WorldWideScience

Sample records for binary star orbits

  1. Orbital Decay in Binaries with Evolved Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meng; Arras, Phil; Weinberg, Nevin N.; Troup, Nicholas; Majewski, Steven R.

    2018-01-01

    Two mechanisms are often invoked to explain tidal friction in binary systems. The ``dynamical tide” is the resonant excitation of internal gravity waves by the tide, and their subsequent damping by nonlinear fluid processes or thermal diffusion. The ``equilibrium tide” refers to non-resonant excitation of fluid motion in the star’s convection zone, with damping by interaction with the turbulent eddies. There have been numerous studies of these processes in main sequence stars, but less so on the subgiant and red giant branches. Motivated by the newly discovered close binary systems in the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE-1), we have performed calculations of both the dynamical and equilibrium tide processes for stars over a range of mass as the star’s cease core hydrogen burning and evolve to shell burning. Even for stars which had a radiative core on the main sequence, the dynamical tide may have very large amplitude in the newly radiative core in post-main sequence, giving rise to wave breaking. The resulting large dynamical tide dissipation rate is compared to the equilibrium tide, and the range of secondary masses and orbital periods over which rapid orbital decay may occur will be discussed, as well as applications to close APOGEE binaries.

  2. The BANANA Survey: Spin-Orbit Alignment in Binary Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Simon; Winn, J. N.; Fabrycky, D. C.; Torres, G.; Setiawan, J.

    2012-04-01

    Binaries are not always neatly aligned. Previous observations of the DI Herculis system showed that the spin axes of both stars are highly inclined with respect to one another and the orbital axis. Here, we report on our ongoing survey to measure relative orientations of spin-axes in a number of eclipsing binary systems. These observations will hopefully lead to new insights into star and planet formation, as different formation scenarios predict different degrees of alignment and different dependencies on the system parameters. Measurements of spin-orbit angles in close binary systems will also create a basis for comparison for similar measurements involving close-in planets.

  3. Investigating Exoplanet Orbital Evolution Around Binary Star Systems with Mass Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid A. Rahoma

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A planet revolving around binary star system is a familiar system. Studies of these systems are important because they provide precise knowledge of planet formation and orbit evolution. In this study, a method to determine the evolution of an exoplanet revolving around a binary star system using different rates of stellar mass loss will be introduced. Using a hierarchical triple body system, in which the outer body can be moved with the center of mass of the inner binary star as a two-body problem, the long period evolution of the exoplanet orbit is determined depending on a Hamiltonian formulation. The model is simulated by numerical integrations of the Hamiltonian equations for the system over a long time. As a conclusion, the behavior of the planet orbital elements is quite affected by the rate of the mass loss from the accompanying binary star.

  4. Stable Conic-Helical Orbits of Planets around Binary Stars: Analytical Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oks, E.

    2015-05-01

    Studies of planets in binary star systems are especially important because it was estimated that about half of binary stars are capable of supporting habitable terrestrial planets within stable orbital ranges. One-planet binary star systems (OBSS) have a limited analogy to objects studied in atomic/molecular physics: one-electron Rydberg quasimolecules (ORQ). Specifically, ORQ, consisting of two fully stripped ions of the nuclear charges Z and Z‧ plus one highly excited electron, are encountered in various plasmas containing more than one kind of ion. Classical analytical studies of ORQ resulted in the discovery of classical stable electronic orbits with the shape of a helix on the surface of a cone. In the present paper we show that despite several important distinctions between OBSS and ORQ, it is possible for OBSS to have stable planetary orbits in the shape of a helix on a conical surface, whose axis of symmetry coincides with the interstellar axis; the stability is not affected by the rotation of the stars. Further, we demonstrate that the eccentricity of the stars’ orbits does not affect the stability of the helical planetary motion if the center of symmetry of the helix is relatively close to the star of the larger mass. We also show that if the center of symmetry of the conic-helical planetary orbit is relatively close to the star of the smaller mass, a sufficiently large eccentricity of stars’ orbits can switch the planetary motion to the unstable mode and the planet would escape the system. We demonstrate that such planets are transitable for the overwhelming majority of inclinations of plane of the stars’ orbits (i.e., the projections of the planet and the adjacent start on the plane of the sky coincide once in a while). This means that conic-helical planetary orbits at binary stars can be detected photometrically. We consider, as an example, Kepler-16 binary stars to provide illustrative numerical data on the possible parameters and the

  5. A BINARY ORBIT FOR THE MASSIVE, EVOLVED STAR HDE 326823, A WR+O SYSTEM PROGENITOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, N. D.; Gies, D. R.; Williams, S. J.

    2011-01-01

    The hot star HDE 326823 is a candidate transition-phase object that is evolving into a nitrogen-enriched Wolf-Rayet star. It is also a known low-amplitude, photometric variable with a 6.123 day period. We present new, high- and moderate-resolution spectroscopy of HDE 326823, and we show that the absorption lines show coherent Doppler shifts with this period while the emission lines display little or no velocity variation. We interpret the absorption line shifts as the orbital motion of the apparently brighter star in a close, interacting binary. We argue that this star is losing mass to a mass gainer star hidden in a thick accretion torus and to a circumbinary disk that is the source of the emission lines. HDE 326823 probably belongs to a class of objects that produce short-period WR+O binaries.

  6. Stability of outer planetary orbits around binary stars - A comparison of Hill's and Laplace's stability criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubala, A.; Black, D.; Szebehely, V.

    1993-01-01

    A comparison is made between the stability criteria of Hill and that of Laplace to determine the stability of outer planetary orbits encircling binary stars. The restricted, analytically determined results of Hill's method by Szebehely and coworkers and the general, numerically integrated results of Laplace's method by Graziani and Black (1981) are compared for varying values of the mass parameter mu. For mu = 0 to 0.15, the closest orbit (lower limit of radius) an outer planet in a binary system can have and still remain stable is determined by Hill's stability criterion. For mu greater than 0.15, the critical radius is determined by Laplace's stability criterion. It appears that the Graziani-Black stability criterion describes the critical orbit within a few percent for all values of mu.

  7. Interacting binary stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pringle, J.E.; Wade, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    This book reviews the theoretical and observational knowledge of interacting binary stars. The topics discussed embrace the following features of these objects: their orbits, evolution, mass transfer, angular momentum losses, X-ray emission, eclipses, variability, and other related phenomena. (U.K.)

  8. Binary Neutron Star Mergers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua A. Faber

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We review the current status of studies of the coalescence of binary neutron star systems. We begin with a discussion of the formation channels of merging binaries and we discuss the most recent theoretical predictions for merger rates. Next, we turn to the quasi-equilibrium formalisms that are used to study binaries prior to the merger phase and to generate initial data for fully dynamical simulations. The quasi-equilibrium approximation has played a key role in developing our understanding of the physics of binary coalescence and, in particular, of the orbital instability processes that can drive binaries to merger at the end of their lifetimes. We then turn to the numerical techniques used in dynamical simulations, including relativistic formalisms, (magneto-hydrodynamics, gravitational-wave extraction techniques, and nuclear microphysics treatments. This is followed by a summary of the simulations performed across the field to date, including the most recent results from both fully relativistic and microphysically detailed simulations. Finally, we discuss the likely directions for the field as we transition from the first to the second generation of gravitational-wave interferometers and while supercomputers reach the petascale frontier.

  9. Determining the Separation and Position Angles of Orbiting Binary Stars: Comparison of Three Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Ryan; Boule, Cory; Andrews, Katelyn; Penfield, Andrew; Ross, Ian; Lucas, Gaylon; Braught, Trisha; Harfenist, Steven; Goodale, Keith

    2015-07-01

    To initiate a long term binary star research program, undergraduate students compared the accuracy and ease of measuring the separations and position angles of three long period binary pairs using three different measurement techniques. It was found that digital image capture using BackyardEOS software and subsequent analysis in Adobe Photoshop was the most accurate and easiest to use of our three methods. The systems WDS J17419+7209 (STF 2241AB), WDS 19418+5032 (STFA 46AB), and WDS 16362+5255 (STF 2087AB) were found to have separations and position angles of: 30", 16°; 39.7", 133°; and 3.1", 104°, respectively. This method produced separation values within 1.3" and position angle values within 1.3° of the most recently observed values found in the Washington Double Star Catalog.

  10. Interacting binary stars

    CERN Document Server

    Sahade, Jorge; Ter Haar, D

    1978-01-01

    Interacting Binary Stars deals with the development, ideas, and problems in the study of interacting binary stars. The book consolidates the information that is scattered over many publications and papers and gives an account of important discoveries with relevant historical background. Chapters are devoted to the presentation and discussion of the different facets of the field, such as historical account of the development in the field of study of binary stars; the Roche equipotential surfaces; methods and techniques in space astronomy; and enumeration of binary star systems that are studied

  11. NEW PRECISION ORBITS OF BRIGHT DOUBLE-LINED SPECTROSCOPIC BINARIES. V. THE AM STARS HD 434 AND 41 SEXTANTIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fekel, Francis C.; Williamson, Michael H.

    2010-01-01

    We have detected the secondary component in two previously known spectroscopic binaries, HD 434 and 41 Sex, and for the first time determined double-lined orbits for them. Despite the relatively long period of 34.26 days and a moderate eccentricity of 0.32, combined with the components' rotationally broadened lines, measurement of the primary and secondary radial velocities of HD 434 has enabled us to obtain significantly improved orbital elements. While the 41 Sex system has a much shorter period of 6.167 days and a circular orbit, the estimated V mag difference of 3.2 between its components also makes this a challenging system. The new orbital dimensions (a 1 sin i and a 2 sin i) and minimum masses (m 1 sin 3 i and m 2 sin 3 i) of HD 434 have accuracies of 0.8% or better, while the same quantities for 41 Sex are good to 0.5% or better. Both components of HD 434 are Am stars while the Am star primary of 41 Sex has a late-F or early-G companion. All four stars are on the main sequence. The two components of HD 434 are rotating much faster than their predicted pseudosynchronous velocities, while both components of 41 Sex are synchronously rotating. For the primary of 41 Sex, the spectrum line depth changes noted by Sreedhar Rao et al. were not detected.

  12. The circumstellar envelope around the S-type AGB star W Aql. Effects of an eccentric binary orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramstedt, S; Mohamed, S; Vlemmings, W H T; Danilovich, T; Brunner, M; De Beck, E; Humphreys, E M L; Lindqvist, M; Maercker, M; Olofsson, H; Kerschbaum, F; Quintana-Lacaci, G

    2017-09-21

    Recent observations at subarcsecond resolution, now possible also at submillimeter wavelengths, have shown intricate circumstellar structures around asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, mostly attributed to binary interaction. The results presented here are part of a larger project aimed at investigating the effects of a binary companion on the morphology of circumstellar envelopes (CSEs) of AGB stars. AGB stars are characterized by intense stellar winds that build CSEs around the stars. Here, the CO( J = 3→2) emission from the CSE of the binary S-type AGB star W Aql has been observed at subarcsecond resolution using ALMA. The aim of this paper is to investigate the wind properties of the AGB star and to analyse how the known companion has shaped the CSE. The average mass-loss rate during the creation of the detected CSE is estimated through modelling, using the ALMA brightness distribution and previously published single-dish measurements as observational constraints. The ALMA observations are presented and compared to the results from a 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) binary interaction model with the same properties as the W Aql system and with two different orbital eccentricities. Three-dimensional radiative transfer modelling is performed and the response of the interferometer is modelled and discussed. The estimated average mass-loss rate of W Aql is Ṁ = 3.0×10 -6 M ⊙ yr -1 and agrees with previous results based on single-dish CO line emission observations. The size of the emitting region is consistent with photodissociation models. The inner 10″ of the CSE is asymmetric with arc-like structures at separations of 2-3″ scattered across the denser sections. Further out, weaker spiral structures at greater separations are found, but this is at the limit of the sensitivity and field of view of the ALMA observations. The CO( J = 3→2) emission is dominated by a smooth component overlayed with two weak arc patterns with different separations

  13. Finding binaries from phase modulation of pulsating stars with Kepler: V. Orbital parameters, with eccentricity and mass-ratio distributions of 341 new binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Simon J.; Moe, Maxwell; Kurtz, Donald W.; Bedding, Timothy R.; Shibahashi, Hiromoto; Boffin, Henri M. J.

    2018-03-01

    The orbital parameters of binaries at intermediate periods (102-103 d) are difficult to measure with conventional methods and are very incomplete. We have undertaken a new survey, applying our pulsation timing method to Kepler light curves of 2224 main-sequence A/F stars and found 341 non-eclipsing binaries. We calculate the orbital parameters for 317 PB1 systems (single-pulsator binaries) and 24 PB2s (double-pulsators), tripling the number of intermediate-mass binaries with full orbital solutions. The method reaches down to small mass ratios q ≈ 0.02 and yields a highly homogeneous sample. We parametrize the mass-ratio distribution using both inversion and Markov-Chain Monte Carlo forward-modelling techniques, and find it to be skewed towards low-mass companions, peaking at q ≈ 0.2. While solar-type primaries exhibit a brown dwarf desert across short and intermediate periods, we find a small but statistically significant (2.6σ) population of extreme-mass-ratio companions (q 0.1, we measure the binary fraction of current A/F primaries to be 15.4 per cent ± 1.4 per cent, though we find that a large fraction of the companions (21 per cent ± 6 per cent) are white dwarfs in post-mass-transfer systems with primaries that are now blue stragglers, some of which are the progenitors of Type Ia supernovae, barium stars, symbiotics, and related phenomena. Excluding these white dwarfs, we determine the binary fraction of original A/F primaries to be 13.9 per cent ± 2.1 per cent over the same parameter space. Combining our measurements with those in the literature, we find the binary fraction across these periods is a constant 5 per cent for primaries M1 < 0.8 M⊙, but then increases linearly with log M1, demonstrating that natal discs around more massive protostars M1 ≳ 1 M⊙ become increasingly more prone to fragmentation. Finally, we find the eccentricity distribution of the main-sequence pairs to be much less eccentric than the thermal distribution.

  14. A Comprehensive Catalog of Galactic Eclipsing Binary Stars with Eccentric Orbits Based on Eclipse Timing Diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, C.-H.; Kreiner, J. M.; Zakrzewski, B.; Ogłoza, W.; Kim, H.-W.; Jeong, M.-J.

    2018-04-01

    A comprehensive catalog of 623 galactic eclipsing binary (EB) systems with eccentric orbits is presented with more than 2830 times of minima determined from the archived photometric data by various sky-survey projects and new photometric measurements. The systems are divided into two groups according to whether the individual system has a GCVS name or not. All the systems in both groups are further classified into three categories (D, A, and A+III) on the basis of their eclipse timing diagrams: 453 D systems showing just constantly displaced secondary minima, 139 A systems displaying only apsidal motion (AM), and 31 A+III systems exhibiting both AM and light-time effects. AM parameters for 170 systems (A and A+III systems) are consistently calculated and cataloged with basic information for all systems. Some important statistics for the AM parameters are discussed and compared with those derived for the eccentric EB systems in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds.

  15. Statistical properties of spectroscopic binary stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogeveen, S.J.

    1992-01-01

    As part of a study of the mass-ratio distribution of spectroscopic binary stars, the statistical properties of the systems in the Eighth Catalogue of the Orbital Elements of Spectroscopic Binary Stars, compiled by Batten et al. (1989), are investigated. Histograms are presented of the

  16. TWO STARS TWO WAYS: CONFIRMING A MICROLENSING BINARY LENS SOLUTION WITH A SPECTROSCOPIC MEASUREMENT OF THE ORBIT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, Jennifer C.; Johnson, John Asher; Eastman, Jason; Vanderburg, Andrew [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Skowron, Jan [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa (Poland); Gould, Andrew [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Pineda, J. Sebastian [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Howard, Andrew, E-mail: jyee@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: jjohnson@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: jason.eastman@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: avanderburg@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822-1839 (United States)

    2016-04-20

    Light curves of microlensing events involving stellar binaries and planetary systems can provide information about the orbital elements of the system due to orbital modulations of the caustic structure. Accurately measuring the orbit in either the stellar or planetary case requires detailed modeling of subtle deviations in the light curve. At the same time, the natural, Cartesian parameterization of a microlensing binary is partially degenerate with the microlens parallax. Hence, it is desirable to perform independent tests of the predictions of microlens orbit models using radial velocity (RV) time series of the lens binary system. To this end, we present 3.5 years of RV monitoring of the binary lens system OGLE-2009-BLG-020 L, for which Skowron et al. constrained all internal parameters of the 200–700 day orbit. Our RV measurements reveal an orbit that is consistent with the predictions of the microlens light curve analysis, thereby providing the first confirmation of orbital elements inferred from microlensing events.

  17. The Influence of Orbital Resonances on the Water Transport to Objects in the Circumprimary Habitable Zone of Binary Star Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancelin, David; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke; Maindl, Thomas I.; Ragossnig, Florian; Schäfer, Christoph

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the role of secular and mean motion resonances on the water transport from a belt of icy asteroids onto planets or embryos orbiting inside the circumprimary habitable zone (HZ) of a binary star system. In addition, the host-star has an accompanying gas giant planet. For a comparison, we perform two case studies where a secular resonance (SR) is located either inside the HZ close to 1.0 au (causing eccentric motion of a planet or embryos therein) or in the asteroid belt, beyond the snow line. In the latter case, a higher flux of icy objects moving toward the HZ is expected. Collisions between asteroids and objects in the HZ are treated analytically. Our purely dynamical study shows that the SR in the HZ boosts the water transport however, collisions can occur at very high impact speeds. In this paper, we treat for the first time, realistic collisions using a GPU 3D-SPH code to assess the water loss in the projectile. Including the water loss into the dynamical results, we get more realistic values for the water mass fraction of the asteroid during an impact. We highlight that collisions occurring at high velocities greatly reduce the water content of the projectile and thus the amount of water transported to planets or embryos orbiting inside the HZ. Moreover, we discuss other effects that could modify our results, namely the asteroid’s surface rate recession due to ice sublimation and the atmospheric drag contribution on the asteroids’ mass loss.

  18. Hidden Markov model tracking of continuous gravitational waves from a binary neutron star with wandering spin. II. Binary orbital phase tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvorova, S.; Clearwater, P.; Melatos, A.; Sun, L.; Moran, W.; Evans, R. J.

    2017-11-01

    A hidden Markov model (HMM) scheme for tracking continuous-wave gravitational radiation from neutron stars in low-mass x-ray binaries (LMXBs) with wandering spin is extended by introducing a frequency-domain matched filter, called the J -statistic, which sums the signal power in orbital sidebands coherently. The J -statistic is similar but not identical to the binary-modulated F -statistic computed by demodulation or resampling. By injecting synthetic LMXB signals into Gaussian noise characteristic of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (Advanced LIGO), it is shown that the J -statistic HMM tracker detects signals with characteristic wave strain h0≥2 ×10-26 in 370 d of data from two interferometers, divided into 37 coherent blocks of equal length. When applied to data from Stage I of the Scorpius X-1 Mock Data Challenge organized by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration, the tracker detects all 50 closed injections (h0≥6.84 ×10-26), recovering the frequency with a root-mean-square accuracy of ≤1.95 ×10-5 Hz . Of the 50 injections, 43 (with h0≥1.09 ×10-25) are detected in a single, coherent 10 d block of data. The tracker employs an efficient, recursive HMM solver based on the Viterbi algorithm, which requires ˜105 CPU-hours for a typical broadband (0.5 kHz) LMXB search.

  19. Close binary stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson-Leander, G.

    1979-01-01

    Studies of close binary stars are being persued more vigorously than ever, with about 3000 research papers and notes pertaining to the field being published during the triennium 1976-1978. Many major advances and spectacular discoveries were made, mostly due to increased observational efficiency and precision, especially in the X-ray, radio, and ultraviolet domains. Progress reports are presented in the following areas: observational techniques, methods of analyzing light curves, observational data, physical data, structure and models of close binaries, statistical investigations, and origin and evolution of close binaries. Reports from the Coordinates Programs Committee, the Committee for Extra-Terrestrial Observations and the Working Group on RS CVn binaries are included. (Auth./C.F.)

  20. Particle Filter-based Estimation of Orbital Parameters of Visual Binary Stars with Incomplete Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claveria, R.; Mendez, R. A.; Orchard, M.

    2018-01-01

    This work addresses the problem of orbital estimation from a Bayesian point of view, using the Particle Filter technique to approximate the posterior distribution of orbital parameters. Additionally, we present a multiple imputation scheme as a means to include partial measurements into the analysis.

  1. Young and Waltzing Binary Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-01

    ADONIS Observes Low-mass Eclipsing System in Orion Summary A series of very detailed images of a binary system of two young stars have been combined into a movie . In merely 3 days, the stars swing around each other. As seen from the earth, they pass in front of each other twice during a full revolution, producing eclipses during which their combined brightness diminishes . A careful analysis of the orbital motions has now made it possible to deduce the masses of the two dancing stars . Both turn out to be about as heavy as our Sun. But while the Sun is about 4500 million years old, these two stars are still in their infancy. They are located some 1500 light-years away in the Orion star-forming region and they probably formed just 10 million years ago . This is the first time such an accurate determination of the stellar masses could be achieved for a young binary system of low-mass stars . The new result provides an important piece of information for our current understanding of how young stars evolve. The observations were obtained by a team of astronomers from Italy and ESO [1] using the ADaptive Optics Near Infrared System (ADONIS) on the 3.6-m telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory. PR Photo 29a/01 : The RXJ 0529.4+0041 system before primary eclipse PR Photo 29b/01 : The RXJ 0529.4+0041 system at mid-primary eclipse PR Photo 29c/01 : The RXJ 0529.4+0041 system after primary eclipse PR Photo 29d/01 : The RXJ 0529.4+0041 system before secondary eclipse PR Photo 29e/01 : The RXJ 0529.4+0041 system at mid-secondary eclipse PR Photo 29f/01 : The RXJ 0529.4+0041 system after secondary eclipse PR Video Clip 06/01 : Video of the RXJ 0529.4+0041 system Binary stars and stellar masses Since some time, astronomers have noted that most stars seem to form in binary or multiple systems. This is quite fortunate, as the study of binary stars is the only way in which it is possible to measure directly one of the most fundamental quantities of a star, its mass. The mass of a

  2. Black holes in binary stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijers, R.A.M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Introduction Distinguishing neutron stars and black holes Optical companions and dynamical masses X-ray signatures of the nature of a compact object Structure and evolution of black-hole binaries High-mass black-hole binaries Low-mass black-hole binaries Low-mass black holes Formation of black holes

  3. Neutron Stars in X-ray Binaries and their Environments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The X-ray pulsars among the binary neutron stars provide excellent handle to make accurate measurement of the orbital parameters and thus also evolution of the binray orbits that take place over time scale of a fraction of a million years to tens of millions of years. The orbital period evolution of X-ray binaries have shown ...

  4. Finding binaries from phase modulation of pulsating stars with Kepler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibahashi Hiromoto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Binary orbital motion causes a periodic variation in the path length travelled by light emitted from a star towards us. Hence, if the star is pulsating, the observed phase of the pulsation varies over the orbit. Conversely, once we have observed such phase variation, we can extract information about the binary orbit from photometry alone. Continuous and precise space-based photometry has made it possible to measure these light travel time effects on the pulsating stars in binary systems. This opens up a new way of finding unseen brown dwarfs, planets, or massive compact stellar remnants: neutron stars and black holes.

  5. Planets in Binary Star Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Haghighipour, Nader

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of extrasolar planets over the past decade has had major impacts on our understanding of the formation and dynamical evolution of planetary systems. There are features and characteristics unseen in our solar system and unexplainable by the current theories of planet formation and dynamics. Among these new surprises is the discovery of planets in binary and multiple-star systems. The discovery of such "binary-planetary" systems has confronted astrodynamicists with many new challenges, and has led them to re-examine the theories of planet formation and dynamics. Among these challenges are: How are planets formed in binary star systems? What would be the notion of habitability in such systems? Under what conditions can binary star systems have habitable planets? How will volatiles necessary for life appear on such planets? This volume seeks to gather the current research in the area of planets in binary and multistar systems and to familiarize readers with its associated theoretical and observation...

  6. Tidal disruption of stars in a supermassive black hole binary system: the influence of orbital properties on fallback and accretion rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneron, Quentin; Lodato, Giuseppe; Guidarelli, Alessio

    2018-03-01

    The disruption of a star by a supermassive black hole generates a sudden bright flare. Previous studies have focused on the disruption by single black holes, for which the fallback rate decays as ∝t-5/3. In this paper, we generalise the study to the case of a supermassive black hole binary (SMBHB), using both analytical estimates and hydrodynamical simulations, looking for specific observable signatures. The range of binary separation for which it is possible to distinguish between the disruption created by a single or a binary black hole concerns typically separations of order a few milliparsecs for a primary of mass ˜106M⊙. When the fallback rate is affected by the secondary, it undergoes two types interruptions, depending on the initial inclination θ of the orbit of the star relative to the plane of the SMBHB. For θ ≲ 70°, periodic sharp interruptions occur and the time of first interruption depends on the distance of the secondary black hole with the debris. If θ ≳ 70°, a first smooth interruption occurs, but not always followed by a further recovery of the fallback rate. This implies that most of the TDEs around a SMBHB will undergo periodic sharp interruptions of their lightcurve.

  7. Exploring the Birth of Binary Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-08-01

    More than half of all stars are thought to be in binary or multiple star systems. But how do these systems form? The misaligned spins of some binary protostars might provide a clue.Two Formation ModelsIts hard to tell how multiple-star systems form, since these systems are difficult to observe in their early stages. But based on numerical simulations, there are two proposed models for the formation of stellar binaries:Turbulent fragmentationTurbulence within a single core leads to multiple dense clumps. These clumps independently collapse to form stars that orbit each other.Disk fragmentationGravitational instabilities in a massive accretion disk cause the formation of a smaller, secondary disk within the first, resulting in two stars that orbit each other.Log column density for one of the authors simulated binary systems, just after the formation of two protostars. Diamonds indicate the protostar positions. [Adapted from Offner et al. 2016]Outflows as CluesHow can we differentiate between these formation mechanisms? Led by Stella Offner (University of Massachusetts), a team of scientists has suggested that the key isto examine the alignment of the stars protostellar outflows jets that are often emitted from the poles of young, newly forming stars.Naively, wed expect that disk fragmentation would produce binary stars with common angular momentum. As the stars spins would be aligned, they would therefore also launch protostellar jets that were aligned with each other. Turbulent fragmentation, on the other hand, would cause the stars to have independent angular momentum. This would lead to randomly oriented spins, so the protostellar jets would be misaligned.Snapshots from the authors simulations. Left panel of each pair: column density; green arrows giveprotostellar spin directions. Right panel: synthetic observations produced from the simulations; cyan arrows giveprotostellar outflow directions. [Offner et al. 2016]Simulations of FragmentationIn order to better

  8. Orbital motion in pre-main sequence binaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, G. H. [The CHARA Array of Georgia State University, Mount Wilson Observatory, Mount Wilson, CA 91023 (United States); Prato, L. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 West Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Simon, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Patience, J., E-mail: schaefer@chara-array.org [Astrophysics Group, School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter, EX4 4QL (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    We present results from our ongoing program to map the visual orbits of pre-main sequence (PMS) binaries in the Taurus star forming region using adaptive optics imaging at the Keck Observatory. We combine our results with measurements reported in the literature to analyze the orbital motion for each binary. We present preliminary orbits for DF Tau, T Tau S, ZZ Tau, and the Pleiades binary HBC 351. Seven additional binaries show curvature in their relative motion. Currently, we can place lower limits on the orbital periods for these systems; full solutions will be possible with more orbital coverage. Five other binaries show motion that is indistinguishable from linear motion. We suspect that these systems are bound and might show curvature with additional measurements in the future. The observations reported herein lay critical groundwork toward the goal of measuring precise masses for low-mass PMS stars.

  9. Star formation history: Modeling of visual binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebrehiwot, Y. M.; Tessema, S. B.; Malkov, O. Yu.; Kovaleva, D. A.; Sytov, A. Yu.; Tutukov, A. V.

    2018-05-01

    Most stars form in binary or multiple systems. Their evolution is defined by masses of components, orbital separation and eccentricity. In order to understand star formation and evolutionary processes, it is vital to find distributions of physical parameters of binaries. We have carried out Monte Carlo simulations in which we simulate different pairing scenarios: random pairing, primary-constrained pairing, split-core pairing, and total and primary pairing in order to get distributions of binaries over physical parameters at birth. Next, for comparison with observations, we account for stellar evolution and selection effects. Brightness, radius, temperature, and other parameters of components are assigned or calculated according to approximate relations for stars in different evolutionary stages (main-sequence stars, red giants, white dwarfs, relativistic objects). Evolutionary stage is defined as a function of system age and component masses. We compare our results with the observed IMF, binarity rate, and binary mass-ratio distributions for field visual binaries to find initial distributions and pairing scenarios that produce observed distributions.

  10. Binary neutron star merger simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruegmann, Bernd [Jena Univ. (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    Our research focuses on the numerical tools necessary to solve Einstein's equations. In recent years we have been particularly interested in spacetimes consisting of two neutron stars in the final stages of their evolution. Because of the emission of gravitational radiation, the objects are driven together to merge; the emitted gravitational wave signal is visualized. This emitted gravitational radiation carries energy and momentum away from the system and contains information about the system. Late last year the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) began searches for these gravitational wave signals at a sensitivity at which detections are expected. Although such systems can radiate a significant amount of their total mass-energy in gravitational waves, the gravitational wave signals one expects to receive on Earth are not strong, since sources of gravitational waves are often many millions of light years away. Therefore one needs accurate templates for the radiation one expects from such systems in order to be able to extract them out of the detector's noise. Although analytical models exist for compact binary systems when the constituents are well separated, we need numerical simulation to investigate the last orbits before merger to obtain accurate templates and validate analytical approximations. Due to the strong nonlinearity of the equations and the large separation of length scales, these simulations are computationally demanding and need to be run on large supercomputers. When matter is present the computational cost as compared to pure black hole (vacuum) simulations increases even more due to the additional matter fields. But also more interesting astrophysical phenomena can happen. In fact, there is the possibility for a strong electromagnetic signal from the merger (e.g., a short gamma-ray burst or lower-energy electromagnetic signatures from the ejecta) and significant neutrino emission. Additionally, we can expect that

  11. The Double Star Orbit Initial Value Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Hagan

    2018-04-01

    Many precise algorithms exist to find a best-fit orbital solution for a double star system given a good enough initial value. Desmos is an online graphing calculator tool with extensive capabilities to support animations and defining functions. It can provide a useful visual means of analyzing double star data to arrive at a best guess approximation of the orbital solution. This is a necessary requirement before using a gradient-descent algorithm to find the best-fit orbital solution for a binary system.

  12. Gravitational waves from neutron star excitations in a binary inspiral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Alessandro; Sturani, Riccardo

    2018-02-01

    In the context of a binary inspiral of mixed neutron star-black hole systems, we investigate the excitation of the neutron star oscillation modes by the orbital motion. We study generic eccentric orbits and show that tidal interaction can excite the f -mode oscillations of the star by computing the amount of energy and angular momentum deposited into the star by the orbital motion tidal forces via closed form analytic expressions. We study the f -mode oscillations of cold neutron stars using recent microscopic nuclear equations of state, and we compute their imprint into the emitted gravitational waves.

  13. A Search for Exoplanets in Short-Period Binary Star Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Kaitchuck

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the progress of a search for exoplanets with S-type orbits in short-period binary star systems. The selected targets have stellar orbital periods of just a few days. These systems are eclipsing binaries so that exoplanet transits, if planets exist, will be highly likely. We report the results for seven binary star systems.

  14. Neutron Stars in X-ray Binaries and their Environments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biswajit Paul

    2017-09-07

    Sep 7, 2017 ... (GX 301–2: Islam & Paul 2014). Predictably, both of these parameters also show strong variation over the orbital phase, especially in binaries with large eccentricity (GX 301–2). In certain orbital phases of GX 301–2, the neutron star goes through an extremely dense component of the stellar wind, and the.

  15. Eclipsing binary stars with a δ Scuti component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman Aliçavuş, F.; Soydugan, E.; Smalley, B.; Kubát, J.

    2017-09-01

    Eclipsing binaries with a δ Sct component are powerful tools to derive the fundamental parameters and probe the internal structure of stars. In this study, spectral analysis of six primary δ Sct components in eclipsing binaries has been performed. Values of Teff, v sin I, and metallicity for the stars have been derived from medium-resolution spectroscopy. Additionally, a revised list of δ Sct stars in eclipsing binaries is presented. In this list, we have only given the δ Sct stars in eclipsing binaries to show the effects of the secondary components and tidal-locking on the pulsations of primary δ Sct components. The stellar pulsation, atmospheric and fundamental parameters (e.g. mass, radius) of 92 δ Sct stars in eclipsing binaries have been gathered. Comparison of the properties of single and eclipsing binary member δ Sct stars has been made. We find that single δ Sct stars pulsate in longer periods and with higher amplitudes than the primary δ Sct components in eclipsing binaries. The v sin I of δ Sct components is found to be significantly lower than that of single δ Sct stars. Relationships between the pulsation periods, amplitudes and stellar parameters in our list have been examined. Significant correlations between the pulsation periods and the orbital periods, Teff, log g, radius, mass ratio, v sin I and the filling factor have been found.

  16. Instabilities in Interacting Binary Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronov, I. L.; Andrych, K. D.; Antoniuk, K. A.; Baklanov, A. V.; Beringer, P.; Breus, V. V.; Burwitz, V.; Chinarova, L. L.; Chochol, D.; Cook, L. M.; Cook, M.; Dubovský, P.; Godlowski, W.; Hegedüs, T.; Hoňková, K.; Hric, L.; Jeon, Y.-B.; Juryšek, J.; Kim, C.-H.; Kim, Y.; Kim, Y.-H.; Kolesnikov, S. V.; Kudashkina, L. S.; Kusakin, A. V.; Marsakova, V. I.; Mason, P. A.; Mašek, M.; Mishevskiy, N.; Nelson, R. H.; Oksanen, A.; Parimucha, S.; Park, J.-W.; Petrík, K.; Quiñones, C.; Reinsch, K.; Robertson, J. W.; Sergey, I. M.; Szpanko, M.; Tkachenko, M. G.; Tkachuk, L. G.; Traulsen, I.; Tremko, J.; Tsehmeystrenko, V. S.; Yoon, J.-N.; Zola, S.; Shakhovskoy, N. M.

    2017-07-01

    The types of instability in the interacting binary stars are briefly reviewed. The project “Inter-Longitude Astronomy” is a series of smaller projects on concrete stars or groups of stars. It has no special funds, and is supported from resources and grants of participating organizations, when informal working groups are created. This “ILA” project is in some kind similar and complementary to other projects like WET, CBA, UkrVO, VSOLJ, BRNO, MEDUZA, AstroStatistics, where many of us collaborate. Totally we studied 1900+ variable stars of different types, including newly discovered variables. The characteristic timescale is from seconds to decades and (extrapolating) even more. The monitoring of the first star of our sample AM Her was initiated by Prof. V.P. Tsesevich (1907-1983). Since more than 358 ADS papers were published. In this short review, we present some highlights of our photometric and photo-polarimetric monitoring and mathematical modeling of interacting binary stars of different types: classical (AM Her, QQ Vul, V808 Aur = CSS 081231:071126+440405, FL Cet), asynchronous (BY Cam, V1432 Aql), intermediate (V405 Aql, BG CMi, MU Cam, V1343 Her, FO Aqr, AO Psc, RXJ 2123, 2133, 0636, 0704) polars and magnetic dwarf novae (DO Dra) with 25 timescales corresponding to different physical mechanisms and their combinations (part “Polar”); negative and positive superhumpers in nova-like (TT Ari, MV Lyr, V603 Aql, V795 Her) and many dwarf novae stars (“Superhumper”); eclipsing “non-magnetic” cataclysmic variables(BH Lyn, DW UMa, EM Cyg; PX And); symbiotic systems (“Symbiosis”); super-soft sources (SSS, QR And); spotted (and not spotted) eclipsing variables with (and without) evidence for a current mass transfer (“Eclipser”) with a special emphasis on systems with a direct impact of the stream into the gainer star's atmosphere, which we propose to call “Impactor” (short from “Extreme Direct Impactor”), or V361 Lyr-type stars. Other

  17. Evolution of a massive binary in a star field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranov, A.S.

    1984-01-01

    The orbital evolution of a massive binary system interacting with a background field of single stars whose phase density is homogeneous in configuration space is considered. The velocity distribution is assumed isotropic up to some limiting value, and a typical field star is regarded as having a velocity much higher than the orbital speed of the pair components. An expression is derived for the transfer of energy from the binary to the field stars. The time evolution of the orbit parameters a, e is established, and the evolution rate is estimated for Kardashev's (1983) model galactic nucleus containing a central black-hole binary. On the above assumptions the components should become twice as close together within only a few tens of millennia, although the picture may change fundamentally if the nucleus is rotating. 13 references

  18. A New Orbit for the Eclipsing Binary V577 Oph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Elizabeth J.; Barnes, Thomas G., III; Skillen, Ian; Montemayor, Thomas J.

    2017-09-01

    Pulsating stars in eclipsing binary systems are unique objects for providing constraints on stellar models. To fully leverage the information available from the binary system, full orbital radial velocity curves must be obtained. We report 23 radial velocities for components of the eclipsing binary V577 Oph, whose primary star is a δ Sct variable. The velocities cover a nearly complete orbit and a time base of 20 years. We computed orbital elements for the binary and compared them to the ephemeris computed by Creevey et al. The comparison shows marginally different results. In particular, a change in the systemic velocity by -2 km s-1 is suggested by our results. We compare this systemic velocity difference to that expected due to reflex motion of the binary in response to the third body in the system. The systemic velocity difference is consistent with reflex motion, given our mass determination for the eclipsing binary and the orbital parameters determined by Volkov & Volkova for the three-body orbit. We see no evidence for the third body in our spectra, but we do see strong interstellar Na D lines that are consistent in strength with the direction and expected distance of V577 Oph.

  19. A New Orbit for the Eclipsing Binary V577 Oph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffery, Elizabeth J. [Physics Department, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, CA 93407 (United States); Barnes, Thomas G. III; Montemayor, Thomas J. [The University of Texas at Austin, McDonald Observatory, 1 University Station, C1402, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Skillen, Ian, E-mail: ejjeffer@calpoly.edu, E-mail: tgb@astro.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: tm@astro.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: wji@ing.iac.es [Isaac Newton Group, Apartado de Correos 321, E-38700 Santa Cruz de La Palma, Canary Islands (Spain)

    2017-09-01

    Pulsating stars in eclipsing binary systems are unique objects for providing constraints on stellar models. To fully leverage the information available from the binary system, full orbital radial velocity curves must be obtained. We report 23 radial velocities for components of the eclipsing binary V577 Oph, whose primary star is a δ Sct variable. The velocities cover a nearly complete orbit and a time base of 20 years. We computed orbital elements for the binary and compared them to the ephemeris computed by Creevey et al. The comparison shows marginally different results. In particular, a change in the systemic velocity by −2 km s{sup −1} is suggested by our results. We compare this systemic velocity difference to that expected due to reflex motion of the binary in response to the third body in the system. The systemic velocity difference is consistent with reflex motion, given our mass determination for the eclipsing binary and the orbital parameters determined by Volkov and Volkova for the three-body orbit. We see no evidence for the third body in our spectra, but we do see strong interstellar Na D lines that are consistent in strength with the direction and expected distance of V577 Oph.

  20. A dearth of short-period massive binaries in the young massive star forming region M 17. Evidence for a large orbital separation at birth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sana, H.; Ramírez-Tannus, M. C.; de Koter, A.; Kaper, L.; Tramper, F.; Bik, A.

    2017-03-01

    Aims: The formation of massive stars remains poorly understood and little is known about their birth multiplicity properties. Here, we aim to quantitatively investigate the strikingly low radial-velocity dispersion measured for a sample of 11 massive pre- and near-main-sequence stars (σ1D= 5.6 ± 0.2 km s-1) in the very young massive star forming region M 17, in order to obtain first constraints on the multiplicity properties of young massive stellar objects. Methods: We compute the radial-velocity dispersion of synthetic populations of massive stars for various multiplicity properties and we compare the obtained σ1D distributions to the observed value. We specifically investigate two scenarios: a low binary fraction and a dearth of short-period binary systems. Results: Simulated populations with low binary fractions () or with truncated period distributions (Pcutoff > 9 months) are able to reproduce the low σ1D observed within their 68%-confidence intervals. Furthermore, parent populations with fbin > 0.42 or Pcutoff < 47 d can be rejected at the 5%-significance level. Both constraints are in stark contrast with the high binary fraction and plethora of short-period systems in few Myr-old, well characterized OB-type populations. To explain the difference in the context of the first scenario would require a variation of the outcome of the massive star formation process. In the context of the second scenario, compact binaries must form later on, and the cut-off period may be related to physical length-scales representative of the bloated pre-main-sequence stellar radii or of their accretion disks. Conclusions: If the obtained constraints for the M 17's massive-star population are representative of the multiplicity properties of massive young stellar objects, our results may provide support to a massive star formation process in which binaries are initially formed at larger separations, then harden or migrate to produce the typical (untruncated) power-law period

  1. Terrestrial Planet Formation Around Individual Stars Within Binary Star Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Quintana, Elisa V.; Adams, Fred C.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Chambers, John E.

    2007-01-01

    We calculate herein the late stages of terrestrial planet accumulation around a solar type star that has a binary companion with semimajor axis larger than the terrestrial planet region. We perform more than one hundred simulations to survey binary parameter space and to account for sensitive dependence on initial conditions in these dynamical systems. As expected, sufficiently wide binaries leave the planet formation process largely unaffected. As a rough approximation, binary stars with per...

  2. SPECTROSCOPIC ORBITS FOR 15 LATE-TYPE STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willmarth, Daryl W.; Abt, Helmut A. [Kitt Peak National Observatory, Box 26732, Tucson, AZ 85726-6732 (United States); Fekel, Francis C. [Center of Excellence in Information Systems, Tennessee State University, 3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard, Box 9501, Nashville, TN 37209 (United States); Pourbaix, Dimitri, E-mail: dwillmarth@noao.edu, E-mail: habt@noao.edu, E-mail: fekel@evans.tsuniv.edu, E-mail: pourbaix@astro.ulb.ac.be [FNRS Institut d’Astronomie et d’Astrophysique, Université Libre de Bruxelles, CP 226, B-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2016-08-01

    Spectroscopic orbital elements are determined for 15 stars with periods from 8 to 6528 days with six orbits computed for the first time. Improved astrometric orbits are computed for two stars and one new orbit is derived. Visual orbits were previously determined for four stars, four stars are members of multiple systems, and five stars have Hipparcos “G” designations or have been resolved by speckle interferometry. For the nine binaries with previous spectroscopic orbits, we determine improved or comparable elements. For HD 28271 and HD 200790, our spectroscopic results support the conclusions of previous authors that the large values of their mass functions and lack of detectable secondary spectrum argue for the secondary in each case being a pair of low-mass dwarfs. The orbits given here may be useful in combination with future interferometric and Gaia satellite observations.

  3. BINARY DISRUPTION BY MASSIVE BLACK HOLES: HYPERVELOCITY STARS, S STARS, AND TIDAL DISRUPTION EVENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromley, Benjamin C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 115 S 1400 E, Rm 201, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Kenyon, Scott J.; Geller, Margaret J.; Brown, Warren R., E-mail: bromley@physics.utah.edu, E-mail: skenyon@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: wbrown@cfa.harvard.edu [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2012-04-20

    We examine whether disrupted binary stars can fuel black hole growth. In this mechanism, tidal disruption produces a single hypervelocity star (HVS) ejected at high velocity and a former companion star bound to the black hole. After a cluster of bound stars forms, orbital diffusion allows the black hole to accrete stars by tidal disruption at a rate comparable to the capture rate. In the Milky Way, HVSs and the S star cluster imply similar rates of 10{sup -5} to 10{sup -3} yr{sup -1} for binary disruption. These rates are consistent with estimates for the tidal disruption rate in nearby galaxies and imply significant black hole growth from disrupted binaries on 10 Gyr timescales.

  4. Milankovitch cycles of terrestrial planets in binary star systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgan, Duncan

    2016-12-01

    The habitability of planets in binary star systems depends not only on the radiation environment created by the two stars, but also on the perturbations to planetary orbits and rotation produced by the gravitational field of the binary and neighbouring planets. Habitable planets in binaries may therefore experience significant perturbations in orbit and spin. The direct effects of orbital resonances and secular evolution on the climate of binary planets remain largely unconsidered. We present latitudinal energy balance modelling of exoplanet climates with direct coupling to an N-Body integrator and an obliquity evolution model. This allows us to simultaneously investigate the thermal and dynamical evolution of planets orbiting binary stars, and discover gravito-climatic oscillations on dynamical and secular time-scales. We investigate the Kepler-47 and Alpha Centauri systems as archetypes of P- and S-type binary systems, respectively. In the first case, Earth-like planets would experience rapid Milankovitch cycles (of order 1000 yr) in eccentricity, obliquity and precession, inducing temperature oscillations of similar periods (modulated by other planets in the system). These secular temperature variations have amplitudes similar to those induced on the much shorter time-scale of the binary period. In the Alpha Centauri system, the influence of the secondary produces eccentricity variations on 15 000 yr time-scales. This produces climate oscillations of similar strength to the variation on the orbital time-scale of the binary. Phase drifts between eccentricity and obliquity oscillations creates further cycles that are of order 100 000 yr in duration, which are further modulated by neighbouring planets.

  5. The Evolution of Compact Binary Star Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postnov, Konstantin A; Yungelson, Lev R

    2014-01-01

    We review the formation and evolution of compact binary stars consisting of white dwarfs (WDs), neutron stars (NSs), and black holes (BHs). Mergings of compact-star binaries are expected to be the most important sources for forthcoming gravitational-wave (GW) astronomy. In the first part of the review, we discuss observational manifestations of close binaries with NS and/or BH components and their merger rate, crucial points in the formation and evolution of compact stars in binary systems, including the treatment of the natal kicks, which NSs and BHs acquire during the core collapse of massive stars and the common envelope phase of binary evolution, which are most relevant to the merging rates of NS-NS, NS-BH and BH-BH binaries. The second part of the review is devoted mainly to the formation and evolution of binary WDs and their observational manifestations, including their role as progenitors of cosmologically-important thermonuclear SN Ia. We also consider AM CVn-stars, which are thought to be the best verification binary GW sources for future low-frequency GW space interferometers.

  6. The Evolution of Compact Binary Star Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yungelson, Lev R.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We review the formation and evolution of compact binary stars consisting of white dwarfs (WDs, neutron stars (NSs, and black holes (BHs. Binary NSs and BHs are thought to be the primary astrophysical sources of gravitational waves (GWs within the frequency band of ground-based detectors, while compact binaries of WDs are important sources of GWs at lower frequencies to be covered by space interferometers (LISA. Major uncertainties in the current understanding of properties of NSs and BHs most relevant to the GW studies are discussed, including the treatment of the natal kicks which compact stellar remnants acquire during the core collapse of massive stars and the common envelope phase of binary evolution. We discuss the coalescence rates of binary NSs and BHs and prospects for their detections, the formation and evolution of binary WDs and their observational manifestations. Special attention is given to AM CVn-stars -- compact binaries in which the Roche lobe is filled by another WD or a low-mass partially degenerate helium-star, as these stars are thought to be the best LISA verification binary GW sources.

  7. The Evolution of Compact Binary Star Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin A. Postnov

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We review the formation and evolution of compact binary stars consisting of white dwarfs (WDs, neutron stars (NSs, and black holes (BHs. Mergings of compact-star binaries are expected to be the most important sources for forthcoming gravitational-wave (GW astronomy. In the first part of the review, we discuss observational manifestations of close binaries with NS and/or BH components and their merger rate, crucial points in the formation and evolution of compact stars in binary systems, including the treatment of the natal kicks, which NSs and BHs acquire during the core collapse of massive stars and the common envelope phase of binary evolution, which are most relevant to the merging rates of NS-NS, NS-BH and BH-BH binaries. The second part of the review is devoted mainly to the formation and evolution of binary WDs and their observational manifestations, including their role as progenitors of cosmologically-important thermonuclear SN Ia. We also consider AM CVn-stars, which are thought to be the best verification binary GW sources for future low-frequency GW space interferometers.

  8. Analysis of the Conformally Flat Approximation for Binary Neutron Star Initial Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Saeng Suh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The spatially conformally flat approximation (CFA is a viable method to deduce initial conditions for the subsequent evolution of binary neutron stars employing the full Einstein equations. Here we analyze the viability of the CFA for the general relativistic hydrodynamic initial conditions of binary neutron stars. We illustrate the stability of the conformally flat condition on the hydrodynamics by numerically evolving ~100 quasicircular orbits. We illustrate the use of this approximation for orbiting neutron stars in the quasicircular orbit approximation to demonstrate the equation of state dependence of these initial conditions and how they might affect the emergent gravitational wave frequency as the stars approach the innermost stable circular orbit.

  9. General Model for Light Curves of Chromospherically Active Binary Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetsu, L.; Henry, G. W.; Lehtinen, J.

    2017-04-01

    The starspots on the surface of many chromospherically active binary stars concentrate on long-lived active longitudes separated by 180°. Shifts in activity between these two longitudes, the “flip-flop” events, have been observed in single stars like FK Comae and binary stars like σ Geminorum. Recently, interferometry has revealed that ellipticity may at least partly explain the flip-flop events in σ Geminorum. This idea was supported by the double-peaked shape of the long-term mean light curve of this star. Here we show that the long-term mean light curves of 14 chromospherically active binaries follow a general model that explains the connection between orbital motion, changes in starspot distribution, ellipticity, and flip-flop events. Surface differential rotation is probably weak in these stars, because the interference of two constant period waves may explain the observed light curve changes. These two constant periods are the active longitude period ({P}{act}) and the orbital period ({P}{orb}). We also show how to apply the same model to single stars, where only the value of P act is known. Finally, we present a tentative interference hypothesis about the origin of magnetic fields in all spectral types of stars. The CPS results are available electronically at the Vizier database.

  10. Formation and Evolution of Binary Systems Containing Collapsed Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, Saul; West, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    This research includes theoretical studies of the formation and evolution of five types of interacting binary systems. Our main focus has been on developing a number of comprehensive population synthesis codes to study the following types of binary systems: (i) cataclysmic variables (#3, #8, #12, #15), (ii) low- and intermediate-mass X-ray binaries (#13, #20, #21), (iii) high-mass X-ray binaries (#14, #17, #22), (iv) recycled binary millisecond pulsars in globular clusters (#5, #10, #ll), and (v) planetary nebulae which form in interacting binaries (#6, #9). The numbers in parentheses refer to papers published or in preparation that are listed in this paper. These codes take a new unified approach to population synthesis studies. The first step involves a Monte Carlo selection of the primordial binaries, including the constituent masses, and orbital separations and eccentricities. Next, a variety of analytic methods are used to evolve the primary star to the point where either a dynamical episode of mass transfer to the secondary occurs (the common envelope phase), or the system evolves down an alternate path. If the residual core of the primary is greater than 2.5 solar mass, it will evolve to Fe core collapse and the production of a neutron star and a supernova explosion. In the case of systems involving neutron stars, a kick velocity is chosen randomly from an appropriate distribution and added to the orbital dynamics which determine the state of the binary system after the supernova explosion. In the third step, all binaries which commence stable mass transfer from the donor star (the original secondary in the binary system) to the compact object, are followed with a detailed binary evolution code. Finally, we include all the relevant dynamics of the binary system. For example, in the case of LMXBs, the binary system, with its recoil velocity from the supernova explosion, is followed in time through its path in the Galactic potential. For our globular cluster

  11. Eclipsing Binary B-Star Mass Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Amanda; Eikenberry, Stephen S.

    2016-01-01

    B-stars in binary pairs provide a laboratory for key astrophysical measurements of massive stars, including key insights for the formation of compact objects (neutron stars and black holes). In their paper, Martayan et al (2004) find 23 Be binary star pairs in NGC2004 in the Large Magellanic Cloud, five of which are both eclipsing and spectroscopic binaries with archival data from VLT-Giraffe and photometric data from MACHO. By using the Wilson eclipsing binary code (e.g., Wilson, 1971), we can determine preliminary stellar masses of the binary components. We present the first results from this analysis. This study also serves as proof-of-concept for future observations with the Photonic Synthesis Telescope Array (Eikenberry et al., in prep) that we are currently building for low-cost, precision spectroscopic observations. With higher resolution and dedicated time for observations, we can follow-up observations of these Be stars as well as Be/X-ray binaries, for improved mass measurements of neutron stars and black holes and better constraints on their origin/formation.

  12. Red-giant stars in eccentric binaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beck P. G.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The unparalleled photometric data obtained by NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope has led to improved understanding of red-giant stars and binary stars. We discuss the characterization of known eccentric system, containing a solar-like oscillating red-giant primary component. We also report several new binary systems that are candidates for hosting an oscillating companion. A powerful approach to study binary stars is to combine asteroseimic techniques with light curve fitting. Seismology allows us to deduce the properties of red giants. In addition, by modeling the ellipsoidal modulations we can constrain the parameters of the binary system. An valuable independent source are ground-bases, high-resolution spectrographs.

  13. THE BINARY NATURE OF CH-LIKE STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sperauskas, J.; Začs, L.; Deveikis, V. [Vilnius University Observatory, Ciurlionio 29, Vilnius 2009 (Lithuania); Schuster, W. J. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 106, C.P. 22800 Ensenada, B.C., México (Mexico)

    2016-07-20

    Yamashita has described a group of early carbon stars with enhanced lines of barium that resemble the CH stars but have low radial velocities. It is not clear whether they represent a class of stars separate from early R stars. Radial-velocity measurements and abundance analyses are applied in order to clarify the evolutionary status of CH-like stars. Radial-velocity monitoring was performed over a time interval of about 10 years. Abundance analysis was carried out using high-resolution spectra and the method of atmospheric models for three CH-like candidate stars. The radial-velocity monitoring confirmed regular variations for all of the classified CH-like stars, except for two, in support of their binary nature. The calculated orbital parameters are similar to those observed for barium stars in the disk of the Galaxy and their counterparts in the halo, that is, the CH stars. The relatively low luminosity of CH-like stars and the overabundance of s -process elements in the atmospheres are in agreement with a mass-transfer scenario from the secondary—an AGB star in the past. The kinematic data and metallicities support the idea that CH-like stars are thin/thick-disk population objects.

  14. Neutron stars with orbiting light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukacs, B.

    1987-11-01

    There is a wide-spread belief in the literature of relativistic astrophysics concerning nonsingular final states of the stellar evolution: the external gravitational field of a physically nonsingular central symmetric body (e.g. a neutron star) is asymptotically empty and simple, i.e. there are no closed or trapped light-like causal geodesics. Present paper shows that this belief is false: some examples are presented for nonsingular bodies with various equations of state, around which there are closed light-like trajectories: 'orbiting light'. The reality of the used equations of state is discussed in detail. Present state of particle physics does not establish the existence of matter with such equations of state, but the hypothetical subquark level of matter may have such equation of state, thus 'subquark-stars' may exist with orbiting light around them. So the criterion of 'nonsingularity' must be further analyzed and accurately defined. (D.Gy.) 24 refs.; 5 figs

  15. A Binary Nature of the Marginal CP Star Sigma Sculptoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janík, Jan; Krtička, Jiří; Mikulášek, Zdeněk; Zverko, Juraj; Pintado, Olga; Paunzen, Ernst; Prvák, Milan; Skalický, Jan; Zejda, Miloslav; Adam, Christian

    2018-05-01

    The A2 V star σ Scl was suspected of being a low-amplitude rotating variable of the Ap-type star by several authors. Aiming to decide whether the star is a variable chemically peculiar (CP) star, we searched for the photometric and spectroscopic variability, and determined chemical abundances of σ Scl. The possible variability was tested using several types of periodograms applied to the photometry from Long-Term Photometry of Variables project (LTPV) and Hipparcos. Sixty spectrograms of high signal-to-noise (S/N) were obtained and used for chemical analysis of the stellar atmosphere and for looking for spectral variability that is symptomatic for the CP stars. We did not find any signs of the light variability or prominent chemical peculiarity, that is specific for the CP stars. The only exception is the abundance of scandium, which is significantly lower than the solar one and yttrium and barium, which are strongly overabundant. As a by-product of the analysis, and with the addition of 29 further spectra, we found that σ Scl is a single-lined spectroscopic binary with orbital period of 46.877(8) d. We argue that σ Scl is not an Ap star, but rather a marginal Am star in SB1 system. The spectral energy distribution of the binary reveals infrared excess due to circumstellar material.

  16. Absolute Dimensions of Contact Binary Stars in Baade Window

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Woon Kang

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The light curves of the representative 6 contact binary stars observed by OGLE Project of searching for dark matter in our Galaxy have been analyzed by the method of the Wilson and Devinney Differential Correction to find photometric solutions. The orbital inclinations of these binaries are in the range of 52 deg - 69 deg which is lower than that of the solar neighborhood binaries. The Roche lobe filling factor of these binaries are distributed in large range of 0.12 - 0.90. Since absence of spectroscopic observations for these binaries we have found masses of the 6 binary systems based on the intersection between Kepler locus and locus derived from Vandenberg isochrones in the mass - luminosity plane. Then absolute dimensions and distances have been found by combining the masses and the photometric solutions. The distances of the 6 binary systems are distributed in the range of 1 kpc - 6 kpc. This distance range is the limiting range where the contact binaries which have period shorter than a day are visible. Most contact binaries discovered in the Baade window do not belong to the Galactic bulge.

  17. Be discs in binary systems - II. Misaligned orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyr, I. H.; Jones, C. E.; Panoglou, D.; Carciofi, A. C.; Okazaki, A. T.

    2017-10-01

    We use a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code to examine the effects of misaligned binary companions on Be star discs. We systematically vary the degree of misalignment between the disc and the binary orbit, as well as the disc viscosity and orbital period to study their effects on the density in the inner and outer parts of the disc. We find that varying the degree of misalignment, the viscosity and the orbital period affects both the truncation radius and the density structure of the outer disc, while the inner disc remains mostly unaffected. We also investigate the tilting of the disc in the innermost part of the disc and find the tilt increases with radius until reaching a maximum around 5 stellar radii. The direction of the line of nodes, with respect to the equator of the central star, is found to be offset compared to the orbital line of nodes, and to vary periodically in time, with a period of half a orbital phase. We also compare the scaleheight of our discs with the analytical scaleheight of an isothermal disc, which increases with radius as r1.5. We find that this formula reproduces the scaleheight well for both aligned and misaligned systems but underestimates the scaleheight in regions of the disc where density enhancements develop.

  18. A simple model for binary star evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whyte, C.A.; Eggleton, P.P.

    1985-01-01

    A simple model for calculating the evolution of binary stars is presented. Detailed stellar evolution calculations of stars undergoing mass and energy transfer at various rates are reported and used to identify the dominant physical processes which determine the type of evolution. These detailed calculations are used to calibrate the simple model and a comparison of calculations using the detailed stellar evolution equations and the simple model is made. Results of the evolution of a few binary systems are reported and compared with previously published calculations using normal stellar evolution programs. (author)

  19. White dwarfs in Be star binary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apparao, K. M. V.

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation is made of possible reasons for the persistent inability to identify white dwarf stars in the Be binary systems. It is noted that many Be stars exhibiting large optical enhancements may be Be + WD and Be + He systems, and that observations of pulsations in the H-alpha emission, as well as observation of time delays between enhancements of optical line and continuum, can identify such systems.

  20. RADIAL VELOCITIES OF GALACTIC O-TYPE STARS. II. SINGLE-LINED SPECTROSCOPIC BINARIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, S. J.; Gies, D. R.; Hillwig, T. C.; McSwain, M. V.; Huang, W.

    2013-01-01

    We report on new radial velocity measurements of massive stars that are either suspected binaries or lacking prior observations. This is part of a survey to identify and characterize spectroscopic binaries among O-type stars with the goal of comparing the binary fraction of field and runaway stars with those in clusters and associations. We present orbits for HDE 308813, HD 152147, HD 164536, BD–16°4826, and HDE 229232, Galactic O-type stars exhibiting single-lined spectroscopic variation. By fitting model spectra to our observed spectra, we obtain estimates for effective temperature, surface gravity, and rotational velocity. We compute orbital periods and velocity semiamplitudes for each system and note the lack of photometric variation for any system. These binaries probably appear single-lined because the companions are faint and because their orbital Doppler shifts are small compared to the width of the rotationally broadened lines of the primary.

  1. The fate of close encounters between binary stars and binary supermassive black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Han; Leigh, Nathan; Yuan, Ye-Fei; Perna, Rosalba

    2018-04-01

    The evolution of main-sequence binaries that reside in the Galactic Centre can be heavily influenced by the central supermassive black hole (SMBH). Due to these perturbative effects, the stellar binaries in dense environments are likely to experience mergers, collisions, or ejections through secular and/or non-secular interactions. More direct interactions with the central SMBH are thought to produce hypervelocity stars (HVSs) and tidal disruption events (TDEs). In this paper, we use N-body simulations to study the dynamics of stellar binaries orbiting a central SMBH primary with an outer SMBH secondary orbiting this inner triple. The effects of the secondary SMBH on the event rates of HVSs, TDEs, and stellar mergers are investigated, as a function of the SMBH-SMBH binary mass ratio. Our numerical experiments reveal that, relative to the isolated SMBH case, the TDE and HVS rates are enhanced for, respectively, the smallest and largest mass ratio SMBH-SMBH binaries. This suggests that the observed event rates of TDEs and HVSs have the potential to serve as a diagnostic of the mass ratio of a central SMBH-SMBH binary. The presence of a secondary SMBH also allows for the creation of hypervelocity binaries. Observations of these systems could thus constrain the presence of a secondary SMBH in the Galactic Centre.

  2. Neutron-Star-Black-Hole Binaries Produced by Binary-Driven Hypernovae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, Chris L; Oliveira, F G; Rueda, J A; Ruffini, R

    2015-12-04

    Binary-driven hypernovae (BdHNe) within the induced gravitational collapse paradigm have been introduced to explain energetic (E_{iso}≳10^{52}  erg), long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with type Ic supernovae (SNe). The progenitor is a tight binary composed of a carbon-oxygen (CO) core and a neutron-star (NS) companion, a subclass of the newly proposed "ultrastripped" binaries. The CO-NS short-period orbit causes the NS to accrete appreciable matter from the SN ejecta when the CO core collapses, ultimately causing it to collapse to a black hole (BH) and producing a GRB. These tight binaries evolve through the SN explosion very differently than compact binaries studied in population synthesis calculations. First, the hypercritical accretion onto the NS companion alters both the mass and the momentum of the binary. Second, because the explosion time scale is on par with the orbital period, the mass ejection cannot be assumed to be instantaneous. This dramatically affects the post-SN fate of the binary. Finally, the bow shock created as the accreting NS plows through the SN ejecta transfers angular momentum, braking the orbit. These systems remain bound even if a large fraction of the binary mass is lost in the explosion (well above the canonical 50% limit), and even large kicks are unlikely to unbind the system. Indeed, BdHNe produce a new family of NS-BH binaries unaccounted for in current population synthesis analyses and, although they may be rare, the fact that nearly 100% remain bound implies that they may play an important role in the compact merger rate, important for gravitational waves that, in turn, can produce a new class of ultrashort GRBs.

  3. A radio-pulsing white dwarf binary star.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, T R; Gänsicke, B T; Hümmerich, S; Hambsch, F-J; Bernhard, K; Lloyd, C; Breedt, E; Stanway, E R; Steeghs, D T; Parsons, S G; Toloza, O; Schreiber, M R; Jonker, P G; van Roestel, J; Kupfer, T; Pala, A F; Dhillon, V S; Hardy, L K; Littlefair, S P; Aungwerojwit, A; Arjyotha, S; Koester, D; Bochinski, J J; Haswell, C A; Frank, P; Wheatley, P J

    2016-09-15

    White dwarfs are compact stars, similar in size to Earth but approximately 200,000 times more massive. Isolated white dwarfs emit most of their power from ultraviolet to near-infrared wavelengths, but when in close orbits with less dense stars, white dwarfs can strip material from their companions and the resulting mass transfer can generate atomic line and X-ray emission, as well as near- and mid-infrared radiation if the white dwarf is magnetic. However, even in binaries, white dwarfs are rarely detected at far-infrared or radio frequencies. Here we report the discovery of a white dwarf/cool star binary that emits from X-ray to radio wavelengths. The star, AR Scorpii (henceforth AR Sco), was classified in the early 1970s as a δ-Scuti star, a common variety of periodic variable star. Our observations reveal instead a 3.56-hour period close binary, pulsing in brightness on a period of 1.97 minutes. The pulses are so intense that AR Sco's optical flux can increase by a factor of four within 30 seconds, and they are also detectable at radio frequencies. They reflect the spin of a magnetic white dwarf, which we find to be slowing down on a 10 7 -year timescale. The spin-down power is an order of magnitude larger than that seen in electromagnetic radiation, which, together with an absence of obvious signs of accretion, suggests that AR Sco is primarily spin-powered. Although the pulsations are driven by the white dwarf's spin, they mainly originate from the cool star. AR Sco's broadband spectrum is characteristic of synchrotron radiation, requiring relativistic electrons. These must either originate from near the white dwarf or be generated in situ at the M star through direct interaction with the white dwarf's magnetosphere.

