WorldWideScience

Sample records for bimonthly

  1. EMSL Bimonthly Report: June 2007 through July 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Showalter, Mary Ann

    2007-10-03

    The W.R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national scientific user facility located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington. PNNL operates EMSL for the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research. At one location, EMSL offers a comprehensive array of leading-edge resources in six research facilities. Access to the capabilities and instrumentation in EMSL facilities is obtained through a peer-reviewed proposal process. The Bimonthly Report documents research activities and accomplishments of EMSL users and staff. Topics covered in the Bimonthly Report include Research Highlights of EMSL user projects, Scientific Grand Challenge Highlights, Awards and Recognition, Professional/Community Service, Major Facility Upgrades, News Coverage, Visitors and Users, New EMSL Staff, Publications, Presentations, Patents, and Journal Covers featuring EMSL user research.

  2. Bimonthly variability of persistent organochlorines in plastic pellets from four beaches in Mumbai coast, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasiri, H B; Purushothaman, C S; Vennila, A

    2015-07-01

    Organochlorines (OCs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) were analysed in plastic pellets collected from four beaches of Mumbai coast bimonthly from May 2011 to March 2012. A total of 72 pools of pellets were extracted and analysed by gas chromatograph equipped with a Ni(63) electron capture detector (ECD). The median concentrations of seven ΣPCBs and 16 ΣOCPs were 37.08 and 104.90 ng g(-1) (n = 72), respectively. PCB-28 was recorded at the highest concentration with a mean of 17.58 ± 2.77 ng g(-1) among the seven PCBs studied, followed by PCB-52 and PCB-101. Bimonthly variation was significant for ΣPCBs. The ΣPCB concentration in November was at par with that of September and was significantly higher than those of the other months (p micropollutants. PMID:26116196

  3. Journal of Natural Gas Chemistry will be published bimonthly in 2010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ Natural gas occupies an increasingly important position in the structure of global energy resources.In order to adapt to the fast developments in natural gas chemistry and hydrogen energy,and to accelerate further the reporting of research and development information in natural gas chemistry and related areas,the publication duration of Journal of Natural Gas Chemistry (JNGC)will be shortened to issue bimonthly instead of quarterly in 2010.

  4. Review on the 30th anniversary of Battery Bimonthly%30周年话《电池》

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯炎伏

    2001-01-01

    The history of development of Battery Bimonthly(Dianchi in Chinese), the chances to develop this battery publication in the past 30 years were reviewed with 9 references.%回顾了《电池》双月刊过去30年中通过抓住机遇,寻求发展的历程。

  5. Bimonthly assessment of PAH content in wild mussels from the Spanish Atlantic Coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Campillo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available During 2013-14 wild mussels were bimonthly sampled in five stations along the Spanish Atlantic coast in order to assess any temporal variation in the concentration of parent PAHs. The sampling stations selected (Oia, Raxó, Mera, Avilés and Pedreña included both polluted and unpolluted sites and tried to reflect the different situations in the area (coastal and more estuarine waters. The samples were shipped to the lab and three homogenates from each site were prepared and frozen until analysis. 13 parent PAHs were quantified using HPLC with fluorescence detection. In general, the highest concentrations were found in the January-March sampling, during the pre-spawning period. PAHs contents were related to mussel biochemical composition, mainly carbohydrates and lipids, and to mussel reproductive stage. In general the 4-ring PAHs is the most abundant group of PAHs. The input of the HMW PAHs (4-5 rings to the total PAH burden generally increases in the winter months probably due to both different sources in that season (building heatings and the remobilization of sediments.

  6. 《电池》新世纪卷首语%Preface for Battery Bimonthly,Vol.31,2001

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@To the new Editor in Chief of Battery Bimonthly, Wen Li, the first volume issued in the new century is a special event which deserves proper recognition of his efforts.   In August 2000 the 30th Anniversary of Battery Bimonthly was celebrated.   Some historical review of his commitment is really deserved. Since April 1984 Wen Li worked as an editor of Battery Bimonthly. I was always aware of his special work as English editor, for his dedicated efforts to obtain international contributions, also from Japan and Russian sources and thereby widen the scope of the Journal and increase the usefulness for the readers in China and with time getting world-wide recognition. Winning Award of China National Best Scientific and Technical Journals in 1992 and 1997 and then another also in 1999 was the result.   The Ministry of Light Industry and the Hunan People's Government had an excellent representative of the Battery Industry in Wen Li. In the year 2000 he was duly promoted to become a Research Fellow of the Hunan Light Industry Research Institute. Personally I really did appreciate his interest in new developments in the areas of Alkaline Rechargeable MnO2-Zn batteries and in Fuel Cell Systems and Hybrids. Wen Li also supported the National Chinese efforts at universities and in companies by publishing their papers and describing the various new exhibits at industrial fairs. This way China′s capabilities, wishes for beneficial mutual global extension and efforts for international co-operation were documented.   Wen Li was not only concerned with the scientific and technical high level of Battery Bimonthly, he also managed the financial budget since 1994 and greatly improved the income from advertising. Without that the large expansion and usefulness of Battery Bimonthly would not have been possible.   The transfer of Battery Bimonthly from a Journal with printed volume editions to an Internet journal with Online editions was Wen Li′s most recent

  7. Synoptic Bi-monthly and Storm Response Water Quality Sampling in Southern Kaneohe Bay, HI 2005-2007 (NODC Accession 0060061)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Synoptic sampling including water column profiles and collected surface water samples was conducted on a bi-monthly basis throughout the rainy season(October-May)...

  8. Synoptic Bi-monthly and Storm Response Water Quality Sampling in Southern Kaneohe Bay, HI November 2007 - April 2009 (NODC Accession 0062644)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Synoptic sampling including water column profiles and collected surface water samples was conducted on a bi-monthly basis throughout the rainy season(October-May)...

  9. Bimonthly Evolution of Cortical Atrophy in Early Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis over 2 Years: A Longitudinal Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Zivadinov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the evolution of cortical atrophy in patients with early relapsing-remitting (RR multiple sclerosis (MS and its association with lesion volume (LV accumulation and disability progression. 136 of 181 RRMS patients who participated in the Avonex-Steroids-Azathioprine study were assessed bimonthly for clinical and MRI outcomes over 2 years. MS patients with disease duration (DD at baseline of ≤24 months were classified in the early group (DD of 1.2 years, n=37, while patients with DD > 24 months were classified in the late group (DD of 7.1 years, n=99. Mixed effect model analysis was used to investigate the associations. Significant changes in whole brain volume (WBV (P<0.001, cortical volume (CV (P<0.001, and in T2-LV (P<0.001 were detected. No significant MRI percent change differences were detected between early and late DD groups over 2 years, except for increased T2-LV accumulation between baseline and year 2 in the early DD group (P<0.01. No significant associations were found between changes in T2-LV and CV over the followup. Change in CV was related to the disability progression over the 2 years, after adjusting for DD (P=0.01. Significant cortical atrophy, independent of T2-LV accumulation, occurs in early RRMS over 2 years, and it is associated with the disability progression.

  10. Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Biomedicine APJTB Bimonthly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>Aims & Scope Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Biomedicine(APJTB)aims to set up and provide an international academic communication platform for physicians,medical scientists,allied health scientists and public health workers,especially those in the Asian Pacific region and worldwide on tropical biomedicine,infectious diseases and public health,and to meet the growing challenges of understanding,preventing and controUing the dramatic global emergence and reemergence of infectious diseases in the Asian Pacific region.

  11. FOREIGN LITERATURE BI-MONTHLY, NO. 2, 2012

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Selected Abstracts WEI Xiaomei On Spatial Narrative of Singer's Story "The Bus" 3 Singer is a master of narrative techniques. From spatial perspective, this paper explores the features of the spatial narrative of Singer's story "The Bus": narrating functions of different physical space; spatial construction of a special group of characters with themes as the core; characters created as sculp- tures. The sense of space comes from the interruption of linear time sequence, the slow-down of reading speed, and readers' collage of identified information and details by taking the work as a whole. The spatial narrative provides a new perspective on understanding the content, form, theme and characters of fiction.

  12. Abstracts from Naihuo Cailiao (Refractories)——A Chinese-Language Bimonthly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Synthesis of MeAl2O4 spinel from mechanically ac-tivated mixtures of magnesium hydroxide-boehm-ite or-aluminum tri-hydroxide.Ye Guotian,GeorgeOprea,Tom Troczynski.(321-325).Magnesium alu-minate spinel.Mechanical activation,Synthesis-Magne-sium hydroxide,boehmite and amorphous aluminum tri-hydroxide were used as the starting materials.

  13. Abstracts from Naihuo Cailiao(Refractories)——A Chinese Language Bimonthly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ Corrosion mechanism of ladle furnace refining slag to fired MgO-CaO bricks.Zhu Boquan,Fang Binxiang,Zhang Wenjie,et al.(81-84).-Ladle furnace,Penetration,Magnesia-calcia bricks,Microstructure-Corrosion effect of ladle furnace(LF)refining slag to fired MgO-CaO bricks with about 34% CaO was studied by static crucible method,and corrosion mechanism was analyzed by techniques of scan electron micrograph(SEM),energy dispersive spectrometer(EDS)and X-ray diffraction(XRD).

  14. ORNL Nuclear Safety Research and Development Program Bimonthly Report for July-August 1968

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottrell, W.B.

    2001-08-17

    The accomplishments during the months of July and August in the research and development program under way at ORNL as part of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's Nuclear Safety Program are summarized, Included in this report are work on various chemical reactions, as well as the release, characterization, and transport of fission products in containment systems under various accident conditions and on problems associated with the removal of these fission products from gas streams. Although most of this work is in general support of water-cooled power reactor technology, including LOFT and CSE programs, the work reflects the current safety problems, such as measurements of the prompt fuel element failure phenomena and the efficacy of containment spray and pool-suppression systems for fission-product removal. Several projects are also conducted in support of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). Other major projects include fuel-transport safety investigations, a series of discussion papers on various aspects of water-reactor technology, antiseismic design of nuclear facilities, and studies of primary piping and steel, pressure-vessel technology. Experimental work relative to pressure-vessel technology includes investigations of the attachment of nozzles to shells and the implementation of joint AEX-PVFX programs on heavy-section steel technology and nuclear piping, pumps, and valves. Several of the projects are directly related to another major undertaking; namely, the AEC's standards program, which entails development of engineering safeguards and the establishment of codes and standards for government-owned or -sponsored reactor facilities. Another task, CHORD-S, is concerned with the establishment of computer programs for the evaluation of reactor design data, The recent activities of the NSIC and the Nuclear Safety journal in behalf of the nuclear community are also discussed.

  15. Abstracts from Naihuo Cailiao(Refractories)——A Chinese-Language Bimonthly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ Volume 43,Number 6,2009 Dissolution behaviors of refractory fiber powders in simulated lung fluid.Wang Xitang,Liu Hao,Zhang Baoguo,et al.(401-404).-Bio-soluble refractory fi-ber,Simulated lung fluid,Dissolution behavior--The dissolution behaviors in Gamble solution (simulated lung fluid)of bio-soluble refractory fiber and alumino-silicate refractory fiber were analyzed and compared using ICP-AES,FTIR,and FESEM.

  16. High-temperature liquid-metal technology review. A Bimonthly Technical Progress Review, Volume 7, Number 2, April 1969

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1969-04-01

    The purpose of the High-Temperature Liquid-Metal Technology Review is to provide up-to-date information on the various research and development programs in the United States in the field of high-temperature liquid-metal technology. The method is to publish reviews prepared by members of the Department of Applied Science of the Brookhaven National Laboratory on current topical and progress reports submitted by contracting organizations. When results and conclusions are reported, it is intended that the individual reviews become both summaries and critiques. Thirteen reviews are presented in this issue.

  17. Qualification testing evaluation (QTE) program, FIN A-1051, Case 0686. Bimonthly status report, February-March 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents information on: accident methodologies assessments; accident environment effects; aging methodologies assessments; TMI-2 related activities; international programs coordination; research/facility definition; seismic methodologies; and related equipment qualification issues

  18. Polarimetric Observations of 15 Active Galactic Nuclei at High Frequencies: Jet Kinematics from Bimonthly Monitoring with the Very Long Baseline Array

    CERN Document Server

    Jorstad, S G; Lister, M L; Stirling, A M; Cawthorne, T V; Gear, W K; Gómez, J L; Stevens, J A; Smith, P S; Forster, J R; Gabuzda, D C; Robson, E I; Jorstad, Svetlana G.; Marscher, Alan P.; Lister, Matthew L.; Stirling, Alastair M.; Cawthorne, Timothy V.; Gear, Walter K.; Gomez, Jose L.; Stevens, Jason A.; Smith, Paul S.; Forster, James R.; Gabuzda, Denise C.

    2005-01-01

    We present total and polarized intensity images of 15 active galactic nuclei obtained with the Very Long Baseline Array at 7 mm at 17 epochs from 1998 March to 2001 April. At some epochs the images are accompanied by nearly simultaneous polarization measurements at 3 mm, 1.35/0.85 mm, and optical wavelengths. Here we analyze the 7 mm images to define the properties of the jets of two radio galaxies, five BL Lac objects, and eight quasars on angular scales $\\gtrsim 0.1$ milliarcseconds. We determine the apparent velocities of 109 features in the jets; for many of the features we derive Doppler factors using a new method based on comparison of timescale of decline in flux density with the light-travel time across the emitting region. This allows us to estimate the Lorentz factors, intrinsic brightness temperatures, and viewing angles of 77 superluminal knots, as well as the opening angle of the jet for each source. We analyze the derived physical parameters of the jets. In nine sources we detect statistically m...

  19. Multi-Hundred Watt Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Program, LES 8/9 Program, MJS Program. Bi-monthly progress report, 1 July--31 August 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-01-01

    Significant events, activities and achievements on the MHW LES 8/9 and MJS Programs for the reporting period are reported. Topics discussed include safety systems, isotope heat source, converter, product assurance, hardware fabrication, acceptance testing, and ground support equipment. (TFD)

  20. Maiana Atoll Isotope (delta 18O, delta 13C) Data for 1840 to 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Maiana bimonthly oxygen isotopic composition, 1840-1995. Notes on the data: File includes columns for Year AD (bimonthly resolution = dec/jan, feb/mar) and coral...

  1. Ras Umm Sidd Oxygen Isotope (delta 18O) Data for 1750 to 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ras Umm Sidd bimonthly coral oxygen isotope data (coral core RUS-95). Notes on the data: File (Ras Umm Sidd d18O.txt.) includes columns for Year AD (bimonthly...

  2. American Society for Radiation Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for postmastectomy radiotherapy PROFESSIONAL PUBLICATIONS ASTROnews Supersize it: Big Data comes to radiation oncology research. PRO Official clinical practice journal of ASTRO. Bimonthly journal dedicated to improving ...

  3. DOE Robotics Project. Summary of progress for 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    This document provide the bimonthly progress reports on the Department of Energy (DOE) Robotics Project by the University of Michigan. Reports are provided for the time periods of December 90/January 91 through June 91/July 91. (FI)

  4. DOE Robotics Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    This document provide the bimonthly progress reports on the Department of Energy (DOE) Robotics Project by the University of Michigan. Reports are provided for the time periods of December 90/January 91 through June 91/July 91. (FI)

  5. Instructions to Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Cellular & Molecular Immunology (CMI) is the official publication of the Chinese Society of Immunology. The Journal is published bimonthly in English and edited at theUniversity of Science & Technology of China (USTC).

  6. Instructions to authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    GENERAL INFORMATION World Journal of Gastrointestinal Pharmacology and Therapeutics (World J Gastrointest Pharmacol Ther,WJGPT,online ISSN 2150-5349,DOI:10.4292),is a bimonthly,openaccess (OA),peer-reviewed journal

  7. SCIENCE IN CHINA (SCIENTIA SINICA)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    Aims and ScopeScience in China is a comprehensive academic journal of natural sciences sponsored by the Chinese Academy ofSciences. The primary purpose is to provide regular, rapid and authoritative reviews of current important developmentsin scientific research in China for scientific workers in both China and other countries. The contents are selected by anextensive editorial committeewhich is composed of the most highly-esteemed scientists in China today. This journalis published in five series. Series A (moothly) covers the following areas : mathematics. phytics. astronomy. Series B(bimonthly) carries papers on chemistry, Series C (bimonthly) carries papers on life sciences, Series D (bimonthly)carries papers on earth sciences, and Series E (bimonthly) carries papers on technological sciences.

  8. SCIENCE IN CHINA (SCIENTIA SINICA)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Science in China is a comprehensive academic journal of natural sciences sponsored by the Chinese Academy of Sciences. The primary purpose is to provide regular, rapid and authoritative reviews of current important developments in scientific research in China for scientific workers in China and other countries. The contents are selected by an extensive editorial committee which is composed of the most highly esteemed scientists in China today. This journal is published in five series. Series A (monthly) covers the following areas: mathematics, physics, astronomy; Series B (bimonthly) carries papers on chemistry; Series C (bimonthly) carries papers on life sciences; Series D (bimonthly) carries papers on earth sciences; and Series E (bimonthly) carries papers on technological sciences.

  9. SCIENCE IN CHINA (SCIENTIA SINICA)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    Science in China is a comprehensive academic journal of natural sciences sponsored by the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Theprimary purpose is to provide regular, rapid and authoritative reviews of current important developments in scientific researchin China for scientific workers in China and other countries. The contents are selected by an extensive editorial committeewhich is composed of the most highly esteemed scientists in China today. This journal is published in five series. Series A(monthly) covers the following areas: mathematics, physics, astronomy; Series B (bimonthly) carries papers on chemistry;Series C (bimonthly) carries papers on life sciences; Series D (bimonthly) carries papers on earth sciences; and Series E (bi-monthly) carries papers on technological sciences.

  10. SCIENCE IN CHINA(SCIENTIASINICA)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    Science in China is a comprehensive academic journal of natural sciences sponsored by the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Theprimary purpose is to provide regular, rapid and authoritative reviews of current important developments in scientific researchin China for scientific workers in China and other countries. The contents are selected by an extensive editorial committeewhich is composed of the most highly esteemed scientists in China today. This journal is published in five series. Series A(monthly) covers the fo1lowing areas: mathematics, physics, astronomy; Series B (bimonthly) carries papers on chemistry;Series C (bimonthly) carries papers on life sciences; Series D (bimonthly) carries papers on earth sciences; and Series E (bi-monthly) carries papers on technological sciences.

  11. SCIENCE IN CHINA (SCIENTIA SINICA)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    Aims and ScopeScience in China is a comprehensive academic journal of natural sciences sponsored by the Chinese Academy ofSciences. The primary purpose is to provide regular. rapid and authoritative reviews of current important developmentsin scientific research in China for scientific workers in both China and other countries. The contents are selected by anextensive editorial committeewhich is composed of the most highly-esteemed scientists in China today. This journalis published in five series. Series A (monthly) covers the following areas : mathematics. phytics. astronomy; Series B(bimonthly) carries papers on chemistry, Series C (bimonthly) carries papers on life sciences. Series D (bimonthly)carries papers on earth sciences, and Series E (bimonthly) carries papers on technological sciences.

  12. Development and demonstration of a teleoperated modular robot system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This collection of bi-monthly progress reports on the DOE/NE Robotics Program presents information on significant accomplishments, reports and major correspondence issued, important meetings, and major problems associated with the program

  13. Geothermal Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steele, B.C.; Harman, G.; Pitsenbarger, J. [eds.

    1996-02-01

    Geothermal Energy Technology (GET) announces on a bimonthly basis the current worldwide information available on the technologies required for economic recovery of geothermal energy and its use as direct heat or for electric power production.

  14. Amped Up! - Volume 1, No. 3, May/June 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-05-01

    Welcome to the latest issue of our bimonthly newsletter, Amped Up!, highlighting the initiatives, events and technologies in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy that influence change.

  15. The relationship between the fluctuations of bird populations and the salinities of ponds in South San Francisco Bay

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes a bi-monthly census of salinities and bird numbers taken in the salt evaporation ponds on the San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge. A...

  16. Seasonal spreading of the Persian Gulf water mass in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Prasad, T.G.; Ikeda, M.; PrasannaKumar, S.

    The characteristics of the subsurface salinity maximum associated with the Persian Gulf Water mass (PGW) are used to quantify the spreading and mixing of PGW in the thermocline of the Arabian Sea based on a bimonthly climatology of temperature...

  17. Instruction to Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Journal of Rare Earths published bimonthly is a unique international science and technology journal which intro-duces original high-quality works on various aspects of basic theory and applied science in the field of rare earths. The

  18. Instruction to Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Journal of Rare Earths published bimonthly is a unique international science and technology journal which in-troduces original high-quality works on various aspects of basic theory and applied science in the fie

  19. Instruction to Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Journal of Rare Earths published bimonthly is a unique international science and technology journal which introduces original high-quality works on various aspects of basic theory and applied science in the field of rare earths.

  20. Guide for Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    1 Chinese Journal of Aeronautics (CJA) is a comprehensive academic journal dealing with the fields of aeronautics and astronautics. The Journal is sponsored by the Chinese Society of Aeronautics and Astronautics. It is a bimonthly journal in English,

  1. Guide for Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    1 Chinese Journal of Aeronautics (CJA) is a comprehensive academic journal dealing with the fields of aeronautics and astronautics. The Journal is sponsored by the Chinese Society of Aeronautics and Astronautics. It is a bimonthly

  2. SCIENCE IN CHINA (SCIENTIA SINICA)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Science in China is a comprehensive academic journal of natural sciences sponsored by the Chinese Academy of Sciences. The primary purpose is to provide regular, rapid and authoritative reviews of current important developments in scientific research in China for scientific workers in China and other countries. The contents are selected by an extensive editorial committee which is composed of the most highly esteemed scientists in China today. This journal is published in five series. Series A (monthly) covers the following areas: mathematics, physics, astronomy; Series B (bimonthly) carries papers on chemistry; Series C (bimonthly) carries papers on life sciences; Series D (bimonthly) carries papers on earth sciences; and Series E (bi monthly) carries papers on technological sciences.

  3. 200 years of nursing--a chief nurse's reflections on practice, theory, policy, education, and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Jeanette Ives

    2012-01-01

    This bimonthly department, sponsored by the AONE, presents information to assist nurse leaders in shaping the future of healthcare through creative and innovative leadership. The strategic priorities of AONE anchor the editorial content. They reflect contemporary healthcare and nursing practice issues that challenge nurse executives as they strive to meet the needs of patients. PMID:22157375

  4. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 24, Number 6, November-December 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) When Worlds Collide: Universal PreK Brings New Challenges for Public Elementary Schools (David McKay Wilson); (2) Answers and Questions: Schools Survey Their Students--and…

  5. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 26, Number 5, September-October 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walser, Nancy, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Scenes from the School Turnaround Movement: Passion, Frustration, Mid-Course Corrections Mark Rapid Reforms (Laura Pappano); (2) The Media Savvy Educator: How to Work with the…

  6. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 23, Number 4, July-August 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Meeting of the Minds: The Parent-Teacher Conference Is the Cornerstone of School-Home Relations. How Can It Work for All Families? (Laura Pappano); (2) In Search of That "Third…

  7. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 25, Number 6, November-December 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) "Platooning" Instruction: Districts Weigh Pros and Cons of Departmentalizing Elementary Schools (Lucy Hood); (2) Behind the Classroom Door: A Rare Glimpse Indicates the…

  8. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 27, Number 2, March-April 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walser, Nancy, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Hybrid Schools for the iGeneration: New Schools Combine "Bricks" and "Clicks" (Brigid Schulte); (2) Dual Language Programs on the Rise: "Enrichment" Model Puts Content Learning…

  9. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 25, Number 5, September-October 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) The Invisible Hand in Education Policy: Behind the Scenes, Economists Wield Unprecedented Influence (David McKay Wilson); (2) Bonding and Bridging: Schools Open Doors for…

  10. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 27, Number 4, July-August 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Integrated Data Systems Link Schools and Communities: Researchers Combine School and Non-School Data to Inform Interventions and Policy (Patti Hartigan); (2) Student-Directed…

  11. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 23, Number 2, March-April 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) More Than "Making Nice": Getting Teachers to (Truly) Collaborate (Laura Pappano); (2) "Doing the Critical Things First": An Aligned Approach to PreK and Early Elementary Math;…

  12. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 26, Number 4, July-August 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Learning Progressions in Science: A New Approach Emphasizes Sustained Instruction in Big Ideas (Patti Hartigan); (2) Putting the "Boy Crisis" in Context: Finding Solutions to…

  13. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 25, Number 1, January-February 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Learning Across Distance: Virtual-Instruction Programs Are Growing Rapidly, but the Impact on "Brick-and-Mortar" Classrooms Is Still up in the Air (Kristina Cowan); (2) Wanted:…

  14. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 25, Number 2, March-April 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Money and Motivation: New Initiatives Rekindle Debate over the Link between Rewards and Student Achievement (David McKay Wilson); (2) An Inexact Science: What Are the Technical…

  15. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 26, Number 1, January-February 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Charters and Unions: What's the Future for This Unorthodox Relationship? (Alexander Russo); (2) From Special Ed to Higher Ed: Transition Planning for Disabled Students Focuses…

  16. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 25, Number 4, July-August 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Putting the Brakes on "Summer Slide": Modified School Calendars Build in Time to Enrich Learning and Sustain Gains (Brigid Schulte); (2) Closing the Achievement Gap with…

  17. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 26, Number 3, May-June 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Unleashing the "Brain Power" of Groups in the Classroom: The Neuroscience behind Collaborative Work (Nancy Walser); (2) Putting AP to the Test: New Research Assesses the…

  18. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 26, Number 6, November-December 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walser, Nancy, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Video Games Take Testing to the Next Level: Researchers See Promise in Game-Like Assessments That Measure Complex Skills (Robert Rothman); (2) An Academic Foothold for…

  19. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 24, Number 3, May-June 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) "Equity, Access, and Opportunity": Despite Challenges, More Districts Adopt One-to-One Laptop Programs (Colleen Gillard); (2) Small Kids, Big Words: Research-Based Strategies…

  20. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 28, Number 1, January-February 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walser, Nancy, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Using Theater to Teach Social Skills: Researchers Document Improvements for Children with Autism (Patti Hartigan); (2) The Family Model of Schooling Revisited: Few Teachers,…

  1. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 27, Number 1, January-February 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walser, Caroline T., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) The Greening of Environmental Ed: Teachers Focus on Complexity, Evidence, and Letting Students Draw Their Own Conclusions (Lucy Hood); (2) Like Teacher, Like Student: Online PD…

  2. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 23, Number 6, November-December 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Charting a New Course toward Racial Integration: Districts Seek Legal Routes to Capture the Benefits of Diversity (Brigid Schulte); (2) Voluntary Integration: Two Views--(a)…

  3. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 23, Number 1, January-February 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Response to Intervention: A New Approach to Reading Instruction Aims to Catch Struggling Readers Early (Nancy Walser); (2) Getting Advisory Right: Focus and Commitment Are Keys…

  4. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 23, Number 3, May-June 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) The Road to School Improvement: It's Hard, It's Bumpy, and It Takes as Long as It Takes (Richard F. Elmore and Elizabeth A. City); (2) Better Teaching with Web Tools: How…

  5. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 27, Number 5, September-October 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Teaching Students to Ask Their Own Questions: One Small Change Can Yield Big Results (Dan Rothstein and Luz Santana); (2) Voice of Experience: Jerry Weast--Leading a System…

  6. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 25, Number 3, May-June 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Improving Teaching and Learning through Instructional Rounds (Lee Teitel); (2) Developmentally Appropriate Practice in the Age of Testing: New Reports Outline Key Principles…

  7. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 24, Number 4, July-August 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Taking the Measure of New Teachers: California Shifts from Standardized Tests to Performance-Based Assessment as a Condition of Licensure (Robert Rothman); (2) When 1/2 + 1/3 =…

  8. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 27, Number 6, November-December 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walser, Nancy, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) With Cheating on the Rise, Schools Respond (David McKay Wilson); (2) Waldorf Education in Public Schools: Educators Adopt--and Adapt--This Developmental, Arts-Rich Approach…

  9. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 28, Number 2, March-April 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Course Credits on the Quick: Controversial Online Recovery Programs Speed the Path to Graduation (Andrew Brownstein); (2) Collaborating to Make Schools More Inclusive…

  10. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 27, Number 3, May-June 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Bringing Art into School, Byte by Byte: Innovative Programs Use Technology to Expand Access to the Arts (Patti Hartigan); (2) Differentiated Instruction Reexamined: Teachers…

  11. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 22, Number 3, May-June 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Making Schools Safer for LGBT Youth: Despite Signs of Progress, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Students Say Harassment Persists (Michael Sadowski); (2) Rx for a…

  12. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 24, Number 1, January-February 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Leadership Lessons From Schools Becoming "Data Wise" (Jennifer L. Steele and Kathryn Parker Boudett); (2) A Guide on the Side: Mentors Help New Leaders Prepare for Life in the…

  13. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 24, Number 5, September-October 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Teaching 21st Century Skills: What Does It Look Like in Practice? (Nancy Walser); (2) Getting and Spending: Schools and Districts Share Lessons on the Effective Uses of…

  14. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 24, Number 2, March-April 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Educating Teenage Immigrants: High Schools Experiment with Ways to Group New English-Language Learners (Lucy Hood); (2) Hot Topics and Key Words: Pilot Project Brings Teachers…

  15. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 23, Number 5, September-October 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly by the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Confronting the Autism Epidemic: New Expectations for Children with Autism Means a New Role for Public Schools (Kate McKenna); (2) Internet Research 101: How to Help Middle…

  16. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 26, Number 2, March-April 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline T., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Online Testing, Version 1.0: Oregon's Adaptive Computer-Based Accountability Test Offers a Peek at a Brave New Future (Robert Rothman); (2) Beyond Gay-Straight Alliances:…

  17. Instructions to Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    General

    2004-01-01

    Cellular & Molecular Immunology (CMI) is the official publication of the Chinese Society of Immunology. The Journal is published bimonthly in English and edited at the University of Science & Technology of China (USTC).Papers in all areas of cellular and molecular immunology are welcome including immunobiology, comparative immu

  18. Instructions to Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Cellular & Molecular Immunology (CMI) is the official publication of the Chinese Society of Immunology. The journal is published bimonthly in English and edited at the University of Science & Technology of China (USTC).Papers in all areas of cellular and molecular immunology are welcome including immunobiology, comparative immunology, immunogenetics, neuroimmunology, immunopathology, immunopharmacology, tumor immunology,

  19. The prevalence of Salmonella from cheek meat and head trim in a pork processing plant in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a preliminary survey, a large pork processing plant in the United States was sampled bimonthly from January to July of 2015 to determine the prevalence, seasonality, and serotype diversity of Salmonella enterica (SE) isolated from cheek meat and head trim of swine carcasses. Each cheek meat and ...

  20. Context: An Inmate Newspaper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manito, Inc., Chambersburg, PA.

    A project was designed to teach writing skills to adult basic education students in prison through the publication of a bimonthly newspaper. The target audience was any inmate in the Franklin County and Adams County Prisons in Pennsylvania; there were no restrictions on admittance to the program or to class size. Participation was voluntary and…

  1. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. March/April 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Deborah, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "SAMHSA News" is the national newsletter of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Published six times a year (bimonthly) by SAMHSA's Office of Communications, SAMHSA News contains information about the latest substance abuse and mental health treatment and prevention practices, recent statistics on mental health and…

  2. Instructions for Authors by Shanghai Journal of Stomatology(SJS )

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ As an internationally peer-reviewed academic periodical, Shanghai Journal of Stomatology is issued both at home and abroad, presenting the latest advances and ncw experiences in stomatology for intermediate and senior doctors, teachers and scientific researchers in the field. This journal has been included in CA and MEDLINE and is published as a bimonthly periodical, 6 issues a year.

  3. Instructions for Authors by Shanghai Journal of Stomatology (SJS)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ As an internationally peer-reviewed academic periodical, Shanghai Journal of Stomatology is issued both at home and abroad, presenting the latest advances and new experiences in stomatology for intermediate and senior doctors, teachers and scientific researchers in the field. This journal has been included in CA and MEDLINE and is published as a bimonthly periodical, 6 issues a year.

  4. Spina Bifida Association of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exceptional Parent, 1974

    1974-01-01

    The Statement of the Spina Bifida Association of America (SBAA) explains SB as a malformation of the central nervous system, reports the formation of SBAA in 1974, explains SBAA's emphasis on local chapter organization, and describes SBAA services, including a bimonthly publication, public education efforts, and research validation projects. (GW)

  5. INFORMATION FOR AUTHORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Advances in Atmospheric Sciences (AAS) is an international journal on the dynamics, physics, and chemistry of the atmosphere and ocean with papers across the full range of the atmospheric sciences, published bimonthly by Science Press, Beijing, China. The journal includes Articles, Note and Correspondence, and Letters. Contributions from all over the world are welcome.

  6. Editorial Policy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Contemporary International Relations (ISSN1003-3408) is published bi-monthly by China Institutes of Contemporary International Relations since 1990. The purpose of the journal is to provide to the foreign readers a comprehensive view of international politics and international relations as studied by both the researchers of CICIR and those outside.

  7. Instructions to Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    The Journal of Natural Gas Chemistry has renamed as the Journal of Energy Chemistry in 2013.The Journal of Energy Chemistry is a bimonthly Journal jointly edited by the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics and the Chengdu Institute of Organic Chemistry,Chinese Academy of Sciences.Elsevier will publish the Journal on ScienceDirect,the online full text and

  8. CJS(Chinese Journal of Sociology) Instructions for Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Ⅰ.CJS is a bimonthly journal that publishes research papers on sociology and anthropology.Contributions are welcome from all related fields.Papers that are considered appropriate for this journal will be reviewed anonymously by expert reviewers in related fields.Papers under review will go through a procedure of"

  9. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, January/February 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives impacting environmental, health, and safety management responsibilities. the table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action

  10. Rule of Law

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    China establishes a comprehensive socialist legal system The Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress (NPC),China’s top legislature,adopted an amendment to the Criminal Law at a bimonthly session in February,reducing the number of capital punishment by 13 to 55.

  11. Notes for Contributors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Global Review is a bilingual(Chinese and English) bimonthly in IR category,the first of the kind in China,published by SIIS and the co-publisher Shanghai Association of International Relations.We invite contributions submitted by Chinese as well as

  12. [Development of a semi-autonomous mobile robot for reactor containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Michigan reports its progress on this project on a bimonthly or quarterly reporting frequency. As a result, the detailed annual summary of activity is derived from the integration of these progress reports. They are attached here to form a permanent record of the University's contribution to this program

  13. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, January/February 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E.; Mayer, S.J.; Salk, M.S.

    1995-03-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives impacting environmental, health, and safety management responsibilities. the table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  14. Child Care Health Connections. A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 16, Number 2. March-April 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Rahman, Ed.; Guralnick, Eva, Ed.; Kunitz, Judith Ed.

    2003-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  15. Child Care Health Connections: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 22, Number 6, November-December 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Garakani, Tahereh, Ed.; Leonard, Victoria, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  16. Child Care Health Connections. A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 21, Number 1. January-February 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.; Leonard, Victoria, Ed.; Turner, Debra, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  17. Child Care Health Connections. A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 18, Number 4. July-August 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Guralnick, Eva, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Walsh, Eileen, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  18. Child Care Health Connections: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 23, Number 2, March-April 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Garakani, Tahereh, Ed.; Leonard, Victoria, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  19. Child Care Health Connections: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 21, Number 3, May-June 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.; Leonard, Victoria, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of this newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  20. Child Care Health Connections. A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 17, Number 2. March-April 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Guralnick, Eva, Ed.; Lucich, Mardi, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  1. Child Care Health Connections. A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 18, Number 1. January-February 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Guralnick, Eva, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Walsh, Eileen, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  2. Child Care Health Connections: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 19, Number 3, May-June 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.; Leonard, Victoria, Ed.; Gendell, Mara, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  3. Child Care Health Connections: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 19, Number 2, March-April 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.; Leonard, Victoria, Ed.; Gendell, Mara, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  4. Child Care Health Connections. A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 18, Number 2. March-April 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Guralnick, Eva, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Walsh, Eileen, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  5. Child Care Health Connections. A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 20, Number 4. July-August 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.; Leonard, Victoria, Ed.; Gendell, Mara, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  6. Child Care Health Connections: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 20, Number 6, November-December 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.; Leonard, Victoria, Ed.; Gendell, Mara, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of this newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  7. Child Care Health Connections: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 23, Number 1, January-February 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Garakani, Tahereh, Ed.; Leonard, Victoria, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  8. Child Care Health Connections. A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 18, Number 6. November-December 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  9. Child Care Health Connections: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 22, Number 3, May-June 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Garakani, Tahereh, Ed.; Leonard, Victoria, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  10. Child Care Health Connections. A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 16, Number 4. July-August 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Rahman, Ed.; Guralnick, Eva, Ed.; Kunitz, Judith Ed.

    2003-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  11. Child Care Health Connections. A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 21, Number 6. November-December 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.; Leonard, Victoria, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  12. Child Care Health Connections. A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 22, Number 5, September-October 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Garakani, Tahereh, Ed.; Leonard, Victoria, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  13. Child Care Health Connections: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 19, Number 4, July-August 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.; Leonard, Victoria, Ed.; Gendell, Mara, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  14. Child Care Health Connections. A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 21, Number 2. March-April 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.; Leonard, Victoria, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  15. Child Care Health Connections: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 22, Number 1, January-February 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Garakani, Tahereh, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.; Leonard, Victoria, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  16. Child Care Health Connections. A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 17, Number 1. January-February 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Guralnick, Eva, Ed.; Lucich, Mardi, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  17. Child Care Health Connections: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 21, Number 4, July-August 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.; Leonard, Victoria, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  18. Child Care Health Connections. A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 16, Number 3. May-June 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Rahman, Ed.; Guralnick, Eva, Ed.; Kunitz, Judith, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  19. Child Care Health Connections: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 20, Number 2, March-April 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.; Leonard, Victoria, Ed.; Gendell, Mara, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  20. Child Care Health Connections: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 20, Number 3, May-June 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.; Leonard, Victoria, Ed.; Gendell, Mara, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  1. Child Care Health Connections: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 23, Number 3, May-June 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Garakani, Tahereh, Ed.; Leonard, Victoria, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of this newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  2. Child Care Health Connections. A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 19, Number 1. January-February 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.; Gendell, Mara, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  3. Child Care Health Connections: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 19, Number 5, September-October 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.; Leonard, Victoria, Ed.; Gendell, Mara, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of this newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  4. Child Care Health Connections. A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 16, Number 1. January-February 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Rahman, Ed.; Guralnick, Eva, Ed.; Kunitz, Judith, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  5. Child Care Health Connections. A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 20, Number 1. January-February 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.; Leonard, Victoria, Ed.; Gendell, Mara, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  6. Child Care Health Connections. A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 16, Number 5. September-October 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Guralnick, Eva, Ed.; Jensen, Susan, Ed.; Lucich, Mardi, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  7. Child Care Health Connections. A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 17, Number 3. May-June 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Guralnick, Eva, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Kunitz, Judith, Ed.; Lucich, Mardi, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  8. Child Care Health Connections: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 20, Number 5, September-October 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.; Leonard, Victoria, Ed.; Gendell, Mara, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  9. Child Care Health Connections. A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 17, Number 6. November-December 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Guralnick, Eva, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Lucich, Mardi, Ed.; Walsh, Eileen, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  10. Child Care Health Connections: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 23, Number 4, July-August 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Garakani, Tahereh, Ed.; Leonard, Victoria, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  11. Child Care Health Connections: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 22, Number 4, July-August 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Garakani, Tahereh, Ed.; Leonard, Victoria, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  12. Child Care Health Connections. A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 17, Number 5. September-October 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Guralnick, Eva, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Lucich, Mardi, Ed.; Walsh, Eileen, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  13. Child Care Health Connections: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 19, Number 6, November-December 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.; Leonard, Victoria, Ed.; Gendell, Mara, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of this newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  14. Child Care Health Connections. A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 18, Number 5. September-October 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Guralnick, Eva, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Walsh, Eileen, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  15. Child Care Health Connections: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 22, Number 2, March-April 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Rose, Bobbie, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Garakani, Tahereh, Ed.; Leonard, Victoria, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  16. Child Care Health Connections. A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 16, Number 6. November-December 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Guralnick, Eva, Ed.; Jensen, Susan, Ed.; Lucich, Mardi, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  17. Child Care Health Connections. A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 17, Number 4. July-August 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Guralnick, Eva, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Kunitz, Judith Ed.; Lucich, Mardi, Ed.; Walsh, Eileen, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  18. Child Care Health Connections. A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals. Volume 18, Number 3. May-June 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A. Rahman, Ed.; Guralnick, Eva, Ed.; Calder, Judy, Ed.; Walsh, Eileen, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Child Care Health Connections" is a bimonthly newsletter published by the California Childcare Health Program (CCHP), a community-based program of the University of California, San Francisco School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing. The goals of the newsletter are to promote and support a healthy and safe environment for all…

  19. Da Que Hablar (Something To Talk About), 1991-1993.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Que Hablar, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This document consists of all 14 issues of a bimonthly serial, from its inception in May 1991 through November 1993. "Da Que Hablar" provides numerous authentic materials from magazines and newspapers to stimulate discussion in Spanish in the foreign language classroom. The articles cover topics such as current events, cultural issues, sports,…

  20. The Crop Journal Calls for Papers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    We would like to invite you to submit your latest research accomplishments to The Crop Journal,an international,peer‐reviewed research publication covering all aspects of crop sciences including crop genetics,breeding,agronomy,crop physiology,germplasm resources,grain chemistry,grain storage and processing,crop management practices,crop biotechnology,and biomathematics on a bimonthly basis.

  1. A Multi-Educational Approach to Improving Teacher Skills with Special Needs Preschoolers in Group Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Mickie

    The practicum developed and implemented an inservice teacher education program to improve services to exceptional children in group settings based on a newly developed resource manual, two workshop series, and observation/evaluation of teachers in their classes on a bimonthly basis over a period of 8 months. Eighty-nine preschool teachers…

  2. Instructions to Author

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ The Journal of Natural Gas Chemistry is a bimonthlyJournal jointly edited by the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics and the Chengdu Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences in 2010.Starting in 2006, Elsevier published the Journal on ScienceDirect, the online full text and bibliographic information resource, and take care of the Journal's international institutional print subscriptions.

  3. Notes for contributors to Journal of Nanjing Medical University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Journal of Nanjing Medical University (English Edition) JNMU, sponsored by Nanjing Medical University, was established in 1987. It is a bimonthly comprehensive English medical journal published locally and abroad.Since 2007, Journal of Nanjing Medical University (English Edition )was granted Elsevier the full publishing and distribution rights worldwide for the Electronic Edition, excluding the People's Republic of China.

  4. Brief Guide for Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    The Crop Journal is a bimonthly scientific journal co-sponsored by the Crop Science Society of China and the Institute of Crop Science,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences and China Science Publishing&Media; Group Ltd.Published by Elsevier and Science Press.General Requirements Contributions submitted to The Crop Journal must be original works of the author(s)that

  5. Harvard Education Letter. Volume 21, Number 6, November-December 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauncey, Caroline, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Harvard Education Letter" is published bimonthly at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. This issue of "Harvard Education Letter" contains the following articles: (1) Is History... History?: Standards, Accountability, and the Future of Our Nation's Past (Robert Rothman); (2) Curriculum Access for All: How Teachers Can Use Universal Design…

  6. Australian Homeschool Journal, November/December 1991-July/August 1993.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beirne, Jo-Anne, Ed.

    1991-01-01

    This document consists of 10 issues of "Australian Homeschool Journal" extrinsic across about a year and a half. This bimonthly serial offers a variety of news, information, and advice for parents who are providing schooling for their children at home. Issues usually contain: (1) articles or reprints of articles from other sources; (2) interviews;…

  7. International Journal of Herbal Medicine (IJHM): A New Open-Access International Journal

    OpenAIRE

    Joshi, Rakesh K.

    2013-01-01

    It is with pleasure that we introduce the first issue of online journal “International Journal of Herbal Medicine (IHJM)” a bimonthly publication of AkiNik Publications. The Journal is peer-reviewed, broad-spectrum and committed to the promotion of research and dissemination of knowledge in Phytochemistry, Pharmacognosy, Essential oil chemistry, Natural product chemistry, Botany, Biochemistry, Biotechnology, Marine research and related multidiscipline. IJHM also provides an advanced internati...

  8. Effects of the proximal factors on the diel vertical migration of zooplankton in a plateau meso-eutrophic Lake Erhai, China

    OpenAIRE

    Cuilin Hu; Shengrui Wang; Longgen Guo; Ping Xie

    2014-01-01

    To study the proximal factors inducing diel vertical migration (DVM) in large and small zooplankton species in a plateau lake in China, we investigated the DVM of crustacean zooplankton in lake Erhai bimonthly from November 2009 to September 2010. We hypothesized that the factors affecting DVM behaviour in different-sized zooplankton were different. A linear regression was used to assess the relationships between environmental variables and the vertical distribution of zooplankton. All crusta...

  9. Environmental water quality assessment in Guaratuba bay, state of Paraná, southern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Byanka Damian Mizerkowski; Eunice da Costa Machado; Nilva Brandini; Mariana Gallucci Nazario; Kleber Vieira Bonfim

    2012-01-01

    An environmental assessment of the estuarine waters of Guaratuba bay, Paraná State, Brazil, is provided through the analysis of physical-chemical, biological and hydrographic dynamics. Twelve stations with a bi-monthly frequency (from October/2002 until August/2003) were sampled during spring and neap tides for the determination of pH, Secchi depth, CO2 saturation, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll, suspended particulate matter and dissolved inorganic nutrients (nitrate, nitrite, ammonium, phosph...

  10. Thermal structure of the Poraquê lake, Central Amazonian, Brazil = Estrutura térmica do lago Poraquê, Amazônia Central, Brasil

    OpenAIRE

    Fabio Marques Aprile

    2011-01-01

    Thermal gradient of a Central Amazonian lake was studied to establish a link between seasonal variations in the water level, temperature, suspended particulate matter (SPM) and thermal stratification. Bimonthly measurements of temperature and PAR radiation were made at 0.25 m intervals from the surface to bottom from February 2004 to July 2006. Daily occurs full vertical mixing of the water column, and classic thermal stratification was not observed in the period. The effect of the winds asso...

  11. Environmental regulatory update table November--December 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E.; Mayer, S.J.; Salk, M.S.

    1995-01-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  12. Instructions to Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Cellular & Molecular Immunology (CMI) is the off icialpublication of the Chinese Society of Immunology. The Journal is published bimonthly in English and edited at the University of Science & Technology of China (USTC). Papers in all areas of cellular and molecular immunology are welcome including immunobiology, comparative immunology, immunogenetics, neuroimmunology, immunopathology, immunopharmacology, tumor immunology, infection immunology, clinical immunology, transplantation immunology, veterinary immunology and immunological techniques. All international immunologists and immunologyrelated investigators will find CMI suitable for their publications.

  13. Environmental regulatory update table: September/October 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E.; Salk, M.S.

    1994-11-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  14. Subsurface microbial communities and degradative capacities during trichloroethylene bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subsurface amendments of air, methane, and nutrients were investigated for the in situ stimulation of trichloroethylene- degrading microorganisms at the US DOE Savannah River Integrated Demonstration. Amendments were injected into a lower horizontal well coupled with vacuum extraction from the vadose zone horizontal well. The amendments were sequenced to give increasingly more aggressive treatments. Microbial populations and degradative capacities were monitored in groundwaters samples bimonthly

  15. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, July--August 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Lewis, E.B.; Salk, M.S.

    1992-09-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  16. Environmental regulatory update table, July/August 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E.; Salk, M.S.

    1994-09-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  17. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, March/April 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1992-05-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  18. Streamflow statistics for development of water rights claims for the Jarbidge Wild and Scenic River, Owyhee Canyonlands Wilderness, Idaho, 2013-14: a supplement to Scientific Investigations Report 2013-5212

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Molly S.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), estimated streamflow statistics for stream segments designated “Wild,” “Scenic,” or “Recreational” under the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System in the Owyhee Canyonlands Wilderness in southwestern Idaho. The streamflow statistics were used by the BLM to develop and file a draft, federal reserved water right claim to protect federally designated “outstanding remarkable values” in the Jarbidge River. The BLM determined that the daily mean streamflow equaled or exceeded 20, 50, and 80 percent of the time during bimonthly periods (two periods per month) and the bankfull (66.7-percent annual exceedance probability) streamflow are important thresholds for maintaining outstanding remarkable values. Although streamflow statistics for the Jarbidge River below Jarbidge, Nevada (USGS 13162225) were published previously in 2013 and used for the draft water right claim, the BLM and USGS have since recognized the need to refine streamflow statistics given the approximate 40 river mile distance and intervening tributaries between the original point of estimation (USGS 13162225) and at the mouth of the Jarbidge River, which is the downstream end of the Wild and Scenic River segment. A drainage-area-ratio method was used in 2013 to estimate bimonthly exceedance probability streamflow statistics at the mouth of the Jarbidge River based on available streamgage data on the Jarbidge and East Fork Jarbidge Rivers. The resulting bimonthly streamflow statistics were further adjusted using a scaling factor calculated from a water balance on streamflow statistics calculated for the Bruneau and East Fork Bruneau Rivers and Sheep Creek. The final, adjusted bimonthly exceedance probability and bankfull streamflow statistics compared well with available verification datasets (including discrete streamflow measurements made at the mouth of the Jarbidge River) and are considered the

  19. О ВЛИЯНИИ ПИТАНИЯ ДИСПЕРГИРОВАННОЙ ПИЩЕЙ НА МОРФОФУНКЦИОНАЛЬНЫЕ ОСОБЕННОСТИ МЫШЕЧНОЙ ОБОЛОЧКИ ПИЩЕВОДА БЕЛЫХ КРЫС

    OpenAIRE

    Сыч, В.; Келасьева, Н.; Слесарев, С.; Пашина, А.

    2007-01-01

    In work it is shown, that a long feed by carefully mechanically crushed (dispersant) food in postnatal ontogenesis is causes deviations in morphogenesis development of the white rat's esophagus muscular coat, shown for 180-day postnatal ontogenesis in the hypotrophy of myosymplasts, and also the general hypotrophy of it's circular and longitudinal layers. Some of these deviations do not disappear during the subsequent bi-monthly period of adaptation of skilled animals to a feed non-dispersant...

  20. 惟楚有材——访新疆大学夏熙教授

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    文力

    1991-01-01

    This is the interview with Professor Xia Xi.Dean of Chemistry Department at Xinjiang University;Vice Chairman of Primary Battery Society of China and Editorial Board of Battery Bimonthly. He is engaged in research of chemical power sources,especially in primary batteries. His scholastic attainments in batteries and their related fields attracted worldwide attention in recent years.During this interview we had a discussion about the present situation in our battery research and development. Prof. Xia pre...

  1. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, September/October 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

    1993-11-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operation and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  2. Prevalence of shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, and Listeria monocytogenes at public access watershed sites in a California Central Coast agricultural region

    OpenAIRE

    Cooley, Michael B.; Quiñones, Beatriz; Oryang, David; Mandrell, Robert E.; Gorski, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Produce contaminated with enteric pathogens is a major source of foodborne illness in the United States. Lakes, streams, rivers, and ponds were sampled with Moore swabs bi-monthly for over 2 years at 30 locations in the vicinity of a leafy green growing region on the Central California Coast and screened for Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC), Salmonella enterica, and Listeria monocytogenes to evaluate the prevalence and persistence of pathogen subtypes. The prevalence of STEC from...

  3. Life History, Diet, Abundance and Distribution, and Length-Frequencies of Selected Invertebrates in Florida Bay, Everglades National Park, Florida

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, Allyn B.; LaCroix, Michael W.; Cheshire, Robin T.; Thayer, Gordon W.

    2006-01-01

    This report presents information on the life history, diet, abundance and distribution, and length-frequency distributions of five invertebrates in Florida Bay, Everglades National Park. Collections were made with an otter trawl in basins on a bi-monthly basis. Non-parametric statistics were used to test spatial and temporal differences in the abundance of invertebrates when numbers were appropriate (i. e., $25). Invertebrate species are presented in four sections. The sections on Life H...

  4. Index to Nuclear Safety. A technical progress review by chronology, permuted title, and author. Vol. 11, No. 1--Vol. 17, No. 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottrell, W.B.; Klein, A.

    1977-02-23

    This index to Nuclear Safety covers articles in Nuclear Safety Vol. 11, No. 1 (Jan.-Feb. 1970), through Vol. 17, No. 6 (Nov.-Dec. 1976). The index includes a chronological list of articles (including abstract) followed by KWIC and Author Indexes. Nuclear Safety, a bimonthly technical progress review prepared by the Nuclear Safety Information Center, covers all safety aspects of nuclear power reactors and associated facilities. The index lists over 350 technical articles in the last six years of publication.

  5. Instructions to Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    The Journal of Natural Gas Chemistry has renamed as the Journal of Energy Chemistry in 2013.The Journal of Energy Chemistry is a bimonthly Journal jointly edited by the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics and the Chengdu Institute of Organic Chemistry,Chinese Academy of Sciences.Elsevier will publish the Journal on ScienceDirect,the online full text and bibliographic information resource,and take care of the Journal’s international institutional print subscriptions.

  6. Information for Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    正>Science in China Series G-Physics,Mechanics & Astronomy(Sci China Ser G-Phys Mech Astrori) is a bimonthly peer-reviewed academic journal supervised by the Chinese Academy of Sciences,and co-sponsored by the Chinese Academy of Sciences and National Natural Science Foundation of China.Its primary mission is to encourage communication of basic and innovative research results of high quality in the fields of physics,mechanics and astronomy.

  7. Index to Nuclear Safety. A technical progress review by chronology, permuted title, and author. Vol. 11, No. 1--Vol. 17, No. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This index to Nuclear Safety covers articles in Nuclear Safety Vol. 11, No. 1 (Jan.-Feb. 1970), through Vol. 17, No. 6 (Nov.-Dec. 1976). The index includes a chronological list of articles (including abstract) followed by KWIC and Author Indexes. Nuclear Safety, a bimonthly technical progress review prepared by the Nuclear Safety Information Center, covers all safety aspects of nuclear power reactors and associated facilities. The index lists over 350 technical articles in the last six years of publication

  8. Environmental regulatory update table, July/August 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action

  9. Evidence of Niche Partitioning under Ontogenetic Influences among Three Morphologically Similar Siluriformes in Small Subtropical Streams

    OpenAIRE

    Karine Orlandi Bonato; Clarice Bernhardt Fialho

    2014-01-01

    Ontogenetic influences in patterns of niche breadth and feeding overlap were investigated in three species of Siluriformes (Heptapterus sp., Rhamdia quelen and Trichomycterus poikilos) aiming at understanding the species coexistence. Samplings were conducted bimonthly by electrofishing technique from June/2012 to June/2013 in ten streams of the northwestern state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The stomach contents of 1,948 individuals were analyzed by volumetric method, with 59 food items iden...

  10. Assessment in undergraduate medical education: a review of course exams

    OpenAIRE

    Vanderbilt, Allison A.; Feldman, Moshe; Wood, Issac K.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study is to describe an approach for evaluating assessments used in the first 2 years of medical school and report the results of applying this method to current first and second year medical student examinations. Methods: Three faculty members coded all exam questions administered during the first 2 years of medical school. The reviewers discussed and compared the coded exam questions. During the bi-monthly meetings, all differences in coding were resolved w...

  11. Comparison of seven water quality assessment methods for the characterization and management of highly impaired river systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, X.; Dahlgren, RA; Zhang, M.

    2016-01-01

    © 2015, Springer International Publishing Switzerland. In the context of water resource management and pollution control, the characterization of water quality impairments and identification of dominant pollutants are of critical importance. In this study, water quality impairment was assessed on the basis of 7 hydrochemical variables that were monitored bimonthly at 17 sites in 2010 along the rural-suburban-urban portion of the Wen-Rui Tang River in eastern China. Seven methods were used to ...

  12. 大村湾における動物プランクトンに関する研究-2 : 輪虫類,枝角類,矢虫類,尾虫類および底生生物幼生の季節的出現

    OpenAIRE

    伊藤, 栄樹; 飯塚, 昭二

    1980-01-01

    Seasonal occurrences of zooplankton except Copepoda described in the previous paper were summarized in this paper. Samples were gathered bimonthly at 26 stations distributed all the bay in January, March, May, July, September and November in 1976. Notholca sp. and Synchaeta sp. were dominant species of Rotatoria, Evadne nordmanni and Evadne tergestina were of Cladocera, Sagitta crassa, Sagitta crassa f. naikaiensis and Sagitta delicata were of Chaetognatha, Fritillaria haplostoma and Oikopleu...

