Octet HTX generated reproducible binding kinetic parameters and correlated with the values measured on Biacore 4000 and MASS-1. Kinetic assays performed on 0.1 nm density mAb surfaces significantly reduced MTL and enabled characterization of picomolar affinity mAbs. Finally, kinetic analysis performed on 150 antibodies to 10 antigens with molecular weights ranging from 21kD to 105kD showed concordance between Octet HTX, Biacore 4000 and MASS-1 (R 2  > 0.90). The data presented in this study suggest that under optimal experimental conditions, Octet biosensor is capable of generating kinetic values comparable to SPR/SPRi biosensors. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of 125ITSH binding to its receptor in thyroid hyperplasies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianco, A.C.; Nunes, M.T.

    1985-01-01

    An unpredictable and unbalanced response to a stimulus like TSH is indeed a striking characteristic of the follicles of the simple goiter. Since it is known that the first step for TSH action on its target cell is binding to specific TSH plasma membrane receptors, the binding of 125 ITSH to these receptors was studied in normal and ''cold'' hyperplastic thyroid fragments obtained at surgery. Through the Scatchard analysis it was verified that there are no differences with regard to the binding capacity of TSH receptors between normal and hyperplastic tissues. On the other hand, a significant decrease of the dissociation constant (Kd) was observed in hyperplastic tissue indicating higher affinity for TSH binding. It is known that intracellular iodine content can interfere with the TSH induced modifications on the thyroid folicular cells. It is supposed that this is mediated by interference on TSH binding to its receptor and/or activation of adenylate cyclase. Due to impaired organification capacity of ''cold'' tissue it is assumed that these cells present decreased intracellular iodine content. Therefore it is proposed that alterations of TSH binding to its receptors detected in the present investigation are consequent of the low iodine content of the hyperplastic folicular cell. (author) [pt

  1. Displacement of DL-[3H]-2-amino-4-phosphonobutanoic acid ( [3H]APB) binding with methyl-substituted APB analogues and glutamate agonists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, M.B.; Crooks, S.L.; Johnson, R.L.; Koerner, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    The binding of the excitatory amino acid antagonist DL-2-amino-4-phosphonobutanoic acid (DL-APB) to rat brain synaptic plasma membranes was characterized. As determined by Scatchard analysis, the binding was saturable and homogeneous with a Kd = 6.0 microM and Bmax = 380 pmol/mg of protein. The binding was dependent on the presence of Ca 2+ and Cl - ions and was diminished upon freezing. The association rate constant was 6.8 X 10(-3) microM -1 min -1 , and the dissociation rate constant was 2.0 X 10(-2) min -1 . The L isomers of APB, glutamate, and aspartate were more potent as displacers of APB binding than the D isomers. With the exception of kynurenic acid, all compounds examined in both systems were more potent as displacers of APB binding than as inhibitors of synaptic transmission. This difference in potency was most pronounced for agonists at dentate granule cells. L-Glutamate, D-glutamate, and L-glutamate tetrazole were between 140- and 7500-fold more potent as displacers of DL-APB binding than as inhibitors of synaptic transmission. D-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid and alpha-methyl-APB were between 10- and 20-fold more potent as displacers of binding

  2. Benzodiazepines: rat pinealocyte binding sites and augmentation of norepinephrine-stimulated N-acetyltransferase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthew, E.; Parfitt, A.G.; Sugden, D.; Engelhardt, D.L.; Zimmerman, E.A.; Klein, D.C.

    1984-02-01

    Studies of (/sup 3/H)diazepam binding to intact rat pineal cells were carried out in tissue culture preparations. The binding was saturable, reversible and proportional to the number of cells used. Scatchard analysis resulted in a linear plot (Kd . 23 nM, maximum binding sites (Bmax) . 1.56 pmol/mg of protein for cells in monolayer culture; Kd . 7 nM, Bmax . 1.3 pmol/mg of protein for cells in suspension culture). Inhibition constants (Ki) for clonazepam (500 nM), flunitrazepam (38 nM) and Ro-5-4864 (5 nM) indicated that the binding sites were probably of the ''peripheral'' type. In addition, the effects of diazepam on norepinephrine-stimulated N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity were studied in organ culture and dissociated cell culture. Diazepam (10-50 microM) both prolonged and increased the magnitude of the norepinephrine-induced increase in NAT activity but did not affect the initial rate of rise of enzyme activity. The effect was dose-dependent and was also seen with clonazepam, flunitrazepam and Ro-5-4864, but not with Ro-15-1788. Diazepam, by itself, at these concentrations, had no effect on NAT, but enzyme activity was increased by higher concentrations (0.1-1 mM). Although a relationship between the (/sup 3/H)diazepam binding sites described here and the effect of benzodiazepines on NAT cannot be established from these studies, the data suggest that the benzodiazepines may alter melatonin levels through their action on NAT.

  3. Division algebras and extended N = 2, 4, 8 super KdVs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrion, H.L.; Rojas, M.; Toppan, F.

    2001-09-01

    The first example of an N = 8 supersymmetric extension of the KdV equation is here explicitly constructed. It involves 8 bosonic and 8 fermionic fields. It corresponds to the unique N = 8 solution based a generalized hamiltonian dynamics with (generalized) Poisson brackets given by the Non-associate N = 8 Superconformal Algebra. The complete list of inequivalent classes of parametric-dependent N = 3 and N = 4 superKdVs obtained from the 'Non-associative N= 8 SCA' is also furnished. Furthermore, a fundamental domain characterizing the class of inequivalent N = 4 superKdVs based on the 'minimal N = 4 SCA' is given. (author)

  4. KdV Equation with Self-consistent Sources in Non-uniform Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Honghai; Zhang Dajun; Wang Guangsheng

    2009-01-01

    Two non-isospectral KdV equations with self-consistent sources are derived. Gauge transformation between the first non-isospectral KdV equation with self-consistent sources (corresponding to λ t = -2aλ) and its isospectral counterpart is given, from which exact solutions for the first non-isospectral KdV equation with self-consistent sources is easily listed. Besides, the soliton solutions for the two equations are obtained by means of Hirota's method and Wronskian technique, respectively. Meanwhile, the dynamical properties for these solutions are investigated. (general)

  5. New binary travelling-wave periodic solutions for the modified KdV equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Zhenya

    2008-01-01

    In this Letter, the modified Korteweg-de Vries (mKdV) equations with the focusing (+) and defocusing (-) branches are investigated, respectively. Many new types of binary travelling-wave periodic solutions are obtained for the mKdV equation in terms of Jacobi elliptic functions such as sn(ξ,m)cn(ξ,m)dn(ξ,m) and their extensions. Moreover, we analyze asymptotic properties of some solutions. In addition, with the aid of the Miura transformation, we also give the corresponding binary travelling-wave periodic solutions of KdV equation

  6. The improved sub-ODE method for a generalized KdV-mKdV equation with nonlinear terms of any order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Sheng; Wang Wei; Tong Jinglin

    2008-01-01

    In this Letter, Li and Wang's sub-ODE method [X.Z. Li, M.L. Wang, Phys. Lett. A 361 (2007) 115] is improved and applied to the generalized KdV-mKdV equation with nonlinear terms of any order. As a result, more travelling wave solutions are obtained including not only all the known solutions found by Li and Wang but also other formal solutions. This improved sub-ODE method can be used for solving other nonlinear partial differential equations with nonlinear terms of any order in mathematical physics

  7. Deriving the New Traveling Wave Solutions for the Nonlinear Dispersive Equation, KdV-ZK Equation and Complex Coupled KdV System Using Extended Simplest Equation Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, K. Elboree

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate the traveling wave solutions for the nonlinear dispersive equation, Korteweg-de Vries Zakharov-Kuznetsov (KdV-ZK) equation and complex coupled KdV system by using extended simplest equation method, and then derive the hyperbolic function solutions include soliton solutions, trigonometric function solutions include periodic solutions with special values for double parameters and rational solutions. The properties of such solutions are shown by figures. The results show that this method is an effective and a powerful tool for handling the solutions of nonlinear partial differential equations (NLEEs) in mathematical physics.

  8. Ghrelin binding to serum albumin and its biological impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lufrano, Daniela; Trejo, Sebastián A; Llovera, Ramiro E; Salgueiro, Mariano; Fernandez, Gimena; Martínez Damonte, Valentina; González Flecha, F Luis; Raingo, Jesica; Ermácora, Mario R; Perelló, Mario

    2016-11-15

    Ghrelin is an octanoylated peptide hormone that plays a key role in the regulation of the body weight and glucose homeostasis. In plasma, ghrelin circulates bound to larger proteins whose identities are partially established. Here, we used size exclusion chromatography, mass spectrometry and isothermal titration microcalorimetry to show that ghrelin interacts with serum albumin. Furthermore, we found that such interaction displays an estimated dissociation constant (KD) in the micromolar range and involves albumin fatty-acid binding sites as well as the octanoyl moiety of ghrelin. Notably, albumin-ghrelin interaction reduces the spontaneous deacylation of the hormone. Both in vitro experiments-assessing ghrelin ability to inhibit calcium channels-and in vivo studies-evaluating ghrelin orexigenic effects-indicate that the binding to albumin affects the bioactivity of the hormone. In conclusion, our results suggest that ghrelin binds to serum albumin and that this interaction impacts on the biological activity of the hormone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Heterogeneity of [3H]phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate binding in primary mouse keratinocytes at different stages of maturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, J.A.; Jeng, A.Y.; Yuspa, S.H.; Blumberg, P.M.

    1985-01-01

    Mouse keratinocytes respond heterogeneously to phorbol esters with distinct subpopulations stimulated to proliferate or induced to differentiate. The maturation state of the epidermal cell at the time of exposure may determine its response. The binding of phorbol esters to primary mouse keratinocytes was studied under culture conditions selecting for proliferating cells or differentiating cells. [20- 3 H]-12-Deoxyphorbol 13-isobutyrate ([ 3 H]-DPB) bound to both types of cells at one class of binding sites. The dissociation constant (Kd) for [ 3 H]DPB in the proliferative cells was 69 nM and the binding at saturation (Bmax) was 1.3 pmol/mg of protein. The corresponding values in the differentiative cells were 96 nM and 1.5 pmol/mg of protein, respectively. In contrast to the results obtained with [ 3 H]DPB, [20- 3 H]phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate ([ 3 H]PDBU) bound to both cell types in a heterogeneous fashion. The site for [ 3 H]DPB binding seemed to correspond to the higher affinity [ 3 H]PDBU binding site. The major difference in the cells grown in the medium containing 1.2 mM CaCl 2 was an increase in the Bmax of the lower affinity binding site with the other three parameters remaining similar. The state of epidermal differentiation thus appears to modulate the amount of the lower affinity binding sites for phorbol esters

  10. Interactions of Soliton Waves for a Generalized Discrete KdV Equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Tong; Zhu Zuo-Nong

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that soliton interactions in discrete integrable systems often possess new properties which are different from the continuous integrable systems, e.g., we found that there are such discrete solitons in a semidiscrete integrable system (the time variable is continuous and the space one is discrete) that the shorter solitary waves travel faster than the taller ones. Very recently, this kind of soliton was also observed in a full discrete generalized KdV system (the both of time and space variables are discrete) introduced by Kanki et al. In this paper, for the generalized discrete KdV (gdKdV) equation, we describe its richer structures of one-soliton solutions. The interactions of two-soliton waves to the gdKdV equation are studied. Some new features of the soliton interactions are proposed by rigorous theoretical analysis. (paper)

  11. Changes in dopamine transporter binding in nucleus accumbens following chronic self-administration cocaine: heroin combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattison, Lindsey P; McIntosh, Scot; Sexton, Tammy; Childers, Steven R; Hemby, Scott E

    2014-10-01

    Concurrent use of cocaine and heroin (speedball) has been shown to exert synergistic effects on dopamine neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), as observed by significant increases in extracellular dopamine levels and compensatory elevations in the maximal reuptake rate of dopamine. The present studies were undertaken to determine whether chronic self-administration of cocaine, heroin or a combination of cocaine:heroin led to compensatory changes in the abundance and/or affinity of high- and low-affinity DAT binding sites. Saturation binding of the cocaine analog [(125) I] 3β-(4-iodophenyl)tropan-2β-carboxylic acid methyl ester ([(125) I]RTI-55) in rat NAc membranes resulted in binding curves that were best fit to two-site binding models, allowing calculation of dissociation constant (Kd ) and binding density (Bmax ) values corresponding to high- and low-affinity DAT binding sites. Scatchard analysis of the saturation binding curves clearly demonstrate the presence of high- and low- affinity binding sites in the NAc, with low-affinity sites comprising 85 to 94% of the binding sites. DAT binding analyses revealed that self-administration of cocaine and a cocaine:heroin combination increased the affinity of the low-affinity site for the cocaine congener RTI-55 compared to saline. These results indicate that the alterations observed following chronic speedball self-administration are likely due to the cocaine component alone; thus further studies are necessary to elaborate upon the synergistic effect of cocaine:heroin combinations on the dopamine system in the NAc. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Significance Of 30 KD Protein As A Diagnostic Marker In CSF Of tuberculour Meningits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashyap R.S

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculous meningitis (TBM is a sub acute or chronic inflammation of the cerebral meninges caused by tubercule bacilli, the diagnosis for which is still very intricate. To establish a rapid diagnosis, we used Sodium dodecyl suplhate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE for the detection of marker protein in CSF specific to TBM patients. CSF was collected by standard lumbar puncture technique. Polyclonal antibody was raised against sonicated M.tuberculosis of H37RV in rabbit. 145 CSF samples were collected for this study over a period of two and half years which included 44 suspected and one proven case of TBM. In this communication we have investigated for a possible presence of a marker protein(s in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of TBM patients. Two bands, a 30kd and a 14kd were detected. The 30kd band was observed in 92% cases of TBM patients. The 14kd band was not much of diagnostic importance since it was found in only about 45%. None of the control group patients had these protein bands. The 30 kd protein band either disappeared or became faint on anti-TB medication. To evaluate whether the eluted 30 kd protein was a mycobacterium tuberculosis product, gel retardation assay was also performed. The 30kd protein did not react with the polyclonal antisera. The CSF biochemical picture correlated well with the presence of this protein band. This study suggests that 30kd protein band observed in CSF is not a Mycobacterium product and is not only an important diagnostic marker for early diagnosis of TBM but may also be useful for monitoring the post treatment phase.

  13. Exact periodic wave solutions to the coupled schrِodinger-KdV ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Solutions for the coupled non-linear partial differential equations. 2. Application. 2.1 The coupled Schriodinger-KdV equation. The coupled schriodinger-KdV equation iuط = uــ + uv, vط + 6vvـ + vـــ = (|u|2. ) ,. (8) describes various processes in dusty plasma, such as Langmuir, dust-acoustic wave and electromagnetic waves ...

  14. Approximate analytical solution for the fractional modified KdV by differential transform method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurulay, Muhammet; Bayram, Mustafa

    2010-07-01

    In this paper, the fractional modified Korteweg-de Vries equation (fmKdV) and fKdV are introduced by fractional derivatives. The approach rest mainly on two-dimensional differential transform method (DTM) which is one of the approximate methods. The method can easily be applied to many problems and is capable of reducing the size of computational work. The fractional derivative is described in the Caputo sense. Some illustrative examples are presented.

  15. Painleve Property and Complexiton Solutions of a Special Coupled KdV Equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jianrong; Mao Jiejian

    2008-01-01

    A special coupled KdV equation is proved to be the Painleve property by the Kruskal's simplification of WTC method. In order to search new exact solutions of the coupled KdV equation, Hirota's bilinear direct method and the conjugate complex number method of exponential functions are applied to this system. As a result, new analytical complexiton and soliton solutions are obtained synchronously in a physical field. Then their structures, time evolution and interaction properties are further discussed graphically

  16. New exact travelling wave solutions for two potential coupled KdV equations with symbolic computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zonghang

    2007-01-01

    We find new exact travelling wave solutions for two potential KdV equations which are presented by Foursov [Foursov MV. J Math Phys 2000;41:6173-85]. Compared with the extended tanh-function method, the algorithm used in our paper can obtain some new kinds of exact travelling wave solutions. With the aid of symbolic computation, some novel exact travelling wave solutions of the potential KdV equations are constructed

  17. KdV and kink antikink solitons in car-following models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, H. X.; Cheng, R. J.; Dai, S. Q.

    2005-11-01

    The jams in the congested traffic are related with various density waves, which might be governed by the nonlinear wave equations, such as the Korteweg-de-Vries (KdV) equation, the Burgers equation and the modified Korteweg-de-Vries (mKdV) equation. Three different versions of optimal velocity models are examined. The stability conditions of the models are obtained by using the linear stability theory. The KdV equation near the neutral stability line and the mKdV equation around the critical point are derived by applying the reductive perturbation method, respectively. The traffic jams could be thus described by the KdV and kink-antikink soliton solutions for the two kinds of equations. The general solutions are given for, which can lead to specific solutions in previous work. Moreover, they are applied to solve a new model-the full velocity difference model and the corresponding KdV and kink-antikink soliton solutions could be quickly obtained, which demonstrates the general solutions presented herein are useful.

  18. Insulin binding characteristics in canine muscle tissue: effects of the estrous cycle phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álan G. Pöppl

    Full Text Available Abstract: Hormonal fluctuations during the different estrous cycle are a well-recognized cause of insulin resistance in bitches, and little is known about insulin receptor binding or post-binding defects associated with insulin resistance in dogs. To evaluate insulin binding characteristics in muscle tissue of bitches during the estrous cycle, 17 owned bitches were used in the study (six in anestrus, five in estrus, and six in diestrus. An intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT was performed in all patients by means of injection of 1mL/kg of a glucose 50% solution (500mg/kg, with blood sample collection for glucose determination at 0, 3, 5, 7, 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes after glucose infusion. Muscle samples, taken after spaying surgery, were immediately frozen in liquid nitrogen and then stored at -80 ºC until the membranes were prepared by sequential centrifugation after being homogenized. For binding studies, membranes were incubated in the presence of 20,000cpm of human 125I-insulin and in increasing concentrations of unlabeled human regular insulin for cold saturation. The IVGTT showed no differences among bitches during the estrous cycle regarding baseline glycemia or glycemic response after glucose infusion. Two insulin binding sites - high-affinity and low-affinity ones - were detected by Scatchard analysis, and significant statistical differences were observed in the dissociation constant (Kd1 and maximum binding capacity (Bmax1 of the high-affinity binding sites. The Kd1 for the anestrus group (6.54±2.77nM/mg of protein was smaller (P<0.001 than for the estrus (28.54±6.94nM/mg of protein and diestrus (15.56±3.88nM/mg of protein groups. Bmax1 in the estrus (0.83±0.42nM/mg of protein and diestrus (1.24±0.24nM/mg of protein groups were also higher (P<0.001 than the values observed in anestrus (0.35±0.06nM/mg of protein. These results indicate modulation of insulin binding characteristics during different phases of the estrous

  19. Ion exchange equilibrium constants

    CERN Document Server

    Marcus, Y

    2013-01-01

    Ion Exchange Equilibrium Constants focuses on the test-compilation of equilibrium constants for ion exchange reactions. The book first underscores the scope of the compilation, equilibrium constants, symbols used, and arrangement of the table. The manuscript then presents the table of equilibrium constants, including polystyrene sulfonate cation exchanger, polyacrylate cation exchanger, polymethacrylate cation exchanger, polysterene phosphate cation exchanger, and zirconium phosphate cation exchanger. The text highlights zirconium oxide anion exchanger, zeolite type 13Y cation exchanger, and

  20. Effect of desipramine treatment on 3H-imipramine binding in the blood platelets of depressed patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arora, R.C.; Meltzer, H.Y.

    1988-01-01

    Platelet imipramine binding (IB) was studied in depressed patients before and after treatment with desipramine for 17-28 days. Administration of desipramine was associated with a significant increase in Bmax. There was a trend for an increase in Kd, but it did not reach statistical significance. The net result of the changes in Bmax and Kd was an increase in IB. There were significant correlations between the change in depression ratings and pretreatment Kd, as well as the change in Kd during treatment. These results suggest that decreased IB is not a trait-dependent marker, but a state-dependent marker for depression. 46 references

  1. The binding between the stem regions of human growth hormone (GH) receptor compensates for the weaker site 1 binding of 20-kDa human GH (hGH) than that of 22-kDa hGH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunekawa, B; Wada, M; Ikeda, M; Banba, S; Kamachi, H; Tanaka, E; Honjo, M

    2000-05-26

    Despite the lower site 1 affinity of the 20-kDa human growth hormone (20K-hGH) for the hGH receptor (hGHR), 20K-hGH has the same hGHR-mediated activity as 22-kDa human GH (22K-hGH) at low hGH concentration and even higher activity at high hGH concentration. This study was performed to elucidate the reason why 20K-hGH can activate hGHR to the same level as 22K-hGH. To answer the question, we hypothesized that the binding between the stem regions of hGHR could compensate for the weaker site 1 binding of 20K-hGH than that of 22K-hGH in the sequential binding with hGHR. To demonstrate it, we prepared 15 types of alanine-substituted hGHR gene at the stem region and stably transfected them into Ba/F3 cells. Using these cells, we measured and compared the cell proliferation activities between 20K- and 22K-hGH. As a result, the activity of 20K-hGH was markedly reduced than that of 22K-hGH in three types of mutant hGHR (T147A, H150A, and Y200A). Regarding these mutants, the dissociation constant of hGH at the first and second step (KD1 and KD2) in the sequential binding with two hGHRs was predicted based on the mathematical cell proliferation model and computational simulation. Consequently, it was revealed that the reduction of the activity in 20K-hGH was attributed to the change of not KD1 but KD2. In conclusion, these findings support our hypothesis, which can account for the same potencies for activating hGHR between 20K- and 22K-hGH, although the site 1 affinity of 20K-hGH is lower than that of 22K-hGH.

  2. Analysis of A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) interaction with protein kinase A (PKA) regulatory subunits: PKA isoform specificity in AKAP binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herberg, F W; Maleszka, A; Eide, T; Vossebein, L; Tasken, K

    2000-04-28

    Compartmentalization of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is in part mediated by specialized protein motifs in the dimerization domain of the regulatory (R)-subunits of PKA that participate in protein-protein interactions with an amphipathic helix region in A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). In order to develop a molecular understanding of the subcellular distribution and specific functions of PKA isozymes mediated by association with AKAPs, it is of importance to determine the apparent binding constants of the R-subunit-AKAP interactions. Here, we present a novel approach using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to examine directly the association and dissociation of AKAPs with all four R-subunit isoforms immobilized on a modified cAMP surface with a high level of accuracy. We show that both AKAP79 and S-AKAP84/D-AKAP1 bind RIIalpha very well (apparent K(D) values of 0.5 and 2 nM, respectively). Both proteins also bind RIIbeta quite well, but with three- to fourfold lower affinities than those observed versus RIIalpha. However, only S-AKAP84/D-AKAP1 interacts with RIalpha at a nanomolar affinity (apparent K(D) of 185 nM). In comparison, AKAP95 binds RIIalpha (apparent K(D) of 5.9 nM) with a tenfold higher affinity than RIIbeta and has no detectable binding to RIalpha. Surface competition assays with increasing concentrations of a competitor peptide covering amino acid residues 493 to 515 of the thyroid anchoring protein Ht31, demonstrated that Ht31, but not a proline-substituted peptide, Ht31-P, competed binding of RIIalpha and RIIbeta to all the AKAPs examined (EC(50)-values from 6 to 360 nM). Furthermore, RIalpha interaction with S-AKAP84/D-AKAP1 was competed (EC(50) 355 nM) with the same peptide. Here we report for the first time an approach to determine apparent rate- and equilibria binding constants for the interaction of all PKA isoforms with any AKAP as well as a novel approach for characterizing peptide competitors that disrupt PKA-AKAP anchoring

  3. Characterization of angiotensin converting enzyme by [3H]captopril binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strittmatter, S.M.; Snyder, S.H.

    1986-01-01

    We demonstrate that [3H]captopril selectively labels angiotensin converting enzyme (EC 3.14.15.1) (ACE) and employ this technique to probe enzyme-inhibitor interactions. [3H]Captopril binding sites copurify with ACE activity from rat lung or rat brain. At each stage of the purification the Vmax/Bmax ratio, or kcat is 17,000 min-1 with hippuryl-L-histidyl-L-leucine as substrate. The specificity of [3H]captopril binding is apparent in the similar pharmacologic profile of inhibition in crude and pure enzyme preparations. Furthermore, binding sites and enzyme activity comigrate in gel filtration and sucrose gradient sedimentation experiments. Equilibrium analysis of [3H]captopril binding to purified ACE reveals a Bmax of 6 nmol/mg of protein (KD = 2 nM), demonstrating the presence of one inhibitor binding site per polypeptide chain. The kinetics of [3H]captopril binding are characterized by monophasic association and dissociation rate constants of 0.026 nM-1 min-1 and 0.034 min-1, respectively. The affinity of ACE for both [3H] captopril and enalaprilat is greater at 37 degrees than at 0 degree, demonstrating that these interactions are entropically driven, perhaps by an isomerization of the enzyme molecule. The ionic requirements for [3H]captopril binding and substrate catalysis differ. Chloride and bromide ion, but not fluoride, are about 100-fold more potent stimulators of binding than catalysis. When the active site Zn2+ ion is replaced by Co2+, catalysis was stimulated 2-fold, whereas binding activity was decreased by 70%

  4. Computation of the binding affinities of catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitors: multisubstate relative free energy calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, P Nuno; Bonifácio, Maria João; Loureiro, Ana Isabel; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício

    2012-04-05

    Alchemical free energy simulations are amongst the most accurate techniques for the computation of the free energy changes associated with noncovalent protein-ligand interactions. A procedure is presented to estimate the relative binding free energies of several ligands to the same protein target where multiple, low-energy configurational substates might coexist, as opposed to one unique structure. The contributions of all individual substates were estimated, explicitly, with the free energy perturbation method, and combined in a rigorous fashion to compute the overall relative binding free energies and dissociation constants. It is shown that, unless the most stable bound forms are known a priori, inaccurate results may be obtained if the contributions of multiple substates are ignored. The method was applied to study the complex formed between human catechol-O-methyltransferase and BIA 9-1067, a newly developed tight-binding inhibitor that is currently under clinical evaluation for the therapy of Parkinson's disease. Our results reveal an exceptionally high-binding affinity (K(d) in subpicomolar range) and provide insightful clues on the interactions and mechanism of inhibition. The inhibitor is, itself, a slowly reacting substrate of the target enzyme and is released from the complex in the form of O-methylated product. By comparing the experimental catalytic rate (k(cat)) and the estimated dissociation rate (k(off)) constants of the enzyme-inhibitor complex, one can conclude that the observed inhibition potency (K(i)) is primarily dependent on the catalytic rate constant of the inhibitor's O-methylation, rather than the rate constant of dissociation of the complex. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Distribution coefficients (Kd's) for use in risk assessment models of the Kara Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, J; Boisson, F; Teyssie, J L; King, S E; Krosshavn, M; Carroll, M L; Fowler, S W; Povinec, P P; Baxter, M S

    1999-07-01

    As a prerequisite for most evaluations of radionuclide transport pathways in marine systems, it is necessary to obtain basic information on the sorption potential of contaminants onto particulate matter. Kd values for use in modeling radionuclide dispersion in the Kara Sea have been determined as part of several international programs addressing the problem of radioactive debris residing in Arctic Seas. Field and laboratory Kd experiments were conducted for the following radionuclides associated with nuclear waste: americium, europium, plutonium, cobalt, cesium and strontium. Emphasis has been placed on two regions in the Kara Sea: (i) the Novaya Zemlya Trough (NZT) and (ii) the mixing zones of the Ob and Yenisey Rivers (RMZ). Short-term batch Kd experiments were performed at-sea on ambient water column samples and on samples prepared both at-sea and in the laboratory by mixing filtered bottom water with small amounts of surficial bottom sediments (particle concentrations in samples = 1-30 mg/l). Within both regions, Kd values for individual radionuclides vary over two to three orders of magnitude. The relative particle affinities for radionuclides in the two regions are americium approximately equal to europium > plutonium > cobalt > cesium > strontium. The values determined in this study agree with minimum values given in the IAEA Technical Report [IAEA, 1985. Sediment Kd's and Concentration Factors for Radionuclides in the Marine Environment. Technical Report No. 247. International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna.]. Given the importance of Kd's in assessments of critical transport pathways for radionuclide contaminants, we recommend that Kd ranges of values for specific elements rather than single mean values be incorporated into model simulations of radionuclide dispersion.

  6. A method for estimating the diffuse attenuation coefficient (KdPAR)from paired temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Jordan S.; Rose, Kevin C.; Winslow, Luke A.; Read, Emily K.

    2015-01-01

    A new method for estimating the diffuse attenuation coefficient for photosynthetically active radiation (KdPAR) from paired temperature sensors was derived. We show that during cases where the attenuation of penetrating shortwave solar radiation is the dominant source of temperature changes, time series measurements of water temperatures at multiple depths (z1 and z2) are related to one another by a linear scaling factor (a). KdPAR can then be estimated by the simple equation KdPAR ln(a)/(z2/z1). A suggested workflow is presented that outlines procedures for calculating KdPAR according to this paired temperature sensor (PTS) method. This method is best suited for conditions when radiative temperature gains are large relative to physical noise. These conditions occur frequently on water bodies with low wind and/or high KdPARs but can be used for other types of lakes during time periods of low wind and/or where spatially redundant measurements of temperatures are available. The optimal vertical placement of temperature sensors according to a priori knowledge of KdPAR is also described. This information can be used to inform the design of future sensor deployments using the PTS method or for campaigns where characterizing sub-daily changes in temperatures is important. The PTS method provides a novel method to characterize light attenuation in aquatic ecosystems without expensive radiometric equipment or the user subjectivity inherent in Secchi depth measurements. This method also can enable the estimation of KdPAR at higher frequencies than many manual monitoring programs allow.

  7. Restricted tissue distribution of a 37-kD possible adherens junction protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, M L; Jones, J C; O'Keefe, E J

    1992-12-01

    A major polypeptide of M(r) 37,000 was purified from a desmosome-enriched citric acid-insoluble pellet of pig tongue epithelium. The polypeptide was solubilized from the 4-M urea-insoluble pellet with 9 M urea, and extracts were separated by carboxymethyl cellulose and gel filtration chromatography. The 37-kD protein was obtained in milligram quantities as a single band on two-dimensional gels in 30% yield after 21-fold purification from the citric acid-insoluble fraction. The protein is not glycosylated and has a pI of approximately 8.7. Although isolated from a fraction rich in desmosomes, the 37-kD protein is not a desmosomal protein. Indirect immunofluorescence analysis of frozen sections of tongue and other tissues demonstrated that antibodies raised to the 37-kD protein bound only to suprabasal cell layers at punctate regions of the periphery of the cell and was absent from most regions of epidermis, whereas antibodies to desmoplakins I and II, desmosomal proteins, bound similarly but in all epidermal layers. Immunoelectron microscopy localized the 37-kD protein to the cell periphery in regions between, but never in, desmosomes. By immunofluorescence, the 37-kD protein colocalized with actin as well as with vinculin and uvomorulin in oral tissues. Like the 37-kD protein, vinculin and uvomorulin were absent from the basal layer. Based on its appearance, localization, and solubility properties, the 37-kD protein is probably a component of adherens junctions; its restriction to suprabasal cells and exclusion from the epidermis are unique.

  8. Using the k-d Tree Data Structure to Accelerate Monte Carlo Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qile P; Xue, Bai; Siepmann, J Ilja

    2017-04-11

    The k-d tree data structure is implemented in a Monte Carlo (MC) molecular simulation program to accelerate the range search for particles or interaction sites within the cutoff distance when Lennard-Jones and Coulomb interactions are computed. MC simulations are performed for different molecules in various ensembles to assess the efficiency enhancements due to the k-d tree data structure. It is found that the use of k-d trees accelerates significantly simulations for Lennard-Jones particles in the NVT and NVT-Gibbs ensembles and for n-butane and 2,4,6,8,10,12,14,16,18,20,22-undecamethylpentacosane represented by the TraPPE-UA force field in the NpT ensemble. Simulations for TraPPE-UA ethanol in the NpT ensemble and for the rigid TIP4P water model in the Gibbs ensemble gain slightly in efficiency with the k-d tree, whereas simulations for TIP4P water in the NpT ensemble do not benefit from the use of the k-d tree. The speed-up can be attributed to the reduction in the number of distance calculations in the range search from scaling as [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text]. In addition, these tests suggest that the efficiency gain from the use of the k-d tree data structure depends on the flexibility of the molecular model (requiring configurational-bias MC moves to sample changes in conformation), on the ensemble (with open ensembles requiring special MC moves to aid particle transfers), and on the number of interaction sites per molecule (with compact multisite models not seeing an efficiency gain). Overall, the use of the k-d tree data structure can substantially enhance MC simulation efficiency for a variety of systems, and it will enable simulations for larger system sizes in the future.

  9. Theoretical Calculation of the NMR Spin-Spin Coupling Constants and the NMR Shifts Allow Distinguishability between the Specific Direct and the Water-Mediated Binding of a Divalent Metal Cation to Guanine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sychrovský, Vladimír; Šponer, Jiří; Hobza, Pavel

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 126, č. 2 (2004), s. 663-672 ISSN 0002-7863 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : nuclear-magnetic-resonance * ion binding * base-pairs Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 6.903, year: 2004

  10. How the K(d) Approach Undermines Groundwater Cleanup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bethke, Craig M.; Brady, Patrick V.

    1999-07-19

    Environmental scientists have long appreciated that the distribution coefficient (the ''K{sub d}'' or ''constant K{sub d}'') approach predicts the partitioning of heavy metals between sediment and groundwater inaccurately; nonetheless, transport models applied to problems of environmental protection and groundwater remediation almost invariably employ this technique. To examine the consequences of this practice, we consider transport in one dimension of Pb and other heavy metals through an aquifer containing hydrous ferric oxide, onto which heavy metals sorb strongly. We compare the predictions of models calculated using the K{sub d} approach to those given by surface complexation theory, which is more realistic physically and chemically. The two modeling techniques give qualitatively differing results that lead to divergent cleanup strategies. The results for surface complexation theory show that water flushing is ineffective at displacing significant amounts of Pb from the sorbing surface. The effluent from such treatment contains a ''tail'' of small but significant levels of contamination that persists indefinitely. Subsurface zones of Pb contamination, furthermore, are largely immobile in flowing groundwater. These results stand in sharp contrast to the predictions of models constructed using the k{sub d} approach, yet are consistent with experience in the laboratory and field.

  11. Dilazep inhibits binding of batrachotoxin to sodium channels in canine sarcolemmal vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, K; Hashizume, H; Inagaki, S I; Abiko, Y

    1995-01-01

    We studied the effect of dilazep on the binding of [3H]- batrachotoxinin A 20 alpha-benzoate ([3H]BTXB), which binds to and stabilizes the activated state of the Na+ channel, and compared it with that of lidocaine in canine cardiac sarcolemmal vesicles. Dilazep inhibited the specific [3H]BTXB binding in a dose-dependent manner with an IC50 value of 0.37 microM, while lidocaine inhibited it with an IC50 value of 92 microM. Scatchard analysis of [3H]BTXB binding demonstrated that both dilazep and lidocaine reduced the amax without a marked effect on the K(D). The inhibition of [3H]BTXB induced by dilazep was reversible. Both dilazep (4 microM) and lidocaine (100 microM) increased the dissociation rate constant of [3H]BTXB only in concentrations which are about a 10-fold greater than their IC50, indicating the low affinity of both drugs for the [3H]BTXB-bound Na+ channel. However, dilazep (0.5 microM) and lidocaine (100 microM) decreased significantly the association rate constant of the [3H]BTXB binding at concentrations near their IC50, indicating that the affinity of both drugs for the [3H]BTXB-unbound Na+ channel is relatively high. These results suggest that, in canine cardiac membrane vesicles, the effect of dilazep in inhibiting the binding of [3H]BTXB and stabilizing the Na+ channel is similar to that of lidocaine, but the potency of dilazep is greater than that of lidocaine.

  12. Characterization of the Klebsiella aerogenes urease accessory protein UreD in fusion with the maltose binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Eric L; Hausinger, Robert P

    2010-05-01

    Assembly of the Klebsiella aerogenes urease metallocenter requires four accessory proteins, UreD, UreE, UreF, and UreG, to effectively deliver and incorporate two Ni2+ ions into the nascent active site of the urease apoprotein (UreABC). Each accessory protein has been purified and characterized with the exception of UreD due to its insolubility when it is overproduced in recombinant cells. In this study, a translational fusion was made between the maltose binding protein (MBP) and UreD, with the resulting MBP-UreD found to be soluble in Escherichia coli cell extracts and able to complement a DeltaureD-urease cluster in this host microorganism. MBP-UreD was purified as a large multimer (> 670 kDa) that bound approximately 2.5 Ni2+ ions (K(d) of approximately 50 microM, where K(d) is the dissociation constant) per UreD protomer according to equilibrium dialysis measurements. Zn2+ directly competes with 10-fold higher affinity (approximately 4 Zn2+ ions per protomer; K(d) of 5 microM) for the Ni2+ binding sites. MBP pulldown experiments demonstrated that the UreD domain of MBP-UreD formed in vivo complexes with UreF, UreG, UreF plus UreG, or UreABC when these proteins were overproduced in the same E. coli cells. In addition, a UreABC-(MBP-UreD)-UreFG complex was observed in cells producing all urease components. Comparative in vitro binding experiments with purified proteins demonstrated an approximate 1:1 binding ratio between the UreD domain of MBP-UreD and the UreF domain of the UreEF fusion, only weak or transient interaction between MBP-UreD and UreG, and no binding with UreABC. These studies are the first to describe the properties of purified UreD, and they extend our understanding of its binding partners both in vitro and in the cell.

  13. Acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) can mediate intermembrane acyl-CoA transport and donate acyl-CoA for beta-oxidation and glycerolipid synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, J T; Færgeman, Nils J.; Kristiansen, K

    1994-01-01

    The dissociation constants for octanoyl-CoA, dodecanoyl-CoA and hexadecanoyl-CoA binding to acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) were determined by using titration microcalorimetry. The KD values obtained, (0.24 +/- 0.02) x 10(-6) M, (0.65 +/- 0.2) x 10(-8) M and (0.45 +/- 0.2) x 10(-13) M respectively......, were much lower than expected. ACBP was able to extract hexadecanoyl-CoA from phosphatidylcholine membranes immobilized on a nitrocellulose membrane. The acyl-CoA/ACBP complex formed was able to transport acyl-CoA to mitochondria or microsomes in suspension, or to microsomes immobilized...

  14. Division algebras and extended N = 2, 4, 8 super KdVs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrion, H.L.; Rojas, M.; Toppan, F. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao de Teoria de Campos e Particulas]. E-mail: lenyj@cbpf.br; mrojas@cbpf.br; toppan@cbpf.br

    2001-09-01

    The first example of an N = 8 supersymmetric extension of the KdV equation is here explicitly constructed. It involves 8 bosonic and 8 fermionic fields. It corresponds to the unique N = 8 solution based a generalized hamiltonian dynamics with (generalized) Poisson brackets given by the Non-associate N = 8 Superconformal Algebra. The complete list of inequivalent classes of parametric-dependent N = 3 and N = 4 superKdVs obtained from the 'Non-associative N= 8 SCA' is also furnished. Furthermore, a fundamental domain characterizing the class of inequivalent N = 4 superKdVs based on the 'minimal N = 4 SCA' is given. (author)

  15. Lie symmetry based-analytical and numerical approach for modified Burgers-KdV equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vikas; Kaur, Lakhveer; Kumar, Ajay; Koksal, Mehmet Emir

    2018-03-01

    In this work, the variable-coefficient modified Burgers-KdV equation, which arises in modeling various physical phenomena, is studied for exact and numerical solution based on Lie symmetry. The infinitesimals of the group of transformations which leaves this equation invariant are furnished along with the admissible forms of the variable coefficients. The optimal systems of one-dimensional subalgebras of the Lie symmetry algebras are determined with the adjoint action of the symmetry group. These are then used to establish new power series solution and exact solutions of variable-coefficient modified Burgers-KdV equation. Further, RK4 (e.g. Fourth Order Runge Kutta) method is applied to the reduced ODE for constructing numerical solutions of the modified Burger-KdV equation.

  16. The Fine Structure Constant

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    The article discusses the importance of the fine structure constant in quantum mechanics, along with the brief history of how it emerged. Al- though Sommerfelds idea of elliptical orbits has been replaced by wave mechanics, the fine struc- ture constant he introduced has remained as an important parameter in the field of ...

  17. The Cosmological Constant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carroll Sean M.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a review of the physics and cosmology of the cosmological constant. Focusing on recent developments, I present a pedagogical overview of cosmology in the presence of a cosmological constant, observational constraints on its magnitude, and the physics of a small (and potentially nonzero vacuum energy.

  18. On Aryabhata's Planetary Constants

    OpenAIRE

    Kak, Subhash

    2001-01-01

    This paper examines the theory of a Babylonian origin of Aryabhata's planetary constants. It shows that Aryabhata's basic constant is closer to the Indian counterpart than to the Babylonian one. Sketching connections between Aryabhata's framework and earlier Indic astronomical ideas on yugas and cyclic calendar systems, it is argued that Aryabhata's system is an outgrowth of an earlier Indic tradition.

  19. N = 4 super KdV hierarchy in N = 4 and N = 2 superspaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delduc, F.

    1995-10-01

    The results of further analysis of the integrability properties of the N = 4 supersymmetric KdV equation deduced earlier as a Hamiltonian flow on N 4 SU(2) superconformal algebra in the harmonic N = 4 superspace are presented. To make this equation and the relevant Hamiltonian structures more tractable, it is reformulated in the ordinary N = 4 and further in N = 2 superspaces. These results provide a strong evidence that the unique N = 4 SU(2) super KdV hierarchy exists. (author)

  20. Using KD(asterisk)P modulators for polarization measurements of the sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, E. A.

    1990-01-01

    Longitudinal KD(asterisk)Ps are used in ground-based solar magnetographs to eliminate seeing effects by rapidly changing their retardation characteristics. Although one of the main applications for longitudinal KD(asteriak)Ps has been their use as a variable retarder for 'imaging' applications, an understanding of their limitations is important when developing scientific instruments that make very accurate polarization measurements. This paper discusses some of the problems associated with the use of these devices in the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) vector magnetograph, including temperature, field of view errors, and electrical characteristics.

  1. Key KdSOC1 gene expression profiles during plantlet morphogenesis under hormone, photoperiod, and drought treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C; Zhu, C; Zeng, H M

    2016-02-11

    Kalanchoe daigremontiana utilizes plantlet formation between its zigzag leaf margins as its method of asexual reproduction. In this study, K. daigremontiana SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS 1 (KdSOC1), a key intermediate in the transition from vegetative to asexual growth, was cloned. Furthermore, its expression profiles during plantlet formation under different environmental and hormone induction conditions were analyzed. The full-KdSOC1 cDNA sequence length was 1410 bp with 70% shared homology with Carya cathayensis SOC1. The conserved domain search of KdSOC1 showed the absence of I and C domains, which might indicate novel biological functions in K. daigremontiana. The full-KdSOC1 promoter sequence was 1401 bp long and contained multiple-hormone-responsive cis-acting elements. Hormone induction assays showed that gibberellins and salicylic acid mainly regulated KdSOC1 expression. The swift change from low to high KdSOC1 expression levels during long-day induction was accompanied by the rapid emergence of plantlets. Drought stress stimulated KdSOC1 expression in leaves both with and without plantlet formation. Together, the results suggested that KdSOC1 was closely involved in environmental stimulation signal perception and the transduction of K. daigremontiana plantlet formation. Therefore, future identification of KdSOC1 functions might reveal key information that will help elucidate the transition network between embryogenesis and organogenesis during plantlet formation.

  2. Kinetic analysis of transport and opioid receptor binding of ( sup 3 H)(-)-cyclofoxy in rat brain in vivo: Implications for human studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawada, Y.; Kawai, R.; McManaway, M.; Otsuki, H.; Rice, K.C.; Patlak, C.S.; Blasberg, R.G. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1991-03-01

    (3H)Cyclofoxy (CF: 17-cyclopropylmethyl-3,14-dihydroxy-4,5-alpha-epoxy-6-beta-fluoromorp hinan) is an opioid antagonist with affinity to both mu and kappa subtypes that was synthesized for quantitative evaluation of opioid receptor binding in vivo. Two sets of experiments in rats were analyzed. The first involved determining the metabolite-corrected blood concentration and tissue distribution of CF in brain 1 to 60 min after i.v. bolus injection. The second involved measuring brain washout for 15 to 120 s following intracarotid artery injection of CF. A physiologically based model and a classical compartmental pharmacokinetic model were compared. The models included different assumptions for transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB); estimates of nonspecific tissue binding and specific binding to a single opiate receptor site were found to be essentially the same with both models. The nonspecific binding equilibrium constant varied modestly in different brain structures (Keq = 3-9), whereas the binding potential (BP) varied over a much broader range (BP = 0.6-32). In vivo estimates of the opioid receptor dissociation constant were similar for different brain structures (KD = 2.1-5.2 nM), whereas the apparent receptor density (Bmax) varied between 1 (cerebellum) and 78 (thalamus) pmol/g of brain. The receptor dissociation rate constants in cerebrum (k4 = 0.08-0.16 min-1; koff = 0.16-0.23 min-1) and brain vascular permeability (PS = 1.3-3.4 ml/min/g) are sufficiently high to achieve equilibrium conditions within a reasonable period of time. Graphical analysis of the data is inappropriate due to the high tissue-loss rate constant for CF in brain. From these findings, CF should be a very useful opioid receptor ligand for the estimation of the receptor binding parameters in human subjects using (18F)CF and positron emission tomography.

