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Sample records for binding assay based

  1. Flow Cytometry-Based Bead-Binding Assay for Measuring Receptor Ligand Specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprokholt, Joris K.; Hertoghs, Nina; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter we describe a fluorescent bead-binding assay, which is an efficient and feasible method to measure interaction between ligands and receptors on cells. In principle, any ligand can be coated on fluorescent beads either directly or via antibodies. Binding between ligand-coated beads

  2. Discovery of potent thermolysin inhibitors using structure based virtual screening and binding assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mahmud Tareq Hassan; Fuskevåg, Ole-Martin; Sylte, Ingebrigt

    2009-01-08

    In the present work, 22 compounds of the U.S. NCI compound library (size 273K) were identified as putative thermolysin binders by structure based virtual screening with the ICM software (ICM-VLS). In vitro competitive binding assays confirmed that 12 were thermolysin binders. Thermolysin binding modes of the 12 compounds were studied by docking using ICM and Molegro Virtual Docker (MVD). The most potent inhibitor had an IC(50) value of 6.4 x 10(-8) mM (NSC250686, 1 beta-D-arabinofuranosyl-N(4)-lauroylcytosine). The structure of this compound is quite different from the other 11 compounds. Nine out of the 12 compounds contained a similar chemical skeleton (3-nitrobenzamide derivatives) and have IC(50) values ranging from 697.48 to 0.047 mM. The ICM-VLS score and the activity profiles (pIC(50) values) were compared and found to be somewhat linearly correlated (R(2) = 0.78). Kinetic studies showed that, except for NSC285166 (oxyquinoline), the compounds are competitive thermolysin inhibitors.

  3. Glucose Sensors Based on Microcapsules Containing an Orange/Red Competitive Binding Resonance Energy Transfer Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHINNAYELKA, SWETHA; McSHANE, and MICHAEL J.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent sensing systems offer the potential for noninvasive monitoring with implantable devices, but they require carrier technologies that provide suitable immobilization, accessibility, and biocompatibility while maintaining adequate response characteristics. A recent development towards this goal is a highly specific and sensitive competitive binding assay for glucose using apo-glucose oxidase (apo-GOx) as the recognition element and dextran as the competing ligand; this has been demonstrated as a glucose sensor system by encapsulating the competitive binding assay in semipermeable microcapsule carriers. This paper describes the extension of this sensor design to longer wavelengths in an attempt to increase the applicability to in vivo monitoring. The glucose sensitivity of the tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate-dextran (TD) and cyanine Cy5-apo-GOx (CAG) complexes showed five to 10 times greater specificity for β-D-glucose over other sugars. Microcapsules loaded with TD/CAG complexes exhibited a linear, totally reversible response in the range of 0–720 mg/dL, with a sensitivity (percent change in intensity ratio) of 0.06%/(mg/dL). The decrease in sensitivity observed with the use of longer-wavelength dyes is most likely to be compensated with the deeper penetration of light and reduced tissue scattering. These findings imply that the encapsulation of sensing assay elements in microcapsules is a simple and translatable method for the fabrication of stable biosensors, and optimization of resonance energy transfer pairs and assay component preparation will further improve the response to approach clinically relevant performance. PMID:16800748

  4. Lateral flow assay-based bacterial detection using engineered cell wall binding domains of a phage endolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Minsuk; Shin, Joong Ho; Heu, Sunggi; Park, Je-Kyun; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2017-10-15

    The development of a cost-effective and efficient bacterial detection assay is essential for diagnostic fields, particularly in resource-poor settings. Although antibodies have been widely used for bacterial capture, the production of soluble antibodies is still expensive and time-consuming. Here, we developed a nitrocellulose-based lateral flow assay using cell wall binding domains (CBDs) from phage as a recognition element and colloidal gold nanoparticles as a colorimetric signal for the detection of a model pathogenic bacterium, Bacillus cereus (B. cereus). To improve conjugation efficiency and detection sensitivity, cysteine-glutathione-S-transferase-tagged CBDs and maltose-binding protein-tagged CBDs were produced in Escherichia coli (E. coli) and incorporated in our assays. The sensitivity of the strip to detect B. cereus was 1×10 4 CFU/mL and the overall assay time was 20min. The assay showed superior results compared to the antibody-based approach, and did not show any significant cross-reactivity. This proof of concept study indicates that the lateral flow assay using engineered CBDs hold considerable promise as simple, rapid, and cost-effective biosensors for whole cell detection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Bacteriophage receptor binding protein based assays for the simultaneous detection of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad A Javed

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are the most common bacterial causes of foodborne gastroenteritis which is occasionally followed by a debilitating neuropathy known as Guillain-Barré syndrome. Rapid and specific detection of these pathogens is very important for effective control and quick treatment of infection. Most of the diagnostics available for these organisms are time consuming and require technical expertise with expensive instruments and reagents to perform. Bacteriophages bind to their host specifically through their receptor binding proteins (RBPs, which can be exploited for pathogen detection. We recently sequenced the genome of C. jejuni phage NCTC12673 and identified its putative host receptor binding protein, Gp047. In the current study, we localized the receptor binding domain to the C-terminal quarter of Gp047. CC-Gp047 could be produced recombinantly and was capable of agglutinating both C. jejuni and C. coli cells unlike the host range of the parent phage which is limited to a subset of C. jejuni isolates. The agglutination procedure could be performed within minutes on a glass slide at room temperature and was not hindered by the presence of buffers or nutrient media. This agglutination assay showed 100% specificity and the sensitivity was 95% for C. jejuni (n = 40 and 90% for C. coli (n = 19. CC-Gp047 was also expressed as a fusion with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP. Chimeric EGFP_CC-Gp047 was able to specifically label C. jejuni and C. coli cells in mixed cultures allowing for the detection of these pathogens by fluorescent microscopy. This study describes a simple and rapid method for the detection of C. jejuni and C. coli using engineered phage RBPs and offers a promising new diagnostics platform for healthcare and surveillance laboratories.

  6. Development of homogeneous binding assays based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer between quantum dots and Alexa Fluor fluorophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforov, Theo T; Beechem, Joseph M

    2006-10-01

    We studied the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between quantum dots emitting at 565, 605, and 655 nm as energy donors and Alexa Fluor fluorophores with absorbance maxima at 594, 633, 647, and 680 nm as energy acceptors. As a first step, we prepared covalent conjugates between all three types of quantum dots and each of the Alexa Fluor fluorophores that could act as an energy acceptor. All of these conjugates displayed efficient resonance energy transfer. Then we prepared covalent conjugates of these quantum dots with biotin, fluorescein, and cortisol and established that the binding of these conjugates to suitable Alexa Fluor-labeled antibodies and streptavidin (in the case of biotin) can be efficiently detected by measuring the resonance energy transfer in homogeneous solutions. Finally, based on these observations, competitive binding assays for these three small analytes were developed. The performance of these assays as a function of the degree of labeling of the quantum dots was evaluated. It was found that decreasing the degree of loading of the quantum dots leads to decreases of the limits of detection. The results show the great potential of this FRET system for the development of new homogeneous binding assays.

  7. Periplasmic binding protein-based detection of maltose using liposomes: a new class of biorecognition elements in competitive assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Katie A; Baeumner, Antje J

    2013-03-05

    A periplasmic binding protein (PBP) was investigated as a novel binding species in a similar manner to an antibody in a competitive enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), resulting in a highly sensitive and specific assay utilizing liposome-based signal amplification. PBPs are located at high concentrations (10(-4) M) between the inner and outer membranes of gram negative bacteria and are involved in the uptake of solutes and chemotaxis of bacteria toward nutrient sources. Previous sensors relying on PBPs took advantage of the change in local environment or proximity of site-specific fluorophore labels resulting from the significant conformational shift of these proteins' two globular domains upon target binding. Here, rather than monitoring conformational shifts, we have instead utilized the maltose binding protein (MBP) in lieu of an antibody in an ELISA. To our knowledge, this is the first PBP-based sensor without the requirement for engineering site-specific modifications within the protein. MBP conjugated fluorescent dye-encapsulating liposomes served to provide recognition and signal amplification in a competitive assay for maltose using amylose magnetic beads in a microtiter plate-based format. The development of appropriate binding buffers and competitive surfaces are described, with general observations expected to extend to PBPs for other analytes. The resulting assay was specific for d-(+)-maltose versus other sugar analogs including d-(+)-raffinose, sucrose, d-trehalose, d-(+)-xylose, d-fructose, 1-thio-β-d-glucose sodium salt, d-(+)-galactose, sorbitol, glycerol, and dextrose. Cross-reactivity with d-lactose and d-(+)-glucose occurred only at concentrations >10(4)-fold greater than d-(+)-maltose. The limit of detection was 78 nM with a dynamic range covering over 3 orders of magnitude. Accurate detection of maltose as an active ingredient in a pharmaceutical preparation was demonstrated. This method offers a significant improvement over existing

  8. Development and utilization of a fluorescence-based receptor-binding assay for the site 5 voltage-sensitive sodium channel ligands brevetoxin and ciguatoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Jennifer R; Jacocks, Henry M; Niven, Susan C; Poli, Mark A; Baden, Daniel G; Bourdelais, Andrea J

    2014-01-01

    Brevetoxins are a family of ladder-frame polyether toxins produced during blooms of the marine dinoflagellate Karenia brevis. Consumption of fish exposed to K. brevis blooms can lead to the development of neurotoxic shellfish poisoning. The toxic effects of brevetoxins are due to activation of voltage-sensitive sodium channels (VSSCs) in cell membranes. Binding of toxins has historically been measured using a radioligand competition assay that is fraught with difficulty. In this study, we developed a novel fluorescence-based binding assay for the brevetoxin receptor. Several fluorophores were conjugated to polyether brevetoxin-2 and used as the labeled ligand. Brevetoxin analogs were able to compete for binding with the fluorescent ligands. This assay was qualified against the standard radioligand receptor assay for the brevetoxin receptor. Furthermore, the fluorescence-based assay was used to determine relative concentrations of toxins in raw extracts of K. brevis culture, and to determine ciguatoxin affinity to site 5 of VSSCs. The fluorescence-based assay was quicker, safer, and far less expensive. As such, this assay can be used to replace the current radioligand assay and will be a vital tool for future experiments examining the binding affinity of various ligands for site 5 on sodium channels.

  9. Microbead agglutination based assays

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2013-01-21

    We report a simple and rapid room temperature assay for point-of-care (POC) testing that is based on specific agglutination. Agglutination tests are based on aggregation of microbeads in the presence of a specific analyte thus enabling the macroscopic observation. Such tests are most often used to explore antibody-antigen reactions. Agglutination has been used for protein assays using a biotin/streptavidin system as well as a hybridization based assay. The agglutination systems are prone to selftermination of the linking analyte, prone to active site saturation and loss of agglomeration at high analyte concentrations. We investigated the molecular target/ligand interaction, explaining the common agglutination problems related to analyte self-termination, linkage of the analyte to the same bead instead of different microbeads. We classified the agglutination process into three kinds of assays: a two- component assay, a three-component assay and a stepped three- component assay. Although we compared these three kinds of assays for recognizing DNA and protein molecules, the assay can be used for virtually any molecule, including ions and metabolites. In total, the optimized assay permits detecting analytes with high sensitivity in a short time, 5 min, at room temperature. Such a system is appropriate for POC testing.

  10. Identification of Tight-Binding Plasmepsin II and Falcipain 2 Inhibitors in Aqueous Extracts of Marine Invertebrates by the Combination of Enzymatic and Interaction-Based Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Sarduy, Emir; Guerra, Yasel; Covaleda Cortés, Giovanni; Avilés, Francesc Xavier; Chávez Planes, María A.

    2017-01-01

    Natural products from marine origin constitute a very promising and underexplored source of interesting compounds for modern biotechnological and pharmaceutical industries. However, their evaluation is quite challenging and requires specifically designed assays to reliably identify the compounds of interest in a highly heterogeneous and interfering context. In the present study, we describe a general strategy for the confident identification of tight-binding protease inhibitors in the aqueous extracts of 62 Cuban marine invertebrates, using Plasmodium falciparum hemoglobinases Plasmepsin II and Falcipain 2 as model enzymes. To this end, we first developed a screening strategy that combined enzymatic with interaction-based assays and then validated screening conditions using five reference extracts. Interferences were evaluated and minimized. The results from the massive screening of such extracts, the validation of several hits by a variety of interaction-based assays and the purification and functional characterization of PhPI, a multifunctional and reversible tight-binding inhibitor for Plasmepsin II and Falcipain 2 from the gorgonian Plexaura homomalla, are presented. PMID:28430158

  11. Comparison of the Hershberger assay and androgen receptor binding assay of twelve chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Kanji; Sawaki, Masakuni; Noda, Shoji; Muroi, Takako; Takakura, Saori; Mitoma, Hideo; Sakamoto, Satoko; Nakai, Makoto; Yakabe, Yoshikuni

    2004-02-15

    We performed the Hershberger assay of 12 chemicals based on the OECD draft protocol. The chemicals tested by the Hershberger assay were phthalic acid di-n-hexyl ester, phthalic acid di-n-amyl ester, phthalic acid di-n-propyl ester, diethylstilbestrol, 17beta-estradiol, tamoxifen, 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane, cyproterone acetate, 6alpha-methyl-17alpha-hydroxy-progesterone, atrazine, and spironolactone. Phthalic acid di-n-hexyl ester, phthalic acid di-n-amyl ester, and phthalic acid di-n-propyl ester are phthalates; diethylstilbestrol and 17beta-estradiol are estrogenic chemicals; tamoxifen is partial estrogen receptor antagonist with mainly estrogenic properties; 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone is an androgen derivatives; dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane is a reference androgen antagonistic chemical; cyproterone acetate, 6alpha-methyl-17alpha-hydroxy-progesterone, and spironolactone have an androgenic steroid structure and are known as androgen antagonistic chemicals; and atrazine is a reference endocrine disruptor. We also subjected these chemicals to the receptor binding assay for androgen. A clear androgen agonistic effect was detected in 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone, and an androgen antagonistic effect was observed in five chemicals: cyproterone acetate, spironolactone, 6alpha-methyl-17alpha-hydroxy-progesterone, phthalic acid di-n-amyl ester, and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane. By contrast, diethylstilbestrol, 17beta-estradiol, tamoxifen, 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane, cyproterone acetate, 6alpha-methyl-17alpha-hydroxy-progesterone, and spironolactone were positive in the receptor binding assay for androgen. Three estrogenic chemicals, diethylstilbestrol, 17beta-estradiol, and tamoxifen, were negative in the Hershberger assay with receptor binding affinity. On the other hand, the Hershberger assays of three phthalates were performed at the same dosages, and the results showed androgen antagonistic affinity only

  12. Development of a nano-SiO2based enzyme-linked ligand binding assay for the determination of ibuprofen in human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian-Long; Xie, Jing; Li, Xing-De; Ding, Li-Sheng; Liang, Jian; Luo, Pei; Qing, Lin-Sen

    2017-05-15

    The application domains of classic enzyme-linked ligand binding assay (ELBA) is relatively narrow due to the high cost and hardly available binding receptor. In here, we described for the first time the possibility of developing a new ELBA based on silica nanoparticles (nano-SiO 2 ) to assess the ibuprofen in human urine. Nano-SiO 2 with a large surface area was introduced as stationary phase to improve the analytical performance. In the experiment, a competitively binding procedure with human serum albumin (HSA) was performed between the ibuprofen presented in sample and horseradish peroxidase labeled ibuprofen (HRP-ibuprofen) subsequently added. After centrifugal separation, the HRP/ibuprofen/nano-SiO 2 composite catalyzed the substrate solution (TMB/H 2 O 2 ) with a color change from colorless to yellow for quantitative measurement via an ultraviolet spectrophotometer. As a validation of the new principle, the developed nano-ELBA method was applied in the determination of ibuprofen excreted in human urine with excellent performance. This detection range only depends on the solubility of ligand and sensitivity of UV spectrophotometer. Our results indicate that this new method demonstrated to be able to rapidly and adequately determine the concentration of components in biological samples and advocate its effectiveness for various applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Novel Alexa Fluor-488 labeled antagonist of the A(2A) adenosine receptor: Application to a fluorescence polarization-based receptor binding assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kecskés, Miklós; Kumar, T Santhosh; Yoo, Lena; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2010-08-15

    Fluorescence polarization (FP) assay has many advantages over the traditional radioreceptor binding studies. We developed an A(2A) adenosine receptor (AR) FP assay using a newly synthesized fluorescent antagonist of the A(2A)AR (MRS5346), a pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidin-5-amine derivative conjugated to the fluorescent dye Alexa Fluor-488. MRS5346 displayed a K(i) value of 111+/-16nM in radioligand binding using [(3)H]CGS21680 and membranes prepared from HEK293 cells stably expressing the human A(2A)AR. In a cyclic AMP functional assay, MRS5346 was shown to be an A(2A)AR antagonist. MRS5346 did not show any effect on A(1) and A(3) ARs in binding or the A(2B)AR in a cyclic AMP assay at 10microM. Its suitability as a fluorescent tracer was indicated in an initial observation of an FP signal following A(2A)AR binding. The FP signal was optimal with 20nM MRS5346 and 150microg protein/mL HEK293 membranes. The association and dissociation kinetic parameters were readily determined using this FP assay. The K(d) value of MRS5346 calculated from kinetic parameters was 16.5+/-4.7nM. In FP competition binding experiments using MRS5346 as a tracer, K(i) values of known AR agonists and antagonists consistently agreed with K(i) values from radioligand binding. Thus, this FP assay, which eliminates using radioisotopes, appears to be appropriate for both routine receptor binding and high-throughput screening with respect to speed of analysis, displaceable signal and precision. The approach used in the present study could be generally applicable to other GPCRs. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. In Situ Protein Binding Assay Using Fc-Fusion Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanabhan, Nirmala; Siddiqui, Tabrez J

    2017-01-01

    This protocol describes an in situ protein-protein interaction assay between tagged recombinant proteins and cell-surface expressed synaptic proteins. The assay is arguably more sensitive than other traditional protein binding assays such as co-immunoprecipitation and pull-downs and provides a visual readout for binding. This assay has been widely used to determine the dissociation constant of binding of trans-synaptic adhesion proteins. The step-wise description in the protocol should facilitate the adoption of this method in other laboratories.

  15. Development of a Novel Fluorescence Assay Based on the Use of the Thrombin-Binding Aptamer for the Detection of O6-Alkylguanine-DNA Alkyltransferase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Tintoré

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Human O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (hAGT is a DNA repair protein that reverses the effects of alkylating agents by removing DNA adducts from the O6 position of guanine. Here, we developed a real-time fluorescence hAGT activity assay that is based on the detection of conformational changes of the thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA. The quadruplex structure of TBA is disrupted when a central guanine is replaced by an O6-methyl-guanine. The sequence also contains a fluorophore (fluorescein and a quencher (dabsyl attached to the opposite ends. In the unfolded structure, the fluorophore and the quencher are separated. When hAGT removes the methyl group from the central guanine of TBA, it folds back immediately into its quadruplex structure. Consequently, the fluorophore and the quencher come into close proximity, thereby resulting in decreased fluorescence intensity. Here, we developed a new method to quantify the hAGT without using radioactivity. This new fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay has been designed to detect the conformational change of TBA that is induced by the removal of the O6-methyl group.

  16. Development of a Novel Green Fluorescent Protein-Based Binding Assay to Study the Association of Plakins with Intermediate Filament Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favre, Bertrand; Begré, Nadja; Bouameur, Jamal-Eddine; Borradori, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are fundamental for most biological processes, such as the formation of cellular structures and enzymatic complexes or in signaling pathways. The identification and characterization of protein-protein interactions are therefore essential for understanding the mechanisms and regulation of biological systems. The organization and dynamics of the cytoskeleton, as well as its anchorage to specific sites in the plasma membrane and organelles, are regulated by the plakins. These structurally related proteins anchor different cytoskeletal networks to each other and/or to other cellular structures. The association of several plakins with intermediate filaments (IFs) is critical for maintenance of the cytoarchitecture. Pathogenic mutations in the genes encoding different plakins can lead to dramatic manifestations, occurring principally in the skin, striated muscle, and/or nervous system, due to cytoskeletal disorganization resulting in abnormal cell fragility. Nevertheless, it is still unclear how plakins bind to IFs, although some general rules are slowly emerging. We here describe in detail a recently developed protein-protein fluorescence binding assay, based on the production of recombinant proteins tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and their use as fluid-phase fluorescent ligands on immobilized IF proteins. Using this method, we have been able to assess the ability of C-terminal regions of GFP-tagged plakin proteins to bind to distinct IF proteins and IF domains. This simple and sensitive technique, which is expected to facilitate further studies in this area, can also be potentially employed for any kind of protein-protein interaction studies. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Fluorescent Receptor Binding Assay for Detecting Ciguatoxins in Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardison, D Ransom; Holland, William C; McCall, Jennifer R; Bourdelais, Andrea J; Baden, Daniel G; Darius, H Taiana; Chinain, Mireille; Tester, Patricia A; Shea, Damian; Quintana, Harold A Flores; Morris, James A; Litaker, R Wayne

    2016-01-01

    Ciguatera fish poisoning is an illness suffered by > 50,000 people yearly after consumption of fish containing ciguatoxins (CTXs). One of the current methodologies to detect ciguatoxins in fish is a radiolabeled receptor binding assay (RBA(R)). However, the license requirements and regulations pertaining to radioisotope utilization can limit the applicability of the RBA(R) in certain labs. A fluorescence based receptor binding assay (RBA(F)) was developed to provide an alternative method of screening fish samples for CTXs in facilities not certified to use radioisotopes. The new assay is based on competition binding between CTXs and fluorescently labeled brevetoxin-2 (BODIPY®-PbTx-2) for voltage-gated sodium channel receptors at site 5 instead of a radiolabeled brevetoxin. Responses were linear in fish tissues spiked from 0.1 to 1.0 ppb with Pacific ciguatoxin-3C (P-CTX-3C) with a detection limit of 0.075 ppb. Carribean ciguatoxins were confirmed in Caribbean fish by LC-MS/MS analysis of the regional biomarker (C-CTX-1). Fish (N = 61) of six different species were screened using the RBA(F). Results for corresponding samples analyzed using the neuroblastoma cell-based assay (CBA-N2a) correlated well (R2 = 0.71) with those of the RBA(F), given the low levels of CTX present in positive fish. Data analyses also showed the resulting toxicity levels of P-CTX-3C equivalents determined by CBA-N2a were consistently lower than the RBA(F) affinities expressed as % binding equivalents, indicating that a given amount of toxin bound to the site 5 receptors translates into corresponding lower cytotoxicity. Consequently, the RBA(F), which takes approximately two hours to perform, provides a generous estimate relative to the widely used CBA-N2a which requires 2.5 days to complete. Other RBA(F) advantages include the long-term (> 5 years) stability of the BODIPY®-PbTx-2 and having similar results as the commonly used RBA(R). The RBA(F) is cost-effective, allows high sample

  18. Fluorescent Receptor Binding Assay for Detecting Ciguatoxins in Fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Ransom Hardison

    Full Text Available Ciguatera fish poisoning is an illness suffered by > 50,000 people yearly after consumption of fish containing ciguatoxins (CTXs. One of the current methodologies to detect ciguatoxins in fish is a radiolabeled receptor binding assay (RBA(R. However, the license requirements and regulations pertaining to radioisotope utilization can limit the applicability of the RBA(R in certain labs. A fluorescence based receptor binding assay (RBA(F was developed to provide an alternative method of screening fish samples for CTXs in facilities not certified to use radioisotopes. The new assay is based on competition binding between CTXs and fluorescently labeled brevetoxin-2 (BODIPY®-PbTx-2 for voltage-gated sodium channel receptors at site 5 instead of a radiolabeled brevetoxin. Responses were linear in fish tissues spiked from 0.1 to 1.0 ppb with Pacific ciguatoxin-3C (P-CTX-3C with a detection limit of 0.075 ppb. Carribean ciguatoxins were confirmed in Caribbean fish by LC-MS/MS analysis of the regional biomarker (C-CTX-1. Fish (N = 61 of six different species were screened using the RBA(F. Results for corresponding samples analyzed using the neuroblastoma cell-based assay (CBA-N2a correlated well (R2 = 0.71 with those of the RBA(F, given the low levels of CTX present in positive fish. Data analyses also showed the resulting toxicity levels of P-CTX-3C equivalents determined by CBA-N2a were consistently lower than the RBA(F affinities expressed as % binding equivalents, indicating that a given amount of toxin bound to the site 5 receptors translates into corresponding lower cytotoxicity. Consequently, the RBA(F, which takes approximately two hours to perform, provides a generous estimate relative to the widely used CBA-N2a which requires 2.5 days to complete. Other RBA(F advantages include the long-term (> 5 years stability of the BODIPY®-PbTx-2 and having similar results as the commonly used RBA(R. The RBA(F is cost-effective, allows high sample

  19. Identification, expression profiling and fluorescence-based binding assays of a chemosensory protein gene from the Western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Ke; Lei, Zhong-Ren

    2015-01-01

    Using RT-PCR and RACE-PCR strategies, we cloned and identified a new chemosensory protein (FoccCSP) from the Western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis, a species for which no chemosensory protein (CSP) has yet been identified. The FoccCSP gene contains a 387 bp open-reading frame encoding a putative protein of 128 amino acids with a molecular weight of 14.51 kDa and an isoelectric point of 5.41. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal peptide of 19 amino acid residues at the N-terminus, as well as the typical four-cysteine signature found in other insect CSPs. As FoccCSP is from a different order of insect than other known CSPs, the GenBank FoccCSP homolog showed only 31-50% sequence identity with them. A neighbor-joining tree was constructed and revealed that FoccCSP is in a group with CSPs from Homopteran insects (e.g., AgosCSP4, AgosCSP10, ApisCSP, and NlugCSP9), suggesting that these genes likely developed from a common ancestral gene. The FoccCSP gene expression profile of different tissues and development stages was measured by quantitative real-time PCR. The results of this analysis revealed this gene is predominantly expressed in the antennae and also highly expressed in the first instar nymph, suggesting a function for FoccCSP in olfactory reception and in particular life activities during the first instar nymph stage. We expressed recombinant FoccCSP protein in a prokaryotic expression system and purified FoccCSP protein by affinity chromatography using a Ni-NTA-Sepharose column. Using N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine (1-NPN) as a fluorescent probe in fluorescence-based competitive binding assay, we determined the binding affinities of 19 volatile substances for FoccCSP protein. This analysis revealed that anisic aldehyde, geraniol and methyl salicylate have high binding affinities for FoccCSP, with KD values of 10.50, 15.35 and 35.24 μM, respectively. Thus, our study indicates that FoccCSP may play an important role in regulating the

  20. Identification, expression profiling and fluorescence-based binding assays of a chemosensory protein gene from the Western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Ke Zhang

    Full Text Available Using RT-PCR and RACE-PCR strategies, we cloned and identified a new chemosensory protein (FoccCSP from the Western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis, a species for which no chemosensory protein (CSP has yet been identified. The FoccCSP gene contains a 387 bp open-reading frame encoding a putative protein of 128 amino acids with a molecular weight of 14.51 kDa and an isoelectric point of 5.41. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal peptide of 19 amino acid residues at the N-terminus, as well as the typical four-cysteine signature found in other insect CSPs. As FoccCSP is from a different order of insect than other known CSPs, the GenBank FoccCSP homolog showed only 31-50% sequence identity with them. A neighbor-joining tree was constructed and revealed that FoccCSP is in a group with CSPs from Homopteran insects (e.g., AgosCSP4, AgosCSP10, ApisCSP, and NlugCSP9, suggesting that these genes likely developed from a common ancestral gene. The FoccCSP gene expression profile of different tissues and development stages was measured by quantitative real-time PCR. The results of this analysis revealed this gene is predominantly expressed in the antennae and also highly expressed in the first instar nymph, suggesting a function for FoccCSP in olfactory reception and in particular life activities during the first instar nymph stage. We expressed recombinant FoccCSP protein in a prokaryotic expression system and purified FoccCSP protein by affinity chromatography using a Ni-NTA-Sepharose column. Using N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine (1-NPN as a fluorescent probe in fluorescence-based competitive binding assay, we determined the binding affinities of 19 volatile substances for FoccCSP protein. This analysis revealed that anisic aldehyde, geraniol and methyl salicylate have high binding affinities for FoccCSP, with KD values of 10.50, 15.35 and 35.24 μM, respectively. Thus, our study indicates that FoccCSP may play an important role in

  1. Competitive binding thyroid assay with improved bound-free separation step

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    A competitive binding assay is described for serum thyroid hormone using 125 I-labelled thyroid hormone and exogenous thyroid hormone binding protein. The unbound thyroid hormone is separated from thyroid hormone bound to thyroid hormone binding protein using an intermediate base anion exchange resin. This resin comprises tertiary and quaternary amine groups on a polyalkyleneamine lattice and is compressed with microcrystalline cellulose in a tablet form. The assay technique of the present invention employing an intermediate base anion resin was found to give superior results compared with alternative assay techniques used in serum thyroid hormone estimation. (UK)

  2. A FRET-based high throughput screening assay to identify inhibitors of anthrax protective antigen binding to capillary morphogenesis gene 2 protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Rogers

    Full Text Available Anti-angiogenic therapies are effective for the treatment of cancer, a variety of ocular diseases, and have potential benefits in cardiovascular disease, arthritis, and psoriasis. We have previously shown that anthrax protective antigen (PA, a non-pathogenic component of anthrax toxin, is an inhibitor of angiogenesis, apparently as a result of interaction with the cell surface receptors capillary morphogenesis gene 2 (CMG2 protein and tumor endothelial marker 8 (TEM8. Hence, molecules that bind the anthrax toxin receptors may be effective to slow or halt pathological vascular growth. Here we describe development and testing of an effective homogeneous steady-state fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET high throughput screening assay designed to identify molecules that inhibit binding of PA to CMG2. Molecules identified in the screen can serve as potential lead compounds for the development of anti-angiogenic and anti-anthrax therapies. The assay to screen for inhibitors of this protein-protein interaction is sensitive and robust, with observed Z' values as high as 0.92. Preliminary screens conducted with a library of known bioactive compounds identified tannic acid and cisplatin as inhibitors of the PA-CMG2 interaction. We have confirmed that tannic acid both binds CMG2 and has anti-endothelial properties. In contrast, cisplatin appears to inhibit PA-CMG2 interaction by binding both PA and CMG2, and observed cisplatin anti-angiogenic effects are not mediated by interaction with CMG2. This work represents the first reported high throughput screening assay targeting CMG2 to identify possible inhibitors of both angiogenesis and anthrax intoxication.

  3. The development of a high-content screening binding assay for the smoothened receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bee, Weilin Tiger; Xie, Wensheng; Truong, Maggie; Will, Matthew; Turunen, Brandon; Zuercher, William J; McMillan, Lynette; Li, Hu; Hornberger, Keith R; Davenport, Elizabeth A; Ames, Robert S; Kallal, Lorena A

    2012-08-01

    In this study, the development of an image-based high-content screening (HCS) binding assay for the seven-transmembrane (7TM) receptor Smoothened (Smo) is described. Using BacMam-based gene delivery of Smo, BODIPY-cyclopamine as a fluorescent probe, and a confocal imaging system, a robust 384-well assay that could be used for high-throughput compound profiling activities was developed. The statistically robust HCS binding assay was developed through optimization of multiple parameters, including cell transduction conditions, Smo expression levels, the image analysis algorithm, and staining procedures. Evaluation of structurally diverse compounds, including functional Smo activators, inhibitors, and related analogs, demonstrated good compound potency correlations between high-content imaging binding, membrane fluorescence polarization binding, and gene reporter assays. Statistical analysis of data from a screening test set of compounds at a single 10-µM concentration suggested that the high-content imaging Smo binding assay is amenable for use in hit identification. The 384-well HCS assay was rapidly developed and met statistical assay performance targets, thus demonstrating its utility as a fluorescent whole-cell binding assay suitable for compound screening and profiling.

  4. Peptide Binding to HLA Class I Molecules: Homogenous, High-Throughput Screening, and Affinity Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harndahl, Mikkel; Justesen, Sune Frederik Lamdahl; Lamberth, Kasper

    2009-01-01

    The Human MHC Project aims at large-scale description of peptide-HLA binding to a wide range of HLA molecules covering all populations of the world and the accompanying generation of bioinformatics tools capable of predicting binding of any given peptide to any given HLA molecule. Here, the authors...... the luminescent oxygen channeling immunoassay technology (abbreviated LOCI and commercialized as AlphaScreen (TM)). Compared with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based peptide-HLA class I binding assay, the LOCI assay yields virtually identical affinity measurements, although having a broader dynamic range...

  5. Rapid, radiochemical-ligand binding assay for methotrexate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caston, J.D.

    1976-01-01

    A radiochemical ligand binding assay for methotrexate is provided. A binder factor comprising a partially purified dihydrofolic acid reductase preparation is employed. The binder factor is conveniently prepared by homogenizing a factor containing animal organ such as liver, and extracting with isotonic saline and ammonium sulfate. A binder cofactor, NADPH 2 , is also employed in the binding reaction. The procedure contemplates both direct and sequential assay techniques, and it is not interfered with by vast excesses of many natural folate derivatives. 12 claims, 6 drawing figures

  6. A cell-based MHC stabilization assay for the detection of peptide binding to the canine classical class I molecule, DLA-88.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Peter; Holmes, Jennifer C; Gojanovich, Gregory S; Hess, Paul R

    2012-12-15

    Identifying immunodominant CTL epitopes is essential for studying CD8+ T-cell responses in populations, but remains difficult, as peptides within antigens typically are too numerous for all to be synthesized and screened. Instead, to facilitate discovery, in silico scanning of proteins for sequences that match the motif, or binding preferences, of the restricting MHC class I allele - the largest determinant of immunodominance - can be used to predict likely candidates. The high false positive rate with this analysis ideally requires binding confirmation, which is obtained routinely by an assay using cell lines such as RMA-S that have defective transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) machinery, and consequently, few surface class I molecules. The stabilization and resultant increased life-span of peptide-MHC complexes on the cell surface by the addition of true binders validates their identity. To determine whether a similar assay could be developed for dogs, we transfected a prevalent class I allele, DLA-88*50801, into RMA-S. In the BARC3 clone, the recombinant heavy chain was associated with murine β2-microglobulin, and importantly, could differentiate motif-matched and -mismatched peptides by surface MHC stabilization. This work demonstrates the potential to use RMA-S cells transfected with canine alleles as a tool for CTL epitope discovery in this species. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Microbead agglutination based assays

    KAUST Repository

    Castro, David

    2013-11-28

    A method for detecting the presence of an analyte in a sample can include adding a plurality of microparticles of a first-type to the sample, where each microparticle of the first-type includes a first binding partner configured to interact with at least a first portion of the analyte, adding a plurality of microparticles of a second-type to the sample, where each microparticle of the second-type includes a second binding partner configured to interact with at least a second portion of the analyte, the first portion of the analyte being different from the second portion of the analyte, and identifying an aggregate including at least one microparticle of the first-type, at least one microparticle of the second-type and the analyte, where the aggregate indicates the presence of the analyte.

  8. Progress on the application of ligand receptor binding assays in radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xue; Qian Jinping; Kong Aiying; Zhu Lin

    2010-01-01

    Receptor binding assay is an important drug screening method, which can quickly and inexpensively study the interactions between the targeted receptor and the potential ligands in vitro and provide the information of the relative binding affinity of ligand-receptor. The imaging of many radiopharmaceuticals is based on highly selective radioligand-receptor binding. The technique plays an important role in the design and screening of receptor-targeting radiopharmaceuticals. (authors)

  9. Development of homogeneous luminescence assays for histone demethylase catalysis and binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Akane; Tumber, Anthony; Rose, Nathan R; King, Oliver N F; Daniel, Michelle; Oppermann, Udo; Heightman, Tom D; Schofield, Christopher

    2010-09-01

    Covalent modifications to histones play important roles in chromatin dynamics and the regulation of gene expression. The JumonjiC (JmjC)-containing histone demethylases (HDMs) catalyze the demethylation of methylated lysine residues on histone tails. Here we report the development of homogeneous luminescence-based assay methods for measuring the catalytic activity and the binding affinities of peptides to HDMs. The assays use amplified luminescent proximity homogeneous assay (ALPHA) technology, are sensitive and robust, and can be used for small molecule inhibitor screening of HDMs. We have profiled known inhibitors of JMJD2E and demonstrate a correlation between the inhibitor potencies determined by the ALPHA and other types of assays. Although this study focuses on the JMJD2E isoform, the catalytic turnover and binding assays described here can be used in studies on other HDMs. The assays should be useful for the development of small molecule inhibitors selective for HDM isoforms. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A sensitive competitive binding assay for exogenous and endogenous heparins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawes, J.; Pepper, D.S.

    1982-01-01

    A new type of assay for heparins has been devised, in which the test material competes with 125 I-labelled heparin for binding to protamine-Sepharose. The assay is very sensitive and will measure heparin concentrations down to 10 ng ml-1. It responds to both the degree of sulphation and the molecular weight of acidic polysaccharides, but is independent of their biological activities. It can be used to quantitate heparins in biological fluids after pretreatment of the samples with protease. In this way endogenous heparins were measured in normal human serum, plasma and urine. The assay is extremely versatile and has great potential for the investigation of endogenous and exogenous heparins

  11. IgG subclasses quantitation: Analytical performance of The Binding Site SPAPLUS® human assay and comparison with Siemens BNII® assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarnago, Ana; Pascual, Rosa M; Moreno, María J; Laíz, Begoña; Fuster, Oscar

    2018-01-01

    Accurate evaluation of analyzers is highly recommended before these devices are broadly introduced for routine testing. Concerning quantification of IgG subclasses (IgGSc), standardization has not yet been reached and thus different assays might lead to different results. Here we report the analytical performances of The Binding Site (TBS) SPA PLUS ® human IgGSc assay and the concordance with the Siemens BNII® human IgGSc assay. We evaluated precision, LoB, LoD and linearity of TBS SPA PLUS ® human IgGSc immunoassay. Quantitation of IgGSc in 53 patients' serum samples was performed in parallel on both analyzers. Results from both assays were compared. Analytical performances of the TBS SPA PLUS ® human IgGSc assay are acceptable for routine clinical use. According to the method comparison study, TBS assay measures lower values than Siemens assay for IgG1 and IgG4, whereas for IgG2 and IgG3 TBS provides greater values. All assays present a proportional bias, greater in the case of IgG3 and IgG4 assays. Individual subclass agreement, based on the classification of samples within three categories (low, normal and high) according to assay-specific reference intervals, range from 75% (IgG1) to 92% (IgG2). However, total classification agreement over all four subclasses only account for 55% of samples. Results obtained from both assays are not interchangeable. Standardization of IgGSc assay and review of the reference ranges must be accomplished in order to achieve a higher degree of agreement between different methods. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Specific binding-adsorbent assay method and test means

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    A description is given of an improved specific binding assay method and test means employing a nonspecific adsorbent for the substance to be determined, particularly hepatitis B surface (HBsub(s)) antigen, in its free state or additionally in the form of its immune complex. The invention is illustrated by 1) the radioimmunoadsorbent assay for HBsub(s) antigen, 2) the radioimmunoadsorbent assay for HBsub(s) antigen in the form of immune complex with antibody, 3) a study of adsorption characteristics of various anion exchange materials for HBsub(s) antigen, 4) the use of hydrophobic adsorbents in a radioimmunoadsorbent assay for HBsub(s) antigen and 5) the radioimmunoadsorbent assay for antibody to HBsub(s) antigen. The advantages of the present method for detecting HBsub(s) antigen compared to previous methods include the manufacturing advantages of eliminating the need for insolubilised anti-HBsub(s) and the advantages of a single incubation step, fewer manipulations, storability of adsorbent materials, increased sensitivity and versatility of detecting HBsub(s) antigen in the form of its immune complex if desired. (U.K.)

  13. Competitive association binding kinetic assays: a new tool to detect two different binding orientations of a ligand to its target protein under distinct conditions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Hans-Joachim; Strasser, Andrea

    2017-06-01

    Within the last years, for several ligands, binding to G protein-coupled receptors or other target proteins, a binding of the ligand in two different orientations is described. One appropriate experimental technique to detect two different binding orientations is the crystallization of the ligand-protein-complex, but crystallization and subsequent X-ray analysis do not belong to the routine methods. By traditional competitive radioligand equilibrium binding assays, it is not possible to detect or to distinguish between two different binding orientations, but there is a possibility to identify two different binding orientations by performing kinetic competitive radioligand-binding assays. To study the limitations of this new technique, the related differential equations were defined and solved numerically for 8 different sets of rate constants, also considering an experimental error up to ~10%. In principal, the kinetic competitive radioligand binding assay is a suitable technique to detect two different ligand binding orientations. However, the present study shows that this is only possible under distinct conditions: (1) the rate constants of dissociation for both binding orientations of the cold ligand should at least be > 10-fold different to each other and (2) the experimental error should be as small as possible. Although there are some limitations for the experimental usability of this method, it is worthwhile to perform kinetic competitive binding assays, especially if there are hints for two binding orientations of a ligand, e.g. based on molecular modelling studies.

  14. A rapid and simple assay for growth hormone-binding protein activity in human plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, G.; Shaw, M.A.; Amburn, K.

    1988-01-01

    The newly discovered circulating growth hormone binding proteins dictate a re-evaluation of the state of GH in plasma in health and disease as the binding proteins are known to affect GH metabolism and action. We describe a rapid and simple GH-binding assay that allows determination of free and complexed plasma GH, as well as GH-binding protein activity as an index of GH-binding protein levels, with relative ease. The method is based on incubation of plasma with 125 I-GH and separation of bound from free GH on small DEAE-cellulose columns; it can be used on a large scale for routine determinations. The results obtained by this method are comparable to those obtained with the previously used slow and more cumbersome gel filtration technique. Initial data obtained in normal subject and certain disease states show that the bound fraction of plasma GH is similar in men, women and children, is unaffected by pregnancy or acute infection, but is marginally decreased in liver cirrhosis. In acromegaly, binding protein activity also appears normal when allowance is made for partial saturation of the binding proteins by the high prevailing GH levels. The technique we describe should facilitate investigations of normal and abnormal regulation of the GH binding proteins. (author)

  15. Data quality in drug discovery: the role of analytical performance in ligand binding assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wätzig, Hermann; Oltmann-Norden, Imke; Steinicke, Franziska; Alhazmi, Hassan A; Nachbar, Markus; El-Hady, Deia Abd; Albishri, Hassan M; Baumann, Knut; Exner, Thomas; Böckler, Frank M; El Deeb, Sami

    2015-09-01

    Despite its importance and all the considerable efforts made, the progress in drug discovery is limited. One main reason for this is the partly questionable data quality. Models relating biological activity and structures and in silico predictions rely on precisely and accurately measured binding data. However, these data vary so strongly, such that only variations by orders of magnitude are considered as unreliable. This can certainly be improved considering the high analytical performance in pharmaceutical quality control. Thus the principles, properties and performances of biochemical and cell-based assays are revisited and evaluated. In the part of biochemical assays immunoassays, fluorescence assays, surface plasmon resonance, isothermal calorimetry, nuclear magnetic resonance and affinity capillary electrophoresis are discussed in details, in addition radiation-based ligand binding assays, mass spectrometry, atomic force microscopy and microscale thermophoresis are briefly evaluated. In addition, general sources of error, such as solvent, dilution, sample pretreatment and the quality of reagents and reference materials are discussed. Biochemical assays can be optimized to provide good accuracy and precision (e.g. percental relative standard deviation data quality are still advancing and will further advance the progress in drug development.

  16. Coupling the Torpedo microplate-receptor binding assay with mass spectrometry to detect cyclic imine neurotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aráoz, Rómulo; Ramos, Suzanne; Pelissier, Franck; Guérineau, Vincent; Benoit, Evelyne; Vilariño, Natalia; Botana, Luis M; Zakarian, Armen; Molgó, Jordi

    2012-12-04

    Cyclic imine neurotoxins constitute an emergent family of neurotoxins of dinoflagellate origin that are potent antagonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. We developed a target-directed functional method based on the mechanism of action of competitive agonists/antagonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors for the detection of marine cyclic imine neurotoxins. The key step for method development was the immobilization of Torpedo electrocyte membranes rich in nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on the surface of microplate wells and the use of biotinylated-α-bungarotoxin as tracer. Cyclic imine neurotoxins competitively inhibit biotinylated-α-bungarotoxin binding to Torpedo-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in a concentration-dependent manner. The microplate-receptor binding assay allowed rapid detection of nanomolar concentrations of cyclic imine neurotoxins directly in shellfish samples. Although highly sensitive and specific for the detection of neurotoxins targeting nicotinic acetylcholine receptors as a class, the receptor binding assay cannot identify a given analyte. To address the low selectivity of the microplate-receptor binding assay, the cyclic imine neurotoxins tightly bound to the coated Torpedo nicotinic receptor were eluted with methanol, and the chemical nature of the eluted ligands was identified by mass spectrometry. The immobilization of Torpedo electrocyte membranes on the surface of microplate wells proved to be a high-throughput format for the survey of neurotoxins targeting nicotinic acetylcholine receptors directly in shellfish matrixes with high sensitivity and reproducibility.

  17. Binding of 3H-iloprost to rat gastric mucosa: a pitfall in performing radioligand binding assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beinborn, M.; Kromer, W.; Staar, U.; Sewing, K.F.

    1985-01-01

    Binding of 3 H-iloprost was studied in a 20,000 x g sediment of the rat gastric mucosa. When pH in both test tubes for total and non-specific binding was kept identical, no displaceable binding of iloprost could be detected. When no care was taken to keep the pH identical in corresponding test tubes of the binding assay, changes in pH simulated specific and displaceable binding of iloprost. Therefore it is concluded that - in contrast to earlier reports - it is not possible to demonstrate specific iloprost binding using the given method

  18. A Soluble Fluorescent Binding Assay Reveals PIP2 Antagonism of TREK-1 Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerrone Cabanos

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Lipid regulation of ion channels by low-abundance signaling lipids phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2 and phosphatidic acid (PA has emerged as a central cellular mechanism for controlling ion channels and the excitability of nerves. A lack of robust assays suitable for facile detection of a lipid bound to a channel has hampered the probing of the lipid binding sites and measuring the pharmacology of putative lipid agonists for ion channels. Here, we show a fluorescent PIP2 competition assay for detergent-purified potassium channels, including TWIK-1-related K+-channel (TREK-1. Anionic lipids PA and phosphatidylglycerol (PG bind dose dependently (9.1 and 96 μM, respectively and agonize the channel. Our assay shows PIP2 binds with high affinity (0.87 μM but surprisingly can directly antagonize TREK-1 in liposomes. We propose a model for TREK-1 lipid regulation where PIP2 can compete with PA and PG agonism based on the affinity of the lipid for a site within the channel.

  19. Single-experiment displacement assay for quantifying high-affinity binding by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainer, Georg; Keller, Sandro

    2015-04-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is the gold standard for dissecting the thermodynamics of a biomolecular binding process within a single experiment. However, reliable determination of the dissociation constant (KD) from a single titration is typically limited to the range 100 μM>KD>1 nM. Interactions characterized by a lower KD can be assessed indirectly by so-called competition or displacement assays, provided that a suitable competitive ligand is available whose KD falls within the directly accessible window. However, this protocol is limited by the fact that it necessitates at least two titrations to characterize one high-affinity inhibitor, resulting in considerable consumption of both sample material and time. Here, we introduce a fast and efficient ITC displacement assay that allows for the simultaneous characterization of both a high-affinity ligand and a moderate-affinity ligand competing for the same binding site on a receptor within a single experiment. The protocol is based on a titration of the high-affinity ligand into a solution containing the moderate-affinity ligand bound to the receptor present in excess. The resulting biphasic binding isotherm enables accurate and precise determination of KD values and binding enthalpies (ΔH) of both ligands. We discuss the theoretical background underlying the approach, demonstrate its practical application to metal ion chelation, explore its potential and limitations with the aid of simulations and statistical analyses, and elaborate on potential applications to protein-inhibitor interactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of a Surface Plasmon Resonance Assay for the Characterization of Small-Molecule Binding Kinetics and Mechanism of Binding to Kynurenine 3-Monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poda, Suresh B; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Nachane, Ruta; Menon, Veena; Gandhi, Adarsh S; Budac, David P; Li, Guiying; Campbell, Brian M; Tagmose, Lena

    2015-10-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), a pivotal enzyme in the kynurenine pathway, was identified as a potential therapeutic target for treating neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. In this article, we describe a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay that delivers both kinetics and the mechanism of binding (MoB) data, enabling a detailed characterization of KMO inhibitors for the enzyme in real time. SPR assay development included optimization of the protein construct and the buffer conditions. The stability and inhibitor binding activity of the immobilized KMO were significantly improved when the experiments were performed at 10°C using a buffer containing 0.05% n-dodecyl-β-d-maltoside (DDM) as the detergent. The KD values of the known KMO inhibitors (UPF648 and RO61-8048) from the SPR assay were in good accordance with the biochemical LC/MS/MS assay. Also, the SPR assay was able to differentiate the binding kinetics (k(a) and k(d)) of the selected unknown KMO inhibitors. For example, the inhibitors that showed comparable IC50 values in the LC/MS/MS assay displayed differences in their residence time (τ = 1/k(d)) in the SPR assay. To better define the MoB of the inhibitors to KMO, an SPR-based competition assay was developed, which demonstrated that both UPF648 and RO61-8048 bound to the substrate-binding site. These results demonstrate the potential of the SPR assay for characterizing the affinity, the kinetics, and the MoB profiles of the KMO inhibitors.

  1. Haptoglobin radioassay based on binding to solid-phase hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, D.C.; Reed, R.A.; Peacock, A.C.

    1979-01-01

    A specific and sensitive assay for haptoglobin based on binding to an easily prepred Sepharose-bound hemoglobin reagent is described. The assay is suitable for directly determining radiolabeled amino acid incorporation into haptoglobin in several liver cell systems in vitro and can be adapted to measure unlabeled free haptoglobin in plasma samples regardlss of the presence of the haptoglobin--hemoglobin complex

  2. Flow Cytometric Bead Sandwich Assay Based on a Split Aptamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Luyao; Bing, Tao; Liu, Xiangjun; Wang, Junyan; Wang, Linlin; Zhang, Nan; Shangguan, Dihua

    2018-01-24

    A few aptamers still bind their targets after being split into two moieties. Split aptamers have shown great potential in the development of aptameric sensors. However, only a few split aptamers have been generated because of lack of knowledge on the binding structure of their parent aptamers. Here, we report the design of a new split aptamer and a flow cytometric bead sandwich assay using a split aptamer instead of double antibodies. Through DMS footprinting and mutation assay, we figured out the target-binding moiety and the structure-stabilizing moiety of the l-selectin aptamer, Sgc-3b. By separating the duplex strand in the structure-stabilizing moiety, we obtained a split aptamer that bound l-selectin. After optimization of one part of the split sequence to eliminate the nonspecific binding of the split sequence pair, we developed a split-aptamer-based cytometric bead assay (SACBA) for the detection of soluble l-selectin. SACBA showed good sensitivity and selectivity to l-selectin and was successfully applied for the detection of spiked l-selectin in the human serum. The strategies for generating split aptamers and designing the split-aptamer-based sandwich assay are simple and efficient and show good practicability in aptamer engineering.

  3. Quantitative Characterization of E-selectin Interaction with Native CD44 and P-selectin Glycoprotein Ligand-1 (PSGL-1) Using a Real Time Immunoprecipitation-based Binding Assay

    KAUST Repository

    Abu Samra, Dina Bashir Kamil

    2015-06-29

    Selectins (E-, P-, and L-selectins) interact with glycoprotein ligands to mediate the essential tethering/rolling step in cell transport and delivery that captures migrating cells from the circulating flow. In this work, we developed a real time immunoprecipitation assay on a surface plasmon resonance chip that captures native glycoforms of two well known E-selectin ligands (CD44/hematopoietic cell E-/L-selectin ligand and P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1) from hematopoietic cell extracts. Here we present a comprehensive characterization of their binding to E-selectin. We show that both ligands bind recombinant monomeric E-selectin transiently with fast on- and fast off-rates, whereas they bind dimeric E-selectin with remarkably slow onand off-rates. This binding requires the sialyl Lewis x sugar moiety to be placed on both O- and N-glycans, and its association, but not dissociation, is sensitive to the salt concentration. Our results suggest a mechanism through which monomeric selectins mediate initial fast on and fast off kinetics to help capture cells out of the circulating shear flow; subsequently, tight binding by dimeric/oligomeric selectins is enabled to significantly slow rolling. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Identification of Lipid Binding Modulators Using the Protein-Lipid Overlay Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tuo-Xian; Xiong, Wen; Finkielstein, Carla V; Capelluto, Daniel G S

    2017-01-01

    The protein-lipid overlay assay is an inexpensive, easy-to-implement, and high-throughput methodology that employs nitrocellulose membranes to immobilize lipids in order to rapid screen and identify protein-lipid interactions. In this chapter, we show how this methodology can identify potential modulators of protein-lipid interactions by screening water-soluble lipid competitors or even the introduction of pH changes during the binding assay to identify pH-dependent lipid binding events.

  5. Liposome-binding assays to assess specificity and affinity of phospholipid-protein interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Julkowska, M.M.; Rankenberg, J.M.; Testerink, C.

    2013-01-01

    Protein-lipid interactions play an important role in cellular protein relocation, activation and signal transduction. The liposome-binding assay is a simple and inexpensive method to examine protein-lipid binding in vitro. The phospholipids used for liposome production are dried and hydrated.

  6. Mitochondrial base excision repair assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maynard, Scott; de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten

    2010-01-01

    The main source of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage is reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during normal cellular metabolism. The main mtDNA lesions generated by ROS are base modifications, such as the ubiquitous 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) lesion; however, base loss and strand breaks may also occur....... Many human diseases are associated with mtDNA mutations and thus maintaining mtDNA integrity is critical. All of these lesions are repaired primarily by the base excision repair (BER) pathway. It is now known that mammalian mitochondria have BER, which, similarly to nuclear BER, is catalyzed by DNA...

  7. A novel flow cytometric HTS assay reveals functional modulators of ATP binding cassette transporter ABCB6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore Polireddy

    Full Text Available ABCB6 is a member of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP-binding cassette family of transporter proteins that is increasingly recognized as a relevant physiological and therapeutic target. Evaluation of modulators of ABCB6 activity would pave the way toward a more complete understanding of the significance of this transport process in tumor cell growth, proliferation and therapy-related drug resistance. In addition, this effort would improve our understanding of the function of ABCB6 in normal physiology with respect to heme biosynthesis, and cellular adaptation to metabolic demand and stress responses. To search for modulators of ABCB6, we developed a novel cell-based approach that, in combination with flow cytometric high-throughput screening (HTS, can be used to identify functional modulators of ABCB6. Accumulation of protoporphyrin, a fluorescent molecule, in wild-type ABCB6 expressing K562 cells, forms the basis of the HTS assay. Screening the Prestwick Chemical Library employing the HTS assay identified four compounds, benzethonium chloride, verteporfin, tomatine hydrochloride and piperlongumine, that reduced ABCB6 mediated cellular porphyrin levels. Validation of the identified compounds employing the hemin-agarose affinity chromatography and mitochondrial transport assays demonstrated that three out of the four compounds were capable of inhibiting ABCB6 mediated hemin transport into isolated mitochondria. However, only verteporfin and tomatine hydrochloride inhibited ABCB6's ability to compete with hemin as an ABCB6 substrate. This assay is therefore sensitive, robust, and suitable for automation in a high-throughput environment as demonstrated by our identification of selective functional modulators of ABCB6. Application of this assay to other libraries of synthetic compounds and natural products is expected to identify novel modulators of ABCB6 activity.

  8. A peptide-binding assay for the disease-associated HLA-DQ8 molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straumfors, A; Johansen, B H; Vartdal, F

    1998-01-01

    The study of peptide binding to HLA class II molecules has mostly concentrated on DR molecules. Since many autoimmune diseases show a primary association to particular DQ molecules rather than DR molecules, it is also important to study the peptide-binding properties of DQ molecules. Here we report...... a biochemical peptide-binding assay for the type I diabetes-associated DQ8, i.e. DQ (alpha1*0301, beta1*0302), molecule. Affinity-purified DQ8 molecules were tested in peptide-binding assays using a radiolabelled influenza haemagglutinin (Ha) peptide encompassing positions 255-271(Y) as an indicator peptide...... of 43 peptides of different lengths and sequences. The DQ8 molecules showed a different pattern of peptide binding compared to a previously studied DQ2 molecule. Peptides derived from thyroid peroxidase, HLA-DQ(alpha1*0301), HLA-DQ(alpha1*0302), retinol receptor and p21ras were among the high...

  9. A robust assay to measure DNA topology-dependent protein binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwin, Tamara R; Solà, Maria; Holt, Ian J; Neuman, Keir C

    2015-04-20

    DNA structure and topology pervasively influence aspects of DNA metabolism including replication, transcription and segregation. However, the effects of DNA topology on DNA-protein interactions have not been systematically explored due to limitations of standard affinity assays. We developed a method to measure protein binding affinity dependence on the topology (topological linking number) of supercoiled DNA. A defined range of DNA topoisomers at equilibrium with a DNA binding protein is separated into free and protein-bound DNA populations using standard nitrocellulose filter binding techniques. Electrophoretic separation and quantification of bound and free topoisomers combined with a simple normalization procedure provide the relative affinity of the protein for the DNA as a function of linking number. Employing this assay we measured topology-dependent DNA binding of a helicase, a type IB topoisomerase, a type IIA topoisomerase, a non-specific mitochondrial DNA binding protein and a type II restriction endonuclease. Most of the proteins preferentially bind negatively supercoiled DNA but the details of the topology-dependent affinity differ among proteins in ways that expose differences in their interactions with DNA. The topology-dependent binding assay provides a robust and easily implemented method to probe topological influences on DNA-protein interactions for a wide range of DNA binding proteins. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research 2014. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  10. Synthesis of Sulochrin-125I and Its Binding Affinity as α-Glucosidase Inhibitor using Radioligand Binding Assay (RBA Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Lestari

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Most of diabetics patients have type 2 diabetes mellitus or non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. Treatment type 2 diabetes mellitus can be done by inhibiting α-glucosidase enzyme which converts carbohydrates into glucose. Sulochrin is one of the potential compounds which can inhibit the function of α-glucosidase enzyme. This study was carried out to obtain data of sulochrin binding with α-glucosidase enzyme as α-glucosidase inhibitor using Radioligand Binding Assay (RBA method. Primary reagent required in RBA method is labeled radioactive ligand (radioligand. In this study, the radioligand was sulochrin-125I and prior to sulochrin-125I synthesis, the sulochrin-I was synthesized. Sulochrin-I and sulochrin-125I were synthesized and their bindings were studied using Radioligand Binding Assay method. Sulochrin-I was synthesized with molecular formula C17H15O7I and molecular weight 457.9940. Sulochrin-125I was synthesized from sulochrin-I by isotope exchange method. From the RBA method, dissociation constant (Kd and maximum binding (Bmax were obtained 26.316 nM and Bmax 9.302 nM respectively. This low Kd indicated that sulochrin was can bind to α-glucosidase

  11. Assaying the binding strength of G-quadruplex ligands using single-molecule TPM experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shih-Wei; Chu, Jen-Fei; Tsai, Cheng-Ting; Fang, Hung-Chih; Chang, Ta-Chau; Li, Hung-Wen

    2013-05-15

    G-quadruplexes are stable secondary structures formed by Hoogsteen base pairing of guanine-rich single-stranded DNA sequences in the presence of monovalent cations (Na(+) or K(+)). Folded G-quadruplex (G4) structures in human telomeres have been proposed as a potential target for cancer therapy. In this study, we used single-molecule tethered particle motion (TPM) experiments to assay the binding strength of possible G4 ligands. We found that individual single-stranded DNA molecules containing the human telomeric sequence d[AGGG(TTAGGG)3] fluctuated between the folded and the unfolded states in a 10 mM Na(+) solution at 37 °C. The durations of folded and unfolded states were single-exponentially distributed, and in return the folding and unfolding rate constants were 1.68 ± 0.01 and 1.63 ± 0.03 (s(-1)), respectively. In the presence of G4 ligands, such as TMPyP4, DODCI, BMVC, and BMVPA, the unfolding rate constant decreased appreciably. In addition, combining the Cu(2+)-induced G4 unfolding and TPM assay, we showed that BMVC and TMPyP4 are better G4 stabilizers than DODCI. The capability of monitoring the fluctuation between the folded and the unfolded state of G4 DNA in real time allows the determination of both kinetic and thermodynamic parameters in a single measurement and offers a simple way to assay binding strength under various conditions. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Radioligand binding assays for high affinity binders in the presence of endogenous ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, H.B. III; McGahan, T.

    1986-01-01

    Endogenous ligands complicate radioligand-binding assays of high-affinity binding proteins by obscuring binding sites or by diluting the labeled ligand. They have developed a mathematical model for such systems where structurally identical radioligand and endogenous ligand can be equilibrated on the binding site and bound radioligand measured. A double-reciprocal plot of bound radioligand, *L/sub B/, versus sample volume, V, yields a straight line. Introduction of scaling factors for sample dilution, F, and total radioligand available, *L/sub T/, produces a plot in which the x-intercept yields the endogenous ligand concentration, [L/sub T/]; the slope is the reciprocal of the binding protein concentration, [P/sub T/] -1 ; and the y-intercept is the fractional saturation of the high-affinity binder, L/sub T//P/sub T/. This type of analysis has been applied to the assay of high-affinity biotin-binding proteins in egg yolk. Its use led to the detection of a second biotin-binding protein which is heat labile. The conceptual approach can be applied to the assay of other high-affinity binders

  13. An assay for the mannan-binding lectin pathway of complement activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Steen Vang; Thiel, S; Jensen, L

    2001-01-01

    the C1 complex, whereas the carbohydrate-binding activity of MBL and the integrity of the MBL complex is maintained under hypertonic conditions. In the assay described here, the specific C4b-depositing capacity of the MBL pathway was determined by incubating serum diluted in buffer containing 1 M NaCl...... deposited on the mannan-coated surface. However, we also found a threefold variation in C4b-depositing capacity between individuals with similar MBL concentrations. The assay permits for the determination of MBL complex activity in serum and plasma samples and may thus be used to evaluate the clinical......The mannan-binding lectin (MBL) pathway of complement activation has been established as the third pathway of complement activation. MBL is a carbohydrate-binding serum protein, which circulates in complex with serine proteases known as mannan-binding lectin associated serine proteases (MASPs...

  14. The Single-Molecule Centroid Localization Algorithm Improves the Accuracy of Fluorescence Binding Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Boyang; Wang, Yanbo; Park, Seongjin; Han, Kyu Young; Singh, Digvijay; Kim, Jin H; Cheng, Wei; Ha, Taekjip

    2018-03-13

    Here, we demonstrate that the use of the single-molecule centroid localization algorithm can improve the accuracy of fluorescence binding assays. Two major artifacts in this type of assay, i.e., nonspecific binding events and optically overlapping receptors, can be detected and corrected during analysis. The effectiveness of our method was confirmed by measuring two weak biomolecular interactions, the interaction between the B1 domain of streptococcal protein G and immunoglobulin G and the interaction between double-stranded DNA and the Cas9-RNA complex with limited sequence matches. This analysis routine requires little modification to common experimental protocols, making it readily applicable to existing data and future experiments.

  15. Radioligand binding assays in the drug discovery process: potential pitfalls of high throughput screenings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noël, F; Mendonça-Silva, D L; Quintas, L E

    2001-02-01

    Radioligand binding assays evaluating directly the ability of a drug to interact with a defined molecular target is part of the drug discovery process. The need for a high throughput rate in screening drugs is actually leading to simplified experimental schemes that increase the probability of false negative results. Special concern involves voltage-gated ion channel drug discovery where a great care is required in designing assays because of frequent multiplicity of (interacting) binding sites. To clearly illustrate this situation, three different assays used in the academic drug discovery program of the authors were selected because they are rich of intrinsic artifacts: (I) (20 mmol/l caffeine almost duplicated [3H]ryanodine binding (89% higher than control) to rat heart microsomes at 0.3 mumol/l free calcium but did not exert any effect when using a high (107 mumol/l) free calcium, as mostly used in ryanodine binding assays; (II) An agonist for the ionotropic glutamate receptor of the kainate type can distinctly affect [3H]kainate binding to chicken cerebellum membranes depending on its concentration: unlabelled kainic acid per se either stimulated about 30% (at 50-100 nmol/l), had no effect (at 200 nmol/l) or even progressively decreased (at 0.3-2 mumol/l) the binding of 5 nmol/l [3H]kainate, emphasizing the risk of using a single concentration for screening a drug; (III) in a classical [3H]flunitrazepam binding assay, the stimulatory effect of a GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) agonist was only observed when using extensively washed rat brain synaptosomes (10 mumol/l GABA increased flunitrazepam binding by 90%). On the other hand, the inhibitory effect of a GABA antagonist was only observed when using crude synaptosomes (10 mumol/l bicuculine reduced [3H]flunitrazepam binding by 40%). It can be concluded that carefully designed radioligand assays which can be performed in an academic laboratory are appropriate for screening a small number of drugs, especially if

  16. A simple, rapid and inexpensive technique to bind small peptides to polystyrene surfaces for immunoenzymatic assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuccuru, Maria Antonietta; Dessì, Daniele; Rappelli, Paola; Fiori, Pier Luigi

    2012-08-31

    Synthetic peptides are widely used in indirect ELISA to detect and characterize specific antibodies in biological samples. Small peptides are not efficiently immobilized on plastic surfaces by simple adsorption, and the conjugation to carrier proteins with different binding techniques is the method of choice. Common techniques to conjugate peptide antigens to carrier proteins and to subsequently purify such complexes are time consuming, expensive, and occasionally abrogate immunogenicity of peptides. In this report we describe a simple, fast and inexpensive alternative protocol to immobilize synthetic peptides to plastic surfaces for standard ELISA. The technique is based on use of maleimide-activated bovine serum albumin or keyhole limpet hemocyanin as a protein anchor adsorbed on the polystyrene surface of the microtiter plate. Following adsorption of the carrier protein, sulfhydryl-containing peptides are cross-linked with an in-well reaction, allowing their correct orientation and availability to antibody binding, avoiding the time consuming steps needed to purify the hapten-carrier complexes. The immunoreactivity of peptides was tested by using both monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies in standard ELISA assays, and compared with established coating methods. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Antibody-drug conjugate bioanalysis using LB-LC-MS/MS hybrid assays: strategies, methodology and correlation to ligand-binding assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Gu, Huidong; Liu, Ang; Kozhich, Alexander; Rangan, Vangipuram; Myler, Heather; Luo, Linlin; Wong, Richard; Sun, Huadong; Wang, Bonnie; Vezina, Heather E; Deshpande, Shrikant; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Zheng; Olah, Timothy V; Aubry, Anne-Francoise; Arnold, Mark E; Pillutla, Renuka; DeSilva, Binodh

    2016-07-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are complex drug constructs with multiple species in the heterogeneous mixture that contribute to their efficacy and toxicity. The bioanalysis of ADCs involves multiple assays and analytical platforms. A series of ligand binding and LC-MS/MS (LB-LC-MS/MS) hybrid assays, through different combinations of anti-idiotype (anti-Id), anti-payload, or generic capture reagents, and cathepsin-B or trypsin enzyme digestion, were developed and evaluated for the analysis of conjugated-payload as well as for species traditionally measured by ligand-binding assays, total-antibody and conjugated-antibody. Hybrid assays are complementary or viable alternatives to ligand-binding assay for ADC bioanalysis and PK/PD modeling. The fit-for-purpose choice of analytes, assays and platforms and an integrated strategy from Discovery to Development for ADC PK and bioanalysis are recommended.

  18. A versatile assay for RNA-binding proteins in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strein, Claudia; Alleaume, Anne-Marie; Rothbauer, Ulrich; Hentze, Matthias W; Castello, Alfredo

    2014-05-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) control RNA fate from synthesis to decay. Since their cellular expression levels frequently do not reflect their in vivo activity, methods are needed to assess the steady state RNA-binding activity of RBPs as well as their responses to stimuli. While electrophoresis mobility shift assays (EMSA) have been used for such determinations, their results serve at best as proxies for the RBP activities in living cells. Here, we describe a quantitative dual fluorescence method to analyze protein-mRNA interactions in vivo. Known or candidate RBPs are fused to fluorescent proteins (eGFP, YFP), expressed in cells, cross-linked in vivo to RNA by ultraviolet light irradiation, and immunoprecipitated, after lysis, with a single chain antibody fragment directed against eGFP (GFP-binding protein, GBP). Polyadenylated RNA-binding activity of fusion proteins is assessed by hybridization with an oligo(DT) probe coupled with a red fluorophore. Since UV light is directly applied to living cells, the assay can be used to monitor dynamic changes in RNA-binding activities in response to biological or pharmacological stimuli. Notably, immunoprecipitation and hybridization can also be performed with commercially available GBP-coupled 96-well plates (GFP-multiTrap), allowing highly parallel RNA-binding measurements in a single experiment. Therefore, this method creates the possibility to conduct in vivo high-throughput RNA-binding assays. We believe that this fast and simple radioactivity-free method will find many useful applications in RNA biology.