  13. Wicked problems in designing healthcare facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stichler, Jaynelle F

    2009-10-01

    The design process for new healthcare facilities presents many wicked problems for nurse leaders with a number of stakeholders, a myriad of opinions, and numerous options to consider. This bimonthly department expands nurse leaders' knowledge and competencies in health facility design and enables them to lead in design efforts. In this article, the concept of wicked problems is explored with application to the healthcare design situation using examples of design decisions frequently challenging nurse leaders.

  14. Effect of e-learning and repeated performance feedback on spirometry test quality in family practice: a cluster trial

    OpenAIRE

    Schermer, T.R.J.; Akkermans, R P; Crockett, A.J.; Van Montfort, M.; Grootens-Stekelenburg, J.G.; Stout, J W; Pieters, W.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Spirometry has become an indispensable tool in primary care to exclude, diagnose, and monitor chronic respiratory conditions, but the quality of spirometry tests in family practices is a reason for concern. Aim of this study was to investigate whether a combination of e-learning and bimonthly performance feedback would improve spirometry test quality in family practices in the course of 1 year. METHODS: Our study was a cluster trial with 19 family practices allocated to intervention ...

  15. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, May/June 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

    1993-07-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bimonthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  16. Environmental regulatory update table, September--October 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Lewis, E.B.; Salk, M.S.

    1992-11-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  17. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, January/February 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1992-03-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action. This table is for January/February 1992.

  18. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, November--December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

    1994-01-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  19. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, January--February 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

    1994-03-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations ad contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  20. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, March/April 1993. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

    1993-05-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bimonthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  1. Environmental Regulatory Update Table July/August 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

    1993-09-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  2. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, November--December 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Lewis, E.B.; Salk, M.S.

    1993-01-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly wit information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  3. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, May--June 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E.; Salk, M.S.

    1994-07-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bimonthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  4. Environmental regulatory update table, March--April 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Health Sciences Research Div.; Salk, M.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.

    1994-03-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  5. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, March/April 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

    1993-05-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bimonthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  6. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, January--February 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.; Danford, G.S.; Lewis, E.B.

    1993-03-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  7. Temporal changes in soil bacterial and archaeal communities with different fertilizers in tea orchards* #

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hua; Yang, Shao-hui; Yang, Jing-ping; Lv, Ya-min; Zhao, Xing; Pang, Ji-liang

    2014-01-01

    It is important to understand the effects of temporal changes in microbial communities in the acidic soils of tea orchards with different fertilizers. A field experiment involving organic fertilizer (OF), chemical fertilizer (CF), and unfertilized control (CK) treatments was arranged to analyze the temporal changes in the bacterial and archaeal communities at bimonthly intervals based on the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) profili...

  8. Brief Guide for Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>The Crop Journal is a bimonthly scientific journal co-sponsored by the Crop Science Society of China and the Institute of Crop Science,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences and China Science Publishing&Media Group Ltd.Published by Elsevier and Science Press.General Requirements Contributions submitted to The Crop Journal must be original works of the author(s)that have not been previously published or simultaneously submitted to any other journals.

  9. Brief Guide for Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>The Crop Journal is a bimonthly scientific journal co-sponsored by the Crop Science Society of China and the institute of Crop Science,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences and China Science Publishing&Media Group Ltd.Published by Elsevier and Science Press.General Requirements Contributions submitted to The Crop Journal must be original works of the author(s)that have not been previously published or simultaneously

  10. Brief Guide for Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    <正>The Crop Journal is a bimonthly scientific journal co-sponsored by the Crop Science Society of China and the Institute of Crop Science,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences and China Science Publishing&Media Group Ltd.Published by Elsevier and Science Press.General Requirements Contributions submitted to The Crop Journal must be original works of the author(s)that have not been previously published or simultaneously submitted to any other journals.

  11. The Crop Journal Calls for Papers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>We would like to invite you to submit your latest research accomplishments to The Crop Journal(ISSN:2095-5421;Online ISSN:2214-5141,CN 10-1112/S),a new bimonthly academic journal co-sponsored by the Crop Science Society of China and the Institute of Crop Science,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences.The Crop Journal is freely available online(Open Access)in ScienceDirect.The Editor-in-Chief of

  12. The Crop Journal Calls for Papers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    <正>We would like to invite you to submit your latest research accomplishments to The Crop Journal(ISSN:2095-5421;Online ISSN:2214-5141,CN 10-1112/S),a new bimonthly academic journal co-sponsored by the Crop Science Society of China and the Institute of Crop Science,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences.The Crop Journal is freely available online(Open Access)in ScienceDirect.The Editor-in-Chief

  13. The Crop Journal Calls for Papers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>We would like to invite you to submit your latest research accomplishments to The Crop Journal(ISSN:2095-5421;Online ISSN:2214-5141,CN 10-1112/S),a new bimonthly academic journal co-sponsored by the Crop Science Society of China and the Institute of Crop Science,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences.The Crop Journal is freely available online(Open Access)in ScienceDirect.

  14. The Crop Journal Calls for Papers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>We would like to invite you to submit your latest research accomplishments to The Crop Journal(ISSN:2095-5421;Online ISSN:2214-5141,CN 10-1112/S),a new bimonthly academic journal co-sponsored by the Crop Science Society of China and the Institute of Crop Science,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences.The Crop Journal is freely available online(Open Access)in ScienceDirect.

  15. Macrobenthic fauna community in the Middle Songkhla Lake, Southern Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Angsupanich, S.; Charoenpornthip, M.; Siripech, A.

    2005-01-01

    A bimonthly investigation of macrobenthic fauna at the area from Ban Pak Khat to Ban Leam Chong Thanon in the Inner Songkhla Lake from February 1998 to February 1999 was undertaken to determine the species richness and abundance. A total of 7 phyla and 161 species were identified. Annelida (58 species), Arthropoda (64 species) and Mollusca (23 species) were the major phyla while Nemertea (1 species), Platyhelminthes (1 species), Cnidaria (4 species) and Chordata (10 species) were the minor. F...

  16. Population structure and reproductive biology of Loricariichthys melanocheilus Reis & Pereira, 2000 (Siluriformes: Loricariidae) in the rio Ibicuí, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Éverton Luís Zardo; Everton Rodolfo Behr

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze population structure (spatial distribution, seasonal distribution and distribution by length classes, sex ratio and length-weight relationship) and aspects of the reproductive biology of Loricariichthys melanocheilus. Fish were sampled bimonthly using gillnets and trammel nets in lentic and lotic environments in the rio Ibicuí, between the years 2000 and 2001. Were collected 410 specimens: 230 females, 164 males and 16 specimens whose sex could not b...

  17. Influences of intermittent preventive treatment and persistent multiclonal Plasmodium falciparum infections on clinical malaria risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Liljander

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intermittent preventive treatment (IPT of malaria involves administration of curative doses of antimalarials at specified time points to vulnerable populations in endemic areas, regardless whether a subject is known to be infected. The effect of this new intervention on the development and maintenance of protective immunity needs further understanding. We have investigated how seasonal IPT affects the genetic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum infections and the risk of subsequent clinical malaria. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study included 2227 Ghanaian children (3-59 months who were given sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP bimonthly, artesunate plus amodiaquine (AS+AQ monthly or bimonthly, or placebo monthly for six months spanning the malaria transmission season. Blood samples collected at three post-interventional surveys were analysed by genotyping of the polymorphic merozoite surface protein 2 gene. Malaria morbidity and anaemia was monitored during 12 months follow-up. RESULTS: Monthly IPT with AS+AQ resulted in a marked reduction in number of concurrent clones and only children parasite negative just after the intervention period developed clinical malaria during follow-up. In the placebo group, children without parasites as well as those infected with ≥2 clones had a reduced risk of subsequent malaria. The bimonthly SP or AS+AQ groups had similar number of clones as placebo after intervention; however, diversity and parasite negativity did not predict the risk of malaria. An interaction effect showed that multiclonal infections were only associated with protection in children without intermittent treatment. CONCLUSION: Molecular typing revealed effects of the intervention not detected by ordinary microscopy. Effective seasonal IPT temporarily reduced the prevalence and genetic diversity of P. falciparum infections. The reduced risk of malaria in children with multiclonal infections only seen in untreated children suggests that

  18. Index to Nuclear Safety: a technical progress review by chronology, permuted title, and author, Volume 18 (1) through Volume 22 (6)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottrell, W.B.; Passiakos, M.

    1982-06-01

    This index to Nuclear Safety covers articles published in Nuclear Safety, Volume 18, Number 1 (January-February 1977) through Volume 22, Number 6 (November-December 1981). The index is divided into three section: a chronological list of articles (including abstracts), a permuted-title (KWIC) index, and an author index. Nuclear Safety, a bimonthly technical progress review prepared by the Nuclear Safety Information Center, covers all safety aspects of nuclear power reactors and associated facilities. Over 300 technical articles published in Nuclear Safety in the last 5 years are listed in this index.

  19. Evidence that abnormally large seasonal declines in vitamin D status may trigger SLE flare in non-African Americans

    OpenAIRE

    Birmingham, DJ; Hebert, LA; Song, H; Noonan, WT; Rovin, BH; Nagaraja, HN; Yu, CY

    2012-01-01

    Cross-sectional studies have shown that low vitamin D (25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D)) is associated with increased systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) activity. This study is the first to assess the temporal relationship between 25(OH)D levels and onset of SLE flare. This assessment was made possible because of the specimen bank and database of the Ohio SLE Study (OSS), a longitudinal study of frequently relapsing SLE that involved regular bimonthly patient follow-up. We identified for this st...

  20. Geothermal Energy; (USA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raridon, M.H.; Hicks, S.C. (eds.)

    1991-01-01

    Geothermal Energy (GET) announces on a bimonthly basis the current worldwide information available on the technologies required for economic recovery of geothermal energy and its use as direct heat or for electric power production. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal article, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database (EDB) during the past two months. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency's Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements.

  1. Brief Introduction to Chinese Optics and Applied Optics Abstracts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    The Chinese Optics and Applied Optics Abstracts, sponsored by the Documentation and Information Center of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the Optical Information Network of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the Changchun Institute of Optics,Fine Mechanics and Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences,is one of the series of science and technology indexing periodicals published by the Chinese Academy of Sciences. The Chinese Optics and Applied Optics Abstracts started a quarterly publication in 1985, with the name of Chinese Science and Technology Document Catalogues: Optics and Applied Optics. It changed into a bimonthly publication with the name of Chinese Optics and Applied

  2. Monitoring of Occupational Exposures in Albania Using TLD-100 cards (2003-2007)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qafmolla, Luan; Hoxhaj, Enver

    2010-01-01

    In our paper is described the monitoring of occupational staff that works in ionising radiation field of the diagnostic centres in Albania for 2003-2007, and is analysed and discussed the mean annual dose rate recorded for above-mentioned period. The monitoring was based in TLD-100 dosimetric cards and the control was performed all over the country on bimonthly basis covering main and important cities like: Tirana, Durresi, Shkodra, Fieri, Vlora, Korça etj. The Department of Human & Environment Protection, at the Centre of Applied Nuclear Physics, through the dosimetric service carried out the monitoring for around 350 radiation workers.

  3. Review of papers published in the Chinese Journal of Traumatology (English Edition) in 2002

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘阳娥; 宋双明

    2003-01-01

    @@ The year 2002 witnesses the great changes of the Journal. In this year, the Journal changes the issue from quarterly publication to bimonthly publication and it gains the credit in entering into the American Index Medicus/MEDLINE. A total of 86 papers have been published in the Journal, covering scopes of both basic scientific researches and clinical studies of craniocerebral, thoracic, extremity, spinal cord and traffic injuries. They revealed the latest findings of basic scientific research or clinical treatment on traumatology in China, which, at the same time, plays an important role in communication with the foreign researchers and clinicians.

  4. Index to Nuclear Safety. A technical progress review by chronology, permuted title, and author. Vol 11, No. 1 through Vol. 16, No. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This index to Nuclear Safety covers articles in Nuclear Safety Vol. 11, No. 1 (Jan.-Feb. 1970) through Vol. 16, No. 6 (Nov.-Dec. 1975). Included in the index is a chronological list of articles (including abstract) followed by both a KWIC index and an Author Index. Nuclear Safety is a bimonthly technical progress review prepared by the Nuclear Safety Information Center and covers all safety aspects of nuclear power reactors and associated facilities. The index lists over 300 technical articles in the last six years of publication

  5. Index to Nuclear Safety: a technical progress review by chronology, permuted title, and author. Vol. 11(1)--Vol. 18(6)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottrell, W.B.; Klein, A.

    1978-04-11

    This index to Nuclear Safety covers articles published in Nuclear Safety, Vol. 11, No. 1 (January-February 1970), through Vol. 18, No. 6 (November-December 1977). It is divided into three sections: a chronological list of articles (including abstracts) followed by a permuted-title (KWIC) index and an author index. Nuclear Safety, a bimonthly technical progress review prepared by the Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC), covers all safety aspects of nuclear power reactors and associated facilities. Over 450 technical articles published in Nuclear Safety in the last eight years are listed in this index.

  6. Journal of Nanjing Medical University Instruction to Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ Journal of Nanjing Medical University, a citation source of China Science and Technology papers,sponsored by Nanjing Medical University, was established in 1987. It is a bimonthly comprehensive medical English journal, published in China and abroad.And it has been embodied by many famous international Resource Indexes such as CA, AJ. The Journal publishes English articles, summaries, reviews and case reports concerning basic, clinical and preventive medicine from teachers and researchers in medical institutes and hospitals world-wide. Priority for publication will be given to those funded by national or provincial foundation and on prize-winning research projects.

  7. New journal on biological frontiers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weihua WU

    2010-01-01

    @@ Frontiers in Biology, an international peer-reviewed scientific journal to be published bi-monthly, is launched today. It is jointly published by Higher Education Press and Springer. The joumal provides a forum for a broad blend of peer-reviewed articles to promote rapid communication and exchanges among biologists around the world. The primary criterion for publication is new insights that are of broad interest to biologists, not just specialists, and the presentation of results must be appropriate to a wide audience of biologists.

  8. European journals on microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronda, C; Vázquez, M

    1997-12-01

    A survey on the scientific journals dealing with microbiology published in Europe has been carried out. Eighteen European countries publish microbiological journals with the United Kingdom. Netherlands and Germany leading in number of journals on this specialty. Most of the European journals on microbiology are published bimonthly (27%), and English is the most common language used (54%). Most of these journals (86%) are included in some database, but only 36 (25%) are indexed in the six databases studied. Out of the 146 journals registered, 71 (49%), published in 11 European countries, are included in the 1995 Journal Citation Reports (ISI, Philadelphia).

  9. Brief Guide for Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>The Crop Journal is a bimonthly scientif ic journal co-sponsored by the Crop Science Society of China and the Institute of Crop Science, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences and China Science Publishing & Media Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier and Science Press. General Requirements Contributions submitted to The Crop Journal must be original works of the author(s) that have not been previously published or simultaneously submitted to any other journals. The experiment related to crop yield should be conducted at least two locations or growing seasons with replications. All the results should be supported by appropriate statistical analyses. Scopes ? Crop Germplasm Resources ? Crop Genetics, Genomics and Molecular Biology

  10. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, May/June 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Lewis, E.B.; Salk, M.S.

    1992-07-01

    This report contains a bi-monthly update of environmental regulatory activity that is of interest to the Department of Energy. It is provided to DOE operations and contractor staff to assist and support environmental management programs by tracking regulatory developments. Any proposed regulation that raises significant issues for any DOE operation should be reported to the Office of Environmental Guidance (EH-23) as soon as possible so that the Department can make its concerns known to the appropriate regulatory agency. Items of particular interest to EH-23 are indicated by a shading of the RU{number sign}.

  11. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, May/June 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Lewis, E.B.; Salk, M.S.

    1992-07-01

    This report contains a bi-monthly update of environmental regulatory activity that is of interest to the Department of Energy. It is provided to DOE operations and contractor staff to assist and support environmental management programs by tracking regulatory developments. Any proposed regulation that raises significant issues for any DOE operation should be reported to the Office of Environmental Guidance (EH-23) as soon as possible so that the Department can make its concerns known to the appropriate regulatory agency. Items of particular interest to EH-23 are indicated by a shading of the RU{number_sign}.

  12. Evaluation of Response Patterns in Somatic and Otolith Features of Laboratory- Reared and Wild Clarias gariepinus Exposed to Industrial Effluent

    OpenAIRE

    Adeogun, Aina O.; Taofeek A. Babatunde; Azubuike V. Chukwuka

    2013-01-01

    This study was aimed at comparing the responses of somatic and otolith features in Clarias gariepinus under chronic exposure conditions to industrial effluents in the laboratory for 60 days and in the wild for 6 months. Fish were collected upstream and downstream bi-monthly from a river receiving composite mixtures of industrial effluent while laboratory-rearedC. gariepinus were exposed to the same effluent mixtures in 60 days static renewal/bioassay using concentrations of 6.11, 3.05 and 2.2...

  13. Index to Nuclear Safety. A technical progress review by chronology, permuted title, and author. Vol 11, No. 1 through Vol. 16, No. 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottrell, W.B.; Klein, A.

    1976-04-01

    This index to Nuclear Safety covers articles in Nuclear Safety Vol. 11, No. 1 (Jan.-Feb. 1970) through Vol. 16, No. 6 (Nov.-Dec. 1975). Included in the index is a chronological list of articles (including abstract) followed by both a KWIC index and an Author Index. Nuclear Safety is a bimonthly technical progress review prepared by the Nuclear Safety Information Center and covers all safety aspects of nuclear power reactors and associated facilities. The index lists over 300 technical articles in the last six years of publication.

  14. INFORMATION FOR OVERSEAS CONTRIBUTORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@The Transactions of Nonferrous Metals Society of China(hereafter Trans. Nonferrous Met. Soc. China),founded in 1991 and sponsored by The Nonferrous Metals Society of China, is published bimonthly and mainly contains reports of original research which reflect the new progresses in the field of nonferrous metals science and technology, including geology, mining, mineral processing, extraction metallurgy, metallic materials and heat treatments, metal working, physical metallurgy, powder metallurgy, machinery, automatization, computer,information and management, with the emphasis on materials science and engineering. It is the unique preeminent publication in English of The Nonferrous Metals Society of China for scientists, engineers, under/postgraduates in the field of nonferrous metals industry.

  15. Leaf mineral concentrations of Erica arborea, Juniperus communis and Myrtus communis growing in the proximity of a natural CO2 spring

    OpenAIRE

    Peñuelas, Josep

    2001-01-01

    Leaf mineral concentrations of co-occurring Erica arborea, Juniperus communis and Myrtus communis were measured at bimonthly intervals throughout a year in a natural CO2 spring and in a nearby control site with similar soil chemistry in a Mediterranean environment. There were different responses to the elevated [CO2] (c. 700 μL L−1) of the spring site plants depending on the element and the species. In the CO2 spring site K, Ca, Mg, Mn, Al, Fe, and Ti leaf concentrations and the ratio C/N sho...

  16. Rebalancing Challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    China's economic rebalancing is in the global spotlight because it has far-reachhng implications for both China and the world.What triggered the imbalance? How should China push forward the adjustment? Economists and researchers discussed these questions at the Conference on Changing Global Economy and China's Macroeconomic Development organized by China & World Economy,a bimonthly English journal published by the Institute of World Economics and Politics of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences on September 22 in Beijing.Beijing Review reporter Hu Yue attended the conference.

  17. Parasitic co-infections: does Ascaris lumbricoides protect against Plasmodium falciparum infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutus, Laurent; Watier, Laurence; Briand, Valérie; Hanitrasoamampionona, Virginie; Razanatsoarilala, Hélène; Cot, Michel

    2006-08-01

    A controlled randomized trial of antihelminthic treatment was undertaken in 1996-1997 in a rural area of Madagascar where populations were simultaneously infected with Ascaris lumbricoides and Plasmodium falciparum. Levamisole was administered bimonthly to 164 subjects, randomized on a family basis, whereas 186 were controls. While levamisole proved to be highly effective in reducing Ascaris egg loads in the treated group (P Ascaris infection and malaria parasite density has important implications. Single community therapy programs to deliver treatments against several parasitic infections could avoid an increase of malaria attacks after mass treatment of ascariasis.

  18. Confirmation of the protective effect of Ascaris lumbricoides on Plasmodium falciparum infection: results of a randomized trial in Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutus, Laurent; Watier, Laurence; Hanitrasoamampionona, Virginie; Razanatsoarilala, Hélène; Cot, Michel

    2007-12-01

    A controlled randomized trial of anti-helminthic treatment was undertaken in 1996-1997 in a rural area of Madagascar where populations were simultaneously infected with Ascaris lumbricoides, Plasmodium falciparum, and Schistosoma mansoni. Levamisole was administered bimonthly to 107 subjects, whereas 105 were controls. Levamisole was highly effective in reducing Ascaris egg loads in the treated group (P 15 years of age. This study confirms the results of a randomized trial, which showed a negative interaction in those > 5 years of age between Ascaris and malaria parasite density in another Malagasy population, submitted to a higher malaria transmission.

  19. Effect of hydrological conditions on nitrous oxide, methane, and carbon dioxide dynamics in a bottomland hardwood forest and its implication for soil carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, K.; Faulkner, S.P.; Baldwin, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    This study was conducted at three locations in a bottomland hardwood forest with a distinct elevation and hydrological gradient: ridge (high, dry), transition, and swamp (low, wet). At each location, concentrations of soil greenhouse gases (N2O, CH4 , and CO2), their fluxes to the atmosphere, and soil redox potential (Eh) were measured bimonthly, while the water table was monitored every day. Results show that soil Eh was significantly (P transition > ridge location. The ratio CO2/CH4 production in soil is a critical factor for evaluating the overall benefit of soil C sequestration, which can be greatly offset by CH4 production and emission. ?? Journal compilation ?? 2008 Blackwell Publishing.

  20. Brief Guide for Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    <正>The Crop Journal is a bimonthly scientific journal co-sponsored by the Crop Science Society of China and the Institute of Crop Science,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences and China Science Publishing&Media Group Ltd.Published by Elsevier and Science Press.General Requirements Contributions submitted to The Crop Journal must be original works of the author(s)that have not been previously published or simultaneously submitted to any other journals.The experiment related to crop yield should be conducted at

  1. Brave New Media World: Science Communication Voyages through the Global Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, C. L.; Reisewitz, A.

    2010-12-01

    By leveraging online tools, such as blogs, Twitter, Facebook, Google Earth, flickr, web-based discussion boards, and a bi-monthly electronic magazine for the non-scientist, Scripps Institution of Oceanography is taking science communications out of the static webpage to create interactive journeys that spark social dialogue and helped raise awareness of science-based research on global marine environmental issues. Several new initiatives are being chronicled through popular blogs and expedition web sites as researchers share interesting scientific facts and unusual findings in near real-time.

  2. Body mass and lipid content of shorebirds overwintering on the south Texas coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, D.H.; Mitchell, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    Three species of shorebirds were collected at bimonthly intervals in 1979-1980, from the time of their arrival in early autumn to mid-February, on the south Texas coast. Female Long-billed Dowitchers (Limnodromus scolopaceus) and Western Sandpipers (Calidris mauri) were heavier (P 0.05) between sexes in any of the three species. During the wintering period, fat stores in Long-billed Dowitchers and Western Sandpipers declined 70% and 44%, respectively, but not in American Avocets. Lipid content was highly correlated (P body mass in all three species, providing further evidence that fat accumulation is responsible for the major variation in total mass of some shorebird species.

  3. The Stone Cold Truth: The Effect of Concrete Encasement on the Rate and Pattern of Soft Tissue Decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, D C; Dabbs, Gretchen R; Roberts, Lindsey G; Cleary, Megan K

    2016-03-01

    This study provides a descriptive analysis of taphonomic changes observed in the soft tissue of ten pigs (Sus scrofa) after being encased in Quickrete (®) concrete and excavated at monthly or bimonthly intervals over the course of 2 years. The best method of subject excavation was investigated. Rate and pattern of decomposition were compared to a nonencased control subject. Results demonstrate subjects interred in concrete decomposed significantly slower than the control subject (p burned outer layer of skin and a common separation of the dermal and epidermal layers. Results suggest using traditional methods to estimate postmortem interval on concrete subjects may result in underestimation. PMID:27404603

  4. Index to Nuclear Safety: a technical progress review by chronology, permuted title, and author, Volume 18 (1) through Volume 22 (6)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This index to Nuclear Safety covers articles published in Nuclear Safety, Volume 18, Number 1 (January-February 1977) through Volume 22, Number 6 (November-December 1981). The index is divided into three section: a chronological list of articles (including abstracts), a permuted-title (KWIC) index, and an author index. Nuclear Safety, a bimonthly technical progress review prepared by the Nuclear Safety Information Center, covers all safety aspects of nuclear power reactors and associated facilities. Over 300 technical articles published in Nuclear Safety in the last 5 years are listed in this index

  5. Ritmo de alimentação de juvenis de Loricariichthys anus (Siluriformes, Loricariidae da Lagoa dos Quadros, RS, Brasil Feeding activity of juveniles of Loricariichthys anus (Siluriformes, Loricariidae in the Quadros Lake, RS, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Petry

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available The rhythm of movements and feeding activity of juveniles of Loricariichthys anus (Valenciennes, 1840 in the Quadros lake, South Brazil, are investigated. Between October 1997 and August 1998, 236 specimens were captured during six bimonthly 24 hour gillnet surveys. Significantly elevated levels of movement and feeding activity during the day are registered. The patterns of movement and feeding activity displayed no significant difference, suggesting that high movement activity levels can be attributed to feeding activity. The mean of the intestinal quotient was 1,89, indicating omnivorous feeding habits.

  6. Daytime plasma drifts in the equatorial lower ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Debrup; Fejer, Bela G.

    2015-11-01

    We have used extensive radar measurements from the Jicamarca Observatory during low solar flux periods to study the quiet time variability and altitudinal dependence of equatorial daytime vertical and zonal plasma drifts. The daytime vertical drifts are upward and have largest values during September-October. The day-to-day variability of these drifts does not change with height between 150 and 600 km, but the bimonthly variability is much larger in the F region than below about 200 km. These drifts vary linearly with height generally increasing in the morning and decreasing in the afternoon. The zonal drifts are westward during the day and have largest values during July-October. The 150 km region zonal drifts have much larger day-to-day, but much smaller bimonthly variability than the F region drifts. The daytime zonal drifts strongly increase with height up to about 300 km from March through October, and more weakly at higher altitudes. The December solstice zonal drifts have generally weaker altitudinal dependence, except perhaps below 200 km. Current theoretical and general circulation models do not reproduce the observed altitudinal variation of the daytime equatorial zonal drifts.

  7. Computador X Papel, Suor e Caneta: Percepção dos Alunos sobre as Avaliações Realizadas em Computadores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ramos Nogueira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to verify the perception of undergraduate students in Economics of a public university, who were taking an introductory Accountancy course, about using computers to do bimonthly exams. Therefore, instead of usual paper and pen, the exams were electronically applied, with support of an online environment and the possibility of using electronic spreadsheets. After the implementation of two bimonthly tests, students were asked to answer a questionnaire adapted from an Apostolou et al. (2009 research, in order to obtain data about their perception of the advantages and disadvantages of online tests compared to traditional tests. Two classes, totaling 83 students, took part in the research. Results show that, most students (87% are more prone to the realization of electronic tests. Some points stood out as being highly positive about online tests, such as flexibility for the realization of exercises, quicker feedback of the results and the elimination of the need of attending tests. As for the negative points, students indicated the elimination of discursive questions (in case the test has only direct questions. As a tool to identify hindrances to the adoption of electronic tests, the group of students who showed a negative perception was analyzed more closely, searching evidence to explain the lack of trust on that procedure. Analyzing the variables, students who do not trust in online tests have the perception that they limit the subject, they allow students to copy the answers (cheat from each other (or from other sources, and affect negatively the grades obtained.

  8. Midwives as drivers of reproductive health commodity security in Kaduna State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alayande, Audu; Mamman-Daura, Fatima; Adedeji, Olanike; Muhammad, Ado Zakari

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: The significant improvement in the contraceptive prevalence rate in Kaduna State, Nigeria, from 8.4% in 2008 to 18.5% in 2013 is a notable achievement. This article analyses the role of midwives as drivers of reproductive health commodity security (RHCS) and their impact on contraceptive use in Kaduna State. Methods: The United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) supported the bimonthly review resupply meetings facilitated by midwives at State and local government area (LGA) levels. The midwives deliver contraception to the LGAs for onward distribution to 6974 of the 25,000 health facilities across the country according to usage data from the previous 2 months. They also collect requisition, issue and resupply form data from the previous 2 months. Results: The active participation of midwives at the bimonthly meetings improved data timeliness by 23% and data completeness by 50% in 1 year. Only one health facility ran out of intrauterine devices and only 17% reported running out of female condoms. The total number of contraceptives issued increased from 31,866 in 2012 to 177,828 in 2013, resulting in a couple–year protection increase from 3408 in 2012 to 102,207 in 2013. Conclusions: Creation of increased demand and engagement of midwives in providing family planning services, especially long-acting contraceptive methods, coupled with the removal of cost to the user and the strengthening of the supply chain have been major factors in more than doubling the contraceptive prevalence rate. PMID:26909871

  9. Seasonal intermittent preventive treatment for the prevention of anaemia and malaria in Ghanaian children: a randomized, placebo controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Kweku

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malaria and anaemia are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in children in sub-Saharan Africa. We have investigated the effect of intermittent preventive treatment with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine or artesunate plus amodiaquine on anaemia and malaria in children in an area of intense, prolonged, seasonal malaria transmission in Ghana. METHODS: 2451 children aged 3-59 months from 30 villages were individually randomised to receive placebo or artesunate plus amodiaquine (AS+AQ monthly or bimonthly, or sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP bimonthly over a period of six months. The primary outcome measures were episodes of anaemia (Hb1 year old when they received IPTc compared to the placebo group. However the incidence of malaria in the post intervention period was higher in children who were <1 year old when they received AS+AQ monthly compared to the placebo group. INTERPRETATION: IPTc is safe and efficacious in reducing the burden of malaria in an area of Ghana with a prolonged, intense malaria transmission season. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00119132.

  10. Ella-V and technology usage technology usage in an english language and literacy acquisition validation randomized controlled trial study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roisin P. Corcoran

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the use of technology to provide virtual professional development (VPD for teachers and to conduct classroom observations in a study of English Language Learner (ELL instruction in grades K–3. The technology applications were part of a cluster randomized control trial (RCT design for a federally funded longitudinal validation study of a particular program, English Language and Literacy Acquisition-Validation, ELLA- V, to determine its degree of impact on English oral language/literacy, reading, and science across 63 randomly assigned urban, suburban, and rural schools (first year of implementation. ELLA-V also examines the impact of bimonthly VPD for treatment teachers compared to comparison group teachers on pedagogical skills, measured by sound observation instruments, and on student achievement, measured by state/national English language/literacy/reading tests and a national science test. This study features extensive technology use via virtual observations, bimonthly VPD, and randomly assigned treatment and control schools with students served in English as second language (ESL instructional time. The study design and methodology are discussed relativeto the specialized uses of technology and issues involving the evaluation of technology’s contribution to the intervention of interest and of the efficient, cost-effective execution of the study.

  11. Observation of Therapeutic Effects of Two Traditional Chinese Herbal Medicines on Piglet' s Yellow- white Dysentery%两种中成药防治仔猪黄白痢的疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢四仙; 张建乐

    2012-01-01

    采用中成药“母仔安”给分娩前3d、产仔后7~10d的母猪喂服、“仔痢宁”给已产黄白痢仔猪的母猪喂服3~5d,观察其发病率、病死率及双月仔猪成活率。试验结果表明:服用“母仔安”的产仔母猪所产仔猪发病率下降11.56%,病死率下降15.58%,双月成活率提高9.61%,非病死率下降1.1%;服用“仔痢宁”的母猪所产仔猪发病率下降6.9%,治愈率占发病数的88.9%,病死率下降18.93%,双月成活率提高8.72%,非病死率下降1.86%。%Piglet's yellow -white dysentery was an epidemic gastroenteritis caused by the pathogenic Escherichia coli with multiple serotypes in piglets induced by dysentery, high incidence, difficulty in cure, the high mortality. The test of feeding Muzian of traditional Chinese herbal medicine three days before delivery or 7 -10 days after farrowing and feeding Zilining of traditional Chinese herbal medicines for 3 - 5 days to sows was done to observe the incidence, mortality and survival rate of piglets bimonthly. The results showed that the incidence of piglet' s yellow - white dysentery after feeding Muzian of traditional Chinese herbal medicines to farrowing sows was seen down by | 1.56%, case fatality rate decreased by 15.58%, bimonthly survival rate increased by 9.61%, non - fatality rate decreased by 1.1%. The incidence of piglet' s yellow - white dysentery after feeding Zilining of traditional Chinese herbal medicines decreased by 6.9% , the cure rate of incidence number was 88.9% , case fatality rate decreased by 18.93% . bimonthly survival rate increased bv 8.72% , non -fatality rate decreased by 1.86%.

  12. Temporally variable macroinvertebrate-stone relationships in streams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, D.

    2005-01-01

    ) multiple regression analyses showed high temporal variability between sampling dates in factor loadings of specific stone micro habitat variables. In spite of this, there was a clear negative effect of depth and a positive effect of current on density and number of families. Stone size was consistently......Stones were used to sample macroinvertebrates and characterise microhabitats at monthly or bimonthly intervals in six Ecuadorian streams covering a gradient in four different stability measures and other stream characteristics. The physical variables current velocity, water depth, horizontal...... of families vs. individuals) were related to the physical characteristics of individual stone habitats. My second objective was to quantify temporal variability in fauna-stone relationships and to analyse if such variability was related to overall stability of stream reaches. Partial Least Squares (PLS...

  13. Relationship between micro-invertebrates and macrophytes in a wetland: Laguna Iberá (Corrientes, Argentina). Implications for water quality monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momo, F R; Casset, M A; Gantes, P; Torremorell, A M; Perelli, R M

    2006-01-01

    From November 2000 to September 2001, eight points in the Iberá lagoon were sampled bimonthly. At each point, pH, temperature and dissolved oxygen were measured and invertebrates were collected from the water around macrophytes by mean of a net of 180 mu m pore size. Four biotic indices were calculated and compared, given similar trends. The total number of taxa shows to be a good and simple indicator of water quality. Averaging indices across points we obtained a good positive correlation between indices and temperature. In this ecosystem, multi-habitat sampling must be used in order to obtain a good estimation of ecological integrity. The total number of taxa can be used for water quality assessment.

  14. Brief Introduction to Chinese Optics and Applied Optics Abstracts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The Chinese Optics and Applied Optics Abstracts , sponsored by the Documentation andInformation Center of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the Optical Information Networkof the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanicsand Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, is one of the series of science andtechnology indexing periodicals published by the Chinese Academy of Sciences.The Chinese Optics and Applied Optics Abstracts started a quarterly publication in 1985,with the name of Chinese Science and Technology Document Catalogues: Optics andApplied Optics. It changed into a bimonthly publication with the name of Chinese Opticsand Applied Optics Abstracts in 1987. In combination with the Chinese Optics Documen-

  15. The Crop Journal Calls for Papers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>We would like to invite you to submit your latest research accomplishments to The Crop Journal(ISSN:2095-5421;Online ISSN:2214-5141,CN 10-1112/S),a new bimonthly academic journal co-sponsored by the Crop Science Society of China and the Institute of Crop Science,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences.The Crop Journal is freely available online(Open Access) in Science Direct.The Editor-in-Chief of The Crop Journal is Professor Jianmin Wan,PhD,Cheung Kong Scholar,Director of the Institute of Crop Science and Executive Vice President of the Crop Science Society of China,supported by

  16. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooke, L. R. (Editor); Radtke, M. (Editor); Garshnek, V. (Editor); Rowe, J. E. (Editor); Teeter, R. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The second issue of the bimonthly digest of USSR Space Life Sciences is presented. Abstracts are included for 39 Soviet periodical articles in 16 areas of aerospace medicine and space biology and published in Russian during the first half of 1985. Selected articles are illustrated with figures from the original. Translated introductions and tables of contents for 14 Russian books on 11 topics related to NASA's life science concerns are presented. Areas covered are: adaptation, biospheric, body fluids, botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, cybernetics and biomedical data processing, gastrointestinal system, group dynamics, habitability and environmental effects, health and medical treatment, hematology, immunology, life support systems, metabolism, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, psychology, radiobiology, and space biology. Two book reviews translated from Russian are included and lists of additional relevant titles available either in English or in Russian only are appended.

  17. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooke, L. R.; Radtke, M.; Rowe, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    The first issue of the bimonthly digest of USSR Space Life Sciences is presented. Abstracts are included for 49 Soviet periodical articles in 19 areas of aerospace medicine and space biology, published in Russian during the first quarter of 1985. Translated introductions and table of contents for nine Russian books on topics related to NASA's life science concerns are presented. Areas covered include: botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, cybernetics and biomedical data processing, endocrinology, gastrointestinal system, genetics, group dynamics, habitability and environmental effects, health and medicine, hematology, immunology, life support systems, man machine systems, metabolism, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, perception, personnel selection, psychology, radiobiology, reproductive system, and space biology. This issue concentrates on aerospace medicine and space biology.

  18. Distribution and population structure of the fish Cyphocharax gilbert (Characiformes: Curimatidae) in the lower Paraíba do Sul River, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, M S; Caramaschi, E P

    2007-01-01

    The distribution and population structure of Cyphocharax gilbert in four areas of the lower Paraíba do Sul River and its major tributaries (22 degrees S, 43 degrees W) were analyzed between March 1989 and February 1990. The species was common throughout the area, preferring major rivers with high turbidity and sand-mud substrates and range of length and size of specimens found varied depending on the particular characteristics of the site. A predominance of females was found in only area. Nevertheless, in all areas the bimonthly analysis showed preponderance of one of the sexes in periods before or after spawning. Males prevailed in shorter length classes and females in longer ones. There was a prevalence of young in one area that probably was used as a growth and feeding zone. v. PMID:19086403

  19. DOE/NE University Program in robotics for advanced reactors research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document presents the bimonthly progress reports published during 1990 regarding the US Department of Energy/NE-sponsored research at the University of Tennessee Knoxville under the DOE Robitics for Advanced Reactors Research Grant. Significant accomplishments are noted in the following areas: development of edge-segment based stereo matching algorithm; vision system integration in the CESAR laboratory; evaluation of algorithms for surface characterization from range data; comparative study of data fusion techniques; development of architectural framework, software, and graphics environment for sensor-based robots; algorithms for acquiring tactile images from planer surfaces; investigations in geometric model-based robotic manipulation; investigations of non-deterministic approaches to sensor fusion; and evaluation of sensor calibration techniques. (MB)

  20. Hydrochemical characterization of groundwaters in projected hydroelectric power plant areas: Taquari-Antas Basin/RS, Brazil; Caracterizacao hidrogeoquimica de agua subterranea em area de influencia de futuras instalacoes de usinas hidreletricas - bacia hidrografica do rio Taquari-Antas/RS, Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scopel, Rejane Maria; Teixeira, Elba Calesso; Binotto, Raquel Barros [Fundacao Estadual de Protecao Ambiental Henrique Luis Roessler, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)]. E-mail: gerpro.pesquisa@fepam.rs.gov.br

    2005-06-01

    The identification and characterization of the hydrochemistry of the groundwaters has been done for seven wells. The sampling occurred during three bimonthly campaigns. The results classified the waters as of the calcium bicarbonated type for the majority of the samples, except for one well, whose composition is of the sodium bicarbonated type. The major ions found and how they determine the quality parameters are consistent with the reactions of mineral dissolution of the majority of volcanic rocks and the reactions with intrusion of alkaline rock in only one well. Anomalous values of nitrate in some wells alert to the impact of especially polluting sources at the time the reservoirs of the hydroeletric plant were formed. (author)

  1. Potential for attenuation of a stream in a subtropical region - Rio Grande do Sul - Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Peresin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The study and knowledge of the depuration capacity of the water resources, is necessary to preserve them. This study was objective identify the attenuation capacity of the Belo stream - Caxias do Sul - RS / Brazil, through the evaluation of physicochemical parameters, distance and slope between 4 points located along the stream. Were collected five samplings, bimonthly. The data were analyzed through descriptive statistics, one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA "one way", Tukey’s test e Pearson’s correlation. The results showed that there is an improvement in the quality of water resources from upstream to downstream of the stream. However, despite the stream have a high attenuation potential, is necessary the development of control actions to input of industrial and domestic effluents, to prevent the ecological impairment of the same.

  2. Information for Contributors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ The Transactions of Nonferrous Metals Society of China(hereafter Trans. Nonferrous Met.Soc. China), founded in 1991 and sponsored by The Nonferrous Metals Society of China, is published bimonthly and mainly contains reports of original research which reflect the new progresses in the field of nonferrous metals science and technology, including mineral processing, extraction metallurgy, metallic materials and heat treatments, metal working, physical metallurgy, powder metallurgy, with the emphasis on materials science and engineering. It is the unique preeminent publication in English of The Nonferrous Metals Society of China for scientists, engineers,under/post-graduates on the field of nonferrous metals industry. This journal is covered by many famous abstract/index systems and databases such as SCI Expanded, Ei Compendex Plus, INSPEC,CA, METADEX, AJ, JICST.

  3. Ecological distribution of harmful epiphytic Oscillatoriales in Alexandria coast, Egypt, with special reference to DNA identification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amany Abdel Hamid Ismael; Eman Abdel Razak Mohamed; Mostafa Mohamed El-Sheikh; Wafaa Hassan Hegazy

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify the potentially harmful epiphytic Oscillatoriales species and follow up their distribution along Alexandria coast. Methods: Samples were collected bimonthly from April 2009 to February 2010 at three sites along Alexandria coast. Both morphological and molecular analyses were used for identifying the dominant species.Results:Five species belonging to two families were identified; Oscillatoria acutissima, Oscillatoria nigroviridis, Oscillatoria sp., Lyngbya majuscule and Phormidium formosum. Their cell density ranged from 103 to 126X103 filament g-1 fresh weight macroalgae. The morphological study of the dominant species, Oscillatoria sp. (Oscillatoria sp. W1) showed much similarity withPlanktothrix agardhii with no heterocysts and akinetes, while molecular ananlysis (16S rDNA) clustered the species in the same group with Anabaena sp.Conclusions:The 16S rDNA genes are not suitable for identifying Oscillatoriales during the present study and another molecular method should be used instead.

  4. Country-of-origin labeling prior to and at the point of purchase: an exploration of the information environment in Baltimore City grocery stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagasse, Lisa P; Love, David C; Smith, Katherine Clegg

    2014-01-01

    The country-of-origin labeling (COOL) law requires United States grocers to indicate the origin and procurement method (farm-raised or wild-caught) for seafood. This study explored the presentation of COOL on fresh, frozen, packaged, and unpackaged seafood in Baltimore City grocery stores. Eight stores were visited bi-monthly to photograph seafood labels, and circulars were collected weekly from fourteen stores over three months. Ninety-six percent of products were labeled correctly. Forty-eight percent of advertisements included COOL. While in-store labels did not highlight COOL, advertising featured references to domestic and wild-caught seafood, signaling to customers that these are high-value product qualities. PMID:24437544

  5. Snapshots of the Past, by Brian Fagan. Alta Mira Press (Sage Publications. Walnut Creek, CA, 1995

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd W. Bostwick

    1997-05-01

    Full Text Available Brian Fagan is well known for his archaeology books written for a general public as well as his textbooks. This book is a collection of his articles originally published as bimonthly 'Timelines' columns in Archaeol­ogy Magazine. As he states in the preface of the book, his articles were meant to entertain, inform and sometimes wax indignant on a wide variety of archaeological subjects. His intent was to make available to a wide audience short stories that "navigated through the maze of detailed and specialized literature, creating snapshots of archaeology, archaeologists, and our complex, multifaceted past." The collection of 27 articles he chose for the book were published between 1988 and 1995; in addition, Fagan wrote two new articles for the book (one on prehistoric art and the other on the lives of Egyptian townspeople, for a total 29 articles.

  6. Valuing a wind farm construction: A contingent valuation study in Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our analysis is based on data from a double-bounded dichotomous choice contingent valuation study implemented to elicit public attitudes towards renewable energy generation and their willingness to pay for the construction of a wind farm in the area of Messanagros in the island of Rhodes, Greece. Results indicate that there are significant positive values deriving from the proposed project. Respondents report a mean willingness to pay a premium in their bi-monthly electric bills of Euro 8.86 for the sole purpose of the construction of the wind farm. The estimated economic benefits to the local population are weighed against the investment cost in a cost-benefit analysis to inform policy making and implications for EU energy policy are provided.

  7. [Medycyna Pracy: the scopus-based analysis of citations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przyłuska, Jolanta

    2006-01-01

    Medycyna Pracy, a Polish bimonthly published since 1950, forms a long-standing documentation of studies carried out in the area of workers' health protection. The journal is primarily addressed to occupational health physicians and work hygiene specialists in Poland. It is indexed by numerous foreign information services (e.g., MEDLINE, EMBASE, BIOSIS PREVIEWS, BIOLOGICAL ABSTRACTS, SCOPUS) and thus promotes Polish research in occupational medicine throughout the world. The quantitative analysis for the years 1996-2005, grounded on the SCOPUS database, presents an average number of citations concerning a given volume, frequency of citations, articles most frequently cited, and countries, in which articles published in Medycyna Pracy have been referred to. A growing number of citations observed in the recent years signify the importance of issues investigated and discussed in the journal as well as its role in the world-wide circulation of scientific information.

  8. Country-of-origin labeling prior to and at the point of purchase: an exploration of the information environment in Baltimore City grocery stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagasse, Lisa P; Love, David C; Smith, Katherine Clegg

    2014-01-01

    The country-of-origin labeling (COOL) law requires United States grocers to indicate the origin and procurement method (farm-raised or wild-caught) for seafood. This study explored the presentation of COOL on fresh, frozen, packaged, and unpackaged seafood in Baltimore City grocery stores. Eight stores were visited bi-monthly to photograph seafood labels, and circulars were collected weekly from fourteen stores over three months. Ninety-six percent of products were labeled correctly. Forty-eight percent of advertisements included COOL. While in-store labels did not highlight COOL, advertising featured references to domestic and wild-caught seafood, signaling to customers that these are high-value product qualities.

  9. Effects of Clinical Decision Topic on Patients' Involvement in and Satisfaction With Decisions and Their Subsequent Implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freidl, Marion; Pesola, Francesca; Konrad, Jana;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Clinical decision making is an important aspect of mental health care. Predictors of how patients experience decision making and whether decisions are implemented are underresearched. This study investigated the relationship between decision topic and involvement in the decision......, satisfaction with it, and its subsequent implementation from both staff and patient perspectives. METHODS: As part of the Clinical Decision Making and Outcome in Routine Care for People With Severe Mental Illness study, patients (N=588) and their providers (N=213) were recruited from community-based mental...... health services in six European countries. Both completed bimonthly assessments for one year using the Clinical Decision Making in Routine Care Scale to assess the decision topic and implementation; both also completed the Clinical Decision Making Involvement and Satisfaction Scale. RESULTS: Three...

  10. Temporal distribution of heavy metal concentrations in oysters Crassostrea rhizophorae from the central Venezuelan coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso, Juan A; Handt, Helga; Mora, Abrahan; Vásquez, Yaneth; Azocar, José; Marcano, Eunice

    2013-08-15

    The oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae is a bivalve abundant in Venezuelan estuaries and consumed by local populations. No known values have been reported on trace metals in oysters from the central Venezuelan coast. We report the concentrations of Al, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sr, V and Zn in the soft parts of C. rhizophorae, which were collected bimonthly between March 2008 and March 2009, at two sampling areas from the Central Venezuelan Coast: Buche estuary and Mochima estuary. Our results show that for each metal there is a similar temporal variation pattern. The concentrations of the heavy metals reported in this work are useful as reliable baselines and can be used for comparison in future environment studies. Concentrations in C. rhizophorae from the Buche estuary can be interpreted to be high on a global scale for Cd, Cu, Ni and Mn, indicating atypically raised bioavailabilities. PMID:23746942

  11. Longitudinal behavioral analysis during dental care of children aged 0 to 3 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robson Frederico Cunha

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available "When" and "how" the dentist intervenes have repercussions on children's physical and emotional patterns. The objective of the present study was to conduct a longitudinal behavioral analysis during dental care of babies aged 0 to 3 years. A total of 216 patients seen at the Baby Clinic of the School of Dentistry at Araçatuba, São Paulo State University (UNESP, were selected. The selection criterion was attendance at ten dental care sessions at bimonthly intervals for routine procedures such as clinical examination and oral hygiene. There was a predominance of cooperative behavior compared to uncooperative behavior when each visit was analyzed separately. The behavior of the patients must have been directly influenced by their psychomotor development. Constant attendance and exposure of the baby to non-stressful dental stimuli are factors that favor a cooperative behavior.

  12. Brief Introduction to Chinese Optics and Applied Optics Abstracts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The Chinese Optics and Applied Optics Abstracts , sponsored by the Documentation andInformation Center of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the Optical Information Networkof the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanicsand Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, is one of the series of science andtechnology indexing periodicals published by the Chinese Academy of Sciences.The Chinese Optics and Applied Optics Abstracts started a quarterly publication in 1985,with the name of Chinese Science and Technology Document Catalogues: Optics andApplied Optics. It changed into a bimonthly publication with the name of Chinese Opticsand Applied Optics Abstracts in 1987. In combination with the Chinese Optics

  13. Editor's note

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dingsheng

    2009-01-01

    @@ 2008 has witnessed the great progress of both the Chinese version and the English version of Science in China Series G: Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy. During the past year, these journals were developed from bimonthly to monthly, with an obviously raised information capacity; while speeding up the peer-revie-wing process, a quick-publication policy was established for the top articles recommended by the editorial board members and the academicians of Chinese Acedemy of Sciences (CAS), thus shortening the average publishing cycle; and several special issues were published, with the paper quality improved to a certain extent. Here, on behalf of the new editorial board 2008, I would like to express sincere thanks to the readers,authors and the former editorial board members who have made great contributions to the journal development.

  14. To Our Readers, on the 40th Anniversary of the Magazine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    Dear readers, Women of China was first issued in 1956, a full 40 years ago. In that time, the magzine’s format has changed from a quarterly, to a bi-monthly, to a monthly. Our magazine is distributed in more than 130 countries and regions and is well-received by our readers. Women of China is a comprehensive English monthly concerned with the conditions of Chinese women. It aims to enhance contacts and exchanges between Chinese women and women from all over the world, and to increase their understanding and friendship. In the 40 years, forerunners in Chinese women’s movement and women state leaders, Soong Ching Ling, Cai Chang, Deng Yingchao, Kang Keqing and

  15. Publications in biomedical and environmental sciences programs, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography contains 725 references to articles in journals, books, and reports published in the subject area of biomedical and environmental sciences during 1982. There are 553 references to articles published in journals and books and 172 references to reports. The citations appear once ordered by the first author's division or by the performing division. Staff members in the Biomedical and Environmental Sciences divisions have other publications not included in this bibliography; for example, theses, book reviews, abstracts published in journals or symposia proceedings, pending journal publications and reports such as monthly, bimonthly, and quarterly progress reports, contractor reports, and reports for internal distribution. This document is sorted by the division, and then alphabetically by author. The sorting by divisions separates the references by subject area in a simple way. The divisions are represented alphabetically. Indexes are provided by author, title, and journal reference. Reprints of articles referenced in this bibliography can be obtained from the author or the author's division

  16. Publications in biomedical and environmental sciences programs, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography contains 690 references to articles in journals, books, and reports published in the subject area of biomedical and environmental sciences during 1980. There are 529 references to articles published in journals and books and 161 references to reports. Staff members in the Biomedical and Environmental Sciences divisions have other publications not included in this bibliography; for example, theses, book reviews, abstracts published in journals or symposia proceedings, pending journal publications and reports such as monthly and bimonthly progress reports, contractor reports, and reports for internal distribution. This document is sorted by the division, and then alphabetically by author. The sorting by divisions separates the references by subject area in a simple way. The divisions represented in the order that they appear in the bibliography are Analytical Chemistry, Biology, Chemical Technology, Information R and D, Health and Safety Research, Energy, Environmental Sciences, and Computer Sciences

  17. The Crop Journal Calls for Papers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    <正>We would like to invite you to submit your latest research accomplishments to The Crop Journal(ISSN:2095-5421;Online ISSN:2214-5141,CN 10-1112/S),a new bimonthly academic journal co-sponsored by the Crop Science Society of China and the Institute of Crop Science,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences.The Crop Journal is freely available online(Open Access)in Science Direct.The Editor-in-Chief of The Crop Journal is Professor Jianmin Wan,Ph D,Cheung Kong Scholar,Director of the Institute of Crop Science and Executive Vice President of the Crop Science Society of China,supported by

  18. Psychological intervention for a child exposed to murder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupa, Megha; Hirisave, Uma; Srinath, Shoba

    2014-05-01

    This report describes the process of psychotherapy for a 7-y-old boy who witnessed the gruesome murder of his mother by the father. Expressive therapy techniques such as play, art and storytelling were used to help the child emote, achieve independence and emotional maturity. The child was seen as an in-patient for 3 mo on a daily basis, followed by weekly and subsequently bi-monthly follow ups. During the ward stay, aggression towards other children and grandmother had reduced significantly. The child was able to verbalize the irreversibility and inevitability of death, and had developed healthy ways to resolve the grief. In the subsequent follow ups, although some behavior problems persisted, gains from therapy generalized to help him deal with challenges of real life, such as a constantly lurking fear of the father returning from prison. PMID:23604611

  19. Southern-Hemisphere AGN Monitoring on (Sub-)Parsec Scales: The TANAMI Program

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, Cornelia; Wilms, J; Kadler, M; Ojha, R; Blanchard, J; Dutka, M; Ros, E

    2012-01-01

    The Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) monitoring program TANAMI provides bi-monthly, dualfrequency (8GHz and 22GHz) observations of extragalactic jets with milliarcsecond resolution south of -30 deg declination using the Australian Long Baseline Array (LBA) and additional radio telescopes in Antarctica, Chile, New Zealand and South Africa. Supporting programs provide multiwavelength coverage of the Fermi/LAT sources of the TANAMI sample, in order to construct simultaneous broadband spectral energy distributions (SEDs), as well as rapid follow-ups of high energy flares. The main purpose of this project is to study the radio-gamma-ray connection seen in the jets of active galactic nuclei (AGN) via simultaneous monitoring of their VLBI structure and broadband emission in order to distinguish between different proposed emission models. Here we give a brief description of the TANAMI program and will then focus on its current status: (1) We present some results on the first simultaneous dual-frequency images...

  20. Instructions to Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>The Journal of Natural Gas Chemistry has renamed as the Journal of Energy Chemistry in 2013.The Journal of Energy Chemistry is a bimonthly Journal jointly edited by the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics and the Chengdu Institute of Organic Chemistry,Chinese Academy of Sciences.Elsevier will publish the Journal on ScienceDirect,the online full text and bibliographic information resource,and take care of the Journal’s international institutional print subscriptions.Scope of the Journal The Journal of Energy Chemistry will function as a medium for reporting original research papers dealing with topics in the fields of energy chemistry.It will be devoted to up-to-date progress in the following fields all over the world:

  1. Link between sewage-derived nitrogen pollution and coral disease severity in Guam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redding, Jamey E; Myers-Miller, Roxanna L; Baker, David M; Fogel, Marilyn; Raymundo, Laurie J; Kim, Kiho

    2013-08-15

    The goals of this study were to evaluate the contribution of sewage-derived N to reef flat communities in Guam and to assess the impact of N inputs on coral disease. We used stable isotope analysis of macroalgae and a soft coral, sampled bimonthly, as a proxy for N dynamics, and surveyed Porites spp., a dominant coral taxon on Guam's reefs, for white syndrome disease severity. Results showed a strong influence of sewage-derived N in nearshore waters, with δ(15)N values varying as a function of species sampled, site, and sampling date. Increases in sewage-derived N correlated significantly with increases in the severity of disease among Porites spp., with δ(15)N values accounting for more than 48% of the variation in changes in disease severity. The anticipated military realignment and related population increase in Guam are expected to lead to increased white syndrome infections and other coral diseases.