  4. Formation of a contact binary star system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullen, E.F.F.

    1974-01-01

    The process of forming a contact binary star system is investigated in the light of current knowledge of the W Ursae Majoris type eclipsing binaries and the current rotational braking theories for contracting stars. A preliminary stage of mass transfer is proposed and studied through the use of a computer program which calculates evolutionary model sequences. The detailed development of both stars is followed in these calculations, and findings regarding the internal structure of the star which is receiving the mass are presented. Relaxation of the mass-gaining star is also studied; for these stars of low mass and essentially zero age, the star eventually settles to a state very similar to a zero-age main sequence star of the new mass. A contact system was formed through these calculations; it exhibits the general properties of a W Ursae Majoris system. The initial masses selected for the calculation were 1.29 M/sub solar mass/ and 0.56 M/sub solar mass/. An initial mass transfer rate of about 10 -10 solar masses per year gradually increased to about 10 -8 solar masses per year. After about 2.5 x 10 7 years, the less massive star filled its Roche lobe and an initial contact system was obtained. The final masses were 1.01359 M/sub solar mass/ and 0.83641 M/sub solar mass/. The internal structure of the secondary component is considerably different from that of a main sequence star of the same mass

  5. Binary Model for the Heartbeat Star System KIC 4142768

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Joseph; Hambleton, Kelly

    2018-01-01

    Heartbeat stars are a class of eccentric (e > 0.2) binary systems that undergo strong tidal forces. These tidal forces cause the shape of each star and the temperature across the stellar surfaces to change. This effect also generates variations in the light curve in the form of tidally-induced pulsations, which are theorized to have a significant effect on the circularization of eccentric orbits (Zahn, 1975). Using the binary modeling software PHOEBE (Prša & Zwitter 2005) on the Kepler photometric data and Keck radial velocity data for the eclipsing, heartbeat star KIC 4142768, we have determined the fundamental parameters including masses and radii. The frequency analysis of the residual data has surprisingly revealed approximately 29 pulsations with 8 being Delta Scuti pulsations, 10 being Gamma Doradus pulsations, and 11 being tidally-induced pulsations. After subtracting an initial binary model from the original, detrended photometric data, we analyzed the pulsation frequencies in the residual data. We then were able to disentangle the identified pulsations from the original data in order to conduct subsequent binary modeling. We plan to continue this study by applying asteroseismology to KIC 4142768. Through our continued investigation, we hope to extract information about the star’s internal structure and expect this will yield additional, interesting results.

  6. Coalescence of Black Hole-Neutron Star Binaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru Shibata

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We review the current status of general relativistic studies for the coalescence of black hole-neutron star (BH-NS binaries. First, procedures for a solution of BH-NS binaries in quasi-equilibrium circular orbits and the numerical results, such as quasi-equilibrium sequence and mass-shedding limit, of the high-precision computation, are summarized. Then, the current status of numerical-relativity simulations for the merger of BH-NS binaries is described. We summarize our understanding for the merger and/or tidal disruption processes, the criterion for tidal disruption, the properties of the remnant formed after the tidal disruption, gravitational waveform, and gravitational-wave spectrum.

  7. Kilonova Counterparts of Binary Neutron Star Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Brian

    2018-01-01

    The merger of a binary neutron star is accompanied by the ejection of neutron-rich matter into space at velocities up to several tenths that of light, which synthesizes rare heavy isotopes through the rapid neutron capture process (r-process). The radioactive decay of these nuclei was predicted by Metzger et al. (2010) to power an optical transient roughly 1000 times more luminous than a classical nova (a "kilonova"), which is among the most promising electromagnetic counterparts to accompany gravitational wave signal from the merger. I will describe how the luminosities, color, and spectra of the kilonova emission inform the properties of the merging binary (neutron star masses/radii and inclination angle) and the long sought origin of the heaviest elements in the Universe. Results will be discussed in the context of recent discoveries by Advanced LIGO/Virgo.

  8. Eclipsing binary stars modeling and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Kallrath, Josef

    1999-01-01

    This book focuses on the formulation of mathematical models for the light curves of eclipsing binary stars, and on the algorithms for generating such models Since information gained from binary systems provides much of what we know of the masses, luminosities, and radii of stars, such models are acquiring increasing importance in studies of stellar structure and evolution As in other areas of science, the computer revolution has given many astronomers tools that previously only specialists could use; anyone with access to a set of data can now expect to be able to model it This book will provide astronomers, both amateur and professional, with a guide for - specifying an astrophysical model for a set of observations - selecting an algorithm to determine the parameters of the model - estimating the errors of the parameters It is written for readers with knowledge of basic calculus and linear algebra; appendices cover mathematical details on such matters as optimization, coordinate systems, and specific models ...

  9. An accessible echelle pipeline and its application to a binary star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Theron; Johnson, John Asher

    2018-01-01

    Nearly every star observed in the Galaxy has one or more companions that play an integral role in the evolution of the star. Whether it is a planet or another star, a companion opens up opportunities for unique forms of analysis to be done on a system. Some 2400 lightyears away, there is a 3-10 Myr old binary system called KH 15D, which not only includes two T Tauri K-type stars in a close orbit of 48 days, but also a truncated, coherently precessing warped disk in a circumbinary orbit.In binary systems, a double-lined spectroscopic binary may be observable in spectra. This is a spectrum that contains a mixture of each star's properties and manifests as two sets of spectral emission and absorption lines that correspond to each star. Slightly different is a single-lined spectroscopic binary, where only one set of spectral lines from one star is visible. The data of KH 15D are studied in the form of a double single-lined spectroscopic binary. This means that at two separate observing times, a single-lined spectroscopic binary is obtained from one of the stars of KH 15D. This is possible because of the circumbinary disk that blocks one star at a time from view.Here, we study this binary system with a combination of archival echelle data from the Keck Observatory and new echelle data from Las Campanas Observatory. This optical data is reduced with a new Python-based pipeline available on GitHub. The objective is to measure the mass function of the binary star and refine the current values of each star's properties.

  10. Interaction of Massive Black Hole Binaries with Their Stellar Environment. II. Loss Cone Depletion and Binary Orbital Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesana, Alberto; Haardt, Francesco; Madau, Piero

    2007-05-01

    We study the long-term evolution of massive black hole binaries (MBHBs) at the centers of galaxies using detailed scattering experiments to solve the full three-body problem. Ambient stars drawn from an isotropic Maxwellian distribution unbound to the binary are ejected by the gravitational slingshot. We construct a minimal, hybrid model for the depletion of the loss cone and the orbital decay of the binary and show that secondary slingshots-stars returning on small-impact parameter orbits to have a second superelastic scattering with the MBHB-may considerably help the shrinking of the pair in the case of large binary mass ratios. In the absence of loss cone refilling by two-body relaxation or other processes, the mass ejected before the stalling of a MBHB is half the binary reduced mass. About 50% of the ejected stars are expelled in a ``burst'' lasting ~104 yr M1/46, where M6 is the binary mass in units of 106 Msolar. The loss cone is completely emptied in a few bulge crossing timescales, ~107 yr M1/46. Even in the absence of two-body relaxation or gas dynamical processes, unequal mass and/or eccentric binaries with M6>~0.1 can shrink to the gravitational wave emission regime in less than a Hubble time and are therefore ``safe'' targets for the planned Laser Interferometer Space Antenna.

  11. WR 20a: A massive cornerstone binary system comprising two extreme early-type stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rauw, G.; De Becker, M.; Nazé, Y.; Crowther, P.A.; Gosset, E.; Sana, H.; van der Hucht, K.A.; Vreux, J.-M.; Williams, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    We analyse spectroscopic observations of WR 20a revealing that this star is a massive early-type binary system with a most probable orbital period of ~3.675 days. Our spectra indicate that both components are most likely of WN6ha or O3If*/WN6ha spectral type. The orbital solution for a period of

  12. Binary interaction dominates the evolution of massive stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sana, H; de Mink, S E; de Koter, A; Langer, N; Evans, C J; Gieles, M; Gosset, E; Izzard, R G; Le Bouquin, J-B; Schneider, F R N

    2012-07-27

    The presence of a nearby companion alters the evolution of massive stars in binary systems, leading to phenomena such as stellar mergers, x-ray binaries, and gamma-ray bursts. Unambiguous constraints on the fraction of massive stars affected by binary interaction were lacking. We simultaneously measured all relevant binary characteristics in a sample of Galactic massive O stars and quantified the frequency and nature of binary interactions. More than 70% of all massive stars will exchange mass with a companion, leading to a binary merger in one-third of the cases. These numbers greatly exceed previous estimates and imply that binary interaction dominates the evolution of massive stars, with implications for populations of massive stars and their supernovae.

  13. Binary interaction dominates the evolution of massive stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sana, H.; de Mink, S.E.; de Koter, A.; Langer, N.; Evans, C.J.; Gieles, M.; Gosset, E.; Izzard, R.G.; Le Bouquin, J.-B.; Schneider, F.R.N.

    2012-01-01

    The presence of a nearby companion alters the evolution of massive stars in binary systems, leading to phenomena such as stellar mergers, x-ray binaries, and gamma-ray bursts. Unambiguous constraints on the fraction of massive stars affected by binary interaction were lacking. We simultaneously

  14. Star cluster disruption by a massive black hole binary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolas, Elisa; Mapelli, Michela; Spera, Mario

    2018-02-01

    Massive black hole binaries (BHBs) are expected to form as the result of galaxy mergers; they shrink via dynamical friction and stellar scatterings, until gravitational waves (GWs) bring them to the final coalescence. It has been argued that BHBs may stall at a parsec scale and never enter the GW stage if stars are not continuously supplied to the BHB loss cone. Here, we perform several N-body experiments to study the effect of an 8 × 104 M⊙ stellar cluster (SC) infalling on a parsec-scale BHB. We explore different orbital elements for the SC, and we perform runs both with and without accounting for the influence of a rigid stellar cusp (modelled as a rigid Dehnen potential). We find that the semimajor axis of the BHB shrinks by ≳ 10 per cent if the SC is on a nearly radial orbit; the shrinking is more efficient when a Dehnen potential is included and the orbital plane of the SC coincides with that of the BHB. In contrast, if the SC orbit has non-zero angular momentum, only few stars enter the BHB loss cone and the resulting BHB shrinking is negligible. Our results indicate that SC disruption might significantly contribute to the shrinking of a parsec-scale BHB only if the SC approaches the BHB on a nearly radial orbit.

  15. Rotation, activity, and lithium abundance in cool binary stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassmeier, K. G.; Weber, M.; Granzer, T.; Järvinen, S.

    2012-10-01

    We have used two robotic telescopes to obtain time-series high-resolution optical echelle spectroscopy and V I and/or by photometry for a sample of 60 active stars, mostly binaries. Orbital solutions are presented for 26 double-lined systems and for 19 single-lined systems, seven of them for the first time but all of them with unprecedented phase coverage and accuracy. Eighteen systems turned out to be single stars. The total of 6609 {R=55 000} échelle spectra are also used to systematically determine effective temperatures, gravities, metallicities, rotational velocities, lithium abundances and absolute Hα-core fluxes as a function of time. The photometry is used to infer unspotted brightness, {V-I} and/or b-y colors, spot-induced brightness amplitudes and precise rotation periods. An extra 22 radial-velocity standard stars were monitored throughout the science observations and yield a new barycentric zero point for our STELLA/SES robotic system. Our data are complemented by literature data and are used to determine rotation-temperature-activity relations for active binary components. We also relate lithium abundance to rotation and surface temperature. We find that 74 % of all known rapidly-rotating active binary stars are synchronized and in circular orbits but 26 % (61 systems) are rotating asynchronously of which half have {P_rot>P_orb} and {e>0}. Because rotational synchronization is predicted to occur before orbital circularization active binaries should undergo an extra spin-down besides tidal dissipation. We suspect this to be due to a magnetically channeled wind with its subsequent braking torque. We find a steep increase of rotation period with decreasing effective temperature for active stars, P_rot ∝ T_eff-7, for both single and binaries, main sequence and evolved. For inactive, single giants with {P_rot>100} d, the relation is much weaker, {P_rot ∝ T_eff-1.12}. Our data also indicate a period-activity relation for Hα of the form {R_Hα ∝ P

  16. Observations of binary stars by speckle interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, B.L.; Beckmann, G.K.; Scaddan, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    This is the second paper in a series describing observations of binary stars using the technique of speckle interferometry. Observations were made using the 2.5-m Isaac Newton Telescope and the 1-m telescope of the Royal Greenwich Observatory and the 1.9-m telescope of the South African Astronomical Observatory. The classical Rayleigh diffraction limits are 0.050 arcsec for the 2.5-m telescope, 0.065 arcsec for the 1.9-m telescope and 0.125 arcsec for the 1-m telescope, at a wavelength of 500 nm. The results of 29 measurements of 26 objects are presented. The objects include long period spectroscopic binaries from the 6th Catalogue of Batten, close visual binary systems from the 3rd Catalogue of Finsen and Worley and variable stars. Nine of the objects have not been previously resolved by speckle interferometry. New members are detected in the systems β Cep, p Vel and iota UMa. (author)

  17. ORBITAL EVOLUTION OF COMPACT WHITE DWARF BINARIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, David L. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Bildsten, Lars [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, Kohn Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Steinfadt, Justin D. R., E-mail: kaplan@uwm.edu, E-mail: bildsten@kitp.ucsb.edu, E-mail: jdrsteinfadt@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Broida Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2012-10-10

    The newfound prevalence of extremely low mass (ELM, M{sub He} < 0.2 M{sub Sun }) helium white dwarfs (WDs) in tight binaries with more massive WDs has raised our interest in understanding the nature of their mass transfer. Possessing small (M{sub env} {approx} 10{sup -3} M{sub Sun }) but thick hydrogen envelopes, these objects have larger radii than cold WDs and so initiate mass transfer of H-rich material at orbital periods of 6-10 minutes. Building on the original work of D'Antona et al., we confirm the 10{sup 6} yr period of continued inspiral with mass transfer of H-rich matter and highlight the fact that the inspiraling direct-impact double WD binary HM Cancri likely has an ELM WD donor. The ELM WDs have less of a radius expansion under mass loss, thus enabling a larger range of donor masses that can stably transfer matter and become a He mass transferring AM CVn binary. Even once in the long-lived AM CVn mass transferring stage, these He WDs have larger radii due to their higher entropy from the prolonged H-burning stage.

  18. BINARY CENTRAL STARS OF PLANETARY NEBULAE DISCOVERED THROUGH PHOTOMETRIC VARIABILITY. IV. THE CENTRAL STARS OF HaTr 4 AND Hf 2-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillwig, Todd C.; Schaub, S. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Valparaiso University, Valparaiso, IN 46383 (United States); Bond, Howard E. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Frew, David J. [Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Bodman, Eva H. L., E-mail: todd.hillwig@valpo.edu [Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy (SARA) (United States)

    2016-08-01

    We explore the photometrically variable central stars of the planetary nebulae HaTr 4 and Hf 2-2. Both have been classified as close binary star systems previously based on their light curves alone. Here, we present additional arguments and data confirming the identification of both as close binaries with an irradiated cool companion to the hot central star. We include updated light curves, orbital periods, and preliminary binary modeling for both systems. We also identify for the first time the central star of HaTr 4 as an eclipsing binary. Neither system has been well studied in the past, but we utilize the small amount of existing data to limit possible binary parameters, including system inclination. These parameters are then compared to nebular parameters to further our knowledge of the relationship between binary central stars of planetary nebulae and nebular shaping and ejection.

  19. The Kepler Eclipsing Binary V2281 Cygni with Twin Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Jae-Rim; Lee, Jae Woo; Hong, Kyeongsoo

    2017-12-01

    We present the physical properties of the eclipsing binary V2281 Cyg, which shows a light-time effect due to a supposed tertiary component from its eclipse timing variation according to the Kepler observations. The high-resolution spectra and BVR photometric data of the system were obtained at Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory and Mount Lemmon Optical Astronomy Observatory, respectively. To determine the fundamental parameters of the eclipsing pair and its circumbinary object, we simultaneously analyzed the radial velocities, light curves, and eclipse times including the Kepler data. The masses and radii for the primary and secondary stars were determined with accuracy levels of approximately 2% and 1%, respectively, as follows: {M}1=1.61+/- 0.04 {M}⊙ and {M}2=1.60+/- 0.04 {M}⊙ , {R}1=1.94+/- 0.02 {R}⊙ and {R}2=1.93+/- 0.02 {R}⊙ . If its orbit is coplanar with the eclipsing binary, the period and semimajor axis of the third body were calculated to be {P}3b=4.1 years and {a}3b=4.06 {au}, respectively, and its mass is {M}3b=0.75 {M}⊙ . The evolutionary state of the system was investigated by comparing the masses and radii with theoretical models. The results demonstrate that V2281 Cyg is a detached eclipsing binary, which consists of twin main-sequence stars with an age of 1.5 Gyr.

  20. Numerical relativity simulations of precessing binary neutron star mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Tim; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Brügmann, Bernd; Ujevic, Maximiliano; Tichy, Wolfgang

    2018-03-01

    We present the first set of numerical relativity simulations of binary neutron mergers that include spin precession effects and are evolved with multiple resolutions. Our simulations employ consistent initial data in general relativity with different spin configurations and dimensionless spin magnitudes ˜0.1 . They start at a gravitational-wave frequency of ˜392 Hz and cover more than 1 precession period and about 15 orbits up to merger. We discuss the spin precession dynamics by analyzing coordinate trajectories, quasilocal spin measurements, and energetics, by comparing spin aligned, antialigned, and irrotational configurations. Gravitational waveforms from different spin configuration are compared by calculating the mismatch between pairs of waveforms in the late inspiral. We find that precession effects are not distinguishable from nonprecessing configurations with aligned spins for approximately face-on binaries, while the latter are distinguishable from nonspinning configurations. Spin precession effects are instead clearly visible for approximately edge-on binaries. For the parameters considered here, precession does not significantly affect the characteristic postmerger gravitational-wave frequencies nor the mass ejection. Our results pave the way for the modeling of spin precession effects in the gravitational waveform from binary neutron star events.

  1. Circumstellar disks around binary stars in Taurus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akeson, R. L.; Jensen, E. L. N.

    2014-01-01

    We have conducted a survey of 17 wide (>100 AU) young binary systems in Taurus with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) at two wavelengths. The observations were designed to measure the masses of circumstellar disks in these systems as an aid to understanding the role of multiplicity in star and planet formation. The ALMA observations had sufficient resolution to localize emission within the binary system. Disk emission was detected around all primaries and 10 secondaries, with disk masses as low as 10 –4 M ☉ . We compare the properties of our sample to the population of known disks in Taurus and find that the disks from this binary sample match the scaling between stellar mass and millimeter flux of F mm ∝M ∗ 1.5--2.0 to within the scatter found in previous studies. We also compare the properties of the primaries to those of the secondaries and find that the secondary/primary stellar and disk mass ratios are not correlated; in three systems, the circumsecondary disk is more massive than the circumprimary disk, counter to some theoretical predictions.

  2. Circumstellar disks around binary stars in Taurus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akeson, R. L. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, IPAC/Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Jensen, E. L. N. [Swarthmore College, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Swarthmore, PA 19081 (United States)

    2014-03-20

    We have conducted a survey of 17 wide (>100 AU) young binary systems in Taurus with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) at two wavelengths. The observations were designed to measure the masses of circumstellar disks in these systems as an aid to understanding the role of multiplicity in star and planet formation. The ALMA observations had sufficient resolution to localize emission within the binary system. Disk emission was detected around all primaries and 10 secondaries, with disk masses as low as 10{sup –4} M {sub ☉}. We compare the properties of our sample to the population of known disks in Taurus and find that the disks from this binary sample match the scaling between stellar mass and millimeter flux of F{sub mm}∝M{sub ∗}{sup 1.5--2.0} to within the scatter found in previous studies. We also compare the properties of the primaries to those of the secondaries and find that the secondary/primary stellar and disk mass ratios are not correlated; in three systems, the circumsecondary disk is more massive than the circumprimary disk, counter to some theoretical predictions.

  3. Orbitally-Modulated High Energy Emission from Millisecond Pulsar Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadiasingh, Zorawar; Kust Harding, Alice; Venter, Christo; Boettcher, Markus; Baring, Matthew G.

    2017-08-01

    Radio, optical and X-ray followup of unidentified Fermi sources has expanded the number of known galactic-field "black widow" and "redback" millisecond pulsar binaries from four to nearly 30. Several systems observed by Chandra, XMM, Suzaku, and NuSTAR exhibit double-peaked X-ray orbital modulation. This is attributed to synchrotron emission from electrons accelerated in an intrabinary shock and Doppler boosting by mildly relativistic bulk flow along the shock. It is anticipated that NICER will also detect such emission from B1957+20 and other targets. The structure of the orbital X-ray light curves depend upon the binary inclination, shock geometry, and particle acceleration distribution. In particular, the spatial variation along the shock of the underlying electron power-law index yields energy-dependence in the shape of light curves motivating future high energy phase-resolved spectroscopic studies to probe the unknown physics of pulsar winds and relativistic shock acceleration therein. We also briefly discuss stability of the shock to dynamical perturbations for redbacks and how observations of correlated X ray-optical variability may test self-regulatory stabilizing mechanisms.

  4. Orbitally-Modulated X-rays From Millisecond Pulsar Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kust Harding, Alice; Wadiasingh, Zorawar; Venter, Christo; Boettcher, Markus; Baring, Matthew G.

    2017-06-01

    A large number of new Black Widow (BW) and Redback (RB) rotation-powered millisecond pulsars have been discovered through radio searches of unidentified Fermi sources, increasing the known number of these systems from 4 to 28. We model the high-energy synchrotron emission component from particles accelerated to several TeV in intrabinary shocks in two known BW and RB systems, and its predicted modulation at the binary orbital period. Constructing a geometric model of the shock, we use radio eclipse data in conjunction with optical constraints on the binary inclination angle to constrain the shock stagnation point distance from either the pulsar or companion star. We next model the X-ray synchrotron orbital light curves and compare them to those observed from the PSR B1957+20, where the shock surrounds the companion, and PSR J1023+0038, where the shock surrounds the pulsar, to constrain the bulk Lorentz factor of the wind flow as well as further constrain the inclination angle.

  5. The massive star O+WR binary γ Velorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marco, O.; Willis, A. J.; Colley, S. R.

    2001-12-01

    The γ Vel O+WR binary system is known to have colliding winds from its X-ray properties. Here we use the stellar parameters of the two stars in the system, derived from the non-LTE models of De Marco & Schmutz (2000) and De Marco et al. (2000), to aid in the interpretation of the optical line variability in terms of the geometry and distribution of the gas around the two stars. We find that the rich dataset (high signal-to-noise ratio, high resolution optical spectra finely sampling the orbital period) allows a very accurate determination of the opening angle of the wake formed as the WR wind impacts the O star. This can lead to understanding whether radiative breaking (of the WR wind gas by the O star radiation field) is efficient in this system. From the location of the emission line forming regions within the WR wind (from the non-LTE models), and the variability patterns of those lines, it is possible to construct a detailed map of the WR wind. Work financed by the Asimov Fellowship program of the Americam Museum of Natural History.

  6. Accretion-induced Collapse from Helium Star + White Dwarf Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Jared; Schwab, Josiah; Bildsten, Lars; Quataert, Eliot; Paxton, Bill

    2017-07-01

    Accretion-induced collapse (AIC) occurs when an O/Ne white dwarf (WD) grows to nearly the Chandrasekhar mass ({M}{Ch}), reaching central densities that trigger electron captures in the core. Using Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA), we present the first true binary simulations of He star + O/Ne WD binaries, focusing on a 1.5 {M}⊙ He star in a 3 hr orbital period with 1.1{--}1.3 {M}⊙ O/Ne WDs. The helium star fills its Roche lobe after core helium burning is completed and donates helium on its thermal timescale to the WD, \\dot{M}≈ 3× {10}-6 {M}⊙ {{yr}}-1, which is a rate high enough that the accreting helium burns stably on the WD. The accumulated carbon/oxygen ashes from the helium burning undergo an unstable shell flash that initiates an inwardly moving, carbon burning flame. This flame is only quenched when it runs out of carbon at the surface of the original O/Ne core. Subsequent accumulation of fresh carbon/oxygen layers also undergo thermal instabilities, but no mass loss is triggered, which allows {M}{WD}\\to {M}{Ch}, and then triggers the onset of AIC. We also discuss the scenario of accreting C/O WDs that experience shell carbon ignitions to become O/Ne WDs, and then, under continuing mass transfer, lead to AIC. Studies of the AIC event rate using binary population synthesis should include all of these channels, especially this latter channel, which has been previously neglected but might dominate the rate.

  7. Compact stars and the evolution of binary systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, E.P.J.

    2011-01-01

    The Chandrasekhar limit is of key importance for the evolution of white dwarfs in binary systems and for the formation of neutron stars and black holes in binaries. Mass transfer can drive a white dwarf in a binary over the Chandrasekhar limit, which may lead to a Type Ia supernova (in case of a CO

  8. Orbital synchronization capture of two binaries emitting gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Naoki

    2018-03-01

    We study the possibility of orbital synchronization capture for a hierarchical quadrupole stellar system composed by two binaries emitting gravitational waves. Based on a simple model including the mass transfer for white dwarf binaries, we find that the capture might be realized for inter-binary distances less than their gravitational wavelength. We also discuss related intriguing phenomena such as a parasitic relation between the coupled white dwarf binaries and significant reductions of gravitational and electromagnetic radiations.

  9. Kepler Eclipsing Binary Stars. I. Catalog and Principal Characterization of 1879 Eclipsing Binaries in the First Data Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prša, Andrej; Batalha, Natalie; Slawson, Robert W.; Doyle, Laurance R.; Welsh, William F.; Orosz, Jerome A.; Seager, Sara; Rucker, Michael; Mjaseth, Kimberly; Engle, Scott G.; Conroy, Kyle; Jenkins, Jon; Caldwell, Douglas; Koch, David; Borucki, William

    2011-03-01

    The Kepler space mission is devoted to finding Earth-size planets orbiting other stars in their habitable zones. Its large, 105 deg2 field of view features over 156,000 stars that are observed continuously to detect and characterize planet transits. Yet, this high-precision instrument holds great promise for other types of objects as well. Here we present a comprehensive catalog of eclipsing binary stars observed by Kepler in the first 44 days of operation, the data being publicly available through MAST as of 2010 June 15. The catalog contains 1879 unique objects. For each object, we provide its Kepler ID (KID), ephemeris (BJD0, P 0), morphology type, physical parameters (T eff, log g, E(B - V)), the estimate of third light contamination (crowding), and principal parameters (T 2/T 1, q, fillout factor, and sin i for overcontacts, and T 2/T 1, (R 1 + R 2)/a, esin ω, ecos ω, and sin i for detached binaries). We present statistics based on the determined periods and measure the average occurrence rate of eclipsing binaries to be ~1.2% across the Kepler field. We further discuss the distribution of binaries as a function of galactic latitude and thoroughly explain the application of artificial intelligence to obtain principal parameters in a matter of seconds for the whole sample. The catalog was envisioned to serve as a bridge between the now public Kepler data and the scientific community interested in eclipsing binary stars.

  10. KEPLER ECLIPSING BINARY STARS. I. CATALOG AND PRINCIPAL CHARACTERIZATION OF 1879 ECLIPSING BINARIES IN THE FIRST DATA RELEASE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prsa, Andrej; Engle, Scott G.; Conroy, Kyle; Batalha, Natalie; Rucker, Michael; Mjaseth, Kimberly; Slawson, Robert W.; Doyle, Laurance R.; Welsh, William F.; Orosz, Jerome A.; Seager, Sara; Jenkins, Jon; Caldwell, Douglas; Koch, David; Borucki, William

    2011-01-01

    The Kepler space mission is devoted to finding Earth-size planets orbiting other stars in their habitable zones. Its large, 105 deg 2 field of view features over 156,000 stars that are observed continuously to detect and characterize planet transits. Yet, this high-precision instrument holds great promise for other types of objects as well. Here we present a comprehensive catalog of eclipsing binary stars observed by Kepler in the first 44 days of operation, the data being publicly available through MAST as of 2010 June 15. The catalog contains 1879 unique objects. For each object, we provide its Kepler ID (KID), ephemeris (BJD 0 , P 0 ), morphology type, physical parameters (T eff , log g, E(B - V)), the estimate of third light contamination (crowding), and principal parameters (T 2 /T 1 , q, fillout factor, and sin i for overcontacts, and T 2 /T 1 , (R 1 + R 2 )/a, esin ω, ecos ω, and sin i for detached binaries). We present statistics based on the determined periods and measure the average occurrence rate of eclipsing binaries to be ∼1.2% across the Kepler field. We further discuss the distribution of binaries as a function of galactic latitude and thoroughly explain the application of artificial intelligence to obtain principal parameters in a matter of seconds for the whole sample. The catalog was envisioned to serve as a bridge between the now public Kepler data and the scientific community interested in eclipsing binary stars.

  11. A Spectroscopic Orbit for the Late-type Be Star β CMi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dulaney, Nicholas A.; Richardson, Noel D.; Gerhartz, Cody J.; Bjorkman, J. E.; Bjorkman, K. S.; Morrison, Nancy D.; Bratcher, Allison D.; Greco, Jennifer J.; Hardegree-Ullman, Kevin K.; Lembryk, Ludwik; Oswald, Wayne L.; Trucks, Jesica L. [Ritter Observatory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606-3390 (United States); Carciofi, Alex C. [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofísica e Ciências Atmosféricas, Universidade de São Paulo, SP 05508-900 (Brazil); Klement, Robert [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Córdova 3107, Vitacura, Casilla 19001, Santiago (Chile); Wang, Luqian, E-mail: noel.richardson@UToledo.edu [Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, P.O. Box 5060, Atlanta, GA 30302-5060 (United States)

    2017-02-10

    The late-type Be star β CMi is remarkably stable compared to other Be stars that have been studied. This has led to a realistic model of the outflowing Be disk by Klement et al. These results showed that the disk is likely truncated at a finite radius from the star, which Klement et al. suggest is evidence for an unseen binary companion in orbit. Here we report on an analysis of the Ritter Observatory spectroscopic archive of β CMi to search for evidence of the elusive companion. We detect periodic Doppler shifts in the wings of the H α line with a period of 170 days and an amplitude of 2.25 km s{sup −1}, consistent with a low-mass binary companion ( M ≈ 0.42 M {sub ⊙}). We then compared small changes in the violet-to-red peak height changes ( V / R ) with the orbital motion. We find weak evidence that it does follow the orbital motion, as suggested by recent Be binary models by Panoglou et al. Our results, which are similar to those for several other Be stars, suggest that β CMi may be a product of binary evolution where Roche lobe overflow has spun up the current Be star, likely leaving a hot subdwarf or white dwarf in orbit around the star. Unfortunately, no direct sign of this companion star is found in the very limited archive of International Ultraviolet Explorer spectra.

  12. The Fate of Neutron Star Binary Mergers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piro, Anthony L. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Giacomazzo, Bruno [Physics Department, University of Trento, via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Trento (Italy); Perna, Rosalba, E-mail: piro@carnegiescience.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Following merger, a neutron star (NS) binary can produce roughly one of three different outcomes: (1) a stable NS, (2) a black hole (BH), or (3) a supramassive, rotationally supported NS, which then collapses to a BH following angular momentum losses. Which of these fates occur and in what proportion has important implications for the electromagnetic transient associated with the mergers and the expected gravitational wave (GW) signatures, which in turn depend on the high density equation of state (EOS). Here we combine relativistic calculations of NS masses using realistic EOSs with Monte Carlo population synthesis based on the mass distribution of NS binaries in our Galaxy to predict the distribution of fates expected. For many EOSs, a significant fraction of the remnants are NSs or supramassive NSs. This lends support to scenarios in which a quickly spinning, highly magnetized NS may be powering an electromagnetic transient. This also indicates that it will be important for future GW observatories to focus on high frequencies to study the post-merger GW emission. Even in cases where individual GW events are too low in signal to noise to study the post merger signature in detail, the statistics of how many mergers produce NSs versus BHs can be compared with our work to constrain the EOS. To match short gamma-ray-burst (SGRB) X-ray afterglow statistics, we find that the stiffest EOSs are ruled out. Furthermore, many popular EOSs require a significant fraction of ∼60%–70% of SGRBs to be from NS–BH mergers rather than just binary NSs.

  13. Double stars with wide separations in the AGK3 - I. Components that are themselves spectroscopic binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbwachs, J.-L.; Mayor, M.; Udry, S.

    2012-05-01

    Wide binaries are tracers of the gravity field of the Galaxy, but their study requires some caution. A large list of common proper motion stars selected from the third Astronomischen Gesellschaft Katalog (AGK3) was monitored with the CORAVEL (for COrrelation RAdial VELocities) spectrovelocimeter, in order to prepare a sample of physical binaries with very wide separations. 66 stars received special attention, since their radial velocities (RV) seemed to be variable. These stars were monitored over several years in order to derive the elements of their spectroscopic orbits. In addition, 10 of them received accurate RV measurements from the SOPHIE spectrograph of the T193 telescope at the Observatory of Haute-Provence. For deriving the orbital elements of double-lined spectroscopic binaries (SB2), a new method was applied, which assumed that the RV of blended measurements are linear combinations of the RV of the components. 13 SB2 orbits were thus calculated. The orbital elements were eventually obtained for 52 spectroscopic binaries (SB), two of them making a triple system. 40 SB received their first orbit and the orbital elements were improved for 10 others. In addition, 11 SB were discovered with very long periods for which the orbital parameters were not found. The median period of the 40 first orbits is 1 yr, and several SB should be resolved or should receive an astrometric orbit in future, providing the masses of the components. In addition, it appeared that HD 153252 has a close companion, which is a candidate brown dwarf with a minimum mass of 50 Jupiter masses. The final selection of wide binaries and the derivation of their statistical properties will be presented in a second paper.

  14. The VLT Unravels the Nature of the Fastest Binary Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-03-01

    Two Hot White Dwarfs Perform a Tight Dance Summary Observations with ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile and the Italian Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) on the Canary Islands during the past two years have enabled an international group of astronomers [1] to unravel the true nature of an exceptional binary stellar system. This system, designated RX J0806.3+1527 , was first discovered as an X-ray source of variable brightness - once every five minutes, it "switches off" for a short moment. The new observations have shown beyond doubt that this period reflects the orbital motion of two "white dwarf" stars that revolve around each other at a distance of only 80,000 km . Each of the stars is about as large as the Earth and this is the shortest orbital period known for any binary stellar system. The VLT spectrum displays lines of ionized helium, indicating that the presence of an exceedingly hot area on one of the stars - a "hot spot" with a temperature of approx. 250,000 degrees. The system is currently in a rarely seen, transitory evolutionary state . PR Photo 10a/02 : U- and R-band images of RX J0806.3+1527. PR Photo 10b/02 : Spectrum of RX J0806.3+1527 An amazing stellar binary system ESO PR Photo 10a/02 ESO PR Photo 10a/02 [Preview - JPEG: 800 x 400 pix - 440k] [Normal - JPEG: 1600 x 800 pix - 1.1M] Caption : PR Photo 10a/02 shows U and R filter images of the sky field around RX J0806.3+1527 (at centre of circle), obtained with the FORS2 multi-mode instrument on VLT KUEYEN. The object is brightest at the shorter wavelength (U-band) - reflecting its very high temperature. Technical information about the photo is available below. One year is the time it takes the Earth to move once around the Sun, our central star. This may seem quite fast when measured on the scale of the Universe, but this is a snail's motion compared to the the speed of two recently discovered stars. They revolve around each other 100,000 times faster; one full revolution takes only 321

  15. Relative orientation of orbits in triple stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterzik, M. F.; Tokovinin, A. A.

    2002-03-01

    Statistical analysis of the relative alignment of inner and outer orbits in triple systems resulting from a dynamical decay of small-N clusters (N le10 ) is presented and compared to the statistics of real multiple stars. The distribution of the relative angle Phi between the angular momentum vectors of inner and outer orbits in triple stars formed by decay is shown to depend on the initial cluster conditions like geometry, mass function, rotational and thermal energy. For a realistic set of initial conditions, a modest alignment of orbital momentum vectors is found, in good agreement with the latest observational data on visual multiple stars exhibiting an average between 67o and 79o. The relation between eccentricities of outer orbits and period ratios for both simulated and real triples is consistent with a slightly adjusted formulation of the stability criterium by Mardling & Aarseth (2001). Dynamical decay can therefore explain the weak correlation of orbital orientations observed in multiple stars. Using modern high-resolution techniques, the observed statistics of Phi should be extended as it will allow one to sensitively constrain properties of initial clusters. Table 4 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/384/1030

  16. Flare Activity of Wide Binary Stars with Kepler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Riley W.; Davenport, James R. A.; Covey, Kevin R.; Baranec, Christoph

    2018-01-01

    We present an analysis of flare activity in wide binary stars using a combination of value-added data sets from the NASA Kepler mission. The target list contains a set of previously discovered wide binary star systems identified by proper motions in the Kepler field. We cross-matched these systems with estimates of flare activity for ∼200,000 stars in the Kepler field, allowing us to compare relative flare luminosity between stars in coeval binaries. From a sample of 184 previously known wide binaries in the Kepler field, we find 58 with detectable flare activity in at least 1 component, 33 of which are similar in mass (q > 0.8). Of these 33 equal-mass binaries, the majority display similar (±1 dex) flare luminosity between both stars, as expected for stars of equal mass and age. However, we find two equal-mass pairs where the secondary (lower mass) star is more active than its counterpart, and two equal-mass pairs where the primary star is more active. The stellar rotation periods are also anomalously fast for stars with elevated flare activity. Pairs with discrepant rotation and activity qualitatively seem to have lower mass ratios. These outliers may be due to tidal spin-up, indicating these wide binaries could be hierarchical triple systems. We additionally present high-resolution adaptive optics images for two wide binary systems to test this hypothesis. The demographics of stellar rotation and magnetic activity between stars in wide binaries may be useful indicators for discerning the formation scenarios of these systems.

  17. Runaway stars from young star clusters containing initial binaries. I. Equal-mass, equal-energy binaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, P.J.T.; Duncan, M.J.

    1988-07-01

    The production of runaway stars by the dynamical-ejection mechanism in an open star cluster containing 50 percent binaries of equal mass and energy is investigated theoretically by means of numerical simulations using the NBODY5 code of Aarseth (1985). The construction of the models is outlined, and the results are presented graphically and characterized in detail. It is shown that binary-binary collisions capable of producing runaways can occur (via formation and disruption, with some stellar collisions, of hierarchical double binaries) in clusters of relatively low density (e.g., pc-sized clusters of O or B stars). The frequency of binaries in the runaway population is found to vary between 0 and 50 percent, with the majority of runaways being unevolved early-type stars. 38 references.

  18. Orbital Motion of Young Binaries in Ophiuchus and Upper Centaurus–Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, G. H.; Prato, L.; Simon, M.

    2018-03-01

    We present measurements of the orbital positions and flux ratios of 17 binary and triple systems in the Ophiuchus star-forming region and the Upper Centaurus–Lupus cluster based on adaptive optics imaging at the Keck Observatory. We report the detection of visual companions in MML 50 and MML 53 for the first time, as well as the possible detection of a third component in WSB 21. For six systems in our sample, our measurements provide a second orbital position following their initial discoveries over a decade ago. For eight systems with sufficient orbital coverage, we analyze the range of orbital solutions that fit the data. Ultimately, these observations will help provide the groundwork toward measuring precise masses for these pre-main-sequence stars and understanding the distribution of orbital parameters in young multiple systems.

  19. Unification of binary star ephemeris solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R. E.; Van Hamme, W.

    2014-01-01

    Time-related binary system characteristics such as orbital period, its rate of change, apsidal motion, and variable light-time delay due to a third body, are measured in two ways that can be mutually complementary. The older way is via eclipse timings, while ephemerides by simultaneous whole light and velocity curve analysis have appeared recently. Each has its advantages, for example, eclipse timings typically cover relatively long time spans while whole curves often have densely packed data within specific intervals and allow access to systemic properties that carry additional timing information. Synthesis of the two information sources can be realized in a one step process that combines several data types, with automated weighting based on their standard deviations. Simultaneous light-velocity-timing solutions treat parameters of apsidal motion and the light-time effect coherently with those of period and period change, allow the phenomena to interact iteratively, and produce parameter standard errors based on the quantity and precision of the curves and timings. The logic and mathematics of the unification algorithm are given, including computation of theoretical conjunction times as needed for generation of eclipse timing residuals. Automated determination of eclipse type, recovery from inaccurate starting ephemerides, and automated data weighting are also covered. Computational examples are given for three timing-related cases—steady period change (XY Bootis), apsidal motion (V526 Sagittarii), and the light-time effect due to a binary's reflex motion in a triple system (AR Aurigae). Solutions for all combinations of radial velocity, light curve, and eclipse timing input show consistent results, with a few minor exceptions.

  20. Contamination of RR Lyrae stars from Binary Evolution Pulsators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karczmarek, Paulina; Pietrzyński, Grzegorz; Belczyński, Krzysztof; Stępień, Kazimierz; Wiktorowicz, Grzegorz; Iłkiewicz, Krystian

    2016-06-01

    Binary Evolution Pulsator (BEP) is an extremely low-mass member of a binary system, which pulsates as a result of a former mass transfer to its companion. BEP mimics RR Lyrae-type pulsations but has different internal structure and evolution history. We present possible evolution channels to produce BEPs, and evaluate the contamination value, i.e. how many objects classified as RR Lyrae stars can be undetected BEPs. In this analysis we use population synthesis code StarTrack.

  1. BinCat: a Catalog of Nearby Binary Stars with Tools for Calculating Light-Leakage for Direct Imaging Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holte, Elias Peter; Sirbu, Dan; Belikov, Ruslan

    2018-01-01

    Binary stars have been largely left out of direct imaging surveys for exoplanets, specifically for earth-sized planets in their star's habitable zone. Utilizing new direct imaging techniques brings us closer to being able to detect earth-like exoplanets around binary stars. In preparation for the upcoming WFIRST mission and other direct imaging-capable missions (HabEx, LUVIOR) it is important to understand the expected science yield resulting from the implementation of these imaging techniques. BinCat is a catalog of binary systems within 30 parsecs to be used as a target list for future direct imaging missions. There is a non-static component along with BinCat that allows researchers to predict the expected light-leakage between a binary component and its off-axis companion (a value critical to the aforementioned techniques) at any epoch. This is accomplished by using orbital elements from the Sixth Orbital Catalog to model the orbits of the binaries. The software was validated against the historical data used to generate the orbital parameters. When orbital information is unknown or the binaries are purely optical the proper motion of the pair taken from the Washington Double Star catalog is integrated in time to estimate expected light-leakage.

  2. Astrometric and photometric measurements of binary stars with adaptive optics: observations from 2001 to 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lewis C.; Mason, Brian D.

    2018-02-01

    The adaptive optics system at the 3.6 m Advanced Electro-Optical System telescope was used to measure the astrometry and differential magnitude in I band of binary star systems between 2002 and 2006. We report 413 astrometric and photometric measurements of 373 stellar pairs. The astrometric measurements will be of use for future orbital determination, and the photometric measurements will be of use in estimating the spectral types of the component stars. For 21 binaries that had not been observed in decades, we are able to confirm that the systems share common proper motion. Candidate new companions were detected in 24 systems; for these we show the discovery images. Follow-up observations should be able to determine if these systems share common proper motion and are gravitationally bound objects. We computed orbits for nine binaries. Of these, the orbits of five systems are improved compared to prior orbits and four systems have their orbits computed for the first time. In addition, 315 stars were unresolved and the full-width half maxima of the images are presented.

  3. V474 Car: A RARE HALO RS CVn BINARY IN RETROGRADE GALACTIC ORBIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bubar, Eric J.; Mamajek, Eric E.; Jensen, Eric L. N.; Walter, Frederick M.

    2011-01-01

    We report the discovery that the star V474 Car is an extremely active, high velocity halo RS CVn system. The star was originally identified as a possible pre-main-sequence star in Carina, given its enhanced stellar activity, rapid rotation (10.3 days), enhanced Li, and absolute magnitude which places it above the main sequence (MS). However, its extreme radial velocity (264 km s -1 ) suggested that this system was unlike any previously known pre-MS system. Our detailed spectroscopic analysis of echelle spectra taken with the CTIO 4 m finds that V474 Car is both a spectroscopic binary with an orbital period similar to the photometric rotation period and metal-poor ([Fe/H] ≅-0.99). The star's Galactic orbit is extremely eccentric (e ≅ 0.93) with a perigalacticon of only ∼0.3 kpc of the Galactic center-and the eccentricity and smallness of its perigalacticon are surpassed by only ∼0.05% of local F/G-type field stars. The observed characteristics are consistent with V474 Car being a high-velocity, metal-poor, tidally locked, chromospherically active binary, i.e., a halo RS CVn binary, and one of only a few such specimens known.

  4. ON THE PULSATIONAL-ORBITAL-PERIOD RELATION OF ECLIPSING BINARIES WITH δ-SCT COMPONENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X. B.; Luo, C. Q. [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Fu, J. N. [Department of Astronomy, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2013-11-01

    We have deduced a theoretical relation between the pulsation and orbital-periods of pulsating stars in close binaries based on their Roche lobe filling. It appears to be of a simple linear form, with the slope as a function of the pulsation constant, the mass ratio, and the filling factor for an individual system. Testing the data of 69 known eclipsing binaries containing δ-Sct-type components yields an empirical slope of 0.020 ± 0.006 for the P{sub pul}-P{sub orb} relation. We have further derived the upper limit of the P{sub pul}/P{sub orb} ratio for the δ-Sct stars in eclipsing binaries with a value of 0.09 ± 0.02. This value could serve as a criterion to distinguish whether or not a pulsator in an eclipsing binary pulsates in the p-mode. Applying the deduced P{sub pul}-P{sub orb} relation, we have computed the dominant pulsation constants for 37 δ-Sct stars in eclipsing systems with definite photometric solutions. These ranged between 0.008 and 0.033 days with a mean value of about 0.014 days, indicating that δ-Sct stars in eclipsing binaries mostly pulsate in the fourth or fifth overtones.

  5. Tomographic separation of composite spectra - The components of the O-star spectroscopic binary AO Cassiopeiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnuolo, William G., Jr.; Gies, Douglas R.

    1991-01-01

    The UV photospheric lines of the short-period, double-lined O-star spectroscopic binary AO Cas are analyzed. Archival data from IUE (16 spectra uniformly distributed in orbital phase) were analyzed with a tomography algorithm to produce the separate spectra of the two stars in six spectral regions. The spectral classifications of the primary and secondary, O9.5 III and O8 V, respectively, were estimated through a comparison of UV line ratios with those in spectral standard stars. An intensity ratio of 0.5-0.7 (primary brighter) at 1600 A is compatible with the data.

  6. Long GRBs from Binary Stars: Runaway, Wolf-Rayet Progenitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cantiello, M.; Yoon, S.C.; Langer, N.; Livio, M.

    2007-01-01

    The collapsar model for long gamma-ray bursts requires a rapidly rotating Wolf-Rayet star as progenitor. We test the idea of producing rapidly rotating Wolf-Rayet stars in massive close binaries through mass accretion and consecutive quasi-chemically homogeneous evolution - the latter had previously

  7. Short-Period Binary Stars: Observations, Analyses, and Results

    CERN Document Server

    Milone, Eugene F; Hobill, David W

    2008-01-01

    Short-period binaries run the gamut from widely separated stars to black-hole pairs; in between are systems that include neutron stars and white dwarfs, and partially evolved systems such as tidally distorted and over-contact systems. These objects represent stages of evolution of binary stars, and their degrees of separation provide critical clues to how their evolutionary paths differ from that of single stars. The widest and least distorted systems provide astronomers with the essential precise data needed to study all stars: mass and radius. The interactions of binary star components, on the other hand, provide a natural laboratory to observe how the matter in these stars behaves under different and often varying physical conditions. Thus, cataclysmic variables with and without overpoweringly strong magnetic fields, and stars with densities from that found in the Sun to the degenerate matter of white dwarfs and the ultra-compact states of neutron stars and black holes are all discussed. The extensive inde...

  8. Binary systems, star clusters and the Galactic-field population. Applied stellar dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroupa, Pavel

    2002-01-01

    This book contains the results of recent theoretical work on the evolution of primordial binary systems in young star clusters, their effect on the evolution of their host clusters, implications for the distribution of young stars in the Milky Way, and the formation of bound star clusters. This work shows that if the Galactic-field binary population is a dynamically evolved version of the Taurus-Auriga pre-main sequence population, then most stars form in clusters with typically a few hundred binaries within a radius of about 0.5-1 pc. The results also suggest that the population I primordial binary-star orbital-parameter distribution functions may be universal, much like the initial mass function. Most solar-like planetary systems can survive in such clusters. The work presented here also establishes that most observed triple and quadruple systems must be primordial, but that α Cen A/B-Proxima Cen-like systems can form in clusters through dynamical capture. Precise N-body calculations using Aarseth's N-body codes of clusters containing up to 104 stars are used to create an extensive young-cluster library. These data demonstrate that the primordial binary systems are disrupted on a crossing-time scale, and that the truncation of the surviving period distribution measures the maximum concentration the cluster ever experienced. The N-body calculations demonstrate that Galactic star clusters form readily as nuclei of expanding OB associations despite a star-formation efficiency of typically 30 per cent and gas-expulsion over a time-span shorter than the cluster crossing time.

  9. Evolving ONe WD+He star systems to intermediate-mass binary pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D.; Wang, B.; Chen, W.; Zuo, Z.; Han, Z.

    2018-03-01

    It has been suggested that accretion-induced collapse (AIC) is a non-negligible path for the formation of the observed neutron stars (NSs). An ONe white dwarf (WD) that accretes material from a He star may experience AIC process and eventually produce intermediate-mass binary pulsars (IMBPs), named as the ONe WD+He star scenario. Note that previous studies can only account for part of the observed IMBPs with short orbital periods. In this work, we investigate the evolution of about 900 ONe WD+He star binaries to explore the distribution of IMBPs. We found that the ONe WD+He star scenario could form IMBPs including pulsars with 5-340 ms spin periods and 0.75-1.38 M_{⊙} WD companions, in which the orbital periods range from 0.04 to 900 d. Compared with the 20 observed IMBPs, this scenario can cover the parameters of 13 sources in the final orbital period-WD mass plane and the Corbet diagram, most of which has short orbital periods. We found that the ONe WD+He star scenario can explain almost all the observed IMBPs with short orbital periods. This work can well match the observed parameters of PSR J1802-2124 (one of the two precisely observed IMBPs), providing a possible evolutional path for its formation. We also speculate that the compact companion of HD 49798 (a hydrogen depleted sdO6 star) may be not a NS based on the present work.

  10. Testing theory of binary evolution with interacting binary stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergma, E.; Sarna, M. J.

    2002-01-01

    Of particular interest to us is the study of mass loss and its influence on the evolution of a binary systems. For this we use theoretical evolutionary models, which include: mass accretion, mass loss, novae explosion, super--efficient wind, and mixing processes. To test our theoretical prediction we proposed to determine the 12C / 13C ratio via measurements of the 12CO and 13CO bands around 2.3 micron. The available observations (Exter at al. 2001, in preparation) show good agreement with the theoretical predictions (Sarna 1992), for Algol-type binaries. Our preliminary estimates of the isotopic ratios for pre-CV's and CV's (Catalan et al. 2000, Dhillon et al. 2001) agree with the theoretical predictions from the common--envelope binary evolution models by Sarna et al. (1995). For the SXT we proposed (Ergma & Sarna 2001) similar observational test, which has not been done yet.

  11. TIDAL BREAKUP OF BINARY STARS AT THE GALACTIC CENTER. II. HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonini, Fabio; Merritt, David; Lombardi, James C. Jr

    2011-01-01

    In Paper I, we followed the evolution of binary stars as they orbited near the supermassive black hole (SMBH) at the Galactic center, noting the cases in which the two stars would come close enough together to collide. In this paper, we replace the point-mass stars by fluid realizations, and use a smoothed-particle hydrodynamics code to follow the close interactions. We model the binary components as main-sequence stars with initial masses of 1, 3, and 6 solar masses, and with chemical composition profiles taken from stellar evolution codes. Outcomes of the close interactions include mergers, collisions that leave both stars intact, and ejection of one star at high velocity accompanied by capture of the other star into a tight orbit around the SMBH. For the first time, we follow the evolution of the collision products for many (∼> 100) orbits around the SMBH. Stars that are initially too small to be tidally disrupted by the SMBH can be puffed up by close encounters or collisions, with the result that tidal stripping occurs in subsequent periapse passages. In these cases, mass loss occurs episodically, sometimes for hundreds of orbits before the star is completely disrupted. Repeated tidal flares, of either increasing or decreasing intensity, are a predicted consequence. In collisions involving a low-mass and a high-mass star, the merger product acquires a high core hydrogen abundance from the smaller star, effectively resetting the nuclear evolution 'clock' to a younger age. Elements like Li, Be, and B that can exist only in the outermost envelope of a star are severely depleted due to envelope ejection during collisions and due to tidal forces from the SMBH. Tidal spin-up can occur due to either a collision or tidal torque by the SMBH at periapsis. However, in the absence of collisions, tidal spin-up of stars is only important in a narrow range of periapse distances, r t /2 ∼ per ∼ t , with r t the tidal disruption radius. We discuss the implications of

  12. The Influence of Mass Loss on the Eccentricity of Double Star Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docobo, J. A.; Prieto, C.; Ling, J. F.

    In this comunication we study the behaviour of the eccentricity of double star orbits (visual and wide spectroscopic binaries) according to simplified laws of mass loss. Applications to the systems WDS 05245S0224 - HD 35411, WDS 05387S0236 - HD 37468 and WDS 06154S0902 - HD 43362 are included.

  13. Gravitational waves from spinning compact binaries in hyperbolic orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vittori, Lorenzo; Gopakumar, Achamveedu; Gupta, Anuradha; Jetzer, Philippe

    2014-12-01

    Compact binaries in hyperbolic orbits are plausible gravitational-wave (GW) sources for the upcoming and planned GW observatories. We develop an efficient prescription to compute post-Newtonian (PN)-accurate ready-to-use GW polarization states for spinning compact binaries, influenced by the dominant-order spin-orbit interactions, in hyperbolic orbits. This is achieved by invoking the 1.5PN-accurate quasi-Keplerian parametrization for the radial sector of the orbital dynamics. We probe the influences of spins and the gravitational radiation reaction on h+ and h× during the hyperbolic passage. It turns out that both polarization states exhibit the memory effect for GWs from spinning compact binaries in hyperbolic orbits. In contrast, only the cross-polarization state exhibits the memory effect for GWs from nonspinning compact binaries. Additionally, we compute 1PN-accurate amplitude corrected GW polarization states for hyperbolic nonspinning compact binaries in a fully parametric manner and perform initial comparisons with the existing waveforms.

  14. Rotational properties of hypermassive neutron stars from binary mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanauske, Matthias; Takami, Kentaro; Bovard, Luke; Rezzolla, Luciano; Font, José A.; Galeazzi, Filippo; Stöcker, Horst

    2017-08-01

    Determining the differential-rotation law of compact stellar objects produced in binary neutron stars mergers or core-collapse supernovae is an old problem in relativistic astrophysics. Addressing this problem is important because it impacts directly on the maximum mass these objects can attain and, hence, on the threshold to black-hole formation under realistic conditions. Using the results from a large number of numerical simulations in full general relativity of binary neutron star mergers described with various equations of state and masses, we study the rotational properties of the resulting hypermassive neutron stars. We find that the angular-velocity distribution shows only a modest dependence on the equation of state, thus exhibiting the traits of "quasiuniversality" found in other aspects of compact stars, both isolated and in binary systems. The distributions are characterized by an almost uniformly rotating core and a "disk." Such a configuration is significantly different from the j -constant differential-rotation law that is commonly adopted in equilibrium models of differentially rotating stars. Furthermore, the rest-mass contained in such a disk can be quite large, ranging from ≃0.03 M⊙ in the case of high-mass binaries with stiff equations of state, up to ≃0.2 M⊙ for low-mass binaries with soft equations of state. We comment on the astrophysical implications of our findings and on the long-term evolutionary scenarios that can be conjectured on the basis of our simulations.

  15. Polarized light curves illuminate wind geometries in Wolf-Rayet binary stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jennifer L.; Fullard, Andrew G.; Nordsieck, Kenneth H.

    2018-01-01

    Although the majority of massive stars are affected by a companion during the course of their evolution, the role of binary systems in creating supernova and GRB progenitors is not well understood. Binaries containing Wolf-Rayet stars are particularly interesting because they may provide a mechanism for producing the rapid rotation necessary for GRB formation. However, constraining the evolutionary fate of a Wolf-Rayet binary system requires characterizing its mass loss and mass transfer, a difficult prospect in systems whose colliding winds obscure the stars and produce complicated spectral signatures.The technique of spectropolarimetry is ideally suited to studying WR binary systems because it can disentangle spectral components that take different scattering paths through a complex distribution of circumstellar material. In particular, comparing the polarization behavior as a function of orbital phase of the continuum (which arises from the stars) with that of the emission lines (which arise from the interaction region) can provide a detailed view of the wind structures in a WR+O binary and constrain the system’s mass loss and mass transfer properties.We present new continuum and line polarization curves for three WR+O binaries (WR 30, WR 47, and WR 113) obtained with the RSS spectropolarimeter at the Southern African Large Telescope. We use radiative transfer simulations to analyze the polarization curves, and discuss our interpretations in light of current models for V444 Cygni, a well-studied related binary system. Accurately characterizing the structures of the wind collision regions in these massive binaries is key to understanding their evolution and properly accounting for their contribution to the supernova (and possible GRB) progenitor population.

  16. Binary stars observed with adaptive optics at the starfire optical range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drummond, Jack D. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Directed Energy Directorate, RDSAM, 3550 Aberdeen Avenue SE, Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5776 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    In reviewing observations taken of binary stars used as calibration objects for non-astronomical purposes with adaptive optics on the 3.5 m Starfire Optical Range telescope over the past 2 years, one-fifth of them were found to be off-orbit. In order to understand such a high number of discrepant position angles and separations, all previous observations in the Washington Double Star Catalog for these rogue binaries were obtained from the Naval Observatory. Adding our observations to these yields new orbits for all, resolving the discrepancies. We have detected both components of γ Gem for the first time, and we have shown that 7 Cam is an optical pair, not physically bound.

  17. K2 Campaign 5 observations of pulsating subdwarf B stars: binaries and super-Nyquist frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, M. D.; Armbrecht, E. L.; Telting, J. H.; Baran, A. S.; Østensen, R. H.; Blay, Pere; Kvammen, A.; Kuutma, Teet; Pursimo, T.; Ketzer, L.; Jeffery, C. S.

    2018-03-01

    We report the discovery of three pulsating subdwarf B stars in binary systems observed with the Kepler space telescope during Campaign 5 of K2. EPIC 211696659 (SDSS J083603.98+155216.4) is a g-mode pulsator with a white dwarf companion and a binary period of 3.16 d. EPICs 211823779 (SDSS J082003.35+173914.2) and 211938328 (LB 378) are both p-mode pulsators with main-sequence F companions. The orbit of EPIC 211938328 is long (635 ± 146 d) while we cannot constrain that of EPIC 211823779. The p modes are near the Nyquist frequency and so we investigate ways to discriminate super- from sub-Nyquist frequencies. We search for rotationally induced frequency multiplets and all three stars appear to be slow rotators with EPIC 211696659 subsynchronous to its orbit.

  18. Merger of white dwarf-neutron star binaries: Prelude to hydrodynamic simulations in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschalidis, Vasileios; MacLeod, Morgan; Baumgarte, Thomas W.; Shapiro, Stuart L.

    2009-01-01

    White dwarf-neutron star binaries generate detectable gravitational radiation. We construct Newtonian equilibrium models of corotational white dwarf-neutron star (WDNS) binaries in circular orbit and find that these models terminate at the Roche limit. At this point the binary will undergo either stable mass transfer (SMT) and evolve on a secular time scale, or unstable mass transfer (UMT), which results in the tidal disruption of the WD. The path a given binary will follow depends primarily on its mass ratio. We analyze the fate of known WDNS binaries and use population synthesis results to estimate the number of LISA-resolved galactic binaries that will undergo either SMT or UMT. We model the quasistationary SMT epoch by solving a set of simple ordinary differential equations and compute the corresponding gravitational waveforms. Finally, we discuss in general terms the possible fate of binaries that undergo UMT and construct approximate Newtonian equilibrium configurations of merged WDNS remnants. We use these configurations to assess plausible outcomes of our future, fully relativistic simulations of these systems. If sufficient WD debris lands on the NS, the remnant may collapse, whereby the gravitational waves from the inspiral, merger, and collapse phases will sweep from LISA through LIGO frequency bands. If the debris forms a disk about the NS, it may fragment and form planets.

  19. On the Possibility of Habitable Trojan Planets in Binary Star Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Richard; Funk, Barbara; Bazsó, Ákos

    2015-12-01

    Approximately 60% of all stars in the solar neighbourhood (up to 80% in our Milky Way) are members of binary or multiple star systems. This fact led to the speculations that many more planets may exist in binary systems than are currently known. To estimate the habitability of exoplanetary systems, we have to define the so-called habitable zone (HZ). The HZ is defined as a region around a star where a planet would receive enough radiation to maintain liquid water on its surface and to be able to build a stable atmosphere. We search for new dynamical configurations-where planets may stay in stable orbits-to increase the probability to find a planet like the Earth.

  20. The Binary Fraction of Stars in Dwarf Galaxies: The Case of Leo II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Meghin E.; Mateo, Mario; Walker, Matthew G.; Olszewski, Edward W.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Kirby, Evan N.; Koch, Andreas

    2017-06-01

    We combine precision radial velocity data from four different published works of the stars in the Leo II dwarf spheroidal galaxy. This yields a data set that spans 19 years, has 14 different epochs of observation, and contains 372 unique red giant branch stars, 196 of which have repeat observations. Using this multi-epoch data set, we constrain the binary fraction for Leo II. We generate a suite of Monte Carlo simulations that test different binary fractions using Bayesian analysis and determine that the binary fraction for Leo II ranges from {0.30}-0.10+0.09 to {0.34}-0.11+0.11, depending on the distributions of binary orbital parameters assumed. This value is smaller than what has been found for the solar neighborhood (˜0.4-0.6) but falls within the wide range of values that have been inferred for other dwarf spheroidals (0.14-0.69). The distribution of orbital periods has the greatest impact on the binary fraction results. If the fraction we find in Leo II is present in low-mass ultra-faints, it can artificially inflate the velocity dispersion of those systems and cause them to appear more dark matter rich than in actuality. For a galaxy with an intrinsic dispersion of 1 km s-1 and an observational sample of 100 stars, the dispersion can be increased by a factor of 1.5-2 for Leo II-like binary fractions or by a factor of three for binary fractions on the higher end of what has been seen in other dwarf spheroidals.

  1. Introduction & Overview to Symposium 240: Binary Stars as Critical Tools and Tests in Contemporary Astrophysics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guinan, Edward F; Harmanec, Petr; Hartkopf, William

    2006-01-01

    .... It is crucial to study binary and multiple stars because the vast majority of stars (>60%) in our Galaxy and in other galaxies consist, not of single stars, but of double and multiple star systems...

