WorldWideScience

Sample records for binary radio pulsars

  1. Formation of binary radio pulsars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of the standard scenario of the evolution of massive binary stars a study is made of the formation of final binary systems in which at least one of the components is a neutron star. It is found that about every fortieth radio pulsar must be a member of a close binary system. This is confirmed by observations. Radio pulsars are not formed in wide binary systems, possibly because of the very slow rotation of the presupernova stars

  2. Understanding the evolution of close binary systems with radio pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Benvenuto, O G; Horvath, J E

    2014-01-01

    We calculate the evolution of close binary systems (CBSs) formed by a neutron star (behaving as a radio pulsar) and a normal donor star, evolving either to helium white dwarf (HeWD) or ultra short orbital period systems. We consider X-ray irradiation feedback and evaporation due to radio pulsar irradiation. We show that irradiation feedback leads to cyclic mass transfer episodes, allowing CBSs to be observed in-between as binary radio pulsars under conditions in which standard, non-irradiated models predict the occurrence of a low mass X-ray binary. This behavior accounts for the existence of a family of eclipsing binary systems known as redbacks. We predict that redback companions should almost fill their Roche lobe, as observed in PSR J1723-2837. This state is also possible for systems evolving with larger orbital periods. Therefore, binary radio pulsars with companion star masses usually interpreted as larger than expected to produce HeWDs may also result in such {\\it quasi - Roche Lobe Overflow} states, r...

  3. On tests of general relativity with binary radio pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pozzo, W.; Vecchio, A.

    2016-10-01

    The timing of radio pulsars in binary systems provides a superb testing ground of general relativity. Here we propose a Bayesian approach to carry out these tests, and a relevant efficient numerical implementation, that has several conceptual and practical advantages with respect to traditional methods based on least-squares fit that have been used so far: (i) it accounts for the actual structure of the likelihood function - and it is not predicated on the Laplace approximation which is implicitly built in least-squares fit that can potentially bias the inference - (ii) it provides the ratio of the evidences of any two models under consideration as the statistical quantity to compare different theories, and (iii) it allows us to put joint constraints from the monitoring of multiple systems, that can be expressed in terms of ratio of evidences or probability intervals of global (thus not system-dependent) parameters of the theory, if any exists. Our proposed approach optimally exploits the progress in timing of radio pulsars and the increase in the number of observed systems. We demonstrate the power of this framework using simulated data sets that are representative of current observations.

  4. Binary and Millisecond Pulsars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorimer Duncan R.

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We review the main properties, demographics and applications of binary and millisecond radio pulsars. Our knowledge of these exciting objects has greatly increased in recent years, mainly due to successful surveys which have brought the known pulsar population to over 1800. There are now 83 binary and millisecond pulsars associated with the disk of our Galaxy, and a further 140 pulsars in 26 of the Galactic globular clusters. Recent highlights include the discovery of the young relativistic binary system PSR J1906+0746, a rejuvination in globular cluster pulsar research including growing numbers of pulsars with masses in excess of 1.5M_⊙, a precise measurement of relativistic spin precession in the double pulsar system and a Galactic millisecond pulsar in an eccentric (e = 0.44 orbit around an unevolved companion.

  5. On tests of general relativity with binary radio pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Del Pozzo, Walter

    2016-01-01

    The timing of radio pulsars in binary systems provides a superb testing ground of general relativity. Here we propose a Bayesian approach to carry out these tests, and a relevant efficient numerical implementation, that has several conceptual and practical advantages with respect to traditional methods based on least-square-fits that have been used so far: (i) it accounts for the actual structure of the likelihood function - and it is not predicated on the Laplace approximation which is implicitly built in least-square fits that can potentially bias the inference - (ii) it provides the ratio of the evidences of any two models under consideration as the statistical quantity to compare different theories, and (iii) it allows us to put joint constraints from the monitoring of multiple systems, that can be expressed in terms of ratio of evidences or probability intervals of global (thus not system-dependent) parameters of the theory, if any exists. Our proposed approach optimally exploits the progress in timing o...

  6. PSR J0045-7319 a dual-line binary radio pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, J F; Stappers, B W; Bailes, M; Kaspi, V M

    1995-01-01

    Binary radio pulsars are superb tools for mapping binary orbits, because of the precision of the pulse timing method (Taylor and Weisberg 1989). To date, all orbital parameters for binary pulsars have been derived from observations of the pulsar alone. We present the first observations of the radial velocity variations due to the binary motion of a companion to a radio pulsar. Our results demonstrate that the companion to the Small Magellanic Cloud pulsar PSR J0045-7319 is the B1V star identified by Kaspi et al. (1994). The mass ratio of the system is 6.3 +/- 1.2, which, for a neutron star mass of 1.4 Mo, implies a mass of 8.8 +/- 1.8 Mo for the companion, consistent with the mass expected for a B1V star. The inclination angle for the binary system is therefore 44 +/- 5 degrees, and the projected rotational velocity of the companion is 113 +/- 10 km/s. The heliocentric radial velocity of the binary system is consistent with that of other stars and gas in the same region of the Small Magellanic Cloud.

  7. Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Beskin, V S; Gwinn, C R; Tchekhovskoy, A

    2015-01-01

    Almost 50 years after radio pulsars were discovered in 1967, our understanding of these objects remains incomplete. On the one hand, within a few years it became clear that neutron star rotation gives rise to the extremely stable sequence of radio pulses, that the kinetic energy of rotation provides the reservoir of energy, and that electromagnetic fields are the braking mechanism. On the other hand, no consensus regarding the mechanism of coherent radio emission or the conversion of electromagnetic energy to particle energy yet exists. In this review, we report on three aspects of pulsar structure that have seen recent progress: the self-consistent theory of the magnetosphere of an oblique magnetic rotator; the location, geometry, and optics of radio emission; and evolution of the angle between spin and magnetic axes. These allow us to take the next step in understanding the physical nature of the pulsar activity.

  8. Eclipsing Binary Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Freire, P C C

    2004-01-01

    The first eclipsing binary pulsar, PSR B1957+20, was discovered in 1987. Since then, 13 other eclipsing low-mass binary pulsars have been found, 12 of these are in globular clusters. In this paper we list the known eclipsing binary pulsars and their properties, with special attention to the eclipsing systems in 47 Tuc. We find that there are two fundamentally different groups of eclipsing binary pulsars; separated by their companion masses. The less massive systems (M_c ~ 0.02 M_sun) are a product of predictable stellar evolution in binary pulsars. The systems with more massive companions (M_c ~ 0.2 M_sun) were formed by exchange encounters in globular clusters, and for that reason are exclusive to those environments. This class of systems can be used to learn about the neutron star recycling fraction in the globular clusters actively forming pulsars. We suggest that most of these binary systems are undetectable at radio wavelengths.

  9. PSR J1723-2837: An Eclipsing Binary Radio Millisecond Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Crawford, F; Stairs, I H; Kaplan, D L; McLaughlin, M A; Freire, P C C; Burgay, M; Camilo, F; D'Amico, N; Faulkner, A; Kramer, M; Lorimer, D R; Manchester, R N; Possenti, A; Steeghs, D

    2013-01-01

    We present a study of PSR J1723-2837, an eclipsing, 1.86 ms millisecond binary radio pulsar discovered in the Parkes Multibeam survey. Radio timing indicates that the pulsar has a circular orbit with a 15 hr orbital period, a low-mass companion, and a measurable orbital period derivative. The eclipse fraction of ~15% during the pulsar's orbit is twice the Roche lobe size inferred for the companion. The timing behavior is significantly affected by unmodeled systematics of astrophysical origin, and higher-order orbital period derivatives are needed in the timing solution to account for these variations. We have identified the pulsar's (non-degenerate) companion using archival ultraviolet, optical, and infrared survey data and new optical photometry. Doppler shifts from optical spectroscopy confirm the star's association with the pulsar and indicate a pulsar-to-companion mass ratio of 3.3 +/- 0.5, corresponding to a companion mass range of 0.4 to 0.7 Msun and an orbital inclination angle range of between 30 and ...

  10. PSR J1723–2837: AN ECLIPSING BINARY RADIO MILLISECOND PULSAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, Fronefield [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Franklin and Marshall College, P.O. Box 3003, Lancaster, PA 17604 (United States); Lyne, Andrew G. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Stairs, Ingrid H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Kaplan, David L. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); McLaughlin, Maura A.; Lorimer, Duncan R. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Freire, Paulo C. C.; Kramer, Michael [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Burgay, Marta; D' Amico, Nichi; Possenti, Andrea [INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, Poggio dei Pini, I-09012 Capoterra (Italy); Camilo, Fernando [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Faulkner, Andrew [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J. J. Thompson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Manchester, Richard N. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Steeghs, Danny, E-mail: fcrawfor@fandm.edu [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-10

    We present a study of PSR J1723–2837, an eclipsing, 1.86 ms millisecond binary radio pulsar discovered in the Parkes Multibeam survey. Radio timing indicates that the pulsar has a circular orbit with a 15 hr orbital period, a low-mass companion, and a measurable orbital period derivative. The eclipse fraction of ∼15% during the pulsar's orbit is twice the Roche lobe size inferred for the companion. The timing behavior is significantly affected by unmodeled systematics of astrophysical origin, and higher-order orbital period derivatives are needed in the timing solution to account for these variations. We have identified the pulsar's (non-degenerate) companion using archival ultraviolet, optical, and infrared survey data and new optical photometry. Doppler shifts from optical spectroscopy confirm the star's association with the pulsar and indicate a pulsar-to-companion mass ratio of 3.3 ± 0.5, corresponding to a companion mass range of 0.4 to 0.7 M{sub ☉} and an orbital inclination angle range of between 30° and 41°, assuming a pulsar mass range of 1.4-2.0 M{sub ☉}. Spectroscopy indicates a spectral type of G for the companion and an inferred Roche-lobe-filling distance that is consistent with the distance estimated from radio dispersion. The features of PSR J1723–2837 indicate that it is likely a 'redback' system. Unlike the five other Galactic redbacks discovered to date, PSR J1723–2837 has not been detected as a γ-ray source with Fermi. This may be due to an intrinsic spin-down luminosity that is much smaller than the measured value if the unmeasured contribution from proper motion is large.

  11. On the nature of the binary radio pulsar PSR B0042-73 in the small magellanic cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipunov, V. M.; Postnov, K. A.; Prokhorov, M. E.

    1995-01-01

    The modern scenario of evolution of massive binary systems predicts the existence of a subclass of binary radio pulsars (PSRs) with black holes (BHs). Their Galactic number was evaluated as approximately 1 per 1000 single pulsars (Lipunov et al. 1994b). Distinctive properties of such binaries would be (1) mass of the unseen companion M(sub c) greater than 3-4 solar mass and (2) absence of eclipses of the pulsar radiation with no distinctive variance of the dispersion measure along the pulsar orbit. The pulsars themselves must be similar to standard isolated ones. The recently discovered binary 1 s pulsar PSR B0042-73 = PSR J0045-7319 in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) with a massive companion in a highly elongated (eccentricity e =0.8) 51 day orbit (Kaspi et al. 1994) may be the first such pulsar with a BH. The paradoxical fact that the first pulsar discovered in the SMC proved to be in a binary system can be naturally understood if its companion actually is a 10-30 solar mass black hole. We illustrate this fact by the numerical calculation of evolution of radio pulsars after a star formation burst.

  12. The Unusual Binary Pulsar PSR J1744-3922: Radio Flux Variability, Near-Infrared Observation, and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, R. P.; Roberts, M. S. E.; Ransom, S. M.; Kaspi, V. M.; Durant, M.; Bergeron, P.; Faulkner, A. J.

    2007-06-01

    PSR J1744-3922 is a binary pulsar exhibiting highly variable pulsed radio emission. We report on a statistical multifrequency study of the pulsed radio flux variability which suggests that this phenomenon is extrinsic to the pulsar and possibly tied to the companion, although not strongly correlated with orbital phase. The pulsar has an unusual combination of characteristics compared to typical recycled pulsars: a long spin period (172 ms); a relatively high magnetic field strength (1.7×1010 G); a very circular, compact orbit of 4.6 hr; and a low-mass companion (0.08 Msolar). These spin and orbital properties are likely inconsistent with standard evolutionary models. We find similarities between the properties of the PSR J1744-3922 system and those of several other known binary pulsar systems, motivating the identification of a new class of binary pulsars. We suggest that this new class could result from: a standard accretion scenario of a magnetar or a high magnetic field pulsar; common envelope evolution with a low-mass star and a neutron star, similar to what is expected for ultracompact X-ray binaries; or accretion induced collapse of a white dwarf. We also report the detection of a possible K'=19.30(15) infrared counterpart at the position of the pulsar, which is relatively bright if the companion is a helium white dwarf at the nominal distance, and discuss its implications for the pulsar's companion and evolutionary history.

  13. The Unusual Binary Pulsar PSR J1744-3922: Radio Flux Variability, Near-infrared Observation and Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Breton, R P; Ransom, S M; Kaspi, V M; Durant, M; Bergeron, P; Faulkner, A J

    2007-01-01

    PSR J1744-3922 is a binary pulsar exhibiting highly variable pulsed radio emission. We report on a statistical multi-frequency study of the pulsed radio flux variability which suggests that this phenomenon is extrinsic to the pulsar and possibly tied to the companion, although not strongly correlated with orbital phase. The pulsar has an unusual combination of characteristics compared to typical recycled pulsars: a long spin period (172 ms); a relatively high magnetic field strength (1.7x10^10 G); a very circular, compact orbit of 4.6 hours; and a low-mass companion (0.08 Msun). These spin and orbital properties are likely inconsistent with standard evolutionary models. We find similarities between the properties of the PSR J1744-3922 system and those of several other known binary pulsar systems, motivating the identification of a new class of binary pulsars. We suggest that this new class could result from either: a standard accretion scenario of a magnetar or a high-magnetic field pulsar; common envelope ev...

  14. The low-mass X-ray binary-millisecond radio pulsar birthrate problem revisited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the birthrate problem for low-mass X-ray binaries(LMXBs) and millisecond radio pulsars(MRPs) in this paper.We consider intermediate-mass and low-mass X-ray binaries(I/LMXBs) to be the progenitors of MRPs,and calculate their evolutionary response to the cosmic star formation rate(SFR) both semi-analytically and numerically.With a typical value(1 Gyr) of the LMXB lifetime,one may expect comparable birthrates of LMXBs and MRPs,but the calculated number of LMXBs is an order of magnitude higher than that observed in the Galaxy.Instead,we suggest that the birthrate problem could be solved if most MRPs have evolved from faint to rather than bright LMXBs.The former may have a population of-104 in the Galaxy.

  15. X-ray and $\\gamma$-ray Studies of the Millisecond Pulsar and PossibleX-ray Binary/Radio Pulsar Transition Object PSR J1723-2837

    CERN Document Server

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Crawford, Fronefield; Possenti, Andrea; McLaughlin, Maura A; Freire, Paulo

    2013-01-01

    We present X-ray observations of the ``redback'' eclipsing radio millisecond pulsar and candidate radio pulsar/X-ray binary transition object PSR J1723-2837. The X-ray emission from the system is predominantly non-thermal and exhibits pronounced variability as a function of orbital phase, with a factor of ~2 reduction in brightness around superior conjunction. Such temporal behavior appears to be a defining characteristic of this variety of peculiar millisecond pulsar binaries and is likely caused by a partial geometric occultation by the main-sequence-like companion of a shock within the binary. There is no indication of diffuse X-ray emission from a bow shock or pulsar wind nebula associated with the pulsar. We also report on a search for point source emission and $\\gamma$-ray pulsations in Fermi Large Area Telescope data using a likelihood analysis and photon probability weighting. Although PSR J1723-2837 is consistent with being a $\\gamma$-ray point source, due to the strong Galactic diffuse emission at i...

  16. X-ray and γ-ray studies of the millisecond pulsar and possible X-ray binary/radio pulsar transition object PSR J1723-2837

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogdanov, Slavko [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Esposito, Paolo [INAF-IASF Milano, via East Bassini 15, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Crawford III, Fronefield [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Franklin and Marshall College, P.O. Box 3003, Lancaster, PA 17604 (United States); Possenti, Andrea [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, Loc. Poggio dei Pini, Strada 54, I-09012 Capoterra (Italy); McLaughlin, Maura A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Virginia University, 210E Hodges Hall, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Freire, Paulo, E-mail: slavko@astro.columbia.edu [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2014-01-20

    We present X-ray observations of the 'redback' eclipsing radio millisecond pulsar (MSP) and candidate radio pulsar/X-ray binary transition object PSR J1723-2837. The X-ray emission from the system is predominantly non-thermal and exhibits pronounced variability as a function of orbital phase, with a factor of ∼2 reduction in brightness around superior conjunction. Such temporal behavior appears to be a defining characteristic of this variety of peculiar MSP binaries and is likely caused by a partial geometric occultation by the main-sequence-like companion of a shock within the binary. There is no indication of diffuse X-ray emission from a bow shock or pulsar wind nebula associated with the pulsar. We also report on a search for point source emission and γ-ray pulsations in Fermi Large Area Telescope data using a likelihood analysis and photon probability weighting. Although PSR J1723-2837 is consistent with being a γ-ray point source, due to the strong Galactic diffuse emission at its position a definitive association cannot be established. No statistically significant pulsations or modulation at the orbital period are detected. For a presumed detection, the implied γ-ray luminosity is ≲5% of its spin-down power. This indicates that PSR J1723-2837 is either one of the least efficient γ-ray producing MSPs or, if the detection is spurious, the γ-ray emission pattern is not directed toward us.

  17. LMXB AND IMXB EVOLUTION: I. THE BINARY RADIO PULSAR PSR J1614-2230

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have computed an extensive grid of binary evolution tracks to represent low- and intermediate-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs and IMXBs). The grid includes 42,000 models which cover 60 initial donor masses over the range of 1-4 Msun and, for each of these, 700 initial orbital periods over the range of 10-250 hr. These results can be applied to understanding LMXBs and IMXBs: those that evolve analogously to cataclysmic variables, that form ultracompact binaries with Porb in the range of 6-50 minutes, and that lead to wide orbits with giant donors. We also investigate the relic binary recycled radio pulsars into which these systems evolve. To evolve the donor stars in this study, we utilized a newly developed stellar evolution code called 'MESA' that was designed, among other things, to be able to handle very low mass and degenerate donors. This first application of the results is aimed at an understanding of the newly discovered pulsar PSR J1614-2230 which has a 1.97 Msun neutron star, Porb = 8.7 days, and a companion star of 0.5 Msun. We show that (1) this system is a cousin to the LMXB Cyg X-2; (2) for neutron stars of canonical birth mass 1.4 Msun, the initial donor stars which produce the closest relatives to PSR J1614-2230 have a mass between 3.4 and 3.8 Msun; (3) neutron stars as massive as 1.97 Msun are not easy to produce in spite of the initially high mass of the donor star, unless they were already born as relatively massive neutron stars; (4) to successfully produce a system like PSR J1614-2230 requires a minimum initial neutron-star mass of at least 1.6 ± 0.1 Msun, as well as initial donor masses and Porb of ∼4.25 ± 0.10 Msun and ∼49 ± 2 hr, respectively; and (5) the current companion star is largely composed of CO, but should have a surface H abundance of ∼10%-15%.

  18. Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries, Millisecond Radio Pulsars, and the Cosmic Star Formation Rate

    CERN Document Server

    White, N E; White, Nicholas E.; Ghosh, Pranab

    1998-01-01

    We report on the implications of the peak in the cosmic star-formation rate (SFR) at redshift z ~ 1.5 for the resulting population of low-mass X-ray binaries(LMXB) and for that of their descendants, the millisecond radio pulsars (MRP). Since the evolutionary timescales of LMXBs, their progenitors, and their descendants are thought be significant fractions of the time-interval between the SFR peak and the present epoch, there is a lag in the turn-on of the LMXB population, with the peak activity occurring at z ~ 0.5 - 1.0. The peak in the MRP population is delayed further, occurring at z < 0.5. We show that the discrepancy between the birthrate of LMXBs and MRPs, found under the assumption of a stead-state SFR, can be resolved for the population as a whole when the effects of a time-variable SFR are included. A discrepancy may persist for LMXBs with short orbital periods, although a detailed population synthesis will be required to confirm this. Further, since the integrated X-ray luminosity distribution of...

  19. Spin frequency distributions of binary millisecond pulsars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Papitto; D.F. Torres; N. Rea; T.M. Tauris

    2014-01-01

    Rotation-powered millisecond radio pulsars have been spun up to their present spin period by a 108−109 yr long X-ray-bright phase of accretion of matter and angular momentum in a low-to-intermediate mass binary system. Recently, the discovery of transitional pulsars that alternate cyclically between

  20. A Radio Pulsar Search of the Gamma-ray Binaries LS I +61 303 and LS 5039

    CERN Document Server

    McSwain, M Virginia; Ransom, Scott M; Roberts, Mallory S E; Dougherty, Sean M; Pooley, Guy G

    2011-01-01

    LS I +61 303 and LS 5039 are exceptionally rare examples of HMXBs with MeV-TeV emission, making them two of only five known or proposed "gamma-ray binaries". There has been disagreement within the literature over whether these systems are microquasars, with stellar winds accreting onto a compact object to produce high energy emission and relativistic jets, or whether their emission properties might be better explained by a relativistic pulsar wind colliding with the stellar wind. Here we present an attempt to detect radio pulsars in both systems with the Green Bank Telescope. The upper limits of flux density are between 4.1-14.5 uJy, and we discuss the null results of the search. Our spherically symmetric model of the wind of LS 5039 demonstrates that any pulsar emission will be strongly absorbed by the dense wind unless there is an evacuated region formed by a relativistic colliding wind shock. LS I +61 303 contains a rapidly rotating Be star whose wind is concentrated near the stellar equator. As long as th...

  1. Observations of Binary and Millisecond Pulsars at Xinjiang Astronomical Observatory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jingbo Wang; Na Wang; Jianping Yuan; Zhiyong Liu

    2014-09-01

    We present the first results of radio timing observations of binary and millisecond pulsars in China. We have timed four binary pulsars for 9 years, using Nanshan 25-m radio telescope. The long time span has enabled us to determine their rotation and orbital parameters.

  2. An eccentric binary millisecond pulsar in the Galactic plane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.J. Champion; S.M. Ransom; P. Lazarus; F. Camilo; C. Bassa; V.M. Kaspi; D.J. Nice; P.C.C. Freire; I.H. Stairs; J. van Leeuwen; B.W. Stappers; J.M. Cordes; J.W.T. Hessels; D.R. Lorimer; Z. Arzoumanian; D.C. Backer; N.D.R. Bhat; S. Chatterjee; I. Cognard; J.S. Deneva; C.A. Faucher-Giguère; B.M. Gaensler; J. Han; F.A. Jenet; L. Kasian; V.I. Kondratiev; M. Kramer; J. Lazio; M.A. McLaughlin; A. Venkataraman; W. Vlemmings

    2008-01-01

    Binary pulsar systems are superb probes of stellar and binary evolution and the physics of extreme environments. In a survey with the Arecibo telescope, we have found PSR J1903+ 0327, a radio pulsar with a rotational period of 2.15 milliseconds in a highly eccentric ( e = 0.44) 95- day orbit around

  3. Millisecond Pulsars in Close Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Tauris, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    In this Habilitationsschrift (Habilitation thesis) I present my research carried out over the last four years at the Argelander Institute for Astronomy (AIfA) and the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy (MPIfR). The thesis summarizes my main findings and has been written to fulfill the requirements for the Habilitation qualification at the University of Bonn. Although my work is mainly focused on the topic of millisecond pulsars (MSPs), there is a fairly broad spread of research areas ranging from the formation of neutron stars (NSs) in various supernova (SN) events, to their evolution, for example, via accretion processes in binary and triple systems, and finally to their possible destruction in merger events. The thesis is organized in the following manner: A general introduction to neutron stars and millisecond pulsars is given in Chapter 1. A selection of key papers published in 2011-2014 are presented in Chapters 2-10, ordered within five main research areas (ultra-stripped SNe in close binaries, ma...

  4. A Search for Radio Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayer, Ronald Winston

    1996-01-01

    We have built a data acquisition backend for radio pulsar search observations carried out at the NRAO 140 -foot telescope in Green Bank, West Virginia. Our system sampled 512 spectral channels over 40 MHz every 256 mus, reduced samples to one-bit precision, and wrote the resulting data stream onto magnetic tape for later, off-line processing. We have completed three surveys with this backend. In the first survey, we searched most of the Northern Hemisphere for millisecond radio pulsars. Previous surveys directed towards most of the region covered had not been as sensitive to pulsars with millisecond periods. We obtained high quality data for 15,876 deg^2 of sky. Eight new pulsars were discovered and 76 previously known pulsars were detected. Two of the eight new pulsars (PSR J1022+1001 and PSR J1518+4904) are millisecond pulsars in binary systems. PSR J1518+4904 is a 41 ms radio pulsar in an eccentric (e = 0.25) 8.6 day orbit with another stellar object, probably another neutron star. It is only the fifth double neutron star system known. The system's relativistic advance of periastron has been measured to be ˙omega = 0.0112 +/- 0.0002 ^circ yr^{-1}, implying that the total mass of the pair of stars is 2.65 +/-0.07Modot. We have searched for radio pulsar companions to 40 nearby OB runaway stars. No pulsar companions to OB runaways were discovered. One previously unknown pulsar, PSR J2044+4614, was discovered while observing towards target O star BD+45,3260. However, follow-up timing observations reveal that the pulsar is not associated with the target O star. Assuming standard models for the pulsar beaming fraction and luminosity function, we conclude that most OB runaways do not have pulsar companions. We have completed a survey for pulsed radio signals towards 27 gamma-ray sources detected by the EGRET instrument of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. No new pulsars were discovered.

  5. Gravitational Radiation from Compact Binary Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadis, John

    2014-01-01

    An outstanding question in modern Physics is whether general relativity (GR) is a complete description of gravity among bodies at macroscopic scales. Currently, the best experiments supporting this hypothesis are based on high-precision timing of radio pulsars. This chapter reviews recent advances in the field with a focus on compact binary millisecond pulsars with white-dwarf (WD) companions. These systems - if modeled properly - provide an unparalleled test ground for physically motivated alternatives to GR that deviate significantly in the strong-field regime. Recent improvements in observational techniques and advances in our understanding of WD interiors have enabled a series of precise mass measurements in such systems. These masses, combined with high-precision radio timing of the pulsars, result to stringent constraints on the radiative properties of gravity, qualitatively very different from what was available in the past.

  6. Radio pulsar disk electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, F. C.

    1983-01-01

    Macroscopic physics are discussed for the case of a disk close to an isolated, magnetized, rotating neutron star that acts as a Faraday disk dynamo, while the disk acts as both a load and a neutral sheet. This sheet allows the polar cap current to return to the neutron star, splitting a dipolar field into two monopolar halves. The dominant energy loss is from the stellar wind torque, and the next contribution is dissipation in the auroral zones, where the current returns to the star in a 5 cm-thick sheet. The disk itself may be a source of visible radiation comparable to that in pulsed radio frequency emission. As the pulsar ages, the disk expands and narrows into a ring which, it is suggested, may lead to a cessation of pulsed emission at periods of a few sec.

  7. The Velocity Distribution of Isolated Radio Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzoumanian, Z.; Chernoff, D. F.; Cordes, J. M.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We infer the velocity distribution of radio pulsars based on large-scale 0.4 GHz pulsar surveys. We do so by modelling evolution of the locations, velocities, spins, and radio luminosities of pulsars; calculating pulsed flux according to a beaming model and random orientation angles of spin and beam; applying selection effects of pulsar surveys; and comparing model distributions of measurable pulsar properties with survey data using a likelihood function. The surveys analyzed have well-defined characteristics and cover approx. 95% of the sky. We maximize the likelihood in a 6-dimensional space of observables P, dot-P, DM, absolute value of b, mu, F (period, period derivative, dispersion measure, Galactic latitude, proper motion, and flux density). The models we test are described by 12 parameters that characterize a population's birth rate, luminosity, shutoff of radio emission, birth locations, and birth velocities. We infer that the radio beam luminosity (i) is comparable to the energy flux of relativistic particles in models for spin-driven magnetospheres, signifying that radio emission losses reach nearly 100% for the oldest pulsars; and (ii) scales approximately as E(exp 1/2) which, in magnetosphere models, is proportional to the voltage drop available for acceleration of particles. We find that a two-component velocity distribution with characteristic velocities of 90 km/ s and 500 km/ s is greatly preferred to any one-component distribution; this preference is largely immune to variations in other population parameters, such as the luminosity or distance scale, or the assumed spin-down law. We explore some consequences of the preferred birth velocity distribution: (1) roughly 50% of pulsars in the solar neighborhood will escape the Galaxy, while approx. 15% have velocities greater than 1000 km/ s (2) observational bias against high velocity pulsars is relatively unimportant for surveys that reach high Galactic absolute value of z distances, but is severe for

  8. A Cosmic Census of Radio Pulsars with the SKA

    CERN Document Server

    Keane, E F; Kramer, M; Stappers, B W; Bates, S D; Burgay, M; Chatterjee, S; Champion, D J; Eatough, R P; Hessels, J W T; Janssen, G; Lee, K J; van Leeuwen, J; Margueron, J; Oertel, M; Possenti, A; Ransom, S; Theureau, G; Torne, P

    2015-01-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will make ground breaking discoveries in pulsar science. In this chapter we outline the SKA surveys for new pulsars, as well as how we will perform the necessary follow-up timing observations. The SKA's wide field-of-view, high sensitivity, multi-beaming and sub-arraying capabilities, coupled with advanced pulsar search backends, will result in the discovery of a large population of pulsars. These will enable the SKA's pulsar science goals (tests of General Relativity with pulsar binary systems, investigating black hole theorems with pulsar-black hole binaries, and direct detection of gravitational waves in a pulsar timing array). Using SKA1-MID and SKA1-LOW we will survey the Milky Way to unprecedented depth, increasing the number of known pulsars by more than an order of magnitude. SKA2 will potentially find all the Galactic radio-emitting pulsars in the SKA sky which are beamed in our direction. This will give a clear picture of the birth properties of pulsars and of the gr...

  9. An Eccentric Binary Millisecond Pulsar in the Galactic Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, David J.; Ransom, Scott M.; Lazarus, Patrick; Camilo, Fernando; Bassa, Cess; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Nice, David J.; Freire, Paulo C. C.; Stairs, Ingrid H.; vanLeeuwen, Joeri; Stappers, Ben W.; Cordes, James M.; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Lorimer, Duncan R.; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Backer, Don C.; Bhat, N. D. Ramesh; Chatterjee, Shami; Cognard, Ismael; Deneva, Julia S.; Faucher-Giguere, Claude-Andre; Gaensler, Bryan M.; Han, JinLin; Jenet, Fredrick A.; Kasian, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Binary pulsar systems are superb probes of stellar and binary evolution and the physics of extreme environments. In a survey with the Arecibo telescope, we have found PSR J1903+0327, a radio pulsar with a rotational period of 2.15 milliseconds in a highly eccentric (e = 0.44) 95-day orbit around a solar mass (M.) companion. Infrared observations identify a possible main-sequence companion star. Conventional binary stellar evolution models predict neither large orbital eccentricities nor main-sequence companions around millisecond pulsars. Alternative formation scenarios involve recycling a neutron star in a globular cluster, then ejecting it into the Galactic disk, or membership in a hierarchical triple system. A relativistic analysis of timing observations of the pulsar finds its mass to be 1.74 +/- 0.04 Solar Mass, an unusually high value.

  10. Radio Pulsars: The Neutron Star Population & Fundamental Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kaspi, Victoria M

    2016-01-01

    Radio pulsars are unique laboratories for a wide range of physics and astrophysics. Understanding how they are created, how they evolve and where we find them in the Galaxy, with or without binary companions, is highly constraining of theories of stellar and binary evolution. Pulsars' relationship with a recently discovered variety of apparently different classes of neutron stars is an interesting modern astrophysical puzzle which we consider in Part I of this review. Radio pulsars are also famous for allowing us to probe the laws of nature at a fundamental level. They act as precise cosmic clocks and, when in a binary system with a companion star, provide indispensable venues for precision tests of gravity. The different applications of radio pulsars for fundamental physics will be discussed in Part II. We finish by making mention of the newly discovered class of astrophysical objects, the Fast Radio Bursts, which may or may not be related to radio pulsars or neutron stars, but which were discovered in obser...

  11. Pulsar Observations with Radio Telescope FAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Ren-Dong; Wang, Qi-Ming; Zhu, Li-Chun; Zhu, Wen-Bai; Jin, Cheng-Jin; Gan, Heng-Qian

    2006-12-01

    FAST, Five hundred meter Aperture Spherical Telescope, is the Chinese effort for the international project SKA, Square Kilometer Array. An innovative engineering concept and design pave a new road to realizing huge single dish in the most effective way. Three outstanding features of the telescope are the unique karst depressions as the sites, the active main reflector which corrects spherical aberration on the ground to achieve full polarization and wide band without involving complex feed system, and the light focus cabin driven by cables and servomechanism plus a parallel robot as secondary adjustable system to carry the most precise parts of the receivers. Besides a general coverage of those critical technologies involved in FAST concept, the progresses in demonstrating model being constructed at the Miyun Radio Observatory of the NAOC is introduced. Being the most sensitive radio telescope, FAST will enable astronomers to jumpstart many of science goals, for example, the natural hydrogen line surveying in distant galaxies, looking for the first generation of shining objects, hearing the possible signal from other civilizations, etc. Among these subjects, the most striking one could be pulsar study. Large scale survey by FAST will not only improve the statistics of the pulsar population, but also may offer us a good fortune to pick up more of the most exotic, even unknown types like a sub-millisecond pulsar or a neutron star -- black hole binary as the telescope is put into operation.

  12. The Aid of Optical Studies in Understanding Millisecond Pulsar Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Wadiasingh, Zorawar; Venter, Christo; Boettcher, Markus

    2016-01-01

    A large number of new "black widow" and "redback" energetic millisecond pulsars with irradiated stellar companions have been discovered through radio and optical searches of unidentified \\textit{Fermi} sources. Synchrotron emission, from particles accelerated up to several TeV in the intrabinary shock, exhibits modulation at the binary orbital period. Our simulated double-peaked X-ray light curves modulated at the orbital period, produced by relativistic Doppler-boosting along the intrabinary shock, are found to qualitatively match those observed in many sources. In this model, redbacks and transitional pulsar systems where the double-peaked X-ray light curve is observed at inferior conjunction have intrinsically different shock geometry than other millisecond pulsar binaries where the light curve is centered at superior conjunction. We discuss, and advocate, how current and future optical observations may aid in constraining the emission geometry, intrabinary shock and the unknown physics of pulsar winds.

  13. Binary Millisecond Pulsar Discovery via Gamma-Ray Pulsations

    CERN Document Server

    Pletsch, H J; Fehrmann, H; Allen, B; Kramer, M; Aulbert, C; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; de Angelis, A; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Borgland, A W; Bottacini, E; Brandt, T J; Bregeon, J; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Celik, Ö; Charles, E; Chaves, R C G; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; D'Ammando, F; Dermer, C D; Digel, S W; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Favuzzi, C; Ferrara, E C; Franckowiak, A; Fukazawa, Y; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M -H; Grove, J E; Guiriec, S; Hadasch, D; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hartog, P R den; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Hill, A B; Hou, X; Hughes, R E; Johannesson, G; Jackson, M S; Jogler, T; Johnson, A S; Johnson, W N; Kataoka, J; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Massaro, F; Mayer, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Mehault, J; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Nemmen, R; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Orienti, M; Orlando, E; de Palma, F; Paneque, D; Perkins, J S; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T A; Raino, S; Rando, R; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Romani, R W; Romoli, C; Sanchez, D A; Parkinson, P M Saz; Schulz, A; Sgro, C; Silva, E do Couto e; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Suson, D J; Takahashi, H; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Tinivella, M; Troja, E; Usher, T L; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wood, M; Yang, Z; Zimmer, S; 10.1126/science.1229054

    2012-01-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs), old neutron stars spun-up by accreting matter from a companion star, can reach high rotation rates of hundreds of revolutions per second. Until now, all such "recycled" rotation-powered pulsars have been detected by their spin-modulated radio emission. In a computing-intensive blind search of gamma-ray data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (with partial constraints from optical data), we detected a 2.5-millisecond pulsar, PSR J1311-3430. This unambiguously explains a formerly unidentified gamma-ray source that had been a decade-long enigma, confirming previous conjectures. The pulsar is in a circular orbit with an orbital period of only 93 minutes, the shortest of any spin-powered pulsar binary ever found.

  14. Microarcsecond VLBI pulsar astrometry with PSRPI I. Two binary millisecond pulsars with white dwarf companions

    CERN Document Server

    Deller, A T; Kaplan, D L; Goss, W M; Brisken, W F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Janssen, G H; Lazio, T J W; Petrov, L; Stappers, B W; Lyne, A

    2016-01-01

    Model-independent distance constraints to binary millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are of great value to both the timing observations of the radio pulsars, and multiwavelength observations of their companion stars. Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) astrometry can be employed to provide these model-independent distances with very high precision via the detection of annual geometric parallax. Using the Very Long Baseline Array, we have observed two binary millisecond pulsars, PSR J1022+1001 and J2145-0750, over a two-year period and measured their distances to be 700 +14 -10 pc and 613 +16 -14 pc respectively. We use the well-calibrated distance in conjunction with revised analysis of optical photometry to tightly constrain the nature of their massive (M ~ 0.85 Msun) white dwarf companions. Finally, we show that several measurements of their parallax and proper motion obtained by pulsar timing array projects are incorrect, and investigate possible causes for the discrepancy.

  15. The Binary Pulsar: Gravity Waves Exist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Clifford

    1987-01-01

    Reviews the history of pulsars generally and the 1974 discovery of the binary pulsar by Joe Taylor and Russell Hulse specifically. Details the data collection and analysis used by Taylor and Hulse. Uses this discussion as support for Albert Einstein's theory of gravitational waves. (CW)

  16. Searching for Pulsars in Close Binary Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Jouteux, S; Stappers, B W; Jonker, P; Van der Klis, M

    2001-01-01

    We present a detailed mathematical analysis of the Fourier response of binary pulsar signals whose frequencies are modulated by circular orbital motion. The fluctuation power spectrum of such signals is found to be \

  17. On the disruption of pulsar and X-ray binaries in globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Verbunt, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The stellar encounter rate Gamma has been shown to be strongly correlated with the number of X-ray binaries in clusters and also to the number of radio pulsars. However, the pulsar populations in different clusters show remarkably different characteristics: in some GCs the population is dominated by binary systems, in others by single pulsars and exotic systems that result from exchange encounters. In this paper, we describe a second dynamical parameter for globular clusters, the encounter rate for a single binary, gamma. We find that this parameter provides a good characterization of the differences between the pulsar populations of different globular clusters. The higher gamma is for any particular globular cluster the more isolated pulsars and products of exchange interactions are observed. Furthermore, we also find that slow and "young" pulsars are found almost exclusively in clusters with a high gamma; this suggests that these kinds of objects are formed by the disruption of X-ray binaries, thus halting ...

  18. Radio pulsars in the Magellanic Clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) have been searched for radio pulsars using the 64-m Parkes radiotelescope. The search has resulted in the discovery of four pulsars. Their observed dispersion measures suggest that three lie in the Clouds (two in the LMC, one in the SMC). The fourth, which was found in the direction of the LMC, may be a foreground object belonging to the galactic pulsar population. (author)

  19. The radio-loud plasma in pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Eilek, J A; Weatherall, J C

    2002-01-01

    The pulsar magnetosphere contains a strongly magnetized, relativistic plasma. We need to understand the physics of that plasma if we want to connect the data to the models. Our group in Socorro is mixing theory and observations in order to study the radio-loud pulsar plasma. In this paper we report on several aspects of our current work.

  20. Upper limits on gravitational wave emission from 78 radio pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Agresti, J; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arain, M; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Aston, S; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Ballmer, S; Bantilan, H; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barton, M; Bayer, K; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Biswas, R; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Bogenstahl, J; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brinkmann, M; Brooks, A; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burmeister, O; Busby, D; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Cantley, C A; Cao, J; Cardenas, L; Castaldi, G; Cepeda, C; Chalkey, E; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chiadini, F; Christensen, N; Clark, J; Cochrane, P; Cokelaer, T; Coldwell, R; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Croce, R P; Crooks, D R M; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; D'Ambrosio, E; Dalrymple, J; Danzmann, K; Davies, G; De Bra, D; DeSalvo, R; Degallaix, J; Degree, M; Demma, T; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; Dhurandhar, S V; Di Credico, A; Dickson, J; Diederichs, G; Dietz, A; Doomes, E E; Drever, R W P; Dumas, J C; Dupuis, R J; Dwyer, J G; Díaz, M; Ehrens, P; Espinoza, E; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Fazi, D; Fejer, M M; Finn, L S; Fiumara, V; Fotopoulos, N; Franzen, A; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R E; Fricke, T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Galdi, V; Garofoli, J; Gholami, I; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Goda, K; Goetz, E; Goggin, L; González, G; Gossler, S; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, M; Greenhalgh, J; Gretarsson, A M; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Gustafson, R; Günther, M; Hage, B; Hammer, D; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G; Harstad, E; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hirose, E; Hoak, D; Hosken, D; Hough, J; Hoyland, D; Huttner, S H; Ingram, D; Innerhofer, E; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, Peter Ignaz Paul; Kalogera, V; Kasprzyk, D; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalili, F Ya; Kim, C; King, P; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R K; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Krämer, M; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leiner, J; Leonhardt, V; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Lindquist, P; Lockerbie, N A; Longo, M; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Lyne, A G; MacInnis, M; Machenschalk, B; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Malec, M; Mandic, V; Marano, S; Marka, S; Markowitz, J; Maros, E; Martin, I; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Matone, L; Matta, V; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McHugh, M; McKenzie, K; McWilliams, S; Meier, T; Melissinos, A C; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C J; Meyers, D; Mikhailov, E; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mow Lowry, C; Moylan, A; Mukherjee, S; Muller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murray, P; Myers, E; Myers, J; Müller, G; Newton, G; Nishizawa, A; Numata, K; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Patel, P; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pierro, V; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H; Plissi, M V; Postiglione, F; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Rabeling, D; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rainer, N; Rakhmanov, M; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Rehbein, H; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ribichini, L; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Roddy, S; Rodríguez, A; Rogan, A M; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Route, R; Rowan, S; Ruet, L; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Rüdiger, A; Sakata, S; Samidi, M; Sancho de la Jordana, L; Sandberg, V; Sannibale, V; Saraf, S; Sarin, P; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Savov, P; Schediwy, S; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Sidles, J A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Sinha, S; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Somiya, K; Strain, K A; Strom, D M; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, K X; Sung, M; Sutton, P J; Takahashi, H; Tanner, D B; Taylor, R; Thacker, J; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thüring, A; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Trias, M; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D W; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Vallisneri, M; Van Den Broeck, C; Varvella, M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Veitch, P; Villar, A; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Waldman, S J; Wallace, L; Ward, H; Ward, R; Watts, K; Weidner, A; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A; Weiss, R; Wen, S; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, L; Willke, B; Wilmut, I; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wise, S; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Woods, D; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Wu, W; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yan, Z; Yoshida, S; Yunes, N; Zanolin, M; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, C; Zotov, N; Zucker, M; Zweizig, J; zur Muhlen, H

    2007-01-01

    We present upper limits on the gravitational wave emission from 78 radio pulsars based on data from the third and fourth science runs of the LIGO and GEO600 gravitational wave detectors. The data from both runs have been combined coherently to maximise sensitivity. For the first time pulsars within binary (or multiple) systems have been included in the search by taking into account the signal modulation due to their orbits. Our upper limits are therefore the first measured for 56 of these pulsars. For the remaining 22, our results improve on previous upper limits by up to a factor of 10. For example, our tightest upper limit on the gravitational strain is 3.2e-25 for PSRJ1603-7202, and the equatorial ellipticity of PSRJ2124-3358 is less than 10e-6. Furthermore, our strain upper limit for the Crab pulsar is only three times greater than the fiducial spin-down limit.

  1. The Velocity Distribution of Isolated Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Arzoumanian, Z; Cordes, J M

    2002-01-01

    (Abridged) We infer the velocity distribution of radio pulsars by modelling their birth, evolution, and detection in large-scale 0.4 GHz pulsar surveys, and by comparing model distributions of measurable pulsar properties with survey data using a likelihood function. We test models that characterize a population's birth rate, luminosity, shutoff of radio emission, birth locations, and birth velocities. We infer that the radio beam luminosity (i) is comparable to the energy flux of relativistic particles in models for spin-driven magnetospheres, signifying that radio emission losses reach nearly 100% for the oldest pulsars; and (ii) scales approximately as sqrt(Edot) which, in magnetosphere models, is proportional to the voltage drop available for acceleration of particles. We find that a two-component velocity distribution with characteristic velocities of 90 km/s and 500 km/s is greatly preferred to any one-component distribution. We explore some consequences of the preferred birth velocity distribution: (i)...

  2. Nature of microstructure in pulsar radio emission

    OpenAIRE

    Machabeli, George; Khechinashvili, David; Melikidze, George; Shapakidze, David

    2000-01-01

    We present a model for microstructure in pulsar radio emission. We propose that micropulses result from the alteration of the radio wave generation region by nearly transverse drift waves propagating across the pulsar magnetic field and encircling the bundle of the open magnetic field lines. It is demonstrated that such waves can modify significantly curvature of these dipolar field lines. This in turn affects strongly fulfillment of the resonance conditions necessary for the excitation of ra...

  3. Radio polarimetry of Galactic Centre pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzeler, D. H. F. M.; Eatough, R. P.; Ferrière, K.; Kramer, M.; Lee, K. J.; Noutsos, A.; Shannon, R. M.

    2016-07-01

    To study the strength and structure of the magnetic field in the Galactic Centre (GC), we measured Faraday rotation of the radio emission of pulsars which are seen towards the GC. Three of these pulsars have the largest rotation measures (RMs) observed in any Galactic object with the exception of Sgr A⋆. Their large dispersion measures, RMs and the large RM variation between these pulsars and other known objects in the GC implies that the pulsars lie in the GC and are not merely seen in projection towards the GC. The large RMs of these pulsars indicate large line-of-sight magnetic field components between ˜ 16 and 33 μG; combined with recent model predictions for the strength of the magnetic field in the GC this implies that the large-scale magnetic field has a very small inclination angle with respect to the plane of the sky (˜12°). Foreground objects like the Radio Arc or possibly an ablated, ionized halo around the molecular cloud G0.11-0.11 could contribute to the large RMs of two of the pulsars. If these pulsars lie behind the Radio Arc or G0.11-0.11 then this proves that low-scattering corridors with lengths ≳100 pc must exist in the GC. This also suggests that future, sensitive observations will be able to detect additional pulsars in the GC. Finally, we show that the GC component in our most accurate electron density model oversimplifies structure in the GC.

  4. On magnetic fields of radio pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Nikitina, E B

    2016-01-01

    We used the magneto-dipole radiation mechanism for the braking of radio pulsars to calculate the new values of magnetic inductions at the surfaces of neutron stars. For this aim we estimated the angles ? between the rotation axis and the magnetic moment of the neutron star for 376 radio pulsars using three different methods. It was shown that there was the predominance of small inclinations of the magnetic axes. Using the obtained values of the angle ? we calculated the equatorial magnetic inductions for pulsars considered. These inductions are several times higher as a rule than corresponding values in the known catalogs.

  5. Binary pulsars as dark-matter probes

    CERN Document Server

    Pani, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    During the motion of a binary pulsar around the galactic center, the pulsar and its companion experience a wind of dark-matter particles that can affect the orbital motion through dynamical friction. We show that this effect produces a characteristic seasonal modulation of the orbit and causes a secular change of the orbital period whose magnitude can be well within the astonishing precision of various binary-pulsar observations. Our analysis is valid for binary systems with orbital period longer than a day. By comparing this effect with pulsar-timing measurements, it is possible to derive model-independent upper bounds on the dark-matter density at different distances $D$ from the galactic center. For example, the precision timing of J1713+0747 imposes $\\rho_{\\rm DM}\\lesssim 10^5\\,{\\rm GeV/cm}^3$ at $D\\approx7\\,{\\rm kpc}$. The detection of a binary pulsar at $D\\lesssim 10\\,{\\rm pc}$ could provide stringent constraints on dark-matter halo profiles and on growth models of the central black hole. The Square Kil...

  6. Gemini optical observations of binary millisecond-pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Testa, V; Pallanca, C; Corongiu, A; Ferraro, F R

    2015-01-01

    Milli-second pulsars (MSPs) are rapidly spinning neutron stars, with spin periods P_s <= 10 ms, which have been most likely spun up after a phase of matter accretion from a companion star. In this work we present the results of the search for the companion stars of four binary milli-second pulsars, carried out with archival data from the Gemini South telescope. Based upon a very good positional coincidence with the pulsar radio coordinates, we likely identified the companion stars to three MSPs, namely PSRJ0614-3329 (g=21.95 +- 0.05), J1231-1411 (g=25.40 +-0.23), and J2017+0603 (g=24.72 +- 0.28). For the last pulsar (PSRJ0613-0200) the identification was hampered by the presence of a bright star (g=16 +- 0.03) at \\sim 2" from the pulsar radio coordinates and we could only set 3-sigma upper limits of g=25.0, r= 24.3, and i= 24.2 on the magnitudes of its companion star. The candidate companion stars to PSRJ0614-3329, J1231-1411, and J2017+0603 can be tentatively identified as He white dwarfs (WDs) on the bas...

  7. Birth and Evolution of Isolated Radio Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2008-02-01

    We investigate the birth and evolution of isolated radio pulsars using a population synthesis method, modeling the birth properties of the pulsars, their time evolution, and their detection in the Parkes and Swinburne Multibeam (MB) surveys. Together, the Parkes and Swinburne MB surveys [1, 2] have detected nearly 2/3 of the known pulsars and provide a remarkably homogeneous sample to compare with simulations. New proper motion measurements [3, 4] and an improved model of the distribution of free electrons in the interstellar medium, NE2001 [5], also make revisiting these issues particularly worthwhile. We present a simple population model that reproduces the actual observations well, and consider others that fail. We conclude that: pulsars are born in the spiral arms, with the birthrate of 2.8+/-0.5 pulsars/century peaking at a distance ~3 kpc from the Galactic centre, and with mean initial speed of 380-60+40 km s-1 the birth spin period distribution extends to several hundred milliseconds, with no evidence of multimodality, implying that characteristic ages overestimate the true ages of the pulsars by a median factor >2 for true ages <30,000 yr models in which the radio luminosities of the pulsars are random generically fail to reproduce the observed P-Ṗ diagram, suggesting a relation between intrinsic radio luminosity and (P,Ṗ) radio luminosities L~Ė provides a good match to the observed P-Ṗ diagram; for this favored radio luminosity model, we find no evidence for significant magnetic field decay over the lifetime of the pulsars as radio sources (~100 Myr).

  8. Gamma radiation from radio pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruderman, Malvin

    1990-01-01

    The probable magnetospheric location and source of the gamma ray emission from some young radiopulsars is discussed. The suggested evolution of this emission as a function of pulsar period gives a diminished gamma-ray luminosity for a more rapidly spinning pre-Crab pulsar. A greatly enhanced one, similar to that of unidentified Cos B sources, is predicted for a slightly slower post-Vela pulsar, followed by a relatively rapid quenching of the gamma-ray luminosity at still longer periods. Possible anomalous exo-magnetospheric pulsed MeV and TeV-PeV radiation from the Crab pulsar is considered.

  9. Polarization Patterns in Pulsar Radio Emission

    CERN Document Server

    McKinnon, Mark M

    2009-01-01

    A variety of intriguing polarization patterns are created when polarization observations of the single pulses from radio pulsars are displayed in a two-dimensional projection of the Poincare sphere. In many pulsars, the projections produce two clusters of data points that reside at antipodal points on the sphere. The clusters are formed by fluctuations in polarization amplitude that are parallel to the unit vectors representing the polarization states of the wave propagation modes in the pulsar magnetosphere. In other pulsars, however, the patterns are more complex, resembling annuli and bow ties or bars. The formation of these complex patterns is not understood and largely unexplored. An empirical model of pulsar polarization is used to show that these patterns arise from polarization fluctuations that are perpendicular to the mode vectors. The model also shows that the modulation index of the polarization amplitude is an indicator of polarization pattern complexity. A stochastic version of generalized Farad...

  10. Constraining Binary Stellar Evolution With Pulsar Timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdman, Robert D.; Stairs, I. H.; Backer, D. C.; Burgay, M.; Camilo, F.; D'Amico, N.; Demorest, P.; Faulkner, A.; Hobbs, G.; Kramer, M.; Lorimer, D. R.; Lyne, A. G.; Manchester, R.; McLaughlin, M.; Nice, D. J.; Possenti, A.

    2006-06-01

    The Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey has yielded a significant number of very interesting binary and millisecond pulsars. Two of these objects are part of an ongoing timing study at the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). PSR J1756-2251 is a double-neutron star (DNS) binary system. It is similar to the original Hulse-Taylor binary pulsar system PSR B1913+16 in its orbital properties, thus providing another important opportunity to test the validity of General Relativity, as well as the evolutionary history of DNS systems through mass measurements. PSR J1802-2124 is part of the relatively new and unstudied "intermediate-mass" class of binary system, which typically have spin periods in the tens of milliseconds, and/or relatively massive (> 0.7 solar masses) white dwarf companions. With our GBT observations, we have detected the Shapiro delay in this system, allowing us to constrain the individual masses of the neutron star and white dwarf companion, and thus the mass-transfer history, in this unusual system.

  11. Radio polarimetry of Galactic centre pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Schnitzeler, D H F M; Ferrière, K; Kramer, M; Lee, K J; Noutsos, A; Shannon, R M

    2016-01-01

    To study the strength and structure of the magnetic field in the Galactic centre (GC) we measured Faraday rotation of the radio emission of pulsars which are seen towards the GC. Three of these pulsars have the largest rotation measures (RMs) observed in any Galactic object with the exception of Sgr A*. Their large dispersion measures, RMs and the large RM variation between these pulsars and other known objects in the GC implies that the pulsars lie in the GC and are not merely seen in projection towards the GC. The large RMs of these pulsars indicate large line-of-sight magnetic field components between ~ 16-33 microgauss; combined with recent model predictions for the strength of the magnetic field in the GC this implies that the large-scale magnetic field has a very small inclination angle with respect to the plane of the sky (~ 12 degrees). Foreground objects like the Radio Arc or possibly an ablated, ionized halo around the molecular cloud G0.11-0.11 could contribute to the large RMs of two of the pulsar...

  12. Avalanche dynamics of radio pulsar glitches

    CERN Document Server

    Melatos, A; Wyithe, J S B

    2007-01-01

    We test statistically the hypothesis that radio pulsar glitches result from an avalanche process, in which angular momentum is transferred erratically from the flywheel-like superfluid in the star to the slowly decelerating, solid crust via spatially connected chains of local, impulsive, threshold-activated events, so that the system fluctuates around a self-organised critical state. Analysis of the glitch population (currently 285 events from 101 pulsars) demonstrates that the size distribution in individual pulsars is consistent with being scale invariant, as expected for an avalanche process. The waiting-time distribution is consistent with being exponential in seven out of nine pulsars where it can be measured reliably, after adjusting for observational limits on the minimum waiting time, as for a constant-rate Poisson process. PSR J0537$-$6910 and PSR J0835$-$4510 are the exceptions; their waiting-time distributions show evidence of quasiperiodicity. In each object, stationarity requires that the rate $\\...

  13. Birth and Evolution of Isolated Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Faucher-Giguere, C A

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the birth and evolution of Galactic isolated radio pulsars. We begin by estimating their birth space velocity distribution from proper motion measurements of Brisken et al. (2002, 2003). We find no evidence for multimodality of the distribution and favor one in which the absolute one-dimensional velocity components are exponentially distributed and with a three-dimensional mean velocity of 380^{+40}_{-60} km s^-1. We then proceed with a Monte Carlo-based population synthesis, modelling the birth properties of the pulsars, their time evolution, and their detection in the Parkes and Swinburne Multibeam surveys. We present a population model that appears generally consistent with the observations. Our results suggest that pulsars are born in the spiral arms, with a Galactocentric radial distribution that is well described by the functional form proposed by Yusifov & Kucuk (2004), in which the pulsar surface density peaks at radius ~3 kpc. The birth spin period distribution extends to several h...

  14. On the connection between accreting X-ray and radio millisecond pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Tauris, T M

    2012-01-01

    For many years it has been recognized that the terminal stages of mass transfer in a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) should cause the magnetosphere of the accreting neutron star to expand, leading to a braking torque acting on the spinning pulsar. After the discovery of radio millisecond pulsars (MSPs) it was therefore somewhat a paradox (e.g. Ruderman et al. 1989) how these pulsars could retain their fast spins following the Roche-lobe decoupling phase, RLDP. Here I present a solution to this so-called "turn-off problem" which was recently found by combining binary stellar evolution models with torque computations (Tauris 2012). The solution is that during the RLDP the spin equilibrium of the pulsar is broken and therefore it remains a fast spinning object. I briefly discuss these findings in view of the two observed spin distributions in the populations of accreting X-ray millisecond pulsars (AXMSPs) and radio MSPs.

  15. Radiation dosimetry of binary pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Eichler, D; Eichler, David; Nath, Biman B

    1995-01-01

    Companion stars exposed to high energy radiation from a primary neutron star or accreting black hole can experience significant spallation of their heavy elements, so that their atmospheres would be extremely rich in lithium, beryllium, and especially boron. In this paper we note that the detection or non-detection of these elements, and their relative abundances if detected, would provide a diagnostic of the high energy output of the primary, and possibly the shock acceleration of particles at the companion's bow shock in a pulsar wind.

  16. High-Energy Emission at Shocks in Millisecond Pulsar Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kust Harding, Alice; Wadiasingh, Zorawar; Venter, Christo; Boettcher, Markus

    2016-04-01

    A large number of new Black Widow (BW) and Redback (RB) energetic millisecond pulsars have been discovered through radio searches of unidentified Fermi sources, increasing the known number of these systems from 4 to 28. We model the high-energy emission components from particles accelerated to several TeV in intrabinary shocks in BW and RB systems, and their predicted modulation at the binary orbital period. Synchrotron emission is expected at X-ray energies and such modulated emission has already been detected by Chandra and XMM. Inverse Compton emission from accelerated particles scattering the UV emission from the radiated companion star is expected in the Fermi and TeV bands. Detections or constraints on this emission will probe the unknown physics of pulsar winds.

  17. 1974: the discovery of the first binary pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Damour, Thibault

    2014-01-01

    The 1974 discovery, by Russell A. Hulse and Joseph H. Taylor, of the first binary pulsar PSR 1913+16, opened up new possibilities for the study of relativistic gravity. PSR 1913+16, as well as several other binary pulsars, provided {\\it direct} observational proofs that gravity propagates at the velocity of light and has a quadrupolar structure. Binary pulsars also provided accurate tests of the strong-field regime of relativistic gravity. General Relativity has passed all the binary pulsar tests with flying colors. The discovery of binary pulsars had also very important consequences for astrophysics: accurate measurement of neutron star masses, improved understanding of the possible evolution scenarios for the co-evolution of binary stars, proof of the existence of binary neutron stars emitting gravitational waves for hundreds of millions of years, before coalescing in catastrophic events probably leading to an important emission of electromagnetic radiation and neutrinos. This article reviews the history of...

  18. Nature of giant pulses in radio pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Petrova, S A

    2006-01-01

    Formation of giant radio pulses is attributed to propagation effects in the plasma of pulsar magnetosphere. Induced scattering of radio waves by the plasma particles is found to lead to an efficient redistribution of the radio emission in frequency. With the steep spectrum of pulsar radiation, intensity transfer between the widely spaced frequencies may imply significant narrow-band amplification of the radiation. This may give rise to giant pulses. It is demonstrated that the statistics of giant pulse intensities observed can be reproduced if one take into account pulse-to-pulse fluctuations of the plasma number density and the original intensity. Polarization properties of the strongly amplified pulses, their location in the average pulse window and the origin of the nanostructure of giant pulses are discussed as well.

  19. New mechanism of pulsar radio emission

    OpenAIRE

    Gedalin, M.; Gruman, E.; Melrose, D. B.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that pulsar radio emission can be generated effectively through a streaming motion in the polar-cap regions of a pulsar magnetosphere causing nonresonant growth of waves that can escape directly. As in other beam models, a relatively low-energy high-density beam is required. The instability generates quasi-transverse waves in a beam mode at frequencies that can be well below the resonant frequency. As the waves propagate outward growth continues until the height at which the wave ...

  20. A Large-Area Survey for Radio Pulsars at High Galactic Latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby, B. A.; Bailes, M.; Ord, S. M.; Edwards, R. T.; Kulkarni, S. R.

    2009-07-01

    We have completed a survey for pulsars at high Galactic latitudes with the 64 m Parkes radio telescope. Observing with the 13 beam multibeam receiver at a frequency of 1374 MHz, we covered ~4150 square degrees in the region -100° Swinburne Intermediate Latitude Pulsar Survey a further 15° on either side of the Galactic plane. The signal from each beam was processed by a 96 channel × 3 MHz × 2 polarization filterbank, with the detected power in the two polarizations of each frequency channel summed and digitized with 1 bit sampling every 125 μs, giving good sensitivity to millisecond pulsars with low or moderate dispersion measure. The resulting 2.4 TB data set was processed using standard pulsar search techniques with the workstation cluster at the Swinburne Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing. This survey resulted in the discovery of 26 new pulsars including seven binary and/or millisecond pulsars, and redetected 36 previously known pulsars. We describe the survey methodology and results, and present timing solutions for the 19 newly discovered slow pulsars, as well as for nine slow pulsars discovered the Swinburne Intermediate Latitude Pulsar Survey that had no previous timing solutions. Even with a small sampling interval, 1374 MHz center frequency, and a large mid-latitude survey volume we failed to detect any very rapidly spinning pulsars. Evidently, such "submillisecond" pulsars are rare.

  1. Stokes tomography of radio pulsar magnetospheres. II. Millisecond pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, C T Y

    2011-01-01

    The radio polarization characteristics of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) differ significantly from those of non-recycled pulsars. In particular, the position angle (PA) swings of many MSPs deviate from the S-shape predicted by the rotating vector model, even after relativistic aberration is accounted for, indicating that they have non-dipolar magnetic geometries, likely due to a history of accretion. Stokes tomography uses phase portraits of the Stokes parameters as a diagnostic tool to infer a pulsar's magnetic geometry and orientation. This paper applies Stokes tomography to MSPs, generalizing the technique to handle interpulse emission. We present an atlas of look-up tables for the Stokes phase portraits and PA swings of MSPs with current-modified dipole fields, filled core and hollow cone beams, and two empirical linear polarization models. We compare our look-up tables to data from 15 MSPs and find that the Stokes phase portraits for a current-modified dipole approximately match several MSPs whose PA swings ...

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: X-ray and radio sources in binaries (Malkov+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkov, O. Y.; Tessema, S. B.; Kniazev, A. Y.

    2016-05-01

    We have also compiled a general list of 239 radio pulsars in binary systems. The list is supplied with indication of photometric, spectroscopic or X-ray binarity, and with cross-identification data. (4 data files).

  3. The radio luminosity distribution of pulsars in 47 Tucanae

    CERN Document Server

    McConnell, D; Connors, T; Ables, J G

    2004-01-01

    We have used the Australia Telescope Compact Array to seek the integrated radio flux from all the pulsars in the core of the globular cluster 47 Tucanae. We have detected an extended region of radio emission and have calibrated its flux against the flux distribution of the known pulsars in the cluster. We find the total 20-cm radio flux from the cluster's pulsars to be S = 2.0 +/- 0.3 mJy. This implies the lower limit to the radio luminosity distribution to be L_1400 = 0.4 mJy kpc^2 and the size of the observable pulsar population to be N < 30.

  4. A Fan Beam Model for Radio Pulsars. I. Observational Evidence

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Hong Guang; Zheng, Xiao Ping; Deng, Chun Lan; Wen, Sai Qin; Ye, Feng; Guan, Kai Ying; Liu, Yi; Xu, Li Qing

    2014-01-01

    We propose a novel beam model for radio pulsars based on the scenario that the broadband and coherent emission from secondary relativistic particles, as they move along a flux tube in a dipolar magnetic field, forms a radially extended sub-beam with unique properties. The whole radio beam may consist of several sub-beams, forming a fan-shaped pattern. When only one or a few flux tubes are active, the fan beam becomes very patchy. This model differs essentially from the conal beam models in the respects of beam structure and predictions on the relationship between pulse width and impact angle $\\beta$ (the angle between line of sight and magnetic pole) and the relationship between emission intensity and beam angular radius. The evidence for this model comes from the observed patchy beams of precessional binary pulsars and three statistical relationships found for a sample of 64 pulsars, of which $\\beta$ were mostly constrained by fitting polarization position angle data with the Rotation Vector Model. With appr...

  5. Orbital decay of the PSR J0045-7319\\/B star binary system age of radio pulsar and initial spin of neutron star

    CERN Document Server

    Lai, D

    1996-01-01

    Recent timing observations of PSR J0045-7319 reveal that the neutron star/B star binary orbit is decaying on a time scale of |\\Porb/\\dot\\Porb|=0.5 Myr, shorter than the characteristic age (\\tau_c=3 Myr) of the pulsar (Kaspi et al.~1996a). We study mechanisms for the orbital decay. The standard weak friction theory based on static tide requires far too short a viscous time to explain the observed \\dot\\Porb. We show that dynamical tidal excitation of g-modes in the B star can be responsible for the orbital decay. However, to explain the observed short decay timescale, the B star must have some significant retrograde rotation with respect to the orbit --- The retrograde rotation brings lower-order g-modes, which couple much more strongly to the tidal potential, into closer ``resonances'' with the orbital motion, thus significantly enhancing the dynamical tide. A much less likely possibility is that the g-mode damping time is much shorter than the ordinary radiative damping time. The observed orbital decay timesc...

  6. New algorithms for radio pulsar search

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Kendrick M

    2016-01-01

    The computational cost of searching for new pulsars is a limiting factor for upcoming radio telescopes such as SKA. We introduce four new algorithms: an optimal constant-period search, a coherent tree search which permits optimal searching with O(1) cost per model, a semicoherent search which combines information from coherent subsearches while preserving as much phase information as possible, and a hierarchical search which interpolates between the coherent and semicoherent limits. Taken together, these algorithms improve the computational cost of pulsar search by several orders of magnitude. In this paper, we consider the simple case of a constant-acceleration phase model, but our methods should generalize to more complex search spaces.

  7. The nature of pulsar radio emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyks, J.; Rudak, B.; Demorest, P.

    2010-01-01

    High-quality averaged radio profiles of some pulsars exhibit double, highly symmetric features both in emission and in absorption. It is shown that both types of feature are produced by a split fan beam of extraordinary-mode curvature radiation that is emitted/absorbed by radially extended streams of magnetospheric plasma. With no emissivity in the plane of the stream, such a beam produces bifurcated emission components (BFCs) when our line of sight passes through the plane. An example of a double component created in this way is present in the averaged profile of the 5-ms pulsar J1012+5307. We show that the component can indeed be very well fitted by the textbook formula for the non-coherent beam of curvature radiation in the polarization state that is orthogonal to the plane of electron trajectory. The observed width of the BFC decreases with increasing frequency at a rate that confirms the curvature origin. Likewise, the double absorption features (double notches) are produced by the same beam of the extraordinary-mode curvature radiation, when it is eclipsed by thin plasma streams. The intrinsic property of curvature radiation to create bifurcated fan beams explains the double features in terms of a very natural geometry and implies the curvature origin of pulsar radio emission. Similarly, the `double conal' profiles of class D result from a cut through a wider stream with finite extent in magnetic azimuth. Therefore, their width reacts very slowly to changes of viewing geometry resulting from geodetic precession. The stream-cut interpretation implies a highly non-orthodox origin of both the famous S-swing of polarization angle and the low-frequency pulse broadening in D profiles. The azimuthal structure of polarization modes in the curvature radiation beam provides an explanation for the polarized `multiple imaging' and the edge depolarization of pulsar profiles.

