WorldWideScience

Sample records for binaries observational tests

  1. Testing the asteroseismic scaling relations for Red Giants with Eclipsing Binaries Observed by Kepler

    CERN Document Server

    Gaulme, Patrick; Jackiewicz, Jason; Rawls, Meredith R; Corsaro, Enrico; Mosser, Benoit; Southworth, John; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Bender, Chad; Deshpande, Rohit

    2016-01-01

    Given the potential of ensemble asteroseismology for understanding fundamental properties of large numbers of stars, it is critical to determine the accuracy of the scaling relations on which these measurements are based. From several powerful validation techniques, all indications so far show that stellar radius estimates from the asteroseismic scaling relations are accurate to within a few percent. Eclipsing binary systems hosting at least one star with detectable solar-like oscillations constitute the ideal test objects for validating asteroseismic radius and mass inferences. By combining radial-velocity measurements and photometric time series of eclipses, it is possible to determine the masses and radii of each component of a double-lined spectroscopic binary. We report the results of a four-year radial-velocity survey performed with the \\'echelle spectrometer of the Astrophysical Research Consortium's 3.5-m telescope and the APOGEE spectrometer at Apache Point Observatory. We compare the masses and radi...

  2. HI OBSERVATIONS OF BINARY SPIRAL GALAXIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    OOSTERLOO, T; SHOSTAK, S

    1993-01-01

    Observations in the 21 cm line of neutral hydrogen made with the Arecibo- and the Westerbork radio telescopes are presented of a sample of binary spiral galaxies. Completed with optical information, these observations are used to determine the spatial orientation of the spin-vectors of the galaxies

  3. Observational Signatures of Binary Supermassive Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Roedig, Constanze; Miller, M Coleman

    2014-01-01

    Observations indicate that most massive galaxies contain a supermassive black hole, and theoretical studies suggest that when such galaxies have a major merger, the central black holes will form a binary and eventually coalesce. Here we discuss two spectral signatures of such binaries that may help distinguish them from ordinary AGN. These signatures are expected when the mass ratio between the holes is not extreme and the system is fed by a circumbinary disk. One such signature is a notch in the thermal continuum that has been predicted by other authors; we point out that it should be accompanied by a spectral revival at shorter wavelengths and also discuss its dependence on binary properties such as mass, mass ratio, and separation. In particular, we note that the wavelength $\\lambda_n$ at which the notch occurs depends on these three parameters in such a way as to make the number of systems displaying these notches $\\propto \\lambda_n^{16/3}$; longer wavelength searches are therefore strongly favored. A sec...

  4. Observational signatures of binary supermassive black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedig, Constanze; Krolik, Julian H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Miller, M. Coleman [Department of Astronomy and Joint Space-Science Institute, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2014-04-20

    Observations indicate that most massive galaxies contain a supermassive black hole, and theoretical studies suggest that when such galaxies have a major merger, the central black holes will form a binary and eventually coalesce. Here we discuss two spectral signatures of such binaries that may help distinguish them from ordinary active galactic nuclei. These signatures are expected when the mass ratio between the holes is not extreme and the system is fed by a circumbinary disk. One such signature is a notch in the thermal continuum that has been predicted by other authors; we point out that it should be accompanied by a spectral revival at shorter wavelengths and also discuss its dependence on binary properties such as mass, mass ratio, and separation. In particular, we note that the wavelength λ {sub n} at which the notch occurs depends on these three parameters in such a way as to make the number of systems displaying these notches ∝λ{sub n}{sup 16/3}; longer wavelength searches are therefore strongly favored. A second signature, first discussed here, is hard X-ray emission with a Wien-like spectrum at a characteristic temperature ∼100 keV produced by Compton cooling of the shock generated when streams from the circumbinary disk hit the accretion disks around the individual black holes. We investigate the observability of both signatures. The hard X-ray signal may be particularly valuable as it can provide an indicator of black hole merger a few decades in advance of the event.

  5. Model-independent inference on compact-binary observations

    CERN Document Server

    Mandel, Ilya; Colonna, Andrea; Stevenson, Simon; Tiňo, Peter; Veitch, John

    2016-01-01

    The recent advanced LIGO detections of gravitational waves from merging binary black holes enhance the prospect of exploring binary evolution via gravitational-wave observations of a population of compact-object binaries. In the face of uncertainty about binary formation models, model-independent inference provides an appealing alternative to comparisons between observed and modelled populations. We describe a procedure for clustering in the multi-dimensional parameter space of observations that are subject to significant measurement errors. We apply this procedure to a mock data set of population-synthesis predictions for the masses of merging compact binaries convolved with realistic measurement uncertainties, and demonstrate that we can accurately distinguish subpopulations of binary neutron stars, binary black holes, and mixed black hole -- neutron star binaries.

  6. Testing the Binary Trigger Hypothesis in FUors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Joel D.; Kraus, Adam L.; Rizzuto, Aaron C.; Ireland, Michael J.; Dupuy, Trent J.; Mann, Andrew W.; Kuruwita, Rajika

    2016-10-01

    We present observations of three FU Orionis objects (hereafter, FUors) with nonredundant aperture-mask interferometry at 1.59 μm and 2.12 μm that probe for binary companions on the scale of the protoplanetary disk that feeds their accretion outbursts. We do not identify any companions to V1515 Cyg or HBC 722, but we do resolve a close binary companion to V1057 Cyg that is at the diffraction limit (ρ =58.3+/- 1.4 mas or 30 ± 5 au) and currently much fainter than the outbursting star ({{Δ }}K\\prime =3.34+/- 0.10 mag). Given the flux excess of the outbursting star, we estimate that the mass of the companion (M∼ 0.25{M}ȯ ) is similar to or slightly below that of the FUor itself, and therefore it resembles a typical T Tauri binary system. Our observations only achieve contrast limits of {{Δ }}K\\prime ∼ 4 mag, and hence we are only sensitive to companions that were near or above the pre-outburst luminosity of the FUors. It remains plausible that FUor outbursts could be tied to the presence of a close binary companion. However, we argue from the system geometry and mass reservoir considerations that these outbursts are not directly tied to the orbital period (i.e., occurring at periastron passage), but instead must only occur infrequently.

  7. Testing the Binary Trigger Hypothesis in FUors

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Joel D; Rizzuto, Aaron C; Ireland, Michael J; Dupuy, Trent J; Mann, Andrew W; Kuruwita, Rajika

    2016-01-01

    We present observations of three FU Orionis objects (hereafter, FUors) with nonredundant aperture-mask interferometry (NRM) at 1.59 um and 2.12 um that probe for binary companions on the scale of the protoplanetary disk that feeds their accretion outbursts. We do not identify any companions to V1515 Cyg or HBC 722, but we do resolve a close binary companion to V1057 Cyg that is at the diffraction limit (rho = 58.3 +/- 1.4 mas or 30 +/- 5 AU) and currently much fainter than the outbursting star (delta(K') = 3.34 +/- 0.10 mag). Given the flux excess of the outbursting star, we estimate that the mass of the companion (M ~ 0.25 Msun) is similar to or slightly below that of the FUor itself, and therefore it resembles a typical T Tauri binary system. Our observations only achieve contrast limits of delta(K') ~ 4 mag, and hence we are only sensitive to companions that were near or above the pre-outburst luminosity of the FUors. It remains plausible that FUor outbursts could be tied to the presence of a close binary ...

  8. Speckle interferometric observations of close binary stars

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, S K; Yeswanth, L; Anbazhagan, P

    2002-01-01

    Speckle interferometric technique is employed to record a series of hundreds of short-exposure images of several close binary stars with sub-arcsecond separation through a narrow band filter at the Cassegrain focus of the 2.34 meter (m) Vainu Bappu telescope (VBT), situated at Vainu Bappu Observatory (VBO), Kavalur, India. The data are recorded sequentially by a Peltier-cooled intensified CCD camera with 10 ms exposure. The auto-correlation method is applied to determine the angular separations and position angles of these binary systems.

  9. Observations of Binary and Millisecond Pulsars at Xinjiang Astronomical Observatory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jingbo Wang; Na Wang; Jianping Yuan; Zhiyong Liu

    2014-09-01

    We present the first results of radio timing observations of binary and millisecond pulsars in China. We have timed four binary pulsars for 9 years, using Nanshan 25-m radio telescope. The long time span has enabled us to determine their rotation and orbital parameters.

  10. Shapes of binary asteroid primaries from photometric observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheirich, Peter

    2016-10-01

    I will present results from a method which combine lightcurve inversion for single bodies and the method for inversion of lightcurves of occulting/eclipsing binary systems. A code developed by M. Kaasalainen and J. Durech for inversion of lightcurves of single bodies is adapted to fit our purposes. The original code uses a slightly elongated ellipsoid as an initial shape for optimization. We substituted this ellipsoid with a variety of shapes using Gaussian random spheres. This allowed the optimization algorithm to iterate to a range of final shapes.For each binary system, the short-period (rotational) component of its lightcurve is inverted using this code and a set of possible shapes of the primary are obtained. In the next step these shape models of the primary are, one by one, incorporated into the full model of the binary system and complete photometric data including the mutual events are fitted. Comparing synthetic lightcurves of the best-fit solutions with the observed data enables another narrowing of the selection of the possible shapes of the primary. This process is based on the times of phases of mutual events occurring on different geometries (i.e. the secondary passing in front of/behind the primary not only equator-on).We will also test a hypothesis that most of the primaries of the binary systems are similar in shape to each other. A figure resembling the shape of the primary of 1999 KW4, i.e., the top-shaped object with an equatorial ridge, will be used for the primary's shape. Its main characteristics – a polar flattening and width and height of the equatorial ridge, will be used as independent parameters. A variety of the shapes generated by a combination of these parameters will be used as an initial shapes for the optimization using the code described above.The work is supported by the Grant Agency of the Czech Republic, Grant 15-07193S.

  11. The chemical composition of donors in AM CVn stars and ultra-compact X-ray binaries: observational tests of their formation

    OpenAIRE

    Nelemans, G.A.; Yungelson, L. R.; Van Der Sluys, M. V.; Tout, C. A.

    2009-01-01

    We study the formation of ultra-compact binaries (AM CVn stars and ultra-compact X-ray binaries) with emphasis on the surface chemical abundances of the donors in these systems. Hydrogen is not convincingly detected in the spectra of these systems. Three different proposed formation scenarios involve different donor stars, white dwarfs, helium stars or evolved main-sequence stars. Using detailed evolutionary calculations we show that the abundances of helium WD donors and evolved main-sequenc...

  12. Binary Colloidal Alloy Test-5: Phase Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Matthew; Weitz, David A.; Lu, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    The Binary Colloidal Alloy Test - 5: Phase Separation (BCAT-5-PhaseSep) experiment will photograph initially randomized colloidal samples onboard the ISS to determine their resulting structure over time. This allows the scientists to capture the kinetics (evolution) of their samples, as well as the final equilibrium state of each sample. BCAT-5-PhaseSep studies collapse (phase separation rates that impact product shelf-life); in microgravity the physics of collapse is not masked by being reduced to a simple top and bottom phase as it is on Earth.

  13. Using electromagnetic observations to aid gravitational-wave parameter estimation of compact binaries observed with LISA

    CERN Document Server

    Shah, Sweta; Nelemans, Gijs

    2012-01-01

    We present a first-stage study of the effect of using knowledge from electromagnetic (EM) observations in the gravitational wave (GW) data analysis of Galactic binaries that are predicted to be observed by the new \\textit{Laser Interferometer Space Antenna} in the low-frequency range, $10^{-4} \\mathrm{Hz}binaries and whether some of these parameters are also available from EM observations. We used verification binaries, which are known as the guaranteed sources for \\emph{eLISA} and will test the functioning of the instrument. We find that of the seven parameters that characterise such a binary, only a few are correlated. The most useful result is the strong correlation between amplitude and inclination, which can be used to constrain the parameter...

  14. Testing Theory with Dynamical Masses and Orbits of Ultracool Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Dupuy, Trent J; Ireland, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Mass is the fundamental parameter that governs the evolution of stars, brown dwarfs, and gas-giant planets. Thus, direct mass measurements are essential to test the evolutionary and atmospheric models that underpin studies of these objects. We present results from our program to test models using precise dynamical masses for visual binaries based on Keck laser guide star adaptive optics astrometric monitoring of a sample of over 30 ultracool (> M6) objects since 2005. In just the last 2 years, we have more than tripled the number of late-M, L, and T dwarf binaries with precise dynamical masses. For most field binaries, based on direct measurements of their luminosities and total masses, we find a "temperature problem" in that evolutionary model radii give effective temperatures that are inconsistent with those from model atmosphere fitting of observed spectra by 100-300 K. We also find a "luminosity problem" for the only binary with an independent age determination (from its solar-type primary via age-activit...

  15. Massive Black Hole Binaries: Dynamical Evolution and Observational Signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dotti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the dynamical evolution of massive black hole pairs in mergers is crucial in the context of a hierarchical galaxy formation scenario. The timescales for the formation and the coalescence of black hole binaries are still poorly constrained, resulting in large uncertainties in the expected rate of massive black hole binaries detectable in the electromagnetic and gravitational wave spectra. Here, we review the current theoretical understanding of the black hole pairing in galaxy mergers, with a particular attention to recent developments and open issues. We conclude with a review of the expected observational signatures of massive binaries and of the candidates discussed in literature to date.

  16. Observing mergers of non-spinning black-hole binaries

    CERN Document Server

    McWilliams, Sean T; Baker, John G

    2010-01-01

    Advances in the field of numerical relativity now make it possible to calculate the final, most powerful merger phase of binary black-hole coalescence for generic binaries. The state of the art has advanced well beyond the equal-mass case into the unequal-mass and spinning regions of parameter space. We present a study of the nonspinning portion of parameter space, primarily using an analytic waveform model tuned to available numerical data, with an emphasis on observational implications. We investigate the impact of varied mass ratio on merger signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) for several detectors, and compare our results with expectations from the test-mass limit. We note a striking similarity of the waveform phasing of the merger waveform across the available mass ratios. Motivated by this, we calculate the match between our 1:1 (equal mass) and 4:1 mass-ratio waveforms during the merger as a function of location on the source sky, using a new formalism for the match that accounts for higher harmonics. This i...

  17. Observing Mergers of Non-Spinning Black-Hole Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Sean T.; Boggs, William D.; Baker, John G.; Kelly, Bernard J.

    2010-01-01

    Advances in the field of numerical relativity now make it possible to calculate the final, most powerful merger phase of binary black-hole coalescence for generic binaries. The state of the art has advanced well beyond the equal-mass case into the unequal-mass and spinning regions of parameter space. We present a study of the nonspinning portion of parameter space, primarily using an analytic waveform model tuned to available numerical data, with an emphasis on observational implications. We investigate the impact of varied m8BS ratio on merger signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) for several detectors, and compare our results with expectations from the test-mass limit. We note a striking similarity of the waveform phasing of the merger waveform across the available mass ratios. Motivated by this, we calculate the match between our equal-mass and 4:1 mass-ratio waveforms during the merger as a function of location on the source sky, using a new formalism for the match that accounts for higher harmonics. This is an indicator of the amount of degeneracy in mass ratio for mergers of moderate mass ratio systems.

  18. Extrasolar Binary Planets II: Detectability by Transit Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, K M; Nagasawa, M; Ida, S

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the detectability of gravitationally bounded pairs of gas-giant planets (which we call "binary planets") in extrasolar planetary systems that are formed through orbital instability followed by planet-planet dynamical tides during their close encounters, based on the results of N-body simulations by Ochiai, Nagasawa and Ida (Paper I). Paper I showed that the formation probability of a binary is as much as $\\sim 10\\%$ for three giant planet systems that undergo orbital instability, and after post-capture long-term tidal evolution, the typical binary separation is 3--5 times the sum of physical radii of the planets. The binary planets are stable during main sequence lifetime of solar-type stars, if the stellarcentric semimajor axis of the binary is larger than 0.3 AU. We show that detecting modulations of transit light curves is the most promising observational method to detect binary planets. Since the likely binary separations are comparable to the stellar diameter, the shape of the transit light cu...

  19. Robust parameter estimation for compact binaries with ground-based gravitational-wave observations using LALInference

    CERN Document Server

    Veitch, John; Farr, Benjamin; Farr, Will M; Graff, Philip; Vitale, Salvatore; Aylott, Ben; Blackburn, Kent; Christensen, Nelson; Coughlin, Michael; Del Pozzo, Walter; Feroz, Farhan; Gair, Jonathan; Haster, Carl-Johan; Kalogera, Vicky; Littenberg, Tyson; Mandel, Ilya; O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Pitkin, Matthew; Rodriguez, Carl; Röver, Christian; Sidery, Trevor; Smith, Rory; Van Der Sluys, Marc; Vecchio, Alberto; Vousden, Will; Wade, Leslie

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo gravitational wave (GW) detectors will begin operation in the coming years, with compact binary coalescence events a likely source for the first detections. The gravitational waveforms emitted directly encode information about the sources, including the masses and spins of the compact objects. Recovering the physical parameters of the sources from the GW observations is a key analysis task. This work describes the LALInference software library for Bayesian parameter estimation of compact binary coalescence (CBC) signals, which builds on several previous methods to provide a well-tested toolkit which has already been used for several studies. We are able to show using three independent sampling algorithms that our implementation consistently converges on the same results, giving confidence in the parameter estimates thus obtained. We demonstrate this with a detailed comparison on three compact binary systems: a binary neutron star, a neutron star-black hole binary and a bin...

  20. The Tarantula Massive Binary Monitoring: I. Observational campaign and OB-type spectroscopic binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Almeida, L A; Taylor, W; Barbá, R; Bonanos, A; Crowther, P; Damineli, A; de Koter, A; de Mink, S E; Evans, C J; Gieles, M; Grin, N J; Hénault-Brunet, V; Langer, N; Lennon, D; Lockwood, S; Apellániz, J Maíz; Moffat, A F J; Neijssel, C; Norman, C; Ramírez-Agudelo, O H; Richardson, N D; Schootemeijer, A; Shenar, T; Soszyński, I; Tramper, F; Vink, J S

    2016-01-01

    Massive binaries (MBs) play a crucial role in the Universe and knowing the distributions of their orbital parameters (OPs) is important for a wide range of topics, from stellar feedback to binary evolution channels, from the distribution of supernova types to gravitational wave progenitors. Yet, no direct measurements exist outside the Milky Way. The Tarantula Massive Binary Monitoring was designed to help fill this gap by obtaining multi-epoch radial velocity monitoring of 102 MBs in the 30 Dor. In this paper, we analyse 32 FLAMES/GIRAFFE observations of 93 O- and 7 B-type binaries. We performed a Fourier analysis and obtained orbital solutions for 82 systems: 51 single-lined and 31 double-lined spectroscopic binaries. Overall, the OPs and binary fraction are remarkably similar across the 30 Dor region and compared to existing Galactic samples (GSs). This indicates that within these domains environmental effects are of second order in shaping the properties of MBs. A small difference is found in the distribu...

  1. Wide binaries as a critical test for Gravity theories

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez, X; Allen, C

    2012-01-01

    Assuming Newton's gravity and GR to be valid at all scales leads to the dark matter hypothesis as a requirement demanded by the observed dynamics and measured baryonic content at galactic and extragalactic scales. Alternatively, modified gravity scenarios where a change of regime appears at acceleration scales $atest in this debate and we propose its application to samples of wide binary stars. Since for $1 M_{\\odot}$ systems the acceleration drops below $a_{0}$ at scales of around 7000 AU, a statistical survey of wide binaries with relative velocities and separations reaching $10^{4}$ AU and beyond should prove useful to the above debate. We apply the proposed test to the best currently available data. Results show a constant upper limit to the relative velocities in wide binaries which is independent of separation fo...

  2. Wide binaries as a critical test for Gravity theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assuming Newton's gravity and GR to be valid at all scales leads to the dark matter hypothesis as a requirement demanded by the observed dynamics and measured baryonic content at galactic and extragalactic scales. Alternatively, modified gravity scenarios where a change of regime appears at acceleration scales a 0 have been proposed. This modified regime at a 0 will generically be characterised by equilibrium velocities which become independent of distance. Here we identify a critical test in this debate and we propose its application to samples of wide binary stars. Since for 1Msun systems the acceleration drops below a0 at scales of around 7000 AU, a statistical survey of wide binaries with relative velocities and separations reaching 104 AU and beyond should prove useful to the above debate. We apply the proposed test to the best currently available data. Results show a constant upper limit to the relative velocities in wide binaries which is independent of separation for over three orders of magnitude, in analogy with galactic flat rotation curves in the same a 0 acceleration regime. Our results are suggestive of a breakdown of Kepler's third law beyond a ≈ a0 scales, in accordance with generic predictions of modified gravity theories designed not to require any dark matter at galactic scales and beyond.

  3. Testing general relativity using golden black-hole binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Abhirup; Johnson-McDaniel, Nathan K; Mishra, Chandra Kant; Ajith, Parameswaran; Del Pozzo, Walter; Nichols, David A; Chen, Yanbei; Nielsen, Alex B; Berry, Christopher P L; London, Lionel

    2016-01-01

    The coalescences of stellar-mass black-hole binaries through their inspiral, merger, and ringdown are among the most promising sources for ground-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. If a GW signal is observed with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio, the masses and spins of the black holes can be estimated from just the inspiral part of the signal. Using these estimates of the initial parameters of the binary, the mass and spin of the final black hole can be uniquely predicted making use of general-relativistic numerical simulations. In addition, the mass and spin of the final black hole can be independently estimated from the merger-ringdown part of the signal. If the binary black hole dynamics is correctly described by general relativity, these independent estimates have to be consistent with each other. We present a Bayesian implementation of such a test of general relativity, and outline the expected constraints from upcoming GW observations using the second-generation of ground-based GW detectors.

  4. X-ray binary systems - Ariel V SSI observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basis of our current theoretical understanding of galactic x-ray sources is reviewed. Models are outlined involving close binary systems containing a compact object accreting mass which has been lost from the nondegenerate star by a variety of mechanisms. The present status of galactic x-ray astronomy is discussed, with emphasis on the links between established observational categories and the characteristics of the proposed models. Observational results, consisting primarily of extended x-ray light curves derived from analysis of Ariel V SSI data are presented for two main classes of galactic x-ray source: (i) high-mass x-ray binaries containing an early-type giant or supergiant star; (ii) low-mass x-ray binaries in which the nondegenerate star is a late-type dwarf. For the high-mass binaries emphasis is placed on the determination and improvement of the orbital parameters; for the low-mass binaries, where a less complete picture is available, the discussion centres on the type of system involved, taking into account the optical observations of the source. Finally, the properties of two further categories - the sources in the galactic bulge and those associated with dwarf novae - are discussed as examples of rather different types of galactic x-ray emitter. In the case of the galactic bulge sources current observations have not led so far to a clear picture of the nature of the systems involved, indeed their binary membership is not established. X-ray emission from dwarf novae and related objects is a relatively recent discovery and represents the opening up of a new field of galactic x-ray astronomy. (author)

  5. LUT observations of the mass-transferring binary AI Dra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wenping; Qian, Shengbang; Li, Linjia; Zhou, Xiao; Zhao, Ergang; Liu, Nianping

    2016-06-01

    Complete UV band light curve of the eclipsing binary AI Dra was observed with the Lunar-based Ultraviolet Telescope (LUT) in October 2014. It is very useful to adopt this continuous and uninterrupted light curve to determine physical and orbital parameters of the binary system. Photometric solutions of the spot model are obtained by using the W-D (Wilson and Devinney) method. It is confirmed that AI Dra is a semi-detached binary with secondary component filling its critical Roche lobe, which indicates that a mass transfer from the secondary component to the primary one should happen. Orbital period analysis based on all available eclipse times suggests a secular period increase and two cyclic variations. The secular period increase was interpreted by mass transfer from the secondary component to the primary one at a rate of 4.12 ×10^{-8}M_{⊙}/yr, which is in agreement with the photometric solutions. Two cyclic oscillations were due to light travel-time effect (LTTE) via the presence of two cool stellar companions in a near 2:1 mean-motion resonance. Both photometric solutions and orbital period analysis confirm that AI Dra is a mass-transferring binary, the massive primary is filling 69 % of its critical Roche lobe. After the primary evolves to fill the critical Roche lobe, the mass transfer will be reversed and the binary will evolve into a contact configuration.

  6. Pre-main sequence spectroscopic binaries suitable for VLTI observations

    CERN Document Server

    Guenther, E W; Mundt, R; Covino, E; Alcalá, J M; Cusano, F; Stecklum, B

    2007-01-01

    A severe problem of the research in star-formation is that the masses of young stars are almost always estimated only from evolutionary tracks. Since the tracks published by different groups differ, it is often only possible to give a rough estimate of the masses of young stars. It is thus crucial to test and calibrate the tracks. Up to now, only a few tests of the tracks could be carried out. However, with the VLTI it is now possible to set constrains on the tracks by determining the masses of many young binary stars precisely. In order to use the VLTI efficiently, a first step is to find suitable targets, which is the purpose of this work. Given the distance of nearby star-forming regions, suitable VLTI targets are binaries with orbital periods between at least 50 days, and few years. Although a number of surveys for detecting spectroscopic binaries have been carried out, most of the binaries found so far have periods which are too short. We thus surveyed the Chamaeleon, Corona Australis, Lupus, Sco-Cen, rh...

  7. Observational studies of X-ray binary systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject of Chapter 1 is theoretical. The other chapters, Ch. 2 to 6, contain original observational data and efforts towards their interpretation. Of these, Ch. 3, 4 and 5 deal with massive X-ray binaries, Ch. 6 with low-mass systems and Ch. 2 with Cygnus X-3, which we have not yet been able to assign to any of these two classes. The X-ray observations described were made with the COS-B satellite. Work based on UV and optical observations is described in Ch. 5. The UV observations were made with the IUE satellite, the optical observations at several ground-based observatories. (Auth.)

  8. A supremum-type RESET test for binary choice models

    OpenAIRE

    Esmeralda Ramalho; Joaquim Ramalho; Jose M.R. Murteira

    2012-01-01

    This note introduces a supremum-type RESET statistic for testing the specification of binary choice regression models. A Monte Carlo simulation study reveals very promising results for the proposed statistic.

  9. XMM-Newton observation of the eclipsing binary Algol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Juan Yang; Fang-Jun Lu; Bernd Aschenbach; Li Chen

    2011-01-01

    We present an XMM-Newton observation of the eclipsing binary Algol which contains an X-ray dark B8V primary and an X-ray bright K2IV secondary.The observation covered the optical secondary eclipse and captured an X-ray flare that was eclipsed by the B star.The XMM-Newton European Photon Imaging Camera and Reflection Grating Spectrometer spectra of Algol in its quiescent state are described by a two-temperature plasma model.The cool component has a temperature around 6.4×106 K while that of the hot component ranges from 2 to 4.0× 107 K.Coronal abundances of C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si and Fe were obtained for each component for both the quiescent and the flare phases, generally with upper limits for S and Ar, and upper limits for C, N, and O from the hot component.F-tests show that the abundances do not need to be different between the cool and the hot component and between the quiescent and the flare phase with the exception of Fe.Although the Fe abundance of the cool component remains constant at ~0.14, the hot component shows an Fe abundance of ~0.28, which increases to ~0.44 during the flare.This increase is expected from the chromospheric evaporation model.The absorbing column density NH of the quiescent emission is 2.5 × 1020 cm-2, while that of the flare-only emission is significantly lower and consistent with the column density of the interstellar medium.This observation substantiates earlier suggestions of the presence of X-ray absorbing material in the Algol system.

  10. Hunting for brown dwarf binaries and testing atmospheric models with X-Shooter

    CERN Document Server

    Manjavacas, E; Alcalá, J M; Zapatero-Osorio, M R; Béjar, V J S; Homeier, D; Bonnefoy, M; Smart, R L; Henning, T; Allard, F

    2015-01-01

    The determination of the brown dwarf binary fraction may contribute to the understanding of the substellar formation mechanisms. Unresolved brown dwarf binaries may be revealed through their peculiar spectra or the discrepancy between optical and near-infrared spectral type classification. We obtained medium-resolution spectra of 22 brown dwarfs with these characteristics using the X-Shooter spectrograph at the VLT. We aimed to identify brown dwarf binary candidates, and to test if the BT-Settl 2014 atmospheric models reproduce their observed spectra. To find binaries spanning the L-T boundary, we used spectral indices and compared the spectra of the selected candidates to single spectra and synthetic binary spectra. We used synthetic binary spectra with components of same spectral type to determine as well the sensitivity of the method to this class of binaries. We identified three candidates to be combination of L plus T brown dwarfs. We are not able to identify binaries with components of similar spectral ...

  11. Short-Period Binary Stars: Observations, Analyses, and Results

    CERN Document Server

    Milone, Eugene F; Hobill, David W

    2008-01-01

    Short-period binaries run the gamut from widely separated stars to black-hole pairs; in between are systems that include neutron stars and white dwarfs, and partially evolved systems such as tidally distorted and over-contact systems. These objects represent stages of evolution of binary stars, and their degrees of separation provide critical clues to how their evolutionary paths differ from that of single stars. The widest and least distorted systems provide astronomers with the essential precise data needed to study all stars: mass and radius. The interactions of binary star components, on the other hand, provide a natural laboratory to observe how the matter in these stars behaves under different and often varying physical conditions. Thus, cataclysmic variables with and without overpoweringly strong magnetic fields, and stars with densities from that found in the Sun to the degenerate matter of white dwarfs and the ultra-compact states of neutron stars and black holes are all discussed. The extensive inde...

  12. Observing Mergers of Nonspinning Black Hole Binaries with LISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams S.; Baker, John G.; Boggs, William D.; Centrella, Joan; Kelly Bernard J.; Thorpe, J. Ira; vanMeter, James R.

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in the field of numerical relativity now make it possible to calculate the final, most powerful merger phase of binary black hole coalescence. We present the application of nonspinning numerical relativity waveforms to the search for and precision measurement of black hole binary coalescences using LISA. In particular, we focus on the advances made in moving beyond the equal mass, nonspinning case into other regions of parameter space, focusing on the case of nonspinning holes with ever-increasing mass ratios. We analyze the available unequal mass merger waveforms from numerical relativity, and compare them to two models, both of which use an effective one body treatment of the inspiral, but which use fundamentally different approaches to the treatment of the merger-ringdown. We confirm the expected mass ratio scaling of the merger, and investigate the changes in waveform behavior and their observational impact with changing mass ratio. Finally, we investigate the potential contribution from the merger portion of the waveform to measurement uncertainties of the binary's parameters for the unequal mass case.

  13. Observation of Gravitational Waves from a Binary Black Hole Merger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V B; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Aiello, L; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Altin, P A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C C; Areeda, J S; Arnaud, N; Arun, K G; Ascenzi, S; Ashton, G; Ast, M; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Bacon, P; Bader, M K M; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barclay, S E; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barta, D; Bartlett, J; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Bazzan, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C J; Berger, B K; Bergman, J; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birney, R; Birnholtz, O; Biscans, S; Bisht, A; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blair, C D; Blair, D G; Blair, R M; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bohe, A; Bojtos, P; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonnand, R; Boom, B A; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bouffanais, Y; Bozzi, A; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brockill, P; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Buchanan, C C; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cabero, M; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cahillane, C; Calderón Bustillo, J; Callister, T; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Cannon, K C; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Capocasa, E; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Casanueva Diaz, J; Casentini, C; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C B; Cerboni Baiardi, L; Cerretani, G; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chan, M; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, H Y; Chen, Y; Cheng, C; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P-F; Colla, A; Collette, C G; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conti, L; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Cortese, S; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S B; Coulon, J-P; Countryman, S T; Couvares, P; Cowan, E E; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dal Canton, T; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Darman, N S; Da Silva Costa, C F; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Daveloza, H P; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; De, S; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R T; De Rosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M C; Di Fiore, L; Di Giovanni, M; Di Lieto, A; Di Pace, S; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dojcinoski, G; Dolique, V; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S E; Edo, T B; Edwards, M C; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H-B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Engels, W; Essick, R C; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T M; Everett, R; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fair, H; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fiorucci, D; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fletcher, M; Fong, H; Fournier, J-D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Frey, V; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gabbard, H A G; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S G; Garufi, F; Gatto, A; Gaur, G; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; George, J; Gergely, L; Germain, V; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, K; Glaefke, A; Gleason, J R; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gonzalez Castro, J M; Gopakumar, A; Gordon, N A; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S E; Gosselin, M; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greco, G; Green, A C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guo, X; Gupta, A; Gupta, M K; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hacker, J J; Hall, B R; Hall, E D; Hammond, G; Haney, M; Hanke, M M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M J; Hartman, M T; Haster, C-J; Haughian, K; Healy, J; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heinzel, G; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Hennig, J; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Hofman, D; Hollitt, S E; Holt, K; Holz, D E; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Houston, E A; Howell, E J; Hu, Y M; Huang, S; Huerta, E A; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Idrisy, A; Indik, N; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isa, H N; Isac, J-M; Isi, M; Islas, G; Isogai, T; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M B; Jacqmin, T; Jang, H; Jani, K; Jaranowski, P; Jawahar, S; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Johnson-McDaniel, N K; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Haris, K; Kalaghatgi, C V; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karki, S; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Kehl, M S; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Kennedy, R; Keppel, D G; Key, J S; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khan, I; Khan, S; Khan, Z; Khazanov, E A; Kijbunchoo, N; Kim, C; Kim, J; Kim, K; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y-M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Kleybolte, L; Klimenko, S; Koehlenbeck, S M; Kokeyama, K; Koley, S; Kondrashov, V; Kontos, A; Koranda, S; Korobko, M; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Krueger, C; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Kwee, P; Lackey, B D; Landry, M; Lange, J; Lantz, B; Lasky, P D; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, K; Lenon, A; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Levine, B M; Li, T G F; Libson, A; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; London, L T; Lord, J E; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J D; Lousto, C O; Lovelace, G; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Luo, J; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; MacDonald, T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magaña-Sandoval, F; Magee, R M; Mageswaran, M; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mansell, G L; Manske, M; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A S; Maros, E; Martelli, F; Martellini, L; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martynov, D V; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Masso-Reid, M; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McCormick, S; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McManus, D J; McWilliams, S T; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Meidam, J; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mendoza-Gandara, D; Mercer, R A; Merilh, E; Merzougui, M; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Messick, C; Meyers, P M; Mezzani, F; Miao, H; Michel, C; Middleton, H; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, J; Millhouse, M; Minenkov, Y; Ming, J; Mirshekari, S; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moggi, A; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Montani, M; Moore, B C; Moore, C J; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Muir, A W; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D; Mukherjee, S; Mukund, N; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D J; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R K; Necula, V; Nedkova, K; Nelemans, G; Neri, M; Neunzert, A; Newton, G; Nguyen, T T; Nielsen, A B; Nissanke, S; Nitz, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E N; Nuttall, L K; Oberling, J; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oliver, M; Oppermann, P; Oram, Richard J; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ott, C D; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pai, A; Pai, S A; Palamos, J R; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pal-Singh, A; Pan, H; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Pannarale, F; Pant, B C; Paoletti, F; Paoli, A; Papa, M A; Paris, H R; Parker, W; Pascucci, D; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patricelli, B; Patrick, Z; Pearlstone, B L; Pedraza, M; Pedurand, R; Pekowsky, L; Pele, A; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Pfeiffer, H P; Phelps, M; Piccinni, O; Pichot, M; Pickenpack, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pillant, G; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poeld, J H; Poggiani, R; Popolizio, P; Post, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Predoi, V; Premachandra, S S; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Pürrer, M; Qi, H; Qin, J; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E A; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rakhmanov, M; Ramet, C R; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Re, V; Read, J; Reed, C M; Regimbau, T; Rei, L; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Rew, H; Reyes, S D; Ricci, F; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robie, R; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Roma, V J; Romano, J D; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Sachdev, S; Sadecki, T; Sadeghian, L; Salconi, L; Saleem, M; Salemi, F; Samajdar, A; Sammut, L; Sampson, L M; Sanchez, E J; Sandberg, V; Sandeen, B; Sanders, G H; Sanders, J R; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Sauter, O; Savage, R L; Sawadsky, A; Schale, P; Schilling, R; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schönbeck, A; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Serna, G; Setyawati, Y; Sevigny, A; Shaddock, D A; Shaffer, T; Shah, S; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shao, Z; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Sheperd, A; Shoemaker, D H; Shoemaker, D M; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Silva, A D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L P; Singh, A; Singh, R; Singhal, A; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, N D; Smith, R J E; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Sorrentino, F; Souradeep, T; Srivastava, A K; Staley, A; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steinmeyer, D; Stephens, B C; Stevenson, S P; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Stratta, G; Strauss, N A; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, L; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B L; Szczepańczyk, M J; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tápai, M; Tarabrin, S P; Taracchini, A; Taylor, R; Theeg, T; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, E G; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, S; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Töyrä, D; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trifirò, D; Tringali, M C; Trozzo, L; Tse, M; Turconi, M; Tuyenbayev, D; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; Vallisneri, M; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; van den Brand, J F J; Van Den Broeck, C; Vander-Hyde, D C; van der Schaaf, L; van Heijningen, J V; van Veggel, A A; Vardaro, M; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vinciguerra, S; Vine, D J; Vinet, J-Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Voss, D; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L E; Wade, M; Waldman, S J; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wang, Y; Ward, H; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L-W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Weßels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Wiesner, K; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, L; Williams, R D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M H; Winkelmann, L; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wiseman, A G; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Wright, J L; Wu, G; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yap, M J; Yu, H; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zangrando, L; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J-P; Zevin, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhou, Z; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S E; Zweizig, J

    2016-02-12

    On September 14, 2015 at 09:50:45 UTC the two detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory simultaneously observed a transient gravitational-wave signal. The signal sweeps upwards in frequency from 35 to 250 Hz with a peak gravitational-wave strain of 1.0×10(-21). It matches the waveform predicted by general relativity for the inspiral and merger of a pair of black holes and the ringdown of the resulting single black hole. The signal was observed with a matched-filter signal-to-noise ratio of 24 and a false alarm rate estimated to be less than 1 event per 203,000 years, equivalent to a significance greater than 5.1σ. The source lies at a luminosity distance of 410(-180)(+160)  Mpc corresponding to a redshift z=0.09(-0.04)(+0.03). In the source frame, the initial black hole masses are 36(-4)(+5)M⊙ and 29(-4)(+4)M⊙, and the final black hole mass is 62(-4)(+4)M⊙, with 3.0(-0.5)(+0.5)M⊙c(2) radiated in gravitational waves. All uncertainties define 90% credible intervals. These observations demonstrate the existence of binary stellar-mass black hole systems. This is the first direct detection of gravitational waves and the first observation of a binary black hole merger. PMID:26918975

  14. Observation of Gravitational Waves from a Binary Black Hole Merger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V B; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Aiello, L; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Altin, P A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C C; Areeda, J S; Arnaud, N; Arun, K G; Ascenzi, S; Ashton, G; Ast, M; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Bacon, P; Bader, M K M; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barclay, S E; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barta, D; Bartlett, J; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Bazzan, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C J; Berger, B K; Bergman, J; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birney, R; Birnholtz, O; Biscans, S; Bisht, A; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blair, C D; Blair, D G; Blair, R M; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bohe, A; Bojtos, P; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonnand, R; Boom, B A; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bouffanais, Y; Bozzi, A; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brockill, P; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Buchanan, C C; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cabero, M; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cahillane, C; Calderón Bustillo, J; Callister, T; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Cannon, K C; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Capocasa, E; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Casanueva Diaz, J; Casentini, C; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C B; Cerboni Baiardi, L; Cerretani, G; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chan, M; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, H Y; Chen, Y; Cheng, C; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P-F; Colla, A; Collette, C G; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conti, L; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Cortese, S; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S B; Coulon, J-P; Countryman, S T; Couvares, P; Cowan, E E; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dal Canton, T; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Darman, N S; Da Silva Costa, C F; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Daveloza, H P; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; De, S; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R T; De Rosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M C; Di Fiore, L; Di Giovanni, M; Di Lieto, A; Di Pace, S; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dojcinoski, G; Dolique, V; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S E; Edo, T B; Edwards, M C; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H-B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Engels, W; Essick, R C; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T M; Everett, R; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fair, H; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fiorucci, D; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fletcher, M; Fong, H; Fournier, J-D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Frey, V; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gabbard, H A G; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S G; Garufi, F; Gatto, A; Gaur, G; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; George, J; Gergely, L; Germain, V; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, K; Glaefke, A; Gleason, J R; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gonzalez Castro, J M; Gopakumar, A; Gordon, N A; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S E; Gosselin, M; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greco, G; Green, A C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guo, X; Gupta, A; Gupta, M K; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hacker, J J; Hall, B R; Hall, E D; Hammond, G; Haney, M; Hanke, M M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M J; Hartman, M T; Haster, C-J; Haughian, K; Healy, J; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heinzel, G; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Hennig, J; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Hofman, D; Hollitt, S E; Holt, K; Holz, D E; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Houston, E A; Howell, E J; Hu, Y M; Huang, S; Huerta, E A; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Idrisy, A; Indik, N; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isa, H N; Isac, J-M; Isi, M; Islas, G; Isogai, T; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M B; Jacqmin, T; Jang, H; Jani, K; Jaranowski, P; Jawahar, S; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Johnson-McDaniel, N K; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Haris, K; Kalaghatgi, C V; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karki, S; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Kehl, M S; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Kennedy, R; Keppel, D G; Key, J S; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khan, I; Khan, S; Khan, Z; Khazanov, E A; Kijbunchoo, N; Kim, C; Kim, J; Kim, K; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y-M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Kleybolte, L; Klimenko, S; Koehlenbeck, S M; Kokeyama, K; Koley, S; Kondrashov, V; Kontos, A; Koranda, S; Korobko, M; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Krueger, C; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Kwee, P; Lackey, B D; Landry, M; Lange, J; Lantz, B; Lasky, P D; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, K; Lenon, A; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Levine, B M; Li, T G F; Libson, A; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; London, L T; Lord, J E; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J D; Lousto, C O; Lovelace, G; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Luo, J; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; MacDonald, T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magaña-Sandoval, F; Magee, R M; Mageswaran, M; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mansell, G L; Manske, M; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A S; Maros, E; Martelli, F; Martellini, L; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martynov, D V; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Masso-Reid, M; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McCormick, S; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McManus, D J; McWilliams, S T; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Meidam, J; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mendoza-Gandara, D; Mercer, R A; Merilh, E; Merzougui, M; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Messick, C; Meyers, P M; Mezzani, F; Miao, H; Michel, C; Middleton, H; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, J; Millhouse, M; Minenkov, Y; Ming, J; Mirshekari, S; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moggi, A; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Montani, M; Moore, B C; Moore, C J; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Muir, A W; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D; Mukherjee, S; Mukund, N; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D J; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R K; Necula, V; Nedkova, K; Nelemans, G; Neri, M; Neunzert, A; Newton, G; Nguyen, T T; Nielsen, A B; Nissanke, S; Nitz, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E N; Nuttall, L K; Oberling, J; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oliver, M; Oppermann, P; Oram, Richard J; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ott, C D; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pai, A; Pai, S A; Palamos, J R; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pal-Singh, A; Pan, H; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Pannarale, F; Pant, B C; Paoletti, F; Paoli, A; Papa, M A; Paris, H R; Parker, W; Pascucci, D; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patricelli, B; Patrick, Z; Pearlstone, B L; Pedraza, M; Pedurand, R; Pekowsky, L; Pele, A; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Pfeiffer, H P; Phelps, M; Piccinni, O; Pichot, M; Pickenpack, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pillant, G; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poeld, J H; Poggiani, R; Popolizio, P; Post, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Predoi, V; Premachandra, S S; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Pürrer, M; Qi, H; Qin, J; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E A; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rakhmanov, M; Ramet, C R; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Re, V; Read, J; Reed, C M; Regimbau, T; Rei, L; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Rew, H; Reyes, S D; Ricci, F; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robie, R; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Roma, V J; Romano, J D; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Sachdev, S; Sadecki, T; Sadeghian, L; Salconi, L; Saleem, M; Salemi, F; Samajdar, A; Sammut, L; Sampson, L M; Sanchez, E J; Sandberg, V; Sandeen, B; Sanders, G H; Sanders, J R; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Sauter, O; Savage, R L; Sawadsky, A; Schale, P; Schilling, R; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schönbeck, A; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Serna, G; Setyawati, Y; Sevigny, A; Shaddock, D A; Shaffer, T; Shah, S; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shao, Z; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Sheperd, A; Shoemaker, D H; Shoemaker, D M; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Silva, A D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L P; Singh, A; Singh, R; Singhal, A; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, N D; Smith, R J E; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Sorrentino, F; Souradeep, T; Srivastava, A K; Staley, A; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steinmeyer, D; Stephens, B C; Stevenson, S P; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Stratta, G; Strauss, N A; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, L; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B L; Szczepańczyk, M J; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tápai, M; Tarabrin, S P; Taracchini, A; Taylor, R; Theeg, T; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, E G; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, S; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Töyrä, D; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trifirò, D; Tringali, M C; Trozzo, L; Tse, M; Turconi, M; Tuyenbayev, D; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; Vallisneri, M; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; van den Brand, J F J; Van Den Broeck, C; Vander-Hyde, D C; van der Schaaf, L; van Heijningen, J V; van Veggel, A A; Vardaro, M; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vinciguerra, S; Vine, D J; Vinet, J-Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Voss, D; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L E; Wade, M; Waldman, S J; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wang, Y; Ward, H; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L-W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Weßels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Wiesner, K; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, L; Williams, R D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M H; Winkelmann, L; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wiseman, A G; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Wright, J L; Wu, G; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yap, M J; Yu, H; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zangrando, L; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J-P; Zevin, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhou, Z; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S E; Zweizig, J

    2016-02-12

    On September 14, 2015 at 09:50:45 UTC the two detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory simultaneously observed a transient gravitational-wave signal. The signal sweeps upwards in frequency from 35 to 250 Hz with a peak gravitational-wave strain of 1.0×10(-21). It matches the waveform predicted by general relativity for the inspiral and merger of a pair of black holes and the ringdown of the resulting single black hole. The signal was observed with a matched-filter signal-to-noise ratio of 24 and a false alarm rate estimated to be less than 1 event per 203,000 years, equivalent to a significance greater than 5.1σ. The source lies at a luminosity distance of 410(-180)(+160)  Mpc corresponding to a redshift z=0.09(-0.04)(+0.03). In the source frame, the initial black hole masses are 36(-4)(+5)M⊙ and 29(-4)(+4)M⊙, and the final black hole mass is 62(-4)(+4)M⊙, with 3.0(-0.5)(+0.5)M⊙c(2) radiated in gravitational waves. All uncertainties define 90% credible intervals. These observations demonstrate the existence of binary stellar-mass black hole systems. This is the first direct detection of gravitational waves and the first observation of a binary black hole merger.

  15. On tests of general relativity with binary radio pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pozzo, W.; Vecchio, A.

    2016-10-01

    The timing of radio pulsars in binary systems provides a superb testing ground of general relativity. Here we propose a Bayesian approach to carry out these tests, and a relevant efficient numerical implementation, that has several conceptual and practical advantages with respect to traditional methods based on least-squares fit that have been used so far: (i) it accounts for the actual structure of the likelihood function - and it is not predicated on the Laplace approximation which is implicitly built in least-squares fit that can potentially bias the inference - (ii) it provides the ratio of the evidences of any two models under consideration as the statistical quantity to compare different theories, and (iii) it allows us to put joint constraints from the monitoring of multiple systems, that can be expressed in terms of ratio of evidences or probability intervals of global (thus not system-dependent) parameters of the theory, if any exists. Our proposed approach optimally exploits the progress in timing of radio pulsars and the increase in the number of observed systems. We demonstrate the power of this framework using simulated data sets that are representative of current observations.

  16. Tests and applications of the SXS binary black hole catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheel, Mark; Simulations of Extreme Spacetimes (SXS) Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Numerical relativity is the only reliable method of computing the full gravitational waveform--including inspiral, merger, and ringdown--for strongly-gravitating systems like coalescing black holes, which are of foremost importance to gravitational-wave interferometers such as LIGO. We have used the Spectral Einstein Code [black-holes.org/SpEC.html] to construct a public catalog of hundreds of binary black hole simulations, for use by gravitational-wave science, and for calibration of fast analytic models of binary black-hole waveforms. We discuss the current status of the catalog, tests of the resulting waveforms, and selected applications.

  17. White-light Flares on Close Binaries Observed with Kepler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qing; Xin, Yu; Liu, Ji-Feng; Zhang, Xiao-Bin; Gao, Shuang

    2016-06-01

    Based on Kepler data, we present the results of a search for white light flares on 1049 close binaries. We identify 234 flare binaries, of which 6818 flares are detected. We compare the flare-binary fraction in different binary morphologies (“detachedness”). The result shows that the fractions in over-contact and ellipsoidal binaries are approximately 10%–20% lower than those in detached and semi-detached systems. We calculate the binary flare activity level (AL) of all the flare binaries, and discuss its variations along the orbital period (P orb) and rotation period (P rot, calculated for only detached binaries). We find that the AL increases with decreasing P orb or P rot, up to the critical values at P orb ∼ 3 days or P rot ∼ 1.5 days, and thereafter the AL starts decreasing no matter how fast the stars rotate. We examine the flaring rate as a function of orbital phase in two eclipsing binaries on which a large number of flares are detected. It appears that there is no correlation between flaring rate and orbital phase in these two binaries. In contrast, when we examine the function with 203 flares on 20 non-eclipse ellipsoidal binaries, bimodal distribution of amplitude-weighted flare numbers shows up at orbital phases 0.25 and 0.75. Such variation could be larger than what is expected from the cross section modification.

  18. Kepler Observations of the Asteroseismic Binary HD 176465

    CERN Document Server

    White, T R; Aguirre, V Silva; Ball, W H; Bedding, T R; Chaplin, W J; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Garcia, R A; Gizon, L; Stello, D; Aigrain, S; Antia, H M; Appourchaux, T; Bazot, M; Campante, T L; Creevey, O L; Davies, G R; Elsworth, Y P; Gaulme, P; Handberg, R; Hekker, S; Houdek, G; Howe, R; Huber, D; Karoff, C; Marques, J P; Mathur, S; McQuillan, A; Metcalfe, T S; Mosser, B; Nielsen, M B; Régulo, C; Salabert, D; Stahn, T

    2016-01-01

    Binary star systems are important for understanding stellar structure and evolution, and are especially useful when oscillations can be detected and analysed with asteroseismology. However, only four systems are known in which solar-like oscillations are detected in both components. Here, we analyse the fifth such system, HD 176465, which was observed by Kepler. We carefully analysed the system's power spectrum to measure individual mode frequencies, adapting our methods where necessary to accommodate the fact that both stars oscillate in a similar frequency range. We also modelled the two stars independently by fitting stellar models to the frequencies and complementary parameters. We are able to cleanly separate the oscillation modes in both systems. The stellar models produce compatible ages and initial compositions for the stars, as is expected from their common and contemporaneous origin. Combining the individual ages, the system is about 3.0$\\pm$0.5 Gyr old. The two components of HD 176465 are young phy...

  19. White-Light Flares on Close Binaries Observed with Kepler

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Qing; Liu, Ji-Feng; Zhang, Xiao-Bin; Gao, Shuang

    2016-01-01

    Based on Kepler data, we present the results of a search for white-light flares on 1049 close binaries. We identify 234 flare binaries, on which 6818 flares are detected. We compare the flare-binary fraction in different binary morphologies ("detachedness"). The result shows that the fractions in over-contact and ellipsoidal binaries are approximately 10-20 percent lower than those in detached and semi-detached systems. We calculate the binary flares activity level (AL) of all the flare binaries, and discuss its variations along the orbital period (P_orb) and rotation period (P_rot, calculated for only detached binaries). We find that AL increases with decreasing P_orb or P_rot up to the critical values at P_orb near 3 days or P_rot near 1.5 days, thereafter, the AL starts decreasing no matter how fast the stars rotate. We examine the flaring rate as a function of orbital phase in 2 eclipsing binaries on which a large number of flares are detected. It appears that there is no correlation between flaring rate ...

  20. Observer bias in randomised clinical trials with binary outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Thomsen, Ann Sofia Skou; Emanuelsson, Frida;

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of non-blinded outcome assessment on estimated treatment effects in randomised clinical trials with binary outcomes.......To evaluate the impact of non-blinded outcome assessment on estimated treatment effects in randomised clinical trials with binary outcomes....

  1. Binary Experiments, Minimax Tests and 2-Alternating Capacities

    OpenAIRE

    Bednarski, Tadeusz

    1982-01-01

    The concept of Choquet's 2-alternating capacity is explored from the viewpoint of Le Cam's experiment theory. It is shown that there always exists a least informative binary experiment for two sets of probability measures generated by 2-alternating capacities. This result easily implies the Neyman-Pearson lemma for capacities. Moreover, its proof gives a new method of construction of minimax tests for problems in which hypotheses are generated by 2-alternating capacities. It is also proved th...

  2. Chandra observation of the relativistic binary J1906+0746

    CERN Document Server

    Kargaltsev, O

    2009-01-01

    PSR J1906+0746 is a 112-kyr-old radio pulsar in a tight relativistic binary with a compact high-mass companion, at the distance of about 5 kpc. We observed this unique system with the Chandra ACIS detector for 31.6 ks. Surprisingly, not a single photon was detected within the 3" radius from the J1906+0746 radio position. For a plausible range of hydrogen column densities, n_H=(0.5-1)\\times10^{22} cm^{-2}, the nondetection corresponds to the 90% upper limit of (3-5)\\times10^{30} erg s^{-1} on the unabsorbed 0.5-8 keV luminosity for the power-law model with Gamma=1.0-2.0, and ~10^{32} erg s^{-1} on the bolometric luminosity of the thermal emission from the NS surface. The inferred limits are the lowest known for pulsars with spin-down properties similar to those of PSR J1906+0746. We have also tentatively detected a puzzling extended structure which looks like a tilted ring with a radius of 1.6' centered on the pulsar. The measured 0.5-8 keV flux of the feature, 3.1\\times10^{-14} erg cm^{-2} s^{-1}, implies an ...

  3. Bright low mass eclipsing binary candidates observed by STEREO

    CERN Document Server

    Wraight, K T; White, Glenn J; Norton, A J; Bewsher, D

    2012-01-01

    Observations from the Heliospheric Imagers (HI-1) on both the STEREO spacecraft have been analysed to search for bright low mass eclipsing binaries (EBs) and potential brown dwarf transits and to determine the radii of the companions. A total of 9 EB candidates have been found, ranging in brightness from V=6.59 mag to V=11.3 mag, where the radius of the companion appears to be less than 0.4 Rsol, with a diverse range of host temperatures, from 4074 K to 6925 K. Both components of one candidate, BD-07 3648, appear to be less than 0.4 Rsol and this represents a particularly interesting system for further study. The shapes of the eclipses in some cases are not clear enough to be certain they are total and the corresponding radii found should therefore be considered as lower limits. The EBs reported in this paper have either been newly found by the present analysis, or previously reported to be eclipsing by our earlier STEREO/HI-1 results. One of the new objects has subsequently been confirmed using archival Supe...

  4. Observing complete gravitational wave signals from dynamical capture binaries

    OpenAIRE

    East, William E.; McWilliams, Sean T.; Levin, Janna; Pretorius, Frans

    2012-01-01

    We assess the detectability of the gravitational wave signals from highly eccentric compact binaries. We use a simple model for the inspiral, merger, and ringdown of these systems. The model is based on mapping the binary to an effective single black hole system described by a Kerr metric, thereby including certain relativistic effects such as zoom-whirl-type behavior. The resultant geodesics source quadrupolar radiation and, in turn, are evolved under its dissipative effects. At the light ri...

  5. Non-thermal emission from high-energy binaries through interferometric radio observations

    CERN Document Server

    Marcote, B

    2016-01-01

    High-mass binary systems involve extreme environments that produce non-thermal emission from radio to gamma rays. Only three types of these systems are known to emit persistent gamma-ray emission: colliding-wind binaries, high-mass X-ray binaries and gamma-ray binaries. This thesis is focused on the radio emission of high-mass binary systems through interferometric observations, and we have explored several of these sources with low- and high-frequency radio observations, and very high-resolution VLBI ones. We have studied two gamma-ray binaries, LS 5039 and LS I +61 303, at low frequencies. We have obtained their light-curves and spectra, and we have determined the physical properties of their radio emitting regions. We have also studied the gamma-ray binary HESS J0632+057 through VLBI observations. A new colliding wind binary, HD 93129A, has been discovered through VLBI and optical observations. Finally, we have conducted radio observations of two sources that were candidates to be gamma-ray binaries.

  6. Timed Testing under Partial Observability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    David, Alexandre; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand; Li, Shuhao;

    2009-01-01

    To steer model-based conformance testing of real-time systems towards certain test purposes or test coverage, many testing methods need (to be enhanced with) the assumption of full observability of the System Under Test (SUT), which means that the tester can observe precisely what state...... precision sensors that we use to measure the SUT. This paper studies the problem of testing timed systems that are only partially observable. We model the SUT using Timed Game Automata (TGA) which has internal actions, uncontrollable outputs and timing uncertainty of outputs. We define the partial...... framework, define a partial observation-based conformance relation, present the test execution algorithms, and prove the soundness and completeness of this test method (i.e., a detected error is really an error, and if the SUT violates the test purpose, then a test case can be generated to detect...

  7. Observing complete gravitational wave signals from dynamical capture binaries

    CERN Document Server

    East, William E; Levin, Janna; Pretorius, Frans

    2012-01-01

    We present a model for the inspiral, merger, and ringdown of highly eccentric compact binaries. We map the binary to an effective single black hole system described by a Kerr metric, thereby including certain relativistic effects not incorporated in existing post-Newtonian approximations. The resultant geodesics source quadrupolar radiation and in turn are evolved under its dissipative effects. At the light ring, we attach a merger model that was previously developed for quasicircular mergers but also performs well for eccentric mergers with little modification. We apply our model to assess the detectability of these sources for initial, Enhanced, and Advanced LIGO across the parameter space of nonspinning close capture compact binaries. We conclude that, should these systems exist in nature, the vast majority will be missed by conventional burst searches or by quasicircular waveform templates in the advanced detector era. Other methods, such as eccentric templates or, more practically, a stacked excess power...

  8. Observations of VHE gamma-ray binaries with the MAGIC Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    López-Oramas, A; Cortina, J; Hadasch, D; Herrero, A; Marcote, B; Munar-Adrover, P; Moldón, J; Paredes, J M; Ribas, I; Ribó, M; Torres, D; Casares, J; Rea, N

    2013-01-01

    Several binary systems, composed of a star and a compact object, have been detected in the GeV-TeV range. Several systems have been observed but only a handful of sources have shown emission at those energies. Here, we present the observations conducted by MAGIC of different {\\gamma}-ray binary systems. On one hand, we show the latest studies on the binary system LS I +61 303, which displays variability on different timescales. With the latest MAGIC observations, we will try to shed light on our understanding of this source, by presenting super-orbital and multi-wavelength studies. On the other hand, we show the observational results on the binary system HD 215227. This source has been proposed as a new {\\gamma}-ray binary for being spatially coincident with the gamma-ray source AGL J2241+4454 detected by AGILE at E >100 GeV.

  9. A massive binary black-hole system in OJ 287 and a test of general relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valtonen, M J; Lehto, H J; Nilsson, K; Heidt, J; Takalo, L O; Sillanpää, A; Villforth, C; Kidger, M; Poyner, G; Pursimo, T; Zola, S; Wu, J-H; Zhou, X; Sadakane, K; Drozdz, M; Koziel, D; Marchev, D; Ogloza, W; Porowski, C; Siwak, M; Stachowski, G; Winiarski, M; Hentunen, V-P; Nissinen, M; Liakos, A; Dogru, S

    2008-04-17

    Tests of Einstein's general theory of relativity have mostly been carried out in weak gravitational fields where the space-time curvature effects are first-order deviations from Newton's theory. Binary pulsars provide a means of probing the strong gravitational field around a neutron star, but strong-field effects may be best tested in systems containing black holes. Here we report such a test in a close binary system of two candidate black holes in the quasar OJ 287. This quasar shows quasi-periodic optical outbursts at 12-year intervals, with two outburst peaks per interval. The latest outburst occurred in September 2007, within a day of the time predicted by the binary black-hole model and general relativity. The observations confirm the binary nature of the system and also provide evidence for the loss of orbital energy in agreement (within 10 per cent) with the emission of gravitational waves from the system. In the absence of gravitational wave emission the outburst would have happened 20 days later. PMID:18421348

  10. K2 observations of the pulsating subdwarf B star EQ Piscium: an sdB+dM binary

    CERN Document Server

    Jeffery, C S

    2014-01-01

    K2, the two-wheel mission of the Kepler space telescope, observed the pulsating subdwarf B star EQ Psc during engineering tests in 2014 February. In addition to a rich spectrum of g-mode pulsation frequencies, the observations demonstrate a light variation with a period of 19.2 h and a full amplitude of 2%. We suggest that this is due to reflection from a cool companion, making EQ\\,Psc the longest-period member of some 30 binaries comprising a hot subdwarf and a cool dwarf companion (sdB+dM), and hence useful for exploring the common-envelope ejection mechanism in low-mass binaries.

  11. The ``Uberbank'': A search for compact binary coalescences in the first Observing run of Advanced LIGO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capano, Collin; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Modeled searches for gravitational waves from compact binary coalescence (CBC) use a ``bank'' of template waveforms to search the wide range of parameters that binaries may have. Recent advances in waveform modeling and template placement techniques have opened up the possibility to efficiently search for systems with non-precessing spin, using waveforms that model the inspiral, merger, and ringdown of coalescing binaries. I discuss how these advances were combined to produce the template bank used to search for CBCs in the first observing run of Advanced LIGO. This bank covered the full range of plausible masses and non-precessing spins of binary neutron stars, stellar-mass binary black holes, and binaries consisting of a neutron star and a stellar-mass black hole.

  12. Hubble Space Telescope Observations of Binary Very-Low-Mass Stars and Brown Dwarfs

    OpenAIRE

    Gizis, J. E.; Reid, I N; Knapp, G. R.; Liebert, J.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.; Koerner, D. W.; Burgasser, A. J.

    2003-01-01

    We present analysis of Hubble Space Telescope images of 82 nearby field late-M and L dwarfs. We resolve 13 of these systems into double M/L dwarf systems and identify an additional possible binary. Combined with previous observations of 20 L dwarfs, we derive an observed binary fraction for ultracool dwarfs of 17+4-3%, where the statistics included systems with separations in the range 1.6-16 A.U. We argue that accounting for biases and incompleteness leads to an estimated binary fraction 15+...

  13. Binary black hole late inspiral: Simulations for gravitational wave observations

    CERN Document Server

    Baker, J G; Choi, D I; Kelly, B J; Koppitz, M; McWilliams, S T; Van Meter, J R; Baker, John G.; Centrella, Joan; Choi, Dae-Il; Kelly, Bernard J.; Koppitz, Michael; Meter, James R. van; Williams, Sean T. Mc

    2006-01-01

    Coalescing binary black hole mergers are expected to be the strongest gravitational wave sources for ground-based interferometers, such as the LIGO, VIRGO, and GEO600, as well as the space-based interferometer LISA. Until recently it has been impossible to reliably derive the predictions of General Relativity for the final merger stage, which takes place in the strong-field regime. Recent progress in numerical relativity simulations is, however, revolutionizing our understanding of these systems. We examine here the specific case of merging equal-mass Schwarzschild black holes in detail, presenting new simulations in which the black holes start in the late inspiral stage on orbits with very low eccentricity and evolve for ~1200M through ~7 orbits before merging. We study the accuracy and consistency of our simulations and the resulting gravitational waveforms, which encompass ~14 cycles before merger, and highlight the importance of using frequency (rather than time) to set the physical reference when compari...

  14. Observing Massive Black-hole Binaries With A Redesigned Lisa

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Sean T.

    2012-01-01

    In response to recent events in NASA and ESA, which necessitate the redesign of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) to lower its cost, we present results of a design study that evaluates the impact of various redesigns on the study of massive black-hole binaries (MBHB). As a result of the shift in sensitivity towards higher frequencies in all of the redesigns, the final merger signal will be even more critical for characterizing the coalescence of MBHBs. We assess the achievable parameter accuracy of MBHB measurements with various redesign options, and how well we expect the final design choices to perform. We include spinning mergers with higher harmonics in our calculation, which was never previously included in LISA calculations, and highlights the need to include all of the available physics in order to recover any performance lost in the redesign.

  15. Insights into the astrophysics of supermassive black hole binaries from pulsar timing observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) are designed to detect the predicted gravitational wave (GW) background produced by a cosmological population of supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries. In this contribution, I review the physics of such GW background, highlighting its dependence on the overall binary population, the relation between SMBHs and their hosts, and their coupling with the stellar and gaseous environment. The latter is particularly relevant when it drives the binaries to extreme eccentricities (e > 0.9), which might be the case for stellar-driven systems. This causes a substantial suppression of the low-frequency signal, potentially posing a serious threat to the effectiveness of PTA observations. A future PTA detection will allow us to directly observe for the first time subparsec SMBH binaries on their way to the GW-driven coalescence, providing important answers of the outstanding questions related to the physics underlying the formation and evolution of these spectacular sources. (paper)

  16. Determining the Hubble constant from gravitational wave observations of merging compact binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Nissanke, Samaya; Dalal, Neal; Hughes, Scott A; Sievers, Jonathan L; Hirata, Christopher M

    2013-01-01

    Recent observations have accumulated compelling evidence that some short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) are associated with the mergers of neutron star (NS) binaries. This would indicate that the SGRB event is associated with a gravitational-wave (GW) signal corresponding to the final inspiral of the compact binary. In addition, the radioactive decay of elements produced in NS binary mergers may result in transients visible in the optical and infrared with peak luminosities on hours-days timescales. Simultaneous observations of the inspiral GWs and signatures in the electromagnetic band may allow us to directly and independently determine both the luminosity distance and redshift to a binary. These standard sirens (the GW analog of standard candles) have the potential to provide an accurate measurement of the low-redshift Hubble flow. In addition, these systems are absolutely calibrated by general relativity, and therefore do not experience the same set of astrophysical systematics found in traditional standard can...

  17. On tests of general relativity with binary radio pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Del Pozzo, Walter

    2016-01-01

    The timing of radio pulsars in binary systems provides a superb testing ground of general relativity. Here we propose a Bayesian approach to carry out these tests, and a relevant efficient numerical implementation, that has several conceptual and practical advantages with respect to traditional methods based on least-square-fits that have been used so far: (i) it accounts for the actual structure of the likelihood function - and it is not predicated on the Laplace approximation which is implicitly built in least-square fits that can potentially bias the inference - (ii) it provides the ratio of the evidences of any two models under consideration as the statistical quantity to compare different theories, and (iii) it allows us to put joint constraints from the monitoring of multiple systems, that can be expressed in terms of ratio of evidences or probability intervals of global (thus not system-dependent) parameters of the theory, if any exists. Our proposed approach optimally exploits the progress in timing o...

  18. Gemini optical observations of binary millisecond-pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Testa, V; Pallanca, C; Corongiu, A; Ferraro, F R

    2015-01-01

    Milli-second pulsars (MSPs) are rapidly spinning neutron stars, with spin periods P_s <= 10 ms, which have been most likely spun up after a phase of matter accretion from a companion star. In this work we present the results of the search for the companion stars of four binary milli-second pulsars, carried out with archival data from the Gemini South telescope. Based upon a very good positional coincidence with the pulsar radio coordinates, we likely identified the companion stars to three MSPs, namely PSRJ0614-3329 (g=21.95 +- 0.05), J1231-1411 (g=25.40 +-0.23), and J2017+0603 (g=24.72 +- 0.28). For the last pulsar (PSRJ0613-0200) the identification was hampered by the presence of a bright star (g=16 +- 0.03) at \\sim 2" from the pulsar radio coordinates and we could only set 3-sigma upper limits of g=25.0, r= 24.3, and i= 24.2 on the magnitudes of its companion star. The candidate companion stars to PSRJ0614-3329, J1231-1411, and J2017+0603 can be tentatively identified as He white dwarfs (WDs) on the bas...

  19. High-energy observations of black hole binaries with the INTEGRAL satellite

    CERN Document Server

    Del Santo, Melania

    2012-01-01

    Black-hole binaries are important sources through which studying accretion onto compact objects. In the X/gamma-ray domain, these objects show several and complex spectral behaviours and transitions. Based on INTEGRAL observations collected during the last eightyears, we have now a new view on the high energy emission of black-hole binary. An additional component above 200 keV has been observed in a few systems, during either hard/intermediate or low/hard states. The nature of this hard-tail is still debated, as also the one observed in soft states. However, among a number of models, it is usually attributed to the presence of a small fraction of non-thermal electrons in a hot-Comptonising plasma. I review the high energy emission from black hole binary systems and report on some INTEGRAL observations of three different objects: 1E 1740.7-2942, GX 339-4, Cyg X-1.

  20. Radio Observations as a Tool to Investigate Shocks and Asymmetries in Accreting White Dwarf Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Jennifer H. S.

    2016-07-01

    This dissertation uses radio observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to investigate the mechanisms that power and shape accreting white dwarfs (WD) and their ejecta. We test the predictions of both simple spherical and steady-state radio emission models by examining nova V1723 Aql, nova V5589 Sgr, symbiotic CH Cyg, and two small surveys of symbiotic binaries. First, we highlight classical nova V1723 Aql with three years of radio observations alongside optical and X-ray observations. We use these observations to show that multiple outflows from the system collided to create early non-thermal shocks with a brightness temperature of ≥106 K. While the late-time radio light curve is roughly consistent an expanding thermal shell of mass 2x10-4 M⊙ solar masses, resolved images of V1723 Aql show elongated material that apparently rotates its major axis over the course of 15 months, much like what is seen in gamma-ray producing nova V959 Mon, suggesting similar structures in the two systems. Next, we examine nova V5589 Sgr, where we find that the early radio emission is dominated by a shock-powered non-thermal flare that produces strong (kTx > 33 keV) X-rays. We additionally find roughly 10-5 M⊙ solar masses of thermal bremsstrahlung emitting material, all at a distance of ~4 kpc. The similarities in the evolution of both V1723 Aql and V5589 Sgr to that of nova V959 Mon suggest that these systems may all have dense equatorial tori shaping faster flows at their poles. Turning our focus to symbiotic binaries, we first use our radio observations of CH Cyg to link the ejection of a collimated jet to a change of state in the accretion disk. We additionally estimate the amount of mass ejected during this period (10-7 M⊙ masses), and improve measurements of the period of jet precession (P=12013 ± 74 days). We then use our survey of eleven accretion-driven symbiotic systems to determine that the radio brightness of a symbiotic system could potentially

  1. Testing Lorentz violation with binary pulsars: constraints on standard model extension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Xie

    2013-01-01

    Under the standard model extension (SME) framework,Lorentz invariance is tested in five binary pulsars:PSR J0737-3039,PSR B 1534+ 12,PSR J 1756-2251,PSR B1913+16 and PSR B2127+11C.By analyzing the advance of periastron,we obtain the constraints on a dimensionless combination of SME parameters that is sensitive to timing observations.The results imply no evidence for the break of Lorentz invariance at the 10-10 level,one order of magnitude larger than the previous estimation.