  2. THE FIRST SPECTROSCOPICALLY RESOLVED SUB-PARSEC ORBIT OF A SUPERMASSIVE BINARY BLACK HOLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bon, E.; Jovanovic, P.; Bon, N.; Popovic, L. C. [Astronomical Observatory, Volgina 7, 11060 Belgrade (Serbia); Marziani, P. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Padova (Italy); Shapovalova, A. I. [Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian AS, Nizhnij Arkhyz, Karachaevo-Cherkesia 369167 (Russian Federation); Borka Jovanovic, V.; Borka, D. [Isaac Newton Institute of Chile, Yugoslavia Branch, Belgrade (Serbia); Sulentic, J. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, CSIC, Apdo. 3004, E-18080 Granada (Spain)

    2012-11-10

    One of the most intriguing scenarios proposed to explain how active galactic nuclei are triggered involves the existence of a supermassive binary black hole (BH) system in their cores. Here, we present an observational evidence for the first spectroscopically resolved sub-parsec orbit of a such system in the core of Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151. Using a method similar to those typically used for spectroscopic binary stars, we obtained radial velocity curves of the supermassive binary system, from which we calculated orbital elements and made estimates about the masses of the components. Our analysis shows that periodic variations in the light and radial velocity curves can be accounted for by an eccentric, sub-parsec Keplerian orbit with a 15.9 year period. The flux maximum in the light curve corresponds to the approaching phase of the secondary component toward the observer. According to the obtained results, we speculate that the periodic variations in the observed H{alpha} line shape and flux are due to shock waves generated by the supersonic motion of the components through the surrounding medium. Given the large observational effort needed to reveal this spectroscopically resolved binary orbital motion, we suggest that many such systems may exist in similar objects even if they are hard to find. Detecting more of them will provide us with insight into the BH mass growth process.

  3. Rotation of the Mass Donors in High-mass X-ray Binaries and Symbiotic Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Stoyanov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Our aim is to investigate the tidal interaction in High-mass X-ray Binaries and Symbiotic stars in order to determine in which objects the rotation of the mass donors is synchronized or pseudosynchronized with the orbital motion of the compact companion. We find that the Be/X-ray binaries are not synchronized and the orbital periods of the systems are greater than the rotational periods of the mass donors. The giant and supergiant High-mass X-ray binaries and symbiotic stars are close to synchronization. We compare the rotation of mass donors in symbiotics with the projected rotational velocities of field giants and find that the M giants in S-type symbiotics rotate on average 1.5 times faster than the field M giants. We find that the projected rotational velocity of the red giant in symbiotic star MWC 560 is v sin i= 8.2±1.5 km.s−1, and estimate its rotational period to be Prot<>/sub = 144 - 306 days. Using the theoretical predictions of tidal interaction and pseudosynchronization, we estimate the orbital eccentricity e = 0.68 − 0.82.

  4. The disruption of close binaries in the gravitational field of a supermassive black hole and the formation of hypervelocity stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dremova, G. N.; Dremov, V. V.; Tutukov, A. V.

    2014-05-01

    The formation of hypervelocity stars due to the dynamical capture of one component of a closebinary system by the gravitational field of a supermassive black hole (SMBH) is modeled. The mass of the black hole was varied between 106 and 109 M ⊙. In the model, the problem was considered first as a three-body problem (stage I) and then as an N-body problem (stage II). In the first stage, the effect of the inclination of the internal close-binary orbit (the motion of the components about the center of mass of the binary system) relative to the plane of the external orbit (the motion of the close binary around the SMBH) on the velocity with which one of the binary components is ejected was assessed. The initial binary orbits were generated randomly, with 10 000 orbits considered for each external orbit with a fixed pericenter distance r p . Analysis of the results obtained in the first stage of the modeling enables determination of the binary-orbit orientations that are the most favorable for high-velocity ejection, and estimation of the largest possible ejection velocities V max. The boundaries of the region of stellar disruption derived from the balance of tidal forces and self-gravitation are discussed using V max- r p plots, which generalize the results of the first stage of the modeling. Since a point-mass representation does not enable predictions about the survival of stars during close passages by a SMBH, there is the need for a second stage of the modeling, in which the tidal influence of the SMBH is considered. An approach treating a star like a structured finite object containing N bodies ( N = 4000) enables the derivation of more accurate limits for the zone of efficient acceleration of hypervelocity stars and the formulation of conditions for the tidal disruption of stars.

  5. The Brave New World of Binary Star Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinan, Edward F.; Engle, Scott G.

    2006-08-01

    In this paper we discuss some of the new and exciting developments in the study of binary stars. Recent technological advances (such as CCDs) now make it possible (even easy) to study faint, astrophysically important binaries that in the past could only be done with large 4 + meter class telescopes. Also, the panoramic nature of CCDs (and the use of mosaics), permit large numbers of stars to be imaged and studied. At this conference, most of the observational material discussed was secured typically with smaller aperture 0.5 - 2 m telescopes. Excellent examples are the discovery of over 104 new ˜13 - 20 mag eclipsing (and interacting) binaries now found in nearby galaxies from the EROS, OGLE, MACHO and DIRECT programs. As briefly discussed here, and in more detail in several papers in this volume, a small fraction of these extragalactic eclipsing binaries are now serving as “standard candles” to secure accurate distances to the Magellanic Clouds, as well as to M31 and M33. Moreover, the discovery of increasingly larger numbers of eclipsing binaries has stimulated the development of automatic methods for reducing and analyzing the light curves of thousands of systems. In the near future, hundreds of thousands (possibly millions) of additional systems are expected to be discovered by Pan-STARRS, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescopes (LSST), and later by GAIA. Over the last decade, new classes of binary systems have also been found which contain Jupiter-size planets and binaries containing pulsating stars. Some examples of these important binaries are discussed. Also discussed are the increasing numbers (now eight) of eclipsing binary planet-star systems that have been found from high precision photometry. These systems are very important since the radii and masses of the hosted planets can be directly measured. Moreover, from the upcoming COROT and KEPLER missions hundreds of additional transiting planet-star systems are expected to be found. All in all, we hope

  6. Spectrophotometric study of the AN And eclipsing binary star

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rachkovskaya, T.M.

    1979-01-01

    The spectrum of eclipsing binary AN And has been studied using spectrograms with dispersion of 6-15 A/mm. The experiments have been carried out in 1967 and 1976 in the Crimea astrophysical laboratory. The equivalent widths of hydrogen and metallic lines were found to be 1.3-1.5 times stronger on the spectrograms in 1976 in comparison with those in 1967. The calcium spectral type Sp(KCa2)=A9, F0 was found to be earlier than the metallic one Sp(M)=F2-F5. The rotation velocity supposes the synchronism of axial and orbital rotation. Enchancement of titanium, strontiUm, conium and a deficit of magnesium and chromium is observed in the atmosphere of the star as compared with the Sun. The turbulence velocity is equal to 9.4 km/s. The velocity of the system centre-of-mass is equal to (-5.6 km/s) and the half of the amplitude of the main component beam velocity is equal to 72 km/s

  7. Black Hole - Neutron Star Binary Mergers

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Gravitational radiation waveforms for black hole-neutron star coalescence calculations. The physical input is Newtonian physics, an ideal gas equation of state with...

  8. Computer simulations of close encounters between binary and single stars: the effect of the impact velocity and the stellar masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fullerton, L.W.; Hills, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    A total of 45 760 simulated encounters between binary and single stars were run to study the effect of impact velocity and the masses of the three stars on the outcome of the collisions. Letting α be the kinetic energy of impact in units of the minimum kinetic energy required to break up the binary, we find that the crossover point between hard binaries (tightly bound binaries which increase their binding energies in the collisions) and soft binaries (more loosely bound binaries which decrease their binding energies in collisions) occurs at αapprox. =0.5 if the impacting single star is equal to or less massive than the binary components and occurs at αapprox. =10 if its mass is three or more times that of the binary components. This bimodal behavior of the crossover point is even more clearly defined when we find its location in terms of the impact velocity V/sub f/ , expressed in units of the original mean orbital speed V/sub o/ of the binary. We find that the crossover point occurs at V/sub f//V/sub o/ approx. =0.6 when the mass of the impacting star is equal to or less than that of the more massive binary component, and it occurs at V/sub f//V/sub o/ approx. =1.9 when its mass is three or more times greater than that of this binary component. The probability that the binary will be broken up in the encounter depends greatly on the mass of the impacting single star relative to that of the binary components, as well as on the impact velocity. If the single-star mass equals or exceeds that of the individual binary components, there is an interval of impact velocity over which all the binaries are broken up in encounters at the zero-impact parameter. This interval grows as the mass of the impacting single star increases. If the impacting star is less massive than the binary components, then the maximum probability of dissociation drops dramatically

  9. Planet formation, orbital evolution and planet-star tidal interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, D. N. C.; Papaloizou, J. C. B.; Bryden, G.; Ida, S.; Terquem, C.

    1998-01-01

    We consider several processes operating during the late stages of planet formation that can affect observed orbital elements. Disk-planet interactions, tidal interactions with the central star, long term orbital instability and the Kozai mechanism are discussed.

  10. Solar sail orbital motion about asteriods and binary asteroid systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heiligers, M.J.; Scheeres, Daniel J.; Sims, J.A.; Leve, F.A.; McMahon, J.W.; Guo, Y.

    2017-01-01

    While SRP is often considered an undesirable effect, especially for missions to small bodies like asteroids and binary asteroid systems, this paper utilizes the SRP on a solar sail to generate artificial equilibrium points (AEPs) and displaced periodic orbits in these systems. While the solar sail

  11. Primordial main equence binary stars in the globular cluster M71

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lin; Mateo, Mario

    1994-01-01

    We report the identification of five short-period variables near the center of the metal-rich globular cluster M71. Our observations consist of multiepoch VI charge coupled device (CCD) images centered on the cluster and covering a 6.3 min x 6.3 min field. Four of these variables are contact eclipsing binaries with periods between 0.35 and 0.41 days; one is a detached or semidetached eclipsing binary with a period of 0.56 days. Two of the variables were first identified as possible eclipsing binaries in an earlier survey by Hodder et al. (1992). We have used a variety of arguments to conclude that all five binary stars are probable members of M71, a result that is consistent with the low number (0.15) of short-period field binaries expected along this line of sight. Based on a simple model of how contact binaries evolve from initially detached binaries, we have determined a lower limit of 1.3% on the frequency of primordial binaries in M71 with initial orbital periods in the range 2.5 - 5 days. This implies that the overall primordial binary frequency, f, is 22(sup +26)(sub -12)% assuming df/d log P = const ( the 'flat' distribution), or f = 57(sup +15)(sub -8)% for df/d log P = 0.032 log P + const as observed for G-dwarf binaries in the solar neighborhood (the 'sloped' distribution). Both estimates of f correspond to binaries with initial periods shorter than 800 yr since any longer-period binaries would have been disrupted over the lifetime of the cluster. Our short-period binary frequency is in excellent agreement with the observed frequency of red-giant binaries observed in globulars if we adopt the flat distribution. For the sloped distribution, our results significantly overestimate the number of red-giant binaries. All of the short-period M71 binaries lie within 1 mag of the luminosity of the cluster turnoff in the color-magnitude diagram despite the fact we should have easily detected similar eclipsing binaries 2 - 2.5 mag fainter than this. We discuss the

  12. Gravitational interactions of stars with supermassive black hole binaries. I. Tidal disruption events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbha, Siva; Coughlin, Eric R.; Kasen, Daniel; Quataert, Eliot

    2018-04-01

    Stars approaching supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in the centers of galaxies can be torn apart by strong tidal forces. We study the physics of tidal disruption by a circular, binary SMBH as a function of the binary mass ratio q = M2/M1 and separation a, exploring a large set of points in the parameter range q ∈ [0.01, 1] and a/rt1 ∈ [10, 1000]. We simulate encounters in which field stars approach the binary from the loss cone on parabolic, low angular momentum orbits. We present the rate of disruption and the orbital properties of the disrupted stars, and examine the fallback dynamics of the post-disruption debris in the "frozen-in" approximation. We conclude by calculating the time-dependent disruption rate over the lifetime of the binary. Throughout, we use a primary mass M1 = 106M⊙ as our central example. We find that the tidal disruption rate is a factor of ˜2 - 7 times larger than the rate for an isolated BH, and is independent of q for q ≳ 0.2. In the "frozen-in" model, disruptions from close, nearly equal mass binaries can produce intense tidal fallbacks: for binaries with q ≳ 0.2 and a/rt1 ˜ 100, roughly ˜18 - 40% of disruptions will have short rise times (trise ˜ 1 - 10 d) and highly super-Eddington peak return rates (\\dot{M}_{peak} / \\dot{M}_{Edd} ˜ 2 × 10^2 - 3 × 10^3).

  13. Eclipsing binary stars with a delta Scuti component

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Alicavus, F.K.; Soydugan, E.; Smalley, B.; Kubát, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 470, č. 1 (2017), s. 915-931 ISSN 0035-8711 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-01116S Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : stars * eclipsing binaries * fundamental parameters Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics OBOR OECD: Astronomy (including astrophysics,space science) Impact factor: 4.961, year: 2016

  14. Multi-messenger Observations of a Binary Neutron Star Merger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.

    2017-01-01

    On 2017 August 17 a binary neutron star coalescence candidate (later designated GW170817) with merger time 12:41:04 UTC was observed through gravitational waves by the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo detectors. The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor independently detected a gamma-ray burst (GRB 17081...

  15. Multi-messenger observations of a binary neutron star merger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LIGO Scientific Collaboration and Virgo Collaboration; Fermi GBM; INTEGRAL; IceCube Collaboration; AstroSat Cadmium Zinc Telluride Imager Team; IPN Collaboration; The Insight-HXMT Collaboration; ANTARES Collaboration; The Swift Collaboration; AGILE Team; The 1M2H Team; The Dark Energy Camera GW-EM Collaboration and the DES Collaboration; The DLT40 Collaboration; GRAWITA: GRAvitational Wave Inaf TeAm; The Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration; ATCA: Australia Telescope Compact Array; ASKAP: Australian SKA Path finder; Las Cumbres Observatory Group; OzGrav; DWF (Deeper, Wider, Faster Program); AST3; CAASTRO Collaborations; The VINROUGE Collaboration; MASTER Collaboration; J-GEM; GROWTH; JAGWAR; Caltech- NRAO; TTU-NRAO; NuSTAR Collaborations; Pan-STARR; The MAXI Team; TZAC Consortium; KU Collaboration; Nordic Optical Telescope; ePESSTO; GROND; Texas Tech University; SALT Group; TOROS: Transient Robotic Observatory of the South Collaboration; The BOOTES Collaboration; MWA: Murchison Wide field Array; The CALET Collaboration; IKI-GW Follow-up Collaboration; H.E.S.S. Collaboration; LOFAR Collaboration; LWA: Long Wavelength Array; HAWC Collaboration; The Pierre Auger Collaboration; ALMA Collaboration; Euro VLBI Team; Pi of the Sky Collaboration; The Chandra Team at McGill University; DFN: Desert Fireball Network; ATLAS; High Time Resolution Universe Survey; RIMAS and RATIR; SKA South Africa / MeerKAT

    2017-01-01

    On 2017 August 17 a binary neutron star coalescence candidate (later designated GW170817) with merger time 12:41:04 UTC was observed through gravitational waves by the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo detectors. The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor independently detected a gamma-ray burst (GRB 170817A)

  16. Gravitational waves from orbiting binaries without general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilborn, Robert C.

    2018-03-01

    Using analogies with electromagnetic radiation, we present a calculation of the properties of gravitational radiation emitted by orbiting binary objects. The calculation produces results that have the same dependence on the masses of the orbiting objects, the orbital frequency, and the mass separation as do the results from the linear version of general relativity (GR). However, the calculation yields polarization, angular distributions, and overall power results that differ from those of GR. Nevertheless, the calculation produces waveforms that are very similar to those observed by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO-VIRGO) gravitational wave collaboration in 2015 up to the point at which the binary merger occurs. The details of the calculation should be understandable by upper-level physics students and physicists who are not experts in GR.

  17. Relativistic calculations of coalescing binary neutron stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have designed and tested a new relativistic Lagrangian hydrodynamics code, which treats gravity in the conformally flat approximation to general relativity. We have tested the resulting code extensively, finding that it performs well for calculations of equilibrium single-star models, collapsing relativistic dust clouds, and ...

  18. Resolving the Birth of High-Mass Binary Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-02-01

    New observations may help us to learn more about the birth of high-mass star systems. For the first time, scientists have imaged a very young, high-mass binary system and resolved the individual disks that surround each star and the binary.Massive MultiplesIts unusually common for high-mass stars to be discovered in multiple-star systems. More than 80% of all O-type stars which have masses greater than 16 times that of the Sun are in close multiple systems, compared with a multiplicity fraction of only 20% for stars of 3 solar masses, for instance.Reconstructed VLTI observations of the two components of the high-mass binary IRAS17216-3801. [Adapted from Kraus et al. 2017]Why do more massive stars preferentially form in multiple-star systems? Many different models of high-mass star formation have been invoked to explain this observation, but before we can better understand the process, we need better observations. In particular, past observations have placed few constraints on the architecture and disk structure of early high-mass stars.Conveniently, a team of scientists led by Stefan Kraus (University of Exeter) may have found exactly what we need: a high-mass protobinary that is still in the process of forming. Using ESOs Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI), Kraus and collaborators have captured the first observations of a very young, high-mass binary system in which the circumbinary disk and the two circumstellar dust disks could all be spatially resolved.Clues from Resolved DisksThe VLTI near-infrared observations reveal that IRAS17216-3801, originally thought to be a single high-mass star, is instead a close binary separated by only 170 AU. Its two components are both surrounded by disks from which the protostars are actively accreting mass, and both of these circumstellar disks are strongly misaligned with respect to the separation vector of the binary. This confirms that the system is very young, as tidal forces havent yet had time to align the disks

  19. Gravitational-Wave Luminosity of Binary Neutron Stars Mergers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappa, Francesco; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Radice, David; Perego, Albino; Dietrich, Tim

    2018-03-16

    We study the gravitational-wave peak luminosity and radiated energy of quasicircular neutron star mergers using a large sample of numerical relativity simulations with different binary parameters and input physics. The peak luminosity for all the binaries can be described in terms of the mass ratio and of the leading-order post-Newtonian tidal parameter solely. The mergers resulting in a prompt collapse to black hole have the largest peak luminosities. However, the largest amount of energy per unit mass is radiated by mergers that produce a hypermassive neutron star or a massive neutron star remnant. We quantify the gravitational-wave luminosity of binary neutron star merger events, and set upper limits on the radiated energy and the remnant angular momentum from these events. We find that there is an empirical universal relation connecting the total gravitational radiation and the angular momentum of the remnant. Our results constrain the final spin of the remnant black hole and also indicate that stable neutron star remnant forms with super-Keplerian angular momentum.

  20. Gravitational-Wave Luminosity of Binary Neutron Stars Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappa, Francesco; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Radice, David; Perego, Albino; Dietrich, Tim

    2018-03-01

    We study the gravitational-wave peak luminosity and radiated energy of quasicircular neutron star mergers using a large sample of numerical relativity simulations with different binary parameters and input physics. The peak luminosity for all the binaries can be described in terms of the mass ratio and of the leading-order post-Newtonian tidal parameter solely. The mergers resulting in a prompt collapse to black hole have the largest peak luminosities. However, the largest amount of energy per unit mass is radiated by mergers that produce a hypermassive neutron star or a massive neutron star remnant. We quantify the gravitational-wave luminosity of binary neutron star merger events, and set upper limits on the radiated energy and the remnant angular momentum from these events. We find that there is an empirical universal relation connecting the total gravitational radiation and the angular momentum of the remnant. Our results constrain the final spin of the remnant black hole and also indicate that stable neutron star remnant forms with super-Keplerian angular momentum.

  1. Detecting unresolved binary stars in Euclid VIS images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntzer, T.; Courbin, F.

    2017-10-01

    Measuring a weak gravitational lensing signal to the level required by the next generation of space-based surveys demands exquisite reconstruction of the point-spread function (PSF). However, unresolved binary stars can significantly distort the PSF shape. In an effort to mitigate this bias, we aim at detecting unresolved binaries in realistic Euclid stellar populations. We tested methods in numerical experiments where (I) the PSF shape is known to Euclid requirements across the field of view; and (II) the PSF shape is unknown. We drew simulated catalogues of PSF shapes for this proof-of-concept paper. Following the Euclid survey plan, the objects were observed four times. We propose three methods to detect unresolved binary stars. The detection is based on the systematic and correlated biases between exposures of the same object. One method is a simple correlation analysis, while the two others use supervised machine-learning algorithms (random forest and artificial neural network). In both experiments, we demonstrate the ability of our methods to detect unresolved binary stars in simulated catalogues. The performance depends on the level of prior knowledge of the PSF shape and the shape measurement errors. Good detection performances are observed in both experiments. Full complexity, in terms of the images and the survey design, is not included, but key aspects of a more mature pipeline are discussed. Finding unresolved binaries in objects used for PSF reconstruction increases the quality of the PSF determination at arbitrary positions. We show, using different approaches, that we are able to detect at least binary stars that are most damaging for the PSF reconstruction process. The code corresponding to the algorithms used in this work and all scripts to reproduce the results are publicly available from a GitHub repository accessible via http://lastro.epfl.ch/software

  2. The role of binaries in the enrichment of the early Galactic halo. II. Carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars: CEMP-no stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, T. T.; Andersen, J.; Nordström, B.; Beers, T. C.; Placco, V. M.; Yoon, J.; Buchhave, L. A.

    2016-02-01

    Context. The detailed composition of most metal-poor halo stars has been found to be very uniform. However, a fraction of 20-70% (increasing with decreasing metallicity) exhibit dramatic enhancements in their abundances of carbon; these are the so-called carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars. A key question for Galactic chemical evolution models is whether this non-standard composition reflects that of the stellar natal clouds or is due to local, post-birth mass transfer of chemically processed material from a binary companion; CEMP stars should then all be members of binary systems. Aims: Our aim is to determine the frequency and orbital parameters of binaries among CEMP stars with and without over-abundances of neutron-capture elements - CEMP-s and CEMP-no stars, respectively - as a test of this local mass-transfer scenario. This paper discusses a sample of 24 CEMP-no stars, while a subsequent paper will consider a similar sample of CEMP-s stars. Methods: High-resolution, low S/N spectra of the stars were obtained at roughly monthly intervals over a time span of up to eight years with the FIES spectrograph at the Nordic Optical Telescope. Radial velocities of ~100 m s-1 precision were determined by cross-correlation after each observing night, allowing immediate, systematic follow-up of any variable object. Results: Most programme stars exhibit no statistically significant radial-velocity variation over this period and appear to be single, while four are found to be binaries with orbital periods of 300-2000 days and normal eccentricity; the binary frequency for the sample is 17 ± 9%. The single stars mostly belong to the recently identified low-C band, while the binaries have higher absolute carbon abundances. Conclusions: We conclude that the nucleosynthetic process responsible for the strong carbon excess in these ancient stars is unrelated to their binary status; the carbon was imprinted on their natal molecular clouds in the early Galactic interstellar

  3. Introduction & Overview to Symposium 240: Binary Stars as Critical Tools and Tests in Contemporary Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    neutron stars and black holes properties of condensed matter Post CE Binaries V471 Tau (K2 V + wd) Symbiotic Binaries (M III + wd) X-ray Binaries CH...low-mass stars the respect they deserve, since these stars may be the dominant contributor to baryonic mass in the Universe. Ben Lane discussed recent

  4. The critical binary star separation for a planetary system origin of white dwarf pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veras, Dimitri; Xu, Siyi; Rebassa-Mansergas, Alberto

    2018-01-01

    The atmospheres of between one quarter and one half of observed single white dwarfs in the Milky Way contain heavy element pollution from planetary debris. The pollution observed in white dwarfs in binary star systems is, however, less clear, because companion star winds can generate a stream of matter which is accreted by the white dwarf. Here, we (i) discuss the necessity or lack thereof of a major planet in order to pollute a white dwarf with orbiting minor planets in both single and binary systems, and (ii) determine the critical binary separation beyond which the accretion source is from a planetary system. We hence obtain user-friendly functions relating this distance to the masses and radii of both stars, the companion wind, and the accretion rate on to the white dwarf, for a wide variety of published accretion prescriptions. We find that for the majority of white dwarfs in known binaries, if pollution is detected, then that pollution should originate from planetary material.

  5. Binary Stars and Globular Cluster Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fregeau, John M.

    2008-05-01

    In this brief proceedings article I summarize the review talk I gave at the IAU 246 meeting in Capri, Italy, glossing over the well-known results from the literature, but paying particular attention to new, previously unpublished material. This new material includes a careful comparison of the apparently contradictory results of two independent methods used to simulate the evolution of binary populations in dense stellar systems (the direct N-body method of Hurley, Aarseth, & Shara (2007) and the approximate Monte Carlo method of Ivanova et al. (2005)), that shows that the two methods may not actually yield contradictory results, and suggests future work to more directly compare the two methods.

  6. Velocity Curve Studies of Spectroscopic Binary Stars V380 Cygni ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Using measured radial velocity data of five double lined spectroscopic binary systems V380 Cygni, V401 Cyg, V523 Cas, V373 Cas and V2388 Oph, we find corresponding orbital and spectroscopic elements via the method introduced by Karami & Mohebi (2007) and Karami &. Teimoorinia (2007). Our numerical ...

  7. Black holes and neutron stars: evolution of binary systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraft, R.P.

    1975-01-01

    Evidence for the existence of neutron stars and black holes in binary systems has been reviewed, and the following summarizes the current situation: (1) No statistically significant case has been made for the proposition that black holes and/or neutron stars contribute to the population of unseen companions of ordinary spectroscopic binaries; (2) Plausible evolutionary scenarios can be advanced that place compact X-ray sources into context as descendants of several common types of mass-exchange binaries. The collapse object may be a black hole, a neutron star, or a white dwarf, depending mostly on the mass of the original primary; (3) The rotating neutron star model for the pulsating X-ray sources Her X-1 and Cen X-3 is the simplest interpretation of these objects, but the idea that the pulsations result from the non-radial oscillations of a white dwarf cannot be altogether dismissed. The latter is particularly attractive in the case of Her X-1 because the total mass of the system is small; (4) The black hole picture for Cyg X-1 represents the simplest model that can presently be put forward to explain the observations. This does not insure its correctness, however. The picture depends on a long chain of inferences, some of which are by no means unassailable. (Auth.)

  8. Binary Orbits as the Driver of Gamma-Ray Emission and Mass Ejection in Classical Novae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomiuk, Laura; Linford, Justin D.; Yang, Jun; O'Brien, T. J.; Paragi, Zsolt; Mioduszewski, Amy J.; Beswick, R. J.; Cheung, C. C.; Mukai, Koji; Nelson, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Classical novae are the most common astrophysical thermonuclear explosions, occurring on the surfaces of white dwarf stars accreting gas from companions in binary star systems. Novae typically expel about 10 (sup -4) solar masses of material at velocities exceeding 1,000 kilometers per second.However, the mechanism of mass ejection in novae is poorly understood, and could be dominated by the impulsive flash of thermonuclear energy, prolonged optically thick winds or binary interaction with the nova envelope. Classical novae are now routinely detected at giga-electronvolt gamma-ray wavelengths, suggesting that relativistic particles are accelerated by strong shocks in the ejecta. Here we report high-resolution radio imaging of the gamma-ray-emitting nova V959 Mon. We find that its ejecta were shaped by the motion of the binary system: some gas was expelled rapidly along the poles as a wind from the white dwarf, while denser material drifted out along the equatorial plane, propelled by orbital motion..At the interface between the equatorial and polar regions, we observe synchrotron emission indicative of shocks and relativistic particle acceleration, thereby pinpointing the location of gamma-ray production. Binary shaping of the nova ejecta and associated internal shocks are expected to be widespread among novae, explaining why many novae are gamma-ray emitters.

  9. Binary orbits as the driver of γ-ray emission and mass ejection in classical novae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomiuk, Laura; Linford, Justin D; Yang, Jun; O'Brien, T J; Paragi, Zsolt; Mioduszewski, Amy J; Beswick, R J; Cheung, C C; Mukai, Koji; Nelson, Thomas; Ribeiro, Valério A R M; Rupen, Michael P; Sokoloski, J L; Weston, Jennifer; Zheng, Yong; Bode, Michael F; Eyres, Stewart; Roy, Nirupam; Taylor, Gregory B

    2014-10-16

    Classical novae are the most common astrophysical thermonuclear explosions, occurring on the surfaces of white dwarf stars accreting gas from companions in binary star systems. Novae typically expel about 10(-4) solar masses of material at velocities exceeding 1,000 kilometres per second. However, the mechanism of mass ejection in novae is poorly understood, and could be dominated by the impulsive flash of thermonuclear energy, prolonged optically thick winds or binary interaction with the nova envelope. Classical novae are now routinely detected at gigaelectronvolt γ-ray wavelengths, suggesting that relativistic particles are accelerated by strong shocks in the ejecta. Here we report high-resolution radio imaging of the γ-ray-emitting nova V959 Mon. We find that its ejecta were shaped by the motion of the binary system: some gas was expelled rapidly along the poles as a wind from the white dwarf, while denser material drifted out along the equatorial plane, propelled by orbital motion. At the interface between the equatorial and polar regions, we observe synchrotron emission indicative of shocks and relativistic particle acceleration, thereby pinpointing the location of γ-ray production. Binary shaping of the nova ejecta and associated internal shocks are expected to be widespread among novae, explaining why many novae are γ-ray emitters.

  10. Binary interactions on the calibrations of star formation rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fenghui; Li, Lifang; Zhang, Yu; Kang, Xiaoyu; Han, Zhanwen

    2012-03-01

    Using the Yunnan evolutionary population synthesis (EPS) models with and without binary interactions, we present the luminosity of Hα recombination line (LHα), the luminosity of [O II] λ3727 forbidden line doublet (?), the ultraviolet (UV) fluxes at 1500 and 2800 Å (Li, UV) and far-infrared flux (LFIR) for burst, S0, Sa-Sd and Irr galaxies, and present the calibrations of star formation rate (SFR) in terms of these diagnostics. By comparison, we find that binary interactions lower the SFR versus LHα and SFR versus ? conversion factors by ˜0.2 dex. The main reason is that binary interactions raise the UV flux (shortwards of the Lyman limit) of the stellar population (SP) in the age range 6.7 Aarseth-Hurley, Kroupa-Tout-Gilmore and Miller-Scalo IMFs, partly caused by the difference in the IMF), respectively. At last, we give the conversion coefficients between SFR and these diagnostics for all models.

  11. Gravitational waves from remnant massive neutron stars of binary neutron star merger: Viscous hydrodynamics effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Masaru; Kiuchi, Kenta

    2017-06-01

    Employing a simplified version of the Israel-Stewart formalism of general-relativistic shear-viscous hydrodynamics, we explore the evolution of a remnant massive neutron star of binary neutron star merger and pay special attention to the resulting gravitational waveforms. We find that for the plausible values of the so-called viscous alpha parameter of the order 10-2 the degree of the differential rotation in the remnant massive neutron star is significantly reduced in the viscous time scale, ≲5 ms . Associated with this, the degree of nonaxisymmetric deformation is also reduced quickly, and as a consequence, the amplitude of quasiperiodic gravitational waves emitted also decays in the viscous time scale. Our results indicate that for modeling the evolution of the merger remnants of binary neutron stars we would have to take into account magnetohydrodynamics effects, which in nature could provide the viscous effects.

  12. Long-term Spectroscopic and Photometric Monitoring of Bright Interacting Algol-type Binary Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Phillip A.

    2018-01-01

    Binary stars have long been used as natural laboratories for studying such fundamental stellar properties as mass. Interacting binaries allow us to examine more complicated aspects such as mass flow between stars, accretion processes, magnetic fields, and stellar mergers. Algol-type interacting binary stars -- consisting of a cool giant or sub-giant donating mass to a much hotter, less evolved, and more massive main-sequence companion -- undergo steady mass transfer and have been used to measure mass transfer rates and to test stellar evolution theories. The method of back-projection Doppler tomography has also been applied to interacting Algols and has produced indirect velocity-space images of the accretion structures (gas streams, accretion disks, etc.) derived from spectroscopic observations of hydrogen and helium emission lines. The accretion structures in several Algol systems have actually been observed to change between disk-like states and stream-like states on timescales as short as several orbital cycles (Richards et al., 2014). Presented here are the first results from a project aimed at studying bright interacting Algol systems with simultaneous mid-resolution (11,000stream-like and disk-like states over different temperature regimes, to identify the various accretion phenomena, and to extract their physical properties.

  13. On the Progenitor of Binary Neutron Star Merger GW170817

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Afrough, M.; Agarwal, B.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Amato, A.; Ananyeva, A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Angelova, S. V.; Antier, S.; Appert, S.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atallah, D. V.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; AultONeal, K.; Austin, C.; Avila-Alvarez, A.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Bae, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Banagiri, S.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barkett, K.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bawaj, M.; Bayley, J. C.; Bazzan, M.; Bécsy, B.; Beer, C.; Bejger, M.; Belahcene, I.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Bero, J. J.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Billman, C. R.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Biscoveanu, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackman, J.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bode, N.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bohe, A.; Bondu, F.; Bonilla, E.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bossie, K.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. D.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Canepa, M.; Canizares, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, H.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Carney, M. F.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerdá-Durán, P.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chase, E.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chatterjee, D.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H.-P.; Chia, H.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Chmiel, T.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, A. J. K.; Chua, S.; Chung, A. K. W.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Ciolfi, R.; Cirelli, C. E.; Cirone, A.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Clearwater, P.; Cleva, F.; Cocchieri, C.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Cohen, D.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L. R.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conti, L.; Cooper, S. J.; Corban, P.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordero-Carrión, I.; Corley, K. R.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Covas, P. B.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cullen, T. J.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Dálya, G.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dasgupta, A.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davis, D.; Daw, E. J.; Day, B.; De, S.; DeBra, D.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Demos, N.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; De Pietri, R.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; De Rossi, C.; DeSalvo, R.; de Varona, O.; Devenson, J.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Renzo, F.; Doctor, Z.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorrington, I.; Douglas, R.; Dovale Álvarez, M.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Dreissigacker, C.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dupej, P.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Eisenstein, R. A.; Essick, R. C.; Estevez, D.; Etienne, Z. B.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Fauchon-Jones, E. J.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fee, C.; Fehrmann, H.; Feicht, J.; Fejer, M. M.; Fernandez-Galiana, A.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finstad, D.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fishbach, M.; Fisher, R. P.; Fitz-Axen, M.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fong, H.; Font, J. A.; Forsyth, P. W. F.; Forsyth, S. S.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fries, E. M.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H.; Gadre, B. U.; Gaebel, S. M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Ganija, M. R.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garcia-Quiros, C.; Garufi, F.; Gateley, B.; Gaudio, S.; Gaur, G.; Gayathri, V.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, D.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghonge, S.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glover, L.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gomes, S.; Goncharov, B.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Gretarsson, E. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Gruning, P.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Halim, O.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hamilton, E. Z.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hannuksela, O. A.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hinderer, T.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holgado, A. M.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Horst, C.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hreibi, A.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Inta, R.; Intini, G.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Junker, J.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kamai, B.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katolik, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kawabe, K.; Kéfélian, F.; Keitel, D.; Kemball, A. J.; Kennedy, R.; Kent, C.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J. C.; Kim, K.; Kim, W.; Kim, W. S.; Kim, Y.-M.; Kimball, C.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinley-Hanlon, M.; Kirchhoff, R.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knowles, T. D.; Koch, P.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Krämer, C.; Kringel, V.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kumar, S.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Kwang, S.; Lackey, B. D.; Lai, K. H.; Landry, M.; Lang, R. N.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lanza, R. K.; Larson, S. L.; Lartaux-Vollard, A.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, H. W.; Lee, K.; Lehmann, J.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Li, T. G. F.; Linker, S. D.; Littenberg, T. B.; Liu, J.; Lo, R. K. L.; Lockerbie, N. A.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lousto, C. O.; Lovelace, G.; Lück, H.; Lumaca, D.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macas, R.; Macfoy, S.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña Hernandez, I.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magaña Zertuche, L.; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markakis, C.; Markosyan, A. S.; Markowitz, A.; Maros, E.; Marquina, A.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Mason, K.; Massera, E.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matas, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McCuller, L.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McNeill, L.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meidam, J.; Mejuto-Villa, E.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Milovich-Goff, M. C.; Minazzoli, O.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moffa, D.; Moggi, A.; Mogushi, K.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Muñiz, E. A.; Muratore, M.; Murray, P. G.; Napier, K.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Neilson, J.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Nery, M.; Neunzert, A.; Nevin, L.; Newport, J. M.; Newton, G.; Ng, K. K. Y.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nichols, D.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Noack, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; North, C.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; O'Dea, G. D.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Okada, M. A.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; Ormiston, R.; Ortega, L. F.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ossokine, S.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pace, A. E.; Page, J.; Page, M. A.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, Howard; Pan, Huang-Wei; Pang, B.; Pang, P. T. H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Parida, A.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patil, M.; Patricelli, B.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perez, C. J.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pirello, M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Porter, E. K.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Pratt, J. W. W.; Pratten, G.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rajbhandari, B.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K. E.; Ramos-Buades, A.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Read, J.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ren, W.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Ricker, P. M.; Rieger, S.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romel, C. L.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Ross, M. P.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Rutins, G.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sampson, L. M.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sanchez, L. E.; Sanchis-Gual, N.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Scheel, M.; Scheuer, J.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schulte, B. W.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwalbe, S. G.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seidel, E.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shah, A. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaner, M. B.; Shao, L.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, B.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Somala, S.; Son, E. J.; Sonnenberg, J. A.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, A. P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staats, K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stevenson, S. P.; Stone, R.; Stops, D. J.; Strain, K. A.; Stratta, G.; Strigin, S. E.; Strunk, A.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Suresh, J.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Tait, S. C.; Talbot, C.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Taracchini, A.; Tasson, J. D.; Taylor, J. A.; Taylor, R.; Tewari, S. V.; Theeg, T.; Thies, F.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres-Forné, A.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trinastic, J.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tsang, K. W.; Tse, M.; Tso, R.; Tsukada, L.; Tsuna, D.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ueno, K.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Varma, V.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Venugopalan, G.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Viets, A. D.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walet, R.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. Z.; Wang, W. H.; Wang, Y. F.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Watchi, J.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wessel, E. K.; Weßels, P.; Westerweck, J.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Whittle, C.; Wilken, D.; Williams, D.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Wofford, J.; Wong, K. W. K.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, D. S.; Wysocki, D. M.; Xiao, S.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, L.; Yap, M. J.; Yazback, M.; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zelenova, T.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, S. J.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; (LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2017-12-01

    On 2017 August 17 the merger of two compact objects with masses consistent with two neutron stars was discovered through gravitational-wave (GW170817), gamma-ray (GRB 170817A), and optical (SSS17a/AT 2017gfo) observations. The optical source was associated with the early-type galaxy NGC 4993 at a distance of just ˜40 Mpc, consistent with the gravitational-wave measurement, and the merger was localized to be at a projected distance of ˜2 kpc away from the galaxy’s center. We use this minimal set of facts and the mass posteriors of the two neutron stars to derive the first constraints on the progenitor of GW170817 at the time of the second supernova (SN). We generate simulated progenitor populations and follow the three-dimensional kinematic evolution from binary neutron star (BNS) birth to the merger time, accounting for pre-SN galactic motion, for considerably different input distributions of the progenitor mass, pre-SN semimajor axis, and SN-kick velocity. Though not considerably tight, we find these constraints to be comparable to those for Galactic BNS progenitors. The derived constraints are very strongly influenced by the requirement of keeping the binary bound after the second SN and having the merger occur relatively close to the center of the galaxy. These constraints are insensitive to the galaxy’s star formation history, provided the stellar populations are older than 1 Gyr.

  14. Electromagnetic radiation from a rapidly rotating magnetized star in orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacyan, Shahen

    2016-02-01

    A general formula for the electromagnetic energy radiated by a rapidly rotating magnetic dipole in arbitrary motion is obtained. For a pulsar orbiting in a binary system, it is shown that the electromagnetic radiation produced by the orbital motion is usually weaker than the gravitational radiation, but not entirely negligible for general relativistic corrections.

  15. The Orbit of the Gamma-Ray Binary 1FGL J1018.6-5856

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monageng, I. M.; McBride, V. A.; Townsend, L. J.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Mohamed, S.; Böttcher, M.

    2017-09-01

    Gamma-ray binaries are a small subclass of the high mass X-ray binary population that exhibit emission across the whole electromagnetic spectrum. We present the radial velocities of 1FGL J1018.6-5856 based on the observations obtained with the Southern African Large Telescope. We combine our measurements with those published in the literature to get a broad phase coverage. The mass function obtained supports a neutron star compact object, although a black hole mass is possible for the very low inclination angles. The improved phase coverage allows constraints to be placed on the orbital eccentricity (e = 0.31 ± 0.16), which agrees with the estimates from the high-energy data.

  16. Importance of tides for periastron precession in eccentric neutron star-white dwarf binaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sravan, N.; Valsecchi, F.; Kalogera, V. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA), and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Althaus, L. G., E-mail: niharika.sravan@gmail.com [Grupo de Evolución Estelar y Pulsaciones, Facultad de Ciencias Astronómicas y Geofísicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Argentina Instituto de Astrofísica La Plata, CONICET-UNLP, Paseo del Bosque s/n, (1900) La Plata (Argentina)

    2014-09-10

    Although not nearly as numerous as binaries with two white dwarfs, eccentric neutron star-white dwarf (NS-WD) binaries are important gravitational-wave (GW) sources for the next generation of space-based detectors sensitive to low frequency waves. Here we investigate periastron precession in these sources as a result of general relativistic, tidal, and rotational effects; such precession is expected to be detectable for at least some of the detected binaries of this type. Currently, two eccentric NS-WD binaries are known in the galactic field, PSR J1141–6545 and PSR B2303+46, both of which have orbits too wide to be relevant in their current state to GW observations. However, population synthesis studies predict the existence of a significant Galactic population of such systems. Though small in most of these systems, we find that tidally induced periastron precession becomes important when tides contribute to more than 3% of the total precession rate. For these systems, accounting for tides when analyzing periastron precession rate measurements can improve estimates of the inferred WD component mass and, in some cases, will prevent us from misclassifying the object. However, such systems are rare, due to rapid orbital decay. To aid the inclusion of tidal effects when using periastron precession as a mass measurement tool, we derive a function that relates the WD radius and periastron precession constant to the WD mass.

  17. Massive binary stars and self-enrichment of Massive binary stars and self-enrichment of

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Izzard, R.G.; de Mink, S.E.; Pols, O.R.; Langer, N.; Sana, H.; de Koter, A.

    2013-01-01

    Globular clusters contain many stars with surface abundance patterns indicating contributions from hydrogen burning products, as seen in the anti-correlated elemental abundances of e.g. sodium and oxygen, and magnesium and aluminium. Multiple generations of stars can explain this phenomenon, with

  18. Advanced Exoplanet Star Tracker for Orbit Self Determination, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal puts forth an innovative star tracker hardware sensor that allows for autonomous calculation of a spacecraft's orbit by employing Doppler Spectroscopy...

  19. Estimating the Binary Fraction of Central Stars of Planetary Nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douchin, Dimitri

    2015-01-01

    Planetary nebulae are the end-products of intermediate-mass stars evolution, following a phase of expansion of their atmospheres at the end of their lives. Observationally, it has been estimated that 80% of them have non-spherical shapes. Such a high fraction is puzzling and has occupied the planetary nebula community for more than 30 years. One scenario that would allow to justify the observed shapes is that a comparable fraction of the progenitors of central stars of planetary nebula (CSPN) are not single, but possess a companion. The shape of the nebulae would then be the result of an interaction with this companion. The high fraction of non-spherical planetary nebulae would thus imply a high fraction of binary central stars of planetary nebulae, making binarity a preferred channel for planetary nebula formation. After presenting the current state of knowledge regarding planetary nebula formation and shaping and reviewing the diverse efforts to find binaries in planetary nebulae, I present my work to detect a near-infrared excess that would be the signature of the presence of cool companions. The first part of the project consists in the analysis of data and photometry acquired and conducted by myself. The second part details an attempt to make use of archived datasets: the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 optical survey and the extended database assembled by Frew (2008). I also present results from a radial velocity analysis of VLT/UVES spectra for 14 objects aiming to the detection of spectroscopic companions. Finally I give details of the analysis of optical photometry data from our observations associated to the detection of companions around central stars of planetary nebulae using the photometric variability technique. The main result of this thesis is from the near-infrared excess studies which I combine with previously published data. I conclude that if the detected red and NIR flux excess is indicative of a stellar companion then the binary

  20. Orbital Solution for the Spectroscopic Binary in the GW Ori Hierarchical Triple

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prato, L.; Ruíz-Rodríguez, Dary; Wasserman, L. H.

    2018-01-01

    We present the first double-lined orbital solution for the close binary in the GW Ori triple system. Using 12 epochs of infrared spectroscopy, we detected the lines of both stars in the inner pair, previously known as single-lined only. Our preliminary infrared orbital solution has an eccentricity of e = 0.21 ± 0.10, a period of P = 241.15 ± 0.72 days, and a mass ratio of q = 0.66 ± 0.13. We find a larger semi-amplitude for the primary star, K1 = 6.57 ± 1.00 km s‑1, with an infrared-only solution compared to K1 = 4.41 ± 0.33 km s‑1 with optical data from the literature, likely the result of line blending and veiling in the optical. The component spectral types correspond to G3 and K0 stars, with v\\sin i values of 43 km s‑1 and 50 km s‑1, respectively. We obtained a flux ratio of α = 0.58 ± 0.14 in the H-band, allowing us to estimate individual masses of 3.2 and 2.7 M ⊙ for the primary and secondary, respectively, using evolutionary tracks. The tracks also yield a coeval age of 1 Myr for both components to within 1σ. GW Ori is surrounded by a circumbinary/circumtriple disk. A tertiary component has been detected in previous studies; however, we did not detect this component in our near-infrared spectra, probably the result of its relative faintness and blending in the absorption lines of these rapidly rotating stars. With these results, GW Ori joins the small number of classical T Tauri, double-lined spectroscopic binaries.

  1. Supercritical accretion in the evolution of neutron star binaries and its implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang-Hwan, E-mail: clee@pusan.ac.kr; Cho, Hee-Suk

    2014-08-15

    Recently ∼2M{sub ⊙} neutron stars PSR J1614-2230 and PSR J0348+0432 have been observed in neutron star-white dwarf binaries. These observations ruled out many neutron star equations of states with which the maximum neutron star mass becomes less than 2M{sub ⊙}. On the other hand, all well-measured neutron star masses in double neutron star binaries are still less than 1.5M{sub ⊙}. In this article we suggest that 2M{sub ⊙} neutron stars in neutron star-white dwarf binaries are the result of the supercritical accretion onto the first-born neutron star during the evolution of the binary progenitors.

  2. Supercritical accretion in the evolution of neutron star binaries and its implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang-Hwan; Cho, Hee-Suk

    2014-01-01

    Recently ∼2M ⊙ neutron stars PSR J1614-2230 and PSR J0348+0432 have been observed in neutron star-white dwarf binaries. These observations ruled out many neutron star equations of states with which the maximum neutron star mass becomes less than 2M ⊙ . On the other hand, all well-measured neutron star masses in double neutron star binaries are still less than 1.5M ⊙ . In this article we suggest that 2M ⊙ neutron stars in neutron star-white dwarf binaries are the result of the supercritical accretion onto the first-born neutron star during the evolution of the binary progenitors

  3. Neutron stars in compact binary systems: From the equation of state to gravitational radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Jocelyn S.

    Neutron stars are incredibly dense astrophysical objects that give a unique glimpse of physics at extreme scales. This thesis examines computational and mathematical methods of translating our theoretical understanding of neutron star physics, from the properties of matter to the relativistic behaviour of binary systems, into observable characteristics of astrophysical neutron stars. The properties of neutron star matter are encoded in the equation of state, which has substantial uncertainty. Many equations of state have been proposed based on different models of the underlying physics. These predict various quantities, such as the maximum stable mass, which allow them to be ruled out by astronomical measurements. This thesis presents a natural way to write a general equation of state that can approximate many different candidate equations of state with a few parameters. Astronomical observations are then used to systematically constrain parameter values, instead of ruling out models on a case-by-case basis. Orbiting pairs of neutron stars will release gravitational radiation and spiral in toward each other. The radiation may be observable with ground-based detectors. Until the stars get very close to each other the rate of inspiral is slow, and the orbits are approximately circular. One can numerically find spacetime solutions that satisfy the full set of Einstein equations by imposing an exact helical symmetry. However, we find that the helically-symmetric solution must be matched to a waveless boundary region to achieve convergence. Work with toy models suggests this lack of convergence is intractable, but the agreement of waveless and helical codes validates the use of either approximation to construct state-of-the-art initial data for fully dynamic binary neutron star simulations. The parameterized equation of state can be used with such numerical simulations to systematically explore how the emitted gravitational waves depend on the properties of neutron star

  4. Orbits for 18 Visual Binaries and Two Double-line Spectroscopic Binaries Observed with HRCAM on the CTIO SOAR 4 m Telescope, Using a New Bayesian Orbit Code Based on Markov Chain Monte Carlo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Rene A.; Claveria, Ruben M.; Orchard, Marcos E.; Silva, Jorge F.

    2017-11-01

    We present orbital elements and mass sums for 18 visual binary stars of spectral types B to K (five of which are new orbits) with periods ranging from 20 to more than 500 yr. For two double-line spectroscopic binaries with no previous orbits, the individual component masses, using combined astrometric and radial velocity data, have a formal uncertainty of ˜ 0.1 {M}⊙ . Adopting published photometry and trigonometric parallaxes, plus our own measurements, we place these objects on an H-R diagram and discuss their evolutionary status. These objects are part of a survey to characterize the binary population of stars in the Southern Hemisphere using the SOAR 4 m telescope+HRCAM at CTIO. Orbital elements are computed using a newly developed Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm that delivers maximum-likelihood estimates of the parameters, as well as posterior probability density functions that allow us to evaluate the uncertainty of our derived parameters in a robust way. For spectroscopic binaries, using our approach, it is possible to derive a self-consistent parallax for the system from the combined astrometric and radial velocity data (“orbital parallax”), which compares well with the trigonometric parallaxes. We also present a mathematical formalism that allows a dimensionality reduction of the feature space from seven to three search parameters (or from 10 to seven dimensions—including parallax—in the case of spectroscopic binaries with astrometric data), which makes it possible to explore a smaller number of parameters in each case, improving the computational efficiency of our MCMC code. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and Michigan State University (MSU).

  5. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE MOST LUMINOUS STAR IN M33: A SUPER SYMBIOTIC BINARY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikołajewska, Joanna; Iłkiewicz, Krystian [N. Copernicus Astronomical Center, Bartycka 18, PL 00-716 Warsaw (Poland); Caldwell, Nelson [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Shara, Michael M., E-mail: mikolaj@camk.edu.pl [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States)

    2015-01-30

    We present the first spectrum of the most luminous infrared star in M33, and use it to demonstrate that the object is almost certainly a binary composed of a massive O star and a dust-enshrouded red hypergiant. This is the most luminous symbiotic binary ever discovered. Its radial velocity is an excellent match to that of the hydrogen gas in the disk of M33, supporting our interpretation that it is a very young and massive binary star.

  6. Is There a Substellar Object Orbiting the Solar-like Stable Contact Binary V2284 Cyg?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.-J.; Jiang, L.-Q.; Zhang, B.; Zhao, S.-Q.; Yu, J.

    2017-12-01

    V2284 Cyg is a neglected W UMa-type binary star for photometric investigations. Monitored by the Kepler Space Telescope from 2009 to 2013, its light curves are continuously stable, suggesting that both components are inactive during this time interval. Based on the short-cadence observations, we determined the photometric solutions by using the 2013 version of the Wilson-Devinney code. These parameters reveal that V2284 Cyg is a W-type system with a degree of contact factor of f = 39.23% and a mass ratio of q = 2.90. Meanwhile, hundreds of times of minimum light were obtained and applied to analyze the orbital period changes. In the O-C diagram, a small-amplitude cyclic oscillation (A 3 = 0.00030 days and T 3 = 2.06 years) superimposed on a secular decreasing was found. The continuous decreasing may be a result from the mass transfer from the more massive component to the less massive one. With the long-term decreasing of the orbital period, this binary will evolve into a deeper contact system. Because the light curve is stable, the cyclic variation is plausibly explained as the light-travel time effect (LTTE) due to the presence of an additional body. The mass of the companion is {M}3\\sin i\\prime =0.036(+/- 0.003) {M}⊙ . If the orbital plane inclination is a random distribution, it is a brown dwarf with 66.7% probability. Therefore, the companion of V2284 Cyg is possibly the first candidate of the brown dwarf orbiting around contact binary, where both component are sharing a common convective envelope.

  7. Visual Measurements of the Binary Star S 654

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Thomas; Achildiyev, Irina; Alduenda, Chandra; Bridgeman, Reid; Chamberlain, Rebecca; Hendrix, Alex

    2011-01-01

    A member of the faculty and students from The Evergreen State College, Olympia, Washington, participated in the 2010 summer astronomy workshop at Pine Mountain Observatory. They learned the proper techniques and skills required for measuring the separation and position angle of binary star S 654. They learned how to calibrate an astrometric eyepiece, make appropriate measurements, do a statistical analysis, and analyze the data. The separation and position angle values obtained were 69.9 arc seconds and 237 degrees, respectively. The percent difference for each value was less than 0.5% from the literature value.

  8. Probing Gravitational Theories with Eccentric Eclipsing Detached Binary Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leopoldo Milano

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we compare the effects of different theories of gravitation on the apsidal motion of eccentric eclipsing detached binary stars. The comparison is performed by using the formalism of the post-Newtonian parametrization to calculate the theoretical advance at periastron and compare it to the observed one, after having considered the effects of the structure and rotation of the involved stars. A variance analysis on the results of this comparison shows that no signicant difference can be found due to the effect of the different theories under test with respect to the standard general relativity (GR. It will be possible to observe differences, as we would expect, by checking the observed period variation on a much larger lapse of time.

  9. SPECKLE OBSERVATIONS OF BINARY STARS WITH THE WIYN TELESCOPE. VII. MEASURES DURING 2008-2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horch, Elliott P.; Bahi, Lizzie Anne P.; Gaulin, Joseph R. [Department of Physics, Southern Connecticut State University, 501 Crescent Street, New Haven, CT 06515 (United States); Howell, Steve B. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Sherry, William H. [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 87719 (United States); Baena Galle, Roberto [Observatori Fabra, Reial Academia de Ciencies i Arts de Barcelona, Cami de l' Observatori s/n, E-08002 Barcelona (Spain); Van Altena, William F., E-mail: horche2@southernct.edu, E-mail: bahil1@owls.southernct.edu, E-mail: jgaulin.jg@gmail.com, E-mail: steve.b.howell@nasa.gov, E-mail: wsherry@noao.edu, E-mail: rbaena@am.ub.es, E-mail: william.vanaltena@yale.edu [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Five hundred thirty-one speckle measures of binary stars are reported. These data were taken mainly during the period 2008 June through 2009 October at the WIYN 3.5 m Telescope at Kitt Peak and represent the last data set of single-filter speckle observations taken in the WIYN speckle program prior to the use of the current two-channel speckle camera. The astrometric and photometric precision of these observations is consistent with previous papers in this series: we obtain a typical linear measurement uncertainty of approximately 2.5 mas, and the magnitude differences reported have typical uncertainties in the range of 0.1-0.14 mag. In combination with measures already in the literature, the data presented here permit the revision of the orbit of A 1634AB (= HIP 76041) and the first determination of visual orbital elements for HDS 1895 (= HIP 65982).

  10. LONG-ORBITAL-PERIOD PREPOLARS CONTAINING EARLY K-TYPE DONOR STARS. BOTTLENECK ACCRETION MECHANISM IN ACTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tovmassian, G.; González–Buitrago, D.; Zharikov, S.; Reichart, D. E.; Haislip, J. B.; Ivarsen, K. M.; LaCluyze, A. P.; Moore, J. P.; Miroshnichenko, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    We studied two objects identified as cataclysmic variables (CVs) with periods exceeding the natural boundary for Roche-lobe-filling zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) secondary stars. We present observational results for V1082 Sgr with a 20.82 hr orbital period, an object that shows a low luminosity state when its flux is totally dominated by a chromospherically active K star with no signs of ongoing accretion. Frequent accretion shutoffs, together with characteristics of emission lines in a high state, indicate that this binary system is probably detached, and the accretion of matter on the magnetic white dwarf takes place through stellar wind from the active donor star via coupled magnetic fields. Its observational characteristics are surprisingly similar to V479 And, a 14.5 hr binary system. They both have early K-type stars as donor stars. We argue that, similar to the shorter-period prepolars containing M dwarfs, these are detached binaries with strong magnetic components. Their magnetic fields are coupled, allowing enhanced stellar wind from the K star to be captured and channeled through the bottleneck connecting the two stars onto the white dwarf’s magnetic pole, mimicking a magnetic CV. Hence, they become interactive binaries before they reach contact. This will help to explain an unexpected lack of systems possessing white dwarfs with strong magnetic fields among detached white+red dwarf systems

  11. Upper-twin-peak quasiperiodic oscillation in x-ray binaries and the energy from tidal circularization of relativistic orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germanà, C.

    2017-11-01

    High frequency quasiperiodic oscillations (HF QPOs) detected in the power spectra of low mass x-ray binaries (LMXBs) could unveil the fingerprints of gravitation in the strong field regime. Using the energy-momentum relation we calculate the energy a clump of plasma orbiting in the accretion disk releases during circularization of its slightly eccentric relativistic orbit. Following previous works, we highlight the strong tidal force as a mechanism to dissipate such energy. We show that tides acting on the clump are able to reproduce the observed coherence of the upper HF QPO seen in LMXBs with a neutron star (NS). The quantity of energy released by the clump and relativistic boosting might give a modulation amplitude in agreement with that observed in the upper HF QPO. Both the amplitude and coherence of the upper HF QPO in NS LMXBs could allow us to disclose, for the first time, the tidal circularization of relativistic orbits occurring around a neutron star.

  12. A 12 MINUTE ORBITAL PERIOD DETACHED WHITE DWARF ECLIPSING BINARY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Warren R.; Kilic, Mukremin; Kenyon, Scott J.; Hermes, J. J.; Winget, D. E.; Prieto, Carlos Allende

    2011-01-01

    We have discovered a detached pair of white dwarfs (WDs) with a 12.75 minute orbital period and a 1315 km s -1 radial velocity amplitude. We measure the full orbital parameters of the system using its light curve, which shows ellipsoidal variations, Doppler boosting, and primary and secondary eclipses. The primary is a 0.25 M sun tidally distorted helium WD, only the second tidally distorted WD known. The unseen secondary is a 0.55 M sun carbon-oxygen WD. The two WDs will come into contact in 0.9 Myr due to loss of energy and angular momentum via gravitational wave radiation. Upon contact the systems may merge (yielding a rapidly spinning massive WD), form a stable interacting binary, or possibly explode as an underluminous Type Ia supernova. The system currently has a gravitational wave strain of 10 -22 , about 10,000 times larger than the Hulse-Taylor pulsar; this system would be detected by the proposed Laser Interferometer Space Antenna gravitational wave mission in the first week of operation. This system's rapid change in orbital period will provide a fundamental test of general relativity.

  13. Statistical examination of orbital elements affecting radial velocity semi-amplitude of host star in star-planet systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, O.; Erdem, A.

    2018-02-01

    Radial velocity semi-amplitude of the host star in a star-planet system is affected by four parameters: the orbital period and mass of the planet, mass of the host star, and orbital eccentricity. Statistical distribution of the orbital elements was examined using sensitive data from the spectroscopic orbital solutions of 737 systems given in the Exoplanet Orbit Database and Exoplanet Data Explorer (exoplanet.org). The orbital element distribution of the exoplanets was plotted in separate diagrams to highlight the basic features of the host star and planet in star-planet systems.

  14. The Frequency of Binary Stars in the Globular Cluster M71

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barden, S. C.; Armandroff, T. E.; Pryor, C. P.

    1994-12-01

    The frequency of binary stars is a fundamental property of a stellar population. A comparison of the frequency of binaries in globular clusters with those in the field halo and disk populations tests the similarity of star formation in those environments. Binary stars in globular clusters also act as an energy source which ``heats" the cluster through super-elastic encounters with other stars and binaries. Such encounters can not only profoundly affect the dynamical evolution of the cluster, they can disrupt the widely separated binaries and catalyze the formation of exotic objects such as blue stragglers, x-ray binaries, and milli-second pulsars. We have used the KPNO 4-m and the multi-fiber instruments Nessie and Hydra to measure radial velocities at 4 epochs over two years for a sample of 126 stars in the globular cluster M71. Velocity errors are under 1 km s(-1) for the brighter stars and under 2 km s(-1) for the majority of our data set. These velocities will be valuable for studying the kinematics of M71, but here we focus on searching for binaries. The faintest stars are at V=17, or just above the main sequence turnoff. Our sample is thus deeper than any published globular cluster binary search utilizing spectroscopic techniques. By observing smaller stars, we double the number of decades of binary periods sampled compared to previous studies and come within a factor of 4 of the shortest possible periods for turnoff stars. This wider period window has produced the largest known sample of binaries in a globular cluster. Four stars show velocity ranges larger than 20 km s(-1) , nine have ranges larger than 10 km s(-1) , and others are clearly variable. We will compare the radial distribution of these stars to that predicted by theory and derive the main-sequence binary fraction.

  15. The 'WN + WC' Wolf-Rayet stars MR 111 and GP CEP - Spectrum binaries or missing links?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Philip; Grove, Kjirsten

    1989-09-01

    MR 111 and GP Cep are two Wolf-Rayet stars classified as 'WN + WC', showing emission features of both the nitrogen and carbon sequences. They are also both known spectroscopic binaries, providing an excellent opportunity to determine whether the WN and WC features arise in two stars or in a single 'transition' object whose composition is intermediate between that of WN and WC stars. A radial velocity study of the C IV 5806A and N IV 7107A lines shows that these two lines vary in phase, and that therefore both sets of emission lines are produced in a single object in each of these two systems. In addition, an orbit solution is given for MR 111. If the mass of the W-R star is like that known in other binary systems, then the mass of the as-yet undetected companion is at least 15 solar masses, consistent with that of other W-R binaries. The mass of companion must be greater than that of the W-R component, unless the W-R star is very massive (m greater than 40 solar masses).

  16. ON-SKY DEMONSTRATION OF A LINEAR BAND-LIMITED MASK WITH APPLICATION TO VISUAL BINARY STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crepp, J.; Ge, J.; Kravchenko, I.; Serabyn, E.; Carson, J.

    2010-01-01

    We have designed and built the first band-limited coronagraphic mask used for ground-based high-contrast imaging observations. The mask resides in the focal plane of the near-infrared camera PHARO at the Palomar Hale telescope and receives a well-corrected beam from an extreme adaptive optics system. Its performance on-sky with single stars is comparable to current state-of-the-art instruments: contrast levels of ∼10 -5 or better at 0.''8 in K s after post-processing, depending on how well non-common-path errors are calibrated. However, given the mask's linear geometry, we are able to conduct additional unique science observations. Since the mask does not suffer from pointing errors down its long axis, it can suppress the light from two different stars simultaneously, such as the individual components of a spatially resolved binary star system, and search for faint tertiary companions. In this paper, we present the design of the mask, the science motivation for targeting binary stars, and our preliminary results, including the detection of a candidate M-dwarf tertiary companion orbiting the visual binary star HIP 48337, which we are continuing to monitor with astrometry to determine its association.

  17. Chromospheric activity of periodic variable stars (including eclipsing binaries) observed in DR2 LAMOST stellar spectral survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liyun; Lu, Hongpeng; Han, Xianming L.; Jiang, Linyan; Li, Zhongmu; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei; Cao, Zihuang

    2018-05-01

    The LAMOST spectral survey provides a rich databases for studying stellar spectroscopic properties and chromospheric activity. We cross-matched a total of 105,287 periodic variable stars from several photometric surveys and databases (CSS, LINEAR, Kepler, a recently updated eclipsing star catalogue, ASAS, NSVS, some part of SuperWASP survey, variable stars from the Tsinghua University-NAOC Transient Survey, and other objects from some new references) with four million stellar spectra published in the LAMOST data release 2 (DR2). We found 15,955 spectra for 11,469 stars (including 5398 eclipsing binaries). We calculated their equivalent widths (EWs) of their Hα, Hβ, Hγ, Hδ and Caii H lines. Using the Hα line EW, we found 447 spectra with emission above continuum for a total of 316 stars (178 eclipsing binaries). We identified 86 active stars (including 44 eclipsing binaries) with repeated LAMOST spectra. A total of 68 stars (including 34 eclipsing binaries) show chromospheric activity variability. We also found LAMOST spectra of 12 cataclysmic variables, five of which show chromospheric activity variability. We also made photometric follow-up studies of three short period targets (DY CVn, HAT-192-0001481, and LAMOST J164933.24+141255.0) using the Xinglong 60-cm telescope and the SARA 90-cm and 1-m telescopes, and obtained new BVRI CCD light curves. We analyzed these light curves and obtained orbital and starspot parameters. We detected the first flare event with a huge brightness increase of more than about 1.5 magnitudes in R filter in LAMOST J164933.24+141255.0.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Orbital parameters of 341 new binaries (Murphy+, 2018)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, S. J.; Moe, M.; Kurtz, D. W.; Bedding, T.; Shibahashi, H.; Boffin, H. M. J.