  8. Pulsar Radio Emission Modulation in Relation to Rotational Instability

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Neil James

    2012-01-01

    The magnetospheric conditions responsible for radio emission in pulsars are still not clearly understood. Through studying the modulation of this emission, in relation to the rotational properties of these stars, the observer can obtain insight into the mechanism which governs the radio emission in pulsars, as well as their magnetospheric environments. Nulling pulsars are instrumental in this study due to their meta-stable configurations, which result in abrupt cessation or re-activation of t...

  9. The nature of pulsar radio emission

    CERN Document Server

    Dyks, J; Demorest, P

    2009-01-01

    High-quality averaged radio profiles of some pulsars exhibit double, highly symmetric features both in `absorption' and emission. Averaged profile of a 5-ms pulsar J1012+5307 hosts a distinct, extremely symmetric, and bifurcated emission component (BFC) with deep central minimum. We show that the component can be very well fitted by the textbook formula for the non-coherent beam of curvature radiation (CR) in the polarisation state that is orthogonal to the plane of electron trajectory. The separation Delta_bfc of maxima in the BFC is observed to decrease with increasing frequency nu_obs at the rate that is consistent with the curvature origin (Delta_bfc proportional to nu_obs^(-1/3)). With zero emissivity in the plane of electron trajectory, the extraordinary-mode beam can naturally produce deep double absorption features (double notches) observed in other pulsars. The bifurcated emission components are observed when the line of sight passes through splitted fan beams produced by radially-extended streams of...

  10. Accretion, Ablation and Propeller Evolution in Close Millisecond Pulsar Binary Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kiel, P D

    2013-01-01

    A model for the formation and evolution of binary millisecond radio pulsars in systems with low mass companions (< 0.1 Msun) is investigated using a binary population synthesis technique. Taking into account the non conservative evolution of the system due to mass loss from an accretion disk as a result of propeller action and from the companion via ablation by the pulsar, the transition from the accretion powered to rotation powered phase is investigated. It is shown that the operation of the propeller and ablation mechanisms can be responsible for the formation and evolution of black widow millisecond pulsar systems from the low mass X-ray binary phase at an orbital period of ~0.1 day. For a range of population synthesis input parameters, the results reveal that a population of black widow millisecond pulsars characterized by orbital periods as long as ~0.4 days and companion masses as low as ~0.005 Msun can be produced. The orbital periods and minimum companion mass of this radio millisecond pulsar popu...

  11. The pulsar synchrotron: coherent radio emission

    CERN Document Server

    Contopoulos, Ioannis

    2009-01-01

    We propose a simple physical picture for the generation of coherent radio emission in the axisymmetric pulsar magnetosphere that is quite different from the canonical paradigm of radio emission coming from the magnetic polar caps. In this first paper we consider only the axisymmetric case of an aligned rotator. Our picture capitalizes on an important element of the MHD representation of the magnetosphere, namely the separatrix between the corotating closed-line region (the `dead zone') and the open field lines that originate in the polar caps. Along the separatrix flows the return current that corresponds to the main magnetospheric electric current emanating from the polar caps. Across the separatrix, both the toroidal and poloidal components of the magnetic field change discontinuously. The poloidal component discontinuity requires the presence of a significant annular electric current which has up to now been unaccounted for. We estimate the position and thickness of this annular current at the tip of the c...

  12. Gravitational waves from binary supermassive black holes missing in pulsar observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, R M; Ravi, V; Lentati, L T; Lasky, P D; Hobbs, G; Kerr, M; Manchester, R N; Coles, W A; Levin, Y; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Dai, S; Keith, M J; Osłowski, S; Reardon, D J; van Straten, W; Toomey, L; Wang, J-B; Wen, L; Wyithe, J S B; Zhu, X-J

    2015-09-25

    Gravitational waves are expected to be radiated by supermassive black hole binaries formed during galaxy mergers. A stochastic superposition of gravitational waves from all such binary systems would modulate the arrival times of pulses from radio pulsars. Using observations of millisecond pulsars obtained with the Parkes radio telescope, we constrained the characteristic amplitude of this background, A(c,yr), to be <1.0 × 10(-15) with 95% confidence. This limit excludes predicted ranges for A(c,yr) from current models with 91 to 99.7% probability. We conclude that binary evolution is either stalled or dramatically accelerated by galactic-center environments and that higher-cadence and shorter-wavelength observations would be more sensitive to gravitational waves. PMID:26404832

  13. Gravitational waves from binary supermassive black holes missing in pulsar observations

    CERN Document Server

    Shannon, R M; Lentati, L T; Lasky, P D; Hobbs, G; Kerr, M; Manchester, R N; Coles, W A; Levin, Y; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Dai, S; Keith, M J; Osłowski, S; Reardon, D J; van Straten, W; Toomey, L; Wang, J -B; Wen, L; Wyithe, J S B; Zhu, X -J

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational waves are expected to be radiated by supermassive black hole binaries formed during galaxy mergers. A stochastic superposition of gravitational waves from all such binary systems will modulate the arrival times of pulses from radio pulsars. Using observations of millisecond pulsars obtained with the Parkes radio telescope, we constrain the characteristic amplitude of this background, $A_{\\rm c,yr}$, to be < $1.0\\times10^{-15}$ with 95% confidence. This limit excludes predicted ranges for $A_{\\rm c,yr}$ from current models with 91-99.7% probability. We conclude that binary evolution is either stalled or dramatically accelerated by galactic-center environments, and that higher-cadence and shorter-wavelength observations would result in an increased sensitivity to gravitational waves.

  14. On binary pulsars and the force of gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Palle, D

    2002-01-01

    We reanalyze a binary pulsar system and show that the orbital period change rate can be completely understood as a curvature backreaction process. Appreciating a detailed theoretical and observational study of relativistic binary pulsar systems, especially the system of Hulse and Taylor, we conclude that general relativity and astrophysical observations rule out the existence of gravitational radiation. Thus, the force of gravity is not a local gauge force.

  15. Radio Searches for Pulsars and Short-Duration Transients

    CERN Document Server

    McLaughlin, Maura

    2011-01-01

    I discuss methods and current software packages for radio searches for pulsars and short-duration transients. I then describe the properties of the current pulsar population and the status of and predictions for ongoing and future surveys. The presently observed pulsar population numbers around 2000 and is expected to roughly double over the next five years, with the number of millisecond pulsars expected to more than triple. Finally, I discuss individual objects discovered in the Green Bank Telescope 350-MHz Drift-Scan Survey and the Arecibo Pulsar ALFA Survey.

  16. Are the infrared-faint radio sources pulsars?

    CERN Document Server

    Keith, A D Cameron M J; Norris, R P; Mao, M Y; Middelberg, E

    2011-01-01

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRS) are objects which are strong at radio wavelengths but undetected in sensitive Spitzer observations at infrared wavelengths. Their nature is uncertain and most have not yet been associated with any known astrophysical object. One possibility is that they are radio pulsars. To test this hypothesis we undertook observations of 16 of these sources with the Parkes Radio Telescope. Our results limit the radio emission to a pulsed flux density of less than 0.21 mJy (assuming a 50% duty cycle). This is well below the flux density of the IFRS. We therefore conclude that these IFRS are not radio pulsars.

  17. Physics of radio emission in gamma-ray pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    > Propagation of radio emission in a pulsar magnetosphere is reviewed. The effects of polarization transfer, induced scattering and reprocessing to high energies are analysed with a special emphasis on the implications for the gamma-ray pulsars. The possibilities of the pulsar plasma diagnostics based on the observed radio pulse characteristics are also outlined. As an example, the plasma number density profiles obtained from the polarization data for the Vela and the gamma-ray millisecond pulsars J1446-4701, J1939+2134 and J1744-1134 are presented. The number densities derived tend to be the highest/lowest when the radio pulse leads/lags the gamma-ray peak. In the PSR J1939+2134, the plasma density profiles for the main pulse and interpulse appear to fit exactly the same curve, testifying to the origin of both radio components above the same magnetic pole and their propagation through the same plasma flow in opposite directions. The millisecond radio pulse components exhibiting flat position angle curves are suggested to result from the induced scattering of the main pulse by the same particles that generate gamma rays. This is believed to underlie the wide-sense radio/gamma-ray correlation in the millisecond pulsars. The radio quietness of young gamma-ray pulsars is attributed to resonant absorption, whereas the radio loudness to the radio beam escape through the periphery of the open field line tube.

  18. 1FGL J0523.5-2529: A New Probable Gamma-ray Pulsar Binary

    CERN Document Server

    Strader, Jay; Sonbas, Eda; Sokolovsky, Kirill; Sand, David J; Moskvitin, Alexander S; Cheung, C C

    2014-01-01

    We report optical photometric and SOAR spectroscopic observations of an X-ray source found within the localization error of the Fermi-LAT unidentified gamma-ray source J0523.5-2529. The optical data show periodic flux modulation and radial velocity variations indicative of a binary with a 16.5-hr period. The data suggest a massive non-degenerate secondary (~> 0.8 M_sun), and we argue the source is likely a pulsar binary. The radial velocities have good phase coverage and show evidence for a measurable eccentricity (e=0.04). There is no clear sign of irradiation of the secondary in either photometry or spectroscopy. The spatial location out of the Galactic plane and gamma-ray luminosity of the source are more consistent with classification as a recycled millisecond pulsar than as a young pulsar. Future radio timing observations can confirm the identity of the primary and further characterize this interesting system.

  19. Radio Searches of Fermi LAT Sources and Blind Search Pulsars: The Fermi Pulsar Search Consortium

    CERN Document Server

    Ray, P S; Parent, D; Bhattacharya, D; Bhattacharyya, B; Camilo, F; Cognard, I; Theureau, G; Ferrara, E C; Harding, A K; Thompson, D J; Freire, P C C; Guillemot, L; Gupta, Y; Roy, J; Hessels, J W T; Johnston, S; Keith, M; Shannon, R; Kerr, M; Michelson, P F; Romani, R W; Kramer, M; McLaughlin, M A; Ransom, S M; Roberts, M S E; Parkinson, P M Saz; Ziegler, M; Smith, D A; Stappers, B W; Weltevrede, P; Wood, K S

    2012-01-01

    We present a summary of the Fermi Pulsar Search Consortium (PSC), an international collaboration of radio astronomers and members of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) collaboration, whose goal is to organize radio follow-up observations of Fermi pulsars and pulsar candidates among the LAT gamma-ray source population. The PSC includes pulsar observers with expertise using the world's largest radio telescopes that together cover the full sky. We have performed very deep observations of all 35 pulsars discovered in blind frequency searches of the LAT data, resulting in the discovery of radio pulsations from four of them. We have also searched over 300 LAT gamma-ray sources that do not have strong associations with known gamma-ray emitting source classes and have pulsar-like spectra and variability characteristics. These searches have led to the discovery of a total of 43 new radio millisecond pulsars (MSPs) and four normal pulsars. These discoveries greatly increase the known population of MSPs in the Galactic disk...

  20. Radio Timing and Analysis of Black Widow Pulsar J2256-1024

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowter, Kathryn; Stairs, Ingrid H.; McPhee, Christie A.; Archibald, Anne M.; Boyles, Jason; Hessels, Jason; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Kondratiev, Vlad I.; Lorimer, Duncan; Lynch, Ryan S.; McLaughlin, Maura; Pennucci, Timothy; Ransom, Scott M.; Roberts, Mallory; Stovall, Kevin; van Leeuwen, Joeri

    2015-01-01

    Pulsar J2256-1024, discovered in a 350MHz GBT drift-scan survey and subsequently detected by Fermi-LAT, is a black widow millisecond pulsar in an eclipsing binary system. Black widow pulsars have a rather interesting history. They started life in a binary system, were then spun up by their companions into millisecond pulsars but at some point started ablating those companions, slowly destroying them - thus the moniker "black widow". They are characterized by relatively short orbital periods, in this case 5.1 hours, a low companion mass and, if the inclination angle is right, eclipses. For J2256-1024 we see very clear radio eclipses. Black widow systems used to be few and far between but are now more common with at least 18 currently known. Black widows are interesting for a variety of reasons. They provide potential insight into the formation of isolated millisecond pulsars which must have formed in a binary but are now seen alone, and in eclipsing systems pulses travel through the magnetosphere of the companion providing a probe of that region. Here we present timing and polarization results for J2256-1024 based on radio observations with the GBT.

  1. Radio emissions from pulsar companions : a refutable explanation for galactic transients and fast radio bursts

    OpenAIRE

    Mottez, Fabrice; Zarka, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The six known highly dispersed fast radio bursts are attributed to extragalactic radio sources, of unknown origin but extremely energetic. We propose here a new explanation - not requiring an extreme release of energy - involving a body (planet, asteroid, white dwarf) orbiting an extragalactic pulsar. We investigate a theory of radio waves associated to such pulsar-orbiting bodies. We focus our analysis on the waves emitted from the magnetic wake of the body in the pulsar wind. After deriving...

  2. The NANOGrav Nine-year Data Set: Mass and Geometric Measurements of Binary Millisecond Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Fonseca, Emmanuel; Ellis, Justin A; Stairs, Ingrid H; Nice, David J; Ransom, Scott M; Demorest, Paul B; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Crowter, Kathryn; Dolch, Timothy; Ferdman, Robert D; Gonzalez, Marjorie E; Jones, Glenn; Jones, Megan L; Lam, Michael T; Levin, Lina; McLaughlin, Maura A; Stovall, Kevin; Swiggum, Joseph K; Zhu, Weiwei

    2016-01-01

    We analyse 24 binary radio pulsars in the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) nine-year data set. We made fourteen significant measurements of Shapiro delay, including new detections in four pulsar-binary systems (PSRs J0613$-$0200, J2017+0603, J2302+4442, and J2317+1439), and derive estimates of the binary-component masses and orbital inclination for these MSP-binary systems. We find a wide range of binary pulsar masses, with values as low as $m_{\\rm p} = 1.18^{+0.10}_{-0.09}\\text{ M}_{\\odot}$ for PSR J1918$-$0642 and as high as $m_{\\rm p} = 1.928^{+0.017}_{-0.017}\\text{ M}_{\\odot}$ for PSR J1614$-$2230 (both 68.3\\% confidence). We make an improved measurement of the Shapiro timing delay in the PSR J1918$-$0642 and J2043+1711 systems, measuring the pulsar mass in the latter system to be $m_{\\rm p} = 1.41^{+0.21}_{-0.18}\\text{ M}_{\\odot}$ (68.3\\% confidence) for the first time. We measure secular variations of one or more orbital elements in many systems, and use these meas...

  3. The Binary Companion of Young, Relativistic Pulsar J1906+0746

    OpenAIRE

    Leeuwen, van, JL Johan; Kasian, L.; Stairs, I. H.; Lorimer, D. R.; Camilo, F.; S Chatterjee; Cognard, I; Desvignes, G.; Freire, P. C. C.; Janssen, G.H.; Kramer, M.; Lyne, A. G.; Nice, D. J.; Ransom, S. M.; Stappers, B. W.

    2014-01-01

    International audience PSR J1906+0746 is a young pulsar in the relativistic binary with the second-shortest known orbital period, of 3.98 hours. We here present a timing study based on five years of observations, conducted with the 5 largest radio telescopes in the world, aimed at determining the companion nature. Through the measurement of three post-Keplerian orbital parameters we find the pulsar mass to be 1.291(11) M_sol, and the companion mass 1.322(11) M_sol respectively. These masse...

  4. Radio emission physics in the Crab pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilek, Jean A.; Hankins, Timothy H.

    2016-06-01

    > We review our high-time-resolution radio observations of the Crab pulsar and compare our data to a variety of models for the emission physics. The Main Pulse and the Low Frequency Interpulse come from regions somewhere in the high-altitude emission zones (caustics) that also produce pulsed X-ray and -ray emission. Although no emission model can fully explain these two components, the most likely models suggest they arise from a combination of beam-driven instabilities, coherent charge bunching and strong electromagnetic turbulence. Because the radio power fluctuates on a wide range of time scales, we know the emission zones are patchy and dynamic. It is tempting to invoke unsteady pair creation in high-altitude gaps as the source of the variability, but current pair cascade models cannot explain the densities required by any of the likely models. It is harder to account for the mysterious High Frequency Interpulse. We understand neither its origin within the magnetosphere nor the striking emission bands in its dynamic spectrum. The most promising models are based on analogies with solar zebra bands, but they require unusual plasma structures which are not part of our standard picture of the magnetosphere. We argue that radio observations can reveal much about the upper magnetosphere, but work is required before the models can address all of the data.

  5. Pulsar Binaries as Gravitational-Wave Sources: Rate predictions

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Chunglee

    2009-01-01

    Pulsar binaries are important targets for ground-based and future space-borne gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. In order for improving detector design and assessing detector performances, it is a prerequisite to understand the astrophysics of GW sources such as the population size or merger rates. Here, we summarize recent results for Galactic merger rates of two known types of pulsar binaries: (a) double-neutron star-system (DNS) and (b) neutron star-white dwarf (NS-WD) binaries. Based on t...

  6. The Gamma-Ray Luminosity Function of Radio Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfand, David J.

    1998-01-01

    This final report is a study of gamma-ray luminosity function of radio pulsars. The goal is to constrain certain parameters in order to address such diverse issues as the high energy emission mechanism in pulsars and the fraction of the Galaxy's gamma ray emission attributable to these objects.

  7. A Search for X-ray Counterparts of Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Prinz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    We describe a systematic search for X-ray counterparts of radio pulsars. The search was accomplished by cross-correlating the radio timing positions of all radio pulsars from the ATNF pulsar database (version 1.54) with archival XMM-Newton and Chandra observations publicly released by August 1st 2015. In total, 171 of the archival XMM-Newton observations and 215 of the archival Chandra datasets where found to have a radio pulsar serendipitously in the field of view. From the 283 radio pulsars covered by these datasets we identified 19 previously undetected X-ray counterparts. For 6 of them the statistics was sufficient to model the energy spectrum with one- or two-component models. For the remaining new detections and for those pulsars for which we determined an upper limit to their counting rate we computed the energy flux by assuming a Crab-like spectrum. Additionally, we derived upper limits on the neutron stars' surface temperature and on the non-thermal X-ray efficiency for those pulsars for which the sp...

  8. The radio luminosity distribution of pulsars in 47 Tucanae

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, D.; Deshpande, A. A.; Connors, T.; Ables, J. G.

    2004-03-01

    We have used the Australia Telescope Compact Array to seek the integrated radio flux from all the pulsars in the core of the globular cluster 47 Tucanae. We have detected an extended region of radio emission and have calibrated its flux against the flux distribution of the known pulsars in the cluster. We find the total 20-cm radio flux from the pulsars in the cluster to be S= 2.0 +/- 0.3 mJy. This implies the lower limit to the radio luminosity distribution to be minL1400= 0.4 mJy kpc2 and the size of the observable pulsar population to be N<~ 30.

  9. DISCOVERY OF TWO MILLISECOND PULSARS IN FERMI SOURCES WITH THE NANCAY RADIO TELESCOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the discovery of two millisecond pulsars in a search for radio pulsations at the positions of Fermi-Large Area Telescope sources with no previously known counterparts, using the Nancay Radio Telescope. The two millisecond pulsars, PSRs J2017+0603 and J2302+4442, have rotational periods of 2.896 and 5.192 ms and are both in binary systems with low-eccentricity orbits and orbital periods of 2.2 and 125.9 days, respectively, suggesting long recycling processes. Gamma-ray pulsations were subsequently detected for both objects, indicating that they power the associated Fermi sources in which they were found. The gamma-ray light curves and spectral properties are similar to those of previously detected gamma-ray millisecond pulsars. Detailed modeling of the observed radio and gamma-ray light curves shows that the gamma-ray emission seems to originate at high altitudes in their magnetospheres. Additionally, X-ray observations revealed the presence of an X-ray source at the position of PSR J2302+4442, consistent with thermal emission from a neutron star. These discoveries along with the numerous detections of radio-loud millisecond pulsars in gamma rays suggest that many Fermi sources with no known counterpart could be unknown millisecond pulsars.

  10. The LOFAR pilot surveys for pulsars and fast radio transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coenen, Thijs; van Leeuwen, Joeri; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Stappers, Ben W.; Kondratiev, Vladislav I.; Alexov, A.; Breton, R. P.; Bilous, A.; Cooper, S.; Falcke, H.; Fallows, R. A.; Gajjar, V.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Hassall, T. E.; Karastergiou, A.; Keane, E. F.; Kramer, M.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Noutsos, A.; Osłowski, S.; Pilia, M.; Serylak, M.; Schrijvers, C.; Sobey, C.; ter Veen, S.; Verbiest, J.; Weltevrede, P.; Wijnholds, S.; Zagkouris, K.; van Amesfoort, A. S.; Anderson, J.; Asgekar, A.; Avruch, I. M.; Bell, M. E.; Bentum, M. J.; Bernardi, G.; Best, P.; Bonafede, A.; Breitling, F.; Broderick, J.; Brüggen, M.; Butcher, H. R.; Ciardi, B.; Corstanje, A.; Deller, A.; Duscha, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Fender, R.; Ferrari, C.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M. A.; de Gasperin, F.; de Geus, E.; Gunst, A. W.; Hamaker, J. P.; Heald, G.; Hoeft, M.; van der Horst, A.; Juette, E.; Kuper, G.; Law, C.; Mann, G.; McFadden, R.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; McKean, J. P.; Munk, H.; Orru, E.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Polatidis, A. G.; Reich, W.; Renting, A.; Röttgering, H.; Rowlinson, A.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Schwarz, D.; Sluman, J.; Smirnov, O.; Swinbank, J.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; Thoudam, S.; Toribio, C.; Vermeulen, R.; Vocks, C.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wucknitz, O.; Zarka, P.; Zensus, A.

    2014-10-01

    We have conducted two pilot surveys for radio pulsars and fast transients with the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) around 140 MHz and here report on the first low-frequency fast-radio burst limit and the discovery of two new pulsars. The first survey, the LOFAR Pilot Pulsar Survey (LPPS), observed a large fraction of the northern sky, ~ 1.4 × 104 deg2, with 1 h dwell times. Each observation covered ~75 deg2 using 7 independent fields formed by incoherently summing the high-band antenna fields. The second pilot survey, the LOFAR Tied-Array Survey (LOTAS), spanned ~600 deg2, with roughly a 5-fold increase in sensitivity compared with LPPS. Using a coherent sum of the 6 LOFAR "Superterp" stations, we formed 19 tied-array beams, together covering 4 deg2 per pointing. From LPPS we derive a limit on the occurrence, at 142 MHz, of dispersed radio bursts of 107 Jy for the narrowest searched burst duration of 0.66 ms. In LPPS, we re-detected 65 previously known pulsars. LOTAS discovered two pulsars, the first with LOFAR or any digital aperture array. LOTAS also re-detected 27 previously known pulsars. These pilot studies show that LOFAR can efficiently carry out all-sky surveys for pulsars and fast transients, and they set the stage for further surveying efforts using LOFAR and the planned low-frequency component of the Square Kilometer Array. http://www.astron.nl/pulsars/lofar/surveys/lotas/

  11. Radio Emission Physics in the Crab Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Eilek, J A

    2016-01-01

    We review our high-time-resolution radio observations of the Crab pulsar and compare our data to a variety of models for the emission physics. The Main Pulse and the Low-Frequency Interpulse come from regions somewhere in the high-altitude emission zones (caustics) that also produce pulsed X-ray and gamma-ray emission. Although no emission model can fully explain these two components, the most likely models suggest they arise from a combination of beam-driven instabilities, coherent charge bunching and strong electromagnetic turbulence. Because the radio power fluctuates on a wide range of timescales, we know the emission zones are patchy and dynamic. It is tempting to invoke unsteady pair creation in high-altitude gaps as source of the variability, but current pair cascade models cannot explain the densities required by any of the likely models. It is harder to account for the mysterious High-Frequency Interpulse. We understand neither its origin within the magnetosphere nor the striking emission bands in it...

  12. Blind surveys for radio pulsars and transients

    OpenAIRE

    Lorimer, D.R.

    2010-01-01

    The main reasons for searching for pulsars are to: (i) get an accurate census of the neutron star population and its origin and evolution; (ii) connect neutron stars to other stellar populations in the Galaxy and globular clusters; (iii) study Galactic astronomy (the interstellar medium and magnetic field); (iv) find and study new interesting individual objects; (v) study pulsar phenomenology; (vi) find pulsars to add to the sensitivity of pulsar timing arrays. This review focuses on blind (i...

  13. Using Pulsars to Detect Massive Black Hole Binaries via Gravitational Radiation Sagittarius A* and Nearby Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lommen, A N; Lommen, Andrea N.; Backer, Donald C.

    2001-01-01

    Pulsar timing measurements can be used to detect gravitational radiation from massive black hole binaries. The ~106d quasi-periodic flux variations in Sagittarius A* at radio wavelengths reported by Zhao, Bower, & Goss (2001) may be due to binarity of the massive black hole that is presumed to be responsible for the radio emission. A 106d equal-mass binary black hole is unlikely based on its short inspiral lifetime and other arguments. Nevertheless the reported quasi-periodicity has led us to consider whether the long-wavelength gravitational waves from a conjectured binary might be detected in present or future precision timing of millisecond pulsars. While present timing cannot reach the level expected for an equal-mass binary, we estimate that future efforts could. This inquiry has led us to further consider the detection of binarity in the massive black holes now being found in nearby galaxies. For orbital periods of ~2000d where the pulsar timing measurements are most precise, we place upper limits o...

  14. THE EINSTEIN-HOME SEARCH FOR RADIO PULSARS AND PSR J2007+2722 DISCOVERY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, B.; Knispel, B.; Aulbert, C.; Bock, O.; Eggenstein, H. B.; Fehrmann, H.; Machenschalk, B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Cordes, J. M.; Brazier, A.; Chatterjee, S. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Deneva, J. S. [Arecibo Observatory, HC3 Box 53995, Arecibo, PR 00612 (United States); Hessels, J. W. T. [ASTRON, the Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA, Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Anderson, D. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Demorest, P. B. [NRAO (National Radio Astronomy Observatory), Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Gotthelf, E. V. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Hammer, D. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Kaspi, V. M. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A2T8 (Canada); Kramer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Lyne, A. G. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); McLaughlin, M. A., E-mail: bruce.allen@aei.mpg.de [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); and others

    2013-08-20

    Einstein-Home aggregates the computer power of hundreds of thousands of volunteers from 193 countries, to search for new neutron stars using data from electromagnetic and gravitational-wave detectors. This paper presents a detailed description of the search for new radio pulsars using Pulsar ALFA survey data from the Arecibo Observatory. The enormous computing power allows this search to cover a new region of parameter space; it can detect pulsars in binary systems with orbital periods as short as 11 minutes. We also describe the first Einstein-Home discovery, the 40.8 Hz isolated pulsar PSR J2007+2722, and provide a full timing model. PSR J2007+2722's pulse profile is remarkably wide with emission over almost the entire spin period. This neutron star is most likely a disrupted recycled pulsar, about as old as its characteristic spin-down age of 404 Myr. However, there is a small chance that it was born recently, with a low magnetic field. If so, upper limits on the X-ray flux suggest but cannot prove that PSR J2007+2722 is at least {approx}100 kyr old. In the future, we expect that the massive computing power provided by volunteers should enable many additional radio pulsar discoveries.

  15. Spectroscopic Studies of X-Ray Binary Pulsars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F. Nagase

    2002-03-01

    Several new features of X-ray binary pulsars are revealed from recent observations with ASCA, RXTE, BeppoSAX and other X-ray observatories. Among these, I will review in this paper some recent progress in spectroscopic studies of accreting X-ray pulsars in binary systems (XBPs). First, I will discuss soft excess features observed in the energy spectra of XBPs and propose that it is a common feature for various subclasses of XBPs. Next I will present some recent results of high resolution spectroscopy with ASCA and Chandra.

  16. The Binary Companion of Young, Relativistic Pulsar J1906+0746

    CERN Document Server

    van Leeuwen, Joeri; Stairs, Ingrid H; Lorimer, D R; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cognard, I; Desvignes, G; Freire, P C C; Janssen, G H; Kramer, M; Lyne, A G; Nice, D J; Ransom, S M; Stappers, B W; Weisberg, J M

    2014-01-01

    PSR J1906+0746 is a young pulsar in the relativistic binary with the second-shortest known orbital period, of 3.98 hours. We here present a timing study based on five years of observations, conducted with the 5 largest radio telescopes in the world, aimed at determining the companion nature. Through the measurement of three post-Keplerian orbital parameters we find the pulsar mass to be 1.291(11) M_sol, and the companion mass 1.322(11) M_sol respectively. These masses fit well in the observed collection of double neutron stars, but are also compatible with other white dwarfs around young pulsars such as J1906+0746. Neither radio pulsations nor dispersion-inducing outflows that could have further established the companion nature were detected. We derive an HI-absorption distance, which indicates that an optical confirmation of a white dwarf companion is very challenging. The pulsar is fading fast due to geodetic precession, limiting future timing improvements. We conclude that young pulsar J1906+0746 is likely...

  17. THE BINARY COMPANION OF YOUNG, RELATIVISTIC PULSAR J1906+0746

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Leeuwen, J.; Janssen, G. H. [ASTRON, The Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Kasian, L.; Stairs, I. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Lorimer, D. R. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Camilo, F. [Arecibo Observatory, HC3 Box 53995, Arecibo, PR 00612 (United States); Chatterjee, S. [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Cognard, I. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie de l' Environnement et de l' Espace LPC2E CNRS-Université d' Orléans, F-45071 Orléans (France); Desvignes, G.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kramer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Lyne, A. G.; Stappers, B. W. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Nice, D. J. [Department of Physics, Lafayette College, Easton, PA 18042 (United States); Ransom, S. M. [NRAO (National Radio Astronomy Observatory), Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Weisberg, J. M., E-mail: leeuwen@astron.nl [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Carleton College, Northfield, MN 55057 (United States)

    2015-01-10

    PSR J1906+0746 is a young pulsar in the relativistic binary with the second-shortest known orbital period, of 3.98 hr. We here present a timing study based on five years of observations, conducted with the five largest radio telescopes in the world, aimed at determining the companion nature. Through the measurement of three post-Keplerian orbital parameters, we find the pulsar mass to be 1.291(11) M {sub ☉}, and the companion mass 1.322(11) M {sub ☉}, respectively. These masses fit well in the observed collection of double neutron stars (DNSs), but are also compatible with other systems where a young pulsar such as J1906+0746 is orbited by a white dwarf (WD). Neither radio pulsations nor dispersion-inducing outflows that could have further established the companion nature were detected. We derive an H I-absorption distance, which indicates that an optical confirmation of a WD companion is very challenging. The pulsar is fading fast due to geodetic precession, limiting future timing improvements. We conclude that the young pulsar J1906+0746 is likely part of a DNS, or is otherwise orbited by an older WD, in an exotic system formed through two stages of mass transfer.

  18. Pulsar-Black Hole Binaries in the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Faucher-Giguere, C -A

    2010-01-01

    Binaries consisting of a pulsar and a black hole (BH) are a holy grail of astrophysics, both for their significance for stellar evolution and for their potential application as probes of strong gravity. In spite of extensive surveys of our Galaxy and its system of globular clusters, no pulsar-black hole (PSR-BH) binary has been found to date. Clues as to where such systems might exist are therefore highly desirable. We show that if the central parsec around Sgr A* harbors a cluster of ~25,000 stellar BHs (as predicted by mass segregation arguments) and if it is also rich in recycled pulsar binaries (by analogy with globular clusters), then 3-body exchange interactions should produce PSR-BHs in the Galactic center. Simple estimates of the formation rate and survival time of these binaries suggest that a few PSR-BHs should be present in the central parsec today. The proposed formation mechanism makes unique predictions for the PSR-BH properties: 1) the binary would reside within ~1 pc of Sgr A*; 2) the pulsar w...

  19. On pulsar-driven mass ejection in low-mass X-ray binaries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Fu; Xiang-Dong Li

    2011-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence for mass ejection in low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) driven by radio pulsar activity during X-ray quiescence.We consider the condition for mass ejection by comparing the radiation pressure from a millisecond pulsar,and the gas pressure at the inner Lagrange point or at the surrounding accretion disk.We calculate the critical spin period of the pulsar below which mass ejection is allowed.Combining with the evolution of the mass transfer rate,we present constraints on the orbital periods of the systems.We show that mass ejection could happen in both wide and compact LMXBs.It may be caused by transient accretion due to thermal instability in the accretion disks in the former,and irradiation-driven mass-transfer cycles in the latter.

  20. NuSTAR Observations of the State Transition of Millisecond Pulsar Binary PSR J1023+0038

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; Yang, Chengwei; An, Hongjun;

    2014-01-01

    We report NuSTAR observations of the millisecond pulsar - low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) transition system PSR J1023+0038 from June and October 2013, before and after the formation of an accretion disk around the neutron star. Between June 10-12, a few days to two weeks before the radio disappearan...

  1. NuSTAR Observations of the State Transition of Millisecond Pulsar Binary PSR J1023+0038

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; Yang, Chengwei; An, Hongjun;

    2014-01-01

    We report NuSTAR observations of the millisecond pulsar-low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) transition system PSR J1023+0038 from 2013 June and October, before and after the formation of an accretion disk around the neutron star. Between June 10 and 12, a few days to two weeks before the radio disappear...

  2. Be/X-Ray Pulsar Binary Science with LOFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2011-01-01

    Accretion disks are ubiquitous in astronomical sources. Accretion powered pulsars are a good test bed for accretion disk physics, because unlike for other objects, the spin of the neutron star is directly observable allowing us to see the effects of angular momentum transfer onto the pulsar. The combination of a sensitive wide-field monitor and the large area detector on LOFT will enable new detailed studies of accretion powered pulsars which I will review. RXTE observations have shown an unusually high number of Be/X-ray pulsar binaries in the SMC. Unlike binaries in the Milky Way, these systems are all at the same distance, allowing detailed population studies using the sensitive LOFT WFM, potentially providing connections to star formation episodes. For Galactic accreting pulsar systems, LOFT will allow measurement of spectral variations within individual pulses, mapping the accretion column in detail for the first time. LOFT will also provide better constraints on magnetic fields in accreting pulsars, allowing measurements of cyclotron features, observations of transitions into the centrifugal inhibition regime, and monitoring of spin-up rate vs flux correlations. Coordinated multi-wavelength observations are crucial to extracting the best science from LOFT from these and numerous other objects.

  3. An exact solution of Haugan's binary pulsar equation of motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, M.; Mor, A.

    1988-05-01

    In his work on the post-Newtonian arrival-time analysis for a pulsary binary system, Haugan (1985) derived and integrated the two-body equation of the motion of the pulsar. The purpose of the present study is to show that there is an exact solution to this nonlinear equation, without any need of far-reaching assumptions and neglected nonlinear terms.

  4. Probing Binary Evolution Using the Pulsar Fossil Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdman, Robert D.; Stairs, I. H.; Kramer, M.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Faulkner, A.; Backer, D. C.; Demorest, P.; Nice, D. J.; Burgay, M.; Camilo, F.; D'Amico, N.; Hobbs, G.; Lorimer, D. R.; Lyne, A. G.; Manchester, R.; Possenti, A.

    2006-12-01

    The Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey has yielded a significant number of very interesting binary and millisecond pulsars. Two of these objects are part of an ongoing timing study at the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). PSR J1756-2251 is a double-neutron star (DNS) binary system. Its orbital properties show it to be a similar system to PSR B1913+16, the original binary pulsar system discovered by Hulse and Taylor. Mass measurements of this system thus provide another important opportunity to test the validity of General Relativity, and to study the evolutionary history of DNS systems. PSR J1802-2124 is part of the relatively new and unstudied "intermediate-mass" class of binary pulsars. These typically spin with periods in the tens of milliseconds, and often have relatively massive (> 0.7 solar masses) white dwarf companions. GBT observations over the past two years have enabled us to detect the Shapiro delay in this system. This has led to the determination of the individual masses of the neutron star and white dwarf companion, providing constraints on the mass-transfer history in this unusual system.

  5. Excitation of Alfven Waves and Pulsar Radio Emission

    OpenAIRE

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    1999-01-01

    We analyze mechanisms of the excitation of Alfv\\'{e}n wave in pulsar magnetospheres as a possible source of pulsar radio emission generation. We find that Cherenkov excitation of obliquely propagating Alfv\\'{e}n waves is inefficient, while excitation at the anomalous cyclotron resonance by the particles from the primary beam and from the tail of the bulk distribution function may have a considerable growth rate. The cyclotron instability on Alfv\\'{e}n waves occurs in the kinetic regime still ...

  6. Limits on radio emission from pulsar wind nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Gaensler, B M; Frail, D A; Moffett, D A; Johnston, S; Chatterjee, S

    2000-01-01

    We report on a sensitive survey for radio pulsar wind nebulae (PWN) towards 27 energetic and/or high velocity pulsars. Observations were carried out at 1.4 GHz using the Very Large Array and the Australia Telescope Compact Array, and utilised pulsar-gating to search for off-pulse emission. These observing parameters resulted in a considerably more sensitive search than previous surveys, and could detect PWN over a much wider range of spatial scales (and hence ambient densities and pulsar velocities). However, no emission clearly corresponding to a PWN was discovered. Based on these non-detections we argue that the young and energetic pulsars in our sample have winds typical of young pulsars, but produce unobservable PWN because they reside in low density (n approx 0.003 cm^-3) regions of the ISM. However, non-detections of PWN around older and less energetic pulsars can only be explained if the radio luminosity of their winds is less than 1e-5 of their spin-down luminosity, implying an efficiency at least an ...

  7. A RADIO SEARCH FOR PULSAR COMPANIONS TO SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY LOW-MASS WHITE DWARFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have conducted a search for pulsar companions to 15 low-mass white dwarfs (LMWDs; M sun) at 820 MHz with the NRAO Green Bank Telescope (GBT). These LMWDs were spectroscopically identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and do not show the photometric excess or spectroscopic signature associated with a companion in their discovery data. However, LMWDs are believed to evolve in binary systems and to have either a more massive white dwarf (WD) or a neutron star (NS) as a companion. Indeed, evolutionary models of low-mass X-ray binaries, the precursors of millisecond pulsars (MSPs), produce significant numbers of LMWDs, suggesting that the SDSS LMWDs may have NS companions. No convincing pulsar signal is detected in our data. This is consistent with the findings of van Leeuwen et al., who conducted a GBT search for radio pulsations at 340 MHz from unseen companions to eight SDSS WDs (five are still considered LMWDs; the three others are now classified as 'ordinary' WDs). We discuss the constraints our nondetections place on the probability P MSP that the companion to a given LMWD is a radio pulsar in the context of the luminosity and acceleration limits of our search; we find that P MSP +4-2%.

  8. Five new millisecond pulsars from a radio survey of 14 unidentified Fermi-LAT gamma-ray sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Kerr; F. Camilo; T.J. Johnson; E.C. Ferrara; L. Guillemot; A.K. Harding; J. Hessels; S. Johnston; M. Keith; M. Kramer; S.M. Ransom; P.S. Ray; J.E. Reynolds; J. Sarkissian; K.S. Wood

    2012-01-01

    We have discovered five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in a survey of 14 unidentified Fermi Large Area Telescope sources in the southern sky using the Parkes radio telescope. PSRs J0101-6422, J1514-4946, and J1902-5105 reside in binaries, while PSRs J1658-5324 and J1747-4036 are isolated. Using an ephem

  9. Developing radio beam geometry and luminosity models of pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Gonthier, P L; Giacherio, B M; Arevalo, R A; Harding, A K

    2006-01-01

    Our recent studies of pulsar population statistics suggest that improvements of radio and gamma-ray beam geometry and luminosity models require further refinement. The goal of this project is to constrain the viewing geometry for some radio pulsars, especially three-peaked pulse profiles, in order to limit the uncertainty of the magnetic inclination and impact angles. We perform fits of the pulse profile and position angle sweep of radio pulsars for the available frequencies. We assume a single core and conal beams described by Gaussians. We incorporate three different size cones with frequency dependence from the work of Mitra & Deshpande (1999). We obtain separate spectral indices for the core and cone beams and explore the trends of the ratio of core to cone peak fluxes. This ratio is observed to have some dependence with period. However, we cannot establish the suggested functional form of this ratio as indicated by the work of Arzoumanian, Chernoff & Cordes (2002).

  10. Swinging between rotation and accretion power in a binary millisecond pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Papitto, A; Bozzo, E; Rea, N

    2013-01-01

    We present the discovery of IGR J18245-2452, the first millisecond pulsar observed to swing between a rotation-powered, radio pulsar state, and an accretion-powered X-ray pulsar state (Papitto et al. 2013, Nature, 501, 517). This transitional source represents the most convincing proof of the evolutionary link shared by accreting neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries, and radio millisecond pulsars. It demonstrates that swings between these two states take place on the same time-scales of luminosity variations of X-ray transients, and are therefore most easily interpreted in terms of changes in the rate of mass in-flow. While accreting mass, the X-ray emission of IGR J18245-2452 varies dramatically on time-scales ranging from a second to a few hours. We interpret a state characterised by a lower flux and pulsed fraction, and by sudden increases of the hardness of the X-ray emission, in terms of the onset of a magnetospheric centrifugal inhibition of the accretion flow. Prospects of finding new members of th...

  11. Physics of radio emission in gamma-ray pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Petrova, S A

    2016-01-01

    Propagation of radio emission in pulsar magnetosphere is reviewed. The effects of polarization transfer, induced scattering and reprocessing to high energies are analysed with an especial emphasis on the implications for the gamma-ray pulsars. The possibilities of the pulsar plasma diagnostics based on the observed radio pulse characteristics are outlined as well. As an example, the plasma number density profiles obtained from the polarization data for the Vela and the gamma-ray millisecond pulsars J1446-4701, J1939+2134 and J1744-1134 are presented. The number densities derived tend to be the highest/lowest when the radio pulse leads/lags the gamma-ray peak. In the PSR J1939+2134, the plasma density profiles for the main pulse and interpulse appear to fit exactly the same curve, testifying to the origin of both radio components above the same magnetic pole and their propagation through the same plasma flow in opposite directions. The millisecond radio pulse components exhibiting flat position angle curves ar...

  12. A Search for Radio Pulsars at High Galactic Latitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby, B. A.

    We have completed a search for radio pulsars using the Parkes 64-m telescope, covering about 4500 square degrees between 15 deg and 30 deg from the Galactic plane. Each pointing was observed for 265 s with the 13-beam multibeam system at a frequency of 1374 MHz. The signal from each beam was processed by a 96-channel filterbank and sampled every 125 us, with a bandwidth of 288 MHz. This strategy affords rapid sky coverage and good sensitivity to pulsars with periods as short as 1 ms, whose existence would constrain the neutron star equation of state. Data were analyzed using the workstation cluster at the Swinburne Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing. This effort has yielded 26 new pulsars, including seven recycled pulsars. Taken together with the previous Swinburne Intermediate Latitude Pulsar Survey, a total of 95 new pulsars were found over nearly 7500 square degrees of sky between 5 deg and 30 deg from the plane of the Galaxy. This large sample of newly discovered objects contains no young pulsars.

  13. Fast pulsars, strange stars: An opportunity in radio astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The world's data on radio pulsars is not expected to represent the underlying pulsar population because of a search bias against detection of short periods, especially below 1 ms. Yet pulsars in increasing numbers with periods right down to this limit have been discovered suggesting that there may be even shorter ones. If pulsars with periods below 1/2 ms were found, the conclusion that the confined hadronic phase of nucleons and nuclei is only metastable would be almost inescapable. The plausible ground state in that event is the deconfined phase of (3-flavor) strange-quark-matter. From the QCD energy scale this is as likely a ground state as the confined phase. We show that strange matter as the ground state is not ruled out by any known fact, and most especially not by the fact that the universe is in the confined phase. 136 refs

  14. A Massive Pulsar in a Compact Relativistic Binary

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadis, John; Wex, Norbert; Tauris, Thomas M; Lynch, Ryan S; van Kerkwijk, Marten H; Kramer, Michael; Bassa, Cees; Dhillon, Vik S; Driebe, Thomas; Hessels, Jason W T; Kaspi, Victoria M; Kondratiev, Vladislav I; Langer, Norbert; Marsh, Thomas R; McLaughlin, Maura A; Pennucci, Timothy T; Ransom, Scott M; Stairs, Ingrid H; van Leeuwen, Joeri; Verbiest, Joris P W; Whelan, David G; 10.1126/science.1233232

    2013-01-01

    Many physically motivated extensions to general relativity (GR) predict significant deviations in the properties of spacetime surrounding massive neutron stars. We report the measurement of a 2.01 +/- 0.04 solar mass pulsar in a 2.46-hr orbit with a 0.172 +/- 0.003 solar mass white dwarf. The high pulsar mass and the compact orbit make this system a sensitive laboratory of a previously untested strong-field gravity regime. Thus far, the observed orbital decay agrees with GR, supporting its validity even for the extreme conditions present in the system. The resulting constraints on deviations support the use of GR-based templates for ground-based gravitational wave detectors. Additionally, the system strengthens recent constraints on the properties of dense matter and provides insight to binary stellar astrophysics and pulsar recycling.

  15. The LOFAR Pilot Surveys for Pulsars and Fast Radio Transients

    CERN Document Server

    Coenen, Thijs; Hessels, Jason W T; Stappers, Ben W; Kondratiev, Vladislav I; Alexov, A; Breton, R P; Bilous, A; Cooper, S; Falcke, H; Fallows, R A; Gajjar, V; Grießmeier, J -M; Hassall, T E; Karastergiou, A; Keane, E F; Kramer, M; Kuniyoshi, M; Noutsos, A; Osłowski, S; Pilia, M; Serylak, M; Schrijvers, C; Sobey, C; ter Veen, S; Verbiest, J; Weltevrede, P; Wijnholds, S; Zagkouris, K; van Amesfoort, A S; Anderson, J; Asgekar, A; Avruch, I M; Bell, M E; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Bonafede, A; Breitling, F; Broderick, J; Brüggen, M; Butcher, H R; Ciardi, B; Corstanje, A; Deller, A; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Fender, R; Ferrari, C; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; de Gasperin, F; de Geus, E; Gunst, A W; Hamaker, J P; Heald, G; Hoeft, M; van der Horst, A; Juette, E; Kuper, G; Law, C; Mann, G; McFadden, R; McKay-Bukowski, D; McKean, J P; Munk, H; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Renting, A; Röttgering, H; Rowlinson, A; Scaife, A M M; Schwarz, D; Sluman, J; Smirnov, O; Swinbank, J; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; Tasse, C; Thoudam, S; Toribio, C; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; van Weeren, R J; Wucknitz, O; Zarka, P; Zensus, A

    2014-01-01

    We have conducted two pilot surveys for radio pulsars and fast transients with the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) around 140 MHz and here report on the first low-frequency fast-radio burst limit and the discovery of two new pulsars. The first survey, the LOFAR Pilot Pulsar Survey (LPPS), observed a large fraction of the northern sky, ~1.4 x 10^4 sq. deg, with 1-hr dwell times. Each observation covered ~75 sq. deg using 7 independent fields formed by incoherently summing the high-band antenna fields. The second pilot survey, the LOFAR Tied-Array Survey (LOTAS), spanned ~600 sq. deg, with roughly a 5-fold increase in sensitivity compared with LPPS. Using a coherent sum of the 6 LOFAR "Superterp" stations, we formed 19 tied-array beams, together covering 4 sq. deg per pointing. From LPPS we derive a limit on the occurrence, at 142 MHz, of dispersed radio bursts of 107 Jy for the narrowest searched burst duration of 0.66 ms. In LPPS, we re-detected 65 previously known pulsars. LOTAS discovered two pulsars, the firs...

  16. A Statistical Analysis of Radio Pulsar Timing Noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We present an analysis of the timing observations on 27 radio pulsars, collected at Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory (HartRAO), with time spans ranging between ~ 9 and 14 yr. Our results show that the measured pulsar frequency second derivatives are non-stationary. Both the magnitude and the sign of the (v) values depend upon the choice of epoch and data span. A simple statistical analysis of the observed second time derivative of the pulse frequency ((v)obs) of a large sample of 391 (25 HartRAO and 366 Jodrell Bank Observatory). pulsars reveals that (v) is only marginally correlated with both the pulsar spin-down rate (P) and the characteristic age (τc). We find correlation coefficients of ~ 0.20 and -0.30 between the measured braking indices and, respectively,(P) and τc. This result reaffirms earlier conclusions that the braking indices of most radio pulsars, obtained through the standard timing technique, are strongly dominated by sustained random fluctuations in the observed pulse phase.

  17. Gamma-rays from nebulae around binary systems containing energetic rotation powered pulsars

    OpenAIRE

    Bednarek, W.; Sitarek, J.

    2013-01-01

    We consider nebulae which are created around binary systems containing rotation powered pulsars and companion stars with strong stellar winds. It is proposed that the stellar and pulsar winds have to mix at some distance from the binary system, defined by the orbital period of the companion stars and the velocity of the stellar wind. The mixed pulsar-stellar wind expands with a specific velocity determined by the pulsar power and the mass loss rate of the companion star. Relativistic particle...

  18. Conducting the deepest all-sky radio pulsar survey ever: The All-Sky High Time Resolution Universe Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Cherry

    The extreme conditions found in and around pulsars make them fantastic natural laboratories, providing insights to a rich variety of aspects of fundamental physics and astronomy. To discover more pulsars we have begun the High Time Resolution Universe (HTRU) survey; a blind survey of the northern sky with the 100-m Effelsberg radio telescope in Germany and a twin survey of the southern sky with the 64-m Parkes radio telescope in Australia. The HTRU survey uses multi-beam receivers and backends constructed with new advancements in technology, providing unprecedentedly high time and frequency resolution to probe deeper into the Galaxy than ever before. Observations from Parkes have recently been completed and it is thus a suitable moment to review the success of the survey. In my talk I will discuss the discovery highlights such as the magnetar, two “planet-pulsar” binaries and the Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) from cosmological distances. The HTRU low-latitude data promises to provide the deepest large-scale search ever for the Galactic plane region. I will present an innovative segmented search technique which aims to increase our chances of discoveries of highly accelerated relativistic binary systems, including the potential pulsar-black-hole binaries. I will also provide an update on the survey status for the Northern survey with Effelsberg, which has led to the recent discovery of a highly eccentric binary millisecond pulsar.

  19. The induced turbulence effect on propagation of radio emission in pulsar magnetospheres

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Qinghuan; Melrose, D. B.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of photon-beam-induced turbulence on propagation of radio emission in a pulsar magnetosphere is discussed. Beamed radio emission with a high brightness temperature can generate low-frequency plasma waves in the pulsar magnetosphere and these waves scatter the radio beam. We consider this effect on propagation of radio emission both in the open field line region and in the closed field line region. The former is applicable to most cases of pulsar radio emission where the propagation...

  20. Sampling the Radio Transient Universe: Studies of Pulsars and the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chennamangalam, Jayanth

    The transient radio universe is a relatively unexplored area of astronomy, offering a variety of phenomena, from solar and Jovian bursts, to flare stars, pulsars, and bursts of Galactic and potentially even cosmological origin. Among these, perhaps the most widely studied radio transients, pulsars are fast-spinning neutron stars that emit radio beams from their magnetic poles. In spite of over 40 years of research on pulsars, we have more questions than answers on these exotic compact objects, chief among them the nature of their emission mechanism. Nevertheless, the wealth of phenomena exhibited by pulsars make them one of the most useful astrophysical tools. With their high densities, pulsars are probes of the nature of ultra-dense matter. Characterized by their high timing stability, pulsars can be used to verify the predictions of general relativity, discover planets around them, study bodies in the solar system, and even serve as an interplanetary (and possibly some day, interstellar) navigation aid. Pulsars are also used to study the nature of the interstellar medium, much like a flashlight illuminating airborne dust in a dark room. Studies of pulsars in the Galactic center can help answer questions about the massive black hole in the region and the star formation history in its vicinity. Millisecond pulsars in globular clusters are long-lived tracers of their progenitors, low-mass X-ray binaries, and can be used to study the dynamical history of those clusters. Another source of interest in radio transient astronomy is the hitherto undetected engineered signal from extraterrestrial intelligence. The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) is an ongoing attempt at discovering the presence of technological life elsewhere in the Galaxy. In this work, I present my forays into two aspects of the study of the radio transient universe---pulsars and SETI. Firstly, I describe my work on the luminosity function and population size of pulsars in the globular

  1. On the inverse Compton scattering model of radio pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Qiao, G J; Liu Jian Fei; Han, J L; Zhang, B

    2000-01-01

    Some characteristics of the inverse Compton scattering (ICS) model are reviewed. At least the following properties of radio pulsars can be reproduced in the model: core or central emission beam, one or two hollow emission cones, different emission heights of these components, diverse pulse profiles at various frequencies, linear and circular polarization features of core and cones.

  2. The space velocities of radio pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loginov, A. A.; Nikitina, E. B.; Malov, I. F.

    2016-02-01

    Known models proposed to explain the high space velocities of pulsars based on asymmetry of the transport coefficients of different sorts of neutrinos or electromagnetic radiation can be efficient only in the presence of high magnetic fields (to 1016 G) or short rotation periods for the neutron stars (of the order of 1 ms). This current study shows that the observed velocities are not correlated with either the pulsar periods or their surface magnetic fields. The initial rotation periods are estimated in a model for the magnetedipolar deceleration of their spin, aßsuming that the pulsar ages are equal to their kinematic ages. The initial period distribution is bimodal, with peaks at 5 ms and 0.5 s, and similar to the current distribution of periods. It is shown that asymmetry of the pulsar electromagnetic radiation is insufficient to give rise to additional acceleration of pulsars during their evolution after the supernova explosion that gave birth to them. The observations testify to deceleration of the motion, most likely due to the influence of the interstellar medium and interactions with nearby objects. The time scale for the exponential decrease in the magnetic field τ D and in the angle between the rotation axis and magnetic moment τ ß are estimated, yielding τ β = 1.4 million years. The derived dependence of the transverse velocity of a pulsar on the angle between the line of sight and the rotation axis of the neutron star corresponds to the expected dependence for acceleration mechanisms associated with asymmetry of the radiation emitted by the two poles of the star.

  3. A millisecond pulsar in an extremely wide binary system

    CERN Document Server

    Bassa, C G; Stappers, B W; Tauris, T M; Wevers, T; Jonker, P G; Lentati, L; Verbiest, J P W; Desvignes, G; Graikou, E; Guillemot, L; Freire, P C C; Lazarus, P; Caballero, R N; Champion, D J; Cognard, I; Jessner, A; Jordan, C; Karuppusamy, R; Kramer, M; Lazaridis, K; Lee, K J; Liu, K; Lyne, A G; McKee, J; Oslowski, S; Perrodin, D; Sanidas, S; Shaifullah, G; Smits, R; Theureau, G; Tiburzi, C; Zhu, W W

    2016-01-01

    We report on 22 yrs of radio timing observations of the millisecond pulsar J1024$-$0719 by the telescopes participating in the European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA). These observations reveal a significant second derivative of the pulsar spin frequency and confirm the discrepancy between the parallax and Shklovskii distances that has been reported earlier. We also present optical astrometry, photometry and spectroscopy of 2MASS J10243869$-$0719190. We find that it is a low-metallicity main-sequence star (K7V spectral type, $\\mathrm{[M/H]}=-1.0$, $T_\\mathrm{eff}=4050\\pm50$ K) and that its position, proper motion and distance are consistent with those of PSR J1024$-$0719. We conclude that PSR J1024$-$0719 and 2MASS J10243869$-$0719190 form a common proper motion pair and are gravitationally bound. The gravitational interaction between the main-sequence star and the pulsar accounts for the spin frequency derivatives, which in turn resolves the distance discrepancy. Our observations suggest that the pulsar and main...

  4. Parkes radio searches of Fermi gamma-ray sources and millisecond pulsar discoveries

    CERN Document Server

    Camilo, F; Ray, P S; Ransom, S M; Sarkissian, J; Cromartie, H T; Johnston, S; Reynolds, J E; Wolff, M T; Freire, P C C; Bhattacharyya, B; Ferrara, E C; Keith, M; Michelson, P F; Parkinson, P M Saz; Wood, K S

    2015-01-01

    In a search with the Parkes radio telescope of 56 unidentified Fermi-LAT gamma-ray sources, we have detected 11 millisecond pulsars (MSPs), 10 of them discoveries, of which five were reported in Kerr et al. (2012). We did not detect radio pulsations from another six pulsars now known in these sources. We describe the completed survey, which included multiple observations of many targets done to minimize the impact of interstellar scintillation, acceleration effects in binary systems, and eclipses. We consider that 23 of the 39 remaining sources may still be viable pulsar candidates. We present timing solutions and polarimetry for five of the MSPs, and gamma-ray pulsations for PSR J1903-7051 (pulsations for five others were reported in the second Fermi-LAT catalog of gamma-ray pulsars). Two of the new MSPs are isolated and five are in >1 d circular orbits with 0.2-0.3 Msun presumed white dwarf companions. PSR J0955-6150, in a 24 d orbit with a ~0.25 Msun companion but eccentricity of 0.11, belongs to a recentl...

  5. Radio emissions from pulsar companions : a refutable explanation for galactic transients and fast radio bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Mottez, Fabrice

    2014-01-01

    The six known highly dispersed fast radio bursts are attributed to extragalactic radio sources, of unknown origin but extremely energetic. We propose here a new explanation - not requiring an extreme release of energy - involving a body (planet, asteroid, white dwarf) orbiting an extragalactic pulsar. We investigate a theory of radio waves associated to such pulsar-orbiting bodies. We focus our analysis on the waves emitted from the magnetic wake of the body in the pulsar wind. After deriving their properties, we compare them with the observations of various transient radio signals in order to see if they could originate from pulsar-orbiting bodies. The analysis is based on the theory of Alfv\\'en wings: for a body immersed in a pulsar wind, a system of two stationary Alfv\\'en waves is attached to the body, provided that the wind is highly magnetized. When destabilized through plasma instabilities, Alfv\\'en wings can be the locus of strong radio sources convected with the pulsar wind. Assuming a cyclotron mase...

  6. A search for radio emission from X-ray binaries and related objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    5-GHz radio observations are reported of 117 X-ray binary stars and cataclysmic variable stars using the Jodrell Bank Lovell-Mk II broad-band interferometer. Sensitivity was sufficient to detect sources of 2-3 mJy. In addition to seven objects already known to be radio emitters, seven new radio sources were detected. VLA observations confirmed that two of the new radio sources are coincident with the X-ray positions, one of them probably an extragalactic radio source, and the other a pulsar. (author)

  7. A current circuit model of pulsar radio emission

    CERN Document Server

    Kunzl, T A; Jessner, A; Kunzl, Th.

    2002-01-01

    We present the outline of a new model for the coherent radio emission of pulsars that succeeds in reproducing the energetics and brightness temperatures of the observed radio emission from the observationally deduced distances of 50-100 pulsar radii above the neutron star in a narrow region. The restrictions imposed by energy conservation, plasma dynamics of the coherent radiation process and propagation effects are used to apply the action of a plasma process like coherent inverse Compton scattering (CICS) (see Benford, 1992). In accordance with our findings (Kunzl et al. 1998a) this process requires Lorentz factors of about 10 which are lower than in most other radio emission models. This implies that no significant pair production can take place near the surface and we expect charge densities close to the Goldreich-Julian value (Goldreich & Julian (1969)). To fulfill the energetic and electrodynamic constraints the model requires constant re-acceleration in dissipation regions which can be interpreted ...

  8. Hunting for Orphaned Central Compact Objects among Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, J; Ho, W C G; Bogdanov, S; Kaspi, V M; He, C

    2015-01-01

    Central compact objects (CCOs) are a handful of young neutron stars found at the center of supernova remnants (SNRs). They show high thermal X-ray luminosities but no radio emission. Spin-down rate measurements of the three CCOs with X-ray pulsations indicate surface dipole fields much weaker than those of typical young pulsars. To investigate if CCOs and known radio pulsars are objects at different evolutionary stages, we carried out a census of all weak-field (<1e11 G) isolated radio pulsars in the Galactic plane to search for CCO-like X-ray emission. None of the 12 candidates is detected at X-ray energies, with luminosity limits of 1e32-1e34 erg/s. We consider a scenario in which the weak surface fields of CCOs are due to rapid accretion of supernova materials and show that as the buried field diffuses back to the surface, a CCO descendant is expected to leave the P-Pdot parameter space of our candidates at a young age of a few times 10kyr. Hence, the candidates are likely to be just old ordinary pulsar...

  9. A statistical analysis of radio pulsar timing noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an analysis of the timing observations on 27 radio pulsars, collected at Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory (HartRAO), which span between ∼ 9 and 14 yrs. Our results show that the observed frequency second derivative (νobs) are highly non-stationary, with magnitude and sign depending randomly on time and data span length. Statistical analysis of a complete sample of 391 (25 HartRAO and 366 Jodrell Bank Observatory) pulsars reveals no significant correlation between νobs and both the pulsar spin-down rate (P) and the characteristic age (τc). Irrespective of sign, we find ∼ 0.20 and -0.30 as the correlation coefficients between the measured braking indices and, respectively, P and τc. This result reaffirms an earlier conclusion by Chukwude (2003) that the braking indices of most radio pulsars, obtained through the standard timing technique, are strongly dominated by sustained random fluctuations in the observed pulse phase. (author)

  10. Long-term observations of the pulsars in 47 Tucanae. I. A study of four elusive binary systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ridolfi, A; Torne, P; Heinke, C O; Berg, M van den; Jordan, C; Kramer, M; Bassa, C G; Sarkissian, J; D'Amico, N; Lorimer, D; Camilo, F; Manchester, R N; Lyne, A

    2016-01-01

    For the past couple of decades, the Parkes radio telescope has been regularly observing the millisecond pulsars in 47 Tucanae (47 Tuc). This long-term timing program was designed to address a wide range of scientific issues related to these pulsars and the globular cluster where they are located. In this paper, the first of a series, we address one of these objectives: the characterization of four previously known binary pulsars for which no precise orbital parameters were known, namely 47 Tuc P, V, W and X (pulsars 47 Tuc R and Y are discussed elsewhere). We determined the previously unknown orbital parameters of 47 Tuc V and X and greatly improved those of 47 Tuc P and W. For pulsars W and X we obtained, for the first time, full coherent timing solutions across the whole data span, which allowed a much more detailed characterization of these systems. 47 Tuc W, a well-known tight eclipsing binary pulsar, exhibits a large orbital period variability, as expected for a system of its class. 47 Tuc X turns out to...

  11. Radio pulsar death lines to SGRs/AXPs and white dwarfs pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobato, Ronaldo V.; Malheiro, M. [Departamento de Física, Instituto Tecnológico de Aeronáutica, ITA - DCTA, Vila das Acácias, São José dos Campos, 12228-900 SP (Brazil); Coelho, J. G. [INPE - Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Divisão de Astrofísica, Av. dos Astronautas 1758, São José dos Campos, 12227-010 SP (Brazil)

    2015-12-17

    Recently, an alternative model based on white dwarfs pulsars has been proposed to explain a class of pulsars known as Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGR) and Anomalus X-Ray Pulsars (AXP) [1], usually named as magnetars. In this model, the magnetized white dwarfs can have surface magnetic field B ∼ 10{sup 7} − 10{sup 10} G and rotate very fast with angular frequencies Ω ∼ 1 rad/s, allowing them to produce large electromagnetic (EM) potentials and generate electron-positron pairs. These EM potentials are comparable with the ones of neutron star pulsars with strong magnetic fields and even larger. In this study we consider two possible processes associated with the particle acceleration, both of them are common used to explain radio emission in neutron star pulsars: in the first process the pair production happens near to the star polar caps, i.e. inside of the light cylinder where magnetic field lines are closed; in the second one the creation of pair happens in the outer magnetosphere, i.e. far away of the star surface where magnetic field lines are open [2]. The analysis of the possibility of radio emission were done for 23 SGRs/AXPs of the McGill Online Magnetar Catalog [3] that contains the current information available on these sources. The results of this work show that the model where the particles production occur in the outer magnetosphere emission “o2” is the process compatible with the astronomical observations of absence of radio emission for almost all SGRs/AXPs when these sources are understood as white dwarf pulsars. Our work is a first attempted to find an explanation for the puzzle why for almost all the SGRs/AXPs was expected radio emission, but it was observed in only four of them. These four sources, as it was suggested recently [4], seem to belong to an high magnetic field neutron star pulsar category, different from all the others SGRs/AXPs that our work indicate to belong to a new class of white dwarf pulsars, very fast and magnetized.

  12. Discovery of two millisecond pulsars in Fermi sources with the Nancay Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Cognard, I; Johnson, T J; Smith, D A; Venter, C; Harding, A K; Wolff, M T; Cheung, C C; Donato, D; Abdo, A A; Ballet, J; Camilo, F; Desvignes, G; Dumora, D; Ferrara, E C; Freire, P C C; Grove, J E; Keith, M; Kramer, M; Lyne, A G; Michelson, P F; Parent, D; Ransom, S M; Ray, P S; Romani, R W; Parkinson, P M Saz; Stappers, B W; Theureau, G; Thompson, D J; Weltevrede, P; Wood, K S

    2011-01-01

    We report the discovery of two millisecond pulsars in a search for radio pulsations at the positions of \\emph{Fermi Large Area Telescope} sources with no previously known counterparts, using the Nan\\c{c}ay radio telescope. The two millisecond pulsars, PSRs J2017+0603 and J2302+4442, have rotational periods of 2.896 and 5.192 ms and are both in binary systems with low-eccentricity orbits and orbital periods of 2.2 and 125.9 days respectively, suggesting long recycling processes. Gamma-ray pulsations were subsequently detected for both objects, indicating that they power the associated \\emph{Fermi} sources in which they were found. The gamma-ray light curves and spectral properties are similar to those of previously-detected gamma-ray millisecond pulsars. Detailed modeling of the observed radio and gamma-ray light curves shows that the gamma-ray emission seems to originate at high altitudes in their magnetospheres. Additionally, X-ray observations revealed the presence of an X-ray source at the position of PSR ...

  13. Scattering of pulsar radio emission by the interstellar plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Coles, W A; Gao, J J; Hobbs, G; Verbiest, J P W

    2010-01-01

    We present simulations of scattering phenomena which are important in pulsar observations, but which are analytically intractable. The simulation code, which has also been used for solar wind and atmospheric scattering problems, is available from the authors. These simulations reveal an unexpectedly important role of dispersion in combination with refraction. We demonstrate the effect of analyzing observations which are shorter than the refractive scale. We examine time-of-arrival fluctuations in detail: showing their correlation with intensity and dispersion measure; providing a heuristic model from which one can estimate their contribution to pulsar timing observations; and showing that much of the effect can be corrected making use of measured intensity and dispersion. Finally, we analyze observations of the millisecond pulsar J0437$-$4715, made with the Parkes radio telescope, that show timing fluctuations which are correlated with intensity. We demonstrate that these timing fluctuations can be corrected,...

  14. Rotational Behaviors and Magnetic Field Evolution of Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Yi

    2014-01-01

    The observed long-term spin-down evolution of isolated radio pulsars cannot be explained by the standard magnetic dipole radiation with a constant braking torque. However how and why the torque varies still remains controversial, which is an outstanding problem in our understanding of neutron stars. We have constructed a phenomenological model of the evolution of surface magnetic fields of pulsars, which contains a long-term decay modulated by short-term oscillations; a pulsar's spin is thus modified by its magnetic field evolution. The predictions of this model agree with the precisely measured spin evolutions of several individual pulsars; the derived parameters suggest that the Hall drift and Hall waves in the NS crusts are probably responsible for the long-term change and short-term quasi-periodical oscillations, respectively. Many statistical properties of the timing noise of pulsars can be well re-produced with this model, including correlations and the distributions of the observed braking indices of t...

  15. Engulfing a radio pulsar: the case of PSR J1023+0038

    OpenAIRE

    Zelati, F. Coti; Baglio, M. C.; S. Campana; D'Avanzo, P.; Goldoni, P.; Masetti, N.; Muñoz-Darias, T.; Covino, S.; Fender, R. P.; Bailón, E. Jiménez; Otí-Floranes, H.; Palazzi, E.; F. G. Ramón-Fox

    2014-01-01

    The binary millisecond radio pulsar PSR J1023+0038 has been recently the subject of multiwavelength monitoring campaigns which revealed that an accretion disc has formed around the neutron star (since 2013 June). We present here the results of X-ray and UV observations carried out by the Swift satellite between 2013 October and 2014 May, and of optical and NIR observations performed with the REM telescope, the Liverpool Telescope, the 2.1-m telescope at the San Pedro M\\'artir Observatory and ...

  16. Elementary Wideband Timing of Radio Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennucci, Timothy T.; Demorest, Paul B.; Ransom, Scott M.

    2014-08-01

    We present an algorithm for the simultaneous measurement of a pulse time-of-arrival (TOA) and dispersion measure (DM) from folded wideband pulsar data. We extend the prescription from Taylor's 1992 work to accommodate a general two-dimensional template "portrait," the alignment of which can be used to measure a pulse phase and DM. We show that there is a dedispersion reference frequency that removes the covariance between these two quantities and note that the recovered pulse profile scaling amplitudes can provide useful information. We experiment with pulse modeling by using a Gaussian-component scheme that allows for independent component evolution with frequency, a "fiducial component," and the inclusion of scattering. We showcase the algorithm using our publicly available code on three years of wideband data from the bright millisecond pulsar J1824-2452A (M28A) from the Green Bank Telescope, and a suite of Monte Carlo analyses validates the algorithm. By using a simple model portrait of M28A, we obtain DM trends comparable to those measured by more standard methods, with improved TOA and DM precisions by factors of a few. Measurements from our algorithm will yield precisions at least as good as those from traditional techniques, but is prone to fewer systematic effects and is without ad hoc parameters. A broad application of this new method for dispersion measure tracking with modern large-bandwidth observing systems should improve the timing residuals for pulsar timing array experiments, such as the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves.

  17. Discovery of a millisecond pulsar in the 5.4 day binary 3FGL J1417.5-4402: observing the late phase of pulsar recycling

    CERN Document Server

    Camilo, F; Ransom, S M; Halpern, J P; Bogdanov, S; Kerr, M; Ray, P S; Cordes, J M; Sarkissian, J; Barr, E D; Ferrara, E C

    2016-01-01

    In a search of the unidentified Fermi gamma-ray source 3FGL J1417.5-4402 with the Parkes radio telescope, we discovered PSR J1417-4402, a 2.66 ms pulsar having the same 5.4 day orbital period as the optical and X-ray binary identified by Strader et al. The existence of radio pulsations implies that the neutron star is currently not accreting. Substantial outflows from the companion render the radio pulsar undetectable for more than half of the orbit, and may contribute to the observed Halpha emission. Our initial pulsar observations, together with the optically inferred orbit and inclination, imply a mass ratio of 0.171+/-0.002, a companion mass of M_2=0.33+/-0.03 Msun, and a neutron star mass in the range 1.77radio dispersion measure distance of 1.6 kpc. The smaller distance would reduce the inferred Roche-lobe filling factor, increase the inferred i...

  18. A wide low-mass binary model for the origin of axially symmetric non-thermal radio sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An accreting binary model has been proposed by recent workers to account for the origin of the axially symmetric non-thermal radio sources. The authors show that the only type of binary system that can produce the observed structural properties, is a relatively wide neutron star binary, in which the companion of the neutron star is a low-mass giant. Binaries of this type are expected to resemble closely the eight brightest galactic bulge X-ray sources as well as the progenitors of the two wide radio pulsar binaries. (U.K.)

  19. Curvature-drift instability fails to generate pulsar radio emission

    OpenAIRE

    Kaganovich, Alexander; Lyubarsky, Yuri

    2010-01-01

    The curvature drift instability has long been considered as a viable mechanism for pulsar radio emission. We reconsidered this mechanism by finding an explicit solution describing propagation of short-wave electro-magnetic waves in a plasma flow along curved magnetic field lines. We show that even though the waves could be amplified, the amplification factor remains very close to unity therefore this mechanism is unable to generate high brightness temperature emission from initial weak fluctu...

  20. The Einstein@Home search for radio pulsars and PSR J2007+2722

    CERN Document Server

    Allen, B; Cordes, J M; Deneva, J S; Hessels, J W T; Anderson, D; Aulbert, C; Bock, O; Brazier, A; Chatterjee, S; Demorest, P B; Eggenstein, H B; Fehrmann, H; Gotthelf, E V; Hammer, D; Kaspi, V M; Kramer, M; Lyne, A G; Machenschalk, B; McLaughlin, M A; Messenger, C; Pletsch, H J; Ransom, S M; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; Bhat, N D R; Bogdanov, S; Camilo, F; Champion, D J; Crawford, F; Desvignes, G; Freire, P C C; Heald, G; Jenet, F A; Lazarus, P; Lee, K J; van Leeuwen, J; Lynch, R; Papa, M A; Prix, R; Rosen, R; Scholz, P; Siemens, X; Stovall, K; Venkataraman, A; Zhu, W

    2013-01-01

    Einstein@Home aggregates the computer power of hundreds of thousands of volunteers from 192 countries, to search for new neutron stars using data from electromagnetic and gravitational-wave detectors. This paper presents a detailed description of the search for new radio pulsars using PALFA survey data from the Arecibo Observatory. The enormous computing power allows this search to cover a new region of parameter space; it can detect pulsars in binary systems with orbital periods as short as 11 min. We also describe the first Einstein@Home discovery, the 40.8 Hz isolated pulsar PSR J2007+2722, and provide a full timing model. PSR J2007+2722's pulse profile is remarkably wide with emission over almost the entire spin period. This neutron star is most likely a disrupted recycled pulsar, about as old as its characteristic spin-down age of 404 Myr. However there is a small chance that it was born recently, with a low magnetic field. If so, upper limits on the X-ray flux suggest but can not prove that PSR J2007+27...

  1. Tests of Gravitational Symmetries with Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, Lijing

    2016-01-01

    Symmetries play important roles in modern theories of physical laws. In this paper, we review several experimental tests of important symmetries associated with the gravitational interaction, including the universality of free fall for self-gravitating bodies, time-shift symmetry in the gravitational constant, local position invariance and local Lorentz invariance of gravity, and spacetime translational symmetries. Recent experimental explorations for post-Newtonian gravity are discussed, of which, those from pulsar astronomy are highlighted. All of these tests, of very different aspects of gravity theories, at very different length scales, favor to very high precision the predictions of the strong equivalence principle (SEP) and, in particular, general relativity which embodies SEP completely. As the founding principles of gravity, these symmetries are motivated to be promoted to even stricter tests in future.

  2. Tests of gravitational symmetries with radio pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, LiJing; Wex, Norbert

    2016-09-01

    Symmetries play important roles in modern theories of physical laws. In this paper, we review several experimental tests of important symmetries associated with the gravitational interaction, including the universality of free fall for self-gravitating bodies, time-shift symmetry in the gravitational constant, local position invariance and local Lorentz invariance of gravity, and spacetime translational symmetries. Recent experimental explorations for post-Newtonian gravity are discussed, of which, those from pulsar astronomy are highlighted. All of these tests, of very different aspects of gravity theories, at very different length scales, favor to very high precision the predictions of the strong equivalence principle (SEP) and, in particular, general relativity which embodies SEP completely. As the founding principles of gravity, these symmetries are motivated to be promoted to even stricter tests in future.

  3. A study of microglitches in Hartebeesthoek radio pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onuchukwu, C. C.; Chukwude, A. E.

    2016-09-01

    We carried out a statistical analysis of microglitch events on a sample of radio pulsars. The distributions of microglitch events in frequency (ν) and first frequency derivative ({ν'}) indicate that the size of a microglitch and sign combinations of events in ν and {ν'} are purely randomized. Assuming that the probability of a given size of a microglitch event occurring scales inversely as the absolute size of the event in both ν and {ν'}, we constructed a cumulative distribution function (CDF) for the absolute sizes of microglitches. In most of the pulsars, the theoretical CDF matched the observed values. This is an indication that microglitches in pulsar may be interpreted as an avalanche process in which angular momentum is transferred erratically from the flywheel-like superfluid interior to the slowly decelerating solid crust. Analysis of the waiting time indicates that it is purely Poisson distributed with mean microglitch rate spin down rate (r˜-0.6) and the characteristic age of the pulsar (τ) with (r˜-0.4/{-}0.5).

  4. A Shapiro delay detection in the binary system hosting the millisecond pulsar PSR J1910-5959A

    CERN Document Server

    Corongiu, A; Possenti, A; Camilo, F; D'Amico, N; Lyne, A G; Manchester, R N; Sarkissian, J M; Bailes, M; Johnston, S; Kramer, M; van Straten, W

    2012-01-01

    PSR J1910-5959A is a binary pulsar with a helium white dwarf companion located about 6 arcmin from the center of the globular cluster NGC6752. Based on 12 years of observations at the Parkes radio telescope, the relativistic Shapiro delay has been detected in this system. We obtain a companion mass Mc = 0.180+/-0.018Msun (1sigma) implying that the pulsar mass lies in the range 1.1Msun <= Mp <= 1.5Msun. We compare our results with previous optical determinations of the companion mass, and examine prospects for using this new measurement for calibrating the mass-radius relation for helium white dwarfs and for investigating their evolution in a pulsar binary system. Finally we examine the set of binary systems hosting a millisecond pulsar and a low mass helium white dwarf for which the mass of both stars has been measured. We confirm that the correlation between the companion mass and the orbital period predicted by Tauris & Savonije reproduces the observed values but find that the predicted Mp - Pb co...

  5. The Probability Distribution of Binary Pulsar Coalescence Rates. I. Double Neutron Star Systems in the Galactic Field

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, C.; Kalogera, V.; Lorimer, D.R.

    2002-01-01

    Estimates of the Galactic coalescence rate (R) of close binaries with two neutron stars (NS-NS) are known to be uncertain by large factors (about two orders of magnitude) mainly due to the small number of systems detected as binary radio pulsars. We present an analysis method that allows us to estimate the Galactic NS-NS coalescence rate using the current observed sample and, importantly, to assign a statistical significance to these estimates and to calculate the allowed ranges of values at ...

  6. Multi-wavelength observations of the transitional millisecond pulsar binary XSSJ12270-4859

    CERN Document Server

    de Martino, Domitilla; Belloni, Tomaso; Burgay, Marta; Wilhelmi, Emma De Ona; Li, J; Pellizzoni, Alberto; Possenti, Andrea; Rea, Nanda; Torres, Diego F

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of X-ray, Ultraviolet and optical/near-IR photometric data of the transitional millisecond pulsar binary XSSJ12270-4859, obtained at different epochs after the transition to a rotation-powered radio pulsar state. The observations, while confirming the large-amplitude orbital modulation found in previous studies after the state change, also reveal an energy dependence of the amplitudes as well as variations on time scale of months. The amplitude variations are anti-correlated in the X-ray and the UV/optical bands. The average X-ray spectrum is described by a power law with \\Gamma index of 1.07(8) without requiring an additional thermal component. The power law index \\Gamma varies from 1.2 to 1.0 between superior and inferior conjunction of the neutron star. We interpret the observed X-ray behaviour in terms of synchrotron radiation emitted in an extended intrabinary shock, located between the pulsar and the donor star, which is eclipsed due to the companion orbital motion. The G5 type do...

  7. Modulated Gamma-ray emission from compact millisecond pulsar binary systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bednarek, W

    2013-01-01

    A significant amount of the millisecond pulsars has been discovered within binary systems. In several such binary systems the masses of the companion stars have been derived allowing to distinguish two classes of objects, called the Black Widow and the Redback binaries. Pulsars in these binary systems are expected to produce winds which, colliding with stellar winds, create conditions for acceleration of electrons. These electrons should interact with the anisotropic radiation from the companion stars producing gamma-ray emission modulated with the orbital period of the binary system. We consider the interaction of a millisecond pulsar (MSP) wind with a very inhomogeneous stellar wind from the companion star within binary systems of the Black Widow and Redback types. It is expected that the pulsar wind should mix efficiently with the inhomogeneous stellar wind. Electrons accelerated in such mixed, turbulent winds can interact with the magnetic field and also strong radiation from the companion star producing ...

  8. Precision astrometry of pulsars and other compact radio sources in the globular cluster M15

    CERN Document Server

    Kirsten, Franz; Freire, Paulo; Kramer, Michael; Rottmann, Helge; Campbell, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    The globular cluster (GC) M15 (NGC 7078) is host to at least eight pulsars and two low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) one of which is also visible in the radio regime. Here we present the results of a multi-epoch global very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) campaign aiming at i) measuring the proper motion of the known compact radio sources, ii) finding and classifying thus far undetected compact radio sources in the GC, and iii) detecting a signature of the putative intermediate mass black hole (IMBH) proposed to reside at the core of M15. We measure the sky motion in right ascension ($\\mu_{\\alpha}$) and declination ($\\mu_{\\delta}$) of the pulsars M15A and M15C and of the LMXB AC211 to be $(\\mu_{\\alpha},\\,\\mu_{\\delta})_{\\text{M15A}}=(-0.54\\pm0.14,\\,-4.33\\pm0.25)\\,$mas$\\,$yr$^{-1}$, $(\\mu_{\\alpha},\\,\\mu_{\\delta})_{\\text{M15C}}=(-0.75\\pm0.09,\\,-3.52\\pm0.13)\\,$mas$\\,$yr$^{-1}$, and $(\\mu_{\\alpha},\\,\\mu_{\\delta})_{\\text{AC211}}=(-0.46\\pm0.08,\\,-4.31\\pm0.20)\\,$mas$\\,$yr$^{-1}$, respectively. Based on these measur...

  9. Impact of the orbital uncertainties on the timing of pulsars in binary systems

    CERN Document Server

    Caliandro, G Andrea; Rea, Nanda

    2012-01-01

    The detection of pulsations from an X-ray binary is an unambiguous signature of the presence of a neutron star in the system. When the pulsations are missed in the radio band, their detection at other wavelengths, like X-ray or gamma-rays, requires orbital demodulation, since the length of the observations are often comparable to, or longer than the system orbital period. The detailed knowledge of the orbital parameters of binary systems plays a crucial role in the detection of the spin period of pulsars, since any uncertainty in their determination translates into a loss in the coherence of the signal during the demodulation process. In this paper, we present an analytical study aimed at unveiling how the uncertainties in the orbital parameters might impact on periodicity searches. We find a correlation between the power of the signal in the demodulated arrival time series and the uncertainty in each of the orbital parameters. This correlation is also a function of the pulsar frequency. We test our analytica...

  10. Fast Radio Burst Discovered in the Arecibo Pulsar ALFA Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Spitler, L G; Hessels, J W T; Lorimer, D R; McLaughlin, M A; Chatterjee, S; Crawford, F; Deneva, J S; Kaspi, V M; Wharton, R S; Allen, B; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Freire, P C C; Jenet, F A; Karako-Argaman, C; Knispel, B; Lazarus, P; Lee, K J; van Leeuwen, J; Lynch, R; Lyne, A G; Ransom, S M; Scholz, P; Siemens, X; Stairs, I H; Stovall, K; Swiggum, J K; Venkataraman, A; Zhu, W W; Aulbert, C; Fehrmann, H

    2014-01-01

    Recent work has exploited pulsar survey data to identify temporally isolated, millisecond-duration radio bursts with large dispersion measures (DMs). These bursts have been interpreted as arising from a population of extragalactic sources, in which case they would provide unprecedented opportunities for probing the intergalactic medium; they may also be linked to new source classes. Until now, however, all so-called fast radio bursts (FRBs) have been detected with the Parkes radio telescope and its 13-beam receiver, casting some concern about the astrophysical nature of these signals. Here we present FRB 121102, the first FRB discovery from a geographic location other than Parkes. FRB 121102 was found in the Galactic anti-center region in the 1.4-GHz Pulsar ALFA survey with the Arecibo Observatory with a DM = 557.4 $\\pm$ 3 pc cm$^{-3}$, pulse width of $3\\; \\pm 0.5$ ms, and no evidence of interstellar scattering. The observed delay of the signal arrival time with frequency agrees precisely with the expectation...

  11. A precise mass measurement of the intermediate-mass binary pulsar PSR J1802-2124

    CERN Document Server

    Ferdman, Robert D; Kramer, Michael; McLaughlin, Maura A; Lorimer, Duncan R; Nice, David J; Manchester, Richard N; Hobbs, George; Lyne, Andrew G; Camilo, Fernando; Possenti, Andrea; Demorest, Paul B; Cognard, Ismael; Desvignes, Gregory; Theureau, Gilles; Faulkner, Andrew; Backer, Donald C

    2010-01-01

    PSR J1802-2124 is a 12.6-ms pulsar in a 16.8-hour binary orbit with a relatively massive white dwarf (WD) companion. These properties make it a member of the intermediate-mass class of binary pulsar (IMBP) systems. We have been timing this pulsar since its discovery in 2002. Concentrated observations at the Green Bank Telescope, augmented with data from the Parkes and Nancay observatories, have allowed us to determine the general relativistic Shapiro delay. This has yielded pulsar and white dwarf mass measurements of 1.24(11) and 0.78(4) solar masses (68% confidence), respectively. The low mass of the pulsar, the high mass of the WD companion, the short orbital period, and the pulsar spin period may be explained by the system having gone through a common-envelope phase in its evolution. We argue that selection effects may contribute to the relatively small number of known IMBPs.

  12. Formation of black widows and redbacks -- two distinct populations of eclipsing binary millisecond pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Hai-Liang; Tauris, Thomas M; Han, Zhanwen

    2013-01-01

    Eclipsing binary millisecond pulsars (the so-called black widows and redbacks) can provide important information about accretion history, pulsar irradiation of their companion stars and the evolutionary link between accreting X-ray pulsars and isolated millisecond pulsars. However, the formation of such systems is not well understood, nor the difference in progenitor evolution between the two populations of black widows and redbacks. Whereas both populations have orbital periods between $0.1-1.0\\;{\\rm days}$ their companion masses differ by an order of magnitude. In this paper, we investigate the formation of these systems via evolution of converging low-mass X-ray binaries by employing the MESA stellar evolution code. Our results confirm that one can explain the formation of most of these eclipsing binary millisecond pulsars using this scenario. More notably, we find that the determining factor for producing either black widows or redbacks is the efficiency of the irradiation process, such that the redbacks ...

  13. Low-radio-frequency eclipses of the redback pulsar J2215+5135 observed in the image plane with LOFAR

    CERN Document Server

    Broderick, J W; Breton, R P; Stewart, A J; Rowlinson, A; Swinbank, J D; Hessels, J W T; Staley, T D; van der Horst, A J; Bell, M E; Carbone, D; Cendes, Y; Corbel, S; Eislöffel, J; Falcke, H; Grießmeier, J -M; Hassall, T E; Jonker, P; Kramer, M; Kuniyoshi, M; Law, C J; Markoff, S; Molenaar, G J; Pietka, M; Scheers, L H A; Serylak, M; Stappers, B W; ter Veen, S; van Leeuwen, J; Wijers, R A M J; Wijnands, R; Wise, M W; Zarka, P

    2016-01-01

    The eclipses of certain types of binary millisecond pulsars (i.e. `black widows' and `redbacks') are often studied using high-time-resolution, `beamformed' radio observations. However, they may also be detected in images generated from interferometric data. As part of a larger imaging project to characterize the variable and transient sky at radio frequencies <200 MHz, we have blindly detected the redback system PSR J2215+5135 as a variable source of interest with the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR). Using observations with cadences of 2 weeks - 6 months, we find preliminary evidence that the eclipse duration is frequency dependent ($\\propto \

  14. Searching for debris disks around seven radio pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhongxiang; Wang, Xuebing [Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Ng, C.-Y. [Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Li, Aigen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Kaplan, David L. [Physics Department, University of WisconsinMilwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    We report on our searches for debris disks around seven relatively nearby radio pulsars, which are isolated sources that were carefully selected as targets on the basis of our deep K{sub s} -band imaging survey. The K{sub s} images obtained with the 6.5 m Baade Magellan Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory are analyzed together with the Spitzer/IRAC images at 4.5 and 8.0 μm and the WISE images at 3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 μm. No infrared counterparts of these pulsars are found, with flux upper limits of ∼μJy at near-infrared (λ < 10 μm) and ∼10-1000 μJy at mid-infrared wavelengths (λ > 10 μm). The results of this search are discussed in terms of the efficiency of converting the pulsar spin-down energy to thermal energy and X-ray heating of debris disks, with a comparison made of the two magnetars 4U 0142+61 and 1E 2259+586, which are suggested to harbor a debris disk.

  15. European Pulsar Timing Array limits on continuous gravitational waves from individual supermassive slack hole binaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Babak; A. Petiteau; A. Sesana; P. Brem; P.A. Rosado; S.R. Taylor; A. Lassus; J.W.T. Hessels; C.G. Bassa; M. Burgay; R.N. Caballero; D.J. Champion; I. Cognard; G. Desvignes; J.R. Gair; L. Guillemot; G.H. Janssen; R. Karuppusamy; M. Kramer; P. Lazarus; K.J. Lee; L. Lentati; K. Liu; C.M.F. Mingarelli; S. Osłowski; D. Perrodin; A. Possenti; M.B. Purver; S. Sanidas; R. Smits; B. Stappers; G. Theureau; C. Tiburzi; R. van Haasteren; A. Vecchio; J.P.W. Verbiest

    2015-01-01

    We have searched for continuous gravitational wave (CGW) signals produced by individually resolvable, circular supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) in the latest European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA) data set, which consists of ultraprecise timing data on 41-ms pulsars. We develop frequentist and

  16. Formation of the Radio Profile Components of the Crab Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Petrova, S A

    2009-01-01

    The induced Compton scattering of radio emission off the particles of the ultrarelativistic electron-positron plasma in the open field line tube of a pulsar is considered. We examine the scattering of a bright narrow radio beam into the background over a wide solid angle and specifically study the scattering in the transverse regime, which holds in a moderately strong magnetic field. Making use of the angular distribution of the scattered intensity and taking into account the effect of rotational aberration in the scattering region, we simulate the profiles of the backscattered components as applied to the Crab pulsar. It is suggested that the interpulse (IP), the high-frequency interpulse (IP') and the pair of the so-called high-frequency components (HFC1 and HFC2) result from the backward scattering of the main pulse (MP), precursor (PR) and the low-frequency component (LFC), respectively. The components of the high-frequency profiles, the IP' and HFCs, are interpreted for the first time. The HFC1 and HFC2 ...

  17. An Eccentric Binary Millisecond Pulsar with a Helium White Dwarf Companion in the Galactic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniadis, John; Kaplan, David L.; Stovall, Kevin; Freire, Paulo C. C.; Deneva, Julia S.; Koester, Detlev; Jenet, Fredrick; Martinez, Jose G.

    2016-10-01

    Low-mass white dwarfs (LMWDs) are believed to be exclusive products of binary evolution, as the universe is not old enough to produce them from single stars. Because of the strong tidal forces operating during the binary interaction phase, the remnant systems observed today are expected to have negligible eccentricities. Here, we report on the first unambiguous identification of an LMWD in an eccentric (e = 0.13) orbit around the millisecond pulsar PSR J2234+0511, which directly contradicts this picture. We use our spectra and radio-timing solution (derived elsewhere) to infer the WD temperature ({T}{{eff}}=8600+/- 190 K), and peculiar systemic velocity relative to the local standard of rest (≃ 31 km s‑1). We also place model-independent constraints on the WD radius ({R}{{WD}}={0.024}-0.002+0.004 {R}ȯ ) and surface gravity ({log} g={7.11}-0.16+0.08 dex). The WD and kinematic properties are consistent with the expectations for low-mass X-ray binary evolution and disfavor a dynamic three-body formation channel. In the case of the high eccentricity being the result of a spontaneous phase transition, we infer a mass of ∼1.60 M ⊙ for the pulsar progenitor, which is too low for the quark-nova mechanism proposed by Jiang et al., and too high for the scenario of Freire & Tauris, in which a WD collapses into a neutron star via a rotationally delayed accretion-induced collapse. We find that eccentricity pumping via interaction with a circumbinary disk is consistent with our inferred parameters. Finally, we report tentative evidence for pulsations that, if confirmed, would transform the star into an unprecedented laboratory for WD physics.

  18. Pulsars revived by gravitational waves

    OpenAIRE

    Lipunov, Vladimir M.; Panchenko, Ivan E.

    1996-01-01

    Binary neutron stars mergers that are expected to be the most powerful source of energy in the Universe definitely exist in nature, as is proven by the observed behavior of the Hulse-Taylor binary radio pulsar. Though most of energy in such events is radiated in gravitational waves, there probably exist several mechanisms giving also electromagnetic radiation. We propose a new one, involving a revival of the radio pulsar several orbital cycles before the merger.

  19. Fast radio burst discovered in the Arecibo pulsar ALFA survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitler, L. G.; Freire, P. C. C.; Lazarus, P.; Lee, K. J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Cordes, J. M.; Chatterjee, S.; Wharton, R. S.; Brazier, A. [Department of Astronomy and Space Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Hessels, J. W. T. [ASTRON, Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA, Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Lorimer, D. R.; McLaughlin, M. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Crawford, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, PA 17604-3003 (United States); Deneva, J. S. [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Kaspi, V. M.; Karako-Argaman, C. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Allen, B. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Bogdanov, S.; Camilo, F. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Jenet, F. A. [Center for Gravitational Wave Astronomy, University of Texas at Brownsville, Brownsville, TX 78520 (United States); Knispel, B., E-mail: lspitler@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de [Leibniz Universität, Hannover, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); and others

    2014-08-01

    Recent work has exploited pulsar survey data to identify temporally isolated, millisecond-duration radio bursts with large dispersion measures (DMs). These bursts have been interpreted as arising from a population of extragalactic sources, in which case they would provide unprecedented opportunities for probing the intergalactic medium; they may also be linked to new source classes. Until now, however, all so-called fast radio bursts (FRBs) have been detected with the Parkes radio telescope and its 13-beam receiver, casting some concern about the astrophysical nature of these signals. Here we present FRB 121102, the first FRB discovery from a geographic location other than Parkes. FRB 121102 was found in the Galactic anti-center region in the 1.4 GHz Pulsar Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFA) survey with the Arecibo Observatory with a DM = 557.4 ± 2.0 pc cm{sup –3}, pulse width of 3.0 ± 0.5 ms, and no evidence of interstellar scattering. The observed delay of the signal arrival time with frequency agrees precisely with the expectation of dispersion through an ionized medium. Despite its low Galactic latitude (b = –0.°2), the burst has three times the maximum Galactic DM expected along this particular line of sight, suggesting an extragalactic origin. A peculiar aspect of the signal is an inverted spectrum; we interpret this as a consequence of being detected in a sidelobe of the ALFA receiver. FRB 121102's brightness, duration, and the inferred event rate are all consistent with the properties of the previously detected Parkes bursts.

  20. Radio pulsars around intermediate mass black holes in super stellar clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Patruno, A; Faulkner, A J; Possenti, A

    2005-01-01

    We study accretion in binaries hosting an intermediate mass black hole (IMBH) of 1000 solar masses, and a donor star more massive than 15 solar masses. These systems experience an active X-ray phase characterized by luminosities varying over a wide interval, from <10^36 erg/s up to a few 10^40 erg/s typical of the ultra luminous X-ray sources (ULXs). Roche lobe overflow on the zero-age main sequence and donor masses above 20 solar masses can maintain a long-lived accretion phase at the level required to feed a ULX source. In wide systems, wind transfer rates are magnified by the focusing action of the IMBH yielding wind luminosities around 10^38 erg/s. These high mass-IMBH binaries can be identified as progenitors of IMBH-radio pulsar (PSR) binaries. We find that the formation of an IMBH-PSR binary does not necessarely require the transit through a ULX phase, but that a ULX can highlight a system that will evolve into an IMBH-PSR, if the mass of the donor star is constrained to lie within 15 to 30 solar ma...

  1. An eccentric binary millisecond pulsar with a helium white dwarf companion in the Galactic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadis, John; Stovall, Kevin; Freire, Paulo C; Deneva, Julia S; Koester, Detlev; Jenet, Frederick; Martinez, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Low-mass white dwarfs (LMWDs) are believed to be exclusive products of binary evolution, as the Universe is not yet old enough to produce them from single stars. Because of the strong tidal forces operating during the binary interaction phase, the remnant host systems observed today are expected to have negligible eccentricities. Here, we report on the first unambiguous identification of a LMWD in an eccentric (e=0.13) orbit with a millisecond pulsar, which directly contradicts this picture. We use our spectra and radio-timing solution (derived elsewhere) to infer the WD temperature T_eff = 8600 +/- 190 K) and 3D systemic velocity (179.5 km\\s). We also place model-independent constraints on the WD radius (R_WD = 0.024+/- 0.004/0.002 R_sun) and surface gravity (log g = 7.11 +/- 0.08/0.16 dex). The WD and kinematic properties are consistent with the expectations for low-mass X-ray binary evolution and disfavour a three-body formation channel. In the case of the high eccentricity being the result of a spontaneou...

  2. Blind search for radio-quiet and radio-loud gamma-ray pulsars with Fermi-LAT data

    CERN Document Server

    Rubtsov, G I

    2014-01-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has observed more than a hundred of gamma-ray pulsars, about one third of which are radio-quiet, i.e. not detected at radio frequencies. The most of radio-loud pulsars are detected by Fermi LAT by using the radio timing models, while the radio-quiet ones are discovered in a blind search. The difference in the techniques introduces an observational selection bias and, consequently, the direct comparison of populations is complicated. In order to produce an unbiased sample, we perform a blind search of gamma-ray pulsations using Fermi-LAT data alone. No radio data or observations at optical or X-ray frequencies are involved in the search process. We produce a gamma-ray selected catalog of 25 non-recycled gamma-ray pulsars found in a blind search, including 16 radio-quiet and 9 radio-loud pulsars. This results in the direct measurement of the fraction of radio-quiet pulsars $\\varepsilon_{RQ} = 64\\pm 10\\%$, which is in agreement with the existing estimates from the population ...

  3. Radio-quiet and radio-loud pulsars: similar in Gamma-rays but different in X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Marelli, M; De Luca, A; Parkinson, P M Saz; Salvetti, D; Hartog, P R Den; Wolff, M T

    2015-01-01

    We present new Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of a sample of eight radio-quiet Gamma-ray pulsars detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. For all eight pulsars we identify the X-ray counterpart, based on the X-ray source localization and the best position obtained from Gamma-ray pulsar timing. For PSR J2030+4415 we found evidence for an about 10 arcsec-long pulsar wind nebula. Our new results consolidate the work from Marelli et al. 2011 and confirm that, on average, the Gamma-ray--to--X-ray flux ratios (Fgamma/Fx) of radio-quiet pulsars are higher than for the radio-loud ones. Furthermore, while the Fgamma/Fx distribution features a single peak for the radio-quiet pulsars, the distribution is more dispersed for the radio-loud ones, possibly showing two peaks. We discuss possible implications of these different distributions based on current models for pulsar X-ray emission.

  4. On radio emission of the Geminga pulsar and RBS 1223 at the frequency of 111 MHz

    CERN Document Server

    Ershov, Alexander A

    2007-01-01

    I have searched for pulsed radio emission from the Geminga pulsar and for the nearby isolated neutron star 1RX J1308.6+2127 (RBS 1223) at the frequency of 111 MHz. No pulsed signals were detected from these sources. Upper limits for mean flux density are 0.4 - 4 mJy for the Geminga pulsar and 1.5 - 15 mJy for RBS 1223 depending on assumed duty cycle (.05 - .5) of the pulsars.

  5. The birth of radio millisecond pulsars and their high-energy signature

    CERN Document Server

    Tam, P H T; Kong, A K H; Takata, J; Leung, G C K; Cheng, K S; Hui, C Y

    2014-01-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are thought to born in low-mass X-ray binaries when the neutron star has gained enough angular momentum from the accreting materials of its companion star. It is generally believed that a radio MSP is born when the neutron star stops accreting and enters a rotation-powered state. Exactly what happens during the transition time was poorly understood until a year ago. In the past year, observations have revealed a few objects that not only switched from one state to the other (as predicted in the above picture), but also have swung between the two states within weeks to years. In this work, we present observations of two of these transition objects (PSR J1023+0038 and XSS J12270-4859) and a theoretical framework that tries to explain their high-energy radiation.

  6. Stokes tomography of radio pulsar magnetospheres. I. Linear polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, C T Y

    2010-01-01

    Polarimetric studies of pulsar radio emission traditionally concentrate on how the Stokes vector (I, Q, U, V) varies with pulse longitude, with special emphasis on the position angle (PA) swing of the linearly polarized component. The interpretation of the PA swing in terms of the rotating vector model is limited by the assumption of an axisymmetric magnetic field and the degeneracy of the output with respect to the orientation and magnetic geometry of the pulsar; different combinations of the latter two properties can produce similar PA swings. This paper introduces Stokes phase portraits as a supplementary diagnostic tool with which the orientation and magnetic geometry can be inferred more accurately. The Stokes phase portraits feature unique patterns in the I-Q, I-U, and Q-U planes, whose shapes depend sensitively on the magnetic geometry, inclination angle, beam and polarization patterns, and emission altitude. We construct look-up tables of Stokes phase portraits and PA swings for pure and current-modif...

  7. Galactic populations of radio and gamma-ray pulsars in the polar cap model

    CERN Document Server

    Gonthier, P L; Berrier, J; O'Brien, S; Harding, A K; Gonthier, Peter L.; Ouellette, Michelle S.; Berrier, Joel; Brien, Shawn O'; Harding, Alice K.

    2001-01-01

    We simulate the characteristics of the Galactic population of radio and $\\gamma$-ray pulsars using Monte Carlo techniques. At birth, neutron stars are spatially distributed in the Galactic disk, with supernova-kick velocities, and randomly dispersed in age back to $10^9$ years. They are evolved in the Galactic gravitational potential to the present time. From a radio luminosity model, the radio flux is filtered through a selected set of radio-survey parameters. $\\gamma$-ray luminosities are assigned using the features of recent polar cap acceleration models invoking space-charge-limited flow, and a pulsar death valley further attenuates the population of radio-loud pulsars. Assuming a simple emission geometry with aligned radio and $\\gamma$-ray beams of 1 steradian solid angle, our model predicts that EGRET should have seen 7 radio-loud and 1 radio-quiet, $\\gamma$-ray pulsars. With much improved sensitivity, GLAST, on the other hand, is expected to observe 76 radio-loud and 74 radio-quiet, $\\gamma$-ray pulsar...

  8. Assessing the effects of timing irregularities on radio pulsars anomalous braking indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukwude, A. E.; Chidi Odo, Finbarr

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the statistical effects of non-discrete timing irregularities on observed radio pulsar braking indices using correlations between the second derivative of the measured anomalous frequency (̈νobs) and some parameters that have been widely used to quantify pulsar timing fluctuations (the timing activity parameter (A), the amount of timing fluctuations absorbed by the cubic term (σR23) and a measure of pulsar rotational stability (σz)) in a large sample of 366 Jodrell Bank Observatory radio pulsars. The result demonstrates that anomalous braking indices are largely artifacts produced by aggregations of fluctuations that occur within or outside the pulsar system. For a subsample of 223 normal radio pulsars whose observed timing activity appeared consistent with instabilities in rotation of the underlying neutron stars (or timing noise) over timescales of ˜ 10 – 40 yr, |̈νobs| strongly correlates (with correlation coefficient |r| ˜ 0.80 – 0.90) with the pulsar timing activity parameters and spin-down properties. On the other hand, no meaningful correlations (r objects, whose timing activity appears significantly dominated by white noise fluctuations. The current result can be better understood if the timing noise in isolated pulsars originates from intrinsic spin-down processes of the underlying neutron stars, but white noise fluctuations largely arise from processes external to the pulsar system.

  9. Pulsar wind model of close massive gamma-ray binaries: The influence of geometry in the pulsar wind zone processes

    CERN Document Server

    Sierpowska-Bartosik, Agnieszka

    2008-01-01

    Several gamma-ray binaries have been recently detected by the High-Energy Stereoscopy Array (H.E.S.S.) and the Major Atmospheric Imaging Cerenkov (MAGIC) telescope. In at least two cases, their nature is unknown, since a distinctive, final observational feature for a black hole or a pulsar compact object companion is still missing. In this paper we aim to provide the details of a theoretical model of close gamma-ray binaries containing a young energetic pulsar as compact object. This model includes a detailed account of the system geometry, the angular dependence of processes such as Klein-Nishina inverse Compton and gamma-gamma absorption, and a Monte Carlo simulation of cascading. We present and derive the used formulae and give all details about their numerical implementation, particularly, on the computation of cascades. In this model, emphasis is put in the processes occurring in the pulsar wind zone of the binary, i.e., the region between the pulsar and the shock in between of the two stars, since as we...

  10. Linear-drifting sub-pulse sources in radio pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, P B

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of plasma acceleration in pulsars with positive corotational charge density has shown that any element of area on the polar cap is bi-stable: it can be in phases either of pure proton emission or of mixed ions and protons (the ion phase). Ion-phase zones are concentrated near the edge of the polar cap, and are a physical basis for the coherent radio emission observed as components within the mean pulse profile. The state of the polar cap is generally chaotic, but organized linear motion of ion zones in a peripheral band is possible and is the likely source of sub-pulse drift. It is shown that several patterns of limited movement are possible and can account for the varied phenomena observed including mirror and bi-directional drifting.

  11. The GBT350 survey of the Northern Galactic Plane for radio pulsars and transients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W.T. Hessels; S.M. Ransom; V.M. Kaspi; M.S.E. Roberts; D.J. Champion; B.W. Stappers

    2007-01-01

    Using the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) and Pulsar Spigot at 350 MHz, we have surveyed the Northern Galactic Plane for pulsars and radio transients. This survey covers roughly 1000 square degrees of sky within 75°

  12. Match filtering approach for signal acquisition in radio-pulsar navigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heusdens, R.; Engelen, S.; Buist, P.J.; Noroozi, A.; Sundaramoorthy, P.P.; Verhoeven, C.J.M.; Bentum, M.; Gill, E.K.A.

    2012-01-01

    Pulsars with their periodic pulses and known positions are ideal beacons for navigation. The challenge, however, is the detection of the very weak pulsar signals that are submerged in noise. Radio based approaches allow the use of advanced techniques and methods for the detection and acquisition of

  13. A search for dispersed radio bursts in archival Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey data

    CERN Document Server

    Bagchi, Manjari; McLaughlin, Maura

    2012-01-01

    A number of different classes of potentially extra-terrestrial bursts of radio emission have been observed in surveys with the Parkes 64m radio telescope, including "Rotating Radio Transients", the "Lorimer burst" and "perytons". Rotating Radio Transients are radio pulsars which are best detectable in single-pulse searches. The Lorimer burst is a highly dispersed isolated radio burst with properties suggestive of extragalactic origin. Perytons share the frequency-swept nature of the Rotating Radio Transients and Lorimer burst, but unlike these events appear in all thirteen beams of the Parkes Multibeam receiver and are probably a form of peculiar radio frequency interference. In order to constrain these and other radio source populations further, we searched the archival Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey data for events similar to any of these. We did not find any new Rotating Radio Transients or bursts like the Lorimer burst. We did, however, discover four peryton-like events. Similar to the perytons, these fou...

  14. Low-radio-frequency eclipses of the redback pulsar J2215+5135 observed in the image plane with LOFAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, J. W.; Fender, R. P.; Breton, R. P.; Stewart, A. J.; Rowlinson, A.; Swinbank, J. D.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Staley, T. D.; van der Horst, A. J.; Bell, M. E.; Carbone, D.; Cendes, Y.; Corbel, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Falcke, H.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Hassall, T. E.; Jonker, P.; Kramer, M.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Law, C. J.; Markoff, S.; Molenaar, G. J.; Pietka, M.; Scheers, L. H. A.; Serylak, M.; Stappers, B. W.; ter Veen, S.; van Leeuwen, J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wijnands, R.; Wise, M. W.; Zarka, P.

    2016-07-01

    The eclipses of certain types of binary millisecond pulsars (i.e. `black widows' and `redbacks') are often studied using high-time-resolution, `beamformed' radio observations. However, they may also be detected in images generated from interferometric data. As part of a larger imaging project to characterize the variable and transient sky at radio frequencies <200 MHz, we have blindly detected the redback system PSR J2215+5135 as a variable source of interest with the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR). Using observations with cadences of two weeks - six months, we find preliminary evidence that the eclipse duration is frequency dependent (∝ν-0.4), such that the pulsar is eclipsed for longer at lower frequencies, in broad agreement with beamformed studies of other similar sources. Furthermore, the detection of the eclipses in imaging data suggests an eclipsing medium that absorbs the pulsed emission, rather than scattering it. Our study is also a demonstration of the prospects of finding pulsars in wide-field imaging surveys with the current generation of low-frequency radio telescopes.

  15. Shining Light on Quantum Gravity with Pulsar-Black Hole Binaries

    OpenAIRE

    Estes, John; Kavic, Michael; Lippert, Matthew; Simonetti, John H.

    2016-01-01

    Pulsars are some of the most accurate clocks found in nature, while black holes offer a unique arena for the study of quantum gravity. As such, pulsar-black hole (PSR-BH) binaries provide ideal astrophysical systems for detecting effects of quantum gravity. With the success of aLIGO and the advent of instruments like the SKA and eLISA, the prospects for discovery of such PSR-BH binaries are very promising. We argue that PSR-BH binaries can serve as ready-made testing grounds for proposed reso...

  16. Modelling the $\\gamma$-ray and radio light curves of the double pulsar system

    CERN Document Server

    Seyffert, A S; Harding, A K; Johnson, T J

    2014-01-01

    Guillemot et al. recently reported the discovery of $\\gamma$-ray pulsations from the 22.7ms pulsar (pulsar A) in the famous double pulsar system J0737-3039A/B. The $\\gamma$-ray light curve (LC) of pulsar A has two peaks separated by approximately half a rotation, and these are non-coincident with the observed radio and X-ray peaks. This suggests that the $\\gamma$-ray emission originates in a part of the magnetosphere distinct from where the radio and X-ray radiation is generated. Thus far, three different methods have been applied to constrain the viewing geometry of pulsar A (its inclination and observer angles $\\alpha$ and $\\zeta$): geometric modelling of the radio and $\\gamma$-ray light curves, modelling of the position angle sweep in phase seen in the radio polarisation data, and independent studies of the time evolution of the radio pulse profile of pulsar A. These three independent, complementary methods have yielded consistent results: pulsar A's rotation axis is likely perpendicular to the orbital pla...

  17. Gamma-rays from nebulae around binary systems containing energetic rotation powered pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Bednarek, W

    2013-01-01

    We consider nebulae which are created around binary systems containing rotation powered pulsars and companion stars with strong stellar winds. It is proposed that the stellar and pulsar winds have to mix at some distance from the binary system, defined by the orbital period of the companion stars and the velocity of the stellar wind. The mixed pulsar-stellar wind expands with a specific velocity determined by the pulsar power and the mass loss rate of the companion star. Relativistic particles, either from the inner pulsar magnetosphere and/or accelerated at the shocks between stellar and pulsar winds, are expected to be captured and isotropized in the reference frame of the mixed wind. Therefore, they can efficiently comptonize stellar radiation producing GeV-TeV $\\gamma$-rays in the inverse Compton process. We calculate the $\\gamma$-ray spectra expected in such scenario for the two example binary systems: J1816+4510 which is the redback type millisecond binary and LS 5039 which is supposed to contain energe...

  18. A compact pulsar wind nebula model of the gamma-ray loud binary LS I +61 303

    CERN Document Server

    Zdziarski, A A; Chernyakova, M

    2008-01-01

    We study a model of of the binary system LS I +61 303 in which its radio to TeV emission is due to interaction of a relativistic wind from a pulsar with the wind from a Be star. The fast polar wind is clumpy, which causes the two winds to mix. The relativistic electrons from the pulsar wind are retained in the clumps by magnetic field inhomogeneities, which explains the X-ray variability on time scales much shorter than the orbital period. The second stellar-wind component is a dense equatorial disc around the Be star. The energy losses of the radio and X-ray emitting relativistic electrons are dominated by Coulomb interactions within the disc, causing radio and X-ray orbital modulations. A likely mechanism of the TeV orbital modulation is an emission anisotropy, with preferred directions along the surface of equal ram pressures of the two winds. We consider two models for the observed superorbital variability of the radio emission from the system, with the period of 4-5 years. One model involves precession o...

  19. A radio pulsing white dwarf binary star

    CERN Document Server

    Marsh, T R; Hümmerich, S; Hambsch, F -J; Bernhard, K; Lloyd, C; Breedt, E; Stanway, E R; Steeghs, D T; Parsons, S G; Toloza, O; Schreiber, M R; Jonker, P G; van Roestel, J; Kupfer, T; Pala, A F; Dhillon, V S; Hardy, L K; Littlefair, S P; Aungwerojwit, A; Arjyotha, S; Koester, D; Bochinski, J J; Haswell, C A; Frank, P; Wheatley, P J

    2016-01-01

    White dwarfs are compact stars, similar in size to Earth but ~200,000 times more massive. Isolated white dwarfs emit most of their power from ultraviolet to near-infrared wavelengths, but when in close orbits with less dense stars, white dwarfs can strip material from their companions, and the resulting mass transfer can generate atomic line and X-ray emission, as well as near- and mid-infrared radiation if the white dwarf is magnetic. However, even in binaries, white dwarfs are rarely detected at far-infrared or radio frequencies. Here we report the discovery of a white dwarf / cool star binary that emits from X-ray to radio wavelengths. The star, AR Scorpii (henceforth AR Sco), was classified in the early 1970s as a delta-Scuti star, a common variety of periodic variable star. Our observations reveal instead a 3.56 hr period close binary, pulsing in brightness on a period of 1.97 min. The pulses are so intense that AR Sco's optical flux can increase by a factor of four within 30 s, and they are detectable a...

  20. NEW DISCOVERIES FROM THE ARECIBO 327 MHz DRIFT PULSAR SURVEY RADIO TRANSIENT SEARCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deneva, J. S. [National Research Council, resident at the Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Stovall, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); McLaughlin, M. A.; Bagchi, M.; Garver-Daniels, N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Bates, S. D. [The Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Chennai, 600113 (India); Freire, P. C. C.; Martinez, J. G. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Bonn (Germany); Jenet, F. [Center for Advanced Radio Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at Brownsville, Brownsville, TX 78520 (United States)

    2016-04-10

    We present Clusterrank, a new algorithm for identifying dispersed astrophysical pulses. Such pulses are commonly detected from Galactic pulsars and rotating radio transients (RRATs), which are neutron stars with sporadic radio emission. More recently, isolated, highly dispersed pulses dubbed fast radio bursts (FRBs) have been identified as the potential signature of an extragalactic cataclysmic radio source distinct from pulsars and RRATs. Clusterrank helped us discover 14 pulsars and 8 RRATs in data from the Arecibo 327 MHz Drift Pulsar Survey (AO327). The new RRATs have DMs in the range 23.5–86.6 pc cm{sup −3} and periods in the range 0.172–3.901 s. The new pulsars have DMs in the range 23.6–133.3 pc cm{sup −3} and periods in the range 1.249–5.012 s, and include two nullers and a mode-switching object. We estimate an upper limit on the all-sky FRB rate of 10{sup 5} day{sup −1} for bursts with a width of 10 ms and flux density ≳83 mJy. The DMs of all new discoveries are consistent with a Galactic origin. In comparing statistics of the new RRATs with sources from the RRATalog, we find that both sets are drawn from the same period distribution. In contrast, we find that the period distribution of the new pulsars is different from the period distributions of canonical pulsars in the ATNF catalog or pulsars found in AO327 data by a periodicity search. This indicates that Clusterrank is a powerful complement to periodicity searches and uncovers a subset of the pulsar population that has so far been underrepresented in survey results and therefore in Galactic pulsar population models.

  1. HIGH-PRECISION TIMING OF FIVE MILLISECOND PULSARS: SPACE VELOCITIES, BINARY EVOLUTION, AND EQUIVALENCE PRINCIPLES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present high-precision timing of five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) carried out for more than seven years; four pulsars are in binary systems and one is isolated. We are able to measure the pulsars' proper motions and derive an estimate for their space velocities. The measured two-dimensional velocities are in the range 70-210 km s–1, consistent with those measured for other MSPs. We also use all the available proper motion information for isolated and binary MSPs to update the known velocity distribution for these populations. As found by earlier works, we find that the velocity distribution of binary and isolated MSPs are indistinguishable with the current data. Four of the pulsars in our observing program are highly recycled with low-mass white dwarf companions and we are able to derive accurate binary parameters for these systems. For three of these binary systems, we are able to place initial constraints on the pulsar masses with best-fit values in the range 1.0-1.6 M☉. The implications of the results presented here to our understanding of binary pulsar evolution are discussed. The updated parameters for the binary systems studied here, together with recently discovered similar systems, allowed us to update previous limits on the violation of the strong equivalence principle through the parameter |Δ| to 4.6 × 10–3 (95% confidence) and the violation of Lorentz invariance/momentum conservation through the parameter |α-hat3| to 5.5 × 10–20 (95% confidence).

  2. Spectral indices for radio emission of 228 pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jun; Wang, Chen; Xu, Jun; Han, Jin-Lin

    2016-10-01

    We determine spectral indices of 228 pulsars by using Parkes pulsar data observed at 1.4 GHz, among which 200 spectra are newly determined. The indices are distributed in the range from ‑4.84 to ‑0.46. Together with known pulsar spectra from literature, we tried to find clues to the pulsar emission process. The weak correlations between the spectral index, the spin-down energy loss rate E and the potential drop in the polar gap ΔΨ hint that emission properties are related to the particle acceleration process in a pulsar's magnetosphere.

  3. The LOFAR search for radio pulsars and fast transients in M33, M81 & M82

    CERN Document Server

    Mikhailov, K

    2016-01-01

    The radio pulsar and rotating radio transient populations are only known in and near the Milky Way. Investigating such populations in other galaxies requires deep pulsar and transient searches. We have performed 4-h radio observations of nearby galaxies M33, M81 and M82 with LOFAR. Our main purpose was to characterise the bright end of the pulsar population in other galaxies, and compare it to that of the Milky Way. We searched for extragalactic radio pulsars through a periodic-pulse search, and for sporadic fast radio transients through a single-pulse search. We coherently combined 24 LOFAR Core High-Band Antenna (HBA) stations and covered M33, M81, and M82 in their entirety using multiple tied-array beams. No pulsating sources or single pulses were found. We therefore have established stricter limits on the extragalactic pulsar flux density at lower frequencies than those obtained in previous Arecibo and WSRT searches. We conclude that in nearby galaxies M33, M81, and M82 there are no pulsars shining toward...

  4. 2FGL J1653.6-0159: A New Low in Evaporating Pulsar Binary Periods

    CERN Document Server

    Romani, Roger W; Cenko, S Bradley

    2014-01-01

    We have identified an optical binary with orbital period P_b=4488s as the probable counterpart of the Fermi source 2FGL J1653.6-0159. Although pulsations have not yet been detected, the source properties are consistent with an evaporating millisecond pulsar binary; this P_b=75min is the record low for a spin-powered system. The heated side of the companion shows coherent radial velocity variations, with amplitude K=666.9+/-7.5 km/s for a large mass function of f(M)=1.60+/-0.05 M_sun. This heating suggests a pulsar luminosity ~3x10^34 erg/s. The colors and spectra show additional hard emission dominating at binary minimum. This system is similar to PSR J1311-3430, with a low mass H-depleted companion, a dense shrouding wind and, likely, a large pulsar mass.

  5. Searching for GW signals from eccentric supermassive black-hole binaries with pulsar-timing arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Stephen; Gair, Jonathan; Huerta, Eliu; McWilliams, Sean

    2015-04-01

    The mergers of massive galaxies leads to the formation of supermassive black-hole binaries in the common merger remnants. Various mechanisms have been proposed to harden these binaries into the adiabatic GW inspiral regime, from interactions with circumbinary disks to stellar scattering. It may be the case that these mechanisms leave the binary with a residual eccentricity, such that the deviation to the time-of-arrival of pulsar signals induced by the emitted GW passing between the Earth and a pulsar will contain a signature of this eccentricity. Current pulsar-timing search pipelines only probe circular binary systems, but much effort is now being devoted to considering the influence of the binary environment on GW signals. We will detail our efforts in constructing a generalised GW search pipeline to constrain the eccentricity of single systems with arrays of precisely-timed pulsars, which may shed light on the influence of various supermassive black-hole binary hardening mechanisms and illuminate the importance of environmental couplings.

  6. X-ray emission from the double neutron star binary B1534+12: Powered by the pulsar wind?

    CERN Document Server

    Kargaltsev, O; Garmire, G P

    2006-01-01

    We report the detection of the double neutron star binary (DNSB) B1534+12 (= J1537+1155) with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. This DNSB (orbital period 10.1 hr) consists of the millisecond (recycled) pulsar J1537+1155A (P_A=37.9 ms) and a neutron star not detected in the radio. After the remarkable double pulsar binary J0737-3039, it is the only other DNSB detected in X-rays. We measured the flux of (2.2\\pm 0.6)\\times10^{-15} ergs s^{-1} cm^{-2} in the 0.3-6 keV band. The small number of collected counts allows only crude estimates of spectral parameters. The power-law fit yields the photon index of 3.2\\pm 0.5 and the unabsorbed 0.2-10 keV luminosity L_X=6\\times10^{29} ergs s^{-1} = 3\\times 10^{-4}Edot_A, where Edot_A is the spin-down power of J1537+1155A. Alternatively, the spectrum can be fitted by a blackbody model with T = 2.2 MK and the projected emitting area of ~ 5\\times 10^3 m^2. The distribution of photon arrival times over binary orbital phase shows a deficit of X-ray emission around apastron, which ...

  7. Dispersion by pulsars, magnetars, fast radio bursts and massive electromagnetism at very low radio frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Bentum, Mark J; Spallicci, Alessandro D A M

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of the universe relies mostly on electromagnetism. As photons are the messengers, fundamental physics is concerned in testing their properties. Photon mass upper limits have been earlier set through pulsar observations, but new investigations are offered by the excess of dispersion measure (DM) sometimes observed with pulsar and magnetar data at low frequencies, or with the fast radio bursts (FRBs), of yet unknown origin. Arguments for the excess of DM do not reach a consensus, but are not mutually exclusive. Thus, we remind that for massive electromagnetism, dispersion goes as the inverse of the frequency squared. Thereby, new avenues are offered also by the recently operating ground observatories in 10-80 MHz domain and by the proposed Orbiting Low Frequency Antennas for Radio astronomy (OLFAR). The latter acts as a large aperture dish by employing a swarm of nano-satellites observing the sky for the first time in the 0.1 - 15 MHz spectrum. The swarm must be deployed sufficiently away from...

  8. New millisecond pulsars detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope and the radio/gamma-ray connection

    CERN Document Server

    Espinoza, C M; Celik, O; Weltevrede, P; Stappers, B W; Smith, D A; Kerr, M; Zavlin, V E; Cognard, I; Eatough, R P; Freire, P C C; Janssen, G H; Camilo, F; Desvignes, G; Hewitt, J W; Hou, X; Johnston, S; Keith, M; Kramer, M; Lyne, A; Manchester, R N; Ransom, S M; Ray, P S; Shannon, R; Theureau, G; Webb, N

    2012-01-01

    We report on the discovery of gamma-ray pulsations from five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) using the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and timing ephemerides provided by various radio observatories. We also present confirmation of the gamma-ray pulsations from a sixth source, PSR J2051-0827. Five of these six MSPs are in binary systems: PSRs J1713+0747, J1741+1351, J1600-3053 and the two black widow binary pulsars PSRs J0610-2100 and 2051-0827. The only isolated MSP is the nearby PSR J1024-0719, which is also known to emit X-rays. We present X-ray observations in the direction of PSRs J1600-3053 and J2051-0827. While the latter is firmly detected, we an only give upper limits for the X-ray flux of the former. There are no dedicated X-ray observations available for the other 3 objects. The MSPs mentioned above, together with most of the MSPs detected by Fermi, are used to put together a sample of 30 gamma-ray MSPs which is used to study the morphology and phase connection of radio and gamma-ray pulse profiles. We ...

  9. Pulsars in Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Camilo, F; Camilo, Fernando; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2005-01-01

    More than 100 radio pulsars have been detected in 24 globular clusters. The largest observed samples are in Terzan 5 and 47 Tucanae, which together contain 45 pulsars. Accurate timing solutions, including positions in the cluster, are known for many of these pulsars. Here we provide an observational overview of some properties of pulsars in globular clusters, as well as properties of the globular clusters with detected pulsars. The many recent detections also provide a new opportunity to re-examine theoretically the formation and evolution of recycled pulsars in globular clusters. Our brief review considers the most important dynamical interaction and binary evolution processes: collisions, exchange interactions, mass transfer, and common-envelope phases.

  10. Precession of the Orbital Plane of Binary Pulsars and Significant Variabilities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bi-Ping Gong

    2005-01-01

    There are two ways of expressing the precession of orbital plane of a binary pulsar system, given by Barker & O'Connell, Apostolatos et al. and Kidder, respectively. We point out that these two ways actually come from the same Lagrangian under different degrees of freedom. Damour & Schafer and Wex & Kopeikin applied Barker & O'Connell's orbital precession velocity in pulsar timing measurement. This paper applies Apostolatos et al.'s and Kidder's orbital precession velocity. We show that Damour & Schafer's treatment corresponds to negligible Spin-Orbit induced precession of periastron, while Wex & Kopeikin and this paper both found significant (but not equivalent) effects. The observational data of two typical binary pulsars, PSR J2051-0827 and PSR J1713+0747, apparently support a significant Spin-Orbit coupling effect. Specific binary pulsars with orbital plane nearly edge on could discriminate between Wex & Kopeikin and this paper: if the orbital period derivative of the double-pulsar system PSRs J0737-3039 A and B, with orbital inclination angle i =87.7+17 -29 deg, is much larger than that of the gravitational radiation induced one, then the expression in this paper is supported, otherwise Wex & Kopeikin's is supported.

  11. PONDER - A Real time software backend for pulsar and IPS observations at the Ooty Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Naidu, Arun; Manoharan, P K; Krishnakumar, M A

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a new real-time versatile backend, the Pulsar Ooty Radio Telescope New Digital Efficient Receiver (PONDER), which has been designed to operate along with the legacy analog system of the Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT). PONDER makes use of the current state of the art computing hardware, a Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) and sufficiently large disk storage to support high time resolution real-time data of pulsar observations, obtained by coherent dedispersion over a bandpass of 16 MHz. Four different modes for pulsar observations are implemented in PONDER to provide standard reduced data products, such as time-stamped integrated profiles and dedispersed time series, allowing faster avenues to scientific results for a variety of pulsar studies. Additionally, PONDER also supports general modes of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) measurements and very long baseline interferometry data recording. The IPS mode yields a single polarisation correlated time series of solar wind scintillation over a b...

  12. Giant Pulses -- the Main Component of the Radio Emission of the Crab Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, M V; Kondratiev, V I; Kostyuk, S V; Ilyasov, Y P; Oreshko, V V; Ilyasov, Yu.P.

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents an analysis of dual-polarization observations of the Crab pulsar obtained on the 64-m Kalyazin radio telescope at 600 MHz with a time resolution of 250 ns. A lower limit for the intensities of giant pulses is estimated by assuming that the pulsar radio emission in the main pulse and interpulse consists entirely of giant radio pulses; this yields estimates of 100 Jy and 35 Jy for the peak flux densities of giant pulses arising in the main pulse and interpulse, respectively. This assumes that the normal radio emission of the pulse occurs in the precursor pulse. In this case, the longitudes of the giant radio pulses relative to the profile of the normal radio emission turn out to be the same for the Crab pulsar and the millisecond pulsar B1937+21, namely, the giant pulses arise at the trailing edge of the profile of the normal radio emission. Analysis of the distribution of the degree of circular polarization for the giant pulses suggests that they can consist of a random mixture of nanopulses...

  13. Discovery of an ultracompact gamma-ray millisecond pulsar binary candidate

    CERN Document Server

    Kong, A K H; Hui, C Y; Tam, P H T; Hu, C P; Takata, J; Lin, L C C; Cheng, K S; Yen, T -C; Park, S M; Kim, C L

    2014-01-01

    We report multi-wavelength observations of the unidentified Fermi object 2FGL J1653.6-0159. With the help of high-resolution X-ray observation, we have identified an X-ray and optical counterpart of 2FGL J1653.6-0159. The source exhibits a periodic modulation of 74.93 min in optical and possibly also in X-ray. We suggest that 2FGL J1653.6-0159 is a compact binary system with an orbital period of 74.93 min. Combining the gamma-ray and X-ray properties, 2FGL J1653.6-0159 is potentially a black widow/redback type gamma-ray millisecond pulsar (MSP). The optical and X-ray lightcurve profile shows that the companion is mildly heated by the high-energy emission and the X-rays are from intrabinary shock. Although no radio pulsation has been detected yet, we estimated that the spin period of the MSP is ~2 ms based on a theoretical model. If pulsation can be confirmed in the future, 2FGL J1653.6-0159 will become the first ultracompact rotation-powered MSP.

  14. The Braking Index of Radio-quiet Gamma-ray Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, C J; Wu, J; Guillemot, L; Camilo, F; Johnson, T J; Kerr, M; Allen, B; Aulbert, C; Beer, C; Bock, O; Cuéllar, A; Eggenstein, H B; Fehrmann, H; Kramer, M; Machenschalk, B; Nieder, L

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery and timing measurements of PSR J1208-6238, a young and highly magnetized gamma-ray pulsar, with a spin period of 440 ms. The pulsar was discovered in gamma-ray photon data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) during a blind-search survey of unidentified LAT sources, running on the distributed volunteer computing system Einstein@Home. No radio pulsations were detected in dedicated follow-up searches with the Parkes radio telescope, with a flux density upper limit at 1369 MHz of 30 $\\mu$Jy. By timing this pulsar's gamma-ray pulsations, we measure its braking index over five years of LAT observations to be $n = 2.598 \\pm 0.001 \\pm 0.1$, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second estimates the bias due to timing noise. Assuming its braking index has been similar since birth, the pulsar has an estimated age of around 2,700 yr, making it the youngest pulsar to be found in a blind search of gamma-ray data and the youngest known radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar. Despite its you...

  15. New Discoveries from the Arecibo 327 MHz Drift Pulsar Survey Radio Transient Search

    CERN Document Server

    Deneva, J S; McLaughlin, M A; Bagchi, M; Bates, S D; Freire, P C C; Martinez, J G; Jenet, F; Garver-Daniels, N

    2016-01-01

    We present Clusterrank, a new algorithm for identifying dispersed astrophysical pulses. Such pulses are commonly detected from Galactic pulsars and rotating radio transients (RRATs), which are neutron stars with sporadic radio emission. More recently, isolated, highly dispersed pulses dubbed fast radio bursts (FRBs) have been identified as the potential signature of an extragalactic cataclysmic radio source distinct from pulsars and RRATs. Clusterrank helped us discover 14 pulsars and 8 RRATs in data from the Arecibo 327 MHz Drift Pulsar Survey (AO327). The new RRATs have DMs in the range $23.5 - 86.6$ pc cm$^{-3}$ and periods in the range $0.172 - 3.901$ s. The new pulsars have DMs in the range $23.6 - 133.3$ pc cm$^{-3}$ and periods in the range $1.249 - 5.012$ s, and include two nullers and a mode-switching object. We estimate an upper limit on the all-sky FRB rate of $10^5$ day$^{-1}$ for bursts with a width of 10 ms and flux density $\\gtrsim 83$ mJy. The DMs of all new discoveries are consistent with a G...

  16. Wide-band, low-frequency pulse profiles of 100 radio pulsars with LOFAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilia, M.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Stappers, B. W.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kramer, M.; van Leeuwen, J.; Weltevrede, P.; Lyne, A. G.; Zagkouris, K.; Hassall, T. E.; Bilous, A. V.; Breton, R. P.; Falcke, H.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Keane, E.; Karastergiou, A.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Noutsos, A.; Osłowski, S.; Serylak, M.; Sobey, C.; ter Veen, S.; Alexov, A.; Anderson, J.; Asgekar, A.; Avruch, I. M.; Bell, M. E.; Bentum, M. J.; Bernardi, G.; Bîrzan, L.; Bonafede, A.; Breitling, F.; Broderick, J. W.; Brüggen, M.; Ciardi, B.; Corbel, S.; de Geus, E.; de Jong, A.; Deller, A.; Duscha, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Fallows, R. A.; Fender, R.; Ferrari, C.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M. A.; Gunst, A. W.; Hamaker, J. P.; Heald, G.; Horneffer, A.; Jonker, P.; Juette, E.; Kuper, G.; Maat, P.; Mann, G.; Markoff, S.; McFadden, R.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Nelles, A.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pietka, M.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A. G.; Reich, W.; Röttgering, H.; Rowlinson, A.; Schwarz, D.; Smirnov, O.; Steinmetz, M.; Stewart, A.; Swinbank, J. D.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; Thoudam, S.; Toribio, M. C.; van der Horst, A. J.; Vermeulen, R.; Vocks, C.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wijnands, R.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Wucknitz, O.; Zarka, P.

    2016-02-01

    Context. LOFAR offers the unique capability of observing pulsars across the 10-240 MHz frequency range with a fractional bandwidth of roughly 50%. This spectral range is well suited for studying the frequency evolution of pulse profile morphology caused by both intrinsic and extrinsic effects such as changing emission altitude in the pulsar magnetosphere or scatter broadening by the interstellar medium, respectively. Aims: The magnitude of most of these effects increases rapidly towards low frequencies. LOFAR can thus address a number of open questions about the nature of radio pulsar emission and its propagation through the interstellar medium. Methods: We present the average pulse profiles of 100 pulsars observed in the two LOFAR frequency bands: high band (120-167 MHz, 100 profiles) and low band (15-62 MHz, 26 profiles). We compare them with Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) and Lovell Telescope observations at higher frequencies (350 and 1400 MHz) to study the profile evolution. The profiles were aligned in absolute phase by folding with a new set of timing solutions from the Lovell Telescope, which we present along with precise dispersion measures obtained with LOFAR. Results: We find that the profile evolution with decreasing radio frequency does not follow a specific trend; depending on the geometry of the pulsar, new components can enter into or be hidden from view. Nonetheless, in general our observations confirm the widening of pulsar profiles at low frequencies, as expected from radius-to-frequency mapping or birefringence theories. We offer this catalogue of low-frequency pulsar profiles in a user friendly way via the EPN Database of Pulsar Profiles, http://www.epta.eu.org/epndb/

  17. A model for gamma-ray binaries, based on the effect of pair production feedback in shocked pulsar winds

    CERN Document Server

    Derishev, E

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the model of gamma-ray binaries, consisting of a massive star and a pulsar with ultrarelativistic wind. We consider radiation from energetic particles, accelerated at the pulsar wind termination shock, and feedback of this radiation on the wind through production of secondary electron-positron pairs. We show that the pair feedback limits the Lorentz factor of the pulsar wind and creates a population of very energetic pairs, whose radiation may be responsible for the observed gamma-ray signal.