  2. Analysis of the uranium price predicted to 24 months, implementing neural networks and the Monte Carlo method like predictive tools; Analisis del precio del uranio pronosticado a 24 meses, implementando redes neuronales y el metodo de Monte Carlo como herramientas predictivas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esquivel E, J.; Ramirez S, J. R.; Palacios H, J. C., E-mail: jaime.esquivel@fi.uaemex.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    The present work shows predicted prices of the uranium, using a neural network. The importance of predicting financial indexes of an energy resource, in this case, allows establishing budgetary measures, as well as the costs of the resource to medium period. The uranium is part of the main energy generating fuels and as such, its price rebounds in the financial analyses, due to this is appealed to predictive methods to obtain an outline referent to the financial behaviour that will have in a certain time. In this study, two methodologies are used for the prediction of the uranium price: the Monte Carlo method and the neural networks. These methods allow predicting the indexes of monthly costs, for a two years period, starting from the second bimonthly of 2011. For the prediction the uranium costs are used, registered from the year 2005. (Author)

  3. Rebuild America Partner Update, January--February 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-01-01

    Rebuild America Partner Update, the bimonthly newsletter about the Rebuild America community, covers partnership activities, industry trends, and program news. Rebuild America is a network of community partnerships--made up of local governments and businesses--that save money by saving energy. These voluntary partnerships, working with the US Department of Energy, choose the best ways to improve the energy efficiency of commercial, government and apartment buildings. Rebuild America supports them with business and technical tools and customized assistance. By the year 2003, 250 Rebuild America partnerships will be involved in over 2 billion square feet of building renovations, which will save $650 million every year in energy costs, generate $3 billion in private community investment, create 26,000 new private sector jobs, and reduce air pollution by 1.6 million tons of carbon dioxide a year.

  4. Publications in biomedical and environmental sciences programs, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfuderer, H.A.; Moody, J.B.

    1981-07-01

    This bibliography contains 690 references to articles in journals, books, and reports published in the subject area of biomedical and environmental sciences during 1980. There are 529 references to articles published in journals and books and 161 references to reports. Staff members in the Biomedical and Environmental Sciences divisions have other publications not included in this bibliography; for example, theses, book reviews, abstracts published in journals or symposia proceedings, pending journal publications and reports such as monthly and bimonthly progress reports, contractor reports, and reports for internal distribution. This document is sorted by the division, and then alphabetically by author. The sorting by divisions separates the references by subject area in a simple way. The divisions represented in the order that they appear in the bibliography are Analytical Chemistry, Biology, Chemical Technology, Information R and D, Health and Safety Research, Energy, Environmental Sciences, and Computer Sciences.

  5. Estimation Of The Electric Power Potential Of Human Waste Using Students Hostel Soak-Away Pits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onojo, O.J,

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available With the growing demand for electric power supply in Nigeria, there is a need to look into all possible means of electricity generation especially renewable ones. It is an established fact that methane gas is a major product of the anaerobic digestion of human waste and the combustion of this gas can be used to generate electricity. This paper presents a carefully articulated approach to the technique of estimating the amount of electricity that can be generated from a specified amount of human waste. The analysis of the acquired datafrom a student’s hostel pit toilet at the Federal University of Technology, Owerri, shows that the available biomass waste in tonnes per day from the case study area is 3.66 tonnes and the biogas accruable bi-monthly is 154.76kg capable of running a 5KW biogas generator for six (6 days.

  6. A brief introduction of Journal of Traffic and Transportation Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Journal of Tra Evaluating Branch o J.tic f Le and Transportation Engineering was started in 2001 by the suggestion of arning on Traffic and Transportation Engineering of State Council Academic Degree Committee of China. Its responsible department is the Ministry of Education of PRC. Its sponsor is Chang'an University, which is famous with the education and study about road traffic and transportation engineering in China. Its associate sponsors are Evaluating Branch of Learning on Traffic and Transporlation Engineering of State Council Academic Degree Committee of China, Southeast University and Southwest Jiaotong University, the latters are excellent in the field of traffic and transportation engineering in China. This journal with ISSN 1671-1637 is published bimonthly in China

  7. Multifrequency light curves of low-frequency variable radio sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altschuler, D. R.; Broderick, J. J.; Dennison, B.; Mitchell, K. J.; Odell, S. L.; Condon, J. J.; Payne, H. E.

    1984-01-01

    Light curves for the low-frequency variable sources AO 0235 + 16, NRAO 140, PKS 1117 + 14, DA 406, CTA 102, and 3C 454.3, obtained in monthly observations at 318, 430, and 606 MHz using the 305-m telescope at Arecibo and in bimonthly observations at 880 MHz and 1.4 GHz using the 91-m Green Bank transit telescope during 1980-1983, are presented and analyzed. AO 0235 + 16 is found to have basically canonical variability which is attributed to relativistically moving evolving synchrotron components; but in the other sources, strong simultaneous variations at 318, 430, and 606 MHz are observed to be greatly diminished in amplitude at 880 MHz and 1.4 GHz, confirming the existence of the intermediate-frequency gap at about 1 GHz proposed by Spangler and Cotton (1981). The possibility that a second variability mechanism is active in these sources is explored.

  8. On the role of extratropical air-sea interaction in the persistence of the Southern Annular Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Bei; Zhang, Yang; Yang, Xiu-Qun; Nie, Yu

    2016-08-01

    Using the daily atmosphere and ocean reanalysis data, this study highlights the role of extratropical air-sea interaction in the variability of the Southern Annular Mode (SAM). Our analysis shows that the SAM-induced meridional dipolar sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies, through surface heat fluxes, can maintain persistent lower tropospheric temperature anomalies, which further results in anomalous eddy momentum forcing enhancing the persistence of the SAM. With the Finite Amplitude Wave Activity diagnosis, we illustrate that response of the eddy momentum forcing to SST anomalies can be attributed to changes in both baroclinic processes as baroclinic eddy generation and barotropic processes as wave breaking thus resultant diffusive eddy mixing, with the former confined at high latitudes and the latter strongest at midlatitudes. Spectral analysis further suggests that the above air-sea interactions are important for bimonthly and longer time scale SAM variations. The dipolar SST pattern may be an indicator for predicting subseasonal and interseasonal variabilities of the SAM.

  9. Phytoplankton of the portion of the Paranapanema River to be dammed for construction of the Rosana Hydroelectric Plant, Sao Paulo State, Southern Brazil; Fitoplancton do trecho a represar do Rio Paranapanema (Usina Hidreletrica de Rosana), Estado de Sao Paulo, Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bicudo, Carlos E. de M.; Bicudo, Denise de C.; Castro, Ana Alice J. de; Picelli-Vicentim, M. Marcina [Instituto de Botanica, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Secao de Ficologia

    1992-12-31

    The phytoplankton community of the 120 Km long portion of the Paranapanema River located between the Salto Grande Hydroelectric Plant reservoir and the river mouth at the Parana River is surveyed. This part of the river will be dammed for construction of the Rosana hydroelectric System in the State of Sao Paulo, southern Brazil. An inventory was completed for 4 collecting stations, and based on the study of 48 samples gathered bimonthly during the period from November 1985 to September 1986. Each collection is represented by a net concentrated and a raw total phytoplankton sample. Except for the Bacillariophyceae, study of which is still in progress, the other classes present were the following in order of their local representation: Chlorophyceae with 23 taxa, Zygnemaphyceae (= Cyanophyceae) with 9, Tribophyceace (= Xanthophyceae) with 2 each one, and Oedogoniophyceae, Euglenophyceae and Chrysophyceae with a single taxon each, to a total of 55 taxa identified. (author) 27 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Early progress of the Biomedical Computing Technology Information Center (BCTIC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Through five years of effort by the Society of Nuclear Medicine Computer Committee, the Biomedical Computing Technology Information Center (BCTIC) was established by the Division of Biomedical and Environmental Research (DBER) of the U. S. Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in July of 1975. BCTIC forged ahead into the tasks of designing guidelines and procedures, acquisition and packaging of computer codes, data, and interface designs; building a bibliographic data base; and maintaining a directory of the user community. Important contacts were made with societies and individuals involved in biomedical computing; and BCTIC was publicized through news releases, the BCTIC newsletter (bimonthly, since October, 1975), presentations at meetings, and personal contacts. This paper presents the response BCTIC has received in its initial months, gives a progress report on the developmental phase, and takes a look to the future of BCTIC as a national technology resource in nuclear medicine computing

  11. Genomics, Proteomics & Bioinformatics (GPB) Has a New Start——Open Access

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Yu

    2012-01-01

    We are now presenting to our readers the first issue of Volume 10 of Genomics,Proteomics & Bioinformatics (GPB).It is also the first issue for the new status.GPB was founded in 2003 and published in English,focusing on research advancement in the fields of omics and bioinformatics.To ensure an international presence,GPB has its 30-50% editorial board members from outside China.From 2006,GPB has been co-published by Elsevier and Science Press,and its full-text articles are available for downloading from ScienceDirect.In 2011,GPB became a bimonthly journal.Annual downloading counts keep increasing with around 70% from outside China in 2011 (Figure 1).In addition,submissions from abroad account for 70% of the published articles after collaborating with Elsevier.

  12. New methods for the management of esophageal varices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroshi Yoshida; Yasuhiro Mamada; Nobuhiko Taniai; Takashi Tajiri

    2007-01-01

    Bleeding from esophageal varices (EVs) is a catastrophic complication of chronic liver disease. Many years ago, surgical procedures such as esophageal transection or distal splenorenal shunting were the only treatments for EVs. In the 1970s, interventional radiology procedures such as transportal obliteration, left gastric artery embolization, and partial splenic artery embolization were introduced, improving the survival of patients with bleeding EVs. In the 1980s, endoscopic treatment, endoscopic injection sderotherapy (HS), and endoscopic variceal ligarJon (EVL), further contributed to improved survival. We combined IVR with endoscopic treatment or EIS with EVL. Most patients with EVs treated endoscopically required follow-up treatment for recurrent varices. Proper management of recurrent EVs can significantly improve patients' quality of life. Recently, we have performed EVL at 2-mo (bi-monthly) intervals for the management of EVs. Longer intervals between treatment sessions resulted in a higher rate of total eradication and lower rates of recurrence and additional treatment.

  13. The Crop Journal Calls for Papers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>We would like to invite you to submit your latest research accomplishments to The Crop Journal(ISSN:2095-5421;Online ISSN:2214-5141,CN 10-1112/S),a new bimonthly academic journal co-sponsored by the Crop Science Society of China and the Institute of Crop Science,Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences.The Crop Journal is freely available online(Open Access)in ScienceDirect.The Editor-in-Chief of The Crop Journal is Professor Jianmin Wan,PhD,Cheung Kong Scholar,Director of the Institute of Crop Science and Executive Vice President of the Crop Science Society of China,supported by the Editorial Board of 85 international experts from various fields of crop sciences.

  14. A brief introduction of Journal of Traffic and Transportation Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Journal of Traffic and Transportation Engineering was started in 2001 by the suggestion of Evaluating Branch of Learning on Traffic and Transportation Engineering of State Council Academic Degree Committee of China. Its responsible department is the Ministry of Education of PRC. Its sponsor is Chang'an University, which is famous with the education and study about road traffic and transportation engineering in China. Its associate sponsors are Evaluating Branch of Learning on Traffic and Transportation Engineering of State Council Academic Degree Committee of China, Southeast University and Southwest Jiaotong University, the latters are excellent in the field of traffic and transportation engineering in China. This journal with ISSN 1671-1637 is published bimonthly in China.

  15. A brief introduction of Journal of Traffic and Transportation Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Journal of Tra Evaluating Branch o ffic f I.e and Transportation Engineering was started in 2001 by the suggestion of arning on Traffic and Transportation Engineering of State Council Academic Degree Committee of China. Its responsible department is the Ministry of Education of PRC. Its sponsor is Chang'an University, which is famous with the education and study about road traffic and transportation engineering in China. Its associate sponsors are Evaluating Branch of Learning on Traffic and Transportation Engineering of State Council Academic Degree Committee of China, Southeast University and Southwest Jiaotong University, the latters are excellent in the field of traffic and transportation engineering in China. This journal with ISSN 1671-1637 is published bimonthly in China.

  16. Ground-water levels and precipitation data at the Maxey Flats low-level radioactive waste disposal site near Morehead, Kentucky, October 1988-September 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettwoch, Douglas D.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet--Department for Environmental Protection--Division of Waste Management, has an ongoing program to monitor water levels at the Maxey Flats low-level radioactive waste disposal site near Morehead, Kentucky. Ground-water-level and precipitation data were collected from 112 wells and 1 rain gage at the Maxey Flats low-level radioactive waste disposal site during October 1988-September 2000. Data were collected on a semi-annual basis from 62 wells, continuously from 6 wells, and monthly or bimonthly from 44 wells (13 of which had continuous recorders installed for the period October 1998-September 2000). One tipping-bucket rain gage was used to collect data at the Maxey Flats site for the period October 1988-September 2000.

  17. Chemical composition and seasonal variation of the volatile oils from leaves of Michelia champaca L., Magnoliaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Henrique G. Lago

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The volatile oils from leaves of Michelia champaca L. collected bimonthly during one year (four times on the fifteenth day of January, March, May, July, September, and November - 2004 were subjected to GC/FID and GC-MS analysis, from which thirteen components were identified. Additionally, part of the oil obtained from January collection was subjected to fractionation over silica gel soaked with AgNO3 to afford five of the main sesquiterpenes (β-elemene, β-caryophyllene, α-humulene, β-selinene, and α-cadinol. The obtained data showed a significative variation in the proportions of the components, which could be associated to climatic parameters in each collection periods.

  18. The Stone Cold Truth: The Effect of Concrete Encasement on the Rate and Pattern of Soft Tissue Decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, D C; Dabbs, Gretchen R; Roberts, Lindsey G; Cleary, Megan K

    2016-03-01

    This study provides a descriptive analysis of taphonomic changes observed in the soft tissue of ten pigs (Sus scrofa) after being encased in Quickrete (®) concrete and excavated at monthly or bimonthly intervals over the course of 2 years. The best method of subject excavation was investigated. Rate and pattern of decomposition were compared to a nonencased control subject. Results demonstrate subjects interred in concrete decomposed significantly slower than the control subject (p Concrete subjects also display a unique decomposition pattern, exhibiting a chemically burned outer layer of skin and a common separation of the dermal and epidermal layers. Results suggest using traditional methods to estimate postmortem interval on concrete subjects may result in underestimation.

  19. Evaluation of sampling resolution in coral stable isotope records: A case study using records from New Caledonia and Tarawa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Terrence M.; Taylor, Frederick W.; Crowley, Thomas J.; Link, Suzanne M.

    1996-10-01

    We have generated a 40-year-long, monthly stable isotope record from a Porites lutea coral collected offshore of Amedee, New Caledonia (22°S, 167°E) to investigate the relation between sampling resolution in coral isotope studies and retrieval of sea-surface environmental information. We interpret the high correlation between our oxygen isotope record and a twenty-year long sea-surface temperature record at the monthly timescale (r=0.88) to indicate that our coral isotope record is an accurate monitor of environmental conditions offshore of Amedee. The character of the signal and the percent variance explained in the record at the annual band, at the quasi-biennial oscillation band ((QBO) 2.0-2.4 years), and at the El Nino-Southern Oscillation band ((ENSO) 3-8 years) changes little in response to a reduction in sampling density from monthly to bimonthly to quarterly. Similar results have been obtained in a reanalysis of a coral isotope record from Tarawa, Kiribati. Our results indicate that a significant amount of the information obtained from high-density sampling can also be retrieved from lower-density sampling. In particular, bimonthly sampling yields virtually no drop-off in variance explained, and quarterly sampling is satisfactory for resolving interannual and decadal-scale trends in time series. The proposed sampling approach may enable a more rapid filling in of numerous spatial holes in coral sampling sites needed for reconstruction of long-term decadal-scale variations in climate.

  20. Nitric acid measurements in connection with corrosion studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferm, Martin; De Santis, Franco; Varotsos, Costas

    Atmospheric nitric acid does not only contribute to acidification and eutrophication but causes also deterioration of many materials. Material belonging to our cultural heritage is irreplaceable and its lifetime can depend on the corrosion rate. Nowadays, only very few long-term measurements of nitric acid concentration in Europe and elsewhere have been published so far. Due to the fact that atmospheric corrosion is a long-term effect, the relevant research does not necessarily require monitoring of nitric acid on a daily basis. Moreover, power supply is often not available at sites where it is of interest to study the corrosion rate of objects belonging to our cultural heritage. Besides, such measurements must not disturb the impression of the objects. In this context, the diffusive sampling technique provides average concentrations over long-term periods at a low cost. In addition, the samplers used are noiseless, comparatively small in size, and thus, their ambient exposure can be made inconspicuously and with discretion. The present paper is focussed on an intensive corrosion study, which was performed at 11 rural and 23 urban sites in Europe and one rural site in Canada during 2002/2003. For the above-mentioned reasons, the diffusive sampler's technique was employed for the nitric acid monitoring, where the diffusive samplers were first tested against the denuder technique and bi-monthly measurements of nitric acid were thus obtained. The bi-monthly concentrations varied from 0.05 to 4.3 μg m -3 and the annual averages from 0.16 to 2.0 μg m -3. The observations collected, depicted a summertime maximum and a wintertime minimum in the nitric acid concentrations, except at the northern rural sites, where a maximum in the winter was observed. Furthermore, the observed nitric acid concentrations in Southern Europe were higher than in Northern Europe. In a few places, close to the sites of urban measurements, rural measurements of nitric acid were also performed

  1. Biosecurity and mastitis in intensive dairy production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boboš Stanko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Newly purchased animals that enter a herd with high milk production can be infected with pathogens of the mammary gland and are a potential risk of infection to the cows on the farm. This risk cannot be avoided entirely, but it can be minimized by taking biosecurity measures that should be written as a policy developed for biosecurity oversight of veterinary service: when older cows are purchased, they should be bought with complete lactations and SCC records, and bacterial examination of milk from the udder quarters must be negative for pathogens of the udder; newly purchased cows should come from herds in which the geometric mean somatic cell count is less than 200,000. The herd must have individual cow SCC recorded at least bimonthly for the previous 6 months; the herd must not have had any history of Strep. agalactiae infection in the last 2 years, the herd should be BVDV-free or vaccinated, and the herd owner must be honest and willing to provide all this information. Our country has accepted the standards for milk quality and hygienic properties that comply with EU standards. The proposed biosafety measures presented in this paper enable the determination of the health status of the herd and the biosecurity level of mastitis in commercial farming in intensive dairy production. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR-31034

  2. Effect of Different Doses of Oral Cholecalciferol on Serum 1,25(OH)2D in Vitamin D Deficient Schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazi, A A; Hosseinpanah, F; Abdi, H; Hedayati, M; Hasheminia, M; Ghazi, S; Azizi, F

    2016-06-01

    Data regarding 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol in adolescents are limited. We aimed to determine serum levels of this active metabolite of vitamin D and the effects of different doses of vitamin D on its concentration in schoolchildren with high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency. In a previously published randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 210 subjects, aged 14-20 years, were assigned to 3 regimens of vitamin D treatment: group A (n=70) received 50 000 U oral cholecalciferol monthly, group B (n=70), 50 000 U bimonthly, and group C (n=70), placebo. Serum 25(OH)D, calcium, parathyroid hormone, and bone markers were measured at baseline and after 2 and 5 months of treatment. In the present study, serum levels of 1,25(OH)2D were measured in 97 boys and 95 girls. At baseline, girls had significantly higher concentrations of 1,25(OH)2D than boys (36, IQR: 24, 63 vs. 30, IQR: 15, 57.5 pmol/l; psex-stratified analysis did not show any significant difference between different groups at different times of the study period. In an adolescent population with high prevalence of hypovitaminosis D especially in girls, 1,25(OH)2D values were higher in girls than boys. There was no significant change in 1,25(OH)2D concentrations with different doses of vitamin D. PMID:26975346

  3. Temporal changes in fish species composition of headwater streams of the upper Paraguay and Paraná basins, Brazil = Alteração temporal na composição de espécies de peixes em riachos de cabeceira das bacias do alto Paraguai e Paraná, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yzel Rondon Súarez

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out in headwater streams in the Paraguay and Paraná river basins, with bi-monthly samples from January to November 2004, aiming to quantify the influence of environmental factors on the temporal rate of turnover in species composition of the fish communities. The environmental variables explained 73.5% of the variation in beta diversity and 52.5% of the variation in mean dissimilarity. Altitude was the only environmental descriptor that significantly explained the variation in beta diversity and mean dissimilarity in both basins.O presente estudo foi realizado em riachos de cabeceira nas bacias dos rios Paraguai e Paraná, por amostragens bimestrais de janeiro a novembro de 2004, com o objetivo de se quantificar a influência dos fatores ambientais sobre a taxa de alteração temporal na composição de espécies nas comunidades de peixes. As variáveis ambientais utilizadas explicaram 73,5% da variação na taxa de alteração na composição de espécies, utilizando a diversidade beta e 52,5% da variação na taxa de alteração pelo coeficiente de Jaccard. A altitude dos locais amostrados foi o único preditor significativo da taxa de alteração temporal na composição de espécies para ambas as bacias.

  4. Ceramic Technology Project data base: September 1992 summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyes, B.L.P.

    1993-06-01

    Data presented in this report represent an intense effort to improve processing methods, testing methods, and general mechanical properties (rupture modulus, tensile, creep, stress-rupture, dynamic and cyclic fatigue, fracture toughness) of candidate ceramics for use in advanced heat engines. This work was performed by many facilities and represents only a small part of the data generated by the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP) since 1986. Materials discussed include GTE PY6, GN-10, NT-154, NT-164, SN-260, SN-251, SN-252, AY6, silicon nitride combined with rare-earth oxides, Y-TZP, ZTA, NC-433, NT-230, Hexoloy SA, MgO-PSZ-to-MgO-PSZ joints, MgO-PSZ-to-cast iron, and a few whisker/fiber-reinforced ceramics. Information in this report was taken from the project`s semiannual and bimonthly progress reports and from final reports summarizing the results of individual studies. Test results are presented in tabular form and in graphs. All data, including test rig descriptions and material characterizations, are stored in the CTP data base and are available to all project participants on request. The objective of this report is to make available the test results from these studies but not to draw conclusions from those data.

  5. DOE radiological calibrations intercomparison program: Results of fiscal year 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy Radiological Calibration Intercomparison Program was initiated in January 1986, under the research portion of the DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program. The program operates via the exchange of transfer standards, consisting of instrument sets and standard secondary beta sources. There are two instrument sets and the scheduled use has been staggered such that one set is available for use during each month. One set of secondary standard beta sources is available for use bimonthly. During the 1986 fiscal year, five laboratories used the instrument sets and three laboratories used the beta source set. Results were reported for all the measurements. The average and one standard deviation of the ratios of participant results to Pacific Northwest Laboratory calibration values were 1.12 +- 0.17 for gamma measurements. Those ratios for the gamma measurements varied from 0.98 to 3.06. The larger differences of results from measurements performed at two facilities were directly attributable to unfamiliarity with the intercomparison instruments. The average and one standard deviation of the ratios of participant results to PNL calibration values obtained using the secondary 90Sr beta source was 1.02 +- 0.05, which is well within measurement uncertainties. The one participant who performed measurements using 147Pm and 204Tl sources obtained ratios of 0.68 and 1.11, respectively. No measurements were performed using neutron or x-ray sources

  6. Cadmium and lead in seafood from the Aratu Bay, Brazil and the human health risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva da Araújo, Cecilia Freitas; Lopes, Mariângela Vieira; Vaz Ribeiro, Mirian Rocha; Porcino, Thiago Santos; Vaz Ribeiro, Amanda Santos; Rodrigues, Juliana Lima Gomes; do Prado Oliveira, Sérgio Soares; Menezes-Filho, José Antonio

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) levels in seafood and perform a risk assessment based on individual food consumption frequency of inhabitants of the Aratu Bay, Brazil. From December 2013 to November 2014, ready-to-market seafood, including fish [pititinga (Lile piquitinga) and small green eel (Gobionellus oceanicus)], mollusks [mussel (Mytella guyanensis) and oyster (Crassostrea rhizophorae)], and crustaceans [white shrimp (Litopenaeus schmitti) and blue crab (Callinectes exasperatus)], were purchased bimonthly from a local artisanal shellfish harvester. Metal levels were analyzed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Based on the volunteer’ seafood consumption, estimates of the non-carcinogenic target hazard quotients (THQs) were calculated. The annual concentrations (μg/g, w/w) of Cd were 0.007 (±0.001) in crustaceans, 0.001 (±0.0003) in fish, and 0.446 (±0.034) in mollusks. Lead levels were fish, and 0.111 (±0.009) in mollusks. All values were within the international guidelines. We observed that 90.9 % of the responders presented an average THQ < 1, which is classified as negligible risk; however, 9.1 % presented THQs between ≥1 and <9.9. These data are important to inform the community of the imminent exposure risk through communication strategies, with the purpose of minimizing exposure and, consequently, the health effects associated with it.

  7. The distribution of benthic foraminiferal assemblages in the north-west coastal region of Malacca Straits, Malaysia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khairun Yahya; Shuhaida Shuib; Fatin Izzati Minhat; Omar Ahmad; Anita Talib

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the spatial and temporal distribution of benthic foraminiferal assemblages in relation with environmental parameters in Penang Island (the northern part of Malacca Straits, west coast of Peninsula Malaysia). Methods: Foraminifera samples were obtained from 144 sediment samples collected bimonthly throughout a one year sampling period using Ponar grab. These samples were then fixed with 4%buffered formalin stained with Rose Bengal. Temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen and pH were detected in-situ at six sampling points within each transect approximately one metre above the seafloor. Sediment samples collected was also used to determine particle size. Results: A total of fourteen benthic foraminiferal genera obtained from two major groups belonging to the calcareous and agglutinated groups have been identified at all four sampling locations throughout the sampling period. The abundance of 13 out of 14 species were significantly affected by different sampling sites and times (P<0.05). Physicochemical variables comprising temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen and pH differed among sites and sampling months (P<0.05).Conclusions:The distribution of foraminifera in terms of abundance and presence of species indicated dominance by calcareous genera of foraminifera contributed by significantly great abundances of Ammonia sp. and relatively low abundance of agglutinated taxa. This pattern of distribution could indicate a close association between foraminifera and physicochemical parameters.

  8. CJChE, Great Expectation with a Tradition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Time is flying; this issue marks the 20th year of Chinese Journal of Chemical Engineering. As a Journal devoted to the original fundamental research and development on Chemical Engineering, the CJChE grows steadily and healthily in last two decades. It expands in printed pages to become a bimonthly and achieves an editorial time between submission and publication less than 10 months. An electronic editing system has been launched and the published papers can be read on the web. The Journal received 462 submissions in 2011 and a stable acceptance rate of about 50% is maintained in last 8 years, meanwhile the impact factor of ISI statistics rises steadily from 0.124 (year 2000) to 0.901 (year 2010). The delightful growth of CJChE is a result of joint hard work of four troops: readers, authors, reviewers, and editors. Most importantly, we will never forget the great contribution of the founding co-editors-in-chief, Professor Jiayong Chen and Professor Guocong Yu, who took the responsibility of leadership in last 20 years. Their successful leadership constitutes to the valuable tradition: All for Readers and Authors. Therefore, two recent festschrift issues are edited in honor of their 90th Birthday and the retirement from the duty of co-editors-in-chief, and we all wish them happiness and health in the years to come.

  9. Phlebotomine sandfly fauna and natural Leishmania infection rates in a rural area of Cerrado (tropical savannah in Nova Mutum, State of Mato Grosso in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirlei Franck Thies

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL has been reported in every municipality of the State of Mato Grosso, Brazil, but the transmission epidemiology remains poorly understood. Our study was developed in a rural area of the Nova Mutum municipality where four autochthonous cases of ACL were reported in 2009. Our aims were to describe the local phlebotomine sandfly fauna and to investigate the infection rates and infecting Leishmania species in the captured sandflies. Methods Entomological captures were performed bimonthly at 10 fixed sites close to the edge of a forested area between June 2011 and April 2012. Results A total of 3,743 phlebotomine sandflies belonging to 31 distinct species were captured. Approximately 75% of the specimens were females. The most abundant species (45.4% was Lutzomyia antunesi, which was consistently captured at every site. Species that are epidemiologically important for ACL, such as L. flaviscutellata, L. whitmani and L. umbratilis, were also captured. L. antunesi and L. ubiquitalis were naturally infected by Leishmania braziliensis or Le. guyanensis, with minimum infection rates of 0.88% and 6.67%, respectively. Surprisingly, L. antunesi was infected by Le. infantum (synonym chagasi. Conclusions The natural infection of L. antunesi and L. ubiquitalis by Leishmania sp. suggests that these species might play a role in the zoonotic cycle of ACL in Nova Mutum. The presence of Le. infantum in L. antunesi suggests that there may be a risk of an outbreak of visceral leishmaniasis (VL in Nova Mutum.

  10. Quality of water of a dam located in an agricultural area (Campo Verde, MT, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Santos Silva Amorim

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study spatial and temporal variations in limnological characteristics of a dam located in one of the headwaters of the São Lourenço River (Campo Verde, MT were evaluated. The surrounding area is used for soybeans cultivation, corn, cotton, and pasture. We examined biotic (heterotrophic bacteria and chlorophyll a and abiotic factors (precipitation, air and water temperature, electrical conductivity, dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity, total phosphorus, nitrite, nitrate, and ammonia nitrogen at three sampling sites along the longitudinal axis of the water body, and at three depths (at the surface, the Secchi depth, and at the sediment-water interface. Samples were taken bimonthly during 2010. Spearman correlation analysis was used to examine the relationship between biotic and abiotic variables, and then principal components and cluster analyses were used to study the relationship between these factors and the variability observed among the various sampling sites, dam depths, and periods of observation. The analyses showed a strong correlation between factors such as rainfall, heterotrophic bacteria, conductivity, turbidity, and phosphorus, indicating the influence of seasonality in cultivated areas. It was observed that the variations between the sampling sites were more significant (p < 0.01 than in the water column for most of the variables, probably due to the particular characteristics of each sample point and its shallow water column.

  11. Fish diversity of floodplain lakes on the lower stretch of the Solimões river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira-Souza, F K; Freitas, C E C

    2004-08-01

    The fish community of the Solimões floodplain lakes was studied by bimonthly samples taken from May 2001 to April 2002. These were carried out at lakes Maracá (03 degrees 51'33"S, 62 degrees 35'08,6"W), Samaúma (03 degrees 50'42,1"S, 61 degrees 39'49,3"W), and Sumaúma and Sacambú (03 degrees 17'11,6"S and 60 degrees 04'31,4"W), located between the town of Coari and the confluence of the Solimões and Negro rivers. Collections were done with 15 gillnets of standardized dimensions with several mesh sizes. We collected 1,313 animals distributed in 77 species, belonging to 55 genera of 20 families and 5 orders. Characiformes was the most abundant Order, with a larger number of representatives in the Serrasalmidae and Curimatidae. The most abundant species in the samplings were Psectrogaster rutiloides (132 individuals), Pigocentrus nattereri (115 individuals), and Serrasalmus elongatus (109 individuals). Lakes Samaúma, Sacambú, and Sumaúma were adjusted to logarithmic and lognormal series. The diversity exhibited an inverse gradient to the river flow, showing the highest diversity at Lake Sumaúma, followed by Samaúma, Sacambú, and Maracá. Species richness estimated through the jackknife technique ranged from 78 to 107 species. PMID:15622847

  12. Precision Gravity Monitoring of Artificial Recharge at Little Cottonwood Canyon, Wasatch Front, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, B. S.; Gettings, P.; Chapman, D. S.

    2008-12-01

    Repeated high-precision (± 5 μGal) gravity surveys are used to monitor artificial groundwater recharge at the Little Cottonwood Water Treatment Plant (LCWTP) in the southern portion of the Salt Lake Valley, UT. The gravity survey network consists of 30 sites arranged to capture the expected horizontal migration (> 500 meters/yr) of the infiltrated water. An additional 4 stations are arranged 1500 meters from the LCWTP infiltration sites for regional and environmental background control. Prior to starting recharge operations, a set of five background surveys were made between spring 2006 and summer 2007. Background (natural/environmental) variability is reliably estimated at 20 μGals. Infiltration commenced in mid-September 2007 and bimonthly gravity surveys were conducted until July 2008. A peak gravity change of 100 μGals was observed at the end of infiltration. The campaigns following cessation of infiltration showed a decreasing gravity anomaly indicating a dispersion of the ground water mound produced by the infiltration. The final gravity results from July of 2008 showed a 70 μGal decrease from the peak gravity value. Observations suggest the subsurface water flowed to the west of the LCWTP; however the control stations at the western most extent of the survey area show no increase in gravity. The gravity observations are comparable to a previous study conducted in the Weber River delta, which showed that the gravity decay over 3-5 months can be used to determine the bulk hydraulic conductivity of the area.

  13. A comparison of the ecophysiological responses of Chenopodium album and Amaranthus retroflexus to the exclusion of ultraviolet-A and UV-B radiation in the field and the glasshouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cann, J.C.; Miller, S.D.; Vogelmann, T.C. [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States)

    1995-06-01

    The goal of this study was to determine how well two naturalized C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} weedy species, Chenopodium album and Amaranthus retroflexus, would respond to ultraviolet exclusion under field and glasshouse conditions. These plants were grown in: (1) a high elevation (2188m) field plot in Laramie, WY USA, during the summer of 1994 and (2) a glasshouse during the spring of 1995. Three types of plastic were used to exclude either UV-A, UV-B, or both UV-A and UV-B. During the summer of 1994, photosynthetically active radiation and UV-B fluence rates were measured daily. A total of seven biochemical and physiological parameters, such as chlorophyll, flavonoids, biomass, growth rate, stomatal density, and stomatal conductance were measured at bimonthly intervals. The results of the field experiment show almost no effects of excluding UV-A, UV-B, or both upon plant growth, pigment content, or photosynthetic response. Our results suggest that these plants, unlike some crop plants, may be physiologically pre-adapted to tolerate high ambient levels of ultraviolet radiation.

  14. Spatial and temporal patterns of micropollutants upstream and downstream of 24 WWTPs across Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spycher, Barbara; Deuber, Fabian; Kistler, David; Burdon, Frank; Reyes, Marta; Alder, Alfredo C.; Joss, Adriano; Eggen, Rik; Singer, Heinz; Stamm, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Treated wastewater is an important source of micropollutants in many streams. These chemicals consist of very diverse set of compounds that may vary in space and time. In order to improve our understanding of such spatio-temporal patterns of micropollutants in surface waters, we compared upstream and downstream locations at 24 sites across the Swiss Plateau and Jura (12 sites in the 2013 campaign, 12 sites during the 2014 campaign). Each site represents the most upstream treatment plant in the corresponding catchment. This survey is part of the interdisciplinary, Eawag-wide research project EcoImpact that aims at elucidating the ecological effects of micropollutants on stream ecosystems. In 2013, a broad analytical screening was applied to samples collected during winter (January) and summer conditions (June). Based in these results, the bi-monthly samples obtained in 2014 were analysed for a set of about 60 selected organic micropollutants and 10 heavy metals. The screening results demonstrate that generally pharmaceuticals, artificial sweeteners and corrosion inhibitors make up the largest part of the organic micropollutants. Pesticides including biocides and plant protection products are also regularly found but at lower concentrations. This presentation will analyse the variability of the micropollutant patterns across the different sites and how upstream conditions and the wastewater composition changes with season.

  15. Algal massive growth in relation to water quality and salinity at Damietta, north of Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ali Ibraheem Deyab

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To relate the proliferation and dominance of certain algal species at the Damietta and its relation to water quality. Methods: Water and algal biomass were bimonthly sampled from five selected sites at Damietta Province, Egypt during 2012. Algae were identified and quantified. Waters, algae and sediment were analyzed. Results: The physicochemical properties of water showed limited seasonal but substantial local variation. The high levels of nitrogen and phosphorus and turbidity of water pointed to marked eutrophication, which could enhance massive algal growth. The temporal fluctuation in temperature, exposure to industrial and domestic sewage and salinity results in succession between blooming algal species. Spirulina platensis and Chlorella vulgaris alternated in a moderately saline water and Oscillatoria agardhii and Mougeotia scalaris in a fresh water body during summer and winter respectively. Likewise, Microcystis aureginosa and Ulva lactuca alternated in a moderately saline site during autumn and summer respectively. Cladophora albida dominated a fish pond of brackish water and Dunaliella salina dominated the most saline water over the whole period of study. Conclusions: Growth of the predominant algal species is correlated to water quality. These species are of considerable nutritive value, with moderate contents of protein, carbohydrate, macronutrients and micronutrients, which evaluates them for usage as food (green and macroalgae, fodder or bio-fertilizer (cyanophytes.

  16. Estimates of pesticide concentrations and fluxes in two rivers of an extensive French multi-agricultural watershed: application of the passive sampling strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulier, Gaëlle; Lissalde, Sophie; Charriau, Adeline; Buzier, Rémy; Cleries, Karine; Delmas, François; Mazzella, Nicolas; Guibaud, Gilles

    2015-06-01

    In this study, the passive sampling strategy was evaluated for its ability to improve water quality monitoring in terms of concentrations and frequencies of quantification of pesticides, with a focus on flux calculation. Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Samplers (POCIS) were successively exposed and renewed at three sampling sites of an extensive French multi-agricultural watershed from January to September 2012. Grab water samples were recovered every 14 days during the same period and an automated sampler collected composite water samples from April to July 2012. Thirty-nine compounds (pesticides and metabolites) were analysed. DEA, diuron and atrazine (banned in France for many years) likely arrived via groundwater whereas dimethanamid, imidacloprid and acetochlor (all still in use) were probably transported via leaching. The comparison of the three sampling strategies showed that the POCIS offers lower detection limits, resulting in the quantification of trace levels of compounds (acetochlor, diuron and desethylatrazine (DEA)) that could not be measured in grab and composite water samples. As a consequence, the frequencies of occurrence were dramatically enhanced with the POCIS compared to spot sample data. Moreover, the integration of flood events led to a better temporal representation of the fluxes when calculated with the POCIS compared to the bimonthly grab sampling strategy. We conclude that the POCIS could be an advantageous alternative to spot sampling, offering better performance in terms of quantification limits and more representative data.

  17. DOE radiological calibrations intercomparison program: Results of fiscal year 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cummings, F.M.; Roberson, P.L.; McDonald, J.C.

    1987-05-01

    The Department of Energy Radiological Calibration Intercomparison Program was initiated in January 1986, under the research portion of the DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program. The program operates via the exchange of transfer standards, consisting of instrument sets and standard secondary beta sources. There are two instrument sets and the scheduled use has been staggered such that one set is available for use during each month. One set of secondary standard beta sources is available for use bimonthly. During the 1986 fiscal year, five laboratories used the instrument sets and three laboratories used the beta source set. Results were reported for all the measurements. The average and one standard deviation of the ratios of participant results to Pacific Northwest Laboratory calibration values were 1.12 +- 0.17 for gamma measurements. Those ratios for the gamma measurements varied from 0.98 to 3.06. The larger differences of results from measurements performed at two facilities were directly attributable to unfamiliarity with the intercomparison instruments. The average and one standard deviation of the ratios of participant results to PNL calibration values obtained using the secondary /sup 90/Sr beta source was 1.02 +- 0.05, which is well within measurement uncertainties. The one participant who performed measurements using /sup 147/Pm and /sup 204/Tl sources obtained ratios of 0.68 and 1.11, respectively. No measurements were performed using neutron or x-ray sources.

  18. Publications in biomedical and environmental sciences programs, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moody, J.B. (comp.)

    1983-04-01

    This bibliography contains 725 references to articles in journals, books, and reports published in the subject area of biomedical and environmental sciences during 1982. There are 553 references to articles published in journals and books and 172 references to reports. The citations appear once ordered by the first author's division or by the performing division. Staff members in the Biomedical and Environmental Sciences divisions have other publications not included in this bibliography; for example, theses, book reviews, abstracts published in journals or symposia proceedings, pending journal publications and reports such as monthly, bimonthly, and quarterly progress reports, contractor reports, and reports for internal distribution. This document is sorted by the division, and then alphabetically by author. The sorting by divisions separates the references by subject area in a simple way. The divisions are represented alphabetically. Indexes are provided by author, title, and journal reference. Reprints of articles referenced in this bibliography can be obtained from the author or the author's division.

  19. Linking avian communities and avian influenza ecology in southern Africa using epidemiological functional groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Alexandre; de Garine-Wichatitsky, Michel; Ndlovu, Mduduzi; Cumming, Graeme S

    2012-01-01

    The ecology of pathogens, and particularly their emergence in multi-host systems, is complex. New approaches are needed to reduce superficial complexities to a level that still allows scientists to analyse underlying and more fundamental processes. One promising approach for simplification is to use an epidemiological-function classification to describe ecological diversity in a way that relates directly to pathogen dynamics. In this article, we develop and apply the epidemiological functional group (EFG) concept to explore the relationships between wild bird communities and avian influenza virus (AIV) in three ecosystems in southern Africa. Using a two year dataset that combined bird counts and bimonthly sampling for AIV, we allocated each bird species to a set of EFGs that captured two overarching epidemiological functions: the capacity of species to maintain AIV in the system, and their potential to introduce the virus. Comparing AIV prevalence between EFGs suggested that the hypothesis that anseriforms (ducks) and charadriiforms (waders) drive AIV epidemiology cannot entirely explain the high prevalence observed in some EFGs. If anseriforms do play an important role in AIV dynamics in each of the three ecosystems, the role of other species in the local maintenance of AIV cannot be ruled out. The EFG concept thus helped us to identify gaps in knowledge and to highlight understudied bird groups that might play a role in AIV epidemiology. In general, the use of EFGs has potential for generating a range of valuable insights in epidemiology, just as functional group approaches have done in ecology. PMID:23101696

  20. Temporal and spatial variation of the limnological characteristics of a lotic ecosystem in the Cerrado of Mato Grosso.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amintas Nazareth Rossete

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to characterize a stream in the area of Cerrado of Mato Grosso according to limnological characteristics during an annual cycle and to assess its relationship with the hydrological regime and anthropogenic changes of the adjacent land system. Two collection points in the stream were selected which passed through the Parque do Bacaba in addition to two other in areas of anthropogenic influence, mainly cattle-raising activity. Data collection was performed bimonthly in downstream order, from September 2001 to August 2002. At the sampling sites, the water temperature, depth, water transparency, dissolved oxygen, pH, electric conductivity, suspended material and total stream discharge were verified. The spatial variations were more obvious than the temporal changes. The values of water transparency, suspended material, electric conductivity and dissolved oxygen showed the greatest variations. The lowest concentrations of dissolved oxygen in the stream were recorded in the dry period. Among the sampling sites, only the pH did not present any significant differences, and the other variables differed significantly between at least two sampling sites. Between the dry and rainy periods, only the depth of the water column and total stream discharge differed significantly.

  1. Richness, origin and structure of an Eimeria community in a population of Eastern cottontail (Sylvilagus floridanus) introduced into Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolino, S; Hofmannová, L; Girardello, M; Modry, D

    2010-07-01

    The composition and structure of a community of Eimeria was investigated in a population of Eastern cottontail (Sylvilagus floridanus) introduced into Italy. Eight Eimeria species were found, of which all but 1 had North American origins and were presumably introduced into Italy together with imported cottontails. The success of cottontails in spreading microparasites is probably related to their massive release for hunting purposes. Nearly all cottontails were infected with at least 1 Eimeria species, with bimonthly prevalence ranging from 0-6.3% (E. leporis) to 42.9-89.3% (E. environ). Bayesian model averaging and multivariate techniques were used to investigate the relationships between the occurrence of each parasite and the structure of the relative community. Among the host parameters, only sex was found to be associated with the prevalence of E. honessi, while the rest of the parameters were only weakly correlated with prevalence and species richness. This indicates that individual phenotypic host characteristics are probably less important than environmental factors in determining levels of parasite prevalence and diversity. The community of Eimeria species was probably structured by competition, with less species co-occurrence than expected under a null hypothesis. This was made evident by the low co-occurrence of E. environ and E. neoirresidua with E. poudrei, E. honessi, and E. maior. PMID:20233489

  2. Ocorrência de Diplostomum sp Nordmann, 1832 (Digenea: Diplostomatidae em Plagioscion squamosissimus Heckel, 1840, proveniente do Reservatório de Volta Grande, MG, Brasil Occurrence of Diplostomum sp Nordmann, 1832 (Digenea: Diplostomatidae in Plagioscion squamosissimus Heckel, 1840, from Volta Grande Reservoir, MG, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Ruas de Moraes

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho demonstrou a presença de Diplostomum sp (Digenea em corvinas (Plagioscion squamosissimus Heckel, 1840 do reservatório de Volta Grande (MG, avaliando, em condições naturais, a ocorrência do parasito, a intensidade de infestação e a sazonalidade. Os peixes foram coletados bimestralmente, com rede de espera, durante o período de dezembro de 1995 a dezembro de 1996, e dissecados para observação de parasitos. De 68 peixes examinados, 31 apresentaram-se parasitados no globo ocular. A prevalência foi de 45,6% e o número médio de parasitos de 13, variando de 1 a 34.The present work demonstrated the presence of Diplostomum sp (Digenea in corvina (Plagioscion squamosissimus Heckel, 1840 from the Volta Grande Reservoir (MG. Prevalence, intensity and seasonality in the natural conditions were evaluated. Fishes were bimonthly collected with the aid of a net, during the period of December 1995 through December 1996. Thirty one out of sixty eight fishes were parasitized in the eyes. The prevalence was 45,6% and the mean number of parasites was 13 varying from 1 to 34.

  3. Survey of occupational exposure involved in medical and industrial uses of radiation in Israel, 1991-1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Israel Dosimetry Center, operated by the Radiation Safety Department at Soreq NRC, serves approximately 10,000 radiation workers throughout the country. Workers in medical, educational and industrial installations are monitored monthly or bi-monthly for external ionizing radiations: X- and gamma rays, beta radiation, anti thermal and fast neutrons. Dosimetry of all but the last category is performed by TLD (Thermo Luminescence Dosimeter) badges (chest, head, hand, leg) or TLD rings. Fast neutrons exposures are measured by CR-39 track etch detector. The reporting level was 0.2 mSv/month for gamma - and X-radiation until 1993 and has been 0. 1 mSv/month since then. This document constitutes a summary of the occupational exposures (whole-body only, i.e., chest) during the period 1991-1996. Table 1 provides information on the number of monitored workers, the annual collective effective dose, and the average annual effective individual dose per monitored worker and per measurably exposed worker (above the recording level of 0.2 mSv or 0.1 mSv, respectively, at least once a year). The last two columns are the dose distribution ratios, with NR15 being the fraction of the work-force exposed annually to 15 mSv or more and MR15 the fraction of the annual collective dose delivered to this population. (authors)

  4. [Asteroidea, Echinoidea y Holothuroidea in shallow bottoms of Bahía de Loreto, Baja California Sur, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holguin Quiñones, O; Wright López, H; Solís Marín, F

    2000-12-01

    To evaluate echinoderm distribution, abundance and density a double 50 m transect, with a side observation range of 2.5 m was used at each of 11 stations (bimonthly samplings, Aug. 1997-Febr. 1998). In Bahía de Loreto the Phylum Echinodermata consists of 26 taxa. The greatest mean abundance by transect and mean densities in order of importance for Echinoidea were: Echinometra vanbrunti (94.1 +/- 52.9 ind, 0.25 ind/m2), Centrostephanus coronatus (38.15 +/- 9.15 ind, 0.06 ind/m2), Tripneustes depressus (28.68 +/- 6.86 ind, 0.039 ind/m2), Eucidaris thouarsii (10.66 +/- 3.37 ind, 0.025 ind/m2) and Diadema mexicanum (11.75 +/- 4.92 ind, 0.023 ind/m2); for Asteroidea were: Phataria unifascialis, Mithrodia bradleyi and Acanthaster planci. Asteroidea was the dominant class with 12 species, followed by Echinoidea with ten and Holothuroidea was represented by four species. PMID:11487923

  5. Deforestation and Malaria on the Amazon Frontier: Larval Clustering of Anopheles darlingi (Diptera: Culicidae) Determines Focal Distribution of Malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Fábio S M; Honório, Nildimar A

    2015-11-01

    We performed bimonthly mosquito larval collections during 1 year, in an agricultural settlement in the Brazilian Amazon, as well as an analysis of malaria incidence in neighboring houses. Water collections located at forest fringes were more commonly positive for Anopheles darlingi larvae and Kulldorff spatial analysis pinpointed significant larval clusters at sites directly beneath forest fringes, which were called larval "hotspots." Remote sensing identified 43 "potential" hotspots. Sampling of these areas revealed an 85.7% positivity rate for A. darlingi larvae. Malaria was correlated with shorter distances to potential hotpots and settlers living within 400 m of potential hotspots had a 2.60 higher risk of malaria. Recently arrived settlers, usually located closer to the tip of the triangularly shaped deforestation imprints of side roads, may be more exposed to malaria due to their proximity to the forest fringe. As deforestation progresses, transmission decreases. However, forest remnants inside deforested areas conferred an increased risk of malaria. We propose a model for explaining frontier malaria in the Amazon: because of adaptation of A. darlingi to the forest fringe ecotone, humans are exposed to an increased transmission risk when in proximity to these areas, especially when small dams are created on naturally running water collections. PMID:26416110

  6. Dynamics of ovarian maturation during the reproductive cycle of Metynnis maculatus, a reservoir invasive fish species (Teleostei: Characiformes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Scremin Boscolo Pereira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we evaluated the dynamics of ovarian maturation and the spawning processes during the reproductive cycle of Metynnis maculatus. Adult females (n = 36 were collected bimonthly between April 2010 and March 2011. The mean gonadosomatic index (GSI was determined, ovarian and blood samples were submitted for morphometric evaluation and the steroid plasma concentration was determined by ELISA. This species demonstrated asynchronous ovarian development with multiple spawns. This study revealed that, although defined as a multiple spawning species, the ovaries of M. maculatus have a pattern of development with a predominance of vitellogenesis between April and August and have an intensification in spawning in September; in October, a drop in the mean GSI values occurred, and the highest frequencies of post-ovulatory follicles (POFs were observed. We observed a positive correlation between the POF and the levels of 17α-hydroxyprogesterone. Metynnis maculatus has the potential to be used as a source of pituitary tissue for the preparation of crude extracts for hormonal induction; the theoretical period for use is from September to December, but specific studies to determine the feasibility of this approach must be conducted.

  7. Spatial distribution and source apportionment of water pollution in different administrative zones of Wen-Rui-Tang (WRT) river watershed, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liping; Mei, Kun; Liu, Xingmei; Wu, Laosheng; Zhang, Minghua; Xu, Jianming; Wang, Fan

    2013-08-01

    Water quality degradation in river systems has caused great concerns all over the world. Identifying the spatial distribution and sources of water pollutants is the very first step for efficient water quality management. A set of water samples collected bimonthly at 12 monitoring sites in 2009 and 2010 were analyzed to determine the spatial distribution of critical parameters and to apportion the sources of pollutants in Wen-Rui-Tang (WRT) river watershed, near the East China Sea. The 12 monitoring sites were divided into three administrative zones of urban, suburban, and rural zones considering differences in land use and population density. Multivariate statistical methods [one-way analysis of variance, principal component analysis (PCA), and absolute principal component score-multiple linear regression (APCS-MLR) methods] were used to investigate the spatial distribution of water quality and to apportion the pollution sources. Results showed that most water quality parameters had no significant difference between the urban and suburban zones, whereas these two zones showed worse water quality than the rural zone. Based on PCA and APCS-MLR analysis, urban domestic sewage and commercial/service pollution, suburban domestic sewage along with fluorine point source pollution, and agricultural nonpoint source pollution with rural domestic sewage pollution were identified to the main pollution sources in urban, suburban, and rural zones, respectively. Understanding the water pollution characteristics of different administrative zones could put insights into effective water management policy-making especially in the area across various administrative zones. PMID:23404042

  8. Algal massive growth in relation to water quality and salinity at Damietta, north of Egypt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohamed Ali Ibraheem Deyab; Taha Mohamed El-Katony

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To relate the proliferation and dominance of certain algal species at the Damietta and its relation to water quality. Methods: Water and algal biomass were bimonthly sampled from five selected sites at Damietta Province, Egypt during 2012. Algae were identified and quantified. Waters, algae and sediment were analyzed. Results:The physicochemical properties of water showed limited seasonal but substantial local variation. The high levels of nitrogen and phosphorus and turbidity of water pointed to marked eutrophication, which could enhance massive algal growth. The temporal fluctuation in temperature, exposure to industrial and domestic sewage and salinity results in succession between blooming algal species. Spirulina platensis and Chlorella vulgaris alternated in a moderately saline water and Oscillatoria agardhii and Mougeotia scalaris in a fresh water body during summer and winter respectively. Likewise, Microcystis aureginosa and Ulva lactuca alternated in a moderately saline site during autumn and summer respectively. Cladophora albida dominated a fish pond of brackish water and Dunaliella salina dominated the most saline water over the whole period of study. Conclusions:Growth of the predominant algal species is correlated to water quality. These species are of considerable nutritive value, with moderate contents of protein, carbohydrate, macronutrients and micronutrients, which evaluates them for usage as food (green and macroalgae), fodder or bio-fertilizer (cyanophytes).

  9. Cadmium and lead in seafood from the Aratu Bay, Brazil and the human health risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva da Araújo, Cecilia Freitas; Lopes, Mariângela Vieira; Vaz Ribeiro, Mirian Rocha; Porcino, Thiago Santos; Vaz Ribeiro, Amanda Santos; Rodrigues, Juliana Lima Gomes; do Prado Oliveira, Sérgio Soares; Menezes-Filho, José Antonio

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) levels in seafood and perform a risk assessment based on individual food consumption frequency of inhabitants of the Aratu Bay, Brazil. From December 2013 to November 2014, ready-to-market seafood, including fish [pititinga (Lile piquitinga) and small green eel (Gobionellus oceanicus)], mollusks [mussel (Mytella guyanensis) and oyster (Crassostrea rhizophorae)], and crustaceans [white shrimp (Litopenaeus schmitti) and blue crab (Callinectes exasperatus)], were purchased bimonthly from a local artisanal shellfish harvester. Metal levels were analyzed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Based on the volunteer’ seafood consumption, estimates of the non-carcinogenic target hazard quotients (THQs) were calculated. The annual concentrations (μg/g, w/w) of Cd were 0.007 (±0.001) in crustaceans, 0.001 (±0.0003) in fish, and 0.446 (±0.034) in mollusks. Lead levels were

  10. Human migration activities drive the fluctuation of ARGs: Case study of landfills in Nanjing, eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingming; Ye, Mao; Schwab, Arthur P; Li, Xu; Wan, Jinzhong; Wei, Zhong; Wu, Jun; Friman, Ville-Petri; Liu, Kuan; Tian, Da; Liu, Manqiang; Li, Huixin; Hu, Feng; Jiang, Xin

    2016-09-01

    Landfills are perfect sites to study the effect of human migration on fluctuation of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) as they are the final destination of municipal waste. For example, large-scale human migration during the holidays is often accompanied by changes in waste dumping having potential effects on ARG abundance. Three landfills were selected to examine fluctuation in the abundance of fifteen ARGs and Intl1 genes for 14 months in Nanjing, eastern China. Mass human migration, the amount of dumped waste and temperature exerted the most significant effects on bimonthly fluctuations of ARG levels in landfill sites. As a middle-sized cosmopolitan city in China, millions of college students and workers migrate during holidays, contributing to the dramatic increases in waste production and fluctuation in ARG abundances. In line with this, mass migration explained most of the variation in waste dumping. The waste dumping also affected the bioaccessibility of mixed-compound pollutants that further positively impacted the level of ARGs. The influence of various bioaccessible compounds on ARG abundance followed the order: antibiotics>nutrients>metals>organic pollutants. Concentrations of bioaccessible compounds were more strongly correlated with ARG levels compared to total compound concentrations. Improved waste classification and management strategies could thus help to decrease the amount of bioaccessible pollutants leading to more effective control for urban ARG dissemination. PMID:27179703

  11. Plastic litter accumulation on high-water strandline of urban beaches in Mumbai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasiri, H B; Purushothaman, C S; Vennila, A

    2013-09-01

    Today, almost every beach on every coastline is threatened by human activities. The inadequate recycling and poor management of waste in developing countries has resulted in considerable quantities of plastic contaminating beaches. Though India has long coastline of 5,420 km along the mainland with 43 % of sandy beaches, data on litter accumulation, particularly the plastics, which are one of the most common and persistent pollutants in marine environment, are scanty. The abundance and distribution of plastic litter was quantitatively assessed in four sandy beaches in Mumbai, India, bimonthly from May 2011 to March 2012. Triplicates of 2 × 2 m (4 m(2)) quadrats were sampled in each beach with a total of 72 quadrats. Overall, average abundance of 11.6 items m(-2) (0.25-282.5 items m(-2)) and 3.24 g m(-2) (0.27-15.53 g m(-2)) plastic litter was recorded in Mumbai beaches. Plastic litter accumulation significantly varied temporally and spatially at p = 0.05. Significantly higher plastic litter accumulation was recorded in Juhu beach. Furthermore, the highest abundance by weight was recorded in November and May numerically. More than 80 % of plastic particles were within the size range of 5-100 mm both by number and weight. Moreover, coloured plastics were predominant with 67 % by number of items and 51 % by weight. Probably, the intense use of beaches for recreation, tourism, and religious activities has increased the potential for plastic contamination in urban beaches in Mumbai. PMID:23430068

  12. Dermoelectroporation, lipofilling, and pulsed light: a protocol after 2 years of experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacci, Pier A.; Mancini, Sergio

    2005-11-01

    The enourmus boost from adopting biomolecular startegies associated to a better understanding of genetic phenomena opened the way to new methodologies. Among those we can surely locate dermoelectroporation, a methodology that uses the transdermal absorption capacity by means of an apparatus that delivers controlled electrical pulses able to open some "electrical doors". This methodology allows us a protocol of treatment suitable in subjects exhibiting the effects of acne, initial stages of skin ageing without tissue yield. and upkeep of aesthetic surgery. With the term "Biolifting" we signifie a treatment procedure aimed at rejuvenating the face by non-surgical, "soft" and out-patient treatment means. This treatment requires bi-monthly or monthly sessions, a total of four to eight, of a procedure consisting first in superficial microdermabrasion performed with corundum crystals, intended for the removal of the corneus layer and for vascularization. Immediately afterwards, active substances are introduced by means of the Dermoelectroporation treatment, characterized by the possibility of creating the opening of "intercellular gates" that allow the passage of the molecules. The session can be concluded with the application of pulsating light which introduces energy and stimulates the regenerating properties of connective tissues. A home treatment with moisturizing and regenerating creams ends the treatment which is used, with interesting results, also for the aesthetic therapy of stretch marks or hypertrophic scars.

