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Sample records for bimaxillary orthognathic surgery

  1. Value of Prophylactic Postoperative Antibiotic Therapy after Bimaxillary Orthognathic Surgery: A Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Eshghpour

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Antibiotic therapy before or after orthognathic surgery is commonly recommended by surgeons to minimize the risk of wound infection. This article evaluates the value of Prophylactic antibiotic therapy in order to diminish the incidence of postoperative wound infection after orthognathic surgery.   Materials and Methods: Fifty candidates for bimaxillary orthognathic surgery were divided into cases and controls. Cefazolin (1g was administered intravenously to all participants 30 mins prior to surgery followed by a similar dose 4 hours later. Case-group patients ingested amoxicillin (500 mg orally for 7 days after surgery. Postoperative wound infection was assessed using clinical features, and the P-value significance was set at P  Results: Both groups were similar according to gender, age, and operating time. During the follow-up period no infection was observed in either the case or control group.   Conclusion:  The results of this study suggest that long-term postoperative antibiotic therapy is not essential for the prevention of postoperative infection, and that application of aseptic surgical technique and hygiene instruction after surgery are sufficient.

  2. Long-Term Stability of Pre-Orthodontic Orthognathic Bimaxillary Surgery Using Intraoral Vertical Ramus Osteotomy Versus Conventional Surgery.

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    Jeong, Jeong-Hwa; Choi, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Kee-Deog; Hwang, Chung-Ju; Lee, Sang-Hwy; Yu, Hyung-Seog

    2018-02-20

    The aim of the present study was to compare the long-term stability of bimaxillary surgery using an intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy (IVRO) with and without presurgical orthodontic treatment. The present retrospective study included 31 consecutive patients with skeletal Class III malocclusions who had undergone bimaxillary surgery (Le Fort I osteotomy and bilateral IVRO). Patients were divided into 2 groups based on treatment type: pre-orthodontic orthognathic surgery (POGS; n = 17) and conventional surgery with presurgical orthodontic treatment (CS; n = 14). Lateral cephalograms were obtained before surgery, 1 day after surgery, 1 month after surgery, 1 year after surgery, and 2 years after surgery to evaluate skeletal and soft tissue changes between the 2 groups. Data were analyzed using χ 2 tests, Mann-Whitney U tests, repeated-measures analyses of variance, and independent t tests. There was no significant difference in skeletal or soft tissue measurements-with the exception of the angle between the sella-and-nasion plane and the occlusal plane (SN-OP; P stability in patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Soft tissue response in orthognathic surgery patients treated by bimaxillary osteotomy: cephalometry compared with 2-D photogrammetry.

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    Rustemeyer, Jan; Martin, Alice

    2013-03-01

    Since improvement of facial aesthetics after orthognathic surgery moves increasingly into the focus of patients, prediction of soft tissue response to hard tissue movement becomes essential for planning. The aim of this study was to assess the facial soft tissue response in skeletal class II and III patients undergoing orthognathic surgery and to compare the potentials of cephalometry and two-dimensional (2-D) photogrammetry for predicting soft tissue changes. Twenty-eight patients with class II relationship and 33 with class III underwent bimaxillary surgery. All subjects had available both a traced lateral cephalogram and a traced lateral photogram taken pre- and postsurgery in natural head position (median follow-up, 9.4 ± 0.6 months). Facial convexity and lower lip length were highly correlated with hard tissue movements cephalometrically in class III patients and 2-D photogrammetrically in both classes. In comparison, cephalometric correlations for class II patients were weak. Correlations of hard and soft tissue movements between pre- and postoperative corresponding landmarks in horizontal and vertical planes were significant for cephalometry and 2-D photogrammetry. No significant difference was found between cephalometry and 2-D photogrammetry with respect to soft to hard tissue movement ratios. This study revealed that cephalometry is still a feasible standard for evaluating and predicting outcomes in routine orthognathic surgery cases. Accuracy could be enhanced with 2-D photogrammetry, especially in class II patients.

  4. Soft tissue response in orthognathic surgery patients treated by bimaxillary osteotomy: cephalometry compared with 2-D photogrammetry

    OpenAIRE

    Rustemeyer, Jan; Martin, Alice

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Since improvement of facial aesthetics after orthognathic surgery moves increasingly into the focus of patients, prediction of soft tissue response to hard tissue movement becomes essential for planning. The aim of this study was to assess the facial soft tissue response in skeletal class II and III patients undergoing orthognathic surgery and to compare the potentials of cephalometry and two-dimensional (2-D) photogrammetry for predicting soft tissue changes. Material and methods Twe...

  5. Skeletal stability of surgery-first bimaxillary orthognathic surgery for skeletal class III malocclusion, using standardized criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, K-H; Sandor, G K; Kim, Y-D

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the postoperative stability following bimaxillary surgery performed either with or without preoperative orthodontic treatment, in class III malocclusion patients. These patients were enrolled using standardized inclusion criteria. Forty patients with a class III malocclusion were included in this retrospective study. Inclusion criteria were class III malocclusion with and without premolar extraction, stability. With respect to postsurgical changes, significant differences were observed in the changes for the vertical reference plane to the posterior nasal spine, horizontal reference plane to B-point, and occlusal plane angle in both groups. No statistically significant differences in the relapse rates were observed between the two groups. No significant differences were observed between the two groups in terms of the postoperative stability. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Orthognathic Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard Larsen, Marie; Thygesen, Torben Henrik

    2016-01-01

    on the level of satisfaction was studied. The social-networking web site Facebook was used to identify the study population. An online questionnaire was performed using the website SurveyMonkey. In all, 105 (9%) respondents from the Danish Facebook group about OS, called Kaebeoperation (jaw surgery), were......The literature shows that the indications for orthognathic surgery (OS) are often functional problems and unsatisfactory facial esthetics. This study investigated the esthetic outcomes and overall satisfaction following OS. Somatosensory change is a relatively common complication and its influence...... to sex, age, and somatosensory change. High satisfaction and improvement in facial esthetic after OS were seen. Young patients (16-25 years) and men indicated a higher degree of satisfaction than old (>25 years) patients and women. The use of social media seems to be an interesting platform...

  7. Cosmetic procedures in orthognathic surgery.

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    Nocini, Pier Francesco; Chiarini, Luigi; Bertossi, Dario

    2011-03-01

    Orthognathic surgery produces cosmetic and functional effects, and patients should be evaluated for additional cosmetic improvements beyond those possible with orthognathic surgery. Soft tissue procedures can be performed on an outpatient basis in an office environment and can be combined with orthognathics and delayed in a second stage. Systematic accurate facial evaluation is necessary to focus on cosmetic soft tissue problems. Features that make the patient look unattractive, old, tired, out of shape, weak, or sad must be identified by accurate clinical analysis and 3-dimensional planning. Then it will be possible to select the treatment plan according to the patient's input, prioritizing the additional cosmetic improvements that can be added to primary surgery. It is particularly important to review the results and the patient's satisfaction by clinical examination, a questionnaire, and with 3-dimensional pictures, and to understand if the treatment options have been accurately chosen and their lasting effect on follow-up. The treatment sequence is analyzed, and if there are residual defects, a secondary cosmetic procedure can be planned to complete the result. The surgeon's goal must be the simultaneous treatment of malocclusions and facial esthetic disharmonies, and orthognathic surgical procedures and facial cosmetics must be performed simultaneously, if possible. Residual defects must be treated after at least 6 to 12 months. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Virtual planning in orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokbro, K; Aagaard, E; Torkov, P; Bell, R B; Thygesen, T

    2014-08-01

    Numerous publications regarding virtual surgical planning protocols have been published, most reporting only one or two case reports to emphasize the hands-on planning. None have systematically reviewed the data published from clinical trials. This systematic review analyzes the precision and accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) virtual surgical planning of orthognathic procedures compared with the actual surgical outcome following orthognathic surgery reported in clinical trials. A systematic search of the current literature was conducted to identify clinical trials with a sample size of more than five patients, comparing the virtual surgical plan with the actual surgical outcome. Search terms revealed a total of 428 titles, out of which only seven articles were included, with a combined sample size of 149 patients. Data were presented in three different ways: intra-class correlation coefficient, 3D surface area with a difference Virtual planning appears to be an accurate and reproducible method for orthognathic treatment planning. A more uniform presentation of the data is necessary to allow the performance of a meta-analysis. Currently, the software system most often used for 3D virtual planning in clinical trials is SimPlant (Materialise). More independent clinical trials are needed to further validate the precision of virtual planning. Copyright © 2014 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  9. Estudo cefalométrico das alterações no perfil facial em pacientes Classe III dolicocefálicos submetidos à cirurgia ortognática bimaxilar Cephalometric study of the facial profile changes in Class III patients submitted to bimaxillary orthognathic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hewerson Santos Tavares

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo avaliou as modificações no perfil facial de 15 pacientes portadores de má oclusão Classe III esquelética que foram submetidos a tratamento ortodôntico pré-cirúrgico e cirurgia ortognática bimaxilar estabilizada com fixação rígida. Oito pacientes foram submetidos à mentoplastia. Foram utilizadas telerradiografias pré-cirúrgicas (T1 e pós-cirúrgicas (T2 com um intervalo mínimo de 6 meses. Foram analisados deslocamentos horizontais e verticais em pontos do tecido ósseo e tecido mole. Foi realizada uma comparação entre os casos tratados com e sem mentoplastia (teste t mostrando não haver diferenças entre os grupos. A regressão linear múltipla evidenciou uma correlação significante no sentido horizontal para os pontos Pg e Pgm e vertical para os pontos Me e Mem. Foi encontrada baixa correlação para movimentos no sentido horizontal nos pontos Sena e A, e para os pontos Pn, Sn e Ph. No sentido vertical, os deslocamentos mais evidentes foram entre os pontos Pg, Gn e Me e Sena e A, porém com correlações de baixa intensidade.The present study evaluated the facial profile modifications in 15 skeletal Class III patients that were submitted to presurgical orthodontic treatment and orthognathic bimaxillary surgery stabilized with a rigid fixation. Eight of the patients have undergone to genioplastic surgery. Presurgical (T1 and late postsurgical (T2 radiographs taken apart with a minimum of 6 month interval had been used. The horizontal and vertical displacement of skeletal and soft tissue profile points were analyzed. The comparison of the cases submitted or not to a genioplastic surgery (t Test showed no differences for the displacement of the skeletal and soft tissue points. The multiple linear regression analysis showed a significant correlation for horizontal movements of the Pg and Pgm points and for vertical movements of the Me and Mem points. A low correlation was found for the horizontal movements of

  10. Early orthognathic surgery with three-dimensional image simulation during presurgical orthodontics in adults.

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    Kang, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Moon-Key; Park, Sun-Yeon; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Park, Wonse; Lee, Sang-Hwy

    2011-03-01

    To correct dentofacial deformities, three-dimensional skeletal analysis and computerized orthognathic surgery simulation are used to facilitate accurate diagnoses and surgical plans. Computed tomography imaging of dental occlusion can inform three-dimensional facial analyses and orthognathic surgical simulations. Furthermore, three-dimensional laser scans of a cast model of the predetermined postoperative dental occlusion can be used to increase the accuracy of the preoperative surgical simulation. In this study, we prepared cast models of planned postoperative dental occlusions from 12 patients diagnosed with skeletal class III malocclusions with mandibular prognathism and facial asymmetry that had planned to undergo bimaxillary orthognathic surgery during preoperative orthodontic treatment. The data from three-dimensional laser scans of the cast models were used in three-dimensional surgical simulations. Early orthognathic surgeries were performed based on three-dimensional image simulations using the cast images in several presurgical orthodontic states in which teeth alignment, leveling, and space closure were incomplete. After postoperative orthodontic treatments, intraoral examinations revealed that no patient had a posterior open bite or space. The two-dimensional and three-dimensional skeletal analyses showed that no mandibular deviations occurred between the immediate and final postoperative states of orthodontic treatment. These results showed that early orthognathic surgery with three-dimensional computerized simulations based on cast models of predetermined postoperative dental occlusions could provide early correction of facial deformities and improved efficacy of preoperative orthodontic treatment. This approach can reduce the decompensation treatment period of the presurgical orthodontics and contribute to efficient postoperative orthodontic treatments.

  11. Orthognathic patients with nasal deformities: case for simultaneous orthognathic surgery and rhinoplasty.

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    Seah, Tian Ee; Bellis, Hugh; Ilankovan, Velupillai

    2012-01-01

    Orthognathic surgery is a recognised way of correcting dentofacial deformities and it is common practice to treat problems that affect the chin simultaneously, while deferring or not treating nasal deformities. There is inadequate published information about the prevalence of nasal deformities in such patients, and our aim was to remedy this. We retrospectively studied 75 patients with dentofacial deformities to find out if there was an association between nasal and dentofacial abnormalities. Forty-six of the 75 patients (61%) had mild to prominent cosmetic nasal problems, of whom 27 had deformities of the nasal bridge, 22 of the lobule of the nasal tip, 20 of nasal width, 14 in the width of the alar base, and 11 of the columella; 8 presented with deviation of the nose, and 6 with abnormal nasal length. Skeletal classes II and III had only slightly varied emphasis on nasal deformities. In comparison 14 patients (19%) had problems with the chin that required, or had already had, genioplasty. We also studied 9 patients who had had corrective bimaxillary surgery with simultaneous rhinoplasty. We set no formal questionnaire, but all patients expressed satisfaction with the postoperative results. Copyright © 2011 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  12. Orthognathic Surgery in Craniofacial Microsomia: Treatment Algorithm

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    Rodrigo Fariña, DDS, Med

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Craniofacial microsomia is a broad term that covers a variety of craniofacial malformation conditions that are caused by alterations in the derivatives of the first and second pharyngeal arches. In general terms, diverse therapeutic alternatives are proposed according to the growth stage and the severity of the alteration. When craniofacial growth has concluded, conventional orthognathic surgery (Le Fort I osteotomy, bilateral sagittal split osteotomy, and genioplasty provides good alternatives for MI and MIIA type cases. Reconstruction of the mandibular ramus and temporomandibular joint before orthognathic surgery is the indicated treatment for cases MIIB and MIII. The goal of this article is to establish a surgical treatment algorithm for orthognathic surgery on patients with craniofacial microsomia, analyzing the points that allow the ideal treatment for each patient to be chosen.

  13. Relative blood loss and operative time can predict length of stay following orthognathic surgery.

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    Andersen, K; Thastum, M; Nørholt, S E; Blomlöf, J

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the length of stay (LOS) following orthognathic surgery and thereby to establish a benchmark. The secondary aim was to identify predictors of postoperative LOS following orthognathic surgery. Patients were treated consecutively during the period 2010 to 2012. Inclusion criteria were (1) patient age ≥18 years, and (2) surgery involving a three-piece Le Fort I osteotomy, or a bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO), or bimaxillary surgery. A total of 335 patients were included. The following data were recorded: height, weight, body mass index (BMI), age, sex, operative time, intraoperative blood loss, and type of surgery. LOS was defined as the duration of time from date of surgery to date of discharge. The average LOS was 1.3 days following Le Fort I osteotomy, 1.3 days following BSSO, and 1.8 days following bimaxillary surgery. In the multivariate regression model (R(2)=0.11), predictors of a prolonged LOS were operative time (POral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Orthognathic surgery with or without autologous fat micrograft injection: preliminary report on aesthetic outcomes and patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffaini, M; Pisani, C

    2015-03-01

    Orthognathic surgery leaves the intrinsic volume of the facial soft tissues untouched, sometimes resulting in unsatisfactory improvements in aesthetics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the aesthetic outcomes and patient satisfaction following bimaxillary orthognathic surgery with or without simultaneous facial lipofilling procedures. The preoperative and postoperative facial appearances of 210 patients were compared through analysis of photographs and postoperative clinical evaluation. A patient questionnaire was used to assess the perceived improvement in aesthetics. One hundred and twenty patients (mean age 20.3 years) underwent bimaxillary orthognathic surgery and simultaneous facial lipofilling procedures (group I). The remaining 90 patients (mean age 19.8 years) underwent skeletal procedures only (group II). The overall aesthetic improvement was similar in the two groups (group I 92.5%, group II 91.1%). Greater higher-level aesthetic improvement scores were recorded for group I (group I 80%, group II 55.6%). The overall patient satisfaction was 98.3% for group I and 97.8% for group II. Greater higher-level satisfaction scores were recorded for group I (group I 14.2%, group II 6.7%). The simultaneous use of the autologous fat micrograft is a promising technique that may improve the aesthetic outcomes of orthognathic surgery, leading to greater patient satisfaction. Copyright © 2014 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Computer assisted orthognathic surgery: Condyle repositioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettega, G; Leitner, F

    2013-07-17

    Computer aided surgery has become a standard in many fields. It is rarely used in orthognathic surgery. Twenty years ago, we developed a navigation system adapted to this surgery, especially for mandibular condyle repositioning. The system has been improved along with technological progress. The authors of several clinical studies have validated this system. It is now routinely used in our department, because of its educational virtues among other assets. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  16. Young Adults' Experience of Appearance-Altering Orthognathic Surgery: A Longitudinal Interpretative Phenomenologic Analysis.

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    Liddle, Morna J; Baker, Sarah R; Smith, Keith G; Thompson, Andrew R

    2018-02-01

    To gain an experiential account of the processes of change associated specifically with orthognathic surgery. A qualitative design was used. Semistructured interviews were carried out with 7 participants approximately 1 week before and 6-8 weeks after surgery. The data were analyzed using interpretative phenomenologic analysis (IPA). Participants were recruited from a NHS Dental Hospital. Patients aged 16 to 25 years scheduled to undergo orthognathic surgery on both the upper and lower jaws were purposively sought to participate. Seven participants aged between 18 and 25 years and who had undergone a bimaxillary osteotomy completed interviews (5 females and 2 males). Themes were identified in connection with the overall journey of treatment being a rite of passage; the treatment's role in raising awareness about the anomalies in appearance; the initial shock at the changes that followed surgery; the uncertainty about treatment; the impact of actual negative reactions of others; and the role of significant others in the decision-making process. Participants described undergoing a much more complex process of adjustment to change in appearance than has been identified elsewhere within the literature, and the study highlights the nuanced fashion in which both medical and parental communication influence patient expectation and experience of surgery. There is a need to improve communication between clinicians, families, and young adults seeking orthognathic surgery. Further studies are needed to investigate the processes associated with seeking to change facial appearance resulting from other forms of dentofacial condition.

  17. CLASSIFICATION OF ORTHOGNATHIC SURGERY PATIENTS INTO LOW AND HIGH BLEEDING RISK GROUPS USING THROMBELASTOGRAPHY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elenius Madsen, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Title: CLASSIFICATION OF ORTHOGNATHIC SURGERY PATIENTS INTO LOW AND HIGH BLEEDING RISK GROUPS USING THROMBELASTOGRAPHY Objectives: Orthognathic surgery involves surgical manipulation of jaw and face skeletal structure. A subgroup of patients undergoing orthognathic surgery suffers from excessive...

  18. Idiopathic sixth nerve palsy after bimaxillary surgery: a complication or a sequential pathology independent from surgery?

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    Şirinoğlu, Hakan; Güvercin, Emre; Çakmakoğlu, Çağri; Filinte, Gaye Taylan; Yeşiloğlu, Nebil; Bozkurt, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    This was a case of a 21-year-old female patient with a very rare and unexpected symptom "diplopia occurring due to the idiopathic sixth nerve palsy" encountered after 2 weeks following bimaxillary surgery performed for the correction of class III malocclusion deformity.

  19. A new approach of splint-less orthognathic surgery using a personalized orthognathic surgical guide system: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, B; Shen, S; Jiang, W; Li, J; Jiang, T; Xia, J J; Shen, S G; Wang, X

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a personalized orthognathic surgical guide (POSG) system for bimaxillary surgery without the use of surgical splint. Ten patients with dentofacial deformities were enrolled. Surgeries were planned with the computer-aided surgical simulation method. The POSG system was designed for both maxillary and mandibular surgery. Each consisted of cutting guides and three-dimensionally (3D) printed custom titanium plates to guide the osteotomy and repositioning the bony segments without the use of the surgical splints. Finally, the outcome evaluation was completed by comparing planned outcomes with postoperative outcomes. All operations were successfully completed using the POSG system. The largest root-mean-square deviations were 0.74mm and 1.93° for the maxillary dental arch, 1.10mm and 2.82° for the mandibular arch, 0.83mm and 2.59° for the mandibular body, and 0.98mm and 2.45° for the proximal segments. The results of the study indicated that our POSG system is capable of accurately and effectively transferring the surgical plan without the use of surgical splint. A significant advantage is that the repositioning of the bony segments is independent to the mandibular autorotation, thus eliminates the potential problems associated with the surgical splint. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Accuracy of Three-Dimensional Planning in Surgery-First Orthognathic Surgery: Planning Versus Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Ngoc Hieu; Tantidhnazet, Syrina; Raocharernporn, Somchart; Kiattavornchareon, Sirichai; Pairuchvej, Verasak; Wongsirichat, Natthamet

    2018-01-01

    Background The benefit of computer-assisted planning in orthognathic surgery (OGS) has been extensively documented over the last decade. This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) virtual planning in surgery-first OGS. Methods Fifteen patients with skeletal class III malocclusion who underwent bimaxillary OGS with surgery-first approach were included. A composite skull model was reconstructed using data from cone-beam computed tomography and stereolithography from a scanned dental cast. Surgical procedures were simulated using Simplant O&O software, and the virtual plan was transferred to the operation room using 3D-printed splints. Differences of the 3D measurements between the virtual plan and postoperative results were evaluated, and the accuracy was reported using root mean square deviation (RMSD) and the Bland-Altman method. Results The virtual planning was successfully transferred to surgery. The overall mean linear difference was 0.88 mm (0.79 mm for the maxilla and 1 mm for the mandible), and the overall mean angular difference was 1.16°. The RMSD ranged from 0.86 to 1.46 mm and 1.27° to 1.45°, within the acceptable clinical criteria. Conclusion In this study, virtual surgical planning and 3D-printed surgical splints facilitated the diagnosis and treatment planning, and offered an accurate outcome in surgery-first OGS. PMID:29581806

  1. Stability after Cleft Maxillary Distraction Osteogenesis or Conventional Orthognathic Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kristian; Svenstrup, Martin; Pedersen, Thomas Klit

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare stability of maxillary advancements in patients with cleft lip and palate following distraction osteogenesis or orthognathic surgery. MATERIAL AND METHODS: INCLUSION CRITERIA: 1) cleft lip and palate, 2) advancement > 8 mm. Eleven patients comprised the distraction osteogen...

  2. Simultaneous Glossectomy with Orthognathic Surgery for Mandibular Prognathism

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Young-Wook; On, Sung-Woon; Chung, Kyu-Rhim; Song, Seung-Il

    2014-01-01

    Macroglossia can create dental and skeletal instability after orthodontic treatment or orthognathic surgery for mandibular prognathism. In relevant literature, partial glossectomy is suggested for a good post-treatment prognosis. Most of the published partial glossectomy cases are two-staged surgery, because of concern about postoperative airway obstruction. As orthognathic surgical techniques and fixation method develop, however, concerns about postoperative airway obstruction have lessened....

  3. Simultaneous malaroplasty with porous polyethylene implants and orthognathic surgery for correction of malar deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robiony, M; Costa, F; Demitri, V; Politi, M

    1998-06-01

    Patients with skeletal malrelationships caused by maxillary anteroposterior defect and midface hypoplasia may present with an alteration of cheekbone contour. High osteotomies, segmental osteotomies of the zygomatic complex, and malar expansion with alloplastic materials can be performed to improve facial aesthetics. This article describes the restoration of cheekbone-nasal base-lip contour by performing a malaroplasty using an alloplastic implant in addition to orthognathic surgery. From 1995 to 1996, 17 patients with maxillomandibular malrelationships and deficient cheekbone contour were tested by malar augmentation with porous high-density polyethylene in association with maxillary advancement and mandibular setback. The diagnosis of cheekbone contour alteration was made after observing the patient from a lateral, frontal, and oblique point of view. The position of the implant was determined by using Mladick's point, with lateral or medial extension in relation to the depressed area. By the restoration of normal cheekbone-nasal base-upper lip contour produced excellent aesthetic results in all patients. Malaroplasty in association with bimaxillary orthognathic surgery seems to be an effective procedure for treating midface skeletal deficiencies.

  4. Stability of orthognathic surgery and distraction osteogenesis: options and alternatives.

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    Serafin, Bethany; Perciaccante, Vincent J; Cunningham, Larry L

    2007-08-01

    Relapse in orthognathic surgery is multifactorial and can be attributed to posttreatment growth, condylar changes, lack of rigid fixation, and muscle pull and function. Consideration of these factors can aide the surgeon in the decision-making process with regards to treatment options and alternatives. This article reviews the stability of various orthognathic movements using traditional osteotomies and fixation, and compares them to what is currently in the literature regarding distraction osteogenesis.

  5. Orthognathic positioning system: intraoperative system to transfer virtual surgical plan to operating field during orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polley, John W; Figueroa, Alvaro A

    2013-05-01

    To introduce the concept and use of an occlusal-based "orthognathic positioning system" (OPS) to be used during orthognathic surgery. The OPS consists of intraoperative occlusal-based devices that transfer virtual surgical planning to the operating field for repositioning of the osteotomized dentoskeletal segments. The system uses detachable guides connected to an occlusal splint. An initial drilling guide is used to establish stable references or landmarks. These are drilled on the bone that will not be repositioned adjacent to the osteotomy line. After mobilization of the skeletal segment, a final positioning guide, referenced to the drilled landmarks, is used to transfer the skeletal segment according to the virtual surgical planning. The OPS is digitally designed using 3-dimensional computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing technology and manufactured with stereolithographic techniques. Virtual surgical planning has improved the preoperative assessment and, in conjunction with the OPS, the execution of orthognathic surgery. The OPS has the possibility to eliminate the inaccuracies commonly associated with traditional orthognathic surgery planning and to simplify the execution by eliminating surgical steps such as intraoperative measuring, determining the condylar position, the use of bulky intermediate splints, and the use of intermaxillary wire fixation. The OPS attempts precise translation of the virtual plan to the operating field, bridging the gap between virtual and actual surgery. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Férula quirúrgica intermedia en cirugía ortognática bimaxilar: Un método simple de obtención Intermediate surgical splint in orthognathic bimaxillary surgery: A simple method for obtaining it

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    J.V. Pascual Gil

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available La utilización de la férula quirúrgica intermedia (FQI en las intervenciones de cirugía ortognática bimaxilar es un procedimiento habitual. La utilidad, ayuda y confianza que aporta es indiscutible. Sin embargo, el procedimiento clásico de obtención de la FQI es complejo. Proponemos simplificar la fabricación de la FQI sin renunciar a su precisión y fiabilidad. Debemos cuestionar algunos conceptos del método de obtención de esta férula y reflexionar sobre el siguiente concepto básico: la dimensión vertical craneomandibular preoperatoria es igual a la dimensión vertical craneomandibular postoperatoria con la férula en posición. Para confeccionarla se ha diseñado un nuevo dispositivo denominado: Posicionador del maxilar.The employment of the intermediate surgical splint in bimaxillary orthognatic surgery is a common procedure. The utility, aid and confidence which are provided are inquestionable. Anyway the classic procedure of attainment of the splint is complex. We propose to simplify the manufacturing of the splint without renouncing to it´s accuracy and reliability. We must question some concepts about the attainment method of this splint and consider the following basic concept: the vertical preoperatory craneomandibular dimension is the same as the vertical postoperatory craneomandibular dimension with the splint in position. To manufacture it we have designed a new device called: Maxillary Placet.

  7. Seeking beauty: understanding the psychology behind orthognathic surgery.

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    Oluwajana, F

    2015-12-01

    Orthognathic surgery to correct serious skeletal discrepancies of the jaw improves both function and appearance, but patients should spend a lot of time thinking about, discussing, and planning operations that have such a considerable impact. The drive to improve appearance by such radical means is based on social and personal reasons, and this must be understood before treatment is considered. In this paper, we will review studies on the psychology of orthognathic surgery. Copyright © 2015 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Orthodontic-orthognathic interventions in orthognathic surgical cases: "Paper surgery" and "model surgery" concepts in surgical orthodontics

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    Narayan H Gandedkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thorough planning and execution is the key for successful treatment of dentofacial deformity involving surgical orthodontics. Presurgical planning (paper surgery and model surgery are the most essential prerequisites of orthognathic surgery, and orthodontist is the one who carries out this procedure by evaluating diagnostic aids such as crucial clinical findings and radiographic assessments. However, literature pertaining to step-by-step orthognathic surgical guidelines is limited. Hence, this article makes an attempt to provide an insight and nuances involved in the planning and execution. The diagnostic information revealed from clinical findings and radiographic assessments is integrated in the "paper surgery" to establish "surgical-plan." Furthermore, the "paper surgery" is emulated in "model surgery" such that surgical bite-wafers are created, which aid surgeon to preview the final outcome and make surgical movements that are deemed essential for the desired skeletal and dental outcomes. Skeletal complexities are corrected by performing "paper surgery" and an occlusion is set up during "model surgery" for the fabrication of surgical bite-wafers. Further, orthodontics is carried out for the proper settling and finishing of occlusion. Article describes the nuances involved in the treatment of Class III skeletal deformity individuals treated with orthognathic surgical approach and illustrates orthodontic-orthognathic step-by-step procedures from "treatment planning" to "execution" for successful management of aforementioned dentofacial deformity.

  9. Orthognathic surgery: is patient information on the Internet valid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldairy, T; Laverick, S; McIntyre, G T

    2012-08-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the quality and reliability of UK websites providing information on orthognathic and jaw surgery to patients. An Internet search engine (www.google.com) was used to identify websites containing medical information on 'orthognathic surgery' and 'jaw surgery'. Of over 144,000 links for orthognathic surgery and 700,000 for jaw surgery, the first 100 were examined in detail. After excluding discussion groups, news and video feeds, and removing duplicate sites, only 25 relevant websites remained which were then evaluated using the DISCERN instrument (www.discern.org.uk/discern_instrument.php). Through the 16 questions assessing the reliability and quality of the consumer information which are scored from 1 to 5, a relative index of the quality of the information is produced. The maximum score attainable for an excellent website is 80. Of the 25 websites that were scored, DISCERN indicated the majority of websites fell well below the maximum score. The highest score achieved by one of the websites according to the DISCERN tool was 64 of 80 and the lowest score achieved was 21 of 80. The websites achieving maximum and minimum score were Wikipedia and qualitydentistry.com, respectively. By directing patients to validated websites, clinicians can ensure patients find appropriate information; however, further development of websites relating to orthognathic surgery is required. Internet information should be updated on a regular basis to account for improvements in orthodontic and surgical care.

  10. Stability of pre-orthodontic orthognathic surgery depending on mandibular surgical techniques: SSRO vs IVRO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung-Hwan; Yoo, Ho Jin; Lee, Jang-Yeol; Jung, Young-Soo; Choi, Jong-Woo; Lee, Kee-Joon

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to evaluate the postoperative stability of sagittal split ramus osteotomy (SSRO) and intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy (IVRO) in pre-orthodontic orthognathic surgery (POGS) for skeletal Class III malocclusion. Thirty-seven patients (SSRO, n = 18; IVRO, n = 19) who underwent bimaxillary surgery were divided into two groups according to the type of surgery. During the postoperative period, there were no significant differences in anterior and superior movements of the mandible at point B between the two groups, but occlusal plane angle of the SSRO group significantly decreased more than that of the IVRO group (P = 0.003). Only the SSRO group showed a linear relationship between the amount of postoperative horizontal and vertical movements of the mandible (R(2) = 0.254; P = 0.033), indicating that the amount of postoperative upward movement of the mandible increased as the amount of postoperative forward movement increased (r = -0.504; P = 0.033). The mandible after SSRO in POGS rotated counterclockwise due to rigid fixation between two segments, whereas the mandible after IVRO without rigid fixation in POGS moved mainly in a superior direction. These differences must be considered before surgery to ensure postsurgical stability for patients with mandibular prognathism. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Effect of GaAlAs low-level laser therapy on mouth opening after orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rezende, Robson Almeida; Silva, Daniela Nascimento; Frigo, Lúcio

    2018-03-12

    To evaluate low-level laser therapy (LLLT) as an adjunct to enhance postoperative mouth opening after orthognathic surgery. Prospective clinical trial of 82 patients allocated into an intervention group (laser, LG) and a control group (no laser, CG) and subgroups according to the procedure type : (1) surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion (SARME); (2) maxillary surgery; (3) mandibular surgery; or (4) bimaxillary surgery. LG patients received LLLT immediately after surgery and every 24 h thereafter for 3 days, using a gallium-aluminum-arsenide (GaAlAs) diode laser (780 nm, 28 spots, 14 on each side of the face, output power 2 J/spot). Maximum mouth opening was measured using digital calipers at five time points: preoperative baseline and postoperative days 2, 7, 14, and 21. ANOVA was used to evaluate difference in mouth opening across groups. Significance was accepted at P  ≤  0.05. Final average mouth opening differed between women (GL1 = 94.24%, GC1 = 89.54%, GL2 = 69.39%; GC2 = 68.46%; GL3 = 65.11%; GC3 = 58.64%; GL4 = 61.85%; GC4 = 57.11%) and men (GL1 = 86.92%, GC1 = 102.44%, GL2 = 77.56%; GC2 = 81.65%; GL3 = 80.29%; GC3 = 67.63%; GL4 = 66.93%; GC4 = 55.31%). There were no significant differences between the SARME and isolated maxillary/mandibular surgery groups. In the bimaxillary groups, average mouth opening was increased in all patients who received LLLT, significantly so in male patients. LLLT with a GaAlAs diode laser (780 nm) did not affect postoperative mouth opening after SARME, isolated maxillary surgery, or isolated mandibular surgery. However, it improved mouth opening in men who had undergone bimaxillary orthognathic surgery.

  12. Influence of orthognathic surgery for symptoms of temporomandibular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastiani, Aline Monise; Baratto-Filho, Flares; Bonotto, Daniel; Kluppel, Leandro Eduardo; Rebellato, Nelson Luis Barbosa; da Costa, Delson João; Scariot, Rafaela

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the influence of orthognathic surgery on the clinical signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). In a cohort study, 54 patients undergoing orthognathic surgery were evaluated with regard to the signs and symptoms of TMDs through subjective and objective assessments. These evaluations were performed 1 week preoperatively (T1), 1 month postoperatively (T2), and 6 months postoperatively (T3). The evaluations included patient variables and surgery. Univariate analyzes were performed to verify the association of the variables (P < .05). The incidence of TMD 6 months after orthognathic surgery was significantly lower (P < .001). TMD intensity decreases significantly in the postoperative period. Females had a higher prevalence of TMD (P = .003) and muscular disorders preoperatively (P = .001). There was a decrease in clicks between T1 and T3 (P = .013). Mouth opening without pain worsened from T1 to T2 (P < .001) and improved from T1 to T3 (P = .015) and T2 to T3 (P < .001). The results were similar for mouth opening with pain (P < .001). In patients undergoing jaw fixation with bicortical screws, mouth opening without pain was significantly less in T3 patients than in patients undergoing fixation with plate and monocortical screws (P = .048). Orthognathic surgery reduces the clinical signs and symptoms of TMD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The influence of orthognathic surgery on ventilation during sleep

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Foltán, R.; Hoffmannová, J.; Pavlíková, G.; Hanzelka, T.; Klíma, K.; Horká, E.; Adámek, S.; Šedý, Jiří

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 2 (2011), s. 146-149 ISSN 0901-5027 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : orthognathic surgery * obstructive sleep apnea * ventilation Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.506, year: 2011

  14. 3D printing in orthognathic surgery - A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsiu-Hsia; Lonic, Daniel; Lo, Lun-Jou

    2018-02-02

    With the recent advances in three-dimensional (3D) imaging, computer-assisted surgical planning and simulation are now regularly used for analysis of craniofacial structures and improved prediction of surgical outcomes in orthognathic surgery. A variety of patient-specific surgical guides and devices have been designed and manufactured using 3D printing technology, which rapidly gained widespread popularity to improve the outcomes. The article presents an overview of 3D printing technology for state-of-the-art application in orthognathic surgery and discusses the impacts on treatment feasibility and patient outcome. The current available literature regarding the use of 3D printing methods in orthognathic surgery including 3D computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing, rapid prototyping, additive manufacturing, 3D printing, 3D printed models, surgical occlusal splints, custom-made guides, templates and fixation plates is reviewed. A Medline, PubMed, ProQuest and ScienceDirect search was performed to find relevant articles over the past 10 years. A total of 318 articles were found, out of which 69 were publications addressing the topic of this study. An additional 9 hand-searched articles were added. From the review, we can conclude that the use of 3D printing methods in orthognathic surgery provide the benefit of optimal functional and aesthetic results, patient satisfaction, and precise translation of the treatment plan. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Preformed hydroxylapatite blocks for palatal grafting in orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiatt, W R; Moore, D L; Mosby, E L; Fain, D W

    1987-06-01

    Hydroxylapatite has been used as a bone substitute for ridge augmentation, ridge maintenance and periodontal defects for many years. This is a preliminary report of the use of hydroxylapatite blocks as a grafting material in midpalatal splits in orthognathic surgery. With the advent of hydroxylapatite blocks, the need for autogenous bone grafting will, in most cases, be obviated.

  16. A new method of surgical navigation for orthognathic surgery: optical tracking guided free-hand repositioning of the maxillomandibular complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Biao; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Hao; Shen, Steve G F; Wang, Xudong

    2014-03-01

    In bimaxillary orthognathic surgery, the positioning of the maxilla and the mandible is typically accomplished via 2-splint technique, which may be the sources of several types of inaccuracy. To overcome the limitations of the 2-splint technique, we developed a new navigation method, which guided the surgeon to free-hand reposition the maxillomandibular complex as a whole intraoperatively, without the intermediate splint. In this preliminary study, the feasibility was demonstrated. Five patients with dental maxillofacial deformities were enrolled. Before the surgery, 3-dimensional planning was conducted and imported into a navigation system. During the operation, a tracker was connected to the osteotomized maxillomandibular complex via a splint. The navigation system tracked the movement of the complex and displayed it on the screen in real time to guide the surgeon to reposition the complex. The postoperative result was compared with the plan by analyzing the measured distances between the maxillary landmarks and reference planes, as determined from computed tomography data. The mean absolute errors of the maxillary position were clinically acceptable (<1.0 mm). Preoperative preparation time was reduced to 100 minutes on average. All patients were satisfied with the aesthetic results. This navigation method without intraoperative image registration provided a feasible means of transferring virtual planning to the real orthognathic surgery. The real-time position of the maxillomandibular complex was displayed on a monitor to visually guide the surgeon to reposition the complex. In this method, the traditional model surgery and the intermediate splint were discarded, and the preoperative preparation was simplified.

  17. Integrating lingual orthodontics with orthognathic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M S Kannan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Appearance is the most important motivating factor for patients seeking orthodontic treatment and is self-evident that these patients would prefer an appliance that is less visible. Lingual "invisible" Appliances offer the best option to the patient seeking aesthetic correction for their malocclusion. A group of such patients who do not want their appliances to be visible also require surgical correction. Lingual appliance being comparable to the labial counterpart provides the opportunity of hiding appliances for patients requiring Orthognathic surgical correction for their condition. This case report depicts the successful treatment of a patient using lingual appliance in conjunction with anterior maxillary osteotomy.

  18. Orthognathic Surgery in Patients With Congenital Myopathies and Congenital Muscular Dystrophies: Case Series and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezak, Brett J; Arce, Kevin A; Jacob, Adam; Van Ess, James

    2016-03-01

    dentofacial malocclusions that contribute to functional problems with feeding and drooling and psychosocial problems. Orthognathic surgery, usually bimaxillary, can be judiciously considered in these patients; these procedures typically require multidisciplinary pre- and postoperative evaluation and care over lengthy hospital stays with a high risk of respiratory complications that bear consideration in treatment planning. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Psychological evaluation of patients scheduled for orthognathic surgery.

    OpenAIRE

    Barbosa, A. L.; Marcantonio, E.; Barbosa, C. E.; Gabrielli, M. F.; Gabrielli, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    Using a questionnaire, 41 patients scheduled for orthognathic surgery were evaluated pre- and postoperatively to determine some of their psychological characteristics and treatment outcome from the patient's standpoint. Among other conclusions, the results showed that some patients may not fully understand the details of their deformity, despite a full explanation by the orthodontist and surgeon. Expectations regarding treatment outcome may be unrealistic even in patients with valid self-moti...

  20. High-power diode laser in the circumvestibular incision for Le Fort I osteotomy in orthognathic surgery: a prospective case series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Filipe; Chiavaioli, Gustavo Marques; de Toledo, Guilherme Lacerda; Freire-Maia, Belini; Amaral, Marcio Bruno Figueiredo; Mesquita, Ricardo Alves

    2018-01-01

    The incisions during orthognathic surgery are classically performed with conventional scalpel or electrocautery. Considering that the high-power diode laser surgery may provide advantages when compared to conventional incision techniques, the current study aimed to present a prospective case series of patients submitted to circumvestibular incision for Le Fort I osteotomy. Ten patients with dentofacial deformities who underwent to rapid assisted maxillary expansion or bimaxillary orthognathic surgery were enrolled in the study. All incisions were performed by a single surgeon using an 808-nm diode laser, with an optical fiber of 600 μm, at a power of 2.5 W, in a continuous-wave mode. The performance of the incision was evaluated by incision velocity, bleeding, edema, secondary infection, clinical healing, and pain. The velocity of the incision ranged from 0.10 to 0.20 mm/s (mean 0.13 ± 0.03 mm/s). Considering bleeding during the soft tissue incision, all surgeries were classified as absent bleeding. All patients presented a clinical healing of the surgical wound in a period that range from 3 to 5 weeks and experienced swelling during the follow-up period. On average, approximately 50% of the swelling had resolved after the third postoperative week, and 28.8% of swelling remained after 2 months after the surgery. The pain decreased after 2 and 3 days, and 90.0% of the patients reported no pain after 7 postoperative days. High-power diode laser is effective and safety during circumvestibular incisions for Le Fort I osteotomy in orthognathic surgery decreasing bleeding, surgery time, pain, and edema after orthognathic surgery.

  1. Short-term periodontal and microbiological changes following orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinspach, Knut; Demling, Anton; Günay, Hüsamettin; Geurtsen, Werner; Schwestka-Polly, Rainer; Staufenbiel, Ingmar

    2012-07-01

    Aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of orthognathic surgery on the development of periodontal and microbiological changes. Fifteen consecutively treated patients with a mean age of 24.9±7.7 years receiving orthognathic surgery were included in the present study. Plaque index (PI) and concentrations of 11 periodonto-pathogenic bacteria were recorded one day prior to surgery (t(0)) and one week (t(1)) and six weeks (t(2)) post-surgery. In addition, a complete periodontal examination including pocket probing depth (PPD), gingival recession (GR), clinical attachment level (CAL), bleeding on probing (BOP) and width of keratinized gingiva (WKG) was conducted at t(0) and t(2). For statistical analysis, general linear model and paired t-test were applied. A significant increase of PI (t(0)-t(1), p=0.037) was followed by a significant decrease (t(1)-t(2), p=0.017). Apart from Eikenella corrodens (p=0.036), no significant microbiological changes were recorded. PPD significantly increased on oral sites (p=0.045) and GR especially on buccal sites (p=0.001). In the incision area the development of GR was significantly higher on the test (buccal) than on the control sites (oral). Both gingival biotypes were affected by GR. Orthognathic surgery causes statistically significant changes of periodontal parameters, but these changes do not necessarily impair the aesthetic appearance of the gingival margin. Copyright © 2011 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Preliminary evaluation on 3-demension changes of facial soft tissue with structure light scanning technique before and after orthognathic surgery of Class III deformities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ju-xiang; Jiang, Jiu-hui; Zhao, Yi-jiao; Wang, Yong; Li, Ze; Wang, Ning-ning; Feng, Zhi-min

    2015-02-18

    To evaluate facial soft tissue 3-deminsion changes of skeletal Class III malocclusion patients after orthognathic surgery using structure light scanning technique. Eight patients [3 males and 5 females, aged (27.08 ± 4.42) years] with Class III dentoskeletal relationship who underwent a bimaxillary orthognathic surgical procedure involving advancement of the maxilla by Le Fort I osteotomy and mandibular setback by bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy (BSSO) and genioplasty to correct deformity were included. 3D facial images were obtained by structure light scanner for all the patients 2 weeks preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively. The facial soft tissue changes were evaluated in 3-dimension. The linear distances and angulation changes for facial soft tissue landmarks were analyzed. The soft tissue volumetric changes were assessed too. There were significant differences in the sagittal and vertical changes of soft tissue landmarks. The greatest amount of soft tissue change was close to lips. There were more volumetric changes in the chin than in the maxilla, and fewer in the forehead. After biomaxillary surgery, there were significant facial soft tissue differences mainly in the sagittal and vertical dimension for skeletal Class III patients. The structure light 3D scanning technique can be accurately used to estimate the soft tissue changes in patients who undergo orthognathic surgery.

  3. An innovative virtual reality training tool for orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulijala, Y; Ma, M; Pears, M; Peebles, D; Ayoub, A

    2018-02-01

    Virtual reality (VR) surgery using Oculus Rift and Leap Motion devices is a multi-sensory, holistic surgical training experience. A multimedia combination including 360° videos, three-dimensional interaction, and stereoscopic videos in VR has been developed to enable trainees to experience a realistic surgery environment. The innovation allows trainees to interact with the individual components of the maxillofacial anatomy and apply surgical instruments while watching close-up stereoscopic three-dimensional videos of the surgery. In this study, a novel training tool for Le Fort I osteotomy based on immersive virtual reality (iVR) was developed and validated. Seven consultant oral and maxillofacial surgeons evaluated the application for face and content validity. Using a structured assessment process, the surgeons commented on the content of the developed training tool, its realism and usability, and the applicability of VR surgery for orthognathic surgical training. The results confirmed the clinical applicability of VR for delivering training in orthognathic surgery. Modifications were suggested to improve the user experience and interactions with the surgical instruments. This training tool is ready for testing with surgical trainees. Copyright © 2018 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Precision of maxillary repositioning during orthognathic surgery: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Carl; Landry, Pierre-Éric

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of surgical splints and an external reference point to reposition the maxilla during orthognathic surgery. Before surgery, a radiological marker was inserted inside the orthodontic bracket of the first right maxillary molar. A surgical splint was utilized to reposition the maxilla in the sagittal and coronal planes after the osteotomy. The vertical position was established by measuring the distance between a Kirschner wire inserted at bony nasion and the orthodontic wire. Preoperative and postoperative cephalometric radiographs were obtained and manually traced. The radiological marker and the tip of the right maxillary incisor were used as specific landmarks. Their displacement on the pre- and postoperative radiographs was measured. The actual surgical movement of the maxilla was compared to the initial surgical planning. 23 patients met the inclusion criteria to participate in the study. The mean difference between the planned and executed movements of the maxilla was 0.1mm (p=0.71). The difference was not statistically significant for any given movements of the maxilla. The use of surgical splints made from model surgery combined with an external reference point at bony nasion is accurate methods for repositioning the maxilla during orthognathic surgery. Copyright © 2012 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Antibiotic prophylaxis in orthognathic surgery: A complex systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultin, Margareta; Klinge, Anna; Klinge, Björn; Tranæus, Sofia; Lund, Bodil

    2018-01-01

    Objective In orthognathic surgery, antibiotics are prescribed to reduce the risk of postoperative infection. However, there is lack of consensus over the appropriate drug, the dose and duration of administration. The aim of this complex systematic review was to assess the effect of antibiotics on postoperative infections in orthognathic surgery. Methods Both systematic reviews and primary studies were assessed. Medline (OVID), The Cochrane Library (Wiley) and EMBASE (embase.com), PubMed (non-indexed articles) and Health Technology Assessment (HTA) publications were searched. The primary studies were assessed using GRADE and the systematic reviews by AMSTAR. Results Screening of abstracts yielded 6 systematic reviews and 36 primary studies warranting full text scrutiny. In total,14 primary studies were assessed for risk of bias. Assessment of the included systematic reviews identified two studies with a moderate risk of bias, due to inclusion in the meta-analyses of primary studies with a high risk of bias. Quality assessment of the primary studies disclosed one with a moderate risk of bias and one with a low risk. The former compared a single dose of antibiotic with 24 hour prophylaxis using the same antibiotic; the latter compared oral and intravenous administration of antibiotics. Given the limited number of acceptable studies, no statistical analysis was undertaken, as it was unlikely to contribute any relevant information. Conclusion With respect to antibiotic prophylaxis in orthognathic surgery, most of the studies to date have been poorly conducted and reported. Thus scientific uncertainty remains as to the preferred antibiotic and the optimal duration of administration. PMID:29385159

  6. Long-term assessment of psychologic outcomes of orthognathic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazaridou-Terzoudi, T.; Kiyak, H.A.; Moore, R.