  18. A Search for Rapidly Spinning Pulsars and Fast Transients in Unidentified Radio Sources with the NRAO 43-Meter Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Deborah; Langston, Glen; Gilpin, Claire

    2013-01-01

    We have searched 75 unidentified radio sources selected from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) catalog for the presence of rapidly spinning pulsars and short, dispersed radio bursts. The sources are radio bright, have no identifications or optical source coincidences, are more than 5% linearly polarized, and are spatially unresolved in the catalog. If these sources are fast-spinning pulsars (e.g. sub-millisecond pulsars), previous large-scale pulsar surveys may have missed detection due to instrumental and computational limitations, eclipsing effects, or diffractive scintillation. The discovery of a sub-millisecond pulsar would significantly constrain the neutron star equation of state and would have implications for models predicting a rapid slowdown of highly recycled X-ray pulsars to millisecond periods from, e.g., accretion disk decoupling. These same sources were previously searched unsuccessfully for pulsations at 610 MHz with the Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank. This new search was conducted at a differe...

  19. Pulsar timing arrays and the challenge of massive black hole binary astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Sesana, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) are designed to detect gravitational waves (GWs) at nHz frequencies. The expected dominant signal is given by the superposition of all waves emitted by the cosmological population of supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries. Such superposition creates an incoherent stochastic background, on top of which particularly bright or nearby sources might be individually resolved. In this contribution I describe the properties of the expected GW signal, highlighting its dependence on the overall binary population, the relation between SMBHs and their hosts, and their coupling with the stellar and gaseous environment. I describe the status of current PTA efforts, and prospect of future detection and SMBH binary astrophysics.

  20. Shining Light on Quantum Gravity with Pulsar-Black Hole Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Estes, John; Lippert, Matthew; Simonetti, John H

    2016-01-01

    Pulsars are some of the most accurate clocks found in nature, while black holes offer a unique arena for the study of quantum gravity. As such, pulsar-black hole (PSR-BH) binaries provide ideal astrophysical systems for detecting effects of quantum gravity. With the success of aLIGO and the advent of instruments like the SKA and eLISA, the prospects for discovery of such PSR-BH binaries are very promising. We argue that PSR-BH binaries can serve as ready-made testing grounds for proposed resolutions to the black hole information paradox. We propose using timing signals from a pulsar beam passing through the region near a BH event horizon as a probe of quantum gravitational effects. In particular, we demonstrate that fluctuations of the geometry outside a black hole lead to an increase in the measured root-mean-square deviation of arrival times of pulsar pulses traveling near the horizon. This allows for a clear observational test of the nonviolent nonlocality proposal for black hole information escape. For a ...

  1. Observing the dynamics of supermassive black hole binaries with pulsar timing arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingarelli, C M F; Grover, K; Sidery, T; Smith, R J E; Vecchio, A

    2012-08-24

    Pulsar timing arrays are a prime tool to study unexplored astrophysical regimes with gravitational waves. Here, we show that the detection of gravitational radiation from individually resolvable supermassive black hole binary systems can yield direct information about the masses and spins of the black holes, provided that the gravitational-wave-induced timing fluctuations both at the pulsar and at Earth are detected. This in turn provides a map of the nonlinear dynamics of the gravitational field and a new avenue to tackle open problems in astrophysics connected to the formation and evolution of supermassive black holes. We discuss the potential, the challenges, and the limitations of these observations. PMID:23002736

  2. PSR J1740-3052: a Radio Pulsar with a Massive Companion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stairs, I. H.; Manchester, R. N.; Lyne, A. G.; Kaspi, V. M.; Camilo, F.; Bell, J. F.; D'Amico, N.; Crawford, F.; Morris, D. J.; Possenti, A.; McKay, N. P. F.; Lumsden, S. L.; Tacconi-Garman, L. E.; Cannon, R. D.; Hambly, N.; Wood, P. W.

    2000-12-01

    We present multiwavelength observations of PSR J1740-3052, a young radio pulsar discovered in the ongoing Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey. This pulsar is in a 231-day, highly eccentric orbit with a companion whose mass exceeds 11 solar masses. Near-IR observations with the ANU Siding Spring 2.3m telescope and the 3.9m Anglo-Australian Telescope reveal a bright late-type (K5-M3) star coincident with the pulsar position. The star shows hydrogen Brackett-gamma in emission, indicating that it is being heated by a companion. Dual-frequency radio monitoring of the pulsar near periastron shows small changes in dispersion measure and rotation measure, supporting the identification of the companion. However, classical tidal effects on the pulsar timing solution are not as large as might be expected. We conclude that either the stellar radius is very small for such a late-type supergiant, or our identification of the companion is incorrect.

  3. Observing Radio Pulsars in the Galactic Centre with the Square Kilometre Array

    CERN Document Server

    Eatough, R P; Casanellas, J; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Demorest, P B; Kramer, M; Lee, K J; Liu, K; Ransom, S M; Wex, N

    2015-01-01

    The discovery and timing of radio pulsars within the Galactic centre is a fundamental aspect of the SKA Science Case, responding to the topic of "Strong Field Tests of Gravity with Pulsars and Black Holes" (Kramer et al. 2004; Cordes et al. 2004). Pulsars have in many ways proven to be excellent tools for testing the General theory of Relativity and alternative gravity theories (see Wex (2014) for a recent review). Timing a pulsar in orbit around a companion, provides a unique way of probing the relativistic dynamics and spacetime of such a system. The strictest tests of gravity, in strong field conditions, are expected to come from a pulsar orbiting a black hole. In this sense, a pulsar in a close orbit ($P_{\\rm orb}$ < 1 yr) around our nearest supermassive black hole candidate, Sagittarius A* - at a distance of ~8.3 kpc in the Galactic centre (Gillessen et al. 2009a) - would be the ideal tool. Given the size of the orbit and the relativistic effects associated with it, even a slowly spinning pulsar would...

  4. Simultaneous X-Ray and Radio Observations of the Unusual Binary LSI + 61 deg 303

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Fiona A.; Leahy, Denis A.; Waltman, Elizabeth

    1996-01-01

    We present simultaneous 0.5 - 10 keV X-ray and two-frequency radio observations at 2.25 and 8.3 GHz of the unusual binary system LSI + 61 deg. 303. This system was observed twice in a single binary orbit by the ASCA satellite, and monitored daily at two radio frequencies during the same orbital cycle with the Greenbank Interferometer. During the first ASCA observation the source was detected with a 1 - 10 keV luminosity 3.6 x 10(exp 33) (d/2.0 kpc)(exp 2) erg 1/s and during the second at a similar level with evidence for a decrease in average flux of 30%. During the first pointing the radio source was at a quiescent 8 GHz flux level of 30 mJy while during the second the radio flux was rising dramatically with an average value of 100 mJy. No variability is seen in the X-ray flux during the first pointing, but during the second the flux is variable by approx. 50% on timescales of approx. 30 minutes. No pulsations are seen in either X-ray observation with an upper limit on pulsed flux of 20%. The low X-ray luminosity and lack of observed pulsations indicate that accretion onto a neutron star surface is not the origin for the high-energy emission. Rather, the X-rays must result either from accreted matter which is stopped at the magnetosphere because the magnetospheric boundry is rotating at super-Keplerian rates or due to a shock formed in the interaction of the dense wind of the Be star companion and a moderately young pulsar. We derive a required pulsar spin down luminosity of approx. 10(exp 37) erg 1/s, and argue that the shock model more easily explains the observed X-ray radio observations.

  5. The hunt for new pulsars with the Green Bank Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Lynch, Ryan S; Banaszak, Shawn; Becker, Alison; Berndsen, Aaron; Biwer, Chris; Boyles, Jason; Cardoso, Rogerio F; Cherry, Angus; Dartez, Louis P; Day, David; Epstein, Courtney R; Flanigan, Joe; Ford, Anthony; Garcia, Alejandro; Hessels, Jason W T; Jenet, Fredrick A; Kaplan, David L; Karako-Argaman, Chen; Kaspi, Victoria M; Kondratiev, Vladislav I; Lorimer, Duncan R; Lunsford, Grady; Martinez, Jose; McLaughlin, Maura A; McPhee, Christie A; Pennucci, Tim; Ransom, Scott M; Roberts, Mallory S E; Rohr, Matt; Siemens, Xavi; Stairs, Ingrid H; Stovall, Kevin; van Leeuwen, Joeri; Walker, Arielle; Wells, Brad

    2013-01-01

    The Green Bank Telescope (GBT) is the largest fully steerable radio telescope in the world and is one of our greatest tools for discovering and studying radio pulsars. Over the last decade, the GBT has successfully found over 100 new pulsars through large-area surveys. Here I discuss the two most recent---the GBT 350 MHz Drift-scan survey and the Green Bank North Celestial Cap survey. The primary science goal of both surveys is to find interesting individual pulsars, including young pulsars, rotating radio transients, exotic binary systems, and especially bright millisecond pulsars (MSPs) suitable for inclusion in Pulsar Timing Arrays, which are trying to directly detect gravitational waves. These two surveys have combined to discover 85 pulsars to date, among which are 14 MSPs and many unique and fascinating systems. I present highlights from these surveys and discuss future plans. I also discuss recent results from targeted GBT pulsar searches of globular clusters and Fermi sources.

  6. Enhanced pulsar and single pulse detection via automated radio frequency interference detection in multipixel feeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocz, J.; Bailes, M.; Barnes, D.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Levin, L.

    2012-02-01

    Single pixel feeds on large aperture radio telescopes have the ability to detect weak (˜10 mJy) impulsive bursts of radio emission and sub-mJy radio pulsars. Unfortunately, in large-scale blind surveys, radio frequency interference (RFI) mimics both radio bursts and radio pulsars, greatly reducing the sensitivity to new discoveries as real signals of astronomical origin get lost among the millions of false candidates. In this paper a technique that takes advantage of multipixel feeds to use eigenvector decomposition of common signals is used to greatly facilitate radio burst and pulsar discovery. Since the majority of RFI occurs with zero dispersion, the method was tested on the total power present in the 13 beams of the Parkes multibeam receiver using data from archival intermediate-latitude surveys. The implementation of this method greatly reduced the number of false candidates and led to the discovery of one new rotating radio transient or RRAT, six new pulsars and five new pulses that shared the swept-frequency characteristics similar in nature to the `Lorimer burst'. These five new signals occurred within minutes of 11 previous detections of a similar type. When viewed together, they display temporal characteristics related to integer seconds, with non-random distributions and characteristic 'gaps' between them, suggesting they are not from a naturally occurring source. Despite the success in removing RFI, false candidates present in the data that are only visible after integrating in time or at non-zero dispersion remained. It is demonstrated that with some computational penalty, the method can be applied iteratively at all trial dispersions and time resolutions to remove the vast majority of spurious candidates.

  7. EINSTEIN-HOME DISCOVERY OF 24 PULSARS IN THE PARKES MULTI-BEAM PULSAR SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have conducted a new search for radio pulsars in compact binary systems in the Parkes multi-beam pulsar survey (PMPS) data, employing novel methods to remove the Doppler modulation from binary motion. This has yielded unparalleled sensitivity to pulsars in compact binaries. The required computation time of ≈17, 000 CPU core years was provided by the distributed volunteer computing project Einstein-Home, which has a sustained computing power of about 1 PFlop s–1. We discovered 24 new pulsars in our search, 18 of which were isolated pulsars, and 6 were members of binary systems. Despite the wide filterbank channels and relatively slow sampling time of the PMPS data, we found pulsars with very large ratios of dispersion measure (DM) to spin period. Among those is PSR J1748–3009, the millisecond pulsar with the highest known DM (≈420 pc cm–3). We also discovered PSR J1840–0643, which is in a binary system with an orbital period of 937 days, the fourth largest known. The new pulsar J1750–2536 likely belongs to the rare class of intermediate-mass binary pulsars. Three of the isolated pulsars show long-term nulling or intermittency in their emission, further increasing this growing family. Our discoveries demonstrate the value of distributed volunteer computing for data-driven astronomy and the importance of applying new analysis methods to extensively searched data

  8. Synchronous X-ray and radio mode switches: a rapid global transformation of the pulsar magnetosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermsen, W.; Hessels, J.W.; Kuiper, L.; Leeuwen, van J.; Mitra, D.; Plaa, de J.; Rankin, J.M.; Stappers, B.W.; Wright, G.A.E.; Basu, R.; Alexov, A.; Coenen, T.; Griessmeier, J.M.; Hassall, T.E.; Karastergiou, A.; Keane, E.; Kondratiev, V.I.; Kramer, M.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Noutsos, A.; Serylak, M.; Pilia, M.; Sobey, C.; Weltevrede, P.; Zagkouris, K.; Asgekar, A.; Avruch, I.M.; Batejat, F.; Bell, M.E.; Bell, M.R.; Bentum, M.J.; Bernardi, G.; Best, P.; Birzan, L.; Bonfede, A.; Breitling, F.; Broderick, J.; Brüggen, M.; Butcher, H.R.; Ciardi, B.; Duscha, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Falcke, H.; Fender, R.; Ferrari, C.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M.A.; Gasperin, de F.; Geus, de E.; Gunst, A.W.; Heald, G.; Hoeft, M.; Homeffer, A.; Iabobelli, M.; Kuper, G.; Maat, P.; Macario, G.; Markoff, S.; McKean, J.P.; Mevius, M.; Miller-Jones, J.C.A.; Morganti, R.; Munk, H.; Orrú, E.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pandey, V.N.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A.G.; Rawlings, S.; Reich, W.; Röttgering, H.; Scaife, A.M.M.; Schoenmakers, A.; Shulevski, A.; Sluman, J.; Steinmetz, M.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; Veen, ter S.; Vermeulen, R.; Brink, van de R.H.; Weeren, van R.J.; Weijers, R.A.M.J.; Wise, M.W.; Wucknitz, O.; Yatawatta, S.; Zarka, P.

    2013-01-01

    Pulsars emit from low-frequency radio waves up to high-energy gamma-rays, generated anywhere from the stellar surface out to the edge of the magnetosphere. Detecting correlated mode changes across the electromagnetic spectrum is therefore key to understanding the physical relationship among the emis

  9. Properties and Evolution of the Redback Millisecond Pulsar Binary PSR J2129-0429

    CERN Document Server

    Bellm, Eric C; Breton, Rene P; Phinney, E Sterl; Bhalerao, Varun B; Camilo, Fernando; Dahal, Sumit; Djorgovski, S G; Drake, Andrew J; Hessels, J W T; Laher, Russ R; Levitan, David B; Lewis, Fraser; Mahabal, Ashish A; Ofek, Eran O; Prince, Thomas A; Ransom, Scott M; Roberts, Mallory S E; Russell, David M; Sesar, Branimir; Surace, Jason A; Tang, Sumin

    2015-01-01

    PSR J2129-0429 is a "redback" eclipsing millisecond pulsar binary with an unusually long 15.2 hour orbit. It was discovered by the Green Bank Telescope in a targeted search of unidentified Fermi gamma-ray sources. The pulsar companion is optically bright (mean $m_R = 16.6$ mag), allowing us to construct the longest baseline photometric dataset available for such a system. We present ten years of archival and new photometry of the companion from LINEAR, CRTS, PTF, the Palomar 60-inch, and LCOGT. Radial velocity spectroscopy using the Double-Beam Spectrograph on the Palomar 200-inch indicates that the pulsar is massive: $1.74\\pm0.18 M_\\odot$. The G-type pulsar companion has mass $0.44\\pm0.04 M_\\odot$, one of the heaviest known redback companions. It is currently 95\\% Roche-lobe filling and only mildly irradiated by the pulsar. We identify a clear 13.1 mmag yr$^{-1}$ secular decline in the mean magnitude of the companion as well as smaller-scale variations in the optical lightcurve shape. This behavior may indic...

  10. PONDER - A Real time software backend for pulsar and IPS observations at the Ooty Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Arun; Joshi, Bhal Chandra; Manoharan, P. K.; Krishnakumar, M. A.

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a new real-time versatile backend, the Pulsar Ooty Radio Telescope New Digital Efficient Receiver (PONDER), which has been designed to operate along with the legacy analog system of the Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT). PONDER makes use of the current state of the art computing hardware, a Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) and sufficiently large disk storage to support high time resolution real-time data of pulsar observations, obtained by coherent dedispersion over a bandpass of 16 MHz. Four different modes for pulsar observations are implemented in PONDER to provide standard reduced data products, such as time-stamped integrated profiles and dedispersed time series, allowing faster avenues to scientific results for a variety of pulsar studies. Additionally, PONDER also supports general modes of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) measurements and very long baseline interferometry data recording. The IPS mode yields a single polarisation correlated time series of solar wind scintillation over a bandwidth of about four times larger (16 MHz) than that of the legacy system as well as its fluctuation spectrum with high temporal and frequency resolutions. The key point is that all the above modes operate in real time. This paper presents the design aspects of PONDER and outlines the design methodology for future similar backends. It also explains the principal operations of PONDER, illustrates its capabilities for a variety of pulsar and IPS observations and demonstrates its usefulness for a variety of astrophysical studies using the high sensitivity of the ORT.

  11. NuSTAR Observations of the State Transition of Millisecond Pulsar Binary PSR J1023+0038

    CERN Document Server

    Tendulkar, Shriharsh P; An, Hongjun; Kaspi, Victoria M; Archibald, Anne M; Bassa, Cees; Bellm, Eric; Bogdanov, Slavko; Harrison, Fiona A; Hessels, Jason W T; Janssen, Gemma H; Lyne, Andrew G; Patruno, Alessandro; Stappers, Benjamin; Stern, Daniel; Tomsick, John A; Boggs, Steven E; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Christensen, Finn E; Craig, William W; Hailey, Charles A; Zhang, William

    2014-01-01

    We report NuSTAR observations of the millisecond pulsar - low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) transition system PSR J1023+0038 from June and October 2013, before and after the formation of an accretion disk around the neutron star. Between June 10-12, a few days to two weeks before the radio disappearance of the pulsar, the 3-79 keV X-ray spectrum was well fit by a simple power law with a photon index of Gamma=1.17 +/-0.08 (at 90% confidence) with a 3-79 keV luminosity of 7.4+/-0.4 x 10^32 erg/s. Significant orbital modulation was observed with a modulation fraction of 36+/-10%. During the October 19-21 observation, the spectrum is described by a softer power law (Gamma=1.66+/-0.06) with an average luminosity of 5.8+/-0.2 x 10^33 erg/s and a peak luminosity of ~1.2 x 10^34 erg/s observed during a flare. No significant orbital modulation was detected. The spectral observations are consistent with previous and current multi-wavelength observations and show the hard X-ray power law extending to 79 keV without a spectra...

  12. The GBT350 Survey of the Northern Galactic Plane for Radio Pulsars and Transients

    CERN Document Server

    Hessels, J W T; Kaspi, V M; Roberts, M S E; Champion, D J; Stappers, B W

    2007-01-01

    Using the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) and Pulsar Spigot at 350MHz, we have surveyed the Northern Galactic Plane for pulsars and radio transients. This survey covers roughly 1000 square degrees of sky within 75 deg < l < 165 deg and |b| < 5.5 deg, a region of the Galactic Plane inaccessible to both the Parkes and Arecibo multibeam surveys. The large gain of the GBT along with the high time and frequency resolution provided by the Spigot make this survey more sensitive by factors of about 4 to slow pulsars and more than 10 to millisecond pulsars (MSPs), compared with previous surveys of this area. In a preliminary, reduced-resolution search of all the survey data, we have discovered 33 new pulsars, almost doubling the number of known pulsars in this part of the Galaxy. While most of these sources were discovered by normal periodicity searches, 5 of these sources were first identified through single, dispersed bursts. We discuss the interesting properties of some of these new sources. Data processing usi...

  13. On 'An exact solution of Haugan's binary pulsar equation of motion'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugan, Mark P.

    1988-10-01

    The analysis of the equation for the relative orbit of a post-Newtonian two-body system published recently by Weinstein and Mor (45.066.104) does not properly incorporate the Newtonian limit. As a result, the solution they derive is of no use for dealing with the motion of the binary pulsar. The claim that the form of their solution implies that earlier treatments of post-Newtonian orbital motion have missed significant effects is mistaken.

  14. Search for differences between radio-loud and radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar populations with Fermi-LAT data

    CERN Document Server

    Sokolova, E V

    2016-01-01

    Observations by Fermi LAT enabled us to explore the population of non-recycled gamma-ray pulsars with the set of 89 objects. It was recently noted that there are apparent differences in properties of radio-quiet and radio-loud subsets. In particular, average observed radio-loud pulsar is younger than radio-quiet one and is located at smaller galactic latitude. Even so, the analysis based on the full list of pulsars may suffer from selection effects. Namely, most of radio-loud pulsars are first discovered in the radio-band, while radio-quiet ones are found using the gamma-ray data. In this work we perform a blind search for gamma-ray pulsars using the Fermi LAT data alone using all point sources from 3FGL catalog as the candidates. Unlike preceding blind search, the present catalog is constructed with novel semi-coherent method and covers the full range of characteristic ages down to 1 kyr. The search resulted in the catalog of 40 non-recycled pulsars, 26 of which are radio-quiet. There are no statistically si...

  15. On the detection of eccentric supermassive black hole binaries with pulsar timing arrays: Signal-to-noise ratio calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Huerta, E A; Gair, Jonathan R; Taylor, Stephen R

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the expected signal-to-noise ratios of supermassive black hole binaries on eccentric orbits observed by pulsar timing arrays. We derive several analytical relations that extend the results of Peters and Mathews [Phys. Rev. D 131, 435 (1963)] to facilitate this analysis. We show that eccentricity enhances the signal-to-noise ratio of single resolvable sources whose dominant harmonic is located in the low-frequency sensitivity regime of pulsar timing arrays for continuous wave sources, whereas the expected signal-to-noise ratio of single resolvable sources emitting in the high frequency sensitivity regime of pulsar timing arrays will be attenuated. We also show that the strain of a stochastic, isotropic gravitational wave background generated by a cosmological population of eccentric binaries will be suppressed in the frequency band of pulsar timing arrays relative to a population of circular binaries, which may pose a potential problem for their detection.

  16. Discovery of Low DM Fast Radio Transients: Geminga Pulsar Caught in the Act

    CERN Document Server

    Maan, Yogesh

    2015-01-01

    We report discovery of several energetic radio bursts at 34 MHz, using the Gauribidanur radio telescope. The radio bursts exhibit two important properties associated with the propagation of astronomical signals through the interstellar medium: (i) frequency dependent dispersive delays across the observing bandwidth, and (ii) Faraday rotation of the plane of linear polarization. These bursts sample a range of dispersion measures (DM; 1.4--3.6$~{\\rm pc}~{\\rm cm}^{-3}$), and show DM-variation at timescales of the order of a minute. Using groups of bursts having a consistent DM, we show that the bursts have originated from the radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar Geminga. Detection of these bursts supports the existence of occasional radio emission from Geminga. The rare occurrence of these bursts, and the short timescale variation in their DM (if really caused by the intervening medium or the pulsar magnetosphere), might provide clues as to why the pulsar has not been detected in earlier sensitive searches. We present d...

  17. Optical polarisation of the Crab pulsar: precision measurements and comparison to the radio emission

    CERN Document Server

    Słowikowska, Agnieszka; Kramer, Michael; Stefanescu, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    The linear polarisation of the Crab pulsar and its close environment was derived from observations with the high-speed photo-polarimeter OPTIMA at the 2.56-m Nordic Optical Telescope in the optical spectral range (400 - 750 nm). Time resolution as short as 11 microseconds, which corresponds to a phase interval of 1/3000 of the pulsar rotation, and high statistics allow the derivation of polarisation details never achieved before. The degree of optical polarisation and the position angle correlate in surprising details with the light curves at optical wavelengths and at radio frequencies of 610 and 1400 MHz. Our observations show that there exists a subtle connection between presumed non-coherent (optical) and coherent (radio) emissions. This finding supports previously detected correlations between the optical intensity of the Crab and the occurrence of giant radio pulses. Interpretation of our observations require more elaborate theoretical models than those currently available in the literature.

  18. Interpretation of the Low-Frequency Peculiarities in the Radio Profile Structure of the Crab Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Petrova, S A

    2008-01-01

    The theory of magnetized induced scattering off relativistic gyrating particles is developed. It is directly applicable to the magnetosphere of a pulsar, in which case the particles acquire gyration energies as a result of resonant absorption of radio emission. In the course of the radio beam scattering into background the scattered radiation concentrates along the ambient magnetic field. The scattering from different harmonics of the particle gyrofrequency takes place at different characteristic altitudes in the magnetosphere and, because of the rotational effect, gives rise to different components in the pulse profile. It is demonstrated that the induced scattering from the first harmonic into the state under the resonance can account for the so-called low-frequency component in the radio profile of the Crab pulsar. The precursor component is believed to result from the induced scattering between the two states well below the resonance. It is shown that these ideas are strongly supported by the polarization...

  19. A Magnetar-like Outburst from a High-B Radio Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Archibald, R F; Tendulkar, S P; Scholz, P

    2016-01-01

    Radio pulsars are believed to have their emission powered by the loss of rotational kinetic energy. By contrast, magnetars show intense X-ray and gamma-ray radiation whose luminosity greatly exceeds that due to spin-down and is believed to be powered by intense internal magnetic fields. A basic prediction of this picture is that radio pulsars of high magnetic field should show magnetar-like emission. Here we report on a magnetar-like X-ray outburst from the radio pulsar PSR J1119-6127, heralded by two short bright X-ray bursts on 2016 July 27 and 28 (Kennea et al. 2016; Younes et al. 2016). Using Target-of-Opportunity data from the Swift X-ray Telescope and NuSTAR, we show that this pulsar's flux has brightened by a factor of > 160 in the 0.5-10 keV band, and its previously soft X-ray spectrum has undergone a strong hardening, with strong pulsations appearing for the first time above 2.5 keV, with phase-averaged emission detectable up to 25 keV. By comparing Swift-XRT and NuSTAR timing data with a pre-outburs...

  20. Insights into the astrophysics of supermassive black hole binaries from pulsar timing observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) are designed to detect the predicted gravitational wave (GW) background produced by a cosmological population of supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries. In this contribution, I review the physics of such GW background, highlighting its dependence on the overall binary population, the relation between SMBHs and their hosts, and their coupling with the stellar and gaseous environment. The latter is particularly relevant when it drives the binaries to extreme eccentricities (e > 0.9), which might be the case for stellar-driven systems. This causes a substantial suppression of the low-frequency signal, potentially posing a serious threat to the effectiveness of PTA observations. A future PTA detection will allow us to directly observe for the first time subparsec SMBH binaries on their way to the GW-driven coalescence, providing important answers of the outstanding questions related to the physics underlying the formation and evolution of these spectacular sources. (paper)

  1. Search for the Giant Pulses Search for the Giant Pulses - an extreme phenomenon in radio pulsar emission

    CERN Document Server

    Kazantsev, A N

    2016-01-01

    Here we present results of our search for Giant Pulses(GPs) from pulsars of Northern Hemisphere. Our survey was carried out at a frequency of 111 MHz using the Large Phased Array (LPA) radio telescope. Up to now we have detected regular generation of strong pulses satisfying the criteria of GPs from 2 pulsars: B1133+16, B1237+25.

  2. The LOFAR search for radio pulsars and fast transients in M 33, M 81, and M 82

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailov, K.; van Leeuwen, J.

    2016-08-01

    Context. The radio pulsar and rotating radio transient populations are only known in and near the Milky Way. Investigating such populations in other galaxies requires deep pulsar and transient searches. We performed 4-h radio observations of nearby galaxies M 33, M 81 and M 82 with LOFAR. Aims: Our main purpose was to characterise the bright end of the pulsar population in other galaxies, and compare it to that of the Milky Way. Methods: We searched for extragalactic radio pulsars through a periodic-pulse search, and for sporadic fast radio transients through a single-pulse search. We coherently combined at most 23 LOFAR Core High-Band Antenna (HBA) stations and covered M 33, M 81, and M 82 in their entirety using multiple tied-array beams. Results: No pulsating sources or single pulses were found. We have, therefore established stricter limits on the extragalactic pulsar flux density at lower frequencies than those obtained in previous Arecibo, GBT, and WSRT searches. Conclusions: We conclude that in nearby galaxies M 33, M 81, and M 82 there are no pulsars shining toward Earth with pseudo luminosities greater than a few times that of the brightest pulsars in our Milky Way.

  3. Phase offsets between core and conal components of radio pulsars and their emission altitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Kapoor, R C

    2002-01-01

    We present a new method for investigating emission altitudes of radio pulsar core and conal components by attributing them different altitudes and by providing a framework to understand the resulting longitude offsets between them which are frequently observed. By investigating the contributions to these offsets due to aberration and the magnetic field line sweepback, we show that they are always dominated by aberration for all emission altitudes and inclination angles. This directly allows the conclusion that the core emission does not necessarily come from the surface. Our results and the observational trends imply that for a large number of pulsars the emission altitudes of core and conal components are close when compared to the light cylinder radius but not necessarily relative to the stellar radius. The core/cone altitude differences that we find are typically larger than the individual altitudes ascribed to them so far. Widely different core/cone altitudes for some pulsars are also supported by data an...

  4. Timing and Fermi LAT Analysis of Four Millisecond Pulsars Discovered in Parkes Radio Searches of Gamma-ray Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Paul S.; Ransom, Scott M.; Camilo, Fernando M.; Kerr, Matthew; Reynolds, John; Sarkissian, John; Freire, Paulo; Thankful Cromartie, H.; Barr, Ewan D.

    2016-01-01

    We present phase-connected timing solutions for four binary millisecond pulsars discovered in searches of Fermi LAT gamma-ray sources using the Parkes radio telescope. Follow-up timing observations of PSRs J0955-6150, J1012-4235, J1036-8317, and J1946-5403 have yielded timing models with precise orbital and astrometric parameters. For each pulsar, we also did a gamma-ray spectral analysis using LAT Pass 8 data and generated photon probabilities for use in a weighted H-test pulsation test. In all 4 cases, we detect significant gamma-ray pulsations, confirming the identification with the gamma-ray source originally targeted in the discovery observations. We describe the results of the pulse timing and gamma-ray spectral and timing analysis and the characteristics of each of the systems. The Fermi-LAT Collaboration acknowledges support for LAT development, operation and data analysis from NASA and DOE (United States), CEA/Irfu and IN2P3/CNRS (France), ASI and INFN (Italy), MEXT, KEK, and JAXA (Japan), and the K.A. Wallenberg Foundation, the Swedish Research Council and the National Space Board (Sweden). Science analysis support in the operations phase from INAF (Italy) and CNES (France) is also gratefully acknowledged. NRL participation was funded by NASA.

  5. The PALFA Survey: Going to great depths to find radio pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Lazarus, P; Bhat, N D R; Bogdanov, S; Bouchard, A; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Cardoso, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J S; Desvignes, G; Freire, P C C; Hessels, J W T; Jenet, F A; Kaspi, V M; Knispel, B; van Leeuwen, J; Lorimer, D R; Lynch, R; Lyne, A G; McLaughlin, M A; Nice, D J; Ransom, S M; Scholz, P; Siemens, X; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; Stovall, K; Swiggum, J

    2012-01-01

    The on-going PALFA survey is searching the Galactic plane (|b| < 5 deg., 32 < l < 77 deg. and 168 < l < 214 deg.) for radio pulsars at 1.4 GHz using ALFA, the 7-beam receiver installed at the Arecibo Observatory. By the end of August 2012, the PALFA survey has discovered 100 pulsars, including 17 millisecond pulsars (P < 30 ms). Many of these discoveries are among the pulsars with the largest DM/P ratios, proving that the PALFA survey is capable of probing the Galactic plane for millisecond pulsars to a much greater depth than any previous survey. This is due to the survey's high sensitivity, relatively high observing frequency, and its high time and frequency resolution. Recently the rate of discoveries has increased, due to a new more sensitive spectrometer, two updated complementary search pipelines, the development of online collaborative tools, and access to new computing resources. Looking forward, focus has shifted to the application of artificial intelligence systems to identify puls...

  6. CONSTRAINING THE EVOLUTIONARY FATE OF CENTRAL COMPACT OBJECTS: ''OLD'' RADIO PULSARS IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Central compact objects (CCOs) constitute a population of radio-quiet, slowly spinning (≥100 ms) young neutron stars with anomalously high thermal X-ray luminosities. Their spin-down properties imply weak dipole magnetic fields (∼1010-11 G) and characteristic ages much greater than the ages of their host supernova remnants (SNRs). However, CCOs may posses strong ''hidden'' internal magnetic fields that may re-emerge on timescales of ≳10 kyr, with the neutron star possibly activating as a radio pulsar in the process. This suggests that the immediate descendants of CCOs may be masquerading as slowly spinning ''old'' radio pulsars. We present an X-ray survey of all ordinary radio pulsars within 6 kpc that are positionally coincident with Galactic SNRs in order to test the possible connection between the supposedly old but possibly very young pulsars and the SNRs. None of the targets exhibit anomalously high thermal X-ray luminosities, suggesting that they are genuine old ordinary pulsars unrelated to the superposed SNRs. This implies that CCOs are either latent radio pulsars that activate long after their SNRs dissipate or they remain permanently radio-quiet. The true descendants of CCOs remain at large

  7. Very Long Baseline Interferometry Experiment on Giant Radio Pulses of Crab Pulsar toward Fast Radio Burst Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Takefuji, K; Kondo, T; Mikami, R; Takeuchi, H; Misawa, H; Tsuchiya, F; Kita, H; Sekido, M

    2016-01-01

    We report on a very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) experiment on giant radio pulses (GPs) from the Crab pulsar in the radio 1.4 to 1.7 GHz range to demonstrate a VLBI technique for searching for fast radio bursts (FRBs). We carried out the experiment on 26 July 2014 using the Kashima 34 m and Usuda 64 m radio telescopes of the Japanese VLBI Network (JVN) with a baseline of about 200 km. During the approximately 1 h observation, we could detect 35 GPs by high-time-resolution VLBI. Moreover, we determined the dispersion measure (DM) to be 56.7585 +/- 0.0025 on the basis of the mean DM of the 35 GPs detected by VLBI. We confirmed that the sensitivity of a detection of GPs using our technique is superior to that of a single-dish mode detection using the same telescope.

  8. Very Long Baseline Interferometry Experiment on Giant Radio Pulses of Crab Pulsar toward Fast Radio Burst Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takefuji, K.; Terasawa, T.; Kondo, T.; Mikami, R.; Takeuchi, H.; Misawa, H.; Tsuchiya, F.; Kita, H.; Sekido, M.

    2016-08-01

    We report on a very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) experiment on giant radio pulses (GPs) from the Crab pulsar in the radio 1.4–1.7 GHz range to demonstrate a VLBI technique for searching for fast radio bursts (FRBs). We carried out the experiment on 2014 July 26 using the Kashima 34 m and Usuda 64 m radio telescopes of the Japanese VLBI Network (JVN) with a baseline of about 200 km. During the approximately 1 hr observation, we could detect 35 GPs by high-time-resolution VLBI. Moreover, we determined the dispersion measure (DM) to be 56.7585 ± 0.0025 on the basis of the mean DM of the 35 GPs detected by VLBI. We confirmed that the sensitivity of a detection of GPs using our technique is superior to that of a single-dish mode detection using the same telescope.

  9. New Limits on the Photon Mass with Radio Pulsars in the Magellanic Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Jun-Jie; Zhang, Song-Bo; Wu, Xue-Feng

    2016-01-01

    A conservative constraint on the rest mass of the photon can be estimated under the assumption that the frequency dependence of dispersion from astronomical sources is mainly contributed by the nonzero photon mass effect. Photon mass limits have been earlier set through the optical emissions of the Crab Nebula pulsar, but we prove that these limits can be significantly improved with the dispersion measure (DM) measurements of radio pulsars in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. The combination of DM measurements of pulsars and distances of the Magellanic Clouds provide a strict upper limit on the photon mass as low as $m_{\\gamma} \\leq2.0\\times10^{-45}~\\rm{g}$, which is at least four orders of magnitude smaller than the constraint from the Crab Nebula pulsar. Although our limit is not as tight as the current best result ($\\sim10^{-47}~\\rm{g}$) from a fast radio burst (FRB 150418) at a cosmological distance, the cosmological origin of FRB 150418 remains under debate; and our limit can reach the same high pre...

  10. Wide-Band, Low-Frequency Pulse Profiles of 100 Radio Pulsars with LOFAR

    CERN Document Server

    Pilia, M; Stappers, B W; Kondratiev, V I; Kramer, M; van Leeuwen, J; Weltevrede, P; Lyne, A G; Zagkouris, K; Hassall, T E; Bilous, A V; Breton, R P; Falcke, H; Grießmeier, J -M; Keane, E; Karastergiou, A; Kuniyoshi, M; Noutsos, A; Osłowski, S; Serylak, M; Sobey, C; ter Veen, S; Alexov, A; Anderson, J; Asgekar, A; Avruch, I M; Bell, M E; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Bîrzan, L; Bonafede, A; Breitling, F; Broderick, J W; Brüggen, M; Ciardi, B; Corbel, S; de Geus, E; de Jong, A; Deller, A; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Fallows, R A; Fender, R; Ferrari, C; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Gunst, A W; Hamaker, J P; Heald, G; Horneffer, A; Jonker, P; Juette, E; Kuper, G; Maat, P; Mann, G; Markoff, S; McFadden, R; McKay-Bukowski, D; Miller-Jones, J C A; Nelles, A; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pietka, M; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Röttgering, H; Rowlinson, A; Schwarz, D; Smirnov, O; Steinmetz, M; Stewart, A; Swinbank, J D; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; Tasse, C; Thoudam, S; Toribio, M C; van der Horst, A J; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; van Weeren, R J; Wijers, R A M J; Wijnands, R; Wijnholds, S J; Wucknitz, O; Zarka, P

    2015-01-01

    LOFAR offers the unique capability of observing pulsars across the 10-240 MHz frequency range with a fractional bandwidth of roughly 50%. This spectral range is well-suited for studying the frequency evolution of pulse profile morphology caused by both intrinsic and extrinsic effects: such as changing emission altitude in the pulsar magnetosphere or scatter broadening by the interstellar medium, respectively. The magnitude of most of these effects increases rapidly towards low frequencies. LOFAR can thus address a number of open questions about the nature of radio pulsar emission and its propagation through the interstellar medium. We present the average pulse profiles of 100 pulsars observed in the two LOFAR frequency bands: High Band (120-167 MHz, 100 profiles) and Low Band (15-62 MHz, 26 profiles). We compare them with Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) and Lovell Telescope observations at higher frequencies (350 and1400 MHz) in order to study the profile evolution. The profiles are aligned in abs...

  11. High Frequency Cut-off and Changing of Radio Emission Mechanism in Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Kontorovich, V M

    2012-01-01

    Pulsars are the fast rotating neutron stars with strong magnetic field emitting over a wide frequency range. In spite of the efforts during 40 years after the discovery of pulsars, the mechanism of their radio emission remains to be unknown so far. We propose a new approach to solving this problem. The object of our study is a sample of pulsars with a high-frequency break of the spectrum from Pushchino catalogue. A theoretical explanation of the observed dependence of the high-frequency break from the pulsar period is given. The dependence of the break position from the magnetic field is predicted. This explanation is based on a new mechanism for electron emission in the inner polar gap. Radiation occurs when electrons are accelerated in the electric field rising from zero at the star surface. Acceleration passes through a maximum and tends to zero when the electron velocity approaches the velocity of light. The all radiated power is allocated to the radio band. The averaging over the polar cap, with some nat...

  12. X-ray and Rotational Luminosity Correlation and Magnetic Heating of the Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Shibata, S; Yatsu, Y; Enoto, T; Bamba, A

    2016-01-01

    Previous works have suggested a correlation between the X-ray luminosity Lx and the rotational luminosity Lrot of the radio pulsars.However, none of the obtained regression lines are statistically acceptable due to large scatters. We construct a statistical model which has an intrinsic Lx-Lrot relation and reproduces the observed Lx distribution about it by using a Monte Carlo simulator, which takes into account the effects obscuring the intrinsic relation,i.e., the anisotropy of radiation, additional heating, uncertainty in distance and detection limit of the instruments. From the ATNF pulsar catalog we collect 57 `ordinary radio pulsars' with significant detection and 42 with upper limits.The sample does not include the high-magnetic field pulsars (>10^{13} G), which are separately analyzed. We obtain a statistically acceptable relation Lx (0.5 - 10 keV)= 10^{31.69} (Lrot / L_0)^{c_1} with c_1 = 1.03 \\pm 0.27 and L_0 =10^{35.38}. The distribution about the obtained Lx-Lrot relation is reproduced well by the...

  13. Einstein@Home DISCOVERY OF A PALFA MILLISECOND PULSAR IN AN ECCENTRIC BINARY ORBIT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knispel, B.; Allen, B. [Leibniz Universität, Hannover, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Lyne, A. G.; Stappers, B. W. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Freire, P. C. C.; Lazarus, P. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Aulbert, C.; Bock, O.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Fehrmann, H. [Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik, Callinstr. 38, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Bogdanov, S.; Camilo, F. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Brazier, A.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M. [Department of Astronomy and Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Cardoso, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Crawford, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, PA 17604-3003 (United States); Deneva, J. S. [National Research Council, resident at the Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Ferdman, R. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Hessels, J. W. T., E-mail: benjamin.knispel@aei.mpg.de [ASTRON, Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA, Dwingeloo (Netherlands); and others

    2015-06-10

    We report the discovery of the millisecond pulsar (MSP) PSR J1950+2414 (P = 4.3 ms) in a binary system with an eccentric (e = 0.08) 22 day orbit in Pulsar Arecibo L-band Feed Array survey observations with the Arecibo telescope. Its companion star has a median mass of 0.3 M{sub ⊙} and is most likely a white dwarf (WD). Fully recycled MSPs like this one are thought to be old neutron stars spun-up by mass transfer from a companion star. This process should circularize the orbit, as is observed for the vast majority of binary MSPs, which predominantly have orbital eccentricities e < 0.001. However, four recently discovered binary MSPs have orbits with 0. 027 < e < 0.44; PSR J1950+2414 is the fifth such system to be discovered. The upper limits for its intrinsic spin period derivative and inferred surface magnetic field strength are comparable to those of the general MSP population. The large eccentricities are incompatible with the predictions of the standard recycling scenario: something unusual happened during their evolution. Proposed scenarios are (a) initial evolution of the pulsar in a triple system which became dynamically unstable, (b) origin in an exchange encounter in an environment with high stellar density, (c) rotationally delayed accretion-induced collapse of a super-Chandrasekhar WD, and (d) dynamical interaction of the binary with a circumbinary disk. We compare the properties of all five known eccentric MSPs with the predictions of these formation channels. Future measurements of the masses and proper motion might allow us to firmly exclude some of the proposed formation scenarios.

  14. Review of overall parameters of giant radio pulses from the Crab pulsar and B1937+21

    CERN Document Server

    Bilous, A V; Popov, M V; Soglasnov, V A

    2007-01-01

    We present a review of observed parameters of giant radio pulses, based on the observations conducted by our group during recent years. The observations cover a broad frequency range of about 3 octaves, concentrating between 600 and 4850 MHz. Giant pulses of both the Crab pulsar and the millisecond pulsar B1937+21 were studied with the 70-m Tidbinbilla, the 100-m GBT, 64-m Kalyazin and Westerbork radio telescopes. We discuss pulse energy distribution, dependence of peak flux density from the pulse width, peculiarities of radio spectra, and polarization properties of giant radio pulses.

  15. On the detection of eccentric supermassive black hole binaries with pulsar timing arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, Eliu; McWilliams, Sean; Gair, Jonathan; Taylor, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    It is believed that supermassive black holes (SMBHs) with masses between a million up to a few billion solar masses are ubiquitous in nearby galactic nuclei. Hence, the merger of a pair of galaxies hosting these compact objects may result in the formation of a compact binary that decays to small orbital separations via interactions with its stellar and gaseous environments. Recent studies suggest that these formation channels imply that SMBH binaries may have large orbital eccentricities when they become dominated by gravitational wave emission. In light of these considerations, we present a novel and comprehensive framework that we put at work to carry out an end-to-end analysis of the effect of eccentricity on the amplitude and spectrum of a stochastic, isotropic gravitational wave background from SMBH binaries and single resolvable sources that may be detected with Pulsar Timing Arrays.

  16. On the nature of the "radio quiet" black hole binaries

    OpenAIRE

    Soleri, Paolo; Fender, Rob

    2011-01-01

    The coupling between accretion processes and ejection mechanisms in accreting black holes in binary systems can be investigated by empirical relations between the X-ray/radio and X-ray/optical-infrared luminosities. These correlations are valid over several orders of magnitude and were initially thought to be universal. However, recently, many black hole binaries have been found to produce jets that, given certain accretion-powered luminosities, are fainter than expected from the earlier corr...

  17. A Magnetar-like Outburst from a High-B Radio Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibald, R. F.; Kaspi, V. M.; Tendulkar, S. P.; Scholz, P.

    2016-09-01

    Radio pulsars are believed to have their emission powered by the loss of rotational kinetic energy. By contrast, magnetars show intense X-ray and γ-ray radiation whose luminosity greatly exceeds that due to spin down and magnetar luminosity is believed to be powered by intense internal magnetic fields. A basic prediction of this picture is that radio pulsars of high magnetic field should show magnetar-like emission. Here we report on a magnetar-like X-ray outburst from the radio pulsar PSR J1119-6127, heralded by two short bright X-ray bursts on 2016 July 27 and 28. Using target of opportunity data from the Swift X-ray Telescope and NuSTAR, we show that this pulsar’s flux has brightened by a factor of \\gt 160 in the 0.5-10 keV band, and that its previously soft X-ray spectrum has undergone a strong hardening with strong pulsations appearing for the first time above 2.5 keV, with phase-averaged emission detectable up to 25 keV. By comparing Swift-XRT and NuSTAR timing data with a pre-outburst ephemeris derived from Fermi Large Area Telescope data, we find that the source has contemporaneously undergone a large spin-up glitch of amplitude {{Δ }}ν /ν =5.74(8)× {10}-6. The collection of phenomena observed thus far in this outburst strongly mirrors those in most magnetar outbursts and provides an unambiguous connection between the radio pulsar and magnetar populations.

  18. On the mean profiles of radio pulsars I: Theory of the propagation effects

    OpenAIRE

    Beskin, V. S.; Philippov, A. A.

    2011-01-01

    We study the influence of the propagation effects on the mean profiles of radio pulsars using the Kravtsov-Orlov method of the wave propagation in the inhomogeneous media. This approach allows us firstly to include into consideration the transition from geometrical optics to vacuum propagation, the cyclotron absorption, and the wave refraction simultaneously. In addition, arbitrary non-dipole magnetic field configuration, drift motion of plasma particles, and their realistic energy distributi...

  19. Detecting Eccentric Supermassive Black Hole Binaries with Pulsar Timing Arrays: Resolvable Source Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, S. R.; Huerta, E. A.; Gair, J. R.; McWilliams, S. T.

    2016-01-01

    The couplings between supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) and their environments within galactic nuclei have been well studied as part of the search for solutions to the final parsec problem. The scattering of stars by the binary or the interaction with a circumbinary disk may efficiently drive the system to sub-parsec separations, allowing the binary to enter a regime where the emission of gravitational waves can drive it to merger within a Hubble time. However, these interactions can also affect the orbital parameters of the binary. In particular, they may drive an increase in binary eccentricity which survives until the system’s gravitational-wave (GW) signal enters the pulsar-timing array (PTA) band. Therefore, if we can measure the eccentricity from observed signals, we can potentially deduce some of the properties of the binary environment. To this end, we build on previous techniques to present a general Bayesian pipeline with which we can detect and estimate the parameters of an eccentric SMBHB system with PTAs. Additionally, we generalize the PTA {{ F }}{{e}}-statistic to eccentric systems, and show that both this statistic and the Bayesian pipeline are robust when studying circular or arbitrarily eccentric systems. We explore how eccentricity influences the detection prospects of single GW sources, as well as the detection penalty incurred by employing a circular waveform template to search for eccentric signals, and conclude by identifying important avenues for future study.

  20. Detecting eccentric supermassive black hole binaries with pulsar timing arrays: Resolvable source strategies

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, S R; Gair, J R; McWilliams, S T

    2015-01-01

    The couplings between supermassive black-hole binaries and their environments within galactic nuclei have been well studied as part of the search for solutions to the final parsec problem. The scattering of stars by the binary or the interaction with a circumbinary disk may efficiently drive the system to sub-parsec separations, allowing the binary to enter a regime where the emission of gravitational-waves can drive it to merger within a Hubble time. However, these interactions can also affect the orbital parameters of the binary. In particular, they may drive an increase in binary eccentricity which survives until the system's gravitational-wave signal enters the pulsar-timing array band. Therefore, if we can measure the eccentricity from observed signals, we can potentially deduce some of the properties of the binary environment. To this end, we build on previous techniques to present a general Bayesian pipeline with which we can detect and estimate the parameters of an eccentric supermassive black-hole bi...

  1. Constraints on individual supermassive black hole binaries from pulsar timing array limits on continuous gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutz, Katelin; Ma, Chung-Pei

    2016-06-01

    Pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) are placing increasingly stringent constraints on the strain amplitude of continuous gravitational waves emitted by supermassive black hole binaries on subparsec scales. In this paper, we incorporate independent information about the dynamical masses Mbh of supermassive black holes in specific galaxies at known distances and use this additional information to further constrain whether or not those galaxies could host a detectable supermassive black hole binary. We estimate the strain amplitudes from individual binaries as a function of binary mass ratio for two samples of nearby galaxies: (1) those with direct dynamical measurements of Mbh in the literature, and (2) the 116 most massive early-type galaxies (and thus likely hosts of the most massive black holes) within 108 Mpc from the MASSIVE Survey. Our exploratory analysis shows that the current PTA upper limits on continuous waves (as a function of angular position in the sky) can already constrain the mass ratios of hypothetical black hole binaries in many galaxies in our samples. The constraints are stronger for galaxies with larger Mbh and at smaller distances. For the black holes with Mbh ≳ 5 × 109 M⊙ at the centres of NGC 1600, NGC 4889, NGC 4486 (M87), and NGC 4649 (M60), any binary companion in orbit within the PTA frequency bands would have to have a mass ratio of a few per cent or less.

  2. Thermal Radio Emission from Radiative Shocks in Colliding Wind Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, G.; González, R. F.; Cantó, J.; Pérez-Torres, M. A.; Alberdi, A.

    2011-10-01

    We present a semi-analytic model for computing the thermal radio continuum emission from radiative shocks within colliding wind binaries. Assuming a thin shell approximation, we calculate the contribution of the wind collision region (WCR) to the total thermal emission for close binaries. We investigate the effect of the binary separation on the total spectrum. In addition, we point out the relevance of taking into account this contribution for the correct interpretation of the observations, and the accuracy of parameters derived from them.

  3. Einstein@Home Discovery of a PALFA Millisecond Pulsar in an Eccentric Binary Orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Knispel, B; Stappers, B W; Freire, P C C; Lazarus, P; Allen, B; Aulbert, C; Bock, O; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Cardoso, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J S; Eggenstein, H -B; Fehrmann, H; Ferdman, R; Hessels, J W T; Jenet, F A; Karako-Argaman, C; Kaspi, V M; van Leeuwen, J; Lorimer, D R; Lynch, R; Machenschalk, B; Madsen, E; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Scholz, P; Siemens, X; Spitler, L G; Stairs, I H; Stovall, K; Swiggum, J K; Venkataraman, A; Wharton, R S; Zhu, W W

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of the millisecond pulsar (MSP) PSR J1950+2414 ($P=4.3$ ms) in a binary system with an eccentric ($e=0.08$) orbit in Pulsar ALFA survey observations with the Arecibo telescope. Its companion star has a median mass of 0.3 $M_\\odot$ and is most likely a white dwarf. Fully recycled MSPs like this one are thought to be old neutron stars spun-up by mass transfer from a companion star. This process should circularize the orbit, as is observed for the vast majority of binary MSPs, which predominantly have orbital eccentricities $e < 0.001$. However, four recently discovered binary MSPs have orbits with larger eccentricities ($0.03 < e < 0.4$); PSR J1950+2414 is only the fifth such system to be discovered. The upper limits for the the intrinsic spin period derivative and inferred surface magnetic field strength are comparable to those of the general MSP population. The large eccentricities of these systems are not compatible with the predictions of the standard recycling scenario: som...

  4. Multifrequency Study of Giant Radio Pulses from the Crab Pulsar with K5 VLBI Recording Terminal

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, M V; Kondratiev, V I; Bilous, A V; Moshkina, O; Oreshko, V V; Ilyasov, Yu P; Sekido, M; Kondo, T

    2009-01-01

    Simultaneous multifrequency observations of the Crab pulsar giant pulses (GPs) were performed with the 64-m Kalyazin radio telescope at four frequencies 0.6, 1.4, 2.2 and 8.3 GHz using the K5 VLBI recording terminal. K5 terminal provided continuous recording in 16 4-MHz wide frequency channels distributed over 4 frequency bands. Several thousands of GPs were detected during about 6 hours of observations in two successive days in July 2005. Radio spectra of single GPs were analysed at separate frequencies and over whole frequency range. These spectra manifest notable modulation both on large ($\\Delta\

  5. Binary is Good: A Binary Inference Framework for Primary User Separation in Cognitive Radio Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Huy; Han, Zhu

    2010-01-01

    Primary users (PU) separation concerns with the issues of distinguishing and characterizing primary users in cognitive radio (CR) networks. We argue the need for PU separation in the context of collaborative spectrum sensing and monitor selection. In this paper, we model the observations of monitors as boolean OR mixtures of underlying binary latency sources for PUs, and devise a novel binary inference algorithm for PU separation. Simulation results show that without prior knowledge regarding PUs' activities, the algorithm achieves high inference accuracy. An interesting implication of the proposed algorithm is the ability to effectively represent n independent binary sources via (correlated) binary vectors of logarithmic length.

  6. Measuring the Size of the Vela Pulsar's Radio Emission Region

    CERN Document Server

    Gwinn, C R; Jauncey, D L; Hirabayashi, H; Kobayashi, H; Murata, Y; Edwards, P G; Carlson, B; Dougherty, S M; Britton, M C; McCulloch, P M; Lovell, J E J; Del Rizzo, D

    2000-01-01

    We describe measurements of the size of the Vela pulsar via scintillation,using both fits to the distribution of intensity and measurements of themodulation index. We briefly discuss systematic effects other than source sizethat can affect the distribution, including gain variations, self-noise,scintillation shot noise, and correlator saturation. Modulation index, a singlenumber, can be biased by all of these, whereas the distribution of intensity isaffected in different ways by different effects, providing means ofdistinguishing among them. Self-noise and gain variations are likely moreimportant at long observing wavelengths, and correlator saturation andscintillation shot noise at short wavelengths. We find a size of about 500 kmat decimeter wavelengths. Interestingly, this agrees with measurements ofmodulation index by Roberts & Ables at the same wavelength. Their results (andmore recently that reported by Macquart et al.) suggest that size decreaseswith increasing wavelength. Although consistent with ...

  7. Simultaneous absolute timing of the Crab pulsar at radio and optical wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterbroek, T.; Cognard, I.; Golden, A.; Verhoeve, P.; Martin, D. D. E.; Erd, C.; Schulz, R.; Stüwe, J. A.; Stankov, A.; Ho, T.

    2008-09-01

    Context: The Crab pulsar emits across a large part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Determining the time delay between the emission at different wavelengths will allow to better constrain the site and mechanism of the emission. We have simultaneously observed the Crab Pulsar in the optical with S-Cam, an instrument based on Superconducting Tunneling Junctions (STJs) with μs time resolution and at 2 GHz using the Nançay radio telescope with an instrument doing coherent dedispersion and able to record giant pulses data. Aims: We have studied the delay between the radio and optical pulse using simultaneously obtained data therefore reducing possible uncertainties present in previous observations. Methods: We determined the arrival times of the (mean) optical and radio pulse and compared them using the tempo2 software package. Results: We present the most accurate value for the optical-radio lag of 255 ± 21 μs and suggest the likelihood of a spectral dependence to the excess optical emission asociated with giant radio pulses.

  8. On the possible mechanism to form the radio emission spectrum of the Crab pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Machabeli, George

    2014-01-01

    In the present paper a self-consistent theory, explaining shape of the observed phase-averaged radio spectrum in the frequency range from 100MHz to 10GHz is presented. The radio waves are assumed to be generated near the light cylinder through the cyclotron resonance. The cyclotron instability provides excitement of the electron-positron plasma eigen-waves, which come in radio domain when the resonant particles are the most energetic primary beam electrons. It is widely accepted that the distribution function of relativistic particles is one-dimensional at the pulsar surface. The generated waves react back on the resonant particles causing their diffusion in the perpendicular direction to the magnetic field and violating the one-dimensionality, which switches on the synchrotron radiation process. The synchrotron emission of the beam electrons provides generation of high-energy $\\gamma$-rays simultaneously with the radio emission, that explains the observed pulse phase-coincidence in these energy domains. The ...

  9. Detection of the new rotating radio transient pulsar PSR J2225+35

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shitov, Yu. P.; Kuzmin, A. D.; Dumskii, D. V.; Losovsky, B. Ya.

    2009-06-01

    We have detected the new pulsar PSR J2225+35, which displays the properties of the new class of radio sources “Rotating Radio Transients” (RRATs). RRATs are distinguished by isolated bursts of radio emission and long quiet periods. Throughout 45 observations with a total duration of about 3 hr, only two bursts of radio emission lasting a total of about 10 min were detected in two observations. The temporal and frequency delay of the pulses corresponds to the dispersion measure DM = 51.8 pc/cm3 and the distance d = 3.05 kpc. The period of the pulses is P = 0.94 s. The emission is polarized, with the rotation measure being RM = 49.8 rad/m2.

  10. Detection of eccentric supermassive black hole binaries with pulsar timing arrays: Signal-to-noise ratio calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, E. A.; McWilliams, Sean T.; Gair, Jonathan R.; Taylor, Stephen R.

    2015-09-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the expected signal-to-noise ratios of supermassive black hole binaries on eccentric orbits observed by pulsar timing arrays. We derive several analytical relations that extend the results of Peters and Mathews [Phys. Rev. D 131, 435 (1963)] to quantify the impact of eccentricity in the detection of single resolvable binaries in the pulsar timing array band. We present ready-to-use expressions to compute the increase/loss in signal-to-noise ratio of eccentric single resolvable sources whose dominant harmonic is located in the low/high frequency sensitivity regime of pulsar timing arrays. Building upon the work of Phinney (arXiv:astro-ph/0108028) and Enoki and Nagashima [Prog. Theor. Phys. 117, 241 (2007)], we present an analytical framework that enables the construction of rapid spectra for a stochastic gravitational-wave background generated by a cosmological population of eccentric sources. We confirm previous findings which indicate that, relative to a population of quasicircular binaries, the strain of a stochastic, isotropic gravitational-wave background generated by a cosmological population of eccentric binaries will be suppressed in the frequency band of pulsar timing arrays. We quantify this effect in terms of signal-to-noise ratios in a pulsar timing array.

  11. Using Pulsar Timing observations to understand the formation and evolution of supermassive black hole binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornish, Neil; Sampson, Laura; McWilliams, Sean

    2015-04-01

    The astrophysical processes that form and harden supermassive black hole binaries impart distinct features that may be observed in the gravitational-wave spectrum within the sensitive frequency range of Pulsar Timing Arrays (PTA). We investigate how well the various formation and hardening mechanisms can be constrained by applying Bayesian inference to simulated PTA data sets. We find that even without strong priors on the merger rate, any detection of the signal will place interesting constraints on the astrophysical models. Folding in priors on the merger rate allows us to place interesting constraints on the astrophysical models even before a detection is made.

  12. Tidal pressure induced neutrino emission as an energy dissipation mechanism in binary pulsar systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We briefly review possible systematic limitations to the inferred General Relativity tests in binary pulsar systems, then propose a new mechanism whereby orbital energy can drive the electron-proton vs. neutron density away from equilibrium, and the concomitant neutrino (or antineutrino) emission represents an orbital energy dissipation. Of the total orbital energy loss rate, we estimate the fractional contribution of this mechanism as 8x10-6, whereas the observational accuracy is at the level of 7x10-3, and agrees with the predicted rate of gravitational radiation. 10 refs

  13. Testing Lorentz violation with binary pulsars: constraints on standard model extension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Xie

    2013-01-01

    Under the standard model extension (SME) framework,Lorentz invariance is tested in five binary pulsars:PSR J0737-3039,PSR B 1534+ 12,PSR J 1756-2251,PSR B1913+16 and PSR B2127+11C.By analyzing the advance of periastron,we obtain the constraints on a dimensionless combination of SME parameters that is sensitive to timing observations.The results imply no evidence for the break of Lorentz invariance at the 10-10 level,one order of magnitude larger than the previous estimation.

  14. Spectral Properties of the X-ray Binary Pulsar LMC X-4 during Different Intensity States

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S. Naik; B. Paul

    2002-03-01

    We present spectral variations of the binary X-ray pulsar LMC X-4 observed with the RXTE/PCA during different phases of its 30.5 day long third period. Only out-of-eclipse data were used for this study. The 3–25 keV spectrum, modeled with high energy cut-off power-law and iron line emission is found to show strong dependence on the intensity state. Correlations between the Fe line emission flux and different parameters of the continuum are presented here.

  15. A search for rotating radio transients and fast radio bursts in the Parkes high-latitude pulsar survey

    CERN Document Server

    Rane, A; Bates, S D; McMann, N; McLaughlin, M A; Rajwade, K

    2015-01-01

    Discoveries of rotating radio transients and fast radio bursts (FRBs) in pulsar surveys suggest that further transient sources await discovery in archival data sets. Here we report on a single-pulse search for dispersed radio bursts over a wide range of Galactic latitudes ($|b| 0.1$ Jy to be ${\\cal R} = 3.3^{+5.0}_{-2.5} \\times 10^3$ FRBs day$^{-1}$ sky$^{-1}$, where the uncertainties represent a $99\\%$ confidence interval. While this rate is several times lower than inferred from previous studies, it is consistent with all systematic FRB searches at Parkes to date and does not require the need to postulate a dearth of FRBs at intermediate latitudes.

  16. On the role of the current loss in radio pulsar evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Beskin, V S

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this article is to draw attention to the importance of the electric current loss in the energy output of radio pulsars. We remind that even the losses attributed to the magneto-dipole radiation of a pulsar in vacuum can be written as a result of an Ampere force action of the electric currens flowing over the neutron star surface (Michel, 1991, Beskin et al., 1993). It is this force that is responsible for the transfer of angular momentum of a neutron star to an outgoing magneto-dipole wave. If a pulsar is surrounded by plasma, and there is no longitudinal current in its magnetosphere, there is no energy loss (Beskin et al., 1993, Mestel et al., 1999). It is the longitudinal current closing within the pulsar polar cap that exerts the retardation torque acting on the neutron star. This torque can be determined if the structure of longitudinal current is known. Here we remind of the solution by Beskin, Gurevitch & Istomin (1993) and discuss the validity of such an assumption. The behavior of the r...

  17. Gamma-ray and Radio Properties of Six Pulsars Detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltevrede, P.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B. M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Camilo, F.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cognard, I.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; Dermer, C. D.; Desvignes, G.; de Angelis, A.; de Luca, A.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; Dormody, M.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Frailis, M.; Freire, P. C. C.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Hobbs, G.; Hughes, R. E.; Jackson, M. S.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Johnston, S.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Keith, M.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocian, M. L.; Kramer, M.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Lyne, A. G.; Makeev, A.; Manchester, R. N.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Meurer, C.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Ransom, S. M.; Razzano, M.; Rea, N.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Rochester, L. S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stappers, B. W.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Theureau, G.; Thompson, D. J.; Thorsett, S. E.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Van Etten, A.; Vasileiou, V.; Venter, C.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Wang, N.; Watters, K.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2010-01-01

    We report the detection of pulsed γ-rays for PSRs J0631+1036, J0659+1414, J0742-2822, J1420-6048, J1509-5850, and J1718-3825 using the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (formerly known as GLAST). Although these six pulsars are diverse in terms of their spin parameters, they share an important feature: their γ-ray light curves are (at least given the current count statistics) single peaked. For two pulsars, there are hints for a double-peaked structure in the light curves. The shapes of the observed light curves of this group of pulsars are discussed in the light of models for which the emission originates from high up in the magnetosphere. The observed phases of the γ-ray light curves are, in general, consistent with those predicted by high-altitude models, although we speculate that the γ-ray emission of PSR J0659+1414, possibly featuring the softest spectrum of all Fermi pulsars coupled with a very low efficiency, arises from relatively low down in the magnetosphere. High-quality radio polarization data are available showing that all but one have a high degree of linear polarization. This allows us to place some constraints on the viewing geometry and aids the comparison of the γ-ray light curves with high-energy beam models.

  18. GAMMA-RAY AND RADIO PROPERTIES OF SIX PULSARS DETECTED BY THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the detection of pulsed γ-rays for PSRs J0631+1036, J0659+1414, J0742-2822, J1420-6048, J1509-5850, and J1718-3825 using the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (formerly known as GLAST). Although these six pulsars are diverse in terms of their spin parameters, they share an important feature: their γ-ray light curves are (at least given the current count statistics) single peaked. For two pulsars, there are hints for a double-peaked structure in the light curves. The shapes of the observed light curves of this group of pulsars are discussed in the light of models for which the emission originates from high up in the magnetosphere. The observed phases of the γ-ray light curves are, in general, consistent with those predicted by high-altitude models, although we speculate that the γ-ray emission of PSR J0659+1414, possibly featuring the softest spectrum of all Fermi pulsars coupled with a very low efficiency, arises from relatively low down in the magnetosphere. High-quality radio polarization data are available showing that all but one have a high degree of linear polarization. This allows us to place some constraints on the viewing geometry and aids the comparison of the γ-ray light curves with high-energy beam models.

  19. Repeating Fast Radio Bursts from Highly Magnetized Pulsars Travelling through Asteroid Belts

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, Z G; Wu, X F; Huang, Y F

    2016-01-01

    Very recently Spitler et al. (2016) reported their detections of ten additional bright bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst (FRB) 121102. This repeating FRB is obviously distinct from the other non-repeating FRBs and thus challenges all of the energy source models but giant pulses from young pulsars. Here we propose a different model, in which highly magnetized pulsars travel through asteroid belts of other stars. We show that a repeating FRB could originate from this pulsar encountering with lots of asteroids in the belt. During such an impact, an electric field induced on a radially elongated, transversely compressed asteroid near the pulsar's surface is strong enough to accelerate electrons to an ultra-relativistic speed instantaneously. Subsequent movement of these electrons along the magnetic field lines not only gives rise to a current loop, but also produces coherent curvature radiation, which can well account for the properties of an FRB. While the high repetitive rate estimated is well c...

  20. Fast radio bursts as giant pulses from young rapidly rotating pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyutikov, Maxim; Burzawa, Lukasz; Popov, Sergei B.

    2016-10-01

    We discuss possible association of fast radio bursts (FRBs) with supergiant pulses emitted by young pulsars (ages ˜ tens to hundreds of years) born with regular magnetic field but very short - few milliseconds - spin periods. We assume that FRBs are extra-Galactic events coming from distances d ≲ 100 Mpc and that most of the dispersion measure (DM) comes from the material in the freshly ejected SNR shell. We then predict that for a given burst the DM should decrease with time and that FRBs are not expected to be seen below ˜300 MHz due to free-free absorption in the expanding ejecta. A supernova might have been detected years before the burst; FRBs are mostly associated with star-forming galaxies. The model requires that some pulsars are born with very fast spins, of the order of few milliseconds. The observed distribution of spin-down powers dot{E} in young energetic pulsars is consistent with equal birth rate per decade of dot{E}. Accepting this injection distribution and scaling the intrinsic brightness of FRBs with dot{E}, we predict the following properties of a large sample of FRBs: (i) the brightest observed events come from a broad distribution in distances; (ii) for repeating bursts brightness either remains nearly constant (if the spin-down time is longer than the age of the pulsar) or decreases with time otherwise; in the latter case DM ∝ dot{E}.