  13. Advertising can help, if you look before you leap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The task of this presentation is to review the advertising program of the U.S. Council for Energy Awareness -- its history, the rationale behind it and the results. Reaching the American public requires a broad-based program using a variety of communication tools and techniques. A program cannot rely solely on advertising to carry its messages. USCEA therefore also has programs in several other key areas, including media activities, public relations, publications and public attitude research. USCEA arranges media tours in major city markets, using both third-party experts and industry executives who brief the editorial boards of major newspapers, hold radio and TV interviews, and participate in press conferences. Such exposure multiplies the impact of our message many times over. In the publications area, USCEA produces a wire service called INFOWIRE and two popular publications -- a monthly newsletter called INFO and a bimonthly magazine called Nuclear Industry. USCEA also produces a variety of other publications on important industry issues. And finally, in addition to staging the annual Nuclear Energy Forum in Washington, USCEA sustains an active conference and workshop program addressing a variety of industry interests, including public information, licensing, the fuel cycle and so forth

  14. Survival and cardioprotective benefits of long-term blueberry enriched diet in dilated cardiomyopathy following myocardial infarction in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismayil Ahmet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite remarkable progress in treatment of chronic heart failure (CHF over the last two decades, mortality, personal suffering and cost remain staggering, and effective interventions are still a challenge. Previously we reported that a blueberry-enriched diet (BD attenuated necroapoptosis and inflammation in periinfarct area in a rat model of myocardial infarction (MI. OBJECTIVES: To test the hypothesis that BD will attenuate the course of CHF, including mortality and cardiac remodeling during the first year after induction of MI in rats. METHOD AND RESULTS: Two weeks after coronary artery ligation, rats were divided into two groups of similar average MI size, measured by echocardiography, and then 12-mo dietary regimens were initiated as follows: ad libitum regular diet (control, CD, n = 27 and isocaloric food with 2% blueberry supplement (BD, n = 27 also available ad libitum. These dietary groups were compared to each other and to sham group (SH. Mortality over the 12 mo was reduced by 22% in BD compared with CD (p<0.01. In the course of developing CHF, BD had no effect on the body weight, heart rate or blood pressure. Bi-monthly Echo revealed significant attenuation of the LV chamber remodeling, LV posterior wall thinning, and MI expansion in BD compared with CD. In fact, BD arrested the MI expansion. CONCLUSION: This is the first experimental evidence that a blueberry-enriched diet has positive effects on the course of CHF and thus warrants consideration for clinical evaluation.

  15. Sandia's mentoring program : an ongoing success.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brewer, Soila

    2003-12-01

    This report summarizes the Mentoring Program at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), which has been an on-going success since its inception in 1995. The Mentoring Program provides a mechanism to develop a workforce able to respond to changing requirements and complex customer needs. The program objectives are to enhance employee contributions through increased knowledge of SNL culture, strategies, and programmatic direction. Mentoring is a proven mechanism for attracting new employees, retaining employees, and developing leadership. It helps to prevent the loss of corporate knowledge from attrition and retirement, and it increases the rate and level of contributions of new managers and employees, also spurring cross-organizational teaming. The Mentoring Program is structured as a one-year partnership between an experienced staff member or leader and a less experienced one. Mentors and mentees are paired according to mutual objectives and interests. Support is provided to the matched pairs from their management as well as division program coordinators in both New Mexico and California locations. In addition, bi-monthly large-group training sessions are held.

  16. Symbiodinium clades A and D differentially predispose Acropora cytherea to disease and Vibrio spp. colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouzé, Héloïse; Lecellier, Gaël; Saulnier, Denis; Berteaux-Lecellier, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    Coral disease outbreaks have increased over the last three decades, but their causal agents remain mostly unclear (e.g., bacteria, viruses, fungi, protists). This study details a 14-month-long survey of coral colonies in which observations of the development of disease was observed in nearly half of the sampled colonies. A bimonthly qPCR method was used to quantitatively and qualitatively evaluate Symbiodinium assemblages of tagged colonies, and to detect the presence of Vibrio spp. Firstly, our data showed that predisposition to disease development in general, and, more specifically, infection by Vibrio spp. in Acropora cytherea depended on which clades of Symbiodinium were harbored. In both cases, harboring clade D rather than A was beneficial to the coral host. Secondly, the detection of Vibrio spp. in only colonies that developed disease strongly suggests opportunistic traits of the bacteria. Finally, even if sporadic cases of switching and probably shuffling were observed, this long-term survey does not suggest specific-clade recruitment in response to stressors. Altogether, our results demonstrate that the fitness of the coral holobiont depends on its initial consortium of Symbiodinium, which is distinct among colonies, rather than a temporary adaptation achieved through acquiring different Symbiodinium clades. PMID:26843939

  17. ANNALS OF GEOPHYSICS: AD MAJORA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Florindo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Annals of Geophysics is a bimonthly international journal, which publishes scientific papers in the field of geophysics sensu lato. It derives from Annali di Geofisica, which commenced publication in January 1948 as a quarterly periodical devoted to general geophysics, seismology, earth magnetism, and atmospheric studies. The journal was published regularly for a quarter of a century until 1982 when it merged with the French journal Annales de Géophysique to become Annales Geophysicae under the aegis of the European Geophysical Society. In 1981, this journal ceased publication of the section on solid earth geophysics, ending the legacy of Annali di Geofisica. In 1993, the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica (ING, founder of the journal, decided to resume publication of its own journal under the same name, Annali di Geofisica. To ensure continuity, the first volume of the new series was assigned the volume number XXXVI (following the last issue published in 1982. In 2002, with volume XLV, the name of the journal was translated into English to become Annals of Geophysics and in consequence the journal impact factor counter was restarted. Starting in 2010, in order to improve its status and better serve the science community, Annals of Geophysics has instituted a number of editorial changes including full electronic open access, freely accessible online, the possibility to comment on and discuss papers online, and a board of editors representing Asia and the Americas as well as Europe. [...

  18. Atmospheric Ozone And Its Biosphere - Atmosphere Exchange In A Mangrove Forest Ecosystem A Case Study From Sundarbans NE Coast Of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manab Kumar Dutta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Temporal variation of atmospheric O3 and its biosphere atmosphere exchange were monitored in the Sundarbans mangrove forest from January 2011 to December 2011 on bimonthly basis. O3 mixing ratios at 10 m and 20 m heights over the forest atmosphere ranged between 14.66 1.88 to 37.90 0.91 and 19.32 6.27 to 39.80 10.13 ppbv respectively having maximal premonsoon and minimal monsoon periods. Average daytime O3 mixing ratio was 1.69 times higher than nighttime indicates significant photo chemical production of O3 in forest atmosphere. Annual averaged O3 mixing ratio in 10 m height was 13.2 lower than 20 m height induces exchange of O3 across mangrove biosphere atmosphere interface depending upon micrometeorological conditions of the forest ecosystem. Annual average biosphere atmosphere O3 exchange flux in this mangrove forest environment was 0.441 g m-2 s-1. Extrapolating the value for entire forest surface area the mangrove ecosystem acts as a sink of 58.4GgO3 annually indicating significant contribution of Sundarbans mangroves towards regional atmospheric O3 budget as well as climate change.

  19. Healthy eating and active living for diabetes in primary care networks (HEALD-PCN: rationale, design, and evaluation of a pragmatic controlled trial for adults with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Steven T

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While strong and consistent evidence supports the role of lifestyle modification in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes (T2DM, the best strategies for program implementation to support lifestyle modification within primary care remain to be determined. The objective of the study is to evaluate the implementation of an evidence-based self- management program for patients with T2DM within a newly established primary care network (PCN environment. Method Using a non-randomized design, participants (total N = 110 per group will be consecutively allocated in bi-monthly blocks to either a 6-month self-management program lead by an Exercise Specialist or to usual care. Our primary outcome is self-reported physical activity and pedometer steps. Discussion The present study will assess whether a diabetes self-management program lead by an Exercise Specialist provided within a newly emerging model of primary care and linked to available community-based resources, can lead to positive changes in self-management behaviours for adults with T2DM. Ultimately, our work will serve as a platform upon which an emerging model of primary care can incorporate effective and efficient chronic disease management practices that are sustainable through partnerships with local community partners. Clinical Trials Registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00991380

  20. Monitoring of phenolic compounds and surfactants in water of Ganga Canal, Haridwar (India)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Richa; Singh, Prashant; Mohan, Manindra; Singh, Rakesh; Aswal, Ravinder Singh

    2013-12-01

    The Ganga Canal emerging out from Ganga River has great ritual importance among pilgrims and tourists at Haridwar, Uttarakhand, India. The Canal is being polluted due to mass bathing, washing, disposal of sewage, industrial waste and these human activities are deteriorating its water quality. To determine the impact of these activities, Ganga Canal water quality at five sites between Haridwar and Roorkee namely Pantdweep, Har Ki Pauri, Singhdwar, Piran Kaliyar and Old Bridge, Roorkee has been analyzed for organic pollutants phenolic compounds and surfactants, which have rarely been assessed and reported so far. The results of analysis show that phenolic compounds are not present in water samples of selected five sites during bi-monthly monitoring from January 2012 to November 2012. The Har Ki Pauri, Singhdwar, Piran Kaliyar and Old Bridge, Roorkee sites have been detected with surfactant concentrations (1.18, 1.63, 3.2 and 2.5 mg/l) more than permissible limit (1.00 mg/l). Also at most of the sites, surfactants' concentration crossed the desirable limit of BIS during the period of analysis. This distribution of surfactants in water has potential risk for skin diseases and cancer and requires regular monitoring with appropriate measures.

  1. Spatial and temporal variation of THg concentrations in run-off water from 19 boreal catchments, 2000–2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total mercury concentrations are presented for 19 Swedish watercourses 2000–2010, together with an analysis of factors affecting these concentrations in space and time. Organic matter (OM) measured as absorbance at 420 nm (Abs420) and total organic carbon (TOC) were the variables most strongly correlated with THg concentrations in the pooled dataset from all 19 watercourses, explaining 66% and 61% of the variance respectively. The correlation between THg and OM indicates that OM is the main controlling factor independent of geographical variation in Hg deposition, geology, or any other factor evaluated in this study. Despite an increase in TOC concentrations at most sites during the study period, THg increased in only one of the watercourses, and the THg/TOC ratio decreased significantly at six sites. The Abs420 did not increase like TOC. We suggest that OM-fractions absorbing at 420 nm are more important for Hg mobilization than other OM-fractions. - Highlights: ► THg was measured bimonthly 2000–2010 from 19 watercourses across Sweden. ► OM quantity and quality explained most of the THg variation in space and time. ► Despite a temporal increase of TOC in most sites, THg increased in just one. ► THg was more strongly correlated with Abs420 than TOC. - Despite strong spatial similarity in the THg/TOC ratio across large gradients of climate, land use and deposition, THg did not follow the temporal TOC trends in individual watercourses.

  2. Fish assemblages in a small temperate estuary on the Argentinian coast: spatial variation, environmental influence and relevance as nursery area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustín Solari

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe effects of different environmental variables on the fish community structure were evaluated in a small temperate estuary. The biological and environmental data were collected bimonthly between 2007 and 2009 along the main estuarine axis. Multivariate analyses were applied (CLUSTER, SIMPER, CCA to determine the spatial structure of fish community and to estimate the environmental influence on it. A total of 48 species of "teleost" fishes were observed, with the families Characidae and Sciaenidae presenting the largest number of species, 90% of the catches being juveniles. The fish community was overwhelmingly dominated by one species (Micropogonias furnieri, 88.9%, and only four species contributed more than 1% of total catch (Odontesthes argentinensis5.4%, Brevoortia aurea 1.1%, Paralonchurus brasiliensis 1.1%, and Mugil platanus 1.0%. Estuarine and freshwater stragglers dominated in number of species, followed by freshwater migrants and marine migrants. Three areas with different fish assemblages, with distinctive species and functional guilds, were defined along the main axis. The occurrence and spatial spread of these areas were linked to spatial variation in salinity, which was consistently influenced by discharge from the Río de la Plata and local precipitation. The results highlight the importance of shallow environments as nursery areas and permit emphasis on their susceptibility to environmental changes.

  3. Management of communication area in a nuclear research and development institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy to the general public is always associated to the production of nuclear weapons or to nuclear and radiological accidents. Public communication actions done by the National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN) have been contributing to make known the social and peaceful applications of nuclear energy, reaching different kinds of public. Interaction programs with society and in particular with students have also been carried out by the Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN/CNEN). Measuring public communication results can help to show that financial resource in this area should be considered as investment and not as expenses. One needs therefore a well-established managing system. Fundamentals of the National Quality Award Criteria for Excellence - PNQ are being applied in the area in charge of business and public communication at CDTN. Systematic registration of results started in 2000 and a gradual increase in the number of means of communication for the internal public has occurred in the last five years. The Center has now a bimonthly newspaper edition. Communication indicators have shown an increasing number of students received in the Center or provided with lectures in schools. Results of satisfaction inquiry from these students show good results. The implemented management system has allowed informing the nature and quantity of people reached by the information on nuclear applications and the improvement in the institutional image. (author)

  4. Nature's Autonomous Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, H. G.; Yee, J.-H.; Mayr, M.; Schnetzler, R.

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinearity is required to produce autonomous oscillations without external time dependent source, and an example is the pendulum clock. The escapement mechanism of the clock imparts an impulse for each swing direction, which keeps the pendulum oscillating at the resonance frequency. Among nature's observed autonomous oscillators, examples are the quasi-biennial oscillation and bimonthly oscillation of the Earth atmosphere, and the 22-year solar oscillation. The oscillations have been simulated in numerical models without external time dependent source, and in Section 2 we summarize the results. Specifically, we shall discuss the nonlinearities that are involved in generating the oscillations, and the processes that produce the periodicities. In biology, insects have flight muscles, which function autonomously with wing frequencies that far exceed the animals' neural capacity; Stretch-activation of muscle contraction is the mechanism that produces the high frequency oscillation of insect flight, discussed in Section 3. The same mechanism is also invoked to explain the functioning of the cardiac muscle. In Section 4, we present a tutorial review of the cardio-vascular system, heart anatomy, and muscle cell physiology, leading up to Starling's Law of the Heart, which supports our notion that the human heart is also a nonlinear oscillator. In Section 5, we offer a broad perspective of the tenuous links between the fluid dynamical oscillators and the human heart physiology.

  5. Water quality monitoring and assessment of an urban Mediterranean lake facilitated by remote sensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markogianni, V; Dimitriou, E; Karaouzas, I

    2014-08-01

    Degradation of water quality is a major problem worldwide and often leads to serious environmental impacts and concerns about public health. In this study, the water quality monitoring and assessment of the Koumoundourou Lake, a brackish urban shallow lake located in the northeastern part of Elefsis Bay (Greece), were evaluated. A number of water quality parameters (pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen concentration, electrical conductivity, turbidity, nutrients, and chlorophyll-a concentration) were analyzed in water samples collected bimonthly over a 1-year period from five stations throughout the lake. Moreover, biological quality elements were analysed seasonally over the 1-year period (benthic fauna). Statistical analysis was performed in order to evaluate the water quality of the lake and distinguish sources of variation measured in the samples. Furthermore, the chemical and trophic status of the lake was evaluated according to the most widely applicable classification schemes. Satellite images of Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper were used in order for algorithms to be developed and calculate the concentration of chlorophyll-a (Chl-a). The trophic status of the lake was characterized as oligotrophic based on phosphorus and as mesotrophic-eutrophic based on Chl-a concentrations. The results of the remote sensing application indicated a relatively high coefficient of determination (R (2)) among point sampling results and the remotely sensed data, which implies that the selected algorithm is reliable and could be used for the monitoring of Chl-a concentration in the particular water body when no field data are available.

  6. Publications in biomedical and environmental sciences programs, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography contains 698 references to articles in journals, books, and reports published in the subject area of biomedical and environmental sciences during 1981. There are 520 references to articles published in journals and books and 178 references to reports. Staff members in the Biomedical and Environmental Sciences divisions have other publications not included in this bibliography; for example, theses, book reviews, abstracts published in journals or symposia proceedings, pending journal publications and reports such as monthly, bimonthly, and quarterly progress reports, contractor reports, and reports for internal distribution. This document is sorted by the division, and then alphabetically by author. The sorting by divisions separates the references by subject area in a simple way. The divisions represented in the order that they appear in the bibliography are Analytical Chemistry, Biology, Chemical Technology, Information R and D, Health and Safety Research, Instrumentation and Controls, Computer Sciences, Energy, Engineering Technology, Solid State, Central Management, Operations, and Environmental Sciences. Indexes are provided by author, title, and journal reference

  7. Emergence of amae crying in early infancy as a possible social communication tool between infants and mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Hiroko

    2015-08-01

    Amae is defined as "wishing to be loved (Scheidlinger (1999). The Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis, 27(1), p. 91)". Amae crying is known as crying of infants when seeking intimate emotional communication with caregivers. The objective of this study was to delineate when and how amae crying emerges in early infancy. Crying episodes of four infants were observed bimonthly, in the natural context of their homes, from birth to 6 months of age, for approximately 60min per session. Crying episodes (total=275) as determined by two coders were analyzed with respect to several behavioral measures. Results indicated that amae crying emerged at the age of 2 months, and consistently accounted for 30-40% of the total crying episodes after the ages of 3 months. Amae crying could be accurately identified when infants were not in acute discomfort and had already got the attention of their mothers. At such times, infants did not shed tears, cried with a fussy voice, and frequently looked at their mothers. Mothers responded to amae crying more promptly than they did to other types of crying behaviors. It is concluded that 3 months of age, when infants probably begin to use crying as a social communication tool is a major turning point for crying behavior from the perspective of its biological and social roles. It is suggested that amae crying might play an important role in strengthening and encouraging mother-infant interactions.

  8. Link between sewage-derived nitrogen pollution and coral disease severity in Guam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We evaluated sources of nitrogen pollution in coastal waters of Guam. • Stable isotope analyses showed the dominance of sewage-derived nitrogen. • Nitrogen inputs correlated with coral disease severity. • Planned population increase on Guam will exacerbate impact of coral diseases. -- Abstract: The goals of this study were to evaluate the contribution of sewage-derived N to reef flat communities in Guam and to assess the impact of N inputs on coral disease. We used stable isotope analysis of macroalgae and a soft coral, sampled bimonthly, as a proxy for N dynamics, and surveyed Porites spp., a dominant coral taxon on Guam’s reefs, for white syndrome disease severity. Results showed a strong influence of sewage-derived N in nearshore waters, with δ15N values varying as a function of species sampled, site, and sampling date. Increases in sewage-derived N correlated significantly with increases in the severity of disease among Porites spp., with δ15N values accounting for more than 48% of the variation in changes in disease severity. The anticipated military realignment and related population increase in Guam are expected to lead to increased white syndrome infections and other coral diseases

  9. A sociocultural analysis of Latino high school students' funds of knowledge and implications for culturally responsive engineering education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, Joel Alejandro

    Previous studies have suggested that, when funds of knowledge are incorporated into science and mathematics curricula, students are more engaged and often develop richer understandings of scientific concepts. While there has been a growing body of research addressing how teachers may integrate students' linguistic, social, and cultural practices with science and mathematics instruction, very little research has been conducted on how the same can be accomplished with Latino and Latina students in engineering. The purpose of this study was to address this gap in the literature by investigating how fourteen Latino and Latina high school adolescents used their funds of knowledge to address engineering design challenges. This project was intended to enhance the educational experience of underrepresented minorities whose social and cultural practices have been traditionally undervalued in schools. This ethnographic study investigated the funds of knowledge of fourteen Latino and Latina high school adolescents and how they used these funds of knowledge in engineering design. Participant observation, bi-monthly group discussion, retrospective and concurrent protocols, and monthly one-on-one interviews were conducted during the study. A constant comparative analysis suggested that Latino and Latina adolescents, although profoundly underrepresented in engineering, bring a wealth of knowledge and experiences that are relevant to engineering design thinking and practice.

  10. Efficacy of three different regimens of primaquine for the prevention of relapses of Plasmodium vivax malaria in the Amazon Basin of Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Salomón; Cabezas, Cesar; Lescano, Andres G; Galvez, Mariela; Gutierrez, Sonia; Arrospide, Nancy; Alvarez, Carlos; Santolalla, Meddly L; Bacon, David J; Graf, Paul C F

    2014-07-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of three primaquine (PQ) regimes to prevent relapses with Plasmodium vivax through an open-label randomized trial in Loreto, Peru. Vivax monoinfections were treated with chloroquine for 3 days and PQ in three different regimes: 0.5 mg/kg per day for 5 days (150 mg total), 0.5 mg/kg per day for 7 days (210 mg total), or 0.25 mg/kg per day for 14 days (210 mg total). Biweekly fever assessments and bimonthly thick smears were taken for 210 days. Recurrences after 35 days were considered relapses. One hundred eighty cases were enrolled in each group; 90% of cases completed follow-up. There were no group-related differences in age, sex, or parasitemia. Relapse rates were similar in the 7- and 14-day regimes (16/156 = 10.3% and 22/162 = 13.6%, P = 0.361) and higher in the 5-day group (48/169 = 28.4%, P < 0.001 and P = 0.001, respectively). The 7-day PQ regimen used in Peru is as efficacious as the recommended 14-day regimen and superior to 5 treatment days.

  11. Using GenBank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, Eric W; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene

    2016-01-01

    GenBank(®) is a comprehensive database of publicly available DNA sequences for 300,000 named organisms, more than 110,000 within the embryophyta, obtained through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects. Daily data exchange with the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) in Europe and the DNA Data Bank of Japan ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through the NCBI Entrez retrieval system that integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, as well as the biomedical journal literature in PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP. GenBank usage scenarios ranging from local analyses of the data available via FTP to online analyses supported by the NCBI web-based tools are discussed. To access GenBank and its related retrieval and analysis services, go to the NCBI home page at www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov . PMID:26519398

  12. Scavenging ducks and transmission of highly pathogenic avian influenza, Java, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Joerg; Wibawa, Hendra; Morton, John; Usman, Tri Bhakti; Junaidi, Akhmad; Meers, Joanne

    2010-08-01

    In Java, Indonesia, during March 2007-March 2008, 96 farms with scavenging ducks that were not vaccinated against highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) were monitored bimonthly. Bird-level (prevalence among individual birds) H5 seroprevalence was 2.6% for ducks and 0.5% for chickens in contact with ducks. At least 1 seropositive bird was detected during 19.5% and 2.0% of duck- and chicken-flock visits, respectively. Duck flocks were 12.4x more likely than chicken flocks to have seropositive birds. During 21.4% of farm visits,

  13. Dinâmica Populacional de Pulgão Preto dos Citros (Sternorrhyncha em Cultivo Orgânico de Tangerina (Citrus reticulata Blanco em Seropédica-RJ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Rodrigues

    2010-07-01

    Abstract. The aphid Toxoptera citricida (Kyrkaldy (Sternorrhyncha is a potential vector of citrus virus tristeza, consider an important pest of the orchard. Was realized bimonthly monitoring between October 2002 and October 2003, with aim of study the populational dynamic this aphid, included predators ant ant-tending, in organic cropping of tangerine cv Ponkan, Fazendinha Agroecológica, Seropédica, RJ. The faunistic analysis of the ant-tending and predators, were realized across Shanon-Wiener (H' and Simpson (D diversity index's, Berger-Parker dominance (d and equitability J (e. The predators considered efficient in the populational reduction of brown citrus aphid (BCA, was Cycloneda sanguinea (L., Azya luteipes Mulsant and Pseudodorus clavatus (Fabr., although has been registered eight predators attacking BCA colonies. Verified that C. sangiunea obtained the biggest populational peak, following P. clavatus and A. luteipes. The predators diversity and equitability was considered high (H'= 0.7979; D =0.9638; e= 0.8836. Tending BCA, was registered Brachymyrmex sp., Camponotus rufipes (Fabricius Camponotus atriceps (Fabricius, Camponotus crassus (Mayr, Camponotus clypeatus (Mayr; Crematogaster sp., Solenospis sp., Ectatomma brunneum (Fabricius and Pseudomyrmex termitarius (Fr. Smith. Ant-tending was considered medium to H' value (0.6585 and high to D value (0.9012. The equitability was considered medium too (e =0.69. T. citricida populational dynamic is influenced to foliar shoot following predation and ant-tending. These two end factors are antagonist due to protection offer to ants at BCA.

  14. Water-quality reconnaissance of Laguna Tortuguero, Vega Baja, Puerto Rico, March 1999-May 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler-Lopez, Luis; Guzman-Rios, Senen; Conde-Costas, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    The Laguna Tortuguero, a slightly saline to freshwater lagoon in north-central Puerto Rico, has a surface area of about 220 hectares and a mean depth of about 1.2 meters. As part of a water-quality reconnaissance, water samples were collected at about monthly and near bi-monthly intervals from March 1999 to May 2000 at four sites: three stations inside the lagoon and one station at the artificial outlet channel dredged in 1940, which connects the lagoon with the Atlantic Ocean. Physical characteristics that were determined from these water samples were pH, temperature, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, dissolved oxygen saturation, and discharge at the outlet canal. Other water-quality constituents also were determined, including nitrogen and phosphorus species, organic carbon, chlorophyll a and b, plankton biomass, hardness, alkalinity as calcium carbonate, and major ions. Additionally, a diel study was conducted at three stations in the lagoon to obtain data on the diurnal variation of temperature, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, and dissolved oxygen saturation. The data analysis indicates the water quality of Laguna Tortuguero complies with the Puerto Rico Environmental Quality Board standards and regulations.

  15. Thoracic red bone marrow dose evaluation in CT of patients with carcinoma of the testes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruickshank, L. (Mayday Univ. Hospital, London (United Kingdom))

    1994-02-01

    At the Royal Marsden Hospital many patients are treated for testicular tumours. These patients initially undergo orchidectomy to remove the affected testicle and staging of the disease is also assessed at surgery. Patients classified as stage one, which is testicular involvement alone with no evidence of metastases, are placed on a surveillance, or watch, policy. This involves monthly or bi-monthly chest x-rays, depending on the disease, tumour marker tests and regular CT scans of the chest, abdomen and pelvis, during the first year. As these patients are young, the age range being 15-35 years and the five year survival rate for all testicular tumours is 97%, the radiation dose they were receiving from the CT scans alone warranted investigation, because a high percentage of the body's red bone marrow (33%) is contained within the thorax, and these patients always have a CT scan of the thorax to identify the presence of any intra-thoracic metastases. The aim of this project was to assess the radiation dose to the red bone marrow of the thorax to discover if this dose approached a level at which radiation induced detriment might be significant. (author).

  16. Household-based malaria control in a highly endemic area of Africa (Tanzania: determinants of transmission and disease and indicators for monitoring - Kilombero Malaria Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Teuscher

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The Kilombero Malaria Project (KMP attemps to define opperationally useful indicators of levels of transmission and disease and health system relevant monitoring indicators to evaluate the impact of disease control at the community or health facility level. The KMP is longitudinal community based study (N = 1024 in rural Southern Tanzania, investigating risk factors for malarial morbidity and developing household based malaria control strategies. Biweekly morbidity and bimonthly serological, parasitological and drug consumption surveys are carried out in all study households. Mosquito densities are measured biweekly in 50 sentinel houses by timed light traps. Determinants of transmission and indicators of exposure were not strongly aggregated within households. Subjective morbidity (recalled fever, objective morbidity (elevated body temperature and high parasitaemia and chloroquine consumption were strongly aggregated within a few households. Nested analysis of anti-NANP40 antibody suggest that only approximately 30% of the titer variance can explained by household clustering and that the largest proportion of antibody titer variability must be explained by non-measured behavioral determinants relating to an individual's level of exposure within a household. Indicators for evaluation and monitoring and outcome measures are described within the context of health service management to describe control measure output in terms of community effectiveness.

  17. Publications in biomedical and environmental sciences programs, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moody, J.B. (comp.)

    1982-07-01

    This bibliography contains 698 references to articles in journals, books, and reports published in the subject area of biomedical and environmental sciences during 1981. There are 520 references to articles published in journals and books and 178 references to reports. Staff members in the Biomedical and Environmental Sciences divisions have other publications not included in this bibliography; for example, theses, book reviews, abstracts published in journals or symposia proceedings, pending journal publications and reports such as monthly, bimonthly, and quarterly progress reports, contractor reports, and reports for internal distribution. This document is sorted by the division, and then alphabetically by author. The sorting by divisions separates the references by subject area in a simple way. The divisions represented in the order that they appear in the bibliography are Analytical Chemistry, Biology, Chemical Technology, Information R and D, Health and Safety Research, Instrumentation and Controls, Computer Sciences, Energy, Engineering Technology, Solid State, Central Management, Operations, and Environmental Sciences. Indexes are provided by author, title, and journal reference.

  18. Effects of the proximal factors on the diel vertical migration of zooplankton in a plateau meso-eutrophic Lake Erhai, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuilin Hu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available To study the proximal factors inducing diel vertical migration (DVM in large and small zooplankton species in a plateau lake in China, we investigated the DVM of crustacean zooplankton in lake Erhai bimonthly from November 2009 to September 2010. We hypothesized that the factors affecting DVM behaviour in different-sized zooplankton were different. A linear regression was used to assess the relationships between environmental variables and the vertical distribution of zooplankton. All crustacean zooplankton exhibited normal DVM patterns (down during the day, up at night across sampling months. The weighted mean depth (WMD of all zooplankton did not show a significant correlation with the WMD of the dominant phytoplankton and chlorophyll-a. However, a negative relationship was observed between the distribution of zooplankton and water temperature in January, March, and July 2010, but the relationship was relatively weak (R2 between 0.1 and 0.4. The vertical distribution of zooplankton was primarily affected by water transparency (P0.05, whereas the factors inducing DVM behaviour differed between large and small zooplankton. Predation avoidance and phototactic behaviour may be the dominant factors influencing DVM of large species, whereas only phototaxis contributed to the migratory behaviour of small species.

  19. Uso do clodronato endovenoso na calcinose difusa em uma criança com síndrome de superposição esclerose sistêmica e dermatomiosite Use of clodronate in extensive calcinosis in a child with systemic sclerosis and dermatomyositis overlap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gláucio R. Werner de Castro

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Os autores descrevem o caso de uma garota negra, com diagnóstico de síndrome de superposição dermatomiosite e esclerose sistêmica, que desenvolveu calcinose difusa, complicada por infecções secundárias e significativa limitação funcional de membros. Tratamento com colchicina, diltiazem e alendronato sódico não se mostrou eficaz no controle da calcinose, requerendo uso endovenoso bimestral de clodronato, que contribuiu para significativa melhora na cicatrização das úlceras cutâneas e na qualidade de vida.The authors report an Afro-Brazilian girl with systemic sclerosis and dermatomyositis overlap who evolved with extensive calcinosis, complicated by secondary infections and important disability. Treatment with colchicine, diltiazem and sodium alendronate was not effective in the control of calcinosis, requiring the use of bimonthly intravenous doses of clodronate that resulted in significant improvement in the healing of cutaneous ulcers and in the quality of life of the patient.

  20. Monitoreo of the feromonas traps in the control of the plague Lasioderma serricorne (F. in the Managerial Unit of Base Alfredo López Brito.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Rosa Rodríguez Valero

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to their inigualable quality, the Cuban tobacco is one of the cultivations that bigger quantity of foreign currencies contributes to the country, but it is attacked by different plagues, in the different stages for those that it passes until its commercialization in leaves or as elaborated product. In the warehouses the most destructive plague is the Lasioderma serricorne (F. and to combat it in the Managerial Unit of Base Alfredo López Brito of Cabaiguán, the fosfamina, toxic product with high price is used in foreign currencies, the same one is applied with a bimonthly frequency, that is to say, every 60 days, for which the present work had as objective to lengthen the date of application of the fosfamina by means of the use of the feromonas traps to achieve a saving to the Unit and to improve the environmental conditions in the same one. The obtained results allowed to diminish the quantity of necessary fosfamina significantly to control the plague, the Unit saved during 4 months in those that it was carried out this work. $869.40 in national currency and $343.55 in CUC a positive impact also took place about the health of the workers and the one intones.

  1. A controlled trial of pulse cyclophosphamide versus pulse methylprednisolone in severe lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesso, R; Monteiro, M; Sato, E; Kirsztajn, G; Silva, L; Ajzen, H

    1994-04-01

    We carried out a prospective randomized trial comparing pulse cyclophosphamide and pulse methylprednisolone in 29 patients with severe lupus nephritis in activity. Patients were assigned to one of two regimens: monthly pulse cyclophosphamide (0.5-1.0 g/m2 body surface area) for 4 months, followed by bimonthly doses for 4 months and quarterly doses for 6 months (14 patients) or pulse methylprednisolone (10-20 mg/kg weight) initially for 3 consecutive days and thereafter in the same intervals as the alternative regimen (15 patients). The mean follow-up was 15 months. Two patients in the cyclophosphamide group and three in the methylprednisolone group died. Renal failure (doubling of serum creatinine) developed in four patients in the cyclophosphamide group compared with five patients in the methylprednisolone group. Cumulative probability of not doubling serum creatinine was similar for cyclophosphamide and methylprednisolone groups (0.66 vs 0.69, respectively, P > 0.20, after 18 months). Cumulative probability of survival without renal failure was also not significantly different (0.61 and 0.63, respectively, P > 0.20, after 18 months). These results suggest that pulse cyclophosphamide is as effective as pulse methylprednisolone in preserving renal function in patients with severe lupus nephritis. PMID:7920609

  2. Preparedness of NGO Health Service Providers in Bangladesh about Distance Based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AKM ALAMGIR

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional survey was conducted countrywide from 15 January to 01 March 2004 to explore the potentials of health care service providers (physicians, nurses, paramedics etc. for using distance-based learning materials. Face-to-face in-depth interview was taken from 99 randomly selected direct service providers, 45 midlevel clinic mangers/physicians and 06 administrators or policy planners. Quasi-open questionnaire was developed for three different levels. Pre-trained interviewer team assisted data collection at field level. Total procedure was stringently monitored for completeness and consistency to ensure quality data. SPSS software was used to process and analyze both univariate and multivariate multiple responses. Identified need for training areas were- STD/HIV, tuberculosis updates, family planning, treatment of locally endemic diseases, behavioral change communication & marketing and quality management system for managers. About 76.7% clinic managers and 89.1% service providers had primary information about distance-based learning in spite showed interest. About 51.5% desired monthly, 20.6% biweekly and 26.8% wanted bimonthly circulation of the distance-based study materials. About 35.1% expected print materials with regular facilitators while 58.8% demanded stand-by facilitators. The study suggested wide acceptance of distance-based learning methods as supplementary to the continuing medical education among the countrywide health service providers.

  3. A content analysis of advertisements for psychotherapy workshops: implications for disseminating empirically supported treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Joan M; Weingardt, Kenneth R; Jaszka, Jacqueline; Wiesner, Michael

    2008-03-01

    This study involved a content analysis of 261 unique advertisements for psychotherapy workshops that appeared in two bimonthly clinical magazines, Psychotherapy Networker and Counselor, during a 2-year period. Two independent judges coded each advertisement and documented the type and prevalence of advertising appeals used. From the seminal diffusion of innovations model, Rogers' (2003) five perceived characteristics of innovations found to influence adoption in diverse fields were not well represented in these workshops appeals, appearing less than 10% each. Few advertisements cited specific empirically supported treatments or presented any evidence of treatment effectiveness beyond expert testimonials. The most frequently noted appeals were to benefit the clinician (e.g., earning education credit or developing skills), characteristics that enhance credibility of the workshop (e.g., reference to storied history or mention of faculty), and features of the advertisements itself (e.g., use of superlatives and exclamation points). Promotional strategies to advertise psychotherapy workshops can be used to inform the dissemination of empirically supported treatments. PMID:18271002

  4. Geohydrology and water quality of the North Platte River alluvial aquifer, Garden County, Western Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Gregory V.; Cannia, James C.

    1995-01-01

    In 1993, a 3-year study was begun to describe the geohydrology and water quality of the North Platte River alluvial aquifer near Oshkosh, Garden County, Nebraska. The study's objectives are to evaluate the geohydrologic characteristics of the alluvial aquifer and to establish a network of observation wells for long-term monitoring of temporal variations and spatial distributions of nitrate and major-ion concentrations. Monitor wells were installed at 11 sites near Oshkosh. The geohydrology of the aquifer was characterized based on water-level measurements and two short-term aquifer tests. Bimonthly water samples were collected and analyzed for pH, specific conductivity, water temperature, dissolved oxygen, and nutrients that included dissolved nitrate. Concentrations of major ions were defined from analyses of semiannual water samples. Analyses of the geohydrologic and water-quality data indicate that the aquifer is vulnerable to nitrate contamination. These data also show that nitrate concentrations in ground water flowing into and out of the study area are less than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Maximum Concentration Level of 10 milligrams per liter for drinking water. Ground water from Lost Creek Valley may be mixing with ground water in the North Platte River Valley, somewhat moderating nitrate concentrations near Oshkosh.

  5. Evaluation of sweet sorghum as a potential ethanol crop in Mississippi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, David Scott

    2011-08-01

    Petroleum prices have made alternative fuel crops a viable option for ethanol production. Sweet sorghum [Sorghum bicolor] is a non-food crop that may produce large quantities of ethanol with minimal inputs. Eleven cultivars were planted in 2008 and 2009 as a half-season crop. Four-row plots 6.9 m by 0.5 m, were monitored bimonthly for °Brix, height, and sugar accumulation. Yield and extractable sap were taken at the end of season. Stalk yield was greatest for the cultivar Sugar Top (4945 kg ha-1) and lowest for Simon (1054 kg ha-1). Dale ranked highest ethanol output (807 L ha-1) while Simon (123 L ha-1) is the lowest. All cultivars peak Brix accumulation occurs in early October. Individual sugar concentrations indicated sucrose is the predominant sugar with glucose and fructose levels dependent on cultivar. Supplemental ethanol in fermented wort was the best preservative tested to halt degradation of sorghum wort.

  6. An overview of radioactive waste disposal procedures of a nuclear medicine department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravichandran, R; Binukumar, J P; Sreeram, Rajan; Arunkumar, L S

    2011-04-01

    Radioactive wastes from hospitals form one of the various types of urban wastes, which are managed in developed countries in a safe and organized way. In countries where growth of nuclear medicine services are envisaged, implementations of existing regulatory policies and guidelines in hospitals in terms of handling of radioactive materials used in the treatment of patients need a good model. To address this issue, a brief description of the methods is presented. A designed prototype waste storage trolley is found to be of great help in decaying the I-131 solid wastes from wards before releasing to waste treatment plant of the city. Two delay tanks with collection time of about 2 months and delay time of 2 months alternately result in 6 releases of urine toilet effluents to the sewage treatment plant (STP) of the hospital annually. Samples of effluents collected at releasing time documented radioactive releases of I-131 much below recommended levels of bi-monthly release. External counting of samples showed good statistical correlation with calculated values. An overview of safe procedures for radioactive waste disposal is presented. PMID:21731225

  7. Seasonal abundance and potential of Japanese encephalitis virus infection in mosquitoes at the nesting colony of ardeid birds, Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tanasak Changbunjong; Thekhawet Weluwanarak; Namaoy Taowan; Parut Suksai; Tatiyanuch Chamsai; Poonyapat Sedwisai

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the abundance and seasonal dynamics of mosquitoes, and to detect Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) in these mosquitoes at the nesting colony of ardeid birds. Methods: Mosquitoes were collected bimonthly from July 2009 to May 2010 by Centers for Disease Control. Light traps and dry ice, as a source of CO2, were employed to attract mosquitoes. Mosquitoes were first identified, pooled into groups of upto 50 mosquitoes by species, and tested for JEV infection by viral isolation and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Results:A total of 20 370 mosquitoes comprising 14 species in five genera were collected. The five most abundant mosquito species collected were Culex tritaeniorhynchus (95.46%), Culex vishnui (2.68%), Culex gelidus (0.72%), Anopheles peditaeniatus (0.58%) and Culex quinquefasciatus (0.22%). Mosquito peak densities were observed in July. All of 416 mosquito pools were negative for JEV. Conclusions: This study provides new information about mosquito species and status of JEV infection in mosquitoes in Thailand. Further study should be done to continue a close survey for the presence of this virus in the ardeid birds.

  8. Civil Service Workforce Market Supply and the Effect on Cost Estimating Relationship (CERS) that May Effect the Productivity Factors for Future NASA Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterk, Steve; Chesley, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    The upcoming retirement of the Baby Boomers will leave a workforce age gap between the younger generation (the future NASA decision makers) and the gray beards. This paper will reflect on the average age of the workforce across NASA Centers, the Aerospace Industry and other Government Agencies, like DoD. This paper will dig into Productivity and Realization Factors and how they get applied to bi-monthly (payroll) data for true full-time equivalent (FTE) calculations that could be used at each of the NASA Centers and other business systems that are on the forefront in being implemented. This paper offers some comparative costs analysis/solutions, from simple FTE cost-estimating relationships (CERs) versus CERs for monthly time-phasing activities for small research projects that start and get completed within a government fiscal year. This paper will present the results of a parametric study investigating the cost-effectiveness of alternative performance-based CERs and how they get applied into the Center's forward pricing rate proposals (FPRP). True CERs based on the relationship of a younger aged workforce will have some effects on labor rates used in both commercial cost models and other internal home-grown cost models which may impact the productivity factors for future NASA missions.

  9. Civil Service Workforce Market Supply and the Effect on the Cost Estimating Relationships (CERs) that may effect the Productivity Factors for Future NASA Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterk, Steve; Chesley, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    The upcoming retirement of the Baby Boomers on the horizon will leave a performance gap between younger generation (the future NASA decision makers) and the gray beards. This paper will reflect on the average age of workforce across NASA Centers, the Aerospace Industry and other Government Agencies, like DoD. This papers will dig into Productivity and Realization Factors and how they get applied to bimonthly (payroll data) for true FTE calculations that could be used at each of the NASA Centers and other business systems that are on the forefront in being implemented. This paper offers some comparative costs solutions, from simple - full time equivalent (FTE) cost estimating relationships CERs, to complex - CERs for monthly time-phasing activities for small research projects that start and get completed within a government fiscal year. This paper will present the results of a parametric study investigating the cost-effectiveness of different alternatives performance based cost estimating relationships (CERs) and how they get applied into the Center s forward pricing rate proposals (FPRP). True CERs based on the relationship of a younger aged workforce will have some effects on labor rates used in both commercial cost models and internal home-grown cost models which may impact the productivity factors for future NASA missions.

  10. Infection patterns of Tylodelphys barilochensis and T. crubensis (Trematoda: Diplostomatidae) metacercariae in Galaxias maculatus (Osmeriformes: Galaxiidae) from two Patagonian lakes and observations on their geographical distribution in the southern Andean region, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Verónica; Liliana, Semenas

    2002-12-01

    In the Patagonian Andean region, 2 species of diplostomatids parasitize the brains of Galaxias maculatus. The purpose of this study was to evaluate seasonal variation, spatial variation, and association with host age in the transmission of Tylodelphys barilochensis and T. crubensis in several oligotrophic lakes in Argentinian Patagonia. Fishes were captured monthly in Lake Gutiérrez and bimonthly in Lake Escondido. One summer or autumn sample was also taken in several other Patagonian lakes. Infection parameters were calculated and compared using nonparametric tests. The 2 species co-occurred in most of the sampled lakes, with high values of prevalence and mean intensity. In Lake Gutiérrez and Lake Escondido, the intensity of both diplostomatid species did not show significant differences between sexes and co-varied with host length. All age classes were infected; maximum prevalence values were reached before maximum mean intensity values in the 1-yr age class. A seasonal pattern of prevalence and mean intensity of the 2 parasite species with autumn mean intensity values differing significantly from those of the other seasons was evident only in Lake Gutiérrez. PMID:12537107

  11. Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact Study Final Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, Tate [Baylor Univ., Waco, TX (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The goal of the Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact (BBCSI) Study was to characterize the concentration and isotopic composition of carbonaceous atmospheric particulate matter (PM) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site in Barrow, AK. The carbonaceous component was characterized via measurement of the organic and black carbon (OC and BC) components of the total PM. To facilitate complete characterization of the particulate matter, filter-based collections were used, including a medium volume PM2.5 sampler and a high volume PM10 sampler. Thirty-eight fine (PM2.5) and 49 coarse (PM10) particulate matter fractions were collected at weekly and bi-monthly intervals. The PM2.5 sampler operated with minimal maintenance during the 12 month campaign. The PM10 sampler used for the BBCSI used standard Tisch hi-vol motors which have a known lifetime of ~1 month under constant use; this necessitated monthly maintenance and it is suggested that the motors be upgraded to industrial blowers for future deployment in the Arctic. The BBCSI sampling campaign successfully collected and archived 87 ambient atmospheric particulate matter samples from Barrow, AK from July 2012 to June 2013. Preliminary analysis of the organic and black carbon concentrations has been completed. This campaign confirmed known trends of high BC lasting from the winter through to spring haze periods and low BC concentrations in the summer.

  12. Summary of 1987 and 1988 manatee aerial surveys at Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provancha, Jane A.; Provancha, Mark J.

    1989-01-01

    Aerial surveys of manatees conducted since 1977 at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) have provided a very useful and cost effective monitoring tool in the assessment of abundance and distribution of manatees in the northern Banana River. Data collected in the mid 1980's as part of the KSC Environmental Monitoring Program indicated that the numbers of manatees utilizing the northern Banana River had increased dramatically from earlier years and that the animals appeared to have changed their distribution patterns within the area as well (Provancha and Provancha 1988). United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and Florida Department of Natural Resources (FLDNR) conducted bimonthly aerial surveys in 1986 for the entire Florida east coast. Their data clearly show that the Banana River has the highest concentration of manatees during the non-winter months when compared to all other segments of the east coast surveys (B. Wiegle/FLDNR, unpublished data). They further show that, in spring, an average of 71 percent of the manatees in Brevard county were located in the Banana River. During that period 85 percent of the animals were north of the NASA Causeway (State Road (SR) 402) in the KSC security zone. These data indicate the importance of the KSC waters to the Florida east coast manatee population. We reinitiated KSC surveys in 1987 to document distributions and numbers of manatees during the spring influx. Aerial censuses were continued throughout the year in 1988 and this report provides a summary of our findings for the two years.

  13. In vitro micronuclei tests to evaluate the genotoxicity of surface water under the influence of tanneries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, A O; Oliveira, N C D; Lemos, C T

    2011-06-01

    Leather manufacturing has a high potential for environmental pollution due to hides and chemicals that are not completely absorbed during the tanning process. This study aims to investigate the mutagenic potential of surface water samples from Cadeia and Feitoria rivers (RS, Brazil) in areas influenced by tanneries and leather footwear industry. Micronucleus assays using V79 cells and human lymphocytes were used. Cells were exposed to surface water collected bimonthly from three sites for a year, totaling six samples. Significant MN induction in human lymphocytes was shown by 83% of samples from sites FEI001 and CAD001 located downstream from the industrial area, followed by FEI004 (33%), upstream. Only a single sample from site FEI004 showed a positive response for MN in V79 cells. Thirteen discordant and five concordant responses were found between the two in vitro tests. Mutagenic agents were found at the sites where chemical quality was worst, corroborating studies on chronic toxicity, oxidative stress and mutagenicity performed in this area. The assay using human lymphocytes was more sensitive than V79 cells to detect the contaminants from this area, showing that it is an excellent biomarker of environmental genotoxicity. PMID:21238575

  14. Instructions to Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Cellular & Molecular Immunology (CMI) is the official publication of the Chinese Society of Immunology. The Journal is published bimonthly in English and edited at the University of Science & Technology of China (USTC). Papers in all areas of cellular and molecular immunology are welcome including immunobiology, comparative immunology, immunogenetics, neuroimmunology, immunopathology, immunopharmacology, tumor immunology, infection immunology, clinical immunology, transplantation immunology, veterinary immunology and immunological techniques. All international immunologists and immunologyrelated investigators will find CMI suitable for their publications. CMI publishes articles and brief reports for original investigations. Reviews and minireviews are also accepted from authors on request by the editorial board of the journal. A paper is submitted to CMI with the understanding that it has not been and will not be published elsewhere. The submission must have the approval of all of the authors. The preferred medium of final submission to the accepting editor is on computer disk with the accompanying reviewed and revised manuscript (see'electronic manuscripts' below). Publication in CMI is taken to imply the authors' willingness to comply with reasonable requests to supply reagents such as recombinant clones and monoclonal antibodies, and sequence data in electronic form to persons lacking access to computer databases.

  15. Instructions to Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Cellular & Molecular Immunology (CMI) is the official publication of the Chinese Society of Immunology. The Journal is published bimonthly in English and edited at the University of Science & Technology of China (USTC). Papers in all areas of cellular and molecular immunology are welcome including immunobiology, comparative immunology, immunogenetics, neuroimmunology, immunopathology, immunopharmacology, tumor immunology, infection immunology, clinical immunology, transplantation immunology, veterinary immunology and immunological techniques. All international immunologists and irnmunologyrelated investigators will find CMI suitable for their publications. CMI publishes articles and brief reports for original investigations. Reviews and minireviews are also accepted from authors on request by the editorial board of the journal A paper is submitted to CMI with the understanding that it has not been and will not be published elsewhere. The submission must have the approval of all of the authors. The preferred medium of final submission to the accepting editor is on computer disk with the accompanying reviewed and revised manuscript (see 'electronic manuscripts' below). Publication in CMI is taken to imply the authors' willingness to comply with reasonable requests to supply reagents such as recombinant clones and monoclonal antibodies, and sequence data in electronic form to persons lacking access to computer databases.

  16. Viral and bacterial contamination in a sedimentary aquifer in Uruguay: evaluation of coliforms as regional indicators of viral contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamazo, Pablo; Colina, Rodney; Victoria, Matias; Alvareda, Elena; Burutatran, Luciana; Ramos, Julian; Olivera, María; Soler, Joan

    2015-04-01

    In many areas of Uruguay groundwater is the only source of water for human consumption and for industrial-agricultural economic activities. Traditionally considered as a safe source, groundwater is commonly used without any treatment. The Uruguayan law requires bacteriological (fecal) analysis for most water uses, but virological analyses are not mentioned in the legislation. In the Salto district, where groundwater is used for human consumption and for agricultural activities, bacterial contamination has been detected in several wells but no viruses analysis have been performed. The Republic University (UDELAR), with the support of the National Agency for Research and Innovation (ANII), is studying the incidence of virus and fecal bacteria in groundwater on an intensive agriculture area of the Salto district. An initial screening campaign of 44 wells was performed in which, besides total and fecal coliforms, rotavirus and adenovirus were detected. A subgroup of the screening wells (15) where selected for bimonthly sampling during a year. In accordance with literature results, single well data analysis shows that coliform and viral contamination can be considered as independent variables. However, when spatial data is integrated, coliform and viral contamination show linear correlation. In this work we present the survey results, we analyse the temporal incidence of variables like precipitation, temperature and chemical composition in well contamination and we discuss the value of coliforms as global indicator of viral contamination for the Salto aquifer.

  17. Prediction of natural gas consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Distributors of natural gas need to predict future consumption in order to purchase a sufficient supply on contract. Distributors that offer their customers equal payment plans need to predict the consumption of each customer 12 months in advance. Estimates of previous consumption are often used for months when meters are inaccessible, or bimonthly-read meters. Existing methods of predicting natural gas consumption, and a proposed new method for each local region are discussed. The proposed model distinguishes the consumption load factors from summer to other seasons by attempting to adjust them by introducing two parameters. The problem is then reduced to a quadratic programming problem. However, since it is not necessary to use both parameters simultaneously, the problem can be solved with a simple iterative procedure. Results show that the new model can improve the two-equation model to a certain scale. The adjustment to heat load factor can reduce the error of prediction markedly while that to base load factor influences the error marginally. 3 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Fluxes of N2O, CH4 and CO2 in a meadow ecosystem exposed to elevated ozone and carbon dioxide for three years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Open-top chambers (OTCs) were used to evaluate the effects of moderately elevated O3 (40-50 ppb) and CO2 (+100 ppm) and their combination on N2O, CH4 and CO2 fluxes from ground-planted meadow mesocosms. Bimonthly measurements in 2002-2004 showed that the daily fluxes of N2O, CH4 and CO2 reacted mainly to elevated O3, while the fluxes of CO2 also responded to elevated CO2. However, the fluxes did not show any marked response when elevated O3 and CO2 were combined. N2O and CO2 emissions were best explained by soil water content and air and soil temperatures, and they were not clearly associated with potential nitrification and dentrification. Our results suggest that the increasing O3 and/or CO2 concentrations may affect the N2O, CH4 and CO2 fluxes from the soil, but longer study periods are needed to verify the actual consequences of climate change for greenhouse gas emissions. - The soil fluxes of N2O, CH4 and CO2 in a meadow ecosystem changed in response to elevated O3 and CO2 in an OTC experiment

  19. Assessment in undergraduate medical education: a review of course exams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison A. Vanderbilt

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study is to describe an approach for evaluating assessments used in the first 2 years of medical school and report the results of applying this method to current first and second year medical student examinations. Methods: Three faculty members coded all exam questions administered during the first 2 years of medical school. The reviewers discussed and compared the coded exam questions. During the bi-monthly meetings, all differences in coding were resolved with consensus as the final criterion. We applied Moore's framework to assist the review process and to align it with National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME standards. Results: The first and second year medical school examinations had 0% of competence level questions. The majority, more than 50% of test questions, were at the NBME recall level. Conclusion: It is essential that multiple-choice questions (MCQs test the attitudes, skills, knowledge, and competency in medical school. Based on our findings, it is evident that our exams need to be improved to better prepare our medical students for successful completion of NBME step exams.

  20. The analysis of Taiwan's residential electricity demand under the electricity tariff policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Po-Jui

    In October 2013, the Taiwan Power Company (Taipower), the monopolized state utility service in Taiwan, implemented an electricity tariff adjustment policy to reduce residential electricity demand. Using bi-monthly billing data from 6,932 electricity consumers, this study examine how consumers respond to an increase in electricity prices. This study employs an empirical approach that takes advantage of quasi-random variation over a period of time when household bills were affected by a change in electricity price. The study found that this price increase caused a 1.78% decline in residential electricity consumption, implying a price elasticity of -0.19 for summer-season months and -0.15 for non-summer-season months. The demand for electricity is therefore relatively inelastic, likely because it is hard for people to change their electricity consumption behavior in the short-term. The results of this study highlight that demand-side management cannot be the only lever used to address Taiwan's forecasted decrease in electricity supply.

  1. Environmental management of the OSBAT 24'' oil pipeline: reached practical results; Gestao ambiental do Oleoduto OSBAT 24{sup :} resultados praticos alcancados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra, Ricardo N.; Garibaldi, Celia M.; Kagawa, Adriana; Serra, Maira B.; Oliveira, Flavio M. de; Perim, Leandro A. [LENC - Laboratorio de Engenharia e Consultoria Ltda., Cotia, SP (Brazil); Baptista, Sidney L. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The main objective of this article is to present considerations about the practical results obtained over the implementation of specialized technical services for environmental monitoring and control of the work of maintenance of OSBAT 24'' pipeline, located in a stretch of about 32 km from the Aquatic Terminal of Sao Sebastiao - SP (TASSE) to the district Camburi. This area is characterized by intense environmental complexity by the presence of the Serra do Mar State Park, under enormous natural diversity of preserved Mata Atlantica forest, contrasting with a considerable pole of urban sprawl whose population growth rates (4.66% pa) and economic they are above the average for the Sao Paulo State. The presentation of results considers the practical implementation of the package of environmental management tools used and seek verification of the scope and quality of the following items: general Review of care as environmental registers occurred at different periods (eg monthly, bimonthly, half, etc.); survey of the nature of environmental registers; environmental registers recovered; cases of non-compliance and the main control measures implemented; evaluation of environmental performance; recommendations and learning. (author)

  2. Environmental radiological protection of Bariloche Atomic Center; Proteccion radiologica ambiental del Centro Atomico Bariloche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andres, Pablo A.; Levanon, Izhar S., E-mail: andresp@cab.cnea.gov.ar, E-mail: levanon@cab.cnca.gov.ar [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina). Centro Atomico Bariloche. Division Proteccion Radiologica

    2013-07-01

    This plan of monitoring radiological environmental routine fits on environmental policy of CNEA, satisfying national and international recommendations for licensed facilities. Sampling matrices are related to direct routes of exposure: air and water (river, lake, sediments, drinking water). Soil samples are also analyzed for having integrated matrices. They are considered as minimum three points of measurement: a white point (water or winds up), a point of maximum (water or winds down) and a point corresponding to the location of the individual representative or a point of public interest. Measurements in air estimate KERMA rate with thermoluminescent dosimeters, bi-monthly, and concentrations of particulate material and aerosols. For water samples (monthly), soil and sediments (quarterly), radionuclides that have download limits are analyzed, according to its importance in the dosages produced in the representative individual. In these cases artificial radionuclides using gamma spectrometry, beta total and Sr-90 by radiochemical techniques if the value of total screening (1 Bq/L) is exceeded. Foods are not included because no possible matrices were detected, either by their distance. by located not predominant wind direction. They are however still looking for milk producers that fulfills the minimum requirements.The data collected are compared with environmental baselines to set trends that might point to future significant changes in the environment during the life of the facilities. So far it was not observed significant differences with respect to baseline values.

  3. Greenhouse and field assessment of different organic compounds against guava-parasitic Meloidogyne enterolobii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Macedo Almeida

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Guava decline is a complex disease involving Meloidogyne enterolobii and Fusarium solani and it has caused major direct losses to Brazilian growers. Although several strategies have been sought to control the nematode, the use of organic soil amendments is currently the best approach to manage this disease. To assess the best amount of meat and bone meal (MBM to be incorporated into the soil, guava seedlings inoculated with M. enterolobii were treated with 1-5% v/v of the MBM. Ninety days later variables related to nematode reproduction and plant development were evaluated, which indicated a potential nematicidal effect of the MBM at 3%. Another experiment assessed nematode- and plant-related variables 90 days after treatment of the seedlings with MBM, chitosan, shrimp shell or neem cake at 3%, 0.05%, 2% and 0.1% v/v, respectively. The MBM ranked first, reducing nematode reproduction. This MBM rate was converted to 25 kg/tree and assessed in three application regimes (monthly, bimonthly or trimonthly, for six months, in an orchard affected by guava decline. The variables assessed were soil density of colony forming units (CFU of bacteria and fungus, and soil and/or root density of M. enterolobii, Helicotylenchus sp., and of different nematode trophic groups. In all three application regimes the MBM reduced all plant-parasitic nematodes in the soil and the fungus CFUs. It also promoted an increase in bacterial CFU and bacterivorous nematodes.

  4. Dynamics of viral abundance and diversity in a Sphagnum-dominated peatland: temporal fluctuations prevail over habitat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flore Charlotte Ballaud

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Viruses impact microbial activity and carbon cycling in various environments, but their diversity and ecological importance in Sphagnum-peatlands are unknown. Abundances of viral particles and prokaryotes were monitored bi-monthly at a fen and a bog at two different depths. Viral particle abundance ranged from 1.7x106 to 5.6x108 particles mL-1, and did not differ between fen and bog but showed seasonal fluctuations. These fluctuations were positively correlated with prokaryote abundance and dissolved organic carbon, and negatively correlated with water-table height and dissolved oxygen. Using shotgun metagenomics we observed a shift in viral diversity between winter/spring and summer/autumn, indicating a seasonal succession of viral communities, mainly driven by weather-related environmental changes. Based on the seasonal asynchrony between viral and microbial diversity, we hypothesize a seasonal shift in the active microbial communities associated with a shift from lysogenic to lytic lifestyles. Our results suggest that temporal variations of environmental conditions rather than current habitat differences control the dynamics of virus-host interactions in Sphagnum-dominated peatlands.

  5. Dynamics of Viral Abundance and Diversity in a Sphagnum-Dominated Peatland: Temporal Fluctuations Prevail Over Habitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballaud, Flore; Dufresne, Alexis; Francez, André-Jean; Colombet, Jonathan; Sime-Ngando, Télesphore; Quaiser, Achim

    2015-01-01

    Viruses impact microbial activity and carbon cycling in various environments, but their diversity and ecological importance in Sphagnum-peatlands are unknown. Abundances of viral particles and prokaryotes were monitored bi-monthly at a fen and a bog at two different layers of the peat surface. Viral particle abundance ranged from 1.7 x 10(6) to 5.6 x 10(8) particles mL(-1), and did not differ between fen and bog but showed seasonal fluctuations. These fluctuations were positively correlated with prokaryote abundance and dissolved organic carbon, and negatively correlated with water-table height and dissolved oxygen. Using shotgun metagenomics we observed a shift in viral diversity between winter/spring and summer/autumn, indicating a seasonal succession of viral communities, mainly driven by weather-related environmental changes. Based on the seasonal asynchrony between viral and microbial diversity, we hypothesize a seasonal shift in the active microbial communities associated with a shift from lysogenic to lytic lifestyles. Our results suggest that temporal variations of environmental conditions rather than current habitat differences control the dynamics of virus-host interactions in Sphagnum-dominated peatlands. PMID:26779149

  6. Study on Differences in Spermatogenic Suppression between Azoospermic and Oligozoospermic Responders Treated with Levonorgestrel Implant Plus Testosterone Undecanoate Injectable in Chinese Men

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Si-tian LIU; You-lun GUI; W.J. Bremner; Er-sheng GAO; Chang-hai HE

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate possible causes resulting in the differences in the spermatogenesis suppression on individual treated with levonorgestrel (LNG) implants and testosterone undecanoate(TU) injectable Methods Totally 21 Chinese male volunteers were given treatment with LNG implants (four rods, 75 mg/rod) and intramuscular injection of TU (500 mg, bimonthly for 3 times). According to the effects of treatment, they were divided into two groups, namely, azoospermia group (group A) and oligozoospermia group (group 0). Then seminal FSH, LH, T and estradiol (E2)were determined by immunoenzymetric assay, while seminal and serum dihydrotachysterol (DHT)and serum sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) were by radioimmunoassay, and seminal transferrin (Tf) by scatter turbidimetry assay.Results Seminal FSH, LH and serum DHT, SHBG, FTI (T/SHBG × 100) levels were significantly lower in group A than in group O, while higher seminal concentrations of E2 were observed in azoospermia group.Conclusion The differences in the spermatogenic suppression in Chinese men might be attributed to different rate of peripheral androgen metabolism, variations in serum SHBG levels,5a-reductase activity and individual aromatase activity during LNG plus TU administration. In addition, seminal sex hormones might be more sensitive indexes to assess the extent of feedback inhibition on hypothalamus-pituitary-testis with exogenous testosterone plus progestogen in the efficacy hormone male contraceptive trials.

  7. An Example of How to Supplement Goal Setting to Promote Behavior Change for Families Using Motivational Interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draxten, Michelle; Flattum, Colleen; Fulkerson, Jayne

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the components and use of motivational interviewing (MI) within a behavior change intervention to promote healthful eating and family meals and prevent childhood obesity. The Healthy Home Offerings via the Mealtime Environment (HOME) Plus intervention was part of a two-arm randomized-controlled trial and included 81 families (children 8-12 years old and their parents) in the intervention condition. The intervention included 10 monthly, 2-hour group sessions and 5 bimonthly motivational/goal-setting phone calls. Data were collected for intervention families only at each of the goal-setting calls and a behavior change assessment was administered at the 10th/final group session. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the MI call data and behavior assessment. Overall group attendance was high (68% attending ≥7 sessions). Motivational/goal-setting phone calls were well accepted by parents, with an 87% average completion rate. More than 85% of the time, families reported meeting their chosen goal between calls. Families completing the behavioral assessment reported the most change in having family meals more often and improving home food healthfulness. Researchers should use a combination of delivery methods using MI when implementing behavior change programs for families to promote goal setting and healthful eating within pediatric obesity interventions. PMID:26940585

  8. Effect of intermittent treatment with amodiaquine on anaemia and malarial fevers in infants in Tanzania: a randomised placebo-controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Massaga, Julius J; Kitua, Andrew Y; Lemnge, Martha M;

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Malaria is a major cause of infant morbidity and mortality in sub-Saharan Africa, and is often complicated by severe anaemia. Resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to most affordable antimalarial drugs is an impediment to intermittent chemotherapy. We investigated the effect of presumpt......BACKGROUND: Malaria is a major cause of infant morbidity and mortality in sub-Saharan Africa, and is often complicated by severe anaemia. Resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to most affordable antimalarial drugs is an impediment to intermittent chemotherapy. We investigated the effect...... of presumptive intermittent treatment with amodiaquine and daily iron supplementation in infants on malarial fevers and anaemia, in a holoendemic area of Tanzania where malaria is largely resistant to chloroquine and sulfadoxine/ pyrimethamine. METHODS: 291 infants aged 12-16 weeks who attended three clinics...... were randomised to receive amodiaquine, iron supplementation, amodiaquine plus iron supplementation, or placebo. Over 6 months, we gave amodiaquine three times with intervals of 60 days; oral iron supplementation was given daily. Malarial fevers and anaemia were monitored at bimonthly treatment visits...

  9. [Community structure of bivalves and gastropods in roots of red mangrove Rhizophora mangle (Rhizophoraceae) in isla Larga, Mochima Bay, Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta Balbas, Vanessa; Betancourt Tineo, Rafael; Prieto Arcas, Antulio

    2014-06-01

    The Rhizophora mangle roots form a complex ecosystem where a wide range of organisms are permanently established, reproduce, and find refuge. In this study, we assessed the diversity of bivalves and gastropods that inhabit red mangrove roots, in isla Larga, Mochima, Venezuela Sucre state. Bimonthly collections were made from January 2007 to May 2008, in four study areas denominated: South, North, East and West. In each area, five mangrove roots were sampled, and the specimens were obtained. We analyzed a total of 180 roots and a total of 35 bivalve species and 25 gastropod species were found. The most abundant bivalves were: Isognomon alatus, Isognomon bicolor, Ostrea equestris, Crassostrea rhizophorae and Brachidontes exustus; among gastropods, the most common where: Littorina angulifera, (Cymatium pileare and Diodora cayenensis. The months with the highest abundances and number of individuals for both groups were January and July 2007, and March 2008. The mangrove ecosystem in isla Larga, presented a number of individuals and species higher than those reported for other regions in Venezuela and the Caribbean. PMID:25102639

  10. Management of communication area in a nuclear research and development institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Wellington Antonio [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Servico de Negocios e Comunicacao]. E-mail: soaresw@cdtn.br

    2005-07-01

    Nuclear energy to the general public is always associated to the production of nuclear weapons or to nuclear and radiological accidents. Public communication actions done by the National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN) have been contributing to make known the social and peaceful applications of nuclear energy, reaching different kinds of public. Interaction programs with society and in particular with students have also been carried out by the Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN/CNEN). Measuring public communication results can help to show that financial resource in this area should be considered as investment and not as expenses. One needs therefore a well-established managing system. Fundamentals of the National Quality Award Criteria for Excellence - PNQ are being applied in the area in charge of business and public communication at CDTN. Systematic registration of results started in 2000 and a gradual increase in the number of means of communication for the internal public has occurred in the last five years. The Center has now a bimonthly newspaper edition. Communication indicators have shown an increasing number of students received in the Center or provided with lectures in schools. Results of satisfaction inquiry from these students show good results. The implemented management system has allowed informing the nature and quantity of people reached by the information on nuclear applications and the improvement in the institutional image. (author)

  11. An overview of radioactive waste disposal procedures of a nuclear medicine department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Ravichandran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Radioactive wastes from hospitals form one of the various types of urban wastes, which are managed in developed countries in a safe and organized way. In countries where growth of nuclear medicine services are envisaged, implementations of existing regulatory policies and guidelines in hospitals in terms of handling of radioactive materials used in the treatment of patients need a good model. To address this issue, a brief description of the methods is presented. A designed prototype waste storage trolley is found to be of great help in decaying the I-131 solid wastes from wards before releasing to waste treatment plant of the city. Two delay tanks with collection time of about 2 months and delay time of 2 months alternately result in 6 releases of urine toilet effluents to the sewage treatment plant (STP of the hospital annually. Samples of effluents collected at releasing time documented radioactive releases of I-131 much below recommended levels of bi-monthly release. External counting of samples showed good statistical correlation with calculated values. An overview of safe procedures for radioactive waste disposal is presented.

  12. An overview of radioactive waste disposal procedures of a nuclear medicine department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravichandran, R; Binukumar, J P; Sreeram, Rajan; Arunkumar, L S

    2011-04-01

    Radioactive wastes from hospitals form one of the various types of urban wastes, which are managed in developed countries in a safe and organized way. In countries where growth of nuclear medicine services are envisaged, implementations of existing regulatory policies and guidelines in hospitals in terms of handling of radioactive materials used in the treatment of patients need a good model. To address this issue, a brief description of the methods is presented. A designed prototype waste storage trolley is found to be of great help in decaying the I-131 solid wastes from wards before releasing to waste treatment plant of the city. Two delay tanks with collection time of about 2 months and delay time of 2 months alternately result in 6 releases of urine toilet effluents to the sewage treatment plant (STP) of the hospital annually. Samples of effluents collected at releasing time documented radioactive releases of I-131 much below recommended levels of bi-monthly release. External counting of samples showed good statistical correlation with calculated values. An overview of safe procedures for radioactive waste disposal is presented.

  13. Reproduction of the exotic bullfrog Lithobates catesbeianus (Shaw, 1802 (Anura, Ranidae in creeks of the Atlantic Rainforest of Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Gomes Afonso

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Reproduction of the exotic bullfrog Lithobates catesbeianus was studied every two months from January 2005 to December 2006, analyzing tadpoles, juveniles, and adult vocalizations at three creeks located in the largest Brazilian center of ornamental fish breeding. Absolute and relative tadpole frequencies were measured bimonthly in three development stages: G1 (no limbs, G2 (hind limbs present, G3 (fore and hind limbs and I (metamorphs. Results show that, during warmest months, a greater proportion of tadpoles in G1, G2, and G3 phases were found in Santo Antônio and Chato creeks, while G1, G3, and I phases were more common in Gavião creek. Tadpoles in G1 and G2 phases predominated in coldest months at all locations. Male calls and highest average water temperatures and rainfall were recorded at 3 streams during the hottest months. Management measures should be adopted, such as the extermination of larval and adult stages, and initiatives should be taken to prevent new re-introductions, such as: (1 installation of fences around tanks where adults are located, (2 placement of protective screens on the pipes that release waste water from tanks directly into streams, (3 capacity building and educational measures on the problems of biological invasions for staff working on ornamental fish farms.

  14. Trophic state of Versilia coast. Second period 1994; Stato trofico del litorale versiliese: saconda fase di studio, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simoni, F.; Bianucci, P.; Magera, F. [Unita` Sanitaria Locale, Lucca (Italy). Unita` operativa di biotossicologia; Antonetti, M.

    1996-02-01

    Between April and September 1994 monthly and bimonthly samples, from the sea water of the Versilia coast (Italy), have been examined and compared to those collected during the correspondent periods of the previous year. Chemical and biological analysis were performed and the samples 1994 analysis confirms the presence of two opposite streams along the North-South direction, that get together in a neutral area between Marina di Pietrasanta and Viareggio (Italy). The highest values of dissolved oxygen were found in the area between Lido di Camaiore (Italy) and the harbor of the Viareggio area (Italy) where the Burlamacca ship way and other less important creeks flow into the sea. The Burlamacca ship way is the most important eutrophic source for both sea water near the beach and far from it (500 meters); the former band shows high levels of chlorophyll a, above 5 mg m{sup -3}, even near the mouth of the Abate creek. The algal populations of the bathing area are strictly connected to the abundant rain, although, red tides, sustained by Fibrocapsa japonica, have been found during the summer season. Dinophysis sp. is constantly found from April to September, presenting mostly in the mounth of June with 240 cells l{sup -1}, at 500 meters from the coast. The presence of Alexandrium genus, even though in a small number, must be checked constantly together with the assay of the PSP biotoxins.

  15. Streamflow monitoring and statistics for development of water rights claims for Wild and Scenic Rivers, Owyhee Canyonlands Wilderness, Idaho, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Molly S.; Fosness, Ryan L.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), collected streamflow data in 2012 and estimated streamflow statistics for stream segments designated "Wild," "Scenic," or "Recreational" under the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System in the Owyhee Canyonlands Wilderness in southwestern Idaho. The streamflow statistics were used by BLM to develop and file a draft, federal reserved water right claim in autumn 2012 to protect federally designated "outstanding remarkable values" in the stream segments. BLM determined that the daily mean streamflow equaled or exceeded 20 and 80 percent of the time during bimonthly periods (two periods per month) and the bankfull streamflow are important streamflow thresholds for maintaining outstanding remarkable values. Prior to this study, streamflow statistics estimated using available datasets and tools for the Owyhee Canyonlands Wilderness were inaccurate for use in the water rights claim. Streamflow measurements were made at varying intervals during February–September 2012 at 14 monitoring sites; 2 of the monitoring sites were equipped with telemetered streamgaging equipment. Synthetic streamflow records were created for 11 of the 14 monitoring sites using a partial‑record method or a drainage-area-ratio method. Streamflow records were obtained directly from an operating, long-term streamgage at one monitoring site, and from discontinued streamgages at two monitoring sites. For 10 sites analyzed using the partial-record method, discrete measurements were related to daily mean streamflow at a nearby, telemetered “index” streamgage. Resulting regression equations were used to estimate daily mean and annual peak streamflow at the monitoring sites during the full period of record for the index sites. A synthetic streamflow record for Sheep Creek was developed using a drainage-area-ratio method, because measured streamflows did not relate well to any index site to allow use of the partial

  16. Rationale and design of the oral HEMe iron polypeptide Against Treatment with Oral Controlled Release Iron Tablets trial for the correction of anaemia in peritoneal dialysis patients (HEMATOCRIT trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isbel Nicole M

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main hypothesis of this study is that oral heme iron polypeptide (HIP; Proferrin® ES administration will more effectively augment iron stores in erythropoietic stimulatory agent (ESA-treated peritoneal dialysis (PD patients than conventional oral iron supplementation (Ferrogradumet®. Methods Inclusion criteria are peritoneal dialysis patients treated with darbepoietin alpha (DPO; Aranesp®, Amgen for ≥ 1 month. Patients will be randomized 1:1 to receive either slow-release ferrous sulphate (1 tablet twice daily; control or HIP (1 tablet twice daily for a period of 6 months. The study will follow an open-label design but outcome assessors will be blinded to study treatment. During the 6-month study period, haemoglobin levels will be measured monthly and iron studies (including transferring saturation [TSAT] measurements will be performed bi-monthly. The primary outcome measure will be the difference in TSAT levels between the 2 groups at the end of the 6 month study period, adjusted for baseline values using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA. Secondary outcome measures will include serum ferritin concentration, haemoglobin level, DPO dosage, Key's index (DPO dosage divided by haemoglobin concentration, and occurrence of adverse events (especially gastrointestinal adverse events. Discussion This investigator-initiated multicentre study has been designed to provide evidence to help nephrologists and their peritoneal dialysis patients determine whether HIP administration more effectively augments iron stores in ESP-treated PD patients than conventional oral iron supplementation. Trial Registration Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry number ACTRN12609000432213.

  17. Microgobius meeki as a potential bio-indicator of habitat disturbance in shallow estuarine areas: a useful tool for the assessment of estuarine quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis-Filho, J A; Giarrizzo, T

    2016-07-01

    The relationships between changes in habitat quality (disturbed and undisturbed sites) and the population parameters (density, size distribution, reproductive activity and diet) of a goby Microgobius meeki were investigated in a tropical estuary to assess its value as an indicator of anthropogenic changes, predominantly the effects of sedimentation and mangrove removal in shallow estuarine areas. Fish sampling surveys were conducted bimonthly between June 2009 and May 2010 over the entire estuarine gradient of the Paraguaçu River estuary, located on the central Brazilian coast. A predictive model was developed to assess the population changes of this species in 10 other tropical estuaries with different dimensions, basin features and distinct levels of anthropogenic disturbance. General linear models were used to relate the population structure of M. meeki to sediment type, habitat type resulting from mangrove conservation status, anthropogenic pressure and environmental characteristics such as salinity, dissolved oxygen concentrations and temperature. Sediment type and the presence of mangrove forests were the most effective predictors of local variability in the population structure of M. meeki. Individuals with mature gonads and high rates of feeding activity were associated predominantly with undisturbed habitats. Estuaries and estuarine sectors with high levels of sedimentation in shallow marginal areas, anthropogenic pressure from domestic and industrial effluents, and evidence of mangrove deforestation yielded the lowest capture rates of both juvenile and adult M. meeki. Based on these findings, M. meeki is identified as a potential indicator of the consequences of anthropogenic disturbance in transitional waters. A simple, but efficient collection protocol, in which overt signs of distress can be promptly observed is proposed. Testing the generality of this approach across different systems might prove useful in a broader conservation biology context. PMID

  18. Spatial and temporal variations of uranium and thorium series along the Egyptian Mediterranean coast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium and thorium series are the two dominant radioactive decay chains in the environment. Sediment samples were collected bimonthly for two years from the area extending from El-Salloum to El-Arish. Gamma measurements have been carried out by means of high-resolution low background PC multi-channel spectrometer, using a coaxial HPGe detector. The highest U and Th series member's concentrations have been recorded at Rashid as one of the high background areas in the world. Except at Rashid, U and Th series concentrations were found to be at natural levels in all the other stations. The average concentrations along the coast during the monitoring period for 234Th, 226Ra, 214Pb and 214Bi as uranium series were 21.03, 19.49, 13.70 and 13.06 Bq/kg, respectively and for 228Ac, 212Pb, 212Bi and 208Tl as thorium series were 13.75, 10.40, 9.38 and 5.22 Bq/kg, respectively. The activity ratio of 228Ac/208Tl was approximately equal three for the majority of sediment samples. The concentration values of 212Pb were shown to be close to the corresponding concentration values of 212Bi and also between 214Pb and 214Bi. Moreover, the values of the Th series are looking lower than the values of the uranium series. Generally, the lowest Th series values have been detected mainly in the western sector stations except at El-Salloum. The concentration of uranium and thorium is dependent on the calcium carbonate content, grain size composition of the sediments and marine biological activities

  19. Seasonally Resolved Surface Water (delta)14C Variability in the Lombok Strait: A Coralline Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilderson, T P; Fallon, S J; Moore, M D; Schrag, D P; Charles, C D

    2008-04-23

    We have explored surface water mixing in the Lombok Strait through a {approx}bimonthly resolved surface water {Delta}{sup 14}C time-series reconstructed from a coral in the Lombok Strait that spans 1937 through 1990. The prebomb surface water {Delta}{sup 14}C average is -60.5{per_thousand} and individual samples range from -72{per_thousand} to 134{per_thousand}. The annual average post-bomb maximum occurs in 1973 and is 122{per_thousand}. The timing of the post-bomb maximum is consistent with a primary subtropical source for the surface waters in the Indonesian Seas. During the post-bomb period the coral records regular seasonal cycles of 5-20{per_thousand}. Seasonal high {Delta}{sup 14}C occur during March-May (warm, low salinity), and low {Delta}{sup 14}C occur in September (cool, higher salinity). The {Delta}{sup 14}C seasonality is coherent and in phase with the seasonal {Delta}{sup 14}C cycle observed in Makassar Strait. We estimate the influence of high {Delta}{sup 14}C Makassar Strait (North Pacific) water flowing through the Lombok Strait using a two endmember mixing model and the seasonal extremes observed at the two sites. The percentage of Makassar Strait water varies between 16 and 70%, and between 1955 and 1990 it averages 40%. During La Nina events there is a higher percentage of Makassar Strait (high {Delta}{sup 14}C) water in the Lombok Strait.

  20. Temporal changes in soil bacterial and archaeal communities with different fertilizers in tea orchards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua; Yang, Shao-hui; Yang, Jing-ping; Lv, Ya-min; Zhao, Xing; Pang, Ji-liang

    2014-11-01

    It is important to understand the effects of temporal changes in microbial communities in the acidic soils of tea orchards with different fertilizers. A field experiment involving organic fertilizer (OF), chemical fertilizer (CF), and unfertilized control (CK) treatments was arranged to analyze the temporal changes in the bacterial and archaeal communities at bimonthly intervals based on the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) profiling. The abundances of total bacteria, total archaea, and selected functional genes (bacterial and archaeal amoA, bacterial narG, nirK, nirS, and nosZ) were determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The results indicate that the structures of bacterial and archaeal communities varied significantly with time and fertilization based on changes in the relative abundance of dominant T-RFs. The abundancy of the detected genes changed with time. The total bacteria, total archaea, and archaeal amoA were less abundant in July. The bacterial amoA and denitrifying genes were less abundant in September, except the nirK gene. The OF treatment increased the abundance of the observed genes, while the CF treatment had little influence on them. The soil temperature significantly affected the bacterial and archaeal community structures. The soil moisture was significantly correlated with the abundance of denitrifying genes. Of the soil chemical properties, soil organic carbon was the most important factor and was significantly correlated with the abundance of the detected genes, except the nirK gene. Overall, this study demonstrated the effects of both temporal alteration and organic fertilizer on the structures of microbial communities and the abundance of genes involved in the nitrogen cycle.

  1. Exposure of native bees foraging in an agricultural landscape to current-use pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hladik, Michelle L; Vandever, Mark; Smalling, Kelly L

    2016-01-15

    The awareness of insects as pollinators and indicators of environmental quality has grown in recent years, partially in response to declines in honey bee (Apis mellifera) populations. While most pesticide research has focused on honey bees, there has been less work on native bee populations. To determine the exposure of native bees to pesticides, bees were collected from an existing research area in northeastern Colorado in both grasslands (2013-2014) and wheat fields (2014). Traps were deployed bi-monthly during the summer at each land cover type and all bees, regardless of species, were composited as whole samples and analyzed for 136 current-use pesticides and degradates. This reconnaissance approach provides a sampling of all species and represents overall pesticide exposure (internal and external). Nineteen pesticides and degradates were detected in 54 composite samples collected. Compounds detected in >2% of the samples included: insecticides thiamethoxam (46%), bifenthrin (28%), clothianidin (24%), chlorpyrifos (17%), imidacloprid (13%), fipronil desulfinyl (7%; degradate); fungicides azoxystrobin (17%), pyraclostrobin (11%), fluxapyroxad (9%), and propiconazole (9%); herbicides atrazine (19%) and metolachlor (9%). Concentrations ranged from 1 to 310 ng/g for individual pesticides. Pesticides were detected in samples collected from both grasslands and wheat fields; the location of the sample and the surrounding land cover at the 1000 m radius influenced the pesticides detected but because of a small number of temporally comparable samples, correlations between pesticide concentration and land cover were not significant. The results show native bees collected in an agricultural landscape are exposed to multiple pesticides, these results can direct future research on routes/timing of pesticide exposure and the design of future conservation efforts for pollinators.

  2. Prior exposure to capture heightens the corticosterone and behavioural responses of little penguins (Eudyptula minor) to acute stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Gemma; Turner, Emma; Dann, Peter; Harcourt, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Studies of physiology can provide important insight into how animals are coping with challenges in their environment and can signal the potential effects of exposure to human activity in both the short and long term. In this study, we measured the physiological and behavioural response of little penguins (Eudyptula minor) that were naïve to human activity over 30 min of capture and handling. We assessed relationships between corticosterone secretion, behaviour, sex and time of day in order to characterize the determinants of the natural stress response. We then compared the response of these naïve penguins with the responses of female little penguins that had been exposed to research activity (bimonthly nest check and weighing) and to both research activity (monthly nest check and weighing) and evening viewing by tourists. We found that corticosterone concentrations increased significantly over 30 min of capture, with naïve penguins demonstrating a more acute stress response during the day than at night. Penguins that had previously been exposed to handling at the research and research/visitor sites showed elevated corticosterone concentrations and consistently more aggressive behaviour after 30 min compared with naïve birds, although there were no significant differences in baseline corticosterone concentrations. Our findings demonstrate that these little penguins have not habituated to routine capture, but rather mount a heightened physiological and behavioural response to handling by humans. Less invasive research monitoring techniques, such as individual identification with PIT tags and automatic recording and weighing, and a reduction in handling during the day should be considered to mitigate some of the potentially negative effects of disturbance. Given the paucity of data on the long-term consequences of heightened stress on animal physiology, our study highlights the need for further investigation of the relationship between the corticosterone

  3. Progressive decline in fractional anisotropy on serial DTI examinations of the corpus callosum: a putative marker of disease activity and progression in SPMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Wei; Zhu, Tong; Zhong, Jianhui; Liu, Xiang [University of Rochester Medical Center, Department of Imaging Sciences, Rochester, NY (United States); Rao, Praveen; Segal, Benjamin M. [University of Michigan, Department of Neurology, Holtom-Garrett Program in Neuroimmunology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ekholm, Sven [University of Rochester Medical Center, Department of Imaging Sciences, Rochester, NY (United States); University of Rochester Medical Center, Division of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Rochester, NY (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Clinical trials of secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS) is lacking reliable biomarkers or outcome measures that reflect tissue injury incurred within a 1- to 2-year observation period. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is sensitive in detecting acute brain tissue damage. We monitored SPMS patients over 12 months for diffusion changes within the corpus callosum (CC). Bimonthly MRI examinations over a 1-year period were performed on 11 SPMS patients. The protocol included postcontrast T1-weighted images and DTI. Based on the appearance of T1 enhancing lesion(s) during the study period, the patients were divided into enhancing (five patients) and nonenhancing (six patients) groups. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) of the genu, body, and splenium of the CC were measured and temporal changes in mean FA and MD were evaluated for each group as well as between groups. Immunology data from peripheral blood mononuclear cells were also collected on a monthly basis. The enhancing group showed significant, progressive decrease in FA in body (p = 0.012) and splenium (p = 0.033) of CC, and significantly higher lymphotoxin-{beta} levels. No significant FA changes were seen in the nonenhancing group. Moreover, the FA decline in the enhancing group deviated significantly from the nonenhancing group, which remained essentially stable. Although MD increased slightly in both groups, there was no significant difference between the two groups. Based on the MR and immunology findings, the results of our study suggest that DTI undergo more rapid and longitudinal changes in SPMS patients with inflammatory activity. (orig.)

  4. Quality of shallow groundwater and drainage water in irrigated agricultural lands in a Mediterranean coastal region of Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odemiş, Berkant; Bozkurt, Sefer; Ağca, Necat; Yalçin, Mehmet

    2006-04-01

    Spatial and seasonal differences in water quality of drainage water and unconfined shallow groundwater were related to irrigation in Samandağ, a Mediterranean coastal region. Eighteen wells, seven drainage points and Orontes River were monitored bimonthly for one year for analyses of electrical conductivity (EC), total dissolved solids (TDS), sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), cations (Na, K, Ca + Mg) and anions (CO(3), HCO(3), Cl and SO(4)). Agricultural irrigation using saline groundwater decreased water quality of Orontes River during the irrigation season (May to September) more than during the non-irrigation season (October to April). Seasonal fluctuations in water quality of shallow groundwater were greater during the irrigation season than the non-irrigation season in the study area. Excessive use of groundwater resulted in a decline in the water table levels in the irrigation season. Water table level rose up to the soil surface in areas where there was a lack of drainage or poor drainage, due to the impact of precipitation in the winter. SAR and pH values of drainage water increased in the irrigation season, while the other properties of drainage water decreased. Irrigation water quality of Orontes River was classified as C(3)S(1) in both seasons. Irrigation water quality of shallow groundwater and drainage water varied from C(2)S(1) to C(4)S(2) in one year. Drainage and well waters were found to be different on yearly basis in terms of Na, SAR (p<0.01) and Ca + Mg concentrations (p<0.001). Ca + Mg concentrations for both sources were different for all sampling dates (p<0.001). PMID:16614781

  5. The role of biophysical interactions within the ijzermonding tidal flat sediment dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Backer, Annelies; Van Colen, Carl; Vincx, Magda; Degraer, Steven

    2010-05-01

    This paper focuses on the importance of biophysical interactions on short-term and long-term sediment dynamics. Therefore, various biological (macrobenthos, photopigments, colloidal EPS) and physical parameters (grain size, water content, sediment stability, bed level) were determined (bi)monthly in nine sampling plots on the IJzermonding tidal flat (Belgium, 51°08'N, 2°44'E) during three consecutive years (July 2005-June 2008). Results showed that sediment stability varied on the short timescale and was directly influenced by biota, while bed level varied mainly on the long-term due to interannual variability. The short-term dynamic relationships between mud content, water content, fucoxanthin and macrobenthos density resulted in a seasonal mud deposition and erosion cycle, and directly influenced sediment stability. Moreover, macrobenthos was proven to be the most important parameter determining sediment stability. On the long-term, a shift was observed from high fucoxanthin/chl a concentration, high mud content and zero to moderate densities of Corophium volutator towards low fucoxanthin/chl a and mud content and high Corophium densities, which resulted in a transition from net accretion to net erosion. However, most measured variables proved to be poor predictors for these long-term bed level changes, indicating that external physical forces, such as waves and storminess, probably were the most important factors triggering long-term sediment dynamics. Nevertheless, biota indirectly influenced bed level changes by mediating short-term changes in sediment stability, thereby influencing the erodability of the sediment. The macrobenthos, and especially the mud shrimp Corophium, was suggested as the (indirect) driving destabilising factor for the sampling plots in the IIzermonding when considering the long-term evolution.

  6. Caracterización de los lepidópteros fitófagos asociados a la herbivoría de frailejones en la microcuenca de la quebrada Calostros del Parque Nacional Natural Chingaza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Salinas

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The paramo ecosystem is one of the most sensitive to changes in climate and land use. These changes in physical conditions may lead to changes in species composition and their life cycles, increasing susceptibility to attack by pathogens and other species that seize the opportunity to colonize new niches. The “frailejon”, Espeletia sp., is a keystone species of the páramo, but herbivory due to phytophagous insects and fungi has recently led to the death of a large number of frailejones. The knowledge of the biology and the effect of insects on such plants contribute to decision making related to environmental management, monitoring, sustainable management and ecosystem preservation. This study was conducted in the watershed of the Calostros creek, Chingaza National Park, Colombia, in order to determine the magnitude of Lepidoptera insect damage inflicted on vegetative structures of individuals of the genus Espeletia sp., and examine whether the symptoms and the degree of insect damage varies between plants from different elevations. For this purpose, 30 Espeletia plants were monitored bi-monthly over a period of six months. We observed three species of Lepidoptera larvae capable of causing damage to Espeletia sp. However only one species, Hellinsia sp., is widely distributed and is able to cause severe damage to frailejones, primarily to the apical meristem of plants. The pathology caused by Hellinsia sp. Includes tissue loss, severe chlorosis and leaf curling. Finally, it was observed that individuals of Espeletia sp have the ability to continue normal development after being hosts of larval Hellinsia sp.

  7. Coral Radiocarbon Records of Indian Ocean Water Mass Mixing and Wind-Induced Upwelling Along the Coast of Sumatra, Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilderson, T P; Grumet, N S; Abram, N J; Beck, J W; Dunbar, R B; Gagan, M K; Hantoro, W S; Suwargadi, B W

    2004-02-06

    Radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) in the skeletal aragonite of annually banded corals track radiocarbon concentrations in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in surface seawater. As a result of nuclear weapons testing in the 1950s, oceanic uptake of excess {sup 14}C in the atmosphere has increased the contrast between surface and deep ocean {sup 14}C concentrations. We present accelerator mass spectrometric (AMS) measurements of radiocarbon isotope ({Delta}{sup 14}C) in Porites corals from the Mentawai Islands, Sumatra (0 S, 98 E) and Watamu, Kenya (3 S, 39 E) to document the temporal and spatial evolution of the {sup 14}C gradient in the tropical Indian Ocean. The rise in {Delta}{sup 14}C in the Sumatra coral, in response to the maximum in nuclear weapons testing, is delayed by 2-3 years relative to the rise in coral {Delta}{sup 14}C from the coast of Kenya. Kenya coral {Delta}{sup 14}C values rise quickly because surface waters are in prolonged contact with the atmosphere. In contrast, wind-induced upwelling and rapid mixing along the coast of Sumatra entrains {sup 14}C-depleted water from the subsurface, which dilutes the effect of the uptake of bomb-laden {sup 14}C by the surface-ocean. Bimonthly AMS {Delta}{sup 14}C measurements on the Mentawai coral reveal mainly interannual variability with minor seasonal variability. The interannual signal may be a response to changes in the Walker circulation, the development of easterly wind anomalies, shoaling of the eastern thermocline, and upwelling of {sup 14}C-depleted water along the coast of Sumatra. Singular spectrum analysis of the Sumatra coral {Delta}{sup 14}C record reveals a significant 3-year periodicity. The results lend support to the concept that ocean atmosphere interactions between the Pacific and Indian Oceans operate in concert with the El Ni{tilde n}o-Southern Oscillation (ENSO).

  8. Evaluation of the BPA Residential Weatherization Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirst, E.; Goeltz, R.; White, D.; Bronfman, B.; Lerman, D.; Keating, K.

    1985-06-01

    This report documents the activities and results of a comprehensive, quantitative evaluation of the BPA program. The evaluation focuses on the energy-saving effects of the program and on its economic costs and benefits. In addition, the evaluation addresses issues related to program operation: participants satisfaction with the program, differences between participants in 1982 and 1983, differences between participant and nonparticipants, and the retrofit measures recommended in the energy audits relative to those subsequently installed with BPA financing. Analysis of these issues required collection and organization of a large and complicated data base. These data include monthly or bimonthly electricity consumption records, for samples of 1982 and 1983 program participants and nonparticipants, from mid-1981 through mid-1984; daily temperature data for 32 weather stations near these households to adjust electricity consumption for changes in winter severity; energy audit reports and weatherization completion forms for program participants; information on household demographic characteristics, structure characteristics, heating fuels, recent conservation actions, and attitudes towards energy conservation from on-site and telephone surveys conducted in 1983; and updates on changes in important energy-related characteristics from a mail survey conducted in Summer 1984. These data were collected from households served by ten electric utilities that participated in the BPA interim program. All of these households have electric space heating equipment, almost all live in single-family homes, almost all own their homes, and all have lived in their present residence since mid-1981. Data are available for about 600 1982 participants, 600 1983 participants, 400 nonparticipants, and 70 households that received an audit only. 22 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Striped bass annual site fidelity and habitat utilization in J. Strom Thurmond Reservoir, South Carolina-Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, S.P.; Isely, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    Forty-eight adult striped bass Morone saxatilis (3.2-19.1 kg) were captured by electrofishing in the tailrace of Richard B. Russell Dam and in the upper reaches of two major tributaries; they were implanted with temperature-sensitive radio transmitters and tracked approximately bimonthly for 20 months. As J. Strom Thurmond Reservoir downstream from the dam became thermally stratified in May, fish vacated the tributaries. From June to October, all striped bass were found within the reservoir's historical Savannah River channel. By August, most of the instrumented fish were found in the upper section of the reservoir, where optimal habitat was available throughout the summer owing to cool, artificially oxygenated hypolimnetic discharges from Richard B. Russell Dam. In mid-October the reservoir destratified, and fish dispersed from their up-reservoir summering areas and redistributed themselves throughout the reservoir. During early winter, the striped bass returned to tributary habitat or down-reservoir areas and generally used these locations throughout the winter. The fish exhibited a high degree of site fidelity to their summering areas, source tributaries (after fall dispersal and throughout the winter), and spring spawning areas. Mean movement rates were highest in the spring and fall, corresponding to the migration from tributaries in May and the return migration after fall dispersal. Mean movement rates were lowest in summer and winter, corresponding to the periods of high fidelity to summering and wintering areas. The average monthly temperatures and dissolved oxygen concentrations in areas used by striped bass were 19.0-20.4??C and 4.86-6.44 mg/L during May-October, which corresponded to average monthly habitat suitability index values of 0.76-0.98. Striped bass avoided temperatures above 25.1??C and dissolved oxygen concentrations less than 2.3 mg/L.

  10. The implementation of an aquatic toxicity index as a water quality monitoring tool in the Olifants River (Kruger National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Wepener

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Large sets of water quality data can leave water quality managers and decision-makers totally overwhelmed. In order to convey the interpretation of the data in a simplified and understandable manner, the water quality results from bi-monthly surveys undertaken at seven different sampling sites in the Letaba, Olifants, and Selati rivers over a two year period (February 1990 to April 1992 were reduced to index values, using a water quality index. The water quality index (Aquatic Toxicity Index or ATI revealed spatial and temporal trends. The higher index values, recorded for the sampling sites towards the eastern part of the Kruger National Park (KNP, revealed that the water quality was better than the quality measured in the Olifants River on the western bound-ary. The lowest index values were calculated for the Selati River, with index values consistently below 50. Index values indicate that the water quality in the Selati River was unsuitable for supporting normal physiological processes in fish. The water quality of the Selati River had an immediate impact on the water quality of the Olifants River directly below the confluence. Lower index values recorded at sites further downstream was also attributed to the influence of the Selati River since there are no known point sources of contaminants within the boundaries of the KNP. The index scores also elucidated temporal trends with lower scores evident during winter months. This was due to reduced flow in the Olifants River and a greater contribution of contaminated water from the Selati River. Index values increased following the first seasonal rains due to a dilution effect. Very low index values were recorded at certain sites during flood periods due to increased turbidity, reduced oxygen, and increased metal concentrations.

  11. Loomakaitse ja inimeste suhtumine loomadesse 1930. aastate Eestis

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    Loone Ots

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The first animal protection societies in the Baltic provinces of the Tsarist Russian Empire were established in the 1860s. Members were mostly Baltic Germans. Data on the first indigenous Estonian society dates from the 1890s. In the 1930s, the population of Estonia was 1,061,000 and the number of domestic animals was 2,516,500. Animals were protected by § 276 of the Criminal Code (`the ungrounded torturing of animals is punishable' and national law regulated hunting, slaughter and transport to slaughter-houses. Two counties and eleven towns established animal protection by-laws at local authority level. In 1935, 22 animal protection societies were active in Estonia, with 4,500 adult members, and many young members; 18 societies belonged to the Estonian Union of Animal Protection Societies, founded in 1929. In 1935, the Union started to publish a periodical (planned as bi-monthly `The Estonian Animal Protector'. Most people had lived in towns for less than one generation, so attitudes were similar to those in the country. There were some differences to the countryside. Firstly, town animals were gratuitously tortured without reason and secondly, town people were more contemptuous of animals. Direct violence, such as the cutting out of a tongue of a cat, was also recorded in towns, but not in the countryside. This apparent difference of behaviour may be as a result of a lack of information about the situation of pets in the country. In conclusion, in the 1930s, animal protection was respected and successful in Estonia, and animal protection societies' members had strong support from local authorities.

  12. Predicting violence in veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Aleksandar A.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Frequent expression of negative affects, hostility and violent behavior in individuals suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD were recognized long ago, and have been retrospectively well documented in war veterans with PTSD who were shown to have an elevated risk for violent behavior when compared to both veterans without PTSD and other psychiatric patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of clinical prediction of violence in combat veterans suffering from PTSD. Methods. The subjects of this study, 104 male combat veterans with PTSD were assessed with the Historical, Clinical and Risk Management 20 (HCR-20, a 20-item clinicianrated instrument for assessing the risks for violence, and their acts of violence during one-year follow-up period were registered based on bimonthly check-up interviews. Results. Our findings showed that the HCR-20, as an actuarial measure, had good internal consistency reliability (α = 0.82, excellent interrater reliability (Interaclass Correlation ICC = 0.85, as well as excellent predictive validity for acts of any violence, non-physical violence or physical violence in the follow-up period (AUC = 0.82-0.86. The HCR-20 also had good interrater reliability (Cohen's kappa = 0.74, and acceptable predictive accuracy for each outcome criterion (AUC = 0.73-0.79. Conclusion. The results of this research confirm that the HCR-20 may also be applied in prediction of violent behavior in the population of patients suffering from PTSD with reliability and validity comparable with the results of previous studies where this instrument was administered to other populations of psychiatric patients.

  13. Assessment of PCB and chlorinated pesticide accumulation in mussels at Kaštela Bay (Eastern Adriatic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milun, Vesna; Grgas, Dijana; Dragičević, Tibela Landeka

    2016-08-15

    The biological response of mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis, resident and transplanted to cages, to contamination with anthropogenic pollutants from Kaštela Bay, located in the central part of the eastern Adriatic coast, was investigated. The main purpose of this paper is to trace the accumulation of PCBs and chlorinated pesticides (HCB, lindane, heptachlor, aldrin, p,p'-DDTs) as a direct measure of potential contaminant availability to organisms, in a period from 2000 to 2011. In order to do so, cultured mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) of the same size and age were transplanted from the unpolluted Mali Ston Bay to the Kaštela Bay. Sampling was performed bimonthly, and the level of target contaminants in whole soft tissue was determined. After two months of exposure, the concentration of PCBs in transplanted mussels increased on average 6.5-times, and of DDTs 2-times, while the intensity of changes for HCB, lindane, heptachlor and aldrin was negligible. Seasonal variation of pesticide content was similar without a significant change throughout the experimental period, while that of PCBs was somewhat different showing increased accumulation in summer. Seasonal and spatial variation of organochlorines in the Kaštela Bay was likely the result of prevailing environmental rather than biological parameters. In accordance with prevailing hydrodynamic cycling, contaminant concentration decreased in acyclonic direction towards the exit of the Bay. Measurement of target contaminants in resident mussels sampled from the most contaminated area of the Bay exhibited decreasing concentrations of lindane, aldrin and p,p'-DDTs. However, PCBs exhibited statistically significant increasing concentrations in relation to the slightly increasing concentrations of HCB. With regard to human health, organochlorine (OC) levels in the mussel tissue were below prescribed limits for human consumption. PMID:27096632

  14. Enzymatic Upgrading of Heavy Crudes via Partial Oxidation or Conversion of PAHs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borole, A P; Davison, B H; Kuritz, T

    2002-07-01

    The objective of this program was to investigate new enzyme-based technologies for upgrading of heavy oils. Enzymes were selected for screening from those capable of conversion of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) reported in the literature. Oxidative reactions of PAHs using hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant with conversion to partially oxidized products were used. The enzymes (lignin peroxidase, cytochrome c) were tested in various organic solvents and found to loose activity in pure organic solvents. A thermodynamic analysis revealed lack of effective interaction between the substrate and enzyme as the cause for low activity. The protein cytochrome c was modified to work in organic media by chemical hydrophobic group attachment. Two different modifications were made: attachment of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and alkyl groups. Alkyl groups, being small could be attached at interior locations within the core of the enzyme and possibly near the active site. Increase in the threshold solvent concentration where maximum enzyme activity occurred indicated potential of this strategy for effective enzyme-substrate interaction. Further improvements in enzyme activity called for other diverse methods due to the unavailability of sufficient chemical modification sites. Genetic techniques were therefore explored for further improvements. These experiments focused on cloning of a gene for the fungal enzyme lignin peroxidase (lip) into yeast Pichia pastoris, which would allow easy manipulation of the gene. However, differences in the fungal and yeast cellular machinery impeded significant expression of the fungal enzyme. Several strategies were explored to allow higher-level expression of the enzyme, which was required for enzyme improvement. The strategies used in this investigation are described in the report. Industrial in-kind support was available throughout the project period. review of the research results was carried out on a regular basis (bimonthly reports and annual

  15. Soil properties and root biomass responses to prescribed burning in young Corsican pine (Pinus nigra Arn.) stands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufekcioglu, Aydin; Kucuk, Mehmet; Saglam, Bulent; Bilgili, Ertugrul; Altun, Lokman

    2010-05-01

    Fire is an important tool in the management of forest ecosystems. Although both prescribed and wildland fires are common in Turkey, few studies have addressed the influence of such disturbances on soil properties and root biomass dynamics. In this study, soil properties and root biomass responses to prescribed fire were investigated in 25-year-old corsican pine (Pinus nigra Arn.) stands in Kastamonu, Turkey. The stands were established by planting and were subjected to prescribed burning in July 2003. Soil respiration rates were determined every two months using soda-lime method over a two-year period. Fine (0-2 mm diameter) and small root (2-5 mm diameter) biomass were sampled approximately bimonthly using sequential coring method. Mean daily soil respiration ranged from 0.65 to 2.19 g Cm(-2) d(-1) among all sites. Soil respiration rates were significantly higher in burned sites than in controls. Soil respiration rates were correlated significantly with soil moisture and soil temperature. Fine root biomass was significantly lower in burned sites than in control sites. Mean fine root biomass values were 4940 kg ha(-1) for burned and 5450 kg ha(-1) for control sites. Soil pH was significantly higher in burned sites than in control sites in 15-35 cm soil depth. Soil organic matter content did not differ significantly between control and burned sites. Our results indicate that, depending on site conditions, fire could be used successfully as a tool in the management of forest stands in the study area. PMID:21047013

  16. Integrated community profiling indicates long-term temporal stability of the predominant faecal microbiota in captive cheetahs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne A M J Becker

    Full Text Available Understanding the symbiotic relationship between gut microbes and their animal host requires characterization of the core microbiota across populations and in time. Especially in captive populations of endangered wildlife species such as the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus, this knowledge is a key element to enhance feeding strategies and reduce gastrointestinal disorders. In order to investigate the temporal stability of the intestinal microbiota in cheetahs under human care, we conducted a longitudinal study over a 3-year period with bimonthly faecal sampling of 5 cheetahs housed in two European zoos. For this purpose, an integrated 16S rRNA DGGE-clone library approach was used in combination with a series of real-time PCR assays. Our findings disclosed a stable faecal microbiota, beyond intestinal community variations that were detected between zoo sample sets or between animals. The core of this microbiota was dominated by members of Clostridium clusters I, XI and XIVa, with mean concentrations ranging from 7.5-9.2 log10 CFU/g faeces and with significant positive correlations between these clusters (P<0.05, and by Lactobacillaceae. Moving window analysis of DGGE profiles revealed 23.3-25.6% change between consecutive samples for four of the cheetahs. The fifth animal in the study suffered from intermediate episodes of vomiting and diarrhea during the monitoring period and exhibited remarkably more change (39.4%. This observation may reflect the temporary impact of perturbations such as the animal's compromised health, antibiotic administration or a combination thereof, which temporarily altered the relative proportions of Clostridium clusters I and XIVa. In conclusion, this first long-term monitoring study of the faecal microbiota in feline strict carnivores not only reveals a remarkable compositional stability of this ecosystem, but also shows a qualitative and quantitative similarity in a defined set of faecal bacterial lineages across the five

  17. Spatial and temporal patterns of micropollutants in streams and effluent of 24 WWTPs across Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönenberger, Urs; Spycher, Barbara; Kistler, David; Burdon, Frank; Reyes, Marta; Eggen, Rik; Joss, Adriano; Singer, Heinz; Stamm, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Treated municipal wastewater is an important source of micropollutants entering the environment. Micropollutants are a diverse range of chemicals of which concentrations vary strongly in space and time. To better quantitatively understand the spatio-temporal patterns of micropollutants in streams, we compared upstream and downstream locations at 24 wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) across the Swiss Plateau and Jura regions. Each site represents the most upstream treatment plant in the corresponding catchment. In 2013, a broad analytical screening was applied to samples collected at 12 sites during winter (January) and summer conditions (June). Based in these results, the bi-monthly samples obtained in 2014 at 12 additional sites were analysed for a group of approximately 60 selected organic micropollutants. The screening results demonstrate that generally, pharmaceuticals, artificial sweeteners and corrosion inhibitors make up the largest share of the organic micropollutants in wastewater. Pesticides including biocides and plant protection products are also regularly found, but at lower concentrations. The opposite holds true for the concentration variability: pesticides vary the most across time and space, while pharmaceuticals exhibit more stable concentrations. Heavy metals fluctuate to a similar degree as pharmaceuticals. Principal component analyses suggest that pesticide and pharmaceutical levels at both upstream locations and in the wastewater vary independently of each other. At the upstream locations, the pesticide levels increased with the proportion of arable land in the watershed, whilst decreasing with greater cover of pasture and forest. Interestingly, the same patterns hold true for the composition of wastewater when considering land use in the catchments of the WWTPs. This suggests that pesticide-intensive agricultural crops not only impact surface water quality via diffuse pollution but also increase levels of pesticides in wastewater discharged

  18. Economic and energy benefits in clean rooms, case of study: natural illumination and insulating capacity of the lagging; Beneficios economicos y energeticos en cuartos limpios, caso de estudio: iluminacion natural y capacidad aislante de la envolvente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres Rodriguez, Agustin; Morillon Galvez, David [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico)

    2009-01-15

    The objective of the present article is to show the electrical energy saving in clean rooms used to make pharmaceutical products using natural illumination instead of using fluorescent lamps. A study is performed in steady state of the heat load of buildings during three hours in order to observe the thermal its thermal behavior. And it is observed that at 1:00 o'clock p.m. the greatest heat load appears. With the global heat transference coefficients proposed in the official Mexican Norm NOM-008-ENER-2001 the heat load by conduction and convection of the building is estimated. Finally a bimonthly economic study of the energy saving of energy of the air conditioning system was realized with the system of artificial lighting and the system of natural illumination. All this study was realized in a site with temperate climate (Fraccionamiento Industrial Xalostoc, Ecatepec de Morelos, Estado de Mexico). [Spanish] El objetivo del presente articulo es mostrar el ahorro de energia electrica en cuartos limpios utilizados para elaborar productos farmaceuticos utilizando iluminacion natural en ves de utilizar lamparas fluorescentes. Se realiza un estudio en estado estable de la carga de calor de edificios para tres horas con la finalidad de observar el comportamiento termico de este. Y se observa que a las 13:00 horas se presenta la mayor carga de calor. Con los coeficientes globales de transferencia de calor propuestos en la norma oficial mexicana NOM-008-ENER-2001 se estima la carga de calor por conduccion y conveccion del edificio. Finalmente se realizo un estudio economico bimestral del ahorro de energia del sistema de aire acondicionado con el sistema de iluminacion artificial y con el sistema de iluminacion natural. Todo este estudio se realizo en un sitio con clima templado (fraccionamiento industrial Xalostoc, Ecatepec de Morelos Estado de Mexico).

  19. Decadal changes in zooplankton of the Northeast U.S. continental shelf.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongsheng Bi

    Full Text Available The abundance of the subarctic copepod, Calanus finmarchicus, and temperate, shelf copepod, Centropages typicus, was estimated from samples collected bi-monthly over the Northeast U.S. continental shelf (NEUS from 1977-2010. Latitudinal variation in long term trends and seasonal patterns for the two copepod species were examined for four sub-regions: the Gulf of Maine (GOM, Georges Bank (GB, Southern New England (SNE, and Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB. Results suggested that there was significant difference in long term variation between northern region (GOM and GB, and the MAB for both species. C. finmarchicus generally peaked in May - June throughout the entire study region and Cen. typicus had a more complex seasonal pattern. Time series analysis revealed that the peak time for Cen. typicus switched from November - December to January - March after 1985 in the MAB. The long term abundance of C. finmarchicus showed more fluctuation in the MAB than the GOM and GB, whereas the long term abundance of Cen. typicus was more variable in the GB than other sub-regions. Alongshore transport was significantly correlated with the abundance of C. finmarchicus, i.e., more water from north, higher abundance for C. finmarchicus. The abundance of Cen. typicus showed positive relationship with the Gulf Stream north wall index (GSNWI in the GOM and GB, but the GSNWI only explained 12-15% of variation in Cen. typicus abundance. In general, the alongshore current was negatively correlated with the GSNWI, suggesting that Cen. typicus is more abundant when advection from the north is less. However, the relationship between Cen. typicus and alongshore transport was not significant. The present study highlights the importance of spatial scales in the study of marine populations: observed long term changes in the northern region were different from the south for both species.