  3. Kinetic analysis of transport and opioid receptor binding of [3H](-)-cyclofoxy in rat brain in vivo: Implications for human studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Y.; Kawai, R.; McManaway, M.; Otsuki, H.; Rice, K.C.; Patlak, C.S.; Blasberg, R.G.

    1991-01-01

    [3H]Cyclofoxy (CF: 17-cyclopropylmethyl-3,14-dihydroxy-4,5-alpha-epoxy-6-beta-fluoromorp hinan) is an opioid antagonist with affinity to both mu and kappa subtypes that was synthesized for quantitative evaluation of opioid receptor binding in vivo. Two sets of experiments in rats were analyzed. The first involved determining the metabolite-corrected blood concentration and tissue distribution of CF in brain 1 to 60 min after i.v. bolus injection. The second involved measuring brain washout for 15 to 120 s following intracarotid artery injection of CF. A physiologically based model and a classical compartmental pharmacokinetic model were compared. The models included different assumptions for transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB); estimates of nonspecific tissue binding and specific binding to a single opiate receptor site were found to be essentially the same with both models. The nonspecific binding equilibrium constant varied modestly in different brain structures (Keq = 3-9), whereas the binding potential (BP) varied over a much broader range (BP = 0.6-32). In vivo estimates of the opioid receptor dissociation constant were similar for different brain structures (KD = 2.1-5.2 nM), whereas the apparent receptor density (Bmax) varied between 1 (cerebellum) and 78 (thalamus) pmol/g of brain. The receptor dissociation rate constants in cerebrum (k4 = 0.08-0.16 min-1; koff = 0.16-0.23 min-1) and brain vascular permeability (PS = 1.3-3.4 ml/min/g) are sufficiently high to achieve equilibrium conditions within a reasonable period of time. Graphical analysis of the data is inappropriate due to the high tissue-loss rate constant for CF in brain. From these findings, CF should be a very useful opioid receptor ligand for the estimation of the receptor binding parameters in human subjects using [18F]CF and positron emission tomography

  4. The cosmological constant problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolgov, A.D.

    1989-05-01

    A review of the cosmological term problem is presented. Baby universe model and the compensating field model are discussed. The importance of more accurate data on the Hubble constant and the Universe age is stressed. 18 refs

  5. Resolving Two-dimensional Kinetics of the Integrin αIIbβ3-Fibrinogen Interactions Using Binding-Unbinding Correlation Spectroscopy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinov, Rustem I.; Mekler, Andrey; Shuman, Henry; Bennett, Joel S.; Barsegov, Valeri; Weisel, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Using a combined experimental and theoretical approach named binding-unbinding correlation spectroscopy (BUCS), we describe the two-dimensional kinetics of interactions between fibrinogen and the integrin αIIbβ3, the ligand-receptor pair essential for platelet function during hemostasis and thrombosis. The methodology uses the optical trap to probe force-free association of individual surface-attached fibrinogen and αIIbβ3 molecules and forced dissociation of an αIIbβ3-fibrinogen complex. This novel approach combines force clamp measurements of bond lifetimes with the binding mode to quantify the dependence of the binding probability on the interaction time. We found that fibrinogen-reactive αIIbβ3 pre-exists in at least two states that differ in their zero force on-rates (kon1 = 1.4 × 10−4 and kon2 = 2.3 × 10−4 μm2/s), off-rates (koff1 = 2.42 and koff2 = 0.60 s−1), and dissociation constants (Kd1 = 1.7 × 104 and Kd2 = 2.6 × 103 μm−2). The integrin activator Mn2+ changed the on-rates and affinities (Kd1 = 5 × 104 and Kd2 = 0.3 × 103 μm−2) but did not affect the off-rates. The strength of αIIbβ3-fibrinogen interactions was time-dependent due to a progressive increase in the fraction of the high affinity state of the αIIbβ3-fibrinogen complex characterized by a faster on-rate. Upon Mn2+-induced integrin activation, the force-dependent off-rates decrease while the complex undergoes a conformational transition from a lower to higher affinity state. The results obtained provide quantitative estimates of the two-dimensional kinetic rates for the low and high affinity αIIbβ3 and fibrinogen interactions at the single molecule level and offer direct evidence for the time- and force-dependent changes in αIIbβ3 conformation and ligand binding activity, underlying the dynamics of fibrinogen-mediated platelet adhesion and aggregation. PMID:22893701

  6. Deconstructing the Cosmological Constant

    CERN Document Server

    Jejjala, V; Minic, D; Jejjala, Vishnu; Leigh, Robert G.; Minic, Djordje

    2003-01-01

    Deconstruction provides a novel way of dealing with the notoriously difficult ultraviolet problems of four-dimensional gravity. This approach also naturally leads to a new perspective on the holographic principle, tying it to the fundamental requirements of unitarity and diffeomorphism invariance, as well as to a new viewpoint on the cosmological constant problem. The numerical smallness of the cosmological constant is implied by a unique combination of holography and supersymmetry, opening a new window into the fundamental physics of the vacuum.

  7. Mapping Mammalian Cell-type-specific Transcriptional Regulatory Networks Using KD-CAGE and ChIP-seq Data in the TC-YIK Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizio, Marina; Ishizu, Yuri; Itoh, Masayoshi; Lassmann, Timo; Hasegawa, Akira; Kubosaki, Atsutaka; Severin, Jessica; Kawaji, Hideya; Nakamura, Yukio; Suzuki, Harukazu; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R R

    2015-01-01

    Mammals are composed of hundreds of different cell types with specialized functions. Each of these cellular phenotypes are controlled by different combinations of transcription factors. Using a human non islet cell insulinoma cell line (TC-YIK) which expresses insulin and the majority of known pancreatic beta cell specific genes as an example, we describe a general approach to identify key cell-type-specific transcription factors (TFs) and their direct and indirect targets. By ranking all human TFs by their level of enriched expression in TC-YIK relative to a broad collection of samples (FANTOM5), we confirmed known key regulators of pancreatic function and development. Systematic siRNA mediated perturbation of these TFs followed by qRT-PCR revealed their interconnections with NEUROD1 at the top of the regulation hierarchy and its depletion drastically reducing insulin levels. For 15 of the TF knock-downs (KD), we then used Cap Analysis of Gene Expression (CAGE) to identify thousands of their targets genome-wide (KD-CAGE). The data confirm NEUROD1 as a key positive regulator in the transcriptional regulatory network (TRN), and ISL1, and PROX1 as antagonists. As a complimentary approach we used ChIP-seq on four of these factors to identify NEUROD1, LMX1A, PAX6, and RFX6 binding sites in the human genome. Examining the overlap between genes perturbed in the KD-CAGE experiments and genes with a ChIP-seq peak within 50 kb of their promoter, we identified direct transcriptional targets of these TFs. Integration of KD-CAGE and ChIP-seq data shows that both NEUROD1 and LMX1A work as the main transcriptional activators. In the core TRN (i.e., TF-TF only), NEUROD1 directly transcriptionally activates the pancreatic TFs HSF4, INSM1, MLXIPL, MYT1, NKX6-3, ONECUT2, PAX4, PROX1, RFX6, ST18, DACH1, and SHOX2, while LMX1A directly transcriptionally activates DACH1, SHOX2, PAX6, and PDX1. Analysis of these complementary datasets suggests the need for caution in interpreting Ch

  8. Interactions of Soliton Waves for a Generalized Discrete KdV Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tong; Zhu, Zuo-Nong

    2017-07-01

    It is well known that soliton interactions in discrete integrable systems often possess new properties which are different from the continuous integrable systems, e.g., we found that there are such discrete solitons in a semidiscrete integrable system (the time variable is continuous and the space one is discrete) that the shorter solitary waves travel faster than the taller ones. Very recently, this kind of soliton was also observed in a full discrete generalized KdV system (the both of time and space variables are discrete) introduced by Kanki et al. In this paper, for the generalized discrete KdV (gdKdV) equation, we describe its richer structures of one-soliton solutions. The interactions of two-soliton waves to the gdKdV equation are studied. Some new features of the soliton interactions are proposed by rigorous theoretical analysis. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11501353, 11271254, 11428102, and 11671255, also supported by the Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness of Spain under contracts MTM2012-37070 and MTM2016-80276-P (AEI/FEDER, EU)

  9. Travelling wave solutions for a singularly perturbed Burgers–KdV ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This paper concerns with the existence problem of travelling wave solutions to a singularly perturbed Burgers–KdV equation. For this, we use the dynamical systems approach, specifically, the geometric singular perturbation theory and centre manifold theory. We also numerically show approximations, in particular, ...

  10. New exact solutions to the generalized KdV equation with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Improved Fan subequation method; bifurcation method; generalized KdV equation; soliton solution; kink solution; periodic solution. ... Shengqiang Tang1 Dahe Feng1. School of Mathematics and Computing Science, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Guilin, Guangxi, 541004, People's Republic of China ...

  11. Analytical and numerical solutions of the Schrödinger–KdV equation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Schrödinger–KdV equation with power-law nonlinearity is studied in this paper. The solitary wave ansatz method is used to carry out the integration of the equation and obtain one-soliton solution. The ′/ method is also used to integrate this equation. Subsequently, the variational iteration method and homotopy ...

  12. Compacton-like solutions for modified KdV and nonlinear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    through asymmetric twin-core fibres, we hope that the newly found compacton may be launched in a long-haul telecommunication network utilizing asymmetric twin-core fibres. Keywords. Compacton-like solutions; modified KdV equation; nonlinear Schrödinger equation; fractional transform. PACS Nos 42.81.Dp; 42.65.

  13. Deformation and recursion for the $N = 2 \\; \\alpha = 1$ supersymmetric KdV hierarchy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorin, A.S.; Kersten, P.H.M.

    2002-01-01

    A detailed description is given for the construction of the deformation of the $N=2$ supersymmetric $\\alpha=1$ KdV-equation, leading to the recursion operator for symmetries and the zero-th Hamiltonian structure; the solution to a longstanding problem.

  14. The fractional coupled KdV equations: Exact solutions and white noise functional approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghany, Hossam A.; El Bab, A. S. Okb; Zabel, A. M.; Hyder, Abd-Allah

    2013-01-01

    Variable coefficients and Wick-type stochastic fractional coupled KdV equations are investigated. By using the modified fractional sub-equation method, Hermite transform, and white noise theory the exact travelling wave solutions and white noise functional solutions are obtained, including the generalized exponential, hyperbolic, and trigonometric types. (general)

  15. White noise solutions to the stochastic mKdV equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhongjun; Wei Caimin

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present the white noise solutions of the stochastic mKdV equation via the Hermite transformation and variable-coefficient generalized projected Ricatti equation expansion method. These solutions include white noise solitary wave solutions, white noise soliton-like solutions and white noise trigonometric function solutions.

  16. Analytical and numerical solutions of the Schrödinger–KdV equation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    journal of. January 2012 physics pp. 59–90. Analytical and numerical solutions of the Schrödinger–KdV equation. MANEL LABIDI1, GHODRAT EBADI2, ESSAID ZERRAD3 and. ANJAN BISWAS4,∗. 1Laboratory of Engineering Mathematics, Tunisia Polytechnic School, University of Carthage,. BP 743, La Marsa 2070, ...

  17. Compacton-like solutions for modified KdV and nonlinear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-07-18

    Jul 18, 2014 ... ... case of modified KdV equation. Keeping in mind the significance of nonlinear Schrödinger equation with external source, for pulse propagation through asymmetric twin-core fibres, we hope that the newly found compacton may be launched in a long-haul telecommunication network utilizing asymmetric ...

  18. Travelling wave solutions for a singularly perturbed Burgers–KdV ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper concerns with the existence problem of travelling wave solutions to a singularly perturbed Burgers–KdV equation. For this, we use the dynamical systems approach, specifically, the geometric singular perturbation theory and centre manifold theory. We also numerically show approximations, in particular, for ...

  19. Implementasi KD-Tree K-Means Clustering untuk Klasterisasi Dokumen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Budiman Gosno

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Klasterisasi dokumen adalah suatu proses pengelompokan dokumen secara otomatis dan unsupervised. Klasterisasi dokumen merupakan permasalahan yang sering ditemui dalam berbagai bidang seperti text mining dan sistem temu kembali informasi. Metode klasterisasi dokumen yang memiliki akurasi dan efisiensi waktu yang tinggi sangat diperlukan untuk meningkatkan hasil pada mesin pencari web,  dan untuk proses filtering. Salah satu metode klasterisasi yang telah dikenal dan diaplikasikan dalam klasterisasi dokumen adalah K-Means Clustering. Tetapi K-Means Clustering sensitif terhadap pemilihan posisi awal dari titik tengah klaster sehingga pemilihan posisi awal dari titik tengah klaster yang buruk akan mengakibatkan K-Means Clustering terjebak dalam local optimum. KD-Tree K-Means Clustering merupakan perbaikan dari K-Means Clustering. KD-Tree K-Means Clustering menggunakan struktur data K-Dimensional Tree dan nilai kerapatan pada proses inisialisasi titik tengah klaster. Pada makalah ini diimplementasikan algoritma KD-Tree K-Means Clustering untuk permasalahan klasterisasi dokumen. Performa klasterisasi dokumen yang dihasilkan oleh metode KD-Tree K-Means Clustering pada data set 20 newsgroup memiliki nilai distorsi 3×105 lebih rendah dibandingkan dengan nilai rerata distorsi K-Means Clustering dan nilai NIG 0,09 lebih baik dibandingkan dengan nilai NIG K-Means Clustering.

  20. Solid/liquid partition coefficients (Kd) for selected soils and sediments at Forsmark and Laxemar-Simpevarp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, Steve; Long, Jeff; Sanipelli, Barb; Sohlenius, Gustav

    2009-03-01

    Soil and sediment solid/liquid partition coefficients (Kd) are used to indicate the relative mobility of radionuclides and elements of concern from nuclear fuel waste, as well as from other sources. The Kd data are inherently extremely variable, but also vary systematically with key environmental attributes. For soil Kd, the key variables are pH, clay content and organic carbon content. For sediment Kd, water type (freshwater versus marine) and sediment type (benthic versus suspended) are important. This report summarized Kd data for soils and sediments computed from indigenous stable element concentrations measured at the Forsmark and Laxemar-Simpevarp sites. These were then compared to several literature sources of Kd data for Ce, Cl, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, Ho, I, La, Mn, Mo, Nb, Nd, Ni, Np, Pa, Pb, Pu, Ra, Sb, Se, Sm, Sn, Sr, Tc, Th, Tm, U and Yb. The Kd data computed from indigenous stable element concentrations may be especially relevant for assessment of long-lived radionuclides from deep disposal of waste, because the long time frame for the potential releases is more consistent with the steady state measured using indigenous stable elements. For almost every one of these elements in soils, a statistically meaningful regression equation was developed to allow estimation of Kd for any soil given a modest amount of information about the soil. Nonetheless, the median residual geometric standard deviation (GSD) was 4.3-fold, implying confidence bounds of about 18-fold above and below the best estimate Kd. For sediment, the values are categorised simply by water type and sediment type. The median GSD for sediment Kd as measured at the Forsmark and Laxemar-Simpevarp sites was 2.5-fold, but the median GSD among literature values was as high as 8.6-fold. Clearly, there remains considerable uncertainty in Kd values, and it is important to account for this in assessment applications

  1. Solid/liquid partition coefficients (Kd) for selected soils and sediments at Forsmark and Laxemar-Simpevarp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppard, Steve; Long, Jeff; Sanipelli, Barb (ECOMatters Inc., Pinawa (Canada)); Sohlenius, Gustav (Geological Survey of Sweden (SGU), Uppsala (Sweden))

    2009-03-15

    Soil and sediment solid/liquid partition coefficients (Kd) are used to indicate the relative mobility of radionuclides and elements of concern from nuclear fuel waste, as well as from other sources. The Kd data are inherently extremely variable, but also vary systematically with key environmental attributes. For soil Kd, the key variables are pH, clay content and organic carbon content. For sediment Kd, water type (freshwater versus marine) and sediment type (benthic versus suspended) are important. This report summarized Kd data for soils and sediments computed from indigenous stable element concentrations measured at the Forsmark and Laxemar-Simpevarp sites. These were then compared to several literature sources of Kd data for Ce, Cl, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, Ho, I, La, Mn, Mo, Nb, Nd, Ni, Np, Pa, Pb, Pu, Ra, Sb, Se, Sm, Sn, Sr, Tc, Th, Tm, U and Yb. The Kd data computed from indigenous stable element concentrations may be especially relevant for assessment of long-lived radionuclides from deep disposal of waste, because the long time frame for the potential releases is more consistent with the steady state measured using indigenous stable elements. For almost every one of these elements in soils, a statistically meaningful regression equation was developed to allow estimation of Kd for any soil given a modest amount of information about the soil. Nonetheless, the median residual geometric standard deviation (GSD) was 4.3-fold, implying confidence bounds of about 18-fold above and below the best estimate Kd. For sediment, the values are categorised simply by water type and sediment type. The median GSD for sediment Kd as measured at the Forsmark and Laxemar-Simpevarp sites was 2.5-fold, but the median GSD among literature values was as high as 8.6-fold. Clearly, there remains considerable uncertainty in Kd values, and it is important to account for this in assessment applications

  2. Development of a Novel Tetravalent Synthetic Peptide That Binds to Phosphatidic Acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Ogawa

    Full Text Available We employed a multivalent peptide-library screening technique to identify a peptide motif that binds to phosphatidic acid (PA, but not to other phospholipids such as phosphatidylcholine (PC, phosphatidylethanolamine (PE, and phosphatidylserine (PS. A tetravalent peptide with the sequence motif of MARWHRHHH, designated as PAB-TP (phosphatidic acid-binding tetravalent peptide, was shown to bind as low as 1 mol% of PA in the bilayer membrane composed of PC and cholesterol. Kinetic analysis of the interaction between PAB-TP and the membranes containing 10 mol% of PA showed that PAB-TP associated with PA with a low dissociation constant of KD = 38 ± 5 nM. Coexistence of cholesterol or PE with PA in the membrane enhanced the PAB-TP binding to PA by increasing the ionization of the phosphomonoester head group as well as by changing the microenvironment of PA molecules in the membrane. Amino acid replacement analysis demonstrated that the tryptophan residue at position 4 of PAB-TP was involved in the interaction with PA. Furthermore, a series of amino acid substitutions at positions 5 to 9 of PAB-TP revealed the involvement of consecutive histidine and arginine residues in recognition of the phosphomonoester head group of PA. Our results demonstrate that the recognition of PA by PAB-TP is achieved by a combination of hydrophobic, electrostatic and hydrogen-bond interactions, and that the tetravalent structure of PAB-TP contributes to the high affinity binding to PA in the membrane. The novel PA-binding tetravalent peptide PAB-TP will provide insight into the molecular mechanism underlying the recognition of PA by PA-binding proteins that are involved in various cellular events.

  3. Kinetic study of the effects of calcium ions on cationic artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) peroxidase: calcium binding, steady-state kinetics and reactions with hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiner, Alexander N P; Sidrach, Lara; Chazarra, Soledad; Varón, Ramón; Tudela, José; García-Cánovas, Francisco; Rodríguez-López, José Neptuno

    2004-01-01

    The apparent catalytic constant (k(cat)) of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) peroxidase (AKPC) with 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) increased 130-fold in the presence of calcium ions (Ca2+) but the affinity (K(m)) of the enzyme for ABTS was 500 times lower than for Ca2+-free AKPC. AKPC is known to exhibit an equilibrium between 6-aquo hexa-coordinate and penta-coordinate forms of the haem iron that is modulated by Ca2+ and affects compound I formation. Measurements of the Ca2+ dissociation constant (K(D)) were complicated by the water-association/dissociation equilibrium yielding a global value more than 1000 times too high. The value for the Ca2+ binding step alone has now been determined to be K(D) approximately 10 nM. AKPC-Ca2+ was more resistant to inactivation by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and exhibited increased catalase activity. An analysis of the complex H(2)O(2) concentration dependent kinetics of Ca2+-free AKPC is presented.

  4. The University Münster Model Surgery System for Orthognathic Surgery. Part II -- KD-MMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehmer, Ulrike; Joos, Ulrich; Ziebura, Thomas; Flieger, Stefanie; Wiechmann, Dirk

    2013-01-04

    Model surgery is an integral part of the planning procedure in orthognathic surgery. Most concepts comprise cutting the dental cast off its socket. The standardized spacer plates of the KD-MMS provide for a non-destructive, reversible and reproducible means of maxillary and/or mandibular plaster cast separation. In the course of development of the system various articulator types were evaluated with regard to their capability to provide a means of realizing the concepts comprised of the KD-MMS. Special attention was dedicated to the ability to perform three-dimensional displacements without cutting of plaster casts. Various utilities were developed to facilitate maxillary displacement in accordance to the planning. Objectives of this development comprised the ability to implement the values established in the course of two-dimensional ceph planning. The system - KD-MMS comprises a set of hardware components as well as a defined procedure. Essential hardware components are red spacer and blue mounting plates. The blue mounting plates replace the standard yellow SAM mounting elements. The red spacers provide for a defined leeway of 8 mm for three-dimensional movements. The non-destructive approach of the KD-MMS makes it possible to conduct different model surgeries with the same plaster casts as well as to restore the initial, pre-surgical situation at any time. Thereby, surgical protocol generation and gnathologic splint construction are facilitated. The KD-MMS hardware components in conjunction with the defined procedures are capable of increasing efficiency and accuracy of model surgery and splint construction. In cases where different surgical approaches need to be evaluated in the course of model surgery, a significant reduction of chair time may be achieved.

  5. L-( sup 3 H) glutamate binding to a membrane preparation from the optic lobe of the giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii de Man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratumtan, P.; Govitrapong, P.; Withyachumnarnkul, B.; Poolsanguan, B. (Mahidol Univ., Bangkok (Thailand) Mahidol Univ., Nakorn Pathom (Thailand))

    1991-01-01

    Membrane preparation from the optic lobe of the giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii de Man, was examined for the presence of specific L-({sup 3}H) glutamate binding. The optic lobes were isolated from live animals. The tissue was homogenized and the membrane fraction isolated by differential centrifugation. The membrane suspension was incubated with 10-1,000 nM of L-({sup 3}H) glutamate at 37{degree}C for 60 min. Nonspecific binding was determined by incubating the mixture with 100 {mu}M L-glutamate. L-({sup 3}H) glutamate specifically bound to the membrane fraction with a dissociation equilibrium constant (Kd) of 205 nM and maximum number of binding sites (Bmax) of 2.04 n mol/mg protein. By using LIGAND computerized program, the saturation isotherm binding pattern indicates a single type of binding. To determine the type of glutamate receptors, competitive inhibition and IC{sub 50} of several glutamate agonists and antagonists were determined. The study reveals a metabotropic type of binding site.

  6. Profiles of equilibrium constants for self-association of aromatic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beshnova, Daria A; Lantushenko, Anastasia O; Davies, David B; Evstigneev, Maxim P

    2009-04-28

    Analysis of the noncovalent, noncooperative self-association of identical aromatic molecules assumes that the equilibrium self-association constants are either independent of the number of molecules (the EK-model) or change progressively with increasing aggregation (the AK-model). The dependence of the self-association constant on the number of molecules in the aggregate (i.e., the profile of the equilibrium constant) was empirically derived in the AK-model but, in order to provide some physical understanding of the profile, it is proposed that the sources for attenuation of the equilibrium constant are the loss of translational and rotational degrees of freedom, the ordering of molecules in the aggregates and the electrostatic contribution (for charged units). Expressions are derived for the profiles of the equilibrium constants for both neutral and charged molecules. Although the EK-model has been widely used in the analysis of experimental data, it is shown in this work that the derived equilibrium constant, K(EK), depends on the concentration range used and hence, on the experimental method employed. The relationship has also been demonstrated between the equilibrium constant K(EK) and the real dimerization constant, K(D), which shows that the value of K(EK) is always lower than K(D).

  7. In-situ Kd values and geochemical behavior for inorganic and organic constituents of concern at the TNX Outfall Delta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, D.I.

    2000-02-11

    A series of tests were conducted to provide site-specific Kd values for constituents of concern at the TNX Outfall Delta Operable Unit. These Kd values can be used to calculate contaminant migration within the operable unit and are, at this time considered to be the most defensible values.

  8. Binding Interactions of Keratin-Based Hair Fiber Extract to Gold, Keratin, and BMP-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roche C de Guzman

    Full Text Available Hair-derived keratin biomaterials composed mostly of reduced keratin proteins (kerateines have demonstrated their utility as carriers of biologics and drugs for tissue engineering. Electrostatic forces between negatively-charged keratins and biologic macromolecules allow for effective drug retention; attraction to positively-charged growth factors like bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2 has been used as a strategy for osteoinduction. In this study, the intermolecular surface and bulk interaction properties of kerateines were investigated. Thiol-rich kerateines were chemisorbed onto gold substrates to form an irreversible 2-nm rigid layer for surface plasmon resonance analysis. Kerateine-to-kerateine cohesion was observed in pH-neutral water with an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD of 1.8 × 10(-4 M, indicating that non-coulombic attractive forces (i.e. hydrophobic and van der Waals were at work. The association of BMP-2 to kerateine was found to be greater (KD = 1.1 × 10(-7 M, within the range of specific binding. Addition of salts (phosphate-buffered saline; PBS shortened the Debye length or the electrostatic field influence which weakened the kerateine-BMP-2 binding (KD = 3.2 × 10(-5 M. BMP-2 in bulk kerateine gels provided a limited release in PBS (~ 10% dissociation in 4 weeks, suggesting that electrostatic intermolecular attraction was significant to retain BMP-2 within the keratin matrix. Complete dissociation between kerateine and BMP-2 occurred when the PBS pH was lowered (to 4.5, below the keratin isoelectric point of 5.3. This phenomenon can be attributed to the protonation of keratin at a lower pH, leading to positive-positive repulsion. Therefore, the dynamics of kerateine-BMP-2 binding is highly dependent on pH and salt concentration, as well as on BMP-2 solubility at different pH and molarity. The study findings may contribute to our understanding of the release kinetics of drugs from keratin biomaterials and allow for the

  9. Elastic constants of calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peselnick, L.; Robie, R.A.

    1962-01-01

    The recent measurements of the elastic constants of calcite by Reddy and Subrahmanyam (1960) disagree with the values obtained independently by Voigt (1910) and Bhimasenachar (1945). The present authors, using an ultrasonic pulse technique at 3 Mc and 25??C, determined the elastic constants of calcite using the exact equations governing the wave velocities in the single crystal. The results are C11=13.7, C33=8.11, C44=3.50, C12=4.82, C13=5.68, and C14=-2.00, in units of 1011 dyncm2. Independent checks of several of the elastic constants were made employing other directions and polarizations of the wave velocities. With the exception of C13, these values substantially agree with the data of Voigt and Bhimasenachar. ?? 1962 The American Institute of Physics.

  10. Fundamental physics constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, E.R.; Taylor, B.N.

    1995-01-01

    Present technological applications require the values used for the fundamental physical and chemical constants to be more and more precise and at the same time coherent. Great importance is then attached to the task of coordinating and comparing the most recent experimental data, extracting from them as a whole, by means of a least square fit, a set of values for the fundamental constants as precise and coherent as possible. The set of values which is at present in usage, derives from a fit performed in 1986, but new experimental results already promise a large reduction in the uncertainties of various constants. A new global fit that will implement such reductions is scheduled for completion in 1995 or 1996

  11. Fractional rate of degradation (kd) of starch in the rumen and its relation to in vivo rumen and total digestibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvelplund, Torben; Larsen, Mogens; Lund, Peter

    2009-01-01

    was a series of cross-over experiments with two cows and two periods. Ruminal starch pool was estimated from rumen evacuation and starch flow was estimated by duodenal and faeces sampling. Fractional rate of rumen degradation was estimated from the equation [kd = rumen degraded/rumen pool] and rumen and total...... digestibility of starch from flow measurements. The relation between kd and rumen digestibility (RD) was estimated to [kd = 1.139 -3.580*RD + 3.078*RD2; R2 = 0.45; valid for 0.580.81]. It is concluded that the relations between kd and starch digestibility can be used to estimate kd for feed table use from...

  12. Radiographic constant exposure technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1985-01-01

    The constant exposure technique has been applied to assess various industrial radiographic systems. Different X-ray films and radiographic papers of two producers were compared. Special attention was given to fast film and paper used with fluorometallic screens. Radiographic image quality was tes...... was tested by the use of ISO wire IQI's and ASTM penetrameters used on Al and Fe test plates. Relative speed and reduction of kilovoltage obtained with the constant exposure technique were calculated. The advantages of fast radiographic systems are pointed out...

  13. Radiographic constant exposure technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1985-01-01

    The constant exposure technique has been applied to assess various industrial radiographic systems. Different X-ray films and radiographic papers of two producers were compared. Special attention was given to fast film and paper used with fluorometallic screens. Radiographic image quality...... was tested by the use of ISO wire IQI's and ASTM penetrameters used on Al and Fe test plates. Relative speed and reduction of kilovoltage obtained with the constant exposure technique were calculated. The advantages of fast radiographic systems are pointed out...

  14. The King-Devick (K-D) test and concussion diagnosis in semi-professional rugby union players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, John H; Murphy, Ian; Gissane, Conor

    2017-08-01

    To determine the utility of the King-Devick (K-D) test in identifying sports-related concussion in semi-professional rugby players. Descriptive cohort study. 176 male players were recruited from a semi-professional rugby union competition in New Zealand (NZ). Baseline K-D scores were obtained in the pre-season. Post-match K-D and Pitch Side Concussion Assessment Version 2 (PSCA2) scores were obtained in those with suspected concussion. Post-match K-D scores were also administered to selected control players. 19 concussions in 18 players were analysed. In addition, 33 controls were used for analysis. A positive K-D test was identified in 53% of players with concussion post-match. Conversely, a positive test was identified in 33% of controls. The sensitivity and specificity of the K-D test was calculated as 53% and 69% respectively. The positive predictive value and negative predictive value was 48% and 73% respectively. The PSCA2 correctly identified 74% of concussions. The K-D test identified 3 cases not identified by the PSCA2. When the PSCA2 and K-D were combined, 89% of concussions were correctly identified. The K-D test does not appear to be effective if used as a stand-alone test for the diagnosis of concussion. However, if used alongside current side-line cognitive and balance tests, it may assist in more accurately diagnosing sports-related concussion. Further research should look to utilise the K-D test in in-match protocols to establish if this improves the diagnostic accuracy of in-match protocols for sports-related concussion. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The Yamabe constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O Murchadha, N.

    1991-01-01

    The set of riemannian three-metrics with positive Yamabe constant defines the space of independent data for the gravitational field. The boundary of this set is investigated, and it is shown that metrics close to the boundary satisfy the positive-energy theorem. (Author) 18 refs

  16. FORMATION CONSTANTS AND THERMODYNAMIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions has been ... A good deal of work has been reported on the preparation and structural investigation of. Schiff base ... Formation constants and thermodynamic parameters of Co, Ni, Cu and Zn complexes. Bull. Chem.

  17. Multiple growth hormone-binding proteins are expressed on insulin-producing cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møldrup, A; Billestrup, N; Thorn, N A

    1989-01-01

    and intracellular organelles are low in GH-binding activity. The plasma membrane-bound activity is soluble in Triton X-100 with intact hormone binding characteristics. The apparent KD in detergent solution is estimated to 18 ng/ml (8 x 10(-10) M). 125I-hGH-affinity cross-linking to intact and detergent...

  18. Estimation of the effective distribution coefficient from the solubility constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yug-Yea; Yu, C.

    1994-01-01

    An updated version of RESRAD has been developed by Argonne National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy to derive site-specific soil guidelines for residual radioactive material. In this updated version, many new features have been added to the, RESRAD code. One of the options is that a user can input a solubility constant to limit the leaching of contaminants. The leaching model used in the code requires the input of an empirical distribution coefficient, K d , which represents the ratio of the solute concentration in soil to that in solution under equilibrium conditions. This paper describes the methodology developed to estimate an effective distribution coefficient, Kd, from the user-input solubility constant and the use of the effective K d for predicting the leaching of contaminants

  19. An Algebraic Construction of the First Integrals of the Stationary KdV Hierarchy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Masatomo; Ohmiya, Mayumi

    2009-09-01

    The stationary KdV hierarchy is constructed using a kind of recursion operator called Λ-operator. The notion of the maximal solution of the n-th stationary KdV equation is introduced. Using this maximal solution, a specific differential polynomial with the auxiliary spectral parameter called the spectral M-function is constructed as the quadratic form of the fundamental system of the eigenvalue problem for the 2-nd order linear ordinary differential equation which is related to the linearizing operator of the hierarchy. By calculating a perfect square condition of the quadratic form by an elementary algebraic method, the complete set of first integrals of this hierarchy is constructed.

  20. Dynamic Load Balancing Based on Constrained K-D Tree Decomposition for Parallel Particle Tracing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jiang; Guo, Hanqi; Yuan, Xiaoru; Hong, Fan; Peterka, Tom

    2018-01-01

    Particle tracing is a fundamental technique in flow field data visualization. In this work, we present a novel dynamic load balancing method for parallel particle tracing. Specifically, we employ a constrained k-d tree decomposition approach to dynamically redistribute tasks among processes. Each process is initially assigned a regularly partitioned block along with duplicated ghost layer under the memory limit. During particle tracing, the k-d tree decomposition is dynamically performed by constraining the cutting planes in the overlap range of duplicated data. This ensures that each process is reassigned particles as even as possible, and on the other hand the new assigned particles for a process always locate in its block. Result shows good load balance and high efficiency of our method.

  1. Soliton solutions of the two-dimensional KdV-Burgers equation by homotopy perturbation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molabahrami, A.; Khani, F.; Hamedi-Nezhad, S.

    2007-01-01

    In this Letter, the He's homotopy perturbation method (HPM) to finding the soliton solutions of the two-dimensional Korteweg-de Vries Burgers' equation (tdKdVB) for the initial conditions was applied. Numerical solutions of the equation were obtained. The obtained solutions, in comparison with the exact solutions admit a remarkable accuracy. The results reveal that the HPM is very effective and simple

  2. KdV-Burgers equation in the modified continuum model considering anticipation effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huaqing; Zheng, Pengjun; Zhu, Keqiang; Ge, Hongxia

    2015-11-01

    The new continuum model mentioned in this paper is developed based on optimal velocity car-following model, which takes the drivers' anticipation effect into account. The critical condition for traffic flow is derived, and nonlinear analysis shows density waves occur in traffic flow because of the small disturbance. Near the neutral stability line, the KdV-Burgers equation is derived and one of the solutions is given. Numerical simulation is carried out to show the local cluster described by the model.

  3. Renormalization of Newton's constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falls, Kevin

    2015-12-01

    The problem of obtaining a gauge independent beta function for Newton's constant is addressed. By a specific parametrization of metric fluctuations a gauge independent functional integral is constructed for the semiclassical theory around an arbitrary Einstein space. The effective action then has the property that only physical polarizations of the graviton contribute, while all other modes cancel with the functional measure. We are then able to compute a gauge independent beta function for Newton's constant in d dimensions to one-loop order. No Landau pole is present provided Ng<18 , where Ng=d (d -3 )/2 is the number of polarizations of the graviton. While adding a large number of matter fields can change this picture, the absence of a pole persists for the particle content of the standard model in four spacetime dimensions.

  4. Production in constant evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lozano, T.

    2009-01-01

    The Cofrentes Nuclear Power Plant now has 25 years of operation behind it: a quarter century adding value and demonstrating the reasons why it is one of the most important energy producing facilities in the Spanish power market. Particularly noteworthy is the enterprising spirit of the plant, which has strived to continuously improve with the large number of modernization projects that it has undertaken over the past 25 years. The plant has constantly evolved thanks to the amount of investments made to improve safety and reliability and the perseverance to stay technologically up to date. Efficiency, training and teamwork have been key to the success of the plant over these 25 years of constant change and progress. (Author)

  5. The Fine Structure Constant

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    important parameter in the field of atomic struc- ture. The values of the constants of ... tions in their core that produce carbon. As a result, .... atom in 1913. In other words, the size of a hydrogen atom is a factor α−2 ≈ 20000 times the size of an elec- tron. Another way of looking at α is to consider the ratio of the orbital speed of ...

  6. The cosmological constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellor, F.

    1989-01-01

    Astronomical observations predict to an extremely accurate degree that the cosmological term in Einstein's equations should be zero. This conflicts with the predictions from particle theories of a non-zero cosmological term. Attempts to resolve this paradox range from arguments based on the anthropic principle to supersymmetric theories to quantum cosmological proposals. These approaches are discussed here and the history of the cosmological constant is reviewed. (author)

  7. Aflatoxin Toxicity Reduction in Feed by Enhanced Binding to Surface-Modified Clay Additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaynes, William F.; Zartman, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    Animal feeding studies have demonstrated that clay additives, such as bentonites, can bind aflatoxins in ingested feed and reduce or eliminate the toxicity. Bentonite deposits are found throughout the world and mostly consist of expandable smectite minerals, such as montmorillonite. The surfaces of smectite minerals can be treated with organic compounds to create surface-modified clays that more readily bind some contaminants than the untreated clay. Montmorillonites treated with organic cations, such as hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) and phenyltrimethylammonium (PTMA), more effectively remove organic contaminants, such as benzene and toluene, from water than untreated clay. Similarly, montmorillonite treated with PTMA (Kd = 24,100) retained more aflatoxin B1 (AfB1) from aqueous corn flour than untreated montmorillonite (Kd = 944). Feed additives that reduced aflatoxin toxicity in animal feeding studies adsorbed more AfB1 from aqueous corn flour than feed additives that were less effective. The organic cations HDTMA and PTMA are considered toxic and would not be suitable for clay additives used in feed or food, but other non-toxic or nutrient compounds can be used to prepare surface-modified clays. Montmorillonite (SWy) treated with choline (Kd = 13,800) and carnitine (Kd = 3960) adsorbed much more AfB1 from aqueous corn flour than the untreated clay (Kd = 944). A choline-treated clay prepared from a reduced-charge, high-charge montmorillonite (Kd = 20,100) adsorbed more AfB1 than the choline-treated high-charge montmorillonite (Kd = 1340) or the untreated montmorillonite (Kd = 293). Surface-modified clay additives prepared using low-charge smectites and nutrient or non-toxic organic compounds might be used to more effectively bind aflatoxins in contaminated feed or food and prevent toxicity. PMID:22069725

  8. In vitro binding kinetics of DNA double strand break repair proteins Ku70/80 and DNA-PKcs quantified by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdisalaam, Salim; Chen, David J.; Alexandrakis, George

    2012-02-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the most lethal types of DNA damage that occurs in eukaryotic cells. There are two distinct pathways of repairing DSBs, homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). In the NHEJ repairing pathway, DSB recognition and repair initiation is directed by the interaction of DNAbinding subunit Ku70/80 heterodimer with the DNA-PK protein catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). Mutations in these proteins result in repair stalling and eventual DNA misrepair that may lead to genomic instability. Studying the binding kinetics of these repair proteins is therefore important for understanding the conditions under which DSB repair stalls. Currently open questions are, what is the minimum DNA length that this complex needs to get a foothold onto a DSB and how tightly does DNA-PKcs bind onto the DNA-Ku70/80 complex. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) and Fluorescence Cross-Correlation Spectroscopy (FCCS) techniques have the potential to give information about the binding kinetics of DNA-protein and protein-protein interactions at the single-molecule level. In this work, FCS/FCCS measurements were performed to explore the minimum DNA base-pair (bp) length that Ku70/80 needed as a foothold to bind effectively onto the tips of different lengths of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) fragments that mimic DSBs. 25 bp, 33 bp and 50 bp of dsDNA were used for these experiments and binding was studied as a function of salt concentration in solution. It was found that the 25 bp binding was weak even at physiological salt concentrations while the dissociation constant (Kd) remained constant for 33 and 50 bp dsDNA strand lengths. These studies indicated that the minimum binding length for the Ku70/8 is in the vicinity of 25 bp. The specificity of binding of Ku70/80 was proven by competitive binding FCCS experiments between Cy5-labeled DNA, GFP-Ku70/80 and titrations of unlabeled Ku70/80. Finally, using FCCS it was possible to estimate

  9. Structure of the Λ (1405 ) and the K-d →π Σ n reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Shota; Ikeda, Yoichi; Hyodo, Tetsuo; Weise, Wolfram

    2016-02-01

    The Λ (1405 ) resonance production reaction is investigated within the framework of the coupled-channels Alt-Grassberger-Sandhas (AGS) equations. We perform full three-body calculations for the K ¯N N -π Y N amplitudes on the physical real energy axis and investigate how the signature of the Λ (1405 ) appears in the cross sections of the K-d →π Σ n reactions, also in view of the planned E31 experiment at J-PARC. Two types of meson-baryon interaction models are considered: an energy-dependent interaction based on chiral S U (3 ) effective field theory, and an energy-independent version that has been used repeatedly in phenomenological approaches. These two models have different off-shell properties that imply correspondingly different behavior in the three-body system. We investigate how these features show up in differential cross sections of K-d →π Σ n reactions. Characteristic patterns distinguishing between the two models are found in the invariant mass spectrum of the final π Σ state. The K-d →π Σ n reaction, with different (π±Σ∓ and π0Σ0 ) charge combinations in the final state, is thus demonstrated to be a useful tool for investigating the subthreshold behavior of the K ¯N interaction.

  10. Infinitely many conservation laws for the discrete KdV equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasin, Alexander G; Schiff, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    Rasin and Hydon (2007 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 40 12763-73) suggested a way to construct an infinite number of conservation laws for the discrete KdV equation (dKdV), by repeated application of a certain symmetry to a known conservation law. It was not decided, however, whether the resulting conservation laws were distinct and nontrivial. In this paper we obtain the following results: (1) we give an alternative method to construct an infinite number of conservation laws using a discrete version of the Gardner transformation. (2) We give a direct proof that the conservation laws obtained by the method of Rasin and Hydon are indeed distinct and nontrivial. (3) We consider a continuum limit in which the dKdV equation becomes a first-order eikonal equation. In this limit the two sets of conservation laws become the same, and are evidently distinct and nontrivial. This proves the nontriviality of the conservation laws constructed by the Gardner method, and gives an alternative proof of the nontriviality of the conservation laws constructed by the method of Rasin and Hydon

  11. Multi-hump bright solitons in a Schrödinger-mKdV system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros-Ake, Luis A.; Parra Prado, Hugo; López Villatoro, Diego Joselito; Carretero-González, R.

    2018-03-01

    We consider the problem of energy transport in a Davydov model along an anharmonic crystal medium obeying quartic longitudinal interactions corresponding to rigid interacting particles. The Zabusky and Kruskal unidirectional continuum limit of the original discrete equations reduces, in the long wave approximation, to a coupled system between the linear Schrödinger (LS) equation and the modified Korteweg-de Vries (mKdV) equation. Single- and two-hump bright soliton solutions for this LS-mKdV system are predicted to exist by variational means and numerically confirmed. The one-hump bright solitons are found to be the anharmonic supersonic analogue of the Davydov's solitons while the two-hump (in both components) bright solitons are found to be a novel type of soliton consisting of a two-soliton solution of mKdV trapped by the wave function associated to the LS equation. This two-hump soliton solution, as a two component solution, represents a new class of polaron solution to be contrasted with the two-soliton interaction phenomena from soliton theory, as revealed by a variational approach and direct numerical results for the two-soliton solution.

  12. KdV cnoidal waves in a traffic flow model with periodic boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattam, L.

    2017-06-01

    An optimal-velocity (OV) model describes car motion on a single lane road. In particular, near to the boundary signifying the onset of traffic jams, this model reduces to a perturbed Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation using asymptotic analysis. Previously, the KdV soliton solution has then been found and compared to numerical results (see Muramatsu and Nagatani [1]). Here, we instead apply modulation theory to this perturbed KdV equation to obtain at leading order, the modulated cnoidal wave solution. At the next order, the Whitham equations are derived, which have been modified due to the equation perturbation terms. Next, from this modulation system, a family of spatially periodic cnoidal waves are identified that characterise vehicle headway distance. Then, for this set of solutions, we establish the relationship between the wave speed, the modulation term and the driver sensitivity. This analysis is confirmed with comparisons to numerical solutions of the OV model. As well, the long-time behaviour of these solutions is investigated.

  13. Connecting Fundamental Constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Mario, D.

    2008-01-01

    A model for a black hole electron is built from three basic constants only: h, c and G. The result is a description of the electron with its mass and charge. The nature of this black hole seems to fit the properties of the Planck particle and new relationships among basic constants are possible. The time dilation factor in a black hole associated with a variable gravitational field would appear to us as a charge; on the other hand the Planck time is acting as a time gap drastically limiting what we are able to measure and its dimension will appear in some quantities. This is why the Planck time is numerically very close to the gravitational/electric force ratio in an electron: its difference, disregarding a π√(2) factor, is only 0.2%. This is not a coincidence, it is always the same particle and the small difference is between a rotating and a non-rotating particle. The determination of its rotational speed yields accurate numbers for many quantities, including the fine structure constant and the electron magnetic moment

  14. The Hubble Constant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Neal

    2015-01-01

    I review the current state of determinations of the Hubble constant, which gives the length scale of the Universe by relating the expansion velocity of objects to their distance. There are two broad categories of measurements. The first uses individual astrophysical objects which have some property that allows their intrinsic luminosity or size to be determined, or allows the determination of their distance by geometric means. The second category comprises the use of all-sky cosmic microwave background, or correlations between large samples of galaxies, to determine information about the geometry of the Universe and hence the Hubble constant, typically in a combination with other cosmological parameters. Many, but not all, object-based measurements give H 0 values of around 72-74 km s -1 Mpc -1 , with typical errors of 2-3 km s -1 Mpc -1 . This is in mild discrepancy with CMB-based measurements, in particular those from the Planck satellite, which give values of 67-68 km s -1 Mpc -1 and typical errors of 1-2 km s -1 Mpc -1 . The size of the remaining systematics indicate that accuracy rather than precision is the remaining problem in a good determination of the Hubble constant. Whether a discrepancy exists, and whether new physics is needed to resolve it, depends on details of the systematics of the object-based methods, and also on the assumptions about other cosmological parameters and which datasets are combined in the case of the all-sky methods.