  19. Progress in Cell Based Assays for Botulinum Neurotoxin Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most potent human toxins known and the causative agent of botulism, and are widely used as valuable pharmaceuticals. The BoNTs are modular proteins consisting of a heavy chain and a light chain linked by a disulfide bond. Intoxication of neuronal cells by BoNTs is a multi-step process including specific cell binding, endocytosis, conformational change in the endosome, translocation of the enzymatic light chain into the cells cytosol, and SNARE target cleavage. The quantitative and reliable potency determination of fully functional BoNTs produced as active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) requires an assay that considers all steps in the intoxication pathway. The in vivo mouse bioassay has for years been the ‘gold standard’ assay used for this purpose, but it requires the use of large numbers of mice and thus causes associated costs and ethical concerns. Cell-based assays are currently the only in vitro alternative that detect fully functional BoNTs in a single assay and have been utilized for years for research purposes. Within the last 5 years, several cell-based BoNT detection assays have been developed that are able to quantitatively determine BoNT potency with similar or greater sensitivity than the mouse bioassay. These assays now offer an alternative method for BoNT potency determination. Such quantitative and reliable BoNT potency determination is a crucial step in basic research, in the development of pharmaceutical BoNTs, and in the quantitative detection of neutralizing antibodies. PMID:23239357

  20. New binding mode to TNF-alpha revealed by ubiquitin-based artificial binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Hoffmann

    Full Text Available A variety of approaches have been employed to generate binding proteins from non-antibody scaffolds. Utilizing a beta-sheet of the human ubiquitin for paratope creation we obtained binding proteins against tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha. The bioactive form of this validated pharmacological target protein is a non-covalently linked homo-trimer. This structural feature leads to the observation of a certain heterogeneity concerning the binding mode of TNF-alpha binding molecules, for instance in terms of monomer/trimer specificity. We analyzed a ubiquitin-based TNF-alpha binder, selected by ribosome display, with a particular focus on its mode of interaction. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, specific binding to TNF-alpha with nanomolar affinity was observed. In isothermal titration calorimetry we obtained comparable results regarding the affinity and detected an exothermic reaction with one ubiquitin-derived binding molecule binding one TNF-alpha trimer. Using NMR spectroscopy and other analytical methods the 1:3 stoichiometry could be confirmed. Detailed binding analysis showed that the interaction is affected by the detergent Tween-20. Previously, this phenomenon was reported only for one other type of alternative scaffold-derived binding proteins--designed ankyrin repeat proteins--without further investigation. As demonstrated by size exclusion chromatography and NMR spectroscopy, the presence of the detergent increases the association rate significantly. Since the special architecture of TNF-alpha is known to be modulated by detergents, the access to the recognized epitope is indicated to be restricted by conformational transitions within the target protein. Our results suggest that the ubiquitin-derived binding protein targets a new epitope on TNF-alpha, which differs from the epitopes recognized by TNF-alpha neutralizing antibodies.

  1. An Efficient and Economical Assay to Screen for Triclosan Binding to FabI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demissie, Robel D; Kabre, Pauline; Tuntland, Micheal L; Fung, Leslie W-M

    2016-04-01

    Triclosan is an effective inhibitor for enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase (ENR) in fatty acid biosynthesis. Triclosan-resistant mutants of ENR have emerged. Thus, it is important to detect these triclosan-resistant mutations in ENR. Generally, enzyme activity assays on the mutants are used to determine the effect of triclosan on ENR activity. Since the substrates are linked to acyl carrier protein (ACP), the assays are challenging due to the need to prepare the ACP and link it to the substrates. Non-ACP-linked (coenzyme A [CoA]-linked) substrates can be used in some ENR, but not in all. Consequently, screening for triclosan-resistant mutants is also challenging. We have developed a simple thermal shift assay, which does not use ACP-linked substrates, to determine the binding ability of triclosan to the ENR active site, and thus it can be used for screening for triclosan-resistant mutants. Staphylococcus aureus FabI enzyme and its mutants were used to demonstrate the binding ability of triclosan with NADP(+) to FabI. The direct correlation between the binding ability and enzyme activity was demonstrated with Francisella tularensis FabI. This method may also be applied to select effective triclosan analogues that inhibit ENR activity. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  2. Functional recombinant MHC class II molecules and high-throughput peptide-binding assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Sune; Harndahl, Mikkel; Lamberth, Kasper

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Molecules of the class II major histocompability complex (MHC-II) specifically bind and present exogenously derived peptide epitopes to CD4+ T helper cells. The extreme polymorphism of the MHC-II hampers the complete analysis of peptide binding. It is also a significant hurdle......-II molecules and accompanying HTS peptide-binding assay were successfully developed for nine different MHC-II molecules including the DPA1*0103/DPB1*0401 (DP401) and DQA1*0501/DQB1*0201, where both alpha and beta chains are polymorphic, illustrating the advantages of producing the two chains separately....... CONCLUSION: We have successfully developed versatile MHC-II resources, which may assist in the generation of MHC class II -wide reagents, data, and tools....

  3. Characterization of the novel progestin gestodene by receptor binding studies and transactivation assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrmann, U; Slater, E P; Fritzemeier, K H

    1995-01-01

    Gestodene is a novel progestin used in oral contraceptives with an increased separation of progestogenic versus androgenic activity and a distinct antimineralocorticoid activity. This specific pharmacological profile of gestodene is defined by its pattern of binding affinities to a variety of steroid hormone receptors. In the present study the affinity of gestodene to the progesterone receptor (PR), the androgen receptor (AR), the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the estrogen receptor (ER) was re-evaluated by steroid binding assays and compared to those obtained for 3-keto-desogestrel and progesterone. The two synthetic progestins displayed identical high affinity to rabbit PR and similar marked binding to rat AR and GR, while progesterone showed high affinity to PR but only low binding to AR and GR. Furthermore, 3-keto-desogestrel exhibited almost no binding to MR, whereas gestodene, similar to progesterone, showed marked affinity to this receptor. In addition to receptor binding studies, transactivation assays were carried out to investigate the effects of gestodene on AR-, GR- and MR-mediated induction of transcription. In contrast to progesterone, which showed antiandrogenic activity, gestodene and 3-keto-desogestrel both exhibited androgenic activity. Furthermore, all three progestins exhibited weak GR-mediated antagonistic activity. In contrast to progesterone, which showed almost no glucocorticoid activity, gestodene and 3-keto-desogestrel showed weak glucocorticoid action. In addition, gestodene inhibited the aldosterone-induced reporter gene transcription, similar to progesterone, whereas unlike progesterone, gestodene did not induce reporter gene transcription. 3-Keto-desogestrel showed neither antimineralocorticoid nor mineralocorticoid action.

  4. Assay for intrinsic factor based on blocking of the R binder of gastric juice by cobinamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begley, J.A.; Trachtenberg, A.

    1979-01-01

    An in vitro assay for measurement of gastric juice intrinsic factor (IF) was developed based on the ability of the cobinamide (Cbi) [(CN, OH) Cbi] to bind to the gastric juice R-type binders of cobalamin (Cbl) and not to the IF binder. Subsequently added radioactive Cbl, CN-[ 57 Co] Cbl, binds only to the IF binders and allows for direct measurement of this Cbl binding protein. This Cbi blocking assay was found to function as well as the more conventional methods of IF measurement, G-100 column chromatography, and IF blocking antibody assay. The present assay has the advantage of eliminating the need for elaborate forms of protein separation and does not rely on a source of antibody

  5. Estrogen receptor determination in endometrial carcinoma: ligand binding assay versus enzyme immunoassay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyholm, H C; Nielsen, Anette Lynge; Lyndrup, J

    1995-01-01

    We compared concentrations of cytosolic estrogen receptors (ERc) measured in 35 postmenopausal endometrial carcinomas by ligand binding method (LBA) (dextran-coated charcoal assay) and enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Correlations between ERc, nuclear estrogen receptors (ERn) determined by EIA, and cyto......We compared concentrations of cytosolic estrogen receptors (ERc) measured in 35 postmenopausal endometrial carcinomas by ligand binding method (LBA) (dextran-coated charcoal assay) and enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Correlations between ERc, nuclear estrogen receptors (ERn) determined by EIA......, and cytosolic progesterone receptors (PR) measured by LBA were also studied. While ERc concentrations determined by LBA and EIA were highly correlated (r: 0.94), ERc values detected by LBA were approximately twice those found by EIA (median values of ERc: 155 vs. 64 fmol/mg cytosol protein, DCC vs. EIA......). The percentages of ERc positive tumors were 89% by LBA and 77% by EIA. The median fraction of total ER present as ERn was 63%. PR levels correlated positively with ERn concentrations (r: 0.73). We explore possible reasons why greater concentrations of ERc are determined by estradiol binding than by the ER-EIA kit...

  6. Identification of Rift Valley fever virus nucleocapsid protein-RNA binding inhibitors using a high-throughput screening assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenbecker, Mary; Lanchy, Jean-Marc; Lodmell, J Stephen

    2012-09-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an emerging infectious pathogen that causes severe disease in humans and livestock and has the potential for global spread. Currently, there is no proven effective treatment for RVFV infection, and there is no licensed vaccine. Inhibition of RNA binding to the essential viral nucleocapsid (N) protein represents a potential antiviral therapeutic strategy because all of the functions performed by N during infection involve RNA binding. To target this interaction, we developed a fluorescence polarization-based high-throughput drug-screening assay and tested 26 424 chemical compounds for their ability to disrupt an N-RNA complex. From libraries of Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs, druglike molecules, and natural product extracts, we identified several lead compounds that are promising candidates for medicinal chemistry.

  7. Methodology for benzodiazepine receptor binding assays at physiological temperature. Rapid change in equilibrium with falling temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Benzodiazepine receptors of rat cerebellum were assayed with [ 3 H]-labeled flunitrazepam at 37 0 C, and assays were terminated by filtration in a cold room according to one of three protocols: keeping each sample at 37 degrees C until ready for filtration, taking the batch of samples (30) into the cold room and filtering sequentially in the order 1-30, and taking the batch of 30 samples into the cold room and filtering sequentially in the order 30-1. the results for each protocol were substantially different from each other, indicating that rapid disruption of equilibrium occurred as the samples cooled in the cold room while waiting to be filtered. Positive or negative cooperativity of binding was apparent, and misleading effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid on the affinity of diazepam were observed, unless each sample was kept at 37 0 C until just prior to filtration

  8. Bacteroides gingivalis-Actinomyces viscosus cohesive interactions as measured by a quantitative binding assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, S.; Ellen, R.P.; Grove, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    There is limited evidence, mostly indirect, to suggest that the adherence of Bacteroides gingivalis to teeth may be enhanced by the presence of gram-positive dental plaque bacteria like Actinomyces viscosus. The purpose of this study was to carry out direct quantitative assessments of the cohesion of B gingivalis and A. viscosus by using an in vitro assay modeled on the natural sequence in which these two species colonize the teeth. The assay allowed comparisons to be made of the adherence of 3 H-labeled B. gingivalis 2561 and 381 to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite beads (S-HA) and A. viscosus WVU627- or T14V-coated S-HA (actinobeads) in equilibrium and kinetics binding studies. A series of preliminary binding studies with 3H-labeled A. viscosus and parallel studies by scanning electron microscopy with unlabeled A. viscosus were conducted to establish a protocol by which actinobeads suitable for subsequent Bacteroides adherence experiments could be prepared. By scanning electron microscopy, the actinobeads had only small gaps of exposed S-HA between essentially irreversibly bound A. viscosus cells. Furthermore, B. gingivalis cells appeared to bind preferentially to the Actinomyces cells instead of the exposed S-HA. B. gingivalis binding to both S-HA and actinobeads was saturable with at least 2 X 10(9) to 3 X 10(9) cells per ml, and equilibrium with saturating concentrations was reached within 10 to 20 min. B. gingivalis always bound in greater numbers to the actinobeads than to S-HA. These findings provide direct measurements supporting the concept that cohesion with dental plaque bacteria like A. viscosus may foster the establishment of B. gingivalis on teeth by enhancing its adherence

  9. Detection of Harmful Algal Toxins Using the Radioligand Receptor Binding Assay. A Manual of Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-12-01

    Marine ecosystems and their resources play major roles in sustaining human population and economic growth in coastal developing countries. These ecosystems are subjected to various natural and human-made threats. Among these are harmful algal blooms (HABs), which are natural phenomena that are increasingly being reported around the globe and responsible for human poisoning through the accumulation of potent toxins in marine food products. The impact of HABs may be aggravated by a limited knowledge of the microalgal species that cause toxic outbreaks, their biology, their diversity, their life cycles, and by poor capabilities for predicting the outbreaks and assessing the degree of HAB toxicity. Other negative factors are the lack of recognition of the disease, the lack of epidemiological data, the lack of adequate and specific treatment and low public awareness. Owing to the profound public health and socioeconomic impact of HABs, many countries have developed and implemented HAB related monitoring programmes and regulatory frameworks. Following a request made by the Philippines during the IAEA General Conference in 1997 to identify possible meaures to address the impacts of HABs, the IAEA initiated related Technical Cooperation projects to assist Member States in strengthening their capacities for prevention, management and mitigation of health and socioeconomic impacts of HABs. Since 1998, the IAEA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have undertaken concerted actions to develop and to validate a radioligand based method, the receptor binding assay (RBA). The RBA is now recognized by the AOAC International as an official method for the detection of paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins. Within the IAEA Technical Cooperation programme, the RBA methodology was transferred to over 23 Member States in Africa, Asia, the Pacific region and Latin America. Transfer of knowledge and relevant equipment has enabled the development and strengthening

  10. Ultrasensitive human thyrotropin (h TSH) immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) set up, through identification and minimization of non specific bindings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peroni, C.N.

    1994-01-01

    An IRMA of h TSH, based on magnetic solid phase separation, was studied especially for what concerns its non specific bindings. These were identified as a product of the interaction between an altered form of radioiodinated anti-h TSH monoclonal antibody ( 125 I-m AB) and the uncoupled magnetizable cellulose particle (matrix). Apparently this form of 125 I-m AB is a type of aggregate that can be partly resolved from the main peak on Sephadex G-200 and further minimized via a single pre-incubation with the same matrix. Solid phase saturation with milk proteins, tracer storage at 4 0 C and serum addition during incubation were also found particularly effective is preventing its formation. These findings were used in order to reproducibly decrease non specific bindings to values 60 /B O ) up to values of 300-500. This way we obtained h TSH radio assays with functional sensitivities of about 0.05 m IU/L and analytical sensitivities of the order of 0.02 m IU/L, which classify them at least as among the best second generation assays and that are excellent indeed for magnetic IRMA s. A more optimistic sensitivity calculation, based on Rodbard's definition, provided values down to 0.008 m IU/L. Such sensitivities, moreover, were obtained in a very reproducible way and all over the useful tracer life. (author). 83 refs, 13 figs, 25 tabs

  11. A homogeneous fluorometric assay platform based on novel synthetic proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vardar-Schara, Goenuel; Krab, Ivo M.; Yi, Guohua; Su, Wei Wen

    2007-01-01

    Novel synthetic recombinant sensor proteins have been created to detect analytes in solution, in a rapid single-step 'mix and read' noncompetitive homogeneous assay process, based on modulating the Foerster resonance energy transfer (FRET) property of the sensor proteins upon binding to their targets. The sensor proteins comprise a protein scaffold that incorporates a specific target-capturing element, sandwiched by genetic fusion between two molecules that form a FRET pair. The utility of the sensor proteins was demonstrated via three examples, for detecting an anti-biotin Fab antibody, a His-tagged recombinant protein, and an anti-FLAG peptide antibody, respectively, all done directly in solution. The diversity of sensor-target interactions that we have demonstrated in this study points to a potentially universal applicability of the biosensing concept. The possibilities for integrating a variety of target-capturing elements with a common sensor scaffold predict a broad range of practical applications

  12. Concepts for the assay of unbound thyroxine (FT4) and thyroxine binding globulin (TBG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odstrchel, G.; Hertl, W.; Ward, F.B.; Travis, K.; Lindner, R.E.; Mason, R.D.

    1977-01-01

    Two new concepts for the assay of thyroid related substances are presented. One assay (FT 4 ) is based on a kinetic measurement of T 4 as it desorbs from binder proteins onto solid-phase T 4 antibody. This reaction can be described by a second order rate equation; r = k (IMA) (FT 4 ). The assay is rapid (2 hours) and gives good agreement (sigma = 0.92) with equilibrium dialysis and a normal range of 0.9 - 2.3 ng/dl. This assay uses a small sample size (25 μl) and is unaffected by drugs such as aspirin and dilantin. Pregnant and estrogen treated women gave normal FT 4 values. A new method for the measurement of functionally active TEG is also presented. In this case the labeled T 4 is partitioned between bovine serum albumin and the patient's samples. The complex is then removed from solution by solid-phase anti-TBG. A curve remiscent of an immunoradiometric assay is obtained. The assay has a sensitivity of 4 μg/ml and is unaffected by aspirin, dilantin or the patient's T 4 concentrations. Correlation with 'rocket' electrophoresis is 0.90. The normal range was 20 +- 7 μg/ml with pregnant women giving values greater than 30 μg/ml. Five hereditary deficient patients gave a value equivalent to zero TBG concentration. (orig.) [de

  13. Calibration and validation of the 14C-labelled polyethylene glycol-binding assay for tannins in tropical browse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mlambo, V.; Makkar, H.P.S.

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluates the radiolabelled polyethylene glycol (PEG)-binding procedure [Silanikove, N., Shinder, D., Gilboa, N., Eyal, M., Nitsan, Z., 1996. Polyethylene glycol-binding to plant samples as an assay for the biological effects of tannins: predicting the negative effects of tannins in Mediterranean browse on rumen degradation. J. Agric. Food Chem. 44, 3230-3234] for tannin analysis, using 27 tropical browse plants. In this method, the amount of PEG bound to a plant sample is assumed to be a reflection of its tannin content. The method was modified to exclude the use of non-tanniniferous substrate for estimating non-specific binding (NSB) in tannin-containing substrates. Non-specific binding values varied widely (0.4-2.8 mg PEG/100 mg DM tannin-free substrate) when the tannin-free substrate was changed from wheat straw to either rye grass or maize shoots. We therefore propose a modified radiolabelled PEG-binding method to estimate the level of PEG-binding (PEGb) to tannin-containing foliage without using tannin-free substrate to correct for non-specific binding. In this approach, incremental levels of each tanniniferous substrate were used to generate PEGb values. The resultant linear response was analysed and tannin activity was expressed as the slope of the response curve (PEGbSlope) observed for each substrate. The slope takes into account the non-specific binding in each substrate, thus PEGbSlope does not require correction for NSB using tannin-free samples. This approach improved the correlation between PEGb and the 125 I-labelled bovine serum albumin precipitation assay. Relationships between the modified PEG-binding assay and radiolabelled bovine serum albumin assay, in vitro tannin bioassay and colorimetric assays are presented. (author)

  14. Alternative Methods for the Detection of Emerging Marine Toxins: Biosensors, Biochemical Assays and Cell-Based Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia Reverté

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of marine toxins in water and seafood may have a considerable impact on public health. Although the tendency in Europe is to consolidate, when possible, official reference methods based on instrumental analysis, the development of alternative or complementary methods providing functional or toxicological information may provide advantages in terms of risk identification, but also low cost, simplicity, ease of use and high-throughput analysis. This article gives an overview of the immunoassays, cell-based assays, receptor-binding assays and biosensors that have been developed for the screening and quantification of emerging marine toxins: palytoxins, ciguatoxins, cyclic imines and tetrodotoxins. Their advantages and limitations are discussed, as well as their possible integration in research and monitoring programs.

  15. Alternative Methods for the Detection of Emerging Marine Toxins: Biosensors, Biochemical Assays and Cell-Based Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverté, Laia; Soliño, Lucía; Carnicer, Olga; Diogène, Jorge; Campàs, Mònica

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of marine toxins in water and seafood may have a considerable impact on public health. Although the tendency in Europe is to consolidate, when possible, official reference methods based on instrumental analysis, the development of alternative or complementary methods providing functional or toxicological information may provide advantages in terms of risk identification, but also low cost, simplicity, ease of use and high-throughput analysis. This article gives an overview of the immunoassays, cell-based assays, receptor-binding assays and biosensors that have been developed for the screening and quantification of emerging marine toxins: palytoxins, ciguatoxins, cyclic imines and tetrodotoxins. Their advantages and limitations are discussed, as well as their possible integration in research and monitoring programs. PMID:25431968

  16. Clinical value of determination of TSH-binding inhibiting immunoglobulins (TBII) by a radioreceptor assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heberling, H.J.; Bierwolf, B.; Lohmann, D.

    1986-01-01

    The clinical value of a commercial kit for determination of TBII was evaluated. 50 patients with untreated Graves' disease, 21 patients with Graves' disease before and during medical therapy, 18 patients after finishing medical therapy and 10 patients after surgical treatment were examined. Besides these, 41 patients with other thyroid diseases and 36 patients without any thyroid disorder were included. In 47 (94%) of 50 patients with untreated Graves' disease TBII were detectable in serum using a TSH standard curve. Binding activities exceeding 10 U/l TSH equivalents were regarded as positive. In other thyroid diseases TBII were negative with the exception of 3 of 22 patient with autonomously functioning thyroid nodules. After 12 months of antithyroid drug treatment of 19 patients the incidence of positive antibody findings was 26%. During follow-up after medical therapy (1-9 years) 7 of 18 patients had increased TBII in correlation with clinical and functional findings. The determination of TBII by TRAK assay proved to be a sensitive and specific method. The assay can be used to differentiate between hyperthyroidism of autoimmune or non-immunogenic origin. Thus the method seems to be helpful for the follow-up under medical treatment of patients with Graves' disease. (author)

  17. Clinical experience with a radioreceptor assay for TSH-binding inhibiting immunoglobulins (TBII)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heberling, H.J.; Bierwolf, B.; Lohmann, D.

    1988-01-01

    The aim was evaluate the clinical value of a commercial kit for determination of TSH-binding inhibiting immunoglobulin (TBII). 47 of 50 patients with untreated hyperthyroid Graves' disease were TBII positive (sensitivity 94%). TBII was in the normal range in all normal volunteers and in patients with simple goiter, thyroid cancer and in most cases of nonimmunogenic hyperthyreoidism (19 of 22). After 12 months antithyroid drug therapy with methimazole of 21 patients the prevalence of positive TBII findings was 28%. In contrast to this, 50 percent of the patients had increased microsomal antibodies at the end of therapy. The determination of TBII by TRAK assay proved to be a sensitive, specific and practical method. The assay can be used to differentiate between hyperthyreoidism of autoimmune or nonimmunogenic origin. Even so this method seems to be helpful for the follow-up during medical treatment of patients with Graves' disease. The results indicate that persistence of increased TBII levels are markers of active Graves' disease and suggest that in this situation ablative measures should be performed. Normalization of TBII on the end of a longstanding antithyroid therapy does not exclude the possibility of relapse in the further course. (author)

  18. Development of a lectin binding assay to differentiate between recombinant and endogenous proteins in pharmacokinetic studies of protein-biopharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Alfred; Minibeck, Eva; Scheiflinger, Friedrich; Turecek, Peter L

    2015-04-10

    Human glycoproteins, expressed in hamster cell lines, show similar glycosylation patterns to naturally occurring human molecules except for a minute difference in the linkage of terminal sialic acid: both cell types lack α2,6-galactosyl-sialyltransferase, abundantly expressed in human hepatocytes and responsible for the α2,6-sialylation of circulating glycoproteins. This minute difference, which is currently not known to have any physiological relevance, was the basis for the selective measurement of recombinant glycoproteins in the presence of their endogenous counterparts. The assay is based on using the lectin Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA), selectively binding to α2,6-sialylated N-glycans. Using von Willebrand factor (VWF), factor IX (FIX), and factor VIIa (FVIIa), it was demonstrated that (i) the plasma-derived proteins, but not the corresponding recombinant proteins, specifically bind to SNA and (ii) this binding can be used to deplete the plasma-derived proteins. The feasibility of this approach was confirmed in spike-recovery studies for all three recombinant coagulation proteins in human plasma and for recombinant VWF (rVWF) in macaque plasma. Analysis of plasma samples from macaques after administration of recombinant and a plasma-derived VWF demonstrated the suitability and robustness of this approach. Data showed that rVWF could be selectively measured without changing the ELISAs and furthermore revealed the limitations of baseline adjustment using a single measurement of the predose concentration only. The SNA gel-based depletion procedure can easily be integrated in existing procedures as a specific sample pre-treatment step. While ELISA-based methods were used to measure the recombinant coagulation proteins in the supernatants obtained by depletion, this procedure is applicable for all biochemical analyses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A Quantitative Fluorescence-Based Lipase Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Lomolino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An easy and fast gel diffusion assay for detecting and monitoring lipase activity by quantification of fluorescein is described. By measuring the intensity of fluorescein, it is possible to obtain a calibration curve with a regression coefficient better than by using the radius of fluorescent haloes. Through the quantification of fluorescence intensity of fluorescein released after the hydrolysis of a fluorescent ester, fluorescein dibutyrate, used as substrate in agar plates, commercial and skimmed milk lipase activity were studied. Moreover, with this method, lipase activity can be monitored in reaction medium that contains compounds which are affected by turbidity or cause measurement interference for UV-spectrophotometer and fluorimeter. In this experiment, boiled skimmed milk was dispersed in the agar gel with fluorescein dibutyrate, and it was used as a reaction medium to mimic natural conditions. The development of such an assay has a potential for applications in industries ranging from pharmaceuticals to food production and monitoring.

  20. Technology Transfer of Isotopes-Based Assay: Strategies and Mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabbada, R.S.D.C.; Rañada, M.L.O.; Mendoza, A.D.L.; Panganiban, R.; Castañeda, S.S.; Sombrito, E.Z.; Arcamo, S.V.R.

    2015-01-01

    Receptor Binding Assay for Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning (PSP RBA) is an isotope-based assay for detection and quantification of PSP toxins in seafood. It was established in the Philippines through a national program based on the recommendations of the Expert Mission sent by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Through the said program, the Philippines Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) was able to put up an RBA facility and develop expertise. Advantages of the technique against Mouse Bioassay (MBA) and high-performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) methods were are established. RBA is being utilized by some developed countries as screening method for Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) Monitoring. However, it was not immediately adopted by the national HAB regulatory body for the following reasons: (1) acceptance of RBA as an official national method of analysis for PSP, (2) logistics and financial concerns in building up and maintaining a RBA facility, (3) considerations on the use of radioactive materials. To address these issues, the Philippines Council for Agriculture, Aquatic and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCAARRD) approved a Grants-In-Aid Project to initiate and to facilitate the transfer of the RBA technology to the monitoring and regulatory body. The project has two major objectives: capacity building and technology transfer. The capacity building focuses on human resources development of HAB monitoring personnel, specifically training on RBA and on the use of radioactive materials. On the other hand, the technology transfer deals with assistance that PNRI may render in establishing the new RBA facility and over-all know-how of the project. In this is poster, the mechanisms and strategies being undertaken by PNRI, in collaboration with the regulatory and monitoring body, to address the limitation of transferring a technology that utilizes radioactive materials including the technical difficulties are presented and discussed. (author)

  1. Efficacy of hyaluronic acid binding assay in selecting motile spermatozoa with normal morphology at high magnification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauri Ana L

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of the hyaluronic acid (HA binding assay in the selection of motile spermatozoa with normal morphology at high magnification (8400x. Methods A total of 16592 prepared spermatozoa were selected and classified into two groups: Group I, spermatozoa which presented their head attached to an HA substance (HA-bound sperm, and Group II, those spermatozoa that did not attach to the HA substance (HA-unbound sperm. HA-bound and HA-unbound spermatozoa were evaluated according to the following sperm forms: 1-Normal morphology: normal nucleus (smooth, symmetric and oval configuration, length: 4.75+/-2.8 μm and width: 3.28+/-0.20 μm, no extrusion or invagination and no vacuoles occupied more than 4% of the nuclear area as well as acrosome, post-acrosomal lamina, neck, tail, besides not presenting a cytoplasmic droplet or cytoplasm around the head; 2-Abnormalities of nuclear form (a-Large/small; b-Wide/narrow; c-Regional disorder; 3-Abnormalities of nuclear chromatin content (a-Vacuoles: occupy >4% to 50% of the nuclear area and b-Large vacuoles: occupy >50% of the nuclear area using a high magnification (8400x microscopy system. Results No significant differences were obtained with respect to sperm morphological forms and the groups HA-bound and HA-unbound. 1-Normal morphology: HA-bound 2.7% and HA-unbound 2.5% (P = 0.56. 2-Abnormalities of nuclear form: a-Large/small: HA-bound 1.6% vs. HA-unbound 1.6% (P = 0.63; b-Wide/narrow: HA-bound 3.1% vs. HA-unbound 2.7% (P = 0.13; c-Regional disorders: HA-bound 4.7% vs. HA-unbound 4.4% (P = 0.34. 3. Abnormalities of nuclear chromatin content: a-Vacuoles >4% to 50%: HA-bound 72.2% vs. HA-unbound 72.5% (P = 0.74; b-Large vacuoles: HA-bound 15.7% vs. HA-unbound 16.3% (P = 0.36. Conclusions The findings suggest that HA binding assay has limited efficacy in selecting motile spermatozoa with normal morphology at high magnification.

  2. Stage-specific adhesion of Leishmania promastigotes to sand fly midguts assessed using an improved comparative binding assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Wilson

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The binding of Leishmania promastigotes to the midgut epithelium is regarded as an essential part of the life-cycle in the sand fly vector, enabling the parasites to persist beyond the initial blood meal phase and establish the infection. However, the precise nature of the promastigote stage(s that mediate binding is not fully understood.To address this issue we have developed an in vitro gut binding assay in which two promastigote populations are labelled with different fluorescent dyes and compete for binding to dissected sand fly midguts. Binding of procyclic, nectomonad, leptomonad and metacyclic promastigotes of Leishmania infantum and L. mexicana to the midguts of blood-fed, female Lutzomyia longipalpis was investigated. The results show that procyclic and metacyclic promastigotes do not bind to the midgut epithelium in significant numbers, whereas nectomonad and leptomonad promastigotes both bind strongly and in similar numbers. The assay was then used to compare the binding of a range of different parasite species (L. infantum, L. mexicana, L. braziliensis, L. major, L. tropica to guts dissected from various sand flies (Lu. longipalpis, Phlebotomus papatasi, P. sergenti. The results of these comparisons were in many cases in line with expectations, the natural parasite binding most effectively to its natural vector, and no examples were found where a parasite was unable to bind to its natural vector. However, there were interesting exceptions: L. major and L. tropica being able to bind to Lu. longipalpis better than L. infantum; L. braziliensis was able to bind to P. papatasi as well as L. major; and significant binding of L. major to P. sergenti and L. tropica to P. papatasi was observed.The results demonstrate that Leishmania gut binding is strictly stage-dependent, is a property of those forms found in the middle phase of development (nectomonad and leptomonad forms, but is absent in the early blood meal and final stages (procyclic

  3. RAINBOW TROUT ANDROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA AND THE HUMAN ANDROGEN RECEPTOR: COMPARISONS IN THE COS WHOLE CELL BINDING ASSAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainbow Trout Androgen Receptor Alpha And Human Androgen Receptor: Comparisons in the COS Whole Cell Binding Assay Mary C. Cardon, L. Earl Gray, Jr. and Vickie S. WilsonU.S. Environmental Protection Agency, ORD, NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, Research Triangle...

  4. Evidence for ProTα-TLR4/MD-2 binding: molecular dynamics and gravimetric assay studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omotuyi, Olaposi; Matsunaga, Hayato; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    During preconditioning, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) selectively activates TLR4/MD-2/Toll/IL-1 receptor-domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-β (TRIF) pathway instead of pro-inflammatory myeloid differentiation protein-88 (MyD88)/MyD88-adaptor-like protein (MAL) pathway. Extracellular prothymosin alpha (ProTα) is also known to selectively activate the TLR4/MD2/TRIF-IRF3 pathway in certain diseased conditions. In the current study, biophysical evidence for ProTα/TLR4/MD-2 complex formation and its interaction dynamics have been studied. Gravimetric assay was used to investigate ProTα/TLR4/MD-2 complex formation while molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was used to study its interaction dynamics. Through electrostatic interaction, full-length ProTα (F-ProTα) C-terminal peptide (aa 91 - 111) superficially interacts with similar TLR4/MD-2 (KD = 273.36 nm vs 16.07 μg/ml [LPS]) conformation with LPS at an overlapping three-dimensional space while F-ProTα is hinged to the TLR4 scaffold by one-amino acid shift-Mosoian domain (aa-51 - 90). Comparatively, F-ProTα better stabilizes MD-2 metastable states transition and mediates higher TLR4/MD-2 interaction than LPS. ProTα via its C-terminal peptide (aa 91 - 111) exhibits in vitro biophysical contact with TLR4/MD-2 complex conformation recognized by LPS at overlapping LPS-binding positions.

  5. Validation of receptor-binding assays to detect antibiotics in goat's milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán, M C; Borràs, M; Nagel, O; Althaus, R L; Molina, M P

    2014-02-01

    The suitability of different receptor-binding assays to detect antibiotics in raw goat's milk was investigated. Detection capability of most β-lactams and tetracyclines assessed applying the Betastar Combo, the SNAP Betalactam, the SNAP Tetracycline, and the Twinsensor tests was at or below maximum residue limits established by European legislation. Regarding test specificity, cross-reactions with antibiotics other than β-lactams and tetracyclines were not found, and no false-positive results were obtained for the Betastar Combo and the SNAP tests when bulk samples of goat's milk were analyzed. For the Twinsensor test, the false-positive rate was 1%. The performance of the Betastar Combo and the SNAP tests was practically unaffected by the milk quality parameters using individual samples of goat's milk collected at points throughout the entire lactation period (false-positive rate, ≤5%). However, a larger number of positive results were obtained by the Twinsensor test in this type of milk sample (>10%), especially in the last weeks of lactation. Interferences related to the use of the preservative azidiol were not observed in any case. Neither were any significant differences found in relation to the interpretation method (visual versus instrumental) applied. In general, the response of the Betastar Combo, SNAP, and Twinsensor tests was optimal for the analysis of bulk caprine milk; thus, they may be used to monitor milk for the presence of β-lactam and tetracycline residues in quality control programs.

  6. Evaluation of a competitive binding assay for cortisol using horse transcortin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahl, F.; Hubl, W.; Schnorr, D.; Doerner, G.

    1978-01-01

    A non-chromatographic competitive binding assay (CBA) using horse transcortin has been employed in the routine measurement of cortisol in plasma, urine and amniotic fluids. Comparing the values with those of a radioimmunoassay (RIA) or a fluorimetric method (FM) an excellent correlation between the three methods both in plasma and urine has been calculated in normal subjects and in patients with various endocrine disorders. In amniotic fluids, however, there were discrepancies between CBA and RIA. Whereas CBA showed no differences, RIA gave significantly higher values in a amniotic fluids of female than of male fetuses. Elevated free plasma cortisol levels observed in patients with prostatic cancer after diethyl stilboestrol diphosphate therapy did not correlate with unconjugated urinary cortisol concentration as measured with CBA and FM. In newborns, a relatively high plasma level found 12 hours after birth was followed by a nadir on the 2nd and 3rd day of life and by an increase until levels of adults on the 5th day of life were reached. (author)

  7. A DNA-Mediated Homogeneous Binding Assay for Proteins and Small Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhao; Hejesen, Christian; Kjelstrup, Michael Brøndum

    2014-01-01

    Optical detection of molecular targets typically requires immobilization, separation, or chemical or enzymatic processing. An important exception is aptamers that allow optical detection in solution based on conformational changes. This method, however, requires the laborious selection of aptamers....... The shift occurs upon binding of a protein, for example, an antibody to its target. We demonstrate nanomolar detection of small molecules such as biotin, digoxigenin, vitamin D, and folate, in buffer and in plasma. The method is flexible, and we also show nanomolar detection of the respective antibodies...

  8. Developing a yeast-based assay protocol to monitor total ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A yeast-based assay protocol developed for detecting oestrogenic activity in activated sludge (AS) supernatant is described. The protocol used Saccharomyces cerevisiae construct RMY/ER-ERE with human oestrogen receptor (ERα) and lacZ reporter genes, and was developed by modifying existing assays for use with AS ...

  9. Imputation for transcription factor binding predictions based on deep learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Qin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the cell-specific binding patterns of transcription factors (TFs is fundamental to studying gene regulatory networks in biological systems, for which ChIP-seq not only provides valuable data but is also considered as the gold standard. Despite tremendous efforts from the scientific community to conduct TF ChIP-seq experiments, the available data represent only a limited percentage of ChIP-seq experiments, considering all possible combinations of TFs and cell lines. In this study, we demonstrate a method for accurately predicting cell-specific TF binding for TF-cell line combinations based on only a small fraction (4% of the combinations using available ChIP-seq data. The proposed model, termed TFImpute, is based on a deep neural network with a multi-task learning setting to borrow information across transcription factors and cell lines. Compared with existing methods, TFImpute achieves comparable accuracy on TF-cell line combinations with ChIP-seq data; moreover, TFImpute achieves better accuracy on TF-cell line combinations without ChIP-seq data. This approach can predict cell line specific enhancer activities in K562 and HepG2 cell lines, as measured by massively parallel reporter assays, and predicts the impact of SNPs on TF binding.

  10. Application of a biotin functionalized QD assay for determining available binding sites on electrospun nanofiber membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Patrick; Senecal, Kris; Nida, Dawn; Magnone, Joshua; Senecal, Andre

    2011-10-24

    The quantification of surface groups attached to non-woven fibers is an important step in developing nanofiber biosensing detection technologies. A method utilizing biotin functionalized quantum dots (QDs) 655 for quantitative analysis of available biotin binding sites within avidin immobilized on electrospun nanofiber membranes was developed. A method for quantifying nanofiber bound avidin using biotin functionalized QDs is presented. Avidin was covalently bound to electrospun fibrous polyvinyl chloride (PVC 1.8% COOH w/w containing 10% w/w carbon black) membranes using primary amine reactive EDC-Sulfo NHS linkage chemistry. After a 12 h exposure of the avidin coated membranes to the biotin-QD complex, fluorescence intensity was measured and the total amount of attached QDs was determined from a standard curve of QD in solution (total fluorescence vs. femtomole of QD 655). Additionally, fluorescence confocal microscopy verified the labeling of avidin coated nanofibers with QDs. The developed method was tested against 2.4, 5.2, 7.3 and 13.7 mg spray weights of electrospun nanofiber mats. Of the spray weight samples tested, maximum fluorescence was measured for a weight of 7.3 mg, not at the highest weight of 13.7 mg. The data of total fluorescence from QDs bound to immobilized avidin on increasing weights of nanofiber membrane was best fit with a second order polynomial equation (R(2) = .9973) while the standard curve of total fluorescence vs. femtomole QDs in solution had a linear response (R(2) = .999). A QD assay was developed in this study that provides a direct method for quantifying ligand attachment sites of avidin covalently bound to surfaces. The strong fluorescence signal that is a fundamental characteristic of QDs allows for the measurement of small changes in the amount of these particles in solution or attached to surfaces.

  11. Application of a biotin functionalized QD assay for determining available binding sites on electrospun nanofiber membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnone Joshua

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The quantification of surface groups attached to non-woven fibers is an important step in developing nanofiber biosensing detection technologies. A method utilizing biotin functionalized quantum dots (QDs 655 for quantitative analysis of available biotin binding sites within avidin immobilized on electrospun nanofiber membranes was developed. Results A method for quantifying nanofiber bound avidin using biotin functionalized QDs is presented. Avidin was covalently bound to electrospun fibrous polyvinyl chloride (PVC 1.8% COOH w/w containing 10% w/w carbon black membranes using primary amine reactive EDC-Sulfo NHS linkage chemistry. After a 12 h exposure of the avidin coated membranes to the biotin-QD complex, fluorescence intensity was measured and the total amount of attached QDs was determined from a standard curve of QD in solution (total fluorescence vs. femtomole of QD 655. Additionally, fluorescence confocal microscopy verified the labeling of avidin coated nanofibers with QDs. The developed method was tested against 2.4, 5.2, 7.3 and 13.7 mg spray weights of electrospun nanofiber mats. Of the spray weight samples tested, maximum fluorescence was measured for a weight of 7.3 mg, not at the highest weight of 13.7 mg. The data of total fluorescence from QDs bound to immobilized avidin on increasing weights of nanofiber membrane was best fit with a second order polynomial equation (R2 = .9973 while the standard curve of total fluorescence vs. femtomole QDs in solution had a linear response (R2 = .999. Conclusion A QD assay was developed in this study that provides a direct method for quantifying ligand attachment sites of avidin covalently bound to surfaces. The strong fluorescence signal that is a fundamental characteristic of QDs allows for the measurement of small changes in the amount of these particles in solution or attached to surfaces.

  12. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cockburn, Darrell; Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical...

  13. Unfolded HLA class I alpha chains and their use in an assay of HLA class-I-peptide binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanigaki, N; Fruci, D; Chersi, A; Butler, R H

    1993-02-01

    Unfolded HLA class I alpha chains were isolated from B-cell lysates by alkaline denaturation and subsequent gel filtration and used for the detection of HLA class-I-peptide binding. Binding to specific peptides in the presence of excess beta 2-microglobulin induced the unfolded alpha chains to refold and acquire a conformation that is specific to folded alpha chains. This conformational change was measured by a specific RIA that involves inhibition of the binding of 125I-labeled HLA-A2 alpha/beta dimers and rabbit anti-HLA-B7 serum absorbed with beta 2-microglobulin. This assay procedure does not require labeling of either test peptides or test class I proteins and does not seem to have specificity degeneracy. It is applicable to the detection of peptide binding by all HLA class I allelic proteins. Evaluation of the assay conditions and HLA allelic specificity of the peptide binding defined by the use of synthetic peptides are described here, including the technical details, specificity, and reproducibility.

  14. Engineering and exploitation of a fluorescent HIV-1 gp120 for live cell CD4 binding assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costantini, Lindsey M.; Irvin, Susan C.; Kennedy, Steven C.; Guo, Feng; Goldstein, Harris; Herold, Betsy C.; Snapp, Erik L.

    2015-01-01

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, binds the host cell receptor, CD4, in the initial step of HIV viral entry and infection. This process is an appealing target for the development of inhibitory drugs and neutralizing antibodies. To study gp120 binding and intracellular trafficking, we engineered a fluorescent fusion of the humanized gp120 JRFL HIV-1 variant and GFP. Gp120-sfGFP is glycosylated with human sugars, robustly expressed, and secreted from cultured human cells. Protein dynamics, quality control, and trafficking can be visualized in live cells. The fusion protein can be readily modified with different gp120 variants or fluorescent proteins. Finally, secreted gp120-sfGFP enables a sensitive and easy binding assay that can quantitatively screen potential inhibitors of gp120-CD4 binding on live cells via fluorescence imaging or laser scanning cytometry. This adaptable research tool should aid in studies of gp120 cell biology and the development of novel anti-HIV drugs. - Highlights: • Development of fluorescent protein labeled HIV-1 envelope gp120. • Imaging of gp120 dynamics and trafficking in live cells. • Quantitative visual assay of antibody-mediated inhibition of gp120 binding to CD4 on live cells

  15. Engineering and exploitation of a fluorescent HIV-1 gp120 for live cell CD4 binding assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costantini, Lindsey M. [Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Irvin, Susan C. [Department of Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Kennedy, Steven C. [Department of Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Guo, Feng [Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Goldstein, Harris; Herold, Betsy C. [Department of Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Snapp, Erik L., E-mail: erik-lee.snapp@einstein.yu.edu [Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, binds the host cell receptor, CD4, in the initial step of HIV viral entry and infection. This process is an appealing target for the development of inhibitory drugs and neutralizing antibodies. To study gp120 binding and intracellular trafficking, we engineered a fluorescent fusion of the humanized gp120 JRFL HIV-1 variant and GFP. Gp120-sfGFP is glycosylated with human sugars, robustly expressed, and secreted from cultured human cells. Protein dynamics, quality control, and trafficking can be visualized in live cells. The fusion protein can be readily modified with different gp120 variants or fluorescent proteins. Finally, secreted gp120-sfGFP enables a sensitive and easy binding assay that can quantitatively screen potential inhibitors of gp120-CD4 binding on live cells via fluorescence imaging or laser scanning cytometry. This adaptable research tool should aid in studies of gp120 cell biology and the development of novel anti-HIV drugs. - Highlights: • Development of fluorescent protein labeled HIV-1 envelope gp120. • Imaging of gp120 dynamics and trafficking in live cells. • Quantitative visual assay of antibody-mediated inhibition of gp120 binding to CD4 on live cells.

  16. 125I anti-immunoglobulin binding assay for the detection and characterization of anti-platelet antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkley, J.; Fabre, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    The binding assay as described in this paper is a very versatile system, and in this study it has been evaluated specifically for the detection of allo- or autoantibodies to platelets in man. The basic assay involves the incubation of a standard number of platelets with dilutions of test sera and the detection of platelet bound immunoglobulin by a second incubation with 125I labeled, immunoadsorbent purified rabbit F(ab') anti-human F(ab')2 (RAH). Of most importance, by varying the number of target platelets in the titrations and looking for binding plateaus, one can readily define conditions of optimum sensitivity for particular serum/platelet combinations. In addition, the assay can be used in conjunction with quantitative absorptions to subdivide complex sera into subspecificities and to give an estimate of the relative amounts of particular antigens on different platelets or other tissue or cell suspensions. One can also use saturating concentrations of RAH in the second incubation, in which case the amount of platelet bound radioactivity is directly related to the amount of first antibody bound to the platelets, and this can be manipulated to give information about serum antibody concentrations and amounts of antigen on the target tissue. The problem of ABO antibodies in this system, optimal conditions for platelet storage for the assay, and techniques for reducing assay backgrounds resulting from immunoglobulin adsorbed to the platelet surface are all evaluated

  17. Comparison of competitive ligand-binding assay and bioassay formats for the measurement of neutralizing antibodies to protein therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finco, Deborah; Baltrukonis, Daniel; Clements-Egan, Adrienne; Delaria, Kathy; Gunn, George R; Lowe, John; Maia, Mauricio; Wong, Teresa

    2011-01-25

    Administration of biological therapeutic proteins can lead to unwanted immunogenicity in recipients of these products. The assessment and characterization of such immune reactions can be helpful to better understand their clinical relevance and how they relate to patient safety and therefore, have become an integral part of a product development program for biological therapeutics. Testing for anti-drug antibodies (ADA) to biological/biotechnology-derived therapeutic proteins generally follows a tiered approach. Samples are initially screened for binding antibodies; presumptive positives are then confirmed in a confirmatory assay; subsequently, confirmed-positive samples may be further characterized by titration and with a neutralizing antibody (NAb) assay. Regulatory guidances on immunogenicity state that assessing the neutralizing capacity of antibodies should preferably be done using functional bioassays, while recognizing that competitive ligand-binding (CLB) assays may be substituted when neutralizing bioassays are inadequate or not feasible. This manuscript describes case studies from four companies in which CLB assays and functional bioassays were compared for their ability to detect neutralizing ADA against a variety of biotechnology-derived therapeutic proteins. Our findings indicate that CLB assays are comparable to bioassays for the detection of NAbs, in some cases offering better detection sensitivity, lower variability, and less matrix interference. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. What Do Chaotrope-Based Avidity Assays for Antibodies to HIV-1 Envelope Glycoproteins Measure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Marina R; Ringe, Rajesh; Sanders, Rogier W; Voss, James E; Moore, John P; Klasse, Per Johan

    2015-06-01

    When HIV-1 vaccine candidates that include soluble envelope glycoproteins (Env) are tested in humans and other species, the resulting antibody responses to Env are sifted for correlates of protection or risk. One frequently used assay measures the reduction in antibody binding to Env antigens by an added chaotrope (such as thiocyanate). Based on that assay, an avidity index was devised for assessing the affinity maturation of antibodies of unknown concentration in polyclonal sera. Since a high avidity index was linked to protection in animal models of HIV-1 infection, it has become a criterion for evaluating antibody responses to vaccine candidates. But what does the assay measure and what does an avidity index mean? Here, we have used a panel of monoclonal antibodies to well-defined epitopes on Env (gp120, gp41, and SOSIP.664 trimers) to explore how the chaotrope acts. We conclude that the chaotrope sensitivity of antibody binding to Env depends on several properties of the epitopes (continuity versus tertiary- and quaternary-structural dependence) and that the avidity index has no simple relationship to antibody affinity for functional Env spikes on virions. We show that the binding of broadly neutralizing antibodies against quaternary-structural epitopes is particularly sensitive to chaotrope treatment, whereas antibody binding to epitopes in variable loops and to nonneutralization epitopes in gp41 is generally resistant. As a result of such biases, the avidity index may at best be a mere surrogate for undefined antibody or other immune responses that correlate weakly with protection. An effective HIV-1 vaccine is an important goal. Such a vaccine will probably need to induce antibodies that neutralize typically transmitted variants of HIV-1, preventing them from infecting target cells. Vaccine candidates have so far failed to induce such antibody responses, although some do protect weakly against infection in animals and, possibly, humans. In the search for

  19. Comparison of cell-based assays for the identification and evaluation of competitive CXCR4 inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneleen Van Hout

    Full Text Available The chemokine receptor CXCR4 is activated by its unique chemokine ligand CXCL12 and regulates many physiological and developmental processes such as hematopoietic cell trafficking. CXCR4 is also one of the main co-receptors for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV entry. Dysfunction of the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis contributes to several human pathologies, including cancer and inflammatory diseases. Consequently, inhibition of CXCR4 activation is recognized as an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. In this regard, numerous agents modifying CXCR4 activity have been evaluated in in vitro experimental studies and pre-clinical models. Here, we evaluated a CXCL12 competition binding assay for its potential as a valuable initial screen for functional and competitive CXCR4 inhibitors. In total, 11 structurally diverse compounds were included in a side-by-side comparison of in vitro CXCR4 cell-based assays, such as CXCL12 competition binding, CXCL12-induced calcium signaling, CXCR4 internalization, CXCL12-guided cell migration and CXCR4-specific HIV-1 replication experiments. Our data indicated that agents that inhibit CXCL12 binding, i.e. the anti-CXCR4 peptide analogs T22, T140 and TC14012 and the small molecule antagonists AMD3100, AMD3465, AMD11070 and IT1t showed inhibitory activity with consistent relative potencies in all further applied CXCR4-related assays. Accordingly, agents exerting no or very weak receptor binding (i.e., CTCE-9908, WZ811, Me6TREN and gambogic acid showed no or very poor anti-CXCR4 inhibitory activity. Thus, CXCL12 competition binding studies were proven to be highly valuable as an initial screening assay and indicative for the pharmacological and functional profile of competitive CXCR4 antagonists, which will help the design of new potent CXCR4 inhibitors.

  20. PK of immunoconjugate anticancer agent CMD-193 in rats: ligand-binding assay approach to determine in vivo immunoconjugate stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Azher; Gorovits, Boris; Leal, Mauricio; Fluhler, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are a new generation of anticancer therapeutics. The objective of this manuscript is to propose a methodology that can be used to assess the stability of the ADCs by using the PK data obtained by ligand-binding assays that measure various components of ADCs. The ligand-binding assays format of different components of ADCs provided unique valuable PK information. The mathematical manipulation of the bioanalytical data provided an insight into the in vivo integrity, indicating that the loading of the calicheamicin on the G193 antibody declines in an apparent slow first-order process. This report demonstrates the value of analyzing various components of the ADC and their PK profiles to better understand the disposition and in vivo stability of ADCs.

  1. Improved receptor analysis in PET using a priori information from in vitro binding assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litton, J.-E.; Hall, H.; Blomqvist, G. [Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Hospital, S-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-08-01

    An accurate determination of non-specific binding is required for the analysis of in vitro and in vivo receptor binding data. For some radioligands the non-specific binding is of the same magnitude as the specific binding. Furthermore, in vitro measurements have shown that the non-specific binding can be different in different brain regions. If this is the case in a PET study for determining B{sub max} and K{sub d}, a correction for the non-specific binding has to be applied. The aim of the present communication is to present a means for determining corrected B{sub max} and K{sub d} with Scatchard analysis using in vitro binding studies. The influence of non-specific binding on the free and specifically bound radioligand is expressed with the aid of a correction factor, which can be calculated from measurable quantities. Introduction of the corrected free and specifically bound radioligand should give binding parameters closer to reality than previously obtained results. (author)

  2. Development of an FgMito assay: A highly sensitive mitochondrial based qPCR assay for quantification of Fusarium graminearum sensu stricto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, Tomasz; Ostrowska, Anna; Buśko, Maciej; Pasquali, Matias; Beyer, Marco; Stenglein, Sebastian; Załuski, Dariusz; Sawicki, Jakub; Treder, Kinga; Perkowski, Juliusz

    2015-10-01

    An ascomycete fungus, Fusarium graminearum sensu stricto (s.s.), is the major cause of Fusarium head blight (FHB), a devastating disease of cereals worldwide. The fungus contaminates crops with mycotoxins, which pose a serious threat to food and feed safety. In this study, we developed a highly sensitive mitochondrial based qPCR assay (FgMito qPCR) for quantification of F. graminearum s.s. To ensure high sensitivity of the assay, primers and a Minor-groove binding (MGB) probe were designed based on multi-copy mitochondrial DNA. The FgMito assay was successfully validated against a range of geographically diverse F. graminearum s.s. strains to ensure uniformity of the assay at an intraspecific level, as well as with other fungal species to ensure specificity. The assay was further evaluated in terms of efficiency and sensitivity against a test panel of different F. graminearum s.s. strains with various levels of pure fungal DNA and in the presence of wheat background DNA. The results showed a high efficiency of the assay developed, ranging from 93% to 101% with r(2)-values of >0.99. We further showed that three low concentrations of fungal template 2 pg, 0.6 pg and 0.2 pg could be reliably quantified in the presence of wheat background DNA. The FgMito assay was used to quantify F. graminearum s.s. DNA on 65 field samples from a range of hosts with defined levels of trichothecenes. We revealed a significant positive correlation between fungal DNA quantity and the sum of trichothecenes. Lastly, we showed a higher sensitivity of the FgMito assay than the nuclear based qPCR assay for F. graminearum s.s. by comparing Ct-values from both assays. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. On the possibility of using polycrystalline material in the development of structure-based generic assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allaire, Marc; Moiseeva, Natalia; Botez, Cristian E.; Engel, Matthew A.; Stephens, Peter W.

    2009-01-01

    The correlation coefficients calculated between raw powder diffraction profiles can be used to identify ligand-bound/unbound states of lysozyme. The discovery of ligands that bind specifically to a targeted protein benefits from the development of generic assays for high-throughput screening of a library of chemicals. Protein powder diffraction (PPD) has been proposed as a potential method for use as a structure-based assay for high-throughput screening applications. Building on this effort, powder samples of bound/unbound states of soluble hen-egg white lysozyme precipitated with sodium chloride were compared. The correlation coefficients calculated between the raw diffraction profiles were consistent with the known binding properties of the ligands and suggested that the PPD approach can be used even prior to a full description using stereochemically restrained Rietveld refinement

  4. Uranium internal exposure evaluation based on urine assay data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, J.N.P.

    1984-09-01

    The difficulties in assessing internal exposures to uranium from urine assay data are described. A simplified application of the ICRP-30 and ICRP Lung Model concepts to the estimation of uranium intake is presented. A discussion follows on the development of a computer code utilizing the ICRP-30-based uranium elimination model with the existing urine assay information. The calculated uranium exposures from 1949 through 1983 are discussed. 13 references, 1 table.

  5. Competitive binding radioassays for 1α-25(OH)2 vitamin D; comparative evaluation of two receptor assays and a radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jallet, P.; Bidet, M.; Audran, M.

    1985-01-01

    The performances of a 1α,25-dihydroxy vitamin D assay using the cytosol receptor of bovine thymus gland were evaluated and compared to the results obtained with an assay based on cytosol receptor of chicK intestine and with a radioimmunoassay [fr

  6. Measurement of Nanomolar Dissociation Constants by Titration Calorimetry and Thermal Shift Assay – Radicicol Binding to Hsp90 and Ethoxzolamide Binding to CAII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilma Michailovienė

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of tight protein-ligand binding reactions by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC and thermal shift assay (TSA is presented. The binding of radicicol to the N-terminal domain of human heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90aN and the binding of ethoxzolamide to human carbonic anhydrase (hCAII were too strong to be measured accurately by direct ITC titration and therefore were measured by displacement ITC and by observing the temperature-denaturation transitions of ligand-free and ligand-bound protein. Stabilization of both proteins by their ligands was profound, increasing the melting temperature by more than 10 ºC, depending on ligand concentration. Analysis of the melting temperature dependence on the protein and ligand concentrations yielded dissociation constants equal to 1 nM and 2 nM for Hsp90aN-radicicol and hCAII-ethoxzolamide, respectively. The ligand-free and ligand-bound protein fractions melt separately, and two melting transitions are observed. This phenomenon is especially pronounced when the ligand concentration is equal to about half the protein concentration. The analysis compares ITC and TSA data, accounts for two transitions and yields the ligand binding constant and the parameters of protein stability, including the Gibbs free energy and the enthalpy of unfolding.

  7. A peptide-binding assay for the disease-associated HLA-DQ8 molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straumfors, A; Johansen, B H; Vartdal, F

    1998-01-01

    The study of peptide binding to HLA class II molecules has mostly concentrated on DR molecules. Since many autoimmune diseases show a primary association to particular DQ molecules rather than DR molecules, it is also important to study the peptide-binding properties of DQ molecules. Here we report...... of 43 peptides of different lengths and sequences. The DQ8 molecules showed a different pattern of peptide binding compared to a previously studied DQ2 molecule. Peptides derived from thyroid peroxidase, HLA-DQ(alpha1*0301), HLA-DQ(alpha1*0302), retinol receptor and p21ras were among the high...

  8. The production of KIR-Fc fusion proteins and their use in a multiplex HLA class I binding assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Hugo G; Moesta, Achim K; Guethlein, Lisbeth A; Blokhuis, Jeroen; Parham, Peter; Norman, Paul J

    2015-10-01

    Soluble recombinant proteins that comprise the extracellular part of a surface expressed receptor attached to the Fc region of an IgG antibody have facilitated the determination of ligand specificity for an array of immune system receptors. Among such receptors is the family of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) that recognize HLA class I ligands. These receptors, expressed on natural killer (NK) cells and T cells, play important roles in both immune defense and placental development in early pregnancy. Here we describe a method for the production of two domain KIR-Fc fusion proteins using baculovirus infected insect cells. This method is more scalable than traditional mammalian cell expression systems and produces efficiently folded proteins that carry posttranslational modifications found in native KIR. We also describe a multiplex binding assay using the Luminex platform that determines the avidity and specificity of two domain KIR-Fc for a panel of microbeads, each coated with one of 97 HLA class I allotypes. This assay is simple to perform, and represents a major improvement over the assays used previously, which were limited in the number of KIR and HLA class I combinations that could be assayed at any one time. The results obtained from this assay can be used to predict the response of NK cell and T cells when their KIR recognize HLA class I. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Optimization of the cost and sensitivity of receptor- and enzyme-based assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Model, M A; Healy, K E

    1999-06-15

    In detecting receptor antagonists or enzyme inhibitors, there are three parameters that often affect the outcome in a predictable quantitative manner: concentrations of the receptors (enzyme), labeled ligand (substrate), and antagonist (inhibitor). The usual goal of assay optimization is to maximize the ability of the assay to detect low concentrations of the analyte. Another question of practical importance, especially in screening of large numbers of samples, would be minimization of the reagent cost. Although the mathematical theory of optimization of the receptor binding assay was developed a long time ago, the resulting formulas (in the general case of unequal affinities of ligand and competitor) were not well suited for practical use. The current availability of computational programs, such as Mathematica, makes possible an efficient solution, both for receptor- and enzyme-based assays. We use a graphical approach to assay optimization and apply it to the following problems: (1) optimization of assay sensitivity, (2) optimization of the reagent cost, and (3) analysis of the entire range of the parameter values since the mathematically optimal values may sometimes be impractical. The computation is extremely simple and the problem can sometimes be solved in several minutes. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  10. Towards a high throughput droplet-based agglutination assay

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2013-10-22

    This work demonstrates the detection method for a high throughput droplet based agglutination assay system. Using simple hydrodynamic forces to mix and aggregate functionalized microbeads we avoid the need to use magnetic assistance or mixing structures. The concentration of our target molecules was estimated by agglutination strength, obtained through optical image analysis. Agglutination in droplets was performed with flow rates of 150 µl/min and occurred in under a minute, with potential to perform high-throughput measurements. The lowest target concentration detected in droplet microfluidics was 0.17 nM, which is three orders of magnitude more sensitive than a conventional card based agglutination assay.

  11. A non-radioactive ligand-binding assay for detection of cyanobacterial anatoxins using Torpedo electrocyte membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aráoz, Rómulo; Herdman, Michael; Rippka, Rosmarie; Ledreux, Aurélie; Molgó, Jordi; Changeux, Jean-Pierre; Tandeau de Marsac, Nicole; Nghiêm, Hoàng-Oanh

    2008-07-01

    Anatoxin-a (ANTX) and homoanatoxin-a (HANTX), neurotoxins exclusively produced by cyanobacteria (LD(50) 200-250 microg kg(-1), i.p. mouse), are agonists of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) to which they tightly bind. We have exploited the high affinity of these neurotoxins for the nicotinic receptors to develop a non-radioactive ligand-binding assay using Torpedo electrocyte membranes and biotinylated alpha-bungarotoxin (Biotin-BgTx) as tracer for detection of this class of toxins. The affinity of the Torpedo nAChRs for Biotin-BgTx was determined by chemiluminescence (K(d)=1.2 x 10(-8)M Biotin-BgTx) or color development (K(d)=3.5 x 10(-8)M Biotin-BgTx). Binding of ANTX or HANTX to the nAChRs competitively inhibits the binding of Biotin-BgTx to the receptors in a concentration-dependent manner (chemiluminescence: IC(50): 6.2 x 10(-8)M ANTX; color development: IC(50): 1.7 x 10(-8)M ANTX). The proposed method was validated by HPLC/MS with detection in the single ion recording mode. The non-radioactive ligand receptor-binding assay was successfully applied to the analysis of extracts prepared from cyanobacteria in culture and from natural habitats, as well as from aqueous samples. This method is suitable for ANTX and HANTX early survey of environmental samples since it requires minimal manipulations, is highly sensitive and gives consistent signal-to-noise ratios.

  12. Determination of low tetanus or diphtheria antitoxin titers in sera by a toxin neutralization assay and a modified toxin-binding inhibition test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Sonobe

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for the screening of tetanus and diphtheria antibodies in serum using anatoxin (inactivated toxin instead of toxin was developed as an alternative to the in vivo toxin neutralization assay based on the toxin-binding inhibition test (TOBI test. In this study, the serum titers (values between 1.0 and 19.5 IU measured by a modified TOBI test (Modi-TOBI test and toxin neutralization assays were correlated (P < 0.0001. Titers of tetanus or diphtheria antibodies were evaluated in serum samples from guinea pigs immunized with tetanus toxoid, diphtheria-tetanus or triple vaccine. For the Modi-TOBI test, after blocking the microtiter plates, standard tetanus or diphtheria antitoxin and different concentrations of guinea pig sera were incubated with the respective anatoxin. Twelve hours later, these samples were transferred to a plate previously coated with tetanus or diphtheria antitoxin to bind the remaining anatoxin. The anatoxin was then detected using a peroxidase-labeled tetanus or diphtheria antitoxin. Serum titers were calculated using a linear regression plot of the results for the corresponding standard antitoxin. For the toxin neutralization assay, L+/10/50 doses of either toxin combined with different concentrations of serum samples were inoculated into mice for anti-tetanus detection, or in guinea pigs for anti-diphtheria detection. Both assays were suitable for determining wide ranges of antitoxin levels. The linear regression plots showed high correlation coefficients for tetanus (r² = 0.95, P < 0.0001 and for diphtheria (r² = 0.93, P < 0.0001 between the in vitro and the in vivo assays. The standardized method is appropriate for evaluating titers of neutralizing antibodies, thus permitting the in vitro control of serum antitoxin levels.

  13. Designing binding kinetic assay on the bio-layer interferometry (BLI) biosensor to characterize antibody-antigen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Vishal; Rafique, Ashique

    2017-11-01

    The Octet biosensors provide a high-throughput alternative to the well-established surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and SPR imaging (SPRi) biosensors to characterize antibody-antigen interactions. However, the utility of the Octet biosensors for accurate and reproducible measurement of binding rate constants of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is limited due to challenges such as analyte rebinding, and mass transport limitation (MTL). This study focuses on addressing these challenges and provides experimental conditions to reliably measure kinetics of mAb-antigen interactions. The mAb capture density of less than 0.6 nm was found to be optimal to measure a wide range of binding affinities on Octet HTX biosensor. The titration kinetic and single cycle kinetic assays performed on Octet HTX generated reproducible binding kinetic parameters and correlated with the values measured on Biacore 4000 and MASS-1. Kinetic assays performed on 0.1 nm density mAb surfaces significantly reduced MTL and enabled characterization of picomolar affinity mAbs. Finally, kinetic analysis performed on 150 antibodies to 10 antigens with molecular weights ranging from 21kD to 105kD showed concordance between Octet HTX, Biacore 4000 and MASS-1 (R 2  > 0.90). The data presented in this study suggest that under optimal experimental conditions, Octet biosensor is capable of generating kinetic values comparable to SPR/SPRi biosensors. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of a VHH-Based Erythropoietin Quantification Assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kol, Stefan; Beuchert Kallehauge, Thomas; Adema, Simon

    2015-01-01

    human EPO was evaluated as a capturing antibody in a label-free biolayer interferometry-based quantification assay. Human recombinant EPO can be specifically detected in Chinese hamster ovary cell supernatants in a sensitive and pH-dependent manner. This method enables rapid and robust quantification...

  15. Cell-based lipid flippase assay employing fluorescent lipid derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Maria Stumph; Costa, Sara; Günther-Pomorski, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    , studies of individual P4-ATPase family members from fungi, plants, and animals show that P4-ATPases differ in their substrate specificities and mediate transport of a broader range of lipid substrates. Here, we describe an assay based on fluorescent lipid derivatives to monitor and characterize lipid...

  16. Zinc blotting assay for detection of zinc binding prolamin in barley (Hordeum vulgare) grain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uddin, Mohammad Nasir; Nielsen, Ane Langkilde-Lauesen; Vincze, Eva

    2014-01-01

    zinc blotting method with a zinc-sensing dye, dithizone. Hordeins were extracted from mature barley grain, separated by SDS-PAGE, blotted on a membrane, renatured, overlaid, and probed with zinc; subsequently, zinc-binding specificity of certain proteins was detected either by autoradiography or color...

  17. In-vitro binding assay study of 99mTc-flouroquinolones with E. coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Muhammad Abdul Qadir

    2014-10-28

    Oct 28, 2014 ... Abstract A simple methodology was developed to evaluate binding efficiency of antibiotic mem- bers of fluoroquinolones, namely ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin and enorfloxacin, complexed with 99mTc, against Escherichia coli, Salmonella and Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial strains. Radioactivity in the pellet ...

  18. In-vitro binding assay study of 99m Tc-flouroquinolones with E. coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A simple methodology was developed to evaluate binding efficiency of antibiotic members of fluoroquinolones, namely ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin and enorfloxacin, complexed with 99mTc, against Escherichia coli, Salmonella and Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial strains. Radioactivity in the pellet, tips supernatant and ...

  19. Label-free detection of kanamycin based on a G-quadruplex DNA aptamer-based fluorescent intercalator displacement assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yun-Peng; Liu, Chun; Zhou, Xiao-Hong; Shi, Han-Chang

    2015-01-01

    This work was the first to report that the kanamycin-binding DNA aptamer (5'-TGG GGG TTG AGG CTA AGC CGA-3') can form stable parallel G-quadruplex DNA (G4-DNA) structures by themselves and that this phenomenon can be verified by nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Based on these findings, we developed a novel label-free strategy for kanamycin detection based on the G4-DNA aptamer-based fluorescent intercalator displacement assay with thiazole orange (TO) as the fluorescence probe. In the proposed strategy, TO became strongly fluorescent upon binding to kanamycin-binding G4-DNA. However, the addition of kanamycin caused the displacement of TO from the G4-DNA-TO conjugate, thereby resulting in decreased fluorescent signal, which was inversely related to the kanamycin concentration. The detection limit of the proposed assay decreased to 59 nM with a linear working range of 0.1 μM to 20 μM for kanamycin. The cross-reactivity against six other antibiotics was negligible compared with the response to kanamycin. A satisfactory recovery of kanamycin in milk samples ranged from 80.1% to 98.0%, confirming the potential of this bioassay in the measurement of kanamycin in various applications. Our results also served as a good reference for developing similar fluorescent G4-DNA-based bioassays in the future.

  20. A new assay format for NF-kappaB based on a DNA triple helix and a fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altevogt, Dominik; Hrenn, Andrea; Kern, Claudia; Clima, Lilia; Bannwarth, Willi; Merfort, Irmgard

    2009-10-07

    Herein we report a feasibility study for a new concept to detect DNA binding protein NF-kappaB based on a DNA triple helix formation in combination with a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The new principle avoids expensive antibodies and radioactivity and might have implications for assays of other DNA binding proteins.

  1. A recombinant fusion protein-based, fluorescent protease assay for high throughput-compatible substrate screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozóki, Beáta; Gazda, Lívia; Tóth, Ferenc; Miczi, Márió; Mótyán, János András; Tőzsér, József

    2018-01-01

    In connection with the intensive investigation of proteases, several methods have been developed for analysis of the substrate specificity. Due to the great number of proteases and the expected target molecules to be analyzed, time- and cost-efficient high-throughput screening (HTS) methods are preferred. Here we describe the development and application of a separation-based HTS-compatible fluorescent protease assay, which is based on the use of recombinant fusion proteins as substrates of proteases. The protein substrates used in this assay consists of N-terminal (hexahistidine and maltose binding protein) fusion tags, cleavage sequences of the tobacco etch virus (TEV) and HIV-1 proteases, and a C-terminal fluorescent protein (mApple or mTurquoise2). The assay is based on the fluorimetric detection of the fluorescent proteins, which are released from the magnetic bead-attached substrates by the proteolytic cleavage. The protease assay has been applied for activity measurements of TEV and HIV-1 proteases to test the suitability of the system for enzyme kinetic measurements, inhibition studies, and determination of pH optimum. We also found that denatured fluorescent proteins can be renatured after SDS-PAGE of denaturing conditions, but showed differences in their renaturation abilities. After in-gel renaturation both substrates and cleavage products can be identified by in-gel UV detection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed CREB and serine 133 phospho-CREB binding to the CART gene proximal promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogge, George A; Shen, Li-Ling; Kuhar, Michael J

    2010-07-16

    Both over expression of cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), and intra-accumbal injection of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptides, have been shown to decrease cocaine reward. Also, over expression of CREB in the rat NAc increased CART mRNA and peptide levels, but it is not known if this was due to a direct action of P-CREB on the CART gene promoter. The goal of this study was to test if CREB and P-CREB bound directly to the CRE site in the CART promoter, using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. ChIP assay with anti-CREB antibodies showed an enrichment of the CART promoter fragment containing the CRE region over IgG precipitated material, a non-specific control. Forskolin, which was known to increase CART mRNA levels in GH3 cells, was utilized to show that the drug increased levels of P-CREB protein and P-CREB binding to the CART promoter CRE-containing region. A region of the c-Fos promoter containing a CRE cis-regulatory element was previously shown to bind P-CREB, and it was used here as a positive control. These data suggest that the effects of CREB over expression on blunting cocaine reward could be, at least in part, attributed to the increased expression of the CART gene by direct interaction of P-CREB with the CART promoter CRE site, rather than by some indirect action. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Identification of Splicing Factors Involved in DMD Exon Skipping Events Using an In Vitro RNA Binding Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miro, Julie; Bourgeois, Cyril F; Claustres, Mireille; Koenig, Michel; Tuffery-Giraud, Sylvie

    2018-01-01

    Mutation-induced exon skipping in the DMD gene can modulate the severity of the phenotype in patients with Duchenne or Becker Muscular Dystrophy. These alternative splicing events are most likely the result of changes in recruitment of splicing factors at cis-acting elements in the mutated DMD pre-mRNA. The identification of proteins involved can be achieved by an affinity purification procedure. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for the in vitro RNA binding assay that we routinely apply to explore molecular mechanisms underlying splicing defects in the DMD gene. In vitro transcribed RNA probes containing either the wild type or mutated sequence are oxidized and bound to adipic acid dihydrazide-agarose beads. Incubation with a nuclear extract allows the binding of nuclear proteins to the RNA probes. The unbound proteins are washed off and then the specifically RNA-bound proteins are released from the beads by an RNase treatment. After separation by SDS-PAGE, proteins that display differential binding affinities for the wild type and mutant RNA probes are identified by mass spectrometry.

  4. Nanopore-based assay for detection of methylation in double-stranded DNA fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jiwook; Kim, Younghoon; Humphreys, Gwendolyn I; Nardulli, Ann M; Kosari, Farhad; Vasmatzis, George; Taylor, William R; Ahlquist, David A; Myong, Sua; Bashir, Rashid

    2015-01-27

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification of DNA in which methyl groups are added at the 5-carbon position of cytosine. Aberrant DNA methylation, which has been associated with carcinogenesis, can be assessed in various biological fluids and potentially can be used as markers for detection of cancer. Analytically sensitive and specific assays for methylation targeting low-abundance and fragmented DNA are needed for optimal clinical diagnosis and prognosis. We present a nanopore-based direct methylation detection assay that circumvents bisulfite conversion and polymerase chain reaction amplification. Building on our prior work, we used methyl-binding proteins (MBPs), which selectively label the methylated DNA. The nanopore-based assay selectively detects methylated DNA/MBP complexes through a 19 nm nanopore with significantly deeper and prolonged nanopore ionic current blocking, while unmethylated DNA molecules were not detectable due to their smaller diameter. Discrimination of hypermethylated and unmethylated DNA on 90, 60, and 30 bp DNA fragments was demonstrated using sub-10 nm nanopores. Hypermethylated DNA fragments fully bound with MBPs are differentiated from unmethylated DNA at 2.1- to 6.5-fold current blockades and 4.5- to 23.3-fold transport durations. Furthermore, these nanopore assays can detect the CpG dyad in DNA fragments and could someday profile the position of methylated CpG sites on DNA fragments.

  5. Automated evaluation of protein binding affinity of anti-inflammatory choline based ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Rosa; Pinto, Paula C A G; Azevedo, Ana M O; Bica, Katharina; Ressmann, Anna K; Reis, Salette; Saraiva, M Lúcia M F S

    2016-04-01

    In this work, an automated system for the study of the interaction of drugs with human serum albumin (HSA) was developed. The methodology was based on the quenching of the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA by binding of the drug to one of its binding sites. The fluorescence quenching assay was implemented in a sequential injection analysis (SIA) system and the optimized assay was applied to ionic liquids based on the association of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with choline (IL-API). In each cycle, 100 µL of HSA and 100 µL of IL-API (variable concentration) were aspirated at a flow rate of 1 mL min(-1) and then sent through the reaction coil to the detector where the fluorescence intensity was measured. In the optimized conditions the effect of increasing concentrations of choline ketoprofenate and choline naproxenate (and respective starting materials: ketoprofen and naproxen) on the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA was studied and the dissociation constants (Kd) were calculated by means of models of drug-protein binding in the equilibrium. The calculated Kd showed that all the compounds bind strongly to HSA (Kd<100 µmol L(-1)) and that the use of the drugs in the IL format does not affect or can even improve their HSA binding. The obtained results were compared with those provided by a conventional batch assay and the relative errors were lower than 4.5%. The developed SIA methodology showed to be robust and exhibited good repeatability in all the assay conditions (rsd<6.5%). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Image-based ELISA on an activated polypropylene microtest plate--a spectrophotometer-free low cost assay technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parween, Shahila; Nahar, Pradip

    2013-10-15

    In this communication, we report ELISA technique on an activated polypropylene microtest plate (APPµTP) as an illustrative example of a low cost diagnostic assay. Activated test zone in APPµTP binds a capture biomolecule through covalent linkage thereby, eliminating non-specific binding often prevalent in absorption based techniques. Efficacy of APPµTP is demonstrated by detecting human immunoglobulin G (IgG), human immunoglobulin E (IgE) and Aspergillus fumigatus antibody in patient's sera. Detection is done by taking the image of the assay solution by a desktop scanner and analyzing the color of the image. Human IgE quantification by color saturation in the image-based assay shows excellent correlation with absorbance-based assay (Pearson correlation coefficient, r=0.992). Significance of the relationship is seen from its p value which is 4.087e-11. Performance of APPµTP is also checked with respect to microtiter plate and paper-based ELISA. APPµTP can quantify an analyte as precisely as in microtiter plate with insignificant non-specific binding, a necessary prerequisite for ELISA assay. In contrast, paper-ELISA shows high non-specific binding in control sera (false positive). Finally, we have carried out ELISA steps on APPµTP by ultrasound waves on a sonicator bath and the results show that even in 8 min, it can convincingly differentiate a test sample from a control sample. In short, spectrophotometer-free image-based miniaturized ELISA on APPµTP is precise, reliable, rapid, and sensitive and could be a good substitute for conventional immunoassay procedures widely used in clinical and research laboratories. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cell-based protein stabilization assays for the detection of interactions between small-molecule inhibitors and BRD4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Jessica; Moosmayer, Dieter; Weiske, Joerg; Fernández-Montalván, Amaury; Herbst, Christopher; Jung, Marie; Haendler, Bernard; Bader, Benjamin

    2015-02-01

    Bromodomain protein 4 (BRD4), a member of the bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) protein family, acts as a central element in transcriptional elongation and plays essential roles in cell proliferation. Inhibition of BRD4 binding to acetylated histone tails via its two bromodomains, BD1 and BD2, with small-molecule inhibitors has been shown to be a valid strategy to prevent cancer growth. We have evaluated and established two novel assays that quantify the interaction of transfected BRD4 BD1 with chemical inhibitors inside cultured cells. Both methods are based on the principle of ligand-induced protein stabilization by which the binding of a small-molecule inhibitor stabilizes intracellular BRD4 BD1 and protects it from proteolytic degradation. We demonstrate the universal character of this principle by using two orthogonal, highly sensitive detection technologies for the quantification of BRD4 BD1 levels in cellular lysates: enzyme fragment complementation and time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET). Upon optimization of both assays to a miniaturized high-throughput format, the methods were validated by testing a set of small-molecule BET inhibitors and comparing the results with those from a cell-free binding assay and a biophysical thermal shift assay. In addition, point mutations were introduced into BRD4 BD1, and the corresponding mutants were characterized in the TR-FRET stabilization assay. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  8. Probing the functional impact of sequence variation on p53-DNA interactions using a novel microsphere assay for protein-DNA binding with human cell extracts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher A Noureddine

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The p53 tumor suppressor regulates its target genes through sequence-specific binding to DNA response elements (REs. Although numerous p53 REs are established, the thousands more identified by bioinformatics are not easily subjected to comparative functional evaluation. To examine the relationship between RE sequence variation -- including polymorphisms -- and p53 binding, we have developed a multiplex format microsphere assay of protein-DNA binding (MAPD for p53 in nuclear extracts. Using MAPD we measured sequence-specific p53 binding of doxorubicin-activated or transiently expressed p53 to REs from established p53 target genes and p53 consensus REs. To assess the sensitivity and scalability of the assay, we tested 16 variants of the p21 target sequence and a 62-multiplex set of single nucleotide (nt variants of the p53 consensus sequence and found many changes in p53 binding that are not captured by current computational binding models. A group of eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs was examined and binding profiles closely matched transactivation capability tested in luciferase constructs. The in vitro binding characteristics of p53 in nuclear extracts recapitulated the cellular in vivo transactivation capabilities for eight well-established human REs measured by luciferase assay. Using a set of 26 bona fide REs, we observed distinct binding patterns characteristic of transiently expressed wild type and mutant p53s. This microsphere assay system utilizes biologically meaningful cell extracts in a multiplexed, quantitative, in vitro format that provides a powerful experimental tool for elucidating the functional impact of sequence polymorphism and protein variation on protein/DNA binding in transcriptional networks.

  9. Src homology 2 domain-based high throughput assays for profiling downstream molecules in receptor tyrosine kinase pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaoi, Takuro; Chamnongpol, Sangpen; Jiang, Xin; Li, Xianqiang

    2006-05-01

    Src homology 2 (SH2) domains are evolutionary conserved small protein modules that bind specifically to tyrosine-phosphorylated peptides. More than 100 SH2 domains have been identified in proteins encoded by the human genome. The binding specificity of these domains plays a critical role in signaling within the cell, mediating the relocalization and interaction of proteins in response to changes in tyrosine phosphorylation states. Here we developed an SH2 domain profiling method based on a multiplexed fluorescent microsphere assay in which various SH2 domains are used to probe the global state of tyrosine phosphorylation within a cell and to screen synthetic peptides that specifically bind to each SH2 domain. The multiplexed, fluorescent microsphere-based assay is a recently developed technology that can potentially detect a wide variety of interactions between biological molecules. We constructed 25-plex SH2 domain-GST fusion protein-conjugated fluorescent microsphere sets to investigate phosphorylation-mediated cell signaling through the specific binding of SH2 domains to activated target proteins. The response of HeLa, COS-1, A431, and 293 cells and four breast cancer cell lines to epidermal growth factor and insulin were quantitatively profiled using this novel microsphere-based, multiplexed, high throughput assay system.

  10. IgMk paraprotein from gammopathy patient can bind to cardiolipin and interfere with coagulation assay: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xin-Yao; Yin, Yu-Feng; Teng, Jia-Lin; Zhang, Li-Wei; Yang, Cheng-de

    2017-06-23

    The monoclonal gammopathies are a group of plasma-cell proliferative disorders characterized by the secretion of monoclonal immunoglobulin (M protein or paraprotein). Some rare cases have revealed the specific affinity of paraprotein as autoantibody. Here we report a patient with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) accompanied by a remarkable increase of anticardiolipin antibody (aCL) and an extensively decreased coagulation factor activity, however, without any clinical signs of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and bleeding. Our further investigation indicated that IgMκ paraprotein of this patient possessed an antibody activity against phospholipids so as to bind to cardiolipin and interfere with coagulation assay in vitro. This case might be indicative that an abnormality of coagulation tests, disturbed by IgMκ paraprotein, does not predict a risk of bleeding in this patient.

  11. Reflection-Based Python-C++ Bindings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generowicz, Jacek; Lavrijsen, Wim T.L.P.; Marino, Massimo; Mato, Pere

    2004-01-01

    Python is a flexible, powerful, high-level language with excellent interactive and introspective capabilities and a very clean syntax. As such, it can be a very effective tool for driving physics analysis. Python is designed to be extensible in low-level C-like languages, and its use as a scientific steering language has become quite widespread. To this end, existing and custom-written C or C++ libraries are bound to the Python environment as so-called extension modules. A number of tools for easing the process of creating such bindings exist, such as SWIG and Boost. Python. Yet, the process still requires a considerable amount of effort and expertise. The C++ language has few built-in introspective capabilities, but tools such as LCGDict and CINT add this by providing so-called dictionaries: libraries that contain information about the names, entry points, argument types, etc. of other libraries. The reflection information from these dictionaries can be used for the creation of bindings and so the process can be fully automated, as dictionaries are already provided for many end-user libraries for other purposes, such as object persistency. PyLCGDict is a Python extension module that uses LCG dictionaries, as PyROOT uses CINT reflection information, to allow /cwPython users to access C++ libraries with essentially no preparation on the users' behalf. In addition, and in a similar way, PyROOT gives ROOT users access to Python libraries

  12. Development of tissue print binding assay for detection of trace metals in tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umemiya, Yoshiaki; Hiraoka, Kiyoshi; Nakamura, Yuri; Murakami, Yuriko; Kusaba, Shinnosuke; Honda, Chikako

    2000-01-01

    Distribution of 65 Zn, a tracer added to an apple tree was investigated to clarify the correlation between excess-Zn disease and Zn-binding protein. For a short-term treatment with Zn at 100 ppm, browning lesion at leaf margin was observed both in mature and immature leaves of apple tree after 10 days from the treatment, but the lesion did not lead to death. The absorption pattern of 65 Zn into the tree was not different between the treatments at 0.1 and 1.0 ppm and the amount of absorption was lower in the order of thin root, immature leaf, straight root, stem, upper part and lower part of mature leaf. Whereas for the area treated at 1 ppm, the absorption amount decreased in the order of thin root, straight root, immature leaf, stem, upper part and lower part of leaf. In either of the test areas, Zn absorption per dry weight was the most in thin roots. As increasing Zn concentration, the incorporation of labeled Zn into the immature leaves was decreased in thin root as well as the terrestrial part. The count incorporation into the upper part of mature leaves was about 10 to 20 % of that of the lower part. These results indicated that Zn was much abundantly incorporated into immature leaf and thin roots, in which metabolic activities were high compared to other regions of the tree. Zn concentration in its fruit under the ordinary culture conditions was 4-21 ppm, which was similar to the concentrations of Mn, Cu and Fe. This tendency was similar to those of other fruits including other varieties of apples and pears. (M.N.)

  13. An HPLC-based assay of adenylosuccinate lyase in erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierau, Jörgen; Pooters, Ivo N A; Visser, Dennis; Bakker, Jaap A

    2011-11-01

    ADSL deficiency is a disorder of purine metabolism with a broad clinical spectrum. A rapid and simple HPLC-based assay to measure ADSL activity in erythrocytes was developed. The suitability of DBSs was assessed. ADSL activity was measured in erythrocyte lysates and DBS using succinyl-AMP as the substrate. Detection and quantification were performed using isocratic ion-pairing reversed-phase HPLC with UV-detection. Reference values in erythrocyte lysates were established. The intra- and interassay variations were 2% and 8%, respectively. ADSL deficiency was easily recognized. ADSL activity in DBS was highly unstable, disqualifying DBS for diagnostic procedures.

  14. Identification of Listeria Species by Microarray-Based Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Volokhov, Dmitriy; Rasooly, Avraham; Chumakov, Konstantin; Chizhikov, Vladimir

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a rapid microarray-based assay for the reliable detection and discrimination of six species of the Listeria genus: L. monocytogenes, L. ivanovii, L. innocua, L. welshimeri, L. seeligeri, and L. grayi. The approach used in this study involves one-tube multiplex PCR amplification of six target bacterial virulence factor genes (iap, hly, inlB, plcA, plcB, and clpE), synthesis of fluorescently labeled single-stranded DNA, and hybridization to the multiple individual oligonucleot...

  15. In-frame cDNA library combined with protein complementation assay identifies ARL11-binding partners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangkyou Lee

    Full Text Available The cDNA expression libraries that produce correct proteins are essential in facilitating the identification of protein-protein interactions. The 5'-untranslated regions (UTRs that are present in the majority of mammalian and non-mammalian genes are predicted to alter the expression of correct proteins from cDNA libraries. We developed a novel cDNA expression library from which 5'-UTRs were removed using a mixture of polymerase chain reaction primers that complement the Kozak sequences we refer to as an "in-frame cDNA library." We used this library with the protein complementation assay to identify two novel binding partners for ras-related ADP-ribosylation factor-like 11 (ARL11, cellular retinoic acid binding protein 2 (CRABP2, and phosphoglycerate mutase 1 (PGAM1. Thus, the in-frame cDNA library without 5'-UTRs we describe here increases the chance of correctly identifying protein interactions and will have wide applications in both mammalian and non-mammalian detection systems.

  16. Calculations for Adjusting Endogenous Biomarker Levels During Analytical Recovery Assessments for Ligand-Binding Assay Bioanalytical Method Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelletti, John F; Evans, Cindy L; Saxena, Manju; Lopez, Adriana E

    2015-07-01

    It is often necessary to adjust for detectable endogenous biomarker levels in spiked validation samples (VS) and in selectivity determinations during bioanalytical method validation for ligand-binding assays (LBA) with a matrix like normal human serum (NHS). Described herein are case studies of biomarker analyses using multiplex LBA which highlight the challenges associated with such adjustments when calculating percent analytical recovery (%AR). The LBA test methods were the Meso Scale Discovery V-PLEX® proinflammatory and cytokine panels with NHS as test matrix. The NHS matrix blank exhibited varied endogenous content of the 20 individual cytokines before spiking, ranging from undetectable to readily quantifiable. Addition and subtraction methods for adjusting endogenous cytokine levels in %AR calculations are both used in the bioanalytical field. The two methods were compared in %AR calculations following spiking and analysis of VS for cytokines having detectable endogenous levels in NHS. Calculations for %AR obtained by subtracting quantifiable endogenous biomarker concentrations from the respective total analytical VS values yielded reproducible and credible conclusions. The addition method, in contrast, yielded %AR conclusions that were frequently unreliable and discordant with values obtained with the subtraction adjustment method. It is shown that subtraction of assay signal attributable to matrix is a feasible alternative when endogenous biomarkers levels are below the limit of quantitation, but above the limit of detection. These analyses confirm that the subtraction method is preferable over that using addition to adjust for detectable endogenous biomarker levels when calculating %AR for biomarker LBA.

  17. Re-evaluation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in rat brain by a tissue-segment binding assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao Hsien Wang

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs of cerebral cortex and cerebellum of rats were evaluated by a radioligand binding assay, employing tissue segments or homogenates as materials. [3H]-epibatidine specifically bound to nAChRs in rat cortex or cerebellum, but the dissociation constants for [3H]-epibatidine differed between segments and homogenates (187 and 42 pM in cortex, and 160 and 84 pM in cerebellum, respectively. The abundance of total nAChRs was approximately 310 and 170 fmol/mg protein in the segments of cortex and cerebellum, respectively, which were significantly higher than those (115 and 76 fmol/mg protein estimated in the homogenates of cortex and cerebellum. Most of [3H]-epibatidine binding sites in the cortex segments (approximately 70 % in population showed high affinity for nicotine, dihydro--erythroidine or cytisine, but the binding sites in cerebellum segments were mostly low affinity for nicotine. An upregulation of nAChRs by chronic administration of nicotine was observed in the cortex segments but was not in the cerebellum segments with [3H]-epibatidine as a ligand. The upregulation in the cortex was caused by a specific increase in high affinity sites for nicotine. The present study shows that tissue integrity is important for a precise quantitative as well as qualitative estimation of nAChRs in rat brain. Nicotine-induced upregulation was caused by a specific increase in high affinity sites for nicotine (probably 42 of cerebral cortex.

  18. Novel Biomarker Assays Based on Photothermal Effects and Nanophotonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunfei

    The early diagnosis of some chronic and severe diseases such as cancer, tuberculosis, etc. has been a long-sought goal of the medicine community. Traditional diagnostic tools such as X-ray and fecal blood tests cannot detect the disease before the focus or tumor have grown to an appreciable size or before the number of pathogens or tumor cells has reached a considerable amount in body fluids. These drawbacks could significantly delay the diagnosis. To detect and diagnose such diseases at an early stage, people have sought to detect the biomarkers related to certain physical conditions so that the anomalies caused by the diseases can be detected before a significant tumor has developed or the onset of symptoms. Driven by the needs to detect and quantify biomarkers, immunoassays have been developed. Two representative formats of immunoassays are enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and lateral flow assay. They have been widely used for medical and research purposes, yet they still have drawbacks such as costly instruments and lack of sensitivity. To improve their performance, I have developed photoacoustic-based detection schemes that can be easily integrated with commercial immunoassay formats and can increase the sensitivity as well as lower the costs. For both assay formats, limit of detection has been lowered by two orders of magnitude with low-cost and portable instruments. As a follow up of the photoacoustic detection schemes, a technique based on photothermal lens is also developed. In this work, one-dimensional photonic crystal substrates have also been exploited to enhance the photoacoustic and photothermal signals. Due to the guided-mode resonance, the photonic crystal substrate can enhance the photoacoustic or photothermal signals by 10 to 40 times, making it a promising tool for biomarker detection.

  19. PatchSurfers: Two methods for local molecular property-based binding ligand prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Woong-Hee; Bures, Mark Gregory; Kihara, Daisuke

    2016-01-15

    Protein function prediction is an active area of research in computational biology. Function prediction can help biologists make hypotheses for characterization of genes and help interpret biological assays, and thus is a productive area for collaboration between experimental and computational biologists. Among various function prediction methods, predicting binding ligand molecules for a target protein is an important class because ligand binding events for a protein are usually closely intertwined with the proteins' biological function, and also because predicted binding ligands can often be directly tested by biochemical assays. Binding ligand prediction methods can be classified into two types: those which are based on protein-protein (or pocket-pocket) comparison, and those that compare a target pocket directly to ligands. Recently, our group proposed two computational binding ligand prediction methods, Patch-Surfer, which is a pocket-pocket comparison method, and PL-PatchSurfer, which compares a pocket to ligand molecules. The two programs apply surface patch-based descriptions to calculate similarity or complementarity between molecules. A surface patch is characterized by physicochemical properties such as shape, hydrophobicity, and electrostatic potentials. These properties on the surface are represented using three-dimensional Zernike descriptors (3DZD), which are based on a series expansion of a 3 dimensional function. Utilizing 3DZD for describing the physicochemical properties has two main advantages: (1) rotational invariance and (2) fast comparison. Here, we introduce Patch-Surfer and PL-PatchSurfer with an emphasis on PL-PatchSurfer, which is more recently developed. Illustrative examples of PL-PatchSurfer performance on binding ligand prediction as well as virtual drug screening are also provided. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Enzymatic assay for calmodulins based on plant NAD kinase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, A.C.; Jarrett, H.W.; Cormier, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    NAD kinase with increased sensitivity to calmodulin was purified from pea seedlings (Pisum sativum L., Willet Wonder). Assays for calmodulin based on the activities of NAD kinase, bovine brain cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase, and human erythrocyte Ca/sup 2 -/-ATPase were compared for their sensitivities to calmodulin and for their abilities to discriminate between calmodulins from different sources. The activities of the three enzymes were determined in the presence of various concentrations of calmodulins from human erythrocyte, bovine brain, sea pansy (Renilla reniformis), mung bean seed (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek), mushroom (Agaricus bisporus), and Tetrahymena pyriformis. The concentrations of calmodulin required for 50% activation of the NAD kinase (K/sub 0.5/) ranged from 0.520 ng/ml for Tetrahymena to 2.20 ng/ml for bovine brain. The A/sub 0.5/ s ranged from 19.6 ng/ml for bovine brain calmodulin to 73.5 ng/ml for mushroom calmodulin for phosphodiesterase activation. The K/sub 0.5/'s for the activation of Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase ranged from 36.3 ng/mol for erythrocyte calmodulin to 61.7 ng/ml for mushroom calmodulin. NAD kinase was not stimulated by phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, cardiolipin, or palmitoleic acid in the absence or presence of Ca/sup 2 +/. Palmitic acid had a slightly stimulatory effect in the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/ (10% of maximum), but no effect in the absence of Ca/sup 2 +/. Palmitoleic acid inhibited the calmodulin-stimulated activity by 50%. Both the NAD kinase assay and radioimmunoassay were able to detect calmodulin in extracts containing low concentrations of calmodulin. Estimates of calmodulin contents of crude homogenates determined by the NAD kinase assay were consistent with amounts obtained by various purification procedures. 30 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  1. Filtration assay for quantitation of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) specific binding to whole cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dold, K.M.; Greenlee, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive filtration assay for quantitating the specific binding of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) to whole cells in culture is described. Cell monolayers are incubated with [3H]TCDD in the presence or absence of excess unlabeled ligand, detached from the culture dish with trypsin, filtered, and washed with cold (-78 degrees C) acetone to separate free and nonspecifically bound TCDD from specifically bound TCDD. TCDD receptor binding parameters were characterized in the murine hepatoma cell line Hepa1c1c7. The lower limit of detection of TCDD specific binding was in a sample equivalent to 10 micrograms of total cell protein. The equilibrium dissociation constant and stereospecificity for binding to the TCDD receptor were the same as those previously reported with other TCDD receptor assays on broken cell preparations. Analysis of binding in the murine hepatoma TCDD receptor variants TAO-c1BPrc1 and BPrc1 indicated that this assay will detect receptor number or affinity variants, but will not detect nuclear transfer deficient variants. The major advantage of the whole cell binding assay is that it provides the means to rapidly and reproducibly quantitate TCDD specific binding in small samples of whole cells in culture. In addition, this method eliminates loss or degradation of the receptor protein during the fractionation of cells required in previously reported methods. This method should prove useful in screening clonal cell populations for TCDD receptor number and affinity variants, and in screening for TCDD receptor binding activity in complementation studies of receptor deficient cells

  2. Characterization And Screening Of Tight Binding Inhibitors Of Xanthine Oxidase: An On-flow Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues; M. V. N.; Correa; R. S.; Vanzolini; K. L.; Santos; D. S.; Batista; A. A.; Cass; Q. B.

    2015-01-01

    Xanthine oxidase (XO) is an enzyme in the purine salvage pathway that catalyzes the oxidation of hypoxanthine to xanthine with subsequent production of uric acid from the xanthine oxidation, and it has been considered an important target of newly developed inhibitors. Based on the advantages of using immobilized capillary enzyme reactors (ICERs) in a 2D LC system as a tool for screening new enzymatic ligands, this work validated an XO-ICER using allopurinol as a positive control. Despite the ...

  3. A new scintillation proximity assay-based approach for the detection of KRAS mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, So-Young; Lim, Jae-Cheong; Cho, Eun-Ha; Jung, Sung-Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of). Radioisotope Research Div.

    2016-04-01

    KRAS is very commonly mutated resulting in a constitutively activated protein, which is independent of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligand binding and resistant to anti-EGFR therapy. Although KRAS is frequently studied, there is still no uniform standard for detecting of KRAS mutations. In this report, a new scintillation proximity assay-based approach is described that determines the relative affinities of wild-type and mutated KRAS to the anti-KRAS antibody. We performed in vitro experiments using normal human colonic cells (CCD18Co), KRAS wild type (Caco-2) and KRAS mutant (HCT 116) cell lines to determine the relative affinities of wild type or mutated KRAS toward an anti-KRAS monoclonal antibody. The process consists of two primary steps: immunoprecipitation from cell lysate to enrich the KRAS protein and the scintillation proximity assay of the immunoprecipitant to determine the relative affinity against the antibody. A fixed concentration of cell lysates was purified by the immunoprecipitation method. The expressions of the KRAS protein in all cell lines was quantitatively confirmed by western blot analysis. For the scintillation proximity assay, the KRAS standard protein was radiolabeled with {sup 125}I by a simple mixing process in the iodogen tube immediately at room temperature immediately before use. The obtained CPM (count per minute) values of were used to calculate the KRAS concentration using purified KRAS as the standard. The calculated relative affinities of 7 μg of Caco-2 and HCT 116 immunoprecipitants for the anti-KRAS antibody were 77 and 0%, respectively. The newly developed scintillation proximity assay-based strategy determines the relative affinities of wild-type or mutated KRAS towards the anti-KRAS monoclonal antibody. This determination can help distinguish mutated KRAS from the wild type protein. The new SPA based approach for detecting KRAS mutations is applicable to many other cancer-related mutations.

  4. A functional assay-based strategy for nanomaterial risk forecasting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendren, Christine Ogilvie, E-mail: christine.hendren@duke.edu [Center for the Environmental Implications of NanoTechnology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Lowry, Gregory V., E-mail: glowry@andrew.cmu.edu [Center for the Environmental Implications of NanoTechnology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, 119 Porter Hall, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Unrine, Jason M., E-mail: jason.unrine@uky.edu [Center for the Environmental Implications of NanoTechnology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Kentucky, Agricultural Science Center, Lexington, KY 40546 (United States); Wiesner, Mark R., E-mail: wiesner@duke.edu [Center for the Environmental Implications of NanoTechnology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Duke University, 121 Hudson Hall PO Box 90287, Durham, NC 27708 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The study of nanomaterial impacts on environment, health and safety (nanoEHS) has been largely predicated on the assumption that exposure and hazard can be predicted from physical–chemical properties of nanomaterials. This approach is rooted in the view that nanoöbjects essentially resemble chemicals with additional particle-based attributes that must be included among their intrinsic physical–chemical descriptors. With the exception of the trivial case of nanomaterials made from toxic or highly reactive materials, this approach has yielded few actionable guidelines for predicting nanomaterial risk. This article addresses inherent problems in structuring a nanoEHS research strategy based on the goal of predicting outcomes directly from nanomaterial properties, and proposes a framework for organizing data and designing integrated experiments based on functional assays (FAs). FAs are intermediary, semi-empirical measures of processes or functions within a specified system that bridge the gap between nanomaterial properties and potential outcomes in complex systems. The three components of a functional assay are standardized protocols for parameter determination and reporting, a theoretical context for parameter application and reference systems. We propose the identification and adoption of reference systems where FAs may be applied to provide parameter estimates for environmental fate and effects models, as well as benchmarks for comparing the results of FAs and experiments conducted in more complex and varied systems. Surface affinity and dissolution rate are identified as two critical FAs for characterizing nanomaterial behavior in a variety of important systems. The use of these FAs to predict bioaccumulation and toxicity for initial and aged nanomaterials is illustrated for the case of silver nanoparticles and Caenorhabditis elegans. - Highlights: • Approaches to predict risk directly from nanomaterial (NM) properties are problematic. • We propose

  5. A simple, versatile and sensitive cell-based assay for prions from various species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaira E Arellano-Anaya

    Full Text Available Detection and quantification of prion infectivity is a crucial step for various fundamental and applied aspects of prion research. Identification of cell lines highly sensitive to prion infection led to the development of cell-based titration procedures aiming at replacing animal bioassays, usually performed in mice or hamsters. However, most of these cell lines are only permissive to mouse-adapted prions strains and do not allow titration of prions from other species. In this study, we show that epithelial RK13, a cell line permissive to mouse and bank vole prion strains and to natural prion agents from sheep and cervids, enables a robust and sensitive detection of mouse and ovine-derived prions. Importantly, the cell culture work is strongly reduced as the RK13 cell assay procedure designed here does not require subcultivation of the inoculated cultures. We also show that prions effectively bind to culture plastic vessel and are quantitatively detected by the cell assay. The possibility to easily quantify a wider range of prions, including rodent experimental strains but also natural agents from sheep and cervids, should prompt the spread of cell assays for routine prion titration and lead to valuable information in fundamental and applied studies.

  6. Quantitative Analysis of NF-κB Transactivation Specificity Using a Yeast-Based Functional Assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasundhara Sharma

    Full Text Available The NF-κB transcription factor family plays a central role in innate immunity and inflammation processes and is frequently dysregulated in cancer. We developed an NF-κB functional assay in yeast to investigate the following issues: transactivation specificity of NF-κB proteins acting as homodimers or heterodimers; correlation between transactivation capacity and in vitro DNA binding measurements; impact of co-expressed interacting proteins or of small molecule inhibitors on NF-κB-dependent transactivation. Full-length p65 and p50 cDNAs were cloned into centromeric expression vectors under inducible GAL1 promoter in order to vary their expression levels. Since p50 lacks a transactivation domain (TAD, a chimeric construct containing the TAD derived from p65 was also generated (p50TAD to address its binding and transactivation potential. The p50TAD and p65 had distinct transactivation specificities towards seventeen different κB response elements (κB-REs where single nucleotide changes could greatly impact transactivation. For four κB-REs, results in yeast were predictive of transactivation potential measured in the human MCF7 cell lines treated with the NF-κB activator TNFα. Transactivation results in yeast correlated only partially with in vitro measured DNA binding affinities, suggesting that features other than strength of interaction with naked DNA affect transactivation, although factors such as chromatin context are kept constant in our isogenic yeast assay. The small molecules BAY11-7082 and ethyl-pyruvate as well as expressed IkBα protein acted as NF-κB inhibitors in yeast, more strongly towards p65. Thus, the yeast-based system can recapitulate NF-κB features found in human cells, thereby providing opportunities to address various NF-κB functions, interactions and chemical modulators.

  7. A rapid, accurate and robust particle-based assay for the simultaneous screening of plasma samples for the presence of five different anti-cytokine autoantibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldager, Daniel Kring Rasmussen; von Stemann, Jakob Hjorth; Larsen, Rune

    2015-01-01

    suitable for larger screenings. Based on confirmed antibody binding characteristics and the resultant reactivity in this multiplex assay, a classification of the c-aAb levels was suggested. The screening results of the recipients who received blood transfusions indicate that more studies are needed...... plasma samples and pooled normal immunoglobulin preparations were used to validate the assay. Plasma samples from 98 transfusion recipients, half of whom presented with febrile reactions, were tested by the assay. RESULTS: The assay detected specific and saturable immunoglobulin G (IgG) binding to each...... cytokine autoantibodies quantities in the negative plasma samples ranged between 80% and 125%. The analytical intra- and inter-assay variations were 4% and 11%, respectively. Varying c-aAb levels were detectable in the transfusion recipients. There was no difference in c-aAb frequency between the patients...

  8. Evaluation of the N-latex serum free light chain assay on the Siemens BNII analyzer and agreement with The Binding Site FreeLite assay on the SPAPlus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White-Al Habeeb, Nicole M A; Earle, Tammy; Spencer, Megan; Blasutig, Ivan M

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the Siemens N-latex kappa free light chain (κFLC) and lambda FLC (λFLC) assays on the BNII nephelometer and assess agreement with The Binding Site Freelite FLC assays on the SPA Plus . Over 180 patient serum samples from routine analysis of κFLC and λFLC measured by the Freelite assay were collected for the study and measured with the N-latex κFLC and λFLC assays to assess precision, linearity, method comparison and dilutional effects. Complex precision showed coefficients of variation of 4.8-7.2% for the κFLC assay and 3.6-6.0% for the λFLC assay. Linearity assessment showed both assays were linear (κFLC, y=1.00x-0.09 and λFLC, y=1.050x-1.252). Qualitative method comparison showed 87.9% (116/132) agreement and Cohen's kappa of 80.4% between the κFLC assays and 72.6% (98/135) agreement and Cohen's kappa of 55.4% for the λFLC assays. Quantitative method comparison for κFLC<150mg/L was y=0.92x+2.21, R=0.661 and for λFLC<150mg/L was y=7.90x-137.96, R=0.526. Dilutional effects including antigen excess and non-linearity were also examined. The N-latex assay showed good precision and linearity with reasonable agreement to the Freelite assay. However, the assays should not be used interchangeably to monitor patients. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Tricyclic antidepressant radioreceptor assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Innis, R.B.; Tune, L.; Rock, R.; Depaulo, R.; U'Prichard, D.C.; Snyder, S.M.

    1979-01-01

    A receptor assay for tricyclic antidepressants described here is based on the ability of these drugs to compete with [ 3 H]-3-guinuclidnyl benzilate ( 3 H-QNB) for binding to muscarinic cholinergic receptors in rat brain membranes. The assay is sensitive, in that it can detect, for example, 2ng/ml nortriptyline in plasma. Seven plasma samples from depressed patients treated with nortriptyline were assayed with the radioreceptor and gas liquid chromatographic methods, and the results from these two methods were almost identical. This assay should be used cautiously, if at all, in patients treated with other drugs that have potent anticholinergic effects. (Auth.)

  10. Identification of Listeria species by microarray-based assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volokhov, Dmitriy; Rasooly, Avraham; Chumakov, Konstantin; Chizhikov, Vladimir

    2002-12-01

    We have developed a rapid microarray-based assay for the reliable detection and discrimination of six species of the Listeria genus: L. monocytogenes, L. ivanovii, L. innocua, L. welshimeri, L. seeligeri, and L. grayi. The approach used in this study involves one-tube multiplex PCR amplification of six target bacterial virulence factor genes (iap, hly, inlB, plcA, plcB, and clpE), synthesis of fluorescently labeled single-stranded DNA, and hybridization to the multiple individual oligonucleotide probes specific for each Listeria species and immobilized on a glass surface. Results of the microarray analysis of 53 reference and clinical isolates of Listeria spp. demonstrated that this method allowed unambiguous identification of all six Listeria species based on sequence differences in the iap gene. Another virulence factor gene, hly, was used for detection and genotyping all L. monocytogenes, all L. ivanovii, and 8 of 11 L. seeligeri isolates. Other members of the genus Listeria and three L. seeligeri isolates did not contain the hly gene. There was complete agreement between the results of genotyping based on the hly and iap gene sequences. All L. monocytogenes isolates were found to be positive for the inlB, plcA, plcB, and clpE virulence genes specific only to this species. Our data on Listeria species analysis demonstrated that this microarray technique is a simple, rapid, and robust genotyping method that is also a potentially valuable tool for identification and characterization of bacterial pathogens in general.

  11. Transcription factor binding sites prediction based on modified nucleosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Talebzadeh

    Full Text Available In computational methods, position weight matrices (PWMs are commonly applied for transcription factor binding site (TFBS prediction. Although these matrices are more accurate than simple consensus sequences to predict actual binding sites, they usually produce a large number of false positive (FP predictions and so are impoverished sources of information. Several studies have employed additional sources of information such as sequence conservation or the vicinity to transcription start sites to distinguish true binding regions from random ones. Recently, the spatial distribution of modified nucleosomes has been shown to be associated with different promoter architectures. These aligned patterns can facilitate DNA accessibility for transcription factors. We hypothesize that using data from these aligned and periodic patterns can improve the performance of binding region prediction. In this study, we propose two effective features, "modified nucleosomes neighboring" and "modified nucleosomes occupancy", to decrease FP in binding site discovery. Based on these features, we designed a logistic regression classifier which estimates the probability of a region as a TFBS. Our model learned each feature based on Sp1 binding sites on Chromosome 1 and was tested on the other chromosomes in human CD4+T cells. In this work, we investigated 21 histone modifications and found that only 8 out of 21 marks are strongly correlated with transcription factor binding regions. To prove that these features are not specific to Sp1, we combined the logistic regression classifier with the PWM, and created a new model to search TFBSs on the genome. We tested the model using transcription factors MAZ, PU.1 and ELF1 and compared the results to those using only the PWM. The results show that our model can predict Transcription factor binding regions more successfully. The relative simplicity of the model and capability of integrating other features make it a superior method

  12. High content cell-based assay for the inflammatory pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Abhishek; Song, Joon Myong

    2015-07-01

    Cellular inflammation is a non-specific immune response to tissue injury that takes place via cytokine network orchestration to maintain normal tissue homeostasis. However chronic inflammation that lasts for a longer period, plays the key role in human diseases like neurodegenerative disorders and cancer development. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the inflammatory pathways may be effective in targeting and modulating their outcome. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that effectively combines the pro-inflammatory features with the pro-apoptotic potential. Increased levels of TNF-α observed during acute and chronic inflammatory conditions are believed to induce adverse phenotypes like glucose intolerance and abnormal lipid profile. Natural products e. g., amygdalin, cinnamic acid, jasmonic acid and aspirin have proven efficacy in minimizing the TNF-α induced inflammation in vitro and in vivo. Cell lysis-free quantum dot (QDot) imaging is an emerging technique to identify the cellular mediators of a signaling cascade with a single assay in one run. In comparison to organic fluorophores, the inorganic QDots are bright, resistant to photobleaching and possess tunable optical properties that make them suitable for long term and multicolor imaging of various components in a cellular crosstalk. Hence we tested some components of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway during TNF-α induced inflammation and the effects of aspirin in HepG2 cells by QDot multicolor imaging technique. Results demonstrated that aspirin showed significant protective effects against TNF-α induced cellular inflammation. The developed cell based assay paves the platform for the analysis of cellular components in a smooth and reliable way.

  13. Biochemical studies of mouse brain tubulin: colchicine binding (DEAE-cellulose filter) assay and subunits (α and β) biosynthesis and degradation (in newborn brain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tse, C.F.

    1978-01-01

    A DEAE-cellulose filter assay, measuring [ 3 H]colchicine bound to colchicine binding protein (CBP) absorbed on filter discs, has been modified to include lM sucrose in the incubation medium for complexing colchicine to CBP in samples before applying the samples to filter discs (single point assay). Due to the much greater stability of colchicine binding capacity in the presence of lM sucrose, multiple time-point assays and least squares linear regression analysis were not necessary for accurate determination of CBP in hybrid mouse brain at different stages of development. The highest concentrations of CBP were observed in the 160,000g supernatant and pellet of newborn brain homogenate. Further studies of the modified filter assay documented that the assay has an overall counting efficiency of 27.3%, that DEAE-cellulose filters bind and retain all tubulin in the assay samples, and that one molecule of colchicine binds approximately one molecule of tubulin dimer. Therefore, millimoles of colchicine bound per milligram total protein can be used to calculate tubulin content. With this technique tubulin content of brain supernatant was found to be 11.9% for newborn, and 7.15% for 11 month old mice. Quantitative densitometry was also used to measure mouse brain supernatant actin content for these two stages. In vivo synthesis and degradation rates of tubulin α and β subunits of two day mouse brain 100,000g supernatant were studied after intracerebral injection of [ 3 H]leucine. Quantitative changes of the ratio of tritium specific activities of tubulin α and β subunits with time were determined. The pattern of change was biphasic. During the first phase the ratio decreased; during the second phase the ratio increased continuously. An interpretation consistent with all the data in this study is that the α subunit is synthesized at a more rapid rate than the β subunit

  14. Biochemical studies of mouse brain tubulin: colchicine binding (DEAE-cellulose filter) assay and subunits ( α and β) biosynthesis and degradation (in newborn brain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tse, Cek-Fyne [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1978-01-01

    A DEAE-cellulose filter assay, measuring (3H)colchicine bound to colchicine binding protein (CBP) absorbed on filter discs, has been modified to include lM sucrose in the incubation medium for complexing colchicine to CBP in samples before applying the samples to filter discs (single point assay). Due to the much greater stability of colchicine binding capacity in the presence of lM sucrose, multiple time-point assays and least squares linear regression analysis were not necessary for accurate determination of CBP in hybrid mouse brain at different stages of development. The highest concentrations of CBP were observed in the 160,000g supernatant and pellet of newborn brain homogenate. Further studies of the modified filter assay documented that the assay has an overall counting efficiency of 27.3%, that DEAE-cellulose filters bind and retain all tubulin in the assay samples, and that one molecule of colchicine binds approximately one molecule of tubulin dimer. Therefore, millimoles of colchicine bound per milligram total protein can be used to calculate tubulin content. With this technique tubulin content of brain supernatant was found to be 11.9% for newborn, and 7.15% for 11 month old mice. Quantitative densitometry was also used to measure mouse brain supernatant actin content for these two stages. In vivo synthesis and degradation rates of tubulin ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of two day mouse brain 100,000g supernatant were studied after intracerebral injection of (3H)leucine. Quantitative changes of the ratio of tritium specific activities of tubulin ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits with time were determined. The pattern of change was biphasic. During the first phase the ratio decreased; during the second phase the ratio increased continuously. An interpretation consistent with all the data in this study is that the ..cap alpha.. subunit is synthesized at a more rapid rate than the ..beta.. subunit. (ERB)

  15. Development of a chemiluminescence-based ribonuclease protection assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenau, Christopher; Kaboord, Barbara; Qoronfleh, M Walid

    2002-12-01

    The ribonuclease protection assay (RPA) is a widely used method for the detection and quantification of specific mRNA transcripts in a complex mixture of total RNA or mRNA molecules. While exhibiting many advantages over other RNA detection methods, RPAs are traditionally performed using radiolabeled probes that often require gel purification steps and lengthy exposure times to visualize results. Moreover, these probes can only be used for 1-2 weeks because of their short isotopic half-life and radiolysis. We report a method that improves the traditional RPA by replacing radiolabeled probes with biotinylated probes and lengthy exposure times with quick, streptavidin/HRP-based chemiluminescent detection technology. Biotinylated probes can be used without get purification and are stable for years, as opposed to weeks. Most importantly, our streptavidin/HRP-based chemiluminescent technology enables us to achieve sensitivity results similar to radioactive RPAs and to detect multiple transcripts in a single sample more efficiently. Furthermore, this new protocol addresses and eliminates the one major drawback unique to using biotinylated probes in chemiluminescent RPAs: a confounding artifact, not seen when running radioactive RPAs but commonly detected when using certain biotinylated rare message probes.

  16. Electrospin-coating of nitrocellulose membrane enhances sensitivity in nucleic acid-based lateral flow assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yew, Chee-Hong Takahiro; Azari, Pedram; Choi, Jane Ru; Li, Fei; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda

    2018-06-07

    Point-of-care biosensors are important tools developed to aid medical diagnosis and testing, food safety and environmental monitoring. Paper-based biosensors, especially nucleic acid-based lateral flow assays (LFA), are affordable, simple to produce and easy to use in remote settings. However, the sensitivity of such assays to infectious diseases has always been a restrictive challenge. Here, we have successfully electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) on nitrocellulose (NC) membrane to form a hydrophobic coating to reduce the flow rate and increase the interaction rate between the targets and gold nanoparticles-detecting probes conjugates, resulting in the binding of more complexes to the capture probes. With this approach, the sensitivity of the PCL electrospin-coated test strip has been increased by approximately ten-fold as compared to the unmodified test strip. As a proof of concept, this approach holds great potential for sensitive detection of targets at point-of-care testing. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Domain-based small molecule binding site annotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumontier Michel

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate small molecule binding site information for a protein can facilitate studies in drug docking, drug discovery and function prediction, but small molecule binding site protein sequence annotation is sparse. The Small Molecule Interaction Database (SMID, a database of protein domain-small molecule interactions, was created using structural data from the Protein Data Bank (PDB. More importantly it provides a means to predict small molecule binding sites on proteins with a known or unknown structure and unlike prior approaches, removes large numbers of false positive hits arising from transitive alignment errors, non-biologically significant small molecules and crystallographic conditions that overpredict ion binding sites. Description Using a set of co-crystallized protein-small molecule structures as a starting point, SMID interactions were generated by identifying protein domains that bind to small molecules, using NCBI's Reverse Position Specific BLAST (RPS-BLAST algorithm. SMID records are available for viewing at http://smid.blueprint.org. The SMID-BLAST tool provides accurate transitive annotation of small-molecule binding sites for proteins not found in the PDB. Given a protein sequence, SMID-BLAST identifies domains using RPS-BLAST and then lists potential small molecule ligands based on SMID records, as well as their aligned binding sites. A heuristic ligand score is calculated based on E-value, ligand residue identity and domain entropy to assign a level of confidence to hits found. SMID-BLAST predictions were validated against a set of 793 experimental small molecule interactions from the PDB, of which 472 (60% of predicted interactions identically matched the experimental small molecule and of these, 344 had greater than 80% of the binding site residues correctly identified. Further, we estimate that 45% of predictions which were not observed in the PDB validation set may be true positives. Conclusion By

  18. Gold nanoparticles-based colorimetric and visual creatinine assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Yi; Zhang, Xianhui; Yu, Haili

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a selective and sensitive method for determination of creatinine using citrate-stabilized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as a colorimetric probe. It is based on a direct cross-linking reaction that occurs between creatinine and AuNPs that causes aggregation of AuNPs and results in a color change from wine red to blue. The absorption peak is shifted from 520 to 670 nm. Under the optimized conditions, the shift in the absorption peak is related the logarithm of the creatinine concentration in the 0.1 to 20 mM range, and the instrumental detection limit (LOD) is 80 μM. This LOD is about one order of magnitude better than that that of the Jaffé method (720 μM). The assay displays good selectivity over interfering substances including various inorganic ions, organic small compounds, proteins, and biothiols. It was successfully employed to the determination of creatinine in spiked human urine. (author)

  19. Nanobeads-based assays. The case of gluten detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venditti, Iole; Fratoddi, Ilaria; Vittoria Russo, Maria; Bellucci, Stefano; Crescenzo, Roberta; Iozzino, Luisa; Staiano, Maria; Aurilia, Vincenzo; Varriale, Antonio; Rossi, Mosè; D'Auria, Sabato

    2008-11-01

    In order to verify if the use of nanobeads of poly[phenylacetylene-(co-acrylic acid)] (PPA/AA) in the ELISA test would affect the immune-activity of the antibodies (Ab) and/or the activity of the enzymes used to label the Ab anti-rabbit IGg, in this work we immobilized the horse liver peroxidase labelled Ab anti-rabbit IGg onto PPA/AA nanobeads. The gluten test was chosen as the model to demonstrate the usefulness of these nanobeads in immunoassays. The synthesis of PPA/AA nanobeads was performed by a modified emulsion polymerization. Self-assembly of nanospheres with mean diameter equal to 200 nm was achieved by casting aqueous suspensions. The materials were characterized by traditional spectroscopic techniques, while the size and dispersion of the particles were analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements. The obtained results show that the immobilization process of the Abs onto PPA/AA did not affect either the immune-response of the Abs or the functional activity of the peroxidase suggesting the usefulness of PPA/AA for the design of advanced nanobeads-based assays for the simultaneous screening of several analytes in complex media.

  20. Colloidal gold probe based rapid immunochromatographic strip assay for cortisol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nara, Seema, E-mail: seemanara@mnnit.ac.in [Department of Applied Mechanics (Biotechnology), Motilal Nehru National Institute of Technology, Allahabad 211004 (India); Department of Reproductive Biomedicine, National Institute of Health and Family Welfare, Munirka, New Delhi 110067 (India); Center for BioMedical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi 110016 (India); Tripathi, Vinay [Department of Reproductive Biomedicine, National Institute of Health and Family Welfare, Munirka, New Delhi 110067 (India); Center for BioMedical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi 110016 (India); Singh, Harpal [Center for BioMedical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi 110016 (India); Shrivastav, Tulsidas G. [Department of Reproductive Biomedicine, National Institute of Health and Family Welfare, Munirka, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2010-12-03

    A rapid and semi-quantitative immunochromatographic strip (ICS) test for cortisol analysis in serum was developed. The test strip was based on a competitive assay format. Colloidal gold nanoparticles were synthesized and coupled with cortisol-3-carboxymethyloxime-adipic acid dihydrazide-bovine serum albumin (F-3-CMO-ADH-BSA) antigen to directly compete with cortisol in human serum samples. F-3-CMO-ADH-BSA-gold label and uncoupled colloidal gold nanoparticles were appropriately characterized using UV-vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Anticortisol antibody raised against F-3-CMO-BSA immunogen in New Zealand white rabbits was coated on the NC membrane as test line. Anti-BSA antibody was used as control line. The lower detection limit of the ICS test was 30 ng mL{sup -1} with visual detection and was completed in 10 min. About 30 human serum samples were also analyzed by the developed strip test and their range of cortisol concentration was established. The developed ICS test is rapid, economic and user friendly.

  1. Antibody-Based Assays for Phenotyping of Extracellular Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotte Hatting Pugholm

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are a heterogeneous population of membrane-enclosed vesicles. EVs are recognized as important players in cell-to-cell communication and are described to be involved in numerous biological and pathological processes. The fact that EVs are involved in the development and progression of several diseases has formed the basis for the use of EV analysis in a clinical setting. As the interest in EVs has increased immensely, multiple techniques have been developed aiming at characterizing these vesicles. These techniques characterize different features of EVs, like the size distribution, enumeration, protein composition, and the intravesicular cargo (e.g., RNA. This review focuses on techniques that exploit the specificity and sensitivity associated with antibody-based assays to characterize the protein phenotype of EVs. The protein phenotype of EVs can provide information on the functionality of the vesicles and may be used for identification of disease-related biomarkers. Thus, protein profiling of EVs holds great diagnostic and prognostic potential.

  2. Antibody-Based Assays for Phenotyping of Extracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugholm, Lotte Hatting; Revenfeld, Anne Louise Schacht; Søndergaard, Evo Kristina Lindersson; Jørgensen, Malene Møller

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are a heterogeneous population of membrane-enclosed vesicles. EVs are recognized as important players in cell-to-cell communication and are described to be involved in numerous biological and pathological processes. The fact that EVs are involved in the development and progression of several diseases has formed the basis for the use of EV analysis in a clinical setting. As the interest in EVs has increased immensely, multiple techniques have been developed aiming at characterizing these vesicles. These techniques characterize different features of EVs, like the size distribution, enumeration, protein composition, and the intravesicular cargo (e.g., RNA). This review focuses on techniques that exploit the specificity and sensitivity associated with antibody-based assays to characterize the protein phenotype of EVs. The protein phenotype of EVs can provide information on the functionality of the vesicles and may be used for identification of disease-related biomarkers. Thus, protein profiling of EVs holds great diagnostic and prognostic potential.

  3. Yeast-based assay identifies novel Shh/Gli target genes in vertebrate development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milla Luis A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing number of developmental events and molecular mechanisms associated with the Hedgehog (Hh pathway from Drosophila to vertebrates, suggest that gene regulation is crucial for diverse cellular responses, including target genes not yet described. Although several high-throughput, genome-wide approaches have yielded information at the genomic, transcriptional and proteomic levels, the specificity of Gli binding sites related to direct target gene activation still remain elusive. This study aims to identify novel putative targets of Gli transcription factors through a protein-DNA binding assay using yeast, and validating a subset of targets both in-vitro and in-vivo. Testing in different Hh/Gli gain- and loss-of-function scenarios we here identified known (e.g., ptc1 and novel Hh-regulated genes in zebrafish embryos. Results The combined yeast-based screening and MEME/MAST analysis were able to predict Gli transcription factor binding sites, and position mapping of these sequences upstream or in the first intron of promoters served to identify new putative target genes of Gli regulation. These candidates were validated by qPCR in combination with either the pharmacological Hh/Gli antagonist cyc or the agonist pur in Hh-responsive C3H10T1/2 cells. We also used small-hairpin RNAs against Gli proteins to evaluate targets and confirm specific Gli regulation their expression. Taking advantage of mutants that have been identified affecting different components of the Hh/Gli signaling system in the zebrafish model, we further analyzed specific novel candidates. Studying Hh function with pharmacological inhibition or activation complemented these genetic loss-of-function approaches. We provide evidence that in zebrafish embryos, Hh signaling regulates sfrp2, neo1, and c-myc expression in-vivo. Conclusion A recently described yeast-based screening allowed us to identify new Hh/Gli target genes, functionally important in

  4. [A double antibody sandwich ELISA based assay for titration of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Zhang, Quan-Fu; Li, Chuan; Li, Jian-Dong; Jiang, Xiao-Lin; Zhang, Fu-Shun; Wu, Wei; Liang, Mi-Fang; Li, De-Xin

    2013-06-01

    To develop an assay for titration of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) based on double antibody sandwich ELISA. A double antibody sandwich ELISA was developed for detection of SFTSV based on SFTSV nucleocapsid (N) protein specific poly- and monoclonal antibodies, procedures were optimized and evaluated. This ELISA based titration assay was compared with fluorescence assasy and plaque assay based titration method. The results suggested that the titers obtained by ELISA based method are consistent with those obtained by IFA based method (R = 0.999) and the plaque assay titration method (R = 0.949). The novel ELISA based titration method with high sensitivity and specificity is easy to manage and perform, and can overcome the subjectivity associated with result determination of the fluorescence assay and plaque assay based methods. The novel ELISA based titration method can also be applied to high throughput detection.

  5. Counterion Binding Effects on the Micellar Catalysis of the Base ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of counterion binding on micellar catalysis of the base hydrolysis of FE(phen) has been investaged. Pseudo first order rate constant, k , incrases with increase in the concentrations of ME NCI and (But) NC1 at any fixed Sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) concentration while the reserve is the case with NH CL.

  6. Argyreia nervosa (Burm. f.): receptor profiling of lysergic acid amide and other potential psychedelic LSD-like compounds by computational and binding assay approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulke, Alexander; Kremer, Christian; Wunder, Cora; Achenbach, Janosch; Djahanschiri, Bardya; Elias, Anderson; Schwed, J Stefan; Hübner, Harald; Gmeiner, Peter; Proschak, Ewgenij; Toennes, Stefan W; Stark, Holger

    2013-07-09

    The convolvulacea Argyreia nervosa (Burm. f.) is well known as an important medical plant in the traditional Ayurvedic system of medicine and it is used in numerous diseases (e.g. nervousness, bronchitis, tuberculosis, arthritis, and diabetes). Additionally, in the Indian state of Assam and in other regions Argyreia nervosa is part of the traditional tribal medicine (e.g. the Santali people, the Lodhas, and others). In the western hemisphere, Argyreia nervosa has been brought in attention as so called "legal high". In this context, the seeds are used as source of the psychoactive ergotalkaloid lysergic acid amide (LSA), which is considered as the main active ingredient. As the chemical structure of LSA is very similar to that of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), the seeds of Argyreia nervosa (Burm. f.) are often considered as natural substitute of LSD. In the present study, LSA and LSD have been compared concerning their potential pharmacological profiles based on the receptor binding affinities since our recent human study with four volunteers on p.o. application of Argyreia nervosa seeds has led to some ambiguous effects. In an initial step computer-aided in silico prediction models on receptor binding were employed to screen for serotonin, norepinephrine, dopamine, muscarine, and histamine receptor subtypes as potential targets for LSA. In addition, this screening was extended to accompany ergotalkaloids of Argyreia nervosa (Burm. f.). In a verification step, selected LSA screening results were confirmed by in vitro binding assays with some extensions to LSD. In the in silico model LSA exhibited the highest affinity with a pKi of about 8.0 at α1A, and α1B. Clear affinity with pKi>7 was predicted for 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT1D, 5-HT6, 5-HT7, and D2. From these receptors the 5-HT1D subtype exhibited the highest pKi with 7.98 in the prediction model. From the other ergotalkaloids, agroclavine and festuclavine also seemed to be highly affine to the 5-HT1D

  7. Colorimetric microtiter plate receptor-binding assay for the detection of freshwater and marine neurotoxins targeting the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Fernando; Kamp, Lisa; Carpino, Justin; Faltin, Erin; Loftin, Keith A.; Molgó, Jordi; Aráoz, Rómulo

    2014-01-01

    Anatoxin-a and homoanatoxin-a, produced by cyanobacteria, are agonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Pinnatoxins, spirolides, and gymnodimines, produced by dinoflagellates, are antagonists of nAChRs. In this study we describe the development and validation of a competitive colorimetric, high throughput functional assay based on the mechanism of action of freshwater and marine toxins against nAChRs. Torpedo electrocyte membranes (rich in muscle-type nAChR) were immobilized and stabilized on the surface of 96-well microtiter plates. Biotinylated α-bungarotoxin (the tracer) and streptavidin-horseradish peroxidase (the detector) enabled the detection and quantitation of anatoxin-a in surface waters and cyclic imine toxins in shellfish extracts that were obtained from different locations across the US. The method compares favorably to LC/MS/MS and provides accurate results for anatoxin-a and cyclic imine toxins monitoring. Study of common constituents at the concentrations normally found in drinking and environmental waters, as well as the tolerance to pH, salt, solvents, organic and inorganic compounds did not significantly affect toxin detection. The assay allowed the simultaneous analysis of up to 25 samples within 3.5 h and it is well suited for on-site or laboratory monitoring of low levels of toxins in drinking, surface, and ground water as well as in shellfish extracts.

  8. Polyamidoamine starburst dendrimer-activated chromatography paper-based assay for sensitive detection of telomerase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Lei, Zhen; Tian, Rongrong; Wang, Zhenxin

    2018-02-01

    Telomerase is extensively expressed in various cancer cells and recognized as a target for cancer drug discovery. In the present study, a simple and amplification-free fluorescence assay based on polyamidoamine starburst dendrimer (PAMAM dendrimer)-activated paper device is proposed for sensitive detection of telomerase activity through hybridization of Cy5 modified single strand DNA probes with telomerase extension products. The paper substrate is fabricated by hand drawing according to a template, which is low cost, instrument free and easy operation. PAMAM is rich in amino groups on its surface and employed to immobilize the telomerase substrate (TS) primer. Highly sensitive detection of telomerase activity in HeLa cell lysate of 10 cells is achieved since the PAMAM dendrimer-activated paper surface can provide high density of binding sites for immobilization of TS primer. The experimental results also demonstrate that the assay can be employed to evaluate telomerase activity levels of various cell lines and screen telomerase inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. DNA-based mutation assay GPMA (genome profiling-based mutation assay): reproducibility, parts-per-billion scale sensitivity, and introduction of a mammalian-cell-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Parmila; Gautam, Sunita Ghimire; Baba, Misato; Tsukiashi, Motoki; Matsuoka, Koji; Yasukawa, Kiyoshi; Nishigaki, Koichi

    2017-12-01

    Genome profiling-based mutation assay (GPMA) is, to date, the only DNA sequence-based mutation assay that directly measures DNA alterations induced by mutagens. Here, the all-important congruence of mutagen assignment between DNA-based GPMA and the phenotype-based Ames test (the gold standard of mutagen assays) was confirmed qualitatively and semi-quantitatively by means of 94 chemical species (including previously examined 64). The high sensitivity (on the order of 10 ppb) and reproducibility of GPMA were also corroborated by the match between virtually independent experiments conducted in the distant past (10 years ago) and recently. Meanwhile, a standard experimental framework was established: the conditions of 100 parts per billion (ppb) concentration of a chemical and 15-generation culture of Escherichia coli. Moreover, a mammalian cell line (NIH 3T3) was shown to be suitable as a tester organism for the GPMA approach. Preliminary experimental results suggested that this approach can provide a qualitatively equivalent and quantitatively different mutagen assay results relative to the bacteria-based GPMA (renamed as bGPMA). This finding confirmed the effectiveness of the GPMA approach and indicates that mGPMA is a promising way to detect mammalian-cell mutagens. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  10. Development and Validation of an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for the Detection of Binding Anti-Drug Antibodies against Interferon Beta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Ingenhoven

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo develop and validate a method for the detection of binding anti-drug antibodies (ADAs against interferon beta (IFN-β in human serum as part of a European initiative (ABIRISK aimed at the prediction and analysis of clinical relevance of anti-biopharmaceutical immunization to minimize the risk.MethodA two-tiered bridging enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA format was selected and validated according to current recommendations. Screening assay: ADA in serum samples form complexes with immobilized IFN-β and biotinylated IFN-β, which are then detected using HRP labeled Streptavidin and TMB substrate. Confirmation assay: Screen “putative positive” samples are tested in the presence of excess drug (preincubation of sera with 0.3 µg/mL of soluble IFN-β and percentage of inhibition is calculated.ResultsThe assay is precise, and the sensitivity of the assay was confirmed to be 26 ng/mL using commercially available polyclonal rabbit antihuman IFN-β in human sera as the positive control.ConclusionAn ultrasensitive ELISA for IFN-β-binding ADA testing has been validated. This will form the basis to assess anti-biopharmaceutical immunization toward IFN-β with regards to its clinical relevance and may allow for the development of predictive tools, key aims within the ABIRISK consortium.

  11. Interpretation of Ocular Melanin Drug Binding Assays. Alternatives to the Model of Multiple Classes of Independent Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzanares, José A; Rimpelä, Anna-Kaisa; Urtti, Arto

    2016-04-04

    Melanin has a high binding affinity for a wide range of drugs. The determination of the melanin binding capacity and its binding affinity are important, e.g., in the determination of the ocular drug distribution, the prediction of drug effects in the eye, and the trans-scleral drug delivery. The binding parameters estimated from a given data set vary significantly when using different isotherms or different nonlinear fitting methods. In this work, the commonly used bi-Langmuir isotherm, which assumes two classes of independent sites, is confronted with the Sips isotherm. Direct, log-log, and Scatchard plots are used, and the interpretation of the binding curves in the latter is critically analyzed. In addition to the goodness of fit, the emphasis is placed on the physical meaning of the binding parameters. The bi-Langmuir model imposes a bimodal distribution of binding energies for the sites on the melanin granules, but the actual distribution is most likely continuous and unimodal, as assumed by the Sips isotherm. Hence, the latter describes more accurately the distribution of binding energies and also the experimental results of melanin binding to drugs and metal ions. Simulations are used to show that the existence of two classes of sites cannot be confirmed on the sole basis of the shape of the binding curve in the Scatchard plot, and that serious doubts may appear on the meaning of the binding parameters of the bi-Langmuir model. Experimental results of melanin binding to chloroquine and metoprolol are used to illustrate the importance of the choice of the binding isotherm and of the method used to evaluate the binding parameters.

  12. A FLUORESCENCE BASED ASSAY FOR DNA DAMAGE: INDUCED BY RADIATION, CHEMICALS AND ENZYMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    A simple and rapid assay to detect DNA damage is reported. This assay is based on the ability of certain dyes to fluoresce upon intercalation with dsDNA. Damage caused by ultraviolet (UV) radiation, chemicals or restriction enzymes is detected using this assay. UV radiation at...

  13. What Do Chaotrope-Based Avidity Assays for Antibodies to HIV-1 Envelope Glycoproteins Measure?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alexander, Marina R.; Ringe, Rajesh; Sanders, Rogier W.; Voss, James E.; Moore, John P.; Klasse, Per Johan

    2015-01-01

    When HIV-1 vaccine candidates that include soluble envelope glycoproteins (Env) are tested in humans and other species, the resulting antibody responses to Env are sifted for correlates of protection or risk. One frequently used assay measures the reduction in antibody binding to Env antigens by an

  14. Binding of peptides from the N-terminal region of alpha-gliadin to the celiac disease-associated HLA-DQ2 molecule assessed in biochemical and T cell assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, B H; Gjertsen, H A; Vartdal, F

    1996-01-01

    -purified DQ2 and DR3 (i.e., DR(alpha, beta1*0301)) molecules. The peptides were also tested for binding to DQ2 in a functional binding assay, where binding was measured as the capacity to inhibit the stimulation of a gliadin-specific, DQ2-restricted T lymphocyte clone RNnTalpha33. In both assay systems...... here provide new methods for the screening of potentially toxic peptides....

  15. Characterization of equine vitamin D–binding protein, development of an assay, and assessment of plasma concentrations of the protein in healthy horses and horses with gastrointestinal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Tina Holberg; Jacobsen, Stine; Olsen, Dorthe T.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To purify and characterize equine vitamin D-binding protein (VDBP) from equine serum and to evaluate plasma concentrations of VDBP in healthy horses and horses with gastrointestinal injury or disease. ANIMALS 13 healthy laboratory animals (8 mice and 5 rabbits), 61 healthy horses, 12...... in horses with acute gastrointestinal injury or disease. Further studies and the development of a clinically relevant assay are needed to establish the reliability of VDBP as a diagnostic and prognostic marker in horses....

  16. A miniaturized cell-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay for insulin-receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marine, Shane; Zamiara, Elize; Smith, S Todd; Stec, Erica M; McGarvey, Jeremy; Kornienko, Oleg; Jiang, Guoqiang; Wong, Kenny K; Stack, Jeffrey H; Zhang, Bei B; Ferrer, Marc; Strulovici, Berta

    2006-08-15

    This report describes the development, optimization, and implementation of a miniaturized cell-based assay for the identification of small-molecule insulin mimetics and potentiators. Cell-based assays are attractive formats for compound screening because they present the molecular targets in their cellular environment. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) cell-based assay that measures the insulin-dependent colocalization of Akt2 fused with either cyan fluorescent protein or yellow fluorescent protein to the cellular membrane was developed. This ratiometric FRET assay was miniaturized into a robust, yet sensitive 3456-well nanoplate assay with Z' factors of approximately 0.6 despite a very small assay window (less than twofold full activation with insulin). The FRET assay was used for primary screening of a large compound collection for insulin-receptor agonists and potentiators. To prioritize compounds for further development, primary hits were tested in two additional assays, a biochemical time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay to measure insulin-receptor phosphorylation and a translocation-based imaging assay. Results from the three assays were combined to yield 11 compounds as potential leads for the development of insulin mimetics or potentiators.

  17. Binding of the J-binding protein to DNA containing glucosylated hmU (base J) or 5-hmC: evidence for a rapid conformational change upon DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidebrecht, Tatjana; Fish, Alexander; von Castelmur, Eleonore; Johnson, Kenneth A; Zaccai, Giuseppe; Borst, Piet; Perrakis, Anastassis

    2012-08-15

    Base J (β-D-glucosyl-hydroxymethyluracil) was discovered in the nuclear DNA of some pathogenic protozoa, such as trypanosomes and Leishmania, where it replaces a fraction of base T. We have found a J-Binding Protein 1 (JBP1) in these organisms, which contains a unique J-DNA binding domain (DB-JBP1) and a thymidine hydroxylase domain involved in the first step of J biosynthesis. This hydroxylase is related to the mammalian TET enzymes that hydroxylate 5-methylcytosine in DNA. We have now studied the binding of JBP1 and DB-JBP1 to oligonucleotides containing J or glucosylated 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (glu-5-hmC) using an equilibrium fluorescence polarization assay. We find that JBP1 binds glu-5-hmC-DNA with an affinity about 40-fold lower than J-DNA (~400 nM), which is still 200 times higher than the JBP1 affinity for T-DNA. The discrimination between glu-5-hmC-DNA and T-DNA by DB-JBP1 is about 2-fold less, but enough for DB-JBP1 to be useful as a tool to isolate 5-hmC-DNA. Pre-steady state kinetic data obtained in a stopped-flow device show that the initial binding of JBP1 to glucosylated DNA is very fast with a second order rate constant of 70 μM(-1) s(-1) and that JBP1 binds to J-DNA or glu-5-hmC-DNA in a two-step reaction, in contrast to DB-JBP1, which binds in a one-step reaction. As the second (slower) step in binding is concentration independent, we infer that JBP1 undergoes a conformational change upon binding to DNA. Global analysis of pre-steady state and equilibrium binding data supports such a two-step mechanism and allowed us to determine the kinetic parameters that describe it. This notion of a conformational change is supported by small-angle neutron scattering experiments, which show that the shape of JBP1 is more elongated in complex with DNA. The conformational change upon DNA binding may allow the hydroxylase domain of JBP1 to make contact with the DNA and hydroxylate T's in spatial proximity, resulting in regional introduction of base J into the

  18. Specific interactions and binding energies between thermolysin and potent inhibitors: molecular simulations based on ab initio molecular orbital method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, Tatsuya; Fujita, Seiya; Ohyama, Tatsuya; Dedachi, Kenichi; Khan, Mahmud Tareq Hassan; Sylte, Ingebrigt; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2012-03-01

    Biochemical functions of the metalloprotease thermolysin (TLN) are controlled by various inhibitors. In a recent study we identified 12 compounds as TLN inhibitors by virtual screening and in vitro competitive binding assays. However, the specific interactions between TLN and these inhibitors have not been clarified. We here investigate stable structures of the solvated TLN-inhibitor complexes by classical molecular mechanics simulations and elucidate the specific interactions between TLN and these inhibitors at an electronic level by using ab initio fragment molecular orbital (FMO) calculations. The calculated binding energies between TLN and the inhibitors are qualitatively consistent with the experimental results, and the FMO results elucidate important amino acid residues of TLN for inhibitor binding. Based on the calculated results, we propose a novel potent inhibitor having a large binding affinity to TLN. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. DNABP: Identification of DNA-Binding Proteins Based on Feature Selection Using a Random Forest and Predicting Binding Residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin; Guo, Jing; Sun, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins are fundamentally important in cellular processes. Several computational-based methods have been developed to improve the prediction of DNA-binding proteins in previous years. However, insufficient work has been done on the prediction of DNA-binding proteins from protein sequence information. In this paper, a novel predictor, DNABP (DNA-binding proteins), was designed to predict DNA-binding proteins using the random forest (RF) classifier with a hybrid feature. The hybrid feature contains two types of novel sequence features, which reflect information about the conservation of physicochemical properties of the amino acids, and the binding propensity of DNA-binding residues and non-binding propensities of non-binding residues. The comparisons with each feature demonstrated that these two novel features contributed most to the improvement in predictive ability. Furthermore, to improve the prediction performance of the DNABP model, feature selection using the minimum redundancy maximum relevance (mRMR) method combined with incremental feature selection (IFS) was carried out during the model construction. The results showed that the DNABP model could achieve 86.90% accuracy, 83.76% sensitivity, 90.03% specificity and a Matthews correlation coefficient of 0.727. High prediction accuracy and performance comparisons with previous research suggested that DNABP could be a useful approach to identify DNA-binding proteins from sequence information. The DNABP web server system is freely available at http://www.cbi.seu.edu.cn/DNABP/.

  20. Development of a paper-based vertical flow SERS assay for citrulline detection using aptamer-conjugated gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Andrea; Deutz, Nicolaas; Coté, Gerard

    2018-02-01

    Research toward development of point-of-care (POC) technologies is emerging as a means for diagnosis and monitoring of patients outside the hospital. These POC devices typically utilize assays capable of detecting low level biomarkers indicative of specific diseases. L-citrulline, an α-amino acid produced in the intestinal mucosa cells, is one such biomarker typically found circulating within the plasma at physiological concentrations of 40 μM. Researchers have found that intestinal enterocyte malfunction causes its level to be significantly lowered, establishing it as a potential diagnostic biomarker for gut function. Our research group has proposed the development of a surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) based assay, using vertical flow paper fluidics, for citrulline detection. The assay consists of a fluorescently active, Raman reporter labeled aptamer conjugated on gold nanoparticles. The aptamer changes its confirmation on binding to its target, which in turn changes the distance between the Raman active molecule and the nanoparticle surface. These particles were embedded within a portable chip consisting of cellulose-based paper. After the chips were loaded with different concentrations of free L-citrulline in phosphate buffer, time was given for the assay to interact with the sample. A handheld Raman spectrometer (638 nm; Ocean Optics) was used to measure the SERS intensity. Results showed decrease in intensity with increasing concentration of L-citrulline (0-50μM).

  1. Comparison of enzyme immunoassay–based assays for environmental Alternaria alternata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Charles; Portnoy, Jay; Sever, Michelle; Arbes, Samuel; Vaughn, Ben; Zeldin, Darryl C.

    2007-01-01

    Background Alternaria alternata–derived allergenic materials are causes of human disease. Several immunoassays exist to quantify these materials. Objective To compare methods for evaluating Alternaria content. Methods Four methods, including 1 monoclonal antibody (MAb)–based assay specific for recombinant Alt a 1, 1 MAb-based assay for chromatographically purified Alt a 1, 1 polyclonal antibody (PAb)–based assay for chromatographically purified Alt a 1, and 1 PAb-based assay for whole Alternaria extract, were evaluated. Environmental samples collected as part of the National Survey of Lead and Allergens in Housing were examined. Alternaria spore counts were determined in dust by observation. Results The MAb-based assay for recombinant Alt a 1 detected Alternaria in few samples (25%); the PAb-based assay for whole Alternaria proteins detected antigen in 97% of the samples. The PAb- and MAb-based assays for purified Alt a 1 detected antigen in 100% of the samples. There was a significant positive correlation between the 2 assays directed against purified Alt a 1. There was a positive correlation between the PAb-based assay for whole Alternaria and the PAb-based assay for Alt a 1. Nearly all the dust samples contained Alternaria spores, and there was a strong positive correlation between counts and all assays. Conclusion Because of the multifaceted nature of Alternaria, the disparities between methods for quantifying Alternaria, the cross-reactivity between fungal allergens, and the documented genetic promiscuity of this fungus, enzyme immunoassays using PAbs against a range of Alternaria proteins will probably produce the most reliable estimation of overall Alternaria exposure in house dust. PMID:17042141

  2. Endogenous biotin-binding proteins: an overlooked factor causing false positives in streptavidin-based protein detection

    OpenAIRE

    Tytgat, Hanne L P; Schoofs, Geert; Driesen, Mich?le; Proost, Paul; Van Damme, Els J M; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Biotinylation is widely used in DNA, RNA and protein probing assays as this molecule has generally no impact on the biological activity of its substrate. During the streptavidin-based detection of glycoproteins in Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG with biotinylated lectin probes, a strong positive band of approximately 125 kDa was observed, present in different cellular fractions. This potential glycoprotein reacted heavily with concanavalin A (ConA), a lectin that specifically binds...

  3. Identification of Rift Valley Fever Virus Nucleocapsid Protein-RNA Binding Inhibitors Using a High-Throughput Screening Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Ellenbecker, Mary; Lanchy, Jean-Marc; Lodmell, J. Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an emerging infectious pathogen that causes severe disease in humans and livestock and has the potential for global spread. Currently, there is no proven effective treatment for RVFV infection and there is no licensed vaccine. Inhibition of RNA binding to the essential viral nucleocapsid (N) protein represents a potential anti-viral therapeutic strategy because all of the functions performed by N during infection involve RNA binding. To target this interactio...

  4. Development of a bead-based Luminex assay using lipopolysaccharide specific monoclonal antibodies to detect biological threats from Brucella species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbereisen, Angelika; Tamborrini, Marco; Wittwer, Matthias; Schürch, Nadia; Pluschke, Gerd

    2015-10-05

    Brucella, a Gram-negative bacterium, is classified as a potential bioterrorism agent mainly due to the low dose needed to cause infection and the ability to transmit the bacteria via aerosols. Goats/sheep, cattle, pigs, dogs, sheep and rodents are infected by B. melitensis, B. abortus, B. suis, B. canis, B. ovis and B. neotomae, respectively, the six classical Brucella species. Most human cases are caused by B. melitensis and B. abortus. Our aim was to specifically detect Brucellae with 'smooth' lipopolysaccharide (LPS) using a highly sensitive monoclonal antibody (mAb) based immunological assay. To complement molecular detection systems for potential bioterror agents, as required by international biodefense regulations, sets of mAbs were generated by B cell hybridoma technology and used to develop immunological assays. The combination of mAbs most suitable for an antigen capture assay format was identified and an immunoassay using the Luminex xMAP technology was developed. MAbs specific for the LPS O-antigen of Brucella spp. were generated by immunising mice with inactivated B. melitensis or B. abortus cells. Most mAbs recognised both B. melitensis and B. abortus and antigen binding was not impeded by inactivation of the bacterial cells by γ irradiation, formalin or heat treatment, a step required to analyse the samples immunologically under biosafety level two conditions. The Luminex assay recognised all tested Brucella species with 'smooth' LPS with detection limits of 2×10(2) to 8×10(4) cells per mL, depending on the species tested. Milk samples spiked with Brucella spp. cells were identified successfully using the Luminex assay. In addition, the bead-based immunoassay was integrated into a multiplex format, allowing for simultaneous, rapid and specific detection of Brucella spp., Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis within a single sample. Overall, the robust Luminex assay should allow detection of Brucella spp. in both natural

  5. Comet assay for rapid detection of base damage in foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Zubaidi, I. A.; Abdullah, T. S.; Qasim, S. R.

    2012-12-01

    Single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) or comet assay technique a sensitive, reliable and rapid method for DNA double and single strand break, alkali- labile site and delayed repair site detection in individual cells. In recent years, this method has been widely used for studies of DNA repair, genetic toxicology, and environmental biomontoring, however, this technique serves as an important tool for detection of DNA damage in living organism and is increasing being used in genetic testing of industrial chemicals, environmental agent's contaminations. This research paper helps to evaluate the oxidant agent's effects of exposure to organic pollutants by using comet assay techniques. This study used five samples of each food sample (Meat, Chicken, Rice, Fruits, Vegetables and Tea) to evaluate the genotoxic effects of exposure, to environmental agent's pollutants. The experimental data suggest that the DNA damage parameters ( Tail length, Tail width 1 ) were found higher value in exposed population when compared with the ratio of the length to width that cells exhibiting no migration having a ratio of 1. The percentage and distribution of cells in exposed population of cells also increases with the increase in values. This study demonstrates that, using sensitive techniques, it is possible to detect environmental agent's risks at an early stage. (Author)

  6. Aptamer-based microchip electrophoresis assays for amplification detection of carcinoembryonic antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Li; Zhao, Jingjin; Huang, Yong; Zhao, Shulin; Liu, Yi-Ming

    2015-10-23

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as one of the most widely used tumor markers is used in the clinical diagnosis of colorectal, pancreatic, gastric, and cervical carcinomas. We developed an aptamer-based microchip electrophoresis assay technique for assaying CEA in human serum for cancer diagnosis. The magnetic beads (MBs) are employed as carriers of double strand DNA that is formed by an aptamer of the target and a complementary DNA of the aptamer. After the aptamer in the MB-dsDNA conjugate binds with the target, the complementary DNA was released from the MB-dsDNA conjugate. The released complementary DNA hybridizes with a fluorescein amidite (FAM) labeled DNA, and forms a DNA duplex, which triggers the selective cleavage of FAM labeled DNA by nicking endonuclease Nb.BbvCI, and generating a FAM labeled DNA segment. The released complementary DNA hybridizes with another FAM labeled DNA, resulting in a continuous cleavage of FAM labeled DNA, and the generation of large numbers of FAM labeled DNA segments. In MCE laser induced fluorescence detection (LIF), the FAM labeled DNA segment is separated and detected. The linear range for CEA was 130 pg/ml-8.0 ng/ml with a correlation coefficient of 0.9916 and a detection limit of 68 pg/ml. The CEA concentration in the serum samples from healthy subjects was found to be in the range 1.3 ng/ml to 3.2 ng/ml. The CEA concentration in the samples from cancer patients was found to be >15 ng/ml. This method may become a useful tool for rapid analysis of CEA and other tumor markers in biomedical analysis and clinical diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Antibody-based assay discriminates Zika virus infection from other flaviviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmaseda, Angel; Stettler, Karin; Medialdea-Carrera, Raquel; Collado, Damaris; Jin, Xia; Zambrana, José Victor; Jaconi, Stefano; Cameroni, Elisabetta; Saborio, Saira; Rovida, Francesca; Percivalle, Elena; Ijaz, Samreen; Dicks, Steve; Ushiro-Lumb, Ines; Barzon, Luisa; Siqueira, Patricia; Brown, David W G; Baldanti, Fausto; Tedder, Richard; Zambon, Maria; de Filippis, A M Bispo; Harris, Eva; Corti, Davide

    2017-08-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that emerged recently as a global health threat, causing a pandemic in the Americas. ZIKV infection mostly causes mild disease, but is linked to devastating congenital birth defects and Guillain-Barré syndrome in adults. The high level of cross-reactivity among flaviviruses and their cocirculation has complicated serological approaches to differentially detect ZIKV and dengue virus (DENV) infections, accentuating the urgent need for a specific and sensitive serological test. We previously generated a ZIKV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1)-specific human monoclonal antibody, which we used to develop an NS1-based competition ELISA. Well-characterized samples from RT-PCR-confirmed patients with Zika and individuals exposed to other flavivirus infections or vaccination were used in a comprehensive analysis to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the NS1 blockade-of-binding (BOB) assay, which was established in laboratories in five countries (Nicaragua, Brazil, Italy, United Kingdom, and Switzerland). Of 158 sera/plasma from RT-PCR-confirmed ZIKV infections, 145 (91.8%) yielded greater than 50% inhibition. Of 171 patients with primary or secondary DENV infections, 152 (88.9%) scored negative. When the control group was extended to patients infected by other flaviviruses, other viruses, or healthy donors ( n = 540), the specificity was 95.9%. We also analyzed longitudinal samples from DENV-immune and DENV-naive ZIKV infections and found inhibition was achieved within 10 d postonset of illness and maintained over time. Thus, the Zika NS1 BOB assay is sensitive, specific, robust, simple, low-cost, and accessible, and can detect recent and past ZIKV infections for surveillance, seroprevalence studies, and intervention trials.

  8. Synthetic Peptide-Based ELISA and ELISpot Assay for Identifying Autoantibody Epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozsgay, Judit; Szarka, Eszter; Huber, Krisztina; Babos, Fruzsina; Magyar, Anna; Hudecz, Ferenc; Sarmay, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is an invaluable diagnostic tool to detect serum autoantibody binding to target antigen. To map the autoantigenic epitope(s), overlapping synthetic peptides covering the total sequence of a protein antigen are used. A large set of peptides synthesized on the crown of pins can be tested by Multipin ELISA for fast screening. Next, to validate the results, the candidate epitope peptides are resynthesized by solid-phase synthesis, coupled to ELISA plate directly, or in a biotinylated form, bound to neutravidin-coated surface and the binding of autoantibodies from patients' sera is tested by indirect ELISA. Further, selected epitope peptides can be applied in enzyme-linked immunospot assay to distinguish individual, citrullinated peptide-specific autoreactive B cells in a pre-stimulated culture of patients' lymphocytes.

  9. Rapid 2,2'-bicinchoninic-based xylanase assay compatible with high throughput screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    William R. Kenealy; Thomas W. Jeffries

    2003-01-01

    High-throughput screening requires simple assays that give reliable quantitative results. A microplate assay was developed for reducing sugar analysis that uses a 2,2'-bicinchoninic-based protein reagent. Endo-1,4-â-D-xylanase activity against oat spelt xylan was detected at activities of 0.002 to 0.011 IU ml−1. The assay is linear for sugar...

  10. Development of a fluorescent microsphere-based multiplexed high-throughput assay system for profiling of transcription factor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaoi, Takuro; Jiang, Xin; Li, Xianqiang

    2006-06-01

    Transcription factors (TFs), which play crucial roles in the regulation of gene expression in the human genome, are highly regulated by a variety of mechanisms. A single extracellular stimulus can trigger multiple signaling pathways, and these in turn can activate multiple TFs to mediate the inducible expression of target genes. Alterations in the activities of TFs are often associated with human diseases, such as altered activating factor 1, estrogen receptor, and p53 function in cancer, nuclear factor kappaB in inflammatory diseases, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma in obesity. A systematic assay for profiling the activation of TFs will aid in elucidating the mechanisms of TF activation, reveal altered TFs associated with human diseases, and aid in developing assays for drug discovery. Here, we developed a 24-plex fluorescent microsphere-based TF activation assay system with a 96-well plate format. The assay system enabled high-throughput profiling of the DNA binding activity of TFs in multiple samples with high sensitivity.

  11. Synthesis, characterization, anti-microbial, DNA binding and cleavage studies of Schiff base metal complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poomalai Jayaseelan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A novel Schiff base ligand has been prepared by the condensation between butanedione monoxime with 3,3′-diaminobenzidine. The ligand and metal complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, UV, IR, 1H NMR, conductivity measurements, EPR and magnetic studies. The molar conductance studies of Cu(II, Ni(II, Co(II and Mn(II complexes showed non-electrolyte in nature. The ligand acts as dibasic with two N4-tetradentate sites and can coordinate with two metal ions to form binuclear complexes. The spectroscopic data of metal complexes indicated that the metal ions are complexed with azomethine nitrogen and oxyimino nitrogen atoms. The binuclear metal complexes exhibit octahedral arrangements. DNA binding properties of copper(II metal complex have been investigated by electronic absorption spectroscopy. Results suggest that the copper(II complex bind to DNA via an intercalation binding mode. The nucleolytic cleavage activities of the ligand and their complexes were assayed on CT-DNA using gel electrophoresis in the presence and absence of H2O2. The ligand showed increased nuclease activity when administered as copper complex and copper(II complex behave as efficient chemical nucleases with hydrogen peroxide activation. The anti-microbial activities and thermal studies have also been studied. In anti-microbial activity all complexes showed good anti-microbial activity higher than ligand against gram positive, gram negative bacteria and fungi.

  12. A gold nanoparticle-based label free colorimetric aptasensor for adenosine deaminase detection and inhibition assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fen; He, Yue; Xing, Xiao-Jing; Tan, Dai-Di; Lin, Yi; Pang, Dai-Wen; Tang, Hong-Wu

    2015-03-07

    A novel strategy for the fabrication of a colorimetric aptasensor using label free gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is proposed in this work, and the strategy has been employed for the assay of adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity. The aptasensor consists of adenosine (AD) aptamer, AD and AuNPs. The design of the biosensor takes advantage of the special optical properties of AuNPs and the interaction between AuNPs and single-strand DNA. In the absence of ADA, the AuNPs are aggregated and are blue in color under appropriate salt concentration because of the grid structure of an AD aptamer when binding to AD, while in the presence of the analyte, AuNPs remain dispersed with red color under the same concentration of salt owing to ADA converting AD into inosine which has no affinity with the AD aptamer, thus allowing quantitative investigation of ADA activity. The present strategy is simple, cost-effective, selective and sensitive for ADA with a detection limit of 1.526 U L(-1), which is about one order of magnitude lower than that previously reported. In addition, a very low concentration of the inhibitor erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine (EHNA) could generate a distinguishable response. Therefore, the AuNP-based colorimetric biosensor has great potential in the diagnosis of ADA-relevant diseases and drug screening.

  13. Synthesis of 125I Labeled Estradiol-17-Hemisuccinate and Its Binding Study to Estrogen Receptors Using Scintillation Proximity Assay Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Susilo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Research was carried out to obtain a selective ligand which strongly bind to estrogen receptors through determination of binding affinity of estradiol-17β-hemisuccinate. Selectivity of these compounds for estrogen receptor was studied using Scintillation Proximity Assay (SPA method. Primary reagents required in the SPA method including radioligand and receptor, the former was obtained by labeling of estradiol-17β-hemisuccinate with 125I, while MCF7 was used as the receptor. The labeling process was performed by indirect method via two-stage reaction. In this procedure, first step was activation of estradiol-17β-hemisuccinate using isobutylchloroformate and tributylamine as a catalist, while labeling of histamine with 125I was carried out using chloramin-T method to produce 125I-histamine. The second stage was conjugation of activated estradiol-17β-hemisuccinate with 125I-histamine. The product of estradiol-17β-hemisuccinate labeled 125I was extracted using toluene. Furtherly, the organic layer was purified by TLC system. Characterization of estradiol-17β-hemisuccinate labeled 125I from this solvent extraction was carried out by determining its radiochemical purity and the result was obtained using paper electrophoresis and TLC were 79.8% and 84.4% respectively. Radiochemical purity could be increased when purification step was repeated using TLC system, the result showed up to 97.8%. Determination of binding affinity by the SPA method was carried out using MCF7 cell lines which express estrogen receptors showed the value of Kd at 7.192 x 10-3 nM and maximum binding at 336.1 nM. This low value of Kd indicated that binding affinity of estradiol-17β-hemisuccinate was high or strongly binds to estrogen recepto

  14. Homogeneous plate based antibody internalization assay using pH sensor fluorescent dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Nidhi; Godat, Becky; Zimprich, Chad; Dwight, Stephen J; Corona, Cesear; McDougall, Mark; Urh, Marjeta

    2016-04-01

    Receptor-mediated antibody internalization is a key mechanism underlying several anti-cancer antibody therapeutics. Delivering highly toxic drugs to cancer cells, as in the case of antibody drug conjugates (ADCs), efficient removal of surface receptors from cancer cells and changing the pharmacokinetics profile of the antibody drugs are some of key ways that internalization impacts the therapeutic efficacy of the antibodies. Over the years, several techniques have been used to study antibody internalization including radiolabels, fluorescent microscopy, flow cytometry and cellular toxicity assays. While these methods allow analysis of internalization, they have limitations including a multistep process and limited throughput and are generally endpoint assays. Here, we present a new homogeneous method that enables time and concentration dependent measurements of antibody internalization. The method uses a new hydrophilic and bright pH sensor dye (pHAb dye), which is not fluorescent at neutral pH but becomes highly fluorescent at acidic pH. For receptor mediated antibody internalization studies, antibodies against receptors are conjugated with the pHAb dye and incubated with the cells expressing the receptors. Upon binding to the receptor, the dyes conjugated to the antibody are not fluorescent because of the neutral pH of the media, but upon internalization and trafficking into endosomal and lysosomal vesicles the pH drops and dyes become fluorescent. The enabling attributes of the pHAb dyes are the hydrophilic nature to minimize antibody aggregation and bright fluorescence at acidic pH which allows development of simple plate based assays using a fluorescent reader. Using two different therapeutic antibodies--Trastuzumab (anti-HER2) and Cetuximab (anti-EGFR)--we show labeling with pHAb dye using amine and thiol chemistries and impact of chemistry and dye to antibody ration on internalization. We finally present two new approaches using the pHAb dye, which will be

  15. Binding assay and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of ACTIBIND, a protein with anticarcinogenic and antiangiogenic activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeuw, Marina de; Roiz, Levava; Smirnoff, Patricia; Schwartz, Betty; Shoseyov, Oded; Almog, Orna

    2007-01-01

    Native ACTIBIND was successfully crystallized and it was shown that the interaction between ACTIBIND and actin is in a molar ratio of 1:2, with a binding constant of 16.17 × 10 4 M −1 . ACTIBIND is a T2 RNase extracellular glycoprotein produced by the mould Aspergillus niger B1 (CMI CC 324626) that possesses anticarcinogenic and antiangiogenic activities. ACTIBIND was found to be an actin-binding protein that interacts with rabbit muscle actin in a 1:2 molar ratio (ACTIBIND:actin) with a binding constant of 16.17 × 10 4 M −1 . Autoclave-treated ACTIBIND (EI-ACTIBIND) lost its RNase activity, but its actin-binding ability was conserved. ACTIBIND crystals were grown using 20% PEG 3350, 0.2 M ammonium dihydrogen phosphate solution at room temperature (293 K). One to four single crystals appeared in each droplet within a few days and grew to approximate dimensions of 0.5 × 0.5 × 0.5 mm after about two weeks. Diffraction studies of these crystals at low temperature (100 K) indicated that they belong to the P3 1 21 space group, with unit-cell parameters a = 78, b = 78, c = 104 Å

  16. Planarian Phototactic Assay Reveals Differential Behavioral Responses Based on Wavelength.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor R Paskin

    Full Text Available Planarians are free-living aquatic flatworms that possess a well-documented photophobic response to light. With a true central nervous system and simple cerebral eyes (ocelli, planarians are an emerging model for regenerative eye research. However, comparatively little is known about the physiology of their photoreception or how their behavior is affected by various wavelengths. Most phototactic studies have examined planarian behavior using white light. Here, we describe a novel planarian behavioral assay to test responses to small ranges of visible wavelengths (red, blue, green, as well as ultraviolet (UV and infrared (IR which have not previously been examined. Our data show that planarians display behavioral responses across a range of wavelengths. These responses occur in a hierarchy, with the shortest wavelengths (UV causing the most intense photophobic responses while longer wavelengths produce no effect (red or an apparent attraction (IR. In addition, our data reveals that planarian photophobia is comprised of both a general photophobic response (that drives planarians to escape the light source regardless of wavelength and wavelength-specific responses that encompass specific behavioral reactions to individual wavelengths. Our results serve to improve the understanding of planarian phototaxis and suggest that behavioral studies performed with white light mask a complex behavioral interaction with the environment.

  17. Aminoglycoside detection using a universal ELISA binding procedure onto polystyrene microtiter plates in comparison with HPLC analysis and microbiological agar-diffusion assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachetelli, S; Beaulac, C; Lagacé, J

    1998-01-08

    The use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of aminoglycosides has been hindered due to low molecular weight compound adsorption to solid phases. Here, we describe an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on the treatment of polystyrene microtiter plates with Alcian blue prepared in acetic acid prior to coating with the antibiotic. Whereas no detection of tobramycin was possible on commercially treated or untreated enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay plates, the Alcian blue treatment permitted detection of 0.025 and 0.05 microg ml(-1) of tobramycin respectively using 0.05 and 0.1% of Alcian blue with a coefficient of variation of 1.85 and 7.69%, respectively. Comparative studies of five tobramycin samples of unknown quantity using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and high-performance liquid chromatography gave equivalent results while those done via microbiological agar-diffusion assay were an overestimation of the actual quantity. The use of the Alcian blue pretreatment enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay procedure has permitted, in previous studies, the measure of antibodies against synthetic peptides and phospholipids. Subsequently, our demonstration of the sensitivity and reliability of this method in the quantification of tobramycin strongly suggests that the use of Alcian blue pretreatment in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay can be applied universally to avert molecule immobilization problems on solid phases.

  18. Functional nucleic acid-based sensors for heavy metal ion assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guichi; Zhang, Chun-yang

    2014-12-21

    Heavy metal contaminants such as lead ions (Pb(2+)), mercury ions (Hg(2+)) and silver ions (Ag(+)) can cause significant harm to humans and generate enduring bioaccumulation in ecological systems. Even though a variety of methods have been developed for Pb(2+), Hg(2+) and Ag(+) assays, most of them are usually laborious and time-consuming with poor sensitivity. Due to their unique advantages of excellent catalytic properties and high affinity for heavy metal ions, functional nucleic acids such as DNAzymes and aptamers show great promise in the development of novel sensors for heavy metal ion assays. In this review, we summarize the development of functional nucleic acid-based sensors for the detection of Pb(2+), Hg(2+) and Ag(+), and especially focus on two categories including the direct assay and the amplification-based assay. We highlight the emerging trends in the development of sensitive and selective sensors for heavy metal ion assays as well.

  19. Multiplex PCR-based assay for detection of Bordetella pertussis in nasopharyngeal swab specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadowsky, R M; Michaels, R H; Libert, T; Kingsley, L A; Ehrlich, G D

    1996-11-01

    A multiplex PCR-based assay was developed for the detection of Bordetella pertussis in nasopharyngeal swab specimens. The assay simultaneously amplified two separate DNA targets (153 and 203 bp) within a B. pertussis repetitive element and a 438-bp target within the beta-actin gene of human DNA (PCR amplification control). PCR products were detected by a sensitive and specific liquid hybridization gel retardation assay. A total of 496 paired nasopharyngeal swab specimens were tested by both the PCR-based assay and culture. Although 30 (6%) of the specimens inhibited the amplification of the beta-actin target, in all 29 specimens studied, the inhibition disappeared on repeat testing or was easily overcome with a 1:8 dilution or less of specimen digest. Of the 495 specimen pairs yielding a final evaluable result by the PCR-based assay, 19.0% were positive by the PCR-based assay, whereas 13.9% were positive by culture (P < 0.0001). After resolving the PCR-positive, culture-negative results by testing an additional aliquot from these specimens by the multiplex PCR-based assay, the PCR-based assay had a sensitivity and specificity of 98.9 and 99.7%, respectively, compared with values of 73.4 and 100%, respectively, for culture. In comparison with patients with culture-confirmed pertussis, those with PCR-positive, culture-negative results were older and more likely to have had prolonged cough, immunization with pertussis vaccine, or treatment with erythromycin. This multiplex PCR-based assay is substantially more sensitive than culture and identifies specimens that contain inhibitors of PCR.

  20. A radioactive antigen-binding assay for the measurement of antibody to Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular polysaccharide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, J.S.-C.; Monji, N.; Schwalbe, R.S.; McCoy, D.W.

    1981-01-01

    A new polyethylene glycol (PEG) radioimmunoprecipitation assay was developed for the detection of antibody to Haemophilus influenzae b capsular polysaccharide, polyribosylribitol phosphate (PRP). The radioactive antigen, [ 3 H]PRP, with a high specific activity, was produced by growing the organism in the presence of [ 3 H]ribose and was purified by hydroxylapatite and sepharose 4B column chromatography. In the assay, PEG (12.5%) was used to separate antibody-bound [ 3 H]PRP from free [ 3 H]PRP. The present RIA is a simple, specific, sensitive and reproducible procedure for the evaluation of antibody responses of young animals and infants to H. influenzae b vaccines and infections. (Auth.)

  1. Sandwich immunoassay for the hapten angiotensin II. A novel assay principle based on antibodies against immune complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towbin, H; Motz, J; Oroszlan, P; Zingel, O

    1995-04-26

    Immunoassays for haptens such as short peptides or drugs are usually based on the principle of competition for a limited number of binding sites on antibody molecules. Owing to the small size of these antigens it has been thought that two specific antibodies cannot simultaneously bind a hapten. However, antisera containing so called anti-metatypic antibodies have been reported (Voss et al. (1988) Mol. Immunol. 25, 751-759) that bind to hapten-mAb complexes in a reaction where conformational changes on the primary antibody are important. Here, we report on monoclonal antibody pairs able to form ternary complexes with the octapeptide angiotensin II. The first mAb (mAb1) is conventional and binds angiotensin II with high affinity (Kd 10(-11) M). The secondary (anti-metatypic) mAbs (mAbs2s) recognize the immune complex consisting of angiotensin II bound to mAb1, but only poorly recognize mAb1 alone. An immunization technique involving tolerization with uncomplexed mAb1 was used to generate mAb2s. None of the mAbs2s were able to bind angiotensin II by themselves but all efficiently bound the complex of angiotensin II and mAb1. All mAb2s stabilized the angiotensin II-mAb1 complex and one mAb2 distinctly improved the specificity of the assay for angiotensin II. By either labelling mAb1 and immobilizing mAb2 (or vice versa) two-site immunometric assays with detection limits of 1 pg/ml angiotensin II have been established. The kinetics of the complex formation was investigated by fiber optic biospecific interaction analysis (FOBIA), a system allowing real time observation of binding events on the surface of a glass fiber. The association rate towards the liganded conformation of mAb1 was higher than towards the free mAb1. By contrast, the mAb2s dissociated at similar rates from complexed and uncomplexed mAb1.

  2. Spreeta-based biosensor assays for endocrine disruptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchesini, G.R.; Koopal, K.; meulenberg, E.P.; Haasnoot, W.; Irth, H.

    2007-01-01

    The construction and performance of an automated low-cost Spreeta™-based prototype biosensor system for the detection of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) is described. The system consists primarily of a Spreeta miniature liquid sensor incorporated into an aluminum flow cell holder, dedicated to

  3. A fluorescence polarization assay to quantify biotin and biotin-binding proteins in whole plant extracts using Alexa-Fluor 594 biocytin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Harry; Murray, Colleen; Christeller, John; McGhie, Tony

    2008-10-01

    A high-throughput fluorescence polarization assay has been developed for the detection of biotin and biotin-binding proteins in whole leaf extracts. Various groups are investigating the insecticidal properties of avidin and other biotin-binding proteins expressed in leaves of transgenic plants. The methods commonly used to quantify biotin and avidin in leaf extracts are enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blotting. Here we describe a homogeneous fluorescence polarization (FP) method that quantifies transgenic avidin in whole leaf extract by the simple addition of the fluorescent avidin ligand Alexa-Fluor 594 biocytin (AFB). The FP assay exploits the fact that AFB excites and emits in regions of the spectrum that are relatively free of background fluorescence in leaf extract. Transgenic leaf avidin can be quantified within 1-2 h by the FP method, in comparison with 1-2 days for ELISA and Western blotting. The FP method can also measure the amount of biotin in control leaves, not expressing avidin. Functional avidin levels of 1.54 microM (26.1 microg/g leaf tissue) were detected in tobacco leaves expressing vacuole-targeted avidin. Control leaves had biotin levels of around 0.74 microM (approximately 0.18 microg/g leaf tissue). Reagent costs are minimal: typically AFB is used at concentrations of 1-10 nM, avidin is used at 1-100 nM, and sample volumes are 20 microL in 384-well microplates.

  4. Evaluation of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on crude leishmania histone proteins for serodiagnosis of human infantile visceral leishmaniasis.

    OpenAIRE

    Lakhal, Sami; Mekki, Salima; Ben-Abda, Imène; Mousli, Mohamed; Amri, Fethi; Aoun, Karim; Bouratbine, Aïda

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Human visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is routinely diagnosed by detecting IgG that specifically binds to Leishmania antigens. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) remains a widely used method. However, the biggest challenge remains the choice of antigen with the highest specificity and sensitivity. This study is aimed at assessing the diagnostic performances of crude Leishmania histone (CLH) protein-based ELISAs in Mediterranean VL patients. The CLH proteins were ...

  5. Extraction, amplification and detection of DNA in microfluidic chip-based assays

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Jinbo

    2013-12-20

    This review covers three aspects of PCR-based microfluidic chip assays: sample preparation, target amplification, and product detection. We also discuss the challenges related to the miniaturization and integration of each assay and make a comparison between conventional and microfluidic schemes. In order to accomplish these essential assays without human intervention between individual steps, the micro-components for fluid manipulation become critical. We therefore summarize and discuss components such as microvalves (for fluid regulation), pumps (for fluid driving) and mixers (for blending fluids). By combining the above assays and microcomponents, DNA testing of multi-step bio-reactions in microfluidic chips may be achieved with minimal external control. The combination of assay schemes with the use of micro-components also leads to rapid methods for DNA testing via multi-step bioreactions. Contains 259 references.

  6. Extraction, amplification and detection of DNA in microfluidic chip-based assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jinbo; Cao, Wenbin; Wen, Weijia; Kodzius, Rimantas

    2014-01-01

    This review covers three aspects of PCR-based microfluidic chip assays: sample preparation, target amplification, and product detection. We also discuss the challenges related to the miniaturization and integration of each assay and make a comparison between conventional and microfluidic schemes. In order to accomplish these essential assays without human intervention between individual steps, the micro-components for fluid manipulation become critical. We therefore summarize and discuss components such as microvalves (for fluid regulation), pumps (for fluid driving) and mixers (for blending fluids). By combining the above assays and microcomponents, DNA testing of multi-step bio-reactions in microfluidic chips may be achieved with minimal external control. The combination of assay schemes with the use of micro-components also leads to rapid methods for DNA testing via multi-step bioreactions. (author)

  7. Medically Relevant Assays with a Simple Smartphone and Tablet Based Fluorescence Detection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Wargocki

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cell phones and smart phones can be reconfigured as biomedical sensor devices but this requires specialized add-ons. In this paper we present a simple cell phone-based portable bioassay platform, which can be used with fluorescent assays in solution. The system consists of a tablet, a polarizer, a smart phone (camera and a box that provides dark readout conditions. The assay in a well plate is placed on the tablet screen acting as an excitation source. A polarizer on top of the well plate separates excitation light from assay fluorescence emission enabling assay readout with a smartphone camera. The assay result is obtained by analysing the intensity of image pixels in an appropriate colour channel. With this device we carried out two assays, for collagenase and trypsin using fluorescein as the detected fluorophore. The results of collagenase assay with the lowest measured concentration of 3.75 µg/mL and 0.938 µg in total in the sample were comparable to those obtained by a microplate reader. The lowest measured amount of trypsin was 930 pg, which is comparable to the low detection limit of 400 pg for this assay obtained in a microplate reader. The device is sensitive enough to be used in point-of-care medical diagnostics of clinically relevant conditions, including arthritis, cystic fibrosis and acute pancreatitis.

  8. Hormone assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisentraut, A.M.

    1977-01-01

    An improved radioimmunoassay is described for measuring total triiodothyronine or total thyroxine levels in a sample of serum containing free endogenous thyroid hormone and endogenous thyroid hormone bound to thyroid hormone binding protein. The thyroid hormone is released from the protein by adding hydrochloric acid to the serum. The pH of the separated thyroid hormone and thyroid hormone binding protein is raised in the absence of a blocking agent without interference from the endogenous protein. 125 I-labelled thyroid hormone and thyroid hormone antibodies are added to the mixture, allowing the labelled and unlabelled thyroid hormone and the thyroid hormone antibody to bind competitively. This results in free thyroid hormone being separated from antibody bound thyroid hormone and thus the unknown quantity of thyroid hormone may be determined. A thyroid hormone test assay kit is described for this radioimmunoassay. It provides a 'single tube' assay which does not require blocking agents for endogenous protein interference nor an external solid phase sorption step for the separation of bound and free hormone after the competitive binding step; it also requires a minimum number of manipulative steps. Examples of the assay are given to illustrate the reproducibility, linearity and specificity of the assay. (UK)

  9. Highly selective apo-arginase based method for sensitive enzymatic assay of manganese (II) and cobalt (II) ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasyuk, Nataliya; Gayda, Galina; Zakalskiy, Andriy; Zakalska, Oksana; Errachid, Abdelhamid; Gonchar, Mykhailo

    2018-03-01

    A novel enzymatic method of manganese (II) and cobalt (II) ions assay, based on using apo-enzyme of Mn2 +-dependent recombinant arginase I (arginase) and 2,3-butanedione monoxime (DMO) as a chemical reagent is proposed. The principle of the method is the evaluation of the activity of L-arginine-hydrolyzing of arginase holoenzyme after the specific binding of Mn2 + or Co2 + with apo-arginase. Urea, which is the product of enzymatic hydrolysis of L-arginine (Arg), reacts with DMO and the resulted compound is detected by both fluorometry and visual spectrophotometry. Thus, the content of metal ions in the tested samples can be determined by measuring the level of urea generated after enzymatic hydrolysis of Arg by reconstructed arginase holoenzyme in the presence of tested metal ions. The linearity range of the fluorometric apo-arginase-DMO method in the case of Mn2 + assay is from 4 pM to 1.10 nM with a limit of detection of 1 pM Mn2 +, whereas the linearity range of the present method in the case of Co2 + assay is from 8 pM to 45 nM with a limit of detection of 2.5 pM Co2 +. The proposed method being highly sensitive, selective, valid and low-cost, may be useful to monitor Mn2 + and Co2 + content in clinical laboratories, food industry and environmental control service.

  10. Smartphone based visual and quantitative assays on upconversional paper sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Qingsong; Jing, Huarong; Li, You; Yisibashaer, Wuerzha; Chen, Jian; Nan Li, Bing; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-15

    The integration of smartphone with paper sensors recently has been gain increasing attentions because of the achievement of quantitative and rapid analysis. However, smartphone based upconversional paper sensors have been restricted by the lack of effective methods to acquire luminescence signals on test paper. Herein, by the virtue of 3D printing technology, we exploited an auxiliary reusable device, which orderly assembled a 980nm mini-laser, optical filter and mini-cavity together, for digitally imaging the luminescence variations on test paper and quantitative analyzing pesticide thiram by smartphone. In detail, copper ions decorated NaYF4:Yb/Tm upconversion nanoparticles were fixed onto filter paper to form test paper, and the blue luminescence on it would be quenched after additions of thiram through luminescence resonance energy transfer mechanism. These variations could be monitored by the smartphone camera, and then the blue channel intensities of obtained colored images were calculated to quantify amounts of thiram through a self-written Android program installed on the smartphone, offering a reliable and accurate detection limit of 0.1μM for the system. This work provides an initial demonstration of integrating upconversion nanosensors with smartphone digital imaging for point-of-care analysis on a paper-based platform. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Image based quantitative reader for Lateral flow immunofluorescence assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Kaushik Basak; Joseph, Jayaraj; Sivaprakasam, Mohanasankar

    2015-08-01

    Fluorescence Lateral flow immunoassays (LFIA) have wide range of applications in point-of-care testing (POCT). An integrated, motion-free, accurate, reliable reader that performs automated quantitative analysis of LFIA is essential for POCT diagnosis. We demonstrate an image based quantitative method to read the lateral flow immunofluorescence test strips. The developed reader uses line laser diode module to illuminate the LFIA test strip having fluorescent dye. Fluorescence light coming from the region of interest (ROI) of the LFIA test strip was filtered using an emission filter and imaged using a camera following which images were processed in computer. A dedicated control program was developed that automated the entire process including illumination of the test strip using laser diode, capturing the ROI of the test strip, processing and analyzing the images and displaying of results. Reproducibility of the reader has been evaluated using few reference cartridges and HbA1c (Glycated haemoglobin) test cartridges. The proposed system can be upgraded to a compact reader for widespread testing of LFIA test strips.

  12. Droplet-based microfluidic washing module for magnetic particle-based assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hun; Xu, Linfeng; Oh, Kwang W

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a continuous flow droplet-based microfluidic platform for magnetic particle-based assays by employing in-droplet washing. The droplet-based washing was implemented by traversing functionalized magnetic particles across a laterally merged droplet from one side (containing sample and reagent) to the other (containing buffer) by an external magnetic field. Consequently, the magnetic particles were extracted to a parallel-synchronized train of washing buffer droplets, and unbound reagents were left in an original train of sample droplets. To realize the droplet-based washing function, the following four procedures were sequentially carried in a droplet-based microfluidic device: parallel synchronization of two trains of droplets by using a ladder-like channel network; lateral electrocoalescence by an electric field; magnetic particle manipulation by a magnetic field; and asymmetrical splitting of merged droplets. For the stable droplet synchronization and electrocoalescence, we optimized droplet generation conditions by varying the flow rate ratio (or droplet size). Image analysis was carried out to determine the fluorescent intensity of reagents before and after the washing step. As a result, the unbound reagents in sample droplets were significantly removed by more than a factor of 25 in the single washing step, while the magnetic particles were successfully extracted into washing buffer droplets. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate a magnetic particle-based immunoassay with streptavidin-coated magnetic particles and fluorescently labelled biotin in the proposed continuous flow droplet-based microfluidic platform.

  13. A lectin-based gold nanoparticle assay for probing glycosylation of glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Pomales, Germarie; Morris, Todd A; Falabella, James B; Tarlov, Michael J; Zangmeister, Rebecca A

    2012-09-01

    We report a glycoanalysis method in which lectins are used to probe the glycans of therapeutic glycoproteins that are adsorbed on gold nanoparticles. A model mannose-presenting glycoprotein, ribonuclease B (RNase B), and the therapeutic monoclonal antibody (mAb) rituximab, were found to adsorb spontaneously and non-specifically to bare gold nanoparticles such that glycans were accessible for lectin binding. Addition of a multivalent binding lectin, such as concanavalin A (Con A), to a solution of the modified gold nanoparticles resulted in cross-linking of the nanoparticles. This phenomenon was evidenced within 1 min by a change in the hydrodynamic diameter, D(H), measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and a shift and increase in absorbance of the plasmon resonance band of the gold nanoparticles. By combining the sugar-binding specificity and the cross-linking capabilities of lectins, the non-specific adsorption of glycoproteins to gold surfaces, and the unique optical reporting properties of gold nanoparticles, a glycosylation pattern of rituximab could be generated. This assay provides advantages over currently used glycoanalysis methods in terms of short analysis time, simplicity of the conjugation method, convenience of simple spectroscopic detection, and feasibility of providing glycan characterization of the protein drug product by using a variety of binding lectins. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Relative binding affinity-serum modified access (RBA-SMA) assay predicts the relative in vivo bioactivity of the xenoestrogens bisphenol A and octylphenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, S C; vom Saal, F S; Thayer, K A; Dhar, M G; Boechler, M; Welshons, W V

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a relative binding affinity-serum modified access (RBA-SMA) assay to determine the effect of serum on the access of xenoestrogens to estrogen receptors within intact cultured MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. We used this assay to predict low dose activity of two xenoestrogens in mice. In serum-free medium, bisphenol A, a component of polycarbonates and of resins used to line metal food cans, showed a lower relative binding affinity (RBA; 0.006%) than octylphenol (0.072%) and nonylphenol (0.026%), which are used as surfactants in many commercial products (all RBAs are relative to estradiol, which is equal to 100%). In 100% serum from adult men, bisphenol A showed a higher RBA (0.01%) than in serum-free medium and thus enhanced access to estrogen receptors relative to estradiol. In contrast, octylphenol showed a 22-fold decrease in RBA (0.0029%) and nonylphenol showed a 5-fold decrease in RBA (0.0039%) when measured in adult serum. This indicates that, relative to estradiol, serum had less of an inhibitory effect on the cell uptake and binding in MCF-7 cells of bisphenol A, while serum had a greater inhibitory effect on octylphenol and nonylphenol relative to estradiol. Extrapolation of these relative activities in adult serum predicted that the estrogenic bioactivity of bisphenol A would be over 500-fold greater than that of octylphenol in fetal mouse serum. Bisphenol A and octylphenol were fed to pregnant mice at 2 and 20 micrograms/kg/day. Exposure of male mouse fetuses to either dose of bisphenol A, but to neither dose of octylphenol, significantly increased their adult prostate weight relative to control males, which is consistent with the higher predicted bioactivity of bisphenol A than octylphenol in the RBA-SMA assay. In addition, our findings show for the first time that fetal exposure to environmentally relevant parts-per-billion (ppb) doses of bisphenol A, in the range currently being consumed by people, can alter the adult reproductive

  15. Association of HLA Types with Non-Specific Binding of Negative Control Beads in Luminex Panel Reactive Antibody (PRA) Screening Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nuri; Park, Hee Sue; In, Ji Won; Roh, Eun Youn; Shin, Sue; Park, Kyoung Un; Song, Eun Young

    2017-01-01

    Luminex panel reactive antibody (PRA) screening assays using microbeads are widely used for organ transplantation. Anti-HLA serum reactivity is calculated by correcting for non-specific binding to the negative control (NC) beads. High mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) value of NC beads are observed in some patients and can result in false negative results in the PRA screening assay. We analyzed the clinical characteristics and HLA types of those patients with high MFI values of NC beads. Sixty-six patients with high MFI values of NC beads (> 300) in the PRA LABScreen Mixed assay (One Lambda) tested were included as the high NC group. Age and gender matched controls with low MFI values of NC beads (PRA, were selected as the low NC group and 207 healthy Koreans were used as normal controls. Association of clinical characteristics and HLA types with the high NC group were analyzed using Chi-square test or Fischer's exact test, as appropriate. The proportion of patients with underlying liver disease was higher in the high NC group compared to the low NC group (18.1% vs. 1.5%, p < 0.001, OR = 14.2). The seropositivity of anti-nuclear antibody and rheumatoid factor, the frequency of use of intravenous immunoglobulin G, anti-thymocyte globulin, and rituximab showed no difference between two groups. The phenotype frequency (PF) of HLA-B46 was higher in the high NC group than in the low NC group (8.0% vs. 3.2%, p = 0.036, OR = 2.8). The PF of HLA-B7 was lower in the high NC group than in the healthy controls (0.0% vs. 6.5%, p = 0.008, OR = 0.1). The PF of HLA-DR1 was lower in the high NC group than in the low NC group (0.8% vs. 6.6%, p = 0.015, OR = 0.1) or healthy controls (0.8% vs. 7.4%, p = 0.003, Pc = 0.042, OR = 0.1). Increased non-specific binding to NC beads was associated with underlying liver disease and HLAB46. HLA-B7 and HLA-DR1 were related to a lower chance of non-specific binding to NC beads. The mechanism of those associations, such as differences in non

  16. Affinity capillary electrophoresis for the assessment of binding affinity of carbohydrate-based cholera toxin inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizpurua-Olaizola, Oier; Sastre Torano, Javier; Pukin, Aliaksei; Fu, Ou; Boons, Geert Jan; de Jong, Gerhardus J; Pieters, Roland J

    2018-01-01

    Developing tools for the study of protein carbohydrate interactions is an important goal in glycobiology. Cholera toxin inhibition is an interesting target in this context, as its inhibition may help to fight against cholera. For the study of novel ligands an affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) method was optimized and applied. The method uses unlabeled cholera toxin B-subunit (CTB) and unlabeled carbohydrate ligands based on ganglioside GM1-oligosaccharides (GM1os). In an optimized method at pH 4, adsorption of the protein to the capillary walls was prevented by a polybrene-dextran sulfate-polybrene coating. Different concentrations of the ligands were added to the BGE. CTB binding was observed by a mobility shift that could be used for dissociation constant (K d ) determination. The K d values of two GM1 derivatives differed by close to an order of magnitude (600 ± 20 nM and 90 ± 50 nM) which was in good agreement with the differences in their reported nanomolar IC 50 values of an ELISA-type assay. Moreover, the selectivity of GM1os towards CTB was demonstrated using Influenza hemagglutinin (H5) as a binding competitor. The developed method can be an important platform for preclinical development of drugs targeting pathogen-induced secretory diarrhea. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Comparison of cell-based and non-cell-based assay platforms for the detection of clinically relevant anti-drug neutralizing antibodies for immunogenicity assessment of therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jenny; Wala, Iwona; Han, Hong; Nagatani, Janice; Barger, Troy; Civoli, Francesca; Kaliyaperumal, Arunan; Zhuang, Yao; Gupta, Shalini

    2015-04-01

    Anti-drug neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) formed due to unwanted immunogenicity of a therapeutic protein point towards a mature immune response. NAb detection is important in interpreting the therapeutic's efficacy and safety in vivo. In vitro cell-based NAb assays provide a physiological system for NAb detection, however are complex assays. Non-cell-based competitive ligand binding (CLB) approaches are also employed for NAb detection. Instead of cells, CLB assays use soluble receptor and conjugated reagents and are easier to perform, however have reduced physiological relevance. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of CLB assays to established cell-based assays to determine the former's ability to detect clinically relevant NAbs towards therapeutics that (i) acted as an agonist or (ii) acted as antagonists by binding to a target receptor. We performed a head-to-head comparison of the performance of cell-based and CLB NAb assays for erythropoietin (EPO) and two anti-receptor monoclonal antibodies (AMG-X and AMG 317). Clinically relevant NAb-positive samples identified previously by a cell-based assay were assessed in the corresponding CLB format(s). A panel of 12 engineered fully human anti-EPO monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) was tested in both EPO NAb assay formats. Our results showed that the CLB format was (i) capable of detecting human anti-EPO MAbs of differing neutralizing capabilities and affinities and (ii) provided similar results as the cell-based assay for detecting NAbs in patient samples. The cell-based and CLB assays also behaved comparably in detecting NAbs in clinical samples for AMG-X. In the case of anti-AMG 317 NAbs, the CLB format failed to detect NAbs in more than 50% of the tested samples. We conclude that assay sensitivity, drug tolerance and the selected assay matrix played an important role in the inability of AMG 317 CLB assays to detect clinically relevant NAbs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. CLSI-based transference of CALIPER pediatric reference intervals to Beckman Coulter AU biochemical assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou El Hassan, Mohamed; Stoianov, Alexandra; Araújo, Petra A T; Sadeghieh, Tara; Chan, Man Khun; Chen, Yunqi; Randell, Edward; Nieuwesteeg, Michelle; Adeli, Khosrow

    2015-11-01

    The CALIPER program has established a comprehensive database of pediatric reference intervals using largely the Abbott ARCHITECT biochemical assays. To expand clinical application of CALIPER reference standards, the present study is aimed at transferring CALIPER reference intervals from the Abbott ARCHITECT to Beckman Coulter AU assays. Transference of CALIPER reference intervals was performed based on the CLSI guidelines C28-A3 and EP9-A2. The new reference intervals were directly verified using up to 100 reference samples from the healthy CALIPER cohort. We found a strong correlation between Abbott ARCHITECT and Beckman Coulter AU biochemical assays, allowing the transference of the vast majority (94%; 30 out of 32 assays) of CALIPER reference intervals previously established using Abbott assays. Transferred reference intervals were, in general, similar to previously published CALIPER reference intervals, with some exceptions. Most of the transferred reference intervals were sex-specific and were verified using healthy reference samples from the CALIPER biobank based on CLSI criteria. It is important to note that the comparisons performed between the Abbott and Beckman Coulter assays make no assumptions as to assay accuracy or which system is more correct/accurate. The majority of CALIPER reference intervals were transferrable to Beckman Coulter AU assays, allowing the establishment of a new database of pediatric reference intervals. This further expands the utility of the CALIPER database to clinical laboratories using the AU assays; however, each laboratory should validate these intervals for their analytical platform and local population as recommended by the CLSI. Copyright © 2015 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. High content screening for G protein-coupled receptors using cell-based protein translocation assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grånäs, Charlotta; Lundholt, Betina Kerstin; Heydorn, Arne

    2005-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been one of the most productive classes of drug targets for several decades, and new technologies for GPCR-based discovery promise to keep this field active for years to come. While molecular screens for GPCR receptor agonist- and antagonist-based drugs...... will continue to be valuable discovery tools, the most exciting developments in the field involve cell-based assays for GPCR function. Some cell-based discovery strategies, such as the use of beta-arrestin as a surrogate marker for GPCR function, have already been reduced to practice, and have been used...... as valuable discovery tools for several years. The application of high content cell-based screening to GPCR discovery has opened up additional possibilities, such as direct tracking of GPCRs, G proteins and other signaling pathway components using intracellular translocation assays. These assays provide...

  20. From SOMAmer-based biomarker discovery to diagnostic and clinical applications: a SOMAmer-based, streamlined multiplex proteomic assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Kraemer

    Full Text Available Recently, we reported a SOMAmer-based, highly multiplexed assay for the purpose of biomarker identification. To enable seamless transition from highly multiplexed biomarker discovery assays to a format suitable and convenient for diagnostic and life-science applications, we developed a streamlined, plate-based version of the assay. The plate-based version of the assay is robust, sensitive (sub-picomolar, rapid, can be highly multiplexed (upwards of 60 analytes, and fully automated. We demonstrate that quantification by microarray-based hybridization, Luminex bead-based methods, and qPCR are each compatible with our platform, further expanding the breadth of proteomic applications for a wide user community.

  1. A Modified Hydroxyproline Assay Based on Hydrochloric Acid in Ehrlich's Solution Accurately Measures Tissue Collagen Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cissell, Derek D; Link, Jarrett M; Hu, Jerry C; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2017-04-01

    Collagen quantification has long been relevant to biomedical research and clinical practice to characterize tissues and determine disease states. The hydroxyproline assay, while a broadly employed method of quantifying collagen, uses perchloric acid to dissolve Ehrlich's reagent. Since perchloric acid poses occupational safety hazards and high costs, in this study, a new hydroxyproline assay was developed that replaces perchloric acid with a relatively safer and cheaper alternative, hydrochloric acid (HCl). To validate this biochemical technique, first, using either acid to dissolve Ehrlich's reagent, the assays were completed for native and engineered collagenous tissues. No statistical differences were identified between the assays (p = 0.32). Subsequently, both biochemical techniques were compared to amino acid analysis, considered a proteomics gold standard. Interestingly, utilizing HCl in lieu of perchloric acid yielded greater concordance with amino acid analysis (ρ c  = 0.980) than did the traditional assay (ρ c  = 0.947); that is, the HCl-based assay more closely estimates hydroxyproline content, and, consequently, true collagen content. Thus, using Ehrlich's reagent containing HCl in the hydroxyproline assay represents an advance in both mitigating laboratory safety hazards and improving biochemical collagen quantification.

  2. Enzyme activity assay of glycoprotein enzymes based on a boronate affinity molecularly imprinted 96-well microplate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xiaodong; Liu, Zhen

    2014-12-16

    Enzyme activity assay is an important method in clinical diagnostics. However, conventional enzyme activity assay suffers from apparent interference from the sample matrix. Herein, we present a new format of enzyme activity assay that can effectively eliminate the effects of the sample matrix. The key is a 96-well microplate modified with molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) prepared according to a newly proposed method called boronate affinity-based oriented surface imprinting. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), a glycoprotein enzyme that has been routinely used as an indicator for several diseases in clinical tests, was taken as a representative target enzyme. The prepared MIP exhibited strong affinity toward the template enzyme (with a dissociation constant of 10(-10) M) as well as superb tolerance for interference. Thus, the enzyme molecules in a complicated sample matrix could be specifically captured and cleaned up for enzyme activity assay, which eliminated the interference from the sample matrix. On the other hand, because the boronate affinity MIP could well retain the enzymatic activity of glycoprotein enzymes, the enzyme captured by the MIP was directly used for activity assay. Thus, additional assay time and possible enzyme or activity loss due to an enzyme release step required by other methods were avoided. Assay of ALP in human serum was successfully demonstrated, suggesting a promising prospect of the proposed method in real-world applications.

  3. Binding assays for the quantitative detection of P. brevis polyether neurotoxins in biological samples and antibodies as therapeutic aids for polyether marine intoxication. Annual report, 1 December 1987-30 November 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baden, D.G.

    1988-12-15

    The polyether lipid-soluble toxins isolated from the marine dinoflagellate Ptychodiscus brevis (formerly Gymnodinium breve) can be detected using two separate types of specific binding reaction. Using tritiated PbTx-3 as a specific probe for binding to voltage-dependent sodium channels in rat brain synaptosomes or to specific polyclonal antibodies, binding equilibria and displacement by unlabeled brevetoxins were compared. Labeled toxin can be displaced in a competitive manner by any of the other 5 naturally-occurring toxins; the quantitative displacement ability of each appears to reflect individual potency in fish bioassay. A comparison of ED50 in Radioimmunoassay and ED50 in synaptosome binding assay indicates that the former assay is useful for detection of toxins which possess the structural backbone of PbTx-3, the immunizing hapten. Thus, the two assays have quantitative applicability; the sodium channel with respect to potency and the antibodies with respect to structure. Microtiter plate assays utilizing each specific brevetoxin binding component and enzyme-linked toxin hapten have been successful and indicate a general applicability of colorimetric prototypes. There, is however, considerable manipulation required to decrease non-specific binding of the hydrophobic toxin-enzyme complex to the plates. Preliminary studies aimed at producing monoclonal antibodies have been explored using brevetoxins linked to keyhole limpet hemocyanin.

  4. High content screening for G protein-coupled receptors using cell-based protein translocation assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grånäs, Charlotta; Lundholt, Betina Kerstin; Heydorn, Arne

    2005-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been one of the most productive classes of drug targets for several decades, and new technologies for GPCR-based discovery promise to keep this field active for years to come. While molecular screens for GPCR receptor agonist- and antagonist-based drugs...... as valuable discovery tools for several years. The application of high content cell-based screening to GPCR discovery has opened up additional possibilities, such as direct tracking of GPCRs, G proteins and other signaling pathway components using intracellular translocation assays. These assays provide...

  5. Development and validation of a generic fluorescent methyltransferase activity assay based on the Transcreener® AMP/GMP Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klink, Tony A.; Staeben, Matt; Twesten, Kim; Kopp, Andrew L.; Kumar, Meera; Dunn, Rebecca Schall; Pinchard, Cori A.; Kleman-Leyer, Karen M.; Klumpp, Martin; Lowery, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Methylation is a ubiquitous covalent modification used to control the function of diverse biomolecules including hormones, neurotransmitters, xenobiotics, proteins, nucleic acids and lipids. Histone methyltransferases (HMTs) are currently of high interest as drug targets because of their role in epigenetic regulation, however most HMT assay methods are either not amenable to an HTS environment or are applicable to a limited number of enzymes. We developed a generic methyltransferase assay method using fluorescent immunodetection of AMP, which is formed from the MT reaction product S-adenosylhomocysteine in a dual enzyme coupling step. The detection range of the assay, its suitability for HTS, including stability of reagents following dispensing and after addition to reactions as well as the potential for interference from drug like molecules was investigated. In addition, the use of the assay for measuring inhibitor potencies with peptide or intact protein substrates was examined through pilot screening with selected reference enzymes including HMT G9a. By combining a novel enzymatic coupling step with the well characterized Transcreener® AMP/GMP assay, we have developed a robust HTS assay for HMTs which should be broadly applicable to other types of methyltransferases as well. PMID:21956169

  6. flippant-An R package for the automated analysis of fluorescence-based scramblase assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Richard J; Ploier, Birgit; Goren, Michael A; Menon, Anant K; Graumann, Johannes

    2017-03-03

    The lipid scrambling activity of protein extracts and purified scramblases is typically measured using a fluorescence-based assay. While the assay has yielded insight into the scramblase activity in crude membrane preparations, functional validation of candidate scramblases, stoichiometry of scramblase complexes as well as ATP-dependence of flippases, data analysis in its context has remained a task involving many manual steps. With the extension package "flippant" to R, a free software environment for statistical computing and graphics, we introduce an integrated solution for the analysis and publication-grade graphical presentation of dithionite scramblase assays and demonstrate its utility in revisiting an originally manual analysis from the publication record, closely reproducing the reported results. "flippant" allows for quick, reproducible data analysis of scramblase activity assays and provides a platform for review, dissemination and extension of the strategies it employs.

  7. Newborn Congenital Cytomegalovirus Screening Based on Clinical Manifestations and Evaluation of DNA-based Assays for In Vitro Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Tomoyuki; Oka, Akira; Morioka, Ichiro; Moriuchi, Hiroyuki; Koyano, Shin; Yamada, Hideto; Saito, Shigeru; Sameshima, Hiroshi; Nagamatsu, Takeshi; Tsuchida, Shinya; Inoue, Naoki

    2017-10-01

    To establish a strategy for congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) screening and to establish confirmatory assays approved as in vitro diagnostics by the regulatory authorities, we evaluated the clinical risks and performance of diagnostic assays developed by commercial companies, since cCMV infection has significant clinical consequences. Newborns with clinical manifestations considered to be consequences of cCMV infection (n = 575) were screened for the presence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA in urine specimens collected onto filter paper placed in their diapers using the polymerase chain reaction-based assay reported previously. Liquid urine specimens were obtained from all of 20 CMV-positive newborns and 107 of the CMV-negative newborns identified in the screening. We used these 127 specimens, as well as 12 from cCMV cases identified in a previous study and 41 from healthy newborns, to compare the performance of 2 commercial assays and 1 in-house assay. The risk-based screening allowed the identification of cCMV cases at least 10-fold more efficiently than our previous universal screening, although there appears to be a limit to the identification of asymptomatically infected newborns. Although CMV-specific IgM during pregnancy was found frequently in mothers of cCMV newborns, CMV-IgM alone is not an effective diagnostic marker. The urine-filter-based assay and the 3 diagnostic assays yielded identical results. Although risk-based and universal newborn screening strategies for cCMV infection each have their respective advantages and disadvantages, urine-filter-based assay followed by confirmatory in vitro diagnostics assays is able to identify cCMV cases efficiently.

  8. Anticoagulants Influence the Performance of In Vitro Assays Intended for Characterization of Nanotechnology-Based Formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedrone, Edward; Neun, Barry W; Rodriguez, Jamie; Vermilya, Alison; Clogston, Jeffrey D; McNeil, Scott E; Barenholz, Yechezkel; Szebeni, Janos; Dobrovolskaia, Marina A

    2017-12-21

    The preclinical safety assessment of novel nanotechnology-based drug products frequently relies on in vitro assays, especially during the early stages of product development, due to the limited quantities of nanomaterials available for such studies. The majority of immunological tests require donor blood. To enable such tests one has to prevent the blood from coagulating, which is usually achieved by the addition of an anticoagulant into blood collection tubes. Heparin, ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), and citrate are the most commonly used anticoagulants. Novel anticoagulants such as hirudin are also available but are not broadly used. Despite the notion that certain anticoagulants may influence assay performance, a systematic comparison between traditional and novel anticoagulants in the in vitro assays intended for immunological characterization of nanotechnology-based formulations is currently not available. We compared hirudin-anticoagulated blood with its traditional counterparts in the standardized immunological assay cascade, and found that the type of anticoagulant did not influence the performance of the hemolysis assay. However, hirudin was more optimal for the complement activation and leukocyte proliferation assays, while traditional anticoagulants citrate and heparin were more appropriate for the coagulation and cytokine secretion assays. The results also suggest that traditional immunological controls such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS ) are not reliable for understanding the role of anticoagulant in the assay performance. We observed differences in the test results between hirudin and traditional anticoagulant-prepared blood for nanomaterials at the time when no such effects were seen with traditional controls. It is, therefore, important to recognize the advantages and limitations of each anticoagulant and consider individual nanoparticles on a case-by-case basis.

  9. Anticoagulants Influence the Performance of In Vitro Assays Intended for Characterization of Nanotechnology-Based Formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Cedrone

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The preclinical safety assessment of novel nanotechnology-based drug products frequently relies on in vitro assays, especially during the early stages of product development, due to the limited quantities of nanomaterials available for such studies. The majority of immunological tests require donor blood. To enable such tests one has to prevent the blood from coagulating, which is usually achieved by the addition of an anticoagulant into blood collection tubes. Heparin, ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA, and citrate are the most commonly used anticoagulants. Novel anticoagulants such as hirudin are also available but are not broadly used. Despite the notion that certain anticoagulants may influence assay performance, a systematic comparison between traditional and novel anticoagulants in the in vitro assays intended for immunological characterization of nanotechnology-based formulations is currently not available. We compared hirudin-anticoagulated blood with its traditional counterparts in the standardized immunological assay cascade, and found that the type of anticoagulant did not influence the performance of the hemolysis assay. However, hirudin was more optimal for the complement activation and leukocyte proliferation assays, while traditional anticoagulants citrate and heparin were more appropriate for the coagulation and cytokine secretion assays. The results also suggest that traditional immunological controls such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS are not reliable for understanding the role of anticoagulant in the assay performance. We observed differences in the test results between hirudin and traditional anticoagulant-prepared blood for nanomaterials at the time when no such effects were seen with traditional controls. It is, therefore, important to recognize the advantages and limitations of each anticoagulant and consider individual nanoparticles on a case-by-case basis.

  10. Characterization of equine vitamin D-binding protein, development of an assay, and assessment of plasma concentrations of the protein in healthy horses and horses with gastrointestinal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihl, Tina H; Jacobsen, Stine; Olsen, Dorthe T; Højrup, Peter; Grosche, Astrid; Freeman, David E; Andersen, Pia H; Houen, Gunnar

    2017-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To purify and characterize equine vitamin D-binding protein (VDBP) from equine serum and to evaluate plasma concentrations of VDBP in healthy horses and horses with gastrointestinal injury or disease. ANIMALS 13 healthy laboratory animals (8 mice and 5 rabbits), 61 healthy horses, 12 horses with experimentally induced intestinal ischemia and reperfusion (IR), and 59 horses with acute gastrointestinal diseases. PROCEDURES VDBP was purified from serum of 2 healthy horses, and recombinant equine VDBP was obtained through a commercial service. Equine VDBP was characterized by mass spectrometry. Monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies were raised against equine VDBP, and a rocket immunoelectrophoresis assay for equine VDBP was established. Plasma samples from 61 healthy horses were used to establish working VDBP reference values for study purposes. Plasma VDBP concentrations were assessed at predetermined time points in horses with IR and in horses with naturally occurring gastrointestinal diseases. RESULTS The working reference range for plasma VDBP concentration in healthy horses was 531 to 1,382 mg/L. Plasma VDBP concentrations were significantly decreased after 1 hour of ischemia in horses with IR, compared with values prior to induction of ischemia, and were significantly lower in horses with naturally occurring gastrointestinal diseases with a colic duration of < 12 hours than in healthy horses. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Plasma VDBP concentrations were significantly decreased in horses with acute gastrointestinal injury or disease. Further studies and the development of a clinically relevant assay are needed to establish the reliability of VDBP as a diagnostic and prognostic marker in horses.

  11. Analysis of the structural and functional roles of coupling helices in the ATP-binding cassette transporter MsbA through enzyme assays and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Tadaomi; Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Kato, Hiroaki; Sakurai, Minoru

    2014-07-08

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are constructed from some common structural units: the highly conserved nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs), which work as a nucleotide-dependent engine for driving substrate transport, the diverse transmembrane domains (TMDs), which create the translocation pathway, and the coupling helices (CHs), which are located at the NBD-TMD interface. Although the CHs are believed to be essential for NBD-TMD communication, their roles remain unclear. In this study, we performed enzyme assays and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the ABC transporter MsbA and two MsbA mutants in which the amino acid residues of one of the CHs were mutated to alanines: (i) wild type (Wt), (ii) CH1 mutant (Mt1), and (iii) CH2 mutant (Mt2). The experiments show that the CH2 mutation decreases the ATPase activity (kcat) compared with that of the Wt (a decrease of 32%), and a nearly equal degree of decrease in the ATP binding affinity (Km) was observed for both Mt1 and Mt2. The MD simulations successfully accounted for several structural and dynamical origins for these experimental observations. In addition, on the basis of collective motion and morphing analyses, we propose that the reverse-rotational motions and noddinglike motions between the NBDs and TMDs are indispensable for the conformational transition between the inward- and outward-facing conformations. In particular, CH2 is significantly important for the occurrence of the noddinglike motion. These findings provide important insights into the structure-function relationship of ABC transporters.

  12. IRAG working group 2. CAM-based assays. Interagency Regulatory Alternatives Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielmann, H; Liebsch, M; Moldenhauer, F; Holzhütter, H G; Bagley, D M; Lipman, J M; Pape, W J; Miltenburger, H; de Silva, O; Hofer, H; Steiling, W

    1997-01-01

    CAM-based assays, in which test material is applied to the chorion allantoic membrane (CAM) of embryonated chicken eggs, were assessed as alternatives to the Draize eye irritation test. Two general types of CAM-based assays are currently in use, the HET-CAM test and the CAMVA assay. Evaluations were made of five data sets produced with three different modifications of the HET-CAM test and two data sets obtained with the same CAMVA protocol. Data sets consisted of 9-133 test chemicals, usually from the sponsor's product line, and also from a validation trial. Each data set and assay protocol were analysed for quality of data, purpose and proposed use of the assay, range of responses covered, range of test materials amenable, current use in safety and risk assessment both in-house and for regulatory purposes. Since the MMAS Draize score was not available for all in vivo data sets, the sigma MMMIS, which correlates well with the MMAS, was used instead. In vitro/in vivo correlations calculated with Pearson's linear coefficient ranged from r = 0.6 to r = 0.9 for six of seven data sets. Corneal opacity and inflammation of the iris showed the best correlation to in vitro data. Prediction rates were significantly improved when partial linear regression was used, and the predictivity of three different HET-CAM protocols was almost the same. HET-CAM assays showed the best prediction with surfactants and surfactant-based formulations, whereas the CAMVA assay provided the best performance with alcohols.

  13. Ultrasensitive human thyrotropin (h TSH) immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) set up, through identification and minimization of non specific bindings; Ensaio imunoradiometrico ultra-sensivel de tireotrofina humana (hTSH) obtido mediante a identificacao e minimizacao de ligacoes inespecificas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peroni, C.N.

    1994-12-31

    An IRMA of h TSH, based on magnetic solid phase separation, was studied especially for what concerns its non specific bindings. These were identified as a product of the interaction between an altered form of radioiodinated anti-h TSH monoclonal antibody ({sup 125} I-m AB) and the uncoupled magnetizable cellulose particle (matrix). Apparently this form of {sup 125} I-m AB is a type of aggregate that can be partly resolved from the main peak on Sephadex G-200 and further minimized via a single pre-incubation with the same matrix. Solid phase saturation with milk proteins, tracer storage at 4{sup 0} C and serum addition during incubation were also found particularly effective is preventing its formation. These findings were used in order to reproducibly decrease non specific bindings to values <0.1% (or <70 cpm), increasing thus the signal-to-noise ratio (B{sub 60}/B{sub O}) up to values of 300-500. This way we obtained h TSH radio assays with functional sensitivities of about 0.05 m IU/L and analytical sensitivities of the order of 0.02 m IU/L, which classify them at least as among the best second generation assays and that are excellent indeed for magnetic IRMA s. A more optimistic sensitivity calculation, based on Rodbard`s definition, provided values down to 0.008 m IU/L. Such sensitivities, moreover, were obtained in a very reproducible way and all over the useful tracer life. (author). 83 refs, 13 figs, 25 tabs.

  14. Development of a versatile organophosphorous-hydrolase-based assay for organophosphate pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Kim R.; Wang, Yi; Mulchandani, Ashok; Mulchandani, P.; Chen, Wilfred

    1999-02-01

    We report a rapid and versatile organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH)-based method for measurement of organophosphate pesticides. This assay is based on a substrate-dependant change in pH near the active site of the enzyme. The pH change is monitored using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) which is covalently immobilized to the enzyme. This method employs FITC-labeled enzyme adsorbed to polymethylmethacrylate beads. Analytes were measured using a microbead fluorescence analyzer. The dynamic concentration range for the assay extends from 25 (mu) M to 400 (mu) M for paraoxon with a detection limit of 8 (mu) M. This assay compared favorably to an HPLC method for monitoring the concentration of coumaphos in bioremediation filtrate samples.

  15. Cell-based potassium ion channel screening using the FluxOR assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beacham, Daniel W; Blackmer, Trillium; O' Grady, Michael; Hanson, George T

    2010-04-01

    FluxOR technology is a cell-based assay used for high-throughput screening measurements of potassium channel activity. Using thallium influx as a surrogate indicator of potassium ion channel activity, the FluxOR Potassium Ion Channel Assay is based on the activation of a novel fluorescent dye. This indicator reports channel activity with a large fluorogenic response and is proportional to the number of open potassium channels on the cell, making it extremely useful for studying K(+) channel targets. In contrast to BTC-AM ester, FluxOR dye is roughly 10-fold more thallium sensitive, requiring much lower thallium for a larger signal window. This also means that the assay is carried out in a physiological, normal-chloride saline. In this article, the authors describe how they used BacMam gene delivery to express Kv7.2 and 7.3 (KCNQ), Kir2.1, or Kv11.1 (hERG) potassium ion channels in U2-OS cells. Using these cells, they ran the FluxOR assay to identify and characterize channel-specific inhibitory compounds discovered within the library (Tocriscreen Mini 1200 and Sigma Sodium/Potassium Modulators Ligand set). The FluxOR assay was able to identify several known specific inhibitors of Kv7.2/7.3 or hERG, highlighting its potential to identify novel and more efficacious small-molecule modulators.

  16. Development of a screening assay for ligands to the estrogen receptor based on magnetic microparticles and LC-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yongsoo; van Breemen, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    A high throughput screening assay for the identification of ligands to pharmacologically significant receptors was developed based on magnetic particles containing immobilized receptors followed by liquid chromatography—mass spectrometry (LC-MS). This assay is suitable for the screening of complex mixtures such as botanical extracts. For proof-of-principle, estrogen receptor-α (ER-α) and ER-β were immobilized on magnetic particles functionalized with aldehyde or carboxylic acid groups. Alternatively, biotinylated ER was immobilized onto streptavidin-derivatized magnetic particles. The ER that was immobilized using the streptavidin-biotin chemistry showed higher activity than that immobilized on aldehyde or carboxylic acid functionalized magnetic particles. Immobilized ER was incubated with extracts of Trifolium pratense L. (red clover) or Humulus lupulus L. (hops). As a control for non-specific binding, each botanical extract was incubated with magnetic particles containing no ER. After magnetic separation of the particles containing bound ligands from the unbound components in the extract, the particles were washed, ligands were released using methanol, and then the ligands were identified using LC-MS. The estrogens genistein and daidzein were identified in the red clover extract, and the estrogen 8-prenylnaringenin was identified in the hop extract. These screening results are consistent with those obtained using previous screening approaches. PMID:18220538

  17. A flow cytometry-based FRET assay to identify and analyse protein-protein interactions in living cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Banning

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Försters resonance energy transfer (FRET microscopy is widely used for the analysis of protein interactions in intact cells. However, FRET microscopy is technically challenging and does not allow assessing interactions in large cell numbers. To overcome these limitations we developed a flow cytometry-based FRET assay and analysed interactions of human and simian immunodeficiency virus (HIV and SIV Nef and Vpu proteins with cellular factors, as well as HIV Rev multimer-formation.Amongst others, we characterize the interaction of Vpu with CD317 (also termed Bst-2 or tetherin, a host restriction factor that inhibits HIV release from infected cells and demonstrate that the direct binding of both is mediated by the Vpu membrane-spanning region. Furthermore, we adapted our assay to allow the identification of novel protein interaction partners in a high-throughput format.The presented combination of FRET and FACS offers the precious possibility to discover and define protein interactions in living cells and is expected to contribute to the identification of novel therapeutic targets for treatment of human diseases.

  18. The use of a modified [3H]4-DAMP radioligand binding assay with increased selectivity for muscarinic M3 receptor shows that cortical CHRM3 levels are not altered in mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Won Je; Gibbons, Andrew S; Dean, Brian

    2013-12-02

    [(3)H]4-DAMP is a radioligand that has been used to quantify levels of the muscarinic receptor CHRM3 protein in situ. However, in addition to high affinity binding to CHRM3, [(3)H]4-DAMP binds with low affinity to CHRM1 confounding the potential to discriminate between changes in these two muscarinic receptors. We have developed a [(3)H]4-DAMP binding assay, optimised for measuring CHRM3 protein levels in the cortex, with minimal selectivity towards CHRM1. The selectivity of our assay towards CHRM3 was confirmed using recombinant receptor-expressing, cell lysate preparations. [(3)H]4-DAMP binding levels were similar between wildtype and CHRM1 knockout mice, confirming that the amount of [(3)H]4-DAMP binding to CHRM1 was negligible. We used this assay to measure CHRM3 protein levels in the frontal pole, obtained post-mortem from subjects with bipolar disorder (n = 15), major depressive disorder (n = 15) and matched controls (n = 20) and showed that [(3)H]4-DAMP binding was not altered in either bipolar disorder or major depressive disorder. Western blotting confirmed that CHRM3 protein levels were unchanged in these subjects. © 2013.

  19. Lipopolysaccharide Specific Immunochromatography Based Lateral Flow Assay for Serogroup Specific Diagnosis of Leptospirosis in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanmugam Vanithamani

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is a re-emerging infectious disease that is under-recognized due to low-sensitivity and cumbersome serological tests. MAT is the gold standard test and it is the only serogroup specific test used till date. Rapid reliable alternative serogroup specific tests are needed for surveillance studies to identify locally circulating serogroups in the study area.In the present investigation the serological specificity of leptospiral lipopolysaccharides (LPS was evaluated by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, dot blot assay and rapid immunochromatography based lateral flow assay (ICG-LFA. Sera samples from 120 MAT positive cases, 174 cases with febrile illness other than leptospirosis, and 121 seronegative healthy controls were evaluated for the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the developed assays. LPS was extracted from five locally predominant circulating serogroups including: Australis (27.5%, Autumnalis (11.7%, Ballum (25.8%, Grippotyphosa (12.5%, Pomona (10% and were used as antigens in the diagnostics to detect IgM antibodies in patients' sera. The sensitivity observed by IgM ELISA and dot blot assay using various leptospiral LPS was >90% for homologous sera. Except for Ballum LPS, no other LPS showed cross-reactivity to heterologous sera. An attempt was made to develop LPS based ICG-LFA for rapid and sensitive serogroup specific diagnostics of leptospirosis. The developed ICG-LFA showed sensitivity in the range between 93 and 100% for homologous sera. The Wilcoxon analysis showed LPS based ICG-LFA did not differ significantly from the gold standard MAT (P>0.05.The application of single array of LPS for serogroup specific diagnosis is first of its kind. The developed assay could potentially be evaluated and employed for as MAT alternative.

  20. Serological Assays Based on Recombinant Viral Proteins for the Diagnosis of Arenavirus Hemorrhagic Fevers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Saijo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The family Arenaviridae, genus Arenavirus, consists of two phylogenetically independent groups: Old World (OW and New World (NW complexes. The Lassa and Lujo viruses in the OW complex and the Guanarito, Junin, Machupo, Sabia, and Chapare viruses in the NW complex cause viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF in humans, leading to serious public health concerns. These viruses are also considered potential bioterrorism agents. Therefore, it is of great importance to detect these pathogens rapidly and specifically in order to minimize the risk and scale of arenavirus outbreaks. However, these arenaviruses are classified as BSL-4 pathogens, thus making it difficult to develop diagnostic techniques for these virus infections in institutes without BSL-4 facilities. To overcome these difficulties, antibody detection systems in the form of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and an indirect immunofluorescence assay were developed using recombinant nucleoproteins (rNPs derived from these viruses. Furthermore, several antigen-detection assays were developed. For example, novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs to the rNPs of Lassa and Junin viruses were generated. Sandwich antigen-capture (Ag-capture ELISAs using these mAbs as capture antibodies were developed and confirmed to be sensitive and specific for detecting the respective arenavirus NPs. These rNP-based assays were proposed to be useful not only for an etiological diagnosis of VHFs, but also for seroepidemiological studies on VHFs. We recently developed arenavirus neutralization assays using vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV-based pseudotypes bearing arenavirus recombinant glycoproteins. The goal of this article is to review the recent advances in developing laboratory diagnostic assays based on recombinant viral proteins for the diagnosis of VHFs and epidemiological studies on the VHFs caused by arenaviruses.

  1. Innovative mode of action based in vitro assays for detection of marine neurotoxins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolas, J.A.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Innovative mode of action based in vitro assays for detection of marine neurotoxins

    J. Nicolas, P.J.M. Hendriksen, T.F.H. Bovee, I.M.C.M. Rietjens

    Marine biotoxins are naturally occurring compounds produced by particular phytoplankton species. These toxins often accumulate in

  2. Homogeneous electrochemical aptamer-based ATP assay with signal amplification by exonuclease III assisted target recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shufeng; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Chengxin; Lin, Ying; Li, Feng

    2013-03-21

    A novel and homogeneous electrochemical aptamer-based adenosine triphosphate (ATP) assay was demonstrated with signal amplification by exonuclease III-assisted target recycling. A superior detection limit of 1 nM toward ATP with an excellent selectivity could be achieved.

  3. A Fluorescence-Based Assay for Identification of Bacterial Topoisomerase I Poisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalai, Thirunavukkarasu; Cheng, Bokun; Keswani, Neelam; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2018-01-01

    Bacterial Topoisomerase I is a potential target for the identification of novel topoisomerase poison inhibitors that could provide leads for a new class of antibacterial compounds. Here we describe in detail a fluorescence-based cleavage assay that is successfully used in HTS for the discovery of bacterial topoisomerase Ι poisons.

  4. Application of a yeast-based assay protocol developed to monitor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Batch experiments were carried out with activated sludge from laboratory reactors and a full-scale treatment plant spiked with 17β-oestradiol (E2). An oestrogen-sensitive yeast-based assay protocol, described in detail in a related publication, was used to measure reduction of E2-induced total oestrogenic activity from the ...

  5. Synthesis, characterization, X-ray crystal structure, DFT calculation, DNA binding, and antimicrobial assays of two new mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimipour, S. Yousef; Sheikhshoaie, Iran; Mohamadi, Maryam; Suarez, Sebastian; Baggio, Ricardo; Khaleghi, Moj; Torkzadeh-Mahani, Masoud; Mostafavi, Ali

    2015-05-01

    Two new Cu(II) complexes, [Cu(L)(phen)] (1), [Cu(L)(bipy)] (2), where L2- = (3-methoxy-2oxidobenzylidene)benzohydrazidato, phen = 1,10 phenanthroline, and bipy = 2,2‧ bipyridine, were prepared and fully characterized using elemental analyses, FT-IR, molar conductivity, and electronic spectra. The structures of both complexes were also determined by X-ray diffraction. It was found that, both complexes possessed square pyramidal coordination environment in which, Cu(II) ions were coordinated by donor atoms of HL and two nitrogens of heterocyclic bases. Computational studies were performed using DFT calculations at B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level of theory. DNA binding activities of these complexes were also investigated using electronic absorption, competitive fluorescence titration and cyclic voltammetry studies. The obtained results indicated that binding of the complexes to DNA was of intercalative mode. Furthermore, antimicrobial activities of these compounds were screened against microorganisms.

  6. An assay for secologanin in plant tissues based on enzymatic conversion into strictosidine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallard, Didier; van der Heijden, Robert; Contin, Adriana

    1998-01-01

    The secoiridoid glucoside secologanin is the terpenoid building block in the biosynthesis of terpenoid indole alkaloids. A method for its determination in plant tissues and cell suspension cultures has been developed. This assay is based on the condensation of secologanin with tryptamine, yielding...... of STR for secologanin, in combination with a sensitive and selective HPLC system, allows a simple extraction of secologanin from plant tissue. The detection limit of this methos is 15 ng secologanin. Using this assay, secologanin contents were determined in tissues of various plant species; Lonicera...

  7. Mixed-ligand copper(ii) Schiff base complexes: the role of the co-ligand in DNA binding, DNA cleavage, protein binding and cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Wen-Jing; Wang, Xin-Tian; Xie, Cheng-Zhi; Tian, He; Song, Xue-Qing; Pan, He-Ting; Qiao, Xin; Xu, Jing-Yuan

    2016-05-31

    Four novel mononuclear Schiff base copper(ii) complexes, namely, [Cu(L)(OAc)]·H2O (), [Cu(HL)(C2O4)(EtOH)]·EtOH (), [Cu(L)(Bza)] () and [Cu(L)(Sal)] () (HL = 1-(((2-((2-hydroxypropyl)amino)ethyl)imino)methyl)naphthalene-2-ol), Bza = benzoic acid, Sal = salicylic acid), were synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography, elemental analysis and infrared spectroscopy. Single-crystal diffraction analysis revealed that all the complexes were mononuclear molecules, in which the Schiff base ligand exhibited different coordination modes and conformations. The N-HO and O-HO inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonding interactions linked these molecules into multidimensional networks. Their interactions with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) were investigated by UV-visible and fluorescence spectrometry, as well as by viscosity measurements. The magnitude of the Kapp values of the four complexes was 10(5), indicating a moderate intercalative binding mode between the complexes and DNA. Electrophoresis results showed that all these complexes induced double strand breaks of pUC19 plasmid DNA in the presence of H2O2 through an oxidative pathway. In addition, the fluorescence spectrum of human serum albumin (HSA) with the complexes suggested that the quenching mechanism of HSA by the complexes was a static process. Moreover, the antiproliferative activity of the four complexes against HeLa (human cervical carcinoma) and HepG-2 (human liver hepatocellular carcinoma) cells evaluated by colorimetric cell proliferation assay and clonogenic assay revealed that all four complexes had improved cytotoxicity against cancer cells. Inspiringly, complex , with salicylic acid as the auxiliary ligand, displayed a stronger anticancer activity, suggesting that a synergistic effect of the Schiff base complex and the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug may be involved in the cell killing process. The biological features of mixed-ligand copper(ii) Schiff base complexes and how acetic auxiliary

  8. Paradox and Double Binds in Adventure-Based Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Stephen Barcia

    Paradox and therapeutic double bind techniques are used to overcome resistance in students with a history of success avoidance. Predictions of failure, restraining comments, and the use of paradox in the midst of an activity are defended theoretically by presenting historical roots and a rationale of effectiveness. A skill-building approach…

  9. Structure-Based Redesign of Cofactor Binding in Putrescine Oxidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kopacz, Malgorzata M.; Rovida, Stefano; van Duijn, Esther; Fraaije, Marco W.; Mattevi, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Putrescine oxidase (PuO) from Rhodococcus erythropolis is a soluble homodimeric Flavoprotein, which oxidizes small aliphatic diamines. In this study, we report the crystal structures and cofactor binding properties of wild-type and mutant enzymes. From a structural viewpoint, PuO closely resembles

  10. Detection of Ureaplasma diversum in cattle using a newly developed PCR-based detection assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcellos Cardoso, M; Blanchard, A; Ferris, S; Verlengia, R; Timenetsky, J; Florio Da Cunha, R A

    2000-03-15

    Ureaplasma diversum has been associated with different clinical manifestations including bovine vulvitis, endometritis, salpingitis, spontaneous abortion and infertility. Because the isolation of this ureaplasma from clinical samples is difficult, there is a need for improved detection methods. We developed a PCR assay based on amplification of a region of the gene encoding 16S rRNA. The specificity of the amplification was verified by sequence analysis. Female bovine vaginal swabs (n=168) were collected and the presence of U. diversum evaluated by both culture methods and by the PCR assay. Culture was positive for 60 samples (35.7%), and PCR-specific amplification was obtained for 89 samples (52.9%). These results indicated a high prevalence of U. diversum in the selected animals and the higher sensitivity of this PCR assay as compared to culture.

  11. LNA probe-based assay for the detection of Tomato black ring virus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasiów-Jaroszewska, Beata; Rymelska, Natalia; Borodynko, Natasza

    2015-02-01

    Tomato black ring virus (TBRV) infects a wide range of economically important plant species worldwide. In the present study we developed a locked nucleic acid (LNA) real-time RT-PCR assay for accurate detection of genetically diverse TBRV isolates collected from different hosts. The assay based on the LNA probe has a wide detection range, high sensitivity, stability and amplification efficiency. The assay amplified all tested TBRV isolates, but no signal was observed for the RNA from other nepoviruses and healthy plant species. Under optimum reaction conditions, the detection limit was estimated around 17 copies of the TBRV target region in total RNA. Real-time RT-PCR with the LNA probe described in this paper will serve as a valuable tool for robust, sensitive and reliable detection of TBRV isolates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Implementation and Use of State-of-the-Art, Cell-Based In Vitro Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Gernot

    2016-01-01

    The impressive advances in the generation and interpretation of functional omics data have greatly contributed to a better understanding of the (patho-)physiology of many biological systems and led to a massive increase in the number of specific targets and phenotypes to investigate in both basic and applied research. The obvious complexity revealed by these studies represents a major challenge to the research community and asks for improved target characterisation strategies with the help of reliable, high-quality assays. Thus, the use of living cells has become an integral part of many research activities because the cellular context more closely represents target-specific interrelations and activity patterns. Although still predominant, the use of traditional two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cell culture models has been gradually complemented by studies based on three-dimensional (3D) spheroid (Sutherland 1988) and other 3D tissue culture systems (Santos et al. 2012; Matsusaki et al. 2014) in an attempt to employ model systems more closely representing the microenvironment of cells in the body. Hence, quite a variety of state-of-the-art cell culture models are available for the generation of novel chemical probes or the identification of starting points for drug development in translational research and pharma drug discovery. In order to cope with these information-rich formats and their increasing technical complexity, cell-based assay development has become a scientific research topic in its own right and is used to ensure the provision of significant, reliable and high-quality data outlasting any discussions related to the current "irreproducibility epidemic" (Dolgin 2014; Prinz et al. 2011; Schatz 2014). At the same time the use of cells in microplate assay formats has become state of the art and greatly facilitates rigorous cell-based assay development by providing the researcher with the opportunity to address the multitude of factors affecting the actual

  13. High throughput functional assays of the variant antigen PfEMP1 reveal a single domain in the 3D7 Plasmodium falciparum genome that binds ICAM1 with high affinity and is targeted by naturally acquired neutralizing antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew V Oleinikov

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes bind endothelial receptors to sequester in vascular beds, and binding to ICAM1 has been implicated in cerebral malaria. Binding to ICAM1 may be mediated by the variant surface antigen family PfEMP1: for example, 6 of 21 DBLbetaC2 domains from the IT4 strain PfEMP1 repertoire were shown to bind ICAM1, and the PfEMP1 containing these 6 domains are all classified as Group B or C type. In this study, we surveyed binding of ICAM1 to 16 DBLbetaC2 domains of the 3D7 strain PfEMP1 repertoire, using a high throughput Bioplex assay format. Only one DBL2betaC2 domain from the Group A PfEMP1 PF11_0521 showed strong specific binding. Among these 16 domains, DBL2betaC2(PF11_0521 best preserved the residues previously identified as conserved in ICAM1-binding versus non-binding domains. Our analyses further highlighted the potential role of conserved residues within predominantly non-conserved flexible loops in adhesion, and, therefore, as targets for intervention. Our studies also suggest that the structural/functional DBLbetaC2 domain involved in ICAM1 binding includes about 80 amino acid residues upstream of the previously suggested DBLbetaC2 domain. DBL2betaC2(PF11_0521 binding to ICAM1 was inhibited by immune sera from east Africa but not by control US sera. Neutralizing antibodies were uncommon in children but common in immune adults from east Africa. Inhibition of binding was much more efficient than reversal of binding, indicating a strong interaction between DBL2betaC2(PF11_0521 and ICAM1. Our high throughput approach will significantly accelerate studies of PfEMP1 binding domains and protective antibody responses.

  14. Mkit: A Cell Migration Assay Based on Microfluidic Device and Smartphone

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ke; Wu, Jiandong; Peretz-Soroka, Hagit; Zhu, Ling; Li, Zhigang; Sang, Yaoshuo; Hipolito, Jolly; Zhang, Michael; Santos, Susy; Hillier, Craig; de Faria, Ricardo Lobato; Liu, Yong; Lin, Francis

    2017-01-01

    Mobile sensing based on the integration of microfluidic device and smartphone, so-called MS2 technology, has enabled many applications over recent years, and continues to stimulate growing interest in both research communities and industries. In particular, it has been envisioned that MS2 technology can be developed for various cell functional assays to enable basic research and clinical applications. Toward this direction, in this paper, we describe the development of a MS2-based cell functi...

  15. Genome-wide prediction, display and refinement of binding sites with information theory-based models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leeder J Steven

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We present Delila-genome, a software system for identification, visualization and analysis of protein binding sites in complete genome sequences. Binding sites are predicted by scanning genomic sequences with information theory-based (or user-defined weight matrices. Matrices are refined by adding experimentally-defined binding sites to published binding sites. Delila-Genome was used to examine the accuracy of individual information contents of binding sites detected with refined matrices as a measure of the strengths of the corresponding protein-nucleic acid interactions. The software can then be used to predict novel sites by rescanning the genome with the refined matrices. Results Parameters for genome scans are entered using a Java-based GUI interface and backend scripts in Perl. Multi-processor CPU load-sharing minimized the average response time for scans of different chromosomes. Scans of human genome assemblies required 4–6 hours for transcription factor binding sites and 10–19 hours for splice sites, respectively, on 24- and 3-node Mosix and Beowulf clusters. Individual binding sites are displayed either as high-resolution sequence walkers or in low-resolution custom tracks in the UCSC genome browser. For large datasets, we applied a data reduction strategy that limited displays of binding sites exceeding a threshold information content to specific chromosomal regions within or adjacent to genes. An HTML document is produced listing binding sites ranked by binding site strength or chromosomal location hyperlinked to the UCSC custom track, other annotation databases and binding site sequences. Post-genome scan tools parse binding site annotations of selected chromosome intervals and compare the results of genome scans using different weight matrices. Comparisons of multiple genome scans can display binding sites that are unique to each scan and identify sites with significantly altered binding strengths

  16. Identification of cellular proteins that interact with Newcastle Disease Virus and human Respiratory Syncytial Virus by a two-dimensional virus overlay protein binding assay (VOPBA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holguera, Javier; Villar, Enrique; Muñoz-Barroso, Isabel

    2014-10-13

    Although it is well documented that the initial attachment receptors for Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) and Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) are sialic acid-containing molecules and glycosaminoglycans respectively, the exact nature of the receptors for both viruses remains to be deciphered. Moreover, additional molecules at the host cell surface might be involved in the entry mechanism. With the aim of identifying the cellular proteins that interact with NDV and RSV at the cell surface, we performed a virus overlay protein binding assay (VOPBA). Cell membrane lysates were separated by two dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and electrotransferred to PVDF membranes, after which they were probed with high viral concentrations. NDV interacted with a Protein Disulfide Isomerase from chicken fibroblasts. In the case of RSV, we detected 15 reactive spots, which were identified as six different proteins, of which nucleolin was outstanding. We discuss the possible role of PDI and nucleolin in NDV and RSV entry, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparison of M22-based ELISA and human-TSH-receptor-based luminescence assay for the measurement of thyrotropin receptor antibodies in patients with thyroid diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C; Hermsen, D; Domberg, J; Graeber, C; Hautzel, H; Duan, Y; Xu, K F; Liu, C P; Mao, X D; Cupisti, K; Scherbaum, W A; Schott, M

    2008-07-01

    Previously, a new procedure for measuring serum TSH receptor autoantibodies (TRAb) was reported in which the autoantibodies inhibit binding of a human monoclonal thyroid stimulating antibody M22 to TSHR-coated ELISA plate wells (TRAb ELISA). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical performance of this assay in comparison to the second generation TRAb assay (TRAb LIA) based on the recombinant human TSH-receptor and chemiluminescence technology (TRAb LIA). Among the 158 patients, 84 patients suffered from Graves' disease (GD), 34 patients had Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), and 40 patients had euthyroid nodular thyroid disease (NTD) without signs of autoimmunity. TRAb measurements were performed according to the manufacturer's instructions. Out of 84 GD patients, 80 (95.2%) were TRAb positive as detected by the TRAb LIA. One GD patient had TRAb values within the grey zone (1.0-1.5 IU/l). All patients with HT and NTD were negative except in 6 (8.1%) cases whose TRAb values were within the grey zone. On the basis of the recommended cutoff value (TRAb 1.0 IU/l), the TRAb ELISA found 78 of 84 (92.9%) GD patients to be TRAb positive. None of the patients with HT, but two cases (5.0%) with NTD were TRAb positive. The diagnostic sensitivity of the TRAb LIA and TRAb ELISA assays was 95.2 and 92.9%, while the specificity was 100% and 97.3%, respectively. There was a close correlation (r=0.968, pvalue of 1.0 IU/l. Due to the evaluated imprecision data we propose a higher cutoff value correlating with a between-run CV of 20% (functional assay sensitivity). Our results indicate that due to a worse imprecision the TRAb ELISA has a slightly lower sensitivity and specificity compared to the TRAb LIA assay. These findings suggest that the M22 monoclonal antibody-based TRAb ELISA is not as reliable as other second generation TRAb assays in the diagnosis of Graves' diseases.

  18. Combining intracellular and secreted bioluminescent reporter proteins for multicolor cell-based assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelini, Elisa; Cevenini, Luca; Mezzanotte, Laura; Ablamsky, Danielle; Southworth, Tara; Branchini, Bruce R; Roda, Aldo

    2008-02-01

    Bioluminescent (BL) proteins are a promising tool for diverse applications based on reporter gene technology thanks to their high sensitivity and range of linear response. Due to their widespread use in the environmental, medical and agro-food fields, there is a great need for new BL reporter proteins with improved characteristics to provide researches a wide range of suitable reporters. Few efforts have been made in this direction and further improvement of BL reporter features (e.g., thermostability, narrower emission bandwidth, emission at different wavelengths) tailored for specific applications would be a remarkable progress toward the development of ultrasensitive multiplexed assays either in vitro or in vivo. The suitability of using red- and green-emitting thermostable mutants of Photinus pyralis firefly luciferase and two click beetle luciferases in combination with a secreted luciferase from Gaussia princeps was evaluated to develop a triple-color mammalian assay. Two triple-reporter model mammalian systems were developed in a human hepatoblastoma cell line to monitor the transcriptional regulation of cholesterol 7-alpha hydroxylase (cyp7a1), the enzyme that catalyzes the first and rate-limiting step of the main pathway responsible for cholesterol degradation in humans. These model systems allowed us to evaluate the feasibility of using two intracellular BL reporters and a secreted one in the same cell-based assay. The selection of reporter proteins characterized by similar expression levels was identified as a critical point for the development of a multicolor assay.

  19. Immune Monitoring in Cancer Vaccine Clinical Trials: Critical Issues of Functional Flow Cytometry-Based Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iole Macchia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of immune monitoring assays is essential to determine the immune responses against tumor-specific antigens (TSAs and tumor-associated antigens (TAAs and their possible correlation with clinical outcome in cancer patients receiving immunotherapies. Despite the wide range of techniques used, to date these assays have not shown consistent results among clinical trials and failed to define surrogate markers of clinical efficacy to antitumor vaccines. Multiparameter flow cytometry- (FCM- based assays combining different phenotypic and functional markers have been developed in the past decade for informative and longitudinal analysis of polyfunctional T-cells. These technologies were designed to address the complexity and functional heterogeneity of cancer biology and cellular immunity and to define biomarkers predicting clinical response to anticancer treatment. So far, there is still a lack of standardization of some of these immunological tests. The aim of this review is to overview the latest technologies for immune monitoring and to highlight critical steps involved in some of the FCM-based cellular immune assays. In particular, our laboratory is focused on melanoma vaccine research and thus our main goal was the validation of a functional multiparameter test (FMT combining different functional and lineage markers to be applied in clinical trials involving patients with melanoma.

  20. Quantitative kinetics of proteolytic enzymes determined by a surface concentration-based assay using peptide arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Se-Hui; Kong, Deok-Hoon; Park, Seoung-Woo; Kim, Young-Myeong; Ha, Kwon-Soo

    2012-08-21

    Peptide arrays have emerged as a key technology for drug discovery, diagnosis, and cell biology. Despite the promise of these arrays, applications of peptide arrays to quantitative analysis of enzyme kinetics have been limited due to the difficulty in obtaining quantitative information of enzymatic reaction products. In this study, we developed a new approach for the quantitative kinetics analysis of proteases using fluorescence-conjugated peptide arrays, a surface concentration-based assay with solid-phase peptide standards using dry-off measurements, and compared it with an applied concentration-based assay. For fabrication of the peptide arrays, substrate peptides of cMMP-3, caspase-3, caspase-9, and calpain-1 were functionalized with TAMRA and cysteine, and were immobilized onto amine-functionalized arrays using a heterobifunctional linker, N-[γ-maleimidobutyloxy]succinimide ester. The proteolytic activities of the four enzymes were quantitatively analyzed by calculating changes induced by enzymatic reactions in the concentrations of peptides bound to array surfaces. In addition, this assay was successfully applied for calculating the Michaelis constant (K(m,surf)) for the four enzymes. Thus, this new assay has a strong potential for use in the quantitative evaluation of proteases, and for drug discovery through kinetics studies including the determination of K(m) and V(max).

  1. A sequence-based dynamic ensemble learning system for protein ligand-binding site prediction

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Peng

    2015-12-03

    Background: Proteins have the fundamental ability to selectively bind to other molecules and perform specific functions through such interactions, such as protein-ligand binding. Accurate prediction of protein residues that physically bind to ligands is important for drug design and protein docking studies. Most of the successful protein-ligand binding predictions were based on known structures. However, structural information is not largely available in practice due to the huge gap between the number of known protein sequences and that of experimentally solved structures

  2. [Investigation of reference intervals of blood gas and acid-base analysis assays in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Wang, Wei; Wang, Zhiguo

    2015-10-01

    To investigate and analyze the upper and lower limits and their sources of reference intervals in blood gas and acid-base analysis assays. The data of reference intervals were collected, which come from the first run of 2014 External Quality Assessment (EQA) program in blood gas and acid-base analysis assays performed by National Center for Clinical Laboratories (NCCL). All the abnormal values and errors were eliminated. Data statistics was performed by SPSS 13.0 and Excel 2007 referring to upper and lower limits of reference intervals and sources of 7 blood gas and acid-base analysis assays, i.e. pH value, partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2), partial pressure of oxygen (PO2), Na+, K+, Ca2+ and Cl-. Values were further grouped based on instrument system and the difference between each group were analyzed. There were 225 laboratories submitting the information on the reference intervals they had been using. The three main sources of reference intervals were National Guide to Clinical Laboratory Procedures [37.07% (400/1 079)], instructions of instrument manufactures [31.23% (337/1 079)] and instructions of reagent manufactures [23.26% (251/1 079)]. Approximately 35.1% (79/225) of the laboratories had validated the reference intervals they used. The difference of upper and lower limits in most assays among 7 laboratories was moderate, both minimum and maximum (i.e. the upper limits of pH value was 7.00-7.45, the lower limits of Na+ was 130.00-156.00 mmol/L), and mean and median (i.e. the upper limits of K+ was 5.04 mmol/L and 5.10 mmol/L, the upper limits of PCO2 was 45.65 mmHg and 45.00 mmHg, 1 mmHg = 0.133 kPa), as well as the difference in P2.5 and P97.5 between each instrument system group. It was shown by Kruskal-Wallis method that the P values of upper and lower limits of all the parameters were lower than 0.001, expecting the lower limits of Na+ with P value 0.029. It was shown by Mann-Whitney that the statistic differences were found among instrument

  3. Quantification of equine immunoglobulin A in serum and secretions by a fluorescent bead-based assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, Christiane L; Babasyan, Susanna; Freer, Heather; Wagner, Bettina

    2017-06-01

    Only few quantitative reports exist about the concentrations and induction of immunoglobulin A (IgA) in mucosal secretions of horses. Despite this, it is widely assumed that IgA is the predominant immunoglobulin on mucosal surfaces in the horse. Here, two new monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against equine IgA, clones 84-1 and 161-1, were developed and characterized in detail. Both IgA mAbs specifically bound monomeric and dimeric equine IgA in different applications, such as Western blots and fluorescent bead-based assays. Cross-reactivity with other equine immunoglobulin isotypes was not observed. The new IgA mAb 84-1 was used in combination with the previously characterized anti-equine IgA mAb BVS2 for the development and validation of a fluorescent bead-based assay to quantify total IgA in equine serum and various secretions. The IgA assay's linear detection ranged from 64pg/ml to 1000ng/ml. For the quantification of IgA in serum or in secretions an IgA standard was purified from serum or nasal wash fluid (secretory IgA), respectively. The different standards were needed for accurate IgA quantification in the respective samples taking the different signal intensities of monomeric and dimeric IgA on the florescent bead-based assay into account. IgA was quantified by the bead-based assay established here in different equine samples of healthy adult individuals. In serum the median total IgA was 0.45mg/ml for Thoroughbred horses (TB, n=10) and 1.16mg/ml in Icelandic horses (ICH, n=12). In nasopharyngeal secretions of TB (n=7) 0.13mg/ml median total IgA was measured, and 0.25mg/ml for ICH (n=12). Saliva of ICH (n=6) contained a median of 0.15mg/ml, colostrum of Warmbloods (n=8) a median of 1.89mg/ml IgA. Compared to IgG1 and IgG4/7 quantified in the same samples, IgA appeared as the major immunoglobulin isotype in nasopharyngeal secretions and saliva while it is a minor isotype in serum and colostrum. The newly developed monoclonal antibodies against equine IgA and the

  4. Comparison of functional assays used in the clinical development of a placental malaria vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehrson, Caroline; Heno, Kristine K; Adams, Yvonne; Resende, Mafalda; Mathiesen, Line; Soegaard, Max; de Jongh, Willem A; Theander, Thor G; Salanti, Ali; Nielsen, Morten A

    2017-01-23

    Malaria in pregnancy is associated with significant morbidity in pregnant women and their offspring. Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes (IE) express VAR2CSA that mediates binding to chondroitin sulphate A (CSA) in the placenta. Two VAR2CSA-based vaccines for placental malaria are in clinical development. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the robustness and comparability of binding inhibition assays used in the clinical development of placental malaria vaccines. The ability of sera from animals immunised with different VAR2CSA constructs to inhibit IE binding to CSA was investigated in three in vitro assays using 96-well plates, petri dishes, capillary flow and an ex vivo placental perfusion assay. The inter-assay variation was not uniform between assays and ranged from above ten-fold in the flow assay to two-fold in the perfusion assay. The intra-assay variation was highest in the petri dish assay. A positive correlation between IE binding avidity and the level of binding after antibody inhibition in the petri dish assay indicate that high avidity IE binding is more difficult to inhibit. The highest binding inhibition sensitivity was found in the 96-well and petri dish assays compared to the flow and perfusion assays where binding inhibition required higher antibody titers. The inhibitory capacity of antibodies is not easily translated between assays and the high sensitivity of the 96-well and petri dish assays stresses the need for comparing serial dilutions of serum. Furthermore, IE binding avidity must be in the same range when comparing data from different days. There was an overall concordance in the capacity of antibody-mediated inhibition, when comparing the in vitro assays with the perfusion assay, which more closely represents in vivo conditions. Importantly the ID1-ID2a protein in a liposomal formulation, currently in a phase I trial, effectively induced antibodies that inhibited IE adhesion in placental tissue. Copyright © 2016

  5. Population-Based Study to Determine the Health System Costs of Using the 21-Gene Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittmann, Nicole; Earle, Craig C; Cheng, Stephanie Y; Julian, Jim A; Rahman, Farah; Seung, Soo Jin; Levine, Mark N

    2018-01-20

    Purpose The 21-gene assay Oncotype Dx (Genomic Health, Redwood City, CA) test is used to aid the decision about chemotherapy in patients with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer who received endocrine therapy. Economic studies to support test adoption used decision-analytic models with assumptions and data derived from disparate sources. The objective was to evaluate whether the 21-gene assay test resulted in an overall cost expense or saving to the health system. Patients and Methods One thousand participants enrolled in a field evaluation study, were linked to population-level health system administrative databases, and were observed for 20 months. The cost for the cohort, which included the cost of the test, subsequent treatments received, and health care encounters, was determined. The cost in the absence of the test was compared with the pretest recommendation about chemotherapy from the field study for a base case and under scenarios that reflected different adjuvant chemotherapy use. Overall health system costs and incremental costs were calculated. Results The 21-gene assay resulted in a net decrease in chemotherapy use of 23%. For the base case incremental analysis, the actual overall health system cost of this cohort, including the cost of 21-gene assay, was $29.2 million compared with $26.2 million in the absence of the test-an increase of $3.1 million. For three of the four scenario analyses, the actual overall cost to the health system exceeded the estimated cost in the absence of the test. Results showed that, when at least half of the population received adjuvant chemotherapy, the cost increased to $30.2 million. Conclusion The use of real-world administrative data showed that, despite lower rates of chemotherapy use, the 21-gene assay test results in an overall incremental cost to the health care system in the short-term under most assumptions.

  6. Fluorescence-based assay as a new screening tool for toxic chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moczko, Ewa; Mirkes, Evgeny M.; Cáceres, César; Gorban, Alexander N.; Piletsky, Sergey

    2016-09-01

    Our study involves development of fluorescent cell-based diagnostic assay as a new approach in high-throughput screening method. This highly sensitive optical assay operates similarly to e-noses and e-tongues which combine semi-specific sensors and multivariate data analysis for monitoring biochemical processes. The optical assay consists of a mixture of environmental-sensitive fluorescent dyes and human skin cells that generate fluorescence spectra patterns distinctive for particular physico-chemical and physiological conditions. Using chemometric techniques the optical signal is processed providing qualitative information about analytical characteristics of the samples. This integrated approach has been successfully applied (with sensitivity of 93% and specificity of 97%) in assessing whether particular chemical agents are irritating or not for human skin. It has several advantages compared with traditional biochemical or biological assays and can impact the new way of high-throughput screening and understanding cell activity. It also can provide reliable and reproducible method for assessing a risk of exposing people to different harmful substances, identification active compounds in toxicity screening and safety assessment of drugs, cosmetic or their specific ingredients.

  7. Homogeneous non-competitive bioaffinity assay based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokko, Tiina; Kokko, Leena; Soukka, Tero; Loevgren, Timo

    2007-01-01

    A homogeneous non-competitive assay principle for measurement of small analytes based on quenching of fluorescence is described. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) occurs between the donor, intrinsically fluorescent europium(III)-chelate conjugated to streptavidin, and the acceptor, quencher dye conjugated to biotin derivative when the biotin-quencher is bound to Eu-streptavidin. Fluorescence can be measured only from those streptavidins that are bound to biotin of the sample, while the fluorescence of the streptavidins that are not occupied by biotin are quenched by quencher-biotin conjugates. The quenching efficiencies of the non-fluorescent quencher dyes were over 95% and one dye molecule was able to quench the fluorescence of more than one europium(III)-chelate. This, however, together with the quadrovalent nature of streptavidin limited the measurable range of the assay to 0.2-2 nmol L -1 . In this study we demonstrated that FRET could be used to design a non-competitive homogeneous assay for a small analyte resulting in equal performance with competitive heterogeneous assay

  8. A nuclear DNA-based species determination and DNA quantification assay for common poultry species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, J; Satkoski, J; Premasuthan, A; Kanthaswamy, S

    2014-12-01

    DNA testing for food authentication and quality control requires sensitive species-specific quantification of nuclear DNA from complex and unknown biological sources. We have developed a multiplex assay based on TaqMan® real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) for species-specific detection and quantification of chicken (Gallus gallus), duck (Anas platyrhynchos), and turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) nuclear DNA. The multiplex assay is able to accurately detect very low quantities of species-specific DNA from single or multispecies sample mixtures; its minimum effective quantification range is 5 to 50 pg of starting DNA material. In addition to its use in food fraudulence cases, we have validated the assay using simulated forensic sample conditions to demonstrate its utility in forensic investigations. Despite treatment with potent inhibitors such as hematin and humic acid, and degradation of template DNA by DNase, the assay was still able to robustly detect and quantify DNA from each of the three poultry species in mixed samples. The efficient species determination and accurate DNA quantification will help reduce fraudulent food labeling and facilitate downstream DNA analysis for genetic identification and traceability.

  9. Fluorescence-based retention assays reveals sustained release of vascular endothelial growth factor from bone grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Wonmo; Yun, Ye-Rang; Lee, Dong-Sung; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Joong-Hyun; Kim, Hae-Won; Jang, Jun-Hyeog

    2016-01-01

    The sustained release of growth factors following their implantation in vivo is essential for successful outcomes in bone tissue engineering. In this study, we evaluated the release kinetics and delivery efficacies of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a potent angiogenic growth factor, incorporated into calcium phosphate bone grafts (BGs). We evaluated the release profile of VEGF from BGs using a novel fluorescence-based retention assay, which revealed that VEGF loaded on BGs can be released in a sustained manner without an initial burst (near zero-order cumulative release) with a controlled release rate of 13.6% per week for up to 7 weeks. In contrast, an ELISA-based release assay showed VEGF to have an early burst-release profile for the first week. However, the biological activity of VEGF released from the BGs was preserved over the 7-week release period, which is consistent with the sustained-release profile observed in the fluorescence-based retention assay. Furthermore, the in vivo bone-forming action of the VEGF-loaded BGs was well demonstrated in a rat subcutaneous model. Taken together, the sustained release of VEGF loaded onto BGs was effective in stimulating proliferation, angiogenesis and osteogenesis, suggesting the ultimate value of VEGF-engineered BGs for bone tissue engineering. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. The use of nanocrystal quantum dot as fluorophore reporters in molecular beacon-based assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegoke, Oluwasesan; Park, Enoch Y.

    2016-12-01

    The utilization of molecular beacon (MB) biosensor probes to detect nucleic acid targets has received enormous interest within the scientific community. This interest has been stimulated by the operational qualities of MB-based probes with respect to their unique sensitivity and specificity. The design of MB biosensors entails not only optimizing the sequence of the loop to hybridize with the nucleic acid target or optimization of the length of the stem to tune the sensitivity but also the selection of the appropriate fluorophore reporter to generate the signal transduction read-out upon hybridization of the probe with the target sequence. Traditional organic fluorescent dyes are mostly used for signal reporting in MB assays but their optical properties in comparison to semiconductor fluorescent quantum dot (Qdot) nanocrystals are at a disadvantage. This review highlights the progress made in exploiting Qdot as fluorophore reporters in MB-based assays with the aim of instigating further development in the field of Qdot-MB technology. The development reported to date indicates that unparalleled fluorescence signal reporting in MB-based assays can be achieved using well-constructed Qdot fluorophores.

  11. Mkit: A cell migration assay based on microfluidic device and smartphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ke; Wu, Jiandong; Peretz-Soroka, Hagit; Zhu, Ling; Li, Zhigang; Sang, Yaoshuo; Hipolito, Jolly; Zhang, Michael; Santos, Susy; Hillier, Craig; de Faria, Ricardo Lobato; Liu, Yong; Lin, Francis

    2018-01-15

    Mobile sensing based on the integration of microfluidic device and smartphone, so-called MS 2 technology, has enabled many applications over recent years, and continues to stimulate growing interest in both research communities and industries. In particular, it has been envisioned that MS 2 technology can be developed for various cell functional assays to enable basic research and clinical applications. Toward this direction, in this paper, we describe the development of a MS 2 -based cell functional assay for testing cell migration (the M kit ). The system is constructed as an integrated test kit, which includes microfluidic chips, a smartphone-based imaging platform, the phone apps for image capturing and data analysis, and a set of reagent and accessories for performing the cell migration assay. We demonstrated that the M kit can effectively measure purified neutrophil and cancer cell chemotaxis. Furthermore, neutrophil chemotaxis can be tested from a drop of whole blood using the M kit with red blood cell (RBC) lysis. The effects of chemoattractant dose and gradient profile on neutrophil chemotaxis were also tested using the M kit . In addition to research applications, we demonstrated the effective use of the M kit for on-site test at the hospital and for testing clinical samples from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patient. Thus, this developed M kit provides an easy and integrated experimental platform for cell migration related research and potential medical diagnostic applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Overcoming Reductant Interference in Peroxidase-Based Assays for Hydrogen Peroxide Quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shu; Penner, Michael H

    2017-09-20

    A problem commonly encountered when using peroxidase-based methods for hydrogen peroxide quantification in biobased matrixes is interference due to the presence of endogenous reductants. Such assays are typically based on the generation of an oxidized reporter molecule in direct proportion to the amount of hydrogen peroxide reduced in the peroxidase-catalyzed reaction. Endogenous reductants confound such assays by reducing the oxidized reporter molecule, thus resulting in underestimates of hydrogen peroxide content. In the present work, we demonstrate how this problem can be circumvented by selectively oxidizing offending compounds by treatment with the oxidized reporter molecule prior to initiating the peroxidase reaction for hydrogen peroxide quantification. The approach is demonstrated using horseradish peroxidase, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), as the reporter molecule and a representative garlic paste as the hydrogen peroxide-containing biobased matrix. The approach is expected to be generally applicable to a wide range of peroxidase-based assays when applied to complex biobased systems.

  13. An evaluation of commercial fluorescent bead-based luminex cytokine assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Fleury Djoba Siawaya

    Full Text Available The recent introduction of fluorescent bead-based technology, allowing the measurement of multiples analytes in a single 25-50 microl sample has revolutionized the study of cytokine responses. However, such multiplex approaches may compromise the ability of these assays to accurately measure actual cytokine levels. This study evaluates the performance of three commercially available multiplex cytokine fluorescent bead-based immunoassays (Bio-Rad's Cytokine 17-plex kit; LINCO Inc's 29-plex kit; and RnD System's Fluorokine-Multi Analyte Profiling (MAP base kit A and B. The LINCO Inc kit was found to be the most sensitive assay for measuring concentrations of multiple recombinant cytokines in samples that had been spiked with serial dilutions of the standard provided by the manufacturer, followed respectively by the RnD Fluorokine-(MAP and Bio-Rad 17-plex kits. A positive correlation was found in the levels of IFN-gamma measured in antigen stimulated whole blood culture supernatants by the LINCO Inc 29-plex, RnD Fluorokine-(MAP and RnD system IFN-gamma Quantikine ELISA kits across a panel of controls and stimulated samples. Researchers should take the limitation of such multiplexed assays into account when planning experiments and the most appropriate use for these tests may currently be as screening tools for the selection of promising markers for analysis by more sensitive techniques.

  14. Novel fabrication of immunochromatographic assay based on up conversion phosphors for sensitive detection of clenbuterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peilong; Wang, Ruiguo; Zhang, Wei; Su, Xiaoou; Luo, Haifeng

    2016-03-15

    A novel and ultra sensitive immunochromatographic assay sensor (ICA) based on up conversion phosphor (UCP) for quantitative detection of clenbuterol (CL) was developed. Monoclonal antibody against CL was labeled with UCP beads. The detection strategy is based on competitive immunoreaction between CL antibodies conjugated to UCP beads and CL or CL antigen on the UCP-ICA sensor. It enables ultra sensitive detection of CL in one single test without complicated sample preparation. Sensing results can be obtained within 10 min. Under optimized conditions, visual limit of detection (vLOD) of UCP-ICA for CL was 0.1 ng/mL. Calculated LOD (cLOD) for CL, as low as 0.01 ng/mL, could be achieved with the UCP-ICA sensor. Recoveries of CL in various sample matrixes ranged from 73.0% to 92.2% and relative standard deviations (RSD) were below 12%. The assay was evaluated with spiked and real samples and the results were compared with liquid chromatography-tandem mass. The developed novel assay method based on UCP could be a potential alternative format for on site and rapid detection of CL as well as other illegal drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A SERS-based lateral flow assay biosensor for highly sensitive detection of HIV-1 DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiuli; Cheng, Ziyi; Yu, Jimin; Choo, Priscilla; Chen, Lingxin; Choo, Jaebum

    2016-04-15

    User-friendly lateral flow (LF) strips have been extensively used for point-of-care (POC) self-diagnostics, but they have some limitations in their detection sensitivity and quantitative analysis because they only identify the high cut-off value of a biomarker by utilizing color changes that are detected with the naked eye. To resolve these problems associated with LF strips, we developed a novel surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based LF assay for the quantitative analysis of a specific biomarker in the low concentration range. Herein, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) DNA was chosen as the specific biomarker. Raman reporter-labeled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were employed as SERS nano tags for targeting and detecting the HIV-1 DNA marker, as opposed to using bare AuNPs in LF strips. It was possible to quantitatively analyze HIV-1 DNA with high sensitivity by monitoring the characteristic Raman peak intensity of the DNA-conjugated AuNPs. Under optimized conditions, the detection limit of our SERS-based lateral flow assay was 0.24 pg/mL, which was at least 1000 times more sensitive compared to colorimetric or fluorescent detection methods. These results demonstrate the potential feasibility of the proposed SERS-based lateral flow assay to quantitatively detect a broad range of genetic diseases with high sensitivity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of real-time assays for impedance-based detection of microbial double-stranded DNA targets: optimization and data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghindilis, Andrei L; Smith, Maria W; Messing, Dean S; Haynes, Vena N; Middleton, George B; Schwarzkopf, Kevin R; Campbell, Carmen E; Zhan, Changqing; Ulrich, Bruce; Frasier, Michael J; Schuele, Paul J; Evans, David R; Sezan, Ibrahim; Hartzell, John W; Simon, Holly M

    2012-05-15

    A real-time, label free assay was developed for microbial detection, utilizing double-stranded DNA targets and employing the next generation of an impedimetric sensor array platform designed by Sharp Laboratories of America (SLA). Real-time curves of the impedimetric signal response were obtained at fixed frequency and voltage for target binding to oligonucleotide probes attached to the sensor array surface. Kinetic parameters of these curves were analyzed by the integrated data analysis package for signal quantification. Non-specific binding presented a major challenge for assay development, and required assay optimization. For this, differences were maximized between binding curve kinetic parameters for probes binding to complementary targets versus non-target controls. Variables manipulated for assay optimization included target concentration, hybridization temperature, buffer concentration, and the use of surfactants. Our results showed that (i) different target-probe combinations required optimization of specific sets of variables; (ii) for each assay condition, the optimum range was relatively narrow, and had to be determined empirically; and (iii) outside of the optimum range, the assay could not distinguish between specific and non-specific binding. For each target-probe combination evaluated, conditions resulting in good separation between specific and non-specific binding signals were established, generating high confidence in the SLA impedimetric dsDNA assay results. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A comprehensive comparative review of sequence-based predictors of DNA- and RNA-binding residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jing; Friedrich, Stefanie; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the pressing need to characterize protein-DNA and protein-RNA interactions on large scale, we review a comprehensive set of 30 computational methods for high-throughput prediction of RNA- or DNA-binding residues from protein sequences. We summarize these predictors from several significant perspectives including their design, outputs and availability. We perform empirical assessment of methods that offer web servers using a new benchmark data set characterized by a more complete annotation that includes binding residues transferred from the same or similar proteins. We show that predictors of DNA-binding (RNA-binding) residues offer relatively strong predictive performance but they are unable to properly separate DNA- from RNA-binding residues. We design and empirically assess several types of consensuses and demonstrate that machine learning (ML)-based approaches provide improved predictive performance when compared with the individual predictors of DNA-binding residues or RNA-binding residues. We also formulate and execute first-of-its-kind study that targets combined prediction of DNA- and RNA-binding residues. We design and test three types of consensuses for this prediction and conclude that this novel approach that relies on ML design provides better predictive quality than individual predictors when tested on prediction of DNA- and RNA-binding residues individually. It also substantially improves discrimination between these two types of nucleic acids. Our results suggest that development of a new generation of predictors would benefit from using training data sets that combine both RNA- and DNA-binding proteins, designing new inputs that specifically target either DNA- or RNA-binding residues and pursuing combined prediction of DNA- and RNA-binding residues. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Development and application of an ELISA method for the analysis of protein-based binding media of artworks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Hae Young; Atlasevich, Natalya; Granzotto, Clara

    2015-01-01

    Development and application of an ELISA method for the analysis of protein-based binding media of artworks.......Development and application of an ELISA method for the analysis of protein-based binding media of artworks....

  19. Effects of single-base substitutions within the acanthamoeba castellanii rRNA promoter on transcription and on binding of transcription initiation factor and RNA polymerase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kownin, P.; Bateman, E.; Paule, M.R.

    1988-02-01

    Single-point mutations were introduced into the promoter region of the Acanthamoeba castellanii rRNA gene by chemical mutagen treatment of a single-stranded clone in vitro, followed by reverse transcription and cloning of the altered fragment. The promoter mutants were tested for transcription initiation factor (TIF) binding by a template commitment assay plus DNase I footprinting and for transcription by an in vitro runoff assay. Point mutations within the previously identified TIF interaction region (between -20 and -47, motifs A and B) indicated that TIF interacts most strongly with a sequence centered at -29 and less tightly with sequences upstream and downstream. Some alterations of the base sequence closer to the transcription start site (and outside the TIF-protected site) also significantly decrease specific RNA synthesis in vitro. These were within the region which is protected from DNAse I digestion by polymerase I, but these mutations did not detectably affect the binding of polymerase to the promoter.

  20. Neutron Based Non-Destructive Assay (NDA) Measurement Systems for Safeguard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-21

    The objectives of this project are to introduce the assay methods for plutonium measurements using the HLNC; introduce the assay method for bulk uranium measurements using the AWCC; and introduce the assay method for fuel assembly measurements using the UNCL.

  1. The need for a sequencing-based assay to supplement the Abbott m2000 RealTime HCV Genotype II assay: a 1 year analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedet, Marlin; Adachi, Dena; Wong, Anita; Wong, Sallene; Pabbaraju, Kanti; Tellier, Raymond; Tang, Julian W

    2014-07-01

    Hepatitis C (HCV) genotyping is important for treatment planning. The Abbott m2000 RealTime HCV Genotype II assay is a PCR-based assay targeting specific regions of the 5'NCR gene for genotypes 1-6, and the NS5b gene for subgenotypes 1a/1b. However, not all genotypes can be resolved, with results being reported as: 'indeterminate', 'mixed', 'genotype X reactivity with Y', or just the major genotype 1 alone. To assess the supplementary testing required for these unresolved HCV genotypes, these samples were tested further using an in-house core/E1 sequencing assay. The resulting genotypes/subgenotypes were assigned using phylogenetic analysis with reference HCV genotype sequences. Additional testing was conducted using the INNO-LiPA HCV II assay for truly mixed genotypes. Out of 1052 samples tested, 89 (8.5%) underwent further sequencing to determine the HCV genotype: 16 that were 'indeterminate' on the m2000, were mostly genotype 2s and 3s by sequencing; 12 that were 'mixed', were mostly one of the genotypes reported in the mixture; 7 that were 'X reactivity with Y', were usually genotype X; 54 that gave just a major genotype 1 result were mostly 1a, with some 6 and 1b, and a few 1c. For three truly mixed genotypes, additional testing using the VERSANT(®) HCV Genotype Assay (LiPA) 2.0, showed two mixed 1 and 3, and one indistinguishable 6c-6l genotypes. The Abbott m2000 RealTime HCV Genotype II assay can resolve most (∼90%) HCV genotypes. However in 9-10% of cases, to fully resolve the genotype, additional testing is required. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. An improved gold nanoparticle probe-based assay for HCV core antigen ultrasensitive detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hui-Qiong; Ji, Chang-Fu; Yang, Xi-Qin; Wang, Rui; Yang, Shu; Zhang, He-Qiu; Zhang, Jin-Gang

    2017-05-01

    A gold nanoparticle probe-based assay (GNPA) was developed for ultrasensitive detection of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core antigen. In the GNPA, after anti-HCV core antigen polyclonal antibodies and single-stranded barcode signal DNA were labeled on gold nanoparticle probe (NP), DNA enzyme was used to degrade the unbound barcode DNAs. The anti-HCV core antigen monoclonal antibodies were coated on magnetic microparticles probe (MMP). Then the NP-HCV core antigen-MMP sandwich immuno-complex was formed when the target antigen protein was added and captured. Magnetically separated, the immuno-complex containing the single-stranded barcode signal DNA was characterized by TaqMan probe based real-time fluorescence PCR. A detection limit of 1 fg/ml was determined for the HCV core antigen which is magnitude greater than that of ELISA (2ng/ml). The coefficients of variation (CV) of intra-assay and inter-assay respectively ranged from 0.22-2.62% and 1.92-3.01%. The improved GNPA decreased the interference of unbound barcode DNAs and may be an new way for HCV core antigen detection. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Luminescent Metal-Organic-Framework-Based Label-Free Assay of Polyphenol Oxidase with Fluorescent Scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue; Guo, An; Chang, Lan; Li, Wen-Juan; Ruan, Wen-Juan

    2017-05-11

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are emerging in recent years as a kind of versatile fluorescent sensing materials, but their application to enzyme assays has rarely been studied. Here, the first example of a MOF-based label-free enzyme assay system is reported. A luminescent MOF was synthesized and applied to the activity analysis of polyphenol oxidase (PPO). With its distinct responses to the phenolic substrate and o-quinone product, this MOF could transduce the extent of PPO-catalyzed oxidation to fluorescence signal and enable the real-time monitoring of this reaction. Wide substrate adaptability and high sensitivity (detection limit=0.00012 U mL -1 ) were exhibited by this method, which meets the requirement of common bioanalysis. Interestingly, by the comparison with molecular capturing reagents, the heterogeneous nature of this MOF-based assay effectively preventing the interaction with the enzyme was proven, thus ensuring the authenticity of results. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. A reporter system for assaying influenza virus RNP functionality based on secreted Gaussia luciferase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Xiaobing

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza A virus can infect a wide variety of animal species including humans, pigs, birds and other species. Viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP was involved in genome replication, transcription and host adaptation. Currently, firefly luciferase (Fluc reporter system was used in vRNP functional assay. However, its limitation for the testing by virus infection resulted in an increased need for rapid, sensitive, and biosafe techniques. Here, an influenza A virus UTR-driven gene reporter for vRNP assay based on secreted Gaussia luciferase (Gluc activity was evaluated. Results By measuring Gluc levels in supernatants, reporter gene activity could be detected and quantitated after either reconstitution of influenza A virus polymerase complex or viral infection of 293T and A549 cells, respectively. As compared with Fluc reporter, Gluc-based reporter was heat-tolerant (65°C for 30 min and produced 50-fold higher bioluminescent activity at 24 h posttransfection. Signals generated by Gluc reporter gene could be detected as early as 6 h post-infection and accumulated with time. Testing by viral infection, stronger signals were detected by Gluc reporter at a MOI of 0.001 than that of 1 and the effects of PB2-627K/E or amantadine on influenza vRNP activity were elucidated more effectively by the Gluc reporter system. Conclusions This approach provided a rapid, sensitive, and biosafe assay of influenza vRNP function, particularly for the highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

  5. Novel PCR Assays Complement Laser Biosensor-Based Method and Facilitate Listeria Species Detection from Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang-Pyo; Singh, Atul K; Bai, Xingjian; Leprun, Lena; Bhunia, Arun K

    2015-09-08

    The goal of this study was to develop the Listeria species-specific PCR assays based on a house-keeping gene (lmo1634) encoding alcohol acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (Aad), previously designated as Listeria adhesion protein (LAP), and compare results with a label-free light scattering sensor, BARDOT (bacterial rapid detection using optical scattering technology). PCR primer sets targeting the lap genes from the species of Listeria sensu stricto were designed and tested with 47 Listeria and 8 non-Listeria strains. The resulting PCR primer sets detected either all species of Listeria sensu stricto or individual L. innocua, L. ivanovii and L. seeligeri, L. welshimeri, and L. marthii without producing any amplified products from other bacteria tested. The PCR assays with Listeria sensu stricto-specific primers also successfully detected all species of Listeria sensu stricto and/or Listeria innocua from mixed culture-inoculated food samples, and each bacterium in food was verified by using the light scattering sensor that generated unique scatter signature for each species of Listeria tested. The PCR assays based on the house-keeping gene aad (lap) can be used for detection of either all species of Listeria sensu stricto or certain individual Listeria species in a mixture from food with a detection limit of about 10⁴ CFU/mL.

  6. Fundamentals of rapid injection molding for microfluidic cell-based assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ulri N; Su, Xiaojing; Guckenberger, David J; Dostie, Ashley M; Zhang, Tianzi; Berthier, Erwin; Theberge, Ashleigh B

    2018-01-30

    Microscale cell-based assays have demonstrated unique capabilities in reproducing important cellular behaviors for diagnostics and basic biological research. As these assays move beyond the prototyping stage and into biological and clinical research environments, there is a need to produce microscale culture platforms more rapidly, cost-effectively, and reproducibly. 'Rapid' injection molding is poised to meet this need as it enables some of the benefits of traditional high volume injection molding at a fraction of the cost. However, rapid injection molding has limitations due to the material and methods used for mold fabrication. Here, we characterize advantages and limitations of rapid injection molding for microfluidic device fabrication through measurement of key features for cell culture applications including channel geometry, feature consistency, floor thickness, and surface polishing. We demonstrate phase contrast and fluorescence imaging of cells grown in rapid injection molded devices and provide design recommendations to successfully utilize rapid injection molding methods for microscale cell-based assay development in academic laboratory settings.

  7. An assay for secologanin in plant tissues based on enzymatic conversion into strictosidine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallard, Didier; van der Heijden, Robert; Contin, Adriana

    1998-01-01

    strictosidine, a reaction catalysed by the enzyme strictosidine synthase (STR; E.C. 4.3.3.2). Subsequently, the formation of strictosidine is quantified by HPLC. STR was isolated from transgenic Nicotiana tabacum cells expressing a cDNA-derived gene coding for STR from Catharanthus roseus. The high specificity......The secoiridoid glucoside secologanin is the terpenoid building block in the biosynthesis of terpenoid indole alkaloids. A method for its determination in plant tissues and cell suspension cultures has been developed. This assay is based on the condensation of secologanin with tryptamine, yielding...... of STR for secologanin, in combination with a sensitive and selective HPLC system, allows a simple extraction of secologanin from plant tissue. The detection limit of this methos is 15 ng secologanin. Using this assay, secologanin contents were determined in tissues of various plant species; Lonicera...

  8. Fluorescence-based lateral flow assays for rapid oral fluid roadside detection of cannabis use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plouffe, Brian D; Murthy, Shashi K

    2017-02-01

    With the recent worldwide changes in the legalization of marijuana, there is a significant need for rapid, roadside screening test for driving under the influence of drugs. A robust, sensitive, lateral flow assay has been developed to detect recent use via oral-fluid testing for Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). This proof-of-concept assay uses a fluorescent-based immunoassay detection of polymeric beads, conjugated to antibodies against native THC. The fluorescent technique allows for significantly lower limits of detection and higher precision determination of recent marijuana use without the use of urine or blood sampling-thus allowing for roadside identification. Detection levels of 0.01 ng/mL were distinguished from background and the lower limit of quantification was determined to approach 1 ng/mL. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Rapid identification of bacterial pathogens using a PCR- and microarray-based assay

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    Aittakorpi Anne

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the course of a bacterial infection, the rapid identification of the causative agent(s is necessary for the determination of effective treatment options. We have developed a method based on a modified broad-range PCR and an oligonucleotide microarray for the simultaneous detection and identification of 12 bacterial pathogens at the species level. The broad-range PCR primer mixture was designed using conserved regions of the bacterial topoisomerase genes gyrB and parE. The primer design allowed the use of a novel DNA amplification method, which produced labeled, single-stranded DNA suitable for microarray hybridization. The probes on the microarray were designed from the alignments of species- or genus-specific variable regions of the gyrB and parE genes flanked by the primers. We included mecA-specific primers and probes in the same assay to indicate the presence of methicillin resistance in the bacterial species. The feasibility of this assay in routine diagnostic testing was evaluated using 146 blood culture positive and 40 blood culture negative samples. Results Comparison of our results with those of a conventional culture-based method revealed a sensitivity of 96% (initial sensitivity of 82% and specificity of 98%. Furthermore, only one cross-reaction was observed upon investigating 102 culture isolates from 70 untargeted bacteria. The total assay time was only three hours, including the time required for the DNA extraction, PCR and microarray steps in sequence. Conclusion The assay rapidly provides reliable data, which can guide optimal antimicrobial treatment decisions in a timely manner.

  10. Digitizing Gold Nanoparticle-Based Colorimetric Assay by Imaging and Counting Single Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Liang; Wang, Xian; Fang, Yimin; Liu, Chenbin; Jiang, Dan; Wo, Xiang; Wang, Wei; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2016-02-16

    Gold colloid changes its color when the internanoparticle distance changes. On the basis of analyte-induced aggregation or disaggregation behavior of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), versatile colorimetric assays have been developed for measuring various kinds of analytes including proteins, DNA, small molecules, and ions. Traditional read-out signals, which are usually measured by a spectrometer or naked eyes, are based on the averaged extinction properties of a bulk solution containing billions of nanoparticles. Averaged extinction property of a large amount of nanoparticles diminished the contribution from rare events when the analyte concentration was low, thus resulting in limited detection sensitivity. Instead of measuring the averaged optical property from bulk colloid, in the present work, we proposed a digital counterpart of the colorimetric assay by imaging and counting individual AuNPs. This method quantified the analyte concentration with the number percentage of large-sized AuNPs aggregates, which were digitally counted with surface plasmon resonance microscopy (SPRM), a plasmonic imaging technique recently developed by us and other groups. SPRM was able to identify rare AuNPs aggregates despite their small population and greatly improved the detection sensitivity as demonstrated by two model systems based on analyte-induced aggregation and disaggregation, respectively. Furthermore, besides plasmonic AuNPs, SPRM is also suitable for imaging and counting nonplasmonic nanomaterials such as silica and metal oxide with poor extinction properties. It is thus anticipated that the present digitized assay holds a great potential for expanding the colorimetric assay to broad categories of nonplasmonic nanoparticles.

  11. Structure-Based Understanding of Binding Affinity and Mode of Estrogen Receptor α Agonists and Antagonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehan Lee

    Full Text Available The flexible hydrophobic ligand binding pocket (LBP of estrogen receptor α (ERα allows the binding of a wide variety of endocrine disruptors. Upon ligand binding, the LBP reshapes around the contours of the ligand and stabilizes the complex by complementary hydrophobic interactions and specific hydrogen bonds with the ligand. Here we present a framework for quantitative analysis of the steric and electronic features of the human ERα-ligand complex using three dimensional (3D protein-ligand interaction description combined with 3D-QSAR approach. An empirical hydrophobicity density field is applied to account for hydrophobic contacts of ligand within the LBP. The obtained 3D-QSAR model revealed that hydrophobic contacts primarily determine binding affinity and govern binding mode with hydrogen bonds. Several residues of the LBP appear to be quite flexible and adopt a spectrum of conformations in various ERα-ligand complexes, in particular His524. The 3D-QSAR was combined with molecular docking based on three receptor conformations to accommodate receptor flexibility. The model indicates that the dynamic character of the LBP allows accommodation and stable binding of structurally diverse ligands, and proper representation of the protein flexibility is critical for reasonable description of binding of the ligands. Our results provide a quantitative and mechanistic understanding of binding affinity and mode of ERα agonists and antagonists that may be applicable to other nuclear receptors.

  12. Sensitive Cell-Based Assay for Determination of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Coreceptor Tropism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Jan; Vazquez, Ana C.; Winner, Dane; Gibson, Richard M.; Rhea, Ariel M.; Rose, Justine D.; Wylie, Doug; Henry, Kenneth; Wright, Alison; King, Kevin; Archer, John; Poveda, Eva; Soriano, Vicente; Robertson, David L.; Olivo, Paul D.; Arts, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    CCR5 antagonists are a powerful new class of antiretroviral drugs that require a companion assay to evaluate the presence of CXCR4-tropic (non-R5) viruses prior to use in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. In this study, we have developed, characterized, verified, and prevalidated a novel phenotypic test to determine HIV-1 coreceptor tropism (VERITROP) based on a sensitive cell-to-cell fusion assay. A proprietary vector was constructed containing a near-full-length HIV-1 genome with the yeast uracil biosynthesis (URA3) gene replacing the HIV-1 env coding sequence. Patient-derived HIV-1 PCR products were introduced by homologous recombination using an innovative yeast-based cloning strategy. The env-expressing vectors were then used in a cell-to-cell fusion assay to determine the presence of R5 and/or non-R5 HIV-1 variants within the viral population. Results were compared with (i) the original version of Trofile (Monogram Biosciences, San Francisco, CA), (ii) population sequencing, and (iii) 454 pyrosequencing, with the genotypic data analyzed using several bioinformatics tools, i.e., the 11/24/25 rule, Geno2Pheno (2% to 5.75%, 3.5%, or 10% false-positive rate [FPR]), and webPSSM. VERITROP consistently detected minority non-R5 variants from clinical specimens, with an analytical sensitivity of 0.3%, with viral loads of ≥1,000 copies/ml, and from B and non-B subtypes. In a pilot study, a 73.7% (56/76) concordance was observed with the original Trofile assay, with 19 of the 20 discordant results corresponding to non-R5 variants detected using VERITROP and not by the original Trofile assay. The degree of concordance of VERITROP and Trofile with population and deep sequencing results depended on the algorithm used to determine HIV-1 coreceptor tropism. Overall, VERITROP showed better concordance with deep sequencing/Geno2Pheno at a 0.3% detection threshold (67%), whereas Trofile matched better with population sequencing (79%). However, 454

  13. Simple field assays to check quality of current artemisinin-based antimalarial combination formulations.

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    Jean-Robert Ioset

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Malaria continues to be one of the major public health problems in Africa, Asia and Latin America. Artemisinin derivatives (ARTs; artesunate, artemether, and dihydroartemisinin derived from the herb, Artemisia annua, are the most effective antimalarial drugs available providing rapid cures. The World Health Organisation (WHO has recommended that all antimalarials must be combined with an artemisinin component (artemisinin-based combination therapy; ACT for use as first line treatment against malaria. This class of drugs is now first-line policy in most malaria-endemic countries. Reports of ad hoc surveys from South East Asia show that up to 50% of the artesunate currently sold is counterfeit. Drug quality is rarely assessed in resource poor countries in part due to lack of dedicated laboratory facilities which are expensive to build, equip and maintain. With a view to address this unmet need we developed two novel colour reaction assays that can be used in the field to check the quality of ARTs. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Our assays utilise thin layer chromatography silica gel sheets and 2, 4 dinitrophenylhydrazine or 4-Benzoylamino-2, 5-dimethoxybenzenediazonium chloride hemi (zinc chloride salt as the reagents showing a pink or blue product respectively only in the presence ARTs. We are able to detect as low as 10% of ARTs in ACTs (WINTHROP--artesunate/amodiaquine, Coartem--artemether/lumefantrine and Duocortexcin--dihydroartemisinin/piperaquine. The assays have been validated extensively by testing eighty readily accessible and widely used drugs in malaria endemic countries. None of the other antimalarial drugs or a range of commonly used excipients, antiretroviral drugs or other frequently used drugs from the WHO essential drugs list such as analgesics or antibiotics are detected with our assays. CONCLUSIONS: Our two independent assays requiring no specialist training are specific, simple to use, rapid, robust, reproducible

  14. Simple field assays to check quality of current artemisinin-based antimalarial combination formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioset, Jean-Robert; Kaur, Harparkash

    2009-09-30

    Malaria continues to be one of the major public health problems in Africa, Asia and Latin America. Artemisinin derivatives (ARTs; artesunate, artemether, and dihydroartemisinin) derived from the herb, Artemisia annua, are the most effective antimalarial drugs available providing rapid cures. The World Health Organisation (WHO) has recommended that all antimalarials must be combined with an artemisinin component (artemisinin-based combination therapy; ACT) for use as first line treatment against malaria. This class of drugs is now first-line policy in most malaria-endemic countries. Reports of ad hoc surveys from South East Asia show that up to 50% of the artesunate currently sold is counterfeit. Drug quality is rarely assessed in resource poor countries in part due to lack of dedicated laboratory facilities which are expensive to build, equip and maintain. With a view to address this unmet need we developed two novel colour reaction assays that can be used in the field to check the quality of ARTs. Our assays utilise thin layer chromatography silica gel sheets and 2, 4 dinitrophenylhydrazine or 4-Benzoylamino-2, 5-dimethoxybenzenediazonium chloride hemi (zinc chloride) salt as the reagents showing a pink or blue product respectively only in the presence ARTs. We are able to detect as low as 10% of ARTs in ACTs (WINTHROP--artesunate/amodiaquine, Coartem--artemether/lumefantrine and Duocortexcin--dihydroartemisinin/piperaquine). The assays have been validated extensively by testing eighty readily accessible and widely used drugs in malaria endemic countries. None of the other antimalarial drugs or a range of commonly used excipients, antiretroviral drugs or other frequently used drugs from the WHO essential drugs list such as analgesics or antibiotics are detected with our assays. Our two independent assays requiring no specialist training are specific, simple to use, rapid, robust, reproducible, inexpensive and, have successfully resulted in detecting two

  15. Novel microwell-based spectrophotometric assay for determination of atorvastatin calcium in its pharmaceutical formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Tanveer A; Khalil, Nasr Y; Abdel-Rahman, Hamdy M; Darwish, Ibrahim A

    2011-10-07

    The formation of a colored charge-transfer (CT) complex between atorvastatin calcium (ATR-Ca) as a n-electron donor and 2, 3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone (DDQ) as a π-electron acceptor was investigated, for the first time. The spectral characteristics of the CT complex have been described, and the reaction mechanism has been proved by computational molecular modeling. The reaction was employed in the development of a novel microwell-based spectrophotometric assay for determination of ATR-Ca in its pharmaceutical formulations. The proposed assay was carried out in 96-microwell plates. The absorbance of the colored-CT complex was measured at 460 nm by microwell-plate absorbance reader. The optimum conditions of the reaction and the analytical procedures of the assay were established. Under the optimum conditions, linear relationship with good correlation coefficient (0.9995) was found between the absorbance and the concentration of ATR-Ca in the range of 10-150 μg/well. The limits of detection and quantitation were 5.3 and 15.8 μg/well, respectively. No interference was observed from the additives that are present in the pharmaceutical formulation or from the drugs that are co-formulated with ATR-Ca in its combined formulations. The assay was successfully applied to the analysis of ATR-Ca in its pharmaceutical dosage forms with good accuracy and precision. The assay described herein has great practical value in the routine analysis of ATR-Ca in quality control laboratories, as it has high throughput property, consumes minimum volume of organic solvent thus it offers the reduction in the exposures of the analysts to the toxic effects of organic solvents, and reduction in the analysis cost by 50-fold. Although the proposed assay was validated for ATR-Ca, however, the same methodology could be used for any electron-donating analyte for which a CT reaction can be performed.

  16. Novel microwell-based spectrophotometric assay for determination of atorvastatin calcium in its pharmaceutical formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Rahman Hamdy M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The formation of a colored charge-transfer (CT complex between atorvastatin calcium (ATR-Ca as a n-electron donor and 2, 3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone (DDQ as a π-electron acceptor was investigated, for the first time. The spectral characteristics of the CT complex have been described, and the reaction mechanism has been proved by computational molecular modeling. The reaction was employed in the development of a novel microwell-based spectrophotometric assay for determination of ATR-Ca in its pharmaceutical formulations. The proposed assay was carried out in 96-microwell plates. The absorbance of the colored-CT complex was measured at 460 nm by microwell-plate absorbance reader. The optimum conditions of the reaction and the analytical procedures of the assay were established. Under the optimum conditions, linear relationship with good correlation coefficient (0.9995 was found between the absorbance and the concentration of ATR-Ca in the range of 10-150 μg/well. The limits of detection and quantitation were 5.3 and 15.8 μg/well, respectively. No interference was observed from the additives that are present in the pharmaceutical formulation or from the drugs that are co-formulated with ATR-Ca in its combined formulations. The assay was successfully applied to the analysis of ATR-Ca in its pharmaceutical dosage forms with good accuracy and precision. The assay described herein has great practical value in the routine analysis of ATR-Ca in quality control laboratories, as it has high throughput property, consumes minimum volume of organic solvent thus it offers the reduction in the exposures of the analysts to the toxic effects of organic solvents, and reduction in the analysis cost by 50-fold. Although the proposed assay was validated for ATR-Ca, however, the same methodology could be used for any electron-donating analyte for which a CT reaction can be performed.

  17. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for determination of aflatoxin M1 based on magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanasova, M. K.; Ivanova, N. V.; Godjevargova, T. I.

    2017-02-01

    A sensitive enzyme immunoassay with magnetic nanoparticles (Method A) for the quantitative determination of aflatoxin M1 in milk was developed. This immunoassay was based on the immobilization of monoclonal antibody (mAb) on the modified magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs-NH2). It was observed that for each mg of the MNPs, 25 µg of antibody was immobilized. Both aflatoxin M1 in the sample and aflatoxin M1-BSA-peroxidase conjugate competed for the immobilized antibody. The proposed Method A was compared with other method (B). The Method B was based on the immobilization of aflatoxin M1-BSA conjugate on the MNPs-NH2, which competed with the aflatoxin M1 in the sample for binding to the added mAb. The binding of mAb to the aflatoxin M1-BSA-MNPs-NH2 was detected using a target secondary IgG-peroxidase antibody. The analytical characteristics of the two methods were compared. Real milk samples were investigated for present of aflatoxin M1. Two methods were based on the use of MNPs as a solid support for covalently immunoreagents immobilization. A comfortable separation of bound and free fraction of the tracer can be performed only through a simple collection of the MNPs by a permanent magnet. The application of MNPs helps to eliminate non-specific binding and to retain higher activity of bound biomolecules. The development of a MNPs-based ELISA for determination of aflatoxin M1 has a great potential to supersede the traditional ELISA for aflatoxin M1 diagnosis.

  18. A pseudovirus-based hemagglutination-inhibition assay as a rapid, highly sensitive, and specific assay for detecting avian influenza A (H7N9 antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anli Zhang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Increased surveillance of avian-origin influenza A (H7N9 virus infection is critical to assess the risk of new outbreaks in China. A high-throughput assay with a good safety profile, sensitivity, and specificity is urgently needed. Methods We used a hemagglutination-inhibition (HI assay based on an H7N9-enveloped pseudovirus to assess serum neutralization antibodies level in 40 H7N9 positive sera and 40 H7N9 negative sera and compared the efficacy of the assay with traditional HI test and micro-neutralization (MN test. Results Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient analysis showed pseudovirus HI (PHI titers correlated well with both HI titers and MN titers. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves test revealed using a PHI cut-off titer of 10, the sensitivity and specificity reached 1.0. Conclusions PHI can be used in H7N9-related serological studies. This assay is high-throughput, very sensitive and specific, and cost effective.

  19. A Caco-2 cell-based quantitative antioxidant activity assay for antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Hongxia; Liu, Dong; Yu, Xiangying; Sun, Haiyan; Li, Yan

    2015-05-15

    A Caco-2 cell-based antioxidant activity (CAA) assay for quantitative evaluation of antioxidants was developed by optimizing seeding density and culture time of Caco-2 cells, incubation time and concentration of fluorescent probe (2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate, DCFH-DA), incubation way and incubation time of antioxidants (pure phytochemicals) and DCFH-DA with cells, and detection time of fluorescence. Results showed that the CAA assay was of good reproducibility and could be used to evaluate the antioxidant activity of antioxidants at the following conditions: seeding density of 5 × 10(4)/well, cell culture time of 24h, co-incubation of 60 μM DCFH-DA and pure phytochemicals with Caco-2 cells for 20 min and fluorescence recorded for 90 min. Additionally, a significant correlation was observed between CAA values and rat plasma ORAC values following the intake of antioxidants for selected pure phytochemicals (R(2) = 0.815, p < 0.01), demonstrating the good biological relevance of CAA assay. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. An Acetylcholinesterase-Based Chronoamperometric Biosensor for Fast and Reliable Assay of Nerve Agents

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    Rene Kizek

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE is an important part of cholinergic nervous system, where it stops neurotransmission by hydrolysis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. It is sensitive to inhibition by organophosphate and carbamate insecticides, some Alzheimer disease drugs, secondary metabolites such as aflatoxins and nerve agents used in chemical warfare. When immobilized on a sensor (physico-chemical transducer, it can be used for assay of these inhibitors. In the experiments described herein, an AChE- based electrochemical biosensor using screen printed electrode systems was prepared. The biosensor was used for assay of nerve agents such as sarin, soman, tabun and VX. The limits of detection achieved in a measuring protocol lasting ten minutes were 7.41 × 10−12 mol/L for sarin, 6.31 × 10−12 mol /L for soman, 6.17 × 10−11 mol/L for tabun, and 2.19 × 10−11 mol/L for VX, respectively. The assay was reliable, with minor interferences caused by the organic solvents ethanol, methanol, isopropanol and acetonitrile. Isopropanol was chosen as suitable medium for processing lipophilic samples.

  1. A flow cytometric assay technology based on quantum dots-encoded beads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haiqiao; Liu Tiancai; Cao Yuancheng; Huang Zhenli; Wang Jianhao; Li Xiuqing; Zhao Yuandi

    2006-01-01

    A flow cytometric detecting technology based on quantum dots (QDs)-encoded beads has been described. Using this technology, several QDs-encoded beads with different code were identified effectively, and the target molecule (DNA sequence) in solution was also detected accurately by coupling to its complementary sequence probed on QDs-encoded beads through DNA hybridization assay. The resolution of this technology for encoded beads is resulted from two longer wavelength fluorescence identification signals (yellow and red fluorescent signals of QDs), and the third shorter wavelength fluorescence signal (green reporting signal of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)) for the determination of reaction between probe and target. In experiment, because of QDs' unique optical character, only one excitation light source was needed to excite the QDs and probe dye FITC synchronously comparing with other flow cytometric assay technology. The results show that this technology has present excellent repeatability and good accuracy. It will become a promising multiple assay platform in various application fields after further improvement

  2. A novel in vitro image-based assay identifies new drug leads for giardiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Christopher J S; Munro, Taylah; Andrews, Katherine T; Ryan, John H; Riches, Andrew G; Skinner-Adams, Tina S

    2017-04-01

    Giardia duodenalis is an intestinal parasite that causes giardiasis, a widespread human gastrointestinal disease. Treatment of giardiasis relies on a small arsenal of compounds that can suffer from limitations including side-effects, variable treatment efficacy and parasite drug resistance. Thus new anti-Giardia drug leads are required. The search for new compounds with anti-Giardia activity currently depends on assays that can be labour-intensive, expensive and restricted to measuring activity at a single time-point. Here we describe a new in vitro assay to assess anti-Giardia activity. This image-based assay utilizes the Perkin-Elmer Operetta ® and permits automated assessment of parasite growth at multiple time points without cell-staining. Using this new approach, we assessed the "Malaria Box" compound set for anti-Giardia activity. Three compounds with sub-μM activity (IC 50 0.6-0.9 μM) were identified as potential starting points for giardiasis drug discovery. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Quantitative serine protease assays based on formation of copper(II)-oligopeptide complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiaokang; Yang, Kun-Lin

    2015-01-07

    A quantitative protease assay based on the formation of a copper-oligopeptide complex is developed. In this assay, when a tripeptide GGH fragment is cleaved from an oligopeptide chain by serine proteases, the tripeptide quickly forms a pink GGH/Cu(2+) complex whose concentration can be determined quantitatively by using UV-Vis spectroscopy. Therefore, activities of serine proteases can be determined from the formation rate of the GGH/Cu(2+) complex. This principle can be used to detect the presence of serine protease in a real-time manner, or measure proteolytic activities of serine protease cleaving different oligopeptide substrates. For example, by using this assay, we demonstrate that trypsin, a model serine protease, is able to cleave two oligopeptides GGGGKGGH () and GGGGRGGH (). However, the specificity constant (kcat/Km) for is higher than that of (6.4 × 10(3) mM(-1) min(-1)vs. 1.3 × 10(3) mM(-1) min(-1)). This result shows that trypsin is more specific toward arginine (R) than lysine (K) in the oligopeptide sequence.

  4. A radioreceptor assay for benzodiazepines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, P.; Husson, J.-M.; Raynaud, J.-P.

    1979-01-01

    A simple, rapid and sensitive radioreceptor assay for determining benzodiazepines in serum is based on the displacement by the drug specific [ 3 H] diazepam binding to a membrane fraction from rat brain. The limit of detection of the more active benzodiazepines is about 0.5 ng. Diazepam, nitrazepam, clobazam and HR 458 have been assayed in human serum after a single oral clinical dose. The results can be used for determining pharmacokinetic parameters. The technique measures not only the parent benzodiazepine but also clinically active metabolites. (author)

  5. Endogenous biotin-binding proteins: an overlooked factor causing false positives in streptavidin-based protein detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tytgat, Hanne L P; Schoofs, Geert; Driesen, Michèle; Proost, Paul; Van Damme, Els J M; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Biotinylation is widely used in DNA, RNA and protein probing assays as this molecule has generally no impact on the biological activity of its substrate. During the streptavidin-based detection of glycoproteins in Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG with biotinylated lectin probes, a strong positive band of approximately 125 kDa was observed, present in different cellular fractions. This potential glycoprotein reacted heavily with concanavalin A (ConA), a lectin that specifically binds glucose and mannose residues. Surprisingly, this protein of 125 kDa could not be purified using a ConA affinity column. Edman degradation of the protein, isolated via cation and anion exchange chromatography, lead to the identification of the band as pyruvate carboxylase, an enzyme of 125 kDa that binds biotin as a cofactor. Detection using only the streptavidin conjugate resulted in more false positive signals of proteins, also in extracellular fractions, indicating biotin-associated proteins. Indeed, biotin is a known cofactor of numerous carboxylases. The potential occurence of false positive bands with biotinylated protein probes should thus be considered when using streptavidin-based detection, e.g. by developing a blot using only the streptavidin conjugate. To circumvent these false positives, alternative approaches like detection based on digoxigenin labelling can also be used. PMID:25211245

  6. An assay for the detection of xenoestrogens based on a promoter containing overlapping EREs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaad, C; Barouki, R

    1999-01-01

    Xenoestrogens could be implicated in the decrease of male fertility and in the increased incidence of testicular and breast cancers in humans. To predict their deleterious effects, various in vivo or in vitro tests have been proposed to assay the xenoestrogenic activity. We have designed an assay for the detection of xenoestrogens based on a novel estrogen responsive unit formed by two overlapping estrogen response elements (overEREs). This construct is able to mediate a synergistic activation of transcription by 17ss-estradiol. We have used the overERE unit to assay the estrogenic activity of synthetic compounds, mostly organochlorine compounds. By using the overERE construct, we were able to detect the estrogenic activity of compounds at concentrations 10- to 100-fold lower than a single ERE (i.e., we detected the estrogenic effect of endosulfan at a concentration of 10(-5) M with ERE, whereas the overERE unit allowed us to detect a significant estrogenic activity of endosulfan at a lower concentration (10(-6) M). Some compounds did not exhibit any estrogenic activity when tested with a classical ERE, whereas they were potent xenoestrogens when the overERE was used (i.e., Betanal). The assays we have developed are very sensitive and can be performed quickly. Moreover, because the promoter that we used contains only an overlapping ERE as a regulatory unit, the interference of the tested molecules with other regulatory pathways can be avoided. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:10379002

  7. Lot-to-lot variability in HLA antibody screening using a multiplexed bead-based assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Manish J; Carrick, Danielle M; Jenkins, Sarah; De Goey, Steven; Ploeger, Nancy A; Wilson, Gregory A; Lee, Jar How; Winters, Jeffrey L; Stubbs, James R; Toy, Pearl; Norris, Philip J

    2013-09-01

    Identifying antibodies to HLA (anti-HLA) by solid-phase assays is used to screen blood donors to mitigate transfusion-related acute lung injury risk. Various cutoffs for detection assays have been proposed in the literature; however, these do not take into consideration lot-to-lot variability of commercially available assays. Samples from 93 nontransfused males were tested using five different lots of a multiplex bead-based anti-HLA detection kit. A subset of 17 samples was tested on 5 days using a single lot. An additional 96 samples from donations with varied anti-HLA levels were tested using kits from two different lots. Results were reported as a normalized background (NBG) ratio. For the 93 nontransfused donors, NBG values generated using the reference lot were significantly higher than those obtained with three of the four comparator lots. However, for the 96 samples with low-, moderate-, and higher-level anti-HLA, Class I (CL-I) values were 1.4 times lower and Class II (CL-II) values were 1.2 times lower using the reference versus comparator lot. For CL-I antibodies the between-lot standard deviation (SD) was 1.36 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.19-1.60), while the between-day SD was 1.27 (95% CI, 1.08-1.52). Similarly, for CL-II antibodies the between-lot SD was 0.81 (95% CI, 0.70-0.95), while the between-day SD was 0.50 (95% CI, 0.43-0.60). There is interlot variability in the tested HLA detection assay as well as significant bias between lots. It may be reasonable to develop a new cutoff when a new lot is obtained. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  8. Lot-to-Lot Variability in HLA Antibody Screening Using a Multiplexed Bead Based Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Manish J.; Carrick, Danielle M.; Jenkins, Sarah; De Goey, Steven; Ploeger, Nancy A; Wilson, Gregory A.; Lee, Jar How; Winters, Jeffrey L.; Stubbs, James R.; Toy, Pearl; Norris, Philip J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Identifying antibodies to HLA (HLA-Abs) by solid phase assays is used to screen blood donors to mitigate TRALI risk. Various cutoffs for detection assays have been proposed in the literature, however, these do not take into consideration lot-to-lot variability of commercially available assays. Methods Samples from 93 non-transfused males were tested using five different lots of a multiplex bead-based HLA-Ab detection kit. A subset of 17 samples was tested on five days using a single lot. An additional 96 samples from donations with varied HLA-Ab levels were tested using kits from two different lots. Results were reported as an NBG (normalized background) ratio. Results For the 93 non-transfused donors, NBG values generated using the reference lot were significantly higher than those obtained with three of the four comparator lots. However, for the 96 samples with low, moderate, and higher level HLA-Abs, Class-I values were 1.4 times lower and Class-II values were 1.2 times lower using the reference versus comparator lot. For class-I antibodies the between lot SD was 1.36 (CI:1.19–1.60), while the between day SD was 1.27 (CI:1.08–1.52). Similarly, for class II antibodies the between lot SD was 0.81 (CI:0.70–0.95), while the between day SD was 0.50 (CI:0.43–0.60). Conclusions There is inter-lot variability in the tested HLA detection assay as well as significant bias between lots. It may be reasonable to develop a new cutoff when a new lot is obtained. PMID:23305156

  9. Diagnosis of Morquio Syndrome in Dried Blood Spots Based on a New MRM-MS Assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Cozma

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA; Morquio A disease is an autosomal recessive disease caused and characterized by a decreased activity of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS, resulting in accumulation of keratan sulfate and chondroitin-6-sulfate in tissues and secondary organ damage. Recently approved enzyme replacement therapy renders the easy and early identification of MPS IVA of out-most importance.We propose a completely new assay for the stable and reproducible detection of GALNS deficiency in dry blood spots (DBS. For the validation blood samples were taken from 59 healthy individuals and 24 randomly selected genetically confirmed MPS IVA patients. The material extracted from DBS was incubated with a 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-D-galactopyranoside-6-sulfate as a specific substrate. Final enzymatic product, 4-methylumbelliferone, obtained after adding exogenous beta-galactosidase, was quantified by LC/MRM-MS (liquid-chromatography/multiple-reaction-monitoring mass-spectrometry. 4-propyl-5-hydroxy-7-methyl-2h-chromen-2-one was used as internal standard, a compound with a similar molecular structure and fragmentation pattern in negative ion mode as 4-methylumbelliferone.The enzymatic assay yielded a positive and negative predictive value of 1.0 for genetically confirmed MPS IVA patients (GALNS activity of 0.35 ± 0.21 μmol/L/h and for controls with normal GALNS activity (23.1 ± 5.3 μmol/L /h. With present enzymatic conditions, the reaction yield in dried blood spots is at least 20 fold higher than any previously reported data with other assays.The present LC/MRM-MS based assay for MPS IVA diagnosis provides an easy, highly-standardized, accurate and innovative quantification of the enzymatic product in vitro and distinguishes perfectly between MPS IVA affected patients and normal controls. This technique will significantly simplify the early detection of MPS IVA patients.

  10. Diagnosis of Morquio Syndrome in Dried Blood Spots Based on a New MRM-MS Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozma, Claudia; Eichler, Sabrina; Wittmann, Gyula; Flores Bonet, Alba; Kramp, Guido Johannes; Giese, Anne-Katrin; Rolfs, Arndt

    2015-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA; Morquio A disease) is an autosomal recessive disease caused and characterized by a decreased activity of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS), resulting in accumulation of keratan sulfate and chondroitin-6-sulfate in tissues and secondary organ damage. Recently approved enzyme replacement therapy renders the easy and early identification of MPS IVA of out-most importance. We propose a completely new assay for the stable and reproducible detection of GALNS deficiency in dry blood spots (DBS). For the validation blood samples were taken from 59 healthy individuals and 24 randomly selected genetically confirmed MPS IVA patients. The material extracted from DBS was incubated with a 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-D-galactopyranoside-6-sulfate as a specific substrate. Final enzymatic product, 4-methylumbelliferone, obtained after adding exogenous beta-galactosidase, was quantified by LC/MRM-MS (liquid-chromatography/multiple-reaction-monitoring mass-spectrometry). 4-propyl-5-hydroxy-7-methyl-2h-chromen-2-one was used as internal standard, a compound with a similar molecular structure and fragmentation pattern in negative ion mode as 4-methylumbelliferone. The enzymatic assay yielded a positive and negative predictive value of 1.0 for genetically confirmed MPS IVA patients (GALNS activity of 0.35 ± 0.21 μmol/L/h) and for controls with normal GALNS activity (23.1 ± 5.3 μmol/L /h). With present enzymatic conditions, the reaction yield in dried blood spots is at least 20 fold higher than any previously reported data with other assays. The present LC/MRM-MS based assay for MPS IVA diagnosis provides an easy, highly-standardized, accurate and innovative quantification of the enzymatic product in vitro and distinguishes perfectly between MPS IVA affected patients and normal controls. This technique will significantly simplify the early detection of MPS IVA patients.

  11. Development and validation of a rapid, aldehyde dehydrogenase bright-based cord blood potency assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoulars, Kevin; Noldner, Pamela; Troy, Jesse D; Cheatham, Lynn; Parrish, Amanda; Page, Kristin; Gentry, Tracy; Balber, Andrew E; Kurtzberg, Joanne

    2016-05-12

    Banked, unrelated umbilical cord blood provides access to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for patients lacking matched bone marrow donors, yet 10% to 15% of patients experience graft failure or delayed engraftment. This may be due, at least in part, to inadequate potency of the selected cord blood unit (CBU). CBU potency is typically assessed before cryopreservation, neglecting changes in potency occurring during freezing and thawing. Colony-forming units (CFUs) have been previously shown to predict CBU potency, defined as the ability to engraft in patients by day 42 posttransplant. However, the CFU assay is difficult to standardize and requires 2 weeks to perform. Consequently, we developed a rapid multiparameter flow cytometric CBU potency assay that enumerates cells expressing high levels of the enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH bright [ALDH(br)]), along with viable CD45(+) or CD34(+) cell content. These measurements are made on a segment that was attached to a cryopreserved CBU. We validated the assay with prespecified criteria testing accuracy, specificity, repeatability, intermediate precision, and linearity. We then prospectively examined the correlations among ALDH(br), CD34(+), and CFU content of 3908 segments over a 5-year period. ALDH(br) (r = 0.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.76-0.79), but not CD34(+) (r = 0.25; 95% CI, 0.22-0.28), was strongly correlated with CFU content as well as ALDH(br) content of the CBU. These results suggest that the ALDH(br) segment assay (based on unit characteristics measured before release) is a reliable assessment of potency that allows rapid selection and release of CBUs from the cord blood bank to the transplant center for transplantation. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  12. Development and validation of a rapid, aldehyde dehydrogenase bright–based cord blood potency assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noldner, Pamela; Troy, Jesse D.; Cheatham, Lynn; Parrish, Amanda; Page, Kristin; Gentry, Tracy; Balber, Andrew E.; Kurtzberg, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Banked, unrelated umbilical cord blood provides access to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for patients lacking matched bone marrow donors, yet 10% to 15% of patients experience graft failure or delayed engraftment. This may be due, at least in part, to inadequate potency of the selected cord blood unit (CBU). CBU potency is typically assessed before cryopreservation, neglecting changes in potency occurring during freezing and thawing. Colony-forming units (CFUs) have been previously shown to predict CBU potency, defined as the ability to engraft in patients by day 42 posttransplant. However, the CFU assay is difficult to standardize and requires 2 weeks to perform. Consequently, we developed a rapid multiparameter flow cytometric CBU potency assay that enumerates cells expressing high levels of the enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH bright [ALDHbr]), along with viable CD45+ or CD34+ cell content. These measurements are made on a segment that was attached to a cryopreserved CBU. We validated the assay with prespecified criteria testing accuracy, specificity, repeatability, intermediate precision, and linearity. We then prospectively examined the correlations among ALDHbr, CD34+, and CFU content of 3908 segments over a 5-year period. ALDHbr (r = 0.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.76-0.79), but not CD34+ (r = 0.25; 95% CI, 0.22-0.28), was strongly correlated with CFU content as well as ALDHbr content of the CBU. These results suggest that the ALDHbr segment assay (based on unit characteristics measured before release) is a reliable assessment of potency that allows rapid selection and release of CBUs from the cord blood bank to the transplant center for transplantation. PMID:26968535

  13. Applications of monolithic solid-phase extraction in chromatography-based clinical chemistry assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, Dustin R; Wang, Sihe

    2013-04-01

    Complex matrices, for example urine, serum, plasma, and whole blood, which are common in clinical chemistry testing, contain many non-analyte compounds that can interfere with either detection or in-source ionization in chromatography-based assays. To overcome this problem, analytes are extracted by protein precipitation, solid-phase extraction (SPE), and liquid-liquid extraction. With correct chemistry and well controlled material SPE may furnish clean specimens with consistent performance. Traditionally, SPE has been performed with particle-based adsorbents, but monolithic SPE is attracting increasing interest of clinical laboratories. Monoliths, solid pieces of stationary phase, have bimodal structures consisting of macropores, which enable passage of solvent, and mesopores, in which analytes are separated. This structure results in low back-pressure with separation capabilities similar to those of particle-based adsorbents. Monoliths also enable increased sample throughput, reduced solvent use, varied support formats, and/or automation. However, many of these monoliths are not commercially available. In this review, application of monoliths to purification of samples from humans before chromatography-based assays will be critically reviewed.

  14. Recombinant protein-based assays for detection of antibodies to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus spike and nucleocapsid proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Lia M; Miao, Congrong; Harcourt, Jennifer L; Montgomery, Joel M; Le, Mai Quynh; Dryga, Sergey A; Kamrud, Kurt I; Rivers, Bryan; Babcock, Gregory J; Oliver, Jennifer Betts; Comer, James A; Reynolds, Mary; Uyeki, Timothy M; Bausch, Daniel; Ksiazek, Thomas; Thomas, William; Alterson, Harold; Smith, Jonathan; Ambrosino, Donna M; Anderson, Larry J

    2007-03-01

    Recombinant severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) nucleocapsid and spike protein-based immunoglobulin G immunoassays were developed and evaluated. Our assays demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity to the SARS coronavirus in sera collected from patients as late as 2 years postonset of symptoms. These assays will be useful not only for routine SARS coronavirus diagnostics but also for epidemiological and antibody kinetic studies.

  15. Evaluation and validation of a single-dilution potency assay based upon serology of vaccines containing diphtheria toxoid: statistical analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marsman FR; Akkermans AM; Hendriksen CFM; de Jong WH

    1993-01-01

    This document presents the results of a validation study to the use of a single dilution assay in potency testing of the diphtheria component of DPT-polio vaccines. Based on historical data of multi-dilution assays on 27 consecutive batches a simulation study was performed to test the actual

  16. Evaluation of Methyl-Binding Domain Based Enrichment Approaches Revisited.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina A Aberg

    Full Text Available Methyl-binding domain (MBD enrichment followed by deep sequencing (MBD-seq, is a robust and cost efficient approach for methylome-wide association studies (MWAS. MBD-seq has been demonstrated to be capable of identifying differentially methylated regions, detecting previously reported robust associations and producing findings that replicate with other technologies such as targeted pyrosequencing of bisulfite converted DNA. There are several kits commercially available that can be used for MBD enrichment. Our previous work has involved MethylMiner (Life Technologies, Foster City, CA, USA that we chose after careful investigation of its properties. However, in a recent evaluation of five commercially available MBD-enrichment kits the performance of the MethylMiner was deemed poor. Given our positive experience with MethylMiner, we were surprised by this report. In an attempt to reproduce these findings we here have performed a direct comparison of MethylMiner with MethylCap (Diagenode Inc, Denville, NJ, USA, the best performing kit in that study. We find that both MethylMiner and MethylCap are two well performing MBD-enrichment kits. However, MethylMiner shows somewhat better enrichment efficiency and lower levels of background "noise". In addition, for the purpose of MWAS where we want to investigate the majority of CpGs, we find MethylMiner to be superior as it allows tailoring the enrichment to the regions where most CpGs are located. Using targeted bisulfite sequencing we confirmed that sites where methylation was detected by either MethylMiner or by MethylCap indeed were methylated.

  17. Recognition of base J in duplex DNA by J-binding protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sabatini, Robert; Meeuwenoord, Nico; van Boom, Jacques H.; Borst, Piet

    2002-01-01

    beta-d-Glucosylhydroxymethyluracil, also called base J, is an unusual modified DNA base conserved among Kinetoplastida. Base J is found predominantly in repetitive DNA and correlates with epigenetic silencing of telomeric variant surface glycoprotein genes. We have previously found a J-binding

  18. Synthesis of schiff bases of pyridine-4-carbaldehyde and their antioxidant and DNA binding studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamim, S.; Murtaza, S.; Nazar, M.F.

    2016-01-01

    A series of Schiff bases of pyridine-4-carbaldehyde with 3-aminobenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzoic acid, 4-aminobenzoic acid, 1,3-phenylenediamine, 1,2-phenylenediamine, 2-aminothiophenol, 4-aminoantipyrene, 2-aminophenol and naphthalene-1-amine was synthesized and compounds were characterized by FTIR, NMR and mass spectrometry. The synthesized compounds were evaluated for their antioxidant and DNA binding interaction studies. DPPH scavenging method was used to evaluate the antioxidant activities of synthesized Schiff bases at six gradually increasing concentrations of 0.5-5mg/ml. 2-((pyridin-4-ylmethylidene)amino)phenol came out to be the most efficient antioxidant at a concentration of 4mg/ml with 74% inhibition of free radicals generated by DPPH. The DNA binding interaction of the synthesized Schiff bases was determined using UV-Vis absorption titration method. Both the hypochromic and hyperchromic effects were observed along the series. The values for the binding constant (K) and free energy change (G) were calculated and most of the Schiff bases have high positive K values which indicate the efficient binding of Schiff bases with DNA. Molecular docking studies as carried out using PatchDock molecular algorithm software also indicated the high values for geometrical shape complementarity score suggesting the stabilities of Schiff bases/DNA complex. Docking studies also suggested the minor groove binding of the Schiff bases with DNA. Drug-likeness of the synthesized compounds was also tested in silico and the results are accordingly discussed. (author)

  19. Ultra fast and sensitive liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry based assay for galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase and galactokinase deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yijun; Ptolemy, Adam S; Harmonay, Lauren; Kellogg, Mark; Berry, Gerard T

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of transferase and galactokinase deficiency galactosemia usually involves the measurement of erythrocyte galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) and galactokinase (GALK) enzyme activity, respectively. The current gold standard assays for these enzymes are radioactive assays, which are laborious and/or incapable of measuring low enzyme activities. To further our knowledge of genotype-phenotype relationships, we had developed an assay for GALT activity alone using LC-MS/MS. In this study we generated a robust and sensitive LC-MS/MS based GALT and GALK assay using a novel normal phase chromatographic condition. We improved upon our earlier assay by drastically reducing the instrument run time and eliminating the use of an ion pairing reagent. Stable isotope labeled substrates were utilized in the GALT and GALK assays. The enzymatic products ([(13)C(6)]-uridine diphosphate galactose in GALT assay and [(13)C(6)]-galactose-1-phosphate in GALK assay) were quantified in a 3 min LC-MS/MS run. The assays were sensitive enough to allow for the quantification of enzyme activities as low as 0.2% and 0.3% of normal control values in the GALT and GALK assays, respectively. Thirty-three samples from non-galactosemic patients were assayed to have erythrocyte GALT activity of 23.4±4.2 and GALK activity of 1.8±0.47 (mean±SD) μmol⋅(g Hgb)(-1) h(-1). Erythrocyte GALT activities in a cohort of 16 patients with classic or severe galactosemia were measured: 4 patients had GALT activity less than 1% of normal control values and the remaining 12 had no detectable GALT activity. No GALK activity was detected in a GALK deficient sample we analyzed. Lastly, we tested the feasibility of adapting this LC-MS/MS based GALT/GALK assay as a newborn screening (NBS) test. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Structural Insights for Engineering Binding Proteins Based on Non-Antibody Scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbreth, Ryan N.; Koide, Shohei

    2012-01-01

    Engineered binding proteins derived from non-antibody scaffolds constitute an increasingly prominent class of reagents in both research and therapeutic applications. The growing number of crystal structures of these “alternative” scaffold-based binding proteins in complex with their targets illustrate the mechanisms of molecular recognition that are common among these systems and those unique to each. This information is useful for critically assessing and improving/expanding engineering stra...

  1. Rapid automation of a cell-based assay using a modular approach: case study of a flow-based Varicella Zoster Virus infectivity assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joelsson, Daniel; Gates, Irina V; Pacchione, Diana; Wang, Christopher J; Bennett, Philip S; Zhang, Yuhua; McMackin, Jennifer; Frey, Tina; Brodbeck, Kristin C; Baxter, Heather; Barmat, Scott L; Benetti, Luca; Bodmer, Jean-Luc

    2010-06-01

    Vaccine manufacturing requires constant analytical monitoring to ensure reliable quality and a consistent safety profile of the final product. Concentration and bioactivity of active components of the vaccine are key attributes routinely evaluated throughout the manufacturing cycle and for product release and dosage. In the case of live attenuated virus vaccines, bioactivity is traditionally measured in vitro by infection of susceptible cells with the vaccine followed by quantification of virus replication, cytopathology or expression of viral markers. These assays are typically multi-day procedures that require trained technicians and constant attention. Considering the need for high volumes of testing, automation and streamlining of these assays is highly desirable. In this study, the automation and streamlining of a complex infectivity assay for Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV) containing test articles is presented. The automation procedure was completed using existing liquid handling infrastructure in a modular fashion, limiting custom-designed elements to a minimum to facilitate transposition. In addition, cellular senescence data provided an optimal population doubling range for long term, reliable assay operation at high throughput. The results presented in this study demonstrate a successful automation paradigm resulting in an eightfold increase in throughput while maintaining assay performance characteristics comparable to the original assay. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of a whole-cell-based screening method for a carotenoid assay using aerial microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aburai, Nobuhiro; Kazama, Hiroaki; Tsuruoka, Atsushi; Goto, Mizuki; Abe, Katsuya

    2018-02-20

    Non-destructive approaches based on the application of optical spectroscopy are important for monitoring carotenoid accumulation in a whole cell cultured under various conditions. A simple and rapid assay utilizing aerial microalgae helps to identify stress conditions that can efficiently enhance the carotenogenesis in photosynthetic organisms. The spectra of cell suspensions were characterized in the aerial microalga Coelastrella sp. KGU-Y002, which are unicellular and undifferentiated. Total carotenoid contents could be successfully estimated on the basis of the absorbance values of the cell suspensions and calibration data analyzed by HPLC (high-performance liquid chromatography). A novel screening method, the so-called "whole-cell-based screening method" for carotenoid assays (WCA), was developed based on this procedure. It was possible to investigate the effects of various stresses on carotenoid accumulation in the aerial microalga by adapting this bioassay to a 96-well microtiter plate. When bioactive compounds were screened from our library of plant extracts using this method, an active compound was identified from the plant extract. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Label-free monitoring of DNA polymerase activity based on a thrombin-binding aptamer G-quadruplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Haisheng; Ma, Changbei; Wang, Jun; Zhong, Linxiu; Wu, Kefeng

    2017-04-01

    We have developed a label-free assay for the detection of DNA polymerase activity based on a thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA) G-quadruplex. In the presence of DNA polymerase, the 3'-OH termini of the hairpin substrate are immediately elongated to replace the TBA, which can be recognized quickly by the ThT dye and results in an increase of fluorescence. This method is highly sensitive with a detection limit of 0.1 U/mL. It is simple and cost-effective without any requirement of labeling with a fluorophore-quencher pair. Furthermore, the proposed method can also be applied to analyze the inhibition of DNA polymerase, which clearly indicates that the proposed method can be applied for screening of potential DNA polymerase inhibitors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Portable ceria nanoparticle-based assay for rapid detection of food antioxidants (NanoCerac)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Erica; Frasco, Thalia; Andreescu, Daniel; Andreescu, Silvana

    2012-01-01

    With increased awareness of nutrition and the advocacy for healthier food choices, there exists a great demand for a simple, easy-to-use test that can reliably measure the antioxidant capacity of dietary products. We report development and characterization of a portable nanoparticle based-assay, similar to a small sensor patch, for rapid and sensitive detection of food antioxidants. The assay is based on the use of immobilized ceria nanoparticles, which change color after interaction with antioxidants by means of redox and surface chemistry reactions. Monitoring corresponding optical changes enables sensitive detection of antioxidants in which the nanoceria provides an optical ‘signature’ of antioxidant power, while the antioxidants act as reducing agents. The sensor has been tested for the detection of common antioxidant compounds including ascorbic acid, gallic acid, vanilic acid, quercetin, caffeic acid, and epigallocatechin gallate and its function has been successfully applied for the assessment of antioxidant activity in real samples (teas and medicinal mushrooms). The colorimetric response was concentration dependent, with detection limits ranging from 20–400 μM depending on the antioxidant involved. Steady-state color intensity was achieved within seconds upon addition of antioxidants. The results are presented in terms of Gallic Acid Equivalents (GAE). The sensor performed favorably when compared with commonly used antioxidant detection methods. This assay is particularly appealing for remote sensing applications, where specialized equipment is not available, and also for high throughput analysis of a large number of samples. Potential applications for antioxidant detection in remote locations are envisioned. PMID:23139929

  5. DNA binding propensity and nuclease efficacy of biosensitive Schiff base complexes containing pyrazolone moiety: Synthesis and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulpandiyan, Rajakkani; Raman, Natarajan

    2016-12-01

    A series of novel Co(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes (1-8) were synthesized from pyrazolone precursor Schiff base(s), obtained by the condensation of 4-amino-2,3-dimethyl-1-phenyl-3-pyrazolin-5-one (4-aminoantipyrine) with cinnamaldehyde/benzaldehyde and respective metal(II) chloride. They have been characterized by elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility, molar conductance measurements, UV-Vis., IR, NMR, ESI mass spectra and EPR studies. These complexes show lower conductance values, supporting their non-electrolytic nature. Spectroscopic and other analytical data of the complexes suggest octahedral geometry. The binding properties of these complexes with DNA have been explored by electronic absorption spectra, cyclic voltammetry and viscosity measurements which reveal that the complexes have the ability to interact with calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) by intercalative mode. The binding constant (Kb) values clearly signify that the complex 1 has more intercalating ability than other complexes. DNA cleavage efficacy of these complexes with pUC18 DNA has been investigated by gel electrophoresis technique. All the complexes have been found to promote cleavage of pUC18 DNA from the super coiled form I to the open circular form II in presence of hydrogen peroxide. The in vitro antibacterial and antifungal assay, investigated by Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) method indicates that these complexes are good antimicrobial agents against various pathogens.

  6. Improved PCR-Based Detection of Soil Transmitted Helminth Infections Using a Next-Generation Sequencing Approach to Assay Design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Pilotte

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The soil transmitted helminths are a group of parasitic worms responsible for extensive morbidity in many of the world's most economically depressed locations. With growing emphasis on disease mapping and eradication, the availability of accurate and cost-effective diagnostic measures is of paramount importance to global control and elimination efforts. While real-time PCR-based molecular detection assays have shown great promise, to date, these assays have utilized sub-optimal targets. By performing next-generation sequencing-based repeat analyses, we have identified high copy-number, non-coding DNA sequences from a series of soil transmitted pathogens. We have used these repetitive DNA elements as targets in the development of novel, multi-parallel, PCR-based diagnostic assays.Utilizing next-generation sequencing and the Galaxy-based RepeatExplorer web server, we performed repeat DNA analysis on five species of soil transmitted helminths (Necator americanus, Ancylostoma duodenale, Trichuris trichiura, Ascaris lumbricoides, and Strongyloides stercoralis. Employing high copy-number, non-coding repeat DNA sequences as targets, novel real-time PCR assays were designed, and assays were tested against established molecular detection methods. Each assay provided consistent detection of genomic DNA at quantities of 2 fg or less, demonstrated species-specificity, and showed an improved limit of detection over the existing, proven PCR-based assay.The utilization of next-generation sequencing-based repeat DNA analysis methodologies for the identification of molecular diagnostic targets has the ability to improve assay species-specificity and limits of detection. By exploiting such high copy-number repeat sequences, the assays described here will facilitate soil transmitted helminth diagnostic efforts. We recommend similar analyses when designing PCR-based diagnostic tests for the detection of other eukaryotic pathogens.

  7. An assay for pro-oxidant reactivity based on phenoxyl radicals generated by laccase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moţ, Augustin Cătălin; Coman, Cristina; Miron, Carmen; Damian, Grigore; Sarbu, Costel; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Radu

    2014-01-15

    A transient species may be detected with UV-vis and EPR spectroscopy during turnover of a laccase with quercetin; this species is assigned as a quercetin-derived radical, based on EPR spectra as well the observed UV-vis similarities (a 540nm centred band) with previously reported data. The rates of formation and decay of this species correlate well (r=0.9946) with the pro-oxidant reactivity manifested by flavonoids in the presence of laccase. An assay for the pro-oxidant reactivity of natural products is hence proposed based on the results reported here; its application is demonstrated for a series of pure compounds as well as for several propolis extracts. This assay has the advantages of using a biologically relevant process (haemoglobin oxidation), and not requiring the addition of oxidising agents such as peroxide or superoxide. Correlations, or the lack thereof, between the pro-oxidant parameters and the redox potentials, antioxidant capacities and lipophilicities, were analysed. The laccase employed in our study does display reactivity-related similarities to a range of other proteins, including human plasma ceruloplasmin. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Quantum dot-modified paper-based assay for glucose screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article describes a simple optical assay for glucose. It is based on the use of paper spots loaded with colloidal CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (Q-dots) and the enzyme glucose oxidase (GOx). Circular paper sheets were uniformly loaded with Q-dots and then displayed strong fluorescence under a UV lamp (365 nm exCitation). The action of GOx causes the production of H 2 O 2 which, after a typical exposure time of 20 min, causes fluorescence intensity to be quenched. To obtain a reading, the paper sheets were photographed under 365 nm excitation using a digital camera. Several parameters, including the amount of Q-dots, sample pH, and amount of GOx were optimized to maximize the response to glucose. The paper-based assay showed a sigmoidal-shaped response with respect to the glucose concentration in the 5–200 mg·dL −1 range (limit of detection of 5 μg·dL −1 ), demonstrating their potential use for biomedical applications. (author)

  9. Assay of oestrogen and progestin receptors in human meningioma cytosols using immunological methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankenstein, M.A.; Meulen-Dijk, C. van der; Thijssen, J.H.H.

    1987-01-01

    Oestrogen (ER) and progestin receptors (PR) were assayed in human meningioma cytosol by radioligand binding assay with Scatchard plot analysis and by monoclonal antibody based enzyme immunoassays. For comparison, human breast cancer tissues were used. Results of both assays agreed very well. For

  10. Binding thermodynamics discriminates fragments from druglike compounds: a thermodynamic description of fragment-based drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Glyn; Ferenczy, György G; Ulander, Johan; Keserű, György M

    2017-04-01

    Small is beautiful - reducing the size and complexity of chemical starting points for drug design allows better sampling of chemical space, reveals the most energetically important interactions within protein-binding sites and can lead to improvements in the physicochemical properties of the final drug. The impact of fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) on recent drug discovery projects and our improved knowledge of the structural and thermodynamic details of ligand binding has prompted us to explore the relationships between ligand-binding thermodynamics and FBDD. Information on binding thermodynamics can give insights into the contributions to protein-ligand interactions and could therefore be used to prioritise compounds with a high degree of specificity in forming key interactions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Rapid small intestinal permeability assay based on riboflavin and lactulose detected by bis-boronic acid appended benzyl viologens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resendez, Angel; Abdul Halim, Md; Landhage, Caroline M; Hellström, Per M; Singaram, Bakthan; Webb, Dominic-Luc

    2015-01-15

    Although organoboronic acids are efficient high-throughput sugar sensors, they have not been pursued for gut permeability studies. A modification of the lactulose/mannitol assay is described by which small intestinal permeability is assessed at the time of urine collection using a lactulose/riboflavin ratio. Volunteers ingested 50mg riboflavin and either 5 g mannitol or 10 g lactulose. Urine was collected for 6 hrs. Riboflavin was assayed by autofluorescence. Riboflavin was removed by C18 solid phase extraction. Lactulose and mannitol were then assayed using 1,1'-bis(2-boronobenzyl)-4,4'-bipyridinium (4,4'oBBV) coupled to the fluorophore HPTS. The temporal profile over 6 hrs for riboflavin paralleled mannitol. Riboflavin recovery in urine was 11.1 ± 1.9 % (mean ± SEM, n=7), similar to mannitol. There was selective binding of 4,4'oBBV to lactulose, likely involving cooperativity between the fructose and galactose moieties. Lower limits of detection and quantification were 90 and 364 μM. The lactulose assay was insensitive to other permeability probes (e.g., sucrose, sucralose) while tolerating glucose or lactose. This assay can be adapted to automated systems. Stability of 4,4'oBBV exceeds 4 years. Riboflavin measured by autofluorescence combined with lactulose measured with 4,4'oBBV represents a useful new chemistry for rapid measurement of intestinal permeability with excellent stability, cost and throughput benefits. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Plate reader-based cell viability assays for glioprotection using primary rat optic nerve head astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaja, Simon; Payne, Andrew J; Naumchuk, Yuliya; Levy, Deborah; Zaidi, Danish H; Altman, Alexa M; Nawazish, Saba; Ghuman, Jasleen K; Gerdes, Bryan C; Moore, Mark A; Koulen, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Optic nerve head astrocytes (ONHAs) are the major glia cell type in the non-myelinated optic nerve head where they contribute critically to extracellular matrix synthesis during development and throughout life. In glaucoma, and in related disorders affecting the optic nerve and the optic nerve head, pathological changes include altered astrocyte gene and protein expression resulting in their activation and extracellular matrix remodeling. ONHAs are highly sensitive to mechanical and oxidative stress resulting in the initiation of axon damage early during pathogenesis. Furthermore, ONHAs are crucial for the maintenance of retinal ganglion cell physiology and function. Therefore, glioprotective strategies with the goal to preserve and/or restore the structural and functional viability of ONHA in order to slow glaucoma and related pathologies are of high clinical relevance. Herein, we describe the development of standardized methods that will allow for the systematic advancement of such glioprotective strategies. These include isolation, purification and culture of primary adult rat ONHAs, optimized immunocytochemical protocols for cell type validation, as well as plate reader-based assays determining cellular viability, proliferation and the intracellular redox state. We validated and standardized our protocols by performing a glioprotection study using primary ONHAs. Specifically, we measured protection against exogenously-applied oxidative stress using tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBHP) as a model of disease-mediated oxidative stress in the retina and optic nerve head by the prototypic antioxidant, 6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid (Trolox). Levels of oxidative stress were increased in the response to exogenously applied tBHP and were assessed by 6-carboxy-2', 7' dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA) fluorescence. Normalized DCFDA fluorescence showed a maximal 5.1-fold increase; the half-maximal effect (EC50) for tBHP was 212 ± 25

  13. Assessing the model transferability for prediction of transcription factor binding sites based on chromatin accessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sheng; Zibetti, Cristina; Wan, Jun; Wang, Guohua; Blackshaw, Seth; Qian, Jiang

    2017-07-27

    Computational prediction of transcription factor (TF) binding sites in different cell types is challenging. Recent technology development allows us to determine the genome-wide chromatin accessibility in various cellular and developmental contexts. The chromatin accessibility profiles provide useful information in prediction of TF binding events in various physiological conditions. Furthermore, ChIP-Seq analysis was used to determine genome-wide binding sites for a range of different TFs in multiple cell types. Integration of these two types of genomic information can improve the prediction of TF binding events. We assessed to what extent a model built upon on other TFs and/or other cell types could be used to predict the binding sites of TFs of interest. A random forest model was built using a set of cell type-independent features such as specific sequences recognized by the TFs and evolutionary conservation, as well as cell type-specific features derived from chromatin accessibility data. Our analysis suggested that the models learned from other TFs and/or cell lines performed almost as well as the model learned from the target TF in the cell type of interest. Interestingly, models based on multiple TFs performed better than single-TF models. Finally, we proposed a universal model, BPAC, which was generated using ChIP-Seq data from multiple TFs in various cell types. Integrating chromatin accessibility information with sequence information improves prediction of TF binding.The prediction of TF binding is transferable across TFs and/or cell lines suggesting there are a set of universal "rules". A computational tool was developed to predict TF binding sites based on the universal "rules".

  14. Optimization of gold nanoparticle-based real-time colorimetric assay of dipeptidyl peptidase IV activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldewachi, Hasan Saad; Woodroofe, Nicola; Turega, Simon; Gardiner, Philip H E

    2017-07-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV also referred to as CD-26) is a serine protease enzyme with remarkable diagnostic and prognostic value in a variety of health and disease conditions. Herein, we describe a simple and real-time colorimetric assay for DPP-IV/CD-26 activity based on the aggregation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) functionalized with the peptide substrates: Gly-Pro-Asp-Cys (GPDC) or Val-Pro-ethylene diamine-Asp-Cys (VP-ED-DC). Cleavage of the substrates by DPP-IV resulted in aggregation of the AuNPs with accompanying color change in the solution from red to blue that was monitored using either a UV-visible spectrophotometer or by the naked eye. Factors, such as time course of the reaction, stability of the functionalized AuNPs and the structure of the substrate that influence the cleavage reaction in solution were investigated. The effects of potential interference from serum proteins (lysozyme, thrombin and trypsin) on the analytical response were negligible. The detection limits when GPDC or VP-EN-DC functionalized AuNPs were used for DPP-IV assay were 1.2U/L and 1.5U/L, respectively. The VP-EN-DC method was preferred for the quantitative determination of DPP-IV activity in serum because of its wide linear range 0-30U/L compared to 0-12U/L for the GPDC assay. Recoveries from serum samples spiked with DPP-IV activity, between 5 and 25U/L, and using the VP-EN-DC modified AuNPs method ranged between 83.6% and 114.9%. The two colorimetric biosensors described here are superior to other conventional methods because of their simplicity, stability, selectivity and reliability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Fluorine nuclear magnetic resonance-based assay in living mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronesi, Marina; Giacomina, Francesca; Romeo, Elisa; Castellani, Beatrice; Ottonello, Giuliana; Lambruschini, Chiara; Garau, Gianpiero; Scarpelli, Rita; Bandiera, Tiziano; Piomelli, Daniele; Dalvit, Claudio

    2016-02-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based screening has been recognized as a powerful approach for the identification and characterization of molecules interacting with pharmaceutical targets. Indeed, several NMR methods have been developed and successfully applied to many drug discovery projects. Whereas most of these approaches have targeted isolated biomolecular receptors, very few cases are reported with the screening performed in intact cells and cell extracts. Here we report the first successful application of the fluorine NMR-based assay n-FABS (n-fluorine atoms for biochemical screening) in living mammalian cells expressing the membrane protein fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). This method allows the identification of both weak and potent inhibitors and the measurement of their potency in a physiological environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The use of virtual laboratories and other web-based tools in a drug assay course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Marissa Waldman; Ghirtis, Konstantine; Beleh, Mustapha

    2012-06-18

    To determine students' perceptions of and performance in a drug assay laboratory course after the addition of Web-based multimedia tools. Video modules and other Web-based tools to deliver instructions and emulate the laboratory set up for experiments were implemented in 2005 to improve student preparation for laboratory sessions and eliminate the need for graduate students to present instructions live. Data gathered from quizzes, final examinations, and post-course surveys administered over 6 years were analyzed. Students' scores on online quizzes after implementation of the virtual laboratories reflected improved student understanding and preparation. Students' perception of the course improved significantly after the introduction of the tools and the new teaching model. Implementation of an active-learning model in a laboratory course led to improvement in students' educational experience and satisfaction. Additional benefits included improved resource use, student exposure to a variety of educational methods, and having a highly structured laboratory format that reduced inconsistencies in delivered instructions.

  17. A murine monoclonal antibody based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for almond (Prunus dulcis L.) detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Mengna; Venkatachalam, Mahesh; Liu, Changqi; Zhang, Ying; Roux, Kenneth H; Sathe, Shridhar K

    2013-11-13

    A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using anti-almond soluble protein rabbit polyclonal antibodies as capture antibodies and murine monoclonal antibody 4C10 as the detection antibodies was developed. The assay is specific and sensitive (3-200 ng almond protein/mL) for almond detection. The standardized assay is accurate (<15% CV) and reproducible (intra- and inter assay variability <15% CV). The assay did not register any cross-reactivity with the tested food matrices, suggesting the assay to be almond amandin specific. The assay could detect the presence of declared almond in the tested matched commercial samples. Further, the assay reliably detected the presence of almonds in the laboratory prepared food samples spiked with almond flour.

  18. Parallel force assay for protein-protein interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Aschenbrenner

    Full Text Available Quantitative proteome research is greatly promoted by high-resolution parallel format assays. A characterization of protein complexes based on binding forces offers an unparalleled dynamic range and allows for the effective discrimination of non-specific interactions. Here we present a DNA-based Molecular Force Assay to quantify protein-protein interactions, namely the bond between different variants of GFP and GFP-binding nanobodies. We present different strategies to adjust the maximum sensitivity window of the assay by influencing the binding strength of the DNA reference duplexes. The binding of the nanobody Enhancer to the different GFP constructs is compared at high sensitivity of the assay. Whereas the binding strength to wild type and enhanced GFP are equal within experimental error, stronger binding to superfolder GFP is observed. This difference in binding strength is attributed to alterations in the amino acids that form contacts according to the crystal structure of the initial wild type GFP-Enhancer complex. Moreover, we outline the potential for large-scale parallelization of the assay.

  19. Design and synthesis of ATP-based nucleotide analogues and profiling of nucleotide-binding proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, Justina. C.; Roelfes, Gerard; Poolman, Bert

    Two nucleotide-based probes were designed and synthesized in order to enrich samples for specific classes of proteins by affinity-based protein profiling. We focused on the profiling of adenine nucleotide-binding proteins. Two properties were considered in the design of the probes: the bait needs to

  20. Ternary copper(II) complexes with amino acid chains and heterocyclic bases: DNA binding, cytotoxic and cell apoptosis induction properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tieliang; Xu, Jun; Wang, Yuan; Yu, Hao; Yang, Yong; Liu, Yang; Ding, Weiliang; Zhu, Wenjiao; Chen, Ruhua; Ge, Zhijun; Tan, Yongfei; Jia, Lei; Zhu, Taofeng

    2015-03-01

    Nowadays, chemotherapy is a common means of oncology. However, it is difficult to find excellent chemotherapy drugs. Here we reported three new ternary copper(II) complexes which have potential chemotherapy characteristics with reduced Schiff base ligand and heterocyclic bases (TBHP), [Cu(phen)(TBHP)]H2O (1), [Cu(dpz)(TBHP)]H2O (2) and [Cu(dppz)(TBHP)]H2O (3) (phen=1,10-phenanthroline, dpz=dipyrido [3,2:2',3'-f]quinoxaline, dppz=dipyrido [3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine, H2TBHP=2-(3,5-di-tert-butyl-2-hydroxybenzylamino)-2-benzyl-acetic acid). The DNA-binding properties of the complexes were investigated by spectrometric titrations, ethidium bromide displacement experiments and viscosity measurements. The results indicated that the three complexes, especially the complex 13, can strongly bind to calf-thymus DNA (CT-DNA). The intrinsic binding constants Kb of the ternary copper(II) complexes with CT-DNA were 1.37×10(5), 1.81×10(5) and 3.21×10(5) for 1, 2 and 3 respectively. Comparative cytotoxic activities of the copper(II) complexes were also determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The results showed that the ternary copper(II) complexes had significant cytotoxic activity against the human lung cancer (A549), human esophageal cancer (Eca109) and human gastric cancer (SGC7901) cell lines. Cell apoptosis were detected by AnnexinV/PI flow cytometry and by Western blotting with the protein expression of p53, Bax and Bcl-2. All the three copper complexes can effectively induce apoptosis of the three human tumor cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A facile molecularly imprinted polymer-based fluorometric assay for detection of histamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Xiaotong; Ashley, Jon; Zhou, Tongchang

    2018-01-01

    in the wells of a microplate to bind the histamine in aqueous samples. After binding, o-phthaldialdehyde (OPA) was used to label the bound histamine, which converted the binding events into fluorescent signals. The obtained calibration curve of histamine showed a linear correlation ranging from 1.80 to 44.98 m...

  2. Rapid and quantitative detection of C-reactive protein based on quantum dots and immunofiltration assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang PF

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pengfei Zhang,1,* Yan Bao,1,* Mohamed Shehata Draz,2,3,* Huiqi Lu,1 Chang Liu,1 Huanxing Han11Center for Translational Medicine, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2Zhejiang-California International Nanosystems Institute, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China; 3Faculty of Science, Tanta University, Tanta, Egypt*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Convenient and rapid immunofiltration assays (IFAs enable on-site “yes” or “no” determination of disease markers. However, traditional IFAs are commonly qualitative or semi-quantitative and are very limited for the efficient testing of samples in field diagnostics. Here, we overcome these limitations by developing a quantum dots (QDs-based fluorescent IFA for the quantitative detection of C-reactive proteins (CRP. CRP, the well-known diagnostic marker for acute viral and bacterial infections, was used as a model analyte to demonstrate performance and sensitivity of our developed QDs-based IFA. QDs capped with both polyethylene glycol (PEG and glutathione were used as fluorescent labels for our IFAs. The presence of the surface PEG layer, which reduced the non-specific protein interactions, in conjunction with the inherent optical properties of QDs, resulted in lower background signal, increased sensitivity, and ability to detect CRP down to 0.79 mg/L with only 5 µL serum sample. In addition, the developed assay is simple, fast and can quantitatively detect CRP with a detection limit up to 200 mg/L. Clinical test results of our QD-based IFA are well correlated with the traditional latex enhance immune-agglutination aggregation. The proposed QD-based fluorescent IFA is very promising, and potentially will be adopted for multiplexed immunoassay and in field point-of-care test.Keywords: C-reactive proteins, point-of-care test, Glutathione capped QDs, PEGylation

  3. Mass Spectrometry-based Assay for High Throughput and High Sensitivity Biomarker Verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Xuejiang; Tang, Keqi

    2017-06-14

    Searching for disease specific biomarkers has become a major undertaking in the biomedical research field as the effective diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of many complex human diseases are largely determined by the availability and the quality of the biomarkers. A successful biomarker as an indicator to a specific biological or pathological process is usually selected from a large group of candidates by a strict verification and validation process. To be clinically useful, the validated biomarkers must be detectable and quantifiable by the selected testing techniques in their related tissues or body fluids. Due to its easy accessibility, protein biomarkers would ideally be identified in blood plasma or serum. However, most disease related protein biomarkers in blood exist at very low concentrations (<1ng/mL) and are “masked” by many none significant species at orders of magnitude higher concentrations. The extreme requirements of measurement sensitivity, dynamic range and specificity make the method development extremely challenging. The current clinical protein biomarker measurement primarily relies on antibody based immunoassays, such as ELISA. Although the technique is sensitive and highly specific, the development of high quality protein antibody is both expensive and time consuming. The limited capability of assay multiplexing also makes the measurement an extremely low throughput one rendering it impractical when hundreds to thousands potential biomarkers need to be quantitatively measured across multiple samples. Mass spectrometry (MS)-based assays have recently shown to be a viable alternative for high throughput and quantitative candidate protein biomarker verification. Among them, the triple quadrupole MS based assay is the most promising one. When it is coupled with liquid chromatography (LC) separation and electrospray ionization (ESI) source, a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer operating in a special selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode

  4. Total protein measurement in canine cerebrospinal fluid: agreement between a turbidimetric assay and 2 dye-binding methods and determination of reference intervals using an indirect a posteriori method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riond, B; Steffen, F; Schmied, O; Hofmann-Lehmann, R; Lutz, H

    2014-03-01

    In veterinary clinical laboratories, qualitative tests for total protein measurement in canine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) have been replaced by quantitative methods, which can be divided into dye-binding assays and turbidimetric methods. There is a lack of validation data and reference intervals (RIs) for these assays. The aim of the present study was to assess agreement between the turbidimetric benzethonium chloride method and 2 dye-binding methods (Pyrogallol Red-Molybdate method [PRM], Coomassie Brilliant Blue [CBB] technique) for measurement of total protein concentration in canine CSF. Furthermore, RIs were determined for all 3 methods using an indirect a posteriori method. For assay comparison, a total of 118 canine CSF specimens were analyzed. For RIs calculation, clinical records of 401 canine patients with normal CSF analysis were studied and classified according to their final diagnosis in pathologic and nonpathologic values. The turbidimetric assay showed excellent agreement with the PRM assay (mean bias 0.003 g/L [-0.26-0.27]). The CBB method generally showed higher total protein values than the turbidimetric assay and the PRM assay (mean bias -0.14 g/L for turbidimetric and PRM assay). From 90 of 401 canine patients, nonparametric reference intervals (2.5%, 97.5% quantile) were calculated (turbidimetric assay and PRM method: 0.08-0.35 g/L (90% CI: 0.07-0.08/0.33-0.39); CBB method: 0.17-0.55 g/L (90% CI: 0.16-0.18/0.52-0.61). Total protein concentration in canine CSF specimens remained stable for up to 6 months of storage at -80°C. Due to variations among methods, RIs for total protein concentration in canine CSF have to be calculated for each method. The a posteriori method of RIs calculation described here should encourage other veterinary laboratories to establish RIs that are laboratory-specific. ©2014 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology and European Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  5. Development of liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry based screening assay for PfTrxR inhibitors using relative quantitation of intact thioredoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munigunti, Ranjith; Calderón, Angela I

    2012-09-15

    Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) catalyzes the reduction of thioredoxin disulfide (Trx-S(2)) to thioredoxin dithiol (Trx-(SH)(2)) that is essential for antioxidant defense mechanism and DNA synthesis in the parasite and is a validated drug target for new antimalarial agents. In this study, we have developed a liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS)-based functional assay to identify inhibitors of PfTrxR by quantifying the product formed (Trx-(SH)(2)) in the enzymatic reaction. Relative quantitation of the reaction product (intact Trx-(SH)(2)) was carried out using an Agilent 6520 QTOF mass spectrometer equipped with a positive mode electrospray ionization (ESI) source. The calibration curve prepared for Trx-(SH)(2) at concentrations ranging from 1.8 to 116.5 µg/mL was linear (R(2) >0.998). The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) of Trx-(SH)(2) were at 0.45 and 1.8 µg/mL respectively. To validate the developed functional assay we have screened reference compounds 1, 2 and 3 for their PfTrxR inhibitory activity and ten natural compounds (at 10 μM) which were earlier identified as ligands of PfTrxR by a UF-LC/MS based binding assay. The developed LC/MS-based functional assay for identification of inhibitors of PfTrxR is a sensitive and reliable method that is also amendable for high-throughput format. This is the first representation of a relative quantitation of intact Trx-(SH)(2) using LC/MS. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. A fluorescence polarization based screening assay for identification of small molecule inhibitors of the PICK1 PDZ domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Thor S; Madsen, Kenneth L; Dyhring, Tino

    2011-01-01

    domain in PICK1 (protein interacting with C kinase 1). We screened 43,380 compounds for their ability to inhibit binding of an Oregon Green labeled C-terminal dopamine transporter peptide (OrG-DAT C13) to purified PICK1 in solution. The assay was highly reliable with excellent screening assay parameters...... (Z'˜0.7 and Z˜0.6). Out of ~200 compounds that reduced FP to less than 80% of the control wells, six compounds were further characterized. The apparent affinities of the compounds were determined in FP competition binding experiments and ranged from ~5.0 µM to ~193 µM. Binding to the PICK1 PDZ domain...... to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments capable of inhibiting the interaction between the C-terminus of the GluR2 subunit of the AMPA-type glutamate receptor and PICK1 in live cells. Additional experiments suggested that CSC-03 most likely is an irreversible inhibitor but with specificity...

  7. Planar optical waveguide based sandwich assay sensors and processes for the detection of biological targets including early detection of cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Jennifer S [Santa Fe, NM; Swanson, Basil I [Los Alamos, NM; Shively, John E [Arcadia, CA; Li, Lin [Monrovia, CA

    2009-06-02

    An assay element is described including recognition ligands adapted for binding to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) bound to a film on a single mode planar optical waveguide, the film from the group of a membrane, a polymerized bilayer membrane, and a self-assembled monolayer containing polyethylene glycol or polypropylene glycol groups therein and an assay process for detecting the presence of CEA is described including injecting a possible CEA-containing sample into a sensor cell including the assay element, maintaining the sample within the sensor cell for time sufficient for binding to occur between CEA present within the sample and the recognition ligands, injecting a solution including a reporter ligand into the sensor cell; and, interrogating the sample within the sensor cell with excitation light from the waveguide, the excitation light provided by an evanescent field of the single mode penetrating into the biological target-containing sample to a distance of less than about 200 nanometers from the waveguide thereby exciting any bound reporter ligand within a distance of less than about 200 nanometers from the waveguide and resulting in a detectable signal.

  8. CLSI-based transference and verification of CALIPER pediatric reference intervals for 29 Ortho VITROS 5600 chemistry assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Victoria; Truong, Dorothy; Woroch, Amy; Chan, Man Khun; Tahmasebi, Houman; Adeli, Khosrow

    2018-03-01

    Evidence-based reference intervals (RIs) are essential to accurately interpret pediatric laboratory test results. To fill gaps in pediatric RIs, the Canadian Laboratory Initiative on Pediatric Reference Intervals (CALIPER) project developed an age- and sex-specific pediatric RI database based on healthy pediatric subjects. Originally established for Abbott ARCHITECT assays, CALIPER RIs were transferred to assays on Beckman, Roche, Siemens, and Ortho analytical platforms. This study provides transferred reference intervals for 29 biochemical assays for the Ortho VITROS 5600 Chemistry System (Ortho). Based on Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines, a method comparison analysis was performed by measuring approximately 200 patient serum samples using Abbott and Ortho assays. The equation of the line of best fit was calculated and the appropriateness of the linear model was assessed. This equation was used to transfer RIs from Abbott to Ortho assays. Transferred RIs were verified using 84 healthy pediatric serum samples from the CALIPER cohort. RIs for most chemistry analytes successfully transferred from Abbott to Ortho assays. Calcium and CO 2 did not meet statistical criteria for transference (r 2 CALIPER pediatric RI database to laboratories using Ortho VITROS 5600 biochemical assays. Clinical laboratories should verify CALIPER reference intervals for their specific analytical platform and local population as recommended by CLSI. Copyright © 2018 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Development of a Cell-Based Functional Assay for the Detection of Clostridium botulinum Neurotoxin Types A and E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Basavanna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The standard procedure for definitive detection of BoNT-producing Clostridia is a culture method combined with neurotoxin detection using a standard mouse bioassay (MBA. The mouse bioassay is highly sensitive and specific, but it is expensive and time-consuming, and there are ethical concerns due to use of laboratory animals. Cell-based assays provide an alternative to the MBA in screening for BoNT-producing Clostridia. Here, we describe a cell-based assay utilizing a fluorescence reporter construct expressed in a neuronal cell model to study toxin activity in situ. Our data indicates that the assay can detect as little as 100 pM BoNT/A activity within living cells, and the assay is currently being evaluated for the analysis of BoNT in food matrices. Among available in vitro assays, we believe that cell-based assays are widely applicable in high-throughput screenings and have the potential to at least reduce and refine animal assays if not replace it.

  10. Intra-laboratory validation of a human cell based in vitro angiogenesis assay for testing angiogenesis modulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jertta-Riina Sarkanen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The developed standardized human cell based in vitro angiogenesis assay was intra-laboratory validated to verify that the method is reliable and relevant for routine testing of modulators of angiogenesis e.g. pharmaceuticals and industrial chemicals. This assay is based on the earlier published method but it was improved and shown to be more sensitive and rapid than the previous assay. The performance of the assay was assessed by using 6 reference chemicals, which are widely used pharmaceuticals that inhibit angiogenesis: acetyl salicylic acid, erlotinib, 2-methoxyestradiol, levamisole, thalidomide, and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor. In the intra-laboratory validation, the sensitivity of the assay (upper and lower limits of detection and linearity of response in tubule formation, batch to batch variation in tubule formation between different Master cell bank batches, and precision as well as the reliability of the assay (reproducibility and repeatability were tested. The pre-set acceptance criteria for the intra-laboratory validation study were met. The relevance of the assay in man was investigated by comparing the effects of reference chemicals and their concentrations to the published human data. The comparison showed a good concordance, which indicates that this human cell based angiogenesis model predicts well the effects in man and has the potential to be used to supplement and/or replace of animal tests.

  11. A High-resolution Typing Assay for Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Based on Fimbrial Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yi; Palusiak, Agata; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yi; Li, Xiao; Wei, Huiting; Kong, Qingke; Rozalski, Antoni; Yao, Zhi; Wang, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common bacterial infections in humans, causing cystitis, pyelonephritis, and renal failure. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the leading cause of UTIs. Accurate and rapid discrimination of UPEC lineages is useful for epidemiological surveillance. Fimbriae are necessary for the adherence of UPEC strains to host uroepithelia, and seem to be abundant and diverse in UPEC strains. By analyzing all the possible fimbrial operons in UPEC strains, we found that closely related strains had similar types of chaperone-usher fimbriae, and the diversity of fimbrial genes was higher than that of multilocus sequence typing (MLST) genes. A typing assay based on the polymorphism of four gene sequences (three fimbrial genes and one housekeeping gene) and the diversity of fimbriae present was developed. By comparison with the MLST, whole-genome sequence (WGS) and fumC/fimH typing methods, this was shown to be accurate and have high resolution, and it was also relatively inexpensive and easy to perform. The assay can supply more discriminatory information for UPEC lineages, and have the potential to be applied in epidemiological surveillance of UPEC isolates.

  12. Enzyme assay for identification of pectin and pectin derivatives, based on recombinant pectate lyase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, K M; Truesen, A B; Søderberg, J R

    2001-01-01

    A simple method was developed for fast identification of pectin, based on a recombinant endopectate lyase cloned from Aspergillus niger. When pectin was demethylated and treated with pectate lyase, beta-elimination occurred, resulting in a double bond between C-4 and C-5 in the galacturonic acid residue of the released nonreducing end. The formation of double bonds produced an increase in light absorption, which was detected at 235 nm. The assay was tested on pectin of different origins (apple, orange, sugar beet, sunflower, celery, lemon), pectin derivatives (amidated pectin), and speciality types such as low molecular weight and low %DE (degree of esterification, percentage of galacturonic acid groups esterified with methanol) pectin. The highest response was given by pectate (pectin with %DEgums (carboxymethylcellulose, carrageenan, locust bean gum, tragacanth, gellan, tamarind, xanthan, amylogum, sodium alginate, or agar) gave any response. Members of IPPA (International Pectin Producers Association) have evaluated the validity of the assay in a ring test. All members of the Association were able to identify pectin from other gums in a blind test. The method can replace more laborious and ambiguous identification tests which exist today.

  13. Identification of adiponectin receptor agonist utilizing a fluorescence polarization based high throughput assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiyi Sun

    Full Text Available Adiponectin, the adipose-derived hormone, plays an important role in the suppression of metabolic disorders that can result in type 2 diabetes, obesity, and atherosclerosis. It has been shown that up-regulation of adiponectin or adiponectin receptor has a number of therapeutic benefits. Given that it is hard to convert the full size adiponectin protein into a viable drug, adiponectin receptor agonists could be designed or identified using high-throughput screening. Here, we report on the development of a two-step screening process to identify adiponectin agonists. First step, we developed a high throughput screening assay based on fluorescence polarization to identify adiponectin ligands. The fluorescence polarization assay reported here could be adapted to screening against larger small molecular compound libraries. A natural product library containing 10,000 compounds was screened and 9 hits were selected for validation. These compounds have been taken for the second-step in vitro tests to confirm their agonistic activity. The most active adiponectin receptor 1 agonists are matairesinol, arctiin, (--arctigenin and gramine. The most active adiponectin receptor 2 agonists are parthenolide, taxifoliol, deoxyschizandrin, and syringin. These compounds may be useful drug candidates for hypoadiponectin related diseases.

  14. Novel cell-based assay for detection of thyroid receptor beta-interacting environmental contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavreva, Diana A.; Varticovski, Lyuba; Levkova, Ludmila; George, Anuja A.; Davis, Luke; Pegoraro, Gianluca; Blazer, Vicki; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Hager, Gordon L.

    2016-01-01

    Even though the presence of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) with thyroid hormone (TH)-like activities in the environment is a major health concern, the methods for their efficient detection and monitoring are still limited. Here we describe a novel cell assay, based on the translocation of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)—tagged chimeric molecule of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and the thyroid receptor beta (TRβ) from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in the presence of TR ligands. Unlike the constitutively nuclear TRβ, this GFP-GR-TRβ chimera is cytoplasmic in the absence of hormone while translocating to the nucleus in a time- and concentration-dependent manner upon stimulation with triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroid hormone analogue, TRIAC, while the reverse triiodothyronine (3,3′,5′-triiodothyronine, or rT3) was inactive. Moreover, GFP-GR-TRβ chimera does not show any cross-reactivity with the GR-activating hormones, thus providing a clean system for the screening of TR beta-interacting EDCs. Using this assay, we demonstrated that Bisphenol A (BPA) and 3,3′,5,5′-Tetrabromobisphenol (TBBPA) induced GFP-GR-TRβ translocation at micro molar concentrations. We screened over 100 concentrated water samples from different geographic locations in the United States and detected a low, but reproducible contamination in 53% of the samples. This system provides a novel high-throughput approach for screening for endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) interacting with TR beta.

  15. A thallium transport FLIPR-based assay for the identification of KCC2-positive modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Di; Gopalakrishnan, Sujatha M; Freiberg, Gail; Surowy, Carol S

    2010-02-01

    KCC2, potassium chloride cotransporter 2, is expressed exclusively in the CNS (on inhibitory neurons) and plays a major role in maintaining appropriately low intracellular chloride levels that ensure inhibitory actions of GABA(A) and glycine receptors. As such, it plays a pivotal role in inhibitory mechanisms that control neuronal excitation in the CNS. KCC2 downregulation has been implicated in various excitatory disorders, such as epilepsy and neuropathic pain. Positive modulators of KCC2 expression or activity may thus provide effective therapy for these disorders. However, the identification of such agents is hindered by the lack of a high-throughput screening method. Here the authors report the development of a fluorescence-based thallium (Tl(+)) transport assay using a Fluorometric Imaging Plate Reader (FLIPR), in which KCC2 activity is assessed by measuring the initial rate of KCC2-mediated Tl(+) transport/influx. The authors demonstrate Tl(+)/Cl(-) cotransport by KCC2, which exhibits a high apparent affinity for Tl(+) and dependency on the presence of the Cl(-) ion. Pharmacological studies revealed anticipated effects and potencies of known KCC-positive (NEM, staurosporine) and KCC-negative (DIOA, furosemide) modulators. The authors demonstrate that the assay is robust and reproducible and can be employed in high-throughput screening for positive modulators of KCC2 as potential therapeutic agents.

  16. Aquaporin-4 autoantibodies in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders: comparison between tissue-based and cell-based indirect immunofluorescence assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Koon H

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD are severe central nervous system inflammatory demyelinating disorders (CNS IDD characterized by monophasic or relapsing, longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM and/or optic neuritis (ON. A significant proportion of NMOSD patients are seropositive for aquaporin-4 (AQP4 autoantibodies. We compared the AQP4 autoantibody detection rates of tissue-based indirect immunofluorescence assay (IIFA and cell-based IIFA. Methods Serum of Chinese CNS IDD patients were assayed for AQP4 autoantibodies by tissue-based IIFA using monkey cerebellum and cell-based IIFA using transfected HEK293 cells which express human AQP4 on their cell membranes. Results In total, 128 CNS IDD patients were studied. We found that 78% of NMO patients were seropositive for AQP4 autoantibodies by cell-based IIFA versus 61% by tissue-based IFA (p = 0.250, 75% of patients having relapsing myelitis (RM with LETM were seropositive by cell-based IIFA versus 50% by tissue-based IIFA (p = 0.250, and 33% of relapsing ON patients were seropositive by cell-based IIFA versus 22% by tissue-based IIFA (p = 1.000; however the differences were not statistically significant. All patients seropositive by tissue-based IIFA were also seropositive for AQP4 autoantibodies by cell-based IIFA. Among 29 NMOSD patients seropositive for AQP4 autoantibodies by cell-based IIFA, 20 (69% were seropositive by tissue-based IIFA. The 9 patients seropositive by cell-based IIFA while seronegative by tissue-based IIFA had NMO (3, RM with LETM (3, a single attack of LETM (1, relapsing ON (1 and a single ON attack (1. Among 23 NMO or RM patients seropositive for AQP4 autoantibodies by cell-based IIFA, comparison between those seropositive (n = 17 and seronegative (n = 6 by tissue-based IIFA revealed no differences in clinical and neuroradiological characteristics between the two groups. Conclusion Cell-based IIFA is slightly more sensitive

  17. Quantum dot-based molecular imaging of cancer cell growth using a clone formation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xia-Fei; Fang, Min; Liu, Shao-Ping; Li, Yan

    2016-10-01

    This aim of the present study was to investigate clonal growth behavior and analyze the proliferation characteristics of cancer cells. The MCF‑7 human breast cancer cell line, SW480 human colon cancer cell line and SGC7901 human gastric cancer cell line were selected to investigate the morphology of cell clones. Quantum dot‑based molecular targeted imaging techniques (which stained pan‑cytokeratin in the cytoplasm green and Ki67 in the cell nucleus yellow or red) were used to investigate the clone formation rate, cell morphology, discrete tendency, and Ki67 expression and distribution in clones. From the cell clone formation assay, the MCF‑7, SW480 and SGC7901 cells were observed to form clones on days 6, 8 and 12 of cell culture, respectively. These three types of cells had heterogeneous morphology, large nuclear:cytoplasmic ratios, and conspicuous pathological mitotic features. The cells at the clone periphery formed multiple pseudopodium. In certain clones, cancer cells at the borderline were separated from the central cell clusters or presented a discrete tendency. With quantum dot‑based molecular targeted imaging techniques, cells with strong Ki67 expression were predominantly shown to be distributed at the clone periphery, or concentrated on one side of the clones. In conclusion, cancer cell clones showed asymmetric growth behavior, and Ki67 was widely expressed in clones of these three cell lines, with strong expression around the clones, or aggregated at one side. Cell clone formation assay based on quantum dots molecular imaging offered a novel method to study the proliferative features of cancer cells, thus providing a further insight into tumor biology.

  18. Prediction of peptide binding to a major histocompatibility complex class I molecule based on docking simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Takeshi

    2016-10-01

    Binding between major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and immunogenic epitopes is one of the most important processes for cell-mediated immunity. Consequently, computational prediction of amino acid sequences of MHC class I binding peptides from a given sequence may lead to important biomedical advances. In this study, an efficient structure-based method for predicting peptide binding to MHC class I molecules was developed, in which the binding free energy of the peptide was evaluated by two individual docking simulations. An original penalty function and restriction of degrees of freedom were determined by analysis of 361 published X-ray structures of the complex and were then introduced into the docking simulations. To validate the method, calculations using a 50-amino acid sequence as a prediction target were performed. In 27 calculations, the binding free energy of the known peptide was within the top 5 of 166 peptides generated from the 50-amino acid sequence. Finally, demonstrative calculations using a whole sequence of a protein as a prediction target were performed. These data clearly demonstrate high potential of this method for predicting peptide binding to MHC class I molecules.

  19. Investigation of parameters that affect the success rate of microarray-based allele-specific hybridization assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Poulsen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The development of microarray-based genetic tests for diseases that are caused by known mutations is becoming increasingly important. The key obstacle to developing functional genotyping assays is that such mutations need to be genotyped regardless of their location in genomic regions. These regions include large variations in G+C content, and structural features like hairpins. METHODS/FINDINGS: We describe a rational, stable method for screening and combining assay conditions for the genetic analysis of 42 Phenylketonuria-associated mutations in the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene. The mutations are located in regions with large variations in G+C content (20-75%. Custom-made microarrays with different lengths of complementary probe sequences and spacers were hybridized with pooled PCR products of 12 exons from each of 38 individual patient DNA samples. The arrays were washed with eight buffers with different stringencies in a custom-made microfluidic system. The data were used to assess which parameters play significant roles in assay development. CONCLUSIONS: Several assay development methods found suitable probes and assay conditions for a functional test for all investigated mutation sites. Probe length, probe spacer length, and assay stringency sufficed as variable parameters in the search for a functional multiplex assay. We discuss the optimal assay development methods for several different scenarios.

  20. A DNA Microarray-Based Assay to Detect Dual Infection with Two Dengue Virus Serotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Badillo, Alvaro; de Lourdes Muñoz, María; Perez-Ramirez, Gerardo; Altuzar, Victor; Burgueño, Juan; Mendoza-Alvarez, Julio G.; Martínez-Muñoz, Jorge P.; Cisneros, Alejandro; Navarrete-Espinosa, Joel; Sanchez-Sinencio, Feliciano

    2014-01-01

    Here; we have described and tested a microarray based-method for the screening of dengue virus (DENV) serotypes. This DNA microarray assay is specific and sensitive and can detect dual infections with two dengue virus serotypes and single-serotype infections. Other methodologies may underestimate samples containing more than one serotype. This technology can be used to discriminate between the four DENV serotypes. Single-stranded DNA targets were covalently attached to glass slides and hybridised with specific labelled probes. DENV isolates and dengue samples were used to evaluate microarray performance. Our results demonstrate that the probes hybridized specifically to DENV serotypes; with no detection of unspecific signals. This finding provides evidence that specific probes can effectively identify single and double infections in DENV samples. PMID:24776933

  1. A DNA Microarray-Based Assay to Detect Dual Infection with Two Dengue Virus Serotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Díaz-Badillo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Here; we have described and tested a microarray based-method for the screening of dengue virus (DENV serotypes. This DNA microarray assay is specific and sensitive and can detect dual infections with two dengue virus serotypes and single-serotype infections. Other methodologies may underestimate samples containing more than one serotype. This technology can be used to discriminate between the four DENV serotypes. Single-stranded DNA targets were covalently attached to glass slides and hybridised with specific labelled probes. DENV isolates and dengue samples were used to evaluate microarray performance. Our results demonstrate that the probes hybridized specifically to DENV serotypes; with no detection of unspecific signals. This finding provides evidence that specific probes can effectively identify single and double infections in DENV samples.

  2. Assay based on electrical impedance spectroscopy to discriminate between normal and cancerous mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giana, Fabián Eduardo; Bonetto, Fabián José; Bellotti, Mariela Inés

    2018-03-01

    In this work we present an assay to discriminate between normal and cancerous cells. The method is based on the measurement of electrical impedance spectra of in vitro cell cultures. We developed a protocol consisting on four consecutive measurement phases, each of them designed to obtain different information about the cell cultures. Through the analysis of the measured data, 26 characteristic features were obtained for both cell types. From the complete set of features, we selected the most relevant in terms of their discriminant capacity by means of conventional statistical tests. A linear discriminant analysis was then carried out on the selected features, allowing the classification of the samples in normal or cancerous with 4.5% of false positives and no false negatives.

  3. A single quantum dot-based biosensor for DNA point mutation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wei; Zhu, Guichi; Liang, Li; Zhang, Chun-Yang

    2015-09-07

    Sensitive and selective detection of point mutation is essential to molecular biology research and early clinical diagnosis. Here, we demonstrate a single quantum dot (QD)-based biosensor for DNA point mutation assay. In this assay, a mutant target (G/C) remains unchanged after the endonuclease treatment, and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) may be initiated with the assistance of primers and polymerase, generating a large number of mutant targets. The amplified mutant targets can be captured by biotinylated probes during the process of denaturation and annealing, and Cy5-dGTP may be assembled into the biotinylated probe with the catalysis of polymerase, leading to the formation of Cy5-labeled biotinylated probes. The Cy5-labeled biotinylated probes can be further assembled onto the QD surface to obtain a Cy5-DNA-QD complex, resulting in the generation of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the QD donor and the Cy5 receptor. The mutant targets can be quantitatively evaluated by the measurement of Cy5 counts by total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. While in the presence of wild-type targets (T/A), no Cy5-dGTP can be assembled into the biotinylated probe due to the presence of a mismatch and consequently no FRET is observed. This single QD-based biosensor exhibits high sensitivity with a detection limit of 5.3 aM (or 32 copies) and can even discriminate as low as 0.01% variant frequency from the mixture of mutant targets and wild-type ones. Importantly, this biosensor can be used for genomic analysis in human lung cancer cells, and may be further applied for an early clinical diagnosis and personalized medicine.

  4. [Whole blood leukocyte phagocytosis assay for Candida albicans based on flow cytometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhengxin; Chen, Jing; Wang, Xianling; Zhao, Bohua; Hou, Tianwen

    2015-04-01

    To establish a whole blood leukocyte phagocytosis assay for Candida albicans (C.albicans) based on flow cytometry (FCM). C.albicans of mid-logarithmic growth phase was labeled by fluorescence probe carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFDA-SE), and then added into CD45-PC5 pre-stained human whole blood cells at a 10:1 multiplicity of infection (MOI) in 37DegreesCelsius. The cells were incubated for 10, 30 and 60 minutes. Phagocytosis rate of C.albicans by the CD45 positive cells in the blood was determined by FCM. In yeast extract peptone dextrose medium (YPD) and under the conditions of 37DegreesCelsius and 50 mL/L CO2, the logarithmic growth phase of C.albicans SC5314 was from the 5th to 11th hour. C.albicans were well stained by 10 mmol/L CFDA-SE after 30-minute incubation. After 10-, 30- and 60-minute incubation with SC5314 C.albicans with CD45⁺ cells, the phagocytosis rates measured by FCM were (80.1 ± 6.1)%, (83.8 ± 7.7)% and (92.3 ± 11.2)% for the neutrophils, (11.2 ± 3.6)%, (15.8 ± 4.4)% and (27.7 ± 6.8)% for the monocytes and (0.9 ± 0.3)%, (0.8 ± 0.4)% and (5.2 ± 1.6)% for the lymphocytes. The method for measuring whole blood leukocyte phagocytosis of C.albicans based on FCM is successfully established, and 30 minutes are the proper incubation time for the phagocytosis assay.

  5. Synthesis, characterization and biological assay of Salicylaldehyde Schiff base Cu(II) complexes and their precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftikhar, Bushra; Javed, Kanwal; Khan, Muhammad Saif Ullah; Akhter, Zareen; Mirza, Bushra; Mckee, Vickie

    2018-03-01

    Three new Schiff base ligands were synthesized by the reaction of Salicylaldehyde with semi-aromatic diamines, prepared by the reduction of corresponding dinitro-compounds, and were further used for the formation of complexes with Cu(II) metal ion. The structural features of the synthesized compounds were confirmed by their physical properties and infrared, electronic and NMR spectroscopic techniques. The studies revealed that the synthesized Schiff bases existed as tetradentate ligands and bonded to the metal ion through the phenolic oxygen and azomethine nitrogen. One of the dinitro precursors was also analyzed by single crystal X-ray crystallography, which showed that it crystallizes in monoclinic system with space group P2/n. The thermal behavior of the Cu(II) complexes was determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and kinetic parameters were evaluated from the data. Schiff base ligands, their precursors and metal complexes were also screened for antibacterial, antifungal, antitumor, Brine shrimp lethality, DPPH free radical scavenging and DNA damage assays. The results of these analyses indicated the substantial potential of the synthesized Schiff bases, their precursors and Cu(II) complexes in biological field as future drugs.

  6. Fluorescent ester dye-based assays for the in vitro measurement of Neospora caninum proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Caroline M; Ferreira, Marcela D; Costa, Lourenço F; Barros, Patrício S C; Silva, Murilo V; Santiago, Fernanda M; Mineo, José R; Mineo, Tiago W P

    2014-09-15

    Techniques for the measurement of parasite loads in different experimental models have evolved throughout the years. The quantification of stained slides using regular cytological stains is currently the most common technique. However, this modality of evaluation is labor-intensive, and the interpretation of the results is subjective because the successes of the assays mainly rely on the abilities of the professionals involved. Moreover, the novel genetic manipulation techniques that are commonly applied for closely related Toxoplasma gondii have not yet been developed for Neospora caninum. Thus, we aimed to develop a simple protocol for parasite quantification using pre-stained N. caninum tachyzoites and fluorescent probes based on ester compounds (i.e., CFSE and DDAO). For this purpose, we employed a quantification procedure based on flow cytometry analysis. Pre-stained parasites were also examined with a fluorescent microscope, which revealed that both dyes were detectable. Direct comparison of the numbers of CFSE+ and DDAO+ cells to the values obtained with classical cytology techniques yielded statistically comparable results that also accorded with genomic DNA amplification results. Although the fluorescence emitted by DDAO was more intense and provided better discrimination between the populations of parasitized cells, CFSE+ tachyzoites were detected for several days. In conclusion, this study describes a simple, fast, low-cost and reproducible protocol for N. caninum quantification that is based on parasite pre-staining with fluorescent ester-based probes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Printing silicone-based hydrophobic barriers on paper for microfluidic assays using low-cost ink jet printers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendra, Vinodh; Sicard, Clémence; Brennan, John D; Brook, Michael A

    2014-12-21

    Paper-based microfluidic devices exhibit many advantages for biological assays. Normally, the assays are restricted to certain areas of the paper by hydrophobic barriers comprised of wax or alkyl ketene dimers (AKD). Neither hydrophobic barrier is able to constrain aqueous solutions of surfactants, which are frequently used in biological assays. We demonstrate that rapidly curing silicone resins can be inkjet printed onto pure cellulose paper using inexpensive thermal ink-jet printers. The Piers-Rubinsztajn (PR) reaction dominates the cure chemistry leading to cellulose fibers that are surface coated with a silicone resin. The resulting barriers are able to resist penetration by surfactant solutions and even by the lower surface energy solvents DMF and DMSO. The utility of the barrier was demonstrated using a coliform assay based on detection of β-galactosidase.

  8. Development of a microtiter plate-based assay for the detection of lipase-catalyzed transesterifications in organic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöhnlein, Martin; Finkbeiner, Tim; Syldatk, Christoph; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2015-03-01

    A microtiter plate-based assay was developed to evaluate the ability of lipases to perform transesterifications when employed in different organic solvents. A 4-nitrophenol assay was carried out employing seven different lipase formulations and two fatty acid methyl esters with different chain lengths in a total of six organic solvents with logP values approximately between 1 and -1. This assay delivered results within comparatively short times measured by a color reaction and thus facilitates the choice of an enzyme-solvent combination for the synthesis of glycolipids. To validate the findings, glycolipid syntheses were performed using the same lipase formulation in the same solvents. When comparing the results obtained using the microtiter plate-based assay to the results of the glycolipid syntheses using the same lipases and solvents, matching results were obtained.

  9. Recombinant Protein-Based Assays for Detection of Antibodies to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Spike and Nucleocapsid Proteins▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Lia M.; Miao, Congrong; Harcourt, Jennifer L.; Montgomery, Joel M.; Le, Mai Quynh; Dryga, Sergey A.; Kamrud, Kurt I.; Rivers, Bryan; Babcock, Gregory J.; Oliver, Jennifer Betts; Comer, James A.; Reynolds, Mary; Uyeki, Timothy M.; Bausch, Daniel; Ksiazek, Thomas; Thomas, William; Alterson, Harold; Smith, Jonathan; Ambrosino, Donna M.; Anderson, Larry J.

    2007-01-01

    Recombinant severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) nucleocapsid and spike protein-based immunoglobulin G immunoassays were developed and evaluated. Our assays demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity to the SARS coronavirus in sera collected from patients as late as 2 years postonset of symptoms. These assays will be useful not only for routine SARS coronavirus diagnostics but also for epidemiological and antibody kinetic studies. PMID:17229882

  10. A novel real-time PCR assay for quantitative detection of Campylobacter fetus based on ribosomal sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iraola, Gregorio; Pérez, Ruben; Betancor, Laura; Marandino, Ana; Morsella, Claudia; Méndez, Alejandra; Paolicchi, Fernando; Piccirillo, Alessandra; Tomás, Gonzalo; Velilla, Alejandra; Calleros, Lucía

    2016-12-15

    Campylobacter fetus is a pathogen of major concern for animal and human health. The species shows a great intraspecific variation, with three subspecies: C. fetus subsp. fetus, C. fetus subsp. venerealis, and C. fetus subsp. testudinum. Campylobacter fetus fetus affects a broad range of hosts and induces abortion in sheep and cows. Campylobacter fetus venerealis is restricted to cattle and causes the endemic disease bovine genital campylobacteriosis, which triggers reproductive problems and is responsible for major economic losses. Campylobacter fetus testudinum has been proposed recently based on genetically divergent strains isolated from reptiles and humans. Both C. fetus fetus and C. fetus testudinum are opportunistic pathogens for immune-compromised humans. Biochemical tests remain as the gold standard for identifying C. fetus but the fastidious growing requirements and the lack of reliability and reproducibility of some biochemical tests motivated the development of molecular diagnostic tools. These methods have been successfully tested on bovine isolates but fail to detect some genetically divergent strains isolated from other hosts. The aim of the present study was to develop a highly specific molecular assay to identify and quantify C. fetus strains. We developed a highly sensitive real-time PCR assay that targets a unique region of the 16S rRNA gene. This assay successfully detected all C. fetus strains, including those that were negative for the cstA gene-based assay used as a standard for molecular C. fetus identification. The assay showed high specificity and absence of cross-reactivity with other bacterial species. The analytical testing of the assay was determined using a standard curve. The assay demonstrated a wide dynamic range between 10 2 and 107 genome copies per reaction, and a good reproducibility with small intra- and inter-assay variability. The possibility to characterize samples in a rapid, sensitive and reproducible way makes this assay

  11. Vibrationally resolved UV/Vis spectroscopy with time-dependent density functional based tight binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruger, R.; Niehaus, T.; van Lenthe, E.; Heine, T.; Visscher, L.

    2016-01-01

    We report a time-dependent density functional based tight-binding (TD-DFTB) scheme for the calculation of UV/Vis spectra, explicitly taking into account the excitation of nuclear vibrations via the adiabatic Hessian Franck-Condon method with a harmonic approximation for the nu- clear wavefunction.

  12. Writer's cramp: restoration of striatal D2-binding after successful biofeedback-based sensorimotor training.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, H.J.C.; Werf, S.P. van der; Horstink, C.A.; Cools, A.R.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Horstink, M.W.I.M.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Previous studies of writer's cramp have detected cerebral sensorimotor abnormalities in this disorder and, more specifically, a reduced striatal D2-binding as assessed by [(123)I]IBZM SPECT. However, empirical data were lacking about the influence of effective biofeedback-based

  13. A Fluid Membrane-Based Soluble Ligand Display System for Live CellAssays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Jwa-Min; Nair, Pradeep N.; Neve, Richard M.; Gray, Joe W.; Groves, Jay T.

    2005-10-14

    Cell communication modulates numerous biological processes including proliferation, apoptosis, motility, invasion and differentiation. Correspondingly, there has been significant interest in the development of surface display strategies for the presentation of signaling molecules to living cells. This effort has primarily focused on naturally surface-bound ligands, such as extracellular matrix components and cell membranes. Soluble ligands (e.g. growth factors and cytokines) play an important role in intercellular communications, and their display in a surface-bound format would be of great utility in the design of array-based live cell assays. Recently, several cell microarray systems that display cDNA, RNAi, or small molecules in a surface array format were proven to be useful in accelerating high-throughput functional genetic studies and screening therapeutic agents. These surface display methods provide a flexible platform for the systematic, combinatorial investigation of genes and small molecules affecting cellular processes and phenotypes of interest. In an analogous sense, it would be an important advance if one could display soluble signaling ligands in a surface assay format that allows for systematic, patterned presentation of soluble ligands to live cells. Such a technique would make it possible to examine cellular phenotypes of interest in a parallel format with soluble signaling ligands as one of the display parameters. Herein we report a ligand-modified fluid supported lipid bilayer (SLB) assay system that can be used to functionally display soluble ligands to cells in situ (Figure 1A). By displaying soluble ligands on a SLB surface, both solution behavior (the ability to become locally enriched by reaction-diffusion processes) and solid behavior (the ability to control the spatial location of the ligands in an open system) could be combined. The method reported herein benefits from the naturally fluid state of the supported membrane, which allows

  14. A novel cell-based assay to measure activity of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus nsP2 protease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos-Gomez, Javier; Ahmad, Fahim; Rodriguez, Efrain; Saeed, Mohammad F., E-mail: saeed@southernresearch.org

    2016-09-15

    The encephalitic alphaviruses encode nsP2 protease (nsP2pro), which because of its vital role in virus replication, represents an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. To facilitate the discovery of nsP2 inhibitors we have developed a novel assay for quantitative measurement of nsP2pro activity in a cell-based format. The assay is based on a substrate fusion protein consisting of eGFP and Gaussia luciferase (Gluc) linked together by a small peptide containing a VEEV nsp2pro cleavage sequence. The expression of the substrate protein in cells along with recombinant nsP2pro results in cleavage of the substrate protein resulting in extracellular release of free Gluc. The Gluc activity in supernatants corresponds to intracellular nsP2pro-mediated substrate cleavage; thus, providing a simple and convenient way to quantify nsP2pro activity. Here, we demonstrate potential utility of the assay in identification of nsP2pro inhibitors, as well as in investigations related to molecular characterization of nsP2pro. - Highlights: • A novel cell-based assay to measure VEEV nsP2 protease activity was developed. • Assay utility was demonstrated for antiviral screening. • .The assay also proved to be useful in basic mechanistic studies of nsP2 protease.

  15. An automated smartphone-based diagnostic assay for point-of-care semen analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanakasabapathy, Manoj Kumar; Sadasivam, Magesh; Singh, Anupriya; Preston, Collin; Thirumalaraju, Prudhvi; Venkataraman, Maanasa; Bormann, Charles L.; Draz, Mohamed Shehata; Petrozza, John C.; Shafiee, Hadi

    2017-01-01

    Male infertility affects up to 12% of the world’s male population and is linked to various environmental and medical conditions. Manual microscope-based testing and computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA) are the current standard methods to diagnose male infertility; however, these methods are labor-intensive, expensive, and laboratory-based. Cultural and socially dominated stigma against male infertility testing hinders a large number of men from getting tested for infertility, especially in resource-limited African countries. We describe the development and clinical testing of an automated smartphone-based semen analyzer designed for quantitative measurement of sperm concentration and motility for point-of-care male infertility screening. Using a total of 350 clinical semen specimens at a fertility clinic, we have shown that our assay can analyze an unwashed, unprocessed liquefied semen sample with smartphone capabilities, can make remote semen quality testing accessible to people in both developed and developing countries who have access to smartphones. PMID:28330865

  16. A practical method for extending the biuret assay to protein determination of corn-based products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zelong; Pan, Junhui

    2017-06-01

    A modified biuret method suitable for protein determination of corn-based products was developed by introducing a combination of an alkaline reagent with sodium dodecyl sulfate (reagent A) and heat treatments. The method was tested on seven corn-based samples. The results showed mostly good agreement (P>0.05) as compared to the Kjeldahl values. The proposed method was found to enhance the accuracy of prediction on zein content using bovine serum albumin as standard. Reagent A and sample treatment were proved to effectively improve protein solubilization for the thermally-dried corn-based products, e.g. corn gluten meal. The absorbance was stable for at least 1-h. Moreover, the whole measurement of protein content only needs 15-20min more than the traditional biuret assay, and can be performed in batches. The findings suggest that the proposed method could be a timesaving alternative for routine protein analyses in corn processing factories. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Differentiation of N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2 rapid and intermediate acetylator based on genotype and urinary assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rika Yuliwulandari

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Determination of the acetylator type of NAT2 generally can be predicted based on genotype data from the NAT2 database. However, in some reported studies, it does not show 100 per cent concordance with the phenotype based on urinary assay. The assay generally only differentiates the rapid and slow acetylator but does not consider the intermediate one. Aims We conducted this study to define the phenotype of NAT2 based on both genotyping and urinary assay and to determine the concordance rate between both methods in rapid and intermediate acetylator groups. Methods NAT2 genotyping was done using the PCR-direct sequencing in a total of 30 healthy subjects. However, for the NAT2 phenotypes we only selected 19 healthy subjects that carry rapid or intermediate acetylator genotype, without involving slow acetylator phenotype. The assay was done by measuring the ratios of urinary caffeine metabolites following controlled diet exposure. Results Both data obtained from genotyping and urinary assay showed 2 samples that belonged to the rapid acetylator and 17 samples that belonged to the intermediate acetylator. The mean metabolic ratio of the rapid acetylator group showed a higher level (0.5 than the intermediate group (0.28. The predicted acetylation status of NAT2 SNPs from genotyping was matched with the phenotype which was determined by urinary analysis. Conclusion Our result showed a 100 per cent concordance of NAT2 phenotype based on the genotyping and urinary assay. Based on this study we suggest that NAT2 phenotype based on genotyping method is simpler and faster, rather than using the urinary assay that is more laborious and costly.

  18. Synthesis and structure elucidation of a copper(II) Schiff-base complex: in vitro DNA binding, pBR322 plasmid cleavage and HSA binding studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Sartaj; Ahmad, Musheer; Afzal, Mohd; Zaki, Mehvash; Bharadwaj, Parimal K

    2014-11-01

    New copper(II) complex with Schiff base ligand 4-[(2-Hydroxy-3-methoxy-benzylidene)-amino]-benzoic acid (H₂L) was synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic and analytical and single crystal X-ray diffraction studies which revealed that the complex 1 exist in a distorted octahedral environment. In vitro CT-DNA binding studies were performed by employing different biophysical technique which indicated that the 1 strongly binds to DNA in comparison to ligand via electrostatic binding mode. Complex 1 cleaves pBR322 DNA via hydrolytic pathway and recognizes minor groove of DNA double helix. The HSA binding results showed that ligand and complex 1 has ability to quench the fluorescence emission intensity of Trp 214 residue available in the subdomain IIA of HSA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The PickPocket method for predicting binding specificities for receptors based on receptor pocket similarities: application to MHC-peptide binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, H.; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, M.

    2009-01-01

    of the specificities of MHC molecules in this library weighted by the similarity of their pocket-residues to the query. This PickPocket method is demonstrated to accurately predict MHC-peptide binding for a broad range of MHC alleles, including human and non-human species. In contrast to neural network-based pan-specific......Motivation: Receptor-ligand interactions play an important role in controlling many biological systems. One prominent example is the binding of peptides to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules controlling the onset of cellular immune responses. Thousands of MHC allelic versions...... exist, making determination of the binding specificity for each variant experimentally infeasible. Here, we present a method that can extrapolate from variants with known binding specificity to those where no experimental data are available. Results: For each position in the peptide ligand, we extracted...

  20. Structural insights for engineering binding proteins based on non-antibody scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbreth, Ryan N; Koide, Shohei

    2012-08-01

    Engineered binding proteins derived from non-antibody scaffolds constitute an increasingly prominent class of reagents in both research and therapeutic applications. The growing number of crystal structures of these 'alternative' scaffold-based binding proteins in complex with their targets illustrate the mechanisms of molecular recognition that are common among these systems and those unique to each. This information is useful for critically assessing and improving/expanding engineering strategies. Furthermore, the structural features of these synthetic proteins produced under tightly controlled, directed evolution deepen our understanding of the underlying principles governing molecular recognition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A bead-based assay in the work-up of suspected platelet alloimmunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Nina; Bein, Gregor; Heidinger, Kathrin; Santoso, Sentot; Sachs, Ulrich J

    2016-01-01

    Alloantibodies against human platelet antigens (HPAs) are of clinical significance in immune-mediated thrombocytopenia such as fetal/neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT), posttransfusion purpura, and platelet (PLT) transfusion refractoriness. The gold standard for the detection of these antibodies is the monoclonal antibody immobilization of PLT antigens (MAIPA) assay. Both requirement of typed donor PLT panels and technical expertise often restrict its use to reference laboratories. An easy-to-use, bead-based assay (BBA) has been introduced recently. In this study, we compared MAIPA and BBA test results for 126 serum samples from women who gave birth to a child with FNAIT including rare HPA specificities (n = 111) and from patients with PLT transfusion refractoriness (n = 15). For sera with defined allospecificities, the number of BBA false-negatives was 12 of 126, or 9.5%, and the number of BBA false-positives (i.e., detection of additional specificities) was two of 126, or 1.6%. BBA had major problems in detecting antibodies against HPA-3a (3/15 undetected = 20% failure rate) and HPA-3b (5/6 undetected = 83.3% failure rate), but performed well in detecting typical FNAIT- or PLT transfusion refractoriness-associated antibodies including HPA-1a (35/35 = 100%), HPA-1b (15/15 = 100%), HPA-5b (22/24 = 91.6%), and glycoprotein IV (6/6 = 100%). BBA might be a useful and time-saving tool in the initial laboratory work-up of suspected PLT alloimmunization when an appropriate algorithm ensures follow-up investigation of BBA-negative sera. © 2015 AABB.

  2. Structure-based in silico identification of ubiquitin-binding domains provides insights into the ALIX-V:ubiquitin complex and retrovirus budding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keren-Kaplan, Tal; Attali, Ilan; Estrin, Michael; Kuo, Lillian S; Farkash, Efrat; Jerabek-Willemsen, Moran; Blutraich, Noa; Artzi, Shay; Peri, Aviyah; Freed, Eric O; Wolfson, Haim J; Prag, Gali

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitylation signal promotes trafficking of endogenous and retroviral transmembrane proteins. The signal is decoded by a large set of ubiquitin (Ub) receptors that tether Ub-binding domains (UBDs) to the trafficking machinery. We developed a structure-based procedure to scan the protein data bank for hidden UBDs. The screen retrieved many of the known UBDs. Intriguingly, new potential UBDs were identified, including the ALIX-V domain. Pull-down, cross-linking and E3-independent ubiquitylation assays biochemically corroborated the in silico findings. Guided by the output model, we designed mutations at the postulated ALIX-V:Ub interface. Biophysical affinity measurements using microscale-thermophoresis of wild-type and mutant proteins revealed some of the interacting residues of the complex. ALIX-V binds mono-Ub with a Kd of 119 μM. We show that ALIX-V oligomerizes with a Hill coefficient of 5.4 and IC50 of 27.6 μM and that mono-Ub induces ALIX-V oligomerization. Moreover, we show that ALIX-V preferentially binds K63 di-Ub compared with mono-Ub and K48 di-Ub. Finally, an in vivo functionality assay demonstrates the significance of ALIX-V:Ub interaction in equine infectious anaemia virus budding. These results not only validate the new procedure, but also demonstrate that ALIX-V directly interacts with Ub in vivo and that this interaction can influence retroviral budding. PMID:23361315

  3. Calcium-dependent and calcium-independent signals in the conglutinin-binding assay (KgBa) for immune complexes. Influence of anti-collagen-antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmskov, U; Haas, Henning de; Teisner, B

    1992-01-01

    G to solid phase bovine conglutinin was also observed to a variable degree in normal and pathological sera. However, in this situation the IgG binding was largely calcium-independent, was not inhibited by GlcNAc and did not decrease after prolonged incubation of the serum at 37 degrees C. The reactive Ig...... been "solubilized" (i.e., complement treated by incubation with serum) was employed as a reference. The binding of the complement-reacted IgG to solid phase conglutinin was found to be calcium-dependent and inhibitable with N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc). Prolonged incubation (4 days) of aggregated Ig...

  4. HMMBinder: DNA-Binding Protein Prediction Using HMM Profile Based Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rianon Zaman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA-binding proteins often play important role in various processes within the cell. Over the last decade, a wide range of classification algorithms and feature extraction techniques have been used to solve this problem. In this paper, we propose a novel DNA-binding protein prediction method called HMMBinder. HMMBinder uses monogram and bigram features extracted from the HMM profiles of the protein sequences. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first application of HMM profile based features for the DNA-binding protein prediction problem. We applied Support Vector Machines (SVM as a classification technique in HMMBinder. Our method was tested on standard benchmark datasets. We experimentally show that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art methods found in the literature.

  5. Global identification of hnRNP A1 binding sites for SSO-based splicing modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Gitte H; Doktor, Thomas K; Borch-Jensen, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    for this deregulation by blocking other SREs with splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs). However, the location and sequence of most SREs are not well known. RESULTS: Here, we used individual-nucleotide resolution crosslinking immunoprecipitation (iCLIP) to establish an in vivo binding map for the key splicing...... regulatory factor hnRNP A1 and to generate an hnRNP A1 consensus binding motif. We find that hnRNP A1 binding in proximal introns may be important for repressing exons. We show that inclusion of the alternative cassette exon 3 in SKA2 can be significantly increased by SSO-based treatment which blocks an iCLIP......-identified hnRNP A1 binding site immediately downstream of the 5' splice site. Because pseudoexons are well suited as models for constitutive exons which have been inactivated by pathogenic mutations in SREs, we used a pseudoexon in MTRR as a model and showed that an iCLIP-identified hnRNP A1 binding site...

  6. Aptamer based voltammetric determination of ampicillin using a single-stranded DNA binding protein and DNA functionalized gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Ma, Kui; Yin, Huanshun; Zhou, Yunlei; Ai, Shiyun

    2017-12-20

    An aptamer based method is described for the electrochemical determination of ampicillin. It is based on the use of DNA aptamer, DNA functionalized gold nanoparticles (DNA-AuNPs), and single-stranded DNA binding protein (ssDNA-BP). When the aptamer hybridizes with the target DNA on the AuNPs, the ssDNA-BP is captured on the electrode surface via its specific interaction with ss-DNA. This results in a decreased electrochemical signal of the redox probe Fe(CN) 6 3- which is measured best at a voltage of 0.188 mV (vs. reference electrode). In the presence of ampicillin, the formation of aptamer-ampicillin conjugate blocks the further immobilization of DNA-AuNPs and ssDNA-BP, and this leads to an increased response. The method has a linear reposne that convers the 1 pM to 5 nM ampicillin concentration range, with a 0.38 pM detection limit (at an S/N ratio of 3). The assay is selective, stable and reproducible. It was applied to the determination of ampicillin in spiked milk samples where it gave recoveries ranging from 95.5 to 105.5%. Graphical abstract Schematic of a simple and sensitive electrochemical apta-biosensor for ampicillin detection. It is based on the use of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), DNA aptamer, DNA functionalized AuNPs (DNA-AuNPs), and single-strand DNA binding protein (SSBP).

  7. Effects of copper ions on DNA binding and cytotoxic activity of a chiral salicylidene Schiff base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Bao-Li; Xu, Wu-Shuang; Tao, Hui-Wen; Li, Wen; Zhang, Yu; Long, Jian-Ying; Liu, Qing-Bo; Xia, Bing; Sun, Wei-Yin

    2014-03-05

    A chiral Schiff base HL N-(5-bromo-salicylaldehyde)dehydroabietylamine (1) and its chiral dinuclear copper complex [Cu2L4]·4DMF (2) have been synthesized and fully characterized. The interactions of 1 and 2 with salmon sperm DNA have been investigated by viscosity measurements, UV, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic techniques. Absorption spectral (Kb=3.30 × 10(5)M(-)(1) (1), 6.63 × 10(5)M(-)(1)(2)), emission spectral (Ksv=7.58 × 10(3)M(-)(1) (1), 1.52 × 10(4)M(-)(1) (2)), and viscosity measurements reveal that 1 and 2 interact with DNA through intercalation and 2 exhibits a higher DNA binding ability. In addition, CD study indicates 2 cause a more evident perturbation on the base stacking and helicity of B-DNA upon binding to it. In fluorimetric studies, the enthalpy (ΔH>0) and entropy (ΔS>0) changes of the reactions between the compounds with DNA demonstrate hydrophobic interactions. 1 and 2 were also screened for their cytotoxic ability and 2 demonstrates higher growth inhibition of the selected cancer cells at concentration of 50 μM, this result is identical with their DNA binding ability order. All the experimental results show that the involvement of Cu (II) centers has some interesting effect on DNA binding ability and cytotoxicity of the chiral Schiff base. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A thallium-sensitive, fluorescence-based assay for detecting and characterizing potassium channel modulators in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, C David; Harden, David; Dworetzky, Steven I; Robertson, Barbara; Knox, Ronald J

    2004-12-01

    Potassium channels have been identified as targets for a large number of therapeutic indications. The ability to use a high-throughput functional assay for the detection and characterization of small-molecule modulators of potassium channels is very desirable. However, present techniques capable of screening very large chemical libraries are limited in terms of data quality, temporal resolution, ease of use, and requirements for specialized instrumentation. To address these issues, the authors have developed a fluorescence-based thallium flux assay. This assay is capable of detecting modulators of both voltage and ligand-gated potassium channels expressed in mammalian cells. The thallium flux assay can use instruments standard to most high-throughput screening laboratories, and using such equipment has been successfully employed to screen large chemical libraries consisting of hundreds of thousands of compounds.

  9. Liposome encapsulation of the internal control for whole process quality assurance of nucleic acid amplification-based assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, E S; Skaug, K

    2003-10-01

    A system intended for whole process quality assurance of nucleic acid amplification assays was developed based on the use of liposomes as cell-mimicking vehicles for the internal control, allowing introduction of the internal control directly into the crude biological specimens. By the proof of principle testing, the Roche Cobas Amplicor CT assay was chosen as model system and the Roche CT/NG Internal Control was thus loaded into the liposomes. The liposome/DNA particles were spiked into a Chlamydia trachomatis-positive urine specimen. A quantitative "in-house" duplex real-time C. trachomatis PCR assay showed that liposomes having Blue Dextran 2000 polysaccharide co-entrapped were the most suited particles as they were efficiently deposited by the centrifugation carried out according to the Roche urine specimen preparation procedure. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the liposome/DNA particles might be used for whole process quality assurance of Amplicor assay without major modifications of the assay protocol. An additional feature of the use of these liposomes was that the pellet became blue coloured and that might facilitate a thorough removal of the urine supernatant without increasing the risk of disturbance of the pellet. Principally, the liposome/internal control system is versatile and seems to be applicable for whole process quality control of amplification-based assays for detection of various pathogens.

  10. Development and Validation of an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for the Detection of Binding Anti-Drug Antibodies against Interferon Beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingenhoven, Kathleen; Kramer, Daniel; Jensen, Poul Erik Hyldgaard

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop and validate a method for the detection of binding anti-drug antibodies (ADAs) against interferon beta (IFN-β) in human serum as part of a European initiative (ABIRISK) aimed at the prediction and analysis of clinical relevance of anti-biopharmaceutical immunization to minim...

  11. Time-Resolved Fluorometry Based Sandwich Hybridisation Assay for HLA-DQA1 Typing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöroos, Minna; Ilonen, Jorma; Reijonen, Helena; Lövgren, Timo

    1998-01-01

    A microtitration plate based time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) hybridisation assay was developed for HLA typing utilising biotinylated sequence-specific catching probes and europium (Eu) labelled gene locus-specific detection probe to allow time-resolved fluorometer reading of the reaction. In an application for HLA-DQA typing a 228 base pair long region of the polymorphic exon 2 of DQA1 gene was amplified and the denatured PCR product distributed into streptavidin-coated microtitration wells together with the detection probe and one of the catching probes. After incubation and washes, the enhancement solution was added and specific hybridisation signal detected by measuring the emitted light. A series of 100 isolated genomic DNA samples were studied using biotinylated probes specific for DQA1*01, *0101/0104, *0103/0201/0601, *0201, *03, *0401/0601, *05 and *0502 alleles with results demonstrating the capacity of the test to detect aimed alleles. A series of whole blood spot samples were also studied and the results confirmed the applicability of this modification of the test. PMID:9706458

  12. Time-Resolved Fluorometry Based Sandwich Hybridisation Assay for HLA-DQA1 Typing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minna Sjöroos

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A microtitration plate based time-resolved fluorescence (TRF hybridisation assay was developed for HLA typing utilising biotinylated sequence-specific catching probes and europium (Eu labelled gene locus-specific detection probe to allow time-resolved fluorometer reading of the reaction. In an application for HLA-DQA typing a 228 base pair long region of the polymorphic exon 2 of DQA1 gene was amplified and the denatured PCR product distributed into streptavidin-coated microtitration wells together with the detection probe and one of the catching probes. After incubation and washes, the enhancement solution was added and specific hybridisation signal detected by measuring the emitted light. A series of 100 isolated genomic DNA samples were studied using biotinylated probes specific for DQA1*01, *0101/0104, *0103/0201/0601, *0201, *03, *0401/0601, *05 and *0502 alleles with results demonstrating the capacity of the test to detect aimed alleles. A series of whole blood spot samples were also studied and the results confirmed the applicability of this modification of the test.

  13. Detection and quantitative evaluation of endotoxin contamination in nanoparticle formulations by LAL-based assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neun, Barry W; Dobrovolskaia, Marina A

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial endotoxin or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a membrane component of all Gram-negative bacteria. The administration of products contaminated with bacterial endotoxin can cause fever, shock, and even death. Accordingly, the FDA sets limits on the number of endotoxin units (EU) that may be present in a drug or device product. Limulus amoebocyte lysate (LAL) is the extract from amoebocytes of the horseshoe crab Limulus polyphemus, which reacts with bacterial endotoxin. Detection of the products of this reaction is an effective means of quantifying the EU present in a drug formulation. However, nanoparticles frequently interfere with the reactivity of endotoxin, the LAL reaction, or the detection of the reaction products. This interference can be manifested as either an enhancement or an inhibition, causing a respective overestimation or underestimation of the EU in the sample. Here, we present two methods for the detection and quantification of endotoxin in nanoparticle preparations: one is based on an end-point chromogenic LAL assay, and the second approach is based on measuring the turbidity of the LAL extract.

  14. Analytical assays based on chromogenic and fluorogenic chemosensors for the detection of cyanide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanderléia Gava Marini

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Cyanide (CN– is an anion well–known for its toxicity, being a chemical agent often related to cases of homicide and suicide. Despite being responsible for the toxicity of many animals and plants, it is used in several industrial activities, with innumerous implications in terms of the environment. Due to its high toxicity, the maximum level of CN– concentration allowed by the World Health Organization in potable water is 1.7 µmol/L. This low concentration limit requires methods of visual detection and quantitative determination which are ever more sensitive, simple, reliable, and economical. Advancements in the field of chromogenic and fluorogenic chemosensors for anionic analytes have led to the development of several methodologies for the detection of CN–. Therefore, this review aims to present the main strategies that have been used in the study of quantitative and naked–eye detection of CN– by means of chromogenic and fluorogenic chemosensors. Aspects related to CN–, such as its reactivity, toxicity, applications, and implications in different domains of knowledge, are presented. Recent work involving the development of chemosensors for CN– based on acid–base reactions, chemodosimeters, chromoreactands, and competition assays is also described. In addition, recent studies that make use of nanotechnology to develop strategies for the detection of CN– are also discussed, as well as the prospects envisioned in this field.

  15. Carbon dots based immunosorbent assay for the determination of GFAP in human serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yunsu; Xu, Guanhong; Wei, Fangdi; Cen, Yao; Song, Yueyue; Ma, Yujie; Xu, Xiaoman; Shi, Menglan; Sohail, Muhammad; Hu, Qin

    2018-04-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is expressed in the central nervous system and the level of GFAP normally rises with brain injury and astroglial tumors. So, serum GFAP is used as a marker for diagnosing various types of brain damage and astroglial tumors. In this study, a new sensor based on carbon dots (CDs) linked with antibodies to specifically detect GFAP in human serum was developed. Anti-GFAP (Ab1) linked with protein A/G agarose resin (PA/G) as a capture antibody (PA/G-Ab1) and anti-GFAP (Ab2) labeled with CDs as a detection antibody (CDs-Ab2) were prepared firstly. Then the CD-linked antibody immunosorbent assay (CLAISA) method was constructed based on the sandwich conjunction reaction among PA/G-Ab1, GFAP, and CDs-Ab2. CLAISA, using the fluorescence of PA/G-Ab1-GFAP-Ab2-CDs as the direct signal, enabled the proposed immunosensor to detect GFAP sensitively with a linear range of 0.10-8.00 ng ml-1 and a detection limit of 25 pg ml-1. This method was applied to the determination of GFAP in human serum by the standard addition method, and the results showed high accuracy and precision. Considering the easy synthetic process and excellent performance of CLAISA, this method has great potential to be used to monitor GFAP in the clinic.

  16. Novel electrochemical paper-based immunocapture assay for the quantitative determination of ethinylestradiol in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scala-Benuzzi, María L; Raba, Julio; Soler-Illia, Galo J A A; Schneider, Rudolf J; Messina, Germán A

    2018-02-23

    We report a novel and innovative electrochemical paper-based immunocapture assay (EPIA) to address the need for ultrasensitive detection of emerging pollutants without regulatory status and whose effects on environment and human health are not completely yet understood. In particular, we present the application of this system towards highly sensitive detection of the emerging pollutant ethinyl estradiol (EE2). The EPIA approach is based on the use of paper microzones modified with silica nanoparticles (SNs) and anti-EE2 specific antibodies for capture and pre-concentration of EE2 from river water samples. After the pre-concentration procedure, the paper microzones are placed onto a screen-printed carbon electrode modified with electrochemically reduced graphene (RG). The bound EE2 is subsequently desorbed adding a diluted solution of sulfuric acid on the paper microzones. Finally, recovered EE2 is electrochemically detected by OSWV. The proposed novel methodology showed an appropriate LOD and linear range for the quantification of EE2 for water samples with different origins. The non-sophisticated equipment required, the adequate recovery values obtained (from 97% to 104%, with a RSD less than 4.9%), an appropriate LOD and linear range value (0.1 ng L-1 and 0.5-120 ng L-1, respectively) achieved by our immunocapture sensor present significant analytical figures of merit, particularly when the routine quantification of EE2 is considered. In addition, our system was based on electrochemical paper-based technology, which allows obtaining portable, easy-to-use, inexpensive and disposable devices. The EPIA can also serve as a general-purpose immunoassay platform applicable to quantitation of other drugs and emerging pollutants in environmental samples.

  17. Membrane-based assay for iodide ions based on anti-leaching of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yu-Wei; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Unnikrishnan, Binesh; Li, Yu-Jia; Huang, Chih-Ching

    2014-02-26

    We report a label-free colorimetric strategy for the highly selective and sensitive detection of iodide (I(-)) ions in human urine sample, seawater and edible salt. A poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone)-stabilized Au nanoparticle (34.2-nm) was prepared to detect I(-) ions using silver (Ag(+)) and cyanide (CN(-)) ions as leaching agents in a glycine-NaOH (pH 9.0) solution. For the visual detection of the I(-) ions by naked eye, and for long time stability of the probe, Au nanoparticles (NPs) decorated mixed cellulose ester membrane (MCEM) was prepared (Au NPs/MCEM). The Au NPs-based probe (CN(-)/Ag(+)-Au NPs/MCEM) operates on the principle that Ag(+) ions form a monolyar silver atoms/ions by aurophilic/argentophilic interactions on the Au NPs and it accelerates the leaching rate of Au atoms in presence of CN(-) ions. However, when I(-) is introduced into this system, it inhibits the leaching of Au atoms because of the strong interactions between Ag/Au ions and I(-) ions. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry were used to characterize the surface properties of the Au NPs in the presence of Ag(+) and I(-). Under optimal solution conditions, the CN(-)/Ag(+)-Au NPs/MCEM probe enabled the detection of I(-) by the naked eye at nanomolar concentrations with high selectivity (at least 1000-fold over other anions). In addition, this cost-effective probe allowed the determination of I(-) ions in complex samples, such as urine, seawater, and edible salt samples.

  18. Development of PCR-based assays for detecting and differentiating three species of botrytis infecting broad bean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botrytis cinerea, B. fabae and B. fabiopsis are known to cause chocolate spot on broad bean. This study was conducted to develop PCR-based assays to detect and differentiate this three species. Two sets of primers, Bc-f/Bc-r for B. cinerea and Bfab-f/Bfab-r for B. fabiopsis, were designed based on t...

  19. Antimicrobial efficacy of phenanthrenequinone based Schiff base complexes incorporating methionine amino acid: Structural elucidation and in vitro bio assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun, Thesingu Rajan; Raman, Natarajan

    2014-06-01

    This work focuses the synthesis and characterization of few novel mixed ligand Schiff base metal complexes and their biological activities. For deriving the structural aspects, spectral techniques such as FT-IR, UV-Vis., 1H NMR, Raman, EPR and the physicochemical characterizations including elemental analysis, molar conductance and magnetic susceptibility method have been involved. All the complexes adopt square planar geometry. DNA binding ability of these complexes has been explored using diverse techniques viz. UV-Vis. absorption, fluorescence spectroscopy, viscometry and cyclic voltammetry. These studies prove that CT-DNA binding of the complexes follows the intercalation mode. Comparative DNA oxidative cleavage ability of the complexes has been done under ultraviolet photo radiation on pUC19 DNA. In addition, the biocidal action of the complexes has been investigated against few pathogenic bacteria and fungi by disc diffusion method. Importantly, the amylase inhibition activity of Cu(II) complex has been explored. The amylase inhibition property has been found to be increased upon increasing the complex concentration.

  20. Evaluation of qPCR-based assays for leprosy diagnosis directly in clinical specimens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Nóbrega Martinez

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The increased reliability and efficiency of the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR makes it a promising tool for performing large-scale screening for infectious disease among high-risk individuals. To date, no study has evaluated the specificity and sensitivity of different qPCR assays for leprosy diagnosis using a range of clinical samples that could bias molecular results such as difficult-to-diagnose cases. In this study, qPCR assays amplifying different M. leprae gene targets, sodA, 16S rRNA, RLEP and Ag 85B were compared for leprosy differential diagnosis. qPCR assays were performed on frozen skin biopsy samples from a total of 62 patients: 21 untreated multibacillary (MB, 26 untreated paucibacillary (PB leprosy patients, as well as 10 patients suffering from other dermatological diseases and 5 healthy donors. To develop standardized protocols and to overcome the bias resulted from using chromosome count cutoffs arbitrarily defined for different assays, decision tree classifiers were used to estimate optimum cutoffs and to evaluate the assays. As a result, we found a decreasing sensitivity for Ag 85B (66.1%, 16S rRNA (62.9%, and sodA (59.7% optimized assay classifiers, but with similar maximum specificity for leprosy diagnosis. Conversely, the RLEP assay showed to be the most sensitive (87.1%. Moreover, RLEP assay was positive for 3 samples of patients originally not diagnosed as having leprosy, but these patients developed leprosy 5-10 years after the collection of the biopsy. In addition, 4 other samples of patients clinically classified as non-leprosy presented detectable chromosome counts in their samples by the RLEP assay suggesting that those patients either had leprosy that was misdiagnosed or a subclinical state of leprosy. Overall, these results are encouraging and suggest that RLEP assay could be useful as a sensitive diagnostic test to detect M. leprae infection before major clinical manifestations.

  1. Multiple-endpoints gene alteration-based (MEGA) assay: A toxicogenomics approach for water quality assessment of wastewater effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Toshikazu; Hara-Yamamura, Hiroe; Nakashima, Koji; Tan, Lea Chua; Okabe, Satoshi

    2017-12-01

    Wastewater effluents contain a significant number of toxic contaminants, which, even at low concentrations, display a wide variety of toxic actions. In this study, we developed a multiple-endpoints gene alteration-based (MEGA) assay, a real-time PCR-based transcriptomic analysis, to assess the water quality of wastewater effluents for human health risk assessment and management. Twenty-one genes from the human hepatoblastoma cell line (HepG2), covering the basic health-relevant stress responses such as response to xenobiotics, genotoxicity, and cytotoxicity, were selected and incorporated into the MEGA assay. The genes related to the p53-mediated DNA damage response and cytochrome P450 were selected as markers for genotoxicity and response to xenobiotics, respectively. Additionally, the genes that were dose-dependently regulated by exposure to the wastewater effluents were chosen as markers for cytotoxicity. The alterations in the expression of an individual gene, induced by exposure to the wastewater effluents, were evaluated by real-time PCR and the results were validated by genotoxicity (e.g., comet assay) and cell-based cytotoxicity tests. In summary, the MEGA assay is a real-time PCR-based assay that targets cellular responses to contaminants present in wastewater effluents at the transcriptional level; it is rapid, cost-effective, and high-throughput and can thus complement any chemical analysis for water quality assessment and management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based method for measuring galactosyltransferase activity using a synthetic glycopolymer acceptor substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oubihi, M; Kitajima, K; Kobayashi, K; Adachi, T; Aoki, N; Matsuda, T

    1998-03-15

    A lectin-assisted enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based method using a synthetic glycopolymer as an acceptor substrate was developed for measuring beta 1,4-galactosyltransferase (GalT) activity. A polyacrylamide derivative having a beta-linked N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc beta) moiety on each monomeric unit was synthesized chemically and immobilized on a polystyrene microtiter plate as an acceptor substrate for GalT. After the plate was incubated with bovine GalT, the enzyme reaction product, beta-linked Gal residue on the polyacrylamide-bound GlcNAc residue, was detected by using Ricinus communis agglutinin 1 (RCA1), rabbit anti-RCA1 antibody, and a peroxidase-labeled anti-rabbit IgG. The lowest GalT concentration detectable by this method was about 0.5 mU/ml, which is comparable to those by the previously reported ELISA-based assays. The unique property of the glycopolymer, PAP(GlcNAc beta), of binding noncovalently but tightly to the polystyrene microtiter plate allowed the use of this acceptor substrate for the GalT activity measurement even in the presence of 1% Triton CF-54 and X-100. Our system was successfully applied to assess GalT activity in milk of various mammals.

  3. A single-loop recombinant pseudotyped-virus-based assay to detect HIV-1 phenotypic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shouli; Yan, Pingping; Yan, Yansheng; Qiu, Lijun; Xie, Meirong

    2015-06-01

    HIV/AIDS is a leading public health concern throughout the world. Currently, treatment of HIV/AIDS still depends on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART); however, there is increasing evidence showing the emergence of resistance to antiretroviral drugs in HIV-1 strains, making ART less effective over time. Intensive monitoring of HIV-1 drug resistance is therefore of great importance to evaluate the current sensitivity of antiretroviral agents and is urgently needed. The aim of this study was to develop a single-loop recombinant pseudotyped-virus-based assay to detect phenotypic resistance in clinical HIV-1 strains. HIV-1 RNA was extracted from HIV-1-infected human plasma samples, and an approximately 3-kb fragment containing p7/p1/p6 cleavage sites and full-length protease (PR), reverse transcriptase (RT), thermonuclease (TNase), and integrase (1-280 aa) genes was amplified by nested RT-PCR. A retroviral vector was constructed using the HIV-1 infectious molecular clone pLWJ to test antiretroviral drug susceptibility. pLWJ-SV40-Luc contained a luciferase expression cassette inserted within a deleted region of the envelope (env) gene as an indicator gene. Resistance test vectors (RTVs) were constructed by incorporating amplified target genes into pLWJ-SV40-Luc by using ApaI or AgeI and AarI restriction sites and conventional cloning methods. The virus stocks used for drug susceptibility test were produced by co-transfecting 293T cells with RTVs and a plasmid that provided vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G). Viral replication was monitored by measuring luciferase activity in infected target cells at approximately 48 h postinfection. A total of 35 clinical plasma samples from HIV-1-infected humans were tested, and target fragments were successfully amplified from 34 samples (97.1 %) and 33 RTVs were successfully constructed by directional cloning, with an overall success rate of 94.3 %. A clear-cut dose-dependent relationship was detected between

  4. Recombinant diabody-based immunocapture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for quantification of rabies virus glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmagadda, Sridevi V; Aavula, Shukra M; Biradhar, Neelakantam; Rao, Varaprasada Sankarasetty; Shanmugham, Rajalakshmi; Chandran, Dev; Thirumeni, Nagarajan; Singanallur, Nagendrakumar Balasubramanian; Villuppanoor, Srinivasan Alwar

    2010-08-01

    The potency of rabies vaccines, determined using the NIH mouse protection test, can be directly correlated to the amount of rabies virus glycoprotein (RV GP) present in the vaccine. In an effort to develop a simple and sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using recombinant diabody for quantification of RV GP, the variable heavy (V(H)) and light chain (V(L)) domains of an RV GP-specific human monoclonal antibody (MAb) secreted by a human x mouse heterohybridoma (human MAb R16E5) was amplified, linked using splicing by overlap extension PCR (SOE PCR), and expressed as a recombinant diabody (D06) in the pET28a bacterial expression system. The diabody D06 was purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography on a nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) agarose column and characterized. The purified diabody was used in combination with a well-characterized RV GP-specific mouse MAb, M5B4, to develop an immunocapture ELISA (IC-ELISA) for the quantification of RV GP in human rabies vaccine preparations. The maximum detection limit of the IC-ELISA using the M5B4-D06 combination was up to 31.25 ng/ml of RV GP. The specificity of the diabody was established by its nonreactivity toward other human viral antigens as determined by ELISA and toward RV GP as determined by immunoblot transfer assay and competitive ELISA with the parent human MAb R16E5 and MAb M5B4. The adjusted r(2) value obtained by the regression through the origin model was 0.902, and the equation for predicted potency values for M5B4-D06-based IC-ELISA and MAb M5B4 IC-ELISA were 0.5651x and 0.8044x, respectively, where x is the estimate of RV GP from the IC-ELISA in micrograms. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) results showed the estimates of the two methods differed significantly (P 0.05). The IC-ELISA can be readily adapted to measure the RV GP content in purified antigen, and a vaccine can be formulated based on the estimated GP.

  5. A SILAC-based screen for Methyl-CpG binding proteins identifies RBP-J as a DNA methylation and sequence-specific binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie J J Bartels

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that plays a crucial role in a variety of biological processes. Methylated DNA is specifically bound by Methyl-CpG Binding Proteins (MBPs. Three different types of MBPs have been identified so far: the Methyl-CpG Binding Domain (MBD family proteins, three BTB/POZ-Zn-finger proteins, and UHRF1. Most of the known MBPs have been identified via homology with the MBD and Zn-finger domains as present in MeCP2 and Kaiso, respectively. It is conceivable that other proteins are capable of recognizing methylated DNA. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: For the purpose of identifying novel 'readers' we set up a methyl-CpG pull-down assay combined with stable-isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC. In a methyl-CpG pull-down with U937 nuclear extracts, we recovered several known MBPs and almost all subunits of the MBD2/NuRD complex as methylation specific binders, providing proof-of-principle. Interestingly, RBP-J, the transcription factor downstream of Notch receptors, also bound the DNA in a methylation dependent manner. Follow-up pull-downs and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs showed that RBP-J binds methylated DNA in the context of a mutated RBP-J consensus motif. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The here described SILAC/methyl-CpG pull-down constitutes a new approach to identify potential novel DNAme readers and will advance unraveling of the complete methyl-DNA interactome.

  6. A model-based approach to identify binding sites in CLIP-Seq data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wang

    Full Text Available Cross-linking immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing (CLIP-Seq has made it possible to identify the targeting sites of RNA-binding proteins in various cell culture systems and tissue types on a genome-wide scale. Here we present a novel model-based approach (MiClip to identify high-confidence protein-RNA binding sites from CLIP-seq datasets. This approach assigns a probability score for each potential binding site to help prioritize subsequent validation experiments. The MiClip algorithm has been tested in both HITS-CLIP and PAR-CLIP datasets. In the HITS-CLIP dataset, the signal/noise ratios of miRNA seed motif enrichment produced by the MiClip approach are between 17% and 301% higher than those by the ad hoc method for the top 10 most enriched miRNAs. In the PAR-CLIP dataset, the MiClip approach can identify ∼50% more validated binding targets than the original ad hoc method and two recently published methods. To facilitate the application of the algorithm, we have released an R package, MiClip (http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/MiClip/index.html, and a public web-based graphical user interface software (http://galaxy.qbrc.org/tool_runner?tool_id=mi_clip for customized analysis.

  7. A Parzen window-based approach for the detection of locally enriched transcription factor binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbon, Alexis; Kumagai, Yutaro; Teraguchi, Shunsuke; Amada, Karlou Mar; Akira, Shizuo; Standley, Daron M

    2013-01-21

    Identification of cis- and trans-acting factors regulating gene expression remains an important problem in biology. Bioinformatics analyses of regulatory regions are hampered by several difficulties. One is that binding sites for regulatory proteins are often not significantly over-represented in the set of DNA sequences of interest, because of high levels of false positive predictions, and because of positional restrictions on functional binding sites with regard to the transcription start site. We have developed a novel method for the detection of regulatory motifs based on their local over-representation in sets of regulatory regions. The method makes use of a Parzen window-based approach for scoring local enrichment, and during evaluation of significance it takes into account GC content of sequences. We show that the accuracy of our method compares favourably to that of other methods, and that our method is capable of detecting not only generally over-represented regulatory motifs, but also locally over-represented motifs that are often missed by standard motif detection approaches. Using a number of examples we illustrate the validity of our approach and suggest applications, such as the analysis of weaker binding sites. Our approach can be used to suggest testable hypotheses for wet-lab experiments. It has potential for future analyses, such as the prediction of weaker binding sites. An online application of our approach, called LocaMo Finder (Local Motif Finder), is available at http://sysimm.ifrec.osaka-u.ac.jp/tfbs/locamo/.

  8. Identification of metal ion binding sites based on amino acid sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaoyong; Zhang, Xiaojin; Gao, Sujuan; Ding, Changjiang; Feng, Yonge; Bao, Weihua

    2017-01-01

    The identification of metal ion binding sites is important for protein function annotation and the design of new drug molecules. This study presents an effective method of analyzing and identifying the binding residues of metal ions based solely on sequence information. Ten metal ions were extracted from the BioLip database: Zn2+, Cu2+, Fe2+, Fe3+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Mn2+, Na+, K+ and Co2+. The analysis showed that Zn2+, Cu2+, Fe2+, Fe3+, and Co2+ were sensitive to the conservation of amino acids at binding sites, and promising results can be achieved using the Position Weight Scoring Matrix algorithm, with an accuracy of over 79.9% and a Matthews correlation coefficient of over 0.6. The binding sites of other metals can also be accurately identified using the Support Vector Machine algorithm with multifeature parameters as input. In addition, we found that Ca2+ was insensitive to hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity information and Mn2+ was insensitive to polarization charge information. An online server was constructed based on the framework of the proposed method and is freely available at http://60.31.198.140:8081/metal/HomePage/HomePage.html. PMID:28854211

  9. A novel reagentless sensing system for measuring glucose based on the galactose/glucose-binding protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salins, L. L.; Ware, R. A.; Ensor, C. M.; Daunert, S.

    2001-01-01

    The galactose/glucose-binding protein (GBP) is synthesized in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli in a precursor form and exported into the periplasmic space upon cleavage of a 23-amino-acid leader sequence. GBP binds galactose and glucose in a highly specific manner. The ligand induces a hinge motion in GBP and the resultant protein conformational change constitutes the basis of the sensing system. The mglB gene, which codes for GBP, was isolated from the chromosome of E. coli using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Since wild-type GBP lacks cysteines in its structure, introducing this amino acid by site-directed mutagenesis ensures single-label attachment at specific sites with a sulfhydro-specific fluorescent probe. Site-directed mutagenesis by overlap extension PCR was performed to prepare three different mutants to introduce a single cysteine residue at positions 148, 152, and 182. Since these residues are not involved in ligand binding and since they are located at the edge of the binding cleft, they experience a significant change in environment upon binding of galactose or glucose. The sensing system strategy is based on the fluorescence changes of the probe as the protein undergoes a structural change on binding. In this work a reagentless sensing system has been rationally designed that can detect submicromolar concentrations of glucose. The calibration plots have a linear working range of three orders of magnitude. Although the system can sense galactose as well, this epimer is not a potential interfering substance since its concentration in blood is negligible. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  10. BSSF: a fingerprint based ultrafast binding site similarity search and function analysis server

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Hualiang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome sequencing and post-genomics projects such as structural genomics are extending the frontier of the study of sequence-structure-function relationship of genes and their products. Although many sequence/structure-based methods have been devised with the aim of deciphering this delicate relationship, there still remain large gaps in this fundamental problem, which continuously drives researchers to develop novel methods to extract relevant information from sequences and structures and to infer the functions of newly identified genes by genomics technology. Results Here we present an ultrafast method, named BSSF(Binding Site Similarity & Function, which enables researchers to conduct similarity searches in a comprehensive three-dimensional binding site database extracted from PDB structures. This method utilizes a fingerprint representation of the binding site and a validated statistical Z-score function scheme to judge the similarity between the query and database items, even if their similarities are only constrained in a sub-pocket. This fingerprint based similarity measurement was also validated on a known binding site dataset by comparing with geometric hashing, which is a standard 3D similarity method. The comparison clearly demonstrated the utility of this ultrafast method. After conducting the database searching, the hit list is further analyzed to provide basic statistical information about the occurrences of Gene Ontology terms and Enzyme Commission numbers, which may benefit researchers by helping them to design further experiments to study the query proteins. Conclusions This ultrafast web-based system will not only help researchers interested in drug design and structural genomics to identify similar binding sites, but also assist them by providing further analysis of hit list from database searching.

  11. Development of a toxR-based loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for detecting Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Beilei

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a leading cause of seafood-related bacterial gastroenteritis and outbreaks worldwide. Sensitive and specific detection methods are needed to better control V. parahaemolyticus infections. This study aimed at developing a highly specific and sensitive loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP assay for detecting V. parahaemolyticus in oysters. A set of five LAMP primers, two outer, two inner, and one loop were designed based on the published V. parahaemolyticus toxR sequence. Specificity of the assay was evaluated using a panel of 36 V. parahaemolyticus and 39 other strains. The assay sensitivity was determined using serial dilutions of V. parahaemolyticus ATCC 27969 culture ranging from 108 CFU/ml to extinction. The assay was also tested in experimentally inoculated oyster samples. Results The toxR-based LAMP assay was able to specifically detect all of the 36 V. parahaemolyticus strains without amplification from 39 other strains. The detection limit was 47-470 cells per reaction in pure culture, up to 100-fold more sensitive than that of toxR-PCR. When applied in spiked oysters, the assay was able to detect 1.1 × 105 V. parahaemolyticus cells per gram of oyster without enrichment, up to 100-fold more sensitive than that of toxR-PCR. Standard curves generated for detecting V. parahaemolyticus in both pure culture and spiked oyster samples showed good linear relationship between cell numbers and the fluorescence or turbidity signals. Conclusions The toxR-based LAMP assay developed in this study was sensitive, specific, and quantitative, holding great potential for future field detection of V. parahaemolyticus in raw oysters.

  12. Cell-based cytotoxicity assays for engineered nanomaterials safety screening: exposure of adipose derived stromal cells to titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Hadjiargyrou, M; Rafailovich, Miriam; Mironava, Tatsiana

    2017-07-11

    Increasing production of nanomaterials requires fast and proper assessment of its potential toxicity. Therefore, there is a need to develop new assays that can be performed in vitro, be cost effective, and allow faster screening of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). Herein, we report that titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) nanoparticles (NPs) can induce damage to adipose derived stromal cells (ADSCs) at concentrations which are rated as safe by standard assays such as measuring proliferation, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels. Specifically, we demonstrated that low concentrations of TiO 2 NPs, at which cellular LDH, ROS, or proliferation profiles were not affected, induced changes in the ADSCs secretory function and differentiation capability. These two functions are essential for ADSCs in wound healing, energy expenditure, and metabolism with serious health implications in vivo. We demonstrated that cytotoxicity assays based on specialized cell functions exhibit greater sensitivity and reveal damage induced by ENMs that was not otherwise detected by traditional ROS, LDH, and proliferation assays. For proper toxicological assessment of ENMs standard ROS, LDH, and proliferation assays should be combined with assays that investigate cellular functions relevant to the specific cell type.

  13. Development of a Coxsackievirus A16 neutralization assay based on pseudoviruses for measurement of neutralizing antibody titer in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jun; Ma, Hongxia; Xu, Lin; An, Dong; Sun, Shiyang; Huang, Xueyong; Kong, Wei; Jiang, Chunlai

    2013-02-01

    Serum neutralizing antibody titers are indicative of protective immunity against Coxsackievirus A16 (CV-A16) and Enterovirus 71 (EV71), the two main etiological agents of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), and provide the basis for evaluating vaccine efficacy. The current CV-A16 neutralization assay based on inhibition of cytopathic effects requires manual microscopic examination, which is time-consuming and labor-intensive. In this study, a high-throughput neutralization assay was developed by employing CV-A16 pseudoviruses expressing luciferase for detecting infectivity in rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells and measuring serum viral neutralizing antibodies. Without the need to use infectious CV-A16 strains, the neutralizing antibody titer against CV-A16 could be determined within 15h by measuring luciferase signals by this assay. The pseudovirus CV-A16 neutralization assay (pCNA) was validated by comparison with a conventional CV-A16 neutralization assay (cCNA) in testing 174 human serum samples collected from children (age <5 years). The neutralizing antibody titers determined by these two assays were well correlated (R(2)=0.7689). These results suggest that the pCNA can serve as a rapid and objective procedure for the measurement of neutralizing antibodies against CV-A16. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A cell-based, high content screening assay reveals activators and inhibitors of cancer cell invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintavalle, Manuela; Elia, Leonardo; Price, Jeffrey H.; Heynen-Genel, Susanne; Courtneidge, Sara A.

    2012-01-01

    Acquisition of invasive cell behavior underlies tumor progression and metastasis. To define in more molecular detail the mechanisms underlying invasive behavior, we developed a high throughput screening strategy to quantitate invadopodia; actin-rich membrane protrusions of cancer cells which contribute to tissue invasion and matrix remodeling. We developed a high content, imaged-based assay, and tested the LOPAC 1280 collection of pharmacologically active agents. We found compounds that potently inhibited invadopodia formation without overt toxicity, as well as compounds that increased invadopodia number. One of the two compounds that increased both invadopodia number and invasive behavior was the chemotherapeutic agent paclitaxel, which has potential clinical implications for its use in the neoadjuvant and resistance settings. Several of the invasion inhibitors were annotated as cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitors. Loss-of-function experiments determined that Cdk5 was the relevant target. We further determined that the mechanism by which Cdk5 promotes both invadopodia formation and cancer invasion is by phosphorylation and down regulation of the actin regulatory protein caldesmon. PMID:21791703

  15. Accuracy of an Accelerated, Culture-Based Assay for Detection of Group B Streptococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan P. Faro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the validity of a novel Group B Streptococcus (GBS diagnostic assay for the detection of GBS in antepartum patients. Study Design. Women were screened for GBS colonization at 35 to 37 weeks of gestation. Three vaginal-rectal swabs were collected per patient; two were processed by traditional culture (commercial laboratory versus in-house culture, and the third was processed by an immunoblot-based test, in which a sample is placed over an antibody-coated nitrocellulose membrane, and after a six-hour culture, bound GBS is detected with a secondary antibody. Results. 356 patients were evaluated. Commercial processing revealed a GBS prevalence rate of 85/356 (23.6%. In-house culture provided a prevalence rate of 105/356 (29.5%. When the accelerated GBS test result was compared to the in-house GBS culture, it demonstrated a sensitivity of 97.1% and a specificity of 88.4%. Interobserver reliability for the novel GBS test was 88.2%. Conclusions. The accelerated GBS test provides a high level of validity for the detection of GBS colonization in antepartum patients within 6.5 hours and demonstrates a substantial agreement between observers.

  16. Whole cell based electrical impedance sensing approach for a rapid nanotoxicity assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hondroulis, Evangelia; Liu Chang; Li Chenzhong, E-mail: licz@fiu.edu [Nanobioengineering/Bioelectronics Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Miami, FL 33174 (United States)

    2010-08-06

    A whole cell based biosensor for rapid real-time testing of human and environmental toxicity of nanoscale materials is reported. Recent studies measuring nanoparticle cytotoxicity in vitro provide a final measurement of toxicity to a cell culture overlooking the ongoing cytotoxic effects of the nanoparticles over the desired timeframe. An array biosensor capable of performing multiple cytotoxicity assays simultaneously was designed to address the need for a consistent method to measure real-time assessments of toxicity. The impedimetric response of human lung fibroblasts (CCL-153) and rainbow trout gill epithelial cells (RTgill-W1) when exposed to gold and silver nanoparticles (AuNPs, AgNPs), single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and cadmium oxide (CdO) was tested. Exposure to CdO particles exhibited the fastest rate of cytotoxicity and demonstrated the biosensor's ability to monitor toxicity instantaneously in real time. Advantages of the present method include shorter run times, easier usage, and multi-sample analysis leading to a method that can monitor the kinetic effects of nanoparticle toxicity continuously over a desired timeframe.

  17. Whole cell based electrical impedance sensing approach for a rapid nanotoxicity assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hondroulis, Evangelia; Liu, Chang; Li, Chen-Zhong

    2010-08-01

    A whole cell based biosensor for rapid real-time testing of human and environmental toxicity of nanoscale materials is reported. Recent studies measuring nanoparticle cytotoxicity in vitro provide a final measurement of toxicity to a cell culture overlooking the ongoing cytotoxic effects of the nanoparticles over the desired timeframe. An array biosensor capable of performing multiple cytotoxicity assays simultaneously was designed to address the need for a consistent method to measure real-time assessments of toxicity. The impedimetric response of human lung fibroblasts (CCL-153) and rainbow trout gill epithelial cells (RTgill-W1) when exposed to gold and silver nanoparticles (AuNPs, AgNPs), single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and cadmium oxide (CdO) was tested. Exposure to CdO particles exhibited the fastest rate of cytotoxicity and demonstrated the biosensor's ability to monitor toxicity instantaneously in real time. Advantages of the present method include shorter run times, easier usage, and multi-sample analysis leading to a method that can monitor the kinetic effects of nanoparticle toxicity continuously over a desired timeframe.

  18. Whole cell based electrical impedance sensing approach for a rapid nanotoxicity assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hondroulis, Evangelia; Liu Chang; Li Chenzhong

    2010-01-01

    A whole cell based biosensor for rapid real-time testing of human and environmental toxicity of nanoscale materials is reported. Recent studies measuring nanoparticle cytotoxicity in vitro provide a final measurement of toxicity to a cell culture overlooking the ongoing cytotoxic effects of the nanoparticles over the desired timeframe. An array biosensor capable of performing multiple cytotoxicity assays simultaneously was designed to address the need for a consistent method to measure real-time assessments of toxicity. The impedimetric response of human lung fibroblasts (CCL-153) and rainbow trout gill epithelial cells (RTgill-W1) when exposed to gold and silver nanoparticles (AuNPs, AgNPs), single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and cadmium oxide (CdO) was tested. Exposure to CdO particles exhibited the fastest rate of cytotoxicity and demonstrated the biosensor's ability to monitor toxicity instantaneously in real time. Advantages of the present method include shorter run times, easier usage, and multi-sample analysis leading to a method that can monitor the kinetic effects of nanoparticle toxicity continuously over a desired timeframe.

  19. Radioreceptor opioid assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.J.; Chang, K.-J.

    1981-01-01

    A radioreceptor assay is described for assaying opioid drugs in biological fluids. The method enables the assay of total opioid activity, being specific for opioids as a class but lacking specificity within the class. A radio-iodinated opioid and the liquid test sample are incubated with an opiate receptor material. The percentage inhibition of the binding of the radio-iodinated compound to the opiate receptor is calculated and the opioid activity of the test liquid determined from a standard curve. Examples of preparing radio-iodinated opioids and assaying opioid activity are given. A test kit for the assay is described. Compared to other methods, this assay is cheap, easy and rapid. (U.K.)

  20. CLSI-based transference of the CALIPER database of pediatric reference intervals to Beckman Coulter DxC biochemical assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Petra A T; Thomas, Dylan; Sadeghieh, Tara; Bevilacqua, Victoria; Chan, Man Khun; Chen, Yunqi; Randell, Edward; Adeli, Khosrow

    2015-09-01

    The CALIPER program has established a comprehensive database of age- and sex-stratified pediatric reference intervals for over 85 common biochemical markers, largely using the Abbott ARCHITECT assays. To allow a broader application of the CALIPER database, we examined transference to 36 Beckman Coulter Synchron Unicel DxC800 assays, based on the CLSI C28-A3/EP9-A3 guidelines. Patient sample comparisons were performed for 36 biochemical assays using 200 serum specimens obtained from pediatric patients on the Abbott ARCHITECT ci8200 and the Beckman Coulter DxC800. For each analyte, R(2) values were calculated to assess the quality of correlation between the platforms. Statistical criteria used to assess transferability included a) regression analysis to create the equation of the line of best fit, b) standardized residual, c) Bland-Altman, and d) quantile-quantile plots. Transferred reference intervals were further verified by analyzing serum samples from 100 healthy children from the CALIPER cohort on the Beckman Coulter system. The reference intervals for most of the assessed analytes were transferable to Beckman Coulter assays (31 out of 36 studied) and the newly calculated reference intervals were verified through analysis of CALIPER reference samples (28 out of 31). Eighteen assays demonstrated excellent correlation (R(2)≥0.95), and 13 assays showed strong correlation (0.77≤R2≤0.94). The current study allowed successful transference of a large number of biochemical markers from the CALIPER database to assays on the Beckman Coulter DxC800 platform. Transference should facilitate broader application of CALIPER reference intervals at pediatric centers using DxC biochemical assays. Copyright © 2015 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Luminescence resonance energy transfer-based nucleic acid hybridization assay on cellulose paper with upconverting phosphor as donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feng; Noor, M Omair; Krull, Ulrich J

    2014-03-04

    A bioassay based on DNA hybridization on cellulose paper is a promising format for gene fragment detection that may be suited for in-field and rapid diagnostic applications. We demonstrate for the first time that luminescence resonance energy transfer (LRET) associated with upconverting phosphors (UCPs) can be used to develop a paper-based DNA hybridization assay with high sensitivity, selectivity and fast response. UCPs with strong green emission were synthesized and subsequently functionalized with streptavidin (UCP-strep). UCP-strep particles were immobilized on cellulose paper, and then biotinylated single-stranded oligonucleotide probes were conjugated onto the UCPs via streptavidin-biotin linkage. The UCPs served as donors that were LRET-paired with Cy3-labeled target DNA. Selective DNA hybridization enabled the proximity required for LRET-sensitized emission from Cy3, which was used as the detection signal. Hybridization was complete within 2 min, and the limit of detection of the method was 34 fmol, which is a significant improvement in comparison to an analogous fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay based on quantum dots. The assay exhibited excellent resistance to nonspecific adsorption of noncomplementary short/long DNA and protein. The selectivity of the assay was further evaluated by one base pair mismatched (1BPM) DNA detection, where a maximum signal ratio of 3.1:1 was achieved between fully complementary and 1BPM samples. This work represents a preliminary but significant step for the development of paper-based UCP-LRET nucleic acid hybridization assays, which offer potential for lowering the limit of detection of luminescent hybridization assays due to the negligible background signal associated with optical excitation by near-infrared (NIR) light.

  2. A comparison of protein kinases inhibitor screening methods using both enzymatic activity and binding affinity determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolf, Amalie Frederikke; Skovgaard, Tine; Knapp, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Binding assays are increasingly used as a screening method for protein kinase inhibitors; however, as yet only a weak correlation with enzymatic activity-based assays has been demonstrated. We show that the correlation between the two types of assays can be improved using more precise screening...

  3. Indirect Detection Of Bacillus Anthracis (Anthrax) Using Amplified Gamma Phage-Based Assays

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reiman, Robert W

    2007-01-01

    ... and ultimately killed five individuals. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention currently employs agar plate lysis by gamma phage and direct fluorescence assay to confirm the presence of Bacillus anthracis...

  4. Cell-based screening assay for anti-inflammatory activity of bioactive compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Kees; Vonk, Roel J.; Priebe, Marion G.; Roelofsen, Han

    2015-01-01

    Excess dietary intake may induce metabolic inflammation which is associated with insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. Recent evidence indicates that dietary bioactive compounds may diminish metabolic inflammation. To identify anti-inflammatory bioactives, we developed a screening assay

  5. Graphene and graphene-like two-denominational materials based fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assays for biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Feng; Lyu, Jing; Shi, Jingyu; Yang, Mo

    2017-03-15

    In the past decades, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) has been applied in many biological applications to reveal the biological information at the nanoscale. Recently, graphene and graphene-like two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials started to be used in FRET assays as donors or acceptors including graphene oxide (GO), graphene quantum dot (GQD), graphitic-carbon nitride nanosheets (g-C 3 N 4 ) and transition metal dichalcogenides (e.g. MoS 2 , MnO 2, and WS 2 ). Due to the remarkable properties such as large surface to volume ratio, tunable energy band, photoluminescence and excellent biocompatibility, these 2D nanomaterials based FRET assays have shown great potential in various biological applications. This review summarizes the recent development of graphene and graphene-like 2D nanomaterials based FRET assays in applications of biosensing, bioimaging, and drug delivery monitoring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A multiplex protein-free lateral flow assay for detection of microRNAs based on unmodified molecular beacons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javani, Atefeh; Javadi-Zarnaghi, Fatemeh; Rasaee, Mohammad Javad

    2017-11-15

    Lateral flow assays (LFAs) have promising potentials for point-of-care applications. Recently, many LFAs have been reported that are based on hybridization of oligonucleotide strands. Mostly, biotinylated capture DNAs are immobilized on the surface of a nitrocellulose membrane via streptavidin interactions. During the assay, stable colorful complexes get formed that are visible by naked eyes. Here, we present an inexpensive and unique design of LFA that applies unmodified oligonucleotides at capture lines. The presented LFA do not utilize streptavidin or any other affinity protein. We employ structural switch of molecular beacons (MB) in combination with base stacking hybridization (BSH) phenomenon. The unique design of the reported LFA provided high selectivity for target oligonucleotides. We validated potential applications of the system for detection of DNA mimics of two microRNAs in multiplex assays. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Synthesis, DNA binding, cellular DNA lesion and cytotoxicity of a series of new benzimidazole-based Schiff base copper(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Anup; Anbu, Sellamuthu; Sharma, Gunjan; Kuznetsov, Maxim L; Koch, Biplob; Guedes da Silva, M Fátima C; Pombeiro, Armando J L

    2015-12-14

    A series of new benzimidazole containing compounds 2-((1-R-1-H-benzimidazol-2-yl)phenyl-imino)naphthol HL(1-3) (R = methyl, ethyl or propyl, respectively) have been synthesized by Schiff base condensation of 2-(1-R-1-H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)aniline and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde. The reactions of HL(1-3) with Cu(NO3)2·2.5H2O led to the corresponding copper(II) complexes [Cu(L)(NO3)] 1-3. All the compounds were characterized by conventional analytical techniques and, for 1 and 3, also by single-crystal X-ray analysis. The interactions of complexes 1-3 with calf thymus DNA were studied by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques and the calculated binding constants (K(b)) are in the range of 3.5 × 10(5) M(-1)-3.2 × 10(5) M(-1). Complexes 1-3 effectively bind DNA through an intercalative mode, as proved by molecular docking studies. The binding affinity of the complexes decreases with the size increase of the N-alkyl substituent, in the order of 1 > 2 > 3, which is also in accord with the calculated LUMO(complex) energies. They show substantial in vitro cytotoxic effect against human lung (A-549), breast (MDA-MB-231) and cervical (HeLa) cancer cell lines. Complex 1 exhibits a significant inhibitory effect on the proliferation of the A-549 cancer cells. The antiproliferative efficacy of 1 has also been analysed by a DNA fragmentation assay, fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) and nuclear morphology using a fluorescence microscope. The possible mode for the apoptosis pathway of 1 has also been evaluated by a reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation study.

  8. Analytical validity of a microRNA‐based assay for diagnosing indeterminate thyroid FNA smears from routinely prepared cytology slides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Hila; Schnitzer‐Perlman, Temima; Shtabsky, Alexander; VandenBussche, Christopher J.; Ali, Syed Z.; Kolar, Zdenek; Pagni, Fabio; Bar, Dganit

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The majority of thyroid nodules are diagnosed using fine‐needle aspiration (FNA) biopsies. The authors recently described the clinical validation of a molecular microRNA‐based assay, RosettaGX Reveal, which can diagnose thyroid nodules as benign or suspicious using a single stained FNA smear. This paper describes the analytical validation of the assay. METHODS More than 800 FNA slides were tested, including slides stained with Romanowsky‐type and Papanicolaou stains. The assay was examined for the following features: intranodule concordance, effect of stain type, minimal acceptable RNA amounts, performance on low numbers of thyroid cells, effect of time since sampling, and analytical sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility. RESULTS The assay can be run on FNA slides for which as little as 1% of the cells are thyroid epithelial cells or from which only 5 ng of RNA have been extracted. Samples composed entirely of blood failed quality control and were not classified. Stain type did not affect performance. All slides were stored at room temperature. However, the length of time between FNA sampling and processing did not affect assay performance. There was a high level of concordance between laboratories (96%), and the concordance for slides created from the same FNA pass was 93%. CONCLUSIONS The microRNA‐based assay was robust to various physical processing conditions and to differing sample characteristics. Given the assay's performance, robustness, and use of routinely prepared FNA slides, it has the potential to provide valuable aid for physicians in the diagnosis of thyroid nodules. Cancer Cytopathol 2016;124:711–21. © 2016 Rosetta Genomics. Cancer Cytopathology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Cancer Society. PMID:27223344

  9. Preparation of an ultra fast binding cement from calcium silicate-based mixed oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, S C; Brunner, T J; Grass, R N; Bohner, M; Stark, W J

    2007-10-03

    Building construction takes time, in part because the binding process of cement is based on the slow re-crystallization and precipitation of calcium silicate species. Since the material's reactivity is surface area limited, a reduction in particle size of Portland cements has been used to prepare faster binding formulations. The present work investigates a new and direct, one-step preparation of calcium silicate-based nanoparticles of a typical Portland cement composition by flame spray synthesis. Isothermal calorimetry revealed that the hardening of this new nano-cement corroborated a more than tenfold increase of initial reactivity with different reaction kinetics if compared to conventionally prepared cements. At present, the unfavourably high porosity of nano-cements, however, underlines the need for additional improvements of chemical composition and formulation to make these highly reactive materials applicable to modern construction work, where load-bearing strength is of importance.

  10. SNBRFinder: A Sequence-Based Hybrid Algorithm for Enhanced Prediction of Nucleic Acid-Binding Residues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxia Yang

    Full Text Available Protein-nucleic acid interactions are central to various fundamental biological processes. Automated methods capable of reliably identifying DNA- and RNA-binding residues in protein sequence are assuming ever-increasing importance. The majority of current algorithms rely on feature-based prediction, but their accuracy remains to be further improved. Here we propose a sequence-based hybrid algorithm SNBRFinder (Sequence-based Nucleic acid-Binding Residue Finder by merging a feature predictor SNBRFinderF and a template predictor SNBRFinderT. SNBRFinderF was established using the support vector machine whose inputs include sequence profile and other complementary sequence descriptors, while SNBRFinderT was implemented with the sequence alignment algorithm based on profile hidden Markov models to capture the weakly homologous template of query sequence. Experimental results show that SNBRFinderF was clearly superior to the commonly used sequence profile-based predictor and SNBRFinderT can achieve comparable performance to the structure-based template methods. Leveraging the complementary relationship between these two predictors, SNBRFinder reasonably improved the performance of both DNA- and RNA-binding residue predictions. More importantly, the sequence-based hybrid prediction reached competitive performance relative to our previous structure-based counterpart. Our extensive and stringent comparisons show that SNBRFinder has obvious advantages over the existing sequence-based prediction algorithms. The value of our algorithm is highlighted by establishing an easy-to-use web server that is freely accessible at http://ibi.hzau.edu.cn/SNBRFinder.

  11. Identification of novel KCNQ4 openers by a high-throughput fluorescence-based thallium flux assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qunyi; Rottländer, Mario; Xu, Mingkai; Christoffersen, Claus Tornby; Frederiksen, Kristen; Wang, Ming-Wei; Jensen, Henrik Sindal

    2011-11-01

    To develop a real-time thallium flux assay for high-throughput screening (HTS) of human KCNQ4 (Kv7.4) potassium channel openers, we used CHO-K1 cells stably expressing human KCNQ4 channel protein and a thallium-sensitive dye based on the permeability of thallium through potassium channels. The electrophysiological and pharmacological properties of the cell line expressing the KCNQ4 protein were found to be in agreement with that reported elsewhere. The EC(50) values of the positive control compound (retigabine) determined by the thallium and (86)rubidium flux assays were comparable to and consistent with those documented in the literature. Signal-to-background (S/B) ratio and Z factor of the thallium influx assay system were assessed to be 8.82 and 0.63, respectively. In a large-scale screening of 98,960 synthetic and natural compounds using the thallium influx assay, 76 compounds displayed consistent KCNQ4 activation, and of these 6 compounds demonstrated EC(50) values of less than 20 μmol/L and 2 demonstrated EC(50) values of less than 1 μmol/L. Taken together, the fluorescence-based thallium flux assay is a highly efficient, automatable, and robust tool to screen potential KCNQ4 openers. This approach may also be expanded to identify and evaluate potential modulators of other potassium channels. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Colloidal gold-based immunochromatographic strip assay for the rapid detection of three natural estrogens in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongxing; Guo, Lingling; Liu, Liqiang; Kuang, Hua; Xu, Chuanlai

    2018-09-01

    In this study, we developed highly sensitive and specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against estrone (E 1 ), 17β-estradiol (17β-E 2 ), and estriol (E 3 ). The half-maximal inhibitory concentration values of anti-E 1 , anti-17β-E 2 , and anti-E 3 mAbs were 0.46, 0.36, and 0.39 ng/mL, respectively, based on competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ic-ELISA) results. A rapid colloidal gold-based immunoassay strip assay was developed for the determination of E 1, 17β-E 2 , and E 3 residues in milk samples. The assay had a visual cut-off value of 5 ng/mL, and required 10 min to assess with the naked eye. The results obtained from the immunochromatographic strip assay were consistent with those obtained from ic-ELISA and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The immunochromatographic strip assay is useful and rapid for the detection of E 1 , 17β-E 2 , and E 3 in milk. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Tuning a 96-Well Microtiter Plate Fluorescence-Based Assay to Identify AGE Inhibitors in Crude Plant Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Séro

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs are involved in the pathogenesis of numerous diseases. Among them, cellular accumulation of AGEs contributes to vascular complications in diabetes. Besides using drugs to lower blood sugar, a balanced diet and the intake of herbal products potentially limiting AGE formation could be considered beneficial for patients’ health. The current paper presents a simple and cheap high-throughput screening (HTS assay based on AGE fluorescence and suitable for plant extract screening. We have already implemented an HTS assay based on vesperlysines-like fluorescing AGEs quickly (24 h formed from BSA and ribose under physiological conditions. However, interference was noted when fluorescent compounds and/or complex mixtures were tested. To overcome these problems and apply this HTS assay to plant extracts, we developed a technique for systematic quantification of both vesperlysines (λexc 370 nm; λem 440 nm and pentosidine-like (λexc 335 nm; λem 385 nm AGEs. In a batch of medicinal and food plant extracts, hits were selected as soon as fluorescence decreased under a fixed threshold for at least one wavelength. Hits revealed during this study appeared to contain well-known and powerful anti-AGE substances, thus demonstrating the suitability of this assay for screening crude extracts (0.1 mg/mL. Finally, quercetin was found to be a more powerful reference compound than aminoguanidine in such assay.

  14. GPU-based Point Cloud Superpositioning for Structural Comparisons of Protein Binding Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinweber, Matthias; Fober, Thomas; Freisleben, Bernd

    2016-11-07

    In this paper, we present a novel approach to solve the labeled point cloud superpositioning problem for performing structural comparisons of protein binding sites. The solution is based on a parallel evolution strategy that operates on large populations and runs on GPU hardware. The proposed evolution strategy reduces the likelihood of getting stuck in a local optimum of the multimodal real-valued optimization problem represented by labeled point cloud superpositioning. The performance of the GPU-based parallel evolution strategy is compared to a previously proposed CPU-based sequential approach for labeled point cloud superpositioning, indicating that the GPU-based parallel evolution strategy leads to qualitatively better results and significantly shorter runtimes, with speed improvements of up to a factor of 1,500 for large populations. Binary classification tests based on the ATP, NADH and FAD protein subsets of CavBase, a database containing putative binding sites, show average classification rate improvements from about 92% (CPU) to 96% (GPU). Further experiments indicate that the proposed GPU-based labeled point cloud superpositioning approach can be superior to traditional protein comparison approaches based on sequence alignments.

  15. Tail-labelling of DNA probes using modified deoxynucleotide triphosphates and terminal deoxynucleotidyl tranferase. Application in electrochemical DNA hybridization and protein-DNA binding assays

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horáková Brázdilová, Petra; Macíčková-Cahová, Hana; Pivoňková, Hana; Špaček, Jan; Havran, Luděk; Hocek, Michal; Fojta, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 5 (2011), s. 1366-1371 ISSN 1477-0520 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035; GA MŠk(CZ) LC512; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : DNA tail-labelling * protein-DNA binding * DNA hybridization Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.696, year: 2011

  16. DNA deformability changes of single base pair mutants within CDE binding sites in S. Cerevisiae centromere DNA correlate with measured chromosomal loss rates and CDE binding site symmetries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marx Kenneth A

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The centromeres in yeast (S. cerevisiae are organized by short DNA sequences (125 bp on each chromosome consisting of 2 conserved elements: CDEI and CDEIII spaced by a CDEII region. CDEI and CDEIII are critical sequence specific protein binding sites necessary for correct centromere formation and following assembly with proteins, are positioned near each other on a specialized nucleosome. Hegemann et al. BioEssays 1993, 15: 451–460 reported single base DNA mutants within the critical CDEI and CDEIII binding sites on the centromere of chromosome 6 and quantitated centromere loss of function, which they measured as loss rates for the different chromosome 6 mutants during cell division. Olson et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1998, 95: 11163–11168 reported the use of protein-DNA crystallography data to produce a DNA dinucleotide protein deformability energetic scale (PD-scale that describes local DNA deformability by sequence specific binding proteins. We have used the PD-scale to investigate the DNA sequence dependence of the yeast chromosome 6 mutants' loss rate data. Each single base mutant changes 2 PD-scale values at that changed base position relative to the wild type. In this study, we have utilized these mutants to demonstrate a correlation between the change in DNA deformability of the CDEI and CDEIII core sites and the overall experimentally measured chromosome loss rates of the chromosome 6 mutants. Results In the CDE I and CDEIII core binding regions an increase in the magnitude of change in deformability of chromosome 6 single base mutants with respect to the wild type correlates to an increase in the measured chromosome loss rate. These correlations were found to be significant relative to 105 Monte Carlo randomizations of the dinucleotide PD-scale applied to the same calculation. A net loss of deformability also tends to increase the loss rate. Binding site position specific, 4 data-point correlations were also

  17. Determining the analytical specificity of PCR-based assays for the diagnosis of IA: What is Aspergillus?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morton, C.O.; White, P.L.; Barnes, R.A.; Klingspor, L.; Cuenca-Estrella, M.; Lagrou, K.; Bretagne, S.; Melchers, W.J.; Mengoli, C.; Caliendo, A.M.; Cogliati, M.; Debets-Ossenkopp, Y.; Gorton, R.; Hagen, F.; Halliday, C.; Hamal, P.; Harvey-Wood, K.; Jaton, K.; Johnson, G.; Kidd, S.; Lengerova, M.; Lass-Florl, C.; Linton, C.; Millon, L.; Morrissey, C.O.; Paholcsek, M.; Talento, A.F.; Ruhnke, M.; Willinger, B.; Donnelly, J.P.; Loeffler, J.

    2017-01-01

    A wide array of PCR tests has been developed to aid the diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis (IA), providing technical diversity but limiting standardisation and acceptance. Methodological recommendations for testing blood samples using PCR exist, based on achieving optimal assay sensitivity to help

  18. A fluorescence polarization based screening assay for identification of small molecule inhibitors of the PICK1 PDZ domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Thor S; Madsen, Kenneth L; Dyhring, Tino

    2011-01-01

    PDZ (PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1 homology) domains represent putative targets in several diseases including cancer, stroke, addiction and neuropathic pain. Here we describe the application of a simple and fast screening assay based on fluorescence polarization (FP) to identify inhibitors of the PDZ...

  19. Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Based Assay Predicts Developmental Toxicity Potential of ToxCast Chemicals (ACT meeting)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worldwide initiatives to screen for toxicity potential among the thousands of chemicals currently in use require inexpensive and high-throughput in vitro models to meet their goals. The devTOX quickPredict platform is an in vitro human pluripotent stem cell-based assay used to as...

  20. Cytochrome P450 4A11 inhibition assays based on characterization of lauric acid metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yeon Jung; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Lee, Ji-Yoon; Ryu, Chang Seon; Kim, Young Ho; Lee, Kiho; Kim, Sang Kyum

    2018-02-01

    This study was designed to characterize lauric acid metabolism to facilitate the establishment of cytochrome P450 4A11 (CYP4A11) inhibition assay. Three metabolites (2-, 11-, and 12-hydroxylauric acids) were identified in pooled human liver microsomes based on comparisons with authentic standards. Reaction phenotyping using 14 recombinant CYPs showed that ω-hydroxylation was mediated dominantly by CYP4A11 and marginally by CYP4F3B. CYP2B6 played an exclusive role in the formation of 2-hydroxylauric acid. The production of 11-hydroxylauric acid was mediated by CYP2E1, CYP2C9, CYP2B6, CYP1A2, CYP3A4, and CYP4A11. The IC 50 values of HET0016, a well-known pan-CYP4 inhibitor, against the formation of 12-, 11-, and 2-hydroxylauric acid were 1.0, 1.0, and 0.009 μM, respectively. Among the 50 natural compounds examined, plumbagin (5-hydroxy-2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone) inhibited the formation of 12-, 11-, and 2-hydroxylauric acid with IC 50 values of 1.7, 2.3, and 2.7 μM, respectively. In the selectivity study, HET0016 inhibited CYP2B6 with an IC 50 of 9.2 nM, as well as CYP1A2, CYP2C19, and CYP2E1 with IC 50 values of 1-2 μM. Plumbagin inhibited all CYP enzymes tested with IC 50 values of 1.7-3.0 μM. These methods can be used as tools to develop CYP4A11 inhibitors; simultaneous determination of the hydroxylauric acid metabolites provides further information on selectivity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Bienzymatic-based electrochemical DNA biosensors: a way to lower the detection limit of hybridization assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochelet-Dequaire, Murielle; Djellouli, Naïma; Limoges, Benoît; Brossier, Pierre

    2009-02-01

    The use of the alkaline phosphatase (AP) as an enzyme label and the amplification of its analytical response with a diaphorase (DI) secondary enzyme were investigated in an electrochemical hybridization assay involving arrays of carbon screen-printed DNA biosensors for the sensitive quantification of an amplified 406-base pair human cytomegalovirus DNA sequence (HCMV DNA). For this purpose, PCR-amplified biotinylated HCMV DNA targets were simultaneously bound to a monolayer of neutravidin irreversibly adsorbed on the surface of the electrodes and hybridized to complementary digoxigenin-labeled detection probes. The amount of hybrids immobilized on the electrode surface was labeled with an anti-digoxigenin AP conjugate and quantified electrochemically by measuring the activity of the AP label through the hydrolysis of the electroinactive p-aminophenylphosphate (PAPP) substrate into the p-aminophenol (PAP) product. The intensity of the cyclic voltammetric anodic peak current resulting from the oxidation of PAP into p-quinoneimine (PQI) was related to the number of viral amplified DNA targets present in the sample, and a detection limit of 10 pM was thus achieved. The electrochemical response of the AP label product was further enhanced by adding the diaphorase enzymatic amplifier in the solution. In the presence of the auxiliary enzyme DI, the PQI was reduced back to PAP and the resulting oxidized form of DI was finally regenerated in its reduced native state by its natural substrate, NADH. Such a bienzymatic amplification scheme enabled a 100-fold lowering of the HCMV DNA detection limit obtained with the monoenzymatic system.

  2. EDTA aggregates induce SYPRO orange-based fluorescence in thermal shift assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Kroeger

    Full Text Available Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA is widely used in the life sciences as chelating ligand of metal ions. However, formation of supramolecular EDTA aggregates at pH > 8 has been reported, which may lead to artifactual assay results. When applied as a buffer component at pH ≈ 10 in differential scanning fluorimetry (TSA using SYPRO Orange as fluorescent dye, we observed a sharp change in fluorescence intensity about 20°C lower than expected for the investigated protein. We hypothesized that this change results from SYPRO Orange/EDTA interactions. TSA experiments in the presence of SYPRO Orange using solutions that contain EDTA-Na+ but no protein were performed. The TSA experiments provide evidence that suggests that at pH > 9, EDTA4- interacts with SYPRO Orange in a temperature-dependent manner, leading to a fluorescence signal yielding a "denaturation temperature" of ~68°C. Titrating Ca2+ to SYPRO Orange and EDTA solutions quenched fluorescence. Ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA behaved similarly to EDTA. Analytical ultracentrifugation corroborated the formation of EDTA aggregates. Molecular dynamics simulations of free diffusion of EDTA-Na+ and SYPRO Orange of in total 27 μs suggested the first structural model of EDTA aggregates in which U-shaped EDTA4- arrange in an inverse bilayer-like manner, exposing ethylene moieties to the solvent, with which SYPRO Orange interacts. We conclude that EDTA aggregates induce a SYPRO Orange-based fluorescence in TSA. These results make it relevant to ascertain that future TSA results are not influenced by interference between EDTA, or EDTA-related molecules, and the fluorescent dye.

  3. A next generation enzymatic magnesium assay on the Abbott ARCHITECT chemistry system meets performance goals based on biological variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, D; Martens, P; Mah, W; Yip, P M

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the performance of the Abbott ARCHITECT enzymatic assay for magnesium (3P68) in serum/plasma and urine against analytical goals based on biological variation. Analytical performance was evaluated according to CLSI protocols. Precision was examined using commercial chemistry controls. Accuracy was assessed against NIST SRM 956c, electrolytes in human serum. Correlation with the arsenazo Mg assay (7D70) was completed using patient samples (plasma, N = 101; urine, N = 90). Common interferences were examined in pooled patient specimens with high and low magnesium concentrations. The enzymatic Mg assay displayed imprecision of 1.7% at 0.72 mmol/L and 1.4% at 1.80 mmol/L (20 days, one calibration, one reagent lot). The linear range was verified between 0.18-7.0 mmol/L (plasma) and 0.01-10.69 mmol/L (urine). Results of the enzymatic assay (x) correlated well with the predicate assay (y) with the relationships y = 0.891x + 0.035, R = 0.967 (plasma) and y = 1.181x + 0.086, R = 0.997 (urine). Mean bias of the NIST SRM 956 c samples was -1.4%. This method showed minimal interference by hemoglobin (3g/L as hemolysate), lipemia (20 g/L Intralipid), unconjugated bilirubin (531 μmol/L), and ascorbate (680 μmol/L). The ARCHITECT Magnesium assay 3P68 achieved the desirable analytical quality specification of 4.8% for total allowable error. In comparison to the 7D70 assay, notable improvements are seen in precision, 30-day calibration stability, and minimal interference by hemolyzed and lipemic samples. © 2013.

  4. Determining the analytical specificity of PCR-based assays for the diagnosis of IA: What is Aspergillus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, C Oliver; White, P Lewis; Barnes, Rosemary A; Klingspor, Lena; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Lagrou, Katrien; Bretagne, Stéphane; Melchers, Willem; Mengoli, Carlo; Caliendo, Angela M; Cogliati, Massimo; Debets-Ossenkopp, Yvette; Gorton, Rebecca; Hagen, Ferry; Halliday, Catriona; Hamal, Petr; Harvey-Wood, Kathleen; Jaton, Katia; Johnson, Gemma; Kidd, Sarah; Lengerova, Martina; Lass-Florl, Cornelia; Linton, Chris; Millon, Laurence; Morrissey, C Orla; Paholcsek, Melinda; Talento, Alida Fe; Ruhnke, Markus; Willinger, Birgit; Donnelly, J Peter; Loeffler, Juergen

    2017-06-01

    A wide array of PCR tests has been developed to aid the diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis (IA), providing technical diversity but limiting standardisation and acceptance. Methodological recommendations for testing blood samples using PCR exist, based on achieving optimal assay sensitivity to help exclude IA. Conversely, when testing more invasive samples (BAL, biopsy, CSF) emphasis is placed on confirming disease, so analytical specificity is paramount. This multicenter study examined the analytical specificity of PCR methods for detecting IA by blind testing a panel of DNA extracted from a various fungal species to explore the range of Aspergillus species that could be detected, but also potential cross reactivity with other fungal species. Positivity rates were calculated and regression analysis was performed to determine any associations between technical specifications and performance. The accuracy of Aspergillus genus specific assays was 71.8%, significantly greater (P < .0001) than assays specific for individual Aspergillus species (47.2%). For genus specific assays the most often missed species were A. lentulus (25.0%), A. versicolor (24.1%), A. terreus (16.1%), A. flavus (15.2%), A. niger (13.4%), and A. fumigatus (6.2%). There was a significant positive association between accuracy and using an Aspergillus genus PCR assay targeting the rRNA genes (P = .0011). Conversely, there was a significant association between rRNA PCR targets and false positivity (P = .0032). To conclude current Aspergillus PCR assays are better suited for detecting A. fumigatus, with inferior detection of most other Aspergillus species. The use of an Aspergillus genus specific PCR assay targeting the rRNA genes is preferential. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. A probe-based quantitative PCR assay for detecting Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae in fish tissue and environmental DNA water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Patrick; Sepulveda, Adam; Martin, Renee; Hopper, Lacey

    2017-01-01

    A probe-based quantitative real-time PCR assay was developed to detect Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae, which causes proliferative kidney disease in salmonid fish, in kidney tissue and environmental DNA (eDNA) water samples. The limits of detection and quantification were 7 and 100 DNA copies for calibration standards and T. bryosalmonae was reliably detected down to 100 copies in tissue and eDNA samples. The assay presented here is a highly sensitive and quantitative tool for detecting T. bryosalmonae with potential applications for tissue diagnostics and environmental detection.

  6. Toward the authentication of wines of Nemea denomination of origin through cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS)-based assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaniolas, Stelios; Tsachaki, Maroussa; Bennett, Malcolm J; Tucker, Gregory A

    2008-09-10

    In the present study, we developed a cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS)-based assay as a first attempt to detect fraud in grapevine musts with a long-term objective to establish an analytical methodology to authenticate wines of Nemea denomination of origin (Agiorgitiko). The analytical assay makes use of a single nucleotide polymorphism that discriminates Agiorgitiko and Cabernet Sauvignon varieties. The latter grape variety is one of the major adulterants for Nemea wines. Agiorgitiko grapevine must was spiked with Cabernet Sauvignon in several ratios (v/v) from 50 down to 10%, and the subsequent mixes were subjected to alcoholic microfermentation. DNA was extracted from all mixture samples up to the end of the fermentation process and was subjected to the CAPS assay. Both standard agarose gel and lab-on-a-chip capillary electrophoresis illustrated the ability of the method to detect the presence of Cabernet Sauvignon down to 10% throughout the whole fermentation process.

  7. Toward an international standard for PCR-based detection of food-borne thermotolerant Campylobacters: Assay development and analytical validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lübeck, Peter Stephensen; Wolffs, P.; On, Stephen L.W.

    2003-01-01

    As part of a European research project (FOOD-PCR), we developed a standardized and robust PCR detection assay specific for the three most frequently reported food-borne pathogenic Campylobacter species, C. jejuni, C. coli, and C. lari. Fifteen published and unpublished PCR primers targeting the 16S...... carcass rinse, unlike both Taq DNA polymerase and DyNAzyme. Based on these results, Tth was selected as the most suitable enzyme for the assay. The standardized PCR test described shows potential for use in large-scale screening programs for food-borne Campylobacter species under the assay conditions....... The inclusivity and exclusivity were 100 and 97%, respectively. In an attempt to find a thermostable DNA polymerase more resistant than Taq to PCR inhibitors present in chicken samples, three DNA polymerases were evaluated. The DNA polymerase Tth was not inhibited at a concentration of 2% (vol/vol) chicken...

  8. High-throughput pseudovirion-based neutralization assay for analysis of natural and vaccine-induced antibodies against human papillomaviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Sehr

    Full Text Available A highly sensitive, automated, purely add-on, high-throughput pseudovirion-based neutralization assay (HT-PBNA with excellent repeatability and run-to-run reproducibility was developed for human papillomavirus types (HPV 16, 18, 31, 45, 52, 58 and bovine papillomavirus type 1. Preparation of 384 well assay plates with serially diluted sera and the actual cell-based assay are separated in time, therefore batches of up to one hundred assay plates can be processed sequentially. A mean coefficient of variation (CV of 13% was obtained for anti-HPV 16 and HPV 18 titers for a standard serum tested in a total of 58 repeats on individual plates in seven independent runs. Natural antibody response was analyzed in 35 sera from patients with HPV 16 DNA positive cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2+ lesions. The new HT-PBNA is based on Gaussia luciferase with increased sensitivity compared to the previously described manual PBNA (manPBNA based on secreted alkaline phosphatase as reporter. Titers obtained with HT-PBNA were generally higher than titers obtained with the manPBNA. A good linear correlation (R(2 = 0.7 was found between HT-PBNA titers and anti-HPV 16 L1 antibody-levels determined by a Luminex bead-based GST-capture assay for these 35 sera and a Kappa-value of 0.72, with only 3 discordant sera in the low titer range. In addition to natural low titer antibody responses the high sensitivity of the HT-PBNA also allows detection of cross-neutralizing antibodies induced by commercial HPV L1-vaccines and experimental L2-vaccines. When analyzing the WHO international standards for HPV 16 and 18 we determined an analytical sensitivity of 0.864 and 1.105 mIU, respectively.

  9. Partnership on Rotational ViscoElastic Test Standardization (PROVETS): evidence-based guidelines on rotational viscoelastic assays in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goggs, Robert; Brainard, Benjamin; de Laforcade, Armelle M; Flatland, Bente; Hanel, Rita; McMichael, Maureen; Wiinberg, Bo

    2014-01-01

    To systematically examine the evidence relating to the performance of rotational viscoelastic testing in companion animals, to develop assay guidelines, and to identify knowledge gaps. Multiple questions were considered within 5 parent domains, specifically system comparability, sample handling, assay activation and test protocol, definitions and data reporting, and nonstandard assays. Standardized, systematic evaluation of the literature was performed. Relevant articles were categorized according to level of evidence and assessed for quality. Consensus was developed regarding conclusions for application of concepts to clinical practice. Academic and referral veterinary medical centers. Databases searched included Medline, Commonwealth Agricultural Bureaux abstracts, and Google Scholar. Worksheets were prepared evaluating 28 questions across the 5 domains and generating 84 assay guidelines. Evidence-based guidelines for the performance of thromboelastography in companion animals were generated through this process. Some of these guidelines are well supported while others will benefit from additional evidence. Many knowledge gaps were identified and future work should be directed to address these gaps and to objectively evaluate the impact of these guidelines on assay comparability within and between centers. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2014.

  10. Four-part leukocyte differential count based on sheathless microflow cytometer and fluorescent dye assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wendian; Guo, Luke; Kasdan, Harvey; Tai, Yu-Chong

    2013-04-07

    Leukocyte differential count is one of the most frequently ordered clinical tests in hospitals. This paper reports a point-of-care test for the leukocyte count by using a microflow cytometer and a fluorescent dye assay. The dye assay relied on fluorescent detection alone to count leukocytes in blood and to identify leukocyte subtypes. By combining the fluorescent assay with a sheathless microflow design, the proposed method achieved a minimal sample volume by eliminating excessive dilution and sheath flow. In this paper, a four-part leukocyte differential count including lymphocyte, monocyte, neutrophil and eosinophil was demonstrated, and the whole test consumed only a small amount of blood (5 μL) and reagents (68 μL in total). The merits of minimal sample volume, long reagent shelf life and portable instrument made this method optimal for point-of-care applications.

  11. The Zebra Fish IBD Model Assessed By Novel Probe Based TagMan Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kania, Per Walter; Buchmann, Kurt; Haarder, Simon

    2015-01-01

    or oxazolone. Samples (intestine) were taken for realtime quantitative PCR. An array of TagMan assays was designed using Primer3Plus. All assays were checked by melting curve analysis in SYBR Green and by 3% agarose gel electrophoresis in order to ensure specificity. The assays include transcription factors....... The etiology is complex and not fully understood. The zebra fish (Danio rerio) may serve as a model for elucidation of these inadequately understood mechanisms. Two hapten-mediated IBD-like models in zebra fish have been generated by using the chemicals oxazolone and TNBS dissolved in ethanol. From mammalian...... and cytokines of different subsets of T-cell populations, cell markers etc. The 2-Ct method was used to estimate the fold change of gene expression relative to the H2O instilled group. Only results with p>0.05 and regulations >2 are discussed. The solvent ethanol, necessary for dissolving oxazolone and TNBS...

  12. Synthesis, structure, DNA/BSA binding and antibacterial studies of NNO tridentate Schiff base metal complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakthi, Marimuthu; Ramu, Andy

    2017-12-01

    A new salicylaldehyde derived 2,4-diiodo-6-((2-phenylaminoethylimino)methyl)phenol Schiff base(L) and its transition metal complexes of the type MLCl where, M = Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), Mn(II) and Zn(II) have been synthesized. The coordination mode of Schiff base holding NNO donor atoms with metal ions was well investigated by elemental analysis, ESI-mass as well as IR, UV-vis, CV and NMR spectral studies. The binding efficiency and mode of these complexes with biological macromolecules viz., herring sperm DNA (HS- DNA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) have been explored through various spectroscopic techniques. The characteristic changes in absorption, emission and, circular dichroism spectra of the complexes with DNA indicate the noticeable interaction between them. From the all spectral information complexes could interact with DNA via non-intercalation mode of binding. The hyperchromisim in absorption band and hypochromisim in emission intensity of BSA with different complex concentrations shown significant information, and the binding affinity value has been predicted from Stern-Volmer plots. Further, all the complexes could cleave the circular plasmid pUC19 DNA efficiently by using an activator H2O2. The ligand and all metal(II) complexes showed good antibacterial activities. The molecular docking studies of the complexes with DNA were performed in order to make a comparison and conclusion with spectral technic results.

  13. Positive cooperativity of the specific binding between Hg2+ ion and T:T mismatched base pairs in duplex DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torigoe, Hidetaka; Miyakawa, Yukako; Ono, Akira; Kozasa, Tetsuo

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Hg 2+ specifically bound with the T:T mismatched base pair at 1:1 molar ratio. ► The binding constant between Hg 2+ and the T:T mismatched base pair was 10 6 M −1 . ► The binding constant was larger than those for nonspecific metal–DNA interactions. ► The binding constant for the second Hg 2+ was larger than that for the first Hg 2+ . ► The positive cooperative binding was observed between Hg 2+ and multiple T:T. - Abstract: Metal-mediated base pairs by the interaction between metal ions and artificial bases in oligonucleotides have been developed for their potential applications in nanotechnology. We recently found that a natural T:T mismatched base pair bound with Hg 2+ ion to form a novel T–Hg–T base pair. Here, we examined the thermodynamic properties of the binding between Hg 2+ and each of the single and double T:T mismatched base pair duplex DNAs by isothermal titration calorimetry. Hg 2+ specifically bound with the T:T mismatched base pair at 1:1 molar ratio with 10 6 M −1 binding constant, which was significantly larger than those for nonspecific metal ion–DNA interactions. In the Hg 2+ –double T:T mismatched base pair interaction, the affinity for the second Hg 2+ binding was significantly larger than that for the first Hg 2+ binding. The positively cooperative binding may be favorable to align multiple Hg 2+ in duplex DNA for the application of the metal-mediated base pairs in nanotechnology.

  14. NN-align. An artificial neural network-based alignment algorithm for MHC class II peptide binding prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Lund, Ole

    2009-01-01

    this binding event. RESULTS: Here, we present a novel artificial neural network-based method, NN-align that allows for simultaneous identification of the MHC class II binding core and binding affinity. NN-align is trained using a novel training algorithm that allows for correction of bias in the training data...... due to redundant binding core representation. Incorporation of information about the residues flanking the peptide-binding core is shown to significantly improve the prediction accuracy. The method is evaluated on a large-scale benchmark consisting of six independent data sets covering 14 human MHC...... class II alleles, and is demonstrated to outperform other state-of-the-art MHC class II prediction methods. CONCLUSION: The NN-align method is competitive with the state-of-the-art MHC class II peptide binding prediction algorithms. The method is publicly available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/Net...

  15. Monitoring water supplies for weaponized bacteria and bacterial toxins using rapid fluorescence-based viability and affinity assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tassell, Roger L.; Evans, Mishell

    2004-03-01

    The rapid detection of weaponized bacteria and toxins is a major problem during a biological attack. Although sensitive detection formats exist for many biowarfare agents, they often require advanced training and complex procedures. Luna has developed simple, rapid means for determining the presence of pathogens and bacterial toxins in water supplies using fluorescence-based assays that can be adapted for field use. The batteries of rapid assays are designed for i) determining cell viability and bacterial loads by exploiting metabolic markers (e.g., acid-production, redox potentials, etc) and ii) detecting bacterial toxins using fluorescent, polymerized affinity liposomes (fluorosomes). The viability assays were characterized using E. coli, S. aureus and the anthrax simulant, B. globigii. The viability assays detected bacterial loads of ~ 104 CFU/ml and with simple filtration ~ 100CFU/ml could be detected. The affinity fluorosomes were characterized using cholera toxin (CT). Affinity liposomes displaying GM1 and anti-CT antibodies could detect CT at water susceptible to sabotage could be easily monitored and confirmed for specific agents using simple, general and specific fluorescence-based detection schemes based on metabolism and ligand-target interactions.

  16. Fast DNA Serotyping and Antimicrobial Resistance Gene Determination of Salmonella enterica with an Oligonucleotide Microarray-Based Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Sascha D.; Ziegler, Albrecht; Methner, Ulrich; Slickers, Peter; Keiling, Silke; Monecke, Stefan; Ehricht, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Salmonellosis caused by Salmonella (S.) belongs to the most prevalent food-borne zoonotic diseases throughout the world. Therefore, serotype identification for all culture-confirmed cases of Salmonella infection is important for epidemiological purposes. As a standard, the traditional culture method (ISO 6579:2002) is used to identify Salmonella. Classical serotyping takes 4–5 days to be completed, it is labor-intensive, expensive and more than 250 non-standardized sera are necessary to characterize more than 2,500 Salmonella serovars currently known. These technical difficulties could be overcome with modern molecular methods. We developed a microarray based serogenotyping assay for the most prevalent Salmonella serovars in Europe and North America. The current assay version could theoretically discriminate 28 O-antigens and 86 H-antigens. Additionally, we included 77 targets analyzing antimicrobial resistance genes. The Salmonella assay was evaluated with a set of 168 reference strains representing 132 serovars previously serotyped by conventional agglutination through various reference centers. 117 of 132 (81%) tested serovars showed an unique microarray pattern. 15 of 132 serovars generated a pattern which was shared by multiple serovars (e.g., S. ser. Enteritidis and S. ser. Nitra). These shared patterns mainly resulted from the high similarity of the genotypes of serogroup A and D1. Using patterns of the known reference strains, a database was build which represents the basis of a new PatternMatch software that can serotype unknown Salmonella isolates automatically. After assay verification, the Salmonella serogenotyping assay was used to identify a field panel of 105 Salmonella isolates. All were identified as Salmonella and 93 of 105 isolates (88.6%) were typed in full concordance with conventional serotyping. This microarray based assay is a powerful tool for serogenotyping. PMID:23056321

  17. Cytotoxicity Test Based on Human Cells Labeled with Fluorescent Proteins: Fluorimetry, Photography, and Scanning for High-Throughput Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinina, Marina A; Skvortsov, Dmitry A; Rubtsova, Maria P; Komarova, Ekaterina S; Dontsova, Olga A

    2017-12-21

    High- and medium-throughput assays are now routine methods for drug screening and toxicology investigations on mammalian cells. However, a simple and cost-effective analysis of cytotoxicity that can be carried out with commonly used laboratory equipment is still required. The developed cytotoxicity assays are based on human cell lines stably expressing eGFP, tdTomato, mCherry, or Katushka2S fluorescent proteins. Red fluorescent proteins exhibit a higher signal-to-noise ratio, due to less interference by medium autofluorescence, in comparison to green fluorescent protein. Measurements have been performed on a fluorescence scanner, a plate fluorimeter, and a camera photodocumentation system. For a 96-well plate assay, the sensitivity per well and the measurement duration were 250 cells and 15 min for the scanner, 500 cells and 2 min for the plate fluorimeter, and 1000 cells and less than 1 min for the camera detection. These sensitivities are similar to commonly used MTT (tetrazolium dye) assays. The used scanner and the camera had not been previously applied for cytotoxicity evaluation. An image processing scheme for the high-resolution scanner is proposed that significantly diminishes the number of control wells, even for a library containing fluorescent substances. The suggested cytotoxicity assay has been verified by measurements of the cytotoxicity of several well-known cytotoxic drugs and further applied to test a set of novel bacteriotoxic compounds in a medium-throughput format. The fluorescent signal of living cells is detected without disturbing them and adding any reagents, thus allowing to investigate time-dependent cytotoxicity effects on the same sample of cells. A fast, simple and cost-effective assay is suggested for cytotoxicity evaluation based on mammalian cells expressing fluorescent proteins and commonly used laboratory equipment.

  18. DNA incision evaluation, binding investigation and biocidal screening of Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(II) complexes with isoxazole Schiff bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganji, Nirmala; Chityala, Vijay Kumar; Marri, Pradeep Kumar; Aveli, Rambabu; Narendrula, Vamsikrishna; Daravath, Sreenu; Shivaraj

    2017-10-01

    Two new series of binary metal complexes [M(L 1 ) 2 ] and [M(L 2 ) 2 ] where, M=Cu(II), Ni(II) & Co(II) and L 1 =4-((3,4-dimethylisoxazol-5-ylimino)methyl)benzene-1,3-diol; L 2 =2-((3,4-dimethylisoxazol-5-ylimino)methyl)-5-methoxyphenol were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, 1 H NMR, 13 C NMR, FT-IR, ESI mass, UV-Visible, magnetic moment, ESR, SEM and powder XRD studies. Based on these results, a square planar geometry is assigned for all the metal complexes where the Schiff base acts as uninegatively charged bidentate chelating agent via the hydroxyl oxygen and azomethine nitrogen atoms. DNA binding studies of all the complexes with calf thymus DNA have been comprehensively investigated using electronic absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence quenching and viscosity studies. The oxidative and photo cleavage affinity of metal complexes towards supercoiled pBR322 DNA has been ascertained by agarose gel electrophoresis assay. From the results, it is observed that all the metal complexes bind effectively to CT-DNA via an intercalative mode of binding and also cleave pBR322 DNA in a promising manner. Further the Cu(II) complexes have shown better binding and cleavage properties towards DNA. The antimicrobial activities of the Schiff bases and their metal complexes were studied on bacterial and fungal strains and the results denoted that the complexes are more potent than their Schiff base ligands. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Potency determination of inactivated H7 influenza vaccines using monoclonal antibody-based ELISA and biolayer interferometry assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Anupama; Woerner, Amy; Schmeisser, Falko; Verma, Swati; Williams, Ollie; Weir, Jerry P

    2018-03-01

    The single radial immunodiffusion (SRID) assay, the accepted method for determining potency of inactivated influenza vaccines, measures an immunogenic form of the influenza hemagglutinin. Nevertheless, alternative methods for measuring vaccine potency have been explored to address some of the weaknesses of the SRID assay, including limited sensitivity and the requirement for large amounts of standardized reagents. Monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based potency assays also have the ability to detect and measure relevant immunogenic forms of HA. The objective of this study was to continue evaluation of mAb-based alternative methods for measuring the potency of inactivated influenza vaccines, focusing on A(H7N9) pandemic influenza vaccines. Several murine mAbs that recognize different epitopes on the H7 hemagglutinin (HA) were identified and characterized. These mAbs were evaluated in both a mAb-capture ELISA and a mAb-based biolayer interferometry (BLI) assay. Results indicated that potency of inactivated A(H7N9) vaccines, including vaccine samples that were stressed by heat treatment, measured by either alternative method correlated well with potency determined by the traditional SRID potency assay. The availability of multiple H7 mAbs, directed to different HA epitopes, provides needed redundancy in the potency analysis as A(H7N9) viruses continue to evolve antigenically and suggests the importance of having a broad, well-characterized panel of mAbs available for development of vaccines against influenza strains with pandemic potential. In addition, the results highlight the potential of mAb-based platform such as ELISA and BLI for development as alternative methods for determining the potency of inactivated influenza vaccines. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Improving binding mode and binding affinity predictions of docking by ligand-based search of protein conformations: evaluation in D3R grand challenge 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xianjin; Yan, Chengfei; Zou, Xiaoqin

    2017-08-01

    The growing number of protein-ligand complex structures, particularly the structures of proteins co-bound with different ligands, in the Protein Data Bank helps us tackle two major challenges in molecular docking studies: the protein flexibility and the scoring function. Here, we introduced a systematic strategy by using the information embedded in the known protein-ligand complex structures to improve both binding mode and binding affinity predictions. Specifically, a ligand similarity calculation method was employed to search a receptor structure with a bound ligand sharing high similarity with the query ligand for the docking use. The strategy was applied to the two datasets (HSP90 and MAP4K4) in recent D3R Grand Challenge 2015. In addition, for the HSP90 dataset, a system-specific scoring function (ITScore2_hsp90) was generated by recalibrating our statistical potential-based scoring function (ITScore2) using the known protein-ligand complex structures and the statistical mechanics-based iterative method. For the HSP90 dataset, better performances were achieved for both binding mode and binding affinity predictions comparing with the original ITScore2 and with ensemble docking. For the MAP4K4 dataset, although there were only eight known protein-ligand complex structures, our docking strategy achieved a comparable performance with ensemble docking. Our method for receptor conformational selection and iterative method for the development of system-specific statistical potential-based scoring functions can be easily applied to other protein targets that have a number of protein-ligand complex structures available to improve predictions on binding.

  1. Desenvolvimento de ensaio imunofluorométrico para a medida da globulina ligadora de tiroxina (thyroxine-binding globulin, TBG e sua aplicação em casos de deficiência desta proteína Development of an immunofluorometric assay for thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG and its application in cases of protein deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Gilberto H. Vieira

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A globulina ligadora de tiroxina (thyroxine-binding globulin, TBG é a principal transportadora de hormônios tiroidianos no soro. Variações na concentração sérica de TBG determinam variações proporcionais nas concentrações séricas totais de T4 e T3, sem implicar alterações de função, desde que a fração livre permaneça normal. Várias condições clínicas comuns levam a alterações significativas nos níveis de TBG, sendo as variações mais importantes devidas a defeitos genéticos. Como a TBG é codificada por gene localizado no cromossomo X, os defeitos se manifestam mais facilmente no sexo masculino. Descrevemos o desenvolvimento de ensaio imunofluorométrico para a medida de TBG com base em anticorpos monoclonais, sendo um desenvolvido em nosso laboratório e outro comercial. O método apresenta sensibilidade de 0,8mg/l e coeficientes de variação intra e interensaio inferiores a 10%. O estudo comparativo com método comercial mostrou alta correlação (r = 0,93; n = 48, sendo os valores normais obtidos de 10mg/l a 29mg/l. Estudamos também 20 indivíduos portadores de deficiência congênita de TBG, 19 homens e uma mulher, que apresentavam valores normais de TSH e baixos de T4 total; em todos eles os níveis de TBG foram indetectáveis. Já os níveis de T4 livre medidos por método indireto em 16 desses indivíduos mostraram-se elevados em todos, ao passo que, quando medidos por método direto pós-diálise nos quatro restantes, mostraram-se normais. Nossos resultados reforçam a necessidade prática da disponibilidade de ensaio para a medida de TBG para esclarecimento e definição diagnóstica de alguns casos especiais, principalmente quando o ensaio de T4 livre direto, pós-diálise, não é disponível.Thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG is the main responsible for serum thyroid hormone transport. Serum variations in TBG concentrations determine proportional variations in serum total T4 and T3 concentrations, without

  2. A homogeneous and “off–on” fluorescence aptamer-based assay for chloramphenicol using vesicle quantum dot-gold colloid composite probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Yang-Bao [State Key Laboratory Base of Novel Functional Materials and Preparation Science, Faculty of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China); Ren, Hong-Xia [Key Laboratory of Asymmetric Synthesis and Chirotechnology of Sichuan Province, Chengdu Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 10049 (China); Gan, Ning, E-mail: ganning@nbu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory Base of Novel Functional Materials and Preparation Science, Faculty of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China); Zhou, You [State Key Laboratory Base of Novel Functional Materials and Preparation Science, Faculty of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China); Cao, Yuting, E-mail: caoyuting@nbu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory Base of Novel Functional Materials and Preparation Science, Faculty of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China); Li, Tianhua [State Key Laboratory Base of Novel Functional Materials and Preparation Science, Faculty of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China); Chen, Yinji [Faculty of Food Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Finance and Economics, Nanjing 210000 (China)

    2016-07-27

    In this work, a novel homogeneous and signal “off–on” aptamer based fluorescence assay was successfully developed to detect chloramphenicol (CAP) residues in food based on the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The vesicle nanotracer was prepared through labeling single stranded DNA binding protein (SSB) on limposome-CdSe/ZnS quantum dot (SSB/L-QD) complexes. It was worth mentioning that the signal tracer (SSB/L-QD) with vesicle shape, which was fabricated being encapsulated with a number of quantum dots and SSB. The nanotracer has excellent signal amplification effects. The vesicle composite probe was formed by combining aptamer labeled nano-gold (Au-Apt) and SSB/L-QD. Which based on SSB's specific affinity towards aptamer. This probe can't emit fluoresce which is in “off” state because the signal from SSB/L-QD as donor can be quenched by the Au-aptas acceptor. When CAP was added in the composite probe solution, the aptamer on the Au-Apt can be preferentially bounded with CAP then release from the composite probe, which can turn the “off” signal of SSB/L-QD tracer into “on” state. The assay indicates excellent linear response to CAP from 0.001 nM to 10 nM and detection limit down to 0.3 pM. The vesicle probes with size of 88 nm have strong signal amplification. Because a larger number of QDs can be labeled inside the double phosphorus lipid membrane. Besides, it was employed to detect CAP residues in the milk samples with results being agreed well with those from ELISA, verifying its accuracy and reliability. - Highlights: • Homogeneous and “off–on” fluorescence aptamer-based assay was developed to detect chloramphenicol (CAP) residues in food. • This probe was fabricated based on a vesicle QDs signal tracer (SSB/L-QD) combining with Au-Aptamer. • The detection mechanism was based on FRET with high specificity. • The results for CAP det