  20. A system of networks and continuing education for physical therapists in rheumatology: a feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Verhoef

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of regional physical therapy networks including continuing education in rheumatology. The aim of these networks was to improve care provided by primary care physical therapists by improving specific knowledge, technical and communicative skills and the collaboration with rheumatologists. Methods: In two regions in The Netherlands continuing education (CE programmes, consisting of a 5-day postgraduate training course followed by bimonthly workshops and teaching practices, were organised simultaneously. Network activities included consultations, newsletters and the development of a communication guideline. Endpoint measures included the participation rate, compliance, quality of the CE programme, teaching practices, knowledge, network activities, communication, number of patients treated and patient satisfaction. Results: Sixty-three physical therapists out of 193 practices (33% participated in the project. They all completed the education programmes and were formally registered. All evaluations of the education programmes showed positive scores. Knowledge scores increased significantly directly after the training course and at 18 months. A draft guideline on communication between physical therapists and rheumatologists was developed, and 4 newsletters were distributed. A substantial proportion of physical therapists and rheumatologists reported improved communication at 18 months. The mean number of patients treated by physical therapists participating in the networks increased significantly. Patients' satisfaction scores within the networks were significantly higher than those from outside the networks at 18 months. Conclusions: Setting up a system of networks for continuing education for physical therapists regarding the treatment of patients with rheumatic diseases is feasible. Further research will focus on the effectiveness of the system and its implementation on a larger scale.

  1. Impact of Vermicompost on Growth and Development of Cabbage, Brassica oleracea Linn. and their Sucking Pest, Brevicoryne brassicae Linn. (Homoptera: Aphididae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulusew Getnet

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the present study was to produce vermicompost from organic solid wastes by using red earth worm, Eisenia fetida and to check growth promoting and pest suppression properties on cabbage, Brassica oleracea. The mass of 100 kg of various organic waste sources were collected from Gondar and used to prepare vermicompost. The vermicompost was prepared in the month of June-August 2011 and tested on cabbage, B. oleracea from October 2011 to February 2012. Vermicompost was applied at the rate of 25, 50, 100 and 200 gm/plant individually. Each application 10 plants were selected and vermicompost application was continued on bimonthly basis. Totally 40 plants were used for control group in which 10 plants were selected randomly. Total number of leaves per plant; leaf length and width; plant stand height and root length; cabbage head round distance and weight and aphid population built-up were the parameters studied in experimental and control cabbage plants. Significant differences (p<0.05; LSD were observed in the growth and development and pest infestation level between vermicompost applied and control plants. The number of plant stand height, cabbage head, leaves of cabbage were also significantly different (p<0.05; LSD in experimental cabbage compared to control. Maximum number of cabbage plant was infested by aphid in control than experimental groups. In conclusion vermicompost have significant impact on cabbage growth promotion and reduce the aphid infestation. In future using vermicompost to all kinds of crops and adopting it as commercial fertilizer may create job opportunity to small scale farming society. Also, in this ever escalating cost of chemical fertilizers, the use of vermicompost seems to be quite reasonable in agro-management and should be inclusive as one of the elements of poverty alleviation strategies in such as Ethiopian context.

  2. Precipitation-centered Conceptual Model for Sub-humid Uplands in Lampasas Cut Plains, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, S. R.; Tu, M.; Wilcox, B. P.

    2011-12-01

    Conceptual understandings of dominant hydrological processes, system interactions and feedbacks, and external forcings operating within catchments often defy simple definition and explanation, especially catchments encompassing transition zones, degraded landscapes, rapid development, and where climate forcings exhibit large variations across time and space. However, it is precisely those areas for which understanding and knowledge are most needed to innovate sustainable management strategies and counter past management blunders and failed restoration efforts. The cut plain of central Texas is one such area. Complex geographic and climatic factors lead to spatially and temporally variable precipitation having frequent dry periods interrupted by intense high-volume precipitation. Fort Hood, an army post located in the southeast cut plain contains landscapes ranging from highly degraded to nearly pristine with a topography mainly comprised of flat-topped mesas separated by broad u-shaped valleys. To understand the hydrology of the area and responses to wet-dry cycles we analyzed 4-years of streamflow and rainfall from 8 catchments, sized between 1819 and 16,000 ha. Since aquifer recharge/discharge and surface stream-groundwater interactions are unimportant, we hypothesized a simple conceptual model driven by precipitation and radiative forcings and having stormflow, baseflow, ET, and two hypothetical storage components. The key storage component was conceptualized as a buffer that was highly integrated with the ET component and exerted controls on baseflow. Radiative energy controlled flux from the buffer to ET. We used the conceptual model in making a bimonthly hydrologic budget, which included buffer volumes and a deficit-surplus indicator. Through the analysis, we were led to speculate that buffer capacity plays key roles in these landscapes and even relatively minor changes in capacity, due to soil compaction for example, might lead to ecological shifts. The

  3. Prevalence of shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, and Listeria monocytogenes at public access watershed sites in a California Central Coast agricultural region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Michael B; Quiñones, Beatriz; Oryang, David; Mandrell, Robert E; Gorski, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Produce contaminated with enteric pathogens is a major source of foodborne illness in the United States. Lakes, streams, rivers, and ponds were sampled with Moore swabs bi-monthly for over 2 years at 30 locations in the vicinity of a leafy green growing region on the Central California Coast and screened for Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC), Salmonella enterica, and Listeria monocytogenes to evaluate the prevalence and persistence of pathogen subtypes. The prevalence of STEC from 1386 samples was 11%; 110 samples (8%) contained E. coli O157:H7 with the highest prevalence occurring close to cattle operations. Non-O157 STEC isolates represented major clinical O-types and 57% contained both shiga toxin types 1 and 2 and intimin. Multiple Locus Variable Number Tandem Repeat Analysis of STEC isolates indicated prevalent strains during the period of study. Notably, Salmonella was present at high levels throughout the sampling region with 65% prevalence in 1405 samples resulting in 996 isolates with slightly lower prevalence in late autumn. There were 2, 8, and 14 sites that were Salmonella-positive over 90, 80, and 70% of the time, respectively. The serotypes identified most often were 6,8:d:-, Typhimurium, and Give. Interestingly, analysis by Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis indicated persistence and transport of pulsotypes in the region over several years. In this original study of L. monocytogenes in the region prevalence was 43% of 1405 samples resulting in 635 individual isolates. Over 85% of the isolates belonged to serotype 4b with serotypes 1/2a, 1/2b, 3a, 4d with 4e representing the rest, and there were 12 and 2 sites that were positive over 50 and 80% of the time, respectively. Although surface water is not directly used for irrigation in this region, transport to the produce can occur by other means. This environmental survey assesses initial contamination levels toward an understanding of transport leading to produce recalls or outbreaks. PMID

  4. Surface water processes in the Indonesian Throughflow as documented by a high-resolution coral (Delta)14C record

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallon, S J; Guilderson, T P

    2008-04-23

    To explore the seasonal to decadal variability in surface water masses that contribute to the Indonesian Throughflow we have generated a 115-year bi-monthly coral-based radiocarbon time-series from a coral in the Makassar Straits. In the pre-bomb (pre-1955) era from 1890 to 1954, the radiocarbon time series occasionally displays a small seasonal signal (10-15{per_thousand}). After 1954 the radiocarbon record increases rapidly, in response to the increased atmospheric {sup 14}C content caused by nuclear weapons testing. From 1957 to 1986 the record displays clear seasonal variability from 15 to 60{per_thousand} and the post-bomb peak (163 per mil) occurred in 1974. The seasonal cycle of radiocarbon can be attributed to variations of surface waters passing through South Makassar Strait. Southern Makassar is under the influence of the Northwest Monsoon, which is responsible for the high Austral summer radiocarbon (North Pacific waters) and the Southeast Monsoon that flushes back a mixture of low (South Pacific and upwelling altered) radiocarbon water from the Banda Sea. The coral record also shows a significant {sup 14}C peak in 1955 due to bomb {sup 14}C water advected into this region in the form of CaCO{sub 3} particles (this implies that the particles were advected intact and then become entrapped in the coral skeleton--is this what we really mean? Wouldn't even fine particles settle out over the inferred transit time from Bikini to MAK?) or water particles with dissolved labeled CO{sub 2} produced during fallout from the Castle tests in 1954.

  5. Seasonality and resource availability control bacterial and archaeal communities in soils of a temperate beech forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasche, Frank; Knapp, Daniela; Kaiser, Christina; Koranda, Marianne; Kitzler, Barbara; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Richter, Andreas; Sessitsch, Angela

    2011-03-01

    It was hypothesized that seasonality and resource availability altered through tree girdling were major determinants of the phylogenetic composition of the archaeal and bacterial community in a temperate beech forest soil. During a 2-year field experiment, involving girdling of beech trees to intercept the transfer of easily available carbon (C) from the canopy to roots, members of the dominant phylogenetic microbial phyla residing in top soils under girdled versus untreated control trees were monitored at bimonthly intervals through 16S rRNA gene-based terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism profiling and quantitative PCR analysis. Effects on nitrifying and denitrifying groups were assessed by measuring the abundances of nirS and nosZ genes as well as bacterial and archaeal amoA genes. Seasonal dynamics displayed by key phylogenetic and nitrogen (N) cycling functional groups were found to be tightly coupled with seasonal alterations in labile C and N pools as well as with variation in soil temperature and soil moisture. In particular, archaea and acidobacteria were highly responsive to soil nutritional and soil climatic changes associated with seasonality, indicating their high metabolic versatility and capability to adapt to environmental changes. For these phyla, significant interrelations with soil chemical and microbial process data were found suggesting their potential, but poorly described contribution to nitrification or denitrification in temperate forest soils. In conclusion, our extensive approach allowed us to get novel insights into effects of seasonality and resource availability on the microbial community, in particular on hitherto poorly studied bacterial phyla and functional groups.

  6. Focus on physicochemical parameters and nutrient dynamics in a little peri-urban river, using different frequency monitoring (northern France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovsky, Anastasia; Dumoulin, David; Criquet, Justine; Superville, Pierre-Jean; Prygiel, Jean; Alary, Claire; Billon, Gabriel

    2016-04-01

    The Marque River is a small river located in Northern France in a peri-urban watershed, going through both agricultural and urban areas. A multi scale monitoring frequency has been undertaken in order to understand the aquatic ecosystem dynamic. Indeed, two types of monitoring (low and high frequencies) were applied to assess the quality of this river impacted by multi-origin inputs. The low frequency monitoring consisted in monthly or bi-monthly historical data from 2007 to 2012, and monthly grab samplings carried out from February 2014 to February 2015 focused on physicochemical parameters and nutrients. Additionally, a high frequency monitoring was implemented twice a year at two different seasons (summer 2014 and from spring to summer 2015) in the river. Physicochemical parameters (oxygen, temperature, conductivity, pH, solid particle matter, dissolved organic carbon) and nutrients (NO3-, NH4+ and PO43-) were recorded every 10 minutes. Furthermore, both the river flow and the pluviometry were recorded at the scale of the day. This presentation is going to demonstrate that (i) considering nutrients, a multi-origin pressure (agricultural and urban) impacts the stream and leads to its ecological degradation by comparison with the concentrations limits suggested by the Water Framework Directive; (ii) photosynthesis/respiration cycles are affected by intense inputs of organic matter and nutrients especially during heavy rain events that can also cause anoxic events; (iii) the effects of the urban inputs are more pronounced during the dry periods as exhibited for example by the increase of the river flow during the day; (iv) the phosphate concentrations seem to be related to the dissolved oxygen contents and (v) strong nutrients concentrations stimulate eutrophication. Overall, our findings clearly highlight the importance of high frequency monitoring in order to better understand the dynamic behavior of water courses.

  7. [Two cases of long-term home parenteral nutrition in which increased doses of intravenous selenium were administered and the serum and hair selenium concentration was measured].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washizawa, Naohiro; Kozono, Koki; Naganuma, Hirokazu; Kimura, Yuki; Sato, Yukihiko; Sakai, Masahiro; Chino, Kenichi; Shimoda, Masato; Suzuki, Takashi; Oshima, Yoko; Kaneko, Hiromasa

    2013-12-01

    Care should be taken regarding the intravenous administration of selenium (Se), an essential element, which is known to be associated with toxemia. The concentration of Se in the serum and hair of 2 patients (patient A and B) with short bowel syndrome, undergoing long-term home parenteral nutrition (HPN), was measured. As nutritional management, commercial total parenteral nutrition infusion was used without restricting oral intake. The patients received sodium selenite (Na2O3Se x 5H2O), a hospital preparation, at the Toho University Omori Medical Center. The dosage was gradually increased from 40 microg/ week to 120 micog/week over 17 months, and the Se concentration in serum and hair was measured bimonthly using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The serum concentration of Se increased from 2.0 to 5.3 microg/dL and from 9.0 to 9.7 microg/dL in the case of patient A and B, respectively; however, it did not reach the average value that was observed in healthy volunteers (11.8 microg/dL). In contrast, the concentration of Se in hair gradually approached the reference value (reference range, 405-784 ppb at color correction criteria range 217-520 ppb) in the case of patient A (change from 189 to 278 ppb) and B (change from 291 to 200 ppb). Therefore, we were able to safely manage these cases without any deficiency and poisoning symptoms, by gradually increasing the administration doses.

  8. The AgeWell study of behavior change to promote health and wellbeing in later life: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

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    Clare Linda

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lifestyle factors playing a role in the development of late-life disability may be modifiable. There is a need for robust evidence about the potential for prevention of disability through behavior change interventions. Methods/design This feasibility study involves the development, implementation and initial testing of a behavior change intervention in a naturalistic setting. A small-scale randomized controlled trial (RCT will investigate the implementation of a goal-setting intervention aimed at promoting behavior change in the domains of physical and cognitive activity in the context of a community resource center for over-50s. Healthy older participants attending the center (n = 75 will be randomized to one of three conditions: control (an interview involving a general discussion about the center; goal-setting (an interview involving identification of up to five personal goals in the domains of physical activity, cognitive activity, diet and health, and social engagement; or goal-setting with mentoring (the goal-setting interview followed by bi-monthly telephone mentoring. All participants will be reassessed after 12 months. Primary outcomes are levels of physical and cognitive activity. Secondary outcomes address psychosocial (self-efficacy, mood, quality of life, cognitive (memory and executive function, and physical fitness (functional and metabolic domains. Cost-effectiveness will also be examined. Discussion This study will provide information about the feasibility of a community-based lifestyle intervention model for over-50s and of the implementation of a goal-setting intervention for behavior change, together with initial evidence about the short-term effects of goal-setting on behavior. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN30080637 (http://www.controlled-trials.com

  9. Open-label randomized trial of titrated disease management for patients with hypertension: Study design and baseline sample characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, George L; Weinberger, Morris; Kirshner, Miriam A; Stechuchak, Karen M; Melnyk, Stephanie D; Bosworth, Hayden B; Coffman, Cynthia J; Neelon, Brian; Van Houtven, Courtney; Gentry, Pamela W; Morris, Isis J; Rose, Cynthia M; Taylor, Jennifer P; May, Carrie L; Han, Byungjoo; Wainwright, Christi; Alkon, Aviel; Powell, Lesa; Edelman, David

    2016-09-01

    Despite the availability of efficacious treatments, only half of patients with hypertension achieve adequate blood pressure (BP) control. This paper describes the protocol and baseline subject characteristics of a 2-arm, 18-month randomized clinical trial of titrated disease management (TDM) for patients with pharmaceutically-treated hypertension for whom systolic blood pressure (SBP) is not controlled (≥140mmHg for non-diabetic or ≥130mmHg for diabetic patients). The trial is being conducted among patients of four clinic locations associated with a Veterans Affairs Medical Center. An intervention arm has a TDM strategy in which patients' hypertension control at baseline, 6, and 12months determines the resource intensity of disease management. Intensity levels include: a low-intensity strategy utilizing a licensed practical nurse to provide bi-monthly, non-tailored behavioral support calls to patients whose SBP comes under control; medium-intensity strategy utilizing a registered nurse to provide monthly tailored behavioral support telephone calls plus home BP monitoring; and high-intensity strategy utilizing a pharmacist to provide monthly tailored behavioral support telephone calls, home BP monitoring, and pharmacist-directed medication management. Control arm patients receive the low-intensity strategy regardless of BP control. The primary outcome is SBP. There are 385 randomized (192 intervention; 193 control) veterans that are predominately older (mean age 63.5years) men (92.5%). 61.8% are African American, and the mean baseline SBP for all subjects is 143.6mmHg. This trial will determine if a disease management program that is titrated by matching the intensity of resources to patients' BP control leads to superior outcomes compared to a low-intensity management strategy.

  10. Greenhouse and field assessment of rhizobacteria to control guava decline

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    Alexandre Macedo Almeida

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to devise a biological strategy to control guava decline, 120 rhizobacteria isolates were obtained from symptomless guava trees located in Meloidogyne enterolobii-infested orchards. Of those isolates, 44 were assessed for their potential to reduce nematode's reproduction: for each isolate, six guava stem cuttings were embedded for eight hours with bacterial suspension and transplanted. Upon development of the roots, the plants were inoculated with 2000 nematode eggs and allowed to grow for four months under greenhouse. Seedlings embedded with water, inoculated or not with the nematode, served as controls. All treatments were equivalent in the five variables that assessed plant development. Several rhizobacteria reduced (p<0.05 the final nematode population (Fp, Fp/gram of root and reproduction factor, although not to satisfactory levels. Subsequently, a two-year experiment was set up in a guava orchard affected by guava decline, in which three of the most effective rhizobacterial isolates were compared with the biological products Nemat® and Nemaplus® for their ability to reduce variables related to nematode parasitism and increase guava productivity. Seven bimonthly applications of these treatments under the tree canopy were unable to reduce nematode parasitism and increase productivity. The decline and death of some plants forced the experiment to be stopped after the first harvest. In conclusion, rhizobacteria applications seem unable to reduce the parasitism of M. enterolobii on guava plants, and even less to reduce the extensive root decay or alleviate the physiological stress suffered by trees affected by guava decline.

  11. Evaluation of Response Patterns in Somatic and Otolith Features of Laboratory- Reared and Wild Clarias gariepinus Exposed to Industrial Effluent

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    Aina O. Adeogun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed at comparing the responses of somatic and otolith features in Clarias gariepinus under chronic exposure conditions to industrial effluents in the laboratory for 60 days and in the wild for 6 months. Fish were collected upstream and downstream bi-monthly from a river receiving composite mixtures of industrial effluent while laboratory-rearedC. gariepinus were exposed to the same effluent mixtures in 60 days static renewal/bioassay using concentrations of 6.11, 3.05 and 2.23%, respectively and control series. A total of 21 variables representing saggital otolith and somatic data from both wild and laboratory fish were subjected to factor analysis. For laboratory reared fish, PC 1 indexed as ‘otolith factor’, PC 2 indexed as ‘condition factor’ and PC 3 indexed as ‘paired fin factor’ accounted for 26.15, 19.01 and 12.55% of the total variance, respectively. For wild fish, otolith factor (PC 1 and condition factor (PC 2 accounted for 38.24 and 22.69% of the variance respectively. The first 3 components and the first 2 components for laboratory and wild fish accounted for more than 50% of total variance in data. Reliability index (Cronbach’s alpha (&alpha>0.70 showed that the ‘otolith factor’ had strong internal consistency and is reliable as a primary and viable index of stress for both laboratory and wild fish. The complementary role of condition factor in stress detection was also highlighted. The emergence of paired features (otolith, pectoral and pelvic fins as sensitive parameters in toxicity responses may be an indication of the onset of asymmetry in these structures.

  12. Sampling frequency trade-offs in the assessment of mean transit times of tropical montane catchment waters under semi-steady-state conditions

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    E. Timbe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Stream and soil waters were collected on a weekly basis in a tropical montane cloud forest catchment for two years and analyzed for stable water isotopes in order to infer transit time distribution functions and to define the mean transit times. Depending on the water type (stream or soil water, lumped distribution functions such as Exponential-Piston flow, Linear-Piston flow and Gamma models using temporal isotopic variations of precipitation event samples as input, were fitted. Samples were aggregated to daily, weekly, biweekly, monthly and bimonthly time scales in order to check the sensitivity of temporal sampling on model predictions. The study reveals that the effect of decreasing sampling frequency depends on the water type. For soil waters with transit times in the order of weeks to months, there was a clear trend of over prediction. In contrast, the trend of prediction for stream waters, with a dampened isotopic signal and mean transit times in the order of 2 to 4 years, was less clear and depending on the type of model used. The trade-off to coarse data resolutions could potentially lead to misleading conclusions on how water actually moves through the catchment, while at the same time predictions can reach better fitting efficiencies, lesser uncertainties, errors and biases. For both water types an optimal sampling frequency seems to be one or at most two weeks. The results of our analyses provide information for the planning (in particular in terms of cost-benefit and time requirements of future fieldwork in similar Andean or other catchments.

  13. Exposure of native bees foraging in an agricultural landscape to current-use pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hladik, Michelle L.; Vandever, Mark; Smalling, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    The awareness of insects as pollinators and indicators of environmental quality has grown in recent years, partially in response to declines in honey bee (Apis mellifera) populations. While most pesticide research has focused on honey bees, there has been less work on native bee populations. To determine the exposure of native bees to pesticides, bees were collected from an existing research area in northeastern Colorado from two land cover types: grasslands (2013-2014) and wheat fields (2014). Traps were deployed bi-monthly during the summer at each land cover type and all bees, regardless of species, were composited as whole samples and analyzed for 136 current-use pesticides and degradates. This reconnaissance approach provides a sampling of all species and represents overall pesticide exposure (internal and external). Nineteen pesticides and degradates were detected in 54 composite samples collected. Compounds detected in >10% of the samples included the insecticides thiamethoxam (46%), bifenthrin (28%), clothianidin (24%), chlorpyrifos (17%), and imidacloprid (13%), the fungicides azoxystrobin (17%), and pyraclostrobin (11%), and the herbicide atrazine (19%). Concentrations ranged from 1.1 to 312 ng/g for individual pesticides. Pesticides were detected in samples collected from both grasslands and wheat fields; the location of the sample and the surrounding land cover at the 1000 m buffer influenced the pesticides detected but because of a small number of temporally comparable samples, correlations between pesticide concentration and land cover were not significant. The results show native bees collected in both grasslands and wheat fields are exposed to multiple pesticides, these results can direct future research on routes/timing of pesticide exposure and the design of future conservation efforts for pollinators.

  14. Curvas de crescimento e influência de fatores não-genéticos sobre as taxas de crescimento de bovinos da raça Nelore Growth curves and non-genetic factors affecting growth rate of Nelore cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natascha Almeida Marques da Silva

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se a influência de efeitos não-genéticos sobre as taxas de crescimento de bovinos da raça Nelore nas seguintes fases: do nascimento à desmama, 205 dias, (TX1; da desmama a um ano, 365 dias, (TX2; e de um ano ao sobreano, 550 dias, (TX3. Os dados constam de nove pesagens bimestrais do nascimento aos dois anos de idade, observadas entre 1978 e 1993, em 1.138 animais da raça Nelore, sendo 508 machos e 630 fêmeas. Os modelos não-lineares de Brody, Gompertz, Richards, Bertalanffy e Logístico foram ajustados aos dados de peso-idade de cada animal, para a obtenção de pesos em idades de interesse. O modelo de Gompertz foi o que melhor se ajustou aos dados e, a partir dele, foram calculadas as taxas de crescimento. Foram observadas influências (PNon-genetic effects were evaluated on growth rate of Nelore cattle from birth to 205 days (TX1, 205 to 365 days (TX2, and 365 to 550 days (TX3 of age. The data came from nine bimonthly weight-age records, from birth to two years of age, of 1.138 animals, 508 males and 630 females, collected between 1978 and 1993. Brody, Gompertz, Richards, Bertalanffy and Logistic nonlinear models were fitted for each animal, generating weight estimates at different ages. Gompertz model showed the best fitting and was chosen for growth rates computations. Effects (P<0,01 of sex on TX2 and TX3, year of birth on all growth rates, and season of birth on TX2 and TX3 (P<0,01, were observed. The optimization of management techniques in specialized herds is possible with the informations of the non-genetic factors that influence growth rates at distinct ages.

  15. A longitudinal study of antimicrobial resistant faecal bacteria in sediments collected from a hospital wastewater system

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    Jakob Ryd Ottoson

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective with this study was to determine and follow antimicrobial resistance in faecal bacteria over time in hospital wastewater pipe sediment. A further aim was to determine bacterial growth rates of sensitive, intermediate and resistant intestinal enterococci in different ciprofloxacin concentrations as a measure of bacterial fitness.A system enabling the collection of settled particles over time was installed at Kalmar County Hospital. Samples were collected bi-monthly for a 14-month period. Coliform bacteria and enterococci were isolated from the sediment with standard methods and investigated for resistance to ciprofloxacin (CIP, imipenem (IMI, trimetroprim-sulfamethoxazole (TS, ampicillin (AMP and vancomycin (VAN by the disc diffusion method. Resistant isolates were further typed with the PhenePlateTM system. Growth assessments were performed with an automated spectrophotometer.The rate of intestinal enterococci resistance was <0.6, 1.3, 1.9 and 13% to VAN, IMI, AMP and CIP respectively. Coliform resistance frequencies were 1.1, 2.2 and 2.2% to CIP, IMI and TS respectively. At two sampling occasions, significantly higher rates of ciprofloxacin resistant enterococci were found and the establishment of a resistant clone in the sewer was indicated by the PhP-analysis. Ciprofloxacin resistant intestinal enterococci had a significantly longer lag-phase time than sensitive isolates, but from 500 µg ml−1 (half MIC resistant isolates had a competitive advantage in terms of significantly faster generation time.Despite high concentration of antimicrobials in the sediment, resistance frequencies were generally low. This can depend on limited growth possibilities for faecal bacteria. However, the establishment of a resistant clone shows that hospital sewers can serve as a reservoir for antibiotic resistant bacteria.

  16. Occurrence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs in beached plastic pellets from Mumbai coast, India

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    HB Jayasiri

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available PAHs are a class of ubiquitous pollutants which consist of two or more fused benzene rings in various arrangements. A number of PAH compounds are known carcinogens and bioaccumulate and biomagnify. These compounds originate naturally as well as anthropogenically through oil spills, incineration of waste and combustion of fossil fuels and wood. The environmental consequence of Plastic pellets is the sorption organic pollutants on their surface from the sea surface microlayer (SML where the hydrophobic contaminants are known to be enriched. The plastic pellets were collected along the recent high tide line from four beaches of Mumbai coast bimonthly during May 2011 - March 2012. A total of 72 pools of plastic pellets were extracted, fractionated and analysed by Gas Chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer to evaluate the extent and sources of 16 PAHs. The mean ΣPAH concentration in pellets was 9202.30±114.89 ng g-1 with a wide range (35.4-46191.58 ng g-1. The concentration of fluorene was found to be the highest (1606.30±251.54 ng g-1 followed by anthracene, chrysene and phenanthrene. The ΣPAH concentration was significantly varied among months and there was no significant difference among sites at  p=0.05. The 2-3 aromatic ring compounds accounted for 60% of the total PAHs in pellets of Mumbai coast while 4 rings and 5-6 rings compounds accounted for 26 and 14%, respectively. The ratio of low and high molecular weight PAHs indicated that the contamination by petrogenic sources was predominant over the pyrogenic ones in plastic pellets suggesting oil pollution in coastal area of Mumbai.Keywords: plastic pellets, PAHs, Mumbai, sources

  17. Metabarcoding reveals environmental factors influencing spatio-temporal variation in pelagic micro-eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannock, Pamela M; Ortmann, Alice C; Moss, Anthony G; Halanych, Kenneth M

    2016-08-01

    Marine environments harbour a vast diversity of micro-eukaryotic organisms (protists and other small eukaryotes) that play important roles in structuring marine ecosystems. However, micro-eukaryote diversity is not well understood. Likewise, knowledge is limited regarding micro-eukaryote spatial and seasonal distribution, especially over long temporal scales. Given the importance of this group for mobilizing energy from lower trophic levels near the base of the food chain to larger organisms, assessing community stability, diversity and resilience is important to understand ecosystem health. Herein, we use a metabarcoding approach to examine pelagic micro-eukaryote communities over a 2.5-year time series. Bimonthly surface sampling (July 2009 to December 2011) was conducted at four locations within Mobile Bay (Bay) and along the Alabama continental shelf (Shelf). Alpha-diversity only showed significant differences in Shelf sites, with the greatest differences observed between summer and winter. Beta-diversity showed significant differences in community composition in relation to season and the Bay was dominated by diatoms, while the Shelf was characterized by dinoflagellates and copepods. The northern Gulf of Mexico is heavily influenced by the Mobile River Basin, which brings low-salinity nutrient-rich water mostly during winter and spring. Community composition was correlated with salinity, temperature and dissolved silicate. However, species interactions (e.g. predation and parasitism) may also contribute to the observed variation, especially on the Shelf, which warrants further exploration. Metabarcoding revealed clear patterns in surface pelagic micro-eukaryote communities that were consistent over multiple years, demonstrating how these techniques could be greatly beneficial to ecological monitoring and management over temporal scales. PMID:27238767

  18. The protocol of a randomized controlled trial for playgroup mothers: Reminder on Food, Relaxation, Exercise, and Support for Health (REFRESH Program

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    Monteiro Sarojini MDR

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mother's physical activity levels are relatively low, while their energy consumption is generally high resulting in 58% of Australian women over the age of 18 years being overweight or obese. This study aims to confirm if a low-cost, accessible playgroup based intervention program can improve the dietary and physical activity behaviours of mothers with young children. Methods/Design The current study is a randomized controlled trial lifestyle (nutrition and physical activity intervention for mothers with children aged between 0 to 5 years attending playgroups in Perth, Western Australia. Nine-hundred participants will be recruited and randomly assigned to the intervention (n = 450 and control (n = 450 groups. The study is based on the Social Cognitive Theory (SCT and the Transtheoretical Model (TTM, and the Precede-Proceed Framework incorporating goal setting, motivational interviewing, social support and self-efficacy. The six month intervention will include multiple strategies and resources to ensure the engagement and retention of participants. The main strategy is home based and will include a specially designed booklet with dietary and physical activity information, a muscle strength and flexibility exercise chart, a nutrition label reading shopping list and menu planner. The home based strategy will be supported by face-to-face dietary and physical activity workshops in the playgroup setting, posted and emailed bi-monthly newsletters, and monthly Short Message Service (SMS reminders via mobile phones. Participants in the control group receive no intervention materials. Outcome measures will be assessed using data that will be collected at baseline, six months and 12 months from participants in the control and intervention groups. Discussion This trial will add to the evidence base on the recruitment, retention and the impact of community based dietary and physical activity interventions for mothers with young children

  19. Evidence of niche partitioning under ontogenetic influences among three morphologically similar siluriformes in small subtropical streams.

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    Karine Orlandi Bonato

    Full Text Available Ontogenetic influences in patterns of niche breadth and feeding overlap were investigated in three species of Siluriformes (Heptapterus sp., Rhamdia quelen and Trichomycterus poikilos aiming at understanding the species coexistence. Samplings were conducted bimonthly by electrofishing technique from June/2012 to June/2013 in ten streams of the northwestern state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The stomach contents of 1,948 individuals were analyzed by volumetric method, with 59 food items identified. In general Heptapterus sp. consumed a high proportion of Aegla sp., terrestrial plant remains and Megaloptera; R. quelen consumed fish, and Oligochaeta, followed by Aegla sp.; while the diet of T. poikilos was based on Simuliidae, Ephemeroptera and Trichoptera. Specie segregation was observed in the NMDS. Through PERMANOVA analysis feeding differences among species, and between a combination of species plus size classes were observed. IndVal showed which items were indicators of these differences. Niche breadth values were high for all species. The niche breadth values were low only for the larger size of R. quelen and Heptapterus sp. while T. poikilos values were more similar. Overall the species were a low feeding overlap values. The higher frequency of high feeding overlap was observed for interaction between Heptapterus sp. and T. poikilos. The null model confirmed the niche partitioning between the species. The higher frequency of high and intermediate feeding overlap values were reported to smaller size classes. The null model showed resource sharing between the species/size class. Therefore, overall species showed a resource partitioning because of the use of occasional items. However, these species share resources mainly in the early ontogenetic stages until the emphasized change of morphological characteristics leading to trophic niche expansion and the apparent segregation observed.

  20. Evidence of niche partitioning under ontogenetic influences among three morphologically similar siluriformes in small subtropical streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonato, Karine Orlandi; Fialho, Clarice Bernhardt

    2014-01-01

    Ontogenetic influences in patterns of niche breadth and feeding overlap were investigated in three species of Siluriformes (Heptapterus sp., Rhamdia quelen and Trichomycterus poikilos) aiming at understanding the species coexistence. Samplings were conducted bimonthly by electrofishing technique from June/2012 to June/2013 in ten streams of the northwestern state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The stomach contents of 1,948 individuals were analyzed by volumetric method, with 59 food items identified. In general Heptapterus sp. consumed a high proportion of Aegla sp., terrestrial plant remains and Megaloptera; R. quelen consumed fish, and Oligochaeta, followed by Aegla sp.; while the diet of T. poikilos was based on Simuliidae, Ephemeroptera and Trichoptera. Specie segregation was observed in the NMDS. Through PERMANOVA analysis feeding differences among species, and between a combination of species plus size classes were observed. IndVal showed which items were indicators of these differences. Niche breadth values were high for all species. The niche breadth values were low only for the larger size of R. quelen and Heptapterus sp. while T. poikilos values were more similar. Overall the species were a low feeding overlap values. The higher frequency of high feeding overlap was observed for interaction between Heptapterus sp. and T. poikilos. The null model confirmed the niche partitioning between the species. The higher frequency of high and intermediate feeding overlap values were reported to smaller size classes. The null model showed resource sharing between the species/size class. Therefore, overall species showed a resource partitioning because of the use of occasional items. However, these species share resources mainly in the early ontogenetic stages until the emphasized change of morphological characteristics leading to trophic niche expansion and the apparent segregation observed. PMID:25340614

  1. Perspectives on Climate Effects on Agriculture: The International Efforts of AgMIP in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Job; MacCarthy, Dilys S.; Bationo, Andre; Koala, Saidou; Hickman, Jonathon; Koo, Jawoo; Vanya, Charles; Adiku, Samuel; Beletse, Yacob; Masikate, Patricia; Rao, Karuturi P. C.; Mutter, Carolyn Z.; Rosenzweig, Cynthia; Jones, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Agriculture in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) is experiencing climate change-related effects that call for integrated regional assessments, yet capacity for these assessments has been low. The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) is advancing research on integrated regional assessments of climate change that include climate, crop, and economic modeling and analysis. Through AgMIP, regional integrated assessments are increasingly gaining momentum in SSA, and multi-institutional regional research teams (RRTs) centered in East, West, and Southern· Africa are generating new information on climate change impacts and adaptation in selected agricultural systems. The research in Africa is organized into four RRTs and a coordination team. Each of the RRTs in SSA is composed of scientists from the Consultative Group of International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) institutions, National Agriculture Research institutes (NARs), and universities consisting of experts in crop and economic modeling, climate, and information technology. Stakeholder involvement to inform specific agricultural systems to be evaluated, key outputs, and the representative agricultural pathways (RAPs), is undertaken at two levels: regional and national, in order to contribute to decision making at these levels. Capacity building for integrated assessment (lA) is a key component that is undertaken continuously through interaction with experts in regional and SSA-wide workshops, and through joint creation of tools. Many students and research affiliates have been identified and entrained as part of capacity building in IA. Bi-monthly updates on scholarly publications in climate change in Africa also serve as a vehicle for knowledge-sharing. With 60 scientists already trained and actively engaged in IA and over 80 getting monthly briefs on the latest information on climate change, a climate-informed community of experts is gradually taking shape in SSA. (See Part 2, Appendices 3-5 in

  2. Clinical Decision Making and Outcome in Routine Care for People with Severe Mental Illness (CEDAR: Study protocol

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    Nemes Zoltan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A considerable amount of research has been conducted on clinical decision making (CDM in short-term physical conditions. However, there is a lack of knowledge on CDM and its outcome in long-term illnesses, especially in care for people with severe mental illness. Methods/Design The study entitled "Clinical decision making and outcome in routine care for people with severe mental illness" (CEDAR is carried out in six European countries (Denmark, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Switzerland and UK. First, CEDAR establishes a methodology to assess CDM in people with severe mental illness. Specific instruments are developed (and psychometric properties established to measure CDM style, key elements of CDM in routine care, as well as CDM involvement and satisfaction from patient and therapist perspectives. Second, these instruments are being put to use in a multi-national prospective observational study (bimonthly assessments during a one-year observation period; N = 560. This study investigates the immediate, short- and long-term effect of CDM on crucial dimensions of clinical outcome (symptom level, quality of life, needs by taking into account significant variables moderating the relationship between CDM and outcome. Discussion The results of this study will make possible to delineate quality indicators of CDM, as well as to specify prime areas for further improvement. Ingredients of best practice in CDM in the routine care for people with severe mental illness will be extracted and recommendations formulated. With its explicit focus on the patient role in CDM, CEDAR will also contribute to strengthening the service user perspective. This project will substantially add to improving the practice of CDM in mental health care across Europe. Trial register ISRCTN75841675.

  3. Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact Study Final Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, Tate

    2014-07-01

    The goal of the Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact campaign was to characterize the concentration and isotopic composition of carbonaceous atmospheric particulate matter (PM) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility site in Barrow, Alaska. The carbonaceous component was characterized by measuring the organic and black carbon (OC and BC) components of the total PM. To facilitate complete characterization of the PM, filter-based collections were used, including a medium volume PM2.5 sampler and a high volume PM10 sampler. Thirty-eight fine PM fractions (PM2.5) and 49 coarse (PM10) PM fractions were collected at weekly and bi-monthly intervals. The PM2.5 sampler operated with minimal maintenance during the 12 month campaign. The PM10 sampler used for the Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact (BBCSI) study used standard Tisch “hi-vol” motors that have a known lifetime of approximately 1 month under constant use; this necessitated monthly maintenance, and it is suggested that, for future deployment in the Arctic, the motors be upgraded to industrial blowers. The BBCSI sampling campaign successfully collected and archived 87 ambient atmospheric PM samples from Barrow, Alaska, from July 2012 to June 2013. Preliminary analysis of the OC and BC concentrations has been completed. This campaign confirmed known trends of high BC lasting from the winter through to spring haze periods and low BC concentrations in the summer. However, the annual OC concentrations had a very different seasonal pattern with the highest concentrations during the summer, lowest concentrations during the fall, and increased concentrations during the winter and spring (Figure 1).

  4. Seasonal population dynamics of Zeuxapta seriolae (Monogenea: Heteraxinidae) parasitising Seriola dumerili (Carangidae) in the Western Mediterranean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repullés-Albelda, Aigües; Kostadinova, Aneta; Raga, Juan Antonio; Montero, Francisco E

    2013-03-31

    We examined the seasonal and yearly population dynamics of the monogenean pathogen Zeuxapta seriolae on juvenile fish from wild populations of Seriola dumerili. The study is based on bimonthly monitoring between April, 2005 and April, 2007 off Majorca, and newly obtained monogenean population data for juvenile fish from three additional localities in the Western Mediterranean (off Alicante, Corsica and Sardinia). We documented the highest intensities and abundances of Z. seriolae, with mean abundance values similar to or higher than those reported in the single case of wild fish mortalities reported to date. There was a recurrent pattern of seasonal change in infection with Z. seriolae in the populations of S. dumerili off Majorca, with substantially higher parasite loads during the warm season (April to June). Mean parasite abundance was significantly correlated with seawater temperature and associated with higher proportions of juvenile worms in the parasite populations, thus suggesting increased transmission rates at higher temperatures. There was a significant negative association between abundance of Z. seriolae and fish length. Comparisons with the samples of younger and older fish off Majorca indicated that whereas infection parameters gradually increased in the first year of juvenile fish life, larger/older fish (>43 cm; 1+) were much lightly infected than the smaller/younger (seriolae and mean fish total length, indicate that heavily infected individuals are being rapidly removed (i.e. within 2-3 months) from the host population thus reducing the heterogeneity of parasite distribution as fish grow. We discuss parasite-induced host mortality and other mechanisms that may account for observed recurrent patterns in monogenean abundance and spatial aggregation and review the data available on the spread of Z. seriolae infections in the Mediterranean. PMID:23312866

  5. Treatment of Laugier-Hunziker syndrome with the Q-switched alexandrite laser in 22 Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Ya-Gang; Ma, Dong-Lai; Jin, Hong-Zhong; Liu, Yue-Hua; Wang, Hong-Wei; Sun, Qiu-Ning

    2010-03-01

    Laugier-Hunziker syndrome (LHS), a rare, acquired pigmentary disorder of the lips, oral mucosa, and fingers, is known to be an entirely benign disease with no systemic manifestations. In the past, the pigmentation has been treated efficiently in a few patients with the Q-switched neodymium: yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser and the Q-switched alexandrite laser (QSAL). In order to evaluate the efficacy and safety of QSAL on Chinese patients of LHS, we treated 22 patients with QSAL in the past 5 years. Treatments were delivered on a bimonthly or trimonthly basis until the abnormal pigmentation totally disappeared. Patients were evaluated at each visit for evidence of dyspigmentation, scarring, or other untoward effects from the laser treatment. Our 22 subjects consisted of 18 females and 4 males with a mean age of 42.4 years. After only one session of laser treatment, the clearing on the lips was as follow: 18 (81.8%) excellent, 2 (9.1%) good, 1 (4.5%) fair and 1 (4.5%) poor. Eighteen patients (81.8%) with LHS, who had achieved excellent clearing after only one session of laser treatment, did not receive further treatment. Among the left four patients, three patients (13.6%) achieved complete results after three laser treatments. Only one patient required six sessions to achieve complete clearance. No scarring was noted after any of the treatments. The appearance of pigmentation on mucous membranes in a middle-aged patient without a significant family history for skin disorders should prompt consideration for the possible diagnosis of LHS. Our study has also demonstrated QSAL to be highly effective and safe in the treatment of LHS.

  6. Reproductive biology of Oligosarcus argenteus (Gunther, 1864 adult males and description of the gonadal maturation stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Luis Pinto da Matt

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Oligosarcus argenteus belongs to the Acestrorhynchinae subfamily, being restricted to South America, and found in several Brazilian hydrographic basins, in lotic and lentic environments, where they are able to reproduce. With the purpose of studying the reproductive biology of the males from this species, many morphological parameters were analyzed during a 24 month period, as well as characterizing the different testicular maturation stages. A maturity scale, with three stages (I - Initial Maturing, II - Intermediate Maturing, III - Final Maturing was proposed for the adult males of Oligosarcus argenteus. The reproductive period was established by the bimonthly frequency of spermatogenesis and by the gonadal maturation stages.Oligosarcus argenteus é uma espécie pertencente à subfamília Acestrorhynchinae, restrita à América do Sul, sendo comumente encontrada nas várias bacias hidrográficas brasileiras, em ambientes lóticos e lênticos, onde se reproduzem. Com o objetivo de estudar a biologia reprodutiva de machos desta espécie, vários parâmetros morfológicos foram analisados durante um período de 24 meses, assim como foram caracterizados os diferentes estádios de maturação testicular. Estes foram descritos, considerando-se exemplares adultos, em: Estádio I - Maturação Inicial, Estádio II - Maturação Intermediária e Estádio III - Maturação Final. Pela freqüência bimestral das células germinativas e dos estádios de maturação gonadal, a época de reprodução foi determinada.

  7. Monitoring tools and early warning system for harmful cyanobacterial blooms: Río Uruguay and Río de la Plata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Kruk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Potentially hazardous cyanobacterial blooming constitutes one of the most widespread problems experienced by aquatic systems worldwide. However, there are not any monitoring methods sensitive enough to be directly applicable to predict and manage blooming events. In order to fulfill this goal, both ecological and genetic concepts were combined to generate cyanobacteria monitoring tools. Two approaches were used: grouping organisms into functional groups and utilizing molecular analysis (real time quantitative PCR as indicators of the presence of genes that encode the expression of cyanotoxins (mcy. Six bi-monthly sampling campaigns were performed to evaluate the suitability of these tools (2013-2014 at six locations composed of two sites each one, ranging downstream from Salto Grande, at the River Uruguay, to Punta del Este, at the Estuary River Plate. A remarkable gradient was observed in the meteorological, physical and chemical variables, as well as higher abundances in planktonic organisms both in Salto Grande and in Punta del Este. The most abundant population of toxic species in the whole gradient were found in Salto, and in particular those belonging to the Microcystis aeruginosa complex (MAC. The most relevant environmental variables to determine the gradient and the variation in biological variables were: salinity, temperature, wind and turbidity. The results of the new indicators (presence of MAC in the plankton net and mcy genes were in agreement with the traditional ones (v.g. chlorophyll-a demonstrating being much more sensitive in cases of the most severe blooming events than in the low abundance situations. The conjunction of results was applied to the construction of a monitoring and early warning system protocol.

  8. Analyzing health insurance claims on different timescales to predict days in hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yang; Schreier, Günter; Hoy, Michael; Liu, Ying; Neubauer, Sandra; Chang, David C W; Redmond, Stephen J; Lovell, Nigel H

    2016-04-01

    Health insurers maintain large databases containing information on medical services utilized by claimants, often spanning several healthcare services and providers. Proper use of these databases could facilitate better clinical and administrative decisions. In these data sets, there exists many unequally spaced events, such as hospital visits. However, data mining of temporal data and point processes is still a developing research area and extracting useful information from such data series is a challenging task. In this paper, we developed a time series data mining approach to predict the number of days in hospital in the coming year for individuals from a general insured population based on their insurance claim data. In the proposed method, the data were windowed at four different timescales (bi-monthly, quarterly, half-yearly and yearly) to construct regularly spaced time series features extracted from such events, resulting in four associated prediction models. A comparison of these models indicates models using a half-yearly windowing scheme delivers the best performance on all three populations (the whole population, a senior sub-population and a non-senior sub-population). The superiority of the half-yearly model was found to be particularly pronounced in the senior sub-population. A bagged decision tree approach was able to predict 'no hospitalization' versus 'at least one day in hospital' with a Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.426. This was significantly better than the corresponding yearly model, which achieved 0.375 for this group of customers. Further reducing the length of the analysis windows to three or two months did not produce further improvements. PMID:26827621

  9. A Case of Sustained Intraocular Pressure Elevation after Multiple Intravitreal Injection of Ranibizumab and Aflibercept for Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Hisashi; Miyata, Ryohei; Kobayashi, Maki; Tsukitome, Hideyuki; Ikesugi, Kengo; Kondo, Mineo

    2016-01-01

    Intravitreal injections of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) agents are widely used to treat neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). Although these treatments are effective, multiple injections have recently been recommended to ensure that there is a good long-term prognosis. However, sustained intraocular pressure (IOP) elevations have been reported to develop after multiple injections of anti-VEGF agents. We present our findings of a case of uncontrolled and persistent IOP elevation after switching from intravitreal ranibizumab injections to intravitreal aflibercept injections. A 74-year-old Japanese man without a history of glaucoma underwent 22 ranibizumab injections for nAMD and suddenly developed an elevated IOP after the 22nd injection. Although the subsequent medical treatment led to normalization of his IOP, the subretinal fluid under the central fovea remained even after the 25th injection of ranibizumab. Thus, ranibizumab treatment was switched to bimonthly intravitreal aflibercept injections in conjunction with glaucoma medications. His IOP recovered to within the normal range; however, after the 11th aflibercept injection, there was a sudden elevation of his IOP in spite of the continued glaucoma medications. Due to this sustained IOP elevation, his aflibercept injections were suspended for 16 weeks. Because his IOP could not be normalized by a full glaucoma medication regimen, the patient underwent trabeculotomy, which resulted in a lowering of the IOP to normal levels. We conclude that patients who receive serial intravitreal injections of anti-VEGF agents need to be closely monitored because severe and sustained ocular hypertension can develop.

  10. Veterinary research, monitoring and advisory services in connection with the establishment and operation of a communal biomass conversion plant. Partial project 2 (VET-BIO-2). Veterinaer forskning, overvaagning og raadgivning i forbindelse med etablering og drift af biogasfaellesanlaeg. Delprojekt 2 (VET-BIO-2); Forsknings- og overvaagningsprogram vedroerende bakterier og parasitter med henblik paa opstilling af et driftsovervaagningsprogram for biogasfaellesanlaeg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munch, B.; Bonde Larsen, A.

    1990-01-15

    From Feb. '88 through June '89, contents of Salmonella, M. paratuberculosis, total coliforms, faecal streptococci, eggs of Ascaris suum, eggs and larvae of Trichostrongylus spp., and oocysts of bovine Eimeria spp. were quantified in 481 samples of raw and treated biomass collected bi-monthly for up to 12 months from five biogas plants. All five were run semi- continuously, two being thermophilic, one mesophilic, and two mesophilic with thermophilic pre-treatment. Herds delivering slurry to each plant ranged rom 6 - 33 cattle and/or pig herds, and daily input of biomass from 40 - 100 tons. Slurry was treated when mixed with other types of biomass, e.g. waste from pig or poultry slaughterhouses, fish industries or oil mills, and separate samples of these biomasses were examined. It is concluded that thermophilic as well as mesophilic digestion with, thermophilic pre-treatment may be capable of reducing numbers of vegetative pathogenic bacteria and intestinal parasites potentially present in incoming material, thus to allow for unrestricted use of the degassed biomass in this respect. This requires a reducing capacity on faecal streptococci of at least 3-4 log{sub 10} units by digestons based on or including a thermophillic treatment, corresponding to a maximal concentration of these bacteria in treated biomass in the order of magnitude of 10{sup 2} per ml. Minimum temperature and biomass retention time in the reactors as registered automatically, together with determinations of faecal streptococci in the end-product, are suggested as suitable monitoring parameters in these cases, to check on compliance with criteria for unrestricted use of treated biomass. For mesophilic biogas plants adequate restrictions on the use of the end-product will depend on individual process technology and local conditions. (author) 24 refs.

  11. Experimental transplanting of Posidonia australis seagrass in Port Hacking, Australia, to assess the feasibility of restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Alexander J; West, Ronald J

    2002-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, about one-third of the original area of the seagrass Posidonia australis has been lost from Port Hacking (Australia) due to anthropogenic impacts. To assess the feasibility of restoring these seagrass meadows, healthy Posidonia rhizomes were transplanted to four impact sites and one control site. Survival rates of transplanted shoots were monitored in situ bi-monthly for 16 months and, at the end of the experiment, rhizome growth, shoot growth, shoot production and growth architecture were assessed by harvesting tagged rhizomes. A total of 575 shoots were transplanted and after 16 months 650 shoots were present. Four of the five sites exhibited high survival rates in the short term (less than six months) but only two impact sites, Burraneer Bay (BB) and Red Jacks Point (RJP), and the control site (CS) survived to the end of the experiment. Total number of shoots increased by 61% at CS, tripled at BB, but decreased by 22% at RJP. Rhizome growth varied significantly between site, from 22.3 +/- 1.4 cm yr(-1) at BB to 9.1 +/- 1.0 cm yr(-1) at RJP. Shoot growth did not vary significantly between sites and was approximately 2-3 cm yr(-1). At BB and CS there was substantial colonisation of the surrounding substrate, with new rhizomes, orthotropic shoots and transitional shoots produced. Survival of transplants appeared to depend on whether the factors that had caused the original loss of Posidonia were still operating in the study area. PMID:11883680

  12. Quality of water sources used as drinking water in a Brazilian peri-urban area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Tereza Pepe Razzolini

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper was to assess bacteriological quality of drinking water in a peri-urban area located in the Metropolitan Region of São Paulo, Brazil. A total of 89 water samples were collected from community plastic tanks and 177 water samples from wells were collected bimonthly, from September 2007 to November 2008, for evaluating bacteriological parameters including: Escherichia coli, Enterococcus and heterotrophic plate count (HPC. Clostridium perfringens was investigated in a subsample (40 samples from community plastic tank and 40 from wells. E. coli was present in 5 (5.6% samples from community plastic tanks (2.0 - 5.1x10(4 MPN/100mL and in 70 (39.5% well samples (2.0 - 8.6x10(4 MPN/100mL. Thus, these samples were not in accordance with the Brazilian Regulation. Enterococcus was detected in 20 (22.5% samples of the community plastic tanks (1 to 79 NC/100mL and in 142 (80.2% well samples (1 to >200 NC/100mL. C. perfringens was detected in 5 (12.5% community plastic tanks samples and in 35 (87.5% wells samples (2.2 to >16 MPN/100mL. HPC were above 500 CFU/mL in 5 (5.6% waters from community plastic tanks. In wells samples, the HPC ranged from <1 to 1.6x10(4 CFU/mL. The residual chlorine did not attend the standard established in the drinking water legislation (0.2 mg/L, except in 20 (22.5% samples. These results confirm the vulnerability of the water supply systems in this peri-urban area what is clearly a public health concern.

  13. Facilitating needs based cancer care for people with a chronic disease: Evaluation of an intervention using a multi-centre interrupted time series design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibbritt David

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Palliative care should be provided according to the individual needs of the patient, caregiver and family, so that the type and level of care provided, as well as the setting in which it is delivered, are dependent on the complexity and severity of individual needs, rather than prognosis or diagnosis 1. This paper presents a study designed to assess the feasibility and efficacy of an intervention to assist in the allocation of palliative care resources according to need, within the context of a population of people with advanced cancer. Methods/design People with advanced cancer and their caregivers completed bi-monthly telephone interviews over a period of up to 18 months to assess unmet needs, anxiety and depression, quality of life, satisfaction with care and service utilisation. The intervention, introduced after at least two baseline phone interviews, involved a training medical, nursing and allied health professionals at each recruitment site on the use of the Palliative Care Needs Assessment Guidelines and the Needs Assessment Tool: Progressive Disease - Cancer (NAT: PD-C; b health professionals completing the NAT: PD-C with participating patients approximately monthly for the rest of the study period. Changes in outcomes will be compared pre-and post-intervention. Discussion The study will determine whether the routine, systematic and regular use of the Guidelines and NAT: PD-C in a range of clinical settings is a feasible and effective strategy for facilitating the timely provision of needs based care. Trials registration ISRCTN21699701

  14. Nutrient dynamics from the Changjiang (Yangtze River) estuary to the East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Su Mei; Qi, Xiao Hong; Li, Xiaona; Ye, Hao Ran; Wu, Ying; Ren, Jing Ling; Zhang, Jing; Xu, Wei Yi

    2016-02-01

    Water and sediment samples were collected from the Changjiang (Yangtze River) estuary and the adjacent East China Sea during impoundment of the river at the Three Gorges Dam. The concentrations of dissolved inorganic and organic nutrients, and particulate inorganic phosphorus and particulate organic phosphorus in the water column (PIP and POP, respectively) and sediments (SIP and SOP, respectively) were analyzed. The nutrient dynamics in salt marshes associated with the Changjiang estuary were also considered. In addition, river water samples were collected bimonthly in the lower reaches of the Changjiang. The concentrations of dissolved inorganic nutrients, PIP and POP showed temporal and spatial variations, which decreased from the coast to offshore areas. The dissolved organic nitrogen and phosphorus (P) concentrations showed patchy distributions, but were consistent with the distribution of phytoplankton biomass. Phosphorus is the major limiting element for phytoplankton growth. Among the various P forms, particulate P represented 38-52% of total P. The PIP and POP concentrations showed clear seasonal variations corresponding to the occurrence of the levels of suspended particulate matter. The P accumulation rates showed a decreasing trend from the coast to offshore areas, and high P burial efficiencies were found; the latter were related to a low benthic PO43 - flux and high sediment accumulation rates. The potential bioavailable P was estimated to be 65-70% of total P, of which more than two-thirds was regenerated in the water column. The salt marsh in the Changjiang estuary plays an important ecological role in nutrient transport from the river to offshore areas, and increased P limitation.