  15. Universe of constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongquan, Han

    2016-10-01

    The ideal gas state equation is not applicable to ordinary gas, it should be applied to the Electromagnetic ``gas'' that is applied to the radiation, the radiation should be the ultimate state of matter changes or initial state, the universe is filled with radiation. That is, the ideal gas equation of state is suitable for the Singular point and the universe. Maybe someone consider that, there is no vessel can accommodate radiation, it is because the Ordinary container is too small to accommodate, if the radius of your container is the distance that Light through an hour, would you still think it can't accommodates radiation? Modern scientific determinate that the radius of the universe now is about 1027 m, assuming that the universe is a sphere whose volume is approximately: V = 4.19 × 1081 cubic meters, the temperature radiation of the universe (cosmic microwave background radiation temperature of the universe, should be the closest the average temperature of the universe) T = 3.15k, radiation pressure P = 5 × 10-6 N / m 2, according to the law of ideal gas state equation, PV / T = constant = 6 × 1075, the value of this constant is the universe, The singular point should also equal to the constant Author: hanyongquan

  16. Characterization of nicotine binding in mouse brain and comparison with the binding of alpha-bungarotoxin and quinuclidinyl benzilate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marks, M.J.; Collins, A.C.

    1982-01-01

    The binding of [ 3 H]nicotine to mouse brain has been measured and subsequently compared with the binding of [ 125 I]alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BTX) and L-[ 3 H]quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB). The binding of nicotine was saturable, reversible, and stereospecific. The average KD and Bmax were 59 nM and 88 fmoles/mg of protein, respectively. Although the rates of association and dissociation of nicotine were temperature-dependent, the incubation temperature had no effect on either KD or Bmax. When measured at 20 degrees or 37 degrees, nicotine appeared to bind to a single class of binding sites, but a second, very low-affinity, binding site was observed at 4 degrees. Nicotine binding was unaffected by the addition of NaCl, KCl, CaCl 2 , or MgSO 4 to the incubation medium. Nicotinic cholinergic agonists were potent inhibitors of nicotine binding; however, nicotinic antagonists were poor inhibitors. The regional distribution of binding was not uniform: midbrain and striatum contained the highest number of receptors, whereas cerebellum had the fewest. Differences in site densities, regional distribution, inhibitor potencies, and thermal denaturation indicated that nicotine binding was not the same as either QNB or alpha-BTX binding, and therefore that receptors for nicotine may represent a unique population of cholinergic receptors

  17. The Lax operator approach for the Virasoro and the W-constraints in the generalized KdV hierarchy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panda, S.; Roy, S.

    1992-08-01

    We show directly in the Lax operator approach how the Virasoro and W-constraints on the τ-function arise in the p-reduced KP hierarchy or Generalized KdV hierarchy. In particular, we consider the KdV and the Boussinesq hierarchy to show that the Virasoro and the W-constraints follow from the string equation by expanding the ''additional symmetry'' operator in terms of the Lax operator. We also mention how this method could be generalized for higher KdV hierarchies. (author). 34 refs

  18. The Hubble Constant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal Jackson

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available I review the current state of determinations of the Hubble constant, which gives the length scale of the Universe by relating the expansion velocity of objects to their distance. There are two broad categories of measurements. The first uses individual astrophysical objects which have some property that allows their intrinsic luminosity or size to be determined, or allows the determination of their distance by geometric means. The second category comprises the use of all-sky cosmic microwave background, or correlations between large samples of galaxies, to determine information about the geometry of the Universe and hence the Hubble constant, typically in a combination with other cosmological parameters. Many, but not all, object-based measurements give H_0 values of around 72–74 km s^–1 Mpc^–1, with typical errors of 2–3 km s^–1 Mpc^–1. This is in mild discrepancy with CMB-based measurements, in particular those from the Planck satellite, which give values of 67–68 km s^–1 Mpc^–1 and typical errors of 1–2 km s^–1 Mpc^–1. The size of the remaining systematics indicate that accuracy rather than precision is the remaining problem in a good determination of the Hubble constant. Whether a discrepancy exists, and whether new physics is needed to resolve it, depends on details of the systematics of the object-based methods, and also on the assumptions about other cosmological parameters and which datasets are combined in the case of the all-sky methods.

  19. Spaces of constant curvature

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Joseph A

    2010-01-01

    This book is the sixth edition of the classic Spaces of Constant Curvature, first published in 1967, with the previous (fifth) edition published in 1984. It illustrates the high degree of interplay between group theory and geometry. The reader will benefit from the very concise treatments of riemannian and pseudo-riemannian manifolds and their curvatures, of the representation theory of finite groups, and of indications of recent progress in discrete subgroups of Lie groups. Part I is a brief introduction to differentiable manifolds, covering spaces, and riemannian and pseudo-riemannian geomet

  20. An improved SELEX technique for selection of DNA aptamers binding to M-type 11 of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamula, Camille L A; Peng, Hanyong; Wang, Zhixin; Tyrrell, Gregory J; Li, Xing-Fang; Le, X Chris

    2016-03-15

    preferentially to the M11 M-type of S. pyogenes. Estimated binding dissociation constants (Kd) were in the low nanomolar range for the M11 specific sequences; for example, sequence E-CA20 had a Kd of 7±1 nM. These affinities are comparable to those of a monoclonal antibody. The improved bacterial cell-SELEX technique is successful in generating aptamers selective for S. pyogenes and some of its M-types. These aptamers are potentially useful for detecting S. pyogenes, achieving binding profiles of the various M-types, and developing new M-typing technologies for non-specialized laboratories or point-of-care testing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Improved accuracy of low affinity protein-ligand equilibrium dissociation constants directly determined by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaquillard, Lucie; Saab, Fabienne; Schoentgen, Françoise; Cadene, Martine

    2012-05-01

    There is continued interest in the determination by ESI-MS of equilibrium dissociation constants (K(D)) that accurately reflect the affinity of a protein-ligand complex in solution. Issues in the measurement of K(D) are compounded in the case of low affinity complexes. Here we present a K(D) measurement method and corresponding mathematical model dealing with both gas-phase dissociation (GPD) and aggregation. To this end, a rational mathematical correction of GPD (f(sat)) is combined with the development of an experimental protocol to deal with gas-phase aggregation. A guide to apply the method to noncovalent protein-ligand systems according to their kinetic behavior is provided. The approach is validated by comparing the K(D) values determined by this method with in-solution K(D) literature values. The influence of the type of molecular interactions and instrumental setup on f(sat) is examined as a first step towards a fine dissection of factors affecting GPD. The method can be reliably applied to a wide array of low affinity systems without the need for a reference ligand or protein.

  2. Measurement of nucleotide exchange rate constants in single rabbit soleus myofibrils during shortening and lengthening using a fluorescent ATP analog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirakawa, I; Chaen, S; Bagshaw, C R; Sugi, H

    2000-02-01

    The kinetics of displacement of a fluorescent nucleotide, 2'(3')-O-[N[2-[[Cy3]amido]ethyl]carbamoyl]-adenosine 5'-triphosphate (Cy3-EDA-ATP), bound to rabbit soleus muscle myofibrils were studied using flash photolysis of caged ATP. Use of myofibrils from this slow twitch muscle allowed better resolution of the kinetics of nucleotide exchange than previous studies with psoas muscle myofibrils (, Biophys. J. 73:2033-2042). Soleus myofibrils in the presence of Cy3-EDA-nucleotides (Cy3-EDA-ATP or Cy3-EDA-ADP) showed selective fluorescence staining of the A-band. The K(m) for Cy3-EDA-ATP and the K(d) for Cy3-EDA-ADP binding to the myofibril A-band were 1.9 microM and 3.8 microM, respectively, indicating stronger binding of nucleotide to soleus cross-bridges compared to psoas cross-bridges (2.6 microM and 50 microM, respectively). After flash photolysis of caged ATP, the A-band fluorescence of the myofibril in the Cy3-EDA-ATP solution under isometric conditions decayed exponentially with a rate constant of 0.045 +/- 0.007 s(-1) (n = 32) at 10 degrees C, which was about seven times slower than that for psoas myofibrils. When a myofibril was allowed to shorten with a constant velocity, the nucleotide displacement rate constant increased from 0.066 s(-1) (isometric) to 0.14 s(-1) at 20 degrees C with increasing shortening velocity up to 0.1 myofibril length/s (V(max), the shortening velocity under no load was approximately 0. 2 myofibril lengths/s). The rate constant was not significantly affected by an isovelocity stretch of up to 0.1 myofibril lengths/s. These results suggest that the cross-bridge kinetics are not significantly affected at higher strain during lengthening but depend on the lower strain during shortening. These data also indicate that the interaction distance between a cross-bridge and the actin filament is at least 16 nm for a single cycle of the ATPase.

  3. Quantitative pharmacological analysis of 2-125I-iodomelatonin binding sites in discrete areas of the chicken brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siuciak, J.A.; Krause, D.N.; Dubocovich, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    The authors have localized and characterized 2-125I-iodomelatonin binding sites in the chicken brain using in vitro quantitative autoradiography. Binding sites were widely distributed throughout the chicken brain, predominantly in regions associated with the visual system. The specific binding of 2-125I-iodomelatonin to discrete chicken brain areas was found to be saturable, reversible, and of high affinity. The specific binding of 2-125I-iodomelatonin (75 pm) was quantitated for 40 identifiable brain regions. Eight brain regions were chosen for binding characterization and pharmacological analysis: optic tectum, Edinger-Westphal nucleus, oculomotor nucleus, nucleus rotundus, ventral supraoptic decussation, ventrolateral geniculate nucleus, neostriatum, and ectostriatum. These regions showed no rostral-caudal gradient in 2-125I-iodomelatonin specific binding, and saturation analysis revealed a single class of high-affinity sites with KD values in the range of 33-48 pM and receptor site density (Bmax) ranging from 31 to 58 fmol/mg protein. Competition experiments carried out with various indoles revealed a similar order of pharmacological affinities in these areas: melatonin greater than 6-chloromelatonin greater than methoxyluzindole greater than N-acetylserotonin greater than luzindole much greater than 5-HT greater than 5-methoxytryptamine. The affinity constants determined by quantitative autoradiography for these compounds to compete for 2-125I-iodomelatonin binding in the optic tectum correlated well with the affinities in chicken brain membranes at 25 degrees C (r = 0.966; slope = 0.845; n = 7) and 0 degree C (r = 0.946; slope = 0.379; n = 7), chicken retinal membranes (r = 0.973; slope = 0.759; n = 7), and the potency or affinity of these compounds to affect the calcium-dependent release of 3H-dopamine from the rabbit retina (r = 0.902; slope = 0.506; n = 6)

  4. Temperature-sensitive high affinity [3H]serotonin binding: characterization and effects of antidepressant treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmeste, D.M.; Tang, S.W.

    1984-01-01

    Characterization of temperature-sensitive [ 3 H]serotonin (5-HT) binding sites (1 and 4 nM Kd sites) revealed complex inhibition by neuroleptics and serotonin antagonists. There was no simple correlation with affinities for S 1 and S 2 receptors. In vivo pretreatment (48 h before) with mianserin did not alter B/sub max/ or Kd for the 1 nM Kd [ 3 H]5-HT site, although [ 3 H]ketanserin (S 2 ) densities were decreased by 50%. This suggested that possible S 2 components of [ 3 H]5-HT binding must be negligible, even though ketanserin competed with high affinity (IC 50 = 3 nM) for a portion of the 1 nM Kd [ 3 H]5-HT site. Low concentrations of mianserin inhibited the 1 nM Kd [ 3 H]5-HT site in a non-competitive manner, as shown by a decrease in B/sub max/ with no change in Kd after in vitro incubation. The complex inhibition data may therefore represent indirect interactions through another site

  5. UNDERSTANDING VARIATION IN PARTITION COEFFICIENT KD, VALUES, VOLUME III: AMERICIUM, ARSENIC, CURIUM, IODINE, NEPTUNIUM, RADIUM, AND TECHNETIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report describes the conceptualization, measurement, and use of the partition (or distribution) coefficient, Kd, parameter, and the geochemical aqueous solution and sorbent properties that are most important in controlling adsorption/retardation behavior of selected contamin...

  6. Integrable couplings of C-KdV equations hierarchy with self-consistent sources associated with sl-tilde(4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Fajun [College of Maths and Systematic Science, Shenyang Normal University, Shenyang 110034 (China)], E-mail: yfajun@163.com; Li Li [College of Maths and Systematic Science, Shenyang Normal University, Shenyang 110034 (China)

    2009-04-20

    We present a kind of integrable couplings of soliton equations hierarchy with self-consistent sources by using of loop algebra sl-tilde(4). As an application, a hierarchy of C-KdV equations with self-consistent sources is derived through loop algebra sl-tilde(2). Furthermore, we construct a new integrable couplings of the C-KdV soliton hierarchy with self-consistent sources by using of the enlarged loop algebra sl-tilde(4)

  7. Binding sequences for RdgB, a DNA damage-responsive transcriptional activator, and temperature-dependent expression of bacteriocin and pectin lyase genes in Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kazuteru; Kaneko, Jun; Kamio, Yoshiyuki; Itoh, Yoshifumi

    2008-10-01

    Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum strain Er simultaneously produces the phage tail-like bacteriocin carotovoricin (Ctv) and pectin lyase (Pnl) in response to DNA-damaging agents. The regulatory protein RdgB of the Mor/C family of proteins activates transcription of pnl through binding to the promoter. However, the optimal temperature for the synthesis of Ctv (23 degrees C) differs from that for synthesis of Pnl (30 degrees C), raising the question of whether RdgB directly activates ctv transcription. Here we report that RdgB directly regulates Ctv synthesis. Gel mobility shift assays demonstrated RdgB binding to the P(0), P(1), and P(2) promoters of the ctv operons, and DNase I footprinting determined RdgB-binding sequences (RdgB boxes) on these and on the pnl promoters. The RdgB box of the pnl promoter included a perfect 7-bp inverted repeat with high binding affinity to the regulator (K(d) [dissociation constant] = 150 nM). In contrast, RdgB boxes of the ctv promoters contained an imperfect inverted repeat with two or three mismatches that consequently reduced binding affinity (K(d) = 250 to 350 nM). Transcription of the rdgB and ctv genes was about doubled at 23 degrees C compared with that at 30 degrees C. In contrast, the amount of pnl transcription tripled at 30 degrees C. Thus, the inverse synthesis of Ctv and Pnl as a function of temperature is apparently controlled at the transcriptional level, and reduced rdgB expression at 30 degrees C obviously affected transcription from the ctv promoters with low-affinity RdgB boxes. Pathogenicity toward potato tubers was reduced in an rdgB knockout mutant, suggesting that the RdgAB system contributes to the pathogenicity of this bacterium, probably by activating pnl expression.

  8. Thermodynamic signatures of fragment binding: Validation of direct versus displacement ITC titrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rühmann, Eggert; Betz, Michael; Fricke, Marie; Heine, Andreas; Schäfer, Martina; Klebe, Gerhard

    2015-04-01

    Detailed characterization of the thermodynamic signature of weak binding fragments to proteins is essential to support the decision making process which fragments to take further for the hit-to-lead optimization. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is the method of choice to record thermodynamic data, however, weak binding ligands such as fragments require the development of meaningful and reliable measuring protocols as usually sigmoidal titration curves are hardly possible to record due to limited solubility. Fragments can be titrated either directly under low c-value conditions (no sigmoidal curve) or indirectly by use of a strong binding ligand displacing the pre-incubated weak fragment from the protein. The determination of Gibbs free energy is reliable and rather independent of the applied titration protocol. Even though the displacement method achieves higher accuracy, the obtained enthalpy-entropy profile depends on the properties of the used displacement ligand. The relative enthalpy differences across different displacement experiments reveal a constant signature and can serve as a thermodynamic fingerprint for fragments. Low c-value titrations are only reliable if the final concentration of the fragment in the sample cell exceeds 2-10 fold its K(D) value. Limited solubility often prevents this strategy. The present study suggests an applicable protocol to characterize the thermodynamic signature of protein-fragment binding. It shows however, that such measurements are limited by protein and fragment solubility. Deviating profiles obtained by use of different displacement ligands indicate that changes in the solvation pattern and protein dynamics most likely take influence on the resulting overall binding signature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Un saludo constante

    OpenAIRE

    Salcedo Ortega, Manuela; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Cali

    2013-01-01

    La presencia familiar estará siempre en mi vida: Creo que esa unión va más allá de los lazos que creamos en ese primer abrir de ojos del nacimiento pues los lazos se fortalecen con el tiempo. Es que esos lazos van de la genética al riñón y puede que suene muy raro, pero esta es mi enfermedad, la primera y la constante, la que desaparece y reaparece, la heredada y la que cada vez que me saluda, deja su huella. Comenzó hace 16 años. Mis infecciones urinarias fueron el comienzo de muchas maluque...

  10. The Hubble Constant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Neal

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available I review the current state of determinations of the Hubble constant, which gives the length scale of the Universe by relating the expansion velocity of objects to their distance. In the last 20 years, much progress has been made and estimates now range between 60 and 75 km s^-1 Mpc^-1, with most now between 70 and 75 km s^-1 Mpc^-1, a huge improvement over the factor-of-2 uncertainty which used to prevail. Further improvements which gave a generally agreed margin of error of a few percent rather than the current 10% would be vital input to much other interesting cosmology. There are several programmes which are likely to lead us to this point in the next 10 years.

  11. Constant Proportion Portfolio Insurance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Cathrine

    2014-01-01

    Portfolio insurance, as practiced in 1987, consisted of trading between an underlying stock portfolio and cash, using option theory to place a floor on the value of the position, as if it included a protective put. Constant Proportion Portfolio Insurance (CPPI) is an option-free variation...... on the theme, originally proposed by Fischer Black. In CPPI, a financial institution guarantees a floor value for the “insured” portfolio and adjusts the stock/bond mix to produce a leveraged exposure to the risky assets, which depends on how far the portfolio value is above the floor. Plain-vanilla portfolio...... insurance largely died with the crash of 1987, but CPPI is still going strong. In the frictionless markets of finance theory, the issuer’s strategy to hedge its liability under the contract is clear, but in the real world with transactions costs and stochastic jump risk, the optimal strategy is less obvious...

  12. Experience with MAD on children with epilepsy in Egypt after classic KD failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Rashidy, O F; Nassar, M F; El Gendy, Y G; Deifalla, S M; Gaballa, S

    2018-02-01

    Modified Atkins diet (MAD) is a less restrictive type of ketogenic diet (KD) as compared to the classic one. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of 9 months MAD treatment on the growth and seizure control in patients with intractable epilepsy as well as the quality of life (QoL) of their mothers. The study included 15 patients with intractable epilepsy who could not tolerate their classic KD management plan. From the 15 recruited cases, only seven patients completed this nine months prospective study. After neurological reassessment, the patients were prescribed MAD tailored from the local Egyptian ingredients. Arabic translation of the WHO Quality of life Instruments (WHOQOL-BREF) scale was calculated for the mothers initially and 9 months later. Daily seizure frequency with severity assessment by Chalfont scale was recorded as well as monthly weight and length throughout the study period. Mothers 'QoL in all WHOQOL-BREF domains significantly improved (P < .001) after nine months follow-up coupled by significant decrease in Chalfont scores from 51.00 ± 15.45 to 20.57 ± 21.45 and daily seizure frequency from 13.29 ± 6.99 to 2.71 ± 3.68. Regarding anthropometric data, there was significant increase in patients' weight and length as well as in the z-score for weight and length. After nine months of MAD, growth and seizure parameters significantly improved in the intractable epilepsy patients as well as their mothers& QoL. We thus recommend MAD as a more flexible alternative in intractable epilepsy patients who can not tolerate classic KD. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Modulating functions method for parameters estimation in the fifth order KdV equation

    KAUST Repository

    Asiri, Sharefa M.

    2017-07-25

    In this work, the modulating functions method is proposed for estimating coefficients in higher-order nonlinear partial differential equation which is the fifth order Kortewegde Vries (KdV) equation. The proposed method transforms the problem into a system of linear algebraic equations of the unknowns. The statistical properties of the modulating functions solution are described in this paper. In addition, guidelines for choosing the number of modulating functions, which is an important design parameter, are provided. The effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method are shown through numerical simulations in both noise-free and noisy cases.

  14. Restricted tissue distribution of a 37-kD possible adherens junction protein

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    A major polypeptide of M(r) 37,000 was purified from a desmosome- enriched citric acid-insoluble pellet of pig tongue epithelium. The polypeptide was solubilized from the 4-M urea-insoluble pellet with 9 M urea, and extracts were separated by carboxymethyl cellulose and gel filtration chromatography. The 37-kD protein was obtained in milligram quantities as a single band on two-dimensional gels in 30% yield after 21-fold purification from the citric acid-insoluble fraction. The protein is not...

  15. Chebyshev Rational Approximations for the Rosenau-KdV-RLW Equation on the Whole Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Foroutan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider the use of a modified Chebyshev rational approximations for the Rosenau-KdV-RLW equation on the whole line with initial-boundary values. It is shown that the proposed scheme leads to optimal error estimates. Furthermore, the stability and convergence of the proposed schemes are proved. The fully discrete Chebyshev pseudo-spectral scheme is constructed. Numerical results confirm well with the theoretical results. The idea and techniques presented in this paper will be useful to solve many other problems.

  16. 70 kD stress protein (Hsp70) analysis in living shallow-water benthic foraminifera

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Heinz, P.; Marten, R.A.; Linshy, V.N.; Haap, T.; Geslin, E.; Kohler, H-R.

    ) the monoclonal antibody “mouse anti-human Hsp70 (MA3-006)”; Dianova, Hamburg, Germany, dilution 1:5000, or, alternatively, (b) the monoclonal antibody “mouse anti-chicken Hsp70/Hsc70 (SPA-822)”; Dianova, dilution 1:1000 (experiment II), or (c) a combination... anti-chicken Hsp70/Hsc70 (SPA- 822)” did not detect any band, also no standard was visible here. To check if there was a major loss of Hsp70 during ultrafiltration, the filtrate (containing proteins <30 kD) was also analyzed. No Hsp70 could...

  17. Binding of ReO4(-) with an engineered MoO4(2-)-binding protein: towards a new approach in radiopharmaceutical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Baikuntha P; Brugarolas, Pedro; He, Chuan

    2012-01-01

    Radiolabeled biomolecules are routinely used for clinical diagnostics. (99m)Tc is the most commonly used radioactive tracer in radiopharmaceuticals. (188)Re and (186)Re are also commonly used as radioactive tracers in medicine. However, currently available methods for radiolabeling are lengthy and involve several steps in bioconjugation processes. In this work we present a strategy to engineer proteins that may selectively recognize the perrhenate (ReO(4)(-)) ion as a new way to label proteins. We found that a molybdate (MoO(4)(2-))-binding protein (ModA) from Escherichia coli can bind perrhenate with high affinity. Using fluorescence and isothermal titration calorimetry measurements, we determined the dissociation constant of ModA for ReO(4)(-) to be 541 nM and we solved a crystal structure of ModA with a bound ReO(4)(-). On the basis of the structure we created a mutant protein containing a disulfide linkage, which exhibited increased affinity for perrhenate (K(d) = 104 nM). High-resolution crystal structures of ModA (1.7 Å) and A11C/R153C mutant (2.0 Å) were solved with bound perrhenate. Both structures show that a perrhenate ion occupies the molybdate binding site using the same amino acid residues that are involved in molybdate binding. The overall structure of the perrhenate-bound ModA is unchanged compared with that of the molybdate-bound form. In the mutant protein, the bound perrhenate is further stabilized by the engineered disulfide bond. © SBIC 2011

  18. Self-peptides with intermediate capacity to bind and stabilize MHC class I molecules may be immunogenic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M L M; Ruhwald, Morten; Nissen, M H

    2003-01-01

    Thirty self-peptides were selected on the basis of their predicted binding to H-2b molecules. The binding of peptides was ascertained experimentally by biochemical (KD measurements) and cellular [major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) stabilization] assays. A weak, but significant, corr...

  19. Fluorescence emission and polarization analyses for evaluating binding of ruthenium metalloglycoclusters to lectins and tetanus toxin C-fragment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Tomoko; Minoura, Norihiko

    2011-03-01

    We develop a fluorescent ruthenium metalloglycocluster for use as a powerful molecular probe in evaluating the binding between carbohydrates and lectins by fluorescence emission (FE) and fluorescence polarization (FP) analyses. Changes in the FE and FP of these metalloglycoclusters are measured following the addition of lectin [peanut agglutinin (PNA), Ricinus communis agglutinin 120, Concanavalin A (ConA), or wheat germ agglutinin] or tetanus toxin c-fragment (TCF). After the addition of PNA, the FE spectrum of [Ru(bpy-2Gal)3] shows a new emission peak and the FP value of [Ru(bpy-2Gal)3] increases. Similarly, the FE spectrum of [Ru(bpy-2Glc)3] shows a new emission peak and the FP value increases on addition of ConA. Because other combinations of metalloglycoclusters and lectins show little change, specific binding of galactose to PNA and that of glucose to ConA are confirmed by the FE and FP measurements. Resulting dissociation constants (Kd) prove that the metalloglycoclusters with highly clustered carbohydrates show higher affinity for the respective lectins than those with less clustered carbohydrates. Furthermore, specific binding of [Ru(bpy-2Gal)3] to TCF was confirmed by the FP measurement.

  20. An outline of cellular automaton universe via cosmological KdV equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianto, V.; Smarandache, F.; Umniyati, Y.

    2018-03-01

    It has been known for long time that the cosmic sound wave was there since the early epoch of the Universe. Signatures of its existence are abound. However, such a sound wave model of cosmology is rarely developed fully into a complete framework. This paper can be considered as our second attempt towards such a complete description of the Universe based on soliton wave solution of cosmological KdV equation. Then we advance further this KdV equation by virtue of Cellular Automaton method to solve the PDEs. We submit wholeheartedly Robert Kuruczs hypothesis that Big Bang should be replaced with a finite cellular automaton universe with no expansion [4][5]. Nonetheless, we are fully aware that our model is far from being complete, but it appears the proposed cellular automaton model of the Universe is very close in spirit to what Konrad Zuse envisaged long time ago. It is our hope that the new proposed method can be verified with observation data. But we admit that our model is still in its infancy, more researches are needed to fill all the missing details.

  1. Defects in the supersymmetric mKdV hierarchy via Bäcklund transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, A. R.; Retore, A. L.; Gomes, J. F.; Spano, N. I.; Zimerman, A. H.

    2018-01-01

    The integrability of the N=1 supersymmetric modified Korteweg de-Vries (smKdV) hierarchy in the presence of defects is investigated through the construction of its super Bäcklund transformation. The construction of such transformation is performed by using essentially two methods: the Bäcklund-defect matrix approach and the superfield approach. Firstly, we employ the defect matrix associated to the hierarchy which turns out to be the same for the supersymmetric sinh-Gordon (sshG) model. The method is general for all flows and as an example we derive explicitly the Bäcklund equations in components for the first few flows of the hierarchy, namely t 3 and t 5. Secondly, the supersymmetric extension of the Bäcklund transformation in the superspace formalism is constructed for those flows. Finally, this super Bäcklund transformation is employed to introduce type I defects for the supersymmetric mKdV hierarchy. Further integrability aspects by considering modified conserved quantities are derived from the defect matrix.

  2. Revisitation of the localized excitations of the (2+1)-dimensional KdV equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Sen-yue; Ruan, H.-y.

    2001-01-01

    In a previous paper (Lou S-y 1995 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 28 7227), a generalized dromion structure was revealed for the (2+1)-dimensional KdV equation, which was first derived by Boiti et al (Boiti M, Leon J J P, Manna M and Pempinelli F 1986 Inverse Problems 2 271) using the idea of the weak Lax pair. In this paper, using a Bäcklund transformation and the variable separation approach, we find there exist much more abundant localized structures for the (2+1)-dimensional KdV equation. The abundance of the localized structures of the model is introduced by the entrance of an arbitrary function of the seed solution. Some special types of dromion solution, lumps, breathers, instantons and the ring type of soliton, are discussed by selecting the arbitrary functions appropriately. The dromion solutions can be driven by sets of straight-line and curved-line ghost solitons. The dromion solutions may be located not only at the cross points of the lines but also at the closed points of the curves. The breathers may breathe both in amplitude and in shape.

  3. Construction of type-II Bäcklund transformation for the mKdV hierarchy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, J F; Retore, A L; Zimerman, A H

    2015-01-01

    From an algebraic construction of the mKdV hierarchy we observe that the space component of the Lax operator plays the role of a universal algebraic object. This fact induces the universality of a gauge transformation that relates two field configurations of a given member of the hierarchy. Such gauge transformation generates the Bäcklund transformation (BT). In this paper we propose a systematic construction of BT for the entire mKdV hierarchy from the known type-II BT of the sinh-Gordon theory. We explicitly construct the BT of the first few integrable models associated to positive and negative grade-time evolutions. Solutions of these transformations for several cases describing the transition from vacuum–vacuum and the vacuum to one-soliton solutions which determines the value for the auxiliary field and the Bäcklund parameter respectively, independently of the model. The same follows for the scattering of two one-soliton solutions. The resultant delay is determined by a condition independent of the model considered. (paper)

  4. Beyond the Hubble Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-08-01

    about the distances to galaxies and thereby about the expansion rate of the Universe. A simple way to determine the distance to a remote galaxy is by measuring its redshift, calculate its velocity from the redshift and divide this by the Hubble constant, H0. For instance, the measured redshift of the parent galaxy of SN 1995K (0.478) yields a velocity of 116,000 km/sec, somewhat more than one-third of the speed of light (300,000 km/sec). From the universal expansion rate, described by the Hubble constant (H0 = 20 km/sec per million lightyears as found by some studies), this velocity would indicate a distance to the supernova and its parent galaxy of about 5,800 million lightyears. The explosion of the supernova would thus have taken place 5,800 million years ago, i.e. about 1,000 million years before the solar system was formed. However, such a simple calculation works only for relatively ``nearby'' objects, perhaps out to some hundred million lightyears. When we look much further into space, we also look far back in time and it is not excluded that the universal expansion rate, i.e. the Hubble constant, may have been different at earlier epochs. This means that unless we know the change of the Hubble constant with time, we cannot determine reliable distances of distant galaxies from their measured redshifts and velocities. At the same time, knowledge about such change or lack of the same will provide unique information about the time elapsed since the Universe began to expand (the ``Big Bang''), that is, the age of the Universe and also its ultimate fate. The Deceleration Parameter q0 Cosmologists are therefore eager to determine not only the current expansion rate (i.e., the Hubble constant, H0) but also its possible change with time (known as the deceleration parameter, q0). Although a highly accurate value of H0 has still not become available, increasing attention is now given to the observational determination of the second parameter, cf. also the Appendix at the

  5. Waste isolation safety assessment program. Controlled sample program publication number 2: interlaboratory comparison of batch Kd values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relyea, J.F.; Serne, R.J.

    1979-06-01

    Objectives were to: (1) ascertain whether different experimenters obtain the same results for the adsorption of Cs, Sr and Pu using common rocks, standard solutions and a prescribed method; and (2) compare the results obtained by individual laboratories using different experimental methodologies and resolve any differences found or determine what conversions can be made to compare results from one method with another. Results from Objective 1 indicate that several parameters that were uncontrolled may have affected results. The uncontrolled parameters were: (1) method of tracer addition to solution, (2) solution to rock ratio, (3) initial tracer concentration in influent solution, (4) particle size distribution, (5) solid--solution separation method, (6) sample containers, and (7) temperature. Observed Kds for Cs and Sr in brine showed agreement among laboratories for both limestone and basalt rock samples. Comparable results were also found for Sr and Cs in the basalt groundwater. Results for Kd(Cs) in the limestone groundwater varied over three orders of magnitude, and Kd(Sr) varied by one order of magnitude in the limestone system. Observed Kd values for Pu typically varied by two to three orders of magnitude in all systems studied. Adsorption of Pu by container walls and by colloidal particles caused much of the variation in Kd(Pu). Direct measurement of Pu adsorbed by the rock (rather than measured by the difference between influent and effluent activities) also failed to reduce the Kd(Pu) variability

  6. The tripeptide KdPT ameliorates ongoing psoriasis-like skin inflammation in murine and human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mykicki, Nadine; Klenner, Lars; Baumann, Christoph; Auriemma, Matteo; Sternemann, Carlo; Soeberdt, Michael; Elliott, Graham R; Abels, Christoph; Luger, Thomas A; Loser, Karin

    2017-04-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease appearing as scaly erythematous cutaneous lesions, which are characterized by parakeratosis and acanthosis as well as the infiltration of immune cells, such as T helper-1 and T helper-17 cells. Here, we demonstrated that KdPT, a tripeptide structurally related to the C-terminal amino acids of alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, which was previously shown to exhibit anti-inflammatory effects in intestinal inflammation, ameliorated ongoing disease in the mouse model of imiquimod-induced psoriasis-like skin inflammation and in the small xenotransplant mouse model of psoriasis. We could show that systemic KdPT treatment significantly reduced hyperkeratosis and acanthosis in murine as well as human skin. Moreover, KdPT upregulated Foxp3 in CD4 + T cells from mice and from peripheral blood of individuals with psoriasis and decreased the expression of type 1 inflammatory cytokines, indicating that the beneficial effect of KdPT was, at least in part, mediated by the induction of functional regulatory T cells that suppressed the activation of pathogenic CD4 + IFN-γ + and CD4 + IL-17 + T cells. Thus, these data might suggest KdPT as a potential novel therapeutic alternative for the treatment of psoriasis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Epidermal growth factor binding, stimulation of phosphorylation, and inhibition of gluconeogenesis in rat proximal tubule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, R C; Daniel, T O

    1989-05-01

    Epidermal growth factor and insulin share many biological activities, including stimulation of cell proliferation, ion flux, glycolysis, fatty acid and glycogen synthesis, and activation of receptor-linked tyrosine kinase activity. In the kidney, insulin has been shown to regulate transport processes and inhibit gluconeogenesis in the proximal tubule. Since the kidney represents a major source of EGF, the present studies investigated whether proximal tubule contained EGF receptors, whether EGF receptors were localized to apical or basolateral membranes, and whether EGF receptor activation participated in the regulation of an important proximal tubule function, gluconeogenesis. Specific EGF receptors were demonstrated in the basolateral membrane of proximal tubule. Following incubation with 125I EGF, basolateral membranes demonstrated equilibrium binding at 4 degrees C and 23 degrees C. There was 78 +/- 2% specific binding (n = 13). The dissociation constant (Kd) was 1.5 x 10(-9) M and maximal binding was 44 fmol/mg protein. There was ninefold more specific binding to proximal tubule basolateral membrane than to brush border membrane. In basolateral, but not brush border membranes, EGF induced phosphorylation of the tyrosine residues of intrinsic membrane proteins, including a 170 kDa protein, corresponding to the EGF receptor. In the presence of the gluconeogenic substrates, alanine, lactate, and succinate, proximal tubule suspensions synthesized glucose. EGF inhibited glucose production in a concentration-dependent manner over a concentration range of 3 x 10(-11) to 3 x 10(-9) M. In addition, EGF inhibited angiotensin II-stimulated glucose production in the proximal tubule suspensions. EGF did not significantly increase net glucose metabolism nor decrease cellular ATP concentrations. Therefore, these studies demonstrated that rat proximal tubule contained specific receptors for EGF that were localized to the basolateral membrane and linked to tyrosine kinase

  8. Comparison of the binding and internalization properties of 12 DOTA-coupled and ¹¹¹In-labelled CCK2/gastrin receptor binding peptides: a collaborative project under COST Action BM0607.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloj, Luigi; Aurilio, Michela; Rinaldi, Valentina; D'ambrosio, Laura; Tesauro, Diego; Peitl, Petra Kolenc; Maina, Theodosia; Mansi, Rosalba; von Guggenberg, Elisabeth; Joosten, Lieke; Sosabowski, Jane K; Breeman, Wouter A P; De Blois, Erik; Koelewijn, Stuart; Melis, Marleen; Waser, Beatrice; Beetschen, Karin; Reubi, Jean Claude; de Jong, Marion

    2011-08-01

    Specific overexpression of cholecystokinin 2 (CCK2)/gastrin receptors has been demonstrated in several tumours of neuroendocrine origin. In some of these cancer types, such as medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), a sensitive diagnostic modality is still unavailable and therapeutic options for inoperable lesions are needed. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) may be a viable therapeutic strategy in the management of these patients. Several CCK2R-targeted radiopharmaceuticals have been described in recent years. As part of the European Union COST Action BM0607 we studied the in vitro and in vivo characteristics of 12 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-conjugated CCK2R binding peptides. In the present study, we analysed binding and internalization characteristics. Stability, biodistribution and imaging studies have been performed in parallel by other centres involved in the project. Determination of IC(50) values was performed using autoradiography, with DOTA-peptides displacing (125)I-CCK from receptors on tissue sections from human tumours. Saturation binding and internalization experiments were performed using (111)In-labelled peptides. The rat AR42J cell line and the human A431-CCK2R transfected cell line were utilized for in vitro experiments; dissociation constants (K(d)) and apparent number of binding sites (B(max)) were determined. Internalization was determined in receptor-expressing cells by incubating with tracer amounts of peptide at 37 and 4°C for different times up to 120 min. Surface-bound peptide was then stripped either by acid wash or subsequent incubation with 1 μM unlabelled peptide at 4°C. All peptides showed high receptor affinity with IC(50) values ranging from 0.2 to 3.4 nM. Saturation experiments also showed high affinity with K(d) values in the 10(-9)-10(-8) M range. B(max) values estimated in A431-CCK2R cells ranged from 0.6 to 2.2 × 10(6) per cell. All peptides showed high levels of internalization when

  9. Exact solutions for fifth-order KdV-type equations with time-dependent coefficients using the Kudryashov method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, M.; Mirzazadeh, M.

    2014-09-01

    The KdV equation plays an important role in describing motions of long waves in shallow water under gravity, one-dimensional nonlinear lattice, fluid mechanics, quantum mechanics, plasma physics, nonlinear optics and other areas. The KdV equation is a well-known model for the description of nonlinear long internal waves in a fluid stratified by both density and current. The aim of this paper is to present solitary wave solutions of the fifth-order KdV equations with time-dependent coefficients. The Kudryashov method is applied to solve the governing equations and then exact 1-soliton solutions are obtained. It is shown that this method provides us with a powerful mathematical tool for solving high-order nonlinear partial differential equations with time-dependent coefficients in mathematical physics.

  10. Similarity and conditional similarity reductions of a (2+1)-dimensional KdV equation via a direct method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Sen-yue; Tang, Xiao-yan; Lin, Ji

    2000-12-01

    To get the similarity solutions of a nonlinear physical equation, one may use the classical Lie group approach, nonclassical Lie group approach and the Clarkson and Kruskal (CK) direct method. In this paper the direct method is modified to get the similarity and conditional similarity reductions of a (2+1) dimensional KdV-type equation. Ten types of usual similarity reductions [including the (1+1)-dimensional shallow water wave equation and the variable KdV equation] and six types of conditional similarity reductions of the (2+1)-dimensional KdV equation are obtained. Some special solutions of the conditional similarity reduction equations are found to show the nontriviality of the conditional similarity reduction approach. The conditional similarity solutions cannot be obtained by using the nonclassical Lie group approach in its present form. How to modify the nonclassical Lie group approach to obtain the conditional similarity solutions is still open.

  11. Identification and further characterization of the specific cell binding fragment from sponge aggregation factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramzow, M; Bachmann, M; Uhlenbruck, G; Dorn, A; Müller, W E

    1986-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) were raised against the aggregation factor (AF) from the marine sponge Geodia cydonium. Two clones were identified that secrete McAbs against the cell binding protein of the AF complex. Fab fragments of McAbs: 5D2-D11 completely abolished the activity of the AF to form secondary aggregates from single cells. The McAbs were determined to react with the AF in vitro; this interaction was prevented by addition of the aggregation receptor, isolated and purified from the same species. After dissociation of the AF by sodium dodecyl sulfate and 2-mercaptoethanol, followed by electrophoretical fractionation, a 47-kD protein was identified by immunoblotting which interacted with the McAbs: 5D2-D11. During this dissociation procedure, the sunburst structure of the AF was destroyed. In a second approach, the 47-kD protein was isolated by immunoprecipitation; 12 molecules of this protein species were calculated to be associated with the intact AF particle. The 47-kD AF fragment bound to dissociated Geodia cells with a high affinity (Ka of 7 X 10(8) M-1) even in the absence of Ca++ ions; the number of binding sites was approximately 4 X 10(6)/cell. This interaction was prevented by addition of the aggregation receptor to the 47-kD protein in the homologous cell system. Moreover, it was established that this binding occurs species-specifically. The 47-kD fragment of the AF was localized only extracellularly by indirect immunofluorescence staining in cryostat slices. These data suggest that the 47-kD protein is the cell binding molecule of the AF from Geodia.

  12. Analytical electron acoustic solitary wave solution for the forced KdV equation in superthermal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Rustam; Saha, Asit; Chatterjee, Prasanta

    2017-12-01

    Analytical electron acoustic solitary wave (EASW) solution is investigated in the presence of periodic force for an unmagnetized plasma consisting of cold electron fluid, superthermal hot electrons, and stationary ions. Employing the reductive perturbation technique, the forced Korteg-de Vries (KdV) equation is derived for electron acoustic waves. For the first time, an analytical solution for EASWs is derived in the presence of periodic force. The effects of the ratio between hot electron and cold electron number densities at equilibrium (α), spectral index (κ), speed of the traveling wave (M), strength (f0), and frequency (ω) of the periodic force are studied on the analytical solution of EASWs. It is observed that the parameters α, κ, M, f0, and ω affect significantly the structures of the electron acoustic solitary waves. The results may have relevance in laboratory plasmas as well as in space plasma environments.

  13. Numerical solution of the Rosenau-KdV-RLW equation by using RBFs collocation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Bahar; Dereli, Yilmaz

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a meshfree method based on the collocation with radial basis functions (RBFs) is proposed to solve numerically an initial-boundary value problem of Rosenau-KdV-regularized long-wave (RLW) equation. Numerical values of invariants of the motion are computed to examine the fundamental conservative properties of the equation. Computational experiments for the simulation of solitary waves examine the accuracy of the scheme in terms of error norms L2 and L∞. Linear stability analysis is investigated to determine whether the present method is stable or unstable. The scheme gives unconditionally stable, and second-order convergent. The obtained results are compared with analytical solution and some other earlier works in the literature. The presented results indicate the accuracy and efficiency of the method.

  14. Phase transition of KD3(SeO3)2 studied by neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Yutaka; Koyano, Nobumitsu; Shibuya, Iwao; Tokunaga, Masaharu.

    1979-01-01

    Crystal structure of low temperature phase of KD 3 (SeO 3 ) 2 was studied by neutron diffraction method. Space group is Pbcn at the high temperature phase and changes to P2 1 /b below the transition point. At the low temperature phase, striking twin patterns due to spontaneous shear strain were observed. Suitable corrections were applied to the observed data and the result of structure analysis revealed that a hydrogen atom which is disordered at the high temperature phase is distinctly bonded to one of the oxygens of SeO 3 . This induces slightly different orientational changes and deformations of two SeO 3 tetrahedra connected by the hydrogen. Discussion on the phase transition mechanism is given in parallel to that of KDP. (author)

  15. Transient radiation effects in D.O.I. optical materials: KD*P

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons-Potter, K.

    1998-07-01

    Department of Energy and Defense Programs systems are becoming increasingly reliant on the use of optical technologies that must perform under a range of ionizing radiation environments. In particular, the radiation response of materials under consideration for applications in direct optical initiation (D.O.I.) schemes must be well characterized. In this report, transient radiation effects observed in a KD*P crystal are characterized. Under gamma exposure with 2 MeV photons in a 20--30 nsec pulse, the authors observe induced absorption at 1.06 microm that causes a peak decrease in overall sample transmittance of only 10%. This induced loss is seen to recover fully within the first 30 microsec

  16. Complex dynamical behaviors of compact solitary waves in the perturbed mKdV equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Jiu-Li; Xing Qian-Qian; Tian Li-Xin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we give a detailed discussion about the dynamical behaviors of compact solitary waves subjected to the periodic perturbation. By using the phase portrait theory, we find one of the nonsmooth solitary waves of the mKdV equation, namely, a compact solitary wave, to be a weak solution, which can be proved. It is shown that the compact solitary wave easily turns chaotic from the Melnikov theory. We focus on the sufficient conditions by keeping the system stable through selecting a suitable controller. Furthermore, we discuss the chaotic threshold for a perturbed system. Numerical simulations including chaotic thresholds, bifurcation diagrams, the maximum Lyapunov exponents, and phase portraits demonstrate that there exists a special frequency which has a great influence on our system; with the increase of the controller strength, chaos disappears in the perturbed system. But if the controller strength is sufficiently large, the solitary wave vibrates violently. (general)

  17. A sequential binding mechanism in a PDZ domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Celestine N; Bach, Anders; Engström, Åke

    2009-01-01

    that ligand binding involves at least a two-step process. By using an ultrarapid continuous-flow mixer, we then detected a hyperbolic dependence of binding rate constants on peptide concentration, corroborating the two-step binding mechanism. Furthermore, we found a similar dependence of the rate constants...