    2003-01-01

    . The level of body image and self-esteem approximated but did not reach that of a nonpatient population. In view of the current psychologic and social environment, patients should be offered the appropriate treatment to correct a disfigurement if it is subjectively perceived by them as a handicap, in part......This long-term study of post-orthognathic surgery patients aimed at assessing perceptions of problems with physical and psychologic functioning, self-concept, body image, and satisfaction with the surgical outcome based on subjective evaluations. In addition, the patient's perception of self...

  7. Stability after Cleft Maxillary Distraction Osteogenesis or Conventional Orthognathic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Andersen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare stability of maxillary advancements in patients with cleft lip and palate following distraction osteogenesis or orthognathic surgery. Material and Methods: Inclusion criteria: 1 cleft lip and palate, 2 advancement > 8 mm. Eleven patients comprised the distraction osteogenesis group (DOG. Seven patients comprised the orthognathic treatment group (CONVG. Skeletal and soft tissue points were traced on lateral cephalograms: T1 (preoperatively, T2 (after surgery, T3 (follow-up. Group differences were analyzed using Students t-test. Results: At T1-T2, advancement of 6.98 mm (P = 0.002 was observed in DOG. Horizontal overjet increased 11.62 mm (P = 0.001. A point-nasion-B point (ANB angle increased 8.82° (P = 0.001. Aesthetic plane to upper lip was reduced 5.44 mm (P = 0.017 and the naso-labial angle increased 16.6° (P = 0.001. Vertical overbite (VOB increased 2.27 mm (P = 0.021. In T2-T3, no significant changes were observed in DOG. In T1-T2, horizontal overjet increased 8.45 mm (P = 0.02. The ANB angle, 9.33° (P = 0.009 in CONVG. At T2-T3, VOB increased, 2.35 mm (P = 0.046, and the ANB angle reduced, 3.83° (P = 0.003. In T2-T3, no parameters changed in CONVG. At follow-up (T3, VOB increased in CONVG compared with DOG, (P = 0.01. Vertical position of A point differed between the groups (P = 0.04. No significant intergroup differences between soft tissue parameters occurred. Conclusions: Distraction osteogenesis resulted in a stable position of the maxilla and movement upwards in vertical plane, however in case of orthognathic treatment sagittal relapse and a continued postoperatively downward movement was registered.

  8. Use of spherical coordinates to evaluate three-dimension facial changes after orthognathic surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Suk Ja; Ryu, Sun Youl; Hwang, Hyeon Shik; Kang, Byung Cheol; Lee, Jae [School of Dentistry, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Wang, Rui Feng [Dept. of Biologic and Material Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States); Palomo, Juan M. [Dept. of Orthodontics, School of Dental Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland (United States)

    2014-03-15

    This study aimed to assess the three-dimensional (3D) facial changes after orthognathic surgery by evaluating the spherical coordinates of facial lines using 3D computed tomography (CT). A 19-year-old girl was diagnosed with class III malocclusion and facial asymmetry. Orthognathic surgery was performed after orthodontic treatment. Facial CT scans were taken before and after orthognathic surgery. The patient had a menton deviation of 12.72 mm before surgery and 0.83 mm after surgery. The spherical coordinates of four bilateral facial lines (ramal height, ramal lateral, ramal posterior and mandibular body) were estimated from CT scans before and after surgery on the deviated and opposite side. The spherical coordinates of all facial lines changed after orthognathic surgery. Moreover, the bilateral differences of all facial lines changed after surgery, and no bilateral differences were zero. The spherical coordinate system was useful to compare differences between the presurgical and postsurgical changes to facial lines.

  9. Surgery-first accelerated orthognathic surgery: orthodontic guidelines and setup for model surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Eric J W; Chen, Po-Hsung; Wang, Yu-Chih; Yu, Chung-Chih; Huang, C S; Chen, Yu-Ray

    2011-03-01

    The surgery-first approach indicates that the orthognathic surgery precedes the orthodontic treatment, whereas the orthodontics-first approach indicates that the orthodontic treatment precedes the orthognathic surgery. The conventional approach is an orthodontics-first approach. The purposes of this article are to introduce the concept of the surgery-first approach and to report the guidelines for orthodontic management and model surgery without presurgical orthodontic decompensation. The surgery-first approach treats facial esthetics first and then occlusion, whereas the conventional approach treats occlusion first and then facial esthetics. The surgery-first approach uses osteotomy to solve both skeletal problems and dental compensation, and a "transitional" occlusion is set up postoperatively. Orthodontics in the surgery-first approach is a postoperatively adjunctive treatment to transfigure the transitional occlusion into the solid final occlusion. The advantages of the surgery-first approach are that 1) the patient's chief complaint, dental function, and facial esthetics are achieved and improved in the beginning of the treatment; 2) the entire treatment period is shortened to 1 to 1.5 years or fewer depending on the complexity of orthodontic treatment; and 3) the phenomenon of postoperatively accelerated orthodontic tooth movement reduces the difficulty and treatment time of orthodontic management in the surgery-first approach. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Can a surgery-first orthognathic approach reduce the total treatment time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Woo Shik; Choi, Jong Woo; Kim, Do Yeon; Lee, Jang Yeol; Kwon, Soon Man

    2017-04-01

    Although pre-surgical orthodontic treatment has been accepted as a necessary process for stable orthognathic correction in the traditional orthognathic approach, recent advances in the application of miniscrews and in the pre-surgical simulation of orthodontic management using dental models have shown that it is possible to perform a surgery-first orthognathic approach without pre-surgical orthodontic treatment. This prospective study investigated the surgical outcomes of patients with diagnosed skeletal class III dentofacial deformities who underwent orthognathic surgery between December 2007 and December 2014. Cephalometric landmark data for patients undergoing the surgery-first approach were analyzed in terms of postoperative changes in vertical and horizontal skeletal pattern, dental pattern, and soft tissue profile. Forty-five consecutive Asian patients with skeletal class III dentofacial deformities who underwent surgery-first orthognathic surgery and 52 patients who underwent conventional two-jaw orthognathic surgery were included. The analysis revealed that the total treatment period for the surgery-first approach averaged 14.6 months, compared with 22.0 months for the orthodontics-first approach. Comparisons between the immediate postoperative and preoperative and between the postoperative and immediate postoperative cephalometric data revealed factors that correlated with the total treatment duration. The surgery-first orthognathic approach can dramatically reduce the total treatment time, with no major complications. Copyright © 2016 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A Cost-Effective, In-House, Positioning and Cutting Guide System for Orthognathic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Peter; Watson, Melanie; Burke, Ezra

    2018-03-01

    Technological advances in 3D printing can dramatically improve orthognathic surgical planning workflow. Custom positioning and cutting guides enable intraoperative reproduction of pre-planned osteotomy cuts and can result in greater surgical accuracy and patient safety. This short paper describes the use of freeware (some with open-source) combined with in-house 3D printing facilities to produce reliable, affordable osteotomy cutting guides. Open-source software (3D Slicer) is used to visualise and segment three-dimensional planning models from imported conventional computed tomography (CT) scans. Freeware (Autodesk Meshmixer ©) allows digital manipulation of maxillary and mandibular components to plan precise osteotomy cuts. Bespoke cutting guides allow exact intraoperative positioning. These are printed in polylactic acid (PLA) using a fused-filament fabrication 3D printer. Fixation of the osteotomised segments is achieved using plating templates and four pre-adapted plates with planned screw holes over the thickest bone. We print maxilla/ mandible models with desired movements incorporated to use as a plating template. A 3D printer capable of reproducing a complete skull can be procured for £1000, with material costs in the region of £10 per case. Our production of models and guides typically takes less than 24 hours of total print time. The entire production process is frequently less than three days. Externally sourced models and guides cost significantly more, frequently encountering costs totalling £1500-£2000 for models and guides for a bimaxillary osteotomy. Three-dimensional guided surgical planning utilising custom cutting guides enables the surgeon to determine optimal orientation of osteotomy cuts and better predict the skeletal maxilla/mandible relationship following surgery. The learning curve to develop proficiency using planning software and printer settings is offset by increased surgical predictability and reduced theatre time, making this

  12. Bilateral postoperative maxillary cysts after orthognathic surgery: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Hye; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Won Jin; Heo, Min Suk; Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Soon Chul [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology and Dental Research Institute, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Postoperative maxillary cysts are locally aggressive lesions, usually developing as delayed complications many years after radical antral surgery. This report describes a case of bilateral postoperative maxillary cysts following orthognathic surgery performed approximately 21 years previously. The patient complained of stinging pain on her right cheek. Radiographic examination revealed low-attenuation lesions on both maxillary sinuses with discontinuously corticated margins without distinct expansion or bone destruction. The cysts were enucleated with the removal of metal plates and screws for pain relief. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of postoperative maxillary cysts lined by ciliated, pseudostratified columnar cells. The patient has remained asymptomatic thus far, and there was no evidence of local recurrence at 21 months of postoperative follow-up.

  13. Orthognathic Surgery: Planning and treatment with illustration on six cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AiRuhaimi, K; Nwoku, A. L; Shaikh, H. S

    1991-01-01

    Almost all conferences for plastic and maxillofacial surgery discuss reports on several methods of orthognathic surgery, planning, success results, and complications of the different procedures carried out to correct patient's soft and hard tissues frontal profiles and occlusal discrepancies. Various principles are involved in the diagnosis and treatment of facial deformities. However, the most important consideration, after all, is the final accepted aesthetic and functional requirements and stability of the moved segments. The objective of this paper is to give the basic principles of treatment planning for correcting facial discrepancies, surgical approach to different cases, and the methods to increase stability of the moved segments. Six cases are included to illustrate the different aspects of treatment planning, surgical management, and stabilization methods. (author)

  14. Orthognathic surgery in the presence of temporomandibular dysfunction: what happens next?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadershah, Mohammed; Mehra, Pushkar

    2015-02-01

    One of the most well-known yet perhaps controversial conditions affecting temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) and the signs and symptoms of facial pain and clinical outcomes after orthognathic surgery procedures is temporomandibular joint internal derangement. This article provides an overview of the mutual relationship between orthognathic surgery and TMD, with especial consideration to internal derangement. The existing literature is reviewed and analyzed and the pertinent findings are summarized. The objective is to guide oral and maxillofacial surgeons in their clinical decision making when contemplating orthognathic surgery in patients with preexisting TMD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Systematic review of the surgery-first approach in orthognathic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiung Shing Huang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The surgery-first approach in orthognathic surgery has recently created a broader interest in completely eliminating time-consuming preoperative orthodontic treatment. Available evidence on the surgery-first approach should be appraised to support its use in orthognathic surgery. A MEDLINE search using the keywords "surgery first" and "orthognathic surgery" was conducted to select studies using the surgery-first approach. We also manually searched the reference list of the selected keywords to include articles not selected by the MEDLINE search. The search identified 18 articles related to the surgery-first approach. There was no randomized controlled clinical trial. Four papers were excluded as the content was only personal opinion or basic scientific research. Three studies were retrospective cohort studies in nature. The other 11 studies were case reports. For skeletal Class III surgical correction, the final long-term outcomes for maxillofacial and dental relationship were not significantly different between the surgery-first approach and the orthodontics-first approach in transverse (e.g., intercanine or intermolar width dimension, vertical (e.g., anterior open bite, lower anterior facial height dimension, and sagittal (e.g., anterior-posterior position of pogonion and lower incisors dimension. Total treatment duration was substantially shorter in cases of surgery-first approach use. In conclusion, most published studies related to the surgery-first approach were mainly on orthognathic correction of skeletal Class III malocclusion. Both the surgery-first approach and orthodontics-first approach had similar long-term outcomes in dentofacial relationship. However, the surgery-first approach had shorter treatment time.

  16. Computer-aided design and computer-aided modeling (CAD/CAM) generated surgical splints, cutting guides and custom-made implants: Which indications in orthognathic surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scolozzi, P

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present report was to describe our indications, results and complications of computer-aided design and computer-aided modeling CAD/CAM surgical splints, cutting guides and custom-made implants in orthognathic surgery. We analyzed the clinical and radiological data of ten consecutive patients with dentofacial deformities treated using a CAD/CAM technique. Four patients had surgical splints and cutting guides for correction of maxillomandibular asymmetries, three had surgical cutting guides and customized internal distractors for correction of severe maxillary deficiencies and three had custom-made implants for additional chin contouring and/or mandibular defects following bimaxillary osteotomies and sliding genioplasty. We recorded age, gender, dentofacial deformity, surgical procedure and intra- and postoperative complications. All of the patients had stable cosmetic results with a high rate of patient satisfaction at the 1-year follow-up examination. No intra- and/or postoperative complications were encountered during any of the different steps of the procedure. This study demonstrated that the application of CAD/CAM patient-specific surgical splints, cutting guides and custom-made implants in orthognathic surgery allows for a successful outcome in the ten patients presented in this series. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of the nasal shape after orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Wagner Ranier Maciel; Silveira, Márcia Maria Fonseca da; Vasconcelos, Belmiro Cavalcanti do Egito; Porto, Gabriela Granja

    2015-01-01

    Patients with dentofacial deformities may benefit from orthognathic surgery in the maxilla. Maxillary osteotomy may include procedures in the bone, cartilaginous, and soft tissues of the nose, leading to shape alterations. To evaluate the anatomic alterations of the nasal region in patients undergoing a Le Fort I osteotomy for advancement or superior impaction. This is a clinical prospective study. Twenty-one patients were evaluated during the pre- and postoperative periods. The positioning of the nasal tip and the modification of the nasal base were evaluated. The results showed that the nasal tip was superiorly positioned in 85% of the cases, advanced in 80%, rotated in 80%, and there was a wide nasal base in 95%, resulting in esthetic improvement. Surgeries of maxillary advancement and superior reposition tend to cause elevation and advancement of the nasal tip, as well as enlargement of the nasal base. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Orthognathic Surgery Has a Significant Effect on Perceived Personality Traits and Emotional Expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzaferro, Daniel M; Wes, Ari M; Naran, Sanjay; Pearl, Rebecca; Bartlett, Scott P; Taylor, Jesse A

    2017-11-01

    The effects of orthognathic surgery go beyond objective cephalometric correction of facial and dental disproportion and malocclusion, respectively. The authors hypothesized that there is tangible improvement following surgery that alters publicly perceived personality traits and emotions. The authors used Amazon.com's Mechanical Turk (MTurk), a crowdsourcing tool, to determine how preoperative and postoperative images of orthognathic surgery patients were perceived on six personality traits and six emotional expressions based on posteroanterior and lateral photographs. Blinded respondents provided demographic information and were randomly assigned to one of two sets of 20 photographs (10 subjects before and after surgery). Data on 20 orthognathic surgery patients were collected from 476 individuals. The majority of participants were female (52.6 percent), 18 to 39 years old (67.9 percent), Caucasian (76.6 percent), had some college or technical training or graduated college (72.7 percent), and had an annual income between $20,000 and $99,999 (74.6 percent). A paired t test analysis found that subjects were perceived significantly more favorably after orthognathic surgery in 12 countenance categories: more dominant, trustworthy, friendly, intelligent, attractive, and happy; and also less threatening, angry, surprised, sad, afraid, and disgusted (p personality traits and emotions deemed more favorable. Additional work is needed to better understand the physiologic underpinnings of such findings. Crowdsourcing technology offers a unique opportunity for surgeons to gather data regarding laypeople's perceptions of surgical outcomes in areas such as orthognathic surgery.

  19. [Computer-assisted navigation in orthognathic surgery. Application to Le Fort I osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benassarou, M; Benassarou, A; Meyer, C

    2013-08-05

    Computer-assisted navigation is a tool that allows the surgeon to reach intraoperatively a previously defined target. This technique can be applied to the positioning of bone fragments in orthognathic surgery. It is not used routinely yet because there are no specifically dedicated systems available on the market for this kind of surgery. The goal of our study was to describe the various systems that could be used in orthognathic surgery and to report our experience of computer-assisted surgery in the positioning of the maxilla during maxillomandibular osteotomies. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  20. Oral Rehabilitation With Orthognathic Surgery After Dental Implant Placement for Class III Malocclusion With Skeletal Asymmetry and Posterior Bite Collapse.

    OpenAIRE

    Ohba, Seigo; Nakatani, Yuya; Kawasaki, Takako; Tajima, Nobutaka; Tobita, Takayoshi; Yoshida, Noriaki; Sawase, Takashi; Asahina, Izumi

    2015-01-01

    Increasing numbers of older patients are seeking orthognathic surgery to treat jaw deformity. However, orthodontic and orthognathic surgical treatment is difficult in cases without occlusal vertical stop. A 55-year-old man presented with Class III malocclusion and mandibular protrusion including esthetic problems and posterior bite collapse. He underwent dental implant treatment to reconstruct an occlusal vertical stop before orthognathic surgery. His occlusal function and esthetic problems i...

  1. The Application of 3D Printing Technology for Simultaneous Orthognathic Surgery and Mandibular Contour Osteoplasty in the Treatment of Craniofacial Deformities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yanju; Sun, Xiumei; Wang, Lin; Zhang, Yaoyao; Chen, Kai; Wu, Guomin

    2017-12-01

    Because of the limitation of specific preoperative design and surgical templates, orthognathic surgery and mandibular contour osteoplasty are generally performed in two stages. Three-dimensional printing technology has improved the accuracy of the surgery and results in good surgical predictability easily. This study aims to confirm the effectiveness, feasibility and precision of simultaneous mandibular contour osteoplasty and orthognathic surgery with the assistance of 3D printing technology. Ten patients, who were diagnosed with mandibular hypertrophy and bimaxillary deformities, were included in the study. In addition to conventional orthognathic surgery, mandibular angle ostectomy, mandibular outer cortex grinding or mandibular border ostectomy was designed for mandibular hypertrophy. Optimal osteotomy lines and simulated surgeries were designed according the 3D printing model of the mandible. Then, surgical templates were made on the 3D printing model. No muscle excision was performed in any patient. Preoperative, predicted and postoperative measurements were taken, including the gonial angle (Ar-Go-Me) and the mandibular width (Go-Go). All the patients had a reposeful postoperative recovery, with no indication of obvious infection, facial paralysis, osteonecrosis or bone displacement. The gonial angle was improved from 110.3° ± 11.1 to 121.3° ± 2.9, and the mandibular width was improved from 117.5 mm ± 6.8 to 111.9 mm ± 4.2. The discrepancies between simulation and postoperation of the left gonial angle, the right gonial angle and the mandibular width were 0.56° ± 0.22, 0.65° ± 0.3 and 0.49 mm ± 0.43, respectively. The results of our study illustrated the predictability, feasibility and reliability of simultaneous mandibular contour osteoplasty and orthognathic surgery with the assistance of 3D printing technology. Our technique could achieve functional improvement and an aesthetic profile at the same time. This journal requires

  2. Factors of importance for the functional outcome in orthognathic surgery patients: a prospective study of 118 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øland, Jesper; Jensen, John; Melsen, Birte

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of orthognathic surgery on patients' stomatognathic function and, further, to evaluate how post-treatment function relates to satisfaction.......The aim of this study was to assess the influence of orthognathic surgery on patients' stomatognathic function and, further, to evaluate how post-treatment function relates to satisfaction....

  3. The comparison of patient satisfaction after “surgery first” and conventional orthognathic surgery: An original research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pritam Mohanty

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: We evaluated the factors which affect patient satisfaction and their expectations toward “surgery first” and conventional orthognathic surgery. Materials and Methods: Questionnaires consisting of 17 questions were given to the subjects postoperatively who had undergone Le fort 1 maxillary superior impaction for skeletal gummy smile correction with conventional orthognathic surgery and “surgery first” approach. Eleven-point rating scale based on a (visual analog scale; 0 = poor; 10 = excellent were used to answer six questions. Ten closed-form questions were also included as well as one open question for “further remarks.” Results: Nineteen patients (12 females, 07 males; mean age, 23.4 ± 4.9 [standard deviation] years gave their consent to participate in the study. The intention to undergo surgery only for esthetics was noted in 42.11% of patients; only improvement of chewing function in 21.05% and both in 36.84%. Conclusion: The most common factor for patient satisfaction after “surgery first” and conventional orthognathic surgery was facial esthetics, but masticatory function and even psychological aspects should be considered equally when planning surgery. The patient satisfaction was more in “surgery first” than conventional orthognathic surgery. The timing of treatment and immediate results are important factors toward patient satisfaction.

  4. Follow-up: orthognathic surgery. Is there a future? A national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zins, James E; Morrison, Colin M; Gonzalez, Andrea Moreira; Altus, Gene D; Bena, James

    2008-08-01

    The authors recently documented a significant decrease in orthognathic surgical cases performed by both plastic and oral surgeons in Ohio over a recent 5-year period. The main reason noted was related to third-party reimbursement. This is a potentially serious issue that may affect the quality of health care for patients with dentofacial deformities. Therefore, an expanded survey was conducted to determine whether this was indicative of a national trend. A three-page questionnaire was sent nationally to plastic surgeons and oral surgeons who were members of the American Society of Maxillofacial Surgery and the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, respectively. Surveys requested information regarding changes in the number of orthognathic operations over a 5-year period (1999-2003) and reasons for these changes. Of the 3273 surveys sent, 883 were returned, representing an overall response rate of 27 percent. Of the 883 returned, 771 (87.3 percent) were completed by oral surgeons and 112 (12.7 percent) were completed by plastic surgeons. The majority surveyed (70.0 percent) noted a decrease in the number of orthognathic procedures performed over a 5-year period, and 443 (77.3 percent) stated that the decrease was attributable to problems with insurance. Professional reimbursement per hour was calculated based on data collected from consecutive operations performed at the authors' institution. These data demonstrated that reimbursement per hour is significantly lower when orthognathic surgery procedures were compared with other standard plastic surgery operations. Orthognathic surgery may rapidly be becoming a cosmetic procedure. This has the potential of creating a two-tier system whereby only those who can afford it will undergo orthognathic correction.

  5. Surgery-first accelerated orthognathic surgery: postoperative rapid orthodontic tooth movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Eric J W; Chen, Po-Hsung; Wang, Yu-Chih; Yu, Chung-Chih; Huang, C S; Chen, Yu-Ray

    2011-03-01

    Clinically, we have observed the phenomenon of postoperatively accelerated orthodontic tooth movement in patients who had orthognathic surgery. This phenomenon lasts for a period of 3 to 4 months. However, the underlying mechanisms of this phenomenon have not been well studied yet. The purpose of this prospective clinical pilot study was to study the postoperative changes in bone physiology and metabolism and the corresponding responses in the dentoalveolus, such as the changes in tooth mobility. Twenty-two consecutive adult patients who had 2-jaw orthognathic surgery were included in this study. The levels of serum alkaline phosphatase and C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP), as well as the tooth mobility of the maxillary and mandibular incisors based on the Periotest method (Siemens AG, Bensheim, Germany), were examined preoperatively and 1 week, 1 month, 2 months, 3 months, and 4 months postoperatively. The data were analyzed statistically. Both tooth mobility of the maxillary and mandibular incisors and ICTP significantly increased from 1 week to 3 months postoperatively and then decreased to their preoperative levels in the fourth month postoperatively. The changes in tooth mobility were significantly in correspondence with the changes in ICTP. The alkaline phosphatase level significantly increased from the first to fourth month postoperatively, but it was not significantly correlated to the changes in tooth mobility. The orthognathic surgery triggers a 3- to 4-month period of higher osteoclastic activities and metabolic changes in the dentoalveolus postoperatively, which possibly accelerates postoperative orthodontic tooth movement. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Assessing Patient-Reported Outcomes Following Orthognathic Surgery and Osseous Genioplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwitzer, Jonathan A; Albino, Frank P; Mathis, Ryan K; Scott, Amie M; Gamble, Laurie; Baker, Stephen B

    2015-11-01

    Primary outcomes for orthognathic surgery and genioplasty patients include satisfaction with appearance, improved motor function, and enhanced quality of life. The goal of this study was to assess outcomes among patients undergoing these procedures, and to highlight the potential use of FACE-Q instrument for use in patients with dentofacial deformities. A total of 56 patients presenting for orthognathic surgery and/or osseous genioplasty completed the FACE-Q during preoperative and/or at postoperative visits. FACE-Q scores increased following surgery in satisfaction with facial appearance overall (+24.5, P jawline (+40.7, P < 0.01), and in all satisfaction with chin items (profile, prominence, shape, and overall). Patients also demonstrated increased social confidence (+8.9, P = 0.29). There was no improvement in psychologic well-being (-0.8, P = 0.92). All 3 surgical groups of patients experienced gains in satisfaction with appearance following surgery. Patients who underwent orthognathic surgery either alone or in combination with genioplasty demonstrated statistically significant improvements in satisfaction with facial appearance overall (P < 0.01 for both groups), whereas patients who underwent genioplasty alone did not (P = 0.13). In addition, patients who underwent orthognathic surgery combined with genioplasty demonstrated greater improvement in satisfaction with chin than patients who underwent genioplasty alone. In conclusion, patients who underwent orthognathic surgery and/or genioplasty demonstrated improvement in appearance and social confidence. The use of this model supports the successful outcomes possible for patients undergoing these procedures.

  7. Actinomicosis cervicofacial tras cirugía ortognática: A propósito de un caso Cervicofacial actinomycosis after orthognathic surgery: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán Macía

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Presentar un caso de actinomicosis cervicofacial tras cirugía ortognática. Material y métodos: Varón de 32 años, intervenido de cirugía ortognática bimaxilar en otro centro, que al cabo de varias semanas comienza a desarrollar una masa laterocervical derecha con signos de inflamación local intermitente. Las pruebas de imagen cervical informan de tumoración sólida o vascular. La citología refiere linfocitosis. Resultados: Al cabo de 2 años es intervenido y se le realiza una incisión tipo Risdon cervical, en la que se observa un granuloma caudal a la celda submaxilar derecha y una fístula con trayecto hasta el nivel del ángulo mandibular. El informe de anatomía patológica describe absceso con cambios crónicos y colonia de actinomices. Conclusiones: El diagnóstico temprano de actinomicosis cervicofacial es difícil y sólo un 10% se diagnostican en el inicio de su presentación. Aunque es un hecho infrecuente, debemos considerar la actinomicosis cervicofacial en pacientes intervenidos de cirugía ortognática que desarrollaron una masa cervical varias semanas después de la intervención.Objectives: Presentation of a case of cervicofacial actinomycosis after orthognathic surgery. Material and methods: A 32-year-old male underwent bimaxillary orthognathic surgery at another clinic. Several weeks after surgery, the patient developed a right lateral mass in the neck with intermittent signs of local inflammation. Cervical imaging suggested a solid or vascular tumor. The cytology revealed lymphocytosis. Results: Two years after the index intervention, surgery performed through a Risdontype cervical incision revealed a granuloma in the lower right submaxillary cell with a fistula to the mandibular angle. The pathology report was consistent with chronic abscess with actinomyces colonization. Conclusions: Early diagnosis of cervicofacial actinomycosis is difficult and only 10% of cases are detected at onset. Although uncommon

  8. A new simple three-dimensional method to characterize upper airway in orthognathic surgery patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Carlo, Gabriele; Fernandez Gurani, Sirwan; Pinholt, Else Marie

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop and validate a new reproducible 3D upper airway analysis based on skeletal structures not involved in the modification, which occur during orthognathic surgery. METHODS: From retrospective cohort of orthognathic surgically treated patients, pre- and postsurgical CBCT.......2% for cross-sectional measurements, and 0.3 to 2.5% for linear measurements. No systematic errors were detected. CONCLUSIONS: This new proposed definition of upper airway boundaries was shown to be technical feasible and tested to be reliable in measuring upper airway in patients undergoing orthognathic......-scans of 10 post-pubertal patients were randomly selected. Two operators identified the landmarks, calculated the airway volumes, cross sections and linear measurements on the 10 scans twice at two different time intervals. Statistical analysis included test for normal distribution, technical error...

  9. Effects of intermaxillary fixation during orthognathic surgery on respiratory function after general anesthesia.

    OpenAIRE

    Yamaguchi, H.

    2001-01-01

    I examined the relationship between preoperative breathing route (nasal and/or oral) and respiratory status in 29 patients who underwent orthognathic surgery and intermaxillary fixation (IMF) with general anesthesia and in 14 healthy, adult control volunteers who received IMF without surgery or anesthesia. The tidal volume (VT), minute respiratory volume (MV), respiratory rate, and end-tidal carbon dioxide concentration were measured for both nasal and oral breathing before and after IMF. Pul...

  10. Does Simultaneous Third Molar Extraction Increase Intraoperative and Perioperative Complications in Orthognathic Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbacher, Derek M; Kontaxis, Katrina L

    2016-06-01

    Prior to orthognathic surgery, most surgeons recommend third molar extraction. Espoused reasons include potential risk for infection, untoward osteotomies, and worsened postoperative discomfort. However, in addition to being another procedure for the patient, this may necessitate a longer preorthognathic surgery phase. The purpose of this study is to compare the outcomes of orthognathic surgery with staged versus simultaneous third molar extractions. This was a retrospective analysis of patients who underwent orthognathic surgery from 2013 to 2014, with at least a 1-year follow-up period. Patients were stratified into 2 groups: Extraction of third molars at the time of surgery and prior extraction of third molars. Primary outcomes included the occurrence of unfavorable splits, infection, bleeding, malocclusion, and hardware failure. Secondary outcomes were procedure time, postoperative pain, and length of stay. Pearson χ tests and 2-tailed unpaired t tests were performed to determine if there was an association between the simultaneous removal of third molars and the primary and secondary outcome measures, respectively. One hundred patients were included in the study. Forty-nine patients had third molars extracted at the time of surgery and fifty-one did not. Complications included unfavorable split, postoperative infection, mild postoperative bleeding, postoperative malocclusion, and hardware failure. There was no significant difference in the incidence of complications in both groups. Procedure time was not considerably increased with extractions. There was no significant difference in postoperative pain or length of stay between both groups. Removing third molars concurrently with orthognathic surgery does not increase the risk of adverse outcomes, nor does it significantly influence hospital course.

  11. Review of orthognathic surgery and related papers published in the British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, Alexander M C; Payne, Karl F B; Tahim, Arpan; Colbert, Serryth; Brennan, Peter A

    2015-04-01

    This review summarises all orthognathic and related papers published between January 2011 and December 2012 in the British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (BJOMS). A total of 36 articles were published, a high proportion of which (78%) were full-length papers. The remainder consisted of short communications and technical notes. The topics included operative planning and postoperative outcomes, and there was a strong focus on distraction osteogenesis. There were fewer orthognathic articles published in BJOMS than articles on other subspecialties such as trauma or head and neck oncology. Only 8 (29%) of the full-length articles were prospective studies or randomised trials, which highlights a need for well-designed clinical studies in orthognathic research. Copyright © 2013 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of mandibular condylar changes in patients following orthognathic surgery: A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Aneja

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Condylar resorption as a cause of relapse after orthognathic surgery is well known. Several authors have presented evidence of the relation between orthognathic surgery and condylar remodeling and resorption. This study was done to appraise the condylar changes along with the form and function following orthognathic surgery, as well as to assess what factors may have contributed to the problems. Methodology: A diagnosis of progressive condylar resorption (PCR was made by comparison of preoperative and postoperative radiographs (cephalometric radiograms, as well as clinical evaluations. The radiographs were taken for each patient preoperatively and postoperatively, which include immediately after osteotomy, at 6 months and 24 months. Additional radiographs were taken when required. Then, preoperative and postoperative tracings were compared at 24 months postoperatively. Results and Conclusion: It can be concluded from this study that females of relative low age (<18 years appeared to be a high-risk factor for the occurrence of condylar alteration including PCR. A steep mandibular plane angle, the low facial height ratio (post/ant, and magnitude of surgery were also significantly related to the occurrence of condylar alteration, but the multivariance regression showed that these parameters had only limited value.

  13. Intraoperative hypertensive crisis secondary to an undiagnosed pheochromocytoma during orthognathic surgery: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Carl; Chiniara, Gilles; Valcourt, Annie-Claude

    2014-04-01

    Increased blood pressure (BP) during orthognathic surgery may result in excessive blood loss, poor surgical field visualization, and longer surgical time and require blood transfusion. When uncontrollable high BP is encountered in an otherwise healthy patient during orthognathic surgery, the diagnosis of pheochromocytoma should be considered. Pheochromocytomas are rare neuroendocrine tumors of the chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla or extra-adrenal paraganglia (sympathetic ganglia) that secrete catecholamine. They are present in approximately 0.05 to 0.2% of hypertensive patients. Patients can present with hypertension, tachycardia, headaches, and diaphoresis. The clinical presentation may vary and a wide spectrum of nonspecific symptoms may be encountered. The elevated BP can be intermittent (40%) or permanent (60%). About 10% of pheochromocytomas are hereditary and they can be a feature of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2. This report describes the case of a 29-year-old patient with a large pheochromocytoma of the right adrenal gland undiagnosed before orthognathic surgery. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Presurgical motivations, self-esteem, and oral health of orthognathic surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dedong; Wang, Fang; Wang, Xudong; Fang, Bing; Shen, Steve Guofang

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate motivations, self-esteem, and oral health for undergoing orthognathic patients by gender in China before orthognathic surgery. Using a prospective and control study design, 429 subjects in China were collected from December 2010 to May 2011. The patient group consisted of 210 consecutive healthy patients, and 219 young individuals comprised the control group. All the subjects filled out a questionnaire and were assessed by Self-esteem Scale and Oral Health Impact Profile validated for Chinese patients before surgery. To measure the discrepancy, the Student t test was computed. P motivations for orthognathic surgery are to improve facial appearance (83.33%), occlusion (50%), and self-confidence (48.1%). Females expect to improve facial appearance (83.87%), self-confidence (43.55%), and occlusion (41.94%). Males are for the improvement of facial appearance (82.56%), occlusion (63.95%), and self-confidence (54.65%). Self-esteem in the patient group is obviously lower (P self-esteem in female groups (P motivation. Self-confidence has been more frequently mentioned, while headache far less than other countries. (2) Female patients have less self-esteem than females in the control group. (3) Patients' oral health are worse than those in the control group.

  15. Kinematic analysis of mandibular motion before and after orthognathic surgery for skeletal Class III malocclusion: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugolini, Alessandro; Mapelli, Andrea; Segù, Marzia; Galante, Domenico; Sidequersky, Fernanda V; Sforza, Chiarella

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the study was to detect the changes in 3D mandibular motion after orthognathic surgery for skeletal Class III malocclusion. Using a 3D motion analyzer, free mandibular border movements were recorded in nine patients successfully treated for skeletal Class III malocclusion and in nine patients scheduled for orthognathic surgery. Data were compared using Mann-Whitney non-parametric U-test. The results showed no differences between the groups in the total amount of mouth opening, protrusion, and in lateral excursions, but the percentage of mandibular movement explained by condylar translation was significantly increased after surgery (20% vs. 23.6%). During opening, the post-surgery patients showed a more symmetrical mandibular interincisal point and condylar path than pre-surgery patients (p < 0.01). Patients treated with orthognathic surgery for skeletal Class III malocclusion recover a good and symmetric temporomandibular joint function.

  16. Chin remodeling in a patient with bimaxillary protrusion and open bite by using mini-implants for temporary anchorage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chunmiao; Liu, Yinghong; Cheng, Qian; He, Wei; Fang, Shanbao; Lan, Tingting; Wang, Jun

    2018-03-01

    Patients with bimaxillary protrusion may have an unattractive profile with a retruded chin contour. Correction of the severely protrusive anterior alveolar bone and teeth combined with a moderate open bite without orthognathic surgery can be challenging. This case report describes the orthodontic treatment of a woman with severe bimaxillary protrusion and a moderate open bite. Excellent chin morphology and facial appearance were obtained with the extraction of 4 first premolars and 4 third molars, and total distalization of both arches with 4 mini-implants, one in each quadrant between the second premolar and the first molar. The total treatment time was 30 months. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Three-dimensional computer-assisted surgical simulation and intraoperative navigation in orthognathic surgery: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Hsia Lin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available By incorporating three-dimensional (3D imaging and computer-aided design and manufacturing techniques, 3D computer-assisted technology has been applied widely to provide accurate guidance for assessment and treatment planning in clinical practice. This technology has recently been used in orthognathic surgery to improve surgical planning and outcome. The modality will gradually become popular. This study reviewed the literature concerning the use of computer-assisted techniques in orthognathic surgery including surgical planning, simulation, intraoperative translation of the virtual surgery, and postoperative evaluation. A Medline, PubMed, ProQuest, and ScienceDirect search was performed to find relevant articles with regard to 3D computer-assisted orthognathic surgery in the past 10 years. A total of 460 articles were revealed, out of which 174 were publications addressed the topic of this study. The purpose of this article is to present an overview of the state-of-art methods for 3D computer-assisted technology in orthognathic surgery. From the review we can conclude that the use of computer-assisted technique in orthognathic surgery provides the benefit of optimal functional and aesthetic results, patient satisfaction, precise translation of the treatment plan, and facilitating intraoperative manipulation.

  18. The University Münster Model Surgery System for Orthognathic Surgery. Part II -- KD-MMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehmer, Ulrike; Joos, Ulrich; Ziebura, Thomas; Flieger, Stefanie; Wiechmann, Dirk

    2013-01-04

    Model surgery is an integral part of the planning procedure in orthognathic surgery. Most concepts comprise cutting the dental cast off its socket. The standardized spacer plates of the KD-MMS provide for a non-destructive, reversible and reproducible means of maxillary and/or mandibular plaster cast separation. In the course of development of the system various articulator types were evaluated with regard to their capability to provide a means of realizing the concepts comprised of the KD-MMS. Special attention was dedicated to the ability to perform three-dimensional displacements without cutting of plaster casts. Various utilities were developed to facilitate maxillary displacement in accordance to the planning. Objectives of this development comprised the ability to implement the values established in the course of two-dimensional ceph planning. The system - KD-MMS comprises a set of hardware components as well as a defined procedure. Essential hardware components are red spacer and blue mounting plates. The blue mounting plates replace the standard yellow SAM mounting elements. The red spacers provide for a defined leeway of 8 mm for three-dimensional movements. The non-destructive approach of the KD-MMS makes it possible to conduct different model surgeries with the same plaster casts as well as to restore the initial, pre-surgical situation at any time. Thereby, surgical protocol generation and gnathologic splint construction are facilitated. The KD-MMS hardware components in conjunction with the defined procedures are capable of increasing efficiency and accuracy of model surgery and splint construction. In cases where different surgical approaches need to be evaluated in the course of model surgery, a significant reduction of chair time may be achieved.

  19. Genetic stretching factors in masseter muscle after orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuel, Wiebke; Krause, Micaela; Schneider, Matthias; Harzer, Winfried

    2013-09-01

    Up to 30% of patients relapse after orthognathic operations, and one reason might be incomplete neuromuscular adaptation of the masticatory muscles. Displacement of the mandible in sagittal or vertical directions, or both, leads to stretching or compression of these muscles. The aim of this study was to analyse stretching factors in 35 patients with retrognathism or prognathism of the mandible (Classes II and III). Tissue samples were taken from both sides of the masseter muscle (anterior and posterior) both before and 6 months after operation. Developmental myosin heavy chains MYH3 and MYH8, the fast and slow MYH 1, 2, and 7, and cyclo-oxygenase (COX) 2, forkhead transcription factor (FOX)O3a, calcineurin, and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT)1c (stretching and regeneration-specific), were analysed by real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Correlations of Class II and III with sagittal and vertical cephalometric measurements ANB and ML-NL-angle were examined, and the results showed significant differences in amounts of MYH8 (pstretching indicators FOXO3a, calcineurin, and NFAT1c only in Class II patients. This means that stretching of the masseter muscle caused by lengthening of the mandible and raising of the bite in Class II patients was more likely to lead to relapse (similar to that in patients with open bite) than in Class III patients. In conclusion, deep bite should be reduced more by incisor intrusion than by skeletal opening. The focus in these patients should be directed towards physiotherapeutic strengthening of the muscles of mastication, and more consideration should be given to change in the vertical dimension. Copyright © 2012 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Effect of Orthognathic Surgery on Osteoprotegerin as Immunological Caliper of Bone Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Sara; Ahmed, Mamdouh

    2016-12-15

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is considered to be the cytokine that plays an important role in the healing process. OPG regulates bone cell biology, osteoblast-osteoclast, bone-immune cross-talk and maintenance of bone mass. It plays an important role in the development, induction, and repair of bone. Orthognathic surgery as multiples segmental osteotomies has been taken as a model surgery to assess the changes in osteoprotegerin levels in the post-operative bone healing period. The aim of the study was to evaluate OPG as immunological caliper of bone healing. OPG was evaluated in nine patients seeking orthognathic surgery. Patients were examined and checked to be medically and immunologically free prior to surgery. Blood samples were collected immediate pre-operative as control group and for six weeks post-operative as study group. Data were collected from nine consecutive patients. The results showed higher levels of OPG. it showed significant increase in the immediate post-operative value (p = 0.001) which started to increase gradually during the six weeks (p caliper of bone healing.

  1. [Dissertations 25 years after date 43. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction and condylar resorption following orthognathic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerstens, H C J

    2015-12-01

    A surgical-orthodontic treatment has a direct influence on a patient's skeletal, dental, functional and psychological factors. A variety of surgical and anatomical factors determine the result of this complex treatment. Risk factors are a retrognathy with a steep mandibular angle, and the anatomy of the mandibular condyles and the fossa. The customary surgical techniques have an enhancing influence on the function of the temporomandibular joint. The role of the position of the articular disc remains unclear. Since 1989, more insight has gradually been gained in the aspects having an influence on the function of the temporomandibular joint following orthognathic surgery.

  2. Maxillary hypoplasia in the cleft patient: contribution of orthodontic dental space closure to orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Justine C; Slack, Ginger C; Walker, Ryann; Graves, Lindsay; Yen, Sandra; Woo, Jessica; Ambaram, Rishal; Martz, Martin G; Kawamoto, Henry K; Bradley, James P

    2014-02-01

    Cleft lip and palate surgery in the developing child is known to be associated with maxillary hypoplasia. However, the effects of nonsurgical manipulations on maxillary growth have not been well investigated. The authors present the contribution of orthodontic dental space closure with canine substitution to maxillary hypoplasia and the need for orthognathic surgery. Cleft lip/palate and cleft palate patients older than 15 years of age were reviewed for dental anomalies, orthodontic canine substitution, and Le Fort I advancement. Skeletal relationships of the maxilla to the skull base (SNA), mandible (ANB), and facial height were determined on lateral cephalograms. Logistic regression analyses were performed to estimate odds ratios. Ninety-five patients were reviewed (mean age, 18.1 years). In 65 patients with congenitally missing teeth, 55 percent with patent dental spaces required Le Fort I advancement. In contrast, 89 percent who underwent canine substitution required Le Fort I advancement (p = 0.004). Canine substitution is associated with a statistically significant increase in maxillary retrognathia when compared with dental space preservation on lateral cephalograms (mean SNA, 75.2 and 79.0, respectively; p = 0.006). Adjusting for missing dentition, logistic regression analyses demonstrated that canine substitution is an independent predictor for orthognathic surgery (OR, 6.47) and maxillary retrusion defined by SNA orthodontic cleft closure using canine substitution with maxillary hypoplasia and subsequent Le Fort I advancement, and suggest systematic criteria for management of cleft-related dental agenesis. Therapeutic, III.

  3. Numbers of Beauty: An Innovative Aesthetic Analysis for Orthognathic Surgery Treatment Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marianetti, Tito Matteo; Gasparini, Giulio; Midulla, Giulia; Grippaudo, Cristina; Deli, Roberto; Cervelli, Daniele; Pelo, Sandro; Moro, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to validate a new aesthetic analysis and establish the sagittal position of the maxilla on an ideal group of reference. We want to demonstrate the usefulness of these findings in the treatment planning of patients undergoing orthognathic surgery. We took a reference group of 81 Italian women participating in a national beauty contest in 2011 on which we performed Arnett's soft tissues cephalometric analysis and our new "Vertical Planning Line" analysis. We used the ideal values to elaborate the surgical treatment planning of a second group of 60 consecutive female patients affected by skeletal class III malocclusion. Finally we compared both pre- and postoperative pictures with the reference values of the ideal group. The ideal group of reference does not perfectly fit in Arnett's proposed norms. From the descriptive statistical comparison of the patients' values before and after orthognathic surgery with the reference values we observed how all parameters considered got closer to the ideal population. We consider our "Vertical Planning Line" a useful help for orthodontist and surgeon in the treatment planning of patients with skeletal malocclusions, in combination with the clinical facial examination and the classical cephalometric analysis of bone structures.

  4. RapidSplint: virtual splint generation for orthognathic surgery - results of a pilot series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolphs, Nicolai; Liu, Weichen; Keeve, Erwin; Hoffmeister, Bodo

    2014-01-01

    Within the domain of craniomaxillofacial surgery, orthognathic surgery is a special field dedicated to the correction of dentofacial anomalies resulting from skeletal malocclusion. Generally, in such cases, an interdisciplinary orthodontic and surgical treatment approach is required. After initial orthodontic alignment of the dental arches, skeletal discrepancies of the jaws can be corrected by distinct surgical strategies and procedures in order to achieve correct occlusal relations, as well as facial balance and harmony within individualized treatment concepts. To transfer the preoperative surgical planning and reposition the mobilized dental arches with optimal occlusal relations, surgical splints are typically used. For this purpose, different strategies have been described which use one or more splints. Traditionally, these splints are manufactured by a dental technician based on patient-specific dental casts; however, computer-assisted technologies have gained increasing importance with respect to preoperative planning and its subsequent surgical transfer. In a pilot study of 10 patients undergoing orthognathic corrections by a one-splint strategy, two final occlusal splints were produced for each patient and compared with respect to their clinical usability. One splint was manufactured in the traditional way by a dental technician according to the preoperative surgical planning. After performing a CBCT scan of the patient's dental casts, a second splint was designed virtually by an engineer and surgeon working together, according to the desired final occlusion. For this purpose, RapidSplint, a custom-made software platform, was used. After post-processing and conversion of the datasets into .stl files, the splints were fabricated by the PolyJet procedure using photo polymerization. During surgery, both splints were inserted after mobilization of the dental arches then compared with respect to their clinical usability according to the occlusal fitting. Using

  5. A 3-Dimensional Facial Morpho-Dynamic Database in the development of a prediction model in orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretta, Redento; Concheri, Gianmaria; Comelli, Daniele; Meneghello, Roberto; Galzignato, Pier Francesco; Ferronato, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    Current methodologies in the prevision of post-surgical features of the face in orthognathic surgery are mainly 2-D. An improvement is certainly given by the introduction of CT, but its acceptance is controversial due to its high biological cost. As an alternative, in this study an effective procedure for the construction of a 3-D textured digital model of the face and dental arches of patients with dentofacial malformations using a 3-D laser scanner at no biological cost is presented. A 3-D Laser scanner Konica-Minolta VIVID 910 is used to obtain multiple scans from different perspectives of the face of patients with dentofacial malocclusions requiring orthognathic surgery. These multiple views are then recombined, integrating also the maxillary and mandibular arch plaster casts, to obtain the 3-D textured model of the face and occlusion with minimal error. A viable methodology was identified for the face and occlusal modeling of orthognathic patients and validated in a test case, confirming its effectiveness: the 3-D model created accurately describes the actual features of the patient's face; the proposed methodology can be easily applied in the clinical routine to accurately record the steps of the surgical treatment and to perform accurate anthropometric analyses of the facial morphology, and thus constitute the necessary database for the development of previsional tools in orthognathic surgery. The proposed method is effective in recording all the morphological facial features of patients with dentofacial malformations, to develop a facial modification database and tools for virtual surgery.