  15. Succession of phytoplankton assemblages in response to large-scale reservoir operation: a case study in a tributary of the Three Gorges Reservoir, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yan; Li, Zhe; Guo, Jinsong; Fang, Fang; Smith, Val H

    2016-03-01

    The Three Gorges Dam (TGD) has greatly altered ecological and environmental conditions within the reservoir region, but it is not known how these changes affect phytoplankton structure and dynamics. Here, a bimonthly monitoring program was implemented from 2007 to 2009 to study the impact of damming on phytoplankton assemblages in the backwater area of the Pengxi River (PBA). By application of the phytoplankton functional group (C strategists, competitive species; S strategists, stress-tolerant species; R strategists, rapid propagation species), seasonal changes in phytoplankton relative to environmental variations were evaluated using ordination analysis. Seasonal patterns of phytoplankton dynamics were detected during this study, with CS/S strategists causing algal blooms from mid-spring to early summer, CS/CR strategists often observed during flood season, and CS strategists dominant during mid-autumn. CR/R groups dominated during winter and caused algal blooms in February. Our results indicated that phytoplankton assemblages were directly related to reservoir operation effects. Generally, the TGD had a low water level during flood season, resulting in a relatively short hydraulic retention time and intensive variability, which supported the cooccurrence of CS and CR species. During the winter drought season, water storage in the TGD increased the water level and the hydraulic retention time in the PBA, enabling R/CR strategists to overcome the sedimentation effect and to out-compete S/CS species in winter. As expected, these diversity patterns were significantly correlated with the hydraulic retention time and nutrient limitation pattern in the PBA. This study provides strategic insight for evaluating the impacts of reservoir operations on phytoplankton adaptation. PMID:26861743

  16. Phytoplankton Community of Elechi Creek, Niger Delta, Nigeria-A Nutrient-Polluted Tropical Creek

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Davies

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Elechi Creek of the Upper Bonny Estuary in the Niger Delta contributes to the Rivers State Fish resources. It is a sink receiving organic anthropogenic wastes from Diobu, Eagle Island and waterfront dwellers of Diobu areas. Fishing, car washing, bathing, swimming and other human activities are constantly going on within and around this creek. Based on these activities, there is urgent need to study the phytoplankton community that supports its fisheries. Approach: The study investigated the phytoplankton composition, diversity, abundance and distribution as well as surface water physico-chemical parameters. Phytoplankton and surface water samples were collected bi-monthly from October 2007-March 2008 at high tide from five stations according to APHA methods. These were analyzed for temperature, transparency, dissolved oxygen, salinity, alkalinity, chloride and nutrients. Phytoplankton was identified microscopically. Species diversity was calculated using standard indices. Results: A total of 169 species of phytoplankton, based on cell counts, was dominated by diatoms, 33255 counts mL-1 (36% and blue-green algae, 32909 counts mL-1 (35.7% were identified. The abundance of phytoplankton decreased downstream of this creek (1>2>3>4 except in station 5 with the highest phytoplankton abundance (23938 counts mL-1. There was slight fluctuation in the measured physico-chemical parameters. The results of this study indicated the characteristic species and distribution of phytoplankton in Elechi Creek during the dry months. Conclusion/Recommendation: The high level of phosphate above the permissive limit showed that this creek is hypereutrophic and organic polluted. The high nutrients status favors the high abundance of phytoplankton. The municipal effluents (especially raw human and animal faces discharges must be discontinued. Detergents with low concentration of phosphate are recommended for manufacturing and use. Municipal wastes must

  17. The Hong Kong Chinese University Document Retrieval Database——The Hong Kong Newspaper Full-text Database Projeet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MichaelM.Lee

    1994-01-01

    This project is to collect, organize, index and store full-text and graphics of selected Chinese and English newspapers currently published in Hang Kong. The end product will be an electronic database available to researchers through local area network, Internet and dial-up users. New items of the day before and up to six months will be available for online searching, via key word or subject, Earlier cumulated nateriats alone with the same indexing and searchmg software will be archived to optical media (CD ROM disks). As Itong Kong experiences rapid social, financial, conmtercial, political, educational and cultural changes, our state-of-the-art comprehensive coverage of local and regional newspapers will be a landmark contribution to information industries and researchers internationally. As the coverage of the database will be comprehensive and centralized, retrieval of news items of major Hang Kong newspapers will be fast and immtediate. Users do no need to look through daily or bi-monthly indexes in order to go to the newspapers or cuttings to obtain the hard copy, and then bring to the photocopier machine to copy,At this stage, we are hiring librarians, information specialists and support staff to work on this project. We also met and work with newspaper indexing and retrieval system developers in Beijing and Hang Kong to study cooperative systems to speed up the process. So far, we have received funding support from the Chinese University and the Hong Kong Government for two years. It is our plan to have a presentable sample database done by mid 1995, and have several newspapers indexed and stored in the structure arid for mat easy formigration to the eventual database system by the end of 1996.

  18. Bactérias associadas à decomposição de folhas de Cedrela fissilis Vell. (Cedro em mata tropical subcaducifólia do noroeste do Estado do Paraná - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v20i0.4485 Bacteria associated with decomposition of leaves of Cedrela fissilis Vell. (Cedro in a tropical semideciduous forest of the northwest of state of Parana - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v20i0.4485

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdovino Damásio dos Santos

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Folhas de Cedrela fissilis Vell. (cedro, coletadas de exemplares ocorrentes no Horto Florestal de Maringá, foram colocadas em bolsas de tela de náilon e distribuídas em 10 pontos sobre o solo no interior da mata e recolhidas bimestralmente por um período de 12 meses. Pequenos discos, obtidos das folhas, foram submetidos à lavagem vigorosa em solução salina estéril 0,89% e aplicados na superfície do meio ágar nutriente. Os principais gêneros de bactérias associadas à decomposição foram os seguintes microrganismos: Bacillus, Cellulomonas, Pseudomonas e membros da família Enterobacteriaceae. Entre as enterobactérias destacam-se os gêneros Enterobacter e Erwinia. A sucessão bacteriana em Cedrela fissilis foi estudada pela caracterização da microflora do litter em diferentes estágios para compreender a natureza da sua degradação.Leaves from Cedrela fissilis Vell. grown in a tropical semideciduous urban forest reserve were placed in litterbags and collected at bimonthly intervals during twelve months. Small disks from the leaves were washed, dried and inoculated in Petri plates with agar medium nutrient and incubated at 37ºC for 24-48 hours. The most frequent bacterial groups were the following: Bacillus, Cellulomonas, Pseudomonas, and members of the Enterobacteriaceae family. Enterobacter and Erwinia were the most frequent members of this family. The pattern of bacterial succession in Cedrela fissilis was studied through litter microflora characterization at different stages to understand the nature of its degradation.

  19. National information service in mining, mineral processing and extractive metallurgy. [MINTEC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romaniuk, A.S.; MacDonald, R.J.C.

    1979-03-01

    More than a dedade ago, CANMET management recognized the need to make better use of existing technological information in mining and extractive metallurgy, two fields basic to the economic well-being of Canada. There were at that time no indexes or files didicated to disseminating technical information for the many minerals mined and processed in Canada, including coal. CANMET, with the nation's largest research and library resources in the minerals field, was in a unique position to fill this need. Initial efforts were concentrated on building a mining file beginning with identification of world sources of published information, development of a special thesaurus of terms for language control and adoption of a manual indexing/retrieval system. By early 1973, this file held 8,300 references, with source, abstract and keywords given for each reference. In mid-1973, operations were computerized. Software for indexing and retrieval by batch mode was written by CANMET staff to utilize the hardware facilities of EMR's Computer Science Center. The resulting MINTEC file, one of the few files of technological information produced in Canada, is the basis for the national literature search service in mining offered by CANMET. Attention is now focussed on building a sister-file in extractive metallurgy using the system already developed. Published information sources have been identified and a thesaurus of terms is being compiled and tested. The software developed for CANMET's file-building operations has several features, including the selective dissemination of information and production from magnetic tape of photoready copy for publication, as in a bi-monthly abstracts journal.

  20. The challenges of healthcare delivery to people with multiple sclerosis in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdannik, Ahmadreza; Abolhassani, Shahla; Taleghani, Fariba; Zamani, Ahmadreza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease prevalent in young and middle-aged people. Patients with MS often have numerous complicated needs and, consequently, require a broad range of health services. Results of a number of studies indicate that patients’ needs are only partially met. Aims: This study was conducted to explore the challenges of healthcare delivery to patients with MS in Iran. Materials and Methods: In this qualitative case study, 43 participants selected through purposeful sampling were interviewed using semi-structured method in the cities of Isfahan and Tehran in 2012–2013. Besides the interview, documentations relevant to healthcare delivery were collected from different sources, including websites of all Iranian universities of medical sciences, insurance organizations, patients’ weblogs, news agencies, the MS Center forum for MS patients, and MS Payam bimonthly. The data were analyzed through the constant comparative analysis. Results: The data were categorized into four main categories, including functional challenges (diagnosis problems, failure to pay attention to patient needs, failure to follow-up, and miscommunication), administrative challenges (resource allocation and supervision), policy-making challenges (lack of comprehensive services, bureaucracy, and problems in provision of medications), and structural challenges (difficult access to services, lack of comprehensive centers, space limit, and long wait). Conclusion: Despite all attempts of governmental and nongovernmental organizations for healthcare delivery to MS patients, these services cannot satisfy all needs of the patients. In this regard, service providers and administrators should pay more attention to the needs and expectations of patients and their families. PMID:27462625

  1. Abundance and diversity of amphipod crustaceans in the Upper Songkhla Lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruensirikul, J.

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available A bimonthly investigation of amphipod crustaceans in the Upper Songkhla Lagoon from April 2003 to February 2004 was undertaken to determine the abundance and species richness. The mean density of amphipods among stations ranged from 233 to 4937 ind.m-2, while the monthly densities ranged from 600 to 3620 ind.m-2. A total 10 families, 14 genera and 16 species were identified. The diversity among stationsranged from 2-12 species while varying from 8-15 species during the different months. Kamaka cf. taditadi is the most dominant amphipod with 89.2% of total (max. 16486 ind.m-2 in December. It distributed widely and in every sampling month. Photis longicaudata (36-338 ind.m-2 Grandidierella taihuensis (28-65 ind.m-2 Cerapus sp. (3-95 ind.m-2 and Perioculodes cf. acuticoxa (19-54 ind.m-2 distributed widely in all months but with lower densities. The other 11 species were occasionally found and had narrow distribution with low densities (< 20 ind.m-2. The density and diversity of amphipods were higher at the shallower stations nearby the bank (mean depth 1.1 m. than at the deeper stations in the middle area (mean depth 2.5 m.. The species richness among seasons was not different but the density tended to increase in the rainy season in December and markedly decrease in the post-rainy season in February. The best fitting of the environmental variables to explain the amphipod community pattern of the Upper Songkhla Lagoon for 6 months was a 4-variable combination of pH, salinity, %sand and %organic carbon and a 3-variable combination of depth, DO and %sand for 11 stations (harmonic rank correlation coefficient, ρw = 0.56 and 0.51 respectively.

  2. Oral vaccination with microencapsuled strain 19 vaccine confers enhanced protection against Brucella abortus strain 2308 challenge in red deer (Cervus elaphus elaphus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas-Gamboa, Angela M; Ficht, Thomas A; Davis, Donald S; Elzer, Philip H; Kahl-McDonagh, Melissa; Wong-Gonzalez, Alfredo; Rice-Ficht, Allison C

    2009-10-01

    Bison (Bison bison) and elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) in the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA), USA, are infected with Brucella abortus, the causative agent of bovine brucellosis, and they serve as a wildlife reservoir for the disease. Bovine brucellosis recently has been transmitted from infected elk to cattle in Montana, Wyoming, and Idaho and has resulted in their loss of brucellosis-free status. An efficacious Brucella vaccine with a delivery system suitable for wildlife would be a valuable tool in a disease prevention and control program. We evaluated Strain 19 (S19) in a sustained release vehicle consisting of alginate microspheres containing live vaccine. In a challenge study using red deer (Cervus elaphus elaphus) as a model for elk, alginate, a naturally occurring polymer combined with a protein of Fasciola hepatica vitelline protein B was used to microencapsulate S19. Red deer were orally or subcutaneously immunized with 1.5 x 10(10) colony-forming units (CFUs) using microencapsulated S19. Humoral and cellular profiles were analyzed bimonthly throughout the study. The vaccinated red deer and nonvaccinated controls were challenged 1 yr postimmunization conjunctivally with 1 x 10(9) CFUs of B. abortus strain 2308. Red deer vaccinated with oral microencapsulated S19 had a statistically significant lower bacterial tissue load compared with controls. These data indicate for the first time that protection against Brucella-challenge can be achieved by combining a commonly used vaccine with a novel oral delivery system such as alginate-vitelline protein B microencapsulation. This system is a potential improvement for efficacious Brucella-vaccine delivery to wildlife in the GYA. PMID:19901378

  3. Role of Sediments and Nutrients in the Condition of a Coral Reef Under Tourist Pressure: Akumal México.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo-Garcia, M. J.; Vadés Lozano, D. S.; Real-De-Leon, E.; Lopez-Aguiar, K.; Garza-Perez, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Akumal, Mexico, was the first tourist resort in the Mexican Caribbean mainland, its highly developed coastal zone lies directly above the phreatic, and it is directly connected to the sub-littoral waters. Akumal is also known as a well-developed fringing coral reef, now in a critical condition. The main objective of this study was to explore the relationship between two of the main indicators of human pressure (nutrients and sedimentation, linked to coastal development and water run-offs) and the condition of the reef benthos, during a year. The sampling design used four transects perpendicular to shore, associated to different tourist and water run-off exposure, for a total of 12 stations distributed in three different reef zones (transition zone, shallow and deep spurs and grooves). Monthly samples were collected: water samples close to the reef lagoon drain channels and at bottom depth at each station, and sediment traps were recovered and replaced also at each station. Reef Benthos videotransects were recorded bi-monthly at each station to assess its condition. Macroalgae and filamentous algae dominate benthic cover (up to 50%), hard-coral cover ranges from 5-9%. Five coral-diseases were recorded, affecting 10.16% of the coral colonies: Caribbean Ciliate Infection, White Band, Purple Spots, White Spots and Yellow Band. The sedimentation rate -sr- ranged from 0.13 to 83.7 mg/cm2/day during the year; 86% of the samples had a sr ≤ 10 mg/cm2/day (reefs not stressed); 13% of the samples had a sr ranging from 10 to 50 mg/cm2/day (stressed reefs); and 1% of the samples were over the critical threshold (>50 mg/cm2/day). Dissolved Inorganic Nitrogen concentrations during the year were above those recorded previously in Caribbean reefs. The most abundant fraction was ammonium, surpassing both Mexican norms: For protection of aquatic life in coastal zones (0.01 mg/L), and the critical threshold for aquatic life (0.4 mg/L). These concentration limits are considered as

  4. 胶州湾北部浮游动物的生物量和生产力%The Zooplankton Biomass and Productivity in Northern Jiaozhou Bay, Qingdao, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The seasonal variation, horizontal distribution and turnover rate of the zooplankton in northern Jiaozhou Bay (Qingdao, China) were studied over the period March 1995 to January 1996. The sampling scheme included bi-monthly hauls from the bottom to the surface of the water by using a plankt on net (0.5m diameter, 505 μm mesh size) at eight stations. The zooplankton bio mass varied from 8.73 mgC/m3 to 24.05 mgC/m3, and the zooplankton productivi ty fluctuated between 0.26 mgC/m3.d and 1.09 mgC/m3.d. Both of them had significant seasonal variations. Among the factors that influenced the fluctuati ons of zooplankton biomass and productivity, chlorophyll a and phytoplankton pro ductivity and salinity played an important role. There was remarkably positive c orrelation between the turnover rate of zooplankton and the temperature, and the re was significantly negative correlation between it and zooplankton dry weight.%结合海洋生态系统动力学研究,以碳为基本 单位研究了胶州湾北部浮游动物的生物量和生产力的季节变化和平面分布及其周转率等。浮 游动物生物量的变化范围为8.73 ~ 24.05 mgC/m3;生产力的变化范围为0.26 ~ 1.09 mgC /m3.d。二者具有显著的季节变化。 其平面分布表现为不均匀性。海水中Chl a的含量、 初级生产力及盐度等是影响浮游动物生物量和生产力的主要因素。该水域浮游动物的周转率 平均为0.047(0.019 ~ 0.13),其变化与水温呈显著正相关,与浮游动物平均个体干重呈负 相关。

  5. 台湾《美育》杂志的创办及艺术教育的发展方向--陈怡蓉、王凤翎访谈录%The Founding of Taiwan′s Journal Aesthetic Education and the Direction of the Development of Art Education-An Interview of Chen Yirong and Wang Fengling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈怡蓉; 王凤翎; 杨铭

    2015-01-01

    With the deepening of reform in education, the importance of aesthetic education as the linking element in the "Five Educations"becomes increasingly apparent.On January 10th, 2014, in order to improve aesthetic education, the Min-istry of Education issued"Opinions of the Ministry of Education on Promoting the Development of Art Education in Schools"which injected new vitality into and opened a new chapter in the promotion of art education.To learn from the experience of colleagues everywhere in the development of art education, Yang Ming took advantage of a visit to Taiwan and interviewed Ms Chen Yirong the current editor of Aesthetic Education of the Taiwan Museum of Art ( bimonthly) and Ms Wang Fengling its former editor .It is hoped that by publishing the transcription of this interview we can provide a glimpse into the current state of aesthetic and art educations in Taiwan and boost cross-strait exchanges in these areas between the mainland and Tai-wan.%随着教育改革的不断深化,美育越发显现出其在“五育”中重要的桥梁纽带作用。为了改进美育教学,教育部于2014年1月10日发布了《教育部关于推进学校艺术教育发展的若干意见》,为促进艺术教育的发展开启了新的篇章、注入了新的活力。为借鉴各方发展艺术教育的经验,杨铭借由个人参访的机会,对台湾艺术教育馆《美育》(双月刊)杂志的现任总编陈怡蓉女士与前任总编王凤翎女士做了一次访谈,并整理成为文字。希望借由刊发这篇文稿,为学界提供对台湾美育及艺术教育的信息,进而助力两岸艺术教育界的交流与学习。现将采访内容编辑整理如下。

  6. Ecologia de mosquitos (Diptera, Culicidae em áreas do Parque Nacional do Iguaçu, Brasil: 1 ­ Distribuição por hábitat Mosquito (Diptera, Culicidae ecology in the Iguaçu National Park, Brazil: 1 ­ Habitat distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Érico Guimarães

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Estabelecemos a influência exercida pela cobertura vegetal de quatro diferentes biótopos em áreas do Parque Nacional do Iguaçu (PNI sobre a fauna local de mosquitos. Realizaram-se capturas bimestrais, em isca humana e armadilha Shannon, em três diferentes períodos do dia, em ambiente silvestre e domiciliar, durante 24 meses consecutivos. Dentre os 20.273 espécimes de fêmeas adultas capturadas, pertencentes a 44 espécies, Ochlerotatus serratus (10,3%, Haemagogus leucocelaenus (9,7%, Mansonia titillans (9,6% e Chagasia fajardoi (8,8% foram predominantes. Anopheles cruzii, Runchomyia theobaldi, Wyeomyia aporonoma e Wy. confusa ocorreram exclusivamente em áreas com vegetação bem preservada e densa configuração. Culex nigripalpus, Oc. pennai, Oc. serratus, Sabethes purpureus e Sa. albiprivus foram capturados nos três biótopos essencialmente silvestres. Na mata no entorno da represa foram capturadas principalmente An. albitarsis s.l., An. galvaoi, An. evansae, An. fluminensis, Coquillettidia venezuelensis, Cq. juxtamansonia, Wy. quasilongirostris e Onirion personatum. As espécies que apresentaram maiores incidências na área sob ação antrópica foram Ch. fajardoi, Cq. fasciolata, Cq. nitens e Ma. titillans.A study of the mosquito fauna in the Iguaçu National Park focused on population behavior in four biotopes with different types of plant cover inside the Park. Systematic bimonthly diurnal and nocturnal human bait and Shannon trap captures were conducted in both forest and domiciliary environments over the course of 24 months. A total of 20,273 adult mosquito specimens belonging to 44 species were collected: Ochlerotatus serratus (10.3%, Haemagogus leucocelaenus (9.7%, Mansonia titillans (9.6%, and Chagasia fajardoi (8.8% were the most frequently captured mosquitoes. Anopheles cruzii, Runchomyia theobaldi, Wyeomyia aporonoma, and Wy. confusa were captured almost exclusively in well-preserved areas with dense forest cover. Culex

  7. The Perception of Stress Pattern in Young Cochlear Implanted Children: An EEG Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavatzanidis, Niki K; Mürbe, Dirk; Friederici, Angela D; Hahne, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Children with sensorineural hearing loss may (re)gain hearing with a cochlear implant-a device that transforms sounds into electric pulses and bypasses the dysfunctioning inner ear by stimulating the auditory nerve directly with an electrode array. Many implanted children master the acquisition of spoken language successfully, yet we still have little knowledge of the actual input they receive with the implant and specifically which language sensitive cues they hear. This would be important however, both for understanding the flexibility of the auditory system when presented with stimuli after a (life-) long phase of deprivation and for planning therapeutic intervention. In rhythmic languages the general stress pattern conveys important information about word boundaries. Infant language acquisition relies on such cues and can be severely hampered when this information is missing, as seen for dyslexic children and children with specific language impairment. Here we ask whether children with a cochlear implant perceive differences in stress patterns during their language acquisition phase and if they do, whether it is present directly following implant stimulation or if and how much time is needed for the auditory system to adapt to the new sensory modality. We performed a longitudinal ERP study, testing in bimonthly intervals the stress pattern perception of 17 young hearing impaired children (age range: 9-50 months; mean: 22 months) during their first 6 months of implant use. An additional session before the implantation served as control baseline. During a session they passively listened to an oddball paradigm featuring the disyllable "baba," which was stressed either on the first or second syllable (trochaic vs. iambic stress pattern). A group of age-matched normal hearing children participated as controls. Our results show, that within the first 6 months of implant use the implanted children develop a negative mismatch response for iambic but not for trochaic

  8. Cascadia GeoSciences: Community-Based Earth Science Research Focused on Geologic Hazard Assessment and Environmental Restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, T. B.; Patton, J. R.; Leroy, T. H.

    2007-12-01

    segmentation in the SCSZ. CG will also provide educational materials and resources to the public regarding environmental restoration and earthquake hazards. All research conducted through CG will be published to a publicly accessible digital archive. Education and outreach activities include the student grant program, a digital public archive (maps, reports, geospatial data, guidebooks, MS theses, etc), web-based resources, bi-monthly publications, and annual reports. We invite all types of earth scientists to help support student field research and join us in promoting collaboration, communication, and cooperation with Cascadia GeoSciences.

  9. Distribution of oxygen-18 and deuterium in river waters across the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Carol; Coplen, Tyler B.

    2001-05-01

    Reconstruction of continental palaeoclimate and palaeohydrology is currently hampered by limited information about isotopic patterns in the modern hydrologic cycle. To remedy this situation and to provide baseline data for other isotope hydrology studies, more than 4800, depth- and width-integrated, stream samples from 391 selected sites within the USGS National Stream Quality Accounting Network (NASQAN) and Hydrologic Benchmark Network (HBN) were analysed for 18O and 2H (http://water.usgs.gov/pubs/ofr/ofr00-160/pdf/ofr00-160.pdf). Each site was sampled bimonthly or quarterly for 2·5 to 3 years between 1984 and 1987. The ability of this dataset to serve as a proxy for the isotopic composition of modern precipitation in the USA is supported by the excellent agreement between the river dataset and the isotopic compositions of adjacent precipitation monitoring sites, the strong spatial coherence of the distributions of 18O and 2H, the good correlations of the isotopic compositions with climatic parameters, and the good agreement between the national meteoric water line (MWL) generated from unweighted analyses of samples from the 48 contiguous states of 2H=8·1118O+8·99 (r2=0·98) and the unweighted global MWL of sites from the Global Network for Isotopes in Precipitation (GNIP) of the International Atomic Energy Agency and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) of 2

  10. NOAA ESRL Atmospheric Research Operations in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasel, B. A.; Borgeld, J.; Ives, M.; Conway, T.; Karion, A.; Fischer, M. L.; Andrews, A. E.; Sweeney, C.; Andrews, B.; Oltmans, S. J.; Johnson, B. J.; Patrick, L. C.; Berkoff, T.

    2009-12-01

    In 2009 the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) had over two dozen operational research programs within the state of California. These diverse research missions include the Fire Weather Service and Support, the Pt Sur Debris Flow Project, and the Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) regional test bed. The ESRL Global Monitoring Division had 10 atmospheric measurement programs with a common goal to understand the regional and global climate impacts in and around California. The NOAA Trinidad Head (THD) baseline observatory, run in cooperation with Humboldt State University (HSU), was recently promoted to the top-tier WMO/Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW) global station in 2009. The Trinidad Head observatory was strategically located (April 2002) along the west coast to monitor the air entering the United States and is now being impacted by effluents and anthropogenic aerosols and gases from booming Asian economies. Recent forest fire seasons in CA have had dramatic effects on aerosol properties and ozone concentrations measured at the THD site. Light aircraft flights made by NOAA/ESRL as part of the Airborne Greenhouse Emissions Survey (AGES) campaign in collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley National Lab and UC Davis in the spring and summer of 2008 captured large signals indicative of urban air plumes with highly correlated CO2, CH4, CO, as well as agricultural signatures with enhanced CH4 coincident with depleted CO2. These flights also captured a large signal from the northern CA wildfires enabling the comparison of signatures from forest fires to other sources. Ozonesonde balloon flights have been done weekly at the THD site since August of 1997 and bi-monthly vertical aircraft profiles above THD for carbon cycle gases (>50 gas species) began in September of 2003. In 2008 carbon cycle flasks were added to the HSU research vessel, the Coral Sea, to obtain surface values ~20 nautical miles offshore from the THD observatory. Particular attention will be paid to the

  11. Determinantes ambientais da ocorrência de espécies de peixes em riachos de cabeceira da bacia do rio Ivinhema, alto rio Paraná = Environmental determinants of fish species occurrence in headwaters streams of Ivinhema river basin, upper Paraná river

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yzel Rondon Súarez

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de quantificar a importância de algumas característicasfisiográficas dos riachos sobre a ocorrência de quatro espécies de Characidae em riachos de cabeceira na bacia do rio Ivinhema, realizaram-se amostragens bimestrais em dez riachos com uso de telas de isca, com esforço amostral padronizado. A influência das variáveisambientais sobre a ocorrência das espécies de peixes foi quantificada utilizando-se do modelo da análise de regressão logística. Constatou-se que a velocidade da correnteza foi o principal fator limitante da ocorrência de Serrapinnus notomelas, Hemigrammus marginatus e Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae, enquanto a profundidade dos riachos foi o principal determinante da ocorrência de Bryconamericus stramineus. Assim, as primeiras espécies ocorrem predominantemente em locais com baixa velocidade da correnteza, enquanto B. stramineus ocorre principalmente em locais com pouca profundidade e com elevada velocidade da correnteza, sugerindo que as características fisiográficas dos habitat sejam importantes determinantes da colonização e persistência das espécies.In order to quantify the importance of some physiographic characteristics of headwaters streams of Ivinhema basin on occurrence of four Characidae species, bimonthly samples in 10 streams using arectangular sieve, with standardized sampling effort were collected. The influence of environmental descriptors on species occurrence was quantified using a logistic regression model. It was observed that the water velocity was the main limiting factor to occurrence ofSerrapinnus notomelas, Hemigrammus marginatus and Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae while stream depth was the main determinant of Bryconamericus stramineus occurrence. Thus, the first three species are found mainly in sites with less water velocity, while B. stramineus is found mainly in sites with less depth and higher water velocity, suggesting that physiographic habitat characteristics can be

  12. Determinantes ambientais da ocorrência de espécies de peixes em riachos de cabeceira da bacia do rio Ivinhema, alto rio Paraná - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v29i2.520 Environmental determinants of fish species occurrence in headwaters streams of Ivinhema river basin, upper Paraná river - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v29i2.520

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Rota Alves Felipe

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de quantificar a importância de algumas características fisiográficas dos riachos sobre a ocorrência de quatro espécies de Characidae em riachos de cabeceira na bacia do rio Ivinhema, realizaram-se amostragens bimestrais em dez riachos com uso de telas de isca, com esforço amostral padronizado. A influência das variáveis ambientais sobre a ocorrência das espécies de peixes foi quantificada utilizando-se do modelo da análise de regressão logística. Constatou-se que a velocidade da correnteza foi o principal fator limitante da ocorrência de Serrapinnus notomelas, Hemigrammus marginatus e Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae, enquanto a profundidade dos riachos foi o principal determinante da ocorrência de Bryconamericus stramineus. Assim, as primeiras espécies ocorrem predominantemente em locais com baixa velocidade da correnteza, enquanto B. stramineus ocorre principalmente em locais com pouca profundidade e com elevada velocidade da correnteza, sugerindo que as características fisiográficas dos habitat sejam importantes determinantes da colonização e persistência das espécies. Palavras-chave: distribuição espacial, peixes de riachos, bacia do rio Ivinhema.In order to quantify the importance of some physiographic characteristics of headwaters streams of Ivinhema basin on occurrence of four Characidae species, bimonthly samples in 10 streams using a rectangular sieve, with standardized sampling effort were collected. The influence of environmental descriptors on species occurrence was quantified using a logistic regression model. It was observed that the water velocity was the main limiting factor to occurrence of Serrapinnus notomelas, Hemigrammus marginatus and Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae while stream depth was the main determinant of Bryconamericus stramineus occurrence. Thus, the first three species are found mainly in sites with less water velocity, while B. stramineus is found mainly in sites with less depth

  13. Training program in radiation protection: implantation in a radiation oncology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Purpose: To introduce the radiation protection training program implemented in the radiation oncology department of the Hotel-Dieu de Quebec. This program seeks to provide an adequate training for all the clinic workers and to fulfill Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission's (CNSC) legislations. Materials and Methods: The radiation protection training program implemented is based on the use of five different education modalities: 1) Oral presentations, when the objective of the formation is to inform a large number of persons about general topics; 2) Periodic journals are published bimonthly and distributed to members of the department. They aim to answer frequently asked questions on the radiation safety domain. Each journal contains one main subject which is vulgarized and short notices, these later added to inform the readers about the departmental news and developments in radiation safety; 3) Electronic self-training presentations are divided into several units. Topics, durations, complexity and evaluations are adapted for different worker groups; 4) Posters are strategically displayed in the department in order to be read by all the radiation oncology employees, even those who are not specialized in the radiation protection area; 5) Simulations are organized for specialised workers to practice and to develop their skills in radiation protection situations as emergencies. A registration method was developed to record all training performed by each member of the department. Results: The training program implemented follows the CNSC recommendations. It allows about 150 members of the department to receive proper radiation safety training. The oral presentations allow an interaction between the trainer and the workers. The periodic journals are simple to write while ensuring continuous training. They are also easy to read and to understand. The e-learning units and their associated evaluations can be done at any time and everywhere in the department. The

  14. Relating the Diversity, Abundance, and Activity of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaeal Communities to Nitrification Rates in the Coastal Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolar, B. B.; Smith, J. M.; Chavez, F.; Francis, C.

    2015-12-01

    Ammonia oxidation, the rate-limiting first step of nitrification, is an important link between reduced (ammonia) and oxidized (nitrate) nitrogen, and controls the relative distribution of these forms of inorganic nitrogen. This process is catalyzed via the ammonia monooxygenase enzyme of both ammonia-oxidizing Bacteria (AOB) and Archaea (AOA); the α subunit of this enzyme is encoded by the amoA gene and has been used as the molecular marker to detect this process. In the ocean, AOA are typically 10-1000 times more and are likely more active than AOB, and thus are key players in the marine nitrogen cycle. Monterey Bay is a dynamic site to study nitrification, as seasonal upwelling brings deep water and nutrients into surface waters, which can promote phytoplankton blooms and impact biogeochemical processes such as the nitrogen cycle. We have sampled two sites within Monterey Bay bimonthly for two years as part of the ongoing Monterey Bay Time Series (MBTS) to quantify AOA genes, transcripts, and nitrification rates. Two ecotypes of AOA are routinely found in Monterey Bay - the 'shallow' water column A (WCA) and 'deep' water column B (WCB) clades, which are thought to have distinct physiological properties and can be distinguished based on the amoA gene sequence. Previous work has shown a strong relationship between nitrification rates in Monterey Bay with the abundance of WCA amoA genes and transcripts. Additionally, we found a correlation between the relative abundance of Marine Group I (MGI) Thaumarchaeota 16S rRNA reads (as % of total) and the absolute abundance of AOA amoA genes (determined via qPCR) in Monterey Bay and the California Current System. AOA 16S rRNA gene abundances in turn correlated significantly with changes in nitrification rate with depth, while the relative abundance of genes and transcripts binned to a single AOA (Nitrosopumilus maritimus) was not significantly correlated to nitrification rate. Further analysis of the sequenced AOA

  15. Iheringichthys labrosus (Siluriformes: Pimelodidae in the Piquiri River, Paraná, Brazil: population structure and some aspects of its reproductive biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlei J. Holzbach

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to analyze the population structure (spatial and temporal distribution, sex ratio, length distribution and length/weight relationship and reproductive biology of Iheringichthys labrosus. This species is of importance as fisheries resource in the Paraná River basin. Fish were sampled, bimonthly, with gill and trammel nets at three sampling sites (Campina, Apertado and Altônia, located in the Piquiri River, between November 2002 and September 2003. In this study, 164 individuals were collected; the largest capture occurred in Campina site, with 209.88 individuals/1000 m² of net for 24 hours, while the shift of largest capture was night time (N and the month was July. Females occurred in larger numbers than males in all periods. The growth was allometric positive and the reproduction period was from the beginning of September to the end of December, with the majority of the individuals showing a standard length between 13.0 and 20.0 cm.O objetivo deste trabalho foi analisar a estrutura populacional (distribuição espacial e temporal, proporção sexual, distribuição de comprimento e relação peso/comprimento e a biologia reprodutiva de Iheringichthys labrosus, espécie de importante valor na pesca da bacia do rio Paraná. Os peixes foram coletados bimestralmente, entre novembro de 2002 e setembro de 2003, em três locais de amostragem (Campina, Apertado e Altônia localizados no rio Piquiri, utilizando-se redes de espera do tipo simples e tresmalhos (emalhar. Nesse estudo foram coletados 164 indivíduos e a maior captura ocorreu no local Campina, com 209,88 indivíduos/1000 m² de rede por 24 horas, enquanto que o turno de maior captura foi o noturno (N e o mês foi julho. O crescimento foi alométrico positivo e o período de reprodução foi do início de setembro ao final de dezembro, com a maioria dos indivíduos apresentando comprimento padrão entre 13,0 e 20,0 cm.

  16. Características morfométricas e crescimento do cachara, Pseudoplatystoma fasciatum (Linnaeus, 1766, em cativeiro - DOI: 10.4025/actascianimsci.v25i2.2002 Morphometric characteristics and growth in cachara, Pseudoplatystoma fasciatum (Linnaeus, 1766 in captivity - DOI: 10.4025/actascianimsci.v25i2.2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloisa Maria Godinho

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Estudaram-se as características morfométricas e o crescimento de machos e fêmeas do cachara, Pseudoplatystoma fasciatum (Pimelodidae, em cativeiro. Os peixes foram distribuídos em 4 viveiros de 600m2, na densidade de 1,0 peixe/2m2. Dados de peso total (Wt /g, comprimento total (Lt/cm, padrão (Ls/cm, cabeça (Lh/cm e altura do corpo (Hb/cm foram obtidos bimestralmente, de janeiro/99 a janeiro/01, considerando-se 5% de cada lote. Foram analisados 132 machos e 248 fêmeas, que atingiram peso médio final, de 1.233,0g e 2.266,0g, respectivamente. A relação Lt/Wt apresentou alta correlação, com valores de b superiores a 3, onde o dimorfismo entre os sexos não foi observado. As relações Lt/Ls e Lt/Lh foram lineares, e para Lt /Hh obteve-se um melhor valor de b superior para as fêmeas. Não ocorreram diferenças entre os sexos para essas variáveis. O fator de condição não apresentou grandes variações sazonais.Morphometric characteristics and growth of males and females of “cachara”, Pseudoplatystoma fasciatum (Pimelodidae, were studied. Fishes were distributed in four ponds (600m2, at the rate of 1fish/2m2. Total weight (g, total length (cm, standard length (cm, head length (cm, body height (cm were obtained bimonthly, from January/99 to January/01, from 5% of each pond population. One hundred thirty two males and two hundred forty eight females were analyzed showing an average final weight of 1,233.0g and 2,266.0g, respectively. The Lt/Wt relationship showed high correlation, with b values slightly above 3, where no sexual dimorphism was observed. The relationship Lt /Ls and Lt /Hl presented linear tendency with high correlation. For Lt /HC, the females b values were higher than males. There were no differences between the sexes for those variables. Condition factor remained relatively constant without showing seasonal fluctuation.

  17. The transfer of seasonal isotopic variability between precipitation and drip water at eight caves in the monsoon regions of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Wuhui; Ruan, Jiaoyang; Luo, Weijun; Li, Tingyong; Tian, Lijun; Zeng, Guangneng; Zhang, Dezhong; Bai, Yijun; Li, Jilong; Tao, Tao; Zhang, Pingzhong; Baker, Andy; Tan, Ming

    2016-06-01

    This study presents new stable isotope data for precipitation (δ18Op) and drip water (δ18Od) from eight cave sites in the monsoon regions of China (MRC), with monthly to bi-monthly sampling intervals from May-2011 to April-2014, to investigate the regional-scale climate forcing on δ18Op and how the isotopic signals are transmitted to various drip sites. The monthly δ18Op values show negative correlation with surface air temperature at all the cave sites except Shihua Cave, which is opposite to that expected from the temperature effect. In addition, although the monthly δ18Op values are negatively correlated with precipitation at all the cave sites, only three sites are significant at the 95% level. These indicate that, due to the various vapor sources, a large portion of variability in δ18Op in the MRC cannot be explained simply by either temperature or precipitation alone. All the thirty-four drip sites are classified into three types based on the δ18Od variability. About 82% of them are static drips with little discernable variation in δ18Od through the whole study period, but the drip rates of these drips are not necessary constant. Their discharge modes are site-specific and the oxygen isotopic composition of the stalagmites growing from them may record the average of multi-year climatic signals, which are modulated by the seasonality of recharge and potential effects of evaporation, and in some cases infiltration from large rainfall events. About 12% of the thirty-four drip sites are seasonal drips, although the amplitude of δ18Od is narrower than that of δ18Op, the monthly response of δ18Od to coeval precipitation is not completely damped, and some of them follow the seasonal trend of δ18Op very well. These drips may be mainly recharged by present-day precipitation, mixing with some stored water. Thus, the stalagmites growing under them may record portions of the seasonal climatic signals embedded in δ18Op. About 6% of the thirty-four drip sites

  18. The benthic foraminiferal community in a naturally CO2-rich coastal habitat in the southwestern Baltic Sea

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    J. Thomsen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available It is expected that the calcification of foraminifera will be negatively affected by the ongoing acidification of the oceans. Compared to the open oceans, these organisms are subjected to much more adverse carbonate system conditions in coastal and estuarine environments such as the southwestern Baltic Sea, where benthic foraminifera are abundant. This study documents the seasonal changes of carbonate chemistry and the ensuing response of the foraminiferal community with bi-monthly resolution in Flensburg Fjord. In comparison to the surface pCO2, which is close to equilibrium with the atmosphere, we observed large seasonal fluctuations of pCO2 in the bottom and sediment pore waters. The sediment pore water pCO2 was constantly high during the entire year ranging from 1244 to 3324 μatm. Nevertheless, in contrast to the bottom water, sediment pore water was slightly supersaturated with respect to calcite as consequence of higher alkalinity (AT for the most time of the year. Foraminiferal assemblages were dominated by two calcareous species, Ammonia aomoriensis and Elphidium incertum, and the agglutinated Ammotium cassis. The one year-cycle was characterized by seasonal community shifts. Our results revealed that there is no dynamic response of foraminiferal population density and diversity to elevated sediment pore water pCO2. Surprisingly, the fluctuations of sediment pore water undersaturation (Ωcalc co-vary with the population densities of living Ammonia aomoriensis. Further, we observed that most of the tests of living calcifying specimens were intact. Only Ammonia aomorienis showed dissolution and recalcification structures on the tests, especially at undersaturated conditions. Therefore, the benthic community is subjected to constantly high pCO2 and tolerates elevated levels as long as sediment pore water remains supersaturated. Model calculations inferred that increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations will finally lead to a perennial

  19. Spatial and temporal variability of surface water pollution in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam.

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    Wilbers, Gert-Jan; Becker, Mathias; Nga, La Thi; Sebesvari, Zita; Renaud, Fabrice G

    2014-07-01

    Surface water pollution in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta (MD) could threaten human, animal and ecosystem health given the fact that this water source is intensively used for drinking, irrigation and domestic services. We therefore determined the levels of pollution by organic pollutants, salts, metals and microbial indicators by (bi)monthly monitoring of canals between November 2011 and July 2012 at 32 sampling locations, representing fresh and saline/brackish environments. The results were compared with national water quality guidelines, between the studied regions and with water quality data from main waterways. Key factors explaining the observed levels of pollution in surface water were identified through principal component analysis (PCA). Temporal variations due to tidal regime and seasonality were also assessed. Based on regression models, the spatial variability of five water quality parameters was visualized using GIS based maps. Results indicate that pH (max. 8.6), turbidity (max. 461 FTU), maximum concentrations of ammonium (14.7 mg L(-1)), arsenic (44.1 μg L(-1)), barium (157.5 μg L(-1)), chromium (84.7 μg L(-1)), mercury (45.5 μg L(-1)), manganese (1659.7 μg L(-1)), aluminum (14.5 mg L(-1)), iron (17.0 mg L(-1)) and the number of Escherichia coli (87,000 CFU 100 mL(-1)) and total coliforms (2,500,000 CFU 100 mL(-1)) in canals exceed the thresholds set by Vietnamese quality guidelines for drinking and domestic purposes. The PCA showed that i) urbanization; ii) metal leaching from soils; iii) aquaculture; and iv) tidal regime explain 85% of the variance of surface water quality attributes. Significant differences in water quality were found due to daily tidal regime and as a result of seasonality. Surface water quality maps for dissolved oxygen, ammonium, ortho-phosphate, manganese and total coliforms were developed to highlight hot-spot areas of pollution. The results of this study can assist policy makers in developing water management strategies

  20. Shorebird use of coastal wetland and barrier island habitat in the Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withers, Kim

    2002-02-27

    The Gulf Coast contains some of the most important shorebird habitats in North America. This area encompasses a diverse mixture of estuarine and barrier island habitats with varying amounts of freshwater swamps and marshes, bottomland hardwood forests, and coastal prairie that has been largely altered for rice and crawfish production, temporary ponds, and river floodplain habitat. For the purposes of this review, discussion is confined to general patterns of shorebird abundance, distribution, and macro- and microhabitat use in natural coastal, estuarine, and barrier island habitats on the Gulf of Mexico Coast. The following geographic regions are considered: Northwestern Gulf (Rio Grande to Louisiana-Mississippi border), Northeastern Gulf (Mississippi to Florida Keys), and Mexico (Rio Grande to Cabo Catoche [Yucatan Strait]). Wintering and migrating shorebirds are most abundant along the Gulf Coast in Texas and Tamaulipas, particularly the Laguna Madre ecosystem. Other important areas are the Southwest Coast region of Florida and the area between Laguna Terminos and Puerto Progresso in Mexico. In general, relative abundances of shorebirds increase from north to south, and decrease south of the Tropic of Cancer (23 degrees 27' N). Based on bimonthly maximum counts within 5 latitudinal bands, the region between 25-30 degrees N is used most heavily by wintering and spring migrating birds. Non-vegetated coastal wetland habitats associated with bays, inlets and lagoons, particularly tidal flats, and sandy beaches are the habitats that appear to be favored by wintering and migrating shorebirds. In general, these habitats tend to occur as habitat complexes that allow for movement between them in relation to tidal flooding of bay-shore habitats. This relationship is particularly important to Piping Plover and may be important to others. Although vegetated habitats are used by some species, they do not appear to attract large numbers of birds. This habitat is most

  1. Infectivity to Phlebotomus perniciosus of dogs naturally parasitized with Leishmania infantum after different treatments

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    Descalzo Miguel A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Europe most dogs with clinical leishmaniosis are treated with leishmanicides, typically antimonials combined with allopurinol and good clinical recovery is observed in a high number of these dogs. Through xenodiagnosis, the capacity of a treated animal to infect the vector of the disease under treatment is assessed as a measure of the chemotherapeutic efficacy of the drug used. The objective of the present study was to evaluate through direct xenodiagnosis the infectivity to Phlebotomus perniciosus of dogs naturally parasitized with Leishmania infantum after treatment, and to follow the clinical and parasite course of disease. Thirty two dogs with clinical leishmaniosis were assigned to one of three treatment groups: meglumine antimoniate plus allopurinol (Group A, meglumine antimoniate (Group B or allopurinol (Group C. During the study, the dogs were examined before treatment (Day 0 and bimonthly thereafter until Day 180 (six months post-treatment onset. Results The three groups were scored over time according to the effects of treatment on clinical signs and clinical-pathological variables. Significant differences in clinical scores were observed between Group A and the other two groups, indicating the combined treatment was the most effective. After treatment, bone marrow cultures were positive for the parasite in 30.8% of dogs in some of the check ups (3 or 25% in Group A, 1 or 11.1% in Group B, and 4 or 80% in Group C. Our xenodiagnosis experiments revealed that 15.4% of treated dogs were still able to infect sand flies at some point after treatment (2 dogs or 16.6% in Group A, 2 or 22.2% in Group B and none in Group C. Only 7.7% of the entire study population could infect sand flies as from the second month post-treatment onset. Conclusion The three treatment regimens tested significantly reduced the infectivity of dogs towards sand flies, thus diminishing the epidemiological risks of treated dogs both for human

  2. The Breathe Easier through Weight Loss Lifestyle (BE WELL Intervention: A randomized controlled trial

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    Buist A

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity and asthma have reached epidemic proportions in the US. Their concurrent rise over the last 30 years suggests that they may be connected. Numerous observational studies support a temporally-correct, dose-response relationship between body mass index (BMI and incident asthma. Weight loss, either induced by surgery or caloric restriction, has been reported to improve asthma symptoms and lung function. Due to methodological shortcomings of previous studies, however, well-controlled trials are needed to investigate the efficacy of weight loss strategies to improve asthma control in obese individuals. Methods/Design BE WELL is a 2-arm parallel randomized clinical trial (RCT of the efficacy of an evidence-based, comprehensive, behavioral weight loss intervention, focusing on diet, physical activity, and behavioral therapy, as adjunct therapy to usual care in the management of asthma in obese adults. Trial participants (n = 324 are patients aged 18 to 70 years who have suboptimally controlled, persistent asthma, BMI between 30.0 and 44.9 kg/m2, and who do not have serious comorbidities (e.g., diabetes, heart disease, stroke. The 12-month weight loss intervention to be studied is based on the principles of the highly successful Diabetes Prevention Program lifestyle intervention. Intervention participants will attend 13 weekly group sessions over a four-month period, followed by two monthly individual sessions, and will then receive individualized counseling primarily by phone, at least bi-monthly, for the remainder of the intervention. Follow-up assessment will occur at six and 12 months. The primary outcome variable is the overall score on the Juniper Asthma Control Questionnaire measured at 12 months. Secondary outcomes include lung function, asthma-specific and general quality of life, asthma medication use, asthma-related and total health care utilization. Potential mediators (e.g., weight loss and change in physical

  3. Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program Hatcheries Division: Ford Hatchery, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Mike; Polacek, Matt; Knuttgen, Kamia

    2002-11-01

    The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife implemented the Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project (BLFEP) in September 2001 with funds from the Bonneville Power Administration. The first year of the BLFEP was used to gather historic information, establish methods and protocols, collect limnology data, and conduct the first seasonal fish surveys. Water quality parameters were collected monthly from February to May and bi-monthly from June to August. Banks Lake water temperatures began to increase in April and stratification was apparent by June at all 3 limnology collection sites. By late August, the thermocline had dropped to nearly 20 m deep, with 19-20 C temperatures throughout the epilimnion. Dissolved oxygen levels were generally above 10 mg/L until mid summer when dissolved oxygen dropped near or below 5 mg/L below 20-m deep. Secchi depths ranged from 3-10 m and varied by location and date. Nearshore and offshore fish surveys were conducted in May and July using boat electrofishing, fyke net, gill net, and hydroacoustic surveys. Smallmouth bass Micropterous dolomieui (24%) and lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis (20%) dominated the nearshore species composition in May; however, by July yellow perch Perca flavescens (26%) were the second most common species to smallmouth bass (30%). Lake whitefish dominated the offshore catch during May (72%) and July (90%). The May hydroacoustic survey revealed highest densities of fish in the upper 1/3 of the water column in the mid- to northern sections of the reservoir near Steamboat Rock. In the future, data from seasonal surveys will be used to identify potential factors that may limit the production and harvest of kokanee, rainbow trout, and various spiny-rayed fishes in Banks Lake. The limiting factors that will be examined consist of: abiotic factors including water temperature, dissolved oxygen levels, habitat, exploitation and entrainment; and biotic factors including food limitation and predation. The BLFEP

  4. An inpatient rehabilitation model of care targeting patients with cognitive impairment

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    McGilton Katherine S

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The course and outcomes of hip fracture patients are often complicated by the presence of dementia and delirium, referred to as cognitive impairment (CI, which limits access to in-patient rehabilitation. In response to this concern, members of our team developed and piloted an in-patient rehabilitation model of care (Patient-Centred Rehabilitation Model; PCRM targeting patients with hip fracture and CI (PCRM-CI. We are now conducting a 3-year study comparing an inpatient rehabilitation model of care for community dwelling individuals with hip fracture and CI (PCRM-CI to usual care to determine whether it results in improved mobility at the time of discharge from inpatient rehabilitation. Methods/Design A non-equivalent pre-post design is being used to evaluate the PCRM-CI compared to usual care. All community dwelling (private home or retirement home patients following a hip fracture are eligible to participate. Recruitment of both cohorts is taking place at two facilities. Target accrual is 70 hip fracture patients in the PCRM-CI cohort and 70 patients in the usual care cohort. We are also recruiting 70 health care providers (HCPs, who are being trained to implement the PCRM-CI, and their unit managers. Patient data are collected at baseline, discharge, and 6 months post-discharge from an inpatient rehabilitation program. Evaluations include mobility, physical function, and living arrangement. Additional outcome variables are being collected from medical records and from the patients via their proxies. Data on the prevalence and severity of dementia and delirium are being collected. Staff data are collected at baseline and one year after implementation of the model to determine change in staff knowledge and attitudes toward patients with hip fracture and CI. Bi-monthly semi-structured interviews with unit managers have been conducted to examine factors and barriers influencing the model implementation. Data collection

  5. The perception of stress pattern in young cochlear implanted children: an EEG study

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    Niki Katerina Vavatzanidis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Children with sensorineural hearing loss may (regain hearing with a cochlear implant – a device that transforms sounds into electric pulses and bypasses the dysfunctioning inner ear by stimulating the auditory nerve directly with an electrode array. Many implanted children master the acquisition of spoken language successfully, yet we still have little knowledge of the actual input they receive with the implant and specifically which language sensitive cues they hear. This would be important however, both for understanding the flexibility of the auditory system when presented with stimuli after a (life-long phase of deprivation and for planning therapeutic intervention. In rhythmic languages the general stress pattern conveys important information about word boundaries. Infant language acquisition relies on such cues and can be severely hampered when this information is missing, as seen for dyslexic children and children with specific language impairment. Here we ask whether children with a cochlear implant perceive differences in stress patterns during their language acquisition phase and if they do, whether it is present directly following implant stimulation or if and how much time is needed for the auditory system to adapt to the new sensory modality. We performed a longitudinal ERP study, testing in bimonthly intervals the stress pattern perception of 17 young hearing impaired children (age range: 9-50 months; mean: 22 months during their first 6 months of implant use. An additional session before the implantation served as control baseline. During a session they passively listened to an oddball paradigm featuring the disyllable baba, which was stressed either on the first or second syllable (trochaic vs. iambic stress pattern. A group of age-matched normal hearing children participated as controls.Our results show, that within the first 6 months of implant use the implanted children develop a negative mismatch response for iambic but not

  6. Composición taxonómica del zooplancton del embalse de Betania, departamento del Huila, Colombia Composición taxonómica del zooplancton del embalse de Betania, departamento del Huila, Colombia

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    Guillot Monroy Gabriel Hernando

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Durante el año de 1991 se realizaron muestreos con frecuencia bimestral en el embalse de Betania (alt.: 560 m.s.n.m.; área: 7.4 km2; volumen 1971x106 m3; prof. media: 28 m en el departamento del Huila, con el objetivo de determinar la composición del zooplancton.  En total se registraron 24 taxa: Thermocyclops decipiens (Crustacea, Copepoda, Moina sp., Ceriodaphnia cornuta y Allona sp. (Crustacea, Cladocera; 19 especies de rotíferos, de los cuales 7 corresponden al género Brachionus y larvas del díptero Chaoborus sp.  Se registran por primera vez para Colombia Brachionus havanaensis, B. falcatus falcatus, b. quadridentatus, y Platyias cuadricornis  f. brevispinus.   A partir de la comparación con faunas zooplanctónicas de varios cuerpos de agua tropicales y subtropicales, se concluyó que la composición zooplanctónica del embalse es típica de lagos tropicales cálidos.

    To determine the species composition of the zooplancton in the reservoir Betania (altitude; 560 m.a.s.l.; area: 7.4 km2; vol: 1971 x 106 m3; mean depht 28 m, at seven sites and several depths, bimonthly net samples (100 and 200 microns mesh size were taken during 1991.  Alltogether 24 species were found: Thermocyclops decipiens (Crustacea, Copepoda, Moina sp., Ceriodaphnia cornuta y Allona sp. (Crustacea, Cladocera; 19 species of rotífers, of which 7 belong to the genus Brachionus, as well as larvas of the dipter Chaoborus sp. For the first time Brachionus havanaensis, B. falcatus falcatus, b. quadridentatus, y Platyias cuadricornis  f. brevispinus  were found in Colombia.  The species composition was compared with the composition of other lakes and comparison shows that the Betania reservoir has a typical species composition for warms tropical lakes.