    2018-01-01

    Kepler targets with effective temperatures between 6600 and 10000K have been investigated for pulsational phase modulation that can be attributed to binary orbital motion. For each target, we provide a binary status, which also reflects whether or not the target pulsates. For the binary systems, we provide the Kepler Input Catalogue (KIC) number, as well as the binary orbital elements: the period, semi-major axis, eccentricity, longitude of periastron, time of periastron passage, binary mass function and a calculated radial velocity semi-amplitude. (3 data files).

  19. Eclipsing binary stars in the era of massive surveys First results and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papageorgiou Athanasios

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Our thinking about eclipsing binary stars has undergone a tremendous change in the last decade. Eclipsing binary stars are one of nature’s best laboratories for determining the fundamental physical properties of stars and thus for testing the predictions of theoretical models. Some of the largest ongoing variable star surveys include the Catalina Real-time Transient Survey (CRTS and the VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea survey (VVV. They both contain a large amount of photometric data and plenty of information about eclipsing binaries that wait to be extracted and exploited. Here we briefly describe our efforts in this direction.

  20. Formation and Evolution of Neutron Star Binaries: Masses of Neutron Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Chang-Hwan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Neutron star (NS is one of the most interesting astrophysical compact objects for hardronic physics. It is believed that the central density of NS can reach several times the normal nuclear matter density (ρ0. Hence, the inner part of NS is the ultimate testing place for the physics of dense matter. Recently, the mass of NS in a NS-white dwarf (WD binary PSR J1614-2230 has been estimated to be 1.97 ± 0.04M๏ [1]. Since this estimate is based on the observed Shapiro delay, it can give the lower limit of the maximum NS mass and rules out many soft equations of state. On the other hand, all the well-measured NS masses in NS-NS binaries are smaller than 1.5M๏. In this work, by introducing the supercritical accretion during the binary evolution, we propose a possibility of forming higher mass NS in NS-WD binaries. In this scenario, the lifetimes of NS and WD progenitors are significantly different, and NS in NS-WD binary can accrete > 0.5M๏ after NS formation during the giant phase of the progenitor of WD. On the other hand, for the binary system with NS and heavier (> 8M๏ giants, the first-born NS will accrete more from the companion and can collapse into black hole. The only way to avoid the supercritical accretion is that the initial masses of progenitors of NS binary should be very close so that they evolve almost at the same time and don’t have time to accrete after NS formation.

  1. Binary neutron star mergers: a review of Einstein's richest laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiotti, Luca; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2017-09-01

    In a single process, the merger of binary neutron star systems combines extreme gravity, the copious emission of gravitational waves, complex microphysics and electromagnetic processes, which can lead to astrophysical signatures observable at the largest redshifts. We review here the recent progress in understanding what could be considered Einstein's richest laboratory, highlighting in particular the numerous significant advances of the last decade. Although special attention is paid to the status of models, techniques and results for fully general-relativistic dynamical simulations, a review is also offered on the initial data and advanced simulations with approximate treatments of gravity. Finally, we review the considerable amount of work carried out on the post-merger phase, including black-hole formation, torus accretion onto the merged compact object, the connection with gamma-ray burst engines, ejected material, and its nucleosynthesis.

  2. Accreting Neutron Star and Black Hole Binaries with NICER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, Deepto

    2018-01-01

    The NICER mission on the International Space Station has significant new capabilities for the study of accreting neutron stars and blackholes, including large effective area, low background, and excellent low-energy X-ray response. Both the NICER Burst and Accretion Working Group and the Observatory Science Working Group have designed observing programs that probe various aspects of accretion physics. I will present some early results from the first six months of the NICER mission, including observations of the black hole transients MAXI J1535-571 and GX 339-4, the high-mass X-ray binary pulsars GRO J1008-57 and Swift J02436+6124, and the X-ray burster 4U 1820-30.

  3. Gravitational lensing of gravitational waves from merging neutron star binaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yun; Stebbins, Albert; Turner, Edwin L.

    1996-05-01

    We discuss the gravitational lensing of gravitational waves from merging neutron star binaries, in the context of advanced LIGO type gravitational wave detectors. We consider properties of the expected observational data with cut on the signal-to-noise ratio \\rho, i.e., \\rho>\\rho_0. An advanced LIGO should see unlensed inspiral events with a redshift distribution with cut-off at a redshift z_{\\rm max} < 1 for h \\leq 0.8. Any inspiral events detected at z>z_{\\rm max} should be lensed. We compute the expected total number of events which are present due to gravitational lensing and their redshift distribution for an advanced LIGO in a flat Universe. If the matter fraction in compact lenses is close to 10\\%, an advanced LIGO should see a few strongly lensed events per year with \\rho >5.

  4. A systematic search for brown dwarfs orbiting nearby stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, T.J.; Mccarthy, D.W. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Survey data for brown dwarf and stellar companions relative to known M dwarf stars within 5 pc north of -30 deg are analyzed. A region 0.2 to 5 arcsec in radius around 27 stars at the IR H and K bands are examined using IR speckle interferometry. The frequency of binary versus single M dwarfs in the solar neighborhood is examined. The IR mass-magnitude relations and mass-luminosity-age relation are studied. The data reveal that there are 19 single M dwarfs, 8 M dwarf binaries, 1 M dwarf triple system, and 1 M dwarf in a triple system for M dwarfs within 5 pc north of -30 deg. Also of the 27 M dwarfs studied none was found to have a brown dwarf companion. 64 refs

  5. Double stars with wide separations in the AGK3 - I. Components that are themselves spectroscopic binaries

    OpenAIRE

    Halbwachs, J.-L; Mayor, M.; Udry, S.

    2017-01-01

    Wide binaries are tracers of the gravity field of the Galaxy, but their study requires some caution. A large list of common proper motion stars selected from the third Astronomischen Gesellschaft Katalog (AGK3) was monitored with the CORAVEL (for COrrelation RAdial VELocities) spectrovelocimeter, in order to prepare a sample of physical binaries with very wide separations. 66 stars received special attention, since their radial velocities (RV) seemed to be variable. These stars were monitored...

  6. Neutron-Star Radius from a Population of Binary Neutron Star Mergers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Sukanta; Chakravarti, Kabir; Rezzolla, Luciano; Sathyaprakash, B S; Takami, Kentaro

    2018-01-19

    We show how gravitational-wave observations with advanced detectors of tens to several tens of neutron-star binaries can measure the neutron-star radius with an accuracy of several to a few percent, for mass and spatial distributions that are realistic, and with none of the sources located within 100 Mpc. We achieve such an accuracy by combining measurements of the total mass from the inspiral phase with those of the compactness from the postmerger oscillation frequencies. For estimating the measurement errors of these frequencies, we utilize analytical fits to postmerger numerical relativity waveforms in the time domain, obtained here for the first time, for four nuclear-physics equations of state and a couple of values for the mass. We further exploit quasiuniversal relations to derive errors in compactness from those frequencies. Measuring the average radius to well within 10% is possible for a sample of 100 binaries distributed uniformly in volume between 100 and 300 Mpc, so long as the equation of state is not too soft or the binaries are not too heavy. We also give error estimates for the Einstein Telescope.

  7. Neutron-Star Radius from a Population of Binary Neutron Star Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Sukanta; Chakravarti, Kabir; Rezzolla, Luciano; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Takami, Kentaro

    2018-01-01

    We show how gravitational-wave observations with advanced detectors of tens to several tens of neutron-star binaries can measure the neutron-star radius with an accuracy of several to a few percent, for mass and spatial distributions that are realistic, and with none of the sources located within 100 Mpc. We achieve such an accuracy by combining measurements of the total mass from the inspiral phase with those of the compactness from the postmerger oscillation frequencies. For estimating the measurement errors of these frequencies, we utilize analytical fits to postmerger numerical relativity waveforms in the time domain, obtained here for the first time, for four nuclear-physics equations of state and a couple of values for the mass. We further exploit quasiuniversal relations to derive errors in compactness from those frequencies. Measuring the average radius to well within 10% is possible for a sample of 100 binaries distributed uniformly in volume between 100 and 300 Mpc, so long as the equation of state is not too soft or the binaries are not too heavy. We also give error estimates for the Einstein Telescope.

  8. arXiv Gravitational Wave Signatures of Highly Compact Boson Star Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Palenzuela, Carlos; Bezares, Miguel; Cardoso, Vitor; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven

    2017-11-30

    Solitonic boson stars are stable objects made of a complex scalar field with a compactness that can reach values comparable to that of neutron stars. A recent study of the collision of identical boson stars produced only nonrotating boson stars or black holes, suggesting that rotating boson stars may not form from binary mergers. Here we extend this study to include an analysis of the gravitational waves radiated during the coalescence of such a binary, which is crucial to distinguish these events from other binaries with LIGO and Virgo observations. Our studies reveal that the remnant’s gravitational wave signature is mainly governed by its fundamental frequency as it settles down to a nonrotating boson star, emitting significant gravitational radiation during this post-merger state. We calculate how the waveforms and their post-merger frequencies depend on the compactness of the initial boson stars and estimate analytically the amount of energy radiated after the merger.

  9. Time-domain inspiral templates for spinning compact binaries in quasi-circular orbits described by their orbital angular momenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, A; Gopakumar, A

    2014-01-01

    We present a prescription to compute the time-domain gravitational wave (GW) polarization states associated with spinning compact binaries inspiraling along quasi-circular orbits. We invoke the orbital angular momentum L rather than its Newtonian counterpart L N to describe the binary orbits while the two spin vectors are freely specified in an inertial frame associated with the initial direction of the total angular momentum. We show that the use of L to describe the orbits leads to additional 1.5PN order amplitude contributions to the two GW polarization states compared to the L N -based approach and discuss few implications of our approach. Furthermore, we provide a plausible prescription for GW phasing based on certain theoretical considerations and which may be treated as the natural circular limit to GW phasing for spinning compact binaries in inspiraling eccentric orbits (Gopakumar A and Schäfer G 2011 Phys. Rev. D 84 124007). (paper)

  10. Exterior Companions to Hot Jupiters Orbiting Cool Stars Are Coplanar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Juliette C.; Vanderburg, Andrew; Adams, Fred C.; Khain, Tali; Bryan, Marta

    2017-12-01

    The existence of hot Jupiters has challenged theories of planetary formation since the first extrasolar planets were detected. Giant planets are generally believed to form far from their host stars, where volatile materials like water exist in their solid phase, making it easier for giant planet cores to accumulate. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain how giant planets can migrate inward from their birth sites to short-period orbits. One such mechanism, called Kozai-Lidov migration, requires the presence of distant companions in orbits inclined by more than ˜40° with respect to the plane of the hot Jupiter’s orbit. The high occurrence rate of wide companions in hot-Jupiter systems lends support to this theory for migration. However, the exact orbital inclinations of these detected planetary and stellar companions is not known, so it is not clear whether the mutual inclination of these companions is large enough for the Kozai-Lidov process to operate. This paper shows that in systems orbiting cool stars with convective outer layers, the orbits of most wide planetary companions to hot Jupiters must be well aligned with the orbits of the hot Jupiters and the spins of the host stars. For a variety of possible distributions for the inclination of the companion, the width of the distribution must be less than ˜20° to recreate the observations with good fidelity. As a result, the companion orbits are likely well aligned with those of the hot Jupiters, and the Kozai-Lidov mechanism does not enforce migration in these systems.

  11. Formation and tidal synchronization of sdB stars in binaries an asteroseismic investigation using Kepler Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pablo, Herbert William

    Subdwarf B (sdB) stars are low mass (0.5 M sun) helium burning stars with thin hydrogen envelopes and Teff 22000-40000 K. Many of these stars are found in binary systems. One common proposed formation mechanism is common envelope (CE) ejection, where the companion spirals deep into the star's envelope ejecting the outer layers and forming a close binary system. In this dissertation, we use short cadence (tint=58.86 s) Kepler photometric time-series data to study three close sdB binaries with P ≈ 10 hours and g-mode pulsations. Asteroseismic analysis finds that each system has a constant period spacing of ΔP ≈ 250 s consistent with single sdB stars. This analysis also shows the presence of rotational multiplets which we used to find the rotation period. In all three cases the binary system is far from tidal synchronization with a rotation period an order of magnitude longer than the orbital period. These observations agree with predictions using the Zahn formulation of tidal evolution which predicts a synchronization time longer than the sdB lifetime (108 yr). We use this synchronization time to backtrack the sdB's rotation history and find its initial rotation period as it is first exiting the CE. This is one of the only observationally based constraints that has been placed on CE evolution. Preliminary investigations of single sdB stars show similar rotation periods, indicating that the rotation period may be independent of the formation channel.

  12. Direct imaging of multiple planets orbiting the star HR 8799

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marois, C; Macintosh, B; Barman, T; Zuckerman, B; Song, I; Patience, J; Lafreniere, D; Doyon, R

    2008-10-14

    Direct imaging of exoplanetary systems is a powerful technique that can reveal Jupiter-like planets in wide orbits, can enable detailed characterization of planetary atmospheres, and is a key step towards imaging Earth-like planets. Imaging detections are challenging due to the combined effect of small angular separation and large luminosity contrast between a planet and its host star. High-contrast observations with the Keck and Gemini telescopes have revealed three planets orbiting the star HR 8799, with projected separations of 24, 38, and 68 astronomical units. Multi-epoch data show counter-clockwise orbital motion for all three imaged planets. The low luminosity of the companions and the estimated age of the system imply planetary masses between 5 and 13 times that of Jupiter. This system resembles a scaled-up version of the outer portion of our Solar System.

  13. Tidal generation of gravitational waves from orbiting Newtonian stars. I. General formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, M.

    1977-01-01

    A linearized formalism is presented for the calculation of the tidally produced gravitational radiation potential h/sup TT/ from binary systems with arbitrary orbits. The stars are Newtonian, isentropic, and nonrotating. Normal-mode analysis is used to calculate the tidally generated internal motions; the resulting radiation potential h/sup TT/ and its Fourier decomposition are calculated in the Newtonian limit of the multipole formalism. The tidal radiation potential is weaker than that produced by the orbital motion by a factor of order [(stellar radius)/(periastron distance)] 5 . If we assume that the time scale of the tidal perturbation is always much less than the damping time of the star, then if in addition the damping time is much less than the time between periastron passages, the radiation spectrum consists of the l=2 eigenfrequencies of the star near the fundamental l=2 eigenfrequency; if the reverse is true (damping time >> time between periastrons), the spectrum is similar to the orbital gravitational radiation specturm

  14. Massive scalar counterpart of gravitational waves in scalarized neutron star binaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing [Sun Yat-sen University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Guangzhou (China)

    2017-09-15

    In analogy with spontaneous magnetization of ferromagnets below the Curie temperature, a neutron star (NS), with a compactness above a certain critical value, may undergo spontaneous scalarization and exhibit an interior nontrivial scalar configuration. Consequently, the exterior spacetime is changed, and an external scalar field appears, which subsequently triggers a scalarization of its companion. The dynamical interplay produces a gravitational scalar counterpart of tensor gravitational waves. In this paper, we resort to scalar-tensor theory and demonstrate that the gravitational scalar counterpart from a double neutron star (DNS) and a neutron star-white dwarf (NS-WD) system become massive. We report that (1) a gravitational scalar background field, arising from convergence of external scalar fields, plays the role of gravitational scalar counterpart in scalarized DNS binary, and the appearance of a mass-dimensional constant in a Higgs-like gravitational scalar potential is responsible for a massive gravitational scalar counterpart with a mass of the order of the Planck scale; (2) a dipolar gravitational scalar radiated field, resulting from differing binding energies of NS and WD, plays the role of a gravitational scalar counterpart in scalarized orbital shrinking NS-WDs, which oscillates around a local and scalar-energy-density-dependent minimum of the gravitational scalar potential and obtains a mass of the order of about 10{sup -21} eV/c{sup 2}. (orig.)

  15. An Orbit Fit to Likely Hermus Stream Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Charles; Amy, Paul M.; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Shelton, Siddhartha; Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Beers, Timothy C.; Denissenkov, Pavel; Willett, Benjamin A.

    2018-03-01

    We selected blue horizontal branch (BHB) stars within the expected distance range and sky position of the Hermus Stream from Data Release 10 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We identify a moving group of 19 BHB stars that are concentrated within two degrees of the Hermus Stream, between 10 and 14 kpc from the Sun. The concentration in velocity is inconsistent with a Gaussian distribution with 98% confidence (2.33 sigma). The stars in the moving group have line-of-sight velocities of vgsr ˜ 50 km s-1, a velocity dispersion of σv ≲ 11 km s-1, a line-of-sight depth of ˜1 kpc, and a metallicity of [Fe/H] =-2.1 ± 0.4. The best-fit orbit has a perigalacticon of ˜4 kpc, apogalacticon of ˜17 kpc, orbital period of ˜247 Myr, eccentricity e = 0.62, and inclination i ˜ 75° from b = 90°. The BHB stars in the stream are estimated to be 12 Gyr old. An N-body simulation of a mass-follows-light ultrafaint dwarf galaxy with mass 106M⊙ and radius 40 pc is consistent with the observed properties. The properties of the identified moving group of 19 BHB stars are close enough to those of the Hermus Stream (which is traced predominantly in turnoff stars) that we find it likely that they are associated. If that is the case, then our orbit fit would imply that there is no relationship between the Hermus and Phoenix streams, as previously proposed.

  16. Testing the Formation Scenarios of Binary Neutron Star Systems with Measurements of the Neutron Star Moment of Inertia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, William G.; Steiner, Andrew W.; Yagi, Kent

    2018-03-01

    Two low-mass (M Advanced LIGO can potentially measure the neutron star tidal polarizability to equivalent accuracy which, using the I-Love-Q relations, would obtain similar constraints on the formation scenarios. Such information would help constrain important aspects of binary evolution used for population synthesis predictions of the rate of binary neutron star mergers and resulting electromagnetic and gravitational wave signals. Further progress needs to be made in modeling the core-collapse process that leads to low-mass neutron stars, particularly in making robust predictions for the mass loss from the progenitor core.

  17. Accretion effects on compact members of binary stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spyrou, N.

    1988-01-01

    The change in the period of axial rotation and in the radius of a magnetized compact star in a binary system, induced by the accretion on it of mass with angular momentum from the surface of its non-compact companion is explored. No specific assumption is made concerning the accretion model, and the primary's interior is described by the Fermi-Dirac statistics for degenerate matter. The rate of change with time of the period and radius is expressed in terms of the compact primary's physical parameters and total absolute luminosity. The conditions are fully derived under which the above changes can be positive, negative or even vanish. In the case of the millisecond pulsars in binary X-ray sources the predicted values of the period time derivative, depending on the values of the accretion rate and the absolute luminosity, can be positive or negative - if not vanishing - and they fall absolutely in the range 10 -21 - 10 -17 ss -1 , in good agreement with current observational data. The corresponding rate of change of radius, either positive or negative, fall in the range of 10 -3 - 10 -1 cm y -1 . Finally, it is proved that the wellknown bursters can be explained by thermonuclear flash due to gravitational instability in the accreted matter, but their explanation as a result of direct contraction could be possible only for quite high accretion rates (>10 -7 M y -1 ). This last result indicates that, in contrast to the accretion-induced change in period, which can be of either sign irrespective of the primary's age, the accretion-induced non-catastrophic contraction is impossible, while according to recent results the contraction in general is possible for young compact objects. (author). 27 refs

  18. THE REFLECTION EFFECT IN INTERACTING BINARIES OR IN PLANET-STAR SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budaj, J.

    2011-01-01

    There are many similarities between interacting binary stars and stars with a close-in giant extrasolar planet. The reflection effect is a well-known example. Although the generally accepted treatment of this effect in interacting binaries is successful in fitting light curves of eclipsing binaries, it is not very suitable for studying cold objects irradiated by hot objects or extrasolar planets. The aim of this paper is to develop a model of the reflection effect which could be easily incorporated into the present codes for modeling of interacting binaries so that these can be used to study the aforementioned objects. Our model of the reflection effect takes into account the reflection (scattering), heating, and heat redistribution over the surface of the irradiated object. The shape of the object is described by the non-spherical Roche potential expected for close objects. Limb and gravity darkening are included in the calculations of the light output from the system. The model also accounts for the orbital revolution and rotation of the exoplanet with appropriate Doppler shifts for the scattered and thermal radiation. Subsequently, light curves and/or spectra of several exoplanets have been modeled and the effects of the heat redistribution, limb darkening/brightening, (non-)gray albedo, and non-spherical shape have been studied. Recent observations of planet-to-star flux ratio of HD189733b, WASP12b, and WASP-19b at various phases were reproduced with very good accuracy. It was found that HD189733b has a low Bond albedo and intense heat redistribution, while WASP-19b has a low Bond albedo and low heat redistribution. The exact Roche geometries and temperature distributions over the surface of all 78 transiting extrasolar planets have been determined. Departures from the spherical shape may vary considerably but departures of about 1% in the radius are common within the sample. In some cases, these departures can reach 8%, 12%, or 14%, for WASP-33b, WASP-19b, and

  19. Tidal disruption flares from stars on eccentric orbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loeb A.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We study tidal disruption and subsequent mass fallback for stars approaching supermassive black holes on bound orbits, by performing three dimensional Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics simulations with a pseudo-Newtonian potential. We find that the mass fallback rate decays with the expected -5/3 power of time for parabolic orbits, albeit with a slight deviation due to the self-gravity of the stellar debris. For eccentric orbits, however, there is a critical value of the orbital eccentricity, significantly below which all of the stellar debris is bound to the supermassive black hole. All the mass therefore falls back to the supermassive black hole in a much shorter time than in the standard, parabolic case. The resultant mass fallback rate considerably exceeds the Eddington accretion rate and substantially differs from the -5/3 power of time.

  20. Numerical simulation of binary black hole and neutron star mergers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastaun, W.; Rezzolla, L.

    2016-01-01

    One of the last predictions of general relativity that still awaits direct observational confirmation is the existence of gravitational waves. Those fluctuations of the geometry of space and time are expected to travel with the speed of light and are emitted by any accelerating mass. Only the most violent events in the universe, such as mergers of two black holes or neutron stars, produce gravitational waves strong enough to be measured. Even those waves are extremely weak when arriving at Earth, and their detection is a formidable technological challenge. In recent years sufficiently sensitive detectors became operational, such as GEO600, Virgo, and LIGO. They are expected to observe around 40 events per year. To interpret the observational data, theoretical modeling of the sources is a necessity, and requires numerical simulations of the equations of general relativity and relativistic hydrodynamics. Such computations can only be carried out on large scale supercomputers, given that many scenarios need to be simulated, each of which typically occupies hundreds of CPU cores for a week. Our main goal is to predict the gravitational wave signal from the merger of two compact objects. Comparison with future observations will provide important insights into the fundamental forces of nature in regimes that are impossible to recreate in laboratory experiments. The waveforms from binary black hole mergers would allow one to test the correctness of general relativity in previously inaccessible regimes. The signal from binary neutron star mergers will provide input for nuclear physics, because the signal depends strongly on the unknown properties of matter at the ultra high densities inside neutron stars, which cannot be observed in any other astrophysical scenario. Besides mergers, we also want to improve the theoretical models of close encounters between black holes. A gravitational wave detector with even higher sensitivity, the Einstein Telescope, is already in the

  1. Numerical simulation of binary black hole and neutron star mergers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kastaun, W.; Rezzolla, L. [Albert Einstein Institut, Potsdam-Golm (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    One of the last predictions of general relativity that still awaits direct observational confirmation is the existence of gravitational waves. Those fluctuations of the geometry of space and time are expected to travel with the speed of light and are emitted by any accelerating mass. Only the most violent events in the universe, such as mergers of two black holes or neutron stars, produce gravitational waves strong enough to be measured. Even those waves are extremely weak when arriving at Earth, and their detection is a formidable technological challenge. In recent years sufficiently sensitive detectors became operational, such as GEO600, Virgo, and LIGO. They are expected to observe around 40 events per year. To interpret the observational data, theoretical modeling of the sources is a necessity, and requires numerical simulations of the equations of general relativity and relativistic hydrodynamics. Such computations can only be carried out on large scale supercomputers, given that many scenarios need to be simulated, each of which typically occupies hundreds of CPU cores for a week. Our main goal is to predict the gravitational wave signal from the merger of two compact objects. Comparison with future observations will provide important insights into the fundamental forces of nature in regimes that are impossible to recreate in laboratory experiments. The waveforms from binary black hole mergers would allow one to test the correctness of general relativity in previously inaccessible regimes. The signal from binary neutron star mergers will provide input for nuclear physics, because the signal depends strongly on the unknown properties of matter at the ultra high densities inside neutron stars, which cannot be observed in any other astrophysical scenario. Besides mergers, we also want to improve the theoretical models of close encounters between black holes. A gravitational wave detector with even higher sensitivity, the Einstein Telescope, is already in the

  2. Exciting (and detecting) gravitational waves from the tidally produced f-modes in highly eccentric neutron star binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirenti, Cecilia; Gold, Roman; Miller, M. Coleman

    2017-08-01

    After the first recent detections of gravitational waves from binary black holes, we expect to observe next gravitational radiation from neutron stars in the near future. Most interestingly, the signal from neutron star binaries could also carry information about the equation of state of cold, catalyzed, dense matter in the interior of neutron stars, which is in a regime not accessible to nuclear and particle physics experiments on Earth. For analyzing this information, more advanced gravitational wave detectors will be needed, such as third-generation detectors like the Einstein Telescope or the Cosmic Explorer. Besides the gravitational wave signal produced by the orbital motion and merger of the binary, a rich spectrum of characteristic fluid oscillations is expected to be produced with low amplitude in the ringdown. The frequencies and physical properties of these modes have been extensively studied in linear perturbation theory (both Newtonian and relativistic) and they have already been found in numerical relativity simulations of isolated neutron stars and of hypermassive remnants of double neutron star mergers. Due to the high frequency of the fundamental (f-)modes, of the order of 1-2 kHz, the resonant excitation of these modes is not expected to be detectable in circular binaries. However, highly eccentric binaries could have the potential for exciting f-modes in their close passages, and recent numerical relativity simulations indicate that the energy deposited in the f-modes could be up to two orders of magnitude greater than predicted in the linear theory. The merger of highly eccentric neutron star binaries will be rare events, but we estimate that up to several tens could be detected per year out to the redshifts ~2-6 accessible with third-generation instruments. Finally, we note that the information from the amplitude, frequency and damping time of the f-modes can be used for simultaneously measuring the masses, moments of inertia and tidal Love

  3. Cataclysmic Variables and Active Binary Stars in Omega Centauri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, T.; Brochmann, M.; Dorfman, J. L.; White, M. V.; Cool, A. M.

    2004-12-01

    We report findings from our ongoing research on the globular cluster Omega Centauri (NGC 5139) using a 3x3 mosaic of Wide Field Camera pointings with the HST Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). The data consist of F435W (B435), F625W (R625), and F658N (Hα ) images and cover roughly 10x10 arcminutes, out to beyond the cluster's half-mass radius. Our current work is a search for cataclysmic variables (CVs) and active binaries (ABs) (e.g., RS CVn and BY Dra stars) as counterparts to X-ray point sources previously detected with Chandra. The ACS field encompasses 109 of the Chandra sources, 20-50 of which are likely to be cluster members according to our statistical estimates (the rest being primarily active galaxies). Using DAOPHOT to obtain photometry in 20x20 arcsecond patches surrounding each X-ray source, we are constructing color-magnitude diagrams to search for stars with Hα -R625 and/or B435-R625 colors indicative of CVs or ABs in ˜ 1 arcsecond Chandra error circles. With roughly half of the patches analyzed, several AB candidates and only a small number of CV candidates have emerged. Our tentative conclusion is that CVs may be significantly rarer in Omega Cen than in 47 Tuc, in contrast to the comparable numbers ( ˜100) predicted for these two clusters from tidal capture theory (Di Stefano and Rappaport 1994). Alternatively, the CVs could be strongly concentrated toward the cluster center, and thus not yet appear in our sample. To date, most of the patches we have analyzed are 3-4 arcminutes from the cluster center and thus are outside the cluster core (radius 2.6 arcminutes). Our continuing work should soon enable us to resolve this question. This work is supported by NASA grant GO-9442 from the Space Telescope Science Institute.

  4. PALFA Discovery of a Highly Relativistic Double Neutron Star Binary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovall, K.; Freire, P. C. C.; Chatterjee, S.; Demorest, P. B.; Lorimer, D. R.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Pol, N.; van Leeuwen, J.; Wharton, R. S.; Allen, B.; Boyce, M.; Brazier, A.; Caballero, K.; Camilo, F.; Camuccio, R.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J. S.; Ferdman, R. D.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Jenet, F. A.; Kaspi, V. M.; Knispel, B.; Lazarus, P.; Lynch, R.; Parent, E.; Patel, C.; Pleunis, Z.; Ransom, S. M.; Scholz, P.; Seymour, A.; Siemens, X.; Stairs, I. H.; Swiggum, J.; Zhu, W. W.

    2018-02-01

    We report the discovery and initial follow-up of a double neutron star (DNS) system, PSR J1946+2052, with the Arecibo L-Band Feed Array pulsar (PALFA) survey. PSR J1946+2052 is a 17 ms pulsar in a 1.88 hr, eccentric (e = 0.06) orbit with a ≳1.2 M ⊙ companion. We have used the Jansky Very Large Array to localize PSR J1946+2052 to a precision of 0.″09 using a new phase binning mode. We have searched multiwavelength catalogs for coincident sources but did not find any counterparts. The improved position enabled a measurement of the spin period derivative of the pulsar (\\dot{P}=9+/- 2× {10}-19); the small inferred magnetic field strength at the surface (B S = 4 × 109 G) indicates that this pulsar has been recycled. This and the orbital eccentricity lead to the conclusion that PSR J1946+2052 is in a DNS system. Among all known radio pulsars in DNS systems, PSR J1946+2052 has the shortest orbital period and the shortest estimated merger timescale, 46 Myr; at that time it will display the largest spin effects on gravitational-wave waveforms of any such system discovered to date. We have measured the advance of periastron passage for this system, \\dot{ω }=25.6+/- 0.3 \\deg {yr}}-1, implying a total system mass of only 2.50 ± 0.04 M ⊙, so it is among the lowest-mass DNS systems. This total mass measurement combined with the minimum companion mass constrains the pulsar mass to ≲1.3 M ⊙.

  5. Multi-messenger Observations of a Binary Neutron Star Merger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Afrough, M.; Agarwal, B.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Amato, A.; Ananyeva, A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Angelova, S. V.; Antier, S.; Appert, S.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atallah, D. V.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; AultONeal, K.; Austin, C.; Avila-Alvarez, A.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Bae, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Banagiri, S.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barkett, K.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bawaj, M.; Bayley, J. C.; Bazzan, M.; Bécsy, B.; Beer, C.; Bejger, M.; Belahcene, I.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Bero, J. J.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Billman, C. R.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Biscoveanu, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackman, J.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bode, N.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bohe, A.; Bondu, F.; Bonilla, E.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bossie, K.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Canepa, M.; Canizares, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, H.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Carney, M. F.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerdá-Durán, P.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chase, E.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chatterjee, D.; Chatziioannou, K.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H.-P.; Chia, H.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Chmiel, T.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, A. J. K.; Chua, S.; Chung, A. K. W.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Ciolfi, R.; Cirelli, C. E.; Cirone, A.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Clearwater, P.; Cleva, F.; Cocchieri, C.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Cohen, D.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L. R.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conti, L.; Cooper, S. J.; Corban, P.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordero-Carrión, I.; Corley, K. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Covas, P. B.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cullen, T. J.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Dálya, G.; Danilishin, S. L.; D’Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dasgupta, A.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davis, D.; Daw, E. J.; Day, B.; De, S.; DeBra, D.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Demos, N.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; De Pietri, R.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; De Rossi, C.; DeSalvo, R.; de Varona, O.; Devenson, J.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. 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H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wills, L.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woolsey, E.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Yuan, T.; Zoll, M.; IceCube Collaboration; Balasubramanian, A.; Mate, S.; Bhalerao, V.; Bhattacharya, D.; Vibhute, A.; Dewangan, G. C.; Rao, A. R.; Vadawale, S. V.; AstroSat Cadmium Zinc Telluride Imager Team; Svinkin, D. S.; Hurley, K.; Aptekar, R. L.; Frederiks, D. D.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Kozlova, A. V.; Lysenko, A. L.; Oleynik, Ph. P.; Tsvetkova, A. E.; Ulanov, M. V.; Cline, T.; IPN Collaboration; Li, T. P.; Xiong, S. L.; Zhang, S. N.; Lu, F. J.; Song, L. M.; Cao, X. L.; Chang, Z.; Chen, G.; Chen, L.; Chen, T. X.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. B.; Chen, Y. P.; Cui, W.; Cui, W. W.; Deng, J. K.; Dong, Y. W.; Du, Y. Y.; Fu, M. X.; Gao, G. H.; Gao, H.; Gao, M.; Ge, M. Y.; Gu, Y. D.; Guan, J.; Guo, C. C.; Han, D. W.; Hu, W.; Huang, Y.; Huo, J.; Jia, S. M.; Jiang, L. H.; Jiang, W. C.; Jin, J.; Jin, Y. J.; Li, B.; Li, C. K.; Li, G.; Li, M. S.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X. B.; Li, X. F.; Li, Y. G.; Li, Z. J.; Li, Z. W.; Liang, X. H.; Liao, J. Y.; Liu, C. Z.; Liu, G. Q.; Liu, H. W.; Liu, S. Z.; Liu, X. J.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Y. N.; Lu, B.; Lu, X. F.; Luo, T.; Ma, X.; Meng, B.; Nang, Y.; Nie, J. Y.; Ou, G.; Qu, J. L.; Sai, N.; Sun, L.; Tan, Y.; Tao, L.; Tao, W. H.; Tuo, Y. L.; Wang, G. F.; Wang, H. Y.; Wang, J.; Wang, W. S.; Wang, Y. S.; Wen, X. Y.; Wu, B. B.; Wu, M.; Xiao, G. C.; Xu, H.; Xu, Y. P.; Yan, L. L.; Yang, J. W.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y. J.; Zhang, A. M.; Zhang, C. L.; Zhang, C. M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H. M.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, W.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, W. Z.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. F.; Zhang, Y. J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, Z. L.; Zhao, H. S.; Zhao, J. L.; Zhao, X. F.; Zheng, S. J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhu, Y. X.; Zou, C. L.; The Insight-HXMT Collaboration; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Ardid, M.; Aubert, J.-J.; Aublin, J.; Avgitas, T.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Martí, J.; Basa, S.; Belhorma, B.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bormuth, R.; Bourret, S.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brânzaş, H.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Carr, J.; Celli, S.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coelho, J. A. B.; Coleiro, A.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Díaz, A. F.; Deschamps, A.; De Bonis, G.; Distefano, C.; Di Palma, I.; Domi, A.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; El Bojaddaini, I.; El Khayati, N.; Elsässer, D.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Ettahiri, A.; Fassi, F.; Felis, I.; Fusco, L. A.; Gay, P.; Giordano, V.; Glotin, H.; Grégoire, T.; Ruiz, R. Gracia; Graf, K.; Hallmann, S.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Hössl, J.; Hofestädt, J.; Hugon, C.; Illuminati, G.; James, C. 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A.; Giommi, P.; Gronwall, C.; Kennea, J. A.; Krimm, H. A.; Kuin, N. P. M.; Lien, A.; Marshall, F. E.; Melandri, A.; Nousek, J. A.; Oates, S. R.; Osborne, J. P.; Pagani, C.; Page, K. L.; Palmer, D. M.; Perri, M.; Siegel, M. H.; Sbarufatti, B.; Tagliaferri, G.; Tohuvavohu, A.; The Swift Collaboration; Tavani, M.; Verrecchia, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Evangelista, Y.; Pacciani, L.; Feroci, M.; Pittori, C.; Giuliani, A.; Del Monte, E.; Donnarumma, I.; Argan, A.; Trois, A.; Ursi, A.; Cardillo, M.; Piano, G.; Longo, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Fuschino, F.; Labanti, C.; Marisaldi, M.; Minervini, G.; Fioretti, V.; Parmiggiani, N.; Gianotti, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Di Persio, G.; Antonelli, L. A.; Barbiellini, G.; Caraveo, P.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Costa, E.; Colafrancesco, S.; D’Amico, F.; Ferrari, A.; Morselli, A.; Paoletti, F.; Picozza, P.; Pilia, M.; Rappoldi, A.; Soffitta, P.; Vercellone, S.; AGILE Team; Foley, R. J.; Coulter, D. A.; Kilpatrick, C. D.; Drout, M. R.; Piro, A. L.; Shappee, B. J.; Siebert, M. R.; Simon, J. D.; Ulloa, N.; Kasen, D.; Madore, B. F.; Murguia-Berthier, A.; Pan, Y.-C.; Prochaska, J. X.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Rest, A.; Rojas-Bravo, C.; The 1M2H Team; Berger, E.; Soares-Santos, M.; Annis, J.; Alexander, K. D.; Allam, S.; Balbinot, E.; Blanchard, P.; Brout, D.; Butler, R. E.; Chornock, R.; Cook, E. R.; Cowperthwaite, P.; Diehl, H. T.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Drout, M. R.; Durret, F.; Eftekhari, T.; Finley, D. A.; Fong, W.; Frieman, J. A.; Fryer, C. L.; García-Bellido, J.; Gruendl, R. A.; Hartley, W.; Herner, K.; Kessler, R.; Lin, H.; Lopes, P. A. A.; Lourenço, A. C. C.; Margutti, R.; Marshall, J. L.; Matheson, T.; Medina, G. E.; Metzger, B. D.; Muñoz, R. R.; Muir, J.; Nicholl, M.; Nugent, P.; Palmese, A.; Paz-Chinchón, F.; Quataert, E.; Sako, M.; Sauseda, M.; Schlegel, D. J.; Scolnic, D.; Secco, L. F.; Smith, N.; Sobreira, F.; Villar, V. A.; Vivas, A. K.; Wester, W.; Williams, P. K. G.; Yanny, B.; Zenteno, A.; Zhang, Y.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Banerji, M.; Bechtol, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Castander, F. J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D’Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Davis, C.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Eifler, T. F.; Fernandez, E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Giannantonio, T.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gschwend, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Jeltema, T.; Johnson, M. W. G.; Johnson, M. D.; Kent, S.; Krause, E.; Kron, R.; Kuehn, K.; Lahav, O.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Martini, P.; McMahon, R. G.; Menanteau, F.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Ogando, R. L. C.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, M.; Smith, R. C.; Stebbins, A.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, R. C.; Troxel, M. A.; Tucker, D. L.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Wechsler, R. H.; Weller, J.; Carlin, J. L.; Gill, M. S. S.; Li, T. S.; Marriner, J.; Neilsen, E.; The Dark Energy Camera GW-EM Collaboration; the DES Collaboration; Haislip, J. B.; Kouprianov, V. V.; Reichart, D. E.; Sand, D. J.; Tartaglia, L.; Valenti, S.; Yang, S.; The DLT40 Collaboration; Benetti, S.; Brocato, E.; Campana, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Covino, S.; D’Avanzo, P.; D’Elia, V.; Getman, F.; Ghirlanda, G.; Ghisellini, G.; Limatola, L.; Nicastro, L.; Palazzi, E.; Pian, E.; Piranomonte, S.; Possenti, A.; Rossi, A.; Salafia, O. S.; Tomasella, L.; Amati, L.; Antonelli, L. A.; Bernardini, M. G.; Bufano, F.; Capaccioli, M.; Casella, P.; Dadina, M.; De Cesare, G.; Di Paola, A.; Giuffrida, G.; Giunta, A.; Israel, G. L.; Lisi, M.; Maiorano, E.; Mapelli, M.; Masetti, N.; Pescalli, A.; Pulone, L.; Salvaterra, R.; Schipani, P.; Spera, M.; Stamerra, A.; Stella, L.; Testa, V.; Turatto, M.; Vergani, D.; Aresu, G.; Bachetti, M.; Buffa, F.; Burgay, M.; Buttu, M.; Caria, T.; Carretti, E.; Casasola, V.; Castangia, P.; Carboni, G.; Casu, S.; Concu, R.; Corongiu, A.; Deiana, G. L.; Egron, E.; Fara, A.; Gaudiomonte, F.; Gusai, V.; Ladu, A.; Loru, S.; Leurini, S.; Marongiu, L.; Melis, A.; Melis, G.; Migoni, Carlo; Milia, Sabrina; Navarrini, Alessandro; Orlati, A.; Ortu, P.; Palmas, S.; Pellizzoni, A.; Perrodin, D.; Pisanu, T.; Poppi, S.; Righini, S.; Saba, A.; Serra, G.; Serrau, M.; Stagni, M.; Surcis, G.; Vacca, V.; Vargiu, G. P.; Hunt, L. K.; Jin, Z. P.; Klose, S.; Kouveliotou, C.; Mazzali, P. A.; Møller, P.; Nava, L.; Piran, T.; Selsing, J.; Vergani, S. D.; Wiersema, K.; Toma, K.; Higgins, A. B.; Mundell, C. G.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Gótz, D.; Gao, W.; Gomboc, A.; Kaper, L.; Kobayashi, S.; Kopac, D.; Mao, J.; Starling, R. L. C.; Steele, I.; van der Horst, A. J.; GRAWITA: GRAvitational Wave Inaf TeAm; Acero, F.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Berenji, B.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Cameron, R. A.; Caputo, R.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Costantin, D.; Cuoco, A.; D’Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; Di Lalla, N.; Di Mauro, M.; Di Venere, L.; Dubois, R.; Fegan, S. J.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Green, D.; Grondin, M.-H.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Harding, A. K.; Horan, D.; Jóhannesson, G.; Kamae, T.; Kensei, S.; Kuss, M.; La Mura, G.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J. D.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Meyer, M.; Michelson, P. F.; Mirabal, N.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Negro, M.; Nuss, E.; Ojha, R.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Palatiello, M.; Paliya, V. S.; Paneque, D.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Principe, G.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Rochester, L. S.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, M.; Tanaka, Y.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Torresi, E.; Troja, E.; Venters, T. M.; Vianello, G.; Zaharijas, G.; The Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration; Allison, J. R.; Bannister, K. W.; Dobie, D.; Kaplan, D. L.; Lenc, E.; Lynch, C.; Murphy, T.; Sadler, E. M.; Australia Telescope Compact Array, ATCA:; Hotan, A.; James, C. W.; Oslowski, S.; Raja, W.; Shannon, R. M.; Whiting, M.; Australian SKA Pathfinder, ASKAP:; Arcavi, I.; Howell, D. A.; McCully, C.; Hosseinzadeh, G.; Hiramatsu, D.; Poznanski, D.; Barnes, J.; Zaltzman, M.; Vasylyev, S.; Maoz, D.; Las Cumbres Observatory Group; Cooke, J.; Bailes, M.; Wolf, C.; Deller, A. T.; Lidman, C.; Wang, L.; Gendre, B.; Andreoni, I.; Ackley, K.; Pritchard, T. A.; Bessell, M. S.; Chang, S.-W.; Möller, A.; Onken, C. A.; Scalzo, R. A.; Ridden-Harper, R.; Sharp, R. G.; Tucker, B. E.; Farrell, T. J.; Elmer, E.; Johnston, S.; Venkatraman Krishnan, V.; Keane, E. F.; Green, J. A.; Jameson, A.; Hu, L.; Ma, B.; Sun, T.; Wu, X.; Wang, X.; Shang, Z.; Hu, Y.; Ashley, M. C. B.; Yuan, X.; Li, X.; Tao, C.; Zhu, Z.; Zhang, H.; Suntzeff, N. B.; Zhou, J.; Yang, J.; Orange, B.; Morris, D.; Cucchiara, A.; Giblin, T.; Klotz, A.; Staff, J.; Thierry, P.; Schmidt, B. P.; OzGrav; (Deeper, DWF; Wider; program, Faster; AST3; CAASTRO Collaborations; Tanvir, N. R.; Levan, A. J.; Cano, Z.; de Ugarte-Postigo, A.; González-Fernández, C.; Greiner, J.; Hjorth, J.; Irwin, M.; Krühler, T.; Mandel, I.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; O’Brien, P.; Rol, E.; Rosetti, S.; Rosswog, S.; Rowlinson, A.; Steeghs, D. T. H.; Thöne, C. C.; Ulaczyk, K.; Watson, D.; Bruun, S. H.; Cutter, R.; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Fujii, Y. I.; Fruchter, A. S.; Gompertz, B.; Jakobsson, P.; Hodosan, G.; Jèrgensen, U. G.; Kangas, T.; Kann, D. A.; Rabus, M.; Schrøder, S. L.; Stanway, E. R.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; The VINROUGE Collaboration; Lipunov, V. M.; Gorbovskoy, E. S.; Kornilov, V. G.; Tyurina, N. V.; Balanutsa, P. V.; Kuznetsov, A. S.; Vlasenko, D. M.; Podesta, R. C.; Lopez, C.; Podesta, F.; Levato, H. O.; Saffe, C.; Mallamaci, C. C.; Budnev, N. M.; Gress, O. A.; Kuvshinov, D. A.; Gorbunov, I. A.; Vladimirov, V. V.; Zimnukhov, D. S.; Gabovich, A. V.; Yurkov, V. V.; Sergienko, Yu. P.; Rebolo, R.; Serra-Ricart, M.; Tlatov, A. G.; Ishmuhametova, Yu. V.; MASTER Collaboration; Abe, F.; Aoki, K.; Aoki, W.; Asakura, Y.; Baar, S.; Barway, S.; Bond, I. A.; Doi, M.; Finet, F.; Fujiyoshi, T.; Furusawa, H.; Honda, S.; Itoh, R.; Kanda, N.; Kawabata, K. S.; Kawabata, M.; Kim, J. H.; Koshida, S.; Kuroda, D.; Lee, C.-H.; Liu, W.; Matsubayashi, K.; Miyazaki, S.; Morihana, K.; Morokuma, T.; Motohara, K.; Murata, K. L.; Nagai, H.; Nagashima, H.; Nagayama, T.; Nakaoka, T.; Nakata, F.; Ohsawa, R.; Ohshima, T.; Ohta, K.; Okita, H.; Saito, T.; Saito, Y.; Sako, S.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sumi, T.; Tajitsu, A.; Takahashi, J.; Takayama, M.; Tamura, Y.; Tanaka, I.; Tanaka, M.; Terai, T.; Tominaga, N.; Tristram, P. J.; Uemura, M.; Utsumi, Y.; Yamaguchi, M. S.; Yasuda, N.; Yoshida, M.; Zenko, T.; J-GEM; Adams, S. M.; Anupama, G. C.; Bally, J.; Barway, S.; Bellm, E.; Blagorodnova, N.; Cannella, C.; Chandra, P.; Chatterjee, D.; Clarke, T. E.; Cobb, B. E.; Cook, D. O.; Copperwheat, C.; De, K.; Emery, S. W. K.; Feindt, U.; Foster, K.; Fox, O. D.; Frail, D. A.; Fremling, C.; Frohmaier, C.; Garcia, J. A.; Ghosh, S.; Giacintucci, S.; Goobar, A.; Gottlieb, O.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Hallinan, G.; Harrison, F.; Heida, M.; Helou, G.; Ho, A. Y. Q.; Horesh, A.; Hotokezaka, K.; Ip, W.-H.; Itoh, R.; Jacobs, Bob; Jencson, J. E.; Kasen, D.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Kassim, N. E.; Kim, H.; Kiran, B. S.; Kuin, N. P. M.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Kupfer, T.; Lau, R. M.; Madsen, K.; Mazzali, P. A.; Miller, A. A.; Miyasaka, H.; Mooley, K.; Myers, S. T.; Nakar, E.; Ngeow, C.-C.; Nugent, P.; Ofek, E. O.; Palliyaguru, N.; Pavana, M.; Perley, D. A.; Peters, W. M.; Pike, S.; Piran, T.; Qi, H.; Quimby, R. M.; Rana, J.; Rosswog, S.; Rusu, F.; Sadler, E. M.; Van Sistine, A.; Sollerman, J.; Xu, Y.; Yan, L.; Yatsu, Y.; Yu, P.-C.; Zhang, C.; Zhao, W.; GROWTH; JAGWAR; Caltech-NRAO; TTU-NRAO; NuSTAR Collaborations; Chambers, K. C.; Huber, M. E.; Schultz, A. S. B.; Bulger, J.; Flewelling, H.; Magnier, E. A.; Lowe, T. B.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.; Willman, M.; Pan-STARRS; Ebisawa, K.; Hanyu, C.; Harita, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Hidaka, K.; Hori, T.; Ishikawa, M.; Isobe, N.; Iwakiri, W.; Kawai, H.; Kawai, N.; Kawamuro, T.; Kawase, T.; Kitaoka, Y.; Makishima, K.; Matsuoka, M.; Mihara, T.; Morita, T.; Morita, K.; Nakahira, S.; Nakajima, M.; Nakamura, Y.; Negoro, H.; Oda, S.; Sakamaki, A.; Sasaki, R.; Serino, M.; Shidatsu, M.; Shimomukai, R.; Sugawara, Y.; Sugita, S.; Sugizaki, M.; Tachibana, Y.; Takao, Y.; Tanimoto, A.; Tomida, H.; Tsuboi, Y.; Tsunemi, H.; Ueda, Y.; Ueno, S.; Yamada, S.; Yamaoka, K.; Yamauchi, M.; Yatabe, F.; Yoneyama, T.; Yoshii, T.; The MAXI Team; Coward, D. M.; Crisp, H.; Macpherson, D.; Andreoni, I.; Laugier, R.; Noysena, K.; Klotz, A.; Gendre, B.; Thierry, P.; Turpin, D.; Consortium, TZAC; Im, M.; Choi, C.; Kim, J.; Yoon, Y.; Lim, G.; Lee, S.-K.; Lee, C.-U.; Kim, S.-L.; Ko, S.-W.; Joe, J.; Kwon, M.-K.; Kim, P.-J.; Lim, S.-K.; Choi, J.-S.; KU Collaboration; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Malesani, D.; Xu, D.; Optical Telescope, Nordic; Smartt, S. J.; Jerkstrand, A.; Kankare, E.; Sim, S. A.; Fraser, M.; Inserra, C.; Maguire, K.; Leloudas, G.; Magee, M.; Shingles, L. J.; Smith, K. W.; Young, D. R.; Kotak, R.; Gal-Yam, A.; Lyman, J. D.; Homan, D. S.; Agliozzo, C.; Anderson, J. P.; Angus, C. R.; Ashall, C.; Barbarino, C.; Bauer, F. E.; Berton, M.; Botticella, M. T.; Bulla, M.; Cannizzaro, G.; Cartier, R.; Cikota, A.; Clark, P.; De Cia, A.; Della Valle, M.; Dennefeld, M.; Dessart, L.; Dimitriadis, G.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Firth, R. E.; Flörs, A.; Frohmaier, C.; Galbany, L.; González-Gaitán, S.; Gromadzki, M.; Gutiérrez, C. P.; Hamanowicz, A.; Harmanen, J.; Heintz, K. E.; Hernandez, M.-S.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Hook, I. M.; Izzo, L.; James, P. A.; Jonker, P. G.; Kerzendorf, W. E.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Kromer, M.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Lawrence, A.; Manulis, I.; Mattila, S.; McBrien, O.; Müller, A.; Nordin, J.; O’Neill, D.; Onori, F.; Palmerio, J. T.; Pastorello, A.; Patat, F.; Pignata, G.; Podsiadlowski, P.; Razza, A.; Reynolds, T.; Roy, R.; Ruiter, A. J.; Rybicki, K. A.; Salmon, L.; Pumo, M. L.; Prentice, S. J.; Seitenzahl, I. R.; Smith, M.; Sollerman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Szegedi, H.; Taddia, F.; Taubenberger, S.; Terreran, G.; Van Soelen, B.; Vos, J.; Walton, N. A.; Wright, D. E.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Yaron, O.; pre="(">ePESSTO,

    2017-10-01

    On 2017 August 17 a binary neutron star coalescence candidate (later designated GW170817) with merger time 12:41:04 UTC was observed through gravitational waves by the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo detectors. The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor independently detected a gamma-ray burst (GRB 170817A) with a time delay of ∼ 1.7 {{s}} with respect to the merger time. From the gravitational-wave signal, the source was initially localized to a sky region of 31 deg2 at a luminosity distance of {40}-8+8 Mpc and with component masses consistent with neutron stars. The component masses were later measured to be in the range 0.86 to 2.26 {M}ȯ . An extensive observing campaign was launched across the electromagnetic spectrum leading to the discovery of a bright optical transient (SSS17a, now with the IAU identification of AT 2017gfo) in NGC 4993 (at ∼ 40 {{Mpc}}) less than 11 hours after the merger by the One-Meter, Two Hemisphere (1M2H) team using the 1 m Swope Telescope. The optical transient was independently detected by multiple teams within an hour. Subsequent observations targeted the object and its environment. Early ultraviolet observations revealed a blue transient that faded within 48 hours. Optical and infrared observations showed a redward evolution over ∼10 days. Following early non-detections, X-ray and radio emission were discovered at the transient’s position ∼ 9 and ∼ 16 days, respectively, after the merger. Both the X-ray and radio emission likely arise from a physical process that is distinct from the one that generates the UV/optical/near-infrared emission. No ultra-high-energy gamma-rays and no neutrino candidates consistent with the source were found in follow-up searches. These observations support the hypothesis that GW170817 was produced by the merger of two neutron stars in NGC 4993 followed by a short gamma-ray burst (GRB 170817A) and a kilonova/macronova powered by the radioactive decay of r-process nuclei synthesized in the ejecta

  6. Accretion from a clumpy massive-star wind in supergiant X-ray binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mellah, I.; Sundqvist, J. O.; Keppens, R.

    2018-04-01

    Supergiant X-ray binaries (SgXB) host a compact object, often a neutron star (NS), orbiting an evolved O/B star. Mass transfer proceeds through the intense line-driven wind of the stellar donor, a fraction of which is captured by the gravitational field of the NS. The subsequent accretion process on to the NS is responsible for the abundant X-ray emission from SgXB. They also display peak-to-peak variability of the X-ray flux by a factor of a few 10-100, along with changes in the hardness ratios possibly due to varying absorption along the line of sight. We use recent radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of inhomogeneities (a.k.a. clumps) in the non-stationary wind of massive hot stars to evaluate their impact on the time-variable accretion process. For this, we run 3D hydrodynamic simulations of the wind in the vicinity of the accretor to investigate the formation of the bow shock and follow the inhomogeneous flow over several spatial orders of magnitude, down to the NS magnetosphere. In particular, we show that the impact of the wind clumps on the time variability of the intrinsic mass accretion rate is severely tempered by the crossing of the shock, compared to the purely ballistic Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton estimation. We also account for the variable absorption due to clumps passing by the line of sight and estimate the final effective variability of the column density and mass accretion rate for different orbital separations. Finally, we compare our results to the most recent analysis of the X-ray flux and the hardness ratio in Vela X-1.

  7. Gravitational Waves from Binary Black Hole Mergers inside Stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedrow, Joseph M; Ott, Christian D; Sperhake, Ulrich; Blackman, Jonathan; Haas, Roland; Reisswig, Christian; De Felice, Antonio

    2017-10-27

    We present results from a controlled numerical experiment investigating the effect of stellar density gas on the coalescence of binary black holes (BBHs) and the resulting gravitational waves (GWs). This investigation is motivated by the proposed stellar core fragmentation scenario for BBH formation and the associated possibility of an electromagnetic counterpart to a BBH GW event. We employ full numerical relativity coupled with general-relativistic hydrodynamics and set up a 30+30  M_{⊙} BBH (motivated by GW150914) inside gas with realistic stellar densities. Our results show that at densities ρ≳10^{6}-10^{7}  g cm^{-3} dynamical friction between the BHs and gas changes the coalescence dynamics and the GW signal in an unmistakable way. We show that for GW150914, LIGO observations appear to rule out BBH coalescence inside stellar gas of ρ≳10^{7}  g cm^{-3}. Typical densities in the collapsing cores of massive stars are in excess of this density. This excludes the fragmentation scenario for the formation of GW150914.

  8. Speckle Imaging of Binary Stars with Large-Format CCDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horch, E.; Ninkov, Z.; Slawson, R. W.; van Altena, W. F.; Meyer, R. D.; Girard, T. M.

    1997-12-01

    In the past, bare (unintensified) CCDs have not been widely used in speckle imaging for two main reasons: 1) the readout rate of most scientific-grade CCDs is too slow to be able to observe at the high frame rates necessary to capture speckle patterns efficiently, and 2) the read noise of CCDs limits the detectability of fainter objects where it becomes difficult to distinguish between speckles and noise peaks in the image. These facts have led to the current supremacy of intensified imaging systems (such as intensified-CCDs) in this field, which can typically be read out at video rates or faster. We have developed a new approach that uses a large format CCD not only to detect the incident photons but also to record many speckle patterns before the chip is read out. This approach effectively uses the large area of the CCD as a physical ``memory cache'' of previous speckle data frames. The method is described, and binary star observations from the University of Toronto Southern Observatory 60-cm telescope and the Wisconsin-Indiana-Yale-NOAO (WIYN) 3.5-m telescope are presented. Plans for future observing and instrumentation improvements are also outlined.

  9. In Orbit Performance of a Fully Autonomous Star Tracker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif

    1999-01-01

    -analysis software and a search engine. The unit autonomously performs all tasks necessary to calculate the inertial attitude from a star image. To allow for flexible attitude manoeuvres, the ASC can, simultaneously, drive from one to four cameras, efficiently removing dropouts from, e.g., sun blinding of one camera......, it is difficult to test and verify the true robustness and accuracy of a star tracker on ground. This is caused by the fact that only real-sky tests offer high fidelity stimulation of the sensor, while the atmosphere instabilities result in a dominant noise source intrinsically limiting the achievable accuracy....... This paper compares in-orbit performance with ground test starting with a brief summary of the ASC configurations on the missions referenced, i.e. Teamsat, ASTRID2 and Oersted. Then the in-orbit operation and performance of the ASC with special emphasis on robustness and closed loop operation aspects...

  10. The Joker: A Custom Monte Carlo Sampler for Binary-star and Exoplanet Radial Velocity Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Hogg, David W.; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2017-03-01

    Given sparse or low-quality radial velocity measurements of a star, there are often many qualitatively different stellar or exoplanet companion orbit models that are consistent with the data. The consequent multimodality of the likelihood function leads to extremely challenging search, optimization, and Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) posterior sampling over the orbital parameters. Here we create a custom Monte Carlo sampler for sparse or noisy radial velocity measurements of two-body systems that can produce posterior samples for orbital parameters even when the likelihood function is poorly behaved. The six standard orbital parameters for a binary system can be split into four nonlinear parameters (period, eccentricity, argument of pericenter, phase) and two linear parameters (velocity amplitude, barycenter velocity). We capitalize on this by building a sampling method in which we densely sample the prior probability density function (pdf) in the nonlinear parameters and perform rejection sampling using a likelihood function marginalized over the linear parameters. With sparse or uninformative data, the sampling obtained by this rejection sampling is generally multimodal and dense. With informative data, the sampling becomes effectively unimodal but too sparse: in these cases we follow the rejection sampling with standard MCMC. The method produces correct samplings in orbital parameters for data that include as few as three epochs. The Joker can therefore be used to produce proper samplings of multimodal pdfs, which are still informative and can be used in hierarchical (population) modeling. We give some examples that show how the posterior pdf depends sensitively on the number and time coverage of the observations and their uncertainties.

  11. International conference entitled Zdeněk Kopal’s Binary Star Legacy

    CERN Document Server

    Drechsel, Horst; ZDENEK KOPAL’S BINARY STAR LEGACY

    2005-01-01

    An international conference entitled "Zdenek Kopal's Binary Star Legacy" was held on the occasion of the late Professor Kopal's 90th birthday in his home town of Litomyšl/Czech Republic and dedicated to the memory of one of the leading astronomers of the 20th century. Professor Kopal, who devoted 60 years of his scientific life to the exploration of close binary systems, initiated a breakthrough in this field with his description of binary components as non-spherical stars deformed by gravity, with surfaces following Roche equipotentials. Such knowledge triggered the development of new branches of astrophysics dealing with the structure and evolution of close binaries and the interaction effects displayed by exciting objects such as cataclysmic variables, symbiotic stars or X-ray binaries. Contributions to this conference included praise of the achievements of a great astronomer and personal reminiscences brought forward by Kopal's former students and colleagues, and reflected the state of the art of the dyn...

  12. Hot subdwarf stars in close-up view. I. Rotational properties of subdwarf B stars in close binary systems and nature of their unseen companions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier, S.; Heber, U.; Podsiadlowski, Ph.; Edelmann, H.; Napiwotzki, R.; Kupfer, T.; Müller, S.

    2010-09-01

    The origin of hot subdwarf B stars (sdBs) is still unclear. About half of the known sdBs are in close binary systems for which common envelope ejection is the most likely formation channel. Little is known about this dynamic phase of binary evolution. Since most of the known sdB systems are single-lined spectroscopic binaries, it is difficult to derive masses and unravel the companions' nature, which is the aim of this paper. Due to the tidal influence of the companion in close binary systems, the rotation of the primary becomes synchronised to its orbital motion. In this case it is possible to constrain the mass of the companion, if the primary mass, its projected rotational velocity as well as its surface gravity are known. For the first time we measured the projected rotational velocities of a large sdB binary sample from high resolution spectra. We analysed a sample of 51 sdB stars in close binaries, 40 of which have known orbital parameters comprising half of all such systems known today. Synchronisation in sdB binaries is discussed both from the theoretical and the observational point of view. The masses and the nature of the unseen companions could be constrained in 31 cases. We found orbital synchronisation most likely to be established in binaries with orbital periods shorter than 1.2 d. Only in five cases it was impossible to decide whether the sdB's companion is a white dwarf or an M dwarf. The companions to seven sdBs could be clearly identified as late M stars. One binary may have a brown dwarf companion. The unseen companions of nine sdBs are white dwarfs with typical masses. The mass of one white dwarf companion is very low. In eight cases (including the well known system KPD1930+2752) the companion mass exceeds 0.9~M_⊙, four of which even exceed the Chandrasekhar limit indicating that they may be neutron stars. Even stellar mass black holes are possible for the most massive companions. The distribution of the inclinations of the systems with low

  13. Modeling and analysis of periodic orbits around a contact binary asteroid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feng, J.; Noomen, R.; Visser, P.N.A.M.; Yuan, J.

    2015-01-01

    The existence and characteristics of periodic orbits (POs) in the vicinity of a contact binary asteroid are investigated with an averaged spherical harmonics model. A contact binary asteroid consists of two components connected to each other, resulting in a highly bifurcated shape. Here, it is

  14. Secular Pulsation Amplitude Variations in the Subdwarf-B Star Component of the V4640 Sgr Binary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynas-Gray, A. E.

    2013-12-01

    V4640 Sgr (EC 20117-4014) is understood to be a long-period binary consisting of a V361 Hya type pulsating subdwarf-B star and a F5 V star. Observations obtained before 2010 show the amplitude of the dominant power spectrum peak (7.28 mHz) to be constant when data from all nights in each season are combined and analysed as a single time-series. Because of the need to constrain mass-transfer scenarios in binaries like V4640 Sgr when the subdwarf-B star progenitor was at or near the Helium Flash, this object was selected for further photometric monitoring with the intention of using a changing light travel-time to improve the orbit determination. An analysis of 2011 August, and existing 2001 July, time series show the 7.28 mHz frequency to have secular nightly amplitude changes. Comparing with similar pulsation amplitude changes in V541 Hya and KIC 010139564 suggested these are a consequence of unresolved rotation splitting, with two or more split components beating against each other. Modelling for confirmation, and assessment of any associated frequency changes, would be needed before any refinement of the light travel-time orbit determination.

