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Sample records for binary pulsar psr

  1. Timing the Relativistic Binary Pulsar PSR B1913+16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuping; Weisberg, Joel M.

    2016-06-01

    We present results of three decades of timing data from the relativistic binary pulsar PSR B1913+16. With kinematic corrections, the measured rate of orbital decay due to gravitational wave radiation exhibits 99.69+/-0.17% agreement with the prediction of general relativity. For the first time in this system, the Shapiro delay parameters have been determined, therefore constituting two additional tests of gravity theories. We have also measured the relativistic deformation parameter of the orbit, and marginally the derivative of the semimajor axis, both of which are biased by the presence of aberration delay. We will discuss the possibility of constraining the moment of inertia of the pulsar in this system through improved measurement of the orbital semimajor axis derivative, and the determination of the aberration delay parameters from future geodetic precession modelling.

  2. Properties and Evolution of the Redback Millisecond Pulsar Binary PSR J2129-0429

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellm, Eric C.; Kaplan, David L.; Breton, Rene P.; Phinney, E. Sterl; Bhalerao, Varun B.; Camilo, Fernando; Dahal, Sumit; Djorgovski, S. G.; Drake, Andrew J.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Laher, Russ R.; Levitan, David B.; Lewis, Fraser; Mahabal, Ashish A.; Ofek, Eran O.; Prince, Thomas A.; Ransom, Scott M.; Roberts, Mallory S. E.; Russell, David M.; Sesar, Branimir; Surace, Jason A.; Tang, Sumin

    2016-01-01

    PSR J2129-0429 is a “redback” eclipsing millisecond pulsar binary with an unusually long 15.2 hr orbit. It was discovered by the Green Bank Telescope in a targeted search of unidentified Fermi gamma-ray sources. The pulsar companion is optically bright (mean mR = 16.6 mag), allowing us to construct the longest baseline photometric data set available for such a system. We present 10 years of archival and new photometry of the companion from the Lincoln Near-Earth Asteroid Research Survey, the Catalina Real-time Transient Survey, the Palomar Transient Factory, the Palomar 60 inch, and the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope. Radial velocity spectroscopy using the Double-Beam Spectrograph on the Palomar 200 inch indicates that the pulsar is massive: 1.74 ± 0.18 {M}⊙ . The G-type pulsar companion has mass 0.44 ± 0.04 {M}⊙ , one of the heaviest known redback companions. It is currently 95 ± 1% Roche-lobe filling and only mildly irradiated by the pulsar. We identify a clear 13.1 mmag yr-1 secular decline in the mean magnitude of the companion as well as smaller-scale variations in the optical light curve shape. This behavior may indicate that the companion is cooling. Binary evolution calculations indicate that PSR J2129-0429 has an orbital period almost exactly at the bifurcation period between systems that converge into tighter orbits as black widows and redbacks and those that diverge into wider pulsar-white dwarf binaries. Its eventual fate may depend on whether it undergoes future episodes of mass transfer and increased irradiation.

  3. A PRECISE MASS MEASUREMENT OF THE INTERMEDIATE-MASS BINARY PULSAR PSR J1802 - 2124

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PSR J1802 - 2124 is a 12.6 ms pulsar in a 16.8 hr binary orbit with a relatively massive white dwarf (WD) companion. These properties make it a member of the intermediate-mass class of binary pulsar (IMBP) systems. We have been timing this pulsar since its discovery in 2002. Concentrated observations at the Green Bank Telescope, augmented with data from the Parkes and Nancay observatories, have allowed us to determine the general relativistic Shapiro delay. This has yielded pulsar and WD mass measurements of 1.24 ± 0.11 Msun and 0.78 ± 0.04 Msun (68% confidence), respectively. The low mass of the pulsar, the high mass of the WD companion, the short orbital period, and the pulsar spin period may be explained by the system having gone through a common-envelope phase in its evolution. We argue that selection effects may contribute to the relatively small number of known IMBPs.

  4. PSR J1723-2837: An Eclipsing Binary Radio Millisecond Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Crawford, F; Stairs, I H; Kaplan, D L; McLaughlin, M A; Freire, P C C; Burgay, M; Camilo, F; D'Amico, N; Faulkner, A; Kramer, M; Lorimer, D R; Manchester, R N; Possenti, A; Steeghs, D

    2013-01-01

    We present a study of PSR J1723-2837, an eclipsing, 1.86 ms millisecond binary radio pulsar discovered in the Parkes Multibeam survey. Radio timing indicates that the pulsar has a circular orbit with a 15 hr orbital period, a low-mass companion, and a measurable orbital period derivative. The eclipse fraction of ~15% during the pulsar's orbit is twice the Roche lobe size inferred for the companion. The timing behavior is significantly affected by unmodeled systematics of astrophysical origin, and higher-order orbital period derivatives are needed in the timing solution to account for these variations. We have identified the pulsar's (non-degenerate) companion using archival ultraviolet, optical, and infrared survey data and new optical photometry. Doppler shifts from optical spectroscopy confirm the star's association with the pulsar and indicate a pulsar-to-companion mass ratio of 3.3 +/- 0.5, corresponding to a companion mass range of 0.4 to 0.7 Msun and an orbital inclination angle range of between 30 and ...

  5. On the nature of the binary radio pulsar PSR B0042-73 in the small magellanic cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipunov, V. M.; Postnov, K. A.; Prokhorov, M. E.

    1995-01-01

    The modern scenario of evolution of massive binary systems predicts the existence of a subclass of binary radio pulsars (PSRs) with black holes (BHs). Their Galactic number was evaluated as approximately 1 per 1000 single pulsars (Lipunov et al. 1994b). Distinctive properties of such binaries would be (1) mass of the unseen companion M(sub c) greater than 3-4 solar mass and (2) absence of eclipses of the pulsar radiation with no distinctive variance of the dispersion measure along the pulsar orbit. The pulsars themselves must be similar to standard isolated ones. The recently discovered binary 1 s pulsar PSR B0042-73 = PSR J0045-7319 in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) with a massive companion in a highly elongated (eccentricity e =0.8) 51 day orbit (Kaspi et al. 1994) may be the first such pulsar with a BH. The paradoxical fact that the first pulsar discovered in the SMC proved to be in a binary system can be naturally understood if its companion actually is a 10-30 solar mass black hole. We illustrate this fact by the numerical calculation of evolution of radio pulsars after a star formation burst.

  6. The Unusual Binary Pulsar PSR J1744-3922: Radio Flux Variability, Near-Infrared Observation, and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, R. P.; Roberts, M. S. E.; Ransom, S. M.; Kaspi, V. M.; Durant, M.; Bergeron, P.; Faulkner, A. J.

    2007-06-01

    PSR J1744-3922 is a binary pulsar exhibiting highly variable pulsed radio emission. We report on a statistical multifrequency study of the pulsed radio flux variability which suggests that this phenomenon is extrinsic to the pulsar and possibly tied to the companion, although not strongly correlated with orbital phase. The pulsar has an unusual combination of characteristics compared to typical recycled pulsars: a long spin period (172 ms); a relatively high magnetic field strength (1.7×1010 G); a very circular, compact orbit of 4.6 hr; and a low-mass companion (0.08 Msolar). These spin and orbital properties are likely inconsistent with standard evolutionary models. We find similarities between the properties of the PSR J1744-3922 system and those of several other known binary pulsar systems, motivating the identification of a new class of binary pulsars. We suggest that this new class could result from: a standard accretion scenario of a magnetar or a high magnetic field pulsar; common envelope evolution with a low-mass star and a neutron star, similar to what is expected for ultracompact X-ray binaries; or accretion induced collapse of a white dwarf. We also report the detection of a possible K'=19.30(15) infrared counterpart at the position of the pulsar, which is relatively bright if the companion is a helium white dwarf at the nominal distance, and discuss its implications for the pulsar's companion and evolutionary history.

  7. Properties and Evolution of the Redback Millisecond Pulsar Binary PSR J2129-0429

    CERN Document Server

    Bellm, Eric C; Breton, Rene P; Phinney, E Sterl; Bhalerao, Varun B; Camilo, Fernando; Dahal, Sumit; Djorgovski, S G; Drake, Andrew J; Hessels, J W T; Laher, Russ R; Levitan, David B; Lewis, Fraser; Mahabal, Ashish A; Ofek, Eran O; Prince, Thomas A; Ransom, Scott M; Roberts, Mallory S E; Russell, David M; Sesar, Branimir; Surace, Jason A; Tang, Sumin

    2015-01-01

    PSR J2129-0429 is a "redback" eclipsing millisecond pulsar binary with an unusually long 15.2 hour orbit. It was discovered by the Green Bank Telescope in a targeted search of unidentified Fermi gamma-ray sources. The pulsar companion is optically bright (mean $m_R = 16.6$ mag), allowing us to construct the longest baseline photometric dataset available for such a system. We present ten years of archival and new photometry of the companion from LINEAR, CRTS, PTF, the Palomar 60-inch, and LCOGT. Radial velocity spectroscopy using the Double-Beam Spectrograph on the Palomar 200-inch indicates that the pulsar is massive: $1.74\\pm0.18 M_\\odot$. The G-type pulsar companion has mass $0.44\\pm0.04 M_\\odot$, one of the heaviest known redback companions. It is currently 95\\% Roche-lobe filling and only mildly irradiated by the pulsar. We identify a clear 13.1 mmag yr$^{-1}$ secular decline in the mean magnitude of the companion as well as smaller-scale variations in the optical lightcurve shape. This behavior may indic...

  8. The Unusual Binary Pulsar PSR J1744-3922: Radio Flux Variability, Near-infrared Observation and Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Breton, R P; Ransom, S M; Kaspi, V M; Durant, M; Bergeron, P; Faulkner, A J

    2007-01-01

    PSR J1744-3922 is a binary pulsar exhibiting highly variable pulsed radio emission. We report on a statistical multi-frequency study of the pulsed radio flux variability which suggests that this phenomenon is extrinsic to the pulsar and possibly tied to the companion, although not strongly correlated with orbital phase. The pulsar has an unusual combination of characteristics compared to typical recycled pulsars: a long spin period (172 ms); a relatively high magnetic field strength (1.7x10^10 G); a very circular, compact orbit of 4.6 hours; and a low-mass companion (0.08 Msun). These spin and orbital properties are likely inconsistent with standard evolutionary models. We find similarities between the properties of the PSR J1744-3922 system and those of several other known binary pulsar systems, motivating the identification of a new class of binary pulsars. We suggest that this new class could result from either: a standard accretion scenario of a magnetar or a high-magnetic field pulsar; common envelope ev...

  9. LMXB AND IMXB EVOLUTION: I. THE BINARY RADIO PULSAR PSR J1614-2230

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have computed an extensive grid of binary evolution tracks to represent low- and intermediate-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs and IMXBs). The grid includes 42,000 models which cover 60 initial donor masses over the range of 1-4 Msun and, for each of these, 700 initial orbital periods over the range of 10-250 hr. These results can be applied to understanding LMXBs and IMXBs: those that evolve analogously to cataclysmic variables, that form ultracompact binaries with Porb in the range of 6-50 minutes, and that lead to wide orbits with giant donors. We also investigate the relic binary recycled radio pulsars into which these systems evolve. To evolve the donor stars in this study, we utilized a newly developed stellar evolution code called 'MESA' that was designed, among other things, to be able to handle very low mass and degenerate donors. This first application of the results is aimed at an understanding of the newly discovered pulsar PSR J1614-2230 which has a 1.97 Msun neutron star, Porb = 8.7 days, and a companion star of 0.5 Msun. We show that (1) this system is a cousin to the LMXB Cyg X-2; (2) for neutron stars of canonical birth mass 1.4 Msun, the initial donor stars which produce the closest relatives to PSR J1614-2230 have a mass between 3.4 and 3.8 Msun; (3) neutron stars as massive as 1.97 Msun are not easy to produce in spite of the initially high mass of the donor star, unless they were already born as relatively massive neutron stars; (4) to successfully produce a system like PSR J1614-2230 requires a minimum initial neutron-star mass of at least 1.6 ± 0.1 Msun, as well as initial donor masses and Porb of ∼4.25 ± 0.10 Msun and ∼49 ± 2 hr, respectively; and (5) the current companion star is largely composed of CO, but should have a surface H abundance of ∼10%-15%.

  10. Relativistic Measurements from Timing the Binary Pulsar PSR B1913+16

    CERN Document Server

    Weisberg, Joel M

    2016-01-01

    We present relativistic analyses of 9257 measurements of times-of-arrival from the first binary pulsar, PSR B1913+16, acquired over the last thirty-five years. The determination of the 'Keplerian' orbital elements plus two relativistic terms completely characterizes the binary system, aside from an unknown rotation about the line of sight; leading to a determination of the masses of the pulsar and its companion: 1.438 $\\pm$ 0.001 solar masses and 1.390 $\\pm$ 0.001 solar masses, respectively. In addition, the complete system characterization allows the creation of tests of relativistic gravitation by comparing measured and predicted sizes of various relativistic phenomena. We find that the ratio of observed orbital period decrease due to gravitational wave damping (corrected by a kinematic term) to the general relativistic prediction, is 0.9983 pm 0.0016; thereby confirming the existence and strength of gravitational radiation as predicted by general relativity. For the first time in this system, we have also ...

  11. The binary millisecond pulsar PSR J1023+0038 during its accretion state - I. Optical variability

    CERN Document Server

    Shahbaz, T; Nevado, S P; Rodríguez-Gil, P; Casares, J; Dhillon, V S; Marsh, T R; Littlefair, S; Leckngam, A; Poshyachinda, S

    2015-01-01

    We present time-resolved optical photometry of the binary millisecond `redback' pulsar PSR J1023+0038 (=AY Sex) during its low-mass X-ray binary phase. The light curves taken between 2014 January and April show an underlying sinusoidal modulation due to the irradiated secondary star and accretion disc. We also observe superimposed rapid flaring on time-scales as short as ~20 s with amplitudes of ~0.1-0.5 mag and additional large flare events on time-scales of ~5-60 min with amplitudes ~0.5-1.0 mag. The power density spectrum of the optical flare light curves is dominated by a red-noise component, typical of aperiodic activity in X-ray binaries. Simultaneous X-ray and UV observations by the Swift satellite reveal strong correlations that are consistent with X-ray reprocessing of the UV light, most likely in the outer regions of the accretion disc. On some nights we also observe sharp-edged, rectangular, flat-bottomed dips randomly distributed in orbital phase, with a median duration of ~250 s and a median ingr...

  12. Optical Observations of the Binary Pulsar System PSR B1718-19 Implications for Tidal Circularization

    CERN Document Server

    Van Kerkwijk, M H; Klemola, A R; Kulkarni, S R; Lyne, A G; Van Buren, D T

    2000-01-01

    We report on Keck and Hubble Space Telescope optical observations of the eclipsing binary pulsar system PSR B1718-19, in the direction of the globular cluster NGC 6342. These reveal a faint star ($m_{\\rm F702W}=25.21\\pm0.07$; Vega system) within the pulsar's 0\\farcs5 radius positional error circle. This may be the companion. If it is a main-sequence star in the cluster, it has radius by accretion or newly formed) and its companion are initially in an eccentric orbit. If so, for tidal circularization to have produced the present-day highly circular orbit, a large stellar radius is required, i.e., the star must be bloated. Using constraints on the radius and temperature from the Roche and Hayashi limits, we infer from our observations that $\\rcomp\\simlt0.44 \\rsun$ and $\\teff\\simgt3300 $K. Even for the largest radii, the required efficiency of tidal dissipation is larger than expected for some prescriptions.

  13. NuSTAR Observations of the State Transition of Millisecond Pulsar Binary PSR J1023+0038

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; Yang, Chengwei; An, Hongjun;

    2014-01-01

    We report NuSTAR observations of the millisecond pulsar-low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) transition system PSR J1023+0038 from 2013 June and October, before and after the formation of an accretion disk around the neutron star. Between June 10 and 12, a few days to two weeks before the radio disappear...... state changes in the similar transition systems PSR J1824-2452I and XSS J1227.0-4859 and discuss possible interpretations based on the transitions in the inner disk....

  14. Binary and Millisecond Pulsars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorimer Duncan R.

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We review the main properties, demographics and applications of binary and millisecond radio pulsars. Our knowledge of these exciting objects has greatly increased in recent years, mainly due to successful surveys which have brought the known pulsar population to over 1800. There are now 83 binary and millisecond pulsars associated with the disk of our Galaxy, and a further 140 pulsars in 26 of the Galactic globular clusters. Recent highlights include the discovery of the young relativistic binary system PSR J1906+0746, a rejuvination in globular cluster pulsar research including growing numbers of pulsars with masses in excess of 1.5M_⊙, a precise measurement of relativistic spin precession in the double pulsar system and a Galactic millisecond pulsar in an eccentric (e = 0.44 orbit around an unevolved companion.

  15. Binary and Millisecond Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Lorimer, D R

    2008-01-01

    We review the main properties, demographics and applications of binary and millisecond radio pulsars. Our knowledge of these exciting objects has greatly increased in recent years, mainly due to successful surveys which have brought the known pulsar population to over 1800. There are now 83 binary and millisecond pulsars associated with the disk of our Galaxy, and a further 140 pulsars in 26 of the Galactic globular clusters. Recent highlights include the discovery of the young relativistic binary system PSR J1906+0746, a rejuvination in globular cluster pulsar research including growing numbers of pulsars with masses in excess of 1.5 solar masses, a precise measurement of relativistic spin precession in the double pulsar system and a Galactic millisecond pulsar in an eccentric (e=0.44) orbit around an unevolved companion.

  16. A Shapiro delay detection in the binary system hosting the millisecond pulsar PSR J1910-5959A

    CERN Document Server

    Corongiu, A; Possenti, A; Camilo, F; D'Amico, N; Lyne, A G; Manchester, R N; Sarkissian, J M; Bailes, M; Johnston, S; Kramer, M; van Straten, W

    2012-01-01

    PSR J1910-5959A is a binary pulsar with a helium white dwarf companion located about 6 arcmin from the center of the globular cluster NGC6752. Based on 12 years of observations at the Parkes radio telescope, the relativistic Shapiro delay has been detected in this system. We obtain a companion mass Mc = 0.180+/-0.018Msun (1sigma) implying that the pulsar mass lies in the range 1.1Msun <= Mp <= 1.5Msun. We compare our results with previous optical determinations of the companion mass, and examine prospects for using this new measurement for calibrating the mass-radius relation for helium white dwarfs and for investigating their evolution in a pulsar binary system. Finally we examine the set of binary systems hosting a millisecond pulsar and a low mass helium white dwarf for which the mass of both stars has been measured. We confirm that the correlation between the companion mass and the orbital period predicted by Tauris & Savonije reproduces the observed values but find that the predicted Mp - Pb co...

  17. NuSTAR Observations of the State Transition of Millisecond Pulsar Binary PSR J1023+0038

    CERN Document Server

    Tendulkar, Shriharsh P; An, Hongjun; Kaspi, Victoria M; Archibald, Anne M; Bassa, Cees; Bellm, Eric; Bogdanov, Slavko; Harrison, Fiona A; Hessels, Jason W T; Janssen, Gemma H; Lyne, Andrew G; Patruno, Alessandro; Stappers, Benjamin; Stern, Daniel; Tomsick, John A; Boggs, Steven E; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Christensen, Finn E; Craig, William W; Hailey, Charles A; Zhang, William

    2014-01-01

    We report NuSTAR observations of the millisecond pulsar - low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) transition system PSR J1023+0038 from June and October 2013, before and after the formation of an accretion disk around the neutron star. Between June 10-12, a few days to two weeks before the radio disappearance of the pulsar, the 3-79 keV X-ray spectrum was well fit by a simple power law with a photon index of Gamma=1.17 +/-0.08 (at 90% confidence) with a 3-79 keV luminosity of 7.4+/-0.4 x 10^32 erg/s. Significant orbital modulation was observed with a modulation fraction of 36+/-10%. During the October 19-21 observation, the spectrum is described by a softer power law (Gamma=1.66+/-0.06) with an average luminosity of 5.8+/-0.2 x 10^33 erg/s and a peak luminosity of ~1.2 x 10^34 erg/s observed during a flare. No significant orbital modulation was detected. The spectral observations are consistent with previous and current multi-wavelength observations and show the hard X-ray power law extending to 79 keV without a spectra...

  18. Relativistic Gravity and Binary Radio Pulsars

    OpenAIRE

    Kaspi, V. M.

    1999-01-01

    Following a summary of the basic principles of pulsar timing, we present a review of recent results from timing observations of relativistic binary pulsars. In particular, we summarize the status of timing observations of the much celebrated original binary pulsar PSR B1913+16, draw attention to the recent confirmation of strong evidence for geodetic precession in this system, review the recent measurement of multiple post-Keplerian binary parameters for PSR B1534+12, and describe the Parkes ...

  19. Eclipsing Binary Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Freire, P C C

    2004-01-01

    The first eclipsing binary pulsar, PSR B1957+20, was discovered in 1987. Since then, 13 other eclipsing low-mass binary pulsars have been found, 12 of these are in globular clusters. In this paper we list the known eclipsing binary pulsars and their properties, with special attention to the eclipsing systems in 47 Tuc. We find that there are two fundamentally different groups of eclipsing binary pulsars; separated by their companion masses. The less massive systems (M_c ~ 0.02 M_sun) are a product of predictable stellar evolution in binary pulsars. The systems with more massive companions (M_c ~ 0.2 M_sun) were formed by exchange encounters in globular clusters, and for that reason are exclusive to those environments. This class of systems can be used to learn about the neutron star recycling fraction in the globular clusters actively forming pulsars. We suggest that most of these binary systems are undetectable at radio wavelengths.

  20. A search for the optical counterpart of the binary millisecond pulsar PSR 1855 + 09

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical observations are reported of the field of PSR1855 + 09, including accurate astrometry and deep CCD imaging. Contrary to an earlier report we do not detect an optical counterpart of PSR1855 + 09, and find a lower limit of mv = 25.4 to the apparent visual magnitude of the white dwarf companion star. White dwarf cooling calculations, and the fact that the neutron star was formed before the companion became a white dwarf, imply that the age of the neutron star is in excess of ∼ 1.9 x 109 yr, reinforcing the idea that old neutron stars must retain a magnetic field ∼ 109 G. (author)

  1. Relativistic Gravity and Binary Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Kaspi, V M

    1999-01-01

    Following a summary of the basic principles of pulsar timing, we present a review of recent results from timing observations of relativistic binary pulsars. In particular, we summarize the status of timing observations of the much celebrated original binary pulsar PSR B1913+16, draw attention to the recent confirmation of strong evidence for geodetic precession in this system, review the recent measurement of multiple post-Keplerian binary parameters for PSR B1534+12, and describe the Parkes Multibeam survey, a major survey of the Galactic Plane which promises to discover new relativistic binary pulsar systems.

  2. DISCOVERY OF PSR J1227−4853: A TRANSITION FROM A LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY TO A REDBACK MILLISECOND PULSAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    XSS J12270−4859 is an X-ray binary associated with the Fermi Large Area Telescope gamma-ray source 1FGL J1227.9−4852. In 2012 December, this source underwent a transition where the X-ray and optical luminosity dropped and the spectral signatures of an accretion disk disappeared. We report the discovery of a 1.69 millisecond pulsar (MSP), PSR J1227−4853, at a dispersion measure of 43.4 pc cm−3 associated with this source, using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) at 607 MHz. This demonstrates that, post-transition, the system hosts an active radio MSP. This is the third system after PSR J1023+0038 and PSR J1824−2452I showing evidence of state switching between radio MSP and low-mass X-ray binary states. We report timing observations of PSR J1227−4853 with the GMRT and Parkes, which give a precise determination of the rotational and orbital parameters of the system. The companion mass measurement of 0.17–0.46 M⊙ suggests that this is a redback system. PSR J1227−4853 is eclipsed for about 40% of its orbit at 607 MHz with additional short-duration eclipses at all orbital phases. We also find that the pulsar is very energetic, with a spin-down luminosity of ∼1035 erg s−1. We report simultaneous imaging and timing observations with the GMRT, which suggests that eclipses are caused by absorption rather than dispersion smearing or scattering

  3. DISCOVERY OF PSR J1227−4853: A TRANSITION FROM A LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY TO A REDBACK MILLISECOND PULSAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Jayanta; Bhattacharyya, Bhaswati; Stappers, Ben [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Ray, Paul S.; Wolff, Michael; Wood, Kent S. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Chengalur, Jayaram N. [National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Pune 411 007 (India); Deneva, Julia [NRC Research Associate, resident at Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Camilo, Fernando [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Johnson, Tyrel J. [College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030, USA, resident at Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Hessels, Jason W. T.; Bassa, Cees G. [ASTRON, the Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA, Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Keane, Evan F. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Mail H30, P.O. Box 218, VIC 3122 (Australia); Ferrara, Elizabeth C.; Harding, Alice K. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2015-02-10

    XSS J12270−4859 is an X-ray binary associated with the Fermi Large Area Telescope gamma-ray source 1FGL J1227.9−4852. In 2012 December, this source underwent a transition where the X-ray and optical luminosity dropped and the spectral signatures of an accretion disk disappeared. We report the discovery of a 1.69 millisecond pulsar (MSP), PSR J1227−4853, at a dispersion measure of 43.4 pc cm{sup −3} associated with this source, using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) at 607 MHz. This demonstrates that, post-transition, the system hosts an active radio MSP. This is the third system after PSR J1023+0038 and PSR J1824−2452I showing evidence of state switching between radio MSP and low-mass X-ray binary states. We report timing observations of PSR J1227−4853 with the GMRT and Parkes, which give a precise determination of the rotational and orbital parameters of the system. The companion mass measurement of 0.17–0.46 M{sub ⊙} suggests that this is a redback system. PSR J1227−4853 is eclipsed for about 40% of its orbit at 607 MHz with additional short-duration eclipses at all orbital phases. We also find that the pulsar is very energetic, with a spin-down luminosity of ∼10{sup 35} erg s{sup −1}. We report simultaneous imaging and timing observations with the GMRT, which suggests that eclipses are caused by absorption rather than dispersion smearing or scattering.

  4. Fermi Study of 5-300 GeV emission from the high-mass pulsar binary PSR B1259-63/LS 2883

    CERN Document Server

    Xing, Yi; Takata, Jumpei

    2016-01-01

    We report the results from our detailed analysis of the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data for the pulsar binary PSR B1259-63/LS 2883. During the GeV flares that occurred when the pulsar was in the periastron passages, we have detected a 5--300 GeV component at $\\simeq 5\\sigma$ in emission from the binary. The detection verifies the presence of the component that has been marginally found in the previous studies of the binary. Furthermore, we have discovered that this component was present even in the quiescent state of the binary, specifically the mean anomaly phase 0.7--0.9. The component can be described by a power law with photon index $\\Gamma\\sim 1.4$, and the flux in the flares is approximately one order of magnitude higher than that in quiescence. We discuss the origin of this component. It likely arises from the inverse-Compton process: high-energy particles from the shock, due to the interaction between the winds from the pulsar and massive companion, scatter the seed photons from the companion to...

  5. Eccentric Binary Millisecond Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Freire, Paulo C C

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we review the recent discovery of several millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in eccentric binary systems. Timing these MSPs we were able to estimate (and in one case precisely measure) their masses. These results suggest that, as a class, MSPs have a much wider range of masses (1.3 to > 2 solar masses) than the normal and mildly recycled pulsars found in double neutron star (DNS) systems (1.25 < Mp < 1.44 solar masses). This is very likely to be due to the prolonged accretion episode that is thought to be required to form a MSP. The likely existence of massive MSPs makes them a powerful probe for understanding the behavior of matter at densities larger than that of the atomic nucleus; in particular, the precise measurement of the mass of PSR J1903+0327 ($1.67 +/- 0.01 solar masses) excludes several "soft" equations of state for dense matter.

  6. The relativistic pulsar-white dwarf binary PSR J1738+0333 II. The most stringent test of scalar-tensor gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Freire, Paulo C C; Esposito-Farèse, Gilles; Verbiest, Joris P W; Bailes, Matthew; Jacoby, Bryan A; Kramer, Michael; Stairs, Ingrid H; Antoniadis, John; Janssen, Gemma H

    2012-01-01

    (abridged) We report the results of a 10-year timing campaign on PSR J1738+0333, a 5.85-ms pulsar in a low-eccentricity 8.5-hour orbit with a low-mass white dwarf companion (...) The measurements of proper motion and parallax allow for a precise subtraction of the kinematic contribution to the observed orbital decay; this results in a significant measurement of the intrinsic orbital decay: (-25.9 +/- 3.2) \\times 10^{-15} s/s. This is consistent with the orbital decay from the emission of gravitational waves predicted by general relativity, (-27.7 +1.5/-1.9) \\times 10^{-15} s/s (...). This agreement introduces a tight upper limit on dipolar gravitational wave emission, a prediction of most alternative theories of gravity for asymmetric binary systems such as this. We use this limit to derive the most stringent constraints ever on a wide class of gravity theories, where gravity involves a scalar field contribution. When considering general scalar-tensor theories of gravity, our new bounds are more stringent tha...

  7. Orbital decay of the PSR J0045-7319\\/B star binary system age of radio pulsar and initial spin of neutron star

    CERN Document Server

    Lai, D

    1996-01-01

    Recent timing observations of PSR J0045-7319 reveal that the neutron star/B star binary orbit is decaying on a time scale of |\\Porb/\\dot\\Porb|=0.5 Myr, shorter than the characteristic age (\\tau_c=3 Myr) of the pulsar (Kaspi et al.~1996a). We study mechanisms for the orbital decay. The standard weak friction theory based on static tide requires far too short a viscous time to explain the observed \\dot\\Porb. We show that dynamical tidal excitation of g-modes in the B star can be responsible for the orbital decay. However, to explain the observed short decay timescale, the B star must have some significant retrograde rotation with respect to the orbit --- The retrograde rotation brings lower-order g-modes, which couple much more strongly to the tidal potential, into closer ``resonances'' with the orbital motion, thus significantly enhancing the dynamical tide. A much less likely possibility is that the g-mode damping time is much shorter than the ordinary radiative damping time. The observed orbital decay timesc...

  8. An eccentric binary millisecond pulsar in the Galactic plane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.J. Champion; S.M. Ransom; P. Lazarus; F. Camilo; C. Bassa; V.M. Kaspi; D.J. Nice; P.C.C. Freire; I.H. Stairs; J. van Leeuwen; B.W. Stappers; J.M. Cordes; J.W.T. Hessels; D.R. Lorimer; Z. Arzoumanian; D.C. Backer; N.D.R. Bhat; S. Chatterjee; I. Cognard; J.S. Deneva; C.A. Faucher-Giguère; B.M. Gaensler; J. Han; F.A. Jenet; L. Kasian; V.I. Kondratiev; M. Kramer; J. Lazio; M.A. McLaughlin; A. Venkataraman; W. Vlemmings

    2008-01-01

    Binary pulsar systems are superb probes of stellar and binary evolution and the physics of extreme environments. In a survey with the Arecibo telescope, we have found PSR J1903+ 0327, a radio pulsar with a rotational period of 2.15 milliseconds in a highly eccentric ( e = 0.44) 95- day orbit around

  9. NuSTAR Observations of the State Transition of Millisecond Pulsar Binary PSR J1023+0038

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; Yang, Chengwei; An, Hongjun;

    2014-01-01

    . Consecutive dip separations are log-normal in distribution with a typical separation of approximately 400 s. These dips are distinct from dipping activity observed in LMXBs. We compare and contrast these dips to observations of dips and state changes in the similar transition systems PSR J1824-2452I and XSS J...

  10. Constraining Binary Stellar Evolution With Pulsar Timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdman, Robert D.; Stairs, I. H.; Backer, D. C.; Burgay, M.; Camilo, F.; D'Amico, N.; Demorest, P.; Faulkner, A.; Hobbs, G.; Kramer, M.; Lorimer, D. R.; Lyne, A. G.; Manchester, R.; McLaughlin, M.; Nice, D. J.; Possenti, A.

    2006-06-01

    The Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey has yielded a significant number of very interesting binary and millisecond pulsars. Two of these objects are part of an ongoing timing study at the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). PSR J1756-2251 is a double-neutron star (DNS) binary system. It is similar to the original Hulse-Taylor binary pulsar system PSR B1913+16 in its orbital properties, thus providing another important opportunity to test the validity of General Relativity, as well as the evolutionary history of DNS systems through mass measurements. PSR J1802-2124 is part of the relatively new and unstudied "intermediate-mass" class of binary system, which typically have spin periods in the tens of milliseconds, and/or relatively massive (> 0.7 solar masses) white dwarf companions. With our GBT observations, we have detected the Shapiro delay in this system, allowing us to constrain the individual masses of the neutron star and white dwarf companion, and thus the mass-transfer history, in this unusual system.

  11. Binary pulsar - a test for general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The binary system of PSR1913 + 16 contains the pulsar and an, as yet unknown, companion. If this star is a compact object too, then the data can be interpreted in terms of general relativistic effects. This leads to the conclusion that the decay of the orbit must be due to the emission of gravitational waves. The nature of the unseen companion is discussed in detail

  12. THE EINSTEIN-HOME SEARCH FOR RADIO PULSARS AND PSR J2007+2722 DISCOVERY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einstein-Home aggregates the computer power of hundreds of thousands of volunteers from 193 countries, to search for new neutron stars using data from electromagnetic and gravitational-wave detectors. This paper presents a detailed description of the search for new radio pulsars using Pulsar ALFA survey data from the Arecibo Observatory. The enormous computing power allows this search to cover a new region of parameter space; it can detect pulsars in binary systems with orbital periods as short as 11 minutes. We also describe the first Einstein-Home discovery, the 40.8 Hz isolated pulsar PSR J2007+2722, and provide a full timing model. PSR J2007+2722's pulse profile is remarkably wide with emission over almost the entire spin period. This neutron star is most likely a disrupted recycled pulsar, about as old as its characteristic spin-down age of 404 Myr. However, there is a small chance that it was born recently, with a low magnetic field. If so, upper limits on the X-ray flux suggest but cannot prove that PSR J2007+2722 is at least ∼100 kyr old. In the future, we expect that the massive computing power provided by volunteers should enable many additional radio pulsar discoveries

  13. THE EINSTEIN-HOME SEARCH FOR RADIO PULSARS AND PSR J2007+2722 DISCOVERY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, B.; Knispel, B.; Aulbert, C.; Bock, O.; Eggenstein, H. B.; Fehrmann, H.; Machenschalk, B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Cordes, J. M.; Brazier, A.; Chatterjee, S. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Deneva, J. S. [Arecibo Observatory, HC3 Box 53995, Arecibo, PR 00612 (United States); Hessels, J. W. T. [ASTRON, the Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA, Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Anderson, D. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Demorest, P. B. [NRAO (National Radio Astronomy Observatory), Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Gotthelf, E. V. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Hammer, D. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Kaspi, V. M. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A2T8 (Canada); Kramer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Lyne, A. G. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); McLaughlin, M. A., E-mail: bruce.allen@aei.mpg.de [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); and others

    2013-08-20

    Einstein-Home aggregates the computer power of hundreds of thousands of volunteers from 193 countries, to search for new neutron stars using data from electromagnetic and gravitational-wave detectors. This paper presents a detailed description of the search for new radio pulsars using Pulsar ALFA survey data from the Arecibo Observatory. The enormous computing power allows this search to cover a new region of parameter space; it can detect pulsars in binary systems with orbital periods as short as 11 minutes. We also describe the first Einstein-Home discovery, the 40.8 Hz isolated pulsar PSR J2007+2722, and provide a full timing model. PSR J2007+2722's pulse profile is remarkably wide with emission over almost the entire spin period. This neutron star is most likely a disrupted recycled pulsar, about as old as its characteristic spin-down age of 404 Myr. However, there is a small chance that it was born recently, with a low magnetic field. If so, upper limits on the X-ray flux suggest but cannot prove that PSR J2007+2722 is at least {approx}100 kyr old. In the future, we expect that the massive computing power provided by volunteers should enable many additional radio pulsar discoveries.

  14. Pulsar Binary Birthrates with Spin-Opening Angle Correlations

    CERN Document Server

    O'Shaughnessy, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Empirical birthrate estimates for pulsar binaries depend on the fraction of sky subtended by the pulsar beam: the pulsar beaming fraction. This fraction depends on both the pulsar's opening angle and the misalignment angle between its spin and magnetic axes. Previous estimates use the average value for only two pulsars, i.e. PSRs B1913+16 and B1534+12. We explore how birthrate predictions depend on assumptions about opening angle and alignment, using empirically-motivated distributions to define an effective beaming correction factor, f_{b,eff}. For most known pulsars, we expect f_{b,eff} to be less than 6. We also calculate f_{b,eff} for PSRs J0737-3039A and J1141-6545, applying the currently available constraints for their beam geometry. Our median posterior birthrate predictions for tight PSR-NS binaries, wide PSR-NS binaries, and tight PSR-WD binaries are 89/Myr, 0.84/Myr, and 34/Myr, respectively. For pulsars with spin period between 10 ms and 100 ms, we marginalized our posterior birthrate distribution ...

  15. Pulsar-Black Hole Binaries in the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Faucher-Giguere, C -A

    2010-01-01

    Binaries consisting of a pulsar and a black hole (BH) are a holy grail of astrophysics, both for their significance for stellar evolution and for their potential application as probes of strong gravity. In spite of extensive surveys of our Galaxy and its system of globular clusters, no pulsar-black hole (PSR-BH) binary has been found to date. Clues as to where such systems might exist are therefore highly desirable. We show that if the central parsec around Sgr A* harbors a cluster of ~25,000 stellar BHs (as predicted by mass segregation arguments) and if it is also rich in recycled pulsar binaries (by analogy with globular clusters), then 3-body exchange interactions should produce PSR-BHs in the Galactic center. Simple estimates of the formation rate and survival time of these binaries suggest that a few PSR-BHs should be present in the central parsec today. The proposed formation mechanism makes unique predictions for the PSR-BH properties: 1) the binary would reside within ~1 pc of Sgr A*; 2) the pulsar w...

  16. Formation of binary radio pulsars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of the standard scenario of the evolution of massive binary stars a study is made of the formation of final binary systems in which at least one of the components is a neutron star. It is found that about every fortieth radio pulsar must be a member of a close binary system. This is confirmed by observations. Radio pulsars are not formed in wide binary systems, possibly because of the very slow rotation of the presupernova stars

  17. Shining Light on Quantum Gravity with Pulsar-Black Hole Binaries

    OpenAIRE

    Estes, John; Kavic, Michael; Lippert, Matthew; Simonetti, John H.

    2016-01-01

    Pulsars are some of the most accurate clocks found in nature, while black holes offer a unique arena for the study of quantum gravity. As such, pulsar-black hole (PSR-BH) binaries provide ideal astrophysical systems for detecting effects of quantum gravity. With the success of aLIGO and the advent of instruments like the SKA and eLISA, the prospects for discovery of such PSR-BH binaries are very promising. We argue that PSR-BH binaries can serve as ready-made testing grounds for proposed reso...

  18. The Einstein@Home search for radio pulsars and PSR J2007+2722

    CERN Document Server

    Allen, B; Cordes, J M; Deneva, J S; Hessels, J W T; Anderson, D; Aulbert, C; Bock, O; Brazier, A; Chatterjee, S; Demorest, P B; Eggenstein, H B; Fehrmann, H; Gotthelf, E V; Hammer, D; Kaspi, V M; Kramer, M; Lyne, A G; Machenschalk, B; McLaughlin, M A; Messenger, C; Pletsch, H J; Ransom, S M; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; Bhat, N D R; Bogdanov, S; Camilo, F; Champion, D J; Crawford, F; Desvignes, G; Freire, P C C; Heald, G; Jenet, F A; Lazarus, P; Lee, K J; van Leeuwen, J; Lynch, R; Papa, M A; Prix, R; Rosen, R; Scholz, P; Siemens, X; Stovall, K; Venkataraman, A; Zhu, W

    2013-01-01

    Einstein@Home aggregates the computer power of hundreds of thousands of volunteers from 192 countries, to search for new neutron stars using data from electromagnetic and gravitational-wave detectors. This paper presents a detailed description of the search for new radio pulsars using PALFA survey data from the Arecibo Observatory. The enormous computing power allows this search to cover a new region of parameter space; it can detect pulsars in binary systems with orbital periods as short as 11 min. We also describe the first Einstein@Home discovery, the 40.8 Hz isolated pulsar PSR J2007+2722, and provide a full timing model. PSR J2007+2722's pulse profile is remarkably wide with emission over almost the entire spin period. This neutron star is most likely a disrupted recycled pulsar, about as old as its characteristic spin-down age of 404 Myr. However there is a small chance that it was born recently, with a low magnetic field. If so, upper limits on the X-ray flux suggest but can not prove that PSR J2007+27...

  19. PSR J1024-0719: A Millisecond Pulsar in an Unusual Long-Period Orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, D L; Nice, D J; Irrgang, A; Heber, U; Arzoumanian, Z; Beklen, E; Crowter, K; DeCesar, M E; Demorest, P B; Dolch, T; Lynch, R S; McLaughlin, M A; Miller, A A; Ng, C; Pennucci, T T; Ellis, J A; Ferdman, R D; Ferrara, E C; Fonseca, E; Gentile, P A; Jones, G; Jones, M L; Kreuzer, S; Lam, M T; Levin, L; Lorimer, D R; Prince, T A; Ransom, S M; Ray, P S; Spiewak, R; Stairs, I H; Stovall, K; Swiggum, J; Zhu, W

    2016-01-01

    PSR J1024$-$0719 is a millisecond pulsar that was long thought to be isolated. However, puzzling results concerning its velocity, distance, and low rotational period derivative have led to reexamination of its properties. We present updated radio timing observations along with new and archival optical data that show PSR J1024$-$0719 is most likely in a long period (2$-$20 kyr) binary system with a low-mass ($\\approx 0.4\\,M_\\odot$) low-metallicity ($Z \\approx -0.9\\,$ dex) main sequence star. Such a system can explain most of the anomalous properties of this pulsar. We suggest that this system formed through a dynamical exchange in a globular cluster that ejected it into a halo orbit, consistent with the low observed metallicity for the stellar companion. Further astrometric and radio timing observations such as measurement of the third period derivative could strongly constrain the range of orbital parameters.

  20. Probing Binary Evolution Using the Pulsar Fossil Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdman, Robert D.; Stairs, I. H.; Kramer, M.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Faulkner, A.; Backer, D. C.; Demorest, P.; Nice, D. J.; Burgay, M.; Camilo, F.; D'Amico, N.; Hobbs, G.; Lorimer, D. R.; Lyne, A. G.; Manchester, R.; Possenti, A.

    2006-12-01

    The Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey has yielded a significant number of very interesting binary and millisecond pulsars. Two of these objects are part of an ongoing timing study at the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). PSR J1756-2251 is a double-neutron star (DNS) binary system. Its orbital properties show it to be a similar system to PSR B1913+16, the original binary pulsar system discovered by Hulse and Taylor. Mass measurements of this system thus provide another important opportunity to test the validity of General Relativity, and to study the evolutionary history of DNS systems. PSR J1802-2124 is part of the relatively new and unstudied "intermediate-mass" class of binary pulsars. These typically spin with periods in the tens of milliseconds, and often have relatively massive (> 0.7 solar masses) white dwarf companions. GBT observations over the past two years have enabled us to detect the Shapiro delay in this system. This has led to the determination of the individual masses of the neutron star and white dwarf companion, providing constraints on the mass-transfer history in this unusual system.

  1. An Eccentric Binary Millisecond Pulsar in the Galactic Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, David J.; Ransom, Scott M.; Lazarus, Patrick; Camilo, Fernando; Bassa, Cess; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Nice, David J.; Freire, Paulo C. C.; Stairs, Ingrid H.; vanLeeuwen, Joeri; Stappers, Ben W.; Cordes, James M.; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Lorimer, Duncan R.; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Backer, Don C.; Bhat, N. D. Ramesh; Chatterjee, Shami; Cognard, Ismael; Deneva, Julia S.; Faucher-Giguere, Claude-Andre; Gaensler, Bryan M.; Han, JinLin; Jenet, Fredrick A.; Kasian, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Binary pulsar systems are superb probes of stellar and binary evolution and the physics of extreme environments. In a survey with the Arecibo telescope, we have found PSR J1903+0327, a radio pulsar with a rotational period of 2.15 milliseconds in a highly eccentric (e = 0.44) 95-day orbit around a solar mass (M.) companion. Infrared observations identify a possible main-sequence companion star. Conventional binary stellar evolution models predict neither large orbital eccentricities nor main-sequence companions around millisecond pulsars. Alternative formation scenarios involve recycling a neutron star in a globular cluster, then ejecting it into the Galactic disk, or membership in a hierarchical triple system. A relativistic analysis of timing observations of the pulsar finds its mass to be 1.74 +/- 0.04 Solar Mass, an unusually high value.

  2. Binary Millisecond Pulsar Discovery via Gamma-Ray Pulsations

    CERN Document Server

    Pletsch, H J; Fehrmann, H; Allen, B; Kramer, M; Aulbert, C; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; de Angelis, A; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Borgland, A W; Bottacini, E; Brandt, T J; Bregeon, J; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Celik, Ö; Charles, E; Chaves, R C G; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; D'Ammando, F; Dermer, C D; Digel, S W; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Favuzzi, C; Ferrara, E C; Franckowiak, A; Fukazawa, Y; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M -H; Grove, J E; Guiriec, S; Hadasch, D; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hartog, P R den; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Hill, A B; Hou, X; Hughes, R E; Johannesson, G; Jackson, M S; Jogler, T; Johnson, A S; Johnson, W N; Kataoka, J; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Massaro, F; Mayer, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Mehault, J; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Nemmen, R; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Orienti, M; Orlando, E; de Palma, F; Paneque, D; Perkins, J S; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T A; Raino, S; Rando, R; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Romani, R W; Romoli, C; Sanchez, D A; Parkinson, P M Saz; Schulz, A; Sgro, C; Silva, E do Couto e; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Suson, D J; Takahashi, H; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Tinivella, M; Troja, E; Usher, T L; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wood, M; Yang, Z; Zimmer, S; 10.1126/science.1229054

    2012-01-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs), old neutron stars spun-up by accreting matter from a companion star, can reach high rotation rates of hundreds of revolutions per second. Until now, all such "recycled" rotation-powered pulsars have been detected by their spin-modulated radio emission. In a computing-intensive blind search of gamma-ray data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (with partial constraints from optical data), we detected a 2.5-millisecond pulsar, PSR J1311-3430. This unambiguously explains a formerly unidentified gamma-ray source that had been a decade-long enigma, confirming previous conjectures. The pulsar is in a circular orbit with an orbital period of only 93 minutes, the shortest of any spin-powered pulsar binary ever found.

  3. Engulfing a radio pulsar: the case of PSR J1023+0038

    OpenAIRE

    Zelati, F. Coti; Baglio, M. C.; S. Campana; D'Avanzo, P.; Goldoni, P.; Masetti, N.; Muñoz-Darias, T.; Covino, S.; Fender, R. P.; Bailón, E. Jiménez; Otí-Floranes, H.; Palazzi, E.; F. G. Ramón-Fox

    2014-01-01

    The binary millisecond radio pulsar PSR J1023+0038 has been recently the subject of multiwavelength monitoring campaigns which revealed that an accretion disc has formed around the neutron star (since 2013 June). We present here the results of X-ray and UV observations carried out by the Swift satellite between 2013 October and 2014 May, and of optical and NIR observations performed with the REM telescope, the Liverpool Telescope, the 2.1-m telescope at the San Pedro M\\'artir Observatory and ...

  4. Microarcsecond VLBI pulsar astrometry with PSRPI I. Two binary millisecond pulsars with white dwarf companions

    CERN Document Server

    Deller, A T; Kaplan, D L; Goss, W M; Brisken, W F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Janssen, G H; Lazio, T J W; Petrov, L; Stappers, B W; Lyne, A

    2016-01-01

    Model-independent distance constraints to binary millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are of great value to both the timing observations of the radio pulsars, and multiwavelength observations of their companion stars. Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) astrometry can be employed to provide these model-independent distances with very high precision via the detection of annual geometric parallax. Using the Very Long Baseline Array, we have observed two binary millisecond pulsars, PSR J1022+1001 and J2145-0750, over a two-year period and measured their distances to be 700 +14 -10 pc and 613 +16 -14 pc respectively. We use the well-calibrated distance in conjunction with revised analysis of optical photometry to tightly constrain the nature of their massive (M ~ 0.85 Msun) white dwarf companions. Finally, we show that several measurements of their parallax and proper motion obtained by pulsar timing array projects are incorrect, and investigate possible causes for the discrepancy.

  5. Test of post-newtonian conservation laws in the binary system PSR 1913+16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Observations that set upper limits on secular changes in the pulsar period and orbital period in the binary system PSR 1913+16 may provide a test of post-Newtonian conservation laws. According to some metric theories of gravitation, the center of mass of a binary system may be accelerated in the direction of the periastron of the orbit because of a violation of post-Newtonian momentum conservation. In the binary system PSR 1913+16, this effect could produce secular changes in both pulsar and orbital periods (changing overall Doppler shift) as large as two parts in 106 per year. The size of the effect is proportional to the sine of the angle of periastron, to the difference in the masses of the components of the binary system, and to the combination of parametrized post-Newtonian parameters α3+zeta2 -zeta/subw/. This combination is zero in any theory that predicts conserved total momentum for isolated systems (including general relativity and Brans-Dicke theory). Although solar-system experiments constrain α3 and zeta/subw/ to be small, no decent direct limit has been placed on zeta2. Other possible sources of secular period changes in PSR 1913+16 are discussed and compared with this effect. It is also shown that a breakdown in the equality of active and passive gravitational masses (violation of ''Newton's third law'') leads only to periodic, unobservable orbital effects in a system like PSR 1913+16

  6. The binary pulsar: A test for general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The binary system of PSR1913+16 contains the pulsar and an, as yet unknown, companion. If this star is a compact object too, then the data can be interpreted in terms of general relativistic effects. This leads to the conclusion that the decay of the orbit must be due to the emission of gravitational waves. The nature of the unseen companion is discussed in detail

  7. Implications of PSR J0737-3039B for the Galactic NS-NS Binary Merger Rate

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Chunglee; McLaughlin, Maura A

    2013-01-01

    The Double Pulsar (PSR J0737-3039) is the only neutron star - neutron star (NS-NS) binary in which both NSs have been detectable as radio pulsars. The Double Pulsar has been assumed to dominate the Galactic NS-NS binary merger rate R_g among all known systems, solely based on the properties of the first-born, recycled pulsar (PSR J0737-3039A, or A) with an assumption for the beaming correction factor of six. In this work, we model the second-born, non-recycled pulsar (PSR J0737-3039B, or B) and estimate the contribution from the Double Pulsar on R_g based on both A and B. Observational constraints from the B pulsar favour a small beaming correction factor for A (~2), which is consistent with a bipolar model. Considering known NS-NS binaries with the best observational constraints, including both A and B, we obtain R_g=21_{-14}^{+28} per Myr at 95 per cent confidence from our reference model. We expect the detection rate of gravitational waves from NS-NS inspirals for the advanced ground-based gravitational-wa...

  8. Detailed studies of the PSR B1259-63 spectrum evolution and classification of radio pulsar spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Dembska, M; Lewandowski, W

    2013-01-01

    Kijak et al. (2011a) studied the radio spectrum of PSR B1259-63 in an unique binary with Be star LS 2883 and showed that this pulsar undergoes a spectrum evolution due to orbital motion. They proposed a qualitative model which explains this evolution. They considered two mechanisms that might influence the observed radio emission: free-free absorption and cyclotron resonance. Using the same database we constructed spectra for chosen observing days and obtained different types of spectra. Comparing to current classification of pulsar spectra, there occurs a suggestion that the appearance of various spectra shapes, different from a simple power law which is typical for radio pulsars, is possibly caused by environmental conditions around neutron stars. Therefore, the case of B1259-63 can be treated as a key factor to explain not only the GPS phenomenon observed for the solitary pulsars with interesting environments and also another types of spectra (e.g. with break).

  9. Evidence of residual Doppler shift on three pulsars, PSR B1259-63, 4U1627-67 and PSR J2051-0827

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Biping

    2014-01-01

    The huge derivative of orbital period observed in binary pulsar PSR B1259-63, the torque reversal displaying on low mass X-ray binary, 4U1627-67 and the long term change of orbital period of PSR J2051-0827, seem totally unrelated phenomena occurring at totally different pulsar systems. In this paper, they are simply interpreted by the same mechanism, residual Doppler shift. In a binary system with periodic signals sending to an observer, the drift of the signal frequency actually changes with the varying orbital velocity, projected to line of sight at different phases of orbit. And it has been taken for granted that the net red-shift and blue-shift of an full orbit circle be cancelled out, so that the effect of Doppler shift to the signal in binary motion cannot be accumulated over the orbital period. However, taking the propagation time at each velocity state into account, the symmetry of the velocity distribution over the orbital phase is broken. Consequently, the net Doppler shift left in an orbit is non-z...

  10. The young, highly relativistic binary pulsar J1906+0746

    CERN Document Server

    Lorimer, D R; Freire, P C C; Cordes, J M; Camilo, F; Faulkner, A J; Lyne, A G; Nice, D J; Ransom, S M; Arzoumanian, Z; Manchester, R N; Champion, D J; Van Leeuwen, J; McLaughlin, M A; Ramachandran, R; Hessels, J W T; Vlemmings, W; Deshpande, A A; Bhat, N D R; Chatterjee, S; Han, J L; Gaensler, B M; Kasian, L; Deneva, J S; Reid, B; Lazio, T J W; Kaspi, V M; Crawford, F; Lommen, A N; Backer, D C; Krämer, M; Stappers, B W; Hobbs, G B; Possenti, A; D'Amico, N; Burgay, M

    2006-01-01

    We report the discovery of PSR J1906+0746, a young 144-ms pulsar in a highly relativistic 3.98-hr orbit with an eccentricity of 0.085 and expected gravitational wave coalescence time of 300 Myr. The new pulsar was found during precursor survey observations with the Arecibo 1.4-GHz feed array system and retrospectively detected in the Parkes Multibeam plane pulsar survey data. From radio follow-up observations with Arecibo, Jodrell Bank, Green Bank, and Parkes, we have measured the spin-down and binary parameters of the pulsar and its basic spectral and polarization properties. We also present evidence for pulse profile evolution, which is likely due to geodetic precession, a relativistic effect caused by the misalignment of the pulsar spin and total angular momentum vectors. Our measurements show that PSR J1906+0746 is a young object with a characteristic age of 112 kyr. From the measured rate of orbital periastron advance 7.57+/-0.03 deg/yr, we infer a total system mass of 2.61+/-0.02 Msun. While these param...

  11. Detection of Giant Pulses in pulsar PSR J1752+2359

    CERN Document Server

    Ershov, A A

    2006-01-01

    We report the detection of Giant Pulses (GPs) in the pulsar PSR J1752+2359. About one pulse in 270 has a peak flux density more than 40 times the peak flux density of an average pulse (AP), and the strongest GP is as large as 260. The energy of the strongest GP exceeds the energy of the average pulse by a factor of 200 which is greater than in other known pulsars with GPs. PSR J1752+2359 as well as the previously detected pulsars PSR B0031-07 and PSR B1112+50, belong to the first group of pulsars found to have GPs without a strong magnetic field at the light cylinder.

  12. Understanding the evolution of close binary systems with radio pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Benvenuto, O G; Horvath, J E

    2014-01-01

    We calculate the evolution of close binary systems (CBSs) formed by a neutron star (behaving as a radio pulsar) and a normal donor star, evolving either to helium white dwarf (HeWD) or ultra short orbital period systems. We consider X-ray irradiation feedback and evaporation due to radio pulsar irradiation. We show that irradiation feedback leads to cyclic mass transfer episodes, allowing CBSs to be observed in-between as binary radio pulsars under conditions in which standard, non-irradiated models predict the occurrence of a low mass X-ray binary. This behavior accounts for the existence of a family of eclipsing binary systems known as redbacks. We predict that redback companions should almost fill their Roche lobe, as observed in PSR J1723-2837. This state is also possible for systems evolving with larger orbital periods. Therefore, binary radio pulsars with companion star masses usually interpreted as larger than expected to produce HeWDs may also result in such {\\it quasi - Roche Lobe Overflow} states, r...

  13. On the nature of the intermittent pulsar PSR B1931+24

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rea, N.; Kramer, M.; Stella, L.; Bassa, C. G.; Groot, P. J.; Israel, G. L.; Mendez, M.; Possenti, A.; Lyne, A.; Jonker, P.G.

    2008-01-01

    PSR B1931+24 is the first intermittent radio pulsar discovered to date, characterized by a 0.8-s pulsation, which turns on and off quasi-periodically every similar to 35 d, with a duty cycle of similar to 10 per cent. Here, we present X-ray and optical observations of PSR B1931+24 performed with the

  14. Monitoring the Stable Pulsar PSR B1509-5B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rots, Arnold H.

    2001-01-01

    The monitoring of this pulsar is still on-going, and hopefully will be for years to come. It has proved to be possible to fit the timing ephemeris for PSR B1509-59 for the entire monitoring period to date (five and a half years) with a single quintic polynomial. In order to establish its significance, we need at least one more year of monitoring data (for which we have proposed), but if this result is confirmed, it appears that two significant results may emerge: 1) well-determined values for the first and second braking indices; the first is well-established, but the second still needs a longer time base for a significant value 2) there seems to be a periodic variation in the pulse arrival times that can be fit with harmonic sinusoids with periods of approximately 790 and 395 days; if this result holds up on a longer time base it would be very exciting. Note that we are in position now to generate a timing ephemeris on the basis of the x-ray data that is more accurate than the radio ephemeris. In the meantime we have also determined a position for the pulsar that is more accurate than the ones derived from radio and Chandra observations. These results were reported at the 2000 HEAD meeting in Honolulu, HI. Travel was partly out of this grant. The remainder was applied toward the acquisition of a laptop computer that allows independent and fast analysis of all monitoring observations.

  15. PSR J1756$-$2251: a pulsar with a low-mass neutron star companion

    CERN Document Server

    Ferdman, Robert D; Kramer, Michael; Janssen, Gemma H; Bassa, Cees G; Stappers, Benjamin W; Demorest, Paul B; Cognard, Ismaël; Desvignes, Gregory; Theureau, Gilles; Burgay, Marta; Lyne, Andrew G; Manchester, Richard N; Possenti, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The pulsar PSR J1756$-$2251 resides in a relativistic double neutron star (DNS) binary system with a 7.67-hr orbit. We have conducted long-term precision timing on more than 9 years of data acquired from five telescopes, measuring five post-Keplerian parameters. This has led to several independent tests of general relativity (GR), the most constraining of which shows agreement with the prediction of GR at the 4% level. Our measurement of the orbital decay rate disagrees with that predicted by GR, likely due to systematic observational biases. We have derived the pulsar distance from parallax and orbital decay measurements to be 0.73$_{-0.24}^{+0.60}$ kpc (68%) and < 1.2 kpc (95% upper limit), respectively; these are significantly discrepant from the distance estimated using Galactic electron density models. We have found the pulsar mass to be 1.341$\\pm$0.007 M$_\\odot$, and a low neutron star (NS) companion mass of 1.230$\\pm$0.007 M$_\\odot$. We also determined an upper limit to the spin-orbit misalignment a...

  16. UNDERSTANDING THE EVOLUTION OF CLOSE BINARY SYSTEMS WITH RADIO PULSARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We calculate the evolution of close binary systems (CBSs) formed by a neutron star (behaving as a radio pulsar) and a normal donor star, which evolve either to a helium white dwarf (HeWD) or to ultra-short orbital period systems. We consider X-ray irradiation feedback and evaporation due to radio pulsar irradiation. We show that irradiation feedback leads to cyclic mass transfer episodes, allowing CBSs to be observed in between episodes as binary radio pulsars under conditions in which standard, non-irradiated models predict the occurrence of a low-mass X-ray binary. This behavior accounts for the existence of a family of eclipsing binary systems known as redbacks. We predict that redback companions should almost fill their Roche lobe, as observed in PSR J1723-2837. This state is also possible for systems evolving with larger orbital periods. Therefore, binary radio pulsars with companion star masses usually interpreted as larger than expected to produce HeWDs may also result in such quasi-Roche lobe overflow states, rather than hosting a carbon-oxygen WD. We found that CBSs with initial orbital periods of Pi < 1 day evolve into redbacks. Some of them produce low-mass HeWDs, and a subgroup with shorter Pi becomes black widows (BWs). Thus, BWs descend from redbacks, although not all redbacks evolve into BWs. There is mounting observational evidence favoring BW pulsars to be very massive (≳ 2 M ☉). As they should be redback descendants, redback pulsars should also be very massive, since most of the mass is transferred before this stage

  17. PSR J1838-0537: Discovery of a young, energetic gamma-ray pulsar

    OpenAIRE

    Pletsch, H.; Guillemot, L.; Allen, B.; Kramer, M.; Aulbert, C.; Fehrmann, H.; Baring, M.; Camilo, F.; Caraveo, P.; Grove, J; Kerr, M.; Marelli, M.; Ransom, S.; Ray, P.; Parkinson, P

    2012-01-01

    We report the discovery of PSR J1838-0537, a gamma-ray pulsar found through a blind search of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). The pulsar has a spin frequency of 6.9 Hz and a frequency derivative of -2.2e-11 Hz/s, implying a young characteristic age of 4970 years and a large spin-down power of 5.9e36 erg/s. Follow-up observations with radio telescopes detected no pulsations, thus PSR J1838-0537 appears radio-quiet as viewed from Earth. In September 2009 the pulsar suffered the ...

  18. Extended Emission from the PSR B1259-63/SS 2883 Binary Detected with Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlov, George G; Kargaltsev, Oleg

    2011-01-01

    PSR B1259-63 is a middle-aged radio pulsar (P=48 ms, tau=330 kyr, Edot=8.3*10^{35} erg/s) in an eccentric binary (P_orb =3.4 yr, e=0.87) with a high-mass Be companion, SS 2883. We observed the binary near apastron with the Chandra ACIS detector on 2009 May 14 for 28 ks. In addition to the previously studied pointlike source at the pulsar's position, we detected extended emission on the south-southwest side of this source. The pointlike source spectrum can be described by the absorbed power-law model with the hydrogen column density N_H = (2.5+/-0.6)*10^{21} cm^{-2}, photon index Gamma = 1.6+/-0.1, and luminosity L_{0.5-8 keV} = 1.3*10^{33} d_3^2 erg/s, where d_3 is the distance scaled to 3 kpc. This emission likely includes an unresolved part of the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) created by the colliding winds from the pulsar and the Be companion, and a contribution from the pulsar magnetosphere. The extended emission apparently consists of two components. The highly significant compact component looks like a south...

  19. Millisecond Pulsars in Close Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Tauris, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    In this Habilitationsschrift (Habilitation thesis) I present my research carried out over the last four years at the Argelander Institute for Astronomy (AIfA) and the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy (MPIfR). The thesis summarizes my main findings and has been written to fulfill the requirements for the Habilitation qualification at the University of Bonn. Although my work is mainly focused on the topic of millisecond pulsars (MSPs), there is a fairly broad spread of research areas ranging from the formation of neutron stars (NSs) in various supernova (SN) events, to their evolution, for example, via accretion processes in binary and triple systems, and finally to their possible destruction in merger events. The thesis is organized in the following manner: A general introduction to neutron stars and millisecond pulsars is given in Chapter 1. A selection of key papers published in 2011-2014 are presented in Chapters 2-10, ordered within five main research areas (ultra-stripped SNe in close binaries, ma...

  20. The NANOGrav Nine-year Data Set: Mass and Geometric Measurements of Binary Millisecond Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Fonseca, Emmanuel; Ellis, Justin A; Stairs, Ingrid H; Nice, David J; Ransom, Scott M; Demorest, Paul B; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Crowter, Kathryn; Dolch, Timothy; Ferdman, Robert D; Gonzalez, Marjorie E; Jones, Glenn; Jones, Megan L; Lam, Michael T; Levin, Lina; McLaughlin, Maura A; Stovall, Kevin; Swiggum, Joseph K; Zhu, Weiwei

    2016-01-01

    We analyse 24 binary radio pulsars in the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) nine-year data set. We made fourteen significant measurements of Shapiro delay, including new detections in four pulsar-binary systems (PSRs J0613$-$0200, J2017+0603, J2302+4442, and J2317+1439), and derive estimates of the binary-component masses and orbital inclination for these MSP-binary systems. We find a wide range of binary pulsar masses, with values as low as $m_{\\rm p} = 1.18^{+0.10}_{-0.09}\\text{ M}_{\\odot}$ for PSR J1918$-$0642 and as high as $m_{\\rm p} = 1.928^{+0.017}_{-0.017}\\text{ M}_{\\odot}$ for PSR J1614$-$2230 (both 68.3\\% confidence). We make an improved measurement of the Shapiro timing delay in the PSR J1918$-$0642 and J2043+1711 systems, measuring the pulsar mass in the latter system to be $m_{\\rm p} = 1.41^{+0.21}_{-0.18}\\text{ M}_{\\odot}$ (68.3\\% confidence) for the first time. We measure secular variations of one or more orbital elements in many systems, and use these meas...

  1. The Binary Pulsar: Gravity Waves Exist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Clifford

    1987-01-01

    Reviews the history of pulsars generally and the 1974 discovery of the binary pulsar by Joe Taylor and Russell Hulse specifically. Details the data collection and analysis used by Taylor and Hulse. Uses this discussion as support for Albert Einstein's theory of gravitational waves. (CW)

  2. Spin frequency distributions of binary millisecond pulsars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Papitto; D.F. Torres; N. Rea; T.M. Tauris

    2014-01-01

    Rotation-powered millisecond radio pulsars have been spun up to their present spin period by a 108−109 yr long X-ray-bright phase of accretion of matter and angular momentum in a low-to-intermediate mass binary system. Recently, the discovery of transitional pulsars that alternate cyclically between

  3. Implications of the PSR 1257+12 Planetary System for Isolated Millisecond Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, M C; Hamilton, Douglas P.

    2000-01-01

    The first extrasolar planets were discovered in 1992 around the millisecond pulsar PSR 1257+12. We show that recent developments in the study of accretion onto magnetized stars, plus the existence of the innermost, moon-sized planet in the PSR 1257+12 system, suggest that the pulsar was born with approximately its current rotation frequency and magnetic moment. If so, this has important implications for the formation and evolution of neutron star magnetic fields as well as for the formation of planets around pulsars. In particular, it suggests that some and perhaps all isolated millisecond pulsars may have been born with high spin rates and low magnetic fields instead of having been recycled by accretion.

  4. Pulsed Gamma-Ray Emission From Short-Period Pulsars: Predicted Gamma-Ray Pulsar PSR1951+32

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, K. S.; Ding, K. Y. Winnis

    1995-03-01

    We studied the gamma-ray emission mechanisms from pulsars with period, P, between 4.6 times 10(-2) B12(2/5) s and 0.17 B12(5/12) sin (1/6) theta alpha (-5/4) s in terms of outermagnetospheric gap model. We found that the spectra of all known gamma -ray pulsars can be fitted by two free parameters, namely, alpha r_L, the mean distance to the outergap, and sin theta , the mean pitch angle of the secondary e(+/-) pairs. Gamma-rays from those pulsars with P B12(5/12) sin (1/6) alpha (-5/4) s are mainly emitted by secondary e(+/-) pairs, which are created beyond the outergap, via synchrotron radiation and the gamma-ray emission efficiency is ~ 10(-2) . For pulsars with period approaching ~ 0.17 B12(5/12) sin (1/6) alpha (-5/4) s, their gamma-ray emission efficiency is approaching unity. We used our model to fit the observed spectra of gamma -ray pulsars (Vela, PSR1706-44, PSR1055-52, PSR1509-58, Geminga). All the best fit curves satisfy the constraints of alpha and sin theta . The pulse separation and relative intensity of pulses are function of alpha . In our model, the first three strongest theoretical gamma -ray sources have been detected. PSR1951+32 is predicted to be the fourth strongest gamma -ray pulsar (Cheng and Ding, 1994, ApJ, 432, 724) which is confirmed by the recent GRO result.

  5. A Chandra search for the pulsar wind nebula around PSR B1055-52

    CERN Document Server

    Posselt, B; Pavlov, G G

    2015-01-01

    The nearby, middle-aged PSR B1055-52 has many properties in common with the Geminga pulsar. Motivated by the Geminga's enigmatic and prominent pulsar wind nebula (PWN), we searched for extended emission around PSR B1055-52 with Chandra ACIS. For an energy range 0.3-1 keV, we found a 4 sigma flux enhancement in a 4.9-20 arcsec annulus around the pulsar. There is a slight asymmetry in the emission close, 1.5-4 arcsec, to the pulsar. The excess emission has a luminosity of about 10^{29} erg s^{-1} in an energy range 0.3-8 keV for a distance of 350 pc. Overall, the faint extended emission around PSR B1055-52 is consistent with a PWN of an aligned rotator moving away from us along the line of sight with supersonic velocity, but a contribution from a dust scattering halo cannot be excluded. Comparing the properties of other nearby, middle-aged pulsars, we suggest that the geometry -- the orientations of rotation axis, magnetic field axis, and the sight-line -- is the deciding factor for a pulsar to show a prominent...

  6. Shining Light on Quantum Gravity with Pulsar-Black Hole Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Estes, John; Lippert, Matthew; Simonetti, John H

    2016-01-01

    Pulsars are some of the most accurate clocks found in nature, while black holes offer a unique arena for the study of quantum gravity. As such, pulsar-black hole (PSR-BH) binaries provide ideal astrophysical systems for detecting effects of quantum gravity. With the success of aLIGO and the advent of instruments like the SKA and eLISA, the prospects for discovery of such PSR-BH binaries are very promising. We argue that PSR-BH binaries can serve as ready-made testing grounds for proposed resolutions to the black hole information paradox. We propose using timing signals from a pulsar beam passing through the region near a BH event horizon as a probe of quantum gravitational effects. In particular, we demonstrate that fluctuations of the geometry outside a black hole lead to an increase in the measured root-mean-square deviation of arrival times of pulsar pulses traveling near the horizon. This allows for a clear observational test of the nonviolent nonlocality proposal for black hole information escape. For a ...