  18. Identification of a chloroplast coenzyme A-binding protein related to the peroxisomal thiolases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L M; Lamppa, G

    1996-12-01

    A 30-kD coenzyme A (CoA)-binding protein was isolated from spinach (Spinacea oleracea) chloroplast soluble extracts using affinity chromatography under conditions in which 95% of the total protein was excluded. The 30-kD protein contains an eight-amino-acid sequence, DVRLYYGA, that is identical to a region in a 36-kD protein of unknown function that is encoded by a kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa) cDNA. Southern blotting also detected a spinach gene that is related to the kiwifruit cDNA. The kiwifruit 36-kD protein that was synthesized in Escherichia coli was imported into chloroplasts and cleaved to a 30-kD form; it was processed to the same size in an organelle-free assay. Furthermore, the kiwifruit protein specifically bound to CoA. The kiwifruit protein contains a single cysteine within a domain that is related to the peroxisomal beta-ketoacyl-CoA thiolases, which catalyze the CoA-dependent degradative step of fatty acid beta-oxidation. Within 50 amino acids surrounding the cysteine, considered to be part of the thiolase active site, the kiwifruit protein shows approximately 26% sequence identity with the mango, cucumber, and rat peroxisomal thiolases. N-terminal alignment with these enzymes, relative to the cysteine, indicates that the 36-kD protein is cleaved after serine-58 during import, agreeing with the estimated size (approximately 6 kD) of a transit peptide. The 30-kD protein is also related to the E. coli and mitochondrial thiolases, as well as to the acetoacetyl-CoA thiolases of prokaryotes. Features distinguish it from members of the thiolase family, suggesting that it carries out a related but novel function. The protein is more distantly related to chloroplast beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III, the initial condensing enzyme of fatty acid synthetase that utilizes acetyl-CoA.

  19. A 62-kD protein required for mitotic progression is associated with the mitotic apparatus during M-phase and with the nucleus during interphase

    OpenAIRE

    Johnston, Jennifer A.; Sloboda, Roger D.

    1992-01-01

    A protein of 62 kD is a substrate of a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase, and both proteins copurify with isolated mitotic apparatuses (Dinsmore, J. H., and R. D. Sloboda. 1988. Cell. 53:769- 780). Phosphorylation of the 62-kD protein increases after fertilization; maximum incorporation of phosphate occurs during late metaphase and anaphase and correlates directly with microtubule disassembly as determined by in vitro experiments with isolated mitotic apparatuses. Because 62-kD prot...

  20. Biophysical characterization and functional studies on calbindin-D28K: A vitamin D-induced calcium-binding protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leathers, V.L.

    1989-01-01

    Vitamin D dependent calcium binding protein, or calbindin-D, is the principal protein induced in the intestine in response to the steroid hormone 1,25(OH) 2 -vitamin D 3 . A definitive role for calbindin-D in vitamin D 3 mediated biological responses remains unclear. Biophysical and functional studies on chick intestinal calbindin-D 28K (CaBP) were initiated so that some insight might be gained into its relevance to the process of intestinal calcium transport. Calbindin-D belongs to a class of high affinity calcium binding proteins which includes calmodulin, parvalbumin and troponin C. The Ca 2+ binding stoichiometry and binding constants for calbindin-D 28K were quantitated by Quin 2 titration analysis. The protein was found to bind 5-6 Ca 2+ ions with a K D on the order of 10 -8 , in agreement with the 6 domains identified from the amino acid sequence. A slow Ca 2+ exchange rate (80 s -1 ) as assessed by 43 Ca NMR and extensive calcium dependent conformational changes in 1 H NMR spectra were also observed. Functional studies on chick intestinal CaBP were carried out by two different methods. Interactions between CaBP and intestinal cellular components were assessed via photoaffinity labeling techniques. Specific calcium dependent complexes for CaBP were identified with bovine intestinal alkaline phosphatase and brush border membrane proteins of 60 and 150 kD. CaBP was also found to co-migrate with the alkaline phosphatase activity of chick intestinal brush border membranes as evaluated by gel filtration chromatography. The second procedure for evaluating CaBP functionality has involved the quantitation of CaBP association with vesicular transport components as assessed by ELISA. CaBP, immunoreactivity was observed in purified lysosomes, microsomes and microtubules

  1. Surface plasmon resonance and circular dichroism characterization of cucurbitacins binding to serum albumins for early pharmacokinetic profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabini, Edoardo; Fiori, Giovana Maria Lanchoti; Tedesco, Daniele; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; Bertucci, Carlo

    2016-04-15

    Cucurbitacins are a group of tetracyclic triterpenoids, known for centuries for their anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties, which are being actively investigated over the past decades in order to elucidate their mechanism of action. In perspective of being used as therapeutic molecules, a pharmacokinetic characterization is crucial to assess the affinity toward blood carrier proteins and extrapolate distribution volumes. Usually, pharmacokinetic data are first collected on animal models and later translated to humans; therefore, an early characterization of the interaction with carrier proteins from different species is highly desirable. In the present study, the interactions of cucurbitacins E and I with human and rat serum albumins (HSA and RSA) were investigated by means of surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based optical biosensing and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Active HSA and RSA sensor chip surfaces were prepared through an amine coupling reaction protocol, and the equilibrium dissociation constants (Kd) for the different cucurbitacins-serum albumins complexes were then determined by SPR analysis. Further information on the binding of cucurbitacins to serum albumins was obtained by CD competition experiments with biliverdin, a specific marker binding to subdomain IB of HSA. SPR data unveiled a previously unreported binding event between CucI and HSA; the determined binding affinities of both compounds were slightly higher for RSA with respect to HSA, even though all the compounds can be ranked as high-affinity binders for both carriers. CD analysis showed that the two cucurbitacins modify the binding of biliverdin to serum albumins through opposite allosteric modulation (positive for HSA, negative for RSA), confirming the need for caution in the translation of pharmacokinetic data across species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Recommended Distribution Coefficients, Kd Values, for Special Analysis Risk Calculations Related to Waste Disposal and Tank Closure on the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, D

    2005-08-31

    The purpose of this document is to provide a technically defensible list of distribution coefficients, or Kd values, for use in performance assessment (PA) and special analysis (SA) calculations on the SRS. Only Kd values for radionuclides that have new information related to them or that have recently been recognized as being important are discussed in this report. Some 150 Kd values are provided in this report for various waste-disposal or tank-closure environments: soil, corrosion in grout, oxidizing grout waste, gravel, clay, and reducing concrete environments. Documentation and justification for the selection of each Kd value is provided.

  3. B700, a murine melanoma-specific antigen, binds Vitamin D3; conservation of binding among albuminoid molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farzaneh, N.K.; Walden, T.L. Jr.; Hearing, V.J.; Gersten, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    B700, a murine melanoma-specific antigen, is a member of the serum albumin protein family. Other members of this family include serum albumin (SMA), a-fetoprotein (AFP), vitamin D binding protein (DBP), and C700. The primary structure and biochemical functions of B700, as well as its in vivo metabolic fate are largely unknown. The authors examined the functional characteristics of MSA, AFP, and DBP, and for their ability to specifically bind [ 3 H]-1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D 3 . Scatchard analysis revealed a single binding site for B700 with a Kd of 51,000 M and a Bmax of 4.51 x 10 -7 . There is no significant difference between the Kd and Bmax values among the albuminoid proteins. However, differences in the binding sites could be distinguished by competition of the 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D 3 with other steroids. 2nM of vitamin D 3 , vitamin D 2 , or estrogen competed for the specific binding of 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D 3 by B700 but not by DBP. The MSA binding site for 1,25 dihydroxy vitamin D 3 more closely resembles that of DBP than B700. These data indicate that the binding function of the albuminoid proteins has been conserved in the B700 melanoma antigen

  4. Lack of diurnal rhythm of low molecular weight insulin-like growth factor binding protein in patients with Cushing's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degerblad, M.; Povoa, G.; Thoren, M.; Wivall, I.-L.; Hall, K.

    1989-01-01

    A specific radioimmunoassay with antibodies raised against the 25 kD insulin-like growth factor binding protein (25 kD IGFBP) in amniotic fluid was used to measure levels of cross-reacting protein in human serum and plasma. Plasma samples collected continually at 20-min intervals during 24-h in 6 healthy adults revealed a distinct diurnal rhythm in the concentration of 25 kD IGFBP. The lowest levels (9-13 μg/l) were found between 13.00 and 24.00 h with a rise after midnight to maximum levels (23-71 μg/l) between 03.00 and 09.00 h. There was no relation between the patterns of GH and 25 kD IGFBP. In 3 patients with active Cushing's disease, the levels of 25 kD IGFBP in plasma samples collected during 12 h. 19.00-07.00 h, were generally low and without nocturnal variations. One of the patients studied after extirpation of a pituitary adenoma displayed a nocturnal rhythm with maximum levels of 25 kD IGFBP between 03.00 and 07.00 h. Eight patients treated with stereotactic pituitary irradiation owing to Cushing's disease also showed a distinct nocturnal increase of 25 kD IGFBP. The results indicate the existence of a diurnal rhythm of 25 kD IGFBP in adults. Further, low levels and lack of diurnal rhythm of 25 kD IGFBP are demonstrated in Cushing's disease. (author)

  5. Legume receptors perceive the rhizobial lipochitin oligosaccharide signal molecules by direct binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broghammer, Angelique; Krusell, Lene; Blaise, Mickael

    2012-01-01

    acid positions N68 and N198. Receptor-ligand interaction was measured by using ligands that were labeled or immobilized by application of chemoselective chemistry at the anomeric center. High-affinity ligand binding was demonstrated with both solid-phase and free solution techniques. The K(d) values...

  6. Self-peptides with intermediate capacity to bind and stabilize MHC class I molecules may be immunogenic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M L M; Ruhwald, M; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    2003-01-01

    Thirty self-peptides were selected on the basis of their predicted binding to H-2b molecules. The binding of peptides was ascertained experimentally by biochemical (KD measurements) and cellular [major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) stabilization] assays. A weak, but significant......, correlation between KD measurements and MHC-I stabilization was observed. Mice (n = 99) were immunized with individual peptides. Twenty-eight peptides were found to induce peptide-specific cytotoxic activity, and a total of 84 mice developed significant cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses after...

  7. Sequence-selective DNA binding to the regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J C; Wang, J H

    1989-06-15

    The fluorescence of Trp-226 in the regulatory subunit of bovine type II cAMP-dependent protein kinase is unaffected by the binding of cAMP, but is quenched by the binding of 2'-dansyl-cAMP (DNS-cAMP). Up to 67% of the fluorescence of Trp-226 can be quenched by resonant energy transfer to the DNS-cAMP bound to the first site, and 96% of the fluorescence can be quenched by saturating both sites with DNS-cAMP. The observed efficiencies of energy transfer gave a distance of 16 A between Trp-226 and the DNS-cAMP bound at the first site and a distance of 12.7 A between Trp-226 and the DNS-cAMP bound at second site. The fluorescence of Trp-226 was suppressed by incubation of RII with the self-complementary octanucleotide TGACGTCA (CRE) due to binding of the oligonucleotide to RII. A detailed study of the binding equilibrium showed that each RII(cAMP)2 molecule binds 1 molecule of CRE with Kd = 80 nM. The corresponding Kd value for cAMP-depleted RII was found to be 25-fold higher. RII was also found to bind randomly selected DNA fragments with an average Kd value much higher than that of CRE. These observations show for the first time that the binding of oligonucleotide to RII is cAMP-enhanced and sequence-selective.

  8. Spectrophotometric determination of association constant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    Least-squares 'Systematic Trial-and-Error Procedure' (STEP) for spectrophotometric evaluation of association constant (equilibrium constant) K and molar absorption coefficient E for a 1:1 molecular complex, A + B = C, with error analysis according to Conrow et al. (1964). An analysis of the Charg...

  9. Opioid binding sites in the guinea pig and rat kidney: Radioligand homogenate binding and autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dissanayake, V.U.; Hughes, J.; Hunter, J.C. (Parke-Davis Research Unit, Addenbrookes Hospital Site, Cambridge (England))

    1991-07-01

    The specific binding of the selective {mu}-, {delta}-, and {kappa}-opioid ligands (3H)(D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly-ol5)enkephalin ((3H) DAGOL), (3H)(D-Pen2,D-Pen5)enkephalin ((3H)DPDPE), and (3H)U69593, respectively, to crude membranes of the guinea pig and rat whole kidney, kidney cortex, and kidney medulla was investigated. In addition, the distribution of specific 3H-opioid binding sites in the guinea pig and rat kidney was visualized by autoradiography. Homogenate binding and autoradiography demonstrated the absence of {mu}- and {kappa}-opioid binding sites in the guinea pig kidney. No opioid binding sites were demonstrable in the rat kidney. In the guinea pig whole kidney, cortex, and medulla, saturation studies demonstrated that (3H)DPDPE bound with high affinity (KD = 2.6-3.5 nM) to an apparently homogeneous population of binding sites (Bmax = 8.4-30 fmol/mg of protein). Competition studies using several opioid compounds confirmed the nature of the {delta}-opioid binding site. Autoradiography experiments demonstrated that specific (3H)DPDPE binding sites were distributed radially in regions of the inner and outer medulla and at the corticomedullary junction of the guinea pig kidney. Computer-assisted image analysis of saturation data yielded KD values (4.5-5.0 nM) that were in good agreement with those obtained from the homogenate binding studies. Further investigation of the {delta}-opioid binding site in medulla homogenates, using agonist ((3H)DPDPE) and antagonist ((3H)diprenorphine) binding in the presence of Na+, Mg2+, and nucleotides, suggested that the {delta}-opioid site is linked to a second messenger system via a GTP-binding protein. Further studies are required to establish the precise localization of the {delta} binding site in the guinea pig kidney and to determine the nature of the second messenger linked to the GTP-binding protein in the medulla.

  10. Endotoxin-induced reduction of beta-adrenergic binding sites on splenic lymphocytes in vivo and in vitro : its modulation by anterior hypothalamic lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Oosterhout, A J; Van Heuven-Nolsen, D; Thijssen, J H; Nijkamp, F P; de Boer, S.F.

    1989-01-01

    Bacterial endotoxin induced a 38% decrease in the number of beta-adrenergic binding sites (Bmax) on splenic lymphocytes, four days after intraperitoneal administration to guinea pigs. No change in the affinity (Kd) for [125-I]-cyanopindolol ([125-I]-CYP) binding was observed. Incubation of guinea

  11. Higher order supersymmetries and fermionic conservation laws of the supersymmetric extension of the KdV equation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kersten, P.H.M.

    1988-01-01

    By the introduction of nonlocal basonic and fermionic variables we construct a recursion symmetry of the super KdV equation, leading to a hierarchy of bosonic symmetries and one of fermionic symmetries. The hierarchies of bosonic and fermionic conservation laws arise in a natural way in the

  12. Technetium, Iodine, and Chromium Adsorption/Desorption Kd Values for Vadose Zone Pore Water, ILAW Glass, and Cast Stone Leachates Contacting an IDF Sand Sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Last, George V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Snyder, Michelle M.V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Um, Wooyong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stephenson, John R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Leavy, Ian I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Strickland, Christopher E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bacon, Diana H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Qafoku, Nikolla [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Serne, R. Jeffrey [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Performance and risk assessments of immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) have shown that risks to groundwater are quite sensitive to adsorption-desorption interactions occurring in the near- and far-field environment. These interactions between the underlying sediments and the contaminants present in the leachates that descend from the buried glass, secondary waste grouts, and potentially Cast Stone low-activity waste packages have been represented in these assessments using the contaminant distribution coefficient (Kd) construct. Some contaminants (99Tc, 129I, and Cr) present in significant quantities in these wastes have low Kd values and tend to drive risk to public health and the environment. Relatively small changes in the Kd value can cause relatively large changes in the retardation factor. Thus, even relatively small uncertainty in the Kd value can result in a relatively large uncertainty in the risk determined through performance assessment modeling. The purpose of this study is to further reduce the uncertainty in Kd values for 99Tc, iodine (iodide and iodate), and Cr (chromate; CrO42-) by conducting systematic adsorption-desorption experiments using actual sand-dominated Hanford formation sediments from beneath the IDF and solutions that closely mimic Hanford vadose zone pore water and leachates from Cast Stone and ILAW glass waste forms. Twenty-four batch and 21 flow-through column experiments were conducted, yielding 261 Kd measurements for these key contaminants, and contributing to our understanding for predicting transport from wastes disposed to the IDF. While the batch Kd methodology is not well-suited for measuring Kd values for non-sorbing species (as noted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency), the batch Kd results presented here are not wholly inconsistent with the column Kd results, and could be used for sensitivity purposes. Results from the column experiments are consistent with the best

  13. Receptors for corticotropin-releasing hormone in human pituitary: Binding characteristics and autoradiographic localization to immunocytochemically defined proopiomelanocortin cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smets, G.; Vauquelin, G.; Moons, L.; Smitz, J.; Kloeppel, G. (Department of Experimental Pathology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (Belgium))

    1991-08-01

    Using autoradiography combined with immunocytochemistry, the authors demonstrated that the target cells of CRH in the human pituitary were proopiomelanocortin cells. Scatchard analysis of (125I)Tyr0-oCRH saturation binding revealed the presence of one class of saturable, high affinity sites on pituitary tissue homogenate. The equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) for (125I)Tyr0-oCRH ranged from 1.1-1.6 nM, and the receptor density was between 200-350 fmol/mg protein. Fixation of cryostat sections with 4% paraformaldehyde before tracer incubation improved both tissue preservation and localization of the CRH receptor at the cellular level. Additional postfixation with 1% glutaraldehyde inhibited tracer diffusion during subsequent immunocytochemistry and autoradiography. (125I)Tyr0-oCRH was found in cytoplasmic inclusions or at the cell periphery of ACTH/beta-endorphin cells in the anterior pituitary. Single cells of the posterior pituitary were also CRH receptor positive. Cells staining for PRL or GH were CRH receptor negative. They conclude that CRH binds only to high affinity receptors on ACTH/{beta}-endorphin cells in the human pituitary.

  14. Using QCM and SPR for the Kinetic Evaluation of the Binding Between A New Recombinant Chimeric Protein and Specific Antibodies of the Visceral Leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souto, Denio E P; Faria, Angelica R; de Andrade, Helida M; Kubota, Lauro T

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) techniques were employed to kinetically evaluate the binding affinity of a new recombinant chimeric protein (CP10) toward anti-Leishmania infantum antibodies for the immunodiagnostics of the visceral leishmaniasis (VL). This chimeric protein was formed by the union in a same artificial coding DNA of ten different peptides, which showed themselves reactive toward positive canine serum for VL. Using the CP10 in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), it was possible to detect 80% of the asymptomatic infected dogs. After this, SPR and QCM immunosensors were constructed by the covalent immobilization of the CP10 on a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) formed by adsorption of alkanethiol on gold substrates. The thickness (6.80 nm) and the refractive index (1.475) of the protein on the SAM were simultaneously determined through SPR curves measured in different wavelengths (670 and 785 nm). Interactions between the CP10 and its specific IgGs (anti-CP10 antibodies) were characterized by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, SPR and QCM techniques. The equilibrium dissociation constant obtained by SPR (K(D) = 8.27 x 10(-10) mol.L(-1)) and QCM (K(D) = 2.42 x 10(- 10) mol.L(-1)) demonstrated high binding affinity of the CP10 toward anti-CP10 antibodies. In this sense, this work quantitatively proves the strong antigenic character of a new recombinant chimeric protein, giving evidence to potential contribution for the use of this protein in programs of control of the VL.

  15. Autoantibodies to a 140-kd protein in juvenile dermatomyositis are associated with calcinosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gunawardena, H

    2009-06-01

    OBJECTIVE: The identification of novel autoantibodies in juvenile dermatomyositis (DM) may have etiologic and clinical implications. The aim of this study was to describe autoantibodies to a 140-kd protein in children recruited to the Juvenile DM National Registry and Repository for UK and Ireland. METHODS: Clinical data and sera were collected from children with juvenile myositis. Sera that recognized a 140-kd protein by immunoprecipitation were identified. The identity of the p140 autoantigen was investigated by immunoprecipitation\\/immunodepletion, using commercial monoclonal antibodies to NXP-2, reference anti-p140, and anti-p155\\/140, the other autoantibody recently described in juvenile DM. DNA samples from 100 Caucasian children with myositis were genotyped for HLA class II haplotype associations and compared with those from 864 randomly selected UK Caucasian control subjects. RESULTS: Sera from 37 (23%) of 162 patients with juvenile myositis were positive for anti-p140 autoantibodies, which were detected exclusively in patients with juvenile DM and not in patients with juvenile DM-overlap syndrome or control subjects. No anti-p140 antibody-positive patients were positive for other recognized autoantibodies. Immunodepletion suggested that the identity of p140 was consistent with NXP-2 (the previously identified MJ autoantigen). In children with anti-p140 antibodies, the association with calcinosis was significant compared with the rest of the cohort (corrected P < 0.005, odds ratio 7.0, 95% confidence interval 3.0-16.1). The clinical features of patients with anti-p140 autoantibodies were different from those of children with anti-p155\\/140 autoantibodies. The presence of HLA-DRB1*08 was a possible risk factor for anti-p140 autoantibody positivity. CONCLUSION: This study has established that anti-p140 autoantibodies represent a major autoantibody subset in juvenile DM. This specificity may identify a further immunogenetic and clinical phenotype within the

  16. The university münster model surgery system for orthognathic surgery. Part II – KD-MMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehmer Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Model surgery is an integral part of the planning procedure in orthognathic surgery. Most concepts comprise cutting the dental cast off its socket. The standardized spacer plates of the KD-MMS provide for a non-destructive, reversible and reproducible means of maxillary and/or mandibular plaster cast separation. Methods In the course of development of the system various articulator types were evaluated with regard to their capability to provide a means of realizing the concepts comprised of the KD-MMS. Special attention was dedicated to the ability to perform three-dimensional displacements without cutting of plaster casts. Various utilities were developed to facilitate maxillary displacement in accordance to the planning. Objectives of this development comprised the ability to implement the values established in the course of two-dimensional ceph planning. Results The system - KD-MMS comprises a set of hardware components as well as a defined procedure. Essential hardware components are red spacer and blue mounting plates. The blue mounting plates replace the standard yellow SAM mounting elements. The red spacers provide for a defined leeway of 8 mm for three-dimensional movements. The non-destructive approach of the KD-MMS makes it possible to conduct different model surgeries with the same plaster casts as well as to restore the initial, pre-surgical situation at any time. Thereby, surgical protocol generation and gnathologic splint construction are facilitated. Conclusions The KD-MMS hardware components in conjunction with the defined procedures are capable of increasing efficiency and accuracy of model surgery and splint construction. In cases where different surgical approaches need to be evaluated in the course of model surgery, a significant reduction of chair time may be achieved.

  17. Low titer, isolated anti Ro/SSA 60 kd antibodies is correlated with positive pregnancy outcomes in women at risk of congenital heart block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonello, Marta; Hoxha, Ariela; Mattia, Elena; Zambon, Alessandra; Visentin, Silvia; Cerutti, Alessia; Ghirardello, Anna; Milanesi, Ornella; Ruffatti, Amelia

    2017-05-01

    Congenital heart block (CHB) is an autoantibody mediated disorder presumably caused by placental transmission of maternal autoantibodies to Ro/SSA 52 kd, p200, Ro/SSA 60 kd, La/SSB ribonucleoproteins. This study investigated the clinical significance of isolated anti-Ro/SSA 52 kd, anti-p200, anti-Ro/SSA 60 kd, and anti-La/SSB antibodies in positive pregnant patients. One hundred sixty-three pregnant women positive to anti-Ro/SSA 52 kd and/or anti-Ro/SSA 60 kd and/or anti-La/SSB antibodies were prospectively enrolled in the study. Anti-Ro52, anti-Ro60, anti-p200, and anti-La antibodies were assayed using home-made ELISA assays. Isolated antibody positivity was found in 25 women (15.3%), while multiple antibody positivity in 138 (84.7%). Twenty-four developed CHB, and the 139 had a favorable pregnancy outcome. The prevalence of isolated anti-Ro/SSA 60 kd antibodies was significantly higher (p Ro/SSA 60 kd antibodies.

  18. What is the role of the second "structural" NADP+-binding site in human glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Tao; Chan, Ting Fai; Lam, Veronica M S; Engel, Paul C

    2008-08-01

    Human glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, purified after overexpression in E. coli, was shown to contain one molecule/subunit of acid-extractable "structural" NADP+ and no NADPH. This tightly bound NADP+ was reduced by G6P, presumably following migration to the catalytic site. Gel-filtration yielded apoenzyme, devoid of bound NADP+ but, surprisingly, still fully active. Mr of the main component of "stripped" enzyme by gel filtration was approximately 100,000, suggesting a dimeric apoenzyme (subunit Mr = 59,000). Holoenzyme also contained tetramer molecules and, at high protein concentration, a dynamic equilibrium gave an apparent intermediate Mr of 150 kDa. Fluorescence titration of the stripped enzyme gave the K d for structural NADP+ as 37 nM, 200-fold lower than for "catalytic" NADP+. Structural NADP+ quenches 91% of protein fluorescence. At 37 degrees C, stripped enzyme, much less stable than holoenzyme, inactivated irreversibly within 2 d. Inactivation at 4 degrees C was partially reversed at room temperature, especially with added NADP+. Apoenzyme was immediately active, without any visible lag, in rapid-reaction studies. Human G6PD thus forms active dimer without structural NADP+. Apparently, the true role of the second, tightly bound NADP+ is to secure long-term stability. This fits the clinical pattern, G6PD deficiency affecting the long-lived non-nucleate erythrocyte. The Kd values for two class I mutants, G488S and G488V, were 273 nM and 480 nM, respectively (seven- and 13-fold elevated), matching the structural prediction of weakened structural NADP+ binding, which would explain decreased stability and consequent disease. Preparation of native apoenzyme and measurement of Kd constant for structural NADP+ will now allow quantitative assessment of this defect in clinical G6PD mutations.

  19. The KdV—Burgers equation in a modified speed gradient continuum model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai Ling-Ling; Ge Hong-Xia; Cheng Rong-Jun; Li Zhi-Peng

    2013-01-01

    Based on the full velocity difference model, Jiang et al. put forward the speed gradient model through the micro-macro linkage (Jiang R, Wu Q S and Zhu Z J 2001 Chin. Sci. Bull. 46 345 and Jiang R, Wu Q S and Zhu Z J 2002 Trans. Res. B 36 405). In this paper, the Taylor expansion is adopted to modify the model. The backward travel problem is overcome by our model, which exists in many higher-order continuum models. The neutral stability condition of the model is obtained through the linear stability analysis. Nonlinear analysis shows clearly that the density fluctuation in traffic flow leads to a variety of density waves. Moreover, the Korteweg-de Vries—Burgers (KdV—Burgers) equation is derived to describe the traffic flow near the neutral stability line and the corresponding solution for traffic density wave is derived. The numerical simulation is carried out to investigate the local cluster effects. The results are consistent with the realistic traffic flow and also further verify the results of nonlinear analysis

  20. Molecular cloning, expression, and characterization of a major 38-kd cochineal allergen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohgiya, Yoko; Arakawa, Fumihiro; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Hayashi, Yoshiki; Sakai, Shinobu; Ito, Sumio; Yamakawa, Yuko; Ohgiya, Satoru; Ikezawa, Zenro; Teshima, Reiko

    2009-05-01

    Carmine is a natural red pigment obtained from dried gravid female cochineal insects (Dactylopius coccus or Coccus cacti). There have been several reports of allergies to carmine, but the major allergens responsible have not been identified. To identify the major allergenic proteins in cochineal. Immunoblots of purified cochineal extract were probed with sera from 3 patients with allergy. Partial amino acid sequences were determined for the proteins bound by IgE, and the corresponding cDNA, containing a complete coding region, was cloned by 5' and 3' rapid cDNA extension and PCR. The recombinant protein was expressed in yeast and subjected to immunoblotting. We identified a full-length cDNA encoding a protein, which we named CC38K, with 335 amino acids and a molecular mass calculated as 38 kd. This amino acid sequence included all the partial amino acid sequences obtained from the purified proteins identified by IgE from patients with allergy. Recombinant CC38K protein was recognized by patients' sera, indicating that this is a major allergen present in carmine. The CC38K sequence showed homology to phospholipases. We have, for the first time, identified the major allergen in cochineal extract. This protein may be a phospholipase or related enzyme, both of which are known to be allergens in other insects.

  1. Determination of Rate Constants and Equilibrium Constants for Solution-Phase Drug–Protein Interactions by Ultrafast Affinity Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    A method was created on the basis of ultrafast affinity extraction to determine both the dissociation rate constants and equilibrium constants for drug–protein interactions in solution. Human serum albumin (HSA), an important binding agent for many drugs in blood, was used as both a model soluble protein and as an immobilized binding agent in affinity microcolumns for the analysis of free drug fractions. Several drugs were examined that are known to bind to HSA. Various conditions to optimize in the use of ultrafast affinity extraction for equilibrium and kinetic studies were considered, and several approaches for these measurements were examined. The dissociation rate constants obtained for soluble HSA with each drug gave good agreement with previous rate constants reported for the same drugs or other solutes with comparable affinities for HSA. The equilibrium constants that were determined also showed good agreement with the literature. The results demonstrated that ultrafast affinity extraction could be used as a rapid approach to provide information on both the kinetics and thermodynamics of a drug–protein interaction in solution. This approach could be extended to other systems and should be valuable for high-throughput drug screening or biointeraction studies. PMID:24911267

  2. Multiple saxitoxin-binding sites in bullfrog muscle: tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium channels and tetrodotoxin-insensitive sites of unknown function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moczydlowski, E.; Mahar, J.; Ravindran, A.

    1988-02-01

    The possible presence of multiple sodium channel subtypes in bullfrog skeletal muscle was investigated in binding experiments with (/sup 3/H)saxitoxin and in single-channel studies using planar lipid bilayers. Two classes of (/sup 3/H)saxitoxin-binding sites were identified in membrane preparations. One class displayed a toxin specificity characteristic of voltage-dependent sodium channels: high affinity for saxitoxin (KD approximately equal to 0.5 nM), neosaxitoxin (KD approximately equal to 0.1 nM), and tetrodotoxin (KD approximately equal to 1.3 nM). A second class of membrane-associated binding sites exhibited high affinity for saxitoxin (KD approximately equal to 0.1 nM), lower affinity for neosaxitoxin (KD approximately equal to 25 nM), and complete insensitivity to tetrodotoxin at concentrations up to 32 microM. The first class corresponded to functional tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium channels that could be incorporated and observed in planar bilayers in the presence of batrachotoxin. The unusual, tetrodotoxin-insensitive binding activity for (/sup 3/H)saxitoxin was also found at nM levels in the high speed supernatant of homogenized skeletal muscle without the addition of detergents. This soluble class of sites exhibited low affinity for neosaxitoxin (KD approximately equal to 60 nM) and a very slow dissociation rate of (/sup 3/H)saxitoxin (t0.5 approximately equal to 90 min), properties nearly identical to those of the tetrodotoxin-insensitive sites in membranes. The soluble saxitoxin-binding activity is also characterized by a more basic pH dependence and a complete lack of binding competition between saxitoxin and alkali cations. Bullfrog muscle appears to be a good tissue source for the purification of this soluble saxitoxin-binding protein.

  3. Seasonal variation in glucocorticoid receptor binding characteristics in human mononuclear leucocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackhurst, G; McElroy, P K; Fraser, R; Swan, R L; Connell, J M

    2001-11-01

    Glucocorticoid sensitivity varies between individuals and between tissues in the same individual. Although some of this variation is explained by the activity of the 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes, the possibility that glucocorticoid receptor sensitivity is modulated remains unexplored. This study examined glucocorticoid receptor binding in leucocytes and assessed the effects of seasonal hormonal variation on receptor binding. Two populations were studied. In the first, 318 healthy subjects were studied over 2 years with a single measurement of receptor binding made on each. In the second study nine healthy male subjects each had receptor binding measurements made at 3-week intervals over 1 year. In both populations there was significant seasonal variation in receptor binding. In the first population Kd for dexamethasone was highest in November and lowest in July (8.37 +/- 0.5 nmol/l vs. 1.58 +/- 0.7, mean +/- SEM P vs. 4969 +/- 302, P melatonin raised Kd without affecting receptor number. Co-incubation with forskolin lowered Kd suggesting that melatonin might act through the ML1 receptor class by inhibiting adenylyl cyclase. No correlations were found with 0900 h plasma cortisol. The results suggest that the glucocorticoid receptor might be modulated by season. Melatonin might mediate part of these effects. The lack of correlation with cortisol suggests that it is not an important determinant of receptor binding and that leucocyte receptors are regulated differently from central receptors.

  4. Varying Constants, Gravitation and Cosmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Fundamental constants are a cornerstone of our physical laws. Any constant varying in space and/or time would reflect the existence of an almost massless field that couples to matter. This will induce a violation of the universality of free fall. Thus, it is of utmost importance for our understanding of gravity and of the domain of validity of general relativity to test for their constancy. We detail the relations between the constants, the tests of the local position invariance and of the universality of free fall. We then review the main experimental and observational constraints that have been obtained from atomic clocks, the Oklo phenomenon, solar system observations, meteorite dating, quasar absorption spectra, stellar physics, pulsar timing, the cosmic microwave background and big bang nucleosynthesis. At each step we describe the basics of each system, its dependence with respect to the constants, the known systematic effects and the most recent constraints that have been obtained. We then describe the main theoretical frameworks in which the low-energy constants may actually be varying and we focus on the unification mechanisms and the relations between the variation of different constants. To finish, we discuss the more speculative possibility of understanding their numerical values and the apparent fine-tuning that they confront us with.

  5. Varying Constants, Gravitation and Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Uzan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental constants are a cornerstone of our physical laws. Any constant varying in space and/or time would reflect the existence of an almost massless field that couples to matter. This will induce a violation of the universality of free fall. Thus, it is of utmost importance for our understanding of gravity and of the domain of validity of general relativity to test for their constancy. We detail the relations between the constants, the tests of the local position invariance and of the universality of free fall. We then review the main experimental and observational constraints that have been obtained from atomic clocks, the Oklo phenomenon, solar system observations, meteorite dating, quasar absorption spectra, stellar physics, pulsar timing, the cosmic microwave background and big bang nucleosynthesis. At each step we describe the basics of each system, its dependence with respect to the constants, the known systematic effects and the most recent constraints that have been obtained. We then describe the main theoretical frameworks in which the low-energy constants may actually be varying and we focus on the unification mechanisms and the relations between the variation of different constants. To finish, we discuss the more speculative possibility of understanding their numerical values and the apparent fine-tuning that they confront us with.

  6. The bone matrix protein secreted phosphoprotein 24 kD (Spp24): bone metabolism regulator and starting material for biotherapeutic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Samuel S; Wang, Jeffrey C; Duarte, Maria Eugenia Leite; Zhao, Ke-Wei; Tian, Haijun; Francis, Timothy; Brochmann Murray, Elsa J

    2015-05-01

    Secreted phosphoprotein 24 kD (Spp24) is a bone matrix protein that appears to be derived primarily from the liver and delivered to other tissues in a protective complex. A significant role in bone growth and turnover is suggested by genetic studies that associate the gene locus (SPP2) with bone mineral density and bone quality. The function of this protein in the normal bone environment is unknown but clues are given by the fact that Spp24, or proteolytic products of Spp24, bind cytokines of the TGF-β superfamily and also activate intracellular signaling pathways. Several potential biotherapeutics have been engineered from this protein including materials that enhance BMP-induced bone healing and, on the other hand, materials that inhibit BMPs in clinical situations where this is called for such as reducing BMP-induced inflammation and inhibiting tumors dependent on BMP autocrine systems. As understanding of the structure and function of this protein increases, more opportunities for rationally developed therapeutics will become apparent.

  7. Akt Substrate of 160 kD Regulates Na+,K+-ATPase Trafficking in Response to Energy Depletion and Renal Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Daiane S; Thulin, Gunilla; Loffing, Johannes; Kashgarian, Michael; Caplan, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    Renal ischemia and reperfusion injury causes loss of renal epithelial cell polarity and perturbations in tubular solute and fluid transport. Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, which is normally found at the basolateral plasma membrane of renal epithelial cells, is internalized and accumulates in intracellular compartments after renal ischemic injury. We previously reported that the subcellular distribution of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase is modulated by direct binding to Akt substrate of 160 kD (AS160), a Rab GTPase-activating protein that regulates the trafficking of glucose transporter 4 in response to insulin and muscle contraction. Here, we investigated the effect of AS160 on Na(+),K(+)-ATPase trafficking in response to energy depletion. We found that AS160 is required for the intracellular accumulation of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase that occurs in response to energy depletion in cultured epithelial cells. Energy depletion led to dephosphorylation of AS160 at S588, which was required for the energy depletion-induced accumulation of Na,K-ATPase in intracellular compartments. In AS160-knockout mice, the effects of renal ischemia on the distribution of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase were substantially reduced in the epithelial cells of distal segments of the renal tubules. These data demonstrate that AS160 has a direct role in linking the trafficking of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase to the energy state of renal epithelial cells. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  8. Protein binding of psychotropic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, H.A.

    1990-01-01

    Based upon fluorescence measurements, protein binding of some psychotropic agents (chlorpromazine, promethazine, and trifluoperazine) to human IgG and HSA was studied in aqueous cacodylate buffer, PH7. The interaction parameters determined from emission quenching of the proteins. The interaction parameters determined include the equilibrium constant (K), calculated from equations derived by Borazan and coworkers, the number of binding sites (n) available to the monomer molecules on a single protein molecule. The results revealed a high level of affinity, as reflected by high values of K, and the existence of specific binding sites, since a limited number of n values are obtained. 39 tabs.; 37 figs.; 83 refs

  9. From the Rydberg constant to the fundamental constants metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nez, F.

    2005-06-01

    This document reviews the theoretical and experimental achievements of the author since the beginning of his scientific career. This document is dedicated to the spectroscopy of hydrogen, deuterium and helium atoms. The first part is divided into 6 sub-sections: 1) the principles of hydrogen spectroscopy, 2) the measurement of the 2S-nS/nD transitions, 3) other optical frequency measurements, 4) our contribution to the determination of the Rydberg constant, 5) our current experiment on the 1S-3S transition, 6) the spectroscopy of the muonic hydrogen. Our experiments have improved the accuracy of the Rydberg Constant by a factor 25 in 15 years and we have achieved the first absolute optical frequency measurement of a transition in hydrogen. The second part is dedicated to the measurement of the fine structure constant and the last part deals with helium spectroscopy and the search for optical references in the near infrared range. (A.C.)

  10. Constant fields and constant gradients in open ionic channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, D P; Barcilon, V; Eisenberg, R S

    1992-05-01

    Ions enter cells through pores in proteins that are holes in dielectrics. The energy of interaction between ion and charge induced on the dielectric is many kT, and so the dielectric properties of channel and pore are important. We describe ionic movement by (three-dimensional) Nemst-Planck equations (including flux and net charge). Potential is described by Poisson's equation in the pore and Laplace's equation in the channel wall, allowing induced but not permanent charge. Asymptotic expansions are constructed exploiting the long narrow shape of the pore and the relatively high dielectric constant of the pore's contents. The resulting one-dimensional equations can be integrated numerically; they can be analyzed when channels are short or long (compared with the Debye length). Traditional constant field equations are derived if the induced charge is small, e.g., if the channel is short or if the total concentration gradient is zero. A constant gradient of concentration is derived if the channel is long. Plots directly comparable to experiments are given of current vs voltage, reversal potential vs. concentration, and slope conductance vs. concentration. This dielectric theory can easily be tested: its parameters can be determined by traditional constant field measurements. The dielectric theory then predicts current-voltage relations quite different from constant field, usually more linear, when gradients of total concentration are imposed. Numerical analysis shows that the interaction of ion and channel can be described by a mean potential if, but only if, the induced charge is negligible, that is to say, the electric field is spatially constant.

  11. Learning Read-constant Polynomials of Constant Degree modulo Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chattopadhyay, Arkadev; Gavaldá, Richard; Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt

    2011-01-01

    Boolean functions that have constant degree polynomial representation over a fixed finite ring form a natural and strict subclass of the complexity class \\textACC0ACC0. They are also precisely the functions computable efficiently by programs over fixed and finite nilpotent groups. This class...... is not known to be learnable in any reasonable learning model. In this paper, we provide a deterministic polynomial time algorithm for learning Boolean functions represented by polynomials of constant degree over arbitrary finite rings from membership queries, with the additional constraint that each variable...

  12. Experimental determination of the distribution coefficient (Kd) of lead and barium in soils of semiarid region of Bahia, Brazil; Determinacao experimental do coeficiente de distribuicao (Kd) de chumbo e bario em solos da regiao semiarida do estado da Bahia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Mariana M.; Fernandes, Heloisa H.F; Pontedeiro, Elizabeth M.; Su, Jian, E-mail: mariana@lasme.coppe.ufrj.br, E-mail: heloisa@lasme.coppe.ufrj.br, E-mail: bettinadulley@hotmail.com, E-mail: sujian@lasme.coppe.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COOPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Simulacao e Metodos em Engenharia

    2013-07-01

    To determine the concentration of heavy metals and other contaminants in soils, aimed at evaluating the environmental impact, the use of the distribution coefficient is required (Kd), defined as the relationship between the concentrations adsorbed and in solution. The objective of this study was to determine the rates for the Lead and Barium metals in soil collected in Caetite, the state of Bahia, in two different depths. The importance of determining the distribution coefficient lies in the fact that being performed using a tropical soil. For the isotherms of Kd was used batch test method by adsorption to obtain the final concentrations. The first step was to determine the best ratio soil: solution obtained after equilibration time and finally the equilibrium concentration of the contaminant. Were also calculated percentages of the metal adsorbed by the soil and the amount of solute by the adsorbent. With the values obtained in experiments and using Mathematica 8.0 software, were made graphics equilibrium concentration versus quantity adsorbed (C vs. S). It can also plot isotherms for different models of Kd: linear, Langmuir and Freundlich in order to determine which adsorption model would fit best to the measured data and thus determine the distribution coefficient of the metal in the soil analyzed. The Freundlich isotherm was better adapted to the points of the two metals in both soils.

  13. CAG trinucleotide RNA repeats interact with RNA-binding proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaughlin, B.A.; Eberwine, J.; Spencer, C. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Genes associated with several neurological diseases are characterized by the presence of an abnormally long trinucleotide repeat sequence. By way of example, Huntington`s disease (HD), is characterized by selective neuronal degeneration associated with the expansion of a polyglutamine-encoding CAG tract. Normally, this CAG tract is comprised of 11-34 repeats, but in HD it is expanded to >37 repeats in affected individuals. The mechanism by which CAG repeats cause neuronal degeneration is unknown, but it has been speculated that the expansion primarily causes abnormal protein functioning, which in turn causes HD pathology. Other mechanisms, however, have not been ruled out. Interactions between RNA and RNA-binding proteins have previously been shown to play a role in the expression of several eukaryotic genes. Herein, we report the association of cytoplasmic proteins with normal length and extended CAG repeats, using gel shift and LJV crosslinking assays. Cytoplasmic protein extracts from several rat brain regions, including the striatum and cortex, sites of neuronal degeneration in HD, contain a 63-kD RNA-binding protein that specifically interacts with these CAG-repeat sequences. These protein-RNA interactions are dependent on the length of the CAG repeat, with longer repeats binding substantially more protein. Two CAG repeat-binding proteins are present in human cortex and striatum; one comigrates with the rat protein at 63 kD, while the other migrates at 49 kD. These data suggest mechanisms by which RNA-binding proteins may be involved in the pathological course of trinucleotide repeat-associated neurological diseases. 47 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Well-posedness and ill-posedness of the fifth-order modified KdV equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soonsik Kwon

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the initial value problem of the fifth-order modified KdV equation on the Sobolev spaces. $$displaylines{ partial_t u - partial_x^5u + c_1partial_x^3(u^3 + c_2upartial_x upartial_x^2 u + c_3uupartial_x^3 u =0cr u(x,0= u_0(x }$$ where $u:mathbb{R}imesmathbb{R} o mathbb{R} $ and $c_j$'s are real. We show the local well-posedness in $H^s(mathbb{R}$ for $sgeq 3/4$ via the contraction principle on $X^{s,b}$ space. Also, we show that the solution map from data to the solutions fails to be uniformly continuous below $H^{3/4}(mathbb{R}$. The counter example is obtained by approximating the fifth order mKdV equation by the cubic NLS equation.

  15. Batch Kd measurements of nuclides to estimate migration potential at the proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serne, R.J.; Rai, D.; Mason, M.J.; Molecke, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    Laboratory measurements to determine the sorption distribution coefficients, Kd, of radionuclides present in, and potentially leached from, radioactive wastes, in contact with representative geologic media, have been conducted. The nuclides studied include Cs, Sr, Tc, Ru, Sb, Ce, Eu, Pu, Np, Cm, Am, U, and Pa. The crushed rock materials used were from the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, a project to isolate radioactive wastes in a bedded salt facility, near Carlsbad, New Mexico. Solutions used consist of salt brine and groundwater, specific to the WIPP site, plus distilled water, for laboratory intercomparisons. The batch Kd data reported, plus data from sorption and migration measurements being conducted or planned elsewhere, will be used to evaluate the potential for radionuclide migration from the bedded salt WIPP facility. The data can be used for transport modeling and for safety assessment determinations

  16. From the Rydberg constant to the fundamental constants metrology; De la constante de Rydberg a la metrologie des constantes fondamentales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nez, F

    2005-06-15

    This document reviews the theoretical and experimental achievements of the author since the beginning of his scientific career. This document is dedicated to the spectroscopy of hydrogen, deuterium and helium atoms. The first part is divided into 6 sub-sections: 1) the principles of hydrogen spectroscopy, 2) the measurement of the 2S-nS/nD transitions, 3) other optical frequency measurements, 4) our contribution to the determination of the Rydberg constant, 5) our current experiment on the 1S-3S transition, 6) the spectroscopy of the muonic hydrogen. Our experiments have improved the accuracy of the Rydberg Constant by a factor 25 in 15 years and we have achieved the first absolute optical frequency measurement of a transition in hydrogen. The second part is dedicated to the measurement of the fine structure constant and the last part deals with helium spectroscopy and the search for optical references in the near infrared range. (A.C.)