  15. Pre-explosion Spiral Mass Loss of a Binary Star Merger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejcha, Ondřej; Metzger, Brian D.; Tyles, Jacob G.; Tomida, Kengo

    2017-11-01

    Binary stars commonly pass through phases of direct interaction, which result in the rapid loss of mass, energy, and angular momentum. Though crucial to understanding the fates of these systems, including their potential as gravitational wave sources, this short-lived phase is poorly understood and has thus far been unambiguously observed in only a single event, V1309 Sco. Here we show that the complex and previously unexplained photometric behavior of V1309 Sco prior to its main outburst results naturally from the runaway loss of mass and angular momentum from the outer Lagrange point, which lasts for thousands of orbits prior to the final dynamical coalescence, much longer than predicted by contemporary models. This process enshrouds the binary in a “death spiral” outflow, which affects the amplitude and phase modulation of its light curve, and contributes to driving the system together. The total amount of mass lost during this gradual phase (˜ 0.05 {M}⊙ ) rivals the mass lost during the subsequent dynamical interaction phase, which has been the main focus of “common envelope” modeling so far. Analogous features in related transients suggest that this behavior is ubiquitous.

  16. γ DORADUS PULSATIONS IN THE ECLIPSING BINARY STAR KIC 6048106

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Woo, E-mail: jwlee@kasi.re.kr [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 34113 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-20

    We present the Kepler photometry of KIC 6048106, which is exhibiting the O’Connell effect and multiperiodic pulsations. Including a starspot on either of the components, light-curve synthesis indicates that this system is a semi-detached Algol with a mass ratio of 0.211, an orbital inclination of 73.°9, and a large temperature difference of 2534 K. To examine in detail both the spot variations and pulsations, we separately analyzed the Kepler time-series data at the interval of an orbital period in an iterative way. The results reveal that the variable asymmetries of the light maxima can be interpreted as the changes with time of a magnetic cool spot on the secondary component. Multiple frequency analyses were performed in the outside-eclipse light residuals after removal of the binarity effects from the observed Kepler data. We detected 30 frequencies with signal to noise amplitude ratios larger than 4.0, of which six ( f {sub 2}– f {sub 6} and f {sub 10}) can be identified as high-order (17 ≤  n  ≤ 25) low-degree ( ℓ  = 2) gravity-mode pulsations that were stable during the observing run of 200 days. In contrast, the other frequencies may be harmonic and combination terms. For the six frequencies, the pulsation periods and pulsation constants are in the ranges of 0.352–0.506 days and 0.232–0.333 days, respectively. These values and the position on the Hertzsprung–Russell diagram demonstrate that the primary star is a γ Dor variable. The evolutionary status and the pulsation nature of KIC 6048106 are discussed.

  17. The EBLM project. I. Physical and orbital parameters, including spin-orbit angles, of two low-mass eclipsing binaries on opposite sides of the brown dwarf limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Hebb, L.; Anderson, D. R.; Cargile, P.; Collier Cameron, A.; Doyle, A. P.; Faedi, F.; Gillon, M.; Gomez Maqueo Chew, Y.; Hellier, C.; Jehin, E.; Maxted, P.; Naef, D.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Queloz, D.; Ségransan, D.; Smalley, B.; Stassun, K.; Udry, S.; West, R. G.

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces a series of papers aiming to study the dozens of low-mass eclipsing binaries (EBLM), with F, G, K primaries, that have been discovered in the course of the WASP survey. Our objects are mostly single-line binaries whose eclipses have been detected by WASP and were initially followed up as potential planetary transit candidates. These have bright primaries, which facilitates spectroscopic observations during transit and allows the study of the spin-orbit distribution of F, G, K+M eclipsing binaries through the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. Here we report on the spin-orbit angle of WASP-30b, a transiting brown dwarf, and improve its orbital parameters. We also present the mass, radius, spin-orbit angle and orbital parameters of a new eclipsing binary, J1219-39b (1SWAPJ121921.03-395125.6, TYC 7760-484-1), which, with a mass of 95 ± 2 Mjup, is close to the limit between brown dwarfs and stars. We find that both objects have projected spin-orbit angles aligned with their primaries' rotation. Neither primaries are synchronous. J1219-39b has a modestly eccentric orbit and is in agreement with the theoretical mass-radius relationship, whereas WASP-30b lies above it. Using WASP-South photometric observations (Sutherland, South Africa) confirmed with radial velocity measurement from the CORALIE spectrograph, photometry from the EulerCam camera (both mounted on the Swiss 1.2 m Euler Telescope), radial velocities from the HARPS spectrograph on the ESO's 3.6 m Telescope (prog ID 085.C-0393), and photometry from the robotic 60 cm TRAPPIST telescope, all located at ESO, La Silla, Chile. The data is publicly available at the CDS Strasbourg and on demand to the main author.Tables A.1-A.3 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgPhotometry tables are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/549/A18

  18. Evolution of Mass Functions of Coeval Stars through Wind Mass Loss and Binary Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, F.R.N.; Izzard, R.G.; Langer, N.; de Mink, S.E.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate determinations of stellar mass functions and ages of stellar populations are crucial to much of astrophysics. We analyze the evolution of stellar mass functions of coeval main-sequence stars, including all relevant aspects of single and binary star evolution. We show that the slope of the

  19. Eclipsing binaries in open clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Southworth, John; Clausen, J.V.

    2006-01-01

    Stars: fundamental parameters - Stars : binaries : eclipsing - Stars: Binaries: spectroscopic - Open clusters and ass. : general Udgivelsesdato: 5 August......Stars: fundamental parameters - Stars : binaries : eclipsing - Stars: Binaries: spectroscopic - Open clusters and ass. : general Udgivelsesdato: 5 August...

  20. No time for dead time: timing analysis of bright black hole binaries with NuSTAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bachetti, Matteo; Harrison, Fiona A.; Cook, Rick

    2015-01-01

    Timing of high-count-rate sources with the NuSTAR Small Explorer Mission requires specialized analysis techniques. NuSTAR was primarily designed for spectroscopic observations of sources with relatively low count rates rather than for timing analysis of bright objects. The instrumental dead time ...... techniques. We apply this technique to NuSTAR observations of the black hole binaries GX 339-4, Cyg X-1, and GRS 1915+105....

  1. Galaxy S-Stars Exhibit Orbital Angular Momentum Quantization per Unit Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potter F.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The innermost stars of our Galaxy, called S-stars, are in Keplerian orbits. Quantum celestial mechanics (QCM predicts orbital angular momentum quantization per unit mass for each of them. I determine the quantization integers for the 27 well-measured S-stars and the total angular momentum of this nearly isolated QCM system within the Galactic bulge.

  2. Doing Research on Eclipsing Binary Stars with Small Telescopes and PC computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goderya, Shaukat

    Astronomical research with a small telescope (20 cm - 40 cm) has always been a challenging problem. The invention of CCD cameras and personal computers has now put this question to past as small telescopes can do good and practicle science. This paper describes the use of small telescope in the study of eclipsing binary stars. Binary stars play an important role as astrophysical laboratories in our quest to understand the evolution and structure of stars. The most useful aspects of research with a small telescope in binary star research is; 1) as a viable teaching laboratory for begining students 2) to teach and learn the fundamental observational techniques that are common to many types of astronomical research areas 3) as a starting point to initiate research programs in observational astronomy, optics, instrumentation, computational astrophysics and 4) as a foundation to develop an infrastructure and technical know how for larger telescope facility.

  3. Are neutron stars crushed? Gravitomagnetic tidal fields as a mechanism for binary-induced collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favata, Marc

    2006-01-01

    Numerical simulations of binary neutron stars by Wilson, Mathews, and Marronetti indicated that neutron stars that are stable in isolation can be made to collapse to black holes when placed in a binary. This claim was surprising as it ran counter to the Newtonian expectation that a neutron star in a binary should be more stable, not less. After correcting an error found by Flanagan, Wilson and Mathews found that the compression of the neutron stars was significantly reduced but not eliminated. This has motivated us to ask the following general question: Under what circumstances can general-relativistic tidal interactions cause an otherwise stable neutron star to be compressed? We have found that if a nonrotating neutron star possesses a current-quadrupole moment, interactions with a gravitomagnetic tidal field can lead to a compressive force on the star. If this current quadrupole is induced by the gravitomagnetic tidal field, it is related to the tidal field by an equation-of-state-dependent constant called the gravitomagnetic Love number. This is analogous to the Newtonian Love number that relates the strength of a Newtonian tidal field to the induced mass quadrupole moment of a star. The compressive force is almost never larger than the Newtonian tidal interaction that stabilizes the neutron star against collapse. In the case in which a current quadrupole is already present in the star (perhaps as an artifact of a numerical simulation), the compressive force can exceed the stabilizing one, leading to a net increase in the central density of the star. This increase is small (< or approx. 1%) but could, in principle, cause gravitational collapse in a star that is close to its maximum mass. This paper also reviews the history of the Wilson-Mathews-Marronetti controversy and, in an appendix, extends the discussion of tidally induced changes in the central density to rotating stars

  4. Mind Your Ps and Qs: The Interrelation between Period (P) and Mass-ratio (Q) Distributions of Binary Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Maxwell; Di Stefano, Rosanne

    2017-06-01

    We compile observations of early-type binaries identified via spectroscopy, eclipses, long-baseline interferometry, adaptive optics, common proper motion, etc. Each observational technique is sensitive to companions across a narrow parameter space of orbital periods P and mass ratios q = {M}{comp}/M 1. After combining the samples from the various surveys and correcting for their respective selection effects, we find that the properties of companions to O-type and B-type main-sequence (MS) stars differ among three regimes. First, at short orbital periods P ≲ 20 days (separations a ≲ 0.4 au), the binaries have small eccentricities e ≲ 0.4, favor modest mass ratios ≈ 0.5, and exhibit a small excess of twins q > 0.95. Second, the companion frequency peaks at intermediate periods log P (days) ≈ 3.5 (a ≈ 10 au), where the binaries have mass ratios weighted toward small values q ≈ 0.2-0.3 and follow a Maxwellian “thermal” eccentricity distribution. Finally, companions with long orbital periods log P (days) ≈ 5.5-7.5 (a ≈ 200-5000 au) are outer tertiary components in hierarchical triples and have a mass ratio distribution across q ≈ 0.1-1.0 that is nearly consistent with random pairings drawn from the initial mass function. We discuss these companion distributions and properties in the context of binary-star formation and evolution. We also reanalyze the binary statistics of solar-type MS primaries, taking into account that 30% ± 10% of single-lined spectroscopic binaries likely contain white dwarf companions instead of low-mass stellar secondaries. The mean frequency of stellar companions with q > 0.1 and log P (days) < 8.0 per primary increases from 0.50 ± 0.04 for solar-type MS primaries to 2.1 ± 0.3 for O-type MS primaries. We fit joint probability density functions f({M}1,q,P,e)\

  5. Photometric and polarimetric variability and mass-loss rate of the massive binary Wolf-Rayet star HDE 311884 (WN6 + 05: V)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffat, A.F.J.; Drissen, L.; Robert, C.; Lamontagne, R.; Coziol, R.

    1990-01-01

    Photometric and polarimetric monitoring of the Wolf-Rayet (W-R) + O-type binary system HDE 311884 = WR 47 over many orbital cycles shows the clear effects of phase-dependent electron scattering of O-star light as the orbiting O companion shines through varying column density of W-R stellar wind material. In contrast to this wind-type eclipse, the stars themselves do not quite eclipse. Both photometry and polarimetry give a consistent estimate of the mass-loss rate of the W-R component: at about 0.00003 solar mass/yr. The orbital inclination, i = 70 deg, along with the previously published velocity orbit, yields high masses: M(WN6) = 48 solar masses and M(O5:V) = 57 solar masses. 33 refs

  6. New Precision Orbits of Bright Double-lined Spectroscopic Binaries. X. HD 96511, HR 7578, and KZ Andromedae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fekel, Francis C.; Henry, Gregory W. [Center of Excellence in Information Systems, Tennessee State University, Nashville, TN 37209 (United States); Tomkin, Jocelyn, E-mail: fekel@evans.tsuniv.edu, E-mail: gregory.w.henry@gmail.com [Astronomy Department and McDonald Observatory, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2017-09-01

    From an extensive number of newly acquired radial velocities we determine the orbital elements for three late-type dwarf systems, HD 96511, HR 7578, and KZ And. The orbital periods are 18.89737 ± 0.00002, 46.81610 ± 0.00006, and 3.0329113 ± 0.0000005 days, respectively, and all three systems are eccentric, although KZ And is just barely so. We have detected lines of the secondary of HD 96511 for the first time. The orbital dimensions ( a {sub 1} sin i and a {sub 2} sin i ) and minimum masses ( m {sub 1} sin{sup 3} i and m {sub 2} sin{sup 3} i ) of the binary components all have accuracies of 0.2% or better. Extensive photometry of the chromospherically active binary HR 7578 confirms a rather long rotation period of 16.446 ± 0.002 days and that the K3 V components do not eclipse. We have estimated the basic properties of the stars in the three systems and compared those results with evolutionary tracks. The results for KZ And that we computed with the revised Hipparcos parallax of van Leeuwen produce inconsistencies. That parallax appears to be too large, and so, instead, we used the original Hipparcos parallax of the common proper motion primary, which improves the results, although some problems remain.

  7. Inferring the post-merger gravitational wave emission from binary neutron star coalescences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatziioannou, Katerina; Clark, James Alexander; Bauswein, Andreas; Millhouse, Margaret; Littenberg, Tyson B.; Cornish, Neil

    2017-12-01

    We present a robust method to characterize the gravitational wave emission from the remnant of a neutron star coalescence. Our approach makes only minimal assumptions about the morphology of the signal and provides a full posterior probability distribution of the underlying waveform. We apply our method on simulated data from a network of advanced ground-based detectors and demonstrate the gravitational wave signal reconstruction. We study the reconstruction quality for different binary configurations and equations of state for the colliding neutron stars. We show how our method can be used to constrain the yet-uncertain equation of state of neutron star matter. The constraints on the equation of state we derive are complementary to measurements of the tidal deformation of the colliding neutron stars during the late inspiral phase. In the case of nondetection of a post-merger signal following a binary neutron star inspiral, we show that we can place upper limits on the energy emitted.

  8. Relativistic iron emission lines in neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries as probes of neutron star radii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cackett, E.M.; Miller, J.M.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Grindlay, J.E.; Homan, J.; van der Klis, M.; Miller, M.C.; Strohmayer, T.E.; Wijnands, R.

    2008-01-01

    Using Suzaku observations of three neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries ( Ser X-1, 4U 1820-30, and GX 349+2) we have found broad, asymmetric, relativistic Fe K emission lines in all three objects. These Fe K lines can be well fit by a model for lines from a relativistic accretion disk ("diskline''),

  9. The K2 M67 Study: A Curiously Young Star in an Eclipsing Binary in an Old Open Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandquist, Eric L.; Mathieu, Robert D.; Quinn, Samuel N.; Pollack, Maxwell L.; Latham, David W.; Brown, Timothy M.; Esselstein, Rebecca; Aigrain, Suzanne; Parviainen, Hannu; Vanderburg, Andrew; Stello, Dennis; Somers, Garrett; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Tayar, Jamie; Orosz, Jerome A.; Bedin, Luigi R.; Libralato, Mattia; Malavolta, Luca; Nardiello, Domenico

    2018-04-01

    We present an analysis of a slightly eccentric (e = 0.05), partially eclipsing, long-period (P = 69.73 days) main-sequence binary system (WOCS 12009, Sanders 1247) in the benchmark old open cluster M67. Using Kepler K2 and ground-based photometry, along with a large set of new and reanalyzed spectra, we derived highly precise masses (1.111 ± 0.015 and 0.748 ± 0.005 M ⊙) and radii (1.071 ± 0.008 ± 0.003 and 0.713 ± 0.019 ± 0.026 R ⊙, with statistical and systematic error estimates) for the stars. The radius of the secondary star is in agreement with theory. The primary, however, is approximately 15% smaller than reasonable isochrones for the cluster predict. Our best explanation is that the primary star was produced from the merger of two stars, as this can also account for the nondetection of photospheric lithium and its higher temperature relative to other cluster main-sequence stars at the same V magnitude. To understand the dynamical characteristics (low measured rotational line broadening of the primary star and low eccentricity of the current binary orbit), we believe that the most probable (but not the only) explanation is the tidal evolution of a close binary within a primordial triple system (possibly after a period of Kozai–Lidov oscillations), leading to merger approximately 1 Gyr ago. This star appears to be a future blue straggler that is being revealed as the cluster ages and the most massive main-sequence stars die out. Based on observations made at Kitt Peak National Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation; with the Tillinghast Reflector Echelle Spectrograph (TRES) on the 1.5 m Tillinghast telescope, located at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory’s Fred L. Whipple Observatory on Mt. Hopkins in Arizona; the HARPS-N spectrograph on the Italian Telescopio Nazionale

  10. Vaporizing neutron stars in low-mass x-ray binaries and the statistics of millisecond pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavani, M. (California Univ., Livermore, CA (United States). Inst. of Geophysics and Planetary Physics)

    1991-08-08

    Recent data on low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and msec pulsars (MSPs) pose a challenge to evolutionary which neglect the effects of disk and companion irradiation. Here we discuss the main features of a radiation-driven (RD) evolutionary model that may be applicable to several LMXBs. According to this model, irradiation from the accreting compact star LMXBs vaporizes'' the accretion disk and the companion star by driving a self-sustained mass loss until a sudden accretion-turn of occurs. The main characteristics of the RD-evolution are: (1) the lifetime of RD-LMXB's is of order 10{sup 7} years or less: (2) both the orbital period gap and the X-ray luminosity may be consequences of RD-evolution of LMXB's containing lower main sequence and degenerate companion stars; (3) the companion star may transfer mass to the primary even if it underfills its Roche lobe; (4) the recycled msec pulsar can continue to vaporize the low-mass companion star even after the accretion turn-off produced by a strong pulsar wind; (5) the RD-evolutionary model resolves the apparent statistical discrepancy between the number of MSP's and their LMXB progenitors. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Orbital decay of supermassive black hole binaries in clumpy multiphase merger remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roškar, Rok; Fiacconi, Davide; Mayer, Lucio; Kazantzidis, Stelios; Quinn, Thomas R.; Wadsley, James

    2015-05-01

    We simulate an equal-mass merger of two Milky Way-size galaxy discs with moderate gas fractions at parsec-scale resolution including a new model for radiative cooling and heating in a multiphase medium, as well as star formation and feedback from supernovae. The two discs initially have a 2.6 × 106 M⊙ supermassive black hole (SMBH) embedded in their centres. As the merger completes and the two galactic cores merge, the SMBHs form a pair with a separation of a few hundred pc that gradually decays. Due to the stochastic nature of the system immediately following the merger, the orbital plane of the binary is significantly perturbed. Furthermore, owing to the strong starburst the gas from the central region is completely evacuated, requiring ˜10 Myr for a nuclear disc to rebuild. Most importantly, the clumpy nature of the interstellar medium has a major impact on the dynamical evolution of the SMBH pair, which undergo gravitational encounters with massive gas clouds and stochastic torquing by both clouds and spiral modes in the disc. These effects combine to greatly delay the decay of the two SMBHs to separations of a few parsecs by nearly two orders of magnitude, ˜108 yr, compared to previous work. In mergers of more gas-rich, clumpier galaxies at high redshift stochastic torques will be even more pronounced and potentially lead to stronger modulation of the orbital decay. This suggests that SMBH pairs at separations of several tens of parsecs should be relatively common at any redshift.

  12. On the Origin of Sub-subgiant Stars. II. Binary Mass Transfer, Envelope Stripping, and Magnetic Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiner, Emily; Mathieu, Robert D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Geller, Aaron M., E-mail: leiner@astro.wisc.edu [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2017-05-10

    Sub-subgiant stars (SSGs) lie to the red of the main sequence and fainter than the red giant branch in cluster color–magnitude diagrams (CMDs), a region not easily populated by standard stellar evolution pathways. While there has been speculation on what mechanisms may create these unusual stars, no well-developed theory exists to explain their origins. Here we discuss three hypotheses of SSG formation: (1) mass transfer in a binary system, (2) stripping of a subgiant’s envelope, perhaps during a dynamical encounter, and (3) reduced luminosity due to magnetic fields that lower convective efficiency and produce large starspots. Using the stellar evolution code MESA, we develop evolutionary tracks for each of these hypotheses, and compare the expected stellar and orbital properties of these models with six known SSGs in the two open clusters M67 and NGC 6791. All three of these mechanisms can create stars or binary systems in the SSG CMD domain. We also calculate the frequency with which each of these mechanisms may create SSG systems, and find that the magnetic field hypothesis is expected to create SSGs with the highest frequency in open clusters. Mass transfer and envelope stripping have lower expected formation frequencies, but may nevertheless create occasional SSGs in open clusters. They may also be important mechanisms to create SSGs in higher mass globular clusters.

  13. Spectroscopic Binaries Among λ Bootis-type Stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paunzen, Ernst; Fraga, Luciano; Heiter, Ulrike; Iliev, Ilian Kh.; Kamp, Inga; Pintado, Olga; Richards, M.T.; Hubeny, I.

    The small group of λ Bootis stars comprises late B to early F-type stars, with moderate to extreme (up to a factor 100) surface under-abundances of most Fe-peak elements and solar abundances of lighter elements (C, N, O, and S). The main mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon are atmospheric

  14. Eclipsing binary stars in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds from the MACHO project: The Sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faccioli, L; Alcock, C; Cook, K; Prochter, G; Protopapas, P; Syphers, D

    2007-03-29

    We present a new sample of 4634 eclipsing binary stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), expanding on a previous sample of 611 objects and a new sample of 1509 eclipsing binary stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), that were identified in the light curve database of the MACHO project. We perform a cross correlation with the OGLE-II LMC sample, finding 1236 matches. A cross correlation with the OGLE-II SMC sample finds 698 matches. We then compare the LMC subsamples corresponding to center and the periphery of the LMC and find only minor differences between the two populations. These samples are sufficiently large and complete that statistical studies of the binary star populations are possible.

  15. Photometric investigation of possible binary occurrence in the central stars of seventeen planetary nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drummond, J.D. III.

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensive literature search was conducted for all possible bihary central stars in planetary nebulae. The results, which include all known and suspected visual, spectroscopic, and spectrum binaries, as well as all reported variable central stars, are presented in a series of tables. A photoelectric study was conducted in order to determine the status of short period (on the order of hours) variability of the central regions of seventeen planetary nebulae. Only the stellar appearing planetary nebula M1-2 (PK 133-8 0 1) was found to be variable. Its short (4.0002 hours) period suggests that it may be only the second eclipsing binary found among central stars to date. A method of concentric apertures was developed to determine the amount of light contributed by the central star vis-a-vis the nebula through a given aperture and filter. The procedure enabled UBV magnitudes and colors (and the errors) of central stars to be measured, including some in the sample of seventeen for which no previous values have been published. Mean nebular UBV magnitudes, surface brightnesses, and color indices were also found with the technique, and represent the first such published measurements. Various UBV two-parameter were constructed, revealing possible nebular/stellar sequences; a star-plus-nebula two-color diagram identifies three spectral classes of central stars, and two suspected binaries in the seventeen studied

  16. Close-In Substellar Companions and the Formation of sdB-Type Close Binary Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Y. Zhu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The sdB-type close binaries are believed to have experienced a common-envelope phase and may evolve into cataclysmic binaries (CVs. About 10% of all known sdB binaries are eclipsing binaries consisting of very hot subdwarf primaries and low-mass companions with short orbital periods. The eclipse profiles of these systems are very narrow and deep, which benefits the determination of high precise eclipsing times and makes the detection of small and close-in tertiary bodies possible. Since 2006 we have monitored some sdB-type eclipsing binaries to search for the close-in substellar companions by analyzing the light travel time effect. Here some progresses of the program are reviewed and the formation of sdB-type binary is discussed.

  17. Orbital parameters of the binary companion in o And using spectrum disentangling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Budovičová, Andrea; Štefl, Stanislav; Hadrava, Petr; Rivinius, Th.; Stahl, O.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 296, 1-4 (2005), s. 169-172 ISSN 0004-640X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1003909 Keywords : star s * binaries * spectroscopy * o And Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 0.495, year: 2005

  18. Unveiling hidden companions in post-AGB stars: 3D simulations of evolved star binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordhaus, Jason

    2017-08-01

    The deaths of ordinary stars are marked by extraordinary transitions. For those with initial masses mask radial velocity signatures. To address this issue, we have selected four post-AGB/PN systems that have comprehensive multi-epoch, multi-wavelength archival data obtained over the past 10-15 years. For each system, we will perform fully-dynamical 3D binary simulations using the AMR code AstroBEAR. Our results will be compared to the broad-band SED, and multi-epoch proper motion and archival images to constrain properties of the companions responsible for the outflow kinematics. We have successfully demonstrated this technique in L2 Puppis (one of the nearest Mira-like systems), where we were able to fully match the multi-wavelength observational data for the system if an unseen planet were present. Since then, ALMA has tentatively detected such a planet in L2 Puppis.Lastly, this award will provide partial funding for a deaf graduate student. Professor Nordhaus is fluent in American Sign Language and working to increase opportunities for deaf and hard-of-hearing students in astronomy.

  19. The rate of neutron star binary mergers in the universe - Minimal predictions for gravity wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phinney, E. S.

    1991-01-01

    Of the many sources which gravitational wave observatories might see, merging neutron star binaries are the most predictable. Their waveforms at the observable frequencies are easy to calculate. And three systems which will merge in less than a Hubble time have already been observed as binary pulsars: two in the disk of the Galaxy, and one in a globular cluster. From the lifetimes and positions of these, a lower limit to the merger rate in the Galaxy and globular cluster system are inferred with confidence. Taking the merger rate in other galaxies to scale with the star formation rate, the merger rate expected in the local universe is computed. An ultraconservative lower limit to the rate gives three per year within 1 Gpc. The best estimate, still conservative in that it considers only systems like those already observed, gives three per year within 200 Mpc. An upper limit of three mergers per year within 23/h Mpc is set by the rate of Type Ib supernovae. The rates of black hole binary mergers and black hole-neutron star binary mergers are model-dependent, but could be comparable to the given rate of neutron-star binary mergers.

  20. TIDAL DISRUPTIONS IN CIRCUMBINARY DISKS. I. STAR FORMATION, DYNAMICS, AND BINARY EVOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Brem, Patrick [Max Planck Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik (Albert-Einstein-Institut), D-14476 Potsdam (Germany); Cuadra, Jorge, E-mail: Pau.Amaro-Seoane@aei.mpg.de, E-mail: Patrick.Brem@aei.mpg.de, E-mail: jcuadra@astro.puc.cl [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Facultad de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, 782-0436 Santiago (Chile)

    2013-02-10

    In our current interpretation of the hierarchical structure of the universe, it is well established that galaxies collide and merge with each other during their lifetimes. If massive black holes (MBHs) reside in galactic centers, we expect them to form binaries in galactic nuclei surrounded by a circumbinary disk. If cooling is efficient enough, the gas in the disk will clump and trigger stellar formation in situ. In this first paper we address the evolution of the binary under the influence of the newly formed stars, which form individually and also clustered. We use smoothed particle hydrodynamics techniques to evolve the gas in the circumbinary disk and to study the phase of star formation. When the amount of gas in the disk is negligible, we further evolve the system with a high-accurate direct-summation N-body code to follow the evolution of the stars, the innermost binary and tidal disruption events (TDEs). For this, we modify the direct N-body code to include (1) treatment of TDEs and (2) 'gas cloud particles' that mimic the gas, so that the stellar clusters do not dissolve when we follow their infall on to the MBHs. We find that the amount of stars disrupted by either infalling stellar clusters or individual stars is as large as 10{sup -4} yr{sup -1} per binary, higher than expected for typical galaxies.

  1. The role of binaries in the enrichment of the early Galactic halo. I. r-process-enhanced metal-poor stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, T. T.; Andersen, J.; Nordström, B.; Beers, T. C.; Yoon, J.; Buchhave, L. A.

    2015-11-01

    Context. The detailed chemical composition of most metal-poor halo stars has been found to be highly uniform, but a minority of stars exhibit dramatic enhancements in their abundances of heavy neutron-capture elements and/or of carbon. The key question for Galactic chemical evolution models is whether these peculiarities reflect the composition of the natal clouds, or if they are due to later (post-birth) mass transfer of chemically processed material from a binary companion. If the former case applies, the observed excess of certain elements was implanted within selected clouds in the early ISM from a production site at interstellar distances. Aims: Our aim is to determine the frequency and orbital properties of binaries among these chemically peculiar stars. This information provides the basis for deciding whether local mass transfer from a binary companion is necessary and sufficient to explain their unusual compositions. This paper discusses our study of a sample of 17 moderately (r-I) and highly (r-II) r-process-element enhanced VMP and EMP stars. Methods: High-resolution, low signal-to-noise spectra of the stars were obtained at roughly monthly intervals over eight years with the FIES spectrograph at the Nordic Optical Telescope. From these spectra, radial velocities with an accuracy of ~100 m s-1 were determined by cross-correlation against an optimized template. Results: Fourteen of the programme stars exhibit no significant radial-velocity variation over this temporal window, while three are binaries with orbits of typical eccentricity for their periods, resulting in a normal binary frequency of ~18 ± 6% for the sample. Conclusions: Our results confirm our preliminary conclusion from 2011, based on partial data, that the chemical peculiarity of the r-I and r-II stars is not caused by any putative binary companions. Instead, it was imprinted on the natal molecular clouds of these stars by an external, distant source. Models of the ISM in early galaxies

  2. Preliminary Modeling of the Eclipsing Binary Star GSC 05765-01271

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marullo, S.; Marchini, A.; Franco, L.; Papini, R.; Salvaggio, F.

    2017-12-01

    The authors discovered the eclipsing binary star system GSC 05765-01271 on August 19, 2015; here a preliminary model is presented. Lacking spectroscopic radial velocity data, period-based empirical relations have been used in order to constrain physical parameters as masses and radii. The effective temperature has been evaluated using color index (V-R) and spectral type estimated from a composite spectrum. These parameters were used as input to obtain a preliminary model of this binary system with Binary Maker 3 and PHOEBE software.

  3. Effects of Hardness of Primordial Binaries on Evolution of Star Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanikawa, A.; Fukushige, T.

    2008-05-01

    We performed N-body simulations of star clusters with primordial binaries using a new code, GORILLA. It is based on Makino and Aarseth (1992)'s integration scheme on GRAPE, and includes a special treatment for relatively isolated binaries. Using the new code, we investigated effects of hardness of primordial binaries on whole evolution of the clusters. We simulated seven N=16384 equal-mass clusters containing 10% (in mass) primordial binaries whose binding energies are 1, 3, 10, 30, 100, 300, and 1000kT, respectively. Additionally, we also simulated a cluster without primordial binaries and that in which all binaries are replaced by stars with double mass, as references of soft and hard limits, respectively. We found that, in both soft (≤ 3kT) and hard (≥ 1000kT) limits, clusters experiences deep core collapse and shows gravothermal oscillations. On the other hands, in the intermediate hardness (10-300kT), the core collapses halt halfway due an energy releases of the primordial binaries.

  4. Spectral and Timing Nature of the Symbiotic X-Ray Binary 4U 1954+319: The Slowest Rotating Neutron Star in AN X-Ray Binary System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoto, Teruaki; Sasano, Makoto; Yamada, Shin'Ya; Tamagawa, Toru; Makishima, Kazuo; Pottschmidt, Katja; Marcu, Diana; Corbet, Robin H. D.; Fuerst, Felix; Wilms, Jorn

    2014-01-01

    The symbiotic X-ray binary (SyXB) 4U 1954+319 is a rare system hosting a peculiar neutron star (NS) and an M-type optical companion. Its approx. 5.4 hr NS spin period is the longest among all known accretion-powered pulsars and exhibited large (is approx. 7%) fluctuations over 8 yr. A spin trend transition was detected with Swift/BAT around an X-ray brightening in 2012. The source was in quiescent and bright states before and after this outburst based on 60 ks Suzaku observations in 2011 and 2012. The observed continuum is well described by a Comptonized model with the addition of a narrow 6.4 keV Fe-K alpha line during the outburst. Spectral similarities to slowly rotating pulsars in high-mass X-ray binaries, its high pulsed fraction (approx. 60%-80%), and the location in the Corbet diagram favor high B-field (approx. greater than 10(exp12) G) over a weak field as in low-mass X-ray binaries. The observed low X-ray luminosity (10(exp33)-10(exp35) erg s(exp-1)), probable wide orbit, and a slow stellar wind of this SyXB make quasi-spherical accretion in the subsonic settling regime a plausible model. Assuming a approx. 10(exp13) G NS, this scheme can explain the approx. 5.4 hr equilibrium rotation without employing the magnetar-like field (approx. 10(exp16) G) required in the disk accretion case. The timescales of multiple irregular flares (approx. 50 s) can also be attributed to the free-fall time from the Alfv´en shell for a approx. 10(exp13) G field. A physical interpretation of SyXBs beyond the canonical binary classifications is discussed.

  5. A NEW TeV BINARY: THE DISCOVERY OF AN ORBITAL PERIOD IN HESS J0632+057

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bongiorno, S. D.; Falcone, A. D.; Stroh, M.; Holder, J.; Skilton, J. L.; Hinton, J. A.; Gehrels, N.; Grube, J.

    2011-01-01

    HESS J0632+057 is a variable, point-like source of very high energy (>100 GeV) gamma rays located in the Galactic plane. It is positionally coincident with a Be star, it is a variable radio and X-ray source, has a hard X-ray spectrum, and has low radio flux. These properties suggest that the object may be a member of the rare class of TeV/X-ray binary systems. The definitive confirmation of this would be the detection of a periodic orbital modulation of the flux at any wavelength. We have obtained Swift X-Ray Telescope observations of the source from MJD 54857 to 55647 (2009 January-2011 March) to test the hypothesis that HESS J0632+057 is an X-ray/TeV binary. We show that these data exhibit flux modulation with a period of 321 ± 5 days and we evaluate the significance of this period by calculating the null hypothesis probability, allowing for stochastic flaring. This periodicity establishes the binary nature of HESS J0632+057.

  6. Dynamic Tides and the Evolution of Stars in Close Binaries

    OpenAIRE

    Willems, B.; Claret, A.

    2004-01-01

    In this talk, we review some recent advances in the theory of dynamic tides in close binaries. We particularly focus on the effects of resonances of dynamic tides with free oscillation modes and on the role of dynamic tides in the comparison of theoretically predicted and observationally inferred apsidal-motion rates.

  7. Unveiling the equation of state of nuclear matter with binary neutron stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galeazzi, F.; Rezzolla, L. [Frankfurt Univ., Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Inst. for Theoretical Physics

    2016-11-01

    2015 marked the hundred anniversary of Albert Einstein's lecture at the Prussian Academy of Science in which he introduced, for the first time, the famous field equations which became the core of his theory of general relativity. This masterpiece of 20th century science has proven extremely solid in all its predictions from the precession of the perihelion of Mercury to the observation of gravitational lensing in distant galaxies, to the more mundane time-delay corrections required by the global positioning system. One last piece of the puzzle is although still missing and comprise the direct measurement of the gravitational wave (GW) radiation emitted by any accelerating mass. These ripples in the spacetime fabric are extremely weak even when produced in the most extreme of the conditions as the ones present during the mergers of two black holes or neutron stars. For this reason they have eluded experimental scientists for almost four decades. But things are about to change, last year a new array of advanced gravitational wave detectors, namely advanced LIGO and Virgo came online in late September and they are expected to observe up to 40 events per year involving the mergers of two compact objects. Despite the high sensitivity of this generation of ground base interferometers, it is still necessary to use accurate gravitational waveforms models to extract all the information from the signal produced by the detector. In this project we focus on the merger of two neutron stars which orbit together in a binary system. The nonlinear nature of the Einstein equations coupled with the complex microphysics behind neutron star matter requires the use of sophisticated codes which uses advanced numerical techniques to produce accurate results. By using the GW signals calculated in our numerical simulations we will be able to strongly link the properties of neutron star matter to a precise set of observable frequencies from the detector. This information, together with

  8. Formation of the First Star Clusters and Massive Star Binaries by Fragmentation of Filamentary Primordial Gas Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Shingo; Yoshida, Naoki; Sakurai, Yuya; Fujii, Michiko S.

    2018-03-01

    We perform a set of cosmological simulations of early structure formation incorporating baryonic streaming motions. We present a case where a significantly elongated gas cloud with ∼104 solar mass (M ⊙) is formed in a pre-galactic (∼107 M ⊙) dark halo. The gas streaming into the halo compresses and heats the massive filamentary cloud to a temperature of ∼10,000 Kelvin. The gas cloud cools rapidly by atomic hydrogen cooling, and then by molecular hydrogen cooling down to ∼400 Kelvin. The rapid decrease of the temperature and hence of the Jeans mass triggers fragmentation of the filament to yield multiple gas clumps with a few hundred solar masses. We estimate the mass of the primordial star formed in each fragment by adopting an analytic model based on a large set of radiation hydrodynamics simulations of protostellar evolution. The resulting stellar masses are in the range of ∼50–120 M ⊙. The massive stars gravitationally attract each other and form a compact star cluster. We follow the dynamics of the star cluster using a hybrid N-body simulation. We show that massive star binaries are formed in a few million years through multi-body interactions at the cluster center. The eventual formation of the remnant black holes will leave a massive black hole binary, which can be a progenitor of strong gravitational wave sources similar to those recently detected by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO).

  9. Shape Shifting Satellites in Binary Near-Earth Asteroids: Do Meteoroid Impacts Play a Role in BYORP Orbital Evolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubincam, David Parry

    2012-01-01

    Less than catastrophic meteoroid impacts over 10(exp 5) years may change the shape of small rubble-pile satellites in binary NEAs, lengthening the average BYORP (binary Yarkovsky-Radzievskii-Paddack) rate of orbital evolution. An estimate of shape-shifting meteoroid fluxes give numbers close enough to causing random walks in the semimajor axis of binary systems to warrant further investigation

  10. How well can gravitational wave observations of coalescing binaries involving neutron stars constrain the neutron star equation of state?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, Sukanta

    2015-01-01

    The Advanced LIGO detectors began observation runs a few weeks ago. This has afforded relativists and astronomers the opportunity to use gravitational waves to improve our understanding of a variety of astronomical objects and phenomena. In this talk I will examine how well gravitational wave observations of coalescing binaries involving neutron stars might constrain the neutron star (NS) equation of state. These astrophysical constraints can improve our understanding of nuclear interactions in ways that complement the knowledge acquired from terrestrial labs. I will study the effects of different NS equations of states in both NS-NS and NS-Black Hole systems, with and without spin, on these constraint. (author)

  11. Constraining the equation of state of neutron stars from binary mergers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takami, Kentaro; Rezzolla, Luciano; Baiotti, Luca

    2014-08-29

    Determining the equation of state of matter at nuclear density and hence the structure of neutron stars has been a riddle for decades. We show how the imminent detection of gravitational waves from merging neutron star binaries can be used to solve this riddle. Using a large number of accurate numerical-relativity simulations of binaries with nuclear equations of state, we find that the postmerger emission is characterized by two distinct and robust spectral features. While the high-frequency peak has already been associated with the oscillations of the hypermassive neutron star produced by the merger and depends on the equation of state, a new correlation emerges between the low-frequency peak, related to the merger process, and the total compactness of the stars in the binary. More importantly, such a correlation is essentially universal, thus providing a powerful tool to set tight constraints on the equation of state. If the mass of the binary is known from the inspiral signal, the combined use of the two frequency peaks sets four simultaneous constraints to be satisfied. Ideally, even a single detection would be sufficient to select one equation of state over the others. We test our approach with simulated data and verify it works well for all the equations of state considered.

  12. The binary fraction of planetary nebula central stars - III. the promise of VPHAS+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Helen; Zijlstra, Albert; De Marco, Orsola; Frew, David J.; Drew, Janet E.; Corradi, Romano L. M.; Eislöffel, Jochen; Parker, Quentin A.

    2018-04-01

    The majority of planetary nebulae (PNe) are not spherical, and current single-star models cannot adequately explain all the morphologies we observe. This has led to the Binary Hypothesis, which states that PNe are preferentially formed by binary systems. This hypothesis can be corroborated or disproved by comparing the estimated binary fraction of all PNe central stars (CS) to that of the supposed progenitor population. One way to quantify the rate of CS binarity is to detect near infrared excess indicative of a low-mass main-sequence companion. In this paper, a sample of known PNe within data release 2 of the ongoing VPHAS+ is investigated. We give details of the method used to calibrate VPHAS+ photometry, and present the expected colours of CS and main-sequence stars within the survey. Objects were scrutinized to remove PN mimics from our sample and identify true CS. Within our final sample of seven CS, six had previously either not been identified or confirmed. We detected an i-band excess indicative of a low-mass companion star in three CS, including one known binary, leading us to conclude that VPHAS+ provides the precise photometry required for the IR excess method presented here, and will likely improve as the survey completes and the calibration process finalized. Given the promising results from this trial sample, the entire VPHAS+ catalogue should be used to study PNe and extend the IR excess-tested CS sample.

  13. Photometric Modelling of Close Binary Star CN And DMZ Jassur & A ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Photometric Modelling of Close Binary Star CN And. D. M. Z. Jassur. 1,2,∗. & A. Khodadadi. 2. 1Faculty of Physics, Tabriz University, Tabriz, Iran. ∗ e-mail: Jassur@tabrizu.ac.ir. 2Center for Applied Physics and Astronomical Research, Khadjeh Nassir Addin Observatory,. Tabriz, Iran. Received 2004 April 15; accepted 2006 ...

  14. Contrasting Behaviour from Two Be/X-ray Binary Pulsars: Insights into Differing Neutron Star Accretion Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, L. J.; Drave, S. P.; Hill, A. B.; Coe, M. J.; Corbet, R. H. D.; Bird, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present the identification of two periodic X-ray signals coming from the direction of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). On detection with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), the 175.4 s and 85.4 s pulsations were considered to originate from new Be/X-ray binary (BeXRB) pulsars with unknown locations. Using rapid follow-up INTEGRAL and XMM-Newton observations, we show the first pulsar (designated SXP175) to be coincident with a candidate high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) in the northern bar region of the SMC undergoing a small Type II outburst. The orbital period (87d) and spectral class (B0-B0.5IIIe) of this system are determined and presented here for the first time. The second pulsar is shown not to be new at all, but is consistent with being SXP91.1 - a pulsar discovered at the very beginning of the 13 year long RXTE key monitoring programme of the SMC. Whilst it is theoretically possible for accreting neutron stars to change spin period so dramatically over such a short time, the X-ray and optical data available for this source suggest this spin-up is continuous during long phases of X-ray quiescence, where accretion driven spin-up of the neutron star should be minimal.

  15. Spacecraft orbit lifetime within two binary near-Earth asteroid systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damme, Friedrich; Hussmann, Hauke; Oberst, Jürgen

    2017-10-01

    We studied the motion of medium-sized and small spacecraft orbiting within the binary asteroid systems 175,706 (1996 FG3) and 65,803 Didymos (1996 GT). We have considered spacecraft motion within the binary systems distance regimes between 0.4 and 2.5 km for Didymos and 0.8-4 km for 1996 FG3. Orbital motion of spacecraft, beginning from 20,000 initial conditions lying in the orbital planes of the secondary, were simulated and evaluated for lifespan. The simulations include the effects of (1) the asteroid's mass, shape, and rotational parameters, (2) the secondary's mass and orbit parameters, (3) the spacecraft mass, surface area, and reflectivity (representing large box-wing-shaped medium-sized spacecraft as well as small satellites), and (4) the time of the mission, and therefore the relative position of the system to the sun. Stable orbital motion (i.e., not requiring thrusting maneuvers) was achieved using the Lagrange points L4/L5 and orbital resonances. This allows for long motion arcs, e.g. of 90 days (L4) and 35 days (resonance) in the Didymos system. The accuracy necessary to deploy a probe into L4, so it can remain there for 35 day, is evaluated by comparisons. Retrograde orbits were found assuring 90 days of low eccentric orbiting for a compact small satellite for a great variety of initial conditions. The comparison of simulations at aphelion and perihelion as well as the different spacecraft show the critical impact of solar radiation pressure on orbital stability. 65,803 Didymos (1996 GT) is shown to be more suitable for orbit phases at the close distances we studied compared to 175,706 (1996 FG3). Two possible obliquities of the Didymos system were considered to study the effects of the inclination on perturbing forces at equinox and solstice, showing that cases of low obliquity or times of equinox are beneficial for spacecraft orbiting.

  16. Gravitational Waves from Stellar Black Hole Binaries and the Impact on Nearby Sun-like Stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Ilídio [Centro Multidisciplinar de Astrofísica, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Silk, Joseph, E-mail: ilidio.lopes@tecnico.ulisboa.pt, E-mail: silk@astro.ox.ac.uk [Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095 CNRS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 98 bis Boulevard Arago, Paris F-75014 (France)

    2017-07-20

    We investigate the impact of resonant gravitational waves on quadrupole acoustic modes of Sun-like stars located nearby stellar black hole binary systems (such as GW150914 and GW151226). We find that the stimulation of the low-overtone modes by gravitational radiation can lead to sizeable photometric amplitude variations, much larger than the predictions for amplitudes driven by turbulent convection, which in turn are consistent with the photometric amplitudes observed in most Sun-like stars. For accurate stellar evolution models, using up-to-date stellar physics, we predict photometric amplitude variations of 1–10{sup 3} ppm for a solar mass star located at a distance between 1 au and 10 au from the black hole binary and belonging to the same multi-star system. The observation of such a phenomenon will be within the reach of the Plato mission because the telescope will observe several portions of the Milky Way, many of which are regions of high stellar density with a substantial mixed population of Sun-like stars and black hole binaries.

  17. IRAS 11472-0800: an extremely depleted pulsating binary post-AGB star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Winckel, H.; Hrivnak, B. J.; Gorlova, N.; Gielen, C.; Lu, W.

    2012-06-01

    Aims: We focus here on one particular and poorly studied object, IRAS 11472-0800. It is a highly evolved post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) star of spectral type F, with a large infrared excess produced by thermal emission of circumstellar dust. Methods: We deployed a multi-wavelength study that includes the analyses of optical and IR spectra as well as a variability study based on photometric and spectroscopic time-series. Results: The spectral energy distribution (SED) properties as well as the highly processed silicate N-band emission show that the dust in IRAS 11472-0800 is likely trapped in a stable disc. The energetics of the SED and the colour variability show that our viewing angle is close to edge-on and that the optical flux is dominated by scattered light. With photospheric abundances of [Fe/H] = -2.7 and [Sc/H] = -4.2, we discovered that IRAS 11472-0800 is one of the most chemically-depleted objects known to date. Moreover, IRAS 11472-0800 is a pulsating star with a period of 31.16 days and a peak-to-peak amplitude of 0.6 mag in V. The radial velocity variability is strongly influenced by the pulsations, but the significant cycle-to-cycle variability is systematic on a longer time scale, which we interpret as evidence for binary motion. Conclusions: We conclude that IRAS 11472-0800 is a pulsating binary star surrounded by a circumbinary disc. The line-of-sight towards the object lies close to the orbital plane, therefore the optical light is dominated by scattered light. IRAS 11472-0800 is one of the most chemically-depleted objects known so far and links the dusty RV Tauri stars to the non-pulsating class of strongly depleted objects. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile. Programme ID: 65.L-0615(A), on observations made with the Mercator Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma by the Flemish Community, at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos and on observations obtained with the HERMES

  18. On the accuracy of Hipparcos using binary stars as a calibration tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Docobo, J. A.; Andrade, M., E-mail: joseangel.docobo@usc.es, E-mail: manuel.andrade@usc.es [R. M. Aller Astronomical Observatory, University of Santiago de Compostela (USC), Santiago de Compostela E-15782, Galiza, P.O. Box 197 (Spain)

    2015-02-01

    Stellar binary systems, specifically those that present the most accurate available orbital elements, are a reliable tool to test the accuracy of astrometric observations. We selected all 35 binaries with these characteristics. Our objective is to provide standard uncertainties for the positions and parallaxes measured by Hipparcos relative to this trustworthy set, as well as to check supposed correlations between several parameters (measurement residuals, positions, magnitudes, and parallaxes). In addition, using the high-confidence subset of visual–spectroscopic binaries, we implemented a validation test of the Hipparcos trigonometric parallaxes of binary systems that allowed the evaluation of their reliability. Standard and non-standard statistical analysis techniques were applied in order to achieve well-founded conclusions. In particular, errors-in-variables models such as the total least-squares method were used to validate Hipparcos parallaxes by comparison with those obtained directly from the orbital elements. Previously, we executed Thompson's τ technique in order to detect suspected outliers in the data. Furthermore, several statistical hypothesis tests were carried out to verify if our results were statistically significant. A statistically significant trend indicating larger Hipparcos angular separations with respect to the reference values in 5.2 ± 1.4 mas was found at the 10{sup −8} significance level. Uncertainties in the polar coordinates θ and ρ of 1.°8 and 6.3 mas, respectively, were estimated for the Hipparcos observations of binary systems. We also verified that the parallaxes of binary systems measured in this mission are absolutely compatible with the set of orbital parallaxes obtained from the most accurate orbits at least at the 95% confidence level. This methodology allows us to better estimate the accuracy of Hipparcos observations of binary systems. Indeed, further application to the data collected by Gaia should yield a

  19. Effective-one-body waveforms for binary neutron stars using surrogate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackey, Benjamin D.; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Galley, Chad R.; Meidam, Jeroen; Van Den Broeck, Chris

    2017-05-01

    Gravitational-wave observations of binary neutron star systems can provide information about the masses, spins, and structure of neutron stars. However, this requires accurate and computationally efficient waveform models that take ≲1 s to evaluate for use in Bayesian parameter estimation codes that perform 1 07- 1 08 waveform evaluations. We present a surrogate model of a nonspinning effective-one-body waveform model with ℓ=2 , 3, and 4 tidal multipole moments that reproduces waveforms of binary neutron star numerical simulations up to merger. The surrogate is built from compact sets of effective-one-body waveform amplitude and phase data that each form a reduced basis. We find that 12 amplitude and 7 phase basis elements are sufficient to reconstruct any binary neutron star waveform with a starting frequency of 10 Hz. The surrogate has maximum errors of 3.8% in amplitude (0.04% excluding the last 100 M before merger) and 0.043 rad in phase. This leads to typical mismatches of 10-5-10-4 for Advanced LIGO depending on the component masses, with a worst case match of 7 ×10-4 when both stars have masses ≥2 M⊙. The version implemented in the LIGO Algorithm Library takes ˜0.07 s to evaluate for a starting frequency of 30 Hz and ˜0.8 s for a starting frequency of 10 Hz, resulting in a speed-up factor of O (1 03) relative to the original matlab code. This allows parameter estimation codes to run in days to weeks rather than years, and we demonstrate this with a nested sampling run that recovers the masses and tidal parameters of a simulated binary neutron star system.

  20. Stable Orbits in the Didymos Binary Asteroid System - Useful Platforms for Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damme, Friedrich; Hussmann, Hauke; Wickhusen, Kai; Enrico, Mai; Oberst, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    We have analyzed particle motion in binary asteroid systems to search for stable orbits. In particular, we studied the motion of particles near the asteroid 1996 GT (Didymos), proposed as a target for the AIDA mission. The combined gravity fields of the odd-shaped rotating objects moving about each other are complex. In addition, orbiting spacecraft or dust particles are affected by radiation pressure, possibly exceeding the faint gravitational forces. For the numerical integrations, we adopt parameters for size, shape, and rotation from telescopic observations. To simulate the effect of radiation pressure during a spacecraft mission, we apply a spacecraft wing-box shape model. Integrations were carried out beginning in near-circular orbits over 11 days, during which the motion of the particles were examined. Most orbits are unstable with particles escaping quickly or colliding with the asteroid bodies. However, with carefully chosen initial positions, we found stable motion (in the orbiting plane of the secondary) associated with the Lagrangian points (L4 and L5), in addition to horseshoe orbits, where particles move from one of the Lagrangian point to the other. Finally, we examined orbits in 1:2 resonances with the motion of the orbital period of the secondary. Stable conditions depend strongly on season caused by the inclination of the mutual orbit plane with respect to Didymos solar orbit. At larger distance from the asteroid pair, we find the well-known terminator orbits where gravitational attraction is balanced against radiation pressure. Stable orbits and long motion arcs are useful for long tracking runs by radio or Laser instruments and are well-suited for modelling of the ephemerides of the asteroid pair and gravity field mapping. Furthermore, these orbits may be useful as observing posts or as platforms for approach. These orbits may also represent traps for dust particles, an opportunity for dust collection - or possibly a hazard to spacecraft

  1. A Long-Period Totally Eclipsing Binary Star at the Turnoff of the Open Cluster NGC 6819 Discovered with Kepler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandquist, Eric L.; Mathieu, Robert D.; Brogaard, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    We present the discovery of the totally eclipsing long-period (P = 771.8 d) binary system WOCS 23009 in the old open cluster NGC 6819 that contains both an evolved star near central hydrogen exhaustion and a low-mass (0.45 Msun) star. This system was previously known to be a single-lined spectros......We present the discovery of the totally eclipsing long-period (P = 771.8 d) binary system WOCS 23009 in the old open cluster NGC 6819 that contains both an evolved star near central hydrogen exhaustion and a low-mass (0.45 Msun) star. This system was previously known to be a single......-lined spectroscopic binary, but the discovery of an eclipse near apastron using data from the Kepler space telescope makes it clear that the system has an inclination that is very close to 90 degrees. Although the secondary star has not been identified in spectra, the mass of the primary star can be constrained using...... other eclipsing binaries in the cluster. The combination of total eclipses and a mass constraint for the primary star allows us to determine a reliable mass for the secondary star and radii for both stars, and to constrain the cluster age. Unlike well-measured stars of similar mass in field binaries...

  2. Multi-periodic pulsations of a stripped red-giant star in an eclipsing binary system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxted, Pierre F L; Serenelli, Aldo M; Miglio, Andrea; Marsh, Thomas R; Heber, Ulrich; Dhillon, Vikram S; Littlefair, Stuart; Copperwheat, Chris; Smalley, Barry; Breedt, Elmé; Schaffenroth, Veronika

    2013-06-27

    Low-mass white-dwarf stars are the remnants of disrupted red-giant stars in binary millisecond pulsars and other exotic binary star systems. Some low-mass white dwarfs cool rapidly, whereas others stay bright for millions of years because of stable fusion in thick surface hydrogen layers. This dichotomy is not well understood, so the potential use of low-mass white dwarfs as independent clocks with which to test the spin-down ages of pulsars or as probes of the extreme environments in which low-mass white dwarfs form cannot fully be exploited. Here we report precise mass and radius measurements for the precursor to a low-mass white dwarf. We find that only models in which this disrupted red-giant star has a thick hydrogen envelope can match the strong constraints provided by our data. Very cool low-mass white dwarfs must therefore have lost their thick hydrogen envelopes by irradiation from pulsar companions or by episodes of unstable hydrogen fusion (shell flashes). We also find that this low-mass white-dwarf precursor is a type of pulsating star not hitherto seen. The observed pulsation frequencies are sensitive to internal processes that determine whether this star will undergo shell flashes.

  3. Giants of eclipse the ζ [Zeta] Aurigae stars and other binary systems

    CERN Document Server

    Griffin, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The zeta Aurigae stars are the rare but illustrious sub-group of binary stars that undergo the dramatic phenomenon of "chromospheric eclipse". This book provides detailed descriptions of the ten known systems, illustrates them richly with examples of new spectra, and places them in the context of stellar structure and evolution. Comprised of a large cool giant plus a small hot dwarf, these key eclipsing binaries reveal fascinating changes in their spectra very close to total eclipse, when the hot star shines through differing heights of the "chromosphere", or outer atmosphere, of the giant star. The phenomenon provides astrophysics with the means of analyzing the outer atmosphere of a giant star and how that material is shed into space. The physics of these critical events can be explained qualitatively, but it is more challenging to extract hard facts from the observations, and tough to model the chromosphere in any detail. The book offers current thinking on mechanisms for heating a star's chromosphere an...

  4. ELECTROMAGNETIC EXTRACTION OF ENERGY FROM BLACK-HOLE–NEUTRON-STAR BINARIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McWilliams, Sean T.; Levin, Janna

    2011-01-01

    The coalescence of black-hole-neutron-star binaries is expected to be a principal source of gravitational waves for the next generation of detectors, Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo. For black hole masses not much larger than the neutron star mass, the tidal disruption of the neutron star by the black hole provides one avenue for generating an electromagnetic counterpart. However, in this work, we demonstrate that, for all black-hole-neutron-star binaries observable by Advanced LIGO/Virgo, the interaction of the black hole with the magnetic field of the neutron star will generate copious luminosity, comparable to supernovae and active galactic nuclei. This novel effect may have already been observed as a new class of very short gamma-ray bursts by the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Telescope. These events may be observable to cosmological distances, so that any black-hole-neutron-star coalescence detectable with gravitational waves by Advanced LIGO/Virgo could also be detectable electromagnetically.

  5. RAPID ORBITAL DECAY IN THE 12.75-MINUTE BINARY WHITE DWARF J0651+2844

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermes, J. J.; Winget, D. E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Kilic, Mukremin; Gianninas, A.; Kenyon, Scott J. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Brown, Warren R. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Allende Prieto, Carlos; Cabrera-Lavers, Antonio [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Mukadam, Anjum S., E-mail: jjhermes@astro.as.utexas.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    We report the detection of orbital decay in the 12.75-minute, detached binary white dwarf (WD) SDSS J065133.338+284423.37 (hereafter J0651). Our photometric observations over a 13 month baseline constrain the orbital period to 765.206543(55) s and indicate that the orbit is decreasing at a rate of (- 9.8 {+-} 2.8) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} s s{sup -1} (or -0.31 {+-} 0.09 ms yr{sup -1}). We revise the system parameters based on our new photometric and spectroscopic observations: J0651 contains two WDs with M{sub 1} = 0.26 {+-} 0.04 M{sub Sun} and M{sub 2} = 0.50 {+-} 0.04 M{sub Sun }. General relativity predicts orbital decay due to gravitational wave radiation of (- 8.2 {+-} 1.7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} s s{sup -1} (or -0.26 {+-} 0.05 ms yr{sup -1}). Our observed rate of orbital decay is consistent with this expectation. J0651 is currently the second-loudest gravitational wave source known in the milli-Hertz range and the loudest non-interacting binary, which makes it an excellent verification source for future missions aimed at directly detecting gravitational waves. Our work establishes the feasibility of monitoring this system's orbital period decay at optical wavelengths.

  6. RAPID ORBITAL DECAY IN THE 12.75-MINUTE BINARY WHITE DWARF J0651+2844

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermes, J. J.; Winget, D. E.; Kilic, Mukremin; Gianninas, A.; Kenyon, Scott J.; Brown, Warren R.; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Cabrera-Lavers, Antonio; Mukadam, Anjum S.

    2012-01-01

    We report the detection of orbital decay in the 12.75-minute, detached binary white dwarf (WD) SDSS J065133.338+284423.37 (hereafter J0651). Our photometric observations over a 13 month baseline constrain the orbital period to 765.206543(55) s and indicate that the orbit is decreasing at a rate of (– 9.8 ± 2.8) × 10 –12 s s –1 (or –0.31 ± 0.09 ms yr –1 ). We revise the system parameters based on our new photometric and spectroscopic observations: J0651 contains two WDs with M 1 = 0.26 ± 0.04 M ☉ and M 2 = 0.50 ± 0.04 M ☉ . General relativity predicts orbital decay due to gravitational wave radiation of (– 8.2 ± 1.7) × 10 –12 s s –1 (or –0.26 ± 0.05 ms yr –1 ). Our observed rate of orbital decay is consistent with this expectation. J0651 is currently the second-loudest gravitational wave source known in the milli-Hertz range and the loudest non-interacting binary, which makes it an excellent verification source for future missions aimed at directly detecting gravitational waves. Our work establishes the feasibility of monitoring this system's orbital period decay at optical wavelengths.

  7. Learning about Parallax and Proper Motion by Searching for Binary Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilachowski, Catherine A.; Hamper, R.; Morris, F.

    2010-01-01

    A new web-based, instructional module allows students to explore the Hipparcos catalog of stellar parallaxes and proper motions to determine whether close double stars are physical binaries or chance superpositions. Because the Hipparcos catalog spans the entire sky, the module guides students to manageable regions of sky. Students navigate to a constellation and grid within the constellation to search for possible binary stars systems. Students can then compare and assess proper motions, in terms of both speed and direction, as well as the distances of both stars, to determine whether the potential close pairs are true binary systems. Students must recognize that multiple lines of evidence (apparent proximity, similar distances, and similar proper motions) must converge to establish the reality of a binary pair. The module gives undergraduate students an opportunity to experience scientific research and discovery, engaging their critical thinking skills in the scientific process. The new module has been developed as part of a collaborative program between the University of Alaska at Anchorage and Indiana University to develop and study the effectiveness of research-based, educational (RBSE) curricula in astronomy for entry-level undergraduate courses. The program is funded through a CCLI award from the National Science Foundation. Further information and access to the web-based RBSE modules is available at www.astro.indiana.edu/catyp/rbseu.

  8. The Study and Applications of Satellite and Satellite Constellation Autonomous Orbit Determination Using Star Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Q. B.

    2012-07-01

    Autonomous satellite orbit determination is a key technique in autonomous satellite navigation. Many kinds of technologies have been proposed to realize the autonomous satellite navigation, such as the star sensor, the Earth magnetometer, the occultation time survey, and the phase measurement of X-ray pulsar signals. This dissertation studies a method of autonomous satellite orbit determination using star sensor. Moreover, the method is extended to the autonomous navigation of satellite constellation and the space-based surveillance. In chapters 1 and 2, some usual time and reference systems are introduced. Then the principles of several typical autonomous navigation methods, and their merits and shortcomings are analyzed. In chapter 3, the autonomous satellite orbit determination using star sensor and infrared Earth sensor (IRES) is specifically studied, which is based on the status movement simulation, the stellar background observation from star sensor, and the Earth center direction survey from IRES. By simulating the low Earth orbit satellites and pseudo Geostationary Earth orbit (PGEO) satellites, the precision of position and speed with autonomous orbit determination using star sensor is obtained. Besides, the autonomous orbit determination using star sensor with double detectors is studied. According to the observation equation's characters, an optimized type of star sensor and IRES initial assembly model is proposed. In the study of the PGEO autonomous orbit determination, an efficient sampling frequency of measurements is promoted. The simulation results confirm that the autonomous satellite orbit determination using star sensor is feasible for satellites with all kinds of altitudes. In chapter 4, the method of autonomous satellite orbit determination using star sensor is extended to the autonomous navigation of mini-satellite constellation. Combining with the high-accuracy inter satellite links data, the precision of the determined orbit and

  9. Binary neutron star mergers: Dependence on the nuclear equation of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotokezaka, Kenta; Kyutoku, Koutarou; Okawa, Hirotada; Shibata, Masaru; Kiuchi, Kenta

    2011-01-01

    We perform a numerical-relativity simulation for the merger of binary neutron stars with 6 nuclear-theory-based equations of states (EOSs) described by piecewise polytropes. Our purpose is to explore the dependence of the dynamical behavior of the binary neutron star merger and resulting gravitational waveforms on the EOS of the supernuclear-density matter. The numerical results show that the merger process and the first outcome are classified into three types: (i) a black hole is promptly formed, (ii) a short-lived hypermassive neutron star (HMNS) is formed, (iii) a long-lived HMNS is formed. The type of the merger depends strongly on the EOS and on the total mass of the binaries. For the EOS with which the maximum mass is larger than 2M · , the lifetime of the HMNS is longer than 10 ms for a total mass m 0 =2.7M · . A recent radio observation suggests that the maximum mass of spherical neutron stars is M max ≥1.97±0.04M · in one σ level. This fact and our results support the possible existence of a HMNS soon after the onset of the merger for a typical binary neutron star with m 0 =2.7M · . We also show that the torus mass surrounding the remnant black hole is correlated with the type of the merger process; the torus mass could be large, ≥0.1M · , in the case that a long-lived HMNS is formed. We also show that gravitational waves carry information of the merger process, the remnant, and the torus mass surrounding a black hole.

  10. The architecture of the hierarchical triple star KOI 928 from eclipse timing variations seen in Kepler photometry

    OpenAIRE

    Steffen, J. H.; Quinn, S. N.; Borucki, W. J.; Brugamyer, E.; Bryson, S. T.; Buchhave, L. A.; Cochran, W. D.; Endl, M.; Fabrycky, D. C.; Ford, E. B.; Holman, M. J.; Jenkins, J.; Koch, D.; Latham, D. W.; MacQueen, P.