  2. New prospects for observing and cataloguing exoplanets in well-detached binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, R.; Funk, B.; Zechner, R.; Bazsó, Á.

    2016-08-01

    This paper is devoted to study the circumstances favourable to detect circumstellar and circumbinary planets in well-detached binary-star systems using eclipse timing variations (ETVs). We investigated the dynamics of well-detached binary star systems with a star separation from 0.5 to 3 au, to determine the probability of the detection of such variations with ground-based telescopes and space telescopes (like former missions CoRoT and Kepler and future space missions Plato, Tess and Cheops). For the chosen star separations both dynamical configurations (circumstellar and circumbinary) may be observable. We performed numerical simulations by using the full three-body problem as dynamical model. The dynamical stability and the ETVs are investigated by computing ETV maps for different masses of the secondary star and the exoplanet (Earth, Neptune and Jupiter size). In addition we changed the planet's and binary's eccentricities. We conclude that many amplitudes of ETVs are large enough to detect exoplanets in binary-star systems. As an application, we prepared statistics of the catalogue of exoplanets in binary star systems which we introduce in this article and compared the statistics with our parameter-space which we used for our calculations. In addition to these statistics of the catalogue we enlarged them by the investigation of well-detached binary star systems from several catalogues and discussed the possibility of further candidates.

  3. Detecting massive black hole binaries and unveiling their cosmic history with gravitational wave observations

    CERN Document Server

    Sesana, A

    2012-01-01

    Space based gravitational wave astronomy will open a completely new window on the Universe and massive black holes binaries are expected to be among the primary actors on this upcoming stage. The New Gravitational-wave Observatory (NGO) is a space interferometer proposal derived from the former Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) concept. We describe here its capabilities of observing massive black hole binaries throughout the Universe, measuring their relevant parameters (masses, spins, distance to the observer) to high precision. The statistical properties of the population of detected systems can be used to constrain the massive black hole cosmic history, providing deep insights into the faint, high redshift Universe.

  4. Adaptive Optics Observations of Exoplanets, Brown Dwarfs, & Binary Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Hinkley, Sasha

    2011-01-01

    The current direct observations of brown dwarfs and exoplanets have been obtained using instruments not specifically designed for overcoming the large contrast ratio between the host star and any wide-separation faint companions. However, we are about to witness the birth of several new dedicated observing platforms specifically geared towards high contrast imaging of these objects. The Gemini Planet Imager, VLT-SPHERE, Subaru HiCIAO, and Project 1640 at the Palomar 5m telescope will return images of numerous exoplanets and brown dwarfs over hundreds of observing nights in the next five years. Along with diffraction-limited coronagraphs and high-order adaptive optics, these instruments also will return spectral and polarimetric information on any discovered targets, giving clues to their atmospheric compositions and characteristics. Such spectral characterization will be key to forming a detailed theory of comparative exoplanetary science which will be widely applicable to both exoplanets and brown dwarfs. Fu...

  5. Observations of Candidate Binary Asteroids in the Jovian Trojan and Hilda Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnett, Sarah M.; Mainzer, Amy K.; Grav, Tommy; Masiero, Joseph R.; Bauer, James M.; Kramer, Emily A.

    2016-10-01

    Jovian Trojans (hereafter, Trojans) are asteroids in stable orbits at Jupiter's L4 and L5 Lagrange points, and Hilda asteroids are inwards of the Trojans in 3:2 mean-motion resonance with Jupiter. Due to their special dynamical properties, observationally constraining the formation location and dynamical histories of Trojans and HIldas offers key input for giant planet migration models. A fundamental parameter in assessing formation location is the bulk density - with low-density objects associated with an ice-rich formation environment in the outer solar system and high-density objects typically linked to the warmer inner solar system. Bulk density can only be directly measured during a close fly-by or by determining the mutual orbits of binary asteroid systems. With the aim of determining densities for a statistically significant sample of Trojans and Hildas, we are undertaking an observational campaign to confirm and characterize candidate binary asteroids published in Sonnett et al. (2015). These objects were flagged as binary candidates because their large NEOWISE brightness variations imply shapes so elongated that they are not likely explained by a singular equilibrium rubble pile and instead may be two elongated, gravitationally bound asteroids. We are obtaining densely sampled rotational light curves of these possible binaries to search for light curve features diagnostic of binarity and to determine the orbital properties of any confirmed binary systems by modeling the light curve. We present preliminary results from the follow-up campaign of these candidates, including estimates on the densities of objects that appear to be in binary systems and the binary fraction for Trojans and Hildas.

  6. Supermassive binary black holes - possible observational effects in the x-ray emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Predrag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we discuss the possible observational effects in the X-ray emission from two relativistic accretion disks in a supermassive binary black hole system. For that purpose we developed a model and performed numerical simulations of the X-ray radiation from a relativistic accretion disk around a supermassive black hole, based on the ray-tracing method in the Kerr metric, and applied it to the case of the close binary supermassive black holes. Our results indicate that the broad Fe Kα line is a powerful tool for detecting such systems and studying their properties. The most favorable candidates for observational studies are the supermassive binary black holes in the galactic mergers during the phase when the orbital velocities of their components are very large and exceed several thousand kms -1. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 176003: Gravitation and the Large Scale Structure of the Universe i br. 176001: Astrophysical Spectroscopy of Extragalactic Objects

  7. Gravitational waves from binary supermassive black holes missing in pulsar observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, R M; Ravi, V; Lentati, L T; Lasky, P D; Hobbs, G; Kerr, M; Manchester, R N; Coles, W A; Levin, Y; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Dai, S; Keith, M J; Osłowski, S; Reardon, D J; van Straten, W; Toomey, L; Wang, J-B; Wen, L; Wyithe, J S B; Zhu, X-J

    2015-09-25

    Gravitational waves are expected to be radiated by supermassive black hole binaries formed during galaxy mergers. A stochastic superposition of gravitational waves from all such binary systems would modulate the arrival times of pulses from radio pulsars. Using observations of millisecond pulsars obtained with the Parkes radio telescope, we constrained the characteristic amplitude of this background, A(c,yr), to be <1.0 × 10(-15) with 95% confidence. This limit excludes predicted ranges for A(c,yr) from current models with 91 to 99.7% probability. We conclude that binary evolution is either stalled or dramatically accelerated by galactic-center environments and that higher-cadence and shorter-wavelength observations would be more sensitive to gravitational waves. PMID:26404832

  8. Gravitational waves from binary supermassive black holes missing in pulsar observations

    CERN Document Server

    Shannon, R M; Lentati, L T; Lasky, P D; Hobbs, G; Kerr, M; Manchester, R N; Coles, W A; Levin, Y; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Dai, S; Keith, M J; Osłowski, S; Reardon, D J; van Straten, W; Toomey, L; Wang, J -B; Wen, L; Wyithe, J S B; Zhu, X -J

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational waves are expected to be radiated by supermassive black hole binaries formed during galaxy mergers. A stochastic superposition of gravitational waves from all such binary systems will modulate the arrival times of pulses from radio pulsars. Using observations of millisecond pulsars obtained with the Parkes radio telescope, we constrain the characteristic amplitude of this background, $A_{\\rm c,yr}$, to be < $1.0\\times10^{-15}$ with 95% confidence. This limit excludes predicted ranges for $A_{\\rm c,yr}$ from current models with 91-99.7% probability. We conclude that binary evolution is either stalled or dramatically accelerated by galactic-center environments, and that higher-cadence and shorter-wavelength observations would result in an increased sensitivity to gravitational waves.

  9. Prospects for Observing Ultracompact Binaries with Space-Based Gravitational Wave Interferometers and Optical Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littenberg, T. B.; Larson, S. L.; Nelemans, G.; Cornish, N. J.

    2012-01-01

    Space-based gravitational wave interferometers are sensitive to the galactic population of ultracompact binaries. An important subset of the ultracompact binary population are those stars that can be individually resolved by both gravitational wave interferometers and electromagnetic telescopes. The aim of this paper is to quantify the multimessenger potential of space-based interferometers with arm-lengths between 1 and 5 Gm. The Fisher information matrix is used to estimate the number of binaries from a model of the Milky Way which are localized on the sky by the gravitational wave detector to within 1 and 10 deg(exp 2) and bright enough to be detected by a magnitude-limited survey.We find, depending on the choice ofGW detector characteristics, limiting magnitude and observing strategy, that up to several hundred gravitational wave sources could be detected in electromagnetic follow-up observations.

  10. Optical observations of binary X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here I shall consider only those systems where the compact object is a neutron star (or in a few cases perhaps a black hole). Since van Paradijs (1982) has recently produced an excellent and comprehensive review of optical observations of compact galactic X-ray sources I shall summarise the basic properties of the optical counterparts and discuss a few representative systems in some detail. (orig./WL)

  11. Observer POD for radiographic testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanzler, Daniel; Mueller, Christina; Bertovic, Marija [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM), Berlin (Germany); Pitkaenen, Jorma [Posiva Oy, Eurajoki (Finland)

    2013-07-01

    The radiographic testing is an important non-destructive testing method, especially in industrial areas where people could be injured in case of failing of a component. There it is a mighty method to find volumetric defects. As bigger the penetrated length of the defect in the component is, as bigger is the radiographic contrast. The detectability of volumetric defects in its turn is not only depending on the contrast but also on the noise, the defect area and its shape. The currently applied POD approach uses mostly only the contrast and the noise as detection threshold. This does not reflect accurately the results of evaluations by human observers. A new approach is introduced, using the widely applied POD evaluation and additionally a detection threshold depending on the area of the defect. The presentation shows the process of calculating the POD curves with simulated data by the modeling software aRTist and with artificial reference data. This approach was developed within a joint project with the company POSIVA, which is constructing a final depository for high active nuclear fuels in Finland. Radiographic testing is one of the NDT-methods they use to test the electron beam welds of the copper canisters. The copper canisters will be used in the depository as a corrosion barrier within the waste management concept. (Published as a poster session.)

  12. Observation of Gravitational Waves from a Binary Black Hole Merger

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    On September 14, 2015 at 09:50:45 UTC the two detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory simultaneously observed a transient gravitational-wave signal. The signal sweeps upwards in frequency from 35 to 250 Hz with a peak gravitational-wave strain of $1.0 \\times 10^{-21}$. It matches the waveform predicted by general relativity for the inspiral and merger of a pair of black holes and the ringdown of the resulting single black hole. The signal was observed with a matched-filter signal-to-noise ratio of 24 and a false alarm rate estimated to be less than 1 event per 203 000 years, equivalent to a significance greater than 5.1 {\\sigma}. The source lies at a luminosity distance of $410^{+160}_{-180}$ Mpc corresponding to a redshift $z = 0.09^{+0.03}_{-0.04}$. In the source frame, the initial black hole masses are $36^{+5}_{-4} M_\\odot$ and $29^{+4}_{-4} M_\\odot$, and the final black hole mass is $62^{+4}_{-4} M_\\odot$, with $3.0^{+0.5}_{-0.5} M_\\odot c^2$ radiated in gravitational waves. ...

  13. A statistical test on the reliability of the non-coevality of stars in binary systems

    CERN Document Server

    Valle, G; Moroni, P G Prada; Degl'Innocenti, S

    2016-01-01

    We develop a statistical test on the expected difference in age estimates of two coeval stars in detached double-lined eclipsing binary systems that are only caused by observational uncertainties. We focus on stars in the mass range [0.8; 1.6] Msun, and on stars in the main-sequence phase. The ages were obtained by means of the maximum-likelihood SCEPtER technique. The observational constraints used in the recovery procedure are stellar mass, radius, effective temperature, and metallicity [Fe/H]. We defined the statistic W computed as the ratio of the absolute difference of estimated ages for the two stars over the age of the older one. We determined the critical values of this statistics above which coevality can be rejected. The median expected difference in the reconstructed age between the coeval stars of a binary system -- caused alone by the observational uncertainties -- shows a strong dependence on the evolutionary stage. This ranges from about 20% for an evolved primary star to about 75% for a near Z...

  14. Binary Black Hole Mergers in the first Advanced LIGO Observing Run

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    The first observational run of the Advanced LIGO detectors, from September 12, 2015 to January 19, 2016, saw the first detections of gravitational waves from binary black hole mergers. In this paper we present full results from a search for binary black hole merger signals with total masses up to $100 M_\\odot$ and detailed implications from our observations of these systems. Our search, based on general-relativistic models of gravitational wave signals from binary black hole systems, unambiguously identified two signals, GW150914 and GW151226, with a significance of greater than $5\\sigma$ over the observing period. It also identified a third possible signal, LVT151012, with substantially lower significance, which has a 87% probability of being of astrophysical origin. We provide detailed estimates of the parameters of the observed systems. Both GW150914 and GW151226 provide an unprecedented opportunity to study the two-body motion of a compact-object binary in the large velocity, highly nonlinear regime. We d...

  15. High-Resolution Observations of a Binary Black Hole Candidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chao-Wei; Phillips, Chris; Norris, Ray; Jarrett, Thomas; Emonts, Bjorn; Cluver, Michelle; Eisenhardt, Peter; Stern, Daniel; Assef, Roberto

    2012-10-01

    We propose a 12-hour 2.3 GHz continuum Long Baseline Array (LBA) observation of WISE J2332-5056, a newly discovered supermassive black hole (SMBH) merger candidate that is located in the nearby universe (z = 0.3447). Our recently acquired 9 GHz ATCA map shows unusual radio morphology: a one-sided, smaller (and likely younger) FR-I jet perpendicular to a larger, Doppler-boosted FR-II jet. Follow-up Gemini-S/GMOS spectroscopy of this WISE-selected radio galaxy reveals broad emission lines blue-shifted by > 3,500 km/s with respect to the narrow lines and host galaxy, hallmarks of a dual AGN system. Combined, the optical spectroscopy and radio morphology of this object are strongly suggestive of a black hole merger system. Even in the local universe these systems are extremely difficult to identify; yet the process of supermassive blackhole growth is vital toward understanding galaxy evolution from the early to the current universe. Moreover, nearby merging SMBHs may serve as outstanding targets for gravitational wave studies. The proposed high resolution LBA map, reaching 50 pc resolution at the source redshift will allow us to investigate the SMBH merger scenario hypothesis.

  16. The Distribution of Coalescing Compact Binaries in the Local Universe: Prospects for Gravitational-Wave Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Kelley, Luke Zoltan; Zemp, Marcel; Diemand, Jürg; Mandel, Ilya

    2010-01-01

    Merging compact binaries are the most viable and best studied candidates for gravitational wave (GW) detection by the fully operational network of ground-based observatories. In anticipation of the first detections, the expected distribution of GW sources in the local universe is of considerable interest. Here we investigate the full phase space distribution of coalescing compact binaries at $z = 0$ using dark matter simulations of structure formation. The fact that these binary systems acquire large barycentric velocities at birth (``kicks") results in merger site distributions that are more diffusely distributed with respect to their putative hosts, with mergers occurring out to distances of a few Mpc from the host halo. Redshift estimates based solely on the nearest galaxy in projection can, as a result, be inaccurate. On the other hand, large offsets from the host galaxy could aid the detection of faint optical counterparts and should be considered when designing strategies for follow-up observations. The...

  17. Observations and light curve solutions of four ultrashort-period binaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjurkchieva D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents light curve solutions of our observations of four new ultrashort-period eclipsing binaries with MS components. Two of them have periods almost at the upper limit (0.22 days of the ultrashort-period binaries, while the periods of around 0.18 days of CSS J171508.5+350658 and CSS J214633.8+120016 are amongst the shortest known orbital periods. CSS J171410.0+ 445850, CSS J214633.8+120016 and CSS J224326.0+154532 are over contact binaries with fill out factors around 0.25 while CSS J171508.5+350658 is a semidetached system. The two targets with shortest periods consist of M dwarfs.

  18. New prospects for observing and cataloguing exoplanets in well detached binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Schwarz, R; Zechner, R; Bazso, A

    2016-01-01

    This paper is devoted to study the circumstances favourable to detect circumstellar and circumbinary planets in well detached binary-star-systems using eclipse timing variations (ETVs). We investigated the dynamics of well detached binary star systems with a star separation from 0.5 to 3~AU, to determine the probability of the detection of such variations with ground based telescopes and space telescopes (like former missions CoRoT and Kepler and future space missions Plato, Tess and Cheops). For the chosen star separations both dynamical configurations (circumstellar and circumbinary) may be observable. We performed numerical simulations by using the full three-body problem as dynamical model. The dynamical stability and the ETVs are investigated by computing ETV maps for different masses of the secondary star and the exoplanet (Earth, Neptune and Jupiter size). In addition we changed the planet's and binary's eccentricities. We conclude that many amplitudes of ETVs are large enough to detect exoplanets in b...

  19. Observational Investigations on Contact Binaries in Multiple-star Systems and Star Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L.

    2013-01-01

    The W UMa-type contact binaries are strongly interacting systems whose components both fill their critical Roche lobes and share a convective common envelope. The models of contact binaries are bottlenecked due to too many uncertain parameters. In the 1960s and 1970s, the common convective envelope model was accepted after several fierce controversies. And then, the thermal relaxation oscillation (TRO) model, the discontinuity model, and the angular momentum loss (AML) model appeared. However, in the past forty years, there lacked remarkable advance. The coexistence of many unknown parameters blocks the theoretical development of contact binaries. A study on the contact binaries in multiple star systems and star clusters, which could provide lots of information for their formation and evolution, may be a potential growing point for understanding these objects. More and more evidence shows that many of contact binaries are located in multiple star systems and star clusters. In this thesis, we observed and analyzed contact binaries in the forementioned systems. The observational and theoretical studies for contact binary are also summarized briefly. The results obtained are as follows: (1) Three contact binaries V1128 Tau, GZ And, VW Boo which possess visual companions show periodic oscillations. The period ranges from 16.7 years to 46.5 years. These oscillations probably come from the orbital movement of a close third body. (2) Four contact binaries GSC 02393-00680, V396 Mon, FU Dra, SS Ari which do not have visual companions also present periodic oscillations. Whether they are real members of multiple star systems needs further investigations. These oscillations probably result from the orbital movement of a close M-type companion. (3) The periods of three contact binaries EQ Cep, ER Cep and V371 Cep in the old open cluster NGC 188 show a long-term increase. There is a cyclic period oscillation in ER Cep, with a period of 5.4 years. We find that the total mass of

  20. SMA OBSERVATIONS OF CLASS 0 PROTOSTARS: A HIGH ANGULAR RESOLUTION SURVEY OF PROTOSTELLAR BINARY SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Xuepeng [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 2 West Beijing Road, Nanjing 210008 (China); Arce, Hector G.; Dunham, Michael M. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Zhang Qizhou; Bourke, Tyler L. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Launhardt, Ralf; Henning, Thomas [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Jorgensen, Jes K. [Niels Bohr Institute and Centre for Star and Planet Formation, Copenhagen University, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark); Lee, Chin-Fei [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Foster, Jonathan B. [Institute for Astrophysical Research, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Pineda, Jaime E., E-mail: xpchen@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: xuepeng.chen@yale.edu [ESO, Karl Schwarzschild Str. 2, D-85748 Garching bei Munchen (Germany)

    2013-05-10

    We present high angular resolution 1.3 mm and 850 {mu}m dust continuum data obtained with the Submillimeter Array toward 33 Class 0 protostars in nearby clouds (distance < 500 pc), which represents so far the largest survey toward protostellar binary/multiple systems. The median angular resolution in the survey is 2.''5, while the median linear resolution is approximately 600 AU. Compact dust continuum emission is observed from all sources in the sample. Twenty-one sources in the sample show signatures of binarity/multiplicity, with separations ranging from 50 AU to 5000 AU. The numbers of singles, binaries, triples, and quadruples in the sample are 12, 14, 5, and 2, respectively. The derived multiplicity frequency (MF) and companion star fraction (CSF) for Class 0 protostars are 0.64 {+-} 0.08 and 0.91 {+-} 0.05, respectively, with no correction for completeness. The derived MF and CSF in this survey are approximately two times higher than the values found in the binary surveys toward Class I young stellar objects, and approximately three (for MF) and four (for CSF) times larger than the values found among main-sequence stars, with a similar range of separations. Furthermore, the observed fraction of high-order multiple systems to binary systems in Class 0 protostars (0.50 {+-} 0.09) is also larger than the fractions found in Class I young stellar objects (0.31 {+-} 0.07) and main-sequence stars ({<=}0.2). These results suggest that binary properties evolve as protostars evolve, as predicted by numerical simulations. The distribution of separations for Class 0 protostellar binary/multiple systems shows a general trend in which CSF increases with decreasing companion separation. We find that 67% {+-} 8% of the protobinary systems have circumstellar mass ratios below 0.5, implying that unequal-mass systems are preferred in the process of binary star formation. We suggest an empirical sequential fragmentation picture for binary star formation, based on this

  1. A characteristic observable signature of preferred frame effects in relativistic binary pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Wex, N

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we develop a consistent, phenomenological methodology to measure preferred-frame effects (PFEs) in binary pulsars that exhibit a high rate of periastron advance. We show that in these systems the existence of a preferred frame for gravity leads to an observable characteristic `signature' in the timing data, which uniquely identifies this effect. We expand the standard Damour-Deruelle timing formula to incorporate this `signature' and show how this new PFE timing model can be used to either measure or constrain the parameters related to a violation of the local Lorentz invariance of gravity in the strong internal fields of neutron stars. In particular, we demonstrate that in the presence of PFEs we expect a set of the new timing parameters to have a unique relationship that can be measured and tested incontrovertibly. This new methodology is applied to the Double Pulsar, which turns out to be the ideal test system for this kind of experiments.The currently available dataset allows us only to stud...

  2. Herschel OBSERVATIONS OF DUST AROUND THE HIGH-MASS X-RAY BINARY GX 301-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Servillat, M. [Laboratoire Univers et Théories (CNRS/INSU, Observatoire de Paris, Université Paris Diderot), 5 place Jules Janssen, F-92190 Meudon (France); Coleiro, A.; Chaty, S. [Laboratoire AIM (CEA/Irfu/SAp, CNRS/INSU, Universit Paris Diderot), CEA Saclay, Bat. 709, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Rahoui, F. [Harvard University, Department of Astronomy, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Zurita Heras, J. A., E-mail: mathieu.servillat@obspm.fr [AstroParticule et Cosmologie (Université Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/DSM, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cité), 10 rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet, F-75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France)

    2014-12-20

    We aim at characterizing the structure of the gas and dust around the high-mass X-ray binary GX 301-2, a highly obscured X-ray binary hosting a hypergiant (HG) star and a neutron star, in order to better constrain its evolution. We used Herschel PACS to observe GX 301-2 in the far infrared and completed the spectral energy distribution of the source using published data or catalogs from the optical to the radio range (0.4 to 4 × 10{sup 4} μm). GX 301-2 is detected for the first time at 70 and 100 μm. We fitted different models of circumstellar (CS) environments to the data. All tested models are statistically acceptable, and consistent with an HG star at ∼3 kpc. We found that the addition of a free-free emission component from the strong stellar wind is required and could dominate the far-infrared flux. Through comparisons with similar systems and discussion on the estimated model parameters, we favor a disk-like CS environment of ∼8 AU that would enshroud the binary system. The temperature goes down to ∼200 K at the edge of the disk, allowing for dust formation. This disk is probably a rimmed viscous disk with an inner rim at the temperature of the dust sublimation temperature (∼1500 K). The similarities between the HG GX 301-2, B[e] supergiants, and the highly obscured X-ray binaries (particularly IGR J16318-4848) are strengthened. GX 301-2 might represent a transition stage in the evolution of massive stars in binary systems, connecting supergiant B[e] systems to luminous blue variables.

  3. Herschel Observations of Dust around the High-mass X-Ray Binary GX 301-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servillat, M.; Coleiro, A.; Chaty, S.; Rahoui, F.; Zurita Heras, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    We aim at characterizing the structure of the gas and dust around the high-mass X-ray binary GX 301-2, a highly obscured X-ray binary hosting a hypergiant (HG) star and a neutron star, in order to better constrain its evolution. We used Herschel PACS to observe GX 301-2 in the far infrared and completed the spectral energy distribution of the source using published data or catalogs from the optical to the radio range (0.4 to 4 × 104 μm). GX 301-2 is detected for the first time at 70 and 100 μm. We fitted different models of circumstellar (CS) environments to the data. All tested models are statistically acceptable, and consistent with an HG star at ~3 kpc. We found that the addition of a free-free emission component from the strong stellar wind is required and could dominate the far-infrared flux. Through comparisons with similar systems and discussion on the estimated model parameters, we favor a disk-like CS environment of ~8 AU that would enshroud the binary system. The temperature goes down to ~200 K at the edge of the disk, allowing for dust formation. This disk is probably a rimmed viscous disk with an inner rim at the temperature of the dust sublimation temperature (~1500 K). The similarities between the HG GX 301-2, B[e] supergiants, and the highly obscured X-ray binaries (particularly IGR J16318-4848) are strengthened. GX 301-2 might represent a transition stage in the evolution of massive stars in binary systems, connecting supergiant B[e] systems to luminous blue variables.

  4. Observer POD for radiographic testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanzler, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.kanzler@bam.de, E-mail: uwe.ewert@bam.de, E-mail: christina.mueller@bam.de; Ewert, Uwe, E-mail: daniel.kanzler@bam.de, E-mail: uwe.ewert@bam.de, E-mail: christina.mueller@bam.de; Müller, Christina, E-mail: daniel.kanzler@bam.de, E-mail: uwe.ewert@bam.de, E-mail: christina.mueller@bam.de [Federal Institute for Materials Testing and Research, Berlin (Germany); Pitkänen, Jorma, E-mail: jorma.pitkanen@posiva.fi [Posiva Oy, Eurajoki (Finland)

    2015-03-31

    The radiographic testing (RT) is a non-destructive testing (NDT) method capable of finding volumetric and open planar defects depending on their orientation. The radiographic contrast is higher for larger penetrated length of the defect in a component. Even though, the detectability of defects does not only depend on the contrast, but also on the noise, the defect area and the geometry of the defect. The currently applied Probability of Detection (POD) approach uses a detection threshold that is only based on a constant noise level or on a constant contrast threshold. This does not reflect accurately the results of evaluations by human observers. A new approach is introduced, using the widely applied POD evaluation and additionally a detection threshold depending on the lateral area and shape of the indication. This work shows the process of calculating the POD curves with simulated data by the modeling software aRTist and with artificial reference data of different defect types, such as ASTM E 476 EPS plates, flat bottom holes and notches. Additional experiments with different operators confirm that the depth of a defect, the lateral area and shape of its indication contribute with different weight to the detectability of the defect if evaluated by human operators on monitors.

  5. Testing General Relativity with Present and Future Astrophysical Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Berti, Emanuele; Cardoso, Vitor; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Pani, Paolo; Sperhake, Ulrich; Stein, Leo C; Wex, Norbert; Yagi, Kent; Baker, Tessa; Burgess, C P; Coelho, Flávio S; Doneva, Daniela; De Felice, Antonio; Ferreira, Pedro G; Freire, Paulo C C; Healy, James; Herdeiro, Carlos; Horbatsch, Michael; Kleihaus, Burkhard; Klein, Antoine; Kokkotas, Kostas; Kunz, Jutta; Laguna, Pablo; Lang, Ryan N; Li, Tjonnie G F; Littenberg, Tyson; Matas, Andrew; Mirshekari, Saeed; Okawa, Hirotada; Radu, Eugen; O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Sathyaprakash, Bangalore S; Broeck, Chris Van Den; Winther, Hans A; Witek, Helvi; Aghili, Mir Emad; Alsing, Justin; Bolen, Brett; Bombelli, Luca; Caudill, Sarah; Chen, Liang; Degollado, Juan Carlos; Fujita, Ryuichi; Gao, Caixia; Gerosa, Davide; Kamali, Saeed; Silva, Hector O; Rosa, João G; Sadeghian, Laleh; Sampaio, Marco; Sotani, Hajime; Zilhao, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    One century after its formulation, Einstein's general relativity has made remarkable predictions and turned out to be compatible with all experimental tests. Most (if not all) of these tests probe the theory in the weak-field regime, and there are theoretical and experimental reasons to believe that general relativity should be modified when gravitational fields are strong and spacetime curvature is large. The best astrophysical laboratories to probe strong-field gravity are black holes and neutron stars, whether isolated or in binary systems. We review the motivations to consider extensions of general relativity. We present a (necessarily incomplete) catalog of modified theories of gravity for which strong-field predictions have been computed and contrasted to Einstein's theory, and we summarize our current understanding of the structure and dynamics of compact objects in these theories. We discuss current bounds on modified gravity from binary pulsar and cosmological observations, and we highlight the poten...

  6. Quark-Noave in binaries: Observational signatures and implications to astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Ouyed, Rachid; Koning, Nico; Staff, Jan E

    2016-01-01

    The explosive transition of a massive neutron star to a quark star (the Quark-Nova, QN) releases in excess of ~ 10^52 erg in kinetic energy which can drastically impact the surrounding environment of the QN. A QN is triggered when a neutron star gains enough mass to reach the critical value for quark deconfinement to happen in the core. In binaries, a neutron star has access to mass reservoirs (e.g. accretion from a companion or from a Common Envelope, CE). We explain observed light-curves of hydrogen-poor superluminous Supernovae (SLSNe Ia) in the context of a QN occurring in the second CE phase of a massive binary. In particular this model gives good fits to light-curves of SLSNe with double-humped light-curves. Our model suggests the QN as a mechanism for CE ejection and that they be taken into account during binary evolution. In a short period binary with a white dwarf companion, the neutron star can quickly grow in mass and experience a QN event. Part of the QN ejecta collides with the white dwarf, shock...

  7. Modelling the observed properties of carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars using binary population synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Abate, C; Stancliffe, R J; Izzard, R G; Karakas, A I; Beers, T C; Lee, Y S

    2015-01-01

    The stellar population in the Galactic halo is characterised by a large fraction of CEMP stars. Most CEMP stars are enriched in $s$-elements (CEMP-$s$ stars), and some of these are also enriched in $r$-elements (CEMP-$s/r$ stars). One formation scenario proposed for CEMP stars invokes wind mass transfer in the past from a TP-AGB primary star to a less massive companion star which is presently observed. We generate low-metallicity populations of binary stars to reproduce the observed CEMP-star fraction. In addition, we aim to constrain our wind mass-transfer model and investigate under which conditions our synthetic populations reproduce observed abundance distributions. We compare the CEMP fractions and the abundance distributions determined from our synthetic populations with observations. Several physical parameters of the binary stellar population of the halo are uncertain, e.g. the initial mass function, the mass-ratio and orbital-period distributions, and the binary fraction. We vary the assumptions in o...

  8. Observable fractions of core-collapse supernova light curves brightened by binary companions

    CERN Document Server

    Moriya, Takashi J; Izzard, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    Many core-collapse supernova progenitors are presumed to be in binary systems. If a star explodes in a binary system, the early supernova light curve can be brightened by the collision of the supernova ejecta with the companion star. The early brightening can be observed when the observer is in the direction of the hole created by the collision. Based on a population synthesis model, we estimate the fractions of core-collapse supernovae in which the light-curve brightening by the collision can be observed. We find that 0.19% of core-collapse supernova light curves can be observed with the collisional brightening. Type Ibc supernova light curves are more likely to be brightened by the collision (0.53%) because of the high fraction of the progenitors being in binary systems and their proximity to the companion stars. Type II and IIb supernova light curves are less affected (~1e-3% and ~1e-2%, respectively). Although the early, slow light-curve declines of some Type IIb and Ibc supernovae are argued to be caused...

  9. Herschel observations of dust around the high-mass X-ray binary GX 301-2

    CERN Document Server

    Servillat, Mathieu; Chaty, Sylvain; Rahoui, Farid; Heras, Juan Antonio Zurita

    2014-01-01

    We aim at characterising the structure of the gas and dust around the high mass X-ray binary GX 301-2, a highly obscured X-ray binary hosting a hypergiant star and a neutron star, in order to better constrain its evolution. We used Herschel PACS to observe GX 301-2 in the far infrared and completed the spectral energy distribution of the source using published data or catalogs, from the optical to the radio range (0.4 to 4x10^4 micrometer). GX 301-2 is detected for the first time at 70 and 100 micrometer. We fitted different models of circumstellar environments to the data. All tested models are statistically acceptable, and consistent with a hypergiant star at ~3 kpc. We found that the addition of a free-free emission component from the strong stellar wind is required and could dominate the far infrared flux. Through comparisons with similar systems and discussion on the estimated model parameters, we favour a disk-like circumstellar environment of ~8 AU that would enshroud the binary system. The temperature...

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: DSSI observations of binaries. VI. Measures in 2014 (Horch+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horch, E. P.; van Belle, G. T.; Davidson, J. W. Jr; Ciastko, L. A.; Everett, M. E.; Bjorkman, K. S.

    2016-04-01

    We have started a new program of speckle observations of double stars at Lowell Observatory's Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT), a 4.3-m telescope. The Differential Speckle Survey Instrument (DSSI) was on the telescope on four occasions during 2014: two nights in March, two in June, eight nights from September 30 to October 7, and four more in November for a total of 16 nights, of which approximately five were used for binary star observations reported here. In Table3, we present our measures of double stars. There are a number of binaries observed that have orbits of relatively high quality in the Sixth Catalog of Visual Orbits of Binary Stars (Hartkopf et al., 2001AJ....122.3472H) that were not used in the determination of the scale. We may use these to further judge the intrinsic accuracy and precision of the measures in Table3. A listing of these objects is given in Table4, together with the orbit information. We also estimate the detection limit at 0.2'' in the cases where no companion was found (see Table5). (3 data files).

  11. A CHANDRA OBSERVATION OF THE ECLIPSING WOLF-RAYET BINARY CQ Cep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, Stephen L. [CASA, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0389 (United States); Zhekov, Svetozar A. [Space Research and Technology Institute, Akad. G. Bonchev Str., Sofia, 1113 (Bulgaria); Güdel, Manuel [Dept. of Astrophysics, Univ. of Vienna, Türkenschanzstr. 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Schmutz, Werner, E-mail: stephen.skinner@colorado.edu, E-mail: szhekov@space.bas.bg, E-mail: manuel.guedel@univie.ac.at, E-mail: werner.schmutz@pmodwrc.ch [Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos and World Radiation Center (PMOD/WRC), Dorfstrasse 33, CH-7260 Davos Dorf (Switzerland)

    2015-02-01

    The short-period (1.64 d) near-contact eclipsing WN6+O9 binary system CQ Cep provides an ideal laboratory for testing the predictions of X-ray colliding wind shock theory at close separation where the winds may not have reached terminal speeds before colliding. We present results of a Chandra X-ray observation of CQ Cep spanning ∼1 day during which a simultaneous Chandra optical light curve was acquired. Our primary objective was to compare the observed X-ray properties with colliding wind shock theory, which predicts that the hottest shock plasma (T ≳ 20 MK) will form on or near the line-of-centers between the stars. The X-ray spectrum is strikingly similar to apparently single WN6 stars such as WR 134 and spectral lines reveal plasma over a broad range of temperatures T ∼ 4-40 MK. A deep optical eclipse was seen as the O star passed in front of the Wolf-Rayet star and we determine an orbital period P {sub orb} = 1.6412400 d. Somewhat surprisingly, no significant X-ray variability was detected. This implies that the hottest X-ray plasma is not confined to the region between the stars, at odds with the colliding wind picture and suggesting that other X-ray production mechanisms may be at work. Hydrodynamic simulations that account for such effects as radiative cooling and orbital motion will be needed to determine if the new Chandra results can be reconciled with the colliding wind picture.

  12. Prospects for joint observations of gravitational waves and gamma rays from merging neutron star binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Patricelli, Barbara; Cella, Giancarlo; Fidecaro, Francesco; Pian, Elena; Branchesi, Marica; Stamerra, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The detection of the event GW150914 opened the era of gravitational wave (GW) astronomy. Besides binary systems of black holes, the most promising GW sources are the coalescences of binary systems formed by two neutron stars or a neutron star and a black hole. These mergers are thought to be connected with short Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs), therefore combined observations of GW and electromagnetic (EM) signals could definitively probe this association. We present a detailed study on the expectations for joint GW and high-energy EM observations of coalescences of binary systems of neutron stars with Advanced Virgo and LIGO and with the Fermi gamma-ray telescope. To this scope, we designed a dedicated Montecarlo simulation pipeline for the multimessenger emission and detection by GW and gamma-ray instruments, considering the evolution of the GW detector sensitivities. We show that the expected rate of joint detection is low during the Advanced Virgo and Advanced LIGO 2016-2017 run; however, as the interferometers a...

  13. Observations of TeV binary systems with the H.E.S.S. telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Bordas, Pol; de Naurois, Mathieu; Ohm, Stefan; Wilhelmi, Emma de Oña; Sushch, Iurii; Volpe, Francesca; Zabalza, Víctor

    2013-01-01

    Recent observations of binary systems obtained with the H.E.S.S. telescopes are providing crucial information on the physics of relativistic outflows and the engines powering them. We report here on new H.E.S.S. results on HESS J0632+057, PSR B1259-63/LS 2883, Eta Carinae and the recently discovered source HESS J1018-589. Despite the high-quality data obtained in the last years through both ground and space-based gamma-ray detectors, many questions on the mechanisms that permit binary systems to emit at gamma-rays remain open. In particular, it is becoming apparent that emission at high and very-high energies is uncorrelated in some gamma-ray binary systems, with bright GeV flares not observed at TeV energies (e.g. PSR B1259-63), and sources periodically detected at VHEs which are lacking its HE counterpart (e.g. HESS J0632+057). Our results mainly confirm the predictions derived previously for the studied sources, but unexpected results are also found in a few cases, which are discussed in the context of con...

  14. Constraining the dark energy equation of state using LISA observations of spinning Massive Black Hole binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Petiteau, Antoine; Sesana, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Gravitational wave signals from coalescing Massive Black Hole (MBH) binaries could be used as standard sirens to measure cosmological parameters. The future space based gravitational wave observatory Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) will detect up to a hundred of those events, providing very accurate measurements of their luminosity distances. To constrain the cosmological parameters we also need to measure the redshift of the galaxy (or cluster of galaxies) hosting the merger. This requires the identification of a distinctive electromagnetic event associated to the binary coalescence. However, putative electromagnetic signatures may be too weak to be observed. Instead, we study here the possibility of constraining the cosmological parameters by enforcing statistical consistency between all the possible hosts detected within the measurement error box of a few dozen of low redshift (z<3) events. We construct MBH populations using merger tree realizations of the dark matter hierarchy in a LambdaCDM ...

  15. Refining our Knowledge of the White Dwarf Mass-Radius Relation with HST Observations of Sirius-type Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barstow, M. A.; Bond, H. E.; Burleigh, M. R.; Casewell, S. L.; Farihi, J.; Holberg, J. B.; Hubeny, I.

    2015-06-01

    The presence of a white dwarf in a resolved binary system, such as Sirius, provides an opportunity to combine dynamical information about the masses, from astrometry and spectroscopy, with a gravitational red-shift measurement and spectrophotometry of the white dwarf atmosphere to provide a test of theoretical mass-radius relations of unprecedented accuracy. We demonstrated this with the first Balmer line spectrum of Sirius B to be obtained free of contamination from the primary, with STIS on HST. However, we also found an unexplained discrepancy between the spectroscopic and gravitational red-shift mass determinations. With the recovery of STIS, we have been able to revisit our observations of Sirius B with an improved observation strategy designed to reduce systematic errors on the gravitational red-shift measurement. We provide a preliminary report on the refined precision of the Sirius B mass-radius measurements and the extension of this technique to a larger sample of white dwarfs in resolved binaries. Together these data can provide accurate mass and radius determinations capable of testing the theoretical mass-radius relation and distinguishing between possible structural models.

  16. GW151226: Observation of Gravitational Waves from a 22-Solar-Mass Binary Black Hole Coalescence

    OpenAIRE

    Abbott, B. P.; Sakellariadou, Maria

    2016-01-01

    We report the observation of a gravitational-wave signal produced by the coalescence of two stellar-mass black holes. The signal, GW151226, was observed by the twin detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) on December 26, 2015 at 03:38:53 UTC. The signal was initially identified within 70 s by an online matched-filter search targeting binary coalescences. Subsequent off-line analyses recovered GW151226 with a network signal-to-noise ratio of 13 and a signifi...

  17. Musings on Lorentz Violation Given the Recent Gravitational-Wave Observations of Coalescing Binary Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Yunes, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    The recent observation of gravitational waves by the LIGO/Virgo collaboration provides a unique opportunity to probe the extreme gravity of coalescing binary black holes. In this regime, the gravitational interaction is not only strong, but the spacetime curvature is large, characteristic velocities are a non-negligible fraction of the speed of light, and the time scale on which the curvature and gravity change is small. This contribution discusses some consequences of these observations on modifications to General Relativity, with a special emphasis on Lorentz-violating theories.

  18. Observations of Binary Systems with the H.E.S.S. Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Bordas, P; Eger, P; Ernenwein, J -P; Laffon, H; Mariaud, C; Murach, T; de Naurois, M; Romoli, C; Schüssler, F

    2016-01-01

    Observations of binary systems obtained recently with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S) of Cherenkov telescopes are reported. The outcomes of a detailed observation campaign on PSR B1259-63 during its periastron passage in 2014 will be presented. This system was observed for the first time with H.E.S.S. II, providing spectra and light curves down to 200 GeV, which will be compared with observations conducted during previous periastron passages and with results from an analysis of contemporaneously taken Fermi-LAT data. Also long-term observations of LS 5039 with H.E.S.S in phase I and phase II are reported. This source was monitored at very high energies (VHEs) in a period of time spanning more than ten years. Its spectral energy distribution measured with H.E.S.S. II extends down to 120 GeV. Spectral results from the Fermi-LAT observations are shown as well, and the compatibility with H.E.S.S. results in the overlapping energy range is discussed. The identification of the new gamma-ray binary can...

  19. SMA Observations of Class 0 Protostars: A High-Angular Resolution Survey of Protostellar Binary Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xuepeng; Zhang, Qizhou; Bourke, Tyler L; Launhardt, Ralf; Jorgensen, Jes K; Lee, Chin-Fee; Foster, Jonathan B; Dunham, Michael M; Pineda, Jaime E; Henning, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We present high angular resolution 1.3 mm and 850 um dust continuum data obtained with the Submillimeter Array toward 33 Class 0 protostars in nearby clouds (distance < 500 pc), which represents so far the largest survey toward protostellar binary/multiple systems. The median angular resolution in the survey is 2.5 arcsec, while the median linear resolution is approximately 600 AU. Compact dust continuum emission is observed from all sources in the sample. Twenty-one sources in the sample show signatures of binarity/multiplicity, with separations ranging from 50 to 5000 AU. The numbers of singles, binaries, triples, and quadruples in the sample are 12, 14, 5, and 2, respectively. The derived multiplicity frequency (MF) and companion star fraction (CSF) for Class 0 protostars are 0.64+/-0.08 and 0.91+/-0.05, respectively, with no correction for completeness. The derived MF and CSF in this survey are approximately two times higher than the values found in the binary surveys toward Class I YSOs, and approxima...

  20. Observations of the Binary Microlens Event MACHO-98-SMC-1 by the Microlensing Planet Search Collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Rhie, S H; Bennett, D P; Fragile, P C; Johnson, B R; King, L J; Peterson, B A; Quinn, J

    1998-01-01

    We present the observations of the binary lensing event MACHO-98-SMC-1 conducted at the Mt.~Stromlo 74" telescope by the Microlensing Planet Search (MPS) collaboration. The MPS data constrain the first caustic crossing to have occurred after 1998 June 5.55 UT and thus directly rule out one of the two fits presented by the PLANET collaboration (model II). This substantially reduces the uncertainty in the the relative proper motion estimations of the lens object. We perform joint binary microlensing fits of the MPS data together with the publicly available data from the EROS, MACHO/GMAN and OGLE collaborations. We also study the binary lens fit parameters previously published by the PLANET and MACHO/GMAN collaborations by using them as initial values for $\\chi^2$ minimization. Fits based on the PLANET model I appear to be in conflict with the GMAN-CTIO data. From our best fit, we find that the lens system has a proper motion of $\\mu = 1.3\\pm 0.2 \\kmsk$ with respect to the source, which implies that the lens sys...

  1. Speckle observations with PISCO in Merate (Italy) - XII. Astrometric measurements of visual binaries in 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scardia, M.; Prieur, J.-L.; Pansecchi, L.; Argyle, R. W.; Spanò, P.; Riva, M.; Landoni, M.

    2013-10-01

    We present relative astrometric measurements of visual binaries, made in 2011 with the Pupil Interferometry Speckle camera and COronagraph (PISCO) at the 102-cm Zeiss telescope of the Brera Astronomical Observatory in Merate (Italy). Our observing list contains orbital couples as well as binaries whose motion is still uncertain. We obtained new measurements of 469 objects, with angular separations in the range 0.14-8.1 arcsec, and an average accuracy of 0.02 arcsec. The mean error on the position angles is 0 .^{circ}7. Most of the position angles were determined without the usual 180° ambiguity with the application of triple-correlation techniques and/or by inspection of the long integration files. Thanks to a new low-magnification option included in PISCO, we have been able to observe fainter stars than previously. The limiting magnitude of our instrumentation on the Zeiss telescope is now close to mV = 10-12, which permits the observation of some red dwarfs. Finally, we present new revised orbits for ADS 8739, 9182 Aa,Ab, 9626 Ba,Bb, 12880 and 14412, partly derived from those observations. The corresponding estimated values for the masses of those systems are compatible with the spectral types.

  2. Observing the dynamics of supermassive black hole binaries with pulsar timing arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingarelli, C M F; Grover, K; Sidery, T; Smith, R J E; Vecchio, A

    2012-08-24

    Pulsar timing arrays are a prime tool to study unexplored astrophysical regimes with gravitational waves. Here, we show that the detection of gravitational radiation from individually resolvable supermassive black hole binary systems can yield direct information about the masses and spins of the black holes, provided that the gravitational-wave-induced timing fluctuations both at the pulsar and at Earth are detected. This in turn provides a map of the nonlinear dynamics of the gravitational field and a new avenue to tackle open problems in astrophysics connected to the formation and evolution of supermassive black holes. We discuss the potential, the challenges, and the limitations of these observations. PMID:23002736

  3. Simultaneous radio and X-ray observations of Galactic Centre low mass X-ray binaries

    OpenAIRE

    Berendsen, S.G.H.; Fender, R.; Kuulkers, E; Heise, J.; M. van der Klis(Astronomical Institute Anton Pannekoek, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands)

    2000-01-01

    We have performed simultaneous X-ray and radio observations of thirteen Galactic centre low-mass X-ray binaries in 1998 April using the Wide-Field Cameras onboard BeppoSAX and the Australia Telescope Compact Array, the latter simultaneously at 4.8 and 8.64 GHz. We detect two Z sources, GX 17+2 and GX 5-1, and the unusual `hybrid' source GX 13+1. Upper limits, which are significantly deeper than previous non-detections, are placed on the radio emission from two more Z sources and seven atoll s...

  4. Using Pulsar Timing observations to understand the formation and evolution of supermassive black hole binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornish, Neil; Sampson, Laura; McWilliams, Sean

    2015-04-01

    The astrophysical processes that form and harden supermassive black hole binaries impart distinct features that may be observed in the gravitational-wave spectrum within the sensitive frequency range of Pulsar Timing Arrays (PTA). We investigate how well the various formation and hardening mechanisms can be constrained by applying Bayesian inference to simulated PTA data sets. We find that even without strong priors on the merger rate, any detection of the signal will place interesting constraints on the astrophysical models. Folding in priors on the merger rate allows us to place interesting constraints on the astrophysical models even before a detection is made.

  5. Photometric Observation and Light Curve Analysis of Binary System ER-Orionis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. M. Lame’e; B. Javanmardi; N. Riazi

    2010-06-01

    Photometric observations of the over-contact binary ER ORI were performed during November 2007 and February to April 2008 with the 51 cm telescope of Biruni Observatory of Shiraz University in U, B and V filters (Johnson system) and an RCA 4509 photomultiplier. We used these data to obtain the light curves and calculate the newtimes of minimum light in each filter and plot the O–C diagram of ER ORI. Using the Wilson’s computer code with the help of an auxiliary computer program to improve the optimizations, the light curve analyses were carried out to find out the photometric elements of the system.

  6. Wide Low-Mass Tertiary Companions of Binary Star Systems as a Test of Star Formation Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Stephanie; Allen, P.

    2012-01-01

    We will present the status of a common proper motion search for wide low-mass stellar and sub-stellar companions to known white dwarf-M dwarf binary systems. I-band observations were made using the 31" NURO telescope at Lowell Observatory. Candidate companions are selected using astrometry from our own data and 2MASS photometry. We have begun to spectroscopically confirm candidates that pass our selection criteria. The ultimate goal of the search is to test star formation theories which predict that close binary systems form by transferring angular momentum to a third companion. To this end, we will model the physical companion population and perform Bayesian statistical analysis to determine the best-fit population model to our data. Here we will present our spectroscopically confirmed companions as well as the preliminary results of our population models and statistical analysis.

  7. VERITAS Observations of the TeV Binary LS I +61 303 During 2008-2010

    CERN Document Server

    Acciari, V A; Arlen, T; Aune, T; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cannon, A; Cesarini, A; Ciupik, L; Collins-Hughes, E; Connolly, M P; Cui, W; Dickherber, R; Duke, C; Errando, M; Falcone, A; Finley, J P; Finnegan, G; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Gall, D; Gillanders, G H; Godambe, S; Griffin, S; Grube, J; Guenette, R; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Hughes, G; Hui, C M; Humensky, T B; Kaaret, P; Karlsson, N; Kertzman, M; Kieda, D; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; LeBohec, S; Maier, G; Majumdar, P; McArthur, S; McCann, A; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Orr, M; Otte, A N; Park, N; Perkins, J S; Pohl, M; Prokoph, H; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Rose, H J; Ruppel, J; Saxon, D B; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Senturk, G Demet; Smith, A W; Staszak, D; Tesic, G; Theiling, M; Thibadeau, S; Tsurusaki, K; Varlotta, A; Vassiliev, V V; Vincent, S; Vivier, M; Wakely, S P; Ward, J E; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; Weisgarber, T; Williams, D A; Zitzer, B

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of observations of the TeV binary LS I +61 303 with the VERITAS telescope array between 2008 and 2010, at energies above 300 GeV. In the past, both ground-based gamma-ray telescopes VERITAS and MAGIC have reported detections of TeV emission near the apastron phases of the binary orbit. The observations presented here show no strong evidence for TeV emission during these orbital phases; however, during observations taken in late 2010, significant emission was detected from the source close to the phase of superior conjunction (much closer to periastron passage) at a 5.6 standard deviation (5.6 sigma) post-trials significance. In total, between October 2008 and December 2010 a total exposure of 64.5 hours was accumulated with VERITAS on LS I +61 303, resulting in an excess at the 3.3 sigma significance level for constant emission over the entire integrated dataset. The flux upper limits derived for emission during the previously reliably active TeV phases (i.e. close to apastron) are less...

  8. Numerical method for binary black hole/neutron star initial data: Code test

    CERN Document Server

    Tsokaros, A A; Tsokaros, Antonios A.; Uryu, Koji

    2007-01-01

    A new numerical method to construct binary black hole/neutron star initial data is presented. The method uses three spherical coordinate patches; Two of these are centered at the binary compact objects and cover a neighborhood of each object; the third patch extends to the asymptotic region. As in the Komatsu-Eriguchi-Hachisu method, nonlinear elliptic field equations are decomposed into a flat space Laplacian and a remaining nonlinear expression that serves in each iteration as an effective source. The equations are solved iteratively, integrating a Green's function against the effective source at each iteration. Detailed convergence tests for the essential part of the code are performed for a few types of selected Green's functions to treat different boundary conditions. Numerical computation of the gravitational potential of a fluid source, and a toy model for a binary black hole field are carefully calibrated with the analytic solutions to examine accuracy and convergence of the new code. As an example of...

  9. Masses of the components of SB2 binaries observed with Gaia. III. Accurate SB2 orbits for 10 binaries and masses of HIP 87895

    CERN Document Server

    Kiefer, Flavien; Arenou, Frédéric; Pourbaix, Dimitri; Famaey, Benoit; Guillout, Patrick; Lebreton, Yveline; Gómez-Morán, Ada Nebot; Mazeh, Tsevi; Salomon, Jean-Baptiste; Soubiran, Caroline; Tal-Or, Lev

    2016-01-01

    In anticipation of the Gaia astrometric mission, a large sample of spectroscopic binaries has been observed since 2010 with the SOPHIE spectrograph at the Haute--Provence Observatory. Our aim is to derive the orbital elements of double-lined spectroscopic binaries (SB2s) with an accuracy sufficient to finally obtain the masses of the components with relative errors as small as 1 % when the astrometric measurements of Gaia are taken into account. In this paper we present the results from five years of observations of 10 SB2 systems with periods ranging from 37 to 881 days. Using the TODMOR algorithm we computed radial velocities from the spectra, and then derived the orbital elements of these binary systems. The minimum masses of the components are then obtained with an accuracy better than 1.2 % for the ten binaries. Combining the radial velocities with existing interferometric measurements, we derived the masses of the primary and secondary components of HIP 87895 with an accuracy of 0.98 % and 1.2 % respect...

  10. Simultaneous X-Ray and Radio Observations of the Unusual Binary LSI + 61 deg 303

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Fiona A.; Leahy, Denis A.; Waltman, Elizabeth

    1996-01-01

    We present simultaneous 0.5 - 10 keV X-ray and two-frequency radio observations at 2.25 and 8.3 GHz of the unusual binary system LSI + 61 deg. 303. This system was observed twice in a single binary orbit by the ASCA satellite, and monitored daily at two radio frequencies during the same orbital cycle with the Greenbank Interferometer. During the first ASCA observation the source was detected with a 1 - 10 keV luminosity 3.6 x 10(exp 33) (d/2.0 kpc)(exp 2) erg 1/s and during the second at a similar level with evidence for a decrease in average flux of 30%. During the first pointing the radio source was at a quiescent 8 GHz flux level of 30 mJy while during the second the radio flux was rising dramatically with an average value of 100 mJy. No variability is seen in the X-ray flux during the first pointing, but during the second the flux is variable by approx. 50% on timescales of approx. 30 minutes. No pulsations are seen in either X-ray observation with an upper limit on pulsed flux of 20%. The low X-ray luminosity and lack of observed pulsations indicate that accretion onto a neutron star surface is not the origin for the high-energy emission. Rather, the X-rays must result either from accreted matter which is stopped at the magnetosphere because the magnetospheric boundry is rotating at super-Keplerian rates or due to a shock formed in the interaction of the dense wind of the Be star companion and a moderately young pulsar. We derive a required pulsar spin down luminosity of approx. 10(exp 37) erg 1/s, and argue that the shock model more easily explains the observed X-ray radio observations.

  11. Testing Gravitational Physics with Space-based Gravitational-wave Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John G.

    2011-01-01

    Gravitational wave observations provide exceptional and unique opportunities for precision tests of gravitational physics, as predicted by general relativity (GR). Space-based gravitational wave measurements, with high signal-to-noise ratios and large numbers of observed events may provide the best-suited gravitational-wave observations for testing GR with unprecedented precision. These observations will be especially useful in testing the properties of gravitational waves and strong-field aspects of the theory which are less relevant in other observations. We review the proposed GR test based on observations of massive black hole mergers, extreme mass ratio inspirals, and galactic binary systems.

  12. Long-term photometric and spectroscopic observations of the near-contact binary KR Cygni

    CERN Document Server

    Sipahi, E; Ibanoglu, C

    2012-01-01

    We present the multi-color, five-year light curves and the first radial velocities of the near-contact binary system KR Cyg. We derived the masses of the components as 2.88$\\pm$0.20 M$_{\\odot}$ and 1.26$\\pm$0.07 M$_{\\odot}$ and the radii as 2.59$\\pm$0.06 R$_{\\odot}$ and 1.80$\\pm$0.04 R$_{\\odot}$. Analyses of the UBVR light curves and the radial velocities indicate that none of the components exactly fill their corresponding Roche lobes. We have calculated the distance to the system of KR Cyg as {411$\\pm$12} pc using the observed apparent UBV magnitudes and the bolometric corrections for the component stars. We also searched for the empirical determination of albedo and effective temperature of the cooler, less massive star of KR Cyg, and of two similar near contact binaries AK CMi, and DO Cas. The residuals between the observed and computed fluxes are attributed to the effect of mutual illumination which heats the surface layers of the illuminated star and does vary not only its bolometric albedo but also its...

  13. Period and amplitude variations in post-common-envelope eclipsing binaries observed with SuperWASP

    CERN Document Server

    Lohr, M E; Anderson, D R; Cameron, A Collier; Faedi, F; Haswell, C A; Hellier, C; Hodgkin, S T; Horne, K; Kolb, U C; Maxted, P F L; Pollacco, D; Skillen, I; Smalley, B; West, R G; Wheatley, P J

    2014-01-01

    Period or amplitude variations in eclipsing binaries may reveal the presence of additional massive bodies in the system, such as circumbinary planets. Here, we have studied twelve previously-known eclipsing post-common-envelope binaries for evidence of such light curve variations, on the basis of multi-year observations in the SuperWASP archive. The results for HW Vir provided strong evidence for period changes consistent with those measured by previous studies, and help support a two-planet model for the system. ASAS J102322-3737.0 exhibited plausible evidence for a period increase not previously suggested; while NY Vir, QS Vir and NSVS 14256825 afforded less significant support for period change, providing some confirmation to earlier claims. In other cases, period change was not convincingly observed; for AA Dor and NSVS 07826147, previous findings of constant period were confirmed. This study allows us to present hundreds of new primary eclipse timings for these systems, and further demonstrates the value...

  14. BeppoSAX observation of the X-ray binary pulsar Vela X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandini, M.; Dal Fiume, D.; Nicastro, L.; Giarrusso, S.; Segreto, A.; Piraino, S.; Cusumano, G.; Del Sordo, S.; Guainazzi, M.; Piro, L.

    1997-05-01

    We report on the spectral (pulse averaged) and timing analysis of the ~20 ksec observation of the X-ray binary pulsar Vela X-1 performed during the BeppoSAX Science Verification Phase. The source was observed in two different intensity states: the low state is probably due to an erratic intensity dip and shows a decrease of a factor ~2 in intensity, and a factor 10 in NH. We have not been able to fit the 2-100 keV continuum spectrum with the standard (for an X-ray pulsar) power law modified by a high energy cutoff because of the flattening of the spectrum in ~10-30 keV. The timing analysis confirms previous results: the pulse profile changes from a five-peak structure for energies less than 15 keV, to a simpler two-peak shape at higher energies. The Fourier analysis shows a very complex harmonic component: up to 23 harmonics are clearly visible in the power spectrum, with a dominant first harmonic for low energy data, and a second one as the more prominent for energies greater than 15 keV. The aperiodic component in the Vela X-1 power spectrum presents a knee at about 1 Hz. The pulse period, corrected for binary motion, is 283.206+/-0.001 sec.

  15. Wide binaries as a critical test for Gravity theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, X.; Jiménez, M. A.; Allen, C.

    2012-12-01

    Assuming Newton's gravity and GR to be valid at all scales leads to the dark matter hypothesis as a requirement demanded by the observed dynamics and measured baryonic content at galactic and extragalactic scales. Alternatively, modified gravity scenarios where a change of regime appears at acceleration scales a law beyond a ≈ a0 scales, in accordance with generic predictions of modified gravity theories designed not to require any dark matter at galactic scales and beyond.

  16. Tracing non-conservative mass transfer eras in close binaries from observed period variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanouris, N.; Kalimeris, A.; Antonopoulou, E.; Rovithis-Livaniou, H.

    2013-09-01

    The pure information directly taken from the observed orbital evolution of eclipsing binary stars (centuries at most) is valuable for the study of many important physical mechanisms related to the stellar structure. Especially in the case of eclipsing binary systems, this may happen by monitoring their eclipse timing variations, i.e. by means of an O-C diagram analysis. As long as a binary system attains a semi-detached configuration, material begins to flow from the component that fills its Roche lobe toward its mate through the first Lagrangian (L1) point. Here, we examine two non conservative mass transfer (MT) paths. The MT process is then accompanied by mass and angular momentum loss from the system. In the first path, angular momentum is removed through a hot spot which re-emits part of the incoming material, and in the second, angular momentum is carried away via an outer Lagrangian point (L2/L3) due to the small accumulating efficiency of the accretion disk surrounding the gainer. Dealing with the less massive component as the donor in the latter path, it is shown that there is always a critical mass ratio over which the period is expected to decrease, contrary to what the fully conservative MT predicts. Consistent with our expectations, the critical values become progressively smaller as the degree of liberalism is gradually widened. The O-C diagram of several semi-detached systems, expecting to experience a liberal era, is individually examined aiming to estimate both the mass transfer and the mass loss rate.

  17. Near-infrared observations of the Be/X-ray binary pulsar A0535+262

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sachindra Naik; Blesson Mathew; D. P. K. Banerjee; N. M. Ashok; Rajeev R. Jaiswal

    2012-01-01

    We present the results obtained from extensive near-infrared (IR) spectro-scopic and photometric observations of the Be/X-ray binary A0535+262/HDE 245770 at different phases of its ~ 111 d orbital period.This observation campaign is part of the monitoring program of selective Be/X-ray binary systems aimed at understanding X-ray and near-IR properties at different orbital phases,especially during the periastron passage of the neutron star.The near-IR observations presented here were carried out using the 1.2 m telescope at the Mt.Abu IR Observatory.Though the source was relatively faint for spectroscopic observations with the 1.2 m telescope,we monitored the source closely during the 2011 February-March giant X-ray outburst to primarily investigate whether any drastic changes in the near-IR JHK spectra took place at the periastron passage.Changes of such a striking nature were expected to be detectable in our spectra.Photometric observations of the Be star show a gradual and systematic fading in the JHK light curves since the onset of the X-ray outburst,which could suggest a mild evacuation/truncation of the circumstellar disk of the Be companion.Near-IR spectroscopy of the object shows that the JHK spectra are dominated by the emission lines of hydrogen Brackett and Paschen series and HeI lines at 1.0830,1.7002 and 2.0585 μm.The presence of all the hydrogen emission lines in the JHK spectra,along with the absence of any significant change in the continuum of the Be companion during X-ray quiescent and X-ray outburst phases,suggests that the near- IR line emitting regions of the disk are not significantly affected during the X-ray outburst.

  18. In what sense a neutron star-black hole binary is the holy grail for testing gravity?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagchi, Manjari [International Centre for Theoretical Sciences, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Bangalore 560012 (India); Torres, Diego F., E-mail: manjari.bagchi@icts.res.in, E-mail: dtorres@ieec.uab.es [ICREA and Institute of Space Sciences, Barcelona 2a Planta E-08193 (Spain)

    2014-08-01

    Pulsars in binary systems have been very successful to test the validity of general relativity in the strong field regime [1-4]. So far, such binaries include neutron star-white dwarf (NS-WD) and neutron star-neutron star (NS-NS) systems. It is commonly believed that a neutron star-black hole (NS-BH) binary will be much superior for this purpose. But in what sense is this true? Does it apply to all possible deviations?.

  19. In what sense a neutron star-black hole binary is the holy grail for testing gravity?

    CERN Document Server

    Bagchi, Manjari

    2014-01-01

    Pulsars in binary systems have been very successful to test the validity of general relativity in the strong field regime. So far, such binaries include neutron star-white dwarf (NS-WD) and neutron star-neutron star (NS-NS) systems. It is commonly believed that a neutron star-black hole (NS-BH) binary will be much superior for this purpose. But in what sense is this true? Does it apply to all possible deviations?

  20. SPECKLE OBSERVATIONS OF BINARY STARS WITH THE WIYN TELESCOPE. VII. MEASURES DURING 2008-2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horch, Elliott P.; Bahi, Lizzie Anne P.; Gaulin, Joseph R. [Department of Physics, Southern Connecticut State University, 501 Crescent Street, New Haven, CT 06515 (United States); Howell, Steve B. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Sherry, William H. [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 87719 (United States); Baena Galle, Roberto [Observatori Fabra, Reial Academia de Ciencies i Arts de Barcelona, Cami de l' Observatori s/n, E-08002 Barcelona (Spain); Van Altena, William F., E-mail: horche2@southernct.edu, E-mail: bahil1@owls.southernct.edu, E-mail: jgaulin.jg@gmail.com, E-mail: steve.b.howell@nasa.gov, E-mail: wsherry@noao.edu, E-mail: rbaena@am.ub.es, E-mail: william.vanaltena@yale.edu [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Five hundred thirty-one speckle measures of binary stars are reported. These data were taken mainly during the period 2008 June through 2009 October at the WIYN 3.5 m Telescope at Kitt Peak and represent the last data set of single-filter speckle observations taken in the WIYN speckle program prior to the use of the current two-channel speckle camera. The astrometric and photometric precision of these observations is consistent with previous papers in this series: we obtain a typical linear measurement uncertainty of approximately 2.5 mas, and the magnitude differences reported have typical uncertainties in the range of 0.1-0.14 mag. In combination with measures already in the literature, the data presented here permit the revision of the orbit of A 1634AB (= HIP 76041) and the first determination of visual orbital elements for HDS 1895 (= HIP 65982).

  1. A Decade of TeV Observations of the Gamma-ray Binary HESSJ0632+057 with VERITAS

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    The gamma-ray binary HESSJ0632+057 (VERJ0633+057) has been observed at very-high energies for a decade by all major systems of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. We present here new observations taken by the VERITAS observatory during the season 2015-2016. The observations cover now all phases of the binary orbit (with its period of about 315 days), showing clearly enhancements around phases 0.35 and 0.75. The results are discussed along with simultaneous observations with Swift's X-Ray Telescope.

  2. CCD Photometric Observations and Light Curve Synthesis of the Near-Contact Binary XZ Canis Minoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chun-Hwey; Park, Jang-Ho; Lee, Jae Woo; Jeong, Jang-Hae

    2009-06-01

    Through the photometric observations of the near-contact binary, XZ CMi, new BV light curves were secured and seven times of minimum light were determined. An intensive period study with all published timings, including ours, confirms that the period of XZ CMi has varied in a cyclic period variation superposed on a secular period decrease over last 70 years. Assuming the cyclic change of period to occur by a light-time effect due to a third-body, the light-time orbit with a semi-amplitude of 0.0056d, a period of 29y and an eccentricity of 0.71 was calculated. The observed secular period decrease of -5.26× 10^{-11} d/P was interpreted as a result of simultaneous occurrence of both a period decrease of -8.20 × 10^{-11} d/P by angular momentum loss (AML) due to a magnetic braking stellar wind and a period increase of 2.94 × 10^{-11} d/P by a mass transfer from the less massive secondary to the primary components in the system. In this line the decreasi! ng rate of period due to AML is about 3 times larger than the increasing one by a mass transfer in their absolute values. The latter implies a mass transfer of dot M_{s}= 3.21 × 10^{-8} M_⊙ y^{-1} from the less massive secondary to the primary. The BV light curves with the latest Wilson-Devinney binary code were analyzed for two separate models of 8200K and 7000K as the photospheric temperature of the primary component. Both models confirm that XZ CMi is truly a near-contact binary with a less massive secondary completely filling Roche lobe and a primary inside the inner Roche lobe and there is a third-light corresponding to about 15-17% of the total system light. However, the third-light source can not be the same as the third-body suggested from the period study. At the present, however, we can not determine which one between two models is better fitted to the observations because of a negligible difference of sum (O-C)^2 between them. The diversity of mass ratios, with which previous investigators were in

  3. VLBI observations of the shortest orbital period black hole binary, MAXI J1659-152

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paragi, Z.; van der Horst, A. J.; Belloni, T.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Linford, J.; Taylor, G.; Yang, J.; Garrett, M. A.; Granot, J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kuulkers, E.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2013-06-01

    The X-ray transient MAXI J1659-152 was discovered by Swift/Burst Alert Telescope and it was initially identified as a gamma-ray burst. Soon its Galactic origin and binary nature were established. There exists a wealth of multiwavelength monitoring data for this source, providing a great coverage of the full X-ray transition in this candidate black hole binary system. We obtained two epochs of European very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) Network (EVN) electronic-VLBI and four epochs of Very Long Baseline Array data of MAXI J1659-152 which show evidence for outflow in the early phases. The overall source properties (polarization, milliarcsecond-scale radio structure, flat radio spectrum) are described well with the presence of a compact jet in the system through the transition from the hard-intermediate to the soft X-ray spectral state. The apparent dependence of source size and the radio core position on the observed flux density (luminosity-dependent core shift) supports this interpretation as well. We see no evidence for major discrete ejecta during the outburst. For the source proper motion we derive 2σ upper limits of 115 μas d-1 in right ascension, and 37 μas d-1 in declination, over a time baseline of 12 d. These correspond to velocities of 1400 and 440 km s-1, respectively, assuming a source distance of ˜7 kpc.