  17. Systematics of constant roll inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguelova, Lilia; Suranyi, Peter; Wijewardhana, L. C. R.

    2018-02-01

    We study constant roll inflation systematically. This is a regime, in which the slow roll approximation can be violated. It has long been thought that this approximation is necessary for agreement with observations. However, recently it was understood that there can be inflationary models with a constant, and not necessarily small, rate of roll that are both stable and compatible with the observational constraint ns ≈ 1. We investigate systematically the condition for such a constant-roll regime. In the process, we find a whole new class of inflationary models, in addition to the known solutions. We show that the new models are stable under scalar perturbations. Finally, we find a part of their parameter space, in which they produce a nearly scale-invariant scalar power spectrum, as needed for observational viability.

  18. Strain fluctuations and elastic constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrinello, M.; Rahman, A.

    1982-03-01

    It is shown that the elastic strain fluctuations are a direct measure of elastic compliances in a general anisotropic medium; depending on the ensemble in which the fluctuation is measured either the isothermal or the adiabatic compliances are obtained. These fluctuations can now be calculated in a constant enthalpy and pressure, and hence, constant entropy, ensemble due to recent develpments in the molecular dynamics techniques. A calculation for a Ni single crystal under uniform uniaxial 100 tensile or compressive load is presented as an illustration of the relationships derived between various strain fluctuations and the elastic modulii. The Born stability criteria and the behavior of strain fluctuations are shown to be related.

  19. Conditional Similarity Reductions of the (2+1)-dimensional KdV Equation via the Extended Lie Group Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiao-yan; Qian, Xian-min; Lin, Ji; Lou, S. Y.

    2004-06-01

    The classical and nonclassical Lie group approaches are extended and applied to construct new conditional similarity reductions for nonlinear systems. The application of the method to a simple (2+1)-dimensional KdV equation results in not only the known conditional similarity reductions obtained by the modified Clarkson and Kruskal’s direct method but also a great diversity of classical and nonclassical conditional similarity reductions.

  20. Series Solution for the Time-Fractional Coupled mKdV Equation Using the Homotopy Analysis Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Gómez-Aguilar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present new analytical approximated solutions for the space-time fractional nonlinear partial differential coupled mKdV equation. A homotopy analysis method is considered to obtain an infinite series solution. The effectiveness of this method is demonstrated by finding exact solutions of the fractional equation proposed, for the special case when the limit of the integral order of the time derivative is considered. The comparison shows a precise agreement between these solutions.

  1. Validation of the Andon KD-391 semiautomated blood pressure monitor in adults according to the International Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yi; Pan, Feng; Liu, Ya; Liang, Ying; Yang, Zhe; Zhao, Huadong; Xu, Yongyong

    2009-08-01

    Accurate blood pressure measurement is important for both the patients and the health service in appropriate treatment and estimation of clinical risk. Few automated devices have been shown to be accurate when compared with mercury sphygmomanometer. This study presents the validation results of the Andon KD-391 semiautomated blood pressure monitor according to the International Protocol of the European Society of Hypertension (ESH) in an adult population. Sequential measurements of systolic and diastolic blood pressures were obtained in 33 participants who fulfilled the requirements of the International Protocol using the mercury sphygmomanometer (two observers) and the test device (one supervisor). According to the ESH validation protocol, 99 couples of test device and reference blood pressure measurements were obtained during the two phases of the study (three pairs for each of the 33 participants). In phase 1, the Andon KD-391 device produced 29, 38 and 44 measurements for systolic blood pressure and 28, 39 and 43 for diastolic blood pressure falling within the zones 5, 10 and 15 mmHg, respectively. The test device also passed phase 2 of the validation study with a mean (+/-SD) device-observer difference of -0.17+/-7.07 mmHg for systolic and -1.01+/-5.95 mmHg for diastolic blood pressure. According to the results of the validation study on the basis of the ESH International Protocol, the Andon KD-391 can be recommended for clinical use in an adult population.

  2. K-Means Algorithm Performance Analysis With Determining The Value Of Starting Centroid With Random And KD-Tree Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirait, Kamson; Tulus; Budhiarti Nababan, Erna

    2017-12-01

    Clustering methods that have high accuracy and time efficiency are necessary for the filtering process. One method that has been known and applied in clustering is K-Means Clustering. In its application, the determination of the begining value of the cluster center greatly affects the results of the K-Means algorithm. This research discusses the results of K-Means Clustering with starting centroid determination with a random and KD-Tree method. The initial determination of random centroid on the data set of 1000 student academic data to classify the potentially dropout has a sse value of 952972 for the quality variable and 232.48 for the GPA, whereas the initial centroid determination by KD-Tree has a sse value of 504302 for the quality variable and 214,37 for the GPA variable. The smaller sse values indicate that the result of K-Means Clustering with initial KD-Tree centroid selection have better accuracy than K-Means Clustering method with random initial centorid selection.

  3. Experimental determination of the distribution coefficient (Kd) of lead and barium in soils of semiarid region of Bahia, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Mariana M.; Fernandes, Heloisa H.F; Pontedeiro, Elizabeth M.; Su, Jian

    2013-01-01

    To determine the concentration of heavy metals and other contaminants in soils, aimed at evaluating the environmental impact, the use of the distribution coefficient is required (Kd), defined as the relationship between the concentrations adsorbed and in solution. The objective of this study was to determine the rates for the Lead and Barium metals in soil collected in Caetite, the state of Bahia, in two different depths. The importance of determining the distribution coefficient lies in the fact that being performed using a tropical soil. For the isotherms of Kd was used batch test method by adsorption to obtain the final concentrations. The first step was to determine the best ratio soil: solution obtained after equilibration time and finally the equilibrium concentration of the contaminant. Were also calculated percentages of the metal adsorbed by the soil and the amount of solute by the adsorbent. With the values obtained in experiments and using Mathematica 8.0 software, were made graphics equilibrium concentration versus quantity adsorbed (C vs. S). It can also plot isotherms for different models of Kd: linear, Langmuir and Freundlich in order to determine which adsorption model would fit best to the measured data and thus determine the distribution coefficient of the metal in the soil analyzed. The Freundlich isotherm was better adapted to the points of the two metals in both soils

  4. Cholecystokinin-8 suppressed /sup 3/H-etorphine binding to rat brain opiate receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X.J.; Fan, S.G.; Ren, M.F.; Han, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    Radioreceptor assay (RRA) was adopted to analyze the influence of CCK-8 on /sup 3/H-etorphine binding to opiate receptors in rat brain synaptosomal membranes (P2). In the competition experiment CCK-8 suppressed the binding of /sup 3/H-etorphine. This effect was completely reversed by proglumide at 1/mu/M. Rosenthal analysis for saturation revealed two populations of /sup 3/H-etorphine binding sites. CCK-8 inhibited /sup 3/H-etorphine binding to the high affinity sites by an increase in Kd and decrease in Bmax without significant changes in the Kd and Bmax of the low affinity sites. This effect of CCK-8 was also completely reversed by proglumide at 1/mu/M. Unsulfated CCK-8 produced only a slight increase in Kd of the high affinity sites without affecting Bmax. The results suggest that CCK-8 might be capable of suppressing the high affinity opioid binding sites via the activation of CCK receptor.

  5. Altered binding of 125I-labeled calmodulin to a 46.5-kilodalton protein in skin fibroblasts cultured from patients with cystic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallant, E.A.; Wallace, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    The levels of calmodulin and calmodulin-binding proteins have been determined in cultured skin fibroblasts from patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and age- and sex-matched controls. Calmodulin ranged from 0.20 to 0.76 microgram/mg protein; there was no difference between calmodulin concentration in fibroblasts from CF patients and controls. Calmodulin-binding proteins of 230, 212, 204, 164, 139, 70, 59, 46.5, and 41 kD were identified. A protein with a mobility identical to the 59-kD calmodulin-binding protein was labeled by antiserum against calmodulin-dependent phosphatase. Although Ca 2+ /calmodulin-dependent phosphatase activity was detected, there was no different in activity between control and CF fibroblasts or in the level of phosphatase protein as determined by radioimmunoassay. Lower amounts of 125 I-calmodulin were bound to the 46.5-kD calmodulin-binding protein in CF fibroblasts as compared with controls. The 46.5-kD calmodulin-binding protein may be reduced in CF fibroblasts or its structure may be altered resulting in a reduced binding capacity and/or affinity for calmodulin and perhaps reflecting, either directly or indirectly, the genetic defect responsible for cystic fibrosis

  6. Non-constant retardation coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiming; Gu Zhijie; Yang Yue'e; Li Shushen

    2004-12-01

    Retardation coefficient is one of the important parameters used in transport models describing radionuclide migration in geological media and usually regarded as a constant in the models. The objectives of the work are to understand: (1) Whether the retardation coefficient, R d , is a constant? (2) How much effect is R d on calculated consequence if R d is not constant? (3) Is the retardation coefficient derived from distribution coefficient, k d , according to conventional equation suitable for safety assessment? The objectives are achieved through test and analysis of the test results on radionuclide migration in unsaturated loess. It can be seen from the results that retardation coefficient, R d , of 85 Sr is not constant and increases with water content, θ, under unsaturated condition. R d , of 85 Sr derived from k d according to conventional equation can not be used for safety assessment. R d , used for safety assessment should be directly measured, rather than derived from k d . It is shown from calculation that the effect of R d on calculated consequence is very considerable. (authors)

  7. Universal relation between spectroscopic constants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (3) The author has used eq. (6) of his paper to calculate De. This relation leads to a large deviation from the correct value depending upon the extent to which experimental values are known. Guided by this fact, in our work, we used experimentally observed De values to derive the relation between spectroscopic constants.

  8. Two Kinds of Darboux-Bäcklund Transformations for the q-Deformed KdV Hierarchy with Self-Consistent Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxia Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Two kinds of Darboux-Bäcklund transformations (DBTs are constructed for the q-deformed Nth KdV hierarchy with self-consistent sources (q-NKdVHSCS by using the q-deformed pseudodifferential operators. Note that one of the DBTs provides a nonauto Bäcklund transformation for two q-deformed Nth KdV equations with self-consistent sources (q-NKdVESCS with different degree. In addition, the soliton solution to the first nontrivial equation of q-KdVHSCS is also obtained.

  9. Vaccination for birch pollen allergy. Induction of affinity-matured or blocking IgG antibodies does not account for the reduced binding of IgE to Bet v 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenson, Morten; Jacobi, Henrik H; Bødtger, Uffe

    2003-01-01

    the amount of Bet v 1 compared with IgE, and together they accounted for more than 85% of the serum binding capacity. While SAV induced minimal changes in IgE binding, the IgG binding capacities increased 6-32 times. In contrast, the binding avidities (K(d) 28-40pM) changed less than 20%, pre- and post...

  10. Stabilized power constant alimentation; Alimentation regulee a puissance constante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roussel, L. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-06-01

    The study and realization of a stabilized power alimentation variable from 5 to 100 watts are described. In order to realize a constant power drift of Lithium compensated diodes, we have searched a 1 per cent precision of regulation and a response time minus than 1 sec. Recent components like Hall multiplicator and integrated amplifiers give this possibility and it is easy to use permutable circuits. (author) [French] On decrit l'etude et la realisation d'une alimentation a puissance constante reglable dans une gamme de 5 a 100 watts. Prevue pour le drift a puissance constante des diodes compensees au lithium, l'etude a ete menee en vue d'obtenir une precision de regulation de 1 pour cent et un temps de reponse inferieur a la seconde. Des systemes recents tels que multiplicateurs a effet Hall et circuits integres ont permis d'atteindre ce but tout en facilitant l'emploi de modules interchangeables. (auteur)

  11. Constant-bandwidth constant-temperature hot-wire anemometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligeza, P

    2007-07-01

    A constant-temperature anemometer (CTA) enables the measurement of fast-changing velocity fluctuations. In the classical solution of CTA, the transmission band is a function of flow velocity. This is a minor drawback when the mean flow velocity does not significantly change, though it might lead to dynamic errors when flow velocity varies over a considerable range. A modification is outlined, whereby an adaptive controller is incorporated in the CTA system such that the anemometer's transmission band remains constant in the function of flow velocity. For that purpose, a second feedback loop is provided, and the output signal from the anemometer will regulate the controller's parameters such that the transmission bandwidth remains constant. The mathematical model of a CTA that has been developed and model testing data allow a through evaluation of the proposed solution. A modified anemometer can be used in measurements of high-frequency variable flows in a wide range of velocities. The proposed modification allows the minimization of dynamic measurement errors.

  12. DISTRIBUTION COEFICIENTS (KD) GENERATED FROM A CORE SAMPLE COLLECTED FROM THE SALTSTONE DISPOSAL FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almond, P.; Kaplan, D.

    2011-04-25

    Core samples originating from Vault 4, Cell E of the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) were collected in September of 2008 (Hansen and Crawford 2009, Smith 2008) and sent to SRNL to measure chemical and physical properties of the material including visual uniformity, mineralogy, microstructure, density, porosity, distribution coefficients (K{sub d}), and chemical composition. Some data from these experiments have been reported (Cozzi and Duncan 2010). In this study, leaching experiments were conducted with a single core sample under conditions that are representative of saltstone performance. In separate experiments, reducing and oxidizing environments were targeted to obtain solubility and Kd values from the measurable species identified in the solid and aqueous leachate. This study was designed to provide insight into how readily species immobilized in saltstone will leach from the saltstone under oxidizing conditions simulating the edge of a saltstone monolith and under reducing conditions, targeting conditions within the saltstone monolith. Core samples were taken from saltstone poured in December of 2007 giving a cure time of nine months in the cell and a total of thirty months before leaching experiments began in June 2010. The saltstone from Vault 4, Cell E is comprised of blast furnace slag, class F fly ash, portland cement, and Deliquification, Dissolution, and Adjustment (DDA) Batch 2 salt solution. The salt solution was previously analyzed from a sample of Tank 50 salt solution and characterized in the 4QCY07 Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) report (Zeigler and Bibler 2009). Subsequent to Tank 50 analysis, additional solution was added to the tank solution from the Effluent Treatment Project as well as from inleakage from Tank 50 pump bearings (Cozzi and Duncan 2010). Core samples were taken from three locations and at three depths at each location using a two-inch diameter concrete coring bit (1-1, 1-2, 1-3; 2-1, 2-2, 2-3; 3-1, 3-2, 3-3) (Hansen and

  13. Cosmological Constant and Local Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Bernabeu, Jose; Mavromatos, Nick E

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the linearization of Einstein equations in the presence of a cosmological constant, by expanding the solution for the metric around a flat Minkowski space-time. We demonstrate that one can find consistent solutions to the linearized set of equations for the metric perturbations, in the Lorentz gauge, which are not spherically symmetric, but they rather exhibit a cylindrical symmetry. We find that the components of the gravitational field satisfying the appropriate Poisson equations have the property of ensuring that a scalar potential can be constructed, in which both contributions, from ordinary matter and $\\Lambda > 0$, are attractive. In addition, there is a novel tensor potential, induced by the pressure density, in which the effect of the cosmological constant is repulsive. We also linearize the Schwarzschild-de Sitter exact solution of Einstein's equations (due to a generalization of Birkhoff's theorem) in the domain between the two horizons. We manage to transform it first to a gauge in whic...

  14. Evolution of the solar constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, M.J.

    1978-01-01

    The ultimate source of the energy utilized by life on Earth is the Sun, and the behavior of the Sun determines to a large extent the conditions under which life originated and continues to thrive. What can be said about the history of the Sun. Has the solar constant, the rate at which energy is received by the Earth from the Sun per unit area per unit time, been constant at its present level since Archean times. Three mechanisms by which it has been suggested that the solar energy output can vary with time are discussed, characterized by long (approx. 10 9 years), intermediate (approx. 10 8 years), and short (approx. years to decades) time scales

  15. Potential constants of CF4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, L.H.; Kennedy, C.; Ekberg, S.

    1978-01-01

    The infrared spectra of the 12 C, 13 C, and 14 C isotopic species of CF 4 have been observed at a resolution of 0.06 cm -1 . In addition to the fundamentals ν 3 and ν 4 a number of combination bands have been observed. Using these results, combined with Raman data in the literature, we have calculated the quadratic valence force field, in terms of force constants as well as compliance constants, with considerably better precision than previously obtained. Interaction displacement coordinates have been calculated and show that stretching one CF bond leads, for minimum energy near equilibrium, to opening up of the angles between the other three bonds as well as to their contraction

  16. Comparison of [11C]cocaine binding at tracer and pharmacological doses of baboon brain: A PET study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.S.; Logan, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1994-05-01

    In vitro studies have shown that cocaine (C) binds to both high and low affinity sites on the dopamine transporter (DAT). We have previously characterized the binding of tracer doses of [{sup 11}C]cocaine (C*)to a high affinity site on the DAT. To assess if in vivo C also binds to low affinity sites we used PET to compare binding of tracer doses (17.8{plus_minus}12.2 {mu}g C) of C* to pharmacological doses (8 mg of C coadministered with C*). Sixteen paired studies were done to assess test/retest variability, specific versus non specific binding and to characterize binding profile. Dynamic scans were started immediately after injection of C* (5-8 mCi) for 50 min on the CTI-931 (6 x 6 x 6.5 mm FWHM). Time activity curves for tissue concentration and for unchanged tracer in plasma were used to calculate the transport constant between plasma and tissue (K1) and to obtain the distribution volume (DV). The ratio of the DV in striatum (ST) to that in cerebellum (CB) (which corresponds to Bmax/Kd-1) was used as model parameter. Peak brain uptake of C* was significantly higher for tracer than for pharmacological doses (0.041 versus 0.033 % dose/cc), as were the values for K1 (1.07{plus_minus}0.21 versus 0.68{plus_minus}0.26 (t=3.0 p<0.01)). Repeated measures were reproducible for tracer ({plus_minus}2%) and pharmacological doses of C* ({plus_minus}4%). Tracer dose C* showed highest binding and slowest clearance in ST which was reduced by C (0.5-2.0 mg/kg iv, -25 to -30%) and by drugs that inhibit DAT (2mg/kg nomifensine - 21%, 0.5 mg/kg methylphenidate -12%) and was increased by serotonin transporter inhibitors (5HT-Ti) (2 mg/kg citalopram +11%, 0.5 mg/kg fluoxetine +6%) and not changed by NE transporter inhibitors (0.5 mg/kg desipramine or 2 mg/kg tomoxetine). The increase with (5HT-Ti) may reflect neurotransmitter interactions or changes in bioavailability. At pharmacological doses C* showed homogeneous distribution and was not changed by C nor by any of the above drugs.

  17. Photodissociation constant of NO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nootebos, M.A.; Bange, P.

    1992-01-01

    The velocity of the dissociation of NO 2 into ozone and NO mainly depends on the ultraviolet sunlight quantity, and with that the cloudiness. A correct value for this reaction constant is important for the accurate modelling of O 3 - and NO 2 -concentrations in plumes of electric power plants, in particular in the case of determination of the amount of photochemical summer smog. An advanced signal processing method (deconvolution, correlation) was applied on the measurements. The measurements were carried out from aeroplanes

  18. “Upbringing” Notion Linguistic Conceptualization in K.D. Ushinsky’s Research and Educational Discourse Rhetoric as a Basis of Modern Educational Space Discourse Projection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadezhda D. Fedorenko

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The article offers linguorhetoric description of “Upbringing” mental component in classic research and educational discourse, illustrated by K.D. Ushinsky’s work “Man as an Object of Upbringing. Pedagogical Anthropology Experience”.

  19. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes reduces the density of [125I]-endothelin-binding sites in rat cardiac membranes.

    OpenAIRE

    Nayler, W. G.; Liu, J. J.; Panagiotopoulos, S.; Casley, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of acute, streptozotocin-induced diabetes on the affinity (KD), density (Bmax) and selectivity of specific, high affinity binding sites for [125I]-endothelin [( 125I]-ET) in rat cardiac membrane fragments was determined. Three days after a single i.v. bolus dose of streptozotocin (60 mg kg-1), the density of [125I]ET binding sites was reduced (P less than 0.01) without changes in affinity or selectivity.

  20. An unusual helix turn helix motif in the catalytic core of HIV-1 integrase binds viral DNA and LEDGF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayate Merad

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Integrase (IN of the type 1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 catalyzes the integration of viral DNA into host cellular DNA. We identified a bi-helix motif (residues 149-186 in the crystal structure of the catalytic core (CC of the IN-Phe185Lys variant that consists of the alpha(4 and alpha(5 helices connected by a 3 to 5-residue turn. The motif is embedded in a large array of interactions that stabilize the monomer and the dimer. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We describe the conformational and binding properties of the corresponding synthetic peptide. This displays features of the protein motif structure thanks to the mutual intramolecular interactions of the alpha(4 and alpha(5 helices that maintain the fold. The main properties are the binding to: 1- the processing-attachment site at the LTR (long terminal repeat ends of virus DNA with a K(d (dissociation constant in the sub-micromolar range; 2- the whole IN enzyme; and 3- the IN binding domain (IBD but not the IBD-Asp366Asn variant of LEDGF (lens epidermal derived growth factor lacking the essential Asp366 residue. In our motif, in contrast to the conventional HTH (helix-turn-helix, it is the N terminal helix (alpha(4 which has the role of DNA recognition helix, while the C terminal helix (alpha(5 would rather contribute to the motif stabilization by interactions with the alpha(4 helix. CONCLUSION: The motif, termed HTHi (i, for inverted emerges as a central piece of the IN structure and function. It could therefore represent an attractive target in the search for inhibitors working at the DNA-IN, IN-IN and IN-LEDGF interfaces.

  1. Searching for Kaprekar's constants: algorithms and results

    OpenAIRE

    Walden, Byron L.

    2005-01-01

    We examine some new results on Kaprekar's constants, specifically establishing the unique 7-digit (in base 4) and 9-digit (in base 5) Kaprekar's constants and showing that there are no 15-, 21-, 27-, or 33-digit Kaprekar's constants.

  2. Lie symmetry analysis, conservation laws and exact solutions of the time-fractional generalized Hirota-Satsuma coupled KdV system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberi, Elaheh; Reza Hejazi, S.

    2018-02-01

    In the present paper, Lie point symmetries of the time-fractional generalized Hirota-Satsuma coupled KdV (HS-cKdV) system based on the Riemann-Liouville derivative are obtained. Using the derived Lie point symmetries, we obtain similarity reductions and conservation laws of the considered system. Finally, some analytic solutions are furnished by means of the invariant subspace method in the Caputo sense.

  3. Etude de la transition ferroelectrique-ferroelastique du KD2PO4 forme du front de phase en fonction du gradient thermique

    OpenAIRE

    Kvítek, Zdeněk

    2010-01-01

    Etude de la transition ferroelectrique-ferroelastique du KD2PO4 forme du front de phase en fonction du gradient thermique The thesis explores complex process of first order transition of KD2PO4 crystal from tetragonal phase to ferroelectric - ferroelastic orthorhombic phase and back at temperature 209 K. The experimental set up of nitrogeneous cryostat allowes temperature and temperature gradient variations during simultaneous three axes optical sample observations, dielectric measurements. T...

  4. Interaction of xenobiotics with estrogen receptors α and β and a putative plasma sex hormone-binding globulin from channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, William L.; Patino, Reynaldo; Maule, Alec G.

    2004-01-01

    Estrogens are important regulators of physiological functions. Although environmental contaminants (xenoestrogens) which interfere with estrogen signaling are of increasing concern, there is only limited information about their ability to interact with estrogen-binding proteins (SHBG) or receptors (ER). Recombinant ER?? and ?? were obtained after transient transfection of COS-7 cells with channel catfish ER cDNA. Plasma from adult female channel catfish was the source of SHBG. Tritiated estradiol ( 3H-E2) was used in standard radioligand-binding assays to characterize the binding properties of channel catfish SHBG (ccfSHBG) and to estimate the inhibition constants for various estrogenic compounds. Binding of 3H-E2 to ccfSHBG was saturable and of high affinity with a Kd (??SE) of 1.9??0.14nM and a Bmax of 14.3??2.4pmol/mg protein (n=3 assays). Additionally, ccfSHBG displayed binding specificity for androgens and estrogens. Endosulfan, 4-nonylphenol, and 4-octylphenol displaced 3H-E2 binding to ccfSHBG albeit only at very high concentrations, whereas dieldrin and atrazine showed little displacement activity even at the highest concentrations used. The synthetic estrogen ethynylestradiol had higher affinity than E2 for ccfSHBG. This finding differs from results with human and rainbow trout SHBG. The alkylphenolic compounds (4-octylphenol and 4-nonylphenol) displayed some ability to displace 3H-E2 binding from ER?? and ?? at high concentrations, but dieldrin and atrazine had little binding activity for both ER subtypes and endosulfan for ER??. The xenobiotics tested generally showed equivalent or greater affinity for ER?? than ER??, whereas natural estrogens had much greater affinity for ER?? than ER??. These observations suggest that results of studies using fish tissue ER extracts must be interpreted with caution, since both ER subtypes may be present, and that the binding of xenoestrogens to SHBG must be taken into account for proper assessment of endocrine

  5. Regional distribution of high affinity binding of 3H-adenosine in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traversa, U.; Puppini, P.; de Angelis, L.; Vertua, R.

    1984-06-01

    The high and low affinity adenosine binding sites with Kd values ranging respectively from 0.8 to 1.65 microM and from 3.1 to 13.86 microM were demonstrated in the following rat brain areas: cortex, hippocampus, striatum, cerebellum, diencephalon, and pons-medulla. Adenosine receptors involved in the high affinity binding seem to be mainly Ra-type. The analysis of the regional distribution of 3H-Adenosine showed the highest levels of specific binding in striatum and hippocampus; somewhat smaller values in cortex, cerebellum, and diencephalon, and even lower in pons-medulla.

  6. Podoplanin, novel 43-kd membrane protein of glomerular epithelial cells, is down-regulated in puromycin nephrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breiteneder-Geleff, S.; Matsui, K.; Soleiman, A.; Meraner, P.; Poczewski, H.; Kalt, R.; Schaffner, G.; Kerjaschki, D.

    1997-01-01

    Puromycin aminonucleoside nephrosis (PAN), a rat model of human minimal change nephropathy, is characterized by extensive flattening of glomerular epithelial cell (podocyte) foot processes and by severe proteinuria. For comparison of expression of glomerular membrane proteins of normal and PAN rats, a membrane protein fraction of isolated rat glomeruli was prepared and monoclonal antibodies were raised against it. An IgG-secreting clone designated LF3 was selected that specifically immunolabeled podocytes of normal but not of PAN rats. The antigen of LF3 IgG was identified as a 43-kd glycoprotein. Molecular cloning of its cDNA was performed in a delta gt11 expression library prepared from mRNA of isolated rat glomeruli. The predicted amino acid sequence indicated a 166-amino-acid integral membrane protein with a single membrane-spanning domain, two potential phosphorylation sites in its short cytoplasmic tail, and six potential O-glycosylation sites in the large ectodomain. High amino acid sequence identities were found to membrane glycoproteins of rat lung and bone and mouse thymus epithelial cells as well as to a phorbol-ester-induced protein in a mouse osteoblast cell line and to a canine influenza C virus receptor. In PAN, expression of this 43-kd protein was selectively reduced to < 30%, as determined by quantitative immunogold electron microscopy, immunoblotting, and Northern blotting. These data provide evidence that transcription of the 43-kd transmembrane podocyte glycoprotein is specifically down-regulated in PAN. To indicate that this protein could be associated with transformation of arborized foot processes to flat feet (Latin, pes planus) we have called it podoplanin. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 10 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 PMID:9327748

  7. Low power constant fraction discriminator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, Shanti; Raut, S.M.; Mukhopadhyay, P.K.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the design of a low power ultrafast constant fraction discriminator, which significantly reduces the power consumption. A conventional fast discriminator consumes about 1250 MW of power whereas this low power version consumes about 440 MW. In a multi detector system, where the number of discriminators is very large, reduction of power is of utmost importance. This low power discriminator is being designed for GRACE (Gamma Ray Atmospheric Cerenkov Experiments) telescope where 1000 channels of discriminators are required. A novel method of decreasing power consumption has been described. (author)

  8. Can coupling constants be related

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandi, Satyanarayan; Ng, Wing-Chiu.

    1978-06-01

    We analyze the conditions under which several coupling constants in field theory can be related to each other. When the relation is independent of the renormalization point, the relation between any g and g' must satisfy a differential equation as follows from the renormalization group equations. Using this differential equation, we investigate the criteria for the feasibility of a power-series relation for various theories, especially the Weinberg-Salam type (including Higgs bosons) with an arbitrary number of quark and lepton flavors. (orig./WL) [de

  9. Measurement of Newton's gravitational constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlamminger, St.; Holzschuh, E.; Kuendig, W.; Nolting, F.; Pixley, R. E.; Schurr, J.; Straumann, U.

    2006-01-01

    A precision measurement of the gravitational constant G has been made using a beam balance. Special attention has been given to determining the calibration, the effect of a possible nonlinearity of the balance and the zero-point variation of the balance. The equipment, the measurements, and the analysis are described in detail. The value obtained for G is 6.674 252(109)(54)x10 -11 m 3 kg -1 s -2 . The relative statistical and systematic uncertainties of this result are 16.3x10 -6 and 8.1x10 -6 , respectively

  10. Exact constants in approximation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Korneichuk, N

    1991-01-01

    This book is intended as a self-contained introduction for non-specialists, or as a reference work for experts, to the particular area of approximation theory that is concerned with exact constants. The results apply mainly to extremal problems in approximation theory, which in turn are closely related to numerical analysis and optimization. The book encompasses a wide range of questions and problems: best approximation by polynomials and splines; linear approximation methods, such as spline-approximation; optimal reconstruction of functions and linear functionals. Many of the results are base

  11. Singular 1-soliton solution of the nonlinear variable-coefficient diffusion reaction and mKdV equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guner, Ozkan; Bekir, Ahmet; Unsal, Omer; Cevikel, Adem C.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we pay attention to the analytical method named, ansatz method for finding the exact solutions of the variable-coefficient modified KdV equation and variable coefficient diffusion-reaction equation. As a result the singular 1-soliton solution is obtained. These solutions are important for the explanation of some practical physical problems. The obtained results show that these methods provides a powerful mathematical tool for solving nonlinear equations with variable coefficients. This method can be extended to solve other variable coefficient nonlinear partial differential equations.

  12. Exact periodic and solitary waves and their interactions for the (2+1)-dimensional KdV equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Yanze

    2006-01-01

    A general solution involving three arbitrary functions is first obtained for a (2+1)-dimensional KdV equation by means of WTC truncation method. Then exact periodic wave solutions are expressed in terms of rational functions of the Jacobi elliptic functions. Limit cases are studied and some interesting, new solitary structures are revealed. The interaction properties between Jacobi elliptic waves (various limit cases) are investigated numerically. The fusion and fission of y-periodic solitary waves is for the first time reported

  13. Cloning and identification of the gene coding for the 140-kd subunit of Drosophila RNA polymerase II

    OpenAIRE

    Faust, Daniela M.; Renkawitz-Pohl, Renate; Falkenburg, Dieter; Gasch, Alexander; Bialojan, Siegfried; Young, Richard A.; Bautz, Ekkehard K. F.

    1986-01-01

    Genomic clones of Drosophila melanogaster were isolated from a λ library by cross-hybridization with the yeast gene coding for the 150-kd subunit of RNA polymerase II. Clones containing a region of ∼2.0 kb with strong homology to the yeast gene were shown to code for a 3.9-kb poly(A)+-RNA. Part of the coding region was cloned into an expression vector. A fusion protein was obtained which reacted with an antibody directed against RNA polymerase II of Drosophila. Peptide mapping of the fusion p...

  14. Using an implicit min/max KD-Tree for doing efficient terrain line of sight calculations

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Duvenhage, B

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available ) and computer graphics techniques, or a CPU ray tracing approach and related accelerated quad- or kd-tree terrain geometry. The second group of existing algorithms, which focusses on reducing the performance impact of LOS queries on the simulation, typically.... An example mip-map is shown later in the article in Figure 7. However, instead of an averaging function—as is usual in computer graphics—a min and a max function is applied to generate two sets of the lower levels of detail. Section 6 gives a brief...

  15. Binding Studies of Lamotrigine with Sera of Different Animal Species

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    into the mechanism of interaction, evaluate the effect of dielectric constant on binding affinity, and to determine the effect of ..... Physico-chemical aspects of protein binding of nimesulide, Ind J. Pharm Sci, 2005; 2: 243-246. 10. Dutta, SK, Basu, SK, Sen KK. Binding of diclofenac sodium with bovine serum albumin at different ...

  16. Enthalpy-Entropy Compensation in the Binding of Modulators at Ionotropic Glutamate Receptor GluA2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krintel, Christian; Francotte, Pierre; Pickering, Darryl S; Juknaitė, Lina; Pøhlsgaard, Jacob; Olsen, Lars; Frydenvang, Karla; Goffin, Eric; Pirotte, Bernard; Kastrup, Jette S

    2016-06-07

    The 1,2,4-benzothiadiazine 1,1-dioxide type of positive allosteric modulators of the ionotropic glutamate receptor A2 (GluA2) are promising lead compounds for the treatment of cognitive disorders, e.g., Alzheimer's disease. The modulators bind in a cleft formed by the interface of two neighboring ligand binding domains and act by stabilizing the agonist-bound open-channel conformation. The driving forces behind the binding of these modulators can be significantly altered with only minor substitutions to the parent molecules. In this study, we show that changing the 7-fluorine substituent of modulators BPAM97 (2) and BPAM344 (3) into a hydroxyl group (BPAM557 (4) and BPAM521 (5), respectively), leads to a more favorable binding enthalpy (ΔH, kcal/mol) from -4.9 (2) and -7.5 (3) to -6.2 (4) and -14.5 (5), but also a less favorable binding entropy (-TΔS, kcal/mol) from -2.3 (2) and -1.3 (3) to -0.5 (4) and 4.8 (5). Thus, the dissociation constants (Kd, μM) of 4 (11.2) and 5 (0.16) are similar to those of 2 (5.6) and 3 (0.35). Functionally, 4 and 5 potentiated responses of 10 μM L-glutamate at homomeric rat GluA2(Q)i receptors with EC50 values of 67.3 and 2.45 μM, respectively. The binding mode of 5 was examined with x-ray crystallography, showing that the only change compared to that of earlier compounds was the orientation of Ser-497 pointing toward the hydroxyl group of 5. The favorable enthalpy can be explained by the formation of a hydrogen bond from the side-chain hydroxyl group of Ser-497 to the hydroxyl group of 5, whereas the unfavorable entropy might be due to desolvation effects combined with a conformational restriction of Ser-497 and 5. In summary, this study shows a remarkable example of enthalpy-entropy compensation in drug development accompanied with a likely explanation of the underlying structural mechanism. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Quantitative autoradiography of brain binding sites for the vesicular acetylcholine transport blocker 2-(4-phenylpiperidino)cyclohexanol (AH5183)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marien, M.R.; Parsons, S.M.; Altar, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    2-(4-Phenylpiperidino)cyclohexanol (AH5183) is a noncompetitive and potent inhibitor of high-affinity acetylcholine transport into cholinergic vesicles. It is reported here that [ 3 H]AH5183 binds specifically and saturably to slide-mounted sections of the rat forebrain (Kd = 1.1 to 2.2 X 10(-8) M; Bmax = 286 to 399 fmol/mg of protein). The association and dissociation rate constants for [ 3 H]AH5183 binding are 8.6 X 10(6) M-1 X min-1 and 0.18 min-1, respectively. Bound [ 3 H]AH5183 can be displaced by nonradioactive AH5183 and by the structural analog (2 alpha,3 beta,4A beta,8A alpha)-decahydro-3-(4-phenyl-1-piperidinyl)-2- naphthalenol but not by 10 microM concentrations of the cholinergic drugs acetylcholine, choline, atropine, hexamethonium, eserine, or hemicholinium-3 or by the structurally related compounds 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine, (+/-)-N-allylnormetazocine (SKF 10,047), levoxadrol, or dexoxadrol. Quantitative autoradiography reveals that [ 3 H]AH5183 binding sites are distributed heterogenously throughout the rat forebrain and are highly localized to cholinergic nerve terminal regions. At the level of the caudate nucleus-putamen, the highest concentrations of saturable [ 3 H]AH5183 binding (713-751 fmol/mg of protein) are found in the vertical limb of the diagonal band and the olfactory tubercle, with lesser amounts (334-516 fmol/mg of protein) in the caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, superficial layers of the cerebral cortex, and the primary olfactory cortex. At day 7 after transsection of the left fimbria, [ 3 H]AH5183 binding and choline acetyltransferase activity in the left hippocampus were reduced by 33 +/- 6% and 61 +/- 7%, respectively. These findings indicate that [ 3 H]AH5183 binds to a unique recognition site in rat brain that is topographically associated with cholinergic nerve terminals

  18. Supersymmetry of Affine Toda Models as Fermionic Symmetry Flows of the Extended mKdV Hierarchy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Schmidtt

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We couple two copies of the supersymmetric mKdV hierarchy by means of the algebraic dressing technique. This allows to deduce the whole set of (N,N supersymmetry transformations of the relativistic sector of the extended mKdV hierarchy and to interpret them as fermionic symmetry flows. The construction is based on an extended Riemann-Hilbert problem for affine Kac-Moody superalgebras with a half-integer gradation. A generalized set of relativistic-like fermionic local current identities is introduced and it is shown that the simplest one, corresponding to the lowest isospectral times t_{±1} provides the supercharges generating rigid supersymmetry transformations in 2D superspace. The number of supercharges is equal to the dimension of the fermionic kernel of a given semisimple element E in ^g which defines both, the physical degrees of freedom and the symmetries of the model. The general construction is applied to the N=(1,1 and N=(2,2 sinh-Gordon models which are worked out in detail.

  19. On W∞ algebras, gauge equivalence of K P hierarchies, two-bosons realizations and their KdV reductions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aratyn, H.; Ferreira, L.A.; Gomes, J.F.; Zimerman, A.H.

    1994-01-01

    The gauge equivalence between basic KP hierarchies is discussed. The first two Hamiltonian structures for KP hierarchies leading to the linear and non-linear W ∞ algebras are derived. The realization of the corresponding generators in terms of two boson currents is presented and it is shown to be related to many integrable models which are bi-Hamiltonian. We can also realize those generators by adding extra currents, coupled in a particular way allowing for instance a description of multi-layered Benney equations or multi- component non-linear Schroedinger equation. In this case we can have a second Hamiltonian bracket structure which violates Jacobi identity. We consider the reduction to one-boson systems leading to KdV and mKdV hierarchies. A Miura transformation relating these two hierarchies is obtained by restricting gauge transformation between corresponding two-boson hierarchies. Connection to Drinfeld-Sokolov approach is also discussed in the SL (2, IR) gauge theory. (author)

  20. The fundamental constants a mystery of physics

    CERN Document Server

    Fritzsch, Harald

    2009-01-01

    The speed of light, the fine structure constant, and Newton's constant of gravity — these are just three among the many physical constants that define our picture of the world. Where do they come from? Are they constant in time and across space? In this book, physicist and author Harald Fritzsch invites the reader to explore the mystery of the fundamental constants of physics in the company of Isaac Newton, Albert Einstein, and a modern-day physicist

  1. Omnidirectional antenna having constant phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sena, Matthew

    2017-04-04

    Various technologies presented herein relate to constructing and/or operating an antenna having an omnidirectional electrical field of constant phase. The antenna comprises an upper plate made up of multiple conductive rings, a lower ground-plane plate, a plurality of grounding posts, a conical feed, and a radio frequency (RF) feed connector. The upper plate has a multi-ring configuration comprising a large outer ring and several smaller rings of equal size located within the outer ring. The large outer ring and the four smaller rings have the same cross-section. The grounding posts ground the upper plate to the lower plate while maintaining a required spacing/parallelism therebetween.

  2. Constant Proportion Debt Obligations (CPDOs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cont, Rama; Jessen, Cathrine

    2012-01-01

    be made arbitrarily small—and thus the credit rating arbitrarily high—by increasing leverage, but the ratings obtained strongly depend on assumptions on the credit environment (high spread or low spread). More importantly, CPDO loss distributions are found to exhibit a wide range of tail risk measures......Constant Proportion Debt Obligations (CPDOs) are structured credit derivatives that generate high coupon payments by dynamically leveraging a position in an underlying portfolio of investment-grade index default swaps. CPDO coupons and principal notes received high initial credit ratings from...... the major rating agencies, based on complex models for the joint transition of ratings and spreads for all names in the underlying portfolio. We propose a parsimonious model for analysing the performance of CPDO strategies using a top-down approach that captures the essential risk factors of the CPDO. Our...

  3. Design and synthesis of biotin analogues reversibly binding with streptavidin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tomohiro; Aoki, Kiyoshi; Sugiyama, Akira; Doi, Hirofumi; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Shimizu, Yohei; Kanai, Motomu

    2015-04-01

    Two new biotin analogues, biotin carbonate 5 and biotin carbamate 6, have been synthesized. These molecules were designed to reversibly bind with streptavidin by replacing the hydrogen-bond donor NH group(s) of biotin's cyclic urea moiety with oxygen. Biotin carbonate 5 was synthesized from L-arabinose (7), which furnishes the desired stereochemistry at the 3,4-cis-dihydroxy groups, in 11% overall yield (over 10 steps). Synthesis of biotin carbamate 6 was accomplished from L-cysteine-derived chiral aldehyde 33 in 11% overall yield (over 7 steps). Surface plasmon resonance analysis of water-soluble biotin carbonate analogue 46 and biotin carbamate analogue 47 revealed that KD values of these compounds for binding to streptavidin were 6.7×10(-6)  M and 1.7×10(-10)  M, respectively. These values were remarkably greater than that of biotin (KD =10(-15)  M), and thus indicate the importance of the nitrogen atoms for the strong binding between biotin and streptavidin. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Characterisation of the human NMDA receptor subunit NR3A glycine binding site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, A; Duan, J; Mo-Boquist, L-L

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we characterise the binding site of the human N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit NR3A. Saturation radioligand binding of the NMDA receptor agonists [(3)H]-glycine and [(3)H]-glutamate showed that only glycine binds to human NR3A (hNR3A) with high affinity (K(d)=535nM (277......-793nM)). Eight amino acids, which correspond to amino acids that are critical for ligand binding to other NMDA receptor subunits, situated within the S1S2 predicted ligand binding domain of hNR3A were mutated, which resulted in complete or near complete loss of [(3)H]-glycine binding to hNR3A. The NMDA...

  5. Self-peptides with intermediate capacity to bind and stabilize MHC class I molecules may be immunogenic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M L M; Ruhwald, Morten; Nissen, M H

    2003-01-01

    Thirty self-peptides were selected on the basis of their predicted binding to H-2b molecules. The binding of peptides was ascertained experimentally by biochemical (KD measurements) and cellular [major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) stabilization] assays. A weak, but significant......, correlation between KD measurements and MHC-I stabilization was observed. Mice (n = 99) were immunized with individual peptides. Twenty-eight peptides were found to induce peptide-specific cytotoxic activity, and a total of 84 mice developed significant cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses after.......05). These observations suggest the absence of tolerance towards most MHC-I-restricted self-peptides and that strong antiself immunity can be generated preferentially towards self-peptides with an intermediate affinity for MHC-I. These data should be considered in the design of tumour vaccines based on MHC-I-binding self-peptides....

  6. Europium (III) and americium (III) stability constants with humic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, R.A.; Choppin, G.R.

    1984-01-01

    The stability constants for tracer concentrations of Eu(III) and Am(III) complexes with a humic acid extracted from a lake-bottom sediment were measured using a solvent extraction system. The organic extractant was di(2-ethylhexyl)-phosphoric acid in toluene while the humate aqueous phase had a constant ionic strength of 0.1 M (NaClO 4 ). Aqueous humic acid concentrations were monitored by measuring uv-visible absorbances at approx.= 380 nm. The total carboxylate capacity of the humic acid was determined by direct potentiometric titration to be 3.86 +- 0.03 meq/g. The humic acid displayed typical characteristics of a polyelectrolyte - the apparent pKsub(a), as well as the calculated metal ion stability constants increased as the degree of ionization (α) increased. The binding data required a fit of two stability constants, β 1 and β 2 , such that for Eu, log β 1 = 8.86 α + 4.39, log β 2 = 3.55 α + 11.06 while for Am, log β 1 = 10.58 α + 3.84, log β 2 = 5.32 α + 10.42. With hydroxide, carbonate, and humate as competing ligands, the humate complex associated with the β 1 constant is calculated to be the dominant species for the trivalent actinides and lanthanides under conditions present in natural waters. (orig.)