    2011-01-01

    We present a hierarchical triple star system (KIC 9140402) where a low mass eclipsing binary orbits a more massive third star. The orbital period of the binary (4.98829 Days) is determined by the eclipse times seen in photometry from NASA's Kepler spacecraft. The periodically changing tidal field, due to the eccentric orbit of the binary about the tertiary, causes a change in the orbital period of the binary. The resulting eclipse timing variations provide insight into the dynamics and archit...

  11. Multi-messenger observations of a binary neutron star merger

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abbott, P.B.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.D.; Blažek, Jiří; Boháčová, Martina; Caballero-García, María Dolores; Chudoba, Jiří; Ebr, Jan; Jelínek, Martin; Juryšek, Jakub; Kubánek, Petr; Mandát, Dušan; Palatka, Miroslav; Pech, Miroslav; Prouza, Michael; Řídký, Jan; Martins dos Santos, Eva M.; Schovánek, Petr; Trávníček, Petr; Vícha, Jakub; Yushkov, Alexey

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 848, č. 2 (2017), s. 1-59, č. článku L12. ISSN 2041-8205 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015038; GA MŠk LG15014; GA MŠk EF16_013/0001402 Grant - others:OP VVV - AUGER-CZ(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/16_013/0001402 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:67985815 Keywords : gravitational waves * stars: neutron Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics; BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics (ASU-R) OBOR OECD: Particles and field physics; Astronomy (including astrophysics,space science) (ASU-R) Impact factor: 5.522, year: 2016

  12. An analytic model for the evolution of a close binary system of neutron (degenerate) stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imshennik, V. S.; Popov, D. V.

    1998-03-01

    The evolution of a close binary system of neutron stars is studied in the point-mass approximation with allowance for gravitational radiation and mass exchange between the components of the system. The calculation of mass transfer from the low-mass component of the system based on the known approximations for the radii of the Roche lobe and the low-mass component provides the reliable determination of the characteristics of the system by the end of its evolution, which are virtually independent of the initial ratio of the component masses. The evolution of the system is accompanied by the mass loss from the low-mass component and ends in the explosion of this component at the time when its mass reaches the lower limit for neutron stars (close to 0.1 M_solar). After the explosion, the second component of the system leaves the supernova remnant with the speed and rotation period which are determined almost entirely by the total mass of the system M_t. The assumption about the explosion of the low-mass component and subsequent escape of the high-mass component (pulsar or black hole) from the system have been made in the recently proposed scenario of the explosion of collapsing supernovae with allowance for rotational effects (Imshennik 1992; Imshennik and Nadezhin 1992; Imshennik and Popov 1996). We formulate and substantiate an analytic model for the evolution of the system under consideration, in which virtually all mass exchange between the components occurs under the assumption of quasi-stationary circular orbits with significant energy and angular momentum losses related to gravitational radiation. Such character of the evolution persists until the time the mass of the low-mass component reaches the value of order ~ 0.15 M_solar. The remaining mass (~0.05 M_solar) is lost by this component in the dynamical regime and the given analytic model takes on, strictly speaking, the character of a crude estimate. On the basis of this model, the main features of

  13. Stability of the orbit of a third body in binary asteroid systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, Imre; Sueli, Aron; Erdi, Balint

    2010-01-01

    In this work we studied the stable regions around four binary asteroids in the main asteroid belt. The studied systems were (107) Camilla, (22) Kallipe, (45) Eugenia and (762) Pulcova. The stability was characterized with three motion indicators: relative Lyapunov indicator, maximum eccentricity, and maximum difference of eccentricities. The survay covered the P type orbits, where satellite moves around both primaries. On the basis of our work it can be decided, in which system the discovery of a third component can be expected.

  14. Viscous Effects on the Interaction between the Coplanar Decretion Disc and the Neutron Star in Be/X-Ray Binaries

    OpenAIRE

    Okazaki, A. T.; Bate, M. R.; Ogilvie, G. I.; Pringle, J. E.

    2002-01-01

    We study the viscous effects on the interaction between the coplanar Be-star disc and the neutron star in Be/X-ray binaries, using a three-dimensional, smoothed particle hydrodynamics code. For simplicity, we assume the Be disc to be isothermal at the temperature of half the stellar effective temperature. In order to mimic the gas ejection process from the Be star, we inject particles with the Keplerian rotation velocity at a radius just outside the star. Both Be star and neutron star are tre...

  15. Neutrino propagation in binary neutron star mergers in presence of nonstandard interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatelain, Amélie; Volpe, Maria Cristina

    2018-01-01

    We explore the impact of nonstandard interactions on neutrino propagation in accretion disks around binary neutron star merger remnants. We show flavor evolution can be significantly modified even for values of the nonstandard couplings well below current bounds. We demonstrate the occurrence of inner resonances as synchronized MSW phenomena and show that intricate conversion patterns might appear depending on the nonstandard interaction parameters. We discuss the possible implications for nucleosynthesis.

  16. Neutrino transport in black hole-neutron star binaries: Neutrino emission and dynamical mass ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyutoku, Koutarou; Kiuchi, Kenta; Sekiguchi, Yuichiro; Shibata, Masaru; Taniguchi, Keisuke

    2018-01-01

    We study the merger of black hole-neutron star binaries by fully general-relativistic neutrino-radiation-hydrodynamics simulations throughout the coalescence, particularly focusing on the role of neutrino irradiation in dynamical mass ejection. Neutrino transport is incorporated by an approximate transfer scheme based on the truncated moment formalism. While we fix the mass ratio of the black hole to the neutron star to be 4 and the dimensionless spin parameter of the black hole to be 0.75, the equations of state for finite-temperature neutron-star matter are varied. The hot accretion disk formed after tidal disruption of the neutron star emits a copious amount of neutrinos with the peak total luminosity ˜1 - 3 ×1053 erg s-1 via thermal pair production and subsequent electron/positron captures on free nucleons. Nevertheless, the neutrino irradiation does not modify significantly the electron fraction of the dynamical ejecta from the neutrinoless β -equilibrium value at zero temperature of initial neutron stars. The mass of the wind component driven by neutrinos from the remnant disk is negligible compared to the very neutron-rich dynamical component, throughout our simulations performed until a few tens milliseconds after the onset of merger, for the models considered in this study. These facts suggest that the ejecta from black hole-neutron star binaries are very neutron rich and are expected to accommodate strong r -process nucleosynthesis, unless magnetic or viscous processes contribute substantially to the mass ejection from the disk. We also find that the peak neutrino luminosity does not necessarily increase as the disk mass increases, because tidal disruption of a compact neutron star can result in a remnant disk with a small mass but high temperature.

  17. [Astrophysics of binary stars, Seyfert galaxies, quasars, and globular clusters. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Press, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    Several problems were investigated. The time-steady accretion of gas irradiated by a self-consistently generated quasar-like continuum was studied. The observed x-ray sources near the core of the Orion molecular cloud were established to be sufficient to supply all the ionization that is needed to drive the molecular chemistry throughout that portion of the cloud in which the greatest density and diversity of molecular species is found. A new suggestion was put forth for a single pass, high gain, O 5+ ion laboratory laser at 1035 A. The only evidence for binaries in globular clusters was found to come from binaries in extreme states, cataclysmic variables, and x-ray sources. The various evolutionary paths possible for highly compact binaries in globular clusters where they come under the simultaneous influence of gravitational radiation and gravitational encounters with field stars were analyzed. The secular evolution of a highly compact binary stellar system, composed of a collapsed object and a low-mass secondary star, in the core of a globular cluster was calculated. The dynamics of the narrow line regions of Seyfert galaxies were investigated. New calculations of the soft x-ray opacity of gas having cosmic elemental abunances were developed for a variety of ionization states. Results were presented of the analysis of 28 Einstein SSS observations of 15 high x-ray luminosity quasars and Seyfert type I nuclei

  18. UPPER LIMITS ON THE RATES OF BINARY NEUTRON STAR AND NEUTRON STAR-BLACK HOLE MERGERS FROM ADVANCED LIGO'S FIRST OBSERVING RUN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, E.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Phythian-Adams, A.T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.T.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, R.D.; Barone, E.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, M.J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, A.L.S.; Bock, O.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, J.G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bond, T.C; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, A.D.; Brown, D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderon Bustillo, J.; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, D. S.; Chen, Y; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Qian; Chua, S. E.; Chung, E.S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, E.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, E.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -E; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, A.C.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J. -P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, A.L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dasgupta, A.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; De, S.; Debra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De laurentis, M.; Deleglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.A.; Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Diaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Giovanni, M.G.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H. -B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, T. M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.M.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Fenyvesi, E.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M; Fournier, J. -D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garunfi, E.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Geng, P.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.P.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; Gonzalez, R.G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Lee-Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.M.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Buffoni-Hall, R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.L.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, P.J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C. -J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.A.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, D.H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jian, L.; Jimenez-Forteza, E.; Johnson, W.; Jones, I.D.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.H.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kefelian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.E.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan., S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kusunchoo, N.; Kim, Chi-Woong; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, Namjun; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kissel, J. S.; Klein, B.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krolak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzar, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C.H.; Lee, K.H.; Lee, M.H.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Lewis, J. B.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lombardi, A. L.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Luck, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Zertuche, L. Magana; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, E.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, E.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B.C.; Moore, J.C.; Moraru, D.; Gutierrez Moreno, M.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, S.D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P.G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Gutierrez-Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton-Howes, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Deill, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M. B.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, E.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.S; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passahieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Proxhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Purrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, E. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, D.M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosinska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rudiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.A.; Sachdev, P.S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O. E. S.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.B.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schonbecx, A.; Schreiber, K.E.C.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, M.S.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Setyawati, Y.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltevi, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, António Dias da; Singer, A; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith, N.D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, J.R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.D.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tapai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, W.R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Toxmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Toyra, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifiro, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.G.; van den Brand, J. E. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.F.F.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heuningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, E.; Vicere, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, MT; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.M.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, D.R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Worden, J.; Wright, J.L.; Wu, D.S.; Wu, G.; Yablong, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the non-detection of gravitational waves from the merger of binary-neutron star systems and neutron star-black hole systems during the first observing run of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO). In particular, we searched for gravitational-wave

  19. GW170817: Observation of Gravitational Waves from a Binary Neutron Star Inspiral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V B; Affeldt, C; Afrough, M; Agarwal, B; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Aiello, L; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allen, G; Allocca, A; Altin, P A; Amato, A; Ananyeva, A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Angelova, S V; Antier, S; Appert, S; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Areeda, J S; Arnaud, N; Arun, K G; Ascenzi, S; Ashton, G; Ast, M; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atallah, D V; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; AultONeal, K; Austin, C; Avila-Alvarez, A; Babak, S; Bacon, P; Bader, M K M; Bae, S; Bailes, M; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Banagiri, S; Barayoga, J C; Barclay, S E; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barkett, K; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barta, D; Barthelmy, S D; Bartlett, J; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bawaj, M; Bayley, J C; Bazzan, M; Bécsy, B; Beer, C; Bejger, M; Belahcene, I; Bell, A S; Berger, B K; Bergmann, G; Bernuzzi, S; Bero, J J; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Billman, C R; Birch, J; Birney, R; Birnholtz, O; Biscans, S; Biscoveanu, S; Bisht, A; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blackman, J; Blair, C D; Blair, D G; Blair, R M; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bode, N; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bohe, A; Bondu, F; Bonilla, E; Bonnand, R; Boom, B A; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bossie, K; Bouffanais, Y; Bozzi, A; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brockill, P; Broida, J E; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brunett, S; Buchanan, C C; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cabero, M; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cahillane, C; Calderón Bustillo, J; Callister, T A; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Canepa, M; Canizares, P; Cannon, K C; Cao, H; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Capocasa, E; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Carney, M F; Carullo, G; Casanueva Diaz, J; Casentini, C; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C B; Cerdá-Durán, P; Cerretani, G; Cesarini, E; Chamberlin, S J; Chan, M; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chase, E; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chatterjee, D; Chatziioannou, K; Cheeseboro, B D; Chen, H Y; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Cheng, H-P; Chia, H; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Chmiel, T; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, A J K; Chua, S; Chung, A K W; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Ciolfi, R; Cirelli, C E; Cirone, A; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Clearwater, P; Cleva, F; Cocchieri, C; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P-F; Cohen, D; Colla, A; Collette, C G; Cominsky, L R; Constancio, M; Conti, L; Cooper, S J; Corban, P; Corbitt, T R; Cordero-Carrión, I; Corley, K R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Cortese, S; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S B; Coulon, J-P; Countryman, S T; Couvares, P; Covas, P B; Cowan, E E; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cullen, T J; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dal Canton, T; Dálya, G; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dasgupta, A; Da Silva Costa, C F; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Davier, M; Davis, D; Daw, E J; Day, B; De, S; DeBra, D; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Demos, N; Denker, T; Dent, T; De Pietri, R; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; De Rossi, C; DeSalvo, R; de Varona, O; Devenson, J; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M C; Dietrich, T; Di Fiore, L; Di Giovanni, M; Di Girolamo, T; Di Lieto, A; Di Pace, S; Di Palma, I; Di Renzo, F; Doctor, Z; Dolique, V; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dorrington, I; Douglas, R; Dovale Álvarez, M; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Dreissigacker, C; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dudi, R; Dupej, P; Dwyer, S E; Edo, T B; Edwards, M C; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H-B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Eisenstein, R A; Essick, R C; Estevez, D; Etienne, Z B; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T M; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fair, H; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Fauchon-Jones, E J; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fee, C; Fehrmann, H; Feicht, J; Fejer, M M; Fernandez-Galiana, A; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finstad, D; Fiori, I; Fiorucci, D; Fishbach, M; Fisher, R P; Fitz-Axen, M; Flaminio, R; Fletcher, M; Fong, H; Font, J A; Forsyth, P W F; Forsyth, S S; Fournier, J-D; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Frey, V; Fries, E M; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gabbard, H; Gadre, B U; Gaebel, S M; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Ganija, M R; Gaonkar, S G; Garcia-Quiros, C; Garufi, F; Gateley, B; Gaudio, S; Gaur, G; Gayathri, V; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; George, D; George, J; Gergely, L; Germain, V; Ghonge, S; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, K; Glover, L; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gomes, S; Goncharov, B; González, G; Gonzalez Castro, J M; Gopakumar, A; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S E; Gosselin, M; Gouaty, R; Grado, A; Graef, C; Granata, M; 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McManus, D J; McNeill, L; McRae, T; McWilliams, S T; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Mehmet, M; Meidam, J; Mejuto-Villa, E; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Merilh, E L; Merzougui, M; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Messick, C; Metzdorff, R; Meyers, P M; Miao, H; Michel, C; Middleton, H; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, A L; Miller, B B; Miller, J; Millhouse, M; Milovich-Goff, M C; Minazzoli, O; Minenkov, Y; Ming, J; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moffa, D; Moggi, A; Mogushi, K; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Molina, I; Montani, M; Moore, C J; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morisaki, S; Morriss, S R; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, G; Muir, A W; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D; Mukherjee, S; Mukund, N; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Muñiz, E A; Muratore, M; Murray, P G; Nagar, A; Napier, K; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R K; Neilson, J; Nelemans, G; Nelson, T J N; Nery, M; Neunzert, A; Nevin, L; Newport, J M; Newton, G; Ng, K K Y; Nguyen, P; Nguyen, T T; Nichols, D; 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    2017-10-20

    On August 17, 2017 at 12∶41:04 UTC the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo gravitational-wave detectors made their first observation of a binary neutron star inspiral. The signal, GW170817, was detected with a combined signal-to-noise ratio of 32.4 and a false-alarm-rate estimate of less than one per 8.0×10^{4}  years. We infer the component masses of the binary to be between 0.86 and 2.26  M_{⊙}, in agreement with masses of known neutron stars. Restricting the component spins to the range inferred in binary neutron stars, we find the component masses to be in the range 1.17-1.60  M_{⊙}, with the total mass of the system 2.74_{-0.01}^{+0.04}M_{⊙}. The source was localized within a sky region of 28  deg^{2} (90% probability) and had a luminosity distance of 40_{-14}^{+8}  Mpc, the closest and most precisely localized gravitational-wave signal yet. The association with the γ-ray burst GRB 170817A, detected by Fermi-GBM 1.7 s after the coalescence, corroborates the hypothesis of a neutron star merger and provides the first direct evidence of a link between these mergers and short γ-ray bursts. Subsequent identification of transient counterparts across the electromagnetic spectrum in the same location further supports the interpretation of this event as a neutron star merger. This unprecedented joint gravitational and electromagnetic observation provides insight into astrophysics, dense matter, gravitation, and cosmology.

  20. Orbital period variations of the eclipsing binaries TU Cnc, VZ Leo, and OS Ori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaliullina, A. I.

    2017-10-01

    Variations of the orbital periods of the eclipsing binaries TU Cnc, VZ Leo, and OS Ori are analyzed. Secular period decreases were earlier believed to occur in these systems. It is demonstrated that the period variations of TU Cnc can be represented using the light-time effect corresponding to the orbital motion of the eclipsing binary with a period of 78.6 years around the center ofmass of the triple system, with the mass of the third body being M 3 > 0.82 M ⊙. With the same accuracy, the period variations of VZ Leo and OS Ori can be represented either solely using the light-time effect, or a superposition of a secular period decrease and the light-time effect. For VZ Leo, the period of the long-term orbit is 63.8 years in the former case and 67.9 years in the latter case. Similar masses for the third body are indicated in both cases: M 3 > 0.55 M ⊙ and M 3 > 0.61 M ⊙. For OS Ori, the period of the long-term orbit is 46 years and M 3 > 0.5 M ⊙ in the former case, and the period is 36 years and M 3 > 0.6 M ⊙ in the latter case.

  1. Detectable radio flares following gravitational waves from mergers of binary neutron stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakar, Ehud; Piran, Tsvi

    2011-09-28

    Mergers of neutron-star/neutron-star binaries are strong sources of gravitational waves. They can also launch subrelativistic and mildly relativistic outflows and are often assumed to be the sources of short γ-ray bursts. An electromagnetic signature that persisted for weeks to months after the event would strengthen any future claim of a detection of gravitational waves. Here we present results of calculations showing that the interaction of mildly relativistic outflows with the surrounding medium produces radio flares with peak emission at 1.4 gigahertz that persist at detectable (submillijansky) levels for weeks, out to a redshift of 0.1. Slower subrelativistic outflows produce flares detectable for years at 150 megahertz, as well as at 1.4 gigahertz, from slightly shorter distances. The radio transient RT 19870422 (ref. 11) has the properties predicted by our model, and its most probable origin is the merger of a compact neutron-star/neutron-star binary. The lack of radio detections usually associated with short γ-ray bursts does not constrain the radio transients that we discuss here (from mildly relativistic and subrelativistic outflows) because short γ-ray burst redshifts are typically >0.1 and the appropriate timescales (longer than weeks) have not been sampled.

  2. Orbital Elements and Stellar Parameters of the Active Binary UX Arietis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, C. A.; Monnier, J. D.; Roettenbacher, R. M.; Torres, G.; Henry, G. W.; Korhonen, H.; Beasley, A.; Schaefer, G. H.; Turner, N. H.; Ten Brummelaar, T.; Farrington, C. D.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Baron, F.; Kraus, S.

    2017-08-01

    Stellar activity observed as large surface spots, radio flares, or emission lines is often found in binary systems. UX Arietis exhibits these signs of activity, originating on the K0 subgiant primary component. Our aim is to resolve the binary, measure the orbital motion, and provide accurate stellar parameters such as masses and luminosities to aid in the interpretation of the observed phenomena. Using the CHARA six-telescope optical long-baseline array on Mount Wilson, California, we obtained amplitudes and phases of the interferometric visibility on baselines up to 330 m in length, resolving the two components of the binary. We reanalyzed archival Center for Astrophysics spectra to disentangle the binary component spectra and the spectrum of the third component, which was resolved by speckle interferometry. We also obtained new spectra with the Nordic Optical Telescope, and we present new photometric data that we use to model stellar surface spot locations. Both interferometric visibilities and spectroscopic radial velocities are modeled with a spotted primary stellar surface using the Wilson-Devinney code. We fit the orbital elements to the apparent orbit and radial velocity data to derive the distance (52.1 ± 0.8 pc) and stellar masses ({M}{{P}}=1.30+/- 0.06 {M}⊙ , {M}{{S}}=1.14+/- 0.06 {M}⊙ ). The radius of the primary can be determined to be {R}{{P}}=5.6+/- 0.1 {R}⊙ and that of the secondary to be {R}{{S}}=1.6+/- 0.2 {R}⊙ . The equivalent spot coverage of the primary component was found to be 62% with an effective temperature 20% below that of the unspotted surface.

  3. Masses of the components of SB2 binaries observed with Gaia - IV. Accurate SB2 orbits for 14 binaries and masses of three binaries*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, F.; Halbwachs, J.-L.; Lebreton, Y.; Soubiran, C.; Arenou, F.; Pourbaix, D.; Famaey, B.; Guillout, P.; Ibata, R.; Mazeh, T.

    2018-02-01

    The orbital motion of non-contact double-lined spectroscopic binaries (SB2s), with periods of a few tens of days to several years, holds unique, accurate information on individual stellar masses, which only long-term monitoring can unlock. The combination of radial velocity measurements from high-resolution spectrographs and astrometric measurements from high-precision interferometers allows the derivation of SB2 component masses down to the percent precision. Since 2010, we have observed a large sample of SB2s with the SOPHIE spectrograph at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence, aiming at the derivation of orbital elements with sufficient accuracy to obtain masses of components with relative errors as low as 1 per cent when the astrometric measurements of the Gaia satellite are taken into account. In this paper, we present the results from 6 yr of observations of 14 SB2 systems with periods ranging from 33 to 4185 days. Using the TODMOR algorithm, we computed radial velocities from the spectra and then derived the orbital elements of these binary systems. The minimum masses of the 28 stellar components are then obtained with an average sample accuracy of 1.0 ± 0.2 per cent. Combining the radial velocities with existing interferometric measurements, we derived the masses of the primary and secondary components of HIP 61100, HIP 95995 and HIP 101382 with relative errors for components (A,B) of, respectively, (2.0, 1.7) per cent, (3.7, 3.7) per cent and (0.2, 0.1) per cent. Using the CESAM2K stellar evolution code, we constrained the initial He abundance, age and metallicity for HIP 61100 and HIP 95995.

  4. Gravitational wave spectroscopy of binary neutron star merger remnants with mode stacking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Paschalidis, Vasileios; Yagi, Kent; Lehner, Luis; Pretorius, Frans; Yunes, Nicolás

    2018-01-01

    A binary neutron star coalescence event has recently been observed for the first time in gravitational waves, and many more detections are expected once current ground-based detectors begin operating at design sensitivity. As in the case of binary black holes, gravitational waves generated by binary neutron stars consist of inspiral, merger, and postmerger components. Detecting the latter is important because it encodes information about the nuclear equation of state in a regime that cannot be probed prior to merger. The postmerger signal, however, can only be expected to be measurable by current detectors for events closer than roughly ten megaparsecs, which given merger rate estimates implies a low probability of observation within the expected lifetime of these detectors. We carry out Monte Carlo simulations showing that the dominant postmerger signal (the ℓ=m =2 mode) from individual binary neutron star mergers may not have a good chance of observation even with the most sensitive future ground-based gravitational wave detectors proposed so far (the Einstein Telescope and Cosmic Explorer, for certain equations of state, assuming a full year of operation, the latest merger rates, and a detection threshold corresponding to a signal-to-noise ratio of 5). For this reason, we propose two methods that stack the postmerger signal from multiple binary neutron star observations to boost the postmerger detection probability. The first method follows a commonly used practice of multiplying the Bayes factors of individual events. The second method relies on an assumption that the mode phase can be determined from the inspiral waveform, so that coherent mode stacking of the data from different events becomes possible. We find that both methods significantly improve the chances of detecting the dominant postmerger signal, making a detection very likely after a year of observation with Cosmic Explorer for certain equations of state. We also show that in terms of detection

  5. Instability in the red star of semi-detached binary systems: Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    A numerical calculation is carried out of the unstable behaviour of the secondary star of a semi-detached binary system near the inner Lagrangian point, using a second-order, two-dimensional hydrodynamic scheme. This work is radiative only and thus may exaggerate any unstable motions of the star, with the intention only to determine the effects of the non-spherical Roche geometry on any mass loss flows. In comparison with previous one-dimensional calculations, the initial discrete mass loss is strengthened near the inner Lagrangian point and suppressed in neighbouring, off-axis regions. These mass loss motions generate a sideways travelling wave which moves across the outer stellar layers and excites further mass loss. We conclude that the effects due to the non-spherical geometry of the star are important and should be included in future calculations. (author)

  6. Instability in the red star of semi-detached binary systems. III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, D. A.

    1988-03-01

    The author calculates numerically the unstable behaviour of the secondary star of a semi-detached binary system near the inner Lagrangian point, using a second-order, two-dimensional hydrodynamic scheme. This work is radiative only and thus may exaggerate any unstable motions of the star, with the intention only to determine the effects of the non-spherical Roche geometry on any mass loss flows. In comparison with previous one-dimensional calculations, the initial discrete mass loss is strengthened near the inner Lagrangian point and suppressed in neighbouring, off-axis regions. These mass loss motions generate a sideways travelling wave which moves across the outer stellar layers and excites further mass loss. The author concludes that the effects due to the non-spherical geometry of the star are important and should be included in future calculations.

  7. Using gravitational-wave data to constrain dynamical tides in neutron star binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Nils; Ho, Wynn C. G.

    2018-01-01

    We discuss the role of dynamical tidal effects for inspiraling neutron star binaries, focusing on features that may be considered "unmodeled" in gravitational-wave searches. In order to cover the range of possibilities, we consider (i) individual oscillation modes becoming resonant with the tide, (ii) the elliptical instability, where a pair of inertial modes exhibit a nonlinear resonance with the tide, and (iii) the nonresonant p-g instability which may arise as high-order pressure (p) and gravity (g) modes in the star couple nonlinearly to the tide. In each case, we estimate the amount of additional energy loss that needs to be associated with the dynamical tide in order for the effect to impact on an observed gravitational-wave signal. We explore to what extent the involved neutron star physics may be considered known and how one may be able to use observational data to constrain theory.

  8. Investigation of the binary fraction among candidate A-F type hybrid stars detected by Kepler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lampens P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We are currently monitoring up to 40 Kepler candidate δ Scuti-γ Doradus (resp. γ Doradus-δ Scuti hybrid stars in radial velocity in order to identify the physical cause behind the low frequencies observed in the periodograms based on the ultra-high accuracy Kepler space photometry. The presence of low frequency variability in unevolved or slightly evolved oscillating A/F-type stars can generally be explained in three ways: either 1 the star is an (undetected binary or multiple system, or 2 the star is a g-mode pulsator (i.e. a genuine hybrid, or 3 the star’s atmosphere displays an asymmetric intensity distribution (caused by spots, i.e. chemical anomalies, or by (very high rotation, which is detected through rotational modulation. Our targets were selected from the globally characterized variable A/F-type stars of the Kepler mission [7]. We observe each star at least 4 times unevenly spread over a time lapse up to 2 months with the HERMES spectrograph [6]. In the case of composite, multiple-lined spectra, these observations also provide the atmospheric properties of each component. Our principal goal is to estimate the fraction of short-period, spectroscopic systems in the sample.

  9. EXPECTED LARGE SYNOPTIC SURVEY TELESCOPE (LSST) YIELD OF ECLIPSING BINARY STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prsa, Andrej; Pepper, Joshua; Stassun, Keivan G.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we estimate the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) yield of eclipsing binary stars, which will survey ∼20,000 deg 2 of the southern sky during a period of 10 years in six photometric passbands to r ∼ 24.5. We generate a set of 10,000 eclipsing binary light curves sampled to the LSST time cadence across the whole sky, with added noise as a function of apparent magnitude. This set is passed to the analysis-of-variance period finder to assess the recoverability rate for the periods, and the successfully phased light curves are passed to the artificial-intelligence-based pipeline ebai to assess the recoverability rate in terms of the eclipsing binaries' physical and geometric parameters. We find that, out of ∼24 million eclipsing binaries observed by LSST with a signal-to-noise ratio >10 in mission lifetime, ∼28% or 6.7 million can be fully characterized by the pipeline. Of those, ∼25% or 1.7 million will be double-lined binaries, a true treasure trove for stellar astrophysics.

  10. Pulsating red giant stars in eccentric binary systems discovered from Kepler space-based photometry. A sample study and the analysis of KIC 5006817

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beck, P.G.; Hambleton, K.; Vos, J.; Kallinger, T.; Bloemen, S.; Tkachenko, A.; García, R.A.; Østensen, R.H.; Aerts, C.; Kurtz, D.W.; De Ridder, J.; Hekker, S.; Pavlovski, K.; Mathur, S.; De Smedt, K.; Derekas, A.; Corsaro, E.; Mosser, B.; Van Winckel, H.; Huber, D.; Degroote, P.; Davies, G.R.; Prša, A.; Debosscher, J.; Elsworth, Y.; Nemeth, P.; Siess, L.; Schmid, V.S.; Pápics, P.I.; de Vries, B.L.; van Marle, A.J.; Marcos-Arenal, P.; Lobel, A.

    2014-01-01

    Context. The unparalleled photometric data obtained by NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope has led to improved understanding of red giant stars and binary stars. Seismology allows us to constrain the properties of red giants. In addition to eclipsing binaries, eccentric non-eclipsing binaries that exhibit

  11. KEPLER ECLIPSING BINARY STARS. III. CLASSIFICATION OF KEPLER ECLIPSING BINARY LIGHT CURVES WITH LOCALLY LINEAR EMBEDDING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matijevič, Gal; Prša, Andrej; Orosz, Jerome A.; Welsh, William F.; Bloemen, Steven; Barclay, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We present an automated classification of 2165 Kepler eclipsing binary (EB) light curves that accompanied the second Kepler data release. The light curves are classified using locally linear embedding, a general nonlinear dimensionality reduction tool, into morphology types (detached, semi-detached, overcontact, ellipsoidal). The method, related to a more widely used principal component analysis, produces a lower-dimensional representation of the input data while preserving local geometry and, consequently, the similarity between neighboring data points. We use this property to reduce the dimensionality in a series of steps to a one-dimensional manifold and classify light curves with a single parameter that is a measure of 'detachedness' of the system. This fully automated classification correlates well with the manual determination of morphology from the data release, and also efficiently highlights any misclassified objects. Once a lower-dimensional projection space is defined, the classification of additional light curves runs in a negligible time and the method can therefore be used as a fully automated classifier in pipeline structures. The classifier forms a tier of the Kepler EB pipeline that pre-processes light curves for the artificial intelligence based parameter estimator.

  12. NuSTAR Observations of the State Transition of Millisecond Pulsar Binary PSR J1023+0038

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tendulkar, S.P.; Yang, C.; An, H.; Kaspi, V.M.; Archibald, A.M.; Bassa, C.; Bellm, E.; Bogdanov, S.; Harrison, F.A.; Hessels, J.W.T.; Janssen, G.H.; Lyne, A.G.; Patruno, A.; Stappers, B.; Stern, D.; Tomsick, J.A.; Boggs, S.; Chakrabarty, D.; Christensen, F.E.; Craig, W.W.; Hailey, C.A.; Zhang, W.

    2014-01-01

    We report NuSTAR observations of the millisecond pulsar-low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) transition system PSR J1023+0038 from 2013 June and October, before and after the formation of an accretion disk around the neutron star. Between June 10 and 12, a few days to two weeks before the radio

  13. HD15082b, a short-period planet orbiting an A-star

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lodieu N.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Most of the known transiting extrasolar planets orbit slowly rotating F, G or K stars. In here we report on the detection of a transiting planet orbiting the bright, rapidly rotating A5 star HD15082, recently made by SuperWASP. Time resolved spectroscopic observations taken during transit show a hump caused by the planet crossing the line profile. From the analysis of the spectra, we derive the radius of the planet and find that it is orbiting retrograde in respect to the spin of the star. Because of its small distance from an A5 star, this planet must be one of the hottest planets known, which makes it relatively easy to detect it in the IR. We thus tried to detect it using the TNG but did not succeed. Using direct imaging, we search for possible companions, and found one candidate.

  14. Elastic, mechanical, and thermodynamic properties of Bi-Sb binaries: Effect of spin-orbit coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sobhit; Valencia-Jaime, Irais; Pavlic, Olivia; Romero, Aldo H.

    2018-02-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we systematically study the elastic stiffness constants, mechanical properties, elastic wave velocities, Debye temperature, melting temperature, and specific heat of several thermodynamically stable crystal structures of BixSb1 -x (0 binaries, which are of great interest due to their numerous inherent rich properties, such as thermoelectricity, thermomagnetic cooling, strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC) effects, and topological features in the electronic band structure. We analyze the bulk modulus (B ), Young's modulus (E ), shear modulus (G ), B /G ratio, and Poisson's ratio (ν ) as a function of the Bi concentration in BixSb1 -x . The effect of SOC on the above-mentioned properties is further investigated. In general, we observe that the SOC effects cause elastic softening in most of the studied structures. Three monoclinic structures of Bi-Sb binaries are found to exhibit significantly large auxetic behavior due to the hingelike geometric structure of bonds. The Debye temperature and the magnitude of the elastic wave velocities monotonically increase with increasing Sb concentration. However, anomalies were observed at very low Sb concentration. We also discuss the specific-heat capacity versus temperature data for all studied binaries. Our theoretical results are in excellent agreement with the existing experimental and theoretical data. The comprehensive understanding of the material properties such as hardness, mechanical strength, melting temperature, propagation of the elastic waves, auxeticity, and heat capacity is vital for practical applications of the studied binaries.

  15. The Electromagnetic Counterpart of the Binary Neutron Star Merger LIGO/Virgo GW170817. III. Optical and UV Spectra of a Blue Kilonova from Fast Polar Ejecta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholl, M.; Berger, E.; Kasen, D.; Metzger, B. D.; Elias, J.; Briceño, C.; Alexander, K. D.; Blanchard, P. K.; Chornock, R.; Cowperthwaite, P. S.; Eftekhari, T.; Fong, W.; Margutti, R.; Villar, V. A.; Williams, P. K. G.; Brown, W.; Annis, J.; Bahramian, A.; Brout, D.; Brown, D. A.; Chen, H. -Y.; Clemens, J. C.; Dennihy, E.; Dunlap, B.; Holz, D. E.; Marchesini, E.; Massaro, F.; Moskowitz, N.; Pelisoli, I.; Rest, A.; Ricci, F.; Sako, M.; Soares-Santos, M.; Strader, J.

    2017-10-16

    We present optical and ultraviolet spectra of the first electromagnetic counterpart to a gravitational wave (GW) source, the binary neutron star merger GW170817. Spectra were obtained nightly between 1.5 and 9.5 days post-merger, using the SOAR and Magellan telescopes; the UV spectrum was obtained with the \\textit{Hubble Space Telescope} at 5.5 days. Our data reveal a rapidly-fading blue component ($T\\approx5500$ K at 1.5 days) that quickly reddens; spectra later than $\\gtrsim 4.5$ days peak beyond the optical regime. The spectra are mostly featureless, although we identify a possible weak emission line at $\\sim 7900$ \\AA\\ at $t\\lesssim 4.5$ days. The colours, rapid evolution and featureless spectrum are consistent with a "blue" kilonova from polar ejecta comprised mainly of light $r$-process nuclei with atomic mass number $A\\lesssim 140$. This indicates a sight-line within $\\theta_{\\rm obs}\\lesssim 45^{\\circ}$ of the orbital axis. Comparison to models suggests $\\sim0.03$ M$_\\odot$ of blue ejecta, with a velocity of $\\sim 0.3c$. The required lanthanide fraction is $\\sim 10^{-4}$, but this drops to $<10^{-5}$ in the outermost ejecta. The large velocities point to a dynamical origin, rather than a disk wind, for this blue component, suggesting that both binary constituents are neutron stars (as opposed to a binary consisting of a neutron star and a black hole). For dynamical ejecta, the high mass favors a small neutron star radius of $\\lesssim 12$ km. This mass also supports the idea that neutron star mergers are a major contributor to $r$-process nucleosynthesis.

  16. On the Orbit Calculation of Visual Binaries With a Very Short Arc: Application to the Pms Binary System, Fw Tau Ab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docobo, J. A.; Tamazian, V. S.; Campo, P. P.

    2018-02-01

    In the vast majority of cases when available astrometric measurements of a visual binary cover a very short orbital arc, it is practically impossible to calculate a good quality orbit. It is especially important for systems with pre-main sequence components where standard mass-spectrum calibrations cannot be applied nor can a dynamical parallax be calculated. We have shown that the analytical method of Docobo allows us to put certain constraints on the most likely orbital solutions, using an available realistic estimate of the global mass of the system. As an example, we studied the interesting PMS binary, FW Tau AB, located in the Taurus-Auriga as well as investigated a range of its possible orbital solutions combined with an assumed distance between 120 pc and 160 pc. To maintain the total mass of FW Tau AB in a realistic range between 0.2M_{⊙} and 0.6M_{⊙}, minimal orbital periods should begin at 105, 150, 335, and 2300 yr for distances of 120, 130, 140, and 150 pc, respectively (no plausible orbits were found assuming a distance of 160 pc). An original criterion to establish the upper limit of the orbital period is applied. When the position angle in some astrometric measurements was flipped by 180°, orbits with periods close to 45 yr are also plausible. Three example orbits with periods of 44.6, 180, and 310 yr are presented.

  17. Strange Quark Stars in Binaries: Formation Rates, Mergers, and Explosive Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiktorowicz, G.; Drago, A.; Pagliara, G.; Popov, S. B.

    2017-09-01

    Recently, the possible coexistence of a first family composed of “normal” neutron stars (NSs) with a second family of strange quark stars (QSs) has been proposed as a solution of problems related to the maximum mass and to the minimal radius of these compact stellar objects. In this paper, we study the mass distribution of compact objects formed in binary systems and the relative fractions of quark and NSs in different subpopulations. We incorporate the strange QS formation model provided by the two-families scenario, and we perform a large-scale population synthesis study in order to obtain the population characteristics. According to our results, the main channel for strange QS formation in binary systems is accretion from a secondary companion on an NS. Therefore, a rather large number of strange QSs form by accretion in low-mass X-ray binaries and this opens the possibility of having explosive GRB-like phenomena not related to supernovae and not due to the merger of two NSs. The number of double strange QS systems is rather small, with only a tiny fraction that merge within a Hubble time. This drastically limits the flux of strangelets produced by the merger, which turns out to be compatible with all limits stemming from Earth and lunar experiments. Moreover, this value of the flux rules out at least one relevant channel for the transformation of all NSs into strange QSs by strangelets’ absorption.

  18. Upper Limits on the Rates of Binary Neutron Star and Neutron Star-Black Hole Mergers from Advanced LIGO’s First Observing Run

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio., M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dasgupta, A.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; De, S.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Fenyvesi, E.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Geng, P.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jian, L.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; K, Haris; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kéfélian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chi-Woong; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.-M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kissel, J. S.; Klein, B.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Lewis, J. B.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lombardi, A. L.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magaña Zertuche, L.; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O. E. S.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Setyawati, Y.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, D. S.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-12-01

    We report here the non-detection of gravitational waves from the merger of binary-neutron star systems and neutron star-black hole systems during the first observing run of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO). In particular, we searched for gravitational-wave signals from binary-neutron star systems with component masses \\in [1,3] {M}⊙ and component dimensionless spins <0.05. We also searched for neutron star-black hole systems with the same neutron star parameters, black hole mass \\in [2,99] {M}⊙ , and no restriction on the black hole spin magnitude. We assess the sensitivity of the two LIGO detectors to these systems and find that they could have detected the merger of binary-neutron star systems with component mass distributions of 1.35 ± 0.13 M ⊙ at a volume-weighted average distance of ˜70 Mpc, and for neutron star-black hole systems with neutron star masses of 1.4 M ⊙ and black hole masses of at least 5 M ⊙, a volume-weighted average distance of at least ˜110 Mpc. From this we constrain with 90% confidence the merger rate to be less than 12,600 Gpc-3 yr-1 for binary-neutron star systems and less than 3600 Gpc-3 yr-1 for neutron star-black hole systems. We discuss the astrophysical implications of these results, which we find to be in conflict with only the most optimistic predictions. However, we find that if no detection of neutron star-binary mergers is made in the next two Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo observing runs we would place significant constraints on the merger rates. Finally, assuming a rate of {10}-7+20 Gpc-3 yr-1, short gamma-ray bursts beamed toward the Earth, and assuming that all short gamma-ray bursts have binary-neutron star (neutron star-black hole) progenitors, we can use our 90% confidence rate upper limits to constrain the beaming angle of the gamma-ray burst to be greater than 2\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} {3}-1.1+1.7 (4\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} {3}-1.9+3.1).

  19. Extreme isolation of WN3/O3 stars and implications for their evolutionary origin as the elusive stripped binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nathan; Götberg, Ylva; de Mink, Selma E.

    2018-03-01

    Recent surveys of the Magellanic Clouds have revealed a subtype of Wolf-Rayet (WR) star with peculiar properties. WN3/O3 spectra exhibit both WR-like emission and O3 V-like absorption - but at lower luminosity than O3 V or WN stars. We examine the projected spatial distribution of WN3/O3 stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud as compared to O-type stars. Surprisingly, WN3/O3 stars are among the most isolated of all classes of massive stars; they have a distribution similar to red supergiants dominated by initial masses of 10-15 M⊙, and are far more dispersed than classical WR stars or luminous blue variables. Their lack of association with clusters of O-type stars suggests strongly that WN3/O3 stars are not the descendants of single massive stars (30 M⊙ or above). Instead, they are likely products of interacting binaries at lower initial mass (10-18 M⊙). Comparison with binary models suggests a probable origin with primaries in this mass range that were stripped of their H envelopes through non-conservative mass transfer by a low-mass secondary. We show that model spectra and positions on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram for binary-stripped stars are consistent with WN3/O3 stars. Monitoring radial velocities with high-resolution spectra can test for low-mass companions or runaway velocities. With lower initial mass and environments that avoid very massive stars, the WN3/O3 stars fit expectations for progenitors of Type Ib and possibly Type Ibn supernovae.

  20. Evidence for Dynamically Driven Formation of the GW170817 Neutron Star Binary in NGC 4993

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmese, A.; Hartley, W.; Tarsitano, F.; Conselice, C.; Lahav, O.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Lin, H.; Soares-Santos, M.; Tucker, D.; Brout, D.; Banerji, M.; Bechtol, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Fruchter, A.; García-Bellido, J.; Herner, K.; Levan, A. J.; Li, T. S.; Lidman, C.; Misra, K.; Sako, M.; Scolnic, D.; Smith, M.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Davis, C.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Eifler, T. F.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Giannantonio, T.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gschwend, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Jeltema, T.; Johnson, M. W. G.; Johnson, M. D.; Krause, E.; Kron, R.; Kuehn, K.; Kuhlmann, S.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; McMahon, R. G.; Menanteau, F.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Neilsen, E.; Ogando, R. L. C.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Sanchez, E.; Schindler, R.; Smith, R. C.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, R. C.; Walker, A. R.; Weller, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zuntz, J.

    2017-11-01

    We present a study of NGC 4993, the host galaxy of the GW170817 gravitational-wave event, the GRB 170817A short gamma-ray burst (sGRB), and the AT 2017gfo kilonova. We use Dark Energy Camera imaging, AAT spectra, and publicly available data, relating our findings to binary neutron star (BNS) formation scenarios and merger delay timescales. NGC 4993 is a nearby early-type galaxy, with an I-band Sérsic index n = 4.0 and low asymmetry (A = 0.04 ± 0.01). These properties are unusual for sGRB hosts. However, NGC 4993 presents shell-like structures and dust lanes indicative of a recent galaxy merger, with the optical transient located close to a shell. We constrain the star formation history (SFH) of the galaxy assuming that the galaxy merger produced a star formation burst, but find little to no ongoing star formation in either spatially resolved broadband SED or spectral fitting. We use the best-fit SFH to estimate the BNS merger rate in this type of galaxy, as {R}{NSM}{gal}={5.7}-3.3+0.57× {10}-6{{yr}}-1. If star formation is the only considered BNS formation scenario, the expected number of BNS mergers from early-type galaxies detectable with LIGO during its first two observing seasons is {0.038}-0.022+0.004, as opposed to ˜0.5 from all galaxy types. Hypothesizing that the binary formed due to dynamical interactions during the galaxy merger, the subsequent time elapsed can constrain the delay time of the BNS coalescence. By using velocity dispersion estimates and the position of the shells, we find that the galaxy merger occurred t mer ≲ 200 Myr prior to the BNS coalescence.

  1. The detection rates of merging binary black holes originating from star clusters and their mass function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Michiko S.; Tanikawa, Ataru; Makino, Junichiro

    2017-12-01

    Advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory) observations achieved the first detection of the gravitational wave, which was from a merging binary black hole (BBH). In the near future, more merger events will be observed, and the mass distribution of them will become available. The mass distribution of merger events reflects the evolutionary path of BBHs: dynamical formation in dense star clusters or common envelope evolution from primordial binaries. In this paper, we estimate the detection rate of merging BBHs which dynamically formed in dense star clusters by combining the results of N-body simulations, modeling of globular clusters, and cosmic star-cluster formation history. We estimate that the merger rate density in the local universe within the redshift of 0.1 is 13-57 Gpc-3 yr-1. We find that the detection rate is 0.23-4.6 per year for the current sensitivity limit and that it would increase to 5.1-99 per year for the designed sensitivity which will be achieved in 2019. The distribution of merger rate density in the local universe as a function of redshifted chirp mass has a peak close to the low-mass end. The chirp mass function of the detected mergers, on the other hand, has a peak at the high-mass end, but is almost flat. This difference is simply because the detection range is larger for more massive BBHs.

  2. Matter in compact binary mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Jocelyn; LIGO Scientific Collaboration, Virgo Scientific Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Mergers of binary neutron stars or neutron-star/black-hole systems are promising targets for gravitational-wave detection. The dynamics of merging compact objects, and thus their gravitational-wave signatures, are primarily determined by the mass and spin of the components. However, the presence of matter can make an imprint on the final orbits and merger of a binary system. I will outline efforts to understand the impact of neutron-star matter on gravitational waves, using both theoretical and computational input, so that gravitational-wave observations can be used to measure the properties of source systems with neutron-star components.

  3. Final binary star results from the ESO VLT Lunar occultations program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richichi, A. [National Astronomical Research Institute of Thailand, 191 Siriphanich Bldg., Huay Kaew Road, Suthep, Muang, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Fors, O. [Departament Astronomia i Meteorologia and Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (ICC), Universitat de Barcelona (UB/IEEC), Martí i Franqués 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Cusano, F. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Ivanov, V. D., E-mail: andrea4work@gmail.com [European Southern Observatory, Ave. Alonso de Cordova 3107, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile)

    2014-03-01

    We report on 13 subarcsecond binaries, detected by means of lunar occultations in the near-infrared at the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT). They are all first-time detections except for the visual binary HD 158122, which we resolved for the first time in the near-infrared. The primaries have magnitudes in the range K = 4.5-10.0, and companions in the range K = 6.8-11.1. The magnitude differences have a median value of 2.4, with the largest being 4.6. The projected separations are in the range of 4-168 mas, with a median of 13 mas. We discuss and compare our results with the available literature. With this paper, we conclude the mining for binary star detections in the 1226 occultations recorded at the VLT with the ISAAC instrument. We expect that the majority of these binaries may be unresolvable by adaptive optics on current telescopes, and they might be challenging for long-baseline interferometry. However, they constitute an interesting sample for future larger telescopes and for astrometric missions such as GAIA.

  4. Can We Distinguish Low-mass Black Holes in Neutron Star Binaries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; East, William E.; Lehner, Luis

    2018-04-01

    The detection of gravitational waves (GWs) from coalescing binary neutron stars (NS) represents another milestone in gravitational-wave astronomy. However, since LIGO is currently not as sensitive to the merger/ringdown part of the waveform, the possibility that such signals are produced by a black hole (BH)–NS binary can not be easily ruled out without appealing to assumptions about the underlying compact object populations. We review a few astrophysical channels that might produce BHs below 3 M ⊙ (roughly the upper bound on the maximum mass of an NS), as well as existing constraints for these channels. We show that, due to the uncertainty in the NS equation of state, it is difficult to distinguish GWs from a binary NS system from those of a BH–NS system with the same component masses, assuming Advanced LIGO sensitivity. This degeneracy can be broken by accumulating statistics from many events to better constrain the equation of state, or by third-generation detectors with higher sensitivity to the late-spiral to post-merger signal. We also discuss the possible differences in electromagnetic (EM) counterparts between binary NS and low-mass BH–NS mergers, arguing that it will be challenging to definitively distinguish the two without better understanding of the underlying astrophysical processes.

  5. Accurate evolutions of inspiralling neutron-star binaries: assessment of the truncation error

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baiotti, Luca; Giacomazzo, Bruno; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2009-01-01

    We have recently presented an investigation in full general relativity of the dynamics and gravitational-wave emission from binary neutron stars which inspiral and merge, producing a black hole surrounded by a torus (Baiotti et al 2008 Phys. Rev. D 78 084033). We discuss here in more detail the convergence properties of the results presented in Baiotti et al (2008 Phys. Rev. D 78 084033) and, in particular, the deterioration of the convergence rate at the merger and during the survival of the merged object, when strong shocks are formed and turbulence develops. We also show that physically reasonable and numerically convergent results obtained at low resolution suffer however from large truncation errors and hence are of little physical use. We summarize our findings in an 'error budget', which includes the different sources of possible inaccuracies we have investigated and provides a first quantitative assessment of the precision in the modelling of compact fluid binaries.

  6. A PRECISE PHYSICAL ORBIT FOR THE M-DWARF BINARY GLIESE 268

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barry, R. K.; Danchi, W. C. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Laboratory for Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics, Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Demory, B.-O.; Segransan, D.; Di Folco, E.; Queloz, D.; Udry, S. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Forveille, T.; Delfosse, X.; Mayor, M.; Perrier, C. [Geneva Observatory, Geneva University, 51 Ch.des Maillettes, CH-1290 Versoix (Switzerland); Spooner, H. R. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Torres, G. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02136 (United States); Traub, W. A., E-mail: Richard.K.Barry@nasa.gov [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2012-11-20

    We report high-precision interferometric and radial velocity (RV) observations of the M-dwarf binary Gl 268. Combining measurements conducted using the IOTA interferometer and the ELODIE and Harvard Center for Astrophysics RV instruments leads to a mass of 0.22596 {+-} 0.00084 M {sub Sun} for component A and 0.19230 {+-} 0.00071 M {sub Sun} for component B. The system parallax as determined by these observations is 0.1560 {+-} 0.0030 arcsec-a measurement with 1.9% uncertainty in excellent agreement with Hipparcos (0.1572 {+-} 0.0033). The absolute H-band magnitudes of the component stars are not well constrained by these measurements; however, we can place an approximate upper limit of 7.95 and 8.1 for Gl 268A and B, respectively. We test these physical parameters against the predictions of theoretical models that combine stellar evolution with high fidelity, non-gray atmospheric models. Measured and predicted values are compatible within 2{sigma}. These results are among the most precise masses measured for visual binaries and compete with the best adaptive optics and eclipsing binary results.

  7. A Precise Physical Orbit For The M-Dwarf Binary Gliese 268

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, R. K.; Demory, B. -O.; Segransan, D.; Forveille, T.; Danchi, W. C.; Di Folco, E.; Queloz, D.; Spooner, H. R.; Torres, G.; Traub, W. A.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We report high-precision interferometric and radial velocity (RV) observations of the M-dwarf binary Gl 268. Combining measurements conducted using the IOTA interferometer and the ELODIE and Harvard Center for Astrophysics RV instruments leads to a mass of 0.22596 plus-minus 0.00084 Mass compared to the sun for component A and 0.19230 plus-minus 0.00071 Mass compared to the sun for component B. The system parallax as determined by these observations is 0.1560 plus-minus 0.0030 arcsec - a measurement with 1.9% uncertainty in excellent agreement with Hipparcos (0.1572 plus-minus 0.0033). The absolute H-band magnitudes of the component stars are not well constrained by these measurements; however, we can place an approximate upper limit of 7.95 and 8.1 for Gl 268A and B, respectively.We test these physical parameters against the predictions of theoretical models that combine stellar evolution with high fidelity, non-gray atmospheric models. Measured and predicted values are compatible within 2sigma. These results are among the most precise masses measured for visual binaries and compete with the best adaptive optics and eclipsing binary results.

  8. Chemical evolution of high-mass stars in close binaries. II. The evolved component of the eclipsing binary V380 Cygni

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavlovski, K.; Tamajo, E.; Koubský, Pavel; Southworth, J.; Yang, S.; Kolbas, V.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 400, č. 2 (2009), s. 791-804 ISSN 0035-8711 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : binaries stars * eclipsing * fundamental parameters Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 5.103, year: 2009

  9. A planet in a polar orbit of 1.4 solar-mass star

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guenther E.W.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although more than a thousand transiting extrasolar planets have been discovered, only very few of them orbit stars that are more massive than the Sun. The discovery of such planets is interesting, because they have formed in disks that are more massive but had a shorter life time than those of solar-like stars. Studies of planets more massive than the Sun thus tell us how the properties of the proto-planetary disks effect the formation of planets. Another aspect that makes these planets interesting is that they have kept their original orbital inclinations. By studying them we can thus find out whether the orbital axes planets are initially aligned to the stars rotational axes, or not. Here we report on the discovery of a planet of a 1.4 solar-mass star with a period of 5.6 days in a polar orbit made by CoRoT. This new planet thus is one of the few known close-in planets orbiting a star that is substantially more massive than the Sun.

  10. Modeling and analysis of periodic orbits around a contact binary asteroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jinglang; Noomen, Ron; Visser, Pieter N. A. M.; Yuan, Jianping

    2015-06-01

    The existence and characteristics of periodic orbits (POs) in the vicinity of a contact binary asteroid are investigated with an averaged spherical harmonics model. A contact binary asteroid consists of two components connected to each other, resulting in a highly bifurcated shape. Here, it is represented by a combination of an ellipsoid and a sphere. The gravitational field of this configuration is for the first time expanded into a spherical harmonics model up to degree and order 8. Compared with the exact potential, the truncation at degree and order 4 is found to introduce an error of less than 10 % at the circumscribing sphere and less than 1 % at a distance of the double of the reference radius. The Hamiltonian taking into account harmonics up to degree and order 4 is developed. After double averaging of this Hamiltonian, the model is reduced to include zonal harmonics only and frozen orbits are obtained. The tesseral terms are found to introduce significant variations on the frozen orbits and distort the frozen situation. Applying the method of Poincaré sections, phase space structures of the single-averaged model are generated for different energy levels and rotation rates of the asteroid, from which the dynamics driven by the 4×4 harmonics model is identified and POs are found. It is found that the disturbing effect of the highly irregular gravitational field on orbital motion is weakened around the polar region, and also for an asteroid with a fast rotation rate. Starting with initial conditions from this averaged model, families of exact POs in the original non-averaged system are obtained employing a numerical search method and a continuation technique. Some of these POs are stable and are candidates for future missions.

  11. An instability due to the nonlinear coupling of p-modes to g-modes: Implications for coalescing neutron star binaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, Nevin N.; Arras, Phil; Burkart, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    A weakly nonlinear fluid wave propagating within a star can be unstable to three-wave interactions. The resonant parametric instability is a well-known form of three-wave interaction in which a primary wave of frequency ω a excites a pair of secondary waves of frequency ω b + ω c ≅ ω a . Here we consider a nonresonant form of three-wave interaction in which a low-frequency primary wave excites a high-frequency p-mode and a low-frequency g-mode such that ω b + ω c >> ω a . We show that a p-mode can couple so strongly to a g-mode of similar radial wavelength that this type of nonresonant interaction is unstable even if the primary wave amplitude is small. As an application, we analyze the stability of the tide in coalescing neutron star binaries to p-g mode coupling. We find that the equilibrium tide and dynamical tide are both p-g unstable at gravitational wave frequencies f gw ≳ 20 Hz and drive short wavelength p-g mode pairs to significant energies on very short timescales (much less than the orbital decay time due to gravitational radiation). Resonant parametric coupling to the tide is, by contrast, either stable or drives modes at a much smaller rate. We do not solve for the saturation of the p-g instability and therefore we cannot say precisely how it influences the evolution of neutron star binaries. However, we show that if even a single daughter mode saturates near its wave breaking amplitude, the p-g instability of the equilibrium tide will (1) induce significant orbital phase errors (Δφ ≳ 1 radian) that accumulate primarily at low frequencies (f gw ≲ 50 Hz) and (2) heat the neutron star core to a temperature of T ∼ 10 10 K. Since there are at least ∼100 unstable p-g daughter pairs, Δφ and T are potentially much larger than these values. Tides might therefore significantly influence the gravitational wave signal and electromagnetic emission from coalescing neutron star binaries at much larger orbital separations than previously

  12. Gravitational waves and neutrino emission from the merger of binary neutron stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Yuichiro; Kiuchi, Kenta; Kyutoku, Koutarou; Shibata, Masaru

    2011-07-29

    Numerical simulations for the merger of binary neutron stars are performed in full general relativity incorporating a finite-temperature (Shen's) equation of state (EOS) and neutrino cooling for the first time. It is found that for this stiff EOS, a hypermassive neutron star (HMNS) with a long lifetime (≫10  ms) is the outcome for the total mass ≲3.0M(⊙). It is shown that the typical total neutrino luminosity of the HMNS is ∼3-8×10(53)  erg/s and the effective amplitude of gravitational waves from the HMNS is 4-6×10(-22) at f=2.1-2.5  kHz for a source distance of 100 Mpc. We also present the neutrino luminosity curve when a black hole is formed for the first time.

  13. Solving the relativistic inverse stellar problem through gravitational waves observation of binary neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelsalhin, Tiziano; Maselli, Andrea; Ferrari, Valeria

    2018-04-01

    The LIGO/Virgo Collaboration has recently announced the direct detection of gravitational waves emitted in the coalescence of a neutron star binary. This discovery allows, for the first time, to set new constraints on the behavior of matter at supranuclear density, complementary with those coming from astrophysical observations in the electromagnetic band. In this paper we demonstrate the feasibility of using gravitational signals to solve the relativistic inverse stellar problem, i.e., to reconstruct the parameters of the equation of state (EoS) from measurements of the stellar mass and tidal Love number. We perform Bayesian inference of mock data, based on different models of the star internal composition, modeled through piecewise polytropes. Our analysis shows that the detection of a small number of sources by a network of advanced interferometers would allow to put accurate bounds on the EoS parameters, and to perform a model selection among the realistic equations of state proposed in the literature.

  14. Probing the properties of the pulsar wind via studying the dispersive effects in the pulses from the pulsar companion in a double neutron-star binary system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Shu-Xu; Cheng, K.-S.

    2017-12-01

    The velocity and density distribution of e± in the pulsar wind are crucial distinction among magnetosphere models, and contain key parameters determining the high-energy emission of pulsar binaries. In this work, a direct method is proposed, which might probe the properties of the wind from one pulsar in a double-pulsar binary. When the radio signals from the first-formed pulsar travel through the relativistic e± flow in the pulsar wind from the younger companion, the components of different radio frequencies will be dispersed. It will introduce an additional frequency-dependent time-of-arrival delay of pulses, which is function of the orbital phase. In this paper, we formulate the above-mentioned dispersive delay with the properties of the pulsar wind. As examples, we apply the formula to the double-pulsar system PSR J0737-3039A/B and the pulsar-neutron star binary PSR B1913+16. For PSR J0737-3039A/B, the time delay in 300 MHz is ≲ 10 μ s-1 near the superior conjunction, under the optimal pulsar wind parameters, which is approximately half of the current timing accuracy. For PSR B1913+16, with the assumption that the neutron-star companion has a typical spin-down luminosity of 1033 erg s-1, the time delay is as large as 10 - 20 μ s-1 in 300 MHz. The best timing precision of this pulsar is ∼ 5 μ s-1 in 1400 MHz. Therefore, it is possible that we can find this signal in archival data. Otherwise, we can set an upper limit on the spin-down luminosity. Similar analysis can be applied to other 11 known pulsar-neutron star binaries.

  15. A Precise Distance to the Host Galaxy of the Binary Neutron Star Merger GW170817 Using Surface Brightness Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantiello, Michele; Jensen, J. B.; Blakeslee, J. P.; Berger, E.; Levan, A. J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Raimondo, G.; Brocato, E.; Alexander, K. D.; Blanchard, P. K.; Branchesi, M.; Cano, Z.; Chornock, R.; Covino, S.; Cowperthwaite, P. S.; D’Avanzo, P.; Eftekhari, T.; Fong, W.; Fruchter, A. S.; Grado, A.; Hjorth, J.; Holz, D. E.; Lyman, J. D.; Mandel, I.; Margutti, R.; Nicholl, M.; Villar, V. A.; Williams, P. K. G.

    2018-02-01

    The joint detection of gravitational waves (GWs) and electromagnetic radiation from the binary neutron star (BNS) merger GW170817 has provided unprecedented insight into a wide range of physical processes: heavy element synthesis via the r-process; the production of relativistic ejecta; the equation of state of neutron stars and the nature of the merger remnant; the binary coalescence timescale; and a measurement of the Hubble constant via the “standard siren” technique. In detail, all of these results depend on the distance to the host galaxy of the merger event, NGC 4993. In this Letter we measure the surface brightness fluctuation (SBF) distance to NGC 4993 in the F110W and F160W passbands of the Wide Field Camera 3 Infrared Channel (WFC3/IR) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). For the preferred F110W passband we derive a distance modulus of (m-M) =33.05+/- 0.08+/- 0.10 mag, or a linear distance d = 40.7 ± 1.4 ± 1.9 Mpc (random and systematic errors, respectively); a virtually identical result is obtained from the F160W data. This is the most precise distance to NGC 4993 available to date. Combining our distance measurement with the corrected recession velocity of NGC 4993 implies a Hubble constant H 0 = 71.9 ± 7.1 km s‑1 Mpc‑1. A comparison of our result to the GW-inferred value of H 0 indicates a binary orbital inclination of i ≳ 137°. The SBF technique can be applied to early-type host galaxies of BNS mergers to ∼100 Mpc with HST and possibly as far as ∼300 Mpc with the James Webb Space Telescope, thereby helping to break the inherent distance-inclination degeneracy of the GW data at distances where many future BNS mergers are likely to be detected. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with Program #15329 (PI: E

  16. Tidal Heating of Earth-like Exoplanets around M Stars: Thermal, Magnetic, and Orbital Evolutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, P E; Barnes, R

    2015-09-01

    The internal thermal and magnetic evolution of rocky exoplanets is critical to their habitability. We focus on the thermal-orbital evolution of Earth-mass planets around low-mass M stars whose radiative habitable zone overlaps with the "tidal zone," where tidal dissipation is expected to be a significant heat source in the interior. We develop a thermal-orbital evolution model calibrated to Earth that couples tidal dissipation, with a temperature-dependent Maxwell rheology, to orbital circularization and migration. We illustrate thermal-orbital steady states where surface heat flow is balanced by tidal dissipation and cooling can be stalled for billions of years until circularization occurs. Orbital energy dissipated as tidal heat in the interior drives both inward migration and circularization, with a circularization time that is inversely proportional to the dissipation rate. We identify a peak in the internal dissipation rate as the mantle passes through a viscoelastic state at mantle temperatures near 1800 K. Planets orbiting a 0.1 solar-mass star within 0.07 AU circularize before 10 Gyr, independent of initial eccentricity. Once circular, these planets cool monotonically and maintain dynamos similar to that of Earth. Planets forced into eccentric orbits can experience a super-cooling of the core and rapid core solidification, inhibiting dynamo action for planets in the habitable zone. We find that tidal heating is insignificant in the habitable zone around 0.45 (or larger) solar-mass stars because tidal dissipation is a stronger function of orbital distance than stellar mass, and the habitable zone is farther from larger stars. Suppression of the planetary magnetic field exposes the atmosphere to stellar wind erosion and the surface to harmful radiation. In addition to weak magnetic fields, massive melt eruption rates and prolonged magma oceans may render eccentric planets in the habitable zone of low-mass stars inhospitable for life.