  7. A Chandra Search for a Pulsar Wind Nebula around PSR B1055-52

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posselt, B.; Spence, G.; Pavlov, G. G.

    2015-10-01

    The nearby, middle-aged PSR B1055-52 has many properties in common with the Geminga pulsar. Motivated by the Geminga's enigmatic and prominent pulsar wind nebula (PWN), we searched for extended emission around PSR B1055-52 with Chandra ACIS. For an energy range 0.3-1 keV, we found a 4σ flux enhancement in a 4\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 9-20\\prime\\prime annulus around the pulsar. There is a slight asymmetry in the emission close, 1\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 5-4\\prime\\prime , to the pulsar. The excess emission has a luminosity of about 1029 erg s-1 in an energy range 0.3-8 keV for a distance of 350 pc. Overall, the faint extended emission around \\text{PSR B1055-52} is consistent with a PWN of an aligned rotator moving away from us along the line of sight with supersonic velocity, but a contribution from a dust scattering halo cannot be excluded. Comparing the properties of other nearby, middle-aged pulsars, we suggest that the geometry—the orientations of rotation axis, magnetic field axis, and the sight-line—is the deciding factor for a pulsar to show a prominent PWN. We also report on an ≳ 30% flux decrease of PSR B1055-52 between the 2000 XMM-Newton and our 2012 Chandra observation. We tentatively attribute this flux decrease to a cross-calibration problem, but further investigations of the pulsar are required to exclude actual intrinsic flux changes.

  8. Hydrodynamics of interaction of pulsar and stellar winds and its impact on the high energy radiation of binary pulsar systems

    CERN Document Server

    Khangulyan, D V; Bogovalov, S V; Koldoba, A V; Ustyugova, G V

    2008-01-01

    The hydrodynamics of the interaction of pulsar and stellar winds in binary systems harboring a pulsar and its impact on the nonthermal radiation of the binary pulsar PSR B1259-63/SS2883 is discussed. The collision of an ultrarelativistic pulsar wind with a nonrelativistic stellar outflow results in significant bulk acceleration of the shocked material from the pulsar wind. Already at distances comparable to the size of the binary system, the Lorentz factor of the shocked flow can be as large as $\\gamma$~4. This results in significant anisotropy of the inverse Compton radiation of accelerated electrons. Because of the Doppler boosting of the produced radiation, one should expect a variable gamma-ray signal from the system. In particular, this effect may naturally explain the reported tendency of a decrease of TeV gamma-ray flux close to the periastron. The modeling of the interaction of pulsar and stellar winds allows self-consistent calculations of adiabatic losses. Our results show that adiabatic losses domi...

  9. PSR B1828-11: a precession pulsar torqued by a quark planet?

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, K.; Y. L. YUE; Xu, R. X.

    2006-01-01

    The pulsar PSR B1828-11 has long-term, highly periodic and correlated variations in both pulse shape and the rate of slow-down. This phenomenon may provide evidence for precession of the pulsar as suggested previously within the framework of free precession as well as forced one. On a presumption of forced precession, we propose a quark planet model to this precession henomenon instead, in which the pulsar is torqued by a quark planet. We construct this model by constraining mass of the pulsa...

  10. PSR J1906+0722: An Elusive Gamma-ray Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, C J; Wu, J; Guillemot, L; Ackermann, M; Allen, B; de Angelis, A; Aulbert, C; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bellazzini, R; Bissaldi, E; Bock, O; Bonino, R; Bottacini, E; Brandt, T J; Bregeon, J; Bruel, P; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caragiulo, M; Caraveo, P A; Cecchi, C; Champion, D J; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Chiang, J; Chiaro, G; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cuéllar, A; Cutini, S; D'Ammando, F; Desiante, R; Drell, P S; Eggenstein, H B; Favuzzi, C; Fehrmann, H; Ferrara, E C; Focke, W B; Franckowiak, A; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grove, J E; Guiriec, S; Harding, A K; Hays, E; Hewitt, J W; Hill, A B; Horan, D; Hou, X; Jogler, T; Johnson, A S; Jóhannesson, G; Kramer, M; Krauss, F; Kuss, M; Laffon, H; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Li, J; Li, L; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Machenschalk, B; Manfreda, A; Marelli, M; Mayer, M; Mazziotta, M N; Michelson, P F; Mizuno, T; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Orienti, M; Orlando, E; de Palma, F; Paneque, D; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Parkinson, P M Saz; Schaal, M; Schulz, A; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Spada, F; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Suson, D J; Takahashi, H; Thayer, J B; Tibaldo, L; Torne, P; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Troja, E; Vianello, G; Wood, K S; Wood, M; Yassine, M

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of PSR J1906+0722, a gamma-ray pulsar detected as part of a blind survey of unidentified Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) sources being carried out on the volunteer distributed computing system, Einstein@Home. This newly discovered pulsar previously appeared as the most significant remaining unidentified gamma-ray source without a known association in the second Fermi-LAT source catalog (2FGL) and was among the top ten most significant unassociated sources in the recent third catalog (3FGL). PSR J1906+0722 is a young, energetic, isolated pulsar, with a spin frequency of $8.9$ Hz, a characteristic age of $49$ kyr, and spin-down power $1.0 \\times 10^{36}$ erg s$^{-1}$. In 2009 August it suffered one of the largest glitches detected from a gamma-ray pulsar ($\\Delta f / f \\approx 4.5\\times10^{-6}$). Remaining undetected in dedicated radio follow-up observations, the pulsar is likely radio-quiet. An off-pulse analysis of the gamma-ray flux from the location of PSR J1906+0722 revealed the pr...

  11. SAS-2 gamma-ray observations of PSR 1747-46. [radio pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Ogelman, H. B.; Lamb, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    Evidence is reported for the observation of gamma-ray emission from the radio pulsar PSR 1747-46 by the gamma-ray telescope aboard SAS 2. The evidence is based on the presence of both an approximately 3-sigma enhancement of gamma rays at the pulsar's location and an approximately 4-sigma peak in the phase plot of 79 gamma-ray events whose phase was calculated from the pulsar's known period. The gamma-ray pulsation is found to appear at a phase lag of about 0.16 from that predicted by the radio observations. The pulsed gamma-ray fluxes above 35 MeV and 100 MeV are estimated, and it is shown that the gamma-ray pulse width is similar to the radio pulse width. It is concluded that PSR 1747-46 is a most likely candidate for pulsed gamma-ray emission.

  12. A propeller model for the sub-luminous disk state of the transitional millisecond pulsar PSR J1023+0038

    CERN Document Server

    Papitto, A

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of millisecond pulsars switching between states powered either by the rotation of their magnetic field or by the accretion of matter, has recently proved the tight link shared by millisecond radio pulsars and neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries. Transitional millisecond pulsars also show an enigmatic intermediate state in which the neutron star is surrounded by an accretion disk, it emits coherent X-ray pulsations, but is sub-luminous in X-rays with respect to accreting neutron stars, and is brighter in gamma-rays than millisecond pulsars in the rotation-powered state. Here, we model the X-ray and gamma-ray emission observed from PSR J1023+0038 in such a state based on the assumption that most of the disk in-flow is propelled away by the rapidly rotating neutron star magnetosphere, and that electrons can be accelerated to energies of a few GeV at the turbulent disk-magnetosphere boundary. We show that the synchrotron and self-synchrotron Compton emission coming from such a region, together ...

  13. 2FGL J1653.6-0159: A New Low in Evaporating Pulsar Binary Periods

    CERN Document Server

    Romani, Roger W; Cenko, S Bradley

    2014-01-01

    We have identified an optical binary with orbital period P_b=4488s as the probable counterpart of the Fermi source 2FGL J1653.6-0159. Although pulsations have not yet been detected, the source properties are consistent with an evaporating millisecond pulsar binary; this P_b=75min is the record low for a spin-powered system. The heated side of the companion shows coherent radial velocity variations, with amplitude K=666.9+/-7.5 km/s for a large mass function of f(M)=1.60+/-0.05 M_sun. This heating suggests a pulsar luminosity ~3x10^34 erg/s. The colors and spectra show additional hard emission dominating at binary minimum. This system is similar to PSR J1311-3430, with a low mass H-depleted companion, a dense shrouding wind and, likely, a large pulsar mass.

  14. Binary pulsars as dark-matter probes

    CERN Document Server

    Pani, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    During the motion of a binary pulsar around the galactic center, the pulsar and its companion experience a wind of dark-matter particles that can affect the orbital motion through dynamical friction. We show that this effect produces a characteristic seasonal modulation of the orbit and causes a secular change of the orbital period whose magnitude can be well within the astonishing precision of various binary-pulsar observations. Our analysis is valid for binary systems with orbital period longer than a day. By comparing this effect with pulsar-timing measurements, it is possible to derive model-independent upper bounds on the dark-matter density at different distances $D$ from the galactic center. For example, the precision timing of J1713+0747 imposes $\\rho_{\\rm DM}\\lesssim 10^5\\,{\\rm GeV/cm}^3$ at $D\\approx7\\,{\\rm kpc}$. The detection of a binary pulsar at $D\\lesssim 10\\,{\\rm pc}$ could provide stringent constraints on dark-matter halo profiles and on growth models of the central black hole. The Square Kil...

  15. The Binary Companion of Young, Relativistic Pulsar J1906+0746

    OpenAIRE

    Leeuwen, van, JL Johan; Kasian, L.; Stairs, I. H.; Lorimer, D. R.; Camilo, F.; S Chatterjee; Cognard, I; Desvignes, G.; Freire, P. C. C.; Janssen, G.H.; Kramer, M.; Lyne, A. G.; Nice, D. J.; Ransom, S. M.; Stappers, B. W.

    2014-01-01

    International audience PSR J1906+0746 is a young pulsar in the relativistic binary with the second-shortest known orbital period, of 3.98 hours. We here present a timing study based on five years of observations, conducted with the 5 largest radio telescopes in the world, aimed at determining the companion nature. Through the measurement of three post-Keplerian orbital parameters we find the pulsar mass to be 1.291(11) M_sol, and the companion mass 1.322(11) M_sol respectively. These masse...

  16. Formation of millisecond pulsars with CO white dwarf companions - I. PSR J1614-2230: Evidence for a neutron star born massive

    OpenAIRE

    Tauris, Thomas M.; Langer, Norbert; Kramer, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The recent discovery of a 2 M_sun binary millisecond pulsar (Demorest et al. 2010) has not only important consequences for the equation-of-state of nuclear matter at high densities but also raises the interesting question if the neutron star PSR J1614-2230 was born massive. The answer is vital for understanding neutron star formation in core collapse supernovae. Furthermore, this system raises interesting issues about the nature of the progenitor binary and how it evolved during its mass exch...

  17. PSR J1838-0537: Discovery of a young, energetic gamma-ray pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Pletsch, H J; Allen, B; Kramer, M; Aulbert, C; Fehrmann, H; Baring, M G; Camilo, F; Caraveo, P A; Grove, J E; Kerr, M; Marelli, M; Ransom, S M; Ray, P S; Parkinson, P M Saz

    2012-01-01

    We report the discovery of PSR J1838-0537, a gamma-ray pulsar found through a blind search of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). The pulsar has a spin frequency of 6.9 Hz and a frequency derivative of -2.2e-11 Hz/s, implying a young characteristic age of 4970 years and a large spin-down power of 5.9e36 erg/s. Follow-up observations with radio telescopes detected no pulsations, thus PSR J1838-0537 appears radio-quiet as viewed from Earth. In September 2009 the pulsar suffered the largest glitch so far seen in any gamma-ray-only pulsar, causing a relative increase in spin frequency of about 5.5e-6. After the glitch, during a putative recovery period, the timing analysis is complicated by the sparsity of the LAT photon data, the weakness of the pulsations, and the reduction in average exposure from a coincidental, contemporaneous change in the LAT's sky-survey observing pattern. The pulsar's sky position is coincident with the spatially extended TeV source HESS J1841-055 detected by the High Energy ...

  18. Magnetar Behavior of a Rotation Powered Pulsar, PSR J1119-6127

    CERN Document Server

    Gogus, Ersin; Kaneko, Yuki; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Watts, Anna L; Alpar, M Ali; Huppenkothen, Daniela; Roberts, Oliver J; Younes, George; van der Horst, Alexander J

    2016-01-01

    Two energetic hard X-ray bursts have recently triggered the Fermi and Swift space observatories from the rotation powered pulsar, PSR J1119-6127. We have performed in depth spectral and temporal analyses of these two events. Our extensive searches in both observatory data for lower luminosity, untriggered, bursts using two independent methods (a signal-to-noise ratio search and a Bayesian blocks based technique), uncovered 10 additional events from the source. We report here on the timing and energetics of the 12 bursts from PSR J1119-6127 during its burst active phase of 2016 July 26 and 28. We also found a softer, extended thermal burst tail emission, which shows evidence of cooling. We discuss here the implications of these results on the nature of this unusual high-field radio pulsar, which firmly place it within the typical magnetar population.

  19. Fermi LAT pulsed detection of PSR J0737-3039A in the double pulsar system

    CERN Document Server

    Guillemot, L; Johnson, T J; Craig, H A; Romani, R W; Venter, C; Harding, A K; Ferdman, R D; Stairs, I H; Kerr, M

    2013-01-01

    We report the Fermi Large Area Telescope discovery of gamma-ray pulsations from the 22.7-ms pulsar A in the double pulsar system J0737-3039A/B. This is the first mildly recycled millisecond pulsar (MSP) detected in the GeV domain. The 2.7-s companion object PSR J0737-3039B is not detected in gamma rays. PSR J0737-3039A is a faint gamma-ray emitter, so that its spectral properties are only weakly constrained; however, its measured efficiency is typical of other MSPs. The two peaks of the gamma-ray light curve are separated by roughly half a rotation and are well offset from the radio and X-ray emission, suggesting that the GeV radiation originates in a distinct part of the magnetosphere from the other types of emission. From the modeling of the radio and the gamma-ray emission profiles and the analysis of radio polarization data, we constrain the magnetic inclination $\\alpha$ and the viewing angle $\\zeta$ to be close to 90$^\\circ$, which is consistent with independent studies of the radio emission from PSR J07...

  20. New VLT observations of the Fermi pulsar PSR J1048-5832

    CERN Document Server

    Razzano, M; Marelli, M; de Luca, A

    2012-01-01

    PSR J1048-5832 is a Vela-like (P=123.6 ms; tau~20.3 kyr) gamma-ray pulsar detected by Fermi, at a distance of ~2.7 kpc and with a rotational energy loss rate dot{E}_{SD} ~2 x 10^{36} erg/s. The PSR J1048-5832 field has been observed with the VLT in the V and R bands. We used these data to determine the colour of the object detected closest to the Chandra position (Star D) and confirm that it is not associated with the pulsar. For the estimated extinction along the line of sight, inferred from a re-analysis of the Chandra and XMM-Newton spectra, the fluxes of Star D (V~26.7; R~25.8) imply a -0.13 26.4; V>27.6) with the extrapolation of the X and gamma-ray spectra and constrained the pulsar spectrum at low-energies. In particular, the VLT upper limits suggest that the pulsar spectrum could be consistent with a single power-law, stretching from the gamma-rays to the optical.

  1. Gravitational wave emission by the high braking index pulsar PSR J1640-4631

    CERN Document Server

    de Araujo, José C N; Costa, César A

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a braking index for the pulsar PSR J1640-4631 has been measured. With a braking index of $n = 3.15 \\pm 0.03$, this pulsar has the highest braking index ever measured. As it is well known, a pure magnetic dipole brake yields $n = 3$, whereas a pure gravitational wave brake yields $n = 5$. Therefore, each of these mechanisms alone can not account for the braking index found for PSR J1640-4631. Here we show that such a braking index can be accounted for if the spindown model combines magnetic dipole and gravitational wave brakes. Then, we briefly discuss the detectability of this pulsar by aLIGO and the planned Einstein Telescope. In particular, we show that the amplitude of the gravitational wave that comes from our model is around a factor four lower than the amplitude modeled exclusively by gravitational wave energy loss. Another interesting outcome of our modeling is that we are able to obtain the ellipticity from the braking index and other pulsar parameters.

  2. Discovery of extended and variable radio structure from the gamma-ray binary system PSR B1259-63/LS 2883

    OpenAIRE

    Moldon, J.; Johnston, S.; Ribo, M.; Paredes, J. M.; Deller, A. T.

    2011-01-01

    PSR B1259-63 is a 48 ms pulsar in a highly eccentric 3.4 year orbit around the young massive star LS 2883. During the periastron passage the system displays transient non-thermal unpulsed emission from radio to very high energy gamma rays. It is one of the three galactic binary systems clearly detected at TeV energies, together with LS 5039 and LS I +61 303. We observed PSR B1259-63 after the 2007 periastron passage with the Australian Long Baseline Array at 2.3 GHz to trace the milliarcsecon...

  3. Chandra observations of the elusive pulsar wind nebula around PSR B0656+14

    CERN Document Server

    Bîrzan, L; Kargaltsev, O

    2015-01-01

    PSR B0656+14 is a middle-aged pulsar with a characteristic age $\\tau_c=110$ kyr and spin-down power $\\dot{E}= 3.8\\times 10^{34}$ erg s$^{-1}$. Using Chandra data, we searched for a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) and found evidence of extended emission in a 3.5-15 arcsec annulus around the pulsar, with a luminosity $L_{\\rm 0.5-8\\,keV}^{\\rm ext} \\sim 8\\times 10^{28}$ erg s$^{-1}$ (at the distance of 288 pc), which is a fraction of $\\sim 0.05$ of the non-thermal pulsar luminosity. If the extended emission is mostly due to a PWN, its X-ray efficiency, $\\eta_{\\rm pwn} = L_{\\rm 0.5-8\\,keV}^{\\rm ext}/\\dot{E} \\sim 2\\times 10^{-6}$, is lower than those of most other known PWNe but similar to that of the middle-aged Geminga pulsar. The small radial extent and nearly round shape of the putative PWN can be explained if the pulsar is receding (or approaching) in the direction close to the line of sight. The very soft spectrum of the extended emission ($\\Gamma\\sim 8$), much softer than those of typical PWNe, could be explained b...

  4. Gravitational Radiation from Compact Binary Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadis, John

    2014-01-01

    An outstanding question in modern Physics is whether general relativity (GR) is a complete description of gravity among bodies at macroscopic scales. Currently, the best experiments supporting this hypothesis are based on high-precision timing of radio pulsars. This chapter reviews recent advances in the field with a focus on compact binary millisecond pulsars with white-dwarf (WD) companions. These systems - if modeled properly - provide an unparalleled test ground for physically motivated alternatives to GR that deviate significantly in the strong-field regime. Recent improvements in observational techniques and advances in our understanding of WD interiors have enabled a series of precise mass measurements in such systems. These masses, combined with high-precision radio timing of the pulsars, result to stringent constraints on the radiative properties of gravity, qualitatively very different from what was available in the past.

  5. Radiation dosimetry of binary pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Eichler, D; Eichler, David; Nath, Biman B

    1995-01-01

    Companion stars exposed to high energy radiation from a primary neutron star or accreting black hole can experience significant spallation of their heavy elements, so that their atmospheres would be extremely rich in lithium, beryllium, and especially boron. In this paper we note that the detection or non-detection of these elements, and their relative abundances if detected, would provide a diagnostic of the high energy output of the primary, and possibly the shock acceleration of particles at the companion's bow shock in a pulsar wind.

  6. A NEW ACCRETION DISK AROUND THE MISSING LINK BINARY SYSTEM PSR J1023+0038

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PSR J1023+0038 is an exceptional system for understanding how slowly rotating neutron stars are spun up to millisecond rotational periods through accretion from a companion star. Observed as a radio pulsar from 2007-2013, optical data showed that the system had an accretion disk in 2000/2001. Starting at the end of 2013 June, the radio pulsar has become undetectable, suggesting a return to the previous accretion-disk state, where the system more closely resembles an X-ray binary. In this Letter we report the first targeted X-ray observations ever performed of the active phase and complement them with UV/optical and radio observations collected in 2013 October. We find strong evidence that indeed an accretion disk has recently formed in the system and we report the detection of fast X-ray changes spanning about two orders of magnitude in luminosity. No radio pulsations are seen during low flux states in the X-ray light curve or at any other times

  7. Spectroscopy of the inner companion of the pulsar PSR J0337+1715

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, David L; Koester, Detlev; Stairs, Ingrid H; Ransom, Scott M; Archibald, Anne M; Hessels, Jason W T; Boyles, Jason

    2014-01-01

    The hierarchical triple system PSR J0337+1715 offers an unprecedented laboratory to study secular evolution of interacting systems and to explore the complicated mass-transfer history that forms millisecond pulsars and helium-core white dwarfs. The latter in particular, however, requires knowledge of the properties of the individual components of the system. Here we present precise optical spectroscopy of the inner companion in the PSR J0337+1715 system. We confirm it as a hot, low-gravity DA white dwarf with Teff=15,800+/-100 K and log(g)=5.82+/-0.05. We also measure an inner mass ratio of 0.1364+/-0.0015, entirely consistent with that inferred from pulsar timing, and a systemic radial velocity of 29.7+/-0.3 km/s. Combined with the mass (0.19751 Msun) determined from pulsar timing, our measurement of the surface gravity implies a radius of 0.091+/-0.005 Rsun; combined further with the effective temperature and extinction, the photometry implies a distance of 1300+/-80 pc. The high temperature of the companio...

  8. Fermi LAT Detection of Pulsed Gamma-Rays From the Vela-Like Pulsars PSR J1048-5832 and PSR J2229+6114

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, A.A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Federal City Coll.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Ajello, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Baring, M.G.; /Rice U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bloom, E.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Columbia U. /IASF, Milan /Milan Polytechnic /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /George Mason U. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /LPCE, Orleans /Montpellier U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /INFN, Trieste /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /UC, Santa Cruz /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /CENBG, Gradignan /CENBG, Gradignan /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /INFN, Trieste /Arecibo Observ. /Hiroshima U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /INFN, Bari /NASA, Goddard /Maryland U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; /more authors..

    2012-03-29

    We report the detection of {gamma}-ray pulsations ({ge}0.1 GeV) from PSR J2229+6114 and PSR J1048-5832, the latter having been detected as a low-significance pulsar by EGRET. Data in the {gamma}-ray band were acquired by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, while the radio rotational ephemerides used to fold the {gamma}-ray light curves were obtained using the Green Bank Telescope, the Lovell telescope at Jodrell Bank, and the Parkes Telescope. The two young radio pulsars, located within the error circles of the previously unidentified EGRET sources 3EG J1048-5840 and 3EG J2227+6122, present spin-down characteristics similar to the Vela pulsar. PSR J1048-5832 shows two sharp peaks at phases 0.15 {+-} 0.01 and 0.57 {+-} 0.01 relative to the radio pulse confirming the EGRET light curve, while PSR J2229+6114 presents a very broad peak at phase 0.49 {+-} 0.01. The {gamma}-ray spectra above 0.1 GeV of both pulsars are fit with power laws having exponential cutoffs near 3 GeV, leading to integral photon fluxes of (2.19 {+-} 0.22 {+-} 0.32) x 10{sup -7} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for PSR J1048-5832 and (3.77 {+-} 0.22 {+-} 0.44) x 10{sup -7} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for PSR J2229+6114. The first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. PSR J1048-5832 is one of the two LAT sources which were entangled together as 3EG J1048-5840. These detections add to the growing number of young {gamma}-ray pulsars that make up the dominant population of GeV {gamma}-ray sources in the Galactic plane.

  9. Binary and recycled pulsars: 30 years after observational discovery

    CERN Document Server

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G S

    2006-01-01

    Binary radio pulsars, first discovered by Hulse and Taylor in 1974 [1], are a unique tool for experimentally testing general relativity (GR), whose validity has been confirmed with a precision unavailable in laboratory experiments. In particular, indirect evidence of the existence of gravitational waves has been obtained. Radio pulsars in binary systems (which have come to be known as recycled) have completed the accretion stage, during which neutron star spins reach millisecond periods and their magnetic fields decay 2 to 4 orders of magnitude more weakly than ordinary radio pulsars. Among about a hundred known recycled pulsars, many have turned out to be single neutron stars. The high concentration of single recycled pulsars in globular clusters suggests that close stellar encounters are highly instrumental in the loss of the companion. A system of one recycled pulsar and one 'normal' one discovered in 2004 is the most compact among binaries containing recycled pulsars [2]. Together with the presence of two...

  10. Observations of Binary and Millisecond Pulsars at Xinjiang Astronomical Observatory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jingbo Wang; Na Wang; Jianping Yuan; Zhiyong Liu

    2014-09-01

    We present the first results of radio timing observations of binary and millisecond pulsars in China. We have timed four binary pulsars for 9 years, using Nanshan 25-m radio telescope. The long time span has enabled us to determine their rotation and orbital parameters.

  11. The X-ray Counterpart of the High-B Pulsar PSR J0726-2612

    CERN Document Server

    Speagle, J S; van Kerkwijk, M H

    2011-01-01

    Middle-aged, cooling neutron stars are observed both as relatively rapidly spinning radio pulsars and as more slowly spinning, strongly magnetized isolated neutron stars (INSs), which stand out by their thermal X-ray spectra. The difference between the two classes may be that the INSs initially had much stronger magnetic fields, which decayed. To test this, we used the Chandra X-ray Observatory to observe 1RXS J072559.8-261229, a possible X-ray counterpart to PSR J0726-2612, which, with its 3.44s period and 3e13G inferred magnetic field strength, is the nearest and least extincted among the possible slowly-spinning, strong-field INS progenitors (it likely is in the Gould Belt, at ~1 kpc). We confirm the identification and find that the pulsar has a spectrum consistent with being purely thermal, with blackbody temperature kT=87+/-5 eV and radius R=5.7+2.6-1.3 km at a distance of 1 kpc. We detect sinusoidal pulsations at twice the radio period with a semi-amplitude of 27\\pm5%. The properties of PSR J0726-2612 s...

  12. Testing Theories of Gravitation Using 21-Year Timing of Pulsar Binary J1713+0747

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, W W; Demorest, P B; Nice, D J; Ellis, J A; Ransom, S M; Arzoumanian, Z; Crowter, K; Dolch, T; Ferdman, R D; Fonseca, E; Gonzalez, M E; Jones, G; Jones, M; Lam, M T; Levin, L; McLaughlin, M A; Pennucci, T; Stovall, K; Swiggum, J

    2015-01-01

    We report 21-yr timing of one of the most precise pulsars: PSR J1713+0747. The pulsar's pulse times of arrival are well modeled, with residuals having WRMS of $\\sim92$ns, by a comprehensive pulsar binary model including the mass and three-dimensional orbit of its white dwarf companion and a noise model that incorporates short- and long-timescale correlated noise such as jitter and red noise. The new dataset allows us to improve previous measurements of the system properties, including the masses of the neutron star ($1.31\\pm0.11$ $M_\\odot$) and white dwarf ($0.286\\pm0.012$ $M_\\odot$) as well as their parallax distance $1.15\\pm0.03$ kpc. We measured the intrinsic change in binary orbital period, $\\dot{P}^{\\rm Int}_{\\rm b}$, is $-0.20\\pm0.17$ ps s$^{-1}$, not distinguishable from zero. This result, combined with those of other pulsar binaries, can place limits on potential changes in the gravitational constant $G$ as predicted in some alternative theories of gravitation. We found that $\\dot{G}/G$ is consistent ...

  13. Einstein@Home Discovery of a PALFA Millisecond Pulsar in an Eccentric Binary Orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Knispel, B; Stappers, B W; Freire, P C C; Lazarus, P; Allen, B; Aulbert, C; Bock, O; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Cardoso, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J S; Eggenstein, H -B; Fehrmann, H; Ferdman, R; Hessels, J W T; Jenet, F A; Karako-Argaman, C; Kaspi, V M; van Leeuwen, J; Lorimer, D R; Lynch, R; Machenschalk, B; Madsen, E; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Scholz, P; Siemens, X; Spitler, L G; Stairs, I H; Stovall, K; Swiggum, J K; Venkataraman, A; Wharton, R S; Zhu, W W

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of the millisecond pulsar (MSP) PSR J1950+2414 ($P=4.3$ ms) in a binary system with an eccentric ($e=0.08$) orbit in Pulsar ALFA survey observations with the Arecibo telescope. Its companion star has a median mass of 0.3 $M_\\odot$ and is most likely a white dwarf. Fully recycled MSPs like this one are thought to be old neutron stars spun-up by mass transfer from a companion star. This process should circularize the orbit, as is observed for the vast majority of binary MSPs, which predominantly have orbital eccentricities $e < 0.001$. However, four recently discovered binary MSPs have orbits with larger eccentricities ($0.03 < e < 0.4$); PSR J1950+2414 is only the fifth such system to be discovered. The upper limits for the the intrinsic spin period derivative and inferred surface magnetic field strength are comparable to those of the general MSP population. The large eccentricities of these systems are not compatible with the predictions of the standard recycling scenario: som...

  14. PSR J0357+3205: A FAST-MOVING PULSAR WITH A VERY UNUSUAL X-RAY TRAIL

    OpenAIRE

    De Luca, A; Mignani, R. P.; Marelli, M.; Salvetti, D.; Sartore, N.; Belfiore, A; Parkinson, P. Saz; Caraveo, P. A.; Bignami, G. F.

    2013-01-01

    The middle-aged PSR J0357+3205 is a nearby, radio-quiet, bright gamma-ray pulsar discovered by the Fermi mission. Our previous Chandra observation revealed a huge, very peculiar structure of diffuse X-ray emission, originating at the pulsar position and extending for > 9' on the plane of the sky. To better understand the nature of such a nebula, we have studied the proper motion of the parent pulsar. We performed relative astrometry on Chandra images of the field spanning a time baseline of 2...

  15. Long-term timing and emission behavior of the young Crab-like pulsar PSR B0540-69

    CERN Document Server

    Ferdman, Robert D; Kaspi, Victoria M

    2015-01-01

    We present timing solutions and spin properties of the young pulsar PSR B0540-69 from analysis of 15.8 yr of data from the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer. We perform a partially phase-coherent timing analysis in order to mitigate the pronounced effects of timing noise in this pulsar. We also perform fully coherent timing over large subsets of the data set in order to arrive at a more precise solution. In addition to the previously reported first glitch undergone by this pulsar, we find a second glitch, which occurred at MJD 52927 $\\pm$ 4, with fractional changes in spin frequency $\\Delta\

  16. Binary pulsar evolution: unveiled links and new species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possenti, Andrea

    2013-03-01

    In the last years a series of blind and/or targeted pulsar searches led to almost triple the number of known binary pulsars in the galactic field with respect to a decade ago. The focus will be on few outliers, which are emerging from the average properties of the enlarged binary pulsar population. Some of them may represent the long sought missing links between two kinds of neutron star binaries, while others could represent the stereotype of new groups of binaries, resulting from an evolutionary path which is more exotic than those considered until recently. In particular, a new class of binaries, which can be dubbed Ultra Low Mass Binary Pulsars (ULMBPs), is emerging from recent data.

  17. Preparing GLAST LAT studies of the millisecond pulsar PSR J0218+4232 and the blazar 3C 66A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millisecond pulsars have weaker magnetic fields than normal pulsars, but their rapid rotation implies open field line voltages similar to those of young pulsars and they are therefore candidates for accelerating particles to the high energies required to emit in the GeV energy domain. PSR J0218+4232 was the only millisecond pulsar detected by EGRET. Its detection was rendered difficult by the powerful BL Lacertae 3C 66A a degree away, in spite of the low background (b= -16.8 degrees). Pulsations were detected at the 4.9 σ level, reinforcing the expectation that millisecond pulsars are a promising class for detection by the forthcoming high-energy mission GLAST. To estimate the GLAST LAT performance for both PSR J0218+4232 and 3C 66A, we have simulated LAT data using predictions for the 'polar cap' and the 'outer gap' pulsar models along with spectral energy distribution estimates for the blazar, normalizing to the EGRET observed fluxes. We demonstrate that GLAST is able to separate unambiguously the two objects in a few weeks. The spectral parameters of the pulsar derived in this context could be used to discriminate between the polar cap and outer gap models

  18. Long-Term X-ray Monitoring of the Young Pulsar PSR B1509-58

    CERN Document Server

    Livingstone, Margaret A

    2011-01-01

    It has long been thought that the pulsed X-ray properties of rotation-powered pulsars are stable on long time scales. However, long-term, systematic studies of individual sources have been lacking. Furthermore, dramatic X-ray variability has now been observed from two pulsars having inferred sub-critical dipole magnetic fields. Here we present an analysis of the long-term pulsed X-ray properties of the young, energetic pulsar PSR B1509-58 using data from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We measured the 2-50 keV pulsed flux for 14.7 yr of X-ray observations and found that it is consistent with being constant on all relevant time scales, and place a 3 sigma upper limit on day-to-week variability of <28%. In addition, we searched for magnetar-like X-ray bursts in all observations and found none, which we use to constrain the measurable burst rate to less than one per 750 ks of observations. We also searched for variability in the pulse profile and found that it is consistent with being stable on time scales o...

  19. DISCOVERY OF EXTENDED AND VARIABLE RADIO STRUCTURE FROM THE GAMMA-RAY BINARY SYSTEM PSR B1259-63/LS 2883

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PSR B1259-63 is a 48 ms pulsar in a highly eccentric 3.4 year orbit around the young massive star LS 2883. During the periastron passage the system displays transient non-thermal unpulsed emission from radio to very high energy gamma rays. It is one of the three galactic binary systems clearly detected at TeV energies, together with LS 5039 and LS I +61 303. We observed PSR B1259-63 after the 2007 periastron passage with the Australian Long Baseline Array at 2.3 GHz to trace the milliarcsecond (mas) structure of the source at three different epochs. We have discovered extended and variable radio structure. The peak of the radio emission is detected outside the binary system near periastron, at projected distances of 10-20 mas (25-45 AU assuming a distance of 2.3 kpc). The total extent of the emission is ∼50 mas (∼120 AU). This is the first observational evidence that non-accreting pulsars orbiting massive stars can produce variable extended radio emission at AU scales. Similar structures are also seen in LS 5039 and LS I +61 303, in which the nature of the compact object is unknown. The discovery presented here for the young non-accreting pulsar PSR B1259-63 reinforces the link with these two sources and supports the presence of pulsars in these systems as well. A simple kinematical model considering only a spherical stellar wind can approximately trace the extended structures if the binary system orbit has a longitude of the ascending node of Ω ∼ -400 and a magnetization parameter of σ ∼ 0.005.

  20. Post-Periastron Gamma Ray Flare from PSR~B1259-63/LS 2883 as a Result of Comptonization of the Cold Pulsar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Khangulyan, D; Bogovalov, S V; Ribo, M

    2011-01-01

    The recent detection of gamma rays with the {\\it Fermi} Large Area Telescope (LAT) from the binary system PSR B1259-63/LS2883 provides unique information about the pulsar wind. Although the nature of the weak gamma-ray signal detected at the periastron passage remains uncertain, the reported fluxes allow robust constraints on the Lorentz factor $\\Gamma_0$ of the pulsar wind. Unless the latter is strongly anisotropic, the range of $\\Gamma_0$ between $10^4$ and $3\\times 10^5$ is excluded by the {\\it Fermi} data. Moreover, we argue that the "surprise" gamma ray flare detected by {\\it Fermi} after several weeks of the periastron passage can be explained by inverse Compton (IC) emission of the cold pulsar wind with $\\Gamma_0 \\approx 10^4$. The combination of two independent effects, both linked to the circumstellar disk, is a principal element in the proposed scenario. The first is related to radiation of the shocked stellar disk which in the close vicinity of the pulsar can provide a dense photon target for the I...

  1. Birth and evolution of neutron stars: Issues raised by millisecond pulsars; Proceedings of the eighth workshop, Green Bank, WV, June 6-8, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Observations of millisecond pulsars are discussed, taking into account a review of millisecond pulsars, arrival time observations of the 1.6 millisecond pulsar 1937 + 214, a 6.1 millisecond binary pulsar, polarimetry of the two fastest pulsars, an optical synchrotron nebula around the X-ray pulsar 0540-693, optical observations of the millisecond pulsars PSR 1937 + 214 and PSR 1935 + 29, and a single pulse study of the millisecond pulsar 1937 + 214. The life history of millisecond pulsars is examined, giving attention to the origin of neutron stars, models for the formation of binary and millisecond radio pulsars, isolated and binary millisecond pulsars and accretion spun-up neutron stars, the period distribution of fast pulsars, the origin of pulsar velocities, a model of radio emission of the millisecond pulsar 1937 + 214, and a study of pulsar luminosities. Other subjects investigated are related to the physics of rapidly rotating neutron stars, a summary of general theoretical issues, and searches

  2. THE BINARY COMPANION OF YOUNG, RELATIVISTIC PULSAR J1906+0746

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Leeuwen, J.; Janssen, G. H. [ASTRON, The Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Kasian, L.; Stairs, I. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Lorimer, D. R. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Camilo, F. [Arecibo Observatory, HC3 Box 53995, Arecibo, PR 00612 (United States); Chatterjee, S. [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Cognard, I. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie de l' Environnement et de l' Espace LPC2E CNRS-Université d' Orléans, F-45071 Orléans (France); Desvignes, G.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kramer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Lyne, A. G.; Stappers, B. W. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Nice, D. J. [Department of Physics, Lafayette College, Easton, PA 18042 (United States); Ransom, S. M. [NRAO (National Radio Astronomy Observatory), Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Weisberg, J. M., E-mail: leeuwen@astron.nl [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Carleton College, Northfield, MN 55057 (United States)

    2015-01-10

    PSR J1906+0746 is a young pulsar in the relativistic binary with the second-shortest known orbital period, of 3.98 hr. We here present a timing study based on five years of observations, conducted with the five largest radio telescopes in the world, aimed at determining the companion nature. Through the measurement of three post-Keplerian orbital parameters, we find the pulsar mass to be 1.291(11) M {sub ☉}, and the companion mass 1.322(11) M {sub ☉}, respectively. These masses fit well in the observed collection of double neutron stars (DNSs), but are also compatible with other systems where a young pulsar such as J1906+0746 is orbited by a white dwarf (WD). Neither radio pulsations nor dispersion-inducing outflows that could have further established the companion nature were detected. We derive an H I-absorption distance, which indicates that an optical confirmation of a WD companion is very challenging. The pulsar is fading fast due to geodetic precession, limiting future timing improvements. We conclude that the young pulsar J1906+0746 is likely part of a DNS, or is otherwise orbited by an older WD, in an exotic system formed through two stages of mass transfer.

  3. The Binary Companion of Young, Relativistic Pulsar J1906+0746

    CERN Document Server

    van Leeuwen, Joeri; Stairs, Ingrid H; Lorimer, D R; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cognard, I; Desvignes, G; Freire, P C C; Janssen, G H; Kramer, M; Lyne, A G; Nice, D J; Ransom, S M; Stappers, B W; Weisberg, J M

    2014-01-01

    PSR J1906+0746 is a young pulsar in the relativistic binary with the second-shortest known orbital period, of 3.98 hours. We here present a timing study based on five years of observations, conducted with the 5 largest radio telescopes in the world, aimed at determining the companion nature. Through the measurement of three post-Keplerian orbital parameters we find the pulsar mass to be 1.291(11) M_sol, and the companion mass 1.322(11) M_sol respectively. These masses fit well in the observed collection of double neutron stars, but are also compatible with other white dwarfs around young pulsars such as J1906+0746. Neither radio pulsations nor dispersion-inducing outflows that could have further established the companion nature were detected. We derive an HI-absorption distance, which indicates that an optical confirmation of a white dwarf companion is very challenging. The pulsar is fading fast due to geodetic precession, limiting future timing improvements. We conclude that young pulsar J1906+0746 is likely...

  4. Exploring the X-ray and gamma-ray properties of the redback millisecond pulsar PSR J1723-2837

    CERN Document Server

    Hui, C Y; Takata, J; Kong, A K H; Cheng, K S; Wu, J H K; Lin, L C C; Wu, E M H

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the X-ray and $\\gamma$-ray properties of the redback millisecond pulsar PSR J1723-2837 with XMM-Newton, Chandra and Fermi. We have discovered the X-ray orbital modulation of this binary system with the minimum that coincides with the phases of radio eclipse. The X-ray emission is clearly non-thermal in nature which can be well described by a simple power-law with a photon index of $\\sim1.2$. The phase-averaged luminosity is $\\sim9\\times10^{31}$ erg/s in 0.3-10 keV which consumes $\\sim0.2\\%$ of the spin-down power. We have detected the $\\gamma-$ray emission in $0.1-300$ GeV from this system at a significance of $\\sim6\\sigma$ for the first time. The $\\gamma-$rays in this energy range consumes $\\sim2\\%$ of the spin-down power and can be modeled by a power-law with a photon index of $\\sim2.6$. We discuss the high energy properties of the new redback in the context of a intrabinary shock model.

  5. Detection of the new rotating radio transient pulsar PSR J2225+35

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shitov, Yu. P.; Kuzmin, A. D.; Dumskii, D. V.; Losovsky, B. Ya.

    2009-06-01

    We have detected the new pulsar PSR J2225+35, which displays the properties of the new class of radio sources “Rotating Radio Transients” (RRATs). RRATs are distinguished by isolated bursts of radio emission and long quiet periods. Throughout 45 observations with a total duration of about 3 hr, only two bursts of radio emission lasting a total of about 10 min were detected in two observations. The temporal and frequency delay of the pulses corresponds to the dispersion measure DM = 51.8 pc/cm3 and the distance d = 3.05 kpc. The period of the pulses is P = 0.94 s. The emission is polarized, with the rotation measure being RM = 49.8 rad/m2.

  6. A millisecond pulsar in an extremely wide binary system

    CERN Document Server

    Bassa, C G; Stappers, B W; Tauris, T M; Wevers, T; Jonker, P G; Lentati, L; Verbiest, J P W; Desvignes, G; Graikou, E; Guillemot, L; Freire, P C C; Lazarus, P; Caballero, R N; Champion, D J; Cognard, I; Jessner, A; Jordan, C; Karuppusamy, R; Kramer, M; Lazaridis, K; Lee, K J; Liu, K; Lyne, A G; McKee, J; Oslowski, S; Perrodin, D; Sanidas, S; Shaifullah, G; Smits, R; Theureau, G; Tiburzi, C; Zhu, W W

    2016-01-01

    We report on 22 yrs of radio timing observations of the millisecond pulsar J1024$-$0719 by the telescopes participating in the European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA). These observations reveal a significant second derivative of the pulsar spin frequency and confirm the discrepancy between the parallax and Shklovskii distances that has been reported earlier. We also present optical astrometry, photometry and spectroscopy of 2MASS J10243869$-$0719190. We find that it is a low-metallicity main-sequence star (K7V spectral type, $\\mathrm{[M/H]}=-1.0$, $T_\\mathrm{eff}=4050\\pm50$ K) and that its position, proper motion and distance are consistent with those of PSR J1024$-$0719. We conclude that PSR J1024$-$0719 and 2MASS J10243869$-$0719190 form a common proper motion pair and are gravitationally bound. The gravitational interaction between the main-sequence star and the pulsar accounts for the spin frequency derivatives, which in turn resolves the distance discrepancy. Our observations suggest that the pulsar and main...

  7. Scintillation Arcs in Low-frequency Observations of the Timing-array Millisecond Pulsar PSR J0437-4715

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, N. D. R.; Ord, S. M.; Tremblay, S. E.; McSweeney, S. J.; Tingay, S. J.

    2016-02-01

    Low-frequency observations of pulsars provide a powerful means for probing the microstructure in the turbulent interstellar medium (ISM). Here we report on high-resolution dynamic spectral analysis of our observations of the timing-array millisecond pulsar PSR J0437-4715 with the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), enabled by our recently commissioned tied-array beam processing pipeline for voltage data recorded from the high time resolution mode of the MWA. A secondary spectral analysis reveals faint parabolic arcs akin to those seen in high-frequency observations of pulsars with the Green Bank and Arecibo telescopes. Data from Parkes observations at a higher frequency of 732 MHz reveal a similar parabolic feature with a curvature that scales approximately as the square of the observing wavelength (λ2) to the MWA's frequency of 192 MHz. Our analysis suggests that scattering toward PSR J0437-4715 predominantly arises from a compact region about 115 pc from the Earth, which matches well with the expected location of the edge of the Local Bubble that envelopes the local Solar neighborhood. As well as demonstrating new and improved pulsar science capabilities of the MWA, our analysis underscores the potential of low-frequency pulsar observations for gaining valuable insights into the local ISM and for characterizing the ISM toward timing-array pulsars.

  8. A candidate optical counterpart to the middle-aged gamma-ray pulsar PSR J1741-2054

    CERN Document Server

    Mignani, R P; Marelli, M; De Luca, A; Salvetti, D; Belfiore, A; Pierbattista, M; Razzano, M; Shearer, A; Moran, P

    2016-01-01

    We carried out deep optical observations of the middle-aged $\\gamma$-ray pulsar PSR J1741-2054 with the Very Large Telescope (VLT). We identified two objects, of magnitudes $m_v=23.10\\pm0.05$ and $m_v=25.32\\pm0.08$, at positions consistent with the very accurate Chandra coordinates of the pulsar, the faintest of which is more likely to be its counterpart. From the VLT images we also detected the known bow-shock nebula around PSR J1741-2054. The nebula is displaced by $\\sim 0\\farcs9$ (at the $3\\sigma$ confidence level) with respect to its position measured in archival data, showing that the shock propagates in the interstellar medium consistently with the pulsar proper motion. Finally, we could not find evidence of large-scale extended optical emission associated with the pulsar wind nebula detected by Chandra, down to a surface brightness limit of $\\sim 28.1$ magnitudes arcsec$^{-2}$. Future observations are needed to confirm the optical identification of PSR J1741-2054 and characterise the spectrum of its co...

  9. Pulsar Timing Residuals Induced by Gravitational Waves from Single Non-evolving Supermassive Black Hole Binaries with Elliptical Orbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pulsar timing residuals induced by gravitational waves from non-evolving single binary sources with general elliptical orbits are analyzed. For different orbital eccentricities, the timing residuals present different properties. The standard deviations of the timing residuals induced by a fixed gravitational wave source are calculated for different values of the eccentricity. We also analyze the timing residuals of PSR J0437-4715 induced by one of the best known single gravitational wave sources, the supermassive black hole binary in the blazar OJ287

  10. PsrPopPy: An open-source package for pulsar population simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Bates, Sam; Rane, Akshaya; Swiggum, Joe

    2013-01-01

    We have produced a new software package for the simulation of pulsar populations, \\textsc{PsrPopPy}, based on the \\textsc{Psrpop} package. The codebase has been re-written in Python (save for some external libraries, which remain in their native Fortran), utilising the object-oriented features of the language, and improving the modularity of the code. Pre-written scripts are provided for running the simulations in `standard' modes of operation, but the code is flexible enough to support the writing of personalised scripts. The modular structure also makes the addition of experimental features (such as new models for period or luminosity distributions) more straightforward than with the previous code. We also discuss potential additions to the modelling capabilities of the software. Finally, we demonstrate some potential applications of the code; first, using results of surveys at different observing frequencies, we find pulsar spectral indices are best fit by a normal distribution with mean $-1.4$ and standar...

  11. The Near-UV Pulse Profile and Spectrum of the Pulsar PSR B0656+14

    CERN Document Server

    Shibanov, Y A; Lundqvist, P; Gull, T R; Lindler, D; Shibanov, Yu.A.

    2005-01-01

    We have observed the middle-aged pulsar PSR B0656+14 with the prism and the NUV MAMA detector of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) to measure the pulsar spectrum and periodic pulsations in the near-ultraviolet (NUV). The pulsations are clearly detected, double-peaked and very similar to the optical pulse profile. The NUV pulsed fraction is 70 +/- 12%. The spectral slope of the dereddened phase-integrated spectrum in the 1800 - 3200 A range is 0.35 +/- 0.5 which together with the high pulse fraction indicates a non-thermal origin for the NUV emission. The total flux in the range 1700-3400 A is estimated to be 3.4 +/- 0.3e-15 erg/s/cm2 when corrected for E(B-V)=0.03. At a distance of 288 pc this corresponds to a luminosity 3.4e28 erg/s assuming isotropy of the emission. We compare the NUV pulse profile with observations from radio to gamma-rays. The first NUV sub-pulse is in phase with the gamma-ray pulse marginally detected with the EGRET, while the second NUV sub-pulse is similar both in shape a...

  12. Binary and recycled pulsars: 30 years after observational discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S.

    2006-01-01

    Binary radio pulsars, first discovered by Hulse and Taylor in 1974 [1], are a unique tool for experimentally testing general relativity (GR), whose validity has been confirmed with a precision unavailable in laboratory experiments. In particular, indirect evidence of the existence of gravitational waves has been obtained. Radio pulsars in binary systems (which have come to be known as recycled) have completed the accretion stage, during which neutron star spins reach millisecond periods and t...

  13. Observations of the Pulsar PSR B1951+32 with the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Kildea, J; Ball, J; Carson, J E; Covault, C E; Driscoll, D D; Fortin, P; Gingrich, D M; Hanna, D S; Jarvis, A; Lindner, T; Müller, C; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Ragan, K; Williams, D A

    2007-01-01

    We present the analysis and results of 12.5 hours of high-energy gamma-ray observations of the EGRET-detected pulsar PSR B1951+32 using the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE). STACEE is an atmospheric Cherenkov detector, in Albuquerque, New Mexico, that detects cosmic gamma rays using the shower-front-sampling technique. STACEE's sensitivity to astrophysical sources at energies around 100 GeV allows it to investigate emission from gamma-ray pulsars with expected pulsed emission cutoffs below 100 GeV. We discuss the observations and analysis of STACEE's PSR 1951+32 data, accumulated during the 2005 and 2006 observing seasons.

  14. PSR J0357+3205: a fast moving pulsar with a very unusual X-ray trail

    CERN Document Server

    De Luca, A; Marelli, M; Salvetti, D; Sartore, N; Belfiore, A; Parkinson, P Saz; Caraveo, P A; Bignami, G F

    2013-01-01

    The middle-aged PSR J0357+3205 is a nearby, radio-quiet, bright gamma-ray pulsar discovered by the Fermi mission. Our previous Chandra observation revealed a huge, very peculiar structure of diffuse X-ray emission, originating at the pulsar position and extending for > 9' on the plane of the sky. To better understand the nature of such a nebula, we have studied the proper motion of the parent pulsar. We performed relative astrometry on Chandra images of the field spanning a time baseline of 2.2 yr, unveiling a significant angular displacement of the pulsar counterpart, corresponding to a proper motion of 0.165"+/-0.030" yr^(-1). At a distance of ~500 pc, the space velocity of the pulsar would be of ~390 km s^(-1) assuming no inclination with respect to the plane of the sky. The direction of the pulsar proper motion is perfectly aligned with the main axis of the X-ray nebula, pointing to a physical, yet elusive link between the nebula and the pulsar space velocity. No optical emission in the H_alpha line is se...

  15. Coordinated X-ray, Ultraviolet, Optical, and Radio Observations of the PSR J1023+0038 System in a Low-mass X-ray Binary State

    CERN Document Server

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Bassa, Cees; Deller, Adam; Halpern, Jules P; Heald, George; Hessels, Jason W T; Janssen, Gemma H; Lyne, Andrew G; Moldon, Javier; Paragi, Zsolt; Patruno, Alessandro; Perera, Benetge; Stappers, Ben W; Tendulkar, Shriharsh P; D'Angelo, Caroline R; Wijnands, Rudy

    2014-01-01

    The PSR J1023+0038 binary system hosts a neutron star and a low-mass, main-sequence-like star. It switches on year timescales between states as an eclipsing radio millisecond pulsar and a low-mass X-ray binary. We present a multi-wavelength observational campaign of PSR J1023+0038 in its most recent low-mass X-ray binary state. Two long XMM-Newton observations reveal that the system spends ~70% of the time in a ~$3\\times10^{33}$ erg/s X-ray luminosity mode, which, as shown in Archibald et al. (2014), exhibits coherent X-ray pulsations. This emission is interspersed with frequent lower flux mode intervals with ~$5\\times 10^{32}$ erg/s and sporadic flares reaching up to ~$10^{34}$ erg/s, with neither mode showing significant X-ray pulsations. The switches between the three flux modes occur on timescales of order 10 s. In the UV and optical, we observe occasional intense flares coincident with those observed in X-rays. Our radio timing observations reveal no pulsations at the pulsar period during any of the thre...

  16. DETECTION OF THE ENERGETIC PULSAR PSR B1509-58 AND ITS PULSAR WIND NEBULA IN MSH 15-52 USING THE FERMI-LARGE AREA TELESCOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the detection of high-energy γ-ray emission from the young and energetic pulsar PSR B1509 - 58 and its pulsar wind nebula (PWN) in the composite supernova remnant G320.4 - 1.2 (aka MSH 15 - 52). Using 1 yr of survey data with the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT), we detected pulsations from PSR B1509 - 58 up to 1 GeV and extended γ-ray emission above 1 GeV spatially coincident with the PWN. The pulsar light curve presents two peaks offset from the radio peak by phases 0.96 ± 0.01 and 0.33 ± 0.02. New constraining upper limits on the pulsar emission are derived below 1 GeV and confirm a severe spectral break at a few tens of MeV. The nebular spectrum in the 1-100 GeV energy range is well described by a power law with a spectral index of (1.57 ± 0.17 ± 0.13) and a flux above 1 GeV of (2.91 ± 0.79 ± 1.35) x 10-9 cm-2 s-1. The first errors represent the statistical errors on the fit parameters, while the second ones are the systematic uncertainties. The LAT spectrum of the nebula connects nicely with Cherenkov observations, and indicates a spectral break between GeV and TeV energies.

  17. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY PULSARS PSR J1057-5226, J1709-4429, AND J1952+3252

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data have confirmed the pulsed emission from all six high-confidence gamma-ray pulsars previously known from the EGRET observations. We report results obtained from the analysis of 13 months of LAT data for three of these pulsars (PSR J1057-5226, PSR J1709-4429, and PSR J1952+3252) each of which had some unique feature among the EGRET pulsars. The excellent sensitivity of LAT allows more detailed analysis of the evolution of the pulse profile with energy and also of the variation of the spectral shape with phase. We measure the cutoff energy of the pulsed emission from these pulsars for the first time and provide a more complete picture of the emission mechanism. The results confirm some, but not all, of the features seen in the EGRET data.

  18. A physical scenario for the high and low X-ray luminosity states in the transitional pulsar PSR J1023+0038

    CERN Document Server

    Campana, S; Papitto, A; Rea, N; Torres, D F; Baglio, M C; D'Avanzo, P

    2016-01-01

    PSR J1023+0038 (J1023) is a binary system hosting a neutron star and a low mass companion. J1023 is the best studied transitional pulsar, alternating a faint eclipsing millisecond radio pulsar state to a brighter X-ray active state. At variance with other Low Mass X-ray binaries, this active state reaches luminosities of only ~$10^{34}$ erg s$^{-1}$, showing strong, fast variability. In the active state, J1023 displays: i) a high state ($L_X\\sim7\\times10^{33}$ erg s$^{-1}$, 0.3-80 keV) occurring ~80% of the time and during which X-ray pulsations at the neutron star spin period are detected (pulsed fraction ~8%); ii) a low state ($L_X~10^{33}$ erg s$^{-1}$) during which pulsations are not detected (~<3%); and iii) a flaring state during which sporadic flares occur in excess of ~$10^{34}$ erg s$^{-1}$, with no pulsation too. The transition between the high and the low states is very rapid, on a ~10 s timescale. Here we put forward a plausible physical interpretation of the high and low states based on the (f...

  19. Pulsar Binaries as Gravitational-Wave Sources: Rate predictions

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Chunglee

    2009-01-01

    Pulsar binaries are important targets for ground-based and future space-borne gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. In order for improving detector design and assessing detector performances, it is a prerequisite to understand the astrophysics of GW sources such as the population size or merger rates. Here, we summarize recent results for Galactic merger rates of two known types of pulsar binaries: (a) double-neutron star-system (DNS) and (b) neutron star-white dwarf (NS-WD) binaries. Based on t...

  20. On The braking index of the unusual high-B rotation-powered pulsar PSR J1846-0258

    CERN Document Server

    Archibald, R F; Beardmore, A P; Gehrels, N; Kennea, J A

    2015-01-01

    PSR J1846-0258 is an object which straddles the boundary between magnetars and rotation powered pulsars. Though behaving for many years as a rotation-powered pulsar, in 2006, it exhibited distinctly magnetar-like behavior - emitting several short hard X-ray bursts, and a flux increase. Here we report on 7 years of post-outburst timing observations of PSR J1846-0258 using the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer and the Swift X-ray Telescope. We measure the braking index over the post-magnetar outburst period to be $n=2.19\\pm0.03$. This represents a change of $\\Delta n=-0.46\\pm0.03$ or a 14.5$\\;\\sigma$ difference from the pre-outburst braking index of $n=2.65\\pm0.01$, which itself was measured over a span of 6.5 yr (Livingstone et al. 2006). So large and long-lived a change to a pulsar braking index is unprecedented and poses a significant challenge to models of pulsar spin-down.

  1. The Aid of Optical Studies in Understanding Millisecond Pulsar Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Wadiasingh, Zorawar; Venter, Christo; Boettcher, Markus

    2016-01-01

    A large number of new "black widow" and "redback" energetic millisecond pulsars with irradiated stellar companions have been discovered through radio and optical searches of unidentified \\textit{Fermi} sources. Synchrotron emission, from particles accelerated up to several TeV in the intrabinary shock, exhibits modulation at the binary orbital period. Our simulated double-peaked X-ray light curves modulated at the orbital period, produced by relativistic Doppler-boosting along the intrabinary shock, are found to qualitatively match those observed in many sources. In this model, redbacks and transitional pulsar systems where the double-peaked X-ray light curve is observed at inferior conjunction have intrinsically different shock geometry than other millisecond pulsar binaries where the light curve is centered at superior conjunction. We discuss, and advocate, how current and future optical observations may aid in constraining the emission geometry, intrabinary shock and the unknown physics of pulsar winds.

  2. Testing the strong equivalence principle with the triple pulsar PSR J 0337 +1715

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Lijing

    2016-04-01

    Three conceptually different masses appear in equations of motion for objects under gravity, namely, the inertial mass, mI , the passive gravitational mass, mP, and the active gravitational mass, mA. It is assumed that, for any objects, mI=mP=mA in the Newtonian gravity, and mI=mP in the Einsteinian gravity, oblivious to objects' sophisticated internal structure. Empirical examination of the equivalence probes deep into gravity theories. We study the possibility of carrying out new tests based on pulsar timing of the stellar triple system, PSR J 0337 +1715 . Various machine-precision three-body simulations are performed, from which, the equivalence-violating parameters are extracted with Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling that takes full correlations into account. We show that the difference in masses could be probed to 3 ×1 0-8 , improving the current constraints from lunar laser ranging on the post-Newtonian parameters that govern violations of mP=mI and mA=mP by thousands and millions, respectively. The test of mP=mA would represent the first test of Newton's third law with compact objects.

  3. PSR J0357+3205: A FAST-MOVING PULSAR WITH A VERY UNUSUAL X-RAY TRAIL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Luca, A.; Mignani, R. P.; Marelli, M.; Salvetti, D.; Sartore, N.; Caraveo, P. A.; Bignami, G. F. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica Milano, Via E. Bassini 15, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Belfiore, A.; Saz Parkinson, P., E-mail: deluca@iasf-milano.inaf.it [Department of Physics, Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2013-03-01

    The middle-aged PSR J0357+3205 is a nearby, radio-quiet, bright {gamma}-ray pulsar discovered by the Fermi mission. Our previous Chandra observation revealed a huge, very peculiar structure of diffuse X-ray emission originating at the pulsar position and extending for >9' on the plane of the sky. To better understand the nature of such a nebula, we have studied the proper motion of the parent pulsar. We performed relative astrometry on Chandra images of the field spanning a time baseline of 2.2 yr, unveiling a significant angular displacement of the pulsar counterpart, corresponding to a proper motion of 0.''165 {+-} 0.''030 yr{sup -1} at a position angle (P.A.) of 314 Degree-Sign {+-} 8 Degree-Sign . At a distance of {approx}500 pc, the space velocity of the pulsar would be of {approx}390 km s{sup -1} assuming no inclination with respect to the plane of the sky. The direction of the pulsar proper motion is aligned very well with the main axis of the X-ray nebula (P.A. = 315. Degree-Sign 5 {+-} 1. Degree-Sign 5), pointing to a physical, yet elusive, link between the nebula and the pulsar space velocity. No optical emission in the H{alpha} line is seen in a deep image collected at the Gemini telescope, which implies that the interstellar medium into which the pulsar is moving is fully ionized.

  4. Spectroscopic Studies of X-Ray Binary Pulsars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F. Nagase

    2002-03-01

    Several new features of X-ray binary pulsars are revealed from recent observations with ASCA, RXTE, BeppoSAX and other X-ray observatories. Among these, I will review in this paper some recent progress in spectroscopic studies of accreting X-ray pulsars in binary systems (XBPs). First, I will discuss soft excess features observed in the energy spectra of XBPs and propose that it is a common feature for various subclasses of XBPs. Next I will present some recent results of high resolution spectroscopy with ASCA and Chandra.

  5. High braking index pulsar PSR J1640-4631: low-mass neutron star with a large inclination angle?

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Wen-Cong

    2016-01-01

    Recent timing observation constrained the braking index of the X-ray pulsar PSR J1640-4631 to be $n=3.15\\pm0.03$, which is the highest value of all pulsars with measured braking indices so far. In this Letter, we investigate whether pulsar braking by combined between the magnetic dipole emission and the gravitational radiation might have a braking index greater than three. For conventional neutron star and low mass quark star candidates, the inferred ellipticities derived by the observed braking index are obviously much larger than the theoretical estimated maximum value. If PSR J1640-4631 is a low-mass neutron star with a mass of $0.1~ \\rm M_{\\odot}$, the inferred ellipticity can be approximately equal to the theoretical estimated maximum value. Because of the radio-quiet nature of this source, we employ the vacuum gap model developed by Ruderman and Sutherland to constrain the inclination angle to be $87.2-90^{\\circ}$. Based on this, we propose that a low-mass neutron star with a large inclination angle can...

  6. THE NEAREST MILLISECOND PULSAR REVISITED WITH XMM-NEWTON: IMPROVED MASS-RADIUS CONSTRAINTS FOR PSR J0437-4715

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I present an analysis of the deepest X-ray exposure of a radio millisecond pulsar (MSP) to date, an X-ray Multi Mirror-Newton European Photon Imaging Camera spectroscopic and timing observation of the nearest known MSP, PSR J0437-4715. The timing data clearly reveal a secondary broad X-ray pulse offset from the main pulse by ∼0.55 in rotational phase. In the context of a model of surface thermal emission from the hot polar caps of the neutron star, this can be plausibly explained by a magnetic dipole field that is significantly displaced from the stellar center. Such an offset, if commonplace in MSPs, has important implications for studies of the pulsar population, high energy pulsed emission, and the pulsar contribution to cosmic-ray positrons. The continuum emission shows evidence for at least three thermal components, with the hottest radiation most likely originating from the hot magnetic polar caps and the cooler emission from the bulk of the surface. I present pulse phase-resolved X-ray spectroscopy of PSR J0437-4715, which for the first time properly accounts for the system geometry of a radio pulsar. Such an approach is essential for unbiased measurements of the temperatures and emission areas of polar cap radiation from pulsars. Detailed modeling of the thermal pulses, including relativistic and atmospheric effects, provides a constraint on the redshift-corrected neutron star radius of R > 11.1 km (at 3σ conf.) for the current radio timing mass measurement of 1.76 M ☉. This limit favors 'stiff' equations of state.

  7. Be/X-Ray Pulsar Binary Science with LOFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2011-01-01

    Accretion disks are ubiquitous in astronomical sources. Accretion powered pulsars are a good test bed for accretion disk physics, because unlike for other objects, the spin of the neutron star is directly observable allowing us to see the effects of angular momentum transfer onto the pulsar. The combination of a sensitive wide-field monitor and the large area detector on LOFT will enable new detailed studies of accretion powered pulsars which I will review. RXTE observations have shown an unusually high number of Be/X-ray pulsar binaries in the SMC. Unlike binaries in the Milky Way, these systems are all at the same distance, allowing detailed population studies using the sensitive LOFT WFM, potentially providing connections to star formation episodes. For Galactic accreting pulsar systems, LOFT will allow measurement of spectral variations within individual pulses, mapping the accretion column in detail for the first time. LOFT will also provide better constraints on magnetic fields in accreting pulsars, allowing measurements of cyclotron features, observations of transitions into the centrifugal inhibition regime, and monitoring of spin-up rate vs flux correlations. Coordinated multi-wavelength observations are crucial to extracting the best science from LOFT from these and numerous other objects.

  8. Discovery of Pulsed Gamma Rays from the Young Radio Pulsar PSR J1028-5819 with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    OpenAIRE

    Collaboration, The Fermi-LAT

    2009-01-01

    Radio pulsar PSR J1028-5819 was recently discovered in a high-frequency search (at 3.1 GHz)in the error circle of the EGRET source 3EG J1027-5817. The spin-down power of this young pulsar is great enough to make it very likely the counterpart for the EGRET source. We report here the discovery of gamma-ray pulsations from PSR J1028-5819 in early observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. The gamma-ray light curve shows two sharp peaks having phase se...

  9. On the mechanism of the pulsed high energy emission from the pulsar PSR B1509-58

    CERN Document Server

    Chkheidze, Nino; 10.1111/j.1365-2966.2011.19887.x

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the high-energy (HE) ($<1$GeV) emission from the pulsar PSR B1509-58 and its relation to the radio emission in the 1.4GHz frequency band. The role of the quasi-linear diffusion in producing the pulsed HE radiation is investigated. We show that by means of the cyclotron instability the relatively low frequency waves excite, which due to the diffusion process influence the particle distribution function and switch on the synchrotron emission mechanism. We argue that the coincidence of HE main peak and the radio pulse is a direct consequence of the fact that the high and low frequency radiation is produced simultaneously in a local area of the pulsar magnetosphere. In the paper we also consider the absence of the radio counter pulse and explain this fact.

  10. The TeV γ-ray binary PSR B1259-63. Observations with the high energy stereoscopic system in the years 2005-2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PSR B1259-63/SS2883 is a binary system where a 48 ms pulsar orbits a massive Be star with a period of 3.4 years. The system exhibits variable, non-thermal radiation around periastron on the highly eccentric orbit (e=0.87) visible from radio to very high energies (VHE; E>100 GeV). When being detected in TeV γ-rays with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) in 2004 it became known as the first variable galactic VHE source. This thesis presents VHE data from PSR B1259-63 as taken during the years 2005, 2006 and before as well as shortly after the 2007 periastron passage. These data extend the knowledge of the lightcurve of this object to all phases of the binary orbit. The lightcurve constrains physical mechanisms present in this TeV source. Observations of VHE γ-rays with the H.E.S.S. telescope array using the Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Technique were performed. The H.E.S.S. instrument features an angular resolution of stat±0.2sys and flux normalisation Φ0=(1.1±0.1stat±0.2sys) x 10-12 TeV-1cm-2s-1. PSR B1259-63 was also monitored in 2005 and 2006, far from periastron passage, comprising 8.9 h and 7.5 h of exposure, respectively. No significant excess of γ-rays is seen in those observations. PSR B1259-63 has been re-confirmed as a variable TeV γ-ray emitter. The firm detection of VHE photons emitted at a true anomaly θ∼0.35 of the pulsar orbit, i.e. already ∝50 days prior to the periastron passage, disfavors the stellar disc target scenario as a primary emission mechanism, based on current knowledge about the companion star's disc inclination, extension, and density profile. In a phenomenological study indirect evidence that PSR B1259-63 could in fact be a periodical VHE emitter is presented using the TeV data discussed in this work. While the TeV energy flux level seems to be only dependent on the binary separation this behavior is not seen in X-rays. Moreover, model calculations based on inverse compton (IC) scattering of shock accelerated

  11. The TeV {gamma}-ray binary PSR B1259-63. Observations with the high energy stereoscopic system in the years 2005-2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerschhaggl, Matthias

    2010-04-06

    PSR B1259-63/SS2883 is a binary system where a 48 ms pulsar orbits a massive Be star with a period of 3.4 years. The system exhibits variable, non-thermal radiation around periastron on the highly eccentric orbit (e=0.87) visible from radio to very high energies (VHE; E>100 GeV). When being detected in TeV {gamma}-rays with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) in 2004 it became known as the first variable galactic VHE source. This thesis presents VHE data from PSR B1259-63 as taken during the years 2005, 2006 and before as well as shortly after the 2007 periastron passage. These data extend the knowledge of the lightcurve of this object to all phases of the binary orbit. The lightcurve constrains physical mechanisms present in this TeV source. Observations of VHE {gamma}-rays with the H.E.S.S. telescope array using the Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Technique were performed. The H.E.S.S. instrument features an angular resolution of < 0.1 and an energy resolution of < 20%. Gamma-ray events in an energy range of 0.5-70 TeV were recorded. From these data, energy spectra and lightcurve with a monthly time sampling were extracted. VHE {gamma}-ray emission from PSRB1259-63 was detected with an overall significance of 9.5 standard deviations using 55 h of exposure, obtained from April to August 2007. The monthly flux of -rays during the observation period was measured, yielding VHE lightcurve data for the early pre-periastron phase of the system for the first time. No spectral variability was found on timescales of months. The spectrum is described by a power law with a photon index of {gamma}=2.8{+-}0.2{sub stat}{+-}0.2{sub sys} and flux normalisation {phi}{sub 0}=(1.1{+-}0.1{sub stat}{+-}0.2{sub sys}) x 10{sup -12} TeV{sup -1}cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. PSR B1259-63 was also monitored in 2005 and 2006, far from periastron passage, comprising 8.9 h and 7.5 h of exposure, respectively. No significant excess of {gamma}-rays is seen in those observations. PSR B1259-63 has

  12. A pilot ASKAP survey of radio transient events in the region around the intermittent pulsar PSR J1107-5907

    CERN Document Server

    Hobbs, G; Bell, M E; Kerr, M; Rowlinson, A; Johnston, S; Shannon, R M; Voronkov, M A; Ward, C; Banyer, J; Hancock, P J; Murphy, Tara; Allison, J R; Amy, S W; Ball, L; Bannister, K; Bock, D C -J; Brodrick, D; Brothers, M; Brown, A J; Bunton, J D; Chapman, J; Chippendale, A P; Chung, Y; DeBoer, D; Diamond, P; Edwards, P G; Ekers, R; Ferris, R H; Forsyth, R; Gough, R; Grancea, A; Gupta, N; Harvey-Smith, L; Hay, S; Hayman, D B; Hotan, A W; Hoyle, S; Humphreys, B; Indermuehle, B; Jacka, C E; Jackson, C A; Jackson, S; Jeganathan, K; Joseph, J; Kendall, R; Kiraly, D; Koribalski, B; Leach, M; Lenc, E; MacLeod, A; Mader, S; Marquarding, M; Marvil, J; McClure-Griffiths, N; McConnell, D; Mirtschin, P; Neuhold, S; Ng, A; Norris, R P; O'Sullivan, J; Pearce, S; Phillips, C J; Popping, A; Qiao, R Y; Reynolds, J E; Roberts, P; Sault, R J; Schinckel, A E T; Serra, P; Shaw, R; Shimwell, T W; Storey, M; Sweetnam, A W; Tzioumis, A; Westmeier, T; Whiting, M; Wilson, C D

    2015-01-01

    We use observations from the Boolardy Engineering Test Array (BETA) of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope to search for transient radio sources in the field around the intermittent pulsar PSR J1107-5907. The pulsar is thought to switch between an "off" state in which no emission is detectable, a weak state and a strong state. We ran three independent transient detection pipelines on two-minute snapshot images from a 13 hour BETA observation in order to 1) study the emission from the pulsar, 2) search for other transient emission from elsewhere in the image and 3) to compare the results from the different transient detection pipelines. The pulsar was easily detected as a transient source and, over the course of the observations, it switched into the strong state three times giving a typical timescale between the strong emission states of 3.7 hours. After the first switch it remained in the strong state for almost 40 minutes. The other strong states lasted less than 4 minutes. Th...