  7. Antibody response dynamics to the Plasmodium falciparum conserved vaccine candidate antigen, merozoite surface protein-1 C-terminal 19kD (MSP1-19kD, in Peruvians exposed to hypoendemic malaria transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamboa Dionicia

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In high-transmission areas, developing immunity to symptomatic Plasmodium falciparum infections requires 2–10 years of uninterrupted exposure. Delayed malaria-immunity has been attributed to difficult-to-develop and then short-lived antibody responses. Methods In a study area with P. falciparum infections/person/year, antibody responses to the MSP1-19kD antigen were evaluated and associations with P. falciparum infections in children and adults. In months surrounding and during the malaria seasons of 2003–2004, 1,772 participants received ≥6 active visits in one study-year. Community-wide surveys were conducted at the beginning and end of each malaria season, and weekly active visits were completed for randomly-selected individuals each month. There were 79 P. falciparum infections with serum samples collected during and approximately one month before and after infection. Anti-MSP1-19kD IgG levels were measured by ELISA. Results The infection prevalence during February-July was similar in children (0.02–0.12 infections/person/month and adults (0.03–0.14 infections/person/month and was negligible in the four-month dry season. In children and adults, the seroprevalence was maintained in the beginning (children = 28.9%, adults = 61.8% versus ending malaria-season community survey (children = 26.7%, adults = 64.6%. Despite the four-month non-transmission season, the IgG levels in Plasmodium-negative adults were similar to P. falciparum-positive adults. Although children frequently responded upon infection, the transition from a negative/low level before infection to a high level during/after infection was slower in children. Adults and children IgG-positive before infection had reduced symptoms and parasite density. Conclusion Individuals in low transmission areas can rapidly develop and maintain αMSP1-19kD IgG responses for >4 months, unlike responses reported in high transmission study areas. A greater immune

  8. Aging-induced changes in brain regional serotonin receptor binding: Effect of Carnosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, S; Poddar, M K

    2016-04-05

    Monoamine neurotransmitter, serotonin (5-HT) has its own specific receptors in both pre- and post-synapse. In the present study the role of carnosine on aging-induced changes of [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding in different brain regions in a rat model was studied. The results showed that during aging (18 and 24 months) the [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding was reduced in hippocampus, hypothalamus and pons-medulla with a decrease in their both Bmax and KD but in cerebral cortex the [(3)H]-5-HT binding was increased with the increase of its only Bmax. The aging-induced changes in [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding with carnosine (2.0 μg/kg/day, intrathecally, for 21 consecutive days) attenuated in (a) 24-month-aged rats irrespective of the brain regions with the attenuation of its Bmax except hypothalamus where both Bmax and KD were significantly attenuated, (b) hippocampus and hypothalamus of 18-month-aged rats with the attenuation of its Bmax, and restored toward the [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding that observed in 4-month-young rats. The decrease in pons-medullary [(3)H]-5-HT binding including its Bmax of 18-month-aged rats was promoted with carnosine without any significant change in its cerebral cortex. The [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding with the same dosages of carnosine in 4-month-young rats (a) increased in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus with the increase in their only Bmax whereas (b) decreased in hypothalamus and pons-medulla with a decrease in their both Bmax and KD. These results suggest that carnosine treatment may (a) play a preventive role in aging-induced brain region-specific changes in serotonergic activity (b) not be worthy in 4-month-young rats in relation to the brain regional serotonergic activity. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [3H]sildenafil binding to phosphodiesterase-5 is specific, kinetically heterogeneous, and stimulated by cGMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbin, Jackie D; Blount, Mitsi A; Weeks, James L; Beasley, Alfreda; Kuhn, Karl P; Ho, Yew S J; Saidi, Layla F; Hurley, James H; Kotera, Jun; Francis, Sharron H

    2003-06-01

    Sildenafil (Viagra) potentiates penile erection by acting as a nonhydrolyzable analog of cGMP and competing with this nucleotide for catalysis by phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5), but the characteristics of direct binding of radiolabeled sildenafil to PDE5 have not been determined. [3H]Sildenafil binding to PDE5 was retained when filtered through nitrocellulose or glass-fiber membranes. Binding was inhibited by excess sildenafil, 2-(2-methylpyridin-4-yl)methyl-4-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-8-(pyrimidin-2-yl)methoxy-1,2-dihydro-1-oxo-2,7-naphthyridine-3-carboxylic acid methyl ester hydrochloride (T-0156), 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, EDTA, or cGMP, but not by cAMP or 5'-GMP. PDE5 was the only [3H]sildenafil binding protein detected in human lung extract. Using purified recombinant PDE5, [3H]sildenafil exchange dissociation yielded two components with t1/2 values of 1 and 14 min and corresponding calculated KD values of 12 and 0.83 nM, respectively. This implied the existence of two conformers of the PDE5 catalytic site. [3H]Sildenafil binding isotherm of PDE5 indicated KD was 8.3 to 13.3 nM, and low cGMP decreased the KD to 4.8 nM but only slightly increased Bmax to a maximum of 0.61 mol/mol-subunit. Results suggest that these effects occur via cGMP binding to the allosteric cGMP binding sites of PDE5. Results imply that by inhibiting PDE5 and thereby increasing cGMP, sildenafil accentuates its own binding affinity for PDE5, which further elevates cGMP. The data also indicate that after physiological elevation, cGMP may directly stimulate the catalytic site by binding to the allosteric cGMP-binding sites of PDE5, thus causing negative feedback on this pathway.

  10. Arrhenius Rate: constant volume burn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-12-06

    A constant volume burn occurs for an idealized initial state in which a large volume of reactants at rest is suddenly raised to a high temperature and begins to burn. Due to the uniform spatial state, there is no fluid motion and no heat conduction. This reduces the time evolu tion to an ODE for the reaction progress variable. With an Arrhenius reaction rate, two characteristics of thermal ignition are illustrated: induction time and thermal runaway. The Frank-Kamenetskii approximation then leads to a simple expression for the adiabatic induction time. For a first order reaction, the analytic solution is derived and used to illustrate the effect of varying the activation temperature; in particular, on the induction time. In general, the ODE can be solved numerically. This is used to illustrate the effect of varying the reaction order. We note that for a first order reaction, the time evolution of the reaction progress variable has an exponential tail. In contrast, for a reaction order less than one, the reaction completes in a nite time. The reaction order also affects the induction time.

  11. Measuring Binding Affinity of Protein-Ligand Interaction Using Spectrophotometry: Binding of Neutral Red to Riboflavin-Binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenprakhon, Pirom; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2010-01-01

    The dissociation constant, K[subscript d], of the binding of riboflavin-binding protein (RP) with neutral red (NR) can be determined by titrating RP to a fixed concentration of NR. Upon adding RP to the NR solution, the maximum absorption peak of NR shifts to 545 nm from 450 nm for the free NR. The change of the absorption can be used to determine…

  12. ESR melting under constant voltage conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlienger, M.E.

    1997-02-01

    Typical industrial ESR melting practice includes operation at a constant current. This constant current operation is achieved through the use of a power supply whose output provides this constant current characteristic. Analysis of this melting mode indicates that the ESR process under conditions of constant current is inherently unstable. Analysis also indicates that ESR melting under the condition of a constant applied voltage yields a process which is inherently stable. This paper reviews the process stability arguments for both constant current and constant voltage operation. Explanations are given as to why there is a difference between the two modes of operation. Finally, constant voltage process considerations such as melt rate control, response to electrode anomalies and impact on solidification will be discussed.

  13. Lepton decay constants of light mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonov, Yu. A.

    2016-01-01

    A theory of lepton decay constants based on the path-integral formalism is given for chiral and vector mesons. Decay constants of the pseudoscalar and vector mesons are calculated and compared to other existing results.

  14. Capacitive Cells for Dielectric Constant Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Horacio Munguía; Maldonado, Rigoberto Franco

    2015-01-01

    A simple capacitive cell for dielectric constant measurement in liquids is presented. As an illustrative application, the cell is used for measuring the degradation of overheated edible oil through the evaluation of their dielectric constant.

  15. The Interactions of N-Soliton Solutions for the Generalized (2+1-Dimensional Variable-Coefficient Fifth-Order KdV Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangrong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A generalized (2+1-dimensional variable-coefficient KdV equation is introduced, which can describe the interaction between a water wave and gravity-capillary waves better than the (1+1-dimensional KdV equation. The N-soliton solutions of the (2+1-dimensional variable-coefficient fifth-order KdV equation are obtained via the Bell-polynomial method. Then the soliton fusion, fission, and the pursuing collision are analyzed depending on the influence of the coefficient eAij; when eAij=0, the soliton fusion and fission will happen; when eAij≠0, the pursuing collision will occur. Moreover, the Bäcklund transformation of the equation is gotten according to the binary Bell-polynomial and the period wave solutions are given by applying the Riemann theta function method.

  16. Critical survey of stability constants of EDTA complexes critical evaluation of equilibrium constants in solution stability constants of metal complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Anderegg, G

    2013-01-01

    Critical Survey of Stability Constants of EDTA Complexes focuses on the computations, values, and characteristics of stability constants. The book emphasizes that for a critical discussion of experimentally determined stability constants, it is important to consider the precision of the values that manifests the self-consistency of the constant, taking into consideration the random errors. The publication reviews the stability constants of metal complexes. The numerical calculations affirm the reactions and transformations of metal ions when exposed to varying conditions. The text also present

  17. Effect of multimer size and a natural dimorphism on the binding of convulxin to platelet glycoprotein (GP)VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, K; Furihata, K; Cheli, Y; Radis-Baptista, G; Kunicki, T J

    2006-05-01

    Convulxin (CVX), a C-type lectin from the venom of Crotalus durissus terrificus, is a potent activator of human platelets, binding predominantly to glycoprotein (GP)VI. Native CVX is an octamer composed of four alphabeta-heterodimers [(alphabeta)(4)]. Two different native sequences have been reported, one bearing lysine (K), the other glutamic acid (E), at beta chain residue 89, but the physiological relevance of this difference is unknown. We used the Drosophila S2 system to express recombinant CVX (rCVX) heterodimers (alphabeta) and site-directed mutagenesis to evaluate the influence of multimer size and the substitution betaK89E on CVX function. By flow cytometry, native CVX and both recombinant forms bind to human platelets in whole blood. By surface plasmon resonance (BIAcore, Piscataway, NJ, USA), the calculated equilibrium dissociation constants (K(D)) were: rCVX alphabeta89K, 11.3 x 10(-8) m; rCVX alphabeta89E, 9 x 10(-8) m; and native CVX, 2.8 x 10(-8) m. Thus, the affinities of the two rCVX forms for human, recombinant GPVI are essentially the same, but the relative affinity of native CVX is about 3-fold higher. The minimum concentration of native CVX that induces maximal human platelet aggregation (70 pm) is roughly 400-fold lower than that of either rCVX (29 nm). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the ability of the native CVX octamer to cluster mobile GPVI molecules within the platelet membrane may be the single most important factor that contributes to the efficiency with which CVX is able to induce platelet activation.

  18. EGS4 and MCNP4b MC Simulation of a Siemens KD2 Accelerator in 6 MV Photon Mode

    CERN Document Server

    Chaves, A; Fragoso, M; Lopes, C; Oliveira, C; Peralta, L; Rodrigues, P; Seco, J; Trindade, A

    2001-01-01

    The geometry of a Siemens Mevatron KD2 linear accelerator in 6 MV photon mode was modeled with EGS4 and MCNP4b. Energy spectra and other phase space distributions have been extensively compared in different plans along the beam line. The differences found have been evaluated both qualitative and quantitatively. The final aim was that both codes, running in different operating systems and with a common set of simulation conditions, met the requirement of fitting the experimental depth dose curves and dose profiles, measured in water for different field sizes. Whereas depth dose calculations are in a certain extent insensible to some simulation parameters like electron nominal energy, dose profiles have revealed to be a much better indicator to appreciate that feature. Fine energy tuning has been tried and the best fit was obtained for a nominal electron energy of 6.15 MeV.

  19. Preparation of antireflective films on small square KH2PO4/KD2PO4 crystals by spin coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Bin; Li, Haiyuan; Zhao, Liyi; Tang, Yongxing

    2016-03-01

    Modified antireflective thin films for optical crystals are developed by sol gel chemistry. Hexamethyldisilazane is added to silica sol to prepare modified sol by the Stöber method. The particle size distribution of the modified sol is found to have good uniformity, with an average particle diameter of about 42.14 nm. This sol can be used to prepare antireflective films with low refractive index of about 1.2. Homogeneous double layered films of antireflective and moisture resistant properties are demonstrated to coat small square sized KH2PO4/KD2PO4 crystals through a combination of dip and spin coating. The modified antireflective films display residual reflectivity close to zero, and laser induced damage threshold of 10.9 J/cm2 (pulse wavelength: 355nm, pulse width: 3ns) measured by raster scan method.

  20. KdV-Burgers equation in a new continuum model based on full velocity difference model considering anticipation effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Rongjun; Ge, Hongxia; Wang, Jufeng

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, a new continuum model based on full velocity difference car following model is developed with the consideration of driver's anticipation effect. By applying the linear stability theory, the new model's linear stability is obtained. Through nonlinear analysis, the KdV-Burgers equation is derived to describe the propagating behavior of traffic density wave near the neutral stability line. Numerical simulation shows that the new model possesses the local cluster, and it is capable of explaining some particular traffic phenomena Numerical results show that when considering the effects of anticipation, the traffic jams can be suppressed efficiently. The key improvement of this new model is that the anticipation effect can improve the stability of traffic flow.

  1. Surprises in numerical expressions of physical constants

    OpenAIRE

    Amir, Ariel; Lemeshko, Mikhail; Tokieda, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    In science, as in life, `surprises' can be adequately appreciated only in the presence of a null model, what we expect a priori. In physics, theories sometimes express the values of dimensionless physical constants as combinations of mathematical constants like pi or e. The inverse problem also arises, whereby the measured value of a physical constant admits a `surprisingly' simple approximation in terms of well-known mathematical constants. Can we estimate the probability for this to be a me...

  2. Distribution of a 69-kD laminin-binding protein in aortic and microvascular endothelial cells: modulation during cell attachment, spreading, and migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yannariello-Brown, J; Wewer, U; Liotta, L

    1988-01-01

    Affinity chromatography and immunolocalization techniques were used to investigate the mechanism(s) by which endothelial cells interact with the basement membrane component laminin. Bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) membranes were solubilized and incubated with a laminin-Sepharose affinity...

  3. Searching for Kaprekar's constants: algorithms and results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byron L. Walden

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We examine some new results on Kaprekar's constants, specifically establishing the unique 7-digit (in base 4 and 9-digit (in base 5 Kaprekar's constants and showing that there are no 15-, 21-, 27-, or 33-digit Kaprekar's constants.

  4. Generalized Euler constants for arithmetical progressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilcher, Karl

    1992-07-01

    The work of Lehmer and Briggs on Euler constants in arithmetical progressions is extended to the generalized Euler constants that arise in the Laurent expansion of ζ(s) about s = 1 . The results are applied to the summation of several classes of slowly converging series. A table of the constants is provided.

  5. Binding Of Ferrocyphen By Sds, Ctab And Triton X-100 In Water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SDS), cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and Triton X-100 surfactants was studied spectrophotometrically in water-ethanol medium. The equilibrium binding constant (Kb) and the number of binding sites (n) per surfactant monomer were ...

  6. Differential dissociation micromethod for the investigation of binding of metandrostenolone (Nerobol) to plasma proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojadzsieva, Milka; Kocsar, Laszlo; Kremmer, Tibor

    1985-01-01

    A micromethod was developed to determine the binding of anabolic streoids to plasma proteins. The new procedure combines precipitation with ammonium sulphate and differential dissociation. The binding parameters (association constant, specific binding capacity) are calculated on the basis of dissociation curves of sup(3)H-metandrostenolone from the precipitated sexual binding globuline. (L.E.)

  7. Differential dissociation micromethod for the investigation of binding of metandrostenolone (Nerobol) to plasma proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bojadzsieva, M.; Kocsar, L. (Orszagos Frederic Joliot-Curie Sugarbiologiai es Sugaregeszseguegyi Kutato Intezet, Budapest (Hungary)); Kremmer, T. (Orszagos Onkologiai Intezet, Budapest (Hungary))

    1985-01-01

    A micromethod was developed to determine the binding of anabolic steroids to plasma proteins. The new procedure combines precipitation with ammonium sulphate and differential dissociation. The binding parameters (association constant, specific binding capacity) are calculated on the basis of dissociation curves of sup(3)H-metandrostenolone from the precipitated sexual binding globuline.

  8. Insulin binding to individual rat skeletal muscles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koerker, D.J.; Sweet, I.R.; Baskin, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    Studies of insulin binding to skeletal muscle, performed using sarcolemmal membrane preparations or whole muscle incubations of mixed muscle or typical red (soleus, psoas) or white [extensor digitorum longus (EDL), gastrocnemius] muscle, have suggested that red muscle binds more insulin than white muscle. We have evaluated this hypothesis using cryostat sections of unfixed tissue to measure insulin binding in a broad range of skeletal muscles; many were of similar fiber-type profiles. Insulin binding per square millimeter of skeletal muscle slice was measured by autoradiography and computer-assisted densitometry. We found a 4.5-fold range in specific insulin tracer binding, with heart and predominantly slow-twitch oxidative muscles (SO) at the high end and the predominantly fast-twitch glycolytic (FG) muscles at the low end of the range. This pattern reflects insulin sensitivity. Evaluation of displacement curves for insulin binding yielded linear Scatchard plots. The dissociation constants varied over a ninefold range (0.26-2.06 nM). Binding capacity varied from 12.2 to 82.7 fmol/mm2. Neither binding parameter was correlated with fiber type or insulin sensitivity; e.g., among three muscles of similar fiber-type profile, the EDL had high numbers of low-affinity binding sites, whereas the quadriceps had low numbers of high-affinity sites. In summary, considerable heterogeneity in insulin binding was found among hindlimb muscles of the rat, which can be attributed to heterogeneity in binding affinities and the numbers of binding sites. It can be concluded that a given fiber type is not uniquely associated with a set of insulin binding parameters that result in high or low binding

  9. Insulin binding to individual rat skeletal muscles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koerker, D.J.; Sweet, I.R.; Baskin, D.G. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Studies of insulin binding to skeletal muscle, performed using sarcolemmal membrane preparations or whole muscle incubations of mixed muscle or typical red (soleus, psoas) or white (extensor digitorum longus (EDL), gastrocnemius) muscle, have suggested that red muscle binds more insulin than white muscle. We have evaluated this hypothesis using cryostat sections of unfixed tissue to measure insulin binding in a broad range of skeletal muscles; many were of similar fiber-type profiles. Insulin binding per square millimeter of skeletal muscle slice was measured by autoradiography and computer-assisted densitometry. We found a 4.5-fold range in specific insulin tracer binding, with heart and predominantly slow-twitch oxidative muscles (SO) at the high end and the predominantly fast-twitch glycolytic (FG) muscles at the low end of the range. This pattern reflects insulin sensitivity. Evaluation of displacement curves for insulin binding yielded linear Scatchard plots. The dissociation constants varied over a ninefold range (0.26-2.06 nM). Binding capacity varied from 12.2 to 82.7 fmol/mm2. Neither binding parameter was correlated with fiber type or insulin sensitivity; e.g., among three muscles of similar fiber-type profile, the EDL had high numbers of low-affinity binding sites, whereas the quadriceps had low numbers of high-affinity sites. In summary, considerable heterogeneity in insulin binding was found among hindlimb muscles of the rat, which can be attributed to heterogeneity in binding affinities and the numbers of binding sites. It can be concluded that a given fiber type is not uniquely associated with a set of insulin binding parameters that result in high or low binding.

  10. Identification and Characterization of Single-Chain Antibodies that Specifically Bind GI Noroviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy M Hurwitz

    Full Text Available Norovirus infections commonly lead to outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis and spread quickly, resulting in many health and economic challenges prior to diagnosis. Rapid and reliable diagnostic tests are therefore essential to identify infections and to guide the appropriate clinical responses at the point-of-care. Existing tools, including RT-PCR and enzyme immunoassays, pose several limitations based on the significant time, equipment and expertise required to elicit results. Immunochromatographic assays available for use at the point-of-care have poor sensitivity and specificity, especially for genogroup I noroviruses, thus requiring confirmation of results with more sensitive testing methods. Therefore, there is a clear need for novel reagents to help achieve quick and reliable results. In this study, we have identified two novel single-chain antibodies (scFvs-named NJT-R3-A2 and NJT-R3-A3-that effectively detect GI.1 and GI.7 virus-like particles (VLPs through selection of a phage display library against the P-domain of the GI.1 major capsid protein. The limits of detection by each scFv for GI.1 and GI.7 are 0.1 and 0.2 ng, and 6.25 and 25 ng, respectively. They detect VLPs with strong specificity in multiple diagnostic formats, including ELISAs and membrane-based dot blots, and in the context of norovirus-negative stool suspensions. The scFvs also detect native virions effectively in norovirus-positive clinical stool samples. Purified scFvs bind to GI.1 and GI.7 VLPs with equilibrium constant (KD values of 27 nM and 49 nM, respectively. Overall, the phage-based scFv reagents identified and characterized here show utility for detecting GI.1 and GI.7 noroviruses in multiple diagnostic assay formats with strong specificity and sensitivity, indicating promise for integration into existing point-of-care tests to improve future diagnostics.

  11. Isotope exchange between natural and anthropogenic Pb in the coastal waters of Singapore: exchange experiment, Kd model, and implications for the interpretation of coastal 210Pb data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, E. A.; Chen, M.; Zurbrick, C.; Carrasco, G. G.

    2015-12-01

    Observations from annually-banded corals and seawater samples show that marine lead (Pb) in the coastal waters of Singapore has an isotopic composition that does not match that of the anthropogenic aerosols in this region, unlike what is seen in most parts of the open ocean. The 206Pb/207Pb composition of Singaporean marine Pb is 1.18-1.20 whereas the local aerosols are 1.14-1.16. In order to explore this discrepancy further, we collected a large volume water from the Johor River estuary (flowing from Malaysia to the northern border of Singapore), added a distinct isotope spike (NBS981, 206Pb/207Pb =1.093) to an unfiltered sample, and followed the dissolved isotope composition of the mixture during the following two months. The initial dissolved Pb concentration was 18.3 pmol/kg with 206Pb/207Pb of 1.200. "Total dissolvable" Pb released after acidification of the in the unfiltered sample was 373 pmol/kg with 206Pb/207Pb of 1.199, indicating that there is a large particulate Pb reservoir with an isotopic composition comparable to regional crustal natural Pb. The isotope spike should have brought the dissolved 206Pb/207Pb to 1.162, but less than a day after isotope spiking, the dissolved Pb had risen to 1.181 and continued a slow increase to 1.197 over the next two months. This experiment demonstrates that Johor estuary particulate matter contains a large reservoir of exchangeable Pb that will modify the isotopic composition of deposited aeolian aerosol anthropogenic Pb. We have modeled the evolution of Pb and Pb isotopes in this experiment with a single Kd -type model that assumes that there are two or three different Pb reservoirs with different exchange time constants. This observation has implications for isotope equilibrium between high Pb/210Pb continental particles and low Pb/210Pb ocean waters - what is merely isotope equilibration may appear to be 210Pb scavenging.

  12. Erythrocyte 3H-ouabain binding and digitalis treatment in ethanol addicted patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battaini, F.; Govoni, S.; Mauri, A.; Civelli, L.; Trabucchi, M.

    1987-01-01

    The binding of 3 H-ouabain to human erythrocytes was analyzed in a population of hospitalized male ethanol addicted patients under long term digitalis treatment. In the non-alcoholic patient group the long term digitalis treatment induced an increase in Bmax and Kd values; such modification was not observed in the alcoholic patients. Chronic alcohol intake itself induced an increase in 3 H-ouabain kinetic parameters. These observations confirm that ouabain binding to human erythrocytes is subject to pharmacological and toxicological regulation and that adaptive changes in peripheral tissues can be useful in predicting possible parallel modifications in other less accessible tissues. 22 references, 1 table

  13. Aspirin and salicylate bind to immunoglobulin heavy chain binding protein (BiP) and inhibit its ATPase activity in human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, W G; Ruan, K H; Du, M; Saunders, M A; Wu, K K

    2001-11-01

    Salicylic acid (SA), an endogenous signaling molecule of plants, possesses anti-inflammatory and anti-neoplastic actions in human. Its derivative, aspirin, is the most commonly used anti-inflammatory and analgesic drug. Aspirin and sodium salicylate (salicylates) have been reported to have multiple pharmacological actions. However, it is unclear whether they bind to a cellular protein. Here, we report for the first time the purification from human fibroblasts of a approximately 78 kDa salicylate binding protein with sequence identity to immunoglobulin heavy chain binding protein (BiP). The Kd values of SA binding to crude extract and to recombinant BiP were 45.2 and 54.6 microM, respectively. BiP is a chaperone protein containing a polypeptide binding site recognizing specific heptapeptide sequence and an ATP binding site. A heptapeptide with the specific sequence displaced SA binding in a concentration-dependent manner whereas a control heptapeptide did not. Salicylates inhibited ATPase activity stimulated by this specific heptapeptide but did not block ATP binding or induce BiP expression. These results indicate that salicylates bind specifically to the polypeptide binding site of BiP in human cells that may interfere with folding and transport of proteins important in inflammation.

  14. The importance of being (a) constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy-Leblond, J.-M.

    1979-01-01

    The author intends to show how the epistemological status of the physical constants bears witness to the development of physical science in general. He classifies the various physical constants into three types, properties of particular physical objects, characteristics of classes of physical phenomena and universal constants. He discusses the phenomena of fundamental constants experiencing a change in their type, at length on the example of two important constants, c and G. He considers Planck's constant and discusses the conceptual role of universal constants in general, as well as some aspects of quantum mechanics which appear in a new light from the proposed point of view. The existence is shown of hidden universal constants, forgotten ones in the realm of classical physics, as well as overlooked ones in modern physics. The velocity of light is studied as an example of general considerations on universal constants, and as a way to approach some epistemological problems of special relativity. Newton's gravitational constant is studied in connection with the interpretation of general relativity. (Auth./C.F.)

  15. Validation of the Andon KD595 for clinical use and self-measurement according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ning; Zhang, Xuezhong; Wang, Wen; Zhang, Hongye

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of the automated oscillometric upper arm blood pressure monitor Andon KD595 for home blood pressure monitoring according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were sequentially measured in 33 participants using the standard mercury sphygmomanometer and the Andon KD595 device. Ninety-nine pairs of comparisons were obtained from 33 participants for analysis. The KD595 device achieved the targets in part 1 of the validation study. The number of absolute differences between the device and the observers within a range of 5, 10, and 15 mmHg was 72/99, 93/99, and 96/99, respectively, for SBP and 72/99, 96/99, and 99/99, respectively, for DBP. The device also achieved the targets in part 2 of the validation study. A total of 28 and 25 participants had at least two of the three device-observer differences within 5 mmHg (required≥24) for SBP and DBP, respectively. The number of participants without device-observer difference within 5 mmHg was two for SBP and two for DBP (required≤3). The Andon upper arm blood pressure monitor KD595 has passed the International Protocol requirements and it can be recommended for clinical use and self-measurement in adults.

  16. Validation of the Andon KD5031 for clinical use and self-measurement according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ning; Zhang, Xuezhong; Wang, Wen; Zhang, Hongye

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of the automated oscillometric upper arm blood pressure (BP) monitor Andon KD5031 for home BP monitoring according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were sequentially measured in 33 participants using the standard mercury sphygmomanometer and the Andon KD5031 device. Ninety-nine pairs of comparisons were obtained from 33 participants for analysis. The KD5031 device achieved the targets in part 1 of the validation study. The number of absolute differences between the device and the observers within a range of 5, 10, and 15 mmHg was 66/99, 93/99, and 98/99, respectively, for SBP and 72/99, 94/99, and 99/99, respectively, for DBP. The device also achieved the targets in part 2 of the validation study. Twenty-six participants for both SBP and DBP had at least two of the three device-observer differences within 5 mmHg (required ≥24). The number of participants without a device-observer difference within 5 mmHg was one for SBP and three for DBP (required ≤3). The Andon upper arm BP monitor KD5031 has passed the International Protocol requirements, and it can be recommended for clinical use and self-measurement in adults.

  17. Use of thermodynamic sorption models to derive radionuclide Kd values for performance assessment: Selected results and recommendations of the NEA sorption project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochs, M.; Davis, J.A.; Olin, M.; Payne, T.E.; Tweed, C.J.; Askarieh, M.M.; Altmann, S.

    2006-01-01

    For the safe final disposal and/or long-term storage of radioactive wastes, deep or near-surface underground repositories are being considered world-wide. A central safety feature is the prevention, or sufficient retardation, of radionuclide (RN) migration to the biosphere. To this end, radionuclide sorption is one of the most important processes. Decreasing the uncertainty in radionuclide sorption may contribute significantly to reducing the overall uncertainty of a performance assessment (PA). For PA, sorption is typically characterised by distribution coefficients (Kd values). The conditional nature of Kd requires different estimates of this parameter for each set of geochemical conditions of potential relevance in a RN's migration pathway. As it is not feasible to measure sorption for every set of conditions, the derivation of Kd for PA must rely on data derived from representative model systems. As a result, uncertainty in Kd is largely caused by the need to derive values for conditions not explicitly addressed in experiments. The recently concluded NEA Sorption Project [1] showed that thermodynamic sorption models (TSMs) are uniquely suited to derive K d as a function of conditions, because they allow a direct coupling of sorption with variable solution chemistry and mineralogy in a thermodynamic framework. The results of the project enable assessment of the suitability of various TSM approaches for PA-relevant applications as well as of the potential and limitations of TSMs to model RN sorption in complex systems. ?? by Oldenbourg Wissenschaftsverlag.

  18. Subcellular distribution of calcium-binding proteins and a calcium-ATPase in canine pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigam, S.K.; Towers, T.

    1990-01-01

    Using a 45Ca blot-overlay assay, we monitored the subcellular fractionation pattern of several Ca binding proteins of apparent molecular masses 94, 61, and 59 kD. These proteins also appeared to stain blue with Stains-All. Additionally, using a monoclonal antiserum raised against canine cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase, we examined the subcellular distribution of a canine pancreatic 110-kD protein recognized by this antiserum. This protein had the same electrophoretic mobility as the cardiac protein against which the antiserum was raised. The three Ca binding proteins and the Ca-ATPase cofractionated into the rough microsomal fraction (RM), previously shown to consist of highly purified RER, in a pattern highly similar to that of the RER marker, ribophorin I. To provide further evidence for an RER localization, native RM were subjected to isopycnic flotation in sucrose gradients. The Ca binding proteins and the Ca-ATPase were found in dense fractions, along with ribophorin I. When RM were stripped of ribosomes with puromycin/high salt, the Ca binding proteins and the Ca-ATPase exhibited a shift to less dense fractions, as did ribophorin I. We conclude that, in pancreas, the Ca binding proteins and Ca-ATPase we detect are localized to the RER (conceivably a subcompartment of the RER) or, possibly, a structure intimately associated with the RER

  19. Development of a Surface Plasmon Resonance Assay for the Characterization of Small-Molecule Binding Kinetics and Mechanism of Binding to Kynurenine 3-Monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poda, Suresh B; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Nachane, Ruta; Menon, Veena; Gandhi, Adarsh S; Budac, David P; Li, Guiying; Campbell, Brian M; Tagmose, Lena

    2015-10-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), a pivotal enzyme in the kynurenine pathway, was identified as a potential therapeutic target for treating neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. In this article, we describe a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay that delivers both kinetics and the mechanism of binding (MoB) data, enabling a detailed characterization of KMO inhibitors for the enzyme in real time. SPR assay development included optimization of the protein construct and the buffer conditions. The stability and inhibitor binding activity of the immobilized KMO were significantly improved when the experiments were performed at 10°C using a buffer containing 0.05% n-dodecyl-β-d-maltoside (DDM) as the detergent. The KD values of the known KMO inhibitors (UPF648 and RO61-8048) from the SPR assay were in good accordance with the biochemical LC/MS/MS assay. Also, the SPR assay was able to differentiate the binding kinetics (k(a) and k(d)) of the selected unknown KMO inhibitors. For example, the inhibitors that showed comparable IC50 values in the LC/MS/MS assay displayed differences in their residence time (τ = 1/k(d)) in the SPR assay. To better define the MoB of the inhibitors to KMO, an SPR-based competition assay was developed, which demonstrated that both UPF648 and RO61-8048 bound to the substrate-binding site. These results demonstrate the potential of the SPR assay for characterizing the affinity, the kinetics, and the MoB profiles of the KMO inhibitors.

  20. Discovery and characterization of surface binding sites in polysaccharide converting enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilkens, Casper

    a generalization and may mask the significance of these sites in catalysis. GH62 α-L-arabinofuranosidase from Aspergillus nidulans FGSC A4 (AnAbf62A-m2,3) does not contain a CBM, however, AnAbf62A-m2,3 interacts strongly with wheat arabinoxylan, birchwood xylan and oatspelt xylan in affinity gel electrophoresis...... no detectable affinity for maltotriose and -tetraose, but clearly binds maltopentaose, -hexaose, -heptaose (M7) and β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) albeit with a measurable KD for only β-CD (0.94 ± 0.07 mM) and M7 (1.99 ± 0.10 mM). The plant phosphoglucan phosphatases Starch Excess 4 (SEX4) and Like Sex Four 2 (LSF2......) have different affinity for amylopectin, KD being 0.030 ± 0.002 and 1.59 ± 0.08 mg ml-1, respectively. Although corresponding KD values for β-CD of 1.69 ± 0.17 and 0.72 ± 0.06 mM are similar, SEX4 and LSF2 are suggested to have different binding modes and roles in starch dephosphorylation. While SEX4...

  1. Synthesis and binding affinity of an iodinated juvenile hormone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prestwich, G.D.; Eng, W.S.; Robles, S.; Vogt, R.G.; Wisniewski, J.R.; Wawrzenczyk, C.

    1988-01-25

    The synthesis of the first iodinated juvenile hormone (JH) in enantiomerically enriched form is reported. This chiral compound, 12-iodo-JH I, has an iodine atom replacing a methyl group of the natural insect juvenile hormone, JH I, which is important in regulating morphogenesis and reproduction in the Lepidoptera. The unlabeled compound shows approximately 10% of the relative binding affinity for the larval hemolymph JH binding protein (JHBP) of Manduca sexta, which specifically binds natural /sup 3/H-10R,11S-JH I (labeled at 58 Ci/mmol) with a KD of 8 X 10(-8) M. It is also approximately one-tenth as biologically active as JH I in the black Manduca and epidermal commitment assays. The 12-hydroxy and 12-oxo compounds are poor competitors and are also biologically inactive. The radioiodinated (/sup 125/I)12-iodo-JH I can be prepared in low yield at greater than 2500 Ci/mmol by nucleophilic displacement using no-carrier-added /sup 125/I-labeled sodium iodide in acetone; however, synthesis using sodium iodide carrier to give the approximately 50 Ci/mmol radioiodinated ligand proceeds in higher radiochemical yield with fewer by-products and provides a radioligand which is more readily handled in binding assays. The KD of (/sup 125/I)12-iodo-JH I was determined for hemolymph JHBP of three insects: M. sexta, 795 nM; Galleria mellonella, 47 nM; Locusta migratoria, 77 nM. The selectivity of 12-iodo-JH I for the 32-kDa JHBP of M. sexta was demonstrated by direct autoradiography of a native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gel of larval hemolymph incubated with the radioiodinated ligand. Thus, the in vitro and in vivo activity of 12-iodo-JH I indicate that it can serve as an important new gamma-emitting probe in the search for JH receptor proteins in target tissues.

  2. Stability constants of scandium complexes, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Hisako; Itoh, Naomi; Suzuki, Yasuo

    1984-01-01

    The stability constants of scandium complexes with some carboxylate ligands were determined potentiometrically at 25.0 and 40.0 0 C and at an ionic strength of 0.10 with potassium nitrate as supporting electrolyte. The constants of the scandium complexes were appreciably greater than those of the corresponding lanthanoid complexes, as expected. The changes in free energy, enthalpy, and entropy for the formation of the scandium complexes were calculated from the stability constants at two temperatures. (author)

  3. Determination of diffuse double layer protonation constants for hydrous ferric oxide (HFO): supporting evidence for the Dzombak and Morel compilation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pretorius, PJ

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available of the experimental system suggests that titration points below pH 4 should not be used for the determination of protonation constants because of potential HFO dissolution. Surface protonation constant, PZC and binding site estimates agree excellently with currently...

  4. A natural cosmological constant from chameleons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horatiu Nastase

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a simple model where the effective cosmological constant appears from chameleon scalar fields. For a Kachru–Kallosh–Linde–Trivedi (KKLT-inspired form of the potential and a particular chameleon coupling to the local density, patches of approximately constant scalar field potential cluster around regions of matter with density above a certain value, generating the effect of a cosmological constant on large scales. This construction addresses both the cosmological constant problem (why Λ is so small, yet nonzero and the coincidence problem (why Λ is comparable to the matter density now.

  5. A natural cosmological constant from chameleons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nastase, Horatiu, E-mail: nastase@ift.unesp.br [Instituto de Física Teórica, UNESP-Universidade Estadual Paulista, R. Dr. Bento T. Ferraz 271, Bl. II, Sao Paulo 01140-070, SP (Brazil); Weltman, Amanda, E-mail: amanda.weltman@uct.ac.za [Astrophysics, Cosmology & Gravity Center, Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Private Bag, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa)

    2015-07-30

    We present a simple model where the effective cosmological constant appears from chameleon scalar fields. For a Kachru–Kallosh–Linde–Trivedi (KKLT)-inspired form of the potential and a particular chameleon coupling to the local density, patches of approximately constant scalar field potential cluster around regions of matter with density above a certain value, generating the effect of a cosmological constant on large scales. This construction addresses both the cosmological constant problem (why Λ is so small, yet nonzero) and the coincidence problem (why Λ is comparable to the matter density now)

  6. A natural cosmological constant from chameleons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nastase, Horatiu; Weltman, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    We present a simple model where the effective cosmological constant appears from chameleon scalar fields. For a Kachru–Kallosh–Linde–Trivedi (KKLT)-inspired form of the potential and a particular chameleon coupling to the local density, patches of approximately constant scalar field potential cluster around regions of matter with density above a certain value, generating the effect of a cosmological constant on large scales. This construction addresses both the cosmological constant problem (why Λ is so small, yet nonzero) and the coincidence problem (why Λ is comparable to the matter density now)

  7. Affinities of bispyridinium non-oxime compounds to [(3)H]epibatidine binding sites of Torpedo californica nicotinic acetylcholine receptors depend on linker length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, K V; Seeger, T; Tattersall, J E H; Timperley, C M; Bird, M; Green, C; Thiermann, H; Worek, F

    2013-12-05

    The toxicity of organophosphorus nerve agents or pesticides arises from accumulation of acetylcholine and overstimulation of both muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs and nAChRs) due to inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Standard treatment by administration of atropine and oximes, e.g., obidoxime or pralidoxime, focuses on antagonism of mAChRs and reactivation of AChE, whereas nicotinic malfunction is not directly treated. An alternative approach would be to use nAChR active substances to counteract the effects of accumulated acetylcholine. Promising in vitro and in vivo results were obtained with the bispyridinium compounds SAD-128 (1,1'-oxydimethylene bis(4-tert-butylpyridinium) dichloride) and MB327 (1,1'-(propane-1,3-diyl)bis(4-tert-butylpyridinium) di(iodide)), which were partly attributed to their interaction with nAChRs. In this study, a homologous series of unsubstituted and 4-tert-butyl-substituted bispyridinium compounds with different alkane linker lengths was investigated in competition binding experiments using [(3)H]epibatidine as a reporter ligand. Additionally, the effect of the well-characterised MB327 on the [(3)H]epibatidine equilibrium dissociation (KD) constant in different buffers was determined. This study demonstrated that divalent cations increased the affinity of [(3)H]epibatidine. Since quaternary ammonium molecules are known to inhibit AChE, the obtained affinity constants of the tested bispyridinium compounds were compared with the inhibition of human AChE. In competition experiments, bispyridinium derivatives of longer linker length displaced [(3)H]epibatidine and inhibited AChE strongly. Bispyridinium compounds with short linkers, at most, have an allosteric interaction with the [(3)H]epibatidine binding sites and barely inhibited AChE. In dependence on alkane linker length, the bispyridinium compounds seemed to interact at different binding sites. However, the exact binding sites of the bispyridinium

  8. Evaluation of d-amphetamine effects on the binding of dopamine D-2 receptor radioligand, 18F-fallypride in nonhuman primates using positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, J; Yang, Z Y; Lew, R; Brown, T; Kronmal, S; Cooper, M D; Seiden, L S

    1997-09-01

    We have investigated the ability of dopamine to compete with the binding of the high affinity dopamine D2 receptor positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand, 18F-fallypride. In vitro dissociation of 18F-fallypride with dopamine in rat striatal homogenates exhibited a dissociation rate, k(off), of 1.76 x 10(-2) min(-1) while the association rate constant, k(on), was found to be 5.30 x 10(8) M(-1) min(-1). This resulted in a dissociation constant, K(D) of 33 pM for 18F-fallypride. For in vivo studies, we investigated the effects of reserpine and d-amphetamine treatment on 18F-fallypride in an attempt to study competition of endogenous dopamine with the radioligand at the receptor sites in rats and monkeys. PET experiments with 18F-fallypride in two male rhesus monkeys were carried out in a PETT VI scanner. In control experiments, rapid specific uptake of 18F-fallypride in the striata was observed (0.05-0.06% injected dose (ID)/g) while nonspecifically bound tracer cleared from other parts of the brain. Striata/cerebellum ratios for 18F-fallypride were approximately 8 at 80 min postinjection, respectively. The monkeys received various doses (0.25 to 1.50 mg/kg) of d-amphetamine (AMPH) pre- and postinjection of the radioligand. There was a decrease of specifically bound 18F-fallypride as well as evidence of an enhanced clearance of specifically bound 18F-fallypride after administering AMPH in the two monkeys. The dissociation rates, k(off), of 18F-fallypride without AMPH was doses of AMPH (0.25 mg/kg) had a reduced effect on the binding of 18F-fallypride. No effect was seen until about 30 minutes after the injection of AMPH. Studies with various doses indicated that 18F-fallypride has a maximum response at doses of 0.75-1.50 mg/kg, with an approximately 16%/hour reduction in binding. These results indicate that AMPH stimulated release of endogenous dopamine reduces the specific binding of 18F-fallypride.

  9. [3H]mazindol binding associated with neuronal dopamine and norepinephrine uptake sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javitch, J A; Blaustein, R O; Snyder, S H

    1984-07-01

    [3H]Mazindol labels neuronal dopamine uptake sites in corpus striatum membranes (KD = 18 nM) and neuronal norepinephrine uptake sites in cerebral cortex and submaxillary/sublingual gland membranes (KD = 4 nM). The potencies of various inhibitors of biogenic amine uptake in reducing [3H]mazindol binding in striatal membranes correlate with their potencies for inhibition of neuronal [3H]dopamine accumulation, whereas their potencies in reducing [3H]mazindol binding to cortical and salivary gland membranes correlate with their potencies for inhibition of neuronal [3H]norepinephrine accumulation. Similar to the dopamine and norepinephrine uptake systems, [3H]mazindol binding in all three tissues is dependent upon sodium (with potassium, lithium, rubidium, and Tris being ineffective substitutes) and chloride (with sulfate and phosphate being ineffective substitutes). In membranes of the cerebral cortex and salivary gland, half-maximal stimulation is observed at 50-80 mM NaCl, whereas in membranes of the corpus striatum half-maximal stimulation occurs at 240 mM NaCl. In striatal membranes NaCl increases the affinity of [3H]mazindol binding with no effect on the maximal number of sites. The enhancement of affinity is due to a selective slowing of the dissociation of the ligand from its binding site. The association of [3H]mazindol binding sites with neuronal dopamine uptake sites in the corpus striatum is further supported by the reduction of [3H]mazindol binding sites in striatal membranes following destruction of dopaminergic neurons by 6-hydroxydopamine. Similarly, the association of [3H]mazindol binding sites with neuronal norepinephrine uptake sites in cerebral cortex is supported by the reduction of [3H]mazindol binding to cortical membranes following destruction of noradrenergic neurons by N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine.

  10. Seasonal variation of imipramine binding in the blood platelets of normal controls and depressed patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arora, R.C.; Meltzer, H.Y.