  1. Suzaku Observation of Be/X-ray Binary Pulsar EXO 2030+375

    CERN Document Server

    Naik, Sachindra

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we study the timing and spectral properties of Be/X-ray binary pulsar EXO 2030+375 using a $Suzaku$ observation on 2012 May 23, during a less intense Type I outburst. Pulsations were clearly detected in the X-ray light curves at a barycentric period of 41.2852 s which suggests that the pulsar is spinning-up. The pulse profiles were found to be peculiar e.g. unlike that obtained from the earlier Suzaku observation on 2007 May 14. A single-peaked narrow profile at soft X-rays (0.5-10 keV range) changed to a double-peaked broad profile in 12-55 keV energy range and again reverted back to a smooth single-peaked profile at hard X-rays (55-70 keV range). The 1.0-100.0 keV broad-band spectrum of the pulsar was found to be well described by three continuum models such as (i) a partial covering high energy cut-off power-law model, (ii) a partially absorbed power-law with high-energy exponential rolloff and (iii) a partial covering Negative and Positive power law with EXponential (NPEX) continuum model. U...

  2. Searches for Radio Pulsars & Fast Transients and Multiwavelength Studies of Single-pulse Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickaliger, Mitchell B.

    1227-6208 has a period of 34.53 ms, a DM of 362.6 pc cm-3, is in a 6.7 day binary orbit. PSR J1546-59 has a period of 7.80 ms and a DM of 168.3 pc cm-3. PSR J1725-3853 is an isolated 4.79-ms pulsar with a DM of 158.2 pc cm-3. PSR J1753-2822 has a period of 18.62 ms, a DM of 298.4 pc cm-3, and is in a 9.3 hour binary orbit. These pulsars were likely missed in earlier processing efforts due to the fact that they have both high DMs and short periods, and also the large number of candidates that needed to be looked through. These discoveries suggest that further pulsars are awaiting discovery in the multibeam survey data. We also searched for single pulses out to a DM of 5000 pc cm-3 with widths of up to two seconds in our reprocessing of the PMPS data. We recorded single pulses from 264 known pulsars and 15 RRATs. We fit amplitude distributions of the pulsars with lognormal distributions and power-law tails, finding that some pulsars show a deviation from a lognormal distribution in the form of an excess of high-energy pulses. Fitting lognormal distributions to the amplitudes of pulses from RRATs showed similar behavior for most RRATs. Here, however, there seem to be two distinct populations of pulses, with the first population being consistent with noise. For pulsars that were detected in a periodicity search, we computed the ratio of their single-pulse S/N to their FFT S/N and looked for correlations between this ratio and physical parameters of the pulsars. We found a few strong correlations, but they all seem to be due to the strongest correlation between the ratio and spin period.

  3. FIVE NEW MILLISECOND PULSARS FROM A RADIO SURVEY OF 14 UNIDENTIFIED FERMI-LAT GAMMA-RAY SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, M. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Camilo, F. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Johnson, T. J. [National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC 20001 (United States); Ferrara, E. C.; Harding, A. K. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Guillemot, L.; Kramer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Hessels, J. [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Johnston, S.; Keith, M.; Reynolds, J. E. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Ransom, S. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Ray, P. S.; Wood, K. S. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Sarkissian, J., E-mail: kerrm@stanford.edu, E-mail: fernando@astro.columbia.edu, E-mail: tyrel.j.johnson@gmail.com [CSIRO Parkes Observatory, Parkes, NSW 2870 (Australia)

    2012-03-20

    We have discovered five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in a survey of 14 unidentified Fermi Large Area Telescope sources in the southern sky using the Parkes radio telescope. PSRs J0101-6422, J1514-4946, and J1902-5105 reside in binaries, while PSRs J1658-5324 and J1747-4036 are isolated. Using an ephemeris derived from timing observations of PSR J0101-6422 (P = 2.57 ms, DM = 12 pc cm{sup -3}), we have detected {gamma}-ray pulsations and measured its proper motion. Its {gamma}-ray spectrum (a power law of {Gamma} = 0.9 with a cutoff at 1.6 GeV) and efficiency are typical of other MSPs, but its radio and {gamma}-ray light curves challenge simple geometric models of emission. The high success rate of this survey-enabled by selecting {gamma}-ray sources based on their detailed spectral characteristics-and other similarly successful searches indicate that a substantial fraction of the local population of MSPs may soon be known.

  4. Probing the presence of a single or binary black hole in the globular cluster NGC 6752 with pulsar dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Colpi, M; Possenti, A; Colpi, Monica; Mapelli, Michela; Possenti, Andrea

    2003-01-01

    The five millisecond pulsars that inhabit NGC 6752 display locations or accelerations that are quite unusual compared to all other pulsars known in globular clusters. In particular PSR-A, a binary pulsar, lives in the cluster halo, while PSR-B and PSR-E, located in the core, show remarkably high negative spin derivatives. This is suggestive that some uncommon dynamical process is at play in the cluster core that we attribute to the presence of a massive perturber. We here investigate whether a single intermediate-mass black hole, lying on the extrapolation of the Mass versus Sigma relation observed in galaxy spheroids, or a less massive binary consisting of two black holes could play the requested role. To this purpose we simulated binary-binary encounters involving PSR-A, its companion star, and the black hole(s). Various scenarios are discussed in detail. In our close 4-body encounters, a black hole-black hole binary may attract on a long-term stable orbit a millisecond pulsar. Timing measurements on the ca...

  5. Pulsar observations with European telescopes for testing gravity and detecting gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Perrodin, D; Janssen, G H; Karuppusamy, R; Kramer, M; Lee, K; Liu, K; McKee, J; Purver, M; Sanidas, S; Smits, R; Stappers, B W; Zhu, W; Concu, R; Melis, A; Burgay, M; Casu, S; Corongiu, A; Egron, E; Iacolina, N; Pellizzoni, A; Pilia, M; Trois, A

    2016-01-01

    A background of nanohertz gravitational waves from supermassive black hole binaries could soon be detected by pulsar timing arrays, which measure the times-of-arrival of radio pulses from millisecond pulsars with very high precision. The European Pulsar Timing Array uses five large European radio telescopes to monitor high-precision millisecond pulsars, imposing in this way strong constraints on a gravitational wave background. To achieve the necessary precision needed to detect gravitational waves, the Large European Array for Pulsars (LEAP) performs simultaneous observations of pulsars with all five telescopes, which allows us to coherently add the radio pulses, maximize the signal-to-noise of pulsar signals and increase the precision of times-of-arrival. We report on the progress made and results obtained by the LEAP collaboration, and in particular on the addition of the Sardinia Radio Telescope to the LEAP observations during its scientific validation phase. In addition, we discuss how LEAP can be used t...

  6. Relativistic Measurements from Timing the Binary Pulsar PSR B1913+16

    CERN Document Server

    Weisberg, Joel M

    2016-01-01

    We present relativistic analyses of 9257 measurements of times-of-arrival from the first binary pulsar, PSR B1913+16, acquired over the last thirty-five years. The determination of the 'Keplerian' orbital elements plus two relativistic terms completely characterizes the binary system, aside from an unknown rotation about the line of sight; leading to a determination of the masses of the pulsar and its companion: 1.438 $\\pm$ 0.001 solar masses and 1.390 $\\pm$ 0.001 solar masses, respectively. In addition, the complete system characterization allows the creation of tests of relativistic gravitation by comparing measured and predicted sizes of various relativistic phenomena. We find that the ratio of observed orbital period decrease due to gravitational wave damping (corrected by a kinematic term) to the general relativistic prediction, is 0.9983 pm 0.0016; thereby confirming the existence and strength of gravitational radiation as predicted by general relativity. For the first time in this system, we have also ...

  7. Fermi Observation of the transitional pulsar binary XSS J12270-4859

    CERN Document Server

    Xing, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Because of the disappearance of its accretion disk since the time period around 2012 November--December, XSS J12270-4859 has recently been identified as, in addition to PSR J1023+0038, another transitional millisecond pulsar binary. We have carried out detailed analysis of the Fermi Large Area Telescope data for the binary. While both spectra before and after the disk-disappearance transition are well described by an exponentially cut-off power law, typical for pulsars' emission in the Fermi's 0.2-300 GeV, a factor of 2 flux decrease related to the transition is detected. A weak orbital modulation is seen, but only detectable in the after-transition data, same to that found at X-rays. In the long-term light curve of the source before the transition, a factor of 3 flux variations are seen. Comparing to the properties of J1023+0038, we disucss the implications from these results. We suggest that since the modulation is aligned with that at X-rays in orbital phase, it possibly arises due to the occultation of th...

  8. BeppoSAX observation of the X-ray binary pulsar Vela X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandini, M.; Dal Fiume, D.; Nicastro, L.; Giarrusso, S.; Segreto, A.; Piraino, S.; Cusumano, G.; Del Sordo, S.; Guainazzi, M.; Piro, L.

    1997-05-01

    We report on the spectral (pulse averaged) and timing analysis of the ~20 ksec observation of the X-ray binary pulsar Vela X-1 performed during the BeppoSAX Science Verification Phase. The source was observed in two different intensity states: the low state is probably due to an erratic intensity dip and shows a decrease of a factor ~2 in intensity, and a factor 10 in NH. We have not been able to fit the 2-100 keV continuum spectrum with the standard (for an X-ray pulsar) power law modified by a high energy cutoff because of the flattening of the spectrum in ~10-30 keV. The timing analysis confirms previous results: the pulse profile changes from a five-peak structure for energies less than 15 keV, to a simpler two-peak shape at higher energies. The Fourier analysis shows a very complex harmonic component: up to 23 harmonics are clearly visible in the power spectrum, with a dominant first harmonic for low energy data, and a second one as the more prominent for energies greater than 15 keV. The aperiodic component in the Vela X-1 power spectrum presents a knee at about 1 Hz. The pulse period, corrected for binary motion, is 283.206+/-0.001 sec.

  9. A NuSTAR Observation of the Gamma-ray-emitting X-ray Binary and Transitional Millisecond Pulsar Candidate 1RXS J154439.4-112820

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, Slavko

    2016-07-01

    I present a 40 ks Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array observation of the recently identified low-luminosity X-ray binary and transitional millisecond pulsar (tMSP) candidate 1RXS J154439.4-112820, which is associated with the high-energy γ-ray source 3FGL J1544.6-1125. The system is detected up to ˜30 keV with an extension of the same power-law spectrum and rapid large-amplitude variability between two flux levels observed in soft X-rays. These findings provide further evidence that 1RXS J154439.4-112820 belongs to the same class of objects as the nearby bona fide tMSPs PSR J1023+0038 and XSS J12270-4859 and therefore almost certainly hosts a millisecond pulsar accreting at low luminosity. I also examine the long-term accretion history of 1RXS J154439.4-112820 based on archival optical, ultraviolet, X-ray, and γ-ray light curves covering approximately the past decade. Throughout this period, the source has maintained similar flux levels at all wavelengths, which is an indication that it has not experienced prolonged episodes of a non-accreting radio pulsar state but may spontaneously undergo such events in the future.

  10. X-ray Spectroscopy of the High Mass X-ray Binary Pulsar Centaurus X-3 over its Binary Orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Naik, Sachindra; Ali, Zulfikar

    2011-01-01

    We present a comprehensive spectral analysis of the high mass X-ray binary (HMXB) pulsar Centaurus X-3 with the Suzaku observatory covering nearly one orbital period. The light curve shows the presence of extended dips which are rarely seen in HMXBs. These dips are seen up to as high as ~40 keV. The pulsar spectra during the eclipse, out-of-eclipse, and dips are found to be well described by a partial covering power-law model with high energy cut-off and three Gaussian functions for 6.4 keV, 6.7 keV, and 6.97 keV iron emission lines. The dips in the light curve can be explained by the presence of an additional absorption component with high column density and covering fraction, the values of which are not significant during the rest of the orbital phases. The iron line parameters during the dips and eclipse are significantly different compared to those during the rest of the observation. During the dips, the iron line intensities are found to be lesser by a factor of 2--3 with significant increase in the line...

  11. Detection of cyclotron resonance scattering feature in high-mass X-ray binary pulsar SMC X-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaisawal, Gaurava K.; Naik, Sachindra

    2016-09-01

    We report broad-band spectral properties of the high-mass X-ray binary pulsar SMC X-2 by using three simultaneous Nuclear Spectroscopy Telescope Array and Swift/XRT observations during its 2015 outburst. The pulsar was significantly bright, reaching a luminosity up to as high as ˜5.5 × 1038 erg s-1 in 1-70 keV range. Spin period of the pulsar was estimated to be 2.37 s. Pulse profiles were found to be strongly luminosity dependent. The 1-70 keV energy spectrum of the pulsar was well described with three different continuum models such as (i) negative and positive power law with exponential cutoff, (ii) Fermi-Dirac cutoff power law and (iii) cutoff power-law models. Apart from the presence of an iron line at ˜6.4 keV, a model independent absorption like feature at ˜27 keV was detected in the pulsar spectrum. This feature was identified as a cyclotron absorption line and detected for the first time in this pulsar. Corresponding magnetic field of the neutron star was estimated to be ˜2.3 × 1012 G. The cyclotron line energy showed a marginal negative dependence on the luminosity. The cyclotron line parameters were found to be variable with pulse phase and interpreted as due to the effect of emission geometry or complicated structure of the pulsar magnetic field.

  12. Directional Statistics for Polarization Observations of Individual Pulses from Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    McKinnon, M M

    2010-01-01

    Radio polarimetry is a three-dimensional statistical problem. The three-dimensional aspect of the problem arises from the Stokes parameters Q, U, and V, which completely describe the polarization of electromagnetic radiation and conceptually define the orientation of a polarization vector in the Poincar'e sphere. The statistical aspect of the problem arises from the random fluctuations in the source-intrinsic polarization and the instrumental noise. A simple model for the polarization of pulsar radio emission has been used to derive the three-dimensional statistics of radio polarimetry. The model is based upon the proposition that the observed polarization is due to the incoherent superposition of two, highly polarized, orthogonal modes. The directional statistics derived from the model follow the Bingham-Mardia and Fisher family of distributions. The model assumptions are supported by the qualitative agreement between the statistics derived from it and those measured with polarization observations of the ind...

  13. Einstein@Home Discovery of 24 Pulsars in the Parkes Multi-beam Pulsar Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Knispel, B; Kim, H; Keane, E F; Allen, B; Anderson, D; Aulbert, C; Bock, O; Crawford, F; Eggenstein, H -B; Fehrmann, H; Hammer, D; Kramer, M; Lyne, A G; Machenschalk, B; Miller, R B; Papa, M A; Rastawicki, D; Sarkissian, J; Siemens, X; Stappers, B W

    2013-01-01

    We have conducted a new search for radio pulsars in compact binary systems in the Parkes multi-beam pulsar survey (PMPS) data, employing novel methods to remove the Doppler modulation from binary motion. This has yielded unparalleled sensitivity to pulsars in compact binaries. The required computation time of approximately 17 000 CPU core years was provided by the distributed volunteer computing project Einstein@Home, which has a sustained computing power of about one PFlop/s. We discovered 24 new pulsars in our search, of which 18 were isolated pulsars, and six were members of binary systems. Despite the wide filterbank channels and relatively slow sampling time of the PMPS data, we found pulsars with very large ratios of dispersion measure (DM) to spin period. Among those is PSR J1748-3009, the millisecond pulsar with the highest known DM (420 pc cm^{-3}). We also discovered PSR J1840-0643, which is in a binary system with an orbital period of 937 days, the fourth largest known. The new pulsar J1750-2531 li...

  14. DISCOVERY OF EXTENDED AND VARIABLE RADIO STRUCTURE FROM THE GAMMA-RAY BINARY SYSTEM PSR B1259-63/LS 2883

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PSR B1259-63 is a 48 ms pulsar in a highly eccentric 3.4 year orbit around the young massive star LS 2883. During the periastron passage the system displays transient non-thermal unpulsed emission from radio to very high energy gamma rays. It is one of the three galactic binary systems clearly detected at TeV energies, together with LS 5039 and LS I +61 303. We observed PSR B1259-63 after the 2007 periastron passage with the Australian Long Baseline Array at 2.3 GHz to trace the milliarcsecond (mas) structure of the source at three different epochs. We have discovered extended and variable radio structure. The peak of the radio emission is detected outside the binary system near periastron, at projected distances of 10-20 mas (25-45 AU assuming a distance of 2.3 kpc). The total extent of the emission is ∼50 mas (∼120 AU). This is the first observational evidence that non-accreting pulsars orbiting massive stars can produce variable extended radio emission at AU scales. Similar structures are also seen in LS 5039 and LS I +61 303, in which the nature of the compact object is unknown. The discovery presented here for the young non-accreting pulsar PSR B1259-63 reinforces the link with these two sources and supports the presence of pulsars in these systems as well. A simple kinematical model considering only a spherical stellar wind can approximately trace the extended structures if the binary system orbit has a longitude of the ascending node of Ω ∼ -400 and a magnetization parameter of σ ∼ 0.005.

  15. Constraint on Pulsar Wind Properties from Induced Compton Scattering off Radio Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Shuta J

    2013-01-01

    Pulsar winds have longstanding problems in energy conversion and pair cascade processes which determine the magnetization $\\sigma$, the pair multiplicity $\\kappa$ and the bulk Lorentz factor $\\gamma$ of the wind. We study induced Compton scattering by a relativistically moving cold plasma to constrain wind properties by imposing that radio pulses from the pulsar itself are not scattered by the wind as was first studied by Wilson & Rees. We find that relativistic effects cause a significant increase or decrease of the scattering coefficient depending on scattering geometry. Applying to the Crab, we consider uncertainties of an inclination angle of the wind velocity with respect to the radio beam $\\theta_{\\rm pl}$ and the emission region size $r_{\\rm e}$ which determines an opening angle of the radio beam. We obtain the lower limit $\\gamma\\gtrsim10^{1.7}r^{1/2}_{\\rm e,3}\\theta^{-1}_{\\rm pl}(1+\\sigma)^{-1/4}$ ($r_{\\rm e}=10^3r_{\\rm e,3}$ cm) at the light cylinder $r_{\\rm LC}$ for an inclined wind $\\theta_{\\r...

  16. Sifting for Fast Radio Transients in Pulsar Survey Data Using the Spectral Modulation Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitler, Laura; Cordes, J.; Chatterjee, S.; Stone, J.

    2012-01-01

    Large-scale surveys for fast radio transients apply single-pulse search algorithms to high time resolution spectral data (i.e. those typical of pulsar surveys). Such surveys are often plagued by radio frequency interference (RFI), which when not properly mitigated, can confuse detection pipelines and lead to a large number of false candidates. We have developed a method to classify a candidate signal based on the modulation of its spectrum using the spectral modulation index. In brief, broadband and narrowband signals have low and high modulation indices respectively, and by choosing a modulation index cutoff, a spectrum can be automatically classified as either broad or narrowband. Our method targets broadband (continuum) transients that have have a non-zero dispersion measure, while RFI is generally broadband at low dispersion measures or narrowband. We show that the spectral modulation index is a powerful tool for identifying RFI and demonstrate the technique with Crab giant pulses and Rotating Radio Transients (RRATs). We also apply it to data taken for the Pulsar ALFA (PALFA) survey being conducted at the Arecibo Observatory and show preliminary results with an emphasis on the data collected with the new Mock spectrometers.

  17. DISCOVERY OF PSR J1227−4853: A TRANSITION FROM A LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY TO A REDBACK MILLISECOND PULSAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Jayanta; Bhattacharyya, Bhaswati; Stappers, Ben [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Ray, Paul S.; Wolff, Michael; Wood, Kent S. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Chengalur, Jayaram N. [National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Pune 411 007 (India); Deneva, Julia [NRC Research Associate, resident at Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Camilo, Fernando [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Johnson, Tyrel J. [College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030, USA, resident at Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Hessels, Jason W. T.; Bassa, Cees G. [ASTRON, the Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA, Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Keane, Evan F. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Mail H30, P.O. Box 218, VIC 3122 (Australia); Ferrara, Elizabeth C.; Harding, Alice K. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2015-02-10

    XSS J12270−4859 is an X-ray binary associated with the Fermi Large Area Telescope gamma-ray source 1FGL J1227.9−4852. In 2012 December, this source underwent a transition where the X-ray and optical luminosity dropped and the spectral signatures of an accretion disk disappeared. We report the discovery of a 1.69 millisecond pulsar (MSP), PSR J1227−4853, at a dispersion measure of 43.4 pc cm{sup −3} associated with this source, using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) at 607 MHz. This demonstrates that, post-transition, the system hosts an active radio MSP. This is the third system after PSR J1023+0038 and PSR J1824−2452I showing evidence of state switching between radio MSP and low-mass X-ray binary states. We report timing observations of PSR J1227−4853 with the GMRT and Parkes, which give a precise determination of the rotational and orbital parameters of the system. The companion mass measurement of 0.17–0.46 M{sub ⊙} suggests that this is a redback system. PSR J1227−4853 is eclipsed for about 40% of its orbit at 607 MHz with additional short-duration eclipses at all orbital phases. We also find that the pulsar is very energetic, with a spin-down luminosity of ∼10{sup 35} erg s{sup −1}. We report simultaneous imaging and timing observations with the GMRT, which suggests that eclipses are caused by absorption rather than dispersion smearing or scattering.

  18. SXP 1062, a young Be X-ray binary pulsar with long spin period; Implications for the neutron star birth spin

    CERN Document Server

    Haberl, F; Filipovic, M D; Pietsch, W; Crawford, E J

    2011-01-01

    (shortened) The SMC is ideally suited to investigating the recent star formation history from X-ray source population studies. It harbours a large number of Be/X-ray binaries, and the supernova remnants can be easily resolved with imaging X-ray instruments. We search for new supernova remnants in the SMC and in particular for composite remnants with a central X-ray source. We study the morphology of newly found candidate supernova remnants using radio, optical and X-ray images and investigate their X-ray spectra. Here we report on the discovery of the new supernova remnant around the recently discovered Be/X-ray binary pulsar SXP 1062 in radio and X-ray images. The Be/X-ray binary system is found near the centre of the supernova remnant, which is located at the outer edge of the eastern wing of the SMC. The remnant is oxygen-rich, indicating that it developed from a type Ib event. From XMM-Newton observations we find that the neutron star with a spin period of 1062 s shows a very high average spin-down rate o...

  19. Fast radio bursts as giant pulses from young rapidly rotating pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Lyutikov, Maxim; Popov, Sergei B

    2016-01-01

    We discuss possible association of fast radio bursts (FRBs) with supergiant pulses emitted by young pulsars (ages $\\sim$ tens to hundreds of years) born with regular magnetic field but very short -- few milliseconds -- spin periods. FRBs are extra-Galactic events coming from distances $d \\lesssim 100$ Mpc. Most of the dispersion measure (DM) comes from the material in the freshly ejected SNR shell; for a given burst the DM should decrease with time. FRBs are not expected to be seen below $\\sim 300 $ MHz due to free-free absorption in the expanding ejecta. A supernova might have been detected years before the burst; FRBs are mostly associated with star forming galaxies. The model requires that some pulsars are born with very fast spins, of the order of few milliseconds. The observed distribution of spin-down powers $\\dot{E}$ in young energetic pulsars is consistent with equal birth rate per decade of $\\dot{E}$. Accepting this injection spectrum and scaling the intrinsic brightness of FRBs with $\\dot{E}$, we pr...

  20. Binary Inference for Primary User Separation in Cognitive Radio Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Huy; Han, Zhu; Zheng, Rong

    2010-01-01

    Spectrum sensing receives much attention recently in the cognitive radio (CR) network research, i.e., secondary users (SUs) constantly monitor channel condition to detect the presence of the primary users (PUs). In this paper, we go beyond spectrum sensing and introduce the PU separation problem, which concerns with the issues of distinguishing and characterizing PUs in the context of collaborative spectrum sensing and monitor selection. The observations of monitors are modeled as boolean OR mixtures of underlying binary sources for PUs. We first justify the use of the binary OR mixture model as opposed to the traditional linear mixture model through simulation studies. Then we devise a novel binary inference algorithm for PU separation. Not only PU-SU relationship are revealed, but PUs' transmission statistics and activities at each time slot can also be inferred. Simulation results show that without any prior knowledge regarding PUs' activities, the algorithm achieves high inference accuracy even in the pre...

  1. Tests of the universality of free fall for strongly self-gravitating bodies with radio pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Freire, Paulo C C; Wex, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we review tests of the strong equivalence principle (SEP) derived from binary pulsar data. The extreme difference in binding energy between both components and the precise measurement of the orbital motion provided by pulsar timing allow the only current precision SEP tests for strongly self-gravitating bodies. We start by highlighting why such tests are conceptually important. We then review previous work where limits on SEP violation are obtained with an ensemble of wide binary systems with small eccentricity orbits. Then we propose a new SEP violation test based on the measurement of the variation of the orbital eccentricity de/dt. This new method has the following advantages: a) unlike previous methods it is not based on probabilistic considerations, b) it can make a direct detection of SEP violation, c) the measurement of de/dt is not contaminated by any known external effects, which implies that this SEP test is only restricted by the measurement precision of de/dt. In the final part of t...

  2. The binary millisecond pulsar PSR J1023+0038 during its accretion state - I. Optical variability

    CERN Document Server

    Shahbaz, T; Nevado, S P; Rodríguez-Gil, P; Casares, J; Dhillon, V S; Marsh, T R; Littlefair, S; Leckngam, A; Poshyachinda, S

    2015-01-01

    We present time-resolved optical photometry of the binary millisecond `redback' pulsar PSR J1023+0038 (=AY Sex) during its low-mass X-ray binary phase. The light curves taken between 2014 January and April show an underlying sinusoidal modulation due to the irradiated secondary star and accretion disc. We also observe superimposed rapid flaring on time-scales as short as ~20 s with amplitudes of ~0.1-0.5 mag and additional large flare events on time-scales of ~5-60 min with amplitudes ~0.5-1.0 mag. The power density spectrum of the optical flare light curves is dominated by a red-noise component, typical of aperiodic activity in X-ray binaries. Simultaneous X-ray and UV observations by the Swift satellite reveal strong correlations that are consistent with X-ray reprocessing of the UV light, most likely in the outer regions of the accretion disc. On some nights we also observe sharp-edged, rectangular, flat-bottomed dips randomly distributed in orbital phase, with a median duration of ~250 s and a median ingr...

  3. A LIKELY MILLISECOND PULSAR BINARY COUNTERPART FOR FERMI SOURCE 2FGL J2039.6–5620

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romani, Roger W., E-mail: rwr@astro.stanford.edu [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4060 (United States)

    2015-10-20

    We have identified an optical/X-ray binary with an orbital period of P{sub b} = 5.47 hr as the likely counterpart of the Fermi source 2FGL J2039.6−5620. GROND, SOAR, and DES observations provide an accurate orbital period and allow us to compare to the light curve of an archival XMM exposure. Like many short-period optical/X-ray binaries associated with Large Area Telescope sources, this may be an interacting (black widow/redback) millisecond pulsar binary. The X-ray light curve is consistent with the emission associated with an intrabinary shock. The optical light curve shows evidence of companion heating, but has a peculiar asymmetric double peak. The nature of this optical structure is not yet clear; additional optical studies and, in particular, detection of an orbital modulation in a γ-ray pulsar are needed to elucidate the nature of this peculiar source.

  4. A characteristic observable signature of preferred frame effects in relativistic binary pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Wex, N

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we develop a consistent, phenomenological methodology to measure preferred-frame effects (PFEs) in binary pulsars that exhibit a high rate of periastron advance. We show that in these systems the existence of a preferred frame for gravity leads to an observable characteristic `signature' in the timing data, which uniquely identifies this effect. We expand the standard Damour-Deruelle timing formula to incorporate this `signature' and show how this new PFE timing model can be used to either measure or constrain the parameters related to a violation of the local Lorentz invariance of gravity in the strong internal fields of neutron stars. In particular, we demonstrate that in the presence of PFEs we expect a set of the new timing parameters to have a unique relationship that can be measured and tested incontrovertibly. This new methodology is applied to the Double Pulsar, which turns out to be the ideal test system for this kind of experiments.The currently available dataset allows us only to stud...

  5. European Pulsar Timing Array Limits on Continuous Gravitational Waves from Individual Supermassive Black Hole Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Babak, Stanislav; Sesana, Alberto; Brem, Patrick; Rosado, Pablo A; Taylor, Stephen R; Lassus, Antoine; Hessels, Jason W T; Bassa, Cees G; Burgay, Marta; Caballero, R Nicolas; Champion, David J; Cognard, Ismael; Desvignes, Gregory; Gair, Jonathan R; Guillemot, Lucas; Janssen, Gemma H; Karuppusamy, Ramesh; Kramer, Michael; Lazarus, Patrick; Lee, K J; Lentati, Lindley; Liu, Kuo; Mingarelli, Chiara M F; Oslowsky, Stefan; Perrodin, Delphine; Possenti, Andrea; Purver, Mark B; Sanidas, Sotiris; Smits, Roy; Stappers, Ben; Theureau, Gilles; Tiburzi, Caterina; van Haasteren, Rutger; Vecchio, Alberto; Verbiest, Joris P W

    2015-01-01

    We have searched for continuous gravitational wave (CGW) signals produced by individually resolvable, circular supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) in the latest EPTA dataset, which consists of ultra-precise timing data on 41 millisecond pulsars. We develop frequentist and Bayesian detection algorithms to search both for monochromatic and frequency-evolving systems. None of the adopted algorithms show evidence for the presence of such a CGW signal, indicating that the data are best described by pulsar and radiometer noise only. Depending on the adopted detection algorithm, the 95\\% upper limit on the sky-averaged strain amplitude lies in the range $6\\times 10^{-15}10^9$M$_\\odot$ out to a distance of about 25Mpc, and with $\\cal{M}_c>10^{10}$M$_\\odot$ out to a distance of about 1Gpc ($z\\approx0.2$). We show that state-of-the-art SMBHB population models predict $<1\\%$ probability of detecting a CGW with the current EPTA dataset, consistent with the reported non-detection. We stress, however, that PTA lim...

  6. BeppoSAX observation of the X-ray binary pulsar Vela X-1

    CERN Document Server

    Orlandini, M; Nicastro, L; Giarrusso, S; Segreto, A; Piraino, S; Cusumano, G; Del Sordo, S; Guainazzi, M; Piro, L

    1997-01-01

    We report on the spectral (pulse averaged) and timing analysis of the ~ 20 ksec observation of the X-ray binary pulsar Vela X-1 performed during the BeppoSAX Science Verification Phase. The source was observed in two different intensity states: the low state is probably due to an erratic intensity dip and shows a decrease of a factor ~ 2 in intensity, and a factor 10 in Nh. We have not been able to fit the 2-100 keV continuum spectrum with the standard (for an X--ray pulsar) power law modified by a high energy cutoff because of the flattening of the spectrum in ~ 10-30 keV. The timing analysis confirms previous results: the pulse profile changes from a five-peak structure for energies less than 15 keV, to a simpler two-peak shape at higher energies. The Fourier analysis shows a very complex harmonic component: up to 23 harmonics are clearly visible in the power spectrum, with a dominant first harmonic for low energy data, and a second one as the more prominent for energies greater than 15 keV. The aperiodic c...

  7. The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchester, Richard N.

    2015-08-01

    The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) project uses the Parkes 64-m radio telescope to observe 22 millisecond pulsars in three bands: 40cm (band centre 732 MHz), 20cm (1369 MHz) and 10cm (3100 MHz). Coherent de-dispersion systems are used for the 40cm and 20cm bands and digital polyphase filterbanks are used for the 20cm and 10cm bands. Observations are made at intervals of two to three weeks and observations times for each pulsar in each band are typically one hour. Regular PPTA observations commenced in early 2005 but earlier timing data, primarily in the 20cm band, exist for many of the pulsars back to 1994. Pipeline processing scripts are based on PSRCHIVE routines and take into account instrumental offsets. Timing analyses include modelling of dispersion variations and red and white noise in the data. The primary scientific goal of the PPTA project is the detection of gravitational waves, either a stochastic background from supermassive black-hole binary systems in distant galaxies or from individual binary systems. The PPTA data sets have many other applications including establishment of a pulsar-based timescale, improvement of solar-system ephemerides and studies of the individual pulsars. PPTA data sets have been made available to the International Pulsar Timing Array consortium and analysis of the combined data sets is progressing. Recent developments, both instrumental and science-related, will be described.

  8. PSR J1738+0333: The First Millisecond Pulsar + Pulsating White Dwarf Binary

    CERN Document Server

    Kilic, Mukremin; Gianninas, A; Brown, Warren R

    2014-01-01

    We report the discovery of the first millisecond pulsar with a pulsating white dwarf companion. Following the recent discoveries of pulsations in extremely low-mass (ELM, <0.3 Msol) white dwarfs (WDs), we targeted ELM WD companions to two millisecond pulsars with high-speed Gemini photometry. We find significant optical variability in PSR J1738+0333 with periods between roughly 1790-3060 s, consistent in timescale with theoretical and empirical observations of pulsations in 0.17 Msol He-core ELM WDs. We additionally put stringent limits on a lack of variability in PSR J1909-3744, showing this ELM WD is not variable to <0.1 per cent amplitude. Thanks to the accurate distance and radius estimates from radio timing measurements, PSR J1738+0333 becomes a benchmark for low-mass, pulsating WDs. Future, more extensive time-series photometry of this system offers an unprecedented opportunity to constrain the physical parameters (including the cooling age) and interior structure of this ELM WD, and in turn, the ...

  9. A model for distortions of polarisation-angle curves in radio pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Dyks, J; Oslowski, S; Saha, L; Guillemot, L; Cognard, I; Rudak, B

    2016-01-01

    Some radio pulsar profiles (in particular those of millisecond pulsars contain wide emission structures which cover large intervals of pulse phase. Local distortions of an average curve of polarisation angle (PA) can be identified in such profiles, and they are often found to be associated with absorption features or narrow emission components. The features may be interpreted as a convolution of a lateral profile of an emitter with a microscopic radiation pattern of a non-negligible angular extent. We study a model which assumes that such an extended microbeam of the X-mode curvature radiation is spreading the radiation polarised at a fixed position angle within an interval of pulse phase. The model is capable of interpreting the strongly dissimilar polarisation of double notches in PSR B1821-24A (for which we present new polarisation data from the Nancay Radio Telescope) and PSR J0437-4715. It also explains a step-like change in PA observed at the bifurcated trailing component in the profile of J0437-4715. A...

  10. High-Energy $\\gamma$-Ray Observations of Two Young, Energetic Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Kaspi, V M; Mattox, J R; Manchester, R N; Bailes, M; Pace, R

    1999-01-01

    We present results of Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory EGRET observations of the unidentified high-energy gamma-ray sources 2EG J1049-5847 (GEV J1047-5840, 3EG J1048-5840) and 2EG J1103-6106 (3EG J1102-6103). These sources are spatially coincident with the young, energetic radio pulsars PSRs B1046-58 and J1105-6107, respectively. We find evidence for an association between PSR B1046-58 and 2EG J1049-5847. The gamma-ray pulse profile, obtained by folding time-tagged photons having energies above 400 MeV using contemporaneous radio ephemerides, has probability of arising by chance of 1.2E-4 according to the binning-independent H-test. A spatial analysis of the on-pulse photons reveals a point source of equivalent significance 10.2 sigma. Off-pulse, the significance drops to 5.8 sigma. Archival ASCA data show that the only hard X-ray point source in the 95% confidence error box of the gamma-ray source is spatially coincident with the pulsar within the 1' uncertainty (Pivovaroff, Kaspi & Gotthelf 1999). The doub...

  11. The electromagnetic interaction of a planet with a rotation-powered pulsar wind: an explanation to fast radio bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottez, F.; Zarka, P.

    2015-12-01

    The pulsars PSR B1257+12 and PSR B1620-26 are known to host planets, and other pulsars are suspected to host asteroids or comets. We investigate the electromagnetic interaction of a relativistic and magnetized pulsar wind with a planet or a smaller body in orbit. Many models predict that, albeit highly relativistic, pulsar winds are slower than Alfven waves. In that case, a pair of stationary Alfven waves, called Alfven wings (AW), is expected to form on the sides of the body. They form a magnetic wake into the plasma flow, and they carry a strong electric current. The theory of Alfven wings was initially developed in the context of the electrodynamic interaction between spacecraft and the Earth's magnetosphere, and then of the Io-Jupiter interaction. We have extended it to relativistic winds, and we have studied the possible consequences on radio emissions from pulsar companions. We predict the existence of very collimated radio beams that are seen by an observer as very rare and brief signals. But they are intense enough to be observed from sources at cosmological distances. Thus they could be an explanation to fast radio bursts (FRB). We discuss the properties (polarisation, recurrence) that could make the difference between this model of FRB and others.

  12. Space Radio Astronomy in the next 1000001 (binary) years

    CERN Document Server

    Gurvits, L I

    2012-01-01

    Radio astronomy and active exploration of space are peers: both began by efforts of enthusiasts in the 1930s and got a major technological boost in the 1940s-50s. Thus, for the sake of a brief review at this very special conference, it is fair to estimate the present age of these human endeavours as 1000001 (binary) years. These years saw a lot of challenging and fruitful concerted efforts by radio astronomers and space explorers. Among the high points one can mention several highly successful space-borne CMB observatories, three orbital VLBI missions, the first examples of radio observations at spectral windows hitherto closed for Earth-based observers and many yet to be implemented initiatives which are at various stages of their paths toward launch-pads of all major world space agencies. In this review I will give a bird-eye picture of the past achievements of space-oriented radio astronomy and zoom into several projects and ideas that will further push the presence of radio astronomy into the space agenda...

  13. Discovery of the Millisecond Pulsar PSR J2043+1711 in a Fermi Source with the Nancay Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemot, L.; Freire, P. C. C.; Cognard, I.; Johnson, T. J.; Takahashi, Y.; Kataoka, J.; Desvignes, G.; Camilo, F.; Ferrara, E. C.; Harding, A. K.; Janssen, G. H.; Keith, M.; Kerr, M.; Kramer, M.; Parent, D.; Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Smith, D. A.; Stappers, W.; Theureau, G.

    2012-01-01

    We report the discovery of the millisecond pulsar PSR J2043+1711 in a search of a Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) source with no known associations, with the Nancay Radio Telescope. The new pulsar, confirmed with the Green Bank Telescope, has a spin period of 2.38 ms, is relatively nearby (d approx. < 2 kpc) and is in a 1.48-d orbit around a low-mass companion, probably an He-type white dwarf. Using an ephemeris based on Arecibo, Nancay and Westerbork timing measurements, pulsed gamma-ray emission was detected in the data recorded by the Fermi LAT. The gamma-ray light curve and spectral properties are typical of other gamma-ray millisecond pulsars seen with Fermi. X-ray observations of the pulsar with Suzaku and the Swift X-ray Telescope yielded no detection. At 1.4 GHz, we observe strong flux density variations because of interstellar diffractive scintillation; however, a sharp peak can be observed at this frequency during bright scintillation states. At 327 MHz, the pulsar is detected with a much higher signal-to-noise ratio and its flux density is far more steady. However, at that frequency the Arecibo instrumentation cannot yet fully resolve the pulse profile. Despite that, our pulse time-of-arrival measurements have a post-fit residual rms of 2 micro s. This and the expected stability of this system have made PSR J2043+1711 one of the first new Fermi-selected millisecond pulsars to be added to pulsar gravitational wave timing arrays. It has also allowed a significant measurement of relativistic delays in the times of arrival of the pulses due to the curvature of space-time near the companion, but not yet with enough precision to derive useful masses for the pulsar and the companion. Nevertheless, a mass for the pulsar between 1.7 and 2.0 solar Mass can be derived if a standard millisecond pulsar formation model is assumed. In this paper, we also present a comprehensive summary of pulsar searches in Fermi LAT sources with the Nancay Radio Telescope to date.

  14. NuSTAR observations of the state transition of millisecond pulsar binary PSR J1023+0038

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; Bellm, Eric; Harrison, Fiona A. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E California Blvd, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Yang, Chengwei; An, Hongjun; Kaspi, Victoria M. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 University St, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Archibald, Anne M.; Bassa, Cees; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Janssen, Gemma H. [ASTRON, The Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA, Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Bogdanov, Slavko [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Lyne, Andrew G.; Stappers, Benjamin [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Patruno, Alessandro [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Tomsick, John A.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Chakrabarty, Deepto [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 70 Vassar Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Christensen, Finn E., E-mail: spt@astro.caltech.edu [DTU Space, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); and others

    2014-08-20

    We report NuSTAR observations of the millisecond pulsar-low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) transition system PSR J1023+0038 from 2013 June and October, before and after the formation of an accretion disk around the neutron star. Between June 10 and 12, a few days to two weeks before the radio disappearance of the pulsar, the 3-79 keV X-ray spectrum was well fit by a simple power law with a photon index of Γ=1.17{sub −0.07}{sup +0.08} (at 90% confidence) with a 3-79 keV luminosity of 7.4 ± 0.4 × 10{sup 32} erg s{sup –1}. Significant orbital modulation was observed with a modulation fraction of 36% ± 10%. During the October 19-21 observation, the spectrum is described by a softer power law (Γ=1.66{sub −0.05}{sup +0.06}) with an average luminosity of 5.8 ± 0.2 × 10{sup 33} erg s{sup –1} and a peak luminosity of ≈1.2 × 10{sup 34} erg s{sup –1} observed during a flare. No significant orbital modulation was detected. The spectral observations are consistent with previous and current multiwavelength observations and show the hard X-ray power law extending to 79 keV without a spectral break. Sharp-edged, flat-bottomed dips are observed with widths between 30 and 1000 s and ingress and egress timescales of 30-60 s. No change in hardness ratio was observed during the dips. Consecutive dip separations are log-normal in distribution with a typical separation of approximately 400 s. These dips are distinct from dipping activity observed in LMXBs. We compare and contrast these dips to observations of dips and state changes in the similar transition systems PSR J1824–2452I and XSS J1227.0–4859 and discuss possible interpretations based on the transitions in the inner disk.

  15. A Search for Very High-Energy Gamma Rays from the Missing Link Binary Pulsar J1023+0038 with VERITAS

    CERN Document Server

    Aliu, E; Archer, A; Benbow, W; Bird, R; Biteau, J; Buchovecky, M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cardenzana, J V; Cerruti, M; Chen, X; Ciupik, L; Connolly, M P; Cui, W; Dickinson, H J; Eisch, J D; Falcone, A; Feng, Q; Finley, J P; Fleischhack, H; Flinders, A; Fortin, P; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Gillanders, G H; Griffin, S; Grube, J; Gyuk, G; Hütten, M; Håkansson, N; Holder, J; Humensky, T B; Johnson, C A; Kaaret, P; Kar, P; Kelley-Hoskins, N; Kertzman, M; Kieda, D; Krause, M; Lang, M J; Loo, A; Maier, G; McArthur, S; McCann, A; Meagher, K; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nguyen, T; Nieto, D; de Bhróithe, A O'Faoláin; Ong, R A; Otte, A N; Pandel, D; Park, N; Pelassa, V; Petrashyk, A; Pohl, M; Popkow, A; Pueschel, E; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reynolds, P T; Richards, G T; Roache, E; Rulten, C; Santander, M; Sembroski, G H; Shahinyan, K; Smith, A W; Staszak, D; Telezhinsky, I; Tucci, J V; Tyler, J; Varlotta, A; Vincent, S; Wakely, S P; Weiner, O M; Weinstein, A; Wilhelm, A; Williams, D A; Zitzer, B; Chernyakova, M; Roberts, M

    2016-01-01

    The binary millisecond radio pulsar PSR J1023+0038 exhibits many characteristics similar to the gamma-ray binary system PSR B1259--63/LS 2883, making it an ideal candidate for the study of high-energy non-thermal emission. It has been the subject of multi-wavelength campaigns following the disappearance of the pulsed radio emission in 2013 June, which revealed the appearance of an accretion disk around the neutron star. We present the results of very high-energy gamma-ray observations carried out by VERITAS before and after this change of state. Searches for steady and pulsed emission of both data sets yield no significant gamma-ray signal above 100 GeV, and upper limits are given for both a steady and pulsed gamma-ray flux. These upper limits are used to constrain the magnetic field strength in the shock region of the PSR J1023+0038 system. Assuming that very high-energy gamma rays are produced via an inverse-Compton mechanism in the shock region, we constrain the shock magnetic field to be greater than $\\si...

  16. Challenging the Presence of Scalar Charge and Dipolar Radiation in Binary Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Yagi, Kent; Yunes, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Corrections to general relativity that introduce long-ranged scalar fields which are non-minimally coupled to curvature typically predict that neutron stars possess a non-trivial scalar field profile. An observer far from a star is most sensitive to the spherically-symmetric piece of this profile that decays linearly with the inverse of the distance, the so-called scalar charge, which is related to the emission of dipolar radiation from compact binaries. The presence of dipolar radiation has the potential to very strongly constrain extended theories of gravity. These facts may lead people to believe that gravitational theories with long-ranged scalar fields have already been constrained strongly from binary pulsar observations. Here we challenge this "lore" by investigating the decoupling limit of Gauss-Bonnet gravity as an example, in which the scalar field couples linearly to the Gauss-Bonnet density in the action. We prove a theorem that neutron stars in this theory cannot possess a scalar charge. Thus Gau...

  17. Electromagnetic counterparts of supermassive black hole binaries resolved by pulsar timing arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Takamitsu; Menou, Kristen

    2011-01-01

    Pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) are expected to detect gravitational waves (GWs) from individual low-redshift (z10^9 Msun) black hole (SMBH) binaries with orbital periods of approx. 0.1 - 10 yrs. Identifying the electromagnetic (EM) counterparts of these sources would provide confirmation of putative direct detections of GWs, present a rare opportunity to study the environments of compact SMBH binaries, and could enable the use of these sources as standard sirens for cosmology. Here we consider the feasibility of such an EM identification. We show that because the host galaxies of resolved PTA sources are expected to be exceptionally massive and rare, it should be possible to find unique hosts of resolved sources out to redshift z=0.2. At higher redshifts, the PTA error boxes are larger, and may contain as many as 100 massive-galaxy interlopers. The number of candidates, however, remains tractable for follow-up searches in upcoming wide-field EM surveys. We develop a toy model to characterize the dynamics and the...

  18. A radio-pulsing white dwarf binary star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, T. R.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Hümmerich, S.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Bernhard, K.; Lloyd, C.; Breedt, E.; Stanway, E. R.; Steeghs, D. T.; Parsons, S. G.; Toloza, O.; Schreiber, M. R.; Jonker, P. G.; van Roestel, J.; Kupfer, T.; Pala, A. F.; Dhillon, V. S.; Hardy, L. K.; Littlefair, S. P.; Aungwerojwit, A.; Arjyotha, S.; Koester, D.; Bochinski, J. J.; Haswell, C. A.; Frank, P.; Wheatley, P. J.

    2016-09-01

    White dwarfs are compact stars, similar in size to Earth but approximately 200,000 times more massive. Isolated white dwarfs emit most of their power from ultraviolet to near-infrared wavelengths, but when in close orbits with less dense stars, white dwarfs can strip material from their companions and the resulting mass transfer can generate atomic line and X-ray emission, as well as near- and mid-infrared radiation if the white dwarf is magnetic. However, even in binaries, white dwarfs are rarely detected at far-infrared or radio frequencies. Here we report the discovery of a white dwarf/cool star binary that emits from X-ray to radio wavelengths. The star, AR Scorpii (henceforth AR Sco), was classified in the early 1970s as a δ-Scuti star, a common variety of periodic variable star. Our observations reveal instead a 3.56-hour period close binary, pulsing in brightness on a period of 1.97 minutes. The pulses are so intense that AR Sco’s optical flux can increase by a factor of four within 30 seconds, and they are also detectable at radio frequencies. They reflect the spin of a magnetic white dwarf, which we find to be slowing down on a 107-year timescale. The spin-down power is an order of magnitude larger than that seen in electromagnetic radiation, which, together with an absence of obvious signs of accretion, suggests that AR Sco is primarily spin-powered. Although the pulsations are driven by the white dwarf’s spin, they mainly originate from the cool star. AR Sco’s broadband spectrum is characteristic of synchrotron radiation, requiring relativistic electrons. These must either originate from near the white dwarf or be generated in situ at the M star through direct interaction with the white dwarf’s magnetosphere.

  19. A search for millisecond pulsars at high galactic latitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby, B.; Bailes, M.; Ord, S.; Kulkarni, S.; Anderson, S.

    2002-05-01

    We are conducting a search for radio pulsars using the Parkes 64 m telescope, covering the galactic latitude range 15o Swinburne Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing. Analysis of ~2200 square degrees of the survey has been completed, yielding twenty new pulsars including four binary recycled pulsars. Three of these objects have great potential for ultra high precision timing experiments, and one has an unusual massive white dwarf companion. We present the current status of survey observations and analysis as well as follow-up observations of the newly discovered pulsars.

  20. Contrasting behaviour from two Be/X-ray binary pulsars: insights into differing neutron star accretion modes

    CERN Document Server

    Townsend, L J; Hill, A B; Coe, M J; Corbet, R H D; Bird, A J

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present the identification of two periodic X-ray signals coming from the direction of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). On detection with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), the 175.4s and 85.4s pulsations were considered to originate from new Be/X-ray binary (BeXRB) pulsars with unknown locations. Using rapid follow-up INTEGRAL and XMM-Newton observations, we show the first pulsar (designated SXP175) to be coincident with a candidate high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) in the northern bar region of the SMC undergoing a small Type II outburst. The orbital period (87d) and spectral class (B0-B0.5IIIe) of this system are determined and presented here for the first time. The second pulsar is shown not to be new at all, but is consistent with being SXP91.1 - a pulsar discovered at the very beginning of the 13 year long RXTE key monitoring programme of the SMC. Whilst it is theoretically possible for accreting neutron stars to change spin period so dramatically over such a short time, the X-ray and ...

  1. Contrasting Behaviour from Two Be/X-ray Binary Pulsars: Insights into Differing Neutron Star Accretion Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, L. J.; Drave, S. P.; Hill, A. B.; Coe, M. J.; Corbet, R. H. D.; Bird, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present the identification of two periodic X-ray signals coming from the direction of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). On detection with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), the 175.4 s and 85.4 s pulsations were considered to originate from new Be/X-ray binary (BeXRB) pulsars with unknown locations. Using rapid follow-up INTEGRAL and XMM-Newton observations, we show the first pulsar (designated SXP175) to be coincident with a candidate high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) in the northern bar region of the SMC undergoing a small Type II outburst. The orbital period (87d) and spectral class (B0-B0.5IIIe) of this system are determined and presented here for the first time. The second pulsar is shown not to be new at all, but is consistent with being SXP91.1 - a pulsar discovered at the very beginning of the 13 year long RXTE key monitoring programme of the SMC. Whilst it is theoretically possible for accreting neutron stars to change spin period so dramatically over such a short time, the X-ray and optical data available for this source suggest this spin-up is continuous during long phases of X-ray quiescence, where accretion driven spin-up of the neutron star should be minimal.

  2. Nature of eclipsing pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Khechinashvili, D; Gil, J; Khechinashvili, David; Melikidze, George; Gil, Janusz

    2000-01-01

    We present a model for pulsar radio eclipses in some binary systems, and test this model for PSRs B1957+20 and J2051-0827. We suggest that in these binaries the companion stars are degenerate dwarfs with strong surface magnetic fields. The magnetospheres of these stars are permanently infused by the relativistic particles of the pulsar wind. We argue that the radio waves emitted by the pulsar split into the eigenmodes of the electron-positron plasma as they enter the companion's magnetosphere and are then strongly damped due to cyclotron resonance with the ambient plasma particles. Our model explains in a natural way the anomalous duration and behavior of radio eclipses observed in such systems. In particular, it provides stable, continuous, and frequency-dependent eclipses, in agreement with the observations. We predict a significant variation of linear polarization both at eclipse ingress and egress. In this paper we also suggest several possible mechanisms of generation of the optical and $X$-ray emission ...

  3. Clumpy stellar winds and high-energy emission in high-mass binaries hosting a young pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Bosch-Ramon, V

    2013-01-01

    High-mass binaries hosting young pulsars can be powerful gamma-ray emitters. The stellar wind of the massive star in the system is expected to be clumpy. Since the high-energy emission comes from the pulsar-star wind interaction, the presence of clumps can affect the spectrum and variability of this radiation. We look for the main effects of the clumps on the two-wind interaction region and on the non-thermal radiation. A simple analytical model for the two-wind interaction dynamics was developed accounting for the lifetime of clumps under the pulsar-wind impact. This time plays a very important role with regard to the evolution of the clump, the magnetic field in the clump-pulsar wind interaction region, and the non-radiative and radiative cooling of the non-thermal particles. We also computed the high-energy emission produced at the interaction of long-living clumps with the pulsar wind. For reasonable parameters, the clumps will induce small variability on the X-ray and gamma-ray radiation. Sporadically, l...

  4. High energy emission from the nebula around the Black Widow binary system containing millisecond pulsar B1957+20

    CERN Document Server

    Bednarek, W

    2013-01-01

    The features of pulsed $\\gamma$-ray emission from classical and millisecond pulsars indicate that the high energy radiation processes in their inner magnetospheres occur in a similar way. In the last decade several TeV $\\gamma$-ray nebulae have been discovered around classical pulsars. The above facts suggest that $\\gamma$-rays should be produced also in the surroundings of millisecond pulsars. We discuss a model for the bow shock nebula around the well known Black Widow binary system containing the millisecond pulsar B1957+20. This model predicts the existence of a synchrotron X-ray and inverse Compton $\\gamma$-ray nebula around this system. We want to find out whether $\\gamma$-ray emission from the nebula around B1957+20 could be detected by the future and present Cherenkov telescopes. Using the Monte Carlo method we followed the propagation of relativistic electrons in the vicinity of the pulsar. We calculated the very high energy radiation produced by them in the synchrotron process and the inverse Compto...

  5. On the power spectra of the wind-fed X-ray binary pulsar GX 301 - 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandini, Mauro; Morfill, G. E.

    1992-01-01

    A phenomenological model of accretion which is applied to the wind-fed X-ray binary pulsar GX 301 - 2 is developed, assuming that the accretion onto the neutron star does not occur from a continuous flux of plasma, but from blobs of matter which are threaded by the magnetic field lines onto the magnetic polar caps of the neutron star. These 'lumps' are produced at the magnetospheric limit by magnetohydrodynamical instability, introducing a 'noise' in the accretion process, due to the discontinuity in the flux of matter onto the neutron star. This model is able to describe the change of slope observed in the continuum component of the power spectra of the X-ray binary pulsar GX 301 - 2, in the frequency range 0.01 - 0.1 Hz. The physical properties of the infalling blobs derived in the model are in agreement with the constraints imposed by observations.

  6. Radio observations of the TeV source HESS J1943+213: a new case of a pulsar wind nebula?

    CERN Document Server

    Gabanyi, K E; Giacani, E; Paragi, Z; Pidopryhora, Y; Frey, S

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the H.E.S.S. Collaboration discovered a very high energy gamma-ray point source close to the Galactic plane. They offered three possible explanations for the nature of the source: a gamma-ray binary, a pulsar wind nebula, or a BL Lac object. They concluded that the observations favoured an extreme BL Lac object interpretation. We investigated the nature of the radio source reported as the counterpart of the very high energy gamma-ray source. We performed high-resolution radio interferometric observations with the European Very Long Baseline Interferometry Network at a frequency of 1.6 GHz on 2011 May 18. We also reanalysed archival 1.4-GHz radio continuum and HI spectral line data taken with the Very Large Array. The accurate position of the radio source, as observed with EVN, is ~ 4" off from the one obtained in the NRAO VLA Sky Survey. The new position is in excellent agreement with that of the proposed X-ray counterpart of the TeV source. From HI absorption data, a distance of about 11.5 +/- 1.5 ...

  7. The formation of low-mass helium white dwarfs orbiting pulsars: Evolution of low-mass X-ray binaries below the bifurcation period

    CERN Document Server

    Istrate, Alina; Langer, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are generally believed to be old neutron stars (NSs) which have been spun up to high rotation rates via accretion of matter from a companion star in a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB). However, many details of this recycling scenario remain to be understood. Here we investigate binary evolution in close LMXBs to study the formation of radio MSPs with low-mass helium white dwarf companions (He WDs) in tight binaries with orbital periods P_orb = 2-9 hr. In particular, we examine: i) if such observed systems can be reproduced from theoretical modelling using standard prescriptions of orbital angular momentum losses (i.e. with respect to the nature and the strength of magnetic braking), ii) if our computations of the Roche-lobe detachments can match the observed orbital periods, and iii) if the correlation between WD mass and orbital period (M_WD, P_orb) is valid for systems with P_orb < 2 days. Numerical calculations with a detailed stellar evolution code were used to trace the mass-tra...

  8. Known Radio Pulsars Do Not Contribute to the Galactic Center Gamma-Ray Excess

    CERN Document Server

    Linden, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Observations using the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) have found a significant gamma-ray excess surrounding the center of the Milky Way (GC). One possible interpretation of this excess invokes gamma-ray emission from an undiscovered population of either young or recycled pulsars densely clustered throughout the inner kiloparsec of the Milky Way. While these systems, by construction, have individual fluxes that lie below the point source sensitivity of the Fermi-LAT, they may already be observed in multiwavelength observations. Notably the Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF) catalog of radio pulsars includes 270 sources observed in the inner 10 degrees around the GC. We calculate the gamma-ray emission observed from these 270 sources and obtain three key results: (1) point source searches in the GC region produce a plethora of highly significant gamma-ray "hotspots", compared to searches far from the Galactic plane, (2) there is no statistical correlation between the positions of these gamma-r...

  9. Low Frequency Radio Emission of Pulsar PSR J1907+0919 Associated with the Magnetar SGR 1900+14

    CERN Document Server

    Shitov, Yu P; Kutuzov, S M; Shitov, Yu. P.

    2000-01-01

    The soft gamma repeater SGR 1900+14 was observed in Pushchino observatorysince 1988 December using BSA radio telescope operating at 111 MHz. We havedetected the pulsed radio emission (Shitov 1999) with the same 5.16 s periodthat was reported earlier for this object. The timing analysis has shown thatthis new radio pulsar PSR J1907+0919 associated with SGR 1900+14 has asuperstrong magnetic field, which is 8.1 * 10^14 G, thereby confirming that itis a "magnetar". The dispersion measure of PSR J1907+0919 is 281.4(9) pc *cm^(-3) which gives an estimate of the pulsar's distance as about 5.8 kpc.

  10. Multifrequency radio observations of SNR J0536-6735 (N 59B with associated pulsar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bozzetto L.M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a study of new Australian Telescope Compact Array (ATCA observations of supernova remnant, SNR J0536-6735. This remnant appears to follow a shell morphology with a diameter of D=36x29 pc (with 1 pc uncertainty in each direction. There is an embedded HII region on the northern limb of the remnant which made various analysis and measurements (such as flux density, spectral index and polarisation difficult. The radio-continuum emission followed the same structure as the optical emission, allowing for extent and flux density estimates at 20 cm. We estimate the surface brightness at 1 GHz of 2.55x10−21 Wm−2 Hz−1 sr−1 for the SNR. Also, we detect a distinctive radio-continuum point source which confirms the previous suggestion of this remnant being associated with pulsar wind nebula (PWN. The tail of this remnant is not seen in the radio-continuum images and is only seen in the optical and X-ray images.

  11. Pulsar Timing Residuals Induced by Gravitational Waves from Single Non-evolving Supermassive Black Hole Binaries with Elliptical Orbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pulsar timing residuals induced by gravitational waves from non-evolving single binary sources with general elliptical orbits are analyzed. For different orbital eccentricities, the timing residuals present different properties. The standard deviations of the timing residuals induced by a fixed gravitational wave source are calculated for different values of the eccentricity. We also analyze the timing residuals of PSR J0437-4715 induced by one of the best known single gravitational wave sources, the supermassive black hole binary in the blazar OJ287

  12. The Green Bank Telescope 350 MHz Drift-scan Survey II: Data Analysis and the Timing of 10 New Pulsars, Including a Relativistic Binary

    CERN Document Server

    Lynch, Ryan S; Ransom, Scott M; Stairs, Ingrid H; Lorimer, Duncan R; McLaughlin, Maura A; Hessels, Jason W T; Kaspi, Victoria M; Kondratiev, Vladislav I; Archibald, Anne M; Berndsen, Aaron; Cardoso, Rogerio F; Cherry, Angus; Karako-Argaman, Chen; van Leeuwen, Joeri; McPhee, Christie A; Pennucci, Tim; Roberts, Mallory S E

    2012-01-01

    We have completed a 350 MHz drift scan survey using the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope with the goal of finding new radio pulsars, especially millisecond pulsars that can be timed to high precision. This survey covered ~10300 square degrees and all of the data have now been fully processed. We have discovered a total of 31 new pulsars, seven of which are recycled pulsars. A companion paper by Boyles et al. (2012) describes the survey strategy, sky coverage, and instrumental set-up, and presents timing solutions for the first 13 pulsars. Here we describe the data analysis pipeline, survey sensitivity, and follow-up observations of new pulsars, and present timing solutions for 10 other pulsars. We highlight several sources---two interesting nulling pulsars, an isolated millisecond pulsar with a measurement of proper motion, and a partially recycled pulsar, PSR J0348+0432, which has a white dwarf companion in a relativistic orbit. PSR J0348+0432 will enable unprecedented tests of theories of gravity.

  13. THE GREEN BANK TELESCOPE 350 MHz DRIFT-SCAN SURVEY II: DATA ANALYSIS AND THE TIMING OF 10 NEW PULSARS, INCLUDING A RELATIVISTIC BINARY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have completed a 350 MHz Drift-scan Survey using the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope with the goal of finding new radio pulsars, especially millisecond pulsars that can be timed to high precision. This survey covered ∼10,300 deg2 and all of the data have now been fully processed. We have discovered a total of 31 new pulsars, 7 of which are recycled pulsars. A companion paper by Boyles et al. describes the survey strategy, sky coverage, and instrumental setup, and presents timing solutions for the first 13 pulsars. Here we describe the data analysis pipeline, survey sensitivity, and follow-up observations of new pulsars, and present timing solutions for 10 other pulsars. We highlight several sources—two interesting nulling pulsars, an isolated millisecond pulsar with a measurement of proper motion, and a partially recycled pulsar, PSR J0348+0432, which has a white dwarf companion in a relativistic orbit. PSR J0348+0432 will enable unprecedented tests of theories of gravity.

  14. Ain't No Crab, PWN Got A Brand New Bag: Correlated radio and X-ray Structures in Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, M S E; Gaensler, B M; Brogan, C L; Tam, C R; Romani, R W; Roberts, Mallory S.E.; Lyutikov, Maxim; Gaensler, Bryan M.; Brogan, Crystal; Tam, Cindy R.; Romani, Roger W.

    2004-01-01

    The traditional view of radio pulsar wind nebulae (PWN), encouraged by the Crab nebula's X-ray and radio morphologies, is that they are a result of the integrated history of their pulsars' wind. The radio emission should therefore be largely unaffected by recent pulsar activity, and hence minimally correlated with structures in the X-ray nebulae. Observations of several PWN, both stationary (sPWN) and rapidly moving (rPWN), now show clear morphological relationships between structures in the radio and X-ray with radio intensity variations on the order of unity. We present high-resolution X-ray and radio images of several PWN of both types and discuss the morphological relationships between the two wavebands.

  15. X-Ray Measurement of the Spin-down of Calvera: A Radio- and Gamma-Ray-Quiet Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, J. P.; Bogdanov, S.; Gotthelf, E. V.

    2013-12-01

    We measure spin-down of the 59 ms X-ray pulsar Calvera by comparing the XMM-Newton discovery data from 2009 with new Chandra timing observations taken in 2013. Its period derivative is \\dot{P}=(3.19+/- \\,0.08)\\times 10^{-15}, which corresponds to spin-down luminosity \\dot{E}=6.1\\times 10^{35} erg s-1, characteristic age \\tau _c\\equiv P/2\\dot{P}=2.9\\times 10^5 yr, and surface dipole magnetic field strength Bs = 4.4 × 1011 G. These values rule out a mildly recycled pulsar, but Calvera could be an orphaned central compact object (anti-magnetar), with a magnetic field that was initially buried by supernova debris and is now reemerging and approaching normal strength. We also performed unsuccessful searches for high-energy γ-rays from Calvera in both imaging and timing of >100 MeV Fermi photons. Even though the distance to Calvera is uncertain by an order of magnitude, an upper limit of d < 2 kpc inferred from X-ray spectra implies a γ-ray luminosity limit of <3.3 × 1032 erg s-1, which is less than that of any pulsar of comparable \\dot{E}. Calvera shares some properties with PSR J1740+1000, a young radio pulsar that we show by virtue of its lack of proper motion was born outside of the Galactic disk. As an energetic, high-Galactic-latitude pulsar, Calvera is unique in being undetected in both radio and γ-rays to faint limits, which should place interesting constraints on models for particle acceleration and beam patterns in pulsar magnetospheres.

  16. Targeting supermassive black hole binaries and gravitational wave sources for the pulsar timing array

    CERN Document Server

    Rosado, Pablo A

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a technique to search for supermassive black hole binaries (MBHBs) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The search is based on the peculiar properties of merging galaxies that are found in a mock galaxy catalog from the Millennium Simulation. MBHBs are expected to be the main gravitational wave (GW) sources for pulsar timing arrays (PTAs); however, it is still unclear if the observed GW signal will be produced by a few single MBHBs, or if it will have the properties of a stochastic background. The goal of this work is to produce a map of the sky in which each galaxy is assigned a probability of having suffered a recent merger, and of hosting a MBHB that could be detected by PTAs. This constitutes a step forward in the understanding of the expected PTA signal: the skymap can be used to investigate the clustering properties of PTA sources and the spatial distribution of the observable GW signal power; moreover, galaxies with the highest probabilities could be used as inputs in targeted se...

  17. Geriatric Pulsar Still Kicking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    The oldest isolated pulsar ever detected in X-rays has been found with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This very old and exotic object turns out to be surprisingly active. The pulsar, PSR J0108-1431 (J0108 for short) is about 200 million years old. Among isolated pulsars -- ones that have not been spun-up in a binary system -- it is over 10 times older than the previous record holder with an X-ray detection. At a distance of 770 light years, it is one of the nearest pulsars known. Pulsars are born when stars that are much more massive than the Sun collapse in supernova explosions, leaving behind a small, incredibly weighty core, known as a neutron star. At birth, these neutron stars, which contain the densest material known in the Universe, are spinning rapidly, up to a hundred revolutions per second. As the rotating beams of their radiation are seen as pulses by distant observers, similar to a lighthouse beam, astronomers call them "pulsars". Astronomers observe a gradual slowing of the rotation of the pulsars as they radiate energy away. Radio observations of J0108 show it to be one of the oldest and faintest pulsars known, spinning only slightly faster than one revolution per second. The surprise came when a team of astronomers led by George Pavlov of Penn State University observed J0108 in X-rays with Chandra. They found that it glows much brighter in X-rays than was expected for a pulsar of such advanced years. People Who Read This Also Read... Chandra Data Reveal Rapidly Whirling Black Holes Milky Way’s Giant Black Hole Awoke from Slumber 300 Years Ago Erratic Black Hole Regulates Itself Celebrate the International Year of Astronomy Some of the energy that J0108 is losing as it spins more slowly is converted into X-ray radiation. The efficiency of this process for J0108 is found to be higher than for any other known pulsar. "This pulsar is pumping out high-energy radiation much more efficiently than its younger cousins," said Pavlov. "So, although it

  18. Coordinated X-ray, Ultraviolet, Optical, and Radio Observations of the PSR J1023+0038 System in a Low-mass X-ray Binary State

    CERN Document Server

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Bassa, Cees; Deller, Adam; Halpern, Jules P; Heald, George; Hessels, Jason W T; Janssen, Gemma H; Lyne, Andrew G; Moldon, Javier; Paragi, Zsolt; Patruno, Alessandro; Perera, Benetge; Stappers, Ben W; Tendulkar, Shriharsh P; D'Angelo, Caroline R; Wijnands, Rudy

    2014-01-01

    The PSR J1023+0038 binary system hosts a neutron star and a low-mass, main-sequence-like star. It switches on year timescales between states as an eclipsing radio millisecond pulsar and a low-mass X-ray binary. We present a multi-wavelength observational campaign of PSR J1023+0038 in its most recent low-mass X-ray binary state. Two long XMM-Newton observations reveal that the system spends ~70% of the time in a ~$3\\times10^{33}$ erg/s X-ray luminosity mode, which, as shown in Archibald et al. (2014), exhibits coherent X-ray pulsations. This emission is interspersed with frequent lower flux mode intervals with ~$5\\times 10^{32}$ erg/s and sporadic flares reaching up to ~$10^{34}$ erg/s, with neither mode showing significant X-ray pulsations. The switches between the three flux modes occur on timescales of order 10 s. In the UV and optical, we observe occasional intense flares coincident with those observed in X-rays. Our radio timing observations reveal no pulsations at the pulsar period during any of the thre...

  19. Discovery of extended and variable radio structure from the gamma-ray binary system PSR B1259-63/LS 2883

    OpenAIRE

    Moldon, J.; Johnston, S.; Ribo, M.; Paredes, J. M.; Deller, A. T.

    2011-01-01

    PSR B1259-63 is a 48 ms pulsar in a highly eccentric 3.4 year orbit around the young massive star LS 2883. During the periastron passage the system displays transient non-thermal unpulsed emission from radio to very high energy gamma rays. It is one of the three galactic binary systems clearly detected at TeV energies, together with LS 5039 and LS I +61 303. We observed PSR B1259-63 after the 2007 periastron passage with the Australian Long Baseline Array at 2.3 GHz to trace the milliarcsecon...

  20. Fate of the companion stars of ultra-rapid pulsars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A millisecond pulsar that is formed by spin-up 'recycling' in a binary system will, once the mass transfer becomes temporarily interrupted, start to evaporate its companion star as a consequence of the large impinging pulsar energy flux. This evaporation is easiest if the pulsar has a short pulse period, the companion star has a relatively large radius and is therefore hydrogen-rich, and the orbital period is short. Evaporation of companion stars induced by millisecond pulsars could account for the lack of low-mass X-ray binaries with short orbital periods below the period gap of the cataclysmic variables, and for the statistics of new-born radio pulsars and their space velocities. (author)

  1. Cyclic evolution of radio pulsars on the time scale of hundreds of years

    CERN Document Server

    Beskin, G; Karpov, S

    2006-01-01

    The recent massive measurements of pulsar frequency second derivatives have shown that they are 100-1000 times larger than expected for standard pulsar slowdown low. Moreover, the second derivatives as well as braking indices are even negative for about half of pulsars. We explain these paradoxical results on the basis of the statistical analysis of the rotational parameters $\

  2. Dark Matter-induced Collapse of Neutron Stars: A Possible Link Between Fast Radio Bursts and the Missing Pulsar Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Fuller, Jim

    2014-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are an emerging class of short and bright radio transients whose sources remain enigmatic. Within the galactic center, the non-detection of pulsars within the inner $\\sim \\!10\\,{\\rm pc}$ has created a missing pulsar problem that has intensified with time. With all reserve, we advance the notion that the two problems could be linked by a common solution: the collapse of neutron stars (NS) due to capture and sedimentation of dark matter (DM) within their cores. Bramante \\& Linden (2014), Phys.\\ Rev.\\ Lett.~19, 191301 showed that certain DM properties allow for rapid NS collapse within the high DM density environments near galactic centers while permitting NS survival elsewhere. Each DM-induced collapse could generate an FRB as the NS magnetosphere is suddenly expelled. This scenario could explain several features of FRBs: their short time scales, large energies, locally produced scattering tails, and high event rates. Our scenario predicts that FRBs are localized to galactic centers...

  3. SKA-Japan Pulsar Science with the Square Kilometre Array

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, Keitaro; Iwata, Kengo; Kameya, Osamu; Kumamoto, Hiroki; Kuroyanagi, Sachiko; Mikami, Ryo; Naruko, Atsushi; Ohno, Hiroshi; Shibata, Shinpei; Terasawa, Toshio; Yonemaru, Naoyuki; Yoo, Chulmoon

    2016-01-01

    The Square Kilometre Array will revolutionize pulsar studies with its wide field-of-view, wide-band observation and high sensitivity, increasing the number of observable pulsars by more than an order of magnitude. Pulsars are of interest not only for the study of neutron stars themselves but for their usage as tools for probing fundamental physics such as general relativity, gravitational waves and nuclear interaction. In this article, we summarize the activity and interests of SKA-Japan Pulsar Science Working Group, focusing on an investigation of modified gravity theory with the supermassive black hole in the Galactic Centre, gravitational-wave detection from cosmic strings and binary supermassive black holes, a study of the physical state of plasma close to pulsars using giant radio pulses and determination of magnetic field structure of Galaxy with pulsar pairs.

  4. 脉冲星巡天观测进展和近邻脉冲星样本估算%Progress on Radio Pulsar Survey and Estimate the Neighbor Pulsar Population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张蕾; 王培; 李菂; 张洁; 岳友岭; 刘姝

    2015-01-01

    射电脉冲星巡天是探测获取更多脉冲星的重要途径.首先介绍了影响射电脉冲星巡天效率的因素,着重分析灵敏度和观测频率两个重要因素,并通过定义脉冲星探测率,简化对脉冲星巡天效率的估算.此外,总结了现有脉冲星巡天项目,利用Parkes多波束脉冲星及两次扩充巡天(Swinburne中纬度脉冲星巡天和Parkes高纬度脉冲星巡天)结果,采用包含时间演化的脉冲星分布模拟软件PsrPopPy,模拟得到脉冲星在银河系中分布的样本,并对近邻太阳系1kpc距离内的脉冲星数目进行了估算,获得了近邻脉冲星样本,可为脉冲星高能辐射对探测宇宙线正电子谱影响等研究提供可靠输入量.%Radio surveys are an important way to detect new pulsars. We first reviewed the main factors affecting sensitivities of pulsar searches in radio bands. These factors can be grouped into two categories. First, the instrumental factors include telescope size, observation frequency, observation bandwidth, integration time, sampling rate, digitization loss, and system temperature. Second, the intrinsic properties of pulsars include dispersion, period, and effective pulse width. We defined a generic detection rate (DR) that combine all these factors to be the number of pulsars detected with specific integration time per pointing. We summarized the results of all radio pulsar surveys. The most successful pulsar survey so far is Parkes multibeam pulsar survey (PKSMB), which detected 1086 normal pulsars. The PKSMB was expanded by two more surveys, namely, Parkes-Swinbume multibeam survey (PKSSW) and Parkes high-latitude multibeam pulsar survey (PKSHL), which in total detected 1377 normal pulsars. We utilized the software package PsrPopPy, which adopts a time evolution model of pulsar parameters, to simulate the Galactic pulsar distribution. The results of Parkes multi-beam pulsar survey and its two extensions were used as inputs of PsrPopPy to constrain

  5. Implementation of a goodness-of-fit test for finding optimal concurrent radio and {\\gamma}-ray pulsar light curves

    CERN Document Server

    Seyffert, A S; Harding, A K; Allison, J; Schutte, W D

    2016-01-01

    Since the launch of the Fermi Large Area Telescope in 2008 the number of known ${\\gamma}$-ray pulsars has increased immensely to over 200, many of which are also visible in the radio and X-ray bands. Seyffert et al. (2011) demonstrated how constraints on the viewing geometries of some of these pulsars could be obtained by comparing their observed radio and ${\\gamma}$-ray light curves by eye to light curves from geometric models. While these constraints compare reasonably well with those yielded by more rigorous single-wavelength approaches, they are still a somewhat subjective representation of how well the models reproduce the observed radio and ${\\gamma}$-ray light curves. Constructing a more rigorous approach is, however, made difficult by the large uncertainties associated with the ${\\gamma}$-ray light curves as compared to those associated with the radio light curves. Naively applying a ${\\chi}^{2}$-like goodness-of-fit test to both bands invariably results in constraints dictated by the radio light curv...

  6. Formation of Binary Millisecond Pulsars by Accretion-Induced Collapse of White Dwarfs under Wind-Driven Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Ablimit, Iminhaji

    2014-01-01

    Accretion-induced collapse of massive white dwarfs (WDs) has been proposed to be an important channel to form binary millisecond pulsars (MSPs). Recent investigations on thermal timescale mass transfer in WD binaries demonstrate that the resultant MSPs are likely to have relatively wide orbit periods ($\\gtrsim 10$ days). Here we calculate the evolution of WD binaries taking into account the excited wind from the companion star induced by X-ray irradiation of the accreting WD, which may drive rapid mass transfer even when the companion star is less massive than the WD. This scenario can naturally explain the formation of the strong-field neutron star in the low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1822$-$37. After AIC the mass transfer resumes when the companion star refills its Roche lobe, and the neutron star is recycled due to mass accretion. A large fraction of the binaries will evolve to become binary MSPs with a He WD companion, with the orbital periods distributed between $\\gtrsim 0.1$ day and $\\lesssim 30$ days, while...

  7. Modeling the Effect of Kick Velocity during the Accretion Induced Collapse of White Dwarfs on Binary Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taani, Ali

    2016-07-01

    The kick velocity which arises during the binary interaction plays an important role in disruption or surviving the binary systems. This paper attempts to draw an evolutionary connection of the long-period (Porb ≥ 2 d) millisecond pulsars (MSPs) with orbits of low eccentricity (e ≤ 0.2). We propose that a kick velocity caused by dynamical effects of asymmetric collapse imparted to the companion star through an accretion induced collapse (AIC) of white dwarfs-that become unstable once they approach the Chandrasekhar limit-can account for the differences in their orbital period distributions. Furthermore, in some cases, an appropriate kick can disrupt the binary system and result in the birth of isolated MSPs. Otherwise, the binary survives and an eccentric binary MSP is formed. In this case only the binding energy equivalent (0.2M⊙) of mass is lost and the system remains intact in a symmetric collapse. Consequently, the AIC decreases the mass of the neutron star and increases the orbital period leading to orbit circularization. We present the results of our model and discuss the possible implications for the binary MSPs in galactic disk and globular clusters.

  8. Constraints on Black Hole/Host Galaxy Co-evolution and Binary Stalling Using Pulsar Timing Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Joseph; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah

    2016-07-01

    Pulsar timing arrays are now setting increasingly tight limits on the gravitational wave background from binary supermassive black holes (SMBHs). But as upper limits grow more constraining, what can be implied about galaxy evolution? We investigate which astrophysical parameters have the largest impact on predictions of the strain spectrum and provide a simple framework to directly translate between measured values for the parameters of galaxy evolution and pulsar timing array (PTA) limits on the gravitational wave background of binary SMBHs. We find that the most influential observable is the relation between a host galaxy's central bulge and its central black hole, {M}\\bullet {--}{M}{bulge}, which has the largest effect on the mean value of the characteristic strain amplitude. However, the variance of each prediction is dominated by uncertainties in galaxy stellar mass functions. Using this framework with the best published PTA limit, we can set limits on the shape and scatter of the {M}\\bullet {--}{M}{bulge} relation. We find our limits to be in contention with strain predictions using two leading measurements of this relation. We investigate several possible reasons for this disagreement. If we take the {M}\\bullet {--}{M}{bulge} relations to be correct within a simple power-law model for the gravitational wave background, then the inconsistency is reconcilable by allowing for an additional “stalling” time between a galaxy merger and evolution of a binary SMBH to sub-parsec scales, with lower limits on this timescale of ∼1–2 Gyr.

  9. Non-thermal emission from high-energy binaries through interferometric radio observations

    CERN Document Server

    Marcote, B

    2016-01-01

    High-mass binary systems involve extreme environments that produce non-thermal emission from radio to gamma rays. Only three types of these systems are known to emit persistent gamma-ray emission: colliding-wind binaries, high-mass X-ray binaries and gamma-ray binaries. This thesis is focused on the radio emission of high-mass binary systems through interferometric observations, and we have explored several of these sources with low- and high-frequency radio observations, and very high-resolution VLBI ones. We have studied two gamma-ray binaries, LS 5039 and LS I +61 303, at low frequencies. We have obtained their light-curves and spectra, and we have determined the physical properties of their radio emitting regions. We have also studied the gamma-ray binary HESS J0632+057 through VLBI observations. A new colliding wind binary, HD 93129A, has been discovered through VLBI and optical observations. Finally, we have conducted radio observations of two sources that were candidates to be gamma-ray binaries.

  10. Known Pulsars Identified in the GMRT 150 MHz All-Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Frail, D A; Mooley, K P; Intema, H T

    2016-01-01

    We have used the 150 MHz radio continuum survey (TGSS ADR) from the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) to search for phase-averaged emission toward all well-localized radio pulsars north of -53deg Declination. We detect emission toward 200 pulsars with high confidence (>=5-sigma) and another 88 pulsars at fainter levels. We show that most of our identifications are likely from pulsars, except for a small number where the measured flux density is confused by an associated supernova or pulsar-wind nebula, or a globular cluster. We investigate the radio properties of the 150 MHz sample and we find an unusually high number of gamma-ray binary millisecond pulsars with very steep spectral indices. We also note a discrepancy in the measured flux densities between GMRT and LOFAR pulsar samples, suggesting that the flux density scale for the LOFAR pulsar sample may be in error by approximately a factor two. We carry out a separate search of 30 well-localized gamma-ray, radio-quiet pulsars in an effort to detect a ...

  11. Pulsar statistics: a study of pulsar luminosities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A statistically significant correlation between pulsar luminosity at 400 MHz and both pulsar period and period derivative is found. Fitting a phenomenological power-law model L/sub model/(P,P) approx. P/sup α/P/sup β/ (where P is pulsar period, P - period derivative and L - radio luminosity) to the pulsar luminosity data, we obtain α = -1.04 +- 0.15 and β = 0.35 +- 0.06. The above values suggest that pulsar radio luminosity varies roughly as the cube root of the total loss of rotational energy. 16 references, 5 figures

  12. A pilot ASKAP survey of radio transient events in the region around the intermittent pulsar PSR J1107-5907

    CERN Document Server

    Hobbs, G; Bell, M E; Kerr, M; Rowlinson, A; Johnston, S; Shannon, R M; Voronkov, M A; Ward, C; Banyer, J; Hancock, P J; Murphy, Tara; Allison, J R; Amy, S W; Ball, L; Bannister, K; Bock, D C -J; Brodrick, D; Brothers, M; Brown, A J; Bunton, J D; Chapman, J; Chippendale, A P; Chung, Y; DeBoer, D; Diamond, P; Edwards, P G; Ekers, R; Ferris, R H; Forsyth, R; Gough, R; Grancea, A; Gupta, N; Harvey-Smith, L; Hay, S; Hayman, D B; Hotan, A W; Hoyle, S; Humphreys, B; Indermuehle, B; Jacka, C E; Jackson, C A; Jackson, S; Jeganathan, K; Joseph, J; Kendall, R; Kiraly, D; Koribalski, B; Leach, M; Lenc, E; MacLeod, A; Mader, S; Marquarding, M; Marvil, J; McClure-Griffiths, N; McConnell, D; Mirtschin, P; Neuhold, S; Ng, A; Norris, R P; O'Sullivan, J; Pearce, S; Phillips, C J; Popping, A; Qiao, R Y; Reynolds, J E; Roberts, P; Sault, R J; Schinckel, A E T; Serra, P; Shaw, R; Shimwell, T W; Storey, M; Sweetnam, A W; Tzioumis, A; Westmeier, T; Whiting, M; Wilson, C D

    2015-01-01

    We use observations from the Boolardy Engineering Test Array (BETA) of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope to search for transient radio sources in the field around the intermittent pulsar PSR J1107-5907. The pulsar is thought to switch between an "off" state in which no emission is detectable, a weak state and a strong state. We ran three independent transient detection pipelines on two-minute snapshot images from a 13 hour BETA observation in order to 1) study the emission from the pulsar, 2) search for other transient emission from elsewhere in the image and 3) to compare the results from the different transient detection pipelines. The pulsar was easily detected as a transient source and, over the course of the observations, it switched into the strong state three times giving a typical timescale between the strong emission states of 3.7 hours. After the first switch it remained in the strong state for almost 40 minutes. The other strong states lasted less than 4 minutes. Th...

  13. The ratio of profile peak separations as a probe of pulsar radio-beam structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyks, J.; Pierbattista, M.

    2015-12-01

    The known population of pulsars contains objects with four- and five-component profiles, for which the peak-to-peak separations between the inner and outer components can be measured. These Q- and M-type profiles can be interpreted as a result of sightline cut through a nested-cone beam, or through a set of azimuthal fan beams. We show that the ratio RW of the components' separations provides a useful measure of the beam shape, which is mostly independent of parameters that determine the beam scale and complicate interpretation of simpler profiles. In particular, the method does not depend on the emission altitude and the dipole tilt distribution. The different structures of the radio beam imply manifestly different statistical distributions of RW, with the conal model being several orders of magnitude less consistent with data than the fan-beam model. To bring the conal model into consistency with data, strong effects of observational selection need to be called for, with 80 per cent of Q and M profiles assumed to be undetected because of intrinsic blending effects. It is concluded that the statistical properties of Q and M profiles are more consistent with the fan-shaped beams, than with the traditional nested-cone geometry.

  14. The ratio of profile peak separations as a probe of pulsar radio-beam structure

    CERN Document Server

    Dyks, J

    2015-01-01

    The known population of pulsars contains objects with four and five component profiles, for which the peak-to-peak separations between the inner and outer components can be measured. These Q and M type profiles can be interpreted as a result of sightline cut through a nested cone beam, or through a set of azimuthal fan beams. We show that the ratio R_W of the components' separations provides a useful measure of the beam shape, which is mostly independent of parameters that determine the beam scale and complicate interpretation of simpler profiles. In particular, the method does not depend on the emission altitude and the dipole tilt distribution. The different structures of the radio beam imply manifestly different statistical distributions of R_W, with the conal model being several orders of magnitude less consistent with data than the fan beam model. To bring the conal model into consistency with data, strong effects of observational selection need to be called for, with 80% of Q and M profiles assumed to b...

  15. Instantaneous Radio Spectra of Giant Pulses from the Crab Pulsar from Decimeter to Decameter Wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, M V; Ul'yanov, O M; Deshpande, A A; Ershov, A A; Zakharenko, V V; Kondratiev, V I; Kostyuk, S V; Losovskii, B Y; Soglasnov, V A

    2006-01-01

    The results of simultaneous multifrequency observations of giant radio pulses from the Crab pulsar, PSR B0531+21, at 23, 111, and 600 MHz are presented and analyzed. Giant pulses were detected at a frequency as low as 23 MHz for the first time. Of the 45 giant pulses detected at 23 MHz, 12 were identified with counterparts observed simultaneously at 600 MHz. Of the 128 giant pulses detected at 111 MHz, 21 were identified with counterparts observed simultaneously at 600 MHz. The spectral indices for the power-law frequency dependence of the giant-pulse energies are from -3.1 to -1.6. The mean spectral index is -2.7 +/- 0.1 and is the same for both frequency combinations (600-111 MHz and 600-23 MHz). The large scatter in the spectral indices of the individual pulses and the large number of unidentified giant pulses suggest that the spectra of the individual giant pulses do not actually follow a simple power law. The observed shapes of the giant pulses at all three frequencies are determined by scattering on int...

  16. Wide-Band Spectra of Giant Radio Pulses from the Crab Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Mikami, Ryo; Tanaka, Shuta J; Kisaka, Shota; Sekido, Mamoru; Takefuji, Kazuhiro; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Misawa, Hiroaki; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; Kita, Hajime; Yonekura, Yoshinori; Terasawa, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of the simultaneous observation of the Giant Radio Pulses (GRPs) from the Crab pulsar at 0.3, 1.6, 2.2, 6.7 and 8.4 GHz with four telescopes in Japan. We obtain 3194 and 272 GRPs occurring at the main pulse and the interpulse phases, respectively. A few GRPs detected at both 0.3 and 8.4 GHz are the most wide-band samples ever reported. In the frequency range from 0.3 to 2.2 GHz, we find that about 70\\% or more of the GRP spectra are consistent with single power-laws and the spectral indices of them are distributed from $-4$ to $-1$. We also find that a significant number of GRPs have so hard spectral index $\\sim -1$) that the fluence at 0.3 GHz is below the detection limit (``dim-hard' GRPs). Stacking light curves of such dim-hard GRPs at 0.3 GHz, we detect consistent enhancement compared to the off-GRP light curve. Our samples show apparent correlations between the fluences and the spectral hardness, which indicates that more energetic GRPs tend to show softer spectra. Our comprehensiv...

  17. NuSTAR observations of the young, energetic radio pulsar PSR B1509-58

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Ge; Kaspi, Victoria M; Harrison, Fiona; Madsen, Kristen; Stern, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    We report on Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) hard X-ray observations of the young rotation-powered radio pulsar PSR B1509$-$58 in the supernova remnant MSH 15$-$52. We confirm the previously reported curvature in the hard X-ray spectrum, showing that a log parabolic model provides a statistically superior fit to the spectrum compared with the standard power law. The log parabolic model describes the NuSTAR data, as well as previously published gamma-ray data obtained with COMPTEL and AGILE, all together spanning 3 keV through 500 MeV. Our spectral modelling allows us to constrain the peak of the broadband high energy spectrum to be at 2.6$\\pm$0.8 MeV, an improvement of nearly an order of magnitude over previous measurements. In addition, we calculate NuSTAR spectra in 26 pulse phase bins and confirm previously reported variations of photon indices with phase. Finally, we measure the pulsed fraction of PSR B1509$-$58 in the hard X-ray energy band for the first time. Using the energy resolved pul...

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Pulse profiles of 100 radio pulsars (Pilia+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilia, M.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Stappers, B. W.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kramer, M.; van Leeuwen, J.; Weltevrede, P.; Lyne, A. G.; Zagkouris, K.; Hassall, T. E.; Bilous, A. V.; Breton, R. P.; Falcke, H.; Griessmeier, J.-M.; Keane, E.; Karastergiou, A.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Noutsos, A.; Oslowski, S.; Serylak, M.; Sobey, C.; Ter Veen, S.; Alexov, A.; Anderson, J.; Asgekar, A.; Avruch, I. M.; Bell, M. E.; Bentum, M. J.; Bernardi, G.; Birzan, L.; Bonafede, A.; Breitling, F.; Broderick, J. W.; Brueggen, M.; Ciardi, B.; Corbel, S.; de Geus, E.; de Jong, A.; Deller, A.; Duscha, S.; Eisloeffel, J.; Fallows, R. A.; Fender, R.; Ferrari, C.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M. A.; Gunst, A. W.; Hamaker, J. P.; Heald, G.; Horneffer, A.; Jonker, P.; Juette, E.; Kuper, G.; Maat, P.; Mann, G.; Markoff, S.; McFadden, R.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Nelles, A.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pietka, M.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A. G.; Reich, W.; Roettgering, H.; Rowlinson, A.; Schwarz, D.; Smirnov, O.; Steinmetz, M.; Stewart, A.; Swinbank, J. D.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; Thoudam, S.; Toribio, M. C.; van der Horst, A. J.; Vermeulen, R.; Vocks, C.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wijnands, R.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Wucknitz, O.; Zarka, P.

    2016-04-01

    The observed sample of pulsars was loosely based on a selection of the brightest objects in the LOFAR-visible sky (declination >-30°), using the ATNF Pulsar Catalog1 (Manchester et al., 2005AJ....129.1993M) for guidance. We observed 100 pulsars using the high-band antennas (HBAs) in the six central "Superterp" stations (CS002-CS007) of the LOFAR core. (3 data files).

  19. The Rest of the Story: Radio Pulsars and IR through Gamma-Ray Emission

    OpenAIRE

    Romani, Roger W.

    2002-01-01

    Recent observations have detected a number of young pulsars from the power peak in the gamma-ray band to the incoherent photon peak in the optical/IR. We have made progress on the multiwavelength phenomenology of pulsar emission and beaming, but a wide variation of light curves between different objects and different energy bands makes the full story complex. I sketch here a `Unified Model' of pulsar beaming and summarize the radiation mechanisms and their interplay in outer magnetosphere mod...

  20. Investigation of iron emission lines in the eclipsing high mass X-ray binary pulsar OAO 1657-415

    CERN Document Server

    Jaisawal, Gaurava K

    2016-01-01

    We present the results obtained from timing and spectral studies of high mass X-ray binary pulsar OAO 1657-415 using a Suzaku observations in 2011 September. X-ray pulsations were detected in the light curves up to $\\sim$70 keV. The continuum spectra during the high- and low-flux regions in light curves were well described by high energy cutoff power-law model along with a blackbody component and iron fluorescent lines at 6.4 keV and 7.06 keV. Time resolved spectroscopy was carried out by dividing the entire observations into 18 narrow segments. Presence of additional dense matter at various orbital phases was confirmed as the cause of low-flux regions in the observations. Presence of additional matter at several orbital phases of the pulsar was interpreted as due to the inhomogeneously distributed clumps of matter around the neutron star. Using clumpy wind hypothesis, the physical parameters of the clumps causing the high- and low-flux episodes in the pulsar light curve were estimated. The equivalent width o...

  1. Programmable Ultra Lightweight System Adaptable Radio (PULSAR) Low Cost Telemetry - Access from Space Advanced Technologies or Down the Middle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims. Herb; Varnavas, Kosta; Eberly, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Software Defined Radio (SDR) technology has been proven in the commercial sector since the early 1990's. Today's rapid advancement in mobile telephone reliability and power management capabilities exemplifies the effectiveness of the SDR technology for the modern communications market. In contrast, presently qualified satellite transponder applications were developed during the early 1960's space program. Programmable Ultra Lightweight System Adaptable Radio (PULSAR, NASA-MSFC SDR) technology revolutionizes satellite transponder technology by increasing data through-put capability by, at least, an order of magnitude. PULSAR leverages existing Marshall Space Flight Center SDR designs and commercially enhanced capabilities to provide a path to a radiation tolerant SDR transponder. These innovations will (1) reduce the cost of NASA Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Deep Space transponders, (2) decrease power requirements, and (3) a commensurate volume reduction. Also, PULSAR increases flexibility to implement multiple transponder types by utilizing the same hardware with altered logic - no analog hardware change is required - all of which can be accomplished in orbit. This provides high capability, low cost, transponders to programs of all sizes. The final project outcome would be the introduction of a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 7 low-cost CubeSat to SmallSat telemetry system into the NASA Portfolio.

  2. Pulsed Gamma Rays from the Original Millisecond and Black Widow Pulsars: A Case for Caustic Radio Emission?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemot, L.; Johnson, T. J.; Venter, C.; Kerr, M.; Pancrazi, B.; Livingstone, M.; Janssen, G. H.; Jaroenjittichai, P.; Kramer, M.; Cognard, I.; Stappers, B. W.; Harding, A. K.; Camilo, F.; Espinoza, C. M.; Freire, P. C. C.; Gargano, F.; Grove, J. E.; Johnston, S.; Michelson, P. F.; Noutsos, A.; Parent, D.; Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Shannon, R.; Smith, D. A.

    2011-01-01

    We report the detection of pulsed gamma-ray emission from the fast millisecond pulsars (MSPs) B1937+21 (also known as J1939+2134) and B1957+20 (J1959+2048) using 18 months of survey data recorded by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and timing solutions based on radio observations conducted at the Westerbork and Nancay radio telescopes. In addition, we analyzed archival RXTE and XMM-Newton X-ray data for the two MSPs, confirming the X-ray emission properties of PSR B1937+21 and finding evidence (approx. 4(sigma)) for pulsed emission from PSR B1957+20 for the first time. In both cases the gamma-ray emission profile is characterized by two peaks separated by half a rotation and are in close alignment with components observed in radio and X-rays. These two pulsars join PSRs J0034..0534 and J2214+3000 to form an emerging class of gamma-ray MSPs with phase-aligned peaks in different energy bands. The modeling of the radio and gamma-ray emission pro les suggests co-located emission regions in the outer magnetosphere.

  3. Constraints on Black Hole/Host Galaxy Co-evolution and Binary Stalling Using Pulsar Timing Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Pulsar timing arrays are now setting increasingly tight limits on the gravitational wave background from binary supermassive black holes. But as upper limits grow more constraining, what can be implied about galaxy evolution? We investigate which astrophysical parameters have the largest impact on strain spectrum predictions and provide a simple framework to directly translate between measured values for the parameters of galaxy evolution and PTA limits on the gravitational wave background of binary supermassive black holes. We find that the most influential observable is the relation between a host galaxy's central bulge and its central black hole, $\\mbox{$M_{\\bullet}$-$M_{\\rm bulge}$}$, which has the largest effect on the mean value of the characteristic strain amplitude. However, the variance of each prediction is dominated by uncertainties in the galaxy stellar mass function. Using this framework with the best published PTA limit, we can set limits on the shape and scatter of the $\\mbox{$M_{\\bullet}$-$M_{...

  4. Radio Counterparts of Compact Binary Mergers detectable in Gravitational Waves: A Simulation for an Optimized Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Hotokezaka, Kenta; Hallinan, Gregg; Lazio, T Joseph W; Nakar, Ehud; Piran, Tsvi

    2016-01-01

    Mergers of binary neutron stars and black hole-neutron star binaries produce gravitational-wave (GW) emission and outflows with significant kinetic energies. These outflows result in radio emissions through synchrotron radiation of accelerated electrons in shocks formed with the circum-merger medium. We explore the detectability of these synchrotron generated radio signals by follow-up observations of GW merger events lacking a detection of electromagnetic counterparts in other wavelengths. We model radio light curves arising from (i) sub-relativistic merger ejecta and (ii) ultra-relativistic jets. The former produces radio remnants on timescales of a few years and the latter produces $\\gamma$-ray bursts in the direction of the jet and orphan radio afterglows extending over wider angles on timescales of a week to a month. The intensity and duration of these radio counterparts depend on the kinetic energies of the outflows and on circum-merger densities. We estimate the detectability of the radio counterparts ...

  5. COSMOLOGICAL FAST RADIO BURSTS FROM BINARY WHITE DWARF MERGERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, Thornton et al. reported the detection of four fast radio bursts (FRBs). The dispersion measures indicate that the sources of these FRBs are at cosmological distance. Given the large full sky event rate ∼104 sky–1 day–1, the FRBs are a promising target for multi-messenger astronomy. Here we propose double degenerate, binary white-dwarf (WD) mergers as the source of FRBs, which are produced by coherent emission from the polar region of a rapidly rotating, magnetized massive WD formed after the merger. The basic characteristics of the FRBs, such as the energetics, emission duration and event rate, can be consistently explained in this scenario. As a result, we predict that some FRBs can accompany type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) or X-ray debris disks. Simultaneous detection could test our scenario and probe the progenitors of SNe Ia, and moreover would provide a novel constraint on the cosmological parameters. We strongly encourage future SN and X-ray surveys that follow up FRBs

  6. Radio Counterparts of Compact Binary Mergers detectable in Gravitational Waves: A Simulation for an Optimized Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Hotokezaka, Kenta; Nissanke, Samaya; Hallinan, Gregg; Lazio, T. Joseph W.; Nakar, Ehud; Piran, Tsvi

    2016-01-01

    Mergers of binary neutron stars and black hole-neutron star binaries produce gravitational-wave (GW) emission and outflows with significant kinetic energies. These outflows result in radio emissions through synchrotron radiation of accelerated electrons in shocks formed with the circum-merger medium. We explore the detectability of these synchrotron generated radio signals by follow-up observations of GW merger events lacking a detection of electromagnetic counterparts in other wavelengths. W...

  7. High Speed, Low Cost Telemetry Access from Space Development Update on Programmable Ultra Lightweight System Adaptable Radio (PULSAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simms, William Herbert, III; Varnavas, Kosta; Eberly, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Software Defined Radio (SDR) technology has been proven in the commercial sector since the early 1990's. Today's rapid advancement in mobile telephone reliability and power management capabilities exemplifies the effectiveness of the SDR technology for the modern communications market. In contrast, the foundations of transponder technology presently qualified for satellite applications were developed during the early space program of the 1960's. Conventional transponders are built to a specific platform and must be redesigned for every new bus while the SDR is adaptive in nature and can fit numerous applications with no hardware modifications. A SDR uses a minimum amount of analog / Radio Frequency (RF) components to up/down-convert the RF signal to/from a digital format. Once the signal is digitized, all processing is performed using hardware or software logic. Typical SDR digital processes include; filtering, modulation, up/down converting and demodulation. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Programmable Ultra Lightweight System Adaptable Radio (PULSAR) leverages existing MSFC SDR designs and commercial sector enhanced capabilities to provide a path to a radiation tolerant SDR transponder. These innovations (1) reduce the cost of NASA Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Deep Space standard transponders, (2) decrease power requirements, and (3) commensurately reduce volume. A second pay-off is the increased SDR flexibility by allowing the same hardware to implement multiple transponder types simply by altering hardware logic - no change of hardware is required - all of which will ultimately be accomplished in orbit. Development of SDR technology for space applications will provide a highly capable, low cost transponder to programs of all sizes. The MSFC PULSAR Project results in a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 7 low-cost telemetry system available to Smallsat and CubeSat missions, as well as other platforms. This paper documents the continued development and

  8. Three Millisecond Pulsars in FERMI LAT Unassociated Bright Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Ransom, S M; Camilo, F; Roberts, M S E; Celik, O; Wolff, M T; Cheung, C C; Kerr, M; Pennucci, T; DeCesar, M E; Cognard, I; Lyne, A G; Stappers, B W; Freire, P C C; Grove, J E; Abdo, A A; Desvignes, G; Donato, D; Ferrara, E C; Gehrels, N; Guillemot, L; Gwon, C; Harding, A K; Johnston, S; Keith, M; Kramer, M; Michelson, P F; Parent, D; Parkinson, P M Saz; Romani, R W; Smith, D A; Theureau, G; Thompson, D J; Weltevrede, P; Wood, K S; Ziegler, M

    2010-01-01

    We searched for radio pulsars in 25 of the non-variable, unassociated sources in the Fermi LAT Bright Source List with the Green Bank Telescope at 820 MHz. We report the discovery of three radio and gamma-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs) from a high Galactic latitude subset of these sources. All of the pulsars are in binary systems, which would have made them virtually impossible to detect in blind gamma-ray pulsation searches. They seem to be relatively normal, nearby (<=2 kpc) millisecond pulsars. These observations, in combination with the Fermi detection of gamma-rays from other known radio MSPs, imply that most, if not all, radio MSPs are efficient gamma-ray producers. The gamma-ray spectra of the pulsars are power-law in nature with exponential cutoffs at a few GeV, as has been found with most other pulsars. The MSPs have all been detected as X-ray point sources. Their soft X-ray luminosities of ~10^{30-31} erg/s are typical of the rare radio MSPs seen in X-rays.

  9. NUSTAR OBSERVATIONS OF THE YOUNG, ENERGETIC RADIO PULSAR PSR B1509–58

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ge; Kaspi, Victoria M. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2T8 (Canada); An, Hongjun [Department of Physics/KIPAC, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4060 (United States); Harrison, Fiona A.; Madsen, Kristin K. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Mail Stop 169-221, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    We report on Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) hard X-ray observations of the young rotation-powered radio pulsar PSR B1509−59 in the supernova remnant MSH 15−52. We confirm the previously reported curvature in the hard X-ray spectrum, showing that a log parabolic model provides a statistically superior fit to the spectrum compared with the standard power law. The log parabolic model describes the NuSTAR data, as well as previously published γ-ray data obtained with COMPTEL and AGILE, all together spanning 3 keV through 500 MeV. Our spectral modeling allows us to constrain the peak of the broadband high energy spectrum to be at 2.6 ± 0.8 MeV, an improvement of nearly an order of magnitude in precision over previous measurements. In addition, we calculate NuSTAR spectra in 26 pulse phase bins and confirm previously reported variations of photon indices with phase. Finally, we measure the pulsed fraction of PSR B1509−58 in the hard X-ray energy band for the first time. Using the energy resolved pulsed fraction results, we estimate that the pulsar’s off-pulse emission has a photon index value between 1.26 and 1.96. Our results support a model in which the pulsar’s lack of GeV emission is due to viewing geometry, with the X-rays originating from synchrotron emission from secondary pairs in the magnetosphere.

  10. The Quiescent X-Ray Properties of the Accreting Millisecond X-Ray Pulsar and Eclipsing binary Swift J1749.4-2807

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Degenaar; A. Patruno; R. Wijnands

    2012-01-01

    Swift J1749.4-2807 is a transient neutron star low-mass X-ray binary that contains an accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar spinning at 518 Hz. It is the first of its kind that displays X-ray eclipses, which holds significant promise to precisely constrain the mass of the neutron star. We report on a s

  11. RADIO-SELECTED BINARY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI FROM THE VERY LARGE ARRAY STRIPE 82 SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Hai [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52245 (United States); Myers, A. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Djorgovski, S. G.; Yan, Lin [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Wrobel, J. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Stockton, A. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2015-01-20

    Galaxy mergers play an important role in the growth of galaxies and their supermassive black holes. Simulations suggest that tidal interactions could enhance black hole accretion, which can be tested by the fraction of binary active galactic nuclei (AGNs) among galaxy mergers. However, determining the fraction requires a statistical sample of binaries. We have identified kiloparsec-scale binary AGNs directly from high-resolution radio imaging. Inside the 92 deg{sup 2} covered by the high-resolution Very Large Array survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82 field, we identified 22 grade A and 30 grade B candidates of binary radio AGNs with angular separations less than 5'' (10 kpc at z = 0.1). Eight of the candidates have optical spectra for both components from the SDSS spectroscopic surveys and our Keck program. Two grade B candidates are projected pairs, but the remaining six candidates are all compelling cases of binary AGNs based on either emission line ratios or the excess in radio power compared to the Hα-traced star formation rate. Only two of the six binaries were previously discovered by an optical spectroscopic search. Based on these results, we estimate that ∼60% of our binary candidates would be confirmed once we obtain complete spectroscopic information. We conclude that wide-area high-resolution radio surveys offer an efficient method to identify large samples of binary AGNs. These radio-selected binary AGNs complement binaries identified at other wavelengths and are useful for understanding the triggering mechanisms of black hole accretion.

  12. The Double Pulsar System J0737-3039

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorimer, D. R.

    The double pulsar system J0737 - 3039 - a 22.7 ms pulsar in a compact 2.4 hr orbit about a 2.7 s pulsar was one of the long-awaited "holy grails" of pulsar astronomy. After only two years of timing, the system is close to surpassing the original Hulse-Taylor binary as a test of general relativity. On-going timing should soon reveal second-order effects in the post-Newtonian parameters. In addition, the observed interactions of the radio beams of the two pulsars provide a unique laboratory for probing neutron star magnetospheres and relativistic winds. Finally, a revised estimate of the cosmic rate of double neutron star mergers including J0737 - 3039 boosts previous estimates by an order of magnitude and suggests a high detection rate for the advanced LIGO gravitational wave detector.

  13. Detecting stochastic backgrounds of gravitational waves with pulsar timing arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemens, Xavier

    2016-03-01

    For the past decade the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) has been using the Green Bank Telescope and the Arecibo Observatory to monitor millisecond pulsars. NANOGrav, along with two other international collaborations, the European Pulsar Timing Array and the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array in Australia, form a consortium of consortia: the International Pulsar Timing Array (IPTA). The goal of the IPTA is to directly detect low-frequency gravitational waves which cause small changes to the times of arrival of radio pulses from millisecond pulsars. In this talk I will discuss the work of NANOGrav and the IPTA, as well as our sensitivity to stochastic backgrounds of gravitational waves. I will show that a detection of the background produced by supermassive black hole binaries is possible by the end of the decade. Supported by the NANOGrav Physics Frontiers Center.

  14. Formation and evolution of X-ray binaries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    We review recent progress in theoretical understanding of X-ray binaries,which has largely been driven by new observations.We select several topics including formation of compact low-mass X-ray binaries,the evolutionary connection between low-mass X-ray binaries and binary and millisecond radio pulsars,and ultraluminous X-ray sources,to illustrate the interplay between theories and observations.

  15. Search for Millisecond Pulsars for the Pulsar Timing Array project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milia, S.

    2012-03-01

    Pulsars are rapidly rotating highly magnetised neutron stars (i.e. ultra dense stars, where about one solar mass is concentrated in a sphere with a radius of ~ 10 km), which irradiate radio beams in a fashion similar to a lighthouse. As a consequence, whenever the beams cut our line of sight we perceive a radio pulses, one (or two) per pulsar rotation, with a frequency up to hundred of times a second. Owing to their compact nature, rapid spin and high inertia, pulsars are in general fairly stable rotators, hence the Times of Arrival (TOAs) of the pulses at a radio telescope can be used as the ticks of a clock. This holds true in particular for the sub­class of the millisecond pulsars (MSPs), having a spin period smaller than the conventional limit of 30 ms, whose very rapid rotation and relatively older age provide better rotational stability than the ordinary pulsars. Indeed, some MSPs rotate so regularly that they can rival the best atomic clocks on Earth over timespan of few months or years.This feature allows us to use MSPs as tools in a cosmic laboratory, by exploiting a procedure called timing, which consists in the repeated and regular measurement of the TOAs from a pulsar and then in the search for trends in the series of the TOAs over various timespans, from fraction of seconds to decades.For example the study of pulsars in binary systems has already provided the most stringent tests to date of General Relativity in strong gravitational fields and has unambiguously showed the occurrence of the emission of gravitational waves from a binary system comprising two massive bodies in a close orbit. In last decades a new exciting perspective has been opened, i.e. to use pulsars also for a direct detection of the so far elusive gravitational waves and thereby applying the pulsar timing for cosmological studies. In fact, the gravitational waves (GWs) going across our Galaxy pass over all the Galactic pulsars and the Earth, perturbing the space­time at the

  16. Discovery of a large time scale cyclic evolution of radio pulsars rotational frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beskin, G.; Biryukov, A.; Karpov, S.

    2006-08-01

    The recent massive measurements of pulsar frequency second derivatives have shown that they are 100-1000 times larger than expected for standard pulsar slowdown low. Moreover, the second derivatives as well as braking indices are even negative for about half of pulsars. We explain these paradoxical results on the basis of the statistical analysis of the rotational parameters (frequency, its first and second derivatives) of the subset of 295 pulsars taken mostly from the ATNF database. We have found strong correlation of second and first frequency derivatives either for positive (correlation coefficient r~0.9) and negative (r~0.85) values of second derivative, and of the frequency and and its first derivative (r~0.7). We interpret these dependencies as evolutionary ones due to the first frequency derivative being nearly proportional to the characteristic age. The derived statistical relations as well as "anomalous" values of the second frequency derivative are well explained in the framework of the simple model of cyclic evolution of the rotational frequency of the pulsars. It combines the secular change of the rotational parameters according to the power law with braking index n~5 and harmonic oscillations of 100--1000 years period with an amplitude from 10^-3 Hz for young pulsars to 10^-10 Hz for elder ones. The physical nature of these cyclic variations of the rotational frequency may be similar to the well-known red timing noise, however, with much larger characteristic time scale.

  17. Star Cluster Buzzing With Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    A dense globular star cluster near the center of our Milky Way Galaxy holds a buzzing beehive of rapidly-spinning millisecond pulsars, according to astronomers who discovered 21 new pulsars in the cluster using the National Science Foundation's 100-meter Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia. The cluster, called Terzan 5, now holds the record for pulsars, with 24, including three known before the GBT observations. Pulsar Diagram Pulsar Diagram: Click on image for more detail. "We hit the jackpot when we looked at this cluster," said Scott Ransom, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Charlottesville, VA. "Not only does this cluster have a lot of pulsars -- and we still expect to find more in it -- but the pulsars in it are very interesting. They include at least 13 in binary systems, two of which are eclipsing, and the four fastest-rotating pulsars known in any globular cluster, with the fastest two rotating nearly 600 times per second, roughly as fast as a household blender," Ransom added. Ransom and his colleagues reported their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in San Diego, CA, and in the online journal Science Express. The star cluster's numerous pulsars are expected to yield a bonanza of new information about not only the pulsars themselves, but also about the dense stellar environment in which they reside and probably even about nuclear physics, according to the scientists. For example, preliminary measurements indicate that two of the pulsars are more massive than some theoretical models would allow. "All these exotic pulsars will keep us busy for years to come," said Jason Hessels, a Ph.D student at McGill University in Montreal. Globular clusters are dense agglomerations of up to millions of stars, all of which formed at about the same time. Pulsars are spinning, superdense neutron stars that whirl "lighthouse beams" of radio waves or light around as they spin. A neutron star is what is

  18. Fermi Study of 5--300 GeV Emission from the High-mass Pulsar Binary PSR B1259-63/LS 2883

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yi; Wang, Zhongxiang; Takata, Jumpei

    2016-09-01

    We report the results from our detailed analysis of the Fermi Large Area Telescope data for the pulsar binary PSR B1259-63/LS 2883. During the GeV flares that occurred when the pulsar was in the periastron passages, we have detected a 5-300 GeV component at ≃5σ in emission from the binary. The detection verifies the presence of the component that has been marginally found in previous studies of the binary. Furthermore, we have discovered that this component was marginally present even in the quiescent state of the binary, specifically the mean anomaly phase 0.7-0.9. The component can be described by a power law with a photon index Γ ˜ 1.4, and the flux in the flares is approximately one order of magnitude higher than that in quiescence. We discuss the origin of this component. It likely arises from the inverse-Compton process: due to the interaction between the winds from the pulsar and its massive companion, high-energy particles from the shock scatter the seed photons from the companion to GeV/TeV energies. Based on this scenario, model fits to the broad-band X-ray to TeV spectra of the binary in the flaring and quiescent states are provided.

  19. 2S1553-542: a Be/X-ray binary pulsar on the far side of the Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Lutovinov, Alexander A; Townsend, Lee J; Tsygankov, Sergey S; Kennea, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of a comprehensive analysis of X-ray (Chandra and Swift observatories), optical (Southern African Large Telescope, SALT) and near-infrared (the VVV survey) observations of the Be/X-ray binary pulsar 2S1553-542. Accurate coordinates for the X-ray source are determined and are used to identify the faint optical/infrared counterpart for the first time. Using VVV and SALTICAM photometry, we have constructed the spectral energy distribution (SED) for this star and found a moderate NIR excess that is typical for Be stars and arises due to the presence of circumstellar material (disk). A comparison of the SED with those of known Be/X-ray binaries has allowed us to estimate the spectral type of the companion star as B1-2V and the distance to the system as $>15$ kpc. This distance estimation is supported by the X-ray data and makes 2S1553-542 one of the most distant X-ray binaries within the Milky Way, residing on the far side in the Scutum-Centaurus arm or even further.

  20. Suzaku view of Be/X-ray binary pulsar GX 304-1 during Type I X-ray outbursts

    CERN Document Server

    Jaisawal, Gaurava K; Epili, Prahlad

    2016-01-01

    We report the timing and spectral properties of Be/X-ray binary pulsar GX 304-1 by using two Suzaku observations during its 2010 August and 2012 January X-ray outbursts. Pulsations at ~275 s were clearly detected in the light curves from both the observations. Pulse profiles were found to be strongly energy-dependent. During 2010 observation, prominent dips seen in soft X-ray ($\\leq$10 keV) pulse profiles were found to be absent at higher energies. However, during 2012 observation, the pulse profiles were complex due to the presence of several dips. Significant changes in the shape of the pulse profiles were detected at high energies ($>$35 keV). A phase shift of $\\sim$0.3 was detected while comparing the phase of main dip in pulse profiles below and above $\\sim$35 keV. Broad-band energy spectrum of pulsar was well described by a partially absorbed Negative and Positive power-law with Exponential cutoff (NPEX) model with 6.4 keV iron line and a cyclotron absorption feature. Energy of cyclotron absorption line...

  1. A Compact X-ray Source in the Radio Pulsar-Wind Nebula G141.2+5.0

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, Stephen P

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of a 50 ks Chandra observation of the recently discovered radio object G141.2+5.0, presumed to be a pulsar-wind nebula. We find a moderately bright unresolved X-ray source which we designate CXOU J033712.8 615302 coincident with the central peak radio emission. An absorbed power-law fit to the 241 counts describes the data well, with absorbing column $N_H = 6.7 (4.0, 9.7) \\times 10^{21}$ cm$^{-2}$ and photon index $\\Gamma = 1.8 (1.4, 2.2)$. For a distance of 4 kpc, the unabsorbed luminosity between 0.5 and 8 keV is $ 1.7^{+0.4}_{-0.3} \\times 10^{32}$ erg s$^{-1}$ (90\\% confidence intervals). Both $L_X$ and $\\Gamma$ are quite typical of pulsars in PWNe. No extended emission is seen; we estimate a conservative $3 \\sigma$ upper limit to the surface brightness of any X-ray PWN near the point source to be $3 \\times 10^{-17}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ arcsec$^{-2}$ between 0.5 and 8 keV, assuming the same spectrum as the point source; for a nebula of diameter $13"$, the flux limit is 6\\% of the f...

  2. Soft X-Ray Properties of the Binary Millisecond Pulsar J0437-4715

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Martin, Christopher; Marshall, Herman, L.; Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We obtained a light curve for the 5.75 ms pulsar J0437-4715 in the 65-120 A range with 0.5 ms time resolution using the Deep Survey instrument on the EUVE satellite. The single-peaked profile has a pulsed fraction of 0.27 +/- 0.05, similar to the ROSAT data in the overlapping energy band. A combined analysis of the EUVE and ROSAT data is consistent with a power-law spectrum of energy index alpha = 1.2 - 1.5, intervening column density N(sub H) = (5 - 8) x 10(exp 19)/sq cm, and luminosity 5.0 x 10(exp 30) ergs/s in the 0.1 - 2.4 keV band. We also use a bright EUVE/ROSAT source only 4.2 min. from the pulsar, the Seyfert galaxy RX J0437.4-4711 (= EUVE J0437-471 = IES 0435-472), to obtain an independent upper limit on the intervening absorption to the pulsar, N(sub H) less than 1.2 x 10(exp 20)/sq cm. Although a blackbody spectrum fails to fit the ROSAT data, two-component spectral fits to the combined EUVE/ROSAT data are used to limit the temperatures and surface areas of thermal emission that might make partial contributions to the flux. A hot polar cap of radius 50 - 600 m and temperature (1.0 - 3.3) x 10(exp 6) K could be present. Alternatively, a larger region with T = (4 - 12) x 10(exp 5) K and area less than 200 sq km, might contribute most of the EUVE and soft X-ray flux, but only if a hotter component were present as well. Any of these temperatures would require some mechanism(s) of surface reheating to be operating in this old pulsar, the most plausible being the impact of accelerated electrons and positrons onto the polar caps. The kinematically corrected spin-down power of PSR J0437-4715 is only 4 x 10(exp 33) ergs/s, which is an order of magnitude less than that of the lowest-luminosity gamma-ray pulsars Geminga and PSR B1055-52. The absence of high-energy gamma-rays from PSR J0437-4715 might signify an inefficient or dead outer gap accelerator, which in turn accounts for the lack of a more luminous reheated surface such as those intermediate-age gamma

  3. Investigation of the bi-drifting subpulses of radio pulsar B1839-04 utilising the open-source data-analysis project PSRSALSA

    CERN Document Server

    Weltevrede, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The usefulness and versatility of the PSRSALSA open-source pulsar data-analysis project is demonstrated through an analysis of the radio pulsar B1839-04. This study focuses on the phenomenon of bi-drifting, an effect where the drift direction of subpulses is systematically different in different pulse profile components. Bi-drifting is extremely rare in the pulsar population. Various tools in PSRSALSA, including those allowing quantification of periodicities in the subpulse modulation, their flux distribution, and polarization properties, are exploited to obtain a comprehensive picture of the radio properties of PSR B1839-04. In particular, the second harmonic in the fluctuation spectra of the subpulse modulation is exploited to convincingly demonstrate the existence of bi-drifting. Bi-drifting is confirmed with a completely independent method allowing the average modulation cycle to be determined. Polarization measurements were used to obtain a robust constraint on the magnetic inclination angle of less than...

  4. Piercing the Vainshtein screen with anomalous gravitational wave speed: Constraints on modified gravity from binary pulsars

    OpenAIRE

    Beltrán Jiménez, Jose; Piazza, Federico; Velten, Hermano

    2016-01-01

    International audience By using observations of the Hulse-Taylor pulsar we constrain the gravitational wave (GW) speed to the level of 10 −2. We apply this result to scalar-tensor theories that generalize Galileon 4 and 5 models, which display anomalous propagation speed and coupling to matter for GWs. We argue that this effect survives conventional screening due to the persistence of a scalar field gradient inside virialized overdensities, which effectively " pierces " the Vainshtein scre...

  5. A search for pulsed radio emission from anomalous X-ray pulsar 4U 0142+61 at the frequency of 111 MHz

    CERN Document Server

    Ershov, Alexander A

    2007-01-01

    We have searched for pulsed radio emission from magnetar 4U 0142+61 at the frequency of 111 MHz. No pulsed signal was detected from this source. Upper limits for mean flux density are 0.9 - 9 mJy depending on assumed duty cycle (.05 - .5) of the pulsar.

  6. On the second derivatives of periods and braking indices in radio pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Malov, I F

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of some braking mechanisms for neutron stars was carried out to determine the sign of the second derivative of the pulsar period. This quantity is the important parameter for calculations of the braking index n. It is shown that this derivative can be positive and lead to decreasing of n. It is necessary to correct the methods of calculations of n used this moment because they are based as a rule on the suggestion on the constancy of pulsar parameters (magnetic fields, angles between some axes and so on). The estimations of corrections to braking indices are obtained. It is shown that these corrections can be marked for pulsars with long periods and their small derivatives.

  7. High-School Teams Joining Massive Pulsar Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    to join in cutting-edge scientific research. The GBT has discovered more than 60 pulsars over the past five years, including the fastest-rotating pulsar ever found, a speedster spinning 716 times per second. At WVU, astronomers Maura McLaughlin and Duncan Lorimer are experienced pulsar specialists who use the GBT regularly for their research. Pulsar Graphic Pulsars Are Spinning Neutron Stars CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on image for larger version) The PSC program will include training for teachers and student leaders at Green Bank, and an annual scientific seminar at WVU where all participants can present their research. During the year, participants will share information through an online collaboration site called the "collaboratory," operated by Northwestern University. Student teams will receive parcels of data from the GBT and analyze the data to discover pulsars. To do so, they will need to learn to use analysis software and to recognize man-made radio interference that contaminates the data. Each portion of the data will be analyzed by multiple teams. Of the 1500 hours of GBT observing data in the project, taken during the summer of 2007, some 300 hours is reserved for analysis by the student teams. This reserved data set is expected to include tens of new pulsars and about 100 known pulsars. "Because multiple teams will analyze each portion of the data, every student in the project is virtually guaranteed to discover a new pulsar," Heatherly said. "This will give West Virginia high school students the chance to make groundbreaking discoveries like finding exotic pulsar binary systems, pulsars with planetary systems, or pulsars spinning faster than currently thought possible," McLaughlin said. The project will begin recruiting teachers in February of 2008. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  8. Fermi Study of 5-300 GeV emission from the high-mass pulsar binary PSR B1259-63/LS 2883

    CERN Document Server

    Xing, Yi; Takata, Jumpei

    2016-01-01

    We report the results from our detailed analysis of the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data for the pulsar binary PSR B1259-63/LS 2883. During the GeV flares that occurred when the pulsar was in the periastron passages, we have detected a 5--300 GeV component at $\\simeq 5\\sigma$ in emission from the binary. The detection verifies the presence of the component that has been marginally found in the previous studies of the binary. Furthermore, we have discovered that this component was present even in the quiescent state of the binary, specifically the mean anomaly phase 0.7--0.9. The component can be described by a power law with photon index $\\Gamma\\sim 1.4$, and the flux in the flares is approximately one order of magnitude higher than that in quiescence. We discuss the origin of this component. It likely arises from the inverse-Compton process: high-energy particles from the shock, due to the interaction between the winds from the pulsar and massive companion, scatter the seed photons from the companion to...

  9. Rotation and Accretion Powered Pulsars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ever wanted to know about pulsars but were afraid to ask. Chapter 1 begins a brief and interesting account of the discovery of pulsars, followed by an overview of the rotation-powered and accretion-powered populations. The following four chapters are fairly detailed and reasonably quantitative descriptions of neutron star interiors. This is no easy feat, given that a description of the physics of neutron stars demands a deep understanding of all major physical forces, and must include general relativity as well as detailed particle physics. The historical notes at the beginning of Chapter 2 are particularly fascinating, recounting the path to today's understanding of neutron stars in very interesting detail. Chapter 7 presents rotation-powered pulsar radio properties, and a nice description of pulsar timing, including relativistic and non-relativistic binaries and GR tests. The remaining chapters tackle a variety of topics including binary evolution, superfluidity, accretion-powered pulsar properties, magnetospheres and emission mechanisms, magnetic fields, spin evolution and strange stars. The coverage is somewhat uneven, with the strange star chapter, for example, an obvious afterthought. The utility of an encyclopedia lies in its breadth and in how up-to-date it is. Although admirable in its intentions, the Ghosh book does omit some major pulsar topics. This book leaves the impression that rotation-powered pulsars produce only radio emission; hardly (if at all) mentioned is the vast literature on their infrared, optical, and even more importantly, x-ray and gamma-ray emission, the latter being far more relevant to the pulsar 'machine' than the energetically puny radio output. Also absent are pulsar winds; this is particularly puzzling given both the lovely wind nebula that graces the book's cover, and the central role the wind plays as primary sink of the rotation power. One of the most actively pursued topics in pulsar astrophysics in the past decade, magnetars

  10. Three Millisecond Pulsars in Fermi LAT Unassociated Bright Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Camilo, F.; Roberts, M. S. E.; Celik, O.; Wolff, M. T.; Cheung, C. C.; Kerr, M.; Pennucci, T.; DeCesar, M. E.; Cognard, I.; Lyne, A. G.; Stappers, B. W.; Freire, P. C. C.; Grove, J. E.; Abdo, A. A.; Desvignes, G.; Donato, D.; Ferrara, E. C.; Gehrels, N.; Guillemot, L.; Gwon, C.; Johnston, S.; Harding, A. K.; Thompson, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    We searched for radio pulsars in 25 of the non-variable, unassociated sources in the Fermi LAT Bright Source List with the Green Bank Telescope at 820 MHz. We report the discovery of three radio and gamma-ray millisecond pulsar (MSPs) from a high Galactic latitude subset of these sources. All of the pulsars are in binary systems, which would have made them virtually impossible to detect in blind gamma-ray pulsation searches. They seem to be relatively normal, nearby (<= 2 kpc) MSPs. These observations, in combination with the Fermi detection of gamma-rays from other known radio MSPs, imply that most, if not all, radio MSPs are efficient gamma-ray producers. The gamma-ray spectra of the pulsars are power law in nature with exponential cutoffs at a few Ge V, as has been found with most other pulsars. The MSPs have all been detected as X-ray point sources. Their soft X-ray luminosities of approx 10(exp 30) - 10(exp 31) erg/s are typical of the rare radio MSPs seen in X-rays.

  11. The Optimization of GBT Pulsar Data for the GBNCC Pulsar Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Ashlee Nicole; Green Bank NRAO, GBNCC

    2016-01-01

    The Green Bank Telescope collects data from the Green Bank Northern Celestial Cap (GBNCC) pulsar survey in order to find new pulsars within its sensitivity and also, to confirm previously found pulsars within its sensitivity range. The collected data is then loaded into the CyberSKA website database where astronomers are tasked with rating the data sets based on its potential to be a pulsar from 0(unclassified), 1(class 1 pulsar), 2(class 2 pulsar), 3(class 3 pulsar), 4(radio frequency interference), 5(not a pulsar), 6(know pulsar), 7(harmonic of a known pulsar). This specific research done was to use previously classified pulsars to create a python script that will automatically identify the data set as a pulsar or a non-pulsar. After finding the recurring frequencies of radio frequency interference (RFI), the frequencies were then added to a pipeline to further discern pulsars from RFI.

  12. The High Time Resolution Universe Pulsar Survey XII : Galactic plane acceleration search and the discovery of 60 pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Ng, C; Bailes, M; Barr, E D; Bates, S D; Bhat, N D R; Burgay, M; Burke-Spolaor, S; Flynn, C M L; Jameson, A; Johnston, S; Keith, M J; Kramer, M; Levin, L; Petroff, E; Possenti, A; Stappers, B W; van Straten, W; Tiburzi, C; Eatough, R P; Lyne, A G

    2015-01-01

    We present initial results from the low-latitude Galactic plane region of the High Time Resolution Universe pulsar survey conducted at the Parkes 64-m radio telescope. We discuss the computational challenges arising from the processing of the terabyte-sized survey data. Two new radio interference mitigation techniques are introduced, as well as a partially-coherent segmented acceleration search algorithm which aims to increase our chances of discovering highly-relativistic short-orbit binary systems, covering a parameter space including potential pulsar-black hole binaries. We show that under a constant acceleration approximation, a ratio of data length over orbital period of ~0.1 results in the highest effectiveness for this search algorithm. From the 50 per cent of data processed thus far, we have re-detected 435 previously known pulsars and discovered a further 60 pulsars, two of which are fast-spinning pulsars with periods less than 30ms. PSR J1101-6424 is a millisecond pulsar whose heavy white dwarf (WD)...

  13. DISCOVERY OF PULSED γ-RAYS FROM THE YOUNG RADIO PULSAR PSR J1028-5819 WITH THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radio pulsar PSR J1028-5819 was recently discovered in a high-frequency search (at 3.1 GHz) in the error circle of the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) source 3EG J1027-5817. The spin-down power of this young pulsar is great enough to make it very likely the counterpart for the EGRET source. We report here the discovery of γ-ray pulsations from PSR J1028-5819 in early observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. The γ-ray light curve shows two sharp peaks having phase separation of 0.460 ± 0.004, trailing the very narrow radio pulse by 0.200 ± 0.003 in phase, very similar to that of other known γ-ray pulsars. The measured γ-ray flux gives an efficiency for the pulsar of ∼10-20% (for outer magnetosphere beam models). No evidence of a surrounding pulsar wind nebula is seen in the current Fermi data but limits on associated emission are weak because the source lies in a crowded region with high background emission. However, the improved angular resolution afforded by the LAT enables the disentanglement of the previous COS-B and EGRET source detections into at least two distinct sources, one of which is now identified as PSR J1028-5819.

  14. Discovery of Pulsed Gamma Rays from the Young Radio Pulsar PSR J1028-5819 with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    Radio pulsar PSR J1028-5819 was recently discovered in a high-frequency search (at 3.1 GHz)in the error circle of the EGRET source 3EG J1027-5817. The spin-down power of this young pulsar is great enough to make it very likely the counterpart for the EGRET source. We report here the discovery of gamma-ray pulsations from PSR J1028-5819 in early observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. The gamma-ray light curve shows two sharp peaks having phase separation of 0.460 +- 0.004, trailing the very narrow radio pulse by 0.200 +- 0.003 in phase, very similar to that of other known $\\gamma$-ray pulsars. The measured gamma-ray flux gives an efficiency for the pulsar of 10-20% (for outer magnetosphere beam models). No evidence of a surrounding pulsar wind nebula is seen in the current Fermi data but limits on associated emission are weak because the source lies in a crowded region with high background emission. However, the improved angular resolution afforded by the LAT ena...

  15. Pulsars and quark stars

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, R

    2005-01-01

    Members of the family of pulsar-like stars are distinguished by their different manifestations observed, i.e., radio pulsars, accretion-driven X-ray pulsars, X-ray bursts, anomalous X-ray pulsars/soft gamma-ray repeaters, compact center objects, and dim thermal neutron stars. Though one may conventionally think that these stars are normal neutron stars, it is still an open issue whether they are actually neutron stars or quark stars, as no convincing work, either theoretical from first principles or observational, has confirmed Baade-Zwicky's original idea that supernovae produce neutron stars. After introducing briefly the history of pulsars and quark stars, the author summarizes the recent achievements in his pulsar group, including quark matter phenomenology at low temperature, starquakes of solid pulsars, low-mass quark stars, and the pulsar magnetospheric activities.

  16. MODELING THE FREQUENCY DEPENDENCE OF RADIO BEAMS FOR CONE-DOMINANT PULSARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beam radii for cone-dominant pulsars follow a power-law relation with frequency, thetav = (ν/ν0) k + thetav0, which has not been well explained in previous works. We study this frequency dependence of beam radius (FDB) for cone-dominant pulsars by using the curvature radiation mechanism. Considering various density and energy distributions of particles in the pulsar open field-line region, we numerically simulate the emission intensity distribution across emission height and rotation phase, get integrated profiles at different frequencies, and obtain the FDB curves. For the density model of a conal-like distribution, the simulated profiles always shrink to one component at high frequencies. In the density model with two separated density patches, the profiles generally have two distinct components, and the power-law indices k are found to be in the range from –0.1 to –2.5, consistent with observational results. Energy distributions of streaming particles have significant influence on the frequency-dependence behavior. Radial energy decay of particles is desired to get proper thetav0 in models. We conclude that by using the curvature radiation mechanism, the observed FDB for the cone-dominant pulsars can only be explained by the emission model of particles in two density patches with a Gaussian energy distribution and a radial energy loss.

  17. An extensive and autonomous deep space navigation system using radio pulsars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kestillä, A.A.; Engelen, S.; Gill, E.K.A.; Verhoeven, C.J.M.; Bentum, M.J.; Irahhauten, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Interstellar navigation poses significant challenges in all aspects of a spacecraft. One of them is reliable, low-cost, real-time navigation, especially when there is a considerable distance between Earth and the spacecraft in question. In this paper, a complete system for navigation using pulsar ra

  18. Nobel Prize in Physics 1993 "for the discovery of a new type of pulsar, a discovery that has opened up new possibilities for the study of gravitation" : Russell A. Hulse and Joseph H. Taylor Jr.

    CERN Multimedia

    1994-01-01

    Prof. J. H. Taylor Jr. presents "Binary pulsars and relativistic gravity" Spinning freely on their axes, and emitting radio noise detectable over interastellar distances, pulsars make extraordinarily stable natural clocks. Detailed comparisons of""pulsar time" with time kept by atomic clocks on Earth have opened the way for tests of gravity under conditions much more relativistic than found anywhere within the solar system. Among other results,these experiments have demonstrated the existence,quadrupolar nature, and propagation speed of gravitational waves.

  19. Discovery of SXP 265, a Be/X-ray binary pulsar in the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, R.; Haberl, F.; Vasilopoulos, G.; Bartlett, E. S.; Maggi, P.; Rau, A.; Greiner, J.; Udalski, A.

    2014-11-01

    We identify a new candidate for a Be/X-ray binary in the XMM-Newton slew survey and archival Swift observations that is located in the transition region of the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud and the Magellanic Bridge. We investigated and classified this source with follow-up XMM-Newton and optical observations. We model the X-ray spectra and search for periodicities and variability in the X-ray observations and the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment I-band light curve. The optical counterpart has been classified spectroscopically, with data obtained at the South African Astronomical Observatory 1.9 m telescope, and photometrically, with data obtained using the Gamma-ray Burst Optical Near-ir Detector at the MPG 2.2 m telescope. The X-ray spectrum is typical of a high-mass X-ray binary with an accreting neutron star. We detect X-ray pulsations, which reveal a neutron-star spin period of Ps = (264.516 ± 0.014) s. The source likely shows a persistent X-ray luminosity of a few 1035 erg s-1 and in addition type-I outbursts that indicate an orbital period of ˜146 d. A periodicity of 0.867 d, found in the optical light curve, can be explained by non-radial pulsations of the Be star. We identify the optical counterpart and classify it as a B1-2II-IVe star. This confirms SXP 265 as a new Be/X-ray binary pulsar originating in the tidal structure between the Magellanic Clouds.

  20. THERMAL ABSORPTION AS THE CAUSE OF GIGAHERTZ-PEAKED SPECTRA IN PULSARS AND MAGNETARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewandowski, Wojciech; Rożko, Karolina; Kijak, Jarosław; Melikidze, George I., E-mail: boe@astro.ia.uz.zgora.pl [Institute of Astronomy, University of Zielona Gora, Szafrana 2, 65-516 Zielona Gora (Poland)

    2015-07-20

    We present a model that explains the observed deviation of the spectra of some pulsars and magnetars from the power-law spectra that are seen in the bulk of the pulsar population. Our model is based on the assumption that the observed variety of pulsar spectra can be naturally explained by the thermal free–free absorption that takes place in the surroundings of the pulsars. In this context, the variety of the pulsar spectra can be explained according to the shape, density, and temperature of the absorbing media and the optical path of the line of sight across it. We have put specific emphasis on the case of the radio magnetar SGR J1745–2900 (also known as the Sgr A* magnetar), modeling the rapid variations of the pulsar spectrum after the outburst of 2013 April as due to the free–free absorption of the radio emission in the electron material ejected during the magnetar outburst. The ejecta expands with time and consequently the absorption rate decreases and the shape of the spectrum changes in such a way that the peak frequency shifts toward the lower radio frequencies. In the hypothesis of an absorbing medium, we also discuss the similarity between the spectral behavior of the binary pulsar B1259–63 and the spectral peculiarities of isolated pulsars.

  1. Distribution of inhomogeneities in the interstellar plasma in the directions of three distant pulsars from observations with the RadioAstron ground-space interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, M. V.; Andrianov, A. S.; Bartel, N.; Gwinn, C.; Joshi, B. C.; Jauncey, D.; Kardashev, N. S.; Rudnitskii, A. G.; Smirnova, T. V.; Soglasnov, V. A.; Fadeev, E. N.; Shishov, V. I.

    2016-09-01

    The RadioAstron ground-space interferometer has been used to measure the angular sizes of the scattering disks of the three distant pulsars B1641-45, B1749-28, and B1933+16. The observations were carried out with the participation of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope; two 32-m telescopes at Torun, Poland and Svetloe, Russia (the latter being one antenna of the KVAZAR network); the Saint Croix VLBA antenna; the Arecibo radio telescope; the Parkes, Narrabri (ATCA), Mopra, Hobart, and Ceduna Australian radio telescopes; and the Hartebeesthoek radio telescope in South Africa. The full widths at half maximum of the scattering disks were 27 mas at 1668 MHz for B1641-45, 0.5 mas at 1668 MHz for B1749-28, and 12.3 at 316 MHz and 0.84 mas at 1668 MHz for B1933+16. The characteristic time scales for scatter-broadening of the pulses on inhomogeneities in the interstellar plasma τsc were also measured for these pulsars using various methods. Joint knowledge of the size of the scattering disk and the scatter-broadening time scale enables estimation of the distance to the effective scattering screen d. For B1641-45, d = 3.0 kpc for a distance to the pulsar D = 4.9 kpc, and for B1749-28, d = 0.95 kpc for D = 1.3 kpc. Observations of B1933+16 were carried out simultaneously at 316 and 1668 MHz. The positions of the screen derived using the measurements at the two frequencies agree: d 1 = 2.6 and d 2 = 2.7 kpc, for a distance to the pulsar of 3.7 kpc. Two screens were detected for this pulsar from an analysis of parabolic arcs in the secondary dynamic spectrum at 1668 MHz, at 1.3 and 3.1 kpc. The scattering screens for two of the pulsars are identified with real physical objects located along the lines of sight toward the pulsars: G339.1-04 (B1641-45) and G0.55-0.85 (B1749-28).

  2. Fast Radio Bursts and Their Gamma-Ray or Radio Afterglows as Kerr–Newman Black Hole Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tong; Romero, Gustavo E.; Liu, Mo-Lin; Li, Ang

    2016-07-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are radio transients lasting only about a few milliseconds. They seem to occur at cosmological distances. We propose that these events can originate in the collapse of the magnetospheres of Kerr–Newman black holes (KNBHs). We show that the closed orbits of charged particles in the magnetospheres of these objects are unstable. After examining the dependencies on the specific charge of the particle and the spin and charge of the KNBH, we conclude that the resulting timescale and radiation mechanism fit well with extant observations of FRBs. Furthermore, we argue that the merger of a KNBH binary is a plausible central engine for the potential gamma-ray or radio afterglow following certain FRBs and can also account for gravitational wave (GW) events like GW 150914. Our model leads to predictions that can be tested by combined multi-wavelength electromagnetic and GW observations.

  3. Discovery of an unidentified Fermi object as a black widow-like millisecond pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Kong, A K H; Cheng, K S; Takata, J; Yatsu, Y; Cheung, C C; Donato, D; Lin, L C C; Kataoka, J; Takahashi, Y; Maeda, K; Hui, C Y; Tam, P H T

    2012-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has revolutionized our knowledge of the gamma-ray pulsar population, leading to the discovery of almost 100 gamma-ray pulsars and dozens of gamma-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs). Although the outer-gap model predicts different sites of emission for the radio and gamma-ray pulsars, until now all of the known gamma-ray MSPs have been visible in the radio. Here we report the discovery of a "radio-quiet" gamma-ray emitting MSP candidate by using Fermi, Chandra, Swift, and optical observations. The X-ray and gamma-ray properties of the source are consistent with known gamma-ray pulsars. We also found a 4.63-hr orbital period in optical and X-ray data. We suggest that the source is a black widow-like MSP with a ~0.1 solar-mass late-type companion star. Based on the profile of the optical and X-ray light-curves, the companion star is believed to be heated by the pulsar while the X-ray emissions originate from pulsar magnetosphere and/or from intra-binary shock. No radio detection o...

  4. The imminent detection of gravitational waves from massive black-hole binaries with pulsar timing arrays

    CERN Document Server

    McWilliams, Sean T; Pretorius, Frans

    2012-01-01

    Recent observations of massive galaxies indicate that they double in mass and quintuple in size between redshift z = 1 and the present, despite undergoing very little star formation, suggesting that galaxy mergers drive the evolution. Since these galaxies will contain supermassive black holes, this suggests a larger black hole merger rate, and therefore a larger gravitational-wave signal, than previously expected. We calculate the merger-driven evolution of the mass function, and find that merger rates are 10 to 30 times higher and gravitational waves are 3 to 5 times stronger than previously estimated, so that the gravitational-wave signal may already be detectable with existing data from pulsar timing arrays. We also provide an explanation for the disagreement with past estimates that were based on dark matter halo simulations.

  5. X-ray measurement of the spin-down of CalverA: A radio- and gamma-ray-quiet pulsar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halpern, J. P.; Bogdanov, S.; Gotthelf, E. V., E-mail: jules@astro.columbia.edu [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027-6601 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    We measure spin-down of the 59 ms X-ray pulsar Calvera by comparing the XMM-Newton discovery data from 2009 with new Chandra timing observations taken in 2013. Its period derivative is P-dot =(3.19± 0.08)×10{sup −15}, which corresponds to spin-down luminosity E-dot =6.1×10{sup 35} erg s{sup –1}, characteristic age τ{sub c}≡P/2 P-dot =2.9×10{sup 5} yr, and surface dipole magnetic field strength B{sub s} = 4.4 × 10{sup 11} G. These values rule out a mildly recycled pulsar, but Calvera could be an orphaned central compact object (anti-magnetar), with a magnetic field that was initially buried by supernova debris and is now reemerging and approaching normal strength. We also performed unsuccessful searches for high-energy γ-rays from Calvera in both imaging and timing of >100 MeV Fermi photons. Even though the distance to Calvera is uncertain by an order of magnitude, an upper limit of d < 2 kpc inferred from X-ray spectra implies a γ-ray luminosity limit of <3.3 × 10{sup 32} erg s{sup –1}, which is less than that of any pulsar of comparable E-dot . Calvera shares some properties with PSR J1740+1000, a young radio pulsar that we show by virtue of its lack of proper motion was born outside of the Galactic disk. As an energetic, high-Galactic-latitude pulsar, Calvera is unique in being undetected in both radio and γ-rays to faint limits, which should place interesting constraints on models for particle acceleration and beam patterns in pulsar magnetospheres.

  6. ON THE COMPLEMENTARITY OF PULSAR TIMING AND SPACE LASER INTERFEROMETRY FOR THE INDIVIDUAL DETECTION OF SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE BINARIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gravitational waves coming from supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) are targeted by both the Pulsar Timing Array (PTA) and Space Laser Interferometry (SLI). The possibility of a single SMBHB being tracked first by PTA, through inspiral, and later by SLI, up to merger and ring-down, has been previously suggested. Although the bounding parameters are drawn by the current PTA or the upcoming Square Kilometer Array (SKA), and by the New Gravitational Observatory (NGO), derived from the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), this paper also addresses sequential detection beyond specific project constraints. We consider PTA-SKA, which is sensitive from 10–9 to p × 10–7 Hz (p = 4, 8), and SLI, which operates from s × 10–5 up to 1 Hz (s = 1, 3). An SMBHB in the range of 2 × 108-2 × 109 M ☉ (the masses are normalized to a (1 + z) factor, the redshift lying between z = 0.2 and z = 1.5) moves from the PTA-SKA to the SLI band over a period ranging from two months to fifty years. By combining three supermassive black hole (SMBH)-host relations with three accretion prescriptions, nine astrophysical scenarios are formed. They are then related to three levels of pulsar timing residuals (50, 5, 1 ns), generating 27 cases. For residuals of 1 ns, sequential detection probability will never be better than 4.7 × 10–4 yr–2 or 3.3 × 10–6 yr–2 (per year to merger and per year of survey), according to the best and worst astrophysical scenarios, respectively; put differently this means one sequential detection every 46 or 550 years for an equivalent maximum time to merger and duration of the survey. The chances of sequential detection are further reduced by increasing values of the s parameter (they vanish for s = 10) and of the SLI noise, and by decreasing values of the remnant spin. The spread in the predictions diminishes when timing precision is improved or the SLI low-frequency cutoff is lowered. So while transit times and the SLI signal-to-noise ratio

  7. Merger of a White Dwarf-Neutron Star Binary to $10^{29}$ Carat Diamonds: Origin of the Pulsar Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Margalit, Ben

    2016-01-01

    We show that the merger and tidal disruption of a C/O white dwarf (WD) by a neutron star (NS) binary companion provides a natural formation scenario for the PSR B1257+12 planetary system. Starting with initial conditions for the debris disk produced of the disrupted WD, we model its long term viscous evolution, including for the first time the effects of mass and angular momentum loss during the early radiatively inefficient accretion flow (RIAF) phase and accounting for the unusual C/O composition on the disk opacity. For plausible values of the disk viscosity $\\alpha \\sim 10^{-3}-10^{-2}$ and the RIAF mass loss efficiency, we find that the disk mass remaining near the planet formation radius at the time of solid condensation is sufficient to explain the pulsar planets. Rapid rocky planet formation via gravitational instability of the solid carbon-dominated disk is facilitated by the suppression of vertical shear instabilities due to the high solid-to-gas ratio. Additional evidence supporting a WD-NS merger ...

  8. Radio Polarization Observations of G319.9-0.7: A Bow-shock Nebula with an Azimuthal Magnetic Field Powered by Pulsar J1509-5850

    CERN Document Server

    Ng, C -Y; Chatterjee, S; Johnston, S

    2010-01-01

    We report radio polarization observations of G319.9-0.7 (MSC 319.9-0.7) at 3 and 6 cm obtained with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. The source shows a highly elongated morphology with the energetic pulsar J1509-5850 located at the tip. We found a flat radio spectrum of index \\alpha=-0.26 +/- 0.04 and a high degree of linear polarization. These results confirm G319.9-0.7 as a bow-shock pulsar wind nebula. The polarization maps suggest a helical magnetic field trailing the pulsar, with the symmetry axis parallel to the system's inferred direction of motion. This is the first time such a field geometry has been seen in a bow-shock nebula, and it may be the result of an alignment between the pulsar spin axis and its space velocity. Compared to other bow-shock examples, G319.9-0.7 exhibits very different properties in the field structure and surface brightness distribution, illustrating the large diversity of the population.

  9. Search for a correlation between very-high-energy gamma rays and giant radio pulses in the Crab pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Aliu, E; Arlen, T; Aune, T; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Bouvier, A; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cesarini, A; Ciupik, L; Collins-Hughes, E; Connolly, M P; Cui, W; Dickherber, R; Duke, C; Dumm, J; Falcone, A; Federici, S; Feng, Q; Finley, J P; Finnegan, G; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Gall, D; Gillanders, G H; Godambe, S; Griffin, S; Grube, J; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Huan, H; Hughes, G; Humensky, T B; Kaaret, P; Karlsson, N; Khassen, Y; Kieda, D; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; LeBohec, S; Lee, K; Lyutikov, M; Madhavan, A S; Maier, G; Majumdar, P; McArthur, S; McCann, A; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nelson, T; de Bhroithe, A O'Faolain; Ong, R A; Orr, M; Otte, A N; Park, N; Perkins, J S; Pohl, M; Prokoph, H; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Saxon, D B; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Senturk, G D; Smith, A W; Staszak, D; Telezhinsky, I; Tesic, G; Theiling, M; Thibadeau, S; Tsurusaki, K; Varlotta, A; Vincent, S; Vivier, M; Wagner, R G; Wakely, S P; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; Welsing, R; Williams, D A; Zitzer, B; Kondratiev, V

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a joint observational campaign between the Green Bank radio telescope and the VERITAS gamma-ray telescope, which searched for a correlation between the emission of very-high-energy (VHE) gamma rays ($E_{\\gamma} >$ 150 GeV) and Giant Radio Pulses (GRPs) from the Crab pulsar at 8.9 GHz. A total of 15366 GRPs were recorded during 11.6 hours of simultaneous observations, which were made across four nights in December 2008 and in November and December 2009. We searched for an enhancement of the pulsed gamma-ray emission within time windows placed around the arrival time of the GRP events. In total, 8 different time windows with durations ranging from 0.033 ms to 72 s were positioned at three different locations relative to the GRP to search for enhanced gamma-ray emission which lagged, led, or was concurrent with, the GRP event. Further, we performed separate searches on main pulse GRPs and interpulse GRPs and on the most energetic GRPs in our data sample. No significant enhancement of pu...

  10. Can we see pulsars around Sgr A*? - The latest searches with the Effelsberg telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Eatough, R P; Klein, B; Karuppusamy, R; Champion, D J; Freire, P C C; Wex, N; Liu, K

    2012-01-01

    Radio pulsars in relativistic binary systems are unique tools to study the curved space-time around massive compact objects. The discovery of a pulsar closely orbiting the super-massive black hole at the centre of our Galaxy, Sgr A*, would provide a superb test-bed for gravitational physics. To date, the absence of any radio pulsar discoveries within a few arc minutes of Sgr A* has been explained by one principal factor: extreme scattering of radio waves caused by inhomogeneities in the ionized component of the interstellar medium in the central 100 pc around Sgr A*. Scattering, which causes temporal broadening of pulses, can only be mitigated by observing at higher frequencies. Here we describe recent searches of the Galactic centre region performed at a frequency of 18.95 GHz with the Effelsberg radio telescope.

  11. Signs of Magnetic Accretion in the X-ray Pulsar Binary GX 301-2

    CERN Document Server

    Ikhsanov, N R

    2012-01-01

    Observations of the cyclotron resonance scattering feature in the X-ray spectrum of GX 301-2 suggest that the surface field of the neutron star is B_CRSF ~ 4 x 10^{12}G. The same value has been derived in modelling the rapid spin-up episodes in terms of the Keplerian disk accretion scenario. However, the spin-down rate observed during the spin-down trends significantly exceeds the value expected in currently used spin-evolution scenarios. This indicates that either the surface field of the star exceeds 50 x B_CRSF, or a currently used accretion scenario is incomplete. We show that the above discrepancy can be avoided if the accreting material is magnetized. The magnetic pressure in the accretion flow increases more rapidly than its ram pressure and, under certain conditions, significantly affects the accretion picture. The spin-down torque applied to the neutron star in this case is larger than that evaluated within a non-magnetized accretion scenario. We find that the observed spin evolution of the pulsar ca...

  12. LeRoy Apker Award: The Atmospheric Dynamics of Pulsar Companions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jermyn, Adam

    2016-03-01

    Pulsars emit radiation over an extremely wide frequency range, from radio through gamma. Recently, systems in which this radiation significantly alters the atmospheres of low-mass pulsar companions have been discovered. These systems, ranging from ones with highly anisotropic heating to those with transient X-ray emissions, represent an exciting opportunity to investigate pulsars through the changes they induce in their companions. In this work, we present both analytic and numerical work investigating these phenomena, with a particular focus on atmospheric heat transport, transient phenomena, and the possibility of deep heating via gamma rays. We find that certain classes of binary systems may explain decadal-timescale X-ray transient phenomena, as well as the formation of so-called redback companion systems. In addition, we examine the temperature anisotropy induced by the Pulsar in its companion, and demonstrate that this may be used to infer properties of both the companion and the Pulsar wind.

  13. On the possible mechanism to form the radio emission spectrum of the Crab pulsar

    OpenAIRE

    Machabeli, George; Chkheidze, Nino

    2014-01-01

    In the present paper a self-consistent theory, explaining shape of the observed phase-averaged radio spectrum in the frequency range from 100MHz to 10GHz is presented. The radio waves are assumed to be generated near the light cylinder through the cyclotron resonance. The cyclotron instability provides excitement of the electron-positron plasma eigen-waves, which come in radio domain when the resonant particles are the most energetic primary beam electrons. It is widely accepted that the dist...

  14. Simultaneous radio and X-ray observations of Galactic Centre low mass X-ray binaries

    OpenAIRE

    Berendsen, S.G.H.; Fender, R.; Kuulkers, E; Heise, J.; M. van der Klis(Astronomical Institute Anton Pannekoek, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands)

    2000-01-01

    We have performed simultaneous X-ray and radio observations of thirteen Galactic centre low-mass X-ray binaries in 1998 April using the Wide-Field Cameras onboard BeppoSAX and the Australia Telescope Compact Array, the latter simultaneously at 4.8 and 8.64 GHz. We detect two Z sources, GX 17+2 and GX 5-1, and the unusual `hybrid' source GX 13+1. Upper limits, which are significantly deeper than previous non-detections, are placed on the radio emission from two more Z sources and seven atoll s...

  15. The LOFAR Known Pulsar Data Pipeline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Alexov; J.W.T. Hessels; J.D. Mol; B. Stappers; J. van Leeuwen

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Transient radio phenomena and pulsars are one of six LOFAR Key Science Projects (KSPs). As part of the Transients KSP, the Pulsar Working Group (PWG) has been developing the LOFAR Pulsar Data Pipelines to both study known pulsars as well as search for new ones. The pipelines are being deve

  16. X-ray states of redback millisecond pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Linares, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Compact binary millisecond pulsars with main-sequence donors, often referred to as "redbacks", constitute the long-sought link between low-mass X-ray binaries and millisecond radio pulsars, and offer a unique probe of the interaction between pulsar winds and accretion flows. We present a systematic study of eight nearby redbacks, using more than 100 observations obtained with Swift's X-ray Telescope. We distinguish between three main states: pulsar, disk and outburst states. We find X-ray mode switching in the disk state of PSR J1023+0038 and XSS J12270-4859, similar to what was found in the other redback which showed evidence for accretion: rapid, recurrent changes in X-ray luminosity (0.5-10 keV, L$_\\mathrm{X}$), between [6-9]$\\times$10$^{32}$ erg s$^{-1}$ (disk-passive state) and [3-5]$\\times$10$^{33}$ erg s$^{-1}$ (disk-active state). This strongly suggests that mode switching $-$which has not been observed in quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries$-$ is universal among redback millisecond pulsars in the disk ...

  17. The Expansion and Radio Spectral Index of G21.5-0.9: Is PSR J1833-1034 the Youngest Pulsar?

    CERN Document Server

    Bietenholz, M F

    2008-01-01

    We report on new 5-GHz VLA radio observations of the pulsar-powered supernova remnant G21.5-0.9. These observations have allowed us to make a high-quality radio image of this remnant with a resolution of ~0.7". It has a filamentary structure similar to that seen in the Crab Nebula. Radio structure suggestive of the torus seen around the Crab pulsar is tentatively identified. We also compared the new image with one taken ~15 yr earlier at 1.5 GHz, both to find the expansion speed of the remnant and to make a spectral index image. Between 1991 and 2006, we find that the average expansion rate of the remnant is 0.11 +/- 0.02 %/year, corresponding, for a distance of 5 kpc, to a speed of 910 +/- 160 km/s wrt. the centre of the nebula. Assuming undecelerated expansion, this expansion speed implies that the age of G21.5-0.9 is 870 (+200,-150) yr, which makes PSR J1833-1034 one of the youngest, if not the youngest, known pulsars in the Galaxy.

  18. Radio Polarization Observations of the Snail: A Crushed Pulsar Wind Nebula in G327.1–1.1 with a Highly Ordered Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Y. K.; Ng, C.-Y.; Bucciantini, N.; Slane, P. O.; Gaensler, B. M.; Temim, T.

    2016-04-01

    Pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) are suggested to be acceleration sites of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. While the magnetic field plays an important role in the acceleration process, previous observations of magnetic field configurations of PWNe are rare, particularly for evolved systems. We present a radio polarization study of the “Snail” PWN inside the supernova remnant G327.1‑1.1 using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. This PWN is believed to have been recently crushed by the supernova (SN) reverse shock. The radio morphology is composed of a main circular body with a finger-like protrusion. We detected a strong linear polarization signal from the emission, which reflects a highly ordered magnetic field in the PWN and is in contrast to the turbulent environment with a tangled magnetic field generally expected from hydrodynamical simulations. This could suggest that the characteristic turbulence scale is larger than the radio beam size. We built a toy model to explore this possibility, and found that a simulated PWN with a turbulence scale of about one-eighth to one-sixth of the nebula radius and a pulsar wind filling factor of 50%–75% provides the best match to observations. This implies substantial mixing between the SN ejecta and pulsar wind material in this system.

  19. RADIO POLARIZATION OBSERVATIONS OF THE SNAIL: A CRUSHED PULSAR WIND NEBULA IN G327.1–1.1 WITH A HIGHLY ORDERED MAGNETIC FIELD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Y. K.; Ng, C.-Y. [Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Bucciantini, N. [INAF—Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, L.go E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Slane, P. O. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Gaensler, B. M. [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, The University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Temim, T., E-mail: ncy@bohr.physics.hku.hk [Observational Cosmology Lab, Code 665, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) are suggested to be acceleration sites of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. While the magnetic field plays an important role in the acceleration process, previous observations of magnetic field configurations of PWNe are rare, particularly for evolved systems. We present a radio polarization study of the “Snail” PWN inside the supernova remnant G327.1−1.1 using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. This PWN is believed to have been recently crushed by the supernova (SN) reverse shock. The radio morphology is composed of a main circular body with a finger-like protrusion. We detected a strong linear polarization signal from the emission, which reflects a highly ordered magnetic field in the PWN and is in contrast to the turbulent environment with a tangled magnetic field generally expected from hydrodynamical simulations. This could suggest that the characteristic turbulence scale is larger than the radio beam size. We built a toy model to explore this possibility, and found that a simulated PWN with a turbulence scale of about one-eighth to one-sixth of the nebula radius and a pulsar wind filling factor of 50%–75% provides the best match to observations. This implies substantial mixing between the SN ejecta and pulsar wind material in this system.

  20. A large spin-up rate measured with INTEGRAL in the High Mass X-ray Binary Pulsar SAXJ2103.5+4545

    CERN Document Server

    Sidoli, L; Larsson, S; Chernyakova, M; Kreykenbohm, I; Kretschmar, P; Paizis, A; Santangelo, A; Ferrigno, C; Falanga, M

    2005-01-01

    The High Mass X-ray Binary Pulsar SAXJ2103.5+4545 has been observed with INTEGRAL several times during the last outburst in 2002-2004. We report a comprehensive study of all INTEGRAL observations, allowing a study of the pulse period evolution during the recent outburst. We measured a very rapid spin-up episode, lasting 130days, which decreased the pulse period by 1.8s. The spin-up rate, pdot=-1.5e-7 s/s, is the largest ever measured for SAXJ2103.5+4545, and it is among the fastest for an accreting pulsar. The pulse profile shows evidence for temporal variability, apparently not related to the source flux or to the orbital phase. The X-ray spectrum is hard and there is significant emission up to 150keV. A new derivation of the orbital period, based on RXTE data, is also reported.

  1. X-ray pulsar rush in 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imanishi, K.; Tsujimoto, K.; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Yokogawa, J.; Koyama, K. [Kyoto Univ., Faculty of Science, Kyoto (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    We present recent remarkable topics about discoveries of X-ray pulsars. 1. Pulsations from two Soft Gamma-ray Repeaters: These pulsars have enormously strong magnetic field (B {approx} 10{sup 15} G), thus these are called as 'magnetar', new type of X-ray pulsars. 2. New Crab-like pulsars: These discoveries lead to suggesting universality of Crab-like pulsars. 3. An X-ray bursting millisecond pulsar: This is strong evidence for the recycle theory of generating radio millisecond pulsars. 4. X-ray pulsar rush in the SMC: This indicates the younger star formation history in the SMC. (author)

  2. Radio Observations as a Tool to Investigate Shocks and Asymmetries in Accreting White Dwarf Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Jennifer H. S.

    2016-07-01

    This dissertation uses radio observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to investigate the mechanisms that power and shape accreting white dwarfs (WD) and their ejecta. We test the predictions of both simple spherical and steady-state radio emission models by examining nova V1723 Aql, nova V5589 Sgr, symbiotic CH Cyg, and two small surveys of symbiotic binaries. First, we highlight classical nova V1723 Aql with three years of radio observations alongside optical and X-ray observations. We use these observations to show that multiple outflows from the system collided to create early non-thermal shocks with a brightness temperature of ≥106 K. While the late-time radio light curve is roughly consistent an expanding thermal shell of mass 2x10-4 M⊙ solar masses, resolved images of V1723 Aql show elongated material that apparently rotates its major axis over the course of 15 months, much like what is seen in gamma-ray producing nova V959 Mon, suggesting similar structures in the two systems. Next, we examine nova V5589 Sgr, where we find that the early radio emission is dominated by a shock-powered non-thermal flare that produces strong (kTx > 33 keV) X-rays. We additionally find roughly 10-5 M⊙ solar masses of thermal bremsstrahlung emitting material, all at a distance of ~4 kpc. The similarities in the evolution of both V1723 Aql and V5589 Sgr to that of nova V959 Mon suggest that these systems may all have dense equatorial tori shaping faster flows at their poles. Turning our focus to symbiotic binaries, we first use our radio observations of CH Cyg to link the ejection of a collimated jet to a change of state in the accretion disk. We additionally estimate the amount of mass ejected during this period (10-7 M⊙ masses), and improve measurements of the period of jet precession (P=12013 ± 74 days). We then use our survey of eleven accretion-driven symbiotic systems to determine that the radio brightness of a symbiotic system could potentially

  3. Discovery of a New X-ray Filled Radio Supernova Remnant Around the Pulsar Wind Nebula in 3EG J1809-2328

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Mallory S. E.; Brogan, Crystal L.

    2008-01-01

    We report the discovery of a partial ~2deg. diameter non-thermal radio shell coincident with Taz, the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) in the error box of the apparently variable gamma-ray source 3EG J1809-2328. We propose that this radio shell is a newly identified supernova remnant (SNR G7.5-1.7) associated with the PWN. The SNR surrounds an amorphous region of thermal X-rays detected in archival ROSAT and ASCA observations putting this system in the mixed-morphology class of supernova remnants. G7...

  4. Interplanetary spacecraft navigation using pulsars

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, X. P.; Hobbs, G.; You, X. P.; M. T. Li; Keith, M. J.; Shannon, R. M.; Coles, W.; Manchester, R. N.; J.H. Zheng; Yu, X. Z.; Gao, D.; Wu, X; Chen, D.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate how observations of pulsars can be used to help navigate a spacecraft travelling in the solar system. We make use of archival observations of millisecond pulsars from the Parkes radio telescope in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method and highlight issues, such as pulsar spin irregularities, which need to be accounted for. We show that observations of four millisecond pulsars every seven days using a realistic X-ray telescope on the spacecraft throughout a journe...

  5. Study of luminosity and spin-up relation in X-ray binary pulsars with long-term monitoring by MAXI/GSC and Fermi/GBM

    CERN Document Server

    Sugizaki, Mutsumi; Nakajima, Motoki; Yamaoka, Kazutaka

    2015-01-01

    We study the relation between luminosity and spin-period change in X-ray binary pulsars using long-term light curve obtained by the MAXI/GSC all-sky survey and pulse period data from the Fermi/GBM pulsar project. X-ray binaries, consisting of a highly magnetized neutron star and a stellar companion, originate X-ray emission according to the energy of the accretion matter onto the neutron star. The accretion matter also transfers the angular momentum at the Alfven radius, and then spin up the neutron star. Therefore, the X-ray luminosity and the spin-up rate are supposed to be well correlated. We analyzed the luminosity and period-change relation using the data taken by continuous monitoring of MAXI/GSC and Fermi/GBM for Be/X-ray binaries, GX 304$-$1, A 0535$+$26, GRO J1008$-$57, KS 1947$+$300, and 2S 1417$-$624, which occurred large outbursts in the last four years. We discuss the results comparing the obtained observed relation with that of the theoretical model by Ghosh \\& Lamb (1979).

  6. Near-infrared observations of the Be/X-ray binary pulsar A0535+262

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sachindra Naik; Blesson Mathew; D. P. K. Banerjee; N. M. Ashok; Rajeev R. Jaiswal

    2012-01-01

    We present the results obtained from extensive near-infrared (IR) spectro-scopic and photometric observations of the Be/X-ray binary A0535+262/HDE 245770 at different phases of its ~ 111 d orbital period.This observation campaign is part of the monitoring program of selective Be/X-ray binary systems aimed at understanding X-ray and near-IR properties at different orbital phases,especially during the periastron passage of the neutron star.The near-IR observations presented here were carried out using the 1.2 m telescope at the Mt.Abu IR Observatory.Though the source was relatively faint for spectroscopic observations with the 1.2 m telescope,we monitored the source closely during the 2011 February-March giant X-ray outburst to primarily investigate whether any drastic changes in the near-IR JHK spectra took place at the periastron passage.Changes of such a striking nature were expected to be detectable in our spectra.Photometric observations of the Be star show a gradual and systematic fading in the JHK light curves since the onset of the X-ray outburst,which could suggest a mild evacuation/truncation of the circumstellar disk of the Be companion.Near-IR spectroscopy of the object shows that the JHK spectra are dominated by the emission lines of hydrogen Brackett and Paschen series and HeI lines at 1.0830,1.7002 and 2.0585 μm.The presence of all the hydrogen emission lines in the JHK spectra,along with the absence of any significant change in the continuum of the Be companion during X-ray quiescent and X-ray outburst phases,suggests that the near- IR line emitting regions of the disk are not significantly affected during the X-ray outburst.

  7. Pulsar Candidates Toward Fermi Unassociated Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Frail, D A; Jagannathan, P; Intema, H T

    2016-01-01

    We report on a search for steep spectrum radio sources within the 95% confidence error ellipses of the Fermi unassociated sources from the Large Array Telescope (LAT). Using existing catalogs and the newly released GMRT all-sky survey at 150 MHz we identify compact radio sources that are bright at MHz frequencies but faint or absent at GHz frequencies. Such steep spectrum radio sources are rare and constitute a sample of pulsar candidates, selected independently of period, dispersion measure, interstellar scattering and orbital parameters. We find point-like, steep spectrum candidates toward 11 Fermi sources. Based on the gamma-ray/radio positional coincidence, the rarity of such radio sources, and the properties of the 3FGL sources themselves, we argue that many of these sources could be pulsars. They may have been missed by previous radio periodicity searches due to interstellar propagation effects or because they lie in an unusually tight binary. If this hypothesis is correct, then renewed gamma-ray and ra...

  8. An X-ray Synchrotron Nebula Associated with the Radio Pulsar PSR B1853+01 in the Supernova Remnant W44

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrus, I.; Hughes, J. P.

    1995-12-01

    We present results of a study using ASCA X-ray data from the vicinity of the radio pulsar PSR B1853+01 located within the supernova remnant (SNR) W44. PSR B1853+01 is a 267 ms pulsar, which to date has only been detected in the radio band. Previous observations at soft X-ray energies (e.g., ROSAT HRI) have failed to detect any significant X-ray emission (pulsed or unpulsed) from the pulsar. In addition, no high energy tail was seen in the Ginga spectrum of W44 leading to a 3sigma upper limit of 3.6x 10(-12) ergs cm(-2) s(-1) for the 2--10 keV flux of a Crab-like power-law component contributing to the spectrum of W44. Over the 0.5--5 keV band, the ASCA data show soft thermal (kT ~ 0.5 keV) emission from W44 with a morphology very similar to that observed before by Einstein and ROSAT. In the high energy band (5--10 keV) the SNR for the most part is not visible and instead an unresolved source coincident with the position of PSR B1853+01 is evident. The observed ASCA spectra are consistent with a power-law origin (photon index ~ 3.5) for the X-ray emission from this source at a flux level below the Ginga upper limit. The maximum allowed size for the source is determined directly from the ASCA data (1.5(') ). We also report on our timing analysis, which failed to detect pulsations from the X-ray source at the pulsar's period. Based on these lines of evidence, we suggest that the new hard source in W44 represents the X-ray synchrotron nebula surrounding PSR B1853+01, rather than the beamed output of the pulsar itself. The ratio of the nebula's X-ray luminosity to the spin-down energy loss of the pulsar is consistent with that of other known plerions, lending further support to our interpretation. This is the first indirect detection in the X-ray band of the pulsar associated with W44.

  9. Astronomers Discover Fastest-Spinning Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    pulsars. Giant stars explode as supernovae and leave rotating pulsars which gradually slow down. However, if a pulsar has a companion star from which it can draw material, that incoming material imparts its spin, or angular momentum, to the pulsar. As a result, the pulsar spins faster. "In a dense cluster, interactions between the stars will create more binary pairs that can yield more fast-rotating pulsars," Ransom said. The great sensitivity of the giant, 100-meter diameter GBT, along with a special signal processor, called the Pulsar Spigot, made possible the discovery of so many millisecond pulsars in Terzan 5. "We think there are many more pulsars to be found in Terzan 5 and other clusters, and given that the fast ones are often hidden by eclipses, some of them may be spinning even faster than this new one," Ransom said. "We're excited about using this outstanding new telescope to answer some important questions about fundamental physics," he said. In addition to Hessels, Ransom and Stairs, the research team includes Paulo Freire of Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico, Victoria Kaspi, of McGill University, and Fernando Camilo, of Columbia University. Their report is being published in Science Express, the online version of the journal Science. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc. The pulsar research also was supported by the Canada Foundation for Innovation, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, the Quebec Foundation for Research on Nature and Technology, the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, the Canada Research Chairs Program, and the National Science Foundation..

  10. Fast radio bursts and their possible "afterglows" as Kerr-Newman black hole binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Tong; Liu, Mo-Lin; Li, Ang

    2016-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are radio transients lasting only about a few milliseconds. They seem to occur at cosmological distances. We propose that these events can be originated in the collapse of the magnetosphere of Kerr-Newman black holes (KNBHs). We show that the closed orbits of charged particles in the magnetosphere of these objects are unstable. After examining their dependences on the mass, charge, and angular momentum of the particle and the spin of the KNBH, we conclude that the resulting timescale and radiation mechanism fit well with the extant observations of FRBs. Furthermore, we argue that the merger of a KNBH binary is one of the plausible central engines for potential gamma-ray or radio "afterglow" following a certain FRBs, and can also account for gravitational wave (GW) events like GW 150914. Our model leads to predictions that can be tested by combined multi-wavelength electromagnetic and GW observations.

  11. Radio Flares of Compact Binary Mergers: the Effect of Non-Trivial Outflow Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Margalit, Ben

    2015-01-01

    The next generation gravitational waves (GW) detectors are most sensitive to GW emitted by compact (neutron star/black hole) binary mergers. If one of those is a neutron star the merger will also emit electromagnetic radiation via three possible channels: Gamma-ray bursts and their (possibly orphan) afterglows (Eichler et al. 1989), Li-Paczynski Macronovae (Li & Paczynski 1998) and radio flares (Nakar & Piran 2011). This accompanying electromagnetic radiation is vitally important in confirming the GW detections (Kochanek & Piran 1993). It could also reveal a wealth of information regarding the merger and will open a window towards multi-messenger astronomy. Identifying and characterizing these counterparts is therefore of utmost importance. In this work we explore late time radio flares emitted by the dynamically ejected outflows. We build upon previous work and consider the effect of the outflow's non-trivial geometry. Using an approximate method we estimate the radio light-curves for several eje...

  12. Young and middle age pulsar light-curve morphology: Comparison of Fermi observations with gamma-ray and radio emission geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Pierbattista, M; Gonthier, P L; Grenier, I A

    2016-01-01

    Thanks to the huge amount of gamma-ray pulsar photons collected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope since June 2008, it is now possible to constrain gamma-ray geometrical models by comparing simulated and observed light-curve morphological characteristics. We assumed vacuum-retarded dipole pulsar magnetic field and tested simulated and observed morphological light-curve characteristics in the framework of two pole emission geometries, Polar Cap (PC), radio, and Slot Gap (SG), and Outer Gap (OG)/One Pole Caustic (OPC) emission geometries. We compared simulated and observed/estimated light-curve morphological parameters as a function of observable and non-observable pulsar parameters. The PC model gives the poorest description of the LAT pulsar light-curve morphology. The OPC best explains both the observed gamma-ray peak multiplicity and shape classes. The OPC and SG models describe the observed gamma-ray peak-separation distribution for low- and high-peak separations, respectively. This suggests that the OPC ge...

  13. Binaries in globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hut, Piet; Mcmillan, Steve; Goodman, Jeremy; Mateo, Mario; Phinney, E. S.; Pryor, Carlton; Richer, Harvey B.; Verbunt, Frank; Weinberg, Martin

    1992-01-01

    Recent observations have shown that globular clusters contain a substantial number of binaries most of which are believed to be primordial. We discuss different successful optical search techniques, based on radial-velocity variables, photometric variables, and the positions of stars in the color-magnitude diagram. In addition, we review searches in other wavelengths, which have turned up low-mass X-ray binaries and more recently a variety of radio pulsars. On the theoretical side, we give an overview of the different physical mechanisms through which individual binaries evolve. We discuss the various simulation techniques which recently have been employed to study the effects of a primordial binary population, and the fascinating interplay between stellar evolution and stellar dynamics which drives globular-cluster evolution.

  14. ON THE FORMATION OF ECCENTRIC MILLISECOND PULSARS WITH HELIUM WHITE-DWARF COMPANIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoniadis, John, E-mail: antoniadis@dunlap.utoronto.ca [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H4 (Canada)

    2014-12-20

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) orbiting helium white dwarfs (WDs) in eccentric orbits challenge the established binary-evolution paradigm that predicts efficient orbital circularization during the mass-transfer episode that spins up the pulsar. Freire and Tauris recently proposed that these binary MSPs may instead form from the rotationally delayed accretion-induced collapse of a massive WD. However, their hypothesis predicts that eccentric systems preferably host low-mass pulsars and travel with small systemic velocities—in tension with new observational constraints. Here, I show that a substantial growth in eccentricity may alternatively arise from the dynamical interaction of the binary with a circumbinary disk. Such a disk may form from ejected donor material during hydrogen flash episodes, when the neutron star is already an active radio pulsar and tidal forces can no longer circularize the binary. I demonstrate that a short-lived (10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} yr) disk can result in eccentricities of e ≅ 0.01-0.15 for orbital periods between 15 and 50 days. Finally, I propose that, more generally, the disk hypothesis may explain the lack of circular binary pulsars for the aforementioned orbital-period range.

  15. ON THE FORMATION OF ECCENTRIC MILLISECOND PULSARS WITH HELIUM WHITE-DWARF COMPANIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) orbiting helium white dwarfs (WDs) in eccentric orbits challenge the established binary-evolution paradigm that predicts efficient orbital circularization during the mass-transfer episode that spins up the pulsar. Freire and Tauris recently proposed that these binary MSPs may instead form from the rotationally delayed accretion-induced collapse of a massive WD. However, their hypothesis predicts that eccentric systems preferably host low-mass pulsars and travel with small systemic velocities—in tension with new observational constraints. Here, I show that a substantial growth in eccentricity may alternatively arise from the dynamical interaction of the binary with a circumbinary disk. Such a disk may form from ejected donor material during hydrogen flash episodes, when the neutron star is already an active radio pulsar and tidal forces can no longer circularize the binary. I demonstrate that a short-lived (104-105 yr) disk can result in eccentricities of e ≅ 0.01-0.15 for orbital periods between 15 and 50 days. Finally, I propose that, more generally, the disk hypothesis may explain the lack of circular binary pulsars for the aforementioned orbital-period range

  16. On the Formation of Eccentric Millisecond Pulsars with Helium White-dwarf Companions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniadis, John

    2014-12-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) orbiting helium white dwarfs (WDs) in eccentric orbits challenge the established binary-evolution paradigm that predicts efficient orbital circularization during the mass-transfer episode that spins up the pulsar. Freire & Tauris recently proposed that these binary MSPs may instead form from the rotationally delayed accretion-induced collapse of a massive WD. However, their hypothesis predicts that eccentric systems preferably host low-mass pulsars and travel with small systemic velocities—in tension with new observational constraints. Here, I show that a substantial growth in eccentricity may alternatively arise from the dynamical interaction of the binary with a circumbinary disk. Such a disk may form from ejected donor material during hydrogen flash episodes, when the neutron star is already an active radio pulsar and tidal forces can no longer circularize the binary. I demonstrate that a short-lived (104-105 yr) disk can result in eccentricities of e ~= 0.01-0.15 for orbital periods between 15 and 50 days. Finally, I propose that, more generally, the disk hypothesis may explain the lack of circular binary pulsars for the aforementioned orbital-period range.

  17. High-fidelity radio astronomical polarimetry using a millisecond pulsar as a polarized reference source

    CERN Document Server

    van Straten, W

    2012-01-01

    A new method of polarimetric calibration is presented in which the instrumental response is derived from regular observations of PSR J0437-4715 based on the assumption that the mean polarized emission from this millisecond pulsar remains constant over time. The technique is applicable to any experiment in which high-fidelity polarimetry is required over long time scales; it is demonstrated by calibrating 7.2 years of high-precision timing observations of PSR J1022+1001 made at the Parkes Observatory. Application of the new technique followed by arrival time estimation using matrix template matching yields post-fit residuals with an uncertainty-weighted standard deviation of 880 ns, two times smaller than that of arrival time residuals obtained via conventional methods of calibration and arrival time estimation. The precision achieved by this experiment yields the first significant measurements of the secular variation of the projected semi-major axis, the precession of periastron, and the Shapiro delay; it al...

  18. Application of the Ghosh & Lamb Relation to the Spin-up/down Behavior in the X-ray Binary Pulsar 4U 1626-67

    CERN Document Server

    Takagi, Toshihiro; Sugizaki, Mutsumi; Makishima, Kazuo; Morii, Mikio

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed continuous MAXI/GSC data of the X-ray binary pulsar 4U 1626-67 from 2009 October to 2013 September, and determined the pulse period and the pulse-period derivative for every 60-d interval by the epoch folding method. The obtained periods are consistent with those provided by the Fermi/GBM pulsar project. In all the 60-d intervals, the pulsar was observed to spin up, with the spin-up rate positively correlated with the 2-20 keV flux. We applied the accretion torque model proposed by Ghosh & Lamb (1979, ApJ, 234, 296) to the MAXI/GSC data, as well as the past data including both spin-up and spin-down phases. The Ghosh & Lamb relation was confirmed to successfully explain the observed relation between the spin-up/down rate and the flux. By comparing the model-predicted luminosity with the observed flux, the source distance was constrained as 5-13 kpc, which is consistent with that by Chakrabarty (1998, ApJ, 492, 342). Conversely, if the source distance is assumed, the data can constrain the m...

  19. BOOK REVIEW: Rotation and Accretion Powered Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspi, V. M.

    2008-03-01

    ever wanted to know about pulsars but were afraid to ask. Chapter 1 begins a brief and interesting account of the discovery of pulsars, followed by an overview of the rotation-powered and accretion-powered populations. The following four chapters are fairly detailed and reasonably quantitative descriptions of neutron star interiors. This is no easy feat, given that a description of the physics of neutron stars demands a deep understanding of all major physical forces, and must include general relativity as well as detailed particle physics. The historical notes at the beginning of Chapter 2 are particularly fascinating, recounting the path to today's understanding of neutron stars in very interesting detail. Chapter 7 presents rotation-powered pulsar radio properties, and a nice description of pulsar timing, including relativistic and non-relativistic binaries and GR tests. The remaining chapters tackle a variety of topics including binary evolution, superfluidity, accretion-powered pulsar properties, magnetospheres and emission mechanisms, magnetic fields, spin evolution and strange stars. The coverage is somewhat uneven, with the strange star chapter, for example, an obvious afterthought. The utility of an encyclopedia lies in its breadth and in how up-to-date it is. Although admirable in its intentions, the Ghosh book does omit some major pulsar topics. This book leaves the impression that rotation-powered pulsars produce only radio emission; hardly (if at all) mentioned is the vast literature on their infrared, optical, and even more importantly, x-ray and gamma-ray emission, the latter being far more relevant to the pulsar 'machine' than the energetically puny radio output. Also absent are pulsar winds; this is particularly puzzling given both the lovely wind nebula that graces the book's cover, and the central role the wind plays as primary sink of the rotation power. One of the most actively pursued topics in pulsar astrophysics in the past decade, magnetars

  20. 363. WE-Heraeus seminar on neutron stars and pulsars - 40 years after the discovery. Posters and contributed talks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics were dealt with: X-ray observation of pulsars, gamma-ray observation of pulsars, radio observations of pulsars, theory of neutron stars and pulsars, AXPs, SGRs, and strange stars, gravitayional waves, analysis tools with software. (HSI)

  1. 363. WE-Heraeus seminar on neutron stars and pulsars - 40 years after the discovery. Posters and contributed talks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, W.; Huang, H.H. (eds.)

    2007-07-01

    The following topics were dealt with: X-ray observation of pulsars, gamma-ray observation of pulsars, radio observations of pulsars, theory of neutron stars and pulsars, AXPs, SGRs, and strange stars, gravitayional waves, analysis tools with software. (HSI)

  2. XMM-Newton observations of the Small Magellanic Cloud: Be/X-ray binary pulsars active between October 2006 and June 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberl, F.; Eger, P.; Pietsch, W.

    2008-10-01

    Aims: We analysed eight XMM-Newton observations toward the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), performed between October 2006 and June 2007, to investigate high mass X-ray binary systems. Methods: We produced images from the European Photon Imaging Cameras (EPIC) and extracted X-ray spectra and light curves in different energy bands from sources that yielded a sufficiently high number of counts for a detailed temporal and spectral analysis. To search for periodicity we applied Fourier transformations and folding techniques and determined pulse periods using a Bayesian approach. To identify optical counterparts we produced X-ray source lists for each observation using maximum likelihood source detection techniques and correlated them with optical catalogues. The correlations were also used for astrometric boresight corrections of the X-ray source positions. Results: We found new X-ray binary pulsars with periods of 202 s (XMMU J005929.0-723703), 342 s (XMMU J005403.8-722632), 645 s (XMMU J005535.2-722906) and 325 s (XMMU J005252.1-721715), in the latter case confirming the independent discovery in Chandra data. In addition we detected sixteen known Be/X-ray binary pulsars and six ROSAT-classified candidate high mass X-ray binaries. From one of the candidates, RX J0058.2-7231, we discovered X-ray pulsations with a period of 291 s which makes it the likely counterpart of XTE J0051-727. From the known pulsars, we revise the pulse period of CXOU J010206.6-714115 to 967 s, and we detected the 18.37 s pulsar XTE J0055-727 (=XMM J004911.4-724939) in outburst, which allowed us to localise the source. The pulse profiles of the X-ray pulsars show a wide variety of shapes from smooth to highly structured patterns and differing energy dependence. For all the candidate high mass X-ray binaries, optical counterparts can be identified with magnitudes and colours consistent with Be stars. Twenty of the Be/X-ray binaries were detected with X-ray luminosities in the range 1.5 × 1035-5.5

  3. Discovery of an X-Ray Synchrotron Nebula Associated with the Radio Pulsar PSR B1853+01 in the Supernova Remnant W44

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrus, Ilana M.; Hughes, John P.; Helfand, David J.

    1996-06-01

    We report the detection, using data from the Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), of a hard X-ray source in the vicinity of the radio pulsar PSR B1853+01, which is located within the supernova remnant (SNR) W44. PSR B1853+01, a 267 ms pulsar, has to date been detected only in the radio band. Previous observations at soft X-ray energies (e.g., with ROSAT HRI) have failed to detect any significant X-ray emission (pulsed or unpulsed) from the pulsar. In addition, no high-energy emission (>~4 keV) has been detected previously from W44. Over the 0.5--4.0 keV band, the ASCA data show soft thermal emission from W44, with a morphology very similar to that observed earlier by Einstein and ROSAT. In the high-energy band (4.0--9.5 keV), the SNR is, for the most part, invisible, although a source coincident with the position of PSR B1853+01 is evident. The observed ASCA spectra are consistent with a power-law origin (photon index ~2.3) for the X-ray emission from this source at a flux level (flux density ~0.5 mu Jy at 1 keV) consistent with previous upper limits. The maximum allowed size for the source is determined directly from the ASCA data (~30"). Timing analysis of the hard X-ray source failed to detect pulsations at the pulsar's period. Based on these lines of evidence, we conclude that the new hard source in W44 represents an X-ray synchrotron nebula associated with PSR B1853+01, rather than the beamed output of the pulsar itself. This discovery adds W44 to the small group of previously known plerionic SNRs. This nebula lies at the low end of, but is consistent with, the correlation between X-ray luminosity and pulsar spin-down energy loss found for such objects, lending further support to our interpretation.

  4. The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array and detection of gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchester, R.

    Gravitational waves are an important prediction of Einstein s general theory of relativity Evidence for their existence has come from observations of orbit decay in double-neutron-star binary systems but up to now despite huge efforts there has been no direct detection of these waves In collaboration with groups from the Swinburne University of Technology Melbourne and the University of Texas Brownsville we have embarked on a major project to establish the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array PPTA with the principal goal of making a direct detection of gravitational waves of astronomical origin The project involves making precision timing observations of 20 millisecond pulsars at intervals of 2 -- 3 weeks using the Parkes 64-m radio telescope Observations are made at three radio frequencies 685 1400 and 3100 MHz to allow correction for interstellar propagation effects The PPTA is most sensitive to gravitational waves with frequencies in the nanoHertz range and hence is complementary to ground- and space-based laser interferometer systems Simulations suggest that if timing precisions of order 100 nanoseconds can be reached for most of the observed sample over a 5-year data span the stochastic background of gravitational waves from super-massive binary black holes in the cores of galaxies should be detectable Currently we have achieved this level of precision for 3 or 4 pulsars and sub-microsecond precision for a further 8 or 9 pulsars Improved hardware and software systems under development will hopefully allow us to reach our goal The PPTA

  5. Radio Emission from Binary Stars in the AB Doradus Moving Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azulay, R.; Guirado, J. C.; Marcaide, J. M.; Martí-Vidal, I.; Ros, E.

    2016-01-01

    Precise determination of dynamical masses of pre-main-sequence stars is essential for calibrating stellar evolution models, that are widely used to derive theoretical masses of young low-mass objects. We have determined the individual masses of the pair AB Dor Ba/Bb using Australian Long Baseline Array observations and archive infrared data, as part of a larger program directed to monitor binary systems in the AB Doradus moving group. We have detected, for the first time, compact radio emission from both stars. This has allowed us to determine the orbital parameters of both the relative and absolute orbits and, consequently, their individual dynamical masses: 0.28+/-0.05 M⊙ and 0.25+/-0.05 M⊙. Comparisons of the dynamical masses with the prediction of pre-main-sequence (PMS) evolutionary models show that the models underpredict the dynamical masses of the binary components Ba and Bb by 10-30% and 10-40%, respectively.

  6. Discovery of the disturbed radio morphology in the interacting binary quasar FIRST J164311.3+315618

    CERN Document Server

    Kunert-Bajraszewska, Magdalena

    2011-01-01

    We report the high resolution radio observations and their analysis of a radio-loud compact steep spectrum (CSS) quasar FIRST J164311.3+315618, one of the members of a binary system. The second component of the system is a radio-quiet AGN. The projected separation of this pair is 2.3 arcsec (15 kpc) and it is one of the known smallest separation binary quasars. The multi-band images of this binary system made with the Hubble Space Telescope showed that the host galaxy of the radio-loud quasar is highly disturbed. The radio observations presented here were made with the multi-element radio linked interferometer network (MERLIN) at 1.66 GHz and 5 GHz. We show that the radio morphology of FIRST J164311.3+315618 is complex on both frequencies and exhibits four components, which indicate on the intermittent activity with a possible rapid change of the jet direction and/or restart of the jet due to the interaction with the companion. The radio components that are no longer powered by the jet can quickly fade away. ...

  7. Current Flows in Pulsar Magnetospheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The global structure of .current flows in pulsar magnetosphere is investigated, with rough calculations of the circuit elements. It is emphasized that the potential of the critical field lines (the field lines that intersect the null surface at the light cylinder radius) should be the same as that of interstellar medium, and that pulsars whose rotation axes and magnetic dipole axes are parallel should be positively charged, in order to close the pulsar's current flows. The statistical relation between the radio luminosity and pulsar's electric charge (or the spindown power) may hint that the millisecond pulsars could be low-mass bare strange stars.

  8. A COMPACT RADIO COUNTERPART TO THE ENERGETIC X-RAY PULSAR ASSOCIATED WITH THE TEV GAMMA-RAY SOURCE J1813-178

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Dzib

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Reportamos la detección de una fuente de radio compacta y variable coinci- dente con CXOU J181335.1{174957, el pulsar de rayos-X localizado cerca del cen- tro de la remanente de supernova joven G12.82{0.02, la cual traslapa con la fuente TeV compacta HESS J1813{178. La fuente de radio compacta, que llamamos VLA J181335.1{174957, fue detectada en observaciones hechas a 4.86 GHz con el VLA en 2006. Nuevas observaciones hechas con el VLA en 2009 no detectan la fuente a un nivel 1.9+-0.7 veces (2.8o más bajo que el de 2006. Sugerimos que VLA J181335.1{ 174957 podría estar relacionada con alguna de las recientemente detectadas clases de pulsares de radio variables, pero no podemos alcanzar una conclusión más sólida.

  9. Recycling Pulsars: spins, masses and ages

    CERN Document Server

    Tauris, T M; Langer, N

    2012-01-01

    Although the first millisecond pulsars (MSPs) were discovered 30 years ago we still do not understand all details of their formation process. Here, we present new results from Tauris, Langer & Kramer (2012) on the recycling scenario leading to radio MSPs with helium or carbon-oxygen white dwarf companions via evolution of low- and intermediate mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs, IMXBs). We discuss the location of the spin-up line in the (P,Pdot)-diagram and estimate the amount of accreted mass needed to obtain a given spin period and compare with observations. Finally, we constrain the true ages of observed recycled pulsars via calculated isochrones in the (P,Pdot)-diagram.

  10. Pulsar discoveries by volunteer distributed computing and the strongest continuous gravitational wave signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knispel, Benjamin

    2011-07-01

    Neutron stars are the endpoints of stellar evolution and one of the most compact forms of matter in the universe. They can be observed as radio pulsars and are promising sources for the emission of continuous gravitational waves. Discovering new radio pulsars in tight binary orbits offers the opportunity to conduct very high precision tests of General Relativity and to further our understanding of neutron star structure and matter at super-nuclear densities. The direct detection of gravitational waves would validate Einstein's theory of Relativity and open a new window to the universe by offering a novel astronomical tool. This thesis addresses both of these scientific fields: the first fully coherent search for radio pulsars in tight, circular orbits has been planned, set up and conducted in the course of this thesis. Two unusual radio pulsars, one of them in a binary system, have been discovered. The other half of this thesis is concerned with the simulation of the Galactic neutron star population to predict their emission of continuous gravitational waves. First realistic statistical upper limits on the strongest continuous gravitational-wave signal and detection predictions for realistic all-sky blind searches have been obtained. The data from a large-scale pulsar survey with the 305-m Arecibo radio telescope were searched for signals from radio pulsars in binary orbits. The massive amount of computational work was done on hundreds of thousands of computers volunteered by members of the general public through the distributed computing project Einstein@Home. The newly developed analysis pipeline searched for pulsar spin frequencies below 250 Hz and for orbital periods as short as 11 min. The structure of the search pipeline consisting of data preparation, data analysis, result post-processing, and set-up of the pipeline components is presented in detail. The first radio pulsar, discovered with this search, PSR J2007+2722, is an isolated radio pulsar, likely from

  11. Radio Detection Prospects for a Bulge Population of Millisecond Pulsars as Suggested by Fermi-LAT Observations of the Inner Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calore, F.; Di Mauro, M.; Donato, F.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Weniger, C.

    2016-08-01

    The dense stellar environment of the Galactic center has been proposed to host a large population of as-yet undetected millisecond pulsars (MSPs). Recently, this hypothesis has found support in an analysis of gamma-rays detected using the Large Area Telescope onboard the Fermi satellite, which revealed an excess of diffuse GeV photons in the inner 15 deg about the Galactic center. The excess can be interpreted as the collective emission of thousands of MSPs in the Galactic bulge, with a spherical distribution strongly peaked toward the Galactic center. In order to fully establish the MSP interpretation, it is essential to find corroborating evidence in multi-wavelength searches, most notably through the detection of radio pulsations from individual bulge MSPs. Based on globular cluster observations and gamma-ray emission from the inner Galaxy, we investigate the prospects for detecting MSPs in the Galactic bulge. While previous pulsar surveys failed to identify this population, we demonstrate that upcoming large-area surveys of this region should lead to the detection of dozens of bulge MSPs. Additionally, we show that deep targeted searches of unassociated Fermi sources should be able to detect the first few MSPs in the bulge. The prospects for these deep searches are enhanced by a tentative gamma-ray/radio correlation that we infer from high-latitude gamma-ray MSPs. Such detections would constitute the first clear discoveries of field MSPs in the Galactic bulge, with far-reaching implications for gamma-ray observations, the formation history of the central Milky Way, and strategy optimization for future deep radio pulsar surveys.

  12. Binary Stars "Flare" With Predictable Cycles, Analysis of Radio Observations Reveals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-01

    Astronomers have completed a 5-year campaign to monitor continuously radio flares from two groups of binary star systems. This survey is of special interest because it provides evidence that certain binary star systems have predictable activity cycles like our Sun. The survey, which ran from January 1995 to October 2000, was conducted with the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Green Bank Interferometer. The report was presented at the American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Albuquerque, New Mexico, by Mercedes Richards of the University of Virginia, and her collaborators Elizabeth Waltman of the Naval Research Laboratory, and Frank Ghigo of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). "This long-term survey was critical to our understanding of the short- and long-term magnetic cycles of these intriguing star systems," said Richards. The survey focused on the binary star systems Beta Persei and V711 Tauri -- both are about 95 light-years from Earth. Beta Persei is the prototype of the "Algol" class of interacting binary stars. An Algol system contains a hot, blue, main sequence star, along with a cool, orange/red star that is more active than our Sun. V711 Tauri is an "RS Canum Venaticorum" binary, which contains two cool stars that behave like our Sun. "Our survey was the longest-running continuous radio flare survey of Algol or RS Canum Venaticorum binary star systems," said Richards. A flare is an enormous explosion on the surface of a star, which is accompanied by a release of magnetic energy. Flares can be detected over the full range of wavelengths from gamma rays to the radio. It is estimated that the energy release in a flare on the Sun is equivalent to a billion megatons of TNT. The strength of the magnetic field and the amount of activity it displays, like sunspots and flares, are directly related to the rotation or "spin" of the star. In Beta Persei and V711 Tauri, the cool star spins once every 3 days, compared to once every month in the

  13. On the puzzling high-energy pulsations of the energetic radio-quiet γ-ray pulsar J1813–1246

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marelli, M.; Pizzocaro, D.; De Luca, A.; Caraveo, P.; Salvetti, D. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica Milano, via E. Bassini 15, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Harding, A. [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Wood, K. S. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Saz Parkinson, P. M. [Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Acero, F., E-mail: marelli@lambrate.inaf.it [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Universit Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2014-11-10

    We have analyzed the new deep XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of the energetic, radio-quiet pulsar J1813–1246. The X-ray spectrum is nonthermal, very hard, and absorbed. Based on spectral considerations, we propose that J1813 is located at a distance further than 2.5 kpc. J1813 is highly pulsed in the X-ray domain, with a light curve characterized by two sharp, asymmetrical peaks, separated by 0.5 in phase. We detected no significant X-ray spectral changes during the pulsar phase. We extended the available Fermi ephemeris to five years. We found two glitches. The γ-ray light curve is characterized by two peaks, separated by 0.5 in phase, with a bridge in between and no off-pulse emission. The spectrum shows clear evolution in phase, being softer at the peaks and hardening toward the bridge. Surprisingly, both X-ray peaks lag behind the γ-ray ones by a quarter of phase. We found a hint of detection in the 30-500 keV band with INTEGRAL, which is consistent with the extrapolation of both the soft X-ray and γ-ray emission of J1813. The unique X-ray and γ-ray phasing suggests a singular emission geometry. We discuss some possibilities within the current pulsar emission models. Finally, we develop an alternative geometrical model where the X-ray emission comes from polar cap pair cascades.

  14. Identification of HESS J1303-631 as a Pulsar Wind Nebula through gamma-ray, X-ray and radio observations

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Acero, F; Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Anton, G; Balenderan, S; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; Becherini, Y; Becker, J; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Biteau, J; Bochow, A; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bulik, T; Büsching, I; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Cerruti, M; Chadwick, P M; Charbonnier, A; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Fallon, L; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füßling, M; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Gast, H; Gérard, L; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Göring, D; Grondin, M -H; Häffner, S; Hague, J D; Hahn, J; Hampf, D; Harris, J; Hauser, M; Heinz, S; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Khélifi, B; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kneiske, T; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Kossakowski, R; Krayzel, F; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lenain, J -P; Lennarz, D; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Masbou, J; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Medina, M C; Méhault, J; Menzler, U; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Moulin, E; Naumann, C L; Naumann-Godo, M; de Naurois, M; Nedbal, D; Nekrassov, D; Nguyen, N; Nicholas, B; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Ohm, S; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perez, J; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raue, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sheidaei, F; Skilton, J L; Sol, H; Spengler, G; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Szostek, A; Tavernet, J -P; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorobiov, S; Vorster, M; Wagner, S J; Ward, M; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Zacharias, M; Zajczyk, A; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S

    2012-01-01

    The previously unidentified very high-energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) \\gamma-ray source HESS J1303-631, discovered in 2004, is re-examined including new data from the H.E.S.S. Cherenkov telescope array. Archival data from the XMM-Newton X-ray satellite and from the PMN radio survey are also examined. Detailed morphological and spectral studies of VHE \\gamma-ray emission as well as of the XMM-Newton X-ray data are performed. Significant energy-dependent morphology of the \\gamma-ray source is detected with high-energy emission (E > 10 TeV) positionally coincident with the pulsar PSR J1301-6305 and lower energy emission (E <2 TeV) extending \\sim 0.4^{\\circ} to the South-East of the pulsar. The spectrum of the VHE source can be described with a power-law with an exponential cut-off N_{0} = (5.6 \\pm 0.5) X 10^{-12} TeV^-1 cm^-2 s^-1, \\Gamma = 1.5 \\pm 0.2) and E_{\\rm cut} = (7.7 \\pm 2.2) TeV. The PWN is also detected in X-rays, extending \\sim 2-3' from the pulsar position towards the center of the \\gamma-ray emission ...

  15. A population of gamma-ray millisecond pulsars seen with the Fermi Large Area Telescope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Atwood, W B; Axelsson, M; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Bignami, G F; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Camilo, F; Caraveo, P A; Carlson, P; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Celik, O; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cognard, I; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cominsky, L R; Conrad, J; Corbet, R; Cutini, S; Dermer, C D; Desvignes, G; de Angelis, A; de Luca, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Dormody, M; do Couto e Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Edmonds, Y; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Focke, W B; Frailis, M; Freire, P C C; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M H; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Hobbs, G; Hughes, R E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Johnston, S; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Kramer, M; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Manchester, R N; Marelli, M; Mazziotta, M N; McConville, W; McEnery, J E; McLaughlin, M A; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Ransom, S M; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Rea, N; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Romani, R W; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F W; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Saz Parkinson, P M; Scargle, J D; Schalk, T L; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Stappers, B W; Starck, J L; Striani, E; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Theureau, G; Thompson, D J; Thorsett, S E; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Uchiyama, Y; Usher, T L; Van Etten, A; Vasileiou, V; Venter, C; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Wallace, E; Wang, P; Watters, K; Webb, N; Weltevrede, P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2009-08-14

    Pulsars are born with subsecond spin periods and slow by electromagnetic braking for several tens of millions of years, when detectable radiation ceases. A second life can occur for neutron stars in binary systems. They can acquire mass and angular momentum from their companions, to be spun up to millisecond periods and begin radiating again. We searched Fermi Large Area Telescope data for pulsations from all known millisecond pulsars (MSPs) outside of globular clusters, using rotation parameters from radio telescopes. Strong gamma-ray pulsations were detected for eight MSPs. The gamma-ray pulse profiles and spectral properties resemble those of young gamma-ray pulsars. The basic emission mechanism seems to be the same for MSPs and young pulsars, with the emission originating in regions far from the neutron star surface.

  16. A Population of Gamma-Ray Millisecond Pulsars Seen with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsars are born with sub-second spin periods and slow by electromagnetic braking for several tens of millions of years, when detectable radiation ceases. A second life can occur for neutron stars in binary systems. They can acquire mass and angular momentum from their companions, to be spun up to millisecond periods and begin radiating again. We searched Fermi Large Area Telescope data for pulsations from all known millisecond pulsars (MSPs) outside of globular clusters, using rotation parameters from radio telescopes. Strong gamma-ray pulsations were detected for eight MSPs. The gamma-ray pulse profiles and spectral properties resemble those of young gamma-ray pulsars. The basic emission mechanism seems to be the same for MSPs and young pulsars, with the emission originating in regions far from the neutron star surface. (authors)

  17. A state change in the low-mass X-ray binary XSS J12270-4859

    CERN Document Server

    Bassa, C G; Hessels, J W T; Keane, E F; Monard, B; Mahony, E K; Bogdanov, S; Corbel, S; Edwards, P G; Archibald, A M; Janssen, G H; Stappers, B W; Tendulkar, S

    2014-01-01

    Millisecond radio pulsars acquire their rapid rotation rates through mass and angular momentum transfer in a low-mass X-ray binary system. Recent studies of PSR J1824-2452I and PSR J1023+0038 have observationally demonstrated this link, and they have also shown that such systems can repeatedly transition back-and-forth between the radio millisecond pulsar and low-mass X-ray binary states. This also suggests that a fraction of such systems are not newly born radio millisecond pulsars but are rather suspended in a back-and-forth state switching phase, perhaps for giga-years. XSS J12270-4859 has been previously suggested to be a low-mass X-ray binary, and until recently the only such system to be seen at MeV-GeV energies. We present radio, optical and X-ray observations that offer compelling evidence that XSS J12270-4859 is a low-mass X-ray binary which transitioned to a radio millisecond pulsar state between 2012 November 14 and 2012 December 21. Though radio pulsations remain to be detected, we use optical and...