  13. Glitch event observed in the pulsar PSR J1740-3015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Fabian; Bailes, Matthew; Barr, Ewan; Bateman, Timothy; Bhandari, Shivani; Caleb, Manisha; Campbell-Wilson, Duncan; Farah, Wael; Flynn, Chris; Green, Anne; Hunstead, Richard; Jameson, Andrew; Keane, Evan; Krishnan, Vivek Venkatraman; Parthasarathy, Aditya; Straten, Willem van

    2016-05-01

    As part of the UTMOST project at the recently refurbished Molonglo Observatory Synthesis radio Telescope (MOST) near Canberra, Australia, we carry out a pulsar timing programme in which we observe a large number of pulsars with up to daily cadence.

  14. A Highly Eccentric 3.9-Millisecond Binary Pulsar in the Globular Cluster NGC 6652

    CERN Document Server

    DeCesar, Megan E; Kaplan, David L; Ray, Paul S; Geller, Aaron M

    2015-01-01

    We present the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope discovery of the highly eccentric binary millisecond pulsar PSR J1835$-$3259A in the Fermi Large Area Telescope-detected globular cluster NGC 6652. Timing over one orbit yields the pulse period 3.89 ms, orbital period 9.25 d, eccentricity $\\sim 0.95$, and an unusually high companion mass of $0.74\\,M_{\\odot}$ assuming a $1.4\\,M_{\\odot}$ pulsar. We caution that the lack of data near periastron prevents a precise measurement of the eccentricity, and that further timing is necessary to constrain this and the other orbital parameters. From tidal considerations, we find that the companion must be a compact object. This system likely formed through an exchange encounter in the dense cluster environment. Our initial timing results predict the measurements of at least two post-Keplerian parameters with long-term phase-connected timing: the rate of periastron advance $\\dot{\\omega} \\sim 0.1^{\\circ}\\,$yr$^{-1}$, requiring 1 yr of phase connection; and the Einstein delay ...

  15. Timing the main-sequence-star binary pulsar J1740-3052

    CERN Document Server

    Madsen, E C; Kramer, M; Camilo, F; Hobbs, G B; Janssen, G H; Lyne, A G; Manchester, R N; Possenti, A; Stappers, B W

    2012-01-01

    PSR J1740-3052 is a young pulsar in orbit around a companion that is most likely a B-type main-sequence star. Since its discovery more than a decade ago, data have been taken at several frequencies with instruments at the Green Bank, Parkes, Lovell, and Westerbork telescopes. We measure scattering timescales in the pulse profiles and dispersion measure changes as a function of binary orbital phase and present evidence that both of these vary as would be expected due to a wind from the companion star. Using pulse arrival times that have been corrected for the observed periodic dispersion measure changes, we find a timing solution spanning 1997 November to 2011 March. This includes measurements of the advance of periastron and the change in the projected semimajor axis of the orbit and sets constraints on the orbital geometry. From these constraints, we estimate that the pulsar received a kick of at least ~50 km/s at birth. A quasi-periodic signal is present in the timing residuals with a period of 2.2 times th...

  16. A Massive Pulsar in a Compact Relativistic Binary

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadis, John; Wex, Norbert; Tauris, Thomas M; Lynch, Ryan S; van Kerkwijk, Marten H; Kramer, Michael; Bassa, Cees; Dhillon, Vik S; Driebe, Thomas; Hessels, Jason W T; Kaspi, Victoria M; Kondratiev, Vladislav I; Langer, Norbert; Marsh, Thomas R; McLaughlin, Maura A; Pennucci, Timothy T; Ransom, Scott M; Stairs, Ingrid H; van Leeuwen, Joeri; Verbiest, Joris P W; Whelan, David G; 10.1126/science.1233232

    2013-01-01

    Many physically motivated extensions to general relativity (GR) predict significant deviations in the properties of spacetime surrounding massive neutron stars. We report the measurement of a 2.01 +/- 0.04 solar mass pulsar in a 2.46-hr orbit with a 0.172 +/- 0.003 solar mass white dwarf. The high pulsar mass and the compact orbit make this system a sensitive laboratory of a previously untested strong-field gravity regime. Thus far, the observed orbital decay agrees with GR, supporting its validity even for the extreme conditions present in the system. The resulting constraints on deviations support the use of GR-based templates for ground-based gravitational wave detectors. Additionally, the system strengthens recent constraints on the properties of dense matter and provides insight to binary stellar astrophysics and pulsar recycling.

  17. Gamma-rays from nebulae around binary systems containing energetic rotation powered pulsars

    OpenAIRE

    Bednarek, W.; Sitarek, J.

    2013-01-01

    We consider nebulae which are created around binary systems containing rotation powered pulsars and companion stars with strong stellar winds. It is proposed that the stellar and pulsar winds have to mix at some distance from the binary system, defined by the orbital period of the companion stars and the velocity of the stellar wind. The mixed pulsar-stellar wind expands with a specific velocity determined by the pulsar power and the mass loss rate of the companion star. Relativistic particle...

  18. A pilot ASKAP survey of radio transient events in the region around the intermittent pulsar PSR J1107-5907

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, G.; Heywood, I.; Bell, M. E.; Kerr, M.; Rowlinson, A.; Johnston, S.; Shannon, R. M.; Voronkov, M. A.; Ward, C.; Banyer, J.; Hancock, P. J.; Murphy, Tara; Allison, J. R.; Amy, S. W.; Ball, L.; Bannister, K.; Bock, D. C.-J.; Brodrick, D.; Brothers, M.; Brown, A. J.; Bunton, J. D.; Chapman, J.; Chippendale, A. P.; Chung, Y.; DeBoer, D.; Diamond, P.; Edwards, P. G.; Ekers, R.; Ferris, R. H.; Forsyth, R.; Gough, R.; Grancea, A.; Gupta, N.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Hay, S.; Hayman, D. B.; Hotan, A. W.; Hoyle, S.; Humphreys, B.; Indermuehle, B.; Jacka, C. E.; Jackson, C. A.; Jackson, S.; Jeganathan, K.; Joseph, J.; Kendall, R.; Kiraly, D.; Koribalski, B.; Leach, M.; Lenc, E.; MacLeod, A.; Mader, S.; Marquarding, M.; Marvil, J.; McClure-Griffiths, N.; McConnell, D.; Mirtschin, P.; Neuhold, S.; Ng, A.; Norris, R. P.; O'Sullivan, J.; Pearce, S.; Phillips, C. J.; Popping, A.; Qiao, R. Y.; Reynolds, J. E.; Roberts, P.; Sault, R. J.; Schinckel, A. E. T.; Serra, P.; Shaw, R.; Shimwell, T. W.; Storey, M.; Sweetnam, A. W.; Tzioumis, A.; Westmeier, T.; Whiting, M.; Wilson, C. D.

    2016-03-01

    We use observations from the Boolardy Engineering Test Array (BETA) of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope to search for transient radio sources in the field around the intermittent pulsar PSR J1107-5907. The pulsar is thought to switch between an `off' state in which no emission is detectable, a weak state and a strong state. We ran three independent transient detection pipelines on two-minute snapshot images from a 13 h BETA observation in order to (1) study the emission from the pulsar, (2) search for other transient emission from elsewhere in the image and (3) to compare the results from the different transient detection pipelines. The pulsar was easily detected as a transient source and, over the course of the observations, it switched into the strong state three times giving a typical time-scale between the strong emission states of 3.7 h. After the first switch it remained in the strong state for almost 40 min. The other strong states lasted less than 4 min. The second state change was confirmed using observations with the Parkes radio telescope. No other transient events were found and we place constraints on the surface density of such events on these time-scales. The high sensitivity Parkes observations enabled us to detect individual bright pulses during the weak state and to study the strong state over a wide observing band. We conclude by showing that future transient surveys with ASKAP will have the potential to probe the intermittent pulsar population.

  19. DISCOVERY OF PULSED γ-RAYS FROM THE YOUNG RADIO PULSAR PSR J1028-5819 WITH THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radio pulsar PSR J1028-5819 was recently discovered in a high-frequency search (at 3.1 GHz) in the error circle of the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) source 3EG J1027-5817. The spin-down power of this young pulsar is great enough to make it very likely the counterpart for the EGRET source. We report here the discovery of γ-ray pulsations from PSR J1028-5819 in early observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. The γ-ray light curve shows two sharp peaks having phase separation of 0.460 ± 0.004, trailing the very narrow radio pulse by 0.200 ± 0.003 in phase, very similar to that of other known γ-ray pulsars. The measured γ-ray flux gives an efficiency for the pulsar of ∼10-20% (for outer magnetosphere beam models). No evidence of a surrounding pulsar wind nebula is seen in the current Fermi data but limits on associated emission are weak because the source lies in a crowded region with high background emission. However, the improved angular resolution afforded by the LAT enables the disentanglement of the previous COS-B and EGRET source detections into at least two distinct sources, one of which is now identified as PSR J1028-5819.

  20. Gemini optical observations of binary millisecond-pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Testa, V; Pallanca, C; Corongiu, A; Ferraro, F R

    2015-01-01

    Milli-second pulsars (MSPs) are rapidly spinning neutron stars, with spin periods P_s <= 10 ms, which have been most likely spun up after a phase of matter accretion from a companion star. In this work we present the results of the search for the companion stars of four binary milli-second pulsars, carried out with archival data from the Gemini South telescope. Based upon a very good positional coincidence with the pulsar radio coordinates, we likely identified the companion stars to three MSPs, namely PSRJ0614-3329 (g=21.95 +- 0.05), J1231-1411 (g=25.40 +-0.23), and J2017+0603 (g=24.72 +- 0.28). For the last pulsar (PSRJ0613-0200) the identification was hampered by the presence of a bright star (g=16 +- 0.03) at \\sim 2" from the pulsar radio coordinates and we could only set 3-sigma upper limits of g=25.0, r= 24.3, and i= 24.2 on the magnitudes of its companion star. The candidate companion stars to PSRJ0614-3329, J1231-1411, and J2017+0603 can be tentatively identified as He white dwarfs (WDs) on the bas...

  1. X-ray analysis of the proper motion and pulsar wind nebula for PSR J1741-2054

    CERN Document Server

    Auchettl, Katie; Romani, Roger W; Posselt, Bettina; Pavlov, George G; Kargaltsev, Oleg; Ng, C-Y; Temim, Tea; Weisskopf, Martin C; Bykov, Andrei; Swartz, Douglas A

    2015-01-01

    We obtained six observations of PSR J1741-2054 using the $Chandra$ ACIS-S detector totaling $\\sim$300 ks. By registering this new epoch of observations to an archival observation taken 3.2 years earlier using X-ray point sources in the field of view, we have measured the pulsar proper motion at $\\mu =109 \\pm 10$ mas/yr. The spectrum of the pulsar can be described by an absorbed power law with photon index $\\Gamma$=2.68$\\pm$0.04, plus a blackbody with an emission radius of (4.5$^{+3.2}_{-2.5})d_{0.38}$ km, for a DM-estimated distance of $0.38d_{0.38}$ kpc and a temperature of $61.7\\pm3.0$ eV. Emission from the compact nebula is well described by an absorbed power law model with a photon index of $\\Gamma$ = 1.67$\\pm$0.06, while the diffuse emission seen as a trail extending northeast of the pulsar shows no evidence of synchrotron cooling. We also looked for extended features that might represent a jet or torus-like structure using image deconvolution and PSF-subtraction but we find no conclusive evidence of suc...

  2. Timing, polarimetry and physics of the bright, nearby millisecond pulsar PSR J0437-4715 - a single-pulse perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Osłowski, S; Bailes, M; Jameson, A; Hobbs, G

    2014-01-01

    Single pulses from radio pulsars contain a wealth of information about emission and propagation in the magnetosphere and insight into their timing properties. It was recently demonstrated that single-pulse emission is responsible for limiting the timing stability of the brightest of millisecond pulsars. We report on an analysis of more than a million single-pulses from PSR J0437-4715 and present various statistical properties such as the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) distribution, timing and polarimetry of average profiles integrated from subpulses with chosen S/N cut-offs, modulation properties of the emission, phase-resolved statistics of the S/N, and two dimensional spherical histograms of the polarization vector orientation. The last of these indicates the presence of orthogonally polarised modes (OPMs). Combined with the dependence of the polarisation fraction on the S/N and polarimetry of the brightest pulses, the existence of OPMs constrains pulsar emission mechanisms and models for the plasma physics in...

  3. The Nearest Millisecond Pulsar Revisited with XMM-Newton: Improved Mass-Radius Constraints for PSR J0437-4715

    CERN Document Server

    Bogdanov, Slavko

    2012-01-01

    I present an analysis of the deepest X-ray exposure of a radio millisecond pulsar (MSP) to date, an X-ray Multi Mirror-Newton European Photon Imaging Camera spectroscopic and timing observation of the nearest known MSP, PSR J0437--4715. The timing data clearly reveal a secondary broad X-ray pulse offset from the main pulse by $\\sim$0.55 in rotational phase. In the context of a model of surface thermal emission from the hot polar caps of the neutron star, this can be plausibly explained by a magnetic dipole field that is significantly displaced from the stellar center. Such an offset, if commonplace in MSPs, has important implications for studies of the pulsar population, high energy pulsed emission, and the pulsar contribution to cosmic ray positrons. The continuum emission shows evidence for at least three thermal components, with the hottest radiation most likely originating from the hot magnetic polar caps and the cooler emission from the bulk of the surface. I present pulse phase-resolved X-ray spectrosco...

  4. Discovery of a millisecond pulsar in the 5.4 day binary 3FGL J1417.5-4402: observing the late phase of pulsar recycling

    CERN Document Server

    Camilo, F; Ransom, S M; Halpern, J P; Bogdanov, S; Kerr, M; Ray, P S; Cordes, J M; Sarkissian, J; Barr, E D; Ferrara, E C

    2016-01-01

    In a search of the unidentified Fermi gamma-ray source 3FGL J1417.5-4402 with the Parkes radio telescope, we discovered PSR J1417-4402, a 2.66 ms pulsar having the same 5.4 day orbital period as the optical and X-ray binary identified by Strader et al. The existence of radio pulsations implies that the neutron star is currently not accreting. Substantial outflows from the companion render the radio pulsar undetectable for more than half of the orbit, and may contribute to the observed Halpha emission. Our initial pulsar observations, together with the optically inferred orbit and inclination, imply a mass ratio of 0.171+/-0.002, a companion mass of M_2=0.33+/-0.03 Msun, and a neutron star mass in the range 1.77

  5. THE QUASI-ROCHE LOBE OVERFLOW STATE IN THE EVOLUTION OF CLOSE BINARY SYSTEMS CONTAINING A RADIO PULSAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the evolution of close binary systems formed by a normal (solar composition), intermediate-mass-donor star together with a neutron star. We consider models including irradiation feedback and evaporation. These nonstandard ingredients deeply modify the mass-transfer stages of these binaries. While models that neglect irradiation feedback undergo continuous, long-standing mass-transfer episodes, models including these effects suffer a number of cycles of mass transfer and detachment. During mass transfer, the systems should reveal themselves as low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), whereas when they are detached they behave as binary radio pulsars. We show that at these stages irradiated models are in a Roche lobe overflow (RLOF) state or in a quasi-RLOF state. Quasi-RLOF stars have radii slightly smaller than their Roche lobes. Remarkably, these conditions are attained for an orbital period as well as donor mass values in the range corresponding to a family of binary radio pulsars known as ''redbacks''. Thus, redback companions should be quasi-RLOF stars. We show that the characteristics of the redback system PSR J1723-2837 are accounted for by these models. In each mass-transfer cycle these systems should switch from LMXB to binary radio pulsar states with a timescale of approximately one million years. However, there is recent and fast growing evidence of systems switching on far shorter, human timescales. This should be related to instabilities in the accretion disk surrounding the neutron star and/or radio ejection, still to be included in the model having the quasi-RLOF state as a general condition

  6. The Quasi-Roche Lobe Overflow State in the Evolution of Close Binary Systems Containing a Radio Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benvenuto, O. G.; De Vito, M. A.; Horvath, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    We study the evolution of close binary systems formed by a normal (solar composition), intermediate-mass-donor star together with a neutron star. We consider models including irradiation feedback and evaporation. These nonstandard ingredients deeply modify the mass-transfer stages of these binaries. While models that neglect irradiation feedback undergo continuous, long-standing mass-transfer episodes, models including these effects suffer a number of cycles of mass transfer and detachment. During mass transfer, the systems should reveal themselves as low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), whereas when they are detached they behave as binary radio pulsars. We show that at these stages irradiated models are in a Roche lobe overflow (RLOF) state or in a quasi-RLOF state. Quasi-RLOF stars have radii slightly smaller than their Roche lobes. Remarkably, these conditions are attained for an orbital period as well as donor mass values in the range corresponding to a family of binary radio pulsars known as "redbacks." Thus, redback companions should be quasi-RLOF stars. We show that the characteristics of the redback system PSR J1723-2837 are accounted for by these models. In each mass-transfer cycle these systems should switch from LMXB to binary radio pulsar states with a timescale of approximately one million years. However, there is recent and fast growing evidence of systems switching on far shorter, human timescales. This should be related to instabilities in the accretion disk surrounding the neutron star and/or radio ejection, still to be included in the model having the quasi-RLOF state as a general condition.

  7. EINSTEIN-HOME DISCOVERY OF 24 PULSARS IN THE PARKES MULTI-BEAM PULSAR SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have conducted a new search for radio pulsars in compact binary systems in the Parkes multi-beam pulsar survey (PMPS) data, employing novel methods to remove the Doppler modulation from binary motion. This has yielded unparalleled sensitivity to pulsars in compact binaries. The required computation time of ≈17, 000 CPU core years was provided by the distributed volunteer computing project Einstein-Home, which has a sustained computing power of about 1 PFlop s–1. We discovered 24 new pulsars in our search, 18 of which were isolated pulsars, and 6 were members of binary systems. Despite the wide filterbank channels and relatively slow sampling time of the PMPS data, we found pulsars with very large ratios of dispersion measure (DM) to spin period. Among those is PSR J1748–3009, the millisecond pulsar with the highest known DM (≈420 pc cm–3). We also discovered PSR J1840–0643, which is in a binary system with an orbital period of 937 days, the fourth largest known. The new pulsar J1750–2536 likely belongs to the rare class of intermediate-mass binary pulsars. Three of the isolated pulsars show long-term nulling or intermittency in their emission, further increasing this growing family. Our discoveries demonstrate the value of distributed volunteer computing for data-driven astronomy and the importance of applying new analysis methods to extensively searched data

  8. EINSTEIN-HOME DISCOVERY OF 24 PULSARS IN THE PARKES MULTI-BEAM PULSAR SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knispel, B.; Kim, H.; Allen, B.; Aulbert, C.; Bock, O.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Fehrmann, H.; Machenschalk, B. [Albert-Einstein-Institut, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Eatough, R. P.; Keane, E. F.; Kramer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Anderson, D. [University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Crawford, F.; Rastawicki, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Franklin and Marshall College, P.O. Box 3003, Lancaster, PA 17604 (United States); Hammer, D.; Papa, M. A.; Siemens, X. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Lyne, A. G. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Miller, R. B. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, 111 White Hall, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Sarkissian, J., E-mail: benjamin.knispel@aei.mpg.de [CSIRO Parkes Observatory, Parkes, NSW 2870 (Australia); and others

    2013-09-10

    We have conducted a new search for radio pulsars in compact binary systems in the Parkes multi-beam pulsar survey (PMPS) data, employing novel methods to remove the Doppler modulation from binary motion. This has yielded unparalleled sensitivity to pulsars in compact binaries. The required computation time of Almost-Equal-To 17, 000 CPU core years was provided by the distributed volunteer computing project Einstein-Home, which has a sustained computing power of about 1 PFlop s{sup -1}. We discovered 24 new pulsars in our search, 18 of which were isolated pulsars, and 6 were members of binary systems. Despite the wide filterbank channels and relatively slow sampling time of the PMPS data, we found pulsars with very large ratios of dispersion measure (DM) to spin period. Among those is PSR J1748-3009, the millisecond pulsar with the highest known DM ( Almost-Equal-To 420 pc cm{sup -3}). We also discovered PSR J1840-0643, which is in a binary system with an orbital period of 937 days, the fourth largest known. The new pulsar J1750-2536 likely belongs to the rare class of intermediate-mass binary pulsars. Three of the isolated pulsars show long-term nulling or intermittency in their emission, further increasing this growing family. Our discoveries demonstrate the value of distributed volunteer computing for data-driven astronomy and the importance of applying new analysis methods to extensively searched data.

  9. DISCOVERY OF HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM THE BINARY SYSTEM PSR B1259-63/LS 2883 AROUND PERIASTRON WITH FERMI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the discovery of ≥100 MeV γ-rays from the binary system PSR B1259-63/LS 2883 using the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board Fermi. The system comprises a radio pulsar in orbit around a Be star. We report on LAT observations from near apastron to ∼128 days after the time of periastron, tp , on 2010 December 15. No γ-ray emission was detected from this source when it was far from periastron. Faint γ-ray emission appeared as the pulsar approached periastron. At ∼tp + 30 days, the ≥100 MeV γ-ray flux increased over a period of a few days to a peak flux 20-30 times that seen during the pre-periastron period, but with a softer spectrum. For the following month, it was seen to be variable on daily timescales, but remained at ∼(1-4) x 10-6 cm-2 s-1 before starting to fade at ∼tp + 57 days. The total γ-ray luminosity observed during this period is comparable to the spin-down power of the pulsar. Simultaneous radio and X-ray observations of the source showed no corresponding dramatic changes in radio and X-ray flux between the pre-periastron and post-periastron flares. We discuss possible explanations for the observed γ-ray-only flaring of the source.

  10. New Radial Velocities for 30 Candidate Runaway Stars and a Possible Binary Supernova Origin for HIP 9470 and PSR J0152-1637

    CERN Document Server

    Tetzlaff, N; Bieryla, A; Neuhäuser, R

    2014-01-01

    We report new radial velocity measurements for 30 candidate runaway stars. We revise their age estimates and compute their past trajectories in the Galaxy in order to determine their birthplaces. We find that seven of the stars could be younger than ~100 Myr, and for five of them we identify multiple young clusters and associations in which they may have formed. For the youngest star in the sample, HIP 9470, we suggest a possible ejection scenario in a supernova event, and also that it may be associated with the young pulsar PSR J0152-1637. Our spectroscopic observations reveal seven of the stars in the sample of 30 to be previously unknown spectroscopic binaries. Orbital solutions for four of them are reported here as well.

  11. Search for VHE γ-ray emission from the direction of the two millisecond pulsars PSR J0437-4715 and PSR J1824-2452 and the composite supernova remnant Kes 75 with H.E.S.S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work reports on the search for pulsed and steady very-high energy (VHE) gamma-ray emission in the energy range extending from 100 GeV up to 100 TeV from the direction of three pulsars with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.). Pulsed gamma-ray radiation from pulsars with energies beyond 100 GeV was found thus far only for the young and energetic Crab pulsar. A special class of pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) is associated with composite supernova remnants (SNRs) where the PWN is centered in an expanding SNR shell. In the first part of this thesis, the results on the search for pulsed and steady VHE gamma-ray emission from the two millisecond pulsars, PSR J0437-4715 and PSR J1824-2452, are presented. Parts of the observations were conducted in a special trigger setup (the topological trigger with convergent pointing) to reduce the energy threshold of the instrument. No signal of pulsed or steady emission is found and upper limits on the pulsed and steady gamma-ray flux are derived. The upper limits on the pulsed gamma-ray flux are compared to existing model predictions and, in the case of PSR J1824-2452, allow the range of possible viewing geometries in some models to be constrained. In the second part of this work, results on the search for pulsed and steady VHE gamma-ray emission from the direction of the composite SNR Kes 75 are presented. The PWN in the center of Kes 75 is powered by a very young and powerful pulsar, PSR J1846-0258, that has an exceptionally high magnetic field. While no hint for pulsed emission is found, steady VHE gamma-ray emission is detected with a statistical significance of 10 sigma from a point-like source. The VHE gamma-ray emission is spatially coincident with the PWN and the SNR shell. Both are discussed as a possible origin for the observed emission. The pulsar of Kes 75 would be the youngest pulsar known to date to power a VHE PWN.

  12. Evidence for a Massive Neutron Star from a Radial-Velocity Study of the Companion to the Black Widow Pulsar PSR B1957+20

    CERN Document Server

    van Kerkwijk, M H; Kulkarni, S R

    2010-01-01

    The most massive neutron stars constrain the behavior of ultra-dense matter, with larger masses possible only for increasingly stiff equations of state. Here, we present evidence that the black widow pulsar, PSR B1957+20, has a high mass. We took spectra of its strongly irradiated companion and found an observed radial-velocity amplitude of K_obs=324+/-3 km/s. Correcting this for the fact that, due to the irradiation, the center of light lies inward relative to the center of mass, we infer a true radial-velocity amplitude of K_2=353+/-4 km/s and a mass ratio q=M_PSR/M_2=69.2+/-0.8. Combined with the inclination i=65+/-2 deg inferred from models of the lightcurve, our best-fit pulsar mass is M_PSR=2.40+/-0.12 M_sun. We discuss possible systematic uncertainties, in particular in the lightcurve modeling. Taking an upper limit of i343 km/s (q>67.3), we infer a lower limit to the pulsar mass of M_PSR>1.66 M_sun.

  13. THE LIGHT CURVE AND INTERNAL MAGNETIC FIELD OF THE MODE-SWITCHING PULSAR PSR B0943+10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of radio pulsars exhibit intriguing mode-switching behavior. Recent observations of PSR B0943+10 revealed correlated radio and X-ray mode switches, providing a new avenue for understanding this class of objects. The large X-ray pulse fraction observed during the radio-quiet phase (Q-mode) was previously interpreted as a result of changing obscuration of X-rays by dense magnetosphere plasma. We show that the large X-ray pulse fraction can be explained by including the beaming effect of a magnetic atmosphere, while remaining consistent with the dipole field geometry constrained by radio observations. We also explore a more extreme magnetic field configuration, where a magnetic dipole displaced from the center of the star produces two magnetic polar caps of different sizes and magnetic field strengths. These models are currently consistent with data in radio and X-rays and can be tested or constrained by future X-ray observations

  14. The Origin of the Young Pulsar PSR J0826+2637 and Its Possible Former Companion HIP 13962

    CERN Document Server

    Tetzlaff, N; Neuhaeuser, R; Kovtyukh, V V

    2014-01-01

    We aim to identify the birth place of the young pulsar PSR J0826+2637 in order to determine its kinematic age and give constraints on its radial and spatial (kick) velocity. Since the majority of neutron star (NS) progenitors are in associations or clusters, we search for a possible origin of the NS inside such stellar groups. We trace back the NS and the centres of possible birth associations and clusters to find close encounters. The kinematic age is then given by the time since the encounter. We use Monte Carlo simulations to account for observational uncertainties and the unknown radial velocity of the NS. We evaluate the outcome statistically. In order to find further indication for our findings, we also search for a runaway star that could be the former companion if it exists. We find that PSR J0826+2637 was probably born in the small young cluster Stock 7 ~3 Myr ago. This result is supported by the identification of the former companion candidate HIP 13962 (runaway star with spectral type G0Ia). The sc...

  15. On Low Mass X-ray Binaries and Millisecond Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Burderi, Luciano

    2013-01-01

    The detection, in 1998, of the first Accreting Millisecond Pulsar, started an exciting season of continuing discoveries in the fashinating field of compact binary systems harbouring a neutron star. Indeed, in these last three lustres, thanks to the extraordinary performances of astronomical detectors, on ground as well as on board of satellites, mainly in the Radio, Optical, X-ray, and Gamma-ray bands, astrophysicists had the opportunity to thoroughly investigate the so-called Recycling Scenario: the evolutionary path leading to the formation of a Millisecond Radio Pulsar. The most intriguing phase is certainly the spin-up stage during which, because of the accretion of matter and angular momentum, the neutron star accumulates an extraordinary amount of mechanical rotational energy, up to one percent of its whole rest-mass energy. These millisecond spinning neutron stars are truly extreme physical objects: General and Special Relativity are fully in action, since their surfaces, attaining speeds close to one ...

  16. High-Energy Emission at Shocks in Millisecond Pulsar Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kust Harding, Alice; Wadiasingh, Zorawar; Venter, Christo; Boettcher, Markus

    2016-04-01

    A large number of new Black Widow (BW) and Redback (RB) energetic millisecond pulsars have been discovered through radio searches of unidentified Fermi sources, increasing the known number of these systems from 4 to 28. We model the high-energy emission components from particles accelerated to several TeV in intrabinary shocks in BW and RB systems, and their predicted modulation at the binary orbital period. Synchrotron emission is expected at X-ray energies and such modulated emission has already been detected by Chandra and XMM. Inverse Compton emission from accelerated particles scattering the UV emission from the radiated companion star is expected in the Fermi and TeV bands. Detections or constraints on this emission will probe the unknown physics of pulsar winds.

  17. Constraining the Relative Inclinations of the Planets B and C of the Millisecond Pulsar PSR B1257+12

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lorenzo Iorio

    2010-09-01

    We investigate on the relative inclination of the planets B and C orbiting the pulsar PSR B1257+12. First, we show that the third Kepler’s law does represent an adequate model for the orbital periods of the planets, because other Newtonian and Einsteinian corrections are orders of magnitude smaller than the accuracy in measuring B/C. Then, on the basis of available timing data, we determine the ratio sin C/ sin B = 0.92 ± 0.05 of the orbital inclinations B and C independently of the pulsar’s mass . It turns out that coplanarity of the orbits of B and C would imply a violation of the equivalence principle. Adopting a pulsar mass range 1 ≲ ≲ 3, in solar masses (supported by present-day theoretical and observational bounds for pulsar’s masses), both face-on and edge-on orbital configurations for the orbits of the two planets are ruled out; the acceptable inclinations for B span the range 36 deg ≲ B ≲ 66 deg, with a corresponding relative inclination range 6 deg ≲ (C − B) ≲ 13 deg.

  18. On the disruption of pulsar and X-ray binaries in globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Verbunt, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The stellar encounter rate Gamma has been shown to be strongly correlated with the number of X-ray binaries in clusters and also to the number of radio pulsars. However, the pulsar populations in different clusters show remarkably different characteristics: in some GCs the population is dominated by binary systems, in others by single pulsars and exotic systems that result from exchange encounters. In this paper, we describe a second dynamical parameter for globular clusters, the encounter rate for a single binary, gamma. We find that this parameter provides a good characterization of the differences between the pulsar populations of different globular clusters. The higher gamma is for any particular globular cluster the more isolated pulsars and products of exchange interactions are observed. Furthermore, we also find that slow and "young" pulsars are found almost exclusively in clusters with a high gamma; this suggests that these kinds of objects are formed by the disruption of X-ray binaries, thus halting ...

  19. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey: The fastest rotating O-type star and shortest period LMC pulsar - remnants of a supernova disrupted binary?

    CERN Document Server

    Dufton, P L; Evans, C J; Brott, I; Cantiello, M; de Koter, A; de Mink, S E; Fraser, M; Hénault-Brunet, V; Howarth, I D; Langer, N; Lennon, D J; Markova, N; Sana, H; Taylor, W D

    2011-01-01

    We present a spectroscopic analysis of an extremely rapidly rotating late O-type star, VFTS102, observed during a spectroscopic survey of 30 Doradus. VFTS102 has a projected rotational velocity larger than 500\\kms\\ and probably as large as 600\\kms; as such it would appear to be the most rapidly rotating massive star currently identified. Its radial velocity differs by 40\\kms\\ from the mean for 30 Doradus, suggesting that it is a runaway. VFTS102 lies 12 pcs from the X-ray pulsar PSR J0537-6910 in the tail of its X-ray diffuse emission. We suggest that these objects originated from a binary system with the rotational and radial velocities of VFTS102 resulting from mass transfer from the progenitor of PSR J0537-691 and the supernova explosion respectively.

  20. THE VLT-FLAMES TARANTULA SURVEY: THE FASTEST ROTATING O-TYPE STAR AND SHORTEST PERIOD LMC PULSAR-REMNANTS OF A SUPERNOVA DISRUPTED BINARY?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dufton, P. L.; Dunstall, P. R.; Fraser, M. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Evans, C. J. [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Brott, I. [University of Vienna, Department of Astronomy, Tuerkenschanzstr. 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Cantiello, M.; Langer, N. [Argelander Institut fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Bonn, Auf dem Huegel 71, 53121 Bonn (Germany); De Koter, A.; Sana, H. [Astronomical Institute ' Anton Pannekoek' , University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); De Mink, S. E. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Henault-Brunet, V.; Taylor, W. D. [Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Howarth, I. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Lennon, D. J. [ESA, Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Markova, N., E-mail: p.dufton@qub.ac.uk [Institute of Astronomy with NAO, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 136, 4700 Smoljan (Bulgaria)

    2011-12-10

    We present a spectroscopic analysis of an extremely rapidly rotating late O-type star, VFTS102, observed during a spectroscopic survey of 30 Doradus. VFTS102 has a projected rotational velocity larger than 500 km s{sup -1} and probably as large as 600 km s{sup -1}; as such it would appear to be the most rapidly rotating massive star currently identified. Its radial velocity differs by 40 km s{sup -1} from the mean for 30 Doradus, suggesting that it is a runaway. VFTS102 lies 12 pc from the X-ray pulsar PSR J0537-6910 in the tail of its X-ray diffuse emission. We suggest that these objects originated from a binary system with the rotational and radial velocities of VFTS102 resulting from mass transfer from the progenitor of PSR J0537-691 and the supernova explosion, respectively.

  1. PSR J1930-1852: a pulsar in the widest known orbit around another neutron star

    CERN Document Server

    Swiggum, J K; McLaughlin, M A; Lorimer, D R; Heatherly, S; Lynch, R; Scoles, S; Hockett, T; Filik, E; Marlowe, J A; Barlow, B N; Weaver, M; Hilzendeger, M; Ernst, S; Crowley, R; Stone, E; Miller, B; Nunez, R; Trevino, G; Doehler, M; Cramer, A; Yencsik, D; Thorley, J; Andrews, R; Laws, A; Wenger, K; Teter, L; Snyder, T; Dittmann, A; Gray, S; Carter, M; McGough, C; Dydiw, S; Pruett, C; Fink, J; Vanderhout, A

    2015-01-01

    In the summer of 2012, during a Pulsar Search Collaboratory workshop, two high-school students discovered J1930$-$1852, a pulsar in a double neutron star (DNS) system. Most DNS systems are characterized by short orbital periods, rapid spin periods and eccentric orbits. However, J1930$-$1852 has the longest spin period ($P_{\\rm spin}\\sim$185 ms) and orbital period ($P_{\\rm b}\\sim$45 days) yet measured among known, recycled pulsars in DNS systems, implying a shorter than average and/or inefficient recycling period before its companion went supernova. We measure the relativistic advance of periastron for J1930$-$1852, $\\dot{\\omega}=0.00078$(4) deg/yr, which implies a total mass (M$_{\\rm{tot}}=2.59$(4) M$_{\\odot}$) consistent with other DNS systems. The $2\\sigma$ constraints on M$_{\\rm{tot}}$ place limits on the pulsar and companion masses ($m_{\\rm p}1.30$ M$_{\\odot}$ respectively). J1930$-$1852's spin and orbital parameters challenge current DNS population models and make J1930$-$1852 an important system for fur...

  2. PSR J1930-1852: a Pulsar in the Widest Known Orbit Around Another Neutron Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiggum, Joe K.; Rosen, Rachel; McLaughlin, Maura; Lorimer, Duncan; Heatherly, Sue Ann; Lynch, Ryan S.; Scoles, Sarah A.; Barlow, Brad; Pulsar Search Collaboratory

    2015-01-01

    In the summer of 2012, during a Pulsar Search Collaboratory workshop, two high-school students discovered J1930-1852, a pulsar in a double neutron star (DNS) system. Most DNS systems are characterized by short orbital periods, rapid spin periods and eccentric orbits. However, J1930-1852 has the longest spin period (Pspin~185 ms) and orbital period (Porb~45 days) yet measured among known, recycled pulsars in DNS systems, implying a shorter than average and/or inefficient recycling period before its companion went supernova. We measure a relativistic advance of periastron for J1930-1852 of 0.00077(3) deg/yr, which implies a total mass (Mtot=2.54(3) Msun) consistent with other DNS systems. The constraints that advance of periastron places on the pulsar and companion masses (Mp1.30 Msun respectively) however, imply a unique evolutionary history; given the mass constraints placed on Mp and Mc, J1930-1852 may be the first observed example of a DNS where the primary formed via electron capture supernova and the secondary, via iron core-collapse.

  3. VLBI astrometry of PSR J2222-0137: a pulsar distance measured to 0.4% accuracy

    CERN Document Server

    Deller, A T; Lorimer, D R; Kaspi, V M; McLaughlin, M A; Ransom, S; Stairs, I H; Stovall, K

    2013-01-01

    The binary pulsar J2222-0137 is an enigmatic system containing a partially recycled millisecond pulsar and a companion of unknown nature. Whilst the low eccentricity of the system favors a white dwarf companion, an unusual double neutron star system is also a possibility, and optical observations will be able to distinguish between these possibilities. In order to allow the absolute luminosity (or upper limit) of the companion object to be properly calibrated, we undertook astrometric observations with the Very Long Baseline Array to constrain the system distance via a measurement of annual geometric parallax. With these observations, we measure the parallax of the J2222-0137 system to be 3.742 +0.013 -0.016 milliarcseconds, yielding a distance of 267.3 +1.2 -0.9 pc, and measure the transverse velocity to be 57.1 +0.3 -0.2 km/s. Fixing these parameters in the pulsar timing model made it possible to obtain a measurement of Shapiro delay and hence the system inclination, which shows that the system is nearly ed...

  4. Einstein@Home Discovery of 24 Pulsars in the Parkes Multi-beam Pulsar Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Knispel, B; Kim, H; Keane, E F; Allen, B; Anderson, D; Aulbert, C; Bock, O; Crawford, F; Eggenstein, H -B; Fehrmann, H; Hammer, D; Kramer, M; Lyne, A G; Machenschalk, B; Miller, R B; Papa, M A; Rastawicki, D; Sarkissian, J; Siemens, X; Stappers, B W

    2013-01-01

    We have conducted a new search for radio pulsars in compact binary systems in the Parkes multi-beam pulsar survey (PMPS) data, employing novel methods to remove the Doppler modulation from binary motion. This has yielded unparalleled sensitivity to pulsars in compact binaries. The required computation time of approximately 17 000 CPU core years was provided by the distributed volunteer computing project Einstein@Home, which has a sustained computing power of about one PFlop/s. We discovered 24 new pulsars in our search, of which 18 were isolated pulsars, and six were members of binary systems. Despite the wide filterbank channels and relatively slow sampling time of the PMPS data, we found pulsars with very large ratios of dispersion measure (DM) to spin period. Among those is PSR J1748-3009, the millisecond pulsar with the highest known DM (420 pc cm^{-3}). We also discovered PSR J1840-0643, which is in a binary system with an orbital period of 937 days, the fourth largest known. The new pulsar J1750-2531 li...

  5. Simultaneous Observations of Giant Pulses from Pulsar PSR B0950+08 at 42 MHz and 74 MHz

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai, Jr-Wei; Akukwe, Bernadine; Bear, Brandon; Gough, Jonathan D; Shawhan, Peter; Kavic, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We report the detection of giant pulse emission from PSR~B0950+08 in 12 hours of observations made simultaneously at 42~MHz and 74~MHz, using the first station of the Long Wavelength Array, LWA1. We detected 275 giant pulses (in 0.16\\% of the pulse periods) and 465 giant pulses (0.27\\%) at 42 and 74~MHz, respectively. The pulsar is weaker and produces less frequent giant pulses than at 100~MHz. Here, giant pulses are taken as having $\\geq$ 10 times the flux density of an average pulse; their cumulative distribution of pulse strength follows a power law, with a index of $-$4.1 at 42~MHz and $-$5.1 at 74~MHz, which is much less steep than would be expected if we were observing the tail of a Gaussian distribution of normal pulses. We detected no other transient pulses in a wide dispersion measure range from 1 to 5000~pc~cm$^{-3}$. There were 128 giant pulses detected within in the same periods from both 42 and 74~MHz, which means more than half of them are not generated in a wide band. We use CLEAN-based algorit...

  6. Pulsar constraints on screened modified gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We calculate the rate of energy loss from compact astrophysical objects due to a scalar field in screened modified gravity models of the chameleon, dilaton and symmetron types. The cosmological evolution of the field results in a time-variation of the scalar charge of screened objects, implying the emission of scalar radiation. Focusing on binary objects, this leads to an additional decay in the orbital period complementing that due to the emission of gravitational waves. Using the Hulse–Taylor binary pulsar, the double pulsar PSR J0737–3039 and the pulsar-white dwarf system PSR J1738 + 033, we find a new observational bound on the time variation of the scalar charge of the Earth in the Milky Way. We then translate this into a new bound on the range of the scalar interaction in the Milky Way. Ultimately, we find that pulsar tests are not competitive with current observational constraints. (paper)

  7. A Search for Very High-Energy Gamma Rays from the Missing Link Binary Pulsar J1023+0038 with VERITAS

    CERN Document Server

    Aliu, E; Archer, A; Benbow, W; Bird, R; Biteau, J; Buchovecky, M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cardenzana, J V; Cerruti, M; Chen, X; Ciupik, L; Connolly, M P; Cui, W; Dickinson, H J; Eisch, J D; Falcone, A; Feng, Q; Finley, J P; Fleischhack, H; Flinders, A; Fortin, P; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Gillanders, G H; Griffin, S; Grube, J; Gyuk, G; Hütten, M; Håkansson, N; Holder, J; Humensky, T B; Johnson, C A; Kaaret, P; Kar, P; Kelley-Hoskins, N; Kertzman, M; Kieda, D; Krause, M; Lang, M J; Loo, A; Maier, G; McArthur, S; McCann, A; Meagher, K; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nguyen, T; Nieto, D; de Bhróithe, A O'Faoláin; Ong, R A; Otte, A N; Pandel, D; Park, N; Pelassa, V; Petrashyk, A; Pohl, M; Popkow, A; Pueschel, E; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reynolds, P T; Richards, G T; Roache, E; Rulten, C; Santander, M; Sembroski, G H; Shahinyan, K; Smith, A W; Staszak, D; Telezhinsky, I; Tucci, J V; Tyler, J; Varlotta, A; Vincent, S; Wakely, S P; Weiner, O M; Weinstein, A; Wilhelm, A; Williams, D A; Zitzer, B; Chernyakova, M; Roberts, M

    2016-01-01

    The binary millisecond radio pulsar PSR J1023+0038 exhibits many characteristics similar to the gamma-ray binary system PSR B1259--63/LS 2883, making it an ideal candidate for the study of high-energy non-thermal emission. It has been the subject of multi-wavelength campaigns following the disappearance of the pulsed radio emission in 2013 June, which revealed the appearance of an accretion disk around the neutron star. We present the results of very high-energy gamma-ray observations carried out by VERITAS before and after this change of state. Searches for steady and pulsed emission of both data sets yield no significant gamma-ray signal above 100 GeV, and upper limits are given for both a steady and pulsed gamma-ray flux. These upper limits are used to constrain the magnetic field strength in the shock region of the PSR J1023+0038 system. Assuming that very high-energy gamma rays are produced via an inverse-Compton mechanism in the shock region, we constrain the shock magnetic field to be greater than $\\si...

  8. Formation of black widows and redbacks -- two distinct populations of eclipsing binary millisecond pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Hai-Liang; Tauris, Thomas M; Han, Zhanwen

    2013-01-01

    Eclipsing binary millisecond pulsars (the so-called black widows and redbacks) can provide important information about accretion history, pulsar irradiation of their companion stars and the evolutionary link between accreting X-ray pulsars and isolated millisecond pulsars. However, the formation of such systems is not well understood, nor the difference in progenitor evolution between the two populations of black widows and redbacks. Whereas both populations have orbital periods between $0.1-1.0\\;{\\rm days}$ their companion masses differ by an order of magnitude. In this paper, we investigate the formation of these systems via evolution of converging low-mass X-ray binaries by employing the MESA stellar evolution code. Our results confirm that one can explain the formation of most of these eclipsing binary millisecond pulsars using this scenario. More notably, we find that the determining factor for producing either black widows or redbacks is the efficiency of the irradiation process, such that the redbacks ...

  9. Cosmic-Lab: Optical companions to binary Millisecond Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Pallanca, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Millisecond Pulsars (MSPs) are fast rotating, highly magnetized neutron stars. According to the "canonical recycling scenario", MSPs form in binary systems containing a neutron star which is spun up through mass accretion from the evolving companion. Therefore, the final stage consists of a binary made of a MSP and the core of the deeply peeled companion. In the last years, however an increasing number of systems deviating from these expectations has been discovered, thus strongly indicating that our understanding of MSPs is far to be complete. The identification of the optical companions to binary MSPs is crucial to constrain the formation and evolution of these objects. In dense environments such as Globular Clusters (GCs), it also allows us to get insights on the cluster internal dynamics. By using deep photometric data, acquired both from space and ground-based telescopes, we identified 5 new companions to MSPs. Three of them being located in GCs and two in the Galactic Field. The three new identification...

  10. Discovery of Two New Pulsars in Archival Data

    CERN Document Server

    Mickaliger, Mitchell B; Boyles, Jason; McLaughlin, Maura A; Collins, Adam; Hough, Logan; Tehrani, Nathan; Tenney, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Reprocessing of the Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey has resulted in the discovery of two previously unknown pulsars and several as-yet-unconfirmed candidates. One of the new pulsars, PSR J1725-3853, is an isolated 4.79-ms pulsar with a DM of 158.2 pc cm^-3. The other, PSR J1227-6208, has a period of 34.53 ms, a DM of 362.6 pc cm^-3, is in a 6.7 day binary orbit, and was independently detected in an ongoing high-resolution Parkes survey by Thornton et al. and also in independent processing by Einstein@Home volunteers. These pulsars were likley missed in earlier processing efforts due to their high DMs and short periods. These serendipitous discoveries suggest that further pulsars are awaiting discovery in the multibeam survey data.

  11. Photometry and Spectroscopy of the Optical Companion to the Pulsar PSR J1740-5340 in the Globular Cluster NGC 6397

    OpenAIRE

    Kaluzny, J.; Rucinski, S. M.; Thompson, I. B.

    2002-01-01

    We present photometric and spectroscopic observations of the optical companion to the millisecond radio pulsar PSR J1740-5340 in the globular cluster NGC 6397. An analysis of the photometric variability in the B, V, and I-bands indicates an inclination of the system of 43.9+-2.1 degrees if the optical companion fills its Roche lobe (a semi-detached configuration). The spectroscopic data show a radial velocity variation with a semi-amplitude of K=137.2 +- 2.4 km/sec, and a system velocity gamm...

  12. Variability, polarimetry, and timing properties of single pulses from PSR J1713+0747 using the Large European Array for Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, K; Janssen, G H; Karuppusamy, R; McKee, J; Kramer, M; Lee, K J; Perrodin, D; Purver, M; Sanidas, S; Smits, R; Stappers, B W; Weltevrede, P; Zhu, W W

    2016-01-01

    Single pulses preserve information about the pulsar radio emission and propagation in the pulsar magnetosphere, and understanding the behaviour of their variability is essential for estimating the fundamental limit on the achievable pulsar timing precision. Here we report the findings of our analysis of single pulses from PSR J1713+0747 with data collected by the Large European Array for Pulsars (LEAP). We present statistical studies of the pulse properties that include distributions of their energy, phase and width. Two modes of systematic sub-pulse drifting have been detected, with a periodicity of 7 and 3 pulse periods. The two modes appear at different ranges of pulse longitude but overlap under the main peak of the integrated profile. No evidence for pulse micro-structure is seen with a time resolution down to 140 ns. In addition, we show that the fractional polarisation of single pulses increases with their pulse peak flux density. By mapping the probability density of linear polarisation position angle...

  13. Search for pulsed photons above 30 GeV in the Crab nebula and in the PSR B1951+32 pulsar with CELESTE, an atmospherical Cerenkov detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CELESTE detector is the ancient Themis solar plant that has been turned into a Cerenkov telescope with a huge efficient surface. The purpose of CELESTE is to study the gamma emission of pulsars. The first part of this work begins with a short description of gamma astronomy and of pulsars and details the various acceleration or emission processes occurring inside the magnetosphere and gives an account of the 2 models used to simulate pulsed emission at high energy: the model of the polar cap emission and the model of the outer gap emission. The 2 models disagree in the energy range 10 - 100 GeV that is now open to observation with the CELESTE detector whose threshold is around 30 GeV. The CELESTE detector is the first opportunity to test the 2 models. 2 gamma pulsars among the 8 observed appear to be the best candidates for a low energy detection with the CELESTE detector, they are Crab pulsar and PSR B1951+32. The second part is dedicated to the description of atmospheric showers and of CELESTE detector in order to optimize observation strategy and conditions through simulations. The third part deals with time information that is very important when studying a periodic signal like a pulsar. The last part presents an analysis of the experimental results, this work has allowed the setting of upper limit for the pulsed flux of the 2 pulsars but it appears that the uncertainties on CELESTE energy scale are too important to constrain the 2 models and differentiate them

  14. Different twins in the millisecond pulsar recycling scenario: optical polarimetry of PSR J1023+0038 and XSS J12270-4859

    CERN Document Server

    Baglio, M C; Campana, S; Zelati, F Coti; Covino, S; Russell, D M

    2016-01-01

    We present the first optical polarimetric study of the two transitional pulsars PSR J1023+0038 and XSS J12270-4859. This work is focused on the search for intrinsical linear polarisation (LP) in the optical emission from the two systems. We carried out multiband optical and NIR photo-polarimetry of the two systems using the ESO NTT at La Silla (Chile), equipped with the EFOSC2 and the SOFI instruments. XSS J12270-4859 was observed during its radio-pulsar state; we did not detect LP in all bands, with 3 sigma upper limits of, e.g., 1.4% in the R-band. We built the NIR-optical averaged spectral energy distribution (SED) of the system, that could be well described by an irradiated black body with radius $R_{*} = 0.33\\pm0.03\\,R_{\\odot}$ and albedo $\\eta=0.32\\pm0.05$, without the need of further components (thus excluding the visible presence of an extended accretion disc and/or of relativistic jets). The case was different for PSR J1023+0038, that was in its accretion phase during our campaign. We measured a LP o...

  15. On tests of general relativity with binary radio pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Del Pozzo, Walter

    2016-01-01

    The timing of radio pulsars in binary systems provides a superb testing ground of general relativity. Here we propose a Bayesian approach to carry out these tests, and a relevant efficient numerical implementation, that has several conceptual and practical advantages with respect to traditional methods based on least-square-fits that have been used so far: (i) it accounts for the actual structure of the likelihood function - and it is not predicated on the Laplace approximation which is implicitly built in least-square fits that can potentially bias the inference - (ii) it provides the ratio of the evidences of any two models under consideration as the statistical quantity to compare different theories, and (iii) it allows us to put joint constraints from the monitoring of multiple systems, that can be expressed in terms of ratio of evidences or probability intervals of global (thus not system-dependent) parameters of the theory, if any exists. Our proposed approach optimally exploits the progress in timing o...

  16. Gamma-rays from nebulae around binary systems containing energetic rotation powered pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Bednarek, W

    2013-01-01

    We consider nebulae which are created around binary systems containing rotation powered pulsars and companion stars with strong stellar winds. It is proposed that the stellar and pulsar winds have to mix at some distance from the binary system, defined by the orbital period of the companion stars and the velocity of the stellar wind. The mixed pulsar-stellar wind expands with a specific velocity determined by the pulsar power and the mass loss rate of the companion star. Relativistic particles, either from the inner pulsar magnetosphere and/or accelerated at the shocks between stellar and pulsar winds, are expected to be captured and isotropized in the reference frame of the mixed wind. Therefore, they can efficiently comptonize stellar radiation producing GeV-TeV $\\gamma$-rays in the inverse Compton process. We calculate the $\\gamma$-ray spectra expected in such scenario for the two example binary systems: J1816+4510 which is the redback type millisecond binary and LS 5039 which is supposed to contain energe...

  17. The High Time Resolution Universe Pulsar Survey - VII: discovery of five millisecond pulsars and the different luminosity properties of binary and isolated recycled pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Burgay, M; Bates, S D; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Champion, D J; Coster, P; D'Amico, N; Johnston, S; Keith, M J; Kramer, M; Levin, L; Lyne, A G; Milia, S; Ng, C; Possenti, A; Stappers, B W; Thornton, D; Tiburzi, C; van Straten, W; Bassa, C G

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the discovery and timing parameters for five millisecond pulsars (MSPs), four in binary systems with probable white dwarf companions and one isolated, found in ongoing processing of the High Time Resolution Universe Pulsar Survey (HTRU). We also present high quality polarimetric data on four of them. These further discoveries confirm the high potential of our survey in finding pulsars with very short spin periods. At least two of these five MSPs are excellent candidates to be included in the Pulsar Timing Array projects. Thanks to the wealth of MSP discoveries in the HTRU survey, we revisit the question of whether the luminosity distributions of isolated and binary MSPs are different. Using the Cordes and Lazio distance model and our new and catalogue flux density measurements, we find that 41 of the 42 most luminous MSPs in the Galactic disk are in binaries and a statistical analysis suggests that the luminosity functions differ with 99.9% significance. We conclude that the formation proc...

  18. Orbital Parameters of Binary Radio Pulsars : Revealing Their Structure, Formation, Evolution and Dynamic History

    CERN Document Server

    Bagchi, Manjari

    2010-01-01

    Orbital parameters of binary radio pulsars reveal the history of the pulsars' formation and evolution including dynamic interactions with other objects. Advanced technology has enabled us to determine these orbital parameters accurately in most of the cases. Determination of post-Keplerian parameters of double neutron star binaries (especially of the double pulsar) provide clean tests of GTR and in the future may lead us to constrain the dense matter EoS. For binary pulsars with MS or WD companions, knowledge about the values of the orbital parameters as well as of the spin periods and the masses of the pulsars and the companions might be useful to understand the evolutionary history of the systems. As accreting neutron star binaries lead to orbit circularization due to the tidal coupling during accretion, their descendants i.e. binary MSPs are expected to be in circular orbits. On the other hand, dense stellar environments inside globular clusters (GCs) cause different types of interactions of single stars w...

  19. High-Precision Timing of 5 Millisecond Pulsars: Space Velocities, Binary Evolution and Equivalence Principles

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, M E; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Nice, D J; Demorest, P B; Ransom, S M; Kramer, M; Camilo, F; Hobbs, G; Manchester, R N; Lyne, A G

    2011-01-01

    We present high-precision timing of five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) carried out for more than seven years; four pulsars are in binary systems and one is isolated. We are able to measure the pulsars' proper motions and derive an estimate for their space velocities. The measured two-dimensional velocities are in the range 70-210 km/s, consistent with those measured for other MSPs. We also use all the available proper motion information for isolated and binary MSPs to update the known velocity distribution for these populations. As found by earlier works, we find that the velocity distribution of binary and isolated MSPs are indistinguishable with the current data. Four of the pulsars in our observing program are highly recycled with low-mass white dwarf companions and we are able to derive accurate binary parameters for these systems. For three of these binary systems we are able to place initial constraints on the pulsar masses with best-fit values in the range 1.0-1.6 M_sun. The implications of the results pr...

  20. Soft X-Ray Properties of the Binary Millisecond Pulsar J0437-4715

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Martin, Christopher; Marshall, Herman, L.; Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We obtained a light curve for the 5.75 ms pulsar J0437-4715 in the 65-120 A range with 0.5 ms time resolution using the Deep Survey instrument on the EUVE satellite. The single-peaked profile has a pulsed fraction of 0.27 +/- 0.05, similar to the ROSAT data in the overlapping energy band. A combined analysis of the EUVE and ROSAT data is consistent with a power-law spectrum of energy index alpha = 1.2 - 1.5, intervening column density N(sub H) = (5 - 8) x 10(exp 19)/sq cm, and luminosity 5.0 x 10(exp 30) ergs/s in the 0.1 - 2.4 keV band. We also use a bright EUVE/ROSAT source only 4.2 min. from the pulsar, the Seyfert galaxy RX J0437.4-4711 (= EUVE J0437-471 = IES 0435-472), to obtain an independent upper limit on the intervening absorption to the pulsar, N(sub H) less than 1.2 x 10(exp 20)/sq cm. Although a blackbody spectrum fails to fit the ROSAT data, two-component spectral fits to the combined EUVE/ROSAT data are used to limit the temperatures and surface areas of thermal emission that might make partial contributions to the flux. A hot polar cap of radius 50 - 600 m and temperature (1.0 - 3.3) x 10(exp 6) K could be present. Alternatively, a larger region with T = (4 - 12) x 10(exp 5) K and area less than 200 sq km, might contribute most of the EUVE and soft X-ray flux, but only if a hotter component were present as well. Any of these temperatures would require some mechanism(s) of surface reheating to be operating in this old pulsar, the most plausible being the impact of accelerated electrons and positrons onto the polar caps. The kinematically corrected spin-down power of PSR J0437-4715 is only 4 x 10(exp 33) ergs/s, which is an order of magnitude less than that of the lowest-luminosity gamma-ray pulsars Geminga and PSR B1055-52. The absence of high-energy gamma-rays from PSR J0437-4715 might signify an inefficient or dead outer gap accelerator, which in turn accounts for the lack of a more luminous reheated surface such as those intermediate-age gamma

  1. HIGH-PRECISION TIMING OF FIVE MILLISECOND PULSARS: SPACE VELOCITIES, BINARY EVOLUTION, AND EQUIVALENCE PRINCIPLES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present high-precision timing of five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) carried out for more than seven years; four pulsars are in binary systems and one is isolated. We are able to measure the pulsars' proper motions and derive an estimate for their space velocities. The measured two-dimensional velocities are in the range 70-210 km s–1, consistent with those measured for other MSPs. We also use all the available proper motion information for isolated and binary MSPs to update the known velocity distribution for these populations. As found by earlier works, we find that the velocity distribution of binary and isolated MSPs are indistinguishable with the current data. Four of the pulsars in our observing program are highly recycled with low-mass white dwarf companions and we are able to derive accurate binary parameters for these systems. For three of these binary systems, we are able to place initial constraints on the pulsar masses with best-fit values in the range 1.0-1.6 M☉. The implications of the results presented here to our understanding of binary pulsar evolution are discussed. The updated parameters for the binary systems studied here, together with recently discovered similar systems, allowed us to update previous limits on the violation of the strong equivalence principle through the parameter |Δ| to 4.6 × 10–3 (95% confidence) and the violation of Lorentz invariance/momentum conservation through the parameter |α-hat3| to 5.5 × 10–20 (95% confidence).

  2. Variability of VHE $\\gamma$-ray emission from the binary PSR B1259-63/LS 2883

    CERN Document Server

    Stefanik, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    We examine changes of the $\\gamma$-ray intensity observed from the direction of the binary system PSR B1259-63/LS 2883 during campaigns around its three periastron passages. A simple and straightforward method is applied to the published data obtained with the Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Technique. Regardless of many issues of the detection process, the method works only with numbers of very high energetic photons registered in the specified regions. Within the realm of this scheme, we recognized changes attributable to the variations of the intrinsic source activity at high levels of significance.

  3. The Expansion and Radio Spectral Index of G21.5-0.9: Is PSR J1833-1034 the Youngest Pulsar?

    CERN Document Server

    Bietenholz, M F

    2008-01-01

    We report on new 5-GHz VLA radio observations of the pulsar-powered supernova remnant G21.5-0.9. These observations have allowed us to make a high-quality radio image of this remnant with a resolution of ~0.7". It has a filamentary structure similar to that seen in the Crab Nebula. Radio structure suggestive of the torus seen around the Crab pulsar is tentatively identified. We also compared the new image with one taken ~15 yr earlier at 1.5 GHz, both to find the expansion speed of the remnant and to make a spectral index image. Between 1991 and 2006, we find that the average expansion rate of the remnant is 0.11 +/- 0.02 %/year, corresponding, for a distance of 5 kpc, to a speed of 910 +/- 160 km/s wrt. the centre of the nebula. Assuming undecelerated expansion, this expansion speed implies that the age of G21.5-0.9 is 870 (+200,-150) yr, which makes PSR J1833-1034 one of the youngest, if not the youngest, known pulsars in the Galaxy.

  4. The Size of the Extragalactic Source J1801-231 and the Association of Pulsar PSR B1758-23 with the Supernova Remnant W28

    CERN Document Server

    Claussen, M J; Desai, K M; Brogan, C L

    2002-01-01

    We have used the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA) in conjunction with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) Pie Town antenna as a real-time interferometer system to measure the size of the extragalactic source J1801-231 as a function of frequency from 1285 to 4885 MHz. These observations were made in an attempt to determine the effect interstellar scattering has on the observed sizes of OH (1720 MHz) masers in the nearby (d=2.5 kpc) supernova remnant W28. The observations clearly show that J1801-231 displays angular broadening due to turbulence in the Galaxy's interstellar medium. The minimum distance of the nearby (two arcminutes from J1801-231) pulsar PSR B1758-23 is constrained to be 9.4 +/- 2.4 kpc. This value is based on both the measured size of 220 mas for J1801-231 at 1715 MHz and the temporal broadening of the pulsar. A single thin scattering screen along the line of sight to the W28 OH(1720 MHz) masers must be at 4.7 +/- 1.2 kpc for this minimum pulsar distance. The screen may be placed closer to the Earth...

  5. Searching for GW signals from eccentric supermassive black-hole binaries with pulsar-timing arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Stephen; Gair, Jonathan; Huerta, Eliu; McWilliams, Sean

    2015-04-01

    The mergers of massive galaxies leads to the formation of supermassive black-hole binaries in the common merger remnants. Various mechanisms have been proposed to harden these binaries into the adiabatic GW inspiral regime, from interactions with circumbinary disks to stellar scattering. It may be the case that these mechanisms leave the binary with a residual eccentricity, such that the deviation to the time-of-arrival of pulsar signals induced by the emitted GW passing between the Earth and a pulsar will contain a signature of this eccentricity. Current pulsar-timing search pipelines only probe circular binary systems, but much effort is now being devoted to considering the influence of the binary environment on GW signals. We will detail our efforts in constructing a generalised GW search pipeline to constrain the eccentricity of single systems with arrays of precisely-timed pulsars, which may shed light on the influence of various supermassive black-hole binary hardening mechanisms and illuminate the importance of environmental couplings.

  6. Discovery of a Faint X-Ray Counterpart and a Parsec-long X-Ray Tail for the Middle-aged, γ-Ray-only Pulsar PSR J0357+3205

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, A.; Marelli, M.; Mignani, R. P.; Caraveo, P. A.; Hummel, W.; Collins, S.; Shearer, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Belfiore, A.; Bignami, G. F.

    2011-06-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope opened a new era for pulsar astronomy, detecting γ-ray pulsations from more than 60 pulsars, ~40% of which are not seen at radio wavelengths. One of the most interesting sources discovered by LAT is PSR J0357+3205, a radio-quiet, middle-aged (τ C ~ 0.5 Myr) pulsar standing out for its very low spin-down luminosity (\\dot{E}_{\\rm{rot}}\\sim 6\\times 10^{33} erg s-1), indeed the lowest among non-recycled γ-ray pulsars. A deep X-ray observation with Chandra (0.5-10 keV), coupled with sensitive optical/infrared ground-based images of the field, allowed us to identify PSR J0357+3205 as a faint source with a soft spectrum, consistent with a purely non-thermal emission (photon index Γ = 2.53 ± 0.25). The absorbing column (N H = 8 ± 4 × 1020 cm-2) is consistent with a distance of a few hundred parsecs. Moreover, the Chandra data unveiled a huge (9 arcmin long) extended feature apparently protruding from the pulsar. Its non-thermal X-ray spectrum points to synchrotron emission from energetic particles from the pulsar wind, possibly similar to other elongated X-ray tails associated with rotation-powered pulsars and explained as bow-shock pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). However, energetic arguments as well as the peculiar morphology of the diffuse feature associated with PSR J0357+3205 make the bow-shock PWN interpretation rather challenging.

  7. DISCOVERY OF A FAINT X-RAY COUNTERPART AND A PARSEC-LONG X-RAY TAIL FOR THE MIDDLE-AGED, γ-RAY-ONLY PULSAR PSR J0357+3205

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope opened a new era for pulsar astronomy, detecting γ-ray pulsations from more than 60 pulsars, ∼40% of which are not seen at radio wavelengths. One of the most interesting sources discovered by LAT is PSR J0357+3205, a radio-quiet, middle-aged (τC ∼ 0.5 Myr) pulsar standing out for its very low spin-down luminosity (E-dotrot∼6x1033 erg s-1), indeed the lowest among non-recycled γ-ray pulsars. A deep X-ray observation with Chandra (0.5-10 keV), coupled with sensitive optical/infrared ground-based images of the field, allowed us to identify PSR J0357+3205 as a faint source with a soft spectrum, consistent with a purely non-thermal emission (photon index Γ = 2.53 ± 0.25). The absorbing column (NH = 8 ± 4 x 1020 cm-2) is consistent with a distance of a few hundred parsecs. Moreover, the Chandra data unveiled a huge (9 arcmin long) extended feature apparently protruding from the pulsar. Its non-thermal X-ray spectrum points to synchrotron emission from energetic particles from the pulsar wind, possibly similar to other elongated X-ray tails associated with rotation-powered pulsars and explained as bow-shock pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). However, energetic arguments as well as the peculiar morphology of the diffuse feature associated with PSR J0357+3205 make the bow-shock PWN interpretation rather challenging.

  8. DISCOVERY OF FIVE NEW PULSARS IN ARCHIVAL DATA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reprocessing of the Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey has resulted in the discovery of five previously unknown pulsars and several as-yet-unconfirmed candidates. PSR J0922–52 has a period of 9.68 ms and a dispersion measure (DM) of 122.4 pc cm–3. PSR J1147–66 has a period of 3.72 ms and a DM of 133.8 pc cm–3. PSR J1227–6208 has a period of 34.53 ms, a DM of 362.6 pc cm–3, is in a 6.7 day binary orbit, and was independently detected in an ongoing high-resolution Parkes survey by Thornton et al. and also in independent processing by Einstein-Home volunteers. PSR J1546–59 has a period of 7.80 ms and a DM of 168.3 pc cm–3. PSR J1725–3853 is an isolated 4.79 ms pulsar with a DM of 158.2 pc cm–3. These pulsars were likely missed in earlier processing efforts due to the fact that they have both high DMs and short periods, and also due to the large number of candidates that needed to be looked through. These discoveries suggest that further pulsars are awaiting discovery in the multibeam survey data.

