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Sample records for bimonthly

  1. 30 CFR 90.208 - Bimonthly sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... MANDATORY HEALTH STANDARDS-COAL MINERS WHO HAVE EVIDENCE OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF PNEUMOCONIOSIS Sampling Procedures § 90.208 Bimonthly sampling. (a) Each operator shall take one valid respirable dust sample for... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bimonthly sampling. 90.208 Section 90.208...

  2. Modeling seasonality in bimonthly time series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractA recurring issue in modeling seasonal time series variables is the choice of the most adequate model for the seasonal movements. One selection method for quarterly data is proposed in Hylleberg et al. (1990). Market response models are often constructed for bimonthly variables, and

  3. 30 CFR 71.208 - Bimonthly sampling; designated work positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bimonthly sampling; designated work positions... UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Sampling Procedures § 71.208 Bimonthly sampling; designated work positions. (a) Each... standard when quartz is present), respirable dust sampling of designated work positions shall begin on the...

  4. 30 CFR 70.207 - Bimonthly sampling; mechanized mining units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bimonthly sampling; mechanized mining units. 70... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Sampling Procedures § 70.207 Bimonthly sampling; mechanized mining units. (a) Each operator shall take five valid respirable dust samples...

  5. EMSL Bimonthly Report: June 2007 through July 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Showalter, Mary Ann

    2007-10-03

    The W.R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national scientific user facility located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington. PNNL operates EMSL for the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research. At one location, EMSL offers a comprehensive array of leading-edge resources in six research facilities. Access to the capabilities and instrumentation in EMSL facilities is obtained through a peer-reviewed proposal process. The Bimonthly Report documents research activities and accomplishments of EMSL users and staff. Topics covered in the Bimonthly Report include Research Highlights of EMSL user projects, Scientific Grand Challenge Highlights, Awards and Recognition, Professional/Community Service, Major Facility Upgrades, News Coverage, Visitors and Users, New EMSL Staff, Publications, Presentations, Patents, and Journal Covers featuring EMSL user research.

  6. Research Library Issues: A Bimonthly Report from ARL, CNI, and SPARC. RLI 268

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, G. Jaia, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Research Library Issues" ("RLI") is a bimonthly report from ARL (Association of Research Libraries), CNI (Coalition of Networked Information), and SPARC (Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition). This special issue includes the following articles: (1) Themes within the ARL Strategic Plan 2010-2012 (Charles B. Lowry); (2) ARL…

  7. ARL: A Bimonthly Report on Research Library Issues and Actions from ARL, CNI, and SPARC. Number 259

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, G. Jaia, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "ARL" is the bimonthly report on research library issues and actions from ARL (Association of Research Libraries), CNI (Coalition of Networked Information), and SPARC (Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition). "ARL" reports on current issues of interest to academic and research library administrators, staff, and users; higher…

  8. Bimonthly assessment of PAH content in wild mussels from the Spanish Atlantic Coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Campillo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available During 2013-14 wild mussels were bimonthly sampled in five stations along the Spanish Atlantic coast in order to assess any temporal variation in the concentration of parent PAHs. The sampling stations selected (Oia, Raxó, Mera, Avilés and Pedreña included both polluted and unpolluted sites and tried to reflect the different situations in the area (coastal and more estuarine waters. The samples were shipped to the lab and three homogenates from each site were prepared and frozen until analysis. 13 parent PAHs were quantified using HPLC with fluorescence detection. In general, the highest concentrations were found in the January-March sampling, during the pre-spawning period. PAHs contents were related to mussel biochemical composition, mainly carbohydrates and lipids, and to mussel reproductive stage. In general the 4-ring PAHs is the most abundant group of PAHs. The input of the HMW PAHs (4-5 rings to the total PAH burden generally increases in the winter months probably due to both different sources in that season (building heatings and the remobilization of sediments.

  9. Clinical experience with fixed bimonthly aflibercept dosing in treatment-experienced patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanani AM

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Arshad M Khanani Sierra Eye Associates, Reno, NV, USA Purpose: To evaluate the durability of fixed bimonthly dosing of intravitreal aflibercept for neovascular age-related macular degeneration.Methods: Records of 16 patients were retrospectively reviewed. Patients received three initial 2.0 mg monthly doses of aflibercept then 8-weekly doses according to the product label. Best-corrected visual acuity (Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study [ETDRS] letters, central macular thickness, fluid on optical coherence tomography, and pigment epithelial detachment (PED were measured.Results: Prior to starting aflibercept, 13 patients had subretinal fluid (SRF, five had intraretinal fluid (IRF, four had PED, and baseline visual acuity (VA was 62 approximate ETDRS letters. Following the monthly dosing, seven patients had no improvement or decreased VA, ten patients still had SRF/IRF, and PED had worsened in one patient. At Visit 4, an average of 6.8 weeks after Visit 3, VA had decreased in seven patients, SRF/IRF had increased in 12 patients, and PED had returned in all patients who initially responded. Based on the presence of fluid after the initial monthly injections, 12 patients could not be extended to fixed bimonthly dosing.Conclusion: This case series adds to the growing body of evidence on the need for flexible dosing schedules for the personalized treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Keywords: age-related macular degeneration, AMD, bimonthly, regimen, aflibercept, case studies, retinal fluid

  10. Aqueous vascular endothelial growth factor and aflibercept concentrations after bimonthly intravitreal injections of aflibercept for age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Tomoko; Wang, Xiying; Sawada, Osamu; Saishin, Yoshitsugu; Ohji, Masahito

    2018-01-01

    Clinical evidence supports the efficacy of bimonthly aflibercept injection for age-related macular degeneration. The study aimed to evaluate aqueous vascular endothelial growth factor and aflibercept concentrations and the efficacy of bimonthly aflibercept in patients with age-related macular degeneration. This study is a prospective, interventional case series. Enrolled were 35 eyes with exudative age-related macular degeneration from 35 patients. Patients received three bimonthly intravitreal aflibercept without loading doses. We collected the aqueous humor just before each injection, measured vascular endothelial growth factor and aflibercept concentrations by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and measured best-corrected visual acuity and central retinal subfield thickness before and after the injections. Aqueous vascular endothelial growth factor and aflibercept concentrations were measured. The vascular endothelial growth factor concentration was 135.4 ± 60.5 pg/mL (mean ± standard deviation, range 60.6-323.4) at baseline and below the lowest detectable limit in all eyes at month 2 and in 32 eyes at month 4 (P age-related macular degeneration. © 2017 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  11. Synoptic Bi-monthly and storm response water quality sampling in Southern Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, from November 2007 - April 2009 (NODC Accession 0062644)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Synoptic sampling including water column profiles and collected surface water samples was conducted on a bi-monthly basis throughout the rainy season (October-May)...

  12. Synoptic Bi-monthly and Storm Response Water Quality Sampling in Southern Kaneohe Bay, HI 2005-2007 (NODC Accession 0060061)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Synoptic sampling including water column profiles and collected surface water samples was conducted on a bi-monthly basis throughout the rainy season(October-May)...

  13. Synoptic Bi-monthly and Storm Response Water Quality Sampling in Southern Kaneohe Bay, HI November 2007 - April 2009 (NODC Accession 0062644)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Synoptic sampling including water column profiles and collected surface water samples was conducted on a bi-monthly basis throughout the rainy season(October-May)...

  14. Estimation of 305 Day Milk Yield from Cumulative Monthly and Bimonthly Test Day Records in Indonesian Holstein Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahayu, A. P.; Hartatik, T.; Purnomoadi, A.; Kurnianto, E.

    2018-02-01

    The aims of this study were to estimate 305 day first lactation milk yield of Indonesian Holstein cattle from cumulative monthly and bimonthly test day records and to analyze its accuracy.The first lactation records of 258 dairy cows from 2006 to 2014 consisted of 2571 monthly (MTDY) and 1281 bimonthly test day yield (BTDY) records were used. Milk yields were estimated by regression method. Correlation coefficients between actual and estimated milk yield by cumulative MTDY were 0.70, 0.78, 0.83, 0.86, 0.89, 0.92, 0.94 and 0.96 for 2-9 months, respectively, meanwhile by cumulative BTDY were 0.69, 0.81, 0.87 and 0.92 for 2, 4, 6 and 8 months, respectively. The accuracy of fitting regression models (R2) increased with the increasing in the number of cumulative test day used. The used of 5 cumulative MTDY was considered sufficient for estimating 305 day first lactation milk yield with 80.6% accuracy and 7% error percentage of estimation. The estimated milk yield from MTDY was more accurate than BTDY by 1.1 to 2% less error percentage in the same time.

  15. Progress Monitoring in Reading: Comparison of Weekly, Bimonthly, and Monthly Assessments for Students at Risk for Reading Difficulties in Grades 2-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    January, Stacy-Ann A.; Van Norman, Ethan R.; Christ, Theodore J.; Ardoin, Scott P.; Eckert, Tanya L.; White, Mary Jane

    2018-01-01

    The present study examined the utility of two progress monitoring assessment schedules (bimonthly and monthly) as alternatives to monitoring once weekly with curriculum-based measurement in reading (CBM-R). General education students (N = 93) in Grades 2-4 who were at risk for reading difficulties but not yet receiving special education services…

  16. Synoptic bi-monthly and storm response water quality sampling in Southern Kaneohe Bay, HI, 2005-2007 in support of the Coral Reef Instrumented Monitoring Platform (CRIMP) (NODC Accession 0060061)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Synoptic sampling including water column profiles and collected surface water samples was conducted on a bi-monthly basis throughout the rainy season (October-May)...

  17. Irinotecan plus folinic acid/continuous 5-fluorouracil as simplified bimonthly FOLFIRI regimen for first-line therapy of metastatic colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Höhler Thomas

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Combination therapy of irinotecan, folinic acid (FA and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU has been proven to be highly effective for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. However, in light of safety and efficacy concerns, the best combination regimen for first-line therapy still needs to be defined. The current study reports on the bimonthly FOLFIRI protocol consisting of irinotecan with continuous FA/5-FU in five German outpatient clinics, with emphasis on the safety and efficiency, quality of life, management of delayed diarrhea, and secondary resection of regressive liver metastases. Methods A total of 35 patients were treated for metastatic colorectal cancer. All patients received first-line treatment according to the FOLFIRI regimen, consisting of irinotecan (180 mg/m2, L-FA (200 mg/m2 and 5-FU bolus (400 mg/m2 on day 1, followed by a 46-h continuous infusion 5-FU (2400 mg/m2. One cycle contained three fortnightly administrations. Staging was performed after 2 cycles. Dosage was reduced at any time if toxicity NCI CTC grade III/IV was observed. Chemotherapy was administered only to diarrhea-free patients. Results The FOLFIRI regimen was generally well tolerated. It was postponed for one-week in 51 of 415 applications (12.3%. Dose reduction was necessary in ten patients. Grade III/IV toxicity was rare, with diarrhea (14%, nausea/vomiting (12%, leucopenia (3%, neutropenia (9% and mucositis (3%. The overall response rate was 31% (4 CR and 7 PR, with disease control in 74%. After primary chemotherapy, resection of liver metastases was achieved in three patients. In one patient, the CR was confirmed pathologically. Median progression-free and overall survival were seven and 17 months, respectively. Conclusions The FOLFIRI regimen proved to be safe and efficient. Outpatient treatment was well tolerated. Since downstaging was possible, combinations of irinotecan and continuous FA/5-FU should further be investigated in neoadjuvant

  18. IRIS Bimonthly Public Meeting (Jun 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    On June 25-27, 2014, EPA hosted a public meeting/webinar, to provide an opportunity for the public to give input and participate in an open discussion regarding several IRIS chemical assessments of Hexavalent Chromium (Cr(VI)) and Inorganic Arsenic (iAs).

  19. IRIS Bimonthly Public Meeting (Oct 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The meeting was held to obtain input from the scientific community and the public on studies and data that will be used in the assessments of Diisononyl Phthalate (DINP) and Hexavalent Chromium (Cr(VI)) that are under IRIS development.

  20. IRIS Bimonthly Public Meeting (Apr 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA hosted a public meeting/webinar to provide an opportunity for the public to give input and participate in an open discussion regarding several IRIS chemical assessments for Diethyl Phthalate (DEP) and Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD).

  1. ORNL Nuclear Safety Research and Development Program Bimonthly Report for July-August 1968

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottrell, W.B.

    2001-08-17

    The accomplishments during the months of July and August in the research and development program under way at ORNL as part of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's Nuclear Safety Program are summarized, Included in this report are work on various chemical reactions, as well as the release, characterization, and transport of fission products in containment systems under various accident conditions and on problems associated with the removal of these fission products from gas streams. Although most of this work is in general support of water-cooled power reactor technology, including LOFT and CSE programs, the work reflects the current safety problems, such as measurements of the prompt fuel element failure phenomena and the efficacy of containment spray and pool-suppression systems for fission-product removal. Several projects are also conducted in support of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). Other major projects include fuel-transport safety investigations, a series of discussion papers on various aspects of water-reactor technology, antiseismic design of nuclear facilities, and studies of primary piping and steel, pressure-vessel technology. Experimental work relative to pressure-vessel technology includes investigations of the attachment of nozzles to shells and the implementation of joint AEX-PVFX programs on heavy-section steel technology and nuclear piping, pumps, and valves. Several of the projects are directly related to another major undertaking; namely, the AEC's standards program, which entails development of engineering safeguards and the establishment of codes and standards for government-owned or -sponsored reactor facilities. Another task, CHORD-S, is concerned with the establishment of computer programs for the evaluation of reactor design data, The recent activities of the NSIC and the Nuclear Safety journal in behalf of the nuclear community are also discussed.

  2. La Recherche Aerospatiale, Bimonthly Bulletin, no. 1982-6, 211/November-Decemter 1982

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevestre, C.

    1983-04-01

    A modular method for centrifugal compressor performance prediction is presented. Cyclic hardening of stainless steel under complex loading is described. Fatigue failure microinitiation, micropropagation and damage is considered. The stability of a tilting rotor aircraft model is studied. The thermal stability of titanium alloys is investigated. A compensator for thermal effects on quartz oscillators is described.

  3. SDG and E - ERDA Geothermal Loop, Experimental Facility. Bi-monthly report, November-December 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, H.K.; Bricarello, J.R.; Enos, F.L.; Hodgdon, N.C.; Li, K.K.; Lombard, G.L.; Mulliner, D.K.; Swanson, C.R.

    1977-01-01

    Four continuous operation runs, including the completion of one started in October, were carried out using geothermal brine from Magmamax No. 1 and Woolsey No. 1 wells. Special problems encountered during these operations were noted and corrective actions were taken. System chemistry continued to be monitored and reported. Data management of the GLEF is also included.

  4. SDG and E - ERDA Geothermal Loop Experimental Facility. Bi-monthly report, May 1975-August 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, H.K.; Bricarello, J.R.; Campbell, J.A.; Lombard, G.L.; Mulliner, D.K.; Swanson, C.R.

    1976-09-01

    A description of the Geothermal Loop Experimental Facility (GLEF) its construction problems, and a discussion of start-up testing are included. A history and description of the operation and maintenance with the brine injection pump for the facility are presented. The GLEF was divided into five separate sections: steam and condensate system, brine system, purge water system, vent gas system, and cooling water system. An insight into the chemistry of each system is provided by analysis of samples taken. Scaling and corrosion effects of brine, steam, gas, and water in these systems are described in detail. (MHR)

  5. Qualification testing evaluation (QTE) program, FIN A-1051, Case 0686. Bimonthly status report, February-March 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This report presents information on: accident methodologies assessments; accident environment effects; aging methodologies assessments; TMI-2 related activities; international programs coordination; research/facility definition; seismic methodologies; and related equipment qualification issues

  6. Bimonthly assessment of magnetization transfer magnetic resonance imaging parameters in multiple sclerosis: a 14-month, multicentre, follow-up study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mesaros, S.; Rocca, M.A.; Sormani, M.P.; Valsasina, P.; Markowitz, C.; De Stefano, N.; Montalban, X.; Barkhof, F.; Ranjeva, J.P.; Sailer, M.; Kappos, L.; Comi, G.; Filippi, M.

    2010-01-01

    This study was performed to assess the temporal evolution of damage within lesions and the normal-appearing white matter, measured using frequent magnetization transfer (MT) MRI, in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). The relationship of MT ratio (MTR) changes with measures of lesion

  7. Bimonthly 24 h infusion of high-dose 5-fluorouracil vs EAP regimen in patients with advanced gastric cancer. A randomized phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, I P; Jelić, S B; Krivokapić, Z V; Jezdić, S D; Pesko, P M; Micev, M T; Babić, D R

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the activity and toxicity of high dose (HD) infusional 5-FU in comparison to EAP regimen as first-line chemotherapy in patients with advanced gastric cancer. Histologically confirmed measurable advanced gastric cancer, age EAP arm: doxorubicin (40 mg/m(2)), etoposide (360 mg/m(2)), and cisplatin (80 mg/m(2)) every 28 d; HD 5-FU arm: 5-FU 2.6 g/m(2) 24 h infusion, biweekly. Sixty patients were randomized. Patient characteristics (arms EAP/HD 5-FU): Median age 57/55 yr, median PS 1/1, LAD (patients) 3/8, M1 (patients) 27/22. Median number of cycles (range): EAP arm 4 (2-8), HD 5-FU arm 2 (1-8). Worst toxicity per cycle (grade 3 and 4 in%): Neutropenia 20/3, thrombocytopenia 9/0, anemia 9/13, diarrhea 3/10, nausea 17/7, vomiting 10/0 for EAP and HD 5-FU arms, respectively. All patients were eligible for response in both arms. Confirmed response rate (95%CI): EAP arm 34% [16-50%]/HD 5-FU arm 10% (0-21%), no change: 46/40%, progression of disease: 20/50, respectively. Overall survival (range): EAP arm A 7 mo [3-27], HD 5-FU arm 6 mo (4-25). Infusional HD 5-FU showed a low incidence of severe toxicity. But given the low efficacy of 5-FU in the dosage we applied in the study, it cannot be recommended as a single treatment for further studies. Assessment of higher dose intensity and/or dose density of 5-FU, with introduction of other active drugs in combination, could be an option for further studies.

  8. Recovery of Coastal Fauna after the 2011 Tsunami in Japan as Determined by Bimonthly Underwater Visual Censuses Conducted over Five Years.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiji Masuda

    Full Text Available Massive tsunamis induce catastrophic disturbance in marine ecosystems, yet they can provide unique opportunities to observe the process of regeneration. Here, we report the recovery of fauna after the 2011 tsunami in northeast Japan based on underwater visual censuses performed every two months over five years. Both total fish abundance and species richness increased from the first to the second year after the tsunami followed by stabilization in the following years. Short-lived fish, such as the banded goby Pterogobius elapoides, were relatively abundant in the first two years, whereas long-lived species, such as the black rockfish Sebastes cheni, increased in the latter half of the survey period. Tropical fish species were recorded only in the second and third years after the tsunami. The body size of long-lived fish increased during the survey period resulting in a gradual increase of total fish biomass. The recovery of fish assemblages was slow at one site located in the inner bay, where the impact of the tsunami was the strongest. Apart from fish, blooms of the moon jellyfish Aurelia sp. occurred only in the first two years after the tsunami, whereas the abundances of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus and abalone Haliotis discus hannai increased after the second year. Although we lack quantitative data prior to the tsunami, we conclude that it takes approximately three years for coastal reef fish assemblages to recover from a heavy disturbance such as a tsunami and that the recovery is dependent on species-specific life span and habitat.

  9. Ras Umm Sidd Oxygen Isotope (delta 18O) Data for 1750 to 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ras Umm Sidd bimonthly coral oxygen isotope data (coral core RUS-95). Notes on the data: File (Ras Umm Sidd d18O.txt.) includes columns for Year AD (bimonthly...

  10. Maiana Atoll Isotope (delta 18O, delta 13C) Data for 1840 to 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Maiana bimonthly oxygen isotopic composition, 1840-1995. Notes on the data: File includes columns for Year AD (bimonthly resolution = dec/jan, feb/mar) and coral...

  11. Dietary Fat Intake and Fecundability in 2 Preconception Cohort Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wise, Lauren A; Wesselink, Amelia K; Tucker, Katherine L

    2018-01-01

    American preconception cohort studies. Women who were attempting to become pregnant completed a validated food frequency questionnaire at baseline. Pregnancy status was updated bimonthly for 12 months or until pregnancy. Fecundability ratios (FR) and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using...

  12. Shell Venster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Wit, P.; Looijesteijn, B.; Regeer, B.; Stip, B.

    1995-03-01

    In the bi-monthly issues of 'Shell Venster' (window on Shell) attention is paid to the activities of the multinational petroleum company Shell Nederland and the Koninklijke/Shell Groep by means of non-specialist articles

  13. Development and demonstration of a teleoperated modular robot system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosunoglu, S.; Tesar, D.

    1992-01-01

    This collection of bi-monthly progress reports on the DOE/NE Robotics Program presents information on significant accomplishments, reports and major correspondence issued, important meetings, and major problems associated with the program

  14. DOE Robotics Project. Summary of progress for 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    This document provide the bimonthly progress reports on the Department of Energy (DOE) Robotics Project by the University of Michigan. Reports are provided for the time periods of December 90/January 91 through June 91/July 91. (FI)

  15. DOE Robotics Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    This document provide the bimonthly progress reports on the Department of Energy (DOE) Robotics Project by the University of Michigan. Reports are provided for the time periods of December 90/January 91 through June 91/July 91. (FI)

  16. Amped Up! - Volume 1, No. 3, May/June 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-05-01

    Welcome to the latest issue of our bimonthly newsletter, Amped Up!, highlighting the initiatives, events and technologies in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy that influence change.

  17. Latitudinal trends in the growth and reproductive seasonality of Delesseria sanguinea, Membranoptera alata, and Phycodrys rubens (Rhodophyta)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, FJ; Breeman, AM

    The seasonality of Delesseria sanguinea, Membranoptera alata, and Phycodrys rubens (Rhodophyta) was studied at Helgoland (North Sea, Germany) and Roscoff (Brittany, France). Plants were collected at bimonthly intervals, and growth and reproduction were monitored. Growth of blades was observed mainly

  18. Seasonal spreading of the Persian Gulf water mass in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Prasad, T.G.; Ikeda, M.; PrasannaKumar, S.

    The characteristics of the subsurface salinity maximum associated with the Persian Gulf Water mass (PGW) are used to quantify the spreading and mixing of PGW in the thermocline of the Arabian Sea based on a bimonthly climatology of temperature...

  19. International Developments in Computer Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    background on 52 53 China’s scientific research and on their computer science before 1978. A useful companion to the directory is another publication of the...bimonthly publication in Portuguese; occasional translation of foreign articles into Portuguese. Data News: A bimonthly industry newsletter. Sistemas ...computer-related topics; Spanish. Delta: Publication of local users group; Spanish. Sistemas : Publication of System Engineers of Colombia; Spanish. CUBA

  20. Microbial water quality in the upper Olifants River catchment: implications for health

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Le Rouw, Wouter J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available indicator counts (E. coli) several pathogens were also monitored for (Table 1). Table 1: Microbial pathogens monitored and the detection method used Determinant Method E. coli Colilert TM Salmonella sp. Real-Time polymerase chain reaction Shigella sp...-Time polymerase chain reaction ? Year 1: E. coli levels were monitored bi-monthly at 11 sampling sites (Figure 1). Pathogens were tested for bimonthly at the sites that exhibited high faecal indicator counts (FIO) counts. Twelve additional sites were monitored...

  1. Explanation of the methods employed in the statistical evaluation of SALE program data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bracey, J.T.; Soriano, M.

    1981-01-01

    The analysis of Safeguards Analytical Laboratory Evaluation (SALE) bimonthly data is described. Statistical procedures are discussed in Section A, followed by the descriptions of tabular and graphic values in Section B. Calculation formulae for the various statistics in the reports are presented in Section C. SALE data reported to New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) are entered into a computerized system through routine data processing procedures. Bimonthly and annual reports are generated from this data system. In the bimonthly data analysis, data from the six most recent reporting periods of each laboratory-material-analytical method combination are utilized. Analysis results in the bimonthly reports are only presented for those participants who have reported data at least once during the last 12-month period. Reported values are transformed to relative percent difference values calculated by [(reported value - reference value)/reference value] x 100. Analysis of data is performed on these transformed values. Accordingly, the results given in the bimonthly report are (relative) percent differences (% DIFF). Suspect, large variations are verified with individual participants to eliminate errors in the transcription process. Statistical extreme values are not excluded from bimonthly analysis; all data are used

  2. Index to Nuclear Safety: a technical progress review by chrology, permuted title, and author, Volume 11(1) through Volume 20(6)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottrell, W B; Passiakos, M

    1980-06-01

    This index to Nuclear Safety, a bimonthly technical progress review, covers articles published in Nuclear Safety, Volume II, No. 1 (January-February 1970), through Volume 20, No. 6 (November-December 1979). It is divided into three sections: a chronological list of articles (including abstracts) followed by a permuted-title (KWIC) index and an author index. Nuclear Safety, a bimonthly technical progress review prepared by the Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC), covers all safety aspects of nuclear power reactors and associated facilities. Over 600 technical articles published in Nuclear Safety in the last ten years are listed in this index.

  3. Cross-disciplinary research programs at the Cornell TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes cross-disciplinary research efforts at the Cornell TRIGA reactor. A new graduate laboratory course for nonspecialists was developed which brought in graduate students from many fields, and a weekly or bimonthly nuclear methods seminars are being held to describe research methods, sample preparation, irradiation, etc

  4. Reflecting, Coaching and Mentoring to Enhance Teacher-Child Interactions in Head Start Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Betty; Donegan-Ritter, Mary

    2014-01-01

    In this study we examined the impact of a year long model of professional development comprised of a monthly cycle of video-based self-reflection, peer coaching, and mentoring and bimonthly workshops focused on selected Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS) dimensions. Education supervisors were trained and supported by project staff to lead…

  5. Seasonal changes in chemical composition and nutritive value of native forages in a spruce-hemlock forest, southeastern Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas A. Hanley; Jay D. McKendrick

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-two forages from Admiralty Island, southeastern Alaska, were monitored bimonthly for one year to assess seasonal changes in their chemical composition: neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber, cellulose, lignin/cutin, invitro dry-matter digestibility, total nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, sodium, copper, manganese, iron, and zinc....

  6. Optimizing use of library technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wink, Diane M; Killingsworth, Elizabeth K

    2011-01-01

    In this bimonthly series, the author examines how nurse educators can use the Internet and Web-based computer technologies such as search, communication, collaborative writing tools; social networking and social bookmarking sites; virtual worlds; and Web-based teaching and learning programs. This article describes optimizing the use of library technology.

  7. Child Care Health Connections: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 19, Number 2, March-April 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.; Leonard, Victoria, Ed.; Gendell, Mara, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment…

  8. Short-Term Changes in General and Memory-Specific Control Beliefs and Their Relationship to Cognition in Younger and Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielak, Allison A. M.; Hultsch, David F.; Levy-Ajzenkopf, Judi; MacDonald, Stuart W. S.; Hunter, Michael A.; Strauss, Esther

    2007-01-01

    We examined short-term changes in younger and older adults' control beliefs. Participants completed measures of general and memory-specific competence and locus of control on 10 bi-monthly occasions. At each occasion, participants rated their control beliefs prior to and following completion of a battery of cognitive tasks. Exposure to the set of…

  9. Studies on thermal fields in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Rao, A.S.

    of Science and Technology. The main objective of the program is routine monitoring of the upper ocean thermal structure along selected shipping lanes in the seas around India on annual and interannual time scales. Utilizing the near bi-monthly XBT data along...

  10. Cloud computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wink, Diane M

    2012-01-01

    In this bimonthly series, the author examines how nurse educators can use Internet and Web-based technologies such as search, communication, and collaborative writing tools; social networking and social bookmarking sites; virtual worlds; and Web-based teaching and learning programs. This article describes how cloud computing can be used in nursing education.

  11. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 26, Number 3, May-June 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Unleashing the "Brain Power" of Groups in the Classroom: The Neuroscience behind Collaborative Work (Nancy Walser); (2) Putting AP to the Test: New Research Assesses the…

  12. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 23, Number 1, January-February 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Response to Intervention: A New Approach to Reading Instruction Aims to Catch Struggling Readers Early (Nancy Walser); (2) Getting Advisory Right: Focus and…

  13. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 22, Number 6, November-December 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) (In)formative Assessments: New Tests and Activities Can Help Teachers Guide Student Learning (Robert Rothman); (2) Recent Research on the Achievement Gap: How Lifestyle…

  14. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 24, Number 1, January-February 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Leadership Lessons From Schools Becoming "Data Wise" (Jennifer L. Steele and Kathryn Parker Boudett); (2) A Guide on the Side: Mentors Help New Leaders Prepare for Life in the…

  15. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 26, Number 2, March-April 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Online Testing, Version 1.0: Oregon's Adaptive Computer-Based Accountability Test Offers a Peek at a Brave New Future (Robert Rothman); (2) Beyond…

  16. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 26, Number 5, September-October 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walser, Nancy, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Scenes from the School Turnaround Movement: Passion, Frustration, Mid-Course Corrections Mark Rapid Reforms (Laura Pappano); (2) The Media Savvy Educator:…

  17. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 23, Number 3, May-June 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) The Road to School Improvement: It's Hard, It's Bumpy, and It Takes as Long as It Takes (Richard F. Elmore and Elizabeth A. City); (2) Better Teaching with Web Tools: How…

  18. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 25, Number 5, September-October 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) The Invisible Hand in Education Policy: Behind the Scenes, Economists Wield Unprecedented Influence (David McKay Wilson); (2) Bonding and Bridging: Schools Open Doors for…

  19. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 26, Number 1, January-February 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Charters and Unions: What's the Future for This Unorthodox Relationship? (Alexander Russo); (2) From Special Ed to Higher Ed: Transition Planning for Disabled Students Focuses…

  20. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 28, Number 2, March-April 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Course Credits on the Quick: Controversial Online Recovery Programs Speed the Path to Graduation (Andrew Brownstein); (2) Collaborating to Make Schools More Inclusive…

  1. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 25, Number 2, March-April 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Money and Motivation: New Initiatives Rekindle Debate over the Link between Rewards and Student Achievement (David McKay Wilson); (2) An Inexact Science: What Are the Technical…

  2. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 24, Number 3, May-June 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) "Equity, Access, and Opportunity": Despite Challenges, More Districts Adopt One-to-One Laptop Programs (Colleen Gillard); (2) Small Kids, Big Words: Research-Based Strategies…

  3. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 24, Number 6, November-December 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) When Worlds Collide: Universal PreK Brings New Challenges for Public Elementary Schools (David McKay Wilson); (2) Answers and Questions: Schools Survey Their Students--and…

  4. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 27, Number 4, July-August 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Integrated Data Systems Link Schools and Communities: Researchers Combine School and Non-School Data to Inform Interventions and Policy (Patti Hartigan);…

  5. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 27, Number 5, September-October 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Teaching Students to Ask Their Own Questions: One Small Change Can Yield Big Results (Dan Rothstein and Luz Santana); (2) Voice of Experience: Jerry Weast--Leading a System…

  6. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 25, Number 3, May-June 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Improving Teaching and Learning through Instructional Rounds (Lee Teitel); (2) Developmentally Appropriate Practice in the Age of Testing: New Reports Outline Key Principles…

  7. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 26, Number 6, November-December 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walser, Nancy, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Video Games Take Testing to the Next Level: Researchers See Promise in Game-Like Assessments That Measure Complex Skills (Robert Rothman); (2) An Academic…

  8. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 25, Number 6, November-December 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) "Platooning" Instruction: Districts Weigh Pros and Cons of Departmentalizing Elementary Schools (Lucy Hood); (2) Behind the Classroom Door: A Rare Glimpse Indicates the…

  9. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 23, Number 2, March-April 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) More Than "Making Nice": Getting Teachers to (Truly) Collaborate (Laura Pappano); (2) "Doing the Critical Things First": An Aligned Approach to PreK and Early Elementary Math;…

  10. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 23, Number 6, November-December 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Charting a New Course toward Racial Integration: Districts Seek Legal Routes to Capture the Benefits of Diversity (Brigid Schulte); (2) Voluntary Integration: Two Views--(a)…

  11. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 28, Number 1, January-February 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walser, Nancy, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Using Theater to Teach Social Skills: Researchers Document Improvements for Children with Autism (Patti Hartigan); (2) The Family Model of Schooling Revisited: Few Teachers,…

  12. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 24, Number 5, September-October 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Teaching 21st Century Skills: What Does It Look Like in Practice? (Nancy Walser); (2) Getting and Spending: Schools and Districts Share Lessons on the Effective Uses of…

  13. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 26, Number 4, July-August 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Learning Progressions in Science: A New Approach Emphasizes Sustained Instruction in Big Ideas (Patti Hartigan); (2) Putting the "Boy Crisis" in…

  14. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 23, Number 4, July-August 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Meeting of the Minds: The Parent-Teacher Conference Is the Cornerstone of School-Home Relations. How Can It Work for All Families? (Laura Pappano); (2) In Search of That "Third…

  15. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 24, Number 4, July-August 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Taking the Measure of New Teachers: California Shifts from Standardized Tests to Performance-Based Assessment as a Condition of Licensure (Robert Rothman);…

  16. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 27, Number 1, January-February 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walser, Caroline T., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) The Greening of Environmental Ed: Teachers Focus on Complexity, Evidence, and Letting Students Draw Their Own Conclusions (Lucy Hood); (2) Like Teacher,…

  17. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 27, Number 3, May-June 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Bringing Art into School, Byte by Byte: Innovative Programs Use Technology to Expand Access to the Arts (Patti Hartigan); (2) Differentiated Instruction…

  18. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 25, Number 4, July-August 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Putting the Brakes on "Summer Slide": Modified School Calendars Build in Time to Enrich Learning and Sustain Gains (Brigid Schulte); (2) Closing…

  19. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 23, Number 5, September-October 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Confronting the Autism Epidemic: New Expectations for Children with Autism Means a New Role for Public Schools (Kate McKenna); (2) Internet Research 101:…

  20. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 27, Number 6, November-December 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walser, Nancy, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) With Cheating on the Rise, Schools Respond (David McKay Wilson); (2) Waldorf Education in Public Schools: Educators Adopt--and Adapt--This Developmental, Arts-Rich Approach…

  1. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 24, Number 2, March-April 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Educating Teenage Immigrants: High Schools Experiment with Ways to Group New English-Language Learners (Lucy Hood); (2) Hot Topics and Key Words: Pilot Project Brings Teachers…

  2. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 27, Number 2, March-April 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walser, Nancy, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Hybrid Schools for the iGeneration: New Schools Combine "Bricks" and "Clicks" (Brigid Schulte); (2) Dual Language Programs on the Rise: "Enrichment" Model Puts Content Learning…

  3. 78 FR 63464 - Notice of Extension of the Public Comment Period on the Draft Toxicological Review of Benzo[a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... from October 21, 2013, to November 21, 2013. The draft assessment will be added to the agenda for the...]pyrene to the Agenda for the December 2013 IRIS Bimonthly Meeting AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of Extension of the Public Comment Period to November 21, 2013, and the Public...

  4. Assessing Human Impacts on the Greater Akaki River, Ethiopia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We assessed the impacts of human activities on the Greater Akaki River using physicochemical parameters and macroinvertebrate metrics. Physicochemical samples and macroinvertebrates were collected bimonthly from eight sites established on the Greater Akaki River from February 2006 to April 2006. Eleven metrics ...

  5. Energy Matters - January/February 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ericksen, E.

    2000-01-26

    Energy Matters is an Office of Industrial Technologies bimonthly publication on energy efficiency opportunities. This issue's focus is on reliability-centered maintenance along with articles on optimizing industrial process heating and discussion on an international motor systems management tool.

  6. Establishing a National Shellfish Sanitation Program in The Gambia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Tanbi Wetlands and other estuaries of Gambia support shellfisheries for oysters, Crassostrea tulipa, and the senile ark, Senelia senilis, conducted by the TRY Oyster Women's ... Since August 2010, water was sampled bimonthly for total (TC) and fecal coliforms (FC) at stations near shellfish harvesting areas. Sanitary ...

  7. Child Care Health Connections: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 23, Number 4, July-August 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Garakani, Tahereh, Ed.; Leonard, Victoria, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment…

  8. Digital books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wink, Diane M

    2011-01-01

    In this bimonthly series, the author examines how nurse educators can use the Internet and Web-based computer technologies such as search, communication, and collaborative writing tools; social networking and social bookmarking sites; virtual worlds; and Web-based teaching and learning programs. This article describes digital books.

  9. Pricing in the International Takeoff of New Products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chandrasekaran, D.; Arts, J.W.C.; Tellis, G.J.; Frambach, R.T.

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on the effect of two dimensions of price (relative price and price volatility) on the international takeoff of new products. The study examines these drivers of takeoff using a novel data set of bimonthly observations of 7 new consumer electronic products in 8 countries. The

  10. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 25, Number 1, January-February 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Learning Across Distance: Virtual-Instruction Programs Are Growing Rapidly, but the Impact on "Brick-and-Mortar" Classrooms Is Still up in the Air…

  11. Teaching with technology: automatically receiving information from the internet and web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wink, Diane M

    2010-01-01

    In this bimonthly series, the author examines how nurse educators can use the Internet and Web-based computer technologies such as search, communication, and collaborative writing tools, social networking and social bookmarking sites, virtual worlds, and Web-based teaching and learning programs. This article presents information and tools related to automatically receiving information from the Internet and Web.

  12. The Crop Journal Calls for Papers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    We would like to invite you to submit your latest research accomplishments to The Crop Journal,an international,peer‐reviewed research publication covering all aspects of crop sciences including crop genetics,breeding,agronomy,crop physiology,germplasm resources,grain chemistry,grain storage and processing,crop management practices,crop biotechnology,and biomathematics on a bimonthly basis.

  13. The Crop Journal Call for Papers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    We would like to invite you to submit your latest research accomplishments to The Crop Journal,an international,peer‐reviewed research publication covering all aspects of crop sciences including crop genetics,breeding,agronomy,crop physiology,germplasm resources,grain chemistry,grain storage and processing,crop management practices,crop biotechnology,and biomathematics on a bimonthly basis.

  14. Brief Guide for Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    The Crop Journal is a bimonthly scientific journal co-sponsored by the Crop Science Society of China and the Institute of Crop Science,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences and China Science Publishing&Media; Group Ltd.Published by Elsevier and Science Press.General Requirements Contributions submitted to The Crop Journal must be original works of the author(s)that

  15. The Crop Journal Call for Papers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    We would like to invite you to submit your latest research accomplishments to The Crop Journal,an international,peer-reviewed research publication covering all aspects of crop sciences including crop genetics,breeding,agronomy,crop physiology,germplasm resources,grain chemistry,grain storage and processing,crop management practices,crop biotechnology,and biomathematics on a bimonthly basis.

  16. The Crop Journal Calls for Papers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    We would like to invite you to submit your latest research accomplishments to The Crop Journal,an international,peer‐reviewed research publication covering all aspects of crop sciences including crop genetics,breeding,agronomy,crop physiology,germplasm resources,grain chemistry,grain storage and processing,crop management practices,crop biotechnology,and biomathematics on a bimonthly basis.

  17. The Crop Journal Calls for Papers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    We would like to invite you to submit your latest research accomplishments to The Crop Journal,an international,peer-reviewed research publication covering all aspects of crop sciences including crop genetics,breeding,agronomy,crop physiology,germplasm resources,grain chemistry,grain storage and processing,crop management practices,crop biotechnology,and biomathematics on a bimonthly basis.

  18. Trade Reforms, Mark-Ups and Bargaining Power of Workers: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Optiplex 7010 Pro

    the board to influence firms to properly consider the working and payment conditions of workers. ... Thus, it may lend some policy implications and modest .... meets on a bi-monthly basis or to the court if the committee's decision is not accepted ...

  19. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, January/February 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E.; Mayer, S.J.; Salk, M.S.

    1995-03-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives impacting environmental, health, and safety management responsibilities. the table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  20. Eleven-year response of foliar chemistry to chronic nitrogen and sulfur additions at the Bear Brook Watershed in Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose Alexander Elvir; Lindsey Rustad; G. Bruce Wiersma; Ivan Fernandez; Alan S. White; Gregory J. White

    2005-01-01

    The foliar chemistry of sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.), American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.), and red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) was studied from 1993 to 2003 at the Bear Brook Watershed in Maine (BBWM). The BBWM is a paired-watershed forest ecosystem study, with one watershed treated bimonthly since...

  1. Experimental Acidification Causes Soil Base-Cation Depletion at the Bear Brook Watershed in Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivan J. Fernandez; Lindsey E. Rustad; Stephen A. Norton; Jeffrey S. Kahl; Bernard J. Cosby

    2003-01-01

    There is concern that changes in atmospheric deposition, climate, or land use have altered the biogeochemistry of forests causing soil base-cation depletion, particularly Ca. The Bear Brook Watershed in Maine (BBWM) is a paired watershed experiment with one watershed subjected to elevated N and S deposition through bimonthly additions of (NH4)2SO4. Quantitative soil...

  2. Advancing the nursing profession begins with leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Jennifer A

    2013-04-01

    This bimonthly department, sponsored by the American Organization of Nurse Executives (AONE), presents information to assist nurse leaders in shaping the future of healthcare through creative and innovative leadership. The strategic priorities of AONE anchor the editorial content. They reflect contemporary healthcare and nursing practice issues that challenge nurse executives as they strive to meet the needs of patients.

  3. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, January/February 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E.; Mayer, S.J.; Salk, M.S.

    1995-03-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives impacting environmental, health, and safety management responsibilities. the table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action

  4. Ecological assessment of fish biodiversity in relation to hydrological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research analysed the fish species diversity; ecological distribution and abundance in relation to hydrological variables of Ogun coastal water. Fish species were collected with the use of graded gillnet bimonthly for six-months. Correlation analysis between fish species richness with the hydrological attributes showed ...

  5. A LONGITUDINAL STUDY OF ENTEROCYTOZOON BIENEUSI IN DAIRY CATTLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feces from each of 30 Holstein cattle on a Maryland dairy farm were examined at weekly, bimonthly, and then monthly intervals from 1 week to 24 months of age for the presence of Enterocytozoon bienesusi. DNA was extracted from spores cleaned of fecal debris, and a two-step nested PCR protocol was us...

  6. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 21, Number 6, November-December 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Is History... History?: Standards, Accountability, and the Future of Our Nation's Past (Robert Rothman); (2) Curriculum Access for All: How Teachers Can Use Universal Design…

  7. Seasonal variation of imipramine binding in the blood platelets of normal controls and depressed patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arora, R.C.; Meltzer, H.Y.

    1988-01-01

    Imipramine binding (IB) was studied in the blood platelets from normal controls and depressed patients over a 4-year period (1981-1984) to determine if seasonal variation was present in Bmax or KD. Bimonthly variation in the Bmax of IB was found in normal controls studied longitudinally. No such variation was found when individual values from normal controls were examined on a monthly or seasonal basis. Bmax in depressed patients showed a significant seasonal, but not monthly, variation. KD of IB varied in normal controls using monthly or seasonal data, but not in the probably more reliable bimonthly data. These results suggest that IB studies comparing groups of subjects should match groups for season of the year or, for greater accuracy, month of the year

  8. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, November--December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

    1994-01-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  9. Environmental regulatory update table November--December 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E.; Mayer, S.J.; Salk, M.S.

    1995-01-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  10. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, January--February 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

    1993-03-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  11. Teaching with technology: free Web resources for teaching and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wink, Diane M; Smith-Stoner, Marilyn

    2011-01-01

    In this bimonthly series, the department editor examines how nurse educators can use Internet and Web-based computer technologies such as search, communication, collaborative writing tools; social networking, and social bookmarking sites; virtual worlds; and Web-based teaching and learning programs. In this article, the department editor and her coauthor describe free Web-based resources that can be used to support teaching and learning.

  12. Reproductive biology of the peacock bass Cichla piquiti (Perciformes: Cichlidae), an exotic species in a Neotropical reservoir

    OpenAIRE

    Vieira, Augusto B. C.; Salvador-Jr., Luiz F.; Melo, Rafael M. C.; Santos, Gilmar B.; Bazzoli, Nilo

    2009-01-01

    To analyze the reproductive biology of the peacock bass Cichla piquiti, 361 specimens were collected bimonthly in the Itumbiara Reservoir, southeast Brazil, from December 2004 to November 2005. Males and females in reproductive activity occurred during almost the entire year, with reproductive peak occurring before the beginning of the rains when the water temperature remained low, indicating that these environmental variables do not directly influence in the reproduction of C. piquiti. The l...

  13. Impact Assessment of Phosphogypsum Leachate on Groundwater of Sfax-Agareb (Southeast of Tunisia): Using Geochemical and Isotopic Investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Melki, Samira; Gueddari, Moncef

    2018-01-01

    The production of phosphoric acid by the Tunisian Chemical Group, in Sfax, Tunisia, led to the degradation of the groundwater quality of the Sfax-Agareb aquifer mainly by the phosphogypsum leachates infiltration. Spatiotemporal monitoring of the quality of groundwater was carried out by performing bimonthly sampling between October 2013 and October 2014. Samples culled in the current study were subject to physicochemical parameters measurements and analysis of the major elements, orthophospha...

  14. Index to Nuclear Safety. A technical progress review by chronology, permuted title, and author. Vol. 11, No. 1--Vol. 17, No. 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottrell, W.B.; Klein, A.

    1977-02-23

    This index to Nuclear Safety covers articles in Nuclear Safety Vol. 11, No. 1 (Jan.-Feb. 1970), through Vol. 17, No. 6 (Nov.-Dec. 1976). The index includes a chronological list of articles (including abstract) followed by KWIC and Author Indexes. Nuclear Safety, a bimonthly technical progress review prepared by the Nuclear Safety Information Center, covers all safety aspects of nuclear power reactors and associated facilities. The index lists over 350 technical articles in the last six years of publication.

  15. Index to Nuclear Safety. A technical progress review by chronology, permuted title, and author. Vol. 11, No. 1--Vol. 17, No. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.B.; Klein, A.

    1977-01-01

    This index to Nuclear Safety covers articles in Nuclear Safety Vol. 11, No. 1 (Jan.-Feb. 1970), through Vol. 17, No. 6 (Nov.-Dec. 1976). The index includes a chronological list of articles (including abstract) followed by KWIC and Author Indexes. Nuclear Safety, a bimonthly technical progress review prepared by the Nuclear Safety Information Center, covers all safety aspects of nuclear power reactors and associated facilities. The index lists over 350 technical articles in the last six years of publication

  16. Subsurface microbial communities and degradative capacities during trichloroethylene bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfiffner, S.M.; Ringelberg, D.B.; Hedrick, D.B.; Phelps, T.J.; Palumbo, A.V.

    1995-01-01

    Subsurface amendments of air, methane, and nutrients were investigated for the in situ stimulation of trichloroethylene- degrading microorganisms at the US DOE Savannah River Integrated Demonstration. Amendments were injected into a lower horizontal well coupled with vacuum extraction from the vadose zone horizontal well. The amendments were sequenced to give increasingly more aggressive treatments. Microbial populations and degradative capacities were monitored in groundwaters samples bimonthly

  17. Joint optimization: Merging a new culture with a new physical environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stichler, Jaynelle F; Ecoff, Laurie

    2009-04-01

    Nearly $200 billion of healthcare construction is expected by the year 2015, and nurse leaders must expand their knowledge and capabilities in healthcare design. This bimonthly department prepares nurse leaders to use the evidence-based design process to ensure that new, expanded, and renovated hospitals facilitate optimal patient outcomes, enhance the work environment for healthcare providers, and improve organizational performance. In this article, the authors discuss the concept of joint optimization of merging organizational culture with a new hospital facility.

  18. Brief Guide for Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    The Crop Journal is a bimonthly scientific journal co-sponsored by the Crop Science Society of China and the Institute of Crop Science,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences and China Science Publishing&Media Group Ltd.Published by Elsevier and Science Press.General requirements Contributions submitted to The Crop Journal must be original works of the author(s)that have not been previously

  19. The Crop Journal Calls for Papers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>We would like to invite you to submit your latest research accomplishments to The Crop Journal(ISSN:2095-5421;Online ISSN:2214-5141,CN 10-1112/S),a new bimonthly academic journal co-sponsored by the Crop Science Society of China and the Institute of Crop Science,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences.The Crop Journal is freely available online(Open Access)in ScienceDirect.

  20. The Crop Journal Calls for Papers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>We would like to invite you to submit your latest research accomplishments to The Crop Journal(ISSN:2095-5421;Online ISSN:2214-5141,CN 10-1112/S),a new bimonthly academic journal co-sponsored by the Crop Science Society of China and the Institute of Crop Science,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences.The Crop Journal is freely available online(Open Access)in ScienceDirect.

  1. The Crop Journal Calls for Papers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    <正>We would like to invite you to submit your latest research accomplishments to The Crop Journal(ISSN:2095-5421;Online ISSN:2214-5141,CN 10-1112/S),a new bimonthly academic journal co-sponsored by the Crop Science Society of China and the Institute of Crop Science,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences.The Crop Journal is freely available online(Open Access)in ScienceDirect.The Editor-in-Chief

  2. Brief Guide for Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>The Crop Journal is a bimonthly scientific journal co-sponsored by the Crop Science Society of China and the institute of Crop Science,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences and China Science Publishing&Media Group Ltd.Published by Elsevier and Science Press.General Requirements Contributions submitted to The Crop Journal must be original works of the author(s)that have not been previously published or simultaneously

  3. The Crop Journal Calls for Papers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>We would like to invite you to submit your latest research accomplishments to The Crop Journal(ISSN:2095-5421;Online ISSN:2214-5141,CN 10-1112/S),a new bimonthly academic journal co-sponsored by the Crop Science Society of China and the Institute of Crop Science,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences.The Crop Journal is freely available online(Open Access)in ScienceDirect.The Editor-in-Chief of

  4. Brief Guide for Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>The Crop Journal is a bimonthly scientific journal co-sponsored by the Crop Science Society of China and the Institute of Crop Science,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences and China Science Publishing&Media Group Ltd.Published by Elsevier and Science Press.General Requirements Contributions submitted to The Crop Journal must be original works of the author(s)that have not been previously published or simultaneously submitted to any other journals.

  5. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, May--June 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E.; Salk, M.S.

    1994-07-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bimonthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  6. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, May/June 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

    1993-07-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bimonthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  7. Environmental regulatory update table, March--April 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Health Sciences Research Div.; Salk, M.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.

    1994-03-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  8. Environmental Regulatory Update Table July/August 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

    1993-09-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  9. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, March/April 1993. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

    1993-05-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bimonthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  10. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, March/April 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

    1993-05-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bimonthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  11. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, January/February 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1992-03-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action. This table is for January/February 1992.

  12. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, November--December 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Lewis, E.B.; Salk, M.S.

    1993-01-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly wit information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  13. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, July--August 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Lewis, E.B.; Salk, M.S.

    1992-09-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  14. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, September/October 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

    1993-11-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operation and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  15. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, January--February 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

    1994-03-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations ad contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  16. Environmental regulatory update table, September--October 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Lewis, E.B.; Salk, M.S.

    1992-11-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  17. Environmental regulatory update table, July/August 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E.; Salk, M.S.

    1994-09-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  18. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, March/April 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1992-05-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  19. Environmental regulatory update table, July/August 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E.; Salk, M.S.

    1994-09-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action

  20. Habitat structure modified by an invasive grass enhances inundation withstanding in a salt-marsh wolf spider

    OpenAIRE

    Pétillon, J.; Lambeets, K.; Montaigne, W.; Maelfait, J.-P.; Bonte, D.

    2010-01-01

    Vegetation and underground structures are known to influence flood avoidance and flood resistance in invertebrates. In bimonthly-flooded European salt marshes, recent invasions by the nitrophilous grass Elymus athericus strongly modified usual habitat structure, notably by the production of a deep litter layer. Consequently, invaded habitats provide more interstitial spaces that may act as a refuge during flood events. By using both controlled and field designs, we tested whether invaded habi...

  1. Streamflow statistics for development of water rights claims for the Jarbidge Wild and Scenic River, Owyhee Canyonlands Wilderness, Idaho, 2013-14: a supplement to Scientific Investigations Report 2013-5212

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Molly S.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), estimated streamflow statistics for stream segments designated “Wild,” “Scenic,” or “Recreational” under the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System in the Owyhee Canyonlands Wilderness in southwestern Idaho. The streamflow statistics were used by the BLM to develop and file a draft, federal reserved water right claim to protect federally designated “outstanding remarkable values” in the Jarbidge River. The BLM determined that the daily mean streamflow equaled or exceeded 20, 50, and 80 percent of the time during bimonthly periods (two periods per month) and the bankfull (66.7-percent annual exceedance probability) streamflow are important thresholds for maintaining outstanding remarkable values. Although streamflow statistics for the Jarbidge River below Jarbidge, Nevada (USGS 13162225) were published previously in 2013 and used for the draft water right claim, the BLM and USGS have since recognized the need to refine streamflow statistics given the approximate 40 river mile distance and intervening tributaries between the original point of estimation (USGS 13162225) and at the mouth of the Jarbidge River, which is the downstream end of the Wild and Scenic River segment. A drainage-area-ratio method was used in 2013 to estimate bimonthly exceedance probability streamflow statistics at the mouth of the Jarbidge River based on available streamgage data on the Jarbidge and East Fork Jarbidge Rivers. The resulting bimonthly streamflow statistics were further adjusted using a scaling factor calculated from a water balance on streamflow statistics calculated for the Bruneau and East Fork Bruneau Rivers and Sheep Creek. The final, adjusted bimonthly exceedance probability and bankfull streamflow statistics compared well with available verification datasets (including discrete streamflow measurements made at the mouth of the Jarbidge River) and are considered the

  2. Integrated assessment of chemical quality and genotoxicity of the water of the Luiz Rau Stream in the lower stretch of the Sinos River Basin, in South Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Camila Tamires Petry; Gustavo Marques da Costa; Tatiane Benvenuti; Marco Antônio Siqueira Rodrigues; Annette Droste

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the chemical quality and genotoxicity of the water of the Luiz Rau Stream in Novo Hamburgo (Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil) and investigated the relationship between the genetic damage observed in Tradescantia pallida var. purpurea and the chemical parameters analyzed. Water samplings were collected bimonthly from September 2012 to March 2013 from two sites, near the headspring (S1) and near the mouth (S2). Cuttings with flower buds were exposed to water from the sites and dist...

  3. Diversity patterns in the terrestrial avifauna of the Salton sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark B. Mendelsohn; William I. Boarman; Robert N. Fisher

    2005-01-01

    We performed bird point counts monthly March-June 2001 and bi-monthly August 2001-February 2002 across a sampling grid of 35 points along the west edge of Salton Sea. We found that landbird species diversity (both in numbers of species, and numbers per species) was dependent on proximity to the sea. Diversity was at a maximum nearest the shore, and was significantly...

  4. Multitemporal Snow Cover Mapping in Mountainous Terrain for Landsat Climate Data Record Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Christopher J.; Manson, Steven M.; Bauer, Marvin E.; Hall, Dorothy K.

    2013-01-01

    A multitemporal method to map snow cover in mountainous terrain is proposed to guide Landsat climate data record (CDR) development. The Landsat image archive including MSS, TM, and ETM+ imagery was used to construct a prototype Landsat snow cover CDR for the interior northwestern United States. Landsat snow cover CDRs are designed to capture snow-covered area (SCA) variability at discrete bi-monthly intervals that correspond to ground-based snow telemetry (SNOTEL) snow-water-equivalent (SWE) measurements. The June 1 bi-monthly interval was selected for initial CDR development, and was based on peak snowmelt timing for this mountainous region. Fifty-four Landsat images from 1975 to 2011 were preprocessed that included image registration, top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) reflectance conversion, cloud and shadow masking, and topographic normalization. Snow covered pixels were retrieved using the normalized difference snow index (NDSI) and unsupervised classification, and pixels having greater (less) than 50% snow cover were classified presence (absence). A normalized SCA equation was derived to independently estimate SCA given missing image coverage and cloud-shadow contamination. Relative frequency maps of missing pixels were assembled to assess whether systematic biases were embedded within this Landsat CDR. Our results suggest that it is possible to confidently estimate historical bi-monthly SCA from partially cloudy Landsat images. This multitemporal method is intended to guide Landsat CDR development for freshwaterscarce regions of the western US to monitor climate-driven changes in mountain snowpack extent.

  5. Object-based Dimensionality Reduction in Land Surface Phenology Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian E. Bunker

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Unsupervised classification or clustering of multi-decadal land surface phenology provides a spatio-temporal synopsis of natural and agricultural vegetation response to environmental variability and anthropogenic activities. Notwithstanding the detailed temporal information available in calibrated bi-monthly normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI and comparable time series, typical pre-classification workflows average a pixel’s bi-monthly index within the larger multi-decadal time series. While this process is one practical way to reduce the dimensionality of time series with many hundreds of image epochs, it effectively dampens temporal variation from both intra and inter-annual observations related to land surface phenology. Through a novel application of object-based segmentation aimed at spatial (not temporal dimensionality reduction, all 294 image epochs from a Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS bi-monthly NDVI time series covering the northern Fertile Crescent were retained (in homogenous landscape units as unsupervised classification inputs. Given the inherent challenges of in situ or manual image interpretation of land surface phenology classes, a cluster validation approach based on transformed divergence enabled comparison between traditional and novel techniques. Improved intra-annual contrast was clearly manifest in rain-fed agriculture and inter-annual trajectories showed increased cluster cohesion, reducing the overall number of classes identified in the Fertile Crescent study area from 24 to 10. Given careful segmentation parameters, this spatial dimensionality reduction technique augments the value of unsupervised learning to generate homogeneous land surface phenology units. By combining recent scalable computational approaches to image segmentation, future work can pursue new global land surface phenology products based on the high temporal resolution signatures of vegetation index time series.

  6. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, May/June 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Lewis, E.B.; Salk, M.S.

    1992-07-01

    This report contains a bi-monthly update of environmental regulatory activity that is of interest to the Department of Energy. It is provided to DOE operations and contractor staff to assist and support environmental management programs by tracking regulatory developments. Any proposed regulation that raises significant issues for any DOE operation should be reported to the Office of Environmental Guidance (EH-23) as soon as possible so that the Department can make its concerns known to the appropriate regulatory agency. Items of particular interest to EH-23 are indicated by a shading of the RU{number sign}.

  7. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, May/June 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Lewis, E.B.; Salk, M.S.

    1992-07-01

    This report contains a bi-monthly update of environmental regulatory activity that is of interest to the Department of Energy. It is provided to DOE operations and contractor staff to assist and support environmental management programs by tracking regulatory developments. Any proposed regulation that raises significant issues for any DOE operation should be reported to the Office of Environmental Guidance (EH-23) as soon as possible so that the Department can make its concerns known to the appropriate regulatory agency. Items of particular interest to EH-23 are indicated by a shading of the RU{number_sign}.

  8. Safety and Health in Nuclear Malaysia workplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wo, Y.M.

    2013-01-01

    Safety and health at work place is essential to ensure the health of their workers as required under the Occupational Safety and Health Act 1994 (Act 514). In Malaysian Nuclear Agency, each building / block was appointed with one/ two supervisors, known as Area Supervisor to ensure the safety of buildings / blocks. The area supervisor will conduct periodic bimonthly inspections of the building / block under their supervision. This paper presents the results of the inspection of 80 supervisors over 45 buildings / blocks at the Malaysian Nuclear Agency for the first six months of the year 2013. (author)

  9. Energy Matters, November/December 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ericksen. E.; Sosa-Mallory, M.

    1999-12-01

    Energy Matters is an Office of Industrial Technologies bimonthly publication on energy efficiency opportunities. This issue's focus is on the future of industrial energy efficiency. The issue also contains articles on seven companies that are to receive cost-shared funding for plant-wide, energy efficiency assessments; submitting proposals to assess energy flow and steam system opportunities; partnering to save energy and money; and root cause failure analysis on AC induction motors. Also a special feature by Don Casada ''Lights that Shine Forever.''

  10. Index to Nuclear Safety. A technical progress review by chronology, permuted title, and author. Vol 11, No. 1 through Vol. 16, No. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.B.; Klein, A.

    1976-04-01

    This index to Nuclear Safety covers articles in Nuclear Safety Vol. 11, No. 1 (Jan.-Feb. 1970) through Vol. 16, No. 6 (Nov.-Dec. 1975). Included in the index is a chronological list of articles (including abstract) followed by both a KWIC index and an Author Index. Nuclear Safety is a bimonthly technical progress review prepared by the Nuclear Safety Information Center and covers all safety aspects of nuclear power reactors and associated facilities. The index lists over 300 technical articles in the last six years of publication

  11. Index to Nuclear Safety: a technical progress review by chronology, permuted title, and author. Vol. 11(1)--Vol. 18(6)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottrell, W.B.; Klein, A.

    1978-04-11

    This index to Nuclear Safety covers articles published in Nuclear Safety, Vol. 11, No. 1 (January-February 1970), through Vol. 18, No. 6 (November-December 1977). It is divided into three sections: a chronological list of articles (including abstracts) followed by a permuted-title (KWIC) index and an author index. Nuclear Safety, a bimonthly technical progress review prepared by the Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC), covers all safety aspects of nuclear power reactors and associated facilities. Over 450 technical articles published in Nuclear Safety in the last eight years are listed in this index.

  12. Síndrome de Prune Belly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roni Leonardo Teixeira

    Full Text Available Prune Belly Syndrome is a fetal uropathy of unknown etiology with incidence of 1/35000 to 1/50000 alive been born, characterized by a classical triad: abdominal musculature congenital deficiency, bilateral criptorquidia and urinary tract malformations. The authors present a case of this rare pathology associated with a patent urachus. After complementary exams confirmed urinary tract alterations (bilateral ureterohidronefrosis and vesicoureteral reflux degree 5, besides urinary infection, the surgical approach was vesicostomy to decrease urinary infections and sepsis. Definitve surgery should be accomplished around the 12th month of life. Nowadays, the child is asymptomatic , with follow-up every two months, with return consultation bimonthly.

  13. Solar neutrino results from SAGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrin, V.N.

    2001-01-01

    The results of ten years of solar neutrino observation by the Russian-American gallium solar neutrino experiment (SAGE) are reported. The overall result of 70 runs during the measurement period from January 1990 to October 1999 is 75.4 -6.8 +7.0 (stat.) -3.0 +3.5 (syst) SNU. This represents only slightly more than half of the predicted standard solar model rate of 129 SNU. The individual results on each run, and the results of combined analysis of all runs during each year, as well as the results of combined analysis of all runs during monthly and bimonthly periods are presented

  14. Power reactor events, May-June 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massaro, S.A.

    1986-12-01

    Power Reactor Events is a bi-monthly newsletter that compiles operating experience information about commercial nuclear power plants. This includes summaries of noteworthy events and listings and/or abstracts of USNRC and other documents that discuss safety-related or possible generic issues. It is intended to feed back some of the lessons learned from operational experience to the various plant personnel, i.e., managers, licensed reactor operators, training coordinators, and support personnel. Events at the following plants are reported: McGuire Unit 1; Susquehanna Units 1 and 2; Browns Ferry Units 1, 2, and 3; and River Bend Unit 1

  15. Materials control and accountability at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denning, G.E.; Britschgi, J.J.; Spraktes, F.W.

    1985-01-01

    The ICPP high enriched uranium recovery process has historically been operated as a single Material Balance Area (MBA), with input and output measurement capabilities. Safeguards initiated changes in the last five years have resulted in significant materials control and accountability improvements. Those changes include semi-automation of process accountability measurement, data collection and recording; definition of Sub-MBAs; standard plant cleanouts; and, bimonthly inventory estimates. Process monitoring capabilities are also being installed to provide independent operational procedural compliance verification, process anomaly detection, and enhanced materials traceability. Development of a sensitivity analysis approach to defining process measurement requirements is in progress

  16. Index to Nuclear Safety: a technical progress review by chronology, permuted title, and author, Volume 18 (1) through Volume 22 (6)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.B.; Passiakos, M.

    1982-06-01

    This index to Nuclear Safety covers articles published in Nuclear Safety, Volume 18, Number 1 (January-February 1977) through Volume 22, Number 6 (November-December 1981). The index is divided into three section: a chronological list of articles (including abstracts), a permuted-title (KWIC) index, and an author index. Nuclear Safety, a bimonthly technical progress review prepared by the Nuclear Safety Information Center, covers all safety aspects of nuclear power reactors and associated facilities. Over 300 technical articles published in Nuclear Safety in the last 5 years are listed in this index

  17. Lipids and Composition of Fatty Acids of Saccharina latissima Cultivated Year-Round in Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture

    OpenAIRE

    Marinho, Gon?alo S.; Holdt, Susan L.; Jacobsen, Charlotte; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    This study is evaluating the seasonal lipid and fatty acid composition of the brown seaweed Saccharina latissima. Biomass was sampled throughout the year (bi-monthly) at the commercial cultivation site near a fish farm in an integrated multi-trophic aquaculture (IMTA) and at a reference site in Denmark (2013–2014). Generally, there was no difference in the biomass composition between sites; however, significant seasonal changes were found. The lipid concentration varied from 0.62%–0.88% dry w...

  18. Effect of hydrological conditions on nitrous oxide, methane, and carbon dioxide dynamics in a bottomland hardwood forest and its implication for soil carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, K.; Faulkner, S.P.; Baldwin, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    This study was conducted at three locations in a bottomland hardwood forest with a distinct elevation and hydrological gradient: ridge (high, dry), transition, and swamp (low, wet). At each location, concentrations of soil greenhouse gases (N2O, CH4 , and CO2), their fluxes to the atmosphere, and soil redox potential (Eh) were measured bimonthly, while the water table was monitored every day. Results show that soil Eh was significantly (P transition > ridge location. The ratio CO2/CH4 production in soil is a critical factor for evaluating the overall benefit of soil C sequestration, which can be greatly offset by CH4 production and emission. ?? Journal compilation ?? 2008 Blackwell Publishing.

  19. Feeding ecology of Rhinodoras dorbignyi (Kner, 1855 (Siluriformes: Doradidae in the Paranapanema River, SP, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Pontieri de Lima

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Studies describing the diet of fish are important to determine trophic chain relationships, habitat occupation, trophic niches, and to define food habits of species. To describe the diet of Rhinodoras dorbignyi, six collections were made bimonthly in the upper Paranapanema River, SP, from April 2010 to February 2011. Of the 63 samples collected, 30 had stomach content. The diet of this species was determined using two methods: (i alimentary index (AI% and (ii graphical analysis of feeding strategy. Based on the results, R. dorbignyi is an insectivorous species and autochthonous items play an important role in the diet of this species.

  20. Environmental radiation monitoring around the nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.D.; Lee, W.Y.; Park, D.W.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements and monitoring of the environmental radiation levels, as well as radioactivity of the various environmental samples were carried out three times a month in the on-site and the off-site around the KAERI site. Measurements were made for both gross alpha and beta radioactivity of all environmental samples. Gross beta measurements were made for radioactivity of the fallout, airborne particulates and precipitations which were collected on a daily basis on the roof of the main building. Measurements of the accumulated doses were also carried out at 10 posts on a bimonthly basis by employing thermoluminescent dosimeters

  1. Brief Guide for Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>The Crop Journal is a bimonthly scientif ic journal co-sponsored by the Crop Science Society of China and the Institute of Crop Science, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences and China Science Publishing & Media Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier and Science Press. General Requirements Contributions submitted to The Crop Journal must be original works of the author(s) that have not been previously published or simultaneously submitted to any other journals. The experiment related to crop yield should be conducted at least two locations or growing seasons with replications. All the results should be supported by appropriate statistical analyses. Scopes ? Crop Germplasm Resources ? Crop Genetics, Genomics and Molecular Biology

  2. Brief Guide for Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    The Crop Journal is a bimonthly scientific journal co-sponsored by the Crop Science Society of China and the Institute of Crop Science,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences and China Science Publishing&Media Group Ltd.Published by Elsevier and Science Press.General requirements Contributions submitted to The Crop Journal must be original works of the author(s)that have not been previously published or simultaneously submitted to any other journals.The experiment related to crop yield should be conducted at

  3. Index to Nuclear Safety. A technical progress review by chronology, permuted title, and author. Vol 11, No. 1 through Vol. 16, No. 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottrell, W.B.; Klein, A.

    1976-04-01

    This index to Nuclear Safety covers articles in Nuclear Safety Vol. 11, No. 1 (Jan.-Feb. 1970) through Vol. 16, No. 6 (Nov.-Dec. 1975). Included in the index is a chronological list of articles (including abstract) followed by both a KWIC index and an Author Index. Nuclear Safety is a bimonthly technical progress review prepared by the Nuclear Safety Information Center and covers all safety aspects of nuclear power reactors and associated facilities. The index lists over 300 technical articles in the last six years of publication.

  4. Index to Nuclear Safety: a technical progress review by chronology, permuted title, and author, Volume 18 (1) through Volume 22 (6)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottrell, W.B.; Passiakos, M.

    1982-06-01

    This index to Nuclear Safety covers articles published in Nuclear Safety, Volume 18, Number 1 (January-February 1977) through Volume 22, Number 6 (November-December 1981). The index is divided into three section: a chronological list of articles (including abstracts), a permuted-title (KWIC) index, and an author index. Nuclear Safety, a bimonthly technical progress review prepared by the Nuclear Safety Information Center, covers all safety aspects of nuclear power reactors and associated facilities. Over 300 technical articles published in Nuclear Safety in the last 5 years are listed in this index.

  5. Solar neutrino results from SAGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrin, V.N.

    2000-01-01

    We report the results of ten years of solar neutrino observation by the Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE). The overall result of 70 runs during the measurement period January 1990 to October 1999 is 75.4 + 7.0/-6.8 (stat.) +3.5/-3.0 (syst.) SNU. This represents only slightly more than half of the predicted standard solar model rate of 129 SNU. The individual results of each run, and the results of combined analysis of all runs during each year, as well as the results of combined analysis of all runs during monthly and bimonthly periods are presented

  6. Brave New Media World: Science Communication Voyages through the Global Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, C. L.; Reisewitz, A.

    2010-12-01

    By leveraging online tools, such as blogs, Twitter, Facebook, Google Earth, flickr, web-based discussion boards, and a bi-monthly electronic magazine for the non-scientist, Scripps Institution of Oceanography is taking science communications out of the static webpage to create interactive journeys that spark social dialogue and helped raise awareness of science-based research on global marine environmental issues. Several new initiatives are being chronicled through popular blogs and expedition web sites as researchers share interesting scientific facts and unusual findings in near real-time.

  7. Index to Nuclear Safety: a technical progress review by chronology, permuted title, and author. Vol. 11(1)--Vol. 18(6)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.B.; Klein, A.

    1978-01-01

    This index to Nuclear Safety covers articles published in Nuclear Safety, Vol. 11, No. 1 (January-February 1970), through Vol. 18, No. 6 (November-December 1977). It is divided into three sections: a chronological list of articles (including abstracts) followed by a permuted-title (KWIC) index and an author index. Nuclear Safety, a bimonthly technical progress review prepared by the Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC), covers all safety aspects of nuclear power reactors and associated facilities. Over 450 technical articles published in Nuclear Safety in the last eight years are listed in this index

  8. Analysis performed in cooperation with the SALE program, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuboya, Takao; Wada, Yukio; Suzuki, Takeshi

    1978-01-01

    One of the objects of the SALE (Safeguard Analytical Laboratory Evaluation) program is a development of technique in safeguard and accountability. The SALE program was established by the United States Atomic Energy Commission's New Brunswick Laboratory in 1970. Six years later, SALE program has grown into a worldwide quality control program, receiving analysis results from about 60 laboratories that includes 19 non-U.S. laboratories. All laboratories, participating at present or in the past in the SALE program are listed in Table 1. By 1973, the program was expanded to include six different materials; uranium dioxide (UO 2 ), uranyl nitrate (U-NO 3 ), plutonium dioxide (PuO 2 ), plutonium nitrate (Pu-NO 3 ), uranium-plutonium mixed oxides [(Pu,U)O 2 ], and uranium-plutonium mixed nitrates (Pu-U-NO 3 ). PNC has joined in this program in 1975 for the analysis of samples shown in Table 2. SALE program participants analyze, on a bimonthly basis, materials supplied by the New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) and report measurement results to NBL for evaluation and inclusion in the bimonthly reports. Present paper describes analysis result and evaluations for these samples which were measured in 1975 -- 1976. (author)

  9. Are you more concerned about or relieved by medicines? An explorative randomized study of the impact of telephone counseling by pharmacists on patients' beliefs regarding medicines and blood pressure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scala, Daniela; Menditto, Enrica; Caruso, Giuseppe; Monetti, Valeria Marina; Orlando, Valentina; Guerriero, Francesca; Buonomo, Giuseppe; Caruso, Domenico; D'Avino, Maria

    2018-04-01

    The aim was to determine the impact of a telephone counseling service, provided bi-monthly by pharmacist, on patients' beliefs about antihypertensive medicines and blood pressure (BP) control. Either hypertensive patients were randomly assigned to a control group (CG, usual care) or an intervention group (IG). All patients had BP values registered and filled in the Italian version of the Belief Medicine Questionnaire (BMQ). After 12 months, patients filled in the BMQ again and had their self-reported BP registered. The intervention consisted of an educational/counseling session based on patients' needs assessment provided bi-monthly by a pharmacist for one year via telephone. 80 CG and 84 IG patients were recruited. After 12 months, there were significant differences between IG and CG for both BMQ's Necessity and Concern score (p < 0.001; p < 0.001 respectively) and a significant reduction in BP values in IG (p < 0.001). The intervention improves BP control by modifying patients' perception about treatments and involving patients as participants in the management of their health. This paper could serve as a guideline for other studies to confirm the effectiveness of this intervention in modifying health behavior, and the role of hospital pharmacist. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Ella-V and technology usage technology usage in an english language and literacy acquisition validation randomized controlled trial study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roisin P. Corcoran

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the use of technology to provide virtual professional development (VPD for teachers and to conduct classroom observations in a study of English Language Learner (ELL instruction in grades K–3. The technology applications were part of a cluster randomized control trial (RCT design for a federally funded longitudinal validation study of a particular program, English Language and Literacy Acquisition-Validation, ELLA- V, to determine its degree of impact on English oral language/literacy, reading, and science across 63 randomly assigned urban, suburban, and rural schools (first year of implementation. ELLA-V also examines the impact of bimonthly VPD for treatment teachers compared to comparison group teachers on pedagogical skills, measured by sound observation instruments, and on student achievement, measured by state/national English language/literacy/reading tests and a national science test. This study features extensive technology use via virtual observations, bimonthly VPD, and randomly assigned treatment and control schools with students served in English as second language (ESL instructional time. The study design and methodology are discussed relativeto the specialized uses of technology and issues involving the evaluation of technology’s contribution to the intervention of interest and of the efficient, cost-effective execution of the study.

  11. Computador X Papel, Suor e Caneta: Percepção dos Alunos sobre as Avaliações Realizadas em Computadores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ramos Nogueira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to verify the perception of undergraduate students in Economics of a public university, who were taking an introductory Accountancy course, about using computers to do bimonthly exams. Therefore, instead of usual paper and pen, the exams were electronically applied, with support of an online environment and the possibility of using electronic spreadsheets. After the implementation of two bimonthly tests, students were asked to answer a questionnaire adapted from an Apostolou et al. (2009 research, in order to obtain data about their perception of the advantages and disadvantages of online tests compared to traditional tests. Two classes, totaling 83 students, took part in the research. Results show that, most students (87% are more prone to the realization of electronic tests. Some points stood out as being highly positive about online tests, such as flexibility for the realization of exercises, quicker feedback of the results and the elimination of the need of attending tests. As for the negative points, students indicated the elimination of discursive questions (in case the test has only direct questions. As a tool to identify hindrances to the adoption of electronic tests, the group of students who showed a negative perception was analyzed more closely, searching evidence to explain the lack of trust on that procedure. Analyzing the variables, students who do not trust in online tests have the perception that they limit the subject, they allow students to copy the answers (cheat from each other (or from other sources, and affect negatively the grades obtained.

  12. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment failure detection depends on monitoring interval and microbiological method

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Richard A.; Lu, Chunling; Rodriguez, Carly A.; Bayona, Jaime; Becerra, Mercedes C.; Burgos, Marcos; Centis, Rosella; Cohen, Theodore; Cox, Helen; D'Ambrosio, Lia; Danilovitz, Manfred; Falzon, Dennis; Gelmanova, Irina Y.; Gler, Maria T.; Grinsdale, Jennifer A.; Holtz, Timothy H.; Keshavjee, Salmaan; Leimane, Vaira; Menzies, Dick; Milstein, Meredith B.; Mishustin, Sergey P.; Pagano, Marcello; Quelapio, Maria I.; Shean, Karen; Shin, Sonya S.; Tolman, Arielle W.; van der Walt, Martha L.; Van Deun, Armand; Viiklepp, Piret

    2016-01-01

    Debate persists about monitoring method (culture or smear) and interval (monthly or less frequently) during treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). We analysed existing data and estimated the effect of monitoring strategies on timing of failure detection. We identified studies reporting microbiological response to MDR-TB treatment and solicited individual patient data from authors. Frailty survival models were used to estimate pooled relative risk of failure detection in the last 12 months of treatment; hazard of failure using monthly culture was the reference. Data were obtained for 5410 patients across 12 observational studies. During the last 12 months of treatment, failure detection occurred in a median of 3 months by monthly culture; failure detection was delayed by 2, 7, and 9 months relying on bimonthly culture, monthly smear and bimonthly smear, respectively. Risk (95% CI) of failure detection delay resulting from monthly smear relative to culture is 0.38 (0.34–0.42) for all patients and 0.33 (0.25–0.42) for HIV-co-infected patients. Failure detection is delayed by reducing the sensitivity and frequency of the monitoring method. Monthly monitoring of sputum cultures from patients receiving MDR-TB treatment is recommended. Expanded laboratory capacity is needed for high-quality culture, and for smear microscopy and rapid molecular tests. PMID:27587552

  13. Age-related macular degeneration: using morphological predictors to modify current treatment protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Mohammed; Souka, Ahmed; Adelman, Ron A

    2018-03-01

    To assess predictors of treatment response in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in an attempt to develop a patient-centric treatment algorithm. We conducted a systematic search using PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science for prognostic indicators/predictive factors with the key words: 'age related macular degeneration', 'neovascular AMD', 'choroidal neovascular membrane (CNV)', 'anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF)', 'aflibercept', 'ranibizumab', 'bevacizumab', 'randomized clinical trials', 'post-hoc', 'prognostic', 'predictive', 'response' 'injection frequency, 'treat and extend (TAE), 'pro re nata (PRN)', 'bi-monthly' and 'quarterly'. We only included studies that had an adequate period of follow-up (>1 year), a single predefined treatment regimen with a predetermined re-injection criteria, an adequate number of patients, specific morphological [optical coherence tomography (OCT)] criteria that predicted final visual outcomes and injection frequency and did not include switching from one drug to the other. We were able to identify seven prospective studies and 16 retrospective studies meeting our inclusion criteria. There are several morphological and demographic prognostic indicators that can predict response to therapy in wet AMD. Smaller CNV size, subretinal fluid (SRF), retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP) and response to therapy at 12 weeks (visual, angiographic or OCT) can all predict good visual outcomes in patients receiving anti-VEGF therapy. Patients with larger CNV, older age, pigment epithelial detachment (PED), intraretinal cysts (IRC) and vitreomacular adhesion (VMA) achieved less visual gains. Patients having VMA/VMT required more intensive treatment with increased treatment frequency. Patients with both posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) and SRF require infrequent injections. Patients with PED are prone to recurrences of fluid activity with a reduction in visual acuity (VA). A regimen that involves less intensive

  14. [Medycyna Pracy: the scopus-based analysis of citations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przyłuska, Jolanta

    2006-01-01

    Medycyna Pracy, a Polish bimonthly published since 1950, forms a long-standing documentation of studies carried out in the area of workers' health protection. The journal is primarily addressed to occupational health physicians and work hygiene specialists in Poland. It is indexed by numerous foreign information services (e.g., MEDLINE, EMBASE, BIOSIS PREVIEWS, BIOLOGICAL ABSTRACTS, SCOPUS) and thus promotes Polish research in occupational medicine throughout the world. The quantitative analysis for the years 1996-2005, grounded on the SCOPUS database, presents an average number of citations concerning a given volume, frequency of citations, articles most frequently cited, and countries, in which articles published in Medycyna Pracy have been referred to. A growing number of citations observed in the recent years signify the importance of issues investigated and discussed in the journal as well as its role in the world-wide circulation of scientific information.

  15. Country-of-origin labeling prior to and at the point of purchase: an exploration of the information environment in Baltimore City grocery stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagasse, Lisa P; Love, David C; Smith, Katherine Clegg

    2014-01-01

    The country-of-origin labeling (COOL) law requires United States grocers to indicate the origin and procurement method (farm-raised or wild-caught) for seafood. This study explored the presentation of COOL on fresh, frozen, packaged, and unpackaged seafood in Baltimore City grocery stores. Eight stores were visited bi-monthly to photograph seafood labels, and circulars were collected weekly from fourteen stores over three months. Ninety-six percent of products were labeled correctly. Forty-eight percent of advertisements included COOL. While in-store labels did not highlight COOL, advertising featured references to domestic and wild-caught seafood, signaling to customers that these are high-value product qualities.

  16. Ground-water levels and precipitation data at the Maxey Flats low-level radioactive waste disposal site near Morehead, Kentucky, October 1988-September 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettwoch, Douglas D.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet--Department for Environmental Protection--Division of Waste Management, has an ongoing program to monitor water levels at the Maxey Flats low-level radioactive waste disposal site near Morehead, Kentucky. Ground-water-level and precipitation data were collected from 112 wells and 1 rain gage at the Maxey Flats low-level radioactive waste disposal site during October 1988-September 2000. Data were collected on a semi-annual basis from 62 wells, continuously from 6 wells, and monthly or bimonthly from 44 wells (13 of which had continuous recorders installed for the period October 1998-September 2000). One tipping-bucket rain gage was used to collect data at the Maxey Flats site for the period October 1988-September 2000.

  17. Prevalence and histopathology of Neoechinorhynchus curemai Noronha, 1973 (Acanthocephala: Neoechinorhynchidae in Prochilodus lineatus Valenciennes, 1836 from Volta Grande Reservoir, MG, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. MARTINS

    Full Text Available The present work studied the prevalence and histopathology of Neoechinorhynchus curemai Noronha, 1973 (Acanthocephala: Neoechinorhynchidae from curimbatá, Prochilodus lineatus Valenciennes, 1836. Eighteen fishes with averages of 46.7 + 1.1 cm length and 1,674.8 + 75.6 g weight were collected with net, bimonthly from December 1995 thru December 1996 in the hydroelectric power station of Volta Grande Reservoir (Cemig, Minas Gerais, Brazil. From analysed fishes, 15 were infected with acanthocephalans in the intestine (prevalence 83.3%. The greatest mean intensity occurred in August 1996 with 66.5 (16 to 208 parasites. Histopathological analysis showed complete desquamation of the intestinal epithelium with severe hyperplasia and hypertrofia of the goblet cells. Severe inflammatory reaction at the submucosa, displacement of their sheaf, associated with oedema and mononuclear and eosinophilic infiltration were observed.

  18. Distribution of cysts of Strongyluris sp. (Nematoda) in the pallial system of Achatina fulica Bowdich, 1822 from Vila Dois Rios and Vila do Abraão, Ilha Grande, Angra dos Reis, Rio de Janeiro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, J L; Santos, S B

    2018-04-19

    This work aimed to assessing Strongyluris sp. cysts distribution pattern in the several inner organs from pallial system of Achatina fulica Bowdich, 1822. Also we verified if there is a relationship between the mollusk size and the number of specimens from parasites collected from two touristic villages in Ilha Grande (Angra dos Reis, Rio de Janeiro state): Vila Dois Rios (VDR) and Vila do Abraão (ABR). The samples were obtained through a field work conducted bimonthly during 2007, 2008, 2010, and 2011, at both locations. Height and width were measured from shells collected, and the all specimens were classified in different classes: class 1 - biomass and a larger area of the pallial system, allowing an efficient parasite colonization. Other possible explanation could be the long exposure of the molluscs of class 3 to the parasites, which allowed a longer time to the larvae to allocate themselves.

  19. Analysis of the uranium price predicted to 24 months, implementing neural networks and the Monte Carlo method like predictive tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esquivel E, J.; Ramirez S, J. R.; Palacios H, J. C.

    2011-11-01

    The present work shows predicted prices of the uranium, using a neural network. The importance of predicting financial indexes of an energy resource, in this case, allows establishing budgetary measures, as well as the costs of the resource to medium period. The uranium is part of the main energy generating fuels and as such, its price rebounds in the financial analyses, due to this is appealed to predictive methods to obtain an outline referent to the financial behaviour that will have in a certain time. In this study, two methodologies are used for the prediction of the uranium price: the Monte Carlo method and the neural networks. These methods allow predicting the indexes of monthly costs, for a two years period, starting from the second bimonthly of 2011. For the prediction the uranium costs are used, registered from the year 2005. (Author)

  20. Ecology of Anopheline (Diptera, Culicidae, malaria vectors around the Serra da Mesa Reservoir, State of Goiás, Brazil: 1 - Frequency and climatic factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Érico Guimarães

    Full Text Available The ecology of anopheline species (Diptera, Culicidae was studied in the vicinity of the Serra da Mesa Reservoir, State of Goiás, Brazil. Climatic factors and frequency of anopheline populations were analyzed. Bimonthly human-bait and Shannon trap captures were conducted for 36 consecutive months (January 1997 through December 1999. A total of 5,205 adult anophelines belonging to five species were collected. Anopheles darlingi was the most frequently collected anopheline (61.4%, followed by An. albitarsis s.l. (35.4%, An. triannulatus. (2.5%, An. oswaldoi (0.4%, and An. evansae (0.2%. The water level and vegetation along the banks of the reservoir were crucial to the frequency of the various anopheline species. Climatic factors had a secondary influence. The reservoir's water-level stability, increased frequency of An. darlingi, and the arrival of gold prospectors were responsible for the increase in malaria cases.

  1. Does Nursing Facility Use of Habilitation Therapy Improve Performance on Quality Measures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzler, Sandra; Raia, Paul; Buckley, Fredrick O; Wang, Mei

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of the project, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Innovation study, was to evaluate the impact on 12 quality measures including 10 Minimum Data Set (MDS) publicly reported measures and 2 nursing home process measures using habilitation therapy techniques and a behavior team to manage dementia-related behaviors. A prospective design was used to assess the changes in the measures. A total of 30 Massachusetts nursing homes participated in the project over a 12-month period. Project participation required the creation of an interdisciplinary behavior team, habilitation therapy training, facility visit by the program coordinator, attendance at bimonthly support and sharing calls, and monthly collection of process measure data. Participating facilities showed improvement in 9 of the 12 reported measures. Findings indicate potential quality improvement in having nursing homes learn habilitation therapy techniques and know how to use the interdisciplinary team to manage problem behaviors. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. An online database of nuclear electromagnetic moments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mertzimekis, T.J.; Stamou, K.; Psaltis, A.

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of nuclear magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments are considered quite important for the understanding of nuclear structure both near and far from the valley of stability. The recent advent of radioactive beams has resulted in a plethora of new, continuously flowing, experimental data on nuclear structure – including nuclear moments – which hinders the information management. A new, dedicated, public and user friendly online database ( (http://magneticmoments.info)) has been created comprising experimental data of nuclear electromagnetic moments. The present database supersedes existing printed compilations, including also non-evaluated series of data and relevant meta-data, while putting strong emphasis on bimonthly updates. The scope, features and extensions of the database are reported.

  3. Composición taxonómica del zooplancton del embalse de Betania, departamento del Huila, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yimy Herrera Martinez

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the species composition of the zooplancton in the reservoir Betania (altitude; 560 m.a.s.l.; area: 7.4 km2; vol: 1971 x 106 m3; mean depht 28 m, at seven sites and several depths, bimonthly net samples (100 and 200 microns mesh size were taken during 1991.  Alltogether 24 species were found: Thermocyclops decipiens (Crustacea, Copepoda, Moina sp., Ceriodaphnia cornuta y Allona sp. (Crustacea, Cladocera; 19 species of rotífers, of which 7 belong to the genus Brachionus, as well as larvas of the dipter Chaoborus sp. For the first time Brachionus havanaensis, B. falcatus falcatus, b. quadridentatus, y Platyias cuadricornis  f. brevispinus  were found in Colombia.  The species composition was compared with the composition of other lakes and comparison shows that the Betania reservoir has a typical species composition for warms tropical lakes.

  4. Publications in biomedical and environmental sciences programs, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfuderer, H.A.; Moody, J.B.

    1981-07-01

    This bibliography contains 690 references to articles in journals, books, and reports published in the subject area of biomedical and environmental sciences during 1980. There are 529 references to articles published in journals and books and 161 references to reports. Staff members in the Biomedical and Environmental Sciences divisions have other publications not included in this bibliography; for example, theses, book reviews, abstracts published in journals or symposia proceedings, pending journal publications and reports such as monthly and bimonthly progress reports, contractor reports, and reports for internal distribution. This document is sorted by the division, and then alphabetically by author. The sorting by divisions separates the references by subject area in a simple way. The divisions represented in the order that they appear in the bibliography are Analytical Chemistry, Biology, Chemical Technology, Information R and D, Health and Safety Research, Energy, Environmental Sciences, and Computer Sciences

  5. [Correction of anemia in hemodialysis, effect of intravenous iron without erythropoietin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvo, Miriam; Elgueta, Leticia; Aragón, Henry; Cotera, Alejandro

    2002-08-01

    In the last two decades, the use of erythropoietin for the correction of anemia in hemodialysis patients has been recommended. In Chile, only 10% of hemodialysis patients use erythropoietin, therefore, the correction of iron deficiency must be optimized. To report the effects of intravenous iron without erythropoietin in the management of anemia in hemodialysis patients. Retrospective analysis of 42 patients that received intravenous ferrous sacharate in doses of 100 mg/week during 5 weeks and 100 mg bimonthly during six months. These patients did not receive erythropoietin. Thirty six patients had iron deficiency. Basal ferritin was 137 +/- 22 micrograms/l and increased to 321 +/- 28 micrograms/l after treatment. Packed red cell volume increased from 24 +/- 2% to 29 +/- 3%. No adverse effects were reported. Iron deficiency is frequent in hemodialyzed patients. Intraveineous iron is safe and effective in the treatment of iron deficiency in these patients.

  6. Snapshots of the Past, by Brian Fagan. Alta Mira Press (Sage Publications. Walnut Creek, CA, 1995

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd W. Bostwick

    1997-05-01

    Full Text Available Brian Fagan is well known for his archaeology books written for a general public as well as his textbooks. This book is a collection of his articles originally published as bimonthly 'Timelines' columns in Archaeol­ogy Magazine. As he states in the preface of the book, his articles were meant to entertain, inform and sometimes wax indignant on a wide variety of archaeological subjects. His intent was to make available to a wide audience short stories that "navigated through the maze of detailed and specialized literature, creating snapshots of archaeology, archaeologists, and our complex, multifaceted past." The collection of 27 articles he chose for the book were published between 1988 and 1995; in addition, Fagan wrote two new articles for the book (one on prehistoric art and the other on the lives of Egyptian townspeople, for a total 29 articles.

  7. Water Quality in Micro-watersheds Under Different Land Uses in the Municipality of Alegre, Espírito Santo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Scaramussa Pastro

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The present study aimed to evaluate water quality attributes in micro-watersheds under different soil uses. Therefore, four micro-watersheds under the following vegetation cover were selected: pasture, primary forest reforestation, forest, and coffee plantation. Surface and underground water sampling was performed bimonthly between February and December 2014, where thermotolerant coliforms, dissolved oxygen, total nitrogen, phosphorus, turbidity, temperature, pH, biochemical demand for oxygen and total solids were analyzed. Descriptive analyses of each variable were performed during dry and rainy periods, and the values were compared with the normative standards established by Brazilian legislation. Water Quality Indices (WQIs were also calculated for each collection site. All sites presented some type of nonconformity with human consumption standards. The highest WQI values were found in the forest area micro-basin, followed by the coffee plantation and pasture area micro-basins, highlighting the importance of forested areas for water quality.

  8. Publications in biomedical and environmental sciences programs, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfuderer, H.A.; Moody, J.B.

    1981-07-01

    This bibliography contains 690 references to articles in journals, books, and reports published in the subject area of biomedical and environmental sciences during 1980. There are 529 references to articles published in journals and books and 161 references to reports. Staff members in the Biomedical and Environmental Sciences divisions have other publications not included in this bibliography; for example, theses, book reviews, abstracts published in journals or symposia proceedings, pending journal publications and reports such as monthly and bimonthly progress reports, contractor reports, and reports for internal distribution. This document is sorted by the division, and then alphabetically by author. The sorting by divisions separates the references by subject area in a simple way. The divisions represented in the order that they appear in the bibliography are Analytical Chemistry, Biology, Chemical Technology, Information R and D, Health and Safety Research, Energy, Environmental Sciences, and Computer Sciences.

  9. Longitudinal behavioral analysis during dental care of children aged 0 to 3 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robson Frederico Cunha

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available "When" and "how" the dentist intervenes have repercussions on children's physical and emotional patterns. The objective of the present study was to conduct a longitudinal behavioral analysis during dental care of babies aged 0 to 3 years. A total of 216 patients seen at the Baby Clinic of the School of Dentistry at Araçatuba, São Paulo State University (UNESP, were selected. The selection criterion was attendance at ten dental care sessions at bimonthly intervals for routine procedures such as clinical examination and oral hygiene. There was a predominance of cooperative behavior compared to uncooperative behavior when each visit was analyzed separately. The behavior of the patients must have been directly influenced by their psychomotor development. Constant attendance and exposure of the baby to non-stressful dental stimuli are factors that favor a cooperative behavior.

  10. Analysis of the uranium price predicted to 24 months, implementing neural networks and the Monte Carlo method like predictive tools; Analisis del precio del uranio pronosticado a 24 meses, implementando redes neuronales y el metodo de Monte Carlo como herramientas predictivas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esquivel E, J.; Ramirez S, J. R.; Palacios H, J. C., E-mail: jaime.esquivel@fi.uaemex.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    The present work shows predicted prices of the uranium, using a neural network. The importance of predicting financial indexes of an energy resource, in this case, allows establishing budgetary measures, as well as the costs of the resource to medium period. The uranium is part of the main energy generating fuels and as such, its price rebounds in the financial analyses, due to this is appealed to predictive methods to obtain an outline referent to the financial behaviour that will have in a certain time. In this study, two methodologies are used for the prediction of the uranium price: the Monte Carlo method and the neural networks. These methods allow predicting the indexes of monthly costs, for a two years period, starting from the second bimonthly of 2011. For the prediction the uranium costs are used, registered from the year 2005. (Author)

  11. Network, system, and status software enhancements for the autonomously managed electrical power system breadboard. Volume 1: Project summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckee, James W.

    1990-01-01

    This volume (1 of 4) gives a summary of the original AMPS software system configuration, points out some of the problem areas in the original software design that this project is to address, and in the appendix collects all the bimonthly status reports. The purpose of AMPS is to provide a self reliant system to control the generation and distribution of power in the space station. The software in the AMPS breadboard can be divided into three levels: the operating environment software, the protocol software, and the station specific software. This project deals only with the operating environment software and the protocol software. The present station specific software will not change except as necessary to conform to new data formats.

  12. Reproduction of a fish assemblage in the state of São Paulo, southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LM. Gomiero

    Full Text Available Fish reproductions were studied in two river basins (Corumbataí and Jacaré-Pepira basins in the State of São Paulo, southeastern Brazil. In the Corumbataí basin, four sites were sampled: Cabeça River, Lapa Stream, Passa-Cinco River, and Corumbataí River; in the Jacaré-Pepira basin, three sites were sampled: Tamanduá Stream, Jacaré-Pepira River, and Água Branca Stream. A total of 12 bimonthly samples were made. Fish equipment included gill nets, purse seines, sieves, and traps. The main objective of this study was to characterize the fish assemblage regarding their reproductive biology and to compare these reproductive traits between both river basins. Most individuals with gonads in stage C (mature and in stage D (empty gonads were captured in the spring and summer. Multiple spawn and parental care were common strategies, which guaranteed offspring survivorship in unstable conditions.

  13. Temporally variable macroinvertebrate-stone relationships in streams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, D.

    2005-01-01

    of fauna parameter and stone variable from different sampling dates (n=9-11) were rarely correlated to any of the measures of stream stability, this study has demonstrated high temporal variability in fauna-stone relationships (CV's of regression slopes). Consequently, temporally un-replicated studies......Stones were used to sample macroinvertebrates and characterise microhabitats at monthly or bimonthly intervals in six Ecuadorian streams covering a gradient in four different stability measures and other stream characteristics. The physical variables current velocity, water depth, horizontal...... of families vs. individuals) were related to the physical characteristics of individual stone habitats. My second objective was to quantify temporal variability in fauna-stone relationships and to analyse if such variability was related to overall stability of stream reaches. Partial Least Squares (PLS...

  14. Parasites of South African wildlife. XIII. Helminths of grey rhebuck, Pelea capreolus, and of bontebok, Damaliscus dorcas dorcas, in the Bontebok National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boomker, J; Horak, I G

    1992-09-01

    A total of 25 grey rhebuck, Pelea capreolus, and 16 bontebok, Damaliscus dorcas dorcas, were shot for parasite recovery at bi-monthly intervals in the Bontebok National Park, south-western Cape Province, from February 1983 to December 1983 and February 1983 to February 1984, respectively. The grey rhebuck and the bontebok each harboured 9 nematode species and the latter animals 1 cestode species. Ostertagia hamata was most abundant and most prevalent in the grey rhebuck and Longistrongylus curvispiculum and Nematodirus spathiger in the bontebok. Longistrongylus schrenki is recorded for the first time in grey rhebuck, and Trichostrongylus falculatus and Moniezia expansa in bontebok. The total nematode burdens of the bontebok were considerably larger than those of the grey rhebuck. No clear pattern of seasonal abundance for the helminths of either host species was evident.

  15. Characteristic Rain Events: A Methodology for Improving the Amenity Value of Stormwater Control Measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smit Andersen, Jonas; Lerer, Sara Maria; Backhaus, Antje

    2017-01-01

    of achieving amenity value is to stage the rainwater and thus bring it to the attention of the public. We present here a methodology for creating a selection of rain events that can help bridge between engineering and landscape architecture when dealing with staging of rainwater. The methodology uses......Local management of rainwater using stormwater control measures (SCMs) is gaining increased attention as a sustainable alternative and supplement to traditional sewer systems. Besides offering added utility values, many SCMs also offer a great potential for added amenity values. One way...... quantitative and statistical methods to select Characteristic Rain Events (CREs) for a range of frequent return periods: weekly, bi-weekly, monthly, bi-monthly, and a single rarer event occurring only every 1–10 years. The methodology for selecting CREs is flexible and can be adjusted to any climatic settings...

  16. Quantitative Analysis and Development of the Fore Feet of Arabian Foals from Birth to 1 Year of Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faramarzi, Babak; Salinger, Allison; Kaneps, Andris; Nout-Lomas, Yvette; Greene, Holly; Dong, Fanglong

    2017-11-01

    Objectives  The goal of this study was to quantify external and internal anatomical characteristics of the foal foot throughout the first year of age. Methods  Digital radiographs and photographs were taken bimonthly of the forefeet of nine Arabian foals, beginning at about 2 weeks of age until 12 months of age. Sixty-eight linear and angular variables were measured using NIH (National Institutes of Health) Image J software. Statistical analyses were performed using piecewise random coefficient model and p -values shape and from a club-like, cylindrical conformation to a more angled, conical conformation. This paper quantifies this development, ultimately allowing a better understanding of morphological changes in the foot of the growing foal. Schattauer GmbH Stuttgart.

  17. A Case Follow-Up Report: Possible Health Benefits of Extra Virgin Olive Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Shahtahmasebi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the course of a case study, a number of issues regarding the dynamics of blood cholesterol levels were identified. In this follow-up report, these issues are addressed. For example, issues of past behaviour and seasonality, intraindividual variation, and nonstationarity appear important over and above controllable variables such as diet and exercise. In this report, we conceptualise an alternative protective role for the dynamic blood cholesterol levels in a healthy population. Furthermore, regular consumption of extra virgin olive oil as produced in this case study may interact with the dynamics of cholesterol naturally. We recommend that future studies of this kind ought to include a time series of blood cholesterol based on daily measurements or intervals much shorter than the bimonthly measurements and to include measures of overall well being as covariates.

  18. Feeding ecology of Rhinodoras dorbignyi (Kner, 1855 (Siluriformes: Doradidae in the Paranapanema River, SP, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Pontieri de Lima

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7925.2016v29n1p67 Studies describing the diet of fish are important to determine trophic chain relationships, habitat occupation, trophic niches, and to define food habits of species. To describe the diet of Rhinodoras dorbignyi, six collections were made bimonthly in the upper Paranapanema River, SP, from April 2010 to February 2011. Of the 63 samples collected, 30 had stomach content. The diet of this species was determined using two methods: (i alimentary index (AI% and (ii graphical analysis of feeding strategy. Based on the results, R. dorbignyi is an insectivorous species and autochthonous items play an important role in the diet of this species.

  19. Acquired Bilateral Longitudinal True Leukonychia in a 35-year-old Woman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, Fatemeh; Mozafarpoor, Samaneh; Nouraei, Saeid; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Acquired bilateral longitudinal true leukonychia is a rare disorder. We present a case of a 35-year-old healthy woman presented with this unusual and rare manifestation. She mentioned a history of unprotected exposure to detergents and bleaching chemical agents. Considering her low zinc level, she was prescribed with zinc capsules and recommended to avoid chemical substances for 6 months. During bimonthly follow-up, her zinc level turned normal, and leukonychia subsequently disappeared. Bilateral longitudinal true leukonychia in the nails due to zinc deficiency and exposure to chemical substances has not been reported previously. Direct and indirect effects of chemical substances on matrix and the effect of zinc deficiency on healing process should be considered in these cases. PMID:27857831

  20. The Crop Journal Calls for Papers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>We would like to invite you to submit your latest research accomplishments to The Crop Journal(ISSN:2095-5421;Online ISSN:2214-5141,CN 10-1112/S),a new bimonthly academic journal co-sponsored by the Crop Science Society of China and the Institute of Crop Science,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences.The Crop Journal is freely available online(Open Access)in ScienceDirect.The Editor-in-Chief of The Crop Journal is Professor Jianmin Wan,PhD,Cheung Kong Scholar,Director of the Institute of Crop Science and Executive Vice President of the Crop Science Society of China,supported by the Editorial Board of 85 international experts from various fields of crop sciences.

  1. The Crop Journal Calls for Papers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    <正>We would like to invite you to submit your latest research accomplishments to The Crop Journal(ISSN:2095-5421;Online ISSN:2214-5141,CN 10-1112/S),a new bimonthly academic journal co-sponsored by the Crop Science Society of China and the Institute of Crop Science,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences.The Crop Journal is freely available online(Open Access)in Science Direct.The Editor-in-Chief of The Crop Journal is Professor Jianmin Wan,Ph D,Cheung Kong Scholar,Director of the Institute of Crop Science and Executive Vice President of the Crop Science Society of China,supported by

  2. The Crop Journal Calls for Papers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>We would like to invite you to submit your latest research accomplishments to The Crop Journal(ISSN:2095-5421;Online ISSN:2214-5141,CN 10-1112/S),a new bimonthly academic journal co-sponsored by the Crop Science Society of China and the Institute of Crop Science,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences.The Crop Journal is freely available online(Open Access) in Science Direct.The Editor-in-Chief of The Crop Journal is Professor Jianmin Wan,PhD,Cheung Kong Scholar,Director of the Institute of Crop Science and Executive Vice President of the Crop Science Society of China,supported by

  3. Lipids and Composition of Fatty Acids of Saccharina latissima Cultivated Year-round in Integrated Multi-trophic Aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva Marinho, Goncalo; Holdt, Susan Løvstad; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    This study is evaluating the seasonal lipid and fatty acid composition of the brown seaweed Saccharina latissima. Biomass was sampled throughout the year (bi-monthly) at the commercial cultivation site near a fish farm in an integrated multi-trophic aquaculture (IMTA) and at a reference site...... in Denmark (2013-2014). Generally, there was no difference in the biomass composition between sites; however, significant seasonal changes were found. The lipid concentration varied from 0.62%-0.88% dry weight (DW) in July to 3.33%-3.35% DW in November (p composition...... such as cabbage and lettuce. Compared to fat (salmon) and lean fish (cod) this seaweed species contains higher proportions of ARA and SDA, but lower EPA (only cod) and DHA. Conclusively, the season of harvest is important for the choice of lipid quantity and quality, but the marine vegetables provide better...

  4. Therapy-resistant anaemia in congenital nephrotic syndrome of the Finnish type--implication of EPO, transferrin and transcobalamin losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toubiana, Julie; Schlageter, Marie-Hélène; Aoun, Bilal; Dunand, Olivier; Vitkevic, Renata; Bensman, Albert; Ulinski, Tim

    2009-04-01

    Congenital nephrotic syndrome of the Finnish type (CNF) is due to NPHS1 mutation and is responsible for a variety of urinary protein losses. We report the case of a 4-month-old girl with a particularly severe form (proteinuria approximately 150 g/l) of CNF. She developed severe non-regenerative anaemia requiring bi-monthly blood transfusions despite daily EPO (600 UI/kg) and iron supplementation. Epoetin pharmacokinetics revealed a urinary loss of 27% of the given dose within the first 24 h after IV injection. However, plasma levels remained increased after 24 h (228 UI/l). Plasma transferrin and transcobalamin levels were undetectable. Atransferrinaemia and atranscobalaminaemia seem to be responsible for disturbed erythropoiesis.

  5. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooke, L. R. (Editor); Radtke, M. (Editor); Garshnek, V. (Editor); Rowe, J. E. (Editor); Teeter, R. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The second issue of the bimonthly digest of USSR Space Life Sciences is presented. Abstracts are included for 39 Soviet periodical articles in 16 areas of aerospace medicine and space biology and published in Russian during the first half of 1985. Selected articles are illustrated with figures from the original. Translated introductions and tables of contents for 14 Russian books on 11 topics related to NASA's life science concerns are presented. Areas covered are: adaptation, biospheric, body fluids, botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, cybernetics and biomedical data processing, gastrointestinal system, group dynamics, habitability and environmental effects, health and medical treatment, hematology, immunology, life support systems, metabolism, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, psychology, radiobiology, and space biology. Two book reviews translated from Russian are included and lists of additional relevant titles available either in English or in Russian only are appended.

  6. Experimental determination of optimum annual cleaning frequency and costs for transparent glass covers used in solar devices in Sokoto, Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maduekwe, A. A. L.; Garba, B.; Atiku, A. T.

    1997-01-01

    Transparent covers used in solar collectors collect both solar radiation and dirt from the environment. The dirt collected reduces the amount of useful incident solar radiation that would have been transmitted into system. Samples of ordinary glass used as transparent covers in solar devices at Sokoto Energy Research Centre were exposed to the weather for a period of one year. Cleaning was done on daily, weekly, bi-monthly and monthly basis. A sample was left uncleaned throughout the period. Using the measured average daily transmittance for all seasons as a constant for such glass covers in Sokoto showed that varying the cost/wash/collector for a collector of one-square metre receiver area from =N=0.50 to =N=50.00, would vary the frequency of washing the collector covers from 160 down to 25 times annually respectively. Cost of washing per annum would also vary from 79.90 Naira to 834.46 Naira

  7. List randomization for soliciting experience of intimate partner violence: Application to the evaluation of Zambia's unconditional child grant program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterman, Amber; Palermo, Tia M; Handa, Sudhanshu; Seidenfeld, David

    2018-03-01

    Social scientists have increasingly invested in understanding how to improve data quality and measurement of sensitive topics in household surveys. We utilize the technique of list randomization to collect measures of physical intimate partner violence in an experimental impact evaluation of the Government of Zambia's Child Grant Program. The Child Grant Program is an unconditional cash transfer, which targeted female caregivers of children under the age of 5 in rural areas to receive the equivalent of US $24 as a bimonthly stipend. The implementation results show that the list randomization methodology functioned as planned, with approximately 15% of the sample identifying 12-month prevalence of physical intimate partner violence. According to this measure, after 4 years, the program had no measurable effect on partner violence. List randomization is a promising approach to incorporate sensitive measures into multitopic evaluations; however, more research is needed to improve upon methodology for application to measurement of violence. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Rebuild America Partner Update, January--February 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-01-01

    Rebuild America Partner Update, the bimonthly newsletter about the Rebuild America community, covers partnership activities, industry trends, and program news. Rebuild America is a network of community partnerships--made up of local governments and businesses--that save money by saving energy. These voluntary partnerships, working with the US Department of Energy, choose the best ways to improve the energy efficiency of commercial, government and apartment buildings. Rebuild America supports them with business and technical tools and customized assistance. By the year 2003, 250 Rebuild America partnerships will be involved in over 2 billion square feet of building renovations, which will save $650 million every year in energy costs, generate $3 billion in private community investment, create 26,000 new private sector jobs, and reduce air pollution by 1.6 million tons of carbon dioxide a year.

  9. Phytoplankton of the portion of the Paranapanema River to be dammed for construction of the Rosana Hydroelectric Plant, Sao Paulo State, Southern Brazil; Fitoplancton do trecho a represar do Rio Paranapanema (Usina Hidreletrica de Rosana), Estado de Sao Paulo, Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bicudo, Carlos E. de M.; Bicudo, Denise de C.; Castro, Ana Alice J. de; Picelli-Vicentim, M. Marcina [Instituto de Botanica, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Secao de Ficologia

    1992-12-31

    The phytoplankton community of the 120 Km long portion of the Paranapanema River located between the Salto Grande Hydroelectric Plant reservoir and the river mouth at the Parana River is surveyed. This part of the river will be dammed for construction of the Rosana hydroelectric System in the State of Sao Paulo, southern Brazil. An inventory was completed for 4 collecting stations, and based on the study of 48 samples gathered bimonthly during the period from November 1985 to September 1986. Each collection is represented by a net concentrated and a raw total phytoplankton sample. Except for the Bacillariophyceae, study of which is still in progress, the other classes present were the following in order of their local representation: Chlorophyceae with 23 taxa, Zygnemaphyceae (= Cyanophyceae) with 9, Tribophyceace (= Xanthophyceae) with 2 each one, and Oedogoniophyceae, Euglenophyceae and Chrysophyceae with a single taxon each, to a total of 55 taxa identified. (author) 27 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Sampling frequency of ciliated protozoan microfauna for seasonal distribution research in marine ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Henglong; Yong, Jiang; Xu, Guangjian

    2015-12-30

    Sampling frequency is important to obtain sufficient information for temporal research of microfauna. To determine an optimal strategy for exploring the seasonal variation in ciliated protozoa, a dataset from the Yellow Sea, northern China was studied. Samples were collected with 24 (biweekly), 12 (monthly), 8 (bimonthly per season) and 4 (seasonally) sampling events. Compared to the 24 samplings (100%), the 12-, 8- and 4-samplings recovered 94%, 94%, and 78% of the total species, respectively. To reveal the seasonal distribution, the 8-sampling regime may result in >75% information of the seasonal variance, while the traditional 4-sampling may only explain sampling frequency, the biotic data showed stronger correlations with seasonal variables (e.g., temperature, salinity) in combination with nutrients. It is suggested that the 8-sampling events per year may be an optimal sampling strategy for ciliated protozoan seasonal research in marine ecosystems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Publications in biomedical and environmental sciences programs, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moody, J.B.

    1983-04-01

    This bibliography contains 725 references to articles in journals, books, and reports published in the subject area of biomedical and environmental sciences during 1982. There are 553 references to articles published in journals and books and 172 references to reports. The citations appear once ordered by the first author's division or by the performing division. Staff members in the Biomedical and Environmental Sciences divisions have other publications not included in this bibliography; for example, theses, book reviews, abstracts published in journals or symposia proceedings, pending journal publications and reports such as monthly, bimonthly, and quarterly progress reports, contractor reports, and reports for internal distribution. This document is sorted by the division, and then alphabetically by author. The sorting by divisions separates the references by subject area in a simple way. The divisions are represented alphabetically. Indexes are provided by author, title, and journal reference. Reprints of articles referenced in this bibliography can be obtained from the author or the author's division

  12. DOE/NE University Program in robotics for advanced reactors research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivedi, M.M.

    1990-01-01

    The document presents the bimonthly progress reports published during 1990 regarding the US Department of Energy/NE-sponsored research at the University of Tennessee Knoxville under the DOE Robitics for Advanced Reactors Research Grant. Significant accomplishments are noted in the following areas: development of edge-segment based stereo matching algorithm; vision system integration in the CESAR laboratory; evaluation of algorithms for surface characterization from range data; comparative study of data fusion techniques; development of architectural framework, software, and graphics environment for sensor-based robots; algorithms for acquiring tactile images from planer surfaces; investigations in geometric model-based robotic manipulation; investigations of non-deterministic approaches to sensor fusion; and evaluation of sensor calibration techniques. (MB)

  13. Effect of e-Learning and Repeated Performance Feedback on Spirometry Test Quality in Family Practice: A Cluster Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermer, Tjard R.; Akkermans, Reinier P.; Crockett, Alan J.; van Montfort, Marian; Grootens-Stekelenburg, Joke; Stout, Jim W.; Pieters, Willem

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Spirometry has become an indispensable tool in primary care to exclude, diagnose, and monitor chronic respiratory conditions, but the quality of spirometry tests in family practices is a reason for concern. Aim of this study was to investigate whether a combination of e-learning and bimonthly performance feedback would improve spirometry test quality in family practices in the course of 1 year. METHODS Our study was a cluster trial with 19 family practices allocated to intervention or control conditions through minimization. Intervention consisted of e-learning and bimonthly feedback reports to practice nurses. Control practices received only the joint baseline workshop. Spirometry quality was assessed by independent lung function technicians. Two outcomes were defined, with the difference between rates of tests with 2 acceptable and repeatable blows being the primary outcome and the difference between rates of tests with 2 acceptable blows being the secondary outcome. We used multilevel logistic regression analysis to calculate odds ratios (ORs) for an adequate test in intervention group practices. RESULTS We analyzed 1,135 tests. Rate of adequate tests was 33% in intervention and 30% in control group practices (OR = 1.3; P=.605). Adequacy of tests did not differ between groups but tended to increase with time: OR = 2.2 (P = .057) after 3 and OR = 2.0 (P = .086) in intervention group practices after 4 feedback reports. When ignoring test repeatability, these differences between the groups were slightly more pronounced: OR = 2.4 (P = .033) after 3 and OR=2.2 (P = .051) after 4 feedback reports. CONCLUSIONS In the course of 1 year, we observed a small and late effect of e-learning and repeated feedback on the quality of spirometry as performed by family practice nurses. This intervention does not seem to compensate the lack of rigorous training and experience in performing spirometry tests in most practices. PMID:21747104

  14. Seasonal changes in the gonadossomatic index, allometric condition factor and sex ratio of an auchenipterid catfish from eastern Amazonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Magalhães da Silva Freitas

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the seasonal pattern of the gonadosomatic index (GSI, condition factor (K, and sex ratio in the catfish Auchenipterichthys longimanus (Siluriformes: Auchenipteridae as an approach to identify its reproductive period. A total of 589 A. longimanus specimens (251 males and 338 females were captured in the rivers of the Caxiuanã National Forest, in the Brazilian state of Pará, between July, 2008 and July, 2009. Among the male specimens, 171 were classified as adults and 80 as juveniles, while there were 249 adults and 89 juvenile females. Using a sinusoidal equation, analysis of the GSI revealed a reproductive asynchrony between the genders, with males attaining their highest GSI values in January, while females peaked in March. For males, the sinusoidal regression for GSI values was significant only when used the complete data set (P=0.001, wears no trend was identified for bimonthly means (P=0.136. For females, by contrast, significant values were obtained for both the complete data set (P=0.012 and bimonthly GSI means (P=0.026. For the condition factor, the sinusoidal equation returned significant seasonal variation in both raw data (P=0.02 and with mean values (P=0.00 for males, but only with raw data for females (P=0.04, which appears to reflect variation in the energy budget between genders. With regard to the sex ratio, more reproductive females were captured than males in January and March, 2009, which suggests a pattern of segregation related to the reproductive process. These parameters are fundamental to the assessment, protection, and management of natural fish stocks, as well as providing guidelines for the development of conservation strategies.

  15. Effect of e-learning and repeated performance feedback on spirometry test quality in family practice: a cluster trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermer, Tjard R; Akkermans, Reinier P; Crockett, Alan J; van Montfort, Marian; Grootens-Stekelenburg, Joke; Stout, Jim W; Pieters, Willem

    2011-01-01

    Spirometry has become an indispensable tool in primary care to exclude, diagnose, and monitor chronic respiratory conditions, but the quality of spirometry tests in family practices is a reason for concern. Aim of this study was to investigate whether a combination of e-learning and bimonthly performance feedback would improve spirometry test quality in family practices in the course of 1 year. Our study was a cluster trial with 19 family practices allocated to intervention or control conditions through minimization. Intervention consisted of e-learning and bimonthly feedback reports to practice nurses. Control practices received only the joint baseline workshop. Spirometry quality was assessed by independent lung function technicians. Two outcomes were defined, with the difference between rates of tests with 2 acceptable and repeatable blows being the primary outcome and the difference between rates of tests with 2 acceptable blows being the secondary outcome. We used multilevel logistic regression analysis to calculate odds ratios (ORs) for an adequate test in intervention group practices. We analyzed 1,135 tests. Rate of adequate tests was 33% in intervention and 30% in control group practices (OR = 1.3; P=.605). Adequacy of tests did not differ between groups but tended to increase with time: OR = 2.2 (P = .057) after 3 and OR = 2.0 (P = .086) in intervention group practices after 4 feedback reports. When ignoring test repeatability, these differences between the groups were slightly more pronounced: OR = 2.4 (P = .033) after 3 and OR=2.2 (P = .051) after 4 feedback reports. In the course of 1 year, we observed a small and late effect of e-learning and repeated feedback on the quality of spirometry as performed by family practice nurses. This intervention does not seem to compensate the lack of rigorous training and experience in performing spirometry tests in most practices.

  16. Monitoring and predicting the risk of violence in residential facilities. No difference between patients with history or with no history of violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Girolamo, Giovanni; Buizza, Chiara; Sisti, Davide; Ferrari, Clarissa; Bulgari, Viola; Iozzino, Laura; Boero, Maria Elena; Cristiano, Giuseppe; De Francesco, Alessandra; Giobbio, Gian Marco; Maggi, Paolo; Rossi, Giuseppe; Segalini, Beatrice; Candini, Valentina

    2016-09-01

    Most people with mental disorders are not violent. However, the lack of specific studies in this area and recent radical changes in Italy, including the closure of six Forensic Mental Hospitals, has prompted a more detailed investigation of patients with aggressive behaviour. To compare socio-demographic, clinical and treatment-related characteristics of long-term inpatients with a lifetime history of serious violence with controls; to identify predictors of verbal and physical aggressive behaviour during 1-year follow-up. In a prospective cohort study, patients living in Residential Facilities (RFs) with a lifetime history of serious violence were assessed with a large set of standardized instruments and compared to patients with no violent history. Patients were evaluated bi-monthly with MOAS in order to monitor any aggressive behaviour. The sample included 139 inpatients, 82 violent and 57 control subjects; most patients were male. The bi-monthly monitoring during the 1-year follow-up did not show any statistically significant differences in aggressive behaviour rates between the two groups. The subscale explaining most of the MOAS total score was aggression against objects, although verbal aggression was the most common pattern. Furthermore, verbal aggression was significantly associated with aggression against objects and physical aggression. Patients with a history of violence in RFs, where treatment and clinical supervision are available, do not show higher rates of aggressiveness compared to patients with no lifetime history of violence. Since verbal aggression is associated with more severe forms of aggression, prompt intervention is warranted to reduce the risk of escalation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of fishing with Tephrosia candida (Fabaceae) on diversity and abundance of fish in the streams at the boundary of Sinharaja Man and Biosphere Forest Reserve, Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epa, Udaya Priyantha Kankanamge; Mohotti, Chamari Ruvandika Waniga Chinthamanie

    2016-09-01

    Local communities in some Asian, African and American countries, use plant toxins in fish poisoning for fishing activities; however, the effects of this practice on the particular wild fish assemblages is unknown. This study was conducted with the aim to investigate the effects of fish poisoning using Tephrosia candida, on freshwater fish diversity and abundance in streams at the boundary of the World Natural Heritage site, Sinharaja Forest Reserve, Sri Lanka. A total of seven field trips were undertaken on a bimonthly basis, from May 2013 to June 2014. We surveyed five streams with similar environmental and climatological conditions at the boundary of Sinharaja forest. We selected three streams with active fish poisoning practices as treatments, and two streams with no fish poisoning as controls. Physico-chemical parameters and flow rate of water in selected streams were also measured at bimonthly intervals. Fish were sampled by electrofishing and nets in three randomly selected confined locations (6 x 2 m stretch) along every stream. Fish species were identified, their abundances were recorded, and Shannon-Weiner diversity index was calculated for each stream. Streams were clustered based on the Bray-Curtis similarity matrix for fish composition and abundance. Physico-chemical parameters of water were not significantly different among streams (P > 0.05). A total of 15 fish species belonging to four different orders Cypriniformes, Cyprinodontiformes, Perciformes and Siluriformes were collected; nine species (60 %) were endemic, and six (40 %) were native species. From these, 13 fish species were recorded in streams with no poisoning, while five species were recorded in streams where poisoning was practiced. Four endemic and one native fish species were locally extinct in streams where fish poisoning was active. Fish abundance was significantly higher in control streams (32-39/m2) when compared to treatment streams (5-9/m2) (P fish poisoning with T. candida may

  18. Grid laser with modified pro re nata injection of bevacizumab and ranibizumab in macular edema due to branch retinal vein occlusion: MARVEL report no 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Raja; Panchal, Bhavik; Stewart, Michael W; Das, Taraprasad; Chhablani, Jay; Jalali, Subhadra; Hasnat Ali, Mohd

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively study the efficacy of grid laser combined with intravitreal bevacizumab or ranibizumab in eyes with macular edema due to branch retinal vein occlusion. Treatment-naïve eyes were enrolled to receive injections of ranibizumab or bevacizumab. During the first 6 months, patients were evaluated monthly and injected if the best-corrected visual acuity changed by five or more letters or fluid was noted on spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT); during the next 6 months, patients were evaluated bimonthly and injected only if the best-corrected visual acuity decreased by five or more letters with the associated fluid. Grid laser photocoagulation was performed if there was fluid on OCT and was repeated if patients were eligible after a minimum interval of 3 months. The mean numbers of ranibizumab and bevacizumab injections were, respectively, 3.2±1.5 and 3.0±1.4 in the first 6 months and 0.3±0.6 and 0.3±0.6 in the last 6 months. Moreover, 55/75 (73.33%) participants did not receive any injections in the last 6 months. The mean reductions in central retinal thickness at 12 months were 165.67 μm (P<0.001; 95% confidence interval -221.50 to -135.0) in the ranibizumab group and 184.78 μm (P<0.001; 95% confidence interval -246.49 to -140.0) in the bevacizumab group (P=0.079). More patients in the bevacizumab group compared to those in the ranibizumab group required rescue laser at 12 months (20 vs eleven; P=0.06). Bimonthly evaluations after month 6 with very few pro re nata injections were effective in maintaining visual gains achieved during the first 6 months. Grid laser photocoagulation is effective in maintaining the vision even in the presence of fluid on OCT, although it's required more often in patients treated with bevacizumab.

  19. Grid laser with modified pro re nata injection of bevacizumab and ranibizumab in macular edema due to branch retinal vein occlusion: MARVEL report no 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Raja; Panchal, Bhavik; Stewart, Michael W; Das, Taraprasad; Chhablani, Jay; Jalali, Subhadra; Hasnat Ali, Mohd

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to prospectively study the efficacy of grid laser combined with intravitreal bevacizumab or ranibizumab in eyes with macular edema due to branch retinal vein occlusion. Patients and methods Treatment-naïve eyes were enrolled to receive injections of ranibizumab or bevacizumab. During the first 6 months, patients were evaluated monthly and injected if the best-corrected visual acuity changed by five or more letters or fluid was noted on spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT); during the next 6 months, patients were evaluated bimonthly and injected only if the best-corrected visual acuity decreased by five or more letters with the associated fluid. Grid laser photocoagulation was performed if there was fluid on OCT and was repeated if patients were eligible after a minimum interval of 3 months. Results The mean numbers of ranibizumab and bevacizumab injections were, respectively, 3.2±1.5 and 3.0±1.4 in the first 6 months and 0.3±0.6 and 0.3±0.6 in the last 6 months. Moreover, 55/75 (73.33%) participants did not receive any injections in the last 6 months. The mean reductions in central retinal thickness at 12 months were 165.67 μm (P<0.001; 95% confidence interval −221.50 to −135.0) in the ranibizumab group and 184.78 μm (P<0.001; 95% confidence interval −246.49 to −140.0) in the bevacizumab group (P=0.079). More patients in the bevacizumab group compared to those in the ranibizumab group required rescue laser at 12 months (20 vs eleven; P=0.06). Conclusion Bimonthly evaluations after month 6 with very few pro re nata injections were effective in maintaining visual gains achieved during the first 6 months. Grid laser photocoagulation is effective in maintaining the vision even in the presence of fluid on OCT, although it’s required more often in patients treated with bevacizumab. PMID:27330272

  20. One year study of bacterial and fungal nosocomial infections among patients in pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) in Alexandria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Nawawy, Ahmed Ahmed; Abd El-Fattah, Mohamed Mohamed; Metwally, Hala Abd El-Raouf; Barakat, Shahira Salah El Din; Hassan, Ihab Abdel Rehim

    2006-06-01

    A 1-year prospective and observational study included all admissions (n=216) until 48 h after discharge to Alexandria PICU between first of May 2003 and end of April 2004. Cultures for bacteria and fungi and antibiotic sensitivity tests (19 antibiotic using Bauer-Kirby disc diffusion method) were obtained (blood, stool, urine and cerebrospinal fluid, if needed) and repeated on suspicion of NIs. All cannulae, endotracheal tube (ET) aspirates and tips, nasogastric tubes and different catheters were cultured. All PICU health care workers (HCWs) were subjected to throat and under-finger nails cultures as well as inanimate objects, both on bimonthly basis. The referral place (ward or emergency), PRISM III score, length of stay (LOS) and fate were recorded. Amongst those patients whose age ranged from 1 to 23 months, 23 per cent had NIs with infection rates of 40/1000 days. Significantly high rates of mortality, LOS and PRISM III score were encountered among patients with NIs (52 per cent vs 30 per cent; 9.4+/-4.8 vs 5.4+/-2.2 days; 14.4+/-7 vs 11.8+/-6 respectively). The descending order of frequency of NIs was blood stream infection (BSI) (47 per cent), urinary tract infection (UTI) (28 per cent), ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) (16 per cent) and meningitis (9 per cent). Gr-ve bacilli accounted for 76.7 per cent; Gr+ve cocci 13.3 per cent (with satisfactory sensitivity to cefepime, imipenem and meropenem) and Candida albicans 10 per cent of all NIs. The rate of NIs/1000 device days were: 18.7 per cent for BSI, 10.9 per cent for VAP and 25.5 per cent for UTI. Vulnerable age groups were >6 m for VAP and predictors of NI acquisition (odd ratio and 95 per cent confidence interval: 1.537, 1.423-1.659; 1.073, 1.041-1.105 and 0.269, 0.178-0.406 respectively). Bimonthly cultures for HCWs isolated coagulase-ve Staphylococci, while inanimate objects isolated diphtheroids and Candida albicans. NIs rate was high (23 per cent) mainly due to severity of condition on admission

  1. Determination of Some Physicochemical Properties, Fatty Acid Composition and Antioxidant Capacity, of Organic and Conventional Milk in Turkey Produced

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayram Ürkek

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, determination of effect of production systems (conventional and organic and time of milk collection on some physicochemical properties, fatty acids and antioxidant capacity of conventional and organic raw milk in produced Turkey were aimed. In this research, the milk samples was collected from nine conventional farms and nine organic farms at bimonthly years for one year. Fatty acid composition, antioxidant capacity, total phenolic matter, dry matter, fat, protein, ash, titratable acidity (lactic acid % and pH values of organic and conventional milk were investigated. According to results of this research, the mean values of conventional and organic milk samples respectively for dry matter, fat, protein, ash, specific gravity, acidity and pH was determined as 12.06-11.97%, 3.67-3.50%, 3.33-3.34%, 0.67-0.66%, 1.0381-1.0381 g mL-1, 0.18-0.16% and 6.67-6.73, respectively. Conjugated linoliec acid proportions changed between 1.39% and 2.87% in organic milk, between 1.67% and 2.96% in conventional milk. Consequently, the farm production type did not have effects on the milk compassion (dry matter, fat, protein and ash, fatty acid composition, EC50 and total phenolic compounds. On the other hand, the significant variations in the fat, protein, fatty acid proportions, EC50, inhibition and total phenolic compound values were determined as regarding time of milk collection.

  2. An overview of radioactive waste disposal procedures of a nuclear medicine department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravichandran, R.; Binukumar, J. P.; Sreeram, Rajan; Arunkumar, L. S.

    2011-01-01

    Radioactive wastes from hospitals form one of the various types of urban wastes, which are managed in developed countries in a safe and organized way. In countries where growth of nuclear medicine services are envisaged, implementations of existing regulatory policies and guidelines in hospitals in terms of handling of radioactive materials used in the treatment of patients need a good model. To address this issue, a brief description of the methods is presented. A designed prototype waste storage trolley is found to be of great help in decaying the I-131 solid wastes from wards before releasing to waste treatment plant of the city. Two delay tanks with collection time of about 2 months and delay time of 2 months alternately result in 6 releases of urine toilet effluents to the sewage treatment plant (STP) of the hospital annually. Samples of effluents collected at releasing time documented radioactive releases of I-131 much below recommended levels of bi-monthly release. External counting of samples showed good statistical correlation with calculated values. An overview of safe procedures for radioactive waste disposal is presented. PMID:21731225

  3. An overview of radioactive waste disposal procedures of a nuclear medicine department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravichandran, R; Binukumar, J P; Sreeram, Rajan; Arunkumar, L S

    2011-04-01

    Radioactive wastes from hospitals form one of the various types of urban wastes, which are managed in developed countries in a safe and organized way. In countries where growth of nuclear medicine services are envisaged, implementations of existing regulatory policies and guidelines in hospitals in terms of handling of radioactive materials used in the treatment of patients need a good model. To address this issue, a brief description of the methods is presented. A designed prototype waste storage trolley is found to be of great help in decaying the I-131 solid wastes from wards before releasing to waste treatment plant of the city. Two delay tanks with collection time of about 2 months and delay time of 2 months alternately result in 6 releases of urine toilet effluents to the sewage treatment plant (STP) of the hospital annually. Samples of effluents collected at releasing time documented radioactive releases of I-131 much below recommended levels of bi-monthly release. External counting of samples showed good statistical correlation with calculated values. An overview of safe procedures for radioactive waste disposal is presented.

  4. An overview of radioactive waste disposal procedures of a nuclear medicine department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Ravichandran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Radioactive wastes from hospitals form one of the various types of urban wastes, which are managed in developed countries in a safe and organized way. In countries where growth of nuclear medicine services are envisaged, implementations of existing regulatory policies and guidelines in hospitals in terms of handling of radioactive materials used in the treatment of patients need a good model. To address this issue, a brief description of the methods is presented. A designed prototype waste storage trolley is found to be of great help in decaying the I-131 solid wastes from wards before releasing to waste treatment plant of the city. Two delay tanks with collection time of about 2 months and delay time of 2 months alternately result in 6 releases of urine toilet effluents to the sewage treatment plant (STP of the hospital annually. Samples of effluents collected at releasing time documented radioactive releases of I-131 much below recommended levels of bi-monthly release. External counting of samples showed good statistical correlation with calculated values. An overview of safe procedures for radioactive waste disposal is presented.

  5. Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact Study Final Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, Tate [Baylor Univ., Waco, TX (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The goal of the Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact (BBCSI) Study was to characterize the concentration and isotopic composition of carbonaceous atmospheric particulate matter (PM) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site in Barrow, AK. The carbonaceous component was characterized via measurement of the organic and black carbon (OC and BC) components of the total PM. To facilitate complete characterization of the particulate matter, filter-based collections were used, including a medium volume PM2.5 sampler and a high volume PM10 sampler. Thirty-eight fine (PM2.5) and 49 coarse (PM10) particulate matter fractions were collected at weekly and bi-monthly intervals. The PM2.5 sampler operated with minimal maintenance during the 12 month campaign. The PM10 sampler used for the BBCSI used standard Tisch hi-vol motors which have a known lifetime of ~1 month under constant use; this necessitated monthly maintenance and it is suggested that the motors be upgraded to industrial blowers for future deployment in the Arctic. The BBCSI sampling campaign successfully collected and archived 87 ambient atmospheric particulate matter samples from Barrow, AK from July 2012 to June 2013. Preliminary analysis of the organic and black carbon concentrations has been completed. This campaign confirmed known trends of high BC lasting from the winter through to spring haze periods and low BC concentrations in the summer.

  6. ANNALS OF GEOPHYSICS: AD MAJORA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Florindo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Annals of Geophysics is a bimonthly international journal, which publishes scientific papers in the field of geophysics sensu lato. It derives from Annali di Geofisica, which commenced publication in January 1948 as a quarterly periodical devoted to general geophysics, seismology, earth magnetism, and atmospheric studies. The journal was published regularly for a quarter of a century until 1982 when it merged with the French journal Annales de Géophysique to become Annales Geophysicae under the aegis of the European Geophysical Society. In 1981, this journal ceased publication of the section on solid earth geophysics, ending the legacy of Annali di Geofisica. In 1993, the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica (ING, founder of the journal, decided to resume publication of its own journal under the same name, Annali di Geofisica. To ensure continuity, the first volume of the new series was assigned the volume number XXXVI (following the last issue published in 1982. In 2002, with volume XLV, the name of the journal was translated into English to become Annals of Geophysics and in consequence the journal impact factor counter was restarted. Starting in 2010, in order to improve its status and better serve the science community, Annals of Geophysics has instituted a number of editorial changes including full electronic open access, freely accessible online, the possibility to comment on and discuss papers online, and a board of editors representing Asia and the Americas as well as Europe. [...

  7. Extended interval between enzyme therapy infusions for adult patients with Gaucher′s disease type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez-Calvo J

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT for Gaucher′s disease with alglucerase or imiglucerase is efficacious, well-tolerated and safe. However, cost considerations, visits to medical facilities, potentially duration of theray for life, are issues of major concern to a proportion of treated patients and has, in some cases, led to the withdrawal of therapy. AIMS: To elucidate whether an extension of the interval between enzyme infusions to once every three weeks is as effective in maintaining the clinical responses achieved with the bi-monthly regimen. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Four patients with an optimal response to ERT (at 30 units/kg every two weeks for an average of 27 months, were subjected to enzyme dose/frequency changes that essentially constituted a reduction in cumulative dose over the treatment period. Patients were assessed every 6 months for alterations in haematological parameters, plasma chitotriosidase levels, liver and spleen size, and bone symptoms. RESULTS: All patients had to resume the previous infusion schedule of once every two weeks; one because of new bone marrow infiltrates, two because of visceral enlargement, and the fourth due to progressive anaemia. CONCLUSIONS: This limited experience suggests that a reduction in enzyme dose associated with an extended interval between infusions may lead to variable disease control, and underscores the need for individualization of enzyme therapy.

  8. School Nurse Inspections Improve Handwashing Supplies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Mary M.; Schrader, Ronald; Trujillo, Rebecca; Blea, Mary; Greenberg, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Handwashing in the school setting is important for infectious disease control, yet maintaining adequate handwashing supplies is often made difficult by lack of funds, limited staff time, and student vandalism. This study measured the availability of handwashing supplies for students in New Mexico public schools and determined the impact of scheduled school nurse inspections on the availability of handwashing supplies. METHODS Participating school districts in New Mexico were matched by size and randomized into intervention and control groups. Baseline inspections were conducted in November 2008 followed by 2 subsequent bimonthly inspections. For each student bathroom, the presence or absence of soap and either paper towels or hand dryers was indicated on an inspection checklist. The intervention group reported findings to the New Mexico Department of Health (NMDOH) and to school administrative and custodial staff requesting that any identified problems be addressed. The control group reported inspection findings to the NMDOH only. Descriptive analyses were conducted to determine the proportion of bathrooms with soap and either paper towels or hand dryers. Comparisons were made between the intervention schools and the control schools at baseline and during the intervention period. RESULTS The intervention group had significantly higher probability of bathrooms being supplied with soap (p school nurse inspections of hand hygiene supplies, with reporting to appropriate school officials, can improve the availability of handwashing supplies for students. PMID:21592131

  9. Temporal and spatial variation of the limnological characteristics of a lotic ecosystem in the Cerrado of Mato Grosso.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amintas Nazareth Rossete

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to characterize a stream in the area of Cerrado of Mato Grosso according to limnological characteristics during an annual cycle and to assess its relationship with the hydrological regime and anthropogenic changes of the adjacent land system. Two collection points in the stream were selected which passed through the Parque do Bacaba in addition to two other in areas of anthropogenic influence, mainly cattle-raising activity. Data collection was performed bimonthly in downstream order, from September 2001 to August 2002. At the sampling sites, the water temperature, depth, water transparency, dissolved oxygen, pH, electric conductivity, suspended material and total stream discharge were verified. The spatial variations were more obvious than the temporal changes. The values of water transparency, suspended material, electric conductivity and dissolved oxygen showed the greatest variations. The lowest concentrations of dissolved oxygen in the stream were recorded in the dry period. Among the sampling sites, only the pH did not present any significant differences, and the other variables differed significantly between at least two sampling sites. Between the dry and rainy periods, only the depth of the water column and total stream discharge differed significantly.

  10. Advertising can help, if you look before you leap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hexamer, Hugh D.

    1989-01-01

    The task of this presentation is to review the advertising program of the U.S. Council for Energy Awareness -- its history, the rationale behind it and the results. Reaching the American public requires a broad-based program using a variety of communication tools and techniques. A program cannot rely solely on advertising to carry its messages. USCEA therefore also has programs in several other key areas, including media activities, public relations, publications and public attitude research. USCEA arranges media tours in major city markets, using both third-party experts and industry executives who brief the editorial boards of major newspapers, hold radio and TV interviews, and participate in press conferences. Such exposure multiplies the impact of our message many times over. In the publications area, USCEA produces a wire service called INFOWIRE and two popular publications -- a monthly newsletter called INFO and a bimonthly magazine called Nuclear Industry. USCEA also produces a variety of other publications on important industry issues. And finally, in addition to staging the annual Nuclear Energy Forum in Washington, USCEA sustains an active conference and workshop program addressing a variety of industry interests, including public information, licensing, the fuel cycle and so forth

  11. Management of communication area in a nuclear research and development institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Wellington Antonio

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear energy to the general public is always associated to the production of nuclear weapons or to nuclear and radiological accidents. Public communication actions done by the National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN) have been contributing to make known the social and peaceful applications of nuclear energy, reaching different kinds of public. Interaction programs with society and in particular with students have also been carried out by the Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN/CNEN). Measuring public communication results can help to show that financial resource in this area should be considered as investment and not as expenses. One needs therefore a well-established managing system. Fundamentals of the National Quality Award Criteria for Excellence - PNQ are being applied in the area in charge of business and public communication at CDTN. Systematic registration of results started in 2000 and a gradual increase in the number of means of communication for the internal public has occurred in the last five years. The Center has now a bimonthly newspaper edition. Communication indicators have shown an increasing number of students received in the Center or provided with lectures in schools. Results of satisfaction inquiry from these students show good results. The implemented management system has allowed informing the nature and quantity of people reached by the information on nuclear applications and the improvement in the institutional image. (author)

  12. Management of communication area in a nuclear research and development institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Wellington Antonio [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Servico de Negocios e Comunicacao]. E-mail: soaresw@cdtn.br

    2005-07-01

    Nuclear energy to the general public is always associated to the production of nuclear weapons or to nuclear and radiological accidents. Public communication actions done by the National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN) have been contributing to make known the social and peaceful applications of nuclear energy, reaching different kinds of public. Interaction programs with society and in particular with students have also been carried out by the Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN/CNEN). Measuring public communication results can help to show that financial resource in this area should be considered as investment and not as expenses. One needs therefore a well-established managing system. Fundamentals of the National Quality Award Criteria for Excellence - PNQ are being applied in the area in charge of business and public communication at CDTN. Systematic registration of results started in 2000 and a gradual increase in the number of means of communication for the internal public has occurred in the last five years. The Center has now a bimonthly newspaper edition. Communication indicators have shown an increasing number of students received in the Center or provided with lectures in schools. Results of satisfaction inquiry from these students show good results. The implemented management system has allowed informing the nature and quantity of people reached by the information on nuclear applications and the improvement in the institutional image. (author)

  13. A sociocultural analysis of Latino high school students' funds of knowledge and implications for culturally responsive engineering education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, Joel Alejandro

    Previous studies have suggested that, when funds of knowledge are incorporated into science and mathematics curricula, students are more engaged and often develop richer understandings of scientific concepts. While there has been a growing body of research addressing how teachers may integrate students' linguistic, social, and cultural practices with science and mathematics instruction, very little research has been conducted on how the same can be accomplished with Latino and Latina students in engineering. The purpose of this study was to address this gap in the literature by investigating how fourteen Latino and Latina high school adolescents used their funds of knowledge to address engineering design challenges. This project was intended to enhance the educational experience of underrepresented minorities whose social and cultural practices have been traditionally undervalued in schools. This ethnographic study investigated the funds of knowledge of fourteen Latino and Latina high school adolescents and how they used these funds of knowledge in engineering design. Participant observation, bi-monthly group discussion, retrospective and concurrent protocols, and monthly one-on-one interviews were conducted during the study. A constant comparative analysis suggested that Latino and Latina adolescents, although profoundly underrepresented in engineering, bring a wealth of knowledge and experiences that are relevant to engineering design thinking and practice.

  14. What Are the Most Significant Cost and Value Drivers for Pancreatic Resection in an Integrated Healthcare System?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, Brooke; Dehal, Ahmed; Uppal, Abhineet; Stern, Stacey L; Mejia, Juan; Weerasinghe, Roshanthi; Kapoor, Vandana; Ong, Evan; Hansen, Paul D; Bilchik, Anton J

    2018-03-23

    An initiative was established to improve value-based care for pancreatic surgery in a large nonprofit health system. Cost data were presented bimonthly to a hepatobiliary clinical performance group via videoconference. The direct costs were calculated for all patients undergoing distal pancreatectomy (DP) and pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) between January 2014 and July 2017. Median length of stay, 30-day and 90-day mortality rates, readmission rate, and costs were stratified by surgeon volume using 2 published criteria: "volume pledge" criteria (≥5 PDs/year) and Leapfrog criteria (≥11 PDs/year). There were 270 DPs and 526 PDs performed in 14 hospitals spanning 4 states. Median PD costs were lower for high-volume surgeons (≥5 PDs/year), $21,026 vs $24,706 (p = 0.005). High-volume surgeons had a shorter length of stay (9 days vs 11 days; p definition of high volume. The sharing of detailed financial data with HPB surgeons on a regular basis provides an opportunity to evaluate practice patterns and thereby reduce direct costs. Copyright © 2018 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Spatial and temporal variation of THg concentrations in run-off water from 19 boreal catchments, 2000–2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eklöf, Karin; Fölster, Jens; Sonesten, Lars; Bishop, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Total mercury concentrations are presented for 19 Swedish watercourses 2000–2010, together with an analysis of factors affecting these concentrations in space and time. Organic matter (OM) measured as absorbance at 420 nm (Abs 420 ) and total organic carbon (TOC) were the variables most strongly correlated with THg concentrations in the pooled dataset from all 19 watercourses, explaining 66% and 61% of the variance respectively. The correlation between THg and OM indicates that OM is the main controlling factor independent of geographical variation in Hg deposition, geology, or any other factor evaluated in this study. Despite an increase in TOC concentrations at most sites during the study period, THg increased in only one of the watercourses, and the THg/TOC ratio decreased significantly at six sites. The Abs 420 did not increase like TOC. We suggest that OM-fractions absorbing at 420 nm are more important for Hg mobilization than other OM-fractions. - Highlights: ► THg was measured bimonthly 2000–2010 from 19 watercourses across Sweden. ► OM quantity and quality explained most of the THg variation in space and time. ► Despite a temporal increase of TOC in most sites, THg increased in just one. ► THg was more strongly correlated with Abs 420 than TOC. - Despite strong spatial similarity in the THg/TOC ratio across large gradients of climate, land use and deposition, THg did not follow the temporal TOC trends in individual watercourses.

  16. Viral and bacterial contamination in a sedimentary aquifer in Uruguay: evaluation of coliforms as regional indicators of viral contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamazo, Pablo; Colina, Rodney; Victoria, Matias; Alvareda, Elena; Burutatran, Luciana; Ramos, Julian; Olivera, María; Soler, Joan

    2015-04-01

    In many areas of Uruguay groundwater is the only source of water for human consumption and for industrial-agricultural economic activities. Traditionally considered as a safe source, groundwater is commonly used without any treatment. The Uruguayan law requires bacteriological (fecal) analysis for most water uses, but virological analyses are not mentioned in the legislation. In the Salto district, where groundwater is used for human consumption and for agricultural activities, bacterial contamination has been detected in several wells but no viruses analysis have been performed. The Republic University (UDELAR), with the support of the National Agency for Research and Innovation (ANII), is studying the incidence of virus and fecal bacteria in groundwater on an intensive agriculture area of the Salto district. An initial screening campaign of 44 wells was performed in which, besides total and fecal coliforms, rotavirus and adenovirus were detected. A subgroup of the screening wells (15) where selected for bimonthly sampling during a year. In accordance with literature results, single well data analysis shows that coliform and viral contamination can be considered as independent variables. However, when spatial data is integrated, coliform and viral contamination show linear correlation. In this work we present the survey results, we analyse the temporal incidence of variables like precipitation, temperature and chemical composition in well contamination and we discuss the value of coliforms as global indicator of viral contamination for the Salto aquifer.

  17. Indicadores reprodutivos de Parauchenipterus striatulus (Steindachner (Pisces, Auchenipteridae na Represa de Ribeirão das Lajes, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil Reproductive indicators of Parauchenipterus striatulus (Steindachner (Pisces, Auchenipteridae in the Ribeirão das Lajes reservoir, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Gerson Araújo

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Parauchenipterus striatulus is a representative of the freshwater catfish with wide distribution in the South America region. Despite of being a very abundant fish in rivers and reservoirs of this region, little is known about its biology and ecology. In Ribeirão das Lajes reservoir (22º42'S - 22º50'S, 43º53'- 44º05' W, Rio de Janeiro, the Rio de Janeiro state's largest hydroelectric reservoir, this species is very abundant, representing about 40% of the total experimental fish catches using gill nets. This paper aims to assess aspects of the reproductive cycle of this species describing the gonadal stages, gonadosomatic index, weight-length relationship and condition factor. Fish sampling were carried out bi-monthly, between April 1996 and May 1997. Gill nets used were 100 m long, 4 m high with mesh size between 25 and 65 mm. Macroscopic analysis of 339 individuais were performed for the determination of 5 maturation stages, for both sexes (immature, maturation I, maturation II, ripe, spawned (females and emptied (males. The gonadosomatic index for both sexes was higher from October to March, suggesting a long spawning period while the condition factor was higher from February to June, showing an inverse relationship between these two parameters. Weight-length relationship for males was W=0,0095L3,C862and for females W= 0,0116L3,126, and no significam differences were shown between sex with reference to the alometry coefficient.

  18. Comparative Efficacy of Newer Antidepressants in Combination with Pregabalin for Fibromyalgia Syndrome: A Controlled, Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramzy, Eiad A

    2017-01-01

    This controlled, randomized study investigated the hypothesis that the combined use of pregabalin plus paroxetine for fibromyalgia management would be associated with comparable Somatic Symptoms Scale-8 (SSS-8) and Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CESDS) scores, but higher tolerability than the combined use of pregabalin plus either amitriptyline or venlafaxine. After institutional ethics committee approval, 75 female subjects diagnosed with fibromyalgia and in receipt of pregabalin (75 mg/day) were randomly allocated to concurrently receive amitriptyline (25 mg/day; n = 24), venlafaxine (75 mg/day; n = 25), or paroxetine (25 mg/day; n = 26). All patients were assessed bimonthly for 6 consecutive months for changes in SSS-8 and CESDS scores, life satisfaction, mood, sleep quality, fatigue, medication tolerability, and adverse events. Compared with pregabalin plus amitriptyline or venlafaxine, the combined use of pregabalin plus paroxetine in fibromyalgia patients resulted in significantly lower SSS-8 and CESDS scores from 18 (P life satisfaction, mood, and sleep quality at most observation times (P fibromyalgia and to enhance the quality of life in affected individuals. © 2016 World Institute of Pain.

  19. Crevicular fluid biomarkers and periodontal disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, Janet S; Morelli, Thiago; Oh, Min; Braun, Thomas M; Ramseier, Christoph A; Sugai, Jim V; Giannobile, William V

    2014-02-01

    Assess the ability of a panel of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) biomarkers as predictors of periodontal disease progression (PDP). In this study, 100 individuals participated in a 12-month longitudinal investigation and were categorized into four groups according to their periodontal status. GCF, clinical parameters and saliva were collected bi-monthly. Subgingival plaque and serum were collected bi-annually. For 6 months, no periodontal treatment was provided. At 6 months, patients received periodontal therapy and continued participation from 6 to 12 months. GCF samples were analysed by ELISA for MMP-8, MMP-9, Osteoprotegerin, C-reactive Protein and IL-1β. Differences in median levels of GCF biomarkers were compared between stable and progressing participants using Wilcoxon Rank Sum test (p = 0.05). Clustering algorithm was used to evaluate the ability of oral biomarkers to classify patients as either stable or progressing. Eighty-three individuals completed the 6-month monitoring phase. With the exception of GCF C-reactive protein, all biomarkers were significantly higher in the PDP group compared to stable patients. Clustering analysis showed highest sensitivity levels when biofilm pathogens and GCF biomarkers were combined with clinical measures, 74% (95% CI = 61, 86). Signature of GCF fluid-derived biomarkers combined with pathogens and clinical measures provides a sensitive measure for discrimination of PDP (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00277745). © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Spatial and seasonal patterns in fish assemblage in Corrego Rico, upper Parana River basin

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    Erico L. H Takahashi

    Full Text Available The upper Paraná River basin drains areas of intensive industry and agriculture, suffering negative impacts. The Córrego Rico flows through sugar cane fields and receives urban wastewater. The aim of this work is to describe and to compare the fish assemblage structure in Córrego Rico. Six standardized bimonthly samples were collected between August 2008 and June 2009 in seven different stretches of Córrego Rico. Fishes were collected with an experimental seine and sieves, euthanized, fixed in formalin and preserved in ethanol for counting and identification. Data were recorded for water parameters, instream habitat and riparian features within each stretch. Non-metric multidimensional scaling, species richness and diversity analysis were performed to examine spatial and seasonal variation in assemblage structure. Fish assemblage structure was correlated with instream habitat and water parameters. The fish assemblage was divided in three groups: upper, middle and lower reaches. High values of richness and diversity were observed in the upper and lower stretches due to connectivity with a small lake and Mogi Guaçu River, respectively. Middle stretches showed low values of richness and diversity suggesting that a small dam in the middle stretch negatively impacts the fish assemblage. Seasonal differences in fish assemblage structure were observed only in the lower stretches.

  1. Hydrochemical and environmental isotope analysis of groundwater and surface water in a dry mountain region in Northern Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Carina; Dame, Juliane; Nüsser, Marcus

    2018-05-08

    This case study examines the geological imprint and land use practices on water quality in the arid Huasco Valley against the backdrop of ongoing water conflicts surrounding competing demands for agriculture and mining. The study is based on a detailed analysis of spatial and temporal variations of monthly surface and bi-monthly groundwater quality samples measured during the Chilean summer of 2015/16. Additional information on source regions and river-groundwater interactions were collected using stable water isotopes. Regarding the geological impact on water quality, high concentrations of Ca 2+ , SO 4 2- and HCO 3 - indicate a strong influence of magmatic rocks, which constitute this high mountain basin, on the hydrochemistry. Piper and Gibbs-diagrams revealed that all samples show a homogenous distribution dominated by rock-water interactions. Measured NO 3 - concentrations in surface water are generally low. However, groundwater aquifers exhibit higher concentrations. Mn is the only heavy metal with elevated concentrations in surface water, which are possibly related to mining activities. The results illustrate that both surface and groundwater can be classified as suitable for irrigation. In addition, groundwater has been found to be suitable as drinking water. High similarities in isotopic signatures indicate a strong connection between surface and groundwater. Isotopic analyses suggest a strong influence of evaporation. This combined approach of hydrogeochemical and isotopic analysis proved to be a helpful tool in characterizing the catchment and can serve as a basis for future sustainable water management.

  2. Diagnosis and treatment of a dermal malignant melanoma in an African lion (Panthera leo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeil, James C; Schumacher, Juergen; Baine, Katherine; Ramsay, Edward C; Sura, Patricia; Hodshon, Rebecca; Donnell, Robert L; Lee, Nathan D

    2013-09-01

    A 13-yr-old intact male African lion (Panthera leo) presented with a 4-mo history of left maxillary lip swelling. On physical examination, a 10-cm-diameter, ulcerated, round, firm, and pigmented mass at the level of the left maxillary canine tooth was noticed. All other organ systems examined were within normal limits. Multiple biopsies of the mass were collected and fixed in 10% neutral buffered formalin. Histopathologic evaluation of the biopsies revealed a malignant dermal melanoma. Hematologic and plasma biochemical parameters were within normal reference ranges. Thoracic radiographs taken 3 days following initial presentation showed no evidence of metastasis of the tumor. Computed tomography of the skull and neck was performed to evaluate local tumor invasion and to plan for hypofractionated radiation therapy. Therapy included four weekly treatments of 8 gray external-beam hypofractionated radiation and four bimonthly immunotherapy treatments. Following this treatment regime, the tumor size was reduced by 50%, and surgical excision was performed. No major side effects associated with radiation or immunotherapy were seen. Six months after diagnosis, hematologic and plasma biochemical parameters were within normal limits, thoracic radiographs showed no evidence of metastasis, and the lion showed no clinical signs of disease. The lion will continue to receive immunotherapy every 6 mo for the rest of its life. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a successful treatment of a malignant dermal melanoma with external-beam hypofractionated radiation, immunotherapy, and surgical excision in an African lion.

  3. The challenges of healthcare delivery to people with multiple sclerosis in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdannik, Ahmadreza; Abolhassani, Shahla; Taleghani, Fariba; Zamani, Ahmadreza

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease prevalent in young and middle-aged people. Patients with MS often have numerous complicated needs and, consequently, require a broad range of health services. Results of a number of studies indicate that patients' needs are only partially met. This study was conducted to explore the challenges of healthcare delivery to patients with MS in Iran. In this qualitative case study, 43 participants selected through purposeful sampling were interviewed using semi-structured method in the cities of Isfahan and Tehran in 2012-2013. Besides the interview, documentations relevant to healthcare delivery were collected from different sources, including websites of all Iranian universities of medical sciences, insurance organizations, patients' weblogs, news agencies, the MS Center forum for MS patients, and MS Payam bimonthly. The data were analyzed through the constant comparative analysis. The data were categorized into four main categories, including functional challenges (diagnosis problems, failure to pay attention to patient needs, failure to follow-up, and miscommunication), administrative challenges (resource allocation and supervision), policy-making challenges (lack of comprehensive services, bureaucracy, and problems in provision of medications), and structural challenges (difficult access to services, lack of comprehensive centers, space limit, and long wait). Despite all attempts of governmental and nongovernmental organizations for healthcare delivery to MS patients, these services cannot satisfy all needs of the patients. In this regard, service providers and administrators should pay more attention to the needs and expectations of patients and their families.

  4. Long-duration conservation of a nuclear power plant unit under construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brun, C.; Long, A.; Saurin, P.; Liquette, A.

    1994-01-01

    The experience described is that of the Chooz B1 NPP unit, which had to be put into a state of conservation for one and one-half years with the reactor coolant system and auxiliary systems having been completely erected and internally cleaned. Erection of the secondary systems had been 80% completed. The dry conservation technique was adopted for all of the fluid systems and components, except for the injection and leakoff lines of the four reactor coolant pump no. 1 seals, for which wet conservation was employed. For the buildings themselves, Electricite de France (EdF) took measures to facilitate conservation, including ventilation and heating, limiting the entry of atmospheric air, and evacuating the dehumidifier regeneration air to the atmosphere via a collector and a fan. This conservation required the installation of 20 dry air generators, which enabled continuously circulating dry air through the systems and components. Monthly or bimonthly relative humidity checks, depending on the systems, were carried out. The results of these checks showed that the relative humidity remained below 50% throughout the NPP unit conservation period. For the steam generators, in addition to dry air circulation, humidity detectors as well as corrosion test coupons were installed on the tube sheet. (authors). 5 figs

  5. Monitoreo of the feromonas traps in the control of the plague Lasioderma serricorne (F. in the Managerial Unit of Base Alfredo López Brito.

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    Marta Rosa Rodríguez Valero

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to their inigualable quality, the Cuban tobacco is one of the cultivations that bigger quantity of foreign currencies contributes to the country, but it is attacked by different plagues, in the different stages for those that it passes until its commercialization in leaves or as elaborated product. In the warehouses the most destructive plague is the Lasioderma serricorne (F. and to combat it in the Managerial Unit of Base Alfredo López Brito of Cabaiguán, the fosfamina, toxic product with high price is used in foreign currencies, the same one is applied with a bimonthly frequency, that is to say, every 60 days, for which the present work had as objective to lengthen the date of application of the fosfamina by means of the use of the feromonas traps to achieve a saving to the Unit and to improve the environmental conditions in the same one. The obtained results allowed to diminish the quantity of necessary fosfamina significantly to control the plague, the Unit saved during 4 months in those that it was carried out this work. $869.40 in national currency and $343.55 in CUC a positive impact also took place about the health of the workers and the one intones.

  6. Temporal changes in fish species composition of headwater streams of the upper Paraguay and Paraná basins, Brazil = Alteração temporal na composição de espécies de peixes em riachos de cabeceira das bacias do alto Paraguai e Paraná, Brasil

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    Yzel Rondon Súarez

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out in headwater streams in the Paraguay and Paraná river basins, with bi-monthly samples from January to November 2004, aiming to quantify the influence of environmental factors on the temporal rate of turnover in species composition of the fish communities. The environmental variables explained 73.5% of the variation in beta diversity and 52.5% of the variation in mean dissimilarity. Altitude was the only environmental descriptor that significantly explained the variation in beta diversity and mean dissimilarity in both basins.O presente estudo foi realizado em riachos de cabeceira nas bacias dos rios Paraguai e Paraná, por amostragens bimestrais de janeiro a novembro de 2004, com o objetivo de se quantificar a influência dos fatores ambientais sobre a taxa de alteração temporal na composição de espécies nas comunidades de peixes. As variáveis ambientais utilizadas explicaram 73,5% da variação na taxa de alteração na composição de espécies, utilizando a diversidade beta e 52,5% da variação na taxa de alteração pelo coeficiente de Jaccard. A altitude dos locais amostrados foi o único preditor significativo da taxa de alteração temporal na composição de espécies para ambas as bacias.

  7. Ontogenetic and seasonal shifts in the diet of the pemecou sea catfish Sciades herzbergii (Siluriformes: Ariidae), from a macrotidal mangrove creek in the Curuçá estuary, northern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giarrizzo, Tommaso; Saint-Paul, Ulrich

    2008-06-01

    The feeding ecology of pemecou sea catfish (Sciades herzbergii) was studied bimonthly from September 2003 to July 2004 in a macrotidal mangrove creek at Curuçá estuary, Brazil. Feeding activity and relative importance of prey groups were assessed in 528 and 226 specimens (6.2 to 36.0 cm total length), respectively, using stomach contents. A total of 1 820 specimens were caught. The fish left the creek with an average of 2.2% of their body weight in prey. Feeding activity was lower in the dry season (September and November 2003) than in the rainy season (January to May 2004). The diet was dominated by Ocypodidae and Grapsidae. Feeding strategies of the pemecou sea catfish indicated a slight variation between the diets of adults and juveniles; however; the main factor leading to diversification in the diet were the seasons. Opportunistic feeding behavior was observed in the dry season, shifting to more specialized feeding in the wet season. This temporal diet shift may be explained by the environmental seasonal variations (e.g., transparency of the water, high water level) in the intertidal mangrove creek habitat.

  8. Link between sewage-derived nitrogen pollution and coral disease severity in Guam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redding, Jamey E.; Myers-Miller, Roxanna L.; Baker, David M.; Fogel, Marilyn; Raymundo, Laurie J.; Kim, Kiho

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We evaluated sources of nitrogen pollution in coastal waters of Guam. • Stable isotope analyses showed the dominance of sewage-derived nitrogen. • Nitrogen inputs correlated with coral disease severity. • Planned population increase on Guam will exacerbate impact of coral diseases. -- Abstract: The goals of this study were to evaluate the contribution of sewage-derived N to reef flat communities in Guam and to assess the impact of N inputs on coral disease. We used stable isotope analysis of macroalgae and a soft coral, sampled bimonthly, as a proxy for N dynamics, and surveyed Porites spp., a dominant coral taxon on Guam’s reefs, for white syndrome disease severity. Results showed a strong influence of sewage-derived N in nearshore waters, with δ 15 N values varying as a function of species sampled, site, and sampling date. Increases in sewage-derived N correlated significantly with increases in the severity of disease among Porites spp., with δ 15 N values accounting for more than 48% of the variation in changes in disease severity. The anticipated military realignment and related population increase in Guam are expected to lead to increased white syndrome infections and other coral diseases

  9. Spatio-temporal segregation and size distribution of fish assemblages as related to non-native species occurrence in the middle rio Doce Valley, MG, Brazil

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    Henrique Corrêa Giacomini

    Full Text Available The lakes in the middle rio Doce Valley (MG are suffering impacts due to the introduction of invasive fish species, mainly piscivorous species like red piranha Pygocentrus nattereri and peacock bass Cichla kelberi. Fishes were collected in bimonthly samples conducted at ten lakes along a year. The present study showed that the composition of native fish assemblages is significantly related to the presence and type of non-native species. Fish species distribution among lakes can be explained by differences in species body size: smaller native species are less concentrated in lakes with invasive piscivores, which is in accordance with the hypothesis that they have greater susceptibility to predation by invaders. Another probable cause for this correlation is the proximity of lakes to the drainage system, which could explain both the non-native incidence and the turnover of native species composition. Furthermore, temporal variability in species composition was significantly higher in invaded lakes. This last factor may be linked to seasonal flood pulses, which carry immigrant fishes from streams in the vicinity. The metacommunity framework can bring insights for future studies in such spatially structured systems, and the approach should improve our understanding of processes underlying species composition as well as help direct conservation-focused management plans.

  10. The Dynamic Environment of Crypto Markets: The Lifespan of New Psychoactive Substances (NPS) and Vendors Selling NPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadsworth, Elle; Drummond, Colin; Deluca, Paolo

    2018-03-16

    The Internet has played a major role in the distribution of New Psychoactive Substances (NPS), and crypto markets are increasingly used for the anonymous sale of drugs, including NPS. This study explores the availability of individual NPS and vendors on the crypto markets and considers whether crypto markets are a reliable platform for the sale of NPS. Data was collected from 22 crypto markets that were accessed through the hidden web using the Onion Router (Tor). Data collection took place bimonthly from October 2015 to October 2016 as part of the CASSANDRA ( C omputer A ssisted S olutions for S tudying the A vailability a N d D ist R ibution of novel psycho A ctive substances) project. In seven snapshots over 12 months, 808 unique vendors were found selling 256 unique NPS. The total number of individual NPS and vendors increased across the data collection period (increase of 93.6% and 71.6%, respectively). Only 24% ( n = 61) of the total number of NPS and 4% ( n = 31) of vendors appeared in every snapshot over the 12 months, whereas 21% ( n = 54) of NPS and 45% ( n = 365) of vendors only appeared once throughout the data collection. The individual NPS and vendors did not remain the same over the 12 months. However, the availability of NPS and vendors selling NPS grew. NPS consistently available on crypto markets could indicate popular substances.

  11. Planktonic production and respiration in a subtropical lake dominated by Cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonetta, D; Laudares-Silva, R; Petrucio, M M

    2015-05-01

    Planktonic primary production and respiration rates were estimated in a subtropical coastal lake dominated by Cyanobacteria in order to investigate the temporal and vertical variation in this lake and to evaluate its relationships with limnological variables and phytoplankton. Light and dark bottles were incubated at four different depths in the central part of the lake and were performed bimonthly from June/2009 to December/2010. No significant difference was evident among depths in relation to phytoplankton, limnological variables and metabolic rates. However, the highest production rates were recorded at the surface, and decreased towards the bottom, coupled with phytoplanktonic photosynthetic capacity. Wind induced mixing in Peri Lake played an important role in nutrient and phytoplankton redistribution, characterizing this lake as polymictic. According to density and biovolume, the phytoplankton community was dominated by filamentous Cyanobacteria, especially Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii (Woloszynska) Seenayya and Subba-Raju. This study has shown that both water temperature and nutrient availability drive phytoplankton growth and consequently the temporal variation in metabolic rates, where respiration is higher than primary production.

  12. Planktonic production and respiration in a subtropical lake dominated by Cyanobacteria

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    D. Tonetta

    Full Text Available Planktonic primary production and respiration rates were estimated in a subtropical coastal lake dominated by Cyanobacteria in order to investigate the temporal and vertical variation in this lake and to evaluate its relationships with limnological variables and phytoplankton. Light and dark bottles were incubated at four different depths in the central part of the lake and were performed bimonthly from June/2009 to December/2010. No significant difference was evident among depths in relation to phytoplankton, limnological variables and metabolic rates. However, the highest production rates were recorded at the surface, and decreased towards the bottom, coupled with phytoplanktonic photosynthetic capacity. Wind induced mixing in Peri Lake played an important role in nutrient and phytoplankton redistribution, characterizing this lake as polymictic. According to density and biovolume, the phytoplankton community was dominated by filamentous Cyanobacteria, especially Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii (Woloszynska Seenayya and Subba-Raju. This study has shown that both water temperature and nutrient availability drive phytoplankton growth and consequently the temporal variation in metabolic rates, where respiration is higher than primary production.

  13. Dynamics of ovarian maturation during the reproductive cycle of Metynnis maculatus, a reservoir invasive fish species (Teleostei: Characiformes

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    Thiago Scremin Boscolo Pereira

    Full Text Available In this study, we evaluated the dynamics of ovarian maturation and the spawning processes during the reproductive cycle of Metynnis maculatus. Adult females (n = 36 were collected bimonthly between April 2010 and March 2011. The mean gonadosomatic index (GSI was determined, ovarian and blood samples were submitted for morphometric evaluation and the steroid plasma concentration was determined by ELISA. This species demonstrated asynchronous ovarian development with multiple spawns. This study revealed that, although defined as a multiple spawning species, the ovaries of M. maculatus have a pattern of development with a predominance of vitellogenesis between April and August and have an intensification in spawning in September; in October, a drop in the mean GSI values occurred, and the highest frequencies of post-ovulatory follicles (POFs were observed. We observed a positive correlation between the POF and the levels of 17α-hydroxyprogesterone. Metynnis maculatus has the potential to be used as a source of pituitary tissue for the preparation of crude extracts for hormonal induction; the theoretical period for use is from September to December, but specific studies to determine the feasibility of this approach must be conducted.

  14. Improving Gram stain proficiency in hospital and satellite laboratories that do not have microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarner, Jeannette; Street, Cassandra; Matlock, Margaret; Cole, Lisa; Brierre, Francoise

    2017-03-01

    Consolidation of laboratories has left many hospitals and satellite laboratories with minimal microbiologic testing. In many hospitals and satellite laboratories, Gram stains on primary specimens are still performed despite difficultly in maintaining proficiency. To maintain Gram stain proficiency at a community 450-bed hospital with an active emergency room we designed bimonthly challenges that require reporting Gram staining and morphology of different organisms. The challenges consist of five specimens prepared by the reference microbiology laboratory from cultures and primary specimens. Twenty to 23 medical laboratory scientists participate reading the challenges. Results from the challenges are discussed with each medical laboratory scientists. In addition, printed images from the challenges are presented at huddle to add microbiology knowledge. On the first three challenges, Gram staining was read correctly in 71%-77% of the time while morphology 53%-66%. In the last six challenges correct answers for Gram stain were 77%-99% while morphology 73%-96%. We observed statistically significant improvement when reading Gram stains by providing frequent challenges to medical laboratory scientists. The clinical importance of Gram stain results is emphasized during huddle presentations increasing knowledge and motivation to perform the test for patients.

  15. Ant Fauna Diversity in an Area Degraded by Diamond Mining in the State of Mato Grosso,Brazil

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    Jorge João Aparecido Nahra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at sampling the diversity of ants in environments influenced by diamond mining activities in the Brazilian savannah, providing information on the ant fauna in this region of Mato Grosso.The study was carried out in the city of Poxoréu-MT, Brazil, in a property with diamond mining,where pitfall traps were installed in four different transects per environment: A1 – degraded area by diamond mining A2 – adjacent area to A1 with savannah vegetation with anthropogenic influence, A3 – adjacent area to A2 with anthropized savannah vegetation, bordering with A4 – area with savannah vegetation preserved without anthropogenic changes. Samples were collected bimonthly for a period of one year, and the samples were quantified and identified taking into account their species level in order to allow the application of the diversity indices for each environment. 15 species of ants were sampled among the four environments, being nine species in A1, 13 in A2, 15 in A3 and 12 species in A4, presenting Brachymyrmex patagonicus as the most abundant, foraging in all environments. Diversity indices allow to conclude that A3 has the greatest diversity of species, and conversely the lower dominance, in all environments. However, A1 was the most dominant species of ants due to the lowest diversity. Thus, environmental degradation by diamond mining can affect the composition of ants and their dominance in the savannah vegetation.

  16. Dynamics of Viral Abundance and Diversity in a Sphagnum-Dominated Peatland: Temporal Fluctuations Prevail Over Habitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballaud, Flore; Dufresne, Alexis; Francez, André-Jean; Colombet, Jonathan; Sime-Ngando, Télesphore; Quaiser, Achim

    2015-01-01

    Viruses impact microbial activity and carbon cycling in various environments, but their diversity and ecological importance in Sphagnum-peatlands are unknown. Abundances of viral particles and prokaryotes were monitored bi-monthly at a fen and a bog at two different layers of the peat surface. Viral particle abundance ranged from 1.7 x 10(6) to 5.6 x 10(8) particles mL(-1), and did not differ between fen and bog but showed seasonal fluctuations. These fluctuations were positively correlated with prokaryote abundance and dissolved organic carbon, and negatively correlated with water-table height and dissolved oxygen. Using shotgun metagenomics we observed a shift in viral diversity between winter/spring and summer/autumn, indicating a seasonal succession of viral communities, mainly driven by weather-related environmental changes. Based on the seasonal asynchrony between viral and microbial diversity, we hypothesize a seasonal shift in the active microbial communities associated with a shift from lysogenic to lytic lifestyles. Our results suggest that temporal variations of environmental conditions rather than current habitat differences control the dynamics of virus-host interactions in Sphagnum-dominated peatlands.

  17. The importance of ingested soils in supplying fluorine and lead to sheep grazing contaminated pastures in the Peak District mining area of Derbyshire, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahams, Peter W; Blackwell, Nia L

    2013-12-01

    For sheep grazing pastures in areas of mineralisation and former metalliferous mining activity, an excessive intake of potentially harmful elements (PHEs) such as fluorine (F) and lead (Pb) can result in clinical and subclinical toxicity. The prime aim of our work was to calculate the intakes of both of these PHEs by sheep grazing pastures in the mineralised/mined Peak District area of Derbyshire. The bi-monthly sampling of topsoils (0-15 cm depth) and the faeces of sheep from fields at seven farms was undertaken for a 1-year period. These samples were analysed for titanium that allowed the rates of soil ingestion (and hence also herbage ingestion since we assume that the sheep have an overall diet of 1 kg dry matter (DM)/day) to be determined. Our findings were then combined with previously published soil and soil-free pasture herbage F and Pb concentrations determined from the seven farms to calculate the intakes of both PHEs. The results show seasonal variations of soil ingestion at the seven farms ranging from toxic impact. Because the soil concentrations are greater than those associated with soil-free pasture herbage, ingested soils are the main dietary source of Pb and (especially) F to sheep. However, subjecting freshly sampled topsoils to sequential extraction procedures undertaken in the laboratory indicates that the majority of Pb and (especially) F may not be readily soluble in the ovine digestion system, so reducing the quantities of both PHEs available for absorption.

  18. 36-Month Evaluation of Intravitreous Aflibercept Injection for Wet Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Patients Previously Treated With Ranibizumab or Bevacizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Felipe F; Silva, Fabiana Q; Srivastava, Sunil K; Ehlers, Justis P; Schachat, Andrew P; Singh, Rishi P

    2018-03-01

    In the ASSESS study, patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration transitioned from other anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapies to intravitreous aflibercept (Eylea; Regeneron, Tarrytown, NY) injections (IAI). The purpose was to determine the 36-month outcomes following the change from a fixed 24-month IAI dosing regimen to a routine clinical practice regimen. Patients were treated with a fixed bimonthly regimen for the first 2 years. In the third year, patients were managed according to routine clinical practice. A total of 18 patients completed the 36 months and were considered for statistical analyses. At 36 months, a nonsignificant decrease of -37.8 μm in central subfield thickness and a nonsignificant gain of 5.8 letters from baseline were observed. Despite the significant visual and anatomical gains observed in the 2 years of fixed-dosing IAI, there was gradual decline in these improvements when patients were transitioned to a variable regimen. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2018;49:179-185.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Plastic litter accumulation on high-water strandline of urban beaches in Mumbai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasiri, H B; Purushothaman, C S; Vennila, A

    2013-09-01

    Today, almost every beach on every coastline is threatened by human activities. The inadequate recycling and poor management of waste in developing countries has resulted in considerable quantities of plastic contaminating beaches. Though India has long coastline of 5,420 km along the mainland with 43 % of sandy beaches, data on litter accumulation, particularly the plastics, which are one of the most common and persistent pollutants in marine environment, are scanty. The abundance and distribution of plastic litter was quantitatively assessed in four sandy beaches in Mumbai, India, bimonthly from May 2011 to March 2012. Triplicates of 2 × 2 m (4 m(2)) quadrats were sampled in each beach with a total of 72 quadrats. Overall, average abundance of 11.6 items m(-2) (0.25-282.5 items m(-2)) and 3.24 g m(-2) (0.27-15.53 g m(-2)) plastic litter was recorded in Mumbai beaches. Plastic litter accumulation significantly varied temporally and spatially at p = 0.05. Significantly higher plastic litter accumulation was recorded in Juhu beach. Furthermore, the highest abundance by weight was recorded in November and May numerically. More than 80 % of plastic particles were within the size range of 5-100 mm both by number and weight. Moreover, coloured plastics were predominant with 67 % by number of items and 51 % by weight. Probably, the intense use of beaches for recreation, tourism, and religious activities has increased the potential for plastic contamination in urban beaches in Mumbai.

  20. Long-term monitoring of endangered Laysan ducks: Index validation and population estimates 1998–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Michelle H.; Courtot, Karen; Brinck, Kevin W.; Rehkemper, Cynthia; Hatfield, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring endangered wildlife is essential to assessing management or recovery objectives and learning about population status. We tested assumptions of a population index for endangered Laysan duck (or teal; Anas laysanensis) monitored using mark–resight methods on Laysan Island, Hawai’i. We marked 723 Laysan ducks between 1998 and 2009 and identified seasonal surveys through 2012 that met accuracy and precision criteria for estimating population abundance. Our results provide a 15-y time series of seasonal population estimates at Laysan Island. We found differences in detection among seasons and how observed counts related to population estimates. The highest counts and the strongest relationship between count and population estimates occurred in autumn (September–November). The best autumn surveys yielded population abundance estimates that ranged from 674 (95% CI = 619–730) in 2003 to 339 (95% CI = 265–413) in 2012. A population decline of 42% was observed between 2010 and 2012 after consecutive storms and Japan’s To¯hoku earthquake-generated tsunami in 2011. Our results show positive correlations between the seasonal maximum counts and population estimates from the same date, and support the use of standardized bimonthly counts of unmarked birds as a valid index to monitor trends among years within a season at Laysan Island.

  1. Radiographic analysis of the development of the pelvic limb of captive-reared cranes (Grus spp.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curro, T.G.; Langenberg, J.A.; Deakin, L.

    1996-01-01

    For captive-reared cranes, pelvic limb abnormalities in chicks have been identified as significant morbidity/mortality factors. An important component of the diagnosis of limb abnormalities is the understanding of the normal limb. This study was undertaken to describe the normal, radiographic development of the femur, tibiotarsus, tarsometatarsus, and fibula of the whooping crane (Grus americana), Florida sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pratensis), and Siberian crane (Grus leucogeranus). Crane chicks were anesthetized and their pelvic limb bone development evaluated radiographically on a weekly to bimonthly basis from one to fourteen weeks of age. Body weight, bone length, diaphyseal width, and physeal development and closure were evaluated. Based on the radiographic analysis, the gross development of the long bones of the pelvic limb of whooping, Florida sandhill, and Siberian cranes was found to be similar among the three species, and not dissimilar from other avian species which have been studied. Repeated handling, anesthesia, and radiographic exposure did not produce any behavioral, developmental, or physical abnormalities in the studied cranes when compared to cranes of the same species raised using the same methods. This is the first work to describe pelvic limb bone development in these species

  2. Artigo Original Caetano JA, Pacliuca LMF. Cartilha sobre auto–exame ocular para portadores do HIV/AIDS como tecnologia emancipatória: relato de experiência. Rev. Eletr. Enf. [Internet]. 2006;8(2:241-9. Available from: http://www.fen.ufg.br/r

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joselany Áfio Caetano

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the experience of the one construction an ocular self-examination primer to the HIV/SIDA porters’ and had as objective to develop and to evaluate the actions of the self-examination for intermediary of ocular self-examination primer. The testing process was done by the educative groups and the bimonthly nursing consultancy, followed by the ophthalmologic examination. Leaning on the NIETSCHE (2000 ideas, we marked this material as an emancipated technology because it brings, to this population, the opportunity of if freeing of a subjection stage. The results prove that the HIV/SIDA porters’ if feel motivated to investigate ocular problems, but it is still missing the primer usage habit incorporation in the quotidian life. More than to offer sequential steps to do the ocular self-examination technique, we presented points that help on the potentialities development from the HIV/SIDA porters aiming to improve the self-care with the eye in a dynamic way and accompanied by an allied, is the educative material.

  3. Ecotoxicological evaluation of water of the hydrographic Basin of the Una River using the bioindicator Ceriodaphnia dubia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiane Alves

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The majority of the Una River Basin is located in Taubaté County and contributes significantly to its water supply. The main goal of this research was to evaluate the water quality of the Una River using the microcrustacean C. dubia as bioindicator for tests of chronic and acute toxicity. Bimonthly water samples were obtained from each of six localities throughout the Una Basin, from March to October, 2011. Physical-chemical water parameters such as pH, electrical conductivity, hardness, dissolved oxygen and precipitation were measured and correlated to the C. dubia reproductive rates. No significant relationships were found between the water’s electrical conductivity and precipitation with respect to bioindicator reproductive rates. However, at the Sete Voltas, Antas and Rocinha Sub-Basins, significant interactions were detected between some water parameters and reproductive rates, suggesting that water may constrain the reproduction of C. dubia. Acute toxicity was not detected in any of the six sites, while chronic toxicity was recorded at Rocinha, Sete Voltas, Antas, Médio and Baixo Una Sub-Basins. In general, the water quality of the Una Basin, as indicated by the absence of acute toxicity, still remains in an acceptable conservation condition. Caution is needed, however, since slight pollution sources are causing chronic toxicity in some localities. In addition, as the microcrustacean C. dubia, appeared to be a reliable bioindicator in this investigation, we suggest that it be used for continuous water quality monitoring programs.

  4. Human migration activities drive the fluctuation of ARGs: Case study of landfills in Nanjing, eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingming; Ye, Mao; Schwab, Arthur P; Li, Xu; Wan, Jinzhong; Wei, Zhong; Wu, Jun; Friman, Ville-Petri; Liu, Kuan; Tian, Da; Liu, Manqiang; Li, Huixin; Hu, Feng; Jiang, Xin

    2016-09-05

    Landfills are perfect sites to study the effect of human migration on fluctuation of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) as they are the final destination of municipal waste. For example, large-scale human migration during the holidays is often accompanied by changes in waste dumping having potential effects on ARG abundance. Three landfills were selected to examine fluctuation in the abundance of fifteen ARGs and Intl1 genes for 14 months in Nanjing, eastern China. Mass human migration, the amount of dumped waste and temperature exerted the most significant effects on bimonthly fluctuations of ARG levels in landfill sites. As a middle-sized cosmopolitan city in China, millions of college students and workers migrate during holidays, contributing to the dramatic increases in waste production and fluctuation in ARG abundances. In line with this, mass migration explained most of the variation in waste dumping. The waste dumping also affected the bioaccessibility of mixed-compound pollutants that further positively impacted the level of ARGs. The influence of various bioaccessible compounds on ARG abundance followed the order: antibiotics>nutrients>metals>organic pollutants. Concentrations of bioaccessible compounds were more strongly correlated with ARG levels compared to total compound concentrations. Improved waste classification and management strategies could thus help to decrease the amount of bioaccessible pollutants leading to more effective control for urban ARG dissemination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The Management of Humidifying Treatment for Low Contamination Risks During Indoor Cultivation of Grey Oyster Mushroom (Pleurotus pulmonarius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam Md. Tariqul

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, grey oyster mushroom (Pleurotus pulmonarius was cultivated in indoor controlled environment to seeking out the possible risks of contamination and ways of treatment to avoid the contamination. For this, mushroom was cultivated in providing artificial humidifying and ventilation system to ensure optimum humidity (80-90% and fresh air recirculation in different ways of treatment. The ways of treatment were included as in position of humidifier, frequency of humidifying, plastic cork of bags opening part and cleaning of humidifier water container. Maximum percentages of bag contamination (2.5-25.30%, cap contamination (5.6-30.75%, stalk contamination (4.75-23.25% and root contamination (2.6-18.45% were found in front to front humidifier position, long humidifying with long interval frequency, without plastic cork, without cleaning and bi-monthly cleaning of humidifier water container treatment but no diseases and pest infection was found. Whereas, very low percentages of contamination (0.1-0.5% were found in surrounding humidifying position, short humidifying duration with short interval frequency, with plastic cork and weekly cleaning of humidifier water container treatment.

  6. Environmental management of the OSBAT 24'' oil pipeline: reached practical results; Gestao ambiental do Oleoduto OSBAT 24{sup :} resultados praticos alcancados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra, Ricardo N.; Garibaldi, Celia M.; Kagawa, Adriana; Serra, Maira B.; Oliveira, Flavio M. de; Perim, Leandro A. [LENC - Laboratorio de Engenharia e Consultoria Ltda., Cotia, SP (Brazil); Baptista, Sidney L. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The main objective of this article is to present considerations about the practical results obtained over the implementation of specialized technical services for environmental monitoring and control of the work of maintenance of OSBAT 24'' pipeline, located in a stretch of about 32 km from the Aquatic Terminal of Sao Sebastiao - SP (TASSE) to the district Camburi. This area is characterized by intense environmental complexity by the presence of the Serra do Mar State Park, under enormous natural diversity of preserved Mata Atlantica forest, contrasting with a considerable pole of urban sprawl whose population growth rates (4.66% pa) and economic they are above the average for the Sao Paulo State. The presentation of results considers the practical implementation of the package of environmental management tools used and seek verification of the scope and quality of the following items: general Review of care as environmental registers occurred at different periods (eg monthly, bimonthly, half, etc.); survey of the nature of environmental registers; environmental registers recovered; cases of non-compliance and the main control measures implemented; evaluation of environmental performance; recommendations and learning. (author)

  7. Biosecurity and mastitis in intensive dairy production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boboš Stanko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Newly purchased animals that enter a herd with high milk production can be infected with pathogens of the mammary gland and are a potential risk of infection to the cows on the farm. This risk cannot be avoided entirely, but it can be minimized by taking biosecurity measures that should be written as a policy developed for biosecurity oversight of veterinary service: when older cows are purchased, they should be bought with complete lactations and SCC records, and bacterial examination of milk from the udder quarters must be negative for pathogens of the udder; newly purchased cows should come from herds in which the geometric mean somatic cell count is less than 200,000. The herd must have individual cow SCC recorded at least bimonthly for the previous 6 months; the herd must not have had any history of Strep. agalactiae infection in the last 2 years, the herd should be BVDV-free or vaccinated, and the herd owner must be honest and willing to provide all this information. Our country has accepted the standards for milk quality and hygienic properties that comply with EU standards. The proposed biosafety measures presented in this paper enable the determination of the health status of the herd and the biosecurity level of mastitis in commercial farming in intensive dairy production. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR-31034

  8. Prediction of natural gas consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, R.L.; Walton, D.J.; Hoskins, W.D.

    1993-01-01

    Distributors of natural gas need to predict future consumption in order to purchase a sufficient supply on contract. Distributors that offer their customers equal payment plans need to predict the consumption of each customer 12 months in advance. Estimates of previous consumption are often used for months when meters are inaccessible, or bimonthly-read meters. Existing methods of predicting natural gas consumption, and a proposed new method for each local region are discussed. The proposed model distinguishes the consumption load factors from summer to other seasons by attempting to adjust them by introducing two parameters. The problem is then reduced to a quadratic programming problem. However, since it is not necessary to use both parameters simultaneously, the problem can be solved with a simple iterative procedure. Results show that the new model can improve the two-equation model to a certain scale. The adjustment to heat load factor can reduce the error of prediction markedly while that to base load factor influences the error marginally. 3 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Efficacy of a brief nurse-led pilot psychosocial intervention for newly diagnosed Asian cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahendran, Rathi; Lim, Haikel A; Tan, Joyce Y S; Chua, Joanne; Lim, Siew Eng; Ang, Emily N K; Kua, Ee Heok

    2015-08-01

    Cancer patients experience distress and high levels of psychosocial concerns. However, in Asian countries like Singapore, patients are often unwilling to seek support and help from mental healthcare professionals, but, instead, are more willing to confide in nurses. This quasi-experimental study developed and tested the efficacy of a brief nurse-led psychosocial intervention to alleviate these patients' distress, minor psychiatric morbidity, and psychosocial concerns. The semi-structured intervention comprised 20- to 30-minute face-to-face sessions with trained oncology nurses, monthly for 2 months and then bimonthly for 4 months. Patients received psycho-education on symptoms of stress, anxiety, and depression and counseling and were taught behavioral techniques such as deep breathing, progressive muscle relaxation, and positive self-talk. The results of this study found that patients who received the intervention had reduced distress, depression, and anxiety levels and improved quality of life (QOL) at 6 months. Although further research is necessary to explore the efficacy and viability of this intervention, findings support brief nurse-led psycho-educational interventions in Asian settings especially for cancer patients reluctant to seek help from mental health professionals.

  10. Growth, mortality and susceptibility of oyster Crassostrea spp. to Perkinsus spp. infection during on growing in northeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Paiva Scardua

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Crassostrea rhizophorae and C. gasar oysters are cultivated in the northeast region. Perkinsus parasites infect bivalves, and their effects on oysters from tropical regions are poorly understood. This study evaluated the impact of Perkinsus infection on the productive traits of native oysters. Oysters were sampled bimonthly during 7 months, from July 2010 to February 2011, to evaluate growth rate, mortality and shell color patterns (white and dark-gray (n = 500, and to determine the prevalence and intensity of Perkinsus (n = 152. Perkinsus and Crassostrea species were determined using molecular tools. Results showed that most dark-gray (90%, n = 20 and white (67%, n = 18 oysters were C. gasar and C. rhizophorae, respectively. Oysters showed a high growth rate and moderate cumulative mortality (44%. C. gasar oysters grew better and showed lower mortality and lower incidence of Perkinsus compared to C. rhizophorae. The mean prevalence of Perkinsus was moderate (48%, but the infection intensity was light (2.2. Perkinsosis affected very small oysters (19.4 mm. In conclusion, native oysters, especially C. gasar, have a great potential for culture, mortality is not associated with perkinsosis, and the shell color of oysters can be used to improve selection for spats with better performance.

  11. Prevention of brachial plexus injury-12 years of shoulder dystocia training: an interrupted time-series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crofts, J F; Lenguerrand, E; Bentham, G L; Tawfik, S; Claireaux, H A; Odd, D; Fox, R; Draycott, T J

    2016-01-01

    To investigate management and outcomes of incidences of shoulder dystocia in the 12 years following the introduction of an obstetric emergencies training programme. Interrupted time-series study comparing management and neonatal outcome of births complicated by shoulder dystocia over three 4-year periods: (i) Pre-training (1996-99), (ii) Early training (2001-04), and (iii) Late training (2009-12). Southmead Hospital, Bristol, UK, with approximately 6000 births per annum. Infants and their mothers who experienced shoulder dystocia. A bi-monthly multi-professional 1-day intrapartum emergencies training course, that included a 30-minute practical session on shoulder dystocia management, commenced in 2000. Neonatal morbidity (brachial plexus injury, humeral fracture, clavicular fracture, 5-minute Apgar score dystocia (resolution manoeuvres performed, traction applied, head-to-body delivery interval). Compliance with national guidance improved with continued training. At least one recognised resolution manoeuvre was used in 99.8% (561/562) of cases of shoulder dystocia in the late training period, demonstrating a continued improvement from 46.3% (150/324, P dystocia. © 2015 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  12. Estuary-dependence of larval fishes in a non-estuary associated South African surf zone: evidence for continuity of surf assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strydom, Nadine A.; d'Hotman, Bruce D.

    2005-04-01

    Larval fishes were collected in the Cape Padrone surf zone on the southeast coast of South Africa, using a modified small-mesh seine net. The aim of the study was to assess the composition of fish larvae, with respect to their association with estuaries, in a surf zone that was not in close proximity to an estuary (>5 km). Sampling took place bimonthly during diurnal spring low tides between March and July 2003. In total, 544 fish were caught in the surf zone, comprising 14 families represented by 19 positively identified species, as well as an additional two species that were differentiated but remain unidentified. The families Mugilidae (65%) and Sparidae (26%) dominated the larval catch. The majority of larval fishes caught were in the postflexion stage of development, although some early juveniles were also caught. Body lengths of fish larvae ranged between 2 and 28 mm, with the majority of larvae at the recruitment size for the species. A high proportion of the fish species caught were estuary-dependent. Estuary-dependent marine fish larvae (categories I, II and IV) comprised 68% of total catch by species and 98% by number of individuals. Exclusively marine species (category III) were encountered in low numbers in the surf. The present study provides evidence for continuity in temperate South African surf zones in terms of domination by estuary-dependent larvae and reasons for this pattern are discussed.

  13. Spatial and temporal repeatability in parasite community structure of tropical fish hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Martínez, V M; Poulin, R

    2003-10-01

    An assessment is made of the repeatability of parasite community structure in space for a marine fish, and in space and time for a freshwater fish from south-eastern Mexico. The marine fish species was the red grouper, Epinephelus morio (collected from 9 localities), and the freshwater species was the cichlid, Cichlasoma urophthalmus (collected from 6 localities: including monthly at 2 localities for 1 year, and bimonthly at 1 locality in 1990 and 1999). Pairwise interspecific associations and analyses of nested patterns in the distributions of parasite species among hosts were used in both fish species, with comparisons over time made only with the cichlid. Positive interspecific associations, and nested patterns were noted in some localities for both fish species, and/or at some sampling times for the cichlid fish. However, non-random patterns in the structure of parasite communities in these 2 host species only were observed sporadically. When present, nestedness in both fish species was apparently linked with a positive association between total infection intensities and fish size. Additionally, adjacent localities were more likely to display similar parasite community structure than distant ones. This preliminary result suggests that distance between localities is an important determinant of predictability in parasite community structure.

  14. Anopheles atroparvus density modeling using MODIS NDVI in a former malarious area in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, Pedro M; Sousa, Carla A; Seixas, Júlia; Lopes, Pedro; Novo, Maria T; Almeida, A Paulo G

    2011-12-01

    Malaria is dependent on environmental factors and considered as potentially re-emerging in temperate regions. Remote sensing data have been used successfully for monitoring environmental conditions that influence the patterns of such arthropod vector-borne diseases. Anopheles atroparvus density data were collected from 2002 to 2005, on a bimonthly basis, at three sites in a former malarial area in Southern Portugal. The development of the Remote Vector Model (RVM) was based upon two main variables: temperature and the Normalized Differential Vegetation Index (NDVI) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Terra satellite. Temperature influences the mosquito life cycle and affects its intra-annual prevalence, and MODIS NDVI was used as a proxy for suitable habitat conditions. Mosquito data were used for calibration and validation of the model. For areas with high mosquito density, the model validation demonstrated a Pearson correlation of 0.68 (pNDVI. RVM is a satellite data-based assimilation algorithm that uses temperature fields to predict the intra- and inter-annual densities of this mosquito species using MODIS NDVI. RVM is a relevant tool for vector density estimation, contributing to the risk assessment of transmission of mosquito-borne diseases and can be part of the early warning system and contingency plans providing support to the decision making process of relevant authorities. © 2011 The Society for Vector Ecology.

  15. Advertising can help, if you look before you leap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hexamer, Hugh D [Communication and Public Relations, GE Nuclear Energy, San Jose, CA (United States)

    1989-07-01

    The task of this presentation is to review the advertising program of the U.S. Council for Energy Awareness -- its history, the rationale behind it and the results. Reaching the American public requires a broad-based program using a variety of communication tools and techniques. A program cannot rely solely on advertising to carry its messages. USCEA therefore also has programs in several other key areas, including media activities, public relations, publications and public attitude research. USCEA arranges media tours in major city markets, using both third-party experts and industry executives who brief the editorial boards of major newspapers, hold radio and TV interviews, and participate in press conferences. Such exposure multiplies the impact of our message many times over. In the publications area, USCEA produces a wire service called INFOWIRE and two popular publications -- a monthly newsletter called INFO and a bimonthly magazine called Nuclear Industry. USCEA also produces a variety of other publications on important industry issues. And finally, in addition to staging the annual Nuclear Energy Forum in Washington, USCEA sustains an active conference and workshop program addressing a variety of industry interests, including public information, licensing, the fuel cycle and so forth.

  16. A descriptive evaluation of CDC's LEAN Works! Leading employees to activity and nutrition--a Web-based employer tool for workplace obesity management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemer, Enid C; Liss-Levinson, Rivka C; Samoly, Daniel K; Guy, Gery P; Tabrizi, Maryam J; Beckowski, Meghan S; Pei, Xiaofei; Goetzel, Ron Z

    2013-01-01

    The study aim was to determine the utility of and satisfaction with a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Web-based employer tool, CDC's LEAN Works!, which provides evidence-based recommendations and promising practices for obesity prevention and control at worksites. This study examined employers' natural usage (i.e., without any study parameters on how, when, or how much to use the Web site and its resources) and impressions of the Web site. Employers of varying sizes, industry types, and levels of maturity in offering obesity management programs and from both private and public sectors were recruited to participate in the study. A convenience sample of 29 employers enrolled to participate. Participants were followed over a 12-month period. First impressions, bimonthly use of the Web site, and final assessments were collected using self-report surveys and individual interviews. Descriptive analyses were conducted. Almost all (96%) of participants reported a positive experience with the Web site, noting it provided a wealth of information. Most reported they planned to continue to use the Web site to develop (77%), implement (92%), and evaluate (85%) their obesity management programs. Aspects of the Web site that employers found valuable included a step-by-step implementation process, templates and toolkits, specific recommendations, and promising practices. CDC's LEAN Works! is a useful resource for employers wishing to develop and implement evidence-based workplace obesity prevention programs.

  17. OCCURRENCE AND CHARACTERIZATION OF INSECT GALLS IN THE FLORESTA NACIONAL DE SILVÂNIA, BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BÁRBARA ARAÚJO RIBEIRO BERGAMINI

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In the present paper we investigated the insect gall distribution along savanna and forest sites in the Floresta Nacional de Silvânia, Goiás, Brazil. The insect gall fauna was surveyed bi-monthly between December 2009 and June 2010. In total we found 186 insect gall morphotypes, distributed on 35 botanical families and 61 plant species. Ninety-nine insect gall morphotypes were recorded in the forest and 87 in the savanna. Gall-inducing insects belonged to Coleoptera, Diptera, Hemiptera, Lepidoptera and Thysanoptera, with highlight to Cecidomyiidae (Diptera that induced 34.1% of the gall morphotypes. Parasitoids and/or inquilines were recorded in 38 morphotypes, mainly from the families Eulophidae, Eurytomidae and Torymidae (Hymenoptera. Fabaceae was the botanical family with the greatest richness of galls, followed by Asteraceae and Sapindaceae, being Protium (Burseraceae, Siparuna (Siparunaceae and Serjania (Sapindaceae the main host genera. This is the first systematic survey of insect galls realized in the Flona-Silvânia, which result in six plant species are recorded for the first time in Brazil as host of insect galls.

  18. Colorful invasion in permissive Neotropical ecosystems: establishment of ornamental non-native poeciliids of the genera Poecilia/Xiphophorus (Cyprinodontiformes: Poeciliidae and management alternatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Lincoln Barroso Magalhães

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Headwater creeks are environments susceptible to invasion by non-native fishes. We evaluated the reproduction of 22 populations of the non-native livebearers guppy Poecilia reticulata, black molly Poecilia sphenops, Yucatan molly Poecilia velifera, green swordtail Xiphophorus hellerii, southern platyfish Xiphophorus maculatus, and variable platyfish Xiphophorus variatus during an annual cycle in five headwater creeks located in the largest South American ornamental aquaculture center, Paraíba do Sul River basin, southeastern Brazil. With few exceptions, females of most species were found reproducing (stages 2, 3, 4 all year round in the creeks and gravid females of all species showed small sizes indicating stunting. Juveniles were frequent in all sites. The fecundity of the six poeciliids was always low in all periods. The sex ratio was biased for females in most species, both bimonthly as for the whole period. Water temperature, water level and rainfall were not significantly correlated with reproduction in any species. Therefore, most populations appeared well established. The pertinence of different management actions, such as devices to prevent fish escape, eradication with rotenone and research about negative effects on native species, is discussed in the light of current aquaculture practices in the region.

  19. The analysis of Taiwan's residential electricity demand under the electricity tariff policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Po-Jui

    In October 2013, the Taiwan Power Company (Taipower), the monopolized state utility service in Taiwan, implemented an electricity tariff adjustment policy to reduce residential electricity demand. Using bi-monthly billing data from 6,932 electricity consumers, this study examine how consumers respond to an increase in electricity prices. This study employs an empirical approach that takes advantage of quasi-random variation over a period of time when household bills were affected by a change in electricity price. The study found that this price increase caused a 1.78% decline in residential electricity consumption, implying a price elasticity of -0.19 for summer-season months and -0.15 for non-summer-season months. The demand for electricity is therefore relatively inelastic, likely because it is hard for people to change their electricity consumption behavior in the short-term. The results of this study highlight that demand-side management cannot be the only lever used to address Taiwan's forecasted decrease in electricity supply.

  20. Publications in biomedical and environmental sciences programs, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moody, J.B. (comp.)

    1983-04-01

    This bibliography contains 725 references to articles in journals, books, and reports published in the subject area of biomedical and environmental sciences during 1982. There are 553 references to articles published in journals and books and 172 references to reports. The citations appear once ordered by the first author's division or by the performing division. Staff members in the Biomedical and Environmental Sciences divisions have other publications not included in this bibliography; for example, theses, book reviews, abstracts published in journals or symposia proceedings, pending journal publications and reports such as monthly, bimonthly, and quarterly progress reports, contractor reports, and reports for internal distribution. This document is sorted by the division, and then alphabetically by author. The sorting by divisions separates the references by subject area in a simple way. The divisions are represented alphabetically. Indexes are provided by author, title, and journal reference. Reprints of articles referenced in this bibliography can be obtained from the author or the author's division.

  1. Human health risk assessment of pesticide residues in snappers (Lutjanus) fish from the Navachiste Lagoon complex, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados-Galván, Ingrid Alejandra; Rodríguez-Meza, Durga Guadalupe; Luna-González, Antonio; González-Ocampo, Héctor Abelardo

    2015-08-15

    Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) residues were determined in fillets of Lutjanus colorado, L. argentiventris, and L. novemfasciatus. Fillet samples were collected bimonthly from February 2012 to February 2013. OCPs average concentrations do not differ significantly according to size, weight, or season, nor do they relate with the physico-chemical parameters of the sea water. The highest concentration and most frequently encountered OCPs were endosulfan sulfate, δ-HCH, and heptachlor epoxide, which indicates their use in the recent past and confirms their persistence. Average concentrations of ∑HCHs, ∑chlordane, and ∑heptachlor in samples were above cancer MRLs according to data from monthly consumed portions. HCHs and heptachlor are listed in Appendix III of the Rotterdam Convention of chemicals placed on a prior informed consent procedure for import and export purposes; they are considered illegal in Mexico. The OCPs concentrations above cancer MRLs in Lutjanus spp. turn its frequent consumption into a human health risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Iheringichthys labrosus (Siluriformes: Pimelodidae in the Piquiri River, Paraná, Brazil: population structure and some aspects of its reproductive biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlei J. Holzbach

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to analyze the population structure (spatial and temporal distribution, sex ratio, length distribution and length/weight relationship and reproductive biology of Iheringichthys labrosus. This species is of importance as fisheries resource in the Paraná River basin. Fish were sampled, bimonthly, with gill and trammel nets at three sampling sites (Campina, Apertado and Altônia, located in the Piquiri River, between November 2002 and September 2003. In this study, 164 individuals were collected; the largest capture occurred in Campina site, with 209.88 individuals/1000 m² of net for 24 hours, while the shift of largest capture was night time (N and the month was July. Females occurred in larger numbers than males in all periods. The growth was allometric positive and the reproduction period was from the beginning of September to the end of December, with the majority of the individuals showing a standard length between 13.0 and 20.0 cm.

  3. Michigan residential No. 2 fuel oil and propane price survey for the 1990/91 heating season

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the results of a survey of home heating oil and propane prices over the 1990/1991 heating season in Michigan. The survey was conducted under a cooperative agreement between the State of Michigan, Michigan Public Service Commission and the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Information Administration (EIA), and was funded by a grant from EIA. From October 1990 through May 1991, participating dealers/distributions were called and asked for their current residential retail prices of No. 2 home heating oil and propane. This information was then transmitted to the EIA, bi-monthly using an electronic reporting system called Petroleum Data Reporting Option (PEDRO). The survey was conducted using a sample provided by EIA of home heating oil and propane retailers which supply Michigan households. These retailers were contacted the first and third Mondays of each month. The sample was designed to account for distributors with different sales volumes, geographic distributions and sources of primary supply. It should be noted that this simple is different from the sample used in prior year surveys

  4. Lipids and Composition of Fatty Acids of Saccharina latissima Cultivated Year-Round in Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinho, Gonçalo S; Holdt, Susan L; Jacobsen, Charlotte; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-07-15

    This study is evaluating the seasonal lipid and fatty acid composition of the brown seaweed Saccharina latissima. Biomass was sampled throughout the year (bi-monthly) at the commercial cultivation site near a fish farm in an integrated multi-trophic aquaculture (IMTA) and at a reference site in Denmark (2013-2014). Generally, there was no difference in the biomass composition between sites; however, significant seasonal changes were found. The lipid concentration varied from 0.62%-0.88% dry weight (DW) in July to 3.33%-3.35% DW in November (p EPA; 20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3), but also arachidonic (ARA) and stearidonic acid (SDA), which are not found in land vegetables such as cabbage and lettuce. Compared to fat (salmon) and lean fish (cod) this seaweed species contains higher proportions of ARA and SDA, but lower EPA (only cod) and DHA. Conclusively, the season of harvest is important for the choice of lipid quantity and quality, but the marine vegetables provide better sources of EPA, DHA and long-chain (LC)-PUFA's in general compared to traditional vegetables.

  5. RISCOS GEOLÓGICOS NAS COLINAS DO MUNICÍPIO DE CAMARAJIBE-PE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niédja M G A e Oliveira

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper show us the Real, sufficiently degraded, with the appears of the "voçorocamento" system, produced by the hydraulical action of surface and with indications of the action of freatic sheets. These factors are combined, making possible the geomorfical-environnement characterization, a typical indication of the Glacis collected of the Barriers group, in the Quarter dos Estados, City of Camarajibe/PE. In that it concerns to the methodology, mineralogical analyses straight to grain sized physicist- chemistry had also been become fullfilled and removed samples from the studied area, using the bimonthly control of the profile of "voçorocas", guiding by the erosion of its edges. In order to identify and to evaluate the impacts, multiple criteria had been used, on basis of matricial analyses, from physical, bitics factors, perceptual and social-economic model (factors and elements. As result of the mineralogical analysis, it can be affirmed that the sample presented heterogenity, with clay predominance (74,5%. One concludes that the geologic structure, conjugated to the men action, leads to the movement of mass and the "voçorocamento". "Voçorocas" has suffered loss of mass according to the comment of this monitored data. In relation to the evaluation of the impacts, to 11 actions and 11 Factors and Elements, both had been identified interacting between 50 and 90%, having as resulted 29 impacts.

  6. Spatial distribution and source apportionment of water pollution in different administrative zones of Wen-Rui-Tang (WRT) river watershed, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liping; Mei, Kun; Liu, Xingmei; Wu, Laosheng; Zhang, Minghua; Xu, Jianming; Wang, Fan

    2013-08-01

    Water quality degradation in river systems has caused great concerns all over the world. Identifying the spatial distribution and sources of water pollutants is the very first step for efficient water quality management. A set of water samples collected bimonthly at 12 monitoring sites in 2009 and 2010 were analyzed to determine the spatial distribution of critical parameters and to apportion the sources of pollutants in Wen-Rui-Tang (WRT) river watershed, near the East China Sea. The 12 monitoring sites were divided into three administrative zones of urban, suburban, and rural zones considering differences in land use and population density. Multivariate statistical methods [one-way analysis of variance, principal component analysis (PCA), and absolute principal component score-multiple linear regression (APCS-MLR) methods] were used to investigate the spatial distribution of water quality and to apportion the pollution sources. Results showed that most water quality parameters had no significant difference between the urban and suburban zones, whereas these two zones showed worse water quality than the rural zone. Based on PCA and APCS-MLR analysis, urban domestic sewage and commercial/service pollution, suburban domestic sewage along with fluorine point source pollution, and agricultural nonpoint source pollution with rural domestic sewage pollution were identified to the main pollution sources in urban, suburban, and rural zones, respectively. Understanding the water pollution characteristics of different administrative zones could put insights into effective water management policy-making especially in the area across various administrative zones.

  7. Characteristic Rain Events: A Methodology for Improving the Amenity Value of Stormwater Control Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Smit Andersen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Local management of rainwater using stormwater control measures (SCMs is gaining increased attention as a sustainable alternative and supplement to traditional sewer systems. Besides offering added utility values, many SCMs also offer a great potential for added amenity values. One way of achieving amenity value is to stage the rainwater and thus bring it to the attention of the public. We present here a methodology for creating a selection of rain events that can help bridge between engineering and landscape architecture when dealing with staging of rainwater. The methodology uses quantitative and statistical methods to select Characteristic Rain Events (CREs for a range of frequent return periods: weekly, bi-weekly, monthly, bi-monthly, and a single rarer event occurring only every 1–10 years. The methodology for selecting CREs is flexible and can be adjusted to any climatic settings; here we show its use for Danish conditions. We illustrate with a case study how CREs can be used in combination with a simple hydrological model to visualize where, how deep and for how long water is visible in a landscape designed to manage rainwater.

  8. Loss of genetic diversity in Culex quinquefasciatus targeted by a lymphatic filariasis vector control program in Recife, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartaxo, Marina F S; Ayres, Constância F J; Weetman, David

    2011-09-01

    Recife is one of the largest cities in north-eastern Brazil and is endemic for lymphatic filariasis transmitted by Culex quinquefasciatus. Since 2003 a control program has targeted mosquito larvae by elimination of breeding sites and bimonthly application of Bacillus sphaericus. To assess the impact of this program on the local vector population we monitored the genetic diversity and differentiation of Cx. quinquefasciatus using microsatellites and a B. sphaericus-resistance associated mutation (cqm1(REC)) over a 3-year period. We detected a significant but gradual decline in allelic diversity, which, coupled with subtle temporal genetic structure, suggests a major impact of the control program on the vector population. Selection on cqm1(REC) does not appear to be involved with loss of neutral diversity from the population, with no temporal trend in resistant allele frequency and no correlation with microsatellite differentiation. The evidence for short-term genetic drift we detected suggests a low ratio of effective population size: census population size for Cx. quinquefasciatus, perhaps coupled with strong geographically-restricted population structure. Spatial definition of populations will be an important step for success of an expanded vector control program. Copyright © 2011 Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Publications in biomedical and environmental sciences programs, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moody, J.B. (comp.)

    1982-07-01

    This bibliography contains 698 references to articles in journals, books, and reports published in the subject area of biomedical and environmental sciences during 1981. There are 520 references to articles published in journals and books and 178 references to reports. Staff members in the Biomedical and Environmental Sciences divisions have other publications not included in this bibliography; for example, theses, book reviews, abstracts published in journals or symposia proceedings, pending journal publications and reports such as monthly, bimonthly, and quarterly progress reports, contractor reports, and reports for internal distribution. This document is sorted by the division, and then alphabetically by author. The sorting by divisions separates the references by subject area in a simple way. The divisions represented in the order that they appear in the bibliography are Analytical Chemistry, Biology, Chemical Technology, Information R and D, Health and Safety Research, Instrumentation and Controls, Computer Sciences, Energy, Engineering Technology, Solid State, Central Management, Operations, and Environmental Sciences. Indexes are provided by author, title, and journal reference.

  10. Motivation for change as a predictor of treatment response for dysthymia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frías Ibáñez, Álvaro; González Vallespí, Laura; Palma Sevillano, Carol; Farriols Hernando, Núria

    2016-05-01

    Dysthymia constitutes a chronic, mild affective disorder characterized by heterogeneous treatment effects. Several predictors of clinical response and attendance have been postulated, although research on the role of the psychological variables involved in this mental disorder is still scarce. Fifty-four adult patients, who met criteria for dysthymia completed an ongoing naturalistic treatment based on the brief interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT-B), which was delivered bimonthly over 16 months. As potential predictor variables, the therapeutic alliance, coping strategies, perceived self-efficacy, and motivation for change were measured at baseline. Outcome variables were response to treatment (Clinical Global Impression and Beck’s Depression Inventory) and treatment attendance. Stepwise multiple linear regression analyses revealed that higher motivation for change predicted better response to treatment. Moreover, higher motivation for change also predicted treatment attendance. Therapeutic alliance was not a predictor variable of neither clinical response nor treatment attendance. These preliminary findings support the adjunctive use of motivational interviewing (MI) techniques in the treatment of dysthymia. Further research with larger sample size and follow-up assessment is warranted.

  11. The importance of protozoan bacterivory in a subtropical environment (Lobo-Broa Reservoir, SP, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AS Mansano

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the importance of heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNF and ciliates bacterivory in a mesotrophic subtropical environment (Lobo-Broa Reservoir, Brazil by the quantification of their ingestion rates. The in situ experiments using fluorescently labelled bacteria (FLB were carried out bimonthly over one year (three surveys in the dry season and three in the rainy one at the sub-surface of two sampling points that have different trophic degrees. The ingestion rates for both ciliates and HNF were higher in the meso-eutrophic region (point 2 due to the higher water temperatures, which accelerate the metabolism of protozoans and the higher bacteria densities. Concerning total protozoan bacterivory, the HNF had the greatest grazing impact on bacterial community, especially the HNF <5µm. The data showed that HNF grazing, in addition to regulating the bacteria abundance, also induced changes to the bacterial community structure, such as increasing size and numbers of bacterial filaments. The ciliates were also important to the system bacterivory, especially in point 2, where there were high densities and ingestion rates. The protozoan bottom-up control was more important in the dry season and the top-down control was more important in the rainy season, so, these two forces are equally important to the bacterial abundance regulation in this reservoir in an annual basis.

  12. Impact Assessment of Phosphogypsum Leachate on Groundwater of Sfax-Agareb (Southeast of Tunisia: Using Geochemical and Isotopic Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Melki

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of phosphoric acid by the Tunisian Chemical Group, in Sfax, Tunisia, led to the degradation of the groundwater quality of the Sfax-Agareb aquifer mainly by the phosphogypsum leachates infiltration. Spatiotemporal monitoring of the quality of groundwater was carried out by performing bimonthly sampling between October 2013 and October 2014. Samples culled in the current study were subject to physicochemical parameters measurements and analysis of the major elements, orthophosphates, fluorine, trace metals, and stable isotopes (18O, 2H. The obtained results show that the phosphogypsum leachates infiltration has a major effect on the downstream part of the aquifer, where the highest values of conductivity, SO42-, Ortho-P, and F-, and the lowest pH were recorded. In addition, these results indicated that phosphogypsum leachates contained much higher amount of Cr, Cd, Zn, Cu, Fe, and Al compared to the groundwater. Spatiotemporal variation of the conductivity and concentrations of major elements is linked to the phosphogypsum leachates infiltration as well as to a wide range of factors such as the natural conditions of feeding and the water residence time. Contents of O18 and 2H showed that the water of the Sfax-Agareb aquifer undergoes a large scale evaporation process originated from recent rainfall.

  13. Incidence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Escherichia coli O157:H7 isolates recovered from dairy farms in Amathole District Municipality, Eastern Cape, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asive Myataza

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the incidence of Escherichia coli (E. coli O157:H7 in water and cattle rectal samples from three commercial dairy farms in Amathole District Municipalities in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa. Methods: Samples were collected bimonthly from cattle rectum and dairy water sources including irrigation water, drinking water troughs and wastewater between June and November 2014. Standard culture-based methods were applied for the microbial analyses, the disc diffusion method was employed for the antibiotic susceptibility test and PCR approach was utilized for identification of the isolates. Results: A total of 252 presumptive E. coli O157:H7 were isolated and subjected to molecular confirmation by PCR. About 18.7% (47/252 of these were confirmed as E. coli O157:H7. The antimicrobial susceptibility profile of these confirmed isolates revealed high-level resistance against penicillin G (81%, tetracycline (43%, oxytetracycline (62%, erythromycin (68%, sulphamethoxazole (57%, chloramphenicol (55%, doxycycline (51% and trimethoprimsulphamethoxazole (45%. Conclusions: This is the first report of multi-drug resistance E. coli O157:H7 in commercial dairy farms in the province and suggests the possibility of same in other provinces of the country, and this is the subject of the intensive investigation in our group.

  14. DOE radiological calibrations intercomparison program: Results of fiscal year 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, F.M.; Roberson, P.L.; McDonald, J.C.

    1987-05-01

    The Department of Energy Radiological Calibration Intercomparison Program was initiated in January 1986, under the research portion of the DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program. The program operates via the exchange of transfer standards, consisting of instrument sets and standard secondary beta sources. There are two instrument sets and the scheduled use has been staggered such that one set is available for use during each month. One set of secondary standard beta sources is available for use bimonthly. During the 1986 fiscal year, five laboratories used the instrument sets and three laboratories used the beta source set. Results were reported for all the measurements. The average and one standard deviation of the ratios of participant results to Pacific Northwest Laboratory calibration values were 1.12 +- 0.17 for gamma measurements. Those ratios for the gamma measurements varied from 0.98 to 3.06. The larger differences of results from measurements performed at two facilities were directly attributable to unfamiliarity with the intercomparison instruments. The average and one standard deviation of the ratios of participant results to PNL calibration values obtained using the secondary 90 Sr beta source was 1.02 +- 0.05, which is well within measurement uncertainties. The one participant who performed measurements using 147 Pm and 204 Tl sources obtained ratios of 0.68 and 1.11, respectively. No measurements were performed using neutron or x-ray sources

  15. Comparative impact of AAV and enzyme replacement therapy on respiratory and cardiac function in adult Pompe mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darin J Falk

    Full Text Available Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by a deficiency of the enzyme responsible for degradation of lysosomal glycogen (acid α-glucosidase (GAA. Cardiac dysfunction and respiratory muscle weakness are primary features of this disorder. To attenuate the progressive and rapid accumulation of glycogen resulting in cardiorespiratory dysfunction, adult Gaa−/− mice were administered a single systemic injection of rAAV2/9-DES-hGAA (AAV9-DES or bimonthly injections of recombinant human GAA (enzyme replacement therapy (ERT. Assessment of cardiac function and morphology was measured 1 and 3 months after initiation of treatment while whole-body plethysmography and diaphragmatic contractile function was evaluated at 3 months post-treatment in all groups. Gaa−/− animals receiving either AAV9-DES or ERT demonstrated a significant improvement in cardiac function and diaphragmatic contractile function as compared to control animals. AAV9-DES treatment resulted in a significant reduction in cardiac dimension (end diastolic left ventricular mass/gram wet weight; EDMc at 3 months postinjection. Neither AAV nor ERT therapy altered minute ventilation during quiet breathing (eupnea. However, breathing frequency and expiratory time were significantly improved in AAV9-DES animals. These results indicate systemic delivery of either strategy improves cardiac function but AAV9-DES alone improves respiratory parameters at 3 months post-treatment in a murine model of Pompe disease.

  16. Qualitative and quantitative temporal analysis of licit and illicit drugs in wastewater in Australia using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bade, Richard; White, Jason M; Gerber, Cobus

    2018-01-01

    The combination of qualitative and quantitative bimonthly analysis of pharmaceuticals and illicit drugs using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry is presented. A liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of flight instrument equipped with Sequential Window Acquisition of all THeoretical fragment-ion spectra (SWATH) was used to qualitatively screen 346 compounds in influent wastewater from two wastewater treatment plants in South Australia over a 14-month period. A total of 100 compounds were confirmed and/or detected using this strategy, with 61 confirmed in all samples including antidepressants (amitriptyline, dothiepin, doxepin), antipsychotics (amisulpride, clozapine), illicit drugs (cocaine, methamphetamine, amphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA)), and known drug adulterants (lidocaine and tetramisole). A subset of these compounds was also included in a quantitative method, analyzed on a liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The use of illicit stimulants (methamphetamine) showed a clear decrease, levels of opioid analgesics (morphine and methadone) remained relatively stable, while the use of new psychoactive substances (methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) and Alpha PVP) varied with no visible trend. This work demonstrates the value that high-frequency sampling combined with quantitative and qualitative analysis can deliver. Graphical abstract Temporal analysis of licit and illicit drugs in South Australia.

  17. Fish community structure and dynamics in a coastal hypersaline lagoon: Rio Lagartos, Yucatan, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Cendejas, Ma. Eugenia; Hernández de Santillana, Mireya

    2004-06-01

    Rio Lagartos, a tropical coastal lagoon in northern Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico, is characterized by high salinity during most of the year (55 psu annual average). Even though the area has been designated as a wetland of international importance because of its great biodiversity, fish species composition and distribution are unknown. To determine whether the salinity gradient was influencing fish assemblages or not, fish populations were sampled seasonally by seine and trawl from 1992 to 1993 and bimonthly during 1997. We identified 81 fish species, eight of which accounted for 53.1% considering the Importance Value Index ( Floridichthys polyommus, Sphoeroides testudineus, Eucinostomus argenteus, Eucinostomus gula, Fundulus majalis, Strongylura notata, Cyprinodon artifrons and Elops saurus). Species richness and density declined from the mouth to the inner zone where extreme salinity conditions are prominent (>80) and competitive interactions decreased. However, in Coloradas basin (53 average sanity) and in the inlet of the lagoon, the highest fish density and number of species were observed. Greater habitat heterogeneity and fish immigration were considered as the best explanation. Multivariate analysis found three zones distinguished by fish occurrence, abundance and distribution. Ichthyofaunal spatial differences were attributed to selective recruitment from the Gulf of Mexico due to salinity gradient and to changing climatic periods. Estuarine and euryhaline marine species are abundant, with estuarine dependent ones entering the system according to environmental preferences. This knowledge will contribute to the management of the Special Biosphere Reserve through baseline data to evaluate environmental and anthropogenic changes.

  18. Geohydrology and water quality of the North Platte River alluvial aquifer, Garden County, Western Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Gregory V.; Cannia, James C.

    1995-01-01

    In 1993, a 3-year study was begun to describe the geohydrology and water quality of the North Platte River alluvial aquifer near Oshkosh, Garden County, Nebraska. The study's objectives are to evaluate the geohydrologic characteristics of the alluvial aquifer and to establish a network of observation wells for long-term monitoring of temporal variations and spatial distributions of nitrate and major-ion concentrations. Monitor wells were installed at 11 sites near Oshkosh. The geohydrology of the aquifer was characterized based on water-level measurements and two short-term aquifer tests. Bimonthly water samples were collected and analyzed for pH, specific conductivity, water temperature, dissolved oxygen, and nutrients that included dissolved nitrate. Concentrations of major ions were defined from analyses of semiannual water samples. Analyses of the geohydrologic and water-quality data indicate that the aquifer is vulnerable to nitrate contamination. These data also show that nitrate concentrations in ground water flowing into and out of the study area are less than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Maximum Concentration Level of 10 milligrams per liter for drinking water. Ground water from Lost Creek Valley may be mixing with ground water in the North Platte River Valley, somewhat moderating nitrate concentrations near Oshkosh.

  19. Environmental radiological protection of Bariloche Atomic Center; Proteccion radiologica ambiental del Centro Atomico Bariloche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andres, Pablo A.; Levanon, Izhar S., E-mail: andresp@cab.cnea.gov.ar, E-mail: levanon@cab.cnca.gov.ar [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina). Centro Atomico Bariloche. Division Proteccion Radiologica

    2013-07-01

    This plan of monitoring radiological environmental routine fits on environmental policy of CNEA, satisfying national and international recommendations for licensed facilities. Sampling matrices are related to direct routes of exposure: air and water (river, lake, sediments, drinking water). Soil samples are also analyzed for having integrated matrices. They are considered as minimum three points of measurement: a white point (water or winds up), a point of maximum (water or winds down) and a point corresponding to the location of the individual representative or a point of public interest. Measurements in air estimate KERMA rate with thermoluminescent dosimeters, bi-monthly, and concentrations of particulate material and aerosols. For water samples (monthly), soil and sediments (quarterly), radionuclides that have download limits are analyzed, according to its importance in the dosages produced in the representative individual. In these cases artificial radionuclides using gamma spectrometry, beta total and Sr-90 by radiochemical techniques if the value of total screening (1 Bq/L) is exceeded. Foods are not included because no possible matrices were detected, either by their distance. by located not predominant wind direction. They are however still looking for milk producers that fulfills the minimum requirements.The data collected are compared with environmental baselines to set trends that might point to future significant changes in the environment during the life of the facilities. So far it was not observed significant differences with respect to baseline values.

  20. Seasonal abundance and potential of Japanese encephalitis virus infection in mosquitoes at the nesting colony of ardeid birds, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changbunjong, Tanasak; Weluwanarak, Thekhawet; Taowan, Namaoy; Suksai, Parut; Chamsai, Tatiyanuch; Sedwisai, Poonyapat

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the abundance and seasonal dynamics of mosquitoes, and to detect Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) in these mosquitoes at the nesting colony of ardeid birds. Mosquitoes were collected bimonthly from July 2009 to May 2010 by Centers for Disease Control. Light traps and dry ice, as a source of CO2, were employed to attract mosquitoes. Mosquitoes were first identified, pooled into groups of upto 50 mosquitoes by species, and tested for JEV infection by viral isolation and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. A total of 20 370 mosquitoes comprising 14 species in five genera were collected. The five most abundant mosquito species collected were Culex tritaeniorhynchus (95.46%), Culex vishnui (2.68%), Culex gelidus (0.72%), Anopheles peditaeniatus (0.58%) and Culex quinquefasciatus (0.22%). Mosquito peak densities were observed in July. All of 416 mosquito pools were negative for JEV. This study provides new information about mosquito species and status of JEV infection in mosquitoes in Thailand. Further study should be done to continue a close survey for the presence of this virus in the ardeid birds.

  1. Surface water processes in the Indonesian throughflow as documented by a high-resolution coral Δ14C record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, Stewart J.; Guilderson, Thomas P.

    2008-09-01

    To explore the seasonal to decadal variability in surface water masses that contribute to the Indonesian throughflow, we have generated a 115-year bimonthly coral-based radiocarbon time series from a coral in the Makassar Straits. In the pre-bomb (pre-1955) era from 1890 to 1954, the radiocarbon time series occasionally displays a small seasonal signal (10-15‰). After 1954 the radiocarbon record increases rapidly, in response to the increased atmospheric 14C content caused by nuclear weapons testing. From 1957 to 1986 the record displays clear seasonal variability from 15 to 60‰ and the post-bomb peak (163 per mil) occurred in 1974. The seasonal cycle of radiocarbon can be attributed to variations of surface waters passing through the South Makassar Strait. Southern Makassar is under the influence of the Northwest Monsoon, which is responsible for the high austral summer radiocarbon (North Pacific waters) and the Southeast Monsoon that flushes back a mixture of low (South Pacific and upwelling altered) radiocarbon water from the Banda Sea. The coral record also shows a significant 14C peak in 1955 due to the bomb-14C water advected into this region from nuclear weapons tests in the Marshall Islands in 1954.

  2. Evaluation of water quality at the source of streams of the Sinos River Basin, southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Benvenuti

    Full Text Available The Sinos River Basin (SRB is located in the northeastern region of the state of Rio Grande do Sul (29º20' to 30º10'S and 50º15' to 51º20'W, southern Brazil, and covers two geomorphologic provinces: the southern plateau and the central depression. It is part of the Guaíba basin, has an area of approximately 800 km2 and contains 32 counties. The basin provides drinking water for 1.6 million inhabitants in one of the most important industrial centres in Brazil. This study describes different water quality indices (WQI used for the sub-basins of three important streams in the SRB: Pampa, Estância Velha/Portão and Schmidt streams. Physical, chemical and microbiological parameters assessed bimonthly using samples collected at each stream source were used to calculate the Horton Index (HI, the Dinius Index (DI and the water quality index adopted by the US National Sanitation Foundation (NSF WQI in the additive and multiplicative forms. These indices describe mean water quality levels at the streams sources. The results obtained for these 3 indexes showed a worrying scenario in which water quality has already been negatively affected at the sites where three important sub-basins in the Sinos River Basin begin to form.

  3. Therapeutic Erythrocytapheresis in the Initial Treatment of Hereditary Hemochromatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vít Řeháček

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The current treatment of hereditary hemochromatosis (HH consists of performing periodic whole blood phlebotomies. Erythrocytapheresis (EA can remove up to three times more red blood cells per single procedure and could thus have a clinical benefit. A prospective study of 30 consecutive cases of HH were included in a periodic EA program. Methods and patients: EA were performed using a discontinuous flow cell separators. The protocol consisted of a bimonthly EA until normalization of the serum ferritin was reached. The aim was to reduce the total erythrocyte volume by 25–35%, eventually, to adjust the amount so that hematocrit would not drop below 0.25. Results: 530 ± 101 ml of erythrocytes were removed (median 517, range 116–761 ml. Iron depletion (ferritin < 20 μg/l was achieved in all patients after a mean 6.9 ± 7.6 months, median 5 months, range 1–36 months and a mean 14 EA sessions. The procedures were well tolerated and there were no severe side-effects. Conclusions: We conclude that HH patients treated with EA achieved iron depletion quickly under good conditions of tolerance. The efficacy, speed, tolerability, and more favorable schedule of an EA program facilitate treatment of HH.

  4. An overview of radioactive waste disposal procedures of a nuclear medicine department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravichandran, R.; Binukumar, J.P.; Sreeram, Rajan; Arunkumar, L.S.

    2011-01-01

    Radioactive wastes from hospitals form one of the various types of urban wastes, which are managed in developed countries in a safe and organized way. In countries where growth of nuclear medicine services are envisaged, implementations of existing regulatory policies and guidelines in hospitals in terms of handling of radioactive materials used in the treatment of patients need a good model. To address this issue, a brief description of the methods is presented. A designed prototype waste storage trolley is found to be of great help in decaying the 131 I solid wastes from wards before releasing to waste treatment plant of the city. Two delay tanks with collection time of about 2 months and delay time of 2 months alternately result in 6 releases of urine toilet effluents to the sewage treatment plant (STP) of the hospital annually. Samples of effluents collected at releasing time documented radioactive releases of 131 I- much below recommended levels of bi-monthly release. External counting of samples showed good statistical correlation with calculated values. An overview of safe procedures for radioactive waste disposal is presented. (author)

  5. Phytoplankton abundance, dominance and coexistence in an eutrophic reservoir in the state of Pernambuco, Northeast Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira, Giulliari A S T; Araújo, Elcida L; Bittencourt-Oliveira, Maria Do Carmo; Moura, Ariadne N

    2011-12-01

    The present study reports the phytoplankton abundance, dominance and co-existence relationships in the eutrophic Carpina reservoir, Pernambuco, Brazil. Sampling was carried out at six different depths bimonthly at a single reservoir spanning two climatic periods: dry season (January, September, and November 2006) and rainy season (March, May, and July 2006). Density, abundance, dominance, specific diversity and equitability of the community were determined, along with chlorophyll a, and physical and chemical variables of the environment. Eight species were considered abundant, and their densities corresponded to more than 90% of the total phytoplankton community quantified. Cyanobacteria represented more than 80% of this density. Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii was the only dominant taxon in the dry season, and was co-dominant in the rainy season. C. raciborskii, Planktothrix agardhii and Geitlerinema amphibium had the greatest densities and lowest vertical variation coefficients. The statistical analysis indicated relationships with vertical and seasonal variations in the phytoplankton community and the following variables: total dissolved solids, water temperature, electrical conductivity and pH. The changes in the environmental variables were discrete and regulated by the establishment of precipitation however, they were able to promote vertical and seasonal instability in the structure of the phytoplankton community.

  6. The ghost of fouling communities past: the effect of original community on subsequent recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralston, Emily A; Swain, Geoffrey W

    2014-01-01

    Biofouling on ships has been linked to the spread of invasive species, which has been identified as one of the current primary threats to the environment. Previous research on antifouling coatings suggested that the quantity of fouling, as well as community composition, on biocidal coatings was modified by prior fouling settlement. The experiment reported in this paper was designed to determine how preconditioning affected the rate and composition of subsequent fouling on transplanted silicone coatings. A series of 10 × 20 cm panels coated with Intersleek 700 or DC3140 were placed at three locations in Florida (Ponce Inlet, Sebastian Inlet, and Port of Miami), which were characterized by distinct fouling communities. Panels were immersed for four months, cleaned, and reciprocally transplanted among the three sites. Fouling community composition and coverage were characterized at bimonthly intervals both before and after transplantation. The original fouling community affected the subsequent fouling composition and recolonization by tunicates, sea anemones, barnacles, sponges, hydroids, and arborescent bryozoans. The community-level effects were short-term, lasting 2-4 months, but specific responses lasted up to 14 months post-transplant.

  7. Spatial and temporal distribution of fish larvae in marginal lagoons of Pantanal, Mato Grosso State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Keyla Tondato

    Full Text Available An analysis was made of the spatial and temporal distribution of the abundance and composition of fish larvae assemblies, aiming to ascertain correlations with biotic and abiotic factors in marginal lagoons of the Cuiabá River floodplain in Brazil's Pantanal wetlands. Samples were collected bimonthly in the pelagic region of the marginal lagoons (fourteen lagoons close to the littoral zone covered by aquatic macrophytes from December 2006 to April 2007. The captured individuals consisted of 2,739 larvae, represented predominantly by Triportheus spp. (Characidae, Parodontidae, Anostomidae, Characidae and Serrasalmidae. Larval density varied among the sample lagoons in December, but the biotic (zooplankton density and abiotic (water temperature, electrical conductivity, dissolved oxygen, pH, water transparency and lagoon depth factors did not significantly affect larval composition and abundance. Larvae were captured throughout the sample period, with the highest densities occurring in December and early January. Temporally, lagoon depth, water transparency and fluviometric level showed a negative correlation with larval density. Both the zooplankton and the larval density vary positively, responding likewise to the environmental conditions imposed by flooding. The highest larval density was also found to coincide with the first rains (early December, when the rainfall has not yet reached its peak.

  8. Preparedness of NGO Health Service Providers in Bangladesh about Distance Based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AKM ALAMGIR

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional survey was conducted countrywide from 15 January to 01 March 2004 to explore the potentials of health care service providers (physicians, nurses, paramedics etc. for using distance-based learning materials. Face-to-face in-depth interview was taken from 99 randomly selected direct service providers, 45 midlevel clinic mangers/physicians and 06 administrators or policy planners. Quasi-open questionnaire was developed for three different levels. Pre-trained interviewer team assisted data collection at field level. Total procedure was stringently monitored for completeness and consistency to ensure quality data. SPSS software was used to process and analyze both univariate and multivariate multiple responses. Identified need for training areas were- STD/HIV, tuberculosis updates, family planning, treatment of locally endemic diseases, behavioral change communication & marketing and quality management system for managers. About 76.7% clinic managers and 89.1% service providers had primary information about distance-based learning in spite showed interest. About 51.5% desired monthly, 20.6% biweekly and 26.8% wanted bimonthly circulation of the distance-based study materials. About 35.1% expected print materials with regular facilitators while 58.8% demanded stand-by facilitators. The study suggested wide acceptance of distance-based learning methods as supplementary to the continuing medical education among the countrywide health service providers.

  9. Protozoans bacterivory in a subtropical environment during a dry/cold and a rainy/warm season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina F. Hisatugo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In aquatic ecosystems, bacteria are controlled by several organisms in the food chain, such as protozoa, that use them as food source. This study aimed to quantify the ingestion and clearance rates of bacteria by ciliates and heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNF in a subtropical freshwater reservoir (Monjolinho reservoir -São Carlos -Brazil during one year period, in order to verify their importance as consumers and controllers of bacteria in two seasons, a dry/cold and a rainy/warm one. For this purpose, in situ bacterivory experiments were carried out bimonthly using fluorescently labeled bacteria with 5-(4,6 diclorotriazin-2yl aminofluorescein (DTAF. Although ciliates have shown the highest individual ingestion and clearance rates, bacterivory was dominated by HNF, who showed higher population ingestion rates (mean of 9,140 bacteria h-1mL-1 when compared to ciliates (mean of 492 bacteria h-1mL-1. The greater predation impact on bacterial communities was caused mainly by the small HNF (< 5 µm population, especially in the rainy season, probably due to the abundances of these organisms, the precipitation, trophic index state and water temperature that were higher in this period. Thus, the protozoan densities together with environmental variables were extremely relevant in determining the seasonal pattern of bacterivory in Monjolinho reservoir.

  10. Environmental radiological protection of Bariloche Atomic Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andres, Pablo A.; Levanon, Izhar S.

    2013-01-01

    This plan of monitoring radiological environmental routine fits on environmental policy of CNEA, satisfying national and international recommendations for licensed facilities. Sampling matrices are related to direct routes of exposure: air and water (river, lake, sediments, drinking water). Soil samples are also analyzed for having integrated matrices. They are considered as minimum three points of measurement: a white point (water or winds up), a point of maximum (water or winds down) and a point corresponding to the location of the individual representative or a point of public interest. Measurements in air estimate KERMA rate with thermoluminescent dosimeters, bi-monthly, and concentrations of particulate material and aerosols. For water samples (monthly), soil and sediments (quarterly), radionuclides that have download limits are analyzed, according to its importance in the dosages produced in the representative individual. In these cases artificial radionuclides using gamma spectrometry, beta total and Sr-90 by radiochemical techniques if the value of total screening (1 Bq/L) is exceeded. Foods are not included because no possible matrices were detected, either by their distance. by located not predominant wind direction. They are however still looking for milk producers that fulfills the minimum requirements.The data collected are compared with environmental baselines to set trends that might point to future significant changes in the environment during the life of the facilities. So far it was not observed significant differences with respect to baseline values

  11. Caregiver's Burden, Coping, and Psycho-Education in Indian Households with Single- and Multiple-Affected Members with Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Satabdi; Bhatia, Triptish; Anderson, Carol; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit L; Deshpande, Smita N

    2013-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that family psycho-education combined with pharmacological intervention for patients with schizophrenia increases family understanding of the illness, reduces the familial burden of care, and improves patient outcomes. However, no studies have determined whether the burden of care is greater for those families with more than one ill member (multiplex) than for families with a single-affected individual (simplex), and whether psycho-educational programs should be adapted to meet the specific needs of multiplex families. This study was conducted at a tertiary care postgraduate teaching hospital in New Delhi, India. Caregivers in simplex [n = 50] and multiplex families [n = 30] were compared with regard to levels of burden, coping, and the impact of psycho-education on family functioning. All the caregiver participants attended eight bimonthly, psycho-educational intervention sessions. They were assessed on the Burden Assessment Schedule (BAS) and the Coping Check List (CCL) before and after psycho-education. Caregivers from the multiplex families reported significantly more burden on two domains of the BAS, but there were no significant differences between the groups with regard to coping on the CCL. Following psycho-education, significant improvement occurred in the majority of domains of the BAS and the CCL; the effect sizes varied by domain and family type. Multiplex families face a greater burden of care compared with simplex families. Currently, available psycho-education programs are moderately effective for such families.

  12. Caregiver’s Burden, Coping, and Psycho-Education in Indian Households with Single- and Multiple-Affected Members with Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Satabdi; Bhatia, Triptish; Anderson, Carol; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit L.; Deshpande, Smita N.

    2017-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that family psycho-education combined with pharmacological intervention for patients with schizophrenia increases family understanding of the illness, reduces the familial burden of care, and improves patient outcomes. However, no studies have determined whether the burden of care is greater for those families with more than one ill member (multiplex) than for families with a single-affected individual (simplex), and whether psycho-educational programs should be adapted to meet the specific needs of multiplex families. This study was conducted at a tertiary care postgraduate teaching hospital in New Delhi, India. Caregivers in simplex [n = 50] and multiplex families [n = 30] were compared with regard to levels of burden, coping, and the impact of psycho-education on family functioning. All the caregiver participants attended eight bimonthly, psycho-educational intervention sessions. They were assessed on the Burden Assessment Schedule (BAS) and the Coping Check List (CCL) before and after psycho-education. Caregivers from the multiplex families reported significantly more burden on two domains of the BAS, but there were no significant differences between the groups with regard to coping on the CCL. Following psycho-education, significant improvement occurred in the majority of domains of the BAS and the CCL; the effect sizes varied by domain and family type. Multiplex families face a greater burden of care compared with simplex families. Currently, available psycho-education programs are moderately effective for such families. PMID:29449743

  13. Identification of steelhead and resident rainbow trout progeny in the Deschutes River, Oregon, revealed with otolith microchemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, C.E.; Reeves, G.H.

    2002-01-01

    Comparisons of strontium:calcium (Sr:Ca) ratios in otolith primordia and freshwater growth regions were used to identify the progeny of steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss (anadromous rainbow trout) and resident rainbow trout in the Deschutes River, Oregon. We cultured progeny of known adult steelhead and resident rainbow trout to confirm the relationship between Sr:Ca ratios in otolith primordia and the life history of the maternal parent. The mean (??SD) Sr:Ca ratio was significantly higher in the otolith primordia of the progeny of steelhead (0.001461 ?? 0.00029; n = 100) than in those of the progeny of resident rainbow trout (0.000829 ?? 0.000012; n = 100). We used comparisons of Sr:Ca ratios in the primordia and first-summer growth regions of otoliths to determine the maternal origin of unknown O. mykiss juveniles (n = 272) collected from rearing habitats within the main-stem Deschutes River and tributary rearing habitats and thus to ascertain the relative proportion of each life history morph in each rearing habitat. Resident rainbow trout fry dominated the bi-monthly samples collected from main-stem rearing habitats between May and November 1995. Steelhead fry dominated samples collected from below waterfalls on two tributaries in 1996 and 1998.

  14. Ceramics Technology Project database: September 1991 summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyes, B.L.P.

    1992-06-01

    The piston ring-cylinder liner area of the internal combustion engine must withstand very-high-temperature gradients, highly-corrosive environments, and constant friction. Improving the efficiency in the engine requires ring and cylinder liner materials that can survive this abusive environment and lubricants that resist decomposition at elevated temperatures. Wear and friction tests have been done on many material combinations in environments similar to actual use to find the right materials for the situation. This report covers tribology information produced from 1986 through July 1991 by Battelle columbus Laboratories, Caterpillar Inc., and Cummins Engine Company, Inc. for the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP). All data in this report were taken from the project`s semiannual and bimonthly progress reports and cover base materials, coatings, and lubricants. The data, including test rig descriptions and material characterizations, are stored in the CTP database and are available to all project participants on request. Objective of this report is to make available the test results from these studies, but not to draw conclusions from these data.

  15. Ceramic Technology Project data base: September 1992 summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyes, B.L.P.

    1993-06-01

    Data presented in this report represent an intense effort to improve processing methods, testing methods, and general mechanical properties (rupture modulus, tensile, creep, stress-rupture, dynamic and cyclic fatigue, fracture toughness) of candidate ceramics for use in advanced heat engines. This work was performed by many facilities and represents only a small part of the data generated by the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP) since 1986. Materials discussed include GTE PY6, GN-10, NT-154, NT-164, SN-260, SN-251, SN-252, AY6, silicon nitride combined with rare-earth oxides, Y-TZP, ZTA, NC-433, NT-230, Hexoloy SA, MgO-PSZ-to-MgO-PSZ joints, MgO-PSZ-to-cast iron, and a few whisker/fiber-reinforced ceramics. Information in this report was taken from the project`s semiannual and bimonthly progress reports and from final reports summarizing the results of individual studies. Test results are presented in tabular form and in graphs. All data, including test rig descriptions and material characterizations, are stored in the CTP data base and are available to all project participants on request. The objective of this report is to make available the test results from these studies but not to draw conclusions from those data.

  16. Ceramic Technology Project database: September 1993 summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyes, B.L.P.

    1994-01-01

    Data presented in this report represent an intense effort to improve processing methods, testing methods, and general mechanical properties of candidate ceramics for use in advanced heat engines. Materials discussed include GN-10, GS-44, GTE PY6, NT-154, NT-164, sintered-reaction-bonded silicon nitrides, silicon nitride combined with rare-earth oxides, NT-230, Hexoloy SX-G1, Dow Corning`s {beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, and a few whisker-reinforced ceramic composites. Information in this report was taken from the project`s semiannual and bimonthly progress reports and from final reports summarizing the results of individual studies. Test results are presented in tabular form and in graphs. All data, including test rig descriptions and material characterizations, are stored in the CTP database and are available to all project participants on request. Objective of this report is to make available the test results from these studies but not to draw conclusions from those data.

  17. Ceramics Technology Project database: September 1991 summary report. [Materials for piston ring-cylinder liner for advanced heat/diesel engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyes, B.L.P.

    1992-06-01

    The piston ring-cylinder liner area of the internal combustion engine must withstand very-high-temperature gradients, highly-corrosive environments, and constant friction. Improving the efficiency in the engine requires ring and cylinder liner materials that can survive this abusive environment and lubricants that resist decomposition at elevated temperatures. Wear and friction tests have been done on many material combinations in environments similar to actual use to find the right materials for the situation. This report covers tribology information produced from 1986 through July 1991 by Battelle columbus Laboratories, Caterpillar Inc., and Cummins Engine Company, Inc. for the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP). All data in this report were taken from the project's semiannual and bimonthly progress reports and cover base materials, coatings, and lubricants. The data, including test rig descriptions and material characterizations, are stored in the CTP database and are available to all project participants on request. Objective of this report is to make available the test results from these studies, but not to draw conclusions from these data.

  18. Do smoke-free laws affect revenues in pubs and restaurants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melberg, Hans Olav; Lund, Karl E

    2012-02-01

    In the debate about laws regulating smoking in restaurants and pubs, there has been some controversy as to whether smoke-free laws would reduce revenues in the hospitality industry. Norway presents an interesting case for three reasons. First, it was among the first countries to implement smoke-free laws, so it is possible to assess the long-term effects. Second, it has a cold climate so if there is a negative effect on revenue one would expect to find it in Norway. Third, the data from Norway are detailed enough to distinguish between revenue from pubs and restaurants. Autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) intervention analysis of bi-monthly observations of revenues in restaurants and pubs show that the law did not have a statistically significant long-term effect on revenue in restaurants or on restaurant revenue as a share of personal consumption. Similar analysis for pubs shows that there was no significant long-run effect on pub revenue.

  19. The Healthy Skin Project: changing nursing practice to prevent and treat hospital-acquired pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour-Burton, Teri; Fields, Willa; Outlaw, Lanie; Deleon, Elvira

    2013-06-01

    Hospital-acquired pressure ulcers are serious clinical complications that can lead to increased length of stay, pain, infection, and, potentially, death. The surgical progressive care unit at Sharp Grossmont Hospital, San Diego, California, developed the multidisciplinary Healthy Skin Project to decrease the prevalence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers. The previous treatment plan was reviewed and modified according to current evidence-based practice. The project consisted of 3 components: creation of a position for a unit-based wound liaison nurse, staff education, and involvement of the nursing assistants. The wound liaison nurse developed and conducted bimonthly skin audits, which revealed inconsistencies in clinical practice and documentation. Education for the staff was accomplished via a self-learning module, case presentations, and 1-on-1 training. In addition, a pressure ulcer algorithm tool was developed to demonstrate step-by-step wound management and documentation. From Spring 2003 through Summer 2006, the prevalence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers ranged from 0.0% to 18.92%, with a mean of 4.85%. After implementation of the project, the prevalence decreased to 0.0% for 17 of 20 quarters, through 2011. Prevention and a multidisciplinary approach are effective in reducing the occurrence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers.

  20. Nutrient Losses during Winter and Summer Storage of Separated and Unseparated Digested Cattle Slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perazzolo, Francesca; Mattachini, Gabriele; Riva, Elisabetta; Provolo, Giorgio

    2017-07-01

    Management factors affect nutrient loss during animal manure slurry storage in different ways. We conducted a pilot-scale study to evaluate carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) losses from unseparated and digested dairy slurry during winter and summer storage. In addition to season, treatments included mechanical separation of digestate into liquid and solid fractions and bimonthly mixing. Chemical analyses were performed every 2 wk for the mixed materials and at the start and end of storage for unmixed materials. The parameters examined allowed us to estimate C and N losses and examine the factors that determine these losses as well as emission patterns. Gas measurements were done every 2 wk to determine the main forms in which gaseous losses occurred. To evaluate the effect of separation, measured losses and emissions of separated liquid and solid fractions were mathematically combined using the mass separation efficiency of the mechanical separator. Nutrient losses were mainly affected by climatic conditions. Losses of C (up to 23%) from unseparated, unmixed digestate and of N (38% from combined separated fractions and from unseparated digestate) were much greater in summer than in winter, when C and N losses were losses ( losses (up to 64 and 90% of total losses, respectively) in summer. Moreover, management practices should limit NH, the main form of N losses (up to 99.5%). Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  1. Assessing the spatial pattern of a river water quality in southern Brazil by multivariate analysis of biological and chemical indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. B. Cassanego

    Full Text Available Abstract This study assessed the genotoxicity and chemical quality of the Rio dos Sinos, southern Brazil. During two years, bimonthly, cuttings of Tradescantia pallida var. purpurea with flower buds were exposed to river water samples from Caraá, Santo Antônio da Patrulha, Taquara and Campo Bom, which are municipalities located in the upper, middle and lower stretches of the Rio dos Sinos basin. Simultaneously, chemical parameters were analyzed, rainfall data were surveyed and negative (distilled water and positive (0.1% formaldehyde controls were made. Micronuclei (MCN frequencies were determined in tetrads of pollen grain mother cells. From the upper stretch toward the lower, there was an increase in the frequency of MCN and in concentrations of chemical parameters. Cadmium, lead, copper, total chromium and zinc were present at the four sites and a concentration gradient was not demonstrated along the river. The multivariate analysis revealed that two principal components exist, which accounted for 62.3% of the observed variances. Although genotoxicity was observed in Santo Antônio da Patrulha, the water presented higher mean values for most of the assessed parameters, in the lower stretch, where urbanization and industrialization are greater. The spatial and temporal pattern of water quality observed reinforces the importance of considering the environmental factors and their effects on organisms in an integrated way in watercourse monitoring programs.

  2. Algal massive growth in relation to water quality and salinity at Damietta, north of Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ali Ibraheem Deyab

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To relate the proliferation and dominance of certain algal species at the Damietta and its relation to water quality. Methods: Water and algal biomass were bimonthly sampled from five selected sites at Damietta Province, Egypt during 2012. Algae were identified and quantified. Waters, algae and sediment were analyzed. Results: The physicochemical properties of water showed limited seasonal but substantial local variation. The high levels of nitrogen and phosphorus and turbidity of water pointed to marked eutrophication, which could enhance massive algal growth. The temporal fluctuation in temperature, exposure to industrial and domestic sewage and salinity results in succession between blooming algal species. Spirulina platensis and Chlorella vulgaris alternated in a moderately saline water and Oscillatoria agardhii and Mougeotia scalaris in a fresh water body during summer and winter respectively. Likewise, Microcystis aureginosa and Ulva lactuca alternated in a moderately saline site during autumn and summer respectively. Cladophora albida dominated a fish pond of brackish water and Dunaliella salina dominated the most saline water over the whole period of study. Conclusions: Growth of the predominant algal species is correlated to water quality. These species are of considerable nutritive value, with moderate contents of protein, carbohydrate, macronutrients and micronutrients, which evaluates them for usage as food (green and macroalgae, fodder or bio-fertilizer (cyanophytes.

  3. Salinity and its variability in the Lagoon of Venice, 2000–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Zirino

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Yearly averages computed from monthly and bimonthly salinity data collected between 2000 and 2009 from 13 broadly spaced stations in the Venice Lagoon were analysed in view of 30 min data collected semi-continuously during 2009 at nine similarly located stations. Data from all stations and all years indicate that, based on yearly averages, the lagoon may be divided along its major (long axis into three areas: 1 a northern, freshwater impacted area (S = 32 PSU of low, tidally-caused, variability, and 3 an intermediate zone. Salinity changes are closely associated with rainfall events, and the incoming freshwater is consistently distributed throughout the lagoon by tidal action. Much variability is simply a result of the forward and backward motion of the tides and is not caused by a salinity change in the water itself. The consistency of the 2000–2009 data and the historical (to 1961 watershed record support the hypothesis that the Venice Lagoon has been and is currently at steady-state with respect to its salinity distribution. As such, it is conducive to the development of (at least three separate ecosystems.

  4. Shared governance in a clinic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Michelle M; Costanzo, Cindy

    2015-01-01

    Shared governance in health care empowers nurses to share in the decision-making process, which results in decentralized management and collective accountability. Share governance practices have been present in hospitals since the late 1970s. However, shared governance in ambulatory care clinics has not been well established. The subjects of this quality project included staff and administrative nurses in a clinic system. The stakeholder committee chose what model of shared governance to implement and educated clinic staff. The Index of Professional Nursing Governance measured a shared governance score pre- and postimplementation of the Clinic Nursing Council. The Clinic Nursing Council met bimonthly for 3 months during this project to discuss issues and make decisions related to nursing staff. The Index of Professional Nursing Governance scores indicated traditional governance pre- and postimplementation of the Clinic Nursing Council, which is to be expected. The stakeholder committee was beneficial to the initial implementation process and facilitated staff nurse involvement. Shared governance is an evolutionary process that develops empowered nurses and nurse leaders.

  5. Tacit definitions of informal caregiving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrubel, J; Richards, T A; Folkman, S; Acree, M C

    2001-01-01

    This study describes three tacit definitions of informal caregiving and explores the extent to which differences in these tacit definitions explain variation in caregivers' negative mood over time. There is a growing need to understand the sources of stress and gratification for informal caregivers. Tacit definitions of informal caregiving refer to caregivers' understanding of what caregiving entails. These definitions are tacit because they arise from caregivers' taken-for-granted understanding rather than formally articulated positions concerning caregiving. A random sample of 60 men, all of whom were caregiving partners of men with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), was drawn from a larger cohort of 253 participants in the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Coping Project (1990-1997). The caregivers were assessed bimonthly for 2 years with procedures that included a semi-structured interview focusing on a recent stressful event involving caregiving, and quantitative measures of well-being. Interpretive phenomenological case studies of the narrative accounts of the 60 caregivers produced three tacit definitions of caregiving - engagement, conflict and distance. These three tacit definitions were distinguished by differences in learning about caregiving, involvement in health care decisions, caregiving activities and reported sources of stress. The three groups differed on measures of dyadic adjustment, depression, anger and anxiety. Better understanding of caregivers' tacit definitions can facilitate and enhance effective support and interventions for caregivers.

  6. The Dynamic Environment of Crypto Markets: The Lifespan of New Psychoactive Substances (NPS and Vendors Selling NPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elle Wadsworth

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The Internet has played a major role in the distribution of New Psychoactive Substances (NPS, and crypto markets are increasingly used for the anonymous sale of drugs, including NPS. This study explores the availability of individual NPS and vendors on the crypto markets and considers whether crypto markets are a reliable platform for the sale of NPS. Data was collected from 22 crypto markets that were accessed through the hidden web using the Onion Router (Tor. Data collection took place bimonthly from October 2015 to October 2016 as part of the CASSANDRA (Computer Assisted Solutions for Studying the Availability aNd DistRibution of novel psychoActive substances project. In seven snapshots over 12 months, 808 unique vendors were found selling 256 unique NPS. The total number of individual NPS and vendors increased across the data collection period (increase of 93.6% and 71.6%, respectively. Only 24% (n = 61 of the total number of NPS and 4% (n = 31 of vendors appeared in every snapshot over the 12 months, whereas 21% (n = 54 of NPS and 45% (n = 365 of vendors only appeared once throughout the data collection. The individual NPS and vendors did not remain the same over the 12 months. However, the availability of NPS and vendors selling NPS grew. NPS consistently available on crypto markets could indicate popular substances.

  7. Characteristics of HIV target CD4 T cells collected using different sampling methods from the genital tract of HIV seronegative women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Smita S; Sabula, Michael J; Mehta, C Christina; Haddad, Lisa B; Brown, Nakita L; Amara, Rama R; Ofotokun, Igho; Sheth, Anandi N

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the immune profile of CD4 T cells, the primary targets for HIV, in the female genital tract (FGT) is critical for evaluating and developing effective biomedical HIV prevention strategies in women. However, longitudinal investigation of HIV susceptibility markers expressed by FGT CD4 T cells has been hindered by low cellular yield and risk of sampling-associated trauma. We investigated three minimally invasive FGT sampling methods to characterize and compare CD4 T cell yield and phenotype with the goal of establishing feasible sampling strategies for immune profiling of mucosal CD4 T cells. FGT samples were collected bimonthly from 12 healthy HIV negative women of reproductive age in the following order: 1) Cervicovaginal lavage (CVL), 2) two sequential endocervical flocked swabs (FS), and 3) two sequential endocervical cytobrushes (CB1, CB2). Cells were isolated and phentoyped via flow cytometry. CD4 T cell recovery was highest from each individual CB compared to either CVL or FS (p sampling method, expressed CCR5 relative to peripheral blood (p samples. Using three different mucosal sampling methods collected longitudinally we demonstrate that CD4 T cells within the FGT express CCR5 and α4β7 and are highly activated, attributes which could act in concert to facilitate HIV acquisition. FS and CB sampling methods can allow for investigation of strategies to reduce HIV target cells in the FGT and could inform the design and interpretation microbicide and vaccine studies in women.

  8. Development of manganese toxicity in pasture legumes under extreme climatic conditions. [Trifolium subterraneum; Medicago sativa; Brassica campestris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siman, A; Cradock, F W; Hudson, A W

    1974-08-01

    Manganese levels and pH in soil were measured on limed and unlimed plots at bi-monthly intervals for two years at five field sites with lucerne (Medicago sativa) and subterranean clover (Trifolium subterraneum) and related to rainfall and temperature. Pot experiments with lucerne, subterranean clover and rape (Brassica campestris) were used to confirm the results of the field experiments. Manganese toxicity developed in lucerne and subterranean clover under waterlogged conditions after heavy rain on the slightly acid soils (pH 4.7-5.5). Lucerne also showed manganese toxicity on the same soils in summer after extended hot, dry conditions. The maximum available manganese was 210 ..mu..g/g in the waterlogged soil (0-15 cm) the 128 ..mu..g/g in the heat affected soil. Lime treatment of 2240 kg/ha reduced the maximum available manganese to 148 ..mu..g/g in waterlogged plots and to 47 ..mu..g/g in the heat affected plots but failed to correct manganese toxicity. However, lime corrected toxicity symptoms under less severe conditions. In the pot experiments, available manganese reached 270 ..mu..g/g after 2 weeks artificial waterlogging and 68 ..mu..g/g after 2 weeks dry heat exposure. 12 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  9. Solar neutrino flux measurements by the Soviet-American Gallium Experiment (SAGE) for half the 22-year solar cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdurashitov, J.N.; Veretenkin, E.P.; Vermul, V.M.; Gavrin, V.N.; Girin, S.V.; Gorbachev, V.V.; Gurkina, P.P.; Zatsepin, G.T.; Ibragimova, T.V.; Kalikhov, A.V.; Knodel, T.V.; Mirmov, I.N.; Khairnasov, N.G.; Shikhin, A.A.; Yants, V.E.; Bowles, T.J.; Teasdale, W.A.; Nico, J.S.; Wilkerson, J.F.; Cleveland, B.T.

    2002-01-01

    We present measurements of the solar neutrino capture rate on metallic gallium in the Soviet-American gallium experiment (SAGE) over a period of slightly more than half the 22-year solar cycle. A combined analysis of 92 runs over the twelve-year period from January 1990 until December 2001 yields a capture rate of 70.8 +5.3 -5.2 (stat) +3.7 -3.2 (sys) SNU for solar neutrinos with energies above 0.233 MeV. This value is slightly more than half the rate predicted by the standard solar model, 130 SNU. We present the results of new runs since April 1998 and analyze all runs combined by years, months, and bimonthly periods beginning in 1990. A simple analysis of the SAGE results together with the results of other solar neutrino experiments gives an estimate of (4.6 ± 1.2) x 10 10 neutrinos cm -2 s -1 for the flux of the electron pp neutrinos that reach the Earth without changing their flavor. The flux of the pp neutrinos produced in thermonuclear reactions in the Sun is estimated to be (7.6 ± 2.0) x 10 10 neutrinos cm -2 s -1 , in agreement with the value of (5.95 ± 0.06) x 10 10 neutrinos cm -2 s -1 predicted by the standard solar model

  10. Nature's Autonomous Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, H. G.; Yee, J.-H.; Mayr, M.; Schnetzler, R.

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinearity is required to produce autonomous oscillations without external time dependent source, and an example is the pendulum clock. The escapement mechanism of the clock imparts an impulse for each swing direction, which keeps the pendulum oscillating at the resonance frequency. Among nature's observed autonomous oscillators, examples are the quasi-biennial oscillation and bimonthly oscillation of the Earth atmosphere, and the 22-year solar oscillation. The oscillations have been simulated in numerical models without external time dependent source, and in Section 2 we summarize the results. Specifically, we shall discuss the nonlinearities that are involved in generating the oscillations, and the processes that produce the periodicities. In biology, insects have flight muscles, which function autonomously with wing frequencies that far exceed the animals' neural capacity; Stretch-activation of muscle contraction is the mechanism that produces the high frequency oscillation of insect flight, discussed in Section 3. The same mechanism is also invoked to explain the functioning of the cardiac muscle. In Section 4, we present a tutorial review of the cardio-vascular system, heart anatomy, and muscle cell physiology, leading up to Starling's Law of the Heart, which supports our notion that the human heart is also a nonlinear oscillator. In Section 5, we offer a broad perspective of the tenuous links between the fluid dynamical oscillators and the human heart physiology.

  11. Atmospheric Ozone And Its Biosphere - Atmosphere Exchange In A Mangrove Forest Ecosystem A Case Study From Sundarbans NE Coast Of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manab Kumar Dutta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Temporal variation of atmospheric O3 and its biosphere atmosphere exchange were monitored in the Sundarbans mangrove forest from January 2011 to December 2011 on bimonthly basis. O3 mixing ratios at 10 m and 20 m heights over the forest atmosphere ranged between 14.66 1.88 to 37.90 0.91 and 19.32 6.27 to 39.80 10.13 ppbv respectively having maximal premonsoon and minimal monsoon periods. Average daytime O3 mixing ratio was 1.69 times higher than nighttime indicates significant photo chemical production of O3 in forest atmosphere. Annual averaged O3 mixing ratio in 10 m height was 13.2 lower than 20 m height induces exchange of O3 across mangrove biosphere atmosphere interface depending upon micrometeorological conditions of the forest ecosystem. Annual average biosphere atmosphere O3 exchange flux in this mangrove forest environment was 0.441 g m-2 s-1. Extrapolating the value for entire forest surface area the mangrove ecosystem acts as a sink of 58.4GgO3 annually indicating significant contribution of Sundarbans mangroves towards regional atmospheric O3 budget as well as climate change.

  12. Uranium concentrations and 234U/238U activity ratios in fault-associated groundwater as possible earthquake precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finkel, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    In order to assess the utility of uranium isotopes as fluid phase earthquake precursors, uranium concentrations and 234 U/ 238 U activity ratios have been monitored on a monthly or bimonthly basis in water from 24 wells and springs associated with Southern California fault zones. Uranium concentrations vary from 0.002 ppb at Indian Canyon Springs on the San Jacinto fault to 8.3 ppb at Lake Hughes well on the San Andreas fault in the Palmdale area. 234 U/ 238 U activity ratios vary from 0.88 at Agua Caliente Springs on the Elsinore fault to 5.4 at Niland Slab well on the San Andreas fault in the Imperial Valley. There was one large earthquake in the study area during 1979, the 15 October 1979 M = 6.6 Imperial Valley earthquake. Correlated with this event, uranium concentrations varied by a factor of more than 60 and activity ratios by a factor of 3 at the Niland Slab site, about 70 km from the epicenter. At the other sites monitored, uranium concentrations varied in time, but with no apparent pattern, while uranium activity ratios remained essentially constant throughout the monitoring period

  13. New iGrav superconducting gravimeter: accuracy, drift and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Moigne, N.; Champollion, C.; Warburton, R. J.; Bayer, R.; Deville, S.; Doerflinger, E.; chery, J.; Vernant, P.; Boudin, F.; Collard, P.

    2011-12-01

    A GWR iGrav superconducting gravimeter has been installed in the Larzac karstic area (Southern France near the Mediterranean Sea, elevation 800m, karst thickness 200m). Continuous sub-μGal gravity measurements are needed to study water storage and transfer in the non-saturated zone of the karstic area. The GWR iGrav is a new generation of superconducting gravimeter of reduced size (Dewar 15L) with simplified installation. At first, the specifications of the iGrav site will be presented, then the drift behaviour and the data processing. The drift quickly decreases to less than 0.1 μGal per day and only a few offsets are observed in the data. In order to look at the stability of the iGrav over a wide time period, a FG5 gravimeter is used for bi-monthly absolute gravity measurements and for frequent calibrations. As a result of the installation, the iGrav allows sub-μGal gravity monitoring only a few weeks after the beginning of the installation. After having discussed the instrumental and data processing points of view, preliminary results on the local karstic water storage will be presented and interpreted by combining different geophysical data. Continuous gravity data allow to study processes at different timescale such as summer evapotranspiration or high precipitating event characteristic of the Mediterranean autumn.

  14. Spatial distribution and population structure of fiddler crabs in an Indian Sundarban mangrove

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Sen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Brachyuran crabs constitute the most abundant faunal component of mangrove ecosystems and support a wide range of ecosystem services. In the present study, seasonal variation of population density and biomass along with demographic categories and sex ratios of four species of fiddler crabs (Uca rosea, Uca triangularis, Uca dussumieri and Uca vocans from Jhorkhali Island in the Sundarban mangrove were studied in relation to some major environmental parameters (salinity, nutrient content, soil organic carbon, dissolved oxygen, total dissolved solute, etc. during bimonthly sampling for three consecutive years (2010-2012. Maximum population density and biomass of the ocypodid crabs were recorded during the pre-monsoonal month and minimum values during the monsoon. Different peaks in reproductive activity were observed among seasonal breeders (U. triangularis, U. dussumieri. For U. vocans, the sex ratio peaks declined during the ovigerous period. All four populations were characterized by significantly more males than females. Multiple regression analysis suggested a cumulative effect of several ecological parameters on seasonal fluctuations of the crab population. Breeding periodicity might be controlled by a combination of factors, including temperature, quality of the substratum, food availability for the adult and larval stages, and intertidal zonations.

  15. O PERFIL DE CONHECIMENTO SOBRE SERES VIVOS PELOS ESTUDANTES DA COOPEC: UMA FERRAMENTA PARA PLANEJAR UM ENSINO DE CIÊNCIAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darcy Ribeiro de Castro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to survey the prior knowledge of students from COOPEC-Central - Central, Bahia - at initial grades of Elementary School, in February 2009, describing the context of teaching in classrooms during that school year. This study is part of a masters dissertation and involved content of some aspects of living beings (identification, size and function in the early grades (2nd to 5th year, children aged between 7 and 11. We developed our studies based on Vygotsky’s children’s spontaneous and scientific knowledge theory and on other spontaneous conceptions reference in that area. We applied questionnaires with general questions to students in order to obtain information on students’ spontaneous knowledge with respect to living beings; we discussed with teachers the knowledge brought by the students to school in bimonthly meetings; and we applied a questionnaire to which teachers responded at end of the last meeting. Data analysis – with the students’ and teachers’ reponses - was performed considering all the initial Elementary School grades, based on the comparative method in order to highlight what children actually knew about living beings, as a starting point for planning education on the subject.

  16. Extended Duration Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Inhibition in the Eye: Failures, Successes, and Future Possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Michael W

    2018-01-27

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a pivotal role in the development of neovascularization and edema from several common chorioretinal vascular conditions. The intravitreally injected drugs (aflibercept, bevacizumab, conbercept, pegaptanib, and ranibizumab) used to treat these conditions improve the visual acuity and macular morphology in most patients. Monthly or bimonthly injections were administered in the phase III pivotal trials but physicians usually individualize therapy with pro re nata (PRN) or treat and extend regimens. Despite these lower frequency treatment regimens, frequent injections and clinic visits are still needed to produce satisfactory outcomes. Newly developed drugs and refillable reservoirs with favorable pharmacokinetic profiles may extend durations of action and require fewer office visits. However, we have learned from previous experiences that the longer durations of action seen in strategically designed phase III trials often do not translate to less frequent injections in real-life clinical practice. Unfortunately, long-acting therapies that produce soluble VEGF receptors (encapsulated cell technology and adenovirus injected DNA) have failed in phase II trials. The development of longer duration therapies remains a difficult and frustrating process, and frequent drug injections are likely to remain the standard-of-care for years to come.

  17. Leaf area index estimation of Eucalyptus grandis W.Hill. in plantations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubal Papamija-Muñoz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We estimated leaf area index (LAI in Eucalyptus grandis W.Hill. plantations in four farms in the Smurfit Kappa Carton de Colombia (SKCC with three farms located in the city of Popayan (Cauca and one located in the municipality of Restrepo (Valle del Cauca. Each farm had three fertilized and three unfertilized plots with 64 individuals in each. We used three methods, Plant Canopy Analyzer 2000 (PCA 2000, flat photograph PIPEcv software and a destructive method, which was generated using a mathematical model. The first two methods were measured bimonthly for a year and the final method required trees being cut to measure their diameter. Estimation of leaf area index was 2.01 for PCA 2000, 3.12 for PIPEcv and 2.83 for the mathematical model. These values correspond to the average and range of leaf area indices obtained for each method on all farms. Statistically the three methodologies developed in this study were not closely related.

  18. Publications in biomedical and environmental sciences programs, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moody, J.B.

    1982-07-01

    This bibliography contains 698 references to articles in journals, books, and reports published in the subject area of biomedical and environmental sciences during 1981. There are 520 references to articles published in journals and books and 178 references to reports. Staff members in the Biomedical and Environmental Sciences divisions have other publications not included in this bibliography; for example, theses, book reviews, abstracts published in journals or symposia proceedings, pending journal publications and reports such as monthly, bimonthly, and quarterly progress reports, contractor reports, and reports for internal distribution. This document is sorted by the division, and then alphabetically by author. The sorting by divisions separates the references by subject area in a simple way. The divisions represented in the order that they appear in the bibliography are Analytical Chemistry, Biology, Chemical Technology, Information R and D, Health and Safety Research, Instrumentation and Controls, Computer Sciences, Energy, Engineering Technology, Solid State, Central Management, Operations, and Environmental Sciences. Indexes are provided by author, title, and journal reference

  19. AWG, Enhancing Professional Skills, Providing Resources and Assistance for Women in the Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundermann, C.; Cruse, A. M.; AssociationWomen Geoscientists

    2011-12-01

    The Association for Women Geoscientists (AWG) was founded in 1977. AWG is an international organization, with ten chapters, devoted to enhancing the quality and level of participation of women in geosciences, and introducing women and girls to geoscience careers. Our diverse interests and expertise cover the entire spectrum of geoscience disciplines and career paths, providing unexcelled networking and mentoring opportunities to develop leadership skills. Our membership is brought together by a common love of earth, atmospheric and ocean sciences, and the desire to ensure rewarding opportunities for women in the geosciences. AWG offers a variety of scholarships, including the Chrysalis scholarship for women who are returning to school after a life-changing interruption, and the Sands and Takken awards for students to make presentations at professional meetings. AWG promotes professional development through workshops, an online bi-monthly newsletter, more timely e-mailed newsletters, field trips, and opportunities to serve in an established professional organization. AWG recognizes the work of outstanding women geoscientists and of outstanding men supporters of women in the geosciences. The AWG Foundation funds ten scholarships, a Distinguished Lecture Program, the Geologist-in-the-Parks program, Science Fair awards, and numerous Girl Scout programs. Each year, AWG sends a contingent to Congressional Visits Day, to help educate lawmakers about the unique challenges that women scientists face in the geoscience workforce.

  20. Healthy eating and active living for diabetes in primary care networks (HEALD-PCN: rationale, design, and evaluation of a pragmatic controlled trial for adults with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Steven T

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While strong and consistent evidence supports the role of lifestyle modification in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes (T2DM, the best strategies for program implementation to support lifestyle modification within primary care remain to be determined. The objective of the study is to evaluate the implementation of an evidence-based self- management program for patients with T2DM within a newly established primary care network (PCN environment. Method Using a non-randomized design, participants (total N = 110 per group will be consecutively allocated in bi-monthly blocks to either a 6-month self-management program lead by an Exercise Specialist or to usual care. Our primary outcome is self-reported physical activity and pedometer steps. Discussion The present study will assess whether a diabetes self-management program lead by an Exercise Specialist provided within a newly emerging model of primary care and linked to available community-based resources, can lead to positive changes in self-management behaviours for adults with T2DM. Ultimately, our work will serve as a platform upon which an emerging model of primary care can incorporate effective and efficient chronic disease management practices that are sustainable through partnerships with local community partners. Clinical Trials Registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00991380

  1. Reproduction of the exotic bullfrog Lithobates catesbeianus (Shaw, 1802 (Anura, Ranidae in creeks of the Atlantic Rainforest of Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Gomes Afonso

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Reproduction of the exotic bullfrog Lithobates catesbeianus was studied every two months from January 2005 to December 2006, analyzing tadpoles, juveniles, and adult vocalizations at three creeks located in the largest Brazilian center of ornamental fish breeding. Absolute and relative tadpole frequencies were measured bimonthly in three development stages: G1 (no limbs, G2 (hind limbs present, G3 (fore and hind limbs and I (metamorphs. Results show that, during warmest months, a greater proportion of tadpoles in G1, G2, and G3 phases were found in Santo Antônio and Chato creeks, while G1, G3, and I phases were more common in Gavião creek. Tadpoles in G1 and G2 phases predominated in coldest months at all locations. Male calls and highest average water temperatures and rainfall were recorded at 3 streams during the hottest months. Management measures should be adopted, such as the extermination of larval and adult stages, and initiatives should be taken to prevent new re-introductions, such as: (1 installation of fences around tanks where adults are located, (2 placement of protective screens on the pipes that release waste water from tanks directly into streams, (3 capacity building and educational measures on the problems of biological invasions for staff working on ornamental fish farms.

  2. Reproduction of the exotic bullfrog Lithobates catesbeianus (Shaw, 1802 (Anura, Ranidae in creeks of the Atlantic Rainforest of Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Gomes Afonso

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Reproduction of the exotic bullfrog Lithobates catesbeianus was studied every two months from January 2005 to December 2006, analyzing tadpoles, juveniles, and adult vocalizations at three creeks located in the largest Brazilian center of ornamental fish breeding. Absolute and relative tadpole frequencies were measured bimonthly in three development stages: G1 (no limbs, G2 (hind limbs present, G3 (fore and hind limbs and I (metamorphs. Results show that, during warmest months, a greater proportion of tadpoles in G1, G2, and G3 phases were found in Santo Antônio and Chato creeks, while G1, G3, and I phases were more common in Gavião creek. Tadpoles in G1 and G2 phases predominated in coldest months at all locations. Male calls and highest average water temperatures and rainfall were recorded at 3 streams during the hottest months. Management measures should be adopted, such as the extermination of larval and adult stages, and initiatives should be taken to prevent new re-introductions, such as: (1 installation of fences around tanks where adults are located, (2 placement of protective screens on the pipes that release waste water from tanks directly into streams, (3 capacity building and educational measures on the problems of biological invasions for staff working on ornamental fish farms.

  3. Beija-flores (Aves: Trochilidae e seus recursos florais em uma área de caatinga da Chapada Diamantina, Bahia, Brasil Hummingbirds (Aves: Trochilidae and their floral resources in an area of caatinga vegetation in the Chapada Diamantina, Bahia State, Northeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caio Graco Machado

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the species of hummingbird occurring in an area of caatinga vegetation, examining their seasonal activities, the assemblages of plants that they used, as well as the floral characteristics and flowering phenology of that vegetation. These surveys were performed in an area of arboreal caatinga in Chapada Diamantina, municipality of Mucugê, state of Bahia, Brazil, during 12 expeditions undertaken on a bi-monthly basis between October, 2005 and August, 2007. Field activities included observations made of the visiting hummingbird species, their behavior, and the frequency of their visits; as well as the plant species visited, their floral attributes, size, and the flowering phenophase evident on the occasion of each expedition. Seven species of hummingbirds were registered, including five residents. Phaethornis pretrei (Lesson & Delattre, 1839 acted as the organizer of this pollination guild. This species and Chlorostilbon lucidus (Shaw, 1812, these two species were considered the principal pollinators within the community. The hummingbirds visited a total of 29 plant species, of which only 12 are considered ornitophilous. The plant community presented a continuous flowering, with 19 species flowering in both the dry and the rainy season, permitting the year-round permanence of resident hummingbird species.

  4. Evaluation of long-term trends in hydrographic and nutrient parameters in a southeast US coastal river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Asher A; Kimball, Matthew E

    2013-12-01

    The Nassau River estuary is located in northeast Florida adjacent to the eutrophic St. Johns River. Historically, development has been sparse in the Nassau River's catchment; thus, the system may provide a relatively undisturbed aquatic environment. To monitor the condition of the Nassau River estuary and to discern spatial and temporal trends in water quality, nutrients and hydrographic variables were assessed throughout the estuary from 1997 to 2011. Hydrographic (temperature, salinity, total suspended solids, and turbidity) and nutrient parameters (total phosphorus, ortho-PO₄(3-), total nitrogen, NH₄(+), total Kjeldahl nitrogen, and NO₃(-)) were monitored bimonthly at 12 sites in the mesohaline and polyhaline zones of the river. Nonparametric Kendall's Tau was implemented to analyze long-term water quality patterns. Salinity was found to increase with time, particularly in the mesohaline sampling sites. Dissolved oxygen decreased over time in the estuary and hypoxic conditions became increasingly frequent in the final years of the study. Nutrients increased in the estuary, ranging from 149 to 401%. Rainfall data collected in adjacent conservation areas did not correlate well with nutrients as compared with stream discharge data collected in the basin headwaters, outside of the conservation lands, attributed here to expanding urbanization. During the study period, the Nassau basin underwent rapid human population growth and land development resulting in commensurate impacts to water quality. Nutrient and physical data collected during this study indicate that the Nassau River estuary is becoming more eutrophic with time.

  5. Evaluation of sweet sorghum as a potential ethanol crop in Mississippi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, David Scott

    2011-08-01

    Petroleum prices have made alternative fuel crops a viable option for ethanol production. Sweet sorghum [Sorghum bicolor] is a non-food crop that may produce large quantities of ethanol with minimal inputs. Eleven cultivars were planted in 2008 and 2009 as a half-season crop. Four-row plots 6.9 m by 0.5 m, were monitored bimonthly for °Brix, height, and sugar accumulation. Yield and extractable sap were taken at the end of season. Stalk yield was greatest for the cultivar Sugar Top (4945 kg ha-1) and lowest for Simon (1054 kg ha-1). Dale ranked highest ethanol output (807 L ha-1) while Simon (123 L ha-1) is the lowest. All cultivars peak Brix accumulation occurs in early October. Individual sugar concentrations indicated sucrose is the predominant sugar with glucose and fructose levels dependent on cultivar. Supplemental ethanol in fermented wort was the best preservative tested to halt degradation of sorghum wort.

  6. Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis infection in wild small mammals in ecotourism area of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonelli, Gabriel Barbosa; Tanure, Aline; Rego, Felipe Dutra; Carvalho, Gustavo Mayr de Lima; Stumpp, Rodolfo; Ássimos, Gabriela Ribeiro; Campos, Aldenise Martins; Lima, Ana Cristina Viana Mariano da Rocha; Gontijo, Célia Maria Ferreira; Paz, Gustavo Fontes; Andrade Filho, José Dilermando

    2017-01-01

    Leishmaniases are parasitic diseases transmitted to mammalian hosts by sand fly vectors (Diptera: Psychodidae). Despite the increasing occurrence of visceral and cutaneous leishmaniasis cases in urban centers, their transmission still occur primarily in wild environments and may be associated with professional activities and recreation, such as ecotourism. The Reserva Particular do Patrimônio Natural Santuário do Caraça (RPPNSC) is one of the largest ecotourism attractions in the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil, and comprises an area of environmental preservation with 11,233 hectares presenting a transitional vegetation between Cerrado and Atlantic Forest. The present study describes the abundance of small mammals in RPPNSC, the isolation and identification of Leishmania in five wild animals. Small mammals were bimonthly trapped along 6 trails within the RPPNSC with 10 Tomahawk traps each. Two trails were located in peridomiciliary areas near tourist lodging facilities, and four trails were located at sites visited by tourists in forest areas. The most prevalent species were Akodon cursor, Cerradomys subflavus and Oligoryzomys nigripes. Six isolates of Leishmania were obtained from these animals and identified as Leishmania braziliensis through HSP70-PCR RFLP method. Leishmania spp. DNA was detected by kDNA-PCR method and isolated by biphasic culture. Studies point to some of the captured species as potential wild reservoirs of Leishmania, suggesting they may be involved in the transmission cycle in these wild environments.

  7. Civil Service Workforce Market Supply and the Effect on Cost Estimating Relationship (CERS) that May Effect the Productivity Factors for Future NASA Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterk, Steve; Chesley, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    The upcoming retirement of the Baby Boomers will leave a workforce age gap between the younger generation (the future NASA decision makers) and the gray beards. This paper will reflect on the average age of the workforce across NASA Centers, the Aerospace Industry and other Government Agencies, like DoD. This paper will dig into Productivity and Realization Factors and how they get applied to bi-monthly (payroll) data for true full-time equivalent (FTE) calculations that could be used at each of the NASA Centers and other business systems that are on the forefront in being implemented. This paper offers some comparative costs analysis/solutions, from simple FTE cost-estimating relationships (CERs) versus CERs for monthly time-phasing activities for small research projects that start and get completed within a government fiscal year. This paper will present the results of a parametric study investigating the cost-effectiveness of alternative performance-based CERs and how they get applied into the Center's forward pricing rate proposals (FPRP). True CERs based on the relationship of a younger aged workforce will have some effects on labor rates used in both commercial cost models and other internal home-grown cost models which may impact the productivity factors for future NASA missions.

  8. Civil Service Workforce Market Supply and the Effect on the Cost Estimating Relationships (CERs) that may effect the Productivity Factors for Future NASA Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterk, Steve; Chesley, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    The upcoming retirement of the Baby Boomers on the horizon will leave a performance gap between younger generation (the future NASA decision makers) and the gray beards. This paper will reflect on the average age of workforce across NASA Centers, the Aerospace Industry and other Government Agencies, like DoD. This papers will dig into Productivity and Realization Factors and how they get applied to bimonthly (payroll data) for true FTE calculations that could be used at each of the NASA Centers and other business systems that are on the forefront in being implemented. This paper offers some comparative costs solutions, from simple - full time equivalent (FTE) cost estimating relationships CERs, to complex - CERs for monthly time-phasing activities for small research projects that start and get completed within a government fiscal year. This paper will present the results of a parametric study investigating the cost-effectiveness of different alternatives performance based cost estimating relationships (CERs) and how they get applied into the Center s forward pricing rate proposals (FPRP). True CERs based on the relationship of a younger aged workforce will have some effects on labor rates used in both commercial cost models and internal home-grown cost models which may impact the productivity factors for future NASA missions.

  9. Accumulation and biological cycling of heavy metal in four salt marsh species, from Tagus estuary (Portugal)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, B., E-mail: baduarte@fc.ul.p [Centro de Oceanografia, Instituto de Oceanografia, Campo Grande, 1749-1016 Lisboa (Portugal); Caetano, M. [INRB/IPIMAR - Instituto Nacional de Recursos Biologicos, Av. Brasilia, 1449-006 Lisboa (Portugal); Almeida, P.R. [Centro de Oceanografia, Instituto de Oceanografia, Campo Grande, 1749-1016 Lisboa (Portugal); Departamento de Biologia, Universidade de Evora, Largo dos Colegiais 2, 7004-516 Evora (Portugal); Vale, C. [INRB/IPIMAR - Instituto Nacional de Recursos Biologicos, Av. Brasilia, 1449-006 Lisboa (Portugal); Cacador, I. [Centro de Oceanografia, Instituto de Oceanografia, Campo Grande, 1749-1016 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2010-05-15

    Pools of Zn, Cu, Cd and Co in leaf, stem and root tissues of Sarcocornia fruticosa, Sarcocornia perennis, Halimione portulacoides and Spartina maritima were analyzed on a bimonthly basis, in a Tagus estuary salt marsh. All the major concentrations were found in the root tissues, being the concentrations in the aboveground organs neglectable for sediment budget proposes, as seen by the low root-aboveground translocation. Metal annual accumulation, root turnovers and cycling coefficients were also assessed. S. maritima showed the higher root turnovers and cycling coefficients for most of the analyzed metals, making this a phytostabilizer specie. By contrast the low root turnover, cycling coefficient and low root necromass generation makes S. perennis the most suitable specie for phytoremediation processes. Although the high amounts of metal return to the sediments, due to root senescence, salt marshes can still be considered sinks of heavy metals, cycling heavy metals mostly between sediment and root. - The efficiency of the phytoremediative processes and metal budgets are greatly influenced by the turnover periods and necromass generation.

  10. Concentration-Discharge relationships in a mine-impacted catchment, New River, Tennessee: Comparison across spatial and temporal scales using time-series analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, J.; Hornberger, G. M.

    2009-12-01

    downstream. Bi-monthly, daily, hourly and 15-minute interval field parameter and solute concentration data (depending on the year and location of collection) were used to set model parameters by means of recursive time-series analysis. In this way the dominant processes are identified and compared on temporal and spatial scales. Seasonal variation is evident in clockwise and counterclockwise direction of c-Q hysteresis loops in the winter/spring and summer/fall, respectively, for the New River main-stem. Counterclockwise hysteresis loops are also evident in the late summer for the Indian Fork suggesting similar mechanisms may be at work regardless of the spatial scale of the catchment. Elevated specific conductance and sulfate during extended dry periods in the Indian Fork suggest concentration of solutes during droughts followed by possible flushing events. Constrained by low frequency (bi-monthly) historic data, the time-series model developed from recent data was applied to 1970s water quality data for the Indian Fork to compare c-Q relationships on a temporal scale, particularly investigating land-use changes (i.e. cessation of mining in the catchment) and its effect on water quality.

  11. Grid laser with modified pro re nata injection of bevacizumab and ranibizumab in macular edema due to branch retinal vein occlusion: MARVEL report no 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayanan R

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Raja Narayanan,1 Bhavik Panchal,1 Michael W Stewart,2 Taraprasad Das,1 Jay Chhablani,1 Subhadra Jalali,1 Mohd Hasnat Ali3 On behalf of MARVEL study group 1Smt. Kanuri Santhamma Centre for Vitreo Retinal Diseases, L V Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USA; 3Department of Biostatistics, L V Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India Purpose: The purpose of this study was to prospectively study the efficacy of grid laser combined with intravitreal bevacizumab or ranibizumab in eyes with macular edema due to branch retinal vein occlusion.Patients and methods: Treatment-naïve eyes were enrolled to receive injections of ranibizumab or bevacizumab. During the first 6 months, patients were evaluated monthly and injected if the best-corrected visual acuity changed by five or more letters or fluid was noted on spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT; during the next 6 months, patients were evaluated bimonthly and injected only if the best-corrected visual acuity decreased by five or more letters with the associated fluid. Grid laser photocoagulation was performed if there was fluid on OCT and was repeated if patients were eligible after a minimum interval of 3 months.Results: The mean numbers of ranibizumab and bevacizumab injections were, respectively, 3.2±1.5 and 3.0±1.4 in the first 6 months and 0.3±0.6 and 0.3±0.6 in the last 6 months. ­Moreover, 55/75 (73.33% participants did not receive any injections in the last 6 months. The mean reductions in central retinal thickness at 12 months were 165.67 µm (P<0.001; 95% ­confidence interval -221.50 to -135.0 in the ranibizumab group and 184.78 µm (P<0.001; 95% confidence interval -246.49 to -140.0 in the bevacizumab group (P=0.079. More patients in the bevacizumab group compared to those in the ranibizumab group required rescue laser at 12 months (20 vs eleven; P=0.06.Conclusion: Bimonthly evaluations after month 6

  12. Streamflow monitoring and statistics for development of water rights claims for Wild and Scenic Rivers, Owyhee Canyonlands Wilderness, Idaho, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Molly S.; Fosness, Ryan L.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), collected streamflow data in 2012 and estimated streamflow statistics for stream segments designated "Wild," "Scenic," or "Recreational" under the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System in the Owyhee Canyonlands Wilderness in southwestern Idaho. The streamflow statistics were used by BLM to develop and file a draft, federal reserved water right claim in autumn 2012 to protect federally designated "outstanding remarkable values" in the stream segments. BLM determined that the daily mean streamflow equaled or exceeded 20 and 80 percent of the time during bimonthly periods (two periods per month) and the bankfull streamflow are important streamflow thresholds for maintaining outstanding remarkable values. Prior to this study, streamflow statistics estimated using available datasets and tools for the Owyhee Canyonlands Wilderness were inaccurate for use in the water rights claim. Streamflow measurements were made at varying intervals during February–September 2012 at 14 monitoring sites; 2 of the monitoring sites were equipped with telemetered streamgaging equipment. Synthetic streamflow records were created for 11 of the 14 monitoring sites using a partial‑record method or a drainage-area-ratio method. Streamflow records were obtained directly from an operating, long-term streamgage at one monitoring site, and from discontinued streamgages at two monitoring sites. For 10 sites analyzed using the partial-record method, discrete measurements were related to daily mean streamflow at a nearby, telemetered “index” streamgage. Resulting regression equations were used to estimate daily mean and annual peak streamflow at the monitoring sites during the full period of record for the index sites. A synthetic streamflow record for Sheep Creek was developed using a drainage-area-ratio method, because measured streamflows did not relate well to any index site to allow use of the partial

  13. Wet-dry seasonal and vertical geochemical variations in soil water and their driving forces under different land covers in southwest China karst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Hu, Bill X.; Wu, Chuanhao; Xu, Kai

    2017-04-01

    Karst aquifers supply drinking water for 25% of the world's population, and they are, however, vulnerable to climate change. Bimonthly hydrochemical data in karst soil water samples from July 2010 to July 2011 were obtained to reveal the seasonal and vertical geochemical variations in soil water under five vegetation types in Qingmuguan, a small karst catchment in southwest China. Soil water chemistry was dominated by Ca2+, HCO3-, and SO42- because of the dissolution of limestone, dolomite, and gypsum minerals in the strata. The predominant hydrochemical types in soil water were Ca2+-HCO3-, Ca2+-SO42-, and mixed Ca2+-HCO3-SO42-. Ca2+ and HCO3- concentrations ranked in the following order: shrub land > dry land > afforestation farmland > bamboo land > grassland. In warm and wet seasons, the main ion concentrations in soil water from grasslands were low. Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, HCO3-, SO42-, and Cl- concentrations in soil water from other lands were high. An opposite trend was observed in cold and dry seasons. Marked seasonal variations were observed in Ca2+, HCO3-, and NO3- in soil water from dry land. The main ion concentrations in soil water from bamboo lands decreased as soil depth increased. By contrast, the chemistry of soil water from other lands increased as soil depth increased. Their ions were accumulated in depth. A consistent high and low variation between the main ions in soil water and the contents of carbonate and CO2 was found in the soil. Hydrochemical changes in soil water were regulated by the effects of dilution and soil CO2.

  14. Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact Study Final Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, Tate

    2014-07-01

    The goal of the Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact campaign was to characterize the concentration and isotopic composition of carbonaceous atmospheric particulate matter (PM) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility site in Barrow, Alaska. The carbonaceous component was characterized by measuring the organic and black carbon (OC and BC) components of the total PM. To facilitate complete characterization of the PM, filter-based collections were used, including a medium volume PM2.5 sampler and a high volume PM10 sampler. Thirty-eight fine PM fractions (PM2.5) and 49 coarse (PM10) PM fractions were collected at weekly and bi-monthly intervals. The PM2.5 sampler operated with minimal maintenance during the 12 month campaign. The PM10 sampler used for the Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact (BBCSI) study used standard Tisch “hi-vol” motors that have a known lifetime of approximately 1 month under constant use; this necessitated monthly maintenance, and it is suggested that, for future deployment in the Arctic, the motors be upgraded to industrial blowers. The BBCSI sampling campaign successfully collected and archived 87 ambient atmospheric PM samples from Barrow, Alaska, from July 2012 to June 2013. Preliminary analysis of the OC and BC concentrations has been completed. This campaign confirmed known trends of high BC lasting from the winter through to spring haze periods and low BC concentrations in the summer. However, the annual OC concentrations had a very different seasonal pattern with the highest concentrations during the summer, lowest concentrations during the fall, and increased concentrations during the winter and spring (Figure 1).

  15. Prior exposure to capture heightens the corticosterone and behavioural responses of little penguins (Eudyptula minor) to acute stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Gemma; Turner, Emma; Dann, Peter; Harcourt, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Studies of physiology can provide important insight into how animals are coping with challenges in their environment and can signal the potential effects of exposure to human activity in both the short and long term. In this study, we measured the physiological and behavioural response of little penguins (Eudyptula minor) that were naïve to human activity over 30 min of capture and handling. We assessed relationships between corticosterone secretion, behaviour, sex and time of day in order to characterize the determinants of the natural stress response. We then compared the response of these naïve penguins with the responses of female little penguins that had been exposed to research activity (bimonthly nest check and weighing) and to both research activity (monthly nest check and weighing) and evening viewing by tourists. We found that corticosterone concentrations increased significantly over 30 min of capture, with naïve penguins demonstrating a more acute stress response during the day than at night. Penguins that had previously been exposed to handling at the research and research/visitor sites showed elevated corticosterone concentrations and consistently more aggressive behaviour after 30 min compared with naïve birds, although there were no significant differences in baseline corticosterone concentrations. Our findings demonstrate that these little penguins have not habituated to routine capture, but rather mount a heightened physiological and behavioural response to handling by humans. Less invasive research monitoring techniques, such as individual identification with PIT tags and automatic recording and weighing, and a reduction in handling during the day should be considered to mitigate some of the potentially negative effects of disturbance. Given the paucity of data on the long-term consequences of heightened stress on animal physiology, our study highlights the need for further investigation of the relationship between the corticosterone

  16. Dust deposition effects on growth and physiology of the endangered Astragalus jaegerianus (Fabaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijayratne, Upekala C.; Scoles-Sciulla, Sara J.; Defalco, Lesley A.

    2009-01-01

    Human expansion into the Mojave Desert is a significant threat to rare desert plants. While immediate habitat loss is often the greatest concern, rare plants situated near areas where soil surfaces experience frequent disturbance may be indirectly impacted when fine particulate dust accumulates on leaf surfaces. Remaining populations of the federally listed Astragalus jaegerianus (Lane Mountain milkvetch) occur on land open to expanding military activities and on adjacent public land with increasing recreational use. This study was initiated to determine whether dust accumulation could decrease the vigor and fitness of A. jaegerianus through reduced growth. Beginning in early May 2004, plants located on Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land were dusted bimonthly at canopy-level dust concentrations ranging from 0 to 32 g/m2, and physiology and growth were monitored until late June when plants senesced. The maximum experimental dust level simulates dust concentrations of Mojave Desert perennials neighboring military activities at a nearby army training center. Average shoot growth declined with increasing dust accumulation, but seasonal net photosynthesis increased. Further investigation of plants grown in a greenhouse supported similar trends. This pattern of greater net photosynthesis with increasing dust accumulation may be explained by higher leaf temperatures of dusted individuals. Ambient dust deposition measured in traps near field plants (May 2004–July 2004) ranged from 0.04–0.17 g/m2/ d, which was well below the lowest level of dust on experimental plants (3.95 g/m2/d). With this low level of ambient deposition, we expect that A. jaegerianus plants in this population were not greatly affected by the dust they receive at the level of recreational use during the study.

  17. B.A.I.L.A. - A Latin dance randomized controlled trial for older Spanish-speaking Latinos: Rationale, design, and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez, David X.; Wilbur, JoEllen; Hughes, Susan; Berbaum, Michael L.; Wilson, Robert; Buchner, David M.; McAuley, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) has documented health benefits, but older Latinos are less likely to engage in leisure time PA than older non-Latino whites. Dance holds promise as a culturally appropriate form of PA that challenges individuals physically and cognitively. This paper describes a randomized controlled trial that will test the efficacy of BAILAMOS©, a 4-month Latin dance program followed by a 4-month maintenance program, for improving lifestyle PA and health outcomes. Older adults (n = 332), aged 55+, Latino/Hispanic, Spanish speaking, with low PA levels, and at risk for disability will be randomized to one of two programs, a dance program or health education control group. BAILAMOS© is a 4-month program that meets two times per week for one hour per session. Dance sessions focus on instruction, including four styles of dance, and couples dancing. Bi-monthly “Fiestas de Baile” (dance parties) are also included, in which participants dance and practice what they have learned.. Monthly 1-hour discussion sessions utilize a Social Cognitive framework and focus on knowledge, social support, and self-efficacy to increase lifestyle PA. The health education control group will meet one time per week for two hours per session. Primary outcomes including PA changes and secondary outcomes including self-efficacy, physical function, cognitive function, and disability will be assessed at baseline, 4, and 8 months. It is hypothesized that PA, self-efficacy, physical function, cognitive function, and functional limitations and disability scores will be significantly better in the BAILAMOS© group at 4 and 8 months compared to the control group. PMID:24969395

  18. Review of the Journal Acta Informatica Medica During Eight Year Period: 2008-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet; Begic, Edin; Zunic, Lejla

    2016-04-01

    Acta Informatica Medica is official journal of the Academy for Medical Sciences of Bosnia and Herzegovina (from 2014 Acta Inform Med is published bimonthly). To evaluate journal "Acta Informatica Medica" in 2015 and compare findings to previous years. The study has retrospective and descriptive character, and included the period 2008-2015 (included 36 issues of journal). A total of 83 (average 13,8 articles per journal) articles were published in Acta Informatica Medica during 2015. Analyzing the type of articles, original articles are present in majority during 2015 (68,6%) (by analyzing last eight years, 310 (67,3%) were original). During 2015, 27,7% of articles were related to the applied of Health informatics in field of clinical medicine, 63,8% preclinical medicine and 8,5% to public health. Collaboration rate in 2015 was 0,84. Most often the time required for decision on acceptance of article in 2015 is between 50 and 60 days. Articles came from 16 countries. According to scimagojr.com for 2014, Acta Informatica Medica has SCImago Journal Rank 0,166, while Cites / Doc. (2 years) parameter (widely used as impact index) is 0,70. According to GoogleScholar, h5 index is 11 and h5 median is 19. We analyzed the Acta Informatica Medica by "Publish or Perish" software - H index was 14, g index was 19 and e-index was 10.39. Year after year the highest number of original articles are published. Although the period of revision of articles is acceptable, the period up to two months is certainly not long, the goal is to reduce this period. Although the magazine in mentioned field found its place, although it is indexed in numerous bases, including: PubMed, PubMed Central, SCOPUS, EMBASE, EBSCO, etc. The main goal for next year is that the magazine becomes part of the Web of Science. Imperative is further internationalization of the magazine.

  19. Combining high resolution water use data from smart meters with remote sensing and geospatial datasets to investigate outdoor water demand and greenness changes during drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesnel, K.; Ajami, N.; Urata, J.; Marx, A.

    2017-12-01

    Infrastructure modernization, information technology, and the internet of things are impacting urban water use. Advanced metering infrastructure (AMI), also known as smart meters, is one forthcoming technology that holds the potential to fundamentally shift the way customers use water and utilities manage their water resources. Broadly defined, AMI is a system and process used to measure, communicate, and analyze water use data at high resolution intervals at the customer or sub-customer level. There are many promising benefits of AMI systems, but there are also many challenges; consequently, AMI in the water sector is still in its infancy. In this study we provide insights into this emerging technology by taking advantage of the higher temporal and spatial resolution of water use data provided by these systems. We couple daily water use observations from AMI with monthly and bimonthly billing records to investigate water use trends, patterns, and drivers using a case study of the City of Redwood City, CA from 2007 through 2016. We look across sectors, with a particular focus on water use for urban irrigation. Almost half of Redwood City's irrigation accounts use recycled water, and we take this unique opportunity to investigate if the behavioral response for recycled water follows the water and energy efficiency paradox in which customers who have upgraded to more efficient devices end up using more of the commodity. We model potable and recycled water demand using geospatially explicit climate, demographic, and economic factors to gain insight into various water use drivers. Additionally, we use high resolution remote sensing data from the National Agricultural Imaging Program (NAIP) to observe how changes in greenness and impervious surface are related to water use. Using a series of statistical and unsupervised machine learning techniques, we find that water use has changed dramatically over the past decade corresponding to varying climatic regimes and drought

  20. A pilot study of health and wellness coaching for fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackshaw, Kevin V; Plans-Pujolras, Marcal; Rodriguez-Saona, Luis E; Moore, Margaret A; Jackson, Erika K; Sforzo, Gary A; Buffington, C A Tony

    2016-11-08

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a health and wellness coaching (HWC)-based intervention for fibromyalgia (FM) would result in sustained improvements in health and quality of life, and reductions in health care utilization. Nine female subjects meeting American College of Rheumatology criteria for a diagnosis of primary FM were studied. The HWC protocol had two components, which were delivered telephonically over a twelve-month period. First, each patient met individually with a coach during the 12 month study at the patient's preference of schedule and frequency (Range:22-32 × 45-min sessions). Coaches were health professionals trained in health and wellness coaching tasks, knowledge, and skills. Second, each patient participated in bimonthly (first six months) and monthly (second six months) group classes on self-coaching strategies during the 12 month study. Prior to the intervention, and after 6 months and 12 months of coaching, the Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQR) was used to measure health and quality of life, and the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form (BPI) was used to measure pain intensity and interference with function. Total and rheumatology-related health encounters were documented using electronic medical records. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA. All nine patients finished the HWC protocol. FIQR scores improved by 35 % (P = 0.001). BPI scores decreased by 32 % overall (P = 0.006), 31 % for severity (P = 0.02), and 44 % for interference (P = 0.006). Health care utilization declined by 86 % (P = 0.006) for total and 78 % (P life measures (FIQR), pain (BPI), and marked reductions in health care utilization. Such improvements do not typically occur spontaneously in FM patients, suggesting that HWC deserves further consideration as an intervention for FM.

  1. The Sociedad Espanola de Ceramica y Vidrio over half a century; La Sociedad Espanola de Ceramica y Vidrio a lo largo de medio siglo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez Navarro, J.M.

    2010-07-01

    The double objective of this lecture is to commemorate, on the occasion of its golden jubilee, the work performed by the Spanish Society of Ceramics and Glass and to pay a special homage to the memory of its main promoter and supporter, Professor Antonio Garcia Verduch. Since its foundation in 1960 the Society has contributed to join all the experts in ceramics and glass, as well as to promote and spread among them scientific and technical knowledge related to both areas, while adapting itself to the investigation trends of each moment in time and to the interests of the different industrial sectors. Along its half century of history it has organized some hundred and twenty-five national congresses and specialized technical meetings and nine national congresses. It represents Spain in five international associations. The Society's main contribution, together with its international activities, has been the uninterrupted publication of its bimonthly magazine, the Society's Bulletin, which since 1999 is included in the database of the Science Citation Index. Furthermore, the Society keeps a permanent relationship with investigation centres, universities, museums, technicians' and manufacturers' associations and fairground institutions. As a sign of its promotion of technical development, the Society grants every year since 1977 its Alfa de Oro Awards to the most outstanding industrial products shown in the Valencia Fair, in order to highlight quality, technological innovation and design. In 1999 the Society's Electroceramics group created the Epsilon de Oro Awards which are granted every two years to the people or institutions that have produced the main scientific contribution in a given field. (Author).

  2. The process of installing REDCap, a web based database supporting biomedical research: the first year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klipin, M; Mare, I; Hazelhurst, S; Kramer, B

    2014-01-01

    Clinical and research data are essential for patient care, research and healthcare system planning. REDCapTM is a web-based tool for research data curatorship developed at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, USA. The Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg South Africa identified the need for a cost effective data management instrument. REDCap was installed as per the user agreement with Vanderbilt University in August 2012. In order to assist other institutions that may lack the in-house Information Technology capacity, this paper describes the installation and support of REDCap and incorporates an analysis of user uptake over the first year of use. We reviewed the staffing requirements, costs of installation, process of installation and necessary infrastructure and end-user requests following the introduction of REDCap at Wits. The University Legal Office and Human Research Ethics Committee were consulted regarding the REDCap end-user agreement. Bi-monthly user meetings resulted in a training workshop in August 2013. We compared our REDCap software user numbers and records before and after the first training workshop. Human resources were recruited from existing staff. Installation costs were limited to servers and security certificates. The total costs to provide a functional REDCap platform was less than $9000. Eighty-one (81) users were registered in the first year. After the first training workshop the user numbers increased by 59 in one month and the total number of active users to 140 by the end of August 2013. Custom software applications for REDCap were created by collaboration between clinicians and software developers. REDCap was installed and maintained at limited cost. A small number of people with defined skills can support multiple REDCap users in two to four hours a week. End user training increased in the number of users, number of projects created and the number of projects moved to production.

  3. Physical activity and nutrition program for seniors (PANS: protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Andy

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Along with reduced levels of physical activity, older Australian's mean energy consumption has increased. Now over 60% of older Australians are considered overweight or obese. This study aims to confirm if a low-cost, accessible physical activity and nutrition program can improve levels of physical activity and diet of insufficiently active 60-70 year-olds. Methods/Design This 12-month home-based randomised controlled trial (RCT will consist of a nutrition and physical activity intervention for insufficiently active people aged 60 to 70 years from low to medium socio-economic areas. Six-hundred participants will be recruited from the Australian Federal Electoral Role and randomly assigned to the intervention (n = 300 and control (n = 300 groups. The study is based on the Social Cognitive Theory and Precede-Proceed Model, incorporating voluntary cooperation and self-efficacy. The intervention includes a specially designed booklet that provides participants with information and encourages dietary and physical activity goal setting. The booklet will be supported by an exercise chart, calendar, bi-monthly newsletters, resistance bands and pedometers, along with phone and email contact. Data will be collected over three time points: pre-intervention, immediately post-intervention and 6-months post-study. Discussion This trial will provide valuable information for community-based strategies to improve older adults' physical activity and dietary intake. The project will provide guidelines for appropriate sample recruitment, and the development, implementation and evaluation of a minimal intervention program, as well as information on minimising barriers to participation in similar programs. Trial Registration Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12609000735257

  4. Systematic observations of Volcán Turrialba, Costa Rica, with small unmanned aircraft and aerostats (UAVs): the Costa Rican Airborne Research and Technology Applications (CARTA) missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieri, D. C.; Diaz, J. A.; Bland, G.; Fladeland, M. M.; Abtahi, A.; Alan, A., Jr.; Alegria, O.; Azofeifa, S.; Berthold, R.; Corrales, E.; Fuerstenau, S.; Gerardi, J.; Herlth, D.; Hickman, G.; Hunter, G.; Linick, J.; Madrigal, Y.; Makel, D.; Miles, T.; Realmuto, V. J.; Storms, B.; Vogel, A.; Kolyer, R.; Weber, K.

    2014-12-01

    For several years, the University of Costa Rica, NASA Centers (e.g., JPL, ARC, GSFC/WFF, GRC) & NASA contractors-partners have made regular in situ measurements of aerosols & gases at Turrialba Volcano in Costa Rica, with aerostats (e.g., tethered balloons & kites), & free-flying fixed wing UAVs (e.g., Dragon Eye, Vector Wing 100, DELTA 150), at altitudes up to 12.5Kft ASL within 5km of the summit. Onboard instruments included gas detectors (e.g., SO2, CO2), visible & thermal IR cameras, air samplers, temperature pressure & humidity sensors, particle counters, & a nephelometer. Deployments are timed to support bimonthly overflights of the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) onboard the NASA Terra satellite (26 deployments to date). In situ observations of dilute plume SO2 concentrations (~1-20ppmv), plume dimensions, and associated temperature, pressure, & humidity profiles, validate detailed radiative transfer-based SO2 retrievals, as well as archive-wide ASTER band-ratio SO2 algorithms. Our recent UAV-based CO2 observations confirm high concentrations (e.g., ~3000ppmv max at summit jet), with 1000-1500ppmv flank values, and essentially global background CO2 levels (400ppmv) over distal surroundings. Transient Turrialba He detections (up to 20ppmv) were obtained with a small (~10kg) airborne mass spectrometer on a light aircraft—a UAV version (~3kg) will deploy there soon on the UCR DELTA 500. Thus, these platforms, though small (most payloads de Costa Rica, the NASA Airborne Science and Earth Surface & Interior Programs, the Dirección General de Aeronáutica Civil de Costa Rica, and FH Düsseldorf for their support.

  5. CHESS improves cancer caregivers' burden and mood: results of an eHealth RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBenske, Lori L; Gustafson, David H; Namkoong, Kang; Hawkins, Robert P; Atwood, Amy K; Brown, Roger L; Chih, Ming-Yuan; McTavish, Fiona; Carmack, Cindy L; Buss, Mary K; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Cleary, James F

    2014-10-01

    Informal caregivers (family and friends) of people with cancer are often unprepared for their caregiving role, leading to increased burden or distress. Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System (CHESS) is a Web-based lung cancer information, communication, and coaching system for caregivers. This randomized trial reports the impact on caregiver burden, disruptiveness, and mood of providing caregivers access to CHESS versus the Internet with a list of recommended lung cancer websites. A total of 285 informal caregivers of patients with advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer were randomly assigned to a comparison group that received Internet or a treatment group that received Internet and CHESS. Caregivers were provided a computer and Internet service if needed. Written surveys were completed at pretest and during the intervention period bimonthly for up to 24 months. Analyses of covariance (ANCOVAs) compared the intervention's effect on caregivers' disruptiveness and burden (CQOLI-C), and negative mood (combined Anxiety, Depression, and Anger scales of the POMS) at 6 months, controlling for blocking variables (site, caregiver's race, and relationship to patient) and the given outcome at pretest. Caregivers randomized to CHESS reported lower burden, t(84) = 2.36, p = .021, d = .39, and negative mood, t(86) = 2.82, p = .006, d = .44, than those in the Internet group. The effect on disruptiveness was not significant. Although caring for someone with a terminal illness will always exact a toll on caregivers, eHealth interventions like CHESS may improve caregivers' understanding and coping skills and, as a result, ease their burden and mood.

  6. CHESS Improves Cancer Caregivers’ Burden and Mood: Results of an eHealth RCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBenske, Lori L.; Gustafson, David H.; Namkoong, Kang; Hawkins, Robert P.; Atwood, Amy K.; Brown, Roger L.; Chih, Ming-Yuan; McTavish, Fiona; Carmack, Cindy L.; Buss, Mary K.; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Cleary, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Informal caregivers (family and friends) of people with cancer are often unprepared for their caregiving role, leading to increased burden or distress. CHESS (Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System) is a web-based lung cancer information, communication and coaching system for caregivers. This randomized trial reports the impact on caregiver burden, disruptiveness and mood of providing caregivers access to CHESS versus the Internet with a list of recommended lung cancer websites. Methods 285 informal caregivers of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer were randomly assigned to a comparison group that received Internet or a treatment group that received Internet and CHESS. Caregivers were provided a computer and Internet service if needed. Written surveys were completed at pretest and during the intervention period bimonthly for up to 24 months. ANCOVA analyses compared the intervention’s effect on caregivers’ disruptiveness and burden (CQOLI-C), and negative mood (combined Anxiety, Depression, and Anger scales of the POMS) at six months, controlling for blocking variables (site, caregiver’s race, and relationship to patient) and the given outcome at pretest. Results Caregivers randomized to CHESS reported lower burden [t (84) = 2.36, p = .021, d= .39] and negative mood [t (86) = 2.82, p = .006, d= .44] than those in the Internet group. The effect on disruptiveness was not significant. Conclusions Although caring for someone with a terminal illness will always exact a toll on caregivers, eHealth interventions like CHESS may improve caregivers’ understanding and coping skills and, as a result, ease their burden and mood. PMID:24245838

  7. [Feeding habits of sphoeroides testudineus (Perciformes: Tetraodontidae) in the lagoon system of Ria Lagartos, Yucatán, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi-Espínola, Ariel Adriano; Vega-Cendejas, Maria Eugenia

    2013-06-01

    Sphoeroides testudineus is a dominant species in the coastal systems of Yucatán. Because of its wide distribution, occurrence and abundance performs an important functional role in coastal ecosystems. We assessed the trophic preferences and trophic-level variation in space and time for this species in Ria Lagartos lagoon, an hyperhaline ecosystem located Northwest of Yucatan Peninsula. The specimens were collected bimonthly during two annual periods (2004-2005 and 2007-2008) in 23 sites distributed along the system into four zones (marine, channel, Coloradas West and Coloradas East). Spatial and seasonal trophic variations were evaluated using canonical correspondence analysis (ACC). In a total of 382 individuals, 68 food resources included in 20 trophic groups were obtained. Higher relative importance index values (IIR) were obtained for bivalves, gastropods and macrophytes. Seasonal trophic variation showed that bivalves and gastropods were consumed along the year, while macrophytes were a preferential food during rains and windy seasons. Spatial variation indicates lower gastropods consumption at the inner zone of the system, and the opposite ocurred with bivalves. The consumption ofmacrophytes may be due to their greater abundance during rains and in the channel zone. The ACC showed that spatial trophic variation was due because of the abundance of the preferential preys (bivalves, gastropods), while seasonal differences by the secondary (amphipods, eggs, nematodes, brachyuran, detritus, nematodes). The results contribute to the biological knowledge of the species and highlight the importance and trophic function of S testudineus for the energy transfer from the benthos to higher trophic levels of the food chain.

  8. First assessment of individual monitoring of medical workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation in Burkina Faso

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakoro, A.; Nobila Ouédraogo, Salimata Traoré

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the results of monitoring of medical workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation as a consequence of exposure to X-rays, from 2007 to 2010, in Burkina Faso. The radiation exposure monitoring was made with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100) type 0110 and the reader used was Harshaw 4500. The medical establishments. subscribers were provided with personal dosimeters (measuring Hp (10) and Hp (0.07)) and dosimeters for background and workplace exposure (H*10) measurement. The dosimeters have been worn for periods of 2 months each. The number of establishments subscribed and workers monitored has gradually increased from 4 radiology establishments with 13 workers monitored at September 2007 to 23 subscribers with 121 workers monitored at the end of April 2010. 13 establishments were still working without monitoring. From September 2007 to April 2010, no individual annual dose limit has really been reached. 88.16% of the 2 months dose values of personal dosimeters were below 0.1mSv, the detection limit and 96.61% of Hp (10) bimonthly values were below 3.33mSv. The workplace exposure monitoring values were often low (varying from 0.00mSv to 40.45mSv). 87.08% of the values of H*(10) were below 3.33mSv, the upper limit of Hp (10) for a period of 2 months. Low values of individual dose have also been recorded despite of high values of workplace monitoring. This allowed to state that the workers monitored were not exposed to a major risk. Nevertheless, 13 TLD have been lost and 3 damaged by subscribers (out of 1504 TLD provided). 26 times (out of 240), background measurement and workplace exposure monitoring dosimeters have been placed at the improper location. Therefore, sensitization of the establishments using ionizing radiation should be reinforced and the national regulations should impose radiation monitoring (author)

  9. Feasibility and effect of life skills building education and multiple micronutrient supplements versus the standard of care on anemia among non-pregnant adolescent and young Pakistani women (15-24 years): a prospective, population-based cluster-randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Jo-Anna B; Wasan, Yaqub; Soofi, Sajid B; Suhag, Zamir; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2018-05-30

    Adolescence is a critical period for physical and psychological growth and development, and vitamin and mineral requirements are correspondingly increased. Health and health behaviours correspond strongly from adolescence to adulthood. Developing a preconception care package for adolescent and young women in resource-limited settings could serve to empower them to make informed decisions about their nutrition, health, and well-being, as well as function as a platform for the delivery of basic nutrition-related interventions to address undernutrition. In this population-based two-arm, cluster-randomized, controlled trial of life skills building education (provided bi-monthly) and multiple micronutrient supplementation (provided twice-weekly; UNIMMAP composition), we aim to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention on the prevention of anemia (hemoglobin concentration nutrition (anthropometry [height, weight, middle upper arm circumference (MUAC)], nutritional status [iron, vitamin A, vitamin D]); general health (morbidity, mortality); and empowerment (age at marriage, completion of the 10th grade, use of personal hygienic materials during menstruation) will also be assessed. Participants will be enrolled in the study for a maximum of 2 years. Empowering adolescent and young women with the appropriate knowledge to make informed and healthy decisions will be key to sustained behavioural change throughout the life-course. Although multiple micronutrient deficiencies are known to exist among adolescent and young women in low-resource settings, recommendations on preconception multiple micronutrient supplementation do not exist at this time. This study is expected to offer insight into providing an intervention that includes both education and supplements to non-pregnant adolescent and young women for a prolonged duration of time within the existing public health programmatic context. This study is part of the Matiari emPowerment and Preconception Supplementation

  10. Evidence of niche partitioning under ontogenetic influences among three morphologically similar siluriformes in small subtropical streams.

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    Karine Orlandi Bonato

    Full Text Available Ontogenetic influences in patterns of niche breadth and feeding overlap were investigated in three species of Siluriformes (Heptapterus sp., Rhamdia quelen and Trichomycterus poikilos aiming at understanding the species coexistence. Samplings were conducted bimonthly by electrofishing technique from June/2012 to June/2013 in ten streams of the northwestern state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The stomach contents of 1,948 individuals were analyzed by volumetric method, with 59 food items identified. In general Heptapterus sp. consumed a high proportion of Aegla sp., terrestrial plant remains and Megaloptera; R. quelen consumed fish, and Oligochaeta, followed by Aegla sp.; while the diet of T. poikilos was based on Simuliidae, Ephemeroptera and Trichoptera. Specie segregation was observed in the NMDS. Through PERMANOVA analysis feeding differences among species, and between a combination of species plus size classes were observed. IndVal showed which items were indicators of these differences. Niche breadth values were high for all species. The niche breadth values were low only for the larger size of R. quelen and Heptapterus sp. while T. poikilos values were more similar. Overall the species were a low feeding overlap values. The higher frequency of high feeding overlap was observed for interaction between Heptapterus sp. and T. poikilos. The null model confirmed the niche partitioning between the species. The higher frequency of high and intermediate feeding overlap values were reported to smaller size classes. The null model showed resource sharing between the species/size class. Therefore, overall species showed a resource partitioning because of the use of occasional items. However, these species share resources mainly in the early ontogenetic stages until the emphasized change of morphological characteristics leading to trophic niche expansion and the apparent segregation observed.

  11. Bactérias associadas à decomposição de folhas de Cedrela fissilis Vell. (Cedro em mata tropical subcaducifólia do noroeste do Estado do Paraná - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v20i0.4485 Bacteria associated with decomposition of leaves of Cedrela fissilis Vell. (Cedro in a tropical semideciduous forest of the northwest of state of Parana - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v20i0.4485

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    Valdovino Damásio dos Santos

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Folhas de Cedrela fissilis Vell. (cedro, coletadas de exemplares ocorrentes no Horto Florestal de Maringá, foram colocadas em bolsas de tela de náilon e distribuídas em 10 pontos sobre o solo no interior da mata e recolhidas bimestralmente por um período de 12 meses. Pequenos discos, obtidos das folhas, foram submetidos à lavagem vigorosa em solução salina estéril 0,89% e aplicados na superfície do meio ágar nutriente. Os principais gêneros de bactérias associadas à decomposição foram os seguintes microrganismos: Bacillus, Cellulomonas, Pseudomonas e membros da família Enterobacteriaceae. Entre as enterobactérias destacam-se os gêneros Enterobacter e Erwinia. A sucessão bacteriana em Cedrela fissilis foi estudada pela caracterização da microflora do litter em diferentes estágios para compreender a natureza da sua degradação.Leaves from Cedrela fissilis Vell. grown in a tropical semideciduous urban forest reserve were placed in litterbags and collected at bimonthly intervals during twelve months. Small disks from the leaves were washed, dried and inoculated in Petri plates with agar medium nutrient and incubated at 37ºC for 24-48 hours. The most frequent bacterial groups were the following: Bacillus, Cellulomonas, Pseudomonas, and members of the Enterobacteriaceae family. Enterobacter and Erwinia were the most frequent members of this family. The pattern of bacterial succession in Cedrela fissilis was studied through litter microflora characterization at different stages to understand the nature of its degradation.

  12. Precipitation-centered Conceptual Model for Sub-humid Uplands in Lampasas Cut Plains, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, S. R.; Tu, M.; Wilcox, B. P.

    2011-12-01

    Conceptual understandings of dominant hydrological processes, system interactions and feedbacks, and external forcings operating within catchments often defy simple definition and explanation, especially catchments encompassing transition zones, degraded landscapes, rapid development, and where climate forcings exhibit large variations across time and space. However, it is precisely those areas for which understanding and knowledge are most needed to innovate sustainable management strategies and counter past management blunders and failed restoration efforts. The cut plain of central Texas is one such area. Complex geographic and climatic factors lead to spatially and temporally variable precipitation having frequent dry periods interrupted by intense high-volume precipitation. Fort Hood, an army post located in the southeast cut plain contains landscapes ranging from highly degraded to nearly pristine with a topography mainly comprised of flat-topped mesas separated by broad u-shaped valleys. To understand the hydrology of the area and responses to wet-dry cycles we analyzed 4-years of streamflow and rainfall from 8 catchments, sized between 1819 and 16,000 ha. Since aquifer recharge/discharge and surface stream-groundwater interactions are unimportant, we hypothesized a simple conceptual model driven by precipitation and radiative forcings and having stormflow, baseflow, ET, and two hypothetical storage components. The key storage component was conceptualized as a buffer that was highly integrated with the ET component and exerted controls on baseflow. Radiative energy controlled flux from the buffer to ET. We used the conceptual model in making a bimonthly hydrologic budget, which included buffer volumes and a deficit-surplus indicator. Through the analysis, we were led to speculate that buffer capacity plays key roles in these landscapes and even relatively minor changes in capacity, due to soil compaction for example, might lead to ecological shifts. The

  13. Stable, geochemically mediated biospheres in the Deep Mine Microbial Observatory, SD, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osburn, M. R.; Casar, C. P.; Kruger, B.; Flynn, T. M.

    2017-12-01

    The terrestrial subsurface is a vast reservoir of life, hosting diverse microbial ecosystems with varying levels of connectivity to surface inputs. Understanding long term ecosystem dynamics within the subsurface biosphere is very challenging due to limitations in accessibility, sample availability, and slow microbial growth rates. The establishment of the Deep Mine Microbial Observatory (DeMMO) at the Sanford Underground Research Facility, SD, USA has allowed for bimonthly sampling for nearly two years at six sites spanning 250 to 1500 m below the surface. Here we present a time-resolved analysis of the geomicrobiology of the six DeMMO sites, which have been created from legacy mine boreholes modified to allow for controlled sampling. Our interdisciplinary approach includes analysis of passively draining fracture fluid for aqueous and gas geochemistry, DNA sequencing, microscopy, and isotopic measurements of organic and inorganic substrates. Fluid geochemistry varies significantly between sites, but is relatively stable over time for a given site, even through significant external perturbations such as drilling and installation of permanent sampling devices into the boreholes. The fluid-hosted microbial diversity follows these trends, with consistent populations present at each site through time, even through drilling events. For instance, the shallowest site (DeMMO 1) consistently hosts >30% uncharacterized phyla and >25% Omnitrophica whereas the deepest site (DeMMO 6) is dominated by Firmicutes and Bacterioidetes. Microbial diversity appears to respond to the availability of energy sources such as organic carbon, sulfate, sulfide, hydrogen, and iron. Carbon isotopic measurements reveal closed system behavior with significant recycling of organic carbon into the DIC pool. Together these observations suggest DeMMO hosts isolated subsurface microbial populations adapted to local geochemistry that are stable on yearlong timescales.

  14. Long term evaluation of mesenchymal stem cell therapy in a feline model of chronic allergic asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzil, Julie E; Masseau, Isabelle; Webb, Tracy L; Chang, Chee-hoon; Dodam, John R; Cohn, Leah A; Liu, Hong; Quimby, Jessica M; Dow, Steven W; Reinero, Carol R

    2014-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) decrease airway eosinophilia, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and remodeling in murine models of acutely induced asthma. We hypothesized that MSCs would diminish these hallmark features in a chronic feline asthma model. Objective To document effects of allogeneic, adipose-derived MSCs on airway inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and remodeling over time and investigate mechanisms by which MSCs alter local and systemic immunologic responses in chronic experimental feline allergic asthma. Methods Cats with chronic, experimentally-induced asthma received six intravenous infusions of MSCs (0.36–2.5X10E7 MSCs/infusion) or placebo bimonthly at the time of study enrollment. Cats were evaluated at baseline and longitudinally for one year. Outcome measures included: bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cytology to assess airway eosinophilia; pulmonary mechanics and clinical scoring to assess AHR; and thoracic computed tomographic (CT) scans to assess structural changes (airway remodeling). CT scans were evaluated using a scoring system for lung attenuation (LA) and bronchial wall thickening (BWT). To assess mechanisms of MSC action, immunologic assays including allergen-specific IgE, cellular IL-10 production, and allergen-specific lymphocyte proliferation were performed. Results There were no differences between treatment groups or over time with respect to airway eosinophilia or AHR. However, significantly lower LA and BWT scores were noted in CT images of MSC-treated animals compared to placebo-treated cats at month 8 of the study (LA p=0.0311; BWT p=0.0489). No differences were noted between groups in the immunologic assays. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance When administered after development of chronic allergic feline asthma, MSCs failed to reduce airway inflammation and AHR. However, repeated administration of MSCs at the start of study did reduce computed tomographic measures of airway remodeling by month 8, though

  15. Spatial and temporal variations in cadmium concentrations and burdens in the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) sampled from the Pacific north-west.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendell, Leah I; Feng, Cindy

    2009-08-01

    Oysters from the north-west coast of Canada contain high levels of cadmium, a toxic metal, in amounts that exceed food safety guidelines for international markets. A first required step to determine the sources of cadmium is to identify possible spatial and temporal trends in the accumulation of cadmium by the oyster. To meet this objective, rather than sample wild and cultured oysters of unknown age and origin, an oyster "grow-out" experiment was initiated. Cultured oyster seed was suspended in the water column up to a depth of 7 m and the oyster seed allowed to mature a period of 3 years until market size. Oysters were sampled bimonthly and at time of sampling, temperature, chlorophyll-a, turbidity and salinity were measured. Oyster total shell length, dry tissue weights, cadmium concentrations (microg g(-1)) and burdens (microg of cadmium oyster(-1)) were determined. Oyster cadmium concentrations and burdens were then interpreted with respect to the spatial and temporal sampling design as well as to the measured physio-chemical and biotic variables. When expressed as a concentration, there was a marked seasonality with concentrations being greater in winter as compared in summer; however no spatial trend was evident. When expressed as a burden which corrects for differences in tissue mass, there was no seasonality, however cadmium oyster burdens increased from south to north. Comparison of cadmium accumulation rates oyster(-1) among sites indicated three locations, Webster Island, on the west side of Vancouver Island, and two within Desolation Sound, Teakerne Arm and Redonda Bay, where point sources of cadmium which are not present at all other sampling locations may be contributing to overall oyster cadmium burdens. Of the four physio-chemical factors measured only temperature and turbidity weakly correlated with tissue cadmium concentrations (r(2)=-0.13; p<0.05). By expressing oyster cadmium both as concentration and burden, regional and temporal patterns were

  16. Reproductive biology of the peacock bass Cichla piquiti (Perciformes: Cichlidae, an exotic species in a Neotropical reservoir

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    Augusto B. C. Vieira

    Full Text Available To analyze the reproductive biology of the peacock bass Cichla piquiti, 361 specimens were collected bimonthly in the Itumbiara Reservoir, southeast Brazil, from December 2004 to November 2005. Males and females in reproductive activity occurred during almost the entire year, with reproductive peak occurring before the beginning of the rains when the water temperature remained low, indicating that these environmental variables do not directly influence in the reproduction of C. piquiti. The long reproductive period, partially spent ovaries contained postovulatory follicles and oocytes in all developmental stages, indicate asynchronous development of oocytes and multiple spawning. The mean total lengthand body weigth were, respectively, 38.2 ± 7 cm and 965.0 ± 654.0 g for males and 37.4 ± 6.1 cm and 899.0 ± 495.0 g for females, statistically showing no sexual dimorphism in size. The smallest male and female found in advanced maturation stage measured 31.0 cm and 29.0 cm of total length, respectively. The body condition (K of males and females did not present significant differences during the reproductive cycle and the slope (b of the length-weight relationship was 3.22, suggesting that reproduction and the annual hydrology cycle do not interfere in the health condition. Cichla piquiti is an exotic piscivore fish that is well adapted to this Neotropical reservoir, which exhibits environmental conditions considerably different from its original habitat. This study indicates that the species presents plasticity in reproduction and in allocation of resources, probably due the aseasonality of the reservoir and the exploitation of native species.

  17. Monitoring tools and early warning system for harmful cyanobacterial blooms: Río Uruguay and Río de la Plata

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    Carla Kruk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Potentially hazardous cyanobacterial blooming constitutes one of the most widespread problems experienced by aquatic systems worldwide. However, there are not any monitoring methods sensitive enough to be directly applicable to predict and manage blooming events. In order to fulfill this goal, both ecological and genetic concepts were combined to generate cyanobacteria monitoring tools. Two approaches were used: grouping organisms into functional groups and utilizing molecular analysis (real time quantitative PCR as indicators of the presence of genes that encode the expression of cyanotoxins (mcy. Six bi-monthly sampling campaigns were performed to evaluate the suitability of these tools (2013-2014 at six locations composed of two sites each one, ranging downstream from Salto Grande, at the River Uruguay, to Punta del Este, at the Estuary River Plate. A remarkable gradient was observed in the meteorological, physical and chemical variables, as well as higher abundances in planktonic organisms both in Salto Grande and in Punta del Este. The most abundant population of toxic species in the whole gradient were found in Salto, and in particular those belonging to the Microcystis aeruginosa complex (MAC. The most relevant environmental variables to determine the gradient and the variation in biological variables were: salinity, temperature, wind and turbidity. The results of the new indicators (presence of MAC in the plankton net and mcy genes were in agreement with the traditional ones (v.g. chlorophyll-a demonstrating being much more sensitive in cases of the most severe blooming events than in the low abundance situations. The conjunction of results was applied to the construction of a monitoring and early warning system protocol.

  18. Mass Mortality of Cassin's Auklets, Assessing the Impact of a Warming Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, J.

    2016-02-01

    In Fall/Winter 2014-15, more than 100,000 Cassin's Auklets, Ptychoramphus aleuticus, washed ashore on U.S. West Coast beaches. A small-bodied, zooplanktivorous bird, Cassin's nest in colonies scattered along the Northeast Pacific coastline, with a particular concentration in the Scott Islands, northwest of Vancouver Island, BC where 80% of the world's population ( 3.5M) breeds. Standardized, effort-controlled beach surveys conducted by >500 volunteers for three citizen science organizations (BeachCOMBERS, Beach Watch, COASST) at >225 sites from Cape Flattery, WA to Monterey Bay, CA were used to document the event and contrast it to regionally specific long-term average carcass-fall. Data are abundance of independently verified carcass identifications collected (bi)monthly at known locations and dates, providing an instantaneous index of "new" carcass encounter rate. Two pulses were evident: A small but significant anomaly (+2-3 carcasses/km) in November primarily in California and a much larger (+20-25 carcasses/km) more sustained anomaly in December-January along the Washington and northern Oregon coastline. Four non-exclusive hypotheses were examined: surplus production of young-of-the year (i.e. elevated post-breeding mortality), severity of fall/winter storms (i.e. elevated winterkill), shifts in food diversity (proxied as copepod regional diversity along the Newport Line), and habitat compression calculated as location and relative area of wintering habitat (assessed by GLS-tagged birds) with a monthly SST anomaly event can be explained by the extreme compression of cold water habitat in July-September 2014, trapping dispersing Scott Islands birds as the warm water anomaly expanded eastward, leaving open the question of whether this event was anomalous mortality and/or anomalously high beaching rates.

  19. Lithium in the aragonite skeletons of massive Porites corals: A new tool to reconstruct tropical sea surface temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathorne, Ed C.; Felis, Thomas; Suzuki, Atsushi; Kawahata, Hodaka; Cabioch, Guy

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the potential for the Li content of coral aragonite to record information about environmental conditions, but no detailed study of tropical corals exists. Here we present the Li and Mg to Ca ratios at a bimonthly to monthly resolution over 25 years in two modern Porites corals, the genus most often used for paleoclimate reconstructions in the tropical Indo-Pacific. A strong relationship exists between coral Li/Ca and locally measured SST, indicating that coral Li/Ca can be used to reconstruct tropical SST variations. However, Li/Ca ratios of the skeleton deposited during 1979-1980 do not track local SST well and are anomalously high in places. The Mg/Ca ratios of this interval are also anomalously high, and we suggest Li/Ca can be used to reconstruct tropical SST only when Mg/Ca data are used to carefully screen for relatively rare biological effects. Mg/Li or Li/Mg ratios provide little advantage over Li/Ca ratios, except that the slope of the Li/Mg temperature relationship is more similar between the two corals. The Mg/Li temperature relationship for the coral that experienced a large temperature range is similar to that found for cold water corals and aragonitic benthic foraminifera in previous studies. The comparison with data from other biogenic aragonites suggests the relationship between Li/Mg and water temperature can be described by a single exponential relationship. Despite this hint at an overarching control, it is clear that biological processes strongly influence coral Li/Ca, and more calibration work is required before widely applying the proxy.

  20. Occurrence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs in beached plastic pellets from Mumbai coast, India

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    HB Jayasiri

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available PAHs are a class of ubiquitous pollutants which consist of two or more fused benzene rings in various arrangements. A number of PAH compounds are known carcinogens and bioaccumulate and biomagnify. These compounds originate naturally as well as anthropogenically through oil spills, incineration of waste and combustion of fossil fuels and wood. The environmental consequence of Plastic pellets is the sorption organic pollutants on their surface from the sea surface microlayer (SML where the hydrophobic contaminants are known to be enriched. The plastic pellets were collected along the recent high tide line from four beaches of Mumbai coast bimonthly during May 2011 - March 2012. A total of 72 pools of plastic pellets were extracted, fractionated and analysed by Gas Chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer to evaluate the extent and sources of 16 PAHs. The mean ΣPAH concentration in pellets was 9202.30±114.89 ng g-1 with a wide range (35.4-46191.58 ng g-1. The concentration of fluorene was found to be the highest (1606.30±251.54 ng g-1 followed by anthracene, chrysene and phenanthrene. The ΣPAH concentration was significantly varied among months and there was no significant difference among sites at  p=0.05. The 2-3 aromatic ring compounds accounted for 60% of the total PAHs in pellets of Mumbai coast while 4 rings and 5-6 rings compounds accounted for 26 and 14%, respectively. The ratio of low and high molecular weight PAHs indicated that the contamination by petrogenic sources was predominant over the pyrogenic ones in plastic pellets suggesting oil pollution in coastal area of Mumbai.Keywords: plastic pellets, PAHs, Mumbai, sources

  1. Distributions of Heterocyst Glycolipids in Settling Particulate Matter Record Ecological and Environmental Parameters in a Tropical Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meegan Kumar, D.; Hopmans, E.; S Sinninghe Damsté, J.; Schouten, S.; Bauersachs, T.; Werne, J. P.

    2017-12-01

    Temperature is a critical component of paleoenvironmental reconstructions, yet it is notoriously difficult to measure in terrestrial archives. Presented here is an investigation of unique glycolipids produced by heterocystous cyanobacteria, so-called heterocyst glycolipids (HGs), in the water column of Lake Malawi (East Africa). The goal of the study is to evaluate the potential of HGs to function as a paleotemperature proxy in tropical lacustrine environments. HGs in Lake Malawi were extracted from settling particulate matter (SPM) collected at bi-monthly intervals from 2011 - 2013. Sediment traps were moored in the metalimnion of both the north and south basins of the lake in order to evaluate the spatial and the temporal trends in lipid production and export. This study is the first to analyze HGs in SPM and contains the longest time-series of HG production in a natural environment to date. HGs are consistently present throughout the three-year study period, but maximum fluxes occur annually in December, coincident with the timing of cyanobacterial blooms in the lake. HGs in SPM appear to be sourced from living cyanobacteria populations, indicating rapid export of the lipids through the water column. Temperatures reconstructed with published HG-based indices, which are derived from the relative abundances of HG diols and triols to HG keto-(di)ols, do not accurately reflect the seasonal variability in measured surface water temperatures. Rather, the production of C28 HG keto-ols appears to be related to the timing of heterocyst differentiation. Heterocystous cyanobacteria in Lake Malawi may instead respond to growth temperatures by elongating the alkyl side chain of HG diols, as indicated by increases in the abundance of the C28 HG diol relative to the C26 HG diol with warmer surface water temperatures. Distributions of HGs thus may indeed provide a novel tool for paleotemperature reconstructions in tropical lakes.

  2. Influence of fluvial discharge on the dynamics of Chlorophyll-α in the continental shelf adjacent to the Recife Port Basin (Pernambuco-Brazil

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    Amanda Yumi Otsuka

    Full Text Available Abstract This study was undertaken in the coastal zone of the state of Pernambuco adjacent to the Recife port area, which corresponds to the inner shelf. This research aimed to analyze the dynamics of chlorophyll-a and several other environmental variables. Sampling was undertaken bimonthly on the surface from September 11th to May 10th, thus including the rainy and dry periods, and during low tide in spring tide. The parameters analyzed were chlorophyll-a, salinity, temperature, transparency, dissolved oxygen, oxygen saturation rate, pH, suspended solids, dissolved inorganic nutrients. Phytoplankton biomass ranged from 13.48 to 145.09 mg m-3 in the estuarine area and on the inner shelf, the variation being from 0.24 to 19.29 mg m-3 in the dry season and from 0.78 to 5.20 mg m-3 in the rainy season. PCA showed a direct relationship of chlorophyll-a with ammonia, phosphate and transparency and an inverse relationship with suspended particulate matter and nitrate. Biomass did not vary significantly different as a result of seasonal or spatial dynamics. The estuary of the Capibaribe River is considered highly impacted, and as it forms the Recife port basin, it joins with two more strongly eutrophic water bodies, the Beberibe River and the Pina Basin, leading to an amplification of its influence on the adjacent shelf. In terms of the river plume's dispersion in the Port of Recife, the presence of a dike causes some disturbance in the direction of the current, limiting the plume to the area close to the coast and influences the oceanographic variables on the inner continental shelf.

  3. The protocol of a randomized controlled trial for playgroup mothers: Reminder on Food, Relaxation, Exercise, and Support for Health (REFRESH Program

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    Monteiro Sarojini MDR

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mother's physical activity levels are relatively low, while their energy consumption is generally high resulting in 58% of Australian women over the age of 18 years being overweight or obese. This study aims to confirm if a low-cost, accessible playgroup based intervention program can improve the dietary and physical activity behaviours of mothers with young children. Methods/Design The current study is a randomized controlled trial lifestyle (nutrition and physical activity intervention for mothers with children aged between 0 to 5 years attending playgroups in Perth, Western Australia. Nine-hundred participants will be recruited and randomly assigned to the intervention (n = 450 and control (n = 450 groups. The study is based on the Social Cognitive Theory (SCT and the Transtheoretical Model (TTM, and the Precede-Proceed Framework incorporating goal setting, motivational interviewing, social support and self-efficacy. The six month intervention will include multiple strategies and resources to ensure the engagement and retention of participants. The main strategy is home based and will include a specially designed booklet with dietary and physical activity information, a muscle strength and flexibility exercise chart, a nutrition label reading shopping list and menu planner. The home based strategy will be supported by face-to-face dietary and physical activity workshops in the playgroup setting, posted and emailed bi-monthly newsletters, and monthly Short Message Service (SMS reminders via mobile phones. Participants in the control group receive no intervention materials. Outcome measures will be assessed using data that will be collected at baseline, six months and 12 months from participants in the control and intervention groups. Discussion This trial will add to the evidence base on the recruitment, retention and the impact of community based dietary and physical activity interventions for mothers with young children

  4. Evaluation of Healthy2Go: A country store transformation project to improve the food environment and consumer choices in Appalachian Kentucky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushakoff, Joshua A; Zoughbie, Daniel E; Bui, Nancy; DeVito, Katerina; Makarechi, Leila; Kubo, Hitomi

    2017-09-01

    Rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes in Kentucky's Cumberland Valley region are among the highest in the United States and limited access to healthy food contributes to these epidemics. The aim of Healthy2Go (H2G), a country store transformation project launched by Spread the Health Appalachia (STHA), was to improve awareness and availability of healthy options in small, rural stores. Ten country stores participated in H2G and received training and technical assistance to increase availability and awareness of healthy foods. Stores made inventory changes; installed point-of-purchase educational and in-store marketing materials directing shoppers to healthier options; provided nutrition education such as healthy recipes; and altered the display and location of healthy items. To measure changes within stores and the potential impact on resident eating and purchasing habits, STHA used four instruments: a modified version of the Nutrition Environs Measures Survey - Corner Stores at baseline and follow-up, a bimonthly store inventory assessment, a final store owner survey, and a Community Nutrition Survey at baseline (n = 287) and follow-up (n = 281). The stores in the H2G program (n = 10) had a 40% increase in stocking fresh produce, a 20% increase in produce variety, and trends towards increasing healthy inventory. During the same period, surveyed residents reported a statistically significant increase in the frequency of healthy food consumption. Small store transformation programs can improve availability of and access to healthy food in rural settings and influence local purchasing patterns.

  5. Quality control through dosimetry at a contract radiation processing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Plessis, T.A.; Roediger, A.H.A.

    1985-01-01

    Reliable dosimetry procedures constitute a very important part of process control and quality assurance at a contract gamma radiation processing facility that caters for a large variety of different radiation applications. The choice, calibration and routine intercalibration of the dosimetry systems employed form the basis of a sound dosimetry policy in radiation processing. With the dosimetric procedures established, detailed dosimetric mapping of the irradiator upon commissioning (and whenever source modifications take place) is carried out to determine the radiation processing characteristics and peformance of the plant. Having established the irradiator parameters, routine dosimetry procedures, being part of the overall quality control measures, are employed. In addition to routine dosimetry, independent monitoring of routine dosimetry is performed on a bi-monthly basis and the results indicate a variation of better than 3%. On an annaul basis the dosimetry systems are intercalibrated through at least one primary standard dosimetry laboratory and to date a variation of better than 5% has been experienced. The company also participates in the Pilot Dose Assurance Service of the International Atomic Energy Agency, using the alanine/ESR dosimetry system. Routine calibration of the instrumentation employed is carried out on a regular basis. Detailed permanent records are compiled on all dosimetric and instrumentation calibrations, and the routine dosimetry employed at the plant. Certificates indicating the measured absorbed radiation doses are issued on request and in many cases are used for the dosimetric release of sterilized medical and pharmaceutical products. These procedures, used by Iso-Ster at its industrial gamma radiation facility, as well as the experience built up over a number of years using radiation dosimetry for process control and quality assurance are discussed. (author)

  6. Randomized Comparison of Whole Brain Radiotherapy, 20 Gy in Four Daily Fractions Versus 40 Gy in 20 Twice-Daily Fractions, for Brain Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, P.H.; Bucci, J.; Browne, L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The present study compared the intracranial control rate and quality of life for two radiation fractionation schemes for cerebral metastases. Methods and Materials: A total of 113 patients with a Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 2 months), absent, or concurrent presentation of extracranial disease were randomized to 40 Gy in 20 twice-daily fractions (Arm A) or 20 Gy in four daily fractions (Arm B), stratified by resection status. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life 30-item questionnaire was administered monthly during Year 1, bimonthly during Year 2, and then every 6 months to Year 5. Results: The patient age range was 28-83 years (mean 62). Of the 113 patients, 41 had undergone surgical resection, and 74 patients had extracranial disease (31 concurrent and 43 stable). The median survival time was 6.1 months in Arm A and 6.6 months in Arm B, and the overall 5-year survival rate was 3.5%. Intracranial progression occurred in 44% of Arm A and 64% of Arm B patients (p = .03). Salvage surgery or radiotherapy was used in 4% of Arm A patients and 21% of Arm B patients (p = .004). Death was attributed to central nervous system progression in 32% of patients in Arm A and 52% of patients in Arm B (p = .03). The toxicity was minimal, with a minor increase in short-term cutaneous reactions in Arm A. The patients' quality of life was not impaired by the more intense treatment in Arm A. Conclusion: Intracranial disease control was improved and the quality of life was maintained with 40 Gy in 20 twice-daily fractions. This schema should be considered for better prognosis subgroups of patients with cerebral metastases.

  7. Habitat compression and expansion of sea urchins in response to changing climate conditions on the California continental shelf and slope (1994-2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kirk N.; Levin, Lisa A.; Schiff, Kenneth

    2017-03-01

    Echinoid sea urchins with distributions along the continental shelf and slope of the eastern Pacific often dominate the megafauna community. This occurs despite their exposure to naturally low dissolved oxygen (DO) waters (calcium carbonate (ΩCaCO3<1). Here we present vertical depth distribution and density analyses of historical otter trawl data collected in the Southern California Bight (SCB) from 1994 to 2013 to address the question: Do changes in echinoid density and species' depth distributions along the continental margin in the SCB reflect observed secular or interannual changes in climate? Deep-dwelling burrowing urchins (Brissopsis pacifica, Brisaster spp. and Spatangus californicus), which are adapted to low-DO, low-pH conditions appeared to have expanded their vertical distributions and populations upslope over the past decade (2003-2013), and densities of the deep pink urchin, Strongylocentrotus fragilis, increased significantly in the upper 500 m of the SCB. Conversely, the shallower urchin, Lytechinus pictus, exhibited depth shoaling and density decreases within the upper 200 m of the SCB from 1994 to 2013. Oxygen and pH in the SCB also vary inter-annually due to varying strengths of the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Changes in depth distributions and densities were correlated with bi-monthly ENSO climate indices in the region. Our results suggest that both a secular trend in ocean deoxygenation and acidification and varying strength of ENSO may be linked to echinoid species distributions and densities, creating habitat compression in some and habitat expansion in others. Potential life-history mechanisms underlying depth and density changes observed over these time periods include migration, mortality, and recruitment. These types of analyses are needed for a broad suite of benthic species in order to identify and manage climate-sensitive species on the margin.

  8. Effects of nutrient enrichment derived from fish farming activities on macroinvertebrate assemblages in a subtropical region of Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qin-Feng; Cheung, Kwok-Leung; Cheung, Siu-Gin; Shin, Paul K S

    2005-01-01

    To study the correlation between nutrient enrichment derived from fish farming activities and changes in macrobenthic assemblages, a one-year field study was conducted in Kau Sai Bay marine fish culture zone of Hong Kong. Bimonthly sediment samples were collected at six stations: two at the fish cages, two near the boundary of the fish culture area, and two reference sites further away from the culture area. Sediment physico-chemical characteristics in terms of silt/clay fraction, moisture content, total organic carbon (TOC), total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) and total phosphorus (TP) were analyzed. The macrobenthos (>0.5 mm) present in the sediment were sorted, identified and enumerated. On average, TOC, TKN and TP levels at the fish cage stations were 82.8%, 128.5% and 1315.7% higher than those at the reference stations, respectively. As a result, the N:P molar ratio was greatly reduced from 8.75 at the reference stations to 1.83 at the fish cage stations. Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed that diversity of macrofauna was significantly reduced and community structure differed at the fish cage stations relative to the reference sites. The intermediary stations near the fish culture area showed a transitional state of disturbance. Faunal diversity was negatively correlated with nutrient level, reflecting the adverse impacts of nutrient enrichment derived from fish farming activities on the benthic assemblages. Whilst in subtropical Asia-Pacific trash fish is the major feed for fish culture resulting in a higher nutrient loading and nutrient ratio accumulated in the sediment beneath the fish rafts, the effects of nutrient enrichment on macrobenthic assemblages are comparable to that in temperate waters owing to relatively high sediment metabolism rate and smaller fish culture scale in Hong Kong.

  9. Veterinary research, monitoring and advisory services in connection with the establishment and operation of a communal biomass conversion plant. Partial project 2 (VET-BIO-2). Veterinaer forskning, overvaagning og raadgivning i forbindelse med etablering og drift af biogasfaellesanlaeg. Delprojekt 2 (VET-BIO-2); Forsknings- og overvaagningsprogram vedroerende bakterier og parasitter med henblik paa opstilling af et driftsovervaagningsprogram for biogasfaellesanlaeg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munch, B.; Bonde Larsen, A.

    1990-01-15

    From Feb. '88 through June '89, contents of Salmonella, M. paratuberculosis, total coliforms, faecal streptococci, eggs of Ascaris suum, eggs and larvae of Trichostrongylus spp., and oocysts of bovine Eimeria spp. were quantified in 481 samples of raw and treated biomass collected bi-monthly for up to 12 months from five biogas plants. All five were run semi- continuously, two being thermophilic, one mesophilic, and two mesophilic with thermophilic pre-treatment. Herds delivering slurry to each plant ranged rom 6 - 33 cattle and/or pig herds, and daily input of biomass from 40 - 100 tons. Slurry was treated when mixed with other types of biomass, e.g. waste from pig or poultry slaughterhouses, fish industries or oil mills, and separate samples of these biomasses were examined. It is concluded that thermophilic as well as mesophilic digestion with, thermophilic pre-treatment may be capable of reducing numbers of vegetative pathogenic bacteria and intestinal parasites potentially present in incoming material, thus to allow for unrestricted use of the degassed biomass in this respect. This requires a reducing capacity on faecal streptococci of at least 3-4 log{sub 10} units by digestons based on or including a thermophillic treatment, corresponding to a maximal concentration of these bacteria in treated biomass in the order of magnitude of 10{sup 2} per ml. Minimum temperature and biomass retention time in the reactors as registered automatically, together with determinations of faecal streptococci in the end-product, are suggested as suitable monitoring parameters in these cases, to check on compliance with criteria for unrestricted use of treated biomass. For mesophilic biogas plants adequate restrictions on the use of the end-product will depend on individual process technology and local conditions. (author) 24 refs.

  10. Greenhouse and field assessment of rhizobacteria to control guava decline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Macedo Almeida

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to devise a biological strategy to control guava decline, 120 rhizobacteria isolates were obtained from symptomless guava trees located in Meloidogyne enterolobii-infested orchards. Of those isolates, 44 were assessed for their potential to reduce nematode's reproduction: for each isolate, six guava stem cuttings were embedded for eight hours with bacterial suspension and transplanted. Upon development of the roots, the plants were inoculated with 2000 nematode eggs and allowed to grow for four months under greenhouse. Seedlings embedded with water, inoculated or not with the nematode, served as controls. All treatments were equivalent in the five variables that assessed plant development. Several rhizobacteria reduced (p<0.05 the final nematode population (Fp, Fp/gram of root and reproduction factor, although not to satisfactory levels. Subsequently, a two-year experiment was set up in a guava orchard affected by guava decline, in which three of the most effective rhizobacterial isolates were compared with the biological products Nemat® and Nemaplus® for their ability to reduce variables related to nematode parasitism and increase guava productivity. Seven bimonthly applications of these treatments under the tree canopy were unable to reduce nematode parasitism and increase productivity. The decline and death of some plants forced the experiment to be stopped after the first harvest. In conclusion, rhizobacteria applications seem unable to reduce the parasitism of M. enterolobii on guava plants, and even less to reduce the extensive root decay or alleviate the physiological stress suffered by trees affected by guava decline.

  11. Short-term variability on mesozooplankton community in a shallow mixed estuary (Bahía Blanca, Argentina): Influence of tidal cycles and local winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, María C.; Piccolo, María C.; Hoffmeyer, Mónica S.

    2012-10-01

    The short-term dynamics of zooplankton in coastal ecosystems are strongly influenced by physical processes such as tides, riverine runoff and winds. In this study, we investigated the short-term changes of the representative taxa within mesozooplankton in relation to the semidiurnal tidal cycles. Also, we evaluated the influence of local winds on this short-term variability. Sampling was carried out bimonthly from December 2004 to April 2006 in a fixed point located in the inner zone of the Bahía Blanca Estuary, Argentina. Mesozooplankton samples were taken by pumps during 14-h tidal cycles at 3-h intervals, from surface and bottom. Vertical profiles of temperature and salinity as well as water samples to determine suspended particulate matter were acquired at each sampling date. All data concerning winds were obtained from a meteorological station and water level was recorded with a tide gauge. Holoplankton dominated numerically on meroplankton and adventitious fraction. Concerning holoplanktonic abundance, the highest values were attained by the calanoid copepods Acartia tonsa and Eurytemora americana. Meroplankton occurred mainly as barnacle larvae while benthic harpacticoids and Corophium sp. dominated the adventitious component. Semidiurnal tide was the main influence on the A. tonsa variability. However, noticeable differences in the abundance pattern as function of wind intensity were detected. Meroplankton abundance did not show a clear variation along the tidal cycle. Distributional pattern of harpacticoids seemed to be mainly modulated by velocity asymmetries in the tidal currents, in the same way as suspended particulate matter. However, the Corophium sp. distribution indicated probable behavioural responses associated with tides. The obtained results show how variable the mesozooplankton community structure can be over short-term time scales in mesotidal temperate estuaries. This variability should be taken into account for any zooplankton monitoring

  12. Education and Public Outreach for NASA's EPOXI Mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, Lucy-Ann A.; Crow, C. A.; Behne, J.; Brown, R. N.; Counley, J.; Livengood, T. A.; Ristvey, J. D.; Warner, E. M.

    2009-09-01

    NASA's EPOXI mission is reusing the Deep Impact (DI) flyby spacecraft to study comets and extra-solar planets around other stars. During the Extrasolar Planetary Observations and Characterization (EPOCh) phase of the mission extrasolar planets transiting their parent stars were observed to gain further knowledge and understanding of planetary systems. Observations of Earth also allowed for characterization of Earth as an extrasolar planet. A movie of a lunar transit of the Earth created from EPOCh images and links to existing planet finding activities from other NASA missions are available on the EPOXI website. The Deep Impact Extended Investigation (DIXI) continues the Deep Impact theme of investigating comet properties and formation by observing comet Hartley 2 in November 2010. The EPOXI Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) program is both creating new materials and updating and modifying existing Deep Impact materials based on DI mission results. Comparing Comets is a new educational activity under development that will guide students in conducting analyses of comet surface features similar to those the DIXI scientists will perform after observing comet Hartley 2. A new story designed to stimulate student creativity was developed in alignment with national educational standards. EPOXI E/PO also funded Family Science Night (FSN), a program bringing together students, families, and educators for an evening at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC. FSN events include time for families to explore the museum, a presentation by a space scientist, and an astronomy themed IMAX film. Nine events were held during the 2008-2009 school year with a total attendance of 3,145 (attendance since inception reached 44,732). Half of attendance is reserved for schools with high percentages of underrepresented minorities. EPOXI additionally offers a bi-monthly newsletter to keep the public, teachers, and space enthusiasts updated on current mission activities. For more

  13. Spatio-temporal distribution patterns of the epibenthic community in the coastal waters of Suriname

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Tomas; De Backer, Annelies; Wan Tong You, Kenneth; Vincx, Magda; Hostens, Kris

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to characterize the spatio-temporal patterns of the epibenthic community in the coastal waters of Suriname. Data were collected on a (bi)monthly basis in 2012-2013 at 15 locations in the shallow (turbid-water zone (6-20 m depth), dominated by Atlantic seabob shrimp Xiphopenaeus kroyeri (Crustacea: Penaeoidea). Near the 30 m isobath, sediments were much coarser (median grain size on average 345±103 μm vs. 128±53 μm in the coastal assemblage) and water transparency was much higher (on average 7.6±3.5 m vs. 2.4±2.1 m in the coastal assemblage). In this zone, a diverse offshore assemblage was found, characterized by brittle stars (mainly Ophioderma brevispina and Ophiolepis elegans) and a variety of crabs, sea stars and hermit crabs. In between both zones, a transition assemblage was noted, with epibenthic species typically found in either the coastal or offshore assemblages, but mainly characterized by the absence of X. kroyeri. Although the epibenthic community was primarily structured in an on-offshore gradient related to depth, sediment grain size and sediment total organic carbon content, a longitudinal (west-east) gradient was apparent as well. The zones in the eastern part of the Suriname coastal shelf seemed to be more widely stretched along the on-offshore gradient. Although clear seasonal differences were noted in the environmental characteristics (e.g. dry vs. rainy season), this was not reflected in the epibenthic community structure. X. kroyeri reached very high densities (up to 1383 ind 1000 m-²) in the shallow coastal waters of Suriname. As X. kroyeri is increasingly exploited throughout its range, the current study provides the ecological context for its presence and abundance, which is crucial for an ecosystem approach and the sustainable management of this commercially important species and its habitat.

  14. Equivalence of intrathecal chemotherapy and radiotherapy as central nervous system prophylaxis in children with acute lymphatic leukemia: a pediatric oncology group study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, M.P. (M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Inst., Houston, TX); Chen, T.; Dyment, P.G.; Hvizdala, E.; Steuber, C.P.

    1982-10-01

    The efficacy of intrathecal (i.t.) chemoprophylaxis was compared with cranial radiotherapy plus i.t. methotrexate (MTX) in a Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG) study accessing 408 patients from September 10, 1974, to October 29, 1976. Randomization was stratified by prognostic groups (PGs) based on age and white blood cell count at diagnosis. All received induction therapy with vincristine and prednisone (Pred); maintenance therapy consisted of daily 6-mercaptopurine and weekly MTX. Consolidation for arm 1 employed cyclophosphamide and L-asparaginase followed by biwekly 5-day courses of parenteral MTX. The first dose of each course of MTX was given i.t. in triple chemoprophylaxis (MTX, hydrocortisone, and cytosine arabinoside). During maintenance, i.t. chemoprophylaxis was bimonthly and 28-day Pred ''pulses'' were given every 3 mo. Arm 2 i.t. chemoprophylaxis was initiated on achievement of remission, and arm 3 i.t. on treatment day 1; both continued 1 yr. Arm 4 induction included two doses of L-asparaginase. On achievement of remission, CNS prophylaxis (radiotherapy, 2400 rad plus i.t. MTX) was given. For all, therapy was discontinued after 3 yr of continuous complete remission. Survival and the incidence of extramedullary relapse were similar for the treatment employing either i.t. chemoprophylaxis or radiotherapy plus i.t. MTX upon achievement of remission. The study indicates that i.t. chemoprophylaxis may be substituted for cranial radiotherapy when utilizing effective systemic regimens. Additionally, chemoprophylaxis may be reduced from 3 to 1 yr in patients with good prognostic factors. (JMT)

  15. Applications of UAVs to Measurement and Monitoring of Anthropogenic Contamination of an Urban Wildlife Preserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higa, E.; Valencia, D.; Hunt, A.

    2017-12-01

    Over the past decade, the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV's) has seen unprecedented growth in diverse research areas due to advances in UAV hardware and reduced total operating costs. These developments have given environmental investigators a new aerial data acquisition technique that can be used to not only survey large areas of terrain in a time-efficient and cost-effective manner but can be used to gather previously almost unattainable air quality data. Vertically resolved profiles of air pollutant data can be readily constructed. This project's goal is to produce a time resolved (seasonal) aerial survey of a 150-acre section from a 1300-acre ecologically diverse park of bottomland forests, wetlands and prairies. This ecosystem provides abundant habitats for a diverse wildlife community. This section was chosen due to its close proximity to the city landfill located 0.5 miles due north from the chosen section. The process of collecting UAV aerial images at a constant altitude of ( 200ft) on a bi-monthly basis (for a period of 6 months) has commenced. The UAV has been fitted with a custom made mount to secure an Ultrafine Particle (UFP) counter; this is providing information on UFP levels over the study area as a proxy for airborne particle inputs to the site. Sediment samples will be taken from several runoff ponds within the survey area to evaluate possible anthropogenic contamination of the park . Post processing imaging software, DroneDeploy, is being used to create an orthomosaic, topographic surface and 3D model that can be integrated with GIS platforms to create a comprehensive and cohesive multi-layered data set. Data sets of this nature will provide information on temporally constrained sources of runoff material to the pond areas in the preserve.

  16. Prevalence of shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, and Listeria monocytogenes at public access watershed sites in a California Central Coast agricultural region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Michael B; Quiñones, Beatriz; Oryang, David; Mandrell, Robert E; Gorski, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Produce contaminated with enteric pathogens is a major source of foodborne illness in the United States. Lakes, streams, rivers, and ponds were sampled with Moore swabs bi-monthly for over 2 years at 30 locations in the vicinity of a leafy green growing region on the Central California Coast and screened for Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC), Salmonella enterica, and Listeria monocytogenes to evaluate the prevalence and persistence of pathogen subtypes. The prevalence of STEC from 1386 samples was 11%; 110 samples (8%) contained E. coli O157:H7 with the highest prevalence occurring close to cattle operations. Non-O157 STEC isolates represented major clinical O-types and 57% contained both shiga toxin types 1 and 2 and intimin. Multiple Locus Variable Number Tandem Repeat Analysis of STEC isolates indicated prevalent strains during the period of study. Notably, Salmonella was present at high levels throughout the sampling region with 65% prevalence in 1405 samples resulting in 996 isolates with slightly lower prevalence in late autumn. There were 2, 8, and 14 sites that were Salmonella-positive over 90, 80, and 70% of the time, respectively. The serotypes identified most often were 6,8:d:-, Typhimurium, and Give. Interestingly, analysis by Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis indicated persistence and transport of pulsotypes in the region over several years. In this original study of L. monocytogenes in the region prevalence was 43% of 1405 samples resulting in 635 individual isolates. Over 85% of the isolates belonged to serotype 4b with serotypes 1/2a, 1/2b, 3a, 4d with 4e representing the rest, and there were 12 and 2 sites that were positive over 50 and 80% of the time, respectively. Although surface water is not directly used for irrigation in this region, transport to the produce can occur by other means. This environmental survey assesses initial contamination levels toward an understanding of transport leading to produce recalls or outbreaks.

  17. Molecular ecology of Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria species in small and very small ready-to-eat meat processing plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Shanna K; Roof, Sherry; Boyle, Elizabeth A; Burson, Dennis; Thippareddi, Harshavardhan; Geornaras, Ifigenia; Sofos, John N; Wiedmann, Martin; Nightingale, Kendra

    2011-01-01

    A longitudinal study was conducted to track Listeria contamination patterns in ready-to-eat meats from six small or very small meat processing plants located in three states over 1 year. A total of 688 environmental sponge samples were collected from nonfood contact surfaces during bimonthly visits to each plant. Overall, L. monocytogenes was isolated from 42 (6.1%) environmental samples, and its prevalence ranged from 1.7 to 10.8% across different plants. Listeria spp., other than L. monocytogenes, were isolated from 9.5% of samples overall, with the prevalence ranging from 1.5 to 18.3% across different plants. The prevalence of L. monocytogenes correlated well with that of other Listeria spp. for some but not all plants. One L. monocytogenes isolate representing each positive sample was characterized by molecular serotyping, EcoRI ribotyping, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing. Seven sample sites tested positive for L. monocytogenes on more than one occasion, and the same ribotype was detected more than once at five of these sites. Partial sigB sequencing was used to speciate other Listeria spp. isolates and assign an allelic type to each isolate. Other Listeria spp. were isolated more than once from 14 sample sites, and the same sigB allelic type was recovered at least twice from seven of these sites. One plant was colonized by an atypical hemolytic L. innocua strain. Our findings indicate that small and very small meat processing plants that produce ready-to-eat meat products are characterized by a varied prevalence of Listeria, inconsistent correlation between contamination by L. monocytogenes and other Listeria spp., and a unique Listeria molecular ecology.

  18. Changes in water consumption linked to heavy news media coverage of extreme climatic events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesnel, Kimberly J; Ajami, Newsha K

    2017-10-01

    Public awareness of water- and drought-related issues is an important yet relatively unexplored component of water use behavior. To examine this relationship, we first quantified news media coverage of drought in California from 2005 to 2015, a period with two distinct droughts; the later drought received unprecedentedly high media coverage, whereas the earlier drought did not, as the United States was experiencing an economic downturn coinciding with a historic presidential election. Comparing this coverage to Google search frequency confirmed that public attention followed news media trends. We then modeled single-family residential water consumption in 20 service areas in the San Francisco Bay Area during the same period using geospatially explicit data and including news media coverage as a covariate. Model outputs revealed the factors affecting water use for populations of varying demographics. Importantly, the models estimated that an increase of 100 drought-related articles in a bimonthly period was associated with an 11 to 18% reduction in water use. Then, we evaluated high-resolution water consumption data from smart meters, known as advanced metering infrastructure, in one of the previously modeled service areas to evaluate breakpoints in water use trends. Results demonstrated that whereas nonresidential commercial irrigation customers responded to changes in climate, single-family residential customers decreased water use at the fastest rate following heavy drought-related news media coverage. These results highlight the need for water resource planners and decision makers to further consider the importance of effective, internally and externally driven, public awareness and education in water demand behavior and management.

  19. Human milk adiponectin affects infant weight trajectory during the second year of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Jessica G; Guerrero, M Lourdes; Guo, Fukun; Martin, Lisa J; Davidson, Barbara S; Ortega, Hilda; Ruiz-Palacios, Guillermo M; Morrow, Ardythe L

    2012-04-01

    Serum adiponectin (APN) is associated with lower childhood obesity, and APN concentration in human milk is associated with slower growth during active breast-feeding. We examined infant weight gain in the second year of life after exposure to high or low levels of mother's milk APN. Breast-feeding mother-infant pairs were recruited in Mexico City and studied for 2 years; 192 infants with at least 12 months' follow-up were analyzed. Monthly milk samples were assayed for APN; mothers were classified as producing high or low levels of milk APN. Infant and maternal serum APN were assessed during year 1. Infant anthropometry was measured monthly (year 1) or bimonthly (year 2), and World Health Organization z scores were calculated. Longitudinal adjusted models assessed weight-for-age and weight-for-length z score trajectories from 1 to 2 years. Maternal serum APN modestly correlated with milk APN (r=0.37, Pmilk APN experienced increasing weight-for-age and weight-for-length z scores between age 1 and 2 years in contrast to low milk APN exposure (P for group × time=0.02 and 0.054, respectively), adjusting for growth in the first 6 months and other covariates. In contrast, infant serum APN in year 1 was not associated with the rate of weight gain in year 2. High human milk APN exposure was associated with accelerated weight trajectory during the second year of life, suggesting its role in catch-up growth after slower weight gain during the first year of life.

  20. Evaluation of early endoscopic realignment of post-traumatic complete posterior urethral rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaser M Abdelsalam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: to report our experience with 41 patients treated by early endoscopic realignment of complete post-traumatic rupture urethra. Materials and Methods: The study includes patients presented to our institute, between May 2004 and April 2009, with post-traumatic complete posterior urethral disruption. Preoperative retrograde urethrography, voiding cystourethrography and abdominopelvic CT were performed to evaluate the urethral defect length, the bladder neck competence, the prostate position, and the extent of the pelvic hematoma. Within the first week after trauma, antegrade and retrograde urethroscopy were performed to identify both urethral ends and insert urethral catheter. Patients were followed up by pericatheter retrograde urethrogram monthly postoperatively till catheter removal on disappearance of extravasation. Retrograde urethrography, voiding cystourethrography and urethroscopy were performed 1 month after the removal of the catheter. Follow-up abdominal ultrasound and uroflowmetry monthly till 6 months, bimonthly till 1 year, and every 3 months thereafter were encouraged. Urinary continence and postoperative erectile dysfunction were assessed by direct patient interview. Results: Forty one patients in the age group 17-61 years (mean 37.9 were treated. Patients were followed up for 12-36 months (mean 17 months. Complete healing of the urethra occurred in 18 patients (43.9%. Passable urethral stricture developed in 15 patients (36.6%. Complete urethral obstruction occurred in eight patients (19.5%. Conclusions: Early endoscopic realignment for complete posterior urethral rupture is a feasible technique with no or minimal intraoperative complications. The technique is successful as the definitive line of therapy in reasonable number of patients and seems to render further future interventions for inevitable urethral stricture easier.

  1. Safeguards implementation practices for a model mixed oxide recycle fuel fabrication facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glancy, J.E.

    1976-05-01

    Conclusions on the magnitude of the inspection effort and its effectiveness in meeting IAEA objectives are summarized: the minimum goal quantity that can be detected with 95 percent probability is 6 kg Pu. eight to nine resident inspectors are necessary to monitor all operations (3 shifts a day) and to perform verification measurements (23 per day). The facility must also perform inventories monthly if the goal of 6.0 kg is to be attained. Bi-monthly inventory and continual on-site resident inspection can achieve a detection goal quantity of 8.0 kg Pu with 95 percent detection probability. For annual inventories, the detection goal quantity for a 95 percent detection probability is 40 kg Pu. The probability for detecting 8 kg is less than 20 percent. The total inspection effort for a 200 MT/year RFP is estimated to exceed 15 man-years if IAEA headquarters support and analytical laboratory time are added to on-site manpower requirements. Surveillance and containment in the form of seals must be applied to prevent double inventorying and to assure that samples are extracted from the vessel or container being measured. These assurances will probably be achieved by on-line instrumentation installed by the IAEA prior to plant start-up. For assessment, detailed knowledge of plant equipment and floor layout including piping used to transport material is needed. Such information should be requested from the facility prior to preparation of the SIP. Present NDA appears capable of measuring all material in the RFP; however, verification of residual hold-up will require development of new procedures. In-process inventory verification will require special procedures but can be accomplished with present technology. Alternatives to accountability such as perimeter surveillance and containment of declared material within the perimeter should be studied in order to improve detection sensitivity or decrease the effort. (DLC)

  2. Community-centred eco-bio-social approach to control dengue vectors: an intervention study from Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wai, Khin Thet; Htun, Pe Than; Oo, Tin; Myint, Hla; Lin, Zaw; Kroeger, Axel; Sommerfeld, Johannes; Petzold, Max

    2012-12-01

    To build up and analyse the feasibility, process, and effectiveness of a partnership-driven ecosystem management intervention in reducing dengue vector breeding and constructing sustainable partnerships among multiple stakeholders. A community-based intervention study was conducted from May 2009 to January 2010 in Yangon city. Six high-risk and six low-risk clusters were randomized and allocated as intervention and routine service areas, respectively. For each cluster, 100 households were covered. Bi-monthly entomological evaluations (i.e. larval and pupal surveys) and household acceptability surveys at the end of 6-month intervention period were conducted, supplemented by qualitative evaluations. Intervention description: The strategies included eco-friendly multi-stakeholder partner groups (Thingaha) and ward-based volunteers, informed decision-making of householders, followed by integrated vector management approach. Pupae per person index (PPI) decreased at the last evaluation by 5·7% (0·35-0·33) in high-risk clusters. But in low-risk clusters, PPI remarkably decreased by 63·6% (0·33-0·12). In routine service area, PPI also decreased due to availability of Temephos after Cyclone Nargis. As for total number of pupae in all containers, when compared to evaluation 1, there was a reduction of 18·6% in evaluation 2 and 44·1% in evaluation 3 in intervention area. However, in routine service area, more reduction was observed. All intervention tools were found as acceptable, being feasible to implement by multi-stakeholder partner groups. The efficacy of community-controlled partnership-driven interventions was found to be superior to the vertical approach in terms of sustainability and community empowerment.

  3. Absence of Plasmodium inui and Plasmodium cynomolgi, but detection of Plasmodium knowlesi and Plasmodium vivax infections in asymptomatic humans in the Betong division of Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siner, Angela; Liew, Sze-Tze; Kadir, Khamisah Abdul; Mohamad, Dayang Shuaisah Awang; Thomas, Felicia Kavita; Zulkarnaen, Mohammad; Singh, Balbir

    2017-10-17

    Plasmodium knowlesi, a simian malaria parasite, has become the main cause of malaria in Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo. Epidemiological data on malaria for Sarawak has been derived solely from hospitalized patients, and more accurate epidemiological data on malaria is necessary. Therefore, a longitudinal study of communities affected by knowlesi malaria was undertaken. A total of 3002 blood samples on filter paper were collected from 555 inhabitants of 8 longhouses with recently reported knowlesi malaria cases in the Betong Division of Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo. Each longhouse was visited bimonthly for a total of 10 times during a 21-month study period (Jan 2014-Oct 2015). DNA extracted from blood spots were examined by a nested PCR assay for Plasmodium and positive samples were then examined by nested PCR assays for Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium vivax, Plasmodium malariae, Plasmodium ovale, Plasmodium knowlesi, Plasmodium cynomolgi and Plasmodium inui. Blood films of samples positive by PCR were also examined by microscopy. Genus-specific PCR assay detected Plasmodium DNA in 9 out of 3002 samples. Species-specific PCR identified 7 P. knowlesi and one P. vivax. Malaria parasites were observed in 5 thick blood films of the PCR positive samples. No parasites were observed in blood films from one knowlesi-, one vivax- and the genus-positive samples. Only one of 7 P. knowlesi-infected individual was febrile and had sought medical treatment at Betong Hospital the day after sampling. The 6 knowlesi-, one vivax- and one Plasmodium-infected individuals were afebrile and did not seek any medical treatment. Asymptomatic human P. knowlesi and P. vivax malaria infections, but not P. cynomolgi and P. inui infections, are occurring within communities affected with malaria.

  4. The AgeWell study of behavior change to promote health and wellbeing in later life: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Linda

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lifestyle factors playing a role in the development of late-life disability may be modifiable. There is a need for robust evidence about the potential for prevention of disability through behavior change interventions. Methods/design This feasibility study involves the development, implementation and initial testing of a behavior change intervention in a naturalistic setting. A small-scale randomized controlled trial (RCT will investigate the implementation of a goal-setting intervention aimed at promoting behavior change in the domains of physical and cognitive activity in the context of a community resource center for over-50s. Healthy older participants attending the center (n = 75 will be randomized to one of three conditions: control (an interview involving a general discussion about the center; goal-setting (an interview involving identification of up to five personal goals in the domains of physical activity, cognitive activity, diet and health, and social engagement; or goal-setting with mentoring (the goal-setting interview followed by bi-monthly telephone mentoring. All participants will be reassessed after 12 months. Primary outcomes are levels of physical and cognitive activity. Secondary outcomes address psychosocial (self-efficacy, mood, quality of life, cognitive (memory and executive function, and physical fitness (functional and metabolic domains. Cost-effectiveness will also be examined. Discussion This study will provide information about the feasibility of a community-based lifestyle intervention model for over-50s and of the implementation of a goal-setting intervention for behavior change, together with initial evidence about the short-term effects of goal-setting on behavior. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN30080637 (http://www.controlled-trials.com

  5. The AgeWell study of behavior change to promote health and wellbeing in later life: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clare, Linda; Hindle, John V; Jones, Ian R; Thom, Jeanette M; Nelis, Sharon M; Hounsome, Barry; Whitaker, Christopher J

    2012-07-24

    Lifestyle factors playing a role in the development of late-life disability may be modifiable. There is a need for robust evidence about the potential for prevention of disability through behavior change interventions. This feasibility study involves the development, implementation and initial testing of a behavior change intervention in a naturalistic setting. A small-scale randomized controlled trial (RCT) will investigate the implementation of a goal-setting intervention aimed at promoting behavior change in the domains of physical and cognitive activity in the context of a community resource center for over-50s. Healthy older participants attending the center (n = 75) will be randomized to one of three conditions: control (an interview involving a general discussion about the center); goal-setting (an interview involving identification of up to five personal goals in the domains of physical activity, cognitive activity, diet and health, and social engagement); or goal-setting with mentoring (the goal-setting interview followed by bi-monthly telephone mentoring). All participants will be reassessed after 12 months. Primary outcomes are levels of physical and cognitive activity. Secondary outcomes address psychosocial (self-efficacy, mood, quality of life), cognitive (memory and executive function), and physical fitness (functional and metabolic) domains. Cost-effectiveness will also be examined. This study will provide information about the feasibility of a community-based lifestyle intervention model for over-50s and of the implementation of a goal-setting intervention for behavior change, together with initial evidence about the short-term effects of goal-setting on behavior. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN30080637 (http://www.controlled-trials.com).

  6. Consequences of land use cover change and precipitation regimes on water quality in a tropical landscape: the case of São Paulo, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro Piffer, P.; Reverberi Tambosi, L.; Uriarte, M.

    2017-12-01

    One of the most pressing challenges faced by modern societies is ensuring a sufficient supply of water considering the ever-growing conflict between environmental conservation and expansion of agricultural and urban frontiers worldwide. Land use cover change have marked effects on natural landscapes, putting key watershed ecosystem services in jeopardy. We investigated the consequences of land use cover change and precipitation regimes on water quality in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, a landscape that underwent major changes in past century. Water quality data collected bi-monthly between 2000 and 2014 from 229 water monitoring stations was analyzed together with 2011 land use cover maps. We focused on six water quality metrics (dissolved oxygen, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, turbidity, total dissolved solids and fecal coliforms) and used generalized linear mixed models to analyze the data. Models were built at two scales, the entire watershed and a 60 meters riparian buffer along the river network. Models accounted for 46-67% of the variance in water quality metrics and, apart from dissolved oxygen, which reflected land cover composition in riparian buffers, all metrics responded to land use at the watershed scale. Highly urbanized areas had low dissolved oxygen and high fecal coliforms, dissolved solids, phosphorus and nitrogen levels in streams. Pasture was associated with increases in turbidity, while sugarcane plantations significantly increased nitrogen concentrations. Watersheds with high forest cover had greater dissolved oxygen and lower turbidity. Silviculture plantations had little impact on water quality. Precipitation decreased dissolved oxygen and was associated with higher levels of turbidity, fecal coliforms and phosphorus. Results indicate that conversion of forest cover to other land uses had negative impacts on water quality in the study area, highlighting the need for landscape restoration to improve watersheds ecosystem services.

  7. Safeguards implementation practices for a model mixed oxide recycle fuel fabrication facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glancy, J.E.

    1976-05-01

    Conclusions on the magnitude of the inspection effort and its effectiveness in meeting IAEA objectives are summarized: the minimum goal quantity that can be detected with 95 percent probability is 6 kg Pu. eight to nine resident inspectors are necessary to monitor all operations (3 shifts a day) and to perform verification measurements (23 per day). The facility must also perform inventories monthly if the goal of 6.0 kg is to be attained. Bi-monthly inventory and continual on-site resident inspection can achieve a detection goal quantity of 8.0 kg Pu with 95 percent detection probability. For annual inventories, the detection goal quantity for a 95 percent detection probability is 40 kg Pu. The probability for detecting 8 kg is less than 20 percent. The total inspection effort for a 200 MT/year RFP is estimated to exceed 15 man-years if IAEA headquarters support and analytical laboratory time are added to on-site manpower requirements. Surveillance and containment in the form of seals must be applied to prevent double inventorying and to assure that samples are extracted from the vessel or container being measured. These assurances will probably be achieved by on-line instrumentation installed by the IAEA prior to plant start-up. For assessment, detailed knowledge of plant equipment and floor layout including piping used to transport material is needed. Such information should be requested from the facility prior to preparation of the SIP. Present NDA appears capable of measuring all material in the RFP; however, verification of residual hold-up will require development of new procedures. In-process inventory verification will require special procedures but can be accomplished with present technology. Alternatives to accountability such as perimeter surveillance and containment of declared material within the perimeter should be studied in order to improve detection sensitivity or decrease the effort

  8. Short Term Sediment Exchange Between Marshes and Bays Using Beryllium-7 as a Tracer, Fourleague Bay, Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restreppo, G. A.; Bentley, S. J.; Xu, K.; Wang, J.

    2016-12-01

    Modern delta models focus on the availability and exchange of coarse sediment as one of the major factors of deltaic growth or decay. Fine-grained sediment exchange within a river's delta is relatively poorly understood, as is the impact that this exchange has on land building and land loss. To better understand the dynamics of fine grain sediment exchange between river mouth, adjacent bays, and marshland, sediment cores from Fourleague Bay, LA, were collected and analyzed for 7Be, a naturally occurring radioisotope that serves as a marker for recently deposited sediment. Time-series push cores were collected every two months at ten sites, five located across a longitudinal transect in the middle bay and five located along adjacent marshes, from May 2015 to May 2016. All sites fall within 11 to 28 km of the Atchafalaya Delta, along a gradient extending towards the open ocean. Cores were extruded in 2 cm intervals, dried, ground, and analyzed via gamma spectrometry for the presence of 7Be. Inventories of 7Be were then calculated and used to determine bimonthly sedimentation rates over the course twelve months. Sediment deposition on the bay floor and marsh surface were then compared to Atchafalaya River discharge, wind speed and direction, and wave action. Preliminary results indicate patterns of initial fluvial sediment transfer from river to bay floor, then bay floor to marsh surface, with decreasing fluvial influence towards the open ocean. Sediment transport from bay to marsh appears to be coupled with meteorological forcing that induces bay-floor sediment resuspension and the flooding of marsh surfaces. This indirect mechanism of fluvial sediment supply to wetland surfaces may extend the region of influence for sediment delivery from man-made river-sediment diversions.

  9. Crustáceos decápodos asociados a comunidades algales en la región de Santa Marta, Caribe colombiano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campos C. Néstor Hernando

    1995-11-01

    Full Text Available Bimonthly sampling during a one year period was carried out on three biotopes in the Santa Marta region (Bahía de Gayraca: Lithothamnion; Bahía de Chengue: Halimeda; Bahra de Concha: Sargassum in order to determine the crustacean population associated with to them. A total of 1309 individuals of 58 species were collected. Only two species appeared at the three habitats, Mithraculus forceps y Pagurus brevidactylus. Some species were found to characterize the habitat sampled in the Santa Marta región. Lysmata wurdemanni has been found in Santa Marta only in Halimeda; some galatheids are frequently found in the Lithothamnion habitat; the spider crabs Acanthonix petiveri and Epialtus brasiliensis were found exclusively in the Sargassum habitat.Con el fin de evaluar las poblaciones de crustáceos decápodos asociadas a comunidades algales, se adelantaron muestreos bimensuales durante un año en tres comunidades de la región de Santa Marta, (Bahía de Gayraca: algas coralinácea del género Uthothamnion; Bahra de Chengue: algas del género Halimeda; Bahía de Concha: algas del género Sargassum. Se recolectaron 1.309 individuos pertenecientes a 58 especies de crustáceos decápodos. Del total de especies, sólo dos estuvieron presentes en los tres hábitats (Mithraculus forceps y Pagurus brevidactylus. Para cada una de las tres comunidades se pudieron identificar algunas especies que las caracterizan en la región de Santa Marta: Lysmata wurdemanni en el área de estudio no ha sido capturada en otro hábitat diferente a Halimeda; miembros de la familia Galatheidae son frecuentes en Uthothamnion; los cangrejos araña Acanthonix Petiveri y Epialtus brasiliensisse encontraron únicamente en Sargassum.

  10. Economic and energy benefits in clean rooms, case of study: natural illumination and insulating capacity of the lagging; Beneficios economicos y energeticos en cuartos limpios, caso de estudio: iluminacion natural y capacidad aislante de la envolvente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres Rodriguez, Agustin; Morillon Galvez, David [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico)

    2009-01-15

    The objective of the present article is to show the electrical energy saving in clean rooms used to make pharmaceutical products using natural illumination instead of using fluorescent lamps. A study is performed in steady state of the heat load of buildings during three hours in order to observe the thermal its thermal behavior. And it is observed that at 1:00 o'clock p.m. the greatest heat load appears. With the global heat transference coefficients proposed in the official Mexican Norm NOM-008-ENER-2001 the heat load by conduction and convection of the building is estimated. Finally a bimonthly economic study of the energy saving of energy of the air conditioning system was realized with the system of artificial lighting and the system of natural illumination. All this study was realized in a site with temperate climate (Fraccionamiento Industrial Xalostoc, Ecatepec de Morelos, Estado de Mexico). [Spanish] El objetivo del presente articulo es mostrar el ahorro de energia electrica en cuartos limpios utilizados para elaborar productos farmaceuticos utilizando iluminacion natural en ves de utilizar lamparas fluorescentes. Se realiza un estudio en estado estable de la carga de calor de edificios para tres horas con la finalidad de observar el comportamiento termico de este. Y se observa que a las 13:00 horas se presenta la mayor carga de calor. Con los coeficientes globales de transferencia de calor propuestos en la norma oficial mexicana NOM-008-ENER-2001 se estima la carga de calor por conduccion y conveccion del edificio. Finalmente se realizo un estudio economico bimestral del ahorro de energia del sistema de aire acondicionado con el sistema de iluminacion artificial y con el sistema de iluminacion natural. Todo este estudio se realizo en un sitio con clima templado (fraccionamiento industrial Xalostoc, Ecatepec de Morelos Estado de Mexico).

  11. Effects of Intravitreal Ranibizumab in the Treatment of Retinopathy of Prematurity in Chinese Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zuohuizi; Su, Yu; Zhou, Yunyun; Zheng, Hongmei; Ye, Meihong; Xu, Yonghong; Chen, Changzheng

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the efficacy associated with intravitreal ranibizumab in the treatment of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). A retrospective case series study. Infants diagnosed with Type 1 ROP, or aggressive posterior ROP (AP-ROP) were enrolled in the study. All infants in the study received intravitreal ranibizumab (0.25 mg/0.025 ml) as the initial treatment. Follow-up examinations were performed the day after treatment, then weekly for 1 month, bi-monthly for two additional months, then monthly until vascularization of zone III occurred. Additional treatments were initiated in cases of disease recurrence. Thirty-three premature infants (a total of 66 eyes) receiving intravitreal ranibizumab were included. The mean birth weight was 1291 ± 211 g (range: 650-1650 g) and the mean gestational age was 29.8 ± 1.6 weeks (range: 27.0-33.6 weeks). The mean gestational age at the time of the first injection was 35.8 ± 1.6 weeks (range: 32.7-38.4 weeks). The mean follow-up time was 12.9 ± 4.9 months (range: 6-22 months). Single injections were administered to 58 eyes (87.9%), whereas eight eyes (12.1%) received additional treatments. Recurrence was observed in eight eyes (12.1%), with a mean time to recurrence of 6.9 ± 1.8 weeks (range: 4-8 weeks). Intravitreal ranibizumab is effective for the treatment of retinopathy of prematurity, although a small amount of patients recurred. Compared with intravitreal bevacizumab, a higher incidence and shorter time to recurrence were observed after intravitreal ranibizumab treatment, thus longer and more frequent follow-ups are needed.

  12. Treatment of Laugier-Hunziker syndrome with the Q-switched alexandrite laser in 22 Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Ya-Gang; Ma, Dong-Lai; Jin, Hong-Zhong; Liu, Yue-Hua; Wang, Hong-Wei; Sun, Qiu-Ning

    2010-03-01

    Laugier-Hunziker syndrome (LHS), a rare, acquired pigmentary disorder of the lips, oral mucosa, and fingers, is known to be an entirely benign disease with no systemic manifestations. In the past, the pigmentation has been treated efficiently in a few patients with the Q-switched neodymium: yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser and the Q-switched alexandrite laser (QSAL). In order to evaluate the efficacy and safety of QSAL on Chinese patients of LHS, we treated 22 patients with QSAL in the past 5 years. Treatments were delivered on a bimonthly or trimonthly basis until the abnormal pigmentation totally disappeared. Patients were evaluated at each visit for evidence of dyspigmentation, scarring, or other untoward effects from the laser treatment. Our 22 subjects consisted of 18 females and 4 males with a mean age of 42.4 years. After only one session of laser treatment, the clearing on the lips was as follow: 18 (81.8%) excellent, 2 (9.1%) good, 1 (4.5%) fair and 1 (4.5%) poor. Eighteen patients (81.8%) with LHS, who had achieved excellent clearing after only one session of laser treatment, did not receive further treatment. Among the left four patients, three patients (13.6%) achieved complete results after three laser treatments. Only one patient required six sessions to achieve complete clearance. No scarring was noted after any of the treatments. The appearance of pigmentation on mucous membranes in a middle-aged patient without a significant family history for skin disorders should prompt consideration for the possible diagnosis of LHS. Our study has also demonstrated QSAL to be highly effective and safe in the treatment of LHS.

  13. Effects of storage structures and moisture contents on seed quality attributes of quality protein maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Bhandari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed to examine the effects of various storage structures and moisture contents on seed quality attributes of quality protein maize seed. The quality protein maize (QPM-1 seed was tested in conventional seed storage containers (Fertilizer sack and earthen pot and the improved hermetic ones (Metal bin, Super grain bag, and Purdue Improved Crop Storage (PICS bag at Seed Science and Technology Division, Khumaltar, Nepal during February, 2015 to January 2016. Ten treatments comprising 5 storage devices in two moisture regimes (11% and 9% replicated thrice and laid out in Completely Randomized Design (CRD. Data on temperature, relative humidity (RH, germination, electrical conductivity (EC, seed moisture content (MC were collected bimonthly. The conventional containers were found liable to the external environmental condition whereas the hermetic structures observed with controlled RH level below 40% in all combinations. Electrical conductivity (EC for seed vigor showed that hermetic containers provide higher seed vigor than the conventional ones. Up to 4 months all treatments were found statistically at par for germination. A significant difference was observed in each treatment after 4 months where PICS bag & Super grain bag showed best germination followed by metal bin while fertilizer bag & earthen-pot showed poorer and poorest germination respectively till one year. Almost all treatments with lower MC showed better results than the treatments with higher MC. A negative correlation (R2=69.7% was found between EC and Germination. All six figures from 2 to 12 months on MC showed statistically different where hermetic plastic bags were found maintaining MC as initial whereas MC of fertilizer bags and earthen pot was spiked than the basal figure. The finding evidenced that the hermetic containers and low MC are the seed storage approaches for retaining the quality of seed even in an ambient environmental condition for more than a year.

  14. Open-Label Randomized Trial of Titrated Disease Management for Patients with Hypertension: Study Design and Baseline Sample Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, George L.; Weinberger, Morris; Kirshner, Miriam A.; Stechuchak, Karen M.; Melnyk, Stephanie D.; Bosworth, Hayden B.; Coffman, Cynthia J.; Neelon, Brian; Van Houtven, Courtney; Gentry, Pamela W.; Morris, Isis J.; Rose, Cynthia M.; Taylor, Jennifer P.; May, Carrie L.; Han, Byungjoo; Wainwright, Christi; Alkon, Aviel; Powell, Lesa; Edelman, David

    2016-01-01

    Despite the availability of efficacious treatments, only half of patients with hypertension achieve adequate blood pressure (BP) control. This paper describes the protocol and baseline subject characteristics of a 2-arm, 18-month randomized clinical trial of titrated disease management (TDM) for patients with pharmaceutically-treated hypertension for whom systolic blood pressure (SBP) is not controlled (≥140mmHg for non-diabetic or ≥130mmHg for diabetic patients). The trial is being conducted among patients of four clinic locations associated with a Veterans Affairs Medical Center. An intervention arm has a TDM strategy in which patients' hypertension control at baseline, 6, and 12 months determines the resource intensity of disease management. Intensity levels include: a low-intensity strategy utilizing a licensed practical nurse to provide bi-monthly, non-tailored behavioral support calls to patients whose SBP comes under control; medium-intensity strategy utilizing a registered nurse to provide monthly tailored behavioral support telephone calls plus home BP monitoring; and high-intensity strategy utilizing a pharmacist to provide monthly tailored behavioral support telephone calls, home BP monitoring, and pharmacist-directed medication management. Control arm patients receive the low-intensity strategy regardless of BP control. The primary outcome is SBP. There are 385 randomized (192 intervention; 193 control) veterans that are predominately older (mean age 63.5 years) men (92.5%). 61.8% are African American, and the mean baseline SBP for all subjects is 143.6mmHg. This trial will determine if a disease management program that is titrated by matching the intensity of resources to patients' BP control leads to superior outcomes compared to a low-intensity management strategy. PMID:27417982

  15. Dug Well Recharge Method for Insitu Mitigation of Fluoride Contamination in Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, G.; Lakshmanan, E.; Gunalan, J.

    2016-12-01

    Groundwater with fluoride concentration exceeding 1.5 mg/l is not suitable for drinking water supply as it may cause health issues such as dental and skeletal fluorosis to humans. Several million people around the world has been affected by fluorosis. The objective of the study is to mitigate the problem of fluoride contamination in groundwater by increasing groundwater recharge through a dug well recharge system. The study was carried out in a part of Vaniyar river basin, northwest Tamil Nadu, India where fluorosis is prevalent. A cylindrical pit of 1m diameter and 1.5 m height was constructed during May 2014 at a distance of about 4 m from a dug well existing in this area. This cylindrical pit was divided into 3 compartments and one of them was filled with gravel and one with sand. The third compartment was kept empty for inspection and maintenance. The rainfall collected in a funnel shaped depression was allowed to pass through these compartments to discharge in the nearby dug well through a pipe. The concentration of the fluoride in groundwater from this well was had been monitoring on bi-monthly basis from the year 2012 to 2014. After construction of dug well recharge system, the groundwater level has raised by about 5 m and the fluoride concentration has decreased from 3.1 mg/l to 1.44 mg/l due to recharge. The concentration of fluoride and groundwater level is being monitored on daily basis from June 2014. It is evident that the recharge system constructed is working well and the concentration of fluoride in groundwater is within the permissible limit. The advantage of this dug well recharge system is its low cost and the ease of implementation. Thus this pilot study on dug well recharge system demonstrated it's potential in reducing the concentration of fluoride in groundwater which is more beneficial to the society as they cannot afford the well proven water treatment methods.

  16. Vertical and temporal variation in phytoplankton assemblages correlated with environmental conditions in the Mundaú reservoir, semi-arid northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira, G A S T; Moura, A N; Vilar, M C P; Cordeiro-Araújo, M K; Bittencourt-Oliveira, M C

    2014-08-01

    The goal of this study was to analyse the vertical structure of the phytoplankton community at the Mundaú reservoir, located in the semi-arid region of northeastern Brazil, and to correlate it to environmental conditions over two distinct seasons, dry and rainy. Samples were collected bimonthly at eight depths in the dry and rainy season for analyses of the physical and chemical variables of the water, as well as density, abundance, dominance, species diversity index and equitability of the community. Analysis of variance (ANOVA-two way) was used to analyse the vertical and seasonal differences, and Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) was used to assess associations between phytoplankton and environmental variables Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii (Woloszynska) Seenaya and Subba Raju was the only dominant species and Geitlerinema amphibium (C. Agardh) Anagnostidis, Merismopedia punctata Meyen and Synedra rumpens Kützing. Others six taxa were abundant in at least one of the samples. Distinct vertical distribution patterns were observed for the abundant taxa between depths and seasons. The cyanobacteria, with the exception of C. raciborskii, showed similar seasonal patterns, with higher densities in the dry season. The CCA showed a strong correlation between the density of the phytoplanktonic species and abiotic variables. The vertical changes in abundant taxa revealed distinct patterns regulated by the variation in the environmental factors that were directly linked to seasonality, with the success of one or more species being dependent on their life strategies and ecological needs. The present study restates the importance of environmental and seasonal factors for phytoplankton composition and distribution in a freshwater tropical reservoir through a vertical gradient.

  17. Vertical and temporal variation in phytoplankton assemblages correlated with environmental conditions in the Mundaú reservoir, semi-arid northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GAST LIRA

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to analyse the vertical structure of the phytoplankton community at the Mundaú reservoir, located in the semi-arid region of northeastern Brazil, and to correlate it to environmental conditions over two distinct seasons, dry and rainy. Samples were collected bimonthly at eight depths in the dry and rainy season for analyses of the physical and chemical variables of the water, as well as density, abundance, dominance, species diversity index and equitability of the community. Analysis of variance (ANOVA-two way was used to analyse the vertical and seasonal differences, and Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA was used to assess associations between phytoplankton and environmental variables Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii (Woloszynska Seenaya and Subba Raju was the only dominant species and Geitlerinema amphibium (C. Agardh Anagnostidis, Merismopedia punctata Meyen and Synedra rumpens Kützing. Others six taxa were abundant in at least one of the samples. Distinct vertical distribution patterns were observed for the abundant taxa between depths and seasons. The cyanobacteria, with the exception of C. raciborskii, showed similar seasonal patterns, with higher densities in the dry season. The CCA showed a strong correlation between the density of the phytoplanktonic species and abiotic variables. The vertical changes in abundant taxa revealed distinct patterns regulated by the variation in the environmental factors that were directly linked to seasonality, with the success of one or more species being dependent on their life strategies and ecological needs. The present study restates the importance of environmental and seasonal factors for phytoplankton composition and distribution in a freshwater tropical reservoir through a vertical gradient.

  18. A survey of the radiographic cassettes disinfection of university hospitals in seoul

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kweon, Dae Cheol; Park, Peom; Kim, Moon Sun; Kim, Dong Sung

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to prevent nosocomial infection in patients through contact of radiographic cassettes. Data were collected from radiographers working in 29 university hospitals in Seoul in February and March 2001. Radiographic cassettes were disinfected daily in 5 hospitals, weekly in 4 hospitals, monthly in 5 hospitals, bimonthly in 1 hospital and once every three months in another hospital. 12 other hospitals do not practice regular disinfections of radiographic cassettes. Gauze soaked in disinfectant solution is used in 7 hospitals while 11 hospitals used cotton and cloth soaked in disinfectant solution to clean the radiographic cassettes. 26 hospitals used 99% alcohol based disinfectant solutions while 3 hospitals used 75% alcohol based disinfectant, 26 hospitals use of intercourse cassettes outpatients and in patients. In 26 hospitals, all patients shared the same set of radiographic cassettes used in the hospitals, or in 26 hospitals, separate sets of radiographic cassettes are used for outpatients and inpatients. Separate sets of cassettes are used for ICU and inpatients in 6 others hospitals. 23 hospitals used the same sets of radiographic cassettes for all their patients. radiographic cassettes are cleaned in wash area in the study room of the radiographic department in 17 hospitals. 12 other hospitals do not have designated cleaning areas for the cassettes. All radiographers practiced hands washing with soap. All 29 hospitals surveyed have infection control committee. However, only 9 out of the 29 hospitals surveyed provided Infection · disinfections control education to radiographers. Only 3 hospitals have radiographers sitting in the infection control committee. Infection management education is conducted in 63 hospitals annually, twice a year in 1 hospital and once every 3 months in 2 hospitals

  19. Caracterización de los lepidópteros fitófagos asociados a la herbivoría de frailejones en la microcuenca de la quebrada Calostros del Parque Nacional Natural Chingaza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Salinas

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The paramo ecosystem is one of the most sensitive to changes in climate and land use. These changes in physical conditions may lead to changes in species composition and their life cycles, increasing susceptibility to attack by pathogens and other species that seize the opportunity to colonize new niches. The “frailejon”, Espeletia sp., is a keystone species of the páramo, but herbivory due to phytophagous insects and fungi has recently led to the death of a large number of frailejones. The knowledge of the biology and the effect of insects on such plants contribute to decision making related to environmental management, monitoring, sustainable management and ecosystem preservation. This study was conducted in the watershed of the Calostros creek, Chingaza National Park, Colombia, in order to determine the magnitude of Lepidoptera insect damage inflicted on vegetative structures of individuals of the genus Espeletia sp., and examine whether the symptoms and the degree of insect damage varies between plants from different elevations. For this purpose, 30 Espeletia plants were monitored bi-monthly over a period of six months. We observed three species of Lepidoptera larvae capable of causing damage to Espeletia sp. However only one species, Hellinsia sp., is widely distributed and is able to cause severe damage to frailejones, primarily to the apical meristem of plants. The pathology caused by Hellinsia sp. Includes tissue loss, severe chlorosis and leaf curling. Finally, it was observed that individuals of Espeletia sp have the ability to continue normal development after being hosts of larval Hellinsia sp.

  20. Short spatio-temporal variations in the population dynamics and biology of the deep-water rose shrimp Parapenaeus longirostris (Decapoda: Crustacea in the western Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Guijarro

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The deep-water rose shrimp Parapenaeus longirostris is a demersal decapod crustacean that is commercially exploited by trawl fleets. The present work compares its population dynamics, biology and condition in two locations (southern and north-western Mallorca in the Balearic Islands, western Mediterranean, separated by a distance of 120 km with different environmental conditions and explores the relationships between the species and certain environmental factors. Six multidisciplinary bimonthly surveys were carried out during 2003 and 2004 in these two locations (between 150 and 750 m depth in order to collect data on the demersal species with bottom trawl, the hydrography (temperature and salinity with CTD casts, and trophic resources (zooplankton in the water column and suprabenthos with Bongo net and Macer-GIROQ sledge respectively and sediments with a Shipeck dredge. The trawl fleets from both locations were monitored by monthly on board sampling and daily landings obtained from sales bills. Additional data was obtained from other trawl surveys. Temporal differences were detected both annually, with a decreasing trend over the last years in species abundance, and seasonally, in the biological indexes analysed. Bathymetric differences were also found in abundance, mean length, sex-ratio and condition of females. There were clear differences between the two locations studied, with higher abundance, condition and mean length and a lower length at first maturity for females in the north-western location. Trophic conditions could act as a link between geo-physical and biological changes. These short spatio-temporal differences could be due to the higher productivity found at this location, with higher density of preferred prey for the studied species together with adequate seafloor topography, sediment composition and hydrographical characteristics.

  1. Providing Undergraduate Research Opportunities Through the World Rivers Observatory Collaborative Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, S. L.; Marsh, S. J.; Janmaat, A.; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, B.; Voss, B.; Holmes, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    Successful research collaboration exists between the University of the Fraser Valley (UFV), a primarily undergraduate-serving university located on the Fraser River in British Columbia, and the World Rivers Observatory that is coordinated through the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and the Woods Hole Research Center (WHRC). The World Rivers Observatory coordinates time-series sampling of 15 large rivers, with particular focus on the large Arctic rivers, the Ganges-Brahmaputra, Congo, Fraser, Yangtze (Changjiang), Amazon, and Mackenzie River systems. The success of this international observatory critically depends on the participation of local collaborators, such as UFV, that are necessary in order to collect temporally resolved data from these rivers. Several faculty members and undergraduate students from the Biology and Geography Departments of UFV received on-site training from the lead-PIs of the Global Rivers Observatory. To share information and ensure good quality control of sampling methods, WHOI and WHRC hosted two international workshops at Woods Hole for collaborators. For the past four years, faculty and students from UFV have been collecting a variety of bi-monthly water samples from the Fraser River for the World Rivers Observatory. UFV undergraduate students who become involved learn proper sampling techniques and are given the opportunity to design and conduct their own research. Students have collected, analyzed and presented data from this project at regional, national, and international scientific meetings. UFV undergraduate students have also been hosted by WHOI and WHRC as guest students to work on independent research projects. While at WHOI and WHRC, students are able to conduct research using state-of-the-art specialized research facilities not available at UFV.

  2. A culturally adapted family intervention for African American families coping with parental cancer: outcomes of a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Maureen P; Kissil, Karni; Lynch, Laura; Harmon, La-Rhonda; Hodgson, Nancy

    2013-07-01

    The primary objective of this 2-year pilot study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a culturally adapted family intervention in improving family communication among African American parents coping with cancer and their school-age children. A secondary objective was to determine its impact on other symptoms of psychosocial distress (depression and anxiety). The third objective was to assess for acceptability and feasibility. Using a two-arm pre-intervention and post-intervention prospective design, 12 African American families received five bi-monthly sessions of either a culturally adapted family intervention (n=7 families) or psycho-education treatment (n=5 families). Parents and their children completed pre-intervention and post-intervention questionnaires assessing perceptions of family communication, quality of their relationship, and symptoms of depression. School-age children additionally completed a questionnaire assessing their levels of anxiety. Consumer satisfaction was also evaluated at post-intervention. Parents and school-age children who completed the culturally adapted family intervention reported significantly better communication with each other and were more satisfied compared with the psycho-education control group. No changes were noted in symptoms of anxiety or depression. The culturally adapted family intervention was acceptable based on our findings, families' feedback, and rates of retention. Feasibility is uncertain because our oncology clinic approach to recruitment was slower than expected. Providing culturally adapted family intervention programs to African American families who are coping with parental cancer may result in improved family communication. This pilot study serves as the first step in the development of culturally adapted family intervention programs to help African American families cope with parental cancer. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Findings from the Families on Track Intervention Pilot Trial for Children with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders and Their Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, Christie L M; Pandolfino, Mary E; Robinson, Luther K

    2017-07-01

    Individuals with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) are at high risk for costly, debilitating mental health problems and secondary conditions, such as school disruption, trouble with the law, and substance use. The study objective was to pilot a multicomponent intervention designed to prevent secondary conditions in children with FASD and improve family adaptation. Thirty children with FASD or prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) (ages 4 to 8) and their primary caregivers were enrolled. Families were randomized to either the Families on Track Integrated Preventive Intervention or an active control of neuropsychological assessment and personalized community referrals. The 30-week intervention integrates scientifically validated bimonthly, in-home parent behavioral consultation, and weekly child skills groups. Outcomes measured at baseline and follow-up postintervention included intervention satisfaction, child emotional and behavioral functioning, child self-esteem, caregiver knowledge of FASD and advocacy, caregiver attitudes, use of targeted parenting practices, perceived family needs met, social support, and self-care. Data analysis emphasized calculation of effect sizes and was supplemented with analysis of variance techniques. Analyses indicated that families participating in the intervention reported high program satisfaction. Relative to comparison group outcomes, the intervention was associated with medium-to-large effects for child emotion regulation, self-esteem, and anxiety. Medium-sized improvements in disruptive behavior were observed for both groups. Medium and large effects were seen for important caregiver outcomes: knowledge of FASD and advocacy, attributions of behavior, use of antecedent strategies, parenting efficacy, family needs met, social support, and self-care. This pilot study yielded promising findings from the multicomponent Families on Track Integrated Preventive Intervention for child and caregiver outcomes. An important next step is to

  4. Predicting violence in veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder

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    Jovanović Aleksandar A.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Frequent expression of negative affects, hostility and violent behavior in individuals suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD were recognized long ago, and have been retrospectively well documented in war veterans with PTSD who were shown to have an elevated risk for violent behavior when compared to both veterans without PTSD and other psychiatric patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of clinical prediction of violence in combat veterans suffering from PTSD. Methods. The subjects of this study, 104 male combat veterans with PTSD were assessed with the Historical, Clinical and Risk Management 20 (HCR-20, a 20-item clinicianrated instrument for assessing the risks for violence, and their acts of violence during one-year follow-up period were registered based on bimonthly check-up interviews. Results. Our findings showed that the HCR-20, as an actuarial measure, had good internal consistency reliability (α = 0.82, excellent interrater reliability (Interaclass Correlation ICC = 0.85, as well as excellent predictive validity for acts of any violence, non-physical violence or physical violence in the follow-up period (AUC = 0.82-0.86. The HCR-20 also had good interrater reliability (Cohen's kappa = 0.74, and acceptable predictive accuracy for each outcome criterion (AUC = 0.73-0.79. Conclusion. The results of this research confirm that the HCR-20 may also be applied in prediction of violent behavior in the population of patients suffering from PTSD with reliability and validity comparable with the results of previous studies where this instrument was administered to other populations of psychiatric patients.

  5. Identification of candidate biomarkers of the exposure to PCBs in contaminated cattle: A gene expression- and proteomic-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girolami, F; Badino, P; Spalenza, V; Manzini, L; Renzone, G; Salzano, A M; Dal Piaz, F; Scaloni, A; Rychen, G; Nebbia, C

    2018-05-28

    Dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are widespread and persistent contaminants. Through a combined gene expression/proteomic-based approach, candidate biomarkers of the exposure to such environmental pollutants in cattle subjected to a real eco-contamination event were identified. Animals were removed from the polluted area and fed a standard ration for 6 months. The decontamination was monitored by evaluating dioxin and PCB levels in pericaudal fat two weeks after the removal from the contaminated area (day 0) and then bimonthly for six months (days 59, 125 and 188). Gene expression measurements demonstrated that CYP1B1 expression was significantly higher in blood lymphocytes collected in contaminated animals (day 0), and decreased over time during decontamination. mRNA levels of interleukin 2 showed an opposite quantitative trend. MALDI-TOF-MS polypeptide profiling of serum samples ascertained a progressive decrease (from day 0 to 188) of serum levels of fibrinogen β-chain and serpin A3-7-like fragments, apolipoprotein (APO) C-II and serum amyloid A-4 protein, along with an augmented representation of transthyretin isoforms, as well as APOC-III and APOA-II proteins during decontamination. When differentially represented species were combined with serum antioxidant, acute phase and proinflammatory protein levels already ascertained in the same animals (Cigliano et al., 2016), bioinformatics unveiled an interaction network linking together almost all components. This suggests the occurrence of a complex PCB-responsive mechanism associated with animal contamination/decontamination, including a cohort of protein/polypeptide species involved in blood redox homeostasis, inflammation and lipid transport. All together, these results suggest the use in combination of such biomarkers for identifying PCB-contaminated animals, and for monitoring the restoring of their healthy condition following a decontamination process. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All

  6. Progressive decline in fractional anisotropy on serial DTI examinations of the corpus callosum: a putative marker of disease activity and progression in SPMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Wei; Zhu, Tong; Zhong, Jianhui; Liu, Xiang [University of Rochester Medical Center, Department of Imaging Sciences, Rochester, NY (United States); Rao, Praveen; Segal, Benjamin M. [University of Michigan, Department of Neurology, Holtom-Garrett Program in Neuroimmunology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ekholm, Sven [University of Rochester Medical Center, Department of Imaging Sciences, Rochester, NY (United States); University of Rochester Medical Center, Division of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Rochester, NY (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Clinical trials of secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS) is lacking reliable biomarkers or outcome measures that reflect tissue injury incurred within a 1- to 2-year observation period. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is sensitive in detecting acute brain tissue damage. We monitored SPMS patients over 12 months for diffusion changes within the corpus callosum (CC). Bimonthly MRI examinations over a 1-year period were performed on 11 SPMS patients. The protocol included postcontrast T1-weighted images and DTI. Based on the appearance of T1 enhancing lesion(s) during the study period, the patients were divided into enhancing (five patients) and nonenhancing (six patients) groups. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) of the genu, body, and splenium of the CC were measured and temporal changes in mean FA and MD were evaluated for each group as well as between groups. Immunology data from peripheral blood mononuclear cells were also collected on a monthly basis. The enhancing group showed significant, progressive decrease in FA in body (p = 0.012) and splenium (p = 0.033) of CC, and significantly higher lymphotoxin-{beta} levels. No significant FA changes were seen in the nonenhancing group. Moreover, the FA decline in the enhancing group deviated significantly from the nonenhancing group, which remained essentially stable. Although MD increased slightly in both groups, there was no significant difference between the two groups. Based on the MR and immunology findings, the results of our study suggest that DTI undergo more rapid and longitudinal changes in SPMS patients with inflammatory activity. (orig.)

  7. Lipids and Composition of Fatty Acids of Saccharina latissima Cultivated Year-Round in Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture

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    Gonçalo S. Marinho

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study is evaluating the seasonal lipid and fatty acid composition of the brown seaweed Saccharina latissima. Biomass was sampled throughout the year (bi-monthly at the commercial cultivation site near a fish farm in an integrated multi-trophic aquaculture (IMTA and at a reference site in Denmark (2013–2014. Generally, there was no difference in the biomass composition between sites; however, significant seasonal changes were found. The lipid concentration varied from 0.62%–0.88% dry weight (DW in July to 3.33%–3.35% DW in November (p < 0.05 in both sites. The fatty acid composition in January was significantly different from all the other sampling months. The dissimilarities were mainly explained by changes in the relative abundance of 20:5n-3 (13.12%–33.35%, 14:0 (11.07%–29.37% and 18:1n-9 (10.15%–16.94%. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA’s made up more than half of the fatty acids with a maximum in July (52.3%–54.0% fatty acid methyl esters; FAME. This including the most appreciated health beneficial PUFA’s, eicosapentaenoic (EPA; 20:5n-3 and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3, but also arachidonic (ARA and stearidonic acid (SDA, which are not found in land vegetables such as cabbage and lettuce. Compared to fat (salmon and lean fish (cod this seaweed species contains higher proportions of ARA and SDA, but lower EPA (only cod and DHA. Conclusively, the season of harvest is important for the choice of lipid quantity and quality, but the marine vegetables provide better sources of EPA, DHA and long-chain (LC-PUFA’s in general compared to traditional vegetables.

  8. Copepod community structure in Bahia de Banderas during the 2008-2009 La Niña and their transition to the 2009-2010 El Niño

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    Jiménez-Pérez, L.C.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the taxonomic copepod community structure and its relations with the climate conditions in the Pacific Ocean, bimonthly samples were made between February 2009 and April 2010. Samples were collected by vertical tows between the surface and the vicinity of the bottom with a 40 cm mouth diameter and 335 µ mesh size standard zooplankton net. At the beginning of the study water temperatures were low indicating that La Niña conditions prevailed in the bay. However, at the end of June, 2 °C warmer waters associated with El Niño 2009-2010 arrival were detected. These conditions persisted at least until February 2010, and by April water temperature returned to normal. 57 copepods species were recorded, being Acartia tonsa, Acartia lilljeborgi, Oithona plumífera, Centropages furcatus and Nannocalanus minor the most representative species. These five populations accounted most of the 90 % of the collected animals. Cluster and Non-Metric Multidimensional Scaling (NMDS methods show two groups that seem to be associated with La Niña and El Niño conditions. The analysis of similarities (ANOSIM indicated that these assemblages were different (r=0.411; p=0.01 %. Simper analysis indicated that A. tonsa was the dominant population (85.4 % at the end of the 2008-2009 La Niña; this population was followed by A. lilljeborgi (7.9 % and Pareucalanus subtenuis (2.5 %. During the El Niño the dominance of A. tonsa disappeared (32 % while Oithona plumífera, Temora discaudata and Undinula darwinii increased. At the end of El Niño, species diversity and richness also changed. At the end of the 2008-2009 La Niña conditions, 40 species were recorded, while during El Niño the species richness increased to 52 species.

  9. Aeromonas presence in drinking water from collective reservoirs and wells in peri-urban area in Brazil

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    Maria Tereza Pepe Razzolini

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Aeromonas genus is considered an emerging pathogen and its presence in drinking water supplies is a reason to public health concern. This study investigated the occurrence of Aeromonas in samples from collective reservoirs and wells used as drinking water sources in a peri-urban area. A total of 35 water samples were collected from collective reservoirs and 32 from wells bimonthly, from September 2007 to September 2008. Aeromonas spp determination was carried out using a Multiple-Tube Technique. Samples were inoculated into alkaline peptone water and the superficial film formed was transferred to blood agar plates amended with ampicillin. Typical Aeromonas colonies were submitted to a biochemical screening and then to biochemical tests for species differentiation. Aeromonas was detected in 13 (19% of the 69 samples examined (6 from collective reservoirs and 7 from wells. Concentrations of Aeromonas in collective reservoirs ranged from <0.3 to 1.2 x10²MPN/100mL and, in wells, from <0.3 to 2.4 x10²MPN/100mL. The most frequent specie in the collective reservoir samples was Aeromonas spp (68%, followed by A. encheleia (14% and A. allosaccharophila (8% and A. hydrophila (8%. Aeromonas spp (87% was the most frequent specie isolated from well samples, followed by A. allosacchariphila (8%, A. encheleia (2% and A. jandaei (5%. These data show the presence and diversity of Aeromonas genus in the samples analyzed and highlight that its presence in drinking water poses a significant public health concern.

  10. Succession of phytoplankton assemblages in response to large-scale reservoir operation: a case study in a tributary of the Three Gorges Reservoir, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yan; Li, Zhe; Guo, Jinsong; Fang, Fang; Smith, Val H

    2016-03-01

    The Three Gorges Dam (TGD) has greatly altered ecological and environmental conditions within the reservoir region, but it is not known how these changes affect phytoplankton structure and dynamics. Here, a bimonthly monitoring program was implemented from 2007 to 2009 to study the impact of damming on phytoplankton assemblages in the backwater area of the Pengxi River (PBA). By application of the phytoplankton functional group (C strategists, competitive species; S strategists, stress-tolerant species; R strategists, rapid propagation species), seasonal changes in phytoplankton relative to environmental variations were evaluated using ordination analysis. Seasonal patterns of phytoplankton dynamics were detected during this study, with CS/S strategists causing algal blooms from mid-spring to early summer, CS/CR strategists often observed during flood season, and CS strategists dominant during mid-autumn. CR/R groups dominated during winter and caused algal blooms in February. Our results indicated that phytoplankton assemblages were directly related to reservoir operation effects. Generally, the TGD had a low water level during flood season, resulting in a relatively short hydraulic retention time and intensive variability, which supported the cooccurrence of CS and CR species. During the winter drought season, water storage in the TGD increased the water level and the hydraulic retention time in the PBA, enabling R/CR strategists to overcome the sedimentation effect and to out-compete S/CS species in winter. As expected, these diversity patterns were significantly correlated with the hydraulic retention time and nutrient limitation pattern in the PBA. This study provides strategic insight for evaluating the impacts of reservoir operations on phytoplankton adaptation.

  11. Promoting addiction medicine teaching through functional mentoring by co-training generalist chief residents with faculty mentors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Daniel P; Carney, Brittany L; Jackson, Angela H; Brett, Belle; Bridden, Carly; Winter, Michael; Samet, Jeffrey H

    2018-02-16

    Generalist physicians should play a vital role in identifying and managing individuals with substance use but are inadequately trained to do so. This 5-year (2008-2012) controlled educational study assessed whether internal medicine and family medicine chief residents' (CRs) addiction medicine teaching increased by co-training with faculty mentors at a Chief Resident Immersion Training (CRIT) program in addiction medicine. All CRIT CR attendees identified a residency program faculty mentor to support addiction medicine teaching after CRIT through functional mentoring with a focus on developing and implementing an Addiction Medicine Teaching Project ("Teaching Project"). Approximately half of the CRs attended CRIT with their mentor (co-trained) and half without their mentor (solo-trained). Addiction medicine teaching outcomes were compared between groups using 6- and 11-month questionnaires and 4 bimonthly teaching logs. Of co-trained CRs, mentor characteristics that positively influenced addiction medicine teaching outcomes were identified. One hundred CRs from 74 residency programs attended CRIT from 2008 to 2012; 47 co-trained with their mentors and 53 solo-trained without their mentors. At 6-month follow-up, the co-trained CRs were more likely to meet at least monthly with their mentor (22.7% vs. 9.6%, P mentor as a facilitator for Teaching Project implementation (82.2% vs. 38.5%, P Mentors with more experience, including years of teaching, was associated with better CR Teaching Project outcomes. Co-training generalist chief residents with a faculty mentor appeared to facilitate functional mentoring-driven Teaching Project implementation but did not further increase already high levels of other addiction medicine teaching. Faculty mentors with more years of teaching experience were more effective in facilitating Teaching Project implementation.

  12. Reproductive cycles in tropical intertidal gastropods are timed around tidal amplitude cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Rachel; Kerr, Kecia; Contolini, Gina; Ochoa, Isis

    2017-08-01

    Reproduction in iteroparous marine organisms is often timed with abiotic cycles and may follow lunar, tidal amplitude, or daily cycles. Among intertidal marine invertebrates, decapods are well known to time larval release to coincide with large amplitude nighttime tides, which minimizes the risk of predation. Such bimonthly cycles have been reported for few other intertidal invertebrates. We documented the reproduction of 6 gastropod species from Panama to determine whether they demonstrate reproductive cycles, whether these cycles follow a 2-week cycle, and whether cycles are timed so that larval release occurs during large amplitude tides. Two of the species ( Crepidula cf. marginalis and Nerita scabricosta ) showed nonuniform reproduction, but without clear peaks in timing relative to tidal or lunar cycles. The other 4 species show clear peaks in reproduction occurring every 2 weeks. In 3 of these species ( Cerithideopsis carlifornica var. valida, Littoraria variegata , and Natica chemnitzi ), hatching occurred within 4 days of the maximum amplitude tides. Siphonaria palmata exhibit strong cycles, but reproduction occurred during the neap tides. Strong differences in the intensity of reproduction of Cerithideopsis carlifornica , and in particular, Littoraria variegata , between the larger and smaller spring tides of a lunar month indicate that these species time reproduction with the tidal amplitude cycle rather than the lunar cycle. For those species that reproduce during both the wet and dry seasons, we found that reproductive timing did not differ between seasons despite strong differences in temperature and precipitation. Overall, we found that most (4/6) species have strong reproductive cycles synchronized with the tidal amplitude cycle and that seasonal differences in abiotic factors do not alter these cycles.

  13. Hydrochemical modelling of water quality in terms of emerging micropollutants in Mpumalanga, Gauteng and North West Provinces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanda, Elijah M. M.; Mamba, Bhekie B.; Msagati, Titus A. M.

    2017-08-01

    Emerging micropollutants (EMPs) are ubiquitous in aquatic systems and are associated with a wide range of eco-toxicological effects worldwide. There remains a lack of scientific understanding of the major underlying hydrochemical factors behind variations in concentration heterogeneities of EMPs in time and space. This study was therefore conducted to determine major hydrochemical processes controlling water quality and the occurrence of EMPs mainly, carbamazepine (CBZ), tonalide (AHTN), galaxolide (HHCB), caffeine (CAF), technical 4-nonylphenol (NP) and bisphenol A (BPA) in water from Mpumalanga, Gauteng and North West Provinces in South Africa. Grab water samples were collected bi-monthly between June 2014 and April 2016 from 44 water sources using standard sampling procedures. BPA, NP, CAF, HHCB, AHTN, CBZ were extracted, cleaned and enriched using autotrace-SPE at neutral pH and analyzed using GC × GC-TOFMS. Kruskal Wallis-test was used to test for temporal variations in occurrence of the analytes. The Geochemist's Workbench® Release 11 software, Surfer Golden Graphics for surface mapping, PHREEQC software and bivariate ion plots were used determine the major hydrogeochemical processes. The mean concentrations of EMPs varied from 3.48 μg/L for CAF to 421.53 μg/L for HHCB. Although the Kruskal Wallis test revealed no any statistically significant temporal variations in concentrations of the analytes in water samples at 95% confidence level, their occurrence and distribution vary spatially with BPA being the most widely distributed EMP and was present in 62% of the sampled sites. Municipal waste water inputs, agricultural pollution, ion-exchange reactions, carbonate and silicate weathering were the major processes controlling water quality in the study area. This study may assist water resource managers to ably address and manage water pollution resulting from a number of natural and anthropogenic hydrochemical processes in the study area.

  14. Benazepril slows progression of renal dysfunction in patients with non-diabetic renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimitsu, Toshihiko; Akashiba, Akira; Kameda, Tomoko; Takahashi, Toshiaki; Ohta, Satoshi; Yoshii, Masayoshi; Minami, Junichi; Ono, Hidehiko; Numabe, Atsushi; Matsuoka, Hiroaki

    2007-06-01

    The present study examined the effects of benazepril, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, on the progression of renal insufficiency in patients with non-diabetic renal disease. Fifteen patients with non-diabetic renal disease whose serum creatinine (Cr) ranged from 1.5 to 3.0 mg/dL were given either benazepril (2.5-5 mg) or placebo once daily for 1 year in a random crossover manner. In both periods, antihypertensive medications were increased if blood pressure was greater than 130/85 mmHg. Blood sampling and urinalysis were performed bimonthly throughout the study period. Blood pressure was similar when comparing the benazepril and the placebo periods (128+/-12/83+/-6 vs 129+/-10/83+/-7 mmHg). Serum Cr significantly increased from 1.62+/-0.18 to 1.72+/-0.30 mg/dL (P=0.036) during the placebo period, while there was no statistically significant increase in serum Cr during the benazepril period (from 1.67+/-0.17 to 1.71+/-0.27 mg/dL). The slope of decrease of the reciprocal of serum Cr was steeper in the placebo period than in the benazepril period (-0.073+/-0.067 vs-0.025+/-0.096/year, P=0.014). Urinary protein excretion was lower during the benazepril period than during the placebo period (0.57+/-0.60 vs 1.00+/-0.85 g/gCr, P=0.006). Serum K was significantly higher in the benazepril period than in the placebo period (4.4+/-0.5 vs 4.2+/-0.5 mEq/L, Pbenazepril therapy as a result of hyperkalemia. Long-term benazepril treatment decreased the progression of renal dysfunction in patients with non-diabetic renal disease by a mechanism that is independent of blood pressure reduction.

  15. Integrated assessment of chemical quality and genotoxicity of the water of the Luiz Rau Stream in the lower stretch of the Sinos River Basin, in South Brazil

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    Camila Tamires Petry

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the chemical quality and genotoxicity of the water of the Luiz Rau Stream in Novo Hamburgo (Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil and investigated the relationship between the genetic damage observed in Tradescantia pallida var. purpurea and the chemical parameters analyzed. Water samplings were collected bimonthly from September 2012 to March 2013 from two sites, near the headspring (S1 and near the mouth (S2. Cuttings with flower buds were exposed to water from the sites and distilled water (negative control. Micronuclei (MCN frequencies were determined in pollen mother cells. The chemical parameters analyzed were pH, total dissolved solids, biochemical oxygen demand (DBO5, dissolved oxygen, total phosphorus (TP and the trace elements cadmium, lead, copper, total chromium and zinc. In all samplings, the MCN frequencies observed in buds exposed to water from both sites were significantly higher (S1: 2.48 to 3.38, S2: 3.24 to 5.19 than those observed in the respective negative controls (1.33 to 1.62. The TP was above the legal limit throughout the monitored period and DBO5 presented concentrations higher than those established by legislation in two months at S1 and three months at S2. The principal component analysis showed a relationship between MCN frequency, DBO5 and TP, pointing to the negative influence of pollutants present in water on the bioindicator species and reinforcing the importance of considering the environmental factors in an integrated way in water-body monitoring programs.

  16. National and regional analysis of road accidents in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolón-Becerra, A; Lastra-Bravo, X; Flores-Parra, I

    2013-01-01

    In Spain, the absolute fatality figures decreased almost 50 percent between 1998 and 2009. Despite this great effort, road mortality is still of great concern to political authorities. Further progress requires efficient road safety policy based on an optimal set of measures and targets that consider the initial conditions and characteristics in each region. This study attempts to analyze road accidents in Spain and its provinces in time and space during 1998-2009. First, we analyzed daily, monthly, and nationwide (NUTS 0) development of road accidents, the correlation between logarithmic transformations of road accidents and territorial and socioeconomic variables, the causality by simple linear regression of road accidents and territorial and socioeconomic variables, and preliminary frequency by fast Fourier transform. Then we analyzed the annual trend in accidents in the Spanish provinces (NUTS 3) and found a correlation between the logarithmic transformations of the mortality rate, fatalities per fatal accident, and accidents resulting in injuries per inhabitant variables and population, population density, gross domestic product (GDP), length of road network, and area. Finally, causality was analyzed by simple linear regression. The most outstanding results were the negative correlation between mortality rate and population density in Spanish provinces, which has increased over time, and that road accidents in Spain have an approximate periodicity of 57 days. The fast Fourier transform analysis of road accident frequency in Spain was useful in identifying the periodic, harmonic components of accidents and casualties. The periodicity observed both for the period 1998-2009 and by year showed that the highest intensity in road accidents was bimonthly, despite the lower number of accidents and casualties in the spectra of amplitude and power and efforts to reduce the intensity and concentration during off-season travel (summer and December).

  17. Nurses' narratives of moral identity: Making a difference and reciprocal holding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Elizabeth; Simmonds, Anne; Liaschenko, Joan

    2018-05-01

    Explicating nurses' moral identities is important given the powerful influence moral identity has on the capacity to exercise moral agency. The purpose of this study was to explore how nurses narrate their moral identity through their understanding of their work. An additional purpose was to understand how these moral identities are held in the social space that nurses occupy. The Registered Nurse Journal, a bimonthly publication of the Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario, Canada, features a regular column entitled, 'In the End … What Nursing Means to Me …' These short narratives generally include a story of an important moment in the careers of the authors that defined their identities as nurses. All 29 narratives published before June 2015 were analysed using a critical narrative approach, informed by the work of Margaret Urban Walker and Hilde Lindemann, to identify a typology of moral identity. Ethical considerations: Ethics approval was not required because the narratives are publicly available. Two narrative types were identified that represent the moral identities of nurses as expressed through their work: (1) making a difference in the lives of individuals and communities and (2) holding the identities of vulnerable individuals. Nurses' moral identities became evident when they could see improvement in the health of patients or communities or when they could maintain the identity of their patients despite the disruptive forces of illness and hospitalization. In reciprocal fashion, the responses of their patients, including expressions of gratitude, served to hold the moral identities of these nurses. Ultimately, the sustainability of nurses' moral identities may be dependent on the recognition of their own needs for professional satisfaction and care in ways that go beyond the kind of acknowledgement that patients can offer.

  18. A system of networks and continuing education for physical therapists in rheumatology: a feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Verhoef

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of regional physical therapy networks including continuing education in rheumatology. The aim of these networks was to improve care provided by primary care physical therapists by improving specific knowledge, technical and communicative skills and the collaboration with rheumatologists. Methods: In two regions in The Netherlands continuing education (CE programmes, consisting of a 5-day postgraduate training course followed by bimonthly workshops and teaching practices, were organised simultaneously. Network activities included consultations, newsletters and the development of a communication guideline. Endpoint measures included the participation rate, compliance, quality of the CE programme, teaching practices, knowledge, network activities, communication, number of patients treated and patient satisfaction. Results: Sixty-three physical therapists out of 193 practices (33% participated in the project. They all completed the education programmes and were formally registered. All evaluations of the education programmes showed positive scores. Knowledge scores increased significantly directly after the training course and at 18 months. A draft guideline on communication between physical therapists and rheumatologists was developed, and 4 newsletters were distributed. A substantial proportion of physical therapists and rheumatologists reported improved communication at 18 months. The mean number of patients treated by physical therapists participating in the networks increased significantly. Patients' satisfaction scores within the networks were significantly higher than those from outside the networks at 18 months. Conclusions: Setting up a system of networks for continuing education for physical therapists regarding the treatment of patients with rheumatic diseases is feasible. Further research will focus on the effectiveness of the system and its implementation on a larger scale.

  19. Integrated community profiling indicates long-term temporal stability of the predominant faecal microbiota in captive cheetahs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne A M J Becker

    Full Text Available Understanding the symbiotic relationship between gut microbes and their animal host requires characterization of the core microbiota across populations and in time. Especially in captive populations of endangered wildlife species such as the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus, this knowledge is a key element to enhance feeding strategies and reduce gastrointestinal disorders. In order to investigate the temporal stability of the intestinal microbiota in cheetahs under human care, we conducted a longitudinal study over a 3-year period with bimonthly faecal sampling of 5 cheetahs housed in two European zoos. For this purpose, an integrated 16S rRNA DGGE-clone library approach was used in combination with a series of real-time PCR assays. Our findings disclosed a stable faecal microbiota, beyond intestinal community variations that were detected between zoo sample sets or between animals. The core of this microbiota was dominated by members of Clostridium clusters I, XI and XIVa, with mean concentrations ranging from 7.5-9.2 log10 CFU/g faeces and with significant positive correlations between these clusters (P<0.05, and by Lactobacillaceae. Moving window analysis of DGGE profiles revealed 23.3-25.6% change between consecutive samples for four of the cheetahs. The fifth animal in the study suffered from intermediate episodes of vomiting and diarrhea during the monitoring period and exhibited remarkably more change (39.4%. This observation may reflect the temporary impact of perturbations such as the animal's compromised health, antibiotic administration or a combination thereof, which temporarily altered the relative proportions of Clostridium clusters I and XIVa. In conclusion, this first long-term monitoring study of the faecal microbiota in feline strict carnivores not only reveals a remarkable compositional stability of this ecosystem, but also shows a qualitative and quantitative similarity in a defined set of faecal bacterial lineages across the five

  20. Integrated Community Profiling Indicates Long-Term Temporal Stability of the Predominant Faecal Microbiota in Captive Cheetahs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Anne A. M. J.; Janssens, Geert P. J.; Snauwaert, Cindy; Hesta, Myriam; Huys, Geert

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the symbiotic relationship between gut microbes and their animal host requires characterization of the core microbiota across populations and in time. Especially in captive populations of endangered wildlife species such as the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus), this knowledge is a key element to enhance feeding strategies and reduce gastrointestinal disorders. In order to investigate the temporal stability of the intestinal microbiota in cheetahs under human care, we conducted a longitudinal study over a 3-year period with bimonthly faecal sampling of 5 cheetahs housed in two European zoos. For this purpose, an integrated 16S rRNA DGGE-clone library approach was used in combination with a series of real-time PCR assays. Our findings disclosed a stable faecal microbiota, beyond intestinal community variations that were detected between zoo sample sets or between animals. The core of this microbiota was dominated by members of Clostridium clusters I, XI and XIVa, with mean concentrations ranging from 7.5-9.2 log10 CFU/g faeces and with significant positive correlations between these clusters (Pcheetahs. The fifth animal in the study suffered from intermediate episodes of vomiting and diarrhea during the monitoring period and exhibited remarkably more change (39.4%). This observation may reflect the temporary impact of perturbations such as the animal’s compromised health, antibiotic administration or a combination thereof, which temporarily altered the relative proportions of Clostridium clusters I and XIVa. In conclusion, this first long-term monitoring study of the faecal microbiota in feline strict carnivores not only reveals a remarkable compositional stability of this ecosystem, but also shows a qualitative and quantitative similarity in a defined set of faecal bacterial lineages across the five animals under study that may typify the core phylogenetic microbiome of cheetahs. PMID:25905625

  1. Factors in Variability of Serial Gabapentin Concentrations in Elderly Patients with Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Jeannine M; Eberly, Lynn E; Collins, Joseph F; Macias, Flavia M; Ramsay, R Eugene; Leppik, Ilo E; Birnbaum, Angela K

    2017-10-01

    To characterize and quantify the variability of serial gabapentin concentrations in elderly patients with epilepsy. This study included 83 patients (age ≥ 60 yrs) from an 18-center randomized double-blind double-dummy parallel study from the Veterans Affairs Cooperative 428 Study. All patients were taking 1500 mg/day gabapentin. Within-person coefficient of variation (CV) in gabapentin concentrations, measured weekly to bimonthly for up to 52 weeks, then quarterly, was computed. Impact of patient characteristics on gabapentin concentrations (linear mixed model) and CV (linear regression) were estimated. A total of 482 gabapentin concentration measurements were available for analysis. Gabapentin concentrations and intrapatient CVs ranged from 0.5 to 22.6 μg/ml (mean 7.9 μg/ml, standard deviation [SD] 4.1 μg/ml) and 2% to 79% (mean 27.9%, SD 15.3%), respectively, across all visits. Intrapatient CV was higher by 7.3% for those with a body mass index of ≥ 30 kg/m 2 (coefficient = 7.3, p=0.04). CVs were on average 0.5% higher for each 1-unit higher CV in creatinine clearance (coefficient = 0.5, p=0.03) and 1.2% higher for each 1-hour longer mean time after dose (coefficient = 1.2, p=0.04). Substantial intrapatient variability in serial gabapentin concentration was noted in elderly patients with epilepsy. Creatinine clearance, time of sampling relative to dose, and obesity were found to be positively associated with variability. © 2017 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  2. Mapping Regional Inundation with Spaceborne L-Band SAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Chapman

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Shortly after the launch of ALOS PALSAR L-band SAR by the Japan Space Exploration Agency (JAXA, a program to develop an Earth Science Data Record (ESDR for inundated wetlands was funded by NASA. Using established methodologies, extensive multi-temporal L-band ALOS ScanSAR data acquired bi-monthly by the PALSAR instrument onboard ALOS were used to classify the inundation state for South America for delivery as a component of this Inundated Wetlands ESDR (IW-ESDR and in collaboration with JAXA’s ALOS Kyoto and Carbon Initiative science programme. We describe these methodologies and the final classification of the inundation state, then compared this with results derived from dual-season data acquired by the JERS-1 L-band SAR mission in 1995 and 1996, as well as with estimates of surface water extent measured globally every 10 days by coarser resolution sensors. Good correspondence was found when comparing open water extent classified from multi-temporal ALOS ScanSAR data with surface water fraction identified from coarse resolution sensors, except in those regions where there may be differences in sensitivity to widespread and shallow seasonal flooding event, or in areas that could be excluded through use of a continental-scale inundatable mask. It was found that the ALOS ScanSAR classification of inundated vegetation was relatively insensitive to inundated herbaceous vegetation. Inundation dynamics were examined using the multi-temporal ALOS ScanSAR acquisitions over the Pacaya-Samiria and surrounding areas in the Peruvian Amazon.

  3. Study of groundwater collection protocols on the IPEN/CNEN-SP campus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, Joyce R.; Villa, Sabrina M.; Monteiro, Lucilena R.; Cotrim, Marycel E.B.; Pires, Maria Aparecida F.

    2013-01-01

    As per Brazilian Health Ministry's evaluation, industry is the second activity that most contaminates the soil in Sao Paulo Metropolitan region. In order to assess this scenario and keep a continuous logging of IPEN's installations effect over chemical compounds levels, and to improve the installation radioactive logging, in the region under its campus influence, since 2006, IPEN performs the groundwater monitoring, in the region where it is located. Collections are performed bimonthly in seven monitoring wells, evaluating 17 parameters. These values are compared to the ones established by CONAMA 396/08 Resolution, which provides the groundwater classification and environmental guidelines to chemically stable compounds. So far IPEN keeps the wells in good conditions and performs sampling methods studies to adequate it to current legal standards. The groundwater collection method and the wells characterization, concerning the anionic species content (F - , Cl - , Br - , NO 2 - , NO 3 - , PO 4 -3 e SO 4 -2 ), are evaluated in the present study. The purge procedure requirement was also evaluated. The well purging is the procedure for withdrawing water from inside the well, so the collection is performed only after the water level restoration, thereby ensuring that the water collected represents the aquifer. The use of 'bailer', which requires purging, and a called 'low flow pump', which requires no purging for sample collection, was also evaluated. These methods were selected in this study because they are recommended by CETESB 6410/88, the local standard to groundwater sample collection. Thus some anions concentrations in groundwater sampled with different purging procedures and collection were compared. The concentration change in each well performed with the same collection procedure was compared with the other collection methods variation in order to evaluate if these are equivalents. From the results obtained in this comparative study was possible to optimize the

  4. Enzymatic Upgrading of Heavy Crudes via Partial Oxidation or Conversion of PAHs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borole, A P; Davison, B H; Kuritz, T

    2002-07-01

    The objective of this program was to investigate new enzyme-based technologies for upgrading of heavy oils. Enzymes were selected for screening from those capable of conversion of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) reported in the literature. Oxidative reactions of PAHs using hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant with conversion to partially oxidized products were used. The enzymes (lignin peroxidase, cytochrome c) were tested in various organic solvents and found to loose activity in pure organic solvents. A thermodynamic analysis revealed lack of effective interaction between the substrate and enzyme as the cause for low activity. The protein cytochrome c was modified to work in organic media by chemical hydrophobic group attachment. Two different modifications were made: attachment of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and alkyl groups. Alkyl groups, being small could be attached at interior locations within the core of the enzyme and possibly near the active site. Increase in the threshold solvent concentration where maximum enzyme activity occurred indicated potential of this strategy for effective enzyme-substrate interaction. Further improvements in enzyme activity called for other diverse methods due to the unavailability of sufficient chemical modification sites. Genetic techniques were therefore explored for further improvements. These experiments focused on cloning of a gene for the fungal enzyme lignin peroxidase (lip) into yeast Pichia pastoris, which would allow easy manipulation of the gene. However, differences in the fungal and yeast cellular machinery impeded significant expression of the fungal enzyme. Several strategies were explored to allow higher-level expression of the enzyme, which was required for enzyme improvement. The strategies used in this investigation are described in the report. Industrial in-kind support was available throughout the project period. review of the research results was carried out on a regular basis (bimonthly reports and annual

  5. Exposure of native bees foraging in an agricultural landscape to current-use pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hladik, Michelle; Vandever, Mark W.; Smalling, Kelly L.

    2016-01-01

    The awareness of insects as pollinators and indicators of environmental quality has grown in recent years, partially in response to declines in honey bee (Apis mellifera) populations. While most pesticide research has focused on honey bees, there has been less work on native bee populations. To determine the exposure of native bees to pesticides, bees were collected from an existing research area in northeastern Colorado from two land cover types: grasslands (2013-2014) and wheat fields (2014). Traps were deployed bi-monthly during the summer at each land cover type and all bees, regardless of species, were composited as whole samples and analyzed for 136 current-use pesticides and degradates. This reconnaissance approach provides a sampling of all species and represents overall pesticide exposure (internal and external). Nineteen pesticides and degradates were detected in 54 composite samples collected. Compounds detected in >10% of the samples included the insecticides thiamethoxam (46%), bifenthrin (28%), clothianidin (24%), chlorpyrifos (17%), and imidacloprid (13%), the fungicides azoxystrobin (17%), and pyraclostrobin (11%), and the herbicide atrazine (19%). Concentrations ranged from 1.1 to 312 ng/g for individual pesticides. Pesticides were detected in samples collected from both grasslands and wheat fields; the location of the sample and the surrounding land cover at the 1000 m buffer influenced the pesticides detected but because of a small number of temporally comparable samples, correlations between pesticide concentration and land cover were not significant. The results show native bees collected in both grasslands and wheat fields are exposed to multiple pesticides, these results can direct future research on routes/timing of pesticide exposure and the design of future conservation efforts for pollinators.

  6. Evaluation of Healthy2Go: A country store transformation project to improve the food environment and consumer choices in Appalachian Kentucky

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua A. Rushakoff

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes in Kentucky's Cumberland Valley region are among the highest in the United States and limited access to healthy food contributes to these epidemics. The aim of Healthy2Go (H2G, a country store transformation project launched by Spread the Health Appalachia (STHA, was to improve awareness and availability of healthy options in small, rural stores. Ten country stores participated in H2G and received training and technical assistance to increase availability and awareness of healthy foods. Stores made inventory changes; installed point-of-purchase educational and in-store marketing materials directing shoppers to healthier options; provided nutrition education such as healthy recipes; and altered the display and location of healthy items. To measure changes within stores and the potential impact on resident eating and purchasing habits, STHA used four instruments: a modified version of the Nutrition Environs Measures Survey – Corner Stores at baseline and follow-up, a bimonthly store inventory assessment, a final store owner survey, and a Community Nutrition Survey at baseline (n = 287 and follow-up (n = 281. The stores in the H2G program (n = 10 had a 40% increase in stocking fresh produce, a 20% increase in produce variety, and trends towards increasing healthy inventory. During the same period, surveyed residents reported a statistically significant increase in the frequency of healthy food consumption. Small store transformation programs can improve availability of and access to healthy food in rural settings and influence local purchasing patterns.

  7. Rationale and design of the oral HEMe iron polypeptide Against Treatment with Oral Controlled Release Iron Tablets trial for the correction of anaemia in peritoneal dialysis patients (HEMATOCRIT trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isbel Nicole M

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main hypothesis of this study is that oral heme iron polypeptide (HIP; Proferrin® ES administration will more effectively augment iron stores in erythropoietic stimulatory agent (ESA-treated peritoneal dialysis (PD patients than conventional oral iron supplementation (Ferrogradumet®. Methods Inclusion criteria are peritoneal dialysis patients treated with darbepoietin alpha (DPO; Aranesp®, Amgen for ≥ 1 month. Patients will be randomized 1:1 to receive either slow-release ferrous sulphate (1 tablet twice daily; control or HIP (1 tablet twice daily for a period of 6 months. The study will follow an open-label design but outcome assessors will be blinded to study treatment. During the 6-month study period, haemoglobin levels will be measured monthly and iron studies (including transferring saturation [TSAT] measurements will be performed bi-monthly. The primary outcome measure will be the difference in TSAT levels between the 2 groups at the end of the 6 month study period, adjusted for baseline values using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA. Secondary outcome measures will include serum ferritin concentration, haemoglobin level, DPO dosage, Key's index (DPO dosage divided by haemoglobin concentration, and occurrence of adverse events (especially gastrointestinal adverse events. Discussion This investigator-initiated multicentre study has been designed to provide evidence to help nephrologists and their peritoneal dialysis patients determine whether HIP administration more effectively augments iron stores in ESP-treated PD patients than conventional oral iron supplementation. Trial Registration Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry number ACTRN12609000432213.

  8. Seasonal functioning and dynamics of Caulerpa prolifera meadows in shallow areas: An integrated approach in Cadiz Bay Natural Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Juan J.; García-Sánchez, M. Paz; Olivé, Irene; García-Marín, Patricia; Brun, Fernando G.; Pérez-Lloréns, J. Lucas; Hernández, Ignacio

    2012-10-01

    The rhizophyte alga Caulerpa prolifera thrives in dense monospecific stands in the vicinity of meadows of the seagrass Cymodocea nodosa in Cadiz Bay Natural Park. The seasonal cycle of demographic and biometric properties, photosynthesis, and elemental composition (C:N:P) of this species were monitored bimonthly from March 2004 to March 2005. The number of primary assimilators peaked in spring as consequence of the new recruitment, reaching densities up to 104 assimilators·m-2. A second peak was recorded in late summer, with a further decrease towards autumn and winter. Despite this summer maximum, aboveground biomass followed a unimodal pattern, with a spring peak about 400 g dry weight·m-2. In conjunction to demographic properties of the population, a detailed biometric analysis showed that the percentage of assimilators bearing proliferations and the number of proliferations per assimilator were maximal in spring (100% and c.a. 17, respectively), and decreased towards summer and autumn. The size of the primary assimilators was minimal in spring (May) as a result of the new recruitments. However, the frond area per metre of stolon peaked in early spring and decreased towards the remainder of the year. The thallus area index (TAI) was computed from two different, independent approaches which both produced similar results, with a maximum TAI recorded in spring (transient values up to 18 m2·m-2). The relative contribution of primary assimilators and proliferations to TAI was also assessed. Whereas the number of proliferations accounted for most of the TAI peak in spring, its contribution decreased during the year, to a minimum in winter, where primary assimilators were the main contributors to TAI. The present study represents the first report of the seasonal dynamics of C. prolifera in south Atlantic Spanish coasts, and indicates the important contribution of this primary producer in shallow coastal ecosystems.

  9. Soil properties and root biomass responses to prescribed burning in young Corsican pine (Pinus nigra Arn.) stands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufekcioglu, Aydin; Kucuk, Mehmet; Saglam, Bulent; Bilgili, Ertugrul; Altun, Lokman

    2010-05-01

    Fire is an important tool in the management of forest ecosystems. Although both prescribed and wildland fires are common in Turkey, few studies have addressed the influence of such disturbances on soil properties and root biomass dynamics. In this study, soil properties and root biomass responses to prescribed fire were investigated in 25-year-old corsican pine (Pinus nigra Arn.) stands in Kastamonu, Turkey. The stands were established by planting and were subjected to prescribed burning in July 2003. Soil respiration rates were determined every two months using soda-lime method over a two-year period. Fine (0-2 mm diameter) and small root (2-5 mm diameter) biomass were sampled approximately bimonthly using sequential coring method. Mean daily soil respiration ranged from 0.65 to 2.19 g Cm(-2) d(-1) among all sites. Soil respiration rates were significantly higher in burned sites than in controls. Soil respiration rates were correlated significantly with soil moisture and soil temperature. Fine root biomass was significantly lower in burned sites than in control sites. Mean fine root biomass values were 4940 kg ha(-1) for burned and 5450 kg ha(-1) for control sites. Soil pH was significantly higher in burned sites than in control sites in 15-35 cm soil depth. Soil organic matter content did not differ significantly between control and burned sites. Our results indicate that, depending on site conditions, fire could be used successfully as a tool in the management of forest stands in the study area.

  10. Perspectives on Climate Effects on Agriculture: The International Efforts of AgMIP in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Job; MacCarthy, Dilys S.; Bationo, Andre; Koala, Saidou; Hickman, Jonathon; Koo, Jawoo; Vanya, Charles; Adiku, Samuel; Beletse, Yacob; Masikate, Patricia; hide

    2012-01-01

    Agriculture in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) is experiencing climate change-related effects that call for integrated regional assessments, yet capacity for these assessments has been low. The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) is advancing research on integrated regional assessments of climate change that include climate, crop, and economic modeling and analysis. Through AgMIP, regional integrated assessments are increasingly gaining momentum in SSA, and multi-institutional regional research teams (RRTs) centered in East, West, and Southern· Africa are generating new information on climate change impacts and adaptation in selected agricultural systems. The research in Africa is organized into four RRTs and a coordination team. Each of the RRTs in SSA is composed of scientists from the Consultative Group of International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) institutions, National Agriculture Research institutes (NARs), and universities consisting of experts in crop and economic modeling, climate, and information technology. Stakeholder involvement to inform specific agricultural systems to be evaluated, key outputs, and the representative agricultural pathways (RAPs), is undertaken at two levels: regional and national, in order to contribute to decision making at these levels. Capacity building for integrated assessment (lA) is a key component that is undertaken continuously through interaction with experts in regional and SSA-wide workshops, and through joint creation of tools. Many students and research affiliates have been identified and entrained as part of capacity building in IA. Bi-monthly updates on scholarly publications in climate change in Africa also serve as a vehicle for knowledge-sharing. With 60 scientists already trained and actively engaged in IA and over 80 getting monthly briefs on the latest information on climate change, a climate-informed community of experts is gradually taking shape in SSA. (See Part 2, Appendices 3-5 in

  11. Bolus and continuous infusion mitoxantrone in newly diagnosed adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia: results of two consecutive phase II clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Y; Akpek, G; Kansu, E; Kars, A; Tekuzman, G; Baltali, E; Güler, N; Barista, I; Güllü, I; Ozisik, Y; Firat, D

    1998-01-01

    Two consecutive phase II clinical studies were designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of bolus and continuous infusion (CI) mitoxantrone (MTZ) in 39 patients with newly diagnosed acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). MTZ was used as part of the classical ALL induction regimen. Twenty patients were treated with bolus MTZ (10 mg/m2 for 3 days) combined with vincristine and prednisone. The same regimen was given to a second set of 19 patients, except that MTZ was administered as a 24-hr CI. Both groups received bimonthly intensifications with vincristine and prednisone for 3 years, along with oral maintenance therapy. Patients in the CI-MTZ study arm received additional MTZ on the first day of intensification cycles. Seventeen patients (85%) in the bolus arm and 15 patients (79%) in the CI arm achieved complete remission (CR). Median disease-free survivals (DFS) in the bolus and CI groups were 11 and 15 months after median follow-ups of 16 (3.5-96) and 13 (2.3-32) months, respectively. At 2.5 years, DFS rates were 29.4% and 34.4% in the bolus and CI groups (p > 0.05). There were no significant differences between two groups in rates of early death, degree of organ toxicity, or duration of neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. Significant cardiac toxicity was not observed in either group. Bolus or CI administration of MTZ was equally effective and was well tolerated. Neither the mode of administration nor increasing the dose intensity of MTZ by incorporating intensification cycles reduced relapse rates. Development of new antileukemia agents and novel treatment approaches are still needed to improve the high relapse rates in adult ALL once a complete response is achieved.

  12. Exposure of native bees foraging in an agricultural landscape to current-use pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hladik, Michelle L; Vandever, Mark; Smalling, Kelly L

    2016-01-15

    The awareness of insects as pollinators and indicators of environmental quality has grown in recent years, partially in response to declines in honey bee (Apis mellifera) populations. While most pesticide research has focused on honey bees, there has been less work on native bee populations. To determine the exposure of native bees to pesticides, bees were collected from an existing research area in northeastern Colorado in both grasslands (2013-2014) and wheat fields (2014). Traps were deployed bi-monthly during the summer at each land cover type and all bees, regardless of species, were composited as whole samples and analyzed for 136 current-use pesticides and degradates. This reconnaissance approach provides a sampling of all species and represents overall pesticide exposure (internal and external). Nineteen pesticides and degradates were detected in 54 composite samples collected. Compounds detected in >2% of the samples included: insecticides thiamethoxam (46%), bifenthrin (28%), clothianidin (24%), chlorpyrifos (17%), imidacloprid (13%), fipronil desulfinyl (7%; degradate); fungicides azoxystrobin (17%), pyraclostrobin (11%), fluxapyroxad (9%), and propiconazole (9%); herbicides atrazine (19%) and metolachlor (9%). Concentrations ranged from 1 to 310 ng/g for individual pesticides. Pesticides were detected in samples collected from both grasslands and wheat fields; the location of the sample and the surrounding land cover at the 1000 m radius influenced the pesticides detected but because of a small number of temporally comparable samples, correlations between pesticide concentration and land cover were not significant. The results show native bees collected in an agricultural landscape are exposed to multiple pesticides, these results can direct future research on routes/timing of pesticide exposure and the design of future conservation efforts for pollinators. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. On the ecology of the cursorial spider Odo bruchi (Araneae: Zoridae in a grassland natural reserve from central Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Pompozzi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The “Ernesto Tornquist” Provincial Park (ETPP is located inside the Ventania system (Argentina and was created to protect one of the last relicts of pampean grasslands. Even though many studies have looked at the vertebrate faunal diversity, biology, and conservation in this Park, few studies have been dedicated to arthropods. Among these, spiders have been used as ecological indicators to evaluate nature conservation status, nevertheless, basic information on their distribution and ecology is necessary for their use as indicator taxa in this region. Thus the goal of this study was to present the phenology and demography of the spider Odo bruchi, a cursorial spider present in the ETPP. For this, spiders were sampled bimonthly using pitfall traps between September 2009-2010 (first year, and March 2011-2012 (second year. A total of 10 traps were placed every 10m along a transect of 100m parallel to the longest axis of a grassland slope with native vegetation. Traps were filled with 1 500mL of ethylene glycol, that were examined and refilled every 60 day period. We collected a total of 799 specimens in two years. Juveniles were the most abundant reaching 47.8% of the total, while males corresponded to 27.8% and females 24.4%. We found significant differences in the mean abundance of O. bruchi: the abundance during spring-summer (Nov-Dec-Jan-Feb was significantly higher than the other periods of the two years period. Moreover, we found an even abundance distribution throughout the year in the entire study. This work represents one of the first contributions to the ecology of this spider family in the area. Also, our results comprise relevant information to encourage future studies on this spider species as a bio-indicator of the conservation status of pampean grasslands.

  14. The Sociedad Espanola de Ceramica y Vidrio over half a century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Navarro, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    The double objective of this lecture is to commemorate, on the occasion of its golden jubilee, the work performed by the Spanish Society of Ceramics and Glass and to pay a special homage to the memory of its main promoter and supporter, Professor Antonio Garcia Verduch. Since its foundation in 1960 the Society has contributed to join all the experts in ceramics and glass, as well as to promote and spread among them scientific and technical knowledge related to both areas, while adapting itself to the investigation trends of each moment in time and to the interests of the different industrial sectors. Along its half century of history it has organized some hundred and twenty-five national congresses and specialized technical meetings and nine national congresses. It represents Spain in five international associations. The Society's main contribution, together with its international activities, has been the uninterrupted publication of its bimonthly magazine, the Society's Bulletin, which since 1999 is included in the database of the Science Citation Index. Furthermore, the Society keeps a permanent relationship with investigation centres, universities, museums, technicians and manufacturers associations and fairground institutions. As a sign of its promotion of technical development, the Society grants every year since 1977 its Alfa de Oro Awards to the most outstanding industrial products shown in the Valencia Fair, in order to highlight quality, technological innovation and design. In 1999 the Society's Electroceramics group created the Epsilon de Oro Awards which are granted every two years to the people or institutions that have produced the main scientific contribution in a given field. (Author).

  15. Waste Area Grouping 2 Remedial Investigation Phase 1 Seep Task data report: Contaminant source area assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, D.S.

    1996-03-01

    This report presents the findings of the Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2, Phase 1 Remedial Investigation (RI) Seep Task efforts during 1993 and 1994 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The results presented here follow results form the first year of sampling, 1992, which are contained in the Phase 1 RI report for WAG 2 (DOE 1995a). The WAG 2 Seep Task efforts focused on contaminants in seeps, tributaries, and main streams within the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed. This report is designed primarily as a reference for contaminants and a resource for guiding remedial decisions. Additional in-depth assessments of the Seep Task data may provide clearer understandings of contaminant transport from the different source areas in the WOC watershed. WAG 2 consists of WOC and its tributaries downstream of the ORNL main plant area, White Oak Lake, the White Oak Creek Embayment of the Clinch River, and the associated flood plains and subsurface environment. The WOC watershed encompasses ORNL and associated WAGs. WAG 2 acts as an integrator for contaminant releases from the contaminated sites at ORNL and as the conduit transporting contaminants to the Clinch River. The main objectives of the Seep Task were to identify and characterize seeps, tributaries and source areas that are responsible for the contaminant releases to the main streams in WAG 2 and to quantify their input to the total contaminant release from the watershed at White Oak Dam (WOD). Efforts focused on 90 Sr, 3 H, and 137 Cs because these contaminants pose the greatest potential human health risk from water ingestion at WOD. Bimonthly sampling was conducted throughout the WOC watershed beginning in March 1993 and ending in August 1994. Samples were also collected for metals, anions, alkalinity, organics, and other radionuclides

  16. Aspects of the ecology of phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) in the Private Natural Heritage Reserve Sanctuary Caraça.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonelli, Gabriel Barbosa; Tanure, Aline; Rêgo, Felipe Dutra; Carvalho, Gustavo Mayr de Lima; Simões, Taynãna César; Andrade Filho, José Dilermando

    2017-01-01

    Leishmaniases are a set of parasitic diseases of zoonotic origin that are transmitted by sandfly vectors in wild, rural and urban environments. Their distribution is dependent not only the distribution of vectors, but also on the distribution of mammalian reservoirs. Only by understanding the transmission cycle of these diseases, such as knowing the participating vectors and reservoirs, can one can understand the epidemiology and ecological relationships of leishmaniases. Ecotourism has become an important area of economic growth in Brazil. One of the most visited tourist attractions in the state of Minas Gerais, the Reserva Particular do Patrimônio Natural Santuário do Caraça (RPPNSC) is located in the Quadrilátero Ferrífero. The aim of this study was to contribute to the control of leishmaniasis among tourists of the RPPNPC by surveying its sand fly fauna and testing for the presence of Leishmania DNA in females. Twenty-five CDC light traps were exposed on 7 trails of the RPPNPC where samples were collected bimonthly for a year, starting in June 2013. A total of 376 specimens of 18 species and 10 genera of sandflies were captured. The predominant species were Psychodopygus lloydi (72.34%) and Pintomyia monticola (5.59%). HaeIII restriction enzyme detected and characterized Leishmania braziliensis DNA in 2 of the samples for an infection rate of 0.7% (2/266). Recent studies found specimens of Ps. lloyd infected with Leishmania braziliensis elsewhere in Minas Gerais, which may be an indication that this species is involved in the transmission of Leishmania in this state.

  17. A prospective examination of depression, anxiety and stress throughout pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rallis, Sofia; Skouteris, Helen; McCabe, Marita; Milgrom, Jeannette

    2014-12-01

    Perinatal distress has largely been conceptualised as the experience of depression and/or anxiety. Recent research has shown that the affective state of stress is also present during the perinatal period and thus may add to a broader understanding of perinatal distress. The aims of the present study were to investigate the changes in depression, anxiety and stress symptoms across pregnancy, and to explore the prospective relationships between these symptoms. Two-hundred and fourteen pregnant women were recruited when they were less than 16 weeks gestation. Women completed depression, anxiety and stress measures on a monthly basis, from 16 weeks gestation through to 36 weeks gestation. The covariate measures of sleep quality and social support were assessed bi-monthly at 16, 24 and 32 weeks gestation. Levels of depression, anxiety and stress symptoms were all shown to change over time, with women experiencing fewer symptoms during the middle of their pregnancy. Higher symptoms early in pregnancy predicted higher symptom levels throughout the rest of pregnancy. Higher depression scores early in pregnancy were also shown to predict higher anxiety and higher stress scores in late pregnancy. Increased stress scores during mid pregnancy also predicted higher anxiety scores in late pregnancy. Current findings indicate that symptom levels of depression, anxiety and stress vary over the course of pregnancy. Increased depression in early pregnancy seemed to be particularly pertinent as it not only predicted later depression symptoms, but also increased anxiety and stress in late pregnancy. Collectively, these results further highlight the importance of emotional health screening early in pregnancy. Copyright © 2014 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Aspects of the ecology of phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae in the Private Natural Heritage Reserve Sanctuary Caraça.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Barbosa Tonelli

    Full Text Available Leishmaniases are a set of parasitic diseases of zoonotic origin that are transmitted by sandfly vectors in wild, rural and urban environments. Their distribution is dependent not only the distribution of vectors, but also on the distribution of mammalian reservoirs. Only by understanding the transmission cycle of these diseases, such as knowing the participating vectors and reservoirs, can one can understand the epidemiology and ecological relationships of leishmaniases. Ecotourism has become an important area of economic growth in Brazil. One of the most visited tourist attractions in the state of Minas Gerais, the Reserva Particular do Patrimônio Natural Santuário do Caraça (RPPNSC is located in the Quadrilátero Ferrífero. The aim of this study was to contribute to the control of leishmaniasis among tourists of the RPPNPC by surveying its sand fly fauna and testing for the presence of Leishmania DNA in females. Twenty-five CDC light traps were exposed on 7 trails of the RPPNPC where samples were collected bimonthly for a year, starting in June 2013. A total of 376 specimens of 18 species and 10 genera of sandflies were captured. The predominant species were Psychodopygus lloydi (72.34% and Pintomyia monticola (5.59%. HaeIII restriction enzyme detected and characterized Leishmania braziliensis DNA in 2 of the samples for an infection rate of 0.7% (2/266. Recent studies found specimens of Ps. lloyd infected with Leishmania braziliensis elsewhere in Minas Gerais, which may be an indication that this species is involved in the transmission of Leishmania in this state.

  19. Asteroidea, Echinoidea y Holothuroidea en fondos someros de la Bahía de Loreto, Baja California Sur, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Holguin Quiñones

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Para evaluar distribución, abundancia y densidades de erizos, estrellas y pepinos de mar en la Bahía de Loreto se empleó un transecto de 50 metros, por duplicado, con un margen de observación de 2.5 m a cada lado del mismo por estación y fecha de muestreo. Se observaron mayores abundancias y densidades en la clase Echinoidea: Echinometra vanbrunti (94.1+ 52.9 ind, 0.25 ind/m², Centrostephanus coronatus (38.15+9.15 ind, 0.06 ind/m², Tripneustes depressus (28.68 + 6.86 ind, 0.039 ind/ m², Eucidaris thouarsii (10.66+3.37 ind, 0.025 ind/m² y Diadema mexicanum (11.75+4.92 ind, 0.023 ind/ m²; y para la clase Asteroidea: Phataria unifascialis, Mithrodia bradleyi y Acanthaster planci. Por el número de especies domina Asteroidea con 12, le siguen Echinoidea con 10 y Holothuroidea con 4.To evaluate echinoderm distribution, abundance and density a double 50 m transect, with a side observation range of 2.5 m was used at each of 11 stations (bimonthly samplings, Aug. 1997-Febr. 1998. In Bahía de Loreto the Phylum Echinodermata consists of 26 taxa. The greatest mean abundance by transect and mean densities in order of importance for Echinoidea were: Echinometra vanbrunti (94.1+ 52.9 ind, 0.25 ind/m², Centrostephanus coronatus (38.15. + 9.15 ind, 0.06 ind/m², Tripneustes depressus (28.68 + 6.86 ind, 0.039 ind/ m², Eucidaris thouarsii (10.66 + 3.37 ind, 0.025 ind/m² and Diadema mexicanum (11.75 + 4.92 ind, 0.023 ind/ m²; for Asteroidea were: Phataria unifascialis, Mithrodia bradleyi and Acanthaster planci. Asteroidea was the dominant class with 12 species, followed by Echinoidea with ten and Holothuroidea was represented by four species.

  20. Training program in radiation protection: implantation in a radiation oncology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chretien, Mario; Morrier, Janelle; Cote, Carl; Lavallee, Marie C.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Purpose: To introduce the radiation protection training program implemented in the radiation oncology department of the Hotel-Dieu de Quebec. This program seeks to provide an adequate training for all the clinic workers and to fulfill Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission's (CNSC) legislations. Materials and Methods: The radiation protection training program implemented is based on the use of five different education modalities: 1) Oral presentations, when the objective of the formation is to inform a large number of persons about general topics; 2) Periodic journals are published bimonthly and distributed to members of the department. They aim to answer frequently asked questions on the radiation safety domain. Each journal contains one main subject which is vulgarized and short notices, these later added to inform the readers about the departmental news and developments in radiation safety; 3) Electronic self-training presentations are divided into several units. Topics, durations, complexity and evaluations are adapted for different worker groups; 4) Posters are strategically displayed in the department in order to be read by all the radiation oncology employees, even those who are not specialized in the radiation protection area; 5) Simulations are organized for specialised workers to practice and to develop their skills in radiation protection situations as emergencies. A registration method was developed to record all training performed by each member of the department. Results: The training program implemented follows the CNSC recommendations. It allows about 150 members of the department to receive proper radiation safety training. The oral presentations allow an interaction between the trainer and the workers. The periodic journals are simple to write while ensuring continuous training. They are also easy to read and to understand. The e-learning units and their associated evaluations can be done at any time and everywhere in the department. The

  1. Long-term trends in submersed aquatic vegetation (SAV) in Chesapeake Bay, USA, related to water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Robert J.; Williams, Michael R.; Marion, Scott R.; Wilcox, David J.; Carruthers, Tim J.B.; Moore, Kenneth A.; Kemp, W.M.; Dennison, William C.; Rybicki, Nancy B.; Peter Bergstrom,; Batiuk, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Chesapeake Bay supports a diverse assemblage of marine and freshwater species of submersed aquatic vegetation (SAV) whose broad distributions are generally constrained by salinity. An annual aerial SAV monitoring program and a bi-monthly to monthly water quality monitoring program have been conducted throughout Chesapeake Bay since 1984. We performed an analysis of SAV abundance and up to 22 environmental variables potentially influencing SAV growth and abundance (1984-2006). Historically, SAV abundance has changed dramatically in Chesapeake Bay, and since 1984, when SAV abundance was at historic low levels, SAV has exhibited complex changes including long-term (decadal) increases and decreases, as well as some large, single-year changes. Chesapeake Bay SAV was grouped into three broad-scale community-types based on salinity regime, each with their own distinct group of species, and detailed analyses were conducted on these three community-types as well as on seven distinct case-study areas spanning the three salinity regimes. Different trends in SAVabundance were evident in the different salinity regimes. SAV abundance has (a) continually increased in the low-salinity region; (b) increased initially in the medium-salinity region, followed by fluctuating abundances; and (c) increased initially in the high-salinity region, followed by a subsequent decline. In all areas, consistent negative correlations between measures of SAV abundance and nitrogen loads or concentrations suggest that meadows are responsive to changes in inputs of nitrogen. For smaller case-study areas, different trends in SAV abundance were also noted including correlations to water clarity in high-salinity case-study areas, but nitrogen was highly correlated in all areas. Current maximum SAV coverage for almost all areas remain below restoration targets, indicating that SAV abundance and associated ecosystem services are currently limited by continued poor water quality, and specifically high

  2. SURFACE WATER AND GROUND WATER QUALITY MONITORING FOR RESTORATION OF URBAN LAKES IN GREATER HYDERABAD, INDIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, A. K.

    2009-12-01

    SURFACE WATER AND GROUND WATER QUALITY MONITORING FOR RESTORATION OF URBAN LAKES IN GREATER HYDERABAD, INDIA A.K. Mohanty, K. Mahesh Kumar, B. A. Prakash and V.V.S. Gurunadha Rao Ecology and Environment Group National Geophysical Research Institute, (CSIR) Hyderabad - 500 606, India E-mail:atulyakumarmohanty@yahoo.com Abstract: Hyderabad Metropolitan Development Authority has taken up restoration of urban lakes around Hyderabad city under Green Hyderabad Environment Program. Restoration of Mir Alam Tank, Durgamcheruvu, Patel cheruvu, Pedda Cheruvu and Nallacheruvu lakes have been taken up under the second phase. There are of six lakes viz., RKPuramcheruvu, Nadimicheruvu (Safilguda), Bandacheruvu Patelcheruvu, Peddacheruvu, Nallacheruvu, in North East Musi Basin covering 38 sq km. Bimonthly monitoring of lake water quality for BOD, COD, Total Nitrogen, Total phosphorous has been carried out for two hydrological cycles during October 2002- October 2004 in all the five lakes at inlet channels and outlets. The sediments in the lake have been also assessed for nutrient status. The nutrient parameters have been used to assess eutrophic condition through computation of Trophic Status Index, which has indicated that all the above lakes under study are under hyper-eutrophic condition. The hydrogeological, geophysical, water quality and groundwater data base collected in two watersheds covering 4 lakes has been used to construct groundwater flow and mass transport models. The interaction of lake-water with groundwater has been computed for assessing the lake water budget combining with inflow and outflow measurements on streams entering and leaving the lakes. Individual lake water budget has been used for design of appropriate capacity of Sewage Treatment Plants (STPs) on the inlet channels of the lakes for maintaining Full Tank Level (FTL) in each lake. STPs are designed for tertiary treatment i.e. removal of nutrient load viz., Phosphates and Nitrates. Phosphates are

  3. TLD personnel dosimetry and its relationship with the radiodiagnostic training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaona, E.; Franco E, J.G.; Gaona C, E.

    2002-01-01

    The personnel dosimetry and the training in radiological protection in radiodiagnostic in Mexico before 1997 were almost nonexistent except few services of public and private radiology, we can to say that the personnel dosimetry and the obligatory training was born in the year 1997, together with the present Mexican Official Standards in radiology. This study has the purpose to make an evaluation of the personnel dosimetry of 110 radiology services distributed in the Mexican Republic for the year 2001 and to estimate the annual and bimonthly mean doses, as well as its trust intervals and its relationships with the personnel training in radiological protection by means of a sampling that was realized in two stages (1997 and 2000) in the metropolitan area of Mexico City. The results show that the received doses by the medical and technical personnel in the participating radiology services are in the 0.03 mSv and 0.94 mSv interval and the mean is 0.25 mSv. The estimated annual personnel dose would be in the 0.18 mSv to 5.64 mSv interval, which are values very lower to the annual dose limit that is 50 mSv and its magnitude is similar to the effective annual dose by natural background radiation. In the first stage in training was found that there is not a significant difference in the response frequencies among the medical and technical personnel with a p < 0.05. The 52% of the occupational exposure personnel of radiology uses dosemeter, but only 17% of them know the dose reports. the 15.8% of personnel considers that dosemeter protects against radiation and only 16.5% knows the annual maximum permissible dose for stochastic effects. The second stage, the results shown that there is a significant difference in the response of frequencies among medical and technical personnel, the same results which are obtained for members and non members of a professional association with a p < 0.05. The 38% has personnel dosimetry, the 19% knows the principles of radiological

  4. The perception of stress pattern in young cochlear implanted children: an EEG study

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    Niki Katerina Vavatzanidis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Children with sensorineural hearing loss may (regain hearing with a cochlear implant – a device that transforms sounds into electric pulses and bypasses the dysfunctioning inner ear by stimulating the auditory nerve directly with an electrode array. Many implanted children master the acquisition of spoken language successfully, yet we still have little knowledge of the actual input they receive with the implant and specifically which language sensitive cues they hear. This would be important however, both for understanding the flexibility of the auditory system when presented with stimuli after a (life-long phase of deprivation and for planning therapeutic intervention. In rhythmic languages the general stress pattern conveys important information about word boundaries. Infant language acquisition relies on such cues and can be severely hampered when this information is missing, as seen for dyslexic children and children with specific language impairment. Here we ask whether children with a cochlear implant perceive differences in stress patterns during their language acquisition phase and if they do, whether it is present directly following implant stimulation or if and how much time is needed for the auditory system to adapt to the new sensory modality. We performed a longitudinal ERP study, testing in bimonthly intervals the stress pattern perception of 17 young hearing impaired children (age range: 9-50 months; mean: 22 months during their first 6 months of implant use. An additional session before the implantation served as control baseline. During a session they passively listened to an oddball paradigm featuring the disyllable baba, which was stressed either on the first or second syllable (trochaic vs. iambic stress pattern. A group of age-matched normal hearing children participated as controls.Our results show, that within the first 6 months of implant use the implanted children develop a negative mismatch response for iambic but not

  5. Infectivity to Phlebotomus perniciosus of dogs naturally parasitized with Leishmania infantum after different treatments

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    Descalzo Miguel A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Europe most dogs with clinical leishmaniosis are treated with leishmanicides, typically antimonials combined with allopurinol and good clinical recovery is observed in a high number of these dogs. Through xenodiagnosis, the capacity of a treated animal to infect the vector of the disease under treatment is assessed as a measure of the chemotherapeutic efficacy of the drug used. The objective of the present study was to evaluate through direct xenodiagnosis the infectivity to Phlebotomus perniciosus of dogs naturally parasitized with Leishmania infantum after treatment, and to follow the clinical and parasite course of disease. Thirty two dogs with clinical leishmaniosis were assigned to one of three treatment groups: meglumine antimoniate plus allopurinol (Group A, meglumine antimoniate (Group B or allopurinol (Group C. During the study, the dogs were examined before treatment (Day 0 and bimonthly thereafter until Day 180 (six months post-treatment onset. Results The three groups were scored over time according to the effects of treatment on clinical signs and clinical-pathological variables. Significant differences in clinical scores were observed between Group A and the other two groups, indicating the combined treatment was the most effective. After treatment, bone marrow cultures were positive for the parasite in 30.8% of dogs in some of the check ups (3 or 25% in Group A, 1 or 11.1% in Group B, and 4 or 80% in Group C. Our xenodiagnosis experiments revealed that 15.4% of treated dogs were still able to infect sand flies at some point after treatment (2 dogs or 16.6% in Group A, 2 or 22.2% in Group B and none in Group C. Only 7.7% of the entire study population could infect sand flies as from the second month post-treatment onset. Conclusion The three treatment regimens tested significantly reduced the infectivity of dogs towards sand flies, thus diminishing the epidemiological risks of treated dogs both for human

  6. The transfer of seasonal isotopic variability between precipitation and drip water at eight caves in the monsoon regions of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Wuhui; Ruan, Jiaoyang; Luo, Weijun; Li, Tingyong; Tian, Lijun; Zeng, Guangneng; Zhang, Dezhong; Bai, Yijun; Li, Jilong; Tao, Tao; Zhang, Pingzhong; Baker, Andy; Tan, Ming

    2016-06-01

    This study presents new stable isotope data for precipitation (δ18Op) and drip water (δ18Od) from eight cave sites in the monsoon regions of China (MRC), with monthly to bi-monthly sampling intervals from May-2011 to April-2014, to investigate the regional-scale climate forcing on δ18Op and how the isotopic signals are transmitted to various drip sites. The monthly δ18Op values show negative correlation with surface air temperature at all the cave sites except Shihua Cave, which is opposite to that expected from the temperature effect. In addition, although the monthly δ18Op values are negatively correlated with precipitation at all the cave sites, only three sites are significant at the 95% level. These indicate that, due to the various vapor sources, a large portion of variability in δ18Op in the MRC cannot be explained simply by either temperature or precipitation alone. All the thirty-four drip sites are classified into three types based on the δ18Od variability. About 82% of them are static drips with little discernable variation in δ18Od through the whole study period, but the drip rates of these drips are not necessary constant. Their discharge modes are site-specific and the oxygen isotopic composition of the stalagmites growing from them may record the average of multi-year climatic signals, which are modulated by the seasonality of recharge and potential effects of evaporation, and in some cases infiltration from large rainfall events. About 12% of the thirty-four drip sites are seasonal drips, although the amplitude of δ18Od is narrower than that of δ18Op, the monthly response of δ18Od to coeval precipitation is not completely damped, and some of them follow the seasonal trend of δ18Op very well. These drips may be mainly recharged by present-day precipitation, mixing with some stored water. Thus, the stalagmites growing under them may record portions of the seasonal climatic signals embedded in δ18Op. About 6% of the thirty-four drip sites

  7. Evaluación de la riqueza de especies de peces en las lagunas costeras mexicanas: estudio de un caso en el Golfo de México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurelio Pérez-Hernández

    2000-06-01

    systems should consider: a using the highest possible variety of sampling fishing gears, b collecting in all microhabitat types and c the preference of bimonthly or quarterly samplings for two or more years over monthly samplings in a single year.

  8. (SPartners for Heart Health: a school-based program for enhancing physical activity and nutrition to promote cardiovascular health in 5th grade students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehnert Scott T

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The American Heart Association Position Statement on Cardiovascular Health Promotion in Public Schools encourages school-based interventions for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD through risk factor prevention or reduction in children with an emphasis on creating an environment that promotes healthy food choices and physical activity (PA. In an effort to address issues related to CVD risk factors including obesity in Michigan children, a multi-disciplinary team of Michigan State University (MSU faculty, clinicians, and health profession students was formed to "(Spartner" with elementary school physical education (PE teachers and MSU Extension staff to develop and implement a cost-effective, sustainable program aimed at CVD risk factor prevention and management for 5th grade students. This (Spartnership is intended to augment and improve the existing 5th grade PE, health and nutrition curriculum by achieving the following aims: 1 improve the students' knowledge, attitudes and confidence about nutrition, PA and heart health; 2 increase the number of students achieving national recommendations for PA and nutrition; and 3 increase the number of students with a desirable CVD risk factor status based on national pediatric guidelines. Secondary aims include promoting school staff and parental support for heart health to help children achieve their goals and to provide experiential learning and service for MSU health profession students for academic credit. Methods/Design This pilot effectiveness study was approved by the MSU IRB. At the beginning and the end of the school year students undergo a CVD risk factor assessment conducted by MSU medical students and graduate students. Key intervention components include eight lesson plans (conducted bi-monthly designed to promote heart healthy nutrition and PA behaviors conducted by PE teachers with assistance from MSU undergraduate dietetic and kinesiology students

  9. Tratamento inseticida e qualidade de sementes de milho durante o armazenamento Insecticide treatment and seed quality of corn during storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar José Smiderle

    1999-01-01

    test, cold test, accelerated aging, electric conductivity test, emergence of seedlings in field and rate of seedling emergence, seven times in bimonthly intervals. Interpretation of the results showed that: deltamethrin and chlorpyrifos insecticides (alone or combined, phosphin and diatomaceous earth promoted the control in a similar manner, of pest-insects occuring during storage without causing toxicity to corn seeds. The physiological quality of corn seeds was effectively preserved by the addition of chemical insecticides and diatomaceous earth.

  10. Zooplankton Structure and Potential Food Web Interactions in the Plankton of a Subtropical Chain-of-Lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl E. Havens

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the taxonomic and size structure of macro-zooplankton and its potential role in controlling phytoplankton in the Kissimmee Chain-of-Lakes, six shallow interconnected lakes in Florida, U.S. Macro-zooplankton species biomass and standard limnological attributes (temperature, pH, total phosphorus [TP], chlorophyll a [Chl a], and Secchi transparency were quantified on a bimonthly basis from April 1997 to February 1999. Concentrations of TP ranged from below 50 to over 150 μg l-1. Peak concentrations of particulate P coincided with maximal Chl a, and in one instance a high concentration of soluble reactive P followed. The cladoceran zooplankton was dominated by small species, including Eubosmina tubicen, Ceriodaphnia rigaudi, and Daphnia ambigua. The exotic daphnid, D. lumholtzii, periodically was abundant. The copepods were strongly dominated by Diaptomus dorsalis, a species previously shown to be highly resistant to fish predation. These results, and findings of controlled experiments on a nearby lake with a nearly identical zooplankton species complement, suggest that fish predation may be a major factor structuring the macro-zooplankton assemblage. Zooplankton biomass, on the other hand, may be affected by resource availability. There was a significant positive relationship between average biomass of macro-zooplankton and the average concentration of TP among the six lakes. No such relationship existed between zooplankton biomass and Chl a, suggesting that the predominant food web in these systems may be based on bacteria-plankton, as has been documented in nearby Lake Okeechobee. All of the zooplankton taxa encountered in the Kissimmee Chain-of-Lakes (except Mesocyclops edax are known bacteria grazers in Florida lakes. Phytoplankton biomass, measured as Chl a, was strongly associated with TP, both within and across lakes. Phytoplankton biomass was not associated with the biomass of zooplankton. These results, when

  11. Microbial biogeography of San Francisco Bay sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. A.; Francis, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    The largest estuary on the west coast of North America, San Francisco Bay is an ecosystem of enormous biodiversity, and also enormous human impact. The benthos has experienced dredging, occupation by invasive species, and over a century of sediment input as a result of hydraulic mining. Although the Bay's great cultural and ecological importance has inspired numerous surveys of the benthic macrofauna, to date there has been almost no investigation of the microbial communities on the Bay floor. An understanding of those microbial communities would contribute significantly to our understanding of both the biogeochemical processes (which are driven by the microbiota) and the physical processes (which contribute to microbial distributions) in the Bay. Here, we present the first broad survey of bacterial and archaeal taxa in the sediments of the San Francisco Bay. We conducted 16S rRNA community sequencing of bacteria and archaea in sediment samples taken bimonthly for one year, from five sites spanning the salinity gradient between Suisun and Central Bay, in order to capture the effect of both spatial and temporal environmental variation on microbial diversity. From the same samples we also conducted deep sequencing of a nitrogen-cycling functional gene, nirS, allowing an assessment of evolutionary diversity at a much finer taxonomic scale within an important and widespread functional group of bacteria. We paired these sequencing projects with extensive geochemical metadata as well as information about macrofaunal distribution. Our data reveal a diversity of distinct biogeographical patterns among different taxa: clades ubiquitous across sites; clades that respond to measurable environmental drivers; and clades that show geographical site-specificity. These community datasets allow us to test the hypothesis that salinity is a major driver of both overall microbial community structure and community structure of the denitrifying bacteria specifically; and to assess

  12. Greenhouse gas (CO2 and CH4) emissions from a high altitude hydroelectric reservoir in the tropics (Riogrande II, Colombia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérin, Frédéric; Leon, Juan

    2015-04-01

    Tropical hydroelectric reservoirs are considered as very significant source of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2), especially when flooding dense forest. We report emissions from the Rio Grande II Reservoir located at 2000 m.a.s.l. in the Colombian Andes. The dam was built at the confluence of the Rio Grande and Rio Chico in 1990. The reservoir has a surface of 12 km2, a maximum depth of 40m and a residence time of 2.5 month. Water quality (temperature, oxygen, pH, conductivity), nitrate, ammonium, dissolved and particulate organic carbon (DOC and POC), CO2 and CH4 were monitored bi-monthly during 1.5 year at 9 stations in the reservoir. Diffusive fluxes of CO2 and CH4 and CH4 ebullition were measured at 5 stations. The Rio grande II Reservoir is weakly stratified thermally with surface temperature ranging from 20 to 24°C and a constant bottom temperature of 18°C. The reservoir water column is well oxygenated at the surface and usually anoxic below 10m depth. At the stations close to the tributaries water inputs, the water column is well mixed and oxygenated from the surface to the bottom. As reported for other reservoirs located in "clear water" watersheds, the concentrations of nutrients are low (NO3-10 mmol m-2 d-1) were observed during the dry season. Close to the tributaries water inputs where the water column is well mixed, the average diffusive flux is 8 mmol m-2 d-1. CH4 ebullition was 3.5 mmol m-2 d-1 and no ebullition was observed for a water depth higher than 5m. The zone under the influence of the water inputs from tributaries represents 25% of the surface of the reservoir but contributed half of total CH4 emissions from the reservoir (29MgC month-1). Ebullition contributed only to 12% of total CH4 emissions over a year but it contributed up to 60% during the dry season. CH4 emissions from the Rio Grande Reservoir contributed 30% of the total GHG emissions (38GgCO2eq y-1). Overall, this study show that the majority of CH4 emissions from this

  13. Spatial and temporal variations in cadmium concentrations and burdens in the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) sampled from the Pacific north-west

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendell, Leah I.; Feng, Cindy

    2009-01-01

    Oysters from the north-west coast of Canada contain high levels of cadmium, a toxic metal, in amounts that exceed food safety guidelines for international markets. A first required step to determine the sources of cadmium is to identify possible spatial and temporal trends in the accumulation of cadmium by the oyster. To meet this objective, rather than sample wild and cultured oysters of unknown age and origin, an oyster 'grow-out' experiment was initiated. Cultured oyster seed was suspended in the water column up to a depth of 7 m and the oyster seed allowed to mature a period of 3 years until market size. Oysters were sampled bimonthly and at time of sampling, temperature, chlorophyll-a, turbidity and salinity were measured. Oyster total shell length, dry tissue weights, cadmium concentrations (μg g -1 ) and burdens (μg of cadmium oyster -1 ) were determined. Oyster cadmium concentrations and burdens were then interpreted with respect to the spatial and temporal sampling design as well as to the measured physio-chemical and biotic variables. When expressed as a concentration, there was a marked seasonality with concentrations being greater in winter as compared in summer; however no spatial trend was evident. When expressed as a burden which corrects for differences in tissue mass, there was no seasonality, however cadmium oyster burdens increased from south to north. Comparison of cadmium accumulation rates oyster -1 among sites indicated three locations, Webster Island, on the west side of Vancouver Island, and two within Desolation Sound, Teakerne Arm and Redonda Bay, where point sources of cadmium which are not present at all other sampling locations may be contributing to overall oyster cadmium burdens. Of the four physio-chemical factors measured only temperature and turbidity weakly correlated with tissue cadmium concentrations (r 2 = -0.13; p < 0.05). By expressing oyster cadmium both as concentration and burden, regional and temporal patterns were

  14. Nutritional aspects of honey bee-collected pollen and constraints on colony development in the eastern Mediterranean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avni, Dorit; Hendriksma, Harmen P; Dag, Arnon; Uni, Zehava; Shafir, Sharoni

    2014-10-01

    Pollen is the main protein and lipid source for honey bees (Apis mellifera), and nutritionally impoverished landscapes pose a threat to colony development. To determine colony nutritional demands, we analyzed a yearly cycle of bee-collected pollen from colonies in the field and compared it to colony worker production and honey bee body composition, for the first time in social insects. We monitored monthly bee production in ten colonies at each of seven sites throughout Israel, and trapped pollen bi-monthly in five additional colonies at each of four of these sites. Pollen mixtures from each sampling date and site were analyzed for weight, total protein, total fatty acids (FAs), and FA composition. Compared to more temperate climates, the eastern Mediterranean allows a relatively high yearly colony growth of ca. 300,000-400,000 bees. Colonies at higher elevation above sea level showed lower growth rates. Queen egg-laying rate did not seem to limit growth, as peaks in capped brood areas showed that queens lay a prolific 2000 eggs a day on average, with up to 3300 eggs in individual cases. Pollen uptake varied significantly among sites and seasons, with an overall annual mean total 16.8kg per colony, containing 7.14kg protein and 677g fat. Overall mean pollen protein content was high (39.8%), and mean total FA content was 3.8%. Production cost, as expressed by the amount of nutrient used per bee, was least variable for linoleic acid and protein, suggesting these as the best descriptive variables for total number of bees produced. Linolenic acid levels in pollen during the autumn were relatively low, and supplementing colonies with this essential FA may mitigate potential nutritional deficiency. The essentiality of linoleic and linolenic acids was consistent with these FAs' tendency to be present at higher levels in collected pollen than in the expected nutrients in bee bodies, demonstrating a well-developed adjustment between pollinator nutritional demands and the

  15. Distribution of oxygen-18 and deuteriun in river waters across the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Carol; Coplen, Tyler B.

    2001-01-01

    Reconstruction of continental palaeoclimate and palaeohydrology is currently hampered by limited information about isotopic patterns in the modern hydrologic cycle. To remedy this situation and to provide baseline data for other isotope hydrology studies, more than 4800, depth- and width-integrated, stream samples from 391 selected sites within the USGS National Stream Quality Accounting Network (NASQAN) and Hydrologic Benchmark Network (HBN) were analysed for δ18O and δ2H (http://water.usgs.gov/pubs/ofr/ofr00-160/pdf/ofr00-160.pdf). Each site was sampled bimonthly or quarterly for 2·5 to 3 years between 1984 and 1987. The ability of this dataset to serve as a proxy for the isotopic composition of modern precipitation in the USA is supported by the excellent agreement between the river dataset and the isotopic compositions of adjacent precipitation monitoring sites, the strong spatial coherence of the distributions of δ18O and δ2H, the good correlations of the isotopic compositions with climatic parameters, and the good agreement between the ‘national’ meteoric water line (MWL) generated from unweighted analyses of samples from the 48 contiguous states of δ2H=8·11δ18O+8·99 (r2=0·98) and the unweighted global MWL of sites from the Global Network for Isotopes in Precipitation (GNIP) of the International Atomic Energy Agency and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) of δ2H=8·17δ18O+10·35. The national MWL is composed of water samples that arise in diverse local conditions where the local meteoric water lines (LMWLs) usually have much lower slopes. Adjacent sites often have similar LMWLs, allowing the datasets to be combined into regional MWLs. The slopes of regional MWLs probably reflect the humidity of the local air mass, which imparts a distinctive evaporative isotopic signature to rainfall and hence to stream samples. Deuterium excess values range from 6 to 15‰ in the eastern half of the USA, along the northwest coast and on the Colorado

  16. The climate warming effect of a fen peat meadow with fluctuating water table is reduced by young alder trees

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    V. Huth

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Black alder (Alnus glutinosa (L. Gaertn. occurs naturally in temperate marshes and in minerotrophic peatlands and is also suitable for paludiculture - the cultivation of biomass on wet or rewetted peatland. We investigated the effect of a newly established black alder plantation on the greenhouse gas (GHG balance of a degraded fen in north-eastern Germany over a two-year period (August 2010–August 2012. We compared the alder plantation (Awet with an extensively used meadow (Mwet and a drier reference meadow (Mmoist. GHG fluxes were measured monthly to bi-monthly using the closed chamber method. Our results show that Awet was a slight net GHG (in CO2-eq sink of 3.4 ± 1.7 t ha-1 yr-1, Mwet was a moderate net GHG source of 9.6 ± 1.2 t ha 1 yr-1, and Mmoist was a strong net GHG source of 24.5 ± 1.6 t ha-1 yr-1. This was mainly driven by CO2 uptake at the two very moist (wet sites and by high CO2 release at the drier reference site. Awet was a larger CO2 sink than Mwet, probably due to additional CO2 uptake by the alder stand at Awet and carbon export in plant material harvested from Mwet. All sites were significant CH4 sources. Substantial CH4 emission peaks were observed at all sites following extraordinarily heavy precipitation during the summer of 2011, which accounted for up to 70 % of the accumulated two-year CH4 emissions. However, the Awet site generally emitted less CH4, possibly due to the effective oxygen transport mechanism in black alders. N2O emissions were negligible at all three sites. Our results indicate that the GHG balances of formerly drained fens benefit in the short term from planting of black alders, mostly due to reduced CH4 emissions. This study highlights the importance of acknowledging extreme precipitation events and groundwater fluctuations for the derivation of reliable GHG emission factors.

  17. Response of eyes with age-related macular degeneration to anti-VEGF drugs and implications for therapy planning

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    Miyamoto N

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Noriko Miyamoto,1,2 Michiko Mandai,1,3 Hiroshi Kojima,1,2 Takanori Kameda,1,2 Masataka Shimozono,1,2 Akihiro Nishida,1,2 Yasuo Kurimoto1,2 1Department of Ophthalmology, Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, 3Laboratory for Retinal Regeneration, RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology, Kobe, Japan Purpose: To evaluate the response to and dependence on aflibercept or ranibizumab in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD.Methods: We retrospectively reviewed AMD patients who received induction therapy with aflibercept or ranibizumab for the following parameters: whether complete resolution of the retinal fluid (“good response” was achieved and whether recurrence was observed within 3 months (“dependent” after the induction treatment. With aflibercept treatment, treatment-naïve eyes with a good response/non-dependence were recommended a pro re nata regimen, and other eyes were recommended a proactive bimonthly regimen, followed by monitoring of visual acuity (VA for 12 months. The measured values of the groups were compared using one-way analysis of variance with Tukey’s test to evaluate the difference between baseline and postinjection VA.Results: Among the treatment-naïve eyes, 76% had a good response to aflibercept and 37% of these were aflibercept-dependent, while 58% had a good response to ranibizumab but 51% of these were ranibizumab-dependent. Among the eyes that converted from ranibizumab treatment, 92% of the good responders to ranibizumab with dependence and 76% of the poor responders on ranibizumab had a good response to aflibercept. With aflibercept treatment, the mean VA of treatment-naïve patients was significantly better than the baseline VA over 12 months (P<0.001, and the VA of the converted group improved significantly with proactive treatment and the improvement was continuously maintained from 6 to 12 months

  18. A non-flowering green panic grass (Panicum maximum var. trichoglume) obtained through gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shivashankar, G.; Mahishi, D.M.; Kulkarni, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    Full text: Suppression of flowering has many advantages in a forage crop. Such genotypes are not only expected to give more yield but also to be more nutritious. Non-flowering plants also remain fresh and green for a longer period in the field compared to the flowering types. Green panic (Panicum maximum var. trichoglume) is a high yielding, nutritious, fast growing and drought tolerant grass that has a potential to grow even under partial shade conditions. However, the major drawback of this grass is that it flowers early and profusely, with the result that most of the nutrients are diverted towards panicle formation. With an objective to suppress the panicle initiation a mutation breeding programme was taken up. Seeds of green panic grass were subjected to gamma ray treatment with doses of 40, 50 and 60 krad. From the large spectrum of variation observed for flowering habit quite a few non-flowering plants were isolated and of these the one from 40 krad treatment was prominent. This non-flowering plant yielded more green foliage than the flowering type and recorded an increase to the extend of 10.5% and 22.5% in monthly and bi-monthly harvests respectively. The increase in green foliage yield was directly attributable to an increase in the number of tillers and concomitant reduction in culm weight. Unlike in the flowering types the mutant had more accumulation of dry matter in the leaves rather than the stem. Further nutritional analysis of leaves showed that the non-flowering plant is superior with 6.04% crude protein which represents 100% increase over that of flowering type. The calcium content (0.5%) was also double and the moisture content (11.70%) was higher in the non-flowering plant. The crude fibre content was reduced by 2%. Inhibition of flowering is a common feature in mutagen treated material, but it is seldom inherited. In sugarcane non-arrowing mutants have been induced with advantage to increase the sugar content (Walker and Sisodia, 1969). The

  19. Freqüência da fertirrigação da bananeira prata-anã com nitrogênio e potássio aplicados por microaspersão Frequency of fertigation with nitrogen and potassium applied by microsprinkler system on prata-anã banana plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amilton G. Guerra

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available O experimento teve por objetivo avaliar a freqüência de fertirrigações com nitrogênio e potássio aplicadas por microaspersão na cultura da bananeira (Musa sp. AAB, cultivar Prata-Anã, durante dois ciclos de cultivo. O experimento foi conduzido na Área Demonstrativa e Experimental de Irrigação do Departamento de Engenharia Rural da FCAV/UNESP, Jaboticabal - SP. Utilizou-se do delineamento em blocos ao acaso, com parcelas subdivididas e cinco repetições, constituídas por quatro modalidades de aplicação de fertilizantes (adubação via solo, fertirrigação mensal, fertirrigação bimestral e fertirrigação trimestral e duas doses de nitrogênio e potássio, correspondendo a 100% (dose 1 e 50% (dose 2 da dose recomendada de nutrientes. A fertirrigação mensal proporcionou peso de cachos, peso de pencas e produtividades superiores à adubação convencional e menor acidez total titulável dos frutos em relação à fertirrigação trimestral; a redução de 50% das doses de N e K não exerceu efeito sobre a produção e qualidade dos frutos.This study was carried out in order to evaluate the effect of fertigations with nitrogen and potassium applied by microsprinkler system on the plantation of Prata-Anã banana (Musa sp AAB, during two growing seasons, under field conditions. The experiment was carried out in the irrigation area of the Department of Agricultural Engineering, FCAV/UNESP - Jaboticabal, São Paulo State, Brazil. It was used a completely randomized block design in split plot with five replications. The treatments studied were composed of four fertilizer application modalities (side dressing fertilization, monthly fertigation, bimonthly fertigation and three monthly fertigation combined with two rates of nitrogen and potassium, corresponding to 100% (rate 1 and 50% (rate 2 of the recommended rates based on the soil analysis. Monthly fertigation promoted bunch weight and yield higher than side dressing fertilization and

  20. Concurrent Detection of Human Norovirus and Bacterial Pathogens in Water Samples from an Agricultural Region in Central California Coast

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    Peng Tian

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial pathogens and human norovirus (HuNoV are major cause for acute gastroenteritis caused by contaminated food and water. Public waterways can become contaminated from a variety of sources and flood after heavy rain events, leading to pathogen contamination of produce fields. We initiated a survey of several public watersheds in a major leafy green produce production region of the Central California Coast to determine the prevalence of HuNoV as well as bacterial pathogens. Moore swabs were used to collect environmental samples bi-monthly at over 30 sampling sites in the region. High prevalence of HuNoV and bacterial pathogens were detected in environmental water samples in the region. The overall detection rates of HuNoV, O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC, non-O157 STEC, Salmonella, and Listeria were 25.58, 7.91, 9.42, 59.65, and 44.30%, respectively. The detection rates of Salmonella and L. monocytogenes were significantly higher in the spring. Fall and spring had elevated detection rates of O157 STEC. The overall detection rates of non-O157 STEC in the fall were lower than the other seasons but not significant. The overall detection rates of HuNoV were highest in fall, followed by spring and winter, with summer being lowest and significantly lower than other seasons. This study presented the first study of evaluating the correlation between the detection rate of HuNoV and the detection rates of four bacterial pathogens from environmental water. Overall, there was no significant difference in HuNoV detection rates between samples testing positive or negative for the four bacterial pathogens tested. Pathogens in animal-impacted and human-impacted areas were investigated. There were significant higher detection rates in animal-impacted areas than that of human-impacted areas for bacterial pathogens. However, there was no difference in HuNoV detection rates between these two areas. The overall detection levels of generic E

  1. Emission of greenhouse gases from geographically isolated wetlands of Western Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovatskaya, E.; Dyukarev, E.; Veretennikova, E.

    2014-12-01

    Wetlands are integral components of landscapes with specific nutrient dynamics and carbon sequestration potentials, which frequently differ, based on hydroperiod and seasonal hydropattern, as well as the constituent concentration of inputs, site-specific storages and vegetation structures. Human modifications have the potential to significantly alter controls on carbon dynamics. This study focused on determining carbon emissions (CO2 and CH4) from geographically isolated peatlands within the Ob-Tom River Interfluve area of Western Siberia affected by water diversion for municipal use by the city of Tomsk, Russia. Two oligotrophic wetlands within the study area were selected for site-specific CO2 studies, the Timiryazevskoe (16 ha) and Kirsanovskoe wetlands (29 ha), both affected by the Tomsk water intake (177 water wells 250 000 m3 water daily). Measurements of СО2 and CH4 emissions from peat surfaces were carried out bi-monthly in growing periods from 2008-2013 in two dominate vegetation zones, pine- shrub-sphagnum phytocenosis (ryam) and sedge-sphagnum fens. СО2 emissions were measured using OPTOGAS-500.4 infrared gas analyzer and dark chamber. Methane emissions were measured using static chamber method. Air samples were collected by syringes and analyzed at gas chromatograph Shimadzu-GC14B. Observations were accompanied by measurement of air temperature and humidity, surface temperature, peat temperature at various depths and the water table level. CО2 emission over the vegetative growing period had clearly pronounced seasonal dynamics with maximum values in the middle of the growing season (mid-July) and minimum values in spring and autumn. The average total flux over the studied period is 123±55 gС/m2 at sedge-sphagnum fen of Kirsanovskoe wetland and 323±66 gС/m2 at fen of Timiryazevskoe wetland. Total СО2 flux for the snow-free period at ryam sites of Timiryazevskoe and Kirsanovskoe wetlands is 238±84 and 260±47 gС/m2 accordingly. Methane

  2. A multi-level intervention in subsidized housing sites to increase fruit and vegetable access and intake: Rationale, design and methods of the ‘Live Well, Viva Bien’ cluster randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim M. Gans

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adequate fruit and vegetable (F&V intake is important for disease prevention. Yet, most Americans, especially low-income and racial/ethnic minorities, do not eat adequate amounts. These disparities are partly attributable to food environments in low-income neighborhoods where residents often have limited access to affordable, healthful food and easy access to inexpensive, unhealthful foods. Increasing access to affordable healthful food in underserved neighborhoods through mobile markets is a promising, year-round strategy for improving dietary behaviors and reducing F&V intake disparities. However, to date, there have been no randomized controlled trials studying their effectiveness. The objective of the ‘Live Well, Viva Bien’ (LWVB cluster randomized controlled trial is to evaluate the efficacy of a multicomponent mobile market intervention at increasing F&V intake among residents of subsidized housing complexes. Methods/Design One housing complex served as a pilot site for the intervention group and the remaining 14 demographically-matched sites were randomized into either the intervention or control group. The intervention group received bimonthly, discount, mobile, fresh F&V markets in conjunction with a nutrition education intervention (two F&V campaigns, newsletters, DVDs and cooking demonstrations for 12 months. The control group received physical activity and stress reduction interventions. Outcome measures include F&V intake (measured by two validated F&V screeners at baseline, six-month and twelve-months along with potential psychosocial mediating variables. Extensive quantitative and qualitative process evaluation was also conducted throughout the study. Discussion Modifying neighborhood food environments in ways that increase access to affordable, healthful food is a promising strategy for improving dietary behaviors among low-income, racial and ethnic minority groups at increased risk for obesity and other

  3. HealtheSteps™ Study Protocol: a pragmatic randomized controlled trial promoting active living and healthy lifestyles in at-risk Canadian adults delivered in primary care and community-based clinics

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    Dawn P. Gill

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical inactivity is one of the leading causes of chronic disease in Canadian adults. With less than 50% of Canadian adults reaching the recommended amount of daily physical activity, there is an urgent need for effective programs targeting this risk factor. HealtheSteps™ is a healthy lifestyle prescription program, developed from an extensive research base to address risk factors for chronic disease such as physical inactivity, sedentary behaviour and poor eating habits. HealtheSteps™ participants are provided with in-person lifestyle coaching and access to eHealth technologies delivered in community-based primary care clinics and health care organizations. Method/Design To determine the effectiveness of Healthesteps™, we will conduct a 6-month pragmatic randomized controlled trial with integrated process and economic evaluations of HealtheSteps™ in 5 clinic settings in Southwestern Ontario. 110 participants will be individually randomized (1:1; stratified by site to either the intervention (HealtheSteps™ program or comparator (Wait-list control. There are 3 phases of the HealtheSteps™ program, lasting 6 months each. The active phase consists of bi-monthly in-person coaching with access to a full suite of eHealth technology supports. During the maintenance phase I, the in-person coaching will be removed, but participants will still have access to the full suite of eHealth technology supports. In the final stage, maintenance phase II, access to the full suite of eHealth technology supports is removed and participants only have access to publicly available resources and tools. Discussion This trial aims to determine the effectiveness of the program in increasing physical activity levels and improving other health behaviours and indicators, the acceptability of the HealtheSteps™ program, and the direct cost for each person participating in the program as well as the costs associated with delivering the program

  4. Seasonal variations in the availability of fodder resources and practices of dairy cattle feeding among the smallholder farmers in Western Usambara Highlands, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleko, David; Ng, Wai-Tim; Msalya, George; Mwilawa, Angello; Pasape, Liliane; Mtei, Kelvin

    2018-05-08

    The aim of this study was to assess the seasonal effects on quantity and quality of fodder resources and associated utilization practices among smallholder dairy farmers in Western Usambara Highlands (WUHs) in Tanzania. The WUHs are among the major milk producing areas under smallholder dairy farming systems (SDFS) in Tanzania. Dry season fodder scarcity is a widespread problem affecting the East African SDFS and has been shown to contribute to over 40% reduction in milk yield. There is limited information with regard to seasonal fodder fluctuation and its effects on productivity of dairy cows in different landscape levels of Tanzania. Field and household surveys were conducted in 150 dairy cattle farming households from five villages in three wards located in WUHs. Survey data were analyzed using IBM SPSS version 21. In addition, remote sensing techniques were employed on gap-filled and smoothed Landsat data to generate land cover maps and bimonthly normalized difference vegetation index-time series for the 2009-2016. SDFS landscape was highly heterogeneous typified by crops, bushes, and forests. On average, the household landholding was 1.3 ha, while herd size was three cattle. About 87% of household land was devoted to crop growing with limited pasture along the farm margins and contour strips. Fodder scarcity was the major challenge during the dry season (July to October) as indicated by 87% of the respondents. On-farm fodder resources contributed most of the cattle diet (73%) while rangeland, forest, and purchased feed provided small amount. Natural pasture and napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum) were the most important feeds in wet season while maize stover was most significant during the dry season. Maize stover was profusely stored for dry season feeding and neither silage nor hay making was practiced. The nutritional values of the fibrous feeds declined during the dry season, whereby the metabolizable energy and crude protein contents were 6.0 MJ/kg and

  5. Contamination of the Conchos River in Mexico: Does It Pose a Health Risk to Local Residents?

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    Hector Rubio-Arias

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Presently, water contamination issues are of great concern worldwide. Mexico has not escaped this environmental problem, which negatively affects aquifers, water bodies and biodiversity; but most of all, public health. The objective was to determine the level of water contamination in six tributaries of the Conchos River and to relate their levels to human health risks. Bimonthly samples were obtained from each location during 2005 and 2006. Physical-chemical variables (temperature, pH, electrical conductivity (EC, Total solids and total nitrogen as well as heavy metals (As, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, V, Zn, and Li were determined. The statistical analysis considered yearly, monthly, and location effects, and their interactions. Temperatures differed only as a function of the sampling month (P < 0.001 and the pH was different for years (P = 0.006, months (P < 0.001 and the interaction years x months (P = 0.018. The EC was different for each location (P < 0.001, total solids did not change and total nitrogen was different for years (P < 0.001, months (P < 0.001 and the interaction years x months (P < 0.001. The As concentration was different for months (P = 0.008 and the highest concentration was detected in February samples with 0.11 mg L-1. The Cr was different for months (P < 0.001 and the interaction years x months (P < 0.001, noting the highest value of 0.25 mg L-1. The Cu, Fe, Mn, Va and Zn were different for years, months, and their interaction. The highest value of Cu was 2.50 mg L-1; forFe, it was 16.36 mg L-1; forMn it was 1.66 mg L-1; V was 0.55 mg L-1; and Zn was 0.53 mg L-1. For Ni, there were differences for years (P = 0.030, months (P < 0.001, and locations (P = 0.050, with the highest Ni value being 0.47 mg L-1. The Li level was the same for sampling month (P < 0.001. This information can help prevent potential health risks in the communities established along the river watershed who use this natural resource for swimming and fishing

  6. The Agewell trial: a pilot randomised controlled trial of a behaviour change intervention to promote healthy ageing and reduce risk of dementia in later life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clare, Linda; Nelis, Sharon M; Jones, Ian R; Hindle, John V; Thom, Jeanette M; Nixon, Julie A; Cooney, Jennifer; Jones, Carys L; Tudor Edwards, Rhiannon; Whitaker, Christopher J

    2015-02-19

    Lifestyle factors represent prime targets for behaviour change interventions to promote healthy ageing and reduce dementia risk. We evaluated a goal-setting intervention aimed at promoting increased cognitive and physical activity and improving mental and physical fitness, diet and health. This was a pilot randomised controlled trial designed to guide planning for a larger-scale investigation, provide preliminary evidence regarding efficacy, and explore feasibility and acceptability. Primary outcomes were engagement in physical and cognitive activity. Participants aged over 50 living independently in the community were recruited through a community Agewell Centre. Following baseline assessment participants were randomly allocated to one of three conditions: control (IC) had an interview in which information about activities and health was discussed; goal-setting (GS n = 24) had an interview in which they set behaviour change goals relating to physical, cognitive and social activity, health and nutrition; and goal-setting with mentoring (GM, n = 24) had the goal-setting interview followed by bi-monthly telephone mentoring. Participants and researchers were blinded to group assignment. Participants were reassessed after 12 months. Seventy-five participants were randomised (IC n = 27, GS n = 24, GM n = 24). At 12-month follow-up, the two goal-setting groups, taken together (GS n = 21, GM n = 22), increased their level of physical (effect size 0.37) and cognitive (effect size 0.15) activity relative to controls (IC n = 27). In secondary outcomes, the two goal-setting groups taken together achieved additional benefits compared to control (effect sizes ≥ 0.2) in memory, executive function, cholesterol level, aerobic capacity, flexibility, balance, grip strength, and agility. Adding follow-up mentoring produced further benefits compared to goal-setting alone (effect sizes ≥ 0.2) in physical activity, body composition, global

  7. TLD personnel dosimetry and its relationship with the radiodiagnostic training; Dosimetria personal TLD y su relacion con la capacitacion en radiodiagnostico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaona, E.; Franco E, J.G. [DEHA, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Xochimilco, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Gaona C, E. [Universidad Tecnologica de Mexico, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    The personnel dosimetry and the training in radiological protection in radiodiagnostic in Mexico before 1997 were almost nonexistent except few services of public and private radiology, we can to say that the personnel dosimetry and the obligatory training was born in the year 1997, together with the present Mexican Official Standards in radiology. This study has the purpose to make an evaluation of the personnel dosimetry of 110 radiology services distributed in the Mexican Republic for the year 2001 and to estimate the annual and bimonthly mean doses, as well as its trust intervals and its relationships with the personnel training in radiological protection by means of a sampling that was realized in two stages (1997 and 2000) in the metropolitan area of Mexico City. The results show that the received doses by the medical and technical personnel in the participating radiology services are in the 0.03 mSv and 0.94 mSv interval and the mean is 0.25 mSv. The estimated annual personnel dose would be in the 0.18 mSv to 5.64 mSv interval, which are values very lower to the annual dose limit that is 50 mSv and its magnitude is similar to the effective annual dose by natural background radiation. In the first stage in training was found that there is not a significant difference in the response frequencies among the medical and technical personnel with a p < 0.05. The 52% of the occupational exposure personnel of radiology uses dosemeter, but only 17% of them know the dose reports. the 15.8% of personnel considers that dosemeter protects against radiation and only 16.5% knows the annual maximum permissible dose for stochastic effects. The second stage, the results shown that there is a significant difference in the response of frequencies among medical and technical personnel, the same results which are obtained for members and non members of a professional association with a p < 0.05. The 38% has personnel dosimetry, the 19% knows the principles of radiological

  8. Managing the impact of climate change on the hydrology of the Gallocanta Basin, NE-Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Nikolaus J; Baumhauer, Roland; Schütt, Brigitta

    2011-02-01

    The Gallocanta Basin represents an environment highly sensitive to climate change. Over the past 60 years, the Laguna de Gallocanta, an ephemeral lake situated in the closed Gallocanta basin, experienced a sequence of wet and dry phases. The lake and its surrounding wetlands are one of only a few bird sanctuaries left in NE-Spain for grey cranes on their annual migration from Scandinavia to northern Africa. Understanding the impact of climate change on basin hydrology is therefore of utmost importance for the appropriate management of the bird sanctuary. Changes in lake level are only weakly linked to annual rainfall, with reaction times between hours and months after rainfall. Both the total amount of rainfall over the reaction period, as well as individual extreme events, affect lake level. In this study the characteristics and frequencies of daily, event, monthly and bi-monthly rainfall over the past 60 years were analysed. The results revealed a clear link between increased frequencies of high magnitude rainfall and phases of water filling in the Laguna de Gallocanta. In the middle of the 20th century, the absolute amount of rainfall appears to have been more important for lake level, while more recently the frequency of high magnitude rainfall has emerged as the dominant variable. In the Gallocanta Basin, climate change and the distinct and continuing land use change since Spain joined the EU in 1986 have created an environment that is in a more or less constant state of transition. This highlights two challenges faced by hydrologists and climatologists involved in developing water management tools for the Gallocanta Basin in particular, but also other areas with sensitive and rapidly changing environments. Hydrologists have to understand the processes and the spatial and temporal patterns of surface-climate interaction in a watershed to assess the impact of climate change on its hydrology. Climatologists, on the other hand, have to develop climate models

  9. Multidisciplinary Management of Disorders of Sex Development in Indonesia, A Prototype in Developing Country

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    Nurin Aisyiyah Listyasari

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background : Disorder of sex development (DSD patients require comprehensive management to improve quality of life. A standardized management protocol for patients in Indonesia is not yet available resulting in patients infrequently received a proper diagnosis. This study reported a multidisciplinary management DSD in Indonesia based on minimal diagnostic facilities and expertise in developing country. Objectives : The purpose of the study is to review the management of DSD patients in Indonesia relates to providing appropriate gender assignment and to improving patients quality of life. Methodology : We analyzed the records of DSD patient admitted to the division of Human Genetics Center for Biomedical Research (CEBIOR Faculty of Medicine Diponegoro University, Semarang, Indonesia from May 2004 - December 2015. Data were collected and analyzed for physical examination, family pedigree karyotyping, hormonal assays and  psychosocial.  Other examination such as ultrasonography, Xray and Cytoscopy were also recorded for selected cases. Bimonthly, Sexual Adjustment Team (SAT meeting was recorded. Results : From the total 617 DSD cases we found 426 cases (69,04 % with 46, XY DSD, 117 cases (18,96% with 46,XX DSD and 74 cases (12% with sex chromosome DSD. Most of the patients in the group of 46, XY DSD are Unknown Male Undervirilization (UMU with 256 cases (60.09%. As the majority cases of 46, XX DSD was Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia with 81 cases (69.23%. The remaining cases were Androgen Action Disorder (AAD with 140 cases (32.86%, 46, XY DSD Gonadal Dysgenesis with 30 cases (7.04%, Androgen Excess Disorders with 3 cases (2.56%, Defect of Mullerian Development with 19 cases (16,24%, 3 cases (2.56% of Androgen Excess and 3 cases (2.56% of 46, XX Gonadal Dysgenesis. Conclusion : Comprehensive management for DSD Patients help patient in diagnosis, gender assignment and support patient to improve quality of life. This multidisciplinary of

  10. Effect of life skills building education and micronutrient supplements provided from preconception versus the standard of care on low birth weight births among adolescent and young Pakistani women (15-24 years): a prospective, population-based cluster-randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Jo-Anna B; Wasan, Yaqub; Soofi, Sajid B; Suhag, Zamir; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2018-05-31

    Risk factors known to impact maternal and newborn nutrition and health can exist from adolescence. If an undernourished adolescent girl becomes pregnant, her own health and pregnancy are at an increased risk for adverse outcomes. Offering preconception care from adolescence could provide an opportunity for health and nutrition promotion to improve one's own well-being, as well as future pregnancy outcomes and the health of the next generation. The Matiari emPowerment and Preconception Supplementation (MaPPS) Trial is a population-based two-arm, cluster-randomized, controlled trial of life skills building education and multiple micronutrient supplementation provided in a programmatic context to evaluate the impact on pre-identified nutrition and health outcomes among adolescent and young women (15-24 years) in Matiari district Pakistan, and the infants born to them within the context of the trial. The primary aim is to assess the effect of the intervention on the prevalence of low birth weight births (< 2500 g). The intervention includes bi-monthly life skills building education provided from preconception, and supplementation with multiple micronutrients during preconception (twice-weekly), pregnancy (daily), and post-partum (daily to 6 months). The standard of care includes non-regulated community-based health sessions and daily iron and folic acid supplementation during pregnancy. Additional outcome information will also be collected at set time periods. Among participants, these relate to nutrition (anthropometry, nutritional status), morbidity, and mortality. Among infants, these include birth outcomes (stillbirth, preterm birth, length of gestation, small for gestational age, birth defects), anthropometry, morbidity, and mortality. Preconception care from adolescence that includes interventions targeting life skills development and nutrition is suggested to be important to improving the health and nutrition of adolescent and young women and their future

  11. Use of sleeping perches by the lizard Anolis uniformis (Squamata: Polychrotidae in the fragmented tropical rainforest at Los Tuxtlas, Mexico Uso de perchas para dormir por la lagartija Anolis uniformis (Squamata: Polychrotidae en el bosque tropical fragmentado de Los Tuxtlas, México

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    Elisa Cabrera-Guzmán

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of nocturnal perches by the lizard Anolis uniformis is described. Bimonthly surveys were made throughout a year in small fragments and continuous tropical rainforest areas at Los Tuxtlas, Mexico. Twenty three juvenile individuals and 7 adults were recorded sleeping during the sampling time (18:00 - 23:00 h.. All individuals were found on leaves of plants of 14 species. Perch height ranged from 41.0 to 140.5 cm (mean: 90.1 cm juveniles; 80.6 cm adults and the most frequent sleeping position observed was with the body oriented along the longitudinal axis of the leaf and the head facing the stem of the plant. This apparently vulnerable position can permit the perception of external stimuli such as proximity of predators; although, eco-physiological factors may also influence selection of sleeping perch sites.Se describe el uso de perchas nocturnas por parte de la lagartija Anolis uniformis. Durante un año se ralizaron muestreos bimensuales en fragmentos pequeños y áreas continuas de bosque tropical perennifolio en Los Tuxtlas, México. Se registraron 23 individuos juveniles y 7 adultos durmiendo durante las horas de muestreo (18:00 a 23:00 hrs. Todos los individuos fueron encontrados en hojas de plantas pertenecientes a 14 especies. La altura de las perchas varió entre 41.0 y 140.5 cm (promedio: 90.1 cm juveniles; 80.6 cm adultos y la posición más frecuente de las lagartijas al dormir fue con el cuerpo extendido a lo largo del eje longitudinal de la hoja y la cabeza dirigida hacia el tallo de la planta. Esta posición, aparentemente vulnerable, puede permitir la percepción de estímulos externos como la aproximación de depredadores; sin embargo, factores eco-fisiológicos pueden también influir en la selección de sitios para dormir.

  12. Spatial and temporal variability of surface water pollution in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam.

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    Wilbers, Gert-Jan; Becker, Mathias; Nga, La Thi; Sebesvari, Zita; Renaud, Fabrice G

    2014-07-01

    Surface water pollution in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta (MD) could threaten human, animal and ecosystem health given the fact that this water source is intensively used for drinking, irrigation and domestic services. We therefore determined the levels of pollution by organic pollutants, salts, metals and microbial indicators by (bi)monthly monitoring of canals between November 2011 and July 2012 at 32 sampling locations, representing fresh and saline/brackish environments. The results were compared with national water quality guidelines, between the studied regions and with water quality data from main waterways. Key factors explaining the observed levels of pollution in surface water were identified through principal component analysis (PCA). Temporal variations due to tidal regime and seasonality were also assessed. Based on regression models, the spatial variability of five water quality parameters was visualized using GIS based maps. Results indicate that pH (max. 8.6), turbidity (max. 461 FTU), maximum concentrations of ammonium (14.7 mg L(-1)), arsenic (44.1 μg L(-1)), barium (157.5 μg L(-1)), chromium (84.7 μg L(-1)), mercury (45.5 μg L(-1)), manganese (1659.7 μg L(-1)), aluminum (14.5 mg L(-1)), iron (17.0 mg L(-1)) and the number of Escherichia coli (87,000 CFU 100 mL(-1)) and total coliforms (2,500,000 CFU 100 mL(-1)) in canals exceed the thresholds set by Vietnamese quality guidelines for drinking and domestic purposes. The PCA showed that i) urbanization; ii) metal leaching from soils; iii) aquaculture; and iv) tidal regime explain 85% of the variance of surface water quality attributes. Significant differences in water quality were found due to daily tidal regime and as a result of seasonality. Surface water quality maps for dissolved oxygen, ammonium, ortho-phosphate, manganese and total coliforms were developed to highlight hot-spot areas of pollution. The results of this study can assist policy makers in developing water management strategies

  13. Macrobenthic fauna community in the Middle Songkhla Lake, Southern Thailand

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    Angsupanich, S.

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available A bimonthly investigation of macrobenthic fauna at the area from Ban Pak Khat to Ban Leam Chong Thanon in the Inner Songkhla Lake from February 1998 to February 1999 was undertaken to determine the species richness and abundance. A total of 7 phyla and 161 species were identified. Annelida (58 species, Arthropoda (64 species and Mollusca (23 species were the major phyla while Nemertea (1 species, Platyhelminthes (1 species, Cnidaria (4 species and Chordata (10 species were the minor. Fifty-seven speciesof Polychaete annelids were found. The highest species richness (14 species was in the Nereididae Family, of which Ceratonereis burmensis and Namalycastis indica were predominant. Nephtys sp. and Heteromastus sp. were not so highly abundant but appeared at almost all stations through every sampling month, while Prionospio cirrifera and Pseudopolydora kempi were found in higher densities but with narrower distribution. Ficopomatus sp. and unidentified Terebellidae were not commonly found, but occasionally reached a high density. Amphipods gave the highest species richness (22 species, with Photis longicaudata distributed widely and in all months. Five species of Tanaidaceans were found with Apseudes sapensis the second most dominant (max. 5044 individuals m-2 in February in the overall fauna. Isopoda were not as densely found as tanaidaceans but there were many species (18 species. Cyathura sp.1 was the most dominant isopod. Brachidontes arcuatulus was the most dominant bivalve (max. 29449 individuals m-2 in April, especially at stations with a sand-gravel substrate. The mean density of total macrobenthic fauna among stations ranged from 920 to 10620 ind. m-2 while the monthly densities ranged from 1520 to 6160 ind.m-2. The mean density of macrobenthic fauna was highest in the dry season (April. The species richness among stations ranged from65 to 105 species while varying from 81 to 112 species during the different months. The highest species

  14. Effects of integrated chronic care models on hypertension outcomes and spending: a multi-town clustered randomized trial in China.

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    Zhang, Yuting; Tang, Wenxi; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Lulu; Zhang, Liang

    2017-03-11

    Hypertension affects one billion people globally and is one of the leading risk factors for cardiovascular and renal diseases. However, hypertension management remains poor, especially in rural China. A clustered randomized controlled trial was conducted in six towns in China's Qianjiang county between 7/2012 and 6/2014, including 5462 hypertension patients above 35 years old. Six towns were randomly assigned to three groups: Group 1 had the integrated care model including a multidisciplinary team and continuous care coordination, Group 2 had both the integrated care model and provider-level financial incentives, and the control group had the usual care. Primary outcomes were systolic blood pressure and health-related quality of life measured by SF36; secondary outcomes included hypertension-related hospitalization rate and inpatient spending. Blood pressure was measured sixteen times bimonthly between 12/1/2011 and 6/30/2014, and quality of life was measured on 7/1/2012 and 6/30/2014. Inpatient data between 7/1/2010 and 8/31/2014 were used. This trial is registered at the World Health Organization's International Clinical Trials Registry, number ChiCTR-OOR-14005563. We found that the integrated care model effectively lowered blood pressure by 1.93 mmHg (95% CI 0.063-3.8), improved self-assessed health-related quality of life, and reduced the rate of hypertension-related hospitalization by 0.17 percentage points (95% CI 0.094-0.24). We also found that the provider-level financial contract further lowered blood pressure by 1.76 mmHg (95% CI 0.73-2.79) and reduced rates of hospitalization and inpatient spending, but it also reduced patients' self-assessed health-related quality of life. Integrated care and financial incentives are effective in lowering blood pressure and reducing hospitalization rate, but financial contracts may hurt patient quality of life. This trial was registered at the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry (ChiCTR-OOR-14005563) on November 23, 2014

  15. Assessment of atmospheric metallic pollution in the metropolitan region of Sao Paulo, Brazil, employing Tillandsia usneoides L. as biomonitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, Claudio Ailton

    2006-01-01

    Tillandsia usneoides L. is an epiphytic bromeliad that lives on trees or other kinds of inert substrates, absorbing water and nutrients directly from the environment without roots. Due to its morphological and physiological characteristics, this species accumulates the pollutants present in the atmosphere. In the present work, Tillandsia usneoides was used as a bio monitor of metal atmospheric pollution in Sao Paulo, Brazil, which is the biggest city in South America with a population of 18 million inhabitants and a strong industrial activity. The urban area is polluted by industrial emissions but, according to the Environmental Protection Agency of the State of Sao Paulo (CETESB), the governmental agency of air quality control, regularly occurring emissions from about 7.8 million motor vehicles provide the principal source of air pollution. The Tillandsia samples were collected from an unpolluted area and were exposed bimonthly in 10 sites of the city with different pollution levels and in a control site. After exposure, trace metals were analyzed in the plant by instrumental neutron activation analysis and ICP-MS (Pb, Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Sb e V). The results of the investigation showed a notable concentration of Co and Ni in the plants exposed in an industrial area where there is a metal processing plant, which produces about 600 tons/year of Co and 16,000 tons/year of Ni. Copper and chromium were equally distributed in industrial regions and in sites near heavy traffic avenues, suggesting that these elements can be associated to both vehicular and industrial sources. A high accumulation of Cd in the plant exposed in industrial areas indicates industrial activities as the main source of this element. For Pb, no evident sources could be identified so far as it was spread evenly along the monitoring sites. Traffic-related elements such as Zn, Ba and Sb presented high concentrations in plants exposed in sites near to heavy traffic avenues (cars, buses and trucks) and

  16. Reconnaissance of surface-water quality in the North Platte Natural Resources District, western Nebraska, 1993

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    Steele, G.V.; Cannia, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    In 1993, the U.S. Geological Survey and the North Platte Natural Resources District began a 3-year study to determine the geohydrology and water quality of the North Platte River alluvial aquifer near Oshkosh, Garden County, Nebraska. The objectives of the study were to determine the geohydrologic properties of the North Platte River alluvial aquifer, to establish a well network for long- term monitoring of concentrations of agricultural chemicals including nitrate and herbicides, and to establish baseline concentrations of major ions in the ground water. To meet these objectives, monitor wells were installed at 11 sites near Oshkosh. The geohydrologic properties of the aquifer were estimated from water-level measurements at selected irrigation wells located in the study area and short- term constant-discharge aquifer tests at two monitor wells. Water samples were collected bimonthly and analyzed for specific conductance, pH, water temperature, dissolved oxygen, and nutrients including dissolved nitrate. Samples were collected semiannually for analysis of major ions, and annually for triazine and acetamide herbicides. Evaluation of the aquifer-test data indicates the hydraulic conductivities of the North Platte River alluvial aquifer range between 169 and 184 feet per day and transmissivities ranged from 12,700 to 26,700 feet-squared per day. The average specific yield for the alluvial aquifer, based on the two aquifer tests, was 0.2. Additional hydrologic data for the alluvial aquifer include a horizontal gradient of about 0.002 foot per foot and estimated ground- water flow velocities of about 0.1 to 1.8 feet per day. Evaluation of the water-quality data indicates that nitrate concentrations exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) Maximum Contamination Level of 10 milligrams per liter for drinking water in areas to the east and west of Oshkosh. In these areas, nitrate concentrations generally are continuing to rise. West of Oshkosh the highest

  17. Intervention to improve social and family support for caregivers of dependent patients: ICIAS study protocol.

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    Rosell-Murphy, Magdalena; Bonet-Simó, Josep M; Baena, Esther; Prieto, Gemma; Bellerino, Eva; Solé, Francesc; Rubio, Montserrat; Krier, Ilona; Torres, Pascuala; Mimoso, Sonia

    2014-03-25

    Despite the existence of formal professional support services, informal support (mainly family members) continues to be the main source of eldercare, especially for those who are dependent or disabled. Professionals on the primary health care are the ideal choice to educate, provide psychological support, and help to mobilize social resources available to the informal caregiver.Controversy remains concerning the efficiency of multiple interventions, taking a holistic approach to both the patient and caregiver, and optimum utilization of the available community resources. .For this reason our goal is to assess whether an intervention designed to improve the social support for caregivers effectively decreases caregivers burden and improves their quality of life. CONTROLled, multicentre, community intervention trial, with patients and their caregivers randomized to the intervention or control group according to their assigned Primary Health Care Team (PHCT). Primary Health Care network (9 PHCTs). Primary informal caregivers of patients receiving home health care from participating PHCTs. Required sample size is 282 caregivers (141 from PHCTs randomized to the intervention group and 141 from PHCTs randomized to the control group. a) PHCT professionals: standardized training to implement caregivers intervention. b) Caregivers: 1 individualized counselling session, 1 family session, and 4 educational group sessions conducted by participating PHCT professionals; in addition to usual home health care visits, periodic telephone follow-up contact and unlimited telephone support. Caregivers and dependent patients: usual home health care, consisting of bimonthly scheduled visits, follow-up as needed, and additional attention upon request.Data analysisDependent variables: Caregiver burden (short-form Zarit test), caregivers' social support (Medical Outcomes Study), and caregivers' reported quality of life (SF-12)INDEPENDENT VARIABLES: a) Caregiver: sociodemographic data

  18. Determinantes ambientais da ocorrência de espécies de peixes em riachos de cabeceira da bacia do rio Ivinhema, alto rio Paraná - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v29i2.520 Environmental determinants of fish species occurrence in headwaters streams of Ivinhema river basin, upper Paraná river - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v29i2.520

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    Thiago Rota Alves Felipe

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de quantificar a importância de algumas características fisiográficas dos riachos sobre a ocorrência de quatro espécies de Characidae em riachos de cabeceira na bacia do rio Ivinhema, realizaram-se amostragens bimestrais em dez riachos com uso de telas de isca, com esforço amostral padronizado. A influência das variáveis ambientais sobre a ocorrência das espécies de peixes foi quantificada utilizando-se do modelo da análise de regressão logística. Constatou-se que a velocidade da correnteza foi o principal fator limitante da ocorrência de Serrapinnus notomelas, Hemigrammus marginatus e Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae, enquanto a profundidade dos riachos foi o principal determinante da ocorrência de Bryconamericus stramineus. Assim, as primeiras espécies ocorrem predominantemente em locais com baixa velocidade da correnteza, enquanto B. stramineus ocorre principalmente em locais com pouca profundidade e com elevada velocidade da correnteza, sugerindo que as características fisiográficas dos habitat sejam importantes determinantes da colonização e persistência das espécies. Palavras-chave: distribuição espacial, peixes de riachos, bacia do rio Ivinhema.In order to quantify the importance of some physiographic characteristics of headwaters streams of Ivinhema basin on occurrence of four Characidae species, bimonthly samples in 10 streams using a rectangular sieve, with standardized sampling effort were collected. The influence of environmental descriptors on species occurrence was quantified using a logistic regression model. It was observed that the water velocity was the main limiting factor to occurrence of Serrapinnus notomelas, Hemigrammus marginatus and Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae while stream depth was the main determinant of Bryconamericus stramineus occurrence. Thus, the first three species are found mainly in sites with less water velocity, while B. stramineus is found mainly in sites with less depth

  19. The Breathe Easier through Weight Loss Lifestyle (BE WELL Intervention: A randomized controlled trial

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    Buist A

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity and asthma have reached epidemic proportions in the US. Their concurrent rise over the last 30 years suggests that they may be connected. Numerous observational studies support a temporally-correct, dose-response relationship between body mass index (BMI and incident asthma. Weight loss, either induced by surgery or caloric restriction, has been reported to improve asthma symptoms and lung function. Due to methodological shortcomings of previous studies, however, well-controlled trials are needed to investigate the efficacy of weight loss strategies to improve asthma control in obese individuals. Methods/Design BE WELL is a 2-arm parallel randomized clinical trial (RCT of the efficacy of an evidence-based, comprehensive, behavioral weight loss intervention, focusing on diet, physical activity, and behavioral therapy, as adjunct therapy to usual care in the management of asthma in obese adults. Trial participants (n = 324 are patients aged 18 to 70 years who have suboptimally controlled, persistent asthma, BMI between 30.0 and 44.9 kg/m2, and who do not have serious comorbidities (e.g., diabetes, heart disease, stroke. The 12-month weight loss intervention to be studied is based on the principles of the highly successful Diabetes Prevention Program lifestyle intervention. Intervention participants will attend 13 weekly group sessions over a four-month period, followed by two monthly individual sessions, and will then receive individualized counseling primarily by phone, at least bi-monthly, for the remainder of the intervention. Follow-up assessment will occur at six and 12 months. The primary outcome variable is the overall score on the Juniper Asthma Control Questionnaire measured at 12 months. Secondary outcomes include lung function, asthma-specific and general quality of life, asthma medication use, asthma-related and total health care utilization. Potential mediators (e.g., weight loss and change in physical

  20. Searching Sinks and Sources: CO2 Fluxes Before and After Partial Deforestation of a Spruce Forest

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    Ney, P.; Graf, A.; Druee, C.; Esser, O.; Klosterhalfen, A.; Valler, V.; Pick, K.; Vereecken, H.

    2017-12-01

    Forest ecosystems in the northern mid-latitudes act as a sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and hence play an important role in the terrestrial carbon cycle. Disturbances of these landscapes may have a significant impact on their ecosystem carbon budget. We present seven years of eddy covariance (EC) measurements (September 2013 to September 2017) over a 70 year old spruce stock, including three years prior to and four years after partial deforestation. We analyzed the seasonal and inter-annual changes of carbon fluxes as affected mainly by the forest transition. The measurements were carried out in a small headwater catchment (38.5 ha) within the TERENO (TERrestrial Environmental Observatories) network in the Eifel National Park Germany (50°30'N, 06°19'E, 595-629 m a.s.l.). An EC system, mounted on the top of a 38 m high tower, continuously samples fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat and CO2. In August and September 2013, more than 20% of the catchment was deforested and planned for regeneration towards natural deciduous vegetation, and a second EC station (2.5 m height) was installed in the middle of this clearcut. Flux partitioning and gap filling methods were used to calculate full time series and annual carbon budgets of the measured net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and its components gross primary production (GPP) and total ecosystem respiration (Reco). Additionally, soil respiration was measured with manual chambers on a monthly to bi-monthly basis at 25 transect points in the forest and deforested area. Annual sums of NEE represent the forest as a carbon sink with small inter-annual variability. In contrast, the deforested area showed a clear trend. In the first year after partial deforestation, regrowth on the deforested area consisted mainly of grasses and red foxglove (Digitalis purpurea L.), while since the second year also growth of mountain ash (Sorbus aucuparia L.) and broom (Cytisus scoparius L.) increased. The regrowth of biomass is