  18. Simultaneous Observations of Giant Pulses from the Crab Pulsar, with the Murchison Widefield Array and Parkes Radio Telescope: Implications for the Giant Pulse Emission Mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Oronsaye, S I; Bhat, N D R; Tremblay, S E; McSweeney, S J; Tingay, S J; van Straten, W; Jameson, A; Bernardi, G; Bowman, J D; Briggs, F; Cappallo, R J; Deshpande, A A; Greenhill, L J; Hazelton, B J; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Kaplan, D L; Lonsdale, C J; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, D A; Morales, M F; Morgan, E; Oberoi, D; Prabu, T; Shankar, N Udaya; Srivani, K S; Subrahmanyan, R; Wayth, R B; Webster, R L; Williams, A; Williams, C L

    2015-01-01

    We report on observations of giant pulses from the Crab pulsar performed simultaneously with the Parkes radio telescope and the incoherent combination of the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) antenna tiles. The observations were performed over a duration of approximately one hour at a center frequency of 1382 MHz with 340 MHz bandwidth at Parkes, and at a center frequency of 193 MHz with 15 MHz bandwidth at the MWA. Our analysis has led to the detection of 55 giant pulses at the MWA and 2075 at Parkes above a threshold of 3.5$\\sigma$ and 6.5$\\sigma$ respectively. We detected 51$\\%$ of the MWA giant pulses at the Parkes radio telescope, with spectral indices in the range of $-3.6>\\alpha> -4.9$ ($S_{\\rm \

  19. Suzaku view of the Be/X-ray binary pulsar GX 304-1 during Type I X-ray outbursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaisawal, Gaurava K.; Naik, Sachindra; Epili, Prahlad

    2016-04-01

    We report the timing and spectral properties of the Be/X-ray binary pulsar GX 304-1 using two Suzaku observations during its 2010 August and 2012 January X-ray outbursts. Pulsations at ˜275 s were clearly detected in the light curves from both observations. Pulse profiles were found to be strongly energy-dependent. During the 2010 observation, the prominent dips seen in soft X-ray (≤10 keV) pulse profiles were found to be absent at higher energies. However, during the 2012 observation, the pulse profiles were complex as a result of the presence of several dips. Significant changes in the shape of the pulse profiles were detected at high energies (>35 keV). A phase shift of ˜0.3 was detected while comparing the phase of the main dip in the pulse profiles below and above ˜35 keV. The broad-band energy spectrum of the pulsar was well described by a partially absorbed negative and positive power law with exponential cut-off (NPEX) model with 6.4-keV iron line and a cyclotron absorption feature. The energy of the cyclotron absorption line was found to be ˜53 and 50 keV for the 2010 and 2012 observations, respectively, indicating a marginal positive dependence on source luminosity. Based on the results obtained from phase-resolved spectroscopy, the absorption dips in the pulse profiles can be interpreted as due to the presence of additional matter at same phases. Observed positive correlation between the cyclotron line energy and luminosity, and the significant pulse-phase variation of cyclotron parameters are discussed from the perspective of theoretical models on the cyclotron absorption line in X-ray pulsars.

  20. Application of the Ghosh & Lamb relation to the spin-up/down behavior in the X-ray binary pulsar 4U 1626-67

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Toshihiro; Mihara, Tatehiro; Sugizaki, Mutsumi; Makishima, Kazuo; Morii, Mikio

    2016-06-01

    We analyzed continuous Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image/Gas Slit Camera (MAXI/GSC) data of the X-ray binary pulsar 4U 1626-67 from 2009 October to 2013 September, and determined the pulse period and the pulse-period derivative for every 60-d interval by the epoch folding method. The obtained periods are consistent with those provided by the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor pulsar project. In all the 60-d intervals, the pulsar was observed to spin up, with the spin-up rate positively correlated with the 2-20 keV flux. We applied the accretion torque model proposed by Ghosh and Lamb (1979, ApJ, 234, 296) to the MAXI/GSC data, as well as the past data including both spin-up and spin-down phases. The "Ghosh & Lamb" relation was confirmed to successfully explain the observed relation between the spin-up/down rate and the flux. By comparing the model-predicted luminosity with the observed flux, the source distance was constrained as 5-13 kpc, which is consistent with that found by Chakrabarty (1998, ApJ, 492, 342). Conversely, if the source distance is assumed, the data can constrain the mass and radius of the neutron star, because the Ghosh & Lamb model depends on these parameters. We attempted this idea, and found that an assumed distance of, e.g., 10 kpc gives a mass in the range of 1.81-1.90 solar mass, and a radius of 11.4-11.5 km, although these results are still subject to considerable systematic uncertainties, other than distance.

  1. Astrophysical Mechanisms for Pulsar Spindown

    OpenAIRE

    Addison, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Pulsars are astrophysical sources of pulsed electromagnetic radiation. The pulses have a variety of shapes in the time-domain, and the pulse energy generally peaks in the radio spectrum. The accepted models theorize that pulsars are rapidly rotating neutron stars with strong dipolar magnetic fields. Current models predict that rotational kinetic energy is extracted from the pulsar in the form of electromagnetic and gravitational radiation, causing it to slowly lose rotational speed, or “spin ...

  2. A NuSTAR Observation of the Gamma-Ray-Emitting X-ray Binary and Transitional Millisecond Pulsar Candidate 1RXS J154439.4-112820

    CERN Document Server

    Bogdanov, Slavko

    2015-01-01

    I present a 40 kilosecond Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) observation of the recently identified low-luminosity X-ray binary and transitional millisecond pulsar (tMSP) candidate 1RXS J154439.4-112820, which is associated with the high-energy gamma-ray source 3FGL J1544.6--1125. The system is detected up to ~30 keV with an extension of the same power-law spectrum and rapid large-amplitude variability between two flux levels observed in soft X-rays. These findings provide further evidence that 1RXS J154439.4-112820 belongs to the same class of objects as the nearby bona fide tMSPs PSR J1023+0038 and XSS J12270-4859 and therefore almost certainly hosts a millisecond pulsar accreting at low luminosities. I also examine the long-term accretion history of 1RXS J154439.4-112820 based on archival optical, ultraviolet, X-ray, and $\\gamma$-ray light curves covering the past $\\sim$decade. Throughout this period, the source has maintained similar flux levels at all wavelengths, which is an indication that ...

  3. Identification of the High-Energy Gamma-Ray Source 3FGL J1544.6-1125 as a Transitional Millisecond Pulsar Binary in an Accreting State

    CERN Document Server

    Bogdanov, Slavko

    2015-01-01

    We present X-ray, ultraviolet, and optical observations of 1RXS J154439.4-112820, the most probable counterpart of the unassociated Fermi LAT source 3FGL J1544.6-1125. The optical data reveal rapid variability, which is a feature of accreting systems. The X-ray data exhibit large-amplitude flux variations in the form of fast switching (within ~10 s) between two distinct flux levels that differ by a factor of $\\approx$10. The detailed optical and X-ray behavior is virtually identical to that seen in the accretion-disk-dominated states of the transitional millisecond pulsar binaries PSR J1023+0038 and XSS J12270-4859, which are also associated with $\\gamma$-ray sources. Based on the available observational evidence, we conclude that 1RXS J154439.4-112820 and 3FGL J1544.6-1125 are the same object, with the X-rays arising from intermittent low-luminosity accretion onto a millisecond pulsar and the $\\gamma$-rays originating from an accretion-driven outflow. 1RXS J154439.4-112820 is only the fourth $\\gamma$-ray emi...

  4. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey: The fastest rotating O-type star and shortest period LMC pulsar - remnants of a supernova disrupted binary?

    CERN Document Server

    Dufton, P L; Evans, C J; Brott, I; Cantiello, M; de Koter, A; de Mink, S E; Fraser, M; Hénault-Brunet, V; Howarth, I D; Langer, N; Lennon, D J; Markova, N; Sana, H; Taylor, W D

    2011-01-01

    We present a spectroscopic analysis of an extremely rapidly rotating late O-type star, VFTS102, observed during a spectroscopic survey of 30 Doradus. VFTS102 has a projected rotational velocity larger than 500\\kms\\ and probably as large as 600\\kms; as such it would appear to be the most rapidly rotating massive star currently identified. Its radial velocity differs by 40\\kms\\ from the mean for 30 Doradus, suggesting that it is a runaway. VFTS102 lies 12 pcs from the X-ray pulsar PSR J0537-6910 in the tail of its X-ray diffuse emission. We suggest that these objects originated from a binary system with the rotational and radial velocities of VFTS102 resulting from mass transfer from the progenitor of PSR J0537-691 and the supernova explosion respectively.

  5. THE VLT-FLAMES TARANTULA SURVEY: THE FASTEST ROTATING O-TYPE STAR AND SHORTEST PERIOD LMC PULSAR-REMNANTS OF A SUPERNOVA DISRUPTED BINARY?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dufton, P. L.; Dunstall, P. R.; Fraser, M. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Evans, C. J. [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Brott, I. [University of Vienna, Department of Astronomy, Tuerkenschanzstr. 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Cantiello, M.; Langer, N. [Argelander Institut fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Bonn, Auf dem Huegel 71, 53121 Bonn (Germany); De Koter, A.; Sana, H. [Astronomical Institute ' Anton Pannekoek' , University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); De Mink, S. E. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Henault-Brunet, V.; Taylor, W. D. [Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Howarth, I. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Lennon, D. J. [ESA, Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Markova, N., E-mail: p.dufton@qub.ac.uk [Institute of Astronomy with NAO, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 136, 4700 Smoljan (Bulgaria)

    2011-12-10

    We present a spectroscopic analysis of an extremely rapidly rotating late O-type star, VFTS102, observed during a spectroscopic survey of 30 Doradus. VFTS102 has a projected rotational velocity larger than 500 km s{sup -1} and probably as large as 600 km s{sup -1}; as such it would appear to be the most rapidly rotating massive star currently identified. Its radial velocity differs by 40 km s{sup -1} from the mean for 30 Doradus, suggesting that it is a runaway. VFTS102 lies 12 pc from the X-ray pulsar PSR J0537-6910 in the tail of its X-ray diffuse emission. We suggest that these objects originated from a binary system with the rotational and radial velocities of VFTS102 resulting from mass transfer from the progenitor of PSR J0537-691 and the supernova explosion, respectively.

  6. Pulsar population synthesis using palfa detections and pulsar search collaboratory discoveries including a wide DNS system and a nearby MSP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiggum, Joseph Karl

    Using the ensemble of detections from pulsar surveys, we can learn about the sizes and characteristics of underlying populations. In this thesis, I analyze results from the Pulsar Arecibo L-band Feed Array (PALFA) precursor and Green Bank Telescope 350 MHz Drift Scan surveys; I examine survey sensitivity to see how detections can inform pulsar population models, I look at new ways of including young scientists -- high school students -- in the discovery process and I present timing solutions for students' discoveries (including a nearby millisecond pulsar and a pulsar in a wide-orbit double neutron star system). The PALFA survey is on-going and uses the ALFA 7-beam receiver at 1400 MHz to search both inner and outer Galactic sectors visible from Arecibo (32° ?£? 77° and 168° ?£? 214°) close to the Galactic plane (|b| ? 5°) for pulsars. The PALFA precursor survey observed a subset of this region, (|b| ? 1°) and detected 45 pulsars, including one known millisecond pulsar (MSP) and 11 previously unknown, long-period (normal) pulsars. I assess the sensitivity of the PALFA precursor survey and use the number of normal pulsar and MSP detections to infer the size of each underlying Galactic population. Based on 44 normal pulsar detections and one MSP, we constrain each population size to 107,000+36,000-25,000 and 15,000 +85,000-6,000 respectively with 95% confidence. Based on these constraints, we predict yields for the full PALFA survey and find a deficiency in normal pulsar detections, possibly due to radio frequency interference and/or scintillation, neither of which are currently accounted for in population simulations. The GBT 350 MHz Drift Scan survey collected data in the summer of 2007 while the GBT was stationary, undergoing track replacement. Results discussed here come from ~20% of the survey data, which were processed and donated to the Pulsar Search Collaboratory (PSC). The PSC is a joint outreach program between WVU and NRAO, involving high school

  7. Wind-wind collision in the Carinae binary system II: Constrains to the binary orbital parameters from radio emission near periastron passage

    OpenAIRE

    Abraham, Z.; Falceta-Goncalves, D.; Dominici, T. P.; A. Caproni; Jatenco-Pereira, V.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we use the 7 mm and 1.3 mm light curves obtained during the 2003.5 low excitation phase of the eta Carinae system to constrain the possible parameters of the binary orbit. To do that we assumed that the mm wave emission is produced in a dense disk surrounding the binary system; during the low excitation phase, which occurs close to periastron, the number of ionizing photons decreases, producing the dip in the radio emission. On the other hand, due to the large eccentricity, the ...

  8. Discovery of the Optical Counterparts to Four Energetic Fermi Millisecond Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Breton, R P; Roberts, M S E; Hessels, J W T; Camilo, F; McLaughlin, M A; Ransom, S M; Ray, P S; Stairs, I H

    2013-01-01

    In the last few years, over 43 millisecond radio pulsars have been discovered by targeted searches of unidentified gamma-ray sources found by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. A large fraction of these millisecond pulsars are in compact binaries with low-mass companions. These systems often show eclipses of the pulsar signal and are commonly known as black widows and redbacks because the pulsar is gradually destroying its companion. In this paper, we report on the optical discovery of four strongly irradiated millisecond pulsar companions. All four sources show modulations of their color and luminosity at the known orbital periods from radio timing. Light curve modelling of our exploratory data shows that the equilibrium temperature reached on the companion's dayside with respect to their nightside is consistent with about 10-30% of the available spin-down energy from the pulsar being reprocessed to increase the companion's dayside temperature. This value compares well with the range observed in other irra...

  9. Turn-over in pulsar spectra above 1 GHz

    OpenAIRE

    Kijak, J.; Gupta, Y; Krzeszowski, K.

    2007-01-01

    We present the first direct evidence for turn-over in pulsar radio spectra at high frequencies. Two pulsars are now shown to have a turn-over frequency > 1GHz. We also find some evidence that the peak frequency of turn-over in pulsar spectra appears to depend on dispersion measure and pulsar age.

  10. Characterizing X-Ray and Radio Emission in the Black Hole X-Ray Binary V404 Cygni During Quiescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rana, Vikram; Loh, Alan; Corbel, Stephane;

    2016-01-01

    We present results from multi-wavelength simultaneous X-ray and radio observations of the black hole X-ray binary V404 Cyg in quiescence. Our coverage with NuSTAR provides the very first opportunity to study the X-ray spectrum of V404 Cyg at energies above 10 keV. The unabsorbed broadband (0.3–30...

  11. Recycled Pulsars: Spins, Masses and Ages

    CERN Document Server

    Tauris, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    Recycled pulsars are mainly characterized by their spin periods, B-fields and masses. All these quantities are affected by previous interactions with a companion star in a binary system. Therefore, we can use these quantities as fossil records and learn about binary evolution. Here, I briefly review the distribution of these observed quantities and summarize our current understanding of the pulsar recycling process.

  12. The Pulsar Search Collaboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Rosen, Rachel; McLaughlin, Maura A; Lynch, Ryan; Kondratiev, Vlad I; Boyles, Jason R; Wilson, M Terry; Lorimer, Duncan R; Ransom, Scott; 10.3847/AER2010004

    2010-01-01

    The Pulsar Search Collaboratory [PSC, NSF #0737641] is a joint project between the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and West Virginia University (WVU) designed to interest high school students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics [STEM] related career paths by helping them to conduct authentic scientific research. The 3- year PSC program, which began in summer 2008, teaches students to analyze astronomical radio data acquired with the 100-m Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope for the purpose of discovering new pulsars. We present the results of the first complete year of the PSC, which includes two astronomical discoveries.

  13. Hunting for Gravitational Waves with Massive Gravitons from Inspiralling Double Neutron Star Systems with Pulsar Clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Joan Jing

    2014-01-01

    Pulsars, especially millisecond pulsars, are intrinsically very stable celestial clocks, and their great pulse period stability open up a wide range of potential applications to astronomical phenomena, such as a natural detector for very low frequency ($10^{-7}-10^{-9}$ Hz) gravitational waves (GWs) background from supermassive black hole binaries. Double neutron star (DNS) binary systems, containing one or two radio pulsars, lose orbital energy by gravitational radiation, which leads to the orbital shrink. As a result, two neutron stars get closer and closer, during which it contributes to the emission of high frequency GWs of $1-10^4$ Hz. In this paper, we investigate the frequency shift of pulse signal for radio pulsars in DNS system that is induced by the emission of GWs from the system. We point out that the pulse frequency shift of radio signal in these systems can be a potential tool to hunt for the high-frequency GWs, with massive gravitons, from DNS systems, which resorts to a temporal shift of gravi...

  14. Double-double radio galaxies: remnants of merger of supermassive binary black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, F K; Cao, S L; Wu, Xue-Bing

    2003-01-01

    The activity of active galaxy may be triggered by the merge of galaxies and present-day galaxies are probably the product of successive minor mergers. The frequent galactic merges at high redshift imply that active galaxy harbors supermassive unequal-mass binary black holes in its center at least once during its life time. In this paper, we showed that the recently discovered double-lobed FR II radio galaxies are the remnants of such supermassive binary black holes. The inspiraling secondary black hole opens a gap in the accretion disk and removes the inner accretion disk when it merges into the primary black hole, leaving a big hole of about several hundreds of Schwarzschild radius in the vicinity of the post-merged supermassive black hole and leading to an interruption of jet formation. When the outer accretion disk slowly refills the big hole on a viscous time scale, the jet formation restarts and the interaction of the recurrent jets and the inter-galactic medium forms a secondary pair of lobes. We applie...

  15. Interplanetary spacecraft navigation using pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, X P; You, X P; Li, M T; Keith, M J; Shannon, R M; Coles, W; Manchester, R N; Zheng, J H; Yu, X Z; Gao, D; Wu, X; Chen, D

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate how observations of pulsars can be used to help navigate a spacecraft travelling in the solar system. We make use of archival observations of millisecond pulsars from the Parkes radio telescope in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method and highlight issues, such as pulsar spin irregularities, which need to be accounted for. We show that observations of four millisecond pulsars every seven days using a realistic X-ray telescope on the spacecraft throughout a journey from Earth to Mars can lead to position determinations better than approx. 20km and velocity measurements with a precision of approx. 0.1m/s.

  16. The Double Pulsar System J0737-3039: Modulation of the radio emission from B by radiation from A

    CERN Document Server

    McLaughlin, M A; Lyne, A G; Lorimer, D R; Stairs, I H; Possenti, A; Manchester, R N; Freire, P C C; Joshi, B C; Burgay, M; D'Amico, N

    2004-01-01

    We have analyzed single pulses from PSR J0737-3039B, the 2.8-s pulsar in the recently discovered double pulsar system, using data taken with the Green Bank Telescope at 820 and 1400 MHz. We report the detection of features similar to drifting subpulses, detectable over only a fraction of the pulse window, with a fluctuation frequency of 0.196 cycles/period. This is exactly the beat frequency between the periods of the two pulsars. In addition, the drifting features have a separation within a given pulse of 23 ms, equal to the pulse period of A. These features are therefore due to the direct influence of PSR J0737-3039A's 44-Hz electromagnetic radiation on PSR J0737-3039B's magnetosphere. We only detect them over a small range of orbital phases, when the radiation from the recycled pulsar PSR J0737-3039A meets our line of sight to PSR J0737-3039B from the side.

  17. X-ray states of redback millisecond pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linares, M. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, c/Vía Láctea s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2014-11-01

    Compact binary millisecond pulsars with main-sequence donors, often referred to as 'redbacks', constitute the long-sought link between low-mass X-ray binaries and millisecond radio pulsars and offer a unique probe of the interaction between pulsar winds and accretion flows. We present a systematic study of eight nearby redbacks, using more than 100 observations obtained with Swift's X-ray Telescope. We distinguish between three main states: pulsar, disk, and outburst states. We find X-ray mode switching in the disk state of PSR J1023+0038 and XSS J12270-4859, similar to what was found in the other redback that showed evidence for accretion: rapid, recurrent changes in X-ray luminosity (0.5-10 keV, L {sub X}), between (6-9) × 10{sup 32} erg s{sup –1} (disk-passive state) and (3-5) × 10{sup 33} erg s{sup –1} (disk-active state). This strongly suggests that mode switching—which has not been observed in quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries—is universal among redback millisecond pulsars in the disk state. We briefly explore the implications for accretion disk truncation and find that the inferred magnetospheric radius in the disk state of PSR J1023+0038 and XSS J12270-4859 lies outside the light cylinder. Finally, we note that all three redbacks that have developed accretion disks have relatively high L {sub X} in the pulsar state (>10{sup 32} erg s{sup –1}).

  18. Pulsar disk systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, F.C.; Dessler, A.J.

    1981-12-15

    We argue that the radio pulsars and the X-ray pulsars differ mainly in the fact that the latter are surrounded by an accretion disk, while the former are surrounded by a fossil collapse disk presumably left over from the formation event. We attribute the difference between these two types of pulsars to a strong interaction (enforced accretion) of the X-ray pulsars with their disks as opposed to a relatively weak interaction (and negligible accretion) in the case of the radio pulsars. A number of observational problems (e.g., role of alignment, ion confinement, nulling, drifting subpulses, braking index, residuals, and the supernova association) are readily addressed in terms of the disk model. Moreover, the model is consistent with a ''hollow cone'' type of emission pattern. Rough estimates here suggest that pulsars with disks could function with magnetic fields at the neutron star surface as low as 10/sup 9/ gauss, far below that often assumed; conventional field strengths of 10/sup 12/ gauss are not excluded, however.

  19. Multi-wavelength properties of IGR J05007-7047 (LXP 38.55) and identification as a Be X-ray binary pulsar in the LMC

    CERN Document Server

    Vasilopoulos, G; Delvaux, C; Sturm, R; Udalski, A

    2016-01-01

    We report on the results of a $\\sim$40 d multi-wavelength monitoring of the Be X-ray binary system IGR J05007-7047 (LXP 38.55). During that period the system was monitored in the X-rays using the Swift telescope and in the optical with multiple instruments. When the X-ray luminosity exceeded $10^{36}$ erg/s we triggered an XMM-Newton ToO observation. Timing analysis of the photon events collected during the XMM-Newton observation reveals coherent X-ray pulsations with a period of 38.551(3) s (1 {\\sigma}), making it the 17$^{th}$ known high-mass X-ray binary pulsar in the LMC. During the outburst, the X-ray spectrum is fitted best with a model composed of an absorbed power law ($\\Gamma =0.63$) plus a high-temperature black-body (kT $\\sim$ 2 keV) component. By analysing $\\sim$12 yr of available OGLE optical data we derived a 30.776(5) d optical period, confirming the previously reported X-ray period of the system as its orbital period. During our X-ray monitoring the system showed limited optical variability wh...

  20. Multi-wavelength properties of IGR J05007-7047 (LXP 38.55) and identification as a Be X-ray binary pulsar in the LMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilopoulos, G.; Haberl, F.; Delvaux, C.; Sturm, R.; Udalski, A.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the results of a ˜40-d multi-wavelength monitoring of the Be X-ray binary system IGR J05007-7047 (LXP 38.55). During that period the system was monitored in the X-rays using the Swift telescope and in the optical with multiple instruments. When the X-ray luminosity exceeded 1036 erg s-1 we triggered an XMM-Newton ToO observation. Timing analysis of the photon events collected during the XMM-Newton observation reveals coherent X-ray pulsations with a period of 38.551(3) s (1σ), making it the 17th known high-mass X-ray binary pulsar in the LMC. During the outburst, the X-ray spectrum is fitted best with a model composed of an absorbed power law (Γ = 0.63) plus a high-temperature blackbody (kT ˜2 keV) component. By analysing ˜12 yr of available OGLE optical data we derived a 30.776(5) d optical period, confirming the previously reported X-ray period of the system as its orbital period. During our X-ray monitoring the system showed limited optical variability while its IR flux varied in phase with the X-ray luminosity, which implies the presence of a disc-like component adding cooler light to the spectral energy distribution of the system.

  1. Gamma-ray observations of the Be/pulsar binary 1A 0535+262 during a giant X-ray outburst

    CERN Document Server

    Acciari, V A; Araya, M; Arlen, T; Aune, T; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cannon, A; Cesarini, A; Ciupik, L; Collins-Hughes, E; Cui, W; Dickherber, R; Duke, C; Falcone, A; Finley, J P; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Gall, D; Godambe, S; Griffin, S; Guenette, R; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Hughes, G; Hui, C M; Humensky, T B; Imran, A; Kaaret, P; Kertzman, M; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Madhavan, A S; Maier, G; Majumdar, P; McArthur, S; Moriarty, P; Ong, R A; Otte, A N; Pandel, D; Park, N; Perkins, J S; Pohl, M; Prokoph, H; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Rose, H J; Saxon, D B; Sembroski, G H; Senturk, G Demet; Smith, A W; Tešić, G; Theiling, M; Thibadeau, S; Varlotta, A; Vincent, S; Vivier, M; Wakely, S P; Ward, J E; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; Weisgarber, T; Weng, S; Williams, D A; Wood, M; Zitzer, B

    2011-01-01

    Giant X-ray outbursts, with luminosities of about $ 10^{37}$ erg s$^{-1}$, are observed roughly every 5 years from the nearby Be/pulsar binary 1A 0535+262. In this article, we present observations of the source with VERITAS at very-high energies (VHE; E$>$100 GeV) triggered by the X-ray outburst in December 2009. The observations started shortly after the onset of the outburst, and they provided comprehensive coverage of the episode, as well as the 111-day binary orbit. No VHE emission is evident at any time. We also examined data from the contemporaneous observations of 1A 0535+262 with the Fermi/LAT at high energy photons (HE; E$>$0.1 GeV) and failed to detect the source at GeV energies. The X-ray continua measured with the Swift/XRT and the RXTE/PCA can be well described by the combination of blackbody and Comptonized emission from thermal electrons. Therefore, the gamma-ray and X-ray observations suggest the absence of a significant population of non-thermal particles in the system. This distinguishes 1A~...

  2. Multi-wavelength studies of pulsars and their companions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniadis, John Ioannis

    2013-09-01

    Neutron stars are the degenerate relic cores of massive stars formed in the aftermath of a supernova explosion. Matter in their centes is believed to be condensed at densities as high as ten times that found in atomic nuclei. Thus, observational access to their properties provides the means to study the behavior of physical laws in extreme conditions, beyond the reach of terrestrial experiments. Rapidly rotating, highly magnetized neutron stars emit a narrow intense beam of radio emission from their magnetospheric poles. When this pulse happens to intersect our line of sight, it gives rise to the pulsar phenomenon. Regular radio-timing of pulse arrival times on earth, results in some of the most precise measurements in astrophysics. This thesis deals with the study of binary millisecond pulsars with white dwarf companions and is divided in 7 Chapters. Chapters 1 & 2 give a brief introduction to neutron stars, pulsars, and binary pulsars. Chapter 3 describes spectroscopic and optical observations of the low mass white dwarf companion to PSR J1909-3744. For this system, radio observations have yielded a precise mass measurement as well as distance information. Combined with the optical data, these provide the first observational test for theoretical white-dwarf cooling models and spectra. The latter, if reliable, can be used to infer theory-independent masses for similar systems. In Chapter 4, I discuss the measurement of the component masses in the short-orbit PSR J1738+0333 system based on spectroscopy of its white-dwarf companion. This system is particularly important for understanding the physics of pulsar recycling and binary evolution. Moreover, combined with the measurement of the orbital decay from radio-timing, the masses pose the most stringent constraints on Scalar-Tensor gravity. Chapter 5 describes radio and optical observations of PSR J0348+0432, a compact pulsar-white dwarf binary discovered recently with the 100-m Green-Bank Radio Telescope. Spectral

  3. On the puzzling high-energy pulsations of the energetic radio-quiet $\\gamma$-ray pulsar J1813$-$1246

    CERN Document Server

    Marelli, M; Pizzocaro, D; De Luca, A; Wood, K S; Caraveo, P; Salvetti, D; Parkinson, P M Saz; Acero, F

    2014-01-01

    We have analyzed the new deep {\\it XMM-Newton} and {\\it Chandra} observations of the energetic radio-quiet pulsar J1813$-$1246. The X-ray spectrum is non-thermal, very hard and absorbed. Based on spectral considerations, we propose that J1813 is located at a distance further than 2.5 kpc. J1813 is highly pulsed in the X-ray domain, with a light curve characterized by two sharp, asymmetrical peaks, separated by 0.5 in phase. We detected no significant X-ray spectral changes during the pulsar phase. We extended the available {\\it Fermi} ephemeris to five years. We found two glitches. The $\\gamma$-ray lightcurve is characterized by two peaks, separated by 0.5 in phase, with a bridge in between and no off-pulse emission. The spectrum shows clear evolution in phase, being softer at the peaks and hardenning towards the bridge. The X-ray peaks lag the $\\gamma$-ray ones by 0.25 in phase. We found a hint of detection in the 30-500 keV band with {\\it INTEGRAL} IBIS/ISGRI, that is consistent with the extrapolation of bo...

  4. On the formation of eccentric millisecond pulsars with helium white-dwarf companions

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadis, John

    2014-01-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) orbiting helium white-dwarfs (WD) in eccentric orbits challenge the established binary-evolution paradigm that predicts efficient orbital circularization during the mass-transfer episode that spins up the pulsar. Freire and Tauris (2014) recently proposed that these binary MSPs may instead form from the rotationally-delayed accretion-induced collapse of a massive WD. This scenario predicts that eccentric systems preferably host low-mass pulsars and travel with small systemic velocities -- in tension with new observational constraints. Here, I show that a substantial growth in eccentricity may alternatively arise from the dynamical interaction of the binary with a circumbinary disk. Such a disk may form from ejected donor material during hydrogen flash episodes, when the neutron star is already an active radio pulsar and tidal forces can no longer circularize the binary. I demonstrate that a short-lived (10^4-10^5 yrs disk can result to eccentricities of e ~ 0.01-0.15 for orbital per...

  5. Radio Polarization Observations of the Snail: A Crushed Pulsar Wind Nebula in G327.1-1.1 with a Highly Ordered Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Y K; Bucciantini, N; Slane, P O; Gaensler, B M; Temim, T

    2016-01-01

    Pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) are suggested to be acceleration sites of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. While the magnetic field plays an important role in the acceleration process, previous observations of magnetic field configurations of PWNe are rare, particularly for evolved systems. We present a radio polarization study of the "Snail" PWN inside the supernova remnant G327.1-1.1 using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. This PWN is believed to have been recently crushed by the supernova (SN) reverse shock. The radio morphology is composed of a main circular body with a finger-like protrusion. We detected a strong linear polarization signal from the emission, which reflects a highly ordered magnetic field in the PWN and is in contrast to the turbulent environment with a tangled magnetic field generally expected from hydrodynamical simulations. This could suggest that the characteristic turbulence scale is larger than the radio beam size. We built a toy model to explore this possibility, and found that a simulat...

  6. Newly Commissioned Green Bank Telescope Bags New Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    clusters are breeding grounds for unusual binary star systems, like the ones detected by the researchers. All three pulsars are known as "millisecond pulsars" because they make one complete rotation in only a few thousandths of a second. One of these newly discovered pulsars spins at approximately 440 rotations per second, and the other two both spin about 300 times per second. All are orbited by white dwarfs with orbital periods ranging from 4 to 27 hours. "This discovery demonstrates the remarkable sensitivity of the Green Bank Telescope," said Phil Jewell, site director for the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Green Bank, W.Va. "The fact that these pulsars were never before detected in this highly studied area of the Galaxy shows that the GBT has outstanding capabilities and will be an important tool for astronomers to make very precise, very sensitive observations of the Universe. The GBT is the world's largest fully steerable radio telescope. It was dedicated on August 25, 2000, after nearly 10 years of construction. Since that time, engineers and scientists at the NRAO in Green Bank have been testing the telescope and outfitting it with the sensitive receivers and electronics that will make it one of the world's premier astronomical instruments. "As a graduate student," said Jacoby "this discovery was particularly satisfying, and I feel privileged to be part of the history of the Green Bank Telescope." Shrinivas Kulkarni, the Caltech faculty advisor for this project, remarked, "it is very satisfying to see such discoveries being made by young people. GBT is poised to play a significant role in the education of young astronomers." The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  7. A Hybrid Spin-Down Model and its Application to the Radio Quiet X-Ray Pulsar 1E 1207.4-5209

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张灵娣; 彭秋和; 罗新炼

    2003-01-01

    A series of newly published papers are focusing on the formation of the absorption features discovered by Chandra and XMM-Newton from the young radio quiet x-ray pulsar 1E 1207.4-5209. We try to interpret it as cyclotron absorption lines since this possibility could not be ruled out. With new development and application of a hybrid model, i.e., the magnetic dipole spin-down model combined with the neutrino cyclotron radiation spin-down model, we can easily avoid the contradiction between the normal rotation energy loss rate and the relatively lower magnetic field, and then we obtain the possible initial spin period (~0.420s). We suppose that the progenitor of 1E 1207.4-5209 may be a white dwarf.

  8. An optical & X-ray study of the counterpart to the SMC X-ray binary pulsar system SXP327

    CERN Document Server

    Coe, M J; Corbet, R H D; Galache, J; McBride, V A; Townsend, L J; Udalski, A

    2008-01-01

    Optical and X-ray observations are presented here of a newly reported X-ray transient system in the Small Magellanic Cloud. The data reveal many previously unknown X-ray detections of this system and clear evidence for a 49.995d binary period. In addition, the optical photometry show recurring outburst features at the binary period which may well be indicative of the neutron star interacting with a circumstellar disk around a Be star.

  9. The relativistic pulsar-white dwarf binary PSR J1738+0333 I. Mass determination and evolutionary history

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadis, J; Koester, D; Freire, P C C; Wex, N; Tauris, T M; Kramer, M; Bassa, C G

    2012-01-01

    PSR J1738+0333 is one of the four millisecond pulsars known to be orbited by a white dwarf companion bright enough for optical spectroscopy. Of these, it has the shortest orbital period, making it especially interesting for a range of astrophysical and gravity related questions. We present a spectroscopic and photometric study of the white dwarf companion and infer its radial velocity curve, effective temperature, surface gravity and luminosity. We find that the white dwarf has properties consistent with those of low-mass white dwarfs with thick hydrogen envelopes, and use the corresponding mass-radius relation to infer its mass; M_WD = 0.181 +/- +0.007/-0.005 solar masses. Combined with the mass ratio q=8.1 +/- 0.2 inferred from the radial velocities and the precise pulsar timing ephemeris, the neutron star mass is constrained to M_PSR = 1.47 +/- +0.07/-0.06 solar masses. Contrary to expectations, the latter is only slightly above the Chandrasekhar limit. We find that, even if the birth mass of the neutron s...

  10. "Missing Link" Revealing Fast-Spinning Pulsar Mysteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    Astronomers have discovered a unique double-star system that represents a "missing link" stage in what they believe is the birth process of the most rapidly-spinning stars in the Universe -- millisecond pulsars. "We've thought for some time that we knew how these pulsars get 'spun up' to rotate so swiftly, and this system looks like it's showing us the process in action," said Anne Archibald, of McGill University in Montreal, Canada. Pulsar and Companion Neutron star with accretion disk (left) drawing material from companion star (right). CREDIT:Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF Animations of this system and its evolution. Pulsars are superdense neutron stars, the remnants left after massive stars have exploded as supernovae. Their powerful magnetic fields generate lighthouse-like beams of light and radio waves that sweep around as the star rotates. Most rotate a few to tens of times a second, slowing down over thousands of years. However, some, dubbed millisecond pulsars, rotate hundreds of times a second. Astronomers believe the fast rotation is caused by a companion star dumping material onto the neutron star and spinning it up. The material from the companion would form a flat, spinning disk around the neutron star, and during this period, the radio waves characteristic of a pulsar would not be seen coming from the system. As the amount of matter falling onto the neutron star decreased and stopped, the radio waves could emerge, and the object would be recognized as a pulsar. This sequence of events is apparently what happened with a binary-star system some 4000 light-years from Earth. The millisecond pulsar in this system, called J1023, was discovered by the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia in 2007 in a survey led by astronomers at West Virginia University and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). The astronomers then found that the object had been detected by NSF's Very Large Array (VLA) radio

  11. Investigation of the bi-drifting subpulses of radio pulsar B1839-04 utilising the open-source data-analysis project PSRSALSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltevrede, P.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: The usefulness and versatility of the PSRSALSA open-source pulsar data-analysis project is demonstrated through an analysis of the radio pulsar B1839-04. This study focuses on the phenomenon of bi-drifting, an effect where the drift direction of subpulses is systematically different in different pulse profile components. Bi-drifting is extremely rare in the pulsar population, and the theoretical implications are discussed after comparing B1839-04 with the only other known bi-drifter. Methods: Various tools in PSRSALSA, including those allowing quantification of periodicities in the subpulse modulation, their flux distribution, and polarization properties, are exploited to obtain a comprehensive picture of the radio properties of PSR B1839-04. In particular, the second harmonic in the fluctuation spectra of the subpulse modulation is exploited to convincingly demonstrate the existence of bi-drifting in B1839-04. Bi-drifting is confirmed with a completely independent method allowing the average modulation cycle to be determined. Polarization measurements were used to obtain a robust constraint on the magnetic inclination angle. Results: The angle between the rotation and magnetic axis is found to be smaller than 35°. Two distinct emission modes are discovered to be operating, with periodic subpulse modulation being present only during the weaker mode. Despite the variability of the modulation cycle and interruption by mode-changes, the modulation pattern responsible for the bi-drifting is strictly phase locked over a timescale of years such that the variability is identical in the different components. Conclusions: The phase locking implies that a single physical origin is responsible for both drift directions. Phase locking is hard to explain for many models, including those specifically proposed in the literature to explain bi-drifting, and they are therefore shown to be implausible. It is argued that within the framework of circulating beamlets, bi

  12. The Pulsar Search Collaboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Rosen, Rachel; Heatherly, Sue Ann; McLaughlin, Maura A.; Lynch, Ryan; Kondratiev, Vlad I.; Boyles, Jason R.; Wilson, M. Terry; Lorimer, Duncan R.; Ransom, Scott

    2010-01-01

    The Pulsar Search Collaboratory [PSC, NSF #0737641] is a joint project between the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and West Virginia University (WVU) designed to interest high school students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics [STEM] related career paths by helping them to conduct authentic scientific research. The 3- year PSC program, which began in summer 2008, teaches students to analyze astronomical radio data acquired with the 100-m Robert C. Byrd Green Bank...

  13. X-ray Measurement of the Spin-Down of Calvera: a Radio- and Gamma-ray-Quiet Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Halpern, J P; Gotthelf, E V

    2013-01-01

    We measure spin-down of the 59 ms X-ray pulsar Calvera by comparing the XMM-Newton discovery data from 2009 with new Chandra timing observations taken in 2013. Its period derivative is P-dot = (3.19+/-0.08)e-15, which corresponds to spin-down luminosity E-dot = 6.1e35 erg/s, characteristic age tau_c = P/2P-dot = 2.9e5 yr, and surface dipole magnetic field strength B_s = 4.4e11 G. These values rule out a mildly recycled pulsar, but Calvera could be an orphaned central compact object (anti-magnetar), with a magnetic field that was initially buried by supernova debris and is now reemerging and approaching normal strength. We also performed unsuccessful searches for high-energy gamma-rays from Calvera in both imaging and timing of >100 MeV Fermi photons. Even though the distance to Calvera is uncertain by an order of magnitude, an upper limit of d < 2 kpc inferred from X-ray spectra implies a gamma-ray luminosity limit of < 3.3e32 erg/s, which is less than that of any pulsar of comparable E-dot. Calvera sha...

  14. The Pulsar Search Collaboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, R.; Heatherly, S.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Boyles, J. R.; Wilson, M.; Lorimer, D. R.; Lynch, R.; Ransom, S.

    2010-01-01

    The Pulsar Search Collaboratory (PSC) (NSF #0737641) is a joint project between the National Radio Astronomy Observatory and West Virginia University designed to interest high school students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics related career paths by helping them to conduct authentic scientific research. The 3 year PSC program,…

  15. The LOFAR Pulsar Data Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexov, A.; Hessels, J.; Mol, J. D.; Stappers, B.; van Leeuwen, J.

    2010-12-01

    The LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) for radio astronomy is being built in the Netherlands by ASTRON, with extensions throughout Europe. LOFAR operates at radio frequencies below 250 MHz. The project is an interferometric array of radio antennas grouped into stations that are distributed over an area of hundreds of kilometers. LOFAR will revolutionise low-frequency radio astronomy. Transient radio phenomena and pulsars are one of six LOFAR Key Science Projects (KSPs). As part of the Transients KSP, the Pulsar Working Group has been developing the LOFAR Pulsar Data Pipeline to both study known pulsars as well as search for new ones. The pipeline is being developed for the Blue Gene/P (BG/P) supercomputer and a large Linux cluster in order to utilize enormous amounts of computation capabilities (˜ 50 Tflops) and data streams of up to 23TB/hour. The LOFAR pipeline output will be using the Hierarchical Data Format 5 (HDF5) to efficiently store large amounts of numerical data, and to manage complex data encompassing a variety of data types, across distributed storage and processing architectures. We present the LOFAR Pulsar Data Pipeline overview, the pulsar beam-formed data format, the status of the pipeline processing as well as our future plans for developing additional transient pipelines.

  16. Luminosity Dependent Study of the High Mass X-ray Binary Pulsar 4U 0114 + 65 with ASCA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    U. Mukherjee; B. Paul

    2006-03-01

    Here we report the spectral characteristics of the high and low states of the pulsar 4U 0114+65 and examine the change in the parameters of the spectral model. A power lawand a photoelectric absorption by material along the line of sight together with a high energy cut-off suffice to describe the continuum spectrum in both the states. A fluorescence iron line at ∼ 6.4 keV is present in the high as well as in the low state, though it is less intense in the latter. The photon index, cut-off energy and e-folding energy values hardly show any discernible change over the states. We compare these spectral characteristics as observed with ASCA with those of other satellites. We also compare the spectral characteristics of 4U 0114 + 650 with other X-ray sources which show intensity variation at different time scales.

  17. The optical companion to the intermediate mass millisecond pulsar J1439-5501 in the Galactic field

    OpenAIRE

    Pallanca C.; Lanzoni B.; Dalessandro E.; Ferraro F. R.; Possenti A.; Salaris M.; Burgay M.

    2013-01-01

    We present the identification of the companion star to the intermediate mass binary pulsar J1439-5501 obtained by means of ground-based deep images in the B, V and I bands, acquired with FORS2 mounted at the ESO-VLT. The companion is a massive white dwarf (WD) with B=23.57+-0.02, V=23.21+-0.01 and I=22.96+-0.01, located at only ~0.05" from the pulsar radio position. Comparing the WD location in the (B, B-V) and (V, V-I) Color-Magnitude diagrams with theoretical cooling sequences we derived a ...

  18. RY Scuti: Infrared and radio observations of the mass-loss wind of a massive binary star system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrz, R. D.; Hayward, T. L.; Houck, J. R.; Miles, J. W.; Hjellming, R. M.; Jones, T. J.; Woodward, Charles E.; Prentice, Ricarda; Forrest, W. J.; Libonate, S.

    1995-01-01

    We report infrared (IR) imaging, IR photometry, IR spectroscopy, optical/IR photopolarimetry, and Very Large Array (VLA) radio observations of the peculiar binary star RY Scuti. These observations provide an unprecedented view of the detailed spatial structure of the equatorial mass-loss wind of a massive, luminous, 'overcontact' binary system. The binary star (0.43 AU separation) is surrounded by a flattened equatorial disk with an outer radius of approximately = 3 x 10(exp 16) cm (2000 AU) that emits strongly in the IR and radio. The inside of the disk is ionized and emits free-free radiation from hydrogen and 12.8 micrometers forbidden-line emission from (Ne II); the outside of the disk emits thermal radiation from silicate dust. Radio continuum emission is also produced in a compact H II region surrounding the binary. The dust may have a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) component. We use a rudimentary geometric model in which the thermal IR and radio emission from the disk are assumed to arise in a pair of concentric toroidal rings to estimate the physical properties of the disk. The mean radius of the ionized gas toroid is approximately = 1.3 x 10(exp 16) cm (870 AU), and the mean radius of the dust toroid is approximately = 2.2 x 10(exp 16) cm (1470 AU). RY Scuti has a small intrinsic polarization, with the electric vector perpendicular to the equatorial disk, that is probably caused by electron scattering from hot gas close to the central binary. We conclude that neon in the nebula is overabundant with respect to hydrogen and helium by a factor of between 1.6 and 10. Our IR/radio image data suggest that the circumstellar disk is part of an extensive radiation driven mass-loss outflow that is strongly confined to the equatorial plane of the binary system. The sharp spatial separation of the outer dust torous from the inner ionized gas torus confirms earlier suggestions that dust formation in the circumstellar ejecta of very hot stars must occur in

  19. Pair plasma in pulsar magnetospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main features of radiation received from pulsars imply that they are neutron stars which contain an extremely intense magnetic field and emit coherently in the radio domain. Most recent studies attribute the origin of the coherence to plasma instabilities arising in pulsar magnetospheres; they mainly concern the linear, or the nonlinear, character of the involved unstable waves. We briefly introduce radio pulsars and specify physical conditions in pulsar emission regions: geometrical properties, magnetic field, pair creation processes and repartition of relativistic charged particles. We point to the main ingredients of the linear theory, extensively explored since the 1970s: (i) a dispersion relation specific to the pulsar case; (ii) the characteristics of the waves able to propagate in relativistic pulsar plasmas; (iii) the different ways in which a two-humped distribution of particles may arise in a pulsar magnetosphere and favour the development of a two-stream instability. We sum up recent improvements of the linear theory: (i) the determination of a 'coupling function' responsible for high values of the wave field components and electromagnetic energy available; (ii) the obtention of new dispersion relations for actually anisotropic pulsar plasmas with relativistic motions and temperatures; (iii) the interaction between a plasma and a beam, both with relativistic motions and temperatures; (iv) the interpretation of observed 'coral' and 'conal' features, associated with the presence of boundaries and curved magnetic field lines in the emission region; (v) the detailed topology of the magnetic field in the different parts of the emission region and its relation to models recently proposed to interpret drifting subpulses observed from PSR 0943+10, showing 20 sub-beams of emission. We relate the nonlinear evolution of the two-stream instability and development of strong turbulence in relativistic pulsar plasmas to the emergence of relativistic solitons, able

  20. Non-thermal radio emission from colliding-wind binaries: modelling Cyg OB2 No. 8A and No. 9

    OpenAIRE

    Volpi, Delia; Blomme, Ronny; De Becker, Michael; Rauw, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    Some OB stars show variable non-thermal radio emission. The non-thermal emission is due to synchrotron radiation that is emitted by electrons accelerated to high energies. The electron acceleration occurs at strong shocks created by the collision of radiatively-driven stellar winds in binary systems. Here we present results of our modelling of two colliding wind systems: Cyg OB2 No. 8A and Cyg OB2 No. 9.

  1. A Neutron Star-White Dwarf Binary Model for Repeating Fast Radio Burst 121102

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Wei-Min; Liu, Tong; Ma, Renyi; Wang, Junfeng

    2016-01-01

    We propose a compact binary model for the fast radio burst (FRB) repeaters, where the system consists of a magnetic white dwarf (WD) and a neutron star (NS) with strong bipolar magnetic fields. When the WD fills its Roche lobe, mass transfer will occur from the WD to the NS through the inner Lagrange point. The accreted magnetized materials may trigger magnetic reconnection when they approach the NS surface, and therefore the electrons can be accelerated to an ultra-relativistic speed. In this scenario, the curvature radiation of the electrons moving along the NS magnetic field lines can account for the characteristic frequency and the timescale of an FRB. Owing to the conservation of angular momentum, the WD may be kicked away after a burst, and the next burst may appear when the system becomes semi-detached again through the gravitational radiation. By comparing our analyses with the observations, we show that such an intermittent Roche lobe overflow mechanism can be responsible for the observed repeating b...

  2. A Neutron Star–White Dwarf Binary Model for Repeating Fast Radio Burst 121102

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wei-Min; Dong, Yi-Ze; Liu, Tong; Ma, Renyi; Wang, Junfeng

    2016-06-01

    We propose a compact binary model for the fast radio burst (FRB) repeaters, where the system consists of a magnetic white dwarf (WD) and a neutron star (NS) with strong bipolar magnetic fields. When the WD fills its Roche lobe, mass transfer will occur from the WD to the NS through the inner Lagrange point. The accreted magnetized materials may trigger magnetic reconnection when they approach the NS surface, and therefore the electrons can be accelerated to an ultra-relativistic speed. In this scenario, the curvature radiation of the electrons moving along the NS magnetic field lines can account for the characteristic frequency and the timescale of an FRB. Owing to the conservation of angular momentum, the WD may be kicked away after a burst, and the next burst may appear when the system becomes semi-detached again through the gravitational radiation. By comparing our analyses with the observations, we show that such an intermittent Roche-lobe overflow mechanism can be responsible for the observed repeating behavior of FRB 121102.

  3. The relativistic pulsar-white dwarf binary PSR J1738+0333 II. The most stringent test of scalar-tensor gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Freire, Paulo C C; Esposito-Farèse, Gilles; Verbiest, Joris P W; Bailes, Matthew; Jacoby, Bryan A; Kramer, Michael; Stairs, Ingrid H; Antoniadis, John; Janssen, Gemma H

    2012-01-01

    (abridged) We report the results of a 10-year timing campaign on PSR J1738+0333, a 5.85-ms pulsar in a low-eccentricity 8.5-hour orbit with a low-mass white dwarf companion (...) The measurements of proper motion and parallax allow for a precise subtraction of the kinematic contribution to the observed orbital decay; this results in a significant measurement of the intrinsic orbital decay: (-25.9 +/- 3.2) \\times 10^{-15} s/s. This is consistent with the orbital decay from the emission of gravitational waves predicted by general relativity, (-27.7 +1.5/-1.9) \\times 10^{-15} s/s (...). This agreement introduces a tight upper limit on dipolar gravitational wave emission, a prediction of most alternative theories of gravity for asymmetric binary systems such as this. We use this limit to derive the most stringent constraints ever on a wide class of gravity theories, where gravity involves a scalar field contribution. When considering general scalar-tensor theories of gravity, our new bounds are more stringent tha...

  4. The Square Kilometer Array: cosmology, pulsars and other physics with the SKA

    CERN Document Server

    Combes, Francoise

    2015-01-01

    SKA is a new technology radio-telescope array, about two orders of magnitude more sensitive and rapid in sky surveys than present instruments. It will probe the dark age of the universe, just afer recombination, and during the epoch of reionisation (z=6-15); it will be the unique instrument to map the atomic gas in high redshift galaxies, and determine the amount and distribution of dark matter in the early universe. Not only it will detect and measure the redshifts of billions of galaxies up to z=2, but also it will discover and monitor around 20 000 pulsars in our milky Way. The timing of pulsars will trace the stretching of space, able to detect gravitational waves. Binary pulsars will help to test gravity in strong fields, and probe general relativity. These exciting perspectives will become real beyond 2020.

  5. Observing pulsars and fast transients with LOFAR

    CERN Document Server

    Stappers, B W; Alexov, A; Anderson, K; Coenen, T; Hassall, T; Karastergiou, A; Kondratiev, V I; Kramer, M; van Leeuwen, J; Mol, J D; Noutsos, A; Romein, J W; Weltevrede, P; Fender, R; Wijers, R A M J; Bähren, L; Bell, M E; Broderick, J; Daw, E J; Dhillon, V S; Eislöffel, J; Falcke, H; Griessmeier, J; Law, C; Markoff, S; Miller-Jones, J C A; Scheers, B; Spreeuw, H; Swinbank, J; ter Veen, S; Wise, M W; Wucknitz, O; Zarka, P; Anderson, J; Asgekar, A; Avruch, I M; Beck, R; Bennema, P; Bentum, M J; Best, P; Bregman, J; Brentjens, M; van de Brink, R H; Broekema, P C; Brouw, W N; Brüggen, M; de Bruyn, A G; Butcher, H R; Ciardi, B; Conway, J; Dettmar, R -J; van Duin, A; van Enst, J; Garrett, M; Gerbers, M; Grit, T; Gunst, A; van Haarlem, M P; Hamaker, J P; Heald, G; Hoeft, M; Holties, H; Horneffer, A; Koopmans, L V E; Kuper, G; Loose, M; Maat, P; McKay-Bukowski, D; McKean, J P; Miley, G; Morganti, R; Nijboer, R; Noordam, J E; Norden, M; Olofsson, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Polatidis, A; Reich, W; Röttgering, H; Schoenmakers, A; Sluman, J; Smirnov, O; Steinmetz, M; Sterks, C G M; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; Vermeulen, R; Vermaas, N; Vogt, C; de Vos, M; Wijnholds, S J; Yatawatta, S; Zensus, A

    2011-01-01

    Low frequency radio waves, while challenging to observe, are a rich source of information about pulsars. The LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) is a new radio interferometer operating in the lowest 4 octaves of the ionospheric "radio window": 10-240MHz, that will greatly facilitate observing pulsars at low radio frequencies. Through the huge collecting area, long baselines, and flexible digital hardware, it is expected that LOFAR will revolutionize radio astronomy at the lowest frequencies visible from Earth. LOFAR is a next-generation radio telescope and a pathfinder to the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), in that it incorporates advanced multi-beaming techniques between thousands of individual elements. We discuss the motivation for low-frequency pulsar observations in general and the potential of LOFAR in addressing these science goals. We present LOFAR as it is designed to perform high-time-resolution observations of pulsars and other fast transients, and outline the various relevant observing modes and data reduct...

  6. Pulsars in FIRST Observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    We identify 16 pulsars from the Survey of Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm (FIRST) at 1.4 GHz. Their positions and total flux densities are extracted from the FIRST catalog. By comparing the source positions with those in the PSR catalog, we obtain better determined positions of PSR J1022+1001,J1518+4904, J1652+2651, and proper motion upper limits of PSR J0751+1807,J1012+5307, and J1640+2224. The proper motions of the other ten pulsars are consistent with the catalog values.

  7. The nature of the X-ray pulsar in M 31: An intermediate-mass X-ray binary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karino, Shigeyuki

    2016-09-01

    The first finding of the spin period of an accreting neutron star in M 31 was recently reported. The observed spin period is 1.2 s, and it shows 1.27 d modulations due to orbital motion. From the orbital information, the mass donor could not be a giant massive star. On the other hand, its observed properties are very odd as those of typical low-mass X-ray binaries. In this study, we compare the observed binary parameters with theoretical models given by a stellar evolution track, and give a restriction on the possible mass range of the donor. According to the standard stellar evolution model, the donor star should be larger than 1.5 M⊙, which suggests that this system is a new member of a rare category, an intermediate-mass X-ray binary. The magnetic field strength of the neutron star suggested by the spin-up/down tendency in this system supports the possibility of an intermediate-mass donor.

  8. The evolutionary status of the white dwarf companion of the binary pulsar PSR J1713+0747

    CERN Document Server

    Benvenuto, O G; De Vito, M A

    2006-01-01

    Splaver and coworkers have measured the masses of the white dwarf and the neutron star components of the PSR J1713+0747 binary system pair by Shapiro Delay. We attempt to find the original configuration of this system performing a set of binary evolution calculations to simultaneously account for the masses of both stars and the orbital period. We considered initial masses of 1.5 and 1.4 \\msun for the normal (donor) and the neutron star, respectively. We assumed two metallicity values (Z = 0.010 and 0.020), and an initial orbital period near 3 days. We assume that the neutron star is only able to retain \\lesssim 0.10 of the matter transferred by the donor star. Calculations were performed employing our binary hydro code that handles the mass transfer rate in a fully implicit way together with state-of-the-art physical ingredients, diffusion and a non-grey atmospheres. We compare the structure of the resulting white dwarfs with the characteristic age of PSR J1713+0747 finding a nice agreement with observations...

  9. The nature of the X-ray pulsar in M31: an intermediate mass X-ray binary?

    CERN Document Server

    Karino, Shigeyuki

    2016-01-01

    Recently the first finding of a spin period of an accreting neutron star in M31 is reported. The observed spin period is 1.2 s and it shows 1.27 d modulations due to orbital motion. From the orbital information, the mass donor could not be a giant massive star. On the other hand, the observed properties are quite odd for typical low mass X-ray binaries. In this study, we compare observed binary parameters with theoretical models given by a stellar evolution track and make a restriction on the possible mass range of the donor. According to the standard stellar evolution model, the donor star should be larger than 1.5 solar mass, and this suggests that this system is a new member of a rare category, intermediate mass X-ray binary. The magnetic field strength of the neutron star suggested by spin-up/down tendency in this system supports the possibility of intermediate mass donor.

  10. High-precision timing of 42 millisecond pulsars with the European Pulsar Timing Array

    CERN Document Server

    Desvignes, G; Lentati, L; Verbiest, J P W; Champion, D J; Stappers, B W; Janssen, G H; Lazarus, P; Osłowski, S; Babak, S; Bassa, C G; Brem, P; Burgay, M; Cognard, I; Gair, J R; Graikou, E; Guillemot, L; Hessels, J W T; Jessner, A; Jordan, C; Karuppusamy, R; Kramer, M; Lassus, A; Lazaridis, K; Lee, K J; Liu, K; Lyne, A G; McKee, J; Mingarelli, C M F; Perrodin, D; Petiteau, A; Possenti, A; Purver, M B; Rosado, P A; Sanidas, S; Sesana, A; Shaifullah, G; Smits, R; Taylor, S R; Theureau, G; Tiburzi, C; van Haasteren, R; Vecchio, A

    2016-01-01

    We report on the high-precision timing of 42 radio millisecond pulsars (MSPs) observed by the European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA). This EPTA Data Release 1.0 extends up to mid-2014 and baselines range from 7-18 years. It forms the basis for the stochastic gravitational-wave background, anisotropic background, and continuous-wave limits recently presented by the EPTA elsewhere. The Bayesian timing analysis performed with TempoNest yields the detection of several new parameters: seven parallaxes, nine proper motions and, in the case of six binary pulsars, an apparent change of the semi-major axis. We find the NE2001 Galactic electron density model to be a better match to our parallax distances (after correction from the Lutz-Kelker bias) than the M2 and M3 models by Schnitzeler (2012). However, we measure an average uncertainty of 80\\% (fractional) for NE2001, three times larger than what is typically assumed in the literature. We revisit the transverse velocity distribution for a set of 19 isolated and 57 bina...

  11. The Galactic centre pulsar population

    CERN Document Server

    Chennamangalam, Jayanth

    2013-01-01

    The recent discovery of a magnetar in the Galactic centre region has allowed Spitler et al. to characterize the interstellar scattering in that direction. They find that the temporal broadening of the pulse profile of the magnetar is substantially less than that predicted by models of the electron density of that region. This raises the question of what the plausible limits for the number of potentially observable pulsars - i.e., the number of pulsars beaming towards the Earth - in the Galactic centre region are. In this paper, using realistic assumptions, we show that the potentially observable population of pulsars in the inner parsec has a conservative upper limit of $\\sim$950, and that it is premature to conclude that the number of pulsars in this region is small. We also show that the observational results so far are consistent with this number and make predictions for future radio pulsar surveys of the Galactic centre.

  12. Tempo: Pulsar timing data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchester, R.; Taylor, J.; Peters, W.; Weisberg, J.; Irwin, A.; Wex, N.; Stairs, I.; Demorest, P.; Nice, D.

    2015-09-01

    Tempo analyzes pulsar timing data. Pulse times of arrival (TOAs), pulsar model parameters, and coded instructions are read from one or more input files. The TOAs are fitted by a pulse timing model incorporating transformation to the solar-system barycenter, pulsar rotation and spin-down and, where necessary, one of several binary models. Program output includes parameter values and uncertainties, residual pulse arrival times, chi-squared statistics, and the covariance matrix of the model. In prediction mode, ephemerides of pulse phase behavior (in the form of polynomial expansions) are calculated from input timing models. Tempo is the basis for the Tempo2 (ascl:1210.015) code.

  13. Pulsar Magnetospheres and Pulsar Winds

    CERN Document Server

    Beskin, Vasily S

    2016-01-01

    Surprisingly, the chronology of nearly 50 years of the pulsar magnetosphere and pulsar wind research is quite similar to the history of our civilization. Using this analogy, I have tried to outline the main results obtained in this field. In addition to my talk, the possibility of particle acceleration due to different processes in the pulsar magnetosphere is discussed in more detail.

  14. Discovery of SXP265, a Be/X-ray binary pulsar in the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Sturm, R; Vasilopoulos, G; Bartlett, E S; Maggi, P; Rau, A; Greiner, J; Udalski, A

    2014-01-01

    We identify a new candidate for a Be/X-ray binary in the XMM-Newton slew survey and archival Swift observations that is located in the transition region of the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud and the Magellanic Bridge. We investigated and classified this source with follow-up XMM-Newton and optical observations. We model the X-ray spectra and search for periodicities and variability in the X-ray observations and the OGLE I-band light curve. The optical counterpart has been classified spectroscopically, with data obtained at the SAAO 1.9 m telescope, and photometrically, with data obtained using GROND at the MPG 2.2 m telescope. The X-ray spectrum is typical of a high-mass X-ray binary with an accreting neutron star. We detect X-ray pulsations, which reveal a neutron-star spin period of P = (264.516+-0.014) s. The source likely shows a persistent X-ray luminosity of a few 10^35 erg/s and in addition type-I outbursts that indicate an orbital period of ~146 d. A periodicity of 0.867 d, found in the optical li...

  15. PSR J1024-0719: A Millisecond Pulsar in an Unusual Long-Period Orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, D L; Nice, D J; Irrgang, A; Heber, U; Arzoumanian, Z; Beklen, E; Crowter, K; DeCesar, M E; Demorest, P B; Dolch, T; Lynch, R S; McLaughlin, M A; Miller, A A; Ng, C; Pennucci, T T; Ellis, J A; Ferdman, R D; Ferrara, E C; Fonseca, E; Gentile, P A; Jones, G; Jones, M L; Kreuzer, S; Lam, M T; Levin, L; Lorimer, D R; Prince, T A; Ransom, S M; Ray, P S; Spiewak, R; Stairs, I H; Stovall, K; Swiggum, J; Zhu, W

    2016-01-01

    PSR J1024$-$0719 is a millisecond pulsar that was long thought to be isolated. However, puzzling results concerning its velocity, distance, and low rotational period derivative have led to reexamination of its properties. We present updated radio timing observations along with new and archival optical data that show PSR J1024$-$0719 is most likely in a long period (2$-$20 kyr) binary system with a low-mass ($\\approx 0.4\\,M_\\odot$) low-metallicity ($Z \\approx -0.9\\,$ dex) main sequence star. Such a system can explain most of the anomalous properties of this pulsar. We suggest that this system formed through a dynamical exchange in a globular cluster that ejected it into a halo orbit, consistent with the low observed metallicity for the stellar companion. Further astrometric and radio timing observations such as measurement of the third period derivative could strongly constrain the range of orbital parameters.

  16. Strong-field tests of gravity using pulsars and black holes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Kramer; D.C. Backer; J.M. Cordes; T.J.W. Lazio; B.W. Stappers; S. Johnston

    2004-01-01

    The sensitivity of the SKA enables a number of tests of theories of gravity. A Galactic Census of pulsars will discover most of the active pulsars in the Galaxy beamed toward us. In this census will almost certainly be pulsar black hole binaries as well as pulsars orbiting the super-massive black ho

  17. The Quiescent X-Ray Properties of the Accreting Millisecond X-Ray Pulsar and Eclipsing binary Swift J1749.4-2807

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenaar, N.; Patruno, A.; Wijnands, R.

    2012-09-01

    Swift J1749.4-2807 is a transient neutron star low-mass X-ray binary that contains an accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar spinning at 518 Hz. It is the first of its kind that displays X-ray eclipses, which holds significant promise to precisely constrain the mass of the neutron star. We report on a ~= 105 ks long XMM-Newton observation performed when Swift J1749.4-2807 was in quiescence. We detect the source at a 0.5-10 keV luminosity of sime1 × 1033(D/6.7 kpc)2 erg s-1. The X-ray light curve displays three eclipses that are consistent in orbital phase and duration with the ephemeris derived during outburst. Unlike most quiescent neutron stars, the X-ray spectrum can be adequately described with a simple power law, while a pure-hydrogen atmosphere model does not fit the data. We place an upper limit on the 0.01-100 keV thermal luminosity of the cooling neutron star of <~ 2 × 1033 erg s-1 and constrain its temperature to be <~ 0.1 keV (for an observer at infinity). Timing analysis does not reveal evidence for X-ray pulsations near the known spin frequency of the neutron star or its first overtone with a fractional rms of <~ 34% and <~ 28%, respectively. We discuss the implications of our findings for dynamical mass measurements, the thermal state of the neutron star, and the origin of the quiescent X-ray emission.

  18. Testing Gravity with Pulsars in the SKA Era

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, Lijing; Antoniadis, John; Deller, Adam T; Freire, Paulo C C; Hessels, Jason W T; Janssen, Gemma H; Kramer, Michael; Kunz, Jutta; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Perlick, Volker; Possenti, Andrea; Ransom, Scott; Stappers, Benjamin W; van Straten, Willem

    2015-01-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will use pulsars to enable precise measurements of strong gravity effects in pulsar systems, which yield tests of gravitational theories that cannot be carried out anywhere else. The Galactic census of pulsars will discover dozens of relativistic pulsar systems, possibly including pulsar -- black hole binaries which can be used to test the "cosmic censorship conjecture" and the "no-hair theorem". Also, the SKA's remarkable sensitivity will vastly improve the timing precision of millisecond pulsars, allowing probes of potential deviations from general relativity (GR). Aspects of gravitation to be explored include tests of strong equivalence principles, gravitational dipole radiation, extra field components of gravitation, gravitomagnetism, and spacetime symmetries.

  19. Formation of a partially-screened inner acceleration region in radio pulsars: drifting subpulses and thermal X-ray emission from polar cap surface

    CERN Document Server

    Gil, J; Zhang, B; Gil, Janusz; Melikidze, George; Zhang, Bing

    2006-01-01

    Formation of a partially-screened inner acceleration region in 102 pulsars with drifting subpulses is considered. This is motivated by that spark discharges leading to drifting subpulses cannot be produced in a steady polar cap flow and thus the inner accelerator should be intermittent in nature, that the traditional pure vacuum gap model predicts too fast a sub-pulse drifting rate, and that recent X-ray observations as well as the radio drifting data are both consistent with the inner gap being partially screened. By means of the condition $T_{\\rm c}/T_{\\rm s}>1$ (where $T_{\\rm c}$ is the critical temperature above which the surface delivers a thermal flow to adequately supply the corotation charge density, and $T_{\\rm s}$ is the actual surface temperature), it is found that a partially-screened acceleration region can be formed given that the near surface magnetic fields are very strong and curved. We consider both curvature radiation (CR) and resonant inverse Compton scattering (ICS) to produce seed photon...

  20. SDSS J0159+0105: A Radio-Quiet Quasar with a Centi-Parsec Supermassive Black Hole Binary Candidate

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Zhen-Ya; Shen, Yue; Jiang, Linhua; Wang, Jun-Xian; Chen, Xian; Cuadra, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    We report a candidate centi-parsec supermassive black hole binary (SMBHB) in the radio-quiet quasar SDSS J0159+0105 at z=0.217. The 8.1-year Catalina V-band light curve for this quasar reveals two significant (at P>99%) periodic signals at ~741 day and ~1500 day. The period ratio, which is close to 1:2, is typical of a black-hole binary system with a mass ratio of 0.05binary. SDSS J0159+0105 also has two SDSS spectroscopic observations separated by ~10 years. There is a significant change in the broad H-beta profile between the two epochs, which can be explained by a single broad-line region (BLR) around the binary system illuminated by the aforementioned mini-disks, or a stream of gas flowing from the c...