  9. A NuSTAR Observation of the Gamma-ray-emitting X-ray Binary and Transitional Millisecond Pulsar Candidate 1RXS J154439.4–112820

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, Slavko

    2016-07-01

    I present a 40 ks Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array observation of the recently identified low-luminosity X-ray binary and transitional millisecond pulsar (tMSP) candidate 1RXS J154439.4‑112820, which is associated with the high-energy γ-ray source 3FGL J1544.6‑1125. The system is detected up to ∼30 keV with an extension of the same power-law spectrum and rapid large-amplitude variability between two flux levels observed in soft X-rays. These findings provide further evidence that 1RXS J154439.4‑112820 belongs to the same class of objects as the nearby bona fide tMSPs PSR J1023+0038 and XSS J12270‑4859 and therefore almost certainly hosts a millisecond pulsar accreting at low luminosity. I also examine the long-term accretion history of 1RXS J154439.4‑112820 based on archival optical, ultraviolet, X-ray, and γ-ray light curves covering approximately the past decade. Throughout this period, the source has maintained similar flux levels at all wavelengths, which is an indication that it has not experienced prolonged episodes of a non-accreting radio pulsar state but may spontaneously undergo such events in the future.

  10. An eclipsing millisecond pulsar in the globular cluster Terzan 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have discovered an eclipsing binary millisecond pulsar in the globular cluster Terzan 5. This, the second known eclipsing binary pulsar after PSR1957+20, has a pulse period of 11.56 ms and a very short orbital period of 1.8 hours. In contrast to PSR1957+20, where the eclipses occupy about 10 per cent of the orbital period, the eclipse duration in this pulsar is very variable and never less than one-third of the orbital period. The pulsar is in a circular orbit of radius 0.11 light seconds, which implies a minimum companion mass of 0.089 solar masses, about four times the companion mass of PSR1957+20. Timing observations suggest an identification of the pulsar with a variable continuum source located about 30 arcsec west of the cluster centre. These observations and the variable eclipse duration show that the eclipse is due to absorption or scattering in a tenuous wind which flows from the companion star. We have also detected a second pulsar in the direction of Terzan 5. This pulsar, which has a period of 442 ms, may also be a cluster member, but is more likely to be a foreground object. (author)

  11. Phenomenological constraints on accretion of non-annihilating dark matter on the PSR B1257+12 pulsar from orbital dynamics of its planets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analytically compute the effects that a pulsar's mass variation, whatever its physical origin may be, has on the standard Keplerian changes ΔτKep in the times of arrival of its pulses due to potential test particle companions, and on their orbital dynamics over long time scales. We apply our results to the planetary system of the PSR B1257+12 pulsar, located in the Galaxy at ∼ 600 pc from us, to phenomenologically constrain a putative accretion of non-annihilating dark matter on the hosting neutron star. By comparing our prediction for ΔτM-dot/M to the root-mean-square accuracy of the timing residuals δ(Δτ) = 3.0μs we find for the mass variation rate M-dot /M ≤ 1.3 × 10−6 yr−1. Actually, considerations related to the pulsar's lifetime, of the order of Δt ∼ 0.8 Gyr, and to the currently accepted picture of the formation of its planets point toward a tighter constrain on the mass accretion rate, i.e. M-dot /M ≤ 10−9 yr−1. Otherwise, the planets would have formed at about 300–700 au from PSR B1257+12, i.e. too far with respect to the expected extension of 1–2 au of the part of the protoplanetary disk containing the solid constituents from which they likely originated. In fact, an even smaller upper limit, M-dot /M ≤ 10−11 yr−1, would likely be more realistic to avoid certain technical inconsistencies with the quality of the fit of the timing data, performed by keeping the standard value M = 1.4Msun fixed for the neutron star's mass. Anyway, the entire pulsar data set should be re-processed by explicitly modeling the mass variation rate and solving for it. Model-dependent theoretical predictions for the pulsar's mass accretion, in the framework of the mirror matter scenario, yield a mass increment rate of about 10−16 yr−1 for a value of the density of mirror matter ρdm as large as 10−17 g cm−3 = 5.6 × 106 GeV cm−3. Such a rate corresponds to a fractional mass variation of ΔM/M ∼ 10−7 over the pulsar's lifetime. It

  12. A Search for Radio Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayer, Ronald Winston

    1996-01-01

    We have built a data acquisition backend for radio pulsar search observations carried out at the NRAO 140 -foot telescope in Green Bank, West Virginia. Our system sampled 512 spectral channels over 40 MHz every 256 mus, reduced samples to one-bit precision, and wrote the resulting data stream onto magnetic tape for later, off-line processing. We have completed three surveys with this backend. In the first survey, we searched most of the Northern Hemisphere for millisecond radio pulsars. Previous surveys directed towards most of the region covered had not been as sensitive to pulsars with millisecond periods. We obtained high quality data for 15,876 deg^2 of sky. Eight new pulsars were discovered and 76 previously known pulsars were detected. Two of the eight new pulsars (PSR J1022+1001 and PSR J1518+4904) are millisecond pulsars in binary systems. PSR J1518+4904 is a 41 ms radio pulsar in an eccentric (e = 0.25) 8.6 day orbit with another stellar object, probably another neutron star. It is only the fifth double neutron star system known. The system's relativistic advance of periastron has been measured to be ˙omega = 0.0112 +/- 0.0002 ^circ yr^{-1}, implying that the total mass of the pair of stars is 2.65 +/-0.07Modot. We have searched for radio pulsar companions to 40 nearby OB runaway stars. No pulsar companions to OB runaways were discovered. One previously unknown pulsar, PSR J2044+4614, was discovered while observing towards target O star BD+45,3260. However, follow-up timing observations reveal that the pulsar is not associated with the target O star. Assuming standard models for the pulsar beaming fraction and luminosity function, we conclude that most OB runaways do not have pulsar companions. We have completed a survey for pulsed radio signals towards 27 gamma-ray sources detected by the EGRET instrument of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. No new pulsars were discovered.

  13. Merger of a White Dwarf-Neutron Star Binary to $10^{29}$ Carat Diamonds: Origin of the Pulsar Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Margalit, Ben

    2016-01-01

    We show that the merger and tidal disruption of a C/O white dwarf (WD) by a neutron star (NS) binary companion provides a natural formation scenario for the PSR B1257+12 planetary system. Starting with initial conditions for the debris disk produced of the disrupted WD, we model its long term viscous evolution, including for the first time the effects of mass and angular momentum loss during the early radiatively inefficient accretion flow (RIAF) phase and accounting for the unusual C/O composition on the disk opacity. For plausible values of the disk viscosity $\\alpha \\sim 10^{-3}-10^{-2}$ and the RIAF mass loss efficiency, we find that the disk mass remaining near the planet formation radius at the time of solid condensation is sufficient to explain the pulsar planets. Rapid rocky planet formation via gravitational instability of the solid carbon-dominated disk is facilitated by the suppression of vertical shear instabilities due to the high solid-to-gas ratio. Additional evidence supporting a WD-NS merger ...

  14. FORMATION OF THE GALACTIC MILLISECOND PULSAR TRIPLE SYSTEM PSR J0337+1715—A NEUTRON STAR WITH TWO ORBITING WHITE DWARFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The millisecond pulsar in a triple system (PSR J0337+1715, recently discovered by Ransom et al.) is an unusual neutron star with two orbiting white dwarfs. The existence of such a system in the Galactic field poses new challenges to stellar astrophysics for understanding evolution, interactions, and mass transfer in close multiple stellar systems. In addition, this system provides the first precise confirmation for a very wide-orbit system of the white dwarf mass-orbital period relation. Here, we present a self-consistent, semi-analytical solution to the formation of PSR J0337+1715. Our model constrains the peculiar velocity of the system to be less than 160 km s–1 and brings novel insight to, for example, common envelope evolution in a triple system, for which we find evidence for in-spiral of both outer stars. Finally, we briefly discuss our scenario in relation to alternative models

  15. The distance and luminosity probability distributions derived from parallax and flux with their measurement errors with application to the millisecond pulsar PSR J0218+4232

    CERN Document Server

    Igoshev, A P; Cator, E

    2016-01-01

    We use a Bayesian approach to derive the distance probability distribution for one object from its parallax with measurement uncertainty for two spatial distribution priors, viz. a homogeneous spherical distribution and a galactocentric distribution - applicable for radio pulsars - observed from Earth. We investigate the dependence on measurement uncertainty, and show that a parallax measurement can underestimate or overestimate the actual distance, depending on the spatial distribution prior. We derive the probability distributions for distance and luminosity combined, and for each separately, when a flux with measurement error for the object is also available, and demonstrate the necessity of and dependence on the luminosity function prior. We apply this to estimate the distance and the radio and gamma-ray luminosities of PSR J0218+4232. The use of realistic priors improves the quality of the estimates for distance and luminosity, compared to those based on measurement only. Use of a wrong prior, for exampl...

  16. ARECIBO PALFA SURVEY AND EINSTEIN-HOME: BINARY PULSAR DISCOVERY BY VOLUNTEER COMPUTING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the discovery of the 20.7 ms binary pulsar J1952+2630, made using the distributed computing project Einstein-Home in Pulsar ALFA survey observations with the Arecibo telescope. Follow-up observations with the Arecibo telescope confirm the binary nature of the system. We obtain a circular orbital solution with an orbital period of 9.4 hr, a projected orbital radius of 2.8 lt-s, and a mass function of f = 0.15 Msun by analysis of spin period measurements. No evidence of orbital eccentricity is apparent; we set a 2σ upper limit e ∼-3. The orbital parameters suggest a massive white dwarf companion with a minimum mass of 0.95 Msun, assuming a pulsar mass of 1.4 Msun. Most likely, this pulsar belongs to the rare class of intermediate-mass binary pulsars. Future timing observations will aim to determine the parameters of this system further, measure relativistic effects, and elucidate the nature of the companion star.

  17. Accretion, Ablation and Propeller Evolution in Close Millisecond Pulsar Binary Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kiel, P D

    2013-01-01

    A model for the formation and evolution of binary millisecond radio pulsars in systems with low mass companions (< 0.1 Msun) is investigated using a binary population synthesis technique. Taking into account the non conservative evolution of the system due to mass loss from an accretion disk as a result of propeller action and from the companion via ablation by the pulsar, the transition from the accretion powered to rotation powered phase is investigated. It is shown that the operation of the propeller and ablation mechanisms can be responsible for the formation and evolution of black widow millisecond pulsar systems from the low mass X-ray binary phase at an orbital period of ~0.1 day. For a range of population synthesis input parameters, the results reveal that a population of black widow millisecond pulsars characterized by orbital periods as long as ~0.4 days and companion masses as low as ~0.005 Msun can be produced. The orbital periods and minimum companion mass of this radio millisecond pulsar popu...

  18. Gravitational waves from resolvable massive black hole binary systems and observations with Pulsar Timing Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Sesana, A; Volonteri, M

    2008-01-01

    Massive black holes are key components of the assembly and evolution of cosmic structures and a number of surveys are currently on-going or planned to probe the demographics of these objects and to gain insight into the relevant physical processes. Pulsar Timing Arrays (PTAs) currently provide the only means to observe gravitational radiation from massive black hole binary systems with masses >10^7 solar masses. The whole cosmic population produces a stochastic background that could be detectable with upcoming Pulsar Timing Arrays. Sources sufficiently close and/or massive generate gravitational radiation that significantly exceeds the level of the background and could be individually resolved. We consider a wide range of massive black hole binary assembly scenarios, we investigate the distribution of the main physical parameters of the sources, such as masses and redshift, and explore the consequences for Pulsar Timing Arrays observations. Depending on the specific massive black hole population model, we est...

  19. Broadband Pulsations from PSR B1821-24: Implications for Emission Models and the Pulsar Population of M28

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, T J; Kerr, M; Cognard, I; Ray, P S; Wolff, M T; Begin, S; Janssen, G H; Romani, R W; Venter, C; Grove, J E; Freire, P C C; Wood, M; Cheung, C C; Casandjian, J M; Stairs, I H; Camilo, F; Espinoza, C M; Ferrara, E C; Harding, A K; Johnston, S; Kramer, M; Lyne, A G; Michelson, P F; Ransom, S M; Shannon, R; Smith, D A; Stappers, B W; Theureau, G; Thorsett, S E

    2013-01-01

    We report a 5.4\\sigma\\ detection of pulsed gamma rays from PSR B1821-24 in the globular cluster M28 using ~44 months of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data that have been reprocessed with improved instrument calibration constants. We constructed a phase-coherent ephemeris, with post-fit residual RMS of 3 \\mu s, using radio data spanning ~23.2 years, enabling measurements of the multi-wavelength light curve properties of PSR B1821-24 at the milliperiod level. We fold RXTE observations of PSR B1821-24 from 1996 to 2007 and discuss implications on the emission zones. The gamma-ray light curve consists of two peaks, separated by 0.41$\\pm$0.02 in phase, with the first gamma-ray peak lagging the first radio peak by 0.05$\\pm$0.02 in phase, consistent with the phase of giant radio pulses. We observe significant emission in the off-peak interval of PSR B1821-24 with a best-fit LAT position inconsistent with the core of M28. We do not detect significant gamma-ray pulsations at the spin or orbital periods from any oth...

  20. Inclination angle and braking index evolution of pulsars with plasma-filled magnetosphere: application to high braking index of PSR J1640-4631

    CERN Document Server

    Ekşi, Kazım Yavuz; Çıkıntoğlu, Sercan; Gügercinoğlu, Erbil; Motlagh, Armin Vahdat; Kızıltan, Bülent

    2016-01-01

    The recently discovered rotationally powered pulsar PSR J1640-4631 is the first to have a braking index measured, with high enough precision, to be greater than three. An inclined magnetic rotator in vacuum or plasma would be subject to not only spin-down torque but also to an alignment torque. The vacuum model can address the braking index only for an almost orthogonal rotator which is incompatible with the single peaked pulse profile. We show that the magnetic dipole model with the corotating plasma predicts braking indices between $3-3.25$ and can explain the braking index of $3.15$ for two different inclination angles, $18.5\\pm 3$ degrees and $56 \\pm 4$ degrees. Of these the former is preferred given the pulse profile has a single peak. We infer the change in the inclination angle to be at the rate $-0.23$ degrees per century, three times smaller in absolute value than the rate recently observed from the Crab pulsar.

  1. Discovery of a faint X-ray counterpart and of a parsec-long X-ray tail for the middle-aged, gamma-ray only pulsar PSR J0357+3205

    CERN Document Server

    De Luca, A; Mignani, R P; Caraveo, P A; Hummel, W; Collins, S; Shearer, A; Parkinson, P M Saz; Belfiore, A; Bignami, G F

    2011-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi satellite opened a new era for pulsar astronomy, detecting gamma-ray pulsations from more than 60 pulsars, ~40% of which are not seen at radio wavelengths. One of the most interesting sources discovered by LAT is PSR J0357+3205, a radio-quiet, middle-aged (tau_C ~0.5 Myr) pulsar standing out for its very low spin-down luminosity (Erot ~6x10^33 erg/s), indeed the lowest among non-recycled gamma-ray pulsars. A deep X-ray observation with Chandra (0.5-10 keV), coupled with sensitive optical/infrared ground-based images of the field, allowed us to identify PSR J0357+3205 as a faint source with a soft spectrum, consistent with a purely non-thermal emission (photon index Gamma=2.53+/-0.25). The absorbing column (NH=8+/-4x10^20 cm^-2) is consistent with a distance of a few hundred parsecs. Moreover, the Chandra data unveiled a huge (9 arcmin long) extended feature apparently protruding from the pulsar. Its non-thermal X-ray spectrum points to synchrotron emission from...

  2. A model for gamma-ray binaries, based on the effect of pair production feedback in shocked pulsar winds

    CERN Document Server

    Derishev, E

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the model of gamma-ray binaries, consisting of a massive star and a pulsar with ultrarelativistic wind. We consider radiation from energetic particles, accelerated at the pulsar wind termination shock, and feedback of this radiation on the wind through production of secondary electron-positron pairs. We show that the pair feedback limits the Lorentz factor of the pulsar wind and creates a population of very energetic pairs, whose radiation may be responsible for the observed gamma-ray signal.

  3. Gravitational waves from binary supermassive black holes missing in pulsar observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, R M; Ravi, V; Lentati, L T; Lasky, P D; Hobbs, G; Kerr, M; Manchester, R N; Coles, W A; Levin, Y; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Dai, S; Keith, M J; Osłowski, S; Reardon, D J; van Straten, W; Toomey, L; Wang, J-B; Wen, L; Wyithe, J S B; Zhu, X-J

    2015-09-25

    Gravitational waves are expected to be radiated by supermassive black hole binaries formed during galaxy mergers. A stochastic superposition of gravitational waves from all such binary systems would modulate the arrival times of pulses from radio pulsars. Using observations of millisecond pulsars obtained with the Parkes radio telescope, we constrained the characteristic amplitude of this background, A(c,yr), to be <1.0 × 10(-15) with 95% confidence. This limit excludes predicted ranges for A(c,yr) from current models with 91 to 99.7% probability. We conclude that binary evolution is either stalled or dramatically accelerated by galactic-center environments and that higher-cadence and shorter-wavelength observations would be more sensitive to gravitational waves. PMID:26404832

  4. Observing the dynamics of supermassive black hole binaries with pulsar timing arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingarelli, C M F; Grover, K; Sidery, T; Smith, R J E; Vecchio, A

    2012-08-24

    Pulsar timing arrays are a prime tool to study unexplored astrophysical regimes with gravitational waves. Here, we show that the detection of gravitational radiation from individually resolvable supermassive black hole binary systems can yield direct information about the masses and spins of the black holes, provided that the gravitational-wave-induced timing fluctuations both at the pulsar and at Earth are detected. This in turn provides a map of the nonlinear dynamics of the gravitational field and a new avenue to tackle open problems in astrophysics connected to the formation and evolution of supermassive black holes. We discuss the potential, the challenges, and the limitations of these observations. PMID:23002736

  5. Propagation and stability of superluminal waves in pulsar winds

    CERN Document Server

    Mochol, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinear electromagnetic waves with superluminal phase velocity can propagate in the winds around isolated pulsars, and around some pulsars in binary systems. Using a short-wavelength approximation, we find and analyze an integrable system of equations that govern their evolution in spherical geometry. A confined mode is identified that stagnates to finite pressure at large radius and can form a precursor to the termination shock. Using a simplified criterion, we find this mode is stable for most isolated pulsars, but may be unstable if the external pressure is high, such as in the pulsar wind nebulae in starburst galaxies and in W44. Pulsar winds in eccentric binary systems, such as PSR 1259-63, may go through phases with stable and unstable electromagnetic precursors, as well as phases in which the density is too high for these modes to propagate.

  6. The Green Bank Telescope 350 MHz Drift-scan Survey II: Data Analysis and the Timing of 10 New Pulsars, Including a Relativistic Binary

    CERN Document Server

    Lynch, Ryan S; Ransom, Scott M; Stairs, Ingrid H; Lorimer, Duncan R; McLaughlin, Maura A; Hessels, Jason W T; Kaspi, Victoria M; Kondratiev, Vladislav I; Archibald, Anne M; Berndsen, Aaron; Cardoso, Rogerio F; Cherry, Angus; Karako-Argaman, Chen; van Leeuwen, Joeri; McPhee, Christie A; Pennucci, Tim; Roberts, Mallory S E

    2012-01-01

    We have completed a 350 MHz drift scan survey using the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope with the goal of finding new radio pulsars, especially millisecond pulsars that can be timed to high precision. This survey covered ~10300 square degrees and all of the data have now been fully processed. We have discovered a total of 31 new pulsars, seven of which are recycled pulsars. A companion paper by Boyles et al. (2012) describes the survey strategy, sky coverage, and instrumental set-up, and presents timing solutions for the first 13 pulsars. Here we describe the data analysis pipeline, survey sensitivity, and follow-up observations of new pulsars, and present timing solutions for 10 other pulsars. We highlight several sources---two interesting nulling pulsars, an isolated millisecond pulsar with a measurement of proper motion, and a partially recycled pulsar, PSR J0348+0432, which has a white dwarf companion in a relativistic orbit. PSR J0348+0432 will enable unprecedented tests of theories of gravity.

  7. THE GREEN BANK TELESCOPE 350 MHz DRIFT-SCAN SURVEY II: DATA ANALYSIS AND THE TIMING OF 10 NEW PULSARS, INCLUDING A RELATIVISTIC BINARY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have completed a 350 MHz Drift-scan Survey using the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope with the goal of finding new radio pulsars, especially millisecond pulsars that can be timed to high precision. This survey covered ∼10,300 deg2 and all of the data have now been fully processed. We have discovered a total of 31 new pulsars, 7 of which are recycled pulsars. A companion paper by Boyles et al. describes the survey strategy, sky coverage, and instrumental setup, and presents timing solutions for the first 13 pulsars. Here we describe the data analysis pipeline, survey sensitivity, and follow-up observations of new pulsars, and present timing solutions for 10 other pulsars. We highlight several sources—two interesting nulling pulsars, an isolated millisecond pulsar with a measurement of proper motion, and a partially recycled pulsar, PSR J0348+0432, which has a white dwarf companion in a relativistic orbit. PSR J0348+0432 will enable unprecedented tests of theories of gravity.

  8. Simultaneous single-pulse observations of radio pulsars I. The polarization characteristics of PSR B0329+54

    CERN Document Server

    Karastergiou, A; Krämer, M; Lorimer, D R; Lyne, A G; Doroshenko, O E; Jessner, A; Jordan, C; Wielebinski, R

    2001-01-01

    We present the first results from a programme of multi-frequency simultaneous single pulse observations carried out as part of the European Pulsar Network. We detail the main data analysis methods and apply them to simultaneous observations of the strong pulsar B0329+54 at 1.4 and 2.7 GHz using the Jodrell Bank and Effelsberg radio telescopes respectively. The pulses at different frequencies are highly correlated in their total intensity, as seen in previous experiments, and generally show consistent position angles of the linearly polarized component. In contrast, the circularly polarized emission sometimes shows clear differences between pulses received at different frequencies. These results are unexpected and warrant further follow-up studies to interpret them in the context of the intrinsic bandwidth of pulsar radiation.

  9. Different twins in the millisecond pulsar recycling scenario: Optical polarimetry of PSR J1023+0038 and XSS J12270-4859

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglio, M. C.; D'Avanzo, P.; Campana, S.; Coti Zelati, F.; Covino, S.; Russell, D. M.

    2016-06-01

    We present the first optical polarimetric study of the two transitional pulsars PSR J1023+0038 and XSS J12270-4859. This work is focused on the search for intrinsically linearly polarised optical emission from the two systems. To this aim, we carried out multiband optical (BVRi) and near-infrared (NIR; JHK) photo-polarimetric observations of the two systems using the ESO New Technology Telescope (NTT) at La Silla (Chile), equipped with the EFOSC2 and the SOFI instruments. The system XSS J12270-4859 was observed during its radio-pulsar state; we did not detect a significant degree of polarisation in any of the bands, with 3σ upper limits, for example, of 1.4% in the R-band. We built the NIR-optical averaged spectral energy distribution (SED) of the system, which could be described well by an irradiated black body with radius R∗ = 0.33 ± 0.03 R⊙ and albedo η = 0.32 ± 0.05, without the need for further components. Thus, we excluded the visible presence of an extended accretion disc and/or of relativistic jets. The case was different for PSR J1023+0038, which was in its accretion phase during our campaign. We measured a linear polarisation of 1.09 ± 0.27% and 0.90 ± 0.17% in the V and R bands, respectively. The phase-resolved polarimetric curve of the source in the R band reveals a hint of a sinusoidal modulation at the source 4.75 h orbital period, peaked at the same orbital phase as the light curve. The measured optical polarisation of PSR J1023+0038 could, in principle, be interpreted as electron scattering with free electrons, which can be found in the accretion disc of the system or even in the hot corona that sorrounds the disc itself, or as synchrotron emission from a jet of relativistic particles or an outflow. However, the NIR-optical SED of the system built from our dataset did not suggest the presence of a jet. We conclude that the optical linear polarisation observed for PSR J1023+0038 is possibly due to Thomson scattering with electrons in the

  10. Identification of the High-Energy Gamma-Ray Source 3FGL J1544.6-1125 as a Transitional Millisecond Pulsar Binary in an Accreting State

    CERN Document Server

    Bogdanov, Slavko

    2015-01-01

    We present X-ray, ultraviolet, and optical observations of 1RXS J154439.4-112820, the most probable counterpart of the unassociated Fermi LAT source 3FGL J1544.6-1125. The optical data reveal rapid variability, which is a feature of accreting systems. The X-ray data exhibit large-amplitude flux variations in the form of fast switching (within ~10 s) between two distinct flux levels that differ by a factor of $\\approx$10. The detailed optical and X-ray behavior is virtually identical to that seen in the accretion-disk-dominated states of the transitional millisecond pulsar binaries PSR J1023+0038 and XSS J12270-4859, which are also associated with $\\gamma$-ray sources. Based on the available observational evidence, we conclude that 1RXS J154439.4-112820 and 3FGL J1544.6-1125 are the same object, with the X-rays arising from intermittent low-luminosity accretion onto a millisecond pulsar and the $\\gamma$-rays originating from an accretion-driven outflow. 1RXS J154439.4-112820 is only the fourth $\\gamma$-ray emi...

  11. A NuSTAR Observation of the Gamma-Ray-Emitting X-ray Binary and Transitional Millisecond Pulsar Candidate 1RXS J154439.4-112820

    CERN Document Server

    Bogdanov, Slavko

    2015-01-01

    I present a 40 kilosecond Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) observation of the recently identified low-luminosity X-ray binary and transitional millisecond pulsar (tMSP) candidate 1RXS J154439.4-112820, which is associated with the high-energy gamma-ray source 3FGL J1544.6--1125. The system is detected up to ~30 keV with an extension of the same power-law spectrum and rapid large-amplitude variability between two flux levels observed in soft X-rays. These findings provide further evidence that 1RXS J154439.4-112820 belongs to the same class of objects as the nearby bona fide tMSPs PSR J1023+0038 and XSS J12270-4859 and therefore almost certainly hosts a millisecond pulsar accreting at low luminosities. I also examine the long-term accretion history of 1RXS J154439.4-112820 based on archival optical, ultraviolet, X-ray, and $\\gamma$-ray light curves covering the past $\\sim$decade. Throughout this period, the source has maintained similar flux levels at all wavelengths, which is an indication that ...

  12. On the detection of eccentric supermassive black hole binaries with pulsar timing arrays: Signal-to-noise ratio calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Huerta, E A; Gair, Jonathan R; Taylor, Stephen R

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the expected signal-to-noise ratios of supermassive black hole binaries on eccentric orbits observed by pulsar timing arrays. We derive several analytical relations that extend the results of Peters and Mathews [Phys. Rev. D 131, 435 (1963)] to facilitate this analysis. We show that eccentricity enhances the signal-to-noise ratio of single resolvable sources whose dominant harmonic is located in the low-frequency sensitivity regime of pulsar timing arrays for continuous wave sources, whereas the expected signal-to-noise ratio of single resolvable sources emitting in the high frequency sensitivity regime of pulsar timing arrays will be attenuated. We also show that the strain of a stochastic, isotropic gravitational wave background generated by a cosmological population of eccentric binaries will be suppressed in the frequency band of pulsar timing arrays relative to a population of circular binaries, which may pose a potential problem for their detection.

  13. Insights into the astrophysics of supermassive black hole binaries from pulsar timing observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) are designed to detect the predicted gravitational wave (GW) background produced by a cosmological population of supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries. In this contribution, I review the physics of such GW background, highlighting its dependence on the overall binary population, the relation between SMBHs and their hosts, and their coupling with the stellar and gaseous environment. The latter is particularly relevant when it drives the binaries to extreme eccentricities (e > 0.9), which might be the case for stellar-driven systems. This causes a substantial suppression of the low-frequency signal, potentially posing a serious threat to the effectiveness of PTA observations. A future PTA detection will allow us to directly observe for the first time subparsec SMBH binaries on their way to the GW-driven coalescence, providing important answers of the outstanding questions related to the physics underlying the formation and evolution of these spectacular sources. (paper)

  14. PSR J2021+4026 IN THE GAMMA CYGNI REGION: THE FIRST VARIABLE γ-RAY PULSAR SEEN BY THE Fermi LAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-term monitoring of PSR J2021+4026 in the heart of the Cygnus region with the Fermi Large Area Telescope unveiled a sudden decrease in flux above 100 MeV over a timescale shorter than a week. The 'jump' was near MJD 55850 (2011 October 16), with the flux decreasing from (8.33 ± 0.08) × 10–10 erg cm–2 s–1 to (6.86 ± 0.13) × 10–10 erg cm–2 s–1. Simultaneously, the frequency spindown rate increased from (7.8 ± 0.1) × 10–13 Hz s–1 to (8.1 ± 0.1) × 10–13 Hz s–1. Significant (>5σ) changes in the pulse profile and marginal (<3σ) changes in the emission spectrum occurred at the same time. There is also evidence for a small, steady flux increase over the 3 yr preceding MJD 55850. This is the first observation at γ-ray energies of mode changes and intermittent behavior, observed at radio wavelengths for other pulsars. We argue that the change in pulsed γ-ray emission is due to a change in emission beaming and we speculate that it is precipitated by a shift in the magnetic field structure, leading to a change of either effective magnetic inclination or effective current

  15. Swinging between rotation and accretion power in a binary millisecond pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Papitto, A; Bozzo, E; Rea, N

    2013-01-01

    We present the discovery of IGR J18245-2452, the first millisecond pulsar observed to swing between a rotation-powered, radio pulsar state, and an accretion-powered X-ray pulsar state (Papitto et al. 2013, Nature, 501, 517). This transitional source represents the most convincing proof of the evolutionary link shared by accreting neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries, and radio millisecond pulsars. It demonstrates that swings between these two states take place on the same time-scales of luminosity variations of X-ray transients, and are therefore most easily interpreted in terms of changes in the rate of mass in-flow. While accreting mass, the X-ray emission of IGR J18245-2452 varies dramatically on time-scales ranging from a second to a few hours. We interpret a state characterised by a lower flux and pulsed fraction, and by sudden increases of the hardness of the X-ray emission, in terms of the onset of a magnetospheric centrifugal inhibition of the accretion flow. Prospects of finding new members of th...

  16. What caused the GeV flare of PSR B1259-63 ?

    OpenAIRE

    Dubus, G.; Cerutti, B.

    2013-01-01

    PSR B1259-63 is a gamma-ray binary system composed of a high spindown pulsar and a massive star. Non-thermal emission up to TeV energies is observed near periastron passage, attributed to emission from high energy e+e- pairs accelerated at the shock with the circumstellar material from the companion star, resulting in a small-scale pulsar wind nebula. Weak gamma-ray emission was detected by the Fermi/LAT at the last periastron passage, unexpectedly followed 30 days later by a strong flare, li...

  17. On the detection of eccentric supermassive black hole binaries with pulsar timing arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, Eliu; McWilliams, Sean; Gair, Jonathan; Taylor, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    It is believed that supermassive black holes (SMBHs) with masses between a million up to a few billion solar masses are ubiquitous in nearby galactic nuclei. Hence, the merger of a pair of galaxies hosting these compact objects may result in the formation of a compact binary that decays to small orbital separations via interactions with its stellar and gaseous environments. Recent studies suggest that these formation channels imply that SMBH binaries may have large orbital eccentricities when they become dominated by gravitational wave emission. In light of these considerations, we present a novel and comprehensive framework that we put at work to carry out an end-to-end analysis of the effect of eccentricity on the amplitude and spectrum of a stochastic, isotropic gravitational wave background from SMBH binaries and single resolvable sources that may be detected with Pulsar Timing Arrays.

  18. Simultaneous Observations of Giant Pulses from Pulsar PSR B0031-07 at 38 MHz and 74 MHz

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai, Jr-Wei; Bear, Brandon; Gough, Jonathan D; Newton, Joseph R; Kavic, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The first station of the Long Wavelength Array (LWA1) was used to study PSR~B0031-07 with simultaneous observations at 38 and 74~MHz. We found that 158 (0.35\\%) of the observed pulses at 38~MHz and 221 (0.49\\%) of the observed pulses at 74~MHz qualified as giant pulses in a total of 12 hours of observations. Giant pulses are defined as having flux densities of a factor of $\\geq$ 90 times that of an average pulse at 38~MHz and $\\geq$ 80 times that of an average pulse at 74~MHz. The cumulative distribution of pulse strength follows a power law, with an index of $-$4.2 at 38~MHz and $-$4.9 at 74~MHz. This distribution has a much more gradual slope than would be expected if observing the tail of a Gaussian distribution of normal pulses. The dispersion measure value which resulted in the largest signal-to-noise for dedispersed pulses was DM $=10.9$~pc~cm$^{-3}$. No other transient pulses were detected in the data in the wide dispersion measure range from 1 to 5000~pc~cm$^{-3}$. There were 12 giant pulses detected ...

  19. X-Ray Observations of Black Widow Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Gentile, P; McLaughlin, M; Camilo, F; Hessels, J; Kerr, M; Ransom, S; Ray, P; Stairs, I

    2013-01-01

    We describe the first X-ray observations of five short orbital period ($P_B < 1$ day), $\\gamma$-ray emitting, binary millisecond pulsars. Four of these, PSRs J0023+0923, J1124$-$3653, J1810+1744, and J2256$-$1024 are `black-widow' pulsars, with degenerate companions of mass $\\ll0.1 M_{\\odot}$, three of which exhibit radio eclipses. The fifth source, PSR J2215+5135, is an eclipsing `redback' with a near Roche-lobe filling $\\sim$0.2 solar mass non-degenerate companion. Data were taken using the \\textit{Chandra X-Ray Observatory} and covered a full binary orbit for each pulsar. Two pulsars, PSRs J2215+5135 and J2256$-$1024, show significant orbital variability while PSR J1124$-$3653 shows marginal orbital variability. The lightcurves for these three pulsars have X-ray flux minima coinciding with the phases of the radio eclipses. This phenomenon is consistent with an intrabinary shock emission interpretation for the X-rays. The other two pulsars, PSRs J0023+0923 and J1810+1744, are fainter and do not demonstra...

  20. Constraints on individual supermassive black hole binaries from pulsar timing array limits on continuous gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutz, Katelin; Ma, Chung-Pei

    2016-06-01

    Pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) are placing increasingly stringent constraints on the strain amplitude of continuous gravitational waves emitted by supermassive black hole binaries on subparsec scales. In this paper, we incorporate independent information about the dynamical masses Mbh of supermassive black holes in specific galaxies at known distances and use this additional information to further constrain whether or not those galaxies could host a detectable supermassive black hole binary. We estimate the strain amplitudes from individual binaries as a function of binary mass ratio for two samples of nearby galaxies: (1) those with direct dynamical measurements of Mbh in the literature, and (2) the 116 most massive early-type galaxies (and thus likely hosts of the most massive black holes) within 108 Mpc from the MASSIVE Survey. Our exploratory analysis shows that the current PTA upper limits on continuous waves (as a function of angular position in the sky) can already constrain the mass ratios of hypothetical black hole binaries in many galaxies in our samples. The constraints are stronger for galaxies with larger Mbh and at smaller distances. For the black holes with Mbh ≳ 5 × 109 M⊙ at the centres of NGC 1600, NGC 4889, NGC 4486 (M87), and NGC 4649 (M60), any binary companion in orbit within the PTA frequency bands would have to have a mass ratio of a few per cent or less.

  1. Detecting Eccentric Supermassive Black Hole Binaries with Pulsar Timing Arrays: Resolvable Source Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, S. R.; Huerta, E. A.; Gair, J. R.; McWilliams, S. T.

    2016-01-01

    The couplings between supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) and their environments within galactic nuclei have been well studied as part of the search for solutions to the final parsec problem. The scattering of stars by the binary or the interaction with a circumbinary disk may efficiently drive the system to sub-parsec separations, allowing the binary to enter a regime where the emission of gravitational waves can drive it to merger within a Hubble time. However, these interactions can also affect the orbital parameters of the binary. In particular, they may drive an increase in binary eccentricity which survives until the system’s gravitational-wave (GW) signal enters the pulsar-timing array (PTA) band. Therefore, if we can measure the eccentricity from observed signals, we can potentially deduce some of the properties of the binary environment. To this end, we build on previous techniques to present a general Bayesian pipeline with which we can detect and estimate the parameters of an eccentric SMBHB system with PTAs. Additionally, we generalize the PTA {{ F }}{{e}}-statistic to eccentric systems, and show that both this statistic and the Bayesian pipeline are robust when studying circular or arbitrarily eccentric systems. We explore how eccentricity influences the detection prospects of single GW sources, as well as the detection penalty incurred by employing a circular waveform template to search for eccentric signals, and conclude by identifying important avenues for future study.

  2. Detecting eccentric supermassive black hole binaries with pulsar timing arrays: Resolvable source strategies

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, S R; Gair, J R; McWilliams, S T

    2015-01-01

    The couplings between supermassive black-hole binaries and their environments within galactic nuclei have been well studied as part of the search for solutions to the final parsec problem. The scattering of stars by the binary or the interaction with a circumbinary disk may efficiently drive the system to sub-parsec separations, allowing the binary to enter a regime where the emission of gravitational-waves can drive it to merger within a Hubble time. However, these interactions can also affect the orbital parameters of the binary. In particular, they may drive an increase in binary eccentricity which survives until the system's gravitational-wave signal enters the pulsar-timing array band. Therefore, if we can measure the eccentricity from observed signals, we can potentially deduce some of the properties of the binary environment. To this end, we build on previous techniques to present a general Bayesian pipeline with which we can detect and estimate the parameters of an eccentric supermassive black-hole bi...

  3. PSR J2021+4026 IN THE GAMMA CYGNI REGION: THE FIRST VARIABLE γ-RAY PULSAR SEEN BY THE Fermi LAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allafort, A.; Bottacini, E.; Cameron, R. A. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Baldini, L. [Università di Pisa and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Ballet, J.; Chaves, R.C.G. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Université Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Baring, M. G. [Rice University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, MS-108, P. O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Bastieri, D.; Buson, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bonamente, E.; Cecchi, C. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Brandt, T. J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Bruel, P. [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, École polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Buehler, R. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Caliandro, G. A. [Institut de Ciències de l' Espai (IEEE-CSIC), Campus UAB, E-08193 Barcelona (Spain); Caraveo, P. A. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Chekhtman, A., E-mail: ltibaldo@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: massimiliano.razzano@pi.infn.it [Center for Earth Observing and Space Research, College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030, resident at Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); and others

    2013-11-01

    Long-term monitoring of PSR J2021+4026 in the heart of the Cygnus region with the Fermi Large Area Telescope unveiled a sudden decrease in flux above 100 MeV over a timescale shorter than a week. The 'jump' was near MJD 55850 (2011 October 16), with the flux decreasing from (8.33 ± 0.08) × 10{sup –10} erg cm{sup –2} s{sup –1} to (6.86 ± 0.13) × 10{sup –10} erg cm{sup –2} s{sup –1}. Simultaneously, the frequency spindown rate increased from (7.8 ± 0.1) × 10{sup –13} Hz s{sup –1} to (8.1 ± 0.1) × 10{sup –13} Hz s{sup –1}. Significant (>5σ) changes in the pulse profile and marginal (<3σ) changes in the emission spectrum occurred at the same time. There is also evidence for a small, steady flux increase over the 3 yr preceding MJD 55850. This is the first observation at γ-ray energies of mode changes and intermittent behavior, observed at radio wavelengths for other pulsars. We argue that the change in pulsed γ-ray emission is due to a change in emission beaming and we speculate that it is precipitated by a shift in the magnetic field structure, leading to a change of either effective magnetic inclination or effective current.

  4. Detection of eccentric supermassive black hole binaries with pulsar timing arrays: Signal-to-noise ratio calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, E. A.; McWilliams, Sean T.; Gair, Jonathan R.; Taylor, Stephen R.

    2015-09-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the expected signal-to-noise ratios of supermassive black hole binaries on eccentric orbits observed by pulsar timing arrays. We derive several analytical relations that extend the results of Peters and Mathews [Phys. Rev. D 131, 435 (1963)] to quantify the impact of eccentricity in the detection of single resolvable binaries in the pulsar timing array band. We present ready-to-use expressions to compute the increase/loss in signal-to-noise ratio of eccentric single resolvable sources whose dominant harmonic is located in the low/high frequency sensitivity regime of pulsar timing arrays. Building upon the work of Phinney (arXiv:astro-ph/0108028) and Enoki and Nagashima [Prog. Theor. Phys. 117, 241 (2007)], we present an analytical framework that enables the construction of rapid spectra for a stochastic gravitational-wave background generated by a cosmological population of eccentric sources. We confirm previous findings which indicate that, relative to a population of quasicircular binaries, the strain of a stochastic, isotropic gravitational-wave background generated by a cosmological population of eccentric binaries will be suppressed in the frequency band of pulsar timing arrays. We quantify this effect in terms of signal-to-noise ratios in a pulsar timing array.

  5. Fermi variability study of the candidate pulsar binary 2FGL J0523.3−2530

    OpenAIRE

    Xing, Y.; Wang, ZX; Ng, SCY

    2014-01-01

    The Fermi source 2FGL~J0523.3$-$2530 has recently been identified as a candidate millisecond pulsar binary with an orbital period of 16.5 hrs. We have carried out detailed studies of the source's emission properties by analyzing data taken with the Fermi Large Area Telescope in the 0.2--300 GeV energy range. Long-term, yearly variability from the source has been found, with a factor of 4 flux variations in 1--300 GeV. From spectral analysis, we find an extra spectral component at 2--3 GeV tha...

  6. Possible Fermi Detection of the Accreting Millisecond Pulsar Binary SAX J1808.4-3658

    OpenAIRE

    Xing, Yi; Wang, Zhongxiang; Jithesh, V.

    2015-01-01

    We report the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) detection of a $\\gamma$-ray source at the position of SAX J1808.4$-$3658. This transient low-mass X-ray binary contains an accreting millisecond puslar, which is only seen during its month-long outbursts and likely switches to be rotation powered during its quiescent state. Emission from the $\\gamma$-ray source can be described by a power law with an exponential cutoff, the characteristic form for pulsar emission. Folding the source's 2.0--300 Ge...

  7. Using Pulsar Timing observations to understand the formation and evolution of supermassive black hole binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornish, Neil; Sampson, Laura; McWilliams, Sean

    2015-04-01

    The astrophysical processes that form and harden supermassive black hole binaries impart distinct features that may be observed in the gravitational-wave spectrum within the sensitive frequency range of Pulsar Timing Arrays (PTA). We investigate how well the various formation and hardening mechanisms can be constrained by applying Bayesian inference to simulated PTA data sets. We find that even without strong priors on the merger rate, any detection of the signal will place interesting constraints on the astrophysical models. Folding in priors on the merger rate allows us to place interesting constraints on the astrophysical models even before a detection is made.

  8. Spectral Properties of the X-ray Binary Pulsar LMC X-4 during Different Intensity States

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S. Naik; B. Paul

    2002-03-01

    We present spectral variations of the binary X-ray pulsar LMC X-4 observed with the RXTE/PCA during different phases of its 30.5 day long third period. Only out-of-eclipse data were used for this study. The 3–25 keV spectrum, modeled with high energy cut-off power-law and iron line emission is found to show strong dependence on the intensity state. Correlations between the Fe line emission flux and different parameters of the continuum are presented here.

  9. Tidal pressure induced neutrino emission as an energy dissipation mechanism in binary pulsar systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We briefly review possible systematic limitations to the inferred General Relativity tests in binary pulsar systems, then propose a new mechanism whereby orbital energy can drive the electron-proton vs. neutron density away from equilibrium, and the concomitant neutrino (or antineutrino) emission represents an orbital energy dissipation. Of the total orbital energy loss rate, we estimate the fractional contribution of this mechanism as 8x10-6, whereas the observational accuracy is at the level of 7x10-3, and agrees with the predicted rate of gravitational radiation. 10 refs

  10. An eclipsing millisecond pulsar with a possible main-sequence companion in NGC 6397

    CERN Document Server

    D'Amico, N; Manchester, R N; Sarkissian, J M; Lyne, A G; Camilo, F M

    2001-01-01

    We present the results of one year of pulse timing observations of PSR J1740-5340, an eclipsing millisecond pulsar located in the globular cluster NGC 6397. We have obtained detailed orbital parameters and a precise position for the pulsar. The radio pulsar signal shows frequent interactions with the atmosphere of the companion, and suffers significant and strongly variable delays and intensity variations over a wide range of orbital phases. These characteristics and the binary parameters indicate that the companion may be a bloated main-sequence star or the remnant (still filling its Roche lobe) of the star that spun up the pulsar. In both cases, this would be the first binary millisecond pulsar system with such a companion.

  11. The Quasi-Roche lobe overflow state in the evolution of Close Binary Systems containing a radio pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Benvenuto, O G; Horvath, J E

    2014-01-01

    We study the evolution of close binary systems formed by a normal (solar composition), intermediate mass donor star together with a neutron star. We consider models including irradiation feedback and evaporation. These non-standard ingredients deeply modify the mass transfer stages of these binaries. While models that neglect irradiation feedback undergo continuous, long standing mass transfer episodes, models including these effect suffer a number cycles of mass transfer and detachment. During mass transfer the systems should reveal themselves as low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), whereas when detached they behave as a binary radio pulsars. We show that at these stages irradiated models are in a Roche lobe overflow (RLOF) state or in a quasi-RLOF state. Quasi-RLOF stars have a radius slightly smaller than its Roche lobe. Remarkably, these conditions are attained for orbital period and donor mass values in the range corresponding to a family of binary radio pulsars known as "redbacks". Thus, redback companions ...

  12. The general relativistic problem of motion and binary pulsars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of motion in General Relativity has a long and chequered history. We shall concentrate on two particular issues. The first is the problem of deriving and describing the motion of several gravitationally condensed objects. Relativistic Astrophysics predicts the existence of such objects, namely the neutron stars and the black holes, and there are now many observational data about the motion of binary systems containing at least one such object. But, there are relatively few theoretical works about the general relativistic theory of the motion of condensed objects. One of the reasons for this situation is that there seems to exist an implicit belief that the usual post-Newtonian-type approximation methods are not only adequate to deal, both theoretically and observationally, with the motion of weakly self-gravitating extended bodies, but are even, in some sense, sufficient to deal with the motion of condensed bodies. A critical examination of this belief will constitute the first issue that we wish to discuss here. Then in the last section we shall outline what are the main ingredients that are needed, in our opinion, for providing a complete theoretical coverage of the problem of the motion of condensed bodies, putting a particular emphasis on the necessity of going beyond the usual ''coordinate motion aspect'' to obtain instead a general relativistic theory of the measurement of the motion of such bodies. (author)

  13. Parkes Radio Searches of Fermi Gamma-Ray Sources and Millisecond Pulsar Discoveries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilo, F.; Kerr, M.; Ray, P. S.; Ransom, S. M.; Sarkissian, J.; Cromartie, H. T.; Johnston, S.; Reynolds, J. E.; Wolff, M. T.; Freire, P. C. C.; Bhattacharyya, B.; Ferrara, E. C.; Keith, M.; Michelson, P. F.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Wood, K. S.

    2015-09-01

    In a search with the Parkes radio telescope of 56 unidentified Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) gamma-ray sources, we have detected 11 millisecond pulsars (MSPs), 10 of them discoveries, of which five were reported by Kerr et al. We did not detect radio pulsations from six other pulsars now known in these sources. We describe the completed survey, which included multiple observations of many targets conducted to minimize the impact of interstellar scintillation, acceleration effects in binary systems, and eclipses. We consider that 23 of the 39 remaining sources may still be viable pulsar candidates. We present timing solutions and polarimetry for five of the MSPs and gamma-ray pulsations for PSR J1903-7051 (pulsations for five others were reported in the second Fermi-LAT catalog of gamma-ray pulsars). Two of the new MSPs are isolated and five are in \\gt 1 day circular orbits with 0.2-0.3 {M}⊙ presumed white dwarf companions. PSR J0955-6150, in a 24 day orbit with a ≈ 0.25 {M}⊙ companion but eccentricity of 0.11, belongs to a recently identified class of eccentric MSPs. PSR J1036-8317 is in an 8 hr binary with a \\gt 0.14 {M}⊙ companion that is probably a white dwarf. PSR J1946-5403 is in a 3 hr orbit with a \\gt 0.02 {M}⊙ companion with no evidence of radio eclipses.

  14. Suzaku Observation of Be/X-ray Binary Pulsar EXO 2030+375

    CERN Document Server

    Naik, Sachindra

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we study the timing and spectral properties of Be/X-ray binary pulsar EXO 2030+375 using a $Suzaku$ observation on 2012 May 23, during a less intense Type I outburst. Pulsations were clearly detected in the X-ray light curves at a barycentric period of 41.2852 s which suggests that the pulsar is spinning-up. The pulse profiles were found to be peculiar e.g. unlike that obtained from the earlier Suzaku observation on 2007 May 14. A single-peaked narrow profile at soft X-rays (0.5-10 keV range) changed to a double-peaked broad profile in 12-55 keV energy range and again reverted back to a smooth single-peaked profile at hard X-rays (55-70 keV range). The 1.0-100.0 keV broad-band spectrum of the pulsar was found to be well described by three continuum models such as (i) a partial covering high energy cut-off power-law model, (ii) a partially absorbed power-law with high-energy exponential rolloff and (iii) a partial covering Negative and Positive power law with EXponential (NPEX) continuum model. U...

  15. SDSS J102347.6+003841: A Millisecond Radio Pulsar Binary That Had A Hot Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zhongxiang; Thorstensen, John R; Kaspi, Victoria M; Lorimer, Duncan R; Stairs, Ingrid; Ransom, Scott M

    2009-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) source J102347.6+003841 is a binary star with a 4.75 hr orbital period. A recent radio pulsar survey showed that its primary is a millisecond pulsar (MSP). Here we analyze the SDSS spectrum of the source in detail. The spectrum was taken on 2001 February 1, when the source was in a bright state and showed broad, double-peaked hydrogen and helium lines -- dramatically different from the G-type absorption spectrum seen from 2003 onward. The lines are consistent with emission from a disk around the compact primary. We derive properties of the disk by fitting the SDSS continuum with a simple disk model, and find a temperature range of 2000--34000 K from the outer to inner edge of the disk. The disk inner and outer radii were approximately 10^9 and 5.7x10^10 cm, respectively. These results further emphasize the unique feature of the source: it is evidently a system at the beginning of its life as a recycled radio pulsar. The disk mass is estimated to have been ~10^23 g, most of ...

  16. The low-mass X-ray binary-millisecond radio pulsar birthrate problem revisited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the birthrate problem for low-mass X-ray binaries(LMXBs) and millisecond radio pulsars(MRPs) in this paper.We consider intermediate-mass and low-mass X-ray binaries(I/LMXBs) to be the progenitors of MRPs,and calculate their evolutionary response to the cosmic star formation rate(SFR) both semi-analytically and numerically.With a typical value(1 Gyr) of the LMXB lifetime,one may expect comparable birthrates of LMXBs and MRPs,but the calculated number of LMXBs is an order of magnitude higher than that observed in the Galaxy.Instead,we suggest that the birthrate problem could be solved if most MRPs have evolved from faint to rather than bright LMXBs.The former may have a population of-104 in the Galaxy.

  17. The low-mass X-ray binary-millisecond radio pulsar birthrate problem revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Hailang, Dai

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the birthrate problem for low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and millisecond radio pulsars (MRPs) in this paper. We consider intermediate-mass and low-mss X-ray binaries (I/LMXBs) as the progenitors of MRPs, and calculate their evolutionary response to the cosmic star formation rate (SFR) both semi-analytically and numerically. With typical value (~1 Gyr) of the LMXB lifetime, one may expect comparable birthrates of LMXBs and MRPs, but the calculated number of LMXBs is an order of magnitude higher than observed in the Galaxy. Instead, we suggest that the birthrate problem could be solved if most MRPs have evolved from faint rather bright LMXBs. The former may have a population of ~ 104 in the Galaxy.

  18. Alternancia entre el estado de emisión de Rayos-X y Pulsar en Sistemas Binarios Interactuantes

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vito, M. A.; Benvenuto, O. G.; Horvath, J. E.

    2015-08-01

    Redbacks belong to the family of binary systems in which one of the components is a pulsar. Recent observations show redbacks that have switched their state from pulsar - low mass companion (where the accretion of material over the pulsar has ceased) to low mass X-ray binary system (where emission is produced by the mass accretion on the pulsar), or inversely. The irradiation effect included in our models leads to cyclic mass transfer episodes, which allow close binary systems to switch between one state to other. We apply our results to the case of PSR J1723-2837, and discuss the need to include new ingredients in our code of binary evolution to describe the observed state transitions.

  19. Long-term observations of the pulsars in 47 Tucanae. I. A study of four elusive binary systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ridolfi, A; Torne, P; Heinke, C O; Berg, M van den; Jordan, C; Kramer, M; Bassa, C G; Sarkissian, J; D'Amico, N; Lorimer, D; Camilo, F; Manchester, R N; Lyne, A

    2016-01-01

    For the past couple of decades, the Parkes radio telescope has been regularly observing the millisecond pulsars in 47 Tucanae (47 Tuc). This long-term timing program was designed to address a wide range of scientific issues related to these pulsars and the globular cluster where they are located. In this paper, the first of a series, we address one of these objectives: the characterization of four previously known binary pulsars for which no precise orbital parameters were known, namely 47 Tuc P, V, W and X (pulsars 47 Tuc R and Y are discussed elsewhere). We determined the previously unknown orbital parameters of 47 Tuc V and X and greatly improved those of 47 Tuc P and W. For pulsars W and X we obtained, for the first time, full coherent timing solutions across the whole data span, which allowed a much more detailed characterization of these systems. 47 Tuc W, a well-known tight eclipsing binary pulsar, exhibits a large orbital period variability, as expected for a system of its class. 47 Tuc X turns out to...

  20. Chandra Observations of Black-Widow Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Gentile, Peter; Roberts, Mallory; Camilo, Fernando; Hessels, Jason; Kerr, Matthew; Ransom, Scott; Ray, Paul; Stairs, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    We describe the first X-ray observations of binary millisecond pulsars PSRs J0023+0923, J1810+1744, J2215+5135, and J2256-1024. All four are Fermi gamma-ray sources and three are 'black-widow' pulsars, with companions of mass < 0.1 solar masses. Data were taken using the Chandra X-Ray Observatory and covered a full binary orbit for each pulsar. Two pulsars, PSRs J2215+5135 and J2256-1024, show significant orbital variability and X-ray flux minima at the times of eclipses observed at radio wavelengths. This phenomenon is consistent with intrabinary shock emission characteristic of black-widow pulsars. The other two pulsars, PSRs J0023+0923 and J1810+1744, do not demonstrate significant variability, but are fainter than the other two sources. Spectral fits yield power-law indices that range from 1.4 to 2.3 and blackbody temperatures in the hundreds of eV. The spectrum for PSR J2215+5135 shows a significant hard X-ray component (41% of counts are above 2 keV), which is additional evidence for the presence of ...

  1. X-ray Spectroscopy of the High Mass X-ray Binary Pulsar Centaurus X-3 over its Binary Orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Naik, Sachindra; Ali, Zulfikar

    2011-01-01

    We present a comprehensive spectral analysis of the high mass X-ray binary (HMXB) pulsar Centaurus X-3 with the Suzaku observatory covering nearly one orbital period. The light curve shows the presence of extended dips which are rarely seen in HMXBs. These dips are seen up to as high as ~40 keV. The pulsar spectra during the eclipse, out-of-eclipse, and dips are found to be well described by a partial covering power-law model with high energy cut-off and three Gaussian functions for 6.4 keV, 6.7 keV, and 6.97 keV iron emission lines. The dips in the light curve can be explained by the presence of an additional absorption component with high column density and covering fraction, the values of which are not significant during the rest of the orbital phases. The iron line parameters during the dips and eclipse are significantly different compared to those during the rest of the observation. During the dips, the iron line intensities are found to be lesser by a factor of 2--3 with significant increase in the line...

  2. Detection of cyclotron resonance scattering feature in high-mass X-ray binary pulsar SMC X-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaisawal, Gaurava K.; Naik, Sachindra

    2016-09-01

    We report broad-band spectral properties of the high-mass X-ray binary pulsar SMC X-2 by using three simultaneous Nuclear Spectroscopy Telescope Array and Swift/XRT observations during its 2015 outburst. The pulsar was significantly bright, reaching a luminosity up to as high as ˜5.5 × 1038 erg s-1 in 1-70 keV range. Spin period of the pulsar was estimated to be 2.37 s. Pulse profiles were found to be strongly luminosity dependent. The 1-70 keV energy spectrum of the pulsar was well described with three different continuum models such as (i) negative and positive power law with exponential cutoff, (ii) Fermi-Dirac cutoff power law and (iii) cutoff power-law models. Apart from the presence of an iron line at ˜6.4 keV, a model independent absorption like feature at ˜27 keV was detected in the pulsar spectrum. This feature was identified as a cyclotron absorption line and detected for the first time in this pulsar. Corresponding magnetic field of the neutron star was estimated to be ˜2.3 × 1012 G. The cyclotron line energy showed a marginal negative dependence on the luminosity. The cyclotron line parameters were found to be variable with pulse phase and interpreted as due to the effect of emission geometry or complicated structure of the pulsar magnetic field.

  3. A comprehensive study of relativistic gravity using PSR B1534+12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present updated analyses of pulse profiles and their arrival times from PSR B1534+12, a 37.9 ms radio pulsar in orbit with another neutron star. A high-precision timing model is derived from 22 yr of timing data and accounts for all astrophysical processes that systematically affect pulse arrival times. Five 'post-Keplerian' parameters are measured that represent relativistic corrections to the standard Keplerian quantities of the pulsar's binary orbit. These relativistic parameters are then used to test general relativity by comparing the measurements with their predicted values. We conclude that relativity theory is confirmed to within 0.17% of its predictions. Furthermore, we derive the following astrophysical results from our timing analysis: a distance of d GR = 1.051 ± 0.005 kpc to the pulsar-binary system, by relating the 'excess' orbital decay to Galactic parameters; evidence for pulse 'jitter' in PSR B1534+12 due to short-term magnetospheric activity; and evolution in pulse-dispersion properties. As a secondary study, we also present several analyses on pulse-structure evolution and its connection to relativistic precession of the pulsar's spin axis. The precession-rate measurement yields a value of Ω1spin=0.59−0.08+0.12° yr–1 (68% confidence) that is consistent with expectations and represents an additional test of relativistic gravity.

  4. Pulsars in FIRST Observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    We identify 16 pulsars from the Survey of Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm (FIRST) at 1.4 GHz. Their positions and total flux densities are extracted from the FIRST catalog. By comparing the source positions with those in the PSR catalog, we obtain better determined positions of PSR J1022+1001,J1518+4904, J1652+2651, and proper motion upper limits of PSR J0751+1807,J1012+5307, and J1640+2224. The proper motions of the other ten pulsars are consistent with the catalog values.

  5. Progenitor neutron stars of the lightest and heaviest millisecond pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, M.; Bejger, M.; Haensel, P.; Zdunik, J. L.

    2016-02-01

    Context. The recent mass measurements of two binary millisecond pulsars, PSR J1614-2230 and PSR J0751+1807 with a mass M = 1.97 ± 0.04 M⊙ and M = 1.26 ± 0.14 M⊙, respectively, indicate a wide range of masses for such objects and possibly also a broad spectrum of masses of neutron stars born in core-collapse supernovae. Aims: Starting from the zero-age main sequence binary stage, we aim at inferring the birth masses of PSR J1614-2230 and PSR J0751+1807 by taking the differences in the evolutionary stages preceding their formation into account. Methods: Using simulations for the evolution of binary stars, we reconstruct the evolutionary tracks leading to the formation of PSR J1614-2230 and PSR J0751+1807. We analyse in detail the spin evolution due to the accretion of matter from a disk in the intermediate-mass/low-mass X-ray binary. We consider two equations of state of dense matter, one for purely nucleonic matter and the other one including a high-density softening due to the appearance of hyperons. Stationary and axisymmetric stellar configurations in general relativity are used, together with a recent magnetic torque model and observationally-motivated laws for the decay of magnetic field. Results: The estimated birth mass of the neutron stars PSR J0751+1807 and PSR J1614-2230 could be as low as 1.0 M⊙ and as high as 1.9 M⊙, respectively. These values depend weakly on the equation of state and the assumed model for the magnetic field and its accretion-induced decay. Conclusions: The masses of progenitor neutron stars of recycled pulsars span a broad interval from 1.0 M⊙ to 1.9 M⊙. Including the effect of a slow Roche-lobe detachment phase, which could be relevant for PSR J0751+1807, would make the lower mass limit even lower. A realistic theory for core-collapse supernovæ should account for this wide range of mass.

  6. Probing double neutron star evolution with pulsar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdman, Robert

    2016-07-01

    Pulsars in double neutron star (DNS) binary systems represent a distinct population among pulsar binaries. Within this class of system, the formation channel through which the second neutron star (NS) is formed can differ in ways that can leave distinct observable signatures. In particular, measured DNS properties provide clues about prior interactions and the progenitor supernova event that has left behind the second-formed NS. In this talk I will present results from long-term timing analysis and profile studies of several pulsars in DNS systems, including highly relativistic binaries such as PSR J0737-3039A from the double pulsar system and the recently discovered PSR J1913+1102. I will place them in the larger context of the DNS population, and demonstrate our attempt to distinguishing the different evolutionary channels that are possible for these systems. Doing so will also provide crucial complimentary information to current and future observations by ground-based gravitational-wave detectors such as Advanced LIGO and VIRGO, which are particularly sensitive to merging DNS systems.

  7. Probing f(R)-gravity by PSR J0348+0432

    CERN Document Server

    De Laurentis, Mariafelicia

    2013-01-01

    There are several approaches to extend General Relativity to explain the phenomena related to the Dark Matter and Dark Energy. Furthermore, these theories can be tested using observations coming from relativistic binary systems as PSR J0348+0432. The aim is to show that the debate concerning the viability of f(R)-gravity as an extension of General Relativity could be deal with by using binary pulsar like PSR J0348+0432 .Using a class of analytical f(R)-theories, we construct the first time derivative of orbital period of the binary systems starting from a quadrupolar gravitational emission. To constrain the model, we set boundaries on the parameters of the theory and show that it is not ruled out by the observations on PSR J0348+0432. PSR J0348+0432 represent a good laboratory to test alternative theory of gravity. The constraints that came out from our analysis not ruled out the f(R)-theories, and further the limit on graviton mass are in agree with other estimations present in literature.

  8. An eccentric binary millisecond pulsar with a helium white dwarf companion in the Galactic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadis, John; Stovall, Kevin; Freire, Paulo C; Deneva, Julia S; Koester, Detlev; Jenet, Frederick; Martinez, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Low-mass white dwarfs (LMWDs) are believed to be exclusive products of binary evolution, as the Universe is not yet old enough to produce them from single stars. Because of the strong tidal forces operating during the binary interaction phase, the remnant host systems observed today are expected to have negligible eccentricities. Here, we report on the first unambiguous identification of a LMWD in an eccentric (e=0.13) orbit with a millisecond pulsar, which directly contradicts this picture. We use our spectra and radio-timing solution (derived elsewhere) to infer the WD temperature T_eff = 8600 +/- 190 K) and 3D systemic velocity (179.5 km\\s). We also place model-independent constraints on the WD radius (R_WD = 0.024+/- 0.004/0.002 R_sun) and surface gravity (log g = 7.11 +/- 0.08/0.16 dex). The WD and kinematic properties are consistent with the expectations for low-mass X-ray binary evolution and disfavour a three-body formation channel. In the case of the high eccentricity being the result of a spontaneou...

  9. European Pulsar Timing Array Limits on Continuous Gravitational Waves from Individual Supermassive Black Hole Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Babak, Stanislav; Sesana, Alberto; Brem, Patrick; Rosado, Pablo A; Taylor, Stephen R; Lassus, Antoine; Hessels, Jason W T; Bassa, Cees G; Burgay, Marta; Caballero, R Nicolas; Champion, David J; Cognard, Ismael; Desvignes, Gregory; Gair, Jonathan R; Guillemot, Lucas; Janssen, Gemma H; Karuppusamy, Ramesh; Kramer, Michael; Lazarus, Patrick; Lee, K J; Lentati, Lindley; Liu, Kuo; Mingarelli, Chiara M F; Oslowsky, Stefan; Perrodin, Delphine; Possenti, Andrea; Purver, Mark B; Sanidas, Sotiris; Smits, Roy; Stappers, Ben; Theureau, Gilles; Tiburzi, Caterina; van Haasteren, Rutger; Vecchio, Alberto; Verbiest, Joris P W

    2015-01-01

    We have searched for continuous gravitational wave (CGW) signals produced by individually resolvable, circular supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) in the latest EPTA dataset, which consists of ultra-precise timing data on 41 millisecond pulsars. We develop frequentist and Bayesian detection algorithms to search both for monochromatic and frequency-evolving systems. None of the adopted algorithms show evidence for the presence of such a CGW signal, indicating that the data are best described by pulsar and radiometer noise only. Depending on the adopted detection algorithm, the 95\\% upper limit on the sky-averaged strain amplitude lies in the range $6\\times 10^{-15}10^9$M$_\\odot$ out to a distance of about 25Mpc, and with $\\cal{M}_c>10^{10}$M$_\\odot$ out to a distance of about 1Gpc ($z\\approx0.2$). We show that state-of-the-art SMBHB population models predict $<1\\%$ probability of detecting a CGW with the current EPTA dataset, consistent with the reported non-detection. We stress, however, that PTA lim...

  10. A characteristic observable signature of preferred frame effects in relativistic binary pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Wex, N

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we develop a consistent, phenomenological methodology to measure preferred-frame effects (PFEs) in binary pulsars that exhibit a high rate of periastron advance. We show that in these systems the existence of a preferred frame for gravity leads to an observable characteristic `signature' in the timing data, which uniquely identifies this effect. We expand the standard Damour-Deruelle timing formula to incorporate this `signature' and show how this new PFE timing model can be used to either measure or constrain the parameters related to a violation of the local Lorentz invariance of gravity in the strong internal fields of neutron stars. In particular, we demonstrate that in the presence of PFEs we expect a set of the new timing parameters to have a unique relationship that can be measured and tested incontrovertibly. This new methodology is applied to the Double Pulsar, which turns out to be the ideal test system for this kind of experiments.The currently available dataset allows us only to stud...

  11. Radio Imaging Observations of PSR J1023+0038 in an LMXB State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deller, A. T.; Moldon, J.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Patruno, A.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Archibald, A. M.; Paragi, Z.; Heald, G.; Vilchez, N.

    2015-08-01

    The transitional millisecond pulsar (MSP) binary system PSR J1023+0038 re-entered an accreting state in 2013 June in which it bears many similarities to low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) in quiescence or near-quiescence. At a distance of just 1.37 kpc, PSR J1023+0038 offers an unsurpassed ability to study low-level accretion onto a highly magnetized compact object. We have monitored PSR J1023+0038 intensively using radio imaging with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, the European VLBI Network and the Low Frequency Array, seeing rapidly variable, flat spectrum emission that persists over a period of six months. The flat spectrum and variability are indicative of synchrotron emission originating in an outflow from the system, most likely in the form of a compact, partially self-absorbed jet, as is seen in LMXBs at higher accretion rates. The radio brightness, however, greatly exceeds extrapolations made from observations of more vigorously accreting neutron star LMXB systems. We postulate that PSR J1023+0038 is undergoing radiatively inefficient “propeller-mode” accretion, with the jet carrying away a dominant fraction of the liberated accretion luminosity. We confirm that the enhanced γ-ray emission seen in PSR J1023+0038 since it re-entered an accreting state has been maintained; the increased γ-ray emission in this state can also potentially be associated with propeller-mode accretion. Similar accretion modes can be invoked to explain the radio and X-ray properties of the other two known transitional MSP systems XSS J12270-4859 and PSR J1824-2452I (M28I), suggesting that radiatively inefficient accretion may be a ubiquitous phenomenon among (at least one class of) neutron star binaries at low accretion rates.

  12. Pulsar wind model for the spin-down behavior of intermittent pulsars

    OpenAIRE

    Li, L.; Tong, H; Yan, W. M.; Yuan, J. P.; Xu, R. X.; Wang, N

    2013-01-01

    Intermittent pulsars are part-time radio pulsars. They have higher slow down rate in the on state (radio-loud) than in the off state (radio-quiet). This gives the evidence that particle wind may play an important role in pulsar spindown. The effect of particle acceleration is included in modeling the rotational energy loss rate of the neutron star. Applying the pulsar wind model to the three intermittent pulsars (PSR B1931+24, PSR J1841-0500, and PSR J1832+0029), their magnetic field and incl...

  13. High-energy gamma-ray emission in compact binaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four gamma-ray sources have been associated with binary systems in our Galaxy: the micro-quasar Cygnus X-3 and the gamma-ray binaries LS I +61 degrees 303, LS 5039 and PSR B1259-63. These systems are composed of a massive companion star and a compact object of unknown nature, except in PSR B1259-63 where there is a young pulsar. I propose a comprehensive theoretical model for the high-energy gamma-ray emission and variability in gamma-ray emitting binaries. In this model, the high-energy radiation is produced by inverse Compton scattering of stellar photons on ultra-relativistic electron-positron pairs injected by a young pulsar in gamma-ray binaries and in a relativistic jet in micro-quasars. Considering anisotropic inverse Compton scattering, pair production and pair cascade emission, the TeV gamma-ray emission is well explained in LS 5039. Nevertheless, this model cannot account for the gamma-ray emission in LS I +61 degrees 303 and PSR B1259-63. Other processes should dominate in these complex systems. In Cygnus X-3, the gamma-ray radiation is convincingly reproduced by Doppler-boosted Compton emission of pairs in a relativistic jet. Gamma-ray binaries and micro-quasars provide a novel environment for the study of pulsar winds and relativistic jets at very small spatial scales. (author)

  14. Electromagnetic counterparts of supermassive black hole binaries resolved by pulsar timing arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Takamitsu; Menou, Kristen

    2011-01-01

    Pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) are expected to detect gravitational waves (GWs) from individual low-redshift (z10^9 Msun) black hole (SMBH) binaries with orbital periods of approx. 0.1 - 10 yrs. Identifying the electromagnetic (EM) counterparts of these sources would provide confirmation of putative direct detections of GWs, present a rare opportunity to study the environments of compact SMBH binaries, and could enable the use of these sources as standard sirens for cosmology. Here we consider the feasibility of such an EM identification. We show that because the host galaxies of resolved PTA sources are expected to be exceptionally massive and rare, it should be possible to find unique hosts of resolved sources out to redshift z=0.2. At higher redshifts, the PTA error boxes are larger, and may contain as many as 100 massive-galaxy interlopers. The number of candidates, however, remains tractable for follow-up searches in upcoming wide-field EM surveys. We develop a toy model to characterize the dynamics and the...