  6. Factors affecting satisfaction of patients after orthognathic surgery at a University Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ahmad, Hazem T.; Al-Omari, Iyad K.; Eldurini, Laila N.; Suleiman, Ahmad A.

    2008-01-01

    The objective was to analyze factors that influence patient's satisfaction with orthognathic treatment and evaluate patient's perception of changes in physical and psychosocial aspects. In a retrospective clinical study conducted at Jordan University Hospital, Amman, Jordan between December 2006 and December 2007, we examined 38 patients who had orthognathic surgery after an average follow-up of 20 months. Examination included evaluation of nerve function and temporomandibular function with Helkimo index. Patients filled out a questionnaire on treatment satisfaction and perception of physical and psychosocial changes after treatment. Patients were generally satisfied with the result, 82% agreed they would undergo treatment again. They were divided into very satisfied n=25 and less satisfied n=13 groups according to satisfaction score, with statistically significant differences found between them concerning diagnosis and follow-up period, with all vertical maxillary excess patients very satisfied and 75% of asymmetrical deformities patients less satisfied, and less satisfaction by patients more than one year postoperatively, p=0.006. Patients perceived improvement oral function, general health, appearance and interpersonal skills. Lower rates of joint and muscular pain and increased mobility of lower jaw correlated with better patient's perception of health and appearance. Although patient's report high satisfaction levels, several factors such as the temporomandibular joint function could affect patient's psychosocial adjustment after treatment. Sufficient information for patient on the treatment course is required to improve satisfaction. Controlling these factors could improve patient's quality of life. (author)

  7. Comparison of an Imaging Software and Manual Prediction of Soft Tissue Changes after Orthognathic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Ahmad Akhoundi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Accurate prediction of the surgical outcome is important in treating dentofacial deformities. Visualized treatment objectives usually involve manual surgical simulation based on tracing of cephalometric radiographs. Recent technical advancements have led to the use of computer assisted imaging systems in treatment planning for orthognathic surgical cases. The purpose of this study was to examine and compare the ability and reliability of digitization using Dolphin Imaging Software with traditional manual techniques and to compare orthognathic prediction with actual outcomes.Materials and Methods: Forty patients consisting of 35 women and 5 men (32 class III and 8 class II with no previous surgery were evaluated by manual tracing and indirect digitization using Dolphin Imaging Software. Reliability of each method was assessed then the two techniques were compared using paired t test.Result: The nasal tip presented the least predicted error and higher reliability. The least accurate regions in vertical plane were subnasal and upper lip, and subnasal and pogonion in horizontal plane. There were no statistically significant differences between the predictions of groups with and without genioplasty.Conclusion: Computer-generated image prediction was suitable for patient education and communication. However, efforts are still needed to improve accuracy and reliability of the prediction program and to include changes in soft tissue tension and muscle strain.

  8. Effect of orthognathic surgery on profile esthetics in Class II:1 malocclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, Katharina; Heumann, Christian; Ruf, Sabine

    2017-11-01

    To measure the effect of orthognathic surgery on Class II:1 profile silhouette esthetics and to identify pretreatment parameters and thresholds for consistent esthetic improvement. Pre- and posttreatment black profile silhouettes of 20 patients with Class II:1 malocclusion who had received combined orthodontic/orthognathic treatment were evaluated retrospectively by 20 European orthodontists and laypeople each using a visual analogue scale (VAS). A variety of pretreatment skeletal and facial angles were measured cephalometrically and on the silhouette profiles. Descriptive statistics and Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated. The population showed a mean VAS improvement of 12.6%. VAS changes were significantly and directly related to pretreatment ANB in all evaluator groups (r = 0.48-0.59), whereas the interrelation with the degree of pretreatment profile convexity angle was less clear and statistically significant for the orthodontic evaluators only (r = -0.34 to -0.51). The highest correlation coefficients in all evaluator groups were seen for the relationship with pretreatment VAS scores (r = -0.64 to -0.73). The lower the pretreatment VAS score and the profile convexity angles or the larger the pretreatment ANB angles were, the more the VAS improved. Pretreatment thresholds for consistent improvements were as follows: VAS score 8°, and profile angle ≤ 155°.

  9. Radiographic cephalometry analysis of condylar position after bimaxillary osteotomy in patients with mandibular prognathism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miković, Nikola D; Lazarević, Miloš M; Tatić, Zoran; Krejović-Trivić, Sanja; Petrović, Milan; Trivić, Aleksandar

    2016-04-01

    Postoperative condylar position is a substantial concern in surgical correction of mandibular prognathism. Orthognathic surgery may change condylar position and this is considered a contributing factor for early skeletal relapse and the induction of temporomandibular disorders. The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in condylar position, and to correlate angular skeletal measurements following bimaxillary surgery. On profile teleradiographs of 21 patients with mandibular angular and linear parametres, the changes in condylar position, were measured during preoperative orthodontic treatment and 6 months after the surgical treatment. A statistically significant difference in values between the groups was found. The most distal point on the head of condyle point (DI) moved backward for 1.38 mm (p = 0.02), and the point of center of collum mandibulae point (DC) moved backward for 1.52 mm (p = 0.007). The amount of upward movement of the point DI was 1.62 mm (p = 0.04). In the patients with mandibular prognathism, the condyles tend to migrate upward and forward six months after bimaxillary surgery.

  10. Radiographic cephalometry analysis of condylar position after bimaxillary osteotomy in patients with mandibular prognathism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miković Nikola D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Postoperative condylar position is a substantial concern in surgical correction of mandibular prognathism. Orthognathic surgery may change condylar position and this is considered a contributing factor for early skeletal relapse and the induction of temporomandibular disorders. The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in condylar position, and to correlate angular skeletal measurements following bimaxillary surgery. Methods. On profile teleradiographs of 21 patients with mandibular angular and linear parametres, the changes in condylar position, were measured during preoperative orthodontic treatment and 6 months after the surgical treatment. Results. A statistically significant difference in values between the groups was found. The most distal point on the head of condyle point (DI moved backward for 1.38 mm (p = 0.02, and the point of center of collum mandibulae point (DC moved backward for 1.52 mm (p = 0.007. The amount of upward movement of the point DI was 1.62 mm (p = 0.04. Conclusion. In the patients with mandibular prognathism, the condyles tend to migrate upward and forward six months after bimaxillary surgery.

  11. Autonomous bone reposition around anatomical landmark for robot-assisted orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Sang-Yoon; Lee, Sang-Jeong; Yoo, Ji-Yong; Han, Jung-Joon; Hwang, Soon-Jung; Huh, Kyung-Hoe; Lee, Sam-Sun; Heo, Min-Suk; Choi, Soon-Chul; Yi, Won-Jin

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a new method for enabling a robot to assist a surgeon in repositioning a bone segment to accurately transfer a preoperative virtual plan into the intraoperative phase in orthognathic surgery. We developed a robot system consisting of an arm with six degrees of freedom, a robot motion-controller, and a PC. An end-effector at the end of the robot arm transferred the movements of the robot arm to the patient's jawbone. The registration between the robot and CT image spaces was performed completely preoperatively, and the intraoperative registration could be finished using only position changes of the tracking tools at the robot end-effector and the patient's splint. The phantom's maxillomandibular complex (MMC) connected to the robot's end-effector was repositioned autonomously by the robot movements around an anatomical landmark of interest based on the tool center point (TCP) principle. The robot repositioned the MMC around the TCP of the incisor of the maxilla and the pogonion of the mandible following plans for real orthognathic patients. The accuracy of the robot's repositioning increased when an anatomical landmark for the TCP was close to the registration fiducials. In spite of this influence, we could increase the repositioning accuracy at the landmark by using the landmark itself as the TCP. With its ability to incorporate virtual planning using a CT image and autonomously execute the plan around an anatomical landmark of interest, the robot could help surgeons reposition bones more accurately and dexterously. Copyright © 2017 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Radiologic assessment of bone healing after orthognathic surgery using fractal analysis

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    Park, Kwang Soo; Heo, Min Suk; Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Soon Chul; Park, Tae Won [College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, In Seong [Department of Dentistry, Inje University Sanggyepaik Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Dae [Division of Information and Communication Engineering, Hallym university, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-15

    To evaluate the radiographic change of operation sites after orthognathic surgery using the digital image processing and fractal analysis. A series of panoramic radiographs of thirty-five randomly selected patients who had undergone mandibular orthognathic surgery (bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy) without clinical complication for osseous healing, were taken. The panoramic radiographs of each selected patient were taken at pre-operation (stage 0), 1 or 2 days after operation (stage 1), 1 month after operation (stage 2), 6 months after operation (stage 3), and 12 months after operation (stage 4). The radiographs were digitized at 600 dpi, 8 bit, and 256 gray levels. The region of interest, centered on the bony gap area of the operation site, was selected and the fractal dimension was calculated by using the tile-counting method. The mean values and standard deviations of fractal dimension for each stage were calculated and the differences among stage 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 were evaluated through repeated measures of the ANOVA and paired t-test. The mean values and standard deviations of the fractal dimensions obtained from stage 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 were 1.658 {+-} 0.048, 1.580 {+-} 0.050, 1.607 {+-} 0.046, 1.624 {+-} 0.049, and 1.641 {+-} 0.061, respectively. The fractal dimensions from stage 1 to stage 4 were shown to have a tendency to increase (p<0.05). The tendency of the fractal dimesion to increase relative to healing time may be a useful means of evaluating post-operative bony healing of the osteotomy site.

  13. Maxillary Sagittal Position in Relation to the Forehead: A Target for Orthognathic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Cory M; Calabrese, Carly E; Resnick, Anthea S

    2018-01-04

    The relationship of the maxillary incisor to forehead position and angulation may be a predictor for the esthetic antero-posterior maxillary position in orthognathic surgery, but this has not been fully explored in the existing literature. Additionally, this analysis requires a lateral smiling photograph, which is not typically included in orthodontic/orthognathic records. This is a bidirectional study of Caucasian orthodontic patients with malocclusions correctable with nonsurgical and nonextraction treatment. Subjects for Group 1 were enrolled prospectively and records included a lateral smiling photograph. Group 2 patients were collected retrospectively with standard records. The analysis described in Andrews' Element II of The Six Elements of Orofacial Harmony was applied to the smiling photographs for Group 1, resulting in "Incisor- goal anterior limit line (GALL)" measurements. A modified analysis utilizing cephalometric tracings was applied for both the groups, and the results were compared. Forty-nine subjects with mean age 11.8 ± 1.2 years were included (n = 14 for Group 1, n = 35 for Group 2). Mean Incisor-GALL distances were 3.71 ± 5.39 mm for females and 4.47 ± 5.06 mm for males. Correlation between analyses was excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.872). In conclusion, a modified approach to measuring the Incisor-GALL distance using standard orthodontic records correlated closely with the analysis described by Andrews. Normal values for this measurement are presented for Caucasian patients.

  14. Sensory retraining after orthognathic surgery: effect on patients' perception of altered sensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Ceib; Essick, Greg; Preisser, John S; Turvey, Timothy A; Tucker, Myron; Lin, Dongming

    2007-06-01

    The primary research hypothesis was that the magnitude and duration of the perceived burden from altered sensation reported by patients after bilateral sagittal split osteotomy and trauma to the third division of the trigeminal nerve are decreased when facial sensory retraining exercises are performed in conjunction with standard opening exercises as compared with standard opening exercises alone. A total of 186 subjects were enrolled in a multicenter, double-blind, 2 parallel group-stratified block randomized clinical trial. Oral and facial pain, unusual sensations, numbness, and loss of sensitivity were scored from "no problem" to "serious problem" before surgery and 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after surgery. A proportional odds model for the ordered multinomial response was used to compare the responses of the 2 exercise groups. The 2 exercise groups did not differ significantly at any postsurgical time in terms of perceived problem level from intraoral of facial pain. The difference between the 2 groups at each visit was not statistically significant for unusual sensations, although the trend was for the sensory retraining group to have a higher likelihood of reporting fewer problems. By 6 months, the likelihood of a subject reporting lower problem or interference level related to numbness or decreased lip sensitivity was significantly higher in the sensory-retraining group, approximately twice that of the opening exercise-only group. Our results support the premise that a simple noninvasive exercise program initiated shortly after orthognathic surgery can lessen the objectionable impression of negative altered sensations.

  15. Three-dimensional virtual reality surgical planning and simulation workbench for orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J; Samman, N; Yeung, R W; Shen, S G; Wang, D; Ip, H H; Tideman, H

    2000-01-01

    A new integrated computer system, the 3-dimensional (3D) virtual reality surgical planning and simulation workbench for orthognathic surgery (VRSP), is presented. Five major functions are implemented in this system: post-processing and reconstruction of computed tomographic (CT) data, transformation of 3D unique coordinate system geometry, generation of 3D color facial soft tissue models, virtual surgical planning and simulation, and presurgical prediction of soft tissue changes. The basic mensuration functions, such as linear and spatial measurements, are also included. The surgical planning and simulation are based on 3D CT reconstructions, whereas soft tissue prediction is based on an individualized, texture-mapped, color facial soft tissue model. The surgeon "enters" the virtual operatory with virtual reality equipment, "holds" a virtual scalpel, and "operates" on a virtual patient to accomplish actual surgical planning, simulation of the surgical procedure, and prediction of soft tissue changes before surgery. As a final result, a quantitative osteotomy-simulated bone model and predicted color facial model with photorealistic quality can be visualized from any arbitrary viewing point in a personal computer system. This system can be installed in any hospital for daily use.

  16. Monitoring dental pulp sensibility and blood flow in patients receiving mandibular orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, E; Goonewardene, M; Abbott, P

    2012-03-01

    To investigate the effect of orthognathic surgery, in particular genioplasty, on pulp sensibility and pulp blood flow (PBF). Pulp blood flow monitoring and CO(2) pulp sensibility testing were performed on 101 mandibular anterior teeth from 17 subjects who received mandibular bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO) with or without genioplasty and other maxillary surgical procedures combined with orthodontic treatment. A laser Doppler flowmeter was used to monitor PBF using customized acrylic splints for each subject. Preoperative baseline scores were recorded from up to 1 week preoperatively, and subsequently monitored for up to 18-28 weeks postoperatively. The data were analysed by RMANOVA and pairwise comparisons. Statistical significance was defined as P 0.05). All teeth in both groups responded to CO(2) preoperatively. The average number of teeth that responded to CO(2) postoperatively in the genioplasty group was lower without significant difference when compared to the group without genioplasty (binomial distribution F = 2.63, P = 0.1256, normal distribution F = 2.98, P = 0.1048). At each progressive period after 1-2 weeks following surgery, the number of teeth responding to CO(2) increased significantly (P sensibility in the group without genioplasty at the end of the study. There were neither common trends nor coincidence in the recovery of PBF and pulp sensibility. © 2011 International Endodontic Journal.

  17. Life-quality of orthognathic surgery patients: The search for an integral diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Augusto Mendes Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The decision on whether starting an orthosurgical treatment depends on the negative esthetic, functional and social impact the dentofacial deformity has on the quality of life of each patient. The objective of this article is to demonstrate the importance of assessing the quality of life of these individuals by means of applying specific questionnaires before treatment onset in order to increase the success rate of orthosurgical treatment. These questionnaires assess not only the esthetic factor, but also the functional conditions that may be affected as well as the psychological issues related to self-esteem and sociability, all of which must be assessed in order to enable the development of an individual treatment plan that meets patient's expectations. Thus, a more predictable level of satisfaction can be achieved at treatment completion, not only from a normative standpoint stated by professionals, but also from a subjective standpoint stated by patients. Although not enough comparable data is available in the literature for us to assess the extent of improvements produced by orthosurgical treatment, a few recent reports conducted by different universities around the world reveal a good response from the majority of patients after surgery, demonstrating great satisfaction with regard to esthetic, functional and psychosocial factors. Therefore, it is reasonable to conclude that the current objective of orthodontic treatment associated with orthognathic surgery consists not only in treating the esthetic functional components of dentofacial deformities, but also in considering patients' psychological factor.

  18. Interrelationship between implant and orthognathic surgery for the rehabilitation of edentulous cleft palate patients: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    LOPES, José Fernando Scarelli; PINTO, João Henrique Nogueira; LOPES, Monica Moraes Waldemarin; MAZOTTINI, Reinaldo; SOARES, Simone

    2015-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman with a unilateral cleft lip and palate, presenting a totally edentulous maxilla and mandible with marked maxillomandibular discrepancy, attended the Prosthodontics section of the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies, University of São Paulo for treatment. She could not close her mouth and was dissatisfied with her complete dentures. Treatment planning comprised placement of six implants in the maxilla, four in the mandible followed by prostheses installation and orthognathic surgery. The mandibular full arch prosthesis guided the occlusion for orthognathic positioning of the maxilla. The maxillary complete prosthesis was designed to assist the orthognathic surgery with a provisional prosthesis (no metal framework), allowing reverse treatment planning. Maxillary and mandibular realignment was performed. Three months later, a relapse in the position of the maxilla was observed, which was offset with a new maxillary prosthesis. This isa complex interdisciplinary treatment and two-year follow-up is presented and discussed. It should be considered that this type of treatment could also be applied in non-cleft patients. PMID:26018315

  19. Interrelationship between implant and orthognathic surgery for the rehabilitation of edentulous cleft palate patients: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Fernando Scarelli LOPES

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A 43-year-old woman with a unilateral cleft lip and palate, presenting a totally edentulous maxilla and mandible with marked maxillomandibular discrepancy, attended the Prosthodontics section of the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies, University of São Paulo for treatment. She could not close her mouth and was dissatisfied with her complete dentures. Treatment planning comprised placement of six implants in the maxilla, four in the mandible followed by prostheses installation and orthognathic surgery. The mandibular full arch prosthesis guided the occlusion for orthognathic positioning of the maxilla. The maxillary complete prosthesis was designed to assist the orthognathic surgery with a provisional prosthesis (no metal framework, allowing reverse treatment planning. Maxillary and mandibular realignment was performed. Three months later, a relapse in the position of the maxilla was observed, which was offset with a new maxillary prosthesis. This isa complex interdisciplinary treatment and two-year follow-up is presented and discussed. It should be considered that this type of treatment could also be applied in non-cleft patients.

  20. Can preoperative sex-related differences in hemostatic parameters predict bleeding in orthognathic surgery?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jared Olsen, Jesper; Ingerslev, Janne; Thorn, Jens Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    -one consecutive patients undergoing bimaxillary OS were included and subsequently grouped according to sex (26 men and 15 women). The main finding was that male patients bled twice as much as female patients on average (400 mL [interquartile range, 300 to 500 mL] vs 200 mL [interquartile range, 63 to 288 mL]; P...

  1. Clinical considerations in the use of forced-air warming blankets during orthognathic surgery to avoid postanesthetic shivering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Fiona Daye; Park, Sookyung; Chi, Seong-In; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Hye-Jung; Han, Jin-Hee; Han, Hee-Jeong; Lee, Eun-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Background During head and neck surgery including orthognathic surgery, mild intraoperative hypothermia occurs frequently. Hypothermia is associated with postanesthetic shivering, which may increase the risk of other postoperative complications. To improve intraoperative thermoregulation, devices such as forced-air warming blankets can be applied. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of supplemental forced-air warming blankets in preventing postanesthetic shivering. Methods This retrospective study included 113 patients who underwent orthognathic surgery between March and September 2015. According to the active warming method utilized during surgery, patients were divided into two groups: Group W (n = 55), circulating-water mattress; and Group F (n = 58), circulating-water mattress and forced-air warming blanket. Surgical notes and anesthesia and recovery room records were evaluated. Results Initial axillary temperatures did not significantly differ between groups (Group W = 35.9 ± 0.7℃, Group F = 35.8 ± 0.6℃). However, at the end of surgery, the temperatures in Group W were significantly lower than those in Group F (35.2 ± 0.5℃ and 36.2 ± 0.5℃, respectively, P = 0.04). The average body temperatures in Groups W and F were, respectively, 35.9 ± 0.5℃ and 36.2 ± 0.5℃ (P = 0.0001). In Group W, 24 patients (43.6%) experienced postanesthetic shivering, while in Group F, only 12 (20.7%) patients required treatment for postanesthetic shivering (P = 0.009, odds ratio = 0.333, 95% confidence interval: 0.147–0.772). Conclusions Additional use of forced-air warming blankets in orthognathic surgery was superior in maintaining normothermia and reduced the incidence of postanesthetic shivering. PMID:28879279

  2. Three dimensional assessment of condylar surface changes and remodeling after orthognathic surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Hye; Lee, Jin Woo; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Won Jin; Heo, Min Suk; Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Soon Chul [Dental Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jae Myung [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    This study was performed to evaluate condylar surface changes and remodeling after orthognathic surgery using three-dimensional computed tomography (3D CT) imaging, including comparisons between the right and left sides and between the sexes. Forty patients (20 males and 20 females) who underwent multi-detector CT examinations before and after surgery were selected. Three-dimensional images comprising thousands of points on the condylar surface were obtained before and after surgery. For the quantitative assessment of condylar surface changes, point-to-point (preoperative-to-postoperative) distances were calculated using D processing software. These point-to-point distances were converted to a color map. In order to evaluate the types of condylar remodeling, the condylar head was divided into six areas (anteromedial, anteromiddle, anterolateral, posteromedial, posteromiddle, and posterolateral areas) and each area was classified into three types of condylar remodeling (bone formation, no change, and bone resorption) based on the color map. Additionally, comparative analyses were performed between the right and left sides and according to sex. The mean of the average point-to-point distances on condylar surface was 0.11±0.03 mm. Bone resorption occurred more frequently than other types of condylar remodeling, especially in the lateral areas. However, bone formation in the anteromedial area was particularly prominent. No significant difference was found between the right and left condyles, but condylar surface changes in males were significantly larger than in females. This study revealed that condylar remodeling exhibited a tendency towards bone resorption, especially in the lateral areas. Condylar surface changes occurred, but were small.

  3. Sensory Retraining following Orthognathic Surgery: Effect on Patient Perception of Altered Sensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Ceib; Essick, Greg; Preisser, John S; Turvey, Timothy A; Tucker, Myron; Lin, Dongming

    2007-01-01

    Purpose The primary research hypothesis was that the magnitude and duration of the perceived burden from altered sensation reported by patients following bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO) and trauma to the third division of the trigeminal nerve is lessened when facial sensory retraining exercises are performed in conjunction with standard opening exercises as compared to standard opening exercises alone. Subjects and Methods 186 subjects were enrolled in a multi-center double-blind two parallel group stratified block randomized clinical trial. Oral and facial pain, unusual sensations, numbness and loss of sensitivity, were scored from “no problem” to “serious problem” before surgery, 1,3, and 6 months after surgery. Analysis A proportional odds model for the ordered multinomial response was used to compare the responses of the two exercise groups. Results The two exercise groups did not differ significantly at any postsurgical time in the perceived problem level from mouth or face pain. The difference between the two groups at each visit was not statistically significant for unusual sensations although the trend was for the sensory retraining group to have a higher likelihood of reporting fewer problems. By 6 months, the likelihood of a subject reporting lower problem or interference level related to numbness or less lip sensitivity was significantly higher in the sensory-retraining group, approximately twice that of the opening exercise only group. Conclusion The results from this clinical trial support the premise that a simple noninvasive exercise program initiated shortly after orthognathic surgery can lessen the objectionable impression of negative altered sensations. PMID:17517301

  4. Development of a computer-aided design software for dental splint in orthognathic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaojun; Li, Xing; Xu, Lu; Sun, Yi; Politis, Constantinus; Egger, Jan

    2016-12-01

    In the orthognathic surgery, dental splints are important and necessary to help the surgeon reposition the maxilla or mandible. However, the traditional methods of manual design of dental splints are difficult and time-consuming. The research on computer-aided design software for dental splints is rarely reported. Our purpose is to develop a novel special software named EasySplint to design the dental splints conveniently and efficiently. The design can be divided into two steps, which are the generation of initial splint base and the Boolean operation between it and the maxilla-mandibular model. The initial splint base is formed by ruled surfaces reconstructed using the manually picked points. Then, a method to accomplish Boolean operation based on the distance filed of two meshes is proposed. The interference elimination can be conducted on the basis of marching cubes algorithm and Boolean operation. The accuracy of the dental splint can be guaranteed since the original mesh is utilized to form the result surface. Using EasySplint, the dental splints can be designed in about 10 minutes and saved as a stereo lithography (STL) file for 3D printing in clinical applications. Three phantom experiments were conducted and the efficiency of our method was demonstrated.

  5. Unilateral blindness after orthognathic surgery: hypotensive anaesthesia is not the primary cause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Navarro, Á; Gonzalez-Valverde, F M

    2018-01-01

    Perioperative vision loss in non-ocular surgery represents a rare but devastating complication and multiple causes have been proposed. Any portion of the visual system may be involved and several authors have tried to relate that complication with deliberate hypotension anaesthetic technique, used to control intraoperative bleeding. We report a patient operated for orthognathism who suffered unilateral blindness. After review of similar cases, we can state that the transmission of forces generated during Le fort I osteotomy is related to the complication. This osteotomy technique is regularly performed in our hospital using a curved osteotome to achieve the pterygomaxillary disjunction and the adverse transmission of forces via the sphenoid bone is the main reason for indirect damage to the optic nerve and its vascular structures causing the neuropathy and blindness. Hypotensive anaesthesia may certainly lead to transient ischaemia but only in specific cases because of decreased ocular perfusion pressured. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Measured symmetry of facial 3D shape and perceived facial symmetry and attractiveness before and after orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostwald, Julia; Berssenbrügge, Philipp; Dirksen, Dieter; Runte, Christoph; Wermker, Kai; Kleinheinz, Johannes; Jung, Susanne

    2015-05-01

    One aim of cranio-maxillo-facial surgery is to strive for an esthetical appearance. Do facial symmetry and attractiveness correlate? How are they affected by surgery? Within this study faces of patients with orthognathic surgery were captured and analyzed regarding their symmetry. A total of 25 faces of patients were measured three-dimensionally by an optical sensor using the fringe projection technique before and after orthognathic surgery. Based upon this data an asymmetry index was calculated for each case. In order to gather subjective ratings each face was presented to 100 independent test subjects in a 3D rotation sequence. Those were asked to rate the symmetry and the attractiveness of the faces. It was analyzed to what extend the ratings correlate with the measured asymmetry indices and whether pre- and post-surgical data differ. The measured asymmetry indices correlate significantly with the subjective ratings of both items. The measured symmetry as well as the rated symmetry and attractiveness increased on average after surgery. The increase of the ratings was even statistically significant. A larger enhancement of symmetry is achieved in pre-surgical strongly asymmetric faces than in rather symmetric faces. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of orthognathic surgery on articular disc position and temporomandibular joint symptoms in skeletal class II patients: A Magnetic Resonance Imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firoozei, Gholamreza; Shahnaseri, Shirin; Momeni, Hasan; Soltani, Parisa

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of orthognathic surgery is to correct facial deformity and dental malocclusion and to obtain normal orofacial function. However, there are controversies of whether orthognathic surgery might have any negative influence on temporomandibular (TM) joint. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of orthognathic surgery on articular disc position and temporomandibular joint symptoms of skeletal CI II patients by means of magnetic resonance imaging. For this purpose, fifteen patients with skeletal CI II malocclusion, aged 19-32 years (mean 23 years), 10 women and 5 men, from the Isfahan Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery were studied. All received LeFort I and bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO) osteotomies and all patients received pre- and post-surgical orthodontic treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed 1 day preoperatively and 3 month postoperatively. Descriptive statistics and Wilcoxon and Mc-Nemar tests were used for statistical analysis. P magnetic resonance imaging, temporomandibular disc.

  8. The university münster model surgery system for orthognathic surgery. Part II – KD-MMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehmer Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Model surgery is an integral part of the planning procedure in orthognathic surgery. Most concepts comprise cutting the dental cast off its socket. The standardized spacer plates of the KD-MMS provide for a non-destructive, reversible and reproducible means of maxillary and/or mandibular plaster cast separation. Methods In the course of development of the system various articulator types were evaluated with regard to their capability to provide a means of realizing the concepts comprised of the KD-MMS. Special attention was dedicated to the ability to perform three-dimensional displacements without cutting of plaster casts. Various utilities were developed to facilitate maxillary displacement in accordance to the planning. Objectives of this development comprised the ability to implement the values established in the course of two-dimensional ceph planning. Results The system - KD-MMS comprises a set of hardware components as well as a defined procedure. Essential hardware components are red spacer and blue mounting plates. The blue mounting plates replace the standard yellow SAM mounting elements. The red spacers provide for a defined leeway of 8 mm for three-dimensional movements. The non-destructive approach of the KD-MMS makes it possible to conduct different model surgeries with the same plaster casts as well as to restore the initial, pre-surgical situation at any time. Thereby, surgical protocol generation and gnathologic splint construction are facilitated. Conclusions The KD-MMS hardware components in conjunction with the defined procedures are capable of increasing efficiency and accuracy of model surgery and splint construction. In cases where different surgical approaches need to be evaluated in the course of model surgery, a significant reduction of chair time may be achieved.

  9. Skeletal anchorage for intrusion of bimaxillary molars in a patient with skeletal open bite and temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasa, Akihiko; Horiuchi, Shinya; Kinouchi, Nao; Izawa, Takashi; Hiasa, Masahiro; Kawai, Nobuhiko; Yasue, Akihiro; Hassan, Ali H; Tanaka, Eiji

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of severe skeletal anterior open bite is extremely difficult in adults, and orthognathic surgery is generally selected for its treatment. We report the case of an 18-year-old adult patient with skeletal anterior open bite and temporomandibular disorders who was successfully treated using temporary anchorage devices. She had an open bite of -2.0 mm and an increased facial height. Miniplates were implanted in both the maxilla and mandible, and molar intrusion resulted in counterclockwise rotation of the mandible over a period of 12 months. After active treatment, her upper and lower first molars were intruded by approximately 2 mm and her overbite became +2.5 mm. Her retrognathic profile improved with counterclockwise rotation of the mandible. Orthodontic treatment aided with skeletal anchorage is beneficial for intrusion of bimaxillary molars in patients with anterior open bite.

  10. [Analysis of three dimensional stability of the hypoplastic maxilla after orthognathic surgery in cleft lip and palate patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yingwang, Jun-Zi; Shen, Shun-Yao; Li, Biao; Sun, Hao; Wang, Xu-Dong

    2016-06-01

    To establish a three dimensional spacial measurement method to analyze the short-term stability of maxilla after orthognathic surgery in cleft lip and palate patients. Twenty-five patients with maxillary hypoplasia secondary to cleft lip and palate seeking for orthognathic surgery were included in this study between January 2008 and September 2012. The spiral CT scan for the skull were taken 6 weeks preoperatively (T0), 4 days postoperatively (T1),3 months postoperatively (T2), and 6 months postoperatively (T3) and collected. A three dimensional analytic method for measuring maxilla was set up in ProPlan CMF software, and good repeatability of identification of landmarks was confirmed. Twenty-two indicators to describe the maxillary position and three new angles to describe the maxillary orientation were measured and analyzed. Student's t test was used to analyze the difference between T2 and T3 using SPSS 16.0 software package. In 25 patients with cleft palate there was a translational relapse upwards along vertical axis and a pitch-up relapse of maxilla with an average of 7.46% at the anterior part of the cleft maxilla. The relapse rate was 30.95% in LUCLP, 8.01% in RUCLP, and 34.76% in BCLP, but with no significant difference. Along the horizontal axis, there was a maxillary translational relapse toward noncleft side in both LUCLP and RUCLP group, while a yaw relapse was confirmed with the anterior part of maxilla toward noncleft side and the posterior part toward cleft side. There is a three-dimensional relapse tendency for the maxilla in the cleft patient postoperatively. The established three-dimensional analytic method well describes the special position of cleft maxilla especially in the translational and rotational movement of maxilla in three different axes comparing with that from lateral cephalometry, thus providing references for accurate measurements in study of the three dimensional maxillary stability after orthognathic surgery.

  11. Resistance and Stress Finite Element Analysis of Different Types of Fixation for Mandibular Orthognathic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringhini, Diego José; Sommerfeld, Ricardo; Uetanabaro, Lucas Caetano; Leonardi, Denise Piotto; Araújo, Melissa Rodrigues; Rebellato, Nelson Luís Barbosa; Costa, Delson João da; Scariot, Rafaela

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the stress and dislodgement resistance by finite element analysis of different types of fixation in mandibular orthognathic surgery. A 3D solid finite element model of a hemi-mandible was obtained. A bilateral sagittal split osteotomy was simulated and the distal segment was advanced 5 mm forward. After the adjustment and superimposing of segments, 9 different types of osteosynthesis with 2.0 miniplates and screws were simulated: A, one 4-hole conventional straight miniplate; B, one 4-hole locking straight miniplate; C, one 4-hole conventional miniplate and one bicortical screw; D, one 4-hole locking miniplate and 1 bicortical screws; E, one 6-hole conventional straight miniplate; F, one 6-hole locking miniplate; G, two 4-hole conventional straight miniplates; H, two 4-hole locking straight miniplates; and I, 3 bicortical screws in an inverted-L pattern. In each model, forces simulating the masticatory muscles were applied. The values of stress in the plates and screws were checked. The dislodgement resistance was checked at the proximal segment since the distal segment was stable because of the screen at the occlusal tooth. The regions with the lowest and highest displacement were measured. The offset between the osteotomized segments was verified by millimeter intervals. Inverted-L with bicortical screws was the model that had the lowest dislodgment and the model with the lowest tension was the one with two conventional plates. The results suggest that the tension was better distributed in the locking miniplates, but the locking screws presented higher concentration of tension.

  12. Corticosteroid administration in oral and orthognathic surgery: a systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dan, Anne E B; Thygesen, Torben H; Pinholt, Else M

    2010-01-01

    was made. The primary predictor variable was CS administration and the outcome variables were edema, pain, and infection. A meta-analysis was performed. The risk of other side effects was evaluated through a simple review. RESULTS: In oral surgery, most clinical trials showed a significant decrease...... toward a neuroregeneration effect, but no statistical analysis could be performed. Regarding the risk of other side effects, in oral surgery, a minimal risk of chronic adrenal suppression was seen; in orthognathic surgery, an elevated risk of avascular osteonecrosis, steroid-induced psychosis......, and adrenal suppression was seen. There were no reports of decreased healing. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that the administration of CS in oral surgery decreases edema and pain significantly, with no higher risk of infection and with a minimum risk of other side effects....

  13. A novel method to determine the potential rotational axis of the mandible during virtual three-dimensional orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jiewen; Dong, Yuefu; Xin, Pengfei; Hu, Guanghong; Xiao, Chao; Shen, Shunyao; Shen, Steve Guofang

    2013-11-01

    During virtual three-dimensional orthognathic surgery in cases where an overlap or penetrability occurs between the 2 jaws due to the repositioning of the maxillary segment, it is necessary to establish a vertical opening of the mandible to obtain a relatively good relationship with the maxillary segment for the fabrication of an intermediate occlusal splint. However, there are few reports that address the precise definition of the rotational axis of the mandible during virtual surgery. Here, we present the idea that the mandible's movement during virtual three-dimensional orthognathic surgery is similar to hinge movement in vivo and developed a method for locating the geometric center of the three-dimensional condyle using Hypermesh software combined with Mimics software. Subsequently, we defined the rotational axis of the mandible based on the located geometric centers of the bilateral condyles, and the mandible was then rotated around the defined axis from the retruded contact position to mimic the hinge movement. Preliminary results indicated that the presented method could approximately mimic the hinge movement of the mandible with a relatively high accuracy in a three-dimensional environment, which may improve the accuracy of virtual intermediate occlusal splint.

  14. Post-operative Stability After Bimaxillary Surgery in Patients with Facial Asymmetry: Comparison of Differences Among Different Original Skeletal Class Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Nobuo; Yamaguchi, Hiro-O; Mikoya, Tadashi; Tei, Kanchu

    2015-09-01

    When improving jaw deformity by two-jaw surgery, we are of the opinion from our clinical experience that a certain degree of undercorrection is occasionally beneficial from the perspective of stability. Functional deterioration is not always seen with undercorrection. We conducted this retrospective study to assess post-operative stability in patients with facial asymmetry, with the aim of both clarifying differences between the original three skeletal class patterns, and confirming the efficacy of surgery performed on the basis of our concept. All patients received optimal orthognathic treatment before and after surgery. Surgery was performed by our concept that undercorrection is not always bad. Nineteen patients were enrolled, and separated into three skeletal classes according to the ANB angle, because of the difference of the treatment modalities between them. Evaluations were performed by cephalometric measurements taken at least two-year post-operatively. Transverse occlusal cant, chin deviation, point A, point B, overjet and overbite were assessed. In all patients, transverse occlusal cant improved to stability of patients with facial asymmetry was achieved. Undercorrection is thus by no means problematic from the clinical perspective of stability and our concept of approach appears valid.

  15. Orthodontics and orthognathic surgery in the combined treatment of an excessively "gummy smile".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, P

    1999-06-01

    This report highlights the benefits that can be achieved with the combined orthodontic and orthognathic surgical approach where the presenting malocclusion is related primarily to an underlying skeletal malrelationship. The patient experienced a dramatic improvement in her facial form and occlusion, and a reduction of her excessively "gummy smile".

  16. The spectrum of Apert syndrome: phenotype, particularities in orthodontic treatment, and characteristics of orthognathic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohoff, Ariane; Joos, Ulrich; Meyer, Ulrich; Ehmer, Ulrike; Stamm, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    In the PubMed accessible literature, information on the characteristics of interdisciplinary orthodontic and surgical treatment of patients with Apert syndrome is rare. The aim of the present article is threefold: (1) to show the spectrum of the phenotype, in order (2) to elucidate the scope of hindrances to orthodontic treatment, and (3) to demonstrate the problems of surgery and interdisciplinary approach. Children and adolescents who were born in 1985 or later, who were diagnosed with Apert syndrome, and who sought consultation or treatment at the Departments of Orthodontics or Craniomaxillofacial Surgery at the Dental School of the University Hospital of Münster (n = 22; 9 male, 13 female) were screened. Exemplarily, three of these patients (2 male, 1 female), seeking interdisciplinary (both orthodontic and surgical treatment) are presented. Orthodontic treatment before surgery was performed by one experienced orthodontist (AH), and orthognathic surgery was performed by one experienced surgeon (UJ), who diagnosed the syndrome according to the criteria listed in OMIM™. In the sagittal plane, the patients suffered from a mild to a very severe Angle Class III malocclusion, which was sometimes compensated by the inclination of the lower incisors; in the vertical dimension from an open bite; and transversally from a single tooth in crossbite to a circular crossbite. All patients showed dentitio tarda, some impaction, partial eruption, idopathic root resorption, transposition or other aberrations in the position of the tooth germs, and severe crowding, with sometimes parallel molar tooth buds in each quarter of the upper jaw. Because of the severity of malocclusion, orthodontic treatment needed to be performed with fixed appliances, and mainly with superelastic wires. The therapy was hampered with respect to positioning of bands and brackets because of incomplete tooth eruption, dense gingiva, and mucopolysaccharide ridges. Some teeth did not move, or moved

  17. The spectrum of Apert syndrome: phenotype, particularities in orthodontic treatment, and characteristics of orthognathic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehmer Ulrike

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the PubMed accessible literature, information on the characteristics of interdisciplinary orthodontic and surgical treatment of patients with Apert syndrome is rare. The aim of the present article is threefold: (1 to show the spectrum of the phenotype, in order (2 to elucidate the scope of hindrances to orthodontic treatment, and (3 to demonstrate the problems of surgery and interdisciplinary approach. Children and adolescents who were born in 1985 or later, who were diagnosed with Apert syndrome, and who sought consultation or treatment at the Departments of Orthodontics or Craniomaxillofacial Surgery at the Dental School of the University Hospital of Münster (n = 22; 9 male, 13 female were screened. Exemplarily, three of these patients (2 male, 1 female, seeking interdisciplinary (both orthodontic and surgical treatment are presented. Orthodontic treatment before surgery was performed by one experienced orthodontist (AH, and orthognathic surgery was performed by one experienced surgeon (UJ, who diagnosed the syndrome according to the criteria listed in OMIM™. In the sagittal plane, the patients suffered from a mild to a very severe Angle Class III malocclusion, which was sometimes compensated by the inclination of the lower incisors; in the vertical dimension from an open bite; and transversally from a single tooth in crossbite to a circular crossbite. All patients showed dentitio tarda, some impaction, partial eruption, idopathic root resorption, transposition or other aberrations in the position of the tooth germs, and severe crowding, with sometimes parallel molar tooth buds in each quarter of the upper jaw. Because of the severity of malocclusion, orthodontic treatment needed to be performed with fixed appliances, and mainly with superelastic wires. The therapy was hampered with respect to positioning of bands and brackets because of incomplete tooth eruption, dense gingiva, and mucopolysaccharide ridges. Some teeth did not

  18. A cone-beam computed tomography triple scan procedure to obtain a three-dimensional augmented virtual skull model appropriate for orthognathic surgery planning.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swennen, G.R.J.; Mollemans, W.; Clercq, C. De; Abeloos, J.V.S.; Lamoral, P.; Lippens, F.R.C.; Neyt, N.; Casselman, J.W.; Schutyser, F.A.C.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present a new approach to acquire a three-dimensional virtual skull model appropriate for orthognathic surgery planning without the use of plaster dental models and without deformation of the facial soft-tissue mask. A "triple" cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan

  19. Influence of Electroacupuncture and Laser-Acupuncture on Treating Paresthesia in Patients Submitted to Combined Orthognathic Surgery and Genioplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Renata F; Goldman, Ricardo S; Mendes, Fausto Medeiros; de Freitas, Patricia Moreira

    2017-10-01

    Objective: The goal of this research was to observe the influence of electroacupuncture (EA) and laser-acupuncture on the return of tactile/pain sensitivity in patients who underwent orthognathic surgery. Materials and Methods: Thirty volunteers subjected to orthognathic surgery were evaluated and randomly divided into 2 groups, in which 3 treatments were evaluated: control ( n  = 30) (G0, medication + placebo laser treatment) and 2 experimental treatments ( n  = 15) (G1, medication + EA) or G2 (medication + laser-acupuncture). The control group had n  = 30 because for each experimental treatment conducted on a volunteer's hemi-face, there was a control treatment on the other hemi-face. In G1, medication was given with EA, with needles placed at predetermined points (ST 4 [ Dicang ], M-HN-18 [ Jiachengjiang ], CV 24 [ Chengjiang ], ST 5 [ Daying ], ST 6 [ Jiache ], and point A1 [YNSA]). For electrostimulation, the device used delivered transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation of a burst type, with intensity and frequency variations of T = 220 ms and F = 4 Hz (30 minutes, 2 × /week). In G2, in addition to the medication, laser irradiation (at 780 nm) was applied on acupuncture points (at 0.04 cm 2 , 70 mW, 6 s/point, 0.42 J/point, 10 J/cm 2 , 2 × /week). All volunteers were evaluated before and during the 4 months following the surgery. Tactile sensitivity was assessed by mechanical brushing (brush #s 2 and 12) and by a 2-point discrimination test, using a bow compass. A pain test was performed with a pulp electrical test that stimulates intact nerves of the dentin-pulp complex. A Kaplan-Meier test was performed, and survival curves were plotted for comparison between groups. Cox regression analysis was also conducted (α = 0.05). Results: There were no statistically significant differences among the groups for the 2-point discrimination test (brushes #2 and #12) on the buccal mucosa region and for the pulp test

  20. Influence of Electroacupuncture and Laser-Acupuncture on Treating Paresthesia in Patients Submitted to Combined Orthognathic Surgery and Genioplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Renata F.; Goldman, Ricardo S.; Mendes, Fausto Medeiros

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The goal of this research was to observe the influence of electroacupuncture (EA) and laser-acupuncture on the return of tactile/pain sensitivity in patients who underwent orthognathic surgery. Materials and Methods: Thirty volunteers subjected to orthognathic surgery were evaluated and randomly divided into 2 groups, in which 3 treatments were evaluated: control (n = 30) (G0, medication + placebo laser treatment) and 2 experimental treatments (n = 15) (G1, medication + EA) or G2 (medication + laser-acupuncture). The control group had n = 30 because for each experimental treatment conducted on a volunteer's hemi-face, there was a control treatment on the other hemi-face. In G1, medication was given with EA, with needles placed at predetermined points (ST 4 [Dicang], M-HN-18 [Jiachengjiang], CV 24 [Chengjiang], ST 5 [Daying], ST 6 [Jiache], and point A1 [YNSA]). For electrostimulation, the device used delivered transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation of a burst type, with intensity and frequency variations of T = 220 ms and F = 4 Hz (30 minutes, 2 × /week). In G2, in addition to the medication, laser irradiation (at 780 nm) was applied on acupuncture points (at 0.04 cm2, 70 mW, 6 s/point, 0.42 J/point, 10 J/cm2, 2 × /week). All volunteers were evaluated before and during the 4 months following the surgery. Tactile sensitivity was assessed by mechanical brushing (brush #s 2 and 12) and by a 2-point discrimination test, using a bow compass. A pain test was performed with a pulp electrical test that stimulates intact nerves of the dentin-pulp complex. A Kaplan–Meier test was performed, and survival curves were plotted for comparison between groups. Cox regression analysis was also conducted (α = 0.05). Results: There were no statistically significant differences among the groups for the 2-point discrimination test (brushes #2 and #12) on the buccal mucosa region and for the pulp test on all

  1. Skeletal facial balance and harmony in the cleft patient: Principles and techniques in orthognathic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salyer Kenneth

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The management of the palatal cleft, dental arch, and subsequent maxillary form is a challenge for the craniomaxillofacial surgeon. The purpose of this paper is to present the experience of a senior surgeon (KES who has treated over 2000 patients with cleft lip and palate. This paper focuses on the experience of a recent series of 103 consecutive orthognathic cases treated by one surgeon with a surgical-orthodontic, speech-oriented approach. It will concentrate on not only correcting the occlusion, as others have described, but also on how a surgeon who was trying to achieve optimal aesthetic balance, harmony, and beauty, approached this problem.

  2. Modification of planned postoperative occlusion in orthognathic surgery, based on computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing-engineered preoperative surgical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Moon-Key; You, Tae-Kwon; Lee, Ji-Yeon

    2015-01-01

    In orthognathic surgery, it is important to have a planned postoperative occlusion. A 3-dimensional preoperative simulation, based on 3-dimensional optically scanned occlusion data, can predict how the planned postoperative occlusion will affect the maxilla-mandibular relationship that results from orthognathic surgery. In this study we modified the planned postoperative occlusion, based on computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing-engineered preoperative surgical simulations. This modification made it possible to resolve the facial asymmetry of the patient successfully with a simple bilateral intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy and no additional maxillary or mandibular surgery. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Fremlæggelse af projekt med Epworth søvnighedsskema, opgørelse af data fra 2009-2014: "Prevalence of excessive daytime sleepiness in patients treated with orthognathic surgery"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linderup, Mette Werner

    Fremlæggelse af projekt med Epworth søvnighedsskema, opgørelse af data fra 2009-2014: "Prevalence of excessive daytime sleepiness in patients treated with orthognathic surgery"......Fremlæggelse af projekt med Epworth søvnighedsskema, opgørelse af data fra 2009-2014: "Prevalence of excessive daytime sleepiness in patients treated with orthognathic surgery"...

  4. Nasal changes after orthognathic surgery for patients with prognathism and Class III malocclusion: analysis using three-dimensional photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worasakwutiphong, Saran; Chuang, Ya-Fang; Chang, Hsin-Wen; Lin, Hsiu-Hsia; Lin, Pei-Ju; Lo, Lun-Jou

    2015-02-01

    Orthognathic surgery alters the position of maxilla and mandible, and consequently changes the nasal shape. The nasal change remains a concern to Asian patients. The aim of this study was to measure the nasal changes using a novel three-dimensional photographic imaging method. A total of 38 patients with Class III malocclusion and prognathism were enrolled. All patients underwent two-jaw surgery with the standard technique. A nasal alar cinching suture was included at the end of procedure. Facial landmarks and nasal morphology were defined and measured from pre- and postoperative three-dimensional photographic images. Intra-rater errors on landmark identification were controlled. Patient's reports of perceptual nasal changes were recorded. The average width of the alar base and subalare remained similar after surgery. Alar width was increased by 0.74 mm. Nasal height and length remained the same. Nasolabial angle increased significantly. The area of nostril show revealed a significant increase and was correlated with a decrease of columella inclination. Nasal tip projection decreased significantly, by 1.99 mm. Preoperative nasal morphology was different between patients with and without cleft lip/palate, but most nasal changes were concordant. In the self-perception, 37% of patients reported improved nasal appearance, 58% reported no change, and 5% were not satisfied with the nasal changes. After the surgery, characteristic nasal changes occurred with an increase of nasolabial angle and nostril show, but a preserved nasal width. The majority of patients did not perceive adverse nasal changes. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Evaluation of three-dimensional position change of the condylar head after orthognathic surgery using computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing-made condyle positioning jig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung-Mo; Baek, Seung-Hak; Kim, Tae-Yun; Choi, Jin-Young

    2014-11-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAM/CAD)-made condyle positioning jig in orthognathic surgery. The sample consisted of 40 mandibular condyles of 20 patients with class III malocclusion who underwent bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy with semirigid fixation (6 men and 14 women; mean age, 25 y; mean amount of mandibular setback, 5.8 mm). Exclusion criteria were patients who needed surgical correction of the frontal ramal inclination and had signs and symptoms of the temporomandibular disorder before surgery. Three-dimensional computed tomograms were taken 1 month before the surgery (T1) and 1 day after the surgery (T2). The condylar position was evaluated at the T1 and T2 stages on the axial, frontal, and sagittal aspects in the three-dimensional coordinates. The linear change of the posterior border of the proximal segment of the ramus between T1 and T2 was also evaluated in 30 condyles (15 patients), with the exception of 10 condyles of 5 patients who received mandibular angle reduction surgery. There was no significant difference in the condylar position in the frontal and sagittal aspects (P > 0.05). Although there was a significant difference in the condylar position in the axial aspect (P jig is easy to install and reliable to use in orthognathic surgery.

  6. Correction of facial asymmetry associated with vertical maxillary excess and mandibular prognathism by combined orthognathic surgery and guiding templates and splints fabricated by rapid prototyping technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, B; Ye, N; Jiang, Y; Liu, Y; Hu, J; Zhu, S

    2015-11-01

    The facial asymmetry associated with vertical maxillary excess and mandibular prognathism is one of the more complicated types in the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of combined orthognathic surgeries, together with guiding templates and splints fabricated by rapid prototyping technique, for the correction of facial asymmetry. Fourteen patients with facial asymmetry associated with vertical maxillary excess and mandibular prognathism were included. A maxillary Le Fort I osteotomy, a sagittal split ramus osteotomy on the shorter side of the face, and an intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy on the longer side of the face were performed with the aid of guiding templates and splints fabricated by rapid prototyping technique. Parameters reflecting maxillary canting, ramal inclination, mandibular deviation, and chin inclination were measured before surgery, 7 days after surgery, and 1 year after surgery, and compared. Significant differences in these parameters were found between the two sides preoperatively, whereas no differences were observed postoperatively. Facial asymmetry was corrected in all patients with satisfactory outcomes. In conclusion, combined orthognathic surgery and guiding templates and splints can offer improvements in accuracy, complexity, and duration over traditional procedures for the correction of facial asymmetry associated with vertical maxillary excess and mandibular prognathism. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Use of mini-implants to avoid maxillary surgery for Class III mandibular prognathic patient: a long-term post-retention case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Hee-Yeon; Lee, Shin-Jae; Park, Heung Sik

    2014-11-01

    Because of the potential morbidity and complications associated with surgical procedures, limiting the extent of orthognathic surgery is a desire for many orthodontic patients. An eighteen-year-old woman had a severe Class III malocclusion and required bi-maxillary surgery. By changing the patient's maxillary occlusal plane using orthodontic mini-implants, she was able to avoid the maxillary surgery; requiring only a mandibular setback surgery. To accurately predict the post-surgery outcome, we applied a new soft tissue prediction method. We were able to follow and report the long-term result of her combined orthodontic and orthognathic treatment. The changes to her occlusal plane continue to appear stable over 6 years later.

  8. Higher Dose of Dexamethasone Does Not Further Reduce Facial Swelling After Orthognathic Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial Using 3-Dimensional Photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsiu Hsia; Kim, Sun-Goo; Kim, Hye-Young; Niu, Lien-Shin; Lo, Lun-Jou

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this prospective, double-blind, randomized clinical trial was to compare the effect of 2 dexamethasone dosages on reducing facial swelling after orthognathic surgery through 3-dimensional (3D) photogrammetry. Patients were classified into group 1 (control group) and group 2 (study group), depending on the administered dexamethasone dosage (5 and 15 mg, respectively). Three-dimensional images were recorded at 5 time points: preoperative (T0) and postoperative at 48 ± 6 hours (T1), 1 week (T2), 1 month (T3), and 6 months (T4). A preliminary study was performed on 5 patients, in whom 3D images were captured at 24, 36, 48, and 60 hours postoperatively to record serial changes in facial swelling. Facial swelling at T1, T2, and T3 and the reduction in swelling at T2 and T3 compared with that at the baseline (T4) were calculated. Possible complications, namely, adrenal suppression, wound dehiscence, wound infection, and postoperative nausea and vomiting were evaluated. In total, 68 patients were enrolled, of whom 25 patients in group 1 and 31 patients in group 2 were eligible for final evaluation. No significant differences were found between the 2 groups at any period. On average, the swelling subsided by 86% at 1 month after the orthognathic surgery. Facial swelling peaked approximately 48 hours after the surgery. The incidence of nausea and vomiting did not differ significantly between the groups. The effect of 5 and 15 mg of dexamethasone on facial swelling reduction as well as on nausea and vomiting after orthognathic surgery was not significantly different.

  9. Facial esthetics and the assignment of personality traits before and after orthognathic surgery rated on video clips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinko, Klaus; Jagsch, Reinhold; Drog, Claudio; Mosgoeller, Wilhelm; Wutzl, Arno; Millesi, Gabriele; Klug, Clemens

    2018-01-01

    Typically, before and after surgical correction faces are assessed on still images by surgeons, orthodontists, the patients, and family members. We hypothesized that judgment of faces in motion and by naïve raters may closer reflect the impact on patients' real life, and the treatment impact on e.g. career chances. Therefore we assessed faces from dysgnathic patients (Class II, III and Laterognathia) on video clips. Class I faces served as anchor and controls. Each patient's face was assessed twice before and after treatment in changing sequence, by 155 naïve raters with similar age to the patients. The raters provided independent estimates on aesthetic trait pairs like ugly /beautiful, and personality trait pairs like dominant /flexible. Furthermore the perception of attractiveness, intelligence, health, the persons' erotic aura, faithfulness, and five additional items were rated. We estimated the significance of the perceived treatment related differences and the respective effect size by general linear models for repeated measures. The obtained results were comparable to our previous rating on still images. There was an overall trend, that faces in video clips are rated along common stereotypes to a lesser extent than photographs. We observed significant class differences and treatment related changes of most aesthetic traits (e.g. beauty, attractiveness), these were comparable to intelligence, erotic aura and to some extend healthy appearance. While some personality traits (e.g. faithfulness) did not differ between the classes and between baseline and after treatment, we found that the intervention significantly and effectively altered the perception of the personality trait self-confidence. The effect size was highest in Class III patients, smallest in Class II patients, and in between for patients with Laterognathia. All dysgnathic patients benefitted from orthognathic surgery. We conclude that motion can mitigate marked stereotypes but does not entirely

  10. Facial esthetics and the assignment of personality traits before and after orthognathic surgery rated on video clips.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Sinko

    Full Text Available Typically, before and after surgical correction faces are assessed on still images by surgeons, orthodontists, the patients, and family members. We hypothesized that judgment of faces in motion and by naïve raters may closer reflect the impact on patients' real life, and the treatment impact on e.g. career chances. Therefore we assessed faces from dysgnathic patients (Class II, III and Laterognathia on video clips. Class I faces served as anchor and controls. Each patient's face was assessed twice before and after treatment in changing sequence, by 155 naïve raters with similar age to the patients. The raters provided independent estimates on aesthetic trait pairs like ugly /beautiful, and personality trait pairs like dominant /flexible. Furthermore the perception of attractiveness, intelligence, health, the persons' erotic aura, faithfulness, and five additional items were rated. We estimated the significance of the perceived treatment related differences and the respective effect size by general linear models for repeated measures. The obtained results were comparable to our previous rating on still images. There was an overall trend, that faces in video clips are rated along common stereotypes to a lesser extent than photographs. We observed significant class differences and treatment related changes of most aesthetic traits (e.g. beauty, attractiveness, these were comparable to intelligence, erotic aura and to some extend healthy appearance. While some personality traits (e.g. faithfulness did not differ between the classes and between baseline and after treatment, we found that the intervention significantly and effectively altered the perception of the personality trait self-confidence. The effect size was highest in Class III patients, smallest in Class II patients, and in between for patients with Laterognathia. All dysgnathic patients benefitted from orthognathic surgery. We conclude that motion can mitigate marked stereotypes but

  11. Class II treatment in adults: comparing camouflage orthodontics, dentofacial orthopedics and orthognathic surgery--a cephalometric study to evaluate various therapeutic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzinger, Gero; Frye, Linda; Diedrich, Peter

    2009-01-01

    It was the aim of this clinical study to compare the skeletal and dentoalveolar effects as well as those on the profile of three different treatment approaches in Class II patients (camouflage orthodontics, dentofacial orthopedics, and combined orthodontic and surgical treatment). Our study cohort consisted of 60 young adults presenting a skeletal Class II, Division 1 malocclusion: 20 patients whose overjet was reduced by camouflage following premolar extraction, 20 patients whose occlusions were corrected by placement of a fixed functional orthopedic appliance, and 20 who underwent orthognathic surgery (bilateral sagittal split osteotomy of the mandible without genioplasty). We documented the therapeutic progress using cephalometry. Each patient group achieved a reduction in overjet via their respective treatment. While no treatment-related changes in the maxillary area were assessable, the effects on the mandible differed. We observed advancement of the bony chin and an increase in mandibular length in the sagittal-diagonal dimension in the surgical and functional orthopedic groups. However, the extent of the treatment-related changes was significant only in the group of patients that had undergone orthognathic surgery. Only the surgical group presented changes in vertical relationships. Incisor repositioning as an outcome of the respective treatments differed fundamentally, with those in the surgical group revealing significant protrusion of the upper incisors. The maxillary incisors were retruded and mandibular incisors proclined in the functional orthopedic group, whereas the upper and lower incisors both retruded significantly in the extraction group. Soft-tissue remodeling bore no linear relationship to treatment-induced skeletal and dental effects. Still, orthognathic surgery led to the most marked profile changes. Treatment using fixed functional orthopedic appliances reduced the convexity of the soft-tissue profile at least moderately. Camouflage

  12. Skeletal and dental variables related to the stability of orthognathic surgery in skeletal Class III malocclusion with a surgery-first approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ellen Wen-Ching; Lin, Shao Cheng; Chen, Yu Ray; Huang, Chiung Shing

    2013-05-01

    The objectives of the study were to identify the parameters related to skeletal stability after orthognathic surgery in skeletal Class III malocclusion using a surgery-first approach and to analyze the factors correlated with surgical relapse. Forty-five consecutive patients were included. Serial cephalometric radiographs were traced and superimposed to investigate surgical stability at the initial examination, 1 week postoperatively, and after orthodontic debonding (12.22 mo after surgery). Patient grouping was based on the amount of horizontal relapse at the innermost point of the contour of the mandible between the incisor tooth and the bony chin, the B point (less stable group, n = 15; highly stable group, n = 18). Parameters, such as presurgical skeletal and dental variables, the amount of surgical setback, and total treatment duration, were compared between groups and analyzed for correlations with surgical stability. The mean setback at the innermost point of the contour of the mandible between the incisor tooth and the bony chin was 11.19 mm, and the mean relapse rate was 12.46%. The amount of surgical setback, overbite (positive values), overjet, depth of the curve of Spee, and lower anterior facial height showed statistically significant differences between groups. The amount of surgical setback, overbite (positive values), overjet, and depth of the curve of Spee showed statistically significant correlations with the amount of relapse. Skeletal relapse of the mandible increased significantly as the overbite increased. The factors for instability in the surgery-first approach include a larger overbite, a deeper curve of Spee, a greater negative overjet, and a greater mandibular setback. The initial overbite may be an indicator to predict possible skeletal relapse of mandibular setback. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Periodontal management in orthognathic surgery: early screening of periodontal risk and its current management for the optimization of orthodontic and surgical treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, B; Bouletreau, P; Breton, P

    2014-09-01

    Orthodontic preparation for orthognathic surgery requires correcting mal-occlusions and coordination of arcades. In addition to improving the aesthetics, these treatments can ensure the achievement and sustainability of prosthetics and/or implants. Nevertheless, periodontal structures are easily damaged. Orthodontic displacement can only be applied in the absence of inflammation or weakened periodontal structure. An early detection of periodontal risk should be achievable by prescribers of a surgical-orthodontic treatment. Simplified periodontal examination, with easily detectable warning signs, will help to identify the periodontal risk. Although periodontal treatment follows current "non invasive" trend, some procedures remain necessary to prevent and/or remedy periodontal defects or diseases, such as mineral periodontal reinforcement corticotomy. It is essential that the patient meets all the practitioners to plan and assess the extent of the constraints necessary to optimize results, before starting orthodontic treatment combined with orthognathic surgery. Any periodontal complication (even minor) will be considered as a failure, regardless of good aesthetic and functional results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Assessment of skeletal stability after counterclockwise rotation of the maxillomandibular complex in patients with long-face pattern subjected to orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Lucas Senhorinho; Castro, Vanessa; Prado, Roberto; de Moraes e Silva, Carolina Ávila Varginha; do Prado, Célio Jesus; Trindade Neto, Antonio I

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term skeletal stability of counterclockwise maxillomandibular complex rotation in patients undergoing orthognathic surgery for long-face pattern. This retrospective study consisted of 10 patients who underwent the procedure between September 2002 and April 2008. To assess the skeletal stability, 30 preoperative (T1), recent postoperative (T2), and late postoperative (T3) cephalometric radiographs of the 10 patients were digitized and traced. To measure the stability in the occlusal plane and mandibular plane, the cephalometric points and planes were determined 3 times. In the long term, on average, the A-point moved 0.21 mm backward (AYT3-AYT2), the B-point moved 0.57 mm backward (BYT3-BYT2), and the posterior nasal spine moved 0.31 mm backward (PNSYT3-PNSYT2). On average, the anterior maxillary area (A-point) moved 0.14 mm downward (AXT3-AXT2), the mandible (B-point) moved 0.07 mm downward (BXT3-BXT2), and the posterior nasal spine moved approximately 0.18 mm upward (PNSXT3-PNSXT2). The occlusal plane increased by 0.75 degrees (OPT3-OPT2), and the mandibular plane increased by 0.45 degrees (MPT3-MPT2). It was observed that the counterclockwise rotation of the maxillomandibular complex produces stable results in patients with long-face pattern undergoing orthognathic surgery.

  15. The effects of orthognathic surgery on mandibular movements in patients with mandibular prognathism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinobad Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Mandibular prognathism, one of the most severe dentofacial deformities, affects the person’s appearance, psychological health and the quality of life in the most sensitive age period. Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of sagittal split ramus osteotomy on the range of mandibular border movements in the early postoperative period. Methods. The study was conducted on 20 patients, of mean age 20.8 years, with mandibular prognathism. All patients included in this study were operated on by bilateral sagittal spliting ramus osteotomy according to Obwegeser and Dal Pont followed by mandibular immobilization during eight weeks. In all patients mandibular border movements were recorded before and six months after surgery using the computerized pantograph Arcus-Digma (KaVo EWL GmbH, Leutkirch, Germany. Results. The analysis of the chosen kinematic parameters revealed that sagittal split ramus osteotomy followed by eight weeks of mandibular immobilization had severe effects on the mouth opening. Six months after surgery the range of maximal mouth opening decreased for approximately 13.9 mm in relation to the preoperative stage. On the contrary, the ranges of maximal protrusion and the border of laterotrusive excursions increased significantly after surgery. Conclusion. In patients with mandibular prognathism where enormous mandibular growth was the main causal factor of the deformity, the sagittal split ramus osteotomy yielded good results. The rigid fixation of bone fragments and reduced period of mandibular immobilization followed by appropriate physical therapy could considerably contribute to a more rapid recovery of mandibular kinematics in the postoperative period.

  16. Evaluation in vitro of the tensile strength of crimpable hooks used for stabilization in orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade Gomes, Nascimento Leonard Euller; Melo, Pithon Matheus; Lacerda, Santos Rogério; D'Albuquerque, Medeiros Paulo Jose

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the tensile strength of crimpable hooks used for arch stabilization in orthognatic surgery. Ninety stainless steel wire (0.019" × 0.026") segments, each measuring 6 cm long, were used and attached to crimpable hooks of different commercial brands. Six groups were formed (n = 10) denominated as follows: control, in which the wire segments were perpendicularly welded by spot welding machine; and the hooks groups M (Morelli), MS (Morelli with weld), TP (TP Ortho), TPS (TP with weld), TPTg (TP-tungsten), TPTgS (TP-tungsten with weld), AO (American Orthodontics), and AOS (American Orthodontics with weld). The test specimen topography was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy before and after the tensile strength tests. After obtaining the results, the analysis of variance and Kruskal-Wallis multiple-comparison tests were applied. Compared with the control group, the AOS ball hooks and those from TPS required a greater amount of force to be displaced along the rectangular arch. The hooks in group M were significantly easier to displace, followed by those from AO. The best ball hooks for clinical application are those from AOS and TPS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Frontal soft tissue analysis using a 3 dimensional camera following two-jaw rotational orthognathic surgery in skeletal class III patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jong Woo; Lee, Jang Yeol; Oh, Tae-Suk; Kwon, Soon Man; Yang, Sung Joon; Koh, Kyung Suk

    2014-04-01

    Although two dimensional cephalometry is the standard method for analyzing the results of orthognathic surgery, it has potential limits in frontal soft tissue analysis. We have utilized a 3 dimensional camera to examine changes in soft tissue landmarks in patients with skeletal class III dentofacial deformity who underwent two-jaw rotational setback surgery. We assessed 25 consecutive Asian patients (mean age, 22 years; range, 17-32 years) with skeletal class III dentofacial deformities who underwent two-jaw rotational surgery without maxillary advancement. Using a 3D camera, we analyzed changes in facial proportions, including vertical and horizontal dimensions, facial surface areas, nose profile, lip contour, and soft tissue cheek convexity, as well as landmarks related to facial symmetry. The average mandibular setback was 10.7 mm (range: 5-17 mm). The average SNA changed from 77.4° to 77.8°, the average SNB from 89.2° to 81.1°, and the average occlusal plane from 8.7° to 11.4°. The mid third vertical dimension changed from 58.8 mm to 57.8 mm (p = 0.059), and the lower third vertical dimension changed from 70.4 mm to 68.2 mm (p = 0.0006). The average bigonial width decreased from 113.5 mm to 109.2 mm (p = 0.0028), the alar width increased from 34.7 mm to 36.1 mm (p-value = 0.0002), and lip length was unchanged. Mean mid and lower facial surface areas decreased significantly, from 171.8 cm(2) to 166.2 cm(2) (p = 0.026) and from 71.23 cm(2) to 61.9 cm(2) (p analysis for orthognathic surgery, and enabled quantitative analysis of changes in frontal soft tissue landmarks and facial proportions that were not possible with conventional 2D cephalometric analysis. Copyright © 2013 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Computer-Assisted Orthognathic Surgery for Patients with Cleft Lip/Palate: From Traditional Planning to Three-Dimensional Surgical Simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lonic

    Full Text Available Although conventional two-dimensional (2D methods for orthognathic surgery planning are still popular, the use of three-dimensional (3D simulation is steadily increasing. In facial asymmetry cases such as in cleft lip/palate patients, the additional information can dramatically improve planning accuracy and outcome. The purpose of this study is to investigate which parameters are changed most frequently in transferring a traditional 2D plan to 3D simulation, and what planning parameters can be better adjusted by this method.This prospective study enrolled 30 consecutive patients with cleft lip and/or cleft palate (mean age 18.6±2.9 years, range 15 to 32 years. All patients received two-jaw single-splint orthognathic surgery. 2D orthodontic surgery plans were transferred into a 3D setting. Severe bony collisions in the ramus area after 2D plan transfer were noted. The position of the maxillo-mandibular complex was evaluated and eventually adjusted. Position changes of roll, midline, pitch, yaw, genioplasty and their frequency within the patient group were recorded as an alternation of the initial 2D plan. Patients were divided in groups of no change from the original 2D plan and changes in one, two, three and four of the aforementioned parameters as well as subgroups of unilateral, bilateral cleft lip/palate and isolated cleft palate cases. Postoperative OQLQ scores were obtained for 20 patients who finished orthodontic treatment.83.3% of 2D plans were modified, mostly concerning yaw (63.3% and midline (36.7% adjustments. Yaw adjustments had the highest mean values in total and in all subgroups. Severe bony collisions as a result of 2D planning were seen in 46.7% of patients. Possible asymmetry was regularly foreseen and corrected in the 3D simulation.Based on our findings, 3D simulation renders important information for accurate planning in complex cleft lip/palate cases involving facial asymmetry that is regularly missed in conventional 2D

  19. 3D virtual planning in orthognathic surgery and CAD/CAM surgical splints generation in one patient with craniofacial microsomia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Vale

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this case report, the feasibility and precision of tridimensional (3D virtual planning in one patient with craniofacial microsomia is tested using Nemoceph 3D-OS software (Software Nemotec SL, Madrid, Spain to predict postoperative outcomes on hard tissue and produce CAD/CAM (Computer Aided Design/Computer Aided Manufacturing surgical splints. Methods: The clinical protocol consists of 3D data acquisition of the craniofacial complex by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT and surface scanning of the plaster dental casts. The ''virtual patient'' created underwent virtual surgery and a simulation of postoperative results on hard tissues. Surgical splints were manufactured using CAD/CAM technology in order to transfer the virtual surgical plan to the operating room. Intraoperatively, both CAD/CAM and conventional surgical splints are comparable. A second set of 3D images was obtained after surgery to acquire linear measurements and compare them with measurements obtained when predicting postoperative results virtually. Results: It was found a high similarity between both types of surgical splints with equal fitting on the dental arches. The linear measurements presented some discrepancies between the actual surgical outcomes and the predicted results from the 3D virtual simulation, but caution must be taken in the analysis of these results due to several variables. Conclusions: The reported case confirms the clinical feasibility of the described computer-assisted orthognathic surgical protocol. Further progress in the development of technologies for 3D image acquisition and improvements on software programs to simulate postoperative changes on soft tissue are required.

  20. Cirurgia ortognática de modelos: protocolo para mandíbula Orthognathic model surgery: mandibular protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Eduardo Sant'Ana; Moacyr Tadeu Vicente Rodrigues; Gabriel Ramalho Ferreira; Júlio de Araújo Gurgel

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUÇÃO: o ensaio em modelos de gesso tem grande importância para o planejamento em cirurgia ortognática. OBJETIVO: neste artigo, será apresentado, passo-a-passo, uma técnica de cirurgia de modelos iniciando pela mandíbula, destacando aspectos importantes e as vantagens deste procedimento.INTRODUCTION: The cast surgery has great importance in orthognatic surgery treatment planning. AIM: In this article, a step by step lower model surgery will be presented, emphasizing important details and...

  1. Importance of occlusal plane reproduction on the semi-adjustable articulator in planning maxillary impactions for orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchiori, Erica Cristina; Garcia, Robson Rodrigues; Moreira, Roger William Fernandes

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a 6° counterclockwise change in occlusal plane inclination would produce significant modifications on the final result of a maxillary impaction and mandible advancement model surgery. Four groups were used in this study, with ten identical maxillary casts and one mandibular cast mounted on the same semi-adjustable articulator, with the same malocclusion. The occlusal plane of the two control and study groups had an inclination of 13° and 7°, respectively. Preoperative and postoperative measures were performed using the Erickson platform and impactions of 6 and 10 mm were tested. To control these movements during model surgery, two splints were fabricated using another two maxillary and mandibular casts mounted with occlusal plane of 13°, simulating the proposed movement. The results were compared using the t test. Only the antero-posterior movement of the upper incisor was statistically significant for both study groups (p occlusal plane transference occur, it will not be clinically significant, because differences smaller than 1 mm does not have influence on soft and hard tissue final result.

  2. Changes in occlusal plane through orthognathic surgery Alteração do plano oclusal na cirurgia ortognática

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Senhorinho Esteves

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: A conventional ortho-surgical treatment, although with good clinical results, does not often achieve the desired functional outcomes. Patients with dentofacial deformities, especially those with increased occlusal planes (OP, are also affected by muscle, joint and breathing functional disorders, as well as facial esthetic involvement. The surgical manipulation of the OP in orthognathic surgery is an alternative to overcome the limitations of conventional treatment. OBJECTIVE: To report the importance of assessing the occlusal plane during diagnosis, planning and ortho-surgical treatment of patients with facial skeletal deformities and its main advantages. CONCLUSION: Although both philosophies of ortho-surgical treatment (conventional and by surgical manipulation of the OP have presented good results, the selective correction of the OP allows a full treatment of these patients, providing better esthetic and functional results.INTRODUÇÃO: o tratamento ortocirúrgico convencional, embora apresente bons resultados clínicos, muitas vezes não alcança resultados funcionais desejáveis. Os pacientes com deformidades dentofaciais, principalmente os que possuem plano oclusal (PO aumentado, são acometidos também por distúrbios funcionais musculares, articulares e respiratórios, além do comprometimento estético facial. A manipulação cirúrgica do PO na cirurgia ortognáticaé uma alternativa para suprir as limitações do tratamento convencional. OBJETIVO: relatar a importância da avaliação do plano oclusal nas fases de diagnóstico, planejamento e tratamento ortocirúrgico de pacientes com deformidades esqueléticas faciais, e suas principais vantagens. CONCLUSÃO: apesar de ambas as filosofias de tratamento ortocirúrgico (convencional e pela manipulação cirúrgica do PO apresentarem bons resultados, a correção seletiva do PO permite um tratamento integral desses pacientes, propiciando melhores resultados estéticos e

  3. Epidemiological analysis of orthognathic surgery in a hospital in Curitiba, Brazil: Review of 195 cases Análisis epidemiológico de la cirugía ortognática en un hospital de Curitiba, Brasil: Revisión de 195 casos

    OpenAIRE

    Rafaela Scariot; Delson João da Costa; Nelson Luis Barbosa Rebellato; Paulo Roberto Müller; Roberto da Conceição Ferreira

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The present retrospective study explored the spectrum and characteristics of patients treated with orthognathic surgery at the Universidade Federal do Paraná, Brazil. Materials and method: Over a six-year period from July 2002 to July 2008, the records of 195 patients with dentofacial deformities who underwent orthognathic surgical procedures were followed up. Results: Mean patient age was 25.87 years (range 14 to 65 years) and the female to male ratio was 1.5:1. The predominant ra...

  4. Interdisciplinary orthognathic treatment of high angle class III ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... with bilateral sagittal split osteotomy were done. The surgery simulation, postoperative and 2 year follow up records were compatible. The treatment was finalized in a straight profile with stable occlusion and good smile characteristics without airway disturbance. Key words: Interdisciplinary treatment, orthognathic surgery, ...

  5. Virtual planning in orthognathic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokbro, K.; Aagaard, E.; Torkov, P.

    2014-01-01

    than five patients, comparing the virtual surgical plan with the actual surgical outcome. Search terms revealed a total of 428 titles, out of which only seven articles were included, with a combined sample size of 149 patients. Data were presented in three different ways: intra-class correlation...

  6. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more ... find out more. Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment ...

  7. Use of the surface-based registration function of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing software in medical simulation software for three-dimensional simulation of orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Jae-Won; Kim, Moon-Key

    2013-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography image models are helpful in reproducing the maxillofacial area; however, they do not necessarily provide an accurate representation of dental occlusion and the state of the teeth. Recent efforts have focused on improvement of dental imaging by replacement of computed tomography with other detailed digital images. Unfortunately, despite the advantages of medical simulation software in dentofacial analysis, diagnosis, and surgical simulation, it lacks adequate registration tools. Following up on our previous report on orthognathic simulation surgery using computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) software, we recently used the registration functions of a CAD/CAM platform in conjunction with surgical simulation software. Therefore, we would like to introduce a new technique, which involves use of the registration functions of CAD/CAM software followed by transfer of the images into medical simulation software. This technique may be applicable when using various registration function tools from different software platforms.

  8. Occlusal plane change after intrusion of maxillary posterior teeth by microimplants to avoid maxillary surgery with skeletal Class III orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyo-Sang; Kim, Ji-Yeun; Kwon, Tae-Geon

    2010-11-01

    To increase stability and mandibular setback movement, surgical maxillary impaction is normally performed with mandibular setback surgery in treating adult skeletal Class III patients. This article demonstrates the use of microimplants for anchorage to intrude molars and the resultant rotation of the maxillary occlusal plane clockwise to increase the surgical mandibular setback and reduce the posterior vertical dimension instead of maxillary surgical impaction. A 21-year-old man with mandibular prognathism was treated with mandibular setback surgery that included orthodontic treatment for decompensation. Microimplants placed into the palatal alveolar bone between the maxillary first and second molars were used to intrude the maxillary posterior teeth and change the occlusal plane clockwise. This produced 4 mm more of distal movement of the chin during mandibular setback surgery compared with the surgical prediction with no change in the occlusal plane. These results were similar to those of 2-jaw surgery with maxillary posterior impaction. The intrusion of the maxillary posterior teeth with microimplants might prevent the need for maxillary surgery in adult skeletal Class III patients. Copyright © 2010 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Speech resonance in orthognathic surgery in subjects with cleft lip and palate Ressonância da fala na cirurgia ortognática em indivíduos com fissura labiopalatina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trixy Cristina Niemeyer

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of maxillary advancement on speech resonance in subjects with cleft lip and palate. The study sample was composed of 42 subjects aged 16 to 41 years old with operated cleft palate ± lip submitted to maxillary advancement. Resonance was evaluated before and 3 to 12 months after surgery by perceptual analysis and graduated from absent to severe. It was observed that 47.5% of the subjects presented impairment of resonance after orthognathic surgery, with a confidence interval (at 95% from 31.5% to 63.9%. These results suggest that orthognathic surgery in individuals with cleft palate may interfere in resonance, causing, or increasing the degree of hypernasality. Therefore, this highlights the importance of the orientation about the risks and benefits of maxillary advancement surgery and follow-up of these patients.O propósito deste estudo foi verificar o impacto do avanço de maxila na ressonância de fala em sujeitos com fissura labiopalatina. A amostra do presente estudo foi composta por 42 sujeitos, entre 16 e 41 anos de idade, com fissura de palato associada ou não à de lábio submetidos ao avanço da maxila. A ressonância foi avaliada entre 3 e 12 meses após a cirurgia por análise e perceptual e graduada de ausente a severa. Observou-se que 47.5% dos sujeitos apresentaram prejuízo da ressonância após a cirurgia ortognática, com um intervalo de confiança (a 95% de 31.5% a 63.9%. Esses resultados sugerem que a cirurgia ortognática, em sujeitos com fissura palatina, pode interferir na ressonância, causando ou aumentando o grau de hipernasalidade. Portanto, isso elucida a importância da orientação sobre os riscos e benefícios da cirurgia de avanço da maxila e acompanhamento desses pacientes.

  10. Does Temporomandibular Joint Pathology With or Without Surgical Management Affect the Stability of Counterclockwise Rotation of the Maxillomandibular Complex in Orthognathic Surgery? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Moraissi, Essam Ahmed; Wolford, Larry M

    2017-04-01

    This study was designed to determine the stability of counterclockwise rotation (CCWR) of the maxillomandibular complex (MMC) in orthognathic surgery with or without surgical correction of coexisting temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pathology. The authors implemented a systematic review and meta-analysis. A search of major databases through PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane CENTRAL was performed. Inclusion criteria were studies that analyzed CCWR of the MMC in regard to skeletal stability after orthognathic surgery in patients with or without pre-existing TMJ pathology that was or was not surgically corrected concomitantly. The predictor variables were patients who underwent CCWR of the MMC in the following subgroups: 1) healthy TMJs (presumed healthy based on history, clinical evaluation, and radiographic analysis but without magnetic resonance imaging [MRI] confirmation), 2) no TMJ assessment, 3) untreated TMJ disc displacement (confirmed by MRI), 4) TMJ disc displacement (confirmed by MRI) repositioned using Mitek anchors, and 5) reconstruction with TMJ total joint prosthesis. Outcome variables were surgical relapse for angular and linear measurements. Postsurgical mean changes for the occlusal plane (OP) and linear measurements using a fixed-effects model with a 95% confidence interval were analyzed. A total of 345 patients enrolled in 12 studies were included in this study. There was significant OP relapse and horizontal relapse at the B point and menton for studies with untreated TMJ disc displacement and studies without TMJ assessment (P < .005). There was significant horizontal relapse at the A point for studies with healthy TMJs, without assessment of the TMJs, and with TMJ reconstruction with total joint prostheses (P < .005). There was no significant vertical relapse at the B and A points for all subgroup analyses (P < .005). The result of the meta-analysis suggests that CCWR of the MMC is a stable procedure for patients with healthy TMJs, patients undergoing

  11. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... surgery, orthognathic surgery is performed to correct functional problems. Jaw Surgery can have a dramatic effect on ... without straining Chronic mouth breathing Sleep apnea (breathing problems when sleeping, including snoring) Your dentist, orthodontist and ...

  12. Mandibular kinematics after orthognathic surgical treatment a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sforza, Chiarella; Ugolini, Alessandro; Rocchetta, Davide; Galante, Domenico; Mapelli, Andrea; Giannì, Aldo Bruno

    2010-03-01

    We recorded three-dimensional mandibular movements, while the mouth was being opened and closed, using an optoelectronic motion analyser in 14 patients (5 skeletal Class II, 9 skeletal Class III) who were being assessed 7-49 months after orthognathic operations, and in 44 healthy subjects. All 14 patients had satisfactory healing on clinical examination, and function had been restored. Mandibular movement was divided into its rotational and translational components. On maximum mouth opening, the patients had significantly less total displacement of the mandibular interincisor point (p=0.05), and more mandibular movement that was explained by pure condylar rotation (p=0.006), than control subjects. There was no significant relation between maximum mouth opening and percentage rotation. While mandibular motion was well restored clinically by orthognathic surgery, the kinematics of the joint were modified. Larger studies and longitudinal investigations are necessary to appreciate the clinical relevance of the variations in condylar rotational and translational components.

  13. [Micro-porous titanium implants in orthognathic facial recontouring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrier, Jean-Baptiste; Moreau, Nathan

    2016-09-01

    Facial symmetry has always been a longstanding objective of orthognathic surgery. Patients that present significant facial asymmetry desire functional dental occlusion but also seek to enhance their facial esthetics. In that regard, different surgical techniques have been proposed to enhance facial recontouring. Through a clinical case report and a literature review, this article explores the use of allopastic microporous titanium implants in volumetric corrections of the face. There is a current lack of evidence regarding the use of microporous titanium implants in volumetric corrections of the face, most papers reporting their use in post-traumatic or post-surgical cranio-facial defects repair. Pros and cons of such implants are discussed in association with the usefulness of this surgical technique in daily orthognathic surgical practice. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2016.

  14. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Jaw Surgery Download Download the ebook for further information Corrective jaw, or orthognathic surgery is performed by ... your treatment. Correction of Common Dentofacial Deformities ​ ​ The information provided here is not intended as a substitute ...

  15. Management of bimaxillary transverse discrepancy with vertical excess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh C Chaudhary

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 14-year-old boy reported with a complaint of severe irregularity of lower teeth and forwardly placed upper teeth. History revealed snoring as an occasional complaint. The case was diagnosed as mild class II skeletally with increased lower anterior face height, bimaxillary transverse discrepancy leading to severe crowding in the lower arch, V-shaped upper arch with increased overjet and deep bite. Three phase treatment was planned. In the first phase, bimaxillary expansion with mid-symphyseal distraction osteogenesis and rapid maxillary expansion was carried out. After this phase of treatment, the episodes of snoring vanished. The second phase was 1 year of orthodontics to produce symmetric well-aligned arches in good function and aesthetics. Third, the treatment concluded with reduction-advancement genioplasty for correction of vertical excess and surgical camouflage.

  16. Quality of life and communication in orthognathic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catt, Susan L; Ahmad, Sofia; Collyer, Jeremy; Hardwick, Lauren; Shah, Nahush; Winchester, Lindsay

    2018-04-11

    The primary aim was to determine what, if any, relationships exist between communication and quality of life in patients receiving orthognathic treatment since this has not been explored. A secondary aim was to compare the Quality of Life (QoL) of a pre-treatment sample with those at 2 years post-surgery. A cross-sectional questionnaire method was used. Outpatient clinics providing orthognathic treatment at four UK hospital sites. Two separate samples of pre-treatment (n = 73) and 2-year post-surgery (n = 78) patients participated in the study. At clinic appointments, all eligible patients were invited to complete the Orthognathic Quality of Life Questionnaire (OQLQ), a previously validated condition-specific quality of life measure. At the same time, participants at the 2-year post-surgery stage also completed a second short questionnaire, the Communication Assessment Tool-Team (CAT-T), where they rated the quality of communication they had received during treatment. One hundred and fifty-one complete responses were received. The average age was 24.5 years (S.D. 9.77) and the majority (67%) were female in both groups. Statistically significant associations were found between QoL and quality of communication in the treated sample. Findings also showed a comparatively poorer QoL for the pre-treatment participants. This reduced QoL was more pronounced in females than males for all aspects except dentofacial appearance. There was an improvement in QoL for patients at 2 years post-surgery compared to pre-treatment. There is an association between QoL and quality of communication as reported by participants at 2 years post-surgery. These novel findings are similar to outcomes in other patient settings such as oncology, but further investigation is required to establish the direction of cause and effect.

  17. A 3-Dimensional Approach for Analysis in Orthognathic Surgery-Using Free Software for Voxel-Based Alignment and Semiautomatic Measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokbro, Kasper; Thygesen, Torben

    2018-01-01

    the manual reidentification error. This study evaluated the repeatability of surgical outcome measurements using the semiautomatic approach. Furthermore, a step-by-step guide is provided to enable researchers and clinicians to perform the 3D analysis by themselves. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Evaluating surgical...... outcome consists of 2 parts. First, the scans are aligned at the anterior cranial base. Second, a semiautomatic approach is used to place 3 dental reference points at exactly the same sites of the pre- and postoperative maxilla. Because the maxilla is repositioned during surgery but otherwise unaltered...... the reference points on the postoperative scan, the hard palate is used as a mutual maxillary reference structure. A reproducibility test was performed in 10 participants by analyzing the difference between repeated measurements. RESULTS: Repeated linear measurements differed by less than 0.1 mm along all 3...

  18. Computational fluid dynamics study of the pharyngeal airway space before and after mandibular setback surgery in patients with mandibular prognathism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Y; Oshima, M; Iwai, T; Kitajima, H; Omura, S; Tohnai, I

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the pressure drop in the pharyngeal airway space (ΔP PAS ) and the minimum cross-sectional area (minCSA) of the pharyngeal airway before and after mandibular setback surgery using computational fluid dynamics, in order to prevent iatrogenic obstructive sleep apnoea. Eleven patients with mandibular prognathism underwent bilateral sagittal split osteotomy for mandibular setback. Three-dimensional models of the upper airway were reconstructed from preoperative and postoperative computed tomography images, and simulations were performed using computational fluid dynamics. ΔP PAS and the minCSA of the pharyngeal airway were calculated, and the relationship between them was evaluated by non-linear regression analysis. In all cases, the minCSA was found at the level of the velopharynx. After surgery, ΔP PAS increased significantly and the minCSA decreased significantly. The non-linear regression equation expressing the relationship between these variables was ΔP PAS =3.73×minCSA -2.06 . When the minCSA was <1cm 2 , ΔP PAS increased greatly. The results of this study suggest that surgeons should consider bimaxillary orthognathic surgery rather than mandibular setback surgery to prevent the development of iatrogenic obstructive sleep apnoea when correcting a skeletal class III malocclusion. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Trastornos hidroelectrolíticos en el postoperatorio de cirugía ortognática Hydroelectrolytic disorders following orthognathic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. García-Arana

    2005-02-01

    intraoperatory period, and the first 24 postoperatory hours. Results. 55% of the patients that staid for more than 24 hours in Reanimation showed early autolimited polyuria. All of them were successfully treated with a proper hidroelectrolitic treatment. One needed intranasal desmopresin. However hypopotasemy in one case and hyponatremy in another were resolved with hidroelectrolitic treatment. Disscusion and conclusions. Almost 50% of patients surgically treated of dentofacial deformities present polyuria in the early postoperatory period. There are three main etiologic hypotesis: hydric intoxication during surgery, inhibition of ADH liberation due to facial osteotomies, and salt wasting syndrome. The most probable in our serie is an hydric intoxication during surgery.

  20. Ophthalmic complications associated with orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanigan, D T; Romanchuk, K; Olson, C K

    1993-05-01

    Ophthalmic complications are rare following maxillary osteotomies. Potential complications include a decrease in visual acuity, extraocular muscle dysfunction, neuroparalytic keratitis, and nasolacrimal problems involving both an increase or a decrease in tearing. Ophthalmic injuries appear to be primarily mediated through indirect injuries to neurovascular structures occurring from traction, compression, or contrecoup injuries from forces transmitted during the pterygomaxillary dysjunction using an osteotome or from fractures extending to the base of the skull or orbit associated with the pterygomaxillary dysjunction or the maxillary downfracture. A review of the literature of previous ophthalmic complications as well as eight new cases are reported. The possible etiologic basis for these injuries is discussed in detail as well as treatment possibilities when appropriate.

  1. Integrating lingual orthodontics with orthognathic surgery

    OpenAIRE

    M S Kannan; Mansi Giri

    2016-01-01

    Appearance is the most important motivating factor for patients seeking orthodontic treatment and is self-evident that these patients would prefer an appliance that is less visible. Lingual "invisible" Appliances offer the best option to the patient seeking aesthetic correction for their malocclusion. A group of such patients who do not want their appliances to be visible also require surgical correction. Lingual appliance being comparable to the labial counterpart provides the opportunity of...

  2. An Innovative Treatment Strategy to Counteract Retroactive Forces In Bimaxillary Dentoalveolar Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reena R Kumar

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a case report of a 30 yrs old male patient with Class I Bimaxillary Protrusion treated using innovative lingual forces with a labial appliance (without any additional intraoral or extraoral anchorage devices effectively with negligible anchorage loss.

  3. A modified occlusal wafer for managing partially dentate orthognathic patients--a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soneji, Bhavin Kiritkumar; Esmail, Zaid; Sharma, Pratik

    2015-03-01

    A multidisciplinary approach is essential in orthognathic surgery to achieve stable and successful outcomes. The model surgery planning is an important aspect in achieving the desired aims. An occlusal wafer used at the time of surgery aids the surgeon during correct placement of the jaws. When dealing with partially dentate patients, the design of the occlusal wafer requires modification to appropriately position the jaw. Two cases with partially dentate jaws are presented in which the occlusal wafer has been modified to provide stability at the time of surgery.

  4. Correction of Anterior Open Bite and Facial Profile by Orthognathic Surgery– A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quazi Billur Rahman

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes the treatment of a severe anterior open bite, Class III malocclusion with a history of digitsucking. An 18 years-old male presented with a significant anteroposterior and vertical discrepancy of face. The patient’sface was concave with procumbent lips. He had an anterior open bite of 11 mm, a reverse overjet of 8 mm, and atransverse maxillary deficiency on right side. The orthognathic surgery was elected as an option of treatment to correctthe anterior open bite with improvement of facial profile.Keywords: Anterior open bite; Transverse maxillary deficiency; Vertical excess; Orthognathic surgery.DOI: 10.3329/bsmmuj.v3i1.5512BSMMU J 2010; 3(1: 31-34

  5. Report of a Class I bimaxillary dental protrusion case with extraction of first premolars treated with Clarity™ SL MBT appliances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Trevisi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bimaxillary protrusion cases are common in orthodontic practice. For the best facial outcome, the biomechanics can often be challenging. A class I bimaxillary protrusion case is presented below illustrating the careful application of extractions and bracket prescription. The case highlights how self-ligating brackets and high precision bracket positioning can reduce the need for additional anchorage.

  6. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... their surgery, orthognathic surgery is performed to correct functional problems. Jaw Surgery can have a dramatic effect on many aspects of life. Following are some of the conditions that may ... front, or side Facial injury Birth defects Receding lower jaw and ...

  7. Epidemiological analysis of orthognathic surgery in a hospital in Curitiba, Brazil: Review of 195 cases Análisis epidemiológico de la cirugía ortognática en un hospital de Curitiba, Brasil: Revisión de 195 casos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Scariot

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present retrospective study explored the spectrum and characteristics of patients treated with orthognathic surgery at the Universidade Federal do Paraná, Brazil. Materials and method: Over a six-year period from July 2002 to July 2008, the records of 195 patients with dentofacial deformities who underwent orthognathic surgical procedures were followed up. Results: Mean patient age was 25.87 years (range 14 to 65 years and the female to male ratio was 1.5:1. The predominant racial group was "white". Most patients belonged to the economically productive population. Sixty-two patients had complete dentition. Only 3.59% patients had local anesthesia (rapid palatal expansion. Transverse maxillary deficiency was the most common deformity, followed by maxillary anteroposterior deficiency associated with mandibular anteroposterior excess. Mandibular set-back was the intervention most frequently performed. The surgical procedures took an average of 3 hours 51 minutes and orthodontic treatments took an average of 44.48 months. Complications occurred in 22.57% of patients, the most common of which were permanent paresthesia of the lower lip (7.17% and inadequate fracture reduction (5.12%. Conclusions: The findings included concepts that were useful for characterizing the profile of patients who undergo orthognathic surgery in southern Brazil. The results also may help to correctly develop protocols for patient care designed to improve the overall results of the procedures.Objetivo: Este estudio retrospectivo explora el espectro y las características de los pacientes tratados con cirugía ortognática en la Universidade Federal do Paraná. Material y método: A lo largo de 6 años, a partir de julio de 2002 hasta julio de 2008, se efectuó el seguimiento de 195 pacientes con deformidades dentofaciales que se sometieron a procedimientos de cirugía ortognática. Resultados: La edad media de los pacientes fue de 25,87 años (de 14 a 65 y la

  8. Agenesis of mandibular second premolar in patient with dental bimaxillary protrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Carlos Alberto Estevanell

    2017-01-01

    The present study reports the treatment carried out in a patient with mandibular second premolar agenesis associated with early loss of a deciduous second molar, deep overbite, severe overjet and dentoalveolar bimaxillary protrusion, which led to lip incompetence and a convex facial profile. The main objectives of this treatment were: to eliminate the spaces in mandibular arch, correct overbite, as well as eliminate bimaxillary protrusion and lip incompetence, thus leading to a balanced profile. The case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (BBO) as part of the requirements to obtain the title of BBO diplomate.

  9. Agenesis of mandibular second premolar in patient with dental bimaxillary protrusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Estevanell Tavares

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The present study reports the treatment carried out in a patient with mandibular second premolar agenesis associated with early loss of a deciduous second molar, deep overbite, severe overjet and dentoalveolar bimaxillary protrusion, which led to lip incompetence and a convex facial profile. The main objectives of this treatment were: to eliminate the spaces in mandibular arch, correct overbite, as well as eliminate bimaxillary protrusion and lip incompetence, thus leading to a balanced profile. The case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (BBO as part of the requirements to obtain the title of BBO diplomate.

  10. Morphological impact on patients of maxillomandibular advancement surgery for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beranger, Thibaut; Garreau, Emilie; Ferri, Joël; Raoul, Gwenael

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the experience of patients who have benefited from maxillomandibular advancement surgery for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS), and also the morphological modifications measured on pre- and postoperative lateral headfilms. Twenty-three patients aged 24 to 64 (M=46.8) who had undergone bimaxillary advancement osteotomy for the treatment of OSAHS filled in a questionnaire concerning their overall satisfaction following surgery, the modification of their facial appearance as perceived by themselves and their family and friends, the change in their smile, and the slimmer and more youthful appearance of their face. Measurements of bone and skin points were also performed on lateral cephalograms before and after surgery so as to assess the advancement of the bony bases (maxillary, mandibular and chin advancement) and the impact on soft tissue by analysis of the skin profile. A total of 91.3% of the patients were satisfied overall following the surgical procedure; 78.3% considered that their faces were improved or unchanged; 39.1% found their faces slimmer and 34.8% thought they looked more youthful. Average maxillary, mandibular and chin advancements with respect to the base of the skull were, respectively, 7.4mm, 11.1mm and 14.1mm. Advancement of the stomion point with respect to the Frankfurt plane was 8.3mm on average, reflecting a significant forward movement of the upper and lower lips. Despite greater maxillary and mandibular advancements than in traditional orthognathic surgery, patients reacted positively to these morphological changes, considering in more than a third of cases that their faces looked slimmer or more youthful. It can thus be concluded that overall satisfaction is high, with a morphological impact that is satisfactory and well-accepted by patients postoperatively. Copyright © 2016 CEO. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Bimaxillary simultaneous immediate loading of full-arch restorations: A case series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cercadillo-Ibarguren, Iñaki; Sánchez-Torres, Alba; Valmaseda-Castellón, Eduard

    2017-01-01

    Aim To describe a bimaxillary simultaneous immediate loading protocol with full-arch implant-supported fixed prostheses. Material and Methods A prospective case series of 8 patients who required full-arch rehabilitation was conducted. The main inclusion criteria were patients with teeth that required extraction. At least 1 molar per arch was temporarily employed to stabilize the surgical template and the provisional prosthesis during intraoral relining. Results Two upper implants failed in 1 patient. Structural fracture was registered in 3 patients, around 3 months after loading. All of them had bruxism. Three esthetic complications were registered: midline deviation, canting of the oclusal plane and color mismatch. Conclusions Although this protocol achieves optimal results, some mechanical complications were encountered. The fracture of the provisional prosthesis is a relatively common mechanical complication but does not seem to jeopardize the final treatment result. Key words:Implant-supported full-arch, provisional prosthesis fracture, bimaxillary simultaneous rehabilitation, conical abutments. PMID:29075419

  12. Speech resonance in orthognathic surgery in subjects with cleft lip and palate Ressonância da fala na cirurgia ortognática em indivíduos com fissura labiopalatina

    OpenAIRE

    Trixy Cristina Niemeyer; Adriana de Oliveira Camargo Gomes; Ana Paula Fukushiro; Katia Flores Genaro

    2005-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of maxillary advancement on speech resonance in subjects with cleft lip and palate. The study sample was composed of 42 subjects aged 16 to 41 years old with operated cleft palate ± lip submitted to maxillary advancement. Resonance was evaluated before and 3 to 12 months after surgery by perceptual analysis and graduated from absent to severe. It was observed that 47.5% of the subjects presented impairment of resonance after orthogn...

  13. Risk of surgical glove perforation in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroyanagi, N; Nagao, T; Sakuma, H; Miyachi, H; Ochiai, S; Kimura, Y; Fukano, H; Shimozato, K

    2012-08-01

    Oral and maxillofacial surgery, which involves several sharp instruments and fixation materials, is consistently at a high risk for cross-contamination due to perforated gloves, but it is unclear how often such perforations occur. This study aimed to address this issue. The frequency of the perforation of surgical gloves (n=1436) in 150 oral and maxillofacial surgeries including orthognathic surgery (n=45) was assessed by the hydroinsufflation technique. Orthognathic surgery had the highest perforation rate in at least 1 glove in 1 operation (91.1%), followed by cleft lip and palate surgery (55.0%), excision of oral soft tumour (54.5%) and dental implantation (50.0%). The perforation rate in scrub nurses was 63.4%, followed by 44.4% in surgeons and first assistants, and 16.3% in second assistants. The odds ratio for the perforation rate in orthognathic surgery versus other surgeries was 16.0 (95% confidence interval: 5.3-48.0). The protection rate offered by double gloving in orthognathic surgery was 95.2%. These results suggest that, regardless of the surgical duration and blood loss in all fields of surgery, orthognathic surgery must be categorized in the highest risk group for glove perforation, following gynaecological and open lung surgery, due to the involvement of sharp objects. Copyright © 2012 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Osteosynthesis techniques used for mandibular sagittal split osteotomy – history of orthognathic procedures and modern practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Rafał; Trybek, Grzegorz

    Choosing an appropriate fixation technique after maxillary or mandibular osteotomy is one of the key factors affecting the success of orthognathic surgery. In line with the development of new surgical methods and techniques, the surgeons’ approach to the fixation of bone fragments has evolved accordingly, varying from non-fusion to different osteosynthesis techniques. Advances in medical sciences and medical technologies, have changed our attitudes to bone fragment reduction in orthopaedics and traumatology, and also in maxillofacial surgery. The pivotal underlying principle which determines bone healing – that is proper positioning so as to ensure appropriate contact area and immobilisation so as to ensure osteosynthesis – has remained unchanged for centuries. However, over the years, patient comfort and the predictability of treatment outcomes have vastly improved. The paper provides an overview of the techniques and methods used for the fixation of osteotomized fragments after bilateral sagittal split osteotomy since its introduction by Hugo Obwegeser up to the present day.

  15. Class III orthognathic surgical cases facilitated by accelerated osteogenic orthodontics: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, JiaQi; Xu, Li; Liang, Cheng; Jiang, JiuHui

    2015-11-01

    To describe a multidisciplinary treatment approach that includes corticotomy, orthodontic force and orthognathic surgery for the management of skeletal Class III surgical cases. The main advantage of the combined techniques is a reduction in treatment time for young adult patients. Accelerated Osteogenic Orthodontics (AOO) was delivered to three young adult patients during their pre-surgical orthodontic treatment. After aligning and levelling the dental arches, a piezosurgical corticotomy was performed to the buccal aspect of the alveolar bone. Bone graft materials were used to cover the decorticated area and soft tissue flaps were replaced. The mean time for extraction space closure was 5.4 ± 1.3 months and the mean time for pre-surgical orthodontic treatment was 12.0 ± 0.9 months. The average total treatment time was 20.4 ± 2.4 months. A pre-existing bony fenestration in the buccal cortex adjacent to the right lateral incisor root apex of Case 1 was corrected. The facial aesthetics of three patients improved following multidisciplinary treatment. This approach may be an efficient method for the orthognathic patient who desires a reduced treatment time, but further clinical research is required.

  16. Avaliação da aplicabilidade de um padrão cefalométrico norte-americano em pacientes brasileiros submetidos à cirurgia ortognática Evaluation of the applicability of a North American cephalometric standard to Brazilian patients subjected to orthognathic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Paganeli Machado Giglio

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar a aplicabilidade de um padrão cefalométrico norte-americano em pacientes brasileiros submetidos à cirurgia ortognática, por meio da comparação dos traçados cefalométricos pós-tratamento ortodôntico-cirúrgico de 29 pacientes que passaram por cirurgia de maxila e mandíbula, com o padrão cefalométrico utilizado como orientação para o planejamento dos casos. MÉTODOS: os traçados foram gerados pelo programa Dolphin Imaging 9.0 a partir de telerradiografias em norma lateral digitalizadas, nas quais foram marcados 48 pontos de referência dentários, ósseos e tegumentares. Assim, obteve-se 26 grandezas cefalométricas lineares e angulares para posterior comparação com os valores normativos, considerando-se o dimorfismo sexual e as eventuais modificações feitas no planejamento em virtude de necessidades individuais de cada caso e das possíveis diferenças étnico-raciais. Os dados da amostra foram confrontados com o padrão por meio da comparação das médias e desvios-padrão pelo teste "t" de Student. RESULTADOS: para os homens, as médias da amostra foram significativamente diferentes do padrão em cinco das grandezas estudadas; enquanto, para as mulheres, nove apresentaram diferenças estatisticamente significativas. No entanto, apesar da similaridade das médias na maioria das medidas em ambos os gêneros, os dados mostraram grandes variações individuais. CONCLUSÕES: a análise dos resultados obtidos sugere que o padrão cefalométrico norte-americano empregado é aplicável como referência para o planejamento de casos ortodôntico-cirúrgicos de pacientes brasileiros, desde que se atente às variações individuais de acordo com as necessidades de cada paciente.OBJECTIVES: To study the applicability of a North American cephalometric standard to Brazilian patients subjected to orthognathic surgery by comparing the post-surgical/orthodontic treatment cephalometric tracings of 29 patients who had

  17. Avaliação da alteração do plano oclusal em cirurgias ortognáticas combinadas com utilização de fixação interna rígida em pacientes com padrão facial de Classe II Evaluation of occlusal plane alteration in Orthognathic Surgeries combined with rigid internal fixation in Class II skeletal facial standard patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Eiras Dela Coleta Pizzol

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar a estabilidade de cirurgias bimaxilares com fixação interna rígida, na qual promoveu-se uma rotação anti-horária da mandíbula e conseqüente redução do ângulo do plano oclusal. METODOLOGIA: foram estudados 15 pacientes com padrão facial de Classe II e deficiência mandibular. Os movimentos cirúrgicos foram avaliados por meio de medidas lineares e angulares realizadas no programa CefX, obtidas de telerradiografias cefalométricas em norma lateral em três diferentes tempos: (T0 pré-operatório, (T1 pós-operatório imediato e (T2 pós-operatório de no mínimo 6 meses. RESULTADOS E CONCLUSÕES: os resultados demonstraram que a cirurgia bimaxilar promove mudanças faciais significativas e, principalmente, que a rotação anti-horária da mandíbula com redução do ângulo do plano oclusal mostrou-se estatisticamente estável, sendo uma opção confiável em cirurgias de pacientes com padrão facial de Classe II com deficiência mandibular.AIM: to access the surgical stability combined with rigid internal fixation, where the counter-clockwise jaw rotation was carried out, and consequently the occlusal plane reduction. METHODS: fifteen Class II skeletal facial standard patients were studied. The surgical movements were assessed by linear measures and angles accomplished at the CefX program, collected from cephalometric teleradiography lateral norms in three different moments: (T0 presurgical, (T1 instantaneous postsurgical and (T2 postsurgical at least six months. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: the results showed that the bimaxillary surgery causes meaningful facial changes and mainly, the counter-clockwise mandible rotation and consequently the occlusal plane angle reduction showed statistically stable, suggesting a reliable opinion in Class II standard facial surgeries with defective mandibular.

  18. Space Closure with Loop Mechanics for Treatment of Bimaxillary Protrusion: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjay, N; Rajesh, R N G; Scindia, Rajat; Ajith, Sreedevi D

    2015-01-01

    This case report intends to highlight the space closure with tear drop loop mechanics for bimaxillary protrusion. Loops can be fabricated in a sectional or full arch wire, and closing loops are usually used in loop mechanics for extraction space closure. The major advantage of loop mechanics is the lack of friction between the bracket and arch wire during space closure. An adult patient with bimaxillary protrusion reported to the clinic. The patient was treated successfully by maximum retraction of maxillary and mandibular anterior teeth after extraction of all first premolars. Space closure was begun using a moment differential between posterior and anterior segments created by a Tear drop loop. Anterior teeth were moved with bodily movement, and no anchorage loss of the posterior segments was seen using a Tear drop loop spring. A stable result with normal over jet and overbite was achieved with retraction of maxillary and mandibular anterior teeth. With a Tear drop loop, individual biomechanical responses can be achieved, and it is possible to calculate force magnitude for every patient. PMID:26028908

  19. Design, development and clinical validation of computer-aided surgical simulation system for streamlined orthognathic surgical planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Peng; Mai, Huaming; Li, Jianfu; Ho, Dennis Chun-Yu; Lai, Yingying; Liu, Siting; Kim, Daeseung; Xiong, Zixiang; Alfi, David M; Teichgraeber, John F; Gateno, Jaime; Xia, James J

    2017-12-01

    There are many proven problems associated with traditional surgical planning methods for orthognathic surgery. To address these problems, we developed a computer-aided surgical simulation (CASS) system, the AnatomicAligner, to plan orthognathic surgery following our streamlined clinical protocol. The system includes six modules: image segmentation and three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction, registration and reorientation of models to neutral head posture, 3D cephalometric analysis, virtual osteotomy, surgical simulation, and surgical splint generation. The accuracy of the system was validated in a stepwise fashion: first to evaluate the accuracy of AnatomicAligner using 30 sets of patient data, then to evaluate the fitting of splints generated by AnatomicAligner using 10 sets of patient data. The industrial gold standard system, Mimics, was used as the reference. When comparing the results of segmentation, virtual osteotomy and transformation achieved with AnatomicAligner to the ones achieved with Mimics, the absolute deviation between the two systems was clinically insignificant. The average surface deviation between the two models after 3D model reconstruction in AnatomicAligner and Mimics was 0.3 mm with a standard deviation (SD) of 0.03 mm. All the average surface deviations between the two models after virtual osteotomy and transformations were smaller than 0.01 mm with a SD of 0.01 mm. In addition, the fitting of splints generated by AnatomicAligner was at least as good as the ones generated by Mimics. We successfully developed a CASS system, the AnatomicAligner, for planning orthognathic surgery following the streamlined planning protocol. The system has been proven accurate. AnatomicAligner will soon be available freely to the boarder clinical and research communities.

  20. A New Three-Dimensional Cephalometric Analysis for Orthognathic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gateno, Jaime; Xia, James J.; Teichgraeber, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Two basic problems are associated with traditional 2-dimensional ((2D) cephalometry First, many important parameters cannot be measured on plain cephalograms; and second, most 2D cephalometric measurements are distorted in the presence of facial asymmetry. Three-dimensional (3D) cephalometry, which has been facilitated by the introduction of cone beam computed tomography scans, can be solved these problems. However, before this can be realized, fundamental problems must be solved. They are the unreliability of internal reference systems and some 3D measurements, and the lack of tools to assess and measure symmetry. In this manuscript, the authors present a new 3D cephalometric analysis that uses different geometric approaches to solve the fundamental problems previously mentioned. This analysis allows the accurate measurement of the size, shape, position and orientation of the different facial units and incorporates a novel method to measure asymmetry. PMID:21257250

  1. Subcranial and orthognathic surgery for obstructive sleep apnea in achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susarla, Srinivas M; Mundinger, Gerhard S; Kapadia, Hitesh; Fisher, Mark; Smartt, James; Derderian, Christopher; Dorafshar, Amir; Hopper, Richard A

    2017-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common problem in patients with achondroplasia. The purpose of this study was to assess changes in airway volumes following various degrees of facial skeletal advancement. This was a retrospective evaluation of patients with achondroplasia who underwent facial skeletal advancement for obstructive sleep apnea. Patients were treated with either an isolated Le Fort III distraction (LF3) or Le Fort II distraction with or without subsequent Le Fort I and bilateral sagittal split osteotomies (LF2 ± LF1/BSSO). Demographic, cephalometric, volumetric, and polysomnographic variables were recorded pre- and postoperatively. Six patients with achondroplasia underwent midface advancement for treatment of OSA (2 LF2 + LF1/BSSO, 2 LF2, 2 LF3). Patients undergoing LF2 + LF1/BSSO had consistent volumetric improvements at the nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal levels (Δ ≥ +347% and ≥+253%, respectively). Patients undergoing LF2 alone had consistent improvement in the nasopharyngeal airway alone (Δ ≥ +214%). Patients undergoing LF3 alone had consistent, but less dramatic, changes in nasopharyngeal volume (Δ ≥ +97.1%). All patients undergoing LF2 distraction (with or without LF1/BSSO) had a ≥50% reduction in the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) postoperatively; there was no improvement in AHI with LF3 alone. In patients with achondroplasia-associated OSA there are variable improvements in airway volume. This preliminary report suggests that LF2 distraction, with or without subsequent LF1/BSSO, may provide consistent reductions in AHI relative to LF3 distraction. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. An orthognathic simulation system integrating teeth, jaw and face data using 3D cephalometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, N; Tsuji, M; Shigematsu, M; Goto, M

    2007-07-01

    A method for simulating the movement of teeth, jaw and face caused by orthognathic surgery is proposed, characterized by the use of 3D cephalometric data for 3D simulation. Computed tomography data are not required. The teeth and facial data are obtained by a laser scanner and the data for the patient's mandible are reconstructed and integrated according to 3D cephalometry using a projection-matching technique. The mandibular form is simulated by transforming a generic model to match the patient's cephalometric data. This system permits analysis of bone movement at each individual part, while also helping in the choice of optimal osteotomy design considering the influences on facial soft-tissue form.

  3. OSAS Surgery and Postoperative Discomfort: Phase I Surgery versus Phase II Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Gasparini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This study aims to investigate the reasons that discourage the patients affected by OSAS to undergo orthognathic surgery and compares the postoperative discomfort of phase I (soft tissue surgery and phase II (orthognathic surgery procedures for treatment of OSAS. Material and Methods. A pool of 46 patients affected by OSAS was divided into two groups: “surgery patients” who accepted surgical treatments of their condition and “no surgery patients” who refused surgical procedures. The “surgery patients” group was further subdivided into two arms: patients who accepted phase I procedures (IP and those who accepted phase II (IIP. To better understand the motivations behind the refusal of II phase procedures, we asked the patients belonging to both the IP group and “no surgery” group to indicate the main reason that influenced their decision to avoid II phase procedures. We also monitored and compared five parameters of postoperative discomfort: pain, painkiller assumption, length of hospitalization, foreign body sensation, and diet assumption following IP and IIP procedures. Results. The main reason to avoid IIP procedures was the concern of a more severe postoperative discomfort. Comparison of the postoperative discomfort following IP versus IIP procedures showed that the former scored worse in 4 out of 5 parameters analyzed. Conclusion. IIP procedures produce less postoperative discomfort. IIP procedures, namely, orthognathic surgery, should be the first choice intervention in patients affected by OSAS and dentoskeletal malformation.

  4. Three-dimensional soft-tissue and hard-tissue changes in the treatment of bimaxillary protrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solem, R Christian; Marasco, Richard; Guiterrez-Pulido, Luis; Nielsen, Ib; Kim, Seong-Hun; Nelson, Gerald

    2013-08-01

    Facial convexity related to bimaxillary protrusion is prevalent in many populations. Underlying skeletal protrusion combined with increased dentoalveolar protrusion contributes to facial muscle imbalance and lip incompetence, which is undesirable for many patients. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between soft-tissue and hard-tissue changes in an orthodontically treated Asian population. Twenty-four consecutive adult Asian patients (mean age, 24 years), diagnosed with severe bimaxillary dentoalveolar protrusion, were evaluated using pretreatment and posttreatment cone-beam computed tomography. The patients were treated with 4 first premolar extractions followed by anterior retraction with either skeletal or intraoral anchorage. Serial cone-beam computed tomography radiographs were registered on the entire cranial base and fossa. Soft-tissue and hard-tissue changes were determined through landmark displacement and color mapping. Upper lip retraction was concentrated between the nasolabial folds and commissures. Lower lip retraction was accompanied by significant redistribution of soft tissues at pogonion. Soft-tissue changes correlated well with regional facial muscle activity. Significant retractions (2-4 mm) of the soft tissues occurred beyond the midsagittal region. Use of skeletal anchorage resulted in 1.5 mm greater lower lip retraction than intraoral anchorage, with greater retraction of the maxillary and mandibular incisor root apices. Profound soft-tissue changes accompanied retraction of the anterior dentition with both treatment modalities. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Accessory Mental Foramen and Maxillofacial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahpeyma, Amin; Khajehahmadi, Saeedeh

    2017-10-26

    Accessory mental foramens should be considered in surgical procedures performed in mandibular body and symphysis. Location and content of these foramina has significant impact on the result of surgery.Lip numbness is the catastrophic result if these foramina are violated while their content is nerves that carry sensory inputs from lower lip. Examples of interferences with dental implant, orthognathic, and periapical surgeries are presented and it is discussed in which conditions they complicate oral surgical procedures.

  6. Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and sterile gloves. Before the surgery begins, a time out is held during which the surgical team confirms ... the Consumer Version. DOCTORS: Click here for the Professional Version What Participants Need to Know About Clinical ...

  7. Orthodontic treatment of anterior open bite: a review article--is surgery always necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Isabelle; Figel, Philipp; Winchester, Lindsay

    2014-09-01

    Anterior open bite cases are very difficult to treat satisfactorily because of their multifactorial aetiology and their very high relapse rate. Dependent on the origin of the anterior open bite malocclusion and the patient's age, there are several treatment possibilities ranging from deterrent appliances, high-pull headgear, fixed appliances with and without extractions to orthognathic surgery, and skeletal anchorage with miniplates or miniscrews. The gold standard treatment of skeletal anterior open bite cases is the combined approach of orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances and orthognathic surgery. In recent years, temporary anchorage devices (TAD) have been developed to correct anterior open bites orthodontically. With the introduction of TAD as an effective treatment modality, orthognathic surgery may be avoidable in selected anterior open bite cases. This is a relatively new technique and to date there remains a lack of evidence of long-term stability of anterior open bite closure with TAD.

  8. How do patients perceive the British orthodontic society online information resource about orthognathic treatment? A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettle, Jennifer; Marshman, Zoe; Benson, Philip E; McCarthy, Caroline; Pye, Gurpreet; Sandler, Jonathan; Winchester, Lindsay; Flett, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    To explore the accessibility, usability and relevance of the British Orthodontic Society (BOS) online information resource (OIR), Your Jaw Surgery. Qualitative, cross-sectional study. 5 UK sites. Patients before, during and after treatment for non-cleft skeletal discrepancy. Patients were identified at joint clinics and recruited after having time to view the OIR. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 patients (aged 16-46 years). The interviews were transcribed and thematic analysis was undertaken using a framework approach. The main themes identified were the overall usefulness, personal relevance and positive perceptions of the OIR. The OIR was seen to be useful for patients considering treatment, and potentially useful for patients undergoing treatment. Participants were looking for a personally relevant resource that would give them the best possible idea of how they would look and feel after surgery. The OIR was perceived as trusted, positive and reassuring. Patients at different stages of treatment found the OIR helpful and reassuring. Clinicians may find it useful to direct patients to the OIR to complement a professional consultation, but should be aware that patients may perceive it as presenting a positive image of the long-term benefits of orthognathic surgery.

  9. Changes of occlusal plane inclination after orthodontic treatment with four premolars extraction in dento-alveolar bimaxillary protrusion cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NR Yuliawati Zenab

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to find out whether there were changes in occlusal plane inclination after fixed orthodontic treatment of bimaxillary protrusion cases where extraction of four first premolars was needed using the standard Edgewise appliances. The sample was fourteen orthodontic patients, aged above sixteen years old, no sexual discrimination, treated with fixed appliances at Orthodontic Specialist Clinic Faculty of Dentistry Universitas Padjadjaran. The method was a pre-post design which compared occlusal plane inclination obtained from tracings of lateral cephalograms before and after orthodontic treatment. The results were calculated with the paired t-test analysis. The study revealed that there were no significant changes in occlusal plane inclination after the orthodontic treatment.

  10. Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery has several common causes, including the following: Infections at the operative site Lung problems such as pneumonia or collapsed lung ... the trauma of an operation. The risk of infections at the operative site, DVTs, and UTIs can be decreased by meticulous ...

  11. Immediate loading of bimaxillary total fixed prostheses supported by five flapless-placed implants with machined surfaces: A 6-month follow-up prospective single cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannizzaro, Gioacchino; Felice, Pietro; Loi, Ignazio; Viola, Paolo; Ferri, Vittorio; Leone, Michele; Collivasone, Dario; Esposito, Marco

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical outcome of fully edentulous patients rehabilitated with immediately loaded bimaxillary screw-retained metal-resin prostheses supported by five implants placed flapless: two in the mandible and three in the maxillae. Twenty-five consecutively treated patients were recruited. To be immediately loaded, implants had to be inserted with a minimum torque of 80 Ncm. Outcome measures were prosthesis and implant failures, and complications. Six months after loading no patients dropped out and no prosthesis or implant failed. Two maxillary prostheses were loaded early at 8 weeks because implants were inserted with a torque inferior to 45 Ncm. Three complications occurred in two patients but they were all successfully treated. Six months after loading, immediately loaded bimaxillary cross-arch prostheses can be supported by only two mandibular and three maxillary flapless-placed dental implants. Longer follow-ups of approximately 10 years are needed to understand the prognosis of this treatment modality.

  12. Orthognathic treatment of dentofacial disharmonies: its impact on temporomandibular disorders, quality of life, and psychosocial wellness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yi Lin; Yap, Adrian U Jin

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this literature review was to assess the effect of orthognathic surgical treatment on temporomandibular disorders (TMD), quality of life (QoL), and psychosocial wellness. Journal articles and systematic reviews published in English between 1982 and 2015 were searched using PubMed, MEDLINE, and Cochrane database using the search terms "orthognathic," "temporomandibular disorders," "quality of life," and "psychosocial." The articles were then reviewed and discussed. Both objective and subjective parameters play a role in orthognathic treatment outcome satisfaction and QoL. Psychological factors and TMD exerted a stronger influence on patients' QoL more than objective treatment outcome measures. A paradigm shift in clinical mindset from solely objective measures to a more holistic, patient-centric approach of addressing patients' expectations and improving QoL is warranted when treating patients with dentofacial disharmonies.

  13. Psychological issues in oral and maxillofacial reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sousa, Avinash

    2008-12-01

    Many psychological problems affect patients who have oral and maxillofacial operations. This article reviews these problems among patients with craniofacial conditions, facial injuries, facial cancer, and those having orthognathic surgery. Facial cosmetic surgery is not addressed. Problems such as depression, anxiety, low self-esteem, poor social relationships, and changes in body image are considered. The roles of mental health professionals is emphasised to enhance postoperative satisfaction and to provide a better quality of life for these patients.

  14. Bimaxillary protrusion with an atrophic alveolar defect: orthodontics, autogenous chin-block graft, soft tissue augmentation, and an implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Grace S C; Chang, Chris H N; Roberts, W Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Bimaxillary protrusion in a 28-year-old woman was complicated by multiple missing, restoratively compromised, or hopeless teeth. The maxillary right central incisor had a history of avulsion and replantation that subsequently evolved into generalized external root resorption with Class III mobility and severe loss of the supporting periodontium. This complex malocclusion had a discrepancy index of 21, and 8 additional points were scored for the atrophic dental implant site (maxillary right central incisor). The comprehensive treatment plan included extraction of 4 teeth (both maxillary first premolars, the maxillary right central incisor, and the mandibular right first molar), orthodontic closure of all spaces except for the future implant site (maxillary right central incisor), augmentation of the alveolar defect with an autogenous chin-block graft, enhancement of the gingival biotype with a connective tissue graft, and an implant-supported prosthesis. Orthodontists must understand the limitations of bone grafts. Augmented alveolar defects are slow to completely turn over to living bone, so they are usually good sites for implants but respond poorly to orthodontic space closure. However, postsurgical orthodontic treatment is often indicated to optimally finish the esthetic zone before placing the final prosthesis. The latter was effectively performed for this patient, resulting in a total treatment time of about 36 months for comprehensive interdisciplinary care. An excellent functional and esthetic result was achieved. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Bilateral sagittal split osteotomy: Surgery first approach for correction of skeletal Class II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revathi Peddu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the skeletal malocclusions which require orthognathic surgeries are treated by traditional approach which requires time-consuming and unesthetic presurgical orthodontic phase. Surgery first approach (SFA avoids these disadvantages of the traditional approach. A 24-year-old female patient with skeletal and dental class II malocclusion due to retrognathic mandible was treated with SFA. Bilateral sagittal split osteotomy with mandibular advancement was done immediately after initial alignment and closure of the existing spaces in the maxillary arch. Angle's class I molar and canine relation was achieved after surgery. Bonding of the mandibular arch was done after 1 month of orthognathic surgery and treatment was completed within 13 months. A wrap-around retainer was placed in upper arch, and bonded lingual retainer was given in the lower arch.

  16. Lateral cephalometry changes after SARPE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parhiz, A; Schepers, S; Lambrichts, I; Vrielinck, L; Sun, Y; Politis, C

    2011-07-01

    Surgically assisted rapid palatal expansion (SARPE) is associated with postoperative cephalometric changes. In this study we analyse these changes in the sagittal plane in orthognathic patients undergoing SARPE followed by orthodontic treatment and Le Fort I, bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO), or bimaxillary surgery. This is a retrospective review of 50 patients (20 males, 30 females) undergoing orthognathic treatment with SARPE to correct transversal deficiency of the maxilla as part of a comprehensive treatment plan. PP-SN, SNA, and ANB angles were increased and U1-SN and U1-PP angles were decreased. All changes were statistically significant. Changes of SNB, PP-Mand plane angle, and SN-Mand. plane angle were not statistically significant. Surgically assisted rapid palatal expansion using a bone-borne appliance as a preparative step for later orthognathic surgery results in clockwise rotation of the maxilla. Copyright © 2011 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Body dysmorphic disorder screening in maxillofacial outpatients presenting for orthognathic surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vulink, N. C. C.; Rosenberg, A.; Plooij, J. M.; Koole, R.; Bergé, S. J.; Denys, D.

    2008-01-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a severe psychiatric disease with delusions about defects in appearance for which patients seek surgical help. This is the first European study to determine the half-year prevalence of BDD in a maxillofacial outpatient clinic. A total of 160 patients with

  18. A Retrospective Analysis of Pre-surgical Incisor Decompensation Attained in an Orthognathic Surgery Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    were also evolving during this time period. Edward Angle published his landmark treatise “ Classification of Malocclusion” in 1899, bringing order and...extraction protocol and an MBT™ prescription 0.022 inch slot stainless steel labial orthodontic appliance (3M Unitek, Monrovia, California). 9 T1...results of this study. However, traditionally at TORP, a stainless steel , pre-adjusted 0.022 inch slot, McLaughlin, Bennett and Trevisi (MBT

  19. Augmented corticotomy combined with accelerated orthodontic forces in class III orthognathic patients: morphologic aspects of the mandibular anterior ridge with cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coscia, Giuseppe; Coscia, Vincenzo; Peluso, Vincenzo; Addabbo, Francesco

    2013-10-01

    This study used cone-beam computed tomography to evaluate morphologic changes of the mandibular anterior ridge after using augmented corticotomy plus accelerated orthodontia to decompensate mandibular incisors in patients with surgical skeletal Class III. Fourteen patients (8 men, 6 women; mean age, 26.14 yr) with skeletal Class III were treated before orthognathic surgery with a technique that combined corticotomy, bone grafting, and accelerated orthodontic forces to decompensate the lower incisors. Three-dimensional cone-beam computed tomograms were taken before treatment (T0) and at the completion of presurgical orthodontic treatment (T1). Measurements of the amount of vertical alveolar bone changes and horizontal bone thickness at the midroot and root apex levels of the mandibular incisors were evaluated. All patients showed significant proclination of the mandibular incisors at T1. The mean alveolar bone thickness from T0 to T1 increased buccally at the midroot and apex levels, showing statistically significant horizontal bone augmentation at the labial side of the lower anterior mandibular teeth (P orthodontics, such as marginal bone loss and gingival recession. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Rehabilitative treatment of cleft lip and palate: experience of the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies - USP (HRAC-USP - part 3: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alberto de Souza Freitas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the treatment protocol of maxillofacial surgery in the rehabilitation process of cleft lip and palate patients adopted at HRAC-USP. Maxillofacial surgeons are responsible for the accomplishment of two main procedures, alveolar bone graft surgery and orthognathic surgery. The primary objective of alveolar bone graft is to provide bone tissue for the cleft site and then allow orthodontic movements for the establishment of an an adequate occlusion. When performed before the eruption of the maxillary permanent canine, it presents high rates of success. Orthognathic surgery aims at correcting maxillomandibular discrepancies, especially anteroposterior maxillary deficiencies, commonly observed in cleft lip and palate patients, for the achievement of a functional occlusion combined with a balanced face.

  1. Prevalence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in patients wearing bimaxillary complete dentures, removable partial dentures and in students with natural dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordin, Thaisa B; Conci, Ricardo A; Pezzini, Maristela M G; Pezzini, Rolando P; Mendonça, Márcio J

    2013-01-01

    Temporomandibular Disorder (TMD) has attained a prominent role within the context of dental care due to its high prevalence. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of signs and symptoms of TMD in students at the State University of West of Paraná (UNIOESTE) with natural dentition, and in patients with removable partial dentures and double complete dentures. A total of 210 randomly selected individuals of both genders were evaluated, being divided into three groups: seventy students at the UNIOESTE with natural dentition (Group 1), seventy patients with removable partial dentures (Group 2) and seventy patients with bimaxillary complete dentures (Group 3). The data were collected by a single examiner using the American Academy of Orofacial Pain questionnaire for triage, where a single affirmative response to any of the situations mentioned was enough to carry out clinical evaluation. Kolmogorov Smirnov, Mann Whitney, Chi-Square, ANOVA and Tukey's statistical tests were performed. The most prevalent signs and symptoms of TMD in Group 1 were pain or difficulty in chewing or talking, perception of recent change in bite and deviations during the course of mandibular movements. In Group 2 they were perceptions of recent changes in the bite, deflections in the mandibular movements, presence of joint sounds, pain during excursive movements and muscle tenderness. The most prevalent signs and symptoms in Group 3 were limited to mouth opening and poor stability and retention of at least one of the prostheses. Group 3 also reported having received treatment for headaches or facial pain with a high prevalence. Group 2 had the highest prevalence of signs and symptoms. Prevalence was similar in Groups 1 and 3.

  2. A comparative evaluation of rate of space closure after extraction using E-chain and stretched modules in bimaxillary dentoalveolar protrusion cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Rajat; Londhe, S M; Kumar, Prasanna

    2011-04-01

    Aim of this study was to compare the rate of space closure between E-chain mechanics in one side of upper arch and by elastomeric module with ligature wire on the contralateral side in same patient. Thirty bimaxillary dentoalveolar protrusion cases were taken up for comprehensive fixed orthodontic treatment after extraction of all first premolars to retract both upper and lower anterior teeth. After initial alignment and levelling, alginate impressions were made for upper and lower arches and models constructed. In the upper arch model a vernier caliper was used to measure the extraction space in both sides from middle point of distal surface of canine to the middle most point of mesial surface of second premolar. This is the amount of space present before the onset of retraction mechanics. During space closure procedure two different retracting components were applied in right and left sides of each case. On right side elastic chain (E-chain) applied in both upper and lower arches and on left side elastomeric module with steel ligature (0.010") stretched double its diameter fixed in both arches. Both the mechanisms produced approximately 250-300 g of force as measured by a tension gauge. After onset of retraction mechanism all patients were recalled after every six weeks for three visits. In all these three visits modules and E-chains were changed. In all three visits impression was made, models constructed, and the remaining available space was measured by a vernier caliper up to 0.1 mm level variations. Mean value for total space closure in case of E-chain was 2.777 mm whereas in case of module with ligature wire the value increased to 3.017 mm. Mean value for rate of space closure in case of E-chain was 0.2143 mm, whereas in case of module with ligature wire the value increased to 0.2343 mm with a standard deviation of 0.001104 and 0.001194, respectively. The standard deviation for total space closure was 0.1305 for E-chain and 0.1487 for module with ligature

  3. Robotic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robot-assisted surgery; Robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery; Laparoscopic surgery with robotic assistance ... Robotic surgery is similar to laparoscopic surgery. It can be performed through smaller cuts than open surgery. ...

  4. Accuracy of combined maxillary and mandibular repositioning and of soft tissue prediction in relation to maxillary antero-superior repositioning combined with mandibular set back A computerized cephalometric evaluation of the immediate postsurgical outcome using the TIOPS planning system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donatsky, Ole; Bjørn-Jørgensen, Jens; Hermund, Niels Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    surgical planning system (TIOPS). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Out of 100 prospectively and consecutively treated patients, 52 patients manifested dentofacial deformities requiring bimaxillary orthognathic surgery with maxillary antero-superior repositioning combined with mandibular set back and so were included......AIM: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the immediate postsurgical outcome of planned and predicted hard and soft tissue positional changes in relation to maxillary antero-superior repositioning combined with mandibular set back using the computerized, cephalometric, orthognathic....... All patients were managed with rigid internal fixation (RIF) and without intermaxillary fixation (IMF). Preoperative cephalograms were analyzed and treatment plans and prediction tracings produced by computerized surgical interactive simulation. The planned horizontal and vertical hard tissue...

  5. Association between UGT2B7 gene polymorphisms and fentanyl sensitivity in patients undergoing painful orthognathic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraoka, Wataru; Nishizawa, Daisuke; Fukuda, Kenichi; Kasai, Shinya; Hasegawa, Junko; Wajima, Koichi; Nakagawa, Taneaki

    2016-01-01

    Background Fentanyl is often used instead of morphine for the treatment of pain because it has fewer side effects. The metabolism of morphine by glucuronidation is known to be influenced by polymorphisms of the UGT2B7 gene. Some metabolic products of fentanyl are reportedly metabolized by glucuronate conjugation. The genes that are involved in the metabolic pathway of fentanyl may also influence fentanyl sensitivity. We analyzed associations between fentanyl sensitivity and polymorphisms of the UGT2B7 gene to clarify the hereditary determinants of individual differences in fentanyl sensitivity. Results This study examined whether single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the UGT2B7 gene affect cold pain sensitivity and the analgesic effects of fentanyl, evaluated by a standardized pain test and fentanyl requirements in healthy Japanese subjects who underwent uniform surgical procedures. The rs7439366 SNP of UGT2B7 is reportedly associated with the metabolism and analgesic effects of morphine. We found that this SNP is also associated with the analgesic effects of fentanyl in the cold pressor-induced pain test. It suggested that the C allele of the rs7439366 SNP may enhance analgesic efficacy. Two SNPs of UGT2B7, rs4587017 and rs1002849, were also found to be novel SNPs that may influence the analgesic effects of fentanyl in the cold pressor-induced pain test. Conclusions Fentanyl sensitivity for cold pressor-induced pain was associated with the rs7439366, rs4587017, and rs1002849 SNPs of the UGT2B7 gene. Our findings may provide valuable information for achieving satisfactory pain control and open to new avenues for personalized pain treatment. PMID:28256933

  6. Prevention of Bleeding in Orthognathic Surgery--A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jesper J; Skov, Jane; Ingerslev, Janne

    2016-01-01

    and operating time. This review is registered at PROSPERO (CRD42014014840). RESULTS: Eleven trials were included for review. The individual trials demonstrated the effects on IOB from hypotensive anesthetic regimens, the use of aprotinin, and the herbal medicine Yunnan Baiyao. Six studies of tranexamic acid...

  7. Change in bite force and electromyographic activity of masticatory muscle in accordance with change of occlusal plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min-Kyu; Cho, Sung-Min; Yun, Kyoung-In; Park, Je-Uk

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate effects of occlusal plane on masticatory function (biting force, masticatory muscle activity, biting efficiency) after bimaxillary orthognathic surgery. The subjects of the present study consisted of a group of 55 adults who had undergone bimaxillary surgery more than 6 months earlier. Lateral cephalographs, bite force, and electromyographic measurements of the anterior temporal [EMG(t)] and masseter muscles [EMG(m)] were recorded before and after bimaxillary surgery. Statistical analyses were performed. In the increased occlusal plane group, the frequency of decreased EMG(t) was significantly high. The frequency of increased EMG(t) was also significantly high in the decreased occlusal plane group. A negative correlation was found between the postoperative occlusal plane angle and the biting force efficiency change. No significant difference was found between the group that moved from an abnormal to a normal range and the group that moved from a normal to an abnormal range. The occlusal plane change was significantly greater in the decreased EMG(t) group than in the increased EMG(t) group. The value of EMG(t) was related to the changes in the occlusal plane, and the biting efficiency was affected by the postoperative occlusal plane angle. However, normalization of the occlusal plane might not play a major role in masticatory function. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Psychometric properties of the Brazilian version of the Orthognathic Quality of Life Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gava, Eveline Coutinho Baldoto; Miguel, José Augusto Mendes; de Araújo, Adriana Monteiro; de Oliveira, Branca Heloisa

    2013-10-01

    To assess the construct validity and reliability of the Brazilian version of the Orthognathic Quality of Life Questionnaire (B-OQLQ). A cross-sectional study was performed, and 101 patients in need of orthodontic-surgical treatment were recruited at a public hospital (Hospital Universitário Pedro Ernesto) and a public dental school (Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro). The B-OQLQ was self-completed. The mean age of the participants was 26.51 ± 9.25 years, and most were female (58.42%; n = 59). The construct validity was assessed using Spearman's correlation coefficient between the B-OQLQ and the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) scores and between the B-OQLQ and subjective health indicators' scores. The reliability was assessed in terms of internal consistency and stability (test-retest) using Cronbach's alpha and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), respectively. Significant correlations were found between the B-OQLQ scores and the following: OHIP-14 total score (rs = 0.70, P < .001), perception of oral health (rs = -0.24, P = .02), single-item evaluation of quality of life (rs = -0.29, P = .03), satisfaction with physical appearance (rs = -0.40, P < .001), and satisfaction with facial appearance (rs = -0.39, P = .0001). Cronbach's alpha and the ICC was 0.95 and 0.90, respectively. The domains of B-OQLQ causing the most effect on the quality of life included "social aspects of deformity" (13.0 ± 10.54) and "facial aesthetics" (11.81 ± 6.23). The Brazilian version of the OQLQ was shown to be valid and reliable with good psychometric properties and might thus be considered an appropriate tool to assess the effect of dentofacial deformities on the quality of life of individuals with this condition. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Endoscopic techniques in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroletti, Fred; Johnson, Brad S; McCain, Joseph P

    2010-02-01

    Oral and maxillofacial surgery is entering a new era. Surgeons can use the latest technological advances in equipment in an attempt to improve patient outcomes. Minimally invasive surgery with the use of the endoscope has improved in recent years because of technological advancements in optics and associated instrumentation. Trauma, orthognathic, sialoendoscopy, and temporomandibular joint surgery are commonly performed with the assistance of the endoscope. From an educational standpoint, surgical anatomy and various other principles can easily be taught to trainees with the assistance of the endoscope. The operating surgeon can visualize an area via the endoscope, and instruct regarding the surgical maneuvers on the monitor, without obstructions to view. This technique also allows others in and out of the room to view the image. Endoscopically assisted surgery is gaining popularity and is becoming a tool frequently used by surgeons to assist in and simplify some of the more difficult techniques that often require more extensive surgical exposure for visualization. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cosmetic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Body Looking and feeling your best Cosmetic surgery Cosmetic surgery Teens might have cosmetic surgery for a number ... about my body? What are the risks of cosmetic surgery? top People who have cosmetic surgery face many ...

  11. Dental arch Transversal characteristics in boys and girls with orthognathic bite: head shape and face type dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunas Іgor

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we describe the boundary percentile scope values of transversal characteristics of the dental arch of boys and girls of Podillia, with diagnosed orthognathic bite. The study group consists of individuals with different forms of head and face. Our findings are that, in girls, unlike boys, set differences exist in the transversal dimensions of the upper and lower jaw, both in the distribution of the shape of the head, and the type of face. In boys with different head shape, larger values of transversal size of dental arch are evidenced when contrasted with the corresponding groups of girls, regarding the maxilla in 46.7% of all cases and the mandible in 22.2% of all cases, as well as with different types of faces in 66.7% of cases regarding the maxilla and 55.6% in the mandible.

  12. Maze Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Center > Maze Surgery Menu Topics Topics FAQs Maze Surgery Article Info En español Electrical impulses in your ... called an arrhythmia. Why do I need Maze surgery? Maze surgery is also called the Maze procedure. ...

  13. Surgical Navigation: A Systematic Review of Indications, Treatments, and Outcomes in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarmehr, Iman; Stokbro, Kasper; Bell, R Bryan; Thygesen, Torben

    2017-09-01

    This systematic review investigates the most common indications, treatments, and outcomes of surgical navigation (SN) published from 2010 to 2015. The evolution of SN and its application in oral and maxillofacial surgery have rapidly developed over recent years, and therapeutic indications are discussed. A systematic search in relevant electronic databases, journals, and bibliographies of the included articles was carried out. Clinical studies with 5 or more patients published between 2010 and 2015 were included. Traumatology, orthognathic surgery, cancer and reconstruction surgery, skull-base surgery, and foreign body removal were the areas of interests. The search generated 13 articles dealing with traumatology; 5, 6, 2, and 0 studies were found that dealt with the topics of orthognathic surgery, cancer and reconstruction surgery, skull-base surgery, and foreign body removal, respectively. The average technical system accuracy and intraoperative precision reported were less than 1 mm and 1 to 2 mm, respectively. In general, SN is reported to be a useful tool for surgical planning, execution, evaluation, and research. The largest numbers of studies and patients were identified in the field of traumatology. Treatment of complex orbital fractures was considerably improved by the use of SN compared with traditionally treated control groups. SN seems to be a very promising addition to the surgical toolkit. Planning details of the surgical procedure in a 3-dimensional virtual environment and execution with real-time guidance can significantly improve precision. Among factors to be considered are the financial investments necessary and the learning curve. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  14. Role of nutrition in oral and maxillofacial surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giridhar, V Usha

    2016-01-01

    Diet, nutrition, and dental health are closely related and have multidirectional impacts. Any oral diseases, may it be congenital, infective, traumatic, inflammatory, or neoplastic, affect routine functions of the oral cavity and even after corrective surgeries done to improve may adversely affect the food and fluid intake and further compromises nutritional status. Unlike other general surgeries, the surgeries done in oral and maxillofacial region impairs normal food intake, especially by mouth which is the preferred commonly used route. This oral cavity being harbored by multiple organisms makes it prone to further infection which again hampers the healing. Oral surgeries include the dentoalveolar region for the treatment of fracture or prosthetic reasons, for maxillofacial trauma, orthognathic surgeries, tumors, cleft lip and palate correction, etc., Nutrition plays a major role in the postoperative recovery and healing. Malnutrition in the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (OMFS) patients increases the postoperative morbidity and mortality rate. Nutrition in jaw fractures treated with intermaxillary fixation is more compromised. Healing is impaired in malnourished, critically ill, elderly, and patients with prolonged stay in hospital and hence nutrition in the form of enteral, parenteral, and oral sip feeding plays a major role in providing nutritional care. Preoperative nutrition and perioperative nutrition influence the postoperative outcome and hence metabolic and nutritional care is important for the uneventful healing. This article provides a basic review of the role of nutrition in the postoperative outcome of OMFS patients based on the search through articles in journal and internet.

  15. Oral and maxillofacial surgery: what are the French specificities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herlin, Christian; Goudot, Patrick; Jammet, Patrick; Delaval, Christophe; Yachouh, Jacques

    2011-05-01

    Oral and maxillofacial surgery has expanded rapidly over the past century. Recognition in France has grown since the first face transplantation in the world performed by Professor Bernard Devauchelle. This speciality, which seems to correspond to a narrow scope of services, actually involves oral, plastic, reconstructive, and cosmetic surgeries of the face. French training for maxillofacial surgeons differs from the Anglo-Saxon course of study. After examining surveys carried out in Great Britain, the United States, and Brazil, the perception of this speciality in the general public and among regular correspondents (general practitioners and dental practitioners) was ascertained. More than 4,000 questionnaires were sent to health care workers and patients attending dental practices. The returned questionnaires concerning recognition of this profession in France were analyzed. Evaluating awareness of maxillofacial surgery among practitioners and the public was of particular interest because it can overlap with several other specialities (ear, nose, and throat; plastic surgery; odontology). The questionnaire included the 20 items used in other similar studies so the results could be compared. Several fields of expertise were identified in maxillofacial surgery, in particular traumatology, surgery for facial birth defects, and orthognathic surgery. Moreover, dental practitioners were found to be the most regular correspondents of maxillofacial surgeons compared with general practitioners. Compared with Anglo-Saxon and Brazilian peers, French recognition of maxillofacial surgery was better. Despite encouraging results, maxillofacial surgery remains a somewhat obscure speciality for health care workers and the general public. Better awareness is necessary for this speciality to become the reference in facial surgery. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. KNOWLEDGE GAPS IN ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY: A SYSTEMATIC MAPPING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Österberg, Marie; Holmlund, Anders; Sunzel, Bo; Tranæus, Sofia; Twetman, Svante; Lund, Bodil

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate available knowledge and identify knowledge gaps within the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery, by systematically collecting and evaluating systematic reviews. Twelve specific domains were selected: surgical removal of teeth, antibiotic and corticosteroid prophylaxis, orofacial infections, dental and facial trauma, orthognathic surgery, reconstructive surgery, benign tumors, cysts, premalignant lesions, oral complications of treatment of malignant tumors, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, temporomandibular joint surgery, cost effectiveness of different surgical treatments, and ethics. The literature search, covering four databases, was conducted during September 2014: PubMed, The Cochrane library, Centre for Reviews and Dissemination and EBSCO dentistry and oral science source. Retrieved systematic reviews were quality assessed by AMSTAR. In all, 1,778 abstracts were identified, of which 200 met the inclusion criteria. Forty-five systematic reviews were assessed as of high to moderate quality. The results disclosed some existing evidence in a few domains, such as surgical removal of teeth and implant survival after sinus lifts. However, in all domains, the search revealed a large number of knowledge gaps. Also of concern was the lack of data regarding health economics and ethics. In conclusion, there is a need for well-conducted clinical research in the fields of oral and maxillofacial surgery.

  17. Má oclusão de Classe I com biprotrusão e ausência dos primeiros molares inferiores Angle Class I malocclusion with bimaxillary dental protrusion and missing mandibular first molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldino Puppin Filho

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente relato de caso descreve o tratamento ortodôntico de uma paciente de 24 anos de idade, portadora de má oclusão de Classe I de Angle, com protrusão dos incisivos superiores e inferiores, além de perda recente dos primeiros molares inferiores. O tratamento idealizado envolveu a exodontia dos primeiros pré-molares superiores, aliada ao fechamento dos espaços presentes na arcada inferior. O resultado obtido demonstra a necessidade de planos de tratamento individualizados e a importância dos conceitos biomecânicos para movimentar adequadamente os dentes. Esse caso clínico foi apresentado à Diretoria do Board Brasileiro de Ortodontia e Ortopedia Facial (BBO, representando a categoria livre escolha, como parte dos requisitos para obtenção do título de Diplomado pelo BBO.This case report describes the orthodontic treatment of a 24-year-old patient presenting with Angle Class I malocclusion, bimaxillary dental protrusion and recent loss of mandibular molars. Treatment involved extraction of the maxillary first premolars and closing of mandibular first molar spaces. Treatment outcomes demonstrate the need for individualized treatment planning and highlight the key role played by biomechanical concepts in achieving proper orthodontic tooth movement. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (BBO as representative of the free choice category in partial fulfillment of the requirements for obtaining the BBO Diploma.

  18. Turbinate surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turbinectomy; Turbinoplasty; Turbinate reduction; Nasal airway surgery; Nasal obstruction - turbinate surgery ... There are several types of turbinate surgery: Turbinectomy: All or ... This can be done in several different ways, but sometimes a ...

  19. Oral and cranio-maxillofacial surgery in Byzantium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylonas, Anastassios I; Poulakou-Rebelakou, Eleftheria-Fotini; Androutsos, Georgios I; Seggas, Ioannis; Skouteris, Christos A; Papadopoulou, Evangelia Chr

    2014-03-01

    Byzantine physicians (4th-7th and 8th-12th centuries A.D.), especially those interested in Surgery, developed a number of interesting concepts, views and opinions referring to the field now recognized as Oral and Cranio-maxillofacial Surgery and Pathology. The original texts of Byzantine physicians, written in ancient Greek, and now preserved in the electronic platform Thesaurus Linguae Graecae, at the University of California, Irvine, CA, USA, were investigated in relation to Oral and Cranio-maxillofacial Surgery and Pathology. The most eminent physicians of the Early (4th-7th century A.D.) and Middle (8th-12th century A.D.) Byzantine Period, in particular Oribasius Pergamenus, Aëtius Amidenus, Alexander Trallianus, Theophilus Protospatharius, Paulus Aegineta, Meletius Monachos, and Leo Medicus, in their works deal with topographic and surgical anatomy of the head and neck, and a large list of related topics, including dentoalveolar surgery, oral and cervicofacial infections, trauma of viscerocranium and neurocranium as well as the biomechanics of traumatic brain injuries, temporomandibular joints dysfunction as a consequence of mandibular dislocation, surgical oncology and reconstructive surgery of the head and neck, oral pathology, surgical pathology of salivary glands, therapeutic management of facial nerve dysfunction, preprosthetic surgery, craniofacial surgery, and deformities of the facial skeleton involving anthropologic and craniometric observations. Clinical examination of patients presenting corresponding functional and esthetic problems is considered, using recognizable orthodontic and orthognathic surgical approaches. Finally, specific bandages of the head and neck are described, for treating traumatic injuries of the viscerocranium and neurocranium, diastasis of the cranial sutures, dislocations of the mandible (unilateral and bilateral), as well as inflammatory diseases of the parotids and the neck. Byzantine physicians had been particularly

  20. Open reduction and internal fixation: Screw injury - Retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preetha Balaji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF is a standard surgical procedure in jaw trauma and in orthognathic surgery. Insertion of screws is a significant risk for accidental tooth root injury with varying outcomes. Contrary evidences are found in literature due to a variety of study designs. This study was undertaken to address the lacunae and possibly estimate the difference in occurrence of tooth damage during or after ORIF between trauma and planned osteotomies. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, the data of ORIF in either trauma or orthognathic surgery fulfilling inclusion and exclusion criteria were collected and analyzed. Results: There were 1632 patients fulfilling the inclusion and exclusion criteria and formed the study group, of which 663 were in orthognathic surgery, of whom 210 had bimaxillary orthognathic surgery. In the trauma group, 358 patients had fractures involving both jaws whereas 272 had maxilla alone and 339 had mandibular fractures alone. On comparing the outcome, of the 9073 screws studied, 93.40% were not involved in any contact with the teeth, 6.3% were in category of potential hits (near apices or the root surfaces, and only 0.28% had evidence of root damage with the screws. It is observed that molar and premolar had a significant difference in terms of the type of surgery (P ≤ 0.05 whereas canine (P = 0.75 and incisor (P = 0.67 showed no statistical difference. Conclusion: ORIF when used as mentioned is a safe way for the management of fractures. The incidence of root injury is not uncommon but can be avoided with careful planning and execution.

  1. Laser-assisted lip repositioning surgery: Novel approach to treat gummy smile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farista, Sana; Yeltiwar, Ramreddy; Kalakonda, Butchibabu; Thakare, Kaustubh Suresh

    2017-01-01

    Excessive gingival display (EGD) resulting in a "gummy smile" is a major esthetic concern with ramifications in an individual's personal and social life. Numerous treatment modalities have been used for the correction of EGD. The present case report describes the successful treatment of a young woman with an excess gingival display caused by a hyperactive upper lip and a mild vertical maxillary excess that was treated with a laser-assisted lip repositioning surgical technique accompanied by gingival recontouring. The procedure was accomplished by laser-assisted removal, through scraping a strip of mucosa from the maxillary buccal vestibule and suturing the mucosa of the lip to the mucogingival junction. This technique resulted in shortened vestibule and restricted the muscle pull of the elevator muscles of the lip, thereby reducing gingival display when the patient smiles. Laser-assisted lip repositioning surgery can be a viable, minimally invasive alternative to orthognathic surgery.

  2. Laser-assisted lip repositioning surgery: Novel approach to treat gummy smile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana Farista

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive gingival display (EGD resulting in a “gummy smile” is a major esthetic concern with ramifications in an individual's personal and social life. Numerous treatment modalities have been used for the correction of EGD. The present case report describes the successful treatment of a young woman with an excess gingival display caused by a hyperactive upper lip and a mild vertical maxillary excess that was treated with a laser-assisted lip repositioning surgical technique accompanied by gingival recontouring. The procedure was accomplished by laser-assisted removal, through scraping a strip of mucosa from the maxillary buccal vestibule and suturing the mucosa of the lip to the mucogingival junction. This technique resulted in shortened vestibule and restricted the muscle pull of the elevator muscles of the lip, thereby reducing gingival display when the patient smiles. Laser-assisted lip repositioning surgery can be a viable, minimally invasive alternative to orthognathic surgery.

  3. Dental Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ...

  4. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ...

  5. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ... to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ...

  6. Mandibular Reconstruction with Lateral Tibial Bone Graft: An Excellent Option for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miceli, Ana Lucia Carpi; Pereira, Livia Costa; Torres, Thiago da Silva; Calasans-Maia, Mônica Diuana; Louro, Rafael Seabra

    2017-12-01

    Autogenous bone grafts are the gold standard for reconstruction of atrophic jaws, pseudoarthroses, alveolar clefts, orthognathic surgery, mandibular discontinuity, and augmentation of sinus maxillary. Bone graft can be harvested from iliac bone, calvarium, tibial bone, rib, and intraoral bone. Proximal tibia is a common donor site with few reported problems compared with other sites. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of proximal tibia as a donor area for maxillofacial reconstructions, focusing on quantifying the volume of cancellous graft harvested by a lateral approach and to assess the complications of this technique. In a retrospective study, we collected data from 31 patients, 18 women and 13 men (mean age: 36 years, range: 19-64), who were referred to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at the Servidores do Estado Federal Hospital. Patients were treated for sequelae of orthognathic surgery, jaw fracture, nonunion, malunion, pathology, and augmentation of bone volume to oral implant. The technique of choice was lateral access of proximal tibia metaphysis for graft removal from Gerdy tubercle under general anesthesia. The mean volume of bone harvested was 13.0 ± 3.7 mL (ranged: 8-23 mL). Only five patients (16%) had minor complications, which included superficial infection, pain, suture dehiscence, and unwanted scar. However, none of these complications decreases the result and resolved completely. We conclude that proximal tibia metaphysis for harvesting cancellous bone graft provides sufficient volume for procedures in oral and maxillofacial surgery with minimal postoperative morbidity.

  7. Bone and Soft Tissue Changes after Two-Jaw Surgery in Cleft Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung Sang Yun

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundOrthognathic surgery is required in 25% to 35% of patients with a cleft lip and palate, for whom functional recovery and aesthetic improvement after surgery are important. The aim of this study was to examine maxillary and mandibular changes, along with concomitant soft tissue changes, in cleft patients who underwent LeFort I osteotomy and sagittal split ramus osteotomy (two-jaw surgery.MethodsTwenty-eight cleft patients who underwent two-jaw surgery between August 2008 and November 2013 were included. Cephalometric analysis was conducted before and after surgery. Preoperative and postoperative measurements of the bone and soft tissue were compared.ResultsThe mean horizontal advancement of the maxilla (point A was 6.12 mm, while that of the mandible (point B was -5.19 mm. The mean point A-nasion-point B angle was -4.1° before surgery, and increased to 2.5° after surgery. The mean nasolabial angle was 72.7° before surgery, and increased to 88.7° after surgery. The mean minimal distance between Rickett's E-line and the upper lip was 6.52 mm before surgery and 1.81 mm after surgery. The ratio of soft tissue change to bone change was 0.55 between point A and point A' and 0.93 between point B and point B'.ConclusionsPatients with cleft lip and palate who underwent two-jaw surgery showed optimal soft tissue changes. The position of the soft tissue (point A' was shifted by a distance equal to 55% of the change in the maxillary bone. Therefore, bone surgery without soft tissue correction can achieve good aesthetic results.

  8. Use of 3-d stereolithographic models in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Pushkar; Miner, Jeremey; D'Innocenzo, Richard; Nadershah, Mohammed

    2011-03-01

    To assess the feasibility of the use of 3-dimensional (3-D) stereolithographic (SLA) technology in complex maxillofacial reconstructive surgery. 3-D SLA technology was used in the treatment planning of complex maxillofacial procedures performed by the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at Boston University. Specialized 3-D models were ordered and utilized for surgical treatment of a variety of indications including trauma surgery, temporomandibular joint surgery, orthognathic surgery, secondary correction of facial and skull deformities, and extensive jaw pathology. This technology was also used in one patient for jaw reconstruction using novel bone and tissue engineering techniques. The use of 3-D models in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery significantly improved predictability of clinical outcomes when compared to similar treatments without its use. Total operating time was reduced which had the benefit of decreasing the duration of general anesthesia and reducing wound exposure time. They allowed for assessment of extensive traumatic and pathologic defects in three-dimensions prior to surgical reconstruction. The models were also useful in the design and fabrication of custom prostheses, sizing of bone grafts and allowed for manufacturing of scaffolds for bone regeneration. 3-D SLA models can be very effectively used in oral and maxillofacial surgery for multiple indications and diverse clinical scenarios. Successful incorporation of this technology for jaw bone regeneration using tissue engineering techniques offers exciting new prospects for the future.

  9. Hemorrhoid surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery. Hemorrhoid surgery may involve: Putting a small rubber band around a hemorrhoid to shrink it by blocking blood flow. Stapling a hemorrhoid to block blood flow, causing it to shrink. Using a ...

  10. Plastic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... idea for teens? As with everything, there are right and wrong reasons to have surgery. Cosmetic surgery is unlikely to change your life. Most board-certified plastic surgeons spend a lot of time ... the right reasons. Many plastic surgery procedures are just that — ...

  11. A severe open bite case treated with orthodontics and tongue reduction surgery: 13-year followup. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzistavrou, Evangelia; Kolokitha, Olga-Elpis; Topouzelis, Nikolaos

    2012-05-01

    The management of open bite malocclusions creates controversy when treatment approach and long-term stability are considered. Tongue size, posture and habits have been associated as aetiologic and compounding factors. Reduction tongue surgery has therefore been advocated as an aid in treatment, especially when the open bite is accompanied by perceived macroglossia. The present article describes a clinical case of a 10-year-old girl who started treatment in the mixed dentition with an excessive open bite and speech defects. A combination of orthodontics and a partial glossectomy was necessary to successfully address the open bite associated with an enlarged tongue. The need for orthognathic surgery treatment was eliminated and the patient was satisfied with the post-treatment aesthetics, function and speech. After 13 years of follow-up, a stable occlusion was maintained with only minor relapse.

  12. Condylectomy and “surgery first” approach: An expedited treatment for condylar hyperplasia in a patient with facial asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Diego Fernando; Aristizábal, Juan Fernando; Martínez-Smit, Rosana

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Condylar Hyperplasia (CH) is a self-limiting pathology condition that produces severe facial deformity at the expense of mandibular asymmetry. In this case report a 15-year-old female patient was diagnosed with Unilateral Condylar Hiperplasia (UCH) by mean of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and histological study. A high condylectomy in the right condyle was performed to stop the active status of the hyperplasia. A month after condylectomy, orthognathic jaw impaction and asymmetric mandibular setback surgery was performed with the Surgery First Approach (SFA). After 10 days, orthodontic appointments were made every two weeks during 4 months. The active phase of treatment lasted 14 months. Excellent facial and occlusal outcomes were obtained and after 24 months in retention the results remained stable. PMID:28902254

  13. Condylectomy and “surgery first” approach: An expedited treatment for condylar hyperplasia in a patient with facial asymmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Fernando López

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Condylar Hyperplasia (CH is a self-limiting pathology condition that produces severe facial deformity at the expense of mandibular asymmetry. In this case report a 15-year-old female patient was diagnosed with Unilateral Condylar Hiperplasia (UCH by mean of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT and histological study. A high condylectomy in the right condyle was performed to stop the active status of the hyperplasia. A month after condylectomy, orthognathic jaw impaction and asymmetric mandibular setback surgery was performed with the Surgery First Approach (SFA. After 10 days, orthodontic appointments were made every two weeks during 4 months. The active phase of treatment lasted 14 months. Excellent facial and occlusal outcomes were obtained and after 24 months in retention the results remained stable.

  14. Antibiotic prophylaxis for preventing surgical-site infection in plastic surgery: an evidence-based consensus conference statement from the American Association of Plastic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyan, Stephan; Martin, Janet; Lal, Avtar; Cheng, Davy; Borah, Gregory L; Chung, Kevin C; Conly, John; Havlik, Robert; Lee, W P Andrew; McGrath, Mary H; Pribaz, Julian; Young, V Leroy

    2015-06-01

    There is a growing concern for microbial resistance as a result of overuse of antibiotics. Although guidelines have focused on the use of antibiotics for surgery in general, few have addressed plastic surgery specifically. The objective of this expert consensus conference was to evaluate the evidence for efficacy and safety of antibiotic prophylaxis in plastic surgical procedures. THE AUTHORS: searched for existing high-quality systematic reviews for antibiotic prophylaxis in the literature from the MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Embase databases. All synonyms for antibiotics were combined with terms for relevant plastic surgery procedures. The searches were not limited by language, and included all study designs. In addition, supplemental hand searches were performed of bibliographies of relevant articles, and extensive "related articles." Meta-analyses were performed and reviewed by experts selected by the American Association of Plastic Surgeons to reach consensus recommendations. Database searches identified 4300 articles, from which 2042 full-text articles were identified for eligibility. De novo meta-analyses were performed for each plastic surgical category. In total, 67 studies met the inclusion criteria, including nine for breast surgery, 17 for head and neck surgery, 10 for orthognathic surgery, seven for rhinoplasty/septoplasty, 19 for hand surgery, five for skin surgery, and two for abdominoplasty. Systemic antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended for clean breast surgery and for contaminated surgery of the hand or the head and neck. It is not recommended to reduce infection in clean surgical cases of the hand, skin, head and neck, or abdominoplasty.

  15. The fate of titanium miniplates and screws used in maxillofacial surgery: a 10 year retrospective study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connell, J

    2012-01-31

    The objective of this 10 year, retrospective study is to evaluate the indications for the removal of titanium miniplates following osteosynthesis in maxillofacial trauma and orthognathic surgery. All patients who had miniplates placed in a Regional Oral and Maxillofacial Department between January 1998 and October 2007 were included. The following variables were recorded: patient gender and age, number of plates inserted, indications for plate placement, location of plates, number and location of plates removed, indications for plate removal, time between insertion and removal, medical co-morbidities, and the follow-up period. During the 10 years of the study, 1247 titanium miniplates were placed in 535 patients. A total of 32 (3%) plates were removed from 30 patients. Superficial infection accounted for 41% of all plates removed. All complications were minor and most plates were removed within the first year of insertion. A low removal rate of 3% suggests that the routine removal of asymptomatic titanium miniplates is not indicated.

  16. Algorithm for planning a double-jaw orthognathic surgery using a computer-aided surgical simulation (CASS) protocol. Part 2: three-dimensional cephalometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J J; Gateno, J; Teichgraeber, J F; Yuan, P; Li, J; Chen, K-C; Jajoo, A; Nicol, M; Alfi, D M

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cephalometry is not as simple as just adding a 'third' dimension to a traditional two-dimensional cephalometric analysis. There are more complex issues in 3D analysis. These include how reference frames are created, how size, position, orientation and shape are measured, and how symmetry is assessed. The main purpose of this article is to present the geometric principles of 3D cephalometry. In addition, the Gateno-Xia cephalometric analysis is presented; this is the first 3D cephalometric analysis to observe these principles. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Skeletal stability in orthognathic surgery: evaluation of methods of rigid internal fixation after counterclockwise rotation in patients with class II deformities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Vanessa Álvares de Castro; Neto, Antonio Irineu Trindade; Rebello, Iêda Margarida Crusoé Rocha; de Souza, Gustavo Mota Mascarenhas; Esteves, Lucas Senhorinho; dos Santos, Jean Nunes; Zanetta-Barbosa, Darceny; do Prado, Célio Jesus

    2015-10-01

    Our aim was to assess the influence of internal fixation in skeletal stability on patients who had had counterclockwise rotation of the maxillomandibular complex and mandibular advancement procedures. We studied 60 records of 20 patients (14 female, 6 male), mean (range) age at operation 29 (16-50) years. The mean (range) postoperative follow-up was 15 (8-24) months. Sixty standard lateral cephalometric radiographs were randomly traced and digitised by one senior radiologist to estimate surgical and postoperative changes. Patients were divided into two groups, the first group (n=10) of which had fixation with only 2.0 system plates (2 plates with monocortical screws alone) and the second (n=10) of which had hybrid fixation (1 plate with monocortical screws and 2 or 3 bicortical bone screws). During operation the change in the mean occlusal plane with counterclockwise rotation was 9.4° (range -17.3 to -2.5mm). The maxilla moved forward and upward. All the anterior mandibular measurements had advanced horizontally, the mean (range) being 17 (6.4 to 9.9) mm for the pogonion, and 17.6 (6.0 to 30.7) mm for the menton. At the longest follow-up period, there were significant long-term changes, but these were clinically acceptable (stability or in the magnitude of the advancement and stability. Copyright © 2015 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. PAEDIATRIC SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    3 Department of Paediatric Surgery, Sophia's Children Hospital/Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. 4 Department of Paediatric Surgery, Emma's Children Hospital/Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. 5 Department of Radiology, Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, ...

  19. PAEDIATRIC SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gastroschisis in a developing country: poor resuscitation is a more significant predictor of mortality than postnatal transfer time. PAEDIATRIC SURGERY. P Stevens,1 E Muller,1 P Becker2. 1 Department of Paediatric Surgery, Steve Biko Academic Hospital, University of Pretoria. 2 South African Medical Research Council.

  20. Are oral and maxillofacial surgery residents being adequately trained to care for pediatric patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramowicz, Shelly; Kaban, Leonard B; Wurtzel, Andrew S; Roser, Steven M

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate whether current oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS) residents are receiving adequate training and experience to perform specific surgical procedures and anesthesia for pediatric patients. A 17-question survey was sent electronically to fellows of the American Academy of Craniomaxillofacial Surgeons. Descriptive data for individual surgeons, their associated residency programs, and the quantity of specific pediatric procedures they performed were collected. Resident case load for inpatient and outpatient procedures and overall experience in medical, surgical, and anesthetic management of pediatric OMS patients were explored. Surveys were sent to 110 active fellows; 64 completed the questionnaire (58%). There were 59 male fellows and 5 female fellows, with a mean age of 50.4 years. Of those, 68.8% practice in an academic setting. Specifically, 93.8% take after-hours emergency calls covering adult and pediatric patients and 98.4% have admitting privileges at a children's hospital or a pediatric unit in an adult hospital. Their affiliated residency programs include required rotations in pediatrics or pediatric subspecialties. In their opinion, >90% of graduating OMS residents have the appropriate skill set to perform dentoalveolar procedures, outpatient anesthesia, orthognathic procedures, and alveolar bone grafts. However, residents have limited ability to reconstruct pediatric ramus-condyle unit with a costochondral graft. Results of this study indicate that, in the opinion of the respondents, graduates of OMS residency programs have adequate training to perform dentoalveolar procedures, outpatient anesthesia, orthognathic surgery, and alveolar bone grafts in pediatric procedures, but have limited experience with reconstruction of pediatric ramus-condyle unit via costochondral graft. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Rodding Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... usually undertaken as a scheduled elective procedure. An optimal age for a first rodding surgery has not ... which may prevent or postpone the need for replacement. The smallest diameter expanding rods are still too ...

  2. Lung surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the pulmonary artery ( pulmonary embolism ) Treat complications of tuberculosis Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery can be used to ... Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center-Shreveport, Shreveport, LA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed ...

  3. Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... action of certain hormones, such as ghrelin —“the hunger hormone.” People have these types of surgery if ... organizations to further patient education on hormone related issues. Network Sponsors The Hormone Health Network is supported ...

  4. Epilepsy Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and the portion of your brain that's involved: Memory problems. The temporal lobe handles memory and language functions, so surgery on this part ... computerized tomography (SPECT). The scan image varies in color depending on the amount of blood flow in ...

  5. After Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    After any operation, you'll have some side effects. There is usually some pain with surgery. There ... anesthesia, or accidental injury. Some people have a greater risk of complications because of other medical conditions. ...

  6. Brain surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... Barnett J, Mohanty A, Desai SK, Patterson JT. Neurosurgery. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, ...

  7. Bariatric surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmali, Shahzeer; Stoklossa, Carlene Johnson; Sharma, Arya; Stadnyk, Janet; Christiansen, Sandra; Cottreau, Danielle; Birch, Daniel W.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To review the management of bariatric surgical patients. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched, as well as PubMed US National Library, from January 1950 to December 2009. Evidence was levels I, II, and III. MAIN MESSAGE Bariatric surgery should be considered for obese patients at high risk of morbidity and mortality who have not achieved adequate weight loss with lifestyle and medical management and who are suffering from the complications of obesity. Bariatric surgery can result in substantial weight loss, resolution of comorbid conditions, and improved quality of life. The patient’s weight-loss history; his or her personal accountability, responsibility, and comprehension; and the acceptable level of risk must be taken into account. Complications include technical failure, bleeding, abdominal pain, nausea or vomiting, excess loose skin, bowel obstruction, ulcers, and anastomotic stricture. Lifelong monitoring by a multidisciplinary team is essential. CONCLUSION Limited long-term success of behavioural and pharmacologic therapies in severe obesity has led to renewed interest in bariatric surgery. Success with bariatric surgery is more likely when multidisciplinary care providers, in conjunction with primary care providers, assess, treat, monitor, and evaluate patients before and after surgery. Family physicians will play a critical role in counseling patients about bariatric surgery and will need to develop skills in managing these patients in the long-term. PMID:20841586

  8. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, and is ... to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, and is ...

  9. Mohs micrographic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skin cancer - Mohs surgery; Basal cell skin cancer - Mohs surgery; Squamous cell skin cancer - Mohs surgery ... Mohs surgery usually takes place in the doctor's office. The surgery is started early in the morning and is ...

  10. A biomechanical analysis of prognathous and orthognathous insect head capsules: Evidence for a many to one mapping of ridge strain to head strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanke, Alexander; Pinheiro, Manuel; Watson, Peter J; Fagan, Michael J

    2018-02-14

    Insect head shapes are remarkably variable but the influences of these changes on biomechanical performance are unclear. Among "basal" winged insects, such as dragonflies, mayflies, earwigs, and stoneflies, some of the most prominent anatomical changes are the general mouthpart orientation, eye size and the connection of the endoskeleton to the head. Here, we assess these variations as well as differing ridge and sclerite configurations using modern engineering methods including multibody dynamics modelling and finite element analysis in order to quantify and compare the influence of anatomical changes on strain in particular head regions and the whole head. We show that a range of peculiar structures such as the genal/subgenal, epistomal, and circumoccular areas are consistently highly loaded in all species, despite drastically differing morphologies in species with forward projecting (prognathous) and downwards projecting (orthognathous) mouthparts. Sensitivity analyses show that the presence of eyes has a negligible influence on head capsule strain if a circumoccular ridge is present. In contrast, the connection of the dorsal endoskeletal arms to the head capsule especially affects overall head loading in species with downward projecting mouthparts. Analysis of the relative strains between species for each head region reveals that concerted changes in head substructures such as the subgenal area, the endoskeleton and the epistomal area lead to a consistent relative loading for the whole head capsule and vulnerable structures such as the eyes in prognathous and orthognathous insects. It appears that biting-chewing loads are managed by a system of strengthening ridges on the head capsule irrespective of the general mouthpart and head orientation. Concerted changes in ridge and endoskeleton configuration allow for more radical anatomical changes such as the general mouthpart orientation which could be an explanation for the variability of this trait among insects

  11. Bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alojz Pleskovič

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: In almost six decades different surgical techniques have been developed to treat patients with morbid obesity. Various surgical techniques are generally divided with respect to their effect into restrictive, malabsorbtive and humoral and a combination of these. Surgically modified human metabolism ameliorates metabolic diseases, particularly diabetes, even in nonobese patients. The understanding of metabolic effects changed the traditional paradigm of bariatric surgery from simple weight-loss procedure to metabolic surgery affecting whole-body metabolism. Proper surgical technique for individual patient is the most important factor influencing long- term results, comorbidities and quality of life. Recommendations for patient selection, surgical methods and pre- and postoperative patient management are to be respected. Metabolic surgery principles and current concepts are presented.

  12. Cosmetic surgery.

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    The psychotherapeutic nature of cosmetic surgery is emphasised by outlining the range of symptoms from which patients suffer and by explaining the sequence of psychological reactions which cause them. The principles which govern the selection of patients are defined. A brief account of each of the main cosmetic operations is given together with notes on their limitations and risks.

  13. PLASTIC SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    surgery or subcutaneous mastectomy utilizing a periareolar or circumareolar ... old. Informed consent was obtained. The height of the patients was measured from heel to vertex with a standard height measuring device. The chest circumference was ... The procedure was followed with liposuction 3-6 months later if required.

  14. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Summary: The multidisciplinary management of Breast Cancer (BC) has evolved over the past 50 years: the patient is offered a choice of .... Choice of procedure. – For women with early BC, there is essentially a choice between 2 procedures: mastectomy or breast conserving surgery with radiation (BCT). The standard.

  15. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Schwab , using a three-phase approach.5 In 1998, Moore et al. extended the concept and described the five-stage approach.6. The aim of damage control surgery is to prevent severely injured patients from developing the “lethal triad” of hypothermia, coagulopathy and worsening acidosis, as this confers a dismal prognosis ...

  16. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We plan to protocolise earlier surgery and blood conservation strategies intraoperatively in addition to a restrictive strategy in ..... Marshall JC. Review Transfusion trigger: when to transfuse? Crit Care. 2004;8(Suppl 2):S31-3. 11. Hofmann A, Farmer S, Towler SC. Strategies to preempt and reduce the use of blood products: ...

  17. Cosmetic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/cosmetic-surgery/SN00006 Medical Tourism (Copyright © American Society of Plastic Surgeons) — People considering ... in exotic vacation spots. This publication talks about "medical tourism" and whether it's safe. http://www.plasticsurgery.org/ ...

  18. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Surgery, University of Cape Town Health Sciences Faculty, Groote Schuur Hospital, Observatory, Cape Town,. South Africa ... included all district, regional and tertiary hospitals in the nine provinces. Clinics and so-called ..... large contingency of senior general surgeons from countries such as Cuba, who have ...

  19. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    after pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. J Surg Oncol. 2016;113(2):188-193. http:// dx.doi.org/10.1002/jso.24125. 2. Wente MN, Veit JA, Bassi C, et al. Postpancreatectomy hemorrhage (PPH): An international study group of pancreatic surgery (ISGPS) definition. Surg. 2007;142(1):20-25. http://.

  20. Metabolic Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pareek, Manan; Schauer, Philip R; Kaplan, Lee M

    2018-01-01

    the superiority of surgery over medical treatment alone in achieving improved glycemic control, as well as a reduction in cardiovascular risk factors. The mechanisms seem to extend beyond the magnitude of weight loss alone and include improvements in incretin profiles, insulin secretion, and insulin sensitivity...

  1. TRAUMA SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    deaths due to other trauma types (gunshot wounds, road traffic fatalities and assault) ... the axillary artery was ligated during surgery. Type of ... Left axillary artery. Ischaemic left upper limb. 3. Fifth intercostal space on the left. Bilateral pneumothorax and haemothorax still present at autopsy. (intercostal drain only inserted on ...

  2. Carotid artery surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotid endarterectomy; CAS surgery; Carotid artery stenosis - surgery; Endarterectomy - carotid artery ... through the catheter around the blocked area during surgery. Your carotid artery is opened. The surgeon removes ...

  3. Current Evidence regarding Prophylactic Antibiotics in Head and Neck and Maxillofacial Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kilian Kreutzer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic prophylaxis is commonly used to decrease the rate of infections in head and neck surgery. The aim of this paper is to present the available evidence regarding the application of antibiotic prophylaxis in surgical procedures of the head and neck region in healthy patients. A systemic literature review based on Medline and Embase databases was performed. All reviews and meta-analyses based on RCTs in English from 2000 to 2013 were included. Eight out of 532 studies fulfilled all requirements. Within those, only seven different operative procedures were analyzed. Evidence exists for the beneficial use of prophylactic antibiotics for tympanostomy, orthognathic surgery, and operative tooth extractions. Unfortunately, little high-level evidence exists regarding the use of prophylactic antibiotics in head and neck surgery. In numerous cases, no clear benefit of antibiotic prophylaxis has been shown, particularly considering their potential adverse side effects. Antibiotics are often given unnecessarily and are administered too late and for too long. Furthermore, little research has been performed on the large number of routine cases in the above-mentioned areas of specialization within the last few years, although questions arising with respect to the treatment of high-risk patients or of specific infections are discussed on a broad base.

  4. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more surgeries depending on the extent of ... and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more surgeries depending on the extent of ...

  5. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ...

  6. Tennis elbow surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lateral epicondylitis surgery - discharge; Lateral tendinosis surgery - discharge; Lateral tennis elbow surgery - discharge ... Soon after surgery, severe pain will decrease, but you may have mild soreness for 3 to 6 months.

  7. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures involving ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures involving ...

  8. Emergency surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoneham, M; Murray, D; Foss, N

    2014-01-01

    undertaken on elderly patients with limited physiological reserve. National audits have reported variations in care quality, data that are increasingly being used to drive quality improvement through professional guidance. Given that the number of elderly patients presenting for emergency surgery is likely...... to rise as the population ages, this review summarises the evidence on which such guidance is based, and provides information about how anaesthetists might participate in audit and research aimed at improving local and national outcomes for these most vulnerable of patients....

  9. Value in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery: A Systematic Review of Economic Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Benjamin P; Ji, Yisi D; Peacock, Zachary S

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the state of economic analyses in the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS). A systematic search of published literature up to 2016 was performed. The inclusion criteria were as follows: English-language articles on economic analyses pertaining to OMS including anesthesia and pain management; dentoalveolar surgery; orthognathic, cleft, and/or obstructive sleep apnea treatment; pathology; reconstruction; temporomandibular disorders; trauma; and other. The exclusion criteria were as follows: opinion or perspective articles, studies unrelated to OMS, nonhuman research, and implant-related studies. Cost-effectiveness analyses (CEAs), cost-utility analyses, and cost-minimization analyses (CMAs) were evaluated with the original Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards (CHEERS) checklist or a modified CHEERS checklist. The search yielded 798 articles, 77 of which met the inclusion criteria (published from 1980 to 2016, 48 from the United States). There were an increasing number of studies over time (P for trend surgery (20.7%); 15 studies on orthognathic, cleft, and/or obstructive sleep apnea treatment (19.4%); 1 study on pathology (1.3%); 6 studies on reconstruction (7.8%); no studies on temporomandibular joint disorders and/or facial pain (0%); 20 studies on trauma (25.9%); and 12 studies categorized as other (15.5%). CEAs made up 11.7% of studies, and CMAs comprised 58.4%. Of the 9 CEAs, 55.6% were published in 2010 or later. Of the 45 CMAs, 88.6% were published in 2000 or later and 61.4% in 2010 or later. CEAs met 56.0% (range, 29.2 to 87.5%) of the CHEERS criteria, whereas CMA studies met 45.1% (range, 23.9 to 76.1%) of the modified CHEERS criteria. Only 1 study succeeded in estimating costs and health outcomes (value) of an OMS procedure. There is an increasing trend in the number of economic studies in the field of OMS. More high-quality economic evaluations are needed to demonstrate the value

  10. Choosing surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorstensson, Carina; Lohmander, L; Frobell, Richard

    2009-01-01

    -depth qualitative interviews were conducted with young (aged 18-35), physically active individuals with ACL rupture who were participating in a RCT comparing training and surgical reconstruction with training only. 22/34 were randomised to training only but crossed over to surgery. Of these, 11 were interviewed...... and many patients said that they joined the RCT in order to bypass waiting lists. Patients who chose to cross-over described training as time consuming, boring and as unable to provide sufficient results within a reasonable timeframe. Some said their injured knees had given-way; others experienced new knee...... a variety of views and beliefs about those treatments, and trial participation happens in the absence of equipoise. Furthermore, opting for surgical reconstruction does not necessarily provide patients with satisfactory outcomes. Definition of successful outcome may require an individualised approach...

  11. A more accurate method of predicting soft tissue changes after mandibular setback surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Hee-Yeon; Lee, Shin-Jae; Lee, Yun-Sik; Donatelli, Richard E; Wheeler, Timothy T; Kim, Soo-Hwan; Eo, Soo-Heang; Seo, Byoung-Moo

    2012-10-01

    To propose a more accurate method to predict the soft tissue changes after orthognathic surgery. The subjects included 69 patients who had undergone surgical correction of Class III mandibular prognathism by mandibular setback. Two multivariate methods of forming prediction equations were examined using 134 predictor and 36 soft tissue response variables: the ordinary least-squares (OLS) and the partial least-squares (PLS) methods. After fitting the equation, the bias and a mean absolute prediction error were calculated. To evaluate the predictive performance of the prediction equations, a 10-fold cross-validation method was used. The multivariate PLS method showed significantly better predictive performance than the conventional OLS method. The bias pattern was more favorable and the absolute prediction accuracy was significantly better with the PLS method than with the OLS method. The multivariate PLS method was more satisfactory than the conventional OLS method in accurately predicting the soft tissue profile change after Class III mandibular setback surgery. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Computer-aided design and manufacturing in craniomaxillofacial surgery: the new state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Jamie P; Patel, Ashish; Saadeh, Pierre B; Hirsch, David L

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this article was to illustrate the ease in which virtual surgery and computer-aided design and manufacturing can be used by the craniomaxillofacial surgeon to create tremendously accurate postoperative results and provide confidence with even the most complex three-dimensional bony reconstructions. With advancements in software technology and three-dimensional printing, our ability to plan and execute precise bony reconstruction has become a reality. With this technology, guides can be made to ensure exact bony repositioning or replacement. These guides can help guide cutting of the bone and can act as splints to precisely reposition the bone and direct plate placement. With use of these computer-aided design and manufacturing guides and the addition of guidance technology, the position of the bone can be guaranteed intraoperatively. We review our unique and advanced method in approaching some of these problems and illustrate the application of these techniques in mandibular reconstruction, orthognathic surgery, maxillofacial trauma, and temporomandibular joint reconstruction. This technology continues to evolve, and our indications for its application continue to grow. This article represents only a small portion of the types of cases in which these techniques have already been applied.

  13. Heart failure - surgeries and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - surgery; Congestive heart failure - surgery; Cardiomyopathy - surgery; HF - surgery; Intra-aortic balloon pumps - heart failure; IABP - heart failure; Catheter based assist devices - heart failure

  14. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, ... to find out more. Wisdom Teeth Management Wisdom Teeth Management An impacted wisdom tooth can damage neighboring ...

  15. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oral Surgeries Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Injury / Trauma Surgery Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are ...

  16. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Other Oral Surgeries Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Injury / Trauma Surgery Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons ...

  17. Hip Replacement Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Initiative Breadcrumb Home Health Topics English Español Hip Replacement Surgery Basics In-Depth Download Download EPUB Download ... What is it? Points To Remember About Hip Replacement Surgery Hip replacement surgery removes damaged or diseased ...

  18. Lung surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lung biopsy - discharge; Thoracoscopy - discharge; Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery - discharge; VATS - discharge ... milk) for 2 weeks after video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery and 6 to 8 weeks after open surgery. ...

  19. Laser surgery - skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surgery using a laser ... used is directly related to the type of surgery being performed and the color of the tissue ... Laser surgery can be used to: Close small blood vessels to reduce blood loss Remove warts , moles , sunspots, and ...

  20. Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... t help, you may need coronary artery bypass surgery. The surgery creates a new path for blood to flow ... more than one bypass. The results of the surgery usually are excellent. Many people remain symptom-free ...

  1. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Obstructive Sleep Apnea TMJ and Facial Pain Treatment of Facial Injury Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures ...

  2. Pediatric heart surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart surgery - pediatric; Heart surgery for children; Acquired heart disease; Heart valve surgery - children ... Ginther RM, Forbess JM. Pediatric cardiopulmonary bypass. In: ... Care . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 37. LeRoy S, ...

  3. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and ... Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more surgeries ...

  4. What Is Refractive Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ... Glaucoma Education Center Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic ... Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ...

  5. LASIK - Laser Eye Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ... Glaucoma Education Center Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic ... Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ...

  6. Public and professional perception of oral and maxillofacial surgery (a pilot study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adewole, R A; Akinwande, J A

    2007-01-01

    In the advanced countries, the awareness of Oral and maxillofacial surgery by both the public and medical specialties has led to rapid development and expansion of Oral and Maxillofacial surgery specialty with management of diverse and complex problems within a well defined anatomical region. In the developing countries like Nigeria, the trends are slow and this explains why majority of our patients present at very late stage when only palliative measures are the option. The study aims to assess the level of public and professional (GMP and GDP) knowledge and awareness of oral and Maxillofacial surgery specialty. A questionnaire was devised to assess the knowledge and awareness about the specialty of oral and maxillofacial surgery . Ninety one members of the public who were office workers, civil servants, hospital worker in Yaba local government area of Lagos state were the public respondents. The inclusion criteria was that all respondents had attained at least secondary school educational level. They were randomly chosen and had the questionnaires applied to them. Additionally, 40 General medical practitioners and 40 General dental practitioners were picked randomly from 7 local government areas of Lagos state (Yaba, Ebutte Meta, Surulere, Lagos Island, Shomolu, Kosofe and Ikeja) and the questionnaire was applied to them. Only 5.4% of the public had heard of oral and maxillofacial surgeon before. By comparison, the corresponding figures for ENT and plastic surgeons were 40.0% and 23.1% respectively. Only 4.4% of the public had a prior treatment by an oral and maxillofacial surgeon while 86.2% did not know what a maxillofacial surgeon does. The professionals (GMP and GDP) are quite aware of who a maxillofacial surgeon is, but are less knowledgeable of new areas/subspecialties of maxillofacial surgery such as cleft lip and palate surgery, cosmetic and orthognathic surgery, implantology, craniofacial surgery. Also general Medical Practitioners (60%) views of

  7. Gastric Bypass Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gastrointestinal system Death (rare) Longer term risks and complications of weight-loss surgery vary depending on the type of surgery. They ... room, where medical staff monitors you for any complications. Your hospital stay may ... of bariatric surgery Each type of bariatric surgery has pros and ...

  8. Facial Cosmetic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require ...

  9. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require ...

  10. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require ...

  11. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... It can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Who We Are Find a Surgeon News Videos Contact Anesthesia Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Facial Cosmetic ...

  12. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Other Oral Surgeries Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Oral and maxillofacial surgeons surgically treat the soft tissues of the ... and Other Oral Surgeries Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Oral and maxillofacial surgeons surgically treat the soft tissues of the ...

  13. Bariatric Surgery Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Procedures Who is a Candidate for Bariatric Surgery? Childhood and Adolescent Obesity Find a Provider Benefits of Bariatric Surgery Life ... Bariatric Surgery FAQs Bariatric Surgery Procedures BMI Calculator Childhood and Adolescent Obesity 100 SW 75th Street, Suite 201, Gainesville, FL, ...

  14. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may ...

  15. Limited-Access Heart Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery Menu Topics Topics FAQs Limited-Access Heart Surgery Article Info En español Thousands of heart surgeries ... with cardiovascular disease. What is minimally invasive heart surgery? In minimally invasive heart surgery, surgeons take steps ...

  16. Less extensive surgery compared to extensive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauszus, Finn F; Petersen, Astrid Christine; Neumann, Gudrun

    2014-01-01

    in postmenopausal women was associated with surgery including hysterectomy and bilateral oophorectomy (pcarcinoma was found 138 times (95% CI: 48, 275) more prevalent than the expected rate. CONCLUSION......: The survival of women was better in AGCT than in epithelial ovarian tumor. Age and type of surgery, besides stage, influenced survival. Total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy is the recommended treatment with advancing age. At younger age less extensive surgery was associated...

  17. Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence Page Navigation ▼ ACOG Pregnancy Book Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence Patient Education FAQs Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence Patient Education ...

  18. [Thymus surgery in a general surgery department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mega, Raquel; Coelho, Fátima; Pimentel, Teresa; Ribero, Rui; Matos, Novo de; Araújo, António

    2005-01-01

    Evaluation of thymectomy cases between 1990-2003, in a General Surgery Department. Evaluation of the therapeutic efficacy in Miastenia Gravis patients. Retrospective study based on evaluation of data from Serviço de Cirurgia, Neurologia and Consult de Neurology processes, between 1990-2003, of 15 patients submitted to total thymectomy. 15 patients, aged 17 to 72, 11 female and 4 male. Miastenia Gravis was the main indication for surgery, for uncontrollable symptoms or suspicion of thymoma. In patients with myasthenia, surgery was accomplish after compensation of symptoms. There weren't post-surgery complications. Pathology were divided in thymic hyperplasia and thymoma. Miastenia patients have there symptoms diminished or stable with reduction or cessation of medical therapy. Miastenia was the most frequent indication for thymectomy. Surgery was good results, with low morbimortality, as long as the protocols are respected.

  19. Weight Loss Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weight loss surgery helps people with extreme obesity to lose weight. It may be an option if you ... caused by obesity. There are different types of weight loss surgery. They often limit the amount of food ...

  20. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... administer local anesthesia, all forms of sedation and general anesthesia. Click here to find out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft ...

  1. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... best performed by a trained surgeon with specialized education and training. Click here to find out more. Extractions and ... more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, ...

  2. Preparing for Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FAQs Preparing for Surgery Page Navigation ▼ ACOG Pregnancy Book Preparing for Surgery Patient Education FAQs Preparing for ... the person who is in charge of giving anesthesia and checking its effects. What can I do ...

  3. Laparoscopic Spine Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Global Affairs and Humanitarian Efforts Log In Laparoscopic Spine Surgery Patient Information from SAGES Download PDF Find a SAGES Surgeon Laparoscopic Spine Surgery Your spine surgeon has determined that you ...

  4. Heart valve surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... techniques are used: Percutaneous surgery (through the skin) Robot-assisted surgery If your surgeon can repair your ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  5. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by a trained surgeon with specialized education and training. Click here to find out more. Extractions and ... Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, bone and ...

  6. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more surgeries depending on the extent of the repair needed. Click here to find out more. Corrective ... more surgeries depending on the extent of the repair needed. Click here to find out more. Corrective ...

  7. Cosmetic ear surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otoplasty; Ear pinning; Ear surgery - cosmetic; Ear reshaping; Pinnaplasty ... Cosmetic ear surgery may be done in the surgeon's office, an outpatient clinic, or a hospital. It can be performed under ...

  8. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... best performed by a trained surgeon with specialized education and training. Click here to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, ...

  9. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more surgeries depending on the ... are not uncommon. Individuals with a TMJ disorder may experience a variety of symptoms, such as earaches, ...

  10. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Facial Injury / Trauma Surgery Facial trauma injuries include fractures of the upper and lower jaws and the ... Facial Injury / Trauma Surgery Facial trauma injuries include fractures of the upper and lower jaws and the ...

  11. Abdominal wall surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosmetic surgery of the abdomen; Tummy tuck; Abdominoplasty ... Most of the time, this surgery is an elective or cosmetic procedure because it is an operation you choose to have. It is not usually needed for health reasons. Cosmetic abdomen repair ...

  12. Pediatric heart surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... discharge; Heart valve surgery - children - discharge; Heart surgery - pediatric - discharge; Heart transplant - pediatric - discharge ... Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 434. ...

  13. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... best performed by a trained surgeon with specialized education and training. Click here to find out more. ... more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, ...

  14. Refractive corneal surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... after surgery, it should be OK to use artificial tears. Check with your provider. DO NOT wear contact lenses on the eye that had surgery, even if you have blurry vision. DO NOT use any makeup, creams, or lotions ...

  15. Smoking and surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surgery - quitting smoking; Surgery - quitting tobacco; Wound healing - smoking ... Tar, nicotine, and other chemicals from smoking can increase your risk of many health problems. These include heart and blood vessel problems, such as: Blood clots and aneurysms in ...

  16. Robotic liver surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Universe

    2014-01-01

    Robotic surgery is an evolving technology that has been successfully applied to a number of surgical specialties, but its use in liver surgery has so far been limited. In this review article we discuss the challenges of minimally invasive liver surgery, the pros and cons of robotics, the evolution of medical robots, and the potentials in applying this technology to liver surgery. The current data in the literature are also presented. PMID:25392840

  17. RADIATION AND SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. S.A. Adewuyi

    of radical surgical procedures, surgery remains the only potential curative treatment for many cancer patients ... catheter, 'Toilet' procedure, e.g. simple mastectomy or amputation of a limb, for fungating tumours. Debulking .... that tumour is irradiated prior to surgery and post- operative implies after surgery. 10. Pre-operative.

  18. Cavus Foot Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Toes All Site Content AOFAS / FootCareMD / Treatments Cavus Foot Surgery Page Content What is a cavus foot? A cavus or high-arched foot may have ... related problems. What are the goals of cavus foot surgery? The main goal of surgery is to ...

  19. Breast Cancer Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    FACTS FOR LIFE Breast Cancer Surgery The goal of breast cancer surgery is to remove the whole tumor from the breast. Some lymph nodes ... might still be in the body. Types of breast cancer surgery There are two types of breast cancer ...

  20. Comparison of mandibular stability after SSRO with surgery-first approach versus conventional ortho-first approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamatsu, Tadashi; Hanai, Ushio; Miyasaka, Muneo; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Shou

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative mandibular stability in the surgery-first (SF) approach and ortho-first (OF) approach in orthognathic surgery was retrospectively assessed using the lateral cephalo X-P in 38 patients with skeletal Angle Class III malocclusion who underwent sagittal split ramus osteotomy (SSRO). The postoperative mandibular relapse of the two groups observed from T1 (2 weeks after the surgery) to T2 (for the OF group, a year after surgery; for the SF group, the day orthodontic treatment was completed) was compared. The mean (SD) horizontal relapse at pogonion was 0.86 (0.92) mm in the forward direction in the SF group and 0.90 (1.09) mm in the forward direction in the OF group. No significant difference was found in the amount of horizontal movement between the two groups. On the other hand, the mean (SD) vertical relapse at pogonion was 1.59 (2.91) mm in the downward direction in the SF group and 0.14 (1.30) mm in the upward direction in the OF group, showing a significant difference in the amount of movement between the two groups. The degree of completion of the occlusion at T2 in the SF group was compared with that in the OF group by measuring OB, OJ, L1-occlusal plane angle, and interincisal angle. No significant difference was found between the two groups and the post-treatment occlusion was clinically favourable. Although the SF approach has several advantages for patients, the method of operation and fixation should be selected carefully to maintain postoperative mandibular stability.

  1. Evaluation of the scope and practice of oral and maxillofacial surgery in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinmoladun, V I; Gbolahan, O O; Akadiri, O A; Akinyamoju, C A

    2015-01-01

    Oral and maxillofacial surgery is still evolving, with the scope of practice in Nigeria inadequately determined. This study aims to ascertain the level of practice in various parts of the country vis-a-vis the global trend and factors influencing the scope in Nigeria. Cross-sectional. The study was carried out at the University of Ibadan. Participants included all the maxillofacial surgeons on the mailing list of the Nigerian Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons and Practicing in Nigeria as at December, 2012. Structured questionnaires were delivered to all on the mailing list of the Nigerian Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Respondents were asked to provide information about their demographics, years of practice, areas of practice and factors influencing the choice of practice among others. Nonresponders were reminded a month after initial contact. Data were entered into a personal computer and variables analyzed using descriptive statistical analysis. Thirty-two (56%) of the 57 questionnaires were returned. Most respondents were aged 41-45 years ( n = 11, 34.4%). Twenty-six (81.3%) were males, whereas 6 (18.8%) were females. Twenty respondents (62.5%) practiced in the teaching hospitals. Eighteen respondents (56.3%) practiced in the south-west geopolitical region. Twelve respondents (37.5%) were the only maxillofacial surgeons in their centers. 81.3% routinely practiced traumatology against 15.6% for implantology. Seventy-eight percent ( n = 25) had satisfactory facilities for traumatology, dentoalveolar surgery, and cleft repair surgery, while facilities were least satisfactory in implantology and orthognathic surgery (15.6% and 12.5%, respectively). The highest single factor influencing choice/area of practice was financial reward (100% of respondents). Fifty percent ( n = 16) claimed not to have had adequate training in their area of interest. Most respondents (93.8%) believe the greatest challenge facing oncological maxillofacial

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF PLASTIC SURGERY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pećanac, Marija Đ

    2015-01-01

    Plastic surgery is a medical specialty dealing with corrections of defects, improvements in appearance and restoration of lost function. Ancient times. The first recorded account of reconstructive plastic surgery was found in ancient Indian Sanskrit texts, which described reconstructive surgeries of the nose and ears. In ancient Greece and Rome, many medicine men performed simple plastic cosmetic surgeries to repair damaged parts of the body caused by war mutilation, punishment or humiliation. In the Middle Ages, the development of all medical braches, including plastic surgery was hindered. New age. The interest in surgical reconstruction of mutilated body parts was renewed in the XVIII century by a great number of enthusiastic and charismatic surgeons, who mastered surgical disciplines and became true artists that created new forms. Modern era. In the XX century, plastic surgery developed as a modern branch in medicine including many types of reconstructive surgery, hand, head and neck surgery, microsurgery and replantation, treatment of burns and their sequelae, and esthetic surgery. Contemporary and future plastic surgery will continue to evolve and improve with regenerative medicine and tissue engineering resulting in a lot of benefits to be gained by patients in reconstruction after body trauma, oncology amputation, and for congenital disfigurement and dysfunction.

  3. [Breast cancer surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlastos, Georges; Berclaz, Gilles; Langer, Igor; Pittet-Cuenod, Brigitte; Delaloye, Jean-François

    2007-10-24

    Breast conserving surgery followed by radiation therapy is the treatment of choice for early breast cancer. For patients who choice or need a mastectomy, breast reconstruction provides an acceptable alternative. Breast cancer surgery has been evolving through minimally invasive approaches. Sentinel node biopsy has already remplaced axillary lymph node dissection in the evaluation of the axilla. Local ablation of the tumor may be a valuable alternative to surgery in the future.

  4. Gastric and intestinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossum, Theresa W; Hedlund, Cheryl S

    2003-09-01

    Gastric surgery is commonly performed to remove foreign bodies and correct gastric dilatation-volvulus and is less commonly performed to treat gastric ulceration or erosion, neoplasia, and benign gastric outflow obstruction. Intestinal surgery, although commonly performed by veterinarians, should never be considered routine. The most common procedures of the small intestinal tract performed in dogs and cats include enterotomy and resection/anastomosis. Surgery of the large intestine is indicated for lesions causing obstruction, perforations, colonic inertia, or chronic inflammation.

  5. The effect of hard tissue surgical changes on soft tissue displacement: a pilot CBCT study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Koerich

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: This pilot study had as main objective to test the reliability of a new method to evaluate orthognathic surgery outcomes and also, to understand the effect of hard tissue changes on soft tissue displacement. Methods: The sample consisted of eight patients that underwent bimaxillary advancement and had CBCT at two time points (before surgery and 6-8 months follow-up. Voxel-based cranial base superimposition was used to register the scans. A different technique of iterative closest point (ICP was used to measure and correlate the changes. The average displacement of 15 areas (4 hard tissue and 11 soft tissue were measured twice. Results: ICC was > 0.99 for all areas. Changes in the tip of the nose did not correlate with changes in any maxillary area, whereas soft tissue A point, A point and upper lips had correlation with several areas. The highest correlation for the maxilla was between the upper lip and the left/right supra cheilion (p< 0.001, r= 0.91 and p< 0.001, r= 0.93, respectively. In the mandible, the majority of the correlations involved soft tissue pogonion, pogonion and lower incisors, with the strongest one between pogonion and lower incisors (p< 0.001, r= 0.98. Conclusion: With the proper case selection, ICP is a reliable method that can be used to assess three-dimensional changes.

  6. Annals of surgery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1885-01-01

    Includes the transactions of the American Surgical Association, New York Surgical Society, Philadelphia Academy of Surgery, Southern Surgical Association, Central Surgical Association, and at various...

  7. [Surgery of adrenal tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, V O; Ermolov, A S; Kovalenko, T I; Kondratiev, A V

    2004-01-01

    From 1983 to 2003 examination and surgical treatment were performed in 463 patients with different adrenal tumors. Hormone-active tumors were revealed in 249 of them, non-active - in 214. Combination of CT or MRT with study of adrenal hormones is the basis of the diagnosis. In different cases multispiral computed tomography, angiography, selected taking of blood from inferior caval vein, US- or CT-guided biopsy were used. Open surgery through thoracofrenolumbotomy was performed in 392 patients, videolaparoscopic surgery - in 71. Expediency of laparoscopic surgery in line with open surgery is demonstrated.

  8. Hyperoxaluria and Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asplin, John R.

    2007-04-01

    Bariatric surgery as a means to treat obesity is becoming increasingly common in the United States. An early form of bariatric surgery, the jejunoileal bypass, had to be abandoned in 1980 due to numerous complications, including hyperoxaluria and kidney stones. Current bariatric procedures have not been systematically evaluated to determine if they cause hyperoxaluria. Presented here are data showing that hyperoxaluria is the major metabolic abnormality in patients with bariatric surgery who form kidney stones. Further studies are needed to assess the prevalence of hyperoxaluria in all patients with bariatric surgery.

  9. Oncoplastic breast surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillarisetti, Raghu Ram; Querci Della Rovere, Guidubaldo

    2012-06-01

    Breast Surgery is now a recognized subspecialty of General Surgery abroad with structured training for designated 'Oncoplastic Breast Surgeons'. Oncoplastic Breast surgery is probably one of the most interesting and challenging new developments over the past 20 years. The aims of Oncoplastic surgery are wide local excision of the cancer coupled with partial reconstruction of the defect to achieve a cosmetically acceptable result. Avoidance of mastectomy and consequent reduction of psychological morbidity are the principal goals in the development of various oncoplastic techniques. The use of plastic surgical techniques not only ensures good cosmetic outcome, but also allows the cancer surgeon to remove the tumour with greater volume of surrounding tissue, thus extending the boundaries of breast conserving surgery. Proper patient selection and careful planning after proper radiological and clinical assessment are the two essential prerequisites before undertaking oncoplastic breast surgery. Oncoplastic surgery involves both volume displacement and volume replacement techniques. Some commonly used volume displacement procedures are described in the article. The need for adjustment of contralateral breast should also be anticipated at the time of planning breast conserving surgery, which can be done either at the same time as breast cancer surgery or as a delayed setting.

  10. Abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gefke, K; Schroeder, T V; Thisted, B

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify patients who need longer care in the ICU (more than 48 hours) following abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery and to evaluate the influence of perioperative complications on short- and long-term survival and quality of life. AAA surgery was performed in 553......, 78% stated that their quality of life had improved or was unchanged after surgery and had resumed working. These data justify a therapeutically aggressive approach, including ICU therapy following AAA surgery, despite failure of one or more organ systems....

  11. Annals of surgery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Includes the transactions of the American Surgical Association, New York Surgical Society, Philadelphia Academy of Surgery, Southern Surgical Association, Central Surgical Association, and at various...

  12. [Crohn's disease surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kala, Zdeněk; Marek, Filip; Válek, Vlastimil A; Bartušek, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Surgery of Crohns disease is an important part of the general treatment algorithm. The role of surgery is changing with the development of conservative procedures. The recent years have seen the return to early treatment of patients with Crohns disease. Given the character of the disease and its intestinal symptoms, a specific approach to these patients is necessary, especially regarding the correct choice of surgery. The paper focuses on the luminal damage of the small and large intestine including complications of the disease. We describe the individual indications for a surgical solution, including the choice of anastomosis or multiple / repeated surgeries.

  13. Contemporary endodontic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Richard; Torabinejad, Mahmoud

    2004-06-01

    During the past decade, endodontics has seen a dramatic shift in the application of periradicular surgery and the role it plays in endodontic treatment. With the introduction of enhanced magnification, periradicular ultrasonics and other associative technologies, teeth that might otherwise be extracted now have a chance for retention. This article describes the role of these advances in contemporary endodontic surgery.

  14. Annals of Pediatric Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Annals of Pediatric Surgery is striving to fill an important niche that provides focus to clinical care, technical innovation and clinical research. The Annals of Pediatric Surgery has the responsibility to serve not only pediatric surgeons in the Middle East and North Africa but also should be an important conduit for scientific ...

  15. Robust surgery loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hans, Elias W.; Wullink, Gerhard; van Houdenhoven, Mark; Kazemier, Geert

    2008-01-01

    We consider the robust surgery loading problem for a hospital’s operating theatre department, which concerns assigning surgeries and sufficient planned slack to operating room days. The objective is to maximize capacity utilization and minimize the risk of overtime, and thus cancelled patients. This

  16. Safety in cardiac surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siregar, S.

    2013-01-01

    The monitoring of safety in cardiac surgery is a complex process, which involves many clinical, practical, methodological and statistical issues. The objective of this thesis was to measure and to compare safety in cardiac surgery in The Netherlands using the Netherlands Association for

  17. Prehabilitation Before Major Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson Francis

    2018-01-01

    Prehabilitation is a new term for preoperative rehabilitation before major surgery. Some authors use the short form 'Prehab', though it is not so widely used. Prehabilitation involves measures to improve the physical, physiological, metabolic and psychosocial reserves in preparation for an elective surgery. This involves exercise, nutrition, education and psychosocial interventions.

  18. Annals of African Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The goal of the Annals of African Surgery is to provide a medium for the exchange of current information between surgeons in the African region. The journal embraces surgery in all its aspects; basic science, clinical research, experimental research, surgical education. It will assist surgeons in the region to keep abreast of ...

  19. Economics of epilepsy surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatraman Sadanand

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Surgical decision-making is a complex process. First, a medical decision is made to determine if surgery is necessary. Second, another medical decision is made to determine the type of surgery. Third, a corporate decision is made if such a surgery is financially feasible. Finally, a legal decision is made to proceed or refuse the chosen surgery. This paper examines these issues in the case of surgery for medically intractable epilepsy and proposes a method of decision analysis to guide epilepsy surgery. Materials and Methods: A stochastic game of imperfect information using techniques of game theory and decision analysis is introduced as an analytical tool for surgical decision-making. Results: Surgery for appropriately chosen patients suffering from medically intractable epilepsy may not only be feasible, but may be the best medical option and the best financial option for the patient, families, society and the healthcare system. Such a situation would then make it legally or ethically difficult to reject or postpone surgery for these patients. Conclusions: A process to collect data to quantify the parameters used in the decision analysis is hereby proposed.

  20. Cosmetic breast surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000273.htm Cosmetic breast surgery - discharge To use the sharing features on this ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Plastic and Cosmetic Surgery Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  1. [Cognitive deterioration after surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinmetz, J.; Rasmussen, L.S.

    2008-01-01

    Delirium and postoperative cognitive dysfunction are important and common complications after surgery. Risk factors are first of all increasing age and type of surgery, whereas the type of anaesthesia does not seem to play an important role. Mortality is higher among patients with cognitive...

  2. Bariatric surgery and fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Divya K; Ginsburg, Elizabeth S

    2010-06-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most reliable way to sustain weight loss in the morbidly obese. Reproductive age women comprise the majority of bariatric patients, and many may be interested in conceiving after surgery. The purpose of this review is to synthesize the recent literature on bariatric surgery and fertility to assist providers in patient counseling. Obesity adversely impacts fecundability and IVF outcomes through a variety of mechanisms. The body of literature on reproductive outcome after bariatric surgery is sparse and of mixed quality. Bariatric surgery has been shown to improve menstrual cyclicity in anovulatory women, but little is published on the impact of surgical weight loss on spontaneous or IVF-treatment-related pregnancy rates. The increased risk of miscarriage in obese women may decline after bariatric surgery. There are currently insufficient data to support recommendations regarding the ideal timing for pregnancy after bariatric surgery. Obesity has been shown to adversely impact fertility, and weight loss is associated with significant improvement in many parameters of reproductive function. Further research is required as to the specific impact of surgical weight loss on pregnancy and miscarriage rates, as well as the optimal timing of pregnancy after bariatric surgery.

  3. Sinus surgery: optimal surgery, optimal outcome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkens, Wytske J.

    2016-01-01

    Sinus surgery remains an issue of discussion. We lack data on a number of important issues. In this issue of the journal Jiang et al. show that 67 % of their patients who underwent FESS for CRS had OSAS (of which more than half moderate to severe) but only 38% complained of daytime sleepiness

  4. Administration of Anesthesia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more ... find out more. Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment ...

  5. Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more ... find out more. Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment ...

  6. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more ... find out more. Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment ...

  7. Revision endoscopic sinonasal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantillano, Pablo; Rubio, Fabián; Naser, Alfredo; Nazar, Rodolfo

    Endoscopic sinonasal surgery is the procedure of choice in the treatment of chronic rhinosinusitis and sinonasal polyposis refractory to medical treatment, with high rates of success (76% to 97.5%). However, 2.5%-24% of those patients will require revision surgery (RESS). In this study, we present the clinical, anatomical, radiological and histological features of patients receiving RESS in our centre during a 3-year period. A retrospective review of clinical, anatomical, radiological and histopathological data of patients receiving revision endoscopic sinonasal surgery between 2012 and 2014 was carried out. From 299 surgery procedures performed, 27 (9%) were revision surgeries. The mean patient age was 46 years, with a male/female ratio of 1.4/1. The most frequent preoperative and postoperative diagnosis was chronic polypoid rhinosinusitis. The mean time since the previous surgery was 6.1 years, with 11.9 months of mean follow-up since that surgery. Stenotic antrostomy was found during revision in 81.5% of the patients and incomplete anterior ethmoidectomy and persistent uncinate process, in 59.3%. In radiology, 70.4% of patients had persistent anterior ethmoidal cells. Antrostomy or widening of antrostomy was performed in 96.3% of cases and anterior ethmoidectomy or completion of it was performed in 66.7%. Polyps, stenotic antrostomy and incomplete ethmoidectomy were the most frequent causes of revision surgery, in concordance with the procedures performed. The patients had long periods of time without follow-up between surgeries. Further investigation is necessary to generate measures to reduce the number of revision surgeries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  8. Aortic valve surgery - minimally invasive

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... valve surgery. Techniques include min-thoracotomy, min-sternotomy, robot-assisted surgery, and percutaneous surgery. To perform the ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  9. Cleft Lip and Palate Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery. Cleft Lip / Palate and Craniofacial Surgery This type of surgery is ... the carefully orchestrated, multiple-stage correctional program for cleft lip and palate patients. The goal is to help restore the ...

  10. Tests and visits before surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Before surgery - tests; Before surgery - doctor visits ... Pre-op is the time before your surgery. It means "before operation." During this time, you will meet with one of your doctors. This may be your surgeon or primary care ...

  11. Gamma knife surgery for craniopharyngioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, D.; Steiner, M.; Steiner, L.

    1995-01-01

    We present our results of Gamma Knife surgery for craniopharyngioma in nine patients. The current status of surgery, radiation therapy, intracavitary instillation of radionuclides and Gamma Knife surgery in the management of craniopharyngiomas is discussed. (author)

  12. Getting yourself healthy before surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 3 months after certain surgeries (joint replacement or heart valve surgery). So be sure to schedule your dental ... Mattox KL, eds. Sabiston Textbook of Surgery: The Biological Basis of Modern Surgical Practice . 20th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  13. Anesthesia for bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Tomoki; Kohno, Yumiko; Koishi, Keiko

    2012-02-01

    Bariatric surgery has a lot of problems in anesthesia. We retrospectively compared anesthesia for bariatric surgery in yellow race with that in normal weight patients. Twenty patients who received bariatric surgery and 20 normal body weight patients who received abdominal surgery in Japan were enrolled. Induction condition, depth of epidural space, dose of anesthetics, duration of the effects of muscle relaxants, ventilation, and fluid management in bariatric surgery were analyzed and compared with those in normal body weight patients. An epidural catheterization was successful under ultrasound guide in the bariatric group. The depth epidural space was significantly larger in the bariatric group. Cormack and Lehane classification and the number of intubation attempt were not different between the two groups, while one bariatric case was once awakened to intubate blindly. Pressure-controlled ventilation was used in the bariatric group. Four bariatric patients were continuously ventilated after surgery. The doses of anesthetics and fluid infusion rate were not different between the two groups when calculated by ideal body weight in the bariatric group. The duration of the effects of rocuronium and pancuronium were shorter in the bariatric group. For anesthesia of yellow race patients undergoing bariatric surgery, intravenous anesthetics and acetate Ringer's solution with 1% glucose could be administered per ideal body weight, the effects of muscle relaxants lasted shorter, pressure-controlled ventilation could keep oxygenation with adequate carbon dioxide, and ultrasound assist was useful in epidural catheterization in the bariatric patients.

  14. Surveys on surgery theory

    CERN Document Server

    Cappell, Sylvain; Rosenberg, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Surgery theory, the basis for the classification theory of manifolds, is now about forty years old. There have been some extraordinary accomplishments in that time, which have led to enormously varied interactions with algebra, analysis, and geometry. Workers in many of these areas have often lamented the lack of a single source that surveys surgery theory and its applications. Indeed, no one person could write such a survey. The sixtieth birthday of C. T. C. Wall, one of the leaders of the founding generation of surgery theory, provided an opportunity to rectify the situation and produce a

  15. Surveys on surgery theory

    CERN Document Server

    Cappell, Sylvain; Rosenberg, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Surgery theory, the basis for the classification theory of manifolds, is now about forty years old. The sixtieth birthday (on December 14, 1996) of C.T.C. Wall, a leading member of the subject''s founding generation, led the editors of this volume to reflect on the extraordinary accomplishments of surgery theory as well as its current enormously varied interactions with algebra, analysis, and geometry. Workers in many of these areas have often lamented the lack of a single source surveying surgery theory and its applications. Because no one person could write such a survey, the editors ask

  16. Keratomycosis after cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendicute, J; Orbegozo, J; Ruiz, M; Sáiz, A; Eder, F; Aramberri, J

    2000-11-01

    To evaluate cases and results of keratomycosis that developed after cataract surgery. Hospital de Guipúzcoa, San Sebastián, Spain. This retrospective study comprised 8 patients who developed keratomycosis soon after cataract surgery. Culture analysis revealed 7 cases of Aspergillus fumigatus and 1 of Aspergillus flavus. After medical treatment with antifungal agents, 6 cases resolved and 2 required evisceration. The presence of fungi in corneal ulcers that develop after cataract surgery should be considered. Initiation of early treatment determines the prognosis. Among the therapeutic options, collagen shields soaked in amphotericin B may be effective.

  17. Single port laparoscopic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, Henrik; Istre, Olav

    2012-01-01

    potential benefits. Theoretically, cosmetic outcomes, postoperative pain and complication rates could be improved with use of single site surgery. This study describes introduction of the method in a private hospital in Denmark, in which 40 patients have been treated for benign gynecologic conditions......LESS, or laparo-endoscopic single site surgery, is a promising new method in minimally invasive surgery. An increasing number of surgical procedures are being performed using this technique, however, its large-scale adoption awaits results of prospective randomized controlled studies confirming...

  18. [Cosmetic surgery among Norwegian women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Soest, Tilmann; Kvalem, Ingela Lundin; Roald, Helge Einar; Skolleborg, Knut Chr

    2004-07-01

    There are few data on the frequency of cosmetic surgery among Norwegian women. A random sample of 2000 Norwegian women aged 22 to 55 received a questionnaire on cosmetic surgery, demographic data, self-esteem, and to what extent people around them accepted cosmetic surgery. The response rate was 46% (907 women). Of these, 7.7% indicated that they had undergone cosmetic surgery, while 22.6% wished to do so. Other people's degree of acceptance predicted both the wish to undergo cosmetic surgery and already conducted surgery. Low self-esteem was correlated with a wish to undergo surgery, though women who had done surgery had no lower self-esteem than non-patients. Although the response rate was relatively low, this study gives the first reliable data on the frequency of cosmetic surgery in Norway. The results indicate that other people's degree of acceptance of cosmetic surgery is a predictor of such surgery being chosen.

  19. Repetitive endoscopic sinus surgery failure: a role for radical surgery?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Videler, Ward J. M.; Wreesmann, Volkert B.; van der Meulen, Freerk W.; Knegt, Paul P.; Fokkens, Wytske J.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) is considered to be the golden standard for surgery in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis and nasal polyposis. However, there is still a small group of patients unresponsive despite repetitive surgery. Radical surgery aimed at reduction of the

  20. Cosmetic surgery: medicolegal considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piras, Mauro; Delbon, Paola; Conti, Adelaide; Graziano, Vincenzo; Capasso, Emanuele; Niola, Massimo; Bin, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Cosmetic surgery is one of the two branches of plastic surgery. The characteristic of non-necessity of this surgical speciality implies an increased severity in the evaluation of the risk-benefit balance. Therefore, great care must be taken in providing all the information necessary in order to obtain valid consent to the intervention. We analyzed judgments concerning cosmetic surgery found in national legal databases. A document of National Bioethics Committee (CNB) was also analyzed. The receipt of valid, informed consent is of absolute importance not only to legitimise the medical-surgical act, but it also represents the key element in the question concerning the existence of an obligation to achieve certain results/use of certain methods in the cosmetic surgery.

  1. [Pregnancy after bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzur, Tamar; Sheiner, Eyal

    2011-06-01

    Recent research has put the spotlight on two different aspects of pregnancy after bariatric surgery: safety of the mother and fetus, and the procedure's effectiveness in preventing the complications surrounding reproduction and pregnancy often seen in the obese woman. To evaluate the pregnancy outcome foLlowing bariatric surgery. Although there are severaL reports documenting poor perinatal outcomes and late surgical complications during pregnancies subsequent to bariatric surgery, systematic studies have generaLLy not proven such an association. Pregnancy after bariatric surgery appears to be safe, and in general perinatal outcome is better when compared to pregnancies of obese women. Providers should be familiar with potential complications related to postoperative pregnancies and be prepared to provide appropriate interventions such as nutritional supplementation and band adjustment when necessary.

  2. Gastric Sleeve Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... regular exercise has family members who will provide emotional and practical support (like driving to every doctor's visit or buying healthy food ) Preparing for Gastric Sleeve Surgery Preparing for this ...

  3. Breast augmentation surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... care - open Images Breast lift (mastopexy) - series Breast reduction (mammoplasty) - series Breast augmentation - series References Maxwell GP, Gabriel A. Breast augmentation. In: Neligan PC, ed. Plastic Surgery . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013: ...

  4. Oophorectomy (Ovary Removal Surgery)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptoms, such as hot flashes and vaginal dryness Depression or anxiety Heart disease Memory problems Decreased sex drive Osteoporosis Premature death Taking low doses of hormone replacement drugs after surgery and until about age ...

  5. Annals of Pediatric Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Annals of Pediatric Surgery. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 10, No 1 (2014) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  6. [Pregnancy after bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Franco; DE Luca, Francesco; Stracquadanio, Mariagrazia; Garraffo, Claudia; Santonocito, Veronica C; Privitera, Agata

    2017-04-01

    Pregnancy after bariatric surgery has some peculiarities related to obesity, type of surgery, amount of weight loss, time elapsed from the surgery and adherence to medical prescriptions. Pregnant woman is at risk of nutritional deficiencies and it is unclear whether there is an increased incidence of intestinal complications during pregnancy after bariatric surgery and whether this kind of complications are more frequent during cesarean section. The fetus is at high risk of prematurity and fetal growth restriction, but they seem not at increased risk of birth defects (DTN) except in individual cases of folic acid deficiency (DTN) or vitamin K defect (similar abnormalities in patients receiving oral anticoagulants). In addition, the incidence of gestational diabetes and hypertension results to be decreased. Other postnatal outcomes from possible epigenetic modifications need to be evaluated in the long-term postnatal follow-up.

  7. Bariatric Surgery Misconceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... quality of life than someone who is normal weight. Bariatric surgery results in highly significant improvement in psychosocial well- ... affecting an individual’s weight, such as psychological issues. Weight gain generally occurs when there is an energy imbalance ...

  8. Deep breathing after surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000440.htm Deep breathing after surgery To use the sharing features on ... way to do so is by doing deep breathing exercises. Deep breathing keeps your lungs well-inflated ...

  9. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and teeth. Surgery can improve chewing, speaking and breathing. While the patient's appearance may be dramatically enhanced ... make the lips meet without straining Chronic mouth breathing Sleep apnea (breathing problems when sleeping, including snoring) ...

  10. Art and Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Julio Wilson; Metka, Susanne

    2016-04-01

    The roots of science and art of plastic surgery are very antique. Anatomy, drawing, painting, and sculpting have been very important to the surgery and medicine development over the centuries. Artistic skills besides shape, volume, and lines perception can be a practical aid to the plastic surgeons' daily work. An overview about the interactions between art and plastic surgery is presented, with a few applications to rhinoplasty, cleft lip, and other reconstructive plastic surgeries. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

  11. Blood donation before surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... very safe, some people choose to use a method called autologous blood donation. Autologous blood is blood donated by you, which you later receive if you need a transfusion during or after surgery. You can have blood ...

  12. Nigerian Journal of Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative efficacy of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and levofloxacin in the reduction of postsurgical sequelae after third molar surgery: A randomized, double blind, clinical trial in a Nigerian University Teaching Hospital.

  13. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and orthodontist understand that this is a long-term commitment for you and your family, and will ... face, mouth and jaw surgery Contact Us Sitemap Terms of Use Privacy Policy © Copyright AAOMS 2008-2018 ...

  14. Retrosternal thyroid surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007558.htm Retrosternal thyroid surgery To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The thyroid gland is normally located at the front of ...

  15. Surgery - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 简体中文) Expand Section Biopsy - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Getting Your Skin Ready for Surgery - 简体中文 (Chinese, ...

  16. Heart Surgery - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Pacemaker - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) Bilingual PDF ...

  17. After Surgery - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... After Total Joint Replacement - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Home Care Instructions After Surgery - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified ( ...

  18. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Who We ... Injury / Trauma Surgery Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ ...

  19. Robotics in Colorectal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Allison; Steele, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, robotic surgery has developed from a futuristic dream to a real, widely used technology. Today, robotic platforms are used for a range of procedures and have added a new facet to the development and implementation of minimally invasive surgeries. The potential advantages are enormous, but the current progress is impeded by high costs and limited technology. However, recent advances in haptic feedback systems and single-port surgical techniques demonstrate a clear role for robotics and are likely to improve surgical outcomes. Although robotic surgeries have become the gold standard for a number of procedures, the research in colorectal surgery is not definitive and more work needs to be done to prove its safety and efficacy to both surgeons and patients.

  20. Blepharoplasty (Eyelid Surgery)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lid blepharoplasty is almost always done just for cosmetic reasons. Risks Possible risks of eyelid surgery include: Infection and bleeding Dry, irritated eyes Difficulty closing your eyes or other eyelid problems Noticeable scarring Injury to eye muscles Skin discoloration ...

  1. Alternative Refractive Surgery Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the epithelial cells. Once the epithelial flap is created and moved aside, the procedure is the same ... Sites EyeWiki International Society of Refractive Surgery * Required * First Name: * Last Name: Member ID: * Phone Number: * Email: * ...

  2. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... jaw surgery.™ What We Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do ... out more. Who We Are Find a Surgeon News Videos Contact Administration of Anesthesia Cleft Lip/Palate ...

  3. LASIK Eye Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your eye. Overcorrections may be more difficult to fix than undercorrections. Astigmatism. Astigmatism can be caused by ... back into place. The flap usually heals without stitches. During the surgery, you'll be asked to ...

  4. Orthopaedics in day surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    emergency patients for a surgical procedure, returning home the same day (1). Ambulatory orthopaedics happens to have double meaning, so in this communication day surgery will be the preferred term. In Kenya the three models of day.

  5. Cosmetic surgery: medicolegal considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piras Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cosmetic surgery is one of the two branches of plastic surgery. The characteristic of non-necessity of this surgical speciality implies an increased severity in the evaluation of the risk-benefit balance. Therefore, great care must be taken in providing all the information necessary in order to obtain valid consent to the intervention. We analyzed judgments concerning cosmetic surgery found in national legal databases. A document of National Bioethics Committee (CNB was also analyzed. Conclusion: The receipt of valid, informed consent is of absolute importance not only to legitimise the medical-surgical act, but it also represents the key element in the question concerning the existence of an obligation to achieve certain results/use of certain methods in the cosmetic surgery.

  6. Breast Reduction Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast reduction surgery might also help improve your self-image and your ability to participate in physical activities. ... under the breasts Nerve pain Restricted activity Poor self-image related to large breasts Difficulty fitting into bras ...

  7. Annals of Pediatric Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Annals of Pediatric Surgery. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 7, No 1 (2011) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  8. Annals of Pediatric Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Annals of Pediatric Surgery. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 14, No 1 (2018) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  9. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in face, mouth and jaw surgery.™ What We Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively ...

  10. Expectations of Sinus Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ARS HOME ANATOMY Nasal Anatomy Sinus Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy Skull Base Anatomy Virtual Anatomy Disclosure ... reduce the pressure in your nose. Avoid strenuous exercise for the first 2 weeks after surgery. Also ...

  11. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available AAOMS - Oral and maxillofacial surgeons. The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery.™ What We Do Who ... surgeons surgically treat the soft tissues of the face, mouth and gums to improve function, appearance and ...

  12. Shoulder surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... repair Shoulder arthroscopy Shoulder CT scan Shoulder MRI scan Shoulder ... by: C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA. ...

  13. Endoscopic Sinus Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vitamins, herbal remedies, and spices including vitamin E, garlic, ginger, gingko, and ginseng may increase the risk of bleeding. Some patients may be asked to take antibiotics and/or steroids prior to sinus surgery. This ...

  14. Bariatric Surgery for Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Roux, Carel W; Heneghan, Helen M

    2018-01-01

    In this review, the authors discuss the indications for and the published outcomes of commonly performed bariatric procedures, including weight loss, perioperative morbidity and mortality, late complications, as well as the impact of bariatric surgery on comorbidities, cardiovascular risk, and mortality. They also briefly discuss the mechanisms by which bariatric/metabolic surgery causes such significant weight loss and health gain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Is day surgery safe?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majholm, Birgitte; Engbæk, J; Bartholdy, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Day surgery is expanding in several countries, and it is important to collect information about quality. The aim of this study was to assess morbidity and unanticipated hospital visits 0-30 days post-operatively in a large cohort.......Day surgery is expanding in several countries, and it is important to collect information about quality. The aim of this study was to assess morbidity and unanticipated hospital visits 0-30 days post-operatively in a large cohort....

  16. Robotics in General Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Wall, James; Chandra, Venita; Krummel, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    In summary, robotics has made a significant contribution to General Surgery in the past 20 years. In its infancy, surgical robotics has seen a shift from early systems that assisted the surgeon to current teleoperator systems that can enhance surgical skills. Telepresence and augmented reality surgery are being realized, while research and development into miniaturization and automation is rapidly moving forward. The future of surgical robotics is bright. Researchers are working to address th...

  17. Plastic surgery pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorney, M

    1999-01-01

    As a founding member of the physician-owned insurance carrier The Doctors' Company, the author has reviewed many plastic surgery policy claims. In this article, he presents an overview of the plastic surgery procedures that produce the most severe losses. He then offers suggestions on how to proceed with these "medical malpractice favorites." The author discusses potential antitrust traps and legal recourse for plastic surgeons.

  18. Minimally Invasive Abdominal Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, William S.; Carter, Kristine M.; Fuhrman, George M.; Bolton, John S.; Bowen, John C.

    2000-01-01

    In the last decade, laparoscopy has been the most innovative surgical movement in general surgery. Minimally invasive surgery performed through a few small incisions, laparoscopy is the standard of care for the treatment of gallbladder disease and the gold standard for the treatment of reflux disease. The indications for a laparoscopic approach to abdominal disease continue to increase, and many diseases may be treated with laparoscopic techniques. At Ochsner, laparoscopic techniques have dem...

  19. Surgery for Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Navadgi, Suresh; Pandanaboyana, Sanjay; Windsor, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Surgery for acute pancreatitis has undergone significant changes over the last 3 decades. A better understanding of the pathophysiology has contributed to this, but the greatest driver for change has been the rise of less invasive interventions in the fields of laparoscopy, endoscopy and radiology. Surgery has a very limited role in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. The most common indication for intervention in acute pancreatitis is for the treatment of complications and most notably the ...

  20. Day surgery in Bristol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrington, S

    1993-02-01

    As in the rest of the United Kingdom, day surgery in Bristol is on the increase. In the Bristol Royal Infirmary day surgery unit (DSU) we treat approximately 3,500 patients a year. We have recently opened a second operating theatre. This has shifted the proportion of cases from our general theatres. This has also improved our case mix, less minor surgery under local anaesthetics, to more of the recommended 'basket type' surgery ie hernia repair, varicose vein surgery, excision of breast lumps etc. We have recently introduced an appointment booking system that is progressing. Such changes have to be introduced with good preparation, communication and a lot of diplomacy. I would like to outline the management aspects that help to expand and improve on the service we give, including patient selection and the appointment booking system we have introduced. I will describe how we drew up a policy involving the organisation of operation lists and staff involvement in day surgery management and accountability for patient care from admission through to discharge including our latest care plan. Finally I will outline the methods we have developed for evaluating the care we give.

  1. Innovations in robotic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettman, Matthew; Rivera, Marcelino

    2016-05-01

    Developments in robotic surgery have continued to advance care throughout the field of urology. The purpose of this review is to evaluate innovations in robotic surgery over the past 18 months. The release of the da Vinci Xi system heralded an improvement on the Si system with improved docking, the ability to further manipulate robotic arms without clashing, and an autofocus universal endoscope. Robotic simulation continues to evolve with improvements in simulation training design to include augmented reality in robotic surgical education. Robotic-assisted laparoendoscopic single-site surgery continues to evolve with improvements on technique that allow for tackling previously complex pathologic surgical anatomy including urologic oncology and reconstruction. Last, innovations of new surgical platforms with robotic systems to improve surgeon ergonomics and efficiency in ureteral and renal surgery are being applied in the clinical setting. Urologic surgery continues to be at the forefront of the revolution of robotic surgery with advancements in not only existing technology but also creation of entirely novel surgical systems.

  2. Metabolic surgery: quo vadis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Leví, Ana M; Rubio Herrera, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    The impact of bariatric surgery beyond its effect on weight loss has entailed a change in the way of regarding it. The term metabolic surgery has become more popular to designate those interventions that aim at resolving diseases that have been traditionally considered as of exclusive medical management, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). Recommendations for metabolic surgery have been largely addressed and discussed in worldwide meetings, but no definitive consensus has been reached yet. Rates of diabetes remission after metabolic surgery have been one of the most debated hot topics, with heterogeneity being a current concern. This review aims to identify and clarify controversies regarding metabolic surgery, by focusing on a critical analysis of T2D remission rates achieved with different bariatric procedures, and using different criteria for its definition. Indications for metabolic surgery for patients with T2D who are not morbidly obese are also discussed. Copyright © 2013 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Nonsurgical treatment of an adult with a skeletal Class II gummy smile using zygomatic temporary anchorage devices and improved superelastic nickel-titanium alloy wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Yuji; Ono, Takashi

    2017-11-01

    Patients with a severe gummy smile and a skeletal Class II profile are difficult to treat. This case report describes an effective treatment alternative for improving a gummy smile in a patient with a severe Class II molar relationship, severe crowding, and lip protrusion using zygomatic anchorage devices and improved superelastic nickel-titanium wires. A 36-year-old woman had an excessive overjet and a deep overbite with a bilateral Angle Class II molar relationship. The cephalometric analysis demonstrated a Class II skeletal relationship (ANB, 9.5°), retroclination of the mandible (FMA, 38.4°), and severe labial inclination of the mandibular incisors (IMPA, 101.9°). The main treatment objectives included normalizing the overjet and overbite, improving the gummy smile, and establishing a satisfactory occlusion. During treatment with fixed appliances, intrusion of the total maxillary dentition using skeletal anchorage and elimination of the bimaxillary protrusion were achieved. Improvement of the lateral profile and gummy smile enhanced facial esthetics. Intrusion and distalization of the maxillary dentition with skeletal anchorage and improved superelastic nickel-titanium wires provided a satisfactory dental occlusion, esthetic improvement, and adequate function. This approach should be considered as an alternative treatment option to orthognathic surgery for adults with high-angle skeletal Class II malocclusion and a gummy smile. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Understanding Antegrade Colonic Enema (ACE) Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Colonic Enema (ACE) Surgery Antegrade Colonic Enema (ACE) Surgery Antegrade colonic enema surgery (ACE) is a procedure ... Risks / Benefits What is antegrade colonic enema (ACE) surgery? Antegrade colonic enema surgery (ACE) or Malone antegrade ...

  5. Cleft and Craniofacial Care During Military Pediatric Plastic Surgery Humanitarian Missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Christopher; Lough, Denver; Lim, Alan; Harshbarger, Raymond J; Kumar, Anand R

    2015-06-01

    Military pediatric plastic surgery humanitarian missions in the Western Hemisphere have been initiated and developed since the early 1990 s using the Medical Readiness Education and Training Exercise (MEDRETE) concept. Despite its initial training mission status, the MEDRETE has developed into the most common and advanced low level medical mission platform currently in use. The objective of this study is to report cleft- and craniofacial-related patient outcomes after initiation and evolution of a standardized treatment protocol highlighting lessons learned which apply to civilian plastic surgery missions. A review of the MEDRETE database for pediatric plastic surgery/cleft and craniofacial missions to the Dominican Republic from 2005 to 2009 was performed. A multidisciplinary team including a craniofacial surgeon evaluated all patients with a cleft/craniofacial and/or pediatric plastic condition. A standardized mission time line included predeployment site survey and predeployment checklist, operational brief, and postdeployment after action report. Deployment data collection, remote patient follow-up, and coordination with larger land/amphibious military operations was used to increase patient follow-up data. Data collected included sex, age, diagnosis, date and type of procedure, surgical outcomes including speech scores, surgical morbidity, and mortality. Five hundred ninety-four patients with cleft/craniofacial abnormalities were screened by a multidisciplinary team including craniofacial surgeons over 4 years. Two hundred twenty-three patients underwent 330 surgical procedures (cleft lip, 53; cleft palate, 73; revision cleft lip/nose, 73; rhinoplasty, 15; speech surgery, 24; orthognathic/distraction, 21; general pediatric plastic surgery, 58; fistula repair, 12). Average follow-up was 30 months (range, 1-60). The complication rate was 6% (n = 13) (palate fistula, lip revision, dental/alveolar loss, revision speech surgery rate). The average pre

  6. Robotic Surgery for Thyroid Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jandee; Chung, Woong Youn

    2013-01-01

    Robotic surgery is an innovation in thyroid surgery that may compensate for the drawbacks of conventional endoscopic surgery. A surgical robot provides strong advantages, including three-dimensional imaging, motion scaling, tremor elimination, and additional degrees of freedom. We review here recent adaptations, experience and applications of robotics in thyroid surgery. Robotic thyroid surgeries include thyroid lobectomy, total thyroidectomy, central compartment neck dissection, and radical ...

  7. The Effect of a Condylar Repositioning Plate on Condylar Position and Relapse in Two-Jaw Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyu Sik Jung

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundNumerous condylar repositioning methods have been reported. However, most of them are 2-dimensional or are complex procedures that require a longer operation time and a highly trained surgeon. This study aims to introduce a new technique using a condylar repositioning plate and a centric relation splint to achieve a centric relationship.MethodsWe evaluated 387 patients who had undergone surgery for skeletal jaw deformities. During the operation, a centric relation splint, intermediate splint, final centric occlusion splint, and condylar repositioning plate along with an L-type mini-plate for LeFort I osteotomy or a bicortical screw for bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy were utilized for rigid fixation. The evaluation included: a physical examination to detect preoperative and postoperative temporomandibular joint dysfunction, 3-dimensional computed tomography and oblique transcranial temporomandibular joint radiography to measure 3-dimensional condylar head movement, and posteroanterior and lateral cephalometric radiography to measure the preoperative and postoperative movement of the bony segment and relapse rate.ResultsA 0.3% relapse rate was observed in the coronal plane, and a 2.8% relapse rate in the sagittal plane, which is indistinguishable from the dental relapse rate in orthodontic treatment. The condylar repositioning plate could not fully prevent movement of the condylar head, but the relapse rate was minimal, implying that the movement of the condylar head was within tolerable limits.ConclusionsOur condylar repositioning method using a centric relation splint and mini-plate in orthognathic surgery was found to be simple and effective for patients suffering from skeletal jaw deformities.

  8. Innovations in Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Catherine; Pryor, Aurora D

    2015-11-01

    Surgery has consistently been demonstrated to be the most effective long-term therapy for the treatment of obesity. However, despite excellent outcomes with current procedures, most patients with obesity- and weight-related comorbidities who meet criteria for surgical treatment choose not to pursue surgery out of fear of operative risks and complications or concerns about high costs. Novel minimally invasive procedures and devices may offer alternative solutions for patients who are hesitant to pursue standard surgical approaches. These procedures may be used for primary treatment of obesity, early intervention for patients approaching morbid obesity, temporary management prior to bariatric surgery, or revision of bypass surgery associated with weight regain. Novel bariatric procedures can in general be divided into four categories: endoluminal space-occupying devices, gastric suturing and restrictive devices, absorption-limiting devices, and neural-hormonal modulating devices. Many of these are only approved as short-term interventions, but these devices may be effective for patients desiring low-risk procedures or a transient effect. We will see the expansion of indications and alternatives for metabolic surgery as these techniques gain approval.

  9. Robotic surgery in gynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkatout, Ibrahim; Mettler, Liselotte; Maass, Nicolai; Ackermann, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Robotic surgery is the most dynamic development in the sector of minimally invasive operations currently. It should not be viewed as an alternative to laparoscopy, but as the next step in a process of technological evolution. The advancement of robotic surgery, in terms of the introduction of the Da Vinci Xi, permits the variable use of optical devices in all four trocars. Due to the new geometry of the "patient cart," an operation can be performed in all spatial directions without re-docking. Longer instruments and the markedly narrower mechanical elements of the "patient cart" provide greater flexibility as well as access similar to those of traditional laparoscopy. Currently, robotic surgery is used for a variety of indications in the treatment of benign gynecological diseases as well as malignant ones. Interdisciplinary cooperation and cooperation over large geographical distances have been rendered possible by telemedicine, and will ensure comprehensive patient care in the future by highly specialized surgery teams. In addition, the second operation console and the operation simulator constitute a new dimension in advanced surgical training. The disadvantages of robotic surgery remain the high costs of acquisition and maintenance as well as the laborious training of medical personnel before they are confident with using the technology.

  10. SURGERY AND CARDIOVASCULAR SURGERY JOURNALS ANALYSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanaider, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    To analyze critically the effectiveness and value of bibliometric indicators in journals of Surgery or Cardiovacular Surgery in the context of the postgraduate programs of CAPES Medicine III. A sampling with 16 academic programs and one professional master of Medicine III, encompassing the General and Digestive System Surgery, Cardiovascular Surgery and Multidisciplinary courses with such contents, was evaluated. Thomson Reuters/ISI (JCR), Elsevier/Scopus (SJR), and also Scielo databases were used. Only in seven programs, the teachers had an average of Qualis A1 articles greater than the others strata. Eleven journals in the surgical area are in stratum A1 (5%) and it reaches 25% in Cardiovascular Surgery. Among the six journals with the largest number of publications Qualis A1 in area Medicine III, five are from non-specific areas. The Acta Cirúrgica Brasileira represented 58% of the publications in the stratum A2. There are some obstacles in the Qualis classification with little uniformity among the Medicine areas I, II and III. A permanent committee should be set to update the Qualis, composed by the three medical areas. It should be considered using other index databases and the unification of the Qualis criteria for journals in medicine. Rating criteria of multi and transdisciplinary journals need to be reviewed. It is essential an institutional financial support for national journals chosen by peers aiming to provide a full computerization process and a professional reviewer of the English language, in order to increase the impact factor. Analisar criticamente a eficácia e valor de indicadores bibliométricos dos periódicos da Cirurgia e Cirurgia Cardiovascular no contexto dos Programas de Pós-Graduação da área Medicina III da CAPES. Foi avaliada uma amostragem com 16 programas acadêmicos e um mestrado profissional da área de Medicina III, compreendendo a Cirurgia Geral e do Aparelho Digestivo, a Cirurgia Cardiovascular e Cursos Multidisciplinares

  11. Viscoless microincision cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Sallet

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Guy SalletDepartment of Opthamology, Aalsters Stedelijk Ziekenhuis, BelgiumAbstract: A cataract surgery technique is described in which incisions, continuous circular capsulorhexis and hydrodissection are made without the use of any viscoelastics. Two small incisions are created through which the different parts of the procedure can take place, maintaining a stable anterior chamber under continuous irrigation. Subsequent bimanual phacoemulsification can be done through these microincisions. At the end of the procedure, an intraocular lens can be inserted through the self-sealing incision under continuous irrigation. 50 consecutive cataract patients were operated on without the use of viscoelastics and then compared with a group of 50 patients who had been helped with viscoelastics. No difference in outcome, endothelial cell count or pachymetry was noted between the two groups. No intraoperative complication was encountered. Viscoless cataract surgery was a safe procedure with potential advantages.Keywords: ophthalmic visco-surgical device, viscoless cataract surgery, microincision

  12. Recent advances in laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wei-Jei; Chan, Chien-Pin; Wang, Bing-Yen

    2013-02-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has been widely adopted and new technical innovation, procedures and evidence based knowledge are persistently emerging. This review documents recent major advancements in laparoscopic surgery. A PubMed search was made in order to identify recent advances in this field. We reviewed the recent data on randomized trials in this field as well as papers of systematic review. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is the most frequently performed procedure, followed by laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Although bile duct injuries are relatively uncommon (0.15%-0.6%), intraoperative cholangiography still plays a role in reducing the cost of litigation. Laparoscopic bariatric surgery is the most commonly performed laparoscopic gastrointestinal surgery in the USA, and laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication is the treatment of choice for intractable gastroesophageal reflux disease. Recent randomized trials have demonstrated that laparoscopic gastric and colorectal cancer resection are safe and oncologically correct procedures. Laparoscopic surgery has also been widely developed in hepatic, pancreatic, gynecological and urological surgery. Recently, SILS and robotic surgery have penetrated all specialties of abdominal surgery. However, evidence-based medicine has failed to show major advantages in SILS, and the disadvantage of robotic surgery is the high costs related to purchase and maintenance of technology. Laparoscopic surgery has become well developed in recent decades and is the choice of treatment in abdominal surgery. Recently developed SILS techniques and robotic surgery are promising but their benefits remain to be determined. © 2012 Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery, Asia Endosurgery Task Force and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Surgery in Amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Norin

    2016-01-01

    Amphibian surgery has been especially described in research. Since the last decade, interest for captive amphibians has increased, so have the indications for surgical intervention. Clinicians should not hesitate to advocate such manipulations. Amphibian surgeries have no overwhelming obstacles. These patients heal well and tolerate blood loss more than higher vertebrates. Most procedures described in reptiles (mostly lizards) can be undertaken in most amphibians if equipment can be matched to the patients' size. In general, the most difficult aspect would be the provision of adequate anesthesia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Simulation in pediatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becmeur, François; Lacreuse, Isabelle; Soler, Luc

    2011-11-01

    Simulation in paediatric surgery is essential for educational, ethical, medicolegal and economic reasons, and is particularly important for rare procedures. There are three different levels of simulation:--simulation of basic techniques in order to learn or improve surgical skills (dissection, intracorporeal knots, etc.);--preparation for surgery using virtual reality, to perfect and test various procedures on a virtual patient, and to determine the best approaches for individual cases;--behavioral simulation underlines the importance of the preoperative check-list and facilitates crisis management (complications, conversion, etc.).

  15. Surgery in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trias, M; Targarona, E M; Moral, A; Pera, C

    1998-02-01

    The Iberian Peninsula-the southwestern point of Europe, between the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean-was visited and settled in ancient times by a variety of peoples. Phoenicians, Carthaginians, Celts, Greeks, Romans, Visigoths, and Arabs all left their mark on the peninsula, and their cultures blended together to found, among other things, a rich tradition in medicine and surgery. During the Renaissance, the fluid exchange of technical skills and knowledge with the rest of Europe and the emergence of universities ensured the development of a high level of medical expertise. Today, surgery in Spain is at the forefront of innovations in the field.

  16. Standing equine dental surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, Robert A; Easley, Jack

    2014-04-01

    Dental surgeries refer to procedures that affect the dental tissues or their supporting structures. With the development of specific, efficacious, and conservative treatments, morbidity risks have been lowered and chances of benefiting the health of equids improved. Advances in quality of sedation, analgesia, and locoregional anesthesia allow a majority of dental surgeries to be performed in the standing patient. This update focuses on an orthograde endodontic technique, a minimally invasive buccotomy technique, with the potential to combine it with a transbuccal screw extraction technique, and revisits the AO pinless external fixator for fractures of the body of the mandible. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Bariatric surgery in Denmark.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funch-Jensen, P.; Iversen, M.G.; Kehlet, H.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In 2005 the National Board of Health (NBH) published guidelines on bariatric surgery in Denmark. The aim of the present study was to shed light on the national bariatric effort in relation to these guidelines. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The analysis is based on extraction of the following......, a tendency which was attributable to the activities of one of the private clinics. CONCLUSION: The frequency with which bariatric surgery is performed follows a strongly increasing trend and the procedures are only performed at the public departments selected by the National Board of Health...

  18. Female genital cosmetic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Dorothy; Lefebvre, Guylaine; Bouchard, Celine; Shapiro, Jodi; Blake, Jennifer; Allen, Lisa; Cassell, Krista

    2013-12-01

    To provide Canadian gynaecologists with evidence-based direction for female genital cosmetic surgery in response to increasing requests for, and availability of, vaginal and vulvar surgeries that fall well outside the traditional realm of medically-indicated reconstructions. Published literature was retrieved through searches of PubMed or MEDLINE, CINAHL, and The Cochrane Library in 2011 and 2012 using appropriate controlled vocabulary and key words (female genital cosmetic surgery). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. There were no date or language restrictions. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to May 2012. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. The quality of evidence in this document was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table). Recommendations 1. The obstetrician and gynaecologist should play an important role in helping women to understand their anatomy and to respect individual variations. (III-A) 2. For women who present with requests for vaginal cosmetic procedures, a complete medical, sexual, and gynaecologic history should be obtained and the absence of any major sexual or psychological dysfunction should be ascertained. Any possibility of coercion or exploitation should be ruled out. (III-B) 3. Counselling should be a priority for women requesting female genital cosmetic surgery. Topics should include normal variation and physiological changes over the lifespan, as well as the possibility of unintended consequences of cosmetic surgery to the genital area. The lack of evidence regarding outcomes and the lack of data on the

  19. Epiretinal membrane surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamoudi, Hassan; Correll Christensen, Ulrik; La Cour, Morten

    2017-01-01

    and subsequent pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) (CAT group), (2) PPV and subsequent cataract surgery (VIT group) or (3) phaco-vitrectomy (COMBI group). Examinations were at baseline, one month after each surgery, and at 3 months and 12 months of follow-up. Primary outcome was the RE (the difference between predicted...... and achieved spherical equivalent); secondary outcomes were best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), and incidence of cystoid macular oedema (CME) defined as >10% increment of central subfield macular thickness (CSMT). Results: Sixty-two eyes were enrolled. The mean RE showed a small myopic shift of -0.36D in all...

  20. Cosmetic Surgery Training in Plastic Surgery Residency Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colton H. L. McNichols, MD

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions:. There is an increase in dedicated cosmetic surgery rotations and fewer residents believe they need a fellowship to practice cosmetic surgery. However, the comfort level of performing facial aesthetic and body contouring procedures remains low particularly among independent residents.

  1. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available AAOMS - Oral and maxillofacial surgeons. The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery.™ What We Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find ... Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively trained to appropriately administer local ...

  2. Aortic valve surgery - open

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... while you are connected to this machine. This machine does the work of your heart while your heart is stopped. If your aortic valve is too damaged, you will need a new valve. This is called replacement surgery. Your surgeon will remove your aortic valve ...

  3. Plastic Surgery: Tackling Misconceptions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    will succeed. First impressions tend to last, and if young people's first impression of plastic surgeons is that they spend much of their time doing cosmetic surgery then this is a first impression that might be long ... Res 2014;4 Suppl S3:169‑70. Access this article online. Quick Response Code: Website: www.amhsr.org. DOI:.

  4. Plastic Surgery: Tackling Misconceptions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Misconceptions. Dear Sir,. Denadai and Raposo-Amaral have presented an interesting account of undergraduate plastic surgery education and the challenges associated with it.[1] They have outlined a comprehensive program to ensure that medical students get a much deeper understanding of the activities of plastic ...

  5. Gastric bypass surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Buchwald H, ed. Buchwald's Atlas of Metabolic and Bariatric Surgical Techniques and Procedures . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 5. Halperin F, Ding SA, Simonson DC, et al. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery or lifestyle with intensive medical management in patients ...

  6. Heart bypass surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the hospital. The day before your surgery: Shower and shampoo well. You may be asked to wash your whole body below your neck with a special soap. Scrub your chest 2 or 3 times with this soap. Make sure that you dry ...

  7. Mitral valve surgery - open

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... return. The day before your surgery, take a shower and wash your hair. You may need to wash your whole body below your neck with a special soap. Scrub your chest 2 or 3 times with this soap. You also may need to ...

  8. Ghrelin and Metabolic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios J. Pournaras

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic surgery is the most effective treatment for morbid obesity. Ghrelin has been implicated to play a role in the success of these procedures. Furthermore, these operations have been used to study the gut-brain axis. This article explores this interaction, reviewing the available data on changes in ghrelin levels after different surgical procedures.

  9. Bariatric Surgery and Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Jonathan G; Yazdi, Farshid; Reisin, Efrain

    2017-12-08

    Obesity continues to increase in prevalence worldwide. Hypertension has long been associated with obesity, and weight loss continues to be a first-line therapy in the treatment of hypertension. Lifestyle modification and pharmacologic therapy, however, often meet with treatment failure. Bariatric surgery continues to be the most successful approach to sustained weight loss. This review focuses on the underlying physiologic mechanisms of obesity-hypertension, and the impact of bariatric surgery on the treatment of hypertension. Current available literature on the physiologic mechanisms of obesity-hypertension, and the major trials, meta-analyses and systematic reviews of the impact of bariatric surgery procedures on hypertension are reviewed. Evidence suggests significant improvement in obesity-hypertension in patients who undergo surgical weight-reduction procedures. Malabsorptive techniques such as the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or surgical resection techniques such as laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy appear to offer superior results in regards to hypertension control over restrictive techniques such as Gastric Banding. Though long-term control of hypertension following surgery remains a concern, available follow-up post-operative data of up to 10 years suggests a sustained, if lessened, effect on hypertension control over time. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2017. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Robotics in gynecologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, A C; Falcone, T

    2009-06-01

    Robotic surgery has evolved from an investigational surgical approach to a clinically useful adjunct in multiple surgical specialties over the past decade. Advocates of robotic-assisted gynecologic surgery revere the system's wristed instrumentation, ergonomic positioning, and three-dimensional high-definition vision system as significant improvements over laparoscopic equipment's four degrees of freedom and two-dimensional laparoscope that demand the surgeon stand throughout a procedure. The cost, lack of haptic feedback, and the bulky size of the equipment make robotics less attractive to others. Studies evaluating outcomes in robotic-assisted gynecologic surgery are limited. Multiple small retrospective studies demonstrate the safety and feasibility of robotic hysterectomy. With increased surgeon experience, operative times are similar to, or shorter than, laparoscopic cases. Robotic assistance can facilitate suturing in laparoscopic myomectomies, and is associated with decreased blood loss and a shorter hospital stay, although may require longer operative times. Robotic assistance has also been applied to multiple procedures in the subspecialties of infertility, urogynecology and gynecologic oncology with good success and relatively low morbidity. However, further research is warranted to better evaluate the relative benefits and costs of robotic assisted gynecologic surgery.

  11. Scoliosis surgery - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from getting worse. But, when they no longer work, the child's health care provider will recommend surgery. There are ... urinate. Your child's stomach and bowels may not work for a few days ... Your child may need to receive fluids and nutrition through ...

  12. Nigerian Journal of Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nigerian Journal of Surgery publishes original articles, special articles (by invitation), reviews, case reports, correspondences and notes. Materials cited for publication will include scientific research papers read at the meetings of the Nigerian Surgical Research Society, and of the Association of Surgeons of Nigeria and ...

  13. Annals of Pediatric Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Annals of Pediatric Surgery is striving to fill an important niche that provides focus to clinical care, technical innovation and clinical research. ... Nonconventionalmesocaval prosthetic shunt interposition in refractory case with portal hypertension in a 10-kg female infant · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL ...

  14. Surgery for adrenal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salamah, S.M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the presentation, localization, pathology, surgical management and outcome of surgery for adrenal gland tumors. Design: Prospective clinico epidemiological study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at the Department of General Surgery, University Unit, Riyadh medical Complex Kingdom of Saudi Rabia from June, 1991 to may, 2001. Subjects and Methods: A total of 21 cases with adrenal tumors were studied for demographic data, clinical presentation, diagnostic workup, localization, surgical management, pathology and outcome. The outcome of these patients was followed prospectively. Results: The study included 12 female and 9 male patients. The mean age at surgery was 36.7 years. Hypertension (69.%) was the commonest presentation in hypersecretory functional tumors. The localization accuracy for ultrasonography, computerized tomography, MRI and MIBG scan was 95.2%, 98.3% 87.8% and 83.6% respectively. Pheochromocytoma was the most common adrenal pathology observed in 14 (66.6%) cases. The overall morbidity was 19% with no hospital mortality. Complete follow-up of available 19 patients (90.5 %) revealed no tumor recurrence and persistent hypertension in 14.3% cases. Conclusion: surgery on adrenal glands is safe in experienced hands and is recommended in institutes with all backup facilities. (author)

  15. COMPUTERS IN SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BODE

    to keep abreast of the rapidly changing trends in surgical fields. What are the legal implications of on- line referrals, treatment via telemedicine, surgical decisions following video-conferencing? In robot- assisted remote surgery and telemedicine, is the consulted or remote doctor bound by the licensing regulations of the ...

  16. Robotic endovascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Stephanie; Ko, Koel; Tsang, Josephine; Chan, Yiu Che

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to compare conventional endovascular procedures and the robotic endovascular approach in aortic aneurysm repair. Despite advantages over open surgery, conventional endovascular surgery has limitations. To develop an alternative, efforts have been focused on robotic endovascular systems. Two of the 3 studies comparing procedure times demonstrated reduced procedure time in the robotic group, by 6 times (p robotic procedures reduced fluoroscopic exposure time by 12 minute (p robotic surgery was reduced up to 10 times (p robotic performance score showed a better performance score in the robotic endovascular group (p = 0.007). These results demonstrate that the robotic technique has multiple advantages over the conventional procedure, including improved catheter stability, a shorter learning curve, reduced procedure time, and better performance in cannulating tortuous vessels. However, robotic endovascular technology may be limited by the cost of the system, the size of the catheter, and the setup time required preoperatively. Further comparative studies between conventional and robotic approaches regarding cost-effectiveness, safety, and performance in cases involving complex anatomy and fenestrated stent grafts are essential. Nevertheless, this revolutionary technology is increasingly popular and may be the next milestone in endovascular surgery.

  17. Advances in trauma surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-07-19

    Jul 19, 2007 ... to be fully conscious within 48 hours, then a CT of the whole cervical spine is required to exclude any cervical spine injury. Surgical management of penetrating neck injuries. The patient presenting to the emergency room with massive bleeding from a penetrating neck injury requires haemostatic surgery.

  18. [DRG and gastrointestinal surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leardi, S; Altilia, F; Pietroletti, R; Risetti, A; Schietroma, M; Simi, M

    1999-01-01

    The diagnosis-related-groups (DRG) is the cost-based system for hospital reimbursement. However, the proceeds does not coincide with the costs. Aim of the study was to identify the profit, which we could gained with 147, 155, 158, 162, 165, 198 gastrointestinal surgery DRG. 30 consecutive patients, undergone to surgery in Clinica Chirurgica of L'Aquila University, had been studied. We had calculated the daily costs of medical and nursing practice, diagnostic tests, drugs, hospitalization, surgical instruments for every patient's therapy. The DRG-proceeds had been correlated with the DRG-costs. The "major gastrointestinal surgery" had not profit (147 DRG: anterior resection of rectum = -354428 Pounds, Miles = -94020 Pounds; 155 DRG: total gastrectomy = -1920641 Pounds). On the contrary, "minimal surgery" had good profits (158 DRG: hemorroidectomy with local anestesia = 1469605 Pounds;162 DRG: sutureless groin hernioplasty = 1561200 Pounds; 198 DRG: videolaparochole-cystectomy: 1208807 Pounds). The study seems to demonstrate the disparity of the reimbursement system related to DRG. However, the surgeons, as managers, must employ warily the resources for producing DRG.

  19. [Health education. Heart surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriarte Roteta, Andrea; Wilson-Barnett, Jenifer; Narvaiza, M Jesús

    2003-06-01

    By means of a literature review of nursing articles, the authors aim to evaluate the importance of educational programmes before and after cardiac surgery, to assess the advantages and drawbacks of these programmes and to evaluate the need for following-up patients and their carers after being discharged from hospital. Health Education and cardiac surgery: Delivering information following cardiac surgery is an essential task, not only to achieve a behavioural change and the development of patients' self-care attitudes but also to reduce their anxiety. It is also essential to educate family members as they are the most importance source of physical and emotional support following surgery. Issues about in-hospital teaching programmes: Despite the numerous benefits of in-hospital teaching programmes, the actual tendency to shorten hospitalisation length in association with the high levels of anxiety, impede patients and carers' learning. Some studies suggest that these educational programmes have not completely achieved the task of preparing patients and their families to face the early recovery. Education during the early recovery: The authors highlight those studies that have focused on patients and their carers' needs for information following discharge from hospital. Results from these studies show the need for following-up patients and their carers at this period. Educational programmes can extent and reinforce the information provided at hospital.

  20. Variable Operative Experience in Hand Surgery for Plastic Surgery Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Lin, Ines C; Levin, Lawrence Scott; Chang, Benjamin

    Efforts to standardize hand surgery training during plastic surgery residency remain challenging. We analyze the variability of operative hand experience at U.S. plastic surgery residency programs. Operative case logs of chief residents in accredited U.S. plastic surgery residency programs were analyzed (2011-2015). Trends in fold differences of hand surgery case volume between the 10th and 90th percentiles of residents were assessed graphically. Percentile data were used to calculate the number of residents achieving case minimums in hand surgery for 2015. Case logs from 818 plastic surgery residents were analyzed of which a minority were from integrated (35.7%) versus independent/combined (64.3%) residents. Trend analysis of fold differences in case volume demonstrated decreasing variability among procedure categories over time. By 2015, fold differences for hand reconstruction, tendon cases, nerve cases, arthroplasty/arthrodesis, amputation, arterial repair, Dupuytren release, and neoplasm cases were below 10-fold. Congenital deformity cases among independent/combined residents was the sole category that exceeded 10-fold by 2015. Percentile data suggested that approximately 10% of independent/combined residents did not meet case minimums for arterial repair and congenital deformity in 2015. Variable operative experience during plastic surgery residency may limit adequate exposure to hand surgery for certain residents. Future studies should establish empiric case minimums for plastic surgery residents to ensure hand surgery competency upon graduation. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. ROBOTIC SURGERY: BIOETHICAL ASPECTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira-Batista, Rodrigo; Souza, Camila Ribeiro; Maia, Polyana Mendes; Siqueira, Sávio Lana

    2016-01-01

    The use of robots in surgery has been increasingly common today, allowing the emergence of numerous bioethical issues in this area. To present review of the ethical aspects of robot use in surgery. Search in Pubmed, SciELO and Lilacs crossing the headings "bioethics", "surgery", "ethics", "laparoscopy" and "robotic". Of the citations obtained, were selected 17 articles, which were used for the preparation of the article. It contains brief presentation on robotics, its inclusion in health and bioethical aspects, and the use of robots in surgery. Robotic surgery is a reality today in many hospitals, which makes essential bioethical reflection on the relationship between health professionals, automata and patients. A utilização de robôs em procedimentos cirúrgicos tem sido cada vez mais frequente na atualidade, o que permite a emergência de inúmeras questões bioéticas nesse âmbito. Apresentar revisão sobre os aspectos éticos dos usos de robôs em cirurgia. Realizou-se revisão nas bases de dados Pubmed, SciELO e Lilacs cruzando-se os descritores "bioética", "cirurgia", "ética", "laparoscopia" e "robótica". Do total de citações obtidas, selecionou-se 17 artigos, os quais foram utilizados para a elaboração do artigo. Ele contém breve apresentação sobre a robótica, sua inserção na saúde e os aspectos bioéticos da utilização dos robôs em procedimentos cirúrgicos. A cirurgia robótica é uma realidade, hoje, em muitas unidades hospitalares, o que torna essencial a reflexão bioética sobre as relações entre profissionais da saúde, autômatos e pacientes.

  2. Nanotechnology in plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Ahmed M S; Gerstle, Theodore L; Rabie, Amr N; Song, Yong-Ak; Melik, Rohat; Han, Jongyoon; Lin, Samuel J

    2012-12-01

    Nanotechnology has made inroads over time within surgery and medicine. Translational medical devices and therapies based on nanotechnology are being developed and put into practice. In plastic surgery, it is anticipated that this new technology may be instrumental in the future. Microelectromechanical systems are one form of nanotechnology that offers the ability to develop miniaturized implants for use in the treatment of numerous clinical conditions. The authors summarize their published preliminary findings regarding a microelectromechanical systems-based electrochemical stimulation method through modulation of ions around the nerve that is potentially implantable and clinically efficacious, and expand upon current and potential usages of nanotechnology in plastic surgery. Sciatic nerves (n = 100) of 50 American bullfrogs were placed on a microfabricated planar gold electrode array and stimulated electrically. Using Ca(2+)-selective membranes, ion concentrations were modulated around the nerve environment in situ. In addition, a comprehensive review of the literature was performed to identify all available data pertaining to the use of nanotechnology in medicine. A 40 percent reduction of the electrical threshold value was observed using the Ca(2+) ion-selective membrane. The uses of nanotechnology specifically applicable to plastic surgery are detailed. Nanotechnology may likely lead to advancements in the art and science of plastic surgery. Using microelectromechanical systems nanotechnology, the authors have demonstrated a novel means of modulating the activation of nerve impulses. These findings have potentially significant implications for the design of special nano-enhanced materials that can be used to promote healing, control infection, restore function, and aid nerve regeneration and rehabilitation.

  3. Congenital heart defect - corrective surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... up and over time, cause medical problems and arrhythmias. Sometimes, an ASD can be closed without open- ... surgery. The surgery may be done in the newborn period if the infant has severe symptoms. If ...

  4. Cancer Surgery: Physically Removing Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 30, 2017. Townsend CM Jr, et al. Emerging technology in surgery: Informatics, robotics, electronics. In: Sabiston Textbook of Surgery: The Biological Basis of Modern Surgical Practice. 20th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2017. ...

  5. Infant open heart surgery (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    During open-heart surgery an incision is made through the breastbone (sternum) while the child is under general anesthesia. ... During open-heart surgery an incision is made through the breastbone (sternum) while the child is under general anesthesia.

  6. Preventing Wrong-Site Surgery in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assael, Leon A

    2017-05-01

    This article discusses the risk for wrong-site surgery in oral and maxillofacial surgery and the development and utility of checklists. The intent of checklists and the specific applicability of each of them to ambulatory oral and maxillofacial surgery are presented. Checklists and other considerations to mitigate the risk of wrong-site surgery are evaluated. The role of interprofessional teams in improving patient care outcomes with the checklist as a vehicle is evaluated. Recommendations for the use of checklists and related methods in the ambulatory oral and maxillofacial surgery setting are made. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Nigerian Journal of Plastic Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nigerian Journal of Plastic Surgery has its objectives in publishing original articles about developments in all areas related to plastic and reconstructive surgery as well as to trauma surgery. It also serves as a means of providing a forum for correspondence, information and discussion. It also accepts review articles that ...

  8. Visual Outcome of Cataract Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    non-governmental organization (Amen Foundation) to commence a free cataract surgery programme in January. 2008. Since its inception, the patient turnout for cataract surgery has increased. The World Health Organization (WHO) categorizes the outcome of cataract surgeries into 3 groups: good (visual acuity of 6/ 6-6/ ...

  9. Robot-assisted endoscopic surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruurda, J.P.

    2003-01-01

    During the last three years, robot-assisted surgery systems are increasingly being applied in endoscopic surgery. They were introduced with the objective to overcome the challenges of standard endoscopic surgery. With the improvements in manipulation and visualisation that robotic-assistance offers,

  10. HYPOTHYROIDISM FOLLOWING THYROID SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lankarani

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Postsurgical hypothyroidism and its incidence has not been fully investigated. In this study, the incidence of hypothyroidism and its possible risk factors at Shariati Hospital was assessed. One hundred and two patients with benign thyroid diseases, who had undergone thyroidectomy, were investigated with regards to thyroid function profile during period of one year after the operation every three months with post-operative sample as the baseline. Hypothyroidism was developed in 36 patients (35.2% on average 5 ± 3.2 months after surgery. Factors such as increased age, operation type, histopathologic type, underlying disease, lymphocytic infiltration and use of levothyroxine before surgery were associated with the increased incidence of hypothyroidism. It seems that use of indicators such as Graves' disease and lymphocytic infiltration in pathologic specimens should be helpful in projecting the potential occurrence of hypothyroidism in patients undergoing thyroidectomy.

  11. Robotic mitral valve surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kypson, Alan P; Nifong, L Wiley; Chitwood, W Randolph

    2003-12-01

    A renaissance in cardiac surgery has begun. The early clinical experience with computer-enhanced telemanipulation systems outlines the limitations of this approach despite some procedural success. Technologic advancements, such as the use of nitinol U-clips (Coalescent Surgical Inc., Sunnyvale, CA) instead of sutures requiring manual knot tying, have been shown to decrease operative times significantly. It is expected that with further refinements and development of adjunct technologies, the technique of computer-enhanced endoscopic cardiac surgery will evolve and may prove to be beneficial for many patients. Robotic technology has provided benefits to cardiac surgery. With improved optics and instrumentation, incisions are smaller. The ergometric movements and simulated three-dimensional optics project hand-eye coordination for the surgeon. The placement of the wristlike articulations at the end of the instruments moves the pivoting action to the plane of the mitral annulus. This improves dexterity in tight spaces and allows for ambidextrous suture placement. Sutures can be placed more accurately because of tremor filtration and high-resolution video magnification. Furthermore, the robotic system may have potential as an educational tool. In the near future, surgical vision and training systems might be able to model most surgical procedures through immersive technology. Thus, a "flight simulator" concept emerges where surgeons may be able to practice and perform the operation without a patient. Already, effective curricula for training teams in robotic surgery exist. Nevertheless, certain constraints continue to limit the advancement to a totally endoscopic computer-enhanced mitral valve operation. The current size of the instruments, intrathoracic instrument collisions, and extrathoracic "elbow" conflicts still can limit dexterity. When smaller instruments are developed, these restraints may be resolved. Furthermore, a working port incision is still required for

  12. [Bariatric surgery in Denmark.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funch-Jensen, P.; Iversen, M.G.; Kehlet, H.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In 2005 the National Board of Health (NBH) published guidelines on bariatric surgery in Denmark. The aim of the present study was to shed light on the national bariatric effort in relation to these guidelines. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The analysis is based on extraction of the following......, a tendency which was attributable to the activities of one of the private clinics. CONCLUSION: The frequency with which bariatric surgery is performed follows a strongly increasing trend and the procedures are only performed at the public departments selected by the National Board of Health...... data from the National Patient Registry in the period from 2005 through 2007: annual number of operations, type of operation, laparoscopic versus open procedure. Furthermore, the centres were compared. RESULTS: A total of 2,098 bariatric procedures were performed in the years 2005 to 2007. Apart from...

  13. [Cataract surgery in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlović, S

    2000-01-01

    Cataract extraction in children has improved and became more popular over the past few decades but, due to particular features of children's eyes, still remains controversial--especially regarding the intraocular lens implantation. In contrast to adults, indications for cataract surgery in children are much more difficult to determine. Since subjective visual acuity cannot be obtained, greater reliance must be placed on the morphology and location of the lens opacity, and the behavior of the child. Forced preferential looking and visual evoked potentials can be helpful, but they should not be the only criteria. In management of pediatric cataract, correction of postoperative aphakia is still an incompletely resolved problem. Conventionally, optical correction is achieved by spectacles or contact lenses. The power of both spectacles and contact lenses can be readily adjusted to compensate for ocular growth. The success of both depends significantly on parental compliance and the child's acceptance. Hutchinson reported that 44% children with aphakia stopped wearing glasses or contact lenses 2 months after surgery. Contact lens wearing can also result in a number of corneal complications, including infectious keratitis, corneal vascularization and hypoxic corneal ulceration. IOL implantation is theoretically superior to glasses and contact lenses since it provides almost immediate optical correction which is much more reliable because it does not depend on parental or child's compliance. Still, there are many controversies about IOL implantation in infants and young children like IOL-size, material, IOL power calculation, prevention and management of secondary cataract, as well as long term safety of IOLs in children's eyes. Although short-term anatomic results after cataract extraction and primary IOL implantation in children are excellent and stable, long-term follow-up is necessary to answer questions about the long-term safety of implants in children's eyes. A

  14. Surgery of the Trachea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S. Allen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Surgical procedures on the trachea have only been undertaken within the past 50 years. Knowing the unique blood supply of the trachea and how to reduce tension on any anastomosis are key to a successful outcome. Tracheal conditions requiring surgery usually present with shortness of breath on exertion, and preoperative evaluation involves computed tomography and rigid bronchoscopy. Tracheal resection and reconstruction can be safely performed with excellent outcomes by following a well-described technique.

  15. Pregnancy and bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahawar, Kamal K

    2017-12-01

    A large number of women experience pregnancy after bariatric surgery. The purpose of this review was to understand the evidence base in this area to come up with practical, evidence-based recommendations. We examined PubMed for all published articles on pregnancy in patients who have previously undergone a bariatric surgery. There is an increasing body of evidence pointing towards a beneficial effect of weight loss induced by bariatric surgery on female and male fertility prompting calls for recognition of infertility as a qualifying co-morbidity for patients between the Body Mass Index of 35.0 kg/m2 and 40.0 kg/m2. Women in childbearing age group should be routinely offered contraceptive advice after bariatric surgery and advised to avoid pregnancy until their weight has stabilized. Until more focused studies are available, the advice to wait for 12 months or 2 months after the weight loss has stabilized, whichever is latter, seems reasonable. Patients should be advised to seek clearance from their bariatric teams prior to conception and looked after by a multi-disciplinary team of women health professionals, bariatric surgeons, and dietitians during pregnancy. The main objective of care is to ensure adequate nutritional state to allow for a satisfactory weight gain and fetal growth. There is a relative lack of studies and complete lack of Level 1 evidence to inform practice in this area. This review summarizes current literature and makes a number of practical suggestions for routine care of these women while we develop evidence to better inform future practice.

  16. Nanotechnology in Thoracic Surgery*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Morgan D.; Khullar, Onkar; Frangioni, John V.; Grinstaff, Mark W.; Colson, Yolonda L.

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology is an exciting and rapidly progressive field offering potential solutions to multiple challenges in the diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer, with the potential for improving imaging and mapping techniques, drug delivery and ablative therapy. With promising preclinical results in many applications directly applicable to thoracic oncology, it is possible that the frontiers of minimally invasive thoracic surgery will eventually be explored on a nanoscale. PMID:20494008

  17. Cell response to surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ni Choileain, Niamh

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the profound alterations in host immunity that are produced by major surgery as demonstrated by experimental and clinical studies, and to evaluate the benefits of therapeutic strategies aimed at attenuating perioperative immune dysfunction. DATA SOURCES: A review of the English-language literature was conducted, incorporating searches of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane collaboration databases to identify laboratory and clinical studies investigating the cellular response to surgery. STUDY SELECTION: Original articles and case reports describing immune dysfunction secondary to surgical trauma were included. DATA EXTRACTION: The results were compiled to show outcomes of different studies and were compared. DATA SYNTHESIS: Current evidence indicates that the early systemic inflammatory response syndrome observed after major surgery that is characterized by proinflammatory cytokine release, microcirculatory disturbance, and cell-mediated immune dysfunction is followed by a compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome, which predisposes the patient to opportunistic infection, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, and death. Because there are currently no effective treatment options for multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, measures to prevent its onset should be initiated at an early stage. Accumulating experimental evidence suggests that targeted therapeutic strategies involving immunomodulatory agents such as interferon gamma, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, the prostaglandin E(2) antagonist, indomethacin, and pentoxifylline may be used for the treatment of systemic inflammatory response syndrome to prevent the onset of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Surgical trauma produces profound immunological dysfunction. Therapeutic strategies directed at restoring immune homeostasis should aim to redress the physiological proinflammatory-anti-inflammatory cell imbalance associated with major surgery.

  18. Epilepsy surgery in children

    OpenAIRE

    Sita Jayalakshmi; Sudhindra Vooturi; Swapan Gupta; Manas Panigrahi

    2017-01-01

    Approximately 60% of all patients with epilepsy suffer from focal epilepsy syndromes. In approximately 15% of these patients, the seizures are not adequately controlled with anticonvulsive drugs, and such patients are potential candidates for surgical treatment and majority are children. Epilepsy surgery in children, who have been carefully chosen, can result in either seizure freedom or a marked (>90%) reduction in seizures in approximately two-third of children with intractable seizures. In...

  19. Ambulatory paediatric surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urology: Dental surgery: 1. Please be in ... Ward/Clinic at *7.00 a.m.r9.30 a.m.. 2. If you cannot bring your child, please telephone to make a new appointment. 3. If your child has a cold, ... Please do not give your child medicines containing aspirin for 2 weeks before ... Extraction/filling of teeth under general .. anaesthetic in ...

  20. Pregnancy following bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Carla B

    2004-01-01

    Gastric bypass surgery for morbid obesity is considered an appropriate intervention when other weight-loss measures have proven unsuccessful. Weight loss often brings about improvement in overall health by lessening the effects of obesity-related comorbidities such as chronic hypertension and diabetes. In fact, the ability to become pregnant is enhanced, as weight loss often allows for a normalization of sex hormones. However, the nutrition challenges brought about by the surgery may have a profound impact on maternal health and pregnancy outcome. Surgical procedures for morbid obesity may be classified according to the digestive aftereffects brought about by the particular procedure. These categories include the "restrictive" procedures, "restrictive-malabsorptive" procedures, and the less common "malabsorptive" procedures. Deficiencies in iron, vitamin B12, folate, and calcium can result in maternal complications, such as severe anemia, and in fetal complications, such as neural tube defect, intrauterine growth restriction, and failure to thrive. Nutrient supplementation following bariatric surgery and close supervision before, during, and after pregnancy can help prevent nutrition-related complications and improve maternal and fetal health.

  1. Robotic assisted andrological surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekattil, Sijo J; Gudeloglu, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of the operative microscope for andrological surgery in the 1970s provided enhanced magnification and accuracy, unparalleled to any previous visual loop or magnification techniques. This technology revolutionized techniques for microsurgery in andrology. Today, we may be on the verge of a second such revolution by the incorporation of robotic assisted platforms for microsurgery in andrology. Robotic assisted microsurgery is being utilized to a greater degree in andrology and a number of other microsurgical fields, such as ophthalmology, hand surgery, plastics and reconstructive surgery. The potential advantages of robotic assisted platforms include elimination of tremor, improved stability, surgeon ergonomics, scalability of motion, multi-input visual interphases with up to three simultaneous visual views, enhanced magnification, and the ability to manipulate three surgical instruments and cameras simultaneously. This review paper begins with the historical development of robotic microsurgery. It then provides an in-depth presentation of the technique and outcomes of common robotic microsurgical andrological procedures, such as vasectomy reversal, subinguinal varicocelectomy, targeted spermatic cord denervation (for chronic orchialgia) and robotic assisted microsurgical testicular sperm extraction (microTESE). PMID:23241637

  2. Art and epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladino, Lady Diana; Hunter, Gary; Téllez-Zenteno, José Francisco

    2013-10-01

    The impact of health and disease has led many artists to depict these themes for thousands of years. Specifically, epilepsy has been the subject of many famous works, likely because of the dramatic and misunderstood nature of the clinical presentation. It often evokes religious and even mythical processes. Epilepsy surgical treatment has revolutionized the care of selected patients and is a relatively recent advance. Epilepsy surgery has been depicted in very few artistic works. The first portrait showing a potential surgical treatment for patients with epilepsy was painted in the 12th century. During the Renaissance, Bosch famously provided artistic commentary on traditional beliefs in "The stone of madness". Several of these works demonstrate a surgeon extracting a stone from a patient's head, at one time believed to be the source of all "folly", including epileptic seizures, psychosis, intellectual disability, depression, and a variety of other illnesses. There are some contemporary art pieces including themes around epilepsy surgery, all of them depicting ancient Inca Empire procedures such as trepanning. This article reviews the most relevant artistic works related with epilepsy surgery and also its historical context at the time the work was produced. We also present a painting from the Mexican artist Eduardo Urbano Merino that represents the patient's journey through refractory epilepsy, investigations, and ultimately recovery. Through this work, the artist intends to communicate hope and reassurance to patients going through this difficult process. © 2013.

  3. Robotic surgery in gynecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean eBouquet De Jolinière

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Minimally invasive surgery (MIS can be considered as the greatest surgical innovation over the past thirty years. It revolutionized surgical practice with well-proven advantages over traditional open surgery: reduced surgical trauma and incision-related complications, such as surgical-site infections, postoperative pain and hernia, reduced hospital stay, and improved cosmetic outcome. Nonetheless, proficiency in MIS can be technically challenging as conventional laparoscopy is associated with several limitations as the two-dimensional (2D monitor reduction in-depth perception, camera instability, limited range of motion and steep learning curves. The surgeon has a low force feedback which allows simple gestures, respect for tissues and more effective treatment of complications.Since 1980s several computer sciences and robotics projects have been set up to overcome the difficulties encountered with conventional laparoscopy, to augment the surgeon's skills, achieve accuracy and high precision during complex surgery and facilitate widespread of MIS. Surgical instruments are guided by haptic interfaces that replicate and filter hand movements. Robotically assisted technology offers advantages that include improved three- dimensional stereoscopic vision, wristed instruments that improve dexterity, and tremor canceling software that improves surgical precision.

  4. Gamma surgery for hemangiopericytomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, B.R.; Prasad, D.; Steiner, M.; Steiner, L.

    2000-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of a consecutive series of 12 patients with 15 intracranial hemangiopericytomas treated at the University of Virginia using gamma surgery is presented. Clinical and radiographic follow up of 3 to 56 months is available for 10 patients with 12 tumors. There was one tumor present at the time of initial gamma surgery in each patient. Two new tumors occurred in patients previously treated. Nine of the tumors decreased in volume and three remained stable. Four of the nine tumors that shrank later progressed at an average of 22 months after treatment. Of the tumors that decreased in volume and have not progressed, the response has been for an average of 11 months. The follow-up for two tumors that remained unchanged was 10 and 34 months (average 22 months). A third tumor was unchanged at 42 months but the patient died of new disease adjacent to the treated area in the anterior skull base. There were no complications and the quality of life following the procedure was maintained or improved in every case. Gamma surgery is effective in palliating the patients by decreasing tumor volume and delaying recurrence. (author)

  5. Nutritional considerations after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Kelly

    2003-01-01

    Malnutrition is a risk that is associated with all bariatric surgeries. Malnutrition is largely preventable after these surgeries if proper patient selection, thorough preoperative nutrition education, and postoperative nutritional follow-up take place along with patient compliance. Bariatric surgery is divided into 2 major categories: restrictive or malabsorptive (with or without the restrictive aspect). The more dramatic weight loss is generally associated with procedures that are malabsorptive in nature. There is an increased risk of specific nutritional deficiencies associated with these surgeries. With proper supplementation these deficiencies are largely avoidable. This article reviews the more common bariatric surgeries and the nutritional considerations associated specifically with each surgery. The article then summarizes the typical diet advancement schedule and reviews critical care nutrition in regards to total parenteral nutrition administration for the morbidly obese individual, following bariatric surgery.

  6. Bariatric surgery insurance requirements independently predict surgery dropout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Kaitlin M; Mehaffey, J Hunter; Safavian, Dana; Schirmer, Bruce; Malin, Steven K; Hallowell, Peter T; Kirby, Jennifer L

    2017-05-01

    Many insurance companies have considerable prebariatric surgery requirements despite a lack of evidence for improved clinical outcomes. The hypothesis of this study is that insurance-specific requirements will be associated with a decreased progression to surgery and increased delay in time to surgery. Retrospective data collection was performed for patients undergoing bariatric surgery evaluation from 2010-2015. Patients who underwent surgery (SGY; n = 827; mean body mass index [BMI] 49.1) were compared with those who did not (no-SGY; n = 648; mean BMI: 49.4). Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to identify specific co-morbidity and insurance specific predictors of surgical dropout and time to surgery. A total of 1475 patients using 12 major insurance payors were included. Univariate analysis found insurance requirements associated with surgical drop out included longer median diet duration (no-SGY = 6 mo; SGY = 3 mo; Psurgery dropout. Additionally, surgical patients had an average interval between initial visit and surgery of 5.8±4.6 months with significant weight gain (2.1 kg, Psurgery insurance requirements were associated with lack of patient progression to surgery in this study. In addition, delays in surgery were associated with preoperative weight gain. Although prospective and multicenter studies are needed, these findings have major policy implications suggesting insurance requirements may need to be reconsidered to improve medical care. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. SEBACEOUS CYSTS MINOR SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Gusti Ayu Agung Laksemi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Minor surgery is small surgery or localized example cut ulcers and boils, cyst excision, and suturing. Somethings that need to be considered in the preparation of the surgery is minor tools, operating rooms and operating tables, lighting, maintenance of tools and equipment, sterilization and desinfection equipment, preparation of patients and anesthesia. In general cysts is walled chamber that consist of fluid, cells and the remaining cells. Cysts are formed not due to inflammation although then be inflamed. Lining of the cysts wall is composed of fibrous tissue and usually coated epithelial cells or endothelial. Cysts formed by dilated glands and closed channels, glands, blood vessels, lymph channels or layers of the epidermis. Contents of the cysts wall consists of the results is serum, lymph, sweat sebum, epithelial cells, the stratum corneum, and hair. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  8. Military surgery in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrow, G B; Rosenfeld, J V; Crozier, J A; Wheatley, P; Warfe, P

    1997-10-01

    In April of 1994, a vicious civil was erupted in Rwanda, with more than 500,000 people massacred by extremist militias. The second United Nations Assistance Mission in Rwanda (UNAMIR II) deployed in August 1994 to monitor the ceasefire, with an Australian Defence Force Contingent of Health Service Support consisting of staff for the UNAMIR Head-quarters, and the Australian Medical Support Force (AS MSF). A retrospective audit was conducted of all operative surgery performed during the year-long deployment, in the AS MSF operating theatres. Twenty surgeons rotated through in 6-week intervals. A total of 750 operations were performed on 547 patients, of which 636 (84.8%) involved civilians. A total of 558 (74.4%) cases were the result of trauma both accidental (38.4%) and war related (36%). The mean age of patients was 21.7 years. The age distribution was skewed, with 289 (38.5%) cases being performed on children. General surgeons performed a wide range of surgery, covering the majority of surgical specialties. These included cardiothoracic, neurosurgical, vascular and paediatric cases. Orthopaedic surgeons dealt with amputations, debridements and skin grafting in addition to bony injuries and infections. Children formed a substantial number of those treated, and required surgery for war-related injuries significantly more often than adults. Surgeons involved in future peacekeeping missions should be aware of the broad variety of clinical problems encountered, and undertake refresher training in the sub-specialties. Children are at great risk of violence in war, and if a civilization can be judged by the protection it affords its helpless, the Rwandan genocide and ensuing civil war represents a horrific example of the opposite extreme.

  9. Antifibrinolytics in cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achal Dