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Sample records for binding 9mer peptides

  1. HLA Class I Binding 9mer Peptides from Influenza A Virus Induce CD4(+) T Cell Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, M. J.; Larsen, Mette Voldby; Nielsen, Morten;

    2010-01-01

    Background: Identification of human leukocyte antigen class I (HLA-I) restricted cytotoxic T cell (CTL) epitopes from influenza virus is of importance for the development of new effective peptide-based vaccines. Methodology/Principal Findings: In the present work, bioinformatics was used to predict...... synthesized and their binding affinities for the HLA-I supertypes were measured in a biochemical assay. Influenza-specific T cell responses towards the peptides were quantified using IFN gamma ELISPOT assays with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from adult healthy HLA-I typed donors as responder...... cells. Of the 131 peptides, 21 were found to induce T cell responses in 19 donors. In the ELISPOT assay, five peptides induced responses that could be totally blocked by the pan-specific anti-HLA-I antibody W6/32, whereas 15 peptides induced responses that could be completely blocked in the presence...

  2. Accurate approximation method for prediction of class I MHC affinities for peptides of length 8, 10 and 11 using prediction tools trained on 9mers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundegaard, Claus; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Morten

    2008-01-01

    Several accurate prediction systems have been developed for prediction of class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC):peptide binding. Most of these are trained on binding affinity data of primarily 9mer peptides. Here, we show how prediction methods trained on 9mer data can be used for accurate...

  3. Predicting peptides binding to MHC class II molecules using multi-objective evolutionary algorithms

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    Feng Lin

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peptides binding to Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC class II molecules are crucial for initiation and regulation of immune responses. Predicting peptides that bind to a specific MHC molecule plays an important role in determining potential candidates for vaccines. The binding groove in class II MHC is open at both ends, allowing peptides longer than 9-mer to bind. Finding the consensus motif facilitating the binding of peptides to a MHC class II molecule is difficult because of different lengths of binding peptides and varying location of 9-mer binding core. The level of difficulty increases when the molecule is promiscuous and binds to a large number of low affinity peptides. In this paper, we propose two approaches using multi-objective evolutionary algorithms (MOEA for predicting peptides binding to MHC class II molecules. One uses the information from both binders and non-binders for self-discovery of motifs. The other, in addition, uses information from experimentally determined motifs for guided-discovery of motifs. Results The proposed methods are intended for finding peptides binding to MHC class II I-Ag7 molecule – a promiscuous binder to a large number of low affinity peptides. Cross-validation results across experiments on two motifs derived for I-Ag7 datasets demonstrate better generalization abilities and accuracies of the present method over earlier approaches. Further, the proposed method was validated and compared on two publicly available benchmark datasets: (1 an ensemble of qualitative HLA-DRB1*0401 peptide data obtained from five different sources, and (2 quantitative peptide data obtained for sixteen different alleles comprising of three mouse alleles and thirteen HLA alleles. The proposed method outperformed earlier methods on most datasets, indicating that it is well suited for finding peptides binding to MHC class II molecules. Conclusion We present two MOEA-based algorithms for finding motifs

  4. Biodiscovery of aluminum binding peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2013-05-01

    Cell surface peptide display systems are large and diverse libraries of peptides (7-15 amino acids) which are presented by a display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high affinity binders to a given target of interest, and those binders quickly identified. Peptide display systems have traditionally been utilized in conjunction with organic-based targets, such as protein toxins or carbon nanotubes. However, this technology has been expanded for use with inorganic targets, such as metals, for biofabrication, hybrid material assembly and corrosion prevention. While most current peptide display systems employ viruses to host the display scaffold, we have recently shown that a bacterial host, Escherichia coli, displaying peptides in the ubiquitous, membrane protein scaffold eCPX can also provide specific peptide binders to an organic target. We have, for the first time, extended the use of this bacterial peptide display system for the biodiscovery of aluminum binding 15mer peptides. We will present the process of biopanning with macroscopic inorganic targets, binder enrichment, and binder isolation and discovery.

  5. Material Binding Peptides for Nanotechnology

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    Urartu Ozgur Safak Seker

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Remarkable progress has been made to date in the discovery of material binding peptides and their utilization in nanotechnology, which has brought new challenges and opportunities. Nowadays phage display is a versatile tool, important for the selection of ligands for proteins and peptides. This combinatorial approach has also been adapted over the past decade to select material-specific peptides. Screening and selection of such phage displayed material binding peptides has attracted great interest, in particular because of their use in nanotechnology. Phage display selected peptides are either synthesized independently or expressed on phage coat protein. Selected phage particles are subsequently utilized in the synthesis of nanoparticles, in the assembly of nanostructures on inorganic surfaces, and oriented protein immobilization as fusion partners of proteins. In this paper, we present an overview on the research conducted on this area. In this review we not only focus on the selection process, but also on molecular binding characterization and utilization of peptides as molecular linkers, molecular assemblers and material synthesizers.

  6. Characterization of Immunodominant BK Polyomavirus 9mer Epitope T Cell Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioni, M.; Leboeuf, C.; Comoli, P.; Ginevri, F.

    2016-01-01

    Uncontrolled BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) replication in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) causes polyomavirus‐associated nephropathy and allograft loss. Reducing immunosuppression is associated with clearing viremia and nephropathy and increasing BKPyV‐specific T cell responses in most patients; however, current immunoassays have limited sensitivity, target mostly CD4+ T cells, and largely fail to predict onset and clearance of BKPyV replication. To characterize BKPyV‐specific CD8+ T cells, bioinformatics were used to predict 9mer epitopes in the early viral gene region (EVGR) presented by 14 common HLAs in Europe and North America. Thirty‐nine EVGR epitopes were experimentally confirmed by interferon‐γ enzyme‐linked immunospot assays in at least 30% of BKPyV IgG–seropositive healthy participants. Most 9mers clustered in domains, and some were presented by more than one HLA class I, as typically seen for immunodominant epitopes. Specific T cell binding using MHC class I streptamers was demonstrated for 21 of 39 (54%) epitopes. In a prospective cohort of 118 pediatric KTRs, 19 patients protected or recovering from BKPyV viremia were experimentally tested, and 13 epitopes were validated. Single HLA mismatches were not associated with viremia, suggesting that failing immune control likely involves multiple factors including maintenance immunosuppression. Combining BKPyV load and T cell assays using immunodominant epitopes may help in evaluating risk and reducing immunosuppression and may lead to safe adoptive T cell transfer. PMID:26663765

  7. Peptide binding specificity of the chaperone calreticulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandhu, N.; Duus, K.; Jorgensen, C.S.;

    2007-01-01

    Calreticulin is a molecular chaperone with specificity for polypeptides and N-linked monoglucosylated glycans. In order to determine the specificity of polypeptide binding, the interaction of calreticulin with polypeptides was investigated using synthetic peptides of different length and composit...

  8. Antimicrobial Peptide-Lipid Binding Interactions and Binding Selectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Lad, Mitaben D.; Birembaut, Fabrice; Clifton, Luke A.; Frazier, Richard A.; Webster, John R. P.; Green, Rebecca J.

    2007-01-01

    Surface pressure measurements, external reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and neutron reflectivity have been used to investigate the lipid-binding behavior of three antimicrobial peptides: melittin, magainin II, and cecropin P1. As expected, all three cationic peptides were shown to interact more strongly with the anionic lipid, 1,2 dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycerol-3-(phosphor-rac-(1-glycerol)) (DPPG), compared to the zwitterionic lipid, 1,2 dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphocho...

  9. High-affinity human leucocyte antigen class I binding variola-derived peptides induce CD4(+) T cell responses more than 30 years post-vaccinia virus vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, M.; Tang, Sheila Tuyet; Lund, Ole;

    2009-01-01

    Interferon-gamma secreting T lymphocytes against pox virus-derived synthetic 9-mer peptides were tested by enzyme-linked immunospot in peripheral blood of individuals vaccinated with vaccinia virus more than 30 years ago. The peptides were characterized biochemically as high-affinity human...

  10. Peptide Nucleic Acids Having Enhanced Binding Affinity and Sequence Specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA strand, and exhibit increased sequence specificity and binding affinity. Methods of increasing binding affinity and sequence specificity of peptide nucleic aci...

  11. Analysis of Peptide Ligand Binding to FGFR1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Simulating annealing algorithm was used in docking computation to predict a selected peptide VYMSPF(P2) binding site on the ectodomain of FGFR1. The peptide is located on the hydrophobic surface of the receptor, which is critical for FGF binding. The synthesized peptide can effectively inhibit the mitogenic activity of aFGF, and has a potential to become a therapeutic agent as an aFGF antagonist.

  12. Effect of solid surface charge on the binding behaviour of a metal-binding peptide

    OpenAIRE

    Donatan, Senem; Sarikaya, Mehmet; TAMERLER, Candan; Urgen, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, solid-binding peptides have been increasingly used as molecular building blocks coupling bio- and nanotechnology. Despite considerable research being invested in this field, the effects of many surface-related parameters that define the binding of peptide to solids are still unknown. In the quest to control biological molecules at solid interfaces and, thereby, tailoring the binding characteristics of the peptides, the use of surface charge of the solid surface may proba...

  13. The binding mechanism of a peptidic cyclic serine protease inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Longguang; Svane, Anna Sigrid P.; Sørensen, Hans Peter;

    2011-01-01

    , have attracted considerable attention. Here, we have investigated the mechanism of binding of peptidic inhibitors to serine protease targets. Our model is upain-1 (CSWRGLENHRMC), a disulfide-bond-constrained competitive inhibitor of human urokinase-type plasminogen activator with a noncanonical......Serine proteases are classical objects for studies of catalytic and inhibitory mechanisms as well as interesting as therapeutic targets. Since small-molecule serine protease inhibitors generally suffer from specificity problems, peptidic inhibitors, isolated from phage-displayed peptide libraries...... is stabilised by intrapeptide contacts between the N-terminal extension and the core peptide around Trp3. These results provide a uniquely detailed description of the binding of a peptidic protease inhibitor to its target and are of general importance in the development of peptidic inhibitors with high...

  14. Screening of a specific peptide binding to VPAC1 receptor from a phage display peptide library.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Tang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: The VPAC1 receptor, a member of the vasoactive intestinal peptide receptors (VIPRs, is overexpressed in the most frequently occurring malignant tumors and plays a major role in the progression and angiogenesis of a number of malignancies. Recently, phage display has become widely used for many applications, including ligand generation for targeted imaging, drug delivery and therapy. In this work, we developed a panning procedure using a phage display peptide library to select a peptide that specifically binds to the VPAC1 receptor to develop a novel targeted probe for molecular imaging and therapy. METHODS: CHO-K1 cells stably expressing VPAC1 receptors (CHO-K1/VPAC1 cells were used to select a VPAC1-binding peptide from a 12-mer phage peptide library. DNA sequencing and homologous analysis of the randomly selected phage clones were performed. A cellular ELISA was used to determine the most selectively binding peptide for further investigation. Binding specificity to the VPAC1 receptor was analyzed by competitive inhibition ELISA and flow cytometry. The binding ability of the selected peptide to CHO-K1/VPAC1 cells and colorectal cancer (CRC cell lines was confirmed using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. RESULTS: A significant enrichment of phages that specifically bound to CHO-K1/VPAC1 cells was obtained after four rounds of panning. Of the selected phage clones, 16 out of 60 shared the same peptide sequence, GFRFGALHEYNS, which we termed the VP2 peptide. VP2 and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP competitively bound to the VPAC1 receptor. More importantly, we confirmed that VP2 specifically bound to CHO-K1/VPAC1 cells and several CRC cell lines. CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrate that the VP2 peptide could specifically bind to VPAC1 receptor and several CRC cell lines. And VP2 peptide may be a potential candidate to be developed as a useful diagnostic molecular imaging probe for early detection of CRC.

  15. Prediction of MHC class I binding peptides, using SVMHC

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    Elofsson Arne

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background T-cells are key players in regulating a specific immune response. Activation of cytotoxic T-cells requires recognition of specific peptides bound to Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC class I molecules. MHC-peptide complexes are potential tools for diagnosis and treatment of pathogens and cancer, as well as for the development of peptide vaccines. Only one in 100 to 200 potential binders actually binds to a certain MHC molecule, therefore a good prediction method for MHC class I binding peptides can reduce the number of candidate binders that need to be synthesized and tested. Results Here, we present a novel approach, SVMHC, based on support vector machines to predict the binding of peptides to MHC class I molecules. This method seems to perform slightly better than two profile based methods, SYFPEITHI and HLA_BIND. The implementation of SVMHC is quite simple and does not involve any manual steps, therefore as more data become available it is trivial to provide prediction for more MHC types. SVMHC currently contains prediction for 26 MHC class I types from the MHCPEP database or alternatively 6 MHC class I types from the higher quality SYFPEITHI database. The prediction models for these MHC types are implemented in a public web service available at http://www.sbc.su.se/svmhc/. Conclusions Prediction of MHC class I binding peptides using Support Vector Machines, shows high performance and is easy to apply to a large number of MHC class I types. As more peptide data are put into MHC databases, SVMHC can easily be updated to give prediction for additional MHC class I types. We suggest that the number of binding peptides needed for SVM training is at least 20 sequences.

  16. Novel ZnO-binding peptides obtained by the screening of a phage display peptide library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golec, Piotr [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Molecular Biology (affiliated with the University of Gdansk) (Poland); Karczewska-Golec, Joanna [University of Gdansk and Medical University of Gdansk, Laboratory of Molecular Bacteriology, Intercollegiate Faculty of Biotechnology (Poland); Los, Marcin; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz, E-mail: wegrzyn@biotech.univ.gda.pl [University of Gdansk, Department of Molecular Biology (Poland)

    2012-11-15

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a semiconductor compound with a potential for wide use in various applications, including biomaterials and biosensors, particularly as nanoparticles (the size range of ZnO nanoparticles is from 2 to 100 nm, with an average of about 35 nm). Here, we report isolation of novel ZnO-binding peptides, by screening of a phage display library. Interestingly, amino acid sequences of the ZnO-binding peptides reported in this paper and those described previously are significantly different. This suggests that there is a high variability in sequences of peptides which can bind particular inorganic molecules, indicating that different approaches may lead to discovery of different peptides of generally the same activity (e.g., binding of ZnO) but having various detailed properties, perhaps crucial under specific conditions of different applications.

  17. Adding energy minimization strategy to peptide-design algorithm enables better search for RNA-binding peptides: Redesigned λ N peptide binds boxB RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xingqing; Hung, Michelle E; Leonard, Joshua N; Hall, Carol K

    2016-10-15

    Our previously developed peptide-design algorithm was improved by adding an energy minimization strategy which allows the amino acid sidechains to move in a broad configuration space during sequence evolution. In this work, the new algorithm was used to generate a library of 21-mer peptides which could substitute for λ N peptide in binding to boxB RNA. Six potential peptides were obtained from the algorithm, all of which exhibited good binding capability with boxB RNA. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were then conducted to examine the ability of the λ N peptide and three best evolved peptides, viz. Pept01, Pept26, and Pept28, to bind to boxB RNA. Simulation results demonstrated that our evolved peptides are better at binding to boxB RNA than the λ N peptide. Sequence searches using the old (without energy minimization strategy) and new (with energy minimization strategy) algorithms confirm that the new algorithm is more effective at finding good RNA-binding peptides than the old algorithm. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Peptide Arrays for Binding Studies of E3 Ubiquitin Ligases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klecker, Maria; Dissmeyer, Nico

    2016-01-01

    The automated SPOT (synthetic peptide arrays on membrane support technique) synthesis technology has entrenched as a rapid and robust method to generate peptide libraries on cellulose membrane supports. The synthesis method is based on conventional Fmoc chemistry building up peptides with free N-terminal amino acids starting at their cellulose-coupled C-termini. Several hundreds of peptide sequences can be assembled with this technique on one membrane comprising a strong binding potential due to high local peptide concentrations. Peptide orientation on SPOT membranes qualifies this array type for assaying substrate specificities of N-recognins, the recognition elements of the N-end rule pathway of targeted protein degradation (NERD). Pioneer studies described binding capability of mammalian and yeast enzymes depending on a peptide's N-terminus. SPOT arrays have been successfully used to describe substrate specificity of N-recognins which are the recognition elements of the N-end rule pathway of targeted protein degradation (NERD). Here, we describe the implementation of SPOT binding assays with focus on the identification of N-recognin substrates, applicable also for plant NERD enzymes. PMID:27424747

  19. Describing the Peptide Binding Specificity of HLA-C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael; Harndahl, Mikkel Nors; Nielsen, Morten;

    for 5 HLA-C molecules and for all, but one, molecule we find a high frequency of binders, >70%, among these peptides. To extend the examined peptide space, we use bioinformatic prediction tools to search for additional binders. Finally, we update our prediction tool, NetMHCpan, with the HLA-C affinity......Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) presents peptides to T-cells for immune scrutiny. Whereas HLA-A and -B have been described in great detail, HLA-C has received much less attention. Here, to increase the coverage of HLA-C and the accuracy of the corresponding tools, we have generated HLA-C molecules......; peptide-binding assays, data and predictors; and tetramers; representing the most prevalent HLA-C molecules. We have combined positional scanning combinatorial peptide library (PSCPL) with a homogenous high-throughput dissociation assay and generated specificity matrices for 11 different HLA-C molecules...

  20. Hydroxyapatite-binding peptides for bone growth and inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R. (Berkeley, CA); Song, Jie (Shrewsbury, MA); Lee, Seung-Wuk (Walnut Creek, CA)

    2011-09-20

    Hydroxyapatite (HA)-binding peptides are selected using combinatorial phage library display. Pseudo-repetitive consensus amino acid sequences possessing periodic hydroxyl side chains in every two or three amino acid sequences are obtained. These sequences resemble the (Gly-Pro-Hyp).sub.x repeat of human type I collagen, a major component of extracellular matrices of natural bone. A consistent presence of basic amino acid residues is also observed. The peptides are synthesized by the solid-phase synthetic method and then used for template-driven HA-mineralization. Microscopy reveal that the peptides template the growth of polycrystalline HA crystals .about.40 nm in size.

  1. Zooming into the binding groove of HLA molecules : which positions and which substitutions change peptide binding most?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deutekom, Hanneke W M; Kesmir, C.

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes are the most polymorphic genes in the human genome. Almost all polymorphic residues are located in the peptide-binding groove, resulting in different peptide-binding preferences. Whether a single amino acid change can alter the peptide-binding repertoire of an HLA

  2. Automated benchmarking of peptide-MHC class I binding predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trolle, Thomas; Metushi, Imir G.; Greenbaum, Jason;

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Numerous in silico methods predicting peptide binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules have been developed over the last decades. However, the multitude of available prediction tools makes it non-trivial for the end-user to select which tool to use for a given...... the public access to frequent, up-to-date performance evaluations of all participating tools. To overcome potential selection bias in the data included in the IEDB, a strategy was implemented that suggests a set of peptides for which different prediction methods give divergent predictions as to their binding...

  3. Calcium Carbonate Formation by Genetically Engineered Inorganic Binding Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresswell, Carolyn Gayle

    Understanding how organisms are capable of forming (synthesize, crystallize, and organize) solid minerals into complex architectures has been a fundamental question of biomimetic materials chemistry and biomineralization for decades. This study utilizes short peptides selected using a cell surface display library for the specific polymorphs of calcium carbonate, i.e., aragonite and calcite, to identify two sets of sequences which can then be used to examine their effects in the formation, crystal structure, morphology of the CaCO3 minerals. A procedure of counter selection, along with fluorescence microscopy (FM) characterization, was adapted to insure that the sequences on the cells were specific to their respective substrate, i.e., aragonite or calcite. From the resulting two sets of sequences selected, five distinct strong binders were identified with a variety of biochemical characteristics and synthesized for further study. Protein derived peptides, using the known sequences of the proteins that are associated with calcite or aragonite, were also designed using a bioinformatics-based similarity analysis of the two sets of binders. In particular, an aragonite binding protein segment, AP7, a protein found in nacre, was chosen for this design and the resulting effects of the designed peptides and the AP7 were examined. Specifically, the binding affinities of the selected and the protein derived peptides off the cells were then tested using FM; these studies resulted in different binding characteristics of the synthesized and cellular bound peptides. Two of the peptides that displayed strong binding on the cells bound to neither of the CaCO 3 substrates and both the high and low similarity protein-derived peptides bound to both polymorphs. However, two of the peptides were found to only bind to their respective polymorph showing; these results are significant in that with this study it is demonstrated that the designed peptides based on experimental library

  4. Inhibition of aggregation of amyloid peptides by beta-sheet breaker peptides and their binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viet, Man Hoang; Ngo, Son Tung; Lam, Nguyen Sy; Li, Mai Suan

    2011-06-01

    The effects of beta-sheet breaker peptides KLVFF and LPFFD on the oligomerization of amyloid peptides were studied by all-atom simulations. It was found that LPFFD interferes the aggregation of Aβ(16-22) peptides to a greater extent than does KLVFF. Using the molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method, we found that the former binds more strongly to Aβ(16-22). Therefore, by simulations, we have clarified the relationship between aggregation rates and binding affinity: the stronger the ligand binding, the slower the oligomerization process. The binding affinity of pentapeptides to full-length peptide Aβ(1-40) and its mature fibrils has been considered using the Autodock and MM-PBSA methods. The hydrophobic interaction between ligands and receptors plays a more important role for association than does hydrogen bonding. The influence of beta-sheet breaker peptides on the secondary structures of monomer Aβ(1-40) was studied in detail, and it turns out that, in their presence, the total beta-sheet content can be enhanced. However, the aggregation can be slowed because the beta-content is reduced in fibril-prone regions. Both pentapeptides strongly bind to monomer Aβ(1-40), as well as to mature fibrils, but KLVFF displays a lower binding affinity than LPFFD. Our findings are in accord with earlier experiments that both of these peptides can serve as prominent inhibitors. In addition, we predict that LPFFD inhibits/degrades the fibrillogenesis of full-length amyloid peptides better than KLVFF. This is probably related to a difference in their total hydrophobicities in that the higher the hydrophobicity, the lower the inhibitory capacity. The GROMOS96 43a1 force field with explicit water and the force field proposed by Morris et al. (Morris et al. J. Comput. Chem. 1998, 19, 1639 ) were employed for all-atom molecular dynamics simulations and Autodock experiments, respectively. PMID:21563780

  5. Exploring the Structural Requirements of Collagen-Binding Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Abd-Elgaliel, Wael R; Tung, Ching-Hsuan

    2013-01-01

    Collagen synthesis and tissue remodeling are involved in many diseases; therefore collagen specific binding agents have been developed to study collagen changes in various tissues. Based on a recently reported collagen binding peptide, which contains unnatural Biphenylalanine (Bip) amino acid residue, constructs with various structure variations were synthesized to explore the contributions of unnatural Bip residue, conformational restrain, and amino acid sequence in collagen recognition. The...

  6. SH3 domain-peptide binding energy calculations based on structural ensemble and multiple peptide templates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungpyo Hong

    Full Text Available SH3 domains mediate signal transduction by recognizing short peptides. Understanding of the driving forces in peptide recognitions will help us to predict the binding specificity of the domain-peptide recognition and to understand the molecular interaction networks of cells. However, accurate calculation of the binding energy is a tough challenge. In this study, we propose three ideas for improving our ability to predict the binding energy between SH3 domains and peptides: (1 utilizing the structural ensembles sampled from a molecular dynamics simulation trajectory, (2 utilizing multiple peptide templates, and (3 optimizing the sequence-structure mapping. We tested these three ideas on ten previously studied SH3 domains for which SPOT analysis data were available. The results indicate that calculating binding energy using the structural ensemble was most effective, clearly increasing the prediction accuracy, while the second and third ideas tended to give better binding energy predictions. We applied our method to the five SH3 targets in DREAM4 Challenge and selected the best performing method.

  7. Novel heparan sulfate-binding peptides for blocking herpesvirus entry.

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    Pranay Dogra

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection can lead to congenital hearing loss and mental retardation. Upon immune suppression, reactivation of latent HCMV or primary infection increases morbidity in cancer, transplantation, and late stage AIDS patients. Current treatments include nucleoside analogues, which have significant toxicities limiting their usefulness. In this study we screened a panel of synthetic heparin-binding peptides for their ability to prevent CMV infection in vitro. A peptide designated, p5+14 exhibited ~ 90% reduction in murine CMV (MCMV infection. Because negatively charged, cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs, serve as the attachment receptor during the adsorption phase of the CMV infection cycle, we hypothesized that p5+14 effectively competes for CMV adsorption to the cell surface resulting in the reduction in infection. Positively charged Lys residues were required for peptide binding to cell-surface HSPGs and reducing viral infection. We show that this inhibition was not due to a direct neutralizing effect on the virus itself and that the peptide blocked adsorption of the virus. The peptide also inhibited infection of other herpesviruses: HCMV and herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 in vitro, demonstrating it has broad-spectrum antiviral activity. Therefore, this peptide may offer an adjunct therapy for the treatment of herpes viral infections and other viruses that use HSPGs for entry.

  8. Autologous peptides constitutively occupy the antigen binding site on Ia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Sette, A; Colon, S M;

    1988-01-01

    Low molecular weight material associated with affinity-purified class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules of mouse (Ia) had the expected properties of peptides bound to the antigen binding site of Ia. Thus, the low molecular weight material derived from the I-Ad isotype was effici......Low molecular weight material associated with affinity-purified class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules of mouse (Ia) had the expected properties of peptides bound to the antigen binding site of Ia. Thus, the low molecular weight material derived from the I-Ad isotype...... was predominantly peptide in nature, as shown by its susceptibility to protease digestion. It was heterogeneous as measured by gel filtration (mean molecular weight approximately 3000), and when characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography, it eluted over a wide concentration of solvent. Such self...

  9. Selection of trkB-binding peptides from a phage-displayed random peptide library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA; Zhongcai; (马仲才); WU; Xiaolan; (吴晓兰); CAO; Mingmei; (曹明媚); PAN; Wei; (潘; 卫); ZHU; Fenlu; (朱分禄); CHEN; Jingshan; (陈景山); QI; Zhongtian; (戚中田)

    2003-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) shows potential in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, but the therapeutic application of BDNF has been greatly limited because it is too large in molecular size to permeate blood-brain barrier. To develop low-molecular-weight BDNF-like peptides, we selected a phage-displayed random peptide library using trkB expressed on NIH 3T3 cells as target in the study. With the strategy of peptide library incubation with NIH 3T3 cells and competitive elution with 1 υg/mL of BDNF in the last round of selection, the specific phages able to bind to the natural conformation of trkB and antagonize BDNF binding to trkB were enriched effectively. Five trkB-binding peptides were obtained, in which a core sequence of CRA/TXφXXφXXC (X represents the random amino acids, φ represents T, L or I) was identified. The BDNF-like activity of these five peptides displayed on phages was not observed, though all of them antagonized the activity of BDNF in a dose-dependent manner. Similar results were obtained with the synthetic peptide of C1 clone, indicating that the 5 phage-derived peptides were trkB antagonists. These low-molecular-weight antagonists of trkB may be of potential application in the treatment of neuroblastoma and chronic pain. Meanwhile, the obtained core sequence also could be used as the base to construct the secondary phage-displayed peptide library for further development of small peptides mimicking BDNF activity.

  10. Identification of gliadin-binding peptides by phage display

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    Östman Sofia

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coeliac disease (CD is a common and complex disorder of the small intestine caused by intolerance to wheat gluten and related edible cereals like barley and rye. Peptides originating from incomplete gliadin digestion activate the lamina propria infiltrating T cells to release proinflammatory cytokines, which in turn cause profound tissue remodelling of the small intestinal wall. There is no cure for CD except refraining from consuming gluten-containing products. Results Phage from a random oligomer display library were enriched by repeated pannings against immobilised gliadin proteins. Phage from the final panning round were plated, individual plaques picked, incubated with host bacteria, amplified to a population size of 1011 to 1012 and purified. DNA was isolated from 1000 purified phage populations and the region covering the 36 bp oligonucleotide insert from which the displayed peptides were translated, was sequenced. Altogether more than 150 different peptide-encoding sequences were identified, many of which were repeatedly isolated under various experimental conditions. Amplified phage populations, each expressing a single peptide, were tested first in pools and then one by one for their ability to inhibit binding of human anti-gliadin antibodies in ELISA assays. These experiments showed that several of the different peptide-expressing phage tested inhibited the interaction between gliadin and anti-gliadin antibodies. Finally, four different peptide-encoding sequences were selected for further analysis, and the corresponding 12-mer peptides were synthesised in vitro. By ELISA assays it was demonstrated that several of the peptides inhibited the interaction between gliadin molecules and serum anti-gliadin antibodies. Moreover, ELISA competition experiments as well as dot-blot and western blot revealed that the different peptides interacted with different molecular sites of gliadin. Conclusions We believe that several of

  11. Importance of a Hydrophobic Pocket for Peptide Binding in Lactococcal OppA▿

    OpenAIRE

    Berntsson, Ronnie P-A; Thunnissen, Andy-Mark W H; Poolman, Bert; Slotboom, Dirk-Jan

    2011-01-01

    Lactococcal oligopeptide-binding protein A (OppA) binds peptides with widely varied lengths and sequences. We previously hypothesized that a hydrophobic pocket in OppA preferentially binds a hydrophobic peptide side chain and thus determines its binding register. Two crystal structures of OppA with different nonapeptides now indeed show binding in different registers.

  12. Identification of peptides from foot‐and‐mouth disease virus structural proteins bound by class I swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) alleles, SLA‐1*0401 and SLA‐2*0401

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Harndahl, M.; Nielsen, Morten;

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of the peptide‐binding specificity of swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) class I and II molecules is critical to the understanding of adaptive immune responses of swine toward infectious pathogens. Here, we describe the complete binding motif of the SLA‐2*0401 molecule based...... on a positional scanning combinatorial peptide library approach. By combining this binding motif with data achieved by applying the NetMHCpan peptide prediction algorithm to both SLA‐1*0401 and SLA‐2*0401, we identified high‐affinity binding peptides. A total of 727 different 9mer and 726 different 10mer peptides...... within the structural proteins of foot‐and‐mouth disease virus (FMDV), strain A24 were analyzed as candidate T‐cell epitopes. Peptides predicted by the NetMHCpan were tested in ELISA for binding to the SLA‐1*0401 and SLA‐2*0401 major histocompatibility complex class I proteins. Four of the 10 predicted...

  13. Towards the MHC-peptide combinatorics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangueane, P; Sakharkar, M K; Kolatkar, P R; Ren, E C

    2001-05-01

    The exponentially increased sequence information on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alleles points to the existence of a high degree of polymorphism within them. To understand the functional consequences of MHC alleles, 36 nonredundant MHC-peptide complexes in the protein data bank (PDB) were examined. Induced fit molecular recognition patterns such as those in MHC-peptide complexes are governed by numerous rules. The 36 complexes were clustered into 19 subgroups based on allele specificity and peptide length. The subgroups were further analyzed for identifying common features in MHC-peptide binding pattern. The four major observations made during the investigation were: (1) the positional preference of peptide residues defined by percentage burial upon complex formation is shown for all the 19 subgroups and the burial profiles within entries in a given subgroup are found to be similar; (2) in class I specific 8- and 9-mer peptides, the fourth residue is consistently solvent exposed, however this observation is not consistent in class I specific 10-mer peptides; (3) an anchor-shift in positional preference is observed towards the C terminal as the peptide length increases in class II specific peptides; and (4) peptide backbone atoms are proportionately dominant at the MHC-peptide interface.

  14. SABinder: A Web Service for Predicting Streptavidin-Binding Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Juanjuan; Ru, Beibei; Zhou, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Streptavidin is sometimes used as the intended target to screen phage-displayed combinatorial peptide libraries for streptavidin-binding peptides (SBPs). More often in the biopanning system, however, streptavidin is just a commonly used anchoring molecule that can efficiently capture the biotinylated target. In this case, SBPs creeping into the biopanning results are not desired binders but target-unrelated peptides (TUP). Taking them as intended binders may mislead subsequent studies. Therefore, it is important to find if a peptide is likely to be an SBP when streptavidin is either the intended target or just the anchoring molecule. In this paper, we describe an SVM-based ensemble predictor called SABinder. It is the first predictor for SBP. The model was built with the feature of optimized dipeptide composition. It was observed that 89.20% (MCC = 0.78; AUC = 0.93; permutation test, p < 0.001) of peptides were correctly classified. As a web server, SABinder is freely accessible. The tool provides a highly efficient way to exclude potential SBP when they are TUP or to facilitate identification of possibly new SBP when they are the desired binders. In either case, it will be helpful and can benefit related scientific community.

  15. A Community Resource Benchmarking Predictions of Peptide Binding to MHC-I Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Bjoern Peters; Huynh-Hoa Bui; Sune Frankild; Morten Nielson; Claus Lundegaard; Emrah Kostem; Derek Basch; Kasper Lamberth; Mikkel Harndahl; Ward Fleri; Wilson, Stephen S; John Sidney; Ole Lund; Soren Buus; Alessandro Sette

    2006-01-01

    Recognition of peptides bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules by T lymphocytes is an essential part of immune surveillance. Each MHC allele has a characteristic peptide binding preference, which can be captured in prediction algorithms, allowing for the rapid scan of entire pathogen proteomes for peptide likely to bind MHC. Here we make public a large set of 48,828 quantitative peptide-binding affinity measurements relating to 48 different mouse, human, macaque, an...

  16. A community resource benchmarking predictions of peptide binding to MHC-I molecules.

    OpenAIRE

    Bjoern Peters; Huynh-Hoa Bui; Sune Frankild; Morten Nielson; Claus Lundegaard; Emrah Kostem; Derek Basch; Kasper Lamberth; Mikkel Harndahl; Ward Fleri; Wilson, Stephen S; John Sidney; Ole Lund; Soren Buus; Alessandro Sette

    2006-01-01

    Recognition of peptides bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules by T lymphocytes is an essential part of immune surveillance. Each MHC allele has a characteristic peptide binding preference, which can be captured in prediction algorithms, allowing for the rapid scan of entire pathogen proteomes for peptide likely to bind MHC. Here we make public a large set of 48,828 quantitative peptide-binding affinity measurements relating to 48 different mouse, human, macaque, an...

  17. A community resource benchmarking predictions of peptide binding to MHC-I molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, B; Bui, HH; Pletscher-Frankild, Sune; Nielsen, Morten; Lundegaard, Claus; Kostem, E; Basch, D; Lamberth, K.; Harndahl, M.; Fleri, W.; Wilson, SS; Sidney, J; Lund, Ole; Buus, S.; Sette, Alessandro

    2006-01-01

    Recognition of peptides bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules by T lymphocytes is an essential part of immune surveillance. Each MHC allele has a characteristic peptide binding preference, which can be captured in prediction algorithms, allowing for the rapid scan of entire pathogen proteomes for peptide likely to bind MHC. Here we make public a large set of 48,828 quantitative peptide-binding affinity measurements relating to 48 different mouse, human, macaque, an...

  18. Binding of peptides to HLA-DQ molecules: peptide binding properties of the disease-associated HLA-DQ(alpha 1*0501, beta 1*0201) molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, B H; Buus, S; Vartdal, F;

    1994-01-01

    Peptide binding to DQ molecules has not previously been described. Here we report a biochemical peptide-binding assay specific for the DQ2 [i.e. DQ(alpha 1*0501, beta 1*0201)] molecule. This molecule was chosen since it shows a strong association to diseases such as celiac disease and insulin...

  19. SABinder: A Web Service for Predicting Streptavidin-Binding Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bifang; Kang, Juanjuan; Ru, Beibei; Ding, Hui; Zhou, Peng; Huang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Streptavidin is sometimes used as the intended target to screen phage-displayed combinatorial peptide libraries for streptavidin-binding peptides (SBPs). More often in the biopanning system, however, streptavidin is just a commonly used anchoring molecule that can efficiently capture the biotinylated target. In this case, SBPs creeping into the biopanning results are not desired binders but target-unrelated peptides (TUP). Taking them as intended binders may mislead subsequent studies. Therefore, it is important to find if a peptide is likely to be an SBP when streptavidin is either the intended target or just the anchoring molecule. In this paper, we describe an SVM-based ensemble predictor called SABinder. It is the first predictor for SBP. The model was built with the feature of optimized dipeptide composition. It was observed that 89.20% (MCC = 0.78; AUC = 0.93; permutation test, p web server, SABinder is freely accessible. The tool provides a highly efficient way to exclude potential SBP when they are TUP or to facilitate identification of possibly new SBP when they are the desired binders. In either case, it will be helpful and can benefit related scientific community. PMID:27610387

  20. Description and prediction of peptide-MHC binding: the 'human MHC project'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S

    1999-01-01

    MHC molecules are crucially involved in controlling the specific immune system. They are highly polymorphic receptors sampling peptides from the cellular environment and presenting these peptides for scrutiny by immune cells. Recent advances in combinatorial peptide chemistry have improved the de...... the description and prediction of peptide-MHC binding. It is envisioned that a complete mapping of human immune reactivities will be possible....

  1. Iron-binding properties of sugar cane yeast peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Hoz, Lucia; Ponezi, Alexandre N; Milani, Raquel F; Nunes da Silva, Vera S; Sonia de Souza, A; Bertoldo-Pacheco, Maria Teresa

    2014-01-01

    The extract of sugar-cane yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) was enzymatically hydrolysed by Alcalase, Protex or Viscozyme. Hydrolysates were fractionated using a membrane ultrafiltration system and peptides smaller than 5kDa were evaluated for iron chelating ability through measurements of iron solubility, binding capacity and dialyzability. Iron-chelating peptides were isolated using immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC). They showed higher content of His, Lys, and Arg than the original hydrolysates. In spite of poor iron solubility, hydrolysates of Viscozyme provided higher iron dialyzability than those of other enzymes. This means that more chelates of iron or complexes were formed and these kept the iron stable during simulated gastro-intestinal digestion in vitro, improving its dialyzability.

  2. Biosynthetic regulation of phytochelatins, heavy metal-binding peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Kazumasa; Tsuji, Naoki; Miyamoto, Kazuhisa

    2005-12-01

    Phytochelatins (PCs) are heavy metal-binding peptides that play important roles in the detoxification of toxic heavy metals and the regulation of intracellular concentrations of essential metals in eukaryotes, including higher plants, fungi, and microalgae. Recently, PC synthase genes in higher plants and fission yeast have been identified and characterized, enabling molecular biological studies to unravel the mechanisms underlying PC synthesis. Moreover, recent routine database searches have unexpectedly identified genes that are similar to plant PC synthase genes in the genomes of worms and some prokaryotes. In this review, we introduce these recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms for PC biosynthesis and functions in order to supply basic information about the unique and attractive peptides applicable to various fields.

  3. Automated benchmarking of peptide-MHC class I binding predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trolle, Thomas; Metushi, Imir G.; Greenbaum, Jason;

    2015-01-01

    the public access to frequent, up-to-date performance evaluations of all participating tools. To overcome potential selection bias in the data included in the IEDB, a strategy was implemented that suggests a set of peptides for which different prediction methods give divergent predictions as to their binding...... educated selections between participating tools. Of the four participating servers, NetMHCpan performed the best, followed by ANN, SMM and finally ARB. Availability and implementation: Up-to-date performance evaluations of each server can be found online at http://tools.iedb.org/auto_bench/mhci/weekly. All...

  4. Machine learning competition in immunology – Prediction of HLA class I binding peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Guang Lan; Ansari, Hifzur Rahman; Bradley, Phil;

    2011-01-01

    of peptide binding, therefore, determines the accuracy of the overall method. Computational predictions of peptide binding to HLA, both class I and class II, use a variety of algorithms ranging from binding motifs to advanced machine learning techniques ( [Brusic et al., 2004] and [Lafuente and Reche, 2009...

  5. A peptide-binding assay for the disease-associated HLA-DQ8 molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straumfors, A; Johansen, B H; Vartdal, F;

    1998-01-01

    The study of peptide binding to HLA class II molecules has mostly concentrated on DR molecules. Since many autoimmune diseases show a primary association to particular DQ molecules rather than DR molecules, it is also important to study the peptide-binding properties of DQ molecules. Here we repo......-affinity binders, whereas peptides derived from myelin basic protein were among the low-affinity binders. The sequence of the high-affinity peptides conformed with a previously published peptide-binding motif of DQ8....

  6. Pulling peptides across nanochannels: resolving peptide binding and translocation through the hetero-oligomeric channel from Nocardia farcinica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pratik Raj; Bárcena-Uribarri, Iván; Modi, Niraj; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich; Benz, Roland; Winterhalter, Mathias; Mahendran, Kozhinjampara R

    2012-12-21

    We investigated translocation of cationic peptides through nanochannels derived from the Gram-positive bacterium Nocardia farcinica at the single-molecule level. The two subunits NfpA and NfpB form a hetero-oligomeric cation selective channel. On the basis of amino acid comparison we performed homology modeling and obtained a channel structurally related to MspA of Mycobacterium smegmatis. The quantitative single-molecule measurements provide an insight into transport processes of solutes through nanochannels. High-resolution ion conductance measurements in the presence of peptides of different charge and length revealed the kinetics of peptide binding. The observed asymmetry in peptide binding kinetics indicated a unidirectional channel insertion in the lipid bilayer. In the case of cationic peptides, the external voltage acts as a driving force that promotes the interaction of the peptide with the channel surface. At low voltage, the peptide just binds to the channel, whereas at higher voltage, the force is strong enough to pull the peptide across the channel. This allows distinguishing quantitatively between peptide binding and translocation through the channel. PMID:23121560

  7. Binding Mode of Insulin Receptor and Agonist Peptide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Insulin is a protein hormone secreted by pancreatic β cells. One of its main functions is to keep the balance of glucose inside the body by regulating the absorption and metabolism of glucose in the periphery tissue, as well as the production and storage of hepatic glycogen. The insulin receptor is a transmembrane glycoprotein in which two α subunits with a molecular weight of 135 kD and twoβ subunits with a molecular weight of 95 kD are joined by a disulfide bond to form a β-α-α-β structure. The extracellular α subunit, especially, its three domains near the N-terminal are partially responsible for signal transduction or ligand-binding, as indicated by the experiments. The extracellular α subunits are involved in binding the ligands. The experimental results indicate that the three domains of the N-terminal of the α subunits are the main determinative parts of the insulin receptor to bind the insulin or mimetic peptide.We employed the extracellular domain (PDBID: 1IGR) of the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1 R ) as the template to simulate and optimize the spatial structures of the three domains in the extracellular domain of the insulin receptor, which includes 468 residues. The work was accomplished by making use of the homology program in the Insight Ⅱ package on an Origin3800 server. The docking calculations of the insulin receptor obtained by homology with hexapeptides were carried out by means of the program Affinity. The analysis indicated that there were hydrogen bonding, and electrostatic and hydrophobic effects in the docking complex of the insulin receptor with hexapeptides.Moreover, we described the spatial orientation of a mimetic peptide with agonist activity in the docking complex. We obtained a rough model of binding of DLAPSQ or STIVYS with the insulin receptor, which provides the powerful theoretical support for designing the minimal insulin mimetic peptide with agonist activity, making it possible to develop oral small

  8. High-throughput engineering and analysis of peptide binding to class II MHC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Boder, Eric T

    2010-07-27

    Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II) proteins govern stimulation of adaptive immunity by presenting antigenic peptides to CD4+ T lymphocytes. Many allelic variants of MHC-II exist with implications in peptide presentation and immunity; thus, high-throughput experimental tools for rapid and quantitative analysis of peptide binding to MHC-II are needed. Here, we present an expression system wherein peptide and MHC-II are codisplayed on the surface of yeast in an intracellular association-dependent manner and assayed by flow cytometry. Accordingly, the relative binding of different peptides and/or MHC-II variants can be assayed by genetically manipulating either partner, enabling the application of directed evolution approaches for high-throughput characterization or engineering. We demonstrate the application of this tool to map the side-chain preference for peptides binding to HLA-DR1 and to evolve novel HLA-DR1 mutants with altered peptide-binding specificity.

  9. Identification of an erythrocyte binding peptide from the erythrocyte binding antigen, EBA-175, which blocks parasite multiplication and induces peptide-blocking antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, P H; Heegaard, P M; Koch, C;

    1998-01-01

    A biotinylated peptide covering a sequence of 21 amino acids (aa) from the erythrocyte binding antigen (EBA-175) of Plasmodium falciparum bound to human glycophorin A, an erythrocyte receptor for merozoites, as demonstrated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and to erythrocytes as demon......A biotinylated peptide covering a sequence of 21 amino acids (aa) from the erythrocyte binding antigen (EBA-175) of Plasmodium falciparum bound to human glycophorin A, an erythrocyte receptor for merozoites, as demonstrated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and to erythrocytes...... as demonstrated by flow cytometry analysis. The peptide, EBA(aa1076-96), also bound to desialylated glycophorin A and glycophorin B when tested by ELISA. The peptide blocked parasite multiplication in vitro. The glycophorin A binding sequence was further delineated to a 12-aa sequence, EBA(aa1085-96), by testing...... the binding of a range of truncated peptides to immobilized glycophorin A. Our data indicate that EBA(aa1085-96) is part of a ligand on the merozoite for binding to erythrocyte receptors. This binding suggests that the EBA(aa1085-96) peptide is involved in a second binding step, independent of sialic acid...

  10. Identification of an erythrocyte binding peptide from the erythrocyte binding antigen, EBA-175, which blocks parasite multiplication and induces peptide-blocking antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, P.H.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Koch, C.;

    1998-01-01

    A biotinylated peptide covering a sequence of 21 amino acids (aa) from the erythrocyte binding antigen (EBA-175) of Plasmodium falciparum bound to human glycophorin A, an erythrocyte receptor for merozoites, as demonstrated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and to erythrocytes as demon......A biotinylated peptide covering a sequence of 21 amino acids (aa) from the erythrocyte binding antigen (EBA-175) of Plasmodium falciparum bound to human glycophorin A, an erythrocyte receptor for merozoites, as demonstrated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and to erythrocytes...... as demonstrated by flow cytometry analysis. The peptide, EBA(aa1076-96), also bound to desialylated glycophorin A and glycophorin B when tested by ELISA, The peptide blocked parasite multiplication in vitro. The glycophorin A binding sequence was further delineated to a 12-aa sequence, EBA(aa1085-96), by testing...... the binding of a range of truncated peptides to immobilized glycophorin A. Our data indicate that EBA(aa1085-96) is part of a ligand on the merozoite for binding to erythrocyte receptors. This binding suggests that the EBA(aa1085-96) peptide is involved in a second binding step, independent of sialic acid...

  11. Exploiting anthracene photodimerization within peptides: light induced sequence-selective DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullen, Gemma A; Tucker, James H R; Peacock, Anna F A

    2015-05-11

    The unprecedented use of anthracene photodimerization within a protein or peptide system is explored through its incorporation into a DNA-binding peptide, derived from the GCN4 transcription factor. This study demonstrates an effective and dynamic interplay between a photoreaction and a peptide-DNA assembly, with each process able to exert control over the other.

  12. Binding of Euplotes octocarinatus centrin with target peptide melittin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Interactions between model target peptide melittin (ME) and Euplotes octocarinatus centrin (EoCen) were investigated by fluorescence spectra, circular dichroism (CD) spectra and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). In 0.1 mol/L N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N-2-ethanesulfonic acid (Hepes) and 150 mmol/L NaCl at pH 7.4, EoCen and isolated short C-terminal domain of EoCen (SC-EoCen) form 1:1 peptide:protein complexes. However, no detectable signal changes can be observed while isolated N-terminal domain of EoCen (N-EoCen) or isolated long C-terminal domain of EoCen (LC-EoCen) was added into solution of ME. The interaction between EoCen and ME is specified exclusively for the short C-terminal domain of EoCen. On the basis of fluorescence titration curves, the conditional binding constants of ME with EoCen and SC-EoCen were calculated to be logKME-EoCen = 6.81±0.33 and logKME-SC-EoCen = 6.51±0.45, respectively.

  13. Structural analysis of peptides capable of binding to more than one Ia antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sette, A; Buus, S; Colon, S;

    1989-01-01

    The Ia binding regions were analyzed for three unrelated peptide Ag (sperm whale myoglobin 106-118, influenza hemagglutinin 130-142, and lambda repressor protein 12-26) for which binding to more than one Ia molecule has previously been demonstrated. By determining the binding profile of three...... separate series of truncated synthetic peptides, it was found that in all three cases the different Ia reactivities mapped to largely overlapping regions of the peptides; although, for two of the peptides, the regions involved in binding the different Ia specificities were distinct. Moreover, subtle...... differences were found to dramatically influence some, but not other, Ia reactivities. Using a large panel of synthetic peptides it was found that a significant correlation exists between the capacity of peptides to interact with different alleles of the same molecule (i.e., IAd and IAk), but no correlation...

  14. Sequence-selective DNA binding with cell-permeable oligoguanidinium-peptide conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquera, Jesús; Sánchez, Mateo I; Valero, Julián; de Mendoza, Javier; Vázquez, M Eugenio; Mascareñas, José L

    2015-03-21

    Conjugation of a short peptide fragment from a bZIP protein to an oligoguanidinium tail results in a DNA-binding miniprotein that selectively interacts with composite sequences containing the peptide-binding site next to an A/T-rich tract. In addition to stabilizing the complex with the target DNA, the oligoguanidinium unit also endows the conjugate with cell internalization properties.

  15. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) binding-mediated gene regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are synthetic oligonucleotides with chemically modified backbones. PNAs can bind to both DNA and RNA targets in a sequence-specific manner to form PNA/DNA and PNA/RNA duplex structures. When bound to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) targets, the PNA molecule replaces one DNA strand in the duplex by strand invasion to form a PNA/DNA/PNA [or (PNA)2/DNA] triplex structure and the displaced DNA strand exists as a singlestranded D-loop. PNA has been used in many studies as research tools for gene regulation and gene targeting. The Dloops generated from the PNA binding have also been demonstrated for its potential in initiating transcription and inducing gene expression. PNA provides a powerful tool to study the mechanism of transcription and an innovative strategy to regulate target gene expression. An understanding of the PNA-mediated gene regulation will have important clinical implications in treatment of many human diseases including genetic, cancerous, and age-related diseases.

  16. Metal binding and folding properties of a minimalist Cys2His2 zinc finger peptide.

    OpenAIRE

    Michael, S.F.; Kilfoil, V J; Schmidt, M.H.; Amann, B T; Berg, J M

    1992-01-01

    A minimalist Cys2His2 zinc finger peptide, Lys-Tyr-Ala-Cys-Ala-Ala-Cys-Ala-Ala-Ala-Phe-Ala-Ala-Lys-Ala-Ala-Leu-Ala- Ala-His-Ala-Ala-Ala-His-Ala-Lys, has been synthesized. Metal binding studies using Co2+ as a probe indicated that this peptide forms a 1:1 peptide/metal complex with a dissociation constant comparable to that observed for other zinc finger peptides. At high peptide concentrations, a 2:1 peptide/metal complex also forms, with four cysteinates coordinated to Co2+. Additional studi...

  17. Accurate pan-specific prediction of peptide-MHC class II binding affinity with improved binding core identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreatta, Massimo; Karosiene, Edita; Rasmussen, Michael;

    2015-01-01

    A key event in the generation of a cellular response against malicious organisms through the endocytic pathway is binding of peptidic antigens by major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC class II) molecules. The bound peptide is then presented on the cell surface where it can be recognized ...

  18. Influences of hydrocarbon linkers on the receptor binding affinities of gonadotropin-releasing hormone peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Haixun; Hathaway, Helen; Royce, Melanie E.; Prossnitz, Eric R.; Miao, Yubin

    2013-01-01

    Three new DOTA-conjugated GnRH peptides with various hydrocarbon linkers were synthesized to evaluate the influences of the linkers on their receptor binding affinities. The hydrocarbon linker displayed a profound impact on the receptor binding affinities of DOTA-conjugated GnRH peptides. The Aun linker was better than Gaba, Ahx and Aoc linkers in retaining strong receptor binding affinity of the GnRH peptide. DOTA-Aun-(D-Lys6-GnRH) displayed 22.8 nM GnRH receptor binding affinity. 111In-DOTA...

  19. Immunoglobulin G preparation from plasma samples and analysis of its affinity kinetic binding to peptide hormones

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Romain Legrand, Kuniko Takagi & Sergueï Fetissov ### Abstract Circulating peptide hormones such as ghrelin physiologically bind plasma immunoglobulins (Ig) which protect hormone from degradation and modulate its biological activity depending on affinity of hormone / IgG binding. Because the IgG set of each individual is unique, measuring affinity kinetics of human or animal plasma IgG binding to a specific peptide hormone may provide useful information towards understandi...

  20. Enhancement of mouse sperm motility by trophinin-binding peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Seong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trophinin is an intrinsic membrane protein that forms a complex in the cytoplasm with bystin and tastin, linking it microtubule-associated motor dynein (ATPase in some cell types. Previously, we found that human sperm tails contain trophinin, bystin and tastin proteins, and that trophinin-binding GWRQ (glycine, tryptophan, arginine, glutamine peptide enhanced motility of human sperm. Methods Immunohistochemistry was employed to determine trophinin protein in mouse spermatozoa from wild type mouse, by using spermatozoa from trophinin null mutant mice as a negative control. Multivalent 8-branched GWRQ (glycine, tryptophan, arginine, glutamine peptide or GWRQ-MAPS, was chemically synthesized, purified by HPLC and its structure was confirmed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Effect of GWRQ-MAPS on mouse spermatozoa from wild type and trophinin null mutant was assessed by a computer-assisted semen analyzer (CASA. Results Anti-trophinin antibody stained the principal (central piece of the tail of wild type mouse sperm, whereas the antibody showed no staining on trophinin null sperm. Phage particles displaying GWRQ bound to the principal piece of sperm tail from wild type but not trophinin null mice. GWRQ-MAPS enhanced motility of spermatozoa from wild type but not trophinin null mice. CASA showed that GWRQ-MAPS enhanced both progressive motility and rapid motility in wild type mouse sperm. Conclusions Present study established the expression of trophinin in the mouse sperm tail and trophinin-dependent effect of GWRQ-MAPS on sperm motility. GWRQ causes a significant increase in sperm motility.

  1. Identification of binding peptides of the ADAM15 disintegrin domain using phage display

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jing Wu; Min-Chen Wu; Lian-Fen Zhang; Jian-Yong Lei; Lei Feng; Jian Jin

    2009-06-01

    ADAM15 plays an important role in tumour development by interacting with integrins. In this study, we investigated the target peptides of the ADAM15 disintegrin domain. First, we successfully produced the recombinant human ADAM15 disintegrin domain (RADD) that could inhibit melanoma cell adhesion by using Escherichia coli. Second, four specific binding peptides (peptides A, B, C, and D) were selected using a phage display 12-mer peptide library. The screening protocol involved 4 rounds of positive panning on RADD and 2 rounds of subtractive selection with streptavidin. By using the BLAST software and a relevant protein database, integrin v3 was found to be homologous to peptide A. Synthetic peptide A had a highly inhibitory effect on RADD–integrin v3 binding. The results demonstrate the potential application of short peptides for disrupting high-affinity ADAM–integrin interactions.

  2. Improving membrane binding as a design strategy for amphipathic peptide hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren Ljungberg; Bhatia, Vikram Kjøller; Jurt, Simon;

    2012-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that amphipathic peptides might bind to membranes prior to activating their cognate receptors, but this has proven difficult to test. The peptide hormone PYY3-36 is believed to perform its appetite-suppressing actions through binding to hypothalamic Y2 receptors. It has...... potency. These observations are likely to be generally important for peptide hormones and biopharmaceutical drugs derived from them. This new 2-helix variant of PYY3-36 will be useful as a tool compound for studying peptide-membrane interactions....

  3. Genetic induction of the gastrin releasing peptide receptor on tumor cells for radiolabeled peptide binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: To improve upon existing radioimmunotherapy (RAIT) approaches, we have devised a strategy to genetically induce high levels of new membrane-associated receptors on human cancer cells targetable by radiolabeled peptides. In this context, we report successful adenoviral-mediated transduction of tumor cells to express the murine gastrin releasing peptide receptor (mGRPr) as demonstrated by125 I-labeled bombesin binding. Materials and Methods: To demonstrate the feasibility of our strategy and to provide rapid proof of principle, we constructed a plasmid encoding the mGRPr gene. We cloned the mGRPr gene into the adenoviral shuttle vector pACMVpLpARS+ (F. Graham). We then utilized the methodology of adenovirus-polylysine-mediated transfection (AdpLmGRPr) to accomplish transient gene expression of mGRPr in two human cancer cell lines including A427 non-small cell lung cancer cells and HeLa cervical cancer cells. Murine GRPr expression was then measured by a live-cell binding assay using 125I-labeled bombesin. In order to develop this strategy further, it was necessary to construct a vector that would be more efficient for in vivo transduction. In this regard, we constructed a recombinant adenoviral vector (AdCMVGRPr) encoding the mGRPr under the control of the CMV promoter based on in vivo homologous recombination methods. The recombinant shuttle vector containing mGRPr was co-transfected with the adenoviral rescue plasmid pJM17 into the E1A trans complementing cell line 293 allowing for derivation of replication-incompetent, recombinant adenoviral vector. Individual plaques were isolated and subjected to two further rounds of plaque purification. The identity of the virus was confirmed at each step by PCR employing primers for mGRPr. The absence of wild-type adenovirus was confirmed by PCR using primers to the adenoviral E1A gene. SKOV3.ip1 human ovarian cancer cells and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells were transduced in vitro with AdCMVGRPr at

  4. A GBP 130 derived peptide from Plasmodium falciparum binds to human erythrocytes and inhibits merozoite invasion in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge E Suarez; Mauricio Urquiza; Hernando Curtidor; Rodriguez, Luis E.; Marisol Ocampo; Elizabeth Torres; Fanny Guzman; Manuel Elkin Patarroyo

    2000-01-01

    The malarial GBP 130 protein binds weakly to intact human erythrocytes; the binding sites seem to be located in the repeat region and this region's antibodies block the merozoite invasion. A peptide from this region (residues from 701 to 720) which binds to human erythrocytes was identified. This peptide named 2220 did not bind to sialic acid; the binding site on human erythrocyte was affected by treatment with trypsin but not by chymotrypsin. The peptide was able to inhibit Plasmodium falcip...

  5. Proteomics shows Hsp70 does not bind peptide sequences indiscriminately in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) binds peptide and has several functions that include protein folding, protein trafficking, and involvement with immune function. However, endogenous Hsp70-binding peptides had not previously been identified. Therefore, we eluted and identified several hundred endogenously bound peptides from Hsp70 using liquid chromatography ion trap mass spectrophotometry (LC-ITMS). Our work shows that the peptides are capable of binding Hsp70 as previously described. They are generally 8-26 amino acids in length and correspond to specific regions of many proteins. Through computationally assisted analysis of peptides eluted from Hsp70 we determined variable amino acid sequences, including a 5 amino acid core sequence that Hsp70 favorably binds. We also developed a computer algorithm that predicts Hsp70 binding within proteins. This work helps to define what peptides are bound by Hsp70 in vivo and suggests that Hsp70 facilitates peptide selection by aiding a funneling mechanism that is flexible but allows only a limited number of peptides to be processed

  6. Investigating the Binding of Peptides to Graphene Surfaces for Biosensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garley, Amanda; Saikia, Nabanita; Barr, Stephen; Leuty, Gary; Berry, Rajiv; Heinz, Hendrik

    The Air Force Research Lab is focused on developing highly selective and sensitive graphene-based sensors functionalized with peptides for biomolecule detection. To achieve this there is a need to model interfacial binding interactions between the organic and inorganic components to complement ongoing experimental investigations. It is important to characterize the binding behavior of individual amino acids, with the goal of predicting binding of large peptides. Since polarization is important in graphene systems, a new force field which includes polarizability is used. This allows for an in depth exploration of pi-pi interactions, electrostatics and van der Waals forces involved with binding. The binding strength is determined via enthalpy and free energy calculations. Additionally, structural quantities are computed, such as how aromatic rings align with the graphene surface and the arrangement of various residue substituents in relation to the surface and water layers. Computational results are useful in guiding experimental methods focused on rapidly screening optimal peptide sequence for binding.

  7. The relation between major histocompatibility complex (MHC) restriction and the capacity of Ia to bind immunogenic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Sette, A; Colon, S M;

    1987-01-01

    The capacity of purified I-Ad, I-Ed, I-Ak, and I-Ek to bind to protein derived peptides that have been previously reported to be T cell immunogens has been examined. For each of the 12 peptides studied strong binding to the relevant Ia restriction element was observed. All the peptides bound more...... than one Ia molecule; however, for 11 of 12 peptides, the dominant binding was to the restriction element, whereas in one instance the dominant binding was to a nonrestriction element. When the peptides were used to inhibit the presentation of antigen by prefixed accessory cells to T cells......, an excellent correlation was found between the capacity of a peptide to inhibit the binding of an antigen to purified Ia and the capacity of the peptide to inhibit accessory cell presentation of the antigen. Thus, the binding of peptide to purified Ia is immunologically relevant, and Ia seems to be the only...

  8. Structure and Energetic Contributions of a Designed Modular Peptide-Binding Protein with Picomolar Affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Simon; Tremmel, Dirk; Madhurantakam, Chaithanya; Reichen, Christian; Mittl, Peer R E; Plückthun, Andreas

    2016-03-16

    Natural armadillo repeat proteins (nArmRP) like importin-α or β-catenin bind their target peptides such that each repeat interacts with a dipeptide unit within the stretched target peptide. However, this modularity is imperfect and also restricted to short peptide stretches of usually four to six consecutive amino acids. Here we report the development and characterization of a regularized and truly modular peptide-specific binding protein, based on designed armadillo repeat proteins (dArmRP), binding to peptides of alternating lysine and arginine residues (KR)n. dArmRP were obtained from nArmRP through cycles of extensive protein engineering, which rendered them more uniform. This regularity is reflected in the consistent binding of dArmRP to (KR)-peptides, where affinities depend on the lengths of target peptides and the number of internal repeats in a very systematic manner, thus confirming the modularity of the interaction. This exponential dependency between affinity and recognition length suggests that each module adds a constant increment of binding energy to sequence-specific recognition. This relationship was confirmed by comprehensive mutagenesis studies that also reveal the importance of individual peptide side chains. The 1.83 Å resolution crystal structure of a dArmRP with five identical internal repeats in complex with the cognate (KR)5 peptide proves a modular binding mode, where each dipeptide is recognized by one internal repeat. The confirmation of this true modularity over longer peptide stretches lays the ground for the design of binders with different specificities and tailored affinities by the assembly of dipeptide-specific modules based on armadillo repeats. PMID:26878586

  9. The Different Ligand-Binding Modes of Relaxin Family Peptide Receptors RXFP1 and RXFP2

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Daniel J.; Rosengren, K. Johan; Bathgate, Ross A. D.

    2012-01-01

    Relaxin and insulin-like peptide 3 (INSL3) are peptide hormones with a number of important physiological roles in reproduction, regulation of extracellular matrix turnover, and cardiovascular function. Relaxin and INSL3 mediate their actions through the closely related G-protein coupled receptors, relaxin family peptide receptors 1 and 2 (RXFP1 and RXFP2), respectively. These receptors have large extracellular domains (ECD) that contain high-affinity ligand-binding sites within their 10 leuci...

  10. Transmissible gastroenteritis virus; identification of M protein-binding peptide ligands with antiviral and diagnostic potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    The membrane (M) protein is one of the major structural proteins of coronavirus particles. In this study, the M protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) was used to biopan a 12-mer phage display random peptide library. Three phages expressing TGEV-M-binding peptides were identified and ...

  11. Screening for PreS specific binding ligands with a phage displayed peptides library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Deng; Ming Zhuang; Yu-Ying Kong; You-Hua Xie; Yuan Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To construct a random peptide phage display library and search for peptides that specifically bind to the PreS region of hepatitis B virus (HBV).METHODS: A phage display vector, pFuse8, based on the gene 8 product (pⅧ) of M13 phage was made and used to construct a random peptide library. E. coli derived thioredoxin-PreS was purified with Thio-bond beads, and exploited as the bait protein for library screening. Five rounds of bio-panning were performed. The PreS-binding specificities of enriched phages were characterized with phage ELISA assay.RESULTS: A phage display vector was successfully constructed as demonstrated to present a pⅧ fused HBV PreS1 epitope on the phage surface with a high efficiency.A cysteine confined random peptide library was constructed containing independent clones exceeding 5±108 clone forming unit (CFU). A pool of phages showing a PreS-binding specificity was obtained after the screening against thioPres with an enrichment of approximately 400 times. Five phages with high PreS-binding specificities were selected and characterized. Sequences of the peptides displayed on these phages were determined.CONCLUSION: A phage library has been constructed,with random peptides displaying as pⅧ-fusion proteins.Specific PreS-binding peptides have been obtained, which may be useful for developing antivirals against HBV infection.

  12. Oxpholipin 11D: An Anti-Inflammatory Peptide That Binds Cholesterol and Oxidized Phospholipids

    OpenAIRE

    Piotr Ruchala; Mohamad Navab; Chun-Ling Jung; Susan Hama-Levy; Micewicz, Ewa D.; Hai Luong; Reyles, Jonathan E.; Shantanu Sharma; Waring, Alan J.; Fogelman, Alan M.; Lehrer, Robert I.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many gram-positive bacteria produce pore-forming exotoxins that contain a highly conserved, 12-residue domain (ECTGLAWEWWRT) that binds cholesterol. This domain is usually flanked N-terminally by arginine and C-terminally by valine. We used this 14-residue sequence as a template to create a small library of peptides that bind cholesterol and other lipids. METHODOLOGY/RESULTS: Several of these peptides manifested anti-inflammatory properties in a predictive in vitro monocyte chemot...

  13. PeptiSite: a structural database of peptide binding sites in 4D

    OpenAIRE

    Acharya, Chayan; Kufareva, Irina; Ilatovskiy, Andrey V.; Abagyan, Ruben

    2014-01-01

    We developed PeptiSite, a comprehensive and reliable database of biologically and structurally characterized peptide-binding sites, in which each site is represented by an ensemble of its complexes with protein, peptide and small molecule partners. The unique features of the database include (1) the ensemble site representation that provides a fourth dimension to the otherwise three dimensional data, (2) comprehensive characterization of the binding site architecture that may consist of a mul...

  14. A GBP 130 derived peptide from Plasmodium falciparum binds to human erythrocytes and inhibits merozoite invasion in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suarez Jorge E

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The malarial GBP 130 protein binds weakly to intact human erythrocytes; the binding sites seem to be located in the repeat region and this region's antibodies block the merozoite invasion. A peptide from this region (residues from 701 to 720 which binds to human erythrocytes was identified. This peptide named 2220 did not bind to sialic acid; the binding site on human erythrocyte was affected by treatment with trypsin but not by chymotrypsin. The peptide was able to inhibit Plasmodium falciparum merozoite invasion of erythrocytes. The residues F701, K703, L705, T706, E713 (FYKILTNTDPNDEVERDNAD were found to be critical for peptide binding to erythrocytes.

  15. Prediction of MHC binding peptides and epitopes from alfalfa mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomase, Virendra S; Kale, Karbhari V; Chikhale, Nandkishor J; Changbhale, Smruti S

    2007-08-01

    Peptide fragments from alfalfa mosaic virus involved multiple antigenic components directing and empowering the immune system to protect the host from infection. MHC molecules are cell surface proteins, which take active part in host immune reactions and involvement of MHC class-I & II in response to almost all antigens. Coat protein of alfalfa mosaic virus contains 221 aa residues. Analysis found five MHC ligands in coat protein as 64-LSSFNGLGV-72; 86- RILEEDLIY-94; 96-MVFSITPSY-104; 100- ITPSYAGTF-108; 110- LTDDVTTED-118; having rescaled binding affinity and c-terminal cleavage affinity more than 0.5. The predicted binding affinity is normalized by the 1% fractil. The MHC peptide binding is predicted using neural networks trained on c-terminals of known epitopes. In analysis predicted MHC/peptide binding is a log transformed value related to the IC50 values in nM units. Total numbers of peptides found are 213. Predicted MHC binding regions act like red flags for antigen specific and generate immune response against the parent antigen. So a small fragment of antigen can induce immune response against whole antigen. This theme is implemented in designing subunit and synthetic peptide vaccines. The sequence analysis method allows potential drug targets to identify active sites against plant diseases. The method integrates prediction of peptide MHC class I binding; proteosomal c-terminal cleavage and TAP transport efficiency. PMID:17691913

  16. Statistical deconvolution of enthalpic energetic contributions to MHC-peptide binding affinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew Michael GB

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MHC Class I molecules present antigenic peptides to cytotoxic T cells, which forms an integral part of the adaptive immune response. Peptides are bound within a groove formed by the MHC heavy chain. Previous approaches to MHC Class I-peptide binding prediction have largely concentrated on the peptide anchor residues located at the P2 and C-terminus positions. Results A large dataset comprising MHC-peptide structural complexes was created by re-modelling pre-determined x-ray crystallographic structures. Static energetic analysis, following energy minimisation, was performed on the dataset in order to characterise interactions between bound peptides and the MHC Class I molecule, partitioning the interactions within the groove into van der Waals, electrostatic and total non-bonded energy contributions. Conclusion The QSAR techniques of Genetic Function Approximation (GFA and Genetic Partial Least Squares (G/PLS algorithms were used to identify key interactions between the two molecules by comparing the calculated energy values with experimentally-determined BL50 data. Although the peptide termini binding interactions help ensure the stability of the MHC Class I-peptide complex, the central region of the peptide is also important in defining the specificity of the interaction. As thermodynamic studies indicate that peptide association and dissociation may be driven entropically, it may be necessary to incorporate entropic contributions into future calculations.

  17. An in silico analysis of the binding modes and binding affinities of small molecule modulators of PDZ-peptide interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garima Tiwari

    Full Text Available Inhibitors of PDZ-peptide interactions have important implications in a variety of biological processes including treatment of cancer and Parkinson's disease. Even though experimental studies have reported characterization of peptidomimetic inhibitors of PDZ-peptide interactions, the binding modes for most of them have not been characterized by structural studies. In this study we have attempted to understand the structural basis of the small molecule-PDZ interactions by in silico analysis of the binding modes and binding affinities of a set of 38 small molecules with known K(i or K(d values for PDZ2 and PDZ3 domains of PSD-95 protein. These two PDZ domains show differential selectivity for these compounds despite having a high degree of sequence similarity and almost identical peptide binding pockets. Optimum binding modes for these ligands for PDZ2 and PDZ3 domains were identified by using a novel combination of semi-flexible docking and explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD simulations. Analysis of the binding modes revealed most of the peptidomimectic ligands which had high K(i or K(d moved away from the peptide binding pocket, while ligands with high binding affinities remained in the peptide binding pocket. The differential specificities of the PDZ2 and PDZ3 domains primarily arise from differences in the conformation of the loop connecting βB and βC strands, because this loop interacts with the N-terminal chemical moieties of the ligands. We have also computed the MM/PBSA binding free energy values for these 38 compounds with both the PDZ domains from multiple 5 ns MD trajectories on each complex i.e. a total of 228 MD trajectories of 5 ns length each. Interestingly, computational binding free energies show good agreement with experimental binding free energies with a correlation coefficient of approximately 0.6. Thus our study demonstrates that combined use of docking and MD simulations can help in identification of potent inhibitors

  18. Bioluminescent Ligand-Receptor Binding Assays for Protein or Peptide Hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ya-Li; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence has been widely used in biomedical research due to its high sensitivity, low background, and broad linear range. In recent studies, we applied bioluminescence to ligand-receptor binding assays for some protein or peptide hormones based on a newly developed small monomeric Nanoluciferase (NanoLuc) reporter that has the so far brightest bioluminescence. The conventional ligand-receptor binding assays rely on radioligands that have drawbacks, such as radioactive hazards and short shelf lives. In contrast, the novel bioluminescent binding assays use the NanoLuc-based protein or peptide tracers that are safe, stable, and ultrasensitive. Thus, the novel bioluminescent ligand-receptor binding assay would be applied to more and more protein or peptide hormones for ligand-receptor interaction studies in future. In the present article, we provided detailed protocols for setting up the novel bioluminescent ligand-receptor binding assays using two representative protein hormones as examples. PMID:27424896

  19. Synthesis of gold structures by gold-binding peptide governed by concentration of gold ion and peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungok; Kim, Dong-Hun; Lee, Sylvia J; Rheem, Youngwoo; Myung, Nosang V; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2016-08-01

    Although biological synthesis methods for the production of gold structures by microorganisms, plant extracts, proteins, and peptide have recently been introduced, there have been few reports pertaining to controlling their size and morphology. The gold ion and peptide concentrations affected on the size and uniformity of gold plates by a gold-binding peptide Midas-11. The higher concentration of gold ions produced a larger size of gold structures reached 125.5 μm, but an increased amount of Midas-11 produced a smaller size of gold platelets and increased the yield percentage of polygonal gold particles rather than platelets. The mechanisms governing factors controlling the production of gold structures were primarily related to nucleation and growth. These results indicate that the synthesis of gold architectures can be controlled by newly isolated and substituted peptides under different reaction conditions. PMID:27108675

  20. High-affinity binding of short peptides to major histocompatibility complex class II molecules by anchor combinations.

    OpenAIRE

    Hammer, J.; Belunis, C; Bolin, D; Papadopoulos, J.; Walsky, R; Higelin, J; Danho, W; Sinigaglia, F; Nagy, Z A

    1994-01-01

    We have previously identified four anchor positions in HLA-DRB1*0101-binding peptides, and three anchors involved in peptide binding to DRB1*0401 and DRB1*1101 molecules, by screening of an M13 peptide display library (approximately 20 million independent nonapeptides) for DR-binding activity. In this study, high stringency screening of the M13 library for DRB1*0401 binding has resulted in identification of three further anchor positions. Taken together, a peptide-binding motif has been obtai...

  1. In vitro selected peptides bind with thymidylate synthase mRNA and inhibit its translation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN; Song; NIU; RongLi; WANG; Zheng; LIN; XiuKun

    2007-01-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS), an essential enzyme for catalyzing the biosynthesis of thymidylate, is a critical therapeutic target in cancer therapy. Recent studies have shown that TS functions as an RNA-binding protein by interacting with two different sequences on its own mRNA, thus, repressing translational efficiency. In this study, peptides binding TS RNA with high affinity were isolated using mRNA display from a large peptide library (>1013 different sequences). The randomized library was subjected up to twelve rounds of in vitro selection and amplification. Comparing the amino acid composition of the selected peptides (12th round, R12) with those from the initial random library (round zero, R0), the basic and aromatic residues in the selected peptides were enriched significantly, suggesting that these peptide regions might be important in the peptide-TS mRNA interaction. Categorizing the amino acids at each random position based on their physicochemical properties and comparing the distributions with those of the initial random pool, an obvious basic charge characteristic was found at positions 1, 12, 17 and 18, suggesting that basic side chains participate in RNA binding. Secondary structure prediction showed that the selected peptides of R12 pool represented a helical propensity compared with R0 pool, and the regions were rich in basic residues. The electrophoretic gel mobility shift and in vitro translation assays showed that the peptides selected using mRNA display could bind TS RNA specifically and inhibit the translation of TS mRNA. Our results suggested that the identified peptides could be used as new TS inhibitors and developed to a novel class of anticancer agents.

  2. Identification of Shc Src homology 2 domain-binding peptoid-peptide hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won Jun; Kim, Sung-Eun; Stephen, Andrew G; Weidlich, Iwona; Giubellino, Alessio; Liu, Fa; Worthy, Karen M; Bindu, Lakshman; Fivash, Matthew J; Nicklaus, Marc C; Bottaro, Donald P; Fisher, Robert J; Burke, Terrence R

    2009-03-26

    A fluorescence anisotropy (FA) competition-based Shc Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-binding was established using the high affinity fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) containing peptide, FITC-NH-(CH2)4-CO-pY-Q-G-L-S-amide (8; Kd = 0.35 microM). Examination of a series of open-chain bis-alkenylamide containing peptides, prepared as ring-closing metathesis precursors, showed that the highest affinities were obtained by replacement of the original Gly residue with N alpha-substituted Gly (NSG) "peptoid" residues. This provided peptoid-peptide hybrids of the form "Ac-pY-Q-[NSG]-L-amide." Depending on the NSG substituent, certain of these hybrids exhibited up to 40-fold higher Shc SH2 domain-binding affinity than the parent Gly-containing peptide (IC50 = 248 microM) (for example, for N-homoallyl analogue 50, IC50 = 6 microM). To our knowledge, this work represents the first successful example of the application of peptoid-peptide hybrids in the design of SH2 domain-binding antagonists. These results could provide a foundation for further structural optimization of Shc SH2 domain-binding peptide mimetics. PMID:19226165

  3. Identificaiton of Shc Src Homology 2 Domain-Binding Peptoid – Peptide Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won Jun; Kim, Sung Eun; Stephen, Andrew G.; Weidlich, Iwona; Giubellino, Alessio; Liu, Fa; Worthy, Karen M.; Bindu, Lakshman; Fivash, Matthew J.; Nicklaus, Marc C.; Bottaro, Donald P.; Fisher, Robert J.; Burke, Terrence R.

    2009-01-01

    A fluorescence anisotropy (FA) competition – based Shc Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-binding was established using the high affinity fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-containing peptide, FITC-NH-(CH2)4-CO-pY-Q-G-L-S-amide (8; Kd = 0.35 μM). Examination of a series of open – chain bis-alkenylamide containing peptides, prepared as ring – closing metathesis precursors, showed that the highest affinities were obtained by replacement of the original Gly residue with Nα-substituted Gly (NSG) “peptoid” residues. This provided peptoid-peptide hybrids of the form, “Ac-pY-Q-[NSG]-L-amide.” Depending on the NSG substituent, certain of these hybrids exhibited up to 40 – fold higher Shc SH2 domain binding affinity than the parent Gly-containing peptide (IC50 = 248 μM), (for example, N-homo-allyl analogue 50; IC50 = 6 μM). To our knowledge, this work represents the first successful example of the application of peptoid-peptide hybrids in the design of SH2 domain-binding antagonists. These results could provide a foundation for further structural optimization of Shc SH2 domain-binding peptide mimetics. PMID:19226165

  4. Identification of peptides from foot-and-mouth disease virus structural proteins bound by class I swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) alleles, SLA-1*0401 and SLA-2*0401.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, L E; Harndahl, M; Nielsen, M; Patch, J R; Jungersen, G; Buus, S; Golde, W T

    2013-06-01

    Characterization of the peptide-binding specificity of swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) class I and II molecules is critical to the understanding of adaptive immune responses of swine toward infectious pathogens. Here, we describe the complete binding motif of the SLA-2*0401 molecule based on a positional scanning combinatorial peptide library approach. By combining this binding motif with data achieved by applying the NetMHCpan peptide prediction algorithm to both SLA-1*0401 and SLA-2*0401, we identified high-affinity binding peptides. A total of 727 different 9mer and 726 different 10mer peptides within the structural proteins of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), strain A24 were analyzed as candidate T-cell epitopes. Peptides predicted by the NetMHCpan were tested in ELISA for binding to the SLA-1*0401 and SLA-2*0401 major histocompatibility complex class I proteins. Four of the 10 predicted FMDV peptides bound to SLA-2*0401, whereas five of the nine predicted FMDV peptides bound to SLA-1*0401. These methods provide the characterization of T-cell epitopes in response to pathogens in more detail. The development of such approaches to analyze vaccine performance will contribute to a more accelerated improvement of livestock vaccines by virtue of identifying and focusing analysis on bona fide T-cell epitopes.

  5. Scrutinizing MHC-I binding peptides and their limits of variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian P Koch

    Full Text Available Designed peptides that bind to major histocompatibility protein I (MHC-I allomorphs bear the promise of representing epitopes that stimulate a desired immune response. A rigorous bioinformatical exploration of sequence patterns hidden in peptides that bind to the mouse MHC-I allomorph H-2K(b is presented. We exemplify and validate these motif findings by systematically dissecting the epitope SIINFEKL and analyzing the resulting fragments for their binding potential to H-2K(b in a thermal denaturation assay. The results demonstrate that only fragments exclusively retaining the carboxy- or amino-terminus of the reference peptide exhibit significant binding potential, with the N-terminal pentapeptide SIINF as shortest ligand. This study demonstrates that sophisticated machine-learning algorithms excel at extracting fine-grained patterns from peptide sequence data and predicting MHC-I binding peptides, thereby considerably extending existing linear prediction models and providing a fresh view on the computer-based molecular design of future synthetic vaccines. The server for prediction is available at http://modlab-cadd.ethz.ch (SLiDER tool, MHC-I version 2012.

  6. Discovery and application of peptides that bind to proteins and solid state inorganic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, Linda A.

    A series of three projects was undertaken on the theme of peptide-based molecular recognition. In the first project, a messenger RNA (mRNA) display selection was carried out against the II-VI semiconductors zinc sulfide (ZnS), zinc selenide (ZnSe), and cadmium sulfide (CdS). Sequence analysis of 18-mer semiconductor-binding peptides (SBPs) following four rounds of selection indicated that the amino acid sequences were enriched in polar residues compared to the naive library, suggesting that hydrogen-bonding interactions are a dominant mode of interaction between the SBPs and their cognate inorganic surfaces. Select peptides were expressed as fusions of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) to visualize their recognition of semiconductor crystals. Interpretation of the results was complicated by a high fluorescence background that was observed with certain control GFP fusions. Additional experiments, including cross-specificity binding assays, are needed to characterize the peptides that were isolated in this selection. A second project described the practical application of a known inorganic-binding and nucleating peptide. Peptide A3, which was previously isolated by phage display, was chemically conjugated to a short DNA strand using the heterobifunctional linker succinimidyl 4-[N-maleimidomethyl]cyclohexane-1-carboxylate (SMCC). The resulting peptide-DNA conjugate was hybridized to ten complementary single-stranded capture probes extending outward from the surface of an origami DNA nanotube. A gold precursor solution was added to initiate nucleation and growth of gold nanoparticles at the site of the peptide. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to visualize the gold nanoparticle-decorated nanostructures. This approach holds immense promise for organizing compositionally-diverse materials at the nanoscale. In a third project, a novel non-iterative approach to mRNA display called covalent capture was demonstrated. Using human transferrin as a target

  7. Calcium Binding to Amino Acids and Small Glycine Peptides in Aqueous Solution: Toward Peptide Design for Better Calcium Bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ning; Skibsted, Leif H

    2016-06-01

    Deprotonation of amino acids as occurs during transfer from stomach to intestines during food digestion was found by comparison of complex formation constants as determined electrochemically for increasing pH to increase calcium binding (i) by a factor of around 6 for the neutral amino acids, (ii) by a factor of around 4 for anions of the acidic amino acids aspartic and glutamic acid, and (iii) by a factor of around 5.5 for basic amino acids. Optimized structures of the 1:1 complexes and ΔHbinding for calcium binding as calculated by density functional theory (DFT) confirmed in all complexes a stronger calcium binding and shorter calcium-oxygen bond length in the deprotonated form. In addition, the stronger calcium binding was also accompanied by a binding site shift from carboxylate binding to chelation by α-amino group and carboxylate oxygen for leucine, aspartate, glutamate, alanine, and asparagine. For binary amino acid mixtures, the calcium-binding constant was close to the predicted geometric mean of the individual amino acid binding constants indicating separate binding of calcium to two amino acids when present together in solution. At high pH, corresponding to conditions for calcium absorption, the binding affinity increased in the order Lys < Arg < Cys < Gln < Gly ∼ Ala < Asn < His < Leu < Glu< Asp. In a series of glycine peptides, calcium-binding affinity was found to increase in the order Gly-Leu ∼ Gly-Gly < Ala-Gly < Gly-His ∼ Gly-Lys-Gly < Glu-Cys-Gly < Gly-Glu, an ordering confirmed by DFT calculations for the dipeptides and which also accounted for large synergistic effects in calcium binding for up to 6 kJ/mol when compared to the corresponding amino acid mixtures. PMID:27159329

  8. Metal ion binding to peptides: Oxygen or nitrogen sites?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunbar, R. C.; Polfer, N. C.; G. Berden,; Oomens, J.

    2012-01-01

    Infrared multiple-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy was used to probe the conformations of gas-phase metal-ion complexes between a series of five metal ions and six small peptide ligands. This report is presented in recognition and tribute for the Armentrout group's long and hugely produ

  9. Metal ion binding to peptides: oxygen or nitrogen sites?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.C. Dunbar; N.C. Polfer; G. Berden; J. Oomens

    2012-01-01

    Infrared multiple-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy was used to probe the conformations of gas-phase metal-ion complexes between a series of five metal ions and six small peptide ligands. This report is presented in recognition and tribute for the Armentrout group's long and hugely productive

  10. SPARC is a source of copper-binding peptides that stimulate angiogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    SPARC is a transiently expressed extracellular matrix-binding protein that alters cell shape and regulates endothelial cell proliferation in vitro. In this study, we show that SPARC mRNA and protein are synthesized by endothelial cells during angiogenesis in vivo. SPARC and peptides derived from a cationic region of the protein (amino acids 113- 130) stimulated the formation of endothelial cords in vitro; moreover, these peptides stimulated angiogenesis in vivo. Mapping of the active domain d...

  11. PeptideMine - A webserver for the design of peptides for protein-peptide binding studies derived from protein-protein interactomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Balasubramanian

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signal transduction events often involve transient, yet specific, interactions between structurally conserved protein domains and polypeptide sequences in target proteins. The identification and validation of these associating domains is crucial to understand signal transduction pathways that modulate different cellular or developmental processes. Bioinformatics strategies to extract and integrate information from diverse sources have been shown to facilitate the experimental design to understand complex biological events. These methods, primarily based on information from high-throughput experiments, have also led to the identification of new connections thus providing hypothetical models for cellular events. Such models, in turn, provide a framework for directing experimental efforts for validating the predicted molecular rationale for complex cellular processes. In this context, it is envisaged that the rational design of peptides for protein-peptide binding studies could substantially facilitate the experimental strategies to evaluate a predicted interaction. This rational design procedure involves the integration of protein-protein interaction data, gene ontology, physico-chemical calculations, domain-domain interaction data and information on functional sites or critical residues. Results Here we describe an integrated approach called "PeptideMine" for the identification of peptides based on specific functional patterns present in the sequence of an interacting protein. This approach based on sequence searches in the interacting sequence space has been developed into a webserver, which can be used for the identification and analysis of peptides, peptide homologues or functional patterns from the interacting sequence space of a protein. To further facilitate experimental validation, the PeptideMine webserver also provides a list of physico-chemical parameters corresponding to the peptide to determine the feasibility of

  12. Toxoplasma gondii peptide ligands open the gate of the HLA class I binding groove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurtrey, Curtis; Trolle, Thomas; Sansom, Tiffany; Remesh, Soumya G; Kaever, Thomas; Bardet, Wilfried; Jackson, Kenneth; McLeod, Rima; Sette, Alessandro; Nielsen, Morten; Zajonc, Dirk M; Blader, Ira J; Peters, Bjoern; Hildebrand, William

    2016-01-29

    HLA class I presentation of pathogen-derived peptide ligands is essential for CD8+ T-cell recognition of Toxoplasma gondii infected cells. Currently, little data exist pertaining to peptides that are presented after T. gondii infection. Herein we purify HLA-A*02:01 complexes from T. gondii infected cells and characterize the peptide ligands using LCMS. We identify 195 T. gondii encoded ligands originating from both secreted and cytoplasmic proteins. Surprisingly, T. gondii ligands are significantly longer than uninfected host ligands, and these longer pathogen-derived peptides maintain a canonical N-terminal binding core yet exhibit a C-terminal extension of 1-30 amino acids. Structural analysis demonstrates that binding of extended peptides opens the HLA class I F' pocket, allowing the C-terminal extension to protrude through one end of the binding groove. In summary, we demonstrate that unrealized structural flexibility makes MHC class I receptive to parasite-derived ligands that exhibit unique C-terminal peptide extensions.

  13. Clicked bis-PEG-peptide conjugates for studying calmodulin-Kv7.2 channel binding

    OpenAIRE

    Bonache de Marcos, María Ángeles; Alaimo, Alessandro; Malo, Covadonga; Millet, Oscar; Villarroel, Alvaro; González-Muñiz, Rosario

    2014-01-01

    The recombinant Kv7.2 calmodulin (CaM) binding site (Q2AB CaMBD) shows a high tendency to aggregate, thus complicating biochemical and structural studies. To facilitate these studies we have conceived bis-PEG-peptide CaMBD-mimetics linking helices A and B in single, easy to handle molecules. Short PEG chains were selected as spacers between the two peptide molecules, and a Cu(i)-catalyzed cycloaddition (CuAAC) protocol was used to assemble the final bis-PEG-peptide conjugate, by the convenien...

  14. Label-free detection of biomolecular interaction — DNA — Antimicrobial peptide binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fojan, Peter; Jensen, Kasper Risgaard; Gurevich, Leonid

    2011-01-01

    of plasmon based biosensors to the study of the interaction of Antimicrobial peptide IL4 and DNA. Our results indicate high affinity binding between IL4 and DNA thereby preventing DNA replication and eventually killing the affected cell. We speculate that this is common for a large class of Antimicrobial...... an interest in Antimicrobial peptides that are active against broad range of infections including bacteria, fungi and viruses and were shown to be capable of treating multi-resistant infection either alone or in combination with the conventional antibiotics. In this paper , we demonstrate an application...... peptides and can be a key point explaining their broad range of activity against various pathogens....

  15. A polystyrene binding target-unrelated peptide isolated in the screening of phage display library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2016-11-01

    Phage display is a powerful methodology for the identification of peptide ligands binding to any desired target. However, the selection of target-unrelated peptides (TUPs) appears as a huge problem in the screening of phage display libraries through biopanning. The phage-displayed peptide TLHPAAD has been isolated both in our laboratory and by another reserach group on completely different screening targets prompting us to hypothesize that it may be a potential TUP. In the current study, we analyzed the binding characteristics and propagation rate of phage clone displaying TLHPAAD peptide (SW-TUP clone). The results of ELISA experiment and phage recovery assay provided strong support for the notion that SW-TUP phage binds to polystyrene with a significantly higher affinity than control phage clones. Furthermore, this polystyrene binding was demonstrated to occur in a concentration- and pH-dependent mode. Characterization of the propagation profile of phage clones within a specified time course revealed no statistically significant difference between the amplification rate of SW-TUP and control phages. Our findings lead us to the conclusion that SW-TUP phage clone with the displayed peptide TLHPAAD is not a true target binder and its selection in biopanning experiments results from its bidning affinity to the polystyrene surface of the solid phase.

  16. A polystyrene binding target-unrelated peptide isolated in the screening of phage display library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2016-11-01

    Phage display is a powerful methodology for the identification of peptide ligands binding to any desired target. However, the selection of target-unrelated peptides (TUPs) appears as a huge problem in the screening of phage display libraries through biopanning. The phage-displayed peptide TLHPAAD has been isolated both in our laboratory and by another reserach group on completely different screening targets prompting us to hypothesize that it may be a potential TUP. In the current study, we analyzed the binding characteristics and propagation rate of phage clone displaying TLHPAAD peptide (SW-TUP clone). The results of ELISA experiment and phage recovery assay provided strong support for the notion that SW-TUP phage binds to polystyrene with a significantly higher affinity than control phage clones. Furthermore, this polystyrene binding was demonstrated to occur in a concentration- and pH-dependent mode. Characterization of the propagation profile of phage clones within a specified time course revealed no statistically significant difference between the amplification rate of SW-TUP and control phages. Our findings lead us to the conclusion that SW-TUP phage clone with the displayed peptide TLHPAAD is not a true target binder and its selection in biopanning experiments results from its bidning affinity to the polystyrene surface of the solid phase. PMID:27555439

  17. Specific RNA binding by amino-terminal peptides of alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, M L; Houser, F; Loesch-Fries, L S; Gehrke, L

    1994-01-01

    Specific RNA-protein interactions and ribonucleoprotein complexes are essential for many biological processes, but our understanding of how ribonucleoprotein particles form and accomplish their biological functions is rudimentary. This paper describes the interaction of alfalfa mosaic virus (A1MV) coat protein or peptides with viral RNA. A1MV coat protein is necessary both for virus particle formation and for the initiation of replication of the three genomic RNAs. We have examined protein determinants required for specific RNA binding and analyzed potential structural changes elicited by complex formation. The results indicate that the amino-terminus of the viral coat protein, which lacks primary sequence homology with recognized RNA binding motifs, is both necessary and sufficient for binding to RNA. Circular dichroism spectra and electrophoretic mobility shift experiments suggest that the RNA conformation is altered when amino-terminal coat protein peptides bind to the viral RNA. The peptide--RNA interaction is functionally significant because the peptides will substitute for A1MV coat protein in initiating RNA replication. The apparent conformational change that accompanies RNA--peptide complex formation may generate a structure which, unlike the viral RNA alone, can be recognized by the viral replicase. Images PMID:8313916

  18. Antifreeze and cryoprotective activities of ice-binding collagen peptides from pig skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hui; Zhao, Ying; Zhu, Yu Bing; Xu, Fei; Yu, Jing Song; Yuan, Min

    2016-03-01

    A novel "hyperactive" ice-binding peptide from porcine collagen was prepared by alkaline protease hydrolysis and a series of column chromatography separations, and then its antifreeze and cryoprotective properties were reported. Using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), the thermal hysteresis (TH) of ice-binding collagen peptides was closely related to their concentration and crystal fraction. Collagen hydrolysates with maximal TH were obtained by hydrolysis at pH 8.0, DH 15.0%, and 5% alkaline protease at 55°C. After purification by column chromatography, the AP-3 ice-binding collagen peptide (GLLGPLGPRGLL) with 1162.8Da molecular weights exhibited the highest TH (5.28°C), which can be classified as "hyperactive". Recrystallisation and melt-resistance of ice cream were improved by AP-3 ice-binding collagen peptide at 0.2% (w/v) in a similar manner to natural antifreeze proteins. Moreover, the addition of AP-3 collagen peptides in ice cream greatly elevated the glass transition temperature (Tg) to -17.64°C. PMID:26471678

  19. RXP-E: a connexin43-binding peptide that prevents action potential propagation block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewandowski, Rebecca; Procida, Kristina; Vaidyanathan, Ravi;

    2008-01-01

    Gap junctions provide a low-resistance pathway for cardiac electric propagation. The role of GJ regulation in arrhythmia is unclear, partly because of limited availability of pharmacological tools. Recently, we showed that a peptide called "RXP-E" binds to the carboxyl terminal of connexin43 and ...... junctions in the function of multicellular systems, including the heart.......Gap junctions provide a low-resistance pathway for cardiac electric propagation. The role of GJ regulation in arrhythmia is unclear, partly because of limited availability of pharmacological tools. Recently, we showed that a peptide called "RXP-E" binds to the carboxyl terminal of connexin43...

  20. A resistin binding peptide selected by phage display inhibits 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Background Resistin, a newly discovered cysteine-rich hormone secreted mainly by adipose tissues, has been proposed to form a biochemical link between obesity and type 2 diabetes. However, the resistin receptor has not yet been identified. This study aimed to identify resistin binding proteins/receptor.Methods Three cDNA fragments with the same 11 bp 5' sequence were found by screening a cDNA phage display library of rat multiple tissues. As the reading frames of the same 11 bp 5' sequence were interrupted by a TGA stop codon, plaque lift assay was consequently used to prove the readthrough phenomenon. The stop codon in the same 11 bp 5' sequence was replaced by tryptophan, and the binding activity of the coded peptide [AWIL, which was designated as resistin binding peptide (RBP)] with resistin was identified by the confocal microscopy technique and the affinity chromatography experiment. pDual GC-resistin and pDual GC-resistin binding peptide were co-transfected into 3T3-L1 cells to confirm the function of resistin binding peptide.Results Three cDNA fragments with the same 11 bp 5' sequence were found. The TGA stop codon in reading frames of the same 11 bp 5' sequence was proved to be readthroughed. The binding activity of RBP with resistin was consequently identified. The expression of the resistin binding peptide in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes expressing pDual GC-resistin significantly inhibited the adipogenic differentiation.Conclusion RBP could effectively rescue the promoted differentiation of resistin overxepressed 3T3-L1 preadipocyte.

  1. Development of a Novel Tetravalent Synthetic Peptide That Binds to Phosphatidic Acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Ogawa

    Full Text Available We employed a multivalent peptide-library screening technique to identify a peptide motif that binds to phosphatidic acid (PA, but not to other phospholipids such as phosphatidylcholine (PC, phosphatidylethanolamine (PE, and phosphatidylserine (PS. A tetravalent peptide with the sequence motif of MARWHRHHH, designated as PAB-TP (phosphatidic acid-binding tetravalent peptide, was shown to bind as low as 1 mol% of PA in the bilayer membrane composed of PC and cholesterol. Kinetic analysis of the interaction between PAB-TP and the membranes containing 10 mol% of PA showed that PAB-TP associated with PA with a low dissociation constant of KD = 38 ± 5 nM. Coexistence of cholesterol or PE with PA in the membrane enhanced the PAB-TP binding to PA by increasing the ionization of the phosphomonoester head group as well as by changing the microenvironment of PA molecules in the membrane. Amino acid replacement analysis demonstrated that the tryptophan residue at position 4 of PAB-TP was involved in the interaction with PA. Furthermore, a series of amino acid substitutions at positions 5 to 9 of PAB-TP revealed the involvement of consecutive histidine and arginine residues in recognition of the phosphomonoester head group of PA. Our results demonstrate that the recognition of PA by PAB-TP is achieved by a combination of hydrophobic, electrostatic and hydrogen-bond interactions, and that the tetravalent structure of PAB-TP contributes to the high affinity binding to PA in the membrane. The novel PA-binding tetravalent peptide PAB-TP will provide insight into the molecular mechanism underlying the recognition of PA by PA-binding proteins that are involved in various cellular events.

  2. Biopanning and characterization of peptides with Fe3O4 nanoparticles-binding capability via phage display random peptide library technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Fei; Yin, Guangfu; Pu, Ximing; Li, Yucan; Hu, Yang; Huang, Zhongbin; Liao, Xiaoming; Yao, Yadong; Chen, Xianchun

    2016-05-01

    Functionalization of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) play an important role in biomedical applications. A proper functionalization of NPs can improve biocompatibility, avoid a loss of bioactivity, and further endow NPs with unique performances. Modification with vairous specific binding biomolecules from random biological libraries has been explored. In this work, two 7-mer peptides with sequences of HYIDFRW and TVNFKLY were selected from a phage display random peptide library by using ferromagnetic NPs as targets, and were verified to display strong binding affinity to Fe3O4 NPs. Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, fluorescence microscopy, thermal analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the presence of peptides on the surface of Fe3O4 NPs. Sequence analyses revealed that the probable binding mechanism between the peptide and Fe3O4 NPs might be driven by Pearson hard acid-hard base specific interaction and hydrogen bonds, accompanied with hydrophilic interactions and non-specific electrostatic attractions. The cell viability assay indicated a good cytocompatibility of peptide-bound Fe3O4 NPs. Furthermore, TVNFKLY peptide and an ovarian tumor cell A2780 specific binding peptide (QQTNWSL) were conjugated to afford a liner 14-mer peptide (QQTNWSLTVNFKLY). The binding and targeting studies showed that 14-mer peptide was able to retain both the strong binding ability to Fe3O4 NPs and the specific binding ability to A2780 cells. The results suggested that the Fe3O4-binding peptides would be of great potential in the functionalization of Fe3O4 NPs for the tumor-targeted drug delivery and magnetic hyperthermia. PMID:26896661

  3. Peptide binding landscapes: Specificity and homophilicity across sequence space in a lattice model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Joohyun; Shell, M. Scott

    2016-10-01

    Peptide aggregation frequently involves sequences with strong homophilic binding character, i.e., sequences that self-assemble with like species in a crowded cellular environment, in the face of a multitude of other peptides or proteins as potential heterophilic binding partners. What kinds of sequences display a strong tendency towards homophilic binding and self-assembly, and what are the origins of this behavior? Here, we consider how sequence specificity in oligomerization processes plays out in a simple two-dimensional (2D) lattice statistical-thermodynamic peptide model that permits exhaustive examination of the entire sequence and configurational landscapes. We find that sequences with strong self-specificities have either alternating hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues or short patches of hydrophobic residues, both which minimize intramolecular hydrophobic interactions in part due to the constraints of the 2D lattice. We also find that these specificities are highly sensitive to entropic and free energetic features of the unbound conformational state, such that direct binding interaction energies alone do not capture the complete behavior. These results suggest that the ability of particular peptide sequences to self-assemble and aggregate in a many-protein environment reflects a precise balance of direct binding interactions and behavior in the unbound (monomeric) state.

  4. Challenges in Optimizing a Prostate Carcinoma Binding Peptide, Identified through the Phage Display Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Debus

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The transfer of peptides identified through the phage display technology to clinical applications is difficult. Major drawbacks are the metabolic degradation and label instability. The aim of our work is the optimization of DUP-1, a peptide which was identified by phage display to specifically target human prostate carcinoma. To investigate the influence of chelate conjugation, DOTA was coupled to DUP-1 and labeling was performed with 111In. To improve serum stability cyclization of DUP-1 and targeted D-amino acid substitution were carried out. Alanine scanning was performed for identification of the binding site and based on the results peptide fragments were chemically synthesized. The properties of modified ligands were investigated in in vitro binding and competition assays. In vivo biodistribution studies were carried out in mice, carrying human prostate tumors subcutaneously. DOTA conjugation resulted in different cellular binding kinetics, rapid in vivo renal clearance and increased tumor-to-organ ratios. Cyclization and D-amino acid substitution increased the metabolic stability but led to binding affinity decrease. Fragment investigation indicated that the sequence NRAQDY might be significant for target-binding. Our results demonstrate challenges in optimizing peptides, identified through phage display libraries, and show that careful investigation of modified derivatives is necessary in order to improve their characteristics.

  5. Conservation analysis of dengue virust-cell epitope-based vaccine candidates using peptide block entropy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lars Rønn; Zhang, Guang Lan; Keskin, Derin B.;

    2011-01-01

    Broad coverage of the pathogen population is particularly important when designing CD8+ T-cell epitope vaccines against viral pathogens. Traditional approaches are based on combinations of highly conserved T-cell epitopes. Peptide block entropy analysis is a novel approach for assembling sets....... In contrast, the benchmark study by Khan et al. (2008) resulted in 165 conserved 9-mer peptides. Many of the conserved blocks are located consecutively in the proteins. Connecting these blocks resulted in 78 conserved regions. Of the 1551 blocks of 9-mer peptides 110 comprised predicted HLA binder sets...

  6. Specific binding of DNA to aggregated forms of Alzheimer's disease amyloid peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camero, Sergio; Ayuso, Jose M; Barrantes, Alejandro; Benítez, María J; Jiménez, Juan S

    2013-04-01

    Anomalous protein aggregation is closely associated to age-related mental illness. Extraneuronal plaques, mainly composed of aggregated amyloid peptides, are considered as hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. According to the amyloid cascade hypothesis, this disease starts as a consequence of an abnormal processing of the amyloid precursor protein resulting in an excess of amyloid peptides. Nuclear localization of amyloid peptide aggregates together with amyloid-DNA interaction, have been repeatedly reported. In this paper we have used surface plasmon resonance and electron microscopy to study the structure and behavior of different peptides and proteins, including β-lactoglobulin, bovine serum albumin, myoglobin, histone, casein and the amyloid-β peptides related to Alzheimer's disease Aβ25-35 and Aβ1-40. The main purpose of this study is to investigate whether proneness to DNA interaction is a general property displayed by aggregated forms of proteins, or it is an interaction specifically related to the aggregated forms of those particular proteins and peptides related to neurodegenerative diseases. Our results reveal that those aggregates formed by amyloid peptides show a particular proneness to interact with DNA. They are the only aggregated structures capable of binding DNA, and show more affinity for DNA than for other polyanions like heparin and polyglutamic acid, therefore strengthening the hypothesis that amyloid peptides may, by means of interaction with nuclear DNA, contribute to the onset of Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Optimization of Hydrolysis Conditions for the Production of Iron-Binding Peptides from Mackerel Processing Byproducts

    OpenAIRE

    Pan-Feng Wang; Guang-Rong Huang; Jia-Xin Jiang

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was focused on optimization of enzymatic hydrolysis conditions for the production of iron-binding peptides from marine mackerel processing byproducts. The marine mackerel processing byproducts protein were hydrolyzed using trypsin, Protamex, Flavourzyme, Alcalase and Neutrase. Alcalase and Protamex proteolytic hydrolysates exhibited the highest iron-binding capacity; however, Alcalase proteolytic hydrolysate had higher degree of hydrolysis than that of Protamex. A four-f...

  8. Multiple antigen peptide dendrimer elicits antibodies for detecting rat and mouse growth hormone binding proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Aguilar, Roberto M.; Talamantes, Frank J.; Bustamante, Juan J.; Muñoz, Jesus; Treviño, Lisa R.; Martinez, Andrew O.; Haro, Luis S.

    2009-01-01

    The membrane-bound rat growth hormone receptor (GH-R) and an alternatively spliced isoform, the soluble rat GH binding protein (GH-BP), are comprised of identical N-terminal GH binding domains, however, their C-terminal sequences differ. Immunological reagents are needed to distinguish between the two isoforms in order to understand their respective roles in mediating the actions of GH. Accordingly, a tetravalent multiple antigen peptide (MAP) dendrimer with four identical branches of a C-ter...

  9. The different ligand-binding modes of relaxin family peptide receptors RXFP1 and RXFP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Daniel J; Rosengren, K Johan; Bathgate, Ross A D

    2012-11-01

    Relaxin and insulin-like peptide 3 (INSL3) are peptide hormones with a number of important physiological roles in reproduction, regulation of extracellular matrix turnover, and cardiovascular function. Relaxin and INSL3 mediate their actions through the closely related G-protein coupled receptors, relaxin family peptide receptors 1 and 2 (RXFP1 and RXFP2), respectively. These receptors have large extracellular domains (ECD) that contain high-affinity ligand-binding sites within their 10 leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-containing modules. Although relaxin can bind and activate both RXFP1 and RXFP2, INSL3 can only bind and activate RXFP2. To investigate whether this difference is related to the nature of the high-affinity ECD binding site or to differences in secondary binding sites involving the receptor transmembrane (TM) domain, we created a suite of constructs with RXFP1/2 chimeric ECD attached to single TM helices. We show that by changing as little as one LRR, representing four amino acid substitutions, we were able to engineer a high-affinity INSL3-binding site into the ECD of RXFP1. Molecular modeling of the INSL3-RXFP2 interaction based on extensive experimental data highlights the differences in the binding mechanisms of relaxin and INSL3 to the ECD of their cognate receptors. Interestingly, when the engineered RXFP1/2 ECD were introduced into full-length RXFP1 constructs, INSL3 exhibited only low affinity and efficacy on these receptors. These results highlight critical differences both in the ECD binding and in the coordination of the ECD-binding site with the TM domain, and provide new mechanistic insights into the binding and activation events of RXFP1 and RXFP2 by their native hormone ligands. PMID:22973049

  10. C-terminal substitution of MDM2 interacting peptides modulates binding affinity by distinctive mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Brown

    Full Text Available The complex between the proteins MDM2 and p53 is a promising drug target for cancer therapy. The residues 19-26 of p53 have been biochemically and structurally demonstrated to be a most critical region to maintain the association of MDM2 and p53. Variation of the amino acid sequence in this range obviously alters the binding affinity. Surprisingly, suitable substitutions contiguous to this region of the p53 peptides can yield tightly binding peptides. The peptide variants may differ by a single residue that vary little in their structural conformations and yet are characterized by large differences in their binding affinities. In this study a systematic analysis into the role of single C-terminal mutations of a 12 residue fragment of the p53 transactivation domain (TD and an equivalent phage optimized peptide (12/1 were undertaken to elucidate their mechanistic and thermodynamic differences in interacting with the N-terminal of MDM2. The experimental results together with atomistically detailed dynamics simulations provide insight into the principles that govern peptide design protocols with regard to protein-protein interactions and peptidomimetic design.

  11. PeptiSite: a structural database of peptide binding sites in 4D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Chayan; Kufareva, Irina; Ilatovskiy, Andrey V; Abagyan, Ruben

    2014-03-21

    We developed PeptiSite, a comprehensive and reliable database of biologically and structurally characterized peptide-binding sites, in which each site is represented by an ensemble of its complexes with protein, peptide and small molecule partners. The unique features of the database include: (1) the ensemble site representation that provides a fourth dimension to the otherwise three dimensional data, (2) comprehensive characterization of the binding site architecture that may consist of a multimeric protein assembly with cofactors and metal ions and (3) analysis of consensus interaction motifs within the ensembles and identification of conserved determinants of these interactions. Currently the database contains 585 proteins with 650 peptide-binding sites. http://peptisite.ucsd.edu/ link allows searching for the sites of interest and interactive visualization of the ensembles using the ActiveICM web-browser plugin. This structural database for protein-peptide interactions enables understanding of structural principles of these interactions and may assist the development of an efficient peptide docking benchmark. PMID:24406170

  12. Identification and design of p53-derived HLA-A2-binding peptides with increased CTL immunogenicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, T R; Buus, S; Brunak, S;

    2001-01-01

    of peptide binding to HLA-A2 molecules, we identified three p53 protein-derived nonamer peptides with intermediate binding owing to suboptimal amino acids in the P2 anchor position. These peptides were synthesized along with the corresponding analogs, where the natural P2 residue had been replaced...... HLA-A2 transgenic mouse fibrosarcoma cells transfected with human p53 DNA. The data suggest that modified self-peptides derived from overexpressed tumour-associated proteins can be used in vaccine development against cancer, and that quantitative predictions of HLA binding is of value in the rational...

  13. Novel peptide ligand with high binding capacity for antibody purification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, L. N.; Gustavsson, P. E.; Michael, R.;

    2012-01-01

    and the interaction is favorable and entropy-driven with an enthalpy penalty. Our results show that the binding of the Fc fragment of IgG is mediated by hydrophobic interactions and that elution at low pH is most likely due to electrostatic repulsion. Furthermore, we have separated aggregated IgG from non...

  14. Self-peptides with intermediate capacity to bind and stabilize MHC class I molecules may be immunogenic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M L M; Ruhwald, Morten; Nissen, M H;

    2003-01-01

    Thirty self-peptides were selected on the basis of their predicted binding to H-2b molecules. The binding of peptides was ascertained experimentally by biochemical (KD measurements) and cellular [major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) stabilization] assays. A weak, but significant, corr...

  15. Limitations of Ab Initio Predictions of Peptide Binding to MHC Class II Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Hao; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Morten;

    2010-01-01

    Successful predictions of peptide MHC binding typically require a large set of binding data for the specific MHC molecule that is examined. Structure based prediction methods promise to circumvent this requirement by evaluating the physical contacts a peptide can make with an MHC molecule based...... on the highly conserved 3D structure of peptide:MHC complexes. While several such methods have been described before, most are not publicly available and have not been independently tested for their performance. We here implemented and evaluated three prediction methods for MHC class II molecules: statistical...... methods prediction performance showed that these are significantly better than random, but still substantially lower than the best performing sequence based class II prediction methods available. While the approaches presented here were developed independently, we have chosen to present our results...

  16. Differential binding of urokinase and peptide antagonists to the urokinase receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelholm, L H; Behrendt, N

    2001-01-01

    though these sequences contain very few substitutions relative to the human uPAR, the receptor protein products differ markedly in terms of ligand selectivity. Thus, a well described competitive peptide antagonist directed against the human uPAR reacts with only one of the monkey receptors (chimpanzee u......PAR), in spite of the fact that uPAR from all of the four species cross-reacts with human uPA. Notably, uPAR from African green monkey, which is completely devoid of reactivity with the peptide, contains only three substitutions relative to chimpanzee uPAR in the molecular regions critical for binding....... These findings aid the elucidation of the structure/function relationship of uPAR and, unexpectedly, identify a structural distinction governing the binding of uPA and a very similar peptide antagonist....

  17. Anti-Hemagglutinin Antibody Derived Lead Peptides for Inhibitors of Influenza Virus Binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Memczak

    Full Text Available Antibodies against spike proteins of influenza are used as a tool for characterization of viruses and therapeutic approaches. However, development, production and quality control of antibodies is expensive and time consuming. To circumvent these difficulties, three peptides were derived from complementarity determining regions of an antibody heavy chain against influenza A spike glycoprotein. Their binding properties were studied experimentally, and by molecular dynamics simulations. Two peptide candidates showed binding to influenza A/Aichi/2/68 H3N2. One of them, termed PeB, with the highest affinity prevented binding to and infection of target cells in the micromolar region without any cytotoxic effect. PeB matches best the conserved receptor binding site of hemagglutinin. PeB bound also to other medical relevant influenza strains, such as human-pathogenic A/California/7/2009 H1N1, and avian-pathogenic A/Mute Swan/Rostock/R901/2006 H7N1. Strategies to improve the affinity and to adapt specificity are discussed and exemplified by a double amino acid substituted peptide, obtained by substitutional analysis. The peptides and their derivatives are of great potential for drug development as well as biosensing.

  18. Anti-Hemagglutinin Antibody Derived Lead Peptides for Inhibitors of Influenza Virus Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memczak, Henry; Lauster, Daniel; Kar, Parimal; Di Lella, Santiago; Volkmer, Rudolf; Knecht, Volker; Herrmann, Andreas; Ehrentreich-Förster, Eva; Bier, Frank F; Stöcklein, Walter F M

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies against spike proteins of influenza are used as a tool for characterization of viruses and therapeutic approaches. However, development, production and quality control of antibodies is expensive and time consuming. To circumvent these difficulties, three peptides were derived from complementarity determining regions of an antibody heavy chain against influenza A spike glycoprotein. Their binding properties were studied experimentally, and by molecular dynamics simulations. Two peptide candidates showed binding to influenza A/Aichi/2/68 H3N2. One of them, termed PeB, with the highest affinity prevented binding to and infection of target cells in the micromolar region without any cytotoxic effect. PeB matches best the conserved receptor binding site of hemagglutinin. PeB bound also to other medical relevant influenza strains, such as human-pathogenic A/California/7/2009 H1N1, and avian-pathogenic A/Mute Swan/Rostock/R901/2006 H7N1. Strategies to improve the affinity and to adapt specificity are discussed and exemplified by a double amino acid substituted peptide, obtained by substitutional analysis. The peptides and their derivatives are of great potential for drug development as well as biosensing. PMID:27415624

  19. A peptide fusion protein in hibits angiogenesis and tumorgrowth by blocking VEGF binding to KDR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) binding to its tyrosine kinase receptors (KDR/FLK1, Flt-1) induces angiogenesis. In search of the peptides blocking VEGF binding to its receptor KDR/FLK1 to inhibit tumor- angiogenesis and growth, we screened a phage display peptide library with KDR as target protein, and some candidate peptides were isolated. In this study, we cloned the DNA fragment coding the peptide K237 from the library, into a vector pQE42 to express fusion protein DHFR-K237 in E. coli M15. The affection of fusion protein DHFR-K237 on endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis was investigated. In vitro, DHFR-K237 could completely block VEGF binding to KDR and significantly inhibit the VEGF-medi- ated proliferation of the human vascular endothelial cells. In vivo, DHFR-K237 inhibited angiogenesis in chick embryo chorioa- llantoric membrane and tumor growth in nude mice. These results suggest that K237 is an effective antagonist of VEGF binding to KDR, and could be a potential agent for cancer biotherapy.

  20. Preparation and Characteristic of Iron-Binding Peptides from Shrimp Processing Discards Hydrolysates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang-yan Ren

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was focused on preparation of iron-binding peptides from Shrimp Processing Discards (SPD hydrolysate using response surface methodology (RSM and characteristic of the iron-peptides complex. Six kinds of protease (tyrpsin, pepsin, protmex, flavourzyme, neutrase and alcalase were used to hydrolysis the SPD protein and the trypsin hydrolysate showed the highest iron-binding activity. The factorial design experiments showed that pH, trypsin concentration and hydrolysis time affected significantly the ironbinding activity of hydrolysate. Then the trypsin hydrolysis conditions (time, enzyme concentration, pH were optimized by RSM using central composition design for produing highest iron-binding activity. The pH 8.18, enzyme concentration of 500 U/mL and a hydrolysis time of 120 min were found to be the optimum conditions to obtain a higher iron-binding activity of 6.75 μg-EDTA/mg-protein, which is very closed to the three verificated replicated experiments with 6.73 μg-EDTA/mg-protein. The amino acid composition of the ironpeptides complex was closed to FAO reference protein. The main compositions of the iron-peptides complex were iron of 11.1%, protein of 71.5% and ash of 19.3%. The peptides bound with iron were certified by infrared chromatgraphy.

  1. The specificity of protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides by lactoferrin binding protein B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthau, Ari; Partha, Sarathy K; Adamiak, Paul; Schryvers, Anthony B

    2014-10-01

    A variety of Gram-negative pathogens possess host-specific lactoferrin (Lf) receptors that mediate the acquisition of iron from host Lf. The integral membrane protein component of the receptor, lactoferrin binding protein A specifically binds host Lf and is required for acquisition of iron from Lf. In contrast, the role of the bi-lobed surface lipoprotein, lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB), in Lf binding and iron acquisition is uncertain. A common feature of LbpBs from most species is the presence of clusters of negatively charged amino acids in the protein's C-terminal lobe. Recently it has been shown that the negatively charged regions from the Neisseria meningitidis LbpB are responsible for protecting against an 11 amino acid cationic antimicrobial peptide (CAP), lactoferricin (Lfcin), derived from human Lf. In this study we investigated whether the LbpB confers resistance to other CAPs since N. meningitidis is likely to encounter other CAPs from the host. LbpB provided protection against the cathelicidin derived peptide, cathelicidin related antimicrobial peptide (mCRAMP), but did not confer protection against Tritrp 1 or LL37 under our experimental conditions. When tested against a range of rationally designed synthetic peptides, LbpB was shown to protect against IDR-1002 and IDR-0018 but not against HH-2 or HHC10. PMID:25038734

  2. Peptide Binding to HLA Class I Molecules: Homogenous, High-Throughput Screening, and Affinity Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harndahl, Mikkel; Justesen, Sune Frederik Lamdahl; Lamberth, Kasper;

    2009-01-01

    present a homogenous, proximity-based assay for detection of peptide binding to HLA class I molecules. It uses a conformation-dependent anti-HLA class I antibody, W6/32, as one tag and a biotinylated recombinant HLA class I molecule as the other tag, and a proximity-based signal is generated through...

  3. Analysis of the Resveratrol-binding Protein using Phage-displayed Random Peptide Library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei FENG; Jian JIN; Lian-Feng ZHANG; Ting YAN; Wen-Yi TAO

    2006-01-01

    Resveratrol, a plant polyphenol, is found in significant amounts in the skin of grapes and in some traditional herbs. It is reported to exert different biological activities, such as inhibiting lipid peroxidation,scavenging free radicals, inhibiting platelet aggregation, and anticancer activity. In order to screen the resveratrol-binding proteins, we synthesized biotinylated resveratrol, purified by liquid chromatography and immobilized it into streptavidin-coated microplate wells. 3-(4,5-Demethylthiazol-)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay showed little change in the anticancer activity of biotinylated resveratrol in vitro. A random library of phage-displayed peptides was screened for binding to immobilized resveratrol to isolate resveratrolbinding proteins. Several peptides were found to bind to resveratrol specifically, which was proven by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Through amino acid sequence analysis of the selected peptides and human proteins using the BLAST program, the results showed that resveratrol has an affinity for various proteins such as breast cancer-associated antigen, breast cancer resistance protein, death-associated transcription factor, and human cyclin-dependent kinase. These results demonstrate that our study provides a feasible method for the study of binding proteins of natural compounds using a phage-displayed random peptide library.

  4. Dataset size and composition impact the reliability of performance benchmarks for peptide-MHC binding predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Yohan; Sidney, John; Buus, Søren;

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is important to accurately determine the performance of peptide: MHC binding predictions, as this enables users to compare and choose between different prediction methods and provides estimates of the expected error rate. Two common approaches to determine prediction performance ar...

  5. Stapling monomeric GCN4 peptides allows for DNA binding and enhanced cellular uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Abhishek; Van Lysebetten, Dorien; Ruiz García, Yara; Louage, Benoit; De Geest, Bruno G; Madder, Annemieke

    2015-04-01

    The basic DNA recognition region of the GCN4 protein comprising 23 amino acids has been modified to contain two optimally positioned cysteines which have been linked and stapled using cross-linkers of suitable lengths. This results in stapled peptides with a stabilized α-helical conformation which allows for DNA binding and concurrent enhancement of cellular uptake.

  6. PEPTIDE BINDING AS A MODE OF ACTION FOR THE CARCINOGENICITY AND TOXICITY OF ARSENIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic exposure leads to tumors in human skin, lung, urinary bladder, kidney and liver. Three likely initial stages of arsenical-macromolecular interaction are (1) binding of trivalent arsenicals to the sulfhydryl groups of peptides and proteins, (2) arsenical-induced generation...

  7. I-Ad-binding peptides derived from unrelated protein antigens share a common structural motif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sette, A; Buus, S; Colon, S;

    1988-01-01

    represent a mechanism to achieve a very permissive type of interaction that yet retained some degree of specificity. In the present set of experiments we analyzed the I-Ad binding pattern of a series of overlapping peptides derived from sperm whale myoglobin (residues 102-125) and influenza hemagglutinin...

  8. Creating Prebiotic Sanctuary: Self-Assembling Supramolecular Peptide Structures Bind and Stabilize RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carny, Ohad; Gazit, Ehud

    2011-04-01

    Any attempt to uncover the origins of life must tackle the known `blind watchmaker problem'. That is to demonstrate the likelihood of the emergence of a prebiotic system simple enough to be formed spontaneously and yet complex enough to allow natural selection that will lead to Darwinistic evolution. Studies of short aromatic peptides revealed their ability to self-assemble into ordered and stable structures. The unique physical and chemical characteristics of these peptide assemblies point out to their possible role in the origins of life. We have explored mechanisms by which self-assembling short peptides and RNA fragments could interact together and go through a molecular co-evolution, using diphenylalanine supramolecular assemblies as a model system. The spontaneous formation of these self-assembling peptides under prebiotic conditions, through the salt-induced peptide formation (SIPF) pathway was demonstrated. These peptide assemblies possess the ability to bind and stabilize ribonucleotides in a sequence-depended manner, thus increase their relative fitness. The formation of these peptide assemblies is dependent on the homochirality of the peptide monomers: while homochiral peptides (L-Phe-L-Phe and D-Phe-D-Phe) self-assemble rapidly in aqueous environment, heterochiral diastereoisomers (L-Phe-D-Phe and D-Phe-L-Phe) do not tend to self-assemble. This characteristic consists with the homochirality of all living matter. Finally, based on these findings, we propose a model for the role of short self-assembling peptides in the prebiotic molecular evolution and the origin of life.

  9. Screening of specific binding peptide targeting blood vessel of human esophageal cancer in vivo in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHI Min; WU Kai-chun; HAO Zhi-ming; GUO Chang-cun; YAO Jia-yin

    2011-01-01

    Background Cancer of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction remains a virulent malignancy with poor prognosis. Rapid progresses were made in chemotherapeutic agents and the development of molecular markers allowed better identification of candidates for targeted therapy. This study aimed to identify the candidate peptides used for anti-angiogenic therapy of esophageal cancer by in vivo screening C7C peptide library for peptides binding specifically to blood vessels of human esophageal cancer.Methods The phage displayed C7C peptide library was injected intravenously into mice bearing human esophageal tumor xenografts under renal capsule. After 5 rounds of screening, 13 clones were picked up individually and sequenced.During each round of screening, titers of phage recovery were calculated from tumor xenograft and control tissues.Homing of these 9 peptides to tumor vessel was detected by calculating phage titers in the tumor xenograft and control tissues (lung and spleen) after each phage was injected into mice model, and compared with the distribution of phage M13 and Ⅷ-related antigen in tumor xenograft by immunohistochemical staining. Comparisons among groups of data were made using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), followed by the Bonferroni multiple comparisons test.Results The number of phage recovered from tumor tissue of each round increased gradually in tumor group while decreased in control groups (P <0.01 in tumor and spleen, P <0.05 in lung). Immunohistochemical staining showed similar staining pattern with M13 antibody or Ⅷ-related antigen antibody, suggesting that phages displaying the selected peptides could home to blood vessel of human esophageal cancer. According to their DNA, 9 corresponding peptide sequences were deduced. And the homing ability to blood vessel of phages displaying the selected peptides was confirmed by comparing with their recovery in tumor and control tissues. Two motifs, YSXNXW and PXNXXN, were also obtained by

  10. Arthritogenic peptide binding to DRB1*01 alleles correlates with susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roark, Christina L; Anderson, Kirsten M; Aubrey, Michael T; Rosloniec, Edward F; Freed, Brian M

    2016-08-01

    Genetic susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is often defined by the presence of a shared epitope (QKRAA, QRRAA, or RRRAA) at positions 70-74 in HLA-DRβ1. However, DRβ1*01:01 and 01:02 contain the same QRRAA epitope, but differ considerably in their susceptibility to RA. The purpose of this study was to determine if this difference could be explained by their ability to bind three arthritogenic peptides that we have previously shown to bind to the archetypal RA-susceptible allele, DRβ1*04:01, but not to the resistant DRβ1*08:01 allele. Binding of type II collagen(258-272), citrullinated and native vimentin(66-78), and citrullinated and native α-enolase(11-25) were measured on cell lines expressing either DRβ1*01:01, *01:02 or *01:03 in association with DRα1*01:01. DRβ1*01:01 and *01:02 both exhibited a 6.5-fold preference for citrullinated vimentin(66-78) compared to native vimentin. However, DRβ1*01:01 also exhibited a 1.7-fold preference for citrullinated α-enolase(11-25) and bound collagen(258-272), while DRβ1*01:02 bound neither of these peptides. Consistent with its known resistance to RA, DRβ1*01:03 preferentially bound native vimentin(66-78) and α-enolase(11-25) over the citrullinated forms of these peptides, and also failed to bind collagen(258-272). Site-directed mutagenesis was performed to determine which amino acid residues were responsible for the differences between these alleles. Mutating position 86 in DRβ1*01:01 from glycine to the valine residue found in DRβ1*01:02 eliminated binding of both citrullinated α-enolase(11-25) and collagen(258-272), thereby recapitulating the peptide-binding profile of DRβ1*01:02. The difference in susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis between DRβ1*01:01 and *01:02 thus correlates with the effect of position 86 on the binding of these arthritogenic peptides. Consistent with their association with RA resistance, positions I67, D70 and E71 all contributed to the inability of DRβ1*01:03 to bind

  11. The complex binding mode of the peptide hormone H2 relaxin to its receptor RXFP1

    OpenAIRE

    Sethi, Ashish; Bruell, Shoni; Patil, Nitin; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter; Scott, Daniel J.; Petrie, Emma J.; Bathgate, Ross A. D.; Gooley, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    H2 relaxin activates the relaxin family peptide receptor-1 (RXFP1), a class A G-protein coupled receptor, by a poorly understood mechanism. The ectodomain of RXFP1 comprises an N-terminal LDLa module, essential for activation, tethered to a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain by a 32-residue linker. H2 relaxin is hypothesized to bind with high affinity to the LRR domain enabling the LDLa module to bind and activate the transmembrane domain of RXFP1. Here we define a relaxin-binding site on the L...

  12. Strong Electrostatic Interactions Lead to Entropically Favorable Binding of Peptides to Charged Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprenger, K G; Pfaendtner, Jim

    2016-06-01

    Thermodynamic analyses can provide key insights into the origins of protein self-assembly on surfaces, protein function, and protein stability. However, obtaining quantitative measurements of thermodynamic observables from unbiased classical simulations of peptide or protein adsorption is challenging because of sampling limitations brought on by strong biomolecule/surface binding forces as well as time scale limitations. We used the parallel tempering metadynamics in the well-tempered ensemble (PTMetaD-WTE) enhanced sampling method to study the adsorption behavior and thermodynamics of several explicitly solvated model peptide adsorption systems, providing new molecular-level insight into the biomolecule adsorption process. Specifically studied were peptides LKα14 and LKβ15 and trpcage miniprotein adsorbing onto a charged, hydrophilic self-assembled monolayer surface functionalized with a carboxylic acid/carboxylate headgroup and a neutral, hydrophobic methyl-terminated self-assembled monolayer surface. Binding free energies were calculated as a function of temperature for each system and decomposed into their respective energetic and entropic contributions. We investigated how specific interfacial features such as peptide/surface electrostatic interactions and surface-bound ion content affect the thermodynamic landscape of adsorption and lead to differences in surface-bound conformations of the peptides. Results show that upon adsorption to the charged surface, configurational entropy gains of the released solvent molecules dominate the configurational entropy losses of the bound peptide. This behavior leads to an apparent increase in overall system entropy upon binding and therefore to the surprising and seemingly nonphysical result of an apparent increased binding free energy at elevated temperatures. Opposite effects and conclusions are found for the neutral surface. Additional simulations demonstrate that by adjusting the ionic strength of the solution

  13. Miniaturizing VEGF: Peptides mimicking the discontinuous VEGF receptor-binding site modulate the angiogenic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rosa, Lucia; Finetti, Federica; Diana, Donatella; Di Stasi, Rossella; Auriemma, Sara; Romanelli, Alessandra; Fattorusso, Roberto; Ziche, Marina; Morbidelli, Lucia; D'Andrea, Luca Domenico

    2016-08-08

    The angiogenic properties of VEGF are mediated through the binding of VEGF to its receptor VEGFR2. The VEGF/VEGFR interface is constituted by a discontinuous binding region distributed on both VEGF monomers. We attempted to reproduce this discontinuous binding site by covalently linking into a single molecular entity two VEGF segments involved in receptor recognition. We designed and synthesized by chemical ligation a set of peptides differing in length and flexibility of the molecular linker joining the two VEGF segments. The biological activity of the peptides was characterized in vitro and in vivo showing a VEGF-like activity. The most biologically active mini-VEGF was further analyzed by NMR to determine the atomic details of its interaction with the receptor.

  14. Miniaturizing VEGF: Peptides mimicking the discontinuous VEGF receptor-binding site modulate the angiogenic response

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rosa, Lucia; Finetti, Federica; Diana, Donatella; di Stasi, Rossella; Auriemma, Sara; Romanelli, Alessandra; Fattorusso, Roberto; Ziche, Marina; Morbidelli, Lucia; D’Andrea, Luca Domenico

    2016-08-01

    The angiogenic properties of VEGF are mediated through the binding of VEGF to its receptor VEGFR2. The VEGF/VEGFR interface is constituted by a discontinuous binding region distributed on both VEGF monomers. We attempted to reproduce this discontinuous binding site by covalently linking into a single molecular entity two VEGF segments involved in receptor recognition. We designed and synthesized by chemical ligation a set of peptides differing in length and flexibility of the molecular linker joining the two VEGF segments. The biological activity of the peptides was characterized in vitro and in vivo showing a VEGF-like activity. The most biologically active mini-VEGF was further analyzed by NMR to determine the atomic details of its interaction with the receptor.

  15. Electrostatic Binding and Hydrophobic Collapse of Peptide-Nucleic Acid Aggregates Quantified Using Force Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Camunas-Soler, Joan; Bizarro, Cristiano V; de Loreno, Sara; Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Ramsch, Roland; Vilchez, Susana; Solans, Conxita; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Albericio, Fernando; Eritja, Ramon; Giralt, Ernest; Dev, Sukhendu B; Ritort, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the mechanisms of interaction between self-aggregating peptides and nucleic acids or other polyanions is key to the understanding of many aggregation processes underlying several human diseases (e.g. Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases). Determining the affinity and kinetic steps of such interactions is challenging due to the competition between hydrophobic self-aggregating forces and electrostatic binding forces. Kahalalide F (KF) is an anticancer hydrophobic peptide which contains a single positive charge that confers strong aggregative properties with polyanions. This makes KF an ideal model to elucidate the mechanisms by which self-aggregation competes with binding to a strongly charged polyelectrolyte such as DNA. We use optical tweezers to apply mechanical forces to single DNA molecules and show that KF and DNA interact in a two-step kinetic process promoted by the electrostatic binding of DNA to the aggregate surface followed by the stabilization of the complex due to hydrophobic interact...

  16. TEPITOPEpan: extending TEPITOPE for peptide binding prediction covering over 700 HLA-DR molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianming Zhang

    Full Text Available MOTIVATION: Accurate identification of peptides binding to specific Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II (MHC-II molecules is of great importance for elucidating the underlying mechanism of immune recognition, as well as for developing effective epitope-based vaccines and promising immunotherapies for many severe diseases. Due to extreme polymorphism of MHC-II alleles and the high cost of biochemical experiments, the development of computational methods for accurate prediction of binding peptides of MHC-II molecules, particularly for the ones with few or no experimental data, has become a topic of increasing interest. TEPITOPE is a well-used computational approach because of its good interpretability and relatively high performance. However, TEPITOPE can be applied to only 51 out of over 700 known HLA DR molecules. METHOD: We have developed a new method, called TEPITOPEpan, by extrapolating from the binding specificities of HLA DR molecules characterized by TEPITOPE to those uncharacterized. First, each HLA-DR binding pocket is represented by amino acid residues that have close contact with the corresponding peptide binding core residues. Then the pocket similarity between two HLA-DR molecules is calculated as the sequence similarity of the residues. Finally, for an uncharacterized HLA-DR molecule, the binding specificity of each pocket is computed as a weighted average in pocket binding specificities over HLA-DR molecules characterized by TEPITOPE. RESULT: The performance of TEPITOPEpan has been extensively evaluated using various data sets from different viewpoints: predicting MHC binding peptides, identifying HLA ligands and T-cell epitopes and recognizing binding cores. Among the four state-of-the-art competing pan-specific methods, for predicting binding specificities of unknown HLA-DR molecules, TEPITOPEpan was roughly the second best method next to NETMHCIIpan-2.0. Additionally, TEPITOPEpan achieved the best performance in

  17. A novel method to measure HLA-DM-susceptibility of peptides bound to MHC class II molecules based on peptide binding competition assay and differential IC(50) determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Liusong; Stern, Lawrence J

    2014-04-01

    HLA-DM (DM) functions as a peptide editor that mediates the exchange of peptides loaded onto MHCII molecules by accelerating peptide dissociation and association kinetics. The relative DM-susceptibility of peptides bound to MHCII molecules correlates with antigen presentation and immunodominance hierarchy, and measurement of DM-susceptibility has been a key effort in this field. Current assays of DM-susceptibility, based on differential peptide dissociation rates measured for individually labeled peptides over a long time base, are difficult and cumbersome. Here, we present a novel method to measure DM-susceptibility based on peptide binding competition assays performed in the presence and absence of DM, reported as a delta-IC(50) (change in 50% inhibition concentration) value. We simulated binding competition reactions of peptides with various intrinsic and DM-catalyzed kinetic parameters and found that under a wide range of conditions the delta-IC(50) value is highly correlated with DM-susceptibility as measured in off-rate assay. We confirmed experimentally that DM-susceptibility measured by delta-IC(50) is comparable to that measured by traditional off-rate assay for peptides with known DM-susceptibility hierarchy. The major advantage of this method is that it allows simple, fast and high throughput measurement of DM-susceptibility for a large set of unlabeled peptides in studies of the mechanism of DM action and for identification of CD4+ T cell epitopes.

  18. Design of cyclic peptides that bind protein surfaces with antibody-like affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millward, Steven W; Fiacco, Stephen; Austin, Ryan J; Roberts, Richard W

    2007-09-21

    There is a pressing need for new molecular tools to target protein surfaces with high affinity and specificity. Here, we describe cyclic messenger RNA display with a trillion-member covalent peptide macrocycle library. Using this library, we have designed a number of high-affinity, redox-insensitive, cyclic peptides that target the signaling protein G alpha i1. In addition to cyclization, our library construction took advantage of an expanded genetic code, utilizing nonsense suppression to insert N-methylphenylalanine as a 21st amino acid. The designed macrocycles exhibit several intriguing features. First, the core motif seen in all of the selected variants is the same and shares an identical context with respect to the macrocyclic scaffold, consistent with the idea that selection simultaneously optimizes both the cyclization chemistry and the structural placement of the binding epitope. Second, detailed characterization of one molecule, cyclic G alpha i binding peptide (cycGiBP), demonstrates substantially enhanced proteolytic stability relative to that of the parent linear molecule. Third and perhaps most important, the cycGiBP peptide binds the target with very high affinity ( K i approximately 2.1 nM), similar to those of many of the best monoclonal antibodies and higher than that of the betagamma heterodimer, an endogenous G alpha i1 ligand. Overall the work provides a general route to design novel, low-molecular-weight, high-affinity ligands that target protein surfaces.

  19. Specific bindings of glycine peptides of distinctly different chain length on dynamic papain surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiko

    2011-06-01

    We investigated the specific bindings of peptides of 1-10 glycine residues (1-10GLY) on dynamic papain surfaces via molecular dynamics and docking simulations. Although the binding specificities of 1-5GLY on papain fluctuated little with time, the binding specificities of 6-10GLY on papain considerably fluctuated with time. Some residues had a significant impact on bindings of 6-10GLY to sites near active center of papain, and some of their residues were specific for each 6GLY, 8GLY, and 10GLY. Modification of these specific residues should allow for control of binding specificity of 6GLY, 8GLY, and 10GLY to the active center.

  20. Analysis of Swine Leukocyte Antigen Peptide Binding Profiles and the Identification of T cell Epitopes by Tetramer Staining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers

    within a species makes immune escape almost impossible for any intruding pathogen. Characterization of the SLA class I and class II gene products and their peptide binding capacity defines the T cell epitopes of any given pathogen proteome. To date the analysis of MHC peptide interactions, strength...... class I peptide binding characteristics in relation to immune responses to vaccination or infection. Applying proven technologies to newly produced, recombinant swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) class I proteins yielded a body of data for peptide:SLA:β2m (pSLA) complex affinity and stability. Mapping...... the SLA proteins for their peptide binding requirements along with the identification of their cognate virally derived peptides, made it possible to explore the nature of the SLA proteins and the roles they play in establishing adaptive immunity. The development of SLA tetramers, enabled investigation...

  1. Peptide binding predictions for HLA DR, DP and DQ molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, P.; Sidney, J.; Kim, Y.;

    2010-01-01

    their performance. CONCLUSION: We found that 1) prediction methodologies developed for HLA DR molecules perform equally well for DP or DQ molecules. 2) Prediction performances were significantly increased compared to previous reports due to the larger amounts of training data available. 3) The presence...... include all training data for maximum performance. 4) The recently developed NN-align prediction method significantly outperformed all other algorithms, including a naïve consensus based on all prediction methods. A new consensus method dropping the comparably weak ARB prediction method could outperform......BACKGROUND: MHC class II binding predictions are widely used to identify epitope candidates in infectious agents, allergens, cancer and autoantigens. The vast majority of prediction algorithms for human MHC class II to date have targeted HLA molecules encoded in the DR locus. This reflects...

  2. Rational Optimization of Conformational Effects Induced By Hydrocarbon Staples in Peptides and their Binding Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lama, Dilraj; Quah, Soo T.; Verma, Chandra S.; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Beuerman, Roger W.; Lane, David P.; Brown, Christopher J.

    2013-12-01

    eIF4E is frequently over-expressed in different cancers and causes increased translation of oncogenic proteins via deregulated cap-dependent translation. Inhibitors of the eIF4E:eIF4G interactions represent an approach that would normalize cap-dependent translation. Stapled peptides represent an emerging class of therapeutics that can target protein: protein interactions. We present here molecular dynamics simulations for a set of rationally designed stapled peptides in solution and in complex with eIF4E, supported with biophysical and crystallographic data. Clustering of the simulated structures revealed the favoured conformational states of the stapled peptides in their bound or free forms in solution. Identifying these populations has allowed us to design peptides with improved affinities by introducing mutations into the peptide sequence to alter their conformational distributions. These studies emphasise the effects that engineered mutations have on the conformations of free and bound peptides, and illustrate that both states must be considered in efforts to attain high affinity binding.

  3. Structural analysis of leader peptide binding enables leader-free cyanobactin processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehnke, Jesko; Mann, Greg; Bent, Andrew F; Ludewig, Hannes; Shirran, Sally; Botting, Catherine; Lebl, Tomas; Houssen, Wael E; Jaspars, Marcel; Naismith, James H

    2015-08-01

    Regioselective modification of amino acids within the context of a peptide is common to a number of biosynthetic pathways, and many of the resulting products have potential as therapeutics. The ATP-dependent enzyme LynD heterocyclizes multiple cysteine residues to thiazolines within a peptide substrate. The enzyme requires the substrate to have a conserved N-terminal leader for full activity. Catalysis is almost insensitive to immediately flanking residues in the substrate, suggesting that recognition occurs distant from the active site. Nucleotide and peptide substrate co-complex structures of LynD reveal that the substrate leader peptide binds to and extends the β-sheet of a conserved domain of LynD, whereas catalysis is accomplished in another conserved domain. The spatial segregation of catalysis from recognition combines seemingly contradictory properties of regioselectivity and promiscuity, and it appears to be a conserved strategy in other peptide-modifying enzymes. A variant of LynD that efficiently processes substrates without a leader peptide has been engineered.

  4. Porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and analysis of their peptide-binding specificities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Harndahl, Mikkel; Rasmussen, Michael;

    2011-01-01

    CTL staining and manipulation. This has enabled a complete mapping of all HLA-I specificities (“the Human MHC Project”). Here, we demonstrate that these approaches can be applied to other species. We systematically transferred domains of the frequently expressed swine MHC-I molecule, SLA-1*0401, onto...... a HLA-I molecule (HLA-A*11:01), thereby generating recombinant human/swine chimeric MHC-I molecules as well as the intact SLA-1*0401 molecule. Biochemical peptide-binding assays and positional scanning combinatorial peptide libraries were used to analyze the peptide-binding motifs of these molecules....... A pan-specific predictor of peptide–MHC-I binding, NetMHCpan, which was originally developed to cover the binding specificities of all known HLA-I molecules, was successfully used to predict the specificities of the SLA-1*0401 molecule as well as the porcine/human chimeric MHC-I molecules. These data...

  5. Binding of acylated peptides and fatty acids to phospholipid vesicles: pertinence to myristoylated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peitzsch, R M; McLaughlin, S

    1993-10-01

    We studied the binding of fatty acids and acylated peptides to phospholipid vesicles by making electrophoretic mobility and equilibrium dialysis measurements. The binding energies of the anionic form of the fatty acids and the corresponding acylated glycines were identical; the energies increased by 0.8 kcal/mol per number of carbons in the acyl chain (Ncarbon = 10, 12, 14, 16), a value identical to that for the classical entropy-driven hydrophobic effect discussed by Tanford [The Hydrophobic Effect (1980) Wiley, New York]. The unitary Gibbs free binding energy, delta Gou, of myristoylated glycine, 8 kcal/mol, is independent of the nature of the electrically neutral lipids used to form the vesicles. Similar binding energies were obtained with other myristoylated peptides (e.g., Gly-Ala, Gly-Ala-Ala). The 8 kcal/mol, which corresponds to an effective dissociation constant of 10(-4) M for myristoylated peptides with lipids, provides barely enough energy to attach a myristoylated protein in the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane. Thus, other factors that reduce (e.g., hydrophobic interaction of myristate with the covalently attached protein) or enhance (e.g., electrostatic interactions of basic residues with acidic lipids; protein-protein interactions with intrinsic receptor proteins) the interaction of myristoylated proteins with membranes are likely to be important and may cause reversible translocation of these proteins to the membrane.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Isolation and detection of human IgA using a streptococcal IgA-binding peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandin, Charlotta; Linse, Sara; Areschoug, Thomas; Woof, Jenny M; Reinholdt, Jesper; Lindahl, Gunnar

    2002-08-01

    Bacterial proteins that bind to the Fc part of IgG have found widespread use in immunology. A similar protein suitable for the isolation and detection of human IgA has not been described. Here, we show that a 50-residue synthetic peptide, designated streptococcal IgA-binding peptide (Sap) and derived from a streptococcal M protein, can be used for single-step affinity purification of human IgA. High affinity binding of IgA required the presence in Sap of a C-terminal cysteine residue, not present in the intact M protein. Passage of human serum through a Sap column caused depletion of >99% of the IgA, and elution of the column allowed quantitative recovery of highly purified IgA, for which the proportions of the IgA1 and IgA2 subclasses were the same as in whole serum. Moreover, immobilized Sap could be used for single-step purification of secretory IgA of both subclasses from human saliva, with a recovery of approximately 45%. The Sap peptide could also be used to specifically detect IgA bound to Ag. Together, these data indicate that Sap is a versatile Fc-binding reagent that may open new possibilities for the characterization of human IgA. PMID:12133959

  7. Identification of the bioactive and consensus peptide motif from Momordica charantia insulin receptor-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Hsin-Yi; Li, Chia-Cheng; Ho, Tin-Yun; Hsiang, Chien-Yun

    2016-08-01

    Many food bioactive peptides with diverse functions have been discovered by studying plant proteins. We have previously identified a 68-residue insulin receptor (IR)-binding protein (mcIRBP) from Momordica charantia that exhibits hypoglycemic effects in mice via interaction with IR. By in vitro digestion, we found that mcIRBP-19, spanning residues 50-68 of mcIRBP, enhanced the binding of insulin to IR, stimulated the phosphorylation of PDK1 and Akt, induced the expression of glucose transporter 4, and stimulated both the uptake of glucose in cells and the clearance of glucose in diabetic mice. Furthermore, mcIRBP-19 homologs were present in various plants and shared similar β-hairpin structures and IR kinase-activating abilities to mcIRBP-19. In conclusion, our findings suggested that mcIRBP-19 is a blood glucose-lowering bioactive peptide that exhibits IR-binding potentials. Moreover, we newly identified novel IR-binding bioactive peptides in various plants which belonged to different taxonomic families. PMID:26988505

  8. Derivation of an amino acid similarity matrix for peptide:MHC binding and its application as a Bayesian prior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sette Alessandro

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experts in peptide:MHC binding studies are often able to estimate the impact of a single residue substitution based on a heuristic understanding of amino acid similarity in an experimental context. Our aim is to quantify this measure of similarity to improve peptide:MHC binding prediction methods. This should help compensate for holes and bias in the sequence space coverage of existing peptide binding datasets. Results Here, a novel amino acid similarity matrix (PMBEC is directly derived from the binding affinity data of combinatorial peptide mixtures. Like BLOSUM62, this matrix captures well-known physicochemical properties of amino acid residues. However, PMBEC differs markedly from existing matrices in cases where residue substitution involves a reversal of electrostatic charge. To demonstrate its usefulness, we have developed a new peptide:MHC class I binding prediction method, using the matrix as a Bayesian prior. We show that the new method can compensate for missing information on specific residues in the training data. We also carried out a large-scale benchmark, and its results indicate that prediction performance of the new method is comparable to that of the best neural network based approaches for peptide:MHC class I binding. Conclusion A novel amino acid similarity matrix has been derived for peptide:MHC binding interactions. One prominent feature of the matrix is that it disfavors substitution of residues with opposite charges. Given that the matrix was derived from experimentally determined peptide:MHC binding affinity measurements, this feature is likely shared by all peptide:protein interactions. In addition, we have demonstrated the usefulness of the matrix as a Bayesian prior in an improved scoring-matrix based peptide:MHC class I prediction method. A software implementation of the method is available at: http://www.mhc-pathway.net/smmpmbec.

  9. Improved pan-specific MHC class I peptide-binding predictions using a novel representation of the MHC-binding cleft environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrasco Pro, S.; Zimic, M.; Nielsen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules play a key role in cell-mediated immune responses presenting bounded peptides for recognition by the immune system cells. Several in silico methods have been developed to predict the binding affinity of a given peptide to a specific MHC molecule. One...... of the current state-of-the-art methods for MHC class I is NetMHCpan, which has a core ingredient for the representation of the MHC class I molecule using a pseudo-sequence representation of the binding cleft amino acid environment. New and large MHC-peptide-binding data sets are constantly being made available......, and also new structures of MHC class I molecules with a bound peptide have been published. In order to test if the NetMHCpan method can be improved by integrating this novel information, we created new pseudo-sequence definitions for the MHC-binding cleft environment from sequence and structural analyses...

  10. Synthetic Peptide Ligands of the Antigen Binding Receptor Induce Programmed Cell Death in a Human B-Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renschler, Markus F.; Bhatt, Ramesh R.; Dower, William J.; Levy, Ronald

    1994-04-01

    Peptide ligands for the antigen binding site of the surface immunoglobulin receptor of a human B-cell lymphoma cell line were identified with the use of filamentous phage libraries displaying random 8- and 12-amino acid peptides. Corresponding synthetic peptides bound specifically to the antigen binding site of this immunoglobulin receptor and blocked the binding of an anti-idiotype antibody. The ligands, when conjugated to form dimers or tetramers, induced cell death by apoptosis in vitro with an IC50 between 40 and 200 nM. This effect was associated with specific stimulation of intracellular protein tyrosine phosphorylation.

  11. Peptide-directed binding of quantum dots to integrins in human fibroblast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Peng; Chen, Hongfeng; Cho, Michael R; Stroscio, Michael A

    2006-03-01

    There is currently a major international effort aimed at integrating semiconductor nanostructures with biological structures. This paper reports the use of peptide sequences with certain motifs like artinine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) and leucine-aspartic acid-valine (LDV) to functionalize zinc sulfide (ZnS)-capped cadmiun selenide (CdSe) quantum dots, so that the quantum dot-peptide complexes selectively bind to integrins on HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells membrane. In this way, an interface between semiconductor nanocrystals and subcellular components was achieved, and the distribution pattern of RGD and LDV receptors on HT1080 cell membranes is revealed. These findings point the way to using a wide class of peptide-functionalized semiconductor quantum dots for the study of cellular processes involving integrins.

  12. V3 peptide binding pattern and HIV-1 transmission route in Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica E. Pinto

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available To characterize antibody binding to a panel of V3 loop peptides representing diverse HIV-1 neutralization epitopes, 149 HIV-1 infected individuals from Rio de Janeiro (RJ were investigated. Results were analyzed with respect to risk factors for infection and other epidemiological and clinical data. Peptide reactivity was not associated with sex, clinical status, CD4 counts, antigenemia or ß2-microglobulin serum level. A segregation of peptide reactivity according to route of infection was encountered. This finding suggests that more then one viral strain may be circulating in RJ, in subjects with different risk factors for HIV-1 infection. An investigation of prevalent HIV-1 genotypes, serotypes and immunotypes may be of importance for the design and selection of potential vaccines to be used in Brazil as well as for the selection of populations to be included in future vaccine efficacy trials.

  13. Membrane binding of prion protein N-terminal peptides characterised by neutron reflectometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prion protein (PrP) is widely recognised to mis-fold into the causative agent of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, known as Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (CJD) in humans, scrappie in sheep or Bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cows (BSE, “mad cow disease”). PrP has previously been shown to bind to lipid membranes with binding influenced by both membrane composition and pH. Aside from the mis-folding events associated with prion pathogenesis, PrP can undergo various post-translational modifications, including internal cleavage events. Alpha and beta-cleavage of PrP produces two N-terminal fragments, N1 and N2 respectively, which interact specifically with negatively charged phospholipids at low pH. Previous work probing N1 and N2 interactions with supported bilayers raised the possibility that the peptides could insert deeply with minimal disruption [1]. This work aimed to refine the binding parameters of these peptides with lipid bilayers. To this end, neutron reflectometry was used to define the structural details of the interactions in combination with quartz crystal microbalance interrogation and calcein release assays. Neutron reflectometry confirmed that peptides equivalent to N1 and N2 insert into the interstitial space between the phospholipid headgroups but do not penetrate into the acyl tail region. In accord with previous studies, interactions were stronger for the N1 fragment than for the N2, with more peptide bound per lipid. Neutron reflectometry analysis also detected lengthening of the lipid acyl tails, with a concurrent decrease in lipid area. Overall, the data shows that the N1 and N2 peptides interact with the anionic phospholipid headgroups of supported lipid bilayers, inducing lipid ordering in the absence of significant penetration into the acyl tails or permeation of the membrane.

  14. A community resource benchmarking predictions of peptide binding to MHC-I molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjoern Peters

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Recognition of peptides bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I molecules by T lymphocytes is an essential part of immune surveillance. Each MHC allele has a characteristic peptide binding preference, which can be captured in prediction algorithms, allowing for the rapid scan of entire pathogen proteomes for peptide likely to bind MHC. Here we make public a large set of 48,828 quantitative peptide-binding affinity measurements relating to 48 different mouse, human, macaque, and chimpanzee MHC class I alleles. We use this data to establish a set of benchmark predictions with one neural network method and two matrix-based prediction methods extensively utilized in our groups. In general, the neural network outperforms the matrix-based predictions mainly due to its ability to generalize even on a small amount of data. We also retrieved predictions from tools publicly available on the internet. While differences in the data used to generate these predictions hamper direct comparisons, we do conclude that tools based on combinatorial peptide libraries perform remarkably well. The transparent prediction evaluation on this dataset provides tool developers with a benchmark for comparison of newly developed prediction methods. In addition, to generate and evaluate our own prediction methods, we have established an easily extensible web-based prediction framework that allows automated side-by-side comparisons of prediction methods implemented by experts. This is an advance over the current practice of tool developers having to generate reference predictions themselves, which can lead to underestimating the performance of prediction methods they are not as familiar with as their own. The overall goal of this effort is to provide a transparent prediction evaluation allowing bioinformaticians to identify promising features of prediction methods and providing guidance to immunologists regarding the reliability of prediction tools.

  15. A community resource benchmarking predictions of peptide binding to MHC-I molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, B; Bui, HH; Pletscher-Frankild, Sune;

    2006-01-01

    of entire pathogen proteomes for peptide likely to bind MHC. Here we make public a large set of 48,828 quantitative peptide-binding affinity measurements relating to 48 different mouse, human, macaque, and chimpanzee MHC class I alleles. We use this data to establish a set of benchmark predictions with one...... neural network method and two matrix-based prediction methods extensively utilized in our groups. In general, the neural network outperforms the matrix-based predictions mainly due to its ability to generalize even on a small amount of data. We also retrieved predictions from tools publicly available...... of newly developed prediction methods. In addition, to generate and evaluate our own prediction methods, we have established an easily extensible web-based prediction framework that allows automated side-by-side comparisons of prediction methods implemented by experts. This is an advance over the current...

  16. A High-Affinity Metal-Binding Peptide From Escherichia Coli Hypb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, K.C.Chan; Cao, L.; Dias, A.V.; Pickering, I.J.; George, G.N.; Zamble, D.B.

    2009-05-12

    The high-affinity nickel-binding site of the Escherichia coli [NiFe]-hydrogenase accessory protein HypB was localized to residues at the immediate N-terminus of the protein. Modification of a metal-binding fusion protein, site-directed mutagenesis experiments, and DFT calculations were used to identify the N-terminal amine as a ligand as well as the three cysteine residues in the CXXCGCXXX motif. This sequence can be removed from the protein and both a synthesized peptide and a protein fusion bind nickel with a similar affinity and the same structure as the parent metalloprotein, indicating the self-sufficiency of this high-affinity nickel-binding sequence.

  17. Enhanced lubrication on tissue and biomaterial surfaces through peptide-mediated binding of hyaluronic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anirudha; Corvelli, Michael; Unterman, Shimon A.; Wepasnick, Kevin A.; McDonnell, Peter; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.

    2014-10-01

    Lubrication is key for the efficient function of devices and tissues with moving surfaces, such as articulating joints, ocular surfaces and the lungs. Indeed, lubrication dysfunction leads to increased friction and degeneration of these systems. Here, we present a polymer-peptide surface coating platform to non-covalently bind hyaluronic acid (HA), a natural lubricant in the body. Tissue surfaces treated with the HA-binding system exhibited higher lubricity values, and in vivo were able to retain HA in the articular joint and to bind ocular tissue surfaces. Biomaterials-mediated strategies that locally bind and concentrate HA could provide physical and biological benefits when used to treat tissue-lubricating dysfunction and to coat medical devices.

  18. sNebula, a network-based algorithm to predict binding between human leukocyte antigens and peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Heng; Ye, Hao; Ng, Hui Wen; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Mendrick, Donna L.; Hong, Huixiao

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the binding between human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) and peptides is important to understand the functioning of the immune system. Since it is time-consuming and costly to measure the binding between large numbers of HLAs and peptides, computational methods including machine learning models and network approaches have been developed to predict HLA-peptide binding. However, there are several limitations for the existing methods. We developed a network-based algorithm called sNebula to address these limitations. We curated qualitative Class I HLA-peptide binding data and demonstrated the prediction performance of sNebula on this dataset using leave-one-out cross-validation and five-fold cross-validations. This algorithm can predict not only peptides of different lengths and different types of HLAs, but also the peptides or HLAs that have no existing binding data. We believe sNebula is an effective method to predict HLA-peptide binding and thus improve our understanding of the immune system. PMID:27558848

  19. Oligonucleotide delivery with cell surface binding and cell penetrating Peptide amphiphile nanospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumcuoglu, Didem; Sardan, Melis; Tekinay, Turgay; Guler, Mustafa O; Tekinay, Ayse B

    2015-05-01

    A drug delivery system designed specifically for oligonucleotide therapeutics can ameliorate the problems associated with the in vivo delivery of these molecules. The internalization of free oligonucleotides is challenging, and cytotoxicity is the main obstacle for current transfection vehicles. To develop nontoxic delivery vehicles for efficient transfection of oligonucleotides, we designed a self-assembling peptide amphiphile (PA) nanosphere delivery system decorated with cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) containing multiple arginine residues (R4 and R8), and a cell surface binding peptide (KRSR), and report the efficiency of this system in delivering G-3129, a Bcl-2 antisense oligonucleotide (AON). PA/AON (peptide amphiphile/antisense oligonucleotide) complexes were characterized with regards to their size and secondary structure, and their cellular internalization efficiencies were evaluated. The effect of the number of arginine residues on the cellular internalization was investigated by both flow cytometry and confocal imaging, and the results revealed that uptake efficiency improved as the number of arginines in the sequence increased. The combined effect of cell penetration and surface binding property on the cellular internalization and its uptake mechanism was also evaluated by mixing R8-PA and KRSR-PA. R8 and R8/KRSR decorated PAs were found to drastically increase the internalization of AONs compared to nonbioactive PA control. Overall, the KRSR-decorated self-assembled PA nanospheres were demonstrated to be noncytotoxic delivery vectors with high transfection rates and may serve as a promising delivery system for AONs. PMID:25828697

  20. Peptide synthesis on glass substrate using acoustic droplet ejector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngki Choe; Shih-Jui Chen; Eun Sok Kim

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes the synthesis of a 9-mers-long peptide ladder structure of glycine on a modified glass surface using a nanoliter droplet ejector. To synthesize peptide on a glass substrate, SPOT peptide synthesis protocol was followed with a nozzleless acoustic droplet ejector being used to eject about 300 droplets of preactivated amino acid solution to dispense 60 nL of the solution per mer. The coupling efficiency of each mer was measured with FITC fluorescent tag to be 96%, resulting in net 70% efficiency for the whole 9-mer-long peptide of glycine. Usage of a nanoliter droplet ejector for SPOT peptide synthesis increases the density of protein array on a chip. PMID:24235271

  1. Photounbinding of calmodulin from a family of CaM binding peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus G Neumüller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent studies have shown that fluorescently labeled antibodies can be dissociated from their antigen by illumination with laser light. The mechanism responsible for the photounbinding effect, however, remains elusive. Here, we give important insights into the mechanism of photounbinding and show that the effect is not restricted to antibody/antigen binding. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present studies of the photounbinding of labeled calmodulin (CaM from a set of CaM-binding peptides with different affinities to CaM after one- and two-photon excitation. We found that the photounbinding effect becomes stronger with increasing binding affinity. Our observation that photounbinding can be influenced by using free radical scavengers, that it does not occur with either unlabeled protein or non-fluorescent quencher dyes, and that it becomes evident shortly after or with photobleaching suggest that photounbinding and photobleaching are closely linked. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The experimental results exclude surface effects, or heating by laser irradiation as potential causes of photounbinding. Our data suggest that free radicals formed through photobleaching may cause a conformational change of the CaM which lowers their binding affinity with the peptide or its respective binding partner.

  2. Anti-peptide aptamers recognize amino acid sequence and bind a protein epitope.

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, W; Ellington, A. D.

    1996-01-01

    In vitro selection of nucleic acid binding species (aptamers) is superficially similar to the immune response. Both processes produce biopolymers that can recognize targets with high affinity and specificity. While antibodies are known to recognize the sequence and conformation of protein surface features (epitopes), very little is known about the precise interactions between aptamers and their epitopes. Therefore, aptamers that could recognize a particular epitope, a peptide fragment of huma...

  3. RNA/peptide binding driven by electrostatics -- Insight from bi-directional pulling simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Do, Trang N.; Carloni, Paolo; Varani, Gabriele; Bussi, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    RNA/protein interactions play crucial roles in controlling gene expression. They are becoming important targets for pharmaceutical applications. Due to RNA flexibility and to the strength of electrostatic interactions, standard docking methods are insufficient. We here present a computational method which allows studying the binding of RNA molecules and charged peptides with atomistic, explicit-solvent molecular dynamics. In our method, a suitable estimate of the electrostatic interaction is ...

  4. Biophysical characterization of G-protein coupled receptor-peptide ligand binding

    OpenAIRE

    Langelaan, David N.; Ngweniform, Pascaline; Rainey, Jan K.

    2011-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are ubiquitous membrane proteins allowing intracellular response to extracellular factors that range from photons of light to small molecules to proteins. Despite extensive exploitation of GRCRs as therapeutic targets, biophysical characterization of GPCR-ligand interactions remains challenging. In this minireview, we focus on techniques which have been successfully employed for structural and biophysical characterization of peptide ligands binding to their...

  5. Binding of leachable components of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and peptide on modified SPR chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many types of polymers are often used in dentistry, which may cause allergic reaction, mainly methyl methacrylate allergy due to the leachable, degradable components of polymerized dental products. The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction between the leachable components of PMMA and peptides by Fourier-transform Surface Plasmon Resonance (FT SPR). In our previous work binding of oligopeptides (Ph.D.-7 and Ph.D.-12 Peptide Library Kit) was investigated to PMMA surface by phage display technique. It was found that oligopeptides bounded specifically to PMMA surface. The most common amino acids were leucine and proline inside the amino acids sequences of DNA of phages. The binding of haptens, as formaldehyde and methacrylic acid, to frequent amino acids was to investigate on the modified gold SPR chip. Self assembled monolayer (SAM) modified the surface of gold chip and ensured the specific binding between the haptens and amino acids. It was found that amino acids bounded to modified SPR gold and the haptens bounded to amino acids by creating multilayer on the chip surface. By the application of phage display and SPR modern bioanalytical methods the interaction between allergens and peptides can be investigated

  6. Oxpholipin 11D: an anti-inflammatory peptide that binds cholesterol and oxidized phospholipids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Ruchala

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many gram-positive bacteria produce pore-forming exotoxins that contain a highly conserved, 12-residue domain (ECTGLAWEWWRT that binds cholesterol. This domain is usually flanked N-terminally by arginine and C-terminally by valine. We used this 14-residue sequence as a template to create a small library of peptides that bind cholesterol and other lipids. METHODOLOGY/RESULTS: Several of these peptides manifested anti-inflammatory properties in a predictive in vitro monocyte chemotactic assay, and some also diminished the pro-inflammatory effects of low-density lipoprotein in apoE-deficient mice. The most potent analog, Oxpholipin-11D (OxP-11D, contained D-amino acids exclusively and was identical to the 14-residue design template except that diphenylalanine replaced cysteine-3. In surface plasmon resonance binding studies, OxP-11D bound oxidized (phospholipids and sterols in much the same manner as D-4F, a widely studied cardioprotective apoA-I-mimetic peptide with anti-inflammatory properties. In contrast to D-4F, which adopts a stable alpha-helical structure in solution, the OxP-11D structure was flexible and contained multiple turn-like features. CONCLUSION: Given the substantial evidence that oxidized phospholipids are pro-inflammatory in vivo, OxP-11D and other Oxpholipins may have therapeutic potential.

  7. Binding of leachable components of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and peptide on modified SPR chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szaloki, M.; Vitalyos, G.; Harfalvi, J.; Hegedus, Cs

    2013-12-01

    Many types of polymers are often used in dentistry, which may cause allergic reaction, mainly methyl methacrylate allergy due to the leachable, degradable components of polymerized dental products. The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction between the leachable components of PMMA and peptides by Fourier-transform Surface Plasmon Resonance (FT SPR). In our previous work binding of oligopeptides (Ph.D.-7 and Ph.D.-12 Peptide Library Kit) was investigated to PMMA surface by phage display technique. It was found that oligopeptides bounded specifically to PMMA surface. The most common amino acids were leucine and proline inside the amino acids sequences of DNA of phages. The binding of haptens, as formaldehyde and methacrylic acid, to frequent amino acids was to investigate on the modified gold SPR chip. Self assembled monolayer (SAM) modified the surface of gold chip and ensured the specific binding between the haptens and amino acids. It was found that amino acids bounded to modified SPR gold and the haptens bounded to amino acids by creating multilayer on the chip surface. By the application of phage display and SPR modern bioanalytical methods the interaction between allergens and peptides can be investigated.

  8. Complementary DNA display selection of high-affinity peptides binding the vacuolating toxin (VacA) of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Yumiko; Matsuno, Mitsuhiro; Tanaka, Makoto; Wada, Akihiro; Kitamura, Koichiro; Takei, Osamu; Sasaki, Ryuzo; Mizukami, Tamio; Hasegawa, Makoto

    2015-09-01

    Artificial peptides designed for molecular recognition of a bacterial toxin have been developed. Vacuolating cytotoxin A protein (VacA) is a major virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori, a gram-negative microaerophilic bacterium inhabiting the upper gastrointestinal tract, particularly the stomach. This study attempted to identify specific peptide sequences with high affinity for VacA using systematic directed evolution in vitro, a cDNA display method. A surface plasmon resonance-based biosensor and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to examine binding of peptides with VacA identified a peptide (GRVNQRL) with high affinity. Cyclization of the peptide by attaching cysteine residues to both termini improved its binding affinity to VacA, with a dissociation constant (Kd ) of 58 nm. This study describes a new strategy for the development of artificial functional peptides, which are promising materials in biochemical analyses and medical applications.

  9. Molecular modeling of hair keratin/peptide complex : using MM-PBSA calculations to describe experimental binding results

    OpenAIRE

    Azóia, Nuno G.; Fernandes, Margarida M.; Micaelo, N. M.; Cláudio M Soares; Paulo, Artur Cavaco

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a keratin/peptide complex have been conducted to predict the binding affinity of four different peptides toward human hair. Free energy calculations on the peptides' interaction with the keratin model demonstrated that electrostatic interactions are believed to be the main driving force stabilizing the complex. The molecular mechanics–Poisson-Boltzmann surface area methodology used for the free energy calculations demonstrated that the dielectric constant in ...

  10. Peptide p5 binds both heparinase-sensitive glycosaminoglycans and fibrils in patient-derived AL amyloid extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Emily B.; Williams, Angela [Department of Medicine, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Heidel, Eric [Department of Surgery, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Macy, Sallie [Department of Medicine, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Kennel, Stephen J. [Department of Medicine, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Wall, Jonathan S., E-mail: jwall@utmck.edu [Department of Medicine, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States)

    2013-06-21

    Highlights: •Polybasic peptide p5 binds human light chain amyloid extracts. •The binding of p5 with amyloid involves both glycosaminoglycans and fibrils. •Heparinase treatment led to a correlation between p5 binding and fibril content. •p5 binding to AL amyloid requires electrostatic interactions. -- Abstract: In previously published work, we have described heparin-binding synthetic peptides that preferentially recognize amyloid deposits in a mouse model of reactive systemic (AA) amyloidosis and can be imaged by using positron and single photon emission tomographic imaging. We wanted to extend these findings to the most common form of visceral amyloidosis, namely light chain (AL); however, there are no robust experimental animal models of AL amyloidosis. To further define the binding of the lead peptide, p5, to AL amyloid, we characterized the reactivity in vitro of p5 with in situ and patient-derived AL amyloid extracts which contain both hypersulfated heparan sulfate proteoglycans as well as amyloid fibrils. Histochemical staining demonstrated that the peptide specifically localized with tissue-associated AL amyloid deposits. Although we anticipated that p5 would undergo electrostatic interactions with the amyloid-associated glycosaminoglycans expressing heparin-like side chains, no significant correlation between peptide binding and glycosaminoglycan content within amyloid extracts was observed. In contrast, following heparinase I treatment, although overall binding was reduced, a positive correlation between peptide binding and amyloid fibril content became evident. This interaction was further confirmed using synthetic light chain fibrils that contain no carbohydrates. These data suggest that p5 can bind to both the sulfated glycosaminoglycans and protein fibril components of AL amyloid. Understanding these complex electrostatic interactions will aid in the optimization of synthetic peptides for use as amyloid imaging agents and potentially as

  11. Zinc-induced interaction of the metal-binding domain of amyloid-β peptide with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khmeleva, Svetlana A; Mezentsev, Yuri V; Kozin, Sergey A; Tsvetkov, Philipp O; Ivanov, Alexis S; Bodoev, Nikolay V; Makarov, Alexander A; Radko, Sergey P

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of the 16-mer synthetic peptide (Aβ16), which represents the metal-binding domain of the amyloid-β with DNA, was studied employing the surface plasmon resonance technique. It has been shown that Aβ16 binds to the duplex DNA in the presence of zinc ions and thus the metal-binding domain can serve as a zinc-dependent DNA-binding site of the amyloid-β. The interaction of Aβ16 with DNA most probably depends on oligomerization of the peptide and is dominated by interaction with phosphates of the DNA backbone.

  12. MULTIPRED2: A computational system for large-scale identification of peptides predicted to bind to HLA supertypes and alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Guang Lan; DeLuca, David S.; Keskin, Derin B.;

    2011-01-01

    MULTIPRED2 is a computational system for facile prediction of peptide binding to multiple alleles belonging to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and class II DR molecules. It enables prediction of peptide binding to products of individual HLA alleles, combination of alleles, or HLA supertypes...... groups in North America. MULTIPRED2 is an important tool to complement wet-lab experimental methods for identification of T-cell epitopes. It is available at http://cvc.dfci.harvard.edu/multipred2/....

  13. Bio-inspired Silicification of Silica-binding Peptide-Silk Protein Chimeras: Comparison of Chemically and Genetically Produced Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Canabady-Rochelle, Laetitia L.S.; Belton, David J.; Deschaume, Olivier; Currie, Heather A.; Kaplan, David L; Perry, Carole C.

    2012-01-01

    Novel protein chimeras constituted of ‘silk’ and a silica-binding peptide (KSLSRHDHIHHH) were synthesized by genetic or chemical approaches and their influence on silica-silk based chimera composite formation evaluated. Genetic chimeras were constructed from 6 or 15 repeats of the 32 amino acid consensus sequence of Nephila clavipes spider silk ([SGRGGLGGQG AGAAAAAGGA GQGGYGGLGSQG]n) to which one silica binding peptide was fused at the N terminus. For the chemical chimera, 25 equivalents of t...

  14. The PickPocket method for predicting binding specificities for receptors based on receptor pocket similarities: application to MHC-peptide binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, H.; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, M.

    2009-01-01

    the polymorphic pocket residues in MHC molecules that are in close proximity to the peptide residue. For MHC molecules with known specificities, we established a library of pocket-residues and corresponding binding specificities. The binding specificity for a novel MHC molecule is calculated as the average...

  15. Interference of peptides and specific antibodies with the function of the Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae transferrin-binding protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Strutzberg, K; Franz, B.; Gerlach, G F

    1997-01-01

    Multiple-antigenic peptides (MAPs) containing transferrin-binding domains of the Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 7-derived transferrin-binding protein (TfbA) (K. Strutzberg, L. von Olleschik, B. Franz, C. Pyne, M. A. Schmidt, and G.-F. Gerlach, Infect. Immun. 63:3846-3850, 1995) were constructed. It was found that the MAPs inhibited transferrin binding of the recombinant TfbA protein, whereas antibodies directed against transferrin-binding domains failed to do so.

  16. An approach to the construction of tailor-made amphiphilic peptides that strongly and selectively bind to hairpin RNA targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su Jin; Hyun, Soonsil; Kieft, Jeffrey S; Yu, Jaehoon

    2009-02-18

    The hairpin RNA motif is one of the most frequently observed secondary structures and is often targeted by therapeutic agents. An amphiphilic peptide with seven lysine and eight leucine residues and its derivatives were designed for use as ligands against RNA hairpin motifs. We hypothesized that variations in both the hydrophobic leucine-rich and hydrophilic lysine-rich spheres of these amphiphilic peptides would create extra attractive interactions with hairpin RNA targets. A series of alanine-scanned peptides were probed to identify the most influential lysine residues in the hydrophilic sphere. The binding affinities of these modified peptides with several hairpins, such as RRE, TAR from HIV, a short hairpin from IRES of HCV, and a hairpin from the 16S A-site stem from rRNA, were determined. Since the hairpin from IRES of HCV was the most susceptible to the initial series of alanine-scanned peptides, studies investigating how further variations in the peptides effect binding employed the IRES hairpin. Next, the important Lys residues were substituted by shorter chain amines, such as ornithine, to place the peptide deeper into the hairpin groove. In a few cases, a 70-fold improved binding was observed for peptides that contained the specifically located shorter amine side chains. To further explore changes in binding affinities brought about by alterations in the hydrophobic sphere, tryptophan residues were introduced in place of leucine. A few peptides with tryptophan in specific positions also displayed 70-fold improved binding affinities. Finally, double mutant peptides incorporating both specifically located shorter amine side chains in the hydrophilic region and tryptophan residues in the hydrophobic region were synthesized. The binding affinities of peptides containing the simple double modification were observed to be 80 times lower, and their binding specificities were increased 40-fold. The results of this effort provide important information about

  17. Functional interactions between polypyrimidine tract binding protein and PRI peptide ligand containing proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Miguel B; Ascher, David B; Gooding, Clare; Lang, Emma; Maude, Hannah; Turner, David; Llorian, Miriam; Pires, Douglas E V; Attig, Jan; Smith, Christopher W J

    2016-08-15

    Polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTBP1) is a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) that plays roles in most stages of the life-cycle of pre-mRNA and mRNAs in the nucleus and cytoplasm. PTBP1 has four RNA binding domains of the RNA recognition motif (RRM) family, each of which can bind to pyrimidine motifs. In addition, RRM2 can interact via its dorsal surface with proteins containing short peptide ligands known as PTB RRM2 interacting (PRI) motifs, originally found in the protein Raver1. Here we review our recent progress in understanding the interactions of PTB with RNA and with various proteins containing PRI ligands. PMID:27528752

  18. Affinity-based release of polymer-binding peptides from hydrogels with the target segments of peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serizawa, Takeshi; Fukuta, Hiroki; Date, Takaaki; Sawada, Toshiki

    2016-02-01

    Peptides with affinities for the target segments of polymer hydrogels were identified by biological screening using phage-displayed peptide libraries, and these peptides exhibited an affinity-based release capability from hydrogels. The results from cell culture assays demonstrated the sustained anticancer effects of the drug-conjugated peptides that were released from the hydrogels.

  19. Side-chain interactions form late and cooperatively in the binding reaction between disordered peptides and PDZ domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haq, S Raza; Chi, Celestine N; Bach, Anders;

    2012-01-01

    used short peptides as a model system for intrinsically disordered proteins. Linear free-energy relationships based on rate and equilibrium constants for the binding of these peptides to ordered target proteins, PDZ domains, demonstrate that native side-chain interactions form mainly after the rate......-limiting barrier for binding, in a cooperative fashion. This finding suggests that these disordered peptides first form a weak encounter complex with non-native interactions. The data do not support the recent notion that the affinities of intrinsically disordered proteins towards their targets are generally...

  20. Molecular modeling of hair keratin/peptide complex: Using MM-PBSA calculations to describe experimental binding results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoia, Nuno G; Fernandes, Margarida M; Micaêlo, Nuno M; Soares, Cláudio M; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2012-05-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a keratin/peptide complex have been conducted to predict the binding affinity of four different peptides toward human hair. Free energy calculations on the peptides' interaction with the keratin model demonstrated that electrostatic interactions are believed to be the main driving force stabilizing the complex. The molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area methodology used for the free energy calculations demonstrated that the dielectric constant in the protein's interior plays a major role in the free energy calculations, and the only way to obtain accordance between the free energy calculations and the experimental binding results was to use the average dielectric constant. PMID:22275089

  1. A modern approach for epitope prediction: identification of foot-and-mouth disease virus peptides binding bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA) class I molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules regulate adaptive immune responses through the presentation of antigenic peptides to CD8positive T-cells. Polymorphisms in the peptide binding region of class I molecules determine peptide binding affinity and stability during antigen presenta...

  2. Phage-displayed peptides selected for binding to Campylobacter jejuni are antimicrobial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop-Hurley, Sharon L; Rea, Philippa J; McSweeney, Christopher S

    2010-10-01

    In developed countries, Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of zoonotic bacterial gastroenteritis in humans with chicken meat implicated as a source of infection. Campylobacter jejuni colonises the lower gastrointestinal tract of poultry and during processing is spread from the gastrointestinal tract onto the surface of dressed carcasses. Controlling or eliminating C.jejuni on-farm is considered to be one of the best strategies for reducing human infection. Molecules on the cell surface of C.jejuni interact with the host to facilitate its colonisation and persistence in the gastrointestinal tract of poultry. We used a subtractive phage-display protocol to affinity select for peptides binding to the cell surface of a poultry isolate of C.jejuni with the aim of finding peptides that could be used to control this microorganism in chickens. In total, 27 phage peptides, representing 11 unique clones, were found to inhibit the growth of C.jejuni by up to 99.9% in vitro. One clone was bactericidal, reducing the viability of C.jejuni by 87% in vitro. The phage peptides were highly specific. They completely inhibited the growth of two of the four poultry isolates of C.jejuni tested with no activity detected towards other Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria.

  3. On the mechanism of targeting of phage fusion protein-modified nanocarriers: only the binding peptide sequence matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Kulkarni, Nikita; D’Souza, Gerard G.M.; Petrenko, Valery A.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2011-01-01

    The integration of pharmaceutical nanocarriers with phage display techniques is emerging as a new paradigm for targeted cancer nanomedicines. We explored the direct use of landscape phage fusion proteins for the self-assembly of phage-derived binding peptides to liposomes for cancer cell targeting. The primary purpose of this study was to elucidate the targeting mechanism with a particular emphasis on the relative contributions of the two motifs that make up the landscape phage fusion protein (a binding peptide and the phage pVIII coat protein) to the targeting efficiency. Using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, we confirmed the formation of phage-liposomes. Using FACS analysis, fluorescence microscopy, and fluorescence photospectrometry, we found that liposomes modified with MCF-7-specific phage fusion proteins (MCF-7 binding peptide, DMPGTVLP, fused to the phage PVIII coat protein) provided a strong and specific association with target MCF-7 cancer cells but not with co-cultured, non-target cells including C166-GFP and NIH3T3. The substitution for the binding peptide fused to phage pVIII coat protein abolished the targeting specificity. The addition of free binding peptide, DMPGTVLP, competitively inhibited the interaction of MCF-7-specific phage-liposomes with target MCF-7 cells but showed no reduction of MCF-7-associated plain liposomes. The proteolysis of the binding peptide reduced MCF-7 cell-associated phage-liposomes in a proteinase K (PK) concentration-dependent manner with no effect on the binding of plain liposomes to MCF-7 cells. Overall, only the binding peptide motif was involved in the targeting specificity of phage-liposomes. The presence of phage pVIII coat protein did not interfere with the targeting efficiency. PMID:21675738

  4. On the mechanism of targeting of phage fusion protein-modified nanocarriers: only the binding peptide sequence matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Kulkarni, Nikita; D'Souza, Gerard G M; Petrenko, Valery A; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2011-10-01

    The integration of pharmaceutical nanocarriers with phage display techniques is emerging as a new paradigm for targeted cancer nanomedicines. We explored the direct use of landscape phage fusion proteins for the self-assembly of phage-derived binding peptides to liposomes for cancer cell targeting. The primary purpose of this study was to elucidate the targeting mechanism with a particular emphasis on the relative contributions of the two motifs that make up the landscape phage fusion protein (a binding peptide and the phage pVIII coat protein) to the targeting efficiency. Using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, we confirmed the formation of phage-liposomes. Using FACS analysis, fluorescence microscopy, and fluorescence photospectrometry, we found that liposomes modified with MCF-7-specific phage fusion proteins (MCF-7 binding peptide, DMPGTVLP, fused to the phage PVIII coat protein) provided a strong and specific association with target MCF-7 cancer cells but not with cocultured, nontarget cells including C166-GFP and NIH3T3. The substitution for the binding peptide fused to phage pVIII coat protein abolished the targeting specificity. The addition of free binding peptide, DMPGTVLP, competitively inhibited the interaction of MCF-7-specific phage-liposomes with target MCF-7 cells but showed no reduction of MCF-7-associated plain liposomes. The proteolysis of the binding peptide reduced MCF-7 cell-associated phage-liposomes in a proteinase K (PK) concentration-dependent manner with no effect on the binding of plain liposomes to MCF-7 cells. Overall, only the binding peptide motif was involved in the targeting specificity of phage-liposomes. The presence of phage pVIII coat protein did not interfere with the targeting efficiency. PMID:21675738

  5. Anti-inflammatory effects of a novel peptide designed to bind with NF-кB p50 subunit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-ping WANG; Shao-xi CAI; Dong-bo LIU; Xiang XU; Hua-ping LIANG

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To explore the anti-inflammatory effects of a novel peptide designed to bind with the NF-кB p50 subunit. Methods: The affinity of the peptide binding with p50 was measured with a biosensor. Levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-a) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) from a human acute monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1) treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were measured using the ELISA method. In vivo anti-inflammatory effects of the peptide were tested with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-induced ear edema and zymosan A-induced peritonitis in mice. Results: The peptide has the ability to interact with the NF-кB p50 subunit and can effectively inhibit TNF-α and IL-6 production in the THP-1 cell line, PMA-induced ear edema and zymosan A-induced peritonitis in mice. Conclusion: The peptide may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of local acute inflammation.

  6. Mobility of TOAC spin-labelled peptides binding to the Src SH3 domain studied by paramagnetic NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindfors, Hanna E. [Leiden University, Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Gorlaeus Laboratories (Netherlands); Koning, Peter E. de; Wouter Drijfhout, Jan [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Immunohematology and Blood Transfusion (Netherlands); Venezia, Brigida; Ubbink, Marcellus [Leiden University, Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Gorlaeus Laboratories (Netherlands)], E-mail: m.ubbink@chem.leidenuniv.nl

    2008-07-15

    Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement provides a tool for studying the dynamics as well as the structure of macromolecular complexes. The application of side-chain coupled spin-labels is limited by the mobility of the free radical. The cyclic, rigid amino acid spin-label TOAC (2,2,6,6-Tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl-4-amino-4-carboxylic acid), which can be incorporated straightforwardly by peptide synthesis, provides an attractive alternative. In this study, TOAC was incorporated into a peptide derived from focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and the interaction of the peptide with the Src homology 3 (SH3) domain of Src kinase was studied, using paramagnetic NMR. Placing TOAC within the binding motif of the peptide has a considerable effect on the peptide-protein binding, lowering the affinity substantially. When the TOAC is positioned just outside the binding motif, the binding constant remains nearly unaffected. Although the SH3 domain binds weakly and transiently to proline-rich peptides from FAK, the interaction is not very dynamic and the relative position of the spin-label to the protein is well-defined. It is concluded that TOAC can be used to generate reliable paramagnetic NMR restraints.

  7. A structure-activity-relationship (SAR) study of somatostatin receptor-binding peptides radiolabeled with Tc-99m

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lister-James, J.; McBride, W.J.; Moyer, B.R. [Diatech, Inc, Londonderry, NH (United States)] [and others

    1994-05-01

    Somatostatin receptor (SSTR)-expressing tumors can be detected with high accuracy using In-111-[DTPA]octreotide. We sought a high-affinity SSTR-binding peptide labeled with the preferred radioisotope Tc-99m. We have prepared over 120 SSTR-binding peptides each containing a (N{sub 3}S or N{sub 2}S{sub 2}) chelator for Tc-99m in a SAR study in which peptide structure was systematically altered to optimize SSTR-binding affinity, in vivo rumor uptake and favorable biodistribution and pharmacokinetics. The HPLC-purified (>90% purity), chelator-containing peptides were characterized by FAB/ESMS and assayed in vitro for SSTR binding affinity by a competition assay (I-125 somatostatin-14 tracer and AR42J rat pancreatic tumor cell membranes). The oxo-rhenium complexes of the peptides were prepared by ligand exchange, characterized by FAB or ESMS and assayed for SSTR binding affinity as surrogates for the Tc-99m complexes. The Tc-99m complexes of peptides giving high-affinity oxo-rhenium complexes were also prepared by ligand exchange with specific activities of approx 300 mCi/mmol and examined in vivo for biodistribution and tumor uptake characteristics in CA20948 tumor-bearing rats.

  8. Introduction of D-Phenylalanine enhanced the receptor binding affinities of gonadotropin-releasing hormone peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Jie; Hathaway, Helen J.; Royce, Melanie E.; Prossnitz, Eric R.; Miao, Yubin

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether the introduction of D-Phe could improve the GnRH receptor binding affinities of DOTA-conjugated D-Lys6-GnRH peptides. Building upon the construct of DOTA-Ahx-(D-Lys6-GnRH1) we previously reported, an aromatic amino acid of D-Phe was inserted either between the DOTA and Ahx or between the Ahx and D-Lys6 to generate new DOTA-D-Phe-Ahx-(D-Lys6-GnRH) or DOTA-Ahx-D-Phe-(D-Lys6-GnRH) peptides. Compared to DOTA-Ahx-(D-Lys6-GnRH1) (36.1 nM), the introd...

  9. Binding of Cu(II) ions to peptides studied by fluorescence spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowska, Joanna; Żamojć, Krzysztof; Wyrzykowski, Dariusz; Uber, Dorota; Wierzbicka, Małgorzata; Wiczk, Wiesław; Chmurzyński, Lech

    2016-01-15

    Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence quenching measurements supported by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) were used to study the interactions of Cu(2+) with four peptides. Two of them were taken from the N-terminal part of the FBP28 protein (formin binding protein) WW domain: Tyr-Lys-Thr-Ala-Asp-Gly-Lys-Thr-Tyr-NH2 (D9) and its mutant Tyr-Lys-Thr-Ala-Asn-Gly-Lys-Thr-Tyr-NH2 (D9_M) as well as two mutated peptides from the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G derived from Streptococcus: Asp-Val-Ala-Thr-Tyr-Thr-NH2 (J1) and Glu-Val-Ala-Thr-Tyr-Thr-NH2 (J2). The measurements were carried out at 298.15K in 20mM 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES) buffer solution with a pH of 6. The fluorescence of all peptides was quenched by Cu(2+) ions. The stoichiometry, conditional stability constants and thermodynamic parameters for the interactions of the Cu(2+) ions with D9 and D9_M were determined from the calorimetric data. The values of the conditional stability constants were additionally determined from fluorescence quenching measurements and compared with those obtained from calorimetric studies. There was a good correlation between data obtained from the two techniques. On the other hand, the studies revealed that J1 and J2 do not exhibit an affinity towards metal ions. The obtained results prove that fluorescence quenching experiments may be successfully used in order to determine stability constants of complexes with fluorescent ligands. Finally, based on the obtained results, the coordinating properties of the peptides towards the Cu(2+) ions are discussed.

  10. Calmodulin binding to recombinant myosin-1c and myosin-1c IQ peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyr Janet L

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bullfrog myosin-1c contains three previously recognized calmodulin-binding IQ domains (IQ1, IQ2, and IQ3 in its neck region; we identified a fourth IQ domain (IQ4, located immediately adjacent to IQ3. How calmodulin binds to these IQ domains is the subject of this report. Results In the presence of EGTA, calmodulin bound to synthetic peptides corresponding to IQ1, IQ2, and IQ3 with Kd values of 2–4 μM at normal ionic strength; the interaction with an IQ4 peptide was much weaker. Ca2+ substantially weakened the calmodulin-peptide affinity for all of the IQ peptides except IQ3. To reveal how calmodulin bound to the linearly arranged IQ domains of the myosin-1c neck, we used hydrodynamic measurements to determine the stoichiometry of complexes of calmodulin and myosin-1c. Purified myosin-1c and T701-Myo1c (a myosin-1c fragment with all four IQ domains and the C-terminal tail each bound 2–3 calmodulin molecules. At a physiologically relevant temperature (25°C and under low-Ca2+ conditions, T701-Myo1c bound two calmodulins in the absence and three calmodulins in the presence of 5 μM free calmodulin. Ca2+ dissociated nearly all calmodulins from T701-Myo1c at 25°C; one calmodulin was retained if 5 μM free calmodulin was present. Conclusions We inferred from these data that at 25°C and normal cellular concentrations of calmodulin, calmodulin is bound to IQ1, IQ2, and IQ3 of myosin-1c when Ca2+ is low. The calmodulin bound to one of these IQ domains, probably IQ2, is only weakly associated. Upon Ca2+ elevation, all calmodulin except that bound to IQ3 should dissociate.

  11. Role of solution conformation and flexibility of short peptide ligands that bind to the p56(lck) SH2 domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Frank J; de Mol, Nico J; Bultinck, Patrick; Kemmink, Johan; Hilbers, Hans W; Liskamp, Rob M J; Dekker, Frank

    2003-01-01

    A general approach in drug design is making ligands more rigid in order to avoid loss in conformational entropy (deltaS(conf)) upon receptor binding. We hypothesized that in the high affinity binding of pYEEI peptide ligands to the p56(lck) SH2 domain this loss in deltaS(conf) might be diminished du

  12. A fluorescent glycolipid-binding peptide probe traces cholesterol dependent microdomain-derived trafficking pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Steinert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The uptake and intracellular trafficking of sphingolipids, which self-associate into plasma membrane microdomains, is associated with many pathological conditions, including viral and toxin infection, lipid storage disease, and neurodegenerative disease. However, the means available to label the trafficking pathways of sphingolipids in live cells are extremely limited. In order to address this problem, we have developed an exogenous, non-toxic probe consisting of a 25-amino acid sphingolipid binding domain, the SBD, derived from the amyloid peptide Abeta, and conjugated by a neutral linker with an organic fluorophore. The current work presents the characterization of the sphingolipid binding and live cell trafficking of this novel probe, the SBD peptide. SBD was the name given to a motif originally recognized by Fantini et al in a number of glycolipid-associated proteins, and was proposed to interact with sphingolipids in membrane microdomains. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In accordance with Fantini's model, optimal SBD binding to membranes depends on the presence of sphingolipids and cholesterol. In synthetic membrane binding assays, SBD interacts preferentially with raft-like lipid mixtures containing sphingomyelin, cholesterol, and complex gangliosides in a pH-dependent manner, but is less glycolipid-specific than Cholera toxin B (CtxB. Using quantitative time-course colocalization in live cells, we show that the uptake and intracellular trafficking route of SBD is unlike that of either the non-raft marker Transferrin or the raft markers CtxB and Flotillin2-GFP. However, SBD traverses an endolysosomal route that partially intersects with raft-associated pathways, with a major portion being diverted at a late time point to rab11-positive recycling endosomes. Trafficking of SBD to acidified compartments is strongly disrupted by cholesterol perturbations, consistent with the regulation of sphingolipid trafficking by cholesterol

  13. Reversible pH-controlled DNA-binding peptide nanotweezers: An in-silico study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Sharma

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Gaurav Sharma1, Kaushal Rege2,3, David E Budil4, Martin L Yarmush2,5, Constantinos Mavroidis11Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering; 4Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; 2The Center for Engineering in Medicine (CEM, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 3Department of Chemical Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA; 5Department of Biomedical Engineering, Rutgers University, NJ, USAAbstract: We describe the molecular dynamics (MD-aided engineering design of mutant peptides based on the α-helical coiled-coil GCN4 leucine zipper peptide (GCN4-p1 in order to obtain environmentally-responsive nanotweezers. The actuation mechanism of the nanotweezers depends on the modification of electrostatic charges on the residues along the length of the coiled coil. Modulating the solution pH between neutral and acidic values results in the reversible movement of helices toward and away from each other and creates a complete closed-open-closed transition cycle between the helices. Our results indicate that the mutants show a reversible opening of up to 15 Å (1.5 nm; approximately 150% of the initial separation upon pH actuation. Investigation on the physicochemical phenomena that influence conformational properties, structural stability, and reversibility of the coiled-coil peptide-based nanotweezers revealed that a rationale- and design-based approach is needed to engineer stable peptide or macromolecules into stimuli-responsive devices. The efficacy of the mutant that demonstrated the most significant reversible actuation for environmentally responsive modulation of DNA-binding activity was also demonstrated. Our results have significant implications in bioseparations and in the engineering of novel transcription factors.Keywords: bionanotechnology, nanotweezers, coiled-coil, GCN4, leucine zipper, molecular dynamics, environmentally

  14. 68Ga-DOTA-RGD peptide: biodistribution and binding into atherosclerotic plaques in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increased expression of αvβ3/αvβ5 integrin is involved in angiogenesis and the inflammatory process in atherosclerotic plaques. The novel 68Ga-DOTA-RGD peptide binds with high affinity to αvβ3/αvβ5 integrin. The aim of this study was to investigate the uptake of the 68Ga-DOTA-RGD peptide in atherosclerotic plaques. Uptake of intravenously administered 68Ga-DOTA-RGD peptide was studied ex vivo in excised tissue samples and aortic sections of LDLR-/-ApoB100/100 atherosclerotic mice. The uptake of the tracer in aortic cryosections was examined by using digital autoradiography. Subsequently, the autoradiographs were combined with histological and immunohistological analysis of the sections. DOTA-RGD peptide was successfully labelled with the generator-produced 68Ga. The tracer had reasonably good specific radioactivity (8.7 ± 1.1 GBq/μmol) and was quite stable in vivo. According to ex vivo biodistribution results, 68Ga-DOTA-RGD was cleared rapidly from the blood circulation and excreted through the kidneys to the urine with high radioactivity in the intestine, lungs, spleen and liver. Autoradiography results showed significantly higher uptake of 68Ga-DOTA-RGD peptide in the atherosclerotic plaques compared to healthy vessel wall (mean ratio ± SD 1.4 ± 0.1, p = 0.0004). We observed that 68Ga-DOTA-RGD is accumulated into the plaques of atherosclerotic mice. However, this data only shows the feasibility of the approach, while the clinical significance still remains to be proven. Further studies are warranted to assess the uptake of this tracer into human atherosclerotic plaques. (orig.)

  15. The complex binding mode of the peptide hormone H2 relaxin to its receptor RXFP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Ashish; Bruell, Shoni; Patil, Nitin; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter; Scott, Daniel J; Petrie, Emma J; Bathgate, Ross A D; Gooley, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    H2 relaxin activates the relaxin family peptide receptor-1 (RXFP1), a class A G-protein coupled receptor, by a poorly understood mechanism. The ectodomain of RXFP1 comprises an N-terminal LDLa module, essential for activation, tethered to a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain by a 32-residue linker. H2 relaxin is hypothesized to bind with high affinity to the LRR domain enabling the LDLa module to bind and activate the transmembrane domain of RXFP1. Here we define a relaxin-binding site on the LDLa-LRR linker, essential for the high affinity of H2 relaxin for the ectodomain of RXFP1, and show that residues within the LDLa-LRR linker are critical for receptor activation. We propose H2 relaxin binds and stabilizes a helical conformation of the LDLa-LRR linker that positions residues of both the linker and the LDLa module to bind the transmembrane domain and activate RXFP1. PMID:27088579

  16. NMR characterization of the DNA binding properties of a novel Hoechst 33258 analogue peptide building block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunkenborg, Jakob; Behrens, Carsten; Jacobsen, Jens Peter

    2002-01-01

    A novel aryl-bis-benzimidazole amino acid analogue of the DNA-binding compound Hoechst 33258 has recently been designed for incorporation in peptide combinatorial libraries by replacing the N-methylpiperazine group with a carboxyl group and the hydroxy group with an amino-methyl group. The DNA...... preference with the bis-benzimidazole moiety displaced toward the 3'-end from the center of the duplex. Two families of models of the complexes with A(5) and A(3)T(3) were derived with restrained molecular dynamics based on a large set of 70 and 61, respectively, intermolecular ligand NOEs. Both models give...

  17. A conserved chloramphenicol binding site at the entrance to the ribosomal peptide exit tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Katherine S; Porse, Bo T

    2003-01-01

    The antibiotic chloramphenicol produces modifications in 23S rRNA when bound to ribosomes from the bacterium Escherichia coli and the archaeon Halobacterium halobium and irradiated with 365 nm light. The modifications map to nucleotides m(5)U747 and C2611/C2612, in domains II and V, respectively......, of E.coli 23S rRNA and G2084 (2058 in E.coli numbering) in domain V of H.halobium 23S rRNA. The modification sites overlap with a portion of the macrolide binding site and cluster at the entrance to the peptide exit tunnel. The data correlate with the recently reported chloramphenicol binding site on...

  18. AMYLOID-β PEPTIDE BINDS TO MICROTUBULE-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN 1B (MAP1B)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevorkian, Goar; Gonzalez-Noriega, Alfonso; Acero, Gonzalo; Ordoñez, Jorge; Michalak, Colette; Munguia, Maria Elena; Govezensky, Tzipe; Cribbs, David H.; Manoutcharian, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Extracellular and intraneuronal formation of amyloid-beta aggregates have been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of targets have deleterious effects on cellular functions. In the present study we have shown for the first time that amyloid-beta 1-42 bound to a peptide comprising the microtubule binding domain of the heavy chain of microtubule-associated protein 1B by the screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage. This interaction may explain, in part, the loss of neuronal cytoskeletal integrity, impairment of microtubule-dependent transport and synaptic dysfunction observed previously in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:18079022

  19. Screening and Identification of a Novel Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Binding Peptide by Using a Phage Display Library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaohua ZHU; Hua WU; Sha LUO; Zhiqun XIANYU; Dan ZHU

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to screen peptides that can specifically bind to human hepatocellular carcinoma (hHCC) cells using phage display of random peptide library in order to develope a peptide-based carrier for the diagnosis or therapy of hHCC. A peptide 12-mer phage display library was employed and 4 rounds of subtractive panning were performed using the hHCC cell line HepG2 as the target. After panning, the phages that specifically bound to and internalized in hHCC cells were selected. The selected phages demonstrated highly specific affinity to HepG2 cells analyzed by ELISA and immunofluorescence analysis. 57.3% of the selected phage clones displayed repeated sequence FLLEPHLMDTSM, and 4 amino acid residues, FLEP were extremely conservative. Based on the sequencing results, a 16-mer peptide (WH-16) was synthesized. The competitive ELISA showed that the binding of the phage clones displayed sequence FLLEPHLMDTSM to HepG2 cells was efficiently inhibited by WH-16. Our findings indicate that cellular binding of phage is mediated via its displayed peptide and the synthesized 16-mer peptide may have the potential to be a delivery Carrier in target diagnosis or therapy for hHCC.

  20. Computational Studies of Difference in Binding Modes of Peptide and Non-Peptide Inhibitors to MDM2/MDMX Based on Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxin Zhang

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Inhibition of p53-MDM2/MDMX interaction is considered to be a promising strategy for anticancer drug design to activate wild-type p53 in tumors. We carry out molecular dynamics (MD simulations to study the binding mechanisms of peptide and non-peptide inhibitors to MDM2/MDMX. The rank of binding free energies calculated by molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA method agrees with one of the experimental values. The results suggest that van der Waals energy drives two kinds of inhibitors to MDM2/MDMX. We also find that the peptide inhibitors can produce more interaction contacts with MDM2/MDMX than the non-peptide inhibitors. Binding mode predictions based on the inhibitor-residue interactions show that the π–π, CH–π and CH–CH interactions dominated by shape complimentarity, govern the binding of the inhibitors in the hydrophobic cleft of MDM2/MDMX. Our studies confirm the residue Tyr99 in MDMX can generate a steric clash with the inhibitors due to energy and structure. This finding may theoretically provide help to develop potent dual-specific or MDMX inhibitors.

  1. Evaluation of iron-binding activity of collagen peptides prepared from the scales of four cultivated fishes in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Yung Huang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency is one of the most concerning deficiency problems in the world. It may generate several adverse effects such as iron deficiency anemia (IDA and reduced physical and intellectual working capacity. The aim of this study is to evaluate the Fe(II-binding activity of collagen peptides from fishery by-products. Lates calcarifer, Mugil cephalus, Chanos chanos, and Oreochromis spp are four major cultivated fishes in Taiwan; thousands of scales of these fish are wasted without valuable utilization. In this study, scales of these fish were hydrolyzed by papain plus flavourzyme. Collagen peptides were obtained and compared for their Fe(II-binding activity. Collagen peptides from Chanos chanos showed the highest Fe(II-binding activity, followed by those from Lates calcarifer and Mugil cephalus; that from Oreochromis spp exhibited the lowest one. Fe(II-binding activity of collagen peptides from fish scales was also confirmed with a dialysis method. Molecular weight (MW distributions of the collagen peptides from scales of four fish are all < 10 kDa, and averaged 1.3 kDa. Hydrolysates of fish scales were further partially purified with ion exchange chromatography. Fractions having Fe(II-binding activity were obtained and their activity compared. Data obtained showed that collagen peptides from fish scales did have Fe(II-binding activity. This is the first observation elucidating fish scale collagen possessing this functionality. The results from this study also indicated that collagen peptides from fish scales could be applied in industry as a bioresource.

  2. Caseins from bovine colostrum and milk strongly bind piscidin-1, an antimicrobial peptide from fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kütt, Mary-Liis; Stagsted, Jan

    2014-09-01

    A model system of bovine colostrum and piscidin, a fish-derived antimicrobial peptide, was developed to study potential interactions of antimicrobial peptides in colostrum. We did not detect any antimicrobial activity of colostrum using the radial plate diffusion assay; in fact colostrum completely abrogated activity of added piscidin. This could not be explained by degradation of piscidin by colostrum, which was less than ten percent. We found that colostrum even protected piscidin against degradation by added proteases. We further observed that colostrum and milk rapidly quenched the fluorescence of fluorescein-piscidin but not that of fluorescein. This effect was not seen with BSA and the specific quenching of fluorescein-piscidin by colostrum was saturably inhibited with unlabeled piscidin. Size exclusion chromatography indicated that fluorescein-piscidin bound to casein micelles with no apparent binding to IgG or whey proteins. Further, addition of pure caseins was able to quench fluorescence of fluorescein-piscidin and to inhibit the antimicrobial activity of piscidin. The interaction between caseins and piscidin could be dissociated by guanidine hydrochloride and recovered piscidin had antimicrobial activity against bacteria. Based on our results we propose that caseins could be carriers for antimicrobial peptides in colostrum and milk. PMID:25036607

  3. Model membrane interaction and DNA-binding of antimicrobial peptide Lasioglossin II derived from bee venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Susmita; Lee, Meryl; Sivaraman, J; Chatterjee, Chiradip

    2013-01-01

    Lasioglossins, a new family of antimicrobial peptide, have been shown to have strong antimicrobial activity with low haemo-lytic and mast cell degranulation activity, and exhibit cytotoxic activity against various cancer cells in vitro. In order to understand the active conformation of these pentadecapeptides in membranes, we have studied the interaction of Lasioglossin II (LL-II), one of the members of Lasioglossins family with membrane mimetic micelle Dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) by fluorescence, Circular Dichroism (CD) and two dimensional (2D) (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Fluorescence experiments provide evidence of interaction of the N-terminal tryptophan residue of LL-II with the hydrophobic core of DPC micelle. CD results show an extended chain conformation of LL-II in water which is converted to a partial helical conformation in the presence of DPC micelle. Moreover we have determined the first three-dimensional NMR structure of LL-II bound to DPC micelle with rmsd of 0.36Å. The solution structure of LL-II shows hydrophobic and hydrophilic core formation in peptide pointing towards different direction in the presence of DPC. This amphipathic structure may allow this peptide to penetrate deeply into the interfacial region of negatively charged membranes and leading to local membrane destabilization. Further we have elucidated the DNA binding ability of LL-II by agarose gel retardation and fluorescence quenching experiments.

  4. Comparison of Functional Protein Transduction Domains Using the NEMO Binding Domain Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Robbins

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein transduction domains (PTDs, both naturally occurring and synthetic, have been extensively utilized for intracellular delivery of biologically active molecules both in vitro and in vivo. However, most comparisons of transduction efficiency have been performed using fluorescent markers. To compare efficiency of functional protein transduction, a peptide derived from IkB kinase ß (IKKß that prevents formation of an active IKK complex was used as a biologically active cargo. This peptide, termed NEMO Binding Domain (NBD, is able to block activation of the transcriptional factor NF-κB by IKK, but not basal NF-κB activity. Our results demonstrate that Antp and Tat PTDs were most effective for delivery of NBD for inhibition of NF-kB activation compared to other PTD-NBD in both Hela and 293 cells, however, at higher concentrations (100 µM, the Antp-NBD as well as the FGF-NBD peptide caused significant cellular toxicity. In contrast to the cell culture results, delivery of NBD using 8K (octalysine and 6R (six arginine were the most effect in blocking inflammation following local, footpad delivery in a KLH-induced DTH murine model of inflammatory arthritis. These results demonstrate differences between PTDs for delivery of a functional cargo between cell types.

  5. Weak glycolipid binding of a microdomain-tracer peptide correlates with aggregation and slow diffusion on cell membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Lauterbach

    Full Text Available Organized assembly or aggregation of sphingolipid-binding ligands, such as certain toxins and pathogens, has been suggested to increase binding affinity of the ligand to the cell membrane and cause membrane reorganization or distortion. Here we show that the diffusion behavior of the fluorescently tagged sphingolipid-interacting peptide probe SBD (Sphingolipid Binding Domain is altered by modifications in the construction of the peptide sequence that both result in a reduction in binding to ganglioside-containing supported lipid membranes, and at the same time increase aggregation on the cell plasma membrane, but that do not change relative amounts of secondary structural features. We tested the effects of modifying the overall charge and construction of the SBD probe on its binding and diffusion behavior, by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR; Biacore analysis on lipid surfaces, and by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS on live cells, respectively. SBD binds preferentially to membranes containing the highly sialylated gangliosides GT1b and GD1a. However, simple charge interactions of the peptide with the negative ganglioside do not appear to be a critical determinant of binding. Rather, an aggregation-suppressing amino acid composition and linker between the fluorophore and the peptide are required for optimum binding of the SBD to ganglioside-containing supported lipid bilayer surfaces, as well as for interaction with the membrane. Interestingly, the strength of interactions with ganglioside-containing artificial membranes is mirrored in the diffusion behavior by FCS on cell membranes, with stronger binders displaying similar characteristic diffusion profiles. Our findings indicate that for aggregation-prone peptides, aggregation occurs upon contact with the cell membrane, and rather than giving a stronger interaction with the membrane, aggregation is accompanied by weaker binding and complex diffusion profiles indicative of heterogeneous

  6. MetaMHCpan, A Meta Approach for Pan-Specific MHC Peptide Binding Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yichang; Luo, Cheng; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi; Zhu, Shanfeng

    2016-01-01

    Recent computational approaches in bioinformatics can achieve high performance, by which they can be a powerful support for performing real biological experiments, making biologists pay more attention to bioinformatics than before. In immunology, predicting peptides which can bind to MHC alleles is an important task, being tackled by many computational approaches. However, this situation causes a serious problem for immunologists to select the appropriate method to be used in bioinformatics. To overcome this problem, we develop an ensemble prediction-based Web server, which we call MetaMHCpan, consisting of two parts: MetaMHCIpan and MetaMHCIIpan, for predicting peptides which can bind MHC-I and MHC-II, respectively. MetaMHCIpan and MetaMHCIIpan use two (MHC2SKpan and LApan) and four (TEPITOPEpan, MHC2SKpan, LApan, and MHC2MIL) existing predictors, respectively. MetaMHCpan is available at http://datamining-iip.fudan.edu.cn/MetaMHCpan/index.php/pages/view/info . PMID:27076335

  7. Isolation of mercury-binding peptides in vegetative parts of Chromolaena odorata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velasco-Alinsug, M.P. [Inst. of Biology, Coll. of Science, Univ. of the Philippines, Quezon City (Philippines); Biology Dept., Coll. of Science, Univ. of the Philippines, Baguio City (Philippines); Rivero, G.C. [Inst. of Biology, Coll. of Science, Univ. of the Philippines, Quezon City (Philippines); Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research and Development, Univ. of the Philippines, Quezon City (Philippines); Quibuyen, T.A.O. [Inst. of Chemistry, Coll. of Science, Univ. of the Philippines, Quezon City (Philippines)

    2005-04-01

    Mercury-binding peptides from roots, stems, and leaves of Hg-treated Chromolaena odorata plants were isolated and partially characterized using RP-HPLC and ESI-MS. Upon exposure of C. odorata plants to high concentrations of 1.0 and 2.0 {mu}M Hg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} treatments from 0-28 days, they accumulated as much as 125 mg/g (dry wt) Hg in the roots, 15.280 mg/g (dry wt) Hg in the stems, and 0.800 mg/g (dry wt) Hg in the leaves indicating that C. odorata has a high potential as a phytoremediation agent of inorganic mercury. The plant's ability to accumulate and sequester Hg ions was primarily attributed to the production of Hg-binding peptides, which were initially detected through the use of Ellman's reagent. Isolation techniques using RP-HPLC equipped with a C18 column manifested a single prominent peak consistently appearing at a retention time of 2.6-2.8 min in all the plant samples treated with different Hg concentrations at varying lengths of exposure. Further characterization of this prominent peak using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry revealed the presence of a peptide containing several cysteine residues with the highest peak concentration recorded at 91 mV and 89 mV in roots and stems of plants treated with 2.0 {mu}M Hg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} for 4 wk (P < 0.05) and 85 mV in leaves treated with 1.0 {mu}M Hg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} for 1 wk. (orig.)

  8. Isolation of mercury-binding peptides in vegetative parts of Chromolaena odorata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco-Alinsug, Malona P; Rivero, Gilda C; Quibuyen, Anacleto O

    2005-01-01

    Mercury-binding peptides from roots, stems, and leaves of Hg-treated Chromolaena odorata plants were isolated and partially characterized using RP-HPLC and ESI-MS. Upon exposure of C. odorata plants to high concentrations of 1.0 and 2.0 microM Hg(NO3)2 treatments from 0-28 days, they accumulated as much as 125 mg/g (dry wt) Hg in the roots, 15.280 mg/g (dry wt) Hg in the stems, and 0.800 mg/g (dry wt) Hg in the leaves indicating that C. odorata has a high potential as a phytoremediation agent of inorganic mercury. The plant's ability to accumulate and sequester Hg ions was primarily attributed to the production of Hg-binding peptides, which were initially detected through the use of Ellman's reagent. Isolation techniques using RP-HPLC equipped with a C18 column manifested a single prominent peak consistently appearing at a retention time of 2.6-2.8 min in all the plant samples treated with different Hg concentrations at varying lengths of exposure. Further characterization of this prominent peak using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry revealed the presence of a peptide containing several cysteine residues with the highest peak concentration recorded at 91 mV and 89 mV in roots and stems of plants treated with 2.0 microM Hg(NO3)2 for 4 wk (P < 0.05) and 85 mV in leaves treated with 1.0 microM Hg(NO3)2 for 1 wk. PMID:15948592

  9. The Use ofa Hydrophobic Binding Peptide Modified Lipid Nanocarrier Improving Tumor Distribution and Antitumor Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Yang, Xiucong; Lin, Zhiqiang; Gao, Shanyun; He, Bing; Mei, Bong; Wang, Dan; Yuan, Lan; Zhang, Hua; Dai, Wenbing; Wang, Xueqing; Wang, Jiancheng; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    In addition to showing the specific interaction between a generalized ligand and its receptor and the electrostatic effect between positive cell-penetrating peptides and negative cell membranes, our last study demonstrated the hydrophobic interactivity between a hydrophobic binding peptide (HBP) and biomembranes to be favorable in drug delivery. To yield more evidence for this new strategy and to find more effective HBPs, here we designed and established a novel nanomedicine associated with cyclosporin A (CsA) because this peptide is electrically neutral, highly hydrophobic, very stable in vivo and safe at the given dose. First, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) studies showed a strong hydrophobic interaction between the CsA molecules and the lipid membrane. The lactate dehydrogenase release assay proved that CsA exhibited low toxicity to cell membranes. These facts encouraged us to explore the potential application of CsA as an HBP to actualize intracellular delivery of nanomedicines for tumor therapy. When conjugated to lipid nanocarriers, CsA significantly enhanced their binding with cells and,. consequently, increased the internalization of recoded nanomedicines into cells. The in vivo experiments further showed that the CsA-associated nanocarriers could achieve better delivery to tumor tissues and improve the tumor therapy of doxorubicin (DOX) compared to the nonmodified control; these findings were identical to the observations-in cell studies. In conclusion, CsA, a readily obtainable molecule with favorable characteristics, is indeed a good candidate for an HBP, and this study provides solid, novel evidence for the use of HBP-based nanocarriers as effective antitumor drug delivery systems.

  10. Assessing high affinity binding to HLA-DQ2.5 by a novel peptide library based approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jüse, Ulrike; Arntzen, Magnus; Højrup, Peter;

    2011-01-01

    Here we report on a novel peptide library based method for HLA class II binding motif identification. The approach is based on water soluble HLA class II molecules and soluble dedicated peptide libraries. A high number of different synthetic peptides are competing to interact with a limited amount...... to HLA are then isolated by size exclusion chromatography and sequenced by tandem mass spectrometry online coupled to liquid chromatography. The MS/MS data are subsequently searched against a library defined database using a search engine such as Mascot, followed by manual inspection of the results. We...... library. The eluted sequences fit very well with the previously described HLA-DQ2.5 peptide binding motif. This novel method, limited by library complexity and sensitivity of mass spectrometry, allows the analysis of several thousand synthetic sequences concomitantly in a simple water soluble format....

  11. Isolation and characterisation of sericin antifreeze peptides and molecular dynamics modelling of their ice-binding interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinhong; Rong, Yuzhi; Wang, Zhengwu; Zhou, Yanfu; Wang, Shaoyun; Zhao, Bo

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to isolate and characterise a novel sericin antifreeze peptide and investigate its ice-binding molecular mechanism. The thermal hysteresis activity of ice-binding sericin peptides (I-SP) was measured and their activity reached as high as 0.94 °C. A P4 fraction, with high hypothermia protective activity and inhibition activity of ice recrystallisation, was obtained from I-SP, and a purified sericin peptide, named SM-AFP, with the sequence of TTSPTNVSTT and a molecular weight of 1009.50 Da was then isolated from the P4 fraction. Treatment of Lactobacillus delbrueckii Subsp. bulgaricus LB340 LYO with 100 μg/ml synthetic SM-AFP led to 1.4-fold increased survival (p Sericin peptides could be developed into beneficial cryoprotectants and used in frozen food processing. PMID:25529728

  12. A binding-site barrier affects imaging efficiency of high affinity amyloid-reactive peptide radiotracers in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan S Wall

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a complex pathology associated with a growing number of diseases including Alzheimer's disease, type 2 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and myeloma. The distribution and extent of amyloid deposition in body organs establishes the prognosis and can define treatment options; therefore, determining the amyloid load by using non-invasive molecular imaging is clinically important. We have identified a heparin-binding peptide designated p5 that, when radioiodinated, was capable of selectively imaging systemic visceral AA amyloidosis in a murine model of the disease. The p5 peptide was posited to bind effectively to amyloid deposits, relative to similarly charged polybasic heparin-reactive peptides, because it adopted a polar α helix secondary structure. We have now synthesized a variant, p5R, in which the 8 lysine amino acids of p5 have been replaced with arginine residues predisposing the peptide toward the α helical conformation in an effort to enhance the reactivity of the peptide with the amyloid substrate. The p5R peptide had higher affinity for amyloid and visualized AA amyloid in mice by using SPECT/CT imaging; however, the microdistribution, as evidenced in micro-autoradiographs, was dramatically altered relative to the p5 peptide due to its increased affinity and a resultant "binding site barrier" effect. These data suggest that radioiodinated peptide p5R may be optimal for the in vivo detection of discreet, perivascular amyloid, as found in the brain and pancreatic vasculature, by using molecular imaging techniques; however, peptide p5, due to its increased penetration, may yield more quantitative imaging of expansive tissue amyloid deposits.

  13. Tumor targeting and SPECT imaging properties of an {sup 111}In-labeled galectin-3 binding peptide in prostate carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deutscher, Susan L. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Research Division, Harry S. Truman Veterans Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); Figueroa, Said D. [Research Division, Harry S. Truman Veterans Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); Kumar, Senthil R. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)], E-mail: kumars@missouri.edu

    2009-02-15

    Introduction: Galectin-3 (gal-3) is a carbohydrate binding protein that has been implicated in cell adhesion, tumor invasion and metastasis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the tumor targeting and imaging properties of a gal-3 binding peptide selected by phage display in a mouse model of metastatic human prostate carcinoma expressing gal-3. Methods: A gal-3 binding peptide, ANTPCGPYTHDCPVKR, was synthesized with a Gly-Ser-Gly (GSG) spacer and 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) and then radiolabeled with {sup 111}In. The in vitro cell binding properties of {sup 111}In-DOTA-(GSG)-ANTPCGPYTHDCPVKR were determined in metastatic human PC3-M prostate carcinoma cells. The pharmacokinetics and single-photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT/CT) imaging with the radiolabeled peptide were evaluated in SCID mice bearing human PC3-M prostate carcinoma tumor xenografts. Results: The radiolabeled peptide bound with a 50% inhibitory concentration of 191{+-}10.2 nM to cultured PC3-M prostate carcinoma cells. In vivo tumor uptake and retention coupled with fast whole-body clearance of the peptide were demonstrated in PC3-M tumor-bearing SCID mice. The tumor uptake rates of the radiolabeled peptide were 1.27{+-}0.10%ID/g at 30 min, 0.82{+-}0.15%ID/g at 1 h and 0.57{+-}0.09%ID/g at 2 h. MicroSPECT/CT studies revealed good tumor uptake of {sup 111}In-DOTA-(GSG)-ANTPCGPYTHDCPVKR 2 h postinjection, while uptake in normal organs was low, with the exception of the kidneys. Conclusions: In vitro cell binding along with tumor uptake of {sup 111}In-DOTA-(GSG)-ANTPCGPYTHDCPVKR in PC3-M human prostate carcinoma tumor-bearing SCID mice suggests the potential of this peptide as a radiopharmaceutical for imaging of gal-3-expressing prostate tumors.

  14. Quantitative predictions of peptide binding to any HLA-DR molecule of known sequence: NetMHCIIpan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Lundegaard, Claus; Blicher, Thomas;

    2008-01-01

    is derived from a large compilation of quantitative HLA-DR binding events covering 14 of the more than 500 known HLA-DR alleles. Taking both peptide and HLA sequence information into account, the method can generalize and predict peptide binding also for HLA-DR molecules where experimental data is absent......-even in the absence of specific data for the particular molecule in question. Moreover, when compared to TEPITOPE, currently the only other publicly available prediction method aiming at providing broad HLA-DR allelic coverage, NetMHCIIpan performs equivalently for alleles included in the training of TEPITOPE while...... class II molecules is therefore of pivotal importance for rational discovery of immune epitopes. HLA-DR is a prominent example of a human MHC class II. Here, we present a method, NetMHCIIpan, that allows for pan-specific predictions of peptide binding to any HLA-DR molecule of known sequence. The method...

  15. Rat MHC-linked peptide transporter alleles strongly influence peptide binding by HLA-B27 but not B27-associated inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, W A; Leong, L Y; Satumtira, N; Butcher, G W; Howard, J C; Richardson, J A; Slaughter, C A; Hammer, R E; Taurog, J D

    1996-02-15

    Rats transgenic for the human MHC molecule HLA-B27 were used to study the effect of two alleles, cima and cimb, which are associated with peptide transport by the MHC-encoded Tap2 transporter, on the function of HLA-B27 as a restriction element for CTL recognition of the male H-Y minor H Ag and on the multisystem inflammatory disease characteristic of B27 transgenic rats. Anti-H-Y CTL generated in cima B27 transgenic rats lysed male B27 cimb/b targets significantly less well than cima/a or cima/b targets. Addition of exogenous H-Y peptides to male B27 cimb/b targets increased susceptibility to lysis to the level of cima/a targets. Male B27 cimb/b cells were less efficient than cima/a cells in competitively inhibiting CTL lysis of female B27 cima/a targets sensitized with exogenous H-Y peptides. 3H-Labeled peptides eluted from B27 molecules of lymphoblasts from rats of two cimb and three cima RT1 haplotypes showed that the cimb peptide pool favors comparatively longer and/or more hydrophobic peptides. These results indicate that RT1-linked Tap2 polymorphism in the rat strongly influences peptide loading of HLA-B27. Nonetheless, the prevalence and severity of multisystem inflammatory lesions were comparable in backcross rats bearing either cima/b or cimb/b. It thus appears either that binding of specific peptides to B27 is unimportant in the pathogenesis of B27-associated disease or that the critical peptides, unlike H-Y and many others, are not influenced by Tap transporter polymorphism.

  16. Rat MHC-linked peptide transporter alleles strongly influence peptide binding by HLA-B27 but not B27-associated inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, W A; Leong, L Y; Satumtira, N; Butcher, G W; Howard, J C; Richardson, J A; Slaughter, C A; Hammer, R E; Taurog, J D

    1996-02-15

    Rats transgenic for the human MHC molecule HLA-B27 were used to study the effect of two alleles, cima and cimb, which are associated with peptide transport by the MHC-encoded Tap2 transporter, on the function of HLA-B27 as a restriction element for CTL recognition of the male H-Y minor H Ag and on the multisystem inflammatory disease characteristic of B27 transgenic rats. Anti-H-Y CTL generated in cima B27 transgenic rats lysed male B27 cimb/b targets significantly less well than cima/a or cima/b targets. Addition of exogenous H-Y peptides to male B27 cimb/b targets increased susceptibility to lysis to the level of cima/a targets. Male B27 cimb/b cells were less efficient than cima/a cells in competitively inhibiting CTL lysis of female B27 cima/a targets sensitized with exogenous H-Y peptides. 3H-Labeled peptides eluted from B27 molecules of lymphoblasts from rats of two cimb and three cima RT1 haplotypes showed that the cimb peptide pool favors comparatively longer and/or more hydrophobic peptides. These results indicate that RT1-linked Tap2 polymorphism in the rat strongly influences peptide loading of HLA-B27. Nonetheless, the prevalence and severity of multisystem inflammatory lesions were comparable in backcross rats bearing either cima/b or cimb/b. It thus appears either that binding of specific peptides to B27 is unimportant in the pathogenesis of B27-associated disease or that the critical peptides, unlike H-Y and many others, are not influenced by Tap transporter polymorphism. PMID:8568273

  17. Rat MHC-linked peptide transporter alleles strongly influence peptide binding by HLA-B27 but not B27-associated inflammatory disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, W.A.; Satumtira, Nimman; Taurog, J.D. [Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)] [and others

    1996-02-15

    Rats transgenic for the human MHC molecule HLA-B27 were used to study the effect of two alleles, cim{sup a} and cim{sup b}, which are associated with peptide transport by the MHC-encoded Tap2 transporter, on the function of HLA-B27 as a restriction element for CTL recognition of the male H-Y minor H Ag and on the multisystem inflammatory disease characteristic of B27 transgenic rats. Anti-H-Y CTL generated in cim{sup a} B27 transgenic rats lysed male B27 cim{sup b/b} targets significantly less well than cim{sup a/a} or cim{sup a/b} targets. Addition of exogenous H-Y peptides to male B27 cim{sup b/b} targets increased susceptibility to lysis to the level of cim{sup a/a} targets sensitized with exogenous H-Y peptides. {sup 3}H-labeled peptides eluted from B27 molecules of lymphoblasts from rats of two cim{sup b} and three cim{sup a} RT1 haplotypes showed that the cim{sup b} peptide pool favors comparatively longer and/or more hydrophobic peptides. These results indicate that RT1-linked Tap2 polymorphism in the rat strongly influences peptide loading of HLA-B27. Nonetheless, the prevalence and severity of multisystem inflammatory lesions were comparable in backcross rats bearing either cim{sup a/b} or cim{sup b/b}. It thus appears either that binding of specific peptides to B27 is unimportant in the pathogenesis of B27-associated disease or that the critical peptides, unlike H-Y and many others, are not influenced by Tap transporter polymorphism. 42 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. An In-tether Chiral Center Modulates the Helicity, Cell Permeability, and Target Binding Affinity of a Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Kuan; Geng, Hao; Zhang, Qingzhou; Liu, Qisong; Xie, Mingsheng; Sun, Chengjie; Li, Wenjun; Lin, Huacan; Jiang, Fan; Wang, Tao; Wu, Yun-Dong; Li, Zigang

    2016-07-01

    The addition of a precisely positioned chiral center in the tether of a constrained peptide is reported, yielding two separable peptide diastereomers with significantly different helicity, as supported by circular dichroism (CD) and NMR spectroscopy. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis suggests that the absolute configuration of the in-tether chiral center in helical form is R, which is in agreement with theoretical simulations. The relationship between the secondary structure of the short peptides and their biochemical/biophysical properties remains elusive, largely because of the lack of proper controls. The present strategy provides the only method for investigating the influence of solely conformational differences upon the biochemical/biophysical properties of peptides. The significant differences in permeability and target binding affinity between the peptide diastereomers demonstrate the importance of helical conformation. PMID:27167181

  19. Application of Celluspots peptide arrays for the analysis of the binding specificity of epigenetic reading domains to modified histone tails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhayalan Arunkumar

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epigenetic reading domains are involved in the regulation of gene expression and chromatin state by interacting with histones in a post-translational modification specific manner. A detailed knowledge of the target modifications of reading domains, including enhancing and inhibiting secondary modifications, will lead to a better understanding of the biological signaling processes mediated by reading domains. Results We describe the application of Celluspots peptide arrays which contain 384 histone peptides carrying 59 post translational modifications in different combinations as an inexpensive, reliable and fast method for initial screening for specific interactions of reading domains with modified histone peptides. To validate the method, we tested the binding specificities of seven known epigenetic reading domains on Celluspots peptide arrays, viz. the HP1ß and MPP8 Chromo domains, JMJD2A and 53BP1 Tudor domains, Dnmt3a PWWP domain, Rag2 PHD domain and BRD2 Bromo domain. In general, the binding results agreed with literature data with respect to the primary specificity of the reading domains, but in almost all cases we obtained additional new information concerning the influence of secondary modifications surrounding the target modification. Conclusions We conclude that Celluspots peptide arrays are powerful screening tools for studying the specificity of putative reading domains binding to modified histone peptides.

  20. Prion-derived copper-binding peptide fragments catalyze the generation of superoxide anion in the presence of aromatic monoamines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomonori Kawano

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Studies have proposed two opposing roles for copper-bound forms of prion protein (PrP as an anti-oxidant supporting the neuronal functions and as a pro-oxidant leading to neurodegenerative process involving the generation of reactive oxygen species. The aim of this study is to test the hypothesis in which putative copper-binding peptides derived from PrP function as possible catalysts for monoamine-dependent conversion of hydrogen peroxide to superoxide in vitro. Materials and methods: Four peptides corresponding to the copper (II-binding motifs in PrP were synthesized and used for analysis of peptide-catalyzed generation of superoxide in the presence of Cu (II and other factors naturally present in the neuronal tissues. Results: Among the Cu-binding peptides tested, the amino acid sequence corresponding to the Cu-binding site in the helical region was shown to be the most active for superoxide generation in the presence of Cu(II, hydrogen peroxide and aromatic monoamines, known precursors or intermediates of neurotransmitters. Among monoamines tested, three compounds namely phenylethylamine, tyramine and benzylamine were shown to be good substrates for superoxide-generating reactions by the Cu-bound helical peptide. Conclusions: Possible roles for these reactions in development of prion disease were suggested.

  1. Prediction of Peptide Binding to Major Histocompatibility II Receptors with Molecular Mechanics and Semi-Empirical Quantum Mechanics Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A Platts

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Methods for prediction of the binding of peptides to major histocompatibility complex (MHC II receptors are examined, using literature values of IC50 as a benchmark. Two sets of IC50 data for closely structurally related peptides based on hen egg lysozyme (HEL and myelin basic protein (MBP are reported first. This shows that methods based on both molecular mechanics and semi-empirical quantum mechanics can predict binding with good-to-reasonable accuracy, as long as a suitable method for estimation of solvation effects is included. A more diverse set of 22 peptides bound to HLA-DR1 provides a tougher test of such methods, especially since no crystal structure is available for these peptide-MHC complexes. We therefore use sequence based methods such as SYFPEITHI and SVMHC to generate possible binding poses, using a consensus approach to determine the most likely anchor residues, which are then mapped onto the crystal structure of an unrelated peptide bound to the same receptor. This analysis shows that the MM/GBVI method performs particularly well, as does the AMBER94 forcefield with Born solvation model. Indeed, MM/GBVI can be used as an alternative to sequence based methods in generating binding poses, leading to still better accuracy.

  2. Adhesive and migratory effects of phosphophoryn are modulated by flanking peptides of the integrin binding motif.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeki Suzuki

    Full Text Available Phosphophoryn (PP is generated from the proteolytic cleavage of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP. Gene duplications in the ancestor dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP-1 genomic sequence created the DSPP gene in toothed animals. PP and DMP-1 are phosphorylated extracellular matrix proteins that belong to the family of small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoproteins (SIBLINGs. Many SIBLING members have been shown to evoke various cell responses through the integrin-binding Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD domain; however, the RGD-dependent function of PP is not yet fully understood. We demonstrated that recombinant PP did not exhibit any obvious cell adhesion ability, whereas the simultaneously purified recombinant DMP-1 did. A cell adhesion inhibitory analysis was performed by pre-incubating human osteosarcoma MG63 cells with various PP peptides before seeding onto vitronectin. The results obtained revealed that the incorporation of more than one amino acid on both sides of the PP-RGD domain was unable to inhibit the adhesion of MG63 cells onto vitronectin. Furthermore, the inhibitory activity of a peptide containing the PP-RGD domain with an open carboxyl-terminal side (H-463SDESDTNSESANESGSRGDA482-OH was more potent than that of a peptide containing the RGD domain with an open amino-terminal side (H-478SRGDASYTSDESSDDDNDSDSH499-OH. This phenomenon was supported by the potent cell adhesion and migration abilities of the recombinant truncated PP, which terminated with Ala482. Furthermore, various point mutations in Ala482 and/or Ser483 converted recombinant PP into cell-adhesive proteins. Therefore, we concluded that the Ala482-Ser483 flanking sequence, which was detected in primates and mice, was the key peptide bond that allowed the PP-RGD domain to be sequestered. The differential abilities of PP and DMP-1 to act on integrin imply that DSPP was duplicated from DMP-1 to serve as a crucial extracellular protein for tooth development rather than as an integrin

  3. Amelioration of Chronic Murine Colitis by Peptide-Mediated Transduction of the IκB Kinase Inhibitor NEMO Binding Domain Peptide1

    OpenAIRE

    Davé, Shaival H.; Tilstra, Jeremy S.; Matsuoka, Katsuyoshi; Li, Fengling; Karrasch, Thomas; Uno, Jennifer K.; Sepulveda, Antonia R; Jobin, Christian; Baldwin, Albert S.; Paul D Robbins; Plevy, Scott E.

    2007-01-01

    The NF-κB family of transcription factors is a central regulator of chronic inflammation. The phosphorylation of IκB proteins by the IκB kinase (IKK) complex (IKKα, IKKβ, and NF-κB essential modulator or NEMO) is a key step in NF-κB activation. Peptides corresponding to the NEMO binding domain (NBD) of IKK blocks NF-κB activation without inhibiting basal NF-κB activity. In this report, we determined the effects of the IKK inhibitor peptide (NBD) in a model of spontaneously occurring chronic m...

  4. Optimization of Hydrolysis Conditions for the Production of Iron-Binding Peptides from Mackerel Processing Byproducts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan-Feng Wang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was focused on optimization of enzymatic hydrolysis conditions for the production of iron-binding peptides from marine mackerel processing byproducts. The marine mackerel processing byproducts protein were hydrolyzed using trypsin, Protamex, Flavourzyme, Alcalase and Neutrase. Alcalase and Protamex proteolytic hydrolysates exhibited the highest iron-binding capacity; however, Alcalase proteolytic hydrolysate had higher degree of hydrolysis than that of Protamex. A four-factor-three-level composition central design experiment in response surface methodology was used to optimize the enzymatic hydrolysis conditions of Alcalase. The optimal enzymatic hydrolysis conditions were temperature of 46.0°C, time of 2.01 h, pH 8.35 and enzyme to substrate 6460 U/mL. The quadratic model predicted well about the actual measured value. The average iron-binding capacity of three verification experiment was 6.62 mg-EDTA/g-protein, which was much closed to model predicted value of 6.69 mg-EDTA/g-protein.

  5. Identification and binding mechanism of phage displayed peptides with specific affinity to acid-alkali treated titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuhua; Tan, Jing; Wu, Baohua; Wang, Jianxin; Qu, Shuxin; Weng, Jie; Feng, Bo

    2016-10-01

    Acid-alkali treatment is one of means widely used for preparing bioactive titanium surfaces. Peptides with specific affinity to titanium surface modified by acid-alkali two-steps treatment were obtained via phage display technology. Out of the eight new unique peptides, titanium-binding peptide 54 displayed by monoclonal M13 phage at its pIII coat protein (TBP54-M13 phage) was proved to have higher binding affinity to the substrate. The binding interaction occurred at the domain from phenylalanine at position 1 to arginine at position 6 in the sequences of TBP54 (FAETHRGFHFSF) mainly via the reaction of these residues with the Ti surface. Together the coordination and electrostatic interactions controlled the specific binding of the phage to the substrate. The binding affinity was dependent on the surface basic hydroxyl group content. In addition, the phage showed a different interaction way with the Ti surface without acid-alkali treatment along with an impaired affinity. This study could provide more understanding of the interaction mechanism between the selected peptide and its specific substrate, and develop a promising method for the biofunctionalization of titanium. PMID:27371890

  6. Analysis of memory T lymphocyte activity following stimulation with overlapping HLA-A*2402, A*0101 and Cw*0402 restricted CMV pp65 peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Provenzano Maurizio

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The continuous efforts aimed at the identification of new immune epitopes across the MHC system has led to the discovery that more than one peptide may be restricted to the same HLA antigen and function as an immune determinant for that association. The aim of this study was to compare the ability of two overlapping peptides, the nonamer (9-mer cytomegalovirus (CMV pp65341–349 (QYDPVAALF and the decamer (10-mer CMV pp65341–350 (QYDPVAALFF, and the esadecamer (16-mer peptide containing both the 9-mer and 10-mer sequences, CMV pp65340–355 (RQYDPVAALFFFDIDL, to stimulate and maintain over time a T cell immune reactivation by HLA-A*2402, A*0101, and Cw*0402 cells from CMV-seropositive subjects. The 9-mer, 10-mer, and 16-mer peptides effectively stimulated CTLs from HLA-A*2402, HLA-A*0101, and HLA-Cw*0402 CMV seropositive donors. This data confirms that both the 9-mer and the 10-mer peptides are promiscuous and are not restricted to a single HLA antigen. CMV pp65341–349 and CMV pp65341–350 have the ability to produce CMV-specific CTLs in subjects with several different HLA types, presenting a practical advantage over other peptides that are restricted only to a single HLA antigen, and thus being optimal for CMV adoptive immune therapy. Moreover, since the 16-mer peptide encompasses both the 9-mer and 10-mer peptides, it may be better than either of these peptides for CMV adoptive immune therapy.

  7. mRNA display selection of an optimized MDM2-binding peptide that potently inhibits MDM2-p53 interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Shiheido

    Full Text Available p53 is a tumor suppressor protein that prevents tumorigenesis through cell cycle arrest or apoptosis of cells in response to cellular stress such as DNA damage. Because the oncoprotein MDM2 interacts with p53 and inhibits its activity, MDM2-p53 interaction has been a major target for the development of anticancer drugs. While previous studies have used phage display to identify peptides (such as DI that inhibit the MDM2-p53 interaction, these peptides were not sufficiently optimized because the size of the phage-displayed random peptide libraries did not cover all of the possible sequences. In this study, we performed selection of MDM2-binding peptides from large random peptide libraries in two stages using mRNA display. We identified an optimal peptide named MIP that inhibited the MDM2-p53 and MDMX-p53 interactions 29- and 13-fold more effectively than DI, respectively. Expression of MIP fused to the thioredoxin scaffold protein in living cells by adenovirus caused stabilization of p53 through its interaction with MDM2, resulting in activation of the p53 pathway. Furthermore, expression of MIP also inhibited tumor cell proliferation in a p53-dependent manner more potently than DI. These results show that two-stage, mRNA-displayed peptide selection is useful for the rapid identification of potent peptides that target oncoproteins.

  8. A herpes simplex virus scaffold peptide that binds the portal vertex inhibits early steps in viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kui; Wills, Elizabeth; Baines, Joel D

    2013-06-01

    Previous experiments identified a 12-amino-acid (aa) peptide that was sufficient to interact with the herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) portal protein and was necessary to incorporate the portal into capsids. In the present study, cells were treated at various times postinfection with peptides consisting of a portion of the Drosophila antennapedia protein, previously shown to enter cells efficiently, fused to either wild-type HSV-1 scaffold peptide (YPYYPGEARGAP) or a control peptide that contained changes at positions 4 and 5. These 4-tyrosine and 5-proline residues are highly conserved in herpesvirus scaffold proteins and were previously shown to be critical for the portal interaction. Treatment early in infection with subtoxic levels of wild-type peptide reduced viral infectivity by over 1,000-fold, while the mutant peptide had little effect on viral yields. In cells infected for 3 h in the presence of wild-type peptide, capsids were observed to transit to the nuclear rim normally, as viewed by fluorescence microscopy. However, observation by electron microscopy in thin sections revealed an aberrant and significant increase of DNA-containing capsids compared to infected cells treated with the mutant peptide. Early treatment with peptide also prevented formation of viral DNA replication compartments. These data suggest that the antiviral peptide stabilizes capsids early in infection, causing retention of DNA within them, and that this activity correlates with peptide binding to the portal protein. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that the portal vertex is the conduit through which DNA is ejected to initiate infection.

  9. Amyloid-β peptide binds to cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Zimbron, Luis Fernando; Luna-Muñoz, Jose; Mena, Raul; Vazquez-Ramirez, Ricardo; Kubli-Garfias, Carlos; Cribbs, David H; Manoutcharian, Karen; Gevorkian, Goar

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular and intraneuronal accumulation of amyloid-beta aggregates has been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of macromolecules has deleterious effects on cellular functions. Mitochondria were found to be the target for amyloid-beta, and mitochondrial dysfunction is well documented in AD. In the present study we have shown for the first time that Aβ 1-42 bound to a peptide comprising the amino-terminal region of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1. Phage clone, selected after screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage and bearing a 61 amino acid fragment of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1, bound to Aβ 1-42 in ELISA as well as to Aβ aggregates present in AD brain. Aβ 1-42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 co-immunoprecipitated from mitochondrial fraction of differentiated human neuroblastoma cells. Likewise, molecular dynamics simulation of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and the Aβ 1-42 peptide complex resulted in a reliable helix-helix interaction, supporting the experimental results. The interaction between Aβ 1-42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 may explain, in part, the diminished enzymatic activity of respiratory chain complex IV and subsequent neuronal metabolic dysfunction observed in AD.

  10. Amyloid-β peptide binds to cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Hernandez-Zimbron

    Full Text Available Extracellular and intraneuronal accumulation of amyloid-beta aggregates has been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of macromolecules has deleterious effects on cellular functions. Mitochondria were found to be the target for amyloid-beta, and mitochondrial dysfunction is well documented in AD. In the present study we have shown for the first time that Aβ 1-42 bound to a peptide comprising the amino-terminal region of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1. Phage clone, selected after screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage and bearing a 61 amino acid fragment of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1, bound to Aβ 1-42 in ELISA as well as to Aβ aggregates present in AD brain. Aβ 1-42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 co-immunoprecipitated from mitochondrial fraction of differentiated human neuroblastoma cells. Likewise, molecular dynamics simulation of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and the Aβ 1-42 peptide complex resulted in a reliable helix-helix interaction, supporting the experimental results. The interaction between Aβ 1-42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 may explain, in part, the diminished enzymatic activity of respiratory chain complex IV and subsequent neuronal metabolic dysfunction observed in AD.

  11. Characterization of VCAM-1-binding peptide-functionalized quantum dots for molecular imaging of inflamed endothelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Chen

    Full Text Available Inflammation-induced activation of endothelium constitutes one of the earliest changes during atherogenesis. New imaging techniques that allow detecting activated endothelial cells can improve the identification of persons at high cardiovascular risk in early stages. Quantum dots (QDs have attractive optical properties such as bright fluorescence and high photostability, and have been increasingly studied and developed for bio-imaging and bio-targeting applications. We report here the development of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 binding peptide (VCAM-1 binding peptide functionalized QDs (VQDs from amino QDs. It was found that the QD fluorescence signal in tumor necrosis factor [Formula: see text] (TNF-[Formula: see text] treated endothelial cells in vitro was significantly higher when these cells were labeled with VQDs than amino QDs. The VQD labeling of TNF-[Formula: see text]-treated endothelial cells was VCAM-1 specific since pre-incubation with recombinant VCAM-1 blocked cells' uptake of VQDs. Our ex vivo and in vivo experiments showed that in the inflamed endothelium, QD fluorescence signal from VQDs was also much stronger than that of amino QDs. Moreover, we observed that the QD fluorescence peak was significantly blue-shifted after VQDs interacted with aortic endothelial cells in vivo and in vitro. A similar blue-shift was observed after VQDs were incubated with recombinant VCAM-1 in tube. We anticipate that the specific interaction between VQDs and VCAM-1 and the blue-shift of the QD fluorescence peak can be very useful for VCAM-1 detection in vivo.

  12. Heparin-binding peptide as a novel affinity tag for purification of recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jacqueline; Jayanthi, Srinivas; Langston, Rebekah; Daily, Anna; Kight, Alicia; McNabb, David S; Henry, Ralph; Kumar, Thallapuranam Krishnaswamy Suresh

    2016-10-01

    Purification of recombinant proteins constitutes a significant part of the downstream processing in biopharmaceutical industries. Major costs involved in the production of bio-therapeutics mainly depend on the number of purification steps used during the downstream process. Affinity chromatography is a widely used method for the purification of recombinant proteins expressed in different expression host platforms. Recombinant protein purification is achieved by fusing appropriate affinity tags to either N- or C- terminus of the target recombinant proteins. Currently available protein/peptide affinity tags have proved quite useful in the purification of recombinant proteins. However, these affinity tags suffer from specific limitations in their use under different conditions of purification. In this study, we have designed a novel 34-amino acid heparin-binding affinity tag (HB-tag) for the purification of recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells. HB-tag fused recombinant proteins were overexpressed in E. coli in high yields. A one-step heparin-Sepharose-based affinity chromatography protocol was developed to purify HB-fused recombinant proteins to homogeneity using a simple sodium chloride step gradient elution. The HB-tag has also been shown to facilitate the purification of target recombinant proteins from their 8 M urea denatured state(s). The HB-tag has been demonstrated to be successfully released from the fusion protein by an appropriate protease treatment to obtain the recombinant target protein(s) in high yields. Results of the two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy experiments indicate that the purified recombinant target protein(s) exist in the native conformation. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the HB-peptide sequence, exhibited high binding specificity and sensitivity to the HB-fused recombinant proteins (∼10 ng) in different crude cell extracts obtained from diverse expression hosts. In our opinion, the HB-tag provides a

  13. Identification of the bacteria-binding peptide domain on salivary agglutinin (gp-340/DMBT1), a member of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich superfamily

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bikker, Floris J; Ligtenberg, Antoon J M; Nazmi, Kamran;

    2002-01-01

    SRCR domains that are separated by SRCR-interspersed domains (SIDs), 2 CUB (C1r/C1s Uegf Bmp1) domains, and a zona pellucida domain. We have searched for the peptide domains of agglutinin/DMBT1 responsible for bacteria binding. Digestion with endoproteinase Lys-C resulted in a protein fragment...... containing exclusively SRCR and SID domains that binds to S. mutans. To define more closely the S. mutans-binding domain, consensus-based peptides of the SRCR domains and SIDs were designed and synthesized. Only one of the SRCR peptides, designated SRCRP2, and none of the SID peptides bound to S. mutans...

  14. Unbound position II in MXCXXC metallochaperone model peptides impacts metal binding mode and reactivity: Distinct similarities to whole proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoshan, Michal S; Dekel, Noa; Goch, Wojciech; Shalev, Deborah E; Danieli, Tsafi; Lebendiker, Mario; Bal, Wojciech; Tshuva, Edit Y

    2016-06-01

    The effect of position II in the binding sequence of copper metallochaperones, which varies between Thr and His, was investigated through structural analysis and affinity and oxidation kinetic studies of model peptides. A first Cys-Cu(I)-Cys model obtained for the His peptide at acidic and neutral pH, correlated with higher affinity and more rapid oxidation of its complex; in contrast, the Thr peptide with the Cys-Cu(I)-Met coordination under neutral conditions demonstrated weaker and pH dependent binding. Studies with human antioxidant protein 1 (Atox1) and three of its mutants where S residues were replaced with Ala suggested that (a) the binding affinity is influenced more by the binding sequence than by the protein fold (b) pH may play a role in binding reactivity, and (c) mutating the Met impacted the affinity and oxidation rate more drastically than did mutating one of the Cys, supporting its important role in protein function. Position II thus plays a dominant role in metal binding and transport. PMID:26901629

  15. Heparin-binding peptide amphiphile supramolecular architectures as platforms for angiogenesis and drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Lesleyann W.

    A fascinating phenomenon in nature is the self-assembly of molecules into a functional, hierarchical structure. In the past decade, the Stupp Laboratory has developed several classes of self-assembling biomaterials, one of which is the synthetic peptide amphiphile (PA). Self-assembling PAs are attractive and versatile biomolecules that can be customized for specific applications in regenerative medicine. In particular, a heparin-binding peptide amphiphile (HBPA) containing a specific heparin-binding peptide sequence was used here to induce angiogenesis and serve as a delivery vehicle for growth factors and small hydrophobic molecules. Throughout this dissertation, the HBPA/heparin system is used in different architectures for a variety of regenerative medicine applications. In one aspect of this work, hybrid scaffolds made from HBPA/heparin gelled on a poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) fiber mesh were used to promote angiogenesis to facilitate pancreatic islet transplantation for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. Delivery of growth factors with HBPA/PLLA scafflolds increased vessel density in vivo and correlated with improved transplant outcomes in a streptozotocin-induced diabetic mouse model. Soluble HBPA nanofiber architectures were also useful for islet transplantation applications. These nanofibers were used at concentrations below gelation to deliver growth factors into the dense islet cell aggregate, promoting cell survival and angiogenesis in vitro. The nanostructures infiltrated the islets and promoted the retention of heparin and growth factors within the islet. Another interesting growth factor release system discussed here is the HBPA membrane structure. HBPA was found to self-assemble with hyaluronic acid, a large biopolymer found in the body, into macroscopic, hierarchically-ordered membranes. Heparin was incorporated into these membranes and affected the membrane's mechanical properties and growth factor release. Human mesenchymal stem cells were also shown

  16. The negatively charged regions of lactoferrin binding protein B, an adaptation against anti-microbial peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Morgenthau

    Full Text Available Lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB is a bi-lobed membrane bound lipoprotein that is part of the lactoferrin receptor complex in a variety of Gram-negative pathogens. Despite high sequence diversity among LbpBs from various strains and species, a cluster of negatively charged amino acids is invariably present in the protein's C-terminal lobe in all species except Moraxella bovis. The function of LbpB in iron acquisition has yet to be experimentally demonstrated, whereas in vitro studies have shown that LbpB confers protection against lactoferricin, a short cationic antimicrobial peptide released from the N- terminus of lactoferrin. In this study we demonstrate that the negatively charged regions can be removed from the Neisseria meningitidis LbpB without compromising stability, and this results in the inability of LbpB to protect against the bactericidal effects of lactoferricin. The release of LbpB from the cell surface by the autotransporter NalP reduces the protection against lactoferricin in the in vitro killing assay, attributed to removal of LbpB during washing steps, but is unlikely to have a similar impact in vivo. The protective effect of the negatively charged polysaccharide capsule in the killing assay was less than the protection conferred by LbpB, suggesting that LbpB plays a major role in protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides in vivo. The selective release of LbpB by NalP has been proposed to be a mechanism for evading the adaptive immune response, by reducing the antibody binding to the cell surface, but may also provide insights into the primary function of LbpB in vivo. Although TbpB and LbpB have been shown to be major targets of the human immune response, the selective release of LbpB suggests that unlike TbpB, LbpB may not be essential for iron acquisition, but important for protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides.

  17. The negatively charged regions of lactoferrin binding protein B, an adaptation against anti-microbial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthau, Ari; Beddek, Amanda; Schryvers, Anthony B

    2014-01-01

    Lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB) is a bi-lobed membrane bound lipoprotein that is part of the lactoferrin receptor complex in a variety of Gram-negative pathogens. Despite high sequence diversity among LbpBs from various strains and species, a cluster of negatively charged amino acids is invariably present in the protein's C-terminal lobe in all species except Moraxella bovis. The function of LbpB in iron acquisition has yet to be experimentally demonstrated, whereas in vitro studies have shown that LbpB confers protection against lactoferricin, a short cationic antimicrobial peptide released from the N- terminus of lactoferrin. In this study we demonstrate that the negatively charged regions can be removed from the Neisseria meningitidis LbpB without compromising stability, and this results in the inability of LbpB to protect against the bactericidal effects of lactoferricin. The release of LbpB from the cell surface by the autotransporter NalP reduces the protection against lactoferricin in the in vitro killing assay, attributed to removal of LbpB during washing steps, but is unlikely to have a similar impact in vivo. The protective effect of the negatively charged polysaccharide capsule in the killing assay was less than the protection conferred by LbpB, suggesting that LbpB plays a major role in protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides in vivo. The selective release of LbpB by NalP has been proposed to be a mechanism for evading the adaptive immune response, by reducing the antibody binding to the cell surface, but may also provide insights into the primary function of LbpB in vivo. Although TbpB and LbpB have been shown to be major targets of the human immune response, the selective release of LbpB suggests that unlike TbpB, LbpB may not be essential for iron acquisition, but important for protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides. PMID:24465982

  18. Designed armadillo repeat proteins as general peptide-binding scaffolds: consensus design and computational optimization of the hydrophobic core

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parmeggiani, Fabio; Pellarin, Riccardo; Larsen, Anders Peter;

    2007-01-01

    Armadillo repeat proteins are abundant eukaryotic proteins involved in several cellular processes, including signaling, transport, and cytoskeletal regulation. They are characterized by an armadillo domain, composed of tandem armadillo repeats of approximately 42 amino acids, which mediates...... interactions with peptides or parts of proteins in extended conformation. The conserved binding mode of the peptide in extended form, observed for different targets, makes armadillo repeat proteins attractive candidates for the generation of modular peptide-binding scaffolds. Taking advantage of the large...... number of repeat sequences available, a consensus-based approach combined with a force field-based optimization of the hydrophobic core was used to derive soluble, highly expressed, stable, monomeric designed proteins with improved characteristics compared to natural armadillo proteins. These sequences...

  19. Sensitive quantitative predictions of peptide-MHC binding by a 'Query by Committee' artificial neural network approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Lauemøller, S L; Worning, P;

    2003-01-01

    We have generated Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) capable of performing sensitive, quantitative predictions of peptide binding to the MHC class I molecule, HLA-A*0204. We have shown that such quantitative ANN are superior to conventional classification ANN, that have been trained to predict...

  20. Viral Coat Protein Peptides with Limited Sequence Homology Bind Similar Domains of Alfalfa Mosaic Virus and Tobacco Streak Virus RNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Maud M.; Ansel-McKinney, Patricia; Houser-Scott, Felicia; Yusibov, Vidadi; Loesch-Fries, L. Sue; Gehrke, Lee

    1998-01-01

    An unusual and distinguishing feature of alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) and ilarviruses such as tobacco streak virus (TSV) is that the viral coat protein is required to activate the early stages of viral RNA replication, a phenomenon known as genome activation. AMV-TSV coat protein homology is limited; however, they are functionally interchangeable in activating virus replication. For example, TSV coat protein will activate AMV RNA replication and vice versa. Although AMV and TSV coat proteins have little obvious amino acid homology, we recently reported that they share an N-terminal RNA binding consensus sequence (Ansel-McKinney et al., EMBO J. 15:5077–5084, 1996). Here, we biochemically compare the binding of chemically synthesized peptides that include the consensus RNA binding sequence and lysine-rich (AMV) or arginine-rich (TSV) environment to 3′-terminal TSV and AMV RNA fragments. The arginine-rich TSV coat protein peptide binds viral RNA with lower affinity than the lysine-rich AMV coat protein peptides; however, the ribose moieties protected from hydroxyl radical attack by the two different peptides are localized in the same area of the predicted RNA structures. When included in an infectious inoculum, both AMV and TSV 3′-terminal RNA fragments inhibited AMV RNA replication, while variant RNAs unable to bind coat protein did not affect replication significantly. The data suggest that RNA binding and genome activation functions may reside in the consensus RNA binding sequence that is apparently unique to AMV and ilarvirus coat proteins. PMID:9525649

  1. Bioinspired silicification of silica-binding peptide-silk protein chimeras: comparison of chemically and genetically produced proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canabady-Rochelle, Laetitia L S; Belton, David J; Deschaume, Olivier; Currie, Heather A; Kaplan, David L; Perry, Carole C

    2012-03-12

    Novel protein chimeras constituted of "silk" and a silica-binding peptide (KSLSRHDHIHHH) were synthesized by genetic or chemical approaches and their influence on silica-silk based chimera composite formation evaluated. Genetic chimeras were constructed from 6 or 15 repeats of the 32 amino acid consensus sequence of Nephila clavipes spider silk ([SGRGGLGGQG AGAAAAAGGA GQGGYGGLGSQG](n)) to which one silica binding peptide was fused at the N terminus. For the chemical chimera, 28 equiv of the silica binding peptide were chemically coupled to natural Bombyx mori silk after modification of tyrosine groups by diazonium coupling and EDC/NHS activation of all acid groups. After silica formation under mild, biomaterial-compatible conditions, the effect of peptide addition on the properties of the silk and chimeric silk-silica composite materials was explored. The composite biomaterial properties could be related to the extent of silica condensation and to the higher number of silica binding sites in the chemical chimera as compared with the genetically derived variants. In all cases, the structure of the protein/chimera in solution dictated the type of composite structure that formed with the silica deposition process having little effect on the secondary structural composition of the silk-based materials. Similarly to our study of genetic silk based chimeras containing the R5 peptide (SSKKSGSYSGSKGSKRRIL), the role of the chimeras (genetic and chemical) used in the present study resided more in aggregation and scaffolding than in the catalysis of condensation. The variables of peptide identity, silk construct (number of consensus repeats or silk source), and approach to synthesis (genetic or chemical) can be used to "tune" the properties of the composite materials formed and is a general approach that can be used to prepare a range of materials for biomedical and sensor-based applications. PMID:22229696

  2. Cell surface binding and uptake of arginine- and lysine-rich penetratin peptides in absence and presence of proteoglycans

    KAUST Repository

    Åmand, Helene L.

    2012-11-01

    Cell surface proteoglycans (PGs) appear to promote uptake of arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), but their exact functions are unclear. To address if there is specificity in the interactions of arginines and PGs leading to improved internalization, we used flow cytometry to examine uptake in relation to cell surface binding for penetratin and two arginine/lysine substituted variants (PenArg and PenLys) in wildtype CHO-K1 and PG-deficient A745 cells. All peptides were more efficiently internalized into CHO-K1 than into A745, but their cell surface binding was independent of cell type. Thus, PGs promote internalization of cationic peptides, irrespective of the chemical nature of their positive charges. Uptake of each peptide was linearly dependent on its cell surface binding, and affinity is thus important for efficiency. However, the gradients of these linear dependencies varied significantly. Thus each peptide\\'s ability to stimulate uptake once bound to the cell surface is reliant on formation of specific uptake-promoting interactions. Heparin affinity chromatography and clustering experiments showed that penetratin and PenArg binding to sulfated sugars is stabilized by hydrophobic interactions and result in clustering, whereas PenLys only interacts through electrostatic attraction. This may have implications for the molecular mechanisms behind arginine-specific uptake stimulation as penetratin and PenArg are more efficiently internalized than PenLys upon interaction with PGs. However, PenArg is also least affected by removal of PGs. This indicates that an increased arginine content not only improve PG-dependent uptake but also that PenArg is more adaptable as it can use several portals of entry into the cell. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  3. Phage Display Screening for Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-Binding Peptides: Detection of Inflammation in a Mouse Model of Hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coralie Sclavons

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available TNF-α is one of the most abundant cytokines produced in many inflammatory and autoimmune conditions such as multiple sclerosis, chronic hepatitis C, or neurodegenerative diseases. These pathologies remain difficult to diagnose and consequently difficult to treat. The aim of this work is to offer a new diagnostic tool by seeking new molecular probes for medical imaging. The target-specific part of the probe consists here of heptameric peptides selected by the phage display technology for their affinity for TNF-α. Several affinity tests allowed isolating 2 peptides that showed the best binding capacity to TNF-α. Finally, the best peptide was synthesized in both linear and cyclic forms and tested on the histological sections of concanavalin-A-(ConA-treated mice liver. In this well-known hepatitis mouse model, the best results were obtained with the cyclic form of peptide 2, which allowed for the staining of inflamed areas in the liver. The cyclic form of peptide 2 (2C was, thus, covalently linked to iron oxide nanoparticles (magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agent and tested in the ConA-induced hepatitis mouse model. The vectorized nanoparticles allowed for the detection of inflammation as well as of the free peptide. These ex vivo results suggest that phage display-selected peptides can direct imaging contrast agents to inflammatory areas.

  4. Cytotoxicity and DNA cleavage with core-shell nanocomposites functionalized by a KH domain DNA binding peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazak, Remon; Ressl, Jan; Raha, Sumita; Doty, Caroline; Liu, William; Wanzer, Beau; Salam, Seddik Abdel; Elwany, Samy; Paunesku, Tatjana; Woloschak, Gayle E.

    2013-11-01

    A nanoconjugate was composed of metal oxide nanoparticles decorated with peptides and fluorescent dye and tested for DNA cleavage following UV light activation. The peptide design was based on a DNA binding domain, the so called KH domain of the hnRNPK protein. This ``KH peptide'' enabled cellular uptake of nanoconjugates and their entry into cell nuclei. The control nanoconjugate carried no peptide; it consisted only of the metal oxide nanoparticle prepared as Fe3O4@TiO2 nanocomposite and the fluorescent dye alizarin red S. These components of either construct are responsible for nanoconjugate activation by UV light and the resultant production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Production of ROS at different subcellular locations causes damage to different components of cells: only nanoconjugates inside cell nuclei can be expected to cause DNA cleavage. Degradation of cellular DNA with KH peptide decorated nanoconjugates exceeded the DNA damage obtained from control, no-peptide nanoconjugate counterparts. Moreover, caspase activation and cell death were more extensive in the same cells.A nanoconjugate was composed of metal oxide nanoparticles decorated with peptides and fluorescent dye and tested for DNA cleavage following UV light activation. The peptide design was based on a DNA binding domain, the so called KH domain of the hnRNPK protein. This ``KH peptide'' enabled cellular uptake of nanoconjugates and their entry into cell nuclei. The control nanoconjugate carried no peptide; it consisted only of the metal oxide nanoparticle prepared as Fe3O4@TiO2 nanocomposite and the fluorescent dye alizarin red S. These components of either construct are responsible for nanoconjugate activation by UV light and the resultant production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Production of ROS at different subcellular locations causes damage to different components of cells: only nanoconjugates inside cell nuclei can be expected to cause DNA cleavage. Degradation of cellular DNA

  5. Sequence-specific, nanomolar peptide binding via cucurbit[8]uril-induced folding and inclusion of neighboring side chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lauren C; Leach, David G; Blaylock, Brittney E; Ali, Omar A; Urbach, Adam R

    2015-03-18

    This paper describes the molecular recognition of the tripeptide Tyr-Leu-Ala by the synthetic receptor cucurbit[8]uril (Q8) in aqueous buffer with nanomolar affinity and exceptional specificity. This combination of characteristics, which also applies to antibodies, is desirable for applications in biochemistry and biotechnology but has eluded supramolecular chemists for decades. Building on prior knowledge that Q8 binds to peptides with N-terminal aromatic residues, a library screen of 105 peptides was designed to test the effects of residues adjacent to N-terminal Trp, Phe, or Tyr. The screen used tetramethylbenzobis(imidazolium) (MBBI) as a fluorescent indicator and resulted in the unexpected discovery that MBBI can serve not only as a turn-off sensor via the simultaneous inclusion of a Trp residue but also as a turn-on sensor via the competitive displacement of MBBI upon binding of Phe- or Tyr-terminated peptides. The unusual fluorescence response of the Tyr series prompted further investigation by (1)H NMR spectroscopy, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, and isothermal titration calorimetry. From these studies, a novel binding motif was discovered in which only 1 equiv of peptide binds to Q8, and the side chains of both the N-terminal Tyr residue and its immediate neighbor bind within the Q8 cavity. For the peptide Tyr-Leu-Ala, the equilibrium dissociation constant value is 7.2 nM, whereas that of its sequence isomer Tyr-Ala-Leu is 34 μM. The high stability, recyclability, and low cost of Q8 combined with the straightforward incorporation of Tyr-Leu-Ala into recombinant proteins should make this system attractive for the development of biological applications.

  6. Identification of a PA-binding peptide with inhibitory activity against influenza A and B virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Wunderlich

    Full Text Available There is an urgent need for new drugs against influenza type A and B viruses due to incomplete protection by vaccines and the emergence of resistance to current antivirals. The influenza virus polymerase complex, consisting of the PB1, PB2 and PA subunits, represents a promising target for the development of new drugs. We have previously demonstrated the feasibility of targeting the protein-protein interaction domain between the PB1 and PA subunits of the polymerase complex of influenza A virus using a small peptide derived from the PA-binding domain of PB1. However, this influenza A virus-derived peptide did not affect influenza B virus polymerase activity. Here we report that the PA-binding domain of the polymerase subunit PB1 of influenza A and B viruses is highly conserved and that mutual amino acid exchange shows that they cannot be functionally exchanged with each other. Based on phylogenetic analysis and a novel biochemical ELISA-based screening approach, we were able to identify an influenza A-derived peptide with a single influenza B-specific amino acid substitution which efficiently binds to PA of both virus types. This dual-binding peptide blocked the viral polymerase activity and growth of both virus types. Our findings provide proof of principle that protein-protein interaction inhibitors can be generated against influenza A and B viruses. Furthermore, this dual-binding peptide, combined with our novel screening method, is a promising platform to identify new antiviral lead compounds.

  7. A synthetic peptide from the COOH-terminal heparin-binding domain of fibronectin promotes focal adhesion formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; McCarthy, J B; Furcht, L T;

    1993-01-01

    of focal adhesion and stress fiber formation requires additional interactions. Heparin-binding fragments of fibronectin can provide this signal. The COOH-terminal heparin-binding domain of fibronectin contains five separate heparin-binding amino acid sequences. We show here that all five sequences...... PRARI. The biological response to this peptide and to the COOH-terminal fragment may be mediated through cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans because treatment of cells with heparinase II and III, or competition with heparin, reduces the response. Treatment with chondroitinase ABC or competition...

  8. Signal Peptide-Binding Drug as a Selective Inhibitor of Co-Translational Protein Translocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeire, Kurt; Bell, Thomas W.; Van Puyenbroeck, Victor; Giraut, Anne; Noppen, Sam; Liekens, Sandra; Schols, Dominique; Hartmann, Enno

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, surface expression of most type I transmembrane proteins requires translation and simultaneous insertion of the precursor protein into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane for subsequent routing to the cell surface. This co-translational translocation pathway is initiated when a hydrophobic N-terminal signal peptide (SP) on the nascent protein emerges from the ribosome, binds the cytosolic signal recognition particle (SRP), and targets the ribosome-nascent chain complex to the Sec61 translocon, a universally conserved protein-conducting channel in the ER-membrane. Despite their common function in Sec61 targeting and ER translocation, SPs have diverse but unique primary sequences. Thus, drugs that recognise SPs could be exploited to inhibit translocation of specific proteins into the ER. Here, through flow cytometric analysis the small-molecule macrocycle cyclotriazadisulfonamide (CADA) is identified as a highly selective human CD4 (hCD4) down-modulator. We show that CADA inhibits CD4 biogenesis and that this is due to its ability to inhibit co-translational translocation of CD4 into the lumen of the ER, both in cells as in a cell-free in vitro translation/translocation system. The activity of CADA maps to the cleavable N-terminal SP of hCD4. Moreover, through surface plasmon resonance analysis we were able to show direct binding of CADA to the SP of hCD4 and identify this SP as the target of our drug. Furthermore, CADA locks the SP in the translocon during a post-targeting step, possibly in a folded state, and prevents the translocation of the associated protein into the ER lumen. Instead, the precursor protein is routed to the cytosol for degradation. These findings demonstrate that a synthetic, cell-permeable small-molecule can be developed as a SP-binding drug to selectively inhibit protein translocation and to reversibly regulate the expression of specific target proteins. PMID:25460167

  9. Signal peptide-binding drug as a selective inhibitor of co-translational protein translocation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt Vermeire

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic cells, surface expression of most type I transmembrane proteins requires translation and simultaneous insertion of the precursor protein into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER membrane for subsequent routing to the cell surface. This co-translational translocation pathway is initiated when a hydrophobic N-terminal signal peptide (SP on the nascent protein emerges from the ribosome, binds the cytosolic signal recognition particle (SRP, and targets the ribosome-nascent chain complex to the Sec61 translocon, a universally conserved protein-conducting channel in the ER-membrane. Despite their common function in Sec61 targeting and ER translocation, SPs have diverse but unique primary sequences. Thus, drugs that recognise SPs could be exploited to inhibit translocation of specific proteins into the ER. Here, through flow cytometric analysis the small-molecule macrocycle cyclotriazadisulfonamide (CADA is identified as a highly selective human CD4 (hCD4 down-modulator. We show that CADA inhibits CD4 biogenesis and that this is due to its ability to inhibit co-translational translocation of CD4 into the lumen of the ER, both in cells as in a cell-free in vitro translation/translocation system. The activity of CADA maps to the cleavable N-terminal SP of hCD4. Moreover, through surface plasmon resonance analysis we were able to show direct binding of CADA to the SP of hCD4 and identify this SP as the target of our drug. Furthermore, CADA locks the SP in the translocon during a post-targeting step, possibly in a folded state, and prevents the translocation of the associated protein into the ER lumen. Instead, the precursor protein is routed to the cytosol for degradation. These findings demonstrate that a synthetic, cell-permeable small-molecule can be developed as a SP-binding drug to selectively inhibit protein translocation and to reversibly regulate the expression of specific target proteins.

  10. Peptide-specific, allogeneic T cell response in vitro induced by a self-peptide binding to HLA-A2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WENG XiuFang; LIANG ZhiHui; LU XiaoLing; ZHONG MaoHua; LU ShengJun; ZHANG CaiE; DENG Jing; WU XiongWen; GONG FeiLi

    2007-01-01

    The role of the bound peptide in alloreactive T-cell recognition is controversial, ranging from peptide-independent to peptide-specific recognition of alloreactive T-cells. The aim of this study is to find the evidence that there exist peptide/MHC complex (pMHC)-specific CTLs among alloreactive T cells generated with long-term mixed lymphocytes culture (LTMLC). A single pMHC was manipulated by loading the TAP-defective, HLA-A2 expressing T2 cells with a viral peptide (LMP2A426-434) or a self-peptide (Tyr369-377). The PBLs samples from 4 HLA-A2 positive (HLA-A2+ve) and 4 HLA-A2 negative (HLA-A2-ve) donors were included in this study. The HLA-A2+ve PBL co-cultured with the LMP2A426-434pulsed T2 (T2/LMP) stands for the nominal T-cell response to a viral antigen, and the HLA-A2-ve PBLs co-cultured with the Tyr369-377 pulsed T2 (T2/Tyr) for alloreactive T-cell response to an allogeneic antigen.The specificity of the expanded CTLs after the LTMLC was detected by their specific cytotoxicity and binding ability to specific pMHC-tetramer. An HLA-A2 restricted, HIV peptide (Gag77-85) was included for control. The cultural bulk of HLA-A2+ve PBLs with the T2/LMP showed an elevated specific cytotoxicity against the T2/LMP compared to that against the T2/HIV (26.52%±3.72% vs 7.01%±0.87%, P<0.001), and an increased frequency of binding to LMP-tetramer compared to that binding to HIV-tetramer (0.98%±0.33% vs 0.05%±0.01%, P=0.0014). The cultural bulk of HLA-A2-ve PBLs with the T2/Tyr showed a more active cytotoxicity against the T2/Tyr than that against T2/HIV (28.07%±2.58% vs 6.87%±1.01%,P<0.001), and a higher frequency of binding to the Tyr-tetramer than that binding to the HIV-tetramer (0.88%±0.3% vs 0.06%±0.03%, P=0.0018). Our results indicate that the LTMLC is able to expand the viral antigen-specific CTLs as well as allogeneic antigen-specific CTLs. A relatively large proportion of alloreactive CTLs should be pMHC-specific, i.e., the specificity of the

  11. BiPPred: Combined sequence- and structure-based prediction of peptide binding to the Hsp70 chaperone BiP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Markus; Rosam, Mathias; Glaser, Manuel; Patronov, Atanas; Shah, Harpreet; Back, Katrin Christiane; Daake, Marina Angelika; Buchner, Johannes; Antes, Iris

    2016-10-01

    Substrate binding to Hsp70 chaperones is involved in many biological processes, and the identification of potential substrates is important for a comprehensive understanding of these events. We present a multi-scale pipeline for an accurate, yet efficient prediction of peptides binding to the Hsp70 chaperone BiP by combining sequence-based prediction with molecular docking and MMPBSA calculations. First, we measured the binding of 15mer peptides from known substrate proteins of BiP by peptide array (PA) experiments and performed an accuracy assessment of the PA data by fluorescence anisotropy studies. Several sequence-based prediction models were fitted using this and other peptide binding data. A structure-based position-specific scoring matrix (SB-PSSM) derived solely from structural modeling data forms the core of all models. The matrix elements are based on a combination of binding energy estimations, molecular dynamics simulations, and analysis of the BiP binding site, which led to new insights into the peptide binding specificities of the chaperone. Using this SB-PSSM, peptide binders could be predicted with high selectivity even without training of the model on experimental data. Additional training further increased the prediction accuracies. Subsequent molecular docking (DynaDock) and MMGBSA/MMPBSA-based binding affinity estimations for predicted binders allowed the identification of the correct binding mode of the peptides as well as the calculation of nearly quantitative binding affinities. The general concept behind the developed multi-scale pipeline can readily be applied to other protein-peptide complexes with linearly bound peptides, for which sufficient experimental binding data for the training of classical sequence-based prediction models is not available. Proteins 2016; 84:1390-1407. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Purification and sequencing of the active site tryptic peptide from penicillin-binding protein 1b of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the sequence of the active site peptide of penicillin-binding protein 1b from Escherichia coli. Purified penicillin-binding protein 1b was labeled with [14C]penicillin G, digested with trypsin, and partially purified by gel filtration. Upon further purification by high-pressure liquid chromatography, two radioactive peaks were observed, and the major peak, representing over 75% of the applied radioactivity, was submitted to amino acid analysis and sequencing. The sequence Ser-Ile-Gly-Ser-Leu-Ala-Lys was obtained. The active site nucleophile was identified by digesting the purified peptide with aminopeptidase M and separating the radioactive products on high-pressure liquid chromatography. Amino acid analysis confirmed that the serine residue in the middle of the sequence was covalently bonded to the [14C]penicilloyl moiety. A comparison of this sequence to active site sequences of other penicillin-binding proteins and beta-lactamases is presented

  13. Identification of Plasmodium falciparum RhopH3 protein peptides that specifically bind to erythrocytes and inhibit merozoite invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzón, Carlos Giovanni; Curtidor, Hernando; Reyes, Claudia; Méndez, David; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2008-01-01

    The identification of sequences involved in binding to erythrocytes is an important step for understanding the molecular basis of merozoite–erythrocyte interactions that take place during invasion of the Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite into host cells. Several molecules located in the apical organelles (micronemes, rhoptry, dense granules) of the invasive-stage parasite are essential for erythrocyte recognition, invasion, and establishment of the nascent parasitophorous vacuole. Particularly, it has been demonstrated that rhoptry proteins play an important role in binding to erythrocyte surface receptors, among which is the PfRhopH3 protein, which triggers important immune responses in patients from endemic regions. It has also been reported that anti-RhopH3 antibodies inhibit in vitro invasion of erythrocytes, further supporting its direct involvement in erythrocyte invasion processes. In this study, PfRhopH3 consecutive peptides were synthesized and tested in erythrocyte binding assays for identifying those regions mediating binding to erythrocytes. Fourteen PfRhopH3 peptides presenting high specific binding activity were found, whose bindings were saturable and presented nanomolar dissociation constants. These high-activity binding peptides (HABPs) were characterized by having α-helical structural elements, as determined by circular dichroism, and having receptors of a possible sialic acid-dependent and/or glycoprotein-dependent nature, as evidenced in enzyme-treated erythrocyte binding assays and further corroborated by cross-linking assay results. Furthermore, these HABPs inhibited merozoite in vitro invasion of normal erythrocytes at 200 μM by up to 60% and 90%, suggesting that some RhopH3 protein regions are involved in the P. falciparum erythrocyte invasion. PMID:18593818

  14. The preferred substrates for transglutaminase 2 in a complex wheat gluten digest are Peptide fragments harboring celiac disease T-cell epitopes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siri Dørum

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Celiac disease is a T-cell mediated chronic inflammatory disorder of the gut that is induced by dietary exposure to gluten proteins. CD4+ T cells of the intestinal lesion recognize gluten peptides in the context of HLA-DQ2.5 or HLA-DQ8 and the gluten derived peptides become better T-cell antigens after deamidation catalyzed by the enzyme transglutaminase 2 (TG2. In this study we aimed to identify the preferred peptide substrates of TG2 in a heterogeneous proteolytic digest of whole wheat gluten. METHODS: A method was established to enrich for preferred TG2 substrates in a complex gluten peptide mixture by tagging with 5-biotinamido-pentylamine. Tagged peptides were isolated and then identified by nano-liquid chromatography online-coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, database searching and final manual data validation. RESULTS: We identified 31 different peptides as preferred substrates of TG2. Strikingly, the majority of these peptides were harboring known gluten T-cell epitopes. Five TG2 peptide substrates that were predicted to bind to HLA-DQ2.5 did not contain previously characterized sequences of T-cell epitopes. Two of these peptides elicited T-cell responses when tested for recognition by intestinal T-cell lines of celiac disease patients, and thus they contain novel candidate T-cell epitopes. We also found that the intact 9mer core sequences of the respective epitopes were not present in all peptide substrates. Interestingly, those epitopes that were represented by intact forms were frequently recognized by T cells in celiac disease patients, whereas those that were present in truncated versions were infrequently recognized. CONCLUSION: TG2 as well as gastrointestinal proteolysis play important roles in the selection of gluten T-cell epitopes in celiac disease.

  15. A Peptide Mimetic of 5-Acetylneuraminic Acid-Galactose Binds with High Avidity to Siglecs and NKG2D.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura L Eggink

    Full Text Available We previously identified several peptide sequences that mimicked the terminal sugars of complex glycans. Using plant lectins as analogs of lectin-type cell-surface receptors, a tetravalent form of a peptide with the sequence NPSHPLSG, designated svH1C, bound with high avidity to lectins specific for glycans with terminal 5-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac-galactose (Gal/N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc sequences. In this report, we show by circular dichroism and NMR spectra that svH1C lacks an ordered structure and thus interacts with binding sites from a flexible conformation. The peptide binds with high avidity to several recombinant human siglec receptors that bind preferentially to Neu5Ac(α2,3Gal, Neu5Ac(α2,6GalNAc or Neu5Ac(α2,8Neu5Ac ligands. In addition, the peptide bound the receptor NKG2D, which contains a lectin-like domain that binds Neu5Ac(α2,3Gal. The peptide bound to these receptors with a KD in the range of 0.6 to 1 μM. Binding to these receptors was inhibited by the glycoprotein fetuin, which contains multiple glycans that terminate in Neu5Ac(α2,3Gal or Neu5Ac(α2,6Gal, and by sialyllactose. Binding of svH1C was not detected with CLEC9a, CLEC10a or DC-SIGN, which are lectin-type receptors specific for other sugars. Incubation of neuraminidase-treated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with svH1C resulted in binding of the peptide to a subset of the CD14+ monocyte population. Tyrosine phosphorylation of siglecs decreased dramatically when peripheral blood mononuclear cells were treated with 100 nM svH1C. Subcutaneous, alternate-day injections of svH1C into mice induced several-fold increases in populations of several types of immune cells in the peritoneal cavity. These results support the conclusion that svH1C mimics Neu5Ac-containing sequences and interacts with cell-surface receptors with avidities sufficient to induce biological responses at low concentrations. The attenuation of inhibitory receptors suggests that svH1C

  16. Use of Multiple Peptide-Based SERS Probes Binding to Different Epitopes on a Protein Biomarker To Improve Detection Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kayeong; Cho, Jun-Haeng; Yoon, Moon-Young; Chung, Hoeil

    2016-04-01

    We propose an analytical strategy to improve the sensitivity for detecting a protein biomarker through signal multiplication by manipulating multiple peptide-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probes to bind the biomarker. Protective antigen (PA) was used as an Anthrax biomarker in this study. For this purpose, five small peptides selective to various PA epitopes with different binding affinities were chosen and peptide-conjugated Au nanoparticle (AuNP) SERS probes were individually prepared using each peptide. Initially, five different SERS probes were separately used to detect PA and the sensitivities were compared. Next, the possibility of enhancing sensitivity by employing multiple SERS probes was examined. Rather than applying the probes simultaneously, which would induce competitive binding, each probe was added sequentially and an optimal probe-addition sequence was determined to provide maximal sensitivity. Finally, PA samples at seven different concentrations were measured with the optimal sequence. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.1 aM, and the enhancement was more effective at lower PA concentrations. The proposed scheme can be further applicable to detect other protein biomarkers to diagnose various diseases. PMID:26948277

  17. HIV-1 vaccine development: constrained peptide immunogens show improved binding to the anti-HIV-1 gp41 MAb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaughey, G B; Citron, M; Danzeisen, R C; Freidinger, R M; Garsky, V M; Hurni, W M; Joyce, J G; Liang, X; Miller, M; Shiver, J; Bogusky, M J

    2003-03-25

    The human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) transmembrane glycoprotein gp41 mediates viral entry through fusion of the target cellular and viral membranes. A segment of gp41 containing the sequence Glu-Leu-Asp-Lys-Trp-Ala has previously been identified as the epitope of the HIV-1 neutralizing human monoclonal antibody 2F5 (MAb 2F5). The 2F5 epitope is highly conserved among HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins. Antibodies directed at the 2F5 epitope have neutralizing effects on a broad range of laboratory-adapted HIV-1 variants and primary isolates. Recently, a crystal structure of the epitope bound to the Fab fragment of MAb 2F5 has shown that the 2F5 peptide adopts a beta-turn conformation [Pai, E. F., Klein, M. H., Chong, P., and Pedyczak, A. (2000) World Intellectual Property Organization Patent WO-00/61618]. We have designed cyclic peptides to adopt beta-turn conformations by the incorporation of a side-chain to side-chain lactam bridge between the i and i + 4 residues containing the Asp-Lys-Trp segment. Synthesis of extended, nonconstrained peptides encompassing the 2F5 epitope revealed that the 13 amino acid sequence, Glu-Leu-Leu-Glu-Leu-Asp-Lys-Trp-Ala-Ser-Leu-Trp-Asn, maximized MAb 2F5 binding. Constrained analogues of this sequence were explored to optimize 2F5 binding affinity. The solution conformations of the constrained peptides have been characterized by NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling techniques. The results presented here demonstrate that both inclusion of the lactam constraint and extension of the 2F5 segment are necessary to elicit optimal antibody binding activity. The ability of these peptide immunogens to stimulate a high titer, peptide-specific immune response incapable of viral neutralization is discussed in regard to developing an HIV-1 vaccine designed to elicit a 2F5-like immune response. PMID:12641452

  18. Peptide-specific,allogeneic T cell response in vitro induced by a self-peptide binding to HLA-A2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The role of the bound peptide in alloreactive T-cell recognition is controversial, ranging from pep-tide-independent to peptide-specific recognition of alloreactive T-cells. The aim of this study is to find the evidence that there exist peptide/MHC complex (pMHC)-specific CTLs among alloreactive T cells generated with long-term mixed lymphocytes culture (LTMLC). A single pMHC was manipulated by loading the TAP-defective, HLA-A2 expressing T2 cells with a viral peptide (LMP2A426-434) or a self-peptide (Tyr369-377). The PBLs samples from 4 HLA-A2 positive (HLA-A2+ve) and 4 HLA-A2 negative (HLA-A2-ve) donors were included in this study. The HLA-A2+ve PBL co-cultured with the LMP2A426-434 pulsed T2 (T2/LMP) stands for the nominal T-cell response to a viral antigen, and the HLA-A2-ve PBLs co-cultured with the Tyr369-377 pulsed T2 (T2/Tyr) for alloreactive T-cell response to an allogeneic antigen. The specificity of the expanded CTLs after the LTMLC was detected by their specific cytotoxicity and binding ability to specific pMHC-tetramer. An HLA-A2 restricted, HIV peptide (Gag77-85)was included for control. The cultural bulk of HLA-A2+ve PBLs with the T2/LMP showed an elevated specific cytotoxicity against the T2/LMP compared to that against the T2/HIV (26.52%±3.72% vs 7.01%±0.87%, P<0.001), and an increased frequency of binding to LMP-tetramer compared to that binding to HIV-tetramer (0.98%±0.33% vs 0.05%±0.01%, P=0.0014). The cultural bulk of HLA-A2-ve PBLs with the T2/Tyr showed a more active cytotoxicity against the T2/Tyr than that against T2/HIV (28.07%±2.58% vs 6.87%±0.01 %, P<0.001), and a higher frequency of binding to the Tyr-tetramer than that binding to the HIV-tetramer (0.88%±0.3% vs 0.06%±0.03%, P=0.0018). Our results indicate that the LTMLC is able to expand the viral antigen-specific CTLs as well as allogeneic antigen-specific CTLs. A relatively large proportion of alloreactive CTLs should be pMHC-specific, i.e., the specificity of the

  19. Identification of the sAPRIL binding peptide and its growth inhibition effects in the colorectal cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-qing He

    Full Text Available A proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF super family. It binds to its specific receptors and is involved in multiple processes during tumorigenesis and tumor cells proliferation. High levels of APRIL expression are closely correlated to the growth, metastasis, and 5-FU drug resistance of colorectal cancer. The aim of this study was to identify a specific APRIL binding peptide (BP able to block APRIL activity that could be used as a potential treatment for colorectal cancer.A phage display library was used to identify peptides that bound selectively to soluble recombinant human APRIL (sAPRIL. The peptides with the highest binding affinity for sAPRIL were identified using ELISA. The effects of sAPRIL-BP on cell proliferation and cell cycle/apoptosis in vitro were evaluated using the CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry, respectively. An in vivo mouse model of colorectal cancer was used to determine the anti-tumor efficacy of the sAPRIL-BP.Three candidate peptides were characterized from eight phage clones with high binding affinity for sAPRIL. The peptide with the highest affinity was selected for further characterization. The identified sAPRIL-BP suppressed tumor cell proliferation and cell cycle progression in LOVO cells in a dose-dependent manner. In vivo in a mouse colorectal challenge model, the sAPRIL-BP reduced the growth of tumor xenografts in nude mice by inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis intratumorally. Moreover, in an in vivo metastasis model, sAPRIL-BP reduced liver metastasis of colorectal cancer cells.sAPRIL-BP significantly suppressed tumor growth in vitro and in vivo and might be a candidate for treating colorectal cancers that express high levels of APRIL.

  20. In Silico Investigation of the Neurotensin Receptor 1 Binding Site: Overlapping Binding Modes for Small Molecule Antagonists and the Endogenous Peptide Agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lückmann, Michael; Holst, Birgitte; Schwartz, Thue W; Frimurer, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    The neurotensin receptor 1 (NTSR1) belongs to the family of 7TM, G protein-coupled receptors, and is activated by the 13-amino-acid peptide neurotensin (NTS) that has been shown to play important roles in neurological disorders and the promotion of cancer cells. Recently, a high-resolution x-ray crystal structure of NTSR1 in complex with NTS8-13 has been determined, providing novel insights into peptide ligand recognition by 7TM receptors. SR48692, a potent and selective small molecule antagonist has previously been used extensively as a tool compound to study NTSR1 receptor signaling properties. To investigate the binding mode of SR48692 and other small molecule compounds to NTSR1, we applied an Automated Ligand-guided Backbone Ensemble Receptor Optimization protocol (ALiBERO), taking receptor flexibility and ligand knowledge into account. Structurally overlapping binding poses for SR48692 and NTS8-13 were observed, despite their distinct chemical nature and inverse pharmacological profiles. The optimized models showed significantly improved ligand recognition in a large-scale virtual screening assessment compared to the crystal structure. Our models provide new insights into small molecule ligand binding to NTSR1 and could facilitate the structure-based design of non-peptide ligands for the evaluation of the pharmacological potential of NTSR1 in neurological disorders and cancer. PMID:27491650

  1. In Vivo Selection of Phage Sequences and Characterization of Peptide-specific Binding to Breast Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Wang; Ruifang Niu; Lin Zhang; Hongkai Zhang; Xiyin Wei; Yi Yang; Shiwu Zhang; Jing Wu; Min Wu; Youjia Cao

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To screen specific polypeptide target binding to breast cancer xenografts in vivo from a phage-displayed peptide library in order to provide peptide sequences for breast cancer tumor-targeting diagnosis and therapy.METHODS A mouse model for carrying breast cancer xenografts was established using Tientsin Albinao Ⅱ mice (TAII). A 12-peptide library was biopanned through 4 rounds.Phages were recovered and titrated from tumor xenografts and control tissue (liver). The distribution of phages was detected by immunohistochemical staining.RESULTS Phage homing to breast cancer was enriched through 4 rounds of biopanning, being 14-fold of that recovered from liver tissue. A peptide sequence, ASANPFPTKALL was characterized by randomly picked-up clones which appeared most frequently.Immunohistochemical staining revealed phage localization in cancer xenografts 40 min after injection of the enriched phages.When a specific phage was tested individually, the phage reclaimed from breast cancer xenografts was 14 times as those from control tissues.CONCLUSION Tumor-specific homing peptides may provide an effective tool for breast cancer target therapy. The in vivo phage display selection technique employed in this study was feasible and applicable to screening peptides that home to.breast cells.

  2. Inhibition of human spermatozoa-zona pellucida binding by a combinatorially derived peptide from a synthetic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieczenik, George; Garrisi, John; Cohen, Jacques

    2006-09-01

    Intact zona-free human oocytes were screened using a combinatorial peptide library selection protocol. Pieczenik Peptide Sequence 1 (PPS1) HEHRKRG binds human spermatozoa. A complementary and unique binding sequence HNSSLSPLATPA (PPS2) was developed from the first PPS1 ligand that binds to the human zona pellucida or oolemma. Cytoplasm-free zonae from unfertilized eggs were obtained and used as an assay system to test the effects of exposure to these two ligands. Spermatozoa were inserted into evacuated zonae and their behaviour and binding activity were assessed at regular intervals. The behaviour of spermatozoa exposed to PPS1 and unlabelled spermatozoa injected into unexposed zonae was similar as far as binding was concerned (50 and 54% binding), but PPS1 exposed spermatozoa had higher motility and displacement, marked by their escape from the zona pellucida. Zonae exposed to PPS2 inhibited the interaction between injected spermatozoa and the inside of the zona when compared with controls (8.3 and 53.8% attached respectively, P movie sequence taken approximately 30 min after injection of spermatozoa into empty human zonae pellucidae shows behaviour of non-manipulated spermatozoa into zonae not exposed or exposed to ligand. This may be purchased for viewing on the Internet at www.rbmonline.com/Article/2159 (free to web subscribers).

  3. Poor correspondence between predicted and experimental binding of peptides to class I MHC molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Hald; Tan, L.; Søndergaard, Ib;

    2000-01-01

    Naturally processed peptides presented by class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules display a characteristic allele specific motif of two or more essential amino acid side chains, the so-called peptide anchor residues, in the context of an 8-10 amino acid long peptide. Knowledge of...

  4. Crystal structure of YrrB: a TPR protein with an unusual peptide-binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dohyun; Oh, Jongkil; Kim, Kyunggon; Lim, Hyosun; Kim, Youngsoo

    2007-09-01

    YrrB is a hypothetical protein containing a tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain from a Gram-positive bacterium, Bacillus subtilis. We determined YrrB structure in the C2 space group to 2.5A resolution, which is the first TPR structure of the Gram-positive bacterium B. subtilis. In contrast to other known TPR structures, the concave surface of the YrrB TPR domain is composed of the putative peptide-binding pocket lined with positively-charged residues. This unique charge distribution reveals that YrrB can interact with partner proteins via an unusual TPR-mediated interaction mode, compared to that of other TPR-containing structures. Functional annotation using genomics analysis suggested that YrrB may be an interacting mediator in the complex formation among RNA sulfuration components. No proteins containing a TPR domain have been identified in the biosynthesis of sulfur-containing biomolecules. Thus, YrrB could play a new role as a connecting module among those proteins in the conserved gene cluster for RNA sulfuration.

  5. Conserved C-terminal nascent peptide binding domain of HYPK facilitates its chaperone-like activity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swasti Raychaudhuri; Rachana Banerjee; Subhasish Mukhopadhyay; Nitai P Bhattacharyya

    2014-09-01

    Human HYPK (Huntingtin Yeast-two-hybrid Protein K) is an intrinsically unstructured chaperone-like protein with no sequence homology to known chaperones. HYPK is also known to be a part of ribosome-associated protein complex and present in polysomes. The objective of the present study was to investigate the evolutionary influence on HYPK primary structure and its impact on the protein’s function. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed 105 orthologs of human HYPK from plants, lower invertebrates to mammals. C-terminal part of HYPK was found to be particularly conserved and to contain nascent polypeptide-associated alpha subunit (NPAA) domain. This region experiences highest selection pressure, signifying its importance in the structural and functional evolution. NPAA domain of human HYPK has unique amino acid composition preferring glutamic acid and happens to be more stable from a conformational point of view having higher content of -helices than the rest. Cell biology studies indicate that overexpressed C-terminal human HYPK can interact with nascent proteins, co-localizes with huntingtin, increases cell viability and decreases caspase activities in Huntington’s disease (HD) cell culture model. This domain is found to be required for the chaperone-like activity of HYPK in vivo. Our study suggested that by virtue of its flexibility and nascent peptide binding activity, HYPK may play an important role in assisting protein (re)folding.

  6. Electrostatically induced recruitment of membrane peptides into clusters requires ligand binding at both interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri N Antonenko

    Full Text Available Protein recruitment to specific membrane locations may be governed or facilitated by electrostatic attraction, which originates from a multivalent ligand. Here we explored the energetics of a model system in which this simple electrostatic recruitment mechanism failed. That is, basic poly-L-lysine binding to one leaflet of a planar lipid bilayer did not recruit the triply-charged peptide (O-Pyromellitylgramicidin. Clustering was only observed in cases where PLL was bound to both channel ends. Clustering was indicated (i by the decreased diffusional PLL mobility D(PLL and (ii by an increased lifetime τ(PLL of the clustered channels. In contrast, if PLL was bound to only one leaflet, neither D(PLL nor τ(P changed. Simple calculations suggest that electrostatic repulsion of the unbound ends prevented neighboring OPg dimers from approaching each other. We believe that a similar mechanism may also operate in cell signaling and that it may e.g. contribute to the controversial results obtained for the ligand driven dimerization of G protein-coupled receptors.

  7. Resistin-binding peptide antagonizes role of resistin on white adipose tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan GU; Shu-ping HAN; Li FEI; Xiao-qin PAN; Mei GUO; Rong-hua CHEN; Xi-rong GUO

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the direct effects of resistin and resistin-binding peptide (RBP) on lipid metabolism and endocrine function in adipose tissue. Methods: Rat white adipose tissue was cultured in vitro and incubated for 24 h with 30 ng/Ml recombinant rat resistin protein (rResistin) or combined with RBP of varying concentrations(1x10-12 mol/L, 1x10-10mol/L, 1x10-8mol/L). Free fatty acids (FFA) released into medium was measured by a colorimetric kit. The levels of protein secretion and mRNA expression of TNF-α and adiponectin were detected by ELISA kit and RT-PCR respectively. Results: The levels of FFA released into medium were significantly increased after 24 h of exposure to rResistin, but significantly decreased after RBP was applied, although there was no difference between the 3 concentrations. The protein level and gene expression of TNF-α in adipose tissue were significantly increased after 24 h of exposure to rResistin, but only obviously decreased after incubated with Ix 10-8 mol/L RBP. The levels of protein secretion and mRNA expression of adiponectin in adipose tissue were significantly de-creased after 24 h of exposure to rResistin, but increased after incubated with RBP with the higher concentrations. Conclusion: RBP can effectively antagonize the role of resistin on the lipid metabolism and endocrine function of adipose tissue.

  8. Inhibition of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 binding to endocytosis receptors of the low density lipoprotein receptor family by a peptide isolated from a phage displayed library

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jan K.; Malmendal, Anders; Schiøtt, Birgit;

    2006-01-01

    (DVPCFGWCQDA) was determined by NMR. A binding site in the so-called flexible joint region of PAI-1 was suggested by molecular modelling and validated through binding studies with various competitors and site-directed mutagenesis of PAI-1. The peptide with an N-terminal biotin inhibited the binding of the u...

  9. Local atomic structure and oxidation processes of Cu(I) binding site in amyloid beta peptide: XAS Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremennaya, M. A.; Soldatov, M. A.; Stretsov, V. A.; Soldatov, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    There are two different motifs of X-ray absorption spectra for Cu(I) K-edge in amyloid-β peptide which could be due to two different configurations of local Cu(I) environment. Two or three histidine ligands can coordinate copper ion in varying conformations. On the other hand, oxidation of amyloid-β peptide could play an additional role in local copper environment. In order to explore the peculiarities of local atomic and electronic structure of Cu(I) binding sites in amyloid-β peptide the x-ray absorption spectra were simulated for various Cu(I) environments including oxidized amyloid-β and compared with experimental data.

  10. The peptide-binding specificity of HLA-A*3001 demonstrates membership of the HLA-A3 supertype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamberth, K; Røder, G; Harndahl, M;

    2008-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen class I (HLA-I) molecules are highly polymorphic peptide receptors, which select and present endogenously derived peptide epitopes to CD8+ cytotoxic T cells (CTL). The specificity of the HLA-I system is an important component of the overall specificity of the CTL immune...... system. Unfortunately, the large and rapidly increasing number of known HLA-I molecules seriously complicates a comprehensive analysis of the specificities of the entire HLA-I system (as of June 2008, the international HLA registry holds >1,650 unique HLA-I protein entries). In an attempt to reduce this...... complexity, it has been suggested to cluster the different HLA-I molecules into "supertypes" of largely overlapping peptide-binding specificities. Obviously, the HLA supertype concept is only valuable if membership can be assigned with reasonable accuracy. The supertype assignment of HLA-A*3001, a common HLA...

  11. Solution structure and peptide binding of the PTB domain from the AIDA1 postsynaptic signaling scaffolding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Smirnova

    Full Text Available AIDA1 links persistent chemical signaling events occurring at the neuronal synapse with global changes in gene expression. Consistent with its role as a scaffolding protein, AIDA1 is composed of several protein-protein interaction domains. Here we report the NMR structure of the carboxy terminally located phosphotyrosine binding domain (PTB that is common to all AIDA1 splice variants. A comprehensive survey of peptides identified a consensus sequence around an NxxY motif that is shared by a number of related neuronal signaling proteins. Using peptide arrays and fluorescence based assays, we determined that the AIDA1 PTB domain binds amyloid protein precursor (APP in a similar manner to the X11/Mint PTB domain, albeit at reduced affinity (∼10 µM that may allow AIDA1 to effectively sample APP, as well as other protein partners in a variety of cellular contexts.

  12. Panning of a phage display library against a synthetic capsule for peptide ligands that bind to the native capsule of Bacillus anthracis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Beer

    Full Text Available Bacillus anthracis is the causative agent of anthrax with the ability to not only produce a tripartite toxin, but also an enveloping capsule comprised primarily of γ-D-glutamic acid residues. The purpose of this study was to isolate peptide ligands capable of binding to the native capsule of B. anthracis from a commercial phage display peptide library using a synthetic form of the capsule consisting of 12 γ-D-glutamic acid residues. Following four rounds of selection, 80 clones were selected randomly and analysed by DNA sequencing. Four clones, each containing a unique consensus sequence, were identified by sequence alignment analysis. Phage particles were prepared and their derived 12-mer peptides were also chemically synthesized and conjugated to BSA. Both the phage particles and free peptide-BSA conjugates were evaluated by ELISA for binding to encapsulated cells of B. anthracis as well as a B. anthracis capsule extract. All the phage particles tested except one were able to bind to both the encapsulated cells and the capsule extract. However, the peptide-BSA conjugates could only bind to the encapsulated cells. One of the peptide-BSA conjugates, with the sequence DSSRIPMQWHPQ (termed G1, was fluorescently labelled and its binding to the encapsulated cells was further confirmed by confocal microscopy. The results demonstrated that the synthetic capsule was effective in isolating phage-displayed peptides with binding affinity for the native capsule of B. anthracis.

  13. Short Peptide Nucleic Acids Bind Strongly to Homopurine Tract of Double Helical RNA at pH 5.5

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ming; Zengeya, Thomas; Rozners, Eriks

    2010-01-01

    The important role that non-coding RNA plays in cell biology makes it an attractive target for molecular recognition. However, the discovery of small molecules that bind double helical RNA selectively and may serve as biochemical probes and potential drug leads has been relatively slow. Herein, we show that peptide nucleic acids, as short as six nucleobases, bind very strongly (Ka > 107) and sequence selectively to a homopurine tract of double helical RNA at pH 5.5. The isothermal titration c...

  14. Insights into the Binding Sites of Organometallic Ruthenium Anticancer Compounds on Peptides Using Ultra-High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Rebecca H.; Habtemariam, Abraha; Lopez-Clavijo, Andrea F.; Barrow, Mark P.; Sadler, Peter J.; O'Connor, Peter B.

    2014-04-01

    The binding sites of two ruthenium(II) organometallic complexes of the form [(η6-arene)Ru( N, N)Cl]+, where arene/ N, N = biphenyl (bip)/bipyridine (bipy) for complex AH076, and biphenyl (bip)/ o-phenylenediamine ( o-pda) for complex AH078, on the peptides angiotensin and bombesin have been investigated using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry. Fragmentation was performed using collisionally activated dissociation (CAD), with, in some cases, additional data being provided by electron capture dissociation (ECD). The primary binding sites were identified as methionine and histidine, with further coordination to phenylalanine, potentially through a π-stacking interaction, which has been observed here for the first time. This initial peptide study was expanded to investigate protein binding through reaction with insulin, on which the binding sites proposed are histidine, glutamic acid, and tyrosine. Further reaction of the ruthenium complexes with the oxidized B chain of insulin, in which two cysteine residues are oxidized to cysteine sulfonic acid (Cys-SO3H), and glutathione, which had been oxidized with hydrogen peroxide to convert the cysteine to cysteine sulfonic acid, provided further support for histidine and glutamic acid binding, respectively.

  15. Protein disulfide isomerase isomerizes non-native disulfide bonds in human proinsulin independent of its peptide-binding activity

    OpenAIRE

    Winter, Jeannette; Gleiter, Stefan; Klappa, Peter; Lilie, Hauke

    2011-01-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) supports proinsulin folding as chaperone and isomerase. Here, we focus on how the two PDI functions influence individual steps in the complex folding process of proinsulin. We generated a PDI mutant (PDI-aba′c) where the b′ domain was partially deleted, thus abolishing peptide binding but maintaining a PDI-like redox potential. PDI-aba′c catalyzes the folding of human proinsulin by increasing the rate of formation and the final yield of native proinsulin. Imp...

  16. Peptide 68-88 of apocytochrome c plays a crucial role in its insertion into membrane and binding to mitochondria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Xiaoping; (王小平); HAN; Xuehai; (韩学海); YANG; Fuyu; (杨福愉)

    2003-01-01

    Apocytochrome c (Apocyt. C) is the precursor of cytochrome c. It is synthesized in the cytosol and posttranslationally imported into mitochondria. In order to determine the crucial sequence in apocyt. Ctranslocation, deleted mutant and chemically synthesized peptides with different length were used. Obtained results showed that sequence 68-88 of apocyt. C plays a critical role in its insertion into membrane and binding to mitochondria.

  17. Targeting Cell Membrane Lipid Rafts by Stoichiometric Functionalization of Gold Nanoparticles With a Sphingolipid-Binding Domain Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramelle, David; Nieves, Daniel; Brun, Benjamin; Kraut, Rachel S; Fernig, David G

    2015-04-22

    A non-membrane protein-based nanoparticle agent for the tracking of lipid rafts on live cells is produced by stoichiometric functionalization of gold nanoparticles with a previously characterized sphingolipid- and cell membrane microdomain-binding domain peptide (SBD). The SBD peptide is inserted in a self-assembled monolayer of peptidol and alkane thiol ethylene glycol, on gold nanoparticles surface. The stoichiometric functionalization of nanoparticles with the SBD peptide, essential for single molecule tracking, is achieved by means of non-affinity nanoparticle purification. The SBD-nanoparticles have remarkable long-term resistance to electrolyte-induced aggregation and ligand-exchange and have no detectable non-specific binding to live cells. Binding and diffusion of SBD-nanoparticles bound to the membrane of live cells is measured by real-time photothermal microscopy and shows the dynamics of sphingolipid-enriched microdomains on cells membrane, with evidence for clustering, splitting, and diffusion over time of the SBD-nanoparticle labeled membrane domains. The monofunctionalized SBD-nanoparticle is a promising targeting agent for the tracking of lipid rafts independently of their protein composition and the labelling requires no prior modification of the cells. This approach has potential for further functionalization of the particles to manipulate the organization of, or targeting to microdomains that control signaling events and thereby lead to novel diagnostics and therapeutics.

  18. Molecular modeling on Zn(Ⅱ) binding modes of Alzheimer's amyloid β-peptide in insoluble aggregates and soluble complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Daxiong; YANG Pin

    2004-01-01

    Aggregation of the amyloid β-peptide (A β) into insoluble fibrils is a key pathological event in Alzheimer's disease. Zn(Ⅱ) ion induces significant Aβ aggregation at nearly physiological concentrations in vitro. In order to explore the induce mechanism, the possible binding modes of Zn(Ⅱ) in Aβ peptide are studied by molecular modeling method. First, the Aβ species containing 1,2,4 and 12 peptides are established respectively. And next a Zn(Ⅱ) ion is manually hold the different sits of the Aβ species based on the experimental data and subsequently the coordinate atom and number are assigned. Finally, the optimum binding site is found by the system energy minimization. Modeling results show that in soluble Zn(Ⅱ) complex, Nτ of imidazole ring of His14, O of carbonyl of main-chain, and two O of water occupy the four ligand positions of the tetrahedral complex; in the aggregation of Aβ, the His13(Nτ)-Zn(Ⅱ)-His14(Nτ)bridges are formed by Zn(Ⅱ) cross-linking action. Therefore, the possible Zn(Ⅱ) binding mode obtained by the studies will be helpful to reveal the form mechanism of pathogenic aggregates in brain.

  19. Thermodynamics of binding interactions between bovine beta-lactoglobulin A and the antihypertensive peptide beta-Lg f142-148.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roufik, Samira; Gauthier, Sylvie F; Leng, Xiaojing; Turgeon, Sylvie L

    2006-02-01

    The binding capacity of bovine beta-lactoglobulin variant A (beta-Lg A) for six peptides derived from beta-Lg was evaluated using an ultrafiltration method under the following conditions: pH 6.8, 40 degrees C, and a beta-Lg A/peptide molar ratio of 1:5. Only peptides beta-Lg f102-105, f142-148, and f69-83 bound in significant amounts to beta-Lg A corresponding to 1.5, 1.1, and 0.7 mol of peptide per mole of beta-Lg A, respectively. The interaction between beta-Lg A and the antihypertensive peptide beta-Lg f142-148 was investigated further by isothermal titration calorimetry. The binding isotherms at pH 6.8 and 25 degrees C confirmed that beta-Lg f142-148 bound to beta-Lg A and that the interaction followed a sequential three-site binding model with constants of association of 2 x 10(3), 1 x 10(3), and 0.4 x 10(3) M(-1) for the first, second, and third binding sites, respectively. The enthalpy of binding was exothermic for the first and second binding sites and endothermic for the third binding site. Binding of the peptide to all three sites was spontaneous as shown by the negative free energy values. These results show for the first time that beta-Lg A can bind bioactive peptides. This potential could be exploited to transport bioactive peptides and protect them in the gastrointestinal tract following their oral administration as nutraceuticals.

  20. EWGWS insert in Plasmodium falciparum ookinete surface enolase is involved in binding of PWWP containing peptides: Implications to mosquito midgut invasion by the parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Debanjan; Mishra, Pushpa; Joshi, Mamata; Thakur, Prasoon Kumar; Hosur, R V; Jarori, Gotam K

    2016-01-01

    There are multiple stages in the life cycle of Plasmodium that invade host cells. Molecular machinery involved is such host-pathogen interactions constitute excellent drug targets and/or vaccine candidates. A screen using a phage display library has previously demonstrated presence of enolase on the surface of the Plasmodium ookinete. Phage-displayed peptides that bound to the ookinete contained a conserved motif (PWWP) in their sequence. Here, direct binding of these peptides with recombinant Plasmodium falciparum enolase (rPfeno) was investigated. These peptides showed specific binding to rPfeno, but failed to bind to other enolases. Plasmodium spp enolases are distinct in having an insert of five amino acids ((104)EWGWS(108)) that is not found in host enolases. The possibility of this insert being the recognition motif for the PWWP containing peptides was examined, (i) by comparing the binding of the peptides with rPfeno and a deletion variant Δ-rPfeno lacking (104)EWGWS(108), (ii) by measuring the changes in proton chemical shifts of PWWP peptides on binding to different enolases and (iii) by inter-molecular docking experiment to locate the peptide binding site. Results from these studies showed that the pentapeptide insert of Pfeno indeed constitutes the binding site for the PWWP domain containing peptide ligands. Search for sequences homologous to phage displayed peptides among peritrophic matrix proteins resulted in identification of perlecan, laminin, peritrophin and spacran. The possibility of these PWWP domain-containing proteins in the peritrophic matrix of insect gut to interact with ookinete cell surface enolase and facilitate the invasion of mosquito midgut epithelium is discussed. PMID:26592350

  1. Toxoplasma gondii peptide ligands open the gate of the HLA class I binding groove

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMurtrey, Curtis; Trolle, Thomas; Sansom, Tiffany;

    2016-01-01

    HLA class I presentation of pathogen-derived peptide ligands is essential for CD8+ T cell recognition of Toxoplasma gondii infected cells. Currently, little data exist pertaining to peptides that are presented after T. gondii infection. Herein we purify HLA-A*02:01 complexes from T. gondii infected...... cells and characterize the peptide ligands using LCMS. We identify 195 T. gondii encoded ligands originating from both secreted and cytoplasmic proteins. Surprisingly, T. gondii ligands are significantly longer than uninfected host ligands, and these longer pathogen derived peptides maintain a canonical...

  2. Control of silicification by genetically engineered fusion proteins: Silk–silica binding peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shun; Huang, Wenwen; Belton, David J.; Simmons, Leo O.; Perry, Carole C.; Wang, Xiaoqin; Kaplan, David L.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, an artificial spider silk gene, 6mer, derived from the consensus sequence of Nephila clavipes dragline silk gene, was fused with different silica-binding peptides (SiBPs), A1, A3 and R5, to study the impact of the fusion protein sequence chemistry on silica formation and the ability to generate a silk–silica composite in two different bioinspired silicification systems: solution–solution and solution– solid. Condensed silica nanoscale particles (600–800 nm) were formed in the presence of the recombinant silk and chimeras, which were smaller than those formed by 15mer-SiBP chimeras [1], revealing that the molecular weight of the silk domain correlated to the sizes of the condensed silica particles in the solution system. In addition, the chimeras (6mer-A1/A3/R5) produced smaller condensed silica particles than the control (6mer), revealing that the silica particle size formed in the solution system is controlled by the size of protein assemblies in solution. In the solution–solid interface system, silicification reactions were performed on the surface of films fabricated from the recombinant silk proteins and chimeras and then treated to induce β-sheet formation. A higher density of condensed silica formed on the films containing the lowest β-sheet content while the films with the highest β-sheet content precipitated the lowest density of silica, revealing an inverse correlation between the β-sheet secondary structure and the silica content formed on the films. Intriguingly, the 6mer-A3 showed the highest rate of silica condensation but the lowest density of silica deposition on the films, compared with 6mer-A1 and -R5, revealing antagonistic crosstalk between the silk and the SiBP domains in terms of protein assembly. These findings offer a path forward in the tailoring of biopolymer–silica composites for biomaterial related needs. PMID:25462851

  3. A modern approach for epitope prediction: identification of foot-and-mouth disease virus peptides binding bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA) class I molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandya, Mital; Rasmussen, Michael; Hansen, Andreas;

    2015-01-01

    pathogens, such as foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Six synthetic BoLA class I (BoLA-I) molecules were produced, and the peptide binding motif was generated for five of the six molecules using a combined approach of positional scanning combinatorial peptide libraries (PSCPLs) and neural network...

  4. The Length Distribution of Class I-Restricted T Cell Epitopes Is Determined by Both Peptide Supply and MHC Allele-Specific Binding Preference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trolle, Thomas; McMurtrey, Curtis P.; Sidney, John;

    2016-01-01

    HLA class I-binding predictions are widely used to identify candidate peptide targets of human CD8+ T cell responses. Many such approaches focus exclusively on a limited range of peptide lengths, typically 9 aa and sometimes 9-10 aa, despite multiple examples of dominant epitopes of other lengths...

  5. Identification of a system required for the functional surface localization of sugar binding proteins with class III signal peptides in Sulfolobus solfataricus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zolghadr, Behnam; Weber, Stefan; Szabo, Zalan; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Albers, Sonja-Verena

    2007-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus contains an unusual large number of sugar binding proteins that are synthesized as precursors with a class III signal peptide. Such signal peptides are commonly used to direct archaeal flagellin subunits or bacterial (pseudo)pilins into extracel

  6. NetMHCpan-3.0; improved prediction of binding to MHC class I molecules integrating information from multiple receptor and peptide length datasets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Andreatta, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Binding of peptides to MHC class I molecules (MHC-I) is essential for antigen presentation to cytotoxic T-cells.Results: Here, we demonstrate how a simple alignment step allowing insertions and deletions in a pan-specific MHC-I binding machine-learning model enables combining informat......Background: Binding of peptides to MHC class I molecules (MHC-I) is essential for antigen presentation to cytotoxic T-cells.Results: Here, we demonstrate how a simple alignment step allowing insertions and deletions in a pan-specific MHC-I binding machine-learning model enables combining...

  7. Thermodynamic Study of Interactions Between ZnO and ZnO Binding Peptides Using Isothermal Titration Calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limo, Marion J; Perry, Carole C

    2015-06-23

    While material-specific peptide binding sequences have been identified using a combination of combinatorial methods and computational modeling tools, a deep molecular level understanding of the fundamental principles through which these interactions occur and in some instances modify the morphology of inorganic materials is far from being fully realized. Understanding the thermodynamic changes that occur during peptide-inorganic interactions and correlating these to structural modifications of the inorganic materials could be the key to achieving and mastering control over material formation processes. This study is a detailed investigation applying isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to directly probe thermodynamic changes that occur during interaction of ZnO binding peptides (ZnO-BPs) and ZnO. The ZnO-BPs used are reported sequences G-12 (GLHVMHKVAPPR), GT-16 (GLHVMHKVAPPR-GGGC), and alanine mutants of G-12 (G-12A6, G-12A11, and G-12A12) whose interaction with ZnO during solution synthesis studies have been extensively investigated. The interactions of the ZnO-BPs with ZnO yielded biphasic isotherms comprising both an endothermic and an exothermic event. Qualitative differences were observed in the isothermal profiles of the different peptides and ZnO particles studied. Measured ΔG values were between -6 and -8.5 kcal/mol, and high adsorption affinity values indicated the occurrence of favorable ZnO-BP-ZnO interactions. ITC has great potential in its use to understand peptide-inorganic interactions, and with continued development, the knowledge gained may be instrumental for simplification of selection processes of organic molecules for the advancement of material synthesis and design.

  8. Determining the Binding Sites of β-Cyclodextrin and Peptides by Electron-Capture Dissociation High Resolution Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yulin; Geib, Timon; Volmer, Dietrich A.

    2015-07-01

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) are a group of cyclic oligosaccharides, which readily form inclusion complexes with hydrophobic compounds to increase bioavailability, thus making CDs ideal drug excipients. Recent studies have also shown that CDs exhibit a wide range of protective effects, preventing proteins from aggregation, degradation, and folding. These effects strongly depend on the binding sites on the protein surface. CDs only exhibit weak interactions with amino acids, however; conventional analytical techniques therefore usually fail to reveal the exact location of the binding sites. Moreover, some studies even suggest that CD inclusion complexes are merely electrostatic adducts. Here, electron capture dissociation (ECD) was applied in this proof-of-concept study to examine the exact nature of the CD/peptide complexes, and CD binding sites were unambiguously located for the first time via Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) tandem mass spectrometry.

  9. A Short Peptide That Mimics the Binding Domain of TGF-β1 Presents Potent Anti-Inflammatory Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emília R Vaz

    Full Text Available The transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1 is a pleiotropic cytokine with multiple roles in development, wound healing, and immune regulation. TGF-β1-mediated immune dysfunction may lead to pathological conditions, such as inflammation. Chronic inflammatory process is characterized by a continuous release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and the inhibition or the blockage of these cytokines signaling pathways are considered a target treatment. In this context, despite the high numbers of TGF-β-targeted pathways, the inducible regulatory T cells (iTreg to control inflammation seems to be a promising approach. Our aim was to develop novel peptides through phage display (PhD technology that could mimic TGF-β1 function with higher potency. Specific mimetic peptides were obtained through a PhD subtraction strategy from whole cell binding using TGF-β1 recombinant as a competitor during elution step. We have selected a peptide that seems to play an important role on cellular differentiation and modulation of TNF-α and IL-10 cytokines. The synthetic pm26TGF-β1 peptide tested in PBMC significantly down-modulated TNF-α and up-regulated IL-10 responses, leading to regulatory T cells (Treg phenotype differentiation. Furthermore, the synthetic peptide was able to decrease leukocytes rolling in BALB/C mice and neutrophils migration during inflammatory process in C57BL/6 mice. These data suggest that this peptide may be useful for the treatment of inflammatory diseases, especially because it displays potent anti-inflammatory properties and do not exhibit neutrophils' chemoattraction.

  10. H2-M polymorphism in mice susceptible to collagen-induced arthritis involves the peptide binding groove

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, W.; Loos, M.; Maeurer, M.J. [Johannes Gutenberg Univ., Mainz (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    The ability to develop type II collagen (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice is associated with the major histocompatibility I-A gene and with as yet poorly defined regulatory molecules of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigen processing and presentation pathway. H2-M molecules are thought to be involved in the loading of antigenic peptides into the MHC class II binding cleft. We sequenced H2-Ma, H2-Mb1, and H2-Mb2 genes from CIA-susceptible and -resistant mouse strains and identified four different Ma and Mb2 alleles, and three different Mb1 alleles defined by polymorphic residues within the predicted peptide binding groove. Most CIA-resistant mouse strains share common Ma, Mb1, and Mb2 alleles. In contrast, H2-M alleles designated Ma-III, Ma-IV, Mb1-III, and Mb2-IV could be exclusively identified in the CIA-susceptible H2{sup r} and H2{sup q} haplotypes, suggesting that allelic H2-M molecules may modulate the composition of different CII peptides loaded onto MHC class II molecules, presumably presenting {open_quotes}arthritogenic{close_quotes} epitopes to T lymphocytes. 42 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Interrelationships among biological activity, disulfide bonds, secondary structure, and metal ion binding for a chemically synthesized 34-amino-acid peptide derived from alpha-fetoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacColl, R; Eisele, L E; Stack, R F; Hauer, C; Vakharia, D D; Benno, A; Kelly, W C; Mizejewski, G J

    2001-10-01

    A 34-amino-acid peptide has been chemically synthesized based on a sequence from human alpha-fetoprotein. The purified peptide is active in anti-growth assays when freshly prepared in pH 7.4 buffer at 0.20 g/l, but this peptide slowly becomes inactive. This functional change is proven by mass spectrometry to be triggered by the formation of an intrapeptide disulfide bond between the two cysteine residues on the peptide. Interpeptide cross-linking does not occur. The active and inactive forms of the peptide have almost identical secondary structures as shown by circular dichroism (CD). Zinc ions bind to the active peptide and completely prevents formation of the inactive form. Cobalt(II) ions also bind to the peptide, and the UV-Vis absorption spectrum of the cobalt-peptide complex shows that: (1) a near-UV sulfur-to-metal-ion charge-transfer band had a molar extinction coefficient consistent with two thiolate bonds to Co(II); (2) the lowest-energy visible d-d transition maximum at 659 nm, also, demonstrated that the two cysteine residues are ligands for the metal ion; (3) the d-d molar extinction coefficient showed that the metal ion-ligand complex was in a distorted tetrahedral symmetry. The peptide has two cysteines, and it is speculated that the other two metal ion ligands might be the two histidines. The Zn(II)- and Co(II)-peptide complexes had similar peptide conformations as indicated by their ultraviolet CD spectra, which differed very slightly from that of the free peptide. Surprisingly, the cobalt ions acted in the reverse of the zinc ions in that, instead of stabilizing anti-growth form of the peptide, they catalyzed its loss. Metal ion control of peptide function is a saliently interesting concept. Calcium ions, in the conditions studied, apparently do not bind to the peptide. Trifluoroethanol and temperature (60 degrees C) affected the secondary structure of the peptide, and the peptide was found capable of assuming various conformations in solution

  12. Intranasal Delivery of NEMO-Binding Domain Peptide Prevents Memory Loss in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangasamy, Suresh B; Corbett, Grant T; Roy, Avik; Modi, Khushbu K; Bennett, David A; Mufson, Elliott J; Ghosh, Sankar; Pahan, Kalipada

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. Despite intense investigations, no effective therapy is available to halt its progression. We found that NF-κB was activated within the hippocampus and cortex of AD subjects and that activated forms of NF-κB negatively correlated with cognitive function monitored by Mini-Mental State Examination and global cognitive z score. Accordingly, NF-κB activation was also observed in the hippocampus of a transgenic (5XFAD) mouse model of AD. It has been shown that peptides corresponding to the NF-κB essential modifier (NEMO)-binding domain (NBD) of IκB kinase α (IKKα) or IκB kinase β (IKKβ) specifically inhibit the induction of NF-κB activation without inhibiting the basal NF-κB activity. Interestingly, after intranasal administration, wild-type NBD peptide entered into the hippocampus, reduced hippocampal activation of NF-κB, suppressed hippocampal microglial activation, lowered the burden of Aβ in the hippocampus, attenuated apoptosis of hippocampal neurons, protected plasticity-related molecules, and improved memory and learning in 5XFAD mice. Mutated NBD peptide had no such protective effect, indicating the specificity of our finding. These results suggest that selective targeting of NF-κB activation by intranasal administration of NBD peptide may be of therapeutic benefit for AD patients. PMID:26401561

  13. Dissecting the Binding Mode of Low Affinity Phage Display Peptide Ligands to Protein Targets by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Coupled to Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leurs, Ulrike; Lohse, Brian; Ming, Shonoi A;

    2014-01-01

    of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to characterize interactions of low affinity peptides with their cognate protein targets. The HDX-MS workflow was optimized to accurately detect low-affinity peptide-protein interactions by use of ion mobility, electron transfer dissociation, non...... of KDM4C, indicating distinct binding modes. In contrast, the perturbation site of another PD-selected peptide inhibiting the function of KDM1A maps to a GST-tag. Our results demonstrate that HDX-MS can validate and map weak peptide-protein interactions, and pave the way for understanding and optimizing...

  14. Rational design of YAP WW1 domain-binding peptides to target TGFβ/BMP/Smad-YAP interaction in heterotopic ossification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Liu, Shenghe; Zhang, Wen; Sun, Luyuan

    2015-11-01

    The transforming growth factor-β/bone morphogenic protein/Smad signaling pathway has been raised as a new and promising therapeutic target of heterotopic ossification, which is mediated by recruitment of transcription coactivator Yes-associated protein (YAP) to Smad. Here, we described a successful integration of computational modeling and experimental assay to rationally design novel peptide aptamers to disrupt YAP-Smad interaction by targeting YAP WW1 domain. In the protocol, a computational genetic evolution strategy was used to improve a population of potential YAP WW1-binding peptides generated from the YAP-recognition site in Smad protein, from which several promising peptides were selected and their affinities toward YAP WW1 domain were determined using binding assay. In addition, a high-activity peptide was further optimized based on its complex structure with YAP WW1 domain to derive a number of derivative peptides with higher binding potency to the domain. We also found that a strong YAP WW1 binder should have a negatively charged N-terminus, a positively charged C-terminus and a nonpolar core to match the electrostatic distribution pattern in peptide-binding pocket of YAP WW1 domain, which may also form additional nonbonded interactions such as hydrogen bond, salt bridge and π-π stacking to confer stability and specificity for the domain-peptide recognition. PMID:26435515

  15. Studies on molecular cloning of a binding protein for the monitor peptide and its physilogical significance; Monitapepuchido ketsugo tanpakushitsu no bunshi kuroningu to sono seiriteki igi no kaimei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuzuki, Satoshi [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan). Graduate School of Agriculture

    1999-12-16

    The monitor peptide, its molecular weight of about 6500, was isolated from art bile-pancreatic juice as a stimulant for the secretion of a gastrointestinal hormone, cholecystokinin. We have reported a specific binding of the monitor peptide to rat small intestinal mucosal cells and that monitor peptide binding protein (receptor) seemed to have an affinity site for its regand resembling that of trypsin. In the present study, we isolated a clone from a rat small intestine cDNA library which encodes a novel trypsin-like protein with a transmembrane region. The mRNA corresponding to the cDNA of this protein was expressed in the vill in duodenum. The protein was expressed in cultured cells to examine the specific binding to {sup 125}I labeled monitor peptide. (author)

  16. Studies on adenosine triphosphate transphosphorylases. XVIII. Synthesis and preparation of peptides and peptide fragments of rabbit muscle ATP-AMP transphosphorylase (adenylate kinase) and their nucleotide-binding properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuby, S A; Hamada, M; Johnson, M S; Russell, G A; Manship, M; Palmieri, R H; Fleming, G; Bredt, D S; Mildvan, A S

    1989-08-01

    Two peptide fragments, derived from the head and tail of rabbit muscle myokinase, were found to possess remarkable and specific ligand-binding properties (Hamada et al., 1979). By initiating systematic syntheses and measurements of equilibrium substrate-binding properties of these two sets of peptides, or portions thereof, which encompass the binding sites for (a) the magnesium complexes of the nucleotide substrates (MgATP2- and MgADP-) and (b) the uncomplexed nucleotide substrates (ADP3- and AMP2-) of rabbit muscle myokinase, some of the requirements for binding of the substrates to ATP-AMP transphosphorylase are being deduced and chemically outlined. One requirement for tight nucleotide binding appears to be a minimum peptide length of 15-25 residues. In addition, Lys-172 and/or Lys-194 may be involved in the binding of epsilon AMP. The syntheses are described as a set of peptides corresponding to residues 31-45, 20-45, 5-45, and 1-45, and a set of peptides corresponding to residues 178-192, 178-194, and 172-194 of rabbit muscle adenylate kinase. The ligand-binding properties of the first set of synthetic peptides to the fluorescent ligands: epsilon MgATP/epsilon ATP and epsilon MgADP/epsilon ADP are quantitatively presented in terms of their intrinsic dissociation constants (K'd) and values of N (maximal number of moles bound per mole of peptide); and compared with the peptide fragment MT-I (1-44) obtained from rabbit muscle myokinase (Kuby et al., 1984) and with the native enzyme (Hamada et al., 1979). In addition, the values of N and K'd are given for the second set of synthetic peptides to the fluorescent ligands epsilon AMP and epsilon ADP as well as for the peptide fragments MT-XII(172-194) and CB-VI(126-194) (Kuby et al., 1984) and, in turn, compared with the native enzyme. A few miscellaneous dissociation constants which had been derived kinetically are also given for comparison (e.g., the Ki for epsilon AMP and the value of KMg epsilon ATP obtained for

  17. Influence of Cysteine and Tryptophan Substitution on DNA-Binding Activity on Maize α-Hairpinin Antimicrobial Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Daniel A; Porto, William F; Silva, Maria Z; da Silva, Tatiane R; Franco, Octávio L

    2016-01-01

    For almost four decades, antimicrobial peptides have been studied, and new classes are being discovered. However, for therapeutic use of these molecules, issues related to the mechanism of action must be answered. In this work, the antimicrobial activity of the hairpinin MBP-1 was studied by the synthesis of two variants, one replacing cysteines and one tryptophan with alanine. Antibacterial activity was abolished in both variants. No membrane disturbance, even in concentrations higher than those required to inhibit the bacteria, was observed in SEM microscopy. The gel retardation assay showed that MBP-1 possesses a higher DNA-binding ability than variants. Finally, molecular modelling showed that the lack of cysteines resulted in structure destabilization and lack of tryptophan resulted in a less flexible peptide, with less solvent assessable surface area, both characteristics that could contribute to absence of activity. In summary, the data here reported add more information about the multiple mechanisms of action of α-hairpinins. PMID:27529210

  18. The Structure of the Amyloid-[beta] Peptide High-Affinity Copper II Binding Site in Alzheimer Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streltsov, Victor A.; Titmuss, Stephen J.; Epa, V. Chandana; Barnham, Kevin J.; Masters, Colin L.; Varghese, Joseph N. (CSIRO/MHT)

    2008-11-03

    Neurodegeneration observed in Alzheimer disease (AD) is believed to be related to the toxicity from reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in the brain by the amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) protein bound primarily to copper ions. The evidence for an oxidative stress role of A{beta}-Cu redox chemistry is still incomplete. Details of the copper binding site in A{beta} may be critical to the etiology of AD. Here we present the structure determined by combining x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and density functional theory analysis of A{beta} peptides complexed with Cu{sup 2+} in solution under a range of buffer conditions. Phosphate-buffered saline buffer salt (NaCl) concentration does not affect the high-affinity copper binding mode but alters the second coordination sphere. The XAS spectra for truncated and full-length A{beta}-Cu{sup 2+} peptides are similar. The novel distorted six-coordinated (3N3O) geometry around copper in the A{beta}-Cu{sup 2+} complexes include three histidines: glutamic, or/and aspartic acid, and axial water. The structure of the high-affinity Cu{sup 2+} binding site is consistent with the hypothesis that the redox activity of the metal ion bound to A{beta} can lead to the formation of dityrosine-linked dimers found in AD.

  19. Prediction of Surface and pH-Specific Binding of Peptides to Metal and Oxide Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Hendrik; Lin, Tzu-Jen; Emami, Fateme Sadat; Ramezani-Dakhel, Hadi; Naik, Rajesh; Knecht, Marc; Perry, Carole C.; Huang, Yu

    2015-03-01

    The mechanism of specific peptide adsorption onto metallic and oxidic nanostructures has been elucidated in atomic resolution using novel force fields and surface models in comparison to measurements. As an example, variations in peptide adsorption on Pd and Pt nanoparticles depending on shape, size, and location of peptides on specific bounding facets are explained. Accurate computational predictions of reaction rates in C-C coupling reactions using particle models derived from HE-XRD and PDF data illustrate the utility of computational methods for the rational design of new catalysts. On oxidic nanoparticles such as silica and apatites, it is revealed how changes in pH lead to similarity scores of attracted peptides lower than 20%, supported by appropriate model surfaces and data from adsorption isotherms. The results demonstrate how new computational methods can support the design of nanoparticle carriers for drug release and the understanding of calcification mechanisms in the human body.

  20. Discovery of a novel insulin-like peptide and insulin binding proteins in the Eastern rock lobster Sagmariasus verreauxi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Jennifer C; Aizen, Joseph; Elizur, Abigail; Hollander-Cohen, Lian; Battaglene, Stephen C; Ventura, Tomer

    2015-05-01

    This study reports, for the first time in any of the commercially important decapod species, the identification of an insulin-like peptide (ILP), distinct from the androgenic gland hormone. Bioinformatics analysis of the de novo assembled spiny lobster, (Sagmariasus verreauxi) transcriptome, allowed identification of Sv-ILP1 as well as eight binding proteins. Binding proteins were termed as Sv-IGFBP, due to homology with the vertebrate insulin-like growth-factor binding protein and Sv-SIBD1-7, single insulin-binding domain protein (SIBD), similar to those identified in other invertebrate species. Sv-ILP1 was found to be expressed in the eyestalk, gonads and antennal gland of both sexes and to a lesser extent in male muscle, androgenic gland and hepatopancreas. The expression profiles of each binding protein were found to vary across tissues, with Sv-SIBD5, 6 and 7 showing higher expression in the gonad, demonstrated by PCR and digital gene expression. Further spatial investigations, using in-situ hybridisation, found Sv-ILP1 to be expressed in the neurosecretory cells of the thoracic ganglia, in keeping with the tissue expression of Drosophila ILP7 (DILP7). This correlative tissue expression, considered with the phylogenetic clustering of Sv-ILP1 and DILP7, suggests Sv-ILP1 to be a DILP7 orthologue. The broad expression of Sv-ILP1 strongly suggests that ILPs have a role beyond that of masculinisation in decapods. The function of these novel peptides may have application in enhancing aquaculture practices in the commercially important decapod species. PMID:25218129

  1. Comparison of Functional Protein Transduction Domains Using the NEMO Binding Domain Peptide

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Robbins; Khaleel Khaja

    2010-01-01

    Protein transduction domains (PTDs), both naturally occurring and synthetic, have been extensively utilized for intracellular delivery of biologically active molecules both in vitro and in vivo. However, most comparisons of transduction efficiency have been performed using fluorescent markers. To compare efficiency of functional protein transduction, a peptide derived from IkB kinase ß (IKKß) that prevents formation of an active IKK complex was used as a biologically active cargo. This peptid...

  2. Demonstration of a non-Tac peptide that binds interleukin 2: a potential participant in a multichain interleukin 2 receptor complex.

    OpenAIRE

    Tsudo, M; Kozak, R W; Goldman, C K; Waldmann, T. A.

    1986-01-01

    The interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptor system plays a key role in the T-cell immune response. Although IL-2 binding was reported to be restricted to the Tac peptide, we have identified an IL-2 binding peptide that does not react with anti-human IL-2 receptor monoclonal antibodies, including anti-Tac on MLA 144, a gibbon ape T-cell line. The MLA 144 cell line expressed 6800 IL-2 binding sites per cell with a low (Kd = 14 nM) affinity for human recombinant IL-2. Using cross-linking methodology, we d...

  3. Binding stability of peptides derived from 1ALA residue and 7GLY residues to sites near active center of fluctuating papain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiko

    2012-05-01

    We investigated the binding stability of peptides derived from 1ALA residue and 7GLY residues to sites near active center of fluctuating papain via molecular dynamics and docking simulations. Replacing GLY residue in 8GLY with ALA residue had a positive effect on binding stability to the sites in some cases although the replacing had a negative effect on it in other cases. Furthermore the replacing had a negative effect on the chance of binding to the sites. Residue in peptide should be replaced on the basis of systematic exploration of its position.

  4. KIR polymorphisms modulate peptide-dependent binding to an MHC class I ligand with a Bw6 motif.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud D Colantonio

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular interactions between killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs and their MHC class I ligands play a central role in the regulation of natural killer (NK cell responses to viral pathogens and tumors. Here we identify Mamu-A1*00201 (Mamu-A*02, a common MHC class I molecule in the rhesus macaque with a canonical Bw6 motif, as a ligand for Mamu-KIR3DL05. Mamu-A1*00201 tetramers folded with certain SIV peptides, but not others, directly stained primary NK cells and Jurkat cells expressing multiple allotypes of Mamu-KIR3DL05. Differences in binding avidity were associated with polymorphisms in the D0 and D1 domains of Mamu-KIR3DL05, whereas differences in peptide-selectivity mapped to the D1 domain. The reciprocal exchange of the third predicted MHC class I-contact loop of the D1 domain switched the specificity of two Mamu-KIR3DL05 allotypes for different Mamu-A1*00201-peptide complexes. Consistent with the function of an inhibitory KIR, incubation of lymphocytes from Mamu-KIR3DL05(+ macaques with target cells expressing Mamu-A1*00201 suppressed the degranulation of tetramer-positive NK cells. These observations reveal a previously unappreciated role for D1 polymorphisms in determining the selectivity of KIRs for MHC class I-bound peptides, and identify the first functional KIR-MHC class I interaction in the rhesus macaque. The modulation of KIR-MHC class I interactions by viral peptides has important implications to pathogenesis, since it suggests that the immunodeficiency viruses, and potentially other types of viruses and tumors, may acquire changes in epitopes that increase the affinity of certain MHC class I ligands for inhibitory KIRs to prevent the activation of specific NK cell subsets.

  5. Autoradiographic localization of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) binding sites in human and guinea pig lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    125I-Human calcitonin gene-related peptide (hCGRP) binding sites were localized in human and guinea pig lungs by an autoradiographic method. Scatchard analysis of saturation experiments from slide-mounted sections of guinea pig lung displayed specific 125I-hCGRP binding sites with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 0.72 +/- 0.05 nM (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 3) and a maximal number of binding sites (Bmax) of 133.4 +/- 5.6 fmol/mg protein. In both human and guinea pig lung, autoradiography revealed that CGRP binding sites were widely distributed, with particularly dense labeling over bronchial and pulmonary blood vessels of all sizes and alveolar walls. Airway smooth muscle and epithelium of large airways was sparsely labeled but no labeling was found over submucosal glands. This localization corresponds well to the reported pattern of CGRP-like immunoreactive innervation. The findings of localization of CGRP binding sites on bronchial and pulmonary blood vessels indicate that CGRP may be important in the regulation of airway and pulmonary blood flow

  6. Strains of Actinomyces naeslundii and Actinomyces viscosus Exhibit Structurally Variant Fimbrial Subunit Proteins and Bind to Different Peptide Motifs in Salivary Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Tong; Johansson, Ingegerd; Hay, Donald I.; Strömberg, Nicklas

    1999-01-01

    Oral strains of Actinomyces spp. express type 1 fimbriae, which are composed of major FimP subunits, and bind preferentially to salivary acidic proline-rich proteins (APRPs) or to statherin. We have mapped genetic differences in the fimP subunit genes and the peptide recognition motifs within the host proteins associated with these differential binding specificities. The fimP genes were amplified by PCR from Actinomyces viscosus ATCC 19246, with preferential binding to statherin, and from Act...

  7. The Peptide Vaccine Combined with Prior Immunization of a Conventional Diphtheria-Tetanus Toxoid Vaccine Induced Amyloid β Binding Antibodies on Cynomolgus Monkeys and Guinea Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Yano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of brain amyloid beta (Aβ peptides by anti-Aβ antibodies is one of the possible therapies for Alzheimer’s disease. We previously reported that the Aβ peptide vaccine including the T-cell epitope of diphtheria-tetanus combined toxoid (DT induced anti-Aβ antibodies, and the prior immunization with conventional DT vaccine enhanced the immunogenicity of the peptide. Cynomolgus monkeys were given the peptide vaccine subcutaneously in combination with the prior DT vaccination. Vaccination with a similar regimen was also performed on guinea pigs. The peptide vaccine induced anti-Aβ antibodies in cynomolgus monkeys and guinea pigs without chemical adjuvants, and excessive immune responses were not observed. Those antibodies could preferentially recognize Aβ40, and Aβ42 compared to Aβ fibrils. The levels of serum anti-Aβ antibodies and plasma Aβ peptides increased in both animals and decreased the brain Aβ40 level of guinea pigs. The peptide vaccine could induce a similar binding profile of anti-Aβ antibodies in cynomolgus monkeys and guinea pigs. The peptide vaccination could be expected to reduce the brain Aβ peptides and their toxic effects via clearance of Aβ peptides by generated antibodies.

  8. Carbohydrate-Binding Non-Peptidic Pradimicins for the Treatment of Acute Sleeping Sickness in Murine Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Acosta, Víctor M.; Ruiz-Pérez, Luis M.; Reichardt, Niels C.; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Liekens, Sandra; Balzarini, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Current treatments available for African sleeping sickness or human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) are limited, with poor efficacy and unacceptable safety profiles. Here, we report a new approach to address treatment of this disease based on the use of compounds that bind to parasite surface glycans leading to rapid killing of trypanosomes. Pradimicin and its derivatives are non-peptidic carbohydrate-binding agents that adhere to the carbohydrate moiety of the parasite surface glycoproteins inducing parasite lysis in vitro. Notably, pradimicin S has good pharmaceutical properties and enables cure of an acute form of the disease in mice. By inducing resistance in vitro we have established that the composition of the sugars attached to the variant surface glycoproteins are critical to the mode of action of pradimicins and play an important role in infectivity. The compounds identified represent a novel approach to develop drugs to treat HAT. PMID:27662652

  9. Prion Fragment Peptides Are Digested with Membrane Type Matrix Metalloproteinases and Acquire Enzyme Resistance through Cu2+-Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Kojima

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Prions are the cause of neurodegenerative disease in humans and other mammals. The structural conversion of the prion protein (PrP from a normal cellular protein (PrPC to a protease-resistant isoform (PrPSc is thought to relate to Cu2+ binding to histidine residues. In this study, we focused on the membrane-type matrix metalloproteinases (MT-MMPs such as MT1-MMP and MT3-MMP, which are expressed in the brain as PrPC-degrading proteases. We synthesized 21 prion fragment peptides. Each purified peptide was individually incubated with recombinant MT1-MMP or MT3-MMP in the presence or absence of Cu2+ and the cleavage sites determined by LC-ESI-MS analysis. Recombinant MMP-7 and human serum (HS were also tested as control. hPrP61-90, from the octapeptide-repeat region, was cleaved by HS but not by the MMPs tested here. On the other hand, hPrP92-168 from the central region was cleaved by MT1-MMP and MT3-MMP at various sites. These cleavages were inhibited by treatment with Cu2+. The C-terminal peptides had higher resistance than the central region. The data obtained from this study suggest that MT-MMPs expressed in the brain might possess PrPC-degrading activity.

  10. Peptide pool immunization and CD8+ T cell reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Susanne B; Harndahl, Mikkel N; Buus, Anette Stryhn;

    2013-01-01

    Mice were immunized twice with a pool of five peptides selected among twenty 8-9-mer peptides for their ability to form stable complexes at 37°C with recombinant H-2K(b) (half-lives 10-15h). Vaccine-induced immunity of splenic CD8(+) T cells was studied in a 24h IFNγ Elispot assay. Surprisingly......, IFNγ spot-formation was observed without addition of peptide to the assay culture at 3 weeks and 3 months after immunization. To clarify if IFNγ spot formation in the absence of peptide exposure ex vivo is caused by the peptide-pool per se, mice were immunized with single peptides. Three of the five...

  11. 4-(2-aminooxyethoxy)-2-(ethylureido)quinoline-oligonucleotide conjugates: synthesis, binding interactions, and derivatization with peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamma, Tomoko; Miller, Paul S

    2003-01-01

    Oligo-2'-O-methylribonucleotides conjugated with 4-(2-aminooxyethoxy)-2-(ethylureido)quinoline (AOQ) and 4-ethoxy-2-(ethylureido)quinoline (EOQ) were prepared by reaction of the AOQ or EOQ phosphoramidite with the protected oligonucleotide on a controlled pore glass support. Deprotection with ethylenediamine enabled successful isolation and purification of the highly reactive AOQ-conjugated oligomer. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis mobility shift experiments showed that the dissociation constants of complexes formed between an AOQ- or EOQ-conjugated 8-mer and complementary RNA or 2'-O-methyl-RNA targets (9- and 10-mers) were in the low nM concentration range at 37 degrees C, whereas no binding was observed for the corresponding nonconjugated oligomer, even at a concentration of 500 nM. Fluorescence studies suggested that this enhanced affinity is most likely due to the ability of the quinoline ring of the AOQ or EOQ group to stack on the last base pair formed between the oligomer and target, thus stabilizing the duplex. The binding affinity of a 2'-O-methyl RNA 15-mer, which contained an alternating methylphosphonate/phosphodiester backbone, for a 59-nucleotide stem-loop HIV TAR RNA target, increased 2.3 times as a consequence of conjugation with EOQ. The aminooxy group of AOQ-conjugated oligomers is a highly reactive nucleophile, which reacts readily with aldehydes and ketones to form stable oxime derivatives. This feature was used to couple an AOQ-oligomer with leupeptin, a tripeptide that contains a C-terminus aldehyde group. A simple method was developed to introduce a ketone functionality into peptides that contain a cysteine residue by reacting the peptide with bromoacetone. The resulting keto-peptide was then coupled to the AOQ-oligomer. This procedure was used to prepare oligonucleotide conjugates of a tetrapeptide, RGDC, and a derivative of HIV tat peptide having a C-terminus cysteine. The combination of the unique reactivity of the aminooxy group and

  12. Trapping conformational states along ligand-binding dynamics of peptide deformylase: the impact of induced fit on enzyme catalysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Fieulaine

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available For several decades, molecular recognition has been considered one of the most fundamental processes in biochemistry. For enzymes, substrate binding is often coupled to conformational changes that alter the local environment of the active site to align the reactive groups for efficient catalysis and to reach the transition state. Adaptive substrate recognition is a well-known concept; however, it has been poorly characterized at a structural level because of its dynamic nature. Here, we provide a detailed mechanism for an induced-fit process at atomic resolution. We take advantage of a slow, tight binding inhibitor-enzyme system, actinonin-peptide deformylase. Crystal structures of the initial open state and final closed state were solved, as well as those of several intermediate mimics captured during the process. Ligand-induced reshaping of a hydrophobic pocket drives closure of the active site, which is finally "zipped up" by additional binding interactions. Together with biochemical analyses, these data allow a coherent reconstruction of the sequence of events leading from the encounter complex to the key-lock binding state of the enzyme. A "movie" that reconstructs this entire process can be further extrapolated to catalysis.

  13. Computational study of drug binding to the membrane-bound tetrameric M2 peptide bundle from influenza A virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Ekta; Devane, Russell H; Dal Peraro, Matteo; Klein, Michael L

    2011-02-01

    The M2 protein of influenza A virus performs the crucial function of transporting protons to the interior of virions enclosed in the endosome. Adamantane drugs, amantadine (AMN) and rimantidine (RMN), block the proton conduction in some strains, and have been used for the treatment and prophylaxis of influenza A infections. The structures of the transmembrane (TM) region of M2 that have been solved in micelles using NMR (residues 23-60) (Schnell and Chou, 2008) and by X-ray crystallography (residues 22-46) (Stouffer et al., 2008) suggest different drug binding sites: external and internal for RMN and AMN, respectively. We have used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the nature of the binding site and binding mode of adamantane drugs on the membrane-bound tetrameric M2-TM peptide bundles using as initial conformations the low-pH AMN-bound crystal structure, a high-pH model derived from the drug-free crystal structure, and the high-pH NMR structure. The MD simulations indicate that under both low- and high-pH conditions, AMN is stable inside the tetrameric bundle, spanning the region between residues Val27 to Gly34. At low pH the polar group of AMN is oriented toward the His37 gate, while under high-pH conditions its orientation exhibits large fluctuations. The present MD simulations also suggest that AMN and RMN molecules do not show strong affinity to the external binding sites.

  14. Solution structure of the 45-residue MgATP-binding peptide of adenylate kinase as examined by 2-D NMR, FTIR, and CD spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, D C; Byler, D M; Susi, H; Brown, E M; Kuby, S A; Mildvan, A S

    1988-05-17

    The structure of a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 1-45 of rabbit muscle adenylate kinase has been studied in aqueous solution by two-dimensional NMR, FTIR, and CD spectroscopy. This peptide, which binds MgATP and is believed to represent most of the MgATP-binding site of the enzyme [Fry, D.C., Kuby, S.A., & Mildvan, A.S. (1985) Biochemistry 24, 4680-4694], appears to maintain a conformation similar to that of residues 1-45 in the X-ray structure of intact porcine adenylate kinase [Sachsenheimer, W., & Schulz, G.E. (1977) J. Mol. Biol. 114, 23-26], with 42% of the residues of the peptide showing NOEs indicative of phi and psi angles corresponding to those found in the protein. The NMR studies suggest that the peptide is composed of two helical regions of residues 4-7 and 23-29, and three stretches of beta-strand at residues 8-15, 30-32, and 35-40, yielding an overall secondary structure consisting of 24% alpha-helix, 38% beta-structure, and 38% aperiodic. Although the resolution-enhanced amide I band of the peptide FTIR spectrum is broad and rather featureless, possibly due to disorder, it can be fit by using methods developed on well-characterized globular proteins. On this basis, the peptide consists of 35 +/- 10% beta-structure, 60 +/- 12% turns and aperiodic structure, and not more than 10% alpha-helix. The CD spectrum is best fit by assuming the presence of at most 13% alpha-helix in the peptide, 24 +/- 2% beta-structure, and 66 +/- 4% aperiodic. The inability of the high-frequency FTIR and CD methods to detect helices in the amount found by NMR may result from the short helical lengths as well as from static and dynamic disorder in the peptide. Upon binding of MgATP, numerous conformational changes in the backbone of the peptide are detected by NMR, with smaller alterations in the overall secondary structure as assessed by CD. Detailed assignments of resonances in the peptide spectrum and intermolecular NOEs between protons of bound MgATP and

  15. Inhibition of human papillomavirus DNA replication by an E1-derived p80/UAF1-binding peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehoux, Michaël; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Lussier-Price, Mathieu; Omichinski, James G; Archambault, Jacques

    2012-04-01

    The papillomavirus E1 helicase is recruited by E2 to the viral origin, where it assembles into a double hexamer that orchestrates replication of the viral genome. We previously identified the cellular WD40 repeat-containing protein p80/UAF1 as a novel interaction partner of E1 from anogenital human papillomavirus (HPV) types. p80 was found to interact with the first 40 residues of HPV type 31 (HPV31) E1, and amino acid substitutions within this domain abrogated the maintenance of the viral episome in keratinocytes. In this study, we report that these p80-binding substitutions reduce by 70% the ability of E1 to support transient viral DNA replication without affecting its interaction with E2 and assembly at the origin in vivo. Microscopy studies revealed that p80 is relocalized from the cytoplasm to discrete subnuclear foci by E1 and E2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further revealed that p80 is recruited to the viral origin in an E1- and E2-dependent manner. Interestingly, overexpression of a 40-amino-acid-long p80-binding peptide, derived from HPV31 E1, was found to inhibit viral DNA replication by preventing the recruitment of endogenous p80 to the origin. Mutant peptides defective for p80 interaction were not inhibitory, demonstrating the specificity of this effect. Characterization of this E1 peptide by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) showed that it is intrinsically disordered in solution, while mapping studies indicated that the WD repeats of p80 are required for E1 interaction. These results provide additional evidence for the requirement for p80 in anogenital HPV DNA replication and highlight the potential of E1-p80 interaction as a novel antiviral target.

  16. Characterization of Protein and Peptide Binding to Nanogels Formed by Differently Charged Chitosan Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Zubareva

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan (Chi is a natural biodegradable cationic polymer with remarkable potency as a vehicle for drug or vaccine delivery. Chi possesses multiple groups, which can be used both for Chi derivatization and for particle formation. The aim of this work was to produce stable nanosized range Chi gels (nanogels, NGs with different charge and to study the driving forces of complex formation between Chi NGs and proteins or peptides. Positively charged NGs of 150 nm in diameter were prepared from hexanoyl chitosan (HC by the ionotropic gelation method while negatively charged NGs of 190 nm were obtained from succinoyl Chi (SC by a Ca2+ coacervation approach. NGs were loaded with a panel of proteins or peptides with different weights and charges. We show that NGs preferentially formed complexes with oppositely charged molecules, especially peptides, as was demonstrated by gel-electrophoresis, confocal microscopy and HPLC. Complex formation was accompanied by a change in zeta-potential and decrease in size. We concluded that complex formation between Chi NGs and peptide/proteins is mediated mostly by electrostatic interactions.

  17. PEGylated nanoparticles bind to and alter amyloid-beta peptide conformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brambilla, Davide; Verpillot, Romain; Le Droumaguet, Benjamin;

    2012-01-01

    We have demonstrated that the polyethylene glycol (PEG) corona of long-circulating polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) favors interaction with the amyloid-beta (Aß(1-42)) peptide both in solution and in serum. The influence of PEGylation of poly(alkyl cyanoacrylate) and poly(lactic acid) NPs...

  18. Computational Exploration of a Protein Receptor Binding Space with Student Proposed Peptide Ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Matthew D.; Phillips, Paul; Turner, Matthew W.; Katz, Michael; Lew, Sarah; Bradburn, Sarah; Andersen, Tim; McDougal, Owen M.

    2016-01-01

    Computational molecular docking is a fast and effective "in silico" method for the analysis of binding between a protein receptor model and a ligand. The visualization and manipulation of protein to ligand binding in three-dimensional space represents a powerful tool in the biochemistry curriculum to enhance student learning. The…

  19. NMR characterization of the DNA binding properties of a novel Hoechst 33258 analogue peptide building block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunkenborg, Jakob; Behrens, Carsten; Jacobsen, Jens Peter

    2002-01-01

    ')(2). Chemical shift footprinting shows that the ligand binds at the center of the A(3)T(3) sequence but at the 3'-end of A(5). A large number of NOEs show a well-defined complex with the ligand situated at the center of the palindromic A(3)T(3) but with the asymmetric A(5) the ligand binds with an orientational...

  20. Peptides derived from HIV-1 integrase that bind Rev stimulate viral genome integration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aviad Levin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 integrase protein (IN, catalyzes the integration of viral DNA into the host cell genome. IN catalyzes the first step of the integration process, namely the 3'-end processing in which IN removes a pGT dinucleotide from the 3' end of each viral long terminal repeat (LTR. Following nuclear import of the viral preintegration complex, the host chromosomal DNA becomes accessible to the viral cDNA and the second step of the integration process, namely the strand-transfer step takes place. This ordered sequence of events, centered on integration, is mandatory for HIV replication. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using an integrase peptide library, we selected two peptides, designated INr-1 and INr-2, which interact with the Rev protein and probably mediate the Rev-integrase interaction. Using an in-vitro assay system, we show that INr-1 and INr-2 are able to abrogate the inhibitory effects exerted by Rev and Rev-derived peptides on integrase activity. Both INr-1 and INr-2 were found to be cell-permeable and nontoxic, allowing a study of their effect in HIV-1-infected cultured cells. Interestingly, both INr peptides stimulated virus infectivity as estimated by production of the viral P24 protein, as well as by determination of the appearance of newly formed virus particles. Furthermore, kinetics studies revealed that the cell-permeable INr peptides enhance the integration process, as was indeed confirmed by direct determination of viral DNA integration by real-time PCR. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results of the present study raise the possibility that in HIV-infected cells, the Rev protein may be involved in the integration of proviral DNA by controlling/regulating the activity of the integrase. Release from such inhibition leads to stimulation of IN activity and multiple viral DNA integration events.

  1. A computational docking study on the pH dependence of peptide binding to HLA-B27 sub-types differentially associated with ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serçinoğlu, Onur; Özcan, Gülin; Kabaş, Zeynep Kutlu; Ozbek, Pemra

    2016-07-01

    A single amino acid difference (Asp116His), having a key role in a pathogenesis pathway, distinguishes HLA-B*27:05 and HLA-B*27:09 sub-types as associated and non-associated with ankylosing spondylitis, respectively. In this study, molecular docking simulations were carried out with the aim of comprehending the differences in the binding behavior of both alleles at varying pH conditions. A library of modeled peptides was formed upon single point mutations aiming to address the effect of 20 naturally occurring amino acids at the binding core peptide positions. For both alleles, computational docking was applied using Autodock 4.2. Obtained free energies of binding (FEB) were compared within the peptide library and between the alleles at varying pH conditions. The amino acid preferences of each position were studied enlightening the role of each on binding. The preferred amino acids for each position of pVIPR were found to be harmonious with experimental studies. Our results indicate that, as the pH is lowered, the capacity of HLA-B*27:05 to bind peptides in the library is largely lost. Hydrogen bonding analysis suggests that the interaction between the main anchor positions of pVIPR and their respective binding pocket residues are affected from the pH the most, causing an overall shift in the FEB profiles. PMID:27506766

  2. The comparison of BLyS-binding peptides from phage display library and computer-aided design on BLyS-TACI interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yacong; Hao, Xiafei; Feng, Jiannan; Shen, Beifen; Wei, Jing; Sun, Jian

    2015-02-01

    BLyS antagonists have become the therapeutic reagents in the treatment of autoimmune disorders. BLyS binding peptides and their Fc fusion proteins may be alternative BLyS antagonists in such application. In this study, the activity of BLyS binding peptide 814 obtained from phage display library and peptide TA designed by computer-aided modeling on the interaction of BLyS-TACI was compared. In addition, to maintain the spatial conformation and stability of the peptides, human IgG1 Fc fragment was fused to peptides 814 and TA to form peptide-Fc fusion proteins, steady and innovative peptibodies. The prokaryotic expression plasmids pET30a-814-Fc and pET30a-TA-Fc for these peptibodies were acquired by genetic engineering, and confirmed by DNA sequencing. After the right plasmids were transformed into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), the fusion proteins were expressed and purified by protein A affinity column. As a result of competitive ELISA, peptides 814 and TA at 100μg/ml displayed 52.2% and 28.6% inhibition on the interaction of TACI-Fc with BLyS respectively. Moreover, 814-Fc and TA-Fc fusion proteins could bind to BLyS in a dosage-dependent manner as TACI-Fc did, and displayed 54.7% and 26.1% inhibition on the interaction of TACI-Fc-Myc with BLyS at 100μg/ml respectively. So 814-Fc and TA-Fc proteins had the similar bioactivity as the peptides did. Furthermore, compared with TA-Fc, 814-Fc showed two-fold inhibition effect on BLyS binding to TACI, suggesting that 814-Fc could inhibit BLyS bioactivity significantly and might serve as a potential antagonist to treat autoimmune diseases associated with BLyS overexpression.

  3. In silico peptide-binding predictions of passerine MHC class I reveal similarities across distantly related species, suggesting convergence on the level of protein function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Follin, Elna; Karlsson, Maria; Lundegaard, Claus;

    2013-01-01

    compared to most mammals. To elucidate the reason for this large number of genes, we compared 14 MHC class I alleles (α1–α3 domains), from great reed warbler, house sparrow and tree sparrow, via phylogenetic analysis, homology modelling and in silico peptide-binding predictions to investigate...... is of functional significance. The MHC class I allomorphs from house sparrow and tree sparrow, species that diverged 10 million years ago (MYA), had overlapping peptide-binding specificities, and these similarities across species were also confirmed in phylogenetic analyses based on amino acid sequences. Notably......, there were also overlapping peptide-binding specificities in the allomorphs from house sparrow and great reed warbler, although these species diverged 30 MYA. This overlap was not found in a tree based on amino acid sequences. Our interpretation is that convergent evolution on the level of the protein...

  4. A synthetic peptide with the putative iron binding motif of amyloid precursor protein (APP does not catalytically oxidize iron.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kourosh Honarmand Ebrahimi

    Full Text Available The β-amyloid precursor protein (APP, which is a key player in Alzheimer's disease, was recently reported to possess an Fe(II binding site within its E2 domain which exhibits ferroxidase activity [Duce et al. 2010, Cell 142: 857]. The putative ligands of this site were compared to those in the ferroxidase site of ferritin. The activity was indirectly measured using transferrin, which scavenges the Fe(III product of the reaction. A 22-residue synthetic peptide, named FD1, with the putative ferroxidase site of APP, and the E2 domain of APP were each reported to exhibit 40% of the ferroxidase activity of APP and of ceruloplasmin. It was also claimed that the ferroxidase activity of APP is inhibited by Zn(II just as in ferritin. We measured the ferroxidase activity indirectly (i by the incorporation of the Fe(III product of the ferroxidase reaction into transferrin and directly (ii by monitoring consumption of the substrate molecular oxygen. The results with the FD1 peptide were compared to the established ferroxidase activities of human H-chain ferritin and of ceruloplasmin. For FD1 we observed no activity above the background of non-enzymatic Fe(II oxidation by molecular oxygen. Zn(II binds to transferrin and diminishes its Fe(III incorporation capacity and rate but it does not specifically bind to a putative ferroxidase site of FD1. Based on these results, and on comparison of the putative ligands of the ferroxidase site of APP with those of ferritin, we conclude that the previously reported results for ferroxidase activity of FD1 and - by implication - of APP should be re-evaluated.

  5. NetMHCpan, a method for quantitative predictions of peptide binding to any HLA-A and -B locus protein of known sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Lundegaard, Claus; Blicher, Thomas;

    2007-01-01

    surpassed 1500. Characterizing the specificity of each separately would be a major undertaking. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we have drawn on a large database of known peptide-HLA-I interactions to develop a bioinformatics method, which takes both peptide and HLA sequence information into account, and...... generates quantitative predictions of the affinity of any peptide-HLA-I interaction. Prospective experimental validation of peptides predicted to bind to previously untested HLA-I molecules, cross-validation, and retrospective prediction of known HIV immune epitopes and endogenous presented peptides, all...... provide new basic insights into HLA structure-function relationships. The method is available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetMHCpan....

  6. Conformational states of syntaxin-1 govern the necessity of N-peptide binding in exocytosis of PC12 cells and Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seungmee; Bin, Na-Ryum; Michael Rajah, Maaran; Kim, Byungjin; Chou, Ting-Chieh; Kang, Soo-Young Ann; Sugita, Kyoko; Parsaud, Leon; Smith, Matthew; Monnier, Philippe P; Ikura, Mitsuhiko; Zhen, Mei; Sugita, Shuzo

    2016-02-15

    Syntaxin-1 is the central SNARE protein for neuronal exocytosis. It interacts with Munc18-1 through its cytoplasmic domains, including the N-terminal peptide (N-peptide). Here we examine the role of the N-peptide binding in two conformational states ("closed" vs. "open") of syntaxin-1 using PC12 cells and Caenorhabditis elegans. We show that expression of "closed" syntaxin-1A carrying N-terminal single point mutations (D3R, L8A) that perturb interaction with the hydrophobic pocket of Munc18-1 rescues impaired secretion in syntaxin-1-depleted PC12 cells and the lethality and lethargy of unc-64 (C. elegans orthologue of syntaxin-1)-null mutants. Conversely, expression of the "open" syntaxin-1A harboring the same mutations fails to rescue the impairments. Biochemically, the L8A mutation alone slightly weakens the binding between "closed" syntaxin-1A and Munc18-1, whereas the same mutation in the "open" syntaxin-1A disrupts it. Our results reveal a striking interplay between the syntaxin-1 N-peptide and the conformational state of the protein. We propose that the N-peptide plays a critical role in intracellular trafficking of syntaxin-1, which is dependent on the conformational state of this protein. Surprisingly, however, the N-peptide binding mode seems dispensable for SNARE-mediated exocytosis per se, as long as the protein is trafficked to the plasma membrane.

  7. Enhanced peptide nucleic acid binding to supercoiled DNA: possible implications for DNA "breathing" dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentin, T; Nielsen, Peter E.

    1996-01-01

    efficient with supercoiled than with linear DNA. In the presence of 140 mM KCI, the PNA binding rate was reduced but, notably, highly dependent on template topology. Negative supercoiling (mean superhelix density, sigma approximately -0.051) increased the rate of binding by 2 orders of magnitude compared...... to that of relaxed DNA. The pseudo-first-order rate constant [k psi (sigma)] obeys an exponential function, k psi (sigma) = k psi (lin)e-sigma delta, where delta is a constant of 105 and k psi lin is the rate of PNA binding to linear DNA (sigma = 0). The activation energy [Ea(sigma)] was determined as approximately...... 93 and approximately 48 kJ mol-1 for PNA binding to linear and supercoiled DNA, respectively. The results are discussed in relation to the possible future use of PNA as an antigene agent and in the framework of DNA "breathing" dynamics....

  8. Immunohistochemical localization of the calcitonin gene-related peptide binding site in the primate trigeminovascular system using functional antagonist antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Silke; Liu, Hantao; Warfvinge, Karin; Shi, Licheng; Dovlatyan, Mary; Xu, Cen; Edvinsson, Lars

    2016-07-22

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a potent vasodilator and a neuromodulator implicated in the pathophysiology of migraine. It binds to the extracellular domains of calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) and receptor activity-modifying protein (RAMP) 1 that together form the CGRP receptor. Antagonist antibodies against CGRP and its binding site at the receptor are clinically effective in preventing migraine attacks. The blood-brain barrier penetration of these antagonist antibodies is limited, suggesting that a potential peripheral site of action is sufficient to prevent migraine attacks. To further understand the sites of CGRP-mediated signaling in migraine, we used immunohistochemical staining with recently developed antagonist antibodies specifically recognizing a fusion protein of the extracellular domains of RAMP1 and CLR that comprise the CGRP binding pocket at the CGRP receptor in monkey and man. We confirmed binding of the antagonist antibodies to human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) of dural meningeal arteries and neurons in the trigeminal ganglion, both of which are likely sites of action for therapeutic antibodies in migraine patients. We further used one of these antibodies for detailed mapping on cynomolgus monkey tissue and found antagonist antibody binding sites at multiple levels in the trigeminovascular system: in the dura mater VSMCs, in neurons and satellite glial cells in the trigeminal ganglion, and in neurons in the spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis. These data reinforce and clarify our understanding of CGRP receptor localization in a pattern consistent with a role for CGRP receptors in trigeminal sensitization and migraine pathology. PMID:27155150

  9. Plasticity in the contribution of T cell receptor variable region residues to binding of peptide-HLA-A2 complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sheena N.; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Piepenbrink, Kurt H.; Blevins, Sydney J.; Bernhard, Helga; Uckert, Wolfgang; Baker, Brian M.; Kranz, David M.

    2013-01-01

    One hypothesis to account for MHC-restriction by T cell receptors (TCRs) holds that there are several evolutionary-conserved residues in TCR variable regions that contact MHC. While this ‘germline-codon’ hypothesis is supported by various lines of evidence, it has been difficult to test. The difficulty stems in part from the fact that TCRs exhibit low affinities for pep/MHC, thus limiting the range of binding energies that can be assigned to these key interactions using mutational analyses. To measure the magnitude of binding energies involved, here we used high-affinity TCRs engineered by mutagenesis of CDR3. The TCRs included a high-affinity, MART-1/HLA-A2-specific single-chain TCR and two other high-affinity TCRs that all contain the same Vα (HLA-A2), with different peptides and Vβ regions. Mutational analysis of residues in CDR1 and CDR2 of the three Vα2 regions showed the importance of the key ‘germline codon” residue Y51. However, two other proposed key residues showed significant differences among the TCRs in their relative contributions to binding. Using single-position, yeast-display libraries in two of the key residues, MART-1/HLA-A2 selections also revealed strong preferences for wild-type ‘germline codon’ residues, but several alternative residues could also accommodate binding and hence, MHC-restriction. Thus, although a single residue (Y51) could account for a proportion of the energy associated with positive selection (i.e. MHC-restriction), there is significant plasticity in requirements for particular side-chains in CDR1 and CDR2 and in their relative binding contributions among different TCRs. PMID:23954306

  10. SR-A and SREC-I binding peptides increase HDAd-mediated liver transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccolo, Pasquale; Annunziata, Patrizia; Mithbaokar, Pratibha; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd) vectors can mediate long-term, high-level transgene expression from transduced hepatocytes without inducing chronic toxicity. However, vector therapeutic index is narrow because of a toxic acute response with potentially lethal consequences elicited by high vector doses. Kupffer cells and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) are major barriers to efficient hepatocyte transduction. We investigated two small peptides (PP1 and PP2) developed by phage display to block scavenger receptor type A (SR-A) and scavenger receptor expressed on endothelial cells type I (SREC-I) respectively, for enhancement of HDAd-mediated hepatocyte transduction efficiency. Pre-incubation of J774A.1 macrophages with either PP1 or PP2 prior to HDAd infection significantly reduced viral vector uptake. In vivo, fluorochrome-conjugated PP1 and PP2 injected intravenously into mice co-localized with both CD68 and CD31 on Kupffer cells and LSECs, respectively. Compared to saline pre-treated animals, intravenous injections of both peptides prior to the injection of an HDAd resulted in up to 3.7- and 2.9-fold increase of hepatic transgene expression with PP1 and PP2, respectively. In addition to hepatocyte transduction, compared to control saline injected mice, pre-treatment with either peptide resulted in no increased levels of serum interleukin-6 (IL-6), the major marker of adenoviral vector acute toxicity. In summary, we developed small peptides that significantly increase hepatocyte transduction efficacy and improve HDAd therapeutic index with potential for clinical applications. PMID:25119377

  11. Structural Studies of a Lipid-Binding Peptide from Tunicate Hemocytes with Anti-Biofilm Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Osmar N.; Alves, Eliane S. F.; César de la Fuente-Núñez; Ribeiro, Suzana M.; Mandal, Santi M.; Diana Gaspar; Veiga, Ana S.; Miguel A R B Castanho; Andrade, Cesar A. S.; Nascimento, Jessica M.; Fensterseifer, Isabel C. M.; Porto, William F.; Jose R. Correa; Robert E W Hancock; Suresh Korpole

    2016-01-01

    Clavanins is a class of peptides (23aa) histidine-rich, free of post-translational modifications. Clavanins have been studied largely for their ability to disrupt bacterial membranes. In the present study, the interaction of clavanin A with membranes was assessed by dynamic light scattering, zeta potential and permeabilization assays. We observed through those assays that clavanin A lysis bacterial cells at concentrations corresponding to its MIC. Further, the structure and function of clavan...

  12. Bacterial cell-cell communication in the host via RRNPP peptide-binding regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David ePerez-Pascual

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Human microbiomes are composed of complex and dense bacterial consortia. In these environments, bacteria are able to react quickly to change by coordinating their gene expression at the population level via small signaling molecules. In Gram-positive bacteria, cell-cell communication is mostly mediated by peptides that are released into the extracellular environment. Cell-cell communication based on these peptides is especially widespread in the group Firmicutes, in which they regulate a wide array of biological processes, including functions related to host-microbe interactions. Among the different agents of communication, the RRNPP family of cytoplasmic transcriptional regulators, together with their cognate re-internalized signaling peptides, represents a group of emerging importance. RRNPP members that have been studied so far are found mainly in species of bacilli, streptococci, and enterococci. These bacteria are characterized as both human commensal and pathogenic, and share different niches in the human body with other microorganisms. The goal of this mini-review is to present the current state of research on the biological relevance of RRNPP mechanisms in the context of the host, highlighting their specific roles in commensalism or virulence.

  13. Artificial 64-Residue HIV-1 Enhancer-Binding Peptide Is a Potent Inhibitor of Viral Replication in HIV-1-Infected Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mouhssin Oufir; Bisset, Leslie R.; Hoffmann, Stefan R. K.; Gongda Xue; Stephan Klauser; Bianca Bergamaschi; Alain Gervaix; Jürg Böni; Jörg Schüpbach; Bernd Gutte

    2011-01-01

    An artificial HIV-1 enhancer-binding peptide was extended by nine consecutive arginine residues at the C-terminus and by the nuclear localization signal of SV40 large T antigen at the N-terminus. The resulting synthetic 64-residue peptide was found to bind to the two enhancers of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat, cross the plasma membrane and the nuclear envelope of human cells, and suppress the HIV-1 enhancer-controlled expression of a green fluorescent protein reporter gene. Moreover, HIV-1 r...

  14. A β-hairpin structure in a 13-mer peptide that binds α-bungarotoxin with high affinity and neutralizes its toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Scherf, Tali; Kasher, Roni; Balass, Moshe; Fridkin, Mati; Fuchs, Sara; Katchalski-Katzir, Ephraim

    2001-01-01

    Snake-venom α-bungarotoxin is a member of the α-neurotoxin family that binds with very high affinity to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) at the neuromuscular junction. The structure of the complex between α-bungarotoxin and a 13-mer peptide (WRYYESSLEPYPD) that binds the toxin with high affinity, thus inhibiting its interactions with AChR with an IC50 of 2 nM, has been solved by 1H-NMR spectroscopy. The bound peptide folds into a β-hairpin structure crea...

  15. The common equine class I molecule Eqca-1*00101 (ELA-A3.1) is characterized by narrow peptide binding and T cell epitope repertoires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Tobias; Moore, Carrie; Sidney, John; Miller, Donald; Tallmadge, Rebecca; Harman, Rebecca M; Oseroff, Carla; Wriston, Amanda; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Peters, Bjoern; Antczak, Douglas F; Sette, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    Here we describe a detailed quantitative peptide-binding motif for the common equine leukocyte antigen (ELA) class I allele Eqca-1*00101, present in roughly 25 % of Thoroughbred horses. We determined a preliminary binding motif by sequencing endogenously bound ligands. Subsequently, a positional scanning combinatorial library (PSCL) was used to further characterize binding specificity and derive a quantitative motif involving aspartic acid in position 2 and hydrophobic residues at the C-terminus. Using this motif, we selected and tested 9- and 10-mer peptides derived from the equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) proteome for their capacity to bind Eqca-1*00101. PSCL predictions were very efficient, with an receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve performance of 0.877, and 87 peptides derived from 40 different EHV-1 proteins were identified with affinities of 500 nM or higher. Quantitative analysis revealed that Eqca-1*00101 has a narrow peptide-binding repertoire, in comparison to those of most human, non-human primate, and mouse class I alleles. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from six EHV-1-infected, or vaccinated but uninfected, Eqca-1*00101-positive horses were used in IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays. When we screened the 87 Eqca-1*00101-binding peptides for T cell reactivity, only one Eqca-1*00101 epitope, derived from the intermediate-early protein ICP4, was identified. Thus, despite its common occurrence in several horse breeds, Eqca-1*00101 is associated with a narrow binding repertoire and a similarly narrow T cell response to an important equine viral pathogen. Intriguingly, these features are shared with other human and macaque major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules with a similar specificity for D in position 2 or 3 in their main anchor motif.

  16. The role of water molecules in the binding of class I and II peptides to the SH3 domain of the Fyn tyrosine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara-Artigas, Ana; Ortiz-Salmeron, Emilia; Andujar-Sánchez, Montserrrat; Bacarizo, Julio; Martin-Garcia, Jose Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Interactions of proline-rich motifs with SH3 domains are present in signal transduction and other important cell processes. Analysis of structural and thermodynamic data suggest a relevant role of water molecules in these protein-protein interactions. To determine whether or not the SH3 domain of the Fyn tyrosine kinase shows the same behaviour, the crystal structures of its complexes with two high-affinity synthetic peptides, VSL12 and APP12, which are class I and II peptides, respectively, have been solved. In the class I complexes two water molecules were found at the binding interface that were not present in the class II complexes. The structures suggest a role of these water molecules in facilitating conformational changes in the SH3 domain to allow the binding of the class I or II peptides. In the third binding pocket these changes modify the cation-π and salt-bridge interactions that determine the affinity of the binding. Comparison of the water molecules involved in the binding of the peptides with previous reported hydration spots suggests a different pattern for the SH3 domains of the Src tyrosine kinase family. PMID:27599862

  17. Solution structure of the 45-residue MgATP-binding peptide of adenylate kinase as examined by 2-D NMR, FTIR, and CD spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, D.C.; Byler, D.M.; Susi, H.; Brown, M.; Kuby, S.A.; Mildvan A.S.

    1988-05-17

    The structure of a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 1-45 of rabbit muscle adenylate kinase has been studied in aqueous solution by two-dimensional NMR, FTIR, and CD spectroscopy. This peptide, which binds MgATP and is believed to represent most of the MgATP-binding site of the enzyme, appears to maintain a conformation similar to that of residues 1-45 in the X-ray structure of intact porcine adenylate kinase, with 42% of the residues of the peptide showing NOEs indicative of phi and psi angles corresponding to those found in the protein. The NMR studies suggest that the peptide is composed of two helical regions of residues 4-7 and 23-29, and three stretches of ..beta..-strand at residues 8-15, 30-32, and 35-40, yielding an overall secondary structure consisting of 24% ..cap alpha..-helix, 38% ..beta..-structure, and 38% aperiodic. Although the resolution-enhanced amide I band of the peptide FTIR spectrum is broad and rather featureless, possible due to disorder, it can be fit by using methods developed on well-characterized globular proteins. The CD spectrum is best fit by assuming the presence of at most 13% ..cap alpha..-helix in the peptide, 24 +/- 2% ..beta..-structure, and 66 +/- 4% aperiodic. The inability of the high-frequency FTIR and CD methods to detect helices in the amount found by NMR may result from the short helical lengths as well as from static and dynamic disorder in the peptide. Upon binding of MgATP, numerous conformation changes in the backbone of the peptide are detected by NMR, with smaller alterations in the overall secondary structure as assess by CD.

  18. Coupling of importin beta binding peptide on plasmid DNA: transfection efficiency is increased by modification of lipoplex's physico-chemical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Escriou Virginie

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-viral vectors for gene transfer are less immunogenic than viral vectors but also less efficient. Significant effort has focused on enhancing non-viral gene transfer efficiency by increasing nuclear import of plasmid DNA, particularly by coupling nuclear localization peptidic sequences to plasmid DNA. Results We have coupled a 62-aminoacid peptide derived from hSRP1α importin beta binding domain, called the IBB peptide to plasmid DNA by using the heterobifunctional linker N-(4-azido-2,3,5,6 tetrafluorobenzyl-6-maleimidyl hexanamide (TFPAM-6. When covalently coupled to plasmid DNA, IBB peptide did not increase the efficiency of cationic lipid mediated transfection. The IBB peptide was still able to interact with its nuclear import receptor, importin β, but non-specifically. However, we observed a 20-fold increase in reporter gene expression with plasmid DNA / IBB peptide complexes under conditions of inefficient transfection. In which case, IBB was associated with plasmid DNA through self assembling ionic interaction. Conclusions The improvement of transfection activity was not due to an improved nuclear import of DNA, but rather by the modification of physicochemical properties of IBB peptide / plasmid complexes. IBB peptide increased lipoplex size and these larger complexes were more efficient for gene transfer.

  19. Comparison of the binding and internalization properties of 12 DOTA-coupled and {sup 111}In-labelled CCK2/gastrin receptor binding peptides: a collaborative project under COST Action BM0607

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aloj, Luigi; Aurilio, Michela; Rinaldi, Valentina; D' Ambrosio, Laura [Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Fondazione ' ' G. Pascale' ' , AF Medicina Nucleare, Naples (Italy); Tesauro, Diego [Universita ' ' Federico II' ' , CIRPeB, Naples (Italy); Peitl, Petra Kolenc [University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Maina, Theodosia [National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, Molecular Radiopharmacy, Institute of Radioisotopes-Radiodiagnostic Products, Athens (Greece); Mansi, Rosalba [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Guggenberg, Elisabeth von [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Joosten, Lieke [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Sosabowski, Jane K. [Institute of Cancer, Barts and the London Queen Mary' s School of Medicine and Dentistry, Centre for Molecular Oncology and Imaging, London (United Kingdom); Breeman, W.A.P.; Blois, Erik de; Koelewijn, Stuart; Melis, Marleen; Jong, Marion de [Erasmus MC, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Waser, Beatrice; Beetschen, Karin; Reubi, Jean Claude [University of Berne, Berne (Switzerland)

    2011-08-15

    Specific overexpression of cholecystokinin 2 (CCK2)/gastrin receptors has been demonstrated in several tumours of neuroendocrine origin. In some of these cancer types, such as medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), a sensitive diagnostic modality is still unavailable and therapeutic options for inoperable lesions are needed. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) may be a viable therapeutic strategy in the management of these patients. Several CCK2R-targeted radiopharmaceuticals have been described in recent years. As part of the European Union COST Action BM0607 we studied the in vitro and in vivo characteristics of 12 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-conjugated CCK2R binding peptides. In the present study, we analysed binding and internalization characteristics. Stability, biodistribution and imaging studies have been performed in parallel by other centres involved in the project. Determination of IC{sub 50} values was performed using autoradiography, with DOTA-peptides displacing {sup 125}I-CCK from receptors on tissue sections from human tumours. Saturation binding and internalization experiments were performed using {sup 111}In-labelled peptides. The rat AR42J cell line and the human A431-CCK2R transfected cell line were utilized for in vitro experiments; dissociation constants (K{sub d}) and apparent number of binding sites (B{sub max}) were determined. Internalization was determined in receptor-expressing cells by incubating with tracer amounts of peptide at 37 and 4 C for different times up to 120 min. Surface-bound peptide was then stripped either by acid wash or subsequent incubation with 1 {mu}M unlabelled peptide at 4 C. All peptides showed high receptor affinity with IC{sub 50} values ranging from 0.2 to 3.4 nM. Saturation experiments also showed high affinity with K{sub d} values in the 10{sup -9}-10{sup -8} M range. B{sub max} values estimated in A431-CCK2R cells ranged from 0.6 to 2.2 x 10{sup 6} per cell. All peptides

  20. Efficacy of a small cell-binding peptide coated hydroxyapatite substitute on bone formation and implant fixation in sheep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Andreasen, Christina Møller; Dencker, Mads L.;

    2015-01-01

    Cylindrical critical size defects were created at the distal femoral condyles bilaterally of eight female adult sheep. Titanium implants with 2-mm concentric gaps were inserted and the gaps were filled with one of the four materials: allograft; a synthetic 15-amino acid cell-binding peptide coated...... hydroxyapatite (ABM/P-15); hydroxyapatite + βtricalciumphosphate+ Poly-Lactic-Acid (HA/βTCP-PDLLA); or ABM/P-15+HA/βTCP-PDLLA. After nine weeks, bone-implant blocks were harvested and sectioned for micro-CT scanning, push-out test, and histomorphometry. Significant bone formation and implant fixation could...... formation in concentric gap, and its enhancements on bone formation and implant fixation were at least as good as allograft. It is suggested that ABM/P-15 might be a good alternative biomaterial for bone implant fixation in this well-validated critical-size defect gap model in sheep. Nevertheless, future...

  1. Evaluation of cell binding peptide (p15) with silk fibre enhanced hydroxyappatite bone substitute for posterolateral spinal fusion in sheep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, M.; Jespersen, Stig; Overgaard, Søren;

    2015-01-01

    Background: Spinal fusion is indicated in the surgical management of various spinal disorders. To ensure stabile fusion, bone graft materials are essential. Traditionally allo- or autograft has been used, but both are associated with limitations. Synthetic bone graft materials that reassemble today...... on the surface of bone forming cells. The binding initiates natural intra- and extracellular signalling pathways, inducing production of growth factors, bone morphogenic proteins and cytokines. P15 peptide has previously shown to improve osteoinductive properties when coated on graft materials. Purpose...... two level uninstrumented PLF at level L2/L3 and L4/L5. Levels were randomised to receive silk fibre enhanced ABM graft with or graft without P15 coating. The sheep were sacrificed after 4.5 months. Levels were harvested and evaluated with Micro-CT 50 scanner and qualitative histology. Fusion rates...

  2. The interaction of beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) with mouse class I major histocompatibility antigens and its ability to support peptide binding. A comparison of human and mouse beta 2m

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, L O; Stryhn, A; Holter, T L;

    1995-01-01

    The function of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules is to sample peptides derived from intracellular proteins and to present these peptides to CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. In this paper, biochemical assays addressing MHC class I binding of both peptide and beta 2-microglobul...

  3. Ligand binding and activation mechanism og the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Underwood, Christina Rye

    In recent years, G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) have become important drug targets, which makes elucidation of their molecular structure and functional domains increasingly important for designing new and better therapeutic agents. The Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a GPCR. Its...... molecule-mediated activation of GLP-1R (Study II). A fully functional, cysteine-deprived and Cterminally truncated GLP-1R is developed and characterised in Study III. In Study IV, a cAMP biosensor is used to investigate the cAMP kinetics of GLP-1R upon stimulation with different receptor agonists...

  4. Conformations of Cationized Peptides. Determination of Ligand Binding Geometries by Irmpd Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Robert C.; Steill, Jeffrey; Oomens, Jos; Polfer, Nick C.

    2009-06-01

    Spectroscopic study of the conformations of metalated amino acids has mapped out in some detail the preferences for canonical (charge solvated) versus zwitterionic (salt bridge) conformations. Corresponding studies of larger peptides are now possible. Here are described results for several singly and doubly charged metal ions with dipeptides and tripeptides. Factors including ion charge, size of cation, and side chain identity and sequence are found to be conformational determinants. IRMPD spectra of the ions were acquired by irradiating the cell with infrared light from the FELIX free electron laser at wavelengths in the approximate range 500 to 1900 cm^{-1}.

  5. Conformational and thermodynamic properties of peptide binding to the human S100P protein

    OpenAIRE

    Gribenko, Alexey V.; Guzmán-Casado, Mercedes; Lopez, Maria M.; Makhatadze, George I.

    2002-01-01

    S100P is a member of the S100 subfamily of calcium-binding proteins that are believed to be associated with various diseases, and in particular deregulation of S100P expression has been documented for prostate and breast cancer. Previously, we characterized the effects of metal binding on the conformational properties of S100P and proposed that S100P could function as a Ca2+ conformational switch. In this study we used fluorescence and CD spectroscopies and isothermal titration calorimetry to...

  6. Comprehensive Analysis of Contributions from Protein Conformational Stability and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II-Peptide Binding Affinity to CD4+ Epitope Immunogenicity in HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Tingfeng; Steede, N. Kalaya; Nguyen, Hong-Nam P.; Freytag, Lucy C.; McLachlan, James B.; Mettu, Ramgopal R.; Robinson, James E.; Landry, Samuel J.

    2014-01-01

    Helper T-cell epitope dominance in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein gp120 is not adequately explained by peptide binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins. Antigen processing potentially influences epitope dominance, but few, if any, studies have attempted to reconcile the influences of antigen processing and MHC protein binding for all helper T-cell epitopes of an antigen. Epitopes of gp120 identified in both humans and mice occur on the C-te...

  7. Effects of atrial and brain natriuretic peptides upon cyclic GMP levels, potassium transport, and receptor binding in rat astrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) to alter cyclic GMP levels and NaKCl cotransport in rat neocortical astrocytes was determined. At concentrations of 10(-9)-10(-6) M, rat ANP99-126 (rANF), rat ANP102-126 (auriculin B), and rat ANP103-126 (atriopeptin III) stimulated 6- to 100-fold increases in cyclic GMP levels. Porcine BNP (pBNP) and rat BNP (rBNP) were 20%-90% as effective as rANF over most of this concentration range, although 10(-6) M pBNP produced a greater effect than rANF. NaKCl cotransport as measured by bumetanide-sensitive 86Rb+ influx was not altered by exposure of astrocytes to 10(-6)M rANF, pBNP, or rBNP. Both pBNP and rBNP, as well as rat ANP103-123 (atriopeptin I) and des[gl18, ser19, gly20, leu21, gly22] ANF4-23-NH2 (C-ANF4-23) strongly competed for specific 125I-rANF binding sites in astrocyte membranes with affinities ranging from 0.03 to 0.4 nM, suggesting that virtually all binding sites measured at subnanomolar concentrations of 125I-rANF were of the ANP-C (ANF-R2) receptor subtype. These receptors are thought to serve a clearance function and may be linked to a guanylate cyclase activity that is chemically and pharmacologically distinct from that coupled to ANP-A (ANF-R1) receptors. ANP receptors on astrocytes may function in limiting the access of ANP and BNP to neurons involved in body fluid and cardiovascular regulation

  8. Primary structure of the 175K Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte binding antigen and identification of a peptide which elicits antibodies that inhibit malaria merozoite invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, B K; Orlandi, P A; Haynes, J D; Klotz, F W; Carter, J M; Camus, D; Zegans, M E; Chulay, J D

    1990-11-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum gene encoding erythrocyte binding antigen-175 (EBA-175), a putative receptor for red cell invasion (Camus, D., and T. J. Hadley. 1985. Science (Wash. DC). 230:553-556.), has been isolated and characterized. DNA sequencing demonstrated a single open reading frame encoding a translation product of 1,435 amino acid residues. Peptides corresponding to regions on the deduced amino acid sequence predicted to be B cell epitopes were assessed for immunogenicity. Immunization of mice and rabbits with EBA-peptide 4, a synthetic peptide encompassing amino acid residues 1,062-1,103, produced antibodies that recognized P. falciparum merozoites in an indirect fluorescent antibody assay. When compared to sera from rabbits immunized with the same adjuvant and carrier protein, sera from rabbits immunized with EBA-peptide 4 inhibited merozoite invasion of erythrocytes in vitro by 80% at a 1:5 dilution. Furthermore, these sera inhibited the binding of purified, authentic EBA-175 to erythrocytes, suggesting that their activity in inhibiting merozoite invasion of erythrocytes is mediated by blocking the binding of EBA-175 to erythrocytes. Since the nucleotide sequence of EBA-peptide 4 is conserved among seven strains of P. falciparum from throughout the world (Sim, B. K. L. 1990. Mol. Biochem. Parasitol. 41:293-296.), these data identify a region of the protein that should be a focus of vaccine development efforts. PMID:2229177

  9. Structural and computational analysis of peptide recognition mechanism of class-C type penicillin binding protein, alkaline D-peptidase from Bacillus cereus DF4-B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Shogo; Okazaki, Seiji; Ishitsubo, Erika; Kawahara, Nobuhiro; Komeda, Hidenobu; Tokiwa, Hiroaki; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Alkaline D-peptidase from Bacillus cereus DF4-B, called ADP, is a D-stereospecific endopeptidase reacting with oligopeptides containing D-phenylalanine (D-Phe) at N-terminal penultimate residue. ADP has attracted increasing attention because it is useful as a catalyst for synthesis of D-Phe oligopeptides or, with the help of substrate mimetics, L-amino acid peptides and proteins. Structure and functional analysis of ADP is expected to elucidate molecular mechanism of ADP. In this study, the crystal structure of ADP (apo) form was determined at 2.1 Å resolution. The fold of ADP is similar to that of the class C penicillin-binding proteins of type-AmpH. Docking simulations and fragment molecular orbital analyses of two peptides, (D-Phe)4 and (D-Phe)2-(L-Phe)2, with the putative substrate binding sites of ADP indicated that the P1 residue of the peptide interacts with hydrophobic residues at the S1 site of ADP. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulation of ADP for 50 nsec suggested that the ADP forms large cavity at the active site. Formation of the cavity suggested that the ADP has open state in the solution. For the ADP, having the open state is convenient to bind the peptides having bulky side chain, such as (D-Phe)4. Taken together, we predicted peptide recognition mechanism of ADP. PMID:26370172

  10. Structural Studies of a Lipid-Binding Peptide from Tunicate Hemocytes with Anti-Biofilm Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Osmar N; Alves, Eliane S F; de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Ribeiro, Suzana M; Mandal, Santi M; Gaspar, Diana; Veiga, Ana S; Castanho, Miguel A R B; Andrade, Cesar A S; Nascimento, Jessica M; Fensterseifer, Isabel C M; Porto, William F; Correa, Jose R; Hancock, Robert E W; Korpole, Suresh; Oliveira, Aline L; Liao, Luciano M; Franco, Octavio L

    2016-01-01

    Clavanins is a class of peptides (23aa) histidine-rich, free of post-translational modifications. Clavanins have been studied largely for their ability to disrupt bacterial membranes. In the present study, the interaction of clavanin A with membranes was assessed by dynamic light scattering, zeta potential and permeabilization assays. We observed through those assays that clavanin A lysis bacterial cells at concentrations corresponding to its MIC. Further, the structure and function of clavanin A was investigated. To better understand how clavanin interacted with bacteria, its NMR structure was elucidated. The solution state NMR structure of clavanin A in the presence of TFE-d3 indicated an α-helical conformation. Secondary structures, based on circular dichroism measurements in anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and TFE (2,2,2-trifluorethanol), in silico lipid-peptide docking and molecular simulations with lipids DPPC and DOPC revealed that clavanin A can adopt a variety of folds, possibly influencing its different functions. Microcalorimetry assays revealed that clavanin A was capable of discriminating between different lipids. Finally, clavanin A was found to eradicate bacterial biofilms representing a previously unrecognized function. PMID:27292548

  11. Characterisation of peptide microarrays for studying antibody-antigen binding using surface plasmon resonance imagery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Nogues

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Non-specific binding to biosensor surfaces is a major obstacle to quantitative analysis of selective retention of analytes at immobilized target molecules. Although a range of chemical antifouling monolayers has been developed to address this problem, many macromolecular interactions still remain refractory to analysis due to the prevalent high degree of non-specific binding. We describe how we use the dynamic process of the formation of self assembling monolayers and optimise physical and chemical properties thus reducing considerably non-specific binding and allowing analysis of specific binding of analytes to immobilized target molecules. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We illustrate this approach by the production of specific protein arrays for the analysis of interactions between the 65kDa isoform of human glutamate decarboxylase (GAD65 and a human monoclonal antibody. Our data illustrate that we have effectively eliminated non-specific interactions with the surface containing the immobilised GAD65 molecules. The findings have several implications. First, this approach obviates the dubious process of background subtraction and gives access to more accurate kinetic and equilibrium values that are no longer contaminated by multiphase non-specific binding. Second, an enhanced signal to noise ratio increases not only the sensitivity but also confidence in the use of SPR to generate kinetic constants that may then be inserted into van't Hoff type analyses to provide comparative DeltaG, DeltaS and DeltaH values, making this an efficient, rapid and competitive alternative to ITC measurements used in drug and macromolecular-interaction mechanistic studies. Third, the accuracy of the measurements allows the application of more intricate interaction models than simple Langmuir monophasic binding. CONCLUSIONS: The detection and measurement of antibody binding by the type 1 diabetes autoantigen GAD65 represents an example of an antibody

  12. Influence of a mutation in the ATP-binding region of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II on its interaction with peptide substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praseeda, Mullasseril; Pradeep, Kurup K; Krupa, Ananth; Krishna, S Sri; Leena, Suseela; Kumar, R Rajeev; Cheriyan, John; Mayadevi, Madhavan; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Omkumar, Ramakrishnapillai V

    2004-03-01

    CaMKII (Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II) is expressed in high concentrations in the brain and is found enriched in the postsynaptic densities. The enzyme is activated by the binding of calmodulin to the autoregulatory domain in the presence of high levels of intracellular Ca2+, which causes removal of auto-inhibition from the N-terminal catalytic domain. Knowledge of the 3D (three-dimensional) structure of this enzyme at atomic resolution is restricted to the association domain, a region at the extreme C-terminus. The catalytic domain of CaMKII shares high sequence similarity with CaMKI. The 3D structure of the catalytic core of CaMKI comprises ATP- and substrate-binding regions in a cleft between two distinct lobes, similar to the structures of all protein kinases solved to date. Mutation of Glu-60, a residue in the ATP-binding region of CaMKII, to glycine exerts different effects on phosphorylation of two peptide substrates, syntide and NR2B ( N -methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 2B) 17-mer. Although the mutation caused increases in the Km values for phosphorylation for both the peptide substrates, the effect on the kcat values for each was different. The kcat value decreased in the case of syntide, whereas it increased in the case of the NR2B peptide as a result of the mutation. This resulted in a significant decrease in the apparent kcat/Km value for syntide, but the change was minimal for the NR2B peptide. These results indicate that different catalytic mechanisms are employed by the kinase for the two peptides. Molecular modelling suggests structural changes are likely to occur at the peptide-binding pocket in the active state of the enzyme as a consequence of the Glu-60-->Gly mutation. PMID:14558884

  13. Thrombin-cleaved COOH(-) terminal osteopontin peptide binds with cyclophilin C to CD147 in murine breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Zhiyong; Oliver, Tim; Guo, Hongtao; Gao, Chengjiang; Kuo, Paul C

    2007-05-01

    Osteopontin is a glycoprotein that has been linked to metastatic function in breast, lung, and prostate cancers. However, the mechanism by which osteopontin acts to induce metastatic properties is largely unknown. One intriguing feature of osteopontin is the presence of a conserved thrombin cleavage site that is COOH-terminal from a well-characterized RGD domain. Although the COOH-terminal fragment may bind to cell surface CD44 receptors, little is known about the COOH-terminal osteopontin fragment. In the current study, we use the murine mammary epithelial tumor cell lines 4T1 and 4T07; these cells are thioguanine-resistant sublines derived from the parental population of 410.4 cells from Balb/cfC3H mice. Using flow cytometry and Forster resonance energy transfer, we show that the COOH-terminal fragment of osteopontin binds with another marker of metastatic function (cyclophilin C or rotamase) to the CD147 cell surface glycoprotein (also known as extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer), to activate Akt1/2 and matrix metalloproteinase-2. In in vitro assays, thrombin cleavage of osteopontin to generate short COOH-terminal osteopontin in the presence of cyclophilin C increases migration and invasion of both 4T07 and 4T1 cells. This interaction between osteopontin peptide and cyclophilin C has not been previously described but assigns a heretofore unknown function for the thrombin-cleaved osteopontin COOH-terminal fragment.

  14. Efficient docking of peptides to proteins without prior knowledge of the binding site

    OpenAIRE

    Hetényi, Csaba; van der Spoel, David

    2002-01-01

    Reliability in docking of ligand molecules to proteins or other targets is an important challenge for molecular modeling. Applications of the docking technique include not only prediction of the binding mode of novel drugs, but also other problems like the study of protein-protein interactions. Here we present a study on the reliability of the results obtained with the popular AutoDock program. We have performed systematical studies to test the ability of AutoDock to reproduce eight different...

  15. Cell surface-expressed moesin-like receptor regulates T cell interactions with tissue components and binds an adhesion-modulating IL-2 peptide generated by elastase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariel, A; Hershkoviz, R; Altbaum-Weiss, I; Ganor, S; Lider, O

    2001-03-01

    The adhesion of leukocytes to the extracellular matrix (ECM) depends on their responses to variations in the chemotactic signals in their milieu, as well as on the functioning of cytoskeletal and context-specific receptors. Ezrin, radixin, and moesin constitute a family of proteins that link the plasma membrane to the actin cytoskeleton. The surface expression of moesin on T cells and its role in cell adhesion has not been fully elucidated. Recently, we found that IL-2 peptides generated by elastase modified the adhesion of activated T cells to ECM ligands. Here, we further examined the adhesion regulatory effects of EFLNRWIT, one of the IL-2 peptides, as well as the existence and putative function of its receptor on T cells. We found that when presented to T cells in the absence of another activator, the EFLNRWIT peptide induced cell adhesion to vessel wall and ECM components. Binding of a radiolabeled peptide to T cells, precipitation with the immobilized peptide, and amino acid sequencing of the precipitated protein revealed that EFLNRWIT exerts its function via a cell surface-expressed moesin-like moiety, whose constitutive expression on T cells was increased after activation. This notion was further supported by our findings that: 1) anti-moesin mAb inhibited the binding of T cells to the immobilized EFLNRWIT peptide, 2) immobilized recombinant moesin bound the IL-2 peptide, and 3) soluble moesin inhibited the EFLNRWIT-induced T cell adhesion to fibronectin. Interestingly, moesin appears to be generally involved in T cell responses to adhesion-regulating signals. Thus, the IL-2 peptide EFLNRWIT appears to exert its modulating capacities via an adhesion-regulating moesin-like receptor. PMID:11207255

  16. Solution structure and function in trifluoroethanol of PP-50, an ATP-binding peptide from F1ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, W J; Abeygunawardana, C; Gittis, A G; Pedersen, P L; Mildvan, A S

    1995-05-10

    PP-50, a synthetic peptide, based on residues 141-190 of the beta-subunit of mitochondrial F1ATPase, containing the GX4GKT consensus sequence for nucleoside triphosphate binding, binds ATP tightly (Kd = 17.5 microM) as found by fluorescence titration at pH 4.0. CD and 2D proton NMR studies at pH 4.0 revealed two beta-turns, regions of extended secondary structure, transient tertiary structure, and flexibility in the GX4GKT region (W.J. Chuang, C. Abeygunawardana, P. L. Pedersen, and A. S. Mildvan, 1992, Biochemistry 31, 7915-7921). CD titration of PP-50 with trifluoroethanol (TFE) reveals a decrease in ellipticity at 208 and 222 nm, saturating at 25% TFE. Computer analysis indicates that 25% TFE increases the helix content from 5.8 to 28.6%, decreases the beta-structure from 30.2 to 20.2% and decreases the coil content from 64 to 51.2%. Fluorescence titrations of H2ATP2- with PP-50 in 25% TFE yields a Kd of 7.3 microM, 2.4-fold tighter than in H2O, probably due to TFE increasing the activity of H2ATP2- . PP-50 completely quenches the fluorescence of H2ATP2- in 25% TFE, while in H2O the fluorescence quenching is only 62%. In H2O the binding of H2ATP2- increases the structure of PP-50 as detected by CD, but in 25% TFE no significant change in CD is found on binding either H2ATP2- or Mg2+ HATP (Kd = 14 microM). The complete proton NMR spectrum of PP-50 in 25% TFE has been assigned. The solution structure, determined by distance geometry, molecular dynamics with simulated annealing, and energy minimization, consists of a coil (residues 1-8), a strand (residues 9-12), a loop (residues 13-22) containing the GX4GKT consensus sequence (residues 16-23), an alpha-helix (residues 23-36), a turn (residues 38-41), and a coil (residues 42-50), similar to that of the corresponding region of the X-ray structure of F1ATPase (J.P. Abrahams, A.G.W. Leslie, R. Lutter, and J. E. Walker, 1994 Nature 370, 621-628) and to the structure of a homologous peptide from the ATP-binding site of

  17. A peptide mimetic targeting trans-homophilic NCAM binding sites promotes spatial learning and neural plasticity in the hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Kraev

    Full Text Available The key roles played by the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM in plasticity and cognition underscore this membrane protein as a relevant target to develop cognitive-enhancing drugs. However, NCAM is a structurally and functionally complex molecule with multiple domains engaged in a variety of actions, which raise the question as to which NCAM fragment should be targeted. Synthetic NCAM mimetic peptides that mimic NCAM sequences relevant to specific interactions allow identification of the most promising targets within NCAM. Recently, a decapeptide ligand of NCAM--plannexin, which mimics a homophilic trans-binding site in Ig2 and binds to Ig3--was developed as a tool for studying NCAM's trans-interactions. In this study, we investigated plannexin's ability to affect neural plasticity and memory formation. We found that plannexin facilitates neurite outgrowth in primary hippocampal neuronal cultures and improves spatial learning in rats, both under basal conditions and under conditions involving a deficit in a key plasticity-promoting posttranslational modification of NCAM, its polysialylation. We also found that plannexin enhances excitatory synaptic transmission in hippocampal area CA1, where it also increases the number of mushroom spines and the synaptic expression of the AMPAR subunits GluA1 and GluA2. Altogether, these findings provide compelling evidence that plannexin is an important facilitator of synaptic functional, structural and molecular plasticity in the hippocampal CA1 region, highlighting the fragment in NCAM's Ig3 module where plannexin binds as a novel target for the development of cognition-enhancing drugs.

  18. Nucleotide sequence and structural determinants of specific binding of coat protein or coat protein peptides to the 3' untranslated region of alfalfa mosaic virus RNA 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser-Scott, F; Baer, M L; Liem, K F; Cai, J M; Gehrke, L

    1994-01-01

    The specific binding of alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein to viral RNA requires determinants in the 3' untranslated region (UTR). Coat protein and peptide binding sites in the 3' UTR of alfalfa mosaic virus RNA 4 have been analyzed by hydroxyl radical footprinting, deletion mapping, and site-directed mutagenesis experiments. The 3' UTR has several stable hairpins that are flanked by single-stranded (A/U)UGC sequences. Hydroxyl radical footprinting data show that five sites in the 3' UTR of alfalfa mosaic virus RNA 4 are protected by coat protein, and four of the five protected regions contain AUGC or UUGC. Electrophoretic mobility band shift results suggest four coat protein binding sites in the 3' UTR. A 3'-terminal 39-nucleotide RNA fragment containing four AUGC repeats bound coat protein and coat protein peptides with high affinity; however, coat protein bound poorly to antisense 3' UTR transcripts and poly(AUGC)10. Site-directed mutagenesis of AUGC865-868 resulted in a loss of coat protein binding and peptide binding by the RNA fragment. Alignment of alfalfa mosaic RNA sequences with those from several closely related ilarviruses demonstrates that AUGC865-868 is perfectly conserved; moreover, the RNAs are predicted to form similar 3'-terminal secondary structures. The data strongly suggest that alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein and ilavirus coat proteins recognize invariant AUGC sequences in the context of conserved structural elements. Images PMID:8139004

  19. Discovery and characterization of a novel cyclic peptide that effectively inhibits ephrin binding to the EphA4 receptor and displays anti-angiogenesis activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Han

    Full Text Available The EphA4 receptor tyrosine kinase regulates a variety of physiological and pathological processes during neural development and the formation of tumor blood vessels; thus, it represents a new and promising therapeutic target. We used a combination of phage peptide display and computer modeling/docking approaches and discovered a novel cyclic nonapeptide, now designated TYY. This peptide selectively inhibits the binding of the ephrinA5 ligand with EphA4 and significantly blocks angiogenesis in a 3D matrigel culture system. Molecular docking reveals that TYY recognizes the same binding pocket on EphA4 that the natural ephrin ligand binds to and that the Tyr3 and Tyr4 side chains of TYY are both critical for the TYY/EphA4 interaction. The discovery of TYY introduces a valuable probe of EphA4 function and a new lead for EphA4-targeted therapeutic development.

  20. [The binding ability of insulin-related peptides as the clue to their functional role in phylogenesis. Introduction to the problem].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolychev, A P

    2008-01-01

    The common plan of structure of the main peptides of the vertebrate insulin family--insulin itself, IGF-I, IGF-II, and relaxin--has distinct structural features. Each of the peptides performs its characteristic function. However, overlapping of insulin and IGF-I actions and its stability in the vertebrate phylogenesis have formed the concept of their regulation of growth and metabolism as a function fixed in phylogenesis for a certain type of structures. At the same time, study of insulin-related peptides in invertebrates has revealed the wider spectrum, than in vertebrates, of biological effects; this indicated that the similarity of the total structure designs not sufficient for judging about their functional role. Functional possibilities of a regulatory peptide depend fundamentally on its capability for binding to the receptor realizing its biological action. However, the binding ability has a wider significance than merely transmission of biological signals. Thus, IGF-II when interacting with receptors realizing its biological effects, also binds to he IGF-2 receptor limiting its action and, besides, to the binding proteins (BP) modulating its action. The entire cycle of interactions occurs in the organism at different affinity levels. Meanwhile insulin interacts neither with IGF-2 receptor nor with BP. In this case, specificity and sequence of interaction with each of receptors or with protein are due not to the general design of the peptide structure, but rather to structure of individual submolecular determinants--binding domains. The leading role in disclosure of composition and structure of these domains is played by the "mutant-ligand" approach evaluating affinity of modified analogs. To analyze role of structural elements of the binding domains, the author proposes the system of estimation of affinity of the studied analogs. The present work, alongside with consideration of methodical aspects of the forthcoming analysis, is an introduction to the

  1. Uncovering the Peptide-Binding Specificities of HLA-C: A General Strategy To Determine the Specificity of Any MHC Class I Molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael; Harndahl, Mikkel; Stryhn, Anette;

    2014-01-01

    library approach with a peptide-HLA-I dissociation assay, in this study we present a general strategy to determine the peptide-binding specificity of any MHC class I molecule. We applied this novel strategy to 17 of the most common HLA-C molecules, and for 16 of these we successfully generated matrices...... representing their peptide-binding motifs. The motifs prominently shared a conserved C-terminal primary anchor with hydrophobic amino acid residues, as well as one or more diverse primary and auxiliary anchors at P1, P2, P3, and/or P7. Matrices were used to generate a large panel of HLA-C-specific peptide...... molecules. Assessing the functional significance of these new tools, HLA-C*07:01 transgenic mice were immunized with stable HLA-C*07:01 binders; six of six tested stable peptide binders were immunogenic. Finally, we generated HLA-C tetramers and labeled human CD8(+) T cells and NK cells. These new resources...

  2. Structure and Bioactivity of a Modified Peptide Derived from the LPS-Binding Domain of an Anti-Lipopolysaccharide Factor (ALF of Shrimp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Yang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The lipopolysaccharide binding domain (LBD in anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF is the main functional element of ALF, which exhibits antimicrobial activities. Our previous studies show that the peptide LBDv, synthesized based on the modified sequence of LBD (named LBD2 from FcALF2, exhibited an apparently enhanced antimicrobial activity. To learn the prospect of LBDv application, the characteristics of LBDv were analyzed in the present study. The LBDv peptide showed higher antimicrobial and bactericidal activities compared with LBD2. These activities of the LBDv peptide were stable after heat treatment. LBDv could also exhibit in vivo antimicrobial activity to Vibrio harveyi. The LBDv peptide was found to bind bacteria, quickly cause bacterial agglutination, and kill bacteria by damaging their membrane integrity. Structure analysis showed that both LBDv and LBD2 held the β-sheet structure, and the positive net charge and amphipathicity characteristic were speculated as two important components for their antimicrobial activity. The cytotoxicity of LBDv was evaluated in cultured Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9 cells and Cherax quadricarinatus hemocytes. More than 80% cells could survive with the LBDv concentration up to 16 μM. Collectively, these findings highlighted the potential antimicrobial mechanism of LBD peptides, and provided important information for the commercial use of LBDv in the future.

  3. Cadmium detoxification strategies in two phytoplankton species: Metal binding by newly synthesized thiolated peptides and metal sequestration in granules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether intracellular detoxification mechanisms could explain, at least partially, the different sensitivity to Cd of two freshwater green algae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. Subcellular Cd distribution and the synthesis of metal-binding thiolated peptides were thus examined in both algae exposed to a range of free [Cd2+] from 0.7 to 253 nM. Cadmium partitioning among five subcellular fractions (cellular debris, granules, organelles, heat-denaturable proteins - HDP, and heat-stable proteins - HSP) was determined after differential centrifugation of algal homogenates. Thiolated-peptides, phytochelatins (PCn) and precursors, were analyzed by HPLC with pre-column monobromobimane derivatization. Cadmium accumulation per cell was 2-4 times greater for C. reinhardtii than for P. subcapitata, yet C. reinhardtii was more resistant to Cd with an EC50 of 273 nM Cd2+ [244-333 nM Cd2+ CI95%]) compared to 127 nM Cd2+ [111-143 nM Cd2+ CI95%] for P. subcapitata. Although [Cd] generally increased in the organelle fractions when free [Cd2+] increased in the experimental media, their relative contributions to the total Cd cellular content decreased, suggesting that partial protection of some metal sensitive sites was achieved by the initiation of cellular detoxification mechanisms. An increase in the proportion of Cd in the granules fraction was observed for C. reinhardtii between 6 and 15 nM Cd2+ (i.e., at [Cd2+] n, but with longer oligomers for C. reinhardtii. Unknown thiolated compounds (Xn), which were not canonical or hydroxymethyl PCn, were also found in both algae but at much higher concentrations for C. reinhardtii than for P. subcapitata. This difference in thiol synthesis could also be involved in the higher Cd resistance of C. reinhardtii with respect to P. subcapitata. This study demonstrates the importance of metal detoxification strategies in explaining the Cd sensitivity of different algal species

  4. A Highly Tilted Binding Mode by a Self-Reactive T Cell Receptor Results in Altered Engagement of Peptide and MHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D Sethi; D Schubert; A Anders; A Heroux; D Bonsor; C Thomas; E Sundberg; J Pyrdol; K Wucherpfennig

    2011-12-31

    Self-reactive T cells that escape elimination in the thymus can cause autoimmune pathology, and it is therefore important to understand the structural mechanisms of self-antigen recognition. We report the crystal structure of a T cell receptor (TCR) from a patient with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis that engages its self-peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) ligand in an unusual manner. The TCR is bound in a highly tilted orientation that prevents interaction of the TCR-{alpha} chain with the MHC class II {beta} chain helix. In this structure, only a single germline-encoded TCR loop engages the MHC protein, whereas in most other TCR-pMHC structures all four germline-encoded TCR loops bind to the MHC helices. The tilted binding mode also prevents peptide contacts by the short complementarity-determining region (CDR) 3{beta} loop, and interactions that contribute to peptide side chain specificity are focused on the CDR3{alpha} loop. This structure is the first example in which only a single germline-encoded TCR loop contacts the MHC helices. Furthermore, the reduced interaction surface with the peptide may facilitate TCR cross-reactivity. The structural alterations in the trimolecular complex are distinct from previously characterized self-reactive TCRs, indicating that there are multiple unusual ways for self-reactive TCRs to bind their pMHC ligand.

  5. Molecular decoy to the Y-box binding protein-1 suppresses the growth of breast and prostate cancer cells whilst sparing normal cell viability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer H Law

    Full Text Available The Y-box binding protein-1 (YB-1 is an oncogenic transcription/translation factor that is activated by phosphorylation at S102 whereby it induces the expression of growth promoting genes such as EGFR and HER-2. We recently illustrated by an in vitro kinase assay that a novel peptide to YB-1 was highly phosphorylated by the serine/threonine p90 S6 kinases RSK-1 and RSK-2, and to a lesser degree PKCα and AKT. Herein, we sought to develop this decoy cell permeable peptide (CPP as a cancer therapeutic. This 9-mer was designed as an interference peptide that would prevent endogenous YB-1(S102 phosphorylation based on molecular docking. In cancer cells, the CPP blocked P-YB-1(S102 and down-regulated both HER-2 and EGFR transcript level and protein expression. Further, the CPP prevented YB-1 from binding to the EGFR promoter in a gel shift assay. Notably, the growth of breast (SUM149, MDA-MB-453, AU565 and prostate (PC3, LNCap cancer cells was inhibited by ∼90% with the CPP. Further, treatment with this peptide enhanced sensitivity and overcame resistance to trastuzumab in cells expressing amplified HER-2. By contrast, the CPP had no inhibitory effect on the growth of normal immortalized breast epithelial (184htert cells, primary breast epithelial cells, nor did it inhibit differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors. These data collectively suggest that the CPP is a novel approach to suppressing the growth of cancer cells while sparing normal cells and thereby establishes a proof-of-concept that blocking YB-1 activation is a new course of cancer therapeutics.

  6. Exploring the activity space of peptides binding to diverse SH3 domains using principal property descriptors derived from amino acid rotamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ping; Wu, Wei; Yang, Kang; Jing, Tao; Liao, Ke-Long; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Hai-Dong; Hua, Xing

    2011-01-01

    Although there were intensive works addressed on multivariate extraction of the informative components from numerous physicochemical parameters of amino acids in isolated state, the various conformational behaviors of amino acids in complicated biological context have long been underappreciated in the field of quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR). In this work, the amino acid rotamers, which were derived from statistical survey of protein crystal structures, were used to reproduce the conformational variety of amino acid side-chains in real condition. In this procedure, these rotamers were superposed into a nx x ny x nz lattice and an artificial probe was employed to detect four kinds of nonbonding field potentials (i.e., electrostatic, steric, hydrophobic, and hydrogen bonds) at each lattice point using a Gaussian-type potential function; the generated massive data were then subjected to a principal component analysis (PCA) treatment to obtain a set of few, informative amino acid descriptors. We used this set of descriptors, that we named principal property descriptors derived from amino acid rotamers (PDAR), to characterize over 13,000 peptides with known binding affinities to 10 types of SH3 domains. Genetic algorithm/ partial least square regression (GA/PLS) modeling and Monte Carlo cross-validation (MCCV) demonstrated that the correlation between the PDAR descriptors and the binding affinities of peptides are comparable with or even better than previously published models. Furthermore, from the PDAR-based QSAR models we concluded that the core motif of peptides, particularly the electrostatic property, hydrophobicity, and hydrogen bond at residue positions P3, P2, and/or P0, contribute significantly to the hAmph SH3 domain-peptide binding, whereas two ends of the peptides, such as P6, P4, P-4, and P5, only play a secondary role in the binding.

  7. Determination of binding capacity and adsorption enthalpy between Human Glutamate Receptor (GluR1) peptide fragments and kynurenic acid by surface plasmon resonance experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csapó, E; Majláth, Z; Juhász, Á; Roósz, B; Hetényi, A; Tóth, G K; Tajti, J; Vécsei, L; Dékány, I

    2014-11-01

    The interaction between kynurenic acid (KYNA) and two peptide fragments (ca. 30 residues) of Human Glutamate Receptor 201-300 (GluR1) using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy was investigated. Because of the medical interest in the neuroscience, GluR1 is one of the important subunits of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPAR). AMPARs are ionotoropic glutamate receptors, which are mediating fast synaptic transmission and are crucial for plasticity in the brain. On the other hand, KYNA has been suggested to have neuroprotective activity and it has been considered for apply in therapy in certain neurobiological disorders. In this article the adsorption of the GluR1201-230 and GluR1231-259 peptides were studied on gold biosensor chip. The peptides were chemically bonded onto the gold surface via thiol group of L-cysteine resulted in the formation of peptide monolayer on the SPR chip surface. Because the GluR1231-259 peptide does not contain L-cysteine the Val256 was replaced by Cys256. The cross sectional area and the surface orientation of the studied peptides were determined by SPR and theoretical calculations (LOMETS) as well. The binding capability of KYNA on the peptide monolayer was studied in the concentration range of 0.1-5.0 mM using 150 mM NaCl ionic strength at pH 7.4 (±0.02) in phosphate buffer solutions. In order to determine the binding enthalpy the experiments were carried out between +10°C and +40°C. The heat of adsorption was calculated by using adsorption isotherms at different surface loading of KYNA on the SPR chip.

  8. Short communication: Identification of iron-binding peptides from whey protein hydrolysates using iron (III)-immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography and reversed phase-HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Huerta, Elvia; Martínez Maqueda, Daniel; de la Hoz, Lucia; da Silva, Vera S Nunes; Pacheco, Maria Teresa Bertoldo; Amigo, Lourdes; Recio, Isidra

    2016-01-01

    Peptides with iron-binding capacity obtained by hydrolysis of whey protein with Alcalase (Novozymes, Araucaria, PR, Brazil), pancreatin, and Flavourzyme (Novozymes) were identified. Hydrolysates were subjected to iron (III)-immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography, and the bound peptides were sequenced by mass spectrometry. Regardless of the enzyme used, the domains f(42-59) and f(125-137) from β-lactoglobulin enclosed most of identified peptides. This trend was less pronounced in the case of peptides derived from α-lactalbumin, with sequences deriving from diverse regions. Iron-bound peptides exhibited common structural characteristics, such as an abundance of Asp, Glu, and Pro, as revealed by mass spectrometry and AA analysis. In conclusion, this characterization of iron-binding peptides helps clarify the relationship between peptide structure and iron-chelating activity and supports the promising role of whey protein hydrolysates as functional ingredients in iron supplementation treatments. PMID:26601589

  9. Photoaffinity labeling of human serum vitamin D binding protein and chemical cleavage of the labeled protein: Identification of an 11.5-kDa peptide containing the putative 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 binding site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the authors describe photoaffinity labeling and related studies of human serum vitamin D binding protein (hDBP) with 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 3β-3'-[N-(4-azido-2-nitrophenyl)amino]propyl ether (25-ANE) and its radiolabeled counterpart, i.e., 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 3β-3'-[N-(4-azido-2-nitro-[3,5-3H]phenyl)amino]propyl ether (3H-25-ANE). They have carried out studies to demonstrate that (1) 25-ANE competes with 25-OH-D3 for the binding site of the latter in hDBP and (2) 3H-25-ANE is capable of covalently labeling the hDBP molecule when exposed ot UV light. Treatment of a sample of purified hDBP, labeled with 3H-25-ANE, with BNPS-skatole produced two Coomassie Blue stained peptide fragments, and the majority of the radioactivity was assoicated with the smaller of the two peptide fragments (16.5 kDa). On the other hand, cleavage of the labeled protein with cyanogen bromide produced a peptide (11.5 kDa) containing most of the covalently attached radioactivity. Considering the primary amino acid structure of hDBP, this peptide fragment (11.5 kDa) represents the N-terminus through residue 108 of the intact protein. Thus, the results tentatively identify this segment of the protein containing the binding pocket for 25-OH-D3

  10. The IkB kinase inhibitor nuclear factor-kB essential modulator–binding domain peptide for inhibition of balloon injury-induced neointimal formation

    OpenAIRE

    Grassia, G.; Maddaluno, M.; Musilli, C.; De Stefano, D.; Carnuccio, R.; Di Lauro, M.V.; Parratt, C.A.; Kennedy, S.; di Meglio, P; Ianaro, A; Maffia, P.; Parenti., A; Ialenti, A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective—The activation of nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB) is a crucial step in the arterial wall’s response to injury. The identification and characterization of the NF-kB essential modulator– binding domain (NBD) peptide, which can block the activation of the IkB kinase complex, have provided an opportunity to selectively abrogate the inflammation-induced activation of NF-kB. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the NBD peptide on neointimal formation. Method...

  11. Membrane adsorption and binding, cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of cell-penetrating peptidomimetics with α-peptide/β-peptoid backbone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jing, Xiaona; Yang, Mingjun; Kasimova, Marina Robertovna;

    2012-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) provide a promising approach for enhancing intracellular delivery of therapeutic biomacromolecules by increasing transport through membrane barriers. Here, proteolytically stable cell-penetrating peptidomimetics with α-peptide/β-peptoid backbone were studied...

  12. Structures of the human Pals1 PDZ domain with and without ligand suggest gated access of Crb to the PDZ peptide-binding groove

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanova, Marina E.; Fletcher, Georgina C.; O’Reilly, Nicola; Purkiss, Andrew G.; Thompson, Barry J. [Cancer Research UK, 44 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London WC2A 3LY (United Kingdom); McDonald, Neil Q., E-mail: neil.mcdonald@cancer.org.uk [Cancer Research UK, 44 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London WC2A 3LY (United Kingdom); Birkbeck College, University of London, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HX (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-01

    This study characterizes the interaction between the carboxy-terminal (ERLI) motif of the essential polarity protein Crb and the Pals1/Stardust PDZ-domain protein. Structures of human Pals1 PDZ with and without a Crb peptide are described, explaining the highly conserved nature of the ERLI motif and revealing a sterically blocked peptide-binding groove in the absence of ligand. Many components of epithelial polarity protein complexes possess PDZ domains that are required for protein interaction and recruitment to the apical plasma membrane. Apical localization of the Crumbs (Crb) transmembrane protein requires a PDZ-mediated interaction with Pals1 (protein-associated with Lin7, Stardust, MPP5), a member of the p55 family of membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUKs). This study describes the molecular interaction between the Crb carboxy-terminal motif (ERLI), which is required for Drosophila cell polarity, and the Pals1 PDZ domain using crystallography and fluorescence polarization. Only the last four Crb residues contribute to Pals1 PDZ-domain binding affinity, with specificity contributed by conserved charged interactions. Comparison of the Crb-bound Pals1 PDZ structure with an apo Pals1 structure reveals a key Phe side chain that gates access to the PDZ peptide-binding groove. Removal of this side chain enhances the binding affinity by more than fivefold, suggesting that access of Crb to Pals1 may be regulated by intradomain contacts or by protein–protein interaction.

  13. Enhancement of the Regenerative Potential of Anorganic Bovine Bone Graft Utilizing a Polyglutamate-Modified BMP2 Peptide with Improved Binding to Calcium-Containing Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Jennifer L; Bonvallet, Paul P; Abou-Arraj, Ramzi V; Schupbach, Peter; Reddy, Michael S; Bellis, Susan L

    2015-09-01

    Autogenous bone is the gold standard material for bone grafting in craniofacial and orthopedic regenerative medicine. However, due to complications associated with harvesting donor bone, clinicians often use commercial graft materials that may lose their osteoinductivity due to processing. This study was aimed to functionalize one of these materials, anorganic bovine bone (ABB), with osteoinductive peptides to enhance regenerative capacity. Two peptides known to induce osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells were evaluated: (1) DGEA, an amino acid motif within collagen I and (2) a biomimetic peptide derived from bone morphogenic protein 2 (BMP2pep). To achieve directed coupling of the peptides to the graft surface, the peptides were engineered with a heptaglutamate domain (E7), which confers specific binding to calcium moieties within bone mineral. Peptides with the E7 domain exhibited greater anchoring to ABB than unmodified peptides, and E7 peptides were retained on ABB for at least 8 weeks in vivo. To assess the osteoinductive potential of the peptide-conjugated ABB, ectopic bone formation was evaluated utilizing a rat subcutaneous pouch model. ABB conjugated with full-length recombinant BMP2 (rBMP2) was also implanted as a model for current clinical treatments utilizing rBMP2 passively adsorbed to carriers. These studies showed that E7BMP2pep/ABB samples induced more new bone formation than all other peptides, and an equivalent amount of new bone as compared with rBMP2/ABB. A mandibular defect model was also used to examine intrabony healing of peptide-conjugated ABB. Bone healing was monitored at varying time points by positron emission tomography imaging with (18)F-NaF, and it was found that the E7BMP2pep/ABB group had greater bone metabolic activity than all other groups, including rBMP2/ABB. Importantly, animals implanted with rBMP2/ABB exhibited complications, including inflammation and formation of cataract-like lesions in the eye, whereas

  14. Small lytic peptides escape the inhibitory effect of heparan sulfate on the surface of cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindin Inger

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several naturally occurring cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAPs, including bovine lactoferricin (LfcinB, display promising anticancer activities. These peptides are unaffected by multidrug resistance mechanisms and have been shown to induce a protective immune response against solid tumors, thus making them interesting candidates for developing novel lead structures for anticancer treatment. Recently, we showed that the anticancer activity by LfcinB was inhibited by the presence of heparan sulfate (HS on the surface of tumor cells. Based on extensive structure-activity relationship studies performed on LfcinB, shorter and more potent peptides have been constructed. In the present study, we have investigated the anticancer activity of three chemically modified 9-mer peptides and the influence of HS and chondroitin sulfate (CS on their cytotoxic activity. Methods Various cell lines and red blood cells were used to investigate the anticancer activity and selectivity of the peptides. The cytotoxic effect of the peptides against the different cell lines was measured by use of a colorimetric MTT viability assay. The influence of HS and CS on their cytotoxic activity was evaluated by using HS/CS expressing and HS/CS deficient cell lines. The ability of soluble HS and CS to inhibit the cytotoxic activity of the peptides and the peptides' affinity for HS and CS were also investigated. Results The 9-mer peptides displayed selective anticancer activity. Cells expressing HS/CS were equally or more susceptible to the peptides than cells not expressing HS/CS. The peptides displayed a higher affinity for HS compared to CS, and exogenously added HS inhibited the cytotoxic effect of the peptides. Conclusions In contrast to the previously reported inhibitory effect of HS on LfcinB, the present study shows that the cytotoxic activity of small lytic peptides was increased or not affected by cell surface HS.

  15. Expression of the peptide C4b‐binding protein β in the arthritic joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez‐Pernaute, O; Esparza‐Gordillo, J; Largo, R; Calvo, E; Alvarez‐Soria, M A; Marcos, M E; Herrero‐Beaumont, G; de Córdoba, S R

    2006-01-01

    Background C4b‐binding protein (C4BP) is a plasma oligomeric glycoprotein that participates in the regulation of complement and haemostasis. Complement‐regulatory activity depends on the C4BPα‐polypeptide, whereas the C4BPβ‐polypeptide inactivates protein S, interfering with the anti‐coagulatory protein C‐dependent pathway. Objective To investigate the expression of C4BPβ in the rheumatoid joint. Methods Expression of C4BP was studied in synovial explants from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis and healthy controls, using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridisation. C4BP isoforms and free C4BPβ were studied in synovial effusions from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis and microcrystalline arthritis (MCA) by immunoblotting; total and free protein S levels were studied by enzyme immunoassay. Results C4BPβ was overexpressed in the synovial membranes of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, in close association with the severity of synovitis and the extension of interstitial fibrin deposits. As many as 85% fluids from patients with rheumatoid arthritis contained free C4BPβ, whereas this unusual polypeptide was present in 50% fluids from patients with MCA and 40% fluids from patients with osteoarthritis. Free protein S at the effusions was pathologically reduced in patients with rheumatoid arthrits and MCA, and remained normal in patients with osteoarthritis. Conclusion C4BPβ is expressed by the inflamed synovial tissue, where it can participate in processes of tissue remodelling associated with invasive growth. PMID:16679431

  16. Immunization of rabbits with synthetic peptides derived from a highly conserved β-sheet epitope region underneath the receptor binding site of influenza A virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ideno S

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Shoji Ideno,1,3 Kaoru Sakai,1 Mikihiro Yunoki,2–4 Ritsuko Kubota-Koketsu,3,5 Yuji Inoue,3 Shota Nakamura,6 Teruo Yasunaga,6 Yoshinobu Okuno,5 Kazuyoshi Ikuta3 1Infectious Pathogen Research Section, Central Research Laboratory, Research and Development Division, Japan Blood Products Organization, Kobe, Japan; 2Research and Development Promotion Section, Research and Development Division, Japan Blood Products Organization, Tokyo, Japan; 3Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, Japan; 4Department of Veterinary Microbiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Rakuno Gakuen University, Ebetsu, Hokkaido, Japan; 5Kanonji Institute, The Research Foundation for Microbial Diseases of Osaka University, Kanonji, Kagawa, Japan; 6Department of Genome Informatics, Genome Information Research Center, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, Japan Background: There is increasing concern about the speed with which health care providers can administer prophylaxis and treatment in an influenza pandemic. Generally, it takes several months to manufacture an influenza vaccine by propagation of the virus in chicken eggs or cultured cells. Newer, faster protocols for the production of vaccines that induce broad-spectrum immunity are therefore highly desirable. We previously developed human monoclonal antibody B-1 that shows broadly neutralizing activity against influenza A virus H3N2. B-1 recognizes an epitope region that includes an antiparallel β-sheet structure underneath the receptor binding site of influenza hemagglutinin (HA. In this study, the efficacy of a synthetic peptide vaccine derived from this epitope region against influenza A was evaluated. Materials and methods: Two peptides were synthesized, the upper and lower peptides. These peptides comprise amino acid residues 167–187 and 225–241, respectively, of the B-1 epitope region of HA, which is involved in

  17. Identification of a novel aFGF-binding peptide with anti-tumor effect on breast cancer from phage display library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A specific aFGF-binding peptide AP8 was identified from a phage display library. • AP8 could inhibit aFGF-stimulated cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. • AP8 arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase by suppressing Cyclin D1. • AP8 could block the activation of Erk1/2 and Akt kinase. • AP8 counteracted proliferation and cell cycle via influencing PA2G4 and PCNA. - Abstract: It has been reported that acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) is expressed in breast cancer and via interactions with fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) to promote the stage and grade of the disease. Thus, aFGF/FGFRs have been considered essential targets in breast cancer therapy. We identified a specific aFGF-binding peptide (AGNWTPI, named AP8) from a phage display heptapeptide library with aFGF after four rounds of biopanning. The peptide AP8 contained two (TP) amino acids identical and showed high homology to the peptides of the 182–188 (GTPNPTL) site of high-affinity aFGF receptor FGFR1. Functional analyses indicated that AP8 specifically competed with the corresponding phage clone A8 for binding to aFGF. In addition, AP8 could inhibit aFGF-stimulated cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase by increasing PA2G4 and suppressing Cyclin D1 and PCNA, and blocked the aFGF-induced activation of Erk1/2 and Akt kinase in both breast cancer cells and vascular endothelial cells. Therefore, these results indicate that peptide AP8, acting as an aFGF antagonist, is a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of breast cancer

  18. Identification of a novel aFGF-binding peptide with anti-tumor effect on breast cancer from phage display library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Xiaoyong; Cai, Cuizan [College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Xiao, Fei [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Xiong, Yaoling [College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Huang, Yadong; Zhang, Qihao [Department of Biopharmaceutical Research and Development Centre, Institute of Biomedicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Xiang, Qi [College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Lou, Guofeng [Department of Biopharmaceutical Research and Development Centre, Institute of Biomedicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Lian, Mengyang [College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Su, Zhijian, E-mail: tjnuszj@jnu.edu.cn [Department of Biopharmaceutical Research and Development Centre, Institute of Biomedicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Zheng, Qing, E-mail: tzhengq@jnu.edu.cn [College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China)

    2014-03-21

    Highlights: • A specific aFGF-binding peptide AP8 was identified from a phage display library. • AP8 could inhibit aFGF-stimulated cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. • AP8 arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase by suppressing Cyclin D1. • AP8 could block the activation of Erk1/2 and Akt kinase. • AP8 counteracted proliferation and cell cycle via influencing PA2G4 and PCNA. - Abstract: It has been reported that acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) is expressed in breast cancer and via interactions with fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) to promote the stage and grade of the disease. Thus, aFGF/FGFRs have been considered essential targets in breast cancer therapy. We identified a specific aFGF-binding peptide (AGNWTPI, named AP8) from a phage display heptapeptide library with aFGF after four rounds of biopanning. The peptide AP8 contained two (TP) amino acids identical and showed high homology to the peptides of the 182–188 (GTPNPTL) site of high-affinity aFGF receptor FGFR1. Functional analyses indicated that AP8 specifically competed with the corresponding phage clone A8 for binding to aFGF. In addition, AP8 could inhibit aFGF-stimulated cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase by increasing PA2G4 and suppressing Cyclin D1 and PCNA, and blocked the aFGF-induced activation of Erk1/2 and Akt kinase in both breast cancer cells and vascular endothelial cells. Therefore, these results indicate that peptide AP8, acting as an aFGF antagonist, is a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of breast cancer.

  19. Effect of CD44 binding peptide conjugated to an engineered inert matrix on maintenance of breast cancer stem cells and tumorsphere formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Yang

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: As cancer cells are affected by many factors in their microenvironment, a major challenge is to isolate the effect of a specific factor on cancer stem cells (CSCs while keeping other factors unchanged. We have developed a synthetic inert 3D polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA gel culture system as a unique tool to study the effect of microenvironmental factors on CSCs response. We have reported that CSCs formed in the inert PEGDA gel by encapsulation of breast cancer cells maintain their stemness within a certain range of gel stiffness. The objective was to investigate the effect of CD44 binding peptide (CD44BP conjugated to the gel on the maintenance of breast CSCs. METHODS: 4T1 or MCF7 breast cancer cells were encapsulated in PEGDA gel with CD44BP conjugation. Control groups included dissolved CD44BP and the gel with mutant CD44BP conjugation. Tumorsphere size and density, and expression of CSC markers were determined after 9 days. For in vivo, cell encapsulated gels were inoculated in syngeneic Balb/C mice and tumor formation was determined after 4 weeks. Effect of CD44BP conjugation on breast CSC maintenance was compared with integrin binding RGD peptide (IBP and fibronectin-derived heparin binding peptide (FHBP. RESULTS: Conjugation of CD44BP to the gel inhibited breast tumorsphere formation in vitro and in vivo. The ability of the encapsulated cells to form tumorspheres in the peptide-conjugated gels correlated with the expression of CSC markers. Tumorsphere formation in vitro was enhanced by FHBP while it was abolished by IBP. CONCLUSION: CD44BP and IBP conjugated to the gel abolished tumorsphere formation by encapsulated 4T1 cells while FHBP enhanced tumorsphere formation compared to cells in the gel without peptide. The PEGDA hydrogel culture system provides a novel tool to investigate the individual effect of factors in the microenvironment on CSC maintenance without interference of other factors.

  20. Identification of a synthetic peptide inducing cross-reactive antibodies binding to Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) decoloratus, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, Hyalomma anatolicum anatolicum and Rhipicephalus appendiculatus BM86 homologues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Nadja; Diaz, Diana; Amacker, Mario; Odongo, David O; Beier, Konstantin; Nitsch, Cordula; Bishop, Richard P; Daubenberger, Claudia A

    2009-12-10

    The BM86 antigen, originally identified in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, is the basis of the only commercialized anti-tick vaccine. The long-term goal of our study is to improve BM86 based vaccines by induction of high levels of tick gut binding antibodies that are also cross-reactive with a range of BM86 homologues expressed in other important tick species. Here we have used a BD86 derived synthetic peptide, BD86-3, to raise a series of mouse monoclonal antibodies. One of these mAbs, named 12.1, recognized BM86 homologues in immuno-histochemical analyses in four out of five tick species including R. (B.) microplus, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) decoloratus, Hyalomma anatolicum anatolicum and Rhipicephalus appendiculatus. Our results indicate that broadly cross-reactive tick gut binding antibodies can be induced after immunization with a synthetic peptide derived from the protein BD86. PMID:19808026

  1. Interaction between the Alzheimer's survival peptide humanin and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3 regulates cell survival and apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ikonen, Maaria; LIU, BINGRONG; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Ma, Liqun; Lee, Kuk-Wha; Niikura, Takako; Nishimoto, Ikuo; Cohen, Pinchas

    2003-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) regulates IGF bioactivity and also independently modulates cell growth and survival. By using a yeast two-hybrid screen to identify IGFBP-3-interacting proteins, we cloned humanin (HN) as an IGFBP-3-binding partner. HN is a 24-aa peptide that has been shown to specifically inhibit neuronal cell death induced by familial Alzheimer's disease mutant genes and amyloid-β (Aβ). The physical interaction of HN with IGFBP-3 was determined to be of...

  2. Reversible supramolecular assembly at specific DNA sites: nickel-promoted bivalent DNA binding with designed peptide and bipyridyl-bis(benzamidine) components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Mateo I; Mosquera, Jesús; Vázquez, M Eugenio; Mascareñas, José L

    2014-09-01

    At specific DNA sites, nickel(II) salts promote the assembly of designed components, namely a bis(histidine)-modified peptide that is derived from a bZIP transcription factor and a bis(benzamidine) unit that is equipped with a bipyridine. This programmed supramolecular system with emergent properties reproduces some key characteristics of naturally occurring DNA-binding proteins, such as bivalence, selectivity, responsiveness to external agents, and reversibility.

  3. Ridge preservation with acellular dermal matrix and anorganic bone matrix cell-binding peptide P-15 after tooth extraction in humans. A histologic and morphometric study

    OpenAIRE

    Arthur B. Novaes Jr.; Patricia Garani Fernandes; Flávia Adelino Suaid; Marcio Fernando de Moraes Grisi; Sergio Luis Scombatti de Souza; Mario Taba Jr.; Daniela Bazan Palioto; Valdir Antonio Muglia

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to analyze by histomorphometric parameters the use of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) with or without anorganic bovine bone matrix (ABM) / synthetic cell-binding peptide P-15 in the formation of bone in human alveoli. Materials and methods: Eighteen patients in need of extraction of maxillary anterior teeth were selected and randomly assigned to the test group (ADM plus ABM/P-15) or the control group (ADM only). Histomorphometric measurements and histological a...

  4. In vivo binding of [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC to somatostatin receptors in neuroendocrine tumours - impact of peptide mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velikyan, Irina [Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry, BMC, Uppsala University, Box 599, SE-751 24 Uppsala (Sweden); Uppsala Applied Science Lab, GEMS PET Systems, GE Healthcare, SE-752 28 Uppsala (Sweden); Sundin, Anders [Department of Radiology, Karolinska University Hospital, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Eriksson, Barbro [Department of Endocrine Oncology, Uppsala University Hospital, SE-751 85 Uppsala (Sweden); Lundqvist, Hans [Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Uppsala University, SE-751 85 Uppsala (Sweden); Soerensen, Jens [Department of Medicinal Sciences, Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Uppsala University Hospital, SE-751 85 Uppsala (Sweden); Bergstroem, Mats [Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Uppsala Biomedical Centre, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Langstroem, Bengt [Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry, BMC, Uppsala University, Box 599, SE-751 24 Uppsala (Sweden)], E-mail: langstrom@biorg.uu.se

    2010-04-15

    Objectives: The aim of this pilot study was to explore the impact of peptide mass on binding of [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC to neuroendocrine tumour somatostatin receptors in vivo using a tracer of variable specific radioactivity (SRA) and to show the logistic feasibility of sequential PET scans in the same patient. Material and Methods: Nine patients with gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours were included. Six of them underwent three sequential PET-CT examinations with intravenous injections of [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC proceeded by 0, 50 and 250 or 500 {mu}g of octreotide, administered 10 min before the tracer. Three patients were examined by dynamic and static PET/CT for pharmacokinetic and dosimetric calculations. The [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC synthesis included preconcentration and purification of the generator eluate and microwave heating in a semi-automated in-house procedure. Results: [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC synthesis and quality control were accomplished within 30 min and radiochemical purity was >95%. The tracer accumulation in the tumours varied and depended on the total amount of the administered peptide. In five of six patients, the highest tumour-to-normal tissue ratio was found when 50 {mu}g of octreotide was preadministered. One patient showed a continuously increasing tumour uptake. Dosimetrically, a large variation in organ doses was found (kidney: 0.086-0.168 mSv/MBq; liver: 0.026-0.096 mSv/MBq; spleen: 0.046-0.226 mSv/MBq). The effective dose (0.015, 0.0067 and 0.0042 mSv/MBq) was correlated to the total amount of decays. Discussion: Three sequential PET-CT examinations using {sup 68}Ga-based tracer was carried out in 1 day. The use of high SRA [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC and unlabelled octreotide indicates an optimal mass leading to better image contrast. [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC-PET-CT employing variable SRA may be utilised for accurate quantification of tumour uptake with subsequent dosimetry for personalized therapy management.

  5. Cadmium detoxification strategies in two phytoplankton species: Metal binding by newly synthesized thiolated peptides and metal sequestration in granules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavoie, Michel; Le Faucheur, Severine [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique-Eau, Terre et Environnement (INRS-ETE), 490 de la Couronne, G1K 9A9 Quebec (Canada); Fortin, Claude [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique-Eau, Terre et Environnement (INRS-ETE), 490 de la Couronne, G1K 9A9 Quebec (Canada)], E-mail: fortincl@ete.inrs.ca; Campbell, Peter G.C. [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique-Eau, Terre et Environnement (INRS-ETE), 490 de la Couronne, G1K 9A9 Quebec (Canada)

    2009-04-09

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether intracellular detoxification mechanisms could explain, at least partially, the different sensitivity to Cd of two freshwater green algae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. Subcellular Cd distribution and the synthesis of metal-binding thiolated peptides were thus examined in both algae exposed to a range of free [Cd{sup 2+}] from 0.7 to 253 nM. Cadmium partitioning among five subcellular fractions (cellular debris, granules, organelles, heat-denaturable proteins - HDP, and heat-stable proteins - HSP) was determined after differential centrifugation of algal homogenates. Thiolated-peptides, phytochelatins (PC{sub n}) and precursors, were analyzed by HPLC with pre-column monobromobimane derivatization. Cadmium accumulation per cell was 2-4 times greater for C. reinhardtii than for P. subcapitata, yet C. reinhardtii was more resistant to Cd with an EC{sub 50} of 273 nM Cd{sup 2+} [244-333 nM Cd{sup 2+} CI{sub 95%}]) compared to 127 nM Cd{sup 2+} [111-143 nM Cd{sup 2+} CI{sub 95%}] for P. subcapitata. Although [Cd] generally increased in the organelle fractions when free [Cd{sup 2+}] increased in the experimental media, their relative contributions to the total Cd cellular content decreased, suggesting that partial protection of some metal sensitive sites was achieved by the initiation of cellular detoxification mechanisms. An increase in the proportion of Cd in the granules fraction was observed for C. reinhardtii between 6 and 15 nM Cd{sup 2+} (i.e., at [Cd{sup 2+}] < the threshold for growth inhibition) suggesting the involvement of granules in protecting against the occurrence of toxic effects in C. reinhardtii. Both species also produced also high levels of PC{sub n}, but with longer oligomers for C. reinhardtii. Unknown thiolated compounds (X{sub n}), which were not canonical or hydroxymethyl PC{sub n}, were also found in both algae but at much higher concentrations for C. reinhardtii than

  6. The histone chaperone sNASP binds a conserved peptide motif within the globular core of histone H3 through its TPR repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Andrew; Lercher, Lukas; Singh, Hari R; Zinne, Daria; Timinszky, Gyula; Carlomagno, Teresa; Ladurner, Andreas G

    2016-04-20

    Eukaryotic chromatin is a complex yet dynamic structure, which is regulated in part by the assembly and disassembly of nucleosomes. Key to this process is a group of proteins termed histone chaperones that guide the thermodynamic assembly of nucleosomes by interacting with soluble histones. Here we investigate the interaction between the histone chaperone sNASP and its histone H3 substrate. We find that sNASP binds with nanomolar affinity to a conserved heptapeptide motif in the globular domain of H3, close to the C-terminus. Through functional analysis of sNASP homologues we identified point mutations in surface residues within the TPR domain of sNASP that disrupt H3 peptide interaction, but do not completely disrupt binding to full length H3 in cells, suggesting that sNASP interacts with H3 through additional contacts. Furthermore, chemical shift perturbations from(1)H-(15)N HSQC experiments show that H3 peptide binding maps to the helical groove formed by the stacked TPR motifs of sNASP. Our findings reveal a new mode of interaction between a TPR repeat domain and an evolutionarily conserved peptide motif found in canonical H3 and in all histone H3 variants, including CenpA and have implications for the mechanism of histone chaperoning within the cell.

  7. Acceleration of wound healing in acute full-thickness skin wounds using a collagen-binding peptide with an affinity for MSCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huili Wang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been accepted as a promising cell source in tissue repair and regeneration. However, the inability to enrich MSCs in target areas limits their wide application. As a result, it has been a major goal to induce MSCs to be abundantly and specifically recruited to the injury site. In this study, a peptide with a specific affinity for MSCs (E7 peptide was immobilized to a collagen scaffold via a collagen-binding domain (CBD to construct a functional collagen scaffold. In addition, the hypothesis that this method could recruit MSCs specifically was evaluated in a porcine model. In vivo investigations indicated that due to the immunoreaction, the CBD-MSC-peptide collagen scaffold enhanced MSC adhesion and infiltration and promoted wound healing. At day 7 after surgery, we found more infiltrating cells and capillaries in the Collagen/CBD-E7 peptide group compared to the Scaffold group. At day 14, 21 and 28, a faster healing process was observed in the Collagen/CBD-E7 peptide group, with significant differences compared with the other groups (P < 0.05, P < 0.01. The results demonstrate the potential use of targeted therapy to rapidly heal skin wounds.

  8. A factor VIII-derived peptide enables von Willebrand factor (VWF)-binding of artificial platelet nanoconstructs without interfering with VWF-adhesion of natural platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji-Valizadeh, Hassan; Modery-Pawlowski, Christa L; Sen Gupta, Anirban

    2014-05-01

    There is substantial clinical interest in synthetic platelet analogs for potential application in transfusion medicine. To this end, our research is focused on self-assembled peptide-lipid nanoconstructs that can undergo injury site-selective adhesion and subsequently promote site-directed active platelet aggregation, thus mimicking platelet's primary hemostatic actions. For injury site-selective adhesion, we have utilized a coagulation factor FVIII-derived VWF-binding peptide (VBP). FVIII binds to VWF's D'-D3 domain while natural platelet GPIbα binds to VWF's A1 domain. Therefore, we hypothesized that the VBP-decorated nanoconstructs will adhere to VWF without mutual competition with natural platelets. We further hypothesized that the adherent VBP-decorated constructs can enhance platelet aggregation when co-decorated with a fibrinogen-mimetic peptide (FMP). To test these hypotheses, we used glycocalicin to selectively block VWF's A1 domain and, using fluorescence microscopy, studied the binding of fluorescently labeled VBP-decorated nanoconstructs versus platelets to ristocetin-treated VWF. Subsequently, we co-decorated the nanoconstructs with VBP and FMP and incubated them with human platelets to study construct-mediated enhancement of platelet aggregation. Decoration with VBP resulted in substantial construct adhesion to ristocetin-treated VWF even if the A1-domain was blocked by glycocalicin. In comparison, such A1-blocking resulted in significant reduction of platelet adhesion. Without A1-blocking, the VBP-decorated constructs and natural platelets could adhere to VWF concomitantly. Furthermore, the constructs co-decorated with VBP and FMP enhanced active platelet aggregation. The results indicate significant promise in utilizing the FVIII-derived VBP in developing synthetic platelet analogs that do not interfere with VWF-binding of natural platelets but allow site-directed enhancement of platelet aggregation when combined with FMP.

  9. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) B27 Allotype-Specific Binding and Candidate Arthritogenic Peptides Revealed through Heuristic Clustering of Data-independent Acquisition Mass Spectrometry (DIA-MS) Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schittenhelm, Ralf B; Sivaneswaran, Saranjah; Lim Kam Sian, Terry C C; Croft, Nathan P; Purcell, Anthony W

    2016-06-01

    Expression of HLA-B27 is strongly associated with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and other spondyloarthropathies. While this is true for the majority of HLA-B27 allotypes, HLA-B*27:06 and HLA-B*27:09 are not associated with AS. These two subtypes contain polymorphisms that are ideally positioned to influence the bound peptide repertoire. The existence of disease-inducing peptides (so-called arthritogenic peptides) has therefore been proposed that are exclusively presented by disease-associated HLA-B27 allotypes. However, we have recently demonstrated that this segregation of allotype-bound peptides is not the case and that many peptides that display sequence features predicted to favor binding to disease-associated subtypes are also capable of being presented naturally by protective alleles. To further probe more subtle quantitative changes in peptide presentation, we have used a combination of data-independent acquisition (DIA) and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry to quantify the abundance of 1646 HLA-B27 restricted peptides across the eight most frequent HLA-B27 allotypes (HLA-B*27:02-HLA-B*27:09). We utilized K means cluster analysis to group peptides with similar allelic binding preferences across the eight HLA-B27 allotypes, which enabled us to identify the most-stringent binding characteristics for each HLA-B27 allotype and further refined their existing consensus-binding motifs. Moreover, a thorough analysis of this quantitative dataset led to the identification of 26 peptides, which are presented in lower abundance by HLA-B*27:06 and HLA-B*27:09 compared with disease-associated HLA-B27 subtypes. Although these differences were observed to be very subtle, these 26 peptides might encompass the sought-after arthritogenic peptide(s). PMID:26929215

  10. Identification of MHC class II restricted T‐cell‐mediated reactivity against MHC class I binding Mycobacterium tuberculosis peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Mingjun; Tang, Sheila Tuyet; Stryhn, Anette;

    2011-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are known to play an important role in the control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection so identification of CTL epitopes from M. tuberculosis is of importance for the development of effective peptide....... The antigenicity of a total of 157 peptides with measured affinity for HLA‐I molecules of KD ≤ 500 nm were evaluated using peripheral blood T cells from strongly purified protein derivative reactive healthy donors. Of the 157 peptides, eight peptides (5%) were found to induce T‐cell responses. As judged from...

  11. Apoprotein Structure and Metal Binding Characterization of a de Novo Designed Peptide, α3DIV, that Sequesters Toxic Heavy Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plegaria, Jefferson S; Dzul, Stephen P; Zuiderweg, Erik R P; Stemmler, Timothy L; Pecoraro, Vincent L

    2015-05-12

    De novo protein design is a biologically relevant approach that provides a novel process in elucidating protein folding and modeling the metal centers of metalloproteins in a completely unrelated or simplified fold. An integral step in de novo protein design is the establishment of a well-folded scaffold with one conformation, which is a fundamental characteristic of many native proteins. Here, we report the NMR solution structure of apo α3DIV at pH 7.0, a de novo designed three-helix bundle peptide containing a triscysteine motif (Cys18, Cys28, and Cys67) that binds toxic heavy metals. The structure comprises 1067 NOE restraints derived from multinuclear multidimensional NOESY, as well as 138 dihedral angles (ψ, φ, and χ1). The backbone and heavy atoms of the 20 lowest energy structures have a root mean square deviation from the mean structure of 0.79 (0.16) Å and 1.31 (0.15) Å, respectively. When compared to the parent structure α3D, the substitution of Leu residues to Cys enhanced the α-helical content of α3DIV while maintaining the same overall topology and fold. In addition, solution studies on the metalated species illustrated metal-induced stability. An increase in the melting temperatures was observed for Hg(II), Pb(II), or Cd(II) bound α3DIV by 18-24 °C compared to its apo counterpart. Further, the extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis on Hg(II)-α3DIV produced an average Hg(II)-S bond length at 2.36 Å, indicating a trigonal T-shaped coordination environment. Overall, the structure of apo α3DIV reveals an asymmetric distorted triscysteine metal binding site, which offers a model for native metalloregulatory proteins with thiol-rich ligands that function in regulating toxic heavy metals, such as ArsR, CadC, MerR, and PbrR.

  12. Efficacy of a small cell-binding peptide coated hydroxyapatite substitute on bone formation and implant fixation in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ming; Andreasen, Christina M; Dencker, Mads L; Jensen, Anders E; Theilgaard, Naseem; Overgaard, Søren

    2015-04-01

    Cylindrical critical size defects were created at the distal femoral condyles bilaterally of eight female adult sheep. Titanium implants with 2-mm concentric gaps were inserted and the gaps were filled with one of the four materials: allograft; a synthetic 15-amino acid cell-binding peptide coated hydroxyapatite (ABM/P-15); hydroxyapatite + βtricalciumphosphate+ Poly-Lactic-Acid (HA/βTCP-PDLLA); or ABM/P-15+HA/βTCP-PDLLA. After nine weeks, bone-implant blocks were harvested and sectioned for micro-CT scanning, push-out test, and histomorphometry. Significant bone formation and implant fixation could be observed in all four groups. Interestingly, the microarchitecture of the ABM/P-15 group was significantly different from the control group. Tissue volume fraction and thickness were significantly greater in the ABM/P-15 group than in the allograft group. Bone formation and bone ingrowth to porous titanium implant were not significantly different among the four groups. The ABM/P-15 group had similar shear mechanical properties on implant fixation as the allograft group. Adding HA/βTCP-PDLLA to ABM/P-15 did not significantly change these parameters. This study revealed that ABM/P-15 had significantly bone formation in concentric gap, and its enhancements on bone formation and implant fixation were at least as good as allograft. It is suggested that ABM/P-15 might be a good alternative biomaterial for bone implant fixation in this well-validated critical-size defect gap model in sheep. Nevertheless, future clinical researches should focus on prospective, randomized, controlled trials in order to fully elucidate whether ABM/P-15 could be a feasible candidate for bone substitute material in orthopedic practices.

  13. A comparative study of polyethylene glycol hydrogels derivatized with the RGD peptide and the cell-binding domain of fibronectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen; Hekmatfer, Sogol; Karuri, Nancy W

    2014-01-01

    The goal of our study was to compare the biological responses of cells cultured on polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogels functionalized with varying concentrations of the widely used adhesion peptide, RGD, and the cell-binding domain of fibronectin, III(9-10). We used Michael addition chemistry to covalently link cysteines in GRGDSPC and glutathione S-transferase (GST) tagged III(9-10) (GST-III(9-10)), to the acrylate groups in PEG diacrylate (PEGDA). Conjugation of GST-III(9-10) to PEGDA occurred through cysteine residues in GST. Ellman's reagent and immunoblotting studies demonstrated an efficiency of 90% or more for PEG conjugation of 1 μM GST-III(9-10) or GRDGSPC in 10% (wt/vol) PEGDA at 37°C for 1 h. Circular dichroism and limited proteolysis demonstrated that conjugating PEGDA to GST-III(9-10) did not significantly perturb its native secondary structure. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis characterization of the wash solution of PEG hydrogels after photopolymerization demonstrated that >95% of the 1 μM GST-III(9-10) was incorporated into the PEG hydrogels after cross-linking. PEG hydrogels derivatized with 1 μM GST-III(9-10) had significantly higher cell adhesion and spreading than PEG hydrogels with 1 μM GRGDSPC. A comparable adhesion response between GRGDSPC and GST-III(9-10) was obtained when the former was at millimolar and the latter at micromolar concentration. The amount and type of conjugate in the PEG hydrogel derivative was statistically more significant than hydrogel rigidity in stimulating the biological responses observed. This report presents new evidence of the robustness of III(9-10) in mediating cell adhesion and spreading on PEG hydrogels.

  14. RNA Detection in Live Bacterial Cells Using Fluorescent Protein Complementation Triggered by Interaction of Two RNA Aptamers with Two RNA-Binding Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles R. Cantor

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Many genetic and infectious diseases can be targeted at the RNA level as RNA is more accessible than DNA. We seek to develop new approaches for detection and tracking RNA in live cells, which is necessary for RNA-based diagnostics and therapy. We recently described a method for RNA visualization in live bacterial cells based on fluorescent protein complementation [1-3]. The RNA is tagged with an RNA aptamer that binds an RNA-binding protein with high affinity. This RNA-binding protein is expressed as two split fragments fused to the fragments of a split fluorescent protein. In the presence of RNA the fragments of the RNA-binding protein bind the aptamer and bring together the fragments of the fluorescent protein, which results in its re-assembly and fluorescence development [1-3]. Here we describe a new version of the RNA labeling method where fluorescent protein complementation is triggered by paired interactions of two different closely-positioned RNA aptamers with two different RNA-binding viral peptides. The new method, which has been developed in bacteria as a model system, uses a smaller ribonucleoprotein complementation complex, as compared with the method using split RNA-binding protein, and it can potentially be applied to a broad variety of RNA targets in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. We also describe experiments exploring background fluorescence in these RNA detection systems and conditions that improve the signal-to-background ratio.

  15. HbAHP-25, an In-Silico Designed Peptide, Inhibits HIV-1 Entry by Blocking gp120 Binding to CD4 Receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahir Bashir

    Full Text Available Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1 poses a serious threat to the developing world and sexual transmission continues to be the major source of new infections. Therefore, the development of molecules, which prevent new HIV-1 infections, is highly warranted. In the present study, a panel of human hemoglobin (Hb-α subunit derived peptides and their analogues, with an ability to bind gp120, were designed in-silico and their anti-HIV-1 activity was evaluated. Of these peptides, HbAHP-25, an analogue of Hb-α derived peptide, demonstrated significant anti-HIV-1 activity. HbAHP-25 was found to be active against CCR5-tropic HIV-1 strains (ADA5 and BaL and CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 strains (IIIB and NL4-3. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR and ELISA revealed direct interaction between HbAHP-25 and HIV-1 envelope protein, gp120. The peptide prevented binding of CD4 to gp120 and blocked subsequent steps leading to entry and/or fusion or both. Anti-HIV activity of HbAHP-25 appeared to be specific as it failed to inhibit the entry of HIV-1 pseudotyped virus (HIV-1 VSV. Further, HbAHP-25 was found to be non-cytotoxic to TZM-bl cells, VK2/E6E7 cells, CEM-GFP cells and PBMCs, even at higher concentrations. Moreover, HbAHP-25 retained its anti-HIV activity in presence of seminal plasma and vaginal fluid. In brief, the study identified HbAHP-25, a novel anti-HIV peptide, which directly interacts with gp120 and thus has a potential to inhibit early stages of HIV-1 infection.

  16. A convenient method for europium-labeling of a recombinant chimeric relaxin family peptide R3/I5 for receptor-binding assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei-Jie; Jiang, Qian; Wang, Xin-Yi; Song, Ge; Shao, Xiao-Xia; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2013-06-01

    Relaxin family peptides have important biological functions, and so far, four G-protein-coupled receptors have been identified as their receptors (RXFP1-4). A chimeric relaxin family peptide R3/I5, containing the B-chain of relaxin-3 and the A-chain of INSL5, is a selective agonist for both RXFP3 and RXFP4. In a previous study, europium-labeled R3/I5, as a nonradioactive and low-background receptor-binding tracer, was prepared through a chemical synthesis approach. In the present study, we established a convenient alternative approach for preparing the europium-labeled R3/I5 tracer based on a recombinant R3/I5 designed to carry a solubilizing tag at the A-chain N-terminus and a pyroglutamate residue at the B-chain N-terminus. Because of the presence of a single primary amine moiety, the recombinant R3/I5 peptide was site-specifically mono-labeled at the A-chain N-terminus by a diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid/europium moiety through a convenient one-step procedure. The diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid/Eu3+-labeled R3/I5 bound both receptors RXFP3 and RXFP4 with high binding affinities and low nonspecific binding. Thus, we have presented a valuable nonradioactive tracer for future interaction studies on RXFP3 and RXFP4 with various natural or designed ligands. The present approach could also be adapted for preparing and labeling of other chimeric relaxin family peptides. PMID:23526726

  17. NMR studies of the MgATP binding site of adenylate kinase and of a 45-residue peptide fragment of the enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, D C; Kuby, S A; Mildvan, A S

    1985-08-13

    Proton NMR was used to study the interaction of beta,gamma-bidentate Cr3+ATP and MgATP with rabbit muscle adenylate kinase, which has 194 amino acids, and with a synthetic peptide consisting of residues 1-45 of the enzyme, which has previously been shown to bind MgepsilonATP [Hamada, M., Palmieri, R. H., Russell, G. A., & Kuby, S. A. (1979) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 195, 155-177]. The peptide is globular and binds Cr3+ATP competitively with MgATP with a dissociation constant, KD(Cr3+ATP) = 35 microM, comparable to that of the complete enzyme [KI(Cr3+ATP) = 12 microM]. Time-dependent nuclear Overhauser effects (NOE's) were used to measure interproton distances on enzyme- and peptide-bound MgATP. The correlation time was measured directly for peptide-bound MgATP by studying the frequency dependence of the NOE's at 250 and 500 MHz. The H2' to H1' distance so obtained (3.07 A) was within the range established by X-ray and model-building studies of nucleotides (2.9 +/- 0.2 A). Interproton distances yielded conformations of enzyme- and peptide-bound MgATP with indistinguishable anti-glycosyl torsional angles (chi = 63 +/- 12 degrees) and 3'-endo/O1'-endo ribose puckers (sigma = 96 +/- 12 degrees). Enzyme- and peptide-bound MgATP molecules exhibited different C4'-C5' torsional angles (gamma) of 170 degrees and 50 degrees, respectively. Ten intermolecular NOE's from protons of the enzyme and four such NOE's from protons of the peptide to protons of bound MgATP were detected, which indicated proximity of the adenine ribose moiety to the same residues on both the enzyme and the peptide. Paramagnetic effects of beta,gamma-bidentate Cr3+ATP on the longitudinal relaxation rates of protons of the peptide provided a set of distances to the side chains of five residues, which allowed the location of the bound Cr3+ atom to be uniquely defined. Distances from enzyme-bound Cr3+ATP to the side chains of three residues of the protein agreed with those measured for the peptide. The mutual

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the human androgen receptor ligand-binding domain with a coactivator-like peptide and selective androgen receptor modulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human androgen receptor ligand-binding domain has been crystallized as a ternary complex with a coactivator-like undecapeptide and two different synthetic ligands. The ligand-binding domain of the human androgen receptor has been cloned, overproduced and crystallized in the presence of a coactivator-like 11-mer peptide and two different nonsteroidal ligands. The crystals of the two ternary complexes were isomorphous and belonged to space group P212121, with one molecule in the asymmetric unit. They diffracted to 1.7 and 1.95 Å resolution, respectively. Structure determination of these two complexes will help in understanding the mode of binding of selective nonsteroidal androgens versus endogenous steroidal ligands and possibly the origin of their tissue selectivity

  19. Binding, conformational transition and dimerization of amyloid-β peptide on GM1-containing ternary membrane: insights from molecular dynamics simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moutusi Manna

    Full Text Available Interactions of amyloid-β (Aβ with neuronal membrane are associated with the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Ganglioside GM1 has been shown to promote the structural conversion of Aβ and increase the rate of peptide aggregation; but the exact nature of interaction driving theses processes remains to be explored. In this work, we have carried out atomistic-scale computer simulations (totaling 2.65 µs to investigate the behavior of Aβ monomer and dimers in GM1-containing raft-like membrane. The oligosaccharide head-group of GM1 was observed to act as scaffold for Aβ-binding through sugar-specific interactions. Starting from the initial helical peptide conformation, a β-hairpin motif was formed at the C-terminus of the GM1-bound Aβ-monomer; that didn't appear in absence of GM1 (both in fluid POPC and liquid-ordered cholesterol/POPC bilayers and also in aqueous medium within the simulation time span. For Aβ-dimers, the β-structure was further enhanced by peptide-peptide interactions, which might influence the propensity of Aβ to aggregate into higher-ordered structures. The salt-bridges and inter-peptide hydrogen bonds were found to account for dimer stability. We observed spontaneous formation of intra-peptide D(23-K(28 salt-bridge and a turn at V(24GSN(27 region - long been accepted as characteristic structural-motifs for amyloid self-assembly. Altogether, our results provide atomistic details of Aβ-GM1 and Aβ-Aβ interactions and demonstrate their importance in the early-stages of GM1-mediated Aβ-oligomerisation on membrane surface.

  20. Reconstruction of a swine SLA-I protein complex and determination of binding nonameric peptides derived from the foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng-Shan; Fang, Qin-Mei; Li, Yun-Gang; Li, Xin-Sheng; Hao, Hui-Fang; Xia, Chun

    2006-10-15

    No experimental system to date is available to identify viral T-cell epitopes in swine. In order to reconstruct the system for identification of short antigenic peptides, the swine SLA-2 gene was linked to the beta(2)m gene via (G4S)3, a linker encoding a 15-amino acid glycine-rich sequence (G4S)3, using splicing overlap extension-PCR (SOE-PCR). The maltose binding protein (MBP)-SLA-2-(G4S)3-beta(2)m fusion protein was expressed and purified in a pMAL-p2X/Escherichia coli TB1 system. The purified MBP-SLA-2-(G4S)3-beta(2)m protein was cleaved by factor Xa protease, and further purified by DEAE-Sepharose chromatography. The conformation of the SLA-2-(G4S)3-beta(2)m protein was determined by circular dichroism (CD) spectrum. In addition, the refolded SLA-2-(G4S)3-beta(2)m protein was used to bind three nonameric peptides derived from the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) O subtype VP1. The SLA-2-(G4S)3-beta(2)m-associated peptides were detected by mass spectrometry. The molecular weights and amino acid sequences of the peptides were confirmed by primary and secondary spectra, respectively. The results indicate that the SLA-2-(G4S)3-beta(2)m was 41.6kDa, and its alpha-helix, beta-sheet, turn, and random coil by CD estimation were 78 aa, 149 aa, 67 aa, and 93 aa, respectively. SLA-2-(G4S)3-beta(2)m protein was able to bind the nonameric peptides derived from the FMDV VP1 region: 26-34 (RRQHTDVSF) and 157-165 (RTLPTSFNY). The experimental system demonstrated that the reconstructed SLA-2-(G4S)3-beta(2)m protein complex can be used to identify nonameric peptides, including T-cell epitopes in swine.

  1. An altered gp100 peptide ligand with decreased binding by TCR and CD8alpha dissects T cell cytotoxicity from production of cytokines and activation of NFAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels eSchaft

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Altered peptide ligands (APLs provide useful tools to study T cell activation and potentially direct immune responses to improve treatment of cancer patients. To better understand and exploit APLs, we studied the relationship between APLs and T cell function in more detail. Here, we tested a broad panel of gp100(280-288 APLs with respect to T cell cytotoxicity, production of cytokines and activation of Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT by human T cells gene-engineered with a gp100-HLA-A2-specific TCRalpha/beta. We demonstrated that gp100-specific cytotoxicity, production of cytokines, and activation of NFAT were not affected by APLs with single amino acid substitutions, except for an APL with an amino acid substitution at position 3 (APL A3, which did not elicit any T cell response. A gp100 peptide with a double amino acid mutation (APL S4S6 elicited T cell cytotoxicity and production of IFNgamma, and to a lesser extent TNFalpha, IL-4, and IL-5, but not production of IL-2 and IL-10, or activation of NFAT. Notably, TCR-mediated functions showed decreases in sensitivities for S4S6 versus gp100 wt peptide, which were minor for cytotoxicity but at least a 1000-fold more prominent for the production of cytokines. TCR-engineered T cells did not bind A3-HLA-A2, but did bind S4S6-HLA-A2 although to a lowered extent compared to wt peptide-HLA-A2. Moreover, S4S6-induced T cell function demonstrated an enhanced dependency on CD8alpha. Taken together, most gp100 APLs functioned as agonists, but A3 and S4S6 peptides acted as a null ligand and partial agonist, respectively. Our results further suggest that TCR-mediated cytotoxicity can be dissected from production of cytokines and activation of NFAT, and that the agonist potential of peptide mutants relates to the extent of binding by TCR and CD8alpha. These findings may facilitate the design of APLs to advance the study of T cell activation and their use for therapeutic applications.

  2. Screening a phage display library for a novel FGF8b-binding peptide with anti-tumor effect on prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wenhui; Chen, Xilei; Li, Tao; Li, Yanmei; Wang, Ruixue; He, Dan; Luo, Wu [Institute of Tissue Transplantation and Immunology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Li, Xiaokun [Institute of Tissue Transplantation and Immunology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); School of Pharmaceutical Science, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035 (China); Wu, Xiaoping, E-mail: twxp@jnu.edu.cn [Institute of Tissue Transplantation and Immunology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); School of Pharmaceutical Science, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035 (China)

    2013-05-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 8b (FGF8b) is the major isoform of FGF8 expressed in prostate cancer and it correlates with the stage and grade of the disease. FGF8b has been considered as a potential target for prostate cancer therapy. Here we isolated 12 specific FGF8b-binding phage clones by screening a phage display heptapeptide library with FGF8b. The peptide (HSQAAVP, named as P12) corresponding to one of these clones showed high homology to the immunoglobulin-like (Ig-like) domain II(D2) of high-affinity FGF8b receptor (FGFR3c), contained 3 identical amino acids (AVP) to the authentic FGFR3 D2 sequence aa 163–169 (LLAVPAA) directly participating in ligand binding, carried the same charges as its corresponding motif (aa163–169) in FGFR3c, suggesting that P12 may have a greater potential to interrupt FGF8b binding to its receptors than other identified heptapeptides do. Functional analysis indicated that synthetic P12 peptides mediate significant inhibition of FGF8b-induced cell proliferation, arrest cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase via suppression of Cyclin D1 and PCNA, and blockade of the activations of Erk1/2 and Akt cascades in both prostate cancer cells and vascular endothelial cells. The results demonstrated that the P12 peptide acting as an FGF8b antagonist may have therapeutic potential in prostate cancer. - Highlights: ► A novel FGF8b-binding peptide P12 was isolated from a phage display library. ► The mechanisms for P12 peptide inhibiting cell proliferation were proposed. ► P12 caused cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase via suppression of Cyclin D1 and PCNA. ► P12 suppressed FGF8b-induced activations of Akt and MAP kinases. ► P12 acting as an FGF8b antagonist may have therapeutic potential in prostate cancer.

  3. Sustained inhibition of the NaV1.7 sodium channel by engineered dimers of the domain II binding peptide GpTx-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Justin K; Biswas, Kaustav; Holder, J Ryan; Zou, Anruo; Ligutti, Joseph; Liu, Dong; Poppe, Leszek; Andrews, Kristin L; Lin, Fen-Fen; Meng, Shi-Yuan; Moyer, Bryan D; McDonough, Stefan I; Miranda, Les P

    2015-11-01

    Many efforts are underway to develop selective inhibitors of the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.7 as new analgesics. Thus far, however, in vitro selectivity has proved difficult for small molecules, and peptides generally lack appropriate pharmacokinetic properties. We previously identified the NaV1.7 inhibitory peptide GpTx-1 from tarantula venom and optimized its potency and selectivity via structure-guided analoging. To further understand GpTx-1 binding to NaV1.7, we have mapped the binding site to transmembrane segments 1-4 of the second pseudosubunit internal repeat (commonly referred to as Site 4) using NaV1.5/NaV1.7 chimeric protein constructs. We also report that select GpTx-1 amino acid residues apparently not contacting NaV1.7 can be derivatized with a hydrophilic polymer without adversely affecting peptide potency. Homodimerization of GpTx-1 with a bifunctional polyethylene glycol (PEG) linker resulted in a compound with increased potency and a significantly reduced off-rate, demonstrating the ability to modulate the function and properties of GpTx-1 by linking to additional molecules. PMID:26112439

  4. Conformational consequences of cooperative binding of a coiled-coil peptide motif to poly(N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide) HPMA copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Peter C; Paul, Alison; Apostolovic, Bojana; Klok, Harm-Anton; de Luca, Edoardo; King, Stephen M; Heenan, Richard K

    2011-07-30

    Small-angle neutron scattering and pulsed-gradient spin-echo NMR have been used to examine the solution conformation of a series of water soluble poly(N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide) P(HPMA) co-polymer drug delivery vehicles incorporating a coiled-coil peptide motif as a novel pH sensitive non-covalent linker. The conformation of the HPMA homopolymer is well-described by a Gaussian coil model and changing pH from pH 7 to pH 5 has little effect on the solution conformation, as quantified via the radius of gyration. Copolymerisation with 5-10mol% of the K3 peptide bearing methacrylate monomer (K3-MA), gave a series of copolymers that exhibited an increase in radius of gyration at both pH's, despite being typically 30% lower in molecular weight, indicating that the K3-MA causes a perturbation (expansion) of the copolymer conformation. Subsequent addition of an equimolar amount of the complementary peptide E3 makes little further difference to the conformation, indicative of the intimate binding (coiled-coil motif) between the two peptides. Again, the effects of pH are small. Only the addition of a large aromatic structure such as methotrexate causes a further perturbation of the structure - the hydrophobic interaction between the MTX units causes a significant collapse of the polymer coil. These findings further elaborate the understanding of those factors that determine the solution conformation of novel polymer therapeutics.

  5. Templated Aggregation of TAR DNA-binding Protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) by Seeding with TDP-43 Peptide Fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimonaka, Shotaro; Nonaka, Takashi; Suzuki, Genjiro; Hisanaga, Shin-Ichi; Hasegawa, Masato

    2016-04-22

    TAR DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) has been identified as the major component of ubiquitin-positive neuronal and glial inclusions in frontotemporal lobar degeneration and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Aggregation of TDP-43 to amyloid-like fibrils and spreading of the aggregates are suggested to account for the pathogenesis and progression of these diseases. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of TDP-43 aggregation, we attempted to identify the amino acid sequence required for the aggregation. By expressing a series of deletion mutants lacking 20 amino acid residues in the C-terminal region in SH-SY5Y cells, we established that residues 274-313 in the glycine-rich region are essential for aggregation. In vitro aggregation experiments using synthetic peptides of 40 amino acids from this sequence and adjacent regions showed that peptides 274-313 and 314-353 formed amyloid-like fibrils. Transduction of these fibrils induced seed-dependent aggregation of TDP-43 in cells expressing wild-type TDP-43 or TDP-43 lacking nuclear localization signal. These cells showed different phosphorylated C-terminal fragments of TDP-43 and different trypsin-resistant bands. These results suggest that residues 274-353 are responsible for the conversion of TDP-43 to amyloid-like fibrils and that templated aggregation of TDP-43 by seeding with different peptides induces various types of TDP-43 pathologies, i.e. the peptides appear to act like prion strains.

  6. Effect of nanoparticles binding ß-amyloid peptide on nitric oxide production by cultured endothelial cells and macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando A

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Antonina Orlando,1 Francesca Re,1 Silvia Sesana,1 Ilaria Rivolta,1 Alice Panariti,1 Davide Brambilla,2 Julien Nicolas,2 Patrick Couvreur,2 Karine Andrieux,2 Massimo Masserini,1 Emanuela Cazzaniga1 1Department of Health Sciences, University of Milano-Bicocca, Monza, Italy; 2Institut Galien Paris Sud, University Paris-Sud, Châtenay-Malabry, France Background: As part of a project designing nanoparticles for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, we have synthesized and characterized a small library of nanoparticles binding with high affinity to the β-amyloid peptide and showing features of biocompatibility in vitro, which are important properties for administration in vivo. In this study, we focused on biocompatibility issues, evaluating production of nitric oxide by cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells and macrophages, used as models of cells which would be exposed to nanoparticles after systemic administration. Methods: The nanoparticles tested were liposomes and solid lipid nanoparticles carrying phosphatidic acid or cardiolipin, and PEGylated poly(alkyl cyanoacrylate nanoparticles (PEG-PACA. We measured nitric oxide production using the Griess method as well as phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and intracellular free calcium, which are biochemically related to nitric oxide production. MTT viability tests and caspase-3 detection were also undertaken. Results: Exposure to liposomes did not affect the viability of endothelial cells at any concentration tested. Increased production of nitric oxide was detected only with liposomes carrying phosphatidic acid or cardiolipin at the highest concentration (120 µg/mL, together with increased synthase phosphorylation and intracellular calcium levels. Macrophages exposed to liposomes showed a slightly dose-dependent decrease in viability, with no increase in production of nitric oxide. Exposure to solid lipid nanoparticles carrying phosphatidic acid decreased viability in

  7. The most common Chinese rhesus macaque MHC class I molecule shares peptide binding repertoire with the HLA-B7 supertype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, C.; Southwood, S.; Hoof, Ilka;

    2010-01-01

    Of the two rhesus macaque subspecies used for AIDS studies, the Simian immunodeficiency virus-infected Indian rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) is the most established model of HIV infection, providing both insight into pathogenesis and a system for testing novel vaccines. Despite the Chinese rhesus...... macaque potentially being a more relevant model for AIDS outcomes than the Indian rhesus macaque, the Chinese-origin rhesus macaques have not been well-characterized for their major histocompatibility complex (MHC) composition and function, reducing their greater utilization. In this study, we...... sequences identified were novel. From all MHC alleles detected, we prioritized Mamu-A1*02201 for functional characterization based on its higher frequency of expression. Upon the development of MHC/peptide binding assays and definition of its associated motif, we revealed that this allele shares peptide...

  8. Neuritogenic and survival-promoting effects of the P2 peptide derived from a homophilic binding site in the neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin V; Køhler, Lene B; Ditlevsen, Dorte K;

    2004-01-01

    lowered by P2. Finally, treatment of neurons with P2 resulted in phosphorylation of the ser/thr kinase Akt. Thus, a small peptide mimicking homophilic NCAM interaction is capable of inducing differentiation as reflected by neurite outgrowth in several neuronal cell types and inhibiting apoptosis......The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) plays a pivotal role in neural development, regeneration, and plasticity. NCAM mediates adhesion and subsequent signal transduction through NCAM-NCAM binding. Recently, a peptide ligand termed P2 corresponding to a 12-amino-acid sequence in the FG loop......, it enhanced the survival rate of cerebellar neurons although not of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons. Moreover, our data indicate that the protective effect of P2 in cerebellar neurons was due to an inhibition of the apoptotic process, in that caspase-3 activity and the level of DNA fragmentation were...

  9. IgE-binding epitopic peptide mapping on a three-dimensional model built for the 13S globulin allergen of buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sordet, Camille; Culerrier, Raphaël; Granier, Claude; Didier, Alain; Rougé, Pierre

    2009-06-01

    The three-dimensional model built for the 13S globulin allergen of buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) consists of three protomers exhibiting the cupin motif, arranged in a homotrimer around a three-fold symmetry axis. Using the SPOT technique, 11 continuous IgE-binding epitopic peptides were characterized on the molecular surface of the 13S globulin allergen of buckwheat. Except for one of them, they all correspond to well exposed regions containing electropositiveley and/or electronegatively charged residues, which cover up to 40% of the molecular surface of the allergen. Some of these epitopes come in close contact to probably create more extended discontinuous epitopes, especially those located on the edge of the 13S globulin homotrimer. Half of the identified epitope peptides remain unaltered in a core structure protected against hydrolysis by digestive proteases and are thus assumed to promote the allergenicity of the 13S globulin. In addition, a few of these epitopes coincide with sequential IgE-binding epitopes previously characterized in soybean 11S globulins, that could account for the IgE-binding cross-reactions observed between soybean and buckwheat in Western blot experiments.

  10. Antimicrobial activity of peptides derived from olive flounder lipopolysaccharide binding protein/bactericidal permeability-increasing protein (LBP/BPI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Bo-Hye; Moon, Ji-Young; Park, Eun-Hee; Kim, Young-Ok; Kim, Dong-Gyun; Kong, Hee Jeong; Kim, Woo-Jin; Jee, Young Ju; An, Cheul Min; Park, Nam Gyu; Seo, Jung-Kil

    2014-10-17

    We describe the antimicrobial function of peptides derived from the C-terminus of the olive flounder LBP BPI precursor protein. The investigated peptides, namely, ofLBP1N, ofLBP2A, ofLBP4N, ofLBP5A, and ofLBP6A, formed α-helical structures, showing significant antimicrobial activity against several Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, and the yeast Candida albicans, but very limited hemolytic activities. The biological activities of these five analogs were evaluated against biomembranes or artificial membranes for the development of candidate therapeutic agents. Gel retardation studies revealed that peptides bound to DNA and inhibited migration on an agarose gel. In addition, we demonstrated that ofLBP6A inhibited polymerase chain reaction. These results suggested that the ofLBP-derived peptide bactericidal mechanism may be related to the interaction with intracellular components such as DNA or polymerase.

  11. Antimicrobial Activity of Peptides Derived from Olive Flounder Lipopolysaccharide Binding Protein/Bactericidal Permeability-Increasing Protein (LBP/BPI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Hye Nam

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We describe the antimicrobial function of peptides derived from the C-terminus of the olive flounder LBP BPI precursor protein. The investigated peptides, namely, ofLBP1N, ofLBP2A, ofLBP4N, ofLBP5A, and ofLBP6A, formed α-helical structures, showing significant antimicrobial activity against several Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, and the yeast Candida albicans, but very limited hemolytic activities. The biological activities of these five analogs were evaluated against biomembranes or artificial membranes for the development of candidate therapeutic agents. Gel retardation studies revealed that peptides bound to DNA and inhibited migration on an agarose gel. In addition, we demonstrated that ofLBP6A inhibited polymerase chain reaction. These results suggested that the ofLBP-derived peptide bactericidal mechanism may be related to the interaction with intracellular components such as DNA or polymerase.

  12. The binding of lupus-derived autoantibodies to the C-terminal peptide (83-119) of the major SmD1 autoantigen can be mediated by double-stranded DNA and nucleosomes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieker, J.W.C.; Bavel, C.C.A.W. van; Riemekasten, G.; Berden, J.H.M.; Vlag, J. van der

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the binding of lupus-derived autoantibodies, double-stranded DNA and nucleosomes to the positively charged C-terminal SmD1(residues 83-119) peptide and the full-length SmD protein. METHODS: The binding of lupus-derived monoclonal antibodies, sera from patients with systemic l

  13. Interleukin-1 interaction with neuroregulatory systems: selective enhancement by recombinant human and mouse interleukin-1 of in vitro opioid peptide receptor binding in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) exerts a wide variety of biological effects on various cell types and may be regarded as a pleiotropic peptide hormone. Biological evidence suggests that IL-1 participates in the modulation of central nervous system physiology and behavior in a fashion characteristic of neuroendocrine hormones. In this investigation, recombinant (r) human (h) IL-1 and r mouse (m) IL-1 were examined for their modulation of opioid peptide receptor binding in vitro. Experiments were performed on frozen sections of rat brain. Receptor binding of radiolabeled substance P and of radiolabeled neurotensin were not significantly affected by the presence of rIL-1s. Recombinant IL-1s, however, significantly enhanced specific binding of 125I-beta-endorphin (125I-beta-END) and of D-ala2-(tyrosyl-3,5-3H)enkephalin-(5-D-leucine) (3H-D-ALA), equipotently and in a concentration-dependent manner with maximal activity occurring at a concentration of 10 LAF units/ml. The increased binding of 125I-beta-END and 3H-D-ALA was blocked steroselectively by (-)-naloxone and by etorphine, suggesting detection of opiate receptors. In addition, brain distribution patterns of receptors labeled in the presence of rIL-1s corresponded to patterns previously published for opiate receptors. Autoradiographic visualization of receptors revealed that rIL-1s in the different areas of the brain exert their effect on opioid binding with comparable potencies. The data suggest that certain central nervous system effects of IL-1s may be mediated by their selective interaction with opiatergic systems at the receptor level

  14. Rational modification of a dendrimeric peptide with antimicrobial activity: consequences on membrane-binding and biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batoni, Giovanna; Casu, Mariano; Giuliani, Andrea; Luca, Vincenzo; Maisetta, Giuseppantonio; Mangoni, Maria Luisa; Manzo, Giorgia; Pintus, Manuela; Pirri, Giovanna; Rinaldi, Andrea C; Scorciapino, Mariano A; Serra, Ilaria; Ulrich, Anne S; Wadhwani, Parvesh

    2016-03-01

    Peptide-based antibiotics might help containing the rising tide of antimicrobial resistance. We developed SB056, a semi-synthetic peptide with a dimeric dendrimer scaffold, active against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Being the mechanism of SB056 attributed to disruption of bacterial membranes, we enhanced the amphiphilic profile of the original, empirically derived sequence [WKKIRVRLSA-NH2] by interchanging the first two residues [KWKIRVRLSA-NH2], and explored the effects of this modification on the interaction of peptide, both in linear and dimeric forms, with model membranes and on antimicrobial activity. Results obtained against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus planktonic strains, with or without salts at physiological concentrations, confirmed the added value of dendrimeric structure over the linear one, especially at physiological ionic strength, and the impact of the higher amphipathicity obtained through sequence modification on enhancing peptide performances. SB056 peptides also displayed intriguing antibiofilm properties. Staphylococcus epidermidis was the most susceptible strain in sessile form, notably to optimized linear analog lin-SB056-1 and the wild-type dendrimer den-SB056. Membrane affinity of all peptides increased with the percentage of negatively charged lipids and was less influenced by the presence of salt in the case of dendrimeric peptides. The analog lin-SB056-1 displayed the highest overall affinity, even for zwitterionic PC bilayers. Thus, in addition to electrostatics, distribution of charged/polar and hydrophobic residues along the sequence might have a significant role in driving peptide-lipid interaction. Supporting this view, dendrimeric analog den-SB056-1 retained greater membrane affinity in the presence of salt than den-SB056, despite the fact that they bear exactly the same net positive charge. PMID:26614437

  15. NN-align. An artificial neural network-based alignment algorithm for MHC class II peptide binding prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Lund, Ole

    2009-01-01

    this binding event. RESULTS: Here, we present a novel artificial neural network-based method, NN-align that allows for simultaneous identification of the MHC class II binding core and binding affinity. NN-align is trained using a novel training algorithm that allows for correction of bias in the training data...

  16. [3H]Azidodantrolene photoaffinity labeling, synthetic domain peptides and monoclonal antibody reactivity identify the dantrolene binding sequence on RyR1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul-Pletzer, Kalanethee; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Bhat, Manju B.; Ma, Jianjie; Ikemoto, Noriaki; Jimenez, Leslie S.; Morimoto, Hiromi; Williams, Philip G.; Parness, Jerome

    2002-06-14

    Dantrolene is a drug that suppresses intracellular Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic reticulum in normal skeletal muscle and is used as a therapeutic agent in individuals susceptible to malignant hyperthermia. Though its precise mechanism of action has not been elucidated, we have identified the N-terminal region (amino acids 1-1400) of the skeletal muscle isoform of the ryanodine receptor (RyR1), the primary Ca2+ release channel in sarcoplasmic reticulum, as a molecular target for dantrolene using the photoaffinity analog [3H]azidodantrolene(1). Here, we demonstrate that heterologously expressed RyR1 retains its capacity to be specifically labeled with [3H]azidodantrolene,indicating that muscle specific factors are not required for this ligand-receptor interaction. Synthetic domain peptides of RyR1, previously shown to affect RyR1 function in vitro and in vivo, were exploited as potential drug binding site mimics and used in photoaffinity labeling experiments. Only DP1 and DP1-2, peptide s containing the amino acid sequence corresponding to RyR1 residues 590-609, were specifically labeled by [3H]azidodantrolene. A monoclonal anti-RyR1 antibody which recognizes RyR1 and its 1400 amino acid N-terminal fragment, recognizes DP1 and DP1-2 in both Western blots and immunoprecipitation assays, and specifically inhibits [3H]azidodantrolene photolabeling of RyR1 and its N-terminal fragment in sarcoplasmic reticulum. Our results indicate that synthetic domain peptides can mimic a native, ligand binding conformation in vitro, and that the dantrolene binding site and the epitope for the monoclonal antibody on RyR1 are equivalent and composed of amino-acids 590-609.

  17. Use of chimeric proteins to investigate the role of transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) structural domains in peptide binding and translocation

    OpenAIRE

    Arora, Shikha; Lapinski, Philip Edward; Raghavan, Malini

    2001-01-01

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) comprises two subunits, TAP1 and TAP2, each containing a hydrophobic membrane-spanning region (MSR) and a nucleotide binding domain (NBD). The TAP1/TAP2 complex is required for peptide translocation across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. To understand the role of each structural unit of the TAP1/TAP2 complex, we generated two chimeras containing TAP1 MSR and TAP2 NBD (T1MT2C) or TAP2 MSR and TAP1 NBD (T2MT1C). We show that TAP1/T2MT...

  18. Comprehensive Analysis of Contributions from Protein Conformational Stability and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II-Peptide Binding Affinity to CD4+ Epitope Immunogenicity in HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tingfeng; Steede, N. Kalaya; Nguyen, Hong-Nam P.; Freytag, Lucy C.; McLachlan, James B.; Mettu, Ramgopal R.; Robinson, James E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Helper T-cell epitope dominance in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein gp120 is not adequately explained by peptide binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins. Antigen processing potentially influences epitope dominance, but few, if any, studies have attempted to reconcile the influences of antigen processing and MHC protein binding for all helper T-cell epitopes of an antigen. Epitopes of gp120 identified in both humans and mice occur on the C-terminal flanks of flexible segments that are likely to be proteolytic cleavage sites. In this study, the influence of gp120 conformation on the dominance pattern in gp120 from HIV strain 89.6 was examined in CBA mice, whose MHC class II protein has one of the most well defined peptide-binding preferences. Only one of six dominant epitopes contained the most conserved element of the I-Ak binding motif, an aspartic acid. Destabilization of the gp120 conformation by deletion of single disulfide bonds preferentially enhanced responses to the cryptic I-Ak motif-containing sequences, as reported by T-cell proliferation or cytokine secretion. Conversely, inclusion of CpG in the adjuvant with gp120 enhanced responses to the dominant CD4+ T-cell epitopes. The gp120 destabilization affected secretion of some cytokines more than others, suggesting that antigen conformation could modulate T-cell functions through mechanisms of antigen processing. IMPORTANCE CD4+ helper T cells play an essential role in protection against HIV and other pathogens. Thus, the sites of helper T-cell recognition, the dominant epitopes, are targets for vaccine design; and the corresponding T cells may provide markers for monitoring infection and immunity. However, T-cell epitopes are difficult to identify and predict. It is also unclear whether CD4+ T cells specific for one epitope are more protective than T cells specific for other epitopes. This work shows that the three-dimensional (3D) structure of an

  19. Role of Electrostatic Interactions in Binding of Peptides and Intrinsically Disordered Proteins to Their Folded Targets: 2. The Model of Encounter Complex Involving the Double Mutant of the c-Crk N-SH3 Domain and Peptide Sos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuwen, Tairan; Xue, Yi; Skrynnikov, Nikolai R

    2016-03-29

    In the first part of this work (paper 1, Xue, Y. et al. Biochemistry 2014 , 53 , 6473 ), we have studied the complex between the 10-residue peptide Sos and N-terminal SH3 domain from adaptor protein c-Crk. In the second part (this paper), we designed the double mutant of the c-Crk N-SH3 domain, W169F/Y186L, with the intention to eliminate the interactions responsible for tight peptide-protein binding, while retaining the interactions that create the initial electrostatic encounter complex. The resulting system was characterized experimentally by measuring the backbone and side-chain (15)N relaxation rates, as well as binding shifts and (1)H(N) temperature coefficients. In addition, it was also modeled via a series of ∼5 μs molecular dynamics (MD) simulations recorded in a large water box under an Amber ff99SB*-ILDN force field. Similar to paper 1, we have found that the strength of arginine-aspartate and arginine-glutamate salt bridges is overestimated in the original force field. To address this problem we have applied the empirical force-field correction described in paper 1. Specifically, the Lennard-Jones equilibrium distance for the nitrogen-oxygen pair across Arg-to-Asp/Glu salt bridges has been increased by 3%. This modification led to MD models in good agreement with the experimental data. The emerging picture is that of a fuzzy complex, where the peptide "dances" over the surface of the protein, making transient contacts via salt-bridge interactions. Every once in a while the peptide assumes a certain more stable binding pose, assisted by a number of adventitious polar and nonpolar contacts. On the other hand, occasionally Sos flies off the protein surface; it is then guided by electrostatic steering to quickly reconnect with the protein. The dynamic interaction between Sos and the double mutant of c-Crk N-SH3 gives rise to only small binding shifts. The peptide retains a high degree of conformational mobility, although it is appreciably slowed down due

  20. Inhibition of β-bungarotoxin binding to brain membranes by mast cell degranulating peptide, toxin I, and ethylene glycol bis(β-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presynaptically active snake venom neurotoxin β-bungarotoxin (β-Butx) is known to affect neurotransmitter release by binding to a subtype of voltage-activated K+ channels. Here the authors show that mast cell degranulating (MCD) peptide from bee venom inhibits the binding of 125I-labeled β-Butx to chick and rat brain membranes with apparent K/sub i/ values of 180 nM and 1100 nM, respectively. The mechanisms of inhibition of MCD peptide is noncompetitive, as is inhibition of 125I-β-Butx binding by the protease inhibitor homologue from mamba venom, toxin I. β-Butx and its binding antagonists thus bind to different sites of the same membrane protein. Removal of Ca2+ by ethylene glycol bis(β-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid inhibits the binding of 125I-β-Butx by lowering its affinity to brain membranes

  1. Enhanced striatial /sup 3/H-spiroperidol binding induced by chronic haloperidol treatment inhibited by peptides administered during the withdrawal phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhargava, H.N.

    1984-02-27

    Chronic intragastric administration of haloperidol (1.5 mg/kg/day) for 21 days followed by a 3-day withdrawal period resulted in the development of enhanced locomotor activity response to apomorphine, and an increase in the number of binding sites for /sup 3/H-spiroperidol in the striatal membranes of the rat brain. Subcutaneous administration of Pro-Leu-Gly-NH/sub 2/ or cyclo-(Leu-Gly) in doses of 2 mg/kg/day given for 3-days after termination of haloperidol treatment inhibited the enhanced response to apomorphine, as well as the increases in the number of /sup 3/H-spiroperidol binding sites in the striatum. If indeed, the supersensitivity of striatal dopamine receptors is one of the mechanisms in the development of tardive dyskinesia symptoms, the present results suggest that the above peptides may be helpful in ameliorating some of the symptoms of tardive dyskinesia induced by neuroleptic drugs. 31 references, 3 figures.

  2. Metallothionein and a peptide modeled after metallothionein, EmtinB, induce neuronal differentiation and survival through binding to receptors of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambjørn, Malene; Asmussen, Johanne W; Lindstam, Mats;

    2007-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that metallothionein (MT)-I and -II promote neuronal survival and regeneration in vivo. The present study investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the differentiation and survival-promoting effects of MT and a peptide modeled after MT, EmtinB. Both MT...... and EmtinB directly stimulated neurite outgrowth and promoted survival in vitro using primary cultures of cerebellar granule neurons. In addition, expression and surface localization of megalin, a known MT receptor, and the related lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP) are demonstrated in cerebellar...... granule neurons. By means of surface plasmon resonance MT and EmtinB were found to bind to both megalin and LRP. The bindings were abrogated in the presence of receptor-associated protein-1, an antagonist of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family, which also inhibited MT- and EmtinB-induced neurite...

  3. PEP-SiteFinder: a tool for the blind identification of peptide binding sites on protein surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saladin, Adrien; Rey, Julien; Thévenet, Pierre; Zacharias, Martin; Moroy, Gautier; Tufféry, Pierre

    2014-07-01

    Peptide-protein interactions are important to many processes of life, particularly for signal transmission or regulatory mechanisms. When no information is known about the interaction between a protein and a peptide, it is of interest to propose candidate sites of interaction at the protein surface, to assist the design of biological experiments to probe the interaction, or to serve as a starting point for more focused in silico approaches. PEP-SiteFinder is a tool that will, given the structure of a protein and the sequence of a peptide, identify protein residues predicted to be at peptide-protein interface. PEP-SiteFinder relies on the 3D de novo generation of peptide conformations given its sequence. These conformations then undergo a fast blind rigid docking on the complete protein surface, and we have found, as the result of a benchmark over 41 complexes, that the best poses overlap to some extent the experimental patch of interaction for close to 90% complexes. In addition, PEP-SiteFinder also returns a propensity index we have found informative about the confidence of the prediction. The PEP-SiteFinder web server is available at http://bioserv.rpbs.univ-paris-diderot.fr/PEP-SiteFinder.

  4. Determination of binding capacity and adsorption enthalpy between Human Glutamate Receptor (GluR1) peptide fragments and kynurenic acid by surface plasmon resonance experiments. Part 2: Interaction of GluR1270-300 with KYNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csapó, E; Bogár, F; Juhász, Á; Sebők, D; Szolomájer, J; Tóth, G K; Majláth, Z; Vécsei, L; Dékány, I

    2015-09-01

    In the course of our previous work, the interactions of two peptide fragments (GluR1201-230 and GluR1231-259) of human glutamate receptor (GluR1201-300) polypeptide with kynurenic acid (KYNA) were investigated by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy. Besides quantitation of the interactions, the enthalpies of binding of KYNA on certain peptide fragment-modified gold surfaces were also reported. In the present work, a third peptide fragment (GluR1270-300) of the glutamate receptor was synthesized and its interaction with KYNA was investigated by an SPR technique. This 31-membered peptide was chemically bonded onto a gold-coated SPR chip via a cysteine residue. The peptide-functionalized biosensor chip was analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and theoretical calculations were performed on the structure and dimensions of the peptide on the gold surface. In order to determine the isosteric heat of adsorption of the binding of KYNA on the peptide-functionalized gold thin film, SPR experiments were carried out between +10°C and +40°C. The results on the GluR1270-300-KYNA system were compared with the previously published binding parameters of the interactions of GluR1201-230 and GluR1231-259 with KYNA. The binding abilities of KYNA with all three peptide fragments immobilized on the gold surface were estimated by a molecular docking procedure and the binding free energies of these AMPA receptor subunits with KYNA were determined.

  5. Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  6. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  7. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  8. Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  9. Expanding the druggable space of the LSD1/CoREST epigenetic target: new potential binding regions for drug-like molecules, peptides, protein partners, and chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C Robertson

    Full Text Available Lysine specific demethylase-1 (LSD1/KDM1A in complex with its corepressor protein CoREST is a promising target for epigenetic drugs. No therapeutic that targets LSD1/CoREST, however, has been reported to date. Recently, extended molecular dynamics (MD simulations indicated that LSD1/CoREST nanoscale clamp dynamics is regulated by substrate binding and highlighted key hinge points of this large-scale motion as well as the relevance of local residue dynamics. Prompted by the urgent need for new molecular probes and inhibitors to understand LSD1/CoREST interactions with small-molecules, peptides, protein partners, and chromatin, we undertake here a configurational ensemble approach to expand LSD1/CoREST druggability. The independent algorithms FTMap and SiteMap and our newly developed Druggable Site Visualizer (DSV software tool were used to predict and inspect favorable binding sites. We find that the hinge points revealed by MD simulations at the SANT2/Tower interface, at the SWIRM/AOD interface, and at the AOD/Tower interface are new targets for the discovery of molecular probes to block association of LSD1/CoREST with chromatin or protein partners. A fourth region was also predicted from simulated configurational ensembles and was experimentally validated to have strong binding propensity. The observation that this prediction would be prevented when using only the X-ray structures available (including the X-ray structure bound to the same peptide underscores the relevance of protein dynamics in protein interactions. A fifth region was highlighted corresponding to a small pocket on the AOD domain. This study sets the basis for future virtual screening campaigns targeting the five novel regions reported herein and for the design of LSD1/CoREST mutants to probe LSD1/CoREST binding with chromatin and various protein partners.

  10. Generating High-Accuracy Peptide-Binding Data in High Throughput with Yeast Surface Display and SORTCERY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Lothar Luther; Dutta, Sanjib; Keating, Amy E

    2016-01-01

    Library methods are widely used to study protein-protein interactions, and high-throughput screening or selection followed by sequencing can identify a large number of peptide ligands for a protein target. In this chapter, we describe a procedure called "SORTCERY" that can rank the affinities of library members for a target with high accuracy. SORTCERY follows a three-step protocol. First, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) is used to sort a library of yeast-displayed peptide ligands according to their affinities for a target. Second, all sorted pools are deep sequenced. Third, the resulting data are analyzed to create a ranking. We demonstrate an application of SORTCERY to the problem of ranking peptide ligands for the anti-apoptotic regulator Bcl-xL. PMID:27094295

  11. Mucosal adjuvanticity of fibronectin-binding peptide (FBP fused with Echinococcus multilocularis tetraspanin 3: systemic and local antibody responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhisheng Dang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that a bacterial fibronectin attachment protein (FAP is able to stimulate strong systemic and mucosal antibody responses when it is used alone or co-administrated with other antigens (Ags. Thus, it has been suggested to be a promising adjuvant candidate for the development of efficient vaccines. However, the co-administered Ags and FAP were cloned, expressed and purified individually to date. In a recent study, we first evaluated the adjuvanticity of a fibronectin-binding peptide (FBP, 24 amino acids of Mycobacterium avium FAP fused with Echinococcus multilocularis tetraspanin 3 (Em-TSP3 by detecting systemic and local antibody responses in intranasally (i.n. immunized BALB/c mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Em-TSP3 and FBP fragments were linked with a GSGGSG linker and expressed as a single fusion protein (Em-TSP3-FBP using the pBAD/Thio-TOPO expression vector. BALB/c mice were immunized i.n. with recombinant Em-TSP3-FBP (rEm-TSP3-FBP and rEm-TSP3+CpG and the systemic and local antibody responses were detected by ELISA. The results showed that both rEm-TSP3-FBP and rEm-TSP3+CpG evoked strong serum IgG (p<0.001 and IgG1 responses (p<0.001, whereas only the latter induced a high level IgG2α production (p<0.001, compared to that of rEm-TSP3 alone without any adjuvant. There were no significant differences in IgG and IgG1 production between the groups. Low level of serum IgA and IgM were detected in both groups. The tendency of Th1 and Th2 cell immune responses were assessed via detecting the IgG1/IgG2α ratio after the second and third immunizations. The results indicated that i.n. immunization with rEm-TSP3-FBP resulted in an increased IgG1/IgG2α ratio (a Th2 tendency, while rEm-TSP3+CpG caused a rapid Th1 response that later shifted to a Th2 response. Immunization with rEm-TSP3-FBP provoked significantly stronger IgA antibody responses in intestine (p<0.05, lung (p<0.001 and spleen (p<0.001 compared to those

  12. Structural variations of the cell wall precursor lipid II in Gram-positive bacteria - Impact on binding and efficacy of antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münch, Daniela; Sahl, Hans-Georg

    2015-11-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are natural antibiotics produced by virtually all living organisms. Typically, AMPs are cationic and amphiphilic and first contacts with target microbes involve interactions with negatively charged components of the cell envelope such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and wall- or lipoteichoic acids (WTA, LTA). The importance of charge-mediated interactions of AMPs with the cell envelope is reflected by effective microbial resistance mechanisms which are based on reduction of the overall charge of these polymers. The anionic polymers are linked in various ways to the stress-bearing polymer of the cell envelope, the peptidoglycan, which is made of a highly conserved building block, a disaccharide-pentapeptide moiety that also contains charged residues. This structural element, in spite of its conservation throughout the bacterial world, can undergo genus- and species-specific modifications that also impact significantly on the overall charge of the cell envelope and on the binding affinity of AMPs. The modification reactions involved largely occur on the membrane-bound peptidoglycan building block, the so-called lipid II, which is a most prominent target for AMPs. In this review, we focus on modifications of lipid II and peptidoglycan and discuss their consequences for the interactions with various classes of AMPs, such as defensins, lantibiotics and glyco-(lipo)-peptide antibiotics. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Bacterial Resistance to Antimicrobial Peptides. PMID:25934055

  13. Analysis of binding behavior between dynamic structures of a papain and the peptide consisting of 10 GLY residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiko

    2010-07-01

    The binding of 10GLY to dynamic structures of papain was investigated by molecular dynamics and docking simulations. The binding free energies and sites were greatly fluctuated depending on the time and the binding was more stable and existed at the near site of active center when the structural changes in the highly flexible residues in papain were larger. Binding stability and sites would be significantly influenced by the highly flexible residues. Analysis of such residues would provide an important guideline for clarification of enzymatic activities and modification of structural dynamics of such residues would allow us to control enzymatic activities.

  14. A tarantula-venom peptide that antagonises the TRPA1 nociceptor ion channel by binding to the S1-S4 gating domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Junhong; Liu, Boyi; Cao, Guan; Lipchik, Andrew M.; Perez, Minervo; Dekan, Zoltan; Mobli, Mehdi; Daly, Norelle L.; Alewood, Paul F.; Parker, Laurie L.; King, Glenn F.; Zhou, Yufeng; Jordt, Sven-Eric; Nitabach, Michael N.

    2014-01-01

    Background The venoms of predators such as spiders, scorpions, cone snails, sea anemones, and snakes, have been an excellent source of pharmacological diversity for drug discovery and as pharmacological tools for elucidating the structure, function, and physiological properties of ion channels. Here we describe the first known peptide antagonist of the nociceptor ion channel transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1). Results We constructed a recombinant cDNA library encoding ∼100 diverse GPI-anchored peptide toxins (t-toxins) derived from spider venoms and screened this library by co-expression in Xenopus oocytes with TRPA1. This screen resulted in identification of protoxin-I (ProTx-I), a 35-residue peptide from the venom of the Peruvian green-velvet tarantula, Thrixopelma pruriens, as the first known high-affinity peptide TRPA1 antagonist. Interestingly, ProTx-I was previously identified as an antagonist of voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels. To identify the surfaces of ProTx-I by which it binds to these distinct ion channel types, we constructed a t-toxin library of ProTx-I alanine-scanning mutants and screened this library against NaV1.2 and TRPA1. This revealed distinct partially overlapping surfaces of ProTx-I by which it binds to these two ion channels, and whose specific chemical features explain its higher affinity for NaV1.2 than for TRPA1. Importantly, this mutagenesis yielded two novel ProTx-I variants that are only active against either TRPA1or NaV1.2, but not both. By testing its activity against chimeric channels, we identified the extracellular loops of the TRPA1 S1-S4 gating domain as the ProTx-I binding site. Conclusions These studies establish screening of t-toxin libraries of native and mutated toxins, which we term “toxineering”, as a generally applicable method for isolation of novel ion channel modifiers and for design of ion channel modifiers with altered target selectivity. They also suggest that ProTx-I will be a valuable

  15. N-Methylation as a Strategy for Enhancing the Affinity and Selectivity of RNA-binding Peptides: Application to the HIV-1 Frameshift-Stimulating RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilimire, Thomas A; Bennett, Ryan P; Stewart, Ryan A; Garcia-Miranda, Pablo; Blume, Alex; Becker, Jordan; Sherer, Nathan; Helms, Eric D; Butcher, Samuel E; Smith, Harold C; Miller, Benjamin L

    2016-01-15

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) type 1 uses a -1 programmed ribosomal frameshift (-1 PRF) event to translate its enzymes from the same transcript used to encode the virus' structural proteins. The frequency of this event is highly regulated, and significant deviation from the normal 5-10% frequency has been demonstrated to decrease viral infectivity. Frameshifting is primarily regulated by the Frameshift Stimulatory Signal RNA (FSS-RNA), a thermodynamically stable, highly conserved stem loop that has been proposed as a therapeutic target. We describe the design, synthesis, and testing of a series of N-methyl peptides able to bind the HIV-1 FSS RNA stem loop with low nanomolar affinity and high selectivity. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) data indicates increased affinity is a reflection of a substantially enhanced on rate. Compounds readily penetrate cell membranes and inhibit HIV infectivity in a pseudotyped virus assay. Viral infectivity inhibition correlates with compound-dependent changes in the ratios of Gag and Gag-Pol in virus particles. As the first compounds with both single digit nanomolar affinities for the FSS RNA and an ability to inhibit HIV in cells, these studies support the use of N-methylation for enhancing the affinity, selectivity, and bioactivity of RNA-binding peptides. PMID:26496521

  16. The cationic peptide LL-37 binds Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18) with a low dissociation rate and promotes phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianwei; Bajic, Goran; Andersen, Gregers R; Christiansen, Stig Hill; Vorup-Jensen, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    As a broad-spectrum anti-microbial peptide, LL-37 plays an important role in the innate immune system. A series of previous reports implicates LL-37 as an activator of various cell surface receptor-mediated functions, including chemotaxis in integrin CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1)-expressing cells. However, evidence is scarce concerning the direct binding of LL-37 to these receptors and investigations on the associated binding kinetics is lacking. Mac-1, a member of the β2 integrin family, is mainly expressed in myeloid leukocytes. Its critical functions include phagocytosis of complement-opsonized pathogens. Here, we report on interactions of LL-37 and its fragment FK-13 with the ligand-binding domain of Mac-1, the α-chain I domain. LL-37 bound the I-domain with an affinity comparable to the complement fragment C3d, one of the strongest known ligands for Mac-1. In cell adhesion assays both LL-37 and FK-13 supported binding by Mac-1 expressing cells, however, with LL-37-coupled surfaces supporting stronger cell adhesion than FK-13. Likewise, in phagocytosis assays with primary human monocytes both LL-37 and FK-13 enhanced uptake of particles coupled with these ligands but with a tendency towards a stronger uptake by LL-37.

  17. Electrostatic Modifications of the Human Leukocyte Antigen-DR P9 Peptide-Binding Pocket and Susceptibility to Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hov, Johannes R; Kosmoliaptsis, Vasilis; Traherne, James A; Olsson, Marita; Boberg, Kirsten M; Bergquist, Annika; Schrumpf, Erik; Bradley, J Andrew; Taylor, Craig J; Lie, Benedicte A; Trowsdale, John; Karlsen, Tom H

    2011-01-01

    The strongest genetic risk factors for primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) are found in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex at chromosome 6p21. Genes in the HLA class II region encode molecules that present antigen to T lymphocytes. Polymorphisms in these genes are associated with most autoimmune diseases, most likely because they contribute to the specificity of immune responses. The aim of this study was to analyze the structure and electrostatic properties of the peptide-binding groove of HLA-DR in relation to PSC. Thus, four-digit resolution HLA-DRB1 genotyping was performed in 356 PSC patients and 366 healthy controls. Sequence information was used to assign which amino acids were encoded at all polymorphic positions. In stepwise logistic regressions, variations at residues 37 and 86 were independently associated with PSC (P = 1.2 × 10−32 and P = 1.8 × 10−22 in single-residue models, respectively). Three-dimensional modeling was performed to explore the effect of these key residues on the HLA-DR molecule. This analysis indicated that residue 37 was a major determinant of the electrostatic properties of pocket P9 of the peptide-binding groove. Asparagine at residue 37, which was associated with PSC, induced a positive charge in pocket P9. Tyrosine, which protected against PSC, induced a negative charge in this pocket. Consistent with the statistical observations, variation at residue 86 also indirectly influenced the electrostatic properties of this pocket. DRB1*13:01, which was PSC-associated, had a positive P9 pocket and DRB1*13:02, protective against PSC, had a negative P9 pocket. Conclusion: The results suggest that in patients with PSC, residues 37 and 86 of the HLA-DRβ chain critically influence the electrostatic properties of pocket P9 and thereby the range of peptides presented. (Hepatology 2011;53:1967-1976) PMID:21413052

  18. Solution structure of the 45-residue ATP-binding peptide of adenylate kinase as determined by 2-D NMR, FTIR, and CD spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, D.C.; Byler, D.M.; Susi, H.; Brown, E.M.; Kuby, S.A.; Mildyan, A.S.

    1986-05-01

    In the X-ray structure of adenylate kinase residues 1-45 exist as 47% ..cap alpha..-helix, 29% ..beta..-structure (strands and turns) and 24% coil. The solution structure of a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 1-45, which constitutes the MgATP binding site was studied by 3 independent spectroscopic methods. Globularity of the peptide was shown by its broad NMR resonances which narrow upon denaturation, and by its ability to bind MgATP with similar affinity and conformation as the intact enzyme does. COSY and NOESY NMR methods at 250 and 500 MHz reveal proximities among NH, C..cap alpha.., and C..beta.. protons indicative of >20% ..cap alpha..-helix, and >20% ..beta..-structure. Correlation of regions of secondary structure with the primary sequence by 2D NMR indicates at least one ..cap alpha..-helix (res. 23 to 29) and two ..beta..-strands (res. 12 to 15 and 34 to 38). The broad amide I band in the deconvoluted FTIR spectrum could be fit as the sum of 4 peaks due to specific secondary structures, yielding less than or equal to=45% ..cap alpha..-helix, less than or equal to=40% ..beta..-structure and greater than or equal to=15% coil. The CD spectrum, from 185-250 nm, interpreted with a 3-parameter basis set, yielded 20 +/- 5% ..cap alpha..=helix, and less than or equal to=20% ..beta..-structure. The solution structure of peptide 1-45 thus approximates that of residues 1-45 in the crystal.

  19. A peptide mimetic targeting trans-homophilic NCAM binding sites promotes spatial learning and neural plasticity in the hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraev, Igor; Henneberger, Christian; Rossetti, Clara;

    2011-01-01

    a homophilic trans-binding site in Ig2 and binds to Ig3--was developed as a tool for studying NCAM's trans-interactions. In this study, we investigated plannexin's ability to affect neural plasticity and memory formation. We found that plannexin facilitates neurite outgrowth in primary hippocampal neuronal...

  20. Binding of the Cationic Peptide (KL)4K to Lipid Monolayers at the Air-Water Interface: Effect of Lipid Headgroup Charge, Acyl Chain Length, and Acyl Chain Saturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hädicke, André; Blume, Alfred

    2016-04-28

    The binding of the cationic peptide (KL)4K to monolayers of different anionic lipids was determined by adsorption experiments. The chemical structure of the anionic phospholipids was changed in different ways. First, the hydrophobic region of phosphatidylglycerols was altered by elongation of the acyl chain length. Second, an unsaturated chain was introduced. Third, lipids with negatively charged headgroups of different chemical structure were compared. (KL)4K itself shows no surface activity and does not bind to monolayers of zwitterionic lipids. Analysis of (KL)4K binding to anionic lipid monolayers reveals a competition between two binding processes: (i) incorporation of the peptide into the acyl chain region (surface pressure increase) and (ii) electrostatic interaction screening the negative charges with reduction of charge repulsion (surface pressure decrease due to monolayer condensation). The lipid acyl chain length and the chemical structure of the headgroup have minor effects on the binding properties. However, a strong dependence on the phase state of the monolayer was observed. In the liquid-expanded (LE) phase, the fluid monolayer provides enough space, so that peptide insertion due to hydrophobic interactions dominates. For monolayers in the liquid-condensed (LC) phase, peptide binding followed by monolayer condensation is the main effect. PMID:27049846

  1. An HIV-1 encoded peptide mimics the DNA binding loop of NF-{kappa}B and binds thioredoxin with high affinity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su Guoping [Department of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-2352 (United States)]. E-mail: gsu@u.washington.edu; Wang Min [Department of Pathology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520-8023 (United States)]. E-mail: wang.min@yale.edu; Taylor, Ethan Will [Department of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-2352 (United States)]. E-mail: wtaylor@rx.uga.edu

    2005-11-11

    Pro-fs is a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-l)-encoded putative selenoprotein, predicted by a theoretical analysis of the viral genome; it is potentially expressed by a -1 frameshift from the protease coding region. Pro-fs has significant sequence similarity to the DNA binding loop of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B), which is known to bind thioredoxin (Trx). We hypothesize that the putative HIV-1 pro-fs gene product functions by mimicry of NF-{kappa}B via binding to Trx. The hypothesis was tested in vitro by co-immunoprecipitation and GST-pull down assays, using a purified mutant pro-fs protein, in which the two potential selenocysteine residues were mutated to cysteines, in order to permit expression in bacteria. Both experiments showed that pro-fs binds to human wild type Trx (Trx-wt) with high affinity. Mutation of the two conserved cysteine residues in the Trx active site redox center to serine (Ser) (Trx-CS) weakened but failed to abolish the interaction. In pro-fs-transfected 293T cells, using confocal microscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), we have observed that pro-fs localizes in cell nuclei and forms oligomers. Upon stimulation by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), Trx translocates into cell nuclei. Significant FRET efficiency was detected in the nuclei of PMA-stimulated 293T cells co-expressing fluorescence-tagged pro-fs and Trx-wt or Trx-CS. These results indicate that in living cells the double cysteine mutant of pro-fs binds to both Trx and Trx-CS with high affinity, suggesting that Trx-pro-fs binding is a structurally-specific interaction, involving more of the Trx molecule than just its active site cysteine residues. These results establish the capacity for functional mimicry of the Trx binding ability of the NF-{kappa}B/Rel family of transcription factors by the putative HIV-1 pro-fs protein.

  2. Hepatitis C Virus Subtype 3a Envelope Protein 1 Binding with Human Leukocyte Antigen Class I Types of Pakistani Population: Candidate Epitopes for Synthetic Peptide Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Nawaz-Tipu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The object of this cross sectional study was to determine the HCV subtype 3a envelope protein binding affinity with Human Leukocyte Antigen. Envelope 1 (E1 protein is one of the structural proteins responsible for entering the cells through the receptors. The binding affinity of E1 protein epitopes to the selected Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA class I alleles was investigated using the computer-based tools. These prediction tools were also used to design the synthetic vaccine’s candidate epitopes and to identify the individuals/populations who are likely to be responder to those vaccines.The mean frequency of HLA I antigens in Pakistani population was calculated. Threealleles each from HLA A and B were selected. E1 protein sequence extracted from HCV 3a isolates was retrieved and twenty-four sequences of it were selected. NetMHCcons 1.0 server was used to determine the binding affinities of HLA alleles to the epitope sequences of 10 amino acids in length.A02, A03, A11, A24, A33, B08, B13, B15, B35 and B40 were the first five antigens moreprevalent in Pakistan each from HLA A and HLA B.. We did not find any binding affinity between HLA A*201, B*1501 and B*4001 and epitopes from E1 sequences in a threshold of50 nM. Totally five various epitopes derived from different isolates were characterized.The prediction of HLA-E1 epitope specific bindings and the forthcoming response can be a useful bioinformatics tool to uncover the right synthetic peptides for vaccine design purposes.

  3. Hepatitis C Virus Subtype 3a Envelope Protein 1 Binding with Human Leukocyte Antigen Class I Types of Pakistani Population: Candidate Epitopes for Synthetic Peptide Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz-Tipu, Hamid

    2015-10-01

    The object of this cross sectional study was to determine the HCV subtype 3a envelope protein binding affinity with Human Leukocyte Antigen. Envelope 1 (E1) protein is one of the structural proteins responsible for entering the cells through the receptors. The binding affinity of E1 protein epitopes to the selected Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class I alleles was investigated using the computer-based tools. These prediction tools were also used to design the synthetic vaccine's candidate epitopes and to identify the individuals/populations who are likely to be responder to those vaccines.The mean frequency of HLA I antigens in Pakistani population was calculated. Three alleles each from HLA A and B were selected. E1 protein sequence extracted from HCV 3a isolates was retrieved and twenty-four sequences of it were selected. NetMHCcons 1.0 server was used to determine the binding affinities of HLA alleles to the epitope sequences of 10 amino acids in length.A02, A03, A11, A24, A33, B08, B13, B15, B35 and B40 were the first five antigens more prevalent in Pakistan each from HLA A and HLA B.. We did not find any binding affinity between HLA A*201, B*1501 and B*4001 and epitopes from E1 sequences in a threshold of 50 nM. Totally five various epitopes derived from different isolates were characterized.The prediction of HLA-E1 epitope specific bindings and the forthcoming response can be a useful bioinformatics tool to uncover the right synthetic peptides for vaccine design purposes.

  4. Osteopontin and the C-terminal peptide of thrombospondin-4 compete for CD44 binding and have opposite effects on CD133+ cell colony formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobocan Monica C

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background C21, the C-terminal peptide of thrombospondin-4, has growth promoting activity and was discovered as one of several erythropoietin-dependent endothelial proteins. C21 stimulates red cell formation in anemic mice and is a growth factor for CD34+ and CD36+ hematopoietic cells, skin fibroblasts and kidney epithelial cells. ROD1 has been identified as an intracellular mediator. Nothing is known about the existence of putative C21 receptors on plasma membranes of target cells. Findings We analyzed the nature of C21-binding proteins in cell lysates of skin fibroblasts using C21 affinity columns. The membrane receptor CD44 was identified as C21-binding protein by mass spectrometry. We were unable to demonstrate any direct involvement of CD44 on cell growth or the effect of C21 on cell proliferation. A soluble form of CD44 was synthesized in insect cells and purified from culture supernatants with a combination of PVDF filtration in the presence of ammonium sulphate and HPLC. Both osteopontin and hyaluronic acid competitively displaced Biotin-C21 binding to CD44. In a colony-forming assay using primitive CD133+ hematopoietic stem cells from cord blood, osteopontin and C21 had opposite effects and C21 reduced the inhibitory action of osteopontin. Conclusion CD44 is a C21-binding membrane protein. We could not demonstrate an involvement of CD44 in the proliferative action of C21. Nevertheless, based on the antagonism of C21 and osteopontin in hematopoietic precursors, we speculate that C21 could indirectly have a major impact on hematopoietic stem cell proliferation, by hindering osteopontin membrane binding at the level of the bone marrow niche.

  5. The housekeeping dipeptide permease is the Escherichia coli heme transporter and functions with two optional peptide binding proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Létoffé, Sylvie; Delepelaire, Philippe; Wandersman, Cécile

    2006-01-01

    Heme, a major iron source, is transported through the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria by specific heme/hemoprotein receptors and through the inner membrane by heme-specific, periplasmic, binding protein-dependent, ATP-binding cassette permeases. Escherichia coli K12 does not use exogenous heme, and no heme uptake genes have been identified. Nevertheless, a recombinant E. coli strain expressing just one foreign heme outer membrane receptor can use exogenous heme as an iron source. Thi...

  6. Screening and identification of peptides specifically binding to human osteosarcoma cells%人骨肉瘤细胞特异性结合肽的筛选及验证

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢坤; 姜勇; 管明强; 肖军; 王健; 李郅涵; 史占军

    2012-01-01

    Objective To obtain the peptide that specifically binds to human osteosareoma MG-63 cells from Ph.D.7TM phage display peptide library.Methods Human osteosareoma MG-63 cells were used as the target cells with human embryonic kidney 293T cells as the control for screening the peptide from Ph.D.7TM phage display peptide library.The enriched specially binding peptides were verified by cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).The location of the peptide in MG-63 cells was investigated using cell fluorescence staining,and targeting of the peptide was lested by organ immunohistochemistry with Osteosareoma model.Results The specifically binding peptides were enriched after 4 rounds of screening.The sequence SLTNLSK was confirmed as the most frequent peptide by DNA sequencing and showed strong specificity verified by cell ELISA,fluorescent staining and organ immunohistochemistry.Conclusion A peptide that specifically binds to MG-63 cells has been screened from Ph.D.7TM phage display peptide library to serve as a potential candidate for osteosarcoma-targering therapy.%目的 获得人骨肉瘤细胞MG63特异性结合肽,为骨肉瘤靶向治疗奠定基础.方法 应用噬菌体展示技术,以人骨肉瘤细胞作为靶细胞,293T细胞为差减细胞,筛选获得MG-63细胞特异性结合肽.酶联免疫法进行靶向性验证.应用荧光染色技术初步探讨短肽细胞受体位置.制作人骨肉瘤模型,尾静脉注射目标噬菌体,免疫组化检测其靶向性.结果 经过四轮一步有机相离心分离方法,获得了与骨肉瘤细胞特异性结合的短肽,并测序获得其中出现次数最多的序列SLTNLSK,靶向验证结果显示该短肽有较强的特异性.结论 应用噬菌体展示技术,获得了与人骨肉瘤细胞特异性结合的短肽,序列为SLTNLSK,并验证了其靶向性.可以作为骨肉瘤靶向治疗的导向性化合物.

  7. The Positively Charged COOH-terminal Glycosaminoglycan-binding CXCL9(74-103) Peptide Inhibits CXCL8-induced Neutrophil Extravasation and Monosodium Urate Crystal-induced Gout in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanheule, Vincent; Janssens, Rik; Boff, Daiane; Kitic, Nikola; Berghmans, Nele; Ronsse, Isabelle; Kungl, Andreas J; Amaral, Flavio Almeida; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Van Damme, Jo; Proost, Paul; Mortier, Anneleen

    2015-08-28

    The ELR(-)CXC chemokine CXCL9 is characterized by a long, highly positively charged COOH-terminal region, absent in most other chemokines. Several natural leukocyte- and fibroblast-derived COOH-terminally truncated CXCL9 forms missing up to 30 amino acids were identified. To investigate the role of the COOH-terminal region of CXCL9, several COOH-terminal peptides were chemically synthesized. These peptides display high affinity for glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and compete with functional intact chemokines for GAG binding, the longest peptide (CXCL9(74-103)) being the most potent. The COOH-terminal peptide CXCL9(74-103) does not signal through or act as an antagonist for CXCR3, the G protein-coupled CXCL9 receptor, and does not influence neutrophil chemotactic activity of CXCL8 in vitro. Based on the GAG binding data, an anti-inflammatory role for CXCL9(74-103) was further evidenced in vivo. Simultaneous intravenous injection of CXCL9(74-103) with CXCL8 injection in the joint diminished CXCL8-induced neutrophil extravasation. Analogously, monosodium urate crystal-induced neutrophil migration to the tibiofemural articulation, a murine model of gout, is highly reduced by intravenous injection of CXCL9(74-103). These data show that chemokine-derived peptides with high affinity for GAGs may be used as anti-inflammatory peptides; by competing with active chemokines for binding and immobilization on GAGs, these peptides may lower chemokine presentation on the endothelium and disrupt the generation of a chemokine gradient, thereby preventing a chemokine from properly performing its chemotactic function. The CXCL9 peptide may serve as a lead molecule for further development of inhibitors of inflammation based on interference with chemokine-GAG interactions.

  8. Structure-activity relationship of the peptide binding-motif mediating the BRCA2:RAD51 protein-protein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Duncan E; Marsh, May; Blundell, Tom L; Abell, Chris; Hyvönen, Marko

    2016-04-01

    RAD51 is a recombinase involved in the homologous recombination of double-strand breaks in DNA. RAD51 forms oligomers by binding to another molecule of RAD51 via an 'FxxA' motif, and the same recognition sequence is similarly utilised to bind BRCA2. We have tabulated the effects of mutation of this sequence, across a variety of experimental methods and from relevant mutations observed in the clinic. We use mutants of a tetrapeptide sequence to probe the binding interaction, using both isothermal titration calorimetry and X-ray crystallography. Where possible, comparison between our tetrapeptide mutational study and the previously reported mutations is made, discrepancies are discussed and the importance of secondary structure in interpreting alanine scanning and mutational data of this nature is considered.

  9. Determination of osteogenic or adipogenic lineages in muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) by a collagen-binding peptide (CBP) derived from bone sialoprotein (BSP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yoon Jung [Dental Regenerative Biotechnology Major, School of Dentistry and Dental Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jue Yeon [Research Institute, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC), Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Jin [Department of Industrial Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Chong-Pyoung, E-mail: ccpperio@snu.ac.kr [Research Institute, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC), Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry and Dental Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yoon Jeong, E-mail: parkyj@snu.ac.kr [Dental Regenerative Biotechnology Major, School of Dentistry and Dental Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute, Nano Intelligent Biomedical Engineering Corporation (NIBEC), Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CBP sequence is identified from BSP and has collagen binding activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CBP directly activates the MAPK signaling, especially ERK1/2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CBP increase osteoblastic differentiation by the activation of Runx2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CBP decrease adipogenic differentiation by the inhibition of PPAR{gamma}. -- Abstract: Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is a mineralized, tissue-specific, non-collagenous protein that is normally expressed only in mineralized tissues such as bone, dentin, cementum, and calcified cartilage, and at sites of new mineral formation. The binding of BSP to collagen is thought to be important for initiating bone mineralization and bone cell adhesion to the mineralized matrix. Several recent studies have isolated stem cells from muscle tissue, but their functional properties are still unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of a synthetic collagen-binding peptide (CBP) on the differentiation efficiency of muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs). The CBP sequence (NGVFKYRPRYYLYKHAYFYPHLKRFPVQ) corresponds to residues 35-62 of bone sialoprotein (BSP), which are located within the collagen-binding domain in BSP. Interestingly, this synthetic CBP inhibited adipogenic differentiation but increased osteogenic differentiation in MDSCs. The CBP also induced expression of osteoblastic marker proteins, including alkaline phosphatase (ALP), type I collagen, Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), and osteocalcin; prevented adipogenic differentiation in MDSCs; and down-regulated adipose-specific mRNAs, such as adipocyte protein 2 (aP2) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}. The CBP increased Extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2 protein phosphorylation, which is important in lineage determination. These observations suggest that this CBP determines the osteogenic or adipogenic lineage in MDSCs by activating ERK1/2. Taken together, a

  10. Identification of IgE-binding peptide and critical amino acids of Jatropha curcas allergen involved in allergenic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Livia Maia; de Oliveira, Natalia Deus; Damatta, Renato Augusto; do Nascimento, Viviane Veiga; Soares, Thais Pacheco; Machado, Olga Lima Tavares

    2016-01-01

    Increasing energy demand has spurred interest in the use of biofuels. Jatropha curcas (physic nut), an inedible oilseed, is a potential source of bioenergy. The seeds, however, contain allergens such as Jat c 1, a 2S albumin that can induce hypersensitivity reactions in humans and result in allergic diseases. Recent advances in identifying and characterizing plant allergens and, in particular, their immunoglobulin E (IgE)-binding epitopes have produced a wealth of information. We identified IgE-binding regions and the critical amino acids involved in the degranulation of mast cells and the release of histamine, preliminary steps for the prevention and treatment of this allergy. Four IgE-binding regions were identified in the sequence of Jat c 1. We identified and demonstrated the fundamental role of two glutamic acid residues in IgE binding. The sequence LEKQLEEGEVGS produces a random loop on the most exposed part of Jat c 1. This region is important to the stimulation of the allergic response. The possibility of using this information to produce vaccines and other pharmacological agents for allergy treatment is discussed. PMID:27119058

  11. Selective and ATP-dependent translocation of peptides by the homodimeric ATP binding cassette transporter TAP-like (ABCB9)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, Justina Clarinda; Abele, Rupert; Tampé, Robert

    2005-01-01

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP)-like (TAPL, ABCB9) belongs to the ATP-binding cassette transporter family, which translocates a vast variety of solutes across membranes. The function of this half-size transporter has not yet been determined. Here, we show that TAPL forms a h

  12. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangshun Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms.

  13. Binding of cationic peptides (KX)4K to DPPG bilayers. Increasing the hydrophobicity of the uncharged amino acid X drives formation of membrane bound β-sheets: A DSC and FT-IR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hädicke, André; Blume, Alfred

    2016-06-01

    The binding of cationic peptides of the sequence (KX)4K to lipid vesicles of negatively charged dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and temperature dependent Fourier-transformed infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The hydrophobicity of the uncharged amino acid X was changed from G (glycine) over A (alanine), Abu (α-aminobutyric acid), V (valine) to L (leucine). The binding of the peptides caused an increase of the phase transition temperature (Tm) of DPPG by up to 20°C. The shift depended on the charge ratio and on the hydrophobicity of the amino acid X. Unexpectedly, the upward shift of Tm increased with increasing hydrophobicity of X. FT-IR spectroscopy showed a shift of the CH2 stretching vibrations of DPPG to lower frequency, particularly for bilayers in the liquid-crystalline phase, indicating an ordering of the hydrocarbon chains when the peptides were bound. Changes in the lipid C=O vibrational band indicated a dehydration of the lipid headgroup region after peptide binding. (KG)4K was bound in an unordered structure at all temperatures. All other peptides formed intermolecular antiparallel β-sheets, when bound to gel phase DPPG. However, for (KA)4K and (KAbu)4K, the β-sheets converted into an unordered structure above Tm. In contrast, the β-sheet structures of (KV)4K and (KL)4K remained stable even at 80°C when bound to the liquid-crystalline phase of DPPG. Strong aggregation of DPPG vesicles occurred after peptide binding. For the aggregates, we suggest a structure, where aggregated single β-sheets are sandwiched between opposing DPPG bilayers with a dehydrated interfacial region.

  14. Loop replacements with gut-binding peptides in Cry1Ab domain II enhanced toxicity against the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens (Stål)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Ensi; Lin, Li; Chen, Chen; Chen, Hanze; Zhuang, Haohan; Wu, Songqing; Sha, Li; Guan, Xiong; Huang, Zhipeng

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry toxins have been used widely in pest managements. However, Cry toxins are not effective against sap-sucking insects (Hemiptera), which limits the application of Bt for pest management. In order to extend the insecticidal spectrum of Bt toxins to the rice brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens, we modified Cry1Ab putative receptor binding domains with selected BPH gut-binding peptides (GBPs). Three surface exposed loops in the domain II of Cry1Ab were replaced with two GBPs (P2S and P1Z) respectively. Bioassay results showed that toxicity of modified toxin L2-P2S increased significantly (~9 folds) against BPH nymphs. In addition, damage of midgut cells was observed from the nymphs fed with L2-P2S. Our results indicate that modifying Cry toxins based on the toxin-gut interactions can broaden the insecticidal spectrum of Bt toxin. This method provides another approach for the development of transgenic crops with novel insecticidal activity against hemipteran insects and insect populations resistant to current Bt transgenic crops. PMID:26830331

  15. Loop replacements with gut-binding peptides in Cry1Ab domain II enhanced toxicity against the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens (Stål).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Ensi; Lin, Li; Chen, Chen; Chen, Hanze; Zhuang, Haohan; Wu, Songqing; Sha, Li; Guan, Xiong; Huang, Zhipeng

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry toxins have been used widely in pest managements. However, Cry toxins are not effective against sap-sucking insects (Hemiptera), which limits the application of Bt for pest management. In order to extend the insecticidal spectrum of Bt toxins to the rice brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens, we modified Cry1Ab putative receptor binding domains with selected BPH gut-binding peptides (GBPs). Three surface exposed loops in the domain II of Cry1Ab were replaced with two GBPs (P2S and P1Z) respectively. Bioassay results showed that toxicity of modified toxin L2-P2S increased significantly (~9 folds) against BPH nymphs. In addition, damage of midgut cells was observed from the nymphs fed with L2-P2S. Our results indicate that modifying Cry toxins based on the toxin-gut interactions can broaden the insecticidal spectrum of Bt toxin. This method provides another approach for the development of transgenic crops with novel insecticidal activity against hemipteran insects and insect populations resistant to current Bt transgenic crops. PMID:26830331

  16. Differential binding of monomethylarsonous acid compared to arsenite and arsenic trioxide with zinc finger peptides and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xixi; Sun, Xi; Mobarak, Charlotte; Gandolfi, A Jay; Burchiel, Scott W; Hudson, Laurie G; Liu, Ke Jian

    2014-04-21

    Arsenic is an environmental toxin that enhances the carcinogenic effect of DNA-damaging agents, such as ultraviolet radiation and benzo[a]pyrene. Interaction with zinc finger proteins has been shown to be an important molecular mechanism for arsenic toxicity and cocarcinogenesis. Arsenicals such as arsenite, arsenic trioxide (ATO), and monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) have been reported to interact with cysteine residues of zinc finger domains, but little is known about potential differences in their selectivity of interaction. Herein we analyzed the interaction of arsenite, MMA(III), and ATO with C2H2, C3H1, and C4 configurations of zinc fingers using UV-vis, cobalt, fluorescence, and mass spectrometry. We observed that arsenite and ATO both selectively bound to C3H1 and C4 zinc fingers, while MMA(III) interacted with all three configurations of zinc finger peptides. Structurally and functionally, arsenite and ATO caused conformational changes and zinc loss on C3H1 and C4 zinc finger peptide and protein, respectively, whereas MMA(III) changed conformation and displaced zinc on all three types of zinc fingers. The differential selectivity was also demonstrated in zinc finger proteins isolated from cells treated with these arsenicals. Our results show that trivalent inorganic arsenic compounds, arsenite and ATO, have the same selectivity and behavior when interacting with zinc finger proteins, while methylation removes the selectivity. These findings provide insights on the molecular mechanisms underlying the differential effects of inorganic versus methylated arsenicals, as well as the role of in vivo arsenic methylation in arsenic toxicity and carcinogenesis.

  17. Identification of Plasmodium falciparum RhopH3 protein peptides that specifically bind to erythrocytes and inhibit merozoite invasion

    OpenAIRE

    Pinzón, Carlos Giovanni; Curtidor, Hernando; Reyes, Claudia; Méndez, David; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2008-01-01

    The identification of sequences involved in binding to erythrocytes is an important step for understanding the molecular basis of merozoite–erythrocyte interactions that take place during invasion of the Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite into host cells. Several molecules located in the apical organelles (micronemes, rhoptry, dense granules) of the invasive-stage parasite are essential for erythrocyte recognition, invasion, and establishment of the nascent parasitophorous vacuole. Partic...

  18. NCAM Mimetic Peptides: An Update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    sequences contain one or several NCAM homophilic binding sites involved in NCAM binding to itself, have been identified. By means of NMR titration analysis and molecular modeling a number of peptides derived from NCAM and targeting NCAM heterophilic ligands such as the fibroblast growth factor receptor...... and heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG) have been identified. The FGL, dekaCAM, FRM/EncaminA, BCL, EncaminC and EncaminE peptides all target the FGF receptor whereas the heparin binding peptide HBP targets HSPG. Moreover, a number of NCAM binding peptides have been identified employing screening...

  19. The role of amino acid electron-donor/acceptor atoms in host-cell binding peptides is associated with their 3D structure and HLA-binding capacity in sterile malarial immunity induction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patarroyo, Manuel E., E-mail: mepatarr@mail.com [Fundacion Instituto de Inmunologia de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogota (Colombia); Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia); Almonacid, Hannia; Moreno-Vranich, Armando [Fundacion Instituto de Inmunologia de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogota (Colombia)

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fundamental residues located in some HABPs are associated with their 3D structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron-donor atoms present in {beta}-turn, random, distorted {alpha}-helix structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron-donor atoms bound to HLA-DR53. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron-acceptor atoms present in regular {alpha}-helix structure bound to HLA-DR52. -- Abstract: Plasmodium falciparum malaria continues being one of the parasitic diseases causing the highest worldwide mortality due to the parasite's multiple evasion mechanisms, such as immunological silence. Membrane and organelle proteins are used during invasion for interactions mediated by high binding ability peptides (HABPs); these have amino acids which establish hydrogen bonds between them in some of their critical binding residues. Immunisation assays in the Aotus model using HABPs whose critical residues had been modified have revealed a conformational change thereby enabling a protection-inducing response. This has improved fitting within HLA-DR{beta}1{sup Asterisk-Operator} molecules where amino acid electron-donor atoms present in {beta}-turn, random or distorted {alpha}-helix structures preferentially bound to HLA-DR53 molecules, whilst HABPs having amino acid electron-acceptor atoms present in regular {alpha}-helix structure bound to HLA-DR52. This data has great implications for vaccine development.

  20. Erythromycin, roxithromycin, and clarithromycin: use of slow-binding kinetics to compare their in vitro interaction with a bacterial ribosomal complex active in peptide bond formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinos, George P; Connell, Sean R; Nierhaus, Knud H; Kalpaxis, Dimitrios L

    2003-03-01

    In a cell-free system derived from Escherichia coli, it is shown that clarithromycin and roxithromycin, like their parent compound erythromycin, do not inhibit the puromycin reaction (i.e., the peptide bond formation between puromycin and AcPhe-tRNA bound at the P-site of 70S ribosomes programmed with heteropolymeric mRNA). Nevertheless, all three antibiotics compete for binding on the ribosome with tylosin, a 16-membered ring macrolide that behaves as a slow-binding, slowly reversible inhibitor of peptidyltransferase. The mutually exclusive binding of these macrolides to ribosomes is also corroborated by the fact that they protect overlapping sites in domain V of 23S rRNA from chemical modification by dimethyl sulfate. From this competition effect, detailed kinetic analysis revealed that roxithromycin or clarithromycin (A), like erythromycin, reacts rapidly with AcPhe-tRNA.MF-mRNA x 70S ribosomal complex (C) to form the encounter complex CA which is then slowly isomerized to a more tight complex, termed C*A. The value of the overall dissociation constant, K, encompassing both steps of macrolide interaction with complex C, is 36 nM for erythromycin, 20 nM for roxithromycin, and 8 nM for clarithromycin. Because the off-rate constant of C*A complex does not significantly differ among the three macrolides, the superiority of clarithromycin as an inhibitor of translation in E. coli cells and many Gram-positive bacteria may be correlated with its greater rate of association with ribosomes. PMID:12606769

  1. Correction: Identification of specific calcitonin-like receptor residues important for calcitonin gene-related peptide high affinity binding

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee, Sugato; Evanson, Janel; Harris, Erik; Lowe, Stephen L; Speth, Robert C.; Thomasson, Kathryn A; Porter, James E.

    2006-01-01

    This is a correction article. After publication of this work [1], we became aware of the fact that Robert C. Speth was not included as an author. Dr. Speth put a considerable amount of time and effort into developing and preparing the radiopeptide used to carry out the radioligand binding studies reported in this manuscript and therefore should have originally been included as an author. We apologize to Dr. Speth for any inconvenience that this oversight might have caused and thank him for hi...

  2. Macrobrachium rosenbergii mannose binding lectin: synthesis of MrMBL-N20 and MrMBL-C16 peptides and their antimicrobial characterization, bioinformatics and relative gene expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arockiaraj, Jesu; Chaurasia, Mukesh Kumar; Kumaresan, Venkatesh; Palanisamy, Rajesh; Harikrishnan, Ramasamy; Pasupuleti, Mukesh; Kasi, Marimuthu

    2015-04-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL), an antimicrobial protein, is an important component of innate immune system which recognizes repetitive sugar groups on the surface of bacteria and viruses leading to activation of the complement system. In this study, we reported a complete molecular characterization of cDNA encoded for MBL from freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii (Mr). Two short peptides (MrMBL-N20: (20)AWNTYDYMKREHSLVKPYQG(39) and MrMBL-C16: (307)GGLFYVKHKEQQRKRF(322)) were synthesized from the MrMBL polypeptide. The purity of the MrMBL-N20 (89%) and MrMBL-C16 (93%) peptides were confirmed by MS analysis (MALDI-ToF). The purified peptides were used for further antimicrobial characterization including minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay, kinetics of bactericidal efficiency and analysis of hemolytic capacity. The peptides exhibited antimicrobial activity towards all the Gram-negative bacteria taken for analysis, whereas they showed the activity towards only a few selected Gram-positive bacteria. MrMBL-C16 peptides produced the highest inhibition towards both the Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria compared to the MrMBL-N20. Both peptides do not produce any inhibition against Bacillus sps. The kinetics of bactericidal efficiency showed that the peptides drastically reduced the number of surviving bacterial colonies after 24 h incubation. The results of hemolytic activity showed that both peptides produced strong activity at higher concentration. However, MrMBL-C16 peptide produced the highest activity compared to the MrMBL-N20 peptide. Overall, the results indicated that the peptides can be used as bactericidal agents. The MrMBL protein sequence was characterized using various bioinformatics tools including phylogenetic analysis and structure prediction. We also reported the MrMBL gene expression pattern upon viral and bacterial infection in M. rosenbergii gills. It could be concluded that the prawn MBL may be one of the important molecule which

  3. Rescue of amyloid-Beta-induced inhibition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by a peptide homologous to the nicotine binding domain of the alpha 7 subtype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur A Nery

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by brain accumulation of the neurotoxic amyloid-β peptide (Aβ and by loss of cholinergic neurons and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs. Recent evidence indicates that memory loss and cognitive decline in AD correlate better with the amount of soluble Aβ than with the extent of amyloid plaque deposits in affected brains. Inhibition of nAChRs by soluble Aβ40 is suggested to contribute to early cholinergic dysfunction in AD. Using phage display screening, we have previously identified a heptapeptide, termed IQ, homologous to most nAChR subtypes, binding with nanomolar affinity to soluble Aβ40 and blocking Aβ-induced inhibition of carbamylcholine-induced currents in PC12 cells expressing α7 nAChRs. Using alanine scanning mutagenesis and whole-cell current recording, we have now defined the amino acids in IQ essential for reversal of Aβ40 inhibition of carbamylcholine-induced responses in PC12 cells, mediated by α7 subtypes and other endogenously expressed nAChRs. We further investigated the effects of soluble Aβ, IQ and analogues of IQ on α3β4 nAChRs recombinantly expressed in HEK293 cells. Results show that nanomolar concentrations of soluble Aβ40 potently inhibit the function of α3β4 nAChRs, and that subsequent addition of IQ or its analogues does not reverse this effect. However, co-application of IQ makes the inhibition of α3β4 nAChRs by Aβ40 reversible. These findings indicate that Aβ40 inhibits different subtypes of nAChRs by interacting with specific receptor domains homologous to the IQ peptide, suggesting that IQ may be a lead for novel drugs to block the inhibition of cholinergic function in AD.

  4. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands, and generally do so more strongly than the corresponding DNA or RNA strands while exhibiting increased sequence specificity and solubility. The peptide nucleic acids comprise ligands selected from...

  5. An Unexpected Gas-Phase Binding Motif for Metal Dication Complexation with Peptides: Irmpd Spectroscopic Structure Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Robert C.; Steill, Jeffrey; Polfer, Nicolas; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos

    2011-06-01

    The favorable orientation of the amide linkage and the aromatic side chain of N-terminal Phe or Trp leads to several favorable motifs for metal ion binding to dipeptides, having distinct characteristics in the IR spectrum. Infrared multiple photon photodissociation spectroscopy using the FELIX free electron laser has enabled clear resolution of these isomeric forms. The spectral patterns of complexes of small dications (Mg2+, Ni2+ and Co2+) reveal an unexpected new isomeric form, in which the metal ion displaces the amide hydrogen, forming a metal-nitrogen bond with covalent character which is unprecedented in such gas-phase complexes. Spectra of the ions were acquired by irradiating the cell of the Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer with infrared light from the FELIX laser at wavelengths in the approximate range 500 to 1900 Cm-1.

  6. CopA3 Peptide Prevents Ultraviolet-Induced Inhibition of Type-I Procollagen and Induction of Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 in Human Skin Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hee Kim

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet (UV exposure is well-known to induce premature aging, which is mediated by matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1 activity. A 9-mer peptide, CopA3 (CopA3 was synthesized from a natural peptide, coprisin, which is isolated from the dung beetle Copris tripartitus. As part of our continuing search for novel bioactive natural products, CopA3 was investigated for its in vitro anti-skin photoaging activity. UV-induced inhibition of type-I procollagen and induction of MMP-1 were partially prevented in human skin fibroblasts by CopA3 peptide in a dose-dependent manner. At a concentration of 25 μM, CopA3 nearly completely inhibited MMP-1 expression. These results suggest that CopA3, an insect peptide, is a potential candidate for the prevention and treatment of skin aging.

  7. Identification of Peptides That Inhibit the DNA Binding, trans-Activator, and DNA Replication Functions of the Human Papillomavirus Type 11 E2 Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Su-Jun; Pearce, Kenneth H.; Dixon, Eric P.; Hartley, Kelly A.; Stanley, Thomas B.; Lobe, David C.; Garvey, Edward P.; Kost, Thomas A.; Petty, Regina L.; Rocque, Warren J.; Alexander, Kenneth A.; Underwood, Mark R.

    2004-01-01

    Peptide antagonists of the human papillomavirus type 11 (HPV-11) E2-DNA association were identified using a filamentous bacteriophage random peptide library. Synthetic peptides antagonized the E2-DNA interaction, effectively blocked E2-mediated transcriptional activation of a reporter gene in cell culture, and inhibited E1-E2-mediated HPV-11 DNA replication in vitro. These peptides may prove to be useful tools for characterizing E2 function and for exploring the effectiveness of E2-inhibitor-...

  8. Inhibition of both HIV-1 reverse transcription and gene expression by a cyclic peptide that binds the Tat-transactivating response element (TAR RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S Lalonde

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The RNA response element TAR plays a critical role in HIV replication by providing a binding site for the recruitment of the viral transactivator protein Tat. Using a structure-guided approach, we have developed a series of conformationally-constrained cyclic peptides that act as structural mimics of the Tat RNA binding region and block Tat-TAR interactions at nanomolar concentrations in vitro. Here we show that these compounds block Tat-dependent transcription in cell-free systems and in cell-based reporter assays. The compounds are also cell permeable, have low toxicity, and inhibit replication of diverse HIV-1 strains, including both CXCR4-tropic and CCR5-tropic primary HIV-1 isolates of the divergent subtypes A, B, C, D and CRF01_AE. In human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, the cyclic peptidomimetic L50 exhibited an IC(50 ∼250 nM. Surprisingly, inhibition of LTR-driven HIV-1 transcription could not account for the full antiviral activity. Timed drug-addition experiments revealed that L-50 has a bi-phasic inhibition curve with the first phase occurring after HIV-1 entry into the host cell and during the initiation of HIV-1 reverse transcription. The second phase coincides with inhibition of HIV-1 transcription. Reconstituted reverse transcription assays confirm that HIV-1 (- strand strong stop DNA synthesis is blocked by L50-TAR RNA interactions in-vitro. These findings are consistent with genetic evidence that TAR plays critical roles both during reverse transcription and during HIV gene expression. Our results suggest that antiviral drugs targeting TAR RNA might be highly effective due to a dual inhibitory mechanism.

  9. Crystal structure of the stress-inducible human heat shock protein 70 substrate-binding domain in complex with peptide substrate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingfeng Zhang

    Full Text Available The HSP70 family of molecular chaperones function to maintain protein quality control and homeostasis. The major stress-induced form, HSP70 (also called HSP72 or HSPA1A is considered an important anti-cancer drug target because it is constitutively overexpressed in a number of human cancers and promotes cancer cell survival. All HSP70 family members contain two functional domains: an N-terminal nucleotide binding domain (NBD and a C-terminal protein substrate-binding domain (SBD; the latter is subdivided into SBDα and SBDβ subdomains. The NBD and SBD structures of the bacterial ortholog, DnaK, have been characterized, but only the isolated NBD and SBDα segments of eukaryotic HSP70 proteins have been determined. Here we report the crystal structure of the substrate-bound human HSP70-SBD to 2 angstrom resolution. The overall fold of this SBD is similar to the corresponding domain in the substrate-bound DnaK structures, confirming a similar overall architecture of the orthologous bacterial and human HSP70 proteins. However, conformational differences are observed in the peptide-HSP70-SBD complex, particularly in the loop L(α, β that bridges SBDα to SBDβ, and the loop L(L,1 that connects the SBD and NBD. The interaction between the SBDα and SBDβ subdomains and the mode of substrate recognition is also different between DnaK and HSP70. This suggests that differences may exist in how different HSP70 proteins recognize their respective substrates. The high-resolution structure of the substrate-bound-HSP70-SBD complex provides a molecular platform for the rational design of small molecule compounds that preferentially target this C-terminal domain, in order to modulate human HSP70 function.

  10. Novel Hybrid Compound of a Plinabulin Prodrug with an IgG Binding Peptide for Generating a Tumor Selective Noncovalent-Type Antibody-Drug Conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muguruma, Kyohei; Yakushiji, Fumika; Kawamata, Ryosuke; Akiyama, Daichi; Arima, Risako; Shirasaka, Takuya; Kikkawa, Yamato; Taguchi, Akihiro; Takayama, Kentaro; Fukuhara, Takeshi; Watabe, Tetsuro; Ito, Yuji; Hayashi, Yoshio

    2016-07-20

    Although several approaches for making antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) have been developed, it has yet to be reported that an antibody binding peptide such as Z33 from protein A is utilized as the pivotal unit to generate the noncovalent-type ADC (NC-ADC). Herein we aim to establish a novel probe for NC-ADC by synthesizing the Z33-conjugated antitumor agent, plinabulin. Due to the different solubility of two components, including hydrophobic plinabulin and hydrophilic Z33, an innovative method with a solid-supported disulfide coupling reagent is required for the synthesis of the target compounds with prominent efficiency (29% isolated yield). We demonstrate that the synthesized hybrid exhibits a binding affinity against the anti-HER2 antibody (Herceptin) and the anti-CD71 antibody (6E1) (Kd = 46.6 ± 0.5 nM and 4.5 ± 0.56 μM, respectively) in the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay. In the cell-based assays, the hybrid provides a significant cytotoxicity in the presence of Herceptin against HER2 overexpressing SKBR-3 cells, but not against HER2 low-expressing MCF-7 cells. Further, it is noteworthy that the hybrid in combination with Herceptin induces cytotoxicity against Herceptin-resistant SKBR-3 (SKBR-3HR) cells. Similar results are obtained with the 6E1 antibody, suggesting that the synthesized hybrid can be widely applicable for NC-ADC using the antibody of interest. In summary, a series of evidence presented here strongly indicate that NC-ADCs have high potential for the next generation of antitumor agents. PMID:27304609

  11. Peptide-binding motif prediction by using phage display library for SasaUBA*0301, a resistance haplotype of MHC class I molecule from Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Heng; Hermsen, Trudi; Stet, Rene J M;

    2008-01-01

    -terminus. Meanwhile, phage display peptide library encoding random 12mer peptides was also screened against beta(2)m/SasaUBA*0301. Eighty-five percentages of the corresponding peptides have an enrichment of leucine, methionine, valine, or isoleucine at the C-terminus. We predict that this particular allele of Salmon...

  12. 人结肠癌血管特异结合短肽的噬菌体肽库筛选及鉴定%Selection and identification of a specific binding peptide targeting to blood vessel of human colon cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    季刚; 梁树辉; 董光龙; 王为忠; 傅涛

    2011-01-01

    目的 建立小鼠结肠癌模型,筛选并鉴定能够与人结肠癌血管内皮细胞特异结合的噬菌体呈现短肽.方法 建立小鼠荷瘤模型.鉴定阳性噬菌体的体内归巢能力及内皮细胞结合能力.人工合成噬菌体呈现短肽,通过竞争结合实验观察短肽对其呈现噬菌体的竞争结合抑制作用.并检测短肽与共培养内皮细胞及结肠癌血管的特异性结合能力.结果 鉴定出两种外源肽噬菌体,称为pCV1及pCV2.体内实验显示,pCV1、pCV2均能特异性归巢于人结肠癌移植瘤组织,滴度比值pCV1/pCont、pCV2/pCont分别为15.9、20.1倍,明显高于对照组织.体外细胞酶联免疫吸附试验(ELISA)结果显示pCV2在Co-HUVECs上的结合显著高于在HUVECs上的结合,其比值达2.61.人工合成短肽CV2能特异性竞争抑制pCV2向结肠癌移植瘤内的归巢及与Co-HUVECs的特异性结合.免疫荧光染色结果显示,FITC-CV2特异性结合于Co-HUVECs的胞膜与核周胞质,以及结肠癌移植瘤的血管组织.结论 得到两个能特异性结合于结肠癌移植瘤的噬菌体单克隆pCV1及pCV2.pCV2能够特异性结合于Co-HUVECs,pCV2所呈现的环状九肽CV2介导了它与Co-HUVECs的特异结合.短肽CV2具有与Co-HUVECs及结肠癌移植瘤血管特异性结合的能力,有可能用于结肠癌的血管靶向治疗.%Objective To select, identify and analyze a peptide binding specifically to blood vessels of human colon cancer by phage displayed peptide library in vivo. Methods Animal models were established using sub-renal capsular assay (SRCA) in immunosuppressive mice implanted with human colon cancer xenografts. The phage displayed peptide library was injected intravenously into mice. After 4 rounds of selection, 20 clones were picked up randomly and sequenced individually. The homing ability to human colon cancer xenografts and co-cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells ( Co-HUVECs with human colon cancer Lovo cells) of the

  13. 68Ga-labeling and in vivo evaluation of a uPAR binding DOTA- and NODAGA-conjugated peptide for PET imaging of invasive cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a well-established biomarker for tumor aggressiveness and metastatic potential. DOTA-AE105 and DOTA-AE105-NH2 labeled with 64Cu have previously been demonstrated to be able to noninvasively monitor uPAR expression using positron emission tomography (PET) in human cancer xenograft mice models. Here we introduce 68Ga-DOTA-AE105-NH2 and 68Ga-NODAGA-AE105-NH2 and evaluate their imaging properties using small-animal PET. Methods: Synthesis of DOTA-AE105-NH2 and NODAGA-AE105-NH2 was based on solid-phase peptide synthesis protocols using the Fmoc strategy. 68GaCl3 was eluted from a 68Ge/68Ga generator. The eluate was either concentrated on a cation-exchange column or fractionated and used directly for labeling. For in vitro characterization of both tracers, partition coefficient, buffer and plasma stability, uPAR binding affinity and cell uptake were determined. To characterize the in vivo properties, dynamic microPET imaging was carried out in nude mice bearing human glioma U87MG tumor xenograft. Results: In vitro experiments revealed uPAR binding affinities in the lower nM range for both conjugated peptides and identical to AE105. Labeling of DOTA-AE105-NH2 and NODAGA-AE105-NH2 with 68Ga was done at 95°C and room temperature, respectively. The highest radiochemical yield and purity were obtained using fractionated elution, whereas a negative effect of acetone on labeling efficiency for NODAGA-AE105-NH2 was observed. Good stability in phosphate-buffered saline and mouse plasma was observed. High cell uptake was found for both tracers in U87MG tumor cells. Dynamic microPET imaging demonstrated good tumor-to-background ratio for both tracers. Tumor uptake was 2.1% ID/g and 1.3% ID/g 30 min postinjection and 2.0% ID/g and 1.1% ID/g 60 min postinjection for 68Ga-NODAGA-AE105-NH2 and 68Ga-DOTA-AE105-NH2, respectively. A significantly higher tumor-to-muscle ratio (P68Ga-NODAGA-AE105-NH2 60 min

  14. An Immunosensor Based on Antibody Binding Fragments Attached to Gold Nanoparticles for the Detection of Peptides Derived from Avian Influenza Hemagglutinin H5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula Jarocka

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns the development of an immunosensor for detection of peptides derived from avian influenza hemagglutinin H5. Its preparation consists of successive gold electrode modification steps: (i modification with 1,6-hexanedithiol and gold colloidal nanoparticles; (ii immobilization of antibody-binding fragments (Fab’ of anti-hemagglutinin H5 monoclonal antibodies Mab 6-9-1 via S-Au covalent bonds; and (iii covering the remaining free space on the electrode surfaces with bovine serum albumin. The interactions between Fab’ fragments and hemagglutinin (HA variants have been explored with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS in the presence of [Fe(CN6]3−/4− as an electroactive marker. The immunosensor was able to recognize three different His-tagged variants of recombinant hemagglutinin from H5N1 viruses: H1 subunit (17–340 residues of A/swan/Poland/305-135V08/2006, the long HA (17–530 residues A/Bar-headed Goose/Qinghai/12/2005 and H1 subunit (1–345 residues of A/Vietnam/1194/2004. The strongest response has been observed for the long variant with detection limit of 2.2 pg/mL and dynamic range from 4.0 to 20.0 pg/mL.

  15. Ridge preservation with acellular dermal matrix and anorganic bone matrix cell-binding peptide P-15 after tooth extraction in humans. A histologic and morphometric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur B. Novaes Jr

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to analyze by histomorphometric parameters the use of acellular dermal matrix (ADM with or without anorganic bovine bone matrix (ABM / synthetic cell-binding peptide P-15 in the formation of bone in human alveoli. Materials and methods: Eighteen patients in need of extraction of maxillary anterior teeth were selected and randomly assigned to the test group (ADM plus ABM/P-15 or the control group (ADM only. Histomorphometric measurements and histological analysis were recorded about 6 months after ridge preservation procedures in ten patients. The amount of newly formed bone, the most recently formed bone, fibrous tissue plus marrow spaces and remaining graft particles were measured and analyzed. Results: At 6 months, the new bone area parameter and the percentage of fibrous tissue plus marrow space areas showed higher values to the control group, and statistically significant differences when compared with the test group (p=0.03. Conclusion: The ADM acted as a membrane. The association of ABM/P-15 with ADM resulted in new bone formation within the alveoli, but the results were not considered relevant when used in this indication.

  16. A cellulose-binding domain-fused recombinant human T cell connective tissue-activating peptide-III manifests heparanase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechter, M; Lider, O; Cahalon, L; Baharav, E; Dekel, M; Seigel, D; Vlodavsky, I; Aingorn, H; Cohen, I R; Shoseyov, O

    1999-02-24

    The chemokine connective tissue-activating peptide (CTAP)-III, which belongs to the leukocyte-derived growth factor family of mediators, was previously shown to be mitogenic for fibroblasts. However, it has recently been shown that CTAP-III, released from platelets, can act like a heparanase enzyme and degrade heparan sulfate. This suggests that CTAP-III may also function as a proinflammatory mediator. We have successfully cloned CTAP-III from a lambdagt11 cDNA library of PHA-activated human CD4(+) T cells and produced recombinant CTAP-III as a fusion protein with a cellulose-binding domain moiety. This recombinant CTAP-III exhibited heparanase activity and released degradation products from metabolically labeled, naturally produced extracellular matrix. We have also developed polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies, and these antibodies against the recombinant CTAP-III detected the CTAP-III molecule in human T cells, polymorphonuclear leukocytes, and placental extracts. Thus, our study provides tools to examine further immune cell behavior in inflamed sites rich with extracellular moieties and proinflammatory mediators. PMID:10049766

  17. Radiolabelled peptides for oncological diagnosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laverman, P.; Sosabowski, J.K.; Boerman, O.C.; Oyen, W.J.G.

    2012-01-01

    Radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides targeting receptors (over)expressed on tumour cells are widely under investigation for tumour diagnosis and therapy. The concept of using radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides to target receptor-expressing tissues in vivo has stimulated a large body of resea

  18. Computer-assisted prediction of HLA-DR binding and experimental analysis for human promiscuous Th1-cell peptides in the 24 kDa secreted lipoprotein (LppX) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Attiyah, R; Mustafa, A S

    2004-01-01

    The secreted 24 kDa lipoprotein (LppX) is an antigen that is specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and M. leprae. The present study was carried out to identify the promiscuous T helper 1 (Th1)-cell epitopes of the M. tuberculosis LppX (MT24, Rv2945c) antigen by using 15 overlapping synthetic peptides (25 mers overlapping by 10 residues) covering the sequence of the complete protein. The analysis of Rv2945c sequence for binding to 51 alleles of nine serologically defined HLA-DR molecules, by using a virtual matrix-based prediction program (propred), showed that eight of the 15 peptides of Rv2945c were predicted to bind promiscuously to >/=10 alleles from more than or equal to three serologically defined HLA-DR molecules. The Th1-cell reactivity of all the peptides was assessed in antigen-induced proliferation and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)-secretion assays with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 37 bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-vaccinated healthy subjects. The results showed that 17 of the 37 donors, which represented an HLA-DR-heterogeneous group, responded to one or more peptides of Rv2945c in the Th1-cell assays. Although each peptide stimulated PBMCs from one or more donors in the above assays, the best positive responses (12/17 (71%) responders) were observed with the peptide p14 (aa 196-220). This suggested a highly promiscuous presentation of p14 to Th1 cells. In addition, the sequence of p14 is completely identical among the LppX of M. tuberculosis, M. bovis and M. leprae, which further supports the usefulness of Rv2945c and p14 in the subunit vaccine design against both tuberculosis and leprosy.

  19. Different binding motifs of the celiac disease-associated HLA molecules DQ2.5, DQ2.2, and DQ7.5 revealed by relative quantitative proteomics of endogenous peptide repertoires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergseng, Elin; Dørum, Siri; Arntzen, Magnus Ø.;

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease is caused by intolerance to cereal gluten proteins, and HLA-DQ molecules are involved in the disease pathogenesis by presentation of gluten peptides to CD4+ T cells. The α- or β-chain sharing HLA molecules DQ2.5, DQ2.2, and DQ7.5 display different risks for the disease...... established binding motifs. The binding motif of DQ2.2 was strikingly different from that of DQ2.5 with position P3 being a major anchor having a preference for threonine and serine. This is notable as three recently identified epitopes of gluten recognized by T cells of DQ2.2 celiac patients harbor serine...... at position P3. This study demonstrates that relative quantitative comparison of endogenous peptides sampled from our protein metabolism by HLA molecules provides clues to understand HLA association with disease....

  20. Evaluation of anorganic bovine-derived hydroxyapatite matrix/cell binding peptide as a bone graft material in the treatment of human periodontal infrabony defects: A clinico-radiographic study

    OpenAIRE

    Ghousia Fatima; Ravindra Shivamurthy; Srinath Thakur; Mohammad Abdul Baseer

    2015-01-01

    Background: Various bone graft materials have been used in the treatment of periodontal defects. A synthetic bone substitute material composed of P-15 with anorganic bone mineral has been scantly studied. Hence, the present study was aimed to evaluate and compare the efficacy of anorganic bovine-derived hydroxyapatite matrix (ABM)/cell binding peptide (P-15) in human periodontal infrabony defects with that of open flap debridement (OFD) alone. Materials and Methods: A split-mouth, randomized ...

  1. Polycyclic peptide therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeriswyl, Vanessa; Heinis, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Owing to their excellent binding properties, high stability, and low off-target toxicity, polycyclic peptides are an attractive molecule format for the development of therapeutics. Currently, only a handful of polycyclic peptides are used in the clinic; examples include the antibiotic vancomycin, the anticancer drugs actinomycin D and romidepsin, and the analgesic agent ziconotide. All clinically used polycyclic peptide drugs are derived from natural sources, such as soil bacteria in the case of vancomycin, actinomycin D and romidepsin, or the venom of a fish-hunting coil snail in the case of ziconotide. Unfortunately, nature provides peptide macrocyclic ligands for only a small fraction of therapeutic targets. For the generation of ligands of targets of choice, researchers have inserted artificial binding sites into natural polycyclic peptide scaffolds, such as cystine knot proteins, using rational design or directed evolution approaches. More recently, large combinatorial libraries of genetically encoded bicyclic peptides have been generated de novo and screened by phage display. In this Minireview, the properties of existing polycyclic peptide drugs are discussed and related to their interesting molecular architectures. Furthermore, technologies that allow the development of unnatural polycyclic peptide ligands are discussed. Recent application of these technologies has generated promising results, suggesting that polycyclic peptide therapeutics could potentially be developed for a broad range of diseases. PMID:23355488

  2. Involvement of three meningococcal surface-exposed proteins, the heparin-binding protein NhbA, the α-peptide of IgA protease and the autotransporter protease NalP, in initiation of biofilm formation

    KAUST Repository

    Arenas, Jesús

    2012-12-04

    Neisseria meningitidis is a common and usually harmless inhabitant of the mucosa of the human nasopharynx, which, in rare cases, can cross the epithelial barrier and cause meningitis and sepsis. Biofilm formation favours the colonization of the host and the subsequent carrier state. Two different strategies of biofilm formation, either dependent or independent on extracellular DNA (eDNA), have been described for meningococcal strains. Here, we demonstrate that the autotransporter protease NalP, the expression of which is phase variable, affects eDNA-dependent biofilm formation in N.meningitidis. The effect of NalP was found in biofilm formation under static and flow conditions and was dependent on its protease activity. Cleavage of the heparin-binding antigen NhbA and the α-peptide of IgA protease, resulting in the release of positively charged polypeptides from the cell surface, was responsible for the reduction in biofilm formation when NalP is expressed. Both NhbA and the α-peptide of IgA protease were shown to bind DNA. We conclude that NhbA and the α-peptide of IgA protease are implicated in biofilm formation by binding eDNA and that NalP is an important regulator of this process through the proteolysis of these surface-exposed proteins. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. A single-chain fusion molecule consisting of peptide, major histocompatibility gene complex class I heavy chain and beta2-microglobulin can fold partially correctly, but binds peptide inefficiently

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvester-Hvid, C; Buus, S

    1999-01-01

    The function of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules is to sample peptides from the intracellular environment and present these peptides to CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). We have attempted to develop a general approach to produce large amounts of pure and active...

  4. Distinctive binding modes and inhibitory mechanisms of two peptidic inhibitors of urokinase-type plasminogen activator with isomeric P1 residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Longguang; Zhao, Baoyu; Xu, Peng;

    2015-01-01

    Two isomeric piperidine derivatives (meta and para isomers) were used as arginine mimics in the P1 position of a cyclic peptidic inhibitor (CPAYSRYLDC) of urokinase-type plasminogen activator. The two resulting cyclic peptides showed vastly different affinities (~70 fold) to the target enzyme. X......-ray crystal structure analysis showed that the two P1 residues were inserted into the S1 specificity pocket in indistinguishable manners. However, the rest of the peptides bound in entirely different ways on the surface of the enzyme, and the two peptides have different conformations, despite the highly...... similar sequence. These results demonstrate how the subtle difference in P1 residue can dictate the exosite interactions and the potencies of peptidic inhibitors, and highlight the importance of P1 residue for protease inhibition. This study provides important information for the development of peptidic...

  5. New peptide receptor radionuclide therapy of invasive cancer cells: in vivo studies using 177Lu-DOTA-AE105 targeting uPAR in human colorectal cancer xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposition of uPAR as a potential target in cancer therapy is advanced by its predominant expression at the invasive front of colorectal cancer (CRC) and its value as prognostic biomarker for poor survival in this disease. In this study, we provide the first in vivo proof-of-concept for a theranostic approach as treatment modality in a human xenograft colorectal cancer model. Methods: A DOTA-conjugated 9-mer high affinity uPAR binding peptide (DOTA-AE105) was radiolabeled with 64Cu and 177Lu, for PET imaging and targeted radionuclide therapy study, respectively. Human uPAR-positive CRC HT-29 cells were inoculated in Nude mice and treated with 177Lu-DOTA-AE105 once a visible tumor had formed. To evaluate the true effect of the targeted radiotherapy, two controls groups were included in this study, one receiving a 177Lu-labeled non-binding control peptide and one receiving vehicle. All animals were treated day 0 and 7. A parallel 18F-FLT PET/CT study was performed on day 0, 1, 3 and 6. Dosimetry calculations were based on a biodistribution study, where organs and tissue of interest were collected 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 and 24 h post injection of 177Lu-DOTA-AE105. Toxicity was assessed by recording mouse weight and by H and E staining of kidneys in each treatment group. Results: uPAR-positive HT-29 xenograft was clearly visualized by PET/CT imaging using 64Cu-DOTA-AE105. Subsequently, these xenograft transplants were locally irradiated using 177Lu-DOTA-AE105, where a significant effect on tumor size and the number of uPAR-positive cells in the tumor was found (p 18F-FLT PET/CT imaging study revealed a significant correlation between 18F-FLT tumor uptake and efficacy of the radionuclide therapy. A histological examination of the kidneys from one animal in each treatment group did not reveal any gross abnormalities and the general performance of all treated animals also showed no indications of radioactivity-induced toxicity. Conclusion: These findings document for the

  6. Radiolabelled peptides for oncological diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laverman, Peter; Boerman, Otto C.; Oyen, Wim J.G. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Sosabowski, Jane K. [Queen Mary University of London, Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-15

    Radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides targeting receptors (over)expressed on tumour cells are widely under investigation for tumour diagnosis and therapy. The concept of using radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides to target receptor-expressing tissues in vivo has stimulated a large body of research in nuclear medicine. The {sup 111}In-labelled somatostatin analogue octreotide (OctreoScan trademark) is the most successful radiopeptide for tumour imaging, and was the first to be approved for diagnostic use. Based on the success of these studies, other receptor-targeting peptides such as cholecystokinin/gastrin analogues, glucagon-like peptide-1, bombesin (BN), chemokine receptor CXCR4 targeting peptides, and RGD peptides are currently under development or undergoing clinical trials. In this review, we discuss some of these peptides and their analogues, with regard to their potential for radionuclide imaging of tumours. (orig.)

  7. Improved affinity of engineered streptavidin for the Strep-tag II peptide is due to a fixed open conformation of the lid-like loop at the binding site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korndörfer, Ingo P.; Skerra, Arne

    2002-01-01

    The Strep-tag II is a nine-amino acid peptide that was developed as an affinity tool for the purification of corresponding fusion proteins on streptavidin columns. The peptide recognizes the same pocket of streptavidin where the natural ligand is normally bound so that biotin or its chemical derivatives can be used for competitive elution. We report here the crystal structures of the streptavidin mutants `1' and `2,' which had been engineered for 10-fold higher affinity towards the Strep-tag II. Both streptavidin mutants carry mutations at positions 44, 45, and 47, that is, in a flexible loop region close to the binding site. The crystal structures of the two apo-proteins and their complexes with the Strep-tag II peptide were refined at resolutions below 2 Å. Both in the presence and absence of the peptide, the lid-like loop next to the ligand pocket—comprising residues 45 through 52—adopts an `open' conformation in all four subunits within the asymmetric unit. The same loop was previously described to be disordered in the wild-type apo-streptavidin and to close over the pocket upon complexation of the natural ligand biotin. Our findings suggest that stabilization of the `open' loop conformation in the absence of a ligand abolishes the need for conformational rearrangement prior to the docking of the voluminous peptide. Because no direct contacts between the flexible part of the loop and the peptide ligand were detected, it seems likely that the higher affinity of the two streptavidin mutants for the Strep-tag II is caused by a predominantly entropic mechanism. PMID:11910031

  8. Prediction of binding modes between protein L-isoaspartyl (D-aspartyl) O-methyltransferase and peptide substrates including isomerized aspartic acid residues using in silico analytic methods for the substrate screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Akifumi; Noji, Ikuhiko; Fukuyoshi, Shuichi; Takahashi, Ohgi

    2015-12-10

    Because the aspartic acid (Asp) residues in proteins are occasionally isomerized in the human body, not only l-α-Asp but also l-β-Asp, D-α-Asp and D-β-Asp are found in human proteins. In these isomerized aspartic acids, the proportion of D-β-Asp is the largest and the proportions of l-β-Asp and D-α-Asp found in human proteins are comparatively small. To explain the proportions of aspartic acid isomers, the possibility of an enzyme able to repair l-β-Asp and D-α-Asp is frequently considered. The protein L-isoaspartyl (D-aspartyl) O-methyltransferase (PIMT) is considered one of the possible repair enzymes for l-β-Asp and D-α-Asp. Human PIMT is an enzyme that recognizes both l-β-Asp and D-α-Asp, and catalyzes the methylation of their side chains. In this study, the binding modes between PIMT and peptide substrates containing l-β-Asp or D-α-Asp residues were investigated using computational protein-ligand docking and molecular dynamics simulations. The results indicate that carboxyl groups of both l-β-Asp and D-α-Asp were recognized in similar modes by PIMT and that the C-terminal regions of substrate peptides were located in similar positions on PIMT for both the l-β-Asp and D-α-Asp peptides. In contrast, for peptides containing l-α-Asp or D-β-Asp residues, which are not substrates of PIMT, the computationally constructed binding modes between PIMT and peptides greatly differed from those between PIMT and substrates. In the nonsubstrate peptides, not inter- but intra-molecular hydrogen bonds were observed, and the conformations of peptides were more rigid than those of substrates. Thus, the in silico analytical methods were able to distinguish substrates from nonsubstrates and the computational methods are expected to complement experimental analytical methods.

  9. Association of WT1 IgG antibody against WT1 peptide with prolonged survival in glioblastoma multiforme patients vaccinated with WT1 peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oji, Yusuke; Hashimoto, Naoya; Tsuboi, Akihiro; Murakami, Yui; Iwai, Miki; Kagawa, Naoki; Chiba, Yasuyoshi; Izumoto, Shuichi; Elisseeva, Olga; Ichinohasama, Ryo; Sakamoto, Junichi; Morita, Satoshi; Nakajima, Hiroko; Takashima, Satoshi; Nakae, Yoshiki; Nakata, Jun; Kawakami, Manabu; Nishida, Sumiyuki; Hosen, Naoki; Fujiki, Fumihiro; Morimoto, Soyoko; Adachi, Mayuko; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Oka, Yoshihiro; Yoshimine, Toshiki; Sugiyama, Haruo

    2016-09-15

    We previously evaluated Wilms' tumor gene 1 (WT1) peptide vaccination in a large number of patients with leukemia or solid tumors and have reported that HLA-A*24:02 restricted, 9-mer WT1-235 peptide (CYTWNQMNL) vaccine induces cellular immune responses and elicits WT1-235-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). However, whether this vaccine induces humoral immune responses to produce WT1 antibody remains unknown. Thus, we measured IgG antibody levels against the WT1-235 peptide (WT1-235 IgG antibody) in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) receiving the WT1 peptide vaccine. The WT1-235 IgG antibody, which was undetectable before vaccination, became detectable in 30 (50.8%) of a total of 59 patients during 3 months of WT1 peptide vaccination. The dominant WT1-235 IgG antibody subclass was Th1-type, IgG1 and IgG3 . WT1-235 IgG antibody production was significantly and positively correlated with both progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Importantly, the combination of WT1-235 IgG antibody production and positive delayed type-hypersensitivity (DTH) to the WT1-235 peptide was a better prognostic marker for long-term OS than either parameter alone. These results suggested that WT1-235 peptide vaccination induces not only WT1-235-specific CTLs as previously described but also WT1-235-specific humoral immune responses associated with antitumor cellular immune response. Our results indicate that the WT1 IgG antibody against the WT1 peptide may be a useful predictive marker, with better predictive performance in combination with DTH to WT1 peptide, and provide a new insight into the antitumor immune response induction in WT1 peptide vaccine-treated patients. PMID:27170523

  10. Inhibition of αIIbβ3 Ligand Binding by an αIIb Peptide that Clasps the Hybrid Domain to the βI Domain of β3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Hwa Lee

    Full Text Available Agonist-stimulated platelet activation triggers conformational changes of integrin αIIbβ3, allowing fibrinogen binding and platelet aggregation. We have previously shown that an octapeptide, p1YMESRADR8, corresponding to amino acids 313-320 of the β-ribbon extending from the β-propeller domain of αIIb, acts as a potent inhibitor of platelet aggregation. Here we have performed in silico modelling analysis of the interaction of this peptide with αIIbβ3 in its bent and closed (not swing-out conformation and show that the peptide is able to act as a substitute for the β-ribbon by forming a clasp restraining the β3 hybrid and βI domains in a closed conformation. The involvement of species-specific residues of the β3 hybrid domain (E356 and K384 and the β1 domain (E297 as well as an intrapeptide bond (pE315-pR317 were confirmed as important for this interaction by mutagenesis studies of αIIbβ3 expressed in CHO cells and native or substituted peptide inhibitory studies on platelet functions. Furthermore, NMR data corroborate the above results. Our findings provide insight into the important functional role of the αIIb β-ribbon in preventing integrin αIIbβ3 head piece opening, and highlight a potential new therapeutic approach to prevent integrin ligand binding.

  11. Measurement of the Interaction Between Recombinant I-domain from Integrin alpha 2 beta 1 and a Triple Helical Collagen Peptide with the GFOGER Binding Motif Using Molecular Force Spectroscopy

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    Mark E. Welland

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of the collagen-platelet interaction is of crucial importance to the haemostatic response during both injury and pathogenesis of the blood vessel wall. Of particular interest is the high affinity interaction of the platelet transmembrane receptor, alpha 2 beta 1, responsible for firm attachment of platelets to collagen at and around injury sites. We employ single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS using the atomic force microscope (AFM to study the interaction of the I-domain from integrin alpha 2 beta 1 with a synthetic collagen related triple-helical peptide containing the high-affinity integrin-binding GFOGER motif, and a control peptide lacking this sequence, referred to as GPP. By utilising synthetic peptides in this manner we are able to study at the molecular level subtleties that would otherwise be lost when considering cell-to-collagen matrix interactions using ensemble techniques. We demonstrate for the first time the complexity of this interaction as illustrated by the complex multi-peaked force spectra and confirm specificity using control blocking experiments. In addition we observe specific interaction of the GPP peptide sequence with the I-domain. We propose a model to explain these observations.

  12. Novel targeted nuclear imaging agent for gastric cancer diagnosis: glucose-regulated protein 78 binding peptide-guided 111In-labeled polymeric micelles

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    Cheng CC

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Chun-Chia Cheng,1,2,* Chiung-Fang Huang,3,4,* Ai-Sheng Ho,5 Cheng-Liang Peng,6 Chun-Chao Chang,7,8 Fu-Der Mai,1,9 Ling-Yun Chen,10 Tsai-Yueh Luo,2 Jungshan Chang1,11,121Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 2Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Atomic Energy Council, Taoyuan, 3School of Dental Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 4Division of Family and Operative Dentistry, Department of Dentistry, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, 5Division of Gastroenterology, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, 6Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 7Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, 8Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 9Department of Biochemistry, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 10Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, 11Neuroscience Research Center, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, 12Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Increased expression of cellular membrane bound glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78 is considered to be one of the biomarkers for gastric cancers. Therefore, peptides or molecules with specific recognition to GRP78