  15. Contrasting behaviour from two Be/X-ray binary pulsars: insights into differing neutron star accretion modes

    CERN Document Server

    Townsend, L J; Hill, A B; Coe, M J; Corbet, R H D; Bird, A J

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present the identification of two periodic X-ray signals coming from the direction of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). On detection with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), the 175.4s and 85.4s pulsations were considered to originate from new Be/X-ray binary (BeXRB) pulsars with unknown locations. Using rapid follow-up INTEGRAL and XMM-Newton observations, we show the first pulsar (designated SXP175) to be coincident with a candidate high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) in the northern bar region of the SMC undergoing a small Type II outburst. The orbital period (87d) and spectral class (B0-B0.5IIIe) of this system are determined and presented here for the first time. The second pulsar is shown not to be new at all, but is consistent with being SXP91.1 - a pulsar discovered at the very beginning of the 13 year long RXTE key monitoring programme of the SMC. Whilst it is theoretically possible for accreting neutron stars to change spin period so dramatically over such a short time, the X-ray and ...

  16. Contrasting Behaviour from Two Be/X-ray Binary Pulsars: Insights into Differing Neutron Star Accretion Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, L. J.; Drave, S. P.; Hill, A. B.; Coe, M. J.; Corbet, R. H. D.; Bird, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present the identification of two periodic X-ray signals coming from the direction of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). On detection with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), the 175.4 s and 85.4 s pulsations were considered to originate from new Be/X-ray binary (BeXRB) pulsars with unknown locations. Using rapid follow-up INTEGRAL and XMM-Newton observations, we show the first pulsar (designated SXP175) to be coincident with a candidate high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) in the northern bar region of the SMC undergoing a small Type II outburst. The orbital period (87d) and spectral class (B0-B0.5IIIe) of this system are determined and presented here for the first time. The second pulsar is shown not to be new at all, but is consistent with being SXP91.1 - a pulsar discovered at the very beginning of the 13 year long RXTE key monitoring programme of the SMC. Whilst it is theoretically possible for accreting neutron stars to change spin period so dramatically over such a short time, the X-ray and optical data available for this source suggest this spin-up is continuous during long phases of X-ray quiescence, where accretion driven spin-up of the neutron star should be minimal.

  17. Clumpy stellar winds and high-energy emission in high-mass binaries hosting a young pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Bosch-Ramon, V

    2013-01-01

    High-mass binaries hosting young pulsars can be powerful gamma-ray emitters. The stellar wind of the massive star in the system is expected to be clumpy. Since the high-energy emission comes from the pulsar-star wind interaction, the presence of clumps can affect the spectrum and variability of this radiation. We look for the main effects of the clumps on the two-wind interaction region and on the non-thermal radiation. A simple analytical model for the two-wind interaction dynamics was developed accounting for the lifetime of clumps under the pulsar-wind impact. This time plays a very important role with regard to the evolution of the clump, the magnetic field in the clump-pulsar wind interaction region, and the non-radiative and radiative cooling of the non-thermal particles. We also computed the high-energy emission produced at the interaction of long-living clumps with the pulsar wind. For reasonable parameters, the clumps will induce small variability on the X-ray and gamma-ray radiation. Sporadically, l...

  18. Radio imaging observations of PSR J1023+0038 in an LMXB state

    CERN Document Server

    Deller, A T; Miller-Jones, J C A; Patruno, A; Hessels, J W T; Archibald, A M; Paragi, Z; Heald, G; Vilchez, N

    2014-01-01

    The transitional millisecond pulsar binary system PSR J1023+0038 re-entered an accreting state in 2013 June, in which it bears many similarities to low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) in quiescence or near-quiescence. At a distance of just 1.37 kpc, PSR J1023+0038 offers an unsurpassed ability to study low-level accretion onto a highly-magnetized compact object. We have monitored PSR J1023+0038 intensively using radio imaging with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, the European VLBI Network and LOFAR, seeing rapidly variable, flat spectrum emission that persists over a period of 6 months. The flat spectrum and variability is indicative of synchrotron emission originating in an outflow from the system, most likely in the form of a compact, partially self-absorbed jet, as is seen in LMXBs at higher accretion rates. The radio brightness, however, greatly exceeds extrapolations made from observations of more vigorously accreting neutron star LMXB systems. We postulate that PSR J1023+0038 is undergoing radiatively i...

  19. Millisecond and Binary Pulsars as Nature's Frequency Standards; 2, Effects of Low-Frequency Timing Noise on Residuals and Measured Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Kopeikin, S M

    1998-01-01

    Pulsars are the most stable natural frequency standards. They can be applied to a number of principal problems of modern astronomy and time-keeping metrology. The full exploration of pulsar properties requires obtaining unbiased estimates of the spin and orbital parameters. These estimates depend essentially on the random noise component being revealed in the residuals of time of arrivals (TOA). In the present paper, the influence of low-frequency ("red") timing noise with spectral indices from 1 to 6 on TOA residuals, variances, and covariances of estimates of measured parameters of single and binary pulsars are studied. In order to determine their functional dependence on time, an analytic technique of processing of observational data in time domain is developed which takes into account both stationary and non-stationary components of noise. Our analysis includes a simplified timing model of a binary pulsar in a circular orbit and procedure of estimation of pulsar parameters and residuals under the influenc...

  20. A Comprehensive Study of Relativistic Gravity using PSR B1534+12

    CERN Document Server

    Fonseca, E; Thorsett, S E

    2014-01-01

    We present updated analyses of pulse profiles and their arrival-times from PSR B1534+12, a 37.9-ms radio pulsar in orbit with another neutron star. A high-precision timing model is derived from twenty-two years of timing data, and accounts for all astrophysical processes that systematically affect pulse arrival-times. Five ``post-Keplerian" parameters are measured that represent relativistic corrections to the standard Keplerian quantities of the pulsar's binary orbit. These relativistic parameters are then used to test general relativity by comparing the measurements with their predicted values. We conclude that relativity theory is confirmed to within 0.34% of its predictions. Furthermore, we derive the following astrophysical results from our timing analysis: a distance of 1.041(11) kpc to the pulsar-binary system, by relating the "excess" orbital decay to Galactic parameters; evidence for pulse "jitter" in PSR B1534+12 due to short-term magnetospheric activity; and evolution in pulse-dispersion properties...

  1. NuSTAR discovery of an unusually steady long-term spin-up of the Be binary 2RXP J130159.6-635806

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krivonos, Roman A.; Tsygankov, Sergey S.; Lutovinov, Alexander A.;

    2015-01-01

    We present spectral and timing analysis of NuSTAR observations of the accreting X-ray pulsar 2RXP J130159.6-635806. The source was serendipitously observed during a campaign focused on the gamma-ray binary PSR B1259-63 and was later targeted for a dedicated observation. The spectrum has a typical...

  2. The Probability Distribution of Binary Pulsar Coalescence Rates. I. Double Neutron Star Systems in the Galactic Field

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, C.; Kalogera, V.; Lorimer, D.R.

    2002-01-01

    Estimates of the Galactic coalescence rate (R) of close binaries with two neutron stars (NS-NS) are known to be uncertain by large factors (about two orders of magnitude) mainly due to the small number of systems detected as binary radio pulsars. We present an analysis method that allows us to estimate the Galactic NS-NS coalescence rate using the current observed sample and, importantly, to assign a statistical significance to these estimates and to calculate the allowed ranges of values at ...

  3. CHANDRA X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF 12 MILLISECOND PULSARS IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER M28

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a Chandra X-ray Observatory investigation of the millisecond pulsars in the globular cluster M28 (NGC 6626). In what is one of the deepest X-ray observations of a globular cluster, we firmly detect seven and possibly detect two of the 12 known M28 pulsars. With the exception of PSRs B1821-24 and J1824-2452H, the detected pulsars have relatively soft spectra, with X-ray luminosities 1030-1031 erg s-1 (0.3-8 keV), similar to most recycledpulsars in 47 Tucanae and the field of the Galaxy, implying thermal emission from the pulsar magnetic polar caps. We present the most detailed X-ray spectrum to date of the energetic PSR B1821-24. It is well described by a purely non-thermal spectrum with spectral photon index Γ = 1.23 and luminosity 1.4 x 1033Θ(D/5.5 kpc)2 erg s-1 (0.3-8 keV), where Θ is the fraction of the sky covered by the X-ray emission beam(s). We find no evidence for the previously reported line emission feature around 3.3 keV, most likely as a consequence of improvements in instrument calibration. The X-ray spectrum and pulse profile of PSR B1821-24 suggest that the bulk of unpulsed emission from this pulsar is not of thermal origin, and is likely due to low-level non-thermal magnetospheric radiation, an unresolved pulsar wind nebula, and/or small-angle scattering of the pulsed X-rays by interstellar dust grains. The peculiar binary PSR J1824-2452H shows a relatively hard X-ray spectrum and possible variability at the binary period, indicative of an intrabinary shock formed by interaction between the relativistic pulsar wind and matter from its non-degenerate companion star.

  4. High-energy characteristics of the schizophrenic pulsar PSR J1846-0258 in Kes 75. Multi-year RXTE and INTEGRAL observations crossing the magnetar-like outburst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, L.; Hermsen, W.

    2009-07-01

    Aims: PSR J1846-0258 is a young rotation-powered pulsar with one of the highest surface magnetic field strengths, located in the centre of SN-remnant Kes-75. In June 2006 a magnetar-like outburst took place. Using multi-year RXTE and INTEGRAL observations covering the epoch of the outburst, we aim to study the temporal and spectral characteristics of PSR J1846-0258 over a broad ~3-300 keV energy range to derive constraints on theoretical scenarios aiming to explain this schizophrenic behaviour. Methods: We explored all publically available RXTE observations of PSR J1846-0258 to generate accurate ephemerides over the period January 30, 2000-November 7, 2007. Phase-folding procedures yielded pulse profiles for RXTE PCA (~3-30 keV), RXTE HEXTE (~15-250 keV) and INTEGRAL ISGRI (~20-300 keV). The pulsed spectrum over the full ~3-300 keV energy range was derived, as well as the total spectrum (including the pulsar wind nebula) over the 20-300 keV band with the ISGRI. The timing, spatial, and spectral analyses were applied for epochs before, during, and after the magnetar-like outburst to study the evolution of the high-energy characteristics. Results: ISGRI detected PSR J1846-0258/Kes-75 before outburst during 2003-2006 with a power-law-shape spectrum over the 20-300 keV energy range with photon index Γ = 1.80±0.06 and energy flux (20-300 keV) of (6.62± 0.35)× 10-11 erg/cm2 s. More than 90 days after the onset of the outburst, still during the decay phase, the same spectral shape was measured (Γ = 1.75-0.31+0.27) with an indication for a 52% (2.3σ) enhanced total emission, while one year after the outburst the hard X-ray non-thermal emission of PSR J1846-0258/Kes-75 was found to be back to its pre-outburst values. PCA monitoring of PSR J1846-0258 before the outburst yielded phase-coherent ephemerides confirming the earlier derived breaking index of the spindown. During the outburst, incoherent solutions have been derived. We show that the radiative outburst was

  5. Pulsar searching and timing with the Parkes telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, C. W. Y.

    2014-11-01

    Pulsars are highly magnetised, rapidly rotating neutron stars that radiate a beam of coherent radio emission from their magnetic poles. An introduction to the pulsar phenomenology is presented in Chapter 1 of this thesis. The extreme conditions found in and around such compact objects make pulsars fantastic natural laboratories, as their strong gravitational fields provide exclusive insights to a rich variety of fundamental physics and astronomy. The discovery of pulsars is therefore a gateway to new science. An overview of the standard pulsar searching technique is described in Chapter 2, as well as a discussion on notable pulsar searching efforts undertaken thus far with various telescopes. The High Time Resolution Universe (HTRU) Pulsar Survey conducted with the 64-m Parkes radio telescope in Australia forms the bulk of this PhD. In particular, the author has led the search effort of the HTRU low-latitude Galactic plane project part which is introduced in Chapter 3. We discuss the computational challenges arising from the processing of the petabyte-sized survey data. Two new radio interference mitigation techniques are introduced, as well as a partially-coherent segmented acceleration search algorithm which aims to increase our chances of discovering highly-relativistic short-orbit binary systems, covering a parameter space including the potential pulsar-black hole binaries. We show that under a linear acceleration approximation, a ratio of ~0.1 of data length over orbital period results in the highest effectiveness for this search algorithm. Chapter 4 presents the initial results from the HTRU low-latitude Galactic plane survey. From the 37 per cent of data processed thus far, we have re-detected 348 previously known pulsars and discovered a further 47 pulsars. Two of which are fast-spinning pulsars with periods less than 30 ms. PSR J1101-6424 is a millisecond pulsar (MSP) with a heavy white dwarf companion while its short spin period of 5 ms indicates

  6. Timing of Five PALFA-Discovered Millisecond Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Stovall, K; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Cardoso, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J S; Ferdman, R; Freire, P C C; Hessels, J W T; Jenet, F; Kaplan, D L; Karako-Argaman, C; Kaspi, V M; Knispel, B; Kotulla, R; Lazarus, P; Lee, K J; van Leeuwen, J; Lynch, R; Lyne, A G; Madsen, E; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Scholz, P; Siemens, X; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; Swiggum, J; Zhu, W W; Venkataraman, A

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery and timing results for five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) from the Arecibo PALFA survey: PSRs J1906+0055, J1914+0659, J1933+1726, J1938+2516, and J1957+2516. Timing observations of the 5 pulsars were conducted with the Arecibo and Lovell telescopes for time spans ranging from 1.5 to 3.3 yr. All of the MSPs except one (PSR J1914+0659) are in binary systems with low eccentricities. PSR J1957+2516 is likely a redback pulsar, with a ~0.1 $M_\\odot$ companion and possible eclipses that last ~10% of the orbit. The position of PSR J1957+2516 is also coincident with a NIR source. All 5 MSPs are distant (>3.1 kpc) as determined from their dispersion measures, and none of them show evidence of $\\gamma$-ray pulsations in a search of Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope data. These 5 MSPs bring the total number of MSPs discovered by the PALFA survey to 26 and further demonstrate the power of this survey in finding distant, highly dispersed MSPs deep in the Galactic plane.

  7. Formation of the Double Neutron Star System PSR J1930$-$1852

    OpenAIRE

    Shao, Yong; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2015-01-01

    The spin period (185 ms) and period derivative ($1.8\\times10^{-17}\\,\\rm s\\,s^{-1}$) of the double neutron star (DNS) system PSR J1930$-$1852 recently discovered indicate that the pulsar was mildly recycled through the process of Roche-lobe overflow. This system has the longest orbital period (45 days) of the known DNS systems, and can be formed from a helium star-NS binary if the initial mass of the helium star was $ \\lesssim 4.0M_{\\odot} $; otherwise the helium star would never fill its Roch...

  8. Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries, Millisecond Radio Pulsars, and the Cosmic Star Formation Rate

    CERN Document Server

    White, N E; White, Nicholas E.; Ghosh, Pranab

    1998-01-01

    We report on the implications of the peak in the cosmic star-formation rate (SFR) at redshift z ~ 1.5 for the resulting population of low-mass X-ray binaries(LMXB) and for that of their descendants, the millisecond radio pulsars (MRP). Since the evolutionary timescales of LMXBs, their progenitors, and their descendants are thought be significant fractions of the time-interval between the SFR peak and the present epoch, there is a lag in the turn-on of the LMXB population, with the peak activity occurring at z ~ 0.5 - 1.0. The peak in the MRP population is delayed further, occurring at z < 0.5. We show that the discrepancy between the birthrate of LMXBs and MRPs, found under the assumption of a stead-state SFR, can be resolved for the population as a whole when the effects of a time-variable SFR are included. A discrepancy may persist for LMXBs with short orbital periods, although a detailed population synthesis will be required to confirm this. Further, since the integrated X-ray luminosity distribution of...

  9. Refined Neutron-Star Mass Determinations for Six Eclipsing X-Ray Pulsar Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Rawls, Meredith L; McClintock, Jeffrey E; Torres, Manuel A P; Bailyn, Charles D; Buxton, Michelle M

    2011-01-01

    We present an improved method for determining the mass of neutron stars in eclipsing X-ray pulsar binaries and apply the method to six systems, namely Vela X-1, 4U 1538-52, SMC X-1, LMC X-4, Cen X-3, and Her X-1. In previous studies to determine neutron star mass, the X-ray eclipse duration has been approximated analytically by assuming the companion star is spherical with an effective Roche lobe radius. We use a numerical code based on Roche geometry with various optimizers to analyze the published data for these systems, which we supplement with new spectroscopic and photometric data for 4U 1538-52. This allows us to model the eclipse duration more accurately and thus calculate an improved value for the neutron star mass. The derived neutron star mass also depends on the assumed Roche lobe filling factor beta of the companion star, where beta = 1 indicates a completely filled Roche lobe. In previous work a range of beta between 0.9 and 1.0 was usually adopted. We use optical ellipsoidal lightcurve data to c...

  10. 50 pico arcsecond astrometry of pulsar emission

    CERN Document Server

    Pen, Ue-Li; Deller, Adam; Brisken, Walter

    2013-01-01

    We use VLBI imaging of the interstellar scattering speckle pattern associated with the pulsar PSR 0834+06 to measure the astrometric motion of its emission. The ~ 5AU interstellar baselines, provided by interference between speckles spanning the scattering disk, enable us to detect motions with sub nanoarcsecond accuracy. We measure a small pulse deflection of ~8+/-2 km (not including geometric uncertainties), which is 100 times smaller than the native resolution of this interstellar interferometer. This implies that the emission region is small, and at an altitude of a few hundred km, with the exact value depending on field geometry. This is substantially closer to the star than to the light cylinder. Future VLBI measurements can improve on this finding. This new regime of ultra-precise astrometry may enable precision parallax distance determination of pulsar binary displacements.

  11. Measuring the parameters of massive black hole binary systems with pulsar timing array observations of gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The observation of massive black hole binaries with pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) is one of the goals of gravitational-wave astronomy in the coming years. Massive (> or approx. 108M·) and low-redshift (2 and the other parameters as 1/SNR. For a fiducial PTA of 100 pulsars uniformly distributed in the sky and a coherent SNR=10, we find ΔΩ≅40 deg2, a fractional error on the signal amplitude of ≅30% (which constrains only very poorly the chirp mass-luminosity distance combination M5/3/DL), and the source inclination and polarization angles are recovered at the ≅0.3 rad level. The ongoing Parkes PTA is particularly sensitive to systems located in the southern hemisphere, where at SNR=10 the source position can be determined with ΔΩ≅10 deg2, but has poorer (by an order of magnitude) performance for sources in the northern hemisphere.

  12. Radio Timing and Optical Photometry of the Black Widow System PSR J1953+1846A in the Globular Cluster M71

    CERN Document Server

    Cadelano, M; Ferraro, F R; Stairs, I; Ransom, S M; Dalessandro, E; Lanzoni, B; Hessels, J W T; Freire, P C C

    2015-01-01

    We report on the determination of the astrometric, spin and orbital parameters for PSR J1953+1846A, a "black widow" binary millisecond pulsar in the globular cluster M71. By using the accurate position and orbital parameters obtained from radio timing, we identified the optical companion in ACS/Hubble Space Telescope images. It turns out to be a faint (m_F606W>=24, m_F814W>=23) and variable star located at only ~0.06" from the pulsar timing position. The light curve shows a maximum at the pulsar inferior conjunction and a minimum at the pulsar superior conjunction, thus confirming the association with the system. The shape of the optical modulation suggests that the companion star is heated, likely by the pulsar wind. The comparison with the X-ray light curve possibly suggests the presence of an intra-binary shock due to the interaction between the pulsar wind and the material released by the companion. This is the second identification (after COM-M5C) of an optical companion to a black widow pulsar in a glob...

  13. Radio Timing and Optical Photometry of the Black Widow System PSR J1953+1846A in the Globular Cluster M71

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadelano, M.; Pallanca, C.; Ferraro, F. R.; Stairs, I.; Ransom, S. M.; Dalessandro, E.; Lanzoni, B.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Freire, P. C. C.

    2015-07-01

    We report on the determination of the astrometric, spin, and orbital parameters for PSR J1953+1846 A, a “black widow” binary millisecond pulsar in the globular cluster M71. By using the accurate position and orbital parameters obtained from radio timing, we identified the optical companion in Advanced Camera for Surveys/Hubble Space Telescope images. It turns out to be a faint ({m}{{F}606{{W}}}≳ 24, {m}{{F}814{{W}}}≳ 23) and variable star located at only ˜0.″06 from the pulsar timing position. The light curve shows a maximum at the pulsar inferior conjunction and a minimum at the pulsar superior conjunction, thus confirming the association with the system. The shape of the optical modulation suggests that the companion star is heated, likely by the pulsar wind. The comparison with the X-ray light curve possibly suggests the presence of an intra-binary shock due to the interaction between the pulsar wind and the material released by the companion. This is the second identification (after COM-M5C) of an optical companion to a black widow pulsar in a globular cluster. Interestingly, the two companions show a similar light curve and share the same position in the color-magnitude diagram. Based on observations collected with the NASA/ESA HST (Prop. 12932), obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  14. The Parkes multibeam pulsar survey: VII. Timing of four millisecond pulsars and the underlying spin period distribution of the Galactic millisecond pulsar population

    CERN Document Server

    Lorimer, D R; Manchester, R N; Possenti, A; Lyne, A G; McLaughlin, M A; Kramer, M; Hobbs, G; Stairs, I H; Burgay, M; Eatough, R P; Keith, M J; Faulkner, A J; D'Amico, N; Camilo, F; Corongiu, A; Crawford, F

    2015-01-01

    We present timing observations of four millisecond pulsars discovered in the Parkes 20-cm multibeam pulsar survey of the Galactic plane. PSRs J1552-4937 and J1843-1448 are isolated objects with spin periods of 6.28 and 5.47 ms respectively. PSR J1727-2946 is in a 40-day binary orbit and has a spin period of 27 ms. The 4.43-ms pulsar J1813-2621 is in a circular 8.16-day binary orbit around a low-mass companion star with a minimum companion mass of 0.2 solar masses. Combining these results with detections from five other Parkes multibeam surveys, gives a well-defined sample of 56 pulsars with spin periods below 20 ms. We develop a likelihood analysis to constrain the functional form which best describes the underlying distribution of spin periods for millisecond pulsars. The best results were obtained with a log-normal distribution. A gamma distribution is less favoured, but still compatible with the observations. Uniform, power-law and Gaussian distributions are found to be inconsistent with the data. Galactic...

  15. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey: The fastest rotating O-type star and shortest period LMC pulsar - remnants of a supernova disrupted binary?

    OpenAIRE

    Dufton, P. L.; Dunstall, P. R.; Evans, C J; Brott, I; Cantiello, M.; de Koter, A.; Mink, S.E. de; Fraser, M; Henault-Brunet, V.; Howarth, I. D.; Langer, N.; Lennon, D.J.; Markova, N.; Sana, Hugues; Taylor, W.D.

    2011-01-01

    We present a spectroscopic analysis of an extremely rapidly rotating late O-type star, VFTS102, observed during a spectroscopic survey of 30 Doradus. VFTS102 has a projected rotational velocity larger than 500 km s-1 and probably as large as 600 km s-1 as such it would appear to be the most rapidly rotating massive star currently identified. Its radial velocity differs by 40 km s-1 from the mean for 30 Doradus, suggesting that it is a runaway. VFTS102 lies 12 pc from the X-ray pulsar PSR J053...

  16. Multi-wavelength studies of pulsars and their companions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniadis, John Ioannis

    2013-09-01

    Neutron stars are the degenerate relic cores of massive stars formed in the aftermath of a supernova explosion. Matter in their centes is believed to be condensed at densities as high as ten times that found in atomic nuclei. Thus, observational access to their properties provides the means to study the behavior of physical laws in extreme conditions, beyond the reach of terrestrial experiments. Rapidly rotating, highly magnetized neutron stars emit a narrow intense beam of radio emission from their magnetospheric poles. When this pulse happens to intersect our line of sight, it gives rise to the pulsar phenomenon. Regular radio-timing of pulse arrival times on earth, results in some of the most precise measurements in astrophysics. This thesis deals with the study of binary millisecond pulsars with white dwarf companions and is divided in 7 Chapters. Chapters 1 & 2 give a brief introduction to neutron stars, pulsars, and binary pulsars. Chapter 3 describes spectroscopic and optical observations of the low mass white dwarf companion to PSR J1909-3744. For this system, radio observations have yielded a precise mass measurement as well as distance information. Combined with the optical data, these provide the first observational test for theoretical white-dwarf cooling models and spectra. The latter, if reliable, can be used to infer theory-independent masses for similar systems. In Chapter 4, I discuss the measurement of the component masses in the short-orbit PSR J1738+0333 system based on spectroscopy of its white-dwarf companion. This system is particularly important for understanding the physics of pulsar recycling and binary evolution. Moreover, combined with the measurement of the orbital decay from radio-timing, the masses pose the most stringent constraints on Scalar-Tensor gravity. Chapter 5 describes radio and optical observations of PSR J0348+0432, a compact pulsar-white dwarf binary discovered recently with the 100-m Green-Bank Radio Telescope. Spectral

  17. Formation of Binary Millisecond Pulsars by Accretion-Induced Collapse of White Dwarfs under Wind-Driven Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Ablimit, Iminhaji

    2014-01-01

    Accretion-induced collapse of massive white dwarfs (WDs) has been proposed to be an important channel to form binary millisecond pulsars (MSPs). Recent investigations on thermal timescale mass transfer in WD binaries demonstrate that the resultant MSPs are likely to have relatively wide orbit periods ($\\gtrsim 10$ days). Here we calculate the evolution of WD binaries taking into account the excited wind from the companion star induced by X-ray irradiation of the accreting WD, which may drive rapid mass transfer even when the companion star is less massive than the WD. This scenario can naturally explain the formation of the strong-field neutron star in the low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1822$-$37. After AIC the mass transfer resumes when the companion star refills its Roche lobe, and the neutron star is recycled due to mass accretion. A large fraction of the binaries will evolve to become binary MSPs with a He WD companion, with the orbital periods distributed between $\\gtrsim 0.1$ day and $\\lesssim 30$ days, while...

  18. Constraints on Black Hole/Host Galaxy Co-evolution and Binary Stalling Using Pulsar Timing Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Joseph; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah

    2016-07-01

    Pulsar timing arrays are now setting increasingly tight limits on the gravitational wave background from binary supermassive black holes (SMBHs). But as upper limits grow more constraining, what can be implied about galaxy evolution? We investigate which astrophysical parameters have the largest impact on predictions of the strain spectrum and provide a simple framework to directly translate between measured values for the parameters of galaxy evolution and pulsar timing array (PTA) limits on the gravitational wave background of binary SMBHs. We find that the most influential observable is the relation between a host galaxy's central bulge and its central black hole, {M}\\bullet {--}{M}{bulge}, which has the largest effect on the mean value of the characteristic strain amplitude. However, the variance of each prediction is dominated by uncertainties in galaxy stellar mass functions. Using this framework with the best published PTA limit, we can set limits on the shape and scatter of the {M}\\bullet {--}{M}{bulge} relation. We find our limits to be in contention with strain predictions using two leading measurements of this relation. We investigate several possible reasons for this disagreement. If we take the {M}\\bullet {--}{M}{bulge} relations to be correct within a simple power-law model for the gravitational wave background, then the inconsistency is reconcilable by allowing for an additional “stalling” time between a galaxy merger and evolution of a binary SMBH to sub-parsec scales, with lower limits on this timescale of ∼1–2 Gyr.

  19. Investigation of iron emission lines in the eclipsing high mass X-ray binary pulsar OAO 1657-415

    CERN Document Server

    Jaisawal, Gaurava K

    2016-01-01

    We present the results obtained from timing and spectral studies of high mass X-ray binary pulsar OAO 1657-415 using a Suzaku observations in 2011 September. X-ray pulsations were detected in the light curves up to $\\sim$70 keV. The continuum spectra during the high- and low-flux regions in light curves were well described by high energy cutoff power-law model along with a blackbody component and iron fluorescent lines at 6.4 keV and 7.06 keV. Time resolved spectroscopy was carried out by dividing the entire observations into 18 narrow segments. Presence of additional dense matter at various orbital phases was confirmed as the cause of low-flux regions in the observations. Presence of additional matter at several orbital phases of the pulsar was interpreted as due to the inhomogeneously distributed clumps of matter around the neutron star. Using clumpy wind hypothesis, the physical parameters of the clumps causing the high- and low-flux episodes in the pulsar light curve were estimated. The equivalent width o...

  20. A comprehensive study of relativistic gravity using PSR B1534+12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca, Emmanuel; Stairs, Ingrid H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T-1Z1 (Canada); Thorsett, Stephen E., E-mail: efonseca@phas.ubc.ca, E-mail: stairs@astro.ubc.ca, E-mail: thorsett@willamette.edu [Department of Physics, Willamette University, Salem, OR 97301 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    We present updated analyses of pulse profiles and their arrival times from PSR B1534+12, a 37.9 ms radio pulsar in orbit with another neutron star. A high-precision timing model is derived from 22 yr of timing data and accounts for all astrophysical processes that systematically affect pulse arrival times. Five 'post-Keplerian' parameters are measured that represent relativistic corrections to the standard Keplerian quantities of the pulsar's binary orbit. These relativistic parameters are then used to test general relativity by comparing the measurements with their predicted values. We conclude that relativity theory is confirmed to within 0.17% of its predictions. Furthermore, we derive the following astrophysical results from our timing analysis: a distance of d {sub GR} = 1.051 ± 0.005 kpc to the pulsar-binary system, by relating the 'excess' orbital decay to Galactic parameters; evidence for pulse 'jitter' in PSR B1534+12 due to short-term magnetospheric activity; and evolution in pulse-dispersion properties. As a secondary study, we also present several analyses on pulse-structure evolution and its connection to relativistic precession of the pulsar's spin axis. The precession-rate measurement yields a value of Ω{sub 1}{sup spin}=0.59{sub −0.08}{sup +0.12}° yr{sup –1} (68% confidence) that is consistent with expectations and represents an additional test of relativistic gravity.

  1. PSR J2030+3641: radio discovery and gamma-ray study of a middle-aged pulsar in the now identified Fermi-LAT source 1FGL J2030.0+3641

    CERN Document Server

    Camilo, F; Ray, P S; Ransom, S M; Johnston, S; Romani, R W; Parent, D; DeCesar, M E; Harding, A K; Donato, D; Parkinson, P M Saz; Ferrara, E C; Freire, P C C; Guillemot, L; Keith, M; Kramer, M; Wood, K S

    2011-01-01

    In a radio search with the Green Bank Telescope of three unidentified low Galactic latitude Fermi-LAT sources, we have discovered the middle-aged pulsar J2030+3641, associated with 1FGL J2030.0+3641 (2FGL J2030.0+3640). Following the detection of gamma-ray pulsations using a radio ephemeris, we have obtained a phase-coherent timing solution based on gamma-ray and radio pulse arrival times that spans the entire Fermi mission. With a rotation period of 0.2 s, spin-down luminosity of 3e34 erg/s, and characteristic age of 0.5 Myr, PSR J2030+3641 is a middle-aged neutron star with spin parameters similar to those of the exceedingly gamma-ray-bright and radio-undetected Geminga. Its gamma-ray flux is 1% that of Geminga, primarily because of its much larger distance, as suggested by the large integrated column density of free electrons, DM=246 pc/cc. We fit the gamma-ray light curve, along with limited radio polarimetric constraints, to four geometrical models of magnetospheric emission, and while none of the fits h...

  2. H.E.S.S. Observations of the Binary System PSR B1259-63/LS 2883 around the 2010/2011 Periastron Passage

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Acero, F; Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Anton, G; Balenderan, S; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; Becherini, Y; Tjus, J Becker; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Biteau, J; Bochow, A; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bulik, T; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Cerruti, M; Chadwick, P M; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; deWilt, P; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Fallon, L; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fernandez, D; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füßling, M; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Gast, H; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Göring, D; Grondin, M -H; Grudzińska, M; Häffner, S; Hague, J D; Hahn, J; Hampf, D; Harris, J; Heinz, S; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Khélifi, B; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kneiske, T; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Kossakowski, R; Krayzel, F; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lefaucheur, J; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J -P; Lennarz, D; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Masbou, J; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Medina, M C; Méhault, J; Menzler, U; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Moulin, E; Naumann, C L; Naumann-Godo, M; de Naurois, M; Nedbal, D; Nguyen, N; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Ohm, S; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perez, J; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Raue, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sheidaei, F; Skilton, J L; Sol, H; Spengler, G; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Szostek, A; Tavernet, J -P; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorobiov, S; Vorster, M; Wagner, S J; Ward, M; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Wouters, D; Zacharias, M; Zajczyk, A; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S

    2013-01-01

    Aim. In this paper we present very high energy (VHE; E>100 GeV) data from the \\gamma-ray binary system PSR B1259-63/LS 2883 taken around its periastron passage (15th of December 2010) with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) of Cherenkov Telescopes. We aim to search for a possible TeV counterpart of the GeV flare detected by the Fermi LAT. In addition, we aim to study the current periastron passage in the context of previous observations taken at similar orbital phases, testing the repetitive behavior of the source. Methods. Observations at VHE were conducted with H.E.S.S. from 9th to 16th of January 2011. The total dataset amounts to around 6 h of observing time. Results. The source is detected in the 2011 data at a significance level of 11.5\\sigma\\ revealing an averaged integral flux above 1 TeV of (1.01 \\pm 0.18_{stat} \\pm 0.20_{sys}) \\times 10^{-12} cm^{-2}s^{-1}. The differential energy spectrum follows a power-law shape with a spectral index \\Gamma = 2.92 \\pm 0.30_{stat} \\pm 0.20_{sys} and a ...

  3. Constraints on Black Hole/Host Galaxy Co-evolution and Binary Stalling Using Pulsar Timing Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Pulsar timing arrays are now setting increasingly tight limits on the gravitational wave background from binary supermassive black holes. But as upper limits grow more constraining, what can be implied about galaxy evolution? We investigate which astrophysical parameters have the largest impact on strain spectrum predictions and provide a simple framework to directly translate between measured values for the parameters of galaxy evolution and PTA limits on the gravitational wave background of binary supermassive black holes. We find that the most influential observable is the relation between a host galaxy's central bulge and its central black hole, $\\mbox{$M_{\\bullet}$-$M_{\\rm bulge}$}$, which has the largest effect on the mean value of the characteristic strain amplitude. However, the variance of each prediction is dominated by uncertainties in the galaxy stellar mass function. Using this framework with the best published PTA limit, we can set limits on the shape and scatter of the $\\mbox{$M_{\\bullet}$-$M_{...

  4. New clues on the nature of the companion to PSR J1740-5340 in NGC6397 from XSHOOTER spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Mucciarelli, A.; Salaris, M.; Lanzoni, B.; Pallanca, C.; Dalessandro, E.; Ferraro, F. R.

    2013-01-01

    By using XSHOOTER spectra acquired at the ESO Very Large Telescope, we have studied the surface chemical composition of the companion star to the binary millisecond pulsar PSR J1740-5340 in the globular cluster NGC 6397. The measured abundances of Fe, Mg, Al and Na confirm that the star belongs to the cluster. On the other hand, the measured surface abundance of nitrogen ([N/Fe]=+0.53 +- 0.15 dex) combined with the carbon upper limit ([C/Fe

  5. Cool white dwarf companions to four millisecond pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Bassa, C G; Camilo, F; Cognard, I; Koester, D; Kramer, M; Ransom, S R; Stappers, B W

    2015-01-01

    We report on photometric and spectroscopic observations of white dwarf companions to four binary radio millisecond pulsars, leading to the discovery of companions to PSRs J0614-3329, J1231-1411 and J2017+0603. We place limits on the brightness of the companion to PSR J0613-0200. Optical spectroscopy of the companion to PSR J0614-3329 identifies it as a DA type white dwarf with a temperature of Teff=6460+-80 K, a surface gravity log g=7.0+-0.2 cgs and a mass of Mwd=0.24+-0.04 Msun. We find that the distance to PSR J0614-3329 is smaller than previously estimated, removing the need for the pulsar to have an unrealistically high gamma-ray efficiency. Comparing the photometry with predictions from white dwarf cooling models allows us to estimate temperatures and cooling ages of the companions to PSRs J0613-0200, J1231-1411 and J2017+0603. We find that the white dwarfs in these systems are cool Teff5 Gyr. Thin Hydrogen envelopes are required for these white dwarfs to cool to the observed temperatures, and we sugges...

  6. Pulsar population synthesis using palfa detections and pulsar search collaboratory discoveries including a wide DNS system and a nearby MSP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiggum, Joseph Karl

    students in the pulsar discovery process -- hands-on, cutting-edge research -- to foster their interest in pursuing Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) related career paths. The PSC began in 2008; since then, over 100 teachers and 2,500 students from 18 states have participated and discovered seven pulsars. Of these seven, J1400--1431, a bright, nearby MSP shows promising characteristics for inclusion in pulsar timing arrays, which aim to detect gravitational waves by precisely timing an array of MSPs. Two others -- J1821+0155, a disrupted recycled pulsar and J1930--1852 show interesting properties due to interactions with binary companions. PSR J1930--1852 is a partially-recycled, first-to-evolve pulsar in a double neutron star (DNS) system with a high-eccentricity 45 day orbit. Its spin period and orbital period are factors of 2 and 3 higher, respectively, than any previously-known, primary DNS pulsars. We measure the relativistic advance of periastron o=0.00078(4), implying a total system mass of Mtot =2.59(4), which is consistent with other DNS systems. PSR J1930--1852's spin and orbital parameters, however, challenge current DNS evolution models, making it an important system for further investigation.

  7. Radio timing and optical photometry of the black widow system PSR J1518+0204C in the globular cluster M5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pallanca, C.; Ferraro, F. R.; Dalessandro, E.; Lanzoni, B. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Ransom, S. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22901 (United States); Hessels, J. W. T. [ASTRON, the Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Stairs, I. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T1Z1 (Canada); Freire, P. C. C. [Max-Planck-Institute für Radioastronomie, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2014-11-01

    We report on the determination of astrometric, spin, and orbital parameters for PSR J1518+0204C, a 'black widow' binary millisecond pulsar in the globular cluster (GC) M5. The accurate position and orbital parameters obtained from radio timing allowed us to search for the optical companion. By using WFC3/Hubble Space Telescope images, we identified a very faint variable star (m{sub F390W} ≳ 24.8, m{sub F606W} ≳ 24.3, m{sub F814W} ≳ 23.1) located at only 0.''25 from the pulsar's timing position. Due to its strong variability, this star is visible only in a subsample of images. However, the light curve obtained folding the available data with the orbital parameters of the pulsar shows a maximum at the pulsar inferior conjunction and a possible minimum at the pulsar superior conjunction. Furthermore, the shape of the optical modulation indicates a heating process possibly due to the pulsar wind. This is the first identification of an optical companion to a black widow pulsar in the dense stellar environment of a GC.

  8. Radio timing and optical photometry of the black widow system PSR J1518+0204C in the globular cluster M5

    CERN Document Server

    Pallanca, C; Ferraro, F R; Dalessandro, E; Lanzoni, B; Hessels, J W T; Stairs, I; Freire, P C C

    2014-01-01

    We report on the determination of astrometric, spin and orbital parameters for PSR J1518+0204C, a "black widow" binary millisecond pulsar in the globular cluster M5. The accurate position and orbital parameters obtained from radio timing allowed us to search for the optical companion. By using WFC3/HST images we identified a very faint variable star (m_F390W > 24.8, m_F606W > 24.3, m_F814W > 23.1) located at only 0.25" from the pulsar's timing position. Due to its strong variability, this star is visible only in a sub-sample of images. However, the light curve obtained folding the available data with the orbital parameters of the pulsar shows a maximum at the pulsar inferior conjunction and a possible minimum at the pulsar superior conjunction. Furthermore, the shape of the optical modulation indicates a heating process possibly due to the pulsar wind. This is the first identification of an optical companion to a black widow pulsar in the dense stellar environment of a globular cluster.

  9. Radio timing and optical photometry of the black widow system PSR J1518+0204C in the globular cluster M5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the determination of astrometric, spin, and orbital parameters for PSR J1518+0204C, a 'black widow' binary millisecond pulsar in the globular cluster (GC) M5. The accurate position and orbital parameters obtained from radio timing allowed us to search for the optical companion. By using WFC3/Hubble Space Telescope images, we identified a very faint variable star (mF390W ≳ 24.8, mF606W ≳ 24.3, mF814W ≳ 23.1) located at only 0.''25 from the pulsar's timing position. Due to its strong variability, this star is visible only in a subsample of images. However, the light curve obtained folding the available data with the orbital parameters of the pulsar shows a maximum at the pulsar inferior conjunction and a possible minimum at the pulsar superior conjunction. Furthermore, the shape of the optical modulation indicates a heating process possibly due to the pulsar wind. This is the first identification of an optical companion to a black widow pulsar in the dense stellar environment of a GC.

  10. Pulsar lensing geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Siqi; Macquart, J-P; Brisken, Walter; Deller, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Our analysis of archival VLBI data of PSR 0834+06 revealed that its scintillation properties can be precisely modelled using the inclined sheet model (Pen & Levin 2014), resulting in two distinct lens planes. These data strongly favour the grazing sheet model over turbulence as the primary source of pulsar scattering. This model can reproduce the parameters of the observed diffractive scintillation with an accuracy at the percent level. Comparison with new VLBI proper motion results in a direct measure of the ionized ISM screen transverse velocity. The results are consistent with ISM velocities local to the PSR 0834+06 sight-line (through the Galaxy). The simple 1D structure of the lenses opens up the possibility of using interstellar lenses as precision probes for pulsar lens mapping, precision transverse motions in the ISM, and new opportunities for removing scattering to improve pulsar timing. We describe the parameters and observables of this double screen system. While relative screen distances can i...

  11. Timing of a Young Mildly Recycled Pulsar with a Massive White Dwarf Companion

    CERN Document Server

    Lazarus, P; Knispel, B; Freire, P C C; Deneva, J S; Kaspi, V M; Allen, B; Bogdanov, S; Chatterjee, S; Stairs, I H; Zhu, W W

    2013-01-01

    We report on timing observations of the recently discovered binary pulsar PSR J1952+2630 using the Arecibo Observatory. The mildly recycled 20.7-ms pulsar is in a 9.4-hr orbit with a massive, M_WD > 0.93 M_sun, white dwarf (WD) companion. We present, for the first time, a phase-coherent timing solution, with precise spin, astrometric, and Keplerian orbital parameters. This shows that the characteristic age of PSR J1952+2630 is 77 Myr, younger by one order of magnitude than any other recycled pulsar-massive WD system. We derive an upper limit on the true age of the system of 50 Myr. We investigate the formation of PSR J1952+2630 using detailed modelling of the mass-transfer process from a naked helium star on to the neutron star following a common-envelope phase (Case BB Roche-lobe overflow). From our modelling of the progenitor system, we constrain the accretion efficiency of the neutron star, which suggests a value between 100 and 300% of the Eddington accretion limit. We present numerical models of the chem...

  12. Two Millisecond Pulsars Discovered by the PALFA Survey and a Shapiro Delay Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Deneva, J S; Cordes, J M; Lyne, A G; Ransom, S M; Cognard, I; Camilo, F; Nice, D J; Stairs, I H; Allen, B; Bhat, N D R; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Champion, D J; Chatterjee, S; Crawford, F; Desvignes, G; Hessels, J W T; Jenet, F A; Kaspi, V M; Knispel, B; Kramer, M; Lazarus, P; van Leeuwen, J; Lorimer, D R; Lynch, R S; McLaughlin, M A; Scholz, P; Siemens, X; Stappers, B W; Stovall, K; Venkataraman, A

    2012-01-01

    We present two millisecond pulsar discoveries from the PALFA survey of the Galactic plane with the Arecibo telescope. PSR J1955+2527 is an isolated pulsar with a period of 4.87 ms, and PSR J1949+3106 has a period of 13.14 ms and is in a 1.9-day binary system with a massive companion. Their timing solutions, based on 4 years of timing measurements with the Arecibo, Green Bank, Nan\\c{c}ay and Jodrell Bank telescopes, allow precise determination of spin and astrometric parameters, including precise determinations of their proper motions. For PSR J1949+3106, we can clearly detect the Shapiro delay. From this we measure the pulsar mass to be 1.47(+0.43/-0.31) solar masses, the companion mass to be 0.85(+0.14/-0.11) solar masses and the orbital inclination to be i = 79.9(+1.6/-1.9) degrees, where uncertainties correspond to +/- 1-\\sigma\\ confidence levels. With continued timing, we expect to also be able to detect the advance of periastron for the J1949+3106 system. This effect, combined with the Shapiro delay, wil...

  13. Timing of five millisecond pulsars discovered in the PALFA survey

    CERN Document Server

    Scholz, P; Lyne, A G; Stappers, B W; Bogdanov, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Hessels, J W T; Lorimer, D R; Stairs, I H; Allen, B; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Cardoso, R F; Chatterjee, S; Deneva, J S; Jenet, F A; Karako-Argaman, C; Knispel, B; Lazarus, P; Lee, K J; van Leeuwen, J; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Ransom, S M; Siemens, X; Spitler, L G; Stovall, K; Swiggum, J K; Venkataraman, A; Zhu, W W

    2015-01-01

    We present the discovery of five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) from the PALFA Galactic plane survey using Arecibo. Four of these (PSRs J0557+1551, J1850+0244, J1902+0300, and J1943+2210) are binary pulsars whose companions are likely white dwarfs, and one (PSR J1905+0453) is isolated. Phase-coherent timing solutions, ranging from $\\sim$1 to $\\sim$3 years in length, and based on observations from the Jodrell Bank and Arecibo telescopes, provide precise determinations of spin, orbital, and astrometric parameters. All five pulsars have large dispersion measures ($>100$ pc cm$^{-3}$, within the top 20% of all known Galactic field MSPs) and are faint (1.4 GHz flux density < 0.1 mJy, within the faintest 5% of all known Galactic field MSPs), illustrating PALFA's ability to find increasingly faint, distant MSPs in the Galactic plane. In particular, PSR J1850+0244 has a dispersion measure of 540 pc cm$^{-3}$, the highest of all known MSPs. Such distant, faint MSPs are important input for accurately modeling the total ...

  14. 2S1553-542: a Be/X-ray binary pulsar on the far side of the Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Lutovinov, Alexander A; Townsend, Lee J; Tsygankov, Sergey S; Kennea, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of a comprehensive analysis of X-ray (Chandra and Swift observatories), optical (Southern African Large Telescope, SALT) and near-infrared (the VVV survey) observations of the Be/X-ray binary pulsar 2S1553-542. Accurate coordinates for the X-ray source are determined and are used to identify the faint optical/infrared counterpart for the first time. Using VVV and SALTICAM photometry, we have constructed the spectral energy distribution (SED) for this star and found a moderate NIR excess that is typical for Be stars and arises due to the presence of circumstellar material (disk). A comparison of the SED with those of known Be/X-ray binaries has allowed us to estimate the spectral type of the companion star as B1-2V and the distance to the system as $>15$ kpc. This distance estimation is supported by the X-ray data and makes 2S1553-542 one of the most distant X-ray binaries within the Milky Way, residing on the far side in the Scutum-Centaurus arm or even further.

  15. Suzaku view of Be/X-ray binary pulsar GX 304-1 during Type I X-ray outbursts

    CERN Document Server

    Jaisawal, Gaurava K; Epili, Prahlad

    2016-01-01

    We report the timing and spectral properties of Be/X-ray binary pulsar GX 304-1 by using two Suzaku observations during its 2010 August and 2012 January X-ray outbursts. Pulsations at ~275 s were clearly detected in the light curves from both the observations. Pulse profiles were found to be strongly energy-dependent. During 2010 observation, prominent dips seen in soft X-ray ($\\leq$10 keV) pulse profiles were found to be absent at higher energies. However, during 2012 observation, the pulse profiles were complex due to the presence of several dips. Significant changes in the shape of the pulse profiles were detected at high energies ($>$35 keV). A phase shift of $\\sim$0.3 was detected while comparing the phase of main dip in pulse profiles below and above $\\sim$35 keV. Broad-band energy spectrum of pulsar was well described by a partially absorbed Negative and Positive power-law with Exponential cutoff (NPEX) model with 6.4 keV iron line and a cyclotron absorption feature. Energy of cyclotron absorption line...

  16. A compact pulsar wind nebula model of the gamma-ray loud binary LS I +61 303

    CERN Document Server

    Zdziarski, A A; Chernyakova, M

    2008-01-01

    We study a model of of the binary system LS I +61 303 in which its radio to TeV emission is due to interaction of a relativistic wind from a pulsar with the wind from a Be star. The fast polar wind is clumpy, which causes the two winds to mix. The relativistic electrons from the pulsar wind are retained in the clumps by magnetic field inhomogeneities, which explains the X-ray variability on time scales much shorter than the orbital period. The second stellar-wind component is a dense equatorial disc around the Be star. The energy losses of the radio and X-ray emitting relativistic electrons are dominated by Coulomb interactions within the disc, causing radio and X-ray orbital modulations. A likely mechanism of the TeV orbital modulation is an emission anisotropy, with preferred directions along the surface of equal ram pressures of the two winds. We consider two models for the observed superorbital variability of the radio emission from the system, with the period of 4-5 years. One model involves precession o...

  17. Tests of general relativity from timing the double pulsar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, M; Stairs, I H; Manchester, R N; McLaughlin, M A; Lyne, A G; Ferdman, R D; Burgay, M; Lorimer, D R; Possenti, A; D'Amico, N; Sarkissian, J M; Hobbs, G B; Reynolds, J E; Freire, P C C; Camilo, F

    2006-10-01

    The double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039A/B is unique in that both neutron stars are detectable as radio pulsars. They are also known to have much higher mean orbital velocities and accelerations than those of other binary pulsars. The system is therefore a good candidate for testing Einstein's theory of general relativity and alternative theories of gravity in the strong-field regime. We report on precision timing observations taken over the 2.5 years since its discovery and present four independent strong-field tests of general relativity. These tests use the theory-independent mass ratio of the two stars. By measuring relativistic corrections to the Keplerian description of the orbital motion, we find that the "post-Keplerian" parameter s agrees with the value predicted by general relativity within an uncertainty of 0.05%, the most precise test yet obtained. We also show that the transverse velocity of the system's center of mass is extremely small. Combined with the system's location near the Sun, this result suggests that future tests of gravitational theories with the double pulsar will supersede the best current solar system tests. It also implies that the second-born pulsar may not have formed through the core collapse of a helium star, as is usually assumed. PMID:16973838

  18. Anisotropic inverse Compton scattering of photons from the circumstellar disc in PSR B1259-63

    CERN Document Server

    van Soelen, B; Odendaal, A; Townsend, L J

    2012-01-01

    The gamma-ray binary system PSR B1259-63 consists of a 48 ms pulsar orbiting a Be star. The system is particularly interesting because it is the only gamma-ray binary system where the nature of the compact object is known. The non-thermal radiation from the system is powered by the spin-down luminosity of the pulsar and the unpulsed radiation originates from the stand-off shock front which forms between the pulsar and stellar wind. The Be star/optical companion in the system produces an excess infrared flux from the associated circumstellar disc. This infrared excess provides an additional photon source for inverse Compton scattering. We discuss the effects of the IR excess near periastron, for anisotropic inverse Compton scattering and associated gamma-ray production. We determine the infrared excess from the circumstellar disc using a modified version of a curve of growth method, which takes into account the changing optical depth through the circumstellar disc during the orbit. The model is constrained usi...

  19. Peculiar nulling in PSR J1738-2330

    CERN Document Server

    Gajjar, Vishal; Krämer, M

    2009-01-01

    Several pulsars show sudden cessation of pulsed emission, which is known as nulling. The number of known nulling pulsars has not been significantly enhanced in the last decade, although the pulsar population has more than doubled following the Parkes multi-beam pulsar survey. A systematic follow-up study of the new pulsars, discovered in this survey, is being carried out by us at 325-MHz with GMRT. The peculiar nulling behaviour of PSR J1738-2330, observed as a part of this 325-MHz GMRT survey, is reported in this paper. The pulsar appears to show a periodic null-burst cycle with an upper limit to nulling fraction, of about 90 percent. The pulsed flux density declines by a factor 94 during the nulled pulses in this pulsar.

  20. An evolutionary model for the gamma-ray system PSR J1311-3430 and its companion

    CERN Document Server

    Benvenuto, O G; Horvath, J E

    2013-01-01

    The most recent member of the millisecond pulsar with very low-mass companions and short orbital periods class, PSR J1311-3430 (Pletsch et al. 2012) is a remarkable object in various senses. Besides being the first discovered in gamma-rays, its measured features include the very low or absent hydrogen content. We show in this Letter that this important piece of information leads to a very restricted range of initial periods for a given donor mass. For that purpose, we calculate in detail the evolution of the binary system self-consistently, including mass transfer and evaporation, finding the features of the new evolutionary path leading to the observed configuration. It is also important to remark that the detailed evolutionary history of the system naturally leads to a high final pulsar mass, as it seems to be demanded by observations.

  1. Constraint on Parameters of Inverse Compton Scattering Model for PSR B2319+60

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H. G. Wang; M. Lv

    2011-03-01

    Using the multifrequency radio profiles of pulsar PSR B2319+60, two parameters of inverse Compton scattering model, the initial Lorentz factor and the factor of energy loss of relativistic particles are constrained.

  2. Piercing the Vainshtein screen with anomalous gravitational wave speed: Constraints on modified gravity from binary pulsars

    OpenAIRE

    Beltrán Jiménez, Jose; Piazza, Federico; Velten, Hermano

    2016-01-01

    International audience By using observations of the Hulse-Taylor pulsar we constrain the gravitational wave (GW) speed to the level of 10 −2. We apply this result to scalar-tensor theories that generalize Galileon 4 and 5 models, which display anomalous propagation speed and coupling to matter for GWs. We argue that this effect survives conventional screening due to the persistence of a scalar field gradient inside virialized overdensities, which effectively " pierces " the Vainshtein scre...

  3. Parkes radio searches of Fermi gamma-ray sources and millisecond pulsar discoveries

    CERN Document Server

    Camilo, F; Ray, P S; Ransom, S M; Sarkissian, J; Cromartie, H T; Johnston, S; Reynolds, J E; Wolff, M T; Freire, P C C; Bhattacharyya, B; Ferrara, E C; Keith, M; Michelson, P F; Parkinson, P M Saz; Wood, K S

    2015-01-01

    In a search with the Parkes radio telescope of 56 unidentified Fermi-LAT gamma-ray sources, we have detected 11 millisecond pulsars (MSPs), 10 of them discoveries, of which five were reported in Kerr et al. (2012). We did not detect radio pulsations from another six pulsars now known in these sources. We describe the completed survey, which included multiple observations of many targets done to minimize the impact of interstellar scintillation, acceleration effects in binary systems, and eclipses. We consider that 23 of the 39 remaining sources may still be viable pulsar candidates. We present timing solutions and polarimetry for five of the MSPs, and gamma-ray pulsations for PSR J1903-7051 (pulsations for five others were reported in the second Fermi-LAT catalog of gamma-ray pulsars). Two of the new MSPs are isolated and five are in >1 d circular orbits with 0.2-0.3 Msun presumed white dwarf companions. PSR J0955-6150, in a 24 d orbit with a ~0.25 Msun companion but eccentricity of 0.11, belongs to a recentl...

  4. The impact of a stochastic gravitational-wave background on pulsar timing parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, J; Verbiest, J P W

    2011-01-01

    Gravitational waves are predicted by Einstein's theory of general relativity as well as other theories of gravity. The rotational stability of the fastest pulsars means that timing of an array of these objects can be used to detect and investigate gravitational waves. Simultaneously, however, pulsar timing is used to estimate spin period, period derivative, astrometric, and binary parameters. Here we calculate the effects that a stochastic background of gravitational waves has on pulsar timing parameters through the use of simulations and data from the millisecond pulsars PSR J0437--4715 and PSR J1713+0747. We show that the reported timing uncertainties become underestimated with increasing background amplitude by up to a factor of $\\sim10$ for a stochastic gravitational-wave background amplitude of $A=5\\times 10^{-15}$, where $A$ is the amplitude of the characteristic strain spectrum at one-year gravitational wave periods. We find evidence for prominent low-frequency spectral leakage in simulated data sets i...

  5. Radio pulsars around intermediate mass black holes in super stellar clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Patruno, A; Faulkner, A J; Possenti, A

    2005-01-01

    We study accretion in binaries hosting an intermediate mass black hole (IMBH) of 1000 solar masses, and a donor star more massive than 15 solar masses. These systems experience an active X-ray phase characterized by luminosities varying over a wide interval, from <10^36 erg/s up to a few 10^40 erg/s typical of the ultra luminous X-ray sources (ULXs). Roche lobe overflow on the zero-age main sequence and donor masses above 20 solar masses can maintain a long-lived accretion phase at the level required to feed a ULX source. In wide systems, wind transfer rates are magnified by the focusing action of the IMBH yielding wind luminosities around 10^38 erg/s. These high mass-IMBH binaries can be identified as progenitors of IMBH-radio pulsar (PSR) binaries. We find that the formation of an IMBH-PSR binary does not necessarely require the transit through a ULX phase, but that a ULX can highlight a system that will evolve into an IMBH-PSR, if the mass of the donor star is constrained to lie within 15 to 30 solar ma...

  6. A state change in the low-mass X-ray binary XSS J12270-4859

    CERN Document Server

    Bassa, C G; Hessels, J W T; Keane, E F; Monard, B; Mahony, E K; Bogdanov, S; Corbel, S; Edwards, P G; Archibald, A M; Janssen, G H; Stappers, B W; Tendulkar, S

    2014-01-01

    Millisecond radio pulsars acquire their rapid rotation rates through mass and angular momentum transfer in a low-mass X-ray binary system. Recent studies of PSR J1824-2452I and PSR J1023+0038 have observationally demonstrated this link, and they have also shown that such systems can repeatedly transition back-and-forth between the radio millisecond pulsar and low-mass X-ray binary states. This also suggests that a fraction of such systems are not newly born radio millisecond pulsars but are rather suspended in a back-and-forth state switching phase, perhaps for giga-years. XSS J12270-4859 has been previously suggested to be a low-mass X-ray binary, and until recently the only such system to be seen at MeV-GeV energies. We present radio, optical and X-ray observations that offer compelling evidence that XSS J12270-4859 is a low-mass X-ray binary which transitioned to a radio millisecond pulsar state between 2012 November 14 and 2012 December 21. Though radio pulsations remain to be detected, we use optical and...

  7. The origin of the X-ray-emitting object moving away from PSR B1259-63

    CERN Document Server

    Barkov, Maxim V

    2015-01-01

    A mysterious X-ray-emitting object has been detected moving away from the high-mass gamma-ray binary PSR B1259-63, which contains a non-accreting pulsar and a Be star whose winds collide forming a complex interaction structure. Given the strong eccentricity of this binary, the interaction structure should be strongly anisotropic, which together with the complex evolution of the shocked winds, could explain the origin of the observed moving X-ray feature. We propose here that a fast outflow made of a pulsar-stellar wind mixture is always present moving away from the binary in the apastron direction, with the injection of stellar wind occurring at orbital phases close to periastron passage. This outflow periodically loaded with stellar wind would move with a high speed, and likely host non-thermal activity due to shocks, on scales similar to those of the observed moving X-ray object. Such an outflow is thus a very good candidate to explain this X-ray feature. This, if confirmed, would imply pulsar-to-stellar wi...

  8. Evading the Vainshtein Mechanism with Anomalous Gravitational Wave Speed: Constraints on Modified Gravity from Binary Pulsars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán Jiménez, Jose; Piazza, Federico; Velten, Hermano

    2016-02-12

    By using observations of the Hulse-Taylor pulsar, we constrain the gravitational wave (GW) speed to the level of 10^{-2}. We apply this result to scalar-tensor theories that generalize Galileon 4 and 5 models, which display anomalous propagation speed and coupling to matter for GWs. We argue that this effect survives conventional screening due to the persistence of a scalar field gradient inside virialized overdensities, which effectively "pierces" the Vainshtein screening. In specific branches of solutions, our result allows us to directly constrain the cosmological couplings in the effective field theory of dark energy formalism. PMID:26918974

  9. Swinging between rotation and accretion power in a binary millisecond pulsar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papitto A.

    2014-01-01

    While accreting mass, the X-ray emission of IGR J18245–2452 varies dramatically on time-scales ranging from a second to a few hours. We interpret a state characterised by a lower flux and pulsed fraction, and by sudden increases of the hardness of the X-ray emission, in terms of the onset of a magnetospheric centrifugal inhibition of the accretion flow. Prospects of finding new members of the newly established class of transitional pulsars are also briefly discussed.

  10. The effect of vacuum birefringence on the polarization of X-ray binaries and pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novick, R.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Angel, J. R. P.; Sutherland, P. G.

    1977-01-01

    In a strong magnetic field the vacuum becomes birefringent. This effect is especially important for pulsars at X-ray wavelengths. Any polarized X-ray emission from the surface of a magnetic neutron star becomes depolarized as it propagates through the magnetic field. The soft X-ray emission from AM Her, believed to be a magnetic white dwarf, may show about one radian of phase retardation. In this case, circular polarization of the X-ray flux would be a characteristic signature of vacuum birefringence.

  11. Discovery of SXP 265, a Be/X-ray binary pulsar in the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, R.; Haberl, F.; Vasilopoulos, G.; Bartlett, E. S.; Maggi, P.; Rau, A.; Greiner, J.; Udalski, A.

    2014-11-01

    We identify a new candidate for a Be/X-ray binary in the XMM-Newton slew survey and archival Swift observations that is located in the transition region of the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud and the Magellanic Bridge. We investigated and classified this source with follow-up XMM-Newton and optical observations. We model the X-ray spectra and search for periodicities and variability in the X-ray observations and the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment I-band light curve. The optical counterpart has been classified spectroscopically, with data obtained at the South African Astronomical Observatory 1.9 m telescope, and photometrically, with data obtained using the Gamma-ray Burst Optical Near-ir Detector at the MPG 2.2 m telescope. The X-ray spectrum is typical of a high-mass X-ray binary with an accreting neutron star. We detect X-ray pulsations, which reveal a neutron-star spin period of Ps = (264.516 ± 0.014) s. The source likely shows a persistent X-ray luminosity of a few 1035 erg s-1 and in addition type-I outbursts that indicate an orbital period of ˜146 d. A periodicity of 0.867 d, found in the optical light curve, can be explained by non-radial pulsations of the Be star. We identify the optical counterpart and classify it as a B1-2II-IVe star. This confirms SXP 265 as a new Be/X-ray binary pulsar originating in the tidal structure between the Magellanic Clouds.

  12. Pulsar Braking Indices Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Johnston, S; Johnston, Simon; Galloway, David

    1999-01-01

    Using the standard equation for the slowdown of a neutron star, we derive a formula for the braking index via integration rather than the conventional differentiation. The new formula negates the need to measure the second time derivative of the rotation frequency. We show that the method gives similar braking indices for PSR B1509-58 and the Crab pulsar to those already in the literature. We point out that our method is useful for obtaining the braking indices of moderate aged pulsars without the need for long, phase-connected timing solutions. We applied the method to 20 pulsars and discuss the implications of the results. We find that virtually all the derived braking indices are dominated by the effects of (unseen) glitches, the recovery from which corrupts the value of the frequency first derivative. However, any real, large, positive braking index has implications for magnetic field decay and offers support to recent models of pulsar evolution.

  13. The imminent detection of gravitational waves from massive black-hole binaries with pulsar timing arrays

    CERN Document Server

    McWilliams, Sean T; Pretorius, Frans

    2012-01-01

    Recent observations of massive galaxies indicate that they double in mass and quintuple in size between redshift z = 1 and the present, despite undergoing very little star formation, suggesting that galaxy mergers drive the evolution. Since these galaxies will contain supermassive black holes, this suggests a larger black hole merger rate, and therefore a larger gravitational-wave signal, than previously expected. We calculate the merger-driven evolution of the mass function, and find that merger rates are 10 to 30 times higher and gravitational waves are 3 to 5 times stronger than previously estimated, so that the gravitational-wave signal may already be detectable with existing data from pulsar timing arrays. We also provide an explanation for the disagreement with past estimates that were based on dark matter halo simulations.

  14. ON THE COMPLEMENTARITY OF PULSAR TIMING AND SPACE LASER INTERFEROMETRY FOR THE INDIVIDUAL DETECTION OF SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE BINARIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gravitational waves coming from supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) are targeted by both the Pulsar Timing Array (PTA) and Space Laser Interferometry (SLI). The possibility of a single SMBHB being tracked first by PTA, through inspiral, and later by SLI, up to merger and ring-down, has been previously suggested. Although the bounding parameters are drawn by the current PTA or the upcoming Square Kilometer Array (SKA), and by the New Gravitational Observatory (NGO), derived from the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), this paper also addresses sequential detection beyond specific project constraints. We consider PTA-SKA, which is sensitive from 10–9 to p × 10–7 Hz (p = 4, 8), and SLI, which operates from s × 10–5 up to 1 Hz (s = 1, 3). An SMBHB in the range of 2 × 108-2 × 109 M ☉ (the masses are normalized to a (1 + z) factor, the redshift lying between z = 0.2 and z = 1.5) moves from the PTA-SKA to the SLI band over a period ranging from two months to fifty years. By combining three supermassive black hole (SMBH)-host relations with three accretion prescriptions, nine astrophysical scenarios are formed. They are then related to three levels of pulsar timing residuals (50, 5, 1 ns), generating 27 cases. For residuals of 1 ns, sequential detection probability will never be better than 4.7 × 10–4 yr–2 or 3.3 × 10–6 yr–2 (per year to merger and per year of survey), according to the best and worst astrophysical scenarios, respectively; put differently this means one sequential detection every 46 or 550 years for an equivalent maximum time to merger and duration of the survey. The chances of sequential detection are further reduced by increasing values of the s parameter (they vanish for s = 10) and of the SLI noise, and by decreasing values of the remnant spin. The spread in the predictions diminishes when timing precision is improved or the SLI low-frequency cutoff is lowered. So while transit times and the SLI signal-to-noise ratio

  15. A shell SNR associated with PSR1930 + 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Observations at 408 and 1420 MHz are reported which show a large (1.7 degree diameter) faint shell of nonthermal emission partially surrounding PSR1930 + 22. This may be the SNR associated with the pulsar, whose spin-down age is only 40000 years

  16. Very energy observations of PSR B1951+32

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PSR B1951+32 is a γ-ray pulsar detected by the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) and identified with the 39.5 ms radio pulsar in the supernova remnant CTB 80. The EGRET data shows no evidence for a spectral turnover. Here we report on the first observations of PSR B1951+32 beyond 30 GeV. The observations were carried out with the 10 m γ-ray telescope at the Whipple Observatory on Mt. Hopkins, Arizona. In 8.1 hours of observation we find no evidence for steady or periodic emission from PSR B1951+32 above ∼260 GeV. Flux upper limits are derived and compared with model extrapolations from lower energies and the predictions of emission models. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  17. The Galactic One-Way Shapiro Delay to PSR B1937+21

    CERN Document Server

    Desai, S

    2015-01-01

    The time delay experienced by a light ray as it passes through a changing gravitational potential by a non-zero mass distribution along the line of sight is usually referred to as Shapiro delay. Shapiro delay has been extensively measured in the Solar system and in binary pulsars, enabling stringent tests of general relativity as well as measurement of neutron star masses . However, Shapiro delay is ubiquitous and experienced by all astrophysical messengers on their way from the source to the Earth. We calculate the "one-way" static Shapiro delay for the first discovered millisecond pulsar PSR~B1937+21, by including the contributions from both the dark matter and baryonic matter between this pulsar and the Earth. We find a value of approximately 5 days (of which 4.74 days is from the dark matter and 0.22 days from the baryonic matter). We also calculate the modulation of Shapiro delay from the motion of a single dark matter halo, and also evaluate the cumulative effects of the motion of matter distribution on...

  18. Formation of the planet around the millisecond pulsar J1719-1438

    CERN Document Server

    van Haaften, L M; Voss, R; Jonker, P G

    2012-01-01

    Context. Recently the discovery of PSR J1719-1438, a 5.8 ms pulsar with a companion in a 2.2 hr orbit, was reported. The combination of this orbital period and the very low mass function is unique. The discoverers, Bailes et al., proposed an ultracompact X-ray binary (UCXB) as the progenitor system. However, the standard UCXB scenario would not produce this system as the time required to reach this orbital period exceeds the current estimate of the age of the Universe. The detached state of the system aggravates the problem. Aims. We want to understand the evolutionary history of PSR J1719-1438, and determine under which circumstances it could have evolved from an UCXB. Methods. We model UCXB evolution varying the donor size and investigate the effect of a wind mass loss from the donor, and compare the results with the observed characteristics of PSR J1719-1438. Results. An UCXB can reach a 2.2 hr orbit within the age of the Universe, provided that 1) the millisecond pulsar can significantly heat and expand t...

  19. Constraining the gravitational binding energy of PSR J0737-3039B using terrestrial nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that the gravitational binding energy of a neutron star of a given mass is correlated with the slope of the nuclear symmetry energy at 1-2 times nuclear saturation density for equations of state without significant softening (i.e., those that predict maximum masses Mmax>1.44M· in line with the largest accurately measured neutron star mass). Applying recent laboratory constraints on the slope of the symmetry energy to this correlation we extract a constraint on the baryon mass of the lower mass member of the double pulsar binary system, PSR J0737-3039B. We compare with independent constraints derived from modeling the progenitor star of J0737-3039B up to and through its collapse under the assumption that it formed in an electron capture supernova. The two sets of constraints are consistent only if L < or approx. 70 MeV.

  20. High sensitivity pulsar search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The planning, implementation, and results from a highly sensitive, automated search for new pulsars are discussed. This research effort was begun with a study of the relevant signal detection theory, and the conclusions reached are presented. The general procedures developed were specifically tailored for use on a high speed minicomputer, and produced a search relatively free from observational selection effects. The actual computer coding of these procedures is also described, with emphasis on how the required speed and efficiency of these routines was obtained. The final system applied over half a million different matched digital filters to the data obtained from each successive telescope beam area. Use of this search system at the 1000 foot telescope of the Arecibo Observatory resulted in the detection of 50 pulsars, 40 of which were not previously known. Parameters are presented for these new pulsars. The relatively limited range in dispersion measure exhibited by this pulsar sample is used, along with other evidence, to infer a reduced number density of pulsars at distances beyond approximately 10 kpc from the galactic center. By far the most interesting individual pulsar discovered in the course of this search was PSR 1913+16. Large periodic variations in the observed pulsation period of this pulsar are interpreted in terms of doppler shifts associated with its orbital motion about some companion object. The data analysis methods employed to arrive at the current observational description of this system are discussed, along with a review of the theoretical conclusions that are based on this description

  1. Orbital Phase-Resolved X-ray Observations of the Black-Widow Pulsar J1446-4701

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumugasamy, Prakash; Pavlov, G. G.

    2014-01-01

    PSR J1446--4701 is a recently discovered radio and gamma-ray recycled pulsar in a tight binary (binary period P_b = 6.6 hr, a sin i = 1.7 R_⊙). The relativistic pulsar wind at such close proximity is expected to evaporate the low mass companion (M_{min}= 0.019 M_⊙), which should lead to an orbital phase dependence of the multiwavelength emission of this Black Widow pulsar (BWP) system. We observed the system with XMM-Newton EPIC (0.3--10 keV) and Optical Monitor (B,V) for 60 ks, covering about 2.5 binary orbits, to look for the orbital variability of its flux and spectrum. The EPIC data do not show a significant orbital variability of the flux, perhaps due to a low orbital inclination. However, the orbital phase-resolved spectral analysis allowed us to separate two spectral components: thermal pulsar polar-cap emission (kT=0.18±0.02 keV, R=216±60 m), detected throughout the orbit, and a hard power-law component (Γ = 1.4±0.6), detected only for the half-orbit around superior conjunction of the pulsar. We infer the hard non-thermal component to be the intra-binary shock emission. We did not detect an optical counterpart with the optical monitor, which sets some strong constraints on the companion. In the context of similar BWPs, we discuss the pulsar's high energy emission characteristics and intra-binary shock energetics.

  2. NuSTAR discovery of an unusually steady long-term spin-up of the Be binary 2RXP J130159.6-635806

    OpenAIRE

    Krivonos, Roman A.; Tsygankov, Sergey S.; Lutovinov, Alexander A.; Tomsick, John A.; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Bachetti, Matteo; Boggs, Steven E.; Chernyakova, Masha; Christensen, Finn Erland; Craig, William W.; Fürst, Felix; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Lansbury, George B.; Rahoui, Farid

    2015-01-01

    We present spectral and timing analyses of Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) observations of the accreting X-ray pulsar 2RXP J130159.6–635806. The source was serendipitously observed during a campaign focused on the gamma-ray binary PSR B1259–63 and was later targeted for a dedicated observation. The spectrum has a typical shape for accreting X-ray pulsars, consisting of a simple power law with an exponential cutoff starting at ~7 keV with a folding energy of E_(fold) ≃ 18 keV. T...

  3. Signs of Magnetic Accretion in the X-ray Pulsar Binary GX 301-2

    CERN Document Server

    Ikhsanov, N R

    2012-01-01

    Observations of the cyclotron resonance scattering feature in the X-ray spectrum of GX 301-2 suggest that the surface field of the neutron star is B_CRSF ~ 4 x 10^{12}G. The same value has been derived in modelling the rapid spin-up episodes in terms of the Keplerian disk accretion scenario. However, the spin-down rate observed during the spin-down trends significantly exceeds the value expected in currently used spin-evolution scenarios. This indicates that either the surface field of the star exceeds 50 x B_CRSF, or a currently used accretion scenario is incomplete. We show that the above discrepancy can be avoided if the accreting material is magnetized. The magnetic pressure in the accretion flow increases more rapidly than its ram pressure and, under certain conditions, significantly affects the accretion picture. The spin-down torque applied to the neutron star in this case is larger than that evaluated within a non-magnetized accretion scenario. We find that the observed spin evolution of the pulsar ca...

  4. Angular Momentum Transfer in the Binary X-ray Pulsar GX 1+4

    CERN Document Server

    Greenhill, J; Murray, J R

    1999-01-01

    We describe three presentations relating to the X-ray pulsar GX 1+4 at a workshop on magnetic fields and accretion at the Astrophysical Theory Centre, Australian National University on 1998, November 12-13. Optical and X-ray spectroscopy indicate that GX 1+4 is seen through a cloud of gravitationaly bound matter. We discuss an unstable negative feedback mechanism (originally proposed by Kotani et al, 1999), based on X-ray heating of this matter which controls the accretion rate when the source is in a low X-ray luminosity state. A deep minimum lasting ~6 hours occurred during observations with the RXTE satellite over 1996, July 19-21. The shape of the X-ray pulses changed remarkably from before to after the minimum. These changes may be related to the transition from neutron star spin-down to spin-up which occurred at about the same time. Smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations of the effect of adding matter with opposite angular momentum to an existing disc, show that it is possible for a number of concen...

  5. Intra-binary Shock Heating of Black Widow Companions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Roger W.; Sanchez, Nicolas

    2016-09-01

    The low-mass companions of evaporating binary pulsars (black widows and similar) are strongly heated on the side facing the pulsar. However, in high-quality photometric and spectroscopic data, the heating pattern does not match that expected for direct pulsar illumination. Here we explore a model where the pulsar power is intercepted by an intra-binary shock (IBS) before heating the low-mass companion. We develop a simple analytic model and implement it in the popular “ICARUS” light curve code. The model is parameterized by the wind momentum ratio β and the companion wind speed {f}v{v}{{orb}}, and assumes that the reprocessed pulsar wind emits prompt particles or radiation to heat the companion surface. We illustrate an interesting range of light curve asymmetries controlled by these parameters. The code also computes the IBS synchrotron emission pattern, and thus can model black widow X-ray light curves. As a test, we apply the results to the high-quality asymmetric optical light curves of PSR J2215+5135; the resulting fit gives a substantial improvement upon direct heating models and produces an X-ray light curve consistent with that seen. The IBS model parameters imply that at the present loss rate, the companion evaporation has a characteristic timescale of {τ }{{evap}}≈ 150 Myr. Still, the model is not fully satisfactory, indicating that there are additional unmodeled physical effects.

  6. Optical observations of PSR J1357-6429 field

    CERN Document Server

    Kirichenko, Aida; Mennickent, Ronald E; Pavlov, George; Shibanov, Yury; Zharikov, Sergey; Zyuzin, Dmitry

    2012-01-01

    PSR J1357-6429 is a Vela-like radio pulsar that has been recently detected with Chandra and Fermi, which, like Vela, powers a compact X-ray pulsar wind nebula and X-ray-radio plerion associated with an extended TeV source. We present our deep optical observations with the Very Large Telescope to search for an optical counterpart of the pulsar and its nebula. We detected a point-like source in V, R, and I bands whose position is in agreement with the X-ray position of the pulsar, and whose colours are distinct from those of ordinary stars. The tentative optical luminosity and efficiency of the source are similar to those of the Vela pulsar, which also supports the optical identification. However, the source spectrum is unusually steep, with a spectral index of about 5, which is not typical of optical pulsars. The source offset from the radio position of PSR J1357-6429, which is in line with the corresponding offset of the X-ray position, implies the pulsar transverse velocity of 1600-2000 km/s at the distance ...

  7. Upper limits on the strength of periodic gravitational waves from PSR J1939+2134

    OpenAIRE

    Woan, G.; Allen, B.; Abbott, B.; Abbott, F.; Adhikari, R.; R. Amin; Anderson, S; Anderson, W.; Araya, M; Armandula, H.; Asiri, F.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S; Balasubramanian, R.

    2004-01-01

    The first science run of the LIGO and GEO gravitational wave detectors presented the opportunity to test methods of searching for gravitational waves from known pulsars. Here we present new direct upper limits on the strength of waves from the pulsar PSR J1939+2134 using two independent analysis methods, one in the frequency domain using frequentist statistics and one in the time domain using Bayesian inference. Both methods show that the strain amplitude at Earth from this pulsar is less tha...

  8. The double pulsar: evidence for neutron star formation without an iron core-collapse supernova

    CERN Document Server

    Ferdman, R D; Kramer, M; Breton, R P; McLaughlin, M A; Freire, P C C; Possenti, A; Stappers, B W; Kaspi, V M; Manchester, R N; Lyne, A G

    2013-01-01

    The double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039A/B is a double neutron star binary, with a 2.4-hour orbital period, which has allowed measurement of relativistic orbital perturbations to high precision. The low mass of the second-formed neutron star, as well as the low system eccentricity and proper motion, point to a different evolutionary scenario compared to most other known double neutron star systems. We describe analysis of the pulse profile shape over 6 years of observations, and present the resulting constraints on the system geometry. We find the recycled pulsar in this system, PSR J0737-3039A, to be a near-orthogonal rotator, with an average separation between its spin and magnetic axes of 90 +/- 11 +/- 5 deg. Furthermore, we find a mean 95% upper limit on the misalignment between its spin and orbital angular momentum axes of 3.2 deg, assuming that the observed emission comes from both magnetic poles. This tight constraint lends credence to the idea that the supernova that formed the second pulsar was relat...

  9. THE DOUBLE PULSAR: EVIDENCE FOR NEUTRON STAR FORMATION WITHOUT AN IRON CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferdman, R. D.; Kramer, M.; Stappers, B. W.; Lyne, A. G. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Stairs, I. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Breton, R. P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); McLaughlin, M. A. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Freire, P. C. C. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Possenti, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, Loc. Poggio dei Pini, I-09012 Capoterra (Italy); Kaspi, V. M. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Ernest Rutherford Physics Building, 3600 University Street, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Manchester, R. N., E-mail: ferdman@jb.man.ac.uk [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

    2013-04-10

    The double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039A/B is a double neutron star binary, with a 2.4 hr orbital period, which has allowed measurement of relativistic orbital perturbations to high precision. The low mass of the second-formed neutron star, as well as the low system eccentricity and proper motion, point to a different evolutionary scenario compared to most other known double neutron star systems. We describe analysis of the pulse profile shape over 6 years of observations and present the resulting constraints on the system geometry. We find the recycled pulsar in this system, PSR J0737-3039A, to be a near-orthogonal rotator with an average separation between its spin and magnetic axes of 90 Degree-Sign {+-} 11 Degree-Sign {+-} 5 Degree-Sign . Furthermore, we find a mean 95% upper limit on the misalignment between its spin and orbital angular momentum axes of 3. Degree-Sign 2, assuming that the observed emission comes from both magnetic poles. This tight constraint lends credence to the idea that the supernova that formed the second pulsar was relatively symmetric, possibly involving electron capture onto an O-Ne-Mg core.

  10. THE DOUBLE PULSAR: EVIDENCE FOR NEUTRON STAR FORMATION WITHOUT AN IRON CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The double pulsar system PSR J0737–3039A/B is a double neutron star binary, with a 2.4 hr orbital period, which has allowed measurement of relativistic orbital perturbations to high precision. The low mass of the second-formed neutron star, as well as the low system eccentricity and proper motion, point to a different evolutionary scenario compared to most other known double neutron star systems. We describe analysis of the pulse profile shape over 6 years of observations and present the resulting constraints on the system geometry. We find the recycled pulsar in this system, PSR J0737–3039A, to be a near-orthogonal rotator with an average separation between its spin and magnetic axes of 90° ± 11° ± 5°. Furthermore, we find a mean 95% upper limit on the misalignment between its spin and orbital angular momentum axes of 3.°2, assuming that the observed emission comes from both magnetic poles. This tight constraint lends credence to the idea that the supernova that formed the second pulsar was relatively symmetric, possibly involving electron capture onto an O-Ne-Mg core.

  11. Low-radio-frequency eclipses of the redback pulsar J2215+5135 observed in the image plane with LOFAR

    CERN Document Server

    Broderick, J W; Breton, R P; Stewart, A J; Rowlinson, A; Swinbank, J D; Hessels, J W T; Staley, T D; van der Horst, A J; Bell, M E; Carbone, D; Cendes, Y; Corbel, S; Eislöffel, J; Falcke, H; Grießmeier, J -M; Hassall, T E; Jonker, P; Kramer, M; Kuniyoshi, M; Law, C J; Markoff, S; Molenaar, G J; Pietka, M; Scheers, L H A; Serylak, M; Stappers, B W; ter Veen, S; van Leeuwen, J; Wijers, R A M J; Wijnands, R; Wise, M W; Zarka, P

    2016-01-01

    The eclipses of certain types of binary millisecond pulsars (i.e. `black widows' and `redbacks') are often studied using high-time-resolution, `beamformed' radio observations. However, they may also be detected in images generated from interferometric data. As part of a larger imaging project to characterize the variable and transient sky at radio frequencies <200 MHz, we have blindly detected the redback system PSR J2215+5135 as a variable source of interest with the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR). Using observations with cadences of 2 weeks - 6 months, we find preliminary evidence that the eclipse duration is frequency dependent ($\\propto \

  12. DISCOVERY OF TWO MILLISECOND PULSARS IN FERMI SOURCES WITH THE NANCAY RADIO TELESCOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the discovery of two millisecond pulsars in a search for radio pulsations at the positions of Fermi-Large Area Telescope sources with no previously known counterparts, using the Nancay Radio Telescope. The two millisecond pulsars, PSRs J2017+0603 and J2302+4442, have rotational periods of 2.896 and 5.192 ms and are both in binary systems with low-eccentricity orbits and orbital periods of 2.2 and 125.9 days, respectively, suggesting long recycling processes. Gamma-ray pulsations were subsequently detected for both objects, indicating that they power the associated Fermi sources in which they were found. The gamma-ray light curves and spectral properties are similar to those of previously detected gamma-ray millisecond pulsars. Detailed modeling of the observed radio and gamma-ray light curves shows that the gamma-ray emission seems to originate at high altitudes in their magnetospheres. Additionally, X-ray observations revealed the presence of an X-ray source at the position of PSR J2302+4442, consistent with thermal emission from a neutron star. These discoveries along with the numerous detections of radio-loud millisecond pulsars in gamma rays suggest that many Fermi sources with no known counterpart could be unknown millisecond pulsars.

  13. Study of luminosity and spin-up relation in X-ray binary pulsars with long-term monitoring by MAXI/GSC and Fermi/GBM

    CERN Document Server

    Sugizaki, Mutsumi; Nakajima, Motoki; Yamaoka, Kazutaka

    2015-01-01

    We study the relation between luminosity and spin-period change in X-ray binary pulsars using long-term light curve obtained by the MAXI/GSC all-sky survey and pulse period data from the Fermi/GBM pulsar project. X-ray binaries, consisting of a highly magnetized neutron star and a stellar companion, originate X-ray emission according to the energy of the accretion matter onto the neutron star. The accretion matter also transfers the angular momentum at the Alfven radius, and then spin up the neutron star. Therefore, the X-ray luminosity and the spin-up rate are supposed to be well correlated. We analyzed the luminosity and period-change relation using the data taken by continuous monitoring of MAXI/GSC and Fermi/GBM for Be/X-ray binaries, GX 304$-$1, A 0535$+$26, GRO J1008$-$57, KS 1947$+$300, and 2S 1417$-$624, which occurred large outbursts in the last four years. We discuss the results comparing the obtained observed relation with that of the theoretical model by Ghosh \\& Lamb (1979).

  14. Pulsars in Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Camilo, F; Camilo, Fernando; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2005-01-01

    More than 100 radio pulsars have been detected in 24 globular clusters. The largest observed samples are in Terzan 5 and 47 Tucanae, which together contain 45 pulsars. Accurate timing solutions, including positions in the cluster, are known for many of these pulsars. Here we provide an observational overview of some properties of pulsars in globular clusters, as well as properties of the globular clusters with detected pulsars. The many recent detections also provide a new opportunity to re-examine theoretically the formation and evolution of recycled pulsars in globular clusters. Our brief review considers the most important dynamical interaction and binary evolution processes: collisions, exchange interactions, mass transfer, and common-envelope phases.

  15. Near-infrared observations of the Be/X-ray binary pulsar A0535+262

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sachindra Naik; Blesson Mathew; D. P. K. Banerjee; N. M. Ashok; Rajeev R. Jaiswal

    2012-01-01

    We present the results obtained from extensive near-infrared (IR) spectro-scopic and photometric observations of the Be/X-ray binary A0535+262/HDE 245770 at different phases of its ~ 111 d orbital period.This observation campaign is part of the monitoring program of selective Be/X-ray binary systems aimed at understanding X-ray and near-IR properties at different orbital phases,especially during the periastron passage of the neutron star.The near-IR observations presented here were carried out using the 1.2 m telescope at the Mt.Abu IR Observatory.Though the source was relatively faint for spectroscopic observations with the 1.2 m telescope,we monitored the source closely during the 2011 February-March giant X-ray outburst to primarily investigate whether any drastic changes in the near-IR JHK spectra took place at the periastron passage.Changes of such a striking nature were expected to be detectable in our spectra.Photometric observations of the Be star show a gradual and systematic fading in the JHK light curves since the onset of the X-ray outburst,which could suggest a mild evacuation/truncation of the circumstellar disk of the Be companion.Near-IR spectroscopy of the object shows that the JHK spectra are dominated by the emission lines of hydrogen Brackett and Paschen series and HeI lines at 1.0830,1.7002 and 2.0585 μm.The presence of all the hydrogen emission lines in the JHK spectra,along with the absence of any significant change in the continuum of the Be companion during X-ray quiescent and X-ray outburst phases,suggests that the near- IR line emitting regions of the disk are not significantly affected during the X-ray outburst.

  16. SXP523 = Suzaku J0102-7204 = 2XMM J010247.4-720449, a Be/X-ray binary pulsar in the SMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberl, F.; Sturm, R.; Tsujimoto, M.; Wada, Q.; Ebisawa, K.; Miller, E.; Coe, M. J.; Klus, H.; Beardmore, A. P.

    2012-12-01

    After application of an attitude correction to the Suzaku observation of the supernova remnant 1E 0102.2-7219 described in ATel #4628, we derive an improved position for the X-ray pulsar Suzaku J0102-7204 of R.A. = 01:02:46.8, and Dec. = -72:04:56 (J2000, 1 sigma uncertainty of 20 arcsec). The new position is consistent with that of the Be/X-ray binary 2XMM J010247.4-720449 in the Small Magellanic Cloud seen by XMM-Newton, Swift and Chandra (ATel #3761) and most likely all detections are from the same source.

  17. Formation of the planet orbiting the millisecond pulsar J1719-1438

    CERN Document Server

    van Haaften, L M; Voss, R; Jonker, P G

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, Bailes et al. reported on the discovery of a detached companion in a 131 minute orbit around PSR J1719-1438, a 173 Hz millisecond pulsar. The combination of the very low mass function and such a short orbital period is unique. The discoverers suggested that the progenitor system could be an ultracompact X-ray binary (UCXB), which is a binary with a sub-hour orbital period in which a (semi-)degenerate donor fills its Roche lobe and transfers mass to a neutron star. The standard gravitational-wave driven UCXB scenario, however, cannot produce a system like PSR J1719-1438 as it would take longer than the age of the Universe to reach an orbital period of 131 min. We investigate two modifications to the standard UCXB evolution that may resolve this discrepancy. The first involves significant heating and bloating of the donor by pulsar irradiation, and in the second modification the system loses orbital angular momentum via a fast stellar wind from the irradiated donor, additional to the losses via the usu...

  18. Application of the Ghosh & Lamb Relation to the Spin-up/down Behavior in the X-ray Binary Pulsar 4U 1626-67

    CERN Document Server

    Takagi, Toshihiro; Sugizaki, Mutsumi; Makishima, Kazuo; Morii, Mikio

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed continuous MAXI/GSC data of the X-ray binary pulsar 4U 1626-67 from 2009 October to 2013 September, and determined the pulse period and the pulse-period derivative for every 60-d interval by the epoch folding method. The obtained periods are consistent with those provided by the Fermi/GBM pulsar project. In all the 60-d intervals, the pulsar was observed to spin up, with the spin-up rate positively correlated with the 2-20 keV flux. We applied the accretion torque model proposed by Ghosh & Lamb (1979, ApJ, 234, 296) to the MAXI/GSC data, as well as the past data including both spin-up and spin-down phases. The Ghosh & Lamb relation was confirmed to successfully explain the observed relation between the spin-up/down rate and the flux. By comparing the model-predicted luminosity with the observed flux, the source distance was constrained as 5-13 kpc, which is consistent with that by Chakrabarty (1998, ApJ, 492, 342). Conversely, if the source distance is assumed, the data can constrain the m...

  19. Pulsar discoveries by volunteer distributed computing and the strongest continuous gravitational wave signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knispel, Benjamin

    2011-07-01

    Neutron stars are the endpoints of stellar evolution and one of the most compact forms of matter in the universe. They can be observed as radio pulsars and are promising sources for the emission of continuous gravitational waves. Discovering new radio pulsars in tight binary orbits offers the opportunity to conduct very high precision tests of General Relativity and to further our understanding of neutron star structure and matter at super-nuclear densities. The direct detection of gravitational waves would validate Einstein's theory of Relativity and open a new window to the universe by offering a novel astronomical tool. This thesis addresses both of these scientific fields: the first fully coherent search for radio pulsars in tight, circular orbits has been planned, set up and conducted in the course of this thesis. Two unusual radio pulsars, one of them in a binary system, have been discovered. The other half of this thesis is concerned with the simulation of the Galactic neutron star population to predict their emission of continuous gravitational waves. First realistic statistical upper limits on the strongest continuous gravitational-wave signal and detection predictions for realistic all-sky blind searches have been obtained. The data from a large-scale pulsar survey with the 305-m Arecibo radio telescope were searched for signals from radio pulsars in binary orbits. The massive amount of computational work was done on hundreds of thousands of computers volunteered by members of the general public through the distributed computing project Einstein@Home. The newly developed analysis pipeline searched for pulsar spin frequencies below 250 Hz and for orbital periods as short as 11 min. The structure of the search pipeline consisting of data preparation, data analysis, result post-processing, and set-up of the pipeline components is presented in detail. The first radio pulsar, discovered with this search, PSR J2007+2722, is an isolated radio pulsar, likely from

  20. Search for Optical Pulsations in PSR J0337+1715

    CERN Document Server

    Strader, M J; Meeker, S R; Szypryt, P; Walter, A B; van Eyken, J C; Ulbricht, G; Stoughton, C; Bumble, B; Kaplan, D L; Mazin, B A

    2016-01-01

    We report on a search for optical pulsations from PSR J0337+1715 at its observed radio pulse period. PSR J0337+1715 is a millisecond pulsar (2.7 ms spin period) in a triple hierarchical system with two white dwarfs, and has a known optical counterpart with g-band magnitude 18. The observations were done with the Array Camera for Optical to Near-IR Spectrophotometry (ARCONS) at the 200" Hale telescope at Palomar Observatory. No significant pulsations were found in the range 4000-11000 angstroms, and we can limit pulsed emission in g-band to be fainter than 25 mag.

  1. XMM-Newton observations of the Small Magellanic Cloud: Be/X-ray binary pulsars active between October 2006 and June 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberl, F.; Eger, P.; Pietsch, W.

    2008-10-01

    Aims: We analysed eight XMM-Newton observations toward the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), performed between October 2006 and June 2007, to investigate high mass X-ray binary systems. Methods: We produced images from the European Photon Imaging Cameras (EPIC) and extracted X-ray spectra and light curves in different energy bands from sources that yielded a sufficiently high number of counts for a detailed temporal and spectral analysis. To search for periodicity we applied Fourier transformations and folding techniques and determined pulse periods using a Bayesian approach. To identify optical counterparts we produced X-ray source lists for each observation using maximum likelihood source detection techniques and correlated them with optical catalogues. The correlations were also used for astrometric boresight corrections of the X-ray source positions. Results: We found new X-ray binary pulsars with periods of 202 s (XMMU J005929.0-723703), 342 s (XMMU J005403.8-722632), 645 s (XMMU J005535.2-722906) and 325 s (XMMU J005252.1-721715), in the latter case confirming the independent discovery in Chandra data. In addition we detected sixteen known Be/X-ray binary pulsars and six ROSAT-classified candidate high mass X-ray binaries. From one of the candidates, RX J0058.2-7231, we discovered X-ray pulsations with a period of 291 s which makes it the likely counterpart of XTE J0051-727. From the known pulsars, we revise the pulse period of CXOU J010206.6-714115 to 967 s, and we detected the 18.37 s pulsar XTE J0055-727 (=XMM J004911.4-724939) in outburst, which allowed us to localise the source. The pulse profiles of the X-ray pulsars show a wide variety of shapes from smooth to highly structured patterns and differing energy dependence. For all the candidate high mass X-ray binaries, optical counterparts can be identified with magnitudes and colours consistent with Be stars. Twenty of the Be/X-ray binaries were detected with X-ray luminosities in the range 1.5 × 1035-5.5

  2. SAS-2 gamma-ray observations of PSR 1747-46

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lamb, R. C.; Oegelman, H. B.

    1976-01-01

    Observations with the SAS-2 high energy ( 35 MeV) gamma-ray telescope show evidence of gamma-ray emission from the radio pulsar PSR 1747-46. When the arrival times of gamma-rays from the region of the pulsar were converted to pulsar phases using the radio period and period derivative, a single peak was found in the phase plot, with a Poisson probability of occurring by chance of .00008. Independently, the time-averaged data for the PSR 1747-46 region show an enhancement over the surrounding region of the sky at the same galactic latitude, with a Poisson probability of chance occurrence of less than .008. The probability that these results are chance is the product of these two probabilities times the number of radio pulsars examined (73). This overall probability is sufficiently small (.00005) to suggest an identification of a new gamma-ray pulsar. In the gamma-ray pulsar plot, the peak falls 0.16 + or - 0.03 period after the radio pulsar peak. This phase shift is, within uncertainties, the same as that observed between the single radio peak and the first of the two gamma-ray peaks seen in the phase plot for PSR-0833-45 (the Vela pulsar).

  3. Detection of Hidden Pulsar J0737-3039B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Tessa

    2016-01-01

    The double pulsar system, PSR J0737-3039, contains companions PSR J0737-3039A & PSR J0737-3039B, which rotate at 23 ms and 2.8 respectively. As of March 2008 pulsar B's radio signal disappeared, with previous decreases in flux density by 0.177 mJy yr-1 and evolving pulse profile seperation of 2fdg6 yr-1 from a single peak to a double peak. Models using the system's relativistic spin precession have predicted the reappearance of PSR J0737-3039B in approximately 2014 or 2035. Using data from the Green Bank telescope we attempt to redetect pulsar B and explain the mechanics of its disappearance.

  4. Avalanche dynamics of radio pulsar glitches

    CERN Document Server

    Melatos, A; Wyithe, J S B

    2007-01-01

    We test statistically the hypothesis that radio pulsar glitches result from an avalanche process, in which angular momentum is transferred erratically from the flywheel-like superfluid in the star to the slowly decelerating, solid crust via spatially connected chains of local, impulsive, threshold-activated events, so that the system fluctuates around a self-organised critical state. Analysis of the glitch population (currently 285 events from 101 pulsars) demonstrates that the size distribution in individual pulsars is consistent with being scale invariant, as expected for an avalanche process. The waiting-time distribution is consistent with being exponential in seven out of nine pulsars where it can be measured reliably, after adjusting for observational limits on the minimum waiting time, as for a constant-rate Poisson process. PSR J0537$-$6910 and PSR J0835$-$4510 are the exceptions; their waiting-time distributions show evidence of quasiperiodicity. In each object, stationarity requires that the rate $\\...

  5. Chandra observation of the relativistic binary J1906+0746

    CERN Document Server

    Kargaltsev, O

    2009-01-01

    PSR J1906+0746 is a 112-kyr-old radio pulsar in a tight relativistic binary with a compact high-mass companion, at the distance of about 5 kpc. We observed this unique system with the Chandra ACIS detector for 31.6 ks. Surprisingly, not a single photon was detected within the 3" radius from the J1906+0746 radio position. For a plausible range of hydrogen column densities, n_H=(0.5-1)\\times10^{22} cm^{-2}, the nondetection corresponds to the 90% upper limit of (3-5)\\times10^{30} erg s^{-1} on the unabsorbed 0.5-8 keV luminosity for the power-law model with Gamma=1.0-2.0, and ~10^{32} erg s^{-1} on the bolometric luminosity of the thermal emission from the NS surface. The inferred limits are the lowest known for pulsars with spin-down properties similar to those of PSR J1906+0746. We have also tentatively detected a puzzling extended structure which looks like a tilted ring with a radius of 1.6' centered on the pulsar. The measured 0.5-8 keV flux of the feature, 3.1\\times10^{-14} erg cm^{-2} s^{-1}, implies an ...

  6. Searching for Planets Around Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-09-01

    Did you know that the very first exoplanets ever confirmed were found around a pulsar? The precise timing measurements of pulsar PSR 1257+12 were what made the discovery of its planetary companions possible. Yet surprisingly, though weve discovered thousands of exoplanets since then, only one other planet has ever been confirmed around a pulsar. Now, a team of CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science researchers are trying to figure out why.Formation ChallengesThe lack of detected pulsar planets may simply reflect the fact that getting a pulsar-planet system is challenging! There are three main pathways:The planet formed before the host star became a pulsar which means it somehow survived its star going supernova (yikes!).The planet formed elsewhere and was captured by the pulsar.The planet formed out of the debris of the supernova explosion.The first two options, if even possible, are likely to be rare occurrences but the third option shows some promise. In this scenario, after the supernova explosion, a small fraction of the material falls back toward the stellar remnant and is recaptured, forming what is known as a supernova fallback disk. According to this model, planets could potentially form out of this disk.Disk ImplicationsLed by Matthew Kerr, the CSIRO astronomers set out to systematically look for these potential planets that might have formed in situ around pulsars. They searched a sample of 151 young, energetic pulsars, scouring seven years of pulse time-of-arrival data for periodic variation that could signal the presence of planetary companions. Their methods to mitigate pulsar timing noise and model realistic orbits allowed them to have good sensitivity to low-mass planets.The results? They found no conclusive evidence that any of these pulsars have planets.This outcome carries with it some significant implications. The pulsar sample spans 2 Myr in age, in which planets should have had enough time to form in debris disks. The fact that none were detected

  7. The Fastest Rotating Pulsar: a Strange Star?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐仁新; 徐轩彬; 吴鑫基

    2001-01-01

    According to the observational limits on the radius and mass, the fastest rotating pulsar (PSR 1937+21) is probably a strange star, or at least some neutron star equations of state should be ruled out, if we suggest that a dipole magnetic field is relevant to its radio emission. We presume that the millisecond pulsar is a strange star with much low mass, small radius and weak magnetic moment.

  8. Intra-Binary Shock Heating of Black Widow Companions

    CERN Document Server

    Romani, Roger W

    2016-01-01

    The low mass companions of evaporating binary pulsars (black widows and their ilk) are strongly heated on the side facing the pulsar. However in high-quality photometric and spectroscopic data the heating pattern does not match that expected for direct pulsar illumination. Here we explore heating mediated by an intra-binary shock (IBS). We develop a simple analytic model and implement it in the popular `ICARUS' light curve code. The model is parameterized by the wind momentum ratio beta and velocity v_Rel v_orb and assumes that the reprocessed pulsar wind emits prompt particles or radiation to heat the companion surface. We illustrate an interesting range of light curve asymmetries controlled by these parameters. The code also computes the IBS synchrotron emission pattern, and thus can model black widow X-ray light curves. As a test we apply the results to the high quality asymmetric optical light curves of PSR J2215+5135; the resulting fit gives a substantial improvement upon direct heating models and produc...

  9. Accretion-powered pulsations in an apparently quiescent neutron star binary

    CERN Document Server

    Archibald, Anne M; Patruno, Alessandro; Hessels, Jason W T; Deller, Adam T; Bassa, Cees; Janssen, Gemma H; Kaspi, Vicky M; Lyne, Andrew G; Stappers, Ben W; Tendulkar, Shriharsh P; D'Angelo, Caroline R; Wijnands, Rudy

    2014-01-01

    Accreting millisecond X-ray pulsars are an important subset of low-mass X-ray binaries in which coherent X-ray pulsations can be observed during occasional, bright outbursts (X-ray luminosity $L_X\\sim 10^{36}$ erg s$^{-1}$). These pulsations show that matter is being channeled onto the neutron star's magnetic poles. However, such sources spend most of their time in a low-luminosity, quiescent state ($L_X\\lesssim 10^{34}$ erg s$^{-1}$), where the nature of the accretion flow onto the neutron star (if any) is not well understood. Here we report that the millisecond pulsar/low-mass X-ray binary transition object PSR J1023+0038 intermittently shows coherent X-ray pulsations at luminosities nearly 100 times fainter than observed in any other accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar. We conclude that in spite of its low luminosity PSR J1023+0038 experiences episodes of channeled accretion, a discovery that challenges existing models for accretion onto magnetized neutron stars.

  10. Upper limits for pulsars with MAGIC (2005/2006 observations)

    CERN Document Server

    Reyes, R De los; Camara, M; López, M

    2009-01-01

    During the last 4 years the MAGIC collaboration has searched for high-energy gamma-ray emission of some of the most promising pulsar candidates. The low energy threshold of MAGIC offered the opportunity for a high sensitivity search just above 50-100 GeV (since 2008 a new trigger system has decreased the energy threshold to 25 GeV), an energy region up to now not reachable to ground based instruments and past satellite borne detectors. No pulsed gamma-ray emission has been detected from any pulsar observed during the observation campaigns of 2005-2006. Here we present the upper limits obtained for tow canonical pulsars (PSR J0205+6449 and PSR J2229+6114) and their host nebulae (3C 58 and Boomerang, respectively) and the millisecond pulsar PSR J0218+4232. Physics implications will be discussed.

  11. Roche lobe underfilling of the secondary star in PSR J102347.6+003841?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, O.; Callanan, P. J.; Kennedy, M.; Hurley, D.; Garnavich, P.; Menzies, J.

    2015-08-01

    PSR J102347.6+003841 is a radio pulsar system with a spin period of 1.69 ms and an orbital period of 4.75 h. Uniquely, it undergoes periods of transient accretion from its companion star: it occupies an important position in the evolutionary track from X-ray binary to isolated millisecond radio pulsar. Here, we present a spectroscopic study of this system showing late-type absorption features which match those of a G2V star. We find a semi-amplitude of 286 ± 3 kms-1 and a best-fitting orbital period of 0.198 0966(1) d. We combine these measurements with optical photometry which suggests the secondary star may be underfilling its Roche lobe by between 15 and 20 per cent. We weakly constrain the mass of the neutron star to be ≤2.2 M⊙ at the 2σ level. We also discuss the possible origins of the Hα emission line in our template subtracted, averaged spectrum. Finally, we present and discuss new optical photometry of J1023 taken during the recent outburst of the system.

  12. Roche Lobe Underfilling of the Secondary Star in PSR J102347.6+003841?

    CERN Document Server

    McConnell, O; Kennedy, M; Hurley, D; Garnavich, P; Menzies, J

    2015-01-01

    PSR J102347.6+003841 is a radio pulsar system with a spin period of 1.69 ms and an orbital period of 4.75 hours. Uniquely, it undergoes periods of transient accretion from its companion star: it occupies an important position in the evolutionary track from X-ray binary to isolated millisecond radio pulsar. Here we present a spectroscopic study of this system showing late-type absorption features which match those of a G2V star. We find a semiamplitude of $286 \\pm 3$ kms$^{-1}$ and a best fit orbital period of 0.1980966(1) days. We combine these measurements with optical photometry which suggests the secondary star may be underfilling its Roche lobe by between 15\\% and 20\\%. We weakly constrain the mass of the neutron star to be $\\leq$ 2.2 M$_\\odot$ at the 2$\\sigma$ level. We also discuss the possible origins of the H$\\alpha$ emission line in our template subtracted, averaged spectrum. Finally we present and discuss new optical photometry of J1023 taken during the recent outburst of the system.

  13. THE PULSAR SEARCH COLLABORATORY: DISCOVERY AND TIMING OF FIVE NEW PULSARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the discovery and timing solutions of five new pulsars by students involved in the Pulsar Search Collaboratory, a NSF-funded joint program between the National Radio Astronomy Observatory and West Virginia University designed to excite and engage high-school students in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) and related fields. We encourage students to pursue STEM fields by apprenticing them within a professional scientific community doing cutting edge research, specifically by teaching them to search for pulsars. The students are analyzing 300 hr of drift-scan survey data taken with the Green Bank Telescope at 350 MHz. These data cover 2876 deg2 of the sky. Over the course of five years, more than 700 students have inspected diagnostic plots through a web-based graphical interface designed for this project. The five pulsars discovered in the data have spin periods ranging from 3.1 ms to 4.8 s. Among the new discoveries are PSR J1926–1314, a long period, nulling pulsar; PSR J1821+0155, an isolated, partially recycled 33 ms pulsar; and PSR J1400–1438, a millisecond pulsar in a 9.5 day orbit whose companion is likely a white dwarf star.

  14. THE PULSAR SEARCH COLLABORATORY: DISCOVERY AND TIMING OF FIVE NEW PULSARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, R.; Swiggum, J.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Lorimer, D. R.; Yun, M.; Boyles, J. [West Virginia University, White Hall, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Heatherly, S. A.; Scoles, S. [NRAO, P.O. Box 2, Green Bank, WV 24944 (United States); Lynch, R. [McGill University, Rutherford Physics Building, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Kondratiev, V. I. [ASTRON, the Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Ransom, S. M. [NRAO, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Moniot, M. L.; Thompson, C. [James River High School, 9906 Springwood Road, Buchanan, VA 24066 (United States); Cottrill, A.; Raycraft, M. [Lincoln High School, 100 Jerry Toth Drive, Shinnston, WV 26431 (United States); Weaver, M. [Broadway High School, 269 Gobbler Drive, Broadway, VA 22815 (United States); Snider, A. [Sherando High School, 185 South Warrior Drive, Stephens City, VA 22655 (United States); Dudenhoefer, J.; Allphin, L. [Hedgesville High School, 109 Ridge Road North, Hedgesville, WV 25427 (United States); Thorley, J., E-mail: Rachel.Rosen@mail.wvu.edu [Strasburg High School, 250 Ram Drive, Strasburg, VA 22657 (United States); and others

    2013-05-01

    We present the discovery and timing solutions of five new pulsars by students involved in the Pulsar Search Collaboratory, a NSF-funded joint program between the National Radio Astronomy Observatory and West Virginia University designed to excite and engage high-school students in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) and related fields. We encourage students to pursue STEM fields by apprenticing them within a professional scientific community doing cutting edge research, specifically by teaching them to search for pulsars. The students are analyzing 300 hr of drift-scan survey data taken with the Green Bank Telescope at 350 MHz. These data cover 2876 deg{sup 2} of the sky. Over the course of five years, more than 700 students have inspected diagnostic plots through a web-based graphical interface designed for this project. The five pulsars discovered in the data have spin periods ranging from 3.1 ms to 4.8 s. Among the new discoveries are PSR J1926-1314, a long period, nulling pulsar; PSR J1821+0155, an isolated, partially recycled 33 ms pulsar; and PSR J1400-1438, a millisecond pulsar in a 9.5 day orbit whose companion is likely a white dwarf star.

  15. Pulsar wind model for the spin-down behavior of intermittent pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Li, L; Yan, W M; Yuan, J P; Xu, R X; Wang, N

    2013-01-01

    It is observed that intermittent pulsars have higher slow down rate in the on state (radio-loud) than in the off state (radio-quiet). This gives the evidence that particle wind may play an important role in pulsar spindown. The effect of particle acceleration is included in modeling the rotational energy loss rate. Applying the pulsar wind model to the three intermittent pulsars (PSR B1931+24, PSR J1841-0500, and PSR J1832+0029), we calculate their magnetic field and inclination angle simultaneously. The braking index of intermittent pulsars is also predicted. The duty cycle of particle wind determined from timing observations is consistent with the duty cycle of the on state. It is shown that the particle number density may always be the Goldreich-Julian density. This may ensure that different on states of intermittent pulsars are stable. Observations on the inclination angle and braking index of intermittent pulsars may help to test different models of particle acceleration, as well as different models of p...

  16. Relativistic Spin Precession in the Double Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Breton, Rene P; Kramer, Michael; McLaughlin, Maura A; Lyutikov, Maxim; Ransom, Scott M; Stairs, Ingrid H; Ferdman, Robert D; Camilo, Fernando; Possenti, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    The double pulsar PSR J0737-3039A/B consists of two neutron stars in a highly relativistic orbit that displays a roughly 30-second eclipse when pulsar A passes behind pulsar B. Describing this eclipse of pulsar A as due to absorption occurring in the magnetosphere of pulsar B, we successfully use a simple geometric model to characterize the observed changing eclipse morphology and to measure the relativistic precession of pulsar B's spin axis around the total orbital angular momentum. This provides a test of general relativity and alternative theories of gravity in the strong-field regime. Our measured relativistic spin precession rate of 4.77 (+0.66,-0.65) degrees per year (68% confidence level) is consistent with that predicted by general relativity within an uncertainty of 13%.

  17. A survey for Hα pulsar bow shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a survey for Hα bow shock emission around nearby γ-detected energetic pulsars. This survey adds three Balmer-dominated neutron star bow shocks to the six previously confirmed examples. In addition to the shock around Fermi pulsar PSR J1741–2054, we now report Hα structures around two additional γ-ray pulsars, PSR J2030+4415 and PSR J1509–5850. These are the first known examples of Hα nebulae with pre-ionization halos. With new measurements, we show that a simple analytic model can account for the angular size and flux of the bow shocks' apices. The latter, in particular, provides a new pulsar probe and indicates large moments of inertia and smaller distances than previously assumed in several cases. In particular, we show that the re-measured PSR J0437–4715 shock flux implies I = (1.7 ± 0.2) × 1045/(f HIsin i) g cm2. We also derive a distance d ≈ 0.72 kpc for the γ-ray only pulsar PSR J2030+4415 and revised distances for PSRs J1959+2048 (1.4 kpc) and J2555+6535 (∼1 kpc), smaller than the conventional DM-estimated values. Finally, we report upper limits for 94 additional LAT pulsars. An estimate of the survey sensitivity indicates that for a warm neutral medium filling factor φWNM ∼ 0.3 there should be a total of approximately nine Hα bow shocks in our LAT-targeted survey; given that seven such objects are now known, a much larger φWNM seems problematic.

  18. Secular dynamics of the triple system harboring PSR J0337+1715 and implications for the origin of its orbital configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafikov, Roman R., E-mail: rrr@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2014-10-10

    We explore secular dynamics of a recently discovered hierarchical triple system consisting of the radio pulsar PSR J0337+1715 and two white dwarfs (WDs). We show that three-body interactions endow the inner binary with a large forced eccentricity and suppress its apsidal precession, to about 24% of the rate due to the general relativity. However, precession rate is still quite sensitive to the non-Newtonian effects and may be used to constrain gravity theories if measured accurately. A small value of the free eccentricity of the inner binary e{sub i}{sup free}≈2.6×10{sup −5} and vanishing forced eccentricity of the outer, relatively eccentric binary naturally result in their apsidal near-alignment. In addition, this triple system provides a unique opportunity to explore excitation of both eccentricity and inclination in neutron star-WD binaries, e.g., due to random torques caused by convective eddies in the WD progenitor. We show this process to be highly anisotropic and more effective at driving eccentricity rather than inclination. The outer binary eccentricity and e{sub i}{sup free} exceed by more than an order of magnitude the predictions of the eccentricity-period relation of Phinney, which is not uncommon. We also argue that the non-zero mutual inclination of the two binaries emerges at the end of the Roche lobe overflow of the outer (rather than the inner) binary.

  19. VLT polarimetry observations of PSR B0656+14

    CERN Document Server

    Mignani, R P; Shearer, A; Testa, V; Sowikowska, A; Rudak, B; Krzeszowki, K; Kanbach, G

    2015-01-01

    Optical polarisation measurements are key tests for different models of the pulsar magnetosphere. Furthermore, comparing the relative orientation of the phase-averaged linear polarisation direction and the pulsar proper motion vector may unveil a peculiar alignment, clearly seen in the Crab pulsar. Our goal is to obtain the first measurement of the phase-averaged optical linear polarisation of the fifth brightest optical pulsar, PSR\\, B0656+14, which has also a precisely measured proper motion, and verify a possible alignment between the polarisation direction and the proper motion vector. We carried out observations with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) to measure the phase-averaged optical polarisation degree (P.D.) and position angle (P.A.) of PSR B0656+14. We measured a P.D. of $11.9\\%\\pm5.5\\%$ and a P.A. of $125.8\\degr\\pm13.2\\degr$, measured East of North. Albeit of marginal significance, this is the first measurement of the phase-averaged optical P. D. for this pulsar. Moreover, we found that the P.A. of ...

  20. A Chandra Proper Motion for PSR J1809-2332

    CERN Document Server

    Van Etten, Adam; Ng, C -Y

    2012-01-01

    We report on a new Chandra exposure of PSR J1809-2332, the recently discovered pulsar powering the bright EGRET source 3EG J1809-2328. By registration of field X-ray sources in an archival exposure, we measure a significant proper motion for the pulsar point source over an ~11 year baseline. The shift of 0.30+/-0.06" (at PA= 153.3+/-18.4) supports an association with proposed SNR parent G7.5-1.7. Spectral analysis of diffuse emission in the region also supports the interpretation as a hard wind nebula trail pointing back toward the SNR.

  1. A Chandra Proper Motion for PSR J1809-2332

    OpenAIRE

    Van Etten, Adam; Romani, Roger W.; Ng, C. -Y.

    2012-01-01

    We report on a new Chandra exposure of PSR J1809-2332, the recently discovered pulsar powering the bright EGRET source 3EG J1809-2328. By registration of field X-ray sources in an archival exposure, we measure a significant proper motion for the pulsar point source over an ~11 year baseline. The shift of 0.30+/-0.06" (at PA= 153.3+/-18.4) supports an association with proposed SNR parent G7.5-1.7. Spectral analysis of diffuse emission in the region also supports the interpretation as a hard wi...

  2. Origin of pulsar velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ever since pulsars were found to have significant proper motions, the origin of the velocities has been an intriguing question. The more recent finding that the velocities display a significant correlation with the derived magnetic moments of the pulsars has made the origin of the velocities appear even more mysterious. Arguments are given to show that the above correlation is not causal, but accidental. Pulsar velocities are determined by their binary histories and not governed in any way by their magnetic fields. 10 references, 4 figures

  3. A Pulsar Eases Off the Brakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    In 2006, pulsar PSR 18460258 unexpectedly launched into a series of energetic X-ray outbursts. Now a study has determined that this event may have permanently changed the behavior of this pulsar, raising questions about our understanding of how pulsars evolve.Between CategoriesA pulsar a highly magnetized, rotating neutron star that emits a beam of electromagnetic radiation can be powered by one of three mechanisms:Rotation-powered pulsars transform rotational energy into radiation, gradually slowing down in a predictable way.Accretion-powered pulsars convert the gravitational energy of accreting matter into radiation.Magnetars are powered by the decay of their extremely strong magnetic fields.Astronomical classification often results in one pesky object that doesnt follow the rules. In this case, that object is PSR 18460258, a young pulsar categorized as rotation-powered. But in 2006, PSR 18460258 suddenly emitted a series of short, hard X-ray bursts and underwent a flux increase behavior that is usually only exhibited by magnetars. After this outburst, it returned to normal, rotation-powered-pulsar behavior.Since the discovery of this event, scientists have been attempting to learn more about this strange pulsar that seems to straddle the line between rotation-powered pulsars and magnetars.Unprecedented DropOne way to examine whats going on with PSR 18460258 is to evaluate whats known as its braking index, a measure of how quickly the pulsars rotation slows down. For a rotation-powered pulsar, the braking index should be roughly constant. The pulsar then slows down according to a fixed power law, where the slower it rotates, the slower it slows down.In a recent study, Robert Archibald (McGill University) and collaborators report on 7 years worth of timing observations of PSR 18460258 after its odd magnetar-like outburst. They then compare these observations to 6.5 years of data from before the outburst. The team finds that the braking index for this bizarre

  4. Multiwavelength Observations of the Redback Millisecond Pulsar J1048+2339

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deneva, J. S.; Ray, P. S.; Camilo, F.; Halpern, J. P.; Wood, K.; Cromartie, H. T.; Ferrara, E.; Kerr, M.; Ransom, S. M.; Wolff, M. T.; Chambers, K. C.; Magnier, E. A.

    2016-06-01

    We report on radio timing and multiwavelength observations of the 4.66 ms redback pulsar J1048+2339, which was discovered in an Arecibo search targeting the Fermi-Large Area Telescope source 3FGL J1048.6+2338. Two years of timing allowed us to derive precise astrometric and orbital parameters for the pulsar. PSR J1048+2339 is in a 6 hr binary and exhibits radio eclipses over half the orbital period and rapid orbital period variations. The companion has a minimum mass of 0.3 M ⊙, and we have identified a V ∼ 20 variable optical counterpart in data from several surveys. The phasing of its ∼1 mag modulation at the orbital period suggests highly efficient and asymmetric heating by the pulsar wind, which may be due to an intrabinary shock that is distorted near the companion, or to the companion’s magnetic field channeling the pulsar wind to specific locations on its surface. We also present gamma-ray spectral analysis of the source and preliminary results from searches for gamma-ray pulsations using the radio ephemeris.

  5. Multiwavelength Observations of the Redback Millisecond Pulsar J1048+2339

    CERN Document Server

    Deneva, J S; Camilo, F; Halpern, J P; Wood, K; Cromartie, H T; Ferrara, E; Kerr, M; Ransom, S M; Wolff, M T; Chambers, K C; Magnier, E A

    2016-01-01

    We report on radio timing and multiwavelength observations of the 4.66 ms redback pulsar J1048+2339, which was discovered in an Arecibo search targeting the Fermi-LAT source 3FGLJ1048.6+2338. Two years of timing allowed us to derive precise astrometric and orbital parameters for the pulsar. PSR J1048+2339 is in a 6-hour binary, and exhibits radio eclipses over half the orbital period and rapid orbital period variations. The companion has a minimum mass of 0.3 solar masses, and we have identified a $V \\sim 20$ variable optical counterpart in data from several surveys. The phasing of its $\\sim 1$~mag modulation at the orbital period suggests highly efficient and asymmetric heating by the pulsar wind, which may be due to an intrabinary shock that is distorted near the companion, or to the companion's magnetic field channeling the pulsar wind to specific locations on its surface. We also present gamma-ray spectral analysis of the source and preliminary results from searches for gamma-ray pulsations using the radi...

  6. Suzaku view of the Be/X-ray binary pulsar GX 304-1 during Type I X-ray outbursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaisawal, Gaurava K.; Naik, Sachindra; Epili, Prahlad

    2016-04-01

    We report the timing and spectral properties of the Be/X-ray binary pulsar GX 304-1 using two Suzaku observations during its 2010 August and 2012 January X-ray outbursts. Pulsations at ˜275 s were clearly detected in the light curves from both observations. Pulse profiles were found to be strongly energy-dependent. During the 2010 observation, the prominent dips seen in soft X-ray (≤10 keV) pulse profiles were found to be absent at higher energies. However, during the 2012 observation, the pulse profiles were complex as a result of the presence of several dips. Significant changes in the shape of the pulse profiles were detected at high energies (>35 keV). A phase shift of ˜0.3 was detected while comparing the phase of the main dip in the pulse profiles below and above ˜35 keV. The broad-band energy spectrum of the pulsar was well described by a partially absorbed negative and positive power law with exponential cut-off (NPEX) model with 6.4-keV iron line and a cyclotron absorption feature. The energy of the cyclotron absorption line was found to be ˜53 and 50 keV for the 2010 and 2012 observations, respectively, indicating a marginal positive dependence on source luminosity. Based on the results obtained from phase-resolved spectroscopy, the absorption dips in the pulse profiles can be interpreted as due to the presence of additional matter at same phases. Observed positive correlation between the cyclotron line energy and luminosity, and the significant pulse-phase variation of cyclotron parameters are discussed from the perspective of theoretical models on the cyclotron absorption line in X-ray pulsars.

  7. Application of the Ghosh & Lamb relation to the spin-up/down behavior in the X-ray binary pulsar 4U 1626-67

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Toshihiro; Mihara, Tatehiro; Sugizaki, Mutsumi; Makishima, Kazuo; Morii, Mikio

    2016-06-01

    We analyzed continuous Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image/Gas Slit Camera (MAXI/GSC) data of the X-ray binary pulsar 4U 1626-67 from 2009 October to 2013 September, and determined the pulse period and the pulse-period derivative for every 60-d interval by the epoch folding method. The obtained periods are consistent with those provided by the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor pulsar project. In all the 60-d intervals, the pulsar was observed to spin up, with the spin-up rate positively correlated with the 2-20 keV flux. We applied the accretion torque model proposed by Ghosh and Lamb (1979, ApJ, 234, 296) to the MAXI/GSC data, as well as the past data including both spin-up and spin-down phases. The "Ghosh & Lamb" relation was confirmed to successfully explain the observed relation between the spin-up/down rate and the flux. By comparing the model-predicted luminosity with the observed flux, the source distance was constrained as 5-13 kpc, which is consistent with that found by Chakrabarty (1998, ApJ, 492, 342). Conversely, if the source distance is assumed, the data can constrain the mass and radius of the neutron star, because the Ghosh & Lamb model depends on these parameters. We attempted this idea, and found that an assumed distance of, e.g., 10 kpc gives a mass in the range of 1.81-1.90 solar mass, and a radius of 11.4-11.5 km, although these results are still subject to considerable systematic uncertainties, other than distance.

  8. An extremely bright gamma-ray pulsar in the Large Magellanic Cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-13

    Pulsars are rapidly spinning, highly magnetized neutron stars, created in the gravitational collapse of massive stars. We report the detection of pulsed giga-electron volt gamma rays from the young pulsar PSR J0540-6919 in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way. This is the first gamma-ray pulsar detected in another galaxy. It has the most luminous pulsed gamma-ray emission yet observed, exceeding the Crab pulsar's by a factor of 20. PSR J0540-6919 presents an extreme test case for understanding the structure and evolution of neutron star magnetospheres. PMID:26564852

  9. The formation of low-mass helium white dwarfs orbiting pulsars: Evolution of low-mass X-ray binaries below the bifurcation period

    CERN Document Server

    Istrate, Alina; Langer, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are generally believed to be old neutron stars (NSs) which have been spun up to high rotation rates via accretion of matter from a companion star in a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB). However, many details of this recycling scenario remain to be understood. Here we investigate binary evolution in close LMXBs to study the formation of radio MSPs with low-mass helium white dwarf companions (He WDs) in tight binaries with orbital periods P_orb = 2-9 hr. In particular, we examine: i) if such observed systems can be reproduced from theoretical modelling using standard prescriptions of orbital angular momentum losses (i.e. with respect to the nature and the strength of magnetic braking), ii) if our computations of the Roche-lobe detachments can match the observed orbital periods, and iii) if the correlation between WD mass and orbital period (M_WD, P_orb) is valid for systems with P_orb < 2 days. Numerical calculations with a detailed stellar evolution code were used to trace the mass-tra...

  10. A Survey for H$\\alpha$ Pulsar Bow Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Brownsberger, Sasha

    2014-01-01

    We report on a survey for H$\\alpha$ bow shock emission around nearby $\\gamma$-detected energetic pulsars. This survey adds three Balmer-dominated neutron star bow shocks to the six previously confirmed examples. In addition to the shock around {\\it Fermi} pulsar PSR J1741$-$2054, we now report H$\\alpha$ structures around two additional $\\gamma$-ray pulsars, PSR J2030+4415 and PSR J1509$-$5850. These are the first known examples of H$\\alpha$ nebulae with pre-ionization halos. With new measurements, we show that a simple analytic model can account for the angular size and flux of the bow shocks' apices. The latter, in particular, provides a new pulsar probe and indicates large moments of inertia and smaller distances than previously assumed, in several cases. In particular we show that the re-measured PSR J0437$-$4715 shock flux implies $I = (1.7\\pm 0.2) \\times 10^{45}/(f_{HI} {\\rm sin}i) {\\rm g\\,cm^2}$. We also derive a distance $d\\approx 0.72$kpc for the $\\gamma$-ray only pulsar PSR J2030+4415 and revised dis...

  11. Chandra Observations of Outflows from PSR J1509-5850

    CERN Document Server

    Klingler, Noel; Rangelov, Blagoy; Pavlov, George G; Posselt, Bettina; Ng, C -Y

    2016-01-01

    PSR J1509-5850 is a middle-aged pulsar with the period P ~ 89 ms, spin-down power Edot = 5.1 x 10^35 erg/s, at a distance of about 3.8 kpc. We report on deep Chandra X-ray Observatory observations of this pulsar and its pulsar wind nebula (PWN). In addition to the previously detected tail extending up to 7' southwest from the pulsar (the southern outflow), the deep images reveal a similarly long, faint diffuse emission stretched toward the north (the northern outflow) and the fine structure of the compact nebula (CN) in the pulsar vicinity. The CN is resolved into two lateral tails and one axial tail pointing southwest (a morphology remarkably similar to that of the Geminga PWN), which supports the assumption that the pulsar moves towards the northeast. The luminosities of the southern and northern outflows are about 1 x 10^33 and 4 x 10^32 erg/s, respectively. The spectra extracted from four regions of the southern outflow do not show any softening with increasing distance from the pulsar. The lack of synchr...

  12. Pulsars revived by gravitational waves

    OpenAIRE

    Lipunov, Vladimir M.; Panchenko, Ivan E.

    1996-01-01

    Binary neutron stars mergers that are expected to be the most powerful source of energy in the Universe definitely exist in nature, as is proven by the observed behavior of the Hulse-Taylor binary radio pulsar. Though most of energy in such events is radiated in gravitational waves, there probably exist several mechanisms giving also electromagnetic radiation. We propose a new one, involving a revival of the radio pulsar several orbital cycles before the merger.

  13. The NANOGrav Nine-year Data Set: Astrometric Measurements of 37 Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Allison M.; Nice, David J.; Fonseca, Emmanuel; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Crowter, Kathryn; Demorest, Paul B.; Dolch, Timothy; Ellis, Justin A.; Ferdman, Robert D.; Gonzalez, Marjorie E.; Jones, Glenn; Jones, Megan L.; Lam, Michael T.; Levin, Lina; McLaughlin, Maura A.; Pennucci, Timothy T.; Ransom, Scott M.; Stairs, Ingrid H.; Stovall, Kevin; Swiggum, Joseph K.; Zhu, Weiwei

    2016-02-01

    Using the nine-year radio-pulsar timing data set from the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav), collected at Arecibo Observatory and the Green Bank Telescope, we have measured the positions, proper motions, and parallaxes for 37 millisecond pulsars. We report twelve significant parallax measurements and distance measurements, and eighteen lower limits on distance. We compare these measurements to distances predicted by the NE2001 interstellar electron density model and find them to be in general agreement. We use measured orbital-decay rates and spin-down rates to confirm two of the parallax distances and to place distance upper limits on other sources; these distance limits agree with the parallax distances with one exception, PSR J1024-0719, which we discuss at length. Using the proper motions of the 37 NANOGrav pulsars in combination with other published measurements, we calculate the velocity dispersion of the millisecond pulsar population in Galactocentric coordinates. We find the radial, azimuthal, and perpendicular dispersions to be 46, 40, and 24 {km} {{{s}}}-1, respectively, in a model that allows for high-velocity outliers; or 81, 58, and 62 {km} {{{s}}}-1 for the full population. These velocity dispersions are far smaller than those of the canonical pulsar population, and are similar to older Galactic disk populations. This suggests that millisecond pulsar velocities are largely attributable to their being an old population rather than being artifacts of their birth and evolution as neutron star binary systems. The components of these velocity dispersions follow similar proportions to other Galactic populations, suggesting that our results are not biased by selection effects.

  14. On the nature of the intermittent pulsar PSRB1931+24

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Rea; M. Kramer; L. Stella; P.G. Jonker; C.G. Bassa; P.J. Groot; G.L. Israel; M. Méndez; A. Possenti; A. Lyne

    2008-01-01

    PSR B1931+24 is the first intermittent radio pulsar discovered to date, characterized by a 0.8-s pulsation, which turns on and off quasi-periodically every similar to 35 d, with a duty cycle of similar to 10 per cent. Here, we present X-ray and optical observations of PSR B1931+24 performed with the

  15. Recycled Pulsars: Spins, Masses and Ages

    CERN Document Server

    Tauris, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    Recycled pulsars are mainly characterized by their spin periods, B-fields and masses. All these quantities are affected by previous interactions with a companion star in a binary system. Therefore, we can use these quantities as fossil records and learn about binary evolution. Here, I briefly review the distribution of these observed quantities and summarize our current understanding of the pulsar recycling process.

  16. RADIO AND γ-RAY CONSTRAINTS ON THE EMISSION GEOMETRY AND BIRTHPLACE OF PSR J2043+2740

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the first year of Fermi γ-ray observations of pulsed high-energy emission from the old PSR J2043 + 2740. The study of the γ-ray efficiency of such old pulsars gives us an insight into the evolution of pulsars' ability to emit in γ rays as they age. The γ-ray light curve of this pulsar above 0.1 GeV is clearly defined by two sharp peaks, 0.353 ± 0.035 periods apart. We have combined the γ-ray profile characteristics of PSR J2043 + 2740 with the geometrical properties of the pulsar's radio emission, derived from radio-polarization data, and constrained the pulsar-beam geometry in the framework of a two-pole caustic (TPC) and an outer gap (OG) model. The ranges of magnetic inclination and viewing angle were determined to be {α, ζ} ∼ {52 deg. - 57 deg., 61 deg. - 68 deg.} for the TPC model, and {α, ζ} ∼ {62 deg. -73 deg., 74 deg. - 81 deg.} and {α, ζ} ∼ {72 deg. - 83 deg., 60 deg. - 75 deg.} for the OG model. Based on this geometry, we assess possible birth locations for this pulsar and derive a likely proper motion, sufficiently high to be measurable with VLBI. At a characteristic age of 1.2 Myr, PSR J2043 + 2740 is the third oldest of all discovered, non-recycled, γ-ray pulsars: it is twice as old as the next oldest, PSR J0357 + 32, and younger only than the recently discovered PSR J1836 + 5925 and PSR J2055 + 25, both of which are at least five and ten times less energetic, respectively.

  17. Searching for the optical counterparts of two young gamma-ray pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Mignani, R P; Marelli, M; De Luca, A; Pierbattista, M; Razzano, M; Salvetti, D; Belfiore, A; Shearer, A; Moran, P

    2016-01-01

    We report on the first deep optical observations of two $\\gamma$-ray pulsars, both among the very first discovered by the {\\em Fermi} Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The two pulsars are the radio-loud PSR\\, J1907+0602 in the TeV pulsar wind nebula (PWN) MGRO\\, J1908+06 and the radio-quiet PSR\\, J1809$-$2332 in the "Taz" radio/X-ray PWN. They are relatively young, with spin-down ages of 19.5 and 67.6 kyr, respectively and energetic, with spin-down energies $\\dot{E}_{\\rm rot} = 2.8 \\times 10^{36}$ erg s$^{-1}$ (PSR\\, J1907+0602) and $\\dot{E}_{\\rm rot} = 4.3 \\times 10^{35}$ erg s$^{-1}$ (PSR\\, J1809$-$2332). Both pulsars have been detected in the X-rays by \\xmm, which makes them viable targets for optical observations. We observed the pulsar fields in the B and V bands with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in June/July 2015. Neither of the two pulsars has been detected down to $3\\sigma$ limiting magnitudes of $m_{\\rm v} \\sim 26.9$ and $m_{\\rm v} \\sim 27.6$ for PSR\\, J1907+0602 and PSR\\, J1809$-$2332, respectively. We d...

  18. On the PSR B1133+16 optical counterpart

    CERN Document Server

    Zharikov, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is confirming the optical identification of PSR B1133+16, whose candidate optical counterpart was detected in Very Large Telescope (VLT) images obtained back in 2003. We used new deep optical images of the PSR B1133+16 field obtained with both the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) and the VLT in the g' and B bands, respectively, to confirm the detection of its candidate optical counterpart and its coincidence with the most recent pulsar's radio coordinates. We did not detect any object at the position of the pulsar candidate counterpart (B~28), measured in our 2003 VLT images. However, we tentatively detected an object of comparable brightness in both the 2012 GTC and VLT images, whose position is offset by ~3.03" from that of the pulsar's candidate counterpart in the 2003 VLT images and lies along the pulsar's proper motion direction. Accounting for the time span of ~9 years between the 2012 quasi-contemporary GTC and VLT images and the 2003 VLT one, this offset is consistent with th...

  19. Broadband nulling behaviour of PSR B2319+60

    CERN Document Server

    Gajjar, Vishal; Kramer, M

    2012-01-01

    Pulse nulling is one of many single pulse phenomena exhibited by radio pulsars. The broadband nature of this phenomena remained unexplained due to lack of coordinated observations. We are reporting broadband nulling behaviour of a well known nulling pulsar PSR B2319+60. The simultaneous observations were carried out at four different frequencies using the Giant Meterwave Radio telescope (325 and 610 MHz), the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (1420 MHz) and the Effelsberg radio telescope (5100 MHz). The nulling fractions were estimated at all four observed frequencies, which suggest similar degree of nulling across these frequencies. To comment on the broadband behaviour of pulse nulling, we calculated the Pearson cross-correlation coefficients for the occurrence of null and burst pulses between all four frequencies. We conclude that nulling is largely a broadband phenomenon for this pulsar and it points towards a global failure of the magnetospheric currents which produces radio emission at these frequenc...

  20. Predicting the Starquakes in PSR J0537-6910

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleditch, J.; Marshall, F. E.; Wang, Q. D.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Zhang, W.

    2007-01-01

    We report the results of more than seven years of monitoring of PSR J0537-6910, the 16 ms pulsar in the Large Magellanic Cloud, using data acquired with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. During this campaign the pulsar experienced 22 sudden increases in frequency ("glitches" - 21 with increases of at least eight microHz) amounting to a total gain of over six parts per million of rotation frequency superposed on its gradual spindown of nu-dot = -2 x 10(exp -l0) Hz /s. The time interval from one glitch to the next obeys a strong linear correlation to the amplitude of the first glitch, with a mean slope of about 400 days per part per million (6.5 days per micro Hz), such that these intervals can be predicted to within a few days, an accuracy which has never before been seen in any other pulsar. There appears to be an upper limit of approximately 40 micro Hz for the size of glitches in all pulsars, with the 1999 April glitch of PSR J0537-6910 as the largest so far. The change of its spindown across the glitches, delta (nu-dot), appears to have the same hard lower limit of -1.5 x 10 (exp -13) Hz/s, as, again, that observed in all other pulsars. The spindown continues to increase in the long term, nu-dot = -10(exp -21) Hz / s(exp 2), and thus the timing age of PSR 505374910 (-0.5 nu nu-dot (exp -1) continues to decrease at a rate of nearly one year every year, consistent with movement of its magnetic moment away from its rotational axis by one radian every 10,000 years, or about one meter per year. PSR J0537-6910 was likely to have been born as a nearly-aligned rotator spinning at 75-80 Hz, with a absolute value of nu considerably smaller than its current value of 2x 10(exp -10) Hz per second. Its pulse profile consists of a single pulse which is found to be flat at its peak for at least 0.02 cycles. Glitch activity may grow exponentially with a timescale of 170 years nu nu-dot ((nu nu-dot)(sub crab))exp -l in all young pulsars.

  1. Multi-wavelength properties of IGR J05007-7047 (LXP 38.55) and identification as a Be X-ray binary pulsar in the LMC

    CERN Document Server

    Vasilopoulos, G; Delvaux, C; Sturm, R; Udalski, A

    2016-01-01

    We report on the results of a $\\sim$40 d multi-wavelength monitoring of the Be X-ray binary system IGR J05007-7047 (LXP 38.55). During that period the system was monitored in the X-rays using the Swift telescope and in the optical with multiple instruments. When the X-ray luminosity exceeded $10^{36}$ erg/s we triggered an XMM-Newton ToO observation. Timing analysis of the photon events collected during the XMM-Newton observation reveals coherent X-ray pulsations with a period of 38.551(3) s (1 {\\sigma}), making it the 17$^{th}$ known high-mass X-ray binary pulsar in the LMC. During the outburst, the X-ray spectrum is fitted best with a model composed of an absorbed power law ($\\Gamma =0.63$) plus a high-temperature black-body (kT $\\sim$ 2 keV) component. By analysing $\\sim$12 yr of available OGLE optical data we derived a 30.776(5) d optical period, confirming the previously reported X-ray period of the system as its orbital period. During our X-ray monitoring the system showed limited optical variability wh...

  2. Gamma-ray observations of the Be/pulsar binary 1A 0535+262 during a giant X-ray outburst

    CERN Document Server

    Acciari, V A; Araya, M; Arlen, T; Aune, T; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cannon, A; Cesarini, A; Ciupik, L; Collins-Hughes, E; Cui, W; Dickherber, R; Duke, C; Falcone, A; Finley, J P; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Gall, D; Godambe, S; Griffin, S; Guenette, R; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Hughes, G; Hui, C M; Humensky, T B; Imran, A; Kaaret, P; Kertzman, M; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Madhavan, A S; Maier, G; Majumdar, P; McArthur, S; Moriarty, P; Ong, R A; Otte, A N; Pandel, D; Park, N; Perkins, J S; Pohl, M; Prokoph, H; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Rose, H J; Saxon, D B; Sembroski, G H; Senturk, G Demet; Smith, A W; Tešić, G; Theiling, M; Thibadeau, S; Varlotta, A; Vincent, S; Vivier, M; Wakely, S P; Ward, J E; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; Weisgarber, T; Weng, S; Williams, D A; Wood, M; Zitzer, B

    2011-01-01

    Giant X-ray outbursts, with luminosities of about $ 10^{37}$ erg s$^{-1}$, are observed roughly every 5 years from the nearby Be/pulsar binary 1A 0535+262. In this article, we present observations of the source with VERITAS at very-high energies (VHE; E$>$100 GeV) triggered by the X-ray outburst in December 2009. The observations started shortly after the onset of the outburst, and they provided comprehensive coverage of the episode, as well as the 111-day binary orbit. No VHE emission is evident at any time. We also examined data from the contemporaneous observations of 1A 0535+262 with the Fermi/LAT at high energy photons (HE; E$>$0.1 GeV) and failed to detect the source at GeV energies. The X-ray continua measured with the Swift/XRT and the RXTE/PCA can be well described by the combination of blackbody and Comptonized emission from thermal electrons. Therefore, the gamma-ray and X-ray observations suggest the absence of a significant population of non-thermal particles in the system. This distinguishes 1A~...

  3. LOFAR discovery of a quiet emission mode in PSR B0823+26

    CERN Document Server

    Sobey, C; Hessels, J W T; Weltevrede, P; Noutsos, A; Stappers, B W; Kramer, M; Bassa, C; Lyne, A G; Kondratiev, V I; Hassall, T E; Keane, E F; Bilous, A V; Breton, R P; Grießmeier, J -M; Karastergiou, A; Pilia, M; Serylak, M; ter Veen, S; van Leeuwen, J; Alexov, A; Anderson, J; Asgekar, A; Avruch, I M; Bell, M E; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Bîrzan, L; Bonafede, A; Breitling, F; Broderick, J; Brüggen, M; Corstanje, A; Carbone, D; de Geus, E; de Vos, M; van Duin, A; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Falcke, H; Fallows, R A; Fender, R; Ferrari, C; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Gunst, A W; Hamaker, J P; Heald, G; Hoeft, M; Hörandel, J; Jütte, E; Kuper, G; Maat, P; Mann, G; Markoff, S; McFadden, R; McKay-Bukowski, D; McKean, J P; Mulcahy, D D; Munk, H; Nelles, A; Norden, M J; Orrù, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pandey, V N; Pietka, G; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Rafferty, D; Renting, A; Röttgering, H; Rowlinson, A; Scaife, A M M; Schwarz, D; Sluman, J; Smirnov, O; Steinmetz, M; Stewart, A; Swinbank, J; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; Tasse, C; Thoudam, S; Toribio, C; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; van Weeren, R J; Wijers, R A M J; Wise, M W; Wucknitz, O; Yatawatta, S; Zarka, P

    2015-01-01

    PSR B0823+26, a 0.53-s radio pulsar, displays a host of emission phenomena over timescales of seconds to (at least) hours, including nulling, subpulse drifting, and mode-changing. Studying pulsars like PSR B0823+26 provides further insight into the relationship between these various emission phenomena and what they might teach us about pulsar magnetospheres. Here we report on the LOFAR discovery that PSR B0823+26 has a weak and sporadically emitting 'quiet' (Q) emission mode that is over 100 times weaker (on average) and has a nulling fraction forty-times greater than that of the more regularly-emitting 'bright' (B) mode. Previously, the pulsar has been undetected in the Q-mode, and was assumed to be nulling continuously. PSR B0823+26 shows a further decrease in average flux just before the transition into the B-mode, and perhaps truly turns off completely at these times. Furthermore, simultaneous observations taken with the LOFAR, Westerbork, Lovell, and Effelsberg telescopes between 110 MHz and 2.7 GHz demo...

  4. New clues on the nature of the companion to PSR~J1740-5340 in NGC6397 from XSHOOTER spectroscop

    CERN Document Server

    Mucciarelli, A; Lanzoni, B; Pallanca, C; Dalessandro, E; Ferraro, F R; -,

    2013-01-01

    By using XSHOOTER spectra acquired at the ESO Very Large Telescope, we have studied the surface chemical composition of the companion star to the binary millisecond pulsar PSR J1740-5340 in the globular cluster NGC 6397. The measured abundances of Fe, Mg, Al and Na confirm that the star belongs to the cluster. On the other hand, the measured surface abundance of nitrogen ([N/Fe]=+0.53 +- 0.15 dex) combined with the carbon upper limit ([C/Fe] <-2 dex) previously obtained from UVES spectra allow us to put severe constraints on its nature, strongly suggesting that the pulsar companion is a deeply peeled star. In fact, the comparison with theoretical stellar models indicates that the matter currently observed at the surface of this star has been processed by the hydrogen-burning CN-cycle at equilibrium. In turn, this evidence suggests that the pulsar companion is a low mass (~0.2 Msun) remnant star, descending from a ~0.8 Msun progenitor which lost ~70-80 % of its original material because of mass transfer act...

  5. Optical spectroscopy of PSR B1259-63/LS 2883 during the 2014 periastron passage with the Southern African Large Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    van Soelen, B; Odendaal, A; Klindt, L; Sushch, I; Meintjes, P J

    2015-01-01

    The gamma-ray binary system PSR B1259-63/LS 2883 went through periastron in May 2014. We report on the optical spectroscopic monitoring of the system from 33 d before to 78 d after periastron, undertaken with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT). The H{\\alpha} and He I ({\\lambda}6678) lines exhibit an orbital variation around periastron, with the line strengths reaching a maximum ~13 d after periastron. The line strength is weaker than observed around the previous periastron in 2010. There is also a marked change in the line-strength and asymmetry around the first disc crossing. These observations are consistent with the disruption of the circumstellar disc around periastron due to the interaction with the pulsar.

  6. Upper limits on the strength of periodic gravitational waves from PSR J1939+2134

    CERN Document Server

    Allen, B; Abbott, B; Abbott, R; Adhikari, R; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Asiri, F; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S V; Balasubramanian, R; Ballmer, S; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barker-Patton, C; Barnes, M; Barr, B; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Beausoleil, R; Belczynski, K; Bennett, R; Berukoff, S J; Betzwieser, J; Bhawal, B; Billingsley, G; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Bland-Weaver, B; Bochner, B; Bogue, L; Bork, R G; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Brau, J E; Brown, D A; Brozek, S; Bullington, A; Buonanno, A; Burgess, R; Busby, D; Butler, W E; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cantley, C A; Cardenas, L; Carter, K; Casey, M M; Castiglione, J; Chandler, A; Chapsky, J; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chen, Y; Chickarmane, V; Chin, D; Christensen, N; Churches, D; Colacino, C N; Coldwell, R; Coles, M; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crooks, D R M; Csatorday, P; Cusack, B J; Cutler, C; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Davies, R; Daw, E; De Bra, D; Delker, T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S V; Ding, H; Drever, R W P; Dupuis, R J; Ebeling, C; Edlund, J; Ehrens, P; Elliffe, E J; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fallnich, C; Farnham, D; Fejer, M M; Fine, M; Finn, L S; Flanagan, E; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V; Fyffe, M; Ganezer, K S; Giaime, J A; Gillespie, A; Goda, K; González, G; Gossler, S; Grandclément, P; Grant, A; Gray, C; Gretarsson, A M; Grimmett, D; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, E; Gustafson, R; Hamilton, W O; Hammond, M; Hanson, J; Hardham, C; Harry, G; Hartunian, A; Heefner, J; Hefetz, Y; Heinzel, G; Heng, I S; Hennessy, M; Hepler, N; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hindman, N; Hoang, P; Hough, J; Hrynevych, M; Hua, W; Ingley, R; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jennrich, O; Johnson, W W; Johnston, W; Jones, L; Jungwirth, D; Kalogera, V; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kells, W; Kern, J; Khan, A; Killbourn, S; Killow, C J; Kim, C; King, C; King, P; Klimenko, S; Kloevekorn, P; Koranda, S; Kotter, K; Kovalik, Yu; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Landry, M; Langdale, J; Lantz, B; Lawrence, R; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leonhardt, V; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Lindquist, P; Liu, S; Logan, J; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Lück, H B; Lyons, T T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majid, W; Malec, M; Mann, F; Marin, A; Marka, S; Maros, E; Mason, J; Mason, K; Matherny, O; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McHugh, M; McNamara, P; Mendell, G; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Miyoki, S; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Müller, G; Mukherjee, S; Myers, J; Nagano, S; Nash, T; Naundorf, H; Nayak, R; Newton, G; Nocera, F; Nutzman, P; Olson, T; O'Reilly, B; Ottaway, D J; Ottewill, A; Ouimette, D A; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Papa, M A; Parameswariah, C; Parameshwaraiah, V; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pitkin, M; Plissi, M; Pratt, M; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rakhmanov, M; Rao, S R; Redding, D; Regehr, M W; Regimbau, T; Reilly, K T; Reithmaier, K; Reitze, D H; Richman, S; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rizzi, A; Robertson, D I; Robertson, N A; Robison, L; Roddy, S; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Rong, H; Rose, D; Rotthoff, E; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Salzman, I; Sanders, G H; Sannibale, V; Sathyaprakash, B; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Sazonov, A; Schilling, R; Schlaufman, K; Schmidt, V; Schofield, R; Schrempel, M; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seel, S; Sengupta, A S; Shapiro, C A; Shawhan, P S; Shoemaker, D H; Shu, Q Z; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sievers, L; Sigg, D; Sintes, A M; Skeldon, K D; Smith, J R; Smith, M; Smith, M R; Sneddon, P; Spero, R; Stapfer, G; Strain, K A; Strom, D; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T; Sumner, M C; Sutton, P J; Sylvestre, J; Takamori, A; Tanner, D B; Tariq, H; Taylor, I; Taylor, R; Thorne, K S; Tibbits, M; Tilav, S; Tinto, M; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traeger, S; Traylor, G; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D W; Vallisneri, M; Van Putten, M H P M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Vorvick, C; Wallace, L; Walther, H; Ward, H; Ware, B; Watts, K; Webber, D; Weidner, A; Weiland, U; Weinstein, A; Weiss, R; Welling, H; Wen, L; Wen, S; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Willems, P A; Williams, P R; Williams, R; Willke, B; Wilson, A; Winjum, B J; Winkler, W; Wise, S; Wiseman, A G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yoshida, S; Zawischa, I; Zhang, L; Zotov, N P; Zucker, M; Zweizig, J

    2004-01-01

    The first science run of the LIGO and GEO gravitational wave detectors presented the opportunity to test methods of searching for gravitational waves from known pulsars. Here we present new direct upper limits on the strength of waves from the pulsar PSR J1939+2134 using two independent analysis methods, one in the frequency domain using frequentist statistics and one in the time domain using Bayesian inference. Both methods show that the strain amplitude at Earth from this pulsar is less than a few times $10^{-22}$.

  7. An optical & X-ray study of the counterpart to the SMC X-ray binary pulsar system SXP327

    CERN Document Server

    Coe, M J; Corbet, R H D; Galache, J; McBride, V A; Townsend, L J; Udalski, A

    2008-01-01

    Optical and X-ray observations are presented here of a newly reported X-ray transient system in the Small Magellanic Cloud. The data reveal many previously unknown X-ray detections of this system and clear evidence for a 49.995d binary period. In addition, the optical photometry show recurring outburst features at the binary period which may well be indicative of the neutron star interacting with a circumstellar disk around a Be star.

  8. Evolution of pulsar high-energy pulse profiles due to geodetic precession in the striped wind model

    CERN Document Server

    Petri, J

    2014-01-01

    Geodetic precession has been observed directly in the double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039. Its rate has even been measured and is in agreement with predictions of general relativity. Very recently, the double pulsar has been detected in X-rays and gamma-rays. This opens up the hope to observe geodetic precession in the high-energy pulse profile of this system. Unfortunately the geometric configuration of the binary renders unlikely any detection of such an effect. Nevertheless, this precession should be present in other relativistic binaries or double neutron star systems containing at least one X-ray or gamma-ray pulsar.}{In this paper we compute the variation of the high-energy pulse profile expected from this geodetic motion according to the striped wind model. We compare our results with two-pole caustic and outer gap emission patterns.}{We show that for a sufficient misalignment between the orbital angular momentum and the spin angular momentum, significant change in the pulse profile due to geodetic pre...

  9. Pair plasma in pulsar magnetospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main features of radiation received from pulsars imply that they are neutron stars which contain an extremely intense magnetic field and emit coherently in the radio domain. Most recent studies attribute the origin of the coherence to plasma instabilities arising in pulsar magnetospheres; they mainly concern the linear, or the nonlinear, character of the involved unstable waves. We briefly introduce radio pulsars and specify physical conditions in pulsar emission regions: geometrical properties, magnetic field, pair creation processes and repartition of relativistic charged particles. We point to the main ingredients of the linear theory, extensively explored since the 1970s: (i) a dispersion relation specific to the pulsar case; (ii) the characteristics of the waves able to propagate in relativistic pulsar plasmas; (iii) the different ways in which a two-humped distribution of particles may arise in a pulsar magnetosphere and favour the development of a two-stream instability. We sum up recent improvements of the linear theory: (i) the determination of a 'coupling function' responsible for high values of the wave field components and electromagnetic energy available; (ii) the obtention of new dispersion relations for actually anisotropic pulsar plasmas with relativistic motions and temperatures; (iii) the interaction between a plasma and a beam, both with relativistic motions and temperatures; (iv) the interpretation of observed 'coral' and 'conal' features, associated with the presence of boundaries and curved magnetic field lines in the emission region; (v) the detailed topology of the magnetic field in the different parts of the emission region and its relation to models recently proposed to interpret drifting subpulses observed from PSR 0943+10, showing 20 sub-beams of emission. We relate the nonlinear evolution of the two-stream instability and development of strong turbulence in relativistic pulsar plasmas to the emergence of relativistic solitons, able

  10. The Helium White Dwarf orbiting the Millisecond Pulsar in the halo of the Globular Cluster NGC 6752

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, F R; Sabbi, E; D'Amico, N; Ferraro, Francesco R.; Possenti, Andrea; Sabbi, Elena; Amico, Nichi D'

    2003-01-01

    We have used deep high-resolution multiband images taken at the ESO Very Large Telescope to identify the optical binary companion to the millisecond pulsar (PSR J1911-5958A) located in the halo of the Galactic Globular Cluster NGC6752. The object turns out to be a blue star whose position in the Color Magnitude Diagram is consistent with the cooling sequence of a low mass (M~0.17-0.20Mo), low metallicity Helium white dwarf (He-WD) at the cluster distance. This is the second He-WD which has been found to orbit a millisecond pulsar in GGCs. Curiously both objects have been found to lie on the same mass He-WD cooling sequence. The anomalous position of PSR J1911-5958A with respect to the globular cluster center (~6') suggested that this system has recently (<1 Gyr) been ejected from the cluster core as the result of a strong dynamical interaction. The data presented here allows to constrain the cooling age of the companion within a fairly narrow range (~1.2-2.8 Gyr), therefore suggesting that such dynamical e...

  11. The Green Bank Telescope 350 MHz Drift-scan Survey I: Survey Observations and the Discovery of 13 Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Boyles, Jason; Ransom, Scott M; Stairs, Ingrid H; Lorimer, Duncan R; McLaughlin, Maura A; Hessels, Jason W T; Kaspi, Vicky M; Kondratiev, Vlad I; Archibald, Anne; Berndsen, Aaron; Cardoso, Rogerio F; Cherry, Angus; McPhee, Christie A; Pennucci, Tim; Roberts, Mallory S E; Stovall, Kevin; van Leeuwen, Joeri

    2012-01-01

    Over the summer of 2007, we obtained 1191 hours of `drift-scan' pulsar search observations with the Green Bank Telescope at a radio frequency of 350 MHz. Here we describe the survey setup, search procedure, and the discovery and follow-up timing of thirteen pulsars. Among the new discoveries, one (PSR J1623-0841) was discovered only through its single pulses, two (PSRs J1327-0755 and J1737-0814) are millisecond pulsars, and another (PSR J2222-0137) is a mildly recycled pulsar. PSR J1327-0755 is a 2.7 ms pulsar at a DM of 27.9 pc cm^{-3} in a 8.7 day orbit with a minimum companion mass of 0.22$ solar mass. PSR J1737-0814 is a 4.2 ms pulsar at a DM of 55.3 pc cm^{-3} in a 79.3 day orbit with a minimum companion mass of 0.06 solar mass. PSR J2222$-$0137 is a 32.8 ms pulsar at a very low DM of 3.27 pc cm^{-3} in a 2.4 day orbit with a minimum companion mass of 1.11 solar mass. It is most likely a white dwarf-neutron star system or an unusual low-eccentricity double neutron star system. Ten other pulsars discovere...

  12. Realistic Modeling of the Pulse Profile of PSR J$0737$$-$$3039$A

    CERN Document Server

    Perera, B B P; McLaughlin, M A; Ferdman, R D; Kramer, M; Stairs, I H; Freire, P C C; Possenti, A

    2014-01-01

    The Double Pulsar, PSR J$0737$$-$$3039$A/B, is a unique system in which both neutron stars have been detected as radio pulsars. As shown in Ferdman et al., there is no evidence for pulse profile evolution of the A pulsar, and the geometry of the pulsar was fit well with a double-pole circular radio beam model. Assuming a more realistic polar cap model with a vacuum retarded dipole magnetosphere configuration including special relativistic effects, we create synthesized pulse profiles for A given the best-fit geometry from the simple circular beam model. By fitting synthesized pulse profiles to those observed from pulsar A, we constrain the geometry of the radio beam, namely the half-opening angle and the emission altitude, to be $30^\\circ$ and $10$ neutron star radii, respectively. Combining the observational constraints of PSR J$0737$$-$$3039$A/B, we are able to construct the full three-dimensional orbital geometry of the Double Pulsar. The relative angle between the spin axes of the two pulsars ($\\Delta_S$)...

  13. Time-domain and spectral properties of pulsars at 154 MHz

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, M E; Johnston, S; Kaplan, D L; Croft, S; Hancock, P; Callingham, J R; Zic, A; Dobie, D; Swiggum, J K; Rowlinson, A; Hurley-Walker, N; Offringa, A R; Bernardi, G; Bowman, J D; Briggs, F; Cappallo, R J; Deshpande, A A; Gaensler, B M; Greenhill, L J; Hazelton, B J; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Lonsdale, C J; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, D A; Morales, M F; Morgan, E; Oberoi, D; Ord, S M; Prabu, T; Shankar, N Udaya; Srivani, K S; Subrahmanyan, R; Tingay, S J; Wayth, R B; Webster, R L; Williams, A; Williams, C L

    2016-01-01

    We present 154 MHz Murchison Widefield Array imaging observations and variability information for a sample of pulsars. Over the declination range $-80^{\\circ} < {\\delta} < 10^{\\circ}$ we detect 17 known pulsars with mean flux density greater than 0.3 Jy. We explore the variability properties of this sample on timescales of minutes to years. For three of these pulsars, PSR J0953+0755, PSR J0437-4715 and PSR J0630-2834 we observe interstellar scintillation and variability on timescales of greater than 2 minutes. One further pulsar, PSR J0034-0721, showed significant variability, the physical origins of which are difficult to determine. The dynamic spectra for PSR J0953+0755 and PSR J0437-4715 show discrete time and frequency structure consistent with diffractive interstellar scintillation and we present the scintillation bandwidth and timescales from these observations. The remaining pulsars within our sample were statistically non-variable. We also explore the spectral properties of this sample and find ...

  14. Discovery of two millisecond pulsars in Fermi sources with the Nancay Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Cognard, I; Johnson, T J; Smith, D A; Venter, C; Harding, A K; Wolff, M T; Cheung, C C; Donato, D; Abdo, A A; Ballet, J; Camilo, F; Desvignes, G; Dumora, D; Ferrara, E C; Freire, P C C; Grove, J E; Keith, M; Kramer, M; Lyne, A G; Michelson, P F; Parent, D; Ransom, S M; Ray, P S; Romani, R W; Parkinson, P M Saz; Stappers, B W; Theureau, G; Thompson, D J; Weltevrede, P; Wood, K S

    2011-01-01

    We report the discovery of two millisecond pulsars in a search for radio pulsations at the positions of \\emph{Fermi Large Area Telescope} sources with no previously known counterparts, using the Nan\\c{c}ay radio telescope. The two millisecond pulsars, PSRs J2017+0603 and J2302+4442, have rotational periods of 2.896 and 5.192 ms and are both in binary systems with low-eccentricity orbits and orbital periods of 2.2 and 125.9 days respectively, suggesting long recycling processes. Gamma-ray pulsations were subsequently detected for both objects, indicating that they power the associated \\emph{Fermi} sources in which they were found. The gamma-ray light curves and spectral properties are similar to those of previously-detected gamma-ray millisecond pulsars. Detailed modeling of the observed radio and gamma-ray light curves shows that the gamma-ray emission seems to originate at high altitudes in their magnetospheres. Additionally, X-ray observations revealed the presence of an X-ray source at the position of PSR ...

  15. Impedance estimates for PSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proton Storage Ring (PSR), now in operation at Los Alamos, is a fast-cycling high-current accumulator designed to produce intense 800 MeV proton pulses for driving a spallation neutron source. This paper presents graphs of calculated longitudinal and transverse coupling impedances vs frequency for various components in the PSR beamline. The impedances are estimated using simplified formulas for the effects of steps, cavities, monitor plates, and other discontinuities in the beam pipe for the ring. An examination of stability limits indicates that the longitudinal impedance per harmonic should be less than something in the hundreds of ohms range and the transverse impedance should be less than something of the order of a megohm/meter at low frequencies. For the PSR, the impedances due to the harmonic buncher and due to possible high-Q resonances in the bump magnet chambers might be significant. Simplified growth rate estimates using the real part of the transverse impedance indicate that the bumper magnet coils for the fast kicker plates might be contributing to an observed instability with onset at about 1013 protons per bunch

  16. Luminosity Dependent Study of the High Mass X-ray Binary Pulsar 4U 0114 + 65 with ASCA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    U. Mukherjee; B. Paul

    2006-03-01

    Here we report the spectral characteristics of the high and low states of the pulsar 4U 0114+65 and examine the change in the parameters of the spectral model. A power lawand a photoelectric absorption by material along the line of sight together with a high energy cut-off suffice to describe the continuum spectrum in both the states. A fluorescence iron line at ∼ 6.4 keV is present in the high as well as in the low state, though it is less intense in the latter. The photon index, cut-off energy and e-folding energy values hardly show any discernible change over the states. We compare these spectral characteristics as observed with ASCA with those of other satellites. We also compare the spectral characteristics of 4U 0114 + 650 with other X-ray sources which show intensity variation at different time scales.

  17. An extremely bright gamma-ray pulsar in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermi LAT Collaboration; Ackermann, M.; Albert, A.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Barbieri, C.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cuoco, A.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; Desiante, F. de Palma R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Franckowiak, A.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hagiwara, K.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Johnson, T. J.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Marshall, F.; Martin, P.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Michelson, P. F.; Mirabal, N.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Naletto, G.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Paneque, D.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Romani, R. W.; Parkinson, P. M. Saz; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Uchiyama, Y.; Vianello, G.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Zampieri, L.

    2015-11-01

    Pulsars are rapidly spinning, highly magnetized neutron stars, created in the gravitational collapse of massive stars. We report the detection of pulsed giga-electron volt gamma rays from the young pulsar PSR J0540-6919 in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way. This is the first gamma-ray pulsar detected in another galaxy. It has the most luminous pulsed gamma-ray emission yet observed, exceeding the Crab pulsar’s by a factor of 20. PSR J0540-6919 presents an extreme test case for understanding the structure and evolution of neutron star magnetospheres.

  18. XMM-Newton Observations of Radio Pulsars B0834+06 and B0826-34 and Implications for the Pulsar Inner Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, J.; Haberl, F.; Melikidze, G.; Geppert, U.; Zhang, B.; Melikidze, G., Jr.

    2008-10-01

    We report the X-ray observations of two radio pulsars with drifting subpulses, B0834+06 and B0826-34, using XMM-Newton. PSR B0834+06 was detected with a total of 70 counts from the three EPIC instruments over 50 ks exposure time. Its spectrum is best described as that of a blackbody (BB), with temperature Ts = (2.0+ 2.0-0.9) × 106 K and bolometric luminosity Lb = (8.6+ 14.2-4.4) × 1028 erg s-1. As is typical in pulsars with BB thermal components in their X-ray spectra, the hot-spot surface area is much smaller than that of the canonical polar cap, implying a non-dipolar surface magnetic field much stronger than the dipolar component derived from the pulsar spin-down (in this case about 50 times smaller and stronger, respectively). The second pulsar, PSR B0826-34, was not detected over the 50 ks exposure time, giving an upper limit for the bolometric luminosity Lb PSG) model of the inner accelerator in pulsars. This model predicts a simple and very intuitive relationship between the polar cap thermal X-ray luminosity (Lb) and the "carousel" period (P4) for drifting subpulses detected in the radio band. The PSG model has been previously successfully tested with four radio pulsars whose Lb and P4 were both measured: PSR B0943+10, PSR B1133+16, PSR B0656+14, and PSR B0628-28. The XMM-Newton X-ray data of PSR B0834+16 reported here are also in agreement with the model prediction, and the upper limit derived from the PSR B0826-34 observation does not contradict it. We also include two other pulsars, PSR B1929+10 and B1055-52, whose Lb and/or P4 data became available just recently. These pulsars also follow the prediction of the PSG model. The clear prediction of the PSG model is now supported by all pulsars whose Lb and P4 are measured and/or estimated.

  19. The origin of the Guitar pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetzlaff, N.; Neuhäuser, R.; Hohle, M. M.

    2009-11-01

    Among a sample of 140 OB associations and clusters, we want to identify probable parent associations for the Guitar pulsar (PSR B2224+65), which would then also constrain its age. For this purpose, we are using an Euler-Cauchy technique, treating the vertical component of the Galactic potential to calculate the trajectories of the pulsar and each association into the past. To include errors, we use Monte Carlo simulations varying the initial parameters within their error intervals. The whole range of possible pulsar radial velocities is taken into account during the simulations. We find that the Guitar pulsar most probably originated from the Cygnus OB3 association ~0.8Myr ago, inferring a current radial velocity of vr ~ -30kms-1, consistent with the inclination of its bow shock.

  20. The origin of the Guitar pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Tetzlaff, Nina; Hohle, Markus M

    2009-01-01

    Among a sample of 140 OB associations and clusters, we want to identify probable parent associations for the Guitar pulsar (PSR B2224+65) which would then also constrain its age. For this purpose, we are using an Euler-Cauchy technique treating the vertical component of the galactic potential to calculate the trajectories of the pulsar and each association into the past. To include errors we use Monte-Carlo simulations varying the initial parameters within their error intervals. The whole range of possible pulsar radial velocities is taken into account during the simulations. We find that the Guitar pulsar most probably originated from the Cygnus OB3 association ~0.8 Myr ago inferring a current radial velocity of v_r~-30 km/s, consistent with the inclination of its bow shock.

  1. Pulsar timing and general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer, D. C.; Hellings, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Techniques are described for accounting for relativistic effects in the analysis of pulsar signals. Design features of instrumentation used to achieve millisecond accuracy in the signal measurements are discussed. The accuracy of the data permits modeling the pulsar physical characteristics from the natural glitches in the emissions. Relativistic corrections are defined for adjusting for differences between the pulsar motion in its spacetime coordinate system relative to the terrestrial coordinate system, the earth's motion, and the gravitational potentials of solar system bodies. Modifications of the model to allow for a binary pulsar system are outlined, including treatment of the system as a point mass. Finally, a quadrupole model is presented for gravitational radiation and techniques are defined for using pulsars in the search for gravitational waves.

  2. The nature of the X-ray pulsar in M31: an intermediate mass X-ray binary?

    CERN Document Server

    Karino, Shigeyuki

    2016-01-01

    Recently the first finding of a spin period of an accreting neutron star in M31 is reported. The observed spin period is 1.2 s and it shows 1.27 d modulations due to orbital motion. From the orbital information, the mass donor could not be a giant massive star. On the other hand, the observed properties are quite odd for typical low mass X-ray binaries. In this study, we compare observed binary parameters with theoretical models given by a stellar evolution track and make a restriction on the possible mass range of the donor. According to the standard stellar evolution model, the donor star should be larger than 1.5 solar mass, and this suggests that this system is a new member of a rare category, intermediate mass X-ray binary. The magnetic field strength of the neutron star suggested by spin-up/down tendency in this system supports the possibility of intermediate mass donor.

  3. The spectrum of the recycled PSR J0437-4715 and its white dwarf companion

    CERN Document Server

    Durant, M; Pavlov, G G; Kowalski, P M; Posselt, B; van Kerkwijk, M H; Kaplan, D L

    2011-01-01

    We present extensive spectral and photometric observations of the recycled pulsar/white-dwarf binary containing PSR J0437-4715, which we analyzed together with archival X-ray and gamma-ray data, to obtain the complete mid-infrared to gamma-ray spectrum. We first fit each part of the spectrum separately, and then the whole multi-wavelength spectrum. We find that the optical-infrared part of the spectrum is well fit by a cool white dwarf atmosphere model with pure hydrogen composition. The model atmosphere (Teff = 3950pm150K, log g=6.98pm0.15, R_WD=(1.9pm0.2)e9 cm) fits our spectral data remarkably well for the known mass and distance (M=0.25pm0.02Msun, d=156.3pm1.3pc), yielding the white dwarf age (tau=6.0pm0.5Gyr). In the UV, we find a spectral shape consistent with thermal emission from the bulk of the neutron star surface, with surface temperature between 1.25e5 and 3.5e5K. The temperature of the thermal spectrum suggests that some heating mechanism operates throughout the life of the neutron star. The temp...

  4. Formation of the Double Neutron Star System PSR J1930$-$1852

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The spin period (185 ms) and period derivative ($1.8\\times10^{-17}\\,\\rm s\\,s^{-1}$) of the double neutron star (DNS) system PSR J1930$-$1852 recently discovered indicate that the pulsar was mildly recycled through the process of Roche-lobe overflow. This system has the longest orbital period (45 days) of the known DNS systems, and can be formed from a helium star-NS binary if the initial mass of the helium star was $ \\lesssim 4.0M_{\\odot} $; otherwise the helium star would never fill its Roche-lobe \\citep{t15}. At the moment of the supernova explosion, the mass of the helium star was $ \\lesssim3.0M_{\\odot} $. We find that the probability distribution of the velocity kick imparted to the new-born neutron star has a maximum at about $30 \\,\\rm km\\,s^{-1}$ (and a tail up to $ 260 \\,\\rm km\\,s^{-1}$), indicating that this NS most probably received a low kick velocity at birth.

  5. Formation of the Double Neutron Star System PSR J1930-1852

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yong; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2016-01-01

    The spin period (185 ms) and period derivative (1.8× {10}-17 {{s}} {{{s}}}-1) of the recently discovered double neutron star (DNS) system PSR J1930-1852 indicate that the pulsar was mildly recycled through the process of Roche-lobe overflow. This system has the longest orbital period (45 days) of the known DNS systems, and can be formed from a helium star-NS binary if the initial mass of the helium star was ≲ 4.0{M}⊙ ; otherwise, the helium star would never fill its Roche-lobe. At the moment of the supernova explosion, the mass of the helium star was ≲ 3.0{M}⊙ . We find that the probability distribution of the velocity kick imparted to the new-born neutron star has a maximum at about 30 {km} {{{s}}}-1 (and a tail up to 260 {km} {{{s}}}-1), indicating that this NS probably received a low kick velocity at birth.

  6. Discovery of Two New Pulsars in 47 Tucanae (NGC 104)

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Zhichen; Li, Di; Ridolfi, Alessandro; Wang, Pei; Freire, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of two new millisecond pulsars (PSRs J0024$-$7204aa and J0024$-$7204ab) in the globular cluster 47\\,Tucanae (NGC 104). Our results bring the total number of pulsars in 47\\,Tucanae to 25. These pulsars were discovered by reprocessing archival observations from the Parkes radio telescope. We reprocessed the data using a standard search procedure based on the PRESTO software package as well as using a new method in which we incoherently added the power spectra corresponding to $\\sim$1100\\,hr of observations. The newly discovered PSR~J0024$-$7204aa, has a pulse frequency of $\\rm \\sim$541\\,Hz (corresponding to a $\\rm \\sim$1.84 ms period), which is higher than any other pulsars currently known in the cluster and ranks 12$^{\\rm{th}}$ amongst all the currently known pulsars. The dispersion measure of this pulsar, 24.941(7)\\,cm$^{-3}$ pc, is the highest in the cluster. The second discovered pulsar, PSR~J0024$-$7204ab, is an isolated pulsar with a pulse frequency of $\\rm \\sim$270\\,Hz (correspond...

  7. The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchester, Richard N.

    2015-08-01

    The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) project uses the Parkes 64-m radio telescope to observe 22 millisecond pulsars in three bands: 40cm (band centre 732 MHz), 20cm (1369 MHz) and 10cm (3100 MHz). Coherent de-dispersion systems are used for the 40cm and 20cm bands and digital polyphase filterbanks are used for the 20cm and 10cm bands. Observations are made at intervals of two to three weeks and observations times for each pulsar in each band are typically one hour. Regular PPTA observations commenced in early 2005 but earlier timing data, primarily in the 20cm band, exist for many of the pulsars back to 1994. Pipeline processing scripts are based on PSRCHIVE routines and take into account instrumental offsets. Timing analyses include modelling of dispersion variations and red and white noise in the data. The primary scientific goal of the PPTA project is the detection of gravitational waves, either a stochastic background from supermassive black-hole binary systems in distant galaxies or from individual binary systems. The PPTA data sets have many other applications including establishment of a pulsar-based timescale, improvement of solar-system ephemerides and studies of the individual pulsars. PPTA data sets have been made available to the International Pulsar Timing Array consortium and analysis of the combined data sets is progressing. Recent developments, both instrumental and science-related, will be described.

  8. On the peculiar shapes of some pulsar bow-shock nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandiera, Rino

    Pulsar bow-shock nebulae are pulsar-wind nebulae formed by the direct interaction of pulsar relativistic winds with the interstellar medium. The bow-shock morphology, well outlined in Hα for some objects, is an effect of the supersonic pulsar motion with respect to the ambient medium. However, in a considerable fraction of cases (e.g. the nebulae associated to PSR B2224+65, PSR B0740-28, PSR J2124-3358) clear deviations from the classical bow shock shape are observed. Such deviations are usually interpreted as due to ambient density gradients and/or to pulsar-wind anisotropies. Here I present a different interpretation, aiming at explaining deviations from the standard morphology as signs of the peculiar physical conditions present in these objects. Using dimensional arguments, I show that, unlike normal pulsar-wind nebulae, in pulsar bow-shock nebulae the mean free path of the highest-energy particles may be comparable with the bow-shock head. I then investigate whether this may affect the shape of the bow-shock; for instance, whether a conical bow shock (like that observed in the "Guitar", the nebula associated to PSR B2224+65) does really imply an ambient density gradient. Finally, I discuss some other possible signatures of these high-energy, long mean-free-path particles.

  9. XMM-Newton Observations of PSR B1706-44

    OpenAIRE

    McGowan, Katherine E.; Zane, Silvia; Cropper, Mark; Kennea, Jamie A.; Cordova, France A.; Ho, Cheng; Sasseen, Tim; Vestrand, W. Thomas

    2003-01-01

    We report on the XMM-Newton observations of the young, 102 ms pulsar PSR B1706-44. We have found that both a blackbody plus power-law and a magnetized atmospheric model plus power-law provide an excellent fit to the EPIC spectra. The two scenarios are therefore indistinguishable on a statistical basis, although we are inclined to prefer the latter on physical grounds. In this case, assuming a source distance of ~2.3 kpc, the size of the region responsible for the thermal emission is R~13 km, ...

  10. Gamma-ray Timing of Redback PSR J2339-0533: Hints for Gravitational Quadrupole Moment Changes

    CERN Document Server

    Pletsch, Holger J

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of precision gamma-ray timing measurements of the binary millisecond pulsar PSR J2339$-$0533, an irradiating system of "redback" type, using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope. We describe an optimized analysis method to determine a long-term phase-coherent timing solution spanning more than six years, including a measured eccentricity of the binary orbit and constraints on the proper motion of the system. A major result of this timing analysis is the discovery of an extreme variation of the nominal 4.6-hour orbital period $P_{\\rm orb}$ over time, showing alternating epochs of decrease and increase. We inferred a cyclic modulation of $P_{\\rm orb}$ with an approximate cycle duration of 4.2 years and a modulation amplitude of $\\Delta P_{\\rm orb}/ P_{\\rm orb} = 2.3 \\times 10^{-7}$. Considering different possible physical causes, the observed orbital-period modulation most likely results from a variable gravitational quadrupole moment of the companion star due to cyclic magnetic activ...

  11. A Search for Pulsar Companions to OB Runaway Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayer, R. W.; Nice, D. J.; Kaspi, V. M.

    1996-04-01

    We have searched for radio pulsar companions to 40 nearby OB runaway stars. Observations were made at 575 and 770 MHz with the NRAO 140 foot (43 m) telescope. The survey was sensitive to long- period pulsars with flux densities of 1 mJy or more. No pulsar companions to OB runaways were discovered. One previously unknown pulsar was discovered, PSR J2044 +4614, while observing toward target 0 star BD +45°3260. Follow-up timing observations of the pulsar measured its position to high precision, revealing a 9' separation between the pulsar and the target star, unequivocally indicating they are not associated. The pulsar is ordinary, except that its dispersion measure, 315 pc cm-3, is unusually high given its Galactic longitude, l = 85°. The nondetection of pulsars bound to target stars places an upper limit of 8% (95% confidence) for the fraction of runaway OB stars with pulsar companions detectable via pulsed radio emission by surveys such as ours. Assuming standard models for the pulsar beaming fraction and luminosity function, we conclude most OB runaways do not have pulsar companions.

  12. Discovery of SXP265, a Be/X-ray binary pulsar in the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Sturm, R; Vasilopoulos, G; Bartlett, E S; Maggi, P; Rau, A; Greiner, J; Udalski, A

    2014-01-01

    We identify a new candidate for a Be/X-ray binary in the XMM-Newton slew survey and archival Swift observations that is located in the transition region of the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud and the Magellanic Bridge. We investigated and classified this source with follow-up XMM-Newton and optical observations. We model the X-ray spectra and search for periodicities and variability in the X-ray observations and the OGLE I-band light curve. The optical counterpart has been classified spectroscopically, with data obtained at the SAAO 1.9 m telescope, and photometrically, with data obtained using GROND at the MPG 2.2 m telescope. The X-ray spectrum is typical of a high-mass X-ray binary with an accreting neutron star. We detect X-ray pulsations, which reveal a neutron-star spin period of P = (264.516+-0.014) s. The source likely shows a persistent X-ray luminosity of a few 10^35 erg/s and in addition type-I outbursts that indicate an orbital period of ~146 d. A periodicity of 0.867 d, found in the optical li...

  13. Testing Gravity with Pulsars in the SKA Era

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, Lijing; Antoniadis, John; Deller, Adam T; Freire, Paulo C C; Hessels, Jason W T; Janssen, Gemma H; Kramer, Michael; Kunz, Jutta; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Perlick, Volker; Possenti, Andrea; Ransom, Scott; Stappers, Benjamin W; van Straten, Willem

    2015-01-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will use pulsars to enable precise measurements of strong gravity effects in pulsar systems, which yield tests of gravitational theories that cannot be carried out anywhere else. The Galactic census of pulsars will discover dozens of relativistic pulsar systems, possibly including pulsar -- black hole binaries which can be used to test the "cosmic censorship conjecture" and the "no-hair theorem". Also, the SKA's remarkable sensitivity will vastly improve the timing precision of millisecond pulsars, allowing probes of potential deviations from general relativity (GR). Aspects of gravitation to be explored include tests of strong equivalence principles, gravitational dipole radiation, extra field components of gravitation, gravitomagnetism, and spacetime symmetries.

  14. Low-radio-frequency eclipses of the redback pulsar J2215+5135 observed in the image plane with LOFAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, J. W.; Fender, R. P.; Breton, R. P.; Stewart, A. J.; Rowlinson, A.; Swinbank, J. D.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Staley, T. D.; van der Horst, A. J.; Bell, M. E.; Carbone, D.; Cendes, Y.; Corbel, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Falcke, H.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Hassall, T. E.; Jonker, P.; Kramer, M.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Law, C. J.; Markoff, S.; Molenaar, G. J.; Pietka, M.; Scheers, L. H. A.; Serylak, M.; Stappers, B. W.; ter Veen, S.; van Leeuwen, J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wijnands, R.; Wise, M. W.; Zarka, P.

    2016-07-01

    The eclipses of certain types of binary millisecond pulsars (i.e. `black widows' and `redbacks') are often studied using high-time-resolution, `beamformed' radio observations. However, they may also be detected in images generated from interferometric data. As part of a larger imaging project to characterize the variable and transient sky at radio frequencies <200 MHz, we have blindly detected the redback system PSR J2215+5135 as a variable source of interest with the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR). Using observations with cadences of two weeks - six months, we find preliminary evidence that the eclipse duration is frequency dependent (∝ν-0.4), such that the pulsar is eclipsed for longer at lower frequencies, in broad agreement with beamformed studies of other similar sources. Furthermore, the detection of the eclipses in imaging data suggests an eclipsing medium that absorbs the pulsed emission, rather than scattering it. Our study is also a demonstration of the prospects of finding pulsars in wide-field imaging surveys with the current generation of low-frequency radio telescopes.

  15. Basic physics and cosmology from pulsar timing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J. H.

    1991-01-01

    Radio pulsars provide unparalleled opportunities for making measurements of astrophysically interesting phenomena. The author concentrates on two particular applications of high precision timing observations of pulsars: tests of relativistic gravitation theory using the binary pulsar 1913+16, and tests of cosmological models using timing data from millisecond pulsars. New upper limits are presented for the energy density of a cosmic background of low frequency gravitational radiation.

  16. Identification of the Periodic Hard X-Ray Transient GRO J1849-03 with the X-Ray Pulsar GS 1843-02 = X1845-024 - a New Be/X-Ray Binary

    OpenAIRE

    Soffitta, P.; Tomsick, J. A.; Harmon, B.A.; Costa, E.; Ford, E. C.; M. Tavani(IASF of Rome/INAF); Zhang, S.N.; Kaaret, P.

    1997-01-01

    We identify the periodic transient hard X-ray source GRO J1849-03 with the transient x-ray pulsar GS 1843-02 = X1845-024 based on the detection of x-ray outbursts from X1845-024 coincident with hard x-ray outbursts of GRO J1849--03. Based on its spin period of 94.8 s and its orbital period of 241 days, we classify the system as a Be/X-ray binary.

  17. The Transition between Nonorthogonal Polarization Modes in PSR B2016+28 at 1404 MHz

    CERN Document Server

    McKinnon, M M

    2003-01-01

    Polarization observations of the radio emission from PSR B2016+28 at 1404 MHz reveal properties that are consistent with two, very different, interpretations of the pulsar's viewing geometry. The pulsar's average polarization properties show a rapid change in position angle (PA) near the pulse center, suggesting that the observer's sightline nearly intersects the star's magnetic pole. But single pulse, polarization observations of the pulsar show nearly orthogonal modes of polarization following relatively flat and parallel PA trajectories across the pulse, suggesting that the sightline is far from the pole. Additionally, PA histograms reveal a "modal connecting bridge", of unknown origin, joining the modal PA trajectories over much of the pulse and following the rapid PA change shown in the average data. The nonorthogonality of polarization modes is incorporated in a statistical model of radio polarization to account for the deviations from mode orthogonality that are observed in the pulsar. The model is use...

  18. Toward an Understanding of the Periastron Puzzle of PSR B1259-63

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren-Xin Xu

    2006-01-01

    Efforts are made to understand the timing behaviors (e.g., the jumps in the projected pulsar semimajor axis at the periastron passages) observed in the 13-year monitoring of PSR B1259-63. Planet-like objects are suggested to orbit around the Be star, which may gravitationally perturb the (probably low mass) pulsar when it passes through periastron.An accretion disk should exist outside the pulsar's light cylinder, which creates a spindown torque on the pulsar due to the propeller effect. The observed negative braking index and the discrepant timing residuals close to periastron could be related to the existence of a disk with a varying accretion rate. A speculation is presented that the accretion rate may increase on a long timescale in order to explain the negative braking index.

  19. Neutron star crustal plate tectonics. I. Magnetic dipole evolution in millisecond pulsars and low-mass X-ray binaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crust lattices in spinning-up or spinning-down neutron stars have growing shear stresses caused by neutron superfluid vortex lines pinned to lattice nuclei. For the most rapidly spinning stars, this stress will break and move the crust before vortex unpinning occurs. In spinning-down neutron stars, crustal plates will move an equatorial subduction zone in which the plates are forced into the stellar core below the crust. The opposite plate motion occurs in spinning-up stars. Magnetic fields which pass through the crust or have sources in it move with the crust. Spun-up neutron stars in accreting low-mass X-ray binaries LMXBs should then have almost axially symmetric magnetic fields. Spun-down ones with very weak magnetic fields should have external magnetic fields which enter and leave the neutron star surface only near its equator. The lowest field millisecond radiopulsars seem to be orthogonal rotators implying that they have not previously been spun-up in LMXBs but are neutron stars initially formed with periods near 0.001 s that subsequently spin down to their present periods. Accretion-induced white dwarf collapse is then the most plausible genesis for them. 29 refs

  20. Searching for gravitational waves from known pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Pitkin, M; Ageev, A; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Asiri, F; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Balasubramanian, R; Ballmer, S; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barnes, M; Barr, B; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Beausoleil, R; Belczynski, K; Bennett, R; Berukoff, S J; Betzwieser, J; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Bland, B; Bochner, B; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burgess, R; Busby, D; Butler, W E; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cantley, C A; Cardenas, L; Carter, K; Casey, M M; Castiglione, J; Chandler, A; Chapsky, J; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chickarmane, V; Chin, D; Christensen, N; Churches, D; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C; Coldwell, R; Coles, M; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crooks, D R M; Csatorday, P; Cusack, B J; Cutler, C; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Daw, E; De Bra, D; Delker, T; Dergachev, V; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S V; Di Credico, A; Díaz, M; Ding, H; Drever, R W P; Dupuis, R J; Edlund, J A; Ehrens, P; Elliffe, E J; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fallnich, C; Farnham, D; Fejer, M M; Findley, T; Fine, M; Finn, L S; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Ganezer, K S; Garofoli, J; Giaime, J A; Gillespie, A; Goda, K; González, G; Goler, S; Grandclément, P; Grant, A; Gray, C; Gretarsson, A M; Grimmett, D; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, E; Gustafson, R; Hamilton, W O; Hammond, M; Hanson, J; Hardham, C; Harms, J; Harry, G; Hartunian, A; Heefner, J; Hefetz, Y; Heinzel, G; Heng, I S; Hennessy, M; Hepler, N; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hindman, N; Hoang, P; Hough, J; Hrynevych, M; Hua, W; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jennrich, O; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Johnston, W R; Jones, D I; Jones, L; Jungwirth, D; Kalogera, V; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kells, W; Kern, J; Khan, A; Killbourn, S; Killow, C J; Kim, C; King, C; King, P; Klimenko, S; Koranda, S; Kotter, K; Kovalik, Yu; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Landry, M; Langdale, J; Lantz, B; Lawrence, R; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Libson, A; Lindquist, P; Liu, S; Logan, J; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Lyons, T T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majid, W; Malec, M; Mann, F; Marin, A; Marka, S; Maros, E; Mason, J; Mason, K; Matherny, O; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McHugh, M; McNabb, J W C; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Miyoki, S; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Müller, G; Mukherjee, S; Murray, P; Myers, J; Nagano, S; Nash, T; Nayak, R; Newton, G; Nocera, F; Noel, J S; Nutzman, P; Olson, T; O'Reilly, B; Ottaway, D J; Ottewill, A; Ouimette, D A; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Parameswariah, C; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pitkin, M; Plissi, M; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rakhmanov, M; Rao, S R; Rawlins, K; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Redding, D; Regehr, M W; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reilly, K T; Reithmaier, K; Reitze, D H; Richman, S; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Rizzi, A; Robertson, D I; Robertson, N A; Robison, L; Roddy, S; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Rong, H; Rose, D; Rotthoff, E; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Salzman, I; Sandberg, V; Sanders, G H; Sannibale, V; Sathyaprakash, B; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Sazonov, A; Schilling, R; Schlaufman, K; Schmidt, V; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Seader, S E; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seel, S; Seifert, F; Sengupta, A S; Shapiro, C A; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Shu, Q Z; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sievers, L; Sigg, D; Sintes, A M; Smith, J R; Smith, M; Smith, M R; Sneddon, P H; Spero, R; Stapfer, G; Steussy, D; Strain, K A; Strom, D; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T; Sumner, M C; Sutton, P J; Sylvestre, J; Takamori, A; Tanner, D B; Tariq, H; Taylor, I; Taylor, R; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Tibbits, M; Tilav, S; Tinto, M; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D W; Ungarelli, C; Vallisneri, M; Van Putten, M H P M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Wallace, L; Walther, H; Ward, H; Ware, B; Watts, K; Webber, D; Weidner, A; Weiland, U; Weinstein, A; Weiss, R; Welling, H; Wen, L; Wen, S; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Wiley, S; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, P R; Williams, R; Willke, B; Wilson, A; Winjum, B J; Winkler, W; Wise, S; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Wu, W; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yoshida, S; Zaleski, K D; Zanolin, M; Zawischa, I; Abbott, R; Zhang, L; Zhu, R; Zotov, N P; Zucker, M; Zweizig, J; Pitkin, Matthew

    2005-01-01

    We present upper limits on the amplitude of gravitational waves from 28 isolated pulsars using data from the second science run of LIGO. The results are also expressed as a constraint on the pulsars' equatorial ellipticities. We discuss a new way of presenting such ellipticity upper limits that takes account of the uncertainties of the pulsar moment of inertia. We also extend our previous method to search for known pulsars in binary systems, of which there are about 80 in the sensitive frequency range of LIGO and GEO 600.

  1. Phase Coherent Observations and Millisecond Pulsar Searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrauner, Jay Arthur

    1997-07-01

    We have built a new radio astronomical receiving system designed specifically for very high precision timing and polarimetry of fast pulsars. Unlike most detectors currently used to study pulsars, this instrument does not square the received signal at the time of observation. Instead, voltages proportional to the instantaneous electric vectors of incoming signals are digitized, time-tagged, and recorded on high speed magnetic media. During processing, the data streams are convolved with an inverse 'chirp' function that completely removes the phase retardation introduced by interstellar dispersion. The intrinsic time resolution of this system is the inverse of the system bandwidth, typically well under 1 μs. We have tested this and another phase-coherent observing-system in observations using the Arecibo 305 m and Green Bank 140 foot telescopes. With these two sets of observations we have studied giant pulses, performed high precision timing, and obtained high-resolution polarization profiles and accurate dispersion We have verified the existence of pulses with intensities hundreds of measures. times the mean for both the main pulse and interpulse of PSR B1937+21, and have established that the amplitudes of both types of giant pulses have similar power-law distributions. The giant pulses are narrower than the average pulses, systematically delayed by 40-50 μs, and many are nearly 100% circularly polarized. We have also conducted two searches of the Northern hemisphere for pulsars. The first used the original pulsar discovery telescope in Cambridge, England to search the entire Northern hemisphere at 81.5 MHz, with an average sensitivity to slow pulsars of 230 mJy. Although we obtained flux densities and pulse profiles of 20 known pulsars, no new pulsars were discovered. The second search effort covered a total of 384 deg2 of previously unsearched sky at 430 MHz using the Arecibo telescope, with an average sensitivity to slow pulsars of 0.83 mJy. We discovered 7

  2. A search of the SAS-2 data for pulsed gamma-ray emission from radio pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogelman, H.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    Data from the SAS-2 high-energy (above 35 MeV) gamma-ray experiment have been examined for pulsed emission from each of 75 radio pulsars which were viewed by the instrument and which have sufficiently well-defined period and period-derivative information from radio observations to allow for gamma-ray periodicity searches. When gamma-ray arrival times were converted to pulsar phase using the radio reference timing information, two pulsars, PSR 1747-46 and PSR 1818-04, showed positive effects, each with a probability of less than 1 part in 10,000 of being a random fluctuation in the data for that pulsar. These are in addition to PSR 0531+21 and PSR 0833-45, previously reported. The results of this study suggest that gamma-ray astronomy has reached the detection threshold for gamma-ray pulsars and that work in the near future should give important new information on the nature of pulsars.

  3. Broad-band spectroscopy of the transient X-ray binary pulsar KS 1947+300 during 2013 giant outburst: Detection of pulsating soft X-ray excess component

    CERN Document Server

    Epili, Prahlad; Jaisawal, Gaurava K

    2016-01-01

    We present the results obtained from detailed timing and spectral studies of the Be/X-ray binary pulsar KS 1947+300 during its 2013 giant outburst. We used data from Suzaku observations of the pulsar at two epochs i.e. on 2013 October 22 (close to the peak of the outburst) and 2013 November 22. X-ray pulsations at $\\sim$18.81 s were clearly detected in the light curves obtained from both observations. Pulse periods estimated during the outburst showed that the pulsar was spinning up. The pulse profile was found to be single-peaked up to $\\sim$10 keV beyond which a sharp peak followed by a dip-like feature appeared at hard X-rays. The dip-like feature has been observed up to $\\sim$70 keV. The 1-110 keV broad-band spectroscopy of both observations revealed that the best-fit model comprised of a partially absorbed Negative and Positive power law with EXponential cutoff (NPEX) continuum model along with a blackbody component for the soft X-ray excess and two Gaussian functions at 6.4 and 6.7 keV for emission line...

  4. Multi-telescope timing of PSR J1518+4904

    CERN Document Server

    Janssen, G H; Krämer, M; Nice, D J; Jessner, A; Cognard, I; Purver, M B

    2008-01-01

    PSR J1518+4904 is one of only 9 known double neutron star systems. These systems are highly valuable for measuring the masses of neutron stars, measuring the effects of gravity, and testing gravitational theories. We determine an improved timing solution for a mildly relativistic double neutron star system, combining data from multiple telescopes. We set better constraints on relativistic parameters and the separate masses of the system, and discuss the evolution of PSR J1518+4904 in the context of other double neutron star systems. PSR J1518+4904 has been regularly observed for more than 10 years by the European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA) network using the Westerbork, Jodrell Bank, Effelsberg and Nancay radio telescopes. The data were analysed using the updated timing software Tempo2. We have improved the timing solution for this double neutron star system. The periastron advance has been refined and a significant detection of proper motion is presented. It is not likely that more post-Keplerian parameters, ...

  5. The distance and radius of the neutron star PSR B0656+14

    CERN Document Server

    Brisken, W F; Golden, A; Goss, W M

    2003-01-01

    We present the result of astrometric observations of the radio pulsar PSR B0656+14, made using the Very Long Baseline Array. The parallax of the pulsar is pi = 3.47 +- 0.36 mas, yielding a distance of 288 +33 -27 pc. This independent distance estimate has been used to constrain existing models of thermal x-ray emission from the neutron star's photosphere. Simple blackbody fits to the x-ray data formally yield a neutron star radius R_inf ~ 7-8.5 km. With more realistic fits to a magnetized hydrogen atmosphere, any radius between ~13 and ~20 km is allowed.

  6. Observation and Simulation of the Variable Gamma-ray Emission from PSR~J2021+4026

    CERN Document Server

    Ng, C W; Cheng, K S

    2016-01-01

    Pulsars are rapidly spinning and highly magnetized neutron stars, with highly stable rotational period and gradual spin-down over a long timescale due to the loss of radiation. Glitches refer to the events that suddenly increase the rotational speed of a pulsar. The exact causes of glitches and the resulting processes are not fully understood. It is generally believed that couplings between the normal matter and the superfluid components, and the starquakes, are the common causes of glitches. In this study, one famous glitching pulsar, PSR~J2021+4026, is investigated. PSR~J2021+4026 is the first variable gamma-ray pulsar observed by Fermi. From the gamma-ray observations, it is found that the pulsar experienced a significant flux drop, an increase in the spin-down rate, a change in the pulse profile and a shift in the spectral cut-off to a lower energy, simultaneously around 2011 October 16. To explain these effects on the high-energy emissions by the glitch of PSR~J2021+4026, we hypothesized the glitch to be...

  7. Low braking index of PSR J1734-3333: an interaction between fall-back disk and magnetic field?

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Wen-Cong

    2015-01-01

    Recent timing observation reported that the radio pulsar PSR J1734 - 3333 with a rotating period $P=1.17~\\rm s$ is slowing down with a period derivative $\\dot{P}=2.28\\times 10^{-12}\\rm s\\,s^{-1}$. Its derived braking index $n=0.9 \\pm 0.2$ is the lowest value among young radio pulsars with the measured braking indices. In this Letter, we attempt to investigate the influence of the braking torque caused by the interaction between the fall-back disk and the strong magnetic field of the pulsar on the spin evolution of PSR J1734 - 3333. Analytical result show that this braking torque is obviously far more than that by magnetic dipole radiation for pulsars with spin period of $> 0.1$ s, and play an important role during the spin-down of the pulsars. Our simulated results indicate that, for some typical neutron star parameters, the braking index and the period derivative approximately in agreement with the measured value of PSR J1734 - 3333 if the material inflow rate in the fallback disk is $2 \\times 10^{17} \\rm g\\...

  8. Sampling the Radio Transient Universe: Studies of Pulsars and the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chennamangalam, Jayanth

    The transient radio universe is a relatively unexplored area of astronomy, offering a variety of phenomena, from solar and Jovian bursts, to flare stars, pulsars, and bursts of Galactic and potentially even cosmological origin. Among these, perhaps the most widely studied radio transients, pulsars are fast-spinning neutron stars that emit radio beams from their magnetic poles. In spite of over 40 years of research on pulsars, we have more questions than answers on these exotic compact objects, chief among them the nature of their emission mechanism. Nevertheless, the wealth of phenomena exhibited by pulsars make them one of the most useful astrophysical tools. With their high densities, pulsars are probes of the nature of ultra-dense matter. Characterized by their high timing stability, pulsars can be used to verify the predictions of general relativity, discover planets around them, study bodies in the solar system, and even serve as an interplanetary (and possibly some day, interstellar) navigation aid. Pulsars are also used to study the nature of the interstellar medium, much like a flashlight illuminating airborne dust in a dark room. Studies of pulsars in the Galactic center can help answer questions about the massive black hole in the region and the star formation history in its vicinity. Millisecond pulsars in globular clusters are long-lived tracers of their progenitors, low-mass X-ray binaries, and can be used to study the dynamical history of those clusters. Another source of interest in radio transient astronomy is the hitherto undetected engineered signal from extraterrestrial intelligence. The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) is an ongoing attempt at discovering the presence of technological life elsewhere in the Galaxy. In this work, I present my forays into two aspects of the study of the radio transient universe---pulsars and SETI. Firstly, I describe my work on the luminosity function and population size of pulsars in the globular

  9. Testing Gravity with Pulsar Scintillation Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Huan; Pen, Ue-Li

    2016-01-01

    We propose to use pulsar scintillation measurements to test predictions of alternative theories of gravity. Comparing to single-path pulsar timing measurements, the scintillation measurements can achieve a factor of 10^5 improvement in timing accuracy, due to the effect of multi-path interference. Previous scintillation measurements of PSR B0834+06 have data acquisition for hours, making this approach sensitive to mHz gravitational waves. Therefore it has unique advantages in measuring gravitational effect or other mechanisms (at mHz and above frequencies) on light propagation. We illustrate its application in constraining scalar gravitational-wave background, in which case the sensitivities can be greatly improved with respect to previous limits. We expect much broader applications in testing gravity with existing and future pulsar scintillation observations.

  10. EVIDENCE OF AN ASTEROID ENCOUNTERING A PULSAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brook, P. R.; Karastergiou, A. [Astrophysics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Buchner, S. [Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 443, Krugersdorp 1740 (South Africa); Roberts, S. J. [Information Engineering, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PJ (United Kingdom); Keith, M. J.; Johnston, S.; Shannon, R. M., E-mail: paul.brook@astro.ox.ac.uk [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

    2014-01-10

    Debris disks and asteroid belts are expected to form around young pulsars due to fallback material from their original supernova explosions. Disk material may migrate inward and interact with a pulsar's magnetosphere, causing changes in torque and emission. Long-term monitoring of PSR J0738–4042 reveals both effects. The pulse shape changes multiple times between 1988 and 2012. The torque, inferred via the derivative of the rotational period, changes abruptly from 2005 September. This change is accompanied by an emergent radio component that drifts with respect to the rest of the pulse. No known intrinsic pulsar processes can explain these timing and radio emission signatures. The data lead us to postulate that we are witnessing an encounter with an asteroid or in-falling debris from a disk.

  11. Pulsar Navigation in the Solar System

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Jiang

    2008-01-01

    The X-ray Pulsar-based Autonomous Navigation(XNAV) were recently tested which use the Crab pulsar (PSR B0531+21) in the USA Experiment on flown by the Navy on the Air Force Advanced Research and Global Observation Satellite (ARGOS) under the Space Test Program. It provide the way that the spacecraft could autonomously determine its position with respect to an inertial origin. Now I analysis the sensitivity of the exist instrument and the signal process to use radio pulsar navigation and discuss the integrated navigation use pulsar,then give the different navigation mission analysis and design process basically which include the space, the airborne, the ship and the land of the planet or the lunar.So the pulsar navigation can give the continuous position in deep spaces, that means we can freedom fly successfully in the solar system use celestial navigation that include pulsar and traditional star sensor.It also can less or abolish the depend of Global Navigation Satellite System which include GPS, GRONSS, Gali...

  12. Very high-energy observations of PSR B1951+32

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PSR B1951+32 is a γ-ray pulsar detected by the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) and identified with the 39.5 ms radio pulsar in the supernova remnant CTB 80. The pulsar energy spectrum is consistent with an unbroken power law with differential photon index of -1.8±0.1 between 50 MeV and 10 GeV. The EGRET data shows no evidence for a spectral turnover. Here we report on the first observations of PSR B1951+32 beyond 30 GeV. The observations were carried out with the 10 m γ-ray telescope at the Whipple Observatory on Mount Hopkins, Arizona. In 8.1 hours of observation we find no evidence for steady or periodic emission from PSR B1951+32 above ∼260GeV. Flux upper limits are derived and compared with model extrapolations from lower energies and the predictions of emission models. copyright 1997 The American Astronomical Society

  13. Nature of eclipsing pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Khechinashvili, D; Gil, J; Khechinashvili, David; Melikidze, George; Gil, Janusz

    2000-01-01

    We present a model for pulsar radio eclipses in some binary systems, and test this model for PSRs B1957+20 and J2051-0827. We suggest that in these binaries the companion stars are degenerate dwarfs with strong surface magnetic fields. The magnetospheres of these stars are permanently infused by the relativistic particles of the pulsar wind. We argue that the radio waves emitted by the pulsar split into the eigenmodes of the electron-positron plasma as they enter the companion's magnetosphere and are then strongly damped due to cyclotron resonance with the ambient plasma particles. Our model explains in a natural way the anomalous duration and behavior of radio eclipses observed in such systems. In particular, it provides stable, continuous, and frequency-dependent eclipses, in agreement with the observations. We predict a significant variation of linear polarization both at eclipse ingress and egress. In this paper we also suggest several possible mechanisms of generation of the optical and $X$-ray emission ...

  14. The hunt for new pulsars with the Green Bank Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Lynch, Ryan S; Banaszak, Shawn; Becker, Alison; Berndsen, Aaron; Biwer, Chris; Boyles, Jason; Cardoso, Rogerio F; Cherry, Angus; Dartez, Louis P; Day, David; Epstein, Courtney R; Flanigan, Joe; Ford, Anthony; Garcia, Alejandro; Hessels, Jason W T; Jenet, Fredrick A; Kaplan, David L; Karako-Argaman, Chen; Kaspi, Victoria M; Kondratiev, Vladislav I; Lorimer, Duncan R; Lunsford, Grady; Martinez, Jose; McLaughlin, Maura A; McPhee, Christie A; Pennucci, Tim; Ransom, Scott M; Roberts, Mallory S E; Rohr, Matt; Siemens, Xavi; Stairs, Ingrid H; Stovall, Kevin; van Leeuwen, Joeri; Walker, Arielle; Wells, Brad

    2013-01-01

    The Green Bank Telescope (GBT) is the largest fully steerable radio telescope in the world and is one of our greatest tools for discovering and studying radio pulsars. Over the last decade, the GBT has successfully found over 100 new pulsars through large-area surveys. Here I discuss the two most recent---the GBT 350 MHz Drift-scan survey and the Green Bank North Celestial Cap survey. The primary science goal of both surveys is to find interesting individual pulsars, including young pulsars, rotating radio transients, exotic binary systems, and especially bright millisecond pulsars (MSPs) suitable for inclusion in Pulsar Timing Arrays, which are trying to directly detect gravitational waves. These two surveys have combined to discover 85 pulsars to date, among which are 14 MSPs and many unique and fascinating systems. I present highlights from these surveys and discuss future plans. I also discuss recent results from targeted GBT pulsar searches of globular clusters and Fermi sources.

  15. Ordinary X-Rays from Three Extraordinary Millisecond Pulsars: XMM-Newton Observations of PSRs J0337+1715, J0636+5129, and J0645+5158

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiewak, Renée; Kaplan, David L.; Archibald, Anne; Gentile, Peter; Hessels, Jason; Lorimer, Duncan; Lynch, Ryan; McLaughlin, Maura; Ransom, Scott; Stairs, Ingrid; Stovall, Kevin

    2016-05-01

    We present the first X-ray observations of three recently discovered millisecond pulsars (MSPs) with interesting characteristics: PSR J0337+1715, PSR J0636+5129, and PSR J0645+5158. PSR J0337+1715 is a fast-spinning, bright, and so-far unique MSP in a hierarchical triple system with two white dwarf companions. PSR J0636+5129 is an MSP in a very tight 96-minute orbit with a low-mass, 8 M J companion. PSR J0645+5158 is a nearby, isolated MSP with a very small duty cycle (1%-2%), which has led to its inclusion in high-precision pulsar timing programs. Using data from XMM-Newton, we have analyzed X-ray spectroscopy for these three objects, as well as optical/ultraviolet photometry for PSR J0337+1715. The X-ray data for each are largely consistent with expectations for most MSPs with regards to the ratios of thermal and non-thermal emission. We discuss the implications of these data on the pulsar population, and prospects for future observations of these pulsars.

  16. Ordinary X-rays from Three Extraordinary Millisecond Pulsars: XMM-Newton Observations of PSRs J0337+1715, J0636+5129, and J0645+5158

    CERN Document Server

    Spiewak, Renée; Archibald, Anne; Gentile, Peter; Hessels, Jason; Lorimer, Duncan; Lynch, Ryan; McLaughlin, Maura; Ransom, Scott; Stairs, Ingrid; Stovall, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    We present the first X-ray observations of three recently discovered millisecond pulsars (MSPs) with interesting characteristics: PSR J0337+1715, PSR J0636+5129, and PSR J0645+5158. PSR J0337+1715 is a fast-spinning, bright, and so-far unique MSP in a hierarchical triple system with two white dwarf (WD) companions. PSR J0636+5129 is a MSP in a very tight 96-min orbit with a low-mass, 8 $M_J$ companion. PSR J0645+5158 is a nearby, isolated MSP with a very small duty cycle (1-2%), which has led to its inclusion in high-precision pulsar timing programs. Using data from XMM-Newton, we have analyzed X-ray spectroscopy for these three objects, as well as optical/ultraviolet photometry for PSR J0337+1715. The X-ray data for each are largely consistent with expectations for most MSPs with regards to the ratios of thermal and non-thermal emission. We discuss the implications of these data on the pulsar population, and prospects for future observations of these pulsars.

  17. Observations of three young gamma-ray pulsars with the Gran Telescopio Canarias

    CERN Document Server

    Mignani, R P; Testa, V; Marelli, M; De Luca, A; Pierbattista, M; Shearer, A; Torres, D F; Wilhelmi, E De Ona

    2016-01-01

    We report the analysis of the first deep optical observations of three isolated $\\gamma$-ray pulsars detected by the {\\em Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope}: the radio-loud PSR\\, J0248+6021 and PSR\\, J0631+1036, and the radio-quiet PSR\\, J0633+0632. The latter has also been detected in the X rays. The pulsars are very similar in their spin-down age ($\\tau \\sim$40--60 kyrs), spin-down energy ($\\dot{E} \\sim10^{35}$ erg s$^{-1}$), and dipolar surface magnetic field ($B \\sim 3$--$5\\times10^{12}$ G). These pulsars are promising targets for multi-wavelength observations, since they have been already detected in $\\gamma$ rays and in radio or X-rays. None of them has been detected yet in the optical band. We observed the three pulsar fields in 2014 with the Spanish 10.4m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC). We could not find any candidate optical counterpart to the three pulsars close to their most recent radio or {\\em Chandra} positions down to $3 \\sigma$ limits of $g'\\sim27.3$, $g'\\sim27$, $g'\\sim27.3$ for PSR\\, J0248+602...

  18. Radio and Gamma-Ray Constraints on the Emission Geometry and Birthplace of PSR J2043+2740

    CERN Document Server

    Noutsos, A; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Busetto, G; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Camilo, F; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Celik, O; Chaty, S; Chekhtman, A; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cognard, I; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Colafrancesco, S; Cutini, S; Dermer, C D; de Palma, F; Drell, P S; Dumora, D; Espinoza, C M; Favuzzi, C; Ferrara, E C; Focke, W B; Frailis, M; Freire, P C C; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Godfrey, G; Grandi, P; Grenier, I A; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Harding, A K; Hughes, R E; Jackson, M S; Johannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Johnston, S; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Knoedlseder, J; Kramer, M; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Lee, S -H; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Lyne, A G; Makeev, A; Marelli, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Mehault, J; Michelson, P F; Mizuno, T; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Naumann-Godo, M; Nolan, P L; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Panetta, J H; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Persic, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rain, S; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Romani, R W; Sadrozinski, H F -W; Sander, A; Parkinson, P M Saz; Sgro, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Stappers, B W; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Takahashi, H; Tanaka, T; Theureau, G; Thompson, D J; Thorsett, S E; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Tramacere, A; Usher, T L; Vandenbroucke, J; Vianello, G; Vilchez, N; Villata, M; Vitale, V; von Kienlin, A; Waite, A P; Wang, P; Watters, K; Weltevrede, P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Ziegler, M

    2010-01-01

    We report on the first year of Fermi gamma-ray observations of pulsed high-energy emission from the old PSR J2043+2740. The study of the gamma-ray efficiency of such old pulsars gives us an insight into the evolution of pulsars' ability to emit in gammma rays as they age. The gamma-ray lightcurve of this pulsar above 0.1 GeV is clearly defined by two sharp peaks, 0.353+/-0.035 periods apart. We have combined the gamma-ray profile characteristics of PSR J2043+2740 with the geometrical properties of the pulsar's radio emission, derived from radio polarization data, and constrained the pulsar-beam geometry in the framework of a Two Pole Caustic and an Outer Gap model. The ranges of magnetic inclination and viewing angle were determined to be {alpha,zeta}~{52-57,61-68} for the Two Pole Caustic model, and {alpha,zeta}~{62-73,74-81} and {alpha,zeta}~{72-83,60-75} for the Outer Gap model. Based on this geometry, we assess possible birth locations for this pulsar and derive a likely proper motion, sufficiently high t...

  19. Long Term Study of the Double Pulsar J0737-3039 with XMM-Newton: pulsar timing

    CERN Document Server

    Iacolina, M N; Egron, E; Possenti, A; Breton, R; Lyutikov, M; Kramer, M; Burgay, M; Motta, S E; De Luca, A; Tiengo, A

    2015-01-01

    The relativistic double neutron star binary PSR J0737-3039 shows clear evidence of orbital phase-dependent wind-companion interaction, both in radio and X-rays. In this paper we present the results of timing analysis of PSR J0737-3039 performed during 2006 and 2011 XMM-Newton Large Programs that collected ~20,000 X-ray counts from the system. We detected pulsations from PSR J0737-3039A (PSR A) through the most accurate timing measurement obtained by XMM-Newton so far, the spin period error being of 2x10^-13 s. PSR A's pulse profile in X-rays is very stable despite significant relativistic spin precession that occurred within the time span of observations. This yields a constraint on the misalignment between the spin axis and the orbital momentum axis Delta_A ~6.6^{+1.3}_{-5.4} deg, consistent with estimates based on radio data. We confirmed pulsed emission from PSR J0737-3039B (PSR B) in X-rays even after its disappearance in radio. The unusual phenomenology of PSR B's X-ray emission includes orbital pulsed f...

  20. 21 years of Timing PSR B1509-58

    CERN Document Server

    Livingstone, M A; Gavriil, F P; Manchester, R N; Livingstone, Margaret A.; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Gavriil, Fotis P.; Manchester, Richard N.

    2004-01-01

    We present an updated timing solution for the young, energetic pulsar PSR B1509-58 based on 21.3 years of radio timing data and 7.6 years of X-ray timing data. No glitches have occurred in this time span, in contrast to other well-studied young pulsars, which show frequent glitches. We report a measurement of the third frequency derivative of (-1.28+/-0.21)x10^(-31) s^(-4). This value is 1.65 standard deviations from, i.e. consistent with, that predicted by the simple constant magnetic dipole model of pulsar spin-down. We measured the braking index to be n=2.839+/-0.003 and show that it varies by 1.5% over 21.3 yr due to contamination from timing noise. Results of a low-resolution power spectral analysis of the significant noise apparent in the data yield a spectral index of alpha=-4.6+/-1.0 for the red noise component.

  1. Orbital angular momentum loss in PSR 1957 + 20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banit, Menashe; Shaham, Jacob

    1992-01-01

    It is suggested that the companion winds, excited by the radiation from the neutron star in PSR 1957 + 20 form only through the combined action of the radiation heat on the companion's atmosphere and the radiation force on the slowly lifting wind. Ballistic simulations suggest that these winds leave only from selected areas of the illuminated surface of the companion; surface currents channel into these regions relatively hot (but altogether cooler than the companion escape velocity) 'coronal' matter from the whole illuminated area. Under suitable conditions, wind particles spend some time trailing the companion at close distances before taking off to escape from the system. This can torque the binary into angular momentum loss that will be as efficient as the one recently observed in PSR 1957 + 20 if the companion is bloated to dimensions close to that of the Roche lobe.

  2. Long-term Phase-coherent X-ray Timing of PSR B0540-69

    CERN Document Server

    Livingstone, M A; Gavriil, F P; Livingstone, Margaret A.; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Gavriil, Fotis P.

    2005-01-01

    We present a new phase-coherent timing analysis for the young, energetic pulsar PSR B0540-69 using 7.6 yr of data from the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer. We measure the braking index, n=2.140+/-0.009, and discuss our measurement in the context of other discordant values reported in the literature. We present an improved source position from the phase-coherent timing of the pulsar, to our knowledge, the first of its kind from X-ray pulsar timing. In addition, we detect evidence for a glitch which has been previously reported but later disputed. The glitch occured at MJD 51335+/-12 with a fractional change in frequency of (1.4+/-0.2)E{-9} and a fractional change in frequency derivative of (1.33+/-0.02)E{-4}. We calculate that the glitch activity parameter for PSR B0540-69 is two orders of magnitude smaller than that of the Crab pulsar which has otherwise very similar properties. This suggests that neutron stars of similar apparent ages, rotation properties and inferred dipolar B fields can have significantly diff...

  3. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF PSR J1836+5925

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discovery of the γ-ray pulsar PSR J1836+5925, powering the formerly unidentified EGRET source 3EG J1835+5918, was one of the early accomplishments of the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Sitting 250 off the Galactic plane, PSR J1836+5925 is a 173 ms pulsar with a characteristic age of 1.8 million years, a spindown luminosity of 1.1 x 1034 erg s-1, and a large off-peak (OP) emission component, making it quite unusual among the known γ-ray pulsar population. We present an analysis of one year of LAT data, including an updated timing solution, detailed spectral results, and a long-term light curve showing no indication of variability. No evidence for a surrounding pulsar wind nebula is seen and the spectral characteristics of the OP emission indicate it is likely magnetospheric. Analysis of recent XMM-Newton observations of the X-ray counterpart yields a detailed characterization of its spectrum, which, like Geminga, is consistent with that of a neutron star showing evidence for both magnetospheric and thermal emission.

  4. Reduced spin-down rate of PSR J0738-4042 explained as due to an asteroid disruption event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yong-Bo; Huang, Yong-Feng

    2016-05-01

    Long term observations by Brook et al. reveal that the derivative of rotational frequency of PSR J0738-4042 changed abruptly in 2005. Originally, the spin-down rate was relatively stable, with the rotational frequency derivative being -1.14×10-14 s-2. After September 2005, the derivative began to rise. About 1000 days later, it arrived at another relatively stable value of about -0.98 × 10-14 s-2, indicating that the pulsar is spinning-down relatively slowly. To explain the observed change in spin-down rate, we resort to an asteroid disrupted by PSR J0738-4042. In our model, the orbital angular momentum of the asteroid is assumed to be parallel to that of the rotating pulsar, so that the pronounced reduction in the spin-down rate can be naturally explained as due to the transfer of angular momentum from the disrupted material to the central pulsar. The derived magnetospheric radius is about 7.0 × 109 cm, which is smaller than the tidal disruption radius (8.7 × 1010 cm). Our model is self-consistent. It is shown that the variability in the spin-down rate of PSR J0738-4042 can be quantitatively accounted for by accretion from the asteroid disrupted by the central pulsar.

  5. Equilibrium spin pulsars unite neutron star populations

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, Wynn C G; Coe, M J; Andersson, Nils

    2014-01-01

    Many pulsars are formed with a binary companion from which they can accrete matter. Torque exerted by accreting matter can cause the pulsar spin to increase or decrease, and over long times, an equilibrium spin rate is achieved. Application of accretion theory to these systems provides a probe of the pulsar magnetic field. We compare the large number of recent torque measurements of accreting pulsars with a high-mass companion to the standard model for how accretion affects the pulsar spin period. We find that many long spin period (P > 100 s) pulsars must possess either extremely weak (B 10^14 G) magnetic fields. We argue that the strong-field solution is more compelling, in which case these pulsars are near spin equilibrium. Our results provide evidence for a fundamental link between pulsars with the slowest spin periods and strong magnetic fields around high-mass companions and pulsars with the fastest spin periods and weak fields around low-mass companions. The strong magnetic fields also connect our pul...

  6. The Pulsed Spectra of Two Extraordinary Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, M S E; Ibrahim, A; Kaspi, V M; Markwardt, C B; Ransom, S M; Swank, J H; Woods, P; Gavriil, Fotis; Ibrahim, Alaa; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Markwardt, Craig; Ransom, Scott M.; Roberts, Mallory S.E.; Swank, Jean H.; Woods, Pete

    2004-01-01

    We report on X-ray monitoring of two isolated pulsars within the same RXTE field of view. PSR J1811-1925 in the young supernova remnant G11.2-0.3 has a nearly sinusoidal pulse profile with a hard pulsed spectrum (photon index \\~1.2). The pulsar is a highly efficient (~ 1% of spin-down energy) emitter of 2-50 keV pulsed X-rays despite having a fairly typical B ~ 2e12 G magnetic field. PSR J1809-1943/XTE J1810-197 is a newly discovered slow (P=5.54 s), apparently isolated X-ray pulsar which increased in flux by a factor of ~100 in 2003 January. Nine months of monitoring observations have shown a decrease in pulsed flux of ~ 30% without a significant change in its apparently thermal spectrum (kT ~0.7 keV) or pulse profile. During this time, the spin-down torque has fluctuated by a factor of ~ 2. Both the torque and the flux have remained steady for the last 3 months, at levels consistent with a magnetar interpretation.

  7. A 16 Millisecond X-Ray Pulsar in the Crab-Like SNR N157B Fast Times at 30 Doradus

    CERN Document Server

    Gotthelf, E V; Marshall, F E; Middleditch, J; Wang, Q D

    1998-01-01

    The supernova remnant N157B (30 Dor B, SNR 0539-69.1, NGC 2060), located in the Tarantula Nebula of the Large Magellanic Cloud, has long been considered a possible Crab-like remnant. This hypothesis has been confirmed, quite spectacularly, with the discovery of PSR J0537-6910, the remarkable 16 ms X-ray pulsar in N157B. PSR J0537-6910 is the most rapidly spinning pulsar found to be associated with a supernova remnant. Here we report our discovery and summarize the properties of this pulsar and its supernova remnant.

  8. FERMI-LAT SEARCH FOR PULSAR WIND NEBULAE AROUND GAMMA-RAY PULSARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high sensitivity of the Fermi-LAT (Large Area Telescope) offers the first opportunity to study faint and extended GeV sources such as pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). After one year of observation the LAT detected and identified three PWNe: the Crab Nebula, Vela-X, and the PWN inside MSH 15-52. In the meantime, the list of LAT detected pulsars increased steadily. These pulsars are characterized by high energy loss rates ( E-dot ) from ∼3 x 1033 erg s-1 to 5 x 1038 erg s-1 and are therefore likely to power a PWN. This paper summarizes the search for PWNe in the off-pulse windows of 54 LAT-detected pulsars using 16 months of survey observations. Ten sources show significant emission, seven of these likely being of magnetospheric origin. The detection of significant emission in the off-pulse interval offers new constraints on the γ-ray emitting regions in pulsar magnetospheres. The three other sources with significant emission are the Crab Nebula, Vela-X, and a new PWN candidate associated with the LAT pulsar PSR J1023-5746, coincident with the TeV source HESS J1023-575. We further explore the association between the HESS and the Fermi source by modeling its spectral energy distribution. Flux upper limits derived for the 44 remaining sources are used to provide new constraints on famous PWNe that have been detected at keV and/or TeV energies.

  9. A Cosmic Census of Radio Pulsars with the SKA

    CERN Document Server

    Keane, E F; Kramer, M; Stappers, B W; Bates, S D; Burgay, M; Chatterjee, S; Champion, D J; Eatough, R P; Hessels, J W T; Janssen, G; Lee, K J; van Leeuwen, J; Margueron, J; Oertel, M; Possenti, A; Ransom, S; Theureau, G; Torne, P

    2015-01-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will make ground breaking discoveries in pulsar science. In this chapter we outline the SKA surveys for new pulsars, as well as how we will perform the necessary follow-up timing observations. The SKA's wide field-of-view, high sensitivity, multi-beaming and sub-arraying capabilities, coupled with advanced pulsar search backends, will result in the discovery of a large population of pulsars. These will enable the SKA's pulsar science goals (tests of General Relativity with pulsar binary systems, investigating black hole theorems with pulsar-black hole binaries, and direct detection of gravitational waves in a pulsar timing array). Using SKA1-MID and SKA1-LOW we will survey the Milky Way to unprecedented depth, increasing the number of known pulsars by more than an order of magnitude. SKA2 will potentially find all the Galactic radio-emitting pulsars in the SKA sky which are beamed in our direction. This will give a clear picture of the birth properties of pulsars and of the gr...

  10. Gamma-ray pulsar studies with COMPTEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermsen, W.; Kuiper, L.; Diehl, R.; Lichti, G.; Schoenfelder, V.; Strong, A. W.; Connors, A.; Ryan, J.; Bennett, K.; Busetta, M.; Carraminana, A.; Buccheri, R.; Grenier, I. A.

    1994-06-01

    Since the launch of the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) the number of detected gamma-ray pulsars increased from two to six. COMPTEL, on-board CGRO and sensitive to gamma-rays with energies between approximately 0.7 and 30 MeV, detected three of these unambiguously. The classical Crab and Vela pulsars have been observed on several occasions and detailed pulse patterns and spectral parameters have been derived. The new CGRO gamma-ray pulsar PSR B1509-58 has been detected by COMPTEL at a significance level above 4 sigma, consistently in a timing and spatial analysis. A likely detection of Geminga has been obtained at an approximately 3 sigma level. This indication is found in a phase interval in which COS B data showed the presence of a new variable component, Interpeak 2, exhibiting a very soft spectrum above 50 MeV. The diversities in light-curve sphapes and spectral distributions, the apparent time variabilities, and the significant differences in the fractions of the spin-down power radiated at gamma-ray energies in this small sample of gamma-ray pulsars pose important constraints to pulsar modeling.

  11. NuSTAR discovery of an unusually steady long-term spin-up of the Be binary 2RXP J130159.6-635806

    CERN Document Server

    Krivonos, Roman A; Lutovinov, Alexander A; Tomsick, John A; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Bachetti, Matteo; Boggs, Steven E; Chernyakova, Masha; Christensen, Finn E; Craig, William W; Fuerst, Felix; Hailey, Charles J; Harrison, Fiona A; Lansbury, George B; Rahoui, Farid; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William W

    2015-01-01

    We present spectral and timing analysis of NuSTAR observations of the accreting X-ray pulsar 2RXP J130159.6-635806. The source was serendipitously observed during a campaign focused on the gamma-ray binary PSR B1259-63 and was later targeted for a dedicated observation. The spectrum has a typical shape for accreting X-ray pulsars, consisting of a simple power law with an exponential cutoff starting at ~7 keV with a folding energy of E_fold=~18 keV. There is also an indication of the presence of a 6.4 keV iron line in the spectrum at the ~3 sigma significance level. NuSTAR measurements of the pulsation period reveal that the pulsar has undergone a strong and steady spin-up for the last 20 years. The pulsed fraction is estimated to be ~80%, and is constant with energy up to 40 keV. The power density spectrum shows a break towards higher frequencies relative to the current spin period. This, together with steady persistent luminosity, points to a long-term mass accretion rate high enough to bring the pulsar out ...

  12. Optical observations of PSR J2021+3651 in the Dragonfly Nebula with the GTC

    CERN Document Server

    Kirichenko, Aida; Shternin, Peter; Shibanov, Yuriy; Ryspaeva, Elizaveta; Zyuzin, Dima; Durant, Martin; Kargaltsev, Oleg; Pavlov, George; Cabrera-Lavers, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    PSR J2021+3651 is a 17 kyr old rotation powered pulsar detected in the radio, X-rays, and $\\gamma$-rays. It powers a torus-like pulsar wind nebula with jets, dubbed the Dragonfly, which is very similar to that of the Vela pulsar. The Dragonfly is likely associated with the extended TeV source VER J2019+368 and extended radio emission. We conducted first deep optical observations with the GTC in the Sloan $r'$ band to search for optical counterparts of the pulsar and its nebula. No counterparts were detected down to $r'\\gtrsim27.2$ and $\\gtrsim24.8$ for the point-like pulsar and the compact X-ray nebula, respectively. We also reanalyzed Chandra archival X-ray data taking into account an interstellar extinction--distance relation, constructed by us for the Dragonfly line of sight using the red-clump stars as standard candles. This allowed us to constrain the distance to the pulsar, $D=1.8^{+1.7}_{-1.4}$ kpc at 90% confidence. It is much smaller than the dispersion measure distance of $\\sim$12 kpc but compatible...

  13. On the Pulse Intensity Modulation of PSR B0823+26

    CERN Document Server

    Young, N J; Weltevrede, P; Lyne, A G; Kramer, M

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the radio emission behaviour of PSR B0823+26, a pulsar which is known to undergo pulse nulling, using an 153-d intensive sequence of observations. The pulsar is found to exhibit both short (~min) and unusually long-term (~hours or more) nulls, which not only suggest that the source possesses a distribution of nulling timescales, but that it may also provide a link between conventional nulling pulsars and longer-term intermittent pulsars. Despite seeing evidence for periodicities in the pulsar radio emission, we are uncertain whether they are intrinsic to the source, due to the influence of observation sampling on the periodicity analysis performed. Remarkably, we find evidence to suggest that the pulsar may undergo pre-ignition periods of 'emission flickering', that is rapid changes between radio-on (active) and -off (null) emission states, before transitioning to a steady radio-emitting phase. We find no direct evidence to indicate that the object exhibits any change in spin-down rate between ...

  14. Eight gamma-ray pulsars discovered in blind frequency searches of Fermi LAT data

    CERN Document Server

    Parkinson, P M Saz; Ziegler, M; Ray, P S; Abdo, A A; Ballet, J; Baring, M G; Belfiore, A; Burnett, T H; Caliandro, G A; Camilo, F; Caraveo, P A; de Luca, A; Ferrara, E C; Freire, P C C; Grove, J E; Gwon, C; Harding, A K; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnston, S; Keith, M; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Makeev, A; Marelli, M; Michelson, P F; Parent, D; Ransom, S M; Reimer, O; Romani, R W; Smith, D A; Thompson, D J; Watters, K; Weltevrede, P; Wolff, M T; Wood, K S

    2010-01-01

    We report the discovery of eight gamma-ray pulsars in blind frequency searches using the LAT, onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Five of the eight pulsars are young (tau_c10^36 erg/s), and located within the Galactic plane (|b|<3 deg). The remaining three are older, less energetic, and located off the plane. Five pulsars are associated with sources included in the LAT bright gamma-ray source list, but only one, PSR J1413-6205, is clearly associated with an EGRET source. PSR J1023-5746 has the smallest characteristic age (tau_c=4.6 kyr) and is the most energetic (Edot=1.1E37 erg/s) of all gamma-ray pulsars discovered so far in blind searches. PSRs J1957+5033 and J2055+25 have the largest characteristic ages (tau_c~1 Myr) and are the least energetic (Edot~5E33 erg/s) of the newly-discovered pulsars. We present the timing models, light curves, and detailed spectral parameters of the new pulsars. We used recent XMM observations to identify the counterpart of PSR J2055+25 as XMMU J205549.4+253959. In ...

  15. Precision southern hemisphere VLBI pulsar astrometry II: Measurement of seven parallaxes

    CERN Document Server

    Deller, A T; Bailes, M; Reynolds, J E

    2009-01-01

    Accurate measurement of pulsar distances via astrometry using very long baseline interferometry enables the improvement of Galactic electron density distribution models, improving distance estimates for the vast majority of pulsars for which parallax measurements are unavailable. However, pulsars at southern declinations have been under-represented in previous interferometric astrometry campaigns. In order to redress this imbalance, we have conducted a two-year astrometric campaign targeting eight southern pulsars with the Australian Long Baseline Array. The program summarized in this paper has resulted in the measurement of seven new pulsar parallaxes, with success on objects down to a mean flux density of 0.8 mJy at 1600 MHz. Our results highlight the substantial uncertainties that remain when utilizing free electron density models for individual pulsar distances. Until this study, PSR J0630-2834 was believed to convert 16% of its spin-down energy into x-rays, but our measured parallax distance of 332 (+52 ...

  16. The 3D Space and Spin Velocities of a Gamma-ray Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Roger W.

    2016-04-01

    PSR J2030+4415 is a LAT-discovered 0.5My-old gamma-ray pulsar with an X-ray synchrotron trail and a rare Halpha bowshock. We have obtained GMOS IFU spectroscopic imaging of this shell, and show a sweep through the remarkable Halpha structure, comparing with the high energy emission. These data provide a unique 3D map of the momentum distribution of the relativistic pulsar wind. This shows that the pulsar is moving nearly in the plane of the sky and that the pulsar wind has a polar component misaligned with the space velocity. The spin axis is shown to be inclined some 95degrees to the Earth line of sight, explaining why this is a radio-quiet, gamma-only pulsar. Intriguingly, the shell also shows multiple bubbles that suggest that the pulsar wind power has varied substantially over the past 500 years.

  17. GBM Observations of Be X-Ray Binary Outbursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Finger, M. H.; Jenke, P. A.

    2014-01-01

    Since 2008 we have been monitoring accreting pulsars using the Gamma ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi. This monitoring program includes daily blind full sky searches for previously unknown or previously quiescent pulsars and source specific analysis to track the frequency evolution of all detected pulsars. To date we have detected outbursts from 23 transient accreting pulsars, including 21 confirmed or likely Be/X-ray binaries. I will describe our techniques and highlight results for selected pulsars.

  18. Testing General Relativity with Pulsar Timing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stairs Ingrid H.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulsars of very different types, including isolated objects and binaries (with short- and long-period orbits, and white-dwarf and neutron-star companions provide the means to test both the predictions of general relativity and the viability of alternate theories of gravity. This article presents an overview of pulsars, then discusses the current status of and future prospects for tests of equivalence-principle violations and strong-field gravitational experiments.

  19. Testing General Relativity with Pulsar Timing

    CERN Document Server

    Stairs, I H

    2003-01-01

    Pulsars of very different types - isolated objects, and binaries with short- and long-period orbits, white-dwarf and neutron-star companions - provide the means to test both the predictions of general relativity and the viability of alternate theories of gravity. This article presents an overview of pulsars, then discusses the current status and future prospects of tests of equivalence principle violations and strong-field gravitational experiments.

  20. A new nearby pulsar wind nebula overlapping the RX J0852.0-4622 supernova remnant

    CERN Document Server

    Acero, F; Ballet, J; Renaud, M; Terrier, R

    2012-01-01

    Energetic pulsars can be embedded in a nebula of relativistic leptons which is powered by the dissipation of the rotational energy of the pulsar. The object PSR J0855-4644 is an energetic and fast-spinning pulsar (Edot = 1.1x10^36 erg/s, P=65 ms) discovered near the South-East rim of the supernova remnant (SNR) RX J0852.0-4622 (aka Vela Jr) by the Parkes multibeam survey. The position of the pulsar is in spatial coincidence with an enhancement in X-rays and TeV gamma-rays, which could be due to its putative pulsar wind nebula (PWN). The purpose of this study is to search for diffuse non-thermal X-ray emission around PSR J0855-4644 to test for the presence of a PWN and to estimate the distance to the pulsar. An X-ray observation was carried out with the XMM-Newton satellite to constrain the properties of the pulsar and its nebula. The absorption column density derived in X-rays from the pulsar and from different regions of the rim of the SNR was compared with the absorption derived from the atomic (HI) and mol...

  1. Broad-band spectroscopy of the transient X-ray binary pulsar KS 1947+300 during 2013 giant outburst: Detection of pulsating soft X-ray excess component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epili, Prahlad; Naik, Sachindra; Jaisawal, Gaurava K.

    2016-05-01

    We present the results obtained from detailed timing and spectral studies of the Be/X-ray binary pulsar KS 1947+300 during its 2013 giant outburst. We used data from Suzaku observations of the pulsar at two epochs, i.e. on 2013 October 22 (close to the peak of the outburst) and 2013 November 22. X-ray pulsations at ∼18.81 s were clearly detected in the light curves obtained from both observations. Pulse periods estimated during the outburst showed that the pulsar was spinning up. The pulse profile was found to be single-peaked up to ∼10 keV beyond which a sharp peak followed by a dip-like feature appeared at hard X-rays. The dip-like feature has been observed up to ∼70 keV. The 1–110 keV broad-band spectroscopy of both observations revealed that the best-fit model was comprised of a partially absorbed Negative and Positive power law with EXponential cutoff (NPEX) continuum model along with a blackbody component for the soft X-ray excess and two Gaussian functions at 6.4 and 6.7 keV for emission lines. Both the lines were identified as emission from neutral and He-like iron atoms. To fit the spectra, we included the previously reported cyclotron absorption line at 12.2 keV. From the spin-up rate, the magnetic field of the pulsar was estimated to be ∼1.2×1012 G and found to be comparable to that obtained from the detection of the cyclotron absorption feature. Pulse-phase resolved spectroscopy revealed the pulsating nature of the soft X-ray excess component in phase with the continuum flux. This confirms that the accretion column and/or accretion stream are the most probable regions of the soft X-ray excess emission in KS1947+300. The presence of the pulsating soft X-ray excess in phase with continuum emission may be the possible reason for not observing the dip at soft X-rays.

  2. Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Beskin, V S; Gwinn, C R; Tchekhovskoy, A

    2015-01-01

    Almost 50 years after radio pulsars were discovered in 1967, our understanding of these objects remains incomplete. On the one hand, within a few years it became clear that neutron star rotation gives rise to the extremely stable sequence of radio pulses, that the kinetic energy of rotation provides the reservoir of energy, and that electromagnetic fields are the braking mechanism. On the other hand, no consensus regarding the mechanism of coherent radio emission or the conversion of electromagnetic energy to particle energy yet exists. In this review, we report on three aspects of pulsar structure that have seen recent progress: the self-consistent theory of the magnetosphere of an oblique magnetic rotator; the location, geometry, and optics of radio emission; and evolution of the angle between spin and magnetic axes. These allow us to take the next step in understanding the physical nature of the pulsar activity.

  3. Spin evolution of long-period X-ray pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Ikhsanov, N R; Beskrovnaya, N G

    2014-01-01

    Spin evolution of X-ray pulsars in High Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs) is discussed under various assumptions about the geometry and physical parameters of the accretion flow. The torque applied to the neutron star from the accretion flow and equilibrium period of the pulsars are evaluated. We show that the observed spin evolution of the pulsars can be explained in terms of a scenario in which the neutron star accretes material from a magnetized stellar wind.

  4. The Double Pulsar System J0737-3039: Modulation of the radio emission from B by radiation from A

    CERN Document Server

    McLaughlin, M A; Lyne, A G; Lorimer, D R; Stairs, I H; Possenti, A; Manchester, R N; Freire, P C C; Joshi, B C; Burgay, M; D'Amico, N

    2004-01-01

    We have analyzed single pulses from PSR J0737-3039B, the 2.8-s pulsar in the recently discovered double pulsar system, using data taken with the Green Bank Telescope at 820 and 1400 MHz. We report the detection of features similar to drifting subpulses, detectable over only a fraction of the pulse window, with a fluctuation frequency of 0.196 cycles/period. This is exactly the beat frequency between the periods of the two pulsars. In addition, the drifting features have a separation within a given pulse of 23 ms, equal to the pulse period of A. These features are therefore due to the direct influence of PSR J0737-3039A's 44-Hz electromagnetic radiation on PSR J0737-3039B's magnetosphere. We only detect them over a small range of orbital phases, when the radiation from the recycled pulsar PSR J0737-3039A meets our line of sight to PSR J0737-3039B from the side.

  5. Star Cluster Buzzing With Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    A dense globular star cluster near the center of our Milky Way Galaxy holds a buzzing beehive of rapidly-spinning millisecond pulsars, according to astronomers who discovered 21 new pulsars in the cluster using the National Science Foundation's 100-meter Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia. The cluster, called Terzan 5, now holds the record for pulsars, with 24, including three known before the GBT observations. Pulsar Diagram Pulsar Diagram: Click on image for more detail. "We hit the jackpot when we looked at this cluster," said Scott Ransom, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Charlottesville, VA. "Not only does this cluster have a lot of pulsars -- and we still expect to find more in it -- but the pulsars in it are very interesting. They include at least 13 in binary systems, two of which are eclipsing, and the four fastest-rotating pulsars known in any globular cluster, with the fastest two rotating nearly 600 times per second, roughly as fast as a household blender," Ransom added. Ransom and his colleagues reported their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in San Diego, CA, and in the online journal Science Express. The star cluster's numerous pulsars are expected to yield a bonanza of new information about not only the pulsars themselves, but also about the dense stellar environment in which they reside and probably even about nuclear physics, according to the scientists. For example, preliminary measurements indicate that two of the pulsars are more massive than some theoretical models would allow. "All these exotic pulsars will keep us busy for years to come," said Jason Hessels, a Ph.D student at McGill University in Montreal. Globular clusters are dense agglomerations of up to millions of stars, all of which formed at about the same time. Pulsars are spinning, superdense neutron stars that whirl "lighthouse beams" of radio waves or light around as they spin. A neutron star is what is

  6. Centrifugal acceleration of plasma in pulsar magnetosphere

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R T Gangadhara; V Krishna

    2003-12-01

    We present a relativistic model for the centrifugal acceleration of plasma bunches and the coherent radio emission in pulsar magnetosphere. We find that rotation broadens the width of leading component compared to the width of trailing component. We explain this difference in the component widths using the nested cone emission geometry. We estimate the effect of pulsar spin on the Stokes parameters, and find that the inclination between the rotation and magnetic axes can introduce an asymmetry in the circular polarization of the conal components. We analyse the single pulse polarization data of PSR B0329+54 at 606 MHz, and find that in its conal components, one sense of circular polarization dominates in the leading component while the other sense dominates in the trailing component. Our simulation shows that changing the sign of the impact parameter changes the sense of circular polarization as well as the swing of polarization angle.

  7. Discovery of very-high-energy gamma-ray emission from the vicinity of PSR J1831-952 with H.E.S.S

    CERN Document Server

    Sheidaei, F; Gast, H

    2011-01-01

    We report on the latest discovery of an extended Very High Energy (VHE) gamma-ray source near the 67 ms pulsar PSR J1831-0952 during the H.E.S.S. Galactic Plane Survey (GPS). The dispersion measure distance of the pulsar (4.3 kpc) would imply that less than 1% of its spin-down energy is required to provide the observed VHE luminosity of the source. No other plausible counterparts have yet been found through preliminary multi- wavelength searches. The most likely scenario is that the VHE emission originates from the -yet unseen at other wavelengths-wind nebula of PSR J1831-0952. If so this would constitute another case of a gamma-ray discovered pulsar wind nebula.

  8. Search for Millisecond Pulsars for the Pulsar Timing Array project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milia, S.

    2012-03-01

    Pulsars are rapidly rotating highly magnetised neutron stars (i.e. ultra dense stars, where about one solar mass is concentrated in a sphere with a radius of ~ 10 km), which irradiate radio beams in a fashion similar to a lighthouse. As a consequence, whenever the beams cut our line of sight we perceive a radio pulses, one (or two) per pulsar rotation, with a frequency up to hundred of times a second. Owing to their compact nature, rapid spin and high inertia, pulsars are in general fairly stable rotators, hence the Times of Arrival (TOAs) of the pulses at a radio telescope can be used as the ticks of a clock. This holds true in particular for the sub­class of the millisecond pulsars (MSPs), having a spin period smaller than the conventional limit of 30 ms, whose very rapid rotation and relatively older age provide better rotational stability than the ordinary pulsars. Indeed, some MSPs rotate so regularly that they can rival the best atomic clocks on Earth over timespan of few months or years.This feature allows us to use MSPs as tools in a cosmic laboratory, by exploiting a procedure called timing, which consists in the repeated and regular measurement of the TOAs from a pulsar and then in the search for trends in the series of the TOAs over various timespans, from fraction of seconds to decades.For example the study of pulsars in binary systems has already provided the most stringent tests to date of General Relativity in strong gravitational fields and has unambiguously showed the occurrence of the emission of gravitational waves from a binary system comprising two massive bodies in a close orbit. In last decades a new exciting perspective has been opened, i.e. to use pulsars also for a direct detection of the so far elusive gravitational waves and thereby applying the pulsar timing for cosmological studies. In fact, the gravitational waves (GWs) going across our Galaxy pass over all the Galactic pulsars and the Earth, perturbing the space­time at the

  9. Pulsars for the Beginner

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiLavore, Phillip; Wayland, James R.

    1971-01-01

    Presents the history of the discovery of pulsars, observations that have been made on pulsar radiation, and theories that have been presented for its presence and origin. Illustrations using pulsar's properties are presented in mechanics, electromagnetic radiation and thermodynamics. (DS)

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: ATNF Pulsar Catalogue (Manchester+, 2005)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchester, R. N.; Hobbs, G. B.; Teoh, A.; Hobbs, M.

    2016-05-01

    The catalogue is a compilation of the principal observed parameters of pulsars, including positions, timing parameters, pulse widths, flux densities, proper motions, distances, and dispersion, rotation, and scattering measures. It also lists the orbital elements of binary pulsars, and some commonly used parameters derived from the basic measurements. The catalogue includes all published rotation-powered pulsars, including those detected only at high energies. It also includes Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs) and Soft Gamma-ray Repeaters (SGRs) for which coherent pulsations have been detected. However, it excludes accretion-powered pulsars such as Her X-1 and the recently discovered X-ray millisecond pulsars. (2 data files).

  11. Tachyonic quantum densities of relativistic electron plasmas: Cherenkov spectra of γ-ray pulsars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachyonic Cherenkov radiation in second quantization can explain the subexponential spectral tails of GeV γ-ray pulsars (Crab pulsar, PSR J1836+5925, PSR J0007+7303, PSR J2021+4026) recently observed with the Fermi-LAT, VERITAS and MAGIC telescopes. The radiation is emitted by a thermal ultra-relativistic electron plasma. The Cherenkov effect is derived from a Maxwell–Proca field with negative mass-square in a dispersive spacetime. The frequency variation of the tachyon mass results in exp(−β^ω1−ρ) attenuation of the asymptotic Cherenkov energy flux, where β^ is a decay constant related to the electron temperature and ρ is the frequency scaling exponent of the tachyon mass. An exponent in the range 0<ρ<1 can reproduce the observed subexponential decay of the energy flux. For the Crab pulsar, we find ρ=0.81±0.02, inferred from the substantially weaker-than-exponential decay of its spectral tail measured by MAGIC over an extended energy range. The scaling exponent ρ determines whether the group velocity of the tachyonic γ-rays is sub- or superluminal. - Highlights: • Quantized tachyonic Cherenkov densities lead to subexponential spectral decay. • γ-Ray spectral fits to Crab pulsar, PSR J1836+5925, PSR J0007+7303, PSR J2021+4026. • The polarization of γ-rays is analyzed in the quasiclassical regime and quantum limit. • Three degrees of polarization due to the negative mass-square of the Maxwell–Proca field. • Weibull decay of spectral tails caused by frequency scaling of the tachyon mass

  12. The tale of the two tails of the oldish PSR J2055+2539

    CERN Document Server

    Marelli, Martino; De Luca, Andrea; Gastaldello, Fabio; Caraveo, Patrizia; Parkinson, Pablo Saz

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed a deep XMM-Newton observations of the radio-quiet gamma-ray PSR J2055+2539. The spectrum of the X-ray counterpart is non-thermal, with a photon index of 2.36$\\pm$0.14 (1$\\sigma$ confidence). We detected X-ray pulsations with a pulsed fraction of (25$\\pm$3)% and a sinusoidal shape. Taking into account considerations on the gamma-ray efficiency of the pulsar and on its X-ray spectrum, we can infer a pulsar distance ranging from 450 pc to 750 pc. We found two different nebular features associated to PSR J2055+2539 and protruding from it. The angle between the two nebular main axes is $\\sim$ (162.8$\\pm$0.7) degrees. The main, brighter feature is 12'-long and <20"-thick, characterized by an asymmetry with respect to the main axis that evolves with the distance from the pulsar, possibly forming a helical pattern. The secondary feature is 250" x 30". Both nebulae present an almost flat brightness profile with a sudden decrease at the end. The nebulae can be fitted either by a power-law model or a ther...

  13. Nova Sco and coalescing low mass black hole binaries as LIGO sources

    CERN Document Server

    Sipior, M S; Sipior, Michael S.; Sigurdsson, Steinn

    2002-01-01

    Double neutron star binaries, analogous to the well known Hulse--Taylor pulsar PSR 1913+16, are guaranteed-to-exist sources of high frequency gravitational radiation detectable by LIGO. There is considerable uncertainty in the estimated rate of coalescence of such systems, with conservative estimates of ~1 per million years per galaxy, and optimistic theoretical estimates one or more magnitude larger. Formation rates of low-mass black hole-neutron star binaries may be higher than those of NS-NS binaries, and may dominate the detectable LIGO signal rate. We estimate the enhanced coalescence rate for BH-BH binaries due to weak asymmetric kicks during the formation of low mass black holes like Nova Sco, and find they may contribute significantly to the LIGO signal rate, possibly dominating the phase I detectable signals if the range of BH masses for which there is significant kick is broad enough. For a standard Salpeter IMF, assuming mild natal kicks, we project that the R6 merger rate of BH-BH systems is ~0.5,...

  14. PSR J1906+0746: From relativistic spin-precession to beam modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Desvignes, Gregory; Cognard, Ismaël; Kasian, Laura; van Leeuwen, Joeri; Stairs, Ingrid; Theureau, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    Shortly after the discovery of PSR J1906+0746, some hints of profile variations were already interpreted as first signs of relativistic spin-precession occuring. Using observations from the Nan\\c{c}ay, Arecibo and Green Bank Radio Observatories, we report here the measurement of pulse profile and polarimetric variations. Using the Rotating Vector Model, we show that PSR J1906+0746 is likely to be an orthogonal rotator ($\\alpha \\simeq 80^\\circ$). Fitting our polarimetric data to a precession model, we determined the geometry of the pulsar and found a wide misalignment angle ($\\delta = 89_{-44}^{+85}$ deg, 95% C.L.), although the uncertainty is large. Assuming this geometry, we constructed the beam maps of both magnetic poles.

  15. Implications of PSR J1614-2230 for NJL hybrid star

    CERN Document Server

    Lenzi, César H

    2013-01-01

    The recent determination of the mass of the pulsar PSR J1614-2230 with $1.97 \\pm 0.04 M_\\odot$ by \\cite{Demorest}, renewed the discussions about the possibility of exotic matter being present at the core of neutron stars. Since the description of matter at densities beyond nuclear saturation is model dependent, several works have explored different aspects of the fact that the maximum neutron star mass implied by any equation of state (EoS) must exceed the mass of PSR J1614-2230. In this article we present an extensive study of hybrid star masses using several parametrizations of a relativistic mean-field hadronic EoS together with a typical three-flavor NJL model with scalar, vector and 't Hooft interactions as realized.

  16. Rings and Jets around PSR J2021+3651: the `Dragonfly Nebula'

    CERN Document Server

    Van Etten, Adam; Ng, C -Y

    2008-01-01

    We describe recent Chandra ACIS observations of the Vela-like pulsar PSR J2021+3651 and its pulsar wind nebula (PWN). This `Dragonfly Nebula' displays an axisymmetric morphology, with bright inner jets, a double-ridged inner nebula, and a ~30" polar jet. The PWN is embedded in faint diffuse emission: a bow shock-like structure with standoff ~1' brackets the pulsar to the east and emission trails off westward for 3-4'. Thermal (kT=0.16 +/-0.02 keV) and power law emission are detected from the pulsar. The nebular X-rays show spectral steepening from Gamma=1.5 in the equatorial torus to Gamma=1.9 in the outer nebula, suggesting synchrotron burn-off. A fit to the `Dragonfly' structure suggests a large (86 +/-1 degree) inclination with a double equatorial torus. Vela is currently the only other PWN showing such double structure. The >12 kpc distance implied by the pulsar dispersion measure is not supported by the X-ray data; spectral, scale and efficiency arguments suggest a more modest 3-4 kpc.

  17. Rotation and Accretion Powered Pulsars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ever wanted to know about pulsars but were afraid to ask. Chapter 1 begins a brief and interesting account of the discovery of pulsars, followed by an overview of the rotation-powered and accretion-powered populations. The following four chapters are fairly detailed and reasonably quantitative descriptions of neutron star interiors. This is no easy feat, given that a description of the physics of neutron stars demands a deep understanding of all major physical forces, and must include general relativity as well as detailed particle physics. The historical notes at the beginning of Chapter 2 are particularly fascinating, recounting the path to today's understanding of neutron stars in very interesting detail. Chapter 7 presents rotation-powered pulsar radio properties, and a nice description of pulsar timing, including relativistic and non-relativistic binaries and GR tests. The remaining chapters tackle a variety of topics including binary evolution, superfluidity, accretion-powered pulsar properties, magnetospheres and emission mechanisms, magnetic fields, spin evolution and strange stars. The coverage is somewhat uneven, with the strange star chapter, for example, an obvious afterthought. The utility of an encyclopedia lies in its breadth and in how up-to-date it is. Although admirable in its intentions, the Ghosh book does omit some major pulsar topics. This book leaves the impression that rotation-powered pulsars produce only radio emission; hardly (if at all) mentioned is the vast literature on their infrared, optical, and even more importantly, x-ray and gamma-ray emission, the latter being far more relevant to the pulsar 'machine' than the energetically puny radio output. Also absent are pulsar winds; this is particularly puzzling given both the lovely wind nebula that graces the book's cover, and the central role the wind plays as primary sink of the rotation power. One of the most actively pursued topics in pulsar astrophysics in the past decade, magnetars

  18. EVIDENCE FOR GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM THE LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY SYSTEM FIRST J102347.6+003841

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) system FIRST J102347.6+003841 hosts a newly born millisecond pulsar (MSP) PSR J1023+0038 that was revealed as the first and only known rotation-powered MSP in a quiescent LMXB. While the system is shown to have an accretion disk before 2002, it remains unclear how the accretion disk has been removed in order to reveal the radio pulsation in 2007. In this Letter, we report the discovery of γ-rays spatially consistent with FIRST J102347.6+003841, at a significance of seven standard deviations, using data obtained by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The γ-ray spectrum can be described by a power law (PL) with a photon index of 2.9 ± 0.2, resulting in an energy flux above 200 MeV of (5.5 ± 0.9) x 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1. The γ-rays likely originate from the MSP PSR J1023+0038, but also possibly from an intrabinary shock between the pulsar and its companion star. To complement the γ-ray study, we also re-investigate the XMM-Newton data taken in 2004 and 2008. Our X-ray spectral analysis suggests that a broken PL with two distinct photon indices describes the X-ray data significantly better than a single PL. This indicates that there exists two components and that both components appear to vary with the orbital phase. The evidence for γ-ray emission conforms with a recent suggestion that γ-rays from PSR J1023+0038 may be responsible for ejecting the disk material out of the system.

  19. 21-year timing of the black-widow pulsar J2051-0827

    CERN Document Server

    Shaifullah, G; Freire, P C C; Tauris, T M; Wex, N; Osłowski, S; Stappers, B W; Bassa, C G; Caballero, R N; Champion, D J; Cognard, I; Desvignes, G; Graikou, E; Guillemot, L; Janssen, G H; Jessner, A; Jordan, C; Karuppusamy, R; Kramer, M; Lazaridis, K; Lazarus, P; Lyne, A G; McKee, J W; Perrodin, D; Possenti, A; Tiburzi, C

    2016-01-01

    Timing results for the black-widow pulsar J2051-0827 are presented, using a 21-year dataset from four European Pulsar Timing Array telescopes and the Parkes radio telescope. This dataset, which is the longest published to date for a black-widow system, allows for an improved analysis that addresses previously unknown biases. While secular variations, as identified in previous analyses, are recovered, short-term variations are detected for the first time. Concurrently, a significant decrease of approx. 2.5x10-3 cm-3 pc in the dispersion measure associated with PSR J2051-0827 is measured for the first time and improvements are also made to estimates of the proper motion. Finally, PSR J2051-0827 is shown to have entered a relatively stable state suggesting the possibility of its eventual inclusion in pulsar timing arrays.

  20. Timing Behavior of the Magnetically Active Rotation-Powered Pulsar in the Supernova Remnant Kesteven 75

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, Margaret A.; Gavriil, Fotis P.; Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2009-01-01

    We report a large spin-up glitch in PSR J1846-0258 which coincided with the onset of magnetar-like behavior on 2006 May 31. We show that the pulsar experienced an unusually large glitch recovery, with a recovery fraction of Q = 5.9+/-0.3, resulting in a net decrease of the pulse frequency. Such a glitch recovery has never before been observed in a rotation-powered pulsar, however, similar but smaller glitch over-recovery has been recently reported in the magnetar AXP 4U 0142+61 and may have occurred in the SGR 1900+14. We discuss the implications of the unusual timing behavior in PSR J1846-0258 on its status as the first identified magnetically active rotation-powered pulsar.

  1. Timing behavior of the Magnetically Active Rotation-Powered Pulsar in the Supernova Remnant Kestevan 75

    CERN Document Server

    Livingstone, Margaret A; Gavriil, Fotis P

    2009-01-01

    We report a large spin-up glitch in PSR J1846-0258 which coincided with the onset of magnetar-like behavior on 2006 May 31. We show that the pulsar experienced an unusually large glitch recovery, with a recovery fraction of Q=5.9+/-0.3, resulting in a net decrease of the pulse frequency. Such a glitch recovery has never before been observed in a rotation-powered pulsar, however, similar but smaller glitch over-recovery has been recently reported in the magnetar AXP 4U 0142+61 and may have occurred in the SGR 1900+14. We discuss the implications of the unusual timing behavior in PSR J1846-0258 on its status as the first identified magnetically active rotation-powered pulsar.

  2. Tempo2, a new pulsar timing package. II: The timing model and precision estimates

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, R. T.; Hobbs, G. B.; Manchester, R. N.

    2006-01-01

    Tempo2 is a new software package for the analysis of pulsar pulse times of arrival. In this paper we describe in detail the timing model used by tempo2, and discuss limitations on the attainable precision. In addition to the intrinsic slow-down behaviour of the pulsar, tempo2 accounts for the effects of a binary orbital motion, the secular motion of the pulsar or binary system, interstellar, Solar system and ionospheric dispersion, observatory motion (including Earth rotation, precession, nut...

  3. Discovery of Nine Gamma-Ray Pulsars in Fermi-Lat Data Using a New Blind Search Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik-Tinmaz, Ozlem; Ferrara, E. C.; Pletsch, H. J.; Allen, B.; Aulbert, C.; Fehrmann, H.; Kramer, M.; Barr, E. D.; Champion, D. J.; Eatough, R. P.; Freire, P. C. C.; Reich, W.; Lyne, A. G.; Ray, P. S.

    2011-01-01

    We report the discovery of nine previously unknown gamma-ray pulsars in a blind search of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). The pulsars were found with a novel hierarchical search method originally developed for detecting continuous gravitational waves from rapidly rotating neutron stars. Designed to find isolated pulsars spinning at up to kHz frequencies, the new method is computationally efficient, and incorporates several advances, including a metric-based gridding of the search parameter space (frequency, frequency derivative and sky location) and the use of photon probability weights. The nine pulsars have spin frequencies between 3 and 12 Hz, and characteristic ages ranging from 17 kyr to 3 Myr. Two of them, PSRs Jl803-2149 and J2111+4606, are young and energetic Galactic-plane pulsars (spin-down power above 6 x 10(exp 35) ergs per second and ages below 100 kyr). The seven remaining pulsars, PSRs J0106+4855, J010622+3749, Jl620-4927, Jl746-3239, J2028+3332,J2030+4415, J2139+4716, are older and less energetic; two of them are located at higher Galactic latitudes (|b| greater than 10 degrees). PSR J0106+4855 has the largest characteristic age (3 Myr) and the smallest surface magnetic field (2x 10(exp 11)G) of all LAT blind-search pulsars. PSR J2139+4716 has the lowest spin-down power (3 x l0(exp 33) erg per second) among all non-recycled gamma-ray pulsars ever found. Despite extensive multi-frequency observations, only PSR J0106+4855 has detectable pulsations in the radio band. The other eight pulsars belong to the increasing population of radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars.

  4. Precision VLBI astrometry: Instrumentation, algorithms and pulsar parallax determination

    CERN Document Server

    Deller, A T

    2009-01-01

    (Abridged) This thesis describes the development of DiFX, the first general-purpose software correlator for radio interferometry, and its use with the Australian Long Baseline Array (LBA) to complete the largest VLBI pulsar astrometry program undertaken to date in the Southern Hemisphere. This two year astrometry program has resulted in the measurement of seven new pulsar parallaxes, more than trebling the number of measured VLBI pulsar parallaxes in the Southern Hemisphere. The measurements included a determination of the distance and transverse velocity of PSR J0437-4715 with better than 1% accuracy, enabling improved tests of General Relativity, and the first significant measurement of parallax for the famous double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039A/B, which will allow tests of General Relativity in this system to proceed to the 0.01% level. The DiFX software correlator developed to enable this science has been extensively tested and is now an integral part of the upgraded LBA Major National Research Facility;...

  5. THE PROPER MOTION OF THE GALACTIC CENTER PULSAR RELATIVE TO SAGITTARIUS A*

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bower, Geoffrey C. [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 645 N. A' ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Deller, Adam; Falcke, Heino [ASTRON, PO Box 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Demorest, Paul [NRAO, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475 (United States); Brunthaler, Andreas; Eatough, Ralph P.; Kramer, Michael; Lee, K. J.; Spitler, Laura; Desvignes, Gregory [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Moscibrodzka, Monika [Department of Astrophysics, Institute for Mathematics, Astrophysics and Particle Physics (IMAPP), Radboud University, PO Box 9010, 6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); O' Leary, Ryan M. [JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States); Rushton, Anthony P. [Department of Physics, Astrophysics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Doeleman, Sheperd [MIT Haystack Observatory, Route 40, Westford, MA 01886 (United States); Reid, Mark J., E-mail: gbower@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2015-01-10

    We measure the proper motion of the pulsar PSR J1745-2900 relative to the Galactic center massive black hole, Sgr A*, using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). The pulsar has a transverse velocity of 236 ± 11 km s{sup –1} at position angle 22 ± 2 deg east of north at a projected separation of 0.097 pc from Sgr A*. Given the unknown radial velocity, this transverse velocity measurement does not conclusively prove that the pulsar is bound to Sgr A*; however, the probability of chance alignment is very small. We do show that the velocity and position are consistent with a bound orbit originating in the clockwise disk of massive stars orbiting Sgr A* and a natal velocity kick of ≲ 500 km s{sup –1}. An origin among the isotropic stellar cluster is possible but less probable. If the pulsar remains radio-bright, multiyear astrometry of PSR J1745-2900 can detect its acceleration and determine the full three-dimensional orbit. We also demonstrate that PSR J1745-2900 exhibits the same angular broadening as Sgr A* over a wavelength range of 3.6 cm to 0.7 cm, further confirming that the two sources share the same interstellar scattering properties. Finally, we place the first limits on the presence of a wavelength-dependent shift in the position of Sgr A*, i.e., the core shift, one of the expected properties of optically thick jet emission. Our results for PSR J1745-2900 support the hypothesis that Galactic center pulsars will originate from the stellar disk and deepen the mystery regarding the small number of detected Galactic center pulsars.

  6. The Proper Motion of the Galactic Center Pulsar Relative to Sagittarius A*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Geoffrey C.; Deller, Adam; Demorest, Paul; Brunthaler, Andreas; Falcke, Heino; Moscibrodzka, Monika; O'Leary, Ryan M.; Eatough, Ralph P.; Kramer, Michael; Lee, K. J.; Spitler, Laura; Desvignes, Gregory; Rushton, Anthony P.; Doeleman, Sheperd; Reid, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    We measure the proper motion of the pulsar PSR J1745-2900 relative to the Galactic center massive black hole, Sgr A*, using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). The pulsar has a transverse velocity of 236 ± 11 km s–1 at position angle 22 ± 2 deg east of north at a projected separation of 0.097 pc from Sgr A*. Given the unknown radial velocity, this transverse velocity measurement does not conclusively prove that the pulsar is bound to Sgr A* however, the probability of chance alignment is very small. We do show that the velocity and position are consistent with a bound orbit originating in the clockwise disk of massive stars orbiting Sgr A* and a natal velocity kick of <~ 500 km s–1. An origin among the isotropic stellar cluster is possible but less probable. If the pulsar remains radio-bright, multiyear astrometry of PSR J1745-2900 can detect its acceleration and determine the full three-dimensional orbit. We also demonstrate that PSR J1745-2900 exhibits the same angular broadening as Sgr A* over a wavelength range of 3.6 cm to 0.7 cm, further confirming that the two sources share the same interstellar scattering properties. Finally, we place the first limits on the presence of a wavelength-dependent shift in the position of Sgr A*, i.e., the core shift, one of the expected properties of optically thick jet emission. Our results for PSR J1745-2900 support the hypothesis that Galactic center pulsars will originate from the stellar disk and deepen the mystery regarding the small number of detected Galactic center pulsars.

  7. The origin of planets orbiting millisecond pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavani, Marco; Brookshaw, Leigh

    1992-01-01

    A model for the formation of planets around millisecond pulsar which no longer have stellar companions is suggested. Detailed hydrodynamical models are presented which suggest that planet formation can occur either in a low-mass X-ray binary progenitor to a progenitor of a star-vaporizing millisecond pulsar when the neutron star is accreting material driven off its companion by X-ray irradiation or after a pulsar has formed and is vaporizing its companion. In both cases a circumbinary disk is created in which planets can form on a timescale of 10 exp 5 to 10 exp 6 yrs and the planets can survive a second phase in which the companion star moves toward the pulsar and is completely vaporized.

  8. Pulsar Wind Nebulae in the SKA era

    CERN Document Server

    Gelfand, J D; Ng, C -Y; Hessels, J W T; Stappers, B; Roberts, M S E; Possenti, A

    2015-01-01

    Neutron stars lose the bulk of their rotational energy in the form of a pulsar wind: an ultra-relativistic outflow of predominantly electrons and positrons. This pulsar wind significantly impacts the environment and possible binary companion of the neutron star, and studying the resultant pulsar wind nebulae is critical for understanding the formation of neutron stars and millisecond pulsars, the physics of the neutron star magnetosphere, the acceleration of leptons up to PeV energies, and how these particles impact the interstellar medium. With the SKA1 and the SKA2, it could be possible to study literally hundreds of PWNe in detail, critical for understanding the many open questions in the topics listed above.

  9. Fate of the companion stars of ultra-rapid pulsars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A millisecond pulsar that is formed by spin-up 'recycling' in a binary system will, once the mass transfer becomes temporarily interrupted, start to evaporate its companion star as a consequence of the large impinging pulsar energy flux. This evaporation is easiest if the pulsar has a short pulse period, the companion star has a relatively large radius and is therefore hydrogen-rich, and the orbital period is short. Evaporation of companion stars induced by millisecond pulsars could account for the lack of low-mass X-ray binaries with short orbital periods below the period gap of the cataclysmic variables, and for the statistics of new-born radio pulsars and their space velocities. (author)

  10. Flux-density spectral analysis for several pulsars and two newly-identified gigahertz-peaked spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Dembska, M; Jessner, A; Lewandowski, W; Bhattacharyya, B; Gupta, Y

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present results from flux density measurements for 21 pulsars over a wide frequency range, using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) and the Effelsberg telescope. Our sample was a set of mostly newly discovered pulsars from the selection of candidates for gigahertz-peaked spectra (GPS) pulsars. Using the results of our observations along with previously published data, we identify two new GPS pulsars. One of them, PSR J1740+1000, with dispersion measure of 24 pc cm$^{-3}$, is the first GPS pulsar with such a low DM value.We also selected several strong candidates for objects with high frequency turnover in their spectra which require further investigation.We also revisit our source selection criteria for future searches for GPS pulsars.

  11. A glitch in the millisecond pulsar J0613-0200

    CERN Document Server

    McKee, J W; Stappers, B W; Lyne, A G; Caballero, R N; Lentati, L; Desvignes, G; Jessner, A; Jordan, C A; Karuppusamy, R; Kramer, M; Cognard, I; Champion, D J; Graikou, E; Lazarus, P; Osłowski, S; Perrodin, D; Shaifullah, G; Tiburzi, C; Verbiest, J P W

    2016-01-01

    We present evidence for a small glitch in the spin evolution of the millisecond pulsar J0613$-$0200, using the EPTA Data Release 1.0, combined with Jodrell Bank analogue filterbank TOAs recorded with the Lovell telescope and Effelsberg Pulsar Observing System TOAs. A spin frequency step of 0.82(3) nHz and frequency derivative step of ${-1.6(39) \\times 10^{-19}\\,\\text{Hz} \\ \\text{s}^{-1}}$ are measured at the epoch of MJD 50888(30). After PSR B1821$-$24A, this is only the second glitch ever observed in a millisecond pulsar, with a fractional size in frequency of ${\\Delta \

  12. SKA-Japan Pulsar Science with the Square Kilometre Array

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, Keitaro; Iwata, Kengo; Kameya, Osamu; Kumamoto, Hiroki; Kuroyanagi, Sachiko; Mikami, Ryo; Naruko, Atsushi; Ohno, Hiroshi; Shibata, Shinpei; Terasawa, Toshio; Yonemaru, Naoyuki; Yoo, Chulmoon

    2016-01-01

    The Square Kilometre Array will revolutionize pulsar studies with its wide field-of-view, wide-band observation and high sensitivity, increasing the number of observable pulsars by more than an order of magnitude. Pulsars are of interest not only for the study of neutron stars themselves but for their usage as tools for probing fundamental physics such as general relativity, gravitational waves and nuclear interaction. In this article, we summarize the activity and interests of SKA-Japan Pulsar Science Working Group, focusing on an investigation of modified gravity theory with the supermassive black hole in the Galactic Centre, gravitational-wave detection from cosmic strings and binary supermassive black holes, a study of the physical state of plasma close to pulsars using giant radio pulses and determination of magnetic field structure of Galaxy with pulsar pairs.

  13. CANGAROO-III Observation of TeV Gamma Rays from the vicinity of PSR~B1 706$-$44

    CERN Document Server

    Enomoto, R; Nakamori, T; Kifune, T; Bicknell, G V; Clay, R W; Edwards, P G; Gunji, S; Hara, S; Hara, T; Hattori, T; Hayashi, S; Higashi, Y; Hirai, Y; Inoue, K; Ishioka, H; Kabuki, S; Kajino, F; Katagiri, H; Kawachi, A; Kiuchi, R; Kubo, H; Kunisawa, T; Matoba, T; Matsubara, Y; Matsuzawa, I; Mizukami, T; Mizumura, Y; Mizumoto, Y; Mori, M; Muraishi, H; Naito, T; Nakano, S; Nishijima, K; Ohishi, M; Otake, Y; Ryoki, S; Saitô, K; Sakamoto, Y; Seki, A; Stamatescu, V; Suzuki, T; Swaby, D L; Tanimori, T; Thornton, G; Tokanai, F; Tsuchiya, K; Watanabe, S; Yamazaki, E; Yanagita, S; Yoshida, T; Yoshikoshi, T; Yukawa, Y

    2009-01-01

    Observation by the CANGAROO-III stereoscopic system of the Imaging Cherenkov Telescope has detected extended emission of TeV gamma rays in the vicinity of the pulsar PSR B1706$-$44. The strength of the signal observed as gamma-ray-like events varies when we apply different ways of emulating background events. The reason for such uncertainties is argued in relevance to gamma-rays embedded in the "off-source data", that is, unknown sources and diffuse emission in the Galactic plane, namely, the existence of a complex structure of TeV gamma-ray emission around PSR B1706$-$44.

  14. A Pulsar and a Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    Recent, unusual X-ray observations from our galactic neighbor, the Small Magellanic Cloud, have led to an interesting model for SXP 214, a pulsar in a binary star system.Artists illustration of the magnetic field lines of a pulsar, a highly magnetized, rotating neutron star. [NASA]An Intriguing BinaryAn X-ray pulsar is a magnetized, rotating neutron star in a binary system with a stellar companion. Material is fed from the companion onto the neutron star, channeled by the objects magnetic fields onto a hotspot thats millions of degrees. This hotspot rotating past our line of sight is what produces the pulsations that we observe from X-ray pulsars.Located in the Small Magellanic Cloud, SXP 214 is a transient X-ray pulsar in a binary with a Be-type star. This star is spinning so quickly that material is thrown off of it to form a circumstellar disk.Recently, a team of authors led by JaeSub Hong (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) have presented new Chandra X-ray observations of SXP 214, tracking it for 50 ks (~14 hours) in January 2013. These observations reveal some very unexpected behavior for this pulsar.X-ray PuzzleThe energy distribution of the X-ray emission from SXP 214 over time. Dark shades or blue colors indicate high counts, and light shades or yellow colors indicate low counts. Lower-energy X-ray emission appeared only later, after about 20 ks. [Hong et al. 2016]Three interesting pieces of information came from the Chandra observations:SXP 214s rotation period was measured to be 211.5 s an increase in the spin rate since the discovery measurement of a 214-second period. Pulsars usually spin down as they lose angular momentum over time so what caused this one to spin up?Its overall X-ray luminosity steadily increased over the 50 ks of observations.Its spectrum became gradually softer (lower energy) over time; in the first 20 ks, the spectrum only consisted of hard X-ray photons above 3 keV, but after 20 ks, softer X-ray photons below 2 ke

  15. Geodetic Precession in PSR J1141-6545

    CERN Document Server

    Hotan, A W; Ord, S M

    2004-01-01

    We present observations that show dramatic evolution of the mean pulse profile of the relativistic binary pulsar J1141-6545 over a period of five years. These data indicate that the spin axis of the pulsar is precessing due to relativistic spin-orbit coupling. Observations made between 1999 and 2004 with a number of instruments at the Parkes radio telescope demonstrate a steady, secular evolution of the mean total intensity profile. The width of the profile increases by more than 50 percent during the five year period, indicating that geodetic precession is moving our line of sight closer to the axis of the pulsar beam. This is supported by analysis of the changing position angle of the linearly polarised component of the mean profile. We find that the slope of the position angle swing across the centre of the pulse steepens with time and use a simplified version of the rotating vector model to constrain the magnitude and direction of the change in our line of sight angle relative to the pulsar spin axis. The...

  16. Including the pulsar-term in continuous gravitational-wave searches using pulsar timing arrays: a blessing and a curse

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Stephen; Gair, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    We describe several new techniques which accelerate Bayesian searches for continuous gravitational-wave emission from supermassive black-hole binaries using pulsar timing arrays. These techniques mitigate the problematic increase of search-dimensionality with the size of the pulsar array which arises from having to include an extra parameter per pulsar as the array is expanded. This extra parameter corresponds to searching over the phase of the gravitational-wave as it propagates past each pulsar so that we can coherently include the pulsar-term in our search strategies. Our techniques make the analysis tractable with powerful evidence-evaluation packages like MultiNest. We find good agreement of our techniques with the parameter-estimation and Bayes factor evaluation performed with full signal templates, and conclude that these techniques make excellent first-cut tools for detection and characterisation of continuous gravitational-wave signals with pulsar timing arrays. Crucially, at low to moderate signal-t...

  17. Pulsar statistics: a study of pulsar luminosities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A statistically significant correlation between pulsar luminosity at 400 MHz and both pulsar period and period derivative is found. Fitting a phenomenological power-law model L/sub model/(P,P) approx. P/sup α/P/sup β/ (where P is pulsar period, P - period derivative and L - radio luminosity) to the pulsar luminosity data, we obtain α = -1.04 +- 0.15 and β = 0.35 +- 0.06. The above values suggest that pulsar radio luminosity varies roughly as the cube root of the total loss of rotational energy. 16 references, 5 figures

  18. Spectra of crab-like pulsars: A GRO perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Cheng

    1989-01-01

    A single-parameter model has been constructed to calculate the continuum spectrum of energetic pulsed radiation resulted from the formation of a Crab-type charge depletion region (gap) in the outer magnetosphere of rapidly spinning pulsars (Ho 1989). We discuss the characteristics of the theoretical predictions for the Crab pulsar and the specific features expected in the energy bands of the Gamma-Ray Observatory (GRO). These features include a possible spectral dip in the 0.3 to 30 MeV range, a change in polarization behavior below and above the dip, if polarization can be discerned, and most importantly, an exponential roll-over in the energy range necessary to detect the exponential roll-over. This model predicts that the 50-ms pulsar in the Large Magellanic Cloud (PSR0540-693) will be marginally detectable by GRO with a nominal two-week integration. Furthermore, we discuss the spectrum and detectability of a pulsar with 0.5 ms period and a surface magnetic field of 10/sup 9/ G. Such pulsar may exist in SN 1987A. Since the 50-ms pulsar and SN 1987A are within the same field of view of GRO, it will be of great importance to take an extra long integration of this region to search for gamma-ray emission from these sources. 26 refs., 4 figs.

  19. An Estimation of the Initial Period of Pulsars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The initial period of a pulsar is an important factor in our understandingof the formation of neutron stars and of the nature of the equation of state of neutronstar matter. Up to now this quantity can only be obtained for a few pulsars forwhich accurate age and braking index are known. Based on the theory of the off-center dipole emission, in which pulsars obtain their high velocities depending onthe initial periods, we calculate the initial period using the proper motion data.Because the orbital velocity of the progenitor and asymmetric kick in the supernovaexplosion may also contribute to the observed velocity of the pulsar, the derivedvalues of initial periods are lower limits. For normal pulsars, the initial periodsare in the range of 0.6 ~ 2.6 ms. For the millisecond pulsars, the initial periods arecomparable to their current periods, and the ratio between the initial period and thecurrent period increases with the decrease of the current period. For PSR B1937+21with the shortest period of 1.56 ms, the ratio is 0.77.

  20. 脉冲星巡天观测进展和近邻脉冲星样本估算%Progress on Radio Pulsar Survey and Estimate the Neighbor Pulsar Population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张蕾; 王培; 李菂; 张洁; 岳友岭; 刘姝

    2015-01-01

    射电脉冲星巡天是探测获取更多脉冲星的重要途径.首先介绍了影响射电脉冲星巡天效率的因素,着重分析灵敏度和观测频率两个重要因素,并通过定义脉冲星探测率,简化对脉冲星巡天效率的估算.此外,总结了现有脉冲星巡天项目,利用Parkes多波束脉冲星及两次扩充巡天(Swinburne中纬度脉冲星巡天和Parkes高纬度脉冲星巡天)结果,采用包含时间演化的脉冲星分布模拟软件PsrPopPy,模拟得到脉冲星在银河系中分布的样本,并对近邻太阳系1kpc距离内的脉冲星数目进行了估算,获得了近邻脉冲星样本,可为脉冲星高能辐射对探测宇宙线正电子谱影响等研究提供可靠输入量.%Radio surveys are an important way to detect new pulsars. We first reviewed the main factors affecting sensitivities of pulsar searches in radio bands. These factors can be grouped into two categories. First, the instrumental factors include telescope size, observation frequency, observation bandwidth, integration time, sampling rate, digitization loss, and system temperature. Second, the intrinsic properties of pulsars include dispersion, period, and effective pulse width. We defined a generic detection rate (DR) that combine all these factors to be the number of pulsars detected with specific integration time per pointing. We summarized the results of all radio pulsar surveys. The most successful pulsar survey so far is Parkes multibeam pulsar survey (PKSMB), which detected 1086 normal pulsars. The PKSMB was expanded by two more surveys, namely, Parkes-Swinbume multibeam survey (PKSSW) and Parkes high-latitude multibeam pulsar survey (PKSHL), which in total detected 1377 normal pulsars. We utilized the software package PsrPopPy, which adopts a time evolution model of pulsar parameters, to simulate the Galactic pulsar distribution. The results of Parkes multi-beam pulsar survey and its two extensions were used as inputs of PsrPopPy to constrain