  4. ALMA observations of a misaligned binary protoplanetary disk system in Orion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of a wide binary system in Orion, with projected separation 440 AU, in which we detect submillimeter emission from the protoplanetary disks around each star. Both disks appear moderately massive and have strong line emission in CO 3-2, HCO+ 4-3, and HCN 3-2. In addition, CS 7-6 is detected in one disk. The line-to-continuum ratios are similar for the two disks in each of the lines. From the resolved velocity gradients across each disk, we constrain the masses of the central stars, and show consistency with optical-infrared spectroscopy, both indicative of a high mass ratio ∼9. The small difference between the systemic velocities indicates that the binary orbital plane is close to face-on. The angle between the projected disk rotation axes is very high, ∼72°, showing that the system did not form from a single massive disk or a rigidly rotating cloud core. This finding, which adds to related evidence from disk geometries in other systems, protostellar outflows, stellar rotation, and similar recent ALMA results, demonstrates that turbulence or dynamical interactions act on small scales well below that of molecular cores during the early stages of star formation.

  5. VLBI observations of the shortest orbital period black hole binary, MAXI J1659-152

    CERN Document Server

    Paragi, Z; Belloni, T; Miller-Jones, J C A; Linford, J; Taylor, G; Yang, J; Garrett, M A; Granot, J; Kouveliotou, C; Kuulkers, E; Wijers, R A M J

    2013-01-01

    The X-ray transient MAXI J1659-152 was discovered by Swift/BAT and it was initially identified as a GRB. Soon its Galactic origin and binary nature were established. There exists a wealth of multi-wavelength monitoring data for this source, providing a great coverage of the full X-ray transition in this candidate black hole binary system. We obtained two epochs of European VLBI Network (EVN) electronic-VLBI (e-VLBI) and four epochs of Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) data of MAXI J1659-152 which show evidence for outflow in the early phases. The overall source properties (polarization, milliarcsecond-scale radio structure, flat radio spectrum) are described well with the presence of a compact jet in the system through the transition from the hard-intermediate to the soft X-ray spectral state. The apparent dependence of source size and the radio core position on the observed flux density (luminosity dependent core shift) support this interpretation as well. We see no evidence for major discrete ejecta during th...

  6. Observations and numerical studies of gamma-ray emission in colliding-wind binaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massive stars in binary systems have long been regarded as potential sources of high-energy gamma rays. The emission is thought to arise in the region where the stellar winds collide, thereby producing accelerated particles which subsequently emit gamma rays.This scenario is supported by observations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope presented in this thesis. To address the underlying emission mechanisms in a quantitative way, numerical simulations that incorporate hydrodynamics, the acceleration of charged particles as well as the subsequent gamma-ray emission were found to be needed.This thesis presents the analysis of a high-energy gamma-ray source and its identification with the particle-accelerating colliding-wind binary system Eta Carinae. In order to go beyond the present understanding of such objects, this work provides detailed description of a new 3D-hydrodynamical model, which incorporates the line-driven acceleration of the winds, gravity, orbital motion and the radiative cooling of the shocked plasma, as well as the diffusive shock acceleration of charged particles in the wind collision region. In a subsequent step we simulate and study the resulting gamma-ray emission via relativistic bremsstrahlung, anisotropic inverse Compton radiation and neutral pion decay. (author)

  7. ALMA observations of a misaligned binary protoplanetary disk system in Orion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Jonathan P. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96816 (United States); Mann, Rita K.; Francesco, James Di; Johnstone, Doug; Matthews, Brenda [NRC Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC, V9E 2E7 (Canada); Andrews, Sean M.; Ricci, Luca [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hughes, A. Meredith [Van Vleck Observatory, Astronomy Department, Wesleyan University, 96 Foss Hill Drive, Middletown, CT 06459 (United States); Bally, John, E-mail: jpw@ifa.hawaii.edu [CASA, University of Colorado, CB 389, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of a wide binary system in Orion, with projected separation 440 AU, in which we detect submillimeter emission from the protoplanetary disks around each star. Both disks appear moderately massive and have strong line emission in CO 3-2, HCO{sup +} 4-3, and HCN 3-2. In addition, CS 7-6 is detected in one disk. The line-to-continuum ratios are similar for the two disks in each of the lines. From the resolved velocity gradients across each disk, we constrain the masses of the central stars, and show consistency with optical-infrared spectroscopy, both indicative of a high mass ratio ∼9. The small difference between the systemic velocities indicates that the binary orbital plane is close to face-on. The angle between the projected disk rotation axes is very high, ∼72°, showing that the system did not form from a single massive disk or a rigidly rotating cloud core. This finding, which adds to related evidence from disk geometries in other systems, protostellar outflows, stellar rotation, and similar recent ALMA results, demonstrates that turbulence or dynamical interactions act on small scales well below that of molecular cores during the early stages of star formation.

  8. SARA South Observations and Analysis of the Solar Type, Totally Eclipsing, Contact Binary, DD Indus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samec, Ronald G.; Norris, Cody; Van Hamme, Walter V.; Faulkner, Danny R.

    2016-06-01

    DD Ind (NSVS5066754) is a Solar Type (T ~ 5850K) solar type eclipsing binary. It was observed in June to September, 2013 at Cerro Tololo in remote mode with the 0.6-m SARA South reflector. Five times of minimum light were calculated from our present observations, for three primary and two secondary eclipses: HJD Min I = 2456505.8085±0.0002, 2456533.73933±0.00003, 2456536.6378±0.0012HJD Min II = 2456503.8132±00.0014, 2456533.5583±0.0004In addition, two observations at minima were determined from archived All Sky Automated Survey Data:HJD Min II = 2452872.9104, 2452883.6097.The following quadratic ephemerides was determined from all available times of minimum light:JD Hel Min I=2456533.7394±0.0002d + 0.3627463±0.0000002 X E +0.00000000006 ± 0.00000000002 X E2A BVRcIc filtered simultaneous Wilson-Devinney Program (W-D) solution reveals that the system has a mass ratio of ~0.46, and a component temperature difference of ~200 K. Two weak (Tfact ~ 0.95, ~20 degree radius) cool spots were iterated on the secondary component in the WD Synthetic Light Curve Computations. They appeared in the Northern Hemisphere (colatitude 45 degrees) and near the equator (colatitude ~95 degrees), respectively.The Roche Lobe fill-out of the binary is ~13%. The inclination is ~84.8o. An eclipse duration of ~16 minutes was determined for the primary eclipse. Additional and more detailed information is given in the meeting report.

  9. Testing Asteroseismology with red giants in eclipsing binary and multiple-star systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gaulme, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Red-giant stars are proving to be an incredible source of information for testing models of stellar evolution, as asteroseismology has opened up a window into their interiors. Such insights are a direct result of the unprecedented data from space missions CoRoT and Kepler as well as recent theoretical advances. Eclipsing binaries are also fundamental astrophysical objects, and when coupled with asteroseismology, they would provide two independent methods to obtain masses and radii and exciting opportunities to develop highly constrained stellar models. Gaulme et al. (2013) reported the discovery of 13 bona fide candidates (12 previously unknown) to be eclipsing binaries, one to be an non-eclipsing binary with tidally induced oscillations, and 10 more to be hierarchical triple systems, all of which include a pulsating red giant. When ground-based support in terms of atmospheric abundance and radial velocities are completed, these red giants in eclipsing binary systems have the potential to become some of the m...

  10. Estimates of black-hole natal kick velocities from observations of low-mass X-ray binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Mandel, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    The birth kicks of black holes, arising from asymmetric mass ejection or neutrino emission during core-collapse supernovae, are of great interest for both observationally constraining supernova models and population-synthesis studies of binary evolution. Recently, several efforts were undertaken to estimate black hole birth kicks from observations of black-hole low-mass X-ray binaries. We follow up on this work, specifically focussing on the highest estimated black-hole kick velocities. We find that existing observations do not require black hole birth kicks in excess of approximately 100 km/s, although higher kicks are not ruled out.

  11. Long-term eclipse timing of white dwarf binaries: an observational hint of a magnetic mechanism at work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bours, M. C. P.; Marsh, T. R.; Parsons, S. G.; Dhillon, V. S.; Ashley, R. P.; Bento, J. P.; Breedt, E.; Butterley, T.; Caceres, C.; Chote, P.; Copperwheat, C. M.; Hardy, L. K.; Hermes, J. J.; Irawati, P.; Kerry, P.; Kilkenny, D.; Littlefair, S. P.; McAllister, M. J.; Rattanasoon, S.; Sahman, D. I.; Vučković, M.; Wilson, R. W.

    2016-08-01

    We present a long-term programme for timing the eclipses of white dwarfs in close binaries to measure apparent and/or real variations in their orbital periods. Our programme includes 67 close binaries, both detached and semi-detached and with M-dwarfs, K-dwarfs, brown dwarfs or white dwarfs secondaries. In total, we have observed more than 650 white dwarf eclipses. We use this sample to search for orbital period variations and aim to identify the underlying cause of these variations. We find that the probability of observing orbital period variations increases significantly with the observational baseline. In particular, all binaries with baselines exceeding 10 yr, with secondaries of spectral type K2 - M5.5, show variations in the eclipse arrival times that in most cases amount to several minutes. In addition, among those with baselines shorter than 10 yr, binaries with late spectral type (>M6), brown dwarf or white dwarf secondaries appear to show no orbital period variations. This is in agreement with the so-called Applegate mechanism, which proposes that magnetic cycles in the secondary stars can drive variability in the binary orbits. We also present new eclipse times of NN Ser, which are still compatible with the previously published circumbinary planetary system model, although only with the addition of a quadratic term to the ephemeris. Finally, we conclude that we are limited by the relatively short observational baseline for many of the binaries in the eclipse timing programme, and therefore cannot yet draw robust conclusions about the cause of orbital period variations in evolved, white dwarf binaries.

  12. Supplement: The Rate of Binary Black Hole Mergers Inferred from Advanced LIGO Observations Surrounding GW150914

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, B P; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V B; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Aiello, L; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Altin, P A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C C; Areeda, J S; Arnaud, N; Arun, K G; Ascenzi, S; Ashton, G; Ast, M; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Bacon, P; Bader, M K M; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barclay, S E; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barta, D; Bartlett, J; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Bazzan, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Bell, A S; Bell, C J; Berger, B K; Bergman, J; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birney, R; Biscans, S; Bisht, A; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blair, C D; Blair, D G; Blair, R M; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bohe, A; Bojtos, P; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonnand, R; Boom, B A; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bouffanais, Y; Bozzi, A; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brockill, P; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Buchanan, C C; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cahillane, C; Bustillo, J Calder'on; Callister, T; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Cannon, K C; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Capocasa, E; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Diaz, J Casanueva; Casentini, C; Caudill, S; Cavagli`a, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C B; Baiardi, L Cerboni; Cerretani, G; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chan, M; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, H Y; Chen, Y; Cheng, C; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C G; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conti, L; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Cortese, S; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S B; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S T; Couvares, P; Cowan, E E; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Canton, T Dal; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Darman, N S; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Daveloza, H P; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; De, S; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Del'eglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; D'iaz, M C; Di Fiore, L; Di Giovanni, M; Di Lieto, A; Di Pace, S; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dojcinoski, G; Dolique, V; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S E; Edo, T B; Edwards, M C; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H -B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Engels, W; Essick, R C; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T M; Everett, R; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fair, H; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Fiorucci, D; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fletcher, M; Fong, H; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Frey, V; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gabbard, H A G; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S G; Garufi, F; Gatto, A; Gaur, G; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; George, J; Gergely, L; Germain, V; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, K; Glaefke, A; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; Gonz'alez, G; Castro, J M Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A; Gordon, N A; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S E; Gosselin, M; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greco, G; Green, A C; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guo, X; Gupta, A; Gupta, M K; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hacker, J J; Hall, B R; Hall, E D; Hammond, G; Haney, M; Hanke, M M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M J; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Hennig, J; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Hofman, D; Hollitt, S E; Holt, K; Holz, D E; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Houston, E A; Howell, E J; Hu, Y M; Huang, S; Huerta, E A; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Idrisy, A; Indik, N; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isa, H N; Isac, J -M; Isi, M; Islas, G; Isogai, T; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacqmin, T; Jang, H; Jani, K; Jaranowski, P; Jawahar, S; Jim'enez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalaghatgi, C V; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karki, S; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; K'ef'elian, F; Kehl, M S; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Kennedy, R; Key, J S; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khan, I; Khan, S; Khan, Z; Khazanov, E A; Kijbunchoo, N; Kim, C; Kim, J; Kim, K; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Kleybolte, L; Klimenko, S; Koehlenbeck, S M; Kokeyama, K; Koley, S; Kondrashov, V; Kontos, A; Korobko, M; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Kr'olak, A; Krueger, C; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Lackey, B D; Landry, M; Lange, J; Lantz, B; Lasky, P D; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, K; Lenon, A; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Levine, B M; Li, T G F; Libson, A; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; Lord, J E; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J D; L"uck, H; Lundgren, A P; Luo, J; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; MacDonald, T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Maga~na-Sandoval, F; Magee, R M; Mageswaran, M; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mansell, G L; Manske, M; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; M'arka, S; M'arka, Z; Markosyan, A S; Maros, E; Martelli, F; Martellini, L; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martynov, D V; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Masso-Reid, M; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McCormick, S; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McManus, D J; McWilliams, S T; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Meidam, J; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mendoza-Gandara, D; Mercer, R A; Merilh, E; Merzougui, M; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Messick, C; Meyers, P M; Mezzani, F; Miao, H; Michel, C; Middleton, H; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, J; Millhouse, M; Minenkov, Y; Ming, J; Mirshekari, S; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moggi, A; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Montani, M; Moore, B C; Moore, C J; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Muir, A W; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D; Mukherjee, S; Mukund, N; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D J; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R K; Necula, V; Nedkova, K; Nelemans, G; Neri, M; Neunzert, A; Newton, G; Nguyen, T T; Nielsen, A B; Nissanke, S; Nitz, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E; Nuttall, L K; Oberling, J; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oliver, M; Oppermann, P; Oram, Richard J; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pai, A; Pai, S A; Palamos, J R; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pal-Singh, A; Pan, H; Pankow, C; Pannarale, F; Pant, B C; Paoletti, F; Paoli, A; Papa, M A; Paris, H R; Parker, W; Pascucci, D; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patricelli, B; Patrick, Z; Pearlstone, B L; Pedraza, M; Pedurand, R; Pekowsky, L; Pele, A; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Phelps, M; Piccinni, O; Pichot, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pillant, G; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poggiani, R; Popolizio, P; Porter, E; Post, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Predoi, V; Premachandra, S S; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; P"urrer, M; Qi, H; Qin, J; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E A; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rakhmanov, M; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Re, V; Read, J; Reed, C M; Regimbau, T; Rei, L; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Rew, H; Reyes, S D; Ricci, F; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robie, R; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Roma, V J; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosi'nska, D; Rowan, S; R"udiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Sachdev, S; Sadecki, T; Sadeghian, L; Salconi, L; Saleem, M; Salemi, F; Samajdar, A; Sammut, L; Sampson, L; Sanchez, E J; Sandberg, V; Sandeen, B; Sanders, J R; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Sauter, O; Savage, R L; Sawadsky, A; Schale, P; Schilling, R; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Sch"onbeck, A; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Serna, G; Setyawati, Y; Sevigny, A; Shaddock, D A; Shah, S; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shao, Z; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Sheperd, A; Shoemaker, D H; Shoemaker, D M; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Silva, A D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L P; Singh, A; Singh, R; Singhal, A; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Smith, J R; Smith, N D; Smith, R J E; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Sorrentino, F; Souradeep, T; Srivastava, A K; Staley, A; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steinmeyer, D; Stephens, B C; Stevenson, S; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Stratta, G; Strauss, N A; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, L; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B L; Szczepa'nczyk, M J; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; T'apai, M; Tarabrin, S P; Taracchini, A; Taylor, R; Theeg, T; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, E G; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, S; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; T"oyr"a, D; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trifir`o, D; Tringali, M C; Trozzo, L; Tse, M; Turconi, M; Tuyenbayev, D; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; Vallisneri, M; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C Van Den; Vander-Hyde, D C; van der Schaaf, L; van Heijningen, J V; van Veggel, A A; Vardaro, M; Vass, S; Vas'uth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Vicer'e, A; Vinciguerra, S; Vine, D J; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Voss, D; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L E; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wang, Y; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L -W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Wessels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Williams, R D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M H; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Wright, J L; Wu, G; Yablon, J; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yap, M J; Yu, H; Yvert, M; zny, A Zadro; Zangrando, L; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zevin, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhou, Z; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S E; Zweizig, J

    2016-01-01

    Supplemental information for a Letter reporting the rate of binary black hole (BBH) coalescences inferred from 16 days of coincident Advanced LIGO observations surrounding the transient gravitational wave signal GW150914. In that work we reported various rate estimates whose 90\\% credible intervals fell in the range $2$--$600 \\, \\mathrm{Gpc}^{-3} \\mathrm{yr}^{-1}$. Here we give details of our method and computations, including information about our search pipelines, a derivation of our likelihood function for the analysis, a description of the astrophysical search trigger distribution expected from merging BBHs, details on our computational methods, a description of the effects and our model for calibration uncertainty, and an analytic method of estimating our detector sensitivity that is calibrated to our measurements.

  13. Some linguistic observations on testing hearing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonner, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Diagnostic testing of a person’s hearing is central to the selection and fitting of hearing aids. In addition to the pure tone audiogram based on sounds, hearing loss can also be diagnosed by speech perception tests. While the audiogram does not use language and thus tests auditory perception...... exclusively, it is more difficult to restrict language-based testing to hearing alone. Two central issues observable in current language-based testing for hearing loss may render the test results inaccurate, namely the selection of language materials and the differences between standard and regional varieties...

  14. Spin-multipole effects in binary black holes and the test-body limit

    CERN Document Server

    Vines, Justin

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the Hamiltonian for the conservative dynamics of generic-orbit arbitrary-mass-ratio spinning binary black holes, at the leading post-Newtonian orders at each order in an expansion in spins, to all orders in the spins. The leading-order couplings can all be obtained from a map to the motion of a test black hole (a test body with the spin-induced multipoles of a Kerr black hole) in the Kerr spacetime, as is confirmed with direct post-Newtonian calculations for arbitrary mass ratios. Furthermore, all of the couplings can be "deduced" from those of a pole-dipole test body in Kerr.

  15. General approach to the testing of binary solubility systems for thermodynamic consistency. Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparison of implicit Runge-Kutta and orthogonal collocation methods is made for the numerical solution to the ordinary differential equation which describes the high-pressure vapor-liquid equilibria of a binary system. The systems of interest are limited to binary solubility systems where one of the components is supercritical and exists as a noncondensable gas in the pure state. Of the two methods - implicit Runge-Kuta and orthogonal collocation - this paper attempts to present some preliminary but not necessarily conclusive results that the implicit Runge-Kutta method is superior for the solution to the ordinary differential equation utilized in the thermodynamic consistency testing of binary solubility systems. Due to the extreme nonlinearity of thermodynamic properties in the region near the critical locus, an extended cubic spline fitting technique is devised for correlating the P-x data. The least-squares criterion is employed in smoothing the experimental data. Even though the derivation is presented specifically for the correlation of P-x data, the technique could easily be applied to any thermodynamic data by changing the endpoint requirements. The volumetric behavior of the systems must be given or predicted in order to perform thermodynamic consistency tests. A general procedure is developed for predicting the volumetric behavior required and some indication as to the expected limit of accuracy is given

  16. GW151226: Observation of Gravitational Waves from a 22-Solar-Mass Binary Black Hole Coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dasgupta, A.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; De, S.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Fenyvesi, E.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fong, H.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Geng, P.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hamilton, H.

    2016-06-01

    We report the observation of a gravitational-wave signal produced by the coalescence of two stellar-mass black holes. The signal, GW151226, was observed by the twin detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) on December 26, 2015 at 03:38:53 UTC. The signal was initially identified within 70 s by an online matched-filter search targeting binary coalescences. Subsequent off-line analyses recovered GW151226 with a network signal-to-noise ratio of 13 and a significance greater than 5 σ . The signal persisted in the LIGO frequency band for approximately 1 s, increasing in frequency and amplitude over about 55 cycles from 35 to 450 Hz, and reached a peak gravitational strain of 3. 4-0.9+0.7×10-22 . The inferred source-frame initial black hole masses are 14.2-3.7+8.3 M⊙ and 7. 5-2.3+2.3 M⊙, and the final black hole mass is 20.8-1.7+6.1 M⊙. We find that at least one of the component black holes has spin greater than 0.2. This source is located at a luminosity distance of 44 0-190+180 Mpc corresponding to a redshift of 0.0 9-0.04+0.03. All uncertainties define a 90% credible interval. This second gravitational-wave observation provides improved constraints on stellar populations and on deviations from general relativity.

  17. Multiwavelength observations of V479 Andromedae: a close compact binary with an identity crisis

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Buitrago, Diego; Zharikov, Sergey; Yungelson, Lev; Miyaji, Takamitsu; Echevarria, Juan; Aviles, Andres; Valyavin, Gennady

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a multi-wavelength study to unveil the properties of the extremely long-period cataclysmic variable V479 And. We performed series of observations, including moderate to high spectral resolution optical spectrophotometry, X-ray observations with Swift, linear polarimetry and near-IR photometry. This binary system is a low-inclination ~ 17^o system with a 0.594093(4) day orbital period. The absorption line complex in the spectra indicate a G8--K0 spectral type for the donor star, which has departed from the zero-age main sequence. This implies a distance to the object of about 4 kpc. The primary is probably a massive 1.1-1.4 Msun magnetic white dwarf, accreting matter at a rate M(dot) > 10^-10 Msun/ yr. This rate can be achieved if the donor star fills its corresponding Roche lobe, but there is little observational evidence for a mass-transfer stream in this system. An alternative explanation is a stellar wind from the donor star, although such a high rate mass loss is not anticipated from a subgia...

  18. The Binary Black Hole Model for Mrk 231 Cannot Explain the Observed Emission Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Leighly, Karen M; Gallagher, Sarah C; Lucy, Adrian B

    2016-01-01

    Mrk 231 is a nearby quasar with an unusually red continuum, generally explained as heavy reddening by dust (e.g., Leighly et al. 2014). Yan et al. 2015 proposed that Mrk 231 is a milli-parsec black-hole binary with little intrinsic reddening. The large-mass black hole experiences advection-dominated accretion, emitting little continuum, while the accretion disk of the small-mass black hole emits as an ordinary quasar, dominating the observed weak UV continuum and contributing all of the photoionizing flux. We demonstrate that this model is untenable for four reasons. (1) To produce the observed near-infrared emission lines, the equivalent widths would have to be ~100 times larger than typical values with respect to the photoionizing continuum, a situation that seems energetically unlikely. (2) We use the photoionization code Cloudy to demonstrate it is not possible to produce the HeI* emission line intensity for the observed HeI*/Pbeta flux ratios, even if the line-emitting gas intersects all of the photoioni...

  19. Eclipsing binary systems as tests of low-mass stellar evolution theory

    CERN Document Server

    Feiden, Gregory A

    2015-01-01

    Stellar fundamental properties (masses, radii, effective temperatures) can be extracted from observations of eclipsing binary systems with remarkable precision, often better than 2%. Such precise measurements afford us the opportunity to confront the validity of basic predictions of stellar evolution theory, such as the mass-radius relationship. A brief historical overview of confrontations between stellar models and data from eclipsing binaries is given, highlighting key results and physical insight that have led directly to our present understanding. The current paradigm that standard stellar evolution theory is insufficient to describe the most basic relation, that of a star's mass to its radius, along the main sequence is then described. Departures of theoretical expectations from empirical data, however, provide a rich opportunity to explore various physical solutions, improving our understanding of important stellar astrophysical processes.

  20. Spin-multipole effects in binary black holes and the test-body limit

    OpenAIRE

    Vines, Justin; Steinhoff, Jan

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the Hamiltonian for the conservative dynamics of generic-orbit arbitrary-mass-ratio spinning binary black holes, at the leading post-Newtonian orders at each order in an expansion in spins, to all orders in the spins. The leading-order couplings can all be obtained from a map to the motion of a test black hole (a test body with the spin-induced multipoles of a Kerr black hole) in the Kerr spacetime, as is confirmed with direct post-Newtonian calculations for arbitrary mass ratios. ...

  1. Revisiting galactic black hole binary GX 339-4 by using 2007 - 2014 Swift XRT observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Febrie Ahmad; Vierdayanti, Kiki; Putra, Mahasena

    2015-09-01

    This work aims to study the X-ray properties of the galactic black hole binary GX 339-4. Focus of the study is on exploration of data from Swift-XRT in exclusively photon-counting mode. We use data from 2007 up to August 2014, which contain about 40 pointing observations with level 1 data. The flux of GX 339-4 varies in a factor of 100 during this period of observations. For the purpose of this work, we also try to develop a system to conduct standard SWIFT XRT data reduction automatically, in order to greatly reduce time when working with data bulk, which produces images, lightcurves as well as spectra. We also develop another system to conduct fitting of bulk spectral data with a two-component model, disk blackbody and power-law. The fitting results show that no data have a reduced chi-squared > 2. The fraction of the disk to total flux and the power-law to total flux range from 0.00389 - 0.994 and 0.00605 - 0.996, respectively. From the analysis of the disk component, we obtain the value of the innermost disk radius that does not show any large scale truncation which is in a good agreement with a previous study that used 2007 - 2011 Swift-XRT data, indicating that the systems we developed work properly.

  2. The Rate of Binary Black Hole Mergers Inferred from Advanced LIGO Observations Surrounding GW150914

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, B P; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V B; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Aiello, L; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Altin, P A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C C; Areeda, J S; Arnaud, N; Arun, K G; Ascenzi, S; Ashton, G; Ast, M; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Bacon, P; Bader, M K M; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barclay, S E; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barta, D; Bartlett, J; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Bazzan, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C J; Berger, B K; Bergman, J; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birney, R; Biscans, S; Bisht, A; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blair, C D; Blair, D G; Blair, R M; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bohe, A; Bojtos, P; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonnand, R; Boom, B A; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bouffanais, Y; Bozzi, A; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brockill, P; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Buchanan, C C; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cahillane, C; Bustillo, J Calderón; Callister, T; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Cannon, K C; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Capocasa, E; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Diaz, J Casanueva; Casentini, C; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C B; Baiardi, L Cerboni; Cerretani, G; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chan, M; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, H Y; Chen, Y; Cheng, C; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C G; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conti, L; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Cortese, S; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S B; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S T; Couvares, P; Cowan, E E; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Canton, T Dal; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Darman, N S; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Daveloza, H P; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; De, S; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M C; Di Fiore, L; Di Giovanni, M; Di Lieto, A; Di Pace, S; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dojcinoski, G; Dolique, V; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S E; Edo, T B; Edwards, M C; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H -B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Engels, W; Essick, R C; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T M; Everett, R; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fair, H; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Fiorucci, D; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fletcher, M; Fong, H; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Frey, V; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gabbard, H A G; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S G; Garufi, F; Gatto, A; Gaur, G; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; George, J; Gergely, L; Germain, V; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, K; Glaefke, A; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Castro, J M Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A; Gordon, N A; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S E; Gosselin, M; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greco, G; Green, A C; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guo, X; Gupta, A; Gupta, M K; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hacker, J J; Hall, B R; Hall, E D; Hammond, G; Haney, M; Hanke, M M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M J; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Hennig, J; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Hofman, D; Hollitt, S E; Holt, K; Holz, D E; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Houston, E A; Howell, E J; Hu, Y M; Huang, S; Huerta, E A; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Idrisy, A; Indik, N; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isa, H N; Isac, J -M; Isi, M; Islas, G; Isogai, T; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacqmin, T; Jang, H; Jani, K; Jaranowski, P; Jawahar, S; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalaghatgi, C V; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karki, S; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Kehl, M S; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Kennedy, R; Key, J S; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khan, I; Khan, S; Khan, Z; Khazanov, E A; Kijbunchoo, N; Kim, C; Kim, J; Kim, K; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Kleybolte, L; Klimenko, S; Koehlenbeck, S M; Kokeyama, K; Koley, S; Kondrashov, V; Kontos, A; Korobko, M; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Krueger, C; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Lackey, B D; Landry, M; Lange, J; Lantz, B; Lasky, P D; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, K; Lenon, A; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Levine, B M; Li, T G F; Libson, A; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; Lord, J E; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J D; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Luo, J; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; MacDonald, T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magana-Sandoval, F; Magee, R M; Mageswaran, M; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mansell, G L; Manske, M; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A S; Maros, E; Martelli, F; Martellini, L; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martynov, D V; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Masso-Reid, M; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McCormick, S; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McManus, D J; McWilliams, S T; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Meidam, J; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mendoza-Gandara, D; Mercer, R A; Merilh, E; Merzougui, M; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Messick, C; Meyers, P M; Mezzani, F; Miao, H; Michel, C; Middleton, H; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, J; Millhouse, M; Minenkov, Y; Ming, J; Mirshekari, S; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moggi, A; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Montani, M; Moore, B C; Moore, C J; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Muir, A W; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D; Mukherjee, S; Mukund, N; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D J; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R K; Necula, V; Nedkova, K; Nelemans, G; Neri, M; Neunzert, A; Newton, G; Nguyen, T T; Nielsen, A B; Nissanke, S; Nitz, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E; Nuttall, L K; Oberling, J; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oliver, M; Oppermann, P; Oram, Richard J; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ott, C D; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pai, A; Pai, S A; Palamos, J R; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pal-Singh, A; Pan, H; Pankow, C; Pannarale, F; Pant, B C; Paoletti, F; Paoli, A; Papa, M A; Paris, H R; Parker, W; Pascucci, D; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patricelli, B; Patrick, Z; Pearlstone, B L; Pedraza, M; Pedurand, R; Pekowsky, L; Pele, A; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Phelps, M; Piccinni, O; Pichot, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pillant, G; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poggiani, R; Popolizio, P; Post, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Predoi, V; Premachandra, S S; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Pürrer, M; Qi, H; Qin, J; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E A; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rakhmanov, M; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Re, V; Read, J; Reed, C M; Regimbau, T; Rei, L; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Rew, H; Reyes, S D; Ricci, F; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robie, R; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Roma, V J; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; 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Stephens, B C; Stevenson, S; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Stratta, G; Strauss, N A; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, L; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B L; Szczepańczyk, M J; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tápai, M; Tarabrin, S P; Taracchini, A; Taylor, R; Theeg, T; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, E G; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, S; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Torresddag, C V; Torrie, C I; Töyrä, D; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trifirò, D; Tringali, M C; Trozzo, L; Tse, M; Turconi, M; Tuyenbayev, D; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; Vallisneri, M; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C Van Den; Vander-Hyde, D C; van der Schaaf, L; van Heijningen, J V; van Veggel, A A; Vardaro, M; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vinciguerra, S; Vine, D J; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Voss, D; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L E; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wang, Y; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L -W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Weßels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Williams, R D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M H; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Wright, J L; Wu, G; Yablon, J; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yap, M J; Yu, H; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zangrando, L; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zevin, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhou, Z; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S E; Zweizig, J

    2016-01-01

    A transient gravitational-wave signal was identified in the twin Advanced LIGO detectors on September 14, 2015 at 09:50:45 UTC (GW150914). To assess the implications of this discovery, the detectors remained in operation with unchanged configurations over a period of 39 d around the time of the signal. A search of 16 days of simultaneous two-detector observational data found GW150914 to have a false alarm probability (FAP) of $2 \\times 10^{-7}$. Parameter estimation followup on this trigger identifies its source as a binary black hole (BBH) merger with component masses $(m_1, m_2) = 36^{+5}_{-4}, 29^{+4}_{-4} \\, M_\\odot$ at redshift $z = 0.09^{+0.03}_{-0.04}$. Here we report on the constraints these observations place on the rate of BBH coalescences. Considering only GW150914, assuming that all BBHs in the universe have the same masses and spins as this event, imposing a false alarm threshold of 1 per 100 years, and assuming that the BBH merger rate is constant in the comoving frame, we infer a 90% credible r...

  3. Multi-wavelength observations of the transitional millisecond pulsar binary XSSJ12270-4859

    CERN Document Server

    de Martino, Domitilla; Belloni, Tomaso; Burgay, Marta; Wilhelmi, Emma De Ona; Li, J; Pellizzoni, Alberto; Possenti, Andrea; Rea, Nanda; Torres, Diego F

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of X-ray, Ultraviolet and optical/near-IR photometric data of the transitional millisecond pulsar binary XSSJ12270-4859, obtained at different epochs after the transition to a rotation-powered radio pulsar state. The observations, while confirming the large-amplitude orbital modulation found in previous studies after the state change, also reveal an energy dependence of the amplitudes as well as variations on time scale of months. The amplitude variations are anti-correlated in the X-ray and the UV/optical bands. The average X-ray spectrum is described by a power law with \\Gamma index of 1.07(8) without requiring an additional thermal component. The power law index \\Gamma varies from 1.2 to 1.0 between superior and inferior conjunction of the neutron star. We interpret the observed X-ray behaviour in terms of synchrotron radiation emitted in an extended intrabinary shock, located between the pulsar and the donor star, which is eclipsed due to the companion orbital motion. The G5 type do...

  4. Constraints on binary neutron star merger product from short GRB observations

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, He; Lü, Hou-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Binary neutron star mergers are strong gravitational wave (GW) sources and the leading candidates to interpret short duration gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs). Under the assumptions that SGRBs are produced by double neutron star mergers, we use the statistical observational properties of {\\em Swift} SGRBs and the mass distribution of Galactic double neutron star systems to place constraints on the neutron star equation of state (EoS) and the properties of the post-merger product. We show that current observations already put following tight constraints: 1) A neutron star EoS with a maximum mass close to a parameterization of $M_{\\rm max} = 2.37\\,M_\\odot (1+1.58\\times10^{-10} P^{-2.84})$ is favored; 2) The fractions for the several outcomes of NS-NS mergers are as follows: $\\sim40\\%$ prompt BHs, $\\sim30\\%$ supra-massive NSs that collapse to BHs in a range of delay time scales, and $\\sim30\\%$ stable NSs that never collapse; 3) The initial spin of the newly born supra-massive NSs should be near the breakup limit ($P_i\\s...

  5. GW151226: Observation of Gravitational Waves from a 22-Solar-Mass Binary Black Hole Coalescence

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    We report the observation of a gravitational-wave signal produced by the coalescence of two stellar-mass black holes. The signal, GW151226, was observed by the twin detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) on December 26, 2015 at 03:38:53 UTC. The signal was initially identified within 70 s by an online matched-filter search targeting binary coalescences. Subsequent off-line analyses recovered GW151226 with a network signal-to-noise ratio of 13 and a significance greater than 5 $\\sigma$. The signal persisted in the LIGO frequency band for approximately 1 s, increasing in frequency and amplitude over about 55 cycles from 35 to 450 Hz, and reached a peak gravitational strain of $3.4_{-0.9}^{+0.7} \\times 10^{-22}$. The inferred source-frame initial black hole masses are $14.2_{-3.7}^{+8.3} M_{\\odot}$ and $7.5_{-2.3}^{+2.3} M_{\\odot}$ and the final black hole mass is $20.8_{-1.7}^{+6.1} M_{\\odot}$. We find that at least one of the component black holes has spin greater than 0.2....

  6. Suzaku Observation of Be/X-ray Binary Pulsar EXO 2030+375

    CERN Document Server

    Naik, Sachindra

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we study the timing and spectral properties of Be/X-ray binary pulsar EXO 2030+375 using a $Suzaku$ observation on 2012 May 23, during a less intense Type I outburst. Pulsations were clearly detected in the X-ray light curves at a barycentric period of 41.2852 s which suggests that the pulsar is spinning-up. The pulse profiles were found to be peculiar e.g. unlike that obtained from the earlier Suzaku observation on 2007 May 14. A single-peaked narrow profile at soft X-rays (0.5-10 keV range) changed to a double-peaked broad profile in 12-55 keV energy range and again reverted back to a smooth single-peaked profile at hard X-rays (55-70 keV range). The 1.0-100.0 keV broad-band spectrum of the pulsar was found to be well described by three continuum models such as (i) a partial covering high energy cut-off power-law model, (ii) a partially absorbed power-law with high-energy exponential rolloff and (iii) a partial covering Negative and Positive power law with EXponential (NPEX) continuum model. U...

  7. BeppoSAX observation of the X-ray binary pulsar Vela X-1

    CERN Document Server

    Orlandini, M; Nicastro, L; Giarrusso, S; Segreto, A; Piraino, S; Cusumano, G; Del Sordo, S; Guainazzi, M; Piro, L

    1997-01-01

    We report on the spectral (pulse averaged) and timing analysis of the ~ 20 ksec observation of the X-ray binary pulsar Vela X-1 performed during the BeppoSAX Science Verification Phase. The source was observed in two different intensity states: the low state is probably due to an erratic intensity dip and shows a decrease of a factor ~ 2 in intensity, and a factor 10 in Nh. We have not been able to fit the 2-100 keV continuum spectrum with the standard (for an X--ray pulsar) power law modified by a high energy cutoff because of the flattening of the spectrum in ~ 10-30 keV. The timing analysis confirms previous results: the pulse profile changes from a five-peak structure for energies less than 15 keV, to a simpler two-peak shape at higher energies. The Fourier analysis shows a very complex harmonic component: up to 23 harmonics are clearly visible in the power spectrum, with a dominant first harmonic for low energy data, and a second one as the more prominent for energies greater than 15 keV. The aperiodic c...

  8. Observational Confirmation of a Link Between Common Envelope Binary Interaction and Planetary Nebula Shaping

    CERN Document Server

    Hillwig, Todd; De Marco, Orsola; Bond, Howard; Margheim, Steve; Frew, David

    2016-01-01

    A current issue in the study of planetary nebulae with close binary central stars is the extent to which the binaries affect the shaping of the nebulae. Recent studies have begun to show a high coincidence rate between nebulae with large-scale axial or point symmetries and close binary stars. In addition, combined binary-star and spatio-kinematic modeling of the nebulae have demonstrated that all of the systems studied to date appear to have their central binary axis aligned with the primary axis of the nebula. Here we add two more systems to the list, the central stars and nebulae of NGC 6337 and Sp 1. We show both systems to be low inclination, with their binary axis nearly aligned with our line-of-sight. Their inclinations match published values for the inclinations of their surrounding nebulae. Including these two systems with the existing sample statistically demonstrates a direct link between the central binary and the nebular morphology. In addition to the systems' inclinations we give ranges for other...

  9. Characterizing low-mass binaries from observation of long-timescale caustic-crossing gravitational microlensing events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, I.-G; Han, C.; Choi, J.-Y;

    2012-01-01

    Despite the astrophysical importance of binary star systems, detections are limited to those located in small ranges of separations, distances, and masses and thus it is necessary to use a variety of observational techniques for a complete view of stellar multiplicity across a broad range of phys...

  10. NuSTAR Observations of the State Transition of Millisecond Pulsar Binary PSR J1023+0038

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; Yang, Chengwei; An, Hongjun;

    2014-01-01

    We report NuSTAR observations of the millisecond pulsar - low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) transition system PSR J1023+0038 from June and October 2013, before and after the formation of an accretion disk around the neutron star. Between June 10-12, a few days to two weeks before the radio disappearan...

  11. NuSTAR Observations of the State Transition of Millisecond Pulsar Binary PSR J1023+0038

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; Yang, Chengwei; An, Hongjun;

    2014-01-01

    We report NuSTAR observations of the millisecond pulsar-low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) transition system PSR J1023+0038 from 2013 June and October, before and after the formation of an accretion disk around the neutron star. Between June 10 and 12, a few days to two weeks before the radio disappear...

  12. Herschel observations of dust around the high-mass X-ray binary GX 301-2

    OpenAIRE

    Servillat, Mathieu; Coleiro, Alexis; Chaty, Sylvain; Rahoui, Farid; Heras, Juan Antonio Zurita

    2014-01-01

    We aim at characterising the structure of the gas and dust around the high mass X-ray binary GX 301-2, a highly obscured X-ray binary hosting a hypergiant star and a neutron star, in order to better constrain its evolution. We used Herschel PACS to observe GX 301-2 in the far infrared and completed the spectral energy distribution of the source using published data or catalogs, from the optical to the radio range (0.4 to 4x10^4 micrometer). GX 301-2 is detected for the first time at 70 and 10...

  13. TOPICAL REVIEW: Predictions for the rates of compact binary coalescences observable by ground-based gravitational-wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amin, R. S.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Antonucci, F.; Aoudia, S.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M.; Aronsson, M.; Arun, K. G.; Aso, Y.; Aston, S.; Astone, P.; Atkinson, D. E.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S.; Barker, D.; Barnum, S.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th S.; Behnke, B.; Beker, M. G.; Belczynski, K.; Benacquista, M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bigotta, S.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birindelli, S.; Biswas, R.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Blom, M.; Blomberg, A.; Boccara, C.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bondarescu, R.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Boyle, M.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Budzyński, R.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Burmeister, O.; Buskulic, D.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campagna, E.; Campsie, P.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K. C.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chalkley, E.; Charlton, P.; Chassande Mottin, E.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Clark, D.; Clark, J.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Colacino, C. N.; Colas, J.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Corda, C.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coulon, J. P.; Coward, D.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Culter, R. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dahl, K.; Danilishin, S. L.; Dannenberg, R.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dari, A.; Das, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Davier, M.; Davies, G.; Davis, A.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; De Rosa, R.; DeBra, D.; Degallaix, J.; del Prete, M.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Devanka, P.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Emilio, M. Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doomes, E. E.; Dorsher, S.; Douglas, E. S. D.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Dueck, J.; Dumas, J. C.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Farr, B. F.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Flaminio, R.; Flanigan, M.; Flasch, K.; Foley, S.; Forrest, C.; Forsi, E.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J. D.; Franc, J.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garofoli, J. A.; Garufi, F.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gholami, I.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, C.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L. M.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Greverie, C.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hall, P.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Heefner, J.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hirose, E.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E.; Hoyland, D.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Jaranowski, P.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kanner, J.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, C.; Kim, H.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R.; Koranda, S.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.; Krause, T.; Kringel, V.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kullman, J.; Kumar, R.; Kwee, P.; Landry, M.; Lang, M.; Lantz, B.; Lastzka, N.; Lazzarini, A.; Leaci, P.; Leong, J.; Leonor, I.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Li, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Lin, H.

    2010-09-01

    We present an up-to-date, comprehensive summary of the rates for all types of compact binary coalescence sources detectable by the initial and advanced versions of the ground-based gravitational-wave detectors LIGO and Virgo. Astrophysical estimates for compact-binary coalescence rates depend on a number of assumptions and unknown model parameters and are still uncertain. The most confident among these estimates are the rate predictions for coalescing binary neutron stars which are based on extrapolations from observed binary pulsars in our galaxy. These yield a likely coalescence rate of 100 Myr-1 per Milky Way Equivalent Galaxy (MWEG), although the rate could plausibly range from 1 Myr-1 MWEG-1 to 1000 Myr-1 MWEG-1 (Kalogera et al 2004 Astrophys. J. 601 L179; Kalogera et al 2004 Astrophys. J. 614 L137 (erratum)). We convert coalescence rates into detection rates based on data from the LIGO S5 and Virgo VSR2 science runs and projected sensitivities for our advanced detectors. Using the detector sensitivities derived from these data, we find a likely detection rate of 0.02 per year for Initial LIGO-Virgo interferometers, with a plausible range between 2 × 10-4 and 0.2 per year. The likely binary neutron-star detection rate for the Advanced LIGO-Virgo network increases to 40 events per year, with a range between 0.4 and 400 per year.

  14. Characterization of electron microscopes with binary pseudo-random multilayer test samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V., E-mail: VVYashchuk@lbl.gov [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Conley, Raymond [NSLS-II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Anderson, Erik H. [Center for X-ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Barber, Samuel K. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bouet, Nathalie [NSLS-II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); McKinney, Wayne R. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Takacs, Peter Z. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Voronov, Dmitriy L. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Verification of the reliability of metrology data from high quality X-ray optics requires that adequate methods for test and calibration of the instruments be developed. For such verification for optical surface profilometers in the spatial frequency domain, a modulation transfer function (MTF) calibration method based on binary pseudo-random (BPR) gratings and arrays has been suggested and proven to be an effective calibration method for a number of interferometric microscopes, a phase shifting Fizeau interferometer, and a scatterometer [5]. Here we describe the details of development of binary pseudo-random multilayer (BPRML) test samples suitable for characterization of scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopes. We discuss the results of TEM measurements with the BPRML test samples fabricated from a WiSi{sub 2}/Si multilayer coating with pseudo-randomly distributed layers. In particular, we demonstrate that significant information about the metrological reliability of the TEM measurements can be extracted even when the fundamental frequency of the BPRML sample is smaller than the Nyquist frequency of the measurements. The measurements demonstrate a number of problems related to the interpretation of the SEM and TEM data. Note that similar BPRML test samples can be used to characterize X-ray microscopes. Corresponding work with X-ray microscopes is in progress.

  15. Characterization of electron microscopes with binary pseudo-random multilayer test samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verification of the reliability of metrology data from high quality X-ray optics requires that adequate methods for test and calibration of the instruments be developed. For such verification for optical surface profilometers in the spatial frequency domain, a modulation transfer function (MTF) calibration method based on binary pseudo-random (BPR) gratings and arrays has been suggested and proven to be an effective calibration method for a number of interferometric microscopes, a phase shifting Fizeau interferometer, and a scatterometer [5]. Here we describe the details of development of binary pseudo-random multilayer (BPRML) test samples suitable for characterization of scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopes. We discuss the results of TEM measurements with the BPRML test samples fabricated from a WiSi2/Si multilayer coating with pseudo-randomly distributed layers. In particular, we demonstrate that significant information about the metrological reliability of the TEM measurements can be extracted even when the fundamental frequency of the BPRML sample is smaller than the Nyquist frequency of the measurements. The measurements demonstrate a number of problems related to the interpretation of the SEM and TEM data. Note that similar BPRML test samples can be used to characterize X-ray microscopes. Corresponding work with X-ray microscopes is in progress.

  16. Characterization of electron microscopes with binary pseudo-random multilayer test samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verification of the reliability of metrology data from high quality x-ray optics requires that adequate methods for test and calibration of the instruments be developed. For such verification for optical surface profilometers in the spatial frequency domain, a modulation transfer function (MTF) calibration method based on binary pseudo-random (BPR) gratings and arrays has been suggested (Proc. SPIE 7077-7 (2007), Opt. Eng. 47(7), 073602-1-5 (2008)) and proven to be an effective calibration method for a number of interferometric microscopes, a phase shifting Fizeau interferometer, and a scatterometer (Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 616, 172-82 (2010)). Here we describe the details of development of binary pseudo-random multilayer (BPRML) test samples suitable for characterization of scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopes. We discuss the results of TEM measurements with the BPRML test samples fabricated from a WiSi2/Si multilayer coating with pseudo randomly distributed layers. In particular, we demonstrate that significant information about the metrological reliability of the TEM measurements can be extracted even when the fundamental frequency of the BPRML sample is smaller than the Nyquist frequency of the measurements. The measurements demonstrate a number of problems related to the interpretation of the SEM and TEM data. Note that similar BPRML test samples can be used to characterize x-ray microscopes. Corresponding work with x-ray microscopes is in progress.

  17. Characterization of electron microscopes with binary pseudo-random multilayer test samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V; Conley, Raymond; Anderson, Erik H; Barber, Samuel K; Bouet, Nathalie; McKinney, Wayne R; Takacs, Peter Z; Voronov, Dmitriy L

    2010-09-17

    Verification of the reliability of metrology data from high quality x-ray optics requires that adequate methods for test and calibration of the instruments be developed. For such verification for optical surface profilometers in the spatial frequency domain, a modulation transfer function (MTF) calibration method based on binary pseudo-random (BPR) gratings and arrays has been suggested [Proc. SPIE 7077-7 (2007), Opt. Eng. 47(7), 073602-1-5 (2008)} and proven to be an effective calibration method for a number of interferometric microscopes, a phase shifting Fizeau interferometer, and a scatterometer [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 616, 172-82 (2010)]. Here we describe the details of development of binary pseudo-random multilayer (BPRML) test samples suitable for characterization of scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopes. We discuss the results of TEM measurements with the BPRML test samples fabricated from a WiSi2/Si multilayer coating with pseudo randomly distributed layers. In particular, we demonstrate that significant information about the metrological reliability of the TEM measurements can be extracted even when the fundamental frequency of the BPRML sample is smaller than the Nyquist frequency of the measurements. The measurements demonstrate a number of problems related to the interpretation of the SEM and TEM data. Note that similar BPRML test samples can be used to characterize x-ray microscopes. Corresponding work with x-ray microscopes is in progress.

  18. GW151226: Observation of Gravitational Waves from a 22-Solar-Mass Binary Black Hole Coalescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V B; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Aiello, L; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Altin, P A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C C; Areeda, J S; Arnaud, N; Arun, K G; Ascenzi, S; Ashton, G; Ast, M; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Bacon, P; Bader, M K M; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barclay, S E; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barta, D; Bartlett, J; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Bazzan, M; Bejger, M; Bell, A S; Berger, B K; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birney, R; Birnholtz, O; Biscans, S; Bisht, A; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blair, C D; Blair, D G; Blair, R M; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bohe, A; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonnand, R; Boom, B A; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bouffanais, Y; Bozzi, A; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brockill, P; Broida, J E; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Brunett, S; Buchanan, C C; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cabero, M; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cahillane, C; Calderón Bustillo, J; Callister, T; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Cannon, K C; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Capocasa, E; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Casanueva Diaz, J; Casentini, C; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C B; Cerboni Baiardi, L; Cerretani, G; Cesarini, E; Chamberlin, S J; Chan, M; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Cheeseboro, B D; Chen, H Y; Chen, Y; Cheng, C; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P-F; Colla, A; Collette, C G; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conti, L; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Cortese, S; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S B; Coulon, J-P; Countryman, S T; Couvares, P; Cowan, E E; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dal Canton, T; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Darman, N S; Dasgupta, A; Da Silva Costa, C F; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; De, S; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Devine, R C; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M C; Di Fiore, L; Di Giovanni, M; Di Girolamo, T; Di Lieto, A; Di Pace, S; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dolique, V; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S E; Edo, T B; Edwards, M C; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H-B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Engels, W; Essick, R C; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T M; Everett, R; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fair, H; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Fenyvesi, E; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Fiorucci, D; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fletcher, M; Fong, H; Fournier, J-D; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Frey, V; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gabbard, H A G; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S G; Garufi, F; Gaur, G; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Geng, P; Genin, E; Gennai, A; George, J; Gergely, L; Germain, V; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, K; Glaefke, A; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gonzalez Castro, J M; Gopakumar, A; Gordon, N A; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S E; Gosselin, M; Gouaty, R; Grado, A; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greco, G; Green, A C; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guo, X; Gupta, A; Gupta, M K; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hacker, J J; Hall, B R; Hall, E D; Hamilton, H; Hammond, G; Haney, M; Hanke, M M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M J; Hartman, M T; Haster, C-J; Haughian, K; Healy, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Hennig, J; Henry, J; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hofman, D; Holt, K; Holz, D E; Hopkins, P; Hough, J; Houston, E A; Howell, E J; Hu, Y M; Huang, S; Huerta, E A; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Indik, N; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isa, H N; Isac, J-M; Isi, M; Isogai, T; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacqmin, T; Jang, H; Jani, K; Jaranowski, P; Jawahar, S; Jian, L; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Johnson-McDaniel, N K; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalaghatgi, C V; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kapadia, S J; Karki, S; Karvinen, K S; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kéfélian, F; Kehl, M S; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Kennedy, R; Key, J S; Khalili, F Y; Khan, I; Khan, S; Khan, Z; Khazanov, E A; Kijbunchoo, N; Kim, Chi-Woong; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, W; Kim, Y-M; Kimbrell, S J; King, E J; King, P J; Kissel, J S; Klein, B; Kleybolte, L; Klimenko, S; Koehlenbeck, S M; Koley, S; Kondrashov, V; Kontos, A; Korobko, M; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Krueger, C; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Lackey, B D; Landry, M; Lange, J; Lantz, B; Lasky, P D; Laxen, M; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, K; Lenon, A; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Lewis, J B; Li, T G F; Libson, A; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Lombardi, A L; London, L T; Lord, J E; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J D; Lousto, C O; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magaña-Sandoval, F; Magaña Zertuche, L; Magee, R M; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mansell, G L; Manske, M; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A S; Maros, E; Martelli, F; Martellini, L; Martin, I W; Martynov, D V; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Masso-Reid, M; Mastrogiovanni, S; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; Mazumder, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McCormick, S; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McManus, D J; McRae, T; McWilliams, S T; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Meidam, J; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Merilh, E L; Merzougui, M; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Messick, C; Metzdorff, R; Meyers, P M; 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    2016-06-17

    We report the observation of a gravitational-wave signal produced by the coalescence of two stellar-mass black holes. The signal, GW151226, was observed by the twin detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) on December 26, 2015 at 03:38:53 UTC. The signal was initially identified within 70 s by an online matched-filter search targeting binary coalescences. Subsequent off-line analyses recovered GW151226 with a network signal-to-noise ratio of 13 and a significance greater than 5σ. The signal persisted in the LIGO frequency band for approximately 1 s, increasing in frequency and amplitude over about 55 cycles from 35 to 450 Hz, and reached a peak gravitational strain of 3.4_{-0.9}^{+0.7}×10^{-22}. The inferred source-frame initial black hole masses are 14.2_{-3.7}^{+8.3}M_{⊙} and 7.5_{-2.3}^{+2.3}M_{⊙}, and the final black hole mass is 20.8_{-1.7}^{+6.1}M_{⊙}. We find that at least one of the component black holes has spin greater than 0.2. This source is located at a luminosity distance of 440_{-190}^{+180}  Mpc corresponding to a redshift of 0.09_{-0.04}^{+0.03}. All uncertainties define a 90% credible interval. This second gravitational-wave observation provides improved constraints on stellar populations and on deviations from general relativity. PMID:27367379

  19. GW151226: Observation of Gravitational Waves from a 22-Solar-Mass Binary Black Hole Coalescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

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Pal-Singh, A; Pan, H; Pankow, C; Pannarale, F; Pant, B C; Paoletti, F; Paoli, A; Papa, M A; Paris, H R; Parker, W; Pascucci, D; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patricelli, B; Patrick, Z; Pearlstone, B L; Pedraza, M; Pedurand, R; Pekowsky, L; Pele, A; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Perri, L M; Pfeiffer, H P; Phelps, M; Piccinni, O J; Pichot, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pillant, G; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poe, M; Poggiani, R; Popolizio, P; Post, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Predoi, V; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Pürrer, M; Qi, H; Qin, J; Qiu, S; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E A; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rajan, C; Rakhmanov, M; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Re, V; Read, J; Reed, C M; Regimbau, T; Rei, L; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Rew, H; Reyes, S D; Ricci, F; Riles, K; Rizzo, M; Robertson, N A; Robie, R; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Roma, V J; Romano, J D; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Sachdev, S; Sadecki, T; Sadeghian, L; Sakellariadou, M; Salconi, L; Saleem, M; Salemi, F; Samajdar, A; Sammut, L; Sanchez, E J; Sandberg, V; Sandeen, B; Sanders, J R; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Sauter, O E S; Savage, R L; Sawadsky, A; Schale, P; Schilling, R; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schönbeck, A; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Setyawati, Y; Shaddock, D A; Shaffer, T; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Sheperd, A; Shoemaker, D H; Shoemaker, D M; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sieniawska, M; Sigg, D; Silva, A D; Singer, A; Singer, L P; Singh, A; Singh, R; Singhal, A; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Smith, J R; Smith, N D; Smith, R J E; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Sorrentino, F; Souradeep, T; Srivastava, A K; Staley, A; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steinmeyer, D; Stephens, B C; Stevenson, S P; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Stratta, G; Strauss, N A; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, L; Sunil, S; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B L; Szczepańczyk, M J; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tápai, M; Tarabrin, S P; Taracchini, A; Taylor, R; Theeg, T; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, E G; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thrane, E; Tiwari, S; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Toland, K; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Tornasi, Z; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Töyrä, D; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trifirò, D; Tringali, M C; Trozzo, L; Tse, M; Turconi, M; Tuyenbayev, D; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; Vallisneri, M; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; van den Brand, J F J; Van Den Broeck, C; Vander-Hyde, D C; van der Schaaf, L; van Heijningen, J V; van Veggel, A A; Vardaro, M; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vinciguerra, S; Vine, D J; Vinet, J-Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Voss, D V; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L E; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wang, Y; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L-W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Wen, L; Weßels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whiting, B F; Williams, R D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M H; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Woehler, J; Worden, J; Wright, J L; Wu, D S; Wu, G; Yablon, J; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yu, H; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zangrando, L; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J-P; Zevin, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhou, Z; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S E; Zweizig, J; Boyle, M; Hemberger, D; Kidder, L E; Lovelace, G; Ossokine, S; Scheel, M; Szilagyi, B; Teukolsky, S

    2016-06-17

    We report the observation of a gravitational-wave signal produced by the coalescence of two stellar-mass black holes. The signal, GW151226, was observed by the twin detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) on December 26, 2015 at 03:38:53 UTC. The signal was initially identified within 70 s by an online matched-filter search targeting binary coalescences. Subsequent off-line analyses recovered GW151226 with a network signal-to-noise ratio of 13 and a significance greater than 5σ. The signal persisted in the LIGO frequency band for approximately 1 s, increasing in frequency and amplitude over about 55 cycles from 35 to 450 Hz, and reached a peak gravitational strain of 3.4_{-0.9}^{+0.7}×10^{-22}. The inferred source-frame initial black hole masses are 14.2_{-3.7}^{+8.3}M_{⊙} and 7.5_{-2.3}^{+2.3}M_{⊙}, and the final black hole mass is 20.8_{-1.7}^{+6.1}M_{⊙}. We find that at least one of the component black holes has spin greater than 0.2. This source is located at a luminosity distance of 440_{-190}^{+180}  Mpc corresponding to a redshift of 0.09_{-0.04}^{+0.03}. All uncertainties define a 90% credible interval. This second gravitational-wave observation provides improved constraints on stellar populations and on deviations from general relativity.

  20. The Observation of Gravitational Waves from a Binary Black Hole Merger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitze, David

    2016-03-01

    On September 14, 2015, the two LIGO detectors operating at Hanford, WA and Livingston, LA nearly simultaneously recorded a strong trigger consistent with the passage of gravitational waves. An extensive and thorough analysis by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration and the Virgo Collaboration over the following months determined the gravitational waves to originate from the final stage of the inspiral of two black holes with masses approximately 36 and 29 Msun merging to form a 62 Msun black hole located at a distance of roughly 410 Mpc.This discovery is remarkable in many ways. In addition to being the first direct measurement of a gravitational wave by an earth-based detector, this is the first observation of coalescing binary black hole system and the first evidence that ``heavy'' stellar mass black holes exist. The measured gravitational waveform was determined to be highly consistent with that predicted by general relativity for the merger of two black holes. In this talk, the first of two in this special session on the discovery of GW150914, I'll cover a number of topics related to the detection, including a brief description of the operation and performance of the Advanced LIGO detectors during the first `O1' Observing Run as well as the data quality verification methods used to determine the validity of the detection. I'll also present the searches that were used to find and establish the statistical confidence of the event, as well as provide an estimate of its sky localization. Finally, I will discuss the plans for future observations by LIGO, Virgo and other gravitational wave detectors over the next few years and, time permitting, present the short term and longer term programs for improving the sensitivity and range of gravitational wave detectors over the next ten years.

  1. Observations and Models of Eclipsing Binary Systems: RT And, TU Boo, KV Gem, UU Lyn, MY Cyg, KR Per, RU Eri, and YY Cet

    CERN Document Server

    Coughlin, Jeffrey L

    2010-01-01

    Eclipsing binary systems form the fundamental basis of Astronomy in the sense that they are the primary means to determine fundamental stellar astrophysical quantities such as mass, radius, and temperature. Furthermore, they allow us to study the internal dynamos and resulting magnetic cycles of stars that we would normally only be able to study for one star, our Sun. The systems themselves are extremely interesting objects, consisting of a multitude of configurations that are tied together by a complex evolutionary history. Finally, they allow us to test theories of stellar structure and even General Relativity. Thus the accurate observation and modeling of these systems is of great importance to the field. The first three chapters of this thesis are devoted to acquainting a reader with a general science background, but no knowledge of Astronomy, to eclipsing binaries and the field in general, and should provide the reader with an adequate background to understand the rest of the thesis. The subsequent eight...

  2. Long-term eclipse timing of white dwarf binaries: an observational hint of a magnetic mechanism at work

    CERN Document Server

    Bours, M C P; Parsons, S G; Dhillon, V S; Ashley, R P; Bento, J P; Breedt, E; Butterley, T; Caceres, C; Copperwheat, C M; Hardy, L K; Hermes, J J; Irawati, P; Kerry, P; Kilkenny, D; Littlefair, S P; McAllister, M J; Rattanasoon, S; Sahman, D I; Vuckovic, M; Wilson, R W

    2016-01-01

    We present a long-term programme for timing the eclipses of white dwarfs in close binaries to measure apparent and/or real variations in their orbital periods. Our programme includes 67 close binaries, both detached and semi-detached and with M-dwarfs, K-dwarfs, brown dwarfs or white dwarfs secondaries. In total, we have observed more than 650 white dwarf eclipses. We use this sample to search for orbital period variations and aim to identify the underlying cause of these variations. We find that the probability of observing orbital period variations increases significantly with the observational baseline. In particular, all binaries with baselines exceeding 10 yrs, with secondaries of spectral type K2 -- M5.5, show variations in the eclipse arrival times that in most cases amount to several minutes. In addition, among those with baselines shorter than 10 yrs, binaries with late spectral type (>M6), brown dwarf or white dwarf secondaries appear to show no orbital period variations. This is in agreement with t...

  3. INTEGRAL observations of the gamma-ray binary 1FGL J1018.6-5856

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jian; Chen, Yupeng; Götz, Diego; Rea, Nanda; Zhang, Shu; Caliandro, G Andrea; Wang, Jianmin

    2011-01-01

    The Fermi-LAT collaboration has recently reported that one of their detected sources, namely, 1FGL J1018.6-5856, is a new gamma-ray binary similar to LS 5039. This has prompted efforts to study its multi-frequency behavior. In this report, we present the results from 5.78-Ms INTEGRAL IBIS/ISGRI observations on the source 1FGL J1018.6-5856. By combining all the available INTEGRAL data, a detection is made at a significance level of 5.4 sigma in the 18-40 keV band, with an average intensity of 0.074 counts/s . However, we find that, there is non-statistical noise in the image that effectively reduces the significance to about 4 sigma and a significant part of the signal appears to be located in a 0.2-wide phase region, at phases 0.4-0.6 (where even the corrected significance amounts to 90% of the total signal found). Given the scarcity of counts, a variability is hinted at about 3 sigma at the hard X-rays, with an anti-correlation with the Fermi-LAT periodicity. Should this behavior be true, it would be similar...

  4. XMM-Newton X-ray Observations of the Wolf-Rayet Binary System WR 147

    CERN Document Server

    Skinner, S L; Güdel, M; Schmutz, W

    2007-01-01

    We present results of a 20 ksec X-ray observation of the Wolf-Rayet (WR) binary system WR 147 obtained with XMM-Newton. Previous studies have shown that this system consists of a nitrogen-type WN8 star plus an OB companion whose winds are interacting to produce a colliding wind shock. X-ray spectra from the pn and MOS detectors confirm the high extinction reported from IR studies and reveal hot plasma including the first detection of the Fe K-alpha line complex at 6.67 keV. Spectral fits with a constant-temperature plane-parallel shock model give a shock temperature kT(shock) = 2.7 keV [T(shock) ~ 31 MK], close to but slightly hotter than the maximum temperature predicted for a colliding wind shock. Optically thin plasma models suggest even higher temperatures, which are not yet ruled out. The X-ray spectra are harder than can be accounted for using 2D numerical colliding wind shock models based on nominal mass-loss parameters. Possible explanations include: (i) underestimates of the terminal wind speeds or w...

  5. Probing extra dimension through gravitational wave observations of compact binaries and their electromagnetic counterparts

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Hao; Huang, Fa Peng; Wang, Yong-Qiang; Meng, Xin-He; Liu, Yu-Xiao

    2016-01-01

    The gravitational wave (GW) observations of compact binaries and their possible electromagnetic counterparts may be used to probe the nature of the extra dimension. It is widely accepted that gravitons and photons are the only two completely confirmed objects that can travel along the null geodesics in our four-dimensional space-time. But when one considers that there exists the fifth dimension and only the GW can propagate freely in the bulk, the causal propagations of the GW and electromagnetic wave (EMW) are in general different. In this paper, we compute the null geodesics of the GW and EMW in a five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space-time and our four-dimensional universe in the present of the curvature of universe $k$, respectively. We show that for general cases the horizon radius of the GW is longer than the EMW within the equal time. Taking the GW 150914 event detected by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and the X-ray event detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Mo...

  6. Modeling Multi-Wavelength Stellar Astrometry. I. SIM Lite Observations of Interacting Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Coughlin, Jeffrey L; Harrison, Thomas E; Hoard, D W; Ciardi, David R; Benedict, G Fritz; Howell, Steve B; McArthur, Barbara E; Wachter, Stefanie

    2010-01-01

    Interacting binaries consist of a secondary star which fills or is very close to filling its Roche lobe, resulting in accretion onto the primary star, which is often, but not always, a compact object. In many cases, the primary star, secondary star, and the accretion disk can all be significant sources of luminosity. SIM Lite will only measure the photocenter of an astrometric target, and thus determining the true astrometric orbits of such systems will be difficult. We have modified the Eclipsing Light Curve code (Orosz & Hauschildt 2000) to allow us to model the flux-weighted reflex motions of interacting binaries, in a code we call REFLUX. This code gives us sufficient flexibility to investigate nearly every configuration of interacting binary. We find that SIM Lite will be able to determine astrometric orbits for all sufficiently bright interacting binaries where the primary or secondary star dominates the luminosity. For systems where there are multiple components that comprise the spectrum in the op...

  7. Observing Gravitational Waves From The Post-Merger Phase Of Binary Neutron Star Coalescence

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, James Alexander; Stergioulas, Nikolaos; Shoemaker, Deirdre

    2015-01-01

    We present an effective, low-dimensionality frequency-domain template for the gravitational wave signal from the stellar remnants from binary neutron star coalescence. A principal component decomposition of a suite of numerical simulations of binary neutron star mergers is used to construct orthogonal basis functions for the amplitude and phase spectra of the waveforms for a variety of neutron star equations of state and binary mass configurations. We review the phenomenology of late merger / post-merger gravitational wave emission in binary neutron star coalescence and demonstrate how an understanding of the dynamics during and after the merger leads to the construction of a universal spectrum. We also provide a discussion of the prospects for detecting the post-merger signal in future gravitational wave detectors as a potential contribution to the science case for third generation instruments. The template derived in our analysis achieves $>90\\%$ match across a wide variety of merger waveforms and strain se...

  8. Testing nuclear physics from space with quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillot, Sebastien

    2016-07-01

    X-ray observations of quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries (qLMXBs) provide one of the methods to understand the internal structure of neutron stars and therefore place constraints on the nuclear physics of dense matter. The hot thermal emission from the surface of neutron stars in qLMXBs allows us to measure the neutron star radius. In the past few years, promising results were obtained from statistical analyses that combined the X-ray spectra of qLMXBs. In this talk, I will summarize the constraints on the internal structure of neutron star obtained from currently available observations of qLMXBs, as well as the most recent results. In an effort to be as conservative as possible with the observational constraints, I will present the current limitations of this method, and how these limitations can be overcome with more observations of qLXMBs with current and future instrumentation.

  9. ALMA observations of the T Tauri binary system AS 205: evidence for molecular winds and/or binary interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we present high-resolution millimeter observations of the dust and gas disk of the T Tauri star AS 205 N and its companion, AS 205 S, obtained with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array. The gas disk around AS 205 N, for which infrared emission spectroscopy demonstrates significant deviations from Keplerian motion that has been interpreted as evidence for a disk wind, also displays significant deviations from Keplerian disk emission in the observations presented here. Detections near both AS 205 N and S are obtained in 1.3 mm continuum, 12CO 2-1, 13CO 2-1, and C18O 2-1. The 12CO emission is extended up to ∼2'' from AS 205 N, and both 12CO and 13CO display deviations from Keplerian rotation at all angular scales. Two possible explanations for these observations hold up best to close scrutiny—tidal interaction with AS 205 S or disk winds (or a combination of the two)—and we discuss these possibilities in some detail.