    1988-01-01

    Imipramine binding (IB) was studied in the blood platelets from normal controls and depressed patients over a 4-year period (1981-1984) to determine if seasonal variation was present in Bmax or KD. Bimonthly variation in the Bmax of IB was found in normal controls studied longitudinally. No such variation was found when individual values from normal controls were examined on a monthly or seasonal basis. Bmax in depressed patients showed a significant seasonal, but not monthly, variation. KD of IB varied in normal controls using monthly or seasonal data, but not in the probably more reliable bimonthly data. These results suggest that IB studies comparing groups of subjects should match groups for season of the year or, for greater accuracy, month of the year

  11. Binding of iodinated recombinant human GM-CSF to the blast cells of acute myeloblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelleher, C.A.; Wong, G.G.; Clark, S.C.; Schendel, P.F.; Minden, M.D.; McCulloch, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    Granulocyte/macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is an effective growth factor for the blasts of acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML). Radioiodinated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-cell derived GM-CSF was prepared using Bolton-Hunter reagent to label free amino groups on the protein. Normal human neutrophils and the blast cells from AML patients were examined for binding. We found that there were fewer receptors of higher affinity on blast cells compared with neutrophils. After brief culture in suspension, receptor number increased and affinity decreased. Experiments provided evidence that GM-CSF from Escherichia coli had a higher affinity for neutrophils (kd = 20 pM) than the CHO-cell derived protein (kd = 500 pM-1 nM). This difference was reflected in the increased effectiveness of the E. coli protein over the CHO protein to stimulate colony formation in both normal bone marrow cells and AML blasts

  12. Quantification of Cooperativity in Heterodimer-DNA Binding Improves the Accuracy of Binding Specificity Models*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isakova, Alina; Berset, Yves; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; Deplancke, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Many transcription factors (TFs) have the ability to cooperate on DNA elements as heterodimers. Despite the significance of TF heterodimerization for gene regulation, a quantitative understanding of cooperativity between various TF dimer partners and its impact on heterodimer DNA binding specificity models is still lacking. Here, we used a novel integrative approach, combining microfluidics-steered measurements of dimer-DNA assembly with mechanistic modeling of the implicated protein-protein-DNA interactions to quantitatively interrogate the cooperative DNA binding behavior of the adipogenic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ):retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) heterodimer. Using the high throughput MITOMI (mechanically induced trapping of molecular interactions) platform, we derived equilibrium DNA binding data for PPARγ, RXRα, as well as the PPARγ:RXRα heterodimer to more than 300 target DNA sites and variants thereof. We then quantified cooperativity underlying heterodimer-DNA binding and derived an integrative heterodimer DNA binding constant. Using this cooperativity-inclusive constant, we were able to build a heterodimer-DNA binding specificity model that has superior predictive power than the one based on a regular one-site equilibrium. Our data further revealed that individual nucleotide substitutions within the target site affect the extent of cooperativity in PPARγ:RXRα-DNA binding. Our study therefore emphasizes the importance of assessing cooperativity when generating DNA binding specificity models for heterodimers. PMID:26912662

  13. Quantification of Cooperativity in Heterodimer-DNA Binding Improves the Accuracy of Binding Specificity Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isakova, Alina; Berset, Yves; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; Deplancke, Bart

    2016-05-06

    Many transcription factors (TFs) have the ability to cooperate on DNA elements as heterodimers. Despite the significance of TF heterodimerization for gene regulation, a quantitative understanding of cooperativity between various TF dimer partners and its impact on heterodimer DNA binding specificity models is still lacking. Here, we used a novel integrative approach, combining microfluidics-steered measurements of dimer-DNA assembly with mechanistic modeling of the implicated protein-protein-DNA interactions to quantitatively interrogate the cooperative DNA binding behavior of the adipogenic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ):retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) heterodimer. Using the high throughput MITOMI (mechanically induced trapping of molecular interactions) platform, we derived equilibrium DNA binding data for PPARγ, RXRα, as well as the PPARγ:RXRα heterodimer to more than 300 target DNA sites and variants thereof. We then quantified cooperativity underlying heterodimer-DNA binding and derived an integrative heterodimer DNA binding constant. Using this cooperativity-inclusive constant, we were able to build a heterodimer-DNA binding specificity model that has superior predictive power than the one based on a regular one-site equilibrium. Our data further revealed that individual nucleotide substitutions within the target site affect the extent of cooperativity in PPARγ:RXRα-DNA binding. Our study therefore emphasizes the importance of assessing cooperativity when generating DNA binding specificity models for heterodimers. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Titration ELISA as a Method to Determine the Dissociation Constant of Receptor Ligand Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eble, Johannes A

    2018-02-15

    The dissociation constant describes the interaction between two partners in the binding equilibrium and is a measure of their affinity. It is a crucial parameter to compare different ligands, e.g., competitive inhibitors, protein isoforms and mutants, for their binding strength to a binding partner. Dissociation constants are determined by plotting concentrations of bound versus free ligand as binding curves. In contrast, titration curves, in which a signal that is proportional to the concentration of bound ligand is plotted against the total concentration of added ligand, are much easier to record. The signal can be detected spectroscopically and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). This is exemplified in a protocol for a titration ELISA that measures the binding of the snake venom-derived rhodocetin to its immobilized target domain of α2β1 integrin. Titration ELISAs are versatile and widely used. Any pair of interacting proteins can be used as immobilized receptor and soluble ligand, provided that both proteins are pure, and their concentrations are known. The difficulty so far has been to determine the dissociation constant from a titration curve. In this study, a mathematical function underlying titration curves is introduced. Without any error-prone graphical estimation of a saturation yield, this algorithm allows processing of the raw data (signal intensities at different concentrations of added ligand) directly by mathematical evaluation via non-linear regression. Thus, several titration curves can be recorded simultaneously and transformed into a set of characteristic parameters, among them the dissociation constant and the concentration of binding-active receptor, and they can be evaluated statistically. When combined with this algorithm, titration ELISAs gain the advantage of directly presenting the dissociation constant. Therefore, they may be used more efficiently in the future.

  15. Effect of Methamphetamine on Spectral Binding, Ligand Docking and Metabolism of Anti-HIV Drugs with CYP3A4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ande, Anusha; Wang, Lei; Vaidya, Naveen K.; Li, Weihua; Kumar, Santosh; Kumar, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) is the major drug metabolic enzyme, and is involved in the metabolism of antiretroviral drugs, especially protease inhibitors (PIs). This study was undertaken to examine the effect of methamphetamine on the binding and metabolism of PIs with CYP3A4. We showed that methamphetamine exhibits a type I spectral change upon binding to CYP3A4 with δAmax and KD of 0.016±0.001 and 204±18 μM, respectively. Methamphetamine-CYP3A4 docking showed that methamphetamine binds to the heme of CYP3A4 in two modes, both leading to N-demethylation. We then studied the effect of methamphetamine binding on PIs with CYP3A4. Our results showed that methamphetamine alters spectral binding of nelfinavir but not the other type I PIs (lopinavir, atazanavir, tipranavir). The change in spectral binding for nelfinavir was observed at both δAmax (0.004±0.0003 vs. 0.0068±0.0001) and KD (1.42±0.36 vs.2.93±0.08 μM) levels. We further tested effect of methamphetamine on binding of 2 type II PIs; ritonavir and indinavir. Our results showed that methamphetamine alters the ritonavir binding to CYP3A4 by decreasing both the δAmax (0.0038±0.0003 vs. 0.0055±0.0003) and KD (0.043±0.0001 vs. 0.065±0.001 nM), while indinavir showed only reduced KD in presence of methamphetamine (0.086±0.01 vs. 0.174±0.03 nM). Furthermore, LC-MS/MS studies in high CYP3A4 human liver microsomes showed a decrease in the formation of hydroxy ritonavir in the presence of methamphetamine. Finally, CYP3A4 docking with lopinavir and ritonavir in the absence and presence of methamphetamine showed that methamphetamine alters the docking of ritonavir, which is consistent with the results obtained from spectral binding and metabolism studies. Overall, our results demonstrated differential effects of methamphetamine on the binding and metabolism of PIs with CYP3A4. These findings have clinical implication in terms of drug dose adjustment of antiretroviral medication, especially with ritonavir

  16. Fluorescence spectroscopic studies on binding of a flavonoid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Binding of quercetin to human serum albumin (HSA) was studied and the binding constant measured by following the red-shifted absorption spectrum of quercetin in the presence of HSA and the quenching of the intrinsic protein fluorescence in the presence of different concentrations of quercetin. Fluorescence lifetime ...

  17. Tyrosine phosphorylation of a 66KD soluble protein and augmentation of lectin induced mitogenesis by DMSO in human T lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedner, H.J.; Bass, G.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have demonstrated that induction of mitogenesis in human T lymphocytes is associated with the tyrosine phosphorylation of a 66KD soluble substrate-TPP 66. Since DMSO has been shown to be a non-specific stimulator of tyrosine protein kinases they have examined the effect of DMSO on both activation and tyrosine phosphorylation in human T cells. Human peripheral blood T lymphocytes were isolated by dextran sedimentation, Ficol/Paque centrifugation and nylon wool filtration. Phosphorylation was performed in cells incubated with [ 32 P] orthophosphate followed by DMSO for 30 min. TPP 66 was identified by 2-D PAGE, autoradiography, and HV electrophoresis of the hydrolyzed protein. Concentrations of DMSO from 1% to 50% induced the tyrosine phosphorylation of TPP 66 with maximal stimulation seen at 20%. DMSO alone did not activate the T cells (measured by [ 3 H] thymidine incorporation) when tested at high concentrations for 30 sec to 10 min. (longer incubations were markedly toxic) or low concentrations for 12 to 48 hrs. Low concentrations of DMSO 0.1%-0.5% did however, markedly augment [ 3 H] thymidine incorporation induced by PHA or Con A. These data suggest that tyrosine phosphorylation of TPP 66 alone may not constitute sufficient signal for the activation sequence to begin but the phosphorylation of this soluble substrate may be a critical factor in the propagation of the activation sequence

  18. The Moyal momentum algebra applied to θ-deformed 2d conformal models and KdV-hierarchies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulahoual, A.; Sedra, M.B.

    2002-08-01

    The properties of the Das-Popowicz Moyal momentum algebra that we introduce in hep-th/0207242 are reexamined in detail and used to discuss some aspects of integrable models and 2d conformal field theories. Among the results presented we setup some useful convention notations which lead to extract some non trivial properties of the Moyal momentum algebra. We use the particular sub-algebra sl n -Σ-tilde n (0,n) to construct the sl 2 -Liouville conformal model δδ-barΦ=2/θe -1/θΦ and its sl 3 -Toda extension δδ-bar 1 =Ae -1/2θ(Φ 1 +1/2Φ 2 ) and δδ-barΦ 2 =Be -1/2 / θ (Φ 1 +2Φ 2 ) . We also show that the central charge, a la Feigin-Fuchs, associated to the spin-2 conformal current of the θ-Liouville model is given by c θ =(1+24θ 2 ). Moreover, the results obtained for the Das-Popowicz Mm algebra are applied to study systematically some properties of the Moyal KdV and Boussinesq hierarchies generalizing some known results. We also discuss the primarily condition of conformal w θ -currents and interpret this condition as being a dressing gauge symmetry in the Moyal momentum space. Some computations related to the dressing gauge group are explicitly presented. (author)

  19. Type I integrable defects and finite-gap solutions for KdV and sine-Gordon models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, E.; Parini, R.

    2017-07-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to extend results, which have been obtained previously to describe the classical scattering of solitons with integrable defects of type I, to include the much larger and intricate collection of finite-gap solutions defined in terms of generalised theta functions. In this context, it is generally not feasible to adopt a direct approach, via ansätze for the fields to either side of the defect tuned to satisfy the defect sewing conditions. Rather, essential use is made of the fact that the defect sewing conditions themselves are intimately related to Bäcklund transformations in order to set up a strategy to enable the calculation of the field on one side by suitably transforming the field on the other side. The method is implemented using Darboux transformations and illustrated in detail for the sine-Gordon and KdV models. An exception, treatable by both methods, indirect and direct, is provided by the genus 1 solutions. These can be expressed in terms of Jacobi elliptic functions, which satisfy a number of useful identities of relevance to this problem. There are new features to the solutions obtained in the finite-gap context but, in all cases, if a (multi)soliton limit is taken within the finite-gap solutions previously known results are recovered.

  20. New type of tachykinin binding site in the rat brain characterized by specific binding of a labeled eledoisin derivative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaujouan, J.C.; Torrens, Y.; Viger, A.; Glowinski, J.

    1984-09-01

    A new ligand for investigating tachykinin-binding site subtypes was synthesized by coupling the /sup 125/I-Bolton and Hunter reagent to eledoisin (/sup 125/I-BHE). Using a synaptosomal preparation (P2 fraction) of rat cerebral cortex, /sup 125/I-BHE was shown to bind with apparent high affinity (apparent Kd . 15.3 nM). When concentrations of up to 30 nM /sup 125/I-BHE were used, /sup 125/I-BHE binding was specific, saturable, reversible, and temperature-dependent. In contrast to (/sup 3/H)dopamine, /sup 125/I-BHE was not taken up within synaptosomes by an ouabain-sensitive process. Eledoisin, kassinin, and substance P were examined for their ability to inhibit specific /sup 125/I-BHE binding to cortical synaptosomes. Eledoisin and kassinin were considerably more potent than substance P, in contrast to the order of potency observed for specific /sup 125/I-Bolton-Hunter substance P (/sup 125/I-BHSP) binding. Specific /sup 125/I-BHE binding was highest in the cerebral cortex and hypothalamus; intermediate in the hippocampus, striatum, and thalamus; low in the mesencephalon, septum, and substantia nigra; and absent in the cerebellum. Comparison of these data with those previously obtained for /sup 125/I-BHSP binding to synaptosomes indicated that /sup 125/I-BHE-labeled binding sites differ markedly from those of /sup 125/I-BHSP-labeled binding sites. Therefore, tachykinin receptors other than substance P receptors seem to be present in the central nervous system.

  1. The thermodynamic landscape of testosterone binding to cytochrome P450 3A4: ligand binding and spin state equilibria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Arthur G; Campbell, A Patricia; Atkins, William M

    2005-02-01

    Human cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 catalyzes the oxygen-dependent metabolism of greater than 60% of known drugs. CYP3A4 binds multiple ligands simultaneously, and this contributes to complex allosteric kinetic behavior. Substrates that bind to this enzyme change the ferric spin state equilibrium of the heme, which can be observed by optical absorbance and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The ligand-dependent spin state equilibrium has not been quantitatively understood for any ligands that exhibit multiple binding. The CYP3A4 substrate testosterone (TST) has been shown previously by absorbance spectroscopy to induce spin state changes that are characteristic of a low spin to high spin conversion. Here, EPR was used to examine the equilibrium binding of TST to CYP3A4 at [CYP3A4] > K(D), which allows for characterization of the singly occupied state (i.e., CYP3A4.TST). We also have used absorbance spectroscopy to examine equilibrium binding, where [CYP3A4] equations, and modifications of it, reveals that the first equivalent of TST binds with higher affinity than the second equivalent of TST and its binding is positively cooperative with respect to ligand-dependent spin state conversion. Careful analysis of the EPR and absorbance spectral results suggests that the binding of the second TST induces a shift to the high spin state and thus that the second TST binding causes displacement of the bound water. A model involving six thermodynamic states is presented and this model is related to the turnover of the enzyme.

  2. [125I]RTI-55 binding to cocaine-sensitive dopaminergic and serotonergic uptake sites in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, K Y; Kirkman, J A; Carroll, F I; Breese, G R; Duncan, G E

    1993-12-01

    [125I]RTI-55 is a newly synthesized cocaine congener that may offer advantages over other ligands previously used to examine cocaine binding sites. However, the in vitro pharmacological and anatomical characterization of [125I]RTI-55 binding sites has not been previously performed in human brain. To determine the specificity, stability, and feasibility of [125I]RTI-55 for use in radioligand binding assays in postmortem human tissue, a series of experiments were performed characterizing [125I]RTI-55 binding sites in human brain using homogenized membrane preparations and quantitative autoradiography. Analysis of the association, dissociation, and saturation data favored two-phase processes. A curve-fitting analysis of the data derived in saturation experiments found a high-affinity site with KD = 66 +/- 35 pM and Bmax = 13.2 +/- 10.1 pmol/g of tissue and a low-affinity site with KD = 1.52 +/- 0.55 nM and Bmax of 47.5 +/- 11.2 pmol/g of tissue. Competition by ligands known to bind to the dopamine transporter showed a rank order of RTI-55 > GBR-12909 > maxindol > WIN 35428 > = methylphenidate > (-)-cocaine > buproprion > (+)-amphetamine. Binding to serotonergic sites was evaluated in the midbrain. Results of the saturation experiment performed autoradiographically in the midbrain showed a single site with KD = 370 +/- 84 pM. It appears that [125I]RTI-55 should be useful in further studies of the regulation of cocaine binding sites using postmortem human specimens.

  3. Fundamental Physical Constants: Looking from Different Angles

    OpenAIRE

    Karshenboim, Savely G.

    2005-01-01

    We consider fundamental physical constants which are among a few of the most important pieces of information we have learned about Nature after its intensive centuries-long studies. We discuss their multifunctional role in modern physics including problems related to the art of measurement, natural and practical units, origin of the constants, their possible calculability and variability etc.

  4. Constant Width Planar Computation Characterizes ACC0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, K.A.

    2004-01-01

    We obtain a characterization of ACC 0 in terms of a natural class of constant width circuits, namely in terms of constant width polynomial size planar circuits. This is shown via a characterization of the class of acyclic digraphs which can be embedded on a cylinder surface in such a way that all...

  5. Constant Width Planar Computation Characterizes ACC0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt

    2006-01-01

    We obtain a characterization of ACC0 in terms of a natural class of constant width circuits, namely in terms of constant width polynomial size planar circuits. This is shown via a characterization of the class of acyclic digraphs which can be embedded on a cylinder surface in such a way that all...

  6. Stability constants for silicate adsorbed to ferrihydrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Christian Bruun; Wetche, T.P.; Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten

    1994-01-01

    Intrinsic surface acidity constants (K(a1)intr, K(a2)intr) and surface complexation constant for adsorption of orthosilicate onto synthetic ferrihydrite (K(Si) for the complex = FeOSi(OH)3) have been determined from acid/base titrations in 0.001-0.1 m NaClO4 electrolytes and silicate adsorption...

  7. On special relativity with cosmological constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Hanying; Huang Chaoguang; Xu Zhan; Zhou Bin

    2004-01-01

    Based on the principle of relativity and the postulate of invariant speed and length, we propose the theory of special relativity with cosmological constant SRc,R, in which the cosmological constant is linked with the invariant length. Its relation with the doubly special relativity is briefly mentioned

  8. The case for the cosmological constant

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I present a short overview of current observational results and theoretical models for a cosmological constant. The main motivation for invoking a small cosmological constant (or -term) at the present epoch has to do with observations of high redshift Type Ia supernovae which suggest an accelerating universe.

  9. Some zero-sum constants with weights

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to zero-sum problems, Discrete Math. 306 (2006) 1–10. [2] Adhikari S D and Chen Y G, Davenport constant with weights and some related ques- tions – II, J. Combin. Theory A115 (2008) 178–184. [3] Adhikari Sukumar Das and Rath Purusottam, Davenport constant with weights and some related questions, Integers 6 ...

  10. The time constant of the somatogravic illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia Grácio, B J; de Winkel, K N; Groen, E L; Wentink, M; Bos, J E

    2013-02-01

    Without visual feedback, humans perceive tilt when experiencing a sustained linear acceleration. This tilt illusion is commonly referred to as the somatogravic illusion. Although the physiological basis of the illusion seems to be well understood, the dynamic behavior is still subject to discussion. In this study, the dynamic behavior of the illusion was measured experimentally for three motion profiles with different frequency content. Subjects were exposed to pure centripetal accelerations in the lateral direction and were asked to indicate their tilt percept by means of a joystick. Variable-radius centrifugation during constant angular rotation was used to generate these motion profiles. Two self-motion perception models were fitted to the experimental data and were used to obtain the time constant of the somatogravic illusion. Results showed that the time constant of the somatogravic illusion was on the order of two seconds, in contrast to the higher time constant found in fixed-radius centrifugation studies. Furthermore, the time constant was significantly affected by the frequency content of the motion profiles. Motion profiles with higher frequency content revealed shorter time constants which cannot be explained by self-motion perception models that assume a fixed time constant. Therefore, these models need to be improved with a mechanism that deals with this variable time constant. Apart from the fundamental importance, these results also have practical consequences for the simulation of sustained accelerations in motion simulators.

  11. The case for the cosmological constant

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. I present a short overview of current observational results and theoretical models for a cosmological constant. The main motivation for invoking a small cosmological constant (orA-term) at the present epoch has to do with observations of high redshift Type Ia supernovae which suggest an accelerating universe.

  12. Equilibrium-constant expressions for aqueous plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, G.L.

    2010-01-01

    Equilibrium-constant expressions for Pu disproportionation reactions traditionally contain three or four terms representing the concentrations or fractions of the oxidation states. The expressions can be rewritten so that one of the oxidation states is replaced by a term containing the oxidation number of the plutonium. Experimental estimations of the numerical values of the constants can then be checked in several ways. (author)

  13. DETERMINATION OF STABILITY CONSTANTS OF MANGANESE (II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Keywords: Amino acids, dissociation constant, potentiometry, stability constant. INTRODUCTION. Acids – base titration involves the gradual addition or removal of protons for example using the deprotic form of glycine. The plot has two distinct stages corresponding to the deprotonation of the two different groups on glycine.

  14. Rigidification of the autolysis loop enhances Na(+) binding to thrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, Nicola; Chen, Raymond; Chen, Zhiwei; Bah, Alaji; Di Cera, Enrico

    2011-11-01

    Binding of Na(+) to thrombin ensures high activity toward physiological substrates and optimizes the procoagulant and prothrombotic roles of the enzyme in vivo. Under physiological conditions of pH and temperature, the binding affinity of Na(+) is weak due to large heat capacity and enthalpy changes associated with binding, and the K(d)=80 mM ensures only 64% saturation of the site at the concentration of Na(+) in the blood (140 mM). Residues controlling Na(+) binding and activation have been identified. Yet, attempts to improve the interaction of Na(+) with thrombin and possibly increase catalytic activity under physiological conditions have so far been unsuccessful. Here we report how replacement of the flexible autolysis loop of human thrombin with the homologous rigid domain of the murine enzyme results in a drastic (up to 10-fold) increase in Na(+) affinity and a significant improvement in the catalytic activity of the enzyme. Rigidification of the autolysis loop abolishes the heat capacity change associated with Na(+) binding observed in the wild-type and also increases the stability of thrombin. These findings have general relevance to protein engineering studies of clotting proteases and trypsin-like enzymes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Rigidification of the autolysis loop enhances Na+ binding to thrombin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, Nicola; Chen, Raymond; Chen, Zhiwei; Bah, Alaji; Di Cera, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    Binding of Na+ to thrombin ensures high activity toward physiological substrates and optimizes the procoagulant and prothrombotic roles of the enzyme in vivo. Under physiological conditions of pH and temperature, the binding affinity of Na+ is weak due to large heat capacity and enthalpy changes associated with binding, and the Kd=80 mM ensures only 64% saturation of the site at the concentration of Na+ in the blood (140 mM). Residues controlling Na+ binding and activation have been identified. Yet, attempts to improve the interaction of Na+ with thrombin and possibly increase catalytic activity under physiological conditions have so far been unsuccessful. Here we report how replacement of the flexible autolysis loop of human thrombin with the homologous rigid domain of the murine enzyme results in a drastic (up to 10-fold) increase in Na+ affinity and a significant improvement in the catalytic activity of the enzyme. Rigidification of the autolysis loop abolishes the heat capacity change associated with Na+ binding observed in the wild-type and also increases the stability of thrombin. These findings have general relevance to protein engineering studies of clotting proteases and trypsin-like enzymes. PMID:21536369

  16. Graviton fluctuations erase the cosmological constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetterich, C.

    2017-10-01

    Graviton fluctuations induce strong non-perturbative infrared renormalization effects for the cosmological constant. The functional renormalization flow drives a positive cosmological constant towards zero, solving the cosmological constant problem without the need to tune parameters. We propose a simple computation of the graviton contribution to the flow of the effective potential for scalar fields. Within variable gravity, with effective Planck mass proportional to the scalar field, we find that the potential increases asymptotically at most quadratically with the scalar field. The solutions of the derived cosmological equations lead to an asymptotically vanishing cosmological ;constant; in the infinite future, providing for dynamical dark energy in the present cosmological epoch. Beyond a solution of the cosmological constant problem, our simplified computation also entails a sizeable positive graviton-induced anomalous dimension for the quartic Higgs coupling in the ultraviolet regime, substantiating the successful prediction of the Higgs boson mass within the asymptotic safety scenario for quantum gravity.

  17. Tadpole diagrams in constant electromagnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbstein, Felix

    2017-10-01

    We show how all possible one-particle reducible tadpole diagrams in constant electromagnetic fields can be constructed from one-particle irreducible constant-field diagrams. The construction procedure is essentially algebraic and involves differentiations of the latter class of diagrams with respect to the field strength tensor and contractions with derivatives of the one-particle irreducible part of the Heisenberg-Euler effective Lagrangian in constant fields. Specific examples include the two-loop addendum to the Heisenberg-Euler effective action as well as a novel one-loop correction to the charged particle propagator in constant electromagnetic fields discovered recently. As an additional example, the approach devised in the present article is adopted to derive the tadpole contribution to the two-loop photon polarization tensor in constant fields for the first time.

  18. Solar constant values for estimating solar radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Huashan; Lian, Yongwang; Wang, Xianlong; Ma, Weibin; Zhao, Liang

    2011-01-01

    There are many solar constant values given and adopted by researchers, leading to confusion in estimating solar radiation. In this study, some solar constant values collected from literature for estimating solar radiation with the Angstroem-Prescott correlation are tested in China using the measured data between 1971 and 2000. According to the ranking method based on the t-statistic, a strategy to select the best solar constant value for estimating the monthly average daily global solar radiation with the Angstroem-Prescott correlation is proposed. -- Research highlights: → The effect of the solar constant on estimating solar radiation is investigated. → The investigation covers a diverse range of climate and geography in China. → A strategy to select the best solar constant for estimating radiation is proposed.

  19. Three complement-like repeats compose the complete alpha2-macroglobulin binding site in the second ligand binding cluster of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolmer, Klavs; Gettins, Peter G W

    2006-11-10

    Given the importance of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) as an essential endocytosis and signaling receptor for many protein ligands, and of alpha2-macroglobulin (alpha2M)-proteinase complexes as one such set of ligands, an understanding of the specificity of their interaction with LRP is an important goal. A starting point is the known role of the 138-residue receptor binding domain (RBD) in binding to LRP. Previous studies have localized high affinity alpha2M binding to the eight complement repeat (CR)-containing cluster 2 of LRP. In the present study we have identified the minimum CR domains that constitute the full binding site for RBD and, hence, for alpha2M on LRP. We report on the ability of the triple construct of CR3-4-5 to bind RBD with an affinity (Kd = 130 nM) the same as for isolated RBD to intact LRP. This Kd is 30-fold smaller than for RBD to CR5-6-7, demonstrating the specificity of the interaction with CR3-4-5. Binding requires previously identified critical lysine residues but is almost pH-independent within the range of pH values encountered between extracellular and internal compartments, consistent with an earlier proposed model of intracellular ligand displacement by intramolecular YWTD domains. The present findings suggest a model to explain the ability of LRP to bind a wide range of structurally unrelated ligands in which a nonspecific ligand interaction with the acidic region present in most CR domains is augmented by interactions with other CR surface residues that are unique to a particular CR cluster.

  20. Structural and Thermodynamic Insights into Chitooligosaccharide Binding to Human Cartilage Chitinase 3-like Protein 2 (CHI3L2 or YKL-39)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranok, Araya; Wongsantichon, Jantana; Robinson, Robert C.; Suginta, Wipa

    2015-01-01

    Four crystal structures of human YKL-39 were solved in the absence and presence of chitooligosaccharides. The structure of YKL-39 comprises a major (β/α)8 triose-phosphate isomerase barrel domain and a small α + β insertion domain. Structural analysis demonstrates that YKL-39 interacts with chitooligosaccharides through hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. The binding of chitin fragments induces local conformational changes that facilitate tight binding. Compared with other GH-18 members, YKL-39 has the least extended chitin-binding cleft, containing five subsites for sugars, namely (−3)(−2)(−1)(+1)(+2), with Trp-360 playing a prominent role in the sugar-protein interactions at the center of the chitin-binding cleft. Evaluation of binding affinities obtained from isothermal titration calorimetry and intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy suggests that YKL-39 binds to chitooligosaccharides with Kd values in the micromolar concentration range and that the binding energies increase with the chain length. There were no significant differences between the Kd values of chitopentaose and chitohexaose, supporting the structural evidence for the five binding subsite topology. Thermodynamic analysis indicates that binding of chitooligosaccharide to YKL-39 is mainly driven by enthalpy. PMID:25477513

  1. Structural and thermodynamic insights into chitooligosaccharide binding to human cartilage chitinase 3-like protein 2 (CHI3L2 or YKL-39).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranok, Araya; Wongsantichon, Jantana; Robinson, Robert C; Suginta, Wipa

    2015-01-30

    Four crystal structures of human YKL-39 were solved in the absence and presence of chitooligosaccharides. The structure of YKL-39 comprises a major (β/α)8 triose-phosphate isomerase barrel domain and a small α + β insertion domain. Structural analysis demonstrates that YKL-39 interacts with chitooligosaccharides through hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. The binding of chitin fragments induces local conformational changes that facilitate tight binding. Compared with other GH-18 members, YKL-39 has the least extended chitin-binding cleft, containing five subsites for sugars, namely (-3)(-2)(-1)(+1)(+2), with Trp-360 playing a prominent role in the sugar-protein interactions at the center of the chitin-binding cleft. Evaluation of binding affinities obtained from isothermal titration calorimetry and intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy suggests that YKL-39 binds to chitooligosaccharides with Kd values in the micromolar concentration range and that the binding energies increase with the chain length. There were no significant differences between the Kd values of chitopentaose and chitohexaose, supporting the structural evidence for the five binding subsite topology. Thermodynamic analysis indicates that binding of chitooligosaccharide to YKL-39 is mainly driven by enthalpy. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. RNA-binding protein conserved in both microtubule- and microfilament-based RNA localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havin, Leora; Git, Anna; Elisha, Zichrini; Oberman, Froma; Yaniv, Karina; Schwartz, Sigal Pressman; Standart, Nancy; Yisraeli, Joel K.

    1998-01-01

    Vg1 mRNA translocation to the vegetal cortex of Xenopus oocytes requires intact microtubules, and a 3′ UTR cis-acting element (termed VLE), which also mediates sequence-specific binding of several proteins. One protein, the 69-kD Vg1 RBP, associates Vg1 RNA to microtubules in vitro. Here we show that Vg1 RBP-binding sites correlate with vegetal localization. Purification and cloning of Vg1 RBP revealed five RNA-binding motifs: four KH and one RRM domains. Surprisingly, Vg1 RBP is highly homologous to the zipcode binding protein implicated in the microfilament-mediated localization of β actin mRNA in fibroblasts. These data support Vg1 RBP’s direct role in vegetal localization and suggest the existence of a general, evolutionarily conserved mechanism for mRNA targeting. PMID:9620847

  3. RNA-binding protein conserved in both microtubule- and microfilament-based RNA localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havin, L; Git, A; Elisha, Z; Oberman, F; Yaniv, K; Schwartz, S P; Standart, N; Yisraeli, J K

    1998-06-01

    Vg1 mRNA translocation to the vegetal cortex of Xenopus oocytes requires intact microtubules, and a 3' UTR cis-acting element (termed VLE), which also mediates sequence-specific binding of several proteins. One protein, the 69-kD Vg1 RBP, associates Vg1 RNA to microtubules in vitro. Here we show that Vg1 RBP-binding sites correlate with vegetal localization. Purification and cloning of Vg1 RBP revealed five RNA-binding motifs: four KH and one RRM domains. Surprisingly, Vg1 RBP is highly homologous to the zipcode binding protein implicated in the microfilament-mediated localization of beta actin mRNA in fibroblasts. These data support Vg1 RBP's direct role in vegetal localization and suggest the existence of a general, evolutionarily conserved mechanism for mRNA targeting.

  4. Properties of achetakinin binding sites on malpighian tubule membranes from the house cricket, Acheta domesticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, J S; Wheeler, C H; Goldsworthy, G J; Coast, G M

    1995-01-01

    A biologically active 125I-labeled analogue of AK-II (3'-hydroxyphenyl propionic-Gly-Gly-Gly-Phe-Ser-Pro-Trp-Gly-NH2) was used to investigate the properties of achetakinin binding sites on plasma membranes from Malpighian tubules of Acheta domesticus. With optimized conditions, binding was rapid, reversible, and specific, and saturation studies revealed a single class of binding sites with Kd 0.55 nM and Bmax 39.9 fmol/mg membrane protein. The affinities of achetakinins for binding sites on tubule membranes ranked AK-V > AK III > AK-II > AK-I > or = AK-IV, in general agreement with their potencies in functional assays. However, IC50 values were several orders of magnitude higher than corresponding values for EC50, which suggests a considerable receptor reserve.

  5. Quantitative analysis of multiple kappa-opioid receptors by selective and nonselective ligand binding in guinea pig spinal cord: Resolution of high and low affinity states of the kappa 2 receptors by a computerized model-fitting technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiberi, M.; Magnan, J. (Universite de Montreal, Quebec (Canada))

    1990-05-01

    The binding characteristics of selective and nonselective opioids have been studied in whole guinea pig spinal cord, using a computer fitting method to analyze the data obtained from saturation and competition studies. The delineation of specific binding sites labeled by the mu-selective opioid (3H)D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly-ol5-enkephalin (Kd = 2.58 nM, R = 4.52 pmol/g of tissue) and by the delta-selective opioid (3H)D-Pen2, D-Pen5-enkephalin (Kd = 2.02 nM, R = 1.47 pmol/g of tissue) suggests the presence of mu and delta-receptors in the spinal cord tissue. The presence of kappa receptors was probed by the kappa-selective opioid (3H)U69593 (Kd = 3.31 nM, R = 2.00 pmol/g of tissue). The pharmacological characterization of the sites labeled by (3H)U69593 confirms the assumption that this ligand discriminates kappa receptors in guinea pig spinal cord. The benzomorphan (3H)ethylketazocine labels a population of receptors with one homogeneous affinity state (Kd = 0.65 nM, R = 7.39 pmol/g of tissue). The total binding capacity of this ligand was not different from the sum of the binding capacities of mu, delta-, and kappa-selective ligands. Under mu- and delta-suppressed conditions, (3H)ethylketazocine still binds to receptors with one homogeneous affinity state (Kd = 0.45 nM, R = 1.69 pmol/g of tissue). Competition studies performed against the binding of (3H)ethylketazocine under these experimental conditions reveal that the pharmacological profile of the radiolabeled receptors is similar to the profile of the kappa receptors labeled with (3H)U69593. Saturation studies using the nonselective opioid (3H)bremazocine demonstrate that this ligand binds to spinal cord membranes with heterogeneous affinities (Kd1 = 0.28 nM, R1 = 7.91 pmol/g of tissue; Kd2 = 3.24 nM, R2 = 11.2 pmol/g of tissue).

  6. Quantitative analysis of multiple kappa-opioid receptors by selective and nonselective ligand binding in guinea pig spinal cord: Resolution of high and low affinity states of the kappa 2 receptors by a computerized model-fitting technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiberi, M.; Magnan, J.

    1990-01-01

    The binding characteristics of selective and nonselective opioids have been studied in whole guinea pig spinal cord, using a computer fitting method to analyze the data obtained from saturation and competition studies. The delineation of specific binding sites labeled by the mu-selective opioid [3H]D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly-ol5-enkephalin (Kd = 2.58 nM, R = 4.52 pmol/g of tissue) and by the delta-selective opioid [3H]D-Pen2, D-Pen5-enkephalin (Kd = 2.02 nM, R = 1.47 pmol/g of tissue) suggests the presence of mu and delta-receptors in the spinal cord tissue. The presence of kappa receptors was probed by the kappa-selective opioid [3H]U69593 (Kd = 3.31 nM, R = 2.00 pmol/g of tissue). The pharmacological characterization of the sites labeled by [3H]U69593 confirms the assumption that this ligand discriminates kappa receptors in guinea pig spinal cord. The benzomorphan [3H]ethylketazocine labels a population of receptors with one homogeneous affinity state (Kd = 0.65 nM, R = 7.39 pmol/g of tissue). The total binding capacity of this ligand was not different from the sum of the binding capacities of mu, delta-, and kappa-selective ligands. Under mu- and delta-suppressed conditions, [3H]ethylketazocine still binds to receptors with one homogeneous affinity state (Kd = 0.45 nM, R = 1.69 pmol/g of tissue). Competition studies performed against the binding of [3H]ethylketazocine under these experimental conditions reveal that the pharmacological profile of the radiolabeled receptors is similar to the profile of the kappa receptors labeled with [3H]U69593. Saturation studies using the nonselective opioid [3H]bremazocine demonstrate that this ligand binds to spinal cord membranes with heterogeneous affinities (Kd1 = 0.28 nM, R1 = 7.91 pmol/g of tissue; Kd2 = 3.24 nM, R2 = 11.2 pmol/g of tissue)

  7. The influence of KD and K anti K mesonic molecules in selected reactions; Auswirkung der im KD- und K anti K-Kanal gebildeten mesonischen Molekuele in verschiedenen Reaktionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sassen, F.P.

    2004-07-01

    The attractive potential of the Juelich meson exchange model in the K anti K-channel causes formation of a scalar isoscalar molecule. We investigate this observation from different points of view. First we look at the dependence of pion production in the peripheral reaction {pi}{sup -}p {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}n on the momentum transferred at the nucleus. Accounting for the production via {pi} and a{sub 1} emission in a consistent way, we are able to explain the momentum dependence using the Juelich model. Furthermore we investigate how a measurement of dd {yields} {alpha}K anti K close to threshold may contribute to our knowledge on K anti K interaction and the f{sub 0}(980). The Juelich model links the properties of the f{sub 0}(980) to the a{sub 0}(980). We will use this information to learn about the d anti K-interaction in pp {yields} dK anti K. The recent discovery of the D{sup *}{sub sJ}(2317) o ers a different perspective on the dynamical generation of poles, since it may be connected to the KD-threshold nearby. We construct a SU(4)-extention of the Juelich model including isospin violation. Within this extention a dynamical resonance is formed, which only may explain the D{sup *}{sub sJ}(2317) if isoscalar production is assumed. Special interest is paid to the predicted width of the D{sup *}{sub sJ}(2317) associated with a dynamical interpretation. (orig.)

  8. Interaction of aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA) with four nucleic acid binding proteins DNase I, RNase A, reverse transcriptase and Taq polymerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Utpal; Giri, Kalyan; Bhattacharyya, Nitai P.

    2009-12-01

    In the investigation of interaction of aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA) with four biologically important proteins we observed inhibition of enzymatic activity of DNase I, RNase A, M-MLV reverse transcriptase and Taq polymerase by ATA in vitro assay. As the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) is the main catalytic subunit of telomerase holoenzyme, we also monitored effect of ATA on telomerase activity in vivo and observed dose-dependent inhibition of telomerase activity in Chinese hamster V79 cells treated with ATA. Direct association of ATA with DNase I ( Kd = 9.019 μM)), RNase A ( Kd = 2.33 μM) reverse transcriptase ( Kd = 0.255 μM) and Taq polymerase ( Kd = 81.97 μM) was further shown by tryptophan fluorescence quenching studies. Such association altered the three-dimensional conformation of DNase I, RNase A and Taq polymerase as detected by circular dichroism. We propose ATA inhibits enzymatic activity of the four proteins through interfering with DNA or RNA binding to the respective proteins either competitively or allosterically, i.e. by perturbing three-dimensional structure of enzymes.

  9. Binding properties of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in rat cerebral cortex: similarity to smooth muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minneman, K.P.

    1983-12-01

    The characteristics of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in rat cerebral cortex were examined using the radioiodinated alpha-1 adrenergic receptor antagonist ((/sup 125/I)BE). (/sup 125/I)BE labeled a single class of high-affinity binding sites in a particulate fraction of rat cerebral cortex with mass action kinetics and a KD of 57 pM. The binding of (/sup 125/I)BE was inhibited by various alpha adrenergic receptor antagonists, partial agonists and full agonists. The potency of these compounds in competing for the (/sup 125/I)BE binding sites suggested that (/sup 125/I)BE was labeling alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in rat cerebral cortex. In the absence of a physiological concentration of NaCl in the assay medium there was a small (20%) decrease in the density of (/sup 125/I)BE binding sites with no effect on the KD value. The absence of NaCl also caused a 4-fold increase in the potency of norepinephrine in competing for (/sup 125/I)BE binding sites. All drugs competed for (/sup 125/I) BE binding sites with Hill coefficients greater than 0.86, except for oxymetazoline which had a Hill coefficient of 0.77. Scatchard analysis of specific (/sup 125/I)BE binding in the presence of various competing drugs showed that the inhibition by both agonists and antagonists was purely competitive, but the inhibition by oxymetazoline was complex. Treatment of the particulate fraction of rat cerebral cortex with 0.2 to 200 nM phenoxybenzamine for 10 min caused a dose-dependent decrease in the density of (/sup 125/I) BE binding sites which could be mostly blocked by the presence of norepinephrine during the phenoxybenzamine exposure.

  10. The acyl-CoA binding protein affects Monascus pigment production in Monascus ruber CICC41233.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Chuannan; Liu, Mengmeng; Chen, Xia; Wang, Xiaofang; Ai, Mingqiang; Cui, Jingjing; Zeng, Bin

    2018-02-01

    The present study verified whether acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA)-binding protein (ACBP) affected the production of Monascus pigments (MPs) in Monascus ruber CICC41233 (MrACBP). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the cloned Mracbp gene, which encoded the MrACBP protein, exhibited the closest match (99% confidence level) to the gene from Penicilliopsis zonata . The MrACBP and maltose-binding protein (MBP) were simultaneously expressed in Escherichia coli Rosetta DE3 in the form of a fusion protein. The microscale thermophoresis binding assay revealed that the purified MBP-MrACBP exhibited a higher affinity for myristoyl-CoA (Kd = 88.16 nM) than for palmitoyl-CoA (Kd = 136.07 nM) and octanoyl-CoA (Kd = 270.9 nM). Further, the Mracbp gene was homologously overexpressed in M. ruber CICC41233, and a positive transformant M. ruber ACBP5 was isolated. The fatty acid myristic acid in M. ruber ACBP5 was lower than that in the parent strain M. ruber CICC41233. However, when compared with the parent strain, the production of total MPs, water-soluble pigment, and ethanol-soluble pigment in M. ruber ACBP5 increased by 11.67, 9.80, and 12.70%, respectively, after 6 days. The relative gene expression level, as determined by a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis, of the key genes acbp , pks , mppr1 , fasA , and fasB increased by 4.03-, 3.58-, 1.67-, 2.11-, and 2.62-fold after 6 days. These data demonstrate the binding preference of MrACBP for myristoyl-CoA, and its influence on MPs production.

  11. KD55 METAR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — METAR is a routine scheduled observation and is the primary observation code used in the United States to satisfy requirements for reporting surface meteorological...

  12. KD07 METAR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — METAR is a routine scheduled observation and is the primary observation code used in the United States to satisfy requirements for reporting surface meteorological...

  13. Three-dimensional model of a selective theophylline-binding RNA molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tung, Chang-Shung; Oprea, T.I.; Hummer, G.; Garcia, A.E.

    1995-07-01

    We propose a three-dimensional (3D) model for an RNA molecule that selectively binds theophylline but not caffeine. This RNA, which was found using SELEX [Jenison, R.D., et al., Science (1994) 263:1425] is 10,000 times more specific for theophylline (Kd=320 nM) than for caffeine (Kd=3.5 mM), although the two ligands are identical except for a methyl group substituted at N7 (present only in caffeine). The binding affinity for ten xanthine-based ligands was used to derive a Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) model (R{sup 2} = 0.93 for 3 components, with cross-validated R{sup 2} of 0.73), using the SYBYL and GOLPE programs. A pharmacophoric map was generated to locate steric and electrostatic interactions between theophylline and the RNA binding site. This information was used to identify putative functional groups of the binding pocket and to generate distance constraints. Based on a model for the secondary structure (Jenison et al., idem), the 3D structure of this RNA was then generated using the following method: each helical region of the RNA molecule was treated as a rigid body; single-stranded loops with specific end-to-end distances were generated. The structures of RNA-xanthine complexes were studied using a modified Monte Carlo algorithm. The detailed structure of an RNA-ligand complex model, as well as possible explanations for the theophylline selectivity will be discussed.

  14. Identification of a High Affinity Nucleocapsid Protein Binding Element from The Bovine Leukemia Virus Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, F. Zehra; Babalola, Kathleen; Summers, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    Retroviral genome recognition is mediated by interactions between the nucleocapsid (NC) domain of the virally encoded Gag polyprotein and cognate RNA packaging elements that, for most retroviruses, appear to reside primarily within the 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR) of the genome. Recent studies suggest that a major packaging determinant of Bovine Leukemia Virus (BLV), a member of the human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV)/BLV family and a non-primate animal model for HTLV-induced leukemogenesis, resides within the gag open reading frame. We have prepared and purified the recombinant BLV NC protein and conducted electrophoretic mobility shift and isothermal titration calorimetry studies with RNA fragments corresponding to these proposed packaging elements. The gag-derived RNAs did not exhibit significant affinity for NC, suggesting an alternate role in packaging. However, an 83-nucleotide fragment of the 5′-UTR that resides just upstream of the gag start codon binds NC stoichiometrically and with high affinity (Kd = 136 ± 21 nM). These nucleotides were predicted to form tandem hairpin structures, and studies with smaller fragments indicate that the NC binding site resides exclusively within the distal hairpin (residues G369- U399, Kd = 67 ± 8 nM at physiological ionic strength). Unlike all other structurally characterized retroviral NC binding RNAs, this fragment is not expected to contain exposed guanosines, suggesting that RNA binding may be mediated by a previously uncharacterized mechanism. PMID:22846919

  15. Scalar-tensor cosmology with cosmological constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslanka, K.

    1983-01-01

    The equations of scalar-tensor theory of gravitation with cosmological constant in the case of homogeneous and isotropic cosmological model can be reduced to dynamical system of three differential equations with unknown functions H=R/R, THETA=phi/phi, S=e/phi. When new variables are introduced the system becomes more symmetrical and cosmological solutions R(t), phi(t), e(t) are found. It is shown that when cosmological constant is introduced large class of solutions which depend also on Dicke-Brans parameter can be obtained. Investigations of these solutions give general limits for cosmological constant and mean density of matter in plane model. (author)

  16. Constant strength fuel-fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaseen, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    A fuel cell is an electrochemical apparatus composed of both a nonconsumable anode and cathode; and electrolyte, fuel oxidant and controls. This invention guarantees the constant transfer of hydrogen atoms and their respective electrons, thus a constant flow of power by submergence of the negative electrode in a constant strength hydrogen furnishing fuel; when said fuel is an aqueous absorbed hydrocarbon, such as and similar to ethanol or methnol. The objective is accomplished by recirculation of the liquid fuel, as depleted in the cell through specific type membranes which pass water molecules and reject the fuel molecules; thus concentrating them for recycle use

  17. On the constants for some Sobolev imbeddings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pizzocchero Livio

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the imbedding inequality is the Sobolev space (or Bessel potential space of type and (integer or fractional order . We write down upper bounds for the constants , using an argument previously applied in the literature in particular cases. We prove that the upper bounds computed in this way are in fact the sharp constants if , , and exhibit the maximising functions. Furthermore, using convenient trial functions, we derive lower bounds on for in many cases these are close to the previous upper bounds, as illustrated by a number of examples, thus characterizing the sharp constants with little uncertainty.