  17. Close Binaries in the Orion Nebula Cluster: On the Universality of Stellar Multiplicity and the Origin of Field Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchene, Gaspard; Lacour, Sylvestre; Moraux, Estelle; Bouvier, Jerome; Goodwin, Simon

    2018-01-01

    While stellar multiplicity is an ubiquitous outcome of star formation, there is a clear dichotomy between the multiplicity properties of young (~1 Myr-old) stellar clusters, like the ONC, which host a mostly field-like population of visual binaries, and those of equally young sparse populations, like the Taurus-Auriga region, which host twice as many stellar companions. Two distinct scenarios can account for this observation: one in which different star-forming regions form different number of stars, and one in which multiplicity properties are universal at birth but where internal cluster dynamics destroy many wide binaries. To solve this ambiguity, one must probe binaries that are sufficiently close so as not to be destroyed through interactions with other cluster members. To this end, we have conducted a survey for 10-100 au binaries in the ONC using the aperture masking technique with the VLT adaptive optics system. Among our sample of the 42 ONC members, we discovered 13 companions in this range of projected separations. This is consistent with the companion frequency observed in the Taurus population and twice as high as that observed among field stars. This survey thus strongly supports the idea that stellar multiplicity is characterized by near-universal initial properties that can later be dynamically altered. On the other hand, this exacerbates the question of the origin of field stars, since only clusters much denser than the ONC can effectively destroyed binaries closer than 100 au.

  18. THE DISSIMILAR CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF THE PLANET-HOSTING STARS OF THE XO-2 BINARY SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramírez, I.; Khanal, S.; Aleo, P.; Sobotka, A.; Lambert, D. L. [McDonald Observatory and Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1402, Austin, TX 78712-1205 (United States); Liu, F.; Casagrande, L.; Yong, D.; Asplund, M. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Mt. Stromlo Observatory, via Cotter Rd., Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Meléndez, J. [Departamento de Astronomia do IAG/USP, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Mãtao 1226, São Paulo, 05508-900, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-20

    Using high-quality spectra of the twin stars in the XO-2 binary system, we have detected significant differences in the chemical composition of their photospheres. The differences correlate strongly with the elements’ dust condensation temperature. In XO-2N, volatiles are enhanced by about 0.015 dex and refractories are overabundant by up to 0.090 dex. On average, our error bar in relative abundance is 0.012 dex. We present an early metal-depletion scenario in which the formation of the gas giant planets known to exist around these stars are responsible for a 0.015 dex offset in the abundances of all elements while 20 M{sub ⨁} of non-detected rocky objects that formed around XO-2S explain the additional refractory-element difference. An alternative explanation involves the late accretion of at least 20 M{sub ⨁} of planet-like material by XO-2N, allegedly as a result of the migration of the hot Jupiter detected around that star. Dust cleansing by a nearby hot star as well as age or Galactic birthplace effects can be ruled out as valid explanations for this phenomenon.

  19. Extracting the orbital axis from gravitational waves of precessing binary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Kyohei; Kyutoku, Koutarou; Nakano, Hiroyuki; Shibata, Masaru

    2018-01-01

    We present a new method for extracting the instantaneous orbital axis only from gravitational wave strains of precessing binary systems observed from a particular observer direction. This method enables us to reconstruct the coprecessing frame waveforms only from observed strains for the ideal case with the high signal-to-noise ratio. Specifically, we do not presuppose any theoretical model of the precession dynamics and coprecessing waveforms in our method. We test and measure the accuracy of our method using the numerical relativity simulation data of precessing binary black holes taken from the SXS Catalog. We show that the direction of the orbital axis is extracted within ≈0.07 rad error from gravitational waves emitted during the inspiral phase. The coprecessing waveforms are also reconstructed with high accuracy; the mismatch (assuming white noise) between them and the original coprecessing waveforms is typically a few times 10-3 including the merger-ringdown phase, and can be improved by an order of magnitude focusing only on the inspiral waveform. In this method, the coprecessing frame waveforms are not only the purely technical tools for understanding the complex nature of precessing waveforms but also direct observables.

  20. V346 Centauri: early-type eclipsing binary with apsidal motion and abrupt change of orbital period

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mayer, P.; Harmanec, P.; Wolf, M.; Nemravová, J.; Prsa, A.; Frémat, Y.; Zejda, M.; Liška, J.; Juryšek, Jakub; Hoňková, K.; Mašek, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 591, Jul (2016), 1-9, č. článku A129. E-ISSN 1432-0746 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG15014; GA MŠk(CZ) LG13007; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-17501S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : early-type stars * binaries * close stars Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 5.014, year: 2016

  1. Survival of planets around shrinking stellar binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Diego J.; Lai, Dong

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of transiting circumbinary planets by the Kepler mission suggests that planets can form efficiently around binary stars. None of the stellar binaries currently known to host planets has a period shorter than 7 d, despite the large number of eclipsing binaries found in the Kepler target list with periods shorter than a few days. These compact binaries are believed to have evolved from wider orbits into their current configurations via the so-called Lidov–Kozai migration mechanism, in which gravitational perturbations from a distant tertiary companion induce large-amplitude eccentricity oscillations in the binary, followed by orbital decay and circularization due to tidal dissipation in the stars. Here we explore the orbital evolution of planets around binaries undergoing orbital decay by this mechanism. We show that planets may survive and become misaligned from their host binary, or may develop erratic behavior in eccentricity, resulting in their consumption by the stars or ejection from the system as the binary decays. Our results suggest that circumbinary planets around compact binaries could still exist, and we offer predictions as to what their orbital configurations should be like. PMID:26159412

  2. Survival of planets around shrinking stellar binaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Diego J; Lai, Dong

    2015-07-28

    The discovery of transiting circumbinary planets by the Kepler mission suggests that planets can form efficiently around binary stars. None of the stellar binaries currently known to host planets has a period shorter than 7 d, despite the large number of eclipsing binaries found in the Kepler target list with periods shorter than a few days. These compact binaries are believed to have evolved from wider orbits into their current configurations via the so-called Lidov-Kozai migration mechanism, in which gravitational perturbations from a distant tertiary companion induce large-amplitude eccentricity oscillations in the binary, followed by orbital decay and circularization due to tidal dissipation in the stars. Here we explore the orbital evolution of planets around binaries undergoing orbital decay by this mechanism. We show that planets may survive and become misaligned from their host binary, or may develop erratic behavior in eccentricity, resulting in their consumption by the stars or ejection from the system as the binary decays. Our results suggest that circumbinary planets around compact binaries could still exist, and we offer predictions as to what their orbital configurations should be like.

  3. Accurate evolutions of inspiralling and magnetized neutron stars: Equal-mass binaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giacomazzo, Bruno; Rezzolla, Luciano; Baiotti, Luca

    2011-01-01

    By performing new, long and numerically accurate general-relativistic simulations of magnetized, equal-mass neutron-star binaries, we investigate the role that realistic magnetic fields may have in the evolution of these systems. In particular, we study the evolution of the magnetic fields and show that they can influence the survival of the hypermassive neutron star produced at the merger by accelerating its collapse to a black hole. We also provide evidence that, even if purely poloidal initially, the magnetic fields produced in the tori surrounding the black hole have toroidal and poloidal components of equivalent strength. When estimating the possibility that magnetic fields could have an impact on the gravitational-wave signals emitted by these systems either during the inspiral or after the merger, we conclude that for realistic magnetic-field strengths B 12 G such effects could be detected, but only marginally, by detectors such as advanced LIGO or advanced Virgo. However, magnetically induced modifications could become detectable in the case of small-mass binaries and with the development of gravitational-wave detectors, such as the Einstein Telescope, with much higher sensitivities at frequencies larger than ≅2 kHz.

  4. Jupiter Analogs Orbit Stars with an Average Metallicity Close to That of the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchhave, Lars A.; Bitsch, Bertram; Johansen, Anders; Latham, David W.; Bizzarro, Martin; Bieryla, Allyson; Kipping, David M.

    2018-03-01

    Jupiter played an important role in determining the structure and configuration of the Solar System. Whereas hot-Jupiter type exoplanets preferentially form around metal-rich stars, the conditions required for the formation of planets with masses, orbits, and eccentricities comparable to Jupiter (Jupiter analogs) are unknown. Using spectroscopic metallicities, we show that stars hosting Jupiter analogs have an average metallicity close to solar, in contrast to their hot-Jupiter and eccentric cool-Jupiter counterparts, which orbit stars with super-solar metallicities. Furthermore, the eccentricities of Jupiter analogs increase with host-star metallicity, suggesting that planet–planet scatterings producing highly eccentric cool Jupiters could be more common in metal-rich environments. To investigate a possible explanation for these metallicity trends, we compare the observations to numerical simulations, which indicate that metal-rich stars typically form multiple Jupiters, leading to planet–planet interactions and, hence, a prevalence of either eccentric cool Jupiters or hot Jupiters with circularized orbits. Although the samples are small and exhibit variations in their metallicities, suggesting that numerous processes other than metallicity affect the formation of planetary systems, the data in hand suggests that Jupiter analogs and terrestrial-sized planets form around stars with average metallicities close to solar, whereas high-metallicity systems preferentially host eccentric cool Jupiter or hot Jupiters, indicating that higher metallicity systems may not be favorable for the formation of planetary systems akin to the Solar System.

  5. Multi-technique investigation of the binary fraction of A-F type candidate hybrid variable stars discovered by Kepler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampens, P.; Frémat, Y.; Vermeylen, L.; Sódor, Á.; Skarka, M.; De Cat, P.; Bognár, Zs.; De Nutte, R.; Dumortier, L.; Escorza, A.; Oomen, G. M.; Van de Steene, G.; Kamath, D.; Laverick, M.; Samadi, A.; Triana, S.; Lehmann, H.

    2018-02-01

    Context. Hundreds of candidate hybrid pulsators of intermediate type A-F were revealed by recent space missions. Hybrid pulsators allow us to study the full stellar interiors, where both low-order p- and high-order g-modes are simultaneously excited. The true hybrid stars must be identified since other processes, related to stellar multiplicity or rotation, might explain the presence of (some) low frequencies observed in their periodograms. Aims: We measured the radial velocities of 50 candidate δ Scuti -γ Doradus hybrid stars from the Kepler mission with the Hermes and ACE spectrographs over a time span of months to years. We aim to derive the fraction of binary and multiple systems and to provide an independent and homogeneous determination of the atmospheric properties and v sin i for all targets. The long(er)-term objective is to identify the (probable) physical cause of the low frequencies. Methods: We computed one-dimensional cross-correlation functions (CCFs) in order to find the best set of parameters in terms of the number of components, spectral type(s), and v sin i for each target. Radial velocities were measured using spectrum synthesis and a two-dimensional cross-correlation technique in the case of double- and triple-lined systems. Fundamental parameters were determined by fitting (composite) synthetic spectra to the normalised median spectra corrected for the appropriate Doppler shifts. Results: We report on the analysis of 478 high-resolution Hermes and 41 ACE spectra of A/F-type candidate hybrid pulsators from the Kepler field. We determined their radial velocities, projected rotational velocities, and atmospheric properties and classified our targets based on the shape of the CCFs and the temporal behaviour of the radial velocities. We derived orbital solutions for seven new systems. Three preliminary long-period orbital solutions are confirmed by a photometric time-delay analysis. Finally, we determined a global multiplicity fraction of 27% in

  6. Spectral analysis of gravitational waves from binary neutron star merger remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maione, Francesco; De Pietri, Roberto; Feo, Alessandra; Löffler, Frank

    2017-09-01

    In this work we analyze the gravitational wave signal from hypermassive neutron stars formed after the merger of binary neutron star systems, focusing on its spectral features. The gravitational wave signals are extracted from numerical relativity simulations of models already considered by De Pietri et al. [Phys. Rev. D 93, 064047 (2016)], 10.1103/PhysRevD.93.064047, Maione et al. [Classical Quantum Gravity 33, 175009 (2016)], 10.1088/0264-9381/33/17/175009, and Feo et al. [Classical Quantum Gravity 34, 034001 (2017)], 10.1088/1361-6382/aa51fa, and allow us to study the effect of the total baryonic mass of such systems (from 2.4 M⊙ to 3 M⊙ ), the mass ratio (up to q =0.77 ), and the neutron star equation of state, in both equal and highly unequal mass binaries. We use the peaks we find in the gravitational spectrum as an independent test of already published hypotheses of their physical origin and empirical relations linking them with the characteristics of the merging neutron stars. In particular, we highlight the effects of the mass ratio, which in the past was often neglected. We also analyze the temporal evolution of the emission frequencies. Finally, we introduce a modern variant of Prony's method to analyze the gravitational wave postmerger emission as a sum of complex exponentials, trying to overcome some drawbacks of both Fourier spectra and least-squares fitting. Overall, the spectral properties of the postmerger signal observed in our simulation are in agreement with those proposed by other groups. More specifically, we find that the analysis of Bauswein and Stergioulas [Phys. Rev. D 91, 124056 (2015)], 10.1103/PhysRevD.91.124056 is particularly effective for binaries with very low masses or with a small mass ratio and that the mechanical toy model of Takami et al. [Phys. Rev. D 91, 064001 (2015)], 10.1103/PhysRevD.91.064001 provides a comprehensive and accurate description of the early stages of the postmerger.

  7. Orbital motions and light curves of young binaries XZ Tau and VY Tau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodin, A. V.; Emelyanov, N. V.; Zharova, A. V.; Lamzin, S. A.; Malogolovets, E. V.; Roe, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    The results of our speckle interferometric observations of young binaries VY Tau and XZ Tau are presented. For the first time, we found a relative displacement of VY Tau components as well as a preliminary orbit for XZ Tau. It appeared that the orbit is appreciably non-circular and is inclined by i ≲ 47◦ from the plane of the sky. It means that the rotation axis of XZ Tau A and the axis of its jet are significantly non-perpendicular to the orbital plane. We found that the average brightness of XZ Tau had been increasing from the beginning of the last century up to the mid-thirties and then it decreased by Δ B > 2 mag. The maximal brightness has been reached significantly later on the time of periastron passage. The total brightness of XZ Tau's components varied in a non-regular way from 1970 to 1985 when eruptions of hot gas from XZ Tau A presumably had occurred. In the early nineties the variations became regular following which a chaotic variability had renewed. We also report that a flare activity of VY Tau has resumed after 40 yr pause, parameters of the previous and new flares are similar, and the flares are related with the A component.

  8. DETECTABILITY OF EARTH-LIKE PLANETS IN CIRCUMSTELLAR HABITABLE ZONES OF BINARY STAR SYSTEMS WITH SUN-LIKE COMPONENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggl, Siegfried; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke; Haghighipour, Nader

    2013-01-01

    Given the considerable percentage of stars that are members of binaries or stellar multiples in the solar neighborhood, it is expected that many of these binaries host planets, possibly even habitable ones. The discovery of a terrestrial planet in the α Centauri system supports this notion. Due to the potentially strong gravitational interaction that an Earth-like planet may experience in such systems, classical approaches to determining habitable zones (HZ), especially in close S-type binary systems, can be rather inaccurate. Recent progress in this field, however, allows us to identify regions around the star permitting permanent habitability. While the discovery of α Cen Bb has shown that terrestrial planets can be detected in solar-type binary stars using current observational facilities, it remains to be shown whether this is also the case for Earth analogs in HZs. We provide analytical expressions for the maximum and rms values of radial velocity and astrometric signals, as well as transit probabilities of terrestrial planets in such systems, showing that the dynamical interaction of the second star with the planet may indeed facilitate the planets' detection. As an example, we discuss the detectability of additional Earth-like planets in the averaged, extended, and permanent HZs around both stars of the α Centauri system.

  9. Structure of stable binary neutron star merger remnants: Role of initial spin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastaun, W.; Ciolfi, R.; Endrizzi, A.; Giacomazzo, B.

    2017-08-01

    We present general relativistic numerical simulations of binary neutron star (BNS) mergers with different initial spin configurations. We focus on models with stars of mass 1.4 M⊙ each, which employ the equation of state (EOS) by Shen, Horowitz, and Teige, and which result in stable NSs as merger remnants. For comparison, we consider two irrotational equal mass (M =1.35 M⊙) and unequal mass (M =1.29 , 1.42 M⊙ ) BNS models using the APR4 EOS, which result in a supramassive merger remnant. We present visualizations of the fluid flow and temperature distribution and find a strong impact of the spin on vortex structure and nonaxisymmetric deformation. We compute the radial mass distribution and the rotation profile in the equatorial plane using recently developed measures independent of spatial gauge, revealing slowly rotating cores that can be well approximated by the cores of spherical stars. We also study the influence of the spin on the inspiral phase and the gravitational wave (GW) signal. Using a newly developed analysis method, we further show that gravitational waveforms from BNS mergers can exhibit one or more phase jumps after merger, which occur together with minima of the strain amplitude. We provide a natural explanation in terms of the remnant's quadrupole moment, and show that cancellation effects due to phase jumps can have a strong impact on the GW power spectrum. Finally, we discuss the impact of the spin on the amount of ejected matter.

  10. NO TIME FOR DEAD TIME: TIMING ANALYSIS OF BRIGHT BLACK HOLE BINARIES WITH NuSTAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachetti, Matteo; Barret, Didier [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse F-31400 (France); Harrison, Fiona A.; Cook, Rick; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Fürst, Felix [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Tomsick, John; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Schmid, Christian [Dr. Karl-Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Sternwartstrasse 7, D-96049 Bamberg (Germany); Christensen, Finn E. [DTU Space, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Fabian, Andrew C.; Kara, Erin [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Gandhi, Poshak [Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Hailey, Charles J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Maccarone, Thomas J. [Department of Physics, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States); Miller, Jon M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1042 (United States); Pottschmidt, Katja [CRESST, UMBC, and NASA GSFC, Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Uttley, Phil, E-mail: matteo.bachetti@irap.omp.eu [Anton Pannekoek Institute, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); and others

    2015-02-20

    Timing of high-count-rate sources with the NuSTAR Small Explorer Mission requires specialized analysis techniques. NuSTAR was primarily designed for spectroscopic observations of sources with relatively low count rates rather than for timing analysis of bright objects. The instrumental dead time per event is relatively long (∼2.5 msec) and varies event-to-event by a few percent. The most obvious effect is a distortion of the white noise level in the power density spectrum (PDS) that cannot be easily modeled with standard techniques due to the variable nature of the dead time. In this paper, we show that it is possible to exploit the presence of two completely independent focal planes and use the cospectrum, the real part of the cross PDS, to obtain a good proxy of the white-noise-subtracted PDS. Thereafter, one can use a Monte Carlo approach to estimate the remaining effects of dead time, namely, a frequency-dependent modulation of the variance and a frequency-independent drop of the sensitivity to variability. In this way, most of the standard timing analysis can be performed, albeit with a sacrifice in signal-to-noise ratio relative to what would be achieved using more standard techniques. We apply this technique to NuSTAR observations of the black hole binaries GX 339–4, Cyg X-1, and GRS 1915+105.

  11. HE 0017+0055: A probable pulsating CEMP-rs star and long-period binary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorissen, A.; Hansen, T.; Van Eck, S.; Andersen, J.; Nordström, B.; Siess, L.; Torres, G.; Masseron, T.; Van Winckel, H.

    2016-02-01

    Context. A large fraction of the carbon-enhanced, extremely metal-poor halo giants ([Fe/H] Eu, Dy, and Er in the range 0.9-2.0 dex. With [Ba/Fe] > 1.9 dex and [Eu/Fe] = 2.3 dex, HE 0017+0055 is a CEMP-rs star. We used the derived atmospheric parameters and abundances to infer HE 0017+0055 evolutionary status from a comparison with evolutionary tracks. Results: HE 0017+0055 appears to be a giant star below the tip of the red giant branch. The s-process pollution must therefore originate from mass transfer from a companion formerly on the AGB, which is now a carbon-oxygen white dwarf (WD). If the 384 d velocity variations are attributed to the WD companion, its orbit must be seen almost face-on, with I ~ 2.3°, because the mass function is very small: f(M1,M2) = (6.1 ± 1.1) × 10-6M⊙. Alternatively, the WD orbital motion could be responsible for the long-term velocity variations, with a period of several decades. The 384 d variations should then be attributed either to a low-mass inner companion (perhaps a brown dwarf, depending on the orbital inclination), or to stellar pulsations. The latter possibility is made likely by the fact that similar low-amplitude velocity variations, with periods close to 1 yr, have been reported for other CEMP stars in a companion paper. A definite conclusion about the origin of the 384 d velocity variations should however await the detection of synchronous low-amplitude photometric variations. Based on observations performed with the Mercator telescope and the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), operated by the Nordic Optical Telescope Scientific Association at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, La Palma, Spain, of the Instituto de Astrofïsica de Canarias.

  12. Simulating the X-ray luminosity of Be X-ray binaries: the case for black holes versus neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R. O.; Ho, W. C. G.; Coe, M. J.; Okazaki, A. T.

    2018-04-01

    There are over 100 Be stars that are known to have neutron star companions but only one such system with a black hole. Previous theoretical work suggests this is not due to their formation but due to differences in X-ray luminosity. It has also been proposed that the truncation of the Be star's circumstellar disc is dependent on the mass of the compact object. Hence, Be star discs in black hole binaries are smaller. Since accretion onto the compact object from the Be star's disc is what powers the X-ray luminosity, a smaller disc in black hole systems leads to a lower luminosity. In this paper, simulations are performed with a range of eccentricities and compact object mass. The disc's size and density are shown to be dependent on both quantities. Mass capture and, in turn, X-ray luminosity are heavily dependent on the size and density of the disc. Be/black hole binaries are expected to be up to ˜10 times fainter than Be/neutron star binaries when both systems have the same eccentricity and can be 100 times fainter when comparing systems with different eccentricity.

  13. GIANT PLANETS ORBITING METAL-RICH STARS SHOW SIGNATURES OF PLANET-PLANET INTERACTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, Rebekah I.; Murray-Clay, Ruth A.

    2013-01-01

    Gas giants orbiting interior to the ice line are thought to have been displaced from their formation locations by processes that remain debated. Here we uncover several new metallicity trends, which together may indicate that two competing mechanisms deliver close-in giant planets: gentle disk migration, operating in environments with a range of metallicities, and violent planet-planet gravitational interactions, primarily triggered in metal-rich systems in which multiple giant planets can form. First, we show with 99.1% confidence that giant planets with semimajor axes between 0.1 and 1 AU orbiting metal-poor stars ([Fe/H] < 0) are confined to lower eccentricities than those orbiting metal-rich stars. Second, we show with 93.3% confidence that eccentric proto-hot Jupiters undergoing tidal circularization primarily orbit metal-rich stars. Finally, we show that only metal-rich stars host a pile-up of hot Jupiters, helping account for the lack of such a pile-up in the overall Kepler sample. Migration caused by stellar perturbers (e.g., stellar Kozai) is unlikely to account for the trends. These trends further motivate follow-up theoretical work addressing which hot Jupiter migration theories can also produce the observed population of eccentric giant planets between 0.1 and 1 AU.

  14. Jupiter Analogs Orbit Stars with an Average Metallicity Close to That of the Sun

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchhave, Lars A.; Bitsch, Bertram; Johansen, Anders

    2018-01-01

    Jupiter played an important role in determining the structure and configuration of the Solar System. Whereas hot-Jupiter type exoplanets preferentially form around metal-rich stars, the conditions required for the formation of planets with masses, orbits, and eccentricities comparable to Jupiter ...

  15. Phase shifts and nonellipsoidal light curves: Challenges from mass determinations in x-ray binary stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, Andrew Glenn

    We consider two types of anomalous observations which have arisen from efforts to measure dynamical masses of X-ray binary stars: (1) Radial velocity curves which seemingly show the primary and the secondary out of antiphase in most systems, and (2) The observation of double-waved light curves which deviate significantly from the ellipsoidal modulations expected for a Roche lobe filling star. We consider both problems with the joint goals of understanding the physical origins of the anomalous observations, and using this understanding to allow robust dynamical determinations of mass in X-ray binary systems. In our analysis of phase-shifted radial velocity curves, we discuss a comprehensive sample of X-ray binaries with published phase-shifted radial velocity curves. We show that the most commonly adopted explanation for phase shifts is contradicted by many observations, and consider instead a generalized form of a model proposed by Smak in 1970. We show that this model is well supported by a range of observations, including some systems which had previously been considered anomalous. We lay the groundwork for the derivation of mass ratios based on our explanation for phase shifts, and we discuss the work necessary to produce more detailed physical models of the phase shift. In our analysis of non-ellipsoidal light curves, we focus on the very well-studied system A0620-00. We present new VIH SMARTS photometry spanning 1999-2007, and supplement this with a comprehensive collection of archival data obtained since 1981. We show that A0620-00 undergoes optical state changes within X-ray quiescence and argue that not all quiescent data should be used for determinations of the inclination. We identify twelve light curves which may reliably be used for determining the inclination. We show that the accretion disk contributes significantly to all twelve curves and is the dominant source of nonellipsoidal variations. We derive the disk fraction for each of the twelve curves

  16. The shortest-known-period star orbiting our Galaxy's supermassive black hole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, L; Ghez, A M; Schödel, R; Yelda, S; Boehle, A; Lu, J R; Do, T; Morris, M R; Becklin, E E; Matthews, K

    2012-10-05

    Stars with short orbital periods at the center of our Galaxy offer a powerful probe of a supermassive black hole. Over the past 17 years, the W. M. Keck Observatory has been used to image the galactic center at the highest angular resolution possible today. By adding to this data set and advancing methodologies, we have detected S0-102, a star orbiting our Galaxy's supermassive black hole with a period of just 11.5 years. S0-102 doubles the number of known stars with full phase coverage and periods of less than 20 years. It thereby provides the opportunity, with future measurements, to resolve degeneracies in the parameters describing the central gravitational potential and to test Einstein's theory of general relativity in an unexplored regime.

  17. A Disk of Young Stars at the Galactic Center as Determined by Individual Stellar Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, J. R.; Ghez, A. M.; Hornstein, S. D.; Morris, M. R.; Becklin, E. E.; Matthews, K.

    2009-01-01

    We present new proper motions from the 10 m Keck telescopes for a puzzling population of massive, young stars located within 3farcs5 (0.14 pc) of the supermassive black hole at the Galactic center. Our proper motion measurements have uncertainties of only 0.07 mas yr-1 (3 km s-1), which is gsim 7 times better than previous proper motion measurements for these stars, and enables us to measure accelerations as low as 0.2 mas yr-2 (7 km s-1 yr-1). Using these measurements, line-of-sight velocities from the literature, and three-dimensional velocities for additional young stars in the central parsec, we constrain the true orbit of each individual star and directly test the hypothesis that the massive stars reside in two stellar disks as has been previously proposed. Analysis of the stellar orbits reveals only one of the previously proposed disks of young stars using a method that is capable of detecting disks containing at least seven stars. The detected disk contains 50% of the young stars, is inclined by ~115° from the plane of the sky, and is oriented at a position angle of ~100° east of north. Additionally, the on-disk and off-disk populations have similar K-band luminosity functions and radial distributions that decrease at larger radii as vpropr -2. The disk has an out-of-the-disk velocity dispersion of 28 ± 6 km s-1, which corresponds to a half-opening angle of 7° ± 2°, and several candidate disk members have eccentricities greater than 0.2. Our findings suggest that the young stars may have formed in situ but in a more complex geometry than a simple, thin circular disk.

  18. Gravitational Waves from F-modes Excited by the Inspiral of Highly Eccentric Neutron Star Binaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chirenti, Cecilia [Centro de Matemática, Computação e Cognição, UFABC, 09210-170 Santo André-SP (Brazil); Gold, Roman [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline Street North, Waterloo, ON N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Miller, M. Coleman [Department of Astronomy and Joint Space-Science Institute, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States)

    2017-03-01

    As gravitational wave instrumentation becomes more sensitive, it is interesting to speculate about subtle effects that could be analyzed using upcoming generations of detectors. One such effect that has great potential for revealing the properties of very dense matter is fluid oscillations of neutron stars. These have been found in numerical simulations of the hypermassive remnants of double neutron star mergers and of highly eccentric neutron star orbits. Here we focus on the latter and sketch out some ideas for the production, gravitational-wave detection, and analysis of neutron star oscillations. These events will be rare (perhaps up to several tens per year could be detected using third-generation detectors such as the Einstein Telescope or the Cosmic Explorer), but they would have unique diagnostic power for the analysis of cold, catalyzed, dense matter. Furthermore, these systems are unusual in that analysis of the tidally excited f-modes of the stars could yield simultaneous measurements of their masses, moments of inertia, and tidal Love numbers, using the frequency, damping time, and amplitude of the modes. They would thus present a nearly unique opportunity to test the I-Love-Q relation observationally. The analysis of such events will require significant further work in nuclear physics and general relativistic nonlinear mode coupling, and thus we discuss further directions that will need to be pursued. For example, we note that for nearly grazing encounters, numerical simulations show that the energy delivered to the f-modes may be up to two orders of magnitude greater than predicted in the linear theory.

  19. Gravitational Waves from F-modes Excited by the Inspiral of Highly Eccentric Neutron Star Binaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirenti, Cecilia; Gold, Roman; Miller, M. Coleman

    2017-01-01

    As gravitational wave instrumentation becomes more sensitive, it is interesting to speculate about subtle effects that could be analyzed using upcoming generations of detectors. One such effect that has great potential for revealing the properties of very dense matter is fluid oscillations of neutron stars. These have been found in numerical simulations of the hypermassive remnants of double neutron star mergers and of highly eccentric neutron star orbits. Here we focus on the latter and sketch out some ideas for the production, gravitational-wave detection, and analysis of neutron star oscillations. These events will be rare (perhaps up to several tens per year could be detected using third-generation detectors such as the Einstein Telescope or the Cosmic Explorer), but they would have unique diagnostic power for the analysis of cold, catalyzed, dense matter. Furthermore, these systems are unusual in that analysis of the tidally excited f-modes of the stars could yield simultaneous measurements of their masses, moments of inertia, and tidal Love numbers, using the frequency, damping time, and amplitude of the modes. They would thus present a nearly unique opportunity to test the I-Love-Q relation observationally. The analysis of such events will require significant further work in nuclear physics and general relativistic nonlinear mode coupling, and thus we discuss further directions that will need to be pursued. For example, we note that for nearly grazing encounters, numerical simulations show that the energy delivered to the f-modes may be up to two orders of magnitude greater than predicted in the linear theory.

  20. Searching Ultra-compact Pulsar Binaries with Abnormal Timing Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, B. P.; Li, Y. P.; Yuan, J. P.; Tian, J.; Zhang, Y. Y.; Li, D.; Jiang, B.; Li, X. D.; Wang, H. G.; Zou, Y. C.; Shao, L. J.

    2018-03-01

    Ultra-compact pulsar binaries are both ideal sources of gravitational radiation for gravitational wave detectors and laboratories for fundamental physics. However, the shortest orbital period of all radio pulsar binaries is currently 1.6 hr. The absence of pulsar binaries with a shorter orbital period is most likely due to technique limit. This paper points out that a tidal effect occurring on pulsar binaries with a short orbital period can perturb the orbital elements and result in a significant change in orbital modulation, which dramatically reduces the sensitivity of the acceleration searching that is widely used. Here a new search is proposed. The abnormal timing residual exhibited in a single pulse observation is simulated by a tidal effect occurring on an ultra-compact binary. The reproduction of the main features represented by the sharp peaks displayed in the abnormal timing behavior suggests that pulsars like PSR B0919+06 could be a candidate for an ultra-compact binary of an orbital period of ∼10 minutes and a companion star of a white dwarf star. The binary nature of such a candidate is further tested by (1) comparing the predicted long-term binary effect with decades of timing noise observed and (2) observing the optical counterpart of the expected companion star. Test (1) likely supports our model, while more observations are needed in test (2). Some interesting ultra-compact binaries could be found in the near future by applying such a new approach to other binary candidates.

  1. A hot Jupiter orbiting a 2-million-year-old solar-mass T Tauri star.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, J F; Moutou, C; Malo, L; Baruteau, C; Yu, L; Hébrard, E; Hussain, G; Alencar, S; Ménard, F; Bouvier, J; Petit, P; Takami, M; Doyon, R; Collier Cameron, A

    2016-06-30

    Hot Jupiters are giant Jupiter-like exoplanets that orbit their host stars 100 times more closely than Jupiter orbits the Sun. These planets presumably form in the outer part of the primordial disk from which both the central star and surrounding planets are born, then migrate inwards and yet avoid falling into their host star. It is, however, unclear whether this occurs early in the lives of hot Jupiters, when they are still embedded within protoplanetary disks, or later, once multiple planets are formed and interact. Although numerous hot Jupiters have been detected around mature Sun-like stars, their existence has not yet been firmly demonstrated for young stars, whose magnetic activity is so intense that it overshadows the radial velocity signal that close-in giant planets can induce. Here we report that the radial velocities of the young star V830 Tau exhibit a sine wave of period 4.93 days and semi-amplitude 75 metres per second, detected with a false-alarm probability of less than 0.03 per cent, after filtering out the magnetic activity plaguing the spectra. We find that this signal is unrelated to the 2.741-day rotation period of V830 Tau and we attribute it to the presence of a planet of mass 0.77 times that of Jupiter, orbiting at a distance of 0.057 astronomical units from the host star. Our result demonstrates that hot Jupiters can migrate inwards in less than two million years, probably as a result of planet–disk interactions.

  2. Electromagnetic evidence that SSS17a is the result of a binary neutron star merger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, C. D.; Foley, R. J.; Kasen, D.; Murguia-Berthier, A.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Coulter, D. A.; Drout, M. R.; Piro, A. L.; Shappee, B. J.; Boutsia, K.; Contreras, C.; Di Mille, F.; Madore, B. F.; Morrell, N.; Pan, Y.-C.; Prochaska, J. X.; Rest, A.; Rojas-Bravo, C.; Siebert, M. R.; Simon, J. D.; Ulloa, N.

    2017-12-01

    Eleven hours after the detection of gravitational wave source GW170817 by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory and Virgo Interferometers, an associated optical transient, SSS17a, was identified in the galaxy NGC 4993. Although the gravitational wave data indicate that GW170817 is consistent with the merger of two compact objects, the electromagnetic observations provide independent constraints on the nature of that system. We synthesize the optical to near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy of SSS17a collected by the One-Meter Two-Hemisphere collaboration, finding that SSS17a is unlike other known transients. The source is best described by theoretical models of a kilonova consisting of radioactive elements produced by rapid neutron capture (the r-process). We conclude that SSS17a was the result of a binary neutron star merger, reinforcing the gravitational wave result.

  3. Electromagnetic evidence that SSS17a is the result of a binary neutron star merger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, C D; Foley, R J; Kasen, D; Murguia-Berthier, A; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Coulter, D A; Drout, M R; Piro, A L; Shappee, B J; Boutsia, K; Contreras, C; Di Mille, F; Madore, B F; Morrell, N; Pan, Y-C; Prochaska, J X; Rest, A; Rojas-Bravo, C; Siebert, M R; Simon, J D; Ulloa, N

    2017-12-22

    Eleven hours after the detection of gravitational wave source GW170817 by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory and Virgo Interferometers, an associated optical transient, SSS17a, was identified in the galaxy NGC 4993. Although the gravitational wave data indicate that GW170817 is consistent with the merger of two compact objects, the electromagnetic observations provide independent constraints on the nature of that system. We synthesize the optical to near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy of SSS17a collected by the One-Meter Two-Hemisphere collaboration, finding that SSS17a is unlike other known transients. The source is best described by theoretical models of a kilonova consisting of radioactive elements produced by rapid neutron capture (the r-process). We conclude that SSS17a was the result of a binary neutron star merger, reinforcing the gravitational wave result. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  4. The binary RV Tauri star AC Her and evidence for a long-lived dust-disc

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winckel, H. van; Waelkens, C.; Waters, L.B.F.M.; Molster, F.J.; Udry, S.; Bakker, E.J.

    1998-01-01

    We present in this letter a homogeneous set of CORAVEL radial velocity measurements of the well studied RV Tauri star AC Her showing it to be a binary with a period of 1196 ± 6 days. The photospheric abundances are deduced using high resolution, high signal-to-noise optical spectra and prove that AC

  5. Eclipsing binary stars as tests of gravity theories - The apsidal motion of AS Camelopardalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Frank P.; Guinan, Edward F.; Boyd, Patricia T.

    1989-01-01

    AS Camelopardalis is an 8th-magnitude eclipsing binary that consists of two main-sequence (B8 V and a B9.5 V) components in an eccentric orbit (e = 0.17) with an orbital period of 3.43 days. Like the eccentric eclipsing system DI Herculis, and a few other systems, AS Cam is an important test case for studying relativistic apsidal motion. In these systems, the theoretical general relativistic apsidal motion is comparable to that expected from classical effects arising from tidal and rotational deformation of the stellar components. Accurate determinations of the orbital and stellar properties of AS Cam have been made by Hilditch (1972) and Khalliulin and Kozyreva (1983) that permit the theoretical relativistic and classical contributions to the apsidal motion to be determined reasonably well. All the published timings of primary and secondary minima have been gathered and supplemented with eclipse timings from 1899 to 1920 obtained from the Harvard plate collection. Least-squares solutions of the eclipse timings extending over an 80 yr interval yield a smaller than expected apsidal motion, in agreement with that found by Khalliulin and Kozyreva from a smaller set of data. The observed apsidal motion for AS Cam is about one-third that expected from the combined relativistic and classical effects. Thus, AS Cam joins DI Her in having an observed apsidal motion significantly less than that predicted from theory.

  6. Insight-HXMT observations of the first binary neutron star merger GW170817

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, TiPei; Xiong, ShaoLin; Zhang, ShuangNan; Lu, FangJun; Song, LiMing; Cao, XueLei; Chang, Zhi; Chen, Gang; Chen, Li; Chen, TianXiang; Chen, Yong; Chen, YiBao; Chen, YuPeng; Cui, Wei; Cui, WeiWei; Deng, JingKang; Dong, YongWei; Du, YuanYuan; Fu, MinXue; Gao, GuanHua; Gao, He; Gao, Min; Ge, MingYu; Gu, YuDong; Guan, Ju; Guo, ChengCheng; Han, DaWei; Hu, Wei; Huang, Yue; Huo, Jia; Jia, ShuMei; Jiang, LuHua; Jiang, WeiChun; Jin, Jing; Jin, YongJie; Li, Bing; Li, ChengKui; Li, Gang; Li, MaoShun; Li, Wei; Li, Xian; Li, XiaoBo; Li, XuFang; Li, YanGuo; Li, ZiJian; Li, ZhengWei; Liang, XiaoHua; Liao, JinYuan; Liu, CongZhan; Liu, GuoQing; Liu, HongWei; Liu, ShaoZhen; Liu, XiaoJing; Liu, Yuan; Liu, YiNong; Lu, Bo; Lu, XueFeng; Luo, Tao; Ma, Xiang; Meng, Bin; Nang, Yi; Nie, JianYin; Ou, Ge; Qu, JinLu; Sai, Na; Sun, Liang; Tan, Yin; Tao, Lian; Tao, WenHui; Tuo, YouLi; Wang, GuoFeng; Wang, HuanYu; Wang, Juan; Wang, WenShuai; Wang, YuSa; Wen, XiangYang; Wu, BoBing; Wu, Mei; Xiao, GuangCheng; Xu, He; Xu, YuPeng; Yan, LinLi; Yang, JiaWei; Yang, Sheng; Yang, YanJi; Zhang, AiMei; Zhang, ChunLei; Zhang, ChengMo; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, HongMei; Zhang, Juan; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Shu; Zhang, Tong; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, WanChang; Zhang, WenZhao; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Yue; Zhang, YiFei; Zhang, YongJie; Zhang, Zhao; Zhang, ZiLiang; Zhao, HaiSheng; Zhao, JianLing; Zhao, XiaoFan; Zheng, ShiJie; Zhu, Yue; Zhu, YuXuan; Zou, ChangLin

    2018-03-01

    Finding the electromagnetic (EM) counterpart of binary compact star merger, especially the binary neutron star (BNS) merger, is critically important for gravitational wave (GW) astronomy, cosmology and fundamental physics. On Aug. 17, 2017, Advanced LIGO and Fermi/GBM independently triggered the first BNS merger, GW170817, and its high energy EM counterpart, GRB 170817A, respectively, resulting in a global observation campaign covering gamma-ray, X-ray, UV, optical, IR, radio as well as neutrinos. The High Energy X-ray telescope (HE) onboard Insight-HXMT (Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope) is the unique high-energy gamma-ray telescope that monitored the entire GW localization area and especially the optical counterpart (SSS17a/AT2017gfo) with very large collection area ( 1000 cm2) and microsecond time resolution in 0.2-5 MeV. In addition, Insight-HXMT quickly implemented a Target of Opportunity (ToO) observation to scan the GW localization area for potential X-ray emission from the GW source. Although Insight-HXMT did not detect any significant high energy (0.2-5 MeV) radiation from GW170817, its observation helped to confirm the unexpected weak and soft nature of GRB 170817A. Meanwhile, Insight-HXMT/HE provides one of the most stringent constraints ( 10‒7 to 10‒6 erg/cm2/s) for both GRB170817A and any other possible precursor or extended emissions in 0.2-5 MeV, which help us to better understand the properties of EM radiation from this BNS merger. Therefore the observation of Insight-HXMT constitutes an important chapter in the full context of multi-wavelength and multi-messenger observation of this historical GW event.

  7. Orbits and origins of the young stars in the central parsec of the galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, J. R.; Ghez, A. M.; Morris, M.; Hornstein, S. D.; Matthews, K.

    2008-10-01

    We present new proper motions from the 10 m Keck telescopes for a puzzling population of massive, young stars located within a parsec of the supermassive black hole at the Galactic Center. Our proper motion measurements have uncertainties of only 0.07 mas yr-1 (3 km s-1), which is gtrsim 7 times better than previous proper motion measurements for these stars, and enables us to measure accelerations as low as 0.2 mas yr-2 (7 km s-1 yr-1). These measurements, along with stellar line-of-sight velocities from the literature, constrain the true orbit of each individual star and allow us to directly test the hypothesis that the massive stars reside in two stellar disks as has been previously proposed. Analysis of the stellar orbits reveals only one disk of young stars using a method that is capable of detecting disks containing at least 7 stars. The detected disk contains 50% (38 of 73) of the young stars, is inclined by thicksim 115° from the plane of the sky, and is oriented at a position angle of thicksim 100° East of North. The on-disk and off-disk populations have similar K-band luminosity functions and radial distributions that decrease at larger radii as ∞ r-2. The disk has an out-of-the-disk velocity dispersion of 28 ± 6 km s-1, which corresponds to a half-opening angle of 7° ± 2°, and several candidate disk members have eccentricities greater than 0.2. Our findings suggest that the young stars may have formed in situ but in a more complex geometry than a simple thin circular disk.

  8. Tidal Heating of Earth-like Exoplanets around M Stars: Thermal, Magnetic, and Orbital Evolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The internal thermal and magnetic evolution of rocky exoplanets is critical to their habitability. We focus on the thermal-orbital evolution of Earth-mass planets around low-mass M stars whose radiative habitable zone overlaps with the “tidal zone,” where tidal dissipation is expected to be a significant heat source in the interior. We develop a thermal-orbital evolution model calibrated to Earth that couples tidal dissipation, with a temperature-dependent Maxwell rheology, to orbital circularization and migration. We illustrate thermal-orbital steady states where surface heat flow is balanced by tidal dissipation and cooling can be stalled for billions of years until circularization occurs. Orbital energy dissipated as tidal heat in the interior drives both inward migration and circularization, with a circularization time that is inversely proportional to the dissipation rate. We identify a peak in the internal dissipation rate as the mantle passes through a viscoelastic state at mantle temperatures near 1800 K. Planets orbiting a 0.1 solar-mass star within 0.07 AU circularize before 10 Gyr, independent of initial eccentricity. Once circular, these planets cool monotonically and maintain dynamos similar to that of Earth. Planets forced into eccentric orbits can experience a super-cooling of the core and rapid core solidification, inhibiting dynamo action for planets in the habitable zone. We find that tidal heating is insignificant in the habitable zone around 0.45 (or larger) solar-mass stars because tidal dissipation is a stronger function of orbital distance than stellar mass, and the habitable zone is farther from larger stars. Suppression of the planetary magnetic field exposes the atmosphere to stellar wind erosion and the surface to harmful radiation. In addition to weak magnetic fields, massive melt eruption rates and prolonged magma oceans may render eccentric planets in the habitable zone of low-mass stars inhospitable for life. Key Words

  9. KEPLER-14b: A MASSIVE HOT JUPITER TRANSITING AN F STAR IN A CLOSE VISUAL BINARY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchhave, Lars A.; Latham, David W.; Carter, Joshua A.; Desert, Jean-Michel; Torres, Guillermo; Adams, Elisabeth R.; Charbonneau, David B.; Dupree, Andrea K.; Fressin, Francois; Bryson, Stephen T.; Howell, Steve B.; Ciardi, David R.; Kulesa, Craig; Fischer, Debra A.; Gautier, Thomas N.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Isaacson, Howard; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Jenkins, Jon M.; McCarthy, Donald W.

    2011-01-01

    We present the discovery of a hot Jupiter transiting an F star in a close visual (0.''3 sky projected angular separation) binary system. The dilution of the host star's light by the nearly equal magnitude stellar companion (∼0.5 mag fainter) significantly affects the derived planetary parameters, and if left uncorrected, leads to an underestimate of the radius and mass of the planet by 10% and 60%, respectively. Other published exoplanets, which have not been observed with high-resolution imaging, could similarly have unresolved stellar companions and thus have incorrectly derived planetary parameters. Kepler-14b (KOI-98) has a period of P = 6.790 days and, correcting for the dilution, has a mass of M p = 8.40 +0.35 -0.34 M J and a radius of R p = 1.136 +0.073 -0.054 R J , yielding a mean density of ρ p = 7.1 ± 1.1 g cm -3 .

  10. Binary neutron star merger rate via the luminosity function of short gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Debdutta

    2018-04-01

    The luminosity function of short Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) is modelled by using the available catalogue data of all short GRBs (sGRBs) detected till October, 2017. The luminosities are estimated via the `pseudo-redshifts' obtained from the `Yonetoku correlation', assuming a standard delay distribution between the cosmic star formation rate and the production rate of their progenitors. While the simple powerlaw is ruled out to high confidence, the data is fit well both by exponential cutoff powerlaw and broken powerlaw models. Using the derived parameters of these models along with conservative values in the jet opening angles seen from afterglow observations, the true rate of short GRBs are derived. Assuming a short GRB is produced from each binary neutron star merger (BNSM), the rate of gravitational wave (GW) detections from these mergers are derived for the past, present and future configurations of the GW detector networks. Stringent lower limits of 1.87yr-1 for the aLIGO-VIRGO, and 3.11yr-1 for the upcoming aLIGO-VIRGO-KAGRA-LIGO/India configurations are thus derived for the BNSM rate at 68% confidence. The BNSM rates calculated from this work and that independently inferred from the observation of the only confirmed BNSM observed till date, are shown to have a mild tension; however the scenario that all BNSMs produce sGRBs cannot be ruled out.

  11. A TEMPORAL MAP IN GEOSTATIONARY ORBIT: THE COVER ETCHING ON THE EchoStar XVI ARTIFACT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisberg, Joel M.; Paglen, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    Geostationary satellites are unique among orbital spacecraft in that they experience no appreciable atmospheric drag. After concluding their respective missions, geostationary spacecraft remain in orbit virtually in perpetuity. As such, they represent some of human civilization's longest lasting artifacts. With this in mind, the EchoStar XVI satellite, to be launched in fall 2012, will play host to a time capsule intended as a message for the deep future. Inspired in part by the Pioneer Plaque and Voyager Golden Records, the EchoStar XVI Artifact is a pair of gold-plated aluminum jackets housing a small silicon disk containing 100 photographs. The Cover Etching, the subject of this paper, is etched onto one of the two jackets. It is a temporal map consisting of a star chart, pulsar timings, and other information describing the epoch from which EchoStar XVI came. The pulsar sample consists of 13 rapidly rotating objects, 5 of which are especially stable, having spin periods <10 ms and extremely small spin-down rates. In this paper, we discuss our approach to the time map etched onto the cover and the scientific data shown on it, and we speculate on the uses that future scientists may have for its data. The other portions of the EchoStar XVI Artifact will be discussed elsewhere.

  12. Repeating and non-repeating fast radio bursts from binary neutron star mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Shotaro; Totani, Tomonori; Kiuchi, Kenta

    2018-04-01

    Most fast radio bursts (FRB) do not show evidence of repetition, and such non-repeating FRBs may be produced at the time of a merger of binary neutron stars (BNS), provided that the BNS merger rate is close to the high end of the currently possible range. However, the merger environment is polluted by dynamical ejecta, which may prohibit the radio signal from propagating. We examine this by using a general-relativistic simulation of a BNS merger, and show that the ejecta appears about 1 ms after the rotation speed of the merged star becomes the maximum. Therefore there is a time window in which an FRB signal can reach outside, and the short duration of non-repeating FRBs can be explained by screening after ejecta formation. A fraction of BNS mergers may leave a rapidly rotating and stable neutron star, and such objects may be the origin of repeating FRBs like FRB 121102. We show that a merger remnant would appear as a repeating FRB on a time scale of ˜1-10 yr, and expected properties are consistent with the observations of FRB 121102. We construct an FRB rate evolution model that includes these two populations of repeating and non-repeating FRBs from BNS mergers, and show that the detection rate of repeating FRBs relative to non-repeating ones rapidly increases with improving search sensitivity. This may explain why only the repeating FRB 121102 was discovered by the most sensitive FRB search with Arecibo. Several predictions are made, including the appearance of a repeating FRB 1-10 yr after a BNS merger that is localized by gravitational waves and subsequent electromagnetic radiation.

  13. The electromagnetic Christodoulou memory effect and its application to neutron star binary mergers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieri, Lydia; Chen, PoNing; Yau, Shing-Tung

    2012-01-01

    Gravitational waves are predicted by the general theory of relativity. It has been shown that gravitational waves have a nonlinear memory, displacing test masses permanently. This is called the Christodoulou memory. We proved that the electromagnetic field contributes at highest order to the nonlinear memory effect of gravitational waves, enlarging the permanent displacement of test masses. In experiments like LISA or LIGO which measure distances of test masses, the Christodoulou memory will manifest itself as a permanent displacement of these objects. It has been suggested to detect the Christodoulou memory effect using radio telescopes investigating small changes in pulsar’s pulse arrival times. The latter experiments are based on present-day technology and measure changes in frequency. In the present paper, we study the electromagnetic Christodoulou memory effect and compute it for binary neutron star mergers. These are typical sources of gravitational radiation. During these processes, not only mass and momenta are radiated away in form of gravitational waves, but also very strong magnetic fields are produced and radiated away. Moreover, a large portion of the energy is carried away by neutrinos. We give constraints on the conditions, where the energy transported by electromagnetic radiation is of similar or slightly higher order than the energy radiated in gravitational waves or in form of neutrinos. We find that for coalescing neutron stars, large magnetic fields magnify the Christodoulou memory as long as the gaseous environment is sufficiently rarefied. Thus the observed effect on test masses of a laser interferometer gravitational wave detector will be enlarged by the contribution of the electromagnetic field. Therefore, the present results are important for the planned experiments. Looking at the null asymptotics of spacetimes, which are solutions of the Einstein–Maxwell equations, we derive the electromagnetic Christodoulou memory effect. We obtain

  14. EUV-driven ionospheres and electron transport on extrasolar giant planets orbiting active stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadney, J. M.; Galand, M.; Koskinen, T. T.; Miller, S.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Unruh, Y. C.; Yelle, R. V.

    2016-03-01

    The composition and structure of the upper atmospheres of extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) are affected by the high-energy spectrum of their host stars from soft X-rays to the extreme ultraviolet (EUV). This emission depends on the activity level of the star, which is primarily determined by its age. In this study, we focus upon EGPs orbiting K- and M-dwarf stars of different ages - ɛ Eridani, AD Leonis, AU Microscopii - and the Sun. X-ray and EUV (XUV) spectra for these stars are constructed using a coronal model. These spectra are used to drive both a thermospheric model and an ionospheric model, providing densities of neutral and ion species. Ionisation - as a result of stellar radiation deposition - is included through photo-ionisation and electron-impact processes. The former is calculated by solving the Lambert-Beer law, while the latter is calculated from a supra-thermal electron transport model. We find that EGP ionospheres at all orbital distances considered (0.1-1 AU) and around all stars selected are dominated by the long-lived H+ ion. In addition, planets with upper atmospheres where H2 is not substantially dissociated (at large orbital distances) have a layer in which H3+ is the major ion at the base of the ionosphere. For fast-rotating planets, densities of short-lived H3+ undergo significant diurnal variations, with the maximum value being driven by the stellar X-ray flux. In contrast, densities of longer-lived H+ show very little day/night variability and the magnitude is driven by the level of stellar EUV flux. The H3+ peak in EGPs with upper atmospheres where H2 is dissociated (orbiting close to their star) under strong stellar illumination is pushed to altitudes below the homopause, where this ion is likely to be destroyed through reactions with heavy species (e.g. hydrocarbons, water). The inclusion of secondary ionisation processes produces significantly enhanced ion and electron densities at altitudes below the main EUV ionisation peak, as

  15. On-Orbit Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Star Tracker Warm Pixel Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felikson, Denis; Ekinci, Matthew; Hashmall, Joseph A.; Vess, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the process of identification and analysis of warm pixels in two autonomous star trackers on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission. A brief description of the mission orbit and attitude regimes is discussed and pertinent star tracker hardware specifications are given. Warm pixels are defined and the Quality Index parameter is introduced, which can be explained qualitatively as a manifestation of a possible warm pixel event. A description of the algorithm used to identify warm pixel candidates is given. Finally, analysis of dumps of on-orbit star tracker charge coupled devices (CCD) images is presented and an operational plan going forward is discussed. SDO, launched on February 11, 2010, is operated from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). SDO is in a geosynchronous orbit with a 28.5 inclination. The nominal mission attitude points the spacecraft X-axis at the Sun, with the spacecraft Z-axis roughly aligned with the Solar North Pole. The spacecraft Y-axis completes the triad. In attitude, SDO moves approximately 0.04 per hour, mostly about the spacecraft Z-axis. The SDO star trackers, manufactured by Galileo Avionica, project the images of stars in their 16.4deg x 16.4deg fields-of-view onto CCD detectors consisting of 512 x 512 pixels. The trackers autonomously identify the star patterns and provide an attitude estimate. Each unit is able to track up to 9 stars. Additionally, each tracker calculates a parameter called the Quality Index, which is a measure of the quality of the attitude solution. Each pixel in the CCD measures the intensity of light and a warns pixel is defined as having a measurement consistently and significantly higher than the mean background intensity level. A warns pixel should also have lower intensity than a pixel containing a star image and will not move across the field of view as the attitude changes (as would a dim star image). It should be noted that the maximum error introduced in the star tracker

  16. First Photometric Investigation of the Newly Discovered W UMa-type Binary Star MR Com

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, S.-B.; Liu, N.-P.; Liao, W.-P.; He, J.-J.; Liu, L.; Zhu, L.-Y.; Wang, J.-J.; Zhao, E.-G.

    2013-08-01

    By analyzing multi-color light curves of the newly discovered W UMa-type binary, MR Com, we discovered that it is a shallow-contact binary with a degree of contact factor of f = 10.0% ± 2.1%. Photometric solutions reveal that MR Com is a W-type system with a mass ratio of q = 3.9 where the less massive component is about 90 K hotter than the more massive one. By investigating all of the available times of minimum light, we found that the general trend of the Observed-Calculated (O - C) curve shows a downward parabolic variation while it undergoes a cyclic variation with a small amplitude of 0.0031 days and a period of 10.1 yr. The downward parabolic change corresponds to a long-term decrease in the orbital period at a rate of \\dot{P}=-5.3\\times {10^{-7}} days yr-1 that may be caused by a combination of a mass transfer and an angular momentum loss (AML) via magnetic braking. Among the 16 shallow-contact systems with a decreasing orbital period, MR Com has the lowest mass ratio (e.g., 1/q = 0.26). The shallow-contact configuration, the low-mass ratio, and the long-term period decrease all suggest that systems similar to MR Com are on the AML-controlled stage of the evolutionary scheme proposed by Qian. They will oscillate around a critical mass ratio and evolve into a deep contact with a higher mass ratio. The small-amplitude cyclic change in the O - C curve was analyzed for the light-travel time effect via the presence of an extremely cool stellar companion.

  17. FIRST PHOTOMETRIC INVESTIGATION OF THE NEWLY DISCOVERED W UMa-TYPE BINARY STAR MR Com

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, S.-B.; Liu, N.-P.; Liao, W.-P.; He, J.-J.; Liu, L.; Zhu, L.-Y.; Wang, J.-J.; Zhao, E.-G., E-mail: qsb@ynao.ac.cn [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), P.O. Box 110, 650011 Kunming (China)

    2013-08-01

    By analyzing multi-color light curves of the newly discovered W UMa-type binary, MR Com, we discovered that it is a shallow-contact binary with a degree of contact factor of f = 10.0% {+-} 2.1%. Photometric solutions reveal that MR Com is a W-type system with a mass ratio of q = 3.9 where the less massive component is about 90 K hotter than the more massive one. By investigating all of the available times of minimum light, we found that the general trend of the Observed-Calculated (O - C) curve shows a downward parabolic variation while it undergoes a cyclic variation with a small amplitude of 0.0031 days and a period of 10.1 yr. The downward parabolic change corresponds to a long-term decrease in the orbital period at a rate of P-dot = -5.3 x 10{sup -7} days yr{sup -1} that may be caused by a combination of a mass transfer and an angular momentum loss (AML) via magnetic braking. Among the 16 shallow-contact systems with a decreasing orbital period, MR Com has the lowest mass ratio (e.g., 1/q = 0.26). The shallow-contact configuration, the low-mass ratio, and the long-term period decrease all suggest that systems similar to MR Com are on the AML-controlled stage of the evolutionary scheme proposed by Qian. They will oscillate around a critical mass ratio and evolve into a deep contact with a higher mass ratio. The small-amplitude cyclic change in the O - C curve was analyzed for the light-travel time effect via the presence of an extremely cool stellar companion.

  18. A planet in a polar orbit of 1.4 solar-mass star

    OpenAIRE

    Guenther, E.W.; Cusano, F.; Deeg, H.; Gandolfi, D.; Geier, S.; Grziwa, S.; Heber, U.; Tal-Or, L.; Sebastian, D.; Rodler, F.

    2015-01-01

    Although more than a thousand transiting extrasolar planets have been discovered, only very few of them orbit stars that are more massive than the Sun. The discovery of such planets is interesting, because they have formed in disks that are more massive but had a shorter life time than those of solar-like stars. Studies of planets more massive than the Sun thus tell us how the properties of the proto-planetary disks effect the formation of planets. Another aspect that makes these planets inte...

  19. Stellar Obliquity and Magnetic Activity of Planet-hosting Stars and Eclipsing Binaries Based on Transit Chord Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Fei; Winn, Joshua N.; Berta-Thompson, Zachory; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Albrecht, Simon

    2018-04-01

    The light curve of an eclipsing system shows anomalies whenever the eclipsing body passes in front of active regions on the eclipsed star. In some cases, the pattern of anomalies can be used to determine the obliquity Ψ of the eclipsed star. Here we present a method for detecting and analyzing these patterns, based on a statistical test for correlations between the anomalies observed in a sequence of eclipses. Compared to previous methods, ours makes fewer assumptions and is easier to automate. We apply it to a sample of 64 stars with transiting planets and 24 eclipsing binaries for which precise space-based data are available, and for which there was either some indication of flux anomalies or a previously reported obliquity measurement. We were able to determine obliquities for 10 stars with hot Jupiters. In particular we found Ψ ≲ 10° for Kepler-45, which is only the second M dwarf with a measured obliquity. The other eight cases are G and K stars with low obliquities. Among the eclipsing binaries, we were able to determine obliquities in eight cases, all of which are consistent with zero. Our results also reveal some common patterns of stellar activity for magnetically active G and K stars, including persistently active longitudes.

  20. Double stars with wide separations in the AGK3 - II. The wide binaries and the multiple systems*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbwachs, J.-L.; Mayor, M.; Udry, S.

    2017-02-01

    A large observation programme was carried out to measure the radial velocities of the components of a selection of common proper motion (CPM) stars to select the physical binaries. 80 wide binaries (WBs) were detected, and 39 optical pairs were identified. By adding CPM stars with separations close enough to be almost certain that they are physical, a bias-controlled sample of 116 WBs was obtained, and used to derive the distribution of separations from 100 to 30 000 au. The distribution obtained does not match the log-constant distribution, but agrees with the log-normal distribution. The spectroscopic binaries detected among the WB components were used to derive statistical information about the multiple systems. The close binaries in WBs seem to be like those detected in other field stars. As for the WBs, they seem to obey the log-normal distribution of periods. The number of quadruple systems agrees with the no correlation hypothesis; this indicates that an environment conducive to the formation of WBs does not favour the formation of subsystems with periods shorter than 10 yr.

  1. KEPLER-6b: A TRANSITING HOT JUPITER ORBITING A METAL-RICH STAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunham, Edward W.; Borucki, William J.; Koch, David G.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Furesz, Gabor; Geary, John C.; Latham, David W.; Brown, Timothy M.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Cochran, William D.; Endl, Michael; Fischer, Debra; Gautier, Thomas N.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Gould, Alan; Howell, Steve B.; Kjeldsen, Hans

    2010-01-01

    We announce the discovery of Kepler-6b, a transiting hot Jupiter orbiting a star with unusually high metallicity, [Fe/H]= +0.34±0.04. The planet's mass is about 2/3 that of Jupiter, M P = 0.67 M J , and the radius is 30% larger than that of Jupiter, R P = 1.32 R J , resulting in a density of ρ P = 0.35 g cm -3 , a fairly typical value for such a planet. The orbital period is P = 3.235 days. The host star is both more massive than the Sun, M * = 1.21 M sun , and larger than the Sun, R * = 1.39 R sun .

  2. COMPLEX VARIABILITY OF THE Hα EMISSION LINE PROFILE OF THE T TAURI BINARY SYSTEM KH 15D: THE INFLUENCE OF ORBITAL PHASE, OCCULTATION BY THE CIRCUMBINARY DISK, AND ACCRETION PHENOMENA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, Catrina M.; Johns-Krull, Christopher M.; Mundt, Reinhard; Herbst, William; Winn, Joshua N.

    2012-01-01

    We have obtained 48 high-resolution echelle spectra of the pre-main-sequence eclipsing binary system KH 15D (V582 Mon, P = 48.37 days, e ∼ 0.6, M A = 0.6 M ☉ , M B = 0.7 M ☉ ). The eclipses are caused by a circumbinary disk (CBD) seen nearly edge on, which at the epoch of these observations completely obscured the orbit of star B and a large portion of the orbit of star A. The spectra were obtained over five contiguous observing seasons from 2001/2002 to 2005/2006 while star A was fully visible, fully occulted, and during several ingress and egress events. The Hα line profile shows dramatic changes in these time series data over timescales ranging from days to years. A fraction of the variations are due to 'edge effects' and depend only on the height of star A above or below the razor sharp edge of the occulting disk. Other observed variations depend on the orbital phase: the Hα emission line profile changes from an inverse P-Cygni-type profile during ingress to an enhanced double-peaked profile, with both a blue and a red emission component, during egress. Each of these interpreted variations are complicated by the fact that there is also a chaotic, irregular component present in these profiles. We find that the complex data set can be largely understood in the context of accretion onto the stars from a CBD with gas flows as predicted by the models of eccentric T Tauri binaries put forward by Artymowicz and Lubow, Günther and Kley, and de Val-Borro et al. In particular, our data provide strong support for the pulsed accretion phenomenon, in which enhanced accretion occurs during and after perihelion passage.

  3. Thermal-orbital coupled tidal heating and habitability of Martian-sized extrasolar planets around M stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji, D.; Kurita, K.

    2014-01-01

    M-type stars are good targets in the search for habitable extrasolar planets. Due to their low effective temperatures, the habitable zone of M stars is very close to the stars themselves. For planets that are close to their stars, tidal heating plays an important role in thermal and orbital evolutions, especially when the planet's orbit has a relatively large eccentricity. Although tidal heating interacts with the thermal state and the orbit of the planet, such coupled calculations for extrasolar planets around M stars have not been conducted. We perform coupled calculations using simple structural and orbital models and analyze the thermal state and habitability of a terrestrial planet. Considering this planet to be Martian-sized, the tide heats up and partially melts the mantle, maintaining an equilibrium state if the mass of the star is less than 0.2 times the mass of the Sun and the initial eccentricity of the orbit is more than 0.2. The reduction of heat dissipation due to the melted mantle allows the planet to stay in the habitable zone for more than 10 Gyr even though the orbital distance is small. The surface heat flux at the equilibrium state is between that of Mars and Io. The thermal state of the planet mainly depends on the initial value of the eccentricity and the mass of the star.

  4. BINARIES MIGRATING IN A GASEOUS DISK: WHERE ARE THE GALACTIC CENTER BINARIES?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baruteau, C.; Lin, D. N. C.; Cuadra, J.

    2011-01-01

    The massive stars in the Galactic center inner arcsecond share analogous properties with the so-called Hot Jupiters. Most of these young stars have highly eccentric orbits and were probably not formed in situ. It has been proposed that these stars acquired their current orbits from the tidal disruption of compact massive binaries scattered toward the proximity of the central supermassive black hole. Assuming a binary star formed in a thin gaseous disk beyond 0.1 pc from the central object, we investigate the relevance of disk-satellite interactions to harden the binding energy of the binary, and to drive its inward migration. A massive, equal-mass binary star is found to become more tightly wound as it migrates inward toward the central black hole. The migration timescale is very similar to that of a single-star satellite of the same mass. The binary's hardening is caused by the formation of spiral tails lagging the stars inside the binary's Hill radius. We show that the hardening timescale is mostly determined by the mass of gas inside the binary's Hill radius and that it is much shorter than the migration timescale. We discuss some implications of the binary's hardening process. When the more massive (primary) components of close binaries eject most their mass through supernova explosion, their secondary stars may attain a range of eccentricities and inclinations. Such processes may provide an alternative unified scenario for the origin of the kinematic properties of the central cluster and S-stars in the Galactic center as well as the high-velocity stars in the Galactic halo.

  5. Optimization method of star tracker orientation for sun-synchronous orbit based on space light distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Geng; Xing, Fei; Wei, Minsong; Sun, Ting; You, Zheng

    2017-05-20

    Star trackers, optical attitude sensors with high precision, are susceptible to space light from the Sun and the Earth albedo. Until now, research in this field has lacked systematic analysis. In this paper, we propose an installation orientation method for a star tracker onboard sun-synchronous-orbit spacecraft and analyze the space light distribution by transforming the complicated relative motion among the Sun, Earth, and the satellite to the body coordinate system of the satellite. Meanwhile, the boundary-curve equations of the areas exposed to the stray light from the Sun and the Earth albedo were calculated by the coordinate-transformation matrix under different maneuver attitudes, and the installation orientation of the star tracker was optimized based on the boundary equations instead of the traditional iterative simulation method. The simulation and verification experiment indicate that this installation orientation method is effective and precise and can provide a reference for the installation of sun-synchronous orbit star trackers free from the stray light.

  6. Prevalence of Earth-size planets orbiting Sun-like stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petigura, Erik A; Howard, Andrew W; Marcy, Geoffrey W

    2013-11-26

    Determining whether Earth-like planets are common or rare looms as a touchstone in the question of life in the universe. We searched for Earth-size planets that cross in front of their host stars by examining the brightness measurements of 42,000 stars from National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Kepler mission. We found 603 planets, including 10 that are Earth size ( ) and receive comparable levels of stellar energy to that of Earth (1 - 2 R[Symbol: see text] ). We account for Kepler's imperfect detectability of such planets by injecting synthetic planet-caused dimmings into the Kepler brightness measurements and recording the fraction detected. We find that 11 ± 4% of Sun-like stars harbor an Earth-size planet receiving between one and four times the stellar intensity as Earth. We also find that the occurrence of Earth-size planets is constant with increasing orbital period (P), within equal intervals of logP up to ~200 d. Extrapolating, one finds 5.7(-2.2)(+1.7)% of Sun-like stars harbor an Earth-size planet with orbital periods of 200-400 d.

  7. Low-mass Pre-He White Dwarf Stars in Kepler Eclipsing Binaries with Multi-periodic Pulsations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X. B.; Fu, J. N.; Liu, N.; Luo, C. Q.; Ren, A. B.

    2017-12-01

    We report the discovery of two thermally bloated low-mass pre-He white dwarfs (WDs) in two eclipsing binaries, KIC 10989032 and KIC 8087799. Based on the Kepler long-cadence photometry, we determined comprehensive photometric solutions of the two binary systems. The light curve analysis reveals that KIC 10989032 is a partially eclipsed detached binary system containing a probable low-mass WD with the temperature of about 10,300 K. Having a WD with the temperature of about 13,300, KKIC 8087799 is typical of an EL CVn system. By utilizing radial velocity measurements available for the A-type primary star of KIC 10989032, the mass and radius of the WD component are determined to be 0.24+/- 0.02 {M}⊙ and 0.50+/- 0.01 {R}⊙ , respectively. The values of mass and radius of the WD in KIC 8087799 are estimated as 0.16 ± 0.02 M ⊙ and 0.21 ± 0.01 R ⊙, respectively, according to the effective temperature and mean density of the A-type star derived from the photometric solution. We therefore introduce KIC 10989032 and KIC 8087799 as the eleventh and twelfth dA+WD eclipsing binaries in the Kepler field. Moreover, both binaries display marked multi-periodic pulsations superimposed on binary effects. A preliminary frequency analysis is applied to the light residuals when subtracting the synthetic eclipsing light curves from the observations, revealing that the light pulsations of the two systems are both due to the δ Sct-type primaries. We hence classify KIC 10989032 and KIC 8087799 as two WD+δ Sct binaries.

  8. Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton Accretion onto Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, Andrea; MacLeod, Morgan; Ramírez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2018-01-01

    Binary stars are not rare. While only close binary stars will eventually interact with one another, even the widest binary systems interact with their gaseous surroundings. The rates of accretion and the gaseous drag forces arising in these interactions are the key to understanding how these systems evolve. This poster examines accretion flows around a binary system moving supersonically through a background gas. We perform three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion using the adaptive mesh refinement code FLASH. We simulate a range of values of semi-major axis of the orbit relative to the gravitational focusing impact parameter of the pair. On large scales, gas is gravitationally focused by the center-of-mass of the binary, leading to dynamical friction drag and to the accretion of mass and momentum. On smaller scales, the orbital motion imprints itself on the gas. Notably, the magnitude and direction of the forces acting on the binary inherit this orbital dependence. The long-term evolution of the binary is determined by the timescales for accretion, slow down of the center-of-mass, and decay of the orbit. We use our simulations to measure these timescales and to establish a hierarchy between them. In general, our simulations indicate that binaries moving through gaseous media will slow down before the orbit decays.

  9. V2368 Ophiuchi: an eclipsing and double-lined spectroscopic binary used as a photometric comparison star for U Ophiuchi

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Harmanec, P.; Božić, H.; Mayer, P.; Eenens, P.; Brož, M.; Wolf, M.; Yang, S.; Šlechta, Miroslav; Ruždjak, D.; Sudar, D.; Ak, H.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 531, July (2011), A49/1-A49/10 ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD205/08/H005; GA ČR GAP209/10/0967 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA205/06/0304 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : early-type stars * close binaries stars Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.587, year: 2011

  10. Orbit classification in an equal-mass non-spinning binary black hole pseudo-Newtonian system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotos, Euaggelos E.; Dubeibe, F. L.; González, Guillermo A.

    2018-04-01

    The dynamics of a test particle in a non-spinning binary black hole system of equal masses is numerically investigated. The binary system is modeled in the context of the pseudo-Newtonian circular restricted three-body problem, such that the primaries are separated by a fixed distance and move in a circular orbit around each other. In particular, the Paczyński-Wiita potential is used for describing the gravitational field of the two non-Newtonian primaries. The orbital properties of the test particle are determined through the classification of the initial conditions of the orbits, using several values of the Jacobi constant, in the Hill's regions of possible motion. The initial conditions are classified into three main categories: (i) bounded, (ii) escaping and (iii) displaying close encounters. Using the smaller alignment index (SALI) chaos indicator, we further classify bounded orbits into regular, sticky or chaotic. To gain a complete view of the dynamics of the system, we define grids of initial conditions on different types of two-dimensional planes. The orbital structure of the configuration plane, along with the corresponding distributions of the escape and collision/close encounter times, allow us to observe the transition from the classical Newtonian to the pseudo-Newtonian regime. Our numerical results reveal a strong dependence of the properties of the considered basins with the Jacobi constant as well as with the Schwarzschild radius of the black holes.

  11. Towards a Unified View of Inhomogeneous Stellar Winds in Isolated Supergiant Stars and Supergiant High Mass X-Ray Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Núñez, Silvia; Kretschmar, Peter; Bozzo, Enrico; Oskinova, Lidia M.; Puls, Joachim; Sidoli, Lara; Sundqvist, Jon Olof; Blay, Pere; Falanga, Maurizio; Fürst, Felix; Gímenez-García, Angel; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Kühnel, Matthias; Sander, Andreas; Torrejón, José Miguel; Wilms, Jörn

    2017-10-01

    Massive stars, at least ˜10 times more massive than the Sun, have two key properties that make them the main drivers of evolution of star clusters, galaxies, and the Universe as a whole. On the one hand, the outer layers of massive stars are so hot that they produce most of the ionizing ultraviolet radiation of galaxies; in fact, the first massive stars helped to re-ionize the Universe after its Dark Ages. Another important property of massive stars are the strong stellar winds and outflows they produce. This mass loss, and finally the explosion of a massive star as a supernova or a gamma-ray burst, provide a significant input of mechanical and radiative energy into the interstellar space. These two properties together make massive stars one of the most important cosmic engines: they trigger the star formation and enrich the interstellar medium with heavy elements, that ultimately leads to formation of Earth-like rocky planets and the development of complex life. The study of massive star winds is thus a truly multidisciplinary field and has a wide impact on different areas of astronomy. In recent years observational and theoretical evidences have been growing that these winds are not smooth and homogeneous as previously assumed, but rather populated by dense "clumps". The presence of these structures dramatically affects the mass loss rates derived from the study of stellar winds. Clump properties in isolated stars are nowadays inferred mostly through indirect methods (i.e., spectroscopic observations of line profiles in various wavelength regimes, and their analysis based on tailored, inhomogeneous wind models). The limited characterization of the clump physical properties (mass, size) obtained so far have led to large uncertainties in the mass loss rates from massive stars. Such uncertainties limit our understanding of the role of massive star winds in galactic and cosmic evolution. Supergiant high mass X-ray binaries (SgXBs) are among the brightest X

  12. General-relativistic Large-eddy Simulations of Binary Neutron Star Mergers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radice, David, E-mail: dradice@astro.princeton.edu [Institute for Advanced Study, 1 Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2017-03-20

    The flow inside remnants of binary neutron star (NS) mergers is expected to be turbulent, because of magnetohydrodynamics instability activated at scales too small to be resolved in simulations. To study the large-scale impact of these instabilities, we develop a new formalism, based on the large-eddy simulation technique, for the modeling of subgrid-scale turbulent transport in general relativity. We apply it, for the first time, to the simulation of the late-inspiral and merger of two NSs. We find that turbulence can significantly affect the structure and survival time of the merger remnant, as well as its gravitational-wave (GW) and neutrino emissions. The former will be relevant for GW observation of merging NSs. The latter will affect the composition of the outflow driven by the merger and might influence its nucleosynthetic yields. The accretion rate after black hole formation is also affected. Nevertheless, we find that, for the most likely values of the turbulence mixing efficiency, these effects are relatively small and the GW signal will be affected only weakly by the turbulence. Thus, our simulations provide a first validation of all existing post-merger GW models.

  13. First light - II. Emission line extinction, population III stars, and X-ray binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Kirk S. S.; Wise, John H.; Aykutalp, Aycin; O'Shea, Brian W.; Norman, Michael L.; Xu, Hao

    2018-02-01

    We produce synthetic spectra and observations for metal-free stellar populations and high-mass X-ray binaries in the Renaissance Simulations at a redshift of 15. We extend our methodology from the first paper in the series by modelling the production and extinction of emission lines throughout a dusty and metal-enriched interstellar and circum-galactic media extracted from the simulation, using a Monte Carlo calculation. To capture the impact of high-energy photons, we include all frequencies from hard X-ray to far-infrared with enough frequency resolution to discern line emission and absorption profiles. The most common lines in our sample in order of their rate of occurrence are Ly α, the C IV λλ1548, 1551 doublet, H α, and the Ca II λλλ8498, 8542, 8662 triplet. The best scenario for a direct observation of a metal-free stellar population is a merger between two Population III Galaxies. In mergers between metal-enriched and metal-free stellar populations, some characteristics may be inferred indirectly. Single Population III galaxies are too dim to be observed photometrically at z = 15. Ly α emission is discernible by JWST as an increase in J200w - J277w colour off the intrinsic stellar tracks. Observations of metal-free stars will be difficult, though not impossible, with the next generation of space telescopes.

  14. Rates of short-GRB afterglows in association with binary neutron star mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, M.; Pai, Archana; Misra, Kuntal; Resmi, L.; Arun, K. G.

    2018-03-01

    Assuming all binary neutron star (BNS) mergers produce short gamma-ray bursts, we combine the merger rates of BNS from population synthesis studies, the sensitivities of advanced gravitational wave (GW) interferometer networks, and of the electromagnetic (EM) facilities in various wavebands, to compute the detection rate of associated afterglows in these bands. Using the inclination angle measured from GWs as a proxy for the viewing angle and assuming a uniform distribution of jet opening angle between 3° and 30°, we generate light curves of the counterparts using the open access afterglow hydrodynamics package BOXFIT for X-ray, optical, and radio bands. For different EM detectors, we obtain the fraction of EM counterparts detectable in these three bands by imposing appropriate detection thresholds. In association with BNS mergers detected by five (three) detector networks of advanced GW interferometers, assuming a BNS merger rate of 0.6-774 Gpc-3 yr-1 from population synthesis models, we find the afterglow detection rates (per year) to be 0.04-53 (0.02-27), 0.03-36 (0.01-19), and 0.04-47 (0.02-25) in the X-ray, optical, and radio bands, respectively. Our rates represent maximum possible detections for the given BNS rate since we ignore effects of cadence and field of view in EM follow-up observations.

  15. Galactic orbital motions of star clusters: static versus semicosmological time-dependent Galactic potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghi, Hosein; Zonoozi, Akram Hasani; Taghavi, Saeed

    2015-07-01

    In order to understand the orbital history of Galactic halo objects, such as globular clusters, authors usually assume a static potential for our Galaxy with parameters that appear at the present day. According to the standard paradigm of galaxy formation, galaxies grow through a continuous accretion of fresh gas and a hierarchical merging with smaller galaxies from high redshift to the present day. This implies that the mass and size of disc, bulge, and halo change with time. We investigate the effect of assuming a live Galactic potential on the orbital history of halo objects and its consequences on their internal evolution. We numerically integrate backwards the equations of motion of different test objects located in different Galactocentric distances in both static and time-dependent Galactic potentials in order to see if it is possible to discriminate between them. We show that in a live potential, the birth of the objects, 13 Gyr ago, would have occurred at significantly larger Galactocentric distances, compared to the objects orbiting in a static potential. Based on the direct N-body calculations of star clusters carried out with collisional N-body code, NBODY6, we also discuss the consequences of the time-dependence of a Galactic potential on the early- and long-term evolution of star clusters in a simple way, by comparing the evolution of two star clusters embedded in galactic models, which represent the galaxy at present and 12 Gyr ago, respectively. We show that assuming a static potential over a Hubble time for our Galaxy as it is often done, leads to an enhancement of mass-loss, an overestimation of the dissolution rates of globular clusters, an underestimation of the final size of star clusters, and a shallower stellar mass function.

  16. Close Binary Star Speckle Interferometry on the McMath-Pierce 0.8-Meter Solar Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Edward; Harshaw, Richard; Jones, Gregory; Branston, Detrick; Boyce, Patrick; Rowe, David; Ridgely, John; Estrada, Reed; Genet, Russell

    2015-09-01

    Observations were made in April 2014 to assess the utility of the 0.8-meter solar telescope at the McMath-Pierce Solar Observatory at Kitt Peak National Observatory for performing speckle interferometry observations of close binary stars. Several configurations using science cameras, acquisition cameras, eyepieces, and flip mirrors were evaluated. Speckle images were obtained and recommendations for further improvement of the acquisition system are presented.

  17. The X-ray spectral properties of very-faint persistent neutron star X-ray binaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Armas Padilla, M.; Degenaar, N.; Wijnands, R.

    2013-01-01

    AX J1754.2−2754, 1RXS J171824.2−402934 and 1RXH J173523.7−354013 are three persistent neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries that display a 2-10 keV accretion luminosity LX of only (1-10) × 1034 erg s−1 (i.e. only ≃0.005-0.05 per cent of the Eddington limit). The phenomenology of accreting neutron

  18. The Surface Brightness-color Relations Based on Eclipsing Binary Stars: Toward Precision Better than 1% in Angular Diameter Predictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graczyk, Dariusz; Gieren, Wolfgang [Millennium Institute of Astrophysics (MAS) (Chile); Konorski, Piotr [Obserwatorium Astronomiczne, Uniwersytet Warszawski, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478, Warsaw (Poland); Pietrzyński, Grzegorz [Universidad de Concepción, Departamento de Astronomia, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Storm, Jesper [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam, An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Nardetto, Nicolas [Université Côte d’Azur, Observatoire de la Côte d’Azur, CNRS, Laboratoire Lagrange, UMR7293, Nice (France); Gallenne, Alexandre [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Córdova 3107, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile); Maxted, Pierre F. L. [Astrophysics Group, Keele University, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Kervella, Pierre [Unidad Mixta Internacional Franco-Chilena de Astronomía (CNRS UMI 3386), Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Camino El Observatorio 1515, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile); Kołaczkowski, Zbigniew, E-mail: darek@astro-udec.cl, E-mail: darek@ncac.torun.pl [Instytut Astronomiczny, Uniwersytet Wrocławski, Kopernika 11, 51-622 Wrocław (Poland)

    2017-03-01

    In this study we investigate the calibration of surface brightness–color (SBC) relations based solely on eclipsing binary stars. We selected a sample of 35 detached eclipsing binaries with trigonometric parallaxes from Gaia DR1 or Hipparcos whose absolute dimensions are known with an accuracy better than 3% and that lie within 0.3 kpc from the Sun. For the purpose of this study, we used mostly homogeneous optical and near-infrared photometry based on the Tycho-2 and 2MASS catalogs. We derived geometric angular diameters for all stars in our sample with a precision better than 10%, and for 11 of them with a precision better than 2%. The precision of individual angular diameters of the eclipsing binary components is currently limited by the precision of the geometric distances (∼5% on average). However, by using a subsample of systems with the best agreement between their geometric and photometric distances, we derived the precise SBC relations based only on eclipsing binary stars. These relations have precisions that are comparable to the best available SBC relations based on interferometric angular diameters, and they are fully consistent with them. With very precise Gaia parallaxes becoming available in the near future, angular diameters with a precision better than 1% will be abundant. At that point, the main uncertainty in the total error budget of the SBC relations will come from transformations between different photometric systems, disentangling of component magnitudes, and for hot OB stars, the main uncertainty will come from the interstellar extinction determination. We argue that all these issues can be overcome with modern high-quality data and conclude that a precision better than 1% is entirely feasible.

  19. Evolution of cataclysmic binaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paczynski, B.

    1981-01-01

    Cataclysmic binaries with short orbital periods have low mass secondary components. Their nuclear time scale is too long to be of evolutionary significance. Angular momentum loss from the binary drives the mass transfer between the two components. As long as the characteristic time scale is compared with the Kelvin-Helmholtz time scale of the mass losing secondary the star remains close to the main sequence, and the binary period decreases with time. If angular momentum loss is due to gravitational radiation then the mass transfer time scale becomes comparable to the Kelvin-Helmoltz time scale when the secondary's mass decreases to 0.12 Msub(sun), and the binary period is reduced to 80 minutes. Later, the mass losing secondary departs from the main sequence and gradually becomes degenerate. Now the orbital period increases with time. The observed lower limit to the orbital periods of hydrogen rich cataclysmic binaries implies that gravitational radiation is the main driving force for the evolution of those systems. It is shown that binaries emerging from a common envelope phase of evolution are well detached. They have to lose additional angular momentum to become semidetached cataclysmic variables. (author)

  20. The K2-ESPRINT Project V: A Short-period Giant Planet Orbiting a Subgiant Star*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eylen, Vincent; Albrecht, Simon; Gandolfi, Davide; Dai, Fei; Winn, Joshua N.; Hirano, Teriyuki; Narita, Norio; Bruntt, Hans; Prieto-Arranz, Jorge; Béjar, Víctor J. S.; Nowak, Grzegorz; Lund, Mikkel N.; Palle, Enric; Ribas, Ignasi; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Yu, Liang; Arriagada, Pamela; Butler, R. Paul; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Handberg, Rasmus; Deeg, Hans; Jessen-Hansen, Jens; Johnson, John A.; Nespral, David; Rogers, Leslie; Ryu, Tsuguru; Shectman, Stephen; Shrotriya, Tushar; Slumstrup, Ditte; Takeda, Yoichi; Teske, Johanna; Thompson, Ian; Vanderburg, Andrew; Wittenmyer, Robert

    2016-11-01

    We report on the discovery and characterization of the transiting planet K2-39b (EPIC 206247743b). With an orbital period of 4.6 days, it is the shortest-period planet orbiting a subgiant star known to date. Such planets are rare, with only a handful of known cases. The reason for this is poorly understood but may reflect differences in planet occurrence around the relatively high-mass stars that have been surveyed, or may be the result of tidal destruction of such planets. K2-39 (EPIC 206247743) is an evolved star with a spectroscopically derived stellar radius and mass of {3.88}-0.42+0.48 {R}⊙ and {1.53}-0.12+0.13 {M}⊙ , respectively, and a very close-in transiting planet, with a/{R}\\star =3.4. Radial velocity (RV) follow-up using the HARPS, FIES, and PFS instruments leads to a planetary mass of {50.3}-9.4+9.7 {M}\\oplus . In combination with a radius measurement of 8.3+/- 1.1 {R}\\oplus , this results in a mean planetary density of {0.50}-0.17+0.29 g cm-3. We furthermore discover a long-term RV trend, which may be caused by a long-period planet or stellar companion. Because K2-39b has a short orbital period, its existence makes it seem unlikely that tidal destruction is wholly responsible for the differences in planet populations around subgiant and main-sequence stars. Future monitoring of the transits of this system may enable the detection of period decay and constrain the tidal dissipation rates of subgiant stars. Based on observations made with the NOT telescope under program ID. 50-022/51-503, 50-213(CAT), 52-201 (CAT), 52-108 (OPTICON), 51-211 (CAT), and ESOs 3.6 m telescope at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under program ID 095.C-0718(A).

  1. TSTAR: Stratospheric temperature and pressure profiles retrievals using on-orbit star pairs observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordley, L. L.; Lachance, R. L.; Marshall, B. T.; Stockwell, B.; Wan, K.

    2015-12-01

    TSTAR (Temperature profiles using Star Pairs) is a revolutionary sensor which observes occulting star pairs from orbiting sensors. As star pairs are being compressed during descent through the atmospheric limb, refraction angle change is computed for deducing density profile, which in turn by inversion allows getting stratospheric temperature and pressure profiles. This instrument is intended to be a new source of global high altitude temperature fields, providing global coverage from cloud-top (tropopause ≈8-17 km) to 45 km at a horizontal resolution better than 100 km. Such a system works with standard visible cameras, not requiring complex cooled detectors. Moreover, refractive angle resolution is not limited by the optical resolution of the instrument, and by using orbital mechanics, accurate computation can be done without precise spacecraft attitude knowledge. This technically simple, compact, and low cost hardware will also provide a valuable data set for improving weather forecasting. This concept has just completed the conceptual phase and feasibility analysis. The next step is to form key collaborations for developing a demonstration sensor. In due course, as few as a dozen of nanosatellites could get the Earth covered.

  2. Search for High-energy Neutrinos from Binary Neutron Star Merger GW170817 with ANTARES, IceCube, and the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albert, A.; Andre, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Ardid, M.; Aubert, J. -J.; Aublin, J.; Avgitas, T.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Marti, J.; Basa, S.; Belhorma, B.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bormuth, R.; Bourret, S.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Branzas, H.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Carr, J.; Celli, S.; El Moursli, R. Cherkaoui; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coelho, J. A. B.; Coleiro, A.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Diaz, A. F.; Deschamps, A.; De Bonis, G.; Distefano, C.; Di Palma, I.; Domi, A.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; El Bojaddaini, I.; El Khayati, N.; Elsaesser, D.; Enzenhofer, A.; Ettahiri, A.; Fassi, F.; Felis, I.; Fusco, L. A.; Gay, P.; Giordano, V.; Glotin, H.; Gregoire, T.; Ruiz, R. Gracia; Graf, K.; Hallmann, S.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernandez-Rey, J. J.; Hoessl, J.; Hofestaedt, J.; Illuminati, G.; James, C. W.; de Jong, M.; Jongen, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Katz, U.; Kiessling, D.; Kouchner, A.; Kreter, M.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lachaud, C.; Lahmann, R.; Lefevre, D.; Leonora, E.; Lotze, M.; Loucatos, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Marinelli, A.; Martinez-Mora, J. A.; Mele, R.; Melis, K.; Michael, T.; Migliozzi, P.; Moussa, A.; Navas, S.; Nezri, E.; Organokov, M.; Pavalas, G. E.; Pellegrino, C.; Perrina, C.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Quinn, L.; Racca, C.; Riccobene, G.; Sanchez-Losa, A.; Saldana, M.; Salvadori, I.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sanguineti, M.; Sapienza, P.; Schussler, F.; Sieger, C.; Spurio, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Trovato, A.; Turpin, D.; Tonnis, C.; Vallage, B.; Van Elewyck, V.; Versari, F.; Vivolo, D.; Vizzoca, A.; Wilms, J.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zuniga, J.; Aartsen, M. G.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Al Samarai, I.; Altmann, D.; Andeen, K.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Anton, G.; Arguelles, C.; Auffenberg, J.; Axani, S.; Bagherpour, H.; Bai, X.; Barron, J. P.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Tjus, J. Becker; Becker, K. H.; BenZvi, S.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Blot, S.; Bohm, C.; Boerner, M.; Bos, F.; Bose, D.; Boeser, S.; Botner, O.; Bourbeau, E.; Bourbeau, J.; Bradascio, F.; Braun, J.; Brayeur, L.; Brenzke, M.; Bretz, H. -P.; Bron, S.; Brostean-Kaiser, J.; Burgman, A.; Carver, T.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coenders, S.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Cowen, D. F.; Cross, R.; Day, M.; de Andre, J. P. A. M.; De Clercq, C.; DeLaunay, J. J.; Dembinski, H.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Diaz-Velez, J. C.; di Lorenzo, V.; Dujmovic, H.; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Dvorak, E.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eichmann, B.; Eller, P.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazel, A. R.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Flis, S.; Franckowiak, A.; Friedman, E.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Giang, W.; Glauch, T.; Glsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Grant, D.; Griffith, Z.; Haack, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Hokanson-Fasig, B.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Hultqvist, K.; Huennefeld, M.; In, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jones, B. J. P.; Kalaczynski, P.; Kang, W.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Katz, U.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kheirandish, A.; Kim, J.; Kim, M.; Kintscher, T.; Kiryluk, J.; Kittler, T.; Klein, S. R.; Kohnen, G.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Kopke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koschinsky, J. P.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Kroll, M.; Kruckl, G.; Kunnen, J.; Kunwar, S.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Kyriacou, A.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lauber, F.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Liu, Q. R.; Lu, L.; Lunemann, J.; Luszczak, W.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Mancina, S.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Meier, M.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Micallef, J.; Momente, G.; Montaruli, T.; Moore, R. W.; Moulai, M.; Nahnhauer, R.; Nakarmi, P.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Pollmann, A. Obertacke; Olivas, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Peiffer, P.; Pepper, J. A.; de Los Heros, C. Perez; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Plum, M.; Pranav, D.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Raab, C.; Raedel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Rea, I. C.; Reimann, R.; Relethford, B.; Relich, M.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Rysewyk, D.; Saelzer, T.; Herrera, S. E. Sanchez; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Sarkar, S.; Satalecka, K.; Schlunder, P.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, A.; Schoenen, S.; Schoeneberg, S.; Schumacher, L.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Soedingrekso, J.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stachurska, J.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stasik, A.; Stettner, J.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stossl, A.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Stuttard, T.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sutherland, M.; Taboada, I.; Tatar, J.; Tenholt, F.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tesic, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tobin, M. N.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Tung, C. F.; Turcati, A.; Turley, C. F.; Ty, B.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Driessche, W.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vanheule, S.; van Santen, J.; Vehring, M.; Vogel, E.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandler, F. D.; Wandkowsky, N.; Waza, A.; Weaver, C.; Weiss, M. J.; Wendt, C.; Werthebach, J.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wills, L.; Wolf, M.; Wood, J.; Wood, T. R.; Woolsey, E.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Yuan, T.; Zoll, M.; Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Albury, J. M.; Allekotte, I.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Anastasi, G. A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andrada, B.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arsene, N.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Balaceanu, A.; Barbato, F.; Barreira Luz, R. J.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Biteau, J.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, A.; Blazek, J.; Bleve, C.; Bohacova, M.; Bonifazi, C.; Borodai, N.; Botti, A. M.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bretz, T.; Bridgeman, A.; Briechle, F. L.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, L.; Cancio, A.; Canfora, F.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalani, F.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Chavez, A. G.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Cobos Cerutti, A. C.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceicao, R.; Consolati, G.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; D'Amico, S.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; Day, J. A.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Jong, S. J.; De Mauro, G.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; Debatin, J.; Deligny, O.; Diaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorosti, Q.; dos Anjos, R. C.; Dova, M. T.; Dundovic, A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. 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N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jimenez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Junker, J.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kamai, B.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kapadia, S. J.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katolik, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kawabe, K.; Kefelian, F.; Keitel, D.; Kemball, A. J.; Kennedy, R.; Kent, C.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J. C.; Kim, K.; Kim, W.; Kim, W. S.; Kim, Y. -M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinley-Hanlon, M.; Kirchhoff, R.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knowles, T. D.; Koch, P.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. 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R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, Howard; Pan, Huang-Wei; Pang, B.; Pang, P. T. H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Parida, A.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patil, M.; Patricelli, B.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perez, C. J.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pirello, M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Porter, E. K.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Pratt, J. W. W.; Pratten, G.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Puerrer, M.; Qi, H.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rajbhandari, B.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K. E.; Ramos-Buades, A.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Read, J.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ren, W.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Ricker, P. M.; Rieger, S.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romel, C. L.; Romie, J. H.; Rosinska, D.; Ross, M. P.; Rowan, S.; Ruediger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Rutins, G.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sampson, L. M.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sanchez, L. E.; Sanchis-Gual, N.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Scheel, M.; Scheuer, J.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schoenbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schulte, B. W.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwalbe, S. G.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seidel, E.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shah, A. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaner, M. B.; Shao, L.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, B.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith, R. J. E.; Somala, S.; Son, E. J.; Sonnenberg, J. A.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, A. P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staats, K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stevenson, S. P.; Stone, R.; Stops, D. J.; Strain, K. A.; Stratta, G.; Strigin, S. E.; Strunk, A.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Suresh, J.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Tait, S. C.; Talbot, C.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tapai, M.; Taracchini, A.; Tasson, J. D.; Taylor, J. A.; Taylor, R.; Tewari, S. V.; Theeg, T.; Thies, F.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torres-Forne, A.; Torrie, C. I.; Toyra, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trinastic, J.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tsang, K. W.; Tse, M.; Tso, R.; Tsukada, L.; Tsuna, D.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ueno, K.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Varma, V.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Venugopalan, G.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Viets, A. D.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walet, R.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. Z.; Wang, W. H.; Wang, Y. F.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Watchi, J.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wessel, E. K.; Wessels, P.; Westerweck, J.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Whittle, C.; Wilken, D.; Williams, D.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Wofford, J.; Wong, K. W. K.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, D. S.; Wysocki, D. M.; Xiao, S.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, L.; Yap, M. J.; Yazback, M.; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zelenova, T.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, Y. -H.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, S. J.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.

    2017-01-01

    The Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo observatories recently discovered gravitational waves from a binary neutron star inspiral. A short gamma-ray burst (GRB) that followed the merger of this binary was also recorded by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (Fermi-GBM), and the Anti-Coincidence Shield

  3. Properties of Neutrino-driven Ejecta from the Remnant of a Binary Neutron Star Merger: Pure Radiation Hydrodynamics Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujibayashi, Sho [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Sekiguchi, Yuichiro [Department of Physics, Toho University, Funabashi, Chiba 274-8510 (Japan); Kiuchi, Kenta; Shibata, Masaru, E-mail: sho.fujibayashi@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Center for Gravitational Physics, Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2017-09-10

    We performed general relativistic, long-term, axisymmetric neutrino radiation hydrodynamics simulations for the remnant formed after a binary neutron star merger, which consists of a massive neutron star and a torus surrounding it. As an initial condition, we employ the result derived in a three-dimensional, numerical relativity simulation for the binary neutron star merger. We investigate the properties of neutrino-driven ejecta. Due to the pair-annihilation heating, the dynamics of the neutrino-driven ejecta are significantly modified. The kinetic energy of the ejecta is about two times larger than that in the absence of pair-annihilation heating. This suggests that the pair-annihilation heating plays an important role in the evolution of merger remnants. The relativistic outflow, which is required for driving gamma-ray bursts, is not observed because the specific heating rate around the rotational axis is not sufficiently high, due to the baryon loading caused by the neutrino-driven ejecta from the massive neutron star. We discuss the condition for launching the relativistic outflow and the nucleosynthesis in the ejecta.

  4. 2FGL J0846.0+2820: A New Neutron Star Binary with a Giant Secondary and Variable γ-Ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swihart, Samuel J.; Strader, Jay; Johnson, Tyrel J.; Cheung, C. C.; Sand, David; Chomiuk, Laura; Wasserman, Asher; Larsen, Søren; Brodie, Jean P.; Simonian, Gregory V.; Tremou, Evangelia; Shishkovsky, Laura; Reichart, Daniel E.; Haislip, Joshua

    2017-12-01

    We present optical photometric and spectroscopic observations of the likely stellar counterpart to the unassociated Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) γ-ray source 2FGL J0846.0+2820, selected for study based on positional coincidences of optical variables with unassociated LAT sources. Using optical spectroscopy from the SOAR telescope, we have identified a late-G giant in an eccentric (e = 0.06) 8.133-day orbit with an invisible primary. Modeling the spectroscopy and photometry together led us to infer a heavy neutron star primary of ˜ 2 {M}⊙ and a partially stripped giant secondary of ˜ 0.8 {M}⊙ . Hα emission is observed in some of the spectra, perhaps consistent with the presence of a faint accretion disk. We find that the γ-ray flux of 2FGL J0846.0+2820 dropped substantially in mid-2009, accompanied by an increased variation in the optical brightness, and since then, it has not been detected by Fermi. The long period and giant secondary are reminiscent of the γ-ray bright binary 1FGL J1417.7-4407, which hosts a millisecond pulsar (MSP) apparently in the final stages of the pulsar recycling process. The discovery of 2FGL J0846.0+2820 suggests the identification of a new subclass of MSP binaries that are the likely progenitors of typical field MSPs.

  5. ORBITAL TRAJECTORY SIMULATION ON TWIN STARS SYSTEM IN IFS FRACTAL MODEL BASED ON HYBRID ANIMATION METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tedjo Darmanto

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available IFS (Iterated Function Systems is a method to model fractal object based on affine transformation functions. The star-like object rotation effect in the IFS fractal model could be exhibited by using metamorphical method, as a replacement to the affine rotation method on a non metamorphic animation. The advantage of a metamorphic animation method over the metamorphic animation method is that the object's relative position to the fixed point as an absolute centroid is absolute. Therefore, the rotational effect can be exhibited at any positions. In addition, it can also be combined with rotational effect of the local centroid itself around the absolute centroid as a fixed point by the primitive rotational operation to form an interesting behavior of orbital trajectory Based on the hybrid of both animation methods, the animation simulation could be done on orbital trajectory on a twin stars rotating to each other as a system. Both objects are rotated in the same angular direction, but started in the opposite position around two closely different fixed points. So, the orbital trajectory yielded forms an elliptical path. The two similar objects can be created efficiently by cloning-scaling technique. In general, the animation method can be modeled as an animation framework.

  6. Post-Keplerian perturbations of the orbital time shift in binary pulsars: an analytical formulation with applications to the galactic center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iorio, Lorenzo [Ministero dell' Istruzione, Univ. Ricerca (M.I.U.R.)-Istruzione, Bari (Italy)

    2017-07-15

    We develop a general approach to analytically calculate the perturbations Δδτ p of the orbital component of the change δτ{sub p} of the times of arrival of the pulses emitted by a binary pulsar p induced by the post-Keplerian accelerations due to the mass quadrupole Q{sub 2}, and the post-Newtonian gravitoelectric (GE) and Lense-Thirring (LT) fields. We apply our results to the so-far still hypothetical scenario involving a pulsar orbiting the supermassive black hole in the galactic center at Sgr A*. We also evaluate the gravitomagnetic and quadrupolar Shapiro-like propagation delays δτ{sub prop}. By assuming the orbit of the existing main sequence star S2 and a time span as long as its orbital period P{sub b}, we obtain vertical stroke Δδτ{sub p}{sup GE} vertical stroke orbits would imply net shifts per revolution as large as vertical stroke left angle Δδτ{sub p}{sup GE} right angle vertical stroke orbital parameters and the initial epoch. For the propagation delays, we have vertical stroke δτ{sub prop}{sup LT} vertical stroke orbital configuration nor

  7. Orbital misalignment of the Neptune-mass exoplanet GJ 436b with the spin of its cool star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourrier, Vincent; Lovis, Christophe; Beust, Hervé; Ehrenreich, David; Henry, Gregory W.; Astudillo-Defru, Nicola; Allart, Romain; Bonfils, Xavier; Ségransan, Damien; Delfosse, Xavier; Cegla, Heather M.; Wyttenbach, Aurélien; Heng, Kevin; Lavie, Baptiste; Pepe, Francesco

    2018-01-01

    The angle between the spin of a star and the orbital planes of its planets traces the history of the planetary system. Exoplanets orbiting close to cool stars are expected to be on circular, aligned orbits because of strong tidal interactions with the stellar convective envelope. Spin–orbit alignment can be measured when the planet transits its star, but such ground-based spectroscopic measurements are challenging for cool, slowly rotating stars. Here we report the three-dimensional characterization of the trajectory of an exoplanet around an M dwarf star, derived by mapping the spectrum of the stellar photosphere along the chord transited by the planet. We find that the eccentric orbit of the Neptune-mass exoplanet GJ 436b is nearly perpendicular to the stellar equator. Both eccentricity and misalignment, surprising around a cool star, can result from dynamical interactions (via Kozai migration) with a yet-undetected outer companion. This inward migration of GJ 436b could have triggered the atmospheric escape that now sustains its giant exosphere.

  8. The Search for Binaries in Post-Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars: Do Binary Companions Shape the Nebulae?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce J. Hrivnak

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Binary companions are often invoked to explain the axial and point symmetry seen in the majority of planetary nebulae and proto-planetary nebulae (PPNs. To explore this hypothesis, we have undertaken a long-term (20 year study of light and velocity variations in PPNs. From the photometric study of 24 PPNs, we find that all vary in brightness, and from a subset of 12 carbon-rich PPNs of F-G spectral type we find periods of 35-155 days, with the cooler having the longer periods. The variations are seen to be due to pulsation; no photometric evidence for binarity is seen. A radial velocity study of a sub-sample of seven of the brightest of these shows that they all vary with the pulsation periods. Only one shows evidence of a longer-term variation that we tentatively identify as being due to a binary companion. We conclude that the present evidence for the binary nature of these PPNs is meager and that any undetected companions of these PPNs must be of low mass ( 30 years.

  9. Advances in Telescope and Detector Technologies - Impacts on the Study and Understanding of Binary Star and Exoplanet Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinan, Edward F.; Engle, Scott; Devinney, Edward J.

    2012-04-01

    Current and planned telescope systems (both on the ground and in space) as well as new technologies will be discussed with emphasis on their impact on the studies of binary star and exoplanet systems. Although no telescopes or space missions are primarily designed to study binary stars (what a pity!), several are available (or will be shortly) to study exoplanet systems. Nonetheless those telescopes and instruments can also be powerful tools for studying binary and variable stars. For example, early microlensing missions (mid-1990s) such as EROS, MACHO and OGLE were initially designed for probing dark matter in the halos of galaxies but, serendipitously, these programs turned out to be a bonanza for the studies of eclipsing binaries and variable stars in the Magellanic Clouds and in the Galactic Bulge. A more recent example of this kind of serendipity is the Kepler Mission. Although Kepler was designed to discover exoplanet transits (and so far has been very successful, returning many planetary candidates), Kepler is turning out to be a ``stealth'' stellar astrophysics mission returning fundamentally important and new information on eclipsing binaries, variable stars and, in particular, providing a treasure trove of data of all types of pulsating stars suitable for detailed Asteroseismology studies. With this in mind, current and planned telescopes and networks, new instruments and techniques (including interferometers) are discussed that can play important roles in our understanding of both binary star and exoplanet systems. Recent advances in detectors (e.g. laser frequency comb spectrographs), telescope networks (both small and large - e.g. Super-WASP, HAT-net, RoboNet, Las Combres Observatory Global Telescope (LCOGT) Network), wide field (panoramic) telescope systems (e.g. Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and Pan-Starrs), huge telescopes (e.g. the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT), the Overwhelming Large Telescope (OWL) and the Extremely Large Telescope (ELT

  10. The Bulgarian Contribution to the Study of variable stars on observational data from the Kepler mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjurkchieva, D. P.; Dimitrov, D. P.; Radeva, V. S.; Vasileva, D. L.; Atanasova, T. V.; Stateva, I. V.; Petrov, N. I.; Iliev, I. Kh.

    2018-02-01

    This review paper presents the results of investigations of variable stars obtained by Bulgarian astronomers based on observations of Kepler mission. The main contributions are: determination of orbits and global parameters of more than 100 binary stars; creation of the largest catalog of eccentric stars; identification of sixty new binaries with eccentricity over 0.5; discovery of 19 heartbeat stars; detailed investigation of the spot and flare activity of several binary stars; asteroseismic study of three pulsating stars; detection of deep transits of WD 1145+017 due to its disentangling planet system. The paper illustrates not only scientific significance but also educational and social impact of the work on these tasks.

  11. High-energy Neutrinos from Millisecond Magnetars Formed from the Merger of Binary Neutron Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ke; Metzger, Brian D.

    2017-11-01

    The merger of a neutron star (NS) binary may result in the formation of a long-lived, or indefinitely stable, millisecond magnetar remnant surrounded by a low-mass ejecta shell. A portion of the magnetar’s prodigious rotational energy is deposited behind the ejecta in a pulsar wind nebula, powering luminous optical/X-ray emission for hours to days following the merger. Ions in the pulsar wind may also be accelerated to ultra-high energies, providing a coincident source of high-energy cosmic rays and neutrinos. At early times, the cosmic rays experience strong synchrotron losses; however, after a day or so, pion production through photomeson interaction with thermal photons in the nebula comes to dominate, leading to efficient production of high-energy neutrinos. After roughly a week, the density of background photons decreases sufficiently for cosmic rays to escape the source without secondary production. These competing effects result in a neutrino light curve that peaks on a few day timescale near an energy of ˜1018eV. This signal may be detectable for individual mergers out to ˜10 (100) Mpc by current (next generation) neutrino telescopes, providing clear evidence for a long-lived NS remnant, the presence of which may otherwise be challenging to identify from the gravitational waves alone. Under the optimistic assumption that a sizable fraction of NS mergers produce long-lived magnetars, the cumulative cosmological neutrino background is estimated to be ˜ {10}-9{--}{10}-8 {GeV} {{cm}}-2 {{{s}}}-1 {{sr}}-1 for an NS merger rate of {10}-7 {{Mpc}}-3 {{yr}}-1, overlapping with IceCube’s current sensitivity and within the reach of next-generation neutrino telescopes.

  12. A SUPER-EARTH ORBITING THE NEARBY SUN-LIKE STAR HD 1461

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, Eugenio J.; Vogt, Steven S.; Laughlin, Gregory; Meschiari, Stefano; Butler, R. Paul; Henry, Gregory W.

    2010-01-01

    We present precision radial velocity (RV) data that reveal a Super-Earth mass planet and two probable additional planets orbiting the bright nearby G0V star HD 1461. Our 12.8 years of Keck High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer precision RVs indicate the presence of a 7.4 M + planet on a 5.77 day orbit. The data also suggest, but cannot yet confirm, the presence of outer planets on low-eccentricity orbits with periods of 446.1 and 5017 days, and projected masses (Msin i) of 27.9 and 87.1 M + , respectively. Test integrations of systems consistent with the RV data suggest that the configuration is dynamically stable. We present a 12.2 year time series of photometric observations of HD 1461, which comprise 799 individual measurements, and indicate that it has excellent long-term photometric stability. However, there are small amplitude variations with periods comparable to those of the suspected second and third signals in the RVs near 5000 and 446 days, thus casting some suspicion on those periodicities as Keplerian signals. If the 5.77 day companion has a Neptune-like composition, then its expected transit depth is of order d∼0.5 mmag. The geometric a priori probability of transits is ∼8%. Phase folding of the ground-based photometry shows no indication that transits of the 5.77 day companion are occurring, but high-precision follow-up of HD 1461 during upcoming transit phase windows will be required to definitively rule out or confirm transits. This new system joins a growing list of solar-type stars in the immediate galactic neighborhood that are accompanied by at least one Neptune (or lower) mass planets having orbital periods of 50 days or less.

  13. DIRECT IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPY OF A CANDIDATE COMPANION BELOW/NEAR THE DEUTERIUM-BURNING LIMIT IN THE YOUNG BINARY STAR SYSTEM, ROXs 42B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Currie, Thayne; Daemgen, Sebastian; Jayawardhana, Ray [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON (Canada); Debes, John [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States); Lafreniere, David [Dèpartment de Physique, Université de Montreal, Montréal, QC (Canada); Itoh, Yoichi [Nishi-Harima Observatory, University of Hyogo, Kobe (Japan); Ratzka, Thorsten [Universitäts-Sternwarte München, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München (Germany); Correia, Serge [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Pukalani, HI (United States)

    2014-01-10

    We present near-infrared high-contrast imaging photometry and integral field spectroscopy of ROXs 42B, a binary M0 member of the 1-3 Myr old ρ Ophiuchus star-forming region, from data collected over 7 years. Each data set reveals a faint companion—ROXs 42Bb—located ∼1.''16 (r {sub proj} ≈ 150 AU) from the primaries at a position angle consistent with a point source identified earlier by Ratzka et al.. ROXs 42Bb's astrometry is inconsistent with a background star but consistent with a bound companion, possibly one with detected orbital motion. The most recent data set reveals a second candidate companion at ∼0.''5 of roughly equal brightness, though preliminary analysis indicates it is a background object. ROXs 42Bb's H and K{sub s} band photometry is similar to dusty/cloudy young, low-mass late M/early L dwarfs. K band VLT/SINFONI spectroscopy shows ROXs 42Bb to be a cool substellar object (M8-L0; T {sub eff} ≈ 1800-2600 K), not a background dwarf star, with a spectral shape indicative of young, low surface gravity planet-mass companions. We estimate ROXs 42Bb's mass to be 6-15 M{sub J} , either below the deuterium-burning limit and thus planet mass or straddling the deuterium-burning limit nominally separating planet-mass companions from other substellar objects. Given ROXs 42b's projected separation and mass with respect to the primaries, it may represent the lowest mass objects formed like binary stars or a class of planet-mass objects formed by protostellar disk fragmentation/disk instability, the latter slightly blurring the distinction between non-deuterium-burning planets like HR 8799 bcde and low-mass, deuterium-burning brown dwarfs.

  14. Probes of Cosmic Star Formation History

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    . Chandra and ... the instant of the neutron-star-producing supernova to the instant when the “standard”. HMXB phase begins, and, ... τPSNB due to nuclear evolution of the neutron star's low-mass companion and/or decay of binary orbit due to ...

  15. Photometric Modelling of Close Binary Star CN And DMZ Jassur & A ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    system based upon comparison star reading and standard stars observations. Standard magnitudes and colors of variable stars in different phases are given in Table 2. Figures 1 and 2 show the corrected light curves. The light curves are obviously asymmetric, with the primary maximum (phase 0.25) being brighter than the ...

  16. Confusing Binaries: The Role of Stellar Binaries in Biasing Disk Properties in the Galactic Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naoz, Smadar; Ghez, Andrea M.; Hees, Aurelien; Do, Tuan; Witzel, Gunther; Lu, Jessica R.

    2018-02-01

    The population of young stars near the supermassive black hole (SMBH) in the Galactic Center (GC) has presented an unexpected challenge to theories of star formation. Kinematic measurements of these stars have revealed a stellar disk structure (with an apparent 20% disk membership) that has provided important clues regarding the origin of these mysterious young stars. However, many of the apparent disk properties are difficult to explain, including the low disk membership fraction and the high eccentricities given the youth of this population. Thus far, all efforts to derive the properties of this disk have made the simplifying assumption that stars at the GC are single stars. Nevertheless, stellar binaries are prevalent in our Galaxy, and recent investigations suggested that they may also be abundant in the Galactic Center. Here, we show that binaries in the disk can largely alter the apparent orbital properties of the disk. The motion of binary members around each other adds a velocity component, which can be comparable to the magnitude of the velocity around the SMBH in the GC. Thus, neglecting the contribution of binaries can significantly vary the inferred stars’ orbital properties. While the disk orientation is unaffected, the apparent disk’s 2D width will be increased to about 11.°2, similar to the observed width. For a population of stars orbiting the SMBH with zero eccentricity, unaccounted for binaries will create a wide apparent eccentricity distribution with an average of 0.23. This is consistent with the observed average eccentricity of the stars’ in the disk. We suggest that this high eccentricity value, which poses a theoretical challenge, may be an artifact of binary stars. Finally, our results suggest that the actual disk membership might be significantly higher than the one inferred by observations that ignore the contribution of binaries, alleviating another theoretical challenge.

  17. Over 100 Validated and Candidate Planets Orbiting Bright Stars in K2 Campaigns 0-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Andrew; Vanderburg, Andrew; Latham, David; Bieryla, Allyson; Morton, Timothy

    2018-01-01

    Since 2014, NASA's K2 mission has observed large portions of the ecliptic plane in search of transiting planets and has detected hundreds of planet candidates. With observations planned until at least early 2018, K2 will continue to identify more planet candidates. We present here over 250 planet candidates observed during Campaigns 0-10 of the K2 mission that are orbiting stars brighter than 13th magnitude and for which we have obtained high-resolution spectra. We analyze these candidates using the VESPA package in order to calculate the false positive probability (FPP), and find that more than half are validated with a FPP less than 0.1%. We show that like the population of planets found during the original Kepler mission, large planets discovered by K2 tend to orbit metal-rich stars. We also show tentative evidence of a gap in the planet radius distribution. We compare our sample to the Kepler candidate sample investigated by Fulton and collaborators and conclude that more planets are required to confirm the gap. This work, in addition to increasing the population of validated K2 planets and providing new targets for follow-up observations, will also serve as a framework for validating candidates from upcoming K2 campaigns and the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), expected to launch in 2018.

  18. THE LEECH EXOPLANET IMAGING SURVEY: ORBIT AND COMPONENT MASSES OF THE INTERMEDIATE-AGE, LATE-TYPE BINARY NO UMa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlieder, Joshua E. [NASA Ames Research Center, Space Science and Astrobiology Division, MS 245-6, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Skemer, Andrew J.; Hinz, Philip; Leisenring, Jarron; Defrère, Denis; Close, Laird M.; Eisner, Josh A. [Steward Observatory, Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Maire, Anne-Lise; Desidera, Silvano [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell’Osservatorio 5, I-35122, Padova (Italy); Skrutskie, Michael F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, 22904 (United States); Bailey, Vanessa [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Esposito, Simone [INAF—Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125, Firenze (Italy); Strassmeier, Klaus G.; Weber, Michael [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482, Potsdam (Germany); Biller, Beth A.; Bonnefoy, Mickaël; Buenzli, Esther; Henning, Thomas [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Crepp, Justin R. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN, 46556 (United States); Hofmann, Karl-Heinz, E-mail: joshua.e.schlieder@nasa.gov [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121, Bonn (Germany); and others

    2016-02-10

    We present high-resolution Large Binocular Telescope LBTI/LMIRcam images of the spectroscopic and astrometric binary NO UMa obtained as part of the LBT Interferometer Exozodi Exoplanet Common Hunt exoplanet imaging survey. Our H-, K{sub s}-, and L′-band observations resolve the system at angular separations <0.″09. The components exhibit significant orbital motion over a span of ∼7 months. We combine our imaging data with archival images, published speckle interferometry measurements, and existing spectroscopic velocity data to solve the full orbital solution and estimate component masses. The masses of the K2.0 ± 0.5 primary and K6.5 ± 0.5 secondary are 0.83 ± 0.02 M{sub ⊙} and 0.64 ± 0.02 M{sub ⊙}, respectively. We also derive a system distance of d = 25.87 ± 0.02 pc and revise the Galactic kinematics of NO UMa. Our revised Galactic kinematics confirm NO UMa as a nuclear member of the ∼500 Myr old Ursa Major moving group, and it is thus a mass and age benchmark. We compare the masses of the NO UMa binary components to those predicted by five sets of stellar evolution models at the age of the Ursa Major group. We find excellent agreement between our measured masses and model predictions with little systematic scatter between the models. NO UMa joins the short list of nearby, bright, late-type binaries having known ages and fully characterized orbits.

  19. Precision Orbit of delta Delphini and Prospects for Astrometric Detection of Exoplanets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardner, Tyler; Monnier, John D.; Fekel, Francis C.

    2018-01-01

    Combining visual and spectroscopic orbits of binary stars leads to a determination of the full 3D orbit, individual masses, and distance to the system. We present a full analysis of the evolved binary system delta Delphini using astrometric data from the MIRC and PAVO instruments on the CHARA lon...

  20. High-resolution Spectroscopic Observations of Binary Stars and Yellow Stragglers in Three Open Clusters : NGC 2360, NGC 3680, and NGC 5822

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales Silva, J. V.; Peña Suárez, V. J.; Katime Santrich, O. J.; Pereira, C. B.; Drake, N. A.; Roig, F.

    2014-11-01

    Binary stars in open clusters are very useful targets in constraining the nucleosynthesis process. The luminosities of the stars are known because the distances of the clusters are also known, so chemical peculiarities can be linked directly to the evolutionary status of a star. In addition, binary stars offer the opportunity to verify a relationship between them and the straggler population in both globular and open clusters. We carried out a detailed spectroscopic analysis to derive the atmospheric parameters for 16 red giants in binary systems and the chemical composition of 11 of them in the open clusters NGC 2360, NGC 3680, and NGC 5822. We obtained abundances of C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Ca, Si, Ti, Ni, Cr, Y, Zr, La, Ce, and Nd. The atmospheric parameters of the studied stars and their chemical abundances were determined using high-resolution optical spectroscopy. We employ the local thermodynamic equilibrium model atmospheres of Kurucz and the spectral analysis code MOOG. The abundances of the light elements were derived using the spectral synthesis technique. We found that the stars NGC 2360-92 and 96, NGC 3680-34, and NGC 5822-4 and 312 are yellow straggler stars. We show that the spectra of NGC 5822-4 and 312 present evidence of contamination by an A-type star as a secondary star. For the other yellow stragglers, evidence of contamination is given by the broad wings of the Hα. Detection of yellow straggler stars is important because the observed number can be compared with the number predicted by simulations of binary stellar evolution in open clusters. We also found that the other binary stars are not s-process enriched, which may suggest that in these binaries the secondary star is probably a faint main-sequence object. The lack of any s-process enrichment is very useful in setting constraints for the number of white dwarfs in the open cluster, a subject that is related to the birthrate of these kinds of stars in open clusters and also to the age of a

  1. High space velocities of single radio pulsars versus low orbital eccentricities and masses of double neutron stars: Evidence for two different neutron star formation mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, E.P.J.

    2010-01-01

    Radio pulsars tend to be high-velocity objects, which implies that the majority of them received a velocity kick of several hundreds of km s(-1) at birth. However, six of the eight known double neutron stars in the galactic disk have quite low orbital eccentricities (0.085-0.27), indicating - taking

  2. SOFT X-RAY TEMPERATURE TIDAL DISRUPTION EVENTS FROM STARS ON DEEP PLUNGING ORBITS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Lixin; McKinney, Jonathan C.; Miller, M. Coleman, E-mail: cosimo@umd.edu [Department of Astronomy and Joint Space-Science Institute, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2015-10-20

    One of the puzzles associated with tidal disruption event candidates (TDEs) is that there is a dichotomy between the color temperatures of a few × 10{sup 4} K for TDEs discovered with optical and UV telescopes and the color temperatures of a few × 10{sup 5}–10{sup 6} K for TDEs discovered with X-ray satellites. Here, we propose that high-temperature TDEs are produced when the tidal debris of a disrupted star self-intersects relatively close to the supermassive black hole, in contrast to the more distant self-intersection that leads to lower color temperatures. In particular, we note from simple ballistic considerations that greater apsidal precession in an orbit is the key to closer self-intersection. Thus, larger values of β, the ratio of the tidal radius to the pericenter distance of the initial orbit, are more likely to lead to higher temperatures of more compact disks that are super-Eddington and geometrically and optically thick. For a given star and β, apsidal precession also increases for larger black hole masses, but larger black hole masses imply a lower temperature at the Eddington luminosity. Thus, the expected dependence of the temperature on the mass of the black hole is non-monotonic. We find that in order to produce a soft X-ray temperature TDE, a deep plunging stellar orbit with β > 3 is needed and a black hole mass of ≲5 × 10{sup 6}M{sub ⊙} is favored. Although observations of TDEs are comparatively scarce and are likely dominated by selection effects, it is encouraging that both expectations are consistent with current data.

  3. Richest Planetary System Discovered - Up to seven planets orbiting a Sun-like star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Astronomers using ESO's world-leading HARPS instrument have discovered a planetary system containing at least five planets, orbiting the Sun-like star HD 10180. The researchers also have tantalising evidence that two other planets may be present, one of which would have the lowest mass ever found. This would make the system similar to our Solar System in terms of the number of planets (seven as compared to the Solar System's eight planets). Furthermore, the team also found evidence that the distances of the planets from their star follow a regular pattern, as also seen in our Solar System. "We have found what is most likely the system with the most planets yet discovered," says Christophe Lovis, lead author of the paper reporting the result. "This remarkable discovery also highlights the fact that we are now entering a new era in exoplanet research: the study of complex planetary systems and not just of individual planets. Studies of planetary motions in the new system reveal complex gravitational interactions between the planets and give us insights into the long-term evolution of the system." The team of astronomers used the HARPS spectrograph, attached to ESO's 3.6-metre telescope at La Silla, Chile, for a six-year-long study of the Sun-like star HD 10180, located 127 light-years away in the southern constellation of Hydrus (the Male Water Snake). HARPS is an instrument with unrivalled measurement stability and great precision and is the world's most successful exoplanet hunter. Thanks to the 190 individual HARPS measurements, the astronomers detected the tiny back and forth motions of the star caused by the complex gravitational attractions from five or more planets. The five strongest signals correspond to planets with Neptune-like masses - between 13 and 25 Earth masses [1] - which orbit the star with periods ranging from about 6 to 600 days. These planets are located between 0.06 and 1.4 times the Earth-Sun distance from their central star. "We also have

  4. UV Observations of the Symbiotic Star AR PAV in Eclipse & Two Mass-Transfer X-Ray Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Anne P.

    Previous IUE observations of the eclipse egress of the symbiotic binary AR Pav show that the hot secondary and high excitation emission line region are not eclipsed during the optical totality. Further uv observations nearer the center of eclipse are required to determine the distribution, structure and physical conditions of the disk surrounding the hot star. UV observations of two unusual xray sources with high mass-transfer rates will also be obtained to investigate variations on the time scales of a few days to a few weeks.

  5. Orbital evolution of colliding star and pulsar winds in 2D and 3D: effects of dimensionality, EoS, resolution, and grid size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch-Ramon, V.; Barkov, M. V.; Perucho, M.

    2015-05-01

    Context. The structure formed by the shocked winds of a massive star and a non-accreting pulsar in a binary system suffers periodic and random variations of orbital and non-linear dynamical origins. The characterization of the evolution of the wind interaction region is necessary for understanding the rich phenomenology of these sources. Aims: For the first time, we simulate in 3 dimensions the interaction of isotropic stellar and relativistic pulsar winds along one full orbit, on scales well beyond the binary size. We also investigate the impact of grid resolution and size, and of different state equations: a γ̂-constant ideal gas, and an ideal gas with γ̂ dependent on temperature. Methods: We used the code PLUTO to carry out relativistic hydrodynamical simulations in 2 and 3 dimensions of the interaction between a slow dense wind and a mildly relativistic wind with Lorentz factor 2, along one full orbit in a region up to ~100 times the binary size. The different 2-dimensional simulations were carried out with equal and larger grid resolution and size, and one was done with a more realistic equation of state than in 3 dimensions. Results: The simulations in 3 dimensions confirm previous results in 2 dimensions, showing: a strong shock induced by Coriolis forces that terminates the pulsar wind also in the opposite direction to the star; strong bending of the shocked-wind structure against the pulsar motion; and the generation of turbulence. The shocked flows are also subject to a faster development of instabilities in 3 dimensions, which enhances shocks, two-wind mixing, and large-scale disruption of the shocked structure. In 2 dimensions, higher resolution simulations confirm lower resolution results, simulations with larger grid sizes strengthen the case for the loss of the general coherence of the shocked structure, and simulations with two different equations of state yield very similar results. In addition to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, discussed in

  6. Discovery of a Highly Unequal-mass Binary T Dwarf with Keck Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics: A Coevality Test of Substellar Theoretical Models and Effective Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Michael C.; Dupuy, Trent J.; Leggett, S. K.

    2010-10-01

    Highly unequal-mass ratio binaries are rare among field brown dwarfs, with the mass ratio distribution of the known census described by q (4.9±0.7). However, such systems enable a unique test of the joint accuracy of evolutionary and atmospheric models, under the constraint of coevality for the individual components (the "isochrone test"). We carry out this test using two of the most extreme field substellar binaries currently known, the T1 + T6 epsilon Ind Bab binary and a newly discovered 0farcs14 T2.0 + T7.5 binary, 2MASS J12095613-1004008AB, identified with Keck laser guide star adaptive optics. The latter is the most extreme tight binary resolved to date (q ≈ 0.5). Based on the locations of the binary components on the Hertzsprung-Russell (H-R) diagram, current models successfully indicate that these two systems are coeval, with internal age differences of log(age) = -0.8 ± 1.3(-1.0+1.2 -1.3) dex and 0.5+0.4 -0.3(0.3+0.3 -0.4) dex for 2MASS J1209-1004AB and epsilon Ind Bab, respectively, as inferred from the Lyon (Tucson) models. However, the total mass of epsilon Ind Bab derived from the H-R diagram (≈ 80 M Jup using the Lyon models) is strongly discrepant with the reported dynamical mass. This problem, which is independent of the assumed age of the epsilon Ind Bab system, can be explained by a ≈ 50-100 K systematic error in the model atmosphere fitting, indicating slightly warmer temperatures for both components; bringing the mass determinations from the H-R diagram and the visual orbit into consistency leads to an inferred age of ≈ 6 Gyr for epsilon Ind Bab, older than previously assumed. Overall, the two T dwarf binaries studied here, along with recent results from T dwarfs in age and mass benchmark systems, yield evidence for small (≈100 K) errors in the evolutionary models and/or model atmospheres, but not significantly larger. Future parallax, resolved spectroscopy, and dynamical mass measurements for 2MASS J1209-1004AB will enable a more

  7. Photometric Amplitude Distribution of Stellar Rotation of KOIs—Indication for Spin-Orbit Alignment of Cool Stars and High Obliquity for Hot Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazeh, Tsevi; Perets, Hagai B.; McQuillan, Amy; Goldstein, Eyal S.

    2015-03-01

    The observed amplitude of the rotational photometric modulation of a star with spots should depend on the inclination of its rotational axis relative to our line of sight. Therefore, the distribution of observed rotational amplitudes of a large sample of stars depends on the distribution of their projected axes of rotation. Thus, comparison of the stellar rotational amplitudes of the Kepler objects of interest (KOIs) with those of Kepler single stars can provide a measure to indirectly infer the properties of the spin-orbit obliquity of Kepler planets. We apply this technique to the large samples of 993 KOIs and 33,614 single Kepler stars in temperature range of 3500-6500 K. We find with high significance that the amplitudes of cool KOIs are larger, on the order of 10%, than those of the single stars. In contrast, the amplitudes of hot KOIs are systematically lower. After correcting for an observational bias, we estimate that the amplitudes of the hot KOIs are smaller than the single stars by about the same factor of 10%. The border lin