  10. Experimental observation of magnetically induced phase separation and thermodynamic assessment in the Co–V binary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phase equilibria of Co–V binary system were experimentally investigated, and the magnetically induced phase separation in the fcc phase was observed in a Co/V diffusion couple. Based on previous research and present work, a thermodynamic reassessment in the Co–V binary system was carried out by means of the CALPHAD method. The calculated results are consistent with the experimental data. The metastable miscibility gap of the hcp phase in the Co–V binary system was thermodynamically calculated. According to the calculation, the Co–V thin films with three concentrations were designed and deposited by magnetron sputtering. The transmission electron microscope (TEM) results prove that the metastable phase separation in the hcp phase exists in the Co–V system. The determined magnetic properties of the thin films reveal that the values of coercivity and remanence ratio are function of V content. - Highlights: • The magnetically induced phase separation of (αfCo) + (αpCo) was determined. • A thermodynamic reassessment of the Co–V binary system has been carried out. • The phase separation in the (εfCo) was observed in the Co85V15 thin film. • The coercivity and remanence ratio of the thin films are function of V content

  11. Characterizing Low-Mass Binaries From Observation of Long Time-scale Caustic-crossing Gravitational Microlensing Events

    CERN Document Server

    Shin, I -G; Choi, J -Y; Udalski, A; Sumi, T; Gould, A; Bozza, V; Dominik, M; Fouqué, P; Horne, K; \\, M; Szymański, K; Kubiak, M; Soszyński, I; Pietrzyński, G; Poleski, R; Ulaczyk, K; Pietrukowicz, P; Kozłowski, S; Skowron, J; Wyrzykowski, Ł; Abe, F; Bennett, D P; Bond, I A; Botzler, C S; Chote, P; Freeman, M; Fukui, A; Furusawa, K; Itow, Y; Kobara, S; Ling, C H; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Miyake, N; Muraki, Y; Ohmori, K; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N J; Saito, To; Sullivan, D J; Suzuki, D; Suzuki, K; Sweatman, W L; Takino, S; Tristram, P J; Wada, K; Yock, P C M; Bramich, D M; Snodgrass, C; Steele, I A; Street, R A; Tsapras, Y; Alsubai, K A; Browne, P; Burgdorf, M J; Novati, S Calchi; Dodds, P; Dreizler, S; Fang, X -S; Grundahl, F; Gu, C -H; Hardis, S; Harpsøe, K; Hinse, T C; Hornstrup, A; Hundertmark, M; Jessen-Hansen, J; Jørgensen, U G; Kains, N; Kerins, E; Liebig, C; Lund, M; Lunkkvist, M; Mancini, L; Mathiasen, M; Penny, M T; Rahvar, S; Ricci, D; Scarpetta, G; Skottfelt, J; Southworth, J; Surdej, J; Tregloan-Reed, J; Wambsganss, J; Wertz, O; Almeida, L A; Batista, V; Christie, G; DePoy, D L; Dong, Subo; Gaudi, B S; Henderson, C; Jablonski, F; Lee, C -U; McCormick, J; McGregor, D; Moorhouse, D; Natusch, T; Ngan, H; Park, S -Y; Pogge, R W; Tan, T -G; Thornley, G; Yee, J C; Albrow, M D; Bachelet, E; Beaulieu, J -P; Brillant, S; Cassan, A; Cole, A A; Corrales, E; Coutures, C; Dieters, S; Prester, D Dominis; Donatowicz, J; Greenhill, J; Kubas, D; Marquette, J -B; Menzies, J W; Sahu, K C; Zub, M

    2012-01-01

    Despite astrophysical importance of binary star systems, detections are limited to those located in small ranges of separations, distances, and masses and thus it is necessary to use a variety of observational techniques for a complete view of stellar multiplicity across a broad range of physical parameters. In this paper, we report the detections and measurements of 2 binaries discovered from observations of microlensing events MOA-2011-BLG-090 and OGLE-2011-BLG-0417. Determinations of the binary masses are possible by simultaneously measuring the Einstein radius and the lens parallax from analyses of the well-resolved caustic-crossing parts of the light curve and the long-term deviation induced by the orbital motion of the Earth around the Sun, respectively. The measured masses of the binary components are 0.43 $M_{\\odot}$ and 0.39 $M_{\\odot}$ for MOA-2011-BLG-090 and 0.57 $M_{\\odot}$ and 0.17 $M_{\\odot}$ for OGLE-2011-BLG-0417 and thus both lens components of MOA-2011-BLG-090 and one component of OGLE-2011...

  12. Robotic observations of the most eccentric spectroscopic binary in the sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassmeier, K. G.; Weber, M.; Granzer, T.

    2013-11-01

    Context. The visual A component of the Gliese 586AB system is a double-lined spectroscopic binary consisting of two cool stars with the exceptional orbital eccentricity of 0.976. Such an extremely eccentric system may be important for our understanding of low-mass binary formation. Aims: Precise stellar masses, ages, orbital elements, and rotational periods are a prerequisite for comparing stellar observations to angular-momentum evolution models. Methods: We present a total of 598 high-resolution échelle spectra from our robotic facility STELLA from 2006-2012, which we used to compute orbital elements of unprecedented accuracy. New Johnson VI photometry for the two visual components is also presented. Results: Our double-lined orbital solution for the A system has average velocity residuals for a measure of unit weight of 41 m s-1 for the G9V primary and 258 m s-1 for the M0V secondary, better by a factor ≈10 than the discovery orbit. The orbit constrains the eccentricity to 0.97608 ± 0.00004 and the orbital period to 889.8195 ± 0.0003 d. The masses of the two components are 0.87 ± 0.05 M⊙ and 0.58 ± 0.03 M⊙ if the inclination is 55 ± 1.5° as determined from adaptive-optics images, that is good to only 6% due to the error of the inclination, although the minimum masses reached a precision of 0.3%. The flux ratio Aa:Ab in the optical is between 30:1 in Johnson-B and 11:1 in I. Radial velocities of the visual B-component (K0-1V) appear constant to within 130 m s-1 over six years. Sinusoidal modulations of Teff of Aa with an amplitude of ≈55 K are seen with the orbital period. Component Aa appears warmest at periastron and coolest at apastron, indicating atmospheric changes induced by the high orbital eccentricity. No light variations larger than approximately 4 mmag are detected for A, while a photometric period of 8.5 ± 0.2 d with an amplitude of 7 mmag is discovered for the active star B, which we interpret to be its rotation period. We estimate an

  13. Upper limits to surface force disturbances on LISA proof masses and the possibility of observing galactic binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Carbone, L; Ciani, G; Dolesi, R; Hüller, M; Tombolato, D; Vitale, S; Weber, W J; Carbone, Ludovico; Cavalleri, Antonella; Ciani, Giacomo; Dolesi, Rita; Hueller, Mauro; Tombolato, David; Vitale, Stefano; Weber, William Joseph

    2006-01-01

    We report on the measurement of parasitic surface force noise on a hollow replica of a LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna for the observation of gravitational waves) proof mass surrounded by a faithful representation of its in flight surroundings, namely the capacitive sensor used to detect proof-mass motion. Parasitic forces are detected through the corresponding torque exerted on the proof mass and measured with a torsion pendulum in the frequency range 0.1 30 mHz. The sensor electrodes, electrode housing and associated readout electronics have the same nominal design as for the flight hardware, including 4 mm gaps around the proof mass along the sensitive laser interferometry axis. We show that the measured upper limit for surface forces would allow detection of a number of galactic binaries signals with signal to noise ratio up to approximately 40 for 1 year integration. We also discuss how the flight test under development, LISA Pathfinder, will substantially improve this limit, approaching the per...

  14. Masses of the components of SB2 binaries observed with Gaia. II. Masses derived from PIONIER interferometric observations for Gaia validation

    CERN Document Server

    Halbwachs, J -L; Bouquin, J -B Le; Kiefer, F; Famaey, B; Salomon, J -B; Arenou, F; Pourbaix, D; Anthonioz, F; Grellmann, R; Guieu, S; Sana, H; Guillout, P; Jorissen, A; Lebreton, Y; Mazeh, T; Tal-Or, L; Gomez-Moran, A Nebot

    2015-01-01

    In anticipation of the Gaia astrometric mission, a sample of spectroscopic binaries is being observed since 2010 with the Sophie spectrograph at the Haute--Provence Observatory. Our aim is to derive the orbital elements of double-lined spectroscopic binaries (SB2s) with an accuracy sufficient to finally obtain the masses of the components with relative errors as small as 1 % when combined with Gaia astrometric measurements. In order to validate the masses derived from Gaia, interferometric observations are obtained for three SB2s in our sample with F-K components: HIP 14157, HIP 20601 and HIP 117186. The masses of the six stellar components are derived. Due to its edge-on orientation, HIP 14157 is probably an eclipsing binary. We note that almost all the derived masses are a few percent larger than the expectations from the standard spectral-type-mass calibration and mass-luminosity relation. Our calculation also leads to accurate parallaxes for the three binaries, and the Hipparcos parallaxes are confirmed.

  15. First observational tests of eternal inflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, Stephen M; Johnson, Matthew C; Mortlock, Daniel J; Peiris, Hiranya V

    2011-08-12

    The eternal inflation scenario predicts that our observable Universe resides inside a single bubble embedded in a vast inflating multiverse. We present the first observational tests of eternal inflation, performing a search for cosmological signatures of collisions with other bubble universes in cosmic microwave background data from the WMAP satellite. We conclude that the WMAP 7-year data do not warrant augmenting the cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant with bubble collisions, constraining the average number of detectable bubble collisions on the full sky N(s) < 1.6 at 68% C.L. Data from the Planck satellite can be used to more definitively test the bubble-collision hypothesis.

  16. HII 2407: A Low-Mass Eclipsing Binary Revealed by K2 Observations of the Pleiades

    CERN Document Server

    David, Trevor J; Hillenbrand, Lynne A; Cody, Ann Marie; Conroy, Kyle; Stassun, Keivan G; Pope, Benjamin; Aigrain, Suzanne; Gillen, Ed; Cameron, Andrew Collier; Barrado, David; Rebull, L M; Isaacson, Howard; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Zhang, Celia; Riddle, Reed L; Ziegler, Carl; Law, Nicholas M; Baranec, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The star HII 2407 is a member of the relatively young Pleiades star cluster and was previously discovered to be a single-lined spectroscopic binary. It is newly identified here within $Kepler$/$K2$ photometric time series data as an eclipsing binary system. Mutual fitting of the radial velocity and photometric data leads to an orbital solution and constraints on fundamental stellar parameters. While the primary has arrived on the main sequence, the secondary is still pre-main-sequence and we compare our results for the $M/M_\\odot$ and $R/R_\\odot$ values with stellar evolutionary models. We also demonstrate that the system is likely to be tidally synchronized. Follow-up infrared spectroscopy is likely to reveal the lines of the secondary, allowing for dynamically measured masses and elevating the system to benchmark eclipsing binary status.

  17. Predictions for the Rates of Compact Binary Coalescences Observable by Ground-based Gravitational-wave Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Abadie, J; Abbott, R; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allen, G; Allwine, E; Ceron, E Amador; Amin, R S; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Antonucci, F; Aoudia, S; Arain, M A; Araya, M; Arun, K G; Aso, Y; Aston, S; Astone, P; Atkinson, D E; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Barker, D; Barnum, S; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Bartlett, J; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Behnke, B; Beker, M G; Belczynski, K; Benacquista, M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bigotta, S; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birindelli, S; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Blomberg, A; Boccara, C; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bork, R; Born, M; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Boyle, M; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Buckleitner, D; Budzyński, R; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Burmeister, O; Buskulic, D; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campagna, E; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chalermsongsak, T; Chalkley, E; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Clark, D; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R C; Corda, C; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coulon, J -P; Coward, D; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Culter, R M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dari, A; Das, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Davier, M; Davies, G; Davis, A; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Degallaix, J; del Prete, M; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Devanka, P; Dhurandhar, S; Di Cintio, A; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doomes, E E; Douglas, E S D; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Dueck, J; Dumas, J -C; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Espinoza, E; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Faltas, Y; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Flasch, K; Foley, S; Forrest, C; Forsi, E; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garofoli, J A; Garufi, F; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gholami, I; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Goetz, E A; Goggin, L M; González, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hall, P; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Heefner, J; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hirose, E; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E; Hoyland, D; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh--Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Jackson, B; Jaranowski, P; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kanner, J; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, C; Kim, H; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R; Koranda, S; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Krause, T; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kullman, J; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Landry, M; Lang, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Leong, J; Leonor, I; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Li, J; Li, T G F; Lin, H; Lindquist, P E; Lockerbie, N A; Lodhia, D; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lu, P; Luan, J; Lubinski, M; Lucianetti, A; Lück, H; Lundgren, A; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mackowski, J M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Mak, C; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Maros, E; Marque, J; Martelli, F; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Matzner, R A; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R

    2010-01-01

    We present an up-to-date, comprehensive summary of the rates for all types of compact binary coalescence sources detectable by the Initial and Advanced versions of the ground-based gravitational-wave detectors LIGO and Virgo. Astrophysical estimates for compact-binary coalescence rates depend on a number of assumptions and unknown model parameters, and are still uncertain. The most confident among these estimates are the rate predictions for coalescing binary neutron stars which are based on extrapolations from observed binary pulsars in our Galaxy. These yield a likely coalescence rate of 100 per Myr per Milky Way Equivalent Galaxy (MWEG), although the rate could plausibly range from 1 per Myr per MWEG to 1000 per Myr per MWEG. We convert coalescence rates into detection rates based on data from the LIGO S5 and Virgo VSR2 science runs and projected sensitivities for our Advanced detectors. Using the detector sensitivities derived from these data, we find a likely detection rate of 0.02 per year for Initial L...

  18. Testing theories for longterm accretion variability in black hole X-ray binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambier, Hal J.

    Many X-ray sources are now understood to be "black hole X-ray binaries'' in which a stellar remnant black hole either tidally "squeezes'' gas off a companion star, or pulls in some fraction the companion's wind. This gas can drain inward through a dense, thin disk characterized by thermalized radiation, or a sparse and radiatively-inefficient flow, or some combination of the two. Observations at other energies often provide crucial information, but our primary tools to study accretion, especially closest to the black hole, are X-ray spectra and their time evolution. This evolution includes numerous behaviors spanning orders of magnitude in timescale and luminosity, and also hints at spatial structure since draining is generally faster at smaller radii. This includes variability at time-scales of weeks to months which remains difficult to explain despite an abundance of possible variability mechanisms since direct simulations covering the full spatial and temporal range remain impractical. After reviewing general aspects of accretion, I present both more and less familiar forms of longterm variability. Based on these, I argue the problem involves finding a physical process (or combination) that can generate repeatable yet adjustable cycles in luminosity and evolution of low and high energy spectral components, while letting the ionization instability dominate conventional outbursts. Specific models examined include: disks embedded in, and interacting with, hot, sparse flows, and another instability that quenches viscous-draining of the disk at more fundamental level. Testing these theories, alone and in combination, motivates building a very general and simplified numerical model presented here. I find that two-phase flow models still predict excessive recondensation in LMC X-3 among other problems, while the viscosity-quenching instability may account for rapid drops and slow recoveries in disk accretion rate but also likely requires diffusivity orders of magnitude

  19. Seven new binaries discovered in the Kepler light curves through the BEER method confirmed by radial-velocity observations

    CERN Document Server

    Faigler, S; Quinn, S N; Latham, D W; Tal-Or, L

    2011-01-01

    We present seven newly discovered non-eclipsing short-period binary systems with low-mass companions, identified by the recently introduced BEER algorithm, applied to the publicly available 138-day photometric light curves obtained by the Kepler mission. The detection is based on the beaming effect (sometimes called Doppler boosting), which increases (decreases) the brightness of any light source approaching (receding from) the observer, enabling a prediction of the stellar Doppler radial-velocity modulation from its precise photometry. The BEER algorithm identifies the BEaming periodic modulation, with a combination of the well known Ellipsoidal and Reflection/heating periodic effects, induced by short-period companions. The seven detections were confirmed by spectroscopic radial-velocity follow-up observations, indicating minimum secondary masses in the range of 0.07-0.4 Msun. The discovered binaries establish for the first time the feasibility of the BEER algorithm as a new detection method for short-perio...

  20. VLBI observations of the shortest orbital period black hole binary, MAXI J1659-152

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Paragi; A.J. van der Horst; T. Belloni; J.C.A. Miller-Jones; J. Linford; G. Taylor; J. Yang; M.A. Garrett; J. Granot; C. Kouveliotou; E. Kuulkers; R.A.M.J. Wijers

    2013-01-01

    The X-ray transient MAXI J1659−152 was discovered by Swift/Burst Alert Telescope and it was initially identified as a gamma-ray burst. Soon its Galactic origin and binary nature were established. There exists a wealth of multiwavelength monitoring data for this source, providing a great coverage of

  1. Dark energy towards observational tests and data

    CERN Document Server

    Capozziello, S

    2008-01-01

    A huge amount of good quality data converges towards the picture of a spatially flat universe undergoing the today observed phase of accelerated expansion. This new observational trend is commonly addressed as Precision Cosmology. Despite of the excellent surveys, the nature of dark energy, dominating the matter-energy content of the universe, is still unknown and a lot of different scenarios are viable candidates to explain cosmic acceleration. Methods to test these cosmological models are based on distance measurements and lookback time toward astronomical objects used as standard candles. The related degeneracy problem is the signal that more data at low 0

  2. RY Scuti: Infrared and radio observations of the mass-loss wind of a massive binary star system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrz, R. D.; Hayward, T. L.; Houck, J. R.; Miles, J. W.; Hjellming, R. M.; Jones, T. J.; Woodward, Charles E.; Prentice, Ricarda; Forrest, W. J.; Libonate, S.

    1995-01-01

    We report infrared (IR) imaging, IR photometry, IR spectroscopy, optical/IR photopolarimetry, and Very Large Array (VLA) radio observations of the peculiar binary star RY Scuti. These observations provide an unprecedented view of the detailed spatial structure of the equatorial mass-loss wind of a massive, luminous, 'overcontact' binary system. The binary star (0.43 AU separation) is surrounded by a flattened equatorial disk with an outer radius of approximately = 3 x 10(exp 16) cm (2000 AU) that emits strongly in the IR and radio. The inside of the disk is ionized and emits free-free radiation from hydrogen and 12.8 micrometers forbidden-line emission from (Ne II); the outside of the disk emits thermal radiation from silicate dust. Radio continuum emission is also produced in a compact H II region surrounding the binary. The dust may have a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) component. We use a rudimentary geometric model in which the thermal IR and radio emission from the disk are assumed to arise in a pair of concentric toroidal rings to estimate the physical properties of the disk. The mean radius of the ionized gas toroid is approximately = 1.3 x 10(exp 16) cm (870 AU), and the mean radius of the dust toroid is approximately = 2.2 x 10(exp 16) cm (1470 AU). RY Scuti has a small intrinsic polarization, with the electric vector perpendicular to the equatorial disk, that is probably caused by electron scattering from hot gas close to the central binary. We conclude that neon in the nebula is overabundant with respect to hydrogen and helium by a factor of between 1.6 and 10. Our IR/radio image data suggest that the circumstellar disk is part of an extensive radiation driven mass-loss outflow that is strongly confined to the equatorial plane of the binary system. The sharp spatial separation of the outer dust torous from the inner ionized gas torus confirms earlier suggestions that dust formation in the circumstellar ejecta of very hot stars must occur in

  3. SEVEN NEW BINARIES DISCOVERED IN THE KEPLER LIGHT CURVES THROUGH THE BEER METHOD CONFIRMED BY RADIAL-VELOCITY OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faigler, S.; Mazeh, T.; Tal-Or, L. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Quinn, S. N.; Latham, D. W. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2012-02-20

    We present seven newly discovered non-eclipsing short-period binary systems with low-mass companions, identified by the recently introduced BEER algorithm, applied to the publicly available 138-day photometric light curves obtained by the Kepler mission. The detection is based on the beaming effect (sometimes called Doppler boosting), which increases (decreases) the brightness of any light source approaching (receding from) the observer, enabling a prediction of the stellar Doppler radial-velocity (RV) modulation from its precise photometry. The BEER algorithm identifies the BEaming periodic modulation, with a combination of the well-known Ellipsoidal and Reflection/heating periodic effects, induced by short-period companions. The seven detections were confirmed by spectroscopic RV follow-up observations, indicating minimum secondary masses in the range 0.07-0.4 M{sub Sun }. The binaries discovered establish for the first time the feasibility of the BEER algorithm as a new detection method for short-period non-eclipsing binaries, with the potential to detect in the near future non-transiting brown-dwarf secondaries, or even massive planets.

  4. VLBI observations of the RS Canum Venaticorum binary systems UX Arietis and HR 1099 at 1.65 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutel, R. L.; Doiron, D. J.; Phillips, R. B.; Lestrade, J. F.

    1984-01-01

    VLBI observations of the RS CVn binaries UX Arietis and HR 1099 have been made at 1.65 GHz using a three-element array with a minimum fringe spacing of 11.5 milli-arcsec. Both sources were found to be unresolved within measurement uncertainties. In both cases, the derived upper limit to the source size was comparable to the overall size of each binary system. The lower limits to the brightness temperature were 1.4 x 10 to the 10th K for UX Arietis and 2.9 x 10 to the 10th K for HR 1099. Simultaneous polarization measurements at the VLA showed 4-8 percent circular polarization and less than 2 percent linear polarization. It is found that the data are consistent with gyrosynchrotron emission from a power-law energy distribution of electrons in a magnetic field B less than or approximately equal to 6 gauss.

  5. Measuring a cosmological distance-redshift relationship using only gravitational wave observations of binary neutron star coalescences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messenger, C; Read, J

    2012-03-01

    Detection of gravitational waves from the inspiral phase of binary neutron star coalescence will allow us to measure the effects of the tidal coupling in such systems. Tidal effects provide additional contributions to the phase evolution of the gravitational wave signal that break a degeneracy between the system's mass parameters and redshift and thereby allow the simultaneous measurement of both the effective distance and the redshift for individual sources. Using the population of O(10(3)-10(7)) detectable binary neutron star systems predicted for 3rd generation gravitational wave detectors, the luminosity distance-redshift relation can be probed independently of the cosmological distance ladder and independently of electromagnetic observations. We conclude that for a range of representative neutron star equations of state the redshift of such systems can be determined to an accuracy of 8%-40% for z<1 and 9%-65% for 1

  6. A method to estimate the significance of coincident gravitational-wave observations from compact binary coalescence

    OpenAIRE

    Cannon, K; Hanna, C.; Keppel, D.

    2013-01-01

    Coalescing compact binary systems consisting of neutron stars and/or black holes should be detectable with upcoming advanced gravitational-wave detectors such as LIGO, Virgo, GEO and {KAGRA}. Gravitational-wave experiments to date have been riddled with non-Gaussian, non-stationary noise that makes it challenging to ascertain the significance of an event. A popular method to estimate significance is to time shift the events collected between detectors in order to establish a false coincidence...

  7. Binaries with a $\\delta$ Scuti component: Results from a long term observational survey, updated catalogue and future prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Liakos, Alexios

    2015-01-01

    Results from a six year systematic observational survey on candidate eclipsing binaries with a $\\delta$ delta Sct component are presented. More than a hundred systems with component(s) of A-F spectral types were observed in the frame of this survey in order to be checked for possible pulsational behaviour. The 14% (13 cases) of the currently known such systems were discovered during this survey. Using all the available information from the literature, an updated list with all the currently known systems of this type is presented, while possible correlations between their pulsational and binarity properties are discussed.

  8. Ultraviolet, optical and infra-red observations of the Wolf-Rayet contact-eclipsing binary CQ Cephei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study on wolf-rayet contact-eclipsing binary CQ Cephei is an attempt to combine the best observational previous results with an extensive set of UV data from the IUE Satellite and with new IR photometric data. The orbital variations of the CQ Cep system are investigated as well as the secondary component. The early studies of CQ Cep are reviewed, and the observations used in the present analysis described. Continuum energy distribution, interstellar extinction, photometric variability, light curves, time dependence of the emission and absorption line spectra and models for the CQ Cept system are discussed. (U.K.)

  9. The binary near-Earth asteroid (175706) 1996 FG3 - An observational constraint on its orbital stability

    CERN Document Server

    Scheirich, P; Jacobson, S A; Ďurech, J; Kušnirák, P; Hornoch, K; Mottola, S; Mommert, M; Hellmich, S; Pray, D; Polishook, D; Krugly, Yu N; Inasaridze, R Ya; Kvaratskhelia, O I; Ayvazian, V; Slyusarev, I; Pittichová, J; Jehin, E; Manfroid, J; Gillon, M; Galád, A; Pollock, J; Licandro, J; Alí-Lagoa, V; Brinsfield, J; Molotov, I E

    2014-01-01

    Using our photometric observations taken between April 1996 and January 2013 and other published data, we derive properties of the binary near-Earth asteroid (175706) 1996 FG3 including new measurements constraining evolution of the mutual orbit with potential consequences for the entire binary asteroid population. We also refined previously determined values of parameters of both components, making 1996 FG3 one of the most well understood binary asteroid systems. We determined the orbital vector with a substantially greater accuracy than before and we also placed constraints on a stability of the orbit. Specifically, the ecliptic longitude and latitude of the orbital pole are 266{\\deg} and -83{\\deg}, respectively, with the mean radius of the uncertainty area of 4{\\deg}, and the orbital period is 16.1508 +\\- 0.0002 h (all uncertainties correspond to 3sigma). We looked for a quadratic drift of the mean anomaly of the satellite and obtained a value of 0.04 +\\- 0.20 deg/yr^2, i.e., consistent with zero. The drif...

  10. Long-term photometric and spectroscopic observations of the near-contact binary KR Cygni

    OpenAIRE

    Sipahi, E.; Cakirli, O.; Ibanoglu, C.

    2012-01-01

    We present the multi-color, five-year light curves and the first radial velocities of the near-contact binary system KR Cyg. We derived the masses of the components as 2.88$\\pm$0.20 M$_{\\odot}$ and 1.26$\\pm$0.07 M$_{\\odot}$ and the radii as 2.59$\\pm$0.06 R$_{\\odot}$ and 1.80$\\pm$0.04 R$_{\\odot}$. Analyses of the UBVR light curves and the radial velocities indicate that none of the components exactly fill their corresponding Roche lobes. We have calculated the distance to the system of KR Cyg ...

  11. Structure and nature of gamma-ray binaries by means of VLBI observations

    OpenAIRE

    Moldón Vara, Francisco Javier

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray binaries are extreme systems that produce non-thermal emission from radio to very-high-energy (above TeV) gamma rays, with the energy output in the spectral energy distribution (SED) dominated by the MeV–GeV photons. Their broadband emission is usually modulated by the orbital cycle of the system, which suggests that the physical conditions are also periodic and reproducible. The diversity of systems, together with the reproducibility of the conditions within each system, makes gamm...

  12. A Catalog of Eclipsing Binaries and Variable Stars Observed with ASTEP 400 from Dome C, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapellier, E.; Mékarnia, D.; Abe, L.; Guillot, T.; Agabi, K.; Rivet, J.-P.; Schmider, F.-X.; Crouzet, N.; Aristidi, E.

    2016-10-01

    We used the large photometric database of the ASTEP program, whose primary goal was to detect exoplanets in the southern hemisphere from Antarctica, to search for eclipsing binaries (EcBs) and variable stars. 673 EcBs and 1166 variable stars were detected, including 31 previously known stars. The resulting online catalogs give the identification, the classification, the period, and the depth or semi-amplitude of each star. Data and light curves for each object are available at http://astep-vo.oca.eu.

  13. Eclipsing binaries observed with the WIRE satellite I. Discovery and photometric analysis of the new bright A0IV eclipsing binary Psi Centauri

    CERN Document Server

    Bruntt, H; Torres, G; Penny, A J; Clausen, J V; Buzasi, D L

    2006-01-01

    Determinations of stellar mass and radius with realistic uncertainties at the level of 1% provide important constraints on models of stellar structure and evolution. We present a high-precision light curve of the A0IV star Psi Centauri, from the star tracker on board the WIRE satellite and the Solar Mass Ejection Imager camera on the Coriolis spacecraft. The data show that Psi Cen is an eccentric eclipsing binary system with a relatively long orbital period. The WIRE light curve extends over 28.7 nights and contains 41334 observations with 2 mmag point-to-point scatter. The eclipse depths are 0.28 and 0.16 mag, and show that the two eclipsing components of Psi Cen have very different radii. As a consequence, the secondary eclipse is total. We find the eccentricity to be e=0.55 with an orbital period of 38.8 days from combining the WIRE light curve with data taken over two years from the Solar Mass Ejection Imager camera. We have fitted the light curve with EBOP and have assessed the uncertainties of the resul...

  14. Polarimetric observations of the innermost regions of relativistic jets in X-ray binaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell D.M.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Synchrotron emission from the relativistic jets launched close to black holes and neutron stars can be highly linearly polarized, depending on the configuration of the magnetic field. In X-ray binaries, optically thin synchrotron emission from the compact jets resides at infrared–optical wavelengths. The polarimetric signature of the jets is detected in the infrared and is highly variable in some X-ray binaries. This reveals the magnetic geometry in the compact jet, in a region close enough to the black hole that it is influenced by its strong gravity. In some cases the magnetic field is turbulent and variable near the jet base. In Cyg X–1, the origin of the γ-ray, X-ray and some of the infrared polarization is likely the optically thin synchrotron power law from the inner regions of the jet. In order to reproduce the polarization properties, the magnetic field in this region must be highly ordered, in contrast to other sources.

  15. CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF GALAXY ZOO MERGERS: FREQUENCY OF BINARY ACTIVE NUCLEI IN MASSIVE MERGERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, Stacy H. [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Schawinski, Kevin; Urry, C. Megan; Bonning, Erin W. [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Darg, Dan W.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Lintott, Chris J. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Oh, Kyuseok [Department of Astronomy, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Cardamone, Carolin N. [Harriet W. Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning, Brown University, P.O. Box 1912, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Keel, William C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 206 Gallalee Hall, 514 University Boulevard, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-034 (United States); Simmons, Brooke D. [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208121, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Treister, Ezequiel, E-mail: stacy.h.teng@nasa.gov [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Concepcion, Casilla 160-C, Concepcion (Chile)

    2012-07-10

    We present the results from a Chandra pilot study of 12 massive galaxy mergers selected from Galaxy Zoo. The sample includes major mergers down to a host galaxy mass of 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} that already have optical active galactic nucleus (AGN) signatures in at least one of the progenitors. We find that the coincidences of optically selected active nuclei with mildly obscured (N{sub H} {approx}< 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}) X-ray nuclei are relatively common (8/12), but the detections are too faint (<40 counts per nucleus; f{sub 2-10keV} {approx}< 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -13} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}) to reliably separate starburst and nuclear activity as the origin of the X-ray emission. Only one merger is found to have confirmed binary X-ray nuclei, though the X-ray emission from its southern nucleus could be due solely to star formation. Thus, the occurrences of binary AGNs in these mergers are rare (0%-8%), unless most merger-induced active nuclei are very heavily obscured or Compton thick.

  16. Chandra Observations of Galaxy Zoo Mergers: Frequency of Binary Active Nuclei in Massive Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Stacy H.; Schawinski, Kevin; Urry, C. Megan; Darg, Dan W.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Oh, Kyuseok; Bonning, Erin W.; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Keel, William C.; Lintott, Chris J.; Simmons, Brooke D.; Treister, Ezequiel

    2012-01-01

    We present the results from a Chandra pilot study of 12 massive galaxy mergers selected from Galaxy Zoo. The sample includes major mergers down to a host galaxy mass of 1011 M that already have optical AGN signatures in at least one of the progenitors. We find that the coincidences of optically selected active nuclei with mildly obscured (N(sub H) approx < 1.1 10(exp 22)/sq cm) X-ray nuclei are relatively common (8/12), but the detections are too faint (< 40 counts per nucleus; (sub -10) keV approx < 1.2 10(exp -13) erg/s/sq cm) to reliably separate starburst and nuclear activity as the origin of the X-ray emission. Only one merger is found to have confirmed binary X-ray nuclei, though the X-ray emission from its southern nucleus could be due solely to star formation. Thus, the occurrences of binary AGN in these mergers are rare (0-8%), unless most merger-induced active nuclei are very heavily obscured or Compton thick.

  17. Binary Stars "Flare" With Predictable Cycles, Analysis of Radio Observations Reveals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-01

    Astronomers have completed a 5-year campaign to monitor continuously radio flares from two groups of binary star systems. This survey is of special interest because it provides evidence that certain binary star systems have predictable activity cycles like our Sun. The survey, which ran from January 1995 to October 2000, was conducted with the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Green Bank Interferometer. The report was presented at the American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Albuquerque, New Mexico, by Mercedes Richards of the University of Virginia, and her collaborators Elizabeth Waltman of the Naval Research Laboratory, and Frank Ghigo of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). "This long-term survey was critical to our understanding of the short- and long-term magnetic cycles of these intriguing star systems," said Richards. The survey focused on the binary star systems Beta Persei and V711 Tauri -- both are about 95 light-years from Earth. Beta Persei is the prototype of the "Algol" class of interacting binary stars. An Algol system contains a hot, blue, main sequence star, along with a cool, orange/red star that is more active than our Sun. V711 Tauri is an "RS Canum Venaticorum" binary, which contains two cool stars that behave like our Sun. "Our survey was the longest-running continuous radio flare survey of Algol or RS Canum Venaticorum binary star systems," said Richards. A flare is an enormous explosion on the surface of a star, which is accompanied by a release of magnetic energy. Flares can be detected over the full range of wavelengths from gamma rays to the radio. It is estimated that the energy release in a flare on the Sun is equivalent to a billion megatons of TNT. The strength of the magnetic field and the amount of activity it displays, like sunspots and flares, are directly related to the rotation or "spin" of the star. In Beta Persei and V711 Tauri, the cool star spins once every 3 days, compared to once every month in the

  18. Fermi Observation of the transitional pulsar binary XSS J12270-4859

    CERN Document Server

    Xing, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Because of the disappearance of its accretion disk since the time period around 2012 November--December, XSS J12270-4859 has recently been identified as, in addition to PSR J1023+0038, another transitional millisecond pulsar binary. We have carried out detailed analysis of the Fermi Large Area Telescope data for the binary. While both spectra before and after the disk-disappearance transition are well described by an exponentially cut-off power law, typical for pulsars' emission in the Fermi's 0.2-300 GeV, a factor of 2 flux decrease related to the transition is detected. A weak orbital modulation is seen, but only detectable in the after-transition data, same to that found at X-rays. In the long-term light curve of the source before the transition, a factor of 3 flux variations are seen. Comparing to the properties of J1023+0038, we disucss the implications from these results. We suggest that since the modulation is aligned with that at X-rays in orbital phase, it possibly arises due to the occultation of th...

  19. Gravitational-wave observations of binary black holes: Effect of non-quadrupole modes

    CERN Document Server

    Varma, Vijay; Husa, Sascha; Bustillo, Juan Calderon; Hannam, Mark; Puerrer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We study the effect of non-quadrupolar modes in the detection and parameter estimation of gravitational waves (GWs) from non-spinning black-hole binaries. We evaluate the loss of signal-to-noise ratio and the systematic errors in the estimated parameters when one uses a quadrupole-mode template family to detect GW signals with all the relevant modes, for target signals with total masses $20 M_\\odot \\leq M \\leq 250 M_\\odot$ and mass ratios $1 \\leq q \\leq 18$. Target signals are constructed by matching numerical-relativity simulations describing the late inspiral, merger and ringdown of the binary with post-Newtonian/effective-one-body waveforms describing the early inspiral. We find that waveform templates modeling only the quadrupolar modes of the GW signal are sufficient (loss of detection rate $< 10\\%$) for the detection of GWs with mass ratios $q\\leq4$ using advanced GW observatories. Neglecting the effect of non-quadrupole modes will introduce systematic errors in the estimated parameters. The systemat...

  20. Low-Mass X-Ray Binary MAXI J1421-613 Observed by MAXI GSC and Swift XRT

    CERN Document Server

    Serino, Motoko; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Matsuoka, Masaru; Negoro, Hitoshi; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Kennea, Jamie A; Fukushima, Kosuke; Nagayama, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    Monitor of All sky X-ray Image (MAXI) discovered a new outburst of an X-ray transient source named MAXI J1421-613. Because of the detection of three X-ray bursts from the source, it was identified as a neutron star low-mass X-ray binary. The results of data analyses of the MAXI GSC and the Swift XRT follow-up observations suggest that the spectral hardness remained unchanged during the first two weeks of the outburst. All the XRT spectra in the 0.5-10 keV band can be well explained by thermal Comptonization of multi-color disk blackbody emission. The photon index of the Comptonized component is $\\approx$ 2, which is typical of low-mass X-ray binaries in the low/hard state. Since X-ray bursts have a maximum peak luminosity, it is possible to estimate the (maximum) distance from its observed peak flux. The peak flux of the second X-ray burst, which was observed by the GSC, is about 5 photons cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. By assuming a blackbody spectrum of 2.5 keV, the maximum distance to the source is estimated as 7 kpc...

  1. Measuring neutron star tidal deformability with Advanced LIGO: a Bayesian analysis of neutron star - black hole binary observations

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Prayush; Pfeiffer, Harald P

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of gravitational waves (GW) by Advanced LIGO has ushered us into an era of observational GW astrophysics. Compact binaries remain the primary target sources for LIGO, of which neutron star-black hole (NSBH) binaries form an important subset. GWs from NSBH sources carry signatures of (a) the tidal distortion of the neutron star by its companion black hole during inspiral, and (b) its potential tidal disruption near merger. In this paper, we present a Bayesian study of the measurability of neutron star tidal deformability $\\Lambda_\\mathrm{NS}\\propto (R/M)^{5}$ using observation(s) of inspiral-merger GW signals from disruptive NSBH coalescences, taking into account the crucial effect of black hole spins. First, we find that if non-tidal templates are used to estimate source parameters for an NSBH signal, the bias introduced in the estimation of non-tidal physical parameters will only be significant for loud signals with signal-to-noise ratios greater than $30$. For similarly loud signals, we also f...

  2. Observing gravitational waves from the post-merger phase of binary neutron star coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, J. A.; Bauswein, A.; Stergioulas, N.; Shoemaker, D.

    2016-04-01

    We present an effective, low-dimensionality frequency-domain template for the gravitational wave (GW) signal from the stellar remnants from binary neutron star (BNS) coalescence. A principal component decomposition of a suite of numerical simulations of BNS mergers is used to construct orthogonal basis functions for the amplitude and phase spectra of the waveforms for a variety of neutron star (NS) equations of state and binary mass configurations. We review the phenomenology of late merger/post-merger GW emission in BNS coalescence and demonstrate how an understanding of the dynamics during and after the merger leads to the construction of a universal spectrum. We also provide a discussion of the prospects for detecting the post-merger signal in future GW detectors as a potential contribution to the science case for third generation instruments. The template derived in our analysis achieves \\gt 90% match across a wide variety of merger waveforms and strain sensitivity spectra for current and potential GW detectors. Using a simple Monte Carlo simulation, we find a preliminary estimate of the typical uncertainty in the determination of the dominant post-merger oscillation frequency {f}{peak} of δ {f}{peak}∼ 138 {{Hz}}. Using recently derived correlations between {f}{peak} and the NS radii, this suggests potential constraints on the radius of a fiducial NS of ∼429 m. Such measurements would only be possible for nearby (∼30 Mpc) sources with advanced LIGO but become more feasible for planned upgrades to advanced LIGO and other future instruments, leading to constraints on the high density NS equation of state which are independent and complementary to those inferred from the pre-merger inspiral GW signal. We study the ability of a selection of future GW instruments to provide constraints on the NS equation of state via the postmerger phase of BNS mergers.

  3. Software Test Automation in Practice: Empirical Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jussi Kasurinen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this industry study is to shed light on the current situation and improvement needs in software test automation. To this end, 55 industry specialists from 31 organizational units were interviewed. In parallel with the survey, a qualitative study was conducted in 12 selected software development organizations. The results indicated that the software testing processes usually follow systematic methods to a large degree, and have only little immediate or critical requirements for resources. Based on the results, the testing processes have approximately three fourths of the resources they need, and have access to a limited, but usually sufficient, group of testing tools. As for the test automation, the situation is not as straightforward: based on our study, the applicability of test automation is still limited and its adaptation to testing contains practical difficulties in usability. In this study, we analyze and discuss these limitations and difficulties.

  4. VLA and CARMA observations of protostars in the Cepheus clouds: Sub-arcsecond proto-binaries formed via disk fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, John J.; Looney, Leslie W. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Chandler, Claire J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM (United States); Wilner, David J.; Bourke, Tyler L. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Loinard, Laurent; D' Alessio, Paola [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, UNAM, Apartado Postal 3-72 (Xangari), 58089 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Chiang, Hsin-Fang [Institute for Astronomy and NASA Astrobiology Institute, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Hartmann, Lee; Calvet, Nuria [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Kwon, Woojin, E-mail: jtobin@nrao.edu [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Landleven 12, 9747 AD Groningen (Netherlands)

    2013-12-20

    We present observations of three Class 0/I protostars (L1157-mm, CB230 IRS1, and L1165-SMM1) using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and observations of two (L1165-SMM1 and CB230 IRS1) with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA). The VLA observations were taken at wavelengths of λ = 7.3 mm, 1.4 cm, 3.3 cm, 4.0 cm, and 6.5 cm with a best resolution of ∼0.''06 (18 AU) at 7.3 mm. The L1165-SMM1 CARMA observations were taken at λ = 1.3 mm with a best resolution of ∼0.''3 (100 AU) and the CB230 IRS1 observations were taken at λ = 3.4 mm with a best resolution of ∼3'' (900 AU). We find that L1165-SMM1 and CB230 IRS1 have probable binary companions at separations of ∼0.''3 (100 AU) from detections of secondary peaks at multiple wavelengths. The position angles of these companions are nearly orthogonal to the direction of the observed bipolar outflows, consistent with the expected protostellar disk orientations. We suggest that these companions may have formed from disk fragmentation; turbulent fragmentation would not preferentially arrange the binary companions to be orthogonal to the outflow direction. For L1165-SMM1, both the 7.3 mm and 1.3 mm emission show evidence of a large (R > 100 AU) disk. For the L1165-SMM1 primary protostar and the CB230 IRS1 secondary protostar, the 7.3 mm emission is resolved into structures consistent with ∼20 AU radius disks. For the other protostars, including L1157-mm, the emission is unresolved, suggesting disks with radii <20 AU.

  5. Eclipsing binaries observed with the WIRE satellite. II. beta Aurigae and non-linear limb darkening in light curves

    CERN Document Server

    Southworth, J; Buzasi, D L; Southworth, John; Bruntt, Hans; Buzasi, Derek L.

    2007-01-01

    We present the most precise light curve ever obtained of a detached eclipsing binary star and use it investigate the inclusion of non-linear limb darkening laws in eclipsing binary light curve models. This light curve, of the bright system beta Aurigae, was obtained using the star tracker aboard the WIRE satellite and contains 30000 datapoints with a scatter of 0.3 mmag. We analyse it using a version of the EBOP code modified to include non-linear limb darkening and to directly incorporate observed times of minimum light and spectroscopic light ratios into the solution as individual observations. We also analyse the dataset with the WD code to ensure that the two models give consistent results. EBOP provides an excellent fit to the WIRE data. Whilst the fractional radii are only defined to a precision of 5%, including an accurate published spectroscopic light ratio improves this dramatically to 0.5%. Using non-linear limb darkening improves the quality of the fit significantly and causes the measured radii to...

  6. VHE observations of the gamma-ray binary system LS 5039 with H.E.S.S

    CERN Document Server

    Mariaud, C; Aharonian, F; Boettcher, M; Dubus, G; de Naurois, M; Romoli, C

    2015-01-01

    LS 5039 is a gamma-ray binary system observed in a broad energy range, from radio to TeV energies. The binary system exhibits both flux and spectral modulation as a function of its orbital period. The X-ray and very-high-energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) gamma-ray fluxes display a maximum/minimum at inferior/superior conjunction, with spectra becoming respectively harder/softer, a behaviour that is completely reversed in the high-energy domain (HE, 0.1 10 GeV that is compatible with the low-energy tail of the TeV emission. The low 10 - 100 GeV flux, however, makes the HE and VHE components difficult to reconcile with a scenario including emission from only a single particle population. We report on new observations of LS 5039 conducted with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) telescopes from 2006 to 2015. This new data set enables for an unprecedentedly-deep phase-folded coverage of the source at TeV energies, as well as an extension of the VHE spectral range down to ~120 GeV, which makes LS 5039 the firs...

  7. Deducing the Orientation of the Semimajor Axis of the Eta Carinae Binary System from X-ray Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Soker, Amit Kashi Noam

    2009-01-01

    We study the usage of the X-ray light curve, column density toward the hard X-ray source, and emission measure (density square times volume), of the massive binary system Eta Carinae to determine the orientation of its semi-major axis. The source of the hard X-ray emission is the shocked secondary wind. We argue that, by itself, the observed X-ray flux cannot teach us much about the orientation of the semi-major axis. Minor adjustment of some unknown parameters of the binary system allows to fit theX-ray light curve with almost any inclination angle and orientation. The column density and X-ray emission measure, on the other hand, impose strong constrains on the orientation. We improve our previous calculations and show that the column density is more compatible with an orientation where for most of the time the secondary - the hotter, less massive star - is behind the primary star. The secondary comes closer to the observer only for a short time near periastron passage. The ten-week X-ray deep minimum, which...

  8. Optical/infrared observations unveiling the formation, nature and evolution of High-Mass X-ray Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Chaty, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    In this review I first describe the nature of the three kinds of High-Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs), accreting through: (i) Be circumstellar disc, (ii) supergiant stellar wind, and (iii) Roche lobe filling supergiants. I then report on the discovery of two new populations of HMXBs hosting supergiant stars, recently revealed by a wealth of new observations, coming from the high energy side (INTEGRAL, Swift, XMM, Chandra satellites), and complemented by multi-wavelength optical/infrared observations (mainly ESO facilities). The first population is constituted of obscured supergiant HMXBs, the second one of supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXTs), exhibiting short and intense X-ray flares. I finally discuss the formation and evolution of HMXBs, constrain the accretion models (e.g. clumpy winds, transitory accretion disc, magneto-centrifugal barrier), show evidences suggesting the existence of an evolutionary link, include comparisons with population synthesis models, and finally build a consistent scenario explai...

  9. Multi-wavelength Observations of the Binary System \\psrb/LS~2883 around the 2014 Periastron Passage

    CERN Document Server

    Chernyakova, M; van Soelen, B; Callanan, P; O'Shaughnessy, L; Babyk, Iu; Tsygankov, S; Vovk, Ie; Krivonos, R; Tomsick, J A; Malyshev, D; Li, J; Wood, K; Torres, D; Zhang, S; Kretschmar, P; McSwain, M V; Buckley, D; Koen, C

    2015-01-01

    We report on the results of the extensive multi-wavelength campaign from optical to GeV gamma-rays of the 2014 periastron passage of PSR B1259-63, which is a unique high-mass gamma-ray emitting binary system with a young pulsar companion. Observations demonstrate the stable nature of the post-periastron GeV flare and prove the coincidence of the flare with the start of rapid decay of the H$\\alpha$ equivalent width, usually interpreted as a disruption of the Be stellar disk. Intensive X-ray observations reveal changes in the X-ray spectral behaviour happening at the moment of the GeV flare. We demonstrate that these changes can be naturally explained as a result of synchrotron cooling of monoenergetic relativistic electrons injected into the system during the GeV flare.

  10. Testing Chern-Simons Modified Gravity with Gravitational-Wave Detections of Extreme-Mass-Ratio Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Canizares, Priscilla; Sopuerta, Carlos F

    2012-01-01

    [abridged] The detection of gravitational waves from extreme-mass-ratio (EMRI) binaries, comprising a stellar-mass compact object orbiting around a massive black hole, is one of the main targets for low-frequency gravitational-wave detectors in space, like the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA or eLISA/NGO). The long-duration gravitational-waveforms emitted by such systems encode the structure of the strong field region of the massive black hole, in which the inspiral occurs. The detection and analysis of EMRIs will therefore allow us to study the geometry of massive black holes and determine whether their nature is as predicted by General Relativity and even to test whether General Relativity is the correct theory to describe the dynamics of these systems. To achieve this, EMRI modeling in alternative theories of gravity is required to describe the generation of gravitational waves. In this paper, we explore to what extent EMRI observations with LISA or eLISA/NGO might be able to distinguish between G...

  11. An interferometric-spectroscopic orbit for the binary HD 195987 Testing models of stellar evolution for metal-poor stars

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, G; Latham, D W; Pan, M; Stefanik, R P; Torres, Guillermo; Boden, Andrew F.; Latham, David W.; Pan, Margaret; Stefanik, Robert P.

    2002-01-01

    We report spectroscopic and interferometric observations of the moderately metal-poor double-lined binary system HD 195987, with an orbital period of 57.3 days. By combining our radial-velocity and visibility measurements we determine the orbital elements and derive absolute masses for the components of M(A) = 0.844 +/- 0.018 Msun and M(B) = 0.6650 +/- 0.0079 Msun, with relative errors of 2% and 1%, respectively. We also determine the orbital parallax, pi(orb) = 46.08 +/- 0.27 mas, corresponding to a distance of 21.70 +/- 0.13 pc. The parallax and the measured brightness difference between the stars in V, H, and K yield the component absolute magnitudes in those bands. We also estimate the effective temperatures of the stars as Teff(A) = 5200 +/- 100 K and Teff(B) = 4200 +/- 200 K. Together with detailed chemical abundance analyses from the literature giving [Fe/H] approximately -0.5 (corrected for binarity) and [alpha/Fe] = +0.36, we use these physical properties to test current models of stellar evolution f...

  12. Dynamical Tides in Compact White Dwarf Binaries: Helium Core White Dwarfs, Tidal Heating, and Observational Signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Fuller, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Tidal dissipation in compact white dwarf (WD) binary systems significantly influences the physical conditions (such as surface temperature and rotation rate) of the WDs prior to mass transfer or merger. In these systems, the dominant tidal effects involve the excitation of gravity waves and their dissipation in the outer envelope of the star. We calculate the amplitude of tidally excited gravity waves in low-mass (0.3M_\\odot) helium-core (He) WDs as a function of the tidal forcing frequency \\omega. Like carbon-oxygen (CO) WDs studied in our previous paper, we find that the dimensionless tidal torque F(\\omega) (inversely proportional to the effective tidal quality factor) has an erratic dependence on \\omega. On average, F(\\omega) scales approximately as \\omega^6, and is several orders of magnitude smaller for He WDs than for CO WDs. We find that tidal torques can begin to synchronize the WD rotation when the orbital period is less than about a hour, although a nearly constant asynchronization is maintained eve...

  13. Long-term observations of the pulsars in 47 Tucanae. I. A study of four elusive binary systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ridolfi, A; Torne, P; Heinke, C O; Berg, M van den; Jordan, C; Kramer, M; Bassa, C G; Sarkissian, J; D'Amico, N; Lorimer, D; Camilo, F; Manchester, R N; Lyne, A

    2016-01-01

    For the past couple of decades, the Parkes radio telescope has been regularly observing the millisecond pulsars in 47 Tucanae (47 Tuc). This long-term timing program was designed to address a wide range of scientific issues related to these pulsars and the globular cluster where they are located. In this paper, the first of a series, we address one of these objectives: the characterization of four previously known binary pulsars for which no precise orbital parameters were known, namely 47 Tuc P, V, W and X (pulsars 47 Tuc R and Y are discussed elsewhere). We determined the previously unknown orbital parameters of 47 Tuc V and X and greatly improved those of 47 Tuc P and W. For pulsars W and X we obtained, for the first time, full coherent timing solutions across the whole data span, which allowed a much more detailed characterization of these systems. 47 Tuc W, a well-known tight eclipsing binary pulsar, exhibits a large orbital period variability, as expected for a system of its class. 47 Tuc X turns out to...

  14. VLA and CARMA Observations of Protostars in the Cepheus Clouds: Sub-arcsecond Proto-Binaries Formed via Disk Fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Tobin, John J; Wilner, David J; Looney, Leslie W; Loinard, Laurent; Chiang, Hsin-Fang; Hartmann, Lee; Calvet, Nuria; D'Alessio, Paola; Bourke, Tyler L; Kwon, Woojin

    2013-01-01

    We present observations of three Class 0/I protostars (L1157-mm, CB230 IRS1, and L1165-SMM1) using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and observations of two (L1165-SMM1 and CB230 IRS1) with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA). The VLA observations were taken at wavelengths of $\\lambda = 7.3$ mm, 1.4 cm, 3.3 cm, 4.0 cm, and 6.5 cm with a best resolution of $\\sim$0\\farcs06 (18 AU) at 7.3 mm. The L1165-SMM1 CARMA observations were taken at $\\lambda = 1.3$ mm with a best resolution of $\\sim0\\farcs3$ (100 AU), and the CB230 IRS1 observations were taken at $\\lambda = 3.4$ mm with a best resolution of $\\sim$3\\arcsec\\ (900 AU). We find that L1165-SMM1 and CB230 IRS1 have probable binary companions at separations of $\\sim$0\\farcs3 (100 AU) from detections of secondary peaks at multiple wavelengths. The position angles of these companions are nearly orthogonal to the direction of the observed bipolar outflows, consistent with the expected protostellar disk orientations. We sugge...

  15. NuSTAR Observations of the State Transition of Millisecond Pulsar Binary PSR J1023+0038

    CERN Document Server

    Tendulkar, Shriharsh P; An, Hongjun; Kaspi, Victoria M; Archibald, Anne M; Bassa, Cees; Bellm, Eric; Bogdanov, Slavko; Harrison, Fiona A; Hessels, Jason W T; Janssen, Gemma H; Lyne, Andrew G; Patruno, Alessandro; Stappers, Benjamin; Stern, Daniel; Tomsick, John A; Boggs, Steven E; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Christensen, Finn E; Craig, William W; Hailey, Charles A; Zhang, William

    2014-01-01

    We report NuSTAR observations of the millisecond pulsar - low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) transition system PSR J1023+0038 from June and October 2013, before and after the formation of an accretion disk around the neutron star. Between June 10-12, a few days to two weeks before the radio disappearance of the pulsar, the 3-79 keV X-ray spectrum was well fit by a simple power law with a photon index of Gamma=1.17 +/-0.08 (at 90% confidence) with a 3-79 keV luminosity of 7.4+/-0.4 x 10^32 erg/s. Significant orbital modulation was observed with a modulation fraction of 36+/-10%. During the October 19-21 observation, the spectrum is described by a softer power law (Gamma=1.66+/-0.06) with an average luminosity of 5.8+/-0.2 x 10^33 erg/s and a peak luminosity of ~1.2 x 10^34 erg/s observed during a flare. No significant orbital modulation was detected. The spectral observations are consistent with previous and current multi-wavelength observations and show the hard X-ray power law extending to 79 keV without a spectra...

  16. Photometric and spectroscopic observations of the F3+M3 eclipsing binary T-Lyr0-08070

    CERN Document Server

    Cakirli, O; Sipahi, E

    2012-01-01

    The multi-color photometric and spectroscopic observations of the newly discovered eclipsing binary T-Lyr0-08070 were obtained. The resultant light and radial velocities were analysed and the absolute parameters of the components were determined. The system is composed of an F3 and an M3 main-sequence stars. Masses and radii were estimated to be 1.37$\\pm$0.23 M$_{\\odot}$ and 1.60$\\pm$0.09 R$_{\\odot}$ for the primary and 0.32$\\pm$0.04 M$_{\\odot}$ and 0.86$\\pm$0.06R$_{\\odot}$ for the secondary star. The less massive secondary component has a radius at least two times larger with respect to its mass. Using the BVJHK magnitudes of the system we estimated an interstellar reddening of 0.22 mag and a distance to the system as 479$\\pm$36 pc.

  17. 1974: the discovery of the first binary pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Damour, Thibault

    2014-01-01

    The 1974 discovery, by Russell A. Hulse and Joseph H. Taylor, of the first binary pulsar PSR 1913+16, opened up new possibilities for the study of relativistic gravity. PSR 1913+16, as well as several other binary pulsars, provided {\\it direct} observational proofs that gravity propagates at the velocity of light and has a quadrupolar structure. Binary pulsars also provided accurate tests of the strong-field regime of relativistic gravity. General Relativity has passed all the binary pulsar tests with flying colors. The discovery of binary pulsars had also very important consequences for astrophysics: accurate measurement of neutron star masses, improved understanding of the possible evolution scenarios for the co-evolution of binary stars, proof of the existence of binary neutron stars emitting gravitational waves for hundreds of millions of years, before coalescing in catastrophic events probably leading to an important emission of electromagnetic radiation and neutrinos. This article reviews the history of...

  18. Tests of General Relativity and Alternative theories of gravity using Gravitational Wave observations

    CERN Document Server

    Arun, K G

    2013-01-01

    Gravitational Wave (GW) observations of coalescing compact binaries will be unique probes of strong-field, dynamical aspects of relativistic gravity. We present a short review of various schemes proposed in the literature to test General Relativity (GR) and alternative theories of gravity using inspiral waveforms. Broadly these schemes may be classified into two types: model dependent and model independent. In the model dependent category, GW observations are compared against a specific waveform model representative of a particular theory or a class of theories like Scalar-Tensor theories, Dynamical Chern-Simons theory and Massive graviton theories. Model independent tests are attempts to write down a parametrised gravitational waveform where the free parameters take different values for different theories and (at least some of) which can be constrained by GW observations. We revisit some of the proposed bounds in the case of downscaled LISA configuration (eLISA) and compare them with the original LISA config...

  19. A NuSTAR observation of the reflection spectrum of the low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1728-34

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sleator, Clio C.; Tomsick, John A.; King, Ashley L.;

    2016-01-01

    We report on a simultaneous NuSTAR and Swift observation of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1728-34. We identified and removed four Type I X-ray bursts during the observation in order to study the persistent emission. The continuum spectrum is hard and described well by a blackbody with...

  20. An object that defies stereotypes. X-ray observations of SBS 1150+599A -- the binary nucleus of PN G135.9+55.9

    CERN Document Server

    Tovmassian, G; Napiwotzki, R; Yungelson, L; Stasińska, G; Peña, M; Richer, M

    2007-01-01

    We present X-ray observations of the close binary nucleus of the planetary nebula PN G135.9+55.9 obtained with the XMM satellite. The nebula is the most oxygen-poor PN known to date and is located in the Galactic halo. It is known to harbor a close binary nucleus of which only one component can be observed in optical-UV range. New X-ray observations show that the invisible component is a very hot compact star. This finding allows us to reconstruct the immediate past of the object and predict its future. The parameters of the binary components we determine strongly suggest that the precursor was a symbiotic supersoft X-ray source that finished its life by Roche lobe overflow. PN G135.9+55.9 is an excelent candidate for a future type Ia supernova.

  1. Running cosmological constant with observational tests

    CERN Document Server

    Geng, Chao-Qiang; Zhang, Kaituo

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the running cosmological constant model with dark energy linearly proportional to the Hubble parameter, $\\Lambda = \\sigma H + \\Lambda_0$, in which the $\\Lambda$CDM limit is recovered by taking $\\sigma=0$. We derive the linear perturbation equations of gravity under the Friedmann-Lema\\"itre-Robertson-Walker cosmology, and show the power spectra of the CMB temperature and matter density distribution. By using the Markov chain Monte Carlo method, we fit the model to the current observational data and find that $\\sigma H_0/ \\Lambda_0 \\lesssim 2.63 \\times 10^{-2}$ and $6.74 \\times 10^{-2}$ for $\\Lambda(t)$ coupled to matter and radiation-matter, respectively, along with constraints on other cosmological parameters.

  2. Running cosmological constant with observational tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Qiang Geng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the running cosmological constant model with dark energy linearly proportional to the Hubble parameter, Λ=σH+Λ0, in which the ΛCDM limit is recovered by taking σ=0. We derive the linear perturbation equations of gravity under the Friedmann–Lemaïtre–Robertson–Walker cosmology, and show the power spectra of the CMB temperature and matter density distribution. By using the Markov chain Monte Carlo method, we fit the model to the current observational data and find that σH0/Λ0≲2.63×10−2 and 6.74×10−2 for Λ(t coupled to matter and radiation-matter, respectively, along with constraints on other cosmological parameters.

  3. Running cosmological constant with observational tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Chao-Qiang; Lee, Chung-Chi; Zhang, Kaituo

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the running cosmological constant model with dark energy linearly proportional to the Hubble parameter, Λ = σH +Λ0, in which the ΛCDM limit is recovered by taking σ = 0. We derive the linear perturbation equations of gravity under the Friedmann-Lemaïtre-Robertson-Walker cosmology, and show the power spectra of the CMB temperature and matter density distribution. By using the Markov chain Monte Carlo method, we fit the model to the current observational data and find that σH0 /Λ0 ≲ 2.63 ×10-2 and 6.74 ×10-2 for Λ (t) coupled to matter and radiation-matter, respectively, along with constraints on other cosmological parameters.

  4. Observation of vapor bubble of non-azeotropic binary mixture in microgravity with a two-wavelength interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Yoshiyuki; Iwasaki, Akira

    1999-07-01

    Although non-azeotropic mixtures are considered to be promising working fluids in advanced energy conversion systems, the primary technical problems in the heat transfer degradation in phase change processes cause economical handicap to wide-spread applications. The boiling behavior of mixtures still remains a number of basic questions being not answered yet, and the present authors believe that the most essential information for the boiling process in non-azeotropic mixtures is how temperature and concentration profiles are developed around the bubbles. The present study attempts at understanding fundamental heat and mass transfer mechanisms in nucleate pool boiling of non-azeotropic binary mixtures, and with the knowledge to develop a passive boiling heat transfer enhancement eventually. To this end, the authors have employed microgravity environment for rather detailed observation around vapor bubbles in the course of boiling inception and bubble growth. A two-wavelength Mach-Zehnder interferometer has been developed, which withstands mechanical shock caused by gravity change from very low gravity of the order of 10{sup {minus}5} g to relatively high gravity of approximately 8 g exposed during deceleration period. A series of experiments on single vapor bubbles for CFC113 single component and CFC12/CFC112 non-azeotropic binary mixture have been conducted under a high quality microgravity conditions available in 10-second free-fall facility of Japan Microgravity Center (JAMIC). The results for single component liquid showed a strong influence due to Marangoni effect caused by the temperature profile around the bubble. The results for non-azeotropic binary mixture showed, however, considerably different behavior from single component liquid. Both temperature and concentration profiles around a single vapor bubble were evaluated from the interferograms. The temperature and concentration layers established around the bubbles were nearly one order of magnitude larger

  5. Timing Observations of PSR J1023+0038 During a Low-Mass X-ray Binary State

    CERN Document Server

    Jaodand, Amruta; Hessels, Jason W T; Bogdanov, Slavko; D'Angelo, Caroline R; Patruno, Alessandro; Bassa, Cees; Deller, Adam T

    2016-01-01

    Transitional millisecond pulsars (tMSPs) switch, on roughly multi-year timescales, between rotation-powered radio millisecond pulsar (RMSP) and accretion-powered low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) states. The tMSPs have raised several questions related to the nature of accretion flow in their LMXB state and the mechanism that causes the state switch. The discovery of coherent X-ray pulsations from PSR J1023+0038 (while in the LMXB state) provides us with the first opportunity to perform timing observations and to compare the neutron star's spin variation during this state to the measured spin-down in the RMSP state. Whereas the X-ray pulsations in the LMXB state likely indicate that some material is accreting onto the neutron star's magnetic polar caps, radio continuum observations indicate the presence of an outflow. The fraction of the inflowing material being ejected is not clear, but it may be much larger than that reaching the neutron star's surface. Timing observations can measure the total torque on the neut...

  6. All the self-testings of the singlet for two binary measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yukun; Wu, Xingyao; Scarani, Valerio

    2016-02-01

    Self-testing refers to the possibility of characterizing uniquely (up to local isometries) the state and measurements contained in quantum devices, based only on the observed input-output statistics. Already in the basic case of the two-qubit singlet, self-testing is not unique: the two known criteria (the maximal violation of the CHSH inequality and the Mayers-Yao correlations) are not equivalent. It is unknown how many criteria there are. In this paper, we find the whole set of criteria for the ideal self-testing of a singlet with two measurements and two outcomes on each side; it coincides with all the extremal points of the quantum set that can be obtained by measuring the singlet.

  7. Synergy of short gamma ray burst and gravitational wave observations: Constraining the inclination angle of the binary and possible implications for off-axis GRBs

    CERN Document Server

    Arun, K G; Mishra, Chandra Kant; Pai, Archana

    2014-01-01

    Compact binary mergers are the strongest candidates for the progenitors of Short Gamma Ray Bursts (SGRBs). If a gravitational wave (GW) signal from the compact binary merger is observed in association with a SGRB, such a synergy can help us understand many interesting aspects of these bursts. We examine the accuracies with which a world wide network of gravitational wave interferometers would measure the inclination angle (angle between the angular momentum axis of the binary and observer's line of sight) of the binary. We compare the projected accuracies of GW detectors to measure the inclination angle of double neutron star (DNS) and neutron star-black hole (NS-BH) binaries for different astrophysical scenarios. We find that a 5 detector network could measure inclination angle to an accuracy of $\\sim 5.1 (2.2)$ degrees for a DNS(NS-BH) system at 200 Mpc if the direction of the source as well as the redshift is known electromagnetically. We argue as to how an accurate estimation of the inclination angle of t...

  8. Testing the Rate of False Planetary Transits due to Binary Star Blending

    CERN Document Server

    Bakos, G K G

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the rate of false planetary transit detection due to blending with eclipsing binaries. Our approach is purely empirical and is based on the analysis of the artificially blended light curves of the eclipsing binary stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud from the archive of the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE). Employing parameters that characterize the significance of the transit and the amplitude of the variation out of the transit, we can substantially limit the number of potential false positives. Further constraint comes from the expected length of the transit by a possible planetary companion. By the application of these criteria we are left only with 18 candidates from the full sample of 2495 stars. Visual inspection of these remaining variables eliminates all of them for obvious reasons (e.g., for visible fingerprints of orbital eccentricity). We draw the attention to the short-period stars, where the false alarm rate is especially low.

  9. On the binary origin of FS CMa stars: young massive clusters as test beds

    CERN Document Server

    de la Fuente, Diego; Garcia, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    FS CMa stars are low-luminosity objects showing the B[e] phenomenon whose evolutionary origin is yet to be unraveled. Various binary-related hypotheses have been recently proposed, two of them involving the spiral-in evolution of the binary orbit. The latter occurs more often in dense stellar environments like young massive clusters (YMCs). Hence, a systematic study of FS CMa stars in YMCs would be crucial to find out how these objects are created. In YMCs, two FS CMa stars have been confirmed and three candidates have been found through a search method based on narrow-band photometry at Paschen-alpha and the neighboring continuum. We apply this method to archival data from the Paschen-alpha survey of the Galactic Center region, yielding a new candidate in the Quintuplet cluster. Limitations of this method and other alternatives are briefly discussed.

  10. Observation and analysis of the new W-type W UMa eclipsing binary VSX J053024.8+842243

    CERN Document Server

    Boyd, D R S

    2016-01-01

    Using multicolour photometry we have confirmed the binary nature of the new W-type W UMa eclipsing binary VSX J053024.8+842243 and established its primary eclipse ephemeris to be HJD = 2455924.38150(26) + 0.4322929(1) * E. Using the light curve modelling code PHOEBE and published data on the evolution of W-type contact binaries we found the primary and secondary components to have masses 0.50 Msun and 1.44 Msun, radii 0.87 Rsun and 1.42 Rsun, luminosities 0.98 Lsun and 1.91 Lsun, temperatures 6145 K and 5702 K and binary orbit inclination 59.4{\\deg}. We found the distance to the binary to be 511 parsec, its E(B-V) colour excess 0.04 and its intrinsic (B-V) colour index 0.62. A low resolution spectrum corrected for interstellar reddening confirmed its spectral type as G2V.

  11. Testing Asteroseismic Scaling Relations using Eclipsing Binaries in Star Clusters and the Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard, K.; Jessen-Hansen, J.; Handberg, R.;

    2016-01-01

    measurements of dEBs in the turn-off region to the red giant branch and the red clump where we investigate the giants as an ensemble. For the field stars, we measure dEBs with an oscillating giant component. These measurements allow a comparison of masses and radii calculated from a classical eclipsing binary...... based on our findings in the open clusters NGC6819 and NGC6791....

  12. Testing asteroseismic scaling relations using eclipsing binaries in star clusters and the field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogaard, K.; Jessen-Hansen, J.; Handberg, R.; Arentoft, T.; Frandsen, S.; Grundahl, F.; Bruntt, H.; Sandquist, E. L.; Miglio, A.; Beck, P. G.; Thygesen, A. O.; Kjærgaard, K. L.; Haugaard, N. A.

    2016-09-01

    The accuracy of stellar masses and radii determined from asteroseismology is not known! We examine this issue for giant stars by comparing classical measurements of detached eclipsing binary systems (dEBs) with asteroseismic measurements from the Kepler mission. For star clusters, we extrapolate measurements of dEBs in the turn-off region to the red giant branch and the red clump where we investigate the giants as an ensemble. For the field stars, we measure dEBs with an oscillating giant component. These measurements allow a comparison of masses and radii calculated from a classical eclipsing binary analysis to those calculated from asteroseismic scaling relations and/or other asteroseismic methods. Our first results indicate small but significant systematic differences between the classical and asteroseismic measurements. In this contribution we show our latest results and summarize the current status and future plans. We also stress the importance of realizing that for giant stars mass cannot always be translated to age, since an unknown fraction of these evolved through a blue straggler phase with mass transfer in a binary system. Rough estimates of how many such stars to expect are given based on our findings in the open clusters NGC 6819 and NGC 6791.

  13. H.E.S.S. Observations of the Binary System PSR B1259-63/LS 2883 around the 2010/2011 Periastron Passage

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Acero, F; Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Anton, G; Balenderan, S; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; Becherini, Y; Tjus, J Becker; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Biteau, J; Bochow, A; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bulik, T; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Cerruti, M; Chadwick, P M; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; deWilt, P; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Fallon, L; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fernandez, D; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füßling, M; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Gast, H; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Göring, D; Grondin, M -H; Grudzińska, M; Häffner, S; Hague, J D; Hahn, J; Hampf, D; Harris, J; Heinz, S; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Khélifi, B; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kneiske, T; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Kossakowski, R; Krayzel, F; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lefaucheur, J; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J -P; Lennarz, D; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Masbou, J; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Medina, M C; Méhault, J; Menzler, U; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Moulin, E; Naumann, C L; Naumann-Godo, M; de Naurois, M; Nedbal, D; Nguyen, N; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Ohm, S; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perez, J; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Raue, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sheidaei, F; Skilton, J L; Sol, H; Spengler, G; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Szostek, A; Tavernet, J -P; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorobiov, S; Vorster, M; Wagner, S J; Ward, M; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Wouters, D; Zacharias, M; Zajczyk, A; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S

    2013-01-01

    Aim. In this paper we present very high energy (VHE; E>100 GeV) data from the \\gamma-ray binary system PSR B1259-63/LS 2883 taken around its periastron passage (15th of December 2010) with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) of Cherenkov Telescopes. We aim to search for a possible TeV counterpart of the GeV flare detected by the Fermi LAT. In addition, we aim to study the current periastron passage in the context of previous observations taken at similar orbital phases, testing the repetitive behavior of the source. Methods. Observations at VHE were conducted with H.E.S.S. from 9th to 16th of January 2011. The total dataset amounts to around 6 h of observing time. Results. The source is detected in the 2011 data at a significance level of 11.5\\sigma\\ revealing an averaged integral flux above 1 TeV of (1.01 \\pm 0.18_{stat} \\pm 0.20_{sys}) \\times 10^{-12} cm^{-2}s^{-1}. The differential energy spectrum follows a power-law shape with a spectral index \\Gamma = 2.92 \\pm 0.30_{stat} \\pm 0.20_{sys} and a ...

  14. Timing Observations of PSR J1023+0038 During a Low-mass X-Ray Binary State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaodand, Amruta; Archibald, Anne M.; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Bogdanov, Slavko; D’Angelo, Caroline R.; Patruno, Alessandro; Bassa, Cees; Deller, Adam T.