  18. On the constant-roll inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zhu; Gong, Yungui

    2018-03-01

    The primordial power spectra of scalar and tensor perturbations during slow-roll inflation are usually calculated with the method of Bessel function approximation. For constant-roll or ultra slow-roll inflation, the method of Bessel function approximation may be invalid. We compare the numerical results with the analytical results derived from the Bessel function approximation, and we find that they differ significantly on super-horizon scales if the constant slow-roll parameter ηH is not small. More accurate method is needed for calculating the primordial power spectrum for constant-roll inflation.

  19. Cosmological constant and advanced gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.; Turner, E.L.

    1997-01-01

    Interferometric gravitational wave detectors could measure the frequency sweep of a binary inspiral (characterized by its chirp mass) to high accuracy. The observed chirp mass is the intrinsic chirp mass of the binary source multiplied by (1+z), where z is the redshift of the source. Assuming a nonzero cosmological constant, we compute the expected redshift distribution of observed events for an advanced LIGO detector. We find that the redshift distribution has a robust and sizable dependence on the cosmological constant; the data from advanced LIGO detectors could provide an independent measurement of the cosmological constant. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  20. Identification and properties of very high affinity brain membrane-binding sites for a neurotoxic phospholipase from the taipan venom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambeau, G.; Barhanin, J.; Schweitz, H.; Qar, J.; Lazdunski, M. (Centre de Biochimie, Nice (France))

    1989-07-05

    Four new monochain phospholipases were purified from the Oxyuranus scutellatus (taipan) venom. Three of them were highly toxic when injected into mice brain. One of these neurotoxic phospholipases, OS2, was iodinated and used in binding experiments to demonstrate the presence of two families of specific binding sites in rat brain synaptic membranes. The affinities were exceptionally high, Kd1 = 1.5 +/- 0.5 pM and Kd2 = 45 +/- 10 pM, and the maximal binding capacities were Bmax 1 = 1 +/- 0.4 and Bmax 2 = 3 +/- 0.5 pmol/mg of protein. Both binding sites were sensitive to proteolysis and demonstrated to be located on proteins of Mr 85,000-88,000 and 36,000-51,000 by cross-linking and photoaffinity labeling techniques. The binding of {sup 125}I-OS2 to synaptic membranes was dependent on Ca2+ ions and enhanced by Zn2+ ions which inhibit phospholipase activity. Competition experiments have shown that, except for beta-bungarotoxin, a number of known toxic snake or bee phospholipases have very high affinities for the newly identified binding sites. A good correlation (r = 0.80) was observed between toxicity and affinity but not between phospholipase activity and affinity.

  1. Identification and properties of very high affinity brain membrane-binding sites for a neurotoxic phospholipase from the taipan venom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambeau, G.; Barhanin, J.; Schweitz, H.; Qar, J.; Lazdunski, M.

    1989-01-01

    Four new monochain phospholipases were purified from the Oxyuranus scutellatus (taipan) venom. Three of them were highly toxic when injected into mice brain. One of these neurotoxic phospholipases, OS2, was iodinated and used in binding experiments to demonstrate the presence of two families of specific binding sites in rat brain synaptic membranes. The affinities were exceptionally high, Kd1 = 1.5 +/- 0.5 pM and Kd2 = 45 +/- 10 pM, and the maximal binding capacities were Bmax 1 = 1 +/- 0.4 and Bmax 2 = 3 +/- 0.5 pmol/mg of protein. Both binding sites were sensitive to proteolysis and demonstrated to be located on proteins of Mr 85,000-88,000 and 36,000-51,000 by cross-linking and photoaffinity labeling techniques. The binding of 125 I-OS2 to synaptic membranes was dependent on Ca2+ ions and enhanced by Zn2+ ions which inhibit phospholipase activity. Competition experiments have shown that, except for beta-bungarotoxin, a number of known toxic snake or bee phospholipases have very high affinities for the newly identified binding sites. A good correlation (r = 0.80) was observed between toxicity and affinity but not between phospholipase activity and affinity

  2. Comparative analysis of carbohydrate-binding properties of two tandem repeat-type Jacalin-related lectins, Castanea crenata agglutinin and Cycas revoluta leaf lectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Sachiko; Yagi, Fumio; Totani, Kiichiro; Ito, Yukishige; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2005-06-01

    Lectins belonging to the jacalin-related lectin family are distributed widely in the plant kingdom. Recently, two mannose-specific lectins having tandem repeat-type structures were discovered in Castanea crenata (angiosperm) and Cycas revoluta (gymnosperm). The occurrence of such similar molecules in taxonomically less related plants suggests their importance in the plant body. To obtain clues to understand their physiological roles, we performed detailed analysis of their sugar-binding specificity. For this purpose, we compared the dissociation constants (K(d)) of Castanea crenata agglutinin (CCA) and Cycas revoluta leaf lectin (CRLL) by using 102 pyridylaminated and 13 p-nitrophenyl oligosaccharides with a recently developed automated system for frontal affinity chromatography. As a result, we found that the basic carbohydrate-binding properties of CCA and CRLL were similar, but differed in their preference for larger N-linked glycans (e.g. Man7-9 glycans). While the affinity of CCA decreased with an increase in the number of extended alpha1-2 mannose residues, CRLL could recognize these Man7-9 glycans with much enhanced affinity. Notably, both lectins also preserved considerable affinity for mono-antennary, complex type N-linked glycans, though the specificity was much broader for CCA. The information obtained here should be helpful for understanding their functions in vivo as well as for development of useful probes for animal cells. This is the first systematic approach to elucidate the fine specificities of plant lectins by means of high-throughput, automated frontal affinity chromatography.

  3. Binding interactions of human interleukin 5 with its receptor alpha subunit. Large scale production, structural, and functional studies of Drosophila-expressed recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanson, K; Appelbaum, E; Doyle, M; Hensley, P; Zhao, B; Abdel-Meguid, S S; Young, P; Cook, R; Carr, S; Matico, R

    1995-04-21

    Human interleukin 5 (hIL5) and soluble forms of its receptor alpha subunit were expressed in Drosophila cells and purified to homogeneity, allowing a detailed structural and functional analysis. B cell proliferation confirmed that the hIL5 was biologically active. Deglycosylated hIL5 remained active, while similarly deglycosylated receptor alpha subunit lost activity. The crystal structure of the deglycosylated hIL5 was determined to 2.6-A resolution and found to be similar to that of the protein produced in Escherichia coli. Human IL5 was shown by analytical ultracentrifugation to form a 1:1 complex with the soluble domain of the hIL5 receptor alpha subunit (shIL5R alpha). Additionally, the relative abundance of ligand and receptor in the hIL5.shIL5R alpha complex was determined to be 1:1 by both titration calorimetry and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of dissolved cocrystals of the complex. Titration microcalorimetry yielded equilibrium dissociation constants of 3.1 and 2.0 nM, respectively, for the binding of hIL5 to shIL5R alpha and to a chimeric form of the receptor containing shIL5R alpha fused to the immunoglobulin Fc domain (shIL5R alpha-Fc). Analysis of the binding thermodynamics of IL5 and its soluble receptor indicates that conformational changes are coupled to the binding reaction. Kinetic analysis using surface plasmon resonance yielded data consistent with the Kd values from calorimetry and also with the possibility of conformational isomerization in the interaction of hIL5 with the receptor alpha subunit. Using a radioligand binding assay, the affinity of hIL5 with full-length hIL5R alpha in Drosophila membranes was found to be 6 nM, in accord with the affinities measured for the soluble receptor forms. Hence, most of the binding energy of the alpha receptor is supplied by the soluble domain. Taken with other aspects of hIL5 structure and biological activity, the data obtained allow a prediction for how 1:1 stoichiometry and

  4. IOP from reflectance measurements to obtain the Kd coefficient: application to the Gabon and Congo coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeltz, M.; Froidefond, J.-M.; Jourdain, F.; Martiny, N.

    2009-08-01

    During the "Optic-Congo" oceanographic survey which took place in 2005 on board the "Beautemp-Beaupré" SHOM vessel, different optical measurements of the surface water were acquired using a TRIOS radiance sensor fixed onboard a mini-catamaran. Hydrological measurements (CTD, fluorescence, attenuation, scattering) and water samples were simultaneously collected in order to measure SPM, Chlorophyll-a and CDOM concentrations. Four types of surface water colours (blue, green-yellow, dark and brown) were identified. The main characteristics of these waters were the very low Chlorophyll-a concentrations for this period of the year (March), and the very high CDOM concentrations along the Congo coast, and particularly in the turbid plume of the Congo River. The attenuation and scattering measurements highlighted the predominance of organic matter at the water surface. These observations were documented using a beam electron microscope and by microanalysis. This data set was used to classify the water bodies along the Gabon and Congo coasts. We propose here to use the remote sensing reflectance (Rrs) measurements to invert the IOP (absorption (a) and backscattering (bb)) using the WASI numerical bio-optical model. The model is iterative: the Rrs WASI simulations are computed given initial values of ocean constituents' concentrations and iteratively adjusted to the Rrs in-situ measurements. The IOP computations are satisfying when the correlations between simulated and measured Rrs are optimized. Then, the attenuation coefficients (Kd) are computed from the IOP coefficients. These results are compared with measurements of Ku carried out during the survey.

  5. Phosphorylation of nitrogen regulator I of Escherichia coli induces strong cooperative binding to DNA essential for activation of transcription.

    OpenAIRE

    Weiss, V; Claverie-Martin, F; Magasanik, B

    1992-01-01

    We studied the effect of phosphorylation of nitrogen regulator I (NRI) on its binding properties. Both phosphorylated and unphosphorylated NRI bind linearly to a single binding site but cooperatively to two adjacent binding sites. Cooperative binding of NRI is severely affected by phosphorylation: half-maximal binding of NRI-phosphate is at 20-fold lower concentrations than that of unphosphorylated NRI. This is more due to a huge increase in the cooperativity constant--which is the strength o...

  6. Interacting universes and the cosmological constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso-Serrano, A. [Centro de Física “Miguel Catalán”, Instituto de Física Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Estación Ecológica de Biocosmología, Pedro de Alvarado 14, 06411 Medellín (Spain); Bastos, C. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Bertolami, O. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Departamento de Física e Astronomia, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Robles-Pérez, S., E-mail: salvarp@imaff.cfmac.csic.es [Centro de Física “Miguel Catalán”, Instituto de Física Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Estación Ecológica de Biocosmología, Pedro de Alvarado 14, 06411 Medellín (Spain); Física Teórica, Universidad del País Vasco, Apartado 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2013-02-12

    In this Letter it is studied the effects that an interaction scheme among universes can have in the values of their cosmological constants. In the case of two interacting universes, the value of the cosmological constant of one of the universes becomes very close to zero at the expense of an increasing value of the cosmological constant of the partner universe. In the more general case of a chain of N interacting universes with periodic boundary conditions, the spectrum of the Hamiltonian splits into a large number of levels, each of them associated with a particular value of the cosmological constant, that can be occupied by single universes revealing a collective behavior that plainly shows that the multiverse is much more than the mere sum of its parts.

  7. An improved dosimeter having constant flow pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, W.B.

    1980-01-01

    A dosemeter designed for individual use which can be used to monitor toxic radon gas and toxic related products of radon gas in mines and which incorporates a constant air stream flowing through the dosimeter is described. (U.K.)

  8. Constant conditional entropy and related hypotheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrer-i-Cancho, Ramon; Dębowski, Łukasz; Moscoso del Prado Martín, Fermín

    2013-01-01

    Constant entropy rate (conditional entropies must remain constant as the sequence length increases) and uniform information density (conditional probabilities must remain constant as the sequence length increases) are two information theoretic principles that are argued to underlie a wide range of linguistic phenomena. Here we revise the predictions of these principles in the light of Hilberg’s law on the scaling of conditional entropy in language and related laws. We show that constant entropy rate (CER) and two interpretations for uniform information density (UID), full UID and strong UID, are inconsistent with these laws. Strong UID implies CER but the reverse is not true. Full UID, a particular case of UID, leads to costly uncorrelated sequences that are totally unrealistic. We conclude that CER and its particular cases are incomplete hypotheses about the scaling of conditional entropies. (letter)

  9. Interacting universes and the cosmological constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso-Serrano, A.; Bastos, C.; Bertolami, O.; Robles-Pérez, S.

    2013-01-01

    In this Letter it is studied the effects that an interaction scheme among universes can have in the values of their cosmological constants. In the case of two interacting universes, the value of the cosmological constant of one of the universes becomes very close to zero at the expense of an increasing value of the cosmological constant of the partner universe. In the more general case of a chain of N interacting universes with periodic boundary conditions, the spectrum of the Hamiltonian splits into a large number of levels, each of them associated with a particular value of the cosmological constant, that can be occupied by single universes revealing a collective behavior that plainly shows that the multiverse is much more than the mere sum of its parts

  10. Hydrolysis and formation constants at 250C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, S.L.

    1982-05-01

    A database consisting of hydrolysis and formation constants for about 20 metals associated with the disposal of nuclear waste is given. Complexing ligands for the various ionic species of these metals include OH, F, Cl, SO 4 , PO 4 and CO 3 . Table 1 consists of tabulated calculated and experimental values of log K/sub xy/, mainly at 25 0 C and various ionic strengths together with references to the origin of the data. Table 2 consists of a column of recommended stability constants at 25 0 C and zero ionic strength tabulated in the column headed log K/sub xy/(0); other columns contain coefficients for an extended Debye-Huckel equation to permit calculations of stability constants up to 3 ionic strength, and up to 0.7 ionic strength using the Davies equation. Selected stability constants calculated with these coefficients for various ionic strengths agree to an average of +- 2% when compared with published experimental and calculated values

  11. [3H]cytisine binding to nicotinic cholinergic receptors in brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pabreza, L.A.; Dhawan, S.; Kellar, K.J.

    1991-01-01

    Cytisine, a ganglionic agonist, competes with high affinity for brain nicotinic cholinergic receptors labeled by any of several nicotinic 3 H-agonist ligands. Here we have examined the binding of [ 3 H]cytisine in rat brain homogenates. [ 3 H]Cytisine binds with high affinity (Kd less than 1 nM), and specific binding represented 60-90% of total binding at all concentrations examined up to 15 nM. The nicotinic cholinergic agonists nicotine, acetylcholine, and carbachol compete with high affinity for [ 3 H]cytisine binding sites, whereas among nicotinic receptor antagonists only dihydro-beta-erythroidine competes with high affinity (in the nanomolar range). Comparison of binding in several brain regions showed that [ 3 H]cytisine binding is higher in the thalamus, striatum, and cortex than in the hippocampus, cerebellum, or hypothalamus. The pharmacology and brain regional distribution of [ 3 H]cytisine binding sites are those predicted for neuronal nicotinic receptor agonist recognition sites. The high affinity and low nonspecific binding of [ 3 H]cytisine should make it a very useful ligand for studying neuronal nicotinic receptors

  12. Thermodynamics of aryl-dihydroxyphenyl-thiadiazole binding to human Hsp90.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egidijus Kazlauskas

    Full Text Available The design of specific inhibitors against the Hsp90 chaperone and other enzyme relies on the detailed and correct understanding of both the thermodynamics of inhibitor binding and the structural features of the protein-inhibitor complex. Here we present a detailed thermodynamic study of binding of aryl-dihydroxyphenyl-thiadiazole inhibitor series to recombinant human Hsp90 alpha isozyme. The inhibitors are highly potent, with the intrinsic K(d approximately equal to 1 nM as determined by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC and thermal shift assay (TSA. Dissection of protonation contributions yielded the intrinsic thermodynamic parameters of binding, such as enthalpy, entropy, Gibbs free energy, and the heat capacity. The differences in binding thermodynamic parameters between the series of inhibitors revealed contributions of the functional groups, thus providing insight into molecular reasons for improved or diminished binding efficiency. The inhibitor binding to Hsp90 alpha primarily depended on a large favorable enthalpic contribution combined with the smaller favorable entropic contribution, thus suggesting that their binding was both enthalpically and entropically optimized. The enthalpy-entropy compensation phenomenon was highly evident when comparing the inhibitor binding enthalpies and entropies. This study illustrates how detailed thermodynamic analysis helps to understand energetic reasons for the binding efficiency and develop more potent inhibitors that could be applied for therapeutic use as Hsp90 inhibitors.

  13. A quadri-constant fraction discriminator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wei; Gu Zhongdao

    1992-01-01

    A quad Constant Fraction (Amplitude and Rise Time Compensation) Discriminator Circuit is described, which is based on the ECL high-speed dual comparator AD 9687. The CFD (ARCD) is of the constant fraction timing type (the amplitude and rise time compensation timing type) employing a leading edge discriminator to eliminate error triggers caused by noises. A timing walk measurement indicates a timing walk of less than +- 150 ps from -50 mV to -5 V

  14. Building evolutionary architectures support constant change

    CERN Document Server

    Ford, Neal; Kua, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    The software development ecosystem is constantly changing, providing a constant stream of new tools, frameworks, techniques, and paradigms. Over the past few years, incremental developments in core engineering practices for software development have created the foundations for rethinking how architecture changes over time, along with ways to protect important architectural characteristics as it evolves. This practical guide ties those parts together with a new way to think about architecture and time.

  15. Nuclei quadrupole coupling constants in diatomic molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, A.I.; Rebane, T.K.

    1993-01-01

    An approximate relationship between the constants of quadrupole interaction of nuclei in a two-atom molecule is found. It enabled to establish proportionality of oscillatory-rotation corrections to these constants for both nuclei in the molecule. Similar results were obtained for the factors of electrical dipole-quadrupole screening of nuclei. Applicability of these relationships is proven by the example of lithium deuteride molecule. 4 refs., 1 tab

  16. Optical constants of concentrated aqueous ammonium sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remsberg, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    Using experimental data obtained from applying spectroscopy to a 39-wt-% aqueous ammonium sulfate solution, it is shown that, even though specific aerosol optical constants appear quite accurate, spectral variations may exist as functions of material composition or concentration or both. Prudent users of optical constant data must then include liberal data error estimates when performing calculations or in interpreting spectroscopic surveys of collected aerosol material.

  17. Validation of the ANDON KD-5915 blood pressure monitor for home blood pressure monitoring according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qi-Fang; Wang, Jie; Sheng, Chang-Sheng; Zhang, Na-Na; Li, Yan; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2010-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of the automated oscillometric upper arm blood pressure monitor KD-5915 (ANDON Health, Tianjin, China) for home blood pressure monitoring according to the International Protocol. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were sequentially measured in 33 adult Chinese individuals using a mercury sphygmomanometer (two observers) and the KD-5915 device (one supervisor). Ninety-nine pairs of comparisons were obtained from 15 participants in phase 1 and the remaining 18 participants in phase 2 of the validation study. Data analysis was performed using the ESHIP Analyzer. The KD-5915 device successfully passed phase 1 of the validation study with a number of absolute differences between the device and observers within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg for at least 27 of 45, 34 of 45, and 43 of 45 measurements, respectively. The device also achieved the targets for phase 2.1, with 66 of 99, 81 of 99, and 95 of 99 device-observer differences within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg, respectively, for systolic blood pressure, and with 79 of 99, 95 of 99, and 99 of 99 differences within 5, 10, and 15 mmHg, respectively, for diastolic blood pressure. In phase 2.2, 23, and 27 participants had at least two of the three device-observer differences within 5 mmHg (required Z22) for systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure, respectively. The ANDON upper arm blood pressure monitor KD-5915 has passed the International Protocol requirements, and hence can be recommended for use at home in adults.

  18. Antibodies to SS-A/Ro-52kD and centromere in autoimmune liver disease: a clue to diagnosis and prognosis of primary biliary cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granito, A; Muratori, P; Muratori, L; Pappas, G; Cassani, F; Worthington, J; Ferri, S; Quarneti, C; Cipriano, V; de Molo, C; Lenzi, M; Chapman, R W; Bianchi, F B

    2007-09-15

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) may be associated with various rheumatological disorders. To investigate the frequency and significance of 'rheumatological' antinuclear antibodies in the field of autoimmune chronic liver disease, with special regard to PBC. We studied 105 patients with PBC, 162 autoimmune liver disease controls (type 1 and 2 autoimmune hepatitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis), 30 systemic lupus erythematosus and 50 blood donors. Sera were tested for the presence of antibodies to extractable nuclear antigens (anti-ENA) by counterimmunoelectrophoresis, enzyme-linked and immunoblot (IB) assay, and for the presence of anti-centromere antibodies (ACA) by indirect immunofluorescence on HEp-2 cells and IB. The overall prevalence of IB-detected anti-ENA in PBC (30%) was higher than in type 1 autoimmune hepatitis (2.5%, P < 0.0001), type 2 autoimmune hepatitis (0%, P < 0.0001) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (11.5%, P = 0.006) and lower than in systemic lupus erythematosus (53%, P = 0.03). The most frequent anti-ENA reactivity in PBC was anti-SSA/Ro-52kD (28%). ACA were detected by IB in 21% PBC patients and never in the other subjects (P < 0.0001). Anti-SS-A/Ro/52kD positive PBC patients had at the time of diagnosis a more advanced histological stage (P = 0.01) and higher serum levels of bilirubin (P = 0.01) and IgM (P = 0.03) compared with negative ones. In the autoimmune liver disease setting, anti-SS-A/Ro-52kD and ACA have a high specificity for PBC and can thus be of diagnostic relevance in anti-mitochondrial antibodies negative cases. If confirmed in further studies with adequate follow-up, anti-SS-A/Ro-52kD antibodies might identify PBC patients with a more advanced and active disease.

  19. Periodic Waves and Periodic Solitons and Their Interactions for a (2+1)-Dimensional KdV Equation(Condensed Matter and Statistical Physics)

    OpenAIRE

    Yan ze, PENG; Department of Mathematics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology

    2005-01-01

    An exact periodic wave solution, which represents the interaction between the waves with different speeds, is first given by the rational function of the Jacobi elliptic functions with different moduli for a (2+1)-dimensional KdV equation. Under different limit conditions, some new types of solitary structures called periodic solitons are then revealed. The interaction properties between periodic waves and between periodic solitons are studied numerically and found to be nonelastic. But a lon...

  20. A yeast mutant lacking mitochondrial porin is respiratory-deficient, but can recover respiration with simultaneous accumulation of an 86-kd extramitochondrial protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dihanich, M; Suda, K; Schatz, G

    1987-03-01

    A yeast mutant lacking the only known pore-forming protein of the mitochondrial outer membrane was constructed by gene disruption. The mutant retained all other major proteins of the mitochondrial outer membrane, but was severely deficient in mitochondrial cytochromes and initially did not grow on the non-fermentable carbon source, glycerol. However, it could slowly adapt to glycerol; adaptation was accompanied by the partial restoration of cytochrome levels and massive accumulation of an 86-kd polypeptide in extramitochondrial cell fractions.

  1. Using chemical shift perturbation to characterise ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Mike P

    2013-08-01

    Chemical shift perturbation (CSP, chemical shift mapping or complexation-induced changes in chemical shift, CIS) follows changes in the chemical shifts of a protein when a ligand is added, and uses these to determine the location of the binding site, the affinity of the ligand, and/or possibly the structure of the complex. A key factor in determining the appearance of spectra during a titration is the exchange rate between free and bound, or more specifically the off-rate koff. When koff is greater than the chemical shift difference between free and bound, which typically equates to an affinity Kd weaker than about 3μM, then exchange is fast on the chemical shift timescale. Under these circumstances, the observed shift is the population-weighted average of free and bound, which allows Kd to be determined from measurement of peak positions, provided the measurements are made appropriately. (1)H shifts are influenced to a large extent by through-space interactions, whereas (13)Cα and (13)Cβ shifts are influenced more by through-bond effects. (15)N and (13)C' shifts are influenced both by through-bond and by through-space (hydrogen bonding) interactions. For determining the location of a bound ligand on the basis of shift change, the most appropriate method is therefore usually to measure (15)N HSQC spectra, calculate the geometrical distance moved by the peak, weighting (15)N shifts by a factor of about 0.14 compared to (1)H shifts, and select those residues for which the weighted shift change is larger than the standard deviation of the shift for all residues. Other methods are discussed, in particular the measurement of (13)CH3 signals. Slow to intermediate exchange rates lead to line broadening, and make Kd values very difficult to obtain. There is no good way to distinguish changes in chemical shift due to direct binding of the ligand from changes in chemical shift due to allosteric change. Ligand binding at multiple sites can often be characterised, by

  2. Validation of the Andon KD-575 automated blood pressure monitor according to the European society of hypertension international protocol in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Feng; Wan, Yi; Chen, Wan; Li, Ni; Tong, Wei; Xu, Yongyong

    2010-06-01

    Blood pressure measuring devices should be subjected to an independent evaluation of accuracy before clinical use. The results of the validation of the Andon KD-575 automated blood pressure monitor according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol in adults are presented in this paper. Sequential same-arm measurements of systolic and diastolic blood pressure were obtained in 33 participants using the mercury sphygmomanometer (two observers) and the test device (one supervisor). According to the validation protocol, 99 pairs of test device and reference blood pressure measurements were obtained during the two phases of the study (three pairs for each of the 33 participants). In phase 1, the Andon KD-575 device produced 26, 38 and 43 measurements within 5, 10 and 15 mmHg, respectively, for systolic blood pressure and 35, 44 and 45 mmHg, respectively, for diastolic blood pressure. However, in phase 2, the test device failed to meet the criteria for systolic blood pressure but comfortably passed all of the criteria for diastolic blood pressure with a mean (standard deviation) device-observer difference of 2.00+/-7.12 mmHg for systolic and 1.47+/-4.71 mmHg for diastolic blood pressure. The Andon KD-575 automated blood pressure monitor cannot be recommended for clinical use in an adult population because it records systolic blood pressure inaccurately.

  3. Reducing process delays for real-time earthquake parameter estimation - An application of KD tree to large databases for Earthquake Early Warning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Lucy; Andrews, Jennifer; Heaton, Thomas

    2018-05-01

    Earthquake parameter estimations using nearest neighbor searching among a large database of observations can lead to reliable prediction results. However, in the real-time application of Earthquake Early Warning (EEW) systems, the accurate prediction using a large database is penalized by a significant delay in the processing time. We propose to use a multidimensional binary search tree (KD tree) data structure to organize large seismic databases to reduce the processing time in nearest neighbor search for predictions. We evaluated the performance of KD tree on the Gutenberg Algorithm, a database-searching algorithm for EEW. We constructed an offline test to predict peak ground motions using a database with feature sets of waveform filter-bank characteristics, and compare the results with the observed seismic parameters. We concluded that large database provides more accurate predictions of the ground motion information, such as peak ground acceleration, velocity, and displacement (PGA, PGV, PGD), than source parameters, such as hypocenter distance. Application of the KD tree search to organize the database reduced the average searching process by 85% time cost of the exhaustive method, allowing the method to be feasible for real-time implementation. The algorithm is straightforward and the results will reduce the overall time of warning delivery for EEW.

  4. Identification and characterisation of the IgE-binding proteins 2S albumin and conglutin gamma in almond (Prunus dulcis) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poltronieri, P; Cappello, M S; Dohmae, N; Conti, A; Fortunato, D; Pastorello, E A; Ortolani, C; Zacheo, G

    2002-06-01

    Almond proteins can cause severe anaphylactic reactions in susceptible individuals. The aim of this study was the identification of IgE-binding proteins in almonds and the characterisation of these proteins by N-terminal sequencing. Five sera were selected from individuals with a positive reaction to food challenge. Sodium dodecylsulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting were performed on almond seed proteins. Purified IgE-binding proteins were tested for immunoblot inhibition with sera pre-incubated with extracts of hazelnut and walnut. N-terminal sequences of the 12-, 30- and 45-kD proteins were obtained. The 45- and 30-kD proteins shared the same N terminus, with 60% homology to the conglutin gamma heavy chain from lupine seed (Lupinus albus) and to basic 7S globulin from soybean (Glycine max). The sequences of the N-terminal 12-kD protein and of an internal peptide obtained by endoproteinase digestion showed good homology to 2S albumin from English walnut (Jug r 1). Immunoblot inhibition experiments were performed and IgE binding to almond 2S albumin and conglutin gamma was detected in the presence of cross-reacting walnut or hazelnut antigens. Two IgE-binding almond proteins were N-terminally sequenced and identified as almond 2S albumin and conglutin gamma. Localisation and conservation of IgE binding in a 6-kD peptide obtained by endoproteinase digestion of 2S albumin was shown. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  5. DNA binding studies of tartrazine food additive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashanian, Soheila; Zeidali, Sahar Heidary

    2011-07-01

    The interaction of native calf thymus DNA with tartrazine in 10 mM Tris-HCl aqueous solution at neutral pH 7.4 was investigated. Tartrazine is a nitrous derivative and may cause allergic reactions, with a potential of toxicological risk. Also, tartrazine induces oxidative stress and DNA damage. Its DNA binding properties were studied by UV-vis and circular dichroism spectra, competitive binding with Hoechst 33258, and viscosity measurements. Tartrazine molecules bind to DNA via groove mode as illustrated by hyperchromism in the UV absorption band of tartrazine, decrease in Hoechst-DNA solution fluorescence, unchanged viscosity of DNA, and conformational changes such as conversion from B-like to C-like in the circular dichroism spectra of DNA. The binding constants (K(b)) of DNA with tartrazine were calculated at different temperatures. Enthalpy and entropy changes were calculated to be +37 and +213 kJ mol(-1), respectively, according to the Van't Hoff equation, which indicated that the reaction is predominantly entropically driven. Also, tartrazine does not cleave plasmid DNA. Tartrazine interacts with calf thymus DNA via a groove interaction mode with an intrinsic binding constant of 3.75 × 10(4) M(-1).

  6. Structural and binding studies of SAP-1 protein with heparin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vikash K; Mandal, Rahul S; Puniya, Bhanwar L; Kumar, Rahul; Dey, Sharmistha; Singh, Sarman; Yadav, Savita

    2015-03-01

    SAP-1 is a low molecular weight cysteine protease inhibitor (CPI) which belongs to type-2 cystatins family. SAP-1 protein purified from human seminal plasma (HuSP) has been shown to inhibit cysteine and serine proteases and exhibit interesting biological properties, including high temperature and pH stability. Heparin is a naturally occurring glycosaminoglycan (with varied chain length) which interacts with a number of proteins and regulates multiple steps in different biological processes. As an anticoagulant, heparin enhances inhibition of thrombin by the serpin antithrombin III. Therefore, we have employed surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to improve our understanding of the binding interaction between heparin and SAP-1 (protease inhibitor). SPR data suggest that SAP-1 binds to heparin with a significant affinity (KD = 158 nm). SPR solution competition studies using heparin oligosaccharides showed that the binding of SAP-1 to heparin is dependent on chain length. Large oligosaccharides show strong binding affinity for SAP-1. Further to get insight into the structural aspect of interactions between SAP-1 and heparin, we used modelled structure of the SAP-1 and docked with heparin and heparin-derived polysaccharides. The results suggest that a positively charged residue lysine plays important role in these interactions. Such information should improve our understanding of how heparin, present in the reproductive tract, regulates cystatins activity. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. Selective binding of 2'-F-c-di-GMP to Ct-E88 and Cb-E43, new class I riboswitches from Clostridium tetani and Clostridium botulinum respectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yiling; Zhou, Jie; Wang, Jingxin; Dayie, T Kwaku; Sintim, Herman O

    2013-06-01

    C-di-GMP is a second messenger in bacteria and partly regulates bacterial physiology by binding to class I and II riboswitches. Four class I c-di-GMP riboswitch aptamer candidates, Ct-E88, Cb-17B, Cb-E43 and Cd-630 RNAs, selected from a GEMM RNA sequence motif in the Rfam database, were expressed and experimentally verified to bind to c-di-GMP. The two newly characterized c-di-GMP riboswitches, Ct-E88 and Cb-E43, bound c-di-GMP with nanomolar Kd whereas the affinities of Cb-17B and Cd-630 for c-di-GMP were at least a 100-fold weaker. Interestingly, whereas the three riboswitches (Vc2, Et-E88 and Cb-E43) bound c-di-GMP with similar Kd values, 2'-modified analogs of c-di-GMP differentially bound to these three class I aptamers. For example, 2'-F-c-di-GMP bound Vc2 with a Kd value of 102 nM whereas the Kd value of 2'-F-c-di-GMP-Ct-E88 is 43 μM (422× higher than that for Vc2 RNA), revealing that there are differences in the binding sites of functional class I c-di-GMP riboswitches.

  8. Multiple binding of bilirubin to human serum albumin and cobinding with laurate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sato, H; Honoré, B; Brodersen, R

    1988-01-01

    Numerical analysis of multiple binding of two ligands to one carrier has been accomplished, using the principle of several sets of acceptable binding constants, with bilirubin-laurate-albumin as an example. Binding of bilirubin to defatted human serum albumin was investigated by a spectroscopic m...

  9. Total iron binding capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003489.htm Total iron binding capacity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total iron binding capacity (TIBC) is a blood test to ...

  10. Production and characterization of a monoclonal antibody against recombinant fatty acid binding protein of Fasciola gigantica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirisriro, A; Grams, R; Vichasri-Grams, S; Ardseungneon, P; Pankao, V; Meepool, A; Chaithirayanon, K; Viyanant, V; Tan-Ariya, P; Upatham, E S; Sobhon, P

    2002-04-30

    In Fasciola parasites fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) are the carrier proteins that help in the uptake of fatty acids from the hosts' fluids. Attempts have been made to utilize both native and recombinant FABP (rFABP) for immunodiagnosis and vaccine development for fasciolosis. In this study, we have produced a number of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) against rFABP of Fasciola gigantica. These MoAbs were initially screened against rFABP by ELISA and then tested for their specificities by immunoblotting. Five stable clones were selected and characterized further: four of them were of the isotype IgG(1) while one clone was IgG(2a). All the MoAbs reacted with rFABP which has a molecular weight (MW) of 20 kD and with at least two isoforms of native proteins at MW 14.5 kD that were present in the tegumental antigen (TA) and crude worm extracts, and the excretion-secretion materials. Immunoperoxidase staining of frozen sections of adult parasites by using these MoAbs as primary antibodies indicated that FABP were present in high concentration in the parenchymal cells and reproductive tissues, in low concentration in the tegument and caecal epithelium. All MoAbs cross-reacted with a 14.5 kD antigen present in the whole body (WB) extract of Schistosoma mansoni, while no cross-reactivities were detected with antigens from Eurytrema pancreaticum and Paramphistomum spp.

  11. Analysis of RNA binding by the dengue virus NS5 RNA capping enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittney R Henderson

    Full Text Available Flaviviruses are small, capped positive sense RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Dengue virus and other related flaviviruses have evolved RNA capping enzymes to form the viral RNA cap structure that protects the viral genome and directs efficient viral polyprotein translation. The N-terminal domain of NS5 possesses the methyltransferase and guanylyltransferase activities necessary for forming mature RNA cap structures. The mechanism for flavivirus guanylyltransferase activity is currently unknown, and how the capping enzyme binds its diphosphorylated RNA substrate is important for deciphering how the flavivirus guanylyltransferase functions. In this report we examine how flavivirus NS5 N-terminal capping enzymes bind to the 5' end of the viral RNA using a fluorescence polarization-based RNA binding assay. We observed that the K(D for RNA binding is approximately 200 nM Dengue, Yellow Fever, and West Nile virus capping enzymes. Removal of one or both of the 5' phosphates reduces binding affinity, indicating that the terminal phosphates contribute significantly to binding. RNA binding affinity is negatively affected by the presence of GTP or ATP and positively affected by S-adensyl methoninine (SAM. Structural superpositioning of the dengue virus capping enzyme with the Vaccinia virus VP39 protein bound to RNA suggests how the flavivirus capping enzyme may bind RNA, and mutagenesis analysis of residues in the putative RNA binding site demonstrate that several basic residues are critical for RNA binding. Several mutants show differential binding to 5' di-, mono-, and un-phosphorylated RNAs. The mode of RNA binding appears similar to that found with other methyltransferase enzymes, and a discussion of diphosphorylated RNA binding is presented.

  12. Derivation of the optical constants of anisotropic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, J. R.; Emslie, A. G.; Smith, E. M.; Strong, P. F.

    1985-07-01

    This report concerns the development of methods for obtaining the optical constants of anisotropic crystals of the triclinic and monoclinic systems. The principal method used, classical dispersion theory, is adapted to these crystal systems by extending the Lorentz line parameters to include the angles characterizing the individual resonances, and by replacing the dielectric constant by a dielectric tensor. The sample crystals are gypsium, orthoclase and chalcanthite. The derived optical constants are shown to be suitable for modeling the optical properties of particulate media in the infrared spectral region. For those materials where suitable size single crystals are not available, an extension of a previously used method is applied to alabaster, a polycrystalline material of the monoclinic crystal system.

  13. Fast optimization algorithms and the cosmological constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Ning; Bousso, Raphael; Jordan, Stephen; Lackey, Brad

    2017-11-01

    Denef and Douglas have observed that in certain landscape models the problem of finding small values of the cosmological constant is a large instance of a problem that is hard for the complexity class NP (Nondeterministic Polynomial-time). The number of elementary operations (quantum gates) needed to solve this problem by brute force search exceeds the estimated computational capacity of the observable Universe. Here we describe a way out of this puzzling circumstance: despite being NP-hard, the problem of finding a small cosmological constant can be attacked by more sophisticated algorithms whose performance vastly exceeds brute force search. In fact, in some parameter regimes the average-case complexity is polynomial. We demonstrate this by explicitly finding a cosmological constant of order 10-120 in a randomly generated 1 09-dimensional Arkani-Hamed-Dimopoulos-Kachru landscape.

  14. Stability constants for silicate adsorbed to ferrihydrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Christian Bruun; Wetche, T.P.; Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten

    1994-01-01

    Intrinsic surface acidity constants (K(a1)intr, K(a2)intr) and surface complexation constant for adsorption of orthosilicate onto synthetic ferrihydrite (K(Si) for the complex = FeOSi(OH)3) have been determined from acid/base titrations in 0.001-0.1 m NaClO4 electrolytes and silicate adsorption...... experiments in 0.01 m NaNO3 electrolyte (pH 3-6). The surface equilibrium constants were calculated according to the two-layer model by Dzombak & Morel (1990). Near equilibrium between protons/hydroxyls in solution and the ferrihydrite surface was obtained within minutes while equilibration with silicate...

  15. Effects of quantum entropy on bag constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.E.; Tawfik, A.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of quantum entropy on the bag constant are studied at low temperatures and for small chemical potentials. The inclusion of the quantum entropy of the quarks in the equation of state provides the hadronic bag with an additional heat which causes a decrease in the effective latent heat inside the bag. We have considered two types of baryonic bags, Δ and Ω - . In both cases we have found that the bag constant without the quantum entropy almost does not change with temperature and quark chemical potential. The contribution from the quantum entropy to the equation of state clearly decreases the value of the bag constant. Furthermore, we construct states densities for quarks using the 'Thomas Fermi model' and take into consideration a thermal potential for the interaction. (author)

  16. Conformally invariant braneworld and the cosmological constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guendelman, E.I.

    2004-01-01

    A six-dimensional braneworld scenario based on a model describing the interaction of gravity, gauge fields and 3+1 branes in a conformally invariant way is described. The action of the model is defined using a measure of integration built of degrees of freedom independent of the metric. There is no need to fine tune any bulk cosmological constant or the tension of the two (in the scenario described here) parallel branes to obtain zero cosmological constant, the only solutions are those with zero 4D cosmological constant. The two extra dimensions are compactified in a 'football' fashion and the branes lie on the two opposite poles of the compact 'football-shaped' sphere

  17. Binding and Inhibition of Spermidine Synthase from Plasmodium falciparum and Implications for In Vitro Inhibitor Testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janina Sprenger

    Full Text Available The aminopropyltransferase spermidine synthase (SpdS is a promising drug target in cancer and in protozoan diseases including malaria. Plasmodium falciparum SpdS (PfSpdS transfers the aminopropyl group of decarboxylated S-adenosylmethionine (dcAdoMet to putrescine or to spermidine to form spermidine or spermine, respectively. In an effort to understand why efficient inhibitors of PfSpdS have been elusive, the present study uses enzyme activity assays and isothermal titration calorimetry with verified or predicted inhibitors of PfSpdS to analyze the relationship between binding affinity as assessed by KD and inhibitory activity as assessed by IC50. The results show that some predicted inhibitors bind to the enzyme with high affinity but are poor inhibitors. Binding studies with PfSpdS substrates and products strongly support an ordered sequential mechanism in which the aminopropyl donor (dcAdoMet site must be occupied before the aminopropyl acceptor (putrescine site can be occupied. Analysis of the results also shows that the ordered sequential mechanism adequately accounts for the complex relationship between IC50 and KD and may explain the limited success of previous efforts at structure-based inhibitor design for PfSpdS. Based on PfSpdS active-site occupancy, we suggest a classification of ligands that can help to predict the KD-IC50 relations in future design of new inhibitors. The present findings may be relevant for other drug targets that follow an ordered sequential mechanism.

  18. Convulxin binding to platelet receptor GPVI: competition with collagen related peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedergang, F; Alcover, A; Knight, C G; Farndale, R W; Barnes, M J; Francischetti, I M; Bon, C; Leduc, M

    2000-06-24

    Convulxin (CVX), a potent platelet aggregating protein from the venom of the snake Crotalus durissus terrificus, is known to bind to the platelet collagen receptor, glycoprotein VI (GPVI). CVX binding to human platelets was investigated by flow cytometry, using fluorescein labeled convulxin (FITC-CVX). Scatchard analysis indicated high and low affinity binding sites with Kd values of 0.6 and 4 nM and Bmax values of 1200 and 2000 binding sites per platelet. FITC-CVX binding was inhibited by collagen related peptides (CRPs) comprising a repeated GPO sequence, namely GCO(GPO)(10)GCOGNH(2) and GKO(GPO)(10)GKOGNH(2), which also bind to receptor GPVI. These peptides (monomeric or cross-linked forms) gave a high affinity inhibition of 10-20% for concentrations between 10 ng/ml and 5 microg/ml, followed by a second phase of inhibition at concentrations greater than 5 microg/ml. It was shown also that the inhibition of FITC-CVX binding by CRPs was independent on the time of preincubation of platelets with CRPs, and the same percentage of inhibition was seen with various concentrations of convulxin. Confocal microscopy of the distribution of FITC-CVX binding sites on platelets showed an homogeneous distribution of FITC-CVX bound to GPVI, although some limited clustering may exist. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  19. Construction and experimental testing of the constant-bandwidth constant-temperature anemometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligeza, P

    2008-09-01

    A classical constant-temperature hot-wire anemometer enables the measurement of fast-changing flow velocity fluctuations, although its transmission bandwidth is a function of measured velocity. This may be a source of significant dynamic errors. Incorporation of an adaptive controller into the constant-temperature system results in hot-wire anemometer operating with a constant transmission bandwidth. The construction together with the results of experimental testing of a constant-bandwidth hot-wire anemometer prototype are presented in this article. During the testing, an approximately constant transmission bandwidth of the anemometer was achieved. The constant-bandwidth hot-wire anemometer can be used in measurements of high-frequency variable flows characterized by a wide range of velocity changes.

  20. Thermodynamics of nucleotide binding to actomyosin V and VI: a positive heat capacity change accompanies strong ADP binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robblee, James P; Cao, Wenxiang; Henn, Arnon; Hannemann, Diane E; De La Cruz, Enrique M

    2005-08-02

    We have measured the energetics of ATP and ADP binding to single-headed actomyosin V and VI from the temperature dependence of the rate and equilibrium binding constants. Nucleotide binding to actomyosin V and VI can be modeled as two-step binding mechanisms involving the formation of collision complexes followed by isomerization to states with high nucleotide affinity. Formation of the actomyosin VI-ATP collision complex is much weaker and slower than for actomyosin V. A three-step binding mechanism where actomyosin VI isomerizes between two conformations, one competent to bind ATP and one not, followed by rapid ATP binding best accounts for the data. ADP binds to actomyosin V more tightly than actomyosin VI. At 25 degrees C, the strong ADP-binding equilibria are comparable for actomyosin V and VI, and the different overall ADP affinities arise from differences in the ADP collision complex affinity. The actomyosin-ADP isomerization leading to strong ADP binding is entropy driven at >15 degrees C and occurs with a large, positive change in heat capacity (DeltaC(P) degrees ) for both actomyosin V and VI. Sucrose slows ADP binding and dissociation from actomyosin V and VI but not the overall equilibrium constants for strong ADP binding, indicating that solvent viscosity dampens ADP-dependent kinetic transitions, presumably a tail swing that occurs with ADP binding and release. We favor a mechanism where strong ADP binding increases the dynamics and flexibility of the actomyosin complex. The heat capacity (DeltaC(P) degrees ) and entropy (DeltaS degrees ) changes are greater for actomyosin VI than actomyosin V, suggesting different extents of ADP-induced structural rearrangement.