  7. Crustáceos asociados a sustrato duro en la zona intermareal de Montepío, Veracruz, México Crustaceans associated to hard substrate in the intertidal zone of Montepío, Veracruz, Mexico

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    Carmen Hernández

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available La zona intermareal rocosa ofrece residencia a numerosas especies por su alta heterogeneidad espacial. Este estudio da a conocer la riqueza específica de los crustáceos de Montepío, recolectados mediante muestreos mensuales de febrero 1996 a febrero 1997 y bimestralmente de julio 2004 a julio 2005, depositados en la Colección Nacional de Crustáceos, del Instituto de Biología, UNAM. Se identificaron 4 437 organismos, agrupados en 19 familias, 36 géneros y 60 especies. Las familias con mayor riqueza son Alpheidae con 11 especies, Porcellanidae con 7, Gammaridae con 6, y el resto de las familias representan el 60%. En cuanto a densidad, las especies mejor representadas fueron: Tetraclita stalactifera floridana (457 org/l, Megabalanus tintinnabulum (318 org/l, Elasmopus sp. 1 (280 org/l y Neopisosoma angustifrons (267 org/l. Mediante el análisis de Olmstead-Tükey, se percibió que el 65% de las especies fueron ocasionales, 12% dominantes, 20% comunes y 3% indicadoras. La riqueza de especies en Montepío resulta menor que la de otras zonas con sustratos rocosos, tanto en el golfo de México como del Pacífico.The rocky intertidal zone is the habitat of a number of species due to its spatial heterogeneity. In this study the crustacean species richness at Montepio is presented based on samples obtained monthly from February 1996 to February 1997, and bimonthly from July 2004 to July 2005, and deposited in the National Crustacean Collection, Instituto de Biología, UNAM. A total of 4 437 organisms was identified, grouped in 19 families, 36 genera and 60 species. The families with the highest number of species were Alpheidae with 11 species, Porcellanidae with 7, Gammaridae with 6, the rest of the families contributed with the remaining 60% of the species. Regarding the density, the following species had the highest values: Tetraclita stalactifera floridana (457 org/l, Megabalanus tintinnabulum (318 org/l, Elasmopus sp. 1 (280 org/l and

  8. The effects of combined sewer overflow events on riverine sources of drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madoux-Humery, Anne-Sophie; Dorner, Sarah; Sauvé, Sébastien; Aboulfadl, Khadija; Galarneau, Martine; Servais, Pierre; Prévost, Michèle

    2016-04-01

    This study was set out to investigate the impacts of Combined Sewer Overflows (CSOs) on the microbiological water quality of a river used as a source of drinking water treatment plants. Escherichia coli concentrations were monitored at various stations of a river segment located in the Greater Montreal Area including two Drinking Water Intakes (DWIs) in different weather conditions (dry weather and wet weather (precipitation and snowmelt period)). Long-term monitoring data (2002-2011) at DWIs revealed good microbiological water quality with E. coli median concentrations of 20 and 30 CFU/100 mL for DWI-1 and DWI-2 respectively. However, E. coli concentration peaks reached up to 510 and 1000 CFU/100 mL for both DWIs respectively. Statistical Process Control (SPC) analysis allowed the identification of E. coli concentration peaks in almost a decade of routine monitoring data at DWIs. Almost 80% of these concentrations were linked to CSO discharges caused by precipitation exceeding 10 mm or spring snowmelt. Dry weather monitoring confirmed good microbiological water quality. Wet weather monitoring showed an increase of approximately 1.5 log of E. coli concentrations at DWIs. Cumulative impacts of CSO discharges were quantified at the river center with an increase of approximately 0.5 log of E. coli concentrations. Caffeine (CAF) was tested as a potential chemical indicator of CSO discharges in the river and CAF concentrations fell within the range of previous measurements performed for surface waters in the same area (∼20 ng/L). However, no significant differences were observed between CAF concentrations in dry and wet weather, as the dilution potential of the river was too high. CSO event based monitoring demonstrated that current bi-monthly or weekly compliance monitoring at DWIs underestimate E. coli concentrations entering DWIs and thus, should not be used to quantify the risk at DWIs. High frequency event-based monitoring is a desirable approach to

  9. Light traps fail to estimate reliable malaria mosquito biting rates on Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea

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    Overgaard Hans J

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human biting rate (HBR, an important parameter for assessing malaria transmission and evaluating vector control interventions, is commonly estimated by human landing collections (HLC. Although intense efforts have been made to find alternative non-exposure mosquito collection methods, HLC remains the standard for providing reliable and consistent HBRs. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between human landing and light trap collections (LTC, in an attempt to estimate operationally feasible conversion factors between the two. The study was conducted as part of the operational research component of the Bioko Island Malaria Control Project (BIMCP, Equatorial Guinea. Methods Malaria mosquitoes were collected indoors and outdoors by HLCs and LTCs in three villages on Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea during five bimonthly collections in 2009. Indoor light traps were suspended adjacent to occupied long-lasting, insecticide-treated bed nets. Outdoor light traps were placed close to the outer wall under the roof of the collection house. Collected specimens were subjected to DNA extraction and diagnostic PCR to identify species within the Anopheles gambiae complex. Data were analysed by simple regression of log-transformed values and by Bayesian regression analysis. Results There was a poor correlation between the two collection methods. Results varied by location, venue, month, house, but also by the statistical method used. The more robust Bayesian analyses indicated non-linear relationships and relative sampling efficiencies being density dependent for the indoor collections, implying that straight-forward and simple conversion factors could not be calculated for any of the locations. Outdoor LTC:HLC relationships were weak, but could be estimated at 0.10 and 0.07 for each of two locations. Conclusions Light trap collections in combination with bed nets are not recommended as a reliable method to assess human

  10. Prevalence of shoulder pain after stroke and associated factors

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    M.J. Hadianfar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground and Purpose: Shoulder pain is a common complication from stroke that may cause some rehabilitation limits to achieve functional goals. The information regarding its prevalence and associated factors is limited. This study was conducted to investigate further details pertaining to its associated factors.Materials and Methods: This study was performed on 191 stroke patients at the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Ward at Shiraz-Medical School from 2001 to 2004. Each patient was followed up for one year. A questionnaire was prepared containing information about shoulder pain compliant, thorough history and physical examination, previous history of open heart surgery, scoliosis, limited neck range of motion, type of stroke (based on MRI and brain CT, osteoporosis (based on bone mineral density and X ray, shoulder adductor muscles and biceps spasticity (based on ashworth scale. In follow-up visits bi-monthly for one year, the questionnaire was filled out again and if present, shoulder pain was recorded.Results: Most patients developed shoulder pain between 2 and 6 months following their stroke. Forty-nine patients (32.2% developed shoulder pain, 39(79.6% of whom had spastic tone and 8 (16.3% had flaccid tone. In both groups, with shoulder pain and without shoulder pain respectively, 6.7% and 1.9% had a history of open heart surgery, 6.1% and 1% had scoliosis, 67.3% and 35.1% had Intracranial hemorrhage, 73.5% and 23.3% had limited neck range of motion, and 24.5% and 35% had osteopenia.Conclusion: Spasticity was significantly more common in the shoulder pain group, which can be due to capsulitis, soft tissue inflammation (especially ligament and rotator cuff muscle and anteroinferior subluxation of the shoulder. There was a significant statistical correlation between intracranial hemorrhage, reduced neck range of motion, and hemiplegic shoulder pain. It appears that treatment and rehabilitation of spasticity and underlying

  11. The impact of focused, long-term, and collaborative professional development in math and science participants' self-efficacy, classroom practice, and student achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottingham, Mary E.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of a 2-year professional development model in math and science on the self-efficacy of the teacher and its effects on teacher practice and student outcomes. Further, this study sought to incorporate the instructional use of Inquiry-Based Learning methods of Problem-Based Learning, Japanese Lesson Study, and Action Research. Additionally, this study examined the impacts of these interventions on teacher efficacy and student outcomes. Thirty-eight collaborating participants were purposefully selected by the Math and Science Teacher Academy (MASTA) project grant co-directors because of their content-focused classrooms of mathematics and science. This quasi-experimental study included mathematics and science in-service teachers working on their masters in education. The 2-year, bi-monthly professional development model included collaborating Inquiry-Based Learning communities with in-depth focus on Japanese Lesson Study, Problem-Based Learning instruction, and Action Research. A chi-square analysis was conducted by grade on the difference in passing rate from the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills mathematics and science tests between the MASTA participants and the state passing average. In mathematics there were significant v differences only at grades 3 and 7 where the state passing average was significantly higher than the MASTA students' passing rate. Only at grade 5 was the MASTA students' passing rate higher than the state, but the difference was not significantly different. The science passing rate received from three grade 5 MASTA participants was compared to the state average and a chi-squared was conducted. Although the passing rate for the grade 5 science test was 6% higher for MASTA student that the state, the difference was not statistically significant. However, after analyzing the qualitative participant responses from data gathered during the 2-year MASTA grant the data clearly reflected that

  12. Managing the impact of climate change on the hydrology of the Gallocanta Basin, NE-Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, N. J.

    2010-12-01

    The endorheic Gallocanta Basin represents an environment highly sensitive to climate change. Over the past 60 years, the Laguna de Gallocanta, an ephemeral lake situated in the centre of the Gallocanta basin, experienced a sequence of wet and dry phases. The lake and its surrounding wetlands are one of only a few bird sanctuaries left in NE-Spain for grey cranes on their annual migration from Scandinavia to northern Africa. Understanding the impact of climate change on basin hydrology is therefore of utmost importance for the appropriate management of the bird sanctuary. Changes in lake level are only weakly linked to annual rainfall, but strongly to individual events, with reaction times from hours to months after rainfall. Individual extreme event intensities as well as magnitudes affect lake level through both groundwater and surface runoff. In this study, the characteristics and frequencies of daily, event, monthly and bi-monthly rainfall over the past 60 years were analysed to assess the role of past, current and future rainfall characteristics for the lake level and its fluctuations. The results revealed a clear link between increased frequencies of high magnitude rainfall and phases of water filling in the Laguna de Gallocanta. In the middle of the 20th century, the rainfall recharge of groundwater appears to have been more important for lake level, while more recently the frequency of high magnitude rainfall and surface runoff has emerged as the dominant variable. In the Gallocanta Basin, climate change and the distinct and continuing land use change since Spain joined the EU in 1986 have created an environment that is in a more or less constant state of transition. This highlights two challenges faced by researchers involved in developing water management tools for the Gallocanta Basin in particular, but also other endorheic basins with sensitive and rapidly changing environments. Hydrologists have to understand the processes and the spatial and temporal

  13. Gap filling strategies for annual estimates of soil respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Casanovas, N.; Anderson-Teixeira, K. J.; Zeri, M.; Bernacchi, C. J.; DeLucia, E. H.

    2012-12-01

    Soil respiration (Rsoil) is one of the largest CO2 fluxes in the global carbon cycle. Quantifying the contribution of Rsoil to the global carbon cycle requires calculating annual fluxes from measurements that often are made sporadically. Rsoil records generally contain gaps. Filling data gaps is therefore requisite to accurately predict Rsoil. However, the reliability of various strategies for filling gaps in Rsoil records and scaling survey respiration measurements to an annual time scale has not yet been assessed. Here, we: 1) conducted a literature survey for gap filling strategies used to estimate annual Rsoil, and 2) evaluated the performance of different gap filling methods by analyzing the errors introduced when filling artificial gaps in annual Rsoil datasets for various ecosystem types. Gap filling methods evaluated included linear and cubic interpolation, monthly average, and exponential temperature-dependence models assuming a) a single temperature sensitivity (E) and reference Rsoil (Rref, Rsoil at 10°C) over the entire year, b) constant E and varying Rref, and c) varying E and Rref, and soil temperature and moisture-dependence methods. Artificial gaps were introduced to the datasets at 11 gap fractions (0-95% of existing data) and in a pattern replicating bi-monthly survey measurements (>99% "gap") and filled using each method. In addition, we analyzed how the timing of survey measurements (>99% gap) affected gap-filling performance, considering two time frames for measurement (9AM-5PM and 9AM-12PM) and two portions of the year (entire year and growing season only). Our literature survey identified a wide variety of gap filling methods that have been used in Rsoil records. The linear interpolation method along with the temperature-dependence Rsoil model assuming a single E and Rref over the entire year were the gap filling methods most widely used. All methods performed best at lower gap fractions and had relatively high, systematic errors for

  14. 《中国骨与关节杂志》2012年度常务编委扩大会会议纪要%Chinese Journal of Bone and Joint Minutes of the Board Member Meeting 2012

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    Summary The Board Member Meeting of “Chinese Journal of Bone and Joint” was held in Chengdu Mingyu Shangya Hotel with more than 30 participants under the support of the orthopedic department in the West China Hospital of Sichuan University on December 29, 2012. The meeting was presided by professor Hou Shuxun, the deputy editor-in-chief. Professor Xu Wanpeng, the editor-in-chief, reviewed the course of development of the“Chinese Journal of Bone Tumor and Bone Diseases”, which is the predecessor of the“Chinese Journal of Bone and Joint”. The annual report was made by professor Wu Wenwen, the editorial director. It was concluded as follows:the tendency of more qualified articles submitted urged the conversion of the journal from bimonthly to monthly. In order to raise its international influence, the journal expanded the scope and length of the English to form a full structure and added English introductions to all the main points of short essays, reviews, case reports, meeting minutes, top expert’s notes, and expert’s commentaries. The journal also invited foreign editorial board members from the United States, Britain, the Netherlands, Japan, Korea and other countries to catch the latest progress in the related fields and improve the quality of original articles and English abstract. Ma Zheng, director of the Chinese Ministry of Science and Technology Information Institute, addressed a lecture entitled“Evaluation and Competition of Academic Journals”. In his lecture, he described the basic role of “quantitation” in the measurement and analysis of scientific issues, and emphasized its importance in the research design, experimental analysis and thesis writing. Professor Pei Fuxing, the deputy editor-in-chief, delivered a lecture entitled “Suggestions on the Improvement of Academic Influence”. He stressed the innovativeness, scientificalness and orientation. Many valuable suggestions and opinions were expressed by other participating

  15. Identification of long-term trends in vegetation dynamics in the Guinea savannah region of Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osunmadewa, Babatunde A.; Wessollek, Christine; Karrasch, Pierre

    2014-10-01

    The availability of newly generated data from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) covering the last three decades has broaden our understanding of vegetation dynamics (greening) from global to regional scale through quantitative analysis of seasonal trends in vegetation time series and climatic variability especially in the Guinea savannah region of Nigeria where greening trend is inconsistent. Due to the impact of changes in global climate and sustainability of means of human livelihood, increasing interest on vegetation productivity has become important. The aim of this study is to examine association between NDVI and rainfall using remotely sensed data, since vegetation dynamics (greening) has a high degree of association with weather parameters. This study therefore analyses trends in regional vegetation dynamics in Kogi state, Nigeria using bi-monthly AVHRR GIMMS 3g (Global Inventory Modelling and Mapping Studies) data and TAMSAT (Tropical Applications of Meteorology Satellite) monthly data both from 1983 to 2011 to identify changes in vegetation greenness over time. Analysis of changes in the seasonal variation of vegetation greenness and climatic drivers was conducted for selected locations to further understand the causes of observed interannual changes in vegetation dynamics. For this study, Mann-Kendall (MK) monotonic method was used to analyse long-term inter-annual trends of NDVI and climatic variable. The Theil-Sen median slope was used to calculate the rate of change in slopes between all pair wise combination and then assessing the median over time. Trends were also analysed using a linear model method, after seasonality had been removed from the original NDVI and rainfall data. The result of the linear model are statistically significant (p <0.01) in all the study location which can be interpreted as increase in vegetation trend over time (greening). Also the result of the NDVI trend analysis using Mann-Kendall test shows an increasing

  16. Prevalence of Shiga toxin Producing Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes at Public Access Watershed Sites in a California Central Coast Agricultural Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B Cooley

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Produce contaminated with enteric pathogens is a major source of foodborne illness in the United States. Lakes, streams, rivers, and ponds were sampled with Moore swabs bi-monthly for over two years at 30 locations in the vicinity of a leafy green growing region on the Central California Coast and screened for Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC, Salmonella enterica, and Listeria monocytogenes to evaluate the prevalence and persistence of pathogen subtypes. The prevalence of STEC from 1,386 samples was 11%; 110 samples (8% contained E. coli O157:H7 with the highest prevalence occurring close to cattle operations. Non-O157 STEC isolates represented major clinical O-types and 57% contained both shiga toxin types 1 and 2 and intimin. Multiple Locus Variable Number Tandem Repeat Analysis of STEC isolates indicated prevalent strains during the period of study. Notably, Salmonella was present at high levels throughout the sampling region with 65% prevalence in 1,405 samples resulting in 996 isolates with slightly lower prevalence in late autumn. There were 2, 8 and 14 sites that were Salmonella-positive over 90%, 80% and 70% of the time, respectively. The serotypes identified most often were 6,8:d:-, Typhimurium, and Give. Interestingly, analysis by Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis indicated persistence and transport of pulsotypes in the region over several years. In this original study of L. monocytogenes in the region prevalence was 43% of 1,405 samples resulting in 635 individual isolates. Over 85% of the isolates belonged to serotype 4b with serotypes 1/2a, 1/2b, 3a, 4d with 4e representing the rest, and there were 12 and 2 sites that were positive over 50% and 80% of the time, respectively. Although surface water is not directly used for irrigation in this region, transport to the produce can occur by other means. This environmental survey assesses initial contamination levels towards an understanding of transport leading to produce

  17. 福建省中文核心期刊的统计与分析%Statistics and Analysis of A Guide to the Core Journals of China in Fujian Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨珠; 李志伟

    2013-01-01

    为了解福建省期刊入选《中文核心期刊要目总览》的情况,对1992-2011年6个版本《中文核心期刊要目总览》中入选的福建省期刊进行统计与分析。结果表明,福建省期刊总共有34种期刊曾入选,比例总体较少,低于全国平均水平;出版周期以双月刊为主;出版地主要分布在福州和厦门;福建省实现开放存取的中文核心期刊数量较少;在2004年版、2008年版和2011年版《中文核心期刊要目总览》中,福建中文核心期刊的继承率均在90%或以上,基本形成日趋稳定的核心期刊群。%In order to understand the situation of Fujian province journals are selected to A Guide to the Core Journals of China, the Fujian province journals in A Guide to the Core Journals of China from 1992 edition to the 2011edition are analyzed. The results show that 34 journals of Fujian province were selected. The proportion totally are less, below the national average level. Most of journals are bimonthly and distributing in Fuzhou and Xiamen. The quantity of China core journals with open access in Fujian province are less. In 2004 edition, 2008 edition and 2011 edition of A Guide to the Core Journals of China, the inheritance rate of the core journals in Fujian province are kept 90%or above, and the journals have generally formed the more stable core periodicals.

  18. Use of sleeping perches by the lizard Anolis uniformis (Squamata: Polychrotidae in the fragmented tropical rainforest at Los Tuxtlas, Mexico Uso de perchas para dormir por la lagartija Anolis uniformis (Squamata: Polychrotidae en el bosque tropical fragmentado de Los Tuxtlas, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Cabrera-Guzmán

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of nocturnal perches by the lizard Anolis uniformis is described. Bimonthly surveys were made throughout a year in small fragments and continuous tropical rainforest areas at Los Tuxtlas, Mexico. Twenty three juvenile individuals and 7 adults were recorded sleeping during the sampling time (18:00 - 23:00 h.. All individuals were found on leaves of plants of 14 species. Perch height ranged from 41.0 to 140.5 cm (mean: 90.1 cm juveniles; 80.6 cm adults and the most frequent sleeping position observed was with the body oriented along the longitudinal axis of the leaf and the head facing the stem of the plant. This apparently vulnerable position can permit the perception of external stimuli such as proximity of predators; although, eco-physiological factors may also influence selection of sleeping perch sites.Se describe el uso de perchas nocturnas por parte de la lagartija Anolis uniformis. Durante un año se ralizaron muestreos bimensuales en fragmentos pequeños y áreas continuas de bosque tropical perennifolio en Los Tuxtlas, México. Se registraron 23 individuos juveniles y 7 adultos durmiendo durante las horas de muestreo (18:00 a 23:00 hrs. Todos los individuos fueron encontrados en hojas de plantas pertenecientes a 14 especies. La altura de las perchas varió entre 41.0 y 140.5 cm (promedio: 90.1 cm juveniles; 80.6 cm adultos y la posición más frecuente de las lagartijas al dormir fue con el cuerpo extendido a lo largo del eje longitudinal de la hoja y la cabeza dirigida hacia el tallo de la planta. Esta posición, aparentemente vulnerable, puede permitir la percepción de estímulos externos como la aproximación de depredadores; sin embargo, factores eco-fisiológicos pueden también influir en la selección de sitios para dormir.

  19. Coloured Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM) dynamics in small surface reservoirs in semiarid Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Christine; Foerster, Saskia; Heim, Birgit; de Araujo, Jose Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Coloured Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM) is one of the major light absorbing constituents in freshwaters. Supplied from degradation of components of the aquatic environment, it consists mainly of humic substances and its concentration is strongly related to primary production, often associated to macrophytes. It plays a central role in several biological and chemical processes affecting the bioavailability of nutrients in aquatic ecosystems. Therefore CDOM can be regarded as a water quality indicator. We used the spectral absorption and spectral slope for understanding CDOM dynamics in surface reservoirs in the Brazilian semiarid region. The analysis was based on water samples collected in three reservoirs in a total of ten sampling locations in the period June 2014 to November 2015 with monthly to bi-monthly intervals totaling 120 samples. The collected water samples were filtered through cellulose acetate membrane filters. Subsequently, spectral absorbance was measured in a Lambda 950 UV-VIS spectrometer in the spectral range 250 to 800 nm using a quartz cuvette with 5 cm optical path. From the absorbance measurement, we obtained CDOM content using the specific absorption coefficient at 440nm as well as spectral slope. The average slope for the entire period for all reservoirs is 0,018, but we found a considerable increase in spectral slope values after the wet period (between February 2014 and June 2014) for the reservoirs São Nicolau and Paus Branco while Marengo reservoir showed only slight variations during this period, but exhibited an increase only in the dry period. Regarding aCDOM(440), the average was equal to 2,55 for Marengo, 5,70 for São Nicolau, and 3,53 for Paus Branco reservoir indicating different characteristics of these reservoirs. We noticed a decrease in the absorption coefficient for São Nicolau and Paus Branco reservoirs at the end of the wet period whereas for Marengo reservoir this value showed a different behavior. Spectral slope and

  20. Assessment of atmospheric metallic pollution in the metropolitan region of Sao Paulo, Brazil, employing Tillandsia usneoides L. as biomonitor; Avaliacao da poluicao atmosferica por metais na regiao metropolitana de Sao Paulo, Brasil, utilizando a bromelia Tillandsia usneoides L. como biomonitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, Claudio Ailton

    2006-07-01

    Tillandsia usneoides L. is an epiphytic bromeliad that lives on trees or other kinds of inert substrates, absorbing water and nutrients directly from the environment without roots. Due to its morphological and physiological characteristics, this species accumulates the pollutants present in the atmosphere. In the present work, Tillandsia usneoides was used as a bio monitor of metal atmospheric pollution in Sao Paulo, Brazil, which is the biggest city in South America with a population of 18 million inhabitants and a strong industrial activity. The urban area is polluted by industrial emissions but, according to the Environmental Protection Agency of the State of Sao Paulo (CETESB), the governmental agency of air quality control, regularly occurring emissions from about 7.8 million motor vehicles provide the principal source of air pollution. The Tillandsia samples were collected from an unpolluted area and were exposed bimonthly in 10 sites of the city with different pollution levels and in a control site. After exposure, trace metals were analyzed in the plant by instrumental neutron activation analysis and ICP-MS (Pb, Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Sb e V). The results of the investigation showed a notable concentration of Co and Ni in the plants exposed in an industrial area where there is a metal processing plant, which produces about 600 tons/year of Co and 16,000 tons/year of Ni. Copper and chromium were equally distributed in industrial regions and in sites near heavy traffic avenues, suggesting that these elements can be associated to both vehicular and industrial sources. A high accumulation of Cd in the plant exposed in industrial areas indicates industrial activities as the main source of this element. For Pb, no evident sources could be identified so far as it was spread evenly along the monitoring sites. Traffic-related elements such as Zn, Ba and Sb presented high concentrations in plants exposed in sites near to heavy traffic avenues (cars, buses and trucks) and

  1. The effects of combined sewer overflow events on riverine sources of drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madoux-Humery, Anne-Sophie; Dorner, Sarah; Sauvé, Sébastien; Aboulfadl, Khadija; Galarneau, Martine; Servais, Pierre; Prévost, Michèle

    2016-04-01

    This study was set out to investigate the impacts of Combined Sewer Overflows (CSOs) on the microbiological water quality of a river used as a source of drinking water treatment plants. Escherichia coli concentrations were monitored at various stations of a river segment located in the Greater Montreal Area including two Drinking Water Intakes (DWIs) in different weather conditions (dry weather and wet weather (precipitation and snowmelt period)). Long-term monitoring data (2002-2011) at DWIs revealed good microbiological water quality with E. coli median concentrations of 20 and 30 CFU/100 mL for DWI-1 and DWI-2 respectively. However, E. coli concentration peaks reached up to 510 and 1000 CFU/100 mL for both DWIs respectively. Statistical Process Control (SPC) analysis allowed the identification of E. coli concentration peaks in almost a decade of routine monitoring data at DWIs. Almost 80% of these concentrations were linked to CSO discharges caused by precipitation exceeding 10 mm or spring snowmelt. Dry weather monitoring confirmed good microbiological water quality. Wet weather monitoring showed an increase of approximately 1.5 log of E. coli concentrations at DWIs. Cumulative impacts of CSO discharges were quantified at the river center with an increase of approximately 0.5 log of E. coli concentrations. Caffeine (CAF) was tested as a potential chemical indicator of CSO discharges in the river and CAF concentrations fell within the range of previous measurements performed for surface waters in the same area (∼20 ng/L). However, no significant differences were observed between CAF concentrations in dry and wet weather, as the dilution potential of the river was too high. CSO event based monitoring demonstrated that current bi-monthly or weekly compliance monitoring at DWIs underestimate E. coli concentrations entering DWIs and thus, should not be used to quantify the risk at DWIs. High frequency event-based monitoring is a desirable approach to

  2. mHealth medication and blood pressure self-management program in Hispanic hypertensives: a proof of concept trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sieverdes JC

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available John C Sieverdes,1 Mathew Gregoski,1 Sachin Patel,1 Deborah Williamson,1 Brenda Brunner-Jackson,1 Judith Rundbaken,1 Eveline Treiber,1 Lydia Davidson,1 Frank A Treiber1,21Technology Applications Center for Healthful Lifestyles, College of Nursing, 2College of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USAAbstract: Patient nonadherence to medication regimens and provider therapeutic inertia (failure to respond in timely manner to clinical data are two primary contributors to ineffective chronic disease management. This 3-month proof of concept trial used an iterative design approach guided by self-determination theory and the technology acceptance model to develop a culturally sensitive, patient-centered, and provider-centered mobile health medication and blood pressure self-management program. Cellular connected electronic medication trays provided reminder signals for patients to take medications and smartphone messaging reminded patients to take at-home blood pressures using a Bluetooth-enabled monitor. Providers were given bimonthly feedback. Motivational and reinforcement text and audio messages were sent based upon medication adherence rates and blood pressure levels. Ten Hispanics with uncontrolled essential hypertension were randomized to standard care and Smartphone Medication Adherence Stops Hypertension (SMASH intervention groups. Primary outcomes of provider and patient acceptability of the program were found to be high. Retention rates for the 3-month program were 100%, with mean ± standard deviation overall medication adherence for the SMASH group at 97.2% ± 2.8%, with all strongly believing the program helped them remember to take their medication. SMASH participants measured their blood pressure every 3 days 83.2% ± 6.0% of the time and completed 89.2% ± 19.06% of the expected readings. Nonparametric tests showed statistical significance for resting blood pressure changes between groups at months 2 (P = 0

  3. Reproductive biology of Plagioscion magdalenae (Teleostei: Sciaenidae (Steindachner, 1878 in the bay of Marajo, Amazon Estuary, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayara Barbosa Santos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Plagioscion magdalenae (pacora is a commercially important benthopelagic sciaenid and widely distributed in the Amazon River basin. The present study describes the reproductive biology of this species in the bay of Marajo, Amazon Estuary, Brazil. The gonadal development stage, age and size at first sexual maturity (L50, sex ratio, and reproductive strategy were determined. The data were collected bi-monthly from December 2005 to October 2006. A total of 251 specimens were examined, with the total length (TL ranging between 220 and 590 mm. The weight-length relationship for females, males and grouped sexes was highly significant, showing a positive allometry. The L50 was of 279 mm for grouped sexes, with 305 mm and 269 mm TL for females and males respectively. The sex ratio for the total number of individuals favored the males (2.02 males: 1 female. Macroscopically, the gonads were classified as immature, maturing, mature and spent. Considering the macro and microscopic evaluation of the gonads, an extended spawning period, mainly in August to February, was observed.Plagioscion magdalenae (pescada-curuca é um sciaenídeo bentopelágico, de importância comercial, amplamente distribuído na bacia do rio Amazonas. O objetivo deste trabalho foi descrever a biologia reprodutiva dessa espécie na baía do Marajó, estuário Amazônico, Brasil. Neste estudo foi determinado o estádio do desenvolvimento gonadal, tamanho de primeira maturação gonadal (L50, proporção entre sexos, época e o tipo de desova. A coleta foi realizada bimestralmente no período de dezembro de 2005 a outubro de 2006. Foi examinado um total de 251 exemplares, variando entre 220 e 590 mm de comprimento total (CT. A relação peso-comprimento para fêmeas, machos e sexos agrupados foi altamente significativa, com alometria positiva. O L50 foi de 279 mm considerando sexos agrupados, 305 e 269 mm CT para fêmeas e machos respectivamente. A proporção entre sexos para o total de

  4. TLD personnel dosimetry and its relationship with the radiodiagnostic training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The personnel dosimetry and the training in radiological protection in radiodiagnostic in Mexico before 1997 were almost nonexistent except few services of public and private radiology, we can to say that the personnel dosimetry and the obligatory training was born in the year 1997, together with the present Mexican Official Standards in radiology. This study has the purpose to make an evaluation of the personnel dosimetry of 110 radiology services distributed in the Mexican Republic for the year 2001 and to estimate the annual and bimonthly mean doses, as well as its trust intervals and its relationships with the personnel training in radiological protection by means of a sampling that was realized in two stages (1997 and 2000) in the metropolitan area of Mexico City. The results show that the received doses by the medical and technical personnel in the participating radiology services are in the 0.03 mSv and 0.94 mSv interval and the mean is 0.25 mSv. The estimated annual personnel dose would be in the 0.18 mSv to 5.64 mSv interval, which are values very lower to the annual dose limit that is 50 mSv and its magnitude is similar to the effective annual dose by natural background radiation. In the first stage in training was found that there is not a significant difference in the response frequencies among the medical and technical personnel with a p < 0.05. The 52% of the occupational exposure personnel of radiology uses dosemeter, but only 17% of them know the dose reports. the 15.8% of personnel considers that dosemeter protects against radiation and only 16.5% knows the annual maximum permissible dose for stochastic effects. The second stage, the results shown that there is a significant difference in the response of frequencies among medical and technical personnel, the same results which are obtained for members and non members of a professional association with a p < 0.05. The 38% has personnel dosimetry, the 19% knows the principles of radiological

  5. The influence of contrasting suspended particulate matter transport regimes on the bias and precision of flux estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moatar, Florentina; Person, Gwenaelle; Meybeck, Michel; Coynel, Alexandra; Etcheber, Henri; Crouzet, Philippe

    2006-11-01

    A large database (507 station-years) of daily suspended particulate matter (SPM) concentration and discharge data from 36 stations on river basins ranging from 600 km(2) to 600,000 km(2) in size (USA and Europe) was collected to assess the effects of SPM transport regime on bias and imprecision of flux estimates when using infrequent surveys and the discharge-weighted mean concentration method. By extracting individual SPM concentrations and corresponding discharge values from the database, sampling frequencies from 12 to 200 per year were simulated using Monte Carlo techniques. The resulting estimates of yearly SPM fluxes were compared to reference fluxes derived from the complete database. For each station and given frequency, bias was measured by the median of relative errors between estimated and reference fluxes, and imprecision by the difference between the upper and lower deciles of relative errors. Results show that the SPM transport regime of rivers affects the bias and imprecision of fluxes estimated by the discharge-weighted mean concentration method for given sampling frequencies (e.g. weekly, bimonthly, monthly). The percentage of annual SPM flux discharged in 2% of time (Ms(2)) is a robust indicator of SPM transport regime directly related to bias and imprecision. These errors are linked to the Ms(2) indicator for various sampling frequencies within a specific nomograph. For instance, based on a deviation of simulated flux estimates from reference fluxes lower than +/-20% and a bias lower than 1% or 2%, the required sampling intervals are less than 3 days for rivers with Ms(2) greater than 40% (basin size<10,000 km(2)), between 3 and 5 days for rivers with Ms(2) between 30 and 40% (basin size between 10,000 and 50,000 km(2)), between 5 and 12 days for Ms(2) from 20% to 30% (basin size between 50,000 and 200,000 km(2)), 12-20 days for Ms(2) in the 15-20% range (basin size between 200,000 and 500,000 km(2)). PMID:16949650

  6. Diet of Astyanax species (Teleostei, Characidae in an Atlantic Forest River in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Silveira Vilella

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Feeding habits of six species of Astyanax from river Maquiné are described. Fishes were sampled bi-monthly from November/95 to September/96 in two zones of the river. Items were identified, counted and had their abundance estimated according to a semi-quantitative scale. Frequency of occurrence, alimentary importance index (IFI values and a similarity analysis of diets for each species-river zone sample were examined. All the species were considered typically omnivorous, with insects and vegetal matter being the most important items in their diet. These species could act as seed dispersers, particularly for macrophytes. Intra-specific spatial differences were not observed in comparisons of samples from two diferent regions of the river, except for A. fasciatus. The presence of Podostemaceae macrophytes in the mid-course of the river seemed to be important both as an autochthonous food resource and as habitat for several organisms preyed by the Astyanax species.Seis espécies do gênero Astyanax, presentes no rio Maquiné, RS, foram estudadas quanto aos seus hábitos alimentares. Os exemplares foram amostrados bimensalmente de novembro de 1995 a setembro de 1996 nas zonas ritral e potamal do rio. Os itens alimentares foram identificados e quantificados de acordo com uma escala semi-quantitativa de abundância, utilizando-se para análise a frequência de ocorrência e um índice de importância alimentar para cada espécie e zona do rio. Análises multivariadas de agrupamento e ordenação foram utilizadas para comparar as dietas intra e interespecíficas. Todas as espécies foram consideradas onivoras, sendo que os itens mais importantes foram os insetos e restos de vegetais superiores. Sugere-se que as espécies estudadas possam atuar como dispersoras de sementes, particularmente para macrófitas. Diferenças espaciais intraespecíficas não foram encontradas, exceto para A. fasciatus. A presença de Podostemaceae no curso médio do rio parece

  7. Nutritional aspects of honey bee-collected pollen and constraints on colony development in the eastern Mediterranean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avni, Dorit; Hendriksma, Harmen P; Dag, Arnon; Uni, Zehava; Shafir, Sharoni

    2014-10-01

    Pollen is the main protein and lipid source for honey bees (Apis mellifera), and nutritionally impoverished landscapes pose a threat to colony development. To determine colony nutritional demands, we analyzed a yearly cycle of bee-collected pollen from colonies in the field and compared it to colony worker production and honey bee body composition, for the first time in social insects. We monitored monthly bee production in ten colonies at each of seven sites throughout Israel, and trapped pollen bi-monthly in five additional colonies at each of four of these sites. Pollen mixtures from each sampling date and site were analyzed for weight, total protein, total fatty acids (FAs), and FA composition. Compared to more temperate climates, the eastern Mediterranean allows a relatively high yearly colony growth of ca. 300,000-400,000 bees. Colonies at higher elevation above sea level showed lower growth rates. Queen egg-laying rate did not seem to limit growth, as peaks in capped brood areas showed that queens lay a prolific 2000 eggs a day on average, with up to 3300 eggs in individual cases. Pollen uptake varied significantly among sites and seasons, with an overall annual mean total 16.8kg per colony, containing 7.14kg protein and 677g fat. Overall mean pollen protein content was high (39.8%), and mean total FA content was 3.8%. Production cost, as expressed by the amount of nutrient used per bee, was least variable for linoleic acid and protein, suggesting these as the best descriptive variables for total number of bees produced. Linolenic acid levels in pollen during the autumn were relatively low, and supplementing colonies with this essential FA may mitigate potential nutritional deficiency. The essentiality of linoleic and linolenic acids was consistent with these FAs' tendency to be present at higher levels in collected pollen than in the expected nutrients in bee bodies, demonstrating a well-developed adjustment between pollinator nutritional demands and the

  8. WATER QUALITY EVALUATION IN THE FEE-FISHING LOCATED IN CORUMBATAI RIVER BASIN, SP (BRAZIL = AVALIAÇÃO DA QUALIDADE DA ÁGUA DOS PESQUE-PAGUE LOCALIZADOS NA BACIA DO RIO CORUMBATAÍ, SP (BRASIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Nadai Malagutti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The fee-fishing are comprised of ponds, where fish are raised used in sport fishing. In ponds, the stocking of fish may deteriorate the water quality with the enrichment of nutrients from feed, fertilizer and fish faeces and animals around. This study determined some of the biotic factors of effluent and surface water bodies directly related units fee-fishing. Initially it carried out a number of fee-fishing active in Corumbataí river basin. Subsequently, six fee-fishing were selected for monitoring bi-monthly, this carried out in nine samples. It collected samples of pond water to analyze the parameters: DBO, total pigments, total coliforms, E.coli, and toxicity tests. It was applied a principal component analysis to the values of the biotic fee-fishing studied. Most of the factors determined here were above the limit established by that law, demonstrating the need for greater control of ponds and the establishment of an Environmental Liability for this kind of activity. = Os pesque-pague são unidades compostas por viveiros, onde são criados peixes utilizados em pesca esportiva. Nos viveiros, a estocagem dos peixes pode deteriorar a qualidade da água com o enriquecimento de nutrientes, provenientes da ração, fertilização e das fezes dos peixes e animais do entorno. Este trabalho determinou algumas das variáveis bióticas dos efluentes e dos corpos de água superficiais relacionados diretamente com as unidades de pesque-pague. Inicialmente foi realizado um diagnóstico do número de pesque-pague em atividade na bacia do rio Corumbataí. Posteriormente, foram escolhidos 6 estabelecimentos para monitoramento bimestral, realizado em 9 coletas. Foram coletadas amostras de água dos viveiros para analisar as variáveis DBO, pigmentos totais, coliformes totais, E. coli, e realizados testes de toxicidade. Foi aplicada análise de componentes principais aos valores das variáveis bióticas dos pesque-pague estudados. Os resultados foram

  9. Tratamento inseticida e qualidade de sementes de milho durante o armazenamento Insecticide treatment and seed quality of corn during storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar José Smiderle

    1999-01-01

    test, cold test, accelerated aging, electric conductivity test, emergence of seedlings in field and rate of seedling emergence, seven times in bimonthly intervals. Interpretation of the results showed that: deltamethrin and chlorpyrifos insecticides (alone or combined, phosphin and diatomaceous earth promoted the control in a similar manner, of pest-insects occuring during storage without causing toxicity to corn seeds. The physiological quality of corn seeds was effectively preserved by the addition of chemical insecticides and diatomaceous earth.

  10. Rethinking Dosing Regimen Selection of Piperaquine for Malaria Chemoprevention: A Simulation Study.

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    Nancy C Sambol

    Full Text Available The combination of short-acting dihydroartemisinin and long-acting piperaquine (DP is among the first-line therapies for the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Population pharmacokinetic models of piperaquine (PQ based on data from acute treatment of young children can be used to predict exposure profiles of piperaquine under different DP chemoprevention regimens. The purpose of our study was to make such predictions in young children.Based on a prior population pharmacokinetic model of PQ in young Ugandan children, we simulated capillary plasma concentration-time profiles (including their variability of candidate chemoprevention regimens for a reference population of 1-2 year olds weighing at least 11 kg. Candidate regimens that were tested included monthly administration of standard therapeutic doses, bimonthly dosing, and weekly dosing (with and without a loading dose.Once daily doses of 320 mg for three days (960 mg total at the beginning of each month are predicted to achieve an average steady-state trough capillary piperaquine concentration of 35 ng/mL, with 60% achieving a level of 30 ng/mL or higher. In contrast, weekly dosing of 320 mg (i.e., 33% higher amount per month is predicted to approximately double the average steady-state trough concentration, increase the percent of children predicted to achieve 30 ng/mL or higher (94%, while at the same time lowering peak concentrations. Exposure at steady-state, reached at approximately 3 months of multiple dosing, is expected to be approximately 2-fold higher than exposure following initial dosing, due to accumulation. A loading dose improves early exposure, thereby reducing the risk of breakthrough infections at the initiation of chemoprevention.Once weekly chemoprevention of DP predicts favourable exposures with respect to both trough and peak concentrations. These predictions need to be verified, as well as safety evaluated, in field-based clinical studies of young

  11. Unmanned Airborne System Deployment at Turrialba Volcano for Real Time Eruptive Cloud Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, J. A.; Pieri, D. C.; Fladeland, M. M.; Bland, G.; Corrales, E.; Alan, A., Jr.; Alegria, O.; Kolyer, R.

    2015-12-01

    The development of small unmanned aerial systems (sUAS) with a variety of instrument packages enables in situ and proximal remote sensing measurements of volcanic plumes, even when the active conditions of the volcano do not allow volcanologists and emergency response personnel to get too close to the erupting crater. This has been demonstrated this year by flying a sUAS through the heavy ash driven erupting volcanic cloud of Turrialba Volcano, while conducting real time in situ measurement of gases over the crater summit. The event also achieved the collection of newly released ash samples from the erupting volcano. The interception of the Turrialba ash cloud occurred during the CARTA 2015 field campaign carried out as part of an ongoing program for remote sensing satellite calibration and validation purposes, using active volcanic plumes. These deployments are timed to support overflights of the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) onboard the NASA Terra satellite on a bimonthly basis using airborne platforms such as tethered balloons, free-flying fixed wing small UAVs at altitudes up to 12.5Kft ASL within about a 5km radius of the summit crater. The onboard instrument includes the MiniGas payload which consists of an array of single electrochemical and infrared gas detectors (SO2, H2S CO2), temperature, pressure, relative humidity and GPS sensors, all connected to an Arduino-based board, with data collected at 1Hz. Data are both stored onboard and sent by telemetry to the ground operator within a 3 km range. The UAV can also carry visible and infrared cameras as well as other payloads, such as a UAV-MS payload that is currently under development for mass spectrometer-based in situ measurements. The presentation describes the ongoing UAV- based in situ remote sensing validation program at Turrialba Volcano, the results of a fly-through the eruptive cloud, as well as future plans to continue these efforts. Work presented here was

  12. Connection Between X-Ray Emission and Relativistic Jets in the Radio Galaxies 3C 111 and 3C 120

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    Aller, Margo F.

    2005-01-01

    This work represents a part of a longterm study of the X-ray flux variability in radio galaxies and its relation to flux and structural changes in the associated radio jet. The work described here included: 1) continued study of the emission properties of the FR I radio galaxy 3C 120 known to exhibit a jet/disk connection from our past work; and 2) the commencement of monitoring of a second radio galaxy, the FR I1 object 3C 111 which was selected because of similar radio and X-ray properties to 3C 120, including the presence of Fe K a emission. The association between X-ray dips and new superluminal components, suggesting a picture in which the radio jet is fed by accretion events near the black hole, was identified in 3C 120 using combined RXTE and radio flux monitoring data and bi-monthly to monthly imaging data from the VLBA at 43 GHz. Such data were also obtained for both targets during the period described here. Specific goals were to more broadly investigate the X-ray dip/superluminal connection in 3C 120, thereby determining the epochs of X-ray minima and superluminal ejections more accurately (and hence more precisely determining the distance between the accretion disk and the core of the radio jet), and to determine whether a similar pattern is present in the data for a second radio galaxy. In 3C 111 a different time scale (longer time delays between X-ray dips and superluminal ejections) was expected due to the higher black hole mass implied by its higher radio luminosity: no black hole mass is published for this object but one can be determined from a PDS analysis of the RXTE data. The addition of the second source to the study would identify whether a similar connection was present in other sources and, if found, would provide important information on how time scale (and hence size scale) of accretion disk/jet systems depends on black hole mass. The grant included funding for the reduction and analysis of data obtained during the time period of Rossi

  13. SURFACE WATER AND GROUND WATER QUALITY MONITORING FOR RESTORATION OF URBAN LAKES IN GREATER HYDERABAD, INDIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, A. K.

    2009-12-01

    SURFACE WATER AND GROUND WATER QUALITY MONITORING FOR RESTORATION OF URBAN LAKES IN GREATER HYDERABAD, INDIA A.K. Mohanty, K. Mahesh Kumar, B. A. Prakash and V.V.S. Gurunadha Rao Ecology and Environment Group National Geophysical Research Institute, (CSIR) Hyderabad - 500 606, India E-mail:atulyakumarmohanty@yahoo.com Abstract: Hyderabad Metropolitan Development Authority has taken up restoration of urban lakes around Hyderabad city under Green Hyderabad Environment Program. Restoration of Mir Alam Tank, Durgamcheruvu, Patel cheruvu, Pedda Cheruvu and Nallacheruvu lakes have been taken up under the second phase. There are of six lakes viz., RKPuramcheruvu, Nadimicheruvu (Safilguda), Bandacheruvu Patelcheruvu, Peddacheruvu, Nallacheruvu, in North East Musi Basin covering 38 sq km. Bimonthly monitoring of lake water quality for BOD, COD, Total Nitrogen, Total phosphorous has been carried out for two hydrological cycles during October 2002- October 2004 in all the five lakes at inlet channels and outlets. The sediments in the lake have been also assessed for nutrient status. The nutrient parameters have been used to assess eutrophic condition through computation of Trophic Status Index, which has indicated that all the above lakes under study are under hyper-eutrophic condition. The hydrogeological, geophysical, water quality and groundwater data base collected in two watersheds covering 4 lakes has been used to construct groundwater flow and mass transport models. The interaction of lake-water with groundwater has been computed for assessing the lake water budget combining with inflow and outflow measurements on streams entering and leaving the lakes. Individual lake water budget has been used for design of appropriate capacity of Sewage Treatment Plants (STPs) on the inlet channels of the lakes for maintaining Full Tank Level (FTL) in each lake. STPs are designed for tertiary treatment i.e. removal of nutrient load viz., Phosphates and Nitrates. Phosphates are

  14. (SPartners for Heart Health: a school-based program for enhancing physical activity and nutrition to promote cardiovascular health in 5th grade students

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    Sehnert Scott T

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The American Heart Association Position Statement on Cardiovascular Health Promotion in Public Schools encourages school-based interventions for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD through risk factor prevention or reduction in children with an emphasis on creating an environment that promotes healthy food choices and physical activity (PA. In an effort to address issues related to CVD risk factors including obesity in Michigan children, a multi-disciplinary team of Michigan State University (MSU faculty, clinicians, and health profession students was formed to "(Spartner" with elementary school physical education (PE teachers and MSU Extension staff to develop and implement a cost-effective, sustainable program aimed at CVD risk factor prevention and management for 5th grade students. This (Spartnership is intended to augment and improve the existing 5th grade PE, health and nutrition curriculum by achieving the following aims: 1 improve the students' knowledge, attitudes and confidence about nutrition, PA and heart health; 2 increase the number of students achieving national recommendations for PA and nutrition; and 3 increase the number of students with a desirable CVD risk factor status based on national pediatric guidelines. Secondary aims include promoting school staff and parental support for heart health to help children achieve their goals and to provide experiential learning and service for MSU health profession students for academic credit. Methods/Design This pilot effectiveness study was approved by the MSU IRB. At the beginning and the end of the school year students undergo a CVD risk factor assessment conducted by MSU medical students and graduate students. Key intervention components include eight lesson plans (conducted bi-monthly designed to promote heart healthy nutrition and PA behaviors conducted by PE teachers with assistance from MSU undergraduate dietetic and kinesiology students

  15. Switching patients with non-dialysis chronic kidney disease from oral iron to intravenous ferric carboxymaltose: effects on erythropoiesis-stimulating agent requirements, costs, hemoglobin and iron status.

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    Jorge Eduardo Toblli

    Full Text Available Patients with non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (ND-CKD often receive an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA and oral iron treatment. This study evaluated whether a switch from oral iron to intravenous ferric carboxymaltose can reduce ESA requirements and improve iron status and hemoglobin in patients with ND-CKD.This prospective, single arm and single-center study included adult patients with ND-CKD (creatinine clearance ≤40 mL/min, hemoglobin 11-12 g/dL and iron deficiency (ferritin 20%. Outcome measures were ESA dose requirements during the observation period after initial ferric carboxymaltose treatment (primary endpoint; number of hospitalizations and transfusions, renal function before and after ferric carboxymaltose administration, number of adverse reactions (secondary endpoints. Hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, ferritin and transferrin saturation were measured monthly from baseline until end of study. Creatinine clearance, proteinuria, C-reactive protein, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase bimonthly from baseline until end of study.Thirty patients were enrolled (age 70.1±11.4 years; mean±SD. Mean ESA consumption was significantly reduced by 83.2±10.9% (from 41,839±3,668 IU/patient to 6,879±4,271 IU/patient; p<0.01. Hemoglobin increased by 0.7±0.3 g/dL, ferritin by 196.0±38.7 μg/L and transferrin saturation by 5.3±2.9% (month 6 vs. baseline; all p<0.01. No ferric carboxymaltose-related adverse events were reported and no patient withdrew or required transfusions during the study.Among patients with ND-CKD and stable normal or borderline hemoglobin, switching from oral iron to intravenous ferric carboxymaltose was associated with significant improvements in hematological and iron parameters and a significant reduction in ESA dose requirements in this single-center pilot study.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02232906.

  16. Switching Patients with Non-Dialysis Chronic Kidney Disease from Oral Iron to Intravenous Ferric Carboxymaltose: Effects on Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agent Requirements, Costs, Hemoglobin and Iron Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toblli, Jorge Eduardo; Di Gennaro, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (ND-CKD) often receive an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) and oral iron treatment. This study evaluated whether a switch from oral iron to intravenous ferric carboxymaltose can reduce ESA requirements and improve iron status and hemoglobin in patients with ND-CKD. Methods This prospective, single arm and single-center study included adult patients with ND-CKD (creatinine clearance ≤40 mL/min), hemoglobin 11–12 g/dL and iron deficiency (ferritin 20%). Outcome measures were ESA dose requirements during the observation period after initial ferric carboxymaltose treatment (primary endpoint); number of hospitalizations and transfusions, renal function before and after ferric carboxymaltose administration, number of adverse reactions (secondary endpoints). Hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, ferritin and transferrin saturation were measured monthly from baseline until end of study. Creatinine clearance, proteinuria, C-reactive protein, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase bimonthly from baseline until end of study. Results Thirty patients were enrolled (age 70.1±11.4 years; mean±SD). Mean ESA consumption was significantly reduced by 83.2±10.9% (from 41,839±3,668 IU/patient to 6,879±4,271 IU/patient; p<0.01). Hemoglobin increased by 0.7±0.3 g/dL, ferritin by 196.0±38.7 μg/L and transferrin saturation by 5.3±2.9% (month 6 vs. baseline; all p<0.01). No ferric carboxymaltose-related adverse events were reported and no patient withdrew or required transfusions during the study. Conclusion Among patients with ND-CKD and stable normal or borderline hemoglobin, switching from oral iron to intravenous ferric carboxymaltose was associated with significant improvements in hematological and iron parameters and a significant reduction in ESA dose requirements in this single-center pilot study. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02232906 PMID

  17. Leaf area index from litter collection: impact of specific leaf area variability within a beech stand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litter fall collection is a direct method widely used to estimate leaf area index (LAI) in broad-leaved forest stands. Indirect measurements using radiation transmittance and gap fraction theory are often compared and calibrated against litter fall, which is considered as a reference method, but few studies address the question of litter specific leaf area (SLA) measurement and variability. SLA (leaf area per unit of dry weight, m2·g-1) is used to convert dry leaf litter biomass (g .m-2) into leaf area per ground unit area (m2·m-2). We paid special attention to this parameter in two young beech stands (dense and thinned) in northeastern France. The variability of both canopy (closure, LAI) and site conditions (soil properties, vegetation) was investigated as potential contributing factors to beech SLA variability. A systematic description of soil and floristic composition was performed and three types of soil were identified. Ellenberg's indicator values were averaged for each plot to assess nitrogen soil content. SLA of beech litter was measured three times during the fall in 23 plots in the stands (40 ha). Litter was collected bimonthly in square-shaped traps (0.5 m2) and dried. Before drying, 30 leaves per plot and for each date were sampled, and leaf length, width, and area were measured with the help of a LI-COR areameter. SLA was calculated as the ratio of cumulated leaf area to total dry weight of the 30 leaves. Leaves characteristics per plot were averaged for the three dates of litter collection. Plant area index (PAI), estimated using the LAI-2000 plant canopy analyser and considering only the upper three rings, ranged from 2.9 to 8.1. Specific leaf area of beech litter was also highly different from one plot to the other, ranging from 150 to 320 cm2·g-1. Nevertheless, no relationship was found between SLA and stand canopy closure or PAI On the contrary, a significant relationship between SLA and soil properties was observed. Both SLA and leaf area had

  18. Use of timesat to estimate phenological parameters in Northwestern Patagonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddi, Facundo; Minotti, Priscilla; Ghermandi, Luciana; Lasaponara, Rosa

    2015-04-01

    Under a global change context, ecosystems are receiving high pressure and the ecology science play a key role for monitoring and assessment of natural resources. To achieve an effective resources management to develop an ecosystem functioning knowledge based on spatio-temporal perspective is useful. Satellite imagery periodically capture the spectral response of the earth and remote sensing have been widely utilized as classification and change detection tool making possible evaluate the intra and inter-annual plant dynamics. Vegetation spectral indices (e.g., NDVI) are particularly suitable to study spatio-temporal processes related to plant phenology and remote sensing specific software, such as TIMESAT, has been developed to carry out time series analysis of spectral indexes. We used TIMESAT software applied to series of 25 years of NDVI bi-monthly composites (240 images covering the period 1982-2006) from the NOAA-AVHRR sensor (8 x 8 km) to assessment plant pheonology over 900000 ha of shrubby-grasslands in the Northwestern of Patagonia, Argentina. The study area corresponds to a Mediterranean environment and is part of a gradient defined by a sharp drop west-east in the precipitation regime (600 mm to 280 mm). We fitted the temporal series of NDVI data to double logistic functions by least-squares methods evaluating three seasonality parameters: a) start of growing season, b) growing season length, c) NDVI seasonal integral. According to fitted models by TIMESAT, start average of growing season was the second half of September (± 10 days) with beginnings latest in the east (dryer areas). The average growing season length was 180 days (± 15 days) without a clear spatial trend. The NDVI seasonal integral showed a clear trend of decrease in west-east direction following the precipitation gradient. The temporal and spatial information allows revealing important patterns of ecological interest, which can be of great importance to environmental monitoring. In this

  19. Efficacy of anti-VEGF and laser photocoagulation in the treatment of visual impairment due to diabetic macular edema: a systematic review and network meta-analysis.

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    Stephane Régnier

    Full Text Available Compare the efficacy of ranibizumab, aflibercept, laser, and sham in the first-line treatment of diabetic macular edema (DME to inform technology assessments such as those conducted by the UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE.MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Library, congress abstracts, ClinicalTrials.gov registry and Novartis data on file.Studies reporting 6- or 12-month results of randomized controlled trials (RCTs evaluating at least two of ranibizumab 0.5 mg pro re nata, aflibercept 2.0 mg bi-monthly, laser photocoagulation or sham. Study quality was assessed based on likelihood of bias in selection, attrition, detection and performance.Improvement in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA measured as the proportion of patients gaining ≥10 letters on the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study scale. The outcome was chosen following acceptance by NICE of a Markov model with 10-letter health states in the assessment of ranibizumab for DME.Bayesian network meta-analyses with fixed and random effects adjusted for differences in baseline BCVA or central retinal thickness.The analysis included 1,978 patients from eight RCTs. The random effects model adjusting for baseline BCVA was the best model based on total residual. The efficacy of ranibizumab was numerically, but not statistically, superior to aflibercept (odds ratio [OR] 1.59; 95% credible interval [CrI], 0.61-5.37. Ranibizumab and aflibercept were statistically superior to laser monotherapy with ORs of 5.50 (2.73-13.16 and 3.45 (1.62-6.84 respectively. The probability that ranibizumab is the most efficacious treatment was 73% compared with 14% for aflibercept, 12% for ranibizumab plus laser, and 0% for laser.Three of the eight RCTs included are not yet published. The models did not adjust for all potential effect modifiers.Ranibizumab was non-significantly superior to aflibercept and both anti-VEGF therapies had statistically superior efficacy to laser.

  20. Influence of Kuroshio water on the annual copepod community structure in an estuary in the northwest Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Li-Chun; Hsiao, Shih-Hui; Sarkar, Santosh Kumar; Bhattacharya, Bhaskar Deb; Chen, Qing-Chao; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou

    2016-04-01

    The influence of Kuroshio water on temporal distribution and copepod diversity was investigated in the Lanyang River estuary (LRE), the longest river in northeast Taiwan, to assess secondary productivity. Zooplankton samples were collected bimonthly from the surface waters (0-2 m) of the estuary during cruises in 2006. Hydrological parameters indicated that the water in the LRE was an admixture of the Lanyang River water and seawater. Among the different genera, 47 copepod species (including 10 species that were identified only to the generic level) belonging to 28 genera, 16 families, and 4 orders were identified. The abundance and proportion of copepods to the total zooplankton counts range from 0 to 3683.42 (304.9±692.7 individuals m-3) and from 0 to 100 (55.09±34.84%) respectively. The copepod community structure revealed a distinct seasonal succession and showed significant differences among the sampling cruises (pANOVA). The 5 most abundant species were Parvocalanus crassirostris (relative abundance [RA]: 50.93%), Pseudodiaptomus serricaudatus (RA: 16.85%), Euterpina acutifrons (RA: 7.34%), Cyclops vicinus (RA: 4.82%), and Microcyclops tricolor (RA: 3.15%). The abundance, species number, indices of richness, evenness, and copepod diversity varied significantly (pANOVA) for all the cruises. Pearson correlation analysis results demonstrated that salinity was positively correlated with the copepod species number (r=0.637), total copepod abundance (r=0.456), and Shannon-Wiener diversity index (r=0.375) with a 1% level of significance. By contrast, the evenness index was negatively correlated with salinity (r=-0.375, p=0.01), indicating that copepod diversity in the LRE was influenced mainly by seawater. The Kuroshio Current played a major role in transporting and distributing warm-water copepods to its affected area. Copepod species assemblages showed seasonal succession and varied drastically with tidal change. The latter registered high abundance, and the