    2016-10-01

    Transitional millisecond pulsars (tMSPs) switch, on roughly multi-year timescales, between rotation-powered radio millisecond pulsar (RMSP) and accretion-powered low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) states. The tMSPs have raised several questions related to the nature of accretion flow in their LMXB state and the mechanism that causes the state switch. The discovery of coherent X-ray pulsations from PSR J1023+0038 (while in the LMXB state) provides us with the first opportunity to perform timing observations and to compare the neutron star’s spin variation during this state to the measured spin-down in the RMSP state. Whereas the X-ray pulsations in the LMXB state likely indicate that some material is accreting onto the neutron star’s magnetic polar caps, radio continuum observations indicate the presence of an outflow. The fraction of the inflowing material being ejected is not clear, but it may be much larger than that reaching the neutron star’s surface. Timing observations can measure the total torque on the neutron star. We have phase-connected nine XMM-Newton observations of PSR J1023+0038 over the last 2.5 years of the LMXB state to establish a precise measurement of spin evolution. We find that the average spin-down rate as an LMXB is 26.8 ± 0.4% faster than the rate (‑2.39 × 10‑15 Hz s‑1) determined during the RMSP state. This shows that negative angular momentum contributions (dipolar magnetic braking, and outflow) exceed positive ones (accreted material), and suggests that the pulsar wind continues to operate at a largely unmodified level. We discuss implications of this tight observational constraint in the context of possible accretion models.

  15. Long-term Optical Observations of the Be/X-ray Binary X Per

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hui; Zhou, Jianeng; Liu, Qingzhong

    2014-01-01

    We present the optical spectroscopic observations of X Per from 1999 to 2013 with the 2.16m telescope at Xinglong Station and the 2.4m telescope at Lijiang station, National Astronomical Observatories of China. Combining with the public optical photometric data, we find certain epochs of anti-correlations between the optical brightness and the intensity of the H{\\alpha} and HeI 6678 lines, which may be attributed to the mass ejections from the Be star. Alternative explanations are however also possible. The variability of FeII 6317 line in the spectra of X Per might be also caused by the shocked waves formed after the mass ejections from the Be star. The X-ray activities of the system might also be connected with the mass ejection events from the Be star. When the ejected materials were transported from the surface of the Be star to the orbit of neutron star, an X-ray flare could be observed in its X-ray light curves. We use the neutron star as a probe to constrain the motion of the ejected material in the ci...

  16. Photometric observations of three high mass X-ray binaries and a search for variations induced by orbital motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We searched for long period variation in V-band, IC-band and RXTE X-ray light curves of the High Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs) LS 1698 / RX J1037.5-5647, HD 110432 / 1H 1249-637 and HD 161103 / RX J1744.7-2713 in an attempt to discover orbitally induced variation. Data were obtained primarily from the ASAS database and were supplemented by shorter term observations made with the 24- and 40-inch ANU telescopes and one of the robotic PROMPT telescopes. Fourier peri-odograms suggested the existence of long period variation in the V-band light curves of all three HMXBs, however folding the data at those periods did not reveal convincing periodic variation. At this point we cannot rule out the existence of long term V-band variation for these three sources and hints of longer term variation may be seen in the higher precision PROMPT data. Long term V-band observations, on the order of several years, taken at a frequency of at least once per week and with a precision of 0.01 mag, therefore still have a chance of revealing long term variation in these three HMXBs.

  17. A Suzaku observation of the low-mass X-ray binary GS 1826-238 in the hard state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Ko; Sakurai, Soki; Zhang, Zhongli; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Makishima, Kazuo

    2016-06-01

    The neutron star low-mass X-ray binary GS 1826-238 was observed with Suzaku on 2009 October 21, for a total exposure of 1030 ks. Except for the type I bursts, the source intensity was constant within ˜10%. Combining the Suzaku XIS, HXD-PIN, and HXD-GSO data, burst-removed persistent emission was detected over the 0.8-100 keV range, at an unabsorbed flux of 2.6 × 10-9 erg s-1 cm-2. Although the implied 0.8-100 keV luminosity, 1.5 × 1037 erg s-1 (assuming a distance of 7 kpc), is relatively high, the observed hard spectrum confirms that the source was in the hard state. The spectrum was successfully explained by an emission from a soft standard accretion disk partially Comptonized by a hot electron cloud, and a blackbody emission Comptonized by another hotter electron cloud. These results are compared with those from previous studies, including those on the same source by Thompson et al. (2005, ApJ, 634, 1261) and Cocchi, Farinelli, and Paizis (2011, A&A, 529, A155), as well as that of Aql X-1 in the hard state obtained with Suzaku (Sakurai et al. 2014, PASJ, 66, 10).

  18. Revisiting galactic black hole binary GX 339-4 by using 2007 – 2014 Swift XRT observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azizi, Febrie Ahmad [Department of Computational Science, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Vierdayanti, Kiki; Putra, Mahasena [Astronomy Research Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2015-09-30

    This work aims to study the X-ray properties of the galactic black hole binary GX 339-4. Focus of the study is on exploration of data from Swift-XRT in exclusively photon-counting mode. We use data from 2007 up to August 2014, which contain about 40 pointing observations with level 1 data. The flux of GX 339-4 varies in a factor of 100 during this period of observations. For the purpose of this work, we also try to develop a system to conduct standard SWIFT XRT data reduction automatically, in order to greatly reduce time when working with data bulk, which produces images, lightcurves as well as spectra. We also develop another system to conduct fitting of bulk spectral data with a two-component model, disk blackbody and power-law. The fitting results show that no data have a reduced chi-squared > 2. The fraction of the disk to total flux and the power-law to total flux range from 0.00389 – 0.994 and 0.00605 – 0.996, respectively. From the analysis of the disk component, we obtain the value of the innermost disk radius that does not show any large scale truncation which is in a good agreement with a previous study that used 2007 – 2011 Swift-XRT data, indicating that the systems we developed work properly.

  19. Gravidynamics Scalar-Tensor Gravitation) and the Observed Discrete Mass Spectrum of Compact Stellar Remnants in Close Binary Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, V. V.

    2015-06-01

    There are two new observational facts: the mass spectrum of neutron stars and black hole candidates (or collapsars) shows an evident absence of compact objects with masses within the interval from 2 M⊙ (with a peak for neutron stars about 1.4 M⊙) to about 6 M⊙, and in close binary stellar systems with a low-massive (about 0.6 M⊙) optical companion the most probable mass value (the peak in the masses distribution of black hole candidates) is close to 7 M⊙. The problem of the compact objects discrete mass spectra demands some solution both in the context of the supernovae and gamma-ray bursts relation, and in connection with the core-collapse supernovae explosion mechanism itself. In the totally non-metric scalar-tensor model of gravitational interaction (in a modified or extended Feynman field approach to gravitation) the total mass of a compact relativistic object with extremely strong gravitational field (an analog of black holes in General Relativity) is approximately equal to 6.7 M⊙ with radius of a region filled with a matter (quark-gluon plasma) ≈ 10 km. Polarized emission of long gamma-ray bursts, a black-body component in their spectrum and other observed properties could be explained by the direct manifestation of a surface of these collapsars.

  20. NuSTAR observations of the state transition of millisecond pulsar binary PSR J1023+0038

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; Bellm, Eric; Harrison, Fiona A. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E California Blvd, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Yang, Chengwei; An, Hongjun; Kaspi, Victoria M. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 University St, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Archibald, Anne M.; Bassa, Cees; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Janssen, Gemma H. [ASTRON, The Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA, Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Bogdanov, Slavko [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Lyne, Andrew G.; Stappers, Benjamin [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Patruno, Alessandro [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Tomsick, John A.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Chakrabarty, Deepto [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 70 Vassar Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Christensen, Finn E., E-mail: spt@astro.caltech.edu [DTU Space, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); and others

    2014-08-20

    We report NuSTAR observations of the millisecond pulsar-low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) transition system PSR J1023+0038 from 2013 June and October, before and after the formation of an accretion disk around the neutron star. Between June 10 and 12, a few days to two weeks before the radio disappearance of the pulsar, the 3-79 keV X-ray spectrum was well fit by a simple power law with a photon index of Γ=1.17{sub −0.07}{sup +0.08} (at 90% confidence) with a 3-79 keV luminosity of 7.4 ± 0.4 × 10{sup 32} erg s{sup –1}. Significant orbital modulation was observed with a modulation fraction of 36% ± 10%. During the October 19-21 observation, the spectrum is described by a softer power law (Γ=1.66{sub −0.05}{sup +0.06}) with an average luminosity of 5.8 ± 0.2 × 10{sup 33} erg s{sup –1} and a peak luminosity of ≈1.2 × 10{sup 34} erg s{sup –1} observed during a flare. No significant orbital modulation was detected. The spectral observations are consistent with previous and current multiwavelength observations and show the hard X-ray power law extending to 79 keV without a spectral break. Sharp-edged, flat-bottomed dips are observed with widths between 30 and 1000 s and ingress and egress timescales of 30-60 s. No change in hardness ratio was observed during the dips. Consecutive dip separations are log-normal in distribution with a typical separation of approximately 400 s. These dips are distinct from dipping activity observed in LMXBs. We compare and contrast these dips to observations of dips and state changes in the similar transition systems PSR J1824–2452I and XSS J1227.0–4859 and discuss possible interpretations based on the transitions in the inner disk.

  1. Upper Bounds on r-Mode Amplitudes from Observations of Low-Mass X-Ray Binary Neutron Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodifar, Simin; Strohmayer, Tod

    2013-01-01

    We present upper limits on the amplitude of r-mode oscillations and gravitational-radiation-induced spin-down rates in low-mass X-ray binary neutron stars, under the assumption that the quiescent neutron star luminosity is powered by dissipation from a steady-state r-mode. For masses <2M solar mass we find dimensionless r-mode amplitudes in the range from about 1×10(exp-8) to 1.5×10(exp-6). For the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar sources with known quiescent spin-down rates, these limits suggest that approx. less than 1% of the observed rate can be due to an unstable r-mode. Interestingly, the source with the highest amplitude limit, NGC 6440, could have an r-mode spin-down rate comparable to the observed, quiescent rate for SAX J1808-3658. Thus, quiescent spin-down measurements for this source would be particularly interesting. For all sources considered here, our amplitude limits suggest that gravitational wave signals are likely too weak for detection with Advanced LIGO. Our highest mass model (2.21M solar mass) can support enhanced, direct Urca neutrino emission in the core and thus can have higher r-mode amplitudes. Indeed, the inferred r-mode spin-down rates at these higher amplitudes are inconsistent with the observed spin-down rates for some of the sources, such as IGR J00291+5934 and XTE J1751-305. In the absence of other significant sources of internal heat, these results could be used to place an upper limit on the masses of these sources if they were made of hadronic matter, or alternatively it could be used to probe the existence of exotic matter in them if their masses were known.

  2. Kepler Observations of Three Pre-Launch Exoplanet Candidates: Discovery of Two Eclipsing Binaries and a New Exoplanet

    CERN Document Server

    Howell, Steve B; Sherry, William; von Braun, Kaspar; Ciardi, David R; Bryson, Stephen T; Feldmeier, John J; Horch, Elliott; van Belle, Gerard T

    2010-01-01

    Three transiting exoplanet candidate stars were discovered in a ground-based photometric survey prior to the launch of NASA's {\\it Kepler} mission. {\\it Kepler} observations of them were obtained during Quarter 1 of the {\\it Kepler} mission. All three stars are faint by radial velocity follow-up standards, so we have examined these candidates with regard to eliminating false positives and providing high confidence exoplanet selection. We present a first attempt to exclude false positives for this set of faint stars without high resolution radial velocity analysis. This method of exoplanet confirmation will form a large part of the {\\it Kepler} mission follow-up for Jupiter-sized exoplanet candidates orbiting faint stars. Using the {\\it Kepler} light curves and pixel data, as well as medium resolution reconnaissance spectroscopy and speckle imaging, we find that two of our candidates are binary stars. One consists of a late-F star with an early M companion while the other is a K0 star plus a late M-dwarf/brown...

  3. Kepler Observations of Three Pre-launch Exoplanet Candidates: Discovery of Two Eclipsing Binaries and a New Exoplanet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Steve B.; Rowe, Jason F.; Sherry, William; von Braun, Kaspar; Ciardi, David R.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Feldmeier, John J.; Horch, Elliott; van Belle, Gerard T.

    2010-12-01

    Three transiting exoplanet candidate stars were discovered in a ground-based photometric survey prior to the launch of NASA's Kepler mission. Kepler observations of them were obtained during Quarter 1 of the Kepler mission. All three stars are faint by radial velocity follow-up standards, so we have examined these candidates with regard to eliminating false positives and providing high confidence exoplanet selection. We present a first attempt to exclude false positives for this set of faint stars without high-resolution radial velocity analysis. This method of exoplanet confirmation will form a large part of the Kepler mission follow-up for Jupiter-sized exoplanet candidates orbiting faint stars. Using the Kepler light curves and pixel data, as well as medium-resolution reconnaissance spectroscopy and speckle imaging, we find that two of our candidates are binary stars. One consists of a late-F star with an early M companion, while the other is a K0 star plus a late M-dwarf/brown dwarf in a 19 day elliptical orbit. The third candidate (BOKS-1) is an r = 15 G8V star hosting a newly discovered exoplanet with a radius of 1.12 R Jupiter in a 3.9 day orbit.

  4. Robust high-contrast companion detection from interferometric observations. The CANDID algorithm and an application to six binary Cepheids

    CERN Document Server

    Gallenne, A; Kervella, P; Monnier, J D; Schaefer, G H; Baron, F; Breitfelder, J; Bouquin, J B Le; Roettenbacher, R M; Gieren, W; Pietrzynski, G; McAlister, H; Brummelaar, T ten; Sturmann, J; Sturmann, L; Turner, N; Ridgway, S; Kraus, S

    2015-01-01

    Long-baseline interferometry is an important technique to spatially resolve binary or multiple systems in close orbits. By combining several telescopes together and spectrally dispersing the light, it is possible to detect faint components around bright stars. Aims. We provide a rigorous and detailed method to search for high-contrast companions around stars, determine the detection level, and estimate the dynamic range from interferometric observations. We developed the code CANDID (Companion Analysis and Non-Detection in Interferometric Data), a set of Python tools that allows us to search systematically for point-source, high-contrast companions and estimate the detection limit. The search pro- cedure is made on a N x N grid of fit, whose minimum needed resolution is estimated a posteriori. It includes a tool to estimate the detection level of the companion in the number of sigmas. The code CANDID also incorporates a robust method to set a 3{\\sigma} detection limit on the flux ratio, which is based on an a...

  5. Physical properties of the gamma-ray binary LS 5039 through low and high frequency radio observations

    CERN Document Server

    Marcote, B; Paredes, J M; Ishwara-Chandra, C H

    2015-01-01

    We have studied in detail the 0.15-15 GHz radio spectrum of the gamma-ray binary LS 5039 to look for a possible turnover and absorption mechanisms at low frequencies, and to constrain the physical properties of its emission. We have analysed two archival VLA monitorings, all the available archival GMRT data and a coordinated quasi-simultaneous observational campaign conducted in 2013 with GMRT and WSRT. The data show that the radio emission of LS 5039 is persistent on day, week and year timescales, with a variability $\\lesssim 25~\\%$ at all frequencies, and no signature of orbital modulation. The obtained spectra reveal a power-law shape with a curvature below 5 GHz and a turnover at $\\sim0.5$ GHz, which can be reproduced by a one-zone model with synchrotron self-absorption plus Razin effect. We obtain a coherent picture for a size of the emitting region of $\\sim0.85~\\mathrm{mas}$, setting a magnetic field of $B\\sim20~\\mathrm{mG}$, an electron density of $n_{\\rm e}\\sim4\\times10^5~{\\rm cm^{-3}}$ and a mass-los...

  6. X-ray and optical observations of the unique binary system HD49798/RXJ0648.0-4418

    CERN Document Server

    Mereghetti, S; Tiengo, A; Pizzolato, F; Esposito, P; Woudt, P A; Israel, G L; Stella, L

    2011-01-01

    We report the results of XMM-Newton observations of HD49798/RXJ0648.0-4418, the only known X-ray binary consisting of a hot sub-dwarf and a white dwarf. The white dwarf rotates very rapidly (P=13.2 s) and has a dynamically measured mass of 1.28+/-0.05 M_sun. Its X-ray emission consists of a strongly pulsed, soft component, well fit by a blackbody with kT~40 eV, accounting for most of the luminosity, and a fainter hard power-law component (photon index ~1.6). A luminosity of ~10^{32} erg/s is produced by accretion onto the white dwarf of the helium-rich matter from the wind of the companion, which is one of the few hot sub-dwarfs showing evidence of mass-loss. A search for optical pulsations at the South African Astronomical Observatory 1.9-m telescope gave negative results. X-rays were detected also during the white dwarf eclipse. This emission, with luminosity 2x10^{30} erg/s, can be attributed to HD 49798 and represents the first detection of a hot sub-dwarf star in the X-ray band. HD49798/RXJ0648.0-4418 is...

  7. H.E.S.S. observations of the Carina nebula and its enigmatic colliding wind binary Eta Carinae

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowski, A; Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Anton, G; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; Becherini, Y; Becker, J; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Biteau, J; Bochow, A; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bulik, T; Büsching, I; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Cerruti, M; Chadwick, P M; Charbonnier, A; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Fallon, L; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füßling, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Gast, H; Gèrard, L; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Göring, D; Grondin, M -H; Häffner, S; Hague, J D; Hahn, J; Hampf, D; Harris, J; Hauser, M; Heinz, S; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Khélifi, B; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kneiske, T; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Kossakowski, R; Krayzel, F; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lenain, J -P; Lennarz, D; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Masbou, J; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Medina, M C; Méhault, J; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Moulin, E; Naumann, C L; Naumann-Godo, M; de Naurois, M; Nedbal, D; Nekrassov, D; Nguyen, N; Nicholas, B; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Ohm, S; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perez, J; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raue, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sheidaei, F; Skilton, J L; Sol, H; Spengler, G; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Szostek, A; Tavernet, J -P; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorobiov, S; Vorster, M; Wagner, S J; Ward, M; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Zacharias, M; Zajczyk, A; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S; Montmerle, T

    2012-01-01

    The massive binary system Eta Carinae and the surrounding HII complex, the Carina Nebula, are potential particle acceleration sites from which very-high-energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) \\gamma-ray emission could be expected. This paper presents data collected during VHE \\gamma-ray observations with the H.E.S.S. telescope array from 2004 to 2010, which cover a full orbit of Eta Carinae. In the 33.1-hour data set no hint of significant \\gamma-ray emission from Eta Carinae has been found and an upper limit on the \\gamma-ray flux of 7.7 x 10-13 ph cm-2 s-1 (99% confidence level) is derived above the energy threshold of 470 GeV. Together with the detection of high-energy (HE; 0.1 GeV > E > 100 GeV) \\gamma-ray emission by the Fermi-LAT up to 100 GeV, and assuming a continuation of the average HE spectral index into the VHE domain, these results imply a cut-off in the \\gamma-ray spectrum between the HE and VHE \\gamma-ray range. This could be caused either by a cut-off in the accelerated particle distribution or by severe \\...

  8. Rotational modulation and flares on RS Canum Venaticorum and BY Draconis stars. 18: Coordinated VLA, ROSAT, and IUE observations of RS CVn binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, David C.; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Veale, Anthony; Dempsey, Robert C.; Brown, Alex; Neff, James E.; Pagano, Isabella; Rodono, Marcello; Bromage, Gordon E.; Kuerster, Martin

    1994-01-01

    As part of a coordinated program of multi-wavelength observations of RS CVn close binary systems, we observed 15 systems with the Very Large Array (VLA) and 10 systems with IUE, simultaneously or nearly simultaneously with the ROSAT All Sky Survey observations of these stars. Of the 22 systems observed with ROSAT, three were observed both by IUE and the VLA. Radio observations were made at 3.6, 6 and 20 cm. Of the 15 observed RS CVn systems, we detected 11 with greater than 4 sigma confidence at one or more wavelengths. The IUE observations were made within the RIASS (ROSAT-IUE All Sky Survey) program. We present the results of the VLA observations, along with the corresponding subsets of the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) X-ray and Wide Field Camera (WFC) XUV survey, and RIASS IUE observations. We obtained an extended VLA/IUE/ROSAT simultaneous coverage of one system, TY Pyx, covering more than one orbital period. These observations reveal that the quiescent radio flux of TY Pyx is relatively constant over time scales of up to 7 hours, but that it did change by a factor of 3 over 24 hours, probably due to a flare on 1990 Nov. 12. The UV, XUV and X-ray fluxes do not show large day-to-day or phase-related variability. The observation of the decay phase of a radio flare on EI Eri, with no accompanying X-ray or XUV flare, suggests that the lack of a strong correlation between X-ray and radio flares previously noted for dMe flare stars holds for RS CVn systems as well. We suggest that the radio flare may have been due to a coherent emission process such as electron cyclotron emission. The simultaneous measurements presented here provide a unique test of the general correlation between radio and soft X-ray luminosities, L(sub radio) approximately L(sub x exp m) (Drake et al. 1989) with a power-law slope close to unity, which was previously derived using data obtained years apart. Our derived slopes are consistent with and thus support the general

  9. Testing general relativity with compact coalescing binaries: comparing exact and predictive methods to compute the Bayes factor

    CERN Document Server

    Del Pozzo, Walter; Mandel, Ilya; Vecchio, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The second generation of gravitational-wave detectors is scheduled to start operations in 2015. Gravitational-wave signatures of compact binary coalescences could be used to accurately test the strong-field dynamical predictions of general relativity. Computationally expensive data analysis pipelines, including TIGER, have been developed to carry out such tests. As a means to cheaply assess whether a particular deviation from general relativity can be detected, Cornish et al. and Vallisneri recently proposed an approximate scheme to compute the Bayes factor between a general-relativity gravitational-wave model and a model representing a class of alternative theories of gravity parametrised by one additional parameter. This approximate scheme is based on only two easy-to-compute quantities: the signal-to-noise ratio of the signal and the fitting factor between the signal and the manifold of possible waveforms within general relativity. In this work, we compare the prediction from the approximate formula agains...

  10. Testing Chern-Simons modified gravity with gravitational-wave detections of extreme-mass-ratio binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canizares, Priscilla; Gair, Jonathan R.; Sopuerta, Carlos F.

    2012-08-01

    The detection of gravitational waves from extreme-mass-ratio inspirals (EMRI) binaries, comprising a stellar-mass compact object orbiting around a massive black hole, is one of the main targets for low-frequency gravitational-wave detectors in space, like the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) or evolved LISA/New Gravitational Observatory (eLISA/NGO). The long-duration gravitational-waveforms emitted by such systems encode the structure of the strong field region of the massive black hole, in which the inspiral occurs. The detection and analysis of EMRIs will therefore allow us to study the geometry of massive black holes and determine whether their nature is as predicted by general relativity and even to test whether general relativity is the correct theory to describe the dynamics of these systems. To achieve this, EMRI modeling in alternative theories of gravity is required to describe the generation of gravitational waves. However, up to now, only a restricted class of theories has been investigated. In this paper, we explore to what extent EMRI observations with a space-based gravitational-wave observatory like LISA or eLISA/NGO might be able to distinguish between general relativity and a particular modification of it, known as dynamical Chern-Simons modified gravity. Our analysis is based on a parameter estimation study which uses approximate gravitational waveforms obtained via a radiative-adiabatic method. In this framework, the trajectory of the stellar object is modeled as a sequence of geodesics in the spacetime of the modified-gravity massive black hole. The evolution between geodesics is determined by flux formulae based on general relativistic post-Newtonian and black hole perturbation theory computations. Once the trajectory of the stellar compact object has been obtained, the waveforms are computed using the standard multipole formulae for gravitational radiation applied to this trajectory. Our analysis is restricted to a five

  11. Coordinated X-ray, Ultraviolet, Optical, and Radio Observations of the PSR J1023+0038 System in a Low-mass X-ray Binary State

    CERN Document Server

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Bassa, Cees; Deller, Adam; Halpern, Jules P; Heald, George; Hessels, Jason W T; Janssen, Gemma H; Lyne, Andrew G; Moldon, Javier; Paragi, Zsolt; Patruno, Alessandro; Perera, Benetge; Stappers, Ben W; Tendulkar, Shriharsh P; D'Angelo, Caroline R; Wijnands, Rudy

    2014-01-01

    The PSR J1023+0038 binary system hosts a neutron star and a low-mass, main-sequence-like star. It switches on year timescales between states as an eclipsing radio millisecond pulsar and a low-mass X-ray binary. We present a multi-wavelength observational campaign of PSR J1023+0038 in its most recent low-mass X-ray binary state. Two long XMM-Newton observations reveal that the system spends ~70% of the time in a ~$3\\times10^{33}$ erg/s X-ray luminosity mode, which, as shown in Archibald et al. (2014), exhibits coherent X-ray pulsations. This emission is interspersed with frequent lower flux mode intervals with ~$5\\times 10^{32}$ erg/s and sporadic flares reaching up to ~$10^{34}$ erg/s, with neither mode showing significant X-ray pulsations. The switches between the three flux modes occur on timescales of order 10 s. In the UV and optical, we observe occasional intense flares coincident with those observed in X-rays. Our radio timing observations reveal no pulsations at the pulsar period during any of the thre...

  12. The Nature of the X-Ray Binary IGR J19294+1816 from INTEGRAL, RXTE, and Swift Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriquez, J.; Tomsick, J. A.; Bodaghee, A.; ZuritaHeras, J.-A.; Chaty, S.; Paizis, A.; Corbel, S.

    2009-01-01

    We report the results of a high-energy multi-instrumental campaign with INTEGRAL, RXTE, and Swift of the recently discovered INTEGRAL source IGR J19294+ 1816. The Swift/XRT data allow us to refine the position of the source to R.A. (J2000) = 19h 29m 55.9s, Decl. (J2000) = +18 deg 18 feet 38 inches . 4 (+/- 3 inches .5), which in turn permits us to identify a candidate infrared counterpart. The Swift and RXTE spectra are well fitted with absorbed power laws with hard (Gamma approx 1) photon indices. During the longest Swift observation, we obtained evidence of absorption in true excess to the Galactic value, which may indicate some intrinsic absorption in this source. We detected a strong (P = 40%) pulsations at 12.43781 (+/- 0.00003) s that we interpret as the spin period of a pulsar. All these results, coupled with the possible 117 day orbital period, point to IGR J19294+ 1816 being an high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) with a Be companion star. However, while the long-term INTEGRAL/IBIS/ISGRI 18-40 keV light curve shows that the source spends most of its time in an undetectable state, we detect occurrences of short (2000-3000 s) and intense flares that are more typical of supergiant fast X-ray transients. We therefore cannot make firm conclusions on the type of system, and we discuss the possible implication of IGR J19294+1816 being an Supergiant Fast X-ray Transient (SFXT).

  13. Tests of General Relativity and Alternative Theories of Gravity Using Gravitational Wave Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun, K. G.; Pai, Archana

    2013-01-01

    Gravitational wave (GW) observations of coalescing compact binaries will be unique probes of strong-field, dynamical aspects of relativistic gravity. We present a short review of various schemes proposed in the literature to test general relativity (GR) and alternative theories of gravity using inspiral waveforms. Broadly these schemes may be classified into two types: model dependent and model independent. In the model dependent category, GW observations are compared against a specific waveform model representative of a particular theory or a class of theories such as scalar-tensor theories, dynamical Chern-Simons theory and massive graviton theories. Model independent tests are attempts to write down a parametrized gravitational waveform where the free parameters take different values for different theories and (at least some of) which can be constrained by GW observations. We revisit some of the proposed bounds in the case of downscaled LISA configuration (eLISA) and compare them with the original LISA configuration. We also compare the expected bounds on alternative theories of gravity from ground-based and space-based detectors and find that space-based GW detectors can test GR and other theories of gravity with unprecedented accuracies. We then focus on a recent proposal to use singular value decomposition of the Fisher information matrix to improve the accuracies with which post-Newtonian theory can be tested. We extend those results to the case of space-based detector eLISA and discuss its implications.

  14. Test case set generation method on MC/DC based on binary tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun-jie; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Yuan

    2013-03-01

    Exploring efficient, reliable test case design methods has been tester pursuit of the goal. Along with the aerospace software logic complexity of improving and software scale enlarging, this requirement also gets more compelling. Test case design techniques suited for MC/DC improved test case design efficiency, increase the test coverage. It is suitable to test the software that logical relationship is complicated comparatively. Some software test tools provide the function to calculate the test coverage. And it can assess the test cases whether on the MC/DC or not. But the software tester needs the reverse thinking. The paper puts forward that design the test case by Unique-cause and Masking approach. And it proposes automatic generation method of test case on MC/DC. It improved the efficiency and correctness of generation the test case set on DC/DC.

  15. Multiwavelength optical observations of chromospherically active binary systems V. FF UMa (2RE J0933+624): a system with orbital period variation

    CERN Document Server

    Gálvez, M C; Fernández-Figueroa, M J; De Castro, E; Cornide, M

    2007-01-01

    This is the fifth paper in a series aimed at studying the chromospheres of active binary systems using several optical spectroscopic indicators to obtain or improve orbital solution and fundamental stellar parameters. We present here the study of FF UMa (2RE J0933+624), a recently discovered, X-ray/EUV selected, active binary with strong H_alpha emission. The objectives of this work are, to find orbital solutions and define stellar parameters from precise radial velocities and carry out an extensive study of the optical indicators of chromospheric activity. We obtained high resolution echelle spectroscopic observations during five observing runs from 1998 to 2004. We found radial velocities by cross correlation with radial velocity standard stars to achieve the best orbital solution. We also measured rotational velocity by cross-correlation techniques and have studied the kinematic by galactic space- velocity components (U, V, W) and Eggen criteria. Finally, we have determined the chromospheric contribution i...

  16. The Unusual Binary Pulsar PSR J1744-3922: Radio Flux Variability, Near-Infrared Observation, and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, R. P.; Roberts, M. S. E.; Ransom, S. M.; Kaspi, V. M.; Durant, M.; Bergeron, P.; Faulkner, A. J.

    2007-06-01

    PSR J1744-3922 is a binary pulsar exhibiting highly variable pulsed radio emission. We report on a statistical multifrequency study of the pulsed radio flux variability which suggests that this phenomenon is extrinsic to the pulsar and possibly tied to the companion, although not strongly correlated with orbital phase. The pulsar has an unusual combination of characteristics compared to typical recycled pulsars: a long spin period (172 ms); a relatively high magnetic field strength (1.7×1010 G); a very circular, compact orbit of 4.6 hr; and a low-mass companion (0.08 Msolar). These spin and orbital properties are likely inconsistent with standard evolutionary models. We find similarities between the properties of the PSR J1744-3922 system and those of several other known binary pulsar systems, motivating the identification of a new class of binary pulsars. We suggest that this new class could result from: a standard accretion scenario of a magnetar or a high magnetic field pulsar; common envelope evolution with a low-mass star and a neutron star, similar to what is expected for ultracompact X-ray binaries; or accretion induced collapse of a white dwarf. We also report the detection of a possible K'=19.30(15) infrared counterpart at the position of the pulsar, which is relatively bright if the companion is a helium white dwarf at the nominal distance, and discuss its implications for the pulsar's companion and evolutionary history.

  17. Account of observational selection effects and distribution of close binary systems of types DM and SD in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The probabilities of the discovery of close binary systems as eclipsing variables are calculated and tabulated (for the systems of types DM and SD). The spatial density of these systems in solar neighbourhood, as well as their distribution depending on the parameters of systems are evaluated. 28 refs.; 20 figs.; 3 tabs

  18. Observations on the Re-Emergence of a Binary System in UK Universities for Economics Degree Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Steve; Reeves, Alan; Johnston, James

    2014-01-01

    An audit of economics provision shows that over the past decade economics has disappeared from large parts of the UK's higher education landscape, especially the post-1992 universities. In the north of Britain the binary system has effectively re-emerged leaving many potential students unable to study key subjects such as economics. Post-1992…

  19. Binary pseudo-random grating as a standard test surface formeasurement of modulation transfer function of interferometricmicroscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Takacs, Peter Z.

    2007-07-25

    The task of designing high performance X-ray optical systemsrequires the development of sophisticated X-ray scattering calculationsbased on rigorous information about the optics. One of the mostinsightful approaches to these calculations is based on the powerspectral density (PSD) distribution of the surface height. The majorproblem of measurement of a PSD distribution with an interferometricand/or atomic force microscope arises due to the unknown ModulationTransfer Function (MTF) of the instruments. The MTF characterizes theperturbation of the PSD distribution at higher spatial frequencies. Here,we describe a new method and dedicated test surfaces for calibration ofthe MTF of a microscope. The method is based on use of a speciallydesigned Binary Pseudo-random (BPR) grating. Comparison of atheoretically calculated PSD spectrum of a BPR grating with a spectrummeasured with the grating provides the desired calibration of theinstrumental MTF. The theoretical background of the method, as well asresults of experimental investigations are presented.

  20. Testing Observational Techniques with 3D MHD Jets in Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Mendygral, Peter J; Jones, Tom W

    2009-01-01

    Observations of X-ray cavities formed by powerful jets from AGN in galaxy cluster cores are commonly used to estimate the mechanical luminosity of these sources. We test the reliability of observationally measuring this power with synthetic X-ray observations of 3-D MHD simulations of jets in a galaxy cluster environment. We address the role that factors such as jet intermittency and orientation of the jets on the sky have on the reliability of observational measurements of cavity enthalpy and age. An estimate of the errors in these quantities can be made by directly comparing ``observationally'' derived values with values from the simulations. In our tests, cavity enthalpy, age and mechanical luminosity derived from observations are within a factor of two of the simulation values.

  1. Reconstructing the sky location of gravitational-wave detected compact binary systems: methodology for testing and comparison

    CERN Document Server

    Sidery, Trevor; Christensen, Nelson; Farr, Ben; Farr, Will; Feroz, Farhan; Gair, Jonathan; Grover, Katherine; Graff, Philip; Hanna, Chad; Kalogera, Vassiliki; Mandel, Ilya; O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Pitkin, Matthew; Price, Larry; Raymond, Vivien; Roever, Christian; Singer, Leo; Van der Sluys, Marc; Smith, Rory J E; Vecchio, Alberto; Veitch, John; Vitale, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    The problem of reconstructing the sky position of compact binary coalescences detected via gravitational waves is a central one for future observations with the ground-based network of gravitational-wave laser interferometers, such as Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo. Different techniques for sky localisation have been independently developed. They can be divided in two broad categories: fully coherent Bayesian techniques, which are high-latency and aimed at in-depth studies of all the parameters of a source, including sky position, and "triangulation-based" techniques, which exploit the data products from the search stage of the analysis to provide an almost real-time approximation of the posterior probability density function of the sky location of a detection candidate. These techniques have previously been applied to data collected during the last science runs of gravitational-wave detectors operating in the so-called initial configuration. Here, we develop and analyse methods for assessing the self-consi...

  2. Calibration of the modulation transfer function of surface profilometers with binary pseudo-random test standards: expanding the application range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A modulation transfer function (MTF) calibration method based on binary pseudo-random (BPR) gratings and arrays (Proc. SPIE 7077-7 (2007), Opt. Eng. 47, 073602 (2008)) has been proven to be an effective MTF calibration method for a number of interferometric microscopes and a scatterometer (Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A616, 172 (2010)). Here we report on a further expansion of the application range of the method. We describe the MTF calibration of a 6 inch phase shifting Fizeau interferometer. Beyond providing a direct measurement of the interferometer's MTF, tests with a BPR array surface have revealed an asymmetry in the instrument's data processing algorithm that fundamentally limits its bandwidth. Moreover, the tests have illustrated the effects of the instrument's detrending and filtering procedures on power spectral density measurements. The details of the development of a BPR test sample suitable for calibration of scanning and transmission electron microscopes are also presented. Such a test sample is realized as a multilayer structure with the layer thicknesses of two materials corresponding to BPR sequence. The investigations confirm the universal character of the method that makes it applicable to a large variety of metrology instrumentation with spatial wavelength bandwidths from a few nanometers to hundreds of millimeters.

  3. Calibration of the modulation transfer function of surface profilometers with binary pseudo-random test standards: expanding the application range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Anderson, Erik H.; Barber, Samuel K.; Bouet, Nathalie; Cambie, Rossana; Conley, Raymond; McKinney, Wayne R.; Takacs, Peter Z.; Voronov, Dmitriy L.

    2011-03-14

    A modulation transfer function (MTF) calibration method based on binary pseudo-random (BPR) gratings and arrays [Proc. SPIE 7077-7 (2007), Opt. Eng. 47, 073602 (2008)] has been proven to be an effective MTF calibration method for a number of interferometric microscopes and a scatterometer [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A616, 172 (2010)]. Here we report on a further expansion of the application range of the method. We describe the MTF calibration of a 6 inch phase shifting Fizeau interferometer. Beyond providing a direct measurement of the interferometer's MTF, tests with a BPR array surface have revealed an asymmetry in the instrument's data processing algorithm that fundamentally limits its bandwidth. Moreover, the tests have illustrated the effects of the instrument's detrending and filtering procedures on power spectral density measurements. The details of the development of a BPR test sample suitable for calibration of scanning and transmission electron microscopes are also presented. Such a test sample is realized as a multilayer structure with the layer thicknesses of two materials corresponding to BPR sequence. The investigations confirm the universal character of the method that makes it applicable to a large variety of metrology instrumentation with spatial wavelength bandwidths from a few nanometers to hundreds of millimeters.

  4. Calibration of the modulation transfer function of surface profilometers with binary pseudo-random test standards: Expanding the application range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V; Anderson, Erik H.; Barber, Samuel K.; Bouet, Nathalie; Cambie, Rossana; Conley, Raymond; McKinney, Wayne R.; Takacs, Peter Z.; Voronov, Dmitriy L.

    2010-07-26

    A modulation transfer function (MTF) calibration method based on binary pseudo-random (BPR) gratings and arrays [Proc. SPIE 7077-7 (2007), Opt. Eng. 47(7), 073602-1-5 (2008)] has been proven to be an effective MTF calibration method for a number of interferometric microscopes and a scatterometer [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 616, 172-82 (2010]. Here we report on a significant expansion of the application range of the method. We describe the MTF calibration of a 6 inch phase shifting Fizeau interferometer. Beyond providing a direct measurement of the interferometer's MTF, tests with a BPR array surface have revealed an asymmetry in the instrument's data processing algorithm that fundamentally limits its bandwidth. Moreover, the tests have illustrated the effects of the instrument's detrending and filtering procedures on power spectral density measurements. The details of the development of a BPR test sample suitable for calibration of scanning and transmission electron microscopes are also presented. Such a test sample is realized as a multilayer structure with the layer thicknesses of two materials corresponding to BPR sequence. The investigations confirm the universal character of the method that makes it applicable to a large variety of metrology instrumentation with spatial wavelength bandwidths from a few nanometers to hundreds of millimeters.

  5. PHOEBE: PHysics Of Eclipsing BinariEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prsa, Andrej; Matijevic, Gal; Latkovic, Olivera; Vilardell, Francesc; Wils, Patrick

    2011-06-01

    PHOEBE (PHysics Of Eclipsing BinariEs) is a modeling package for eclipsing binary stars, built on top of the widely used WD program (Wilson & Devinney 1971). This introductory paper overviews most important scientific extensions (incorporating observational spectra of eclipsing binaries into the solution-seeking process, extracting individual temperatures from observed color indices, main-sequence constraining and proper treatment of the reddening), numerical innovations (suggested improvements to WD's Differential Corrections method, the new Nelder & Mead's downhill Simplex method) and technical aspects (back-end scripter structure, graphical user interface). While PHOEBE retains 100% WD compatibility, its add-ons are a powerful way to enhance WD by encompassing even more physics and solution reliability.

  6. Tests of scanning model observers for myocardial SPECT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, H. C.; Pretorius, P. H.; Brankov, J. G.

    2009-02-01

    Many researchers have tested and applied human-model observers as part of their evaluations of reconstruction methods for SPECT perfusion imaging. However, these model observers have generally been limited to signal-known- exactly (SKE) detection tasks. Our objective is to formulate and test scanning model observers that emulate humans in detection-localization tasks involving perfusion defects. Herein, we compare several models based on the channelized nonprewhitening (CNPW) observer. Simulated Tc-99m images of the heart with and without defects were created using a mathematical anthropomorphic phantom. Reconstructions were performed with an iterative algorithm and postsmoothed with a 3D Gaussian filter. Human and model-observer studies were conducted to assess the optimal number of iterations and the smoothing level of the filter. The human-observer study was a multiple-alternative forced-choice (MAFC) study with five defects. The CNPW observer performed the MAFC study, but also performed an SKE-but-variable (SKEV) study and a localization ROC (LROC) study. A separate LROC study applied an observer based on models of human search in mammograms. The amount of prior knowledge about the possible defects differed for these four model-observer studies. The trend was towards improved agreement with the human observers as prior knowledge decreased.

  7. Masses of the components of SB2 binaries observed with Gaia. I. Selection of the sample and mass ratios of 20 new SB2s discovered with Sophie

    CERN Document Server

    Halbwachs, Jean-Louis; Pourbaix, Dimitri; Famaey, Benoît; Guillout, Patrick; Lebreton, Yveline; Salomon, Jean-Baptiste; Tal-Or, Lev; Ibata, Rodrigo; Mazeh, Tsevi

    2014-01-01

    In anticipation of the Gaia astrometric mission, a large sample of spectroscopic binaries is being observed since 2010 with the Sophie spectrograph at the Haute--Provence Observatory. Our aim is to derive the orbital elements of double-lined spectroscopic binaries (SB2s) with an accuracy sufficient to finally obtain the masses of the components with relative errors as small as 1% when the astrometric measurements of Gaia are taken into account. Simultaneously, the luminosities of the components in the Gaia photometric band G will also be obtained. Our observation program started with 200 SBs, including 152 systems that were only known as single-lined. Thanks to the high efficiency of the Sophie spectrograph, an additional component was found for 25 SBs. After rejection of 5 multiple systems, 20 new SB2s were retained, including 8 binaries with evolved primary, and their mass ratios were derived. Our final sample contains 68 SB2s, including 2 late-type giants and 10 other evolved stars.

  8. Monte Carlo simulations of post-common-envelope white dwarf + main sequence binaries: comparison with the SDSS DR7 observed sample

    CERN Document Server

    Camacho, J; García-Berro, E; Zorotovic, M; Schreiber, M R; Rebassa-Mansergas, A; Gómez-Morán, A Nebot; Gänsicke, B T

    2014-01-01

    Detached white dwarf + main sequence (WD+MS) systems represent the simplest population of post-common envelope binaries (PCEBs). Since the ensemble properties of this population carries important information about the characteristics of the common-envelope (CE) phase, it deserves close scrutiny. However, most population synthesis studies do not fully take into account the effects of the observational selection biases of the samples used to compare with the theoretical simulations. Here we present the results of a set of detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the population of WD+MS binaries in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. We used up-to-date stellar evolutionary models, a complete treatment of the Roche lobe overflow episode, and a full implementation of the orbital evolution of the binary systems. Moreover, in our treatment we took into account the selection criteria and all the known observational biases. Our population synthesis study allowed us to make a meaningful comparison with the a...

  9. Interrupted Binary Mass Transfer in Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Leigh, Nathan W C; Toonen, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Binary mass transfer is at the forefront of some of the most exciting puzzles of modern astrophysics, including Type Ia supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and the formation of most observed exotic stellar populations. Typically, the evolution is assumed to proceed in isolation, even in dense stellar environments such as star clusters. In this paper, we test the validity of this assumption via the analysis of a large grid of binary evolution models simulated with the SeBa code. For every binary, we calculate analytically the mean time until another single or binary star comes within the mean separation of the mass-transferring binary, and compare this time-scale to the mean time for stable mass transfer to occur. We then derive the probability for each respective binary to experience a direct dynamical interruption. The resulting probability distribution can be integrated to give an estimate for the fraction of binaries undergoing mass transfer that are expected to be disrupted as a function of the host cluster pro...

  10. RXTE/ASM and Swift / BAT observations of spectral transitions in bright X-ray binaries in 2005-2010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Tang; Wen-Fei Yu; Zhen Yan

    2011-01-01

    We have studied X-ray spectral state transitions that can be seen in the longterm monitoring light curves of bright X-ray binaries from the All-Sky Monitor (ASM) onboard the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) onboard Swift during a period of five years from 2005 to 2010. We have applied a program to automatically identify the hard-to-soft (H-S) spectral state transitions in the bright X-ray binaries monitored by the ASM and the BAT. In total, we identified 128 hard-to-soft transitions, of which 59 occurred after 2008. We also determined the transition fluxes and the peak fluxes of the following soft states, updated the measurements of the luminosity corresponding to the H-S transition and the peak luminosity of the following soft state in about 30 bright persistent and transient black hole and neutron star binaries following Yu &Yan, and found the luminosity correlation and the luminosity range of spectral transitions in data between 2008-2010 are about the same as those derived from data before 2008. This further strengthens the idea that the luminosity at which the H-S spectral transition occurs in the Galactic X-ray binaries is determined by non-stationary accretion parameters such as the rate-of-change of the mass accretion rate rather than the mass accretion rate itself. The correlation is also found to hold in data of individual sources 4U 1608-52 and 4U 1636-53.

  11. Observation of nonreciprocal transmission in binary phase-shift keying modulation using traveling-wave Mach-Zehnder modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Po; Gui, Chengcheng

    2016-06-15

    In coherent optical transmission, traveling-wave Mach-Zehnder modulators are commonly used to generate various advanced formats where the modulators are biased at the minimum transmission point. Here, we report that an optical isolation effect with lower backward transmission occurs under this condition. This concept is successfully demonstrated to achieve ∼7  dB isolation over a 90-nm wavelength span under binary phase-shift keying modulation using a commercial lithium niobate modulator. PMID:27304273

  12. The Unusual Binary Pulsar PSR J1744-3922: Radio Flux Variability, Near-infrared Observation and Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Breton, R P; Ransom, S M; Kaspi, V M; Durant, M; Bergeron, P; Faulkner, A J

    2007-01-01

    PSR J1744-3922 is a binary pulsar exhibiting highly variable pulsed radio emission. We report on a statistical multi-frequency study of the pulsed radio flux variability which suggests that this phenomenon is extrinsic to the pulsar and possibly tied to the companion, although not strongly correlated with orbital phase. The pulsar has an unusual combination of characteristics compared to typical recycled pulsars: a long spin period (172 ms); a relatively high magnetic field strength (1.7x10^10 G); a very circular, compact orbit of 4.6 hours; and a low-mass companion (0.08 Msun). These spin and orbital properties are likely inconsistent with standard evolutionary models. We find similarities between the properties of the PSR J1744-3922 system and those of several other known binary pulsar systems, motivating the identification of a new class of binary pulsars. We suggest that this new class could result from either: a standard accretion scenario of a magnetar or a high-magnetic field pulsar; common envelope ev...

  13. Detection of small leakages by a combination of dedicated Kalman filters and an extended version of the binary sequential probability ratio test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last two decades, Kalman filter-based process monitoring techniques have been rediscovered and widely applied in different areas of control and signal validation. When the physical model of the underlying system is known, the Kalman filter is sensitive enough to indicate small, unexpected changes either in the plant or in the measurement models. Although the innovation process that is generated by Kalman filters contains all the necessary statistical information for detecting certain malfunctions, performance degradation, or off-normal operation conditions, skillful hypothesis testing methods are needed for proper interpretation of the innovation's behavior. The classical binary sequential probability ratio test (SPRT), developed by Wald, is an optimal tool to judge between two concurring hypotheses. For more than two alternatives, the multiple-hypothesis testing method, the so-called M-ary SPRT, is recommended. In many cases, the situation cannot be represented as simply as a binary problem, however, and the M-ary scheme would be an overcomplication. For an illustration, consider leakage detection when the exact amount of the loss is not of interest. In such a case, the problem can be treated by a properly chosen binary test, and Wald's classical SPRT framework can be applied. Thus, any binary SPRT and computer code can be used without any modification

  14. Joint H-alpha and X-Ray Observations of Massive X-Ray Binaries. II. The Be X-ray Binary and Microquasar LS I +61 303

    OpenAIRE

    Grundstrom, E. D.; Caballero-Nieves, S. M.; Gies, D. R.; Huang, W.; McSwain, M. V.; Rafter, S. E.; Riddle, R. L.; Williams, S. J.; Wingert, D. W.

    2006-01-01

    We present the results of an H-alpha monitoring campaign on the BeXRB and microquasar system LS I +61 303. We use radial velocity measurements of HeI lines in our spectra to re-evaluate the orbital elements and to better establish the time of periastron. We list equivalent widths and other parameters for the H-alpha emission line and discuss the orbital phase related variations observed. We call attention to a dramatic episode of emission weakening that occurred in less than a day that probab...

  15. High-resolution spectroscopic observations of binary stars and yellow stragglers in three open clusters: NGC 2360, NGC 3680, and NGC 5822

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sales Silva, J. V.; Peña Suárez, V. J.; Katime Santrich, O. J.; Pereira, C. B.; Drake, N. A.; Roig, F., E-mail: joaovictor@on.br, E-mail: jearim@on.br, E-mail: osantrich@on.br, E-mail: claudio@on.br, E-mail: drake@on.br, E-mail: froig@on.br [Observatório Nacional/MCT, Rua Gen. José Cristino, 77, 20921-400 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2014-11-01

    Binary stars in open clusters are very useful targets in constraining the nucleosynthesis process. The luminosities of the stars are known because the distances of the clusters are also known, so chemical peculiarities can be linked directly to the evolutionary status of a star. In addition, binary stars offer the opportunity to verify a relationship between them and the straggler population in both globular and open clusters. We carried out a detailed spectroscopic analysis to derive the atmospheric parameters for 16 red giants in binary systems and the chemical composition of 11 of them in the open clusters NGC 2360, NGC 3680, and NGC 5822. We obtained abundances of C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Ca, Si, Ti, Ni, Cr, Y, Zr, La, Ce, and Nd. The atmospheric parameters of the studied stars and their chemical abundances were determined using high-resolution optical spectroscopy. We employ the local thermodynamic equilibrium model atmospheres of Kurucz and the spectral analysis code MOOG. The abundances of the light elements were derived using the spectral synthesis technique. We found that the stars NGC 2360-92 and 96, NGC 3680-34, and NGC 5822-4 and 312 are yellow straggler stars. We show that the spectra of NGC 5822-4 and 312 present evidence of contamination by an A-type star as a secondary star. For the other yellow stragglers, evidence of contamination is given by the broad wings of the Hα. Detection of yellow straggler stars is important because the observed number can be compared with the number predicted by simulations of binary stellar evolution in open clusters. We also found that the other binary stars are not s-process enriched, which may suggest that in these binaries the secondary star is probably a faint main-sequence object. The lack of any s-process enrichment is very useful in setting constraints for the number of white dwarfs in the open cluster, a subject that is related to the birthrate of these kinds of stars in open clusters and also to the age of a

  16. Formation of binary radio pulsars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of the standard scenario of the evolution of massive binary stars a study is made of the formation of final binary systems in which at least one of the components is a neutron star. It is found that about every fortieth radio pulsar must be a member of a close binary system. This is confirmed by observations. Radio pulsars are not formed in wide binary systems, possibly because of the very slow rotation of the presupernova stars

  17. Upper limits on the rates of binary neutron star and neutron-star--black-hole mergers from Advanced LIGO's first observing run

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, B P; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V B; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Aiello, L; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Altin, P A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C C; Areeda, J S; Arnaud, N; Arun, K G; Ascenzi, S; Ashton, G; Ast, M; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Bacon, P; Bader, M K M; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barclay, S E; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barta, D; Bartlett, J; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Bazzan, M; Bejger, M; Bell, A S; Berger, B K; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birney, R; Biscans, S; Bisht, A; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blair, C D; Blair, D G; Blair, R M; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bohe, A; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonnand, R; Boom, B A; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bouffanais, Y; Bozzi, A; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brockill, P; Broida, J E; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Brunett, S; Buchanan, C C; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cabero, M; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cahillane, C; Bustillo, J Calder'on; Callister, T; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Cannon, K C; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Capocasa, E; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Diaz, J Casanueva; Casentini, C; Caudill, S; Cavagli`a, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C B; Baiardi, L Cerboni; Cerretani, G; Cesarini, E; Chamberlin, S J; Chan, M; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Cheeseboro, B D; Chen, H Y; Chen, Y; Cheng, C; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C G; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conti, L; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Cortese, S; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S B; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S T; Couvares, P; Cowan, E E; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Canton, T Dal; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Darman, N S; Dasgupta, A; Costa, C F Da Silva; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; De, S; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Del'eglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Devine, R C; Dhurandhar, S; D'iaz, M C; Di Fiore, L; Di Giovanni, M; Di Girolamo, T; Di Lieto, A; Di Pace, S; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dolique, V; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S E; Edo, T B; Edwards, M C; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H -B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Engels, W; Essick, R C; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T M; Everett, R; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fair, H; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Fenyvesi, E; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Fiorucci, D; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fletcher, M; Fournier, J -D; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Frey, V; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gabbard, H A G; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S G; Garufi, F; Gaur, G; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Geng, P; Genin, E; Gennai, A; George, J; Gergely, L; Germain, V; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, K; Glaefke, A; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; Gonz'alez, G; Castro, J M Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A; Gordon, N A; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S E; Gosselin, M; Gouaty, R; Grado, A; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greco, G; Green, A C; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guo, X; Gupta, A; Gupta, M K; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hacker, J J; Hall, B R; Hall, E D; Hammond, G; Haney, M; Hanke, M M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M J; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Hennig, J; Henry, J; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hofman, D; Holt, K; Holz, D E; Hopkins, P; Hough, J; Houston, E A; Howell, E J; Hu, Y M; Huang, S; Huerta, E A; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Indik, N; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isa, H N; Isac, J -M; Isi, M; Isogai, T; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacqmin, T; Jang, H; Jani, K; Jaranowski, P; Jawahar, S; Jian, L; Jim'enez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalaghatgi, C V; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kapadia, S J; Karki, S; Karvinen, K S; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; K'ef'elian, F; Kehl, M S; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Kennedy, R; Key, J S; Khalili, F Y; Khan, I; Khan, S; Khan, Z; Khazanov, E A; Kijbunchoo, N; Kim, Chi-Woong; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, W; Kim, Y -M; Kimbrell, S J; King, E J; King, P J; Kissel, J S; Klein, B; Kleybolte, L; Klimenko, S; Koehlenbeck, S M; Koley, S; Kondrashov, V; Kontos, A; Korobko, M; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Kr'olak, A; Krueger, C; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Lackey, B D; Landry, M; Lange, J; Lantz, B; Lasky, P D; Laxen, M; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, K; Lenon, A; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Lewis, J B; Li, T G F; Libson, A; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Lombardi, A L; London, L T; Lord, J E; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J D; L"uck, H; Lundgren, A P; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magana-Sandoval, F; Zertuche, L Magana; Magee, R M; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mansell, G L; Manske, M; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; M'arka, S; M'arka, Z; Markosyan, A S; Maros, E; Martelli, F; Martellini, L; Martin, I W; Martynov, D V; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Masso-Reid, M; Mastrogiovanni, S; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; Mazumder, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McCormick, S; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McManus, D J; McRae, T; McWilliams, S T; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Meidam, J; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Merilh, E L; Merzougui, M; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Messick, C; Metzdorff, R; Meyers, P M; Mezzani, F; Miao, H; Michel, C; Middleton, H; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, A L; Miller, A; Miller, B B; Miller, J; Millhouse, M; Minenkov, Y; Ming, J; Mirshekari, S; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moggi, A; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Montani, M; Moore, B C; Moore, C J; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, G; Muir, A W; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D; Mukherjee, S; Mukund, N; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D J; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R K; Nedkova, K; Nelemans, G; Nelson, T J N; Neri, M; Neunzert, A; Newton, G; Nguyen, T T; Nielsen, A B; Nissanke, S; Nitz, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E N; Nuttall, L K; Oberling, J; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oliver, M; Oppermann, P; Oram, Richard J; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pai, A; Pai, S A; Palamos, J R; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pal-Singh, A; Pan, H; Pankow, C; Pannarale, F; Pant, B C; Paoletti, F; Paoli, A; Papa, M A; Paris, H R; Parker, W; Pascucci, D; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patricelli, B; Patrick, Z; Pearlstone, B L; Pedraza, M; Pedurand, R; Pekowsky, L; Pele, A; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Perri, L M; Phelps, M; Piccinni, O J; Pichot, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pillant, G; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poe, M; Poggiani, R; Popolizio, P; Post, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Pratt, J; Predoi, V; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; P"urrer, M; Qi, H; Qin, J; Qiu, S; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E A; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rajan, C; Rakhmanov, M; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Re, V; Read, J; Reed, C M; Regimbau, T; Rei, L; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Rew, H; Reyes, S D; Ricci, F; Riles, K; Rizzo, M; Robertson, N A; Robie, R; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Roma, V J; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosi'nska, D; Rowan, S; R"udiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Sachdev, S; Sadecki, T; Sadeghian, L; Sakellariadou, M; Salconi, L; Saleem, M; Salemi, F; Samajdar, A; Sammut, L; Sanchez, E J; Sandberg, V; Sandeen, B; Sanders, J R; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Sauter, O E S; Savage, R L; Sawadsky, A; Schale, P; Schilling, R; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Sch"onbeck, A; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Setyawati, Y; Shaddock, D A; Shaffer, T; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Sheperd, A; Shoemaker, D H; Shoemaker, D M; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sieniawska, M; Sigg, D; Silva, A D; Singer, A; Singer, L P; Singh, A; Singh, R; Singhal, A; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Smith, J R; Smith, N D; Smith, R J E; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Sorrentino, F; Souradeep, T; Srivastava, A K; Staley, A; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steinmeyer, D; Stephens, B C; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Stratta, G; Strauss, N A; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, L; Sunil, S; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B L; Szczepa'nczyk, M J; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; T'apai, M; Tarabrin, S P; Taracchini, A; Taylor, R; Theeg, T; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, E G; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thrane, E; Tiwari, S; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Toland, K; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Tornasi, Z; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; T"oyr"a, D; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trifir`o, D; Tringali, M C; Trozzo, L; Tse, M; Turconi, M; Tuyenbayev, D; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C Van Den; Vander-Hyde, D C; van der Schaaf, L; van Heijningen, J V; van Veggel, A A; Vardaro, M; Vass, S; Vas'uth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Vicer'e, A; Vinciguerra, S; Vine, D J; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Voss, D V; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L E; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wang, Y; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L -W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Wen, L; Wessels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whiting, B F; Williams, R D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M H; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Woehler, J; Worden, J; Wright, J L; Wu, D S; Wu, G; Yablon, J; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yu, H; Yvert, M; zny, A Zadro; Zangrando, L; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zevin, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhou, Z; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S E; Zweizig, J

    2016-01-01

    We report here the non-detection of gravitational waves from the merger of binary neutron star systems and neutron-star--black-hole systems during the first observing run of Advanced LIGO. In particular we searched for gravitational wave signals from binary neutron star systems with component masses $\\in [1,3] M_{\\odot}$ and component dimensionless spins $< 0.05$. We also searched for neutron-star--black-hole systems with the same neutron star parameters, black hole mass $\\in [2,99] M_{\\odot}$ and no restriction on the black hole spin magnitude. We assess the sensitivity of the two LIGO detectors to these systems, and find that they could have detected the merger of binary neutron star systems with component mass distributions of $1.35\\pm0.13 M_{\\odot}$ at a volume-weighted average distance of $\\sim$ 70Mpc, and for neutron-star--black-hole systems with neutron star masses of $1.4M_\\odot$ and black hole masses of at least $5M_\\odot$, a volume-weighted average distance of at least $\\sim$ 110Mpc. From this we...

  18. Unveiling the redback nature of the low-mass X-ray binary XSSJ1227.0-4859 through optical observations

    CERN Document Server

    de Martino, D; Mason, E; Buckley, D A H; Kotze, M M; Bonnet-Bidaud, J -M; Mouchet, M; Coppejans, R; Gulbis, A A S

    2014-01-01

    The peculiar low mass X-ray binary XSSJ12270-4859, associated with the Fermi/LAT source 2FGLJ1227.7-4853, was in a X-ray, gamma-ray and optical low-luminosity persistent state for about a decade until the end of 2012, when it has entered into the dimmest state ever observed. The nature of the compact object has been controversial until the detection of a 1.69ms radio pulsar early 2014. We present optical spectroscopy and optical/near-IR photometry during the previous brighter and in the recent faint states. We determine the first spectroscopic orbital ephemeris and an accurate orbital period of 6.91246(5)h. We infer a mid G-type donor star and a distance d=1.8-2.0kpc. The donor spectral type changes from G5V to F5V between inferior and superior conjunction, a signature of strong irradiation effects. We infer a binary inclination 45deg <~ i <~ 65deg and a highly undermassive donor, M_2 ~ 0.06-0.12M_sun for a neutron star mass in the range 1.4-3M_sun. Thus this binary joins as the seventh member the group...

  19. On the observed mass distribution of compact stellar remnants in close binary systems and possible interpretations proposed for the time being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, V. V.

    2016-06-01

    It turns out that accumulation of data during 40-years observational studies just emphasized a contrast between pulsars and black hole (BH) candidates in Galactic close binary stellar systems: (1) the mass spectrum of these degenerate stellar objects (or collapsars) shows an evident absence of objects with masses within the interval from 2M_(Sun) (with a first peak at about 1.4M_(Sun)) to approximately 6M_(Sun), (2) and in close binary stellar systems with a low-massive (about 0.6M_(Sun)) optical companion the most probable mass value (the peak in the mass distribution of BH candidates) turned out to be close to 6.7M_(Sun). This puzzle of discrete mass spectra of collapsars in close binary systems demands some solution and explanation in stellar evolution scenarios in connection with the core-collapse supernovae explosion mechanism and in context of a relation between supernovae and gamma-ray bursts. The collapsar strong field - an analogue of BH in General Relativity - is investigated in a totally non-metric, dynamical model of gravitational interaction theory, in which extremely compact objects of the masses M_Q approx.= 6.7M_(Sun) with a quark-gluon plasma bag of radius r^* = GM_Q/c^2 approx.= 10 km exist.

  20. Gamma-ray observations of the Be/pulsar binary 1A 0535+262 during a giant X-ray outburst

    CERN Document Server

    Acciari, V A; Araya, M; Arlen, T; Aune, T; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cannon, A; Cesarini, A; Ciupik, L; Collins-Hughes, E; Cui, W; Dickherber, R; Duke, C; Falcone, A; Finley, J P; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Gall, D; Godambe, S; Griffin, S; Guenette, R; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Hughes, G; Hui, C M; Humensky, T B; Imran, A; Kaaret, P; Kertzman, M; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Madhavan, A S; Maier, G; Majumdar, P; McArthur, S; Moriarty, P; Ong, R A; Otte, A N; Pandel, D; Park, N; Perkins, J S; Pohl, M; Prokoph, H; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Rose, H J; Saxon, D B; Sembroski, G H; Senturk, G Demet; Smith, A W; Tešić, G; Theiling, M; Thibadeau, S; Varlotta, A; Vincent, S; Vivier, M; Wakely, S P; Ward, J E; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; Weisgarber, T; Weng, S; Williams, D A; Wood, M; Zitzer, B

    2011-01-01

    Giant X-ray outbursts, with luminosities of about $ 10^{37}$ erg s$^{-1}$, are observed roughly every 5 years from the nearby Be/pulsar binary 1A 0535+262. In this article, we present observations of the source with VERITAS at very-high energies (VHE; E$>$100 GeV) triggered by the X-ray outburst in December 2009. The observations started shortly after the onset of the outburst, and they provided comprehensive coverage of the episode, as well as the 111-day binary orbit. No VHE emission is evident at any time. We also examined data from the contemporaneous observations of 1A 0535+262 with the Fermi/LAT at high energy photons (HE; E$>$0.1 GeV) and failed to detect the source at GeV energies. The X-ray continua measured with the Swift/XRT and the RXTE/PCA can be well described by the combination of blackbody and Comptonized emission from thermal electrons. Therefore, the gamma-ray and X-ray observations suggest the absence of a significant population of non-thermal particles in the system. This distinguishes 1A~...

  1. Very-high-energy observations of the binaries V 404 Cyg and 4U 0115+634 during giant X-ray outbursts

    CERN Document Server

    Archer, A; Bird, R; Bourbeau, E; Buchovecky, M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cerruti, M; Connolly, M P; Cui, W; Errando, M; Falcone, A; Feng, Q; Fernandez-Alonso, M; Finley, J P; Fleischhack, H; Flinders, A; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Griffin, S; Grube, J; Hütten, M; Hanna, D; Hervet, O; Holder, J; Humensky, T B; Johnson, C A; Kaaret, P; Kar, P; Kelley-Hoskins, N; Kertzman, M; Kieda, D; Krause, M; Kumar, S; Lang, M J; Lin, T T Y; Maier, G; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nieto, D; O'Brien, S; Ong, R A; Park, N; Pohl, M; Popkow, A; Pueschel, E; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reynolds, P T; Richards, G T; Roache, E; Rousselle, J; Rovero, A C; Sadeh, I; Schlenstedt, S; Sembroski, G H; Shahinyan, K; Staszak, D; Telezhinsky, I; Tyler, J; Wakely, S P; Wilcox, P; Wilhelm, A; Williams, D A

    2016-01-01

    Transient X-ray binaries produce major outbursts in which the X-ray flux can increase over the quiescent level by factors as large as $10^7$. The low-mass X-ray binary V 404 Cyg and the high-mass system 4U 0115+634 underwent such major outbursts in June and October 2015, respectively. We present here observations at energies above hundreds of GeV with the VERITAS observatory taken during some of the brightest X-ray activity ever observed from these systems. No gamma-ray emission has been detected by VERITAS in 2.5 hours of observations of the microquasar V 404 Cyg from 2015, June 20-21. The upper flux limits derived from these observations on the gamma-ray flux above 200 GeV of F $< 4.4\\times 10^{-12}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ correspond to a tiny fraction (about $10^{-6}$) of the Eddington luminosity of the system, in stark contrast to that seen in the X-ray band. No gamma rays have been detected during observations of 4U 0115+634 in the period of major X-ray activity in October 2015. The flux upper limit deriv...

  2. Observational tests for grain chemistry: posterior isotopic labelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.B. Charnley; P. Ehrenfreund; T.J. Millar; A.C.A. Boogert; A.J. Markwick; H.M. Butner; R. Ruiterkamp; S.D. Rodgers

    2004-01-01

    We propose a series of detailed observations that should allow current ideas concerning the important catalytic pathways to interstellar molecules on interstellar dust grains to be tested. The atoms and molecules that accrete on cold grains and take part in surface reactions will be selectively frac

  3. A Mixed Model Approach to Meta-Analysis of Diagnostic Studies with Binary Test Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doebler, Philipp; Holling, Heinz; Bohning, Dankmar

    2012-01-01

    We propose 2 related models for the meta-analysis of diagnostic tests. Both models are based on the bivariate normal distribution for transformed sensitivities and false-positive rates. Instead of using the logit as a transformation for these proportions, we employ the "t"[subscript alpha] family of transformations that contains the log, logit,…

  4. A Binary Programming Approach to Automated Test Assembly for Cognitive Diagnosis Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelman, Matthew D.; Kim, Wonsuk; Roussos, Louis; Verschoor, Angela

    2010-01-01

    Automated test assembly (ATA) has been an area of prolific psychometric research. Although ATA methodology is well developed for unidimensional models, its application alongside cognitive diagnosis models (CDMs) is a burgeoning topic. Two suggested procedures for combining ATA and CDMs are to maximize the cognitive diagnostic index and to use a…

  5. Characterization of electron microscopes with binary pseudo-random multilayer test samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V; Conley, Raymond; Anderson, Erik H.; Barber, Samuel K.; Bouet, Nathalie; McKinney, Wayne R.; Takacs, Peter Z.; Voronov, Dmitriy L.

    2010-07-09

    We discuss the results of SEM and TEM measurements with the BPRML test samples fabricated from a BPRML (WSi2/Si with fundamental layer thickness of 3 nm) with a Dual Beam FIB (focused ion beam)/SEM technique. In particular, we demonstrate that significant information about the metrological reliability of the TEM measurements can be extracted even when the fundamental frequency of the BPRML sample is smaller than the Nyquist frequency of the measurements. The measurements demonstrate a number of problems related to the interpretation of the SEM and TEM data. Note that similar BPRML test samples can be used to characterize x-ray microscopes. Corresponding work with x-ray microscopes is in progress.

  6. Characterization of electron microscopes with binary pseudo-random multilayer test samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the results of SEM and TEM measurements with the BPRML test samples fabricated from a BPRML (WSi2/Si with fundamental layer thickness of 3 nm) with a Dual Beam FIB (focused ion beam)/SEM technique. In particular, we demonstrate that significant information about the metrological reliability of the TEM measurements can be extracted even when the fundamental frequency of the BPRML sample is smaller than the Nyquist frequency of the measurements. The measurements demonstrate a number of problems related to the interpretation of the SEM and TEM data. Note that similar BPRML test samples can be used to characterize x-ray microscopes. Corresponding work with x-ray microscopes is in progress.

  7. Compositional trends of γ-induced optical changes observed in chalcogenide glasses of binary As-S system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpotyuk, M.; Shpotyuk, O.; Golovchak, Roman; McCloy, John S.; Riley, Brian J.

    2014-01-23

    Compositional trends of γ-induced optical changes in chalcogenide glasses are studied with the binary As-S system. Effects of γ-irradiation and annealing are compared using the changes measured in the fundamental optical absorption edge region. It is shown that annealing near the glass transition temperature leads to bleaching of As-S glasses, while γ-irradiation leads to darkening; both depend on the glass composition and thermal history of the specimens. These results are explained in terms of competitive destruction–polymerization transformations and physical aging occurring in As-S chalcogenide glasses under the influence of γ-irradiation.

  8. NIR and optical observations of the failed outbursts of black hole binary XTE J1550-564

    CERN Document Server

    Curran, P A

    2013-01-01

    A number of low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) undergo "failed outbursts" in which, instead of evolving through the canonical states, they remain in a hard state throughout the outburst. While the sources of X-ray and radio emission in the hard state are relatively well understood, the origin of the near infrared (NIR) and optical emission is more complex though it likely stems from an amalgam of different emission processes, occurring as it does, at the intersecting wavelengths of those processes. We aim to identify the NIR/optical emission region(s) during a number of failed outbursts of one such low mass X-ray binary and black hole candidate, XTE J1550-564, in order to confirm or refute their classification as hard-state, failed outbursts. We present unique NIR/optical images and spectra, obtained with the ESO-New Technology Telescope, during the failed outbursts of 2001 and 2000. We compare the NIR/optical photometric, timing, and spectral properties with those expected for the different emission mechanisms ...

  9. Superorbital Periodic Modulation in Wind-Accretion High-Mass X-Ray Binaries from Swift Burst Alert Telescope Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbet, Robin H. D.; Krimm, Hans A.

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery using data from the Swift-Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) of superorbital modulation in the wind-accretion supergiant high-mass X-ray binaries 4U 1909+07 (= X 1908+075), IGR J16418-4532, and IGR J16479-4514. Together with already known superorbital periodicities in 2S 0114+650 and IGR J16493-4348, the systems exhibit a monotonic relationship between superorbital and orbital periods. These systems include both supergiant fast X-ray transients and classical supergiant systems, and have a range of inclination angles. This suggests an underlying physical mechanism which is connected to the orbital period. In addition to these sources with clear detections of superorbital periods, IGR J16393-4643 (= AX J16390.4-4642) is identified as a system that may have superorbital modulation due to the coincidence of low-amplitude peaks in power spectra derived from BAT, Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array, and International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory light curves. 1E 1145.1-6141 may also be worthy of further attention due to the amount of low-frequency modulation of its light curve. However, we find that the presence of superorbital modulation is not a universal feature of wind-accretion supergiant X-ray binaries.

  10. Fiscal 1995 survey of promotion of the geothermal development. Report on a usage feasibility test of a small scale geothermal binary cycle power generation system; 1995 nendo chinetsu kaihatsu sokushin chosa. Chusho chinetsu binary hatsuden system jissho shiken hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    In this survey, studies for popularization and practical utilization of small and medium size geothermal binary cycle power systems which assesses low and medium temperature geothermal resources were conducted, and studies for development of the system to be introduced for practical use and for promotion of the popularization were made. A study was carried out of preconditions and various conditions of a demonstrative test plant (100kW class, 500kW class) in view of the initial cost of the actual plant, and an analysis was made of the power generation cost. Acceptability of the demonstrative test plant (100kW class) was examined to analyze problems on the introduction. A thermodynamic analysis was made of the output of geothermal binary cycle power generation. Analysis/evaluation of the results of the 100kW demonstrative test plant were carried out in view of the operation results of the plant of the same kind, and checks/reviews were conducted of performance and reliability of the system, equipment simplification, etc. Inspection of the system was made in the stage of design/manufacture of the 500kW demonstrative test plant. Concerning the spread/expansion of the system, studied were multiple stage geothermal utilization and PR promotion method. 14 refs., 62 figs., 55 tabs.

  11. Testing of the Support Vector Machine for Binary-Class Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholten, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The Support Vector Machine is a powerful algorithm, useful in classifying data in to species. The Support Vector Machines implemented in this research were used as classifiers for the final stage in a Multistage Autonomous Target Recognition system. A single kernel SVM known as SVMlight, and a modified version known as a Support Vector Machine with K-Means Clustering were used. These SVM algorithms were tested as classifiers under varying conditions. Image noise levels varied, and the orientation of the targets changed. The classifiers were then optimized to demonstrate their maximum potential as classifiers. Results demonstrate the reliability of SMV as a method for classification. From trial to trial, SVM produces consistent results

  12. Attitude Controller-Observer Design for the NTNU Test Satellite

    OpenAIRE

    Alvenes, Fredrik

    2013-01-01

    This report presents the results from the development and design of an Attitude Controller-Observer for the NTNU Test Satellite (NUTS). It gives an insight to mathematical modeling of satellite attitude dynamics for 3 degrees of freedom. By the different limitations of how the NUTS operates, these models are adjusted accordingly.A strategy for controlling the attitude is presented. Through an explanation of the magnetic actuators, the control laws are also adapted to work with the NUTS satell...

  13. Three observational differences for binary black holes detections with second and third generation gravitational-wave detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Vitale, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Advanced gravitational-wave observatories, such as LIGO and Virgo, will detect hundreds of gravitational waves emitted by binary black holes in the next few years. The collection of detected sources is expected to have certain properties. It is expected that a selection bias will exist toward higher mass systems, that most events will be oriented with their angular momentum pointing to or away from Earth, and that quiet events will be much more numerous than loud events. In this paper we show how all these assumptions are only true for existing detectors and do not have any universality. Using an network of proposed third-generation gravitational wave detectors, we show how each of these assumptions must be revised and we discuss several consequences on the characterization of the sources.

  14. XMM-Newton observations of the Small Magellanic Cloud: Be/X-ray binary pulsars active between October 2006 and June 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberl, F.; Eger, P.; Pietsch, W.

    2008-10-01

    Aims: We analysed eight XMM-Newton observations toward the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), performed between October 2006 and June 2007, to investigate high mass X-ray binary systems. Methods: We produced images from the European Photon Imaging Cameras (EPIC) and extracted X-ray spectra and light curves in different energy bands from sources that yielded a sufficiently high number of counts for a detailed temporal and spectral analysis. To search for periodicity we applied Fourier transformations and folding techniques and determined pulse periods using a Bayesian approach. To identify optical counterparts we produced X-ray source lists for each observation using maximum likelihood source detection techniques and correlated them with optical catalogues. The correlations were also used for astrometric boresight corrections of the X-ray source positions. Results: We found new X-ray binary pulsars with periods of 202 s (XMMU J005929.0-723703), 342 s (XMMU J005403.8-722632), 645 s (XMMU J005535.2-722906) and 325 s (XMMU J005252.1-721715), in the latter case confirming the independent discovery in Chandra data. In addition we detected sixteen known Be/X-ray binary pulsars and six ROSAT-classified candidate high mass X-ray binaries. From one of the candidates, RX J0058.2-7231, we discovered X-ray pulsations with a period of 291 s which makes it the likely counterpart of XTE J0051-727. From the known pulsars, we revise the pulse period of CXOU J010206.6-714115 to 967 s, and we detected the 18.37 s pulsar XTE J0055-727 (=XMM J004911.4-724939) in outburst, which allowed us to localise the source. The pulse profiles of the X-ray pulsars show a wide variety of shapes from smooth to highly structured patterns and differing energy dependence. For all the candidate high mass X-ray binaries, optical counterparts can be identified with magnitudes and colours consistent with Be stars. Twenty of the Be/X-ray binaries were detected with X-ray luminosities in the range 1.5 × 1035-5.5

  15. Spectroscopic Orbits for Kepler FOV Eclipsing Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Rachel A.; Gies, Douglas R.; Williams, Stephen J.; Guo, Zhao

    2013-02-01

    We are currently involved in a four year program of precise eclipsing binary photometry with the NASA Kepler Observatory. Our goal is to search for variations in minimum light timing for intermediate mass eclipsing binaries. Such periodic variations will reveal the reflex motion caused by any distant, low mass object that orbits the close binary. it Kepler's unprecedented accuracy and continuous observations provide a unique opportunity to detect the low mass companions that are predicted to result from the angular momentum of the natal cloud. The goal of this proposal is to obtain blue spectra of short period (0.9-6d) eclipsing binaries, derive radial velocities, and produce a double-lined spectroscopic orbit (as well as estimates of the stellar effective temperatures, gravities, and metallicities). Combined with the it Kepler light curve, we will determine very accurate masses and radii for the members of the close binary, which will yield the mass-inclination product M_3 sin i for any companions detected by light travel time or other effects. An extended sample of eclipsing binaries with longer periods (up to 50d) is now being investigated to test whether the presence of a tertiary companion declines with increasing period. We propose to obtain a single spectrum at quadrature for the brightest 48 stars in this expanded sample to characterize the effective temperatures and total mass contained in these systems.

  16. Testing Quantum Mechanics and Bell's Inequality with Astronomical Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Andrew S.; Kaiser, David I.; Gallicchio, Jason; Team 1: University of Vienna, InstituteQuantum Optics and Quantum Information; Team 2: UC San Diego Cosmology Group; Team 3: NASA/JPL/Caltech

    2016-06-01

    We report on an in progress "Cosmic Bell" experiment that will leverage cosmology to test quantum mechanics and Bell's inequality using astronomical observations. Different iterations of our experiment will send polarization-entangled photons through the open air to detectors ~1-100 kilometers apart, whose settings would be rapidly chosen using real-time telescopic observations of Milky Way stars, and eventually distant, causally disconnected, cosmological sources - such as pairs of quasars or patches of the cosmic microwave background - all while the entangled pair is still in flight. This would, for the first time, attempt to fully close the so-called "setting independence" or "free will" loophole in experimental tests of Bell's inequality, whereby an alternative theory could mimic the quantum predictions if the experimental settings choices shared even a small correlation with unknown, local, causal influences a mere few milliseconds prior to the experiment. A full Cosmic Bell test would push any such influence all the way back to the hot big bang, since the end of any period of inflation, 13.8 billion years ago, an improvement of 20 orders of magnitude compared to the best previous experiments. Redshift z > 3.65 quasars observed at optical wavelengths are the optimal candidate source pairs using present technology. Our experiment is partially funded by the NSF INSPIRE program, in collaboration with MIT, UC San Diego, Harvey Mudd College, NASA/JPL/Caltech, and the University of Vienna. Such an experiment has implications for our understanding of nature at the deepest level. By testing quantum mechanics in a regime never before explored, we would at the very least extend our confidence in quantum theory, while at the same time severely constraining large classes of alternative theories. If the experiment were to uncover discrepancies from the quantum predictions, there could be crucial implications for early-universe cosmology, the security of quantum encryption

  17. OBSERVATIONS OF BINARY STARS WITH THE DIFFERENTIAL SPECKLE SURVEY INSTRUMENT. V. TOWARD AN EMPIRICAL METAL-POOR MASS–LUMINOSITY RELATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horch, Elliott P. [Department of Physics, Southern Connecticut State University, 501 Crescent Street, New Haven, CT 06515 (United States); Van Altena, William F.; Demarque, Pierre [Department of Astronomy, Yale University P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Howell, Steve B. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Everett, Mark E. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Ciardi, David R. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, California Institute of Technology, 770 South Wilson Avenue, Mail Code 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Teske, Johanna K. [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism and Carnegie Observatories, Carnegie Institute of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Road, NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Henry, Todd J.; Winters, Jennifer G., E-mail: horche2@southernct.edu, E-mail: william.vanaltena@yale.edu, E-mail: pierre.demarque@yale.edu, E-mail: steve.b.howell@nasa.gov, E-mail: everett@noao.edu, E-mail: ciardi@ipac.caltech.edu, E-mail: jteske@carnegiescience.edu, E-mail: thenry@astro.gsu.edu, E-mail: winters@astro.gsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30302 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    In an effort to better understand the details of the stellar structure and evolution of metal-poor stars, the Gemini North telescope was used on two occasions to take speckle imaging data of a sample of known spectroscopic binary stars and other nearby stars in order to search for and resolve close companions. The observations were obtained using the Differential Speckle Survey Instrument, which takes data in two filters simultaneously. The results presented here are of 90 observations of 23 systems in which one or more companions was detected, and six stars where no companion was detected to the limit of the camera capabilities at Gemini. In the case of the binary and multiple stars, these results are then further analyzed to make first orbit determinations in five cases, and orbit refinements in four other cases. The mass information is derived, and since the systems span a range in metallicity, a study is presented that compares our results with the expected trend in total mass as derived from the most recent Yale isochrones as a function of metal abundance. These data suggest that metal-poor main-sequence stars are less massive at a given color than their solar-metallicity analogues in a manner consistent with that predicted from the theory.

  18. Observations of Binary Stars with the Differential Speckle Survey Instrument. V. Toward an Empirical Metal-Poor Mass-Luminosity Relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horch, Elliott P.; van Altena, William F.; Demarque, Pierre; Howell, Steve B.; Everett, Mark E.; Ciardi, David R.; Teske, Johanna K.; Henry, Todd J.; Winters, Jennifer G.

    2015-05-01

    In an effort to better understand the details of the stellar structure and evolution of metal-poor stars, the Gemini North telescope was used on two occasions to take speckle imaging data of a sample of known spectroscopic binary stars and other nearby stars in order to search for and resolve close companions. The observations were obtained using the Differential Speckle Survey Instrument, which takes data in two filters simultaneously. The results presented here are of 90 observations of 23 systems in which one or more companions was detected, and six stars where no companion was detected to the limit of the camera capabilities at Gemini. In the case of the binary and multiple stars, these results are then further analyzed to make first orbit determinations in five cases, and orbit refinements in four other cases. The mass information is derived, and since the systems span a range in metallicity, a study is presented that compares our results with the expected trend in total mass as derived from the most recent Yale isochrones as a function of metal abundance. These data suggest that metal-poor main-sequence stars are less massive at a given color than their solar-metallicity analogues in a manner consistent with that predicted from the theory.

  19. Observations of Binary Stars with the Differential Speckle Survey Instrument. V. Toward an Empirical Metal-Poor Mass-Luminosity Relation

    CERN Document Server

    Horch, Elliott P; Demarque, Pierre; Howell, Steve B; Everett, Mark E; Ciardi, David R; Teske, Johanna K; Henry, Todd J; Winters, Jennifer G

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to better understand the details of the stellar structure and evolution of metal poor stars, the Gemini North telescope was used on two occasions to take speckle imaging data of a sample of known spectroscopic binary stars and other nearby stars in order to search for and resolve close companions. The observations were obtained using the Differential Speckle Survey Instrument, which takes data in two filters simultaneously. The results presented here are of 90 observations of 23 systems in which one or more companions was detected, and 6 stars where no companion was detected to the limit of the camera capabilities at Gemini. In the case of the binary and multiple stars, these results are then further analyzed to make first orbit determinations in five cases, and orbit refinements in four other cases. Mass information is derived, and since the systems span a range in metallicity, a study is presented that compares our results with the expected trend in total mass as derived from the most recent Ya...

  20. 二元包装过氧乙酸的相关性能试验观察%OBSERVATION OF RELATED PERFORMANCE OF PERACETIC ACID IN BINARY PACKING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓; 杨宁; 胡顺铁

    2011-01-01

    [目的]二元包装过氧乙酸是由A液(冰醋酸、硫酸)与B液(过氧化氢)按一定比例混合后反应生成过氧乙酸,观察其储存稳定性、杀菌效果和安全性等相关性能.[方法]采用理化分析方法、悬液定量杀菌试验和动物毒性试验进行了检测.[结果]该产品过氧乙酸含量为170.8 g/L,于54℃恒温放置14 d,其含量下降率为4.6%.以50 mg/L过氧乙酸溶液对悬液内大肠杆菌作用3 min,对金黄色葡萄球菌和铜绿假单胞菌作用5 min,杀灭对数值均﹥5.00,以含200 mg/L过氧乙酸水溶液对悬液内的白色念珠菌作用5 min,杀灭对数值﹥4.00,以含750 mg/L过氧乙酸水溶液对悬液内的枯草杆菌黑色变种芽孢作用10 min,杀灭对数值﹥5.00.该消毒剂原液对小鼠急性经口毒性LD50值为1 360.5 mg/kg.BW,最高应用浓度5倍溶液的LD50值大于5 000 mg/kg.BW.[结论]本二元包装过氧乙酸消毒剂的稳定性好,对细菌繁殖体、真菌和细菌芽孢的杀菌效果好,动物试验原液属低毒物质、最高应用浓度5倍溶液属实际无毒.%[Objective]To know the bactericidal efficacy, storing stability and toxicity of peracetic acid in binary packing, which was produced by mixing solution A (glacial acetic acid, sulfuric acid) and solution B ( hydroden peroxide).[Methods]Suspension quantitative germicidal test, physicochemical analysis method and acute LD50 were used to carry out laboratory observation.[Results]After solution A and solution B of the peracetic acid in binary packing filled separately in air-tight plastic bottles were stored at 54℃ for 14 days, the peracetic acid content produced decreased by 4.6% as compared with before storing.The killing logarithm values of Escherichia coli in suspension exposed to the water solution containing 50mg/ Lperacetic acid for 3 min and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus exposed for 5 min were > 5.00.The killing logarithm value of Candida albicans in suspension exposed

  1. HD 30187 B and HD 39927 B: Two suspected nearby hot subdwarfs in resolved binaries (based on observations made with the ESA Hipparcos satellite)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makarov, V.V.; Fabricius, C.

    1999-01-01

    Stars: Individual: HD 30187 B -- Stars: Individual: HD 39927 B - Stars: White dwarfs - Stars: Binaries: Visual......Stars: Individual: HD 30187 B -- Stars: Individual: HD 39927 B - Stars: White dwarfs - Stars: Binaries: Visual...

  2. Tests of gravitation with Gaia observations of Solar System Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Hees, A; Poncin-Lafitte, C Le; David, P

    2015-01-01

    In this communication, we show how asteroids observations from the Gaia mission can be used to perform local tests of General Relativity (GR). This ESA mission, launched in December 2013, will observe --in addition to the stars-- a large number of small Solar System Objects (SSOs) with unprecedented astrometric precision. Indeed, it is expected that about 360,000 asteroids will be observed with a nominal sub-mas precision. Here, we show how these observations can be used to constrain some extensions to General Relativity. We present results of SSOs simulations that take into account the time sequences over 5 years and geometry of the observations that are particular to Gaia. We present a sensitivity study on various GR extensions and dynamical parameters including: the Sun quadrupolar moment $J_2$, the parametrized post-Newtonian parameter $\\beta$, the Nordtvedt parameter $\\eta$, the fifth force formalism, the Lense-Thirring effect, a temporal variation of the gravitational parameter $GM_\\textrm{sun}$ (a line...

  3. An Observational Test of Dark Matter as Cold Fractal Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Irwin, J A; English, J; Irwin, Judith A.; Widrow, Lawrence M.; English, Jayanne

    1999-01-01

    Using the VLA, we have performed the first observational test of dark matter in the form of cold, primordial fractal clouds, as envisioned by Pfenniger, Combes, & Martinet (1994) and Pfenniger & Combes (1994). We show that, after a Hubble Time, primordial fractal clouds will convert most of their HI to H2, but a small fraction of HI remains which is optically thick. This opens up a new window for detecting dark matter which may exist in this form. The detectability of such gas depends on its filling factor and temperature and therefore should be observable in absorption against a background source, with observations of sufficient sensitivity and resolution. The current VLA observations have made a first step towards this goal by taking advantage of a fortuitous alignment between the extension of the HI disk of the nearby galaxy, NGC 3079, and a background quasar Q 0957+561. Our observations probe 28 independent beams against the quasar and all of velocity space between the extension of a flat rotation...

  4. Peculiar Lapse of Periodic Eclipsing Event at Low Mass X-ray Binary GRS 1747$-$312 during Suzaku Observation in 2009

    CERN Document Server

    Saji, Shigetaka; Matsumoto, Hironori; Dotani, Tadayasu; Iwai, Masachika; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Ozaki, Masanobu; Tawara, Yuzuru

    2016-01-01

    GRS 1747$-$312 is a neutron star Low-Mass X-ray Binary in the globular cluster Terzan 6, located at a distance of 9.5 kpc from the Earth. During its outbursts, periodic eclipses were known to occur. Observations for the outbursts were performed with Chandra in 2004 and Swift in 2013. XMM-Newton observed its quiescent state in 2004. In addition, when Suzaku observed it in 2009 as a part of Galactic center mapping observations, GRS 1747$-$312 was found to be in a low luminosity state with $L_{\\rm x} \\sim 1.2 \\times 10^{35}$ erg s$^{-1}$. All of the observations except for XMM-Newton included the time of the eclipses predicted. We analyzed archival data of these observations. During the Chandra and Swift observations, we found clear flux decreases at the expected time of the eclipses. During the Suzaku observation, however, there were no clear signs for the predicted eclipses. The lapse of the predicted eclipses during the Suzaku observation can be explained by a contaminant source quite close to GRS 1747$-$312....

  5. Introducing adapted Nelder & Mead's downhill simplex method to a fully automated analysis of eclipsing binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Prsa, A

    2004-01-01

    Eclipsing binaries are extremely attractive objects because absolute physical parameters (masses, luminosities, radii) of both components may be determined from observations. Since most efforts to extract these parameters were based on dedicated observing programs, existing modeling code is based on interactivity. Gaia will make a revolutionary advance in shear number of observed eclipsing binaries and new methods for automatic handling must be introduced and thoroughly tested. This paper focuses on Nelder & Mead's downhill simplex method applied to a synthetically created test binary as it will be observed by Gaia.

  6. Interacting binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Shore, S N; van den Heuvel, EPJ

    1994-01-01

    This volume contains lecture notes presented at the 22nd Advanced Course of the Swiss Society for Astrophysics and Astronomy. The contributors deal with symbiotic stars, cataclysmic variables, massive binaries and X-ray binaries, in an attempt to provide a better understanding of stellar evolution.

  7. Can we observationally test the weak cosmic censorship conjecture?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Lingyao; Malafarina, Daniele; Bambi, Cosimo [Fudan University, Department of Physics, Center for Field Theory and Particle Physics, Shanghai (China)

    2014-08-15

    In general relativity, gravitational collapse of matter fields ends with the formation of a spacetime singularity, where the matter density becomes infinite and standard physics breaks down. According to the weak cosmic censorship conjecture, singularities produced in the gravitational collapse cannot be seen by distant observers and must be hidden within black holes. The validity of this conjecture is still controversial and at present we cannot exclude that naked singularities can be created in our Universe from regular initial data. In this paper, we study the radiation emitted by a collapsing cloud of dust and check whether it is possible to distinguish the birth of a black hole from the one of a naked singularity. In our simple dust model, we find that the properties of the radiation emitted in the two scenarios is qualitatively similar. That suggests that observational tests of the cosmic censorship conjecture may be very difficult, even in principle. (orig.)

  8. Can we observationally test the weak cosmic censorship conjecture?

    CERN Document Server

    Kong, Lingyao; Bambi, Cosimo

    2014-01-01

    In general relativity, gravitational collapse of matter fields ends with the formation of a spacetime singularity, where the matter density becomes infinite and standard physics breaks down. According to the weak cosmic censorship conjecture, singularities produced in the gravitational collapse cannot be seen by distant observers and must be hidden within black holes. The validity of this conjecture is still controversial and at present we cannot exclude that naked singularities can be created in our Universe from regular initial data. In this paper, we study the radiation emitted by a collapsing cloud of dust and check whether it is possible to distinguish the birth of a black hole from the one of a naked singularity. In our simple dust model, we find that the properties of the radiation emitted in the two scenarios is qualitatively similar. That suggests that observational tests of the cosmic censorship conjecture may be very difficult, even in principle.

  9. Testing gravity with $E_G$: mapping theory onto observations

    CERN Document Server

    Leonard, C Danielle; Heymans, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    We present a complete derivation of the observationally motivated definition of the modified gravity statistic $E_G$. Using this expression, we investigate how variations to theory and survey parameters may introduce uncertainty in the general relativistic prediction of $E_G$. We forecast errors on $E_G$ for measurements using two combinations of upcoming surveys, and find that theoretical uncertainties may dominate for a futuristic measurement. Finally, we compute predictions of $E_G$ under modifications to general relativity in the quasistatic regime, and comment on the pros and cons of using $E_G$ to test gravity with future surveys.

  10. Testing gravity with EG: mapping theory onto observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, C. Danielle; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Heymans, Catherine

    2015-12-01

    We present a complete derivation of the observationally motivated definition of the modified gravity statistic EG. Using this expression, we investigate how variations to theory and survey parameters may introduce uncertainty in the general relativistic prediction of EG. We forecast errors on EG for measurements using two combinations of upcoming surveys, and find that theoretical uncertainties may dominate for a futuristic measurement. Finally, we compute predictions of EG under modifications to general relativity in the quasistatic regime, and comment on the pros and cons of using EG to test gravity with future surveys.

  11. Higgs couplings and electroweak observables: a comparison of precision tests

    CERN Document Server

    Barbieri, Riccardo

    2013-01-01

    Is the weak scale natural? This ever pending question makes the search for new particle production a highly motivated primary goal of the next LHC phase. These searches may or may not be successful. While waiting for a needed higher energy collider to extend the direct exploration, the search for signs of new physics might be confined to indirect tests for quite some time. In a few fully calculable models, weakly or semi-strongly interacting, we compare the significance to measure the Higgs couplings versus the electroweak observables.

  12. A BeppoSAX observation of the massive X-ray binary 4U1700-37

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, A P; Kaper, L; Parmar, A N; Segreto, A

    1999-01-01

    A 0.5-200 keV BeppoSAX spectrum of the non-pulsating high-mass X-ray binary 4U1700-37 is presented. The spectrum is well characterized by the standard accreting pulsar model of an absorbed power-law with a photon index of 1.07 +0.02 -0.03, sharply modified by an exponential cutoff above 5.9 +/- 0.2 keV. The e-folding energy of the cutoff is 23.9 +/-0.5 keV. A soft bremsstrahlung component with a temperature of 0.2 +/- 0.1 keV is also required, together with a narrow iron line at 6.5 keV. Both continuum components are absorbed by a column of (5.1 +/- 0.2) x 10E22 atom/cm2. There is some evidence for the presence of a broad cyclotron absorption feature at ~37 keV, although we cannot exclude the possibility that this is due to an incorrect modeling of the continuum, or instrumental effects. The hypothesis that the compact object is a neutron star rather than a black hole seems most likely.

  13. RXTE observations of the dipping low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1624-49

    CERN Document Server

    Lommen, D; Van der Klis, M; Anthonisse, B; Lommen, Dave; Straaten, Steve van; Klis, Michiel van der; Anthonisse, Brechtje

    2005-01-01

    We analyse ~ 360 ks of archival data from the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) of the 21 hr orbital period dipping low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1624-49. We find that outside the dips the tracks in the colour-colour and hardness-intensity diagrams (CDs and HIDs) are reminiscent of those of atoll sources in the middle and upper parts of the banana branch. The tracks show secular shifts up to ~ 10%. We study the power spectrum of 4U 1624-49 as a function of the position in the CD. This is the first time power spectra of this source are presented. No quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) are found. The power spectra are dominated by very low frequency noise (VLFN), characteristic for atoll sources in the banana state, and band limited noise (BLN) which is not reliably detected but may, uncharacteristically, strengthen and increase in frequency with spectral hardness. The VLFN fits to a power law, which becomes steeper when the source moves to the harder part of the CD. We conclude that 4U 1624-49 is an atoll source wh...

  14. OGLE-2015-BLG-0479LA,B: Binary Gravitational Microlens Characterized by Simultaneous Ground-based and Space-based Observation

    CERN Document Server

    Han, C; Gould, A; Zhu, Wei; Street, R A; Yee, J C; Beichman, C; Bryden, C; Novati, S Calchi; Carey, S; Fausnaugh, M; Gaudi, B S; Henderson, Calen B; Shvartzvald, Y; Wibking, B; Szymański, M K; Soszyński, I; Skowron, J; Mróz, P; Poleski, R; Pietrukowicz, P; Kozłowski, S; Ulaczyk, K; Wyrzykowski, Ł; Pawlak, M; Tsapras, Y; Hundertmark, M; Bachelet, E; Dominik, M; Bramich, D M; Cassan, A; Jaimes, R Figuera; Horne, K; Ranc, C; Schmidt, R; Snodgrass, C; Wambsganss, J; Steele, I A; Menzies, J; Mao, S; Bozza, V; Jørgensen, U G; Alsubai, K A; Ciceri, S; D'Ago, G; Haugbølle, T; Hessman, F V; Hinse, T C; Juncher, D; Korhonen, H; Mancini, L; Popovas, A; Rabus, M; Rahvar, S; Scarpetta, G; Skottfelt, J; Southworth, J; Starkey, D; Surdej, J; Wertz, O; Zarucki, M; Pogge, R W; DePoy, D L

    2016-01-01

    We present a combined analysis of the observations of the gravitational microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-0479 taken both from the ground and by the {\\it Spitzer Space Telescope}. The light curves seen from the ground and from space exhibit a time offset of $\\sim 13$ days between the caustic spikes, indicating that the relative lens-source positions seen from the two places are displaced by parallax effects. From modeling the light curves, we measure the space-based microlens parallax. Combined with the angular Einstein radius measured by analyzing the caustic crossings, we determine the mass and distance of the lens. We find that the lens is a binary composed of two G-type stars with masses $\\sim 1.0\\ M_\\odot$ and $\\sim 0.9\\ M_\\odot$ located at a distance $\\sim 3$ kpc. In addition, we are able to constrain the complete orbital parameters of the lens thanks to the precise measurement of the microlens parallax derived from the joint analysis. In contrast to the binary event OGLE-2014-BLG-1050, which was also ob...

  15. Cloud Computing Test Bed for NASA Earth Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klene, S. A.; Murphy, K. J.; Fertetta, M.; Law, E.; Wilson, B. D.; Hua, H.; Huang, T.

    2014-12-01

    In order to develop a deeper understanding of utilizing cloud computing technologies for using earth observation data processing a test bed was created to ease access to the technology. Users had expressed concerns about accruing large compute bills by accident while they are learning to use the technology. The test bed is to support NASA efforts such as: Developing a Science Data Service platform to handle big earth data for supporting scalable time and space searches, on-the-fly climatologies, data extraction and data transformation such as data re-gridding. Multi-sensor climate data fusion where users can select, merge and cache variables from multiple sensors to compare data over multiple years. Facilitate rapid prototype efforts to provide an infrastructure so that new development efforts do not need to spend time and effort obtaining a platform. Once successful development is done the application could then scale to very large platform on larger or commercial clouds. Goals of the test bed are: To provide a greater understanding of cloud computing so informed choices can be made on future efforts to handle the over 15 Petabytes of NASA earth science data. Provide an environment where a set of science tools can be developed and reused by multiple earth science disciplines. Develop a Platform as a Service (PaaS) capability for general earth science use. This talk will present the lessons learned from building a community cloud for earth science data.

  16. Binaries in globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hut, Piet; Mcmillan, Steve; Goodman, Jeremy; Mateo, Mario; Phinney, E. S.; Pryor, Carlton; Richer, Harvey B.; Verbunt, Frank; Weinberg, Martin

    1992-01-01

    Recent observations have shown that globular clusters contain a substantial number of binaries most of which are believed to be primordial. We discuss different successful optical search techniques, based on radial-velocity variables, photometric variables, and the positions of stars in the color-magnitude diagram. In addition, we review searches in other wavelengths, which have turned up low-mass X-ray binaries and more recently a variety of radio pulsars. On the theoretical side, we give an overview of the different physical mechanisms through which individual binaries evolve. We discuss the various simulation techniques which recently have been employed to study the effects of a primordial binary population, and the fascinating interplay between stellar evolution and stellar dynamics which drives globular-cluster evolution.

  17. The state of globular clusters at birth II: primordial binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Leigh, Nathan W C; Marks, Michael; Webb, Jeremy J; Hypki, Arkadiusz; Heinke, Craig O; Kroupa, Pavel; Sills, Alison

    2014-01-01

    (abridged) In this paper, we constrain the properties of primordial binary populations in Galactic globular clusters using the MOCCA Monte Carlo code for cluster evolution. Our results are compared to the observations of Milone et al. (2012) using the photometric binary populations as proxies for the true underlying distributions, in order to test the hypothesis that the data are consistent with an universal initial binary fraction near unity and the binary orbital parameter distributions of Kroupa (1995). With the exception of a few possible outliers, we find that the data are to first-order consistent with the universality hypothesis. Specifically, the present-day binary fractions inside the half-mass radius r$_{\\rm h}$ can be reproduced assuming either high initial binary fractions near unity with a dominant soft binary component as in the Kroupa distribution combined with high initial densities (10$^4$-10$^6$ M$_{\\odot}$ pc$^{-3}$), or low initial binary fractions ($\\sim$ 5-10%) with a dominant hard binar...

  18. Massive Black Hole Binary Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merritt David

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Coalescence of binary supermassive black holes (SBHs would constitute the strongest sources of gravitational waves to be observed by LISA. While the formation of binary SBHs during galaxy mergers is almost inevitable, coalescence requires that the separation between binary components first drop by a few orders of magnitude, due presumably to interaction of the binary with stars and gas in a galactic nucleus. This article reviews the observational evidence for binary SBHs and discusses how they would evolve. No completely convincing case of a bound, binary SBH has yet been found, although a handful of systems (e.g. interacting galaxies; remnants of galaxy mergers are now believed to contain two SBHs at projected separations of <~ 1kpc. N-body studies of binary evolution in gas-free galaxies have reached large enough particle numbers to reproduce the slow, “diffusive” refilling of the binary’s loss cone that is believed to characterize binary evolution in real galactic nuclei. While some of the results of these simulations - e.g. the binary hardening rate and eccentricity evolution - are strongly N-dependent, others - e.g. the “damage” inflicted by the binary on the nucleus - are not. Luminous early-type galaxies often exhibit depleted cores with masses of ~ 1-2 times the mass of their nuclear SBHs, consistent with the predictions of the binary model. Studies of the interaction of massive binaries with gas are still in their infancy, although much progress is expected in the near future. Binary coalescence has a large influence on the spins of SBHs, even for mass ratios as extreme as 10:1, and evidence of spin-flips may have been observed.

  19. Statistical Treatment of Earth Observing System Pyroshock Separation Test Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNelis, Anne M.; Hughes, William O.

    1998-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) AM-1 spacecraft for NASA's Mission to Planet Earth is scheduled to be launched on an Atlas IIAS vehicle in June of 1998. One concern is that the instruments on the EOS spacecraft are sensitive to the shock-induced vibration produced when the spacecraft separates from the launch vehicle. By employing unique statistical analysis to the available ground test shock data, the NASA Lewis Research Center found that shock-induced vibrations would not be as great as the previously specified levels of Lockheed Martin. The EOS pyroshock separation testing, which was completed in 1997, produced a large quantity of accelerometer data to characterize the shock response levels at the launch vehicle/spacecraft interface. Thirteen pyroshock separation firings of the EOS and payload adapter configuration yielded 78 total measurements at the interface. The multiple firings were necessary to qualify the newly developed Lockheed Martin six-hardpoint separation system. Because of the unusually large amount of data acquired, Lewis developed a statistical methodology to predict the maximum expected shock levels at the interface between the EOS spacecraft and the launch vehicle. Then, this methodology, which is based on six shear plate accelerometer measurements per test firing at the spacecraft/launch vehicle interface, was used to determine the shock endurance specification for EOS. Each pyroshock separation test of the EOS spacecraft simulator produced its own set of interface accelerometer data. Probability distributions, histograms, the median, and higher order moments (skew and kurtosis) were analyzed. The data were found to be lognormally distributed, which is consistent with NASA pyroshock standards. Each set of lognormally transformed test data produced was analyzed to determine if the data should be combined statistically. Statistical testing of the data's standard deviations and means (F and t testing, respectively) determined if data sets were

  20. Binary-disk interaction. II. Gap-opening criteria for unequal-mass binaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Valle, Luciano; Escala, Andrés, E-mail: ldelvalleb@gmail.com [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile)

    2014-01-01

    We study the interaction of an unequal-mass binary with an isothermal circumbinary disk, motivated by the theoretical and observational evidence that after a major merger of gas-rich galaxies, a massive gaseous disk with a supermassive black hole binary will be formed in the nuclear region. We focus on the gravitational torques that the binary exerts on the disk and how these torques can drive the formation of a gap in the disk. This exchange of angular momentum between the binary and the disk is mainly driven by the gravitational interaction between the binary and a strong nonaxisymmetric density perturbation that is produced in the disk, in response to the presence of the binary. Using smoothed particle hydrodynamics numerical simulations, we test two gap-opening criteria, one that assumes the geometry of the density perturbation is an ellipsoid/thick spiral and another that assumes a flat spiral geometry for the density perturbation. We find that the flat spiral gap-opening criterion successfully predicts which simulations will have a gap in the disk and which will not. We also study the limiting cases predicted by the gap-opening criteria. Since the viscosity in our simulations is considerably smaller than the expected value in the nuclear regions of gas-rich merging galaxies, we conclude that in such environments the formation of a circumbinary gap is unlikely.

  1. Binary Disk interaction II: Gap-Opening criteria for unequal mass binaries

    CERN Document Server

    del Valle, Luciano

    2013-01-01

    We study the interaction between an unequal mass binary with an isothermal circumbinary disk, motivated by the theoretical and observational evidence that after a major merger of gas-rich galaxies, a massive gaseous disk with a SMBH binary will be formed in the nuclear region. We focus on the gravitational torques that the binary exerts onto the disk and how these torques can drive the formation of a gap in the disk. This exchange of angular momentum between the binary and the disk is mainly driven by the gravitational interaction between the binary and a strong non-axisymmetric density perturbation that is produced in the disk, as response to the presence of the binary. Using SPH numerical simulations we tested two gap-opening criterion, one that assumes that the geometry of the density perturbation is an ellipsoid/thick-spirals and another that assumes a geometry of flat-spirals for the density perturbation. We find that the flat-spirals gap opening criterion successfully predicts which simulations will hav...

  2. An Observational Study of Tidal Synchronization in Solar-Type Binary Stars in the Open Clusters M35 and M34

    OpenAIRE

    Meibom, Soren; Mathieu, Robert D.; Stassun, Keivan G.

    2006-01-01

    We present rotation periods for the solar-type primary stars in 13 close (a~< 5 AU) single-lined spectroscopic binaries with known orbital periods (P) and eccentricities (e). All binaries are members of the open clusters M35 (150Myr) and M34 (250Myr). The binary orbital parameters and the rotation periods of the primary stars were determined from time-series spectroscopy and time-series photometry, respectively. Knowledge of the ages, orbital periods, and eccentricities of these binaries comb...

  3. An Observational Study of Tidal Synchronization in Solar-Type Binary Stars in the Open Clusters M35 and M34

    CERN Document Server

    Meibom, S; Stassun, K G; Meibom, Soren; Mathieu, Robert D.; Stassun, Keivan G.

    2006-01-01

    We present rotation periods for the solar-type primary stars in 13 close (a \\~0) with the orbital motion. Of the six closest binaries two with circular orbits are not synchronized, one being subsynchronous and one being supersynchronous, and the primary stars in two binaries with eccentric orbits are rotating more slowly than pseudosynchronism. The remaining two binaries have reached the equilibrium state of both a circularized orbit and synchronized rotation. As a set, the six binaries present a challenging case study for tidal evolution theory, which in particular does not predict subsynchronous rotation in such close systems.

  4. Rotational mixing in close binaries

    CERN Document Server

    de Mink, S E; Langer, N; Yoon, S -Ch; Brott, I; Glebbeek, E; Verkoulen, M; Pols, O R

    2008-01-01

    Rotational mixing is a very important but uncertain process in the evolution of massive stars. We propose to use close binaries to test its efficiency. Based on rotating single stellar models we predict nitrogen surface enhancements for tidally locked binaries. Furthermore we demonstrate the possibility of a new evolutionary scenario for very massive (M > 40 solar mass) close (P < 3 days) binaries: Case M, in which mixing is so efficient that the stars evolve quasi-chemically homogeneously, stay compact and avoid any Roche-lobe overflow, leading to very close (double) WR binaries.

  5. Stellar populations from adaptive optics observations four test cases

    CERN Document Server

    Bedding, T R; Courbin, F; Sams, B J

    1997-01-01

    We describe a first attempt to apply adaptive optics to the study of resolved stellar populations in galaxies. Advantages over traditional approaches are (i) improved spatial resolution and point-source sensitivity through adaptive optics, and (ii) use of the near-infrared region, where the peak of the spectral energy distribution for old populations is found. Disadvantages are the small area covered and the need for excellent seeing. We made observations with the ADONIS system at the European Southern Observatory of the peculiar elliptical galaxy NGC 5128; the irregular galaxy IC 5152 (a possible outer member of the Local Group); the Sc galaxy NGC 300 (a member of the Sculptor group); and the Sgr window in the bulge of the Milky Way. These different fields give excellent test cases for the potential of adaptive optics. In the first two cases, we failed to obtain photometry of individual stars, which would have required excellent seeing. For NGC 300 we measured magnitudes for nine individual supergiants (H = ...

  6. The G+M eclipsing binary V530 Orionis: a stringent test of magnetic stellar evolution models for low-mass stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Guillermo [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Lacy, Claud H. Sandberg [Department of Physics, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Pavlovski, Krešimir [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Bijenicka cesta 32, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Feiden, Gregory A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Sabby, Jeffrey A. [Physics Department, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, Edwardsville, IL 62026 (United States); Bruntt, Hans [Stellar Astrophysics Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Clausen, Jens Viggo, E-mail: gtorres@cfa.harvard.edu [Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen University, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark)

    2014-12-10

    We report extensive photometric and spectroscopic observations of the 6.1 day period, G+M-type detached double-lined eclipsing binary V530 Ori, an important new benchmark system for testing stellar evolution models for low-mass stars. We determine accurate masses and radii for the components with errors of 0.7% and 1.3%, as follows: M {sub A} = 1.0038 ± 0.0066 M {sub ☉}, M {sub B} = 0.5955 ± 0.0022 M {sub ☉}, R {sub A} = 0.980 ± 0.013 R {sub ☉}, and R {sub B} = 0.5873 ± 0.0067 R {sub ☉}. The effective temperatures are 5890 ± 100 K (G1 V) and 3880 ± 120 K (M1 V), respectively. A detailed chemical analysis probing more than 20 elements in the primary spectrum shows the system to have a slightly subsolar abundance, with [Fe/H] = –0.12 ± 0.08. A comparison with theory reveals that standard models underpredict the radius and overpredict the temperature of the secondary, as has been found previously for other M dwarfs. On the other hand, models from the Dartmouth series incorporating magnetic fields are able to match the observations of the secondary star at the same age as the primary (∼3 Gyr) with a surface field strength of 2.1 ± 0.4 kG when using a rotational dynamo prescription, or 1.3 ± 0.4 kG with a turbulent dynamo approach, not far from our empirical estimate for this star of 0.83 ± 0.65 kG. The observations are most consistent with magnetic fields playing only a small role in changing the global properties of the primary. The V530 Ori system thus provides an important demonstration that recent advances in modeling appear to be on the right track to explain the long-standing problem of radius inflation and temperature suppression in low-mass stars.

  7. Introducing adapted Nelder & Mead's downhill simplex method to a fully automated analysis of eclipsing binaries

    OpenAIRE

    Prsa, A.; Zwitter, T.

    2004-01-01

    Eclipsing binaries are extremely attractive objects because absolute physical parameters (masses, luminosities, radii) of both components may be determined from observations. Since most efforts to extract these parameters were based on dedicated observing programs, existing modeling code is based on interactivity. Gaia will make a revolutionary advance in shear number of observed eclipsing binaries and new methods for automatic handling must be introduced and thoroughly tested. This paper foc...

  8. Observational tests of non-adiabatic Chaplygin gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carneiro, S.; Pigozzo, C., E-mail: saulo.carneiro@pq.cnpq.br, E-mail: cpigozzo@ufba.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Campus de Ondina, Salvador, BA 40210-340 (Brazil)

    2014-10-01

    In a previous paper [1] it was shown that any dark sector model can be mapped into a non-adiabatic fluid formed by two interacting components, one with zero pressure and the other with equation-of-state parameter ω = -1. It was also shown that the latter does not cluster and, hence, the former is identified as the observed clustering matter. This guarantees that the dark matter power spectrum does not suffer from oscillations or instabilities. It applies in particular to the generalised Chaplygin gas, which was shown to be equivalent to interacting models at both background and perturbation levels. In the present paper we test the non-adiabatic Chaplygin gas against the Hubble diagram of type Ia supernovae, the position of the first acoustic peak in the anisotropy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background and the linear power spectrum of large scale structures. We consider two different compilations of SNe Ia, namely the Constitution and SDSS samples, both calibrated with the MLCS2k2 fitter, and for the power spectrum we use the 2dFGRS catalogue. The model parameters to be adjusted are the present Hubble parameter, the present matter density and the Chaplygin gas parameter α. The joint analysis best fit gives α ≈ - 0.5, which corresponds to a constant-rate energy flux from dark energy to dark matter, with the dark energy density decaying linearly with the Hubble parameter. The ΛCDM model, equivalent to α = 0, stands outside the 3σ confidence interval.

  9. Discovery of a millisecond pulsar in the 5.4 day binary 3FGL J1417.5-4402: observing the late phase of pulsar recycling

    CERN Document Server

    Camilo, F; Ransom, S M; Halpern, J P; Bogdanov, S; Kerr, M; Ray, P S; Cordes, J M; Sarkissian, J; Barr, E D; Ferrara, E C

    2016-01-01

    In a search of the unidentified Fermi gamma-ray source 3FGL J1417.5-4402 with the Parkes radio telescope, we discovered PSR J1417-4402, a 2.66 ms pulsar having the same 5.4 day orbital period as the optical and X-ray binary identified by Strader et al. The existence of radio pulsations implies that the neutron star is currently not accreting. Substantial outflows from the companion render the radio pulsar undetectable for more than half of the orbit, and may contribute to the observed Halpha emission. Our initial pulsar observations, together with the optically inferred orbit and inclination, imply a mass ratio of 0.171+/-0.002, a companion mass of M_2=0.33+/-0.03 Msun, and a neutron star mass in the range 1.77

  10. A NuSTAR Observation of the Gamma-ray-emitting X-ray Binary and Transitional Millisecond Pulsar Candidate 1RXS J154439.4-112820

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, Slavko

    2016-07-01

    I present a 40 ks Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array observation of the recently identified low-luminosity X-ray binary and transitional millisecond pulsar (tMSP) candidate 1RXS J154439.4-112820, which is associated with the high-energy γ-ray source 3FGL J1544.6-1125. The system is detected up to ˜30 keV with an extension of the same power-law spectrum and rapid large-amplitude variability between two flux levels observed in soft X-rays. These findings provide further evidence that 1RXS J154439.4-112820 belongs to the same class of objects as the nearby bona fide tMSPs PSR J1023+0038 and XSS J12270-4859 and therefore almost certainly hosts a millisecond pulsar accreting at low luminosity. I also examine the long-term accretion history of 1RXS J154439.4-112820 based on archival optical, ultraviolet, X-ray, and γ-ray light curves covering approximately the past decade. Throughout this period, the source has maintained similar flux levels at all wavelengths, which is an indication that it has not experienced prolonged episodes of a non-accreting radio pulsar state but may spontaneously undergo such events in the future.

  11. A NuSTAR Observation of the Reflection Spectrum of the Low-mass X-Ray Binary 4U 1728-34

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleator, Clio C.; Tomsick, John A.; King, Ashley L.; Miller, Jon M.; Boggs, Steven E.; Bachetti, Matteo; Barret, Didier; Chenevez, Jérôme; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Rahoui, Farid; Stern, Daniel K.; Walton, Dominic J.; Zhang, William W.

    2016-08-01

    We report on a simultaneous NuSTAR and Swift observation of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1728-34. We identified and removed four Type I X-ray bursts during the observation in order to study the persistent emission. The continuum spectrum is hard and described well by a blackbody with kT = 1.5 keV and a cutoff power law with Γ = 1.5, and a cutoff temperature of 25 keV. Residuals between 6 and 8 keV provide strong evidence of a broad Fe Kα line. By modeling the spectrum with a relativistically blurred reflection model, we find an upper limit for the inner disk radius of {R}{{in}}≤slant 2{R}{{ISCO}}. Consequently, we find that R NS ≤ 23 km, assuming M = 1.4 M ⊙ and a = 0.15. We also find an upper limit on the magnetic field of B ≤ 2 × 108 G.

  12. A NuSTAR Observation of the Gamma-Ray-Emitting X-ray Binary and Transitional Millisecond Pulsar Candidate 1RXS J154439.4-112820

    CERN Document Server

    Bogdanov, Slavko

    2015-01-01

    I present a 40 kilosecond Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) observation of the recently identified low-luminosity X-ray binary and transitional millisecond pulsar (tMSP) candidate 1RXS J154439.4-112820, which is associated with the high-energy gamma-ray source 3FGL J1544.6--1125. The system is detected up to ~30 keV with an extension of the same power-law spectrum and rapid large-amplitude variability between two flux levels observed in soft X-rays. These findings provide further evidence that 1RXS J154439.4-112820 belongs to the same class of objects as the nearby bona fide tMSPs PSR J1023+0038 and XSS J12270-4859 and therefore almost certainly hosts a millisecond pulsar accreting at low luminosities. I also examine the long-term accretion history of 1RXS J154439.4-112820 based on archival optical, ultraviolet, X-ray, and $\\gamma$-ray light curves covering the past $\\sim$decade. Throughout this period, the source has maintained similar flux levels at all wavelengths, which is an indication that ...

  13. Simultaneous Multiwavelength Observations of Magnetic Activity in Ultracool Dwarfs. IV. The Active, Young Binary NLTT 33370 AB (=2MASS J13142039+1320011)

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, P K G; Irwin, J; Berta-Thompson, Z K; Charbonneau, D

    2014-01-01

    We present multi-epoch simultaneous radio, optical, H{\\alpha}, UV, and X-ray observations of the active, young, low-mass binary NLTT 33370 AB (blended spectral type M7e). This system is remarkable for its extreme levels of magnetic activity: it is the most radio-luminous ultracool dwarf (UCD) known, and here we show that it is also one of the most X-ray luminous UCDs known. We detect the system in all bands and find a complex phenomenology of both flaring and periodic variability. Analysis of the optical light curve reveals the simultaneous presence of two periodicities, 3.7859 $\\pm$ 0.0001 and 3.7130 $\\pm$ 0.0002 hr. While these differ by only ~2%, studies of differential rotation in the UCD regime suggest that it cannot be responsible for the two signals. The system's radio emission consists of at least three components: rapid 100% polarized flares, bright emission modulating periodically in phase with the optical emission, and an additional periodic component that appears only in the 2013 observational cam...

  14. A Clean Sightline to Quiescence: Multiwavelength Observations of the High Galactic Latitude Black Hole X-ray Binary Swift J1357.2-0933

    CERN Document Server

    Plotkin, Richard M; Jonker, Peter G; Miller-Jones, James C A; Homan, Jeroen; Munoz-Darias, Teo; Markoff, Sera; Padilla, Montserrat Armas; Fender, Rob; Rushton, Anthony P; Russell, David M; Torres, Manuel A P

    2015-01-01

    We present coordinated multiwavelength observations of the high Galactic latitude (b=+50 deg) black hole X-ray binary (XRB) J1357.2-0933 in quiescence. Our broadband spectrum includes strictly simultaneous radio and X-ray observations, and near-infrared, optical, and ultraviolet data taken 1-2 days later. We detect Swift J1357.2-0933 at all wavebands except for the radio (f_5GHz < 3.9 uJy/beam). Given current constraints on the distance (2.3-6.3 kpc), its 0.5-10 keV X-ray flux corresponds to an Eddington ratio Lx/Ledd = 4e-9 -- 3e-8 (assuming a black hole mass of 10 Msun). The broadband spectrum is dominated by synchrotron radiation from a relativistic population of outflowing thermal electrons, which we argue to be a common signature of short-period quiescent BHXBs. Furthermore, we identify the frequency where the synchrotron radiation transitions from optically thick-to-thin (approximately 2-5e14 Hz, which is the most robust determination of a 'jet break' for a quiescent BHXB to date. Our interpretation ...

  15. Multiwavelength Observations of The TeV Binary LS I +61 303 with VERITAS, Fermi-LAT and Swift-XRT During a TeV Outburst

    CERN Document Server

    Aliu, E; Behera, B; Berger, K; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Bird, R; Bouvier, A; Bugaev, V; Cerruti, M; Chen, X; Ciupik, L; Connolly, M P; Cui, W; Dumm, J; Falcone, A; Federici, S; Feng, Q; Finley, J P; Fortin, P; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Gillanders, G H; Griffin, S; Griffiths, S T; Grube, J; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Hughes, G; Humensky, T B; Kaaret, P; Kertzman, M; Khassen, Y; Kieda, D; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; Maier, G; Majumdar, P; McArthur, S; McCann, A; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; de Bhroithe, A O'Faolain; Ong, R A; Otte, A N; Park, N; Perkins, J S; Pohl, M; Popkow, A; Prokoph, H; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Rajotte, J; Ratliff, G; Reynolds, P T; Richards, G T; Roache, E; Sembroski, G H; Sheidaei, F; Skole, C; Smith, A W; Staszak, D; Telezhinsky, I; Tyler, J; Varlotta, A; Vincent, S; Wakely, S P; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; Welsing, R; Zajczyk, A; Zitzer, B

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a multiwavelength observational campaign on the TeV binary system LS I +61 303 with the VERITAS telescope array (>200 GeV), Fermi-LAT (0.3-300 GeV), and Swift-XRT (2-10 keV). The data were taken from December 2011 through January 2012 and show a strong detection in all three wavebands. During this period VERITAS obtained 24.9 hours of quality selected livetime data in which LS I +61 303 was detected at a statistical sig- nificance of 11.9 sigma. These TeV observations show evidence for nightly variability in the TeV regime at a post-trial significance of 3.6 sigma. The combination of the simultaneously obtained TeV and X-ray fluxes do not demonstrate any evidence for a correlation between emission in the two bands. For the first time since the launch of the Fermi satellite in 2008, this TeV detection allows the construction of a detailed MeV-TeV spectral energy distribution from LS I +61 303. This spectrum shows a distinct cutoff in emission near 4 GeV, with emission seen by the VERI...

  16. Swift/BAT and RXTE Observations of the Peculiar X-ray Binary 4U 2206+54 - Disappearance of the 9.6 Day Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbet, R. H. D.; Markwardt, C.; Tueller, J.

    2007-01-01

    Observations of the high-mass X-ray binary 4U 2206+54 with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) do not show modulation at the previously reported period of 9.6 days found from observations made with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) All-Sky Monitor (ASM). Instead, the strongest peak in the power spectrum of the BAT light curve occurs at a period of 19.25+/-0.08 days, twice the period found with the RXTE ASM. The maximum of the folded BAT light curve is also delayed compared to the maximum of the folded ASM light curve. The most recent ASM data folded on twice the 9.6 day period show 'similar morphology to the folded BAT light curve. This suggests that the apparent period doubling is a recent secular change rather than an energy-dependent effect. The 9.6 day period is thus not a permanent strong feature of the light curve. We suggest that the orbital period of 4U 2206+54 may be twice the previously proposed value.

  17. Constraints on long-lived remnants of neutron star binary mergers from late-time radio observations of short duration gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Metzger, Brian D

    2013-01-01

    The coalescence of a binary neutron star (NS) system may in some cases produce a massive NS remnant that is long-lived and, potentially, indefinitely stable to gravitational collapse. Such a remnant has been proposed as an explanation for the late X-ray emission observed following some short duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and as possible electromagnetic counterparts to the gravitational wave chirp. A stable NS merger remnant necessarily possesses a large rotational energy > 1e52 erg, the majority of which is ultimately deposited into the surrounding circumburst medium (CBM) at mildly relativistic velocities. We present Very Large Array radio observations of 7 short GRBs, some of which possessed temporally extended X-ray emission, on timescales of ~1-3 years following the initial burst. No radio sources were detected, with typical upper limits ~0.3 mJy at 1.4 GHz. A basic model for the synchrotron emission from the blast wave is used to constrain the presence of a long-lived NS merger remnant in each system....

  18. Long-term TeV and X-ray Observations of the Gamma-ray Binary HESS J0632+057

    CERN Document Server

    Aliu, E; Aune, T; Behera, B; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Berger, K; Bird, R; Bouvier, A; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cerruti, M; Chen, X; Ciupik, L; Connolly, M P; Cui, W; Duke, C; Dumm, J; Errando, M; Falcone, A; Federici, S; Feng, Q; Finley, J P; Fortin, P; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Gillanders, G H; Griffin, S; Griffiths, S T; Grube, J; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Hughes, G; Humensky, T B; Kaaret, P; Kertzman, M; Khassen, Y; Kieda, D; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; Madhavan, A S; Maier, G; Majumdar, P; McCann, A; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nieto, D; de Bhróithe, A O'Faoláin; Ong, R A; Otte, A N; Park, N; Perkins, J S; Pohl, M; Popkow, A; Prokoph, H; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Rajotte, J; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Richards, G T; Roache, E; Rousselle, J; Sembroski, G H; Sheidaei, F; Skole, C; Smith, A W; Staszak, D; Stroh, M; Telezhinsky, I; Theiling, M; Tucci, J V; Tyler, J; Varlotta, A; Vincent, S; Wakely, S P; Weinstein, A; Welsing, R; Williams, D A; Zajczyk, A; Zitzer, B; :,; Abramowski, A; Aharonian, F; Benkhali, F Ait; Akhperjanian, A G; Angüner, E; Anton, G; Balenderan, S; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; Becherini, Y; Tjus, J Becker; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Bissaldi, E; Biteau, J; Böttcher, M; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bulik, T; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Chadwick, P M; Chalme-Calvet, R; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Chrétien, M; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; deWilt, P; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Edwards, T; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fernandez, D; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Forster, A; Füßling, M; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Giavitto, G; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Grondin, M -H; Grudzińska, M; Häffner, S; Hahn, J; Harris, J; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hervet, O; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Janiak, M; Jankowsky, F; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Khélifi, B; Kieffer, M; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kneiske, T; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Krakau, S; Krayzel, F; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lefaucheur, J; Lemiére, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J -P; Lennarz, D; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Marx, R; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Méhault, J; Menzler, U; Meyer, M; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Moulin, E; Murach, T; Naumann, C L; de Naurois, M; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Oakes, L; Ohm, S; Wilhelmi, E de Onña; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perez, J; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Poon, H; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Raue, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Rob, L; Romoli, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schüssler, F; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sol, H; Spengler, G; Spies, F; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Szostek, A; Tavernet, J -P; Tavernier, T; Taylor, A M; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorster, M; Wagner, S J; Wagner, P; Ward, M; Weidinger, M; Weitzel, Q; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Willmann, P; Wörnlein, A; Wouters, D; Zacharias, M; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S

    2013-01-01

    HESS J0632+057 is the only gamma-ray binary known so far whose position in the sky allows observations with ground-based observatories both in the northern and southern hemispheres. Here we report on long-term observations of HESS J0632+057 conducted with the VERITAS and H.E.S.S. Cherenkov Telescopes and the X-ray Satellite Swift, spanning a time range from 2004 to 2012 and covering most of the system's orbit. The VHE emission is found to be variable, and is correlated with that at X-ray energies. An orbital period of $315 ^{+6}_{-4}$ days is derived from the X-ray data set, which is compatible with previous results, $P = (321 \\pm 5$) days. The VHE light curve shows a distinct maximum at orbital phases close to 0.3, or about 100 days after periastron passage, which coincides with the periodic enhancement of the X-ray emission. Furthermore, the analysis of the TeV data shows for the first time a statistically significant ($> 6.5 \\sigma$) detection at orbital phases 0.6--0.9. The obtained gamma-ray and X-ray li...

  19. A NuSTAR observation of the reflection spectrum of the low mass X-ray binary 4U 1728-34

    CERN Document Server

    Sleator, Clio C; King, Ashley L; Miller, Jon M; Boggs, Steven E; Bachetti, Matteo; Barret, Didier; Chenevez, Jerome; Christensen, Finn E; Craig, William W; Hailey, Charles J; Harrison, Fiona A; Rahoui, Farid; Stern, Daniel K; Walton, Dominic J; Zhang, William W

    2016-01-01

    We report on a simultaneous NuSTAR and Swift observation of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1728-34. We identified and removed four Type I X-ray bursts during the observation in order to study the persistent emission. The continuum spectrum is hard and well described by a black body with kT = 1.5 keV and a cutoff power law with {\\Gamma} = 1.5. Residuals between 6 and 8 keV provide strong evidence of a broad Fe K{\\alpha} line. By modeling the spectrum with a relativistically blurred reflection model, we find an upper limit for the inner disk radius of $R_{\\rm in} \\leq 2R_{\\rm ISCO}$ . Consequently we find that $R_{\\rm NS} \\leq 23$ km, assuming M = 1.4 $\\rm\\,M_{\\mathord\\odot}$ and a = 0.15. We also find an upper limit on the magnetic field of $B \\leq 2\\times 10^8$ G

  20. SWIFT OBSERVATIONS OF THE HIGH-MASS X-RAY BINARY IGR J16283-4838 UNVEIL A 288 DAY ORBITAL PERIOD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cusumano, G.; Segreto, A.; La Parola, V. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Palermo, Via U. La Malfa 153, I-90146, Palermo (Italy); D' Aì, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Palermo, via Archirafi 36, I-90123, Palermo (Italy); Masetti, N. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Bologna, via Gobetti 101, I-40129, Bologna (Italy); Tagliaferri, G., E-mail: cusumano@ifc.inaf.it [INAF-Brera Astronomical Observatory, via Bianchi 46, I-23807, Merate (Italy)

    2013-09-20

    We report on the temporal and spectral properties of the high-mass X-ray binary IGR J16283-4838 in the hard X-ray band. We searched the first 88 months of Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) survey data for long-term periodic modulations. We also investigated the broad band (0.2-150 keV) spectral properties of IGR J16283-4838 complementing the BAT dataset with soft X-ray data from the available Swift-XRT pointed observations. The BAT light curve of IGR J16283-4838 revealed a periodic modulation at P{sub o} = 287.6 ± 1.7 days (with a significance higher than 4 standard deviations). The profile of the light curve folded at P{sub o} shows a sharp peak lasting ∼12 days over a flat plateau. The long-term light curve also shows a ∼300 day interval of prolonged enhanced emission. The observed phenomenology suggests that IGR J16283-4838 has a Be nature, where the narrow periodic peaks and the ∼300 day outburst can be interpreted as Type I and Type II outbursts, respectively. The broad band 0.2-150 keV spectrum can be described with an absorbed power-law and a steepening in the BAT energy range.

  1. The TeV {gamma}-ray binary PSR B1259-63. Observations with the high energy stereoscopic system in the years 2005-2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerschhaggl, Matthias

    2010-04-06

    PSR B1259-63/SS2883 is a binary system where a 48 ms pulsar orbits a massive Be star with a period of 3.4 years. The system exhibits variable, non-thermal radiation around periastron on the highly eccentric orbit (e=0.87) visible from radio to very high energies (VHE; E>100 GeV). When being detected in TeV {gamma}-rays with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) in 2004 it became known as the first variable galactic VHE source. This thesis presents VHE data from PSR B1259-63 as taken during the years 2005, 2006 and before as well as shortly after the 2007 periastron passage. These data extend the knowledge of the lightcurve of this object to all phases of the binary orbit. The lightcurve constrains physical mechanisms present in this TeV source. Observations of VHE {gamma}-rays with the H.E.S.S. telescope array using the Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Technique were performed. The H.E.S.S. instrument features an angular resolution of < 0.1 and an energy resolution of < 20%. Gamma-ray events in an energy range of 0.5-70 TeV were recorded. From these data, energy spectra and lightcurve with a monthly time sampling were extracted. VHE {gamma}-ray emission from PSRB1259-63 was detected with an overall significance of 9.5 standard deviations using 55 h of exposure, obtained from April to August 2007. The monthly flux of -rays during the observation period was measured, yielding VHE lightcurve data for the early pre-periastron phase of the system for the first time. No spectral variability was found on timescales of months. The spectrum is described by a power law with a photon index of {gamma}=2.8{+-}0.2{sub stat}{+-}0.2{sub sys} and flux normalisation {phi}{sub 0}=(1.1{+-}0.1{sub stat}{+-}0.2{sub sys}) x 10{sup -12} TeV{sup -1}cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. PSR B1259-63 was also monitored in 2005 and 2006, far from periastron passage, comprising 8.9 h and 7.5 h of exposure, respectively. No significant excess of {gamma}-rays is seen in those observations. PSR B1259-63 has

  2. X-Ray Observations of VY Scl-Type Nova-Like Binaries in the High and Low State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemko, P.; Orio, M.; Mukai, K.; Shugarov, S.

    2014-01-01

    Four VY Scl-type nova-like systems were observed in X-rays during both the low- and the high-optical states. We examined Chandra, ROSAT, Swift and Suzaku archival observations of BZ Cam, MV Lyr, TT Ari and V794 Aql. The X-ray flux of BZ Cam is higher during the low state, but there is no supersoft X-ray source (SSS) as hypothesized in previous articles. No SSS was detected in the low state of the any of the other systems, with the X-ray flux decreasing by a factor between 2 and 50. The best fit to the Swift X-ray spectra is obtained with a multicomponent model of plasma in collisional ionization equilibrium. The high-state high-resolution spectra of TT Ari taken with Chandra Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS-S) and the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) shows a rich emission line spectrum, with prominent lines of Mg, Si, Ne and S. The complexity of this spectrum seems to have origin in more than one region, or more than one single physical mechanism. While several emission lines are consistent with a cooling flow in an accretion stream, there is at least an additional component. We discuss the origin of this component, which is probably arising in a wind from the system. We also examine the possibility that the VY Scl systems may be intermediate polars, and that while the boundary layer of the accretion disc emits only in the extreme ultraviolet, part of the X-ray flux may be due to magnetically driven accretion.

  3. Pairing mechanisms for binary stars

    CERN Document Server

    Kouwenhoven, M B N; Goodwin, S P; Zwart, S F Portegies; Kaper, L; 10.1002/asna.200811061

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge of the binary population in stellar groupings provides important information about the outcome of the star forming process in different environments. Binarity is also a key ingredient in stellar population studies and is a prerequisite to calibrate the binary evolution channels. In these proceedings we present an overview of several commonly used methods to pair individual stars into binary systems, which we refer to as the pairing function. Many pairing functions are frequently used by observers and computational astronomers, either for the mathematical convenience, or because they roughly describe the expected outcome of the star forming process. We discuss the consequences of each pairing function for the interpretation of observations and numerical simulations. The binary fraction and mass ratio distribution generally depend strongly on the selection of the range in primary spectral type in a sample. These quantities, when derived from a binary survey with a mass-limited sample of target stars, ...

  4. Binary Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Keegan; Nakajima, Miki; Stevenson, David J.

    2014-11-01

    Can a bound pair of similar mass terrestrial planets exist? We are interested here in bodies with a mass ratio of ~ 3:1 or less (so Pluto/Charon or Earth/Moon do not qualify) and we do not regard the absence of any such discoveries in the Kepler data set to be significant since the tidal decay and merger of a close binary is prohibitively fast well inside of 1AU. SPH simulations of equal mass “Earths” were carried out to seek an answer to this question, assuming encounters that were only slightly more energetic than parabolic (zero energy). We were interested in whether the collision or near collision of two similar mass bodies would lead to a binary in which the two bodies remain largely intact, effectively a tidal capture hypothesis though with the tidal distortion being very large. Necessarily, the angular momentum of such an encounter will lead to bodies separated by only a few planetary radii if capture occurs. Consistent with previous work, mostly by Canup, we find that most impacts are disruptive, leading to a dominant mass body surrounded by a disk from which a secondary forms whose mass is small compared to the primary, hence not a binary planet by our adopted definition. However, larger impact parameter “kissing” collisions were found to produce binaries because the dissipation upon first encounter was sufficient to provide a bound orbit that was then rung down by tides to an end state where the planets are only a few planetary radii apart. The long computational times for these simulation make it difficult to fully map the phase space of encounters for which this outcome is likely but the indications are that the probability is not vanishingly small and since planetary encounters are a plausible part of planet formation, we expect binary planets to exist and be a non-negligible fraction of the larger orbital radius exoplanets awaiting discovery.

  5. Binaries are the best single stars

    CERN Document Server

    de Mink, S E; Izzard, R G

    2010-01-01

    Stellar models of massive single stars are still plagued by major uncertainties. Testing and calibrating against observations is essential for their reliability. For this purpose one preferably uses observed stars that have never experienced strong binary interaction, i.e. "true single stars". However, the binary fraction among massive stars is high and identifying "true single stars" is not straight forward. Binary interaction affects systems in such a way that the initially less massive star becomes, or appears to be, single. For example, mass transfer results in a widening of the orbit and a decrease of the luminosity of the donor star, which makes it very hard to detect. After a merger or disruption of the system by the supernova explosion, no companion will be present. The only unambiguous identification of "true single stars" is possible in detached binaries, which contain two main-sequence stars. For these systems we can exclude the occurrence of mass transfer since their birth. A further advantage is ...

  6. Binary effectivity rules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Hans; Peleg, Bezalel

    2006-01-01

    is binary if it is rationalized by an acyclic binary relation. The foregoing result motivates our definition of a binary effectivity rule as the effectivity rule of some binary SCR. A binary SCR is regular if it satisfies unanimity, monotonicity, and independence of infeasible alternatives. A binary...

  7. The Mass-Radius Relation of Young Stars, I: UScoCTIO 5, An M4.5 Eclipsing Binary in Upper Scorpius Observed By K2

    CERN Document Server

    Kraus, Adam L; Covey, Kevin R; Rizzuto, Aaron C; Mann, Andrew W; Ireland, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary models of pre-main sequence stars remain largely uncalibrated, especially for masses below that of the Sun, making each new dynamical mass and radius measurement a valuable test of theoretical models. Stellar mass dependent features of star formation (such as disk evolution, planet formation, and even the IMF) are fundamentally tied to these models, which implies a systematic uncertainty that can only be improved with precise measurements of calibrator stars. We present the discovery that UScoCTIO 5, a known spectroscopic binary (P = 34 days, Mtot sin(i) = 0.64 Msun), is an eclipsing system with both primary and secondary eclipses apparent in K2 light curves obtained during Campaign 2. We have simultaneously fit the eclipse profiles from the K2 light curves and the existing RV data to demonstrate that UScoCTIO 5 consists of a pair of nearly identical M4.5 stars with M_A = 0.329 +/- 0.002 Msun, R_A = 0.834 +/- 0.006 Rsun, M_B = 0.317 +/- 0.002 Msun, and R_B = 0.810 +/- 0.006 Rsun. The radii are br...

  8. Relativistic Binaries in Globular Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benacquista Matthew J.

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The galactic population of globular clusters are old, dense star systems, with a typical cluster containing 10^4 - 10^7 stars. As an old population of stars, globular clusters contain many collapsed and degenerate objects. As a dense population of stars, globular clusters are the scene of many interesting close dynamical interactions between stars. These dynamical interactions can alter the evolution of individual stars and can produce tight binary systems containing one or two compact objects. In this review, we discuss the theoretical models of globular cluster evolution and binary evolution, techniques for simulating this evolution which lead to relativistic binaries, and current and possible future observational evidence for this population. Globular cluster evolution will focus on the properties that boost the production of hard binary systems and on the tidal interactions of the galaxy with the cluster, which tend to alter the structure of the globular cluster with time. The interaction of the components of hard binary systems alters the evolution of both bodies and can lead to exotic objects. Direct N-body integrations and Fokker-Planck simulations of the evolution of globular clusters that incorporate tidal interactions and lead to predictions of relativistic binary populations are also discussed. We discuss the current observational evidence for cataclysmic variables, millisecond pulsars, and low-mass X-ray binaries as well as possible future detection of relativistic binaries with gravitational radiation.

  9. Relativistic Binaries in Globular Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Benacquista

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Galactic globular clusters are old, dense star systems typically containing 10^4 – 10^6 stars. As an old population of stars, globular clusters contain many collapsed and degenerate objects. As a dense population of stars, globular clusters are the scene of many interesting close dynamical interactions between stars. These dynamical interactions can alter the evolution of individual stars and can produce tight binary systems containing one or two compact objects. In this review, we discuss theoretical models of globular cluster evolution and binary evolution, techniques for simulating this evolution that leads to relativistic binaries, and current and possible future observational evidence for this population. Our discussion of globular cluster evolution will focus on the processes that boost the production of tight binary systems and the subsequent interaction of these binaries that can alter the properties of both bodies and can lead to exotic objects. Direct N-body integrations and Fokker–Planck simulations of the evolution of globular clusters that incorporate tidal interactions and lead to predictions of relativistic binary populations are also discussed. We discuss the current observational evidence for cataclysmic variables, millisecond pulsars, and low-mass X-ray binaries as well as possible future detection of relativistic binaries with gravitational radiation.

  10. SIMULTANEOUS MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF MAGNETIC ACTIVITY IN ULTRACOOL DWARFS. IV. THE ACTIVE, YOUNG BINARY NLTT 33370 AB (= 2MASS J13142039+1320011)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, P. K. G.; Berger, E.; Irwin, J.; Charbonneau, D. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Berta-Thompson, Z. K., E-mail: pwilliams@cfa.harvard.edu [MIT Kavli Institute, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We present multi-epoch simultaneous radio, optical, Hα, UV, and X-ray observations of the active, young, low-mass binary NLTT 33370 AB (blended spectral type M7e). This system is remarkable for its extreme levels of magnetic activity: it is the most radio-luminous ultracool dwarf (UCD) known, and here we show that it is also one of the most X-ray luminous UCDs known. We detect the system in all bands and find a complex phenomenology of both flaring and periodic variability. Analysis of the optical light curve reveals the simultaneous presence of two periodicities, 3.7859 ± 0.0001 and 3.7130 ± 0.0002 hr. While these differ by only ∼2%, studies of differential rotation in the UCD regime suggest that it cannot be responsible for the two signals. The system's radio emission consists of at least three components: rapid 100% polarized flares, bright emission modulating periodically in phase with the optical emission, and an additional periodic component that appears only in the 2013 observational campaign. We interpret the last of these as a gyrosynchrotron feature associated with large-scale magnetic fields and a cool, equatorial plasma torus. However, the persistent rapid flares at all rotational phases imply that small-scale magnetic loops are also present and reconnect nearly continuously. We present a spectral energy distribution of the blended system spanning more than 9 orders of magnitude in wavelength. The significant magnetism present in NLTT 33370 AB will affect its fundamental parameters, with the components' radii and temperatures potentially altered by ∼+20% and ∼–10%, respectively. Finally, we suggest spatially resolved observations that could clarify many aspects of this system's nature.

  11. X-Ray Spectra of The High-Mass X-RAY Binary 4U~1700-37 using BeppoSAX, Suzaku and RXTE Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Seifina, Elena; Shaposhnikov, Nikolai

    2016-01-01

    We present an X-ray spectral analysis of the high-mass binary 4U~1700-37 during its hard-soft state evolution. We use the BeppoSAX, Suzaku and RXTE (Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer), Suzaku and BeppoSAX observations for this investigation. We argue that the X-ray broad-band spectra during all spectral states can be adequately reproduced by a model, consisting of a low-temperature Blackbody component, two Comptonized components both due to the presence of a Compton cloud (CC) that up-scatters seed photons of $T_{s1}$~< 1.4 keV, and $T_{s2}<$1 keV, and an iron-line component. We find using this model that the photon power-law index is almost constant, $\\Gamma_{1}\\sim 2$ for all spectral states. However, $\\Gamma_{2}$ shows a behavior depending on the spectral state. Namely, $\\Gamma_{2}$ is quasi-constant at the level of $\\Gamma_{2}\\sim 2$ while the CC plasma temperature $kT^{(2)}_e$ is less than 40 keV; on the other hand, $\\Gamma_{2}$ is in the range of $1.3<\\Gamma_{2}<2$, when $kT^{(2)}_e$ is greater th...

  12. The radius and effective temperature of the binary Ap star beta CrB from CHARA/FLUOR and VLT/NACO observations

    CERN Document Server

    Bruntt, H; Merand, A; Brandao, I M; Bedding, T R; Brummelaar, T A ten; Foresto, V Coude du; Cunha, M S; Farrington, C; Goldfinger, P J; Kiss, L L; McAlister, H A; Ridgway, S T; Sturmann, J; Sturmann, L; Turner, N; Tuthill, P G

    2009-01-01

    The prospects for using asteroseismology of rapidly oscillating Ap (roAp) stars are hampered by the large uncertainty in fundamental stellar parameters. Results in the literature for the effective temperature (Teff) often span a range of 1000 K. Our goal is to reduce systematic errors and improve the Teff calibration of Ap stars based on new interferometric measurements. We obtained long-baseline interferometric observations of beta CrB using the CHARA/FLUOR instrument. To disentangle the flux contributions of the two components of this binary star, we obtained VLT/NACO adaptive optics images. We determined limb darkened angular diameters of 0.699+-0.017 mas for beta CrB A (from interferometry) and 0.415+-0.017 mas for beta CrB B (from surface brightness- color relations), corresponding to radii of 2.63+-0.09 Rsun (3.4 percent uncertainty) and 1.56+-0.07 Rsun (4.5 percent). The combined bolometric flux of the A and B components was determined from satellite UV data, spectrophotometry in the visible and broadb...

  13. Simulating relativistic binaries with Whisky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiotti, L.

    We report about our first tests and results in simulating the last phase of the coalescence and the merger of binary relativistic stars. The simulations were performed using our code Whisky and mesh refinement through the Carpet driver.

  14. A Computational Guide to Physics of Eclipsing Binaries. Paper I. Demonstrations and Perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Prsa, A

    2005-01-01

    PHOEBE (PHysics Of Eclipsing BinariEs) is a modeling package for eclipsing binary stars, built on top of the widely used WD program (Wilson & Devinney 1971). This introductory paper overviews most important scientific extensions (incorporating observational spectra of eclipsing binaries into the solution-seeking process, extracting individual temperatures from observed color indices, main-sequence constraining and proper treatment of the reddening), numerical innovations (suggested improvements to WD's Differential Corrections method, the new Nelder & Mead's downhill Simplex method) and technical aspects (back-end scripter structure, graphical user interface). While PHOEBE retains 100% WD compatibility, its add-ons are a powerful way to enhance WD by encompassing even more physics and solution reliability. The operability of all these extensions is demonstrated on a synthetic main-sequence test binary; applications to real data will be published in follow-up papers. PHOEBE is released under the GNU Ge...

  15. Testing protostellar disk formation models with ALMA observations

    CERN Document Server

    Harsono, Daniel; Bruderer, Simon; Li, Zhi-Yun; Jorgensen, Jes

    2015-01-01

    Abridged: Recent simulations have explored different ways to form accretion disks around low-mass stars. We aim to present observables to differentiate a rotationally supported disk from an infalling rotating envelope toward deeply embedded young stellar objects and infer their masses and sizes. Two 3D magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) formation simulations and 2D semi-analytical model are studied. The dust temperature structure is determined through continuum radiative transfer RADMC3D modelling. A simple temperature dependent CO abundance structure is adopted and synthetic spectrally resolved submm rotational molecular lines up to $J_{\\rm u} = 10$ are simulated. All models predict similar compact components in continuum if observed at the spatial resolutions of 0.5-1$"$ (70-140 AU) typical of the observations to date. A spatial resolution of $\\sim$14 AU and high dynamic range ($> 1000$) are required to differentiate between RSD and pseudo-disk in the continuum. The peak-position velocity diagrams indicate that the...

  16. Some observational tests of a minimal galaxy formation model

    CERN Document Server

    Cohn, J D

    2016-01-01

    Dark matter simulations can serve as a basis for creating galaxy histories via the galaxy-dark matter connection. Here, one such model by Becker (2015) is implemented with several variations on three different dark matter simulations. Stellar mass and star formation rates are assigned to all simulation subhalos at all times, using subhalo mass gain to determine stellar mass gain. The observational properties of the resulting galaxy distributions are compared to each other and observations for a range of redshifts from 0-2. Although many of the galaxy distributions seem reasonable, there are noticeable differences as simulations, subhalo mass gain definitions, or subhalo mass definitions are altered, suggesting that the model should change as these properties are varied. Agreement with observations may improve by including redshift dependence in the added-by-hand random contribution to star formation rate. There appears to be an excess of faint quiescent galaxies as well (perhaps due in part to differing defin...

  17. Coarse Estimation of Physical Parameters of Eclipsing Binaries by Means of Automative Scripting

    CERN Document Server

    Prsa, A

    2003-01-01

    Because of GAIA's estimated harvest of cca. 100.000 eclipsing binaries (Munari et al. 2001) automative procedures for extracting physical parameters from observations must be introduced. We present the preliminary results of automative scripting applied to 5 eclipsing binaries, for which photometric and radial velocity observations were taken from literature. Although the results are encouraging, extensive testing on a wider sample has to be performed.

  18. Kepler Eclipsing Binaries with Stellar Companions

    CERN Document Server

    Gies, D R; Guo, Z; Lester, K V; Orosz, J A; Peters, G J

    2015-01-01

    Many short-period binary stars have distant orbiting companions that have played a role in driving the binary components into close separation. Indirect detection of a tertiary star is possible by measuring apparent changes in eclipse times of eclipsing binaries as the binary orbits the common center of mass. Here we present an analysis of the eclipse timings of 41 eclipsing binaries observed throughout the NASA Kepler mission of long duration and precise photometry. This subset of binaries is characterized by relatively deep and frequent eclipses of both stellar components. We present preliminary orbital elements for seven probable triple stars among this sample, and we discuss apparent period changes in seven additional eclipsing binaries that may be related to motion about a tertiary in a long period orbit. The results will be used in ongoing investigations of the spectra and light curves of these binaries for further evidence of the presence of third stars.

  19. Testing quantum gravity effects with latest CMB observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inspired by quantum gravitational physics, the approach of non-commutative (NC) phase space leads to a modified dispersion relation of gravitational waves. This feature, if applied to the very early universe, gives rise to a modified power spectrum of primordial tensor perturbations with a suppression of power on large scales. We confront this phenomenon with the BICEP2 and Planck experiments, and show that inflation with the modified dispersion relation can simultaneously fit the observations better than the standard inflationary paradigm. In particular, the numerical result implies that with the latest cosmological microwave background (CMB) observations, a quantum gravity modified power spectrum of primordial tensor modes is preferred at a statistical significance of more than 3σ compared with the minimal model. Our study indicates that the potential tension between the BICEP2 and Planck data may be resolved by quantum gravity effects

  20. Observational tests of Galileon gravity with growth rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Koichi

    2016-10-01

    We compare observational data of growth rate with the prediction by Galileon theory. For the same value of the energy density parameter Ω_{m,0}, the growth rate in Galileon models is enhanced compared with the Λ CDM case, due to the enhancement of Newton's constant. The smaller Ω_{m,0} is, the more suppressed growth rate is. Hence the best fit value of Ω_{m,0} in the Galileon model is 0.16 from only the growth rate data, which is considerably smaller than such value obtained from observations of supernovae Ia, the cosmic microwave background and baryon acoustic oscillations. We also find the upper limit of the Brans-Dicke parameter to be ω < -1000 (1σ ), from the growth rate data. In this paper, specific galileon models are considered, not the entire class. More and better growth rate data are required to distinguish between dark energy and modified gravity.

  1. Almost compatible observables in quantum tests of contextuality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guehne, Otfried [Institut fuer Quantenoptik und Quanteninformation, Oesterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Innsbruck (Austria); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Innsbruck (Austria); Kleinmann, Matthias [Institut fuer Quantenoptik und Quanteninformation, Oesterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Innsbruck (Austria); Cabello, Adan [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada II, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); Larsson, Jan-Ake [Institutionen foer Systemteknik och Matematiska Institutionen, Linkoepings Universitet (Sweden); Kirchmair, Gerhard; Zaehringer, Florian; Gerritsma, Rene; Blatt, Rainer; Roos, Christian [Institut fuer Quantenoptik und Quanteninformation, Oesterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Innsbruck (Austria); Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet Innsbruck (Austria)

    2010-07-01

    The Kochen-Specker-Theorem proves that in a hidden variable description of a quantum system, the value of a particular property (observable) depends on the context in which the value is to be revealed. The conflict here is between the hidden variable approach and the theory of quantum mechanics. In order to establish this conflict as the inability to employ a hidden variable description of an actual experiment, it has been suggested to extend the notion of non-contextuality to sequential measurements of compatible observables. However, in an experimental implementation the requirement of perfect compatibility cannot be reached. We show that this ''compatibility loophole'' can be addressed and that a recent experiment using trapped ions then excludes a large class of non-contextual hidden variable models.

  2. Observational Tests to Detect Photometric Reverberation in H-alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joner, Michael D.; Carroll, Carla

    2014-06-01

    We present photometric observations of several AGN that were secured with the 0.9-m telescope located at the West Mountain Observatory that is operated by Brigham Young University. The new observations use standard BVR filters along with several custom filters that are part of a red shifted H-alpha set. Light curves are presented for several of the targets along with a summary of the analysis made to detect lag times between the continuum and broad emission line flux as evidence for photometric reverberation. Plans are presented for future research that will continue along these lines.We thank the Department of Physics and Astronomy along with the College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences at Brigham Young University for continued support of the research work being done at the West Mountain Observatory.

  3. Testing the Empirical Shock Arrival Model Using Quadrature Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Makela, P.; Xie, H.; Yashiro, S.

    2013-01-01

    The empirical shock arrival (ESA) model was developed based on quadrature data from Helios (in situ) and P-78 (remote sensing) to predict the Sun-Earth travel time of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The ESA model requires earthward CME speed as input, which is not directly measurable from coronagraphs along the Sun-Earth line. The Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) were in quadrature during 20102012, so the speeds of Earth-directed CMEs were observed with minimal projection effects. We identified a set of 20 full halo CMEs in the field of view of SOHO that were also observed in quadrature by STEREO. We used the earthward speed from STEREO measurements as input to the ESA model and compared the resulting travel times with the observed ones from L1 monitors. We find that the model predicts the CME travel time within about 7.3 h, which is similar to the predictions by the ENLIL model. We also find that CME-CME and CME-coronal hole interaction can lead to large deviations from model predictions.

  4. Design and Implementation of BDB, the Binary Star Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaygorodov, P.; Kovaleva, D.; Malkov, O.

    2013-02-01

    The Binary star DataBase (BDB, http://bdb.inasan.ru) is created to provide liasons between binary star catalogue data of various origin. Information on different observational types of binaries is obtained from heterogeneous sources of data - astronomical catalogues and surveys. The database allows a variety of query options useful for selected stars investigation purposes, for binary observations planning, and for construction and examination of binary datasets with certain characteristics.

  5. Constraining Binary Stellar Evolution With Pulsar Timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdman, Robert D.; Stairs, I. H.; Backer, D. C.; Burgay, M.; Camilo, F.; D'Amico, N.; Demorest, P.; Faulkner, A.; Hobbs, G.; Kramer, M.; Lorimer, D. R.; Lyne, A. G.; Manchester, R.; McLaughlin, M.; Nice, D. J.; Possenti, A.

    2006-06-01

    The Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey has yielded a significant number of very interesting binary and millisecond pulsars. Two of these objects are part of an ongoing timing study at the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). PSR J1756-2251 is a double-neutron star (DNS) binary system. It is similar to the original Hulse-Taylor binary pulsar system PSR B1913+16 in its orbital properties, thus providing another important opportunity to test the validity of General Relativity, as well as the evolutionary history of DNS systems through mass measurements. PSR J1802-2124 is part of the relatively new and unstudied "intermediate-mass" class of binary system, which typically have spin periods in the tens of milliseconds, and/or relatively massive (> 0.7 solar masses) white dwarf companions. With our GBT observations, we have detected the Shapiro delay in this system, allowing us to constrain the individual masses of the neutron star and white dwarf companion, and thus the mass-transfer history, in this unusual system.

  6. A Strict Test of Stellar Evolution Models: The Absolute Dimensions of Massive Benchmark Eclipsing Binary V578 Mon

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia, E V; Pavlovski, K; Hensberge, H; Chew, Y Gómez Maqueo; Claret, A \\

    2014-01-01

    We determine the absolute dimensions of the eclipsing binary V578 Mon, a detached system of two early B-type stars (B0V + B1V, P$=$2.40848 d) in the star-forming region NGC 2244 of the Rosette Nebula. From the light curve analysis of 40 yr of photometry and the analysis of HERMES spectra, we find radii of $5.41\\pm0.04$ Rsun and $4.29\\pm 0.05$ Rsun, and temperatures of $ 30000\\pm 500$~K and $ 25750\\pm 435$ K respectively. We find that our disentangled component spectra for V578 Mon agree well previous spectral disentangling from the literature. We also reconfirm the previous spectroscopic orbit of V578 Mon finding that masses of $ 14.54\\pm 0.08$ Msun and $ 10.29\\pm 0.06$ Msun are fully compatible with the new analysis. We compare the absolute dimensions to the rotating models of the Geneva and Utrecht groups and the models of Granada group. We find all three sets of models marginally reproduce the absolute dimensions of both stars with a common age within uncertainty for gravity-effective temperature isochrone...

  7. Testing the validity of the phenomenological gravitational waveform models for nonspinning binary black hole searches at low masses

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, Hee-Suk

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenological gravitational waveform models, i.e. the PhenomA, the PhenomB and the PhenomC, generate full inspiral-merger-ringdown waveforms of coalescing binary back holes (BBHs). These models are defined in the Fourier domain and thus can be used for fast matched filtering in the gravitational wave search. The PhenomA has been developed for nonspinning BBH waveforms, while the PhenomB and the PhenomC can model the nonprecessing BBH waveforms. In this work, we study the validity of the phenomenological models for nonspinning BBH searches at low masses, $m_{1,2}\\geq 4 M_{sun}$ and $m_1+m_2\\equiv M \\leq 30 M_{sun}$, with Advanced LIGO sensitivity. As our complete signal waveform model, we adopt the EOBNRv2 that is a time domain inspiral-merger-ringdown waveform model. To investigate the search efficiency of the phenomenological templates, we calculate fitting factors by exploring overlap surfaces. We find that only the PhenomC is valid to obtain the fitting factors better than 0.97 in the mass range of ...

  8. Testing the Kerr Paradigm with X-ray Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Bambi, Cosimo

    2015-01-01

    Astrophysical black hole candidates are thought to be the Kerr black holes of general relativity, but the actual nature of these objects has still to be confirmed. The continuum-fitting and the iron line methods are currently the only available techniques to probe the spacetime geometry around these bodies and test the Kerr black hole paradigm. The continuum-fitting method is a robust approach, but the shape of the disk's thermal spectrum is in general too simple to measure the spin and to constrain possible deviations from the Kerr solution at the same time. The iron line analysis is potentially a powerful technique, but at the moment we do not have high quality data and a robust astrophysical model.

  9. SWIFT X-RAY TELESCOPE TIMING OBSERVATIONS OF THE BLACK HOLE BINARY SWIFT J1753.5-0127: DISK-DILUTED FLUCTUATIONS IN THE OUTBURST PEAK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a careful analysis of the instrumental effects on the Poisson noise to demonstrate the feasibility of detailed stochastic variability studies with the Swift X-Ray Telescope (XRT), we analyze the variability of the black hole X-ray binary SWIFT J1753.5–0127 in all XRT observations during 2005-2010. We present the evolution of the power spectral components along the outburst in two energy bands: soft (0.5-2 keV) and hard (2-10 keV), and in the hard band we find results consistent with those from the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). The advantage of the XRT is that we can also explore the soft band not covered by RXTE. The source has previously been suggested to host an accretion disk extending down to close to the black hole in the low hard state, and to show low-frequency variability in the soft-band intrinsic to this disk. Our results are consistent with this, with stronger low-frequency variability at low intensities in the soft than in the hard band. From our analysis, we are able to present the first measurements of the soft-band variability in the peak of the outburst. We find the soft band to be less variable than the hard band, especially at high frequencies, opposite to what is seen at low intensity. Both results can be explained within the framework of a simple two emission-region model where the hot flow is more variable in the peak of the outburst and the disk is more variable at low intensities.

  10. The Mass-Radius Relation of Young Stars. I. USco 5, an M4.5 Eclipsing Binary in Upper Scorpius Observed by K2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Adam L.; Cody, Ann Marie; Covey, Kevin R.; Rizzuto, Aaron C.; Mann, Andrew W.; Ireland, Michael J.

    2015-07-01

    We present the discovery that UScoCTIO 5, a known spectroscopic binary in the Upper Scorpius star-forming region (P = 34 days, {M}{tot}{sin}(i)=0.64 {M}⊙ ), is an eclipsing system with both primary and secondary eclipses apparent in K2 light curves obtained during Campaign 2. We have simultaneously fit the eclipse profiles from the K2 light curves and the existing RV data to demonstrate that UScoCTIO 5 consists of a pair of nearly identical M4.5 stars with {M}A=0.329+/- 0.002 {M}⊙ , {R}A=0.834+/- 0.006 {R}⊙ , {M}B=0.317+/- 0.002 {M}⊙ , and {R}B=0.810+/- 0.006 {R}⊙ . The radii are broadly consistent with pre-main-sequence ages predicted by stellar evolutionary models, but none agree to within the uncertainties. All models predict systematically incorrect masses at the 25%-50% level for the HR diagram position of these mid-M dwarfs, suggesting significant modifications to mass-dependent outcomes of star and planet formation. The form of the discrepancy for most model sets is not that they predict luminosities that are too low, but rather that they predict temperatures that are too high, suggesting that the models do not fully encompass the physics of energy transport (via convection and/or missing opacities) and/or a miscalibration of the SpT-{T}{eff} scale. The simplest modification to the models (changing {T}{eff} to match observations) would yield an older age for this system, in line with the recently proposed older age of Upper Scorpius (τ ˜ 11 Myr).

  11. Testing hypotheses about glacial cycles against the observational record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Robert K.; Juselius, Katarina

    2013-01-01

    We estimate an identified cointegrated vector autoregression model of the climate system to test hypotheses about the physical mechanisms that may drive glacial cycles during the late Pleistocene. Results indicate that a permanent doubling of CO2 generates a 11.1°C rise in Antarctic temperature. Large variations in atmospheric CO2 over glacial cycles are driven by changes in sea ice and sea surface temperature in southern oceans and marine biological activity. The latter can be represented by a two-step process in which iron dust increases biological activity and the increase in biological activity reduces CO2 concentrations. Glacial variations in ice volume, as proxied by δ18O are driven by changes in CO2 concentrations, global and high latitude solar insolation, latitudinal gradients in solar insolation, and the atmospheric concentration of CO2. The model is able to quantify the effects of ice volume and temperature on sea level, such that in the long-run, sea level rises 14 m per 0.11‰ δ18O and about 17 m/°C of sea surface temperature in southern oceans. Beyond these specific results, the multivariate model suggests omitted variables may bias bivariate analyses of these mechanisms.

  12. RXTE/ASM and Swift/BAT Observations of Spectral Transitions in Bright X-ray Binaries in 2005-2010

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Jing; Yu, Wenfei; Yan, Zhen

    2010-01-01

    We have studied X-ray spectral state transitions that can be seen in the long- term monitoring light curves of bright X-ray binaries from the All-Sky Monitor (ASM) on board the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on board Swift during a period of five years from 2005 to 2010. We have applied a program to automatically identify the hard-to-soft (H-S) spectral state transitions in the bright X- ray binaries monitored by the ASM and the BAT. In total we identif...

  13. A synthetic model of the gravitational wave background from evolving binary compact objects

    CERN Document Server

    Dvorkin, Irina; Vangioni, Elisabeth; Silk, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Modeling the stochastic gravitational wave background from various astrophysical sources is a key objective in view of upcoming observations with ground- and space-based gravitational wave observatories such as Advanced LIGO, VIRGO, eLISA and PTA. We develop a synthetic model framework that follows the evolution of single and binary compact objects in an astrophysical context. We describe the formation and merger rates of binaries, the evolution of their orbital parameters with time and the spectrum of emitted gravitational waves at different stages of binary evolution. Our approach is modular and allows us to test and constrain different ingredients of the model, including stellar evolution, black hole formation scenarios and the properties of binary systems. We use this framework in the context of a particularly well-motivated astrophysical setup to calculate the gravitational wave background from several types of sources, including inspiraling stellar-mass binary black holes that have not merged during a H...

  14. Projected Constraints on Scalarization with Gravitational Waves from Neutron Star Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Sampson, Laura; Cornish, Neil; Ponce, Marcelo; Barausse, Enrico; Klein, Antoine; Palenzuela, Carlos; Lehner, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Certain scalar-tensor theories have the property of endowing stars with scalar hair, sourced either by the star's own compactness (spontaneous scalarization) or, for binary systems, by the companion's scalar hair (induced scalarization) or by the orbital binding energy (dynamical scalarization). Scalarized stars in binaries present different conservative dynamics than in General Relativity, and can also excite a scalar mode in the metric perturbation that carries away dipolar radiation. As a result, the binary orbit shrinks faster than predicted in General Relativity, modifying the rate of decay of the orbital period. In spite of this, scalar-tensor theories can pass existing binary pulsar tests, because observed pulsars may not be compact enough or sufficiently orbitally bound to activate scalarization. Gravitational waves emitted during the last stages of compact binary inspirals are thus ideal probes of scalarization effects. For the standard projected sensitivity of advanced LIGO, we here show that, if ne...

  15. Pulsar observations with European telescopes for testing gravity and detecting gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Perrodin, D; Janssen, G H; Karuppusamy, R; Kramer, M; Lee, K; Liu, K; McKee, J; Purver, M; Sanidas, S; Smits, R; Stappers, B W; Zhu, W; Concu, R; Melis, A; Burgay, M; Casu, S; Corongiu, A; Egron, E; Iacolina, N; Pellizzoni, A; Pilia, M; Trois, A

    2016-01-01

    A background of nanohertz gravitational waves from supermassive black hole binaries could soon be detected by pulsar timing arrays, which measure the times-of-arrival of radio pulses from millisecond pulsars with very high precision. The European Pulsar Timing Array uses five large European radio telescopes to monitor high-precision millisecond pulsars, imposing in this way strong constraints on a gravitational wave background. To achieve the necessary precision needed to detect gravitational waves, the Large European Array for Pulsars (LEAP) performs simultaneous observations of pulsars with all five telescopes, which allows us to coherently add the radio pulses, maximize the signal-to-noise of pulsar signals and increase the precision of times-of-arrival. We report on the progress made and results obtained by the LEAP collaboration, and in particular on the addition of the Sardinia Radio Telescope to the LEAP observations during its scientific validation phase. In addition, we discuss how LEAP can be used t...

  16. A macroscopic violation of no-signaling in time inequalities? How to test temporal entanglement with behavioral observables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tressoldi, Patrizio E; Maier, Markus A; Buechner, Vanessa L; Khrennikov, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we applied for the first time the no-signaling in time (NSIT) formalism discussed by Kofler and Brukner (2013) to investigate temporal entanglement between binary human behavioral unconscious choices at t1 with binary random outcomes at t2. NSIT consists of a set of inequalities and represents mathematical conditions for macro-realism which require only two measurements in time. The analyses of three independent experiments show a strong violation of NSIT in two out of three of them, suggesting the hypothesis of a quantum-like temporal entanglement between human choices at t1 with binary random outcomes at t2. We discuss the potentialities of using NSIT to test temporal entanglement with behavioral measures.

  17. A Macroscopic Violation of No Signaling In Time Inequalities? How to test Temporal Entanglement with Behavioral Observables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizio E Tressoldi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we applied for the first time the no-signaling in time (NSIT formalism discussed by Kofler and Brukner to investigate temporal entanglement between binary human behavioral unconscious choices at t1 with binary random outcomes at t2. NSIT consists of a set of inequalities and represents mathematical conditions for macro-realism which require only two measurements in time. The analyses of three independent experiments show a strong violation of NSIT in two out of three of them, suggesting the hypothesis of a quantum-like temporal entanglement between human choices at t1 with binary random outcomes at t2. We discuss the potentialities of using NSIT to test temporal entanglement with behavioral measures.

  18. Resonant Transneptunian Binaries: Evidence for Slow Migration of Neptune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Keith S.; Grundy, W. M.; Schlichting, H. E.; Murray-Clay, R. A.; Benecchi, S. B.

    2012-01-01

    As Neptune migrated, its mean-motion resonances preceded it into the planetesimal disk. The efficiency of capture into mean motion resonances depends on the smoothness of Neptune's migration and the local population available to be captured. The two strongest resonances, the 3:2 at 39.4 AU and 2:1 at 47.7 AU, straddle the core repository of the physically distinct and binary-rich Cold Classicals, providing a unique opportunity to test the details of Neptune's migration. Smooth migration should result in a measurable difference between the 3:2 and 2:1 resonant object properties, with low inclination 2:1s having a high fraction of red binaries, mirroring that of the Cold Classicals while the 3:2 will would have fewer binaries. Rapid migration would generate a more homogeneous result. Resonant objects observed with HST show a higher rate of binaries in the 2:1 relative to the 3:2, significant at the 2cr level. This suggests slow Neptune migration over a large enough distance that the 2:1 swept through the Cold Classical region. Colors are available for only a fraction of these targets but a prevalence of red objects in outer Resonances has been reported. We report here on ongoing observations with HST in cycle 19 targeting all unobserved Resonants with observations that will measure color and search for binary companions using the WFC3.

  19. Resolved Companions of Cepheids: Testing the Candidates with X-Ray Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Nancy Remage; Pillitteri, Ignazio; Wolk, Scott; Karovska, Margarita; Tingle, Evan; Guinan, Edward; Engle, Scott; Bond, Howard E.; Schaefer, Gail H.; Mason, Brian D.

    2016-04-01

    We have made XMM-Newton observations of 14 Galactic Cepheids that have candidate resolved (≥5″) companion stars based on our earlier HST Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) imaging survey. Main-sequence stars that are young enough to be physical companions of Cepheids are expected to be strong X-ray producers in contrast to field stars. XMM-Newton exposures were set to detect essentially all companions hotter than spectral type M0 (corresponding to 0.5 M⊙). The large majority of our candidate companions were not detected in X-rays, and hence are not confirmed as young companions. One resolved candidate (S Nor #4) was unambiguously detected, but the Cepheid is a member of a populous cluster. For this reason, it is likely that S Nor #4 is a cluster member rather than a gravitationally bound companion. Two further Cepheids (S Mus and R Cru) have X-ray emission that might be produced by either the Cepheid or the candidate resolved companion. A subsequent Chandra observation of S Mus shows that the X-rays are at the location of the Cepheid/spectroscopic binary. R Cru and also V659 Cen (also X-ray bright) have possible companions closer than 5″ (the limit for this study) which are the likely sources of X-rays. One final X-ray detection (V473 Lyr) has no known optical companion, so the prime suspect is the Cepheid itself. It is a unique Cepheid with a variable amplitude. The 14 stars that we observed with XMM constitute 36% of the 39 Cepheids found to have candidate companions in our HST/WFC3 optical survey. No young probable binary companions were found with separations of ≥5″ or 4000 au. Based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and the USA (NASA).

  20. Clostridium difficile binary toxin CDT

    OpenAIRE

    Gerding, Dale N.; Johnson, Stuart; Rupnik, Maja; Aktories, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Binary toxin (CDT) is frequently observed in Clostridium difficile strains associated with increased severity of C. difficile infection (CDI). CDT belongs to the family of binary ADP-ribosylating toxins consisting of two separate toxin components: CDTa, the enzymatic ADP-ribosyltransferase which modifies actin, and CDTb which binds to host cells and translocates CDTa into the cytosol. CDTb is activated by serine proteases and binds to lipolysis stimulated lipoprotein receptor. ADP-ribosylatio...

  1. Testing lifting capacity : Validity of determining effort level by means of observation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reneman, M.F; Fokkens, A.S.; Dijkstra, P.U.; Geertzen, J.H.B.; Groothoff, J.W.

    2005-01-01

    Study Design. Video observation study. Objectives. To establish the validity of determining effort level by visual observation of a lifting test. Summary of Background Data. Determining effort level during a lifting test is critical for interpretation of test performance, yet the validity of these d

  2. RESOLVED COMPANIONS OF CEPHEIDS: TESTING THE CANDIDATES WITH X-RAY OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Nancy Remage; Pillitteri, Ignazio; Wolk, Scott; Karovska, Margarita; Tingle, Evan [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, MS 4, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Guinan, Edward; Engle, Scott [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Villanova University, 800 Lancaster Ave., Villanova, PA 19085 (United States); Bond, Howard E. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Schaefer, Gail H. [The CHARA Array of Georgia State University, Mount Wilson, California 91023 (United States); Mason, Brian D., E-mail: nevans@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: heb11@psu.edu, E-mail: schaefer@chara-array.org [US Naval Observatory, 3450 Massachusetts Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20392-5420 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    We have made XMM-Newton observations of 14 Galactic Cepheids that have candidate resolved (≥5″) companion stars based on our earlier HST Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) imaging survey. Main-sequence stars that are young enough to be physical companions of Cepheids are expected to be strong X-ray producers in contrast to field stars. XMM-Newton exposures were set to detect essentially all companions hotter than spectral type M0 (corresponding to 0.5 M{sub ⊙}). The large majority of our candidate companions were not detected in X-rays, and hence are not confirmed as young companions. One resolved candidate (S Nor #4) was unambiguously detected, but the Cepheid is a member of a populous cluster. For this reason, it is likely that S Nor #4 is a cluster member rather than a gravitationally bound companion. Two further Cepheids (S Mus and R Cru) have X-ray emission that might be produced by either the Cepheid or the candidate resolved companion. A subsequent Chandra observation of S Mus shows that the X-rays are at the location of the Cepheid/spectroscopic binary. R Cru and also V659 Cen (also X-ray bright) have possible companions closer than 5″ (the limit for this study) which are the likely sources of X-rays. One final X-ray detection (V473 Lyr) has no known optical companion, so the prime suspect is the Cepheid itself. It is a unique Cepheid with a variable amplitude. The 14 stars that we observed with XMM constitute 36% of the 39 Cepheids found to have candidate companions in our HST/WFC3 optical survey. No young probable binary companions were found with separations of ≥5″ or 4000 au.

  3. Evolution of binary stars in multiple-population globular clusters - II. Compact binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jongsuk; Vesperini, Enrico; Sollima, Antonio; McMillan, Stephen L. W.; D'Antona, Franca; D'Ercole, Annibale

    2016-04-01

    We present the results of a survey of N-body simulations aimed at exploring the evolution of compact binaries in multiple-population globular clusters. We show that as a consequence of the initial differences in the structural properties of the first-generation (FG) and the second-generation (SG) populations and the effects of dynamical processes on binary stars, the SG binary fraction decreases more rapidly than that of the FG population. The difference between the FG and SG binary fraction is qualitatively similar to but quantitatively smaller than that found for wider binaries in our previous investigations. The evolution of the radial variation of the binary fraction is driven by the interplay between binary segregation, ionization and ejection. Ionization and ejection counteract in part the effects of mass segregation but for compact binaries the effects of segregation dominate and the inner binary fraction increases during the cluster evolution. We explore the variation of the difference between the FG and the SG binary fraction with the distance from the cluster centre and its dependence on the binary binding energy and cluster structural parameters. The difference between the binary fraction in the FG and the SG populations found in our simulations is consistent with the results of observational studies finding a smaller binary fraction in the SG population.

  4. Magnetic braking in ultracompact binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Farmer, Alison

    2010-01-01

    Angular momentum loss in ultracompact binaries, such as the AM Canum Venaticorum stars, is usually assumed to be due entirely to gravitational radiation. Motivated by the outflows observed in ultracompact binaries, we investigate whether magnetically coupled winds could in fact lead to substantial additional angular momentum losses. We remark that the scaling relations often invoked for the relative importance of gravitational and magnetic braking do not apply, and instead use simple non-empirical expressions for the braking rates. In order to remove significant angular momentum, the wind must be tied to field lines anchored in one of the binary's component stars; uncertainties remain as to the driving mechanism for such a wind. In the case of white dwarf accretors, we find that magnetic braking can potentially remove angular momentum on comparable or even shorter timescales than gravitational waves over a large range in orbital period. We present such a solution for the 17-minute binary AM CVn itself which a...

  5. The Palomar Kernel Phase Experiment: Testing Kernel Phase Interferometry for Ground-based Astronomical Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Pope, Benjamin; Hinkley, Sasha; Ireland, Michael J; Greenbaum, Alexandra; Latyshev, Alexey; Monnier, John D; Martinache, Frantz

    2015-01-01

    At present, the principal limitation on the resolution and contrast of astronomical imaging instruments comes from aberrations in the optical path, which may be imposed by the Earth's turbulent atmosphere or by variations in the alignment and shape of the telescope optics. These errors can be corrected physically, with active and adaptive optics, and in post-processing of the resulting image. A recently-developed adaptive optics post-processing technique, called kernel phase interferometry, uses linear combinations of phases that are self-calibrating with respect to small errors, with the goal of constructing observables that are robust against the residual optical aberrations in otherwise well-corrected imaging systems. Here we present a direct comparison between kernel phase and the more established competing techniques, aperture masking interferometry, point spread function (PSF) fitting and bispectral analysis. We resolve the alpha Ophiuchi binary system near periastron, using the Palomar 200-Inch Telesco...

  6. Third generation stellar models for asteroseismology of hot B subdwarf stars. A test of accuracy with the pulsating eclipsing binary PG 1336--018

    CERN Document Server

    Van Grootel, Valerie; Brassard, Pierre; Fontaine, Gilles; Green, Elizabeth M

    2013-01-01

    Context. Asteroseismic determinations of structural parameters of hot B subdwarfs (sdB) have been carried out for more than a decade now. These analyses rely on stellar models whose reliability for the required task needs to be evaluated critically. Aims. We present new models of the so-called third generation (3G) dedicated to the asteroseismology of sdB stars. These parameterized models are complete static structures suitable for analyzing both p- and g-mode pulsators, contrary to the former second generation (2G) models that were limited to p-modes. While the reliability of the 2G models has been successfully verified in the past, this important test still has to be conducted on the 3G structures. Methods. The close eclipsing binary PG 1336-018 provides a unique opportunity to test the reliability of sdB models. We compared the structural parameters of the sdB component in PG 1336-018 obtained from asteroseismology based on the 3G models, with those derived independently from the modeling of the reflection...

  7. Microlensing modulation by binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Dubath, F; Durrer, R; Dubath, Florian; Gasparini, Maria Alice; Durrer, Ruth

    2006-01-01

    We compute the effect of the lens quadrupole on microlensing. The time dependence of the quadrupole can lead to specific modulations of the amplification signal. We study especially binary system lenses in our galaxy. The modulation is observable if the rotation period of the system is smaller than the time over which the amplification is significant and if the impact parameter of the passing light ray is sufficiently close to the Einstein radius so that the amplification is very large. Observations of this modulation can reveal important information on the quadrupole and thus on the gravitational radiation emitted by the lens.

  8. A Comparison of the Variability of the Symbiotic X-ray Binaries GX 1+4, 4U 1954+31, and 4U 1700+24 from Swift/BAT and RXTE/ASM Observations

    OpenAIRE

    Corbet, R.H.D.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Mukai, K; Markwardt, C. B.; Tueller, J.

    2007-01-01

    We present an analysis of the X-ray variability of three symbiotic X-ray binaries, GX 1+4, 4U 1700+24, and 4U 1954+31, using observations made with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) All-Sky Monitor (ASM). Observations of 4U 1954+31 with the Swift BAT show modulation at a period near 5 hours. Models to explain this modulation are discussed including the presence of an exceptionally slow X-ray pulsar in the system and accretion instabilities. We co...

  9. Stability of binaries. Part II: Rubble-pile binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ishan

    2016-10-01

    We consider the stability of the binary asteroids whose members are granular aggregates held together by self-gravity alone. A binary is said to be stable whenever both its members are orbitally and structurally stable to both orbital and structural perturbations. To this end, we extend the stability analysis of Sharma (Sharma [2015] Icarus, 258, 438-453), that is applicable to binaries with rigid members, to the case of binary systems with rubble members. We employ volume averaging (Sharma et al. [2009] Icarus, 200, 304-322), which was inspired by past work on elastic/fluid, rotating and gravitating ellipsoids. This technique has shown promise when applied to rubble-pile ellipsoids, but requires further work to settle some of its underlying assumptions. The stability test is finally applied to some suspected binary systems, viz., 216 Kleopatra, 624 Hektor and 90 Antiope. We also see that equilibrated binaries that are close to mobilizing their maximum friction can sustain only a narrow range of shapes and, generally, congruent shapes are preferred.

  10. Testing the Magnetar Model via Late Time Radio Observations of Two Macronova Candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Horesh, Assaf; Piran, Tsvi; Nakar, Ehud; Hancock, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Compact binary mergers may have already been observed as they are the leading model for short gamma-ray bursts (sGRBs). Radioactive decay within the ejecta from these mergers is expected to produce an infra-red flare, dubbed macronova (or kilonova), on a time scale of a week. Recently two such macronova candidates were identified in followup observations of sGRBs, strengthening the possibility that those indeed arise from mergers. The same ejecta will also produce a long term (months to years) radio emission due to its interaction with the surrounding ISM. In search for this emission, we observed the two macronova candidates, GRB 130603B and GRB 060614 with the Jansky very large array (VLA) and the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). Our observations resulted in null-detections, putting strong upper limits on the kinetic energy and mass of the ejecta. A possible outcome of a merger is a highly magnetized neutron star (a magnetar), which has been suggested as the central engine for GRBs. Such a magnetar ...

  11. TESTING THE MAGNETAR MODEL VIA LATE-TIME RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF TWO MACRONOVA CANDIDATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horesh, Assaf [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel); Hotokezaka, Kenta; Piran, Tsvi [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Nakar, Ehud [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Hancock, Paul [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth WA 6845 (Australia)

    2016-03-10

    Compact binary mergers may have already been observed as they are the leading model for short gamma-ray bursts (sGRBs). Radioactive decay within the ejecta from these mergers is expected to produce an infrared flare, dubbed macronova (or kilonova), on a timescale of a week. Recently, two such macronova candidates were identified in followup observations of sGRBs, strengthening the possibility that those indeed arise from mergers. The same ejecta will also produce long-term (months to years) radio emission due to its interaction with the surrounding interstellar medium. In the search for this emission, we observed the two macronova candidates, GRB 130603B and GRB 060614, with the Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). Our observations resulted in null-detections, putting strong upper limits on the kinetic energy and mass of the ejecta. A possible outcome of a merger is a highly magnetized neutron star (a magnetar), which has been suggested as the central engine for GRBs. Such a magnetar will deposit a significant fraction of its energy into the ejecta leading to a brighter radio flare. Our results, therefore, rule out magnetars in these two events.

  12. Detection of unresolved binaries with multicolor photometry

    CERN Document Server

    Chulkov, D; Malkov, O; Sichevskij, S; Krussanova, N; Mironov, A; Zakharov, A; Kniazev, A

    2016-01-01

    The principal goal of this paper is to specify conditions of detection of unresolved binaries by multicolor photometry. We have developed a method for estimating the critical distance at which an unresolved binary of given mass and age can be detected. The method is applied to the photometric system of the planned Lyra-B spaceborne experiment. We have shown that some types of unresolved binary stars can be discovered and distinguished from single stars solely by means of photometric observations.

  13. Asteroid Systems: Binaries, Triples, and Pairs

    CERN Document Server

    Margot, Jean-Luc; Taylor, Patrick; Carry, Benoît; Jacobson, Seth

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, the number of known binary near-Earth asteroids has more than quadrupled and the number of known large main belt asteroids with satellites has doubled. Half a dozen triple asteroids have been discovered, and the previously unrecognized populations of asteroid pairs and small main belt binaries have been identified. The current observational evidence confirms that small (20 km) binaries with small satellites are most likely created during large collisions.

  14. Testing over-representation of observations in subsets of a DEA technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmild, Mette; Hougaard, Jens Leth; Olesen, Ole Bent

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a test for whether data are over-represented in a given production zone, i.e. a subset of a production possibility set which has been estimated using the non-parametric Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) approach. A binomial test is used that relates the number of observations in...... space. Potential applications include tests for whether benchmark units dominate more (or less) observations than expected....

  15. The relativistic pulsar-white dwarf binary PSR J1738+0333 II. The most stringent test of scalar-tensor gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Freire, Paulo C C; Esposito-Farèse, Gilles; Verbiest, Joris P W; Bailes, Matthew; Jacoby, Bryan A; Kramer, Michael; Stairs, Ingrid H; Antoniadis, John; Janssen, Gemma H

    2012-01-01

    (abridged) We report the results of a 10-year timing campaign on PSR J1738+0333, a 5.85-ms pulsar in a low-eccentricity 8.5-hour orbit with a low-mass white dwarf companion (...) The measurements of proper motion and parallax allow for a precise subtraction of the kinematic contribution to the observed orbital decay; this results in a significant measurement of the intrinsic orbital decay: (-25.9 +/- 3.2) \\times 10^{-15} s/s. This is consistent with the orbital decay from the emission of gravitational waves predicted by general relativity, (-27.7 +1.5/-1.9) \\times 10^{-15} s/s (...). This agreement introduces a tight upper limit on dipolar gravitational wave emission, a prediction of most alternative theories of gravity for asymmetric binary systems such as this. We use this limit to derive the most stringent constraints ever on a wide class of gravity theories, where gravity involves a scalar field contribution. When considering general scalar-tensor theories of gravity, our new bounds are more stringent tha...

  16. Moving beyond the binary with disordered eating research: a test and extension of objectification theory with bisexual women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewster, Melanie E; Velez, Brandon L; Esposito, Jessica; Wong, Stephanie; Geiger, Elizabeth; Keum, Brian TaeHyuk; Keum, Taehyuk Brian

    2014-01-01

    In predicting disordered eating, the core model of objectification theory (Fredrickson & Roberts, 1997) has been replicated and extended in research across most sexual minority groups (e.g., Haines et al., 2008; Wiseman & Moradi, 2010), but not bisexual women. The present study tested the tenets of objectification theory with a sample of 316 bisexual women and further extended this theory by examining the roles of 2 minority stressors-antibisexual discrimination and internalized biphobia-that are contextually salient for bisexual women. A latent variable structural equation model was conducted, and the model yielded a good fit to the data. Antibisexual discrimination and internalized biphobia (but not sexual objectification experiences) yielded significant unique links with internalization of sociocultural standards of attractiveness (internalization of CSA). Next, internalization of CSA yielded a significant unique link with body surveillance. In addition, antibisexual discrimination, internalization of CSA, and body surveillance yielded significant unique links with body shame. Finally, sexual objectification experiences, internalization of CSA, and body shame yielded significant unique links with eating disorder symptomatology. Beyond the direct relations, antibisexual discrimination yielded significant positive indirect links with body surveillance, body shame, and eating disorder symptoms. Internalization of CSA yielded significant positive indirect links with body shame and eating disorder symptoms. Lastly, body surveillance yielded a significant positive indirect link with eating disorder symptoms. Implications for research and practice with bisexual women are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24188653

  17. Binary Black Hole merger in f(R) theory

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Zhoujian; Li, Li-Fang

    2016-01-01

    In the near future, gravitational wave detection is set to become an important observational tool for astrophysics. It will provide us with an excellent means to distinguish different gravitational theories. In effective form, many gravitational theories can be cast into an f(R) theory. In this article, we study the dynamics and gravitational waveform of an equal-mass binary black hole system in f(R) theory. We reduce the equations of motion in f(R) theory to the Einstein-Klein-Gordon coupled equations. In this form, it is straightforward to modify our existing numerical relativistic codes to simulate binary black hole mergers in f(R) theory. We considered binary black holes surrounded by a shell of scalar field. We solve the initial data numerically using the Olliptic code. The evolution part is calculated using the extended AMSSNCKU code. Both codes were updated and tested to solve the problem of binary black holes in f(R) theory. Our results show that the binary black hole dynamics in f(R) theory is more c...

  18. Formation and evolution of X-ray binaries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    We review recent progress in theoretical understanding of X-ray binaries,which has largely been driven by new observations.We select several topics including formation of compact low-mass X-ray binaries,the evolutionary connection between low-mass X-ray binaries and binary and millisecond radio pulsars,and ultraluminous X-ray sources,to illustrate the interplay between theories and observations.

  19. Speech perception of noise with binary gains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, DeLiang; Kjems, Ulrik; Pedersen, Michael Syskind;

    2008-01-01

    For a given mixture of speech and noise, an ideal binary time-frequency mask is constructed by comparing speech energy and noise energy within local time-frequency units. It is observed that listeners achieve nearly perfect speech recognition from gated noise with binary gains prescribed by the i...... by the ideal binary mask. Only 16 filter channels and a frame rate of 100 Hz are sufficient for high intelligibility. The results show that, despite a dramatic reduction of speech information, a pattern of binary gains provides an adequate basis for speech perception....

  20. Rotational mixing in massive binaries: detached short-period systems

    CERN Document Server

    de Mink, S E; Langer, N; Pols, O R; Brott, I; Yoon, S -Ch

    2009-01-01

    Models of rotating single stars can successfully account for a wide variety of observed stellar phenomena, such as the surface enhancements of N and He. However, recent observations have questioned the idea that rotational mixing is the main process responsible for the surface enhancements, emphasizing the need for a strong and conclusive test. We investigate the consequences of rotational mixing for massive main-sequence stars in short-period binaries. In these systems the tides spin up the stars to rapid rotation. We use a state-of-the-art stellar evolution code including the effect of rotational mixing, tides, and magnetic fields. We discuss the surface abundances expected in massive close binaries (M1~20 solar masses) and we propose using such systems to test the concept of rotational mixing. As these short-period binaries often show eclipses, their parameters can be determined with high accuracy, allowing for a direct comparison with binary evolution models. In more massive close systems (M1~50 solar mas...

  1. On a family of test statistics for discretely observed diffusion processes

    CERN Document Server

    De Gregorio, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    We consider parametric hypotheses testing for multidimensional ergodic diffusion processes observed at discrete time. We propose a family of test statistics, related to the so called $\\phi$-divergence measures. By taking into account the quasi-likelihood approach developed for studying the stochastic differential equations, it is proved that the tests in this family are all asymptotically distribution free. In other words, our test statistics weakly converge to the chi squared distribution. Furthermore, our test statistic is compared with the quasi likelihood ratio test. In the case of contiguous alternatives, it is also possible to study in detail the power function of the tests. Although all the tests in this family are asymptotically equivalent, we show by Monte Carlo analysis that, in the small sample case, the performance of the test strictly depends on the choice of the function $\\phi$. Furthermore, in this framework, the simulations show that there are not uniformly most powerful tests.

  2. Modeling Binary Neutron Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Conner; Read, Jocelyn; Flynn, Eric; Lockett-Ruiz, Veronica

    2016-03-01

    Gravitational waves, predicted by Einstein's Theory of Relativity, are a new frontier in astronomical observation we can use to observe phenomena in the universe. Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory (LIGO) is currently searching for gravitational wave signals, and requires accurate predictions in order to best extract astronomical signals from all other sources of fluctuations. The focus of my research is in increasing the accuracy of Post-Newtonian models of binary neutron star coalescence to match the computationally expensive Numerical models. Numerical simulations can take months to compute a couple of milliseconds of signal whereas the Post-Newtonian can generate similar signals in seconds. However the Post-Newtonian model is an approximation, e.g. the Taylor T4 Post-Newtonian model assumes that the two bodies in the binary neutron star system are point charges. To increase the effectiveness of the approximation, I added in tidal effects, resonance frequencies, and a windowing function. Using these observed effects from simulations significantly increases the Post-Newtonian model's similarity to the Numerical signal.

  3. Observing the Testing Effect using Coursera Video-recorded Lectures: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Zhihao eYONG

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the testing effect in Coursera video-based learning. One hundred and twenty-three participants either (a studied an instructional video-recorded lecture four times, (b studied the lecture three times and took one recall test, or (c studied the lecture once and took three tests. They then took a final recall test, either immediately or a week later, through which their learning was assessed. Whereas repeated studying produced better recall performance than did repeated testing when the final test was administered immediately, testing produced better performance when the final test was delayed until a week after. The testing effect was observed using Coursera lectures. Future directions are documented.

  4. Precession during merger 1: Strong polarization changes are observationally accessible features of strong-field gravity during binary black hole merger

    CERN Document Server

    O'Shaughnessy, R; Healy, J; Shoemaker, D

    2012-01-01

    The short gravitational wave signal from the merger of compact binaries encodes a surprising amount of information about the strong-field dynamics of merger into frequencies accessible to ground-based interferometers. In this paper we describe a previously-unknown "precession" of the peak emission direction with time, both before and after the merger, about the total angular momentum direction. We demonstrate the gravitational wave polarization encodes the orientation of this direction to the line of sight. We argue the effects of polarization can be estimated nonparametrically, directly from the gravitational wave signal as seen along one line of sight, as a slowly-varying feature on top of a rapidly-varying carrier. After merger, our results can be interpreted as a coherent excitation of quasinormal modes of different angular orders, a superposition which naturally "precesses" and modulates the line-of-sight amplitude. Recent analytic calculations have arrived at a similar geometric interpretation. We suspe...

  5. Finding binary active galactic nuclei candidates by the centroid shift in imaging surveys II. Testing the method with SDSS J233635.75-010733.7

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    In Liu (2015), we propose selecting binary active galactic nuclei (AGNs) candidates using the centroid shift of the images, which is induced by the non-synchronous variations of the two nuclei. In this paper, a known binary AGN (SDSS J233635.75-010733.7) is employed to verify the ability of this method. Using 162 exposures in the $R$ band of \\textit{Palomar Transient Factory} (PTF), an excess of dispersion in the positional distribution of the binary AGN is detected, though the two nuclei cannot be resolved in the images of PTF. We also propose a new method to compare the position of the binary AGN in PTF $g$ and $R$ band and find the difference is highly significant even only with 20 exposures. This new method is efficient for two nuclei with different spectral energy distributions, e.g., type I + type II AGN or off-set AGN. Large-scale surveys, e.g., the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, are expected to discover a large sample of binary AGN candida...

  6. The Meritfactor of Binary Seqences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høholdt, Tom

    1999-01-01

    Binary sequences with small aperiodic correlations play an important role in many applications ranging from radar to modulation and testing of systems. Golay(1977) introduced the merit factor as a measure of the goodness of the sequence and conjectured an upper bound for this. His conjecture is s...

  7. Statistical Study of Visual Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Abdel-Rahman, H I; Elsanhoury, W H

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, some statistical distributions of wide pairs included in Double Star Catalogue are investigated. Frequency distributions and testing hypothesis are derived for some basic parameters of visual binaries. The results reached indicate that, it was found that the magnitude difference is distributed exponentially, which means that the majority of the component of the selected systems is of the same spectral type. The distribution of the mass ratios is concentrated about 0.7 which agree with Salpeter mass function. The distribution of the linear separation appears to be exponentially, which contradict with previous studies for close binaries.

  8. Origin of apparent period variations in eclipsing post-common-envelope binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorotovic, M.; Schreiber, M. R.

    2013-01-01

    Context. Apparent period variations detected in several eclipsing, close-compact binaries are frequently interpreted as being caused by circumbinary giant planets. This interpretation raises the question of the origin of the potential planets that must have either formed in the primordial circumbinary disk, together with the host binary star, and survived its evolution into a close-compact binary or formed in a post-common-envelope circumbinary disk that remained bound to the post-common-envelope binary (PCEB). Aims: Here we combine current knowledge of planet formation and the statistics of giant planets around primordial and evolved binary stars with the theory of close-compact binary star evolution aiming to derive new constraints on possible formation scenarios. Methods: We compiled a comprehensive list of observed eclipsing PCEBs, estimated the fraction of systems showing apparent period variations, reconstructed the evolutionary history of the PCEBs, and performed binary population models of PCEBs to characterize their main sequence binary progenitors. We reviewed the currently available constraints on the fraction of PCEB progenitors that host circumbinary giant planets. Results: We find that the progenitors of PCEBs are very unlikely to be frequent hosts of giant planets (≲10 per cent), while the frequency of PCEBs with observed apparent period variations is very high (~90 per cent). Conclusions: The variations in eclipse timings measured in eclipsing PCEBs are probably not caused by first-generation planets that survived common-envelope evolution. The remaining options for explaining the observed period variations are second-generation planet formation or perhaps variations in the shape of a magnetically active secondary star. We suggest observational tests for both options. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  9. Eclipsing binaries in open clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Southworth, John; Clausen, J.V.

    2006-01-01

    Stars: fundamental parameters - Stars : binaries : eclipsing - Stars: Binaries: spectroscopic - Open clusters and ass. : general Udgivelsesdato: 5 August......Stars: fundamental parameters - Stars : binaries : eclipsing - Stars: Binaries: spectroscopic - Open clusters and ass. : general Udgivelsesdato: 5 August...

  10. Development and Testing of the Observational System for Recording Physical Activity in Children: Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIver, Kerry L.; Brown, William H.; Pfeiffer, Karin A.; Dowda, Marsha; Pate, Russell R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study describes the development and pilot testing of the Observational System for Recording Physical Activity-Elementary School (OSRAC-E) Version. Method: This system was developed to observe and document the levels and types of physical activity and physical and social contexts of physical activity in elementary school students…

  11. Black Hole Binaries in Quiescence

    CERN Document Server

    Bailyn, Charles D

    2016-01-01

    I discuss some of what is known and unknown about the behavior of black hole binary systems in the quiescent accretion state. Quiescence is important for several reasons: 1) the dominance of the companion star in the optical and IR wavelengths allows the binary parameters to be robustly determined - as an example, we argue that the longer proposed distance to the X-ray source GRO J1655-40 is correct; 2) quiescence represents the limiting case of an extremely low accretion rate, in which both accretion and jets can be observed; 3) understanding the evolution and duration of the quiescent state is a key factor in determining the overall demographics of X-rary binaries, which has taken on a new importance in the era of gravitational wave astronomy.

  12. GADICON spectrometer for ionosphere far-ultraviolet observation: prototype design, manufacturing, and testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lei

    2016-08-20

    The design, manufacturing, and testing of an imaging spectrometer prototype that will address new scientific requirements by the observation of the lower atmosphere's impact on the ionosphere are presented. The two sided lateral limb observation covering 130-180 nm far-ultraviolet (FUV) region allows the instrument to perform particle measurements in the daytime and nighttime. In this paper, we focus upon the working design principle, observation, and calibration. PMID:27556987

  13. Minimum detection efficiencies for a loophole-free observable-asymmetric Bell-type test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the problem of finding the most favorable conditions for closing the detection loophole in a test of local realism with a Bell inequality. For a generic nonmaximally entangled two-qubit state and two incompatible bases to be adopted for alternative measurements of two observables a and b on each party, we apply Hardy's proof of nonlocality without inequality and derive an Eberhard-like inequality. For an infinity of nonmaximally entangled states we find that it is possible to refute local realism by requiring perfect detection efficiency for only one of the two observables, say b, to be measured on each party: The test is free from the detection loophole for any value of the detection efficiency corresponding to the other observable a. The maximum tolerable noise in such a loophole-free observable-asymmetric test is also evaluated.

  14. The Evolution of Compact Binary Star Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin A. Postnov

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We review the formation and evolution of compact binary stars consisting of white dwarfs (WDs, neutron stars (NSs, and black holes (BHs. Mergings of compact-star binaries are expected to be the most important sources for forthcoming gravitational-wave (GW astronomy. In the first part of the review, we discuss observational manifestations of close binaries with NS and/or BH components and their merger rate, crucial points in the formation and evolution of compact stars in binary systems, including the treatment of the natal kicks, which NSs and BHs acquire during the core collapse of massive stars and the common envelope phase of binary evolution, which are most relevant to the merging rates of NS-NS, NS-BH and BH-BH binaries. The second part of the review is devoted mainly to the formation and evolution of binary WDs and their observational manifestations, including their role as progenitors of cosmologically-important thermonuclear SN Ia. We also consider AM CVn-stars, which are thought to be the best verification binary GW sources for future low-frequency GW space interferometers.

  15. Binary mask programmable hologram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, P W M; Poon, T-C; Zhou, Changhe; Cheung, K W K

    2012-11-19

    We report, for the first time, the concept and generation of a novel Fresnel hologram called the digital binary mask programmable hologram (BMPH). A BMPH is comprised of a static, high resolution binary grating that is overlaid with a lower resolution binary mask. The reconstructed image of the BMPH can be programmed to approximate a target image (including both intensity and depth information) by configuring the pattern of the binary mask with a simple genetic algorithm (SGA). As the low resolution binary mask can be realized with less stringent display technology, our method enables the development of simple and economical holographic video display.

  16. Binary fish passage models for uniform and nonuniform flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neary, Vincent S [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Binary fish passage models are considered by many fisheries managers to be the best 21 available practice for culvert inventory assessments and for fishway and barrier design. 22 Misunderstandings between different binary passage modeling approaches often arise, 23 however, due to differences in terminology, application and presentation. In this paper 24 one-dimensional binary fish passage models are reviewed and refined to clarify their 25 origins and applications. For uniform flow, a simple exhaustion-threshold (ET) model 26 equation is derived that predicts the flow speed threshold in a fishway or velocity barrier 27 that causes exhaustion at a given maximum distance of ascent. Flow speeds at or above 28 the threshold predict failure to pass (exclusion). Flow speeds below the threshold predict 29 passage. The binary ET model is therefore intuitive and easily applied to predict passage 30 or exclusion. It is also shown to be consistent with the distance-maximizing model. The 31 ET model s limitation to uniform flow is addressed by deriving a passage model that 32 accounts for nonuniform flow conditions more commonly found in the field, including 33 backwater profiles and drawdown curves. Comparison of these models with 34 experimental observations of volitional passage for Gambusia affinis in uniform and 35 nonuniform flows indicates reasonable prediction of binary outcomes (passage or 36 exclusion) if the flow speed is not near the threshold flow velocity. More research is 37 needed on fish behavior, passage strategies under nonuniform flow regimes and 38 stochastic methods that account for individual differences in swimming performance at or 39 near the threshold flow speed. Future experiments should track and measure ground 40 speeds of ascending fish to test nonuniform flow passage strategies and to improve model 41 predictions. Stochastic models, such as Monte-Carlo techniques, that account for 42 different passage performance among individuals and allow

  17. Binary is Good: A Binary Inference Framework for Primary User Separation in Cognitive Radio Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Huy; Han, Zhu

    2010-01-01

    Primary users (PU) separation concerns with the issues of distinguishing and characterizing primary users in cognitive radio (CR) networks. We argue the need for PU separation in the context of collaborative spectrum sensing and monitor selection. In this paper, we model the observations of monitors as boolean OR mixtures of underlying binary latency sources for PUs, and devise a novel binary inference algorithm for PU separation. Simulation results show that without prior knowledge regarding PUs' activities, the algorithm achieves high inference accuracy. An interesting implication of the proposed algorithm is the ability to effectively represent n independent binary sources via (correlated) binary vectors of logarithmic length.

  18. Busting Up Binaries: Encounters Between Compact Binaries and a Supermassive Black Hole

    CERN Document Server

    Addison, Eric; Larson, Shane

    2015-01-01

    Given the stellar density near the galactic center, close encounters between compact object binaries and the supermassive black hole are a plausible occurrence. We present results from a numerical study of close to 13 million such encounters. Consistent with previous studies, we corroborate that, for binary systems tidally disrupted by the black hole, the component of the binary remaining bound to the hole has eccentricity ~ 0.97 and circularizes dramatically by the time it enters the classical LISA band. Our results also show that the population of surviving binaries merits attention. These binary systems experience perturbations to their internal orbital parameters with potentially interesting observational consequences. We investigated the regions of parameter space for survival and estimated the distribution of orbital parameters post-encounter. We found that surviving binaries harden and their eccentricity increases, thus accelerating their merger due gravitational radiation emission and increasing the p...

  19. An experimental observation of the different behavior of ionic and neutral lines of iron as a function of number density in a binary carbon–iron mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivakumar, P.; Taleh, L.; Markushin, Y. [Optical Science Center for Applied Research and Applications, Department of Physics and Pre-Engineering, Delaware State University, Dover, DE 19901 (United States); Melikechi, N., E-mail: nmelikechi@desu.edu [Optical Science Center for Applied Research and Applications, Department of Physics and Pre-Engineering, Delaware State University, Dover, DE 19901 (United States); Lasue, J. [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, 9 Av. Colonel Roche, BP 44346, F-31028 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); ISR, MS D466, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Lunar and Planetary Institute, 3600 Bay Area Boulevard, Houston, TX 77058 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    We report on the dependence of the intensities of atomic and ionic lines emitted by a nanosecond laser-induced plasma on the atomic number densities of the constituents of a binary mixture formed of carbon and iron. We show that the packing density of the sample greatly affects the relative standard deviation of the emission lines. Furthermore, we show that the variation of the intensities of the C and Fe emission lines depends in a non-trivial way on the relative C–Fe concentration. The intensities of Fe neutral atomic lines behave differently than those of the ionic ones particularly at and above concentrations of 75%–80% Fe embedded in a carbon matrix. Unlike the emission from neutral Fe, those from ionic Fe yield a very sharp decrease followed by an equally strong increase of the emission lines over a relatively small range of relative concentration of C and Fe. To better investigate this effect, we have compared the results obtained with nanosecond-LIBS to those with femtosecond-LIBS and found that this phenomenon disappears. The physical interpretation of the sharp decrease followed by an equally sharp increase in the emission intensities from Fe ions as the concentration of Fe is increased requires more studies. - Highlights: ► The effects of the size of the particles on the fluctuations of the LIBS signals ► The variation of LIBS signals with the concentrations of Fe embedded in C is nontrivial. ► The intensities of neutral atomic lines can behave differently than those of ions.

  20. An experimental observation of the different behavior of ionic and neutral lines of iron as a function of number density in a binary carbon–iron mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the dependence of the intensities of atomic and ionic lines emitted by a nanosecond laser-induced plasma on the atomic number densities of the constituents of a binary mixture formed of carbon and iron. We show that the packing density of the sample greatly affects the relative standard deviation of the emission lines. Furthermore, we show that the variation of the intensities of the C and Fe emission lines depends in a non-trivial way on the relative C–Fe concentration. The intensities of Fe neutral atomic lines behave differently than those of the ionic ones particularly at and above concentrations of 75%–80% Fe embedded in a carbon matrix. Unlike the emission from neutral Fe, those from ionic Fe yield a very sharp decrease followed by an equally strong increase of the emission lines over a relatively small range of relative concentration of C and Fe. To better investigate this effect, we have compared the results obtained with nanosecond-LIBS to those with femtosecond-LIBS and found that this phenomenon disappears. The physical interpretation of the sharp decrease followed by an equally sharp increase in the emission intensities from Fe ions as the concentration of Fe is increased requires more studies. - Highlights: ► The effects of the size of the particles on the fluctuations of the LIBS signals ► The variation of LIBS signals with the concentrations of Fe embedded in C is nontrivial. ► The intensities of neutral atomic lines can behave differently than those of ions

  1. GAIA survey of galactic eclipsing binaries

    OpenAIRE

    Zwitter, Tomaz

    2002-01-01

    General importance and capabilities of observations of eclipsing binaries by the forthcoming ESA mission GAIA are discussed. Availability of spectroscopic observations and a large number of photometric bands on board will make it possible to reliably determine physical parameters for $\\sim 10^5$ binary stars. It is stressed that current methods of object by object analysis will have to be modified and included in an automatic analysis pipeline.

  2. Testing the Dark Matter Scenario for PeV Neutrinos Observed in IceCube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Kohta; Laha, Ranjan; Ando, Shin'ichiro; Ahlers, Markus

    2015-08-14

    Late time decay of very heavy dark matter is considered as one of the possible explanations for diffuse PeV neutrinos observed in IceCube. We consider implications of multimessenger constraints, and show that proposed models are marginally consistent with the diffuse γ-ray background data. Critical tests are possible by a detailed analysis and identification of the sub-TeV isotropic diffuse γ-ray data observed by Fermi and future observations of sub-PeV γ rays by observatories like HAWC or Tibet AS+MD. In addition, with several-year observations by next-generation telescopes such as IceCube-Gen2, muon neutrino searches for nearby dark matter halos such as the Virgo cluster should allow us to rule out or support the dark matter models, independently of γ-ray and anisotropy tests. PMID:26317706

  3. Testing the Dark Matter Scenario for PeV Neutrinos Observed in IceCube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Kohta; Laha, Ranjan; Ando, Shin'ichiro; Ahlers, Markus

    2015-08-14

    Late time decay of very heavy dark matter is considered as one of the possible explanations for diffuse PeV neutrinos observed in IceCube. We consider implications of multimessenger constraints, and show that proposed models are marginally consistent with the diffuse γ-ray background data. Critical tests are possible by a detailed analysis and identification of the sub-TeV isotropic diffuse γ-ray data observed by Fermi and future observations of sub-PeV γ rays by observatories like HAWC or Tibet AS+MD. In addition, with several-year observations by next-generation telescopes such as IceCube-Gen2, muon neutrino searches for nearby dark matter halos such as the Virgo cluster should allow us to rule out or support the dark matter models, independently of γ-ray and anisotropy tests.

  4. Testing the no-hair theorem with observations of black holes in the electromagnetic spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannsen, Tim

    2016-06-01

    According to the general-relativistic no-hair theorem, astrophysical black holes depend only on their masses and spins and are uniquely described by the Kerr metric. Mass and spin are the first two multipole moments of the Kerr spacetime and completely determine all other moments. The no-hair theorem can be tested by measuring potential deviations from the Kerr metric which alter such higher-order moments. In this review, I discuss tests of the no-hair theorem with current and future observations of such black holes across the electromagnetic spectrum, focusing on near-infrared observations of the supermassive black hole at the Galactic center, pulsar-timing and very-long baseline interferometric observations, as well as x-ray observations of fluorescent iron lines, thermal continuum spectra, variability, and polarization.

  5. Testing the No-Hair Theorem with Observations of Black Holes in the Electromagnetic Spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Johannsen, Tim

    2016-01-01

    According to the general-relativistic no-hair theorem, black holes depend only on their masses and spins and are uniquely described by the Kerr metric. Mass and spin are the first two multipole moments of the Kerr spacetime and completely determine all other moments. The no-hair theorem can be tested by measuring potential deviations from the Kerr metric which alter such higher-order moments. In this review, I discuss tests of the no-hair theorem with current and future observations of black holes across the electromagnetic spectrum, focusing on near-infrared observations of the supermassive black hole at the Galactic center, pulsar-timing and very-long baseline interferometric observations, as well as X-ray observations of fluorescent iron lines, thermal continuum spectra, variability, and polarization.

  6. The Evolution of Compact Binary Star Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yungelson, Lev R.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We review the formation and evolution of compact binary stars consisting of white dwarfs (WDs, neutron stars (NSs, and black holes (BHs. Binary NSs and BHs are thought to be the primary astrophysical sources of gravitational waves (GWs within the frequency band of ground-based detectors, while compact binaries of WDs are important sources of GWs at lower frequencies to be covered by space interferometers (LISA. Major uncertainties in the current understanding of properties of NSs and BHs most relevant to the GW studies are discussed, including the treatment of the natal kicks which compact stellar remnants acquire during the core collapse of massive stars and the common envelope phase of binary evolution. We discuss the coalescence rates of binary NSs and BHs and prospects for their detections, the formation and evolution of binary WDs and their observational manifestations. Special attention is given to AM CVn-stars -- compact binaries in which the Roche lobe is filled by another WD or a low-mass partially degenerate helium-star, as these stars are thought to be the best LISA verification binary GW sources.

  7. Space debris observational test with the Medicina-Evpatoria bistatic radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pupillo, G.; Bartolini, M.; Cevolani, G.; Di Martino, M.; Falkovich, I.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Malevinskij, S.; Montebugnoli, S.; Nabatov, A.; Pluchino, S.; Salerno, E.; Schillirò, F.; Zoni, L.

    In the framework of the space debris monitoring program of the Italian Space Agency (ASI), the Italian Institute of Radioastronomy (IRA), the Turin Astronomical Observatory (OATO) and the Ukrainian Institute of Radioastronomy performed a space debris observational test by using the Medicina-Evpatoria bistatic radar. Several kinds of objects orbiting in LEO, MEO, GEO and HEO were selected as target in order to validate the hardware setup and new observational techniques. Echoes coming from small space debris were detected with an extremely high signal to noise ratio as well as still unknown orbiting objects were presumably discovered during the observations.

  8. Probing Binary Evolution Using the Pulsar Fossil Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdman, Robert D.; Stairs, I. H.; Kramer, M.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Faulkner, A.; Backer, D. C.; Demorest, P.; Nice, D. J.; Burgay, M.; Camilo, F.; D'Amico, N.; Hobbs, G.; Lorimer, D. R.; Lyne, A. G.; Manchester, R.; Possenti, A.

    2006-12-01

    The Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey has yielded a significant number of very interesting binary and millisecond pulsars. Two of these objects are part of an ongoing timing study at the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). PSR J1756-2251 is a double-neutron star (DNS) binary system. Its orbital properties show it to be a similar system to PSR B1913+16, the original binary pulsar system discovered by Hulse and Taylor. Mass measurements of this system thus provide another important opportunity to test the validity of General Relativity, and to study the evolutionary history of DNS systems. PSR J1802-2124 is part of the relatively new and unstudied "intermediate-mass" class of binary pulsars. These typically spin with periods in the tens of milliseconds, and often have relatively massive (> 0.7 solar masses) white dwarf companions. GBT observations over the past two years have enabled us to detect the Shapiro delay in this system. This has led to the determination of the individual masses of the neutron star and white dwarf companion, providing constraints on the mass-transfer history in this unusual system.

  9. Orbital Architectures of Planet-Hosting Binary Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuy, Trent J.; Kratter, Kaitlin M.

    2016-01-01

    We present the first results from our Keck AO astrometric monitoring of Kepler Prime Mission planet-hosting binary systems. Observational biases in exoplanet discovery have long left the frequency, properties, and provenance of planets in most binary systems largely unconstrained. Recent results from our ongoing survey of a volume-limited sample of Kepler planet hosts indicate that binary companions at solar-system scales of 20-100 AU suppress the occurrence of planetary systems at a rate of 30-100%. However, some planetary systems do survive in binaries, and determining these systems' orbital architectures is key to understanding why. As a demonstration of this new approach to testing ideas of planet formation, we present a detailed analysis of the triple star system Kepler-444 (HIP 94931) that hosts five Ganymede- to Mars-sized planets. By combining our high-precision astrometry with radial velocities from HIRES we discover a highly eccentric stellar orbit that would have made this a seemingly hostile site for planet formation. This either points to an extremely robust and efficient planet formation mechanism or a rare case of favorable initial conditions. Such broader implications will be addressed by determining orbital architectures for our larger statistical sample of Kepler planet-hosting systems that have stellar companions on solar system scales.

  10. The Gumbel hypothesis test for left censored observations using regional earthquake records as an example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Thompson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Annual maximum (AM time series are incomplete (i.e., censored when no events are included above the assumed censoring threshold (i.e., magnitude of completeness. We introduce a distrtibutional hypothesis test for left-censored Gumbel observations based on the probability plot correlation coefficient (PPCC. Critical values of the PPCC hypothesis test statistic are computed from Monte-Carlo simulations and are a function of sample size, censoring level, and significance level. When applied to a global catalog of earthquake observations, the left-censored Gumbel PPCC tests are unable to reject the Gumbel hypothesis for 45 of 46 seismic regions. We apply four different field significance tests for combining individual tests into a collective hypothesis test. None of the field significance tests are able to reject the global hypothesis that AM earthquake magnitudes arise from a Gumbel distribution. Because the field significance levels are not conclusive, we also compute the likelihood that these field significance tests are unable to reject the Gumbel model when the samples arise from a more complex distributional alternative. A power study documents that the censored Gumbel PPCC test is unable to reject some important and viable Generalized Extreme Value (GEV alternatives. Thus, we cannot rule out the possibility that the global AM earthquake time series could arise from a GEV distribution with a finite upper bound, also known as a reverse Weibull distribution. Our power study also indicates that the binomial and uniform field significance tests are substantially more powerful than the more commonly used Bonferonni and false discovery rate multiple comparison procedures.

  11. The chemically peculiar double-lined spectroscopic binary HD 90264

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, C.; Torres, A. F.; Cidale, L. S.

    2010-10-01

    Context. HD 90264 is a chemically peculiar (CP) double-lined spectroscopic binary system of the type He-weak. Double-lined binaries are unique sources of data for stellar masses, physical properties, and evolutionary aspects of stars. Therefore, the determination of orbital elements is of great importance to study how the physical characteristics of CP stars are affected by a companion. Aims: We carried out a detailed spectral and polarimetric study of the spectroscopic binary system HD 90264 to characterize its orbit, determine the stellar masses, and investigate the spectral variability and possible polarization of the binary components. Methods: We employed medium-resolution échelle spectra and polarimetric data obtained at the 2.15-m telescope at CASLEO Observatory, Argentina. We measured radial velocities and line equivalent widths with IRAF packages. The radial velocity curves of both binary components were obtained combining radial velocity data derived from the single line of Hg II λ3984 Åand the double lines of Mg II λ4481 Å. Polarimetric data were studied by means of the statistical method of Clarke & Stewart and the Welch test. Results: We found that both components of the binary system are chemically peculiar stars, deficient in helium, where the primary is a He variable and the secondary is a Hg-Mn star. We derived for the first time the orbital parameters of the binary system. We found that the system has a quasi-circular orbit (e ~ 0.04) with an orbital period of 15.727 days. Taking into account the circular orbit solution, we derived a mass ratio of q = MHe-w/MHg-Mn = 1.22. We also found a rotational period of around 15-16 days, suggesting a spin-orbit synchronization. Possible signs of intrinsic polarization have also been detected. Conclusions: HD 90264 is the first known binary system comprised of a He variable star as the primary component and a Hg-Mn star as the secondary one. Based on observations taken at Complejo Astronómico El

  12. Testing the maximal rank of the volatility process for continuous diffusions observed with noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fissler, Tobias; Podolskij, Mark

    In this paper, we present a test for the maximal rank of the volatility process in continuous diffusion models observed with noise. Such models are typically applied in mathematical finance, where latent price processes are corrupted by microstructure noise at ultra high frequencies. Using high...

  13. Binary model for the coma cluster of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the dynamics of galaxies in the Coma cluster and find that the cluster is probably dominated by a central binary of galaxies NGC 4874--NGC4889. We estimate their total mass to be about 3 x 1014 M/sub sun/ by two independent methods (assuming in Hubble constant of 100 km s-1 Mpc-1). This binary is efficient in dynamically ejecting smaller galaxies, some of of which are seen in projection against the inner 30 radius of the cluster and which, if erroneously considered as bound members, cause a serious overestimate of the mass of the entire cluster. Taking account of the ejected galaxies, we estimate the total cluster mass to be 4--9 x 1014 M/sub sun/, with a corresponding mass-to-light ratio for a typical galaxy in the range of 20--120 solar units. The origin of the secondary maximum observed in the radial surface density profile is studied. We consider it to be a remnant of a shell of galaxies which formed around the central binary. This shell expanded, then collapsed into the binary, and is now reexpanding. This is supported by the coincidence of the minimum in the cluster eccentricity and radical velocity dispersion at the same radial distance as the secondary maximum. Numerical simulations of a cluster model with a massive central binary and a spherical shell of test particles are performed, and they reproduce the observed shape, galaxy density, and radial velocity distributions in the Coma cluster fairly well. Consequences of extending the model to other clusters are discussed

  14. The impact of usability reports and user test observations on developers understanding of usability data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høegh, Rune Thaarup; Nielsen, Christian Monrad; Pedersen, Michael Bach;

    2006-01-01

    of the system. This article presents results from an exploratory study of 2 ways of providing feedback from a usability evaluation: observation of user tests and reading usability reports. A case study and a field experiment were used to explore how observation and usability reports impact developers......' understanding of usability data. The results indicate that observation of user tests facilitated a rich understanding of usability problems and created empathy with the users and their work. The usability report had a strong impact on the developers' understanding of specific usability problems and supported......A usability evaluation provides a strong and rich basis for understanding and improving the design of user interaction with a software system. Exploiting this evaluation requires feedback that significantly impacts the developers' understanding of usability data about the interaction design...

  15. Hydrodynamic Simulations of Contact Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadam, Kundan; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Frank, Juhan; Marcello, Dominic; Motl, Patrick M.; Staff, Jan E.

    2015-01-01

    The motivation for our project is the peculiar case of the 'red nova" V1309 Sco which erupted in September 2008. The progenitor was, in fact, a contact binary system. We are developing a simulation of contact binaries, so that their formation, structural, and merger properties could be studied using hydrodynamics codes. The observed transient event was the disruption of the secondary star by the primary, and their subsequent merger into one star; hence to replicate this behavior, we need a core-envelope structure for both the stars. We achieve this using a combination of Self Consistant Field (SCF) technique and composite polytropes, also known as bipolytropes. So far we have been able to generate close binaries with various mass ratios. Another consequence of using bipolytropes is that according to theoretical calculations, the radius of a star should expand when the core mass fraction exceeds a critical value, resulting in interesting consequences in a binary system. We present some initial results of these simulations.

  16. CHAOTIC ZONES AROUND GRAVITATING BINARIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevchenko, Ivan I., E-mail: iis@gao.spb.ru [Pulkovo Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Pulkovskoje ave. 65, St. Petersburg 196140 (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-20

    The extent of the continuous zone of chaotic orbits of a small-mass tertiary around a system of two gravitationally bound primaries of comparable masses (a binary star, a binary black hole, a binary asteroid, etc.) is estimated analytically, as a function of the tertiary's orbital eccentricity. The separatrix map theory is used to demonstrate that the central continuous chaos zone emerges (above a threshold in the primaries' mass ratio) due to overlapping of the orbital resonances corresponding to the integer ratios p:1 between the tertiary and the central binary periods. In this zone, the unlimited chaotic orbital diffusion of the tertiary takes place, up to its ejection from the system. The primaries' mass ratio, above which such a chaotic zone is universally present at all initial eccentricities of the tertiary, is estimated. The diversity of the observed orbital configurations of biplanetary and circumbinary exosystems is shown to be in accord with the existence of the primaries' mass parameter threshold.

  17. Transient Black Hole Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Belloni, T M

    2016-01-01

    The last two decades have seen a great improvement in our understand- ing of the complex phenomenology observed in transient black-hole binary systems, especially thanks to the activity of the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer satellite, com- plemented by observations from many other X-ray observatories and ground-based radio, optical and infrared facilities. Accretion alone cannot describe accurately the intricate behavior associated with black-hole transients and it is now clear that the role played by different kinds of (often massive) outflows seen at different phases of the outburst evolution of these systems is as fundamental as the one played by the accretion process itself. The spectral-timing states originally identified in the X-rays and fundamentally based on the observed effect of accretion, have acquired new importance as they now allow to describe within a coherent picture the phenomenology observed at other wave- length, where the effects of ejection processes are most evident. With a particular focu...

  18. The close environment of high-mass X-ray binaries at high angular resolution I. VLTI/AMBER and VLTI/PIONIER near-infrared interferometric observations of Vela X-1

    CERN Document Server

    Choquet, E; Bouquin, J -B Le; Merand, A; Berger, J -P; Haubois, X; Perrin, G; Petrucci, P -O; Lazareff, B; Pott, J -U

    2013-01-01

    Recent improvements on the sensitivity and spectral resolution of X-ray observations have led to a better understanding of the properties of matter in the vicinity of High Mass X-ray Binaries hosting a supergiant star and a compact object. However the geometry and physical properties of their environment at larger scales are currently only predicted by simulations. We aim at exploring the environment of Vela X-1 at a few stellar radii of the supergiant using spatially resolved observations in the near-infrared and at studying its dynamical evolution along the 9-day orbital period of the system. We observed Vela X-1 in 2010 and 2012 using long baseline interferometry at VLTI, respectively with the AMBER instrument in the K band and the PIONIER instrument in the H band. The PIONIER observations span through one orbital period to monitor possible evolutions in the geometry of the system. We resolved a structure of $8\\pm3~R_\\star$ from the AMBER data and $2.0\\,_{-1.2}^{+0.7}~R_\\star$ from the PIONIER data. From t...

  19. Interacting binary stars

    CERN Document Server

    Sahade, Jorge; Ter Haar, D

    1978-01-01

    Interacting Binary Stars deals with the development, ideas, and problems in the study of interacting binary stars. The book consolidates the information that is scattered over many publications and papers and gives an account of important discoveries with relevant historical background. Chapters are devoted to the presentation and discussion of the different facets of the field, such as historical account of the development in the field of study of binary stars; the Roche equipotential surfaces; methods and techniques in space astronomy; and enumeration of binary star systems that are studied

  20. Modified binary particle swam optimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sangwook Lee; Sangmoon Soak; Sanghoun Oh; Witold Pedrycz; Moongu Jeon

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a modified binary particle swarm optimization(BPSO)which adopts concepts of the genotype-phenotype rep-resentation and the mutation operator of genetic algorithms.Its main feature is that the BPSO can be treated as a continuous PSO.The proposed BPSO algorithm is tested on various benchmark functions,and its performance is compared with that of the original BPSO.Experimental results show that the modified BPSO outperforms the original BPSO algorithm.

  1. Remnants of compact binary mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Domainko, W

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the long-term evolution and observability of remnants originating from the merger of compact binary systems and discuss the differences to supernova remnants. Compact binary mergers expel much smaller amounts of mass at much higher velocities, as compared to supernovae, which will affect the dynamical evolution of their remnants. The ejecta of mergers consist of very neutron rich nuclei. Some of these neutron rich nuclei will produce observational signatures in form of gamma ray lines during their decay. The composition of the ejecta might even give interesting constraints about the internal structure of the neutron star. We further discuss the possibility that merger remnants appear as recently discovered 'dark accelerators' which are extended TeV sources which lack emission in other bands.

  2. Results from Binary Black Hole Simulations in Astrophysics Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John G.

    2007-01-01

    Present and planned gravitational wave observatories are opening a new astronomical window to the sky. A key source of gravitational waves is the merger of two black holes. The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), in particular, is expected to observe these events with signal-to-noise ratio's in the thousands. To fully reap the scientific benefits of these observations requires a detailed understanding, based on numerical simulations, of the predictions of General Relativity for the waveform signals. New techniques for simulating binary black hole mergers, introduced two years ago, have led to dramatic advances in applied numerical simulation work. Over the last two years, numerical relativity researchers have made tremendous strides in understanding the late stages of binary black hole mergers. Simulations have been applied to test much of the basic physics of binary black hole interactions, showing robust results for merger waveform predictions, and illuminating such phenomena as spin-precession. Calculations have shown that merging systems can be kicked at up to 2500 km/s by the thrust from asymmetric emission. Recently, long lasting simulations of ten or more orbits allow tests of post-Newtonian (PN) approximation results for radiation from the last orbits of the binary's inspiral. Already, analytic waveform models based PN techniques with incorporated information from numerical simulations may be adequate for observations with current ground based observatories. As new advances in simulations continue to rapidly improve our theoretical understanding of the systems, it seems certain that high-precision predictions will be available in time for LISA and other advanced ground-based instruments. Future gravitational wave observatories are expected to make precision.

  3. A Few Observations and Remarks on Time Effectiveness of Interactive Electronic Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin MAGDIN

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, we point out several observations and remarks on time effectiveness of electronic testing, in particular of its new form (interactive tests. A test is often used as an effective didactic tool for evaluating the extent of gained cognitive capabilities. According to authors Rudman (1989 and Wang (2003 it is provable that the relationship towards e-testing depends on the degree of previous experiences with this form of examination. Conducted experiments (not only by these authors show that students using the traditional testing form (putting answers down on a paper are happy to have the opportunity to use a computer for testing. The reason is the fact that they are usually used to a complete explanation of the educational content, frontal examination during the lesson and also in the course of the school year and more limited possibilities to use the Internet for educational purposes. Most of them do not even know about the possibilities of e-learning and electronic evaluation. On the other hand, the group of students who are being tested using the traditional form and at the same time using computers usually prefer the traditional form, while using multimedia tools is more or less normal to them.

  4. A log rank type test in observational survival studies with stratified sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiaofei; Tsiatis, Anastasios A

    2016-04-01

    In randomized clinical trials, the log rank test is often used to test the null hypothesis of the equality of treatment-specific survival distributions. In observational studies, however, the ordinary log rank test is no longer guaranteed to be valid. In such studies we must be cautious about potential confounders; that is, the covariates that affect both the treatment assignment and the survival distribution. In this paper, two cases were considered: the first is when it is believed that all the potential confounders are captured in the primary database, and the second case where a substudy is conducted to capture additional confounding covariates. We generalize the augmented inverse probability weighted complete case estimators for treatment-specific survival distribution proposed in Bai et al. (Biometrics 69:830-839, 2013) and develop the log rank type test in both cases. The consistency and double robustness of the proposed test statistics are shown in simulation studies. These statistics are then applied to the data from the observational study that motivated this research.

  5. The Gaia-FUN-SSO observation campaign of 99942 Apophis: A preliminary test for the network

    CERN Document Server

    Bancelin, D; Ivantsov, A; Desmars, J; Assafin, M; Eggl, S; Hestroffer, D; Rocher, P; Carry, B; David, P

    2016-01-01

    In order to test the coordination and evaluate the overall performance of the Gaia-FUN-SSO, an observation campaign on the Potentially Hazardous Asteroid (99 942) Apophis was conducted from 12/21/2012 to 5/2/2013 providing 2732 high quality astrometric observations. We show that a consistent reduction of astrometric campaigns with reliable stellar catalogs substantially improves the quality of astrometric results. We present evidence that the new data will help to reduce the orbit uncertainty of Apophis during its close approach in 2029.

  6. Earth observation mission operation of COMS during in-orbit test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young-Min

    2011-11-01

    Communication Ocean Meteorological Satellite (COMS) for the hybrid mission of meteorological observation, ocean monitoring, and telecommunication service was launched onto Geostationary Earth Orbit on June 27, 2010 and it is currently under normal operation service after the In-Orbit Test (IOT) phase. The COMS is located on 128.2° East of the geostationary orbit. In order to perform the three missions, the COMS has 3 separate payloads, the meteorological imager (MI), the Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI), and the Ka-band antenna. Each payload is dedicated to one of the three missions, respectively. The MI and GOCI perform the Earth observation mission of meteorological observation and ocean monitoring, respectively. During the IOT phase the functionality and the performance of many aspects of the COMS satellite and ground station have been checked through the Earth observation mission operation for the observation of the meteorological phenomenon over several areas of the Earth and the monitoring of marine environments around the Korean peninsula. The Earth observation mission operation of COMS during the IOT phase is introduced in terms of mission operation characteristics, mission planning, and mission operation results for the missions of meteorological observation and ocean monitoring, respectively.

  7. Binary nature of the Barium stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present radial-velocity spectrometer observations that indicate that Ba II stars are binary systems. The secondary stars of these systems have low masses, consistent with their being degenerate objects which have lost mass onto their primaries in a previous stage of evolution. It is suggested that the Population II equivalents, the CH stars, may also be binary systems. This may be related to the fact that they are found only in globular clusters of the lowest central concentration

  8. Status and Future of Deep Searches for Compact Binary Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitz, Alexander` Harvey; LIGO Scientific Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Deep offline searches for gravitational waves from binary black hole, binary neutron star, and neutron star- black hole mergers were conducted during the first Advanced LIGO observing run, and recently Advanced LIGO announced the first detection of gravitational waves from a binary black hole merger. We discuss the recent results, the methodology of the high latency searches, along with improvements for the upcoming observing runs.

  9. Abell 41: shaping of a planetary nebula by a binary central star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D.; Lloyd, M.; Santander-García, M.; López, J. A.; Meaburn, J.; Mitchell, D. L.; O'Brien, T. J.; Pollacco, D.; Rubio-Díez, M. M.; Vaytet, N. M. H.

    2010-11-01

    We present the first detailed spatiokinematical analysis and modelling of the planetary nebula Abell 41, which is known to contain the well-studied close-binary system MT Ser. This object represents an important test case in the study of the evolution of planetary nebulae with binary central stars as current evolutionary theories predict that the binary plane should be aligned perpendicular to the symmetry axis of the nebula. Deep narrow-band imaging in the light of [NII]6584Å, [OIII]5007 Å and [SII]6717+6731Å, obtained using ACAM on the William Herschel Telescope, has been used to investigate the ionization structure of Abell 41. Long-slit observations of the Hα and [NII]6584Å emission were obtained using the Manchester Echelle Spectrometer on the 2.1-m San Pedro Mártir Telescope. These spectra, combined with the narrow-band imagery, were used to develop a spatiokinematical model of [NII]6584Å emission from Abell 41. The best-fitting model reveals Abell 41 to have a waisted, bipolar structure with an expansion velocity of ~40 km s-1 at the waist. The symmetry axis of the model nebula is within 5° of perpendicular to the orbital plane of the central binary system. This provides strong evidence that the close-binary system, MT Ser, has directly affected the shaping of its nebula, Abell 41. Although the theoretical link between bipolar planetary nebulae and binary central stars is long established, this nebula is only the second to have this link, between nebular symmetry axis and binary plane, proved observationally. Based on observations made with the William Herschel Telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias. E-mail: david.jones-3@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk

  10. Wolf-Rayet stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud. II. Analysis of the binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenar, T.; Hainich, R.; Todt, H.; Sander, A.; Hamann, W.-R.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Eldridge, J. J.; Pablo, H.; Oskinova, L. M.; Richardson, N. D.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Massive Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars are evolved massive stars (Mi ≳ 20 M⊙) characterized by strong mass-loss. Hypothetically, they can form either as single stars or as mass donors in close binaries. About 40% of all known WR stars are confirmed binaries, raising the question as to the impact of binarity on the WR population. Studying WR binaries is crucial in this context, and furthermore enable one to reliably derive the elusive masses of their components, making them indispensable for the study of massive stars. Aims: By performing a spectral analysis of all multiple WR systems in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), we obtain the full set of stellar parameters for each individual component. Mass-luminosity relations are tested, and the importance of the binary evolution channel is assessed. Methods: The spectral analysis is performed with the Potsdam Wolf-Rayet (PoWR) model atmosphere code by superimposing model spectra that correspond to each component. Evolutionary channels are constrained using the Binary Population and Spectral Synthesis (BPASS) evolution tool. Results: Significant hydrogen mass fractions (0.1 sample are not chemically homogeneous. The WR component in the binary AB 6 is found to be very luminous (log L ≈ 6.3 [L⊙]) given its orbital mass (≈10 M⊙), presumably because of observational contamination by a third component. Evolutionary paths derived for our objects suggest that Roche lobe overflow had occurred in most systems, affecting their evolution. However, the implied initial masses (≳60 M⊙) are large enough for the primaries to have entered the WR phase, regardless of binary interaction. Conclusions: Together with the results for the putatively single SMC WR stars, our study suggests that the binary evolution channel does not dominate the formation of WR stars at SMC metallicity.

  11. Spectroscopic binaries with components of similar mass

    CERN Document Server

    Lucy, L B

    2006-01-01

    The assertion that there is an intrinsic excess of binaries with mass ratios q \\simeq 1 - the twin hypothesis - is investigated. A strong version of this hypothesis (H_s), due to Lucy & Ricco (1979) and Tokovinin (2000), refers to a narrow peak in the distribution function psi(q) for q \\ga 0.95. A weak version (H_w), due to Halbwachs et al. (2003), refers to a broad peak for q \\ga 0.8. Current data on SB2's is analysed and H_s is found to be statistically significant for a sample restricted to orbits of high precision. But claims that H_s is significant for binaries with special characteristics are not confirmed since the sample sizes are well below the minimum required for a reliable test. With regard to H_w, additional observational evidence is not presented, but evidence to the contrary in the form of Hogeveen's (1992b) model of biased sampling with psi \\propto q^{-2} is criticized. Specifically, his success in thus fitting catalogued data depends on implausible assumptions about the research methodolo...

  12. Binary droplet collision at high Weber number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Kuo-Long; Chou, Ping-Chung; Tseng, Yu-Jen

    2009-09-01

    By using the techniques developed for generating high-speed droplets, we have systematically investigated binary droplet collision when the Weber number (We) was increased from the range usually tested in previous studies on the order of 10 to a much larger value of about 5100 for water (a droplet at 23 m/s with a diameter of 0.7 mm). Various liquids were also used to explore the effects of viscosity and surface tension. Specifically, beyond the well-known regimes at moderate We’s, which exhibited coalescence, separation, and separation followed by satellite droplets, we found different behaviors showing a fingering lamella, separation after fingering, breakup of outer fingers, and prompt splattering into multiple secondary droplets as We was increased. The critical Weber numbers that mark the boundaries between these impact regimes are identified. The specific impact behaviors, such as fingering and prompt splattering or splashing, share essential similarity with those also observed in droplet-surface impacts, whereas substantial variations in the transition boundaries may result from the disparity of the boundary conditions at impacts. To compare the outcomes of both types of collisions, a simple model based on energy conservation was carried out to predict the maximum diameter of an expanding liquid disk for a binary droplet collision. The results oppose the dominance of viscous drag, as proposed by previous studies, as the main deceleration force to effect a Rayleigh-Taylor instability and ensuing periphery fingers, which may further lead to the formations of satellite droplets.

  13. Application of Innovation Test in Cueing and Handoff with Intermittent Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Bo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The cueing and handoff between sensors with intermittent observation is deeply analyzed. This paper first analyzes the cueing and handoff demand and applies IMM-UKF algorithm to design the multi-sensor fusion tracking model. Then the innovation test and fuzzy functions are adopted to form the triggering criterions between the passive sensors and radar. Finally the simulation verifies the criterions and discusses the influence of detection probability in cueing and handoff.

  14. Testing the distance-duality relation with a combination of cosmological distance observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuo Cao; Nan Liang

    2011-01-01

    We propose an accurate test of the distance-duality (DD) relation,η = DL(z)(1 + z)-2/DA(z) = 1 (where DL and DA are the luminosity distances and angular diameter distances,respectively),with a combination of cosmological observational data of Type la Supernovae (SNe Ia) from the Union2 set and the galaxy cluster sample under an assumption of the spherical model.In order to avoid bias brought on by redshift non-coincidence between observational data and to consider redshift error bars of both clusters and SNe Ia in the analysis,we carefully choose the SNe Ia points which have the minimum acceptable redshift difference of the galaxy cluster sample (|△z|min = σz,SN + σz,cluster).By assuming ηto be a constant and defined as functions of the redshift parameterized by six different expressions,we find that there exists no observable evidence for variations in the DD relation based on the collected data,since related statistical tests are well satisfied within the 1σ confidence level for most cases.Further,considering different values of △z as constraints,we also find that the choice of △z may play an important role in this model-independent test of the DD relation for the spherical sample of galaxy clusters.

  15. On sky testing of the SOFIA telescope in preparation for the first science observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Franziska; Wolf, Jürgen; Waddell, Patrick; Dunham, Edward; Reinacher, Andreas; Lampater, Ulrich; Jakob, Holger; Bjarke, Lisa; Adams, Sybil; Grashuis, Randy; Meyer, Allan; Bower, Kenneth; Schweikhard, Keith; Keilig, Thomas

    2009-08-01

    SOFIA, the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, is an airborne observatory that will study the universe in the infrared spectrum. A Boeing 747-SP aircraft will carry a 2.5 m telescope designed to make sensitive infrared measurements of a wide range of astronomical objects. In 2008, SOFIA's primary mirror was demounted and coated for the first time. After reintegration into the telescope assembly in the aircraft, the alignment of the telescope optics was repeated and successive functional and performance testing of the fully integrated telescope assembly was completed on the ground. The High-speed Imaging Photometer for Occultations (HIPO) was used as a test instrument for aligning the optics and calibrating and tuning the telescope's pointing and control system in preparation for the first science observations in flight. In this paper, we describe the mirror coating process, the subsequent telescope testing campaigns and present the results.

  16. Supermassive Black Hole Binaries: The Search Continues

    CERN Document Server

    Bogdanovic, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    Gravitationally bound supermassive black hole binaries (SBHBs) are thought to be a natural product of galactic mergers and growth of the large scale structure in the universe. They however remain observationally elusive, thus raising a question about characteristic observational signatures associated with these systems. In this conference proceeding I discuss current theoretical understanding and latest advances and prospects in observational searches for SBHBs.

  17. Triple Stars Observed by Kepler

    CERN Document Server

    Orosz, Jerome A

    2015-01-01

    The Kepler mission has provided high quality light curves for more than 2000 eclipsing binaries. Tertiary companions to these binaries can be detected if they transit one or both stars in the binary or if they perturb the binary enough to cause deviations in the observed times of the primary and secondary eclipses (in a few cases both effects are observed in the same eclipsing binary). From the study of eclipse timing variations, it is estimated that 15 to 20% of the Kepler eclipsing binaries have close-in tertiary companions. I will give an overview of recent results and discuss some specific systems of interest.

  18. Nonconservative Mass Transfer in Massive Binaries and the Formation of Wolf-Rayet+O Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The mass transfer efficiency during the evolution of massive binaries is still uncertain. We model the mass transfer processes in a grid of binaries to investigate the formation of Wolf-Rayet+O (WR+O) binaries, taking into account two kinds of non-conservative mass transfer models: Model I with rotation-dependent mass accretion and Model II of half mass accretion. Generally the mass transfer in Model I is more inefficient, with the average efficiency in a range of $\\sim0.2-0.7$ and $ \\lesssim0.2 $ for Case A and Case B mass transfer, respectively. We present the parameter distributions for the descendant WR+O binaries. By comparing the modeled stellar mass distribution with the observed Galactic WR+O binaries, we find that highly non-conservative mass transfer is required.

  19. 低质量X射线双星的长期监测和吸积物理%Monitoring Observations of Low Mass X-ray Binary and Accretion Physics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫震

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, we have performed the multi-wavelength monitoring observations of Galactic low-mass X-ray binaries and studied the X-ray spectral evolution and spectral state transitions in bright X-ray binaries, the properties of transient sources during the outbursts and the evolution of multi-wavelength emission during the outburst and the relation between different wavelengths. The large dynamical range of X-ray luminosity is invaluable for studying the accretion physics, since we can watch the evolution of the system through the full range of accretion rates and follow causal sequences between them. The results of our study improve our understanding of accretion physics, especially in some unresolved problems, such as the key role in determining the X-ray spectral transitions, the relation between jet and X-ray spectral states and the origin of emission in different X-ray spectral states.Firstly, we systematically studied the different spectral states and state transitions in the bright Galactic X-ray binaries during the past more than ten years. We could study the long term evolution in different energy bands by using the soft (2-12 keV) and hard (15-50 keV) X-ray monitoring light curves. The hardnessratio of the two energy band can be used to describe the X-ray spectral evolution and define the spectral states and state transitions. We confirmed that the luminosity of hard-to-soft state transition positively correlates with the peak luminosity of following soft state, and also found positively correlation between the luminosity of hard-to-soft state transition and the rate-of-increase of luminosity. These two empirical correlations indicate that the brightest hard state and the hard-to-soft state transition are determined by the non-stationary accretion which is characterised by the rate-of-increase of mass accretion rate. Both correlations do not show any saturation or cut-off in the high luminosity end, which implies that the brighter outbursts and

  20. B-type stars in eclipsing binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratajczak, Milena; Pigulski, Andrzej

    2016-07-01

    B-type stars in eclipsing binary systems are unique astrophysical tools to test several aspects of stellar evolution. Such objects can be used e.g. to determine the masses of Beta Cephei variable stars, as well as help to place tighter constraints on the value of the convective core overshooting parameter α. Both precise photometry and high-resolution spectroscopy with high SNR are required to achieve these goals, but since many of the targets are bright enough, the challenge is fair. Following this assumption, we shall explain how we plan to examine both the aforementioned aspects of stellar evolution using observations of B-type stars obtained with a wide range of spectrographs, as well as BRITE-Constellation satellites.

  1. Gravitational Radiation from Compact Binary Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadis, John

    2014-01-01

    An outstanding question in modern Physics is whether general relativity (GR) is a complete description of gravity among bodies at macroscopic scales. Currently, the best experiments supporting this hypothesis are based on high-precision timing of radio pulsars. This chapter reviews recent advances in the field with a focus on compact binary millisecond pulsars with white-dwarf (WD) companions. These systems - if modeled properly - provide an unparalleled test ground for physically motivated alternatives to GR that deviate significantly in the strong-field regime. Recent improvements in observational techniques and advances in our understanding of WD interiors have enabled a series of precise mass measurements in such systems. These masses, combined with high-precision radio timing of the pulsars, result to stringent constraints on the radiative properties of gravity, qualitatively very different from what was available in the past.

  2. RXTE Observations of the Low-Mass X-Ray Binary 4U 1608-522 in Upper-Banana State

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Makishima, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the physics of mass accretion onto weakly-magnetized neutron stars, 95 archival RXTE datasets of an atoll source 4U 1608-522, acquired over 1996-2004 in so-called upper-banana state, were analyzed. The object meantime exhibited 3-30 keV luminosity in the range of <~ 10^35 - 4 x 10^37 erg s^-1, assuming a distance of 3.6 kpc. The 3-30 keV PCA spectra, produced one from each dataset, were represented successfully with a combination of a soft and a hard component, of which the presence was revealed in a model-independent manner by studying spectral variations among the observations. The soft component is expressed by so-called multi-color disk model with a temperature of ~1.8 keV, and is attributed to the emission from an optically-thick standard accretion disk. The hard component is a blackbody emission with a temperature of ~2.7 keV, thought to be emitted from the neutron-star surface. As the total luminosity increases, a continuous decrease was observed in the ratio of the blackbody luminosi...

  3. Exploring the Birth of Binary Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-08-01

    More than half of all stars are thought to be in binary or multiple star systems. But how do these systems form? The misaligned spins of some binary protostars might provide a clue.Two Formation ModelsIts hard to tell how multiple-star systems form, since these systems are difficult to observe in their early stages. But based on numerical simulations, there are two proposed models for the formation of stellar binaries:Turbulent fragmentationTurbulence within a single core leads to multiple dense clumps. These clumps independently collapse to form stars that orbit each other.Disk fragmentationGravitational instabilities in a massive accretion disk cause the formation of a smaller, secondary disk within the first, resulting in two stars that orbit each other.Log column density for one of the authors simulated binary systems, just after the formation of two protostars. Diamonds indicate the protostar positions. [Adapted from Offner et al. 2016]Outflows as CluesHow can we differentiate between these formation mechanisms? Led by Stella Offner (University of Massachusetts), a team of scientists has suggested that the key isto examine the alignment of the stars protostellar outflows jets that are often emitted from the poles of young, newly forming stars.Naively, wed expect that disk fragmentation would produce binary stars with common angular momentum. As the stars spins would be aligned, they would therefore also launch protostellar jets that were aligned with each other. Turbulent fragmentation, on the other hand, would cause the stars to have independent angular momentum. This would lead to randomly oriented spins, so the protostellar jets would be misaligned.Snapshots from the authors simulations. Left panel of each pair: column density; green arrows giveprotostellar spin directions. Right panel: synthetic observations produced from the simulations; cyan arrows giveprotostellar outflow directions. [Offner et al. 2016]Simulations of FragmentationIn order to better

  4. Radionuclide Observables for the Platte Underground Nuclear Test on 14 April 1962

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnett, Jonathan L.; Milbrath, Brian D.

    2016-08-02

    Past nuclear weapons tests provide invaluable information for understanding the radionuclide observables and data quality objectives expected during an On-site Inspection (OSI) for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). These radioactive signatures are complex and subject to spatial and temporal variability. The Platte Underground Nuclear Test on 14 April 1962 provides extensive environmental monitoring data that can be modelled and used to assess an OSI. The 1.6 kT test is especially useful as it released the highest amounts of recorded activity during Operation Nougat at the Nevada Test Site – now known as the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). It has been estimated that 0.36% of the activity was released, and dispersed in a northerly direction. The deposition ranged from 1 x 10-11 to 1 x 10-9 of the atmospheric release (per m2), and has been used to evaluate a hypothetical OSI at 1 week to 2 years post-detonation. Radioactive decay reduces the activity of the 17 OSI relevant radionuclides by 99.7%, such that detection throughout the inspection is only achievable close to the explosion where deposition was highest.

  5. A Comparison of the Variability of the Symbiotic X-ray Binaries GX 1+4, 4U 1954+31, and 4U 1700+24 from Swift/BAT and RXTE/ASM Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbet, R. H. D.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Mukai, K.; Markwardt, C. B.; Tueller, J.

    2007-01-01

    We present an analysis of the X-ray variability of three symbiotic X-ray binaries, GX 1+4, 4U 1700+24, and 4U 1954+31, using observations made with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) All-Sky Monitor (ASM). Observations of 4U 1954+31 with the Swift BAT show modulation at a period near 5 hours. Models to explain this modulation are discussed including the presence of an exceptionally slow X-ray pulsar in the system and accretion instabilities. We conclude that the most likely interpretation is that 4U 1954+31 contains one of the slowest known X-ray pulsars. Unlike 4U 1954+31, neither GX 1+4 nor 4U 1700+24 show any evidence for modulation on a timescale of hours. An analysis of the RXTE ASM light curves of GX l+4, 4U 1700+24, and 4U 1954+31 does not show the presence of periodic modulation in any source, although there is considerable variability on long timescales for all three sources. There is no modulation in GX 1+4 on either the optical 1161 day orbital period or a previously reported 304 day X-ray period. For 4U 1700+24 we do not confirm the 404 day period previously proposed for this source from a shorter duration ASM light curve.

  6. Incremental Validity of Test Session and Classroom Observations in a Multimethod Assessment of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConaughy, Stephanie H.; Harder, Valerie S.; Antshel, Kevin M.; Gordon, Michael; Eiraldi, Ricardo; Dumenci, Levent

    2010-01-01

    This study tested the incremental validity of behavioral observations, over and above parent and teacher reports, for assessing symptoms of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in children ages 6 to 12, using the Test Observation Form (TOF) and Direct Observation Form (DOF) from the Achenbach System of Empirically Based Assessment. The…

  7. Black holes in stellar-mass binary systems: expiating original spin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Andrew; Nixon, Chris

    2016-10-01

    We investigate systematically whether accreting black hole systems are likely to reach global alignment of the black hole spin and its accretion disc with the binary plane. In low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), there is only a modest tendency to reach such global alignment, and it is difficult to achieve fully: except for special initial conditions, we expect misalignment of the spin and orbital planes by ˜1 rad for most of the LMXB lifetime. The same is expected in high-mass X-ray binaries. A fairly close approach to global alignment is likely in most stellar-mass ultraluminous X-ray binary systems (ULXs) where the companion star fills its Roche lobe and transfers mass on a thermal or nuclear time-scale to a black hole of lower mass. These systems are unlikely to show orbital eclipses, as their emission cones are close to the hole's spin axis. This offers a potential observational test, as models for ULXs invoking intermediate-mass black holes do predict eclipses for ensembles of ≳ 10 systems. Recent observational work shows that eclipses are either absent or extremely rare in ULXs, supporting the picture that most ULXs are stellar-mass binaries with companion stars more massive than the accretor.

  8. A Computational Guide to Physics of Eclipsing Binaries. I. Demonstrations and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prša, A.; Zwitter, T.

    2005-07-01

    PHOEBE (PHysics Of Eclipsing BinariEs) is a modeling package for eclipsing binary stars, built on top of the widely used WD program of Wilson & Devinney. This introductory paper gives an overview of the most important scientific extensions (incorporating observational spectra of eclipsing binaries into the solution-seeking process, extracting individual temperatures from observed color indices, main-sequence constraining, and proper treatment of the reddening), numerical innovations (suggested improvements to WD's differential corrections method, the new Nelder & Mead downhill simplex method), and technical aspects (back-end scripter structure, graphical user interface). While PHOEBE retains 100% WD compatibility, its add-ons are a powerful way to enhance WD by encompassing even more physics and solution reliability. The operability of all these extensions is demonstrated on a synthetic main-sequence test binary; applications to real data will be published in follow-up papers. PHOEBE is released under the GNU General Public License, which guarantees it to be free and open to anyone interested in joining in on future development.

  9. Spectroscopic subsystems in nearby wide binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Tokovinin, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    Radial velocity (RV) monitoring of solar-type visual binaries has been conducted at the CTIO/SMARTS 1.5-m telescope to study short-period systems. Data reduction is described, mean and individual RVs of 163 observed objects are given. New spectroscopic binaries are discovered or suspected in 17 objects, for some of them orbital periods could be determined. Subsystems are efficiently detected even in a single observation by double lines and/or by the RV difference between the components of visual binaries. The potential of this detection technique is quantified by simulation and used for statistical assessment of 96 wide binaries within 67pc. It is found that 43 binaries contain at least one subsystem and the occurrence of subsystems is equally probable in either primary or secondary components. The frequency of subsystems and their periods match the simple prescription proposed by the author (2014, AJ, 147, 87). The remaining 53 simple wide binaries with a median projected separation of 1300AU have the distri...

  10. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2015 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolich, George [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Inst.; Shadel, Craig [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Inst.; Chapman, Jenny [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Inst.; McCurdy, Greg [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Inst.; Etyemezian, Vicken [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Inst.; Miller, Julianne J. [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Inst.; Mizell, Steve [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Inst.

    2016-09-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range). The operation resulted in radionuclide-contaminated soils at the Clean Slate I, II, and III sites. This report documents observations made during ongoing monitoring of radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions at stations installed adjacent to Clean Slate I and Clean Slate III, and at the TTR Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Range Operations Control (ROC) center. The primary objective of the monitoring effort is to determine if winds blowing across the Clean Slate sites are transporting particles of radionuclide-contaminated soil beyond the physical and administrative boundaries of the sites.

  11. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2013 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizell, Steve A [DRI; Nikolich, George [DRI; Shadel, Craig [DRI; McCurdy, Greg [DRI; Etyemezian, Vicken [DRI; Miller, Julianne J [DRI

    2014-10-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range). This test resulted in radionuclide-contaminated soils at Clean Slate I, II, and III. This report documents observations made during on-going monitoring of radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions at stations installed adjacent to Clean Slate I and Clean Slate III and at the TTR Range Operations Control center. The primary objective of the monitoring effort is to determine if winds blowing across the Clean Slate sites are transporting particles of radionuclide-contaminated soils beyond both the physical and administrative boundaries of the sites. Results for the calendar year (CY) 2013 monitoring include: (1) the gross alpha and gross beta values from the monitoring stations are approximately equivalent to the highest values observed during the CY2012 reporting at the surrounding Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations (this was the latest documented data available at the time of this writing); (2) only naturally occurring radionuclides were identified in the gamma spectral analyses; (3) the ambient gamma radiation measurements indicate that the average annual gamma exposure is similar at all three monitoring stations and periodic intervals of increased gamma values appear to be associated with storm fronts passing through the area; and (4) the concentrations of both resuspended dust and saltated sand particles generally increase with increasing wind speed. However, differences in the observed dust concentrations are likely due to differences in the soil characteristics immediately adjacent to the monitoring stations. Neither the resuspended particulate radiological analyses nor the ambient gamma radiation measurements suggest wind transport of radionuclide-contaminated soils.

  12. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring. CY2014 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikoloch, George [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Shadel, Craig [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Chapman, Jenny [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Mizell, Steve A. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); McCurdy, Greg [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Etyemezian, Vicken [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Miller, Julianne J. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2015-10-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range). This test resulted in radionuclide-contaminated soils at Clean Slate I, II, and III. This report documents observations made during ongoing monitoring of radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions at stations installed adjacent to Clean Slate I and Clean Slate III and at the TTR Range Operations Control center. The primary objective of the monitoring effort is to determine if winds blowing across the Clean Slate sites are transporting particles of radionuclide-contaminated soils beyond both the physical and administrative boundaries of the sites. Results for the calendar year (CY) 2014 monitoring are: (1) the gross alpha and gross beta values from the monitoring stations are approximately equivalent to the highest values observed during the CY2014 reporting at the surrounding Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations; (2) only naturally occurring radionuclides were identified in the gamma spectral analyses; (3) the ambient gamma radiation measurements indicate that the average annual gamma exposure is similar at all three monitoring stations and periodic intervals of increased gamma values appear to be associated with storm fronts passing through the area; and (4) the concentrations of both resuspended dust and saltated sand particles generally increase with increasing wind speed. Differences in the observed dust concentrations are likely the result of differences in the soil characteristics immediately adjacent to the monitoring stations. Neither the resuspended particulate radiological analyses nor the ambient gamma radiation measurements suggest wind transport of radionuclide-contaminated soils.

  13. Observations from using models to fit the gas production of varying volume test cells and landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamborn, Julia

    2012-12-01

    Landfill operators are looking for more accurate models to predict waste degradation and landfill gas production. The simple microbial growth and decay models, whilst being easy to use, have been shown to be inaccurate. Many of the newer and more complex (component) models are highly parameter hungry and many of the required parameters have not been collected or measured at full-scale landfills. This paper compares the results of using different models (LANDGEM, HBM, and two Monod models developed by the author) to fit the gas production of laboratory scale, field test cell and full-scale landfills and discusses some observations that can be made regarding the scalability of gas generation rates. The comparison of these results show that the fast degradation rate that occurs at laboratory scale is not replicated at field-test cell and full-scale landfills. At small scale, all the models predict a slower rate of gas generation than actually occurs. At field test cell and full-scale a number of models predict a faster gas generation than actually occurs. Areas for future work have been identified, which include investigations into the capture efficiency of gas extraction systems and into the parameter sensitivity and identification of the critical parameters for field-test cell and full-scale landfill predication.

  14. SEALEX in-situ experiments-performance tests of repository seals: experimental observations and modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokni Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes observations and numerical analysis of SEALEX performance tests installed in Tournemire Underground Research Laboratory (URL. One of the objectives of the large scale in-situ tests is to investigate the impact of technological gaps on the long term performance of bentonite based seals. The swelling cores consist of pre-compacted blocks of a natural sodic Wyoming bentonite (MX80 type mixed with quartz sand in a ratio of 70/30 (in dry mass with different geometries (monolithic disks or four jointed disks. Several technological gaps exist within the in situ tests: Gaps between the blocks and annular gap with variable width between the bentonite-based core and the host rock. All the tests are extensively instrumented for monitoring the main Hydro-Mechanical (HM variables. Comparison of the experimental results showed that the presence of technological gaps constituted new hydration sources (annular gaps and flow paths (gaps between the blocks that changed the saturation kinetics. A coupled HM formulation that incorporates the relevant processes involved in the problem under consideration has been adopted to analyse the effect of the annular technological gap on dry density homogenization of the bentonite based core as hydration progresses. Technological gaps were demonstrated to have an impact on dry density distribution.

  15. Testing the regionalization of a SVAT model for a region with high observation density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiermann, Sven; Thies, Boris; Bendix, Jörg

    2014-05-01

    The variable soil moisture is an important quantity in weather and climate investigations, because it has an essential influence on the energy exchange between the land surface and the atmosphere. However the recording of soil moisture in high spatio-temporal resolution is problematic. The planned Tandem-L mission of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) with an innovative L-band radar on board provides the opportunity to get daily soil moisture data at a spatial resolution of 50 meters. Within the Helmholtz Alliance Remote Sensing and Earth System Dynamics this data is planned to be used to regionalize a Soil Vegetation Atmosphere Transfer Model, in order to analyze the energy flux and the gas exchange and to improve the prediction of the water exchange between soil, vegetation and atmosphere. As investigation areas selected regions of the TERENO (TERrestrial ENviromental Observatoria) test sites and, later on, a region in South Ecuador will be used, for which data for the model initialization and validation are available. The reason for testing the method for the TERENO test sites first is the good data basis as a result of the already established high observation density there. The poster will present the methods being used for the model adaptation for the TERENO test sites and discuss the improvements achieved by these methods.

  16. Distinguishing Between Formation Channels for Binary Black Holes with LISA

    CERN Document Server

    Breivik, Katelyn; Larson, Shane L; Kalogera, Vassiliki; Rasio, Frederic A

    2016-01-01

    The recent detections of GW150914 and GW151226 imply an abundance of stellar-mass binary-black-hole mergers in the local universe. While ground-based gravitational-wave detectors are limited to observing the final moments before a binary merges, space-based detectors, such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), can observe binaries at lower orbital frequencies where such systems may still encode information about their formation histories. In particular, the orbital eccentricity of binary black holes in the LISA frequency band can be used discriminate between binaries formed in isolation in galactic fields, and those formed in dense stellar environments such as globular clusters. In this letter, we explore the differences in orbital eccentricities of binary black hole populations as they evolve through the LISA frequency band. Overall we find that there are three distinct populations of orbital eccentricities discernible by LISA. We show that, depending on gravitational-wave frequency, anywhere fro...

  17. ALMA and CARMA observations of Brown Dwarfs disks: testing the models of dust evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Ricci, L; Natta, A; Scholz, A; de Gregorio-Monsalvo, I; Isella, A; Carpenter, J M

    2013-01-01

    The first steps toward planet formation involve the coagulation of small microscopic grains into larger and larger pebbles and rocks in gas-rich disks around young stars and brown dwarfs. Observations in the sub-millimeter can trace mm/cm-sized pebbles in the outer disks, and investigate the mechanisms of coagulation/fragmentation and radial migration of these solids. These represent key, yet not fully understood ingredients for our understanding of the formation of planetesimals, the building blocks of planets. Here we present the first results from an observational program using the ALMA and CARMA sub-mm/mm interferometers aimed at characterizing the dust properties and disk structure of young disks around brown dwarfs and very low mass stars. Given the physical conditions expected for these disks, they represent critical test beds for the models of the early stages of planet formation in proto-planetary disks.

  18. Probabilistic Group Testing under Sum Observations: A Parallelizable 2-Approximation for Entropy Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Weidong; Rajan, Purnima; Frazier, Peter I.; Jedynak, Bruno M.

    2014-01-01

    We consider the problem of group testing with sum observations and noiseless answers, in which we aim to locate multiple objects by querying the number of objects in each of a sequence of chosen sets. We study a probabilistic setting with entropy loss, in which we assume a joint Bayesian prior density on the locations of the objects and seek to choose the sets queried to minimize the expected entropy of the Bayesian posterior distribution after a fixed number of questions. We present a new no...

  19. CAVITATION INCEPTION WITNESSED BY SOUND PRESSURE LEVEL IN MODEL TEST AND PROTOTYPE OBSERVATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Dong; LIU Zhi-ping; JIN Tai-lai; XIANG Ya-ping

    2004-01-01

    The paper concerns with the relationship between cavitation inception and Sound Pressure Level (SPL).A case study for the Xiaolangdi Hydro-project was taken as a typical example, which demonstrated the standard criterion of SPL indicating cavitation inception. Cavitation inception of an orifice plate used for energy dissipation in a tunnel spillway was witnessed and verified both in model test and prototype observation. A design criterion was proposed for a cavitationfree hydraulic structure which can be served as a reference for designers as well as researchers. Consequently, scale effects were discussed with an aim at suggesting an appropriate factor of safety in design.

  20. Binaries Like to be Twins: Implications for Doubly Degenerate Binaries, the Supernova Ia Rate and Other Interacting Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Pinsonneault, M H

    2006-01-01

    The recent sample of 21 detached eclipsing binaries in the Small Magellanic Cloud (Harries et al. 2003, Hilditch et al. 2005) provides a valuable test of the binary mass function for massive stars. We show that 50% of detached binaries have companions with very similar masses, q=M_2/M_1 > 0.87, where M_1, M_2 denote the masses of the two binary components, M_1 > M_2. A Salpeter relative mass function for the secondary is very strongly excluded, and the data is consistent with a flat mass function containing 55% of the systems and a ``twin'' population with q>0.95 containing the remainder. We also survey the vast existing literature discussing the mass ratio in binaries and conclude that a significant twin population (of more than 20-25%) exists in binaries that are likely to interact across a broad range of stellar masses and metallicity. Interactions involving nearly equal mass stars have distinctly different properties than those involving stars of unequal mass; the secondaries will tend to be evolved and t...

  1. B →K*l+l-: Zeros of angular observables as test of standard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Girish; Mahajan, Namit

    2016-03-01

    We calculate the zeros of angular observables P4' and P5' of the angular distribution of 4-body decay B →K*(→K π )l+l- where LHCb, in its analysis of form-factor independent angular observables, has found deviations from the standard model predictions. In the large recoil region, we obtain relations between the zeros of P4' , P5' and the zero (s^0) of forward-backward asymmetry of lepton pair, AF B. These relations are independent of hadronic uncertainties and depend only on the Wilson coefficients. We also construct a new observable, OTL ,R, whose zero in the standard model coincides with s^0, but in the presence of new physics contributions will show different behavior. Moreover, the profile of the new observable, even within the standard model, is very different from AF B. We point out that precise measurements of these zeros in the near future would provide a crucial test of the standard model and would be useful in distinguishing between different possible new physics contributions to the Wilson coefficients.

  2. The close binary frequency of Wolf-Rayet stars as a function of metallicity in M31 and M33

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neugent, Kathryn F.; Massey, Philip, E-mail: kneugent@lowell.edu, E-mail: phil.massey@lowell.edu [Lowell Observatory, 1400 West Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Massive star evolutionary models generally predict the correct ratio of WC-type and WN-type Wolf-Rayet stars at low metallicities, but underestimate the ratio at higher (solar and above) metallicities. One possible explanation for this failure is perhaps single-star models are not sufficient and Roche-lobe overflow in close binaries is necessary to produce the 'extra' WC stars at higher metallicities. However, this would require the frequency of close massive binaries to be metallicity dependent. Here we test this hypothesis by searching for close Wolf-Rayet binaries in the high metallicity environments of M31 and the center of M33 as well as in the lower metallicity environments of the middle and outer regions of M33. After identifying ∼100 Wolf-Rayet binaries based on radial velocity variations, we conclude that the close binary frequency of Wolf-Rayets is not metallicity dependent and thus other factors must be responsible for the overabundance of WC stars at high metallicities. However, our initial identifications and observations of these close binaries have already been put to good use as we are currently observing additional epochs for eventual orbit and mass determinations.

  3. KIC 10080943: An eccentric binary system containing two pressure and gravity mode hybrid pulsators

    CERN Document Server

    Schmid, V S; Aerts, C; Degroote, P; Bloemen, S; Murphy, S J; Van Reeth, T; Papics, P I; Bedding, T R; Keen, M A; Prsa, A; Menu, J; Debosscher, J; Hrudkova, M; De Smedt, K; Lombaert, R; Nemeth, P

    2015-01-01

    Gamma Doradus and delta Scuti pulsators cover the transition region between low mass and massive main-sequence stars, and are as such critical for testing stellar models. When they reside in binary systems, we can combine two independent methods to derive critical information, such as precise fundamental parameters to aid asteroseismic modelling. In the Kepler light curve of KIC10080943, clear signatures of gravity and pressure mode pulsations have been found. Ground-based spectroscopy revealed this target to be a double-lined binary system. We present the analysis of four years of Kepler photometry and high-resolution spectroscopy to derive observational constraints, which will serve to evaluate theoretical predictions of the stellar structure and evolution for intermediate-mass stars. We used the method of spectral disentangling to determine atmospheric parameters for both components and derive the orbital elements. With phoebe we modelled the ellipsoidal variation and reflection signal of the binary in the...

  4. The binary proletariat

    OpenAIRE

    Bolt, Nate

    2000-01-01

    In the endless quest to transform itself, capitalism has spawned a new working class. The proletariat was an essential product of the industrial revolution, and the lighter, more efficient capitalism of the digital revolution has created the Binary Proletariat.

  5. Segregation phases in a vibrated binary granular layer

    OpenAIRE

    Reis, P. M.; Ehrhardt, G.; Mullin, T.

    2003-01-01

    We present the results of an experimental study of patterned segregation in a horizontally shaken shallow layer of a binary mixture of dry particles. As the compacity, $C$, of the mixture was increased, the evolution of three distinct phases was observed. We classify them as binary gas, segregation liquid and segregation crystal phases using macroscopic and microscopic measures. The binary gas to segregation liquid transition is consistent with a continuous phase transition and includes the c...

  6. The role of electron-beam irradiation in TEM observation of POSS/epoxy resin binary system%电子束辐照在POSS/环氧树脂二元体系TEM观察中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丽月; 王磊

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the role of electron irradiation in TEM observation was investigated using POSS/epoxy resin as an example. The results show that the contract of POSS in this binary system increases with the electron irradiation intensity and the irradiation time. Using the electron irradiation, clearer TEM photo can be obtained. The relative grey value is employed for quantitative analysis. The mechanism of electron⁃beam irradiation is also presumed.%本文以POSS/环氧树脂的二元体系为主体,研究了电子束辐照对该二元体系在透射电镜观察中的作用。研究表明,随着电子束辐照强度和辐照时间的增加,二元体系中POSS分散相的衬度越来越明显,得到的TEM图像也更加清晰。本文采用TEM图像的相对灰度值定量研究了电子束辐照时间对图像清晰度的影响,探索了电子束辐照对该二元体系TEM像衬度提高的原理。

  7. Modal Parameters Estimation of Building Structures from Vibration Test Data Using Observability Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Seung Hwang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The load distribution to each mode of a structure under seismic loading depends on the modal participation factors and mode shapes and thus the exact estimation of modal participation factors and mode shapes is essential to analyze the seismic response of a structure. In this study, an identification procedure for modal participation factors and mode shapes from a vibration test is proposed. The modal participation factors and mode shapes are obtained from the relationship between observability matrices realized from the system identification. Using the observability matrices, it is possible to transform an arbitrarily identified state space model obtained from the experimental data into a state space model which is defined in a domain with physical meaning. Then, the modal participation factor can be estimated based on the transformation matrix between two state space models. The numerical simulation is performed to evaluate the proposed procedure, and the results show that the modal participation factor and mode shapes are estimated from the structural responses accurately. The procedure is also applied to the experimental data obtained from the shaking table test of a three-story shear building model.

  8. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2012 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizell, Steve A; Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; McCurdy, Greg; Miller, Julianne J

    2013-07-01

    In 1963, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), predecessor to the US Department of Energy (DOE), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR)). Operation Roller Coaster consisted of four tests in which chemical explosions were detonated in the presence of nuclear devices to assess the dispersal of radionuclides and evaluate the effectiveness of storage structures to contain the ejected radionuclides. These tests resulted in dispersal of plutonium over the ground surface downwind of the test ground zero. Three tests, Clean Slate 1, 2, and 3, were conducted on the TTR in Cactus Flat; the fourth, Double Tracks, was conducted in Stonewall Flat on the NTTR. DOE is working to clean up and close all four sites. Substantial cleaned up has been accomplished at Double Tracks and Clean Slate 1. Cleanup of Clean Slate 2 and 3 is on the DOE planning horizon for some time in the next several years. The Desert Research Institute installed two monitoring stations, number 400 at the Sandia National Laboratories Range Operations Center and number 401 at Clean Slate 3, in 2008 and a third monitoring station, number 402 at Clean Slate 1, in 2011 to measure radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions. The primary objectives of the data collection and analysis effort are to (1) monitor the concentration of radiological parameters in dust particles suspended in air, (2) determine whether winds are re-distributing radionuclides or contaminated soil material, (3) evaluate the controlling meteorological conditions if wind transport is occurring, and (4) measure ancillary radiological, meteorological, and environmental parameters that might provide insight to the above assessments. The following observations are based on data collected during CY2012. The mean annual concentration of gross alpha and gross beta is highest at Station 400 and lowest at Station

  9. Eclipsing Binary Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Freire, P C C

    2004-01-01

    The first eclipsing binary pulsar, PSR B1957+20, was discovered in 1987. Since then, 13 other eclipsing low-mass binary pulsars have been found, 12 of these are in globular clusters. In this paper we list the known eclipsing binary pulsars and their properties, with special attention to the eclipsing systems in 47 Tuc. We find that there are two fundamentally different groups of eclipsing binary pulsars; separated by their companion masses. The less massive systems (M_c ~ 0.02 M_sun) are a product of predictable stellar evolution in binary pulsars. The systems with more massive companions (M_c ~ 0.2 M_sun) were formed by exchange encounters in globular clusters, and for that reason are exclusive to those environments. This class of systems can be used to learn about the neutron star recycling fraction in the globular clusters actively forming pulsars. We suggest that most of these binary systems are undetectable at radio wavelengths.

  10. Hunter:一种指令集体系结构无关的二进制级动态测试用例生成技术%Hunter: ISA-Independent Binary Level Dynamic Test Generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李根; 卢凯; 张英; 卢锡城; 冯华; 张巍

    2011-01-01

    The dynamic test generation approach is becoming increasingly popular to finding security vulnerabilities in software. More and more research institutes and organizations use this approach to find security vulnerabilities in binary code. However, the existing binary level dynamic test generation approaches and tools are not retargetable, and can only find vulnerabilities in binaries for a specific ISA.This paper presents a new binary-level dynamic test generation technique and a tool, Hunter,which implements this technique. Unlike other such techniques that can operate only on binaries in a specific ISA, Hunter takes the binaries of any ISA as inputs and dynamically generates new inputs that exercise different control paths in the program, which may lead to security vulnerabilities. Hunter defines a meta instruction set architecture(MetaISA); Hunter maps the execution information, which is collected during the binary source code execution, to MetaISA; and symbolic execution, constraint collection and constraint solver operates on MetalSA, thus making these processes ISA-independent. We have implemented our Hunter, retargeted it to 32-bit x86, PowerPC and Sparc ISAs, and used it to automatically find the six known bugs in the six benchmarks. Our results indicate that our Hunter can easily be retargeted to any ISA with only a few overheads; and Hunter can effectively find bugs located deep within large applications from their binaries for 32-bit x86. PowerPC or Snarc ISA.%动态测试用例生成技术是一类新兴的软件测试技术.由于使用该类技术无需任何人工干预,也无需验证人员具备任何专业知识,同时该类技术能够无误地发现程序错误,越来越多的研究者采用该技术查找预发布的二进制级软件错误.然而,已有的该类技术及其实现系统不具有可重定向性,只能处理面向某种特定指令集体系结构(ISA)的二进制代码,进行测试用例的生成与查

  11. A test of the additivity of acute toxicity of binary-metal mixtures of ni with Cd, Cu, and Zn to Daphnia magna, using the inflection point of the concentration-response curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traudt, Elizabeth M; Ranville, James F; Smith, Samantha A; Meyer, Joseph S

    2016-07-01

    Mixtures of metals are often present in surface waters, leading to toxicity that is difficult to predict. To provide data for development of multimetal toxicity models, Daphnia magna neonates were exposed to individual metals (Cd, Cu, Ni, Zn) and to binary combinations of those metals in standard 48-h lethality tests conducted in US Environmental Protection Agency moderately hard reconstituted water with 3 mg dissolved organic carbon (DOC)/L added as Suwannee River fulvic acid. Toxicity tests were performed with mixtures of Ni and 1) Cd, which is considerably more toxic than Ni; 2) Cu, which is less toxic than Cd but more toxic than Ni; and 3) Zn, which has a toxicity threshold similar to Ni. For each combination of metals in the binary mixtures, the concentration of 1 metal was held constant while the second metal was varied through a series that ranged from nonlethal to lethal concentrations; then the roles of the metals were reversed. Inflection points of the concentration-response curves were compared to test for additivity of toxicity. Sublethal concentrations of Ni caused less-than-additive toxicity with Cd, slightly less-than-additive toxicity with Zn, and greater-than-additive toxicity with Cu. One explanation of these results might be competition among the metals for binding to biological ligands and/or dissolved organic matter. Therefore, models might have to incorporate sometimes competing chemical interactions to accurately predict metal-mixture toxicity. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1843-1851. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26681657

  12. Testing the Dark Matter Caustic Theory Against Observations in the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Dumas, Julie; Niedzielski, Bethany; Susser, Adam; Thompson, Jeffery M; Weiss, Jake; Lewis, Kim M

    2015-01-01

    We test a particular theory of dark matter in which dark matter axions form ring "caustics" in the plane of the Milky Way against actual observations of Milky Way stars. According to this theory, cold, collisionless dark matter particles with angular momentum flow in and out of the Milky Way on sheets. These flows form caustic rings (at the positions of the rings, the density of the flow is formally infinite) at the locations of closest approach to the Galactic center. We show that the caustic ring dark matter theory reproduces a roughly logarithmic halo, with large perturbations near the rings. We show that the theory can reasonably match the observed rotation curve of the Milky Way. We explore the effects of the caustic rings on dwarf galaxy tidal disruption using N-body simulations. In particular, simulations of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy tidal disruption in a caustic ring halo potential match observations of the trailing tidal tail as far as 90 kpc from the Galactic center; they do not, however, match t...

  13. The Dichotic Word Listening Test: preliminary observations in American and Canadian samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, M A; Persinger, M A; Grote, C; Evertowski, L M; Springer, J A; Tuten, T; Moulden, D; Franzen, K M; Roberts, R J; Baglio, C S

    1994-11-01

    The present article describes observations of 670 American and Canadian child and adult control subjects on the recently developed Dichotic Word Listening Test (DWLT). The task was also administered to a sample of American children with traumatic brain injuries (n=21) of varying severity and a sample of American adults with mild traumatic injuries (n=36). The conceptual focus in this line of research was on using normative observations to identify clinically defective channels of auditory processing among patients. The principal findings were as follow: 1) the DWLT was sensitive to the effects of cerebral dysfunction following traumatic brain injury; 2) differences among normal samples with different demographic backgrounds were frequently observed, arguing for the development of local norms; 3) a shorter form of the DWLT task (DWLT30) can be used for screening purposes with relatively little reduction in sensitivity to cerebral dysfunction; 4) there appeared to be considerable improvement of DWLT performance between the ages of five and seven, due largely to higher scores from the left auditory channel; and 5) there were indications that use of French (rather than English) as one's native language before age six can negatively influence performance in adulthood on an English version of the DWLT. In general, the present findings suggest that the DWLT is likely to have relatively broad applicability for neuropsychological assessment across the life-span.

  14. Testing General Relativity's No-Hair Theorem with X-Ray Observations of Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Hoormann, Janie K; Krawczynski, Henric

    2016-01-01

    Despite its success in the weak gravity regime, General Relativity (GR) has yet to be verified in the regime of strong gravity. In this paper, we present the results of detailed ray tracing simulations aiming at clarifying if the combined information from X-ray spectroscopy, timing, and polarization observations of stellar mass and supermassive black holes can be used to test GR's no-hair theorem. The latter states that stationary astrophysical black holes are described by the Kerr-family of metrics with the black hole mass and spin being the only free parameters. We use four "non-Kerr metrics", some phenomenological in nature and others motivated by alternative theories of gravity, and study the observational signatures of deviations from the Kerr metric. Particular attention is given to the case when all the metrics are set to give the same Innermost Stable Circular Orbit (ISCO) in quasi-Boyer Lindquist coordinates. We give a detailed discussion of similarities and differences of the observational signature...

  15. Stellar collisions during binary-binary and binary-single star interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Fregeau; P. Cheung; S.F. Portegies Zwart; F.A. Rasio

    2004-01-01

    Physical collisions between stars occur frequently in dense star clusters, either via close encounters between two single stars, or during strong dynamical interactions involving binary stars. Here we study stellar collisions that occur during binary-single and binary-binary interactions, by perform

  16. Statistical analysis of a comprehensive list of visual binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Kovaleva, D; Yungelson, L; Chulkov, D; Yikdem, G M

    2016-01-01

    Visual binary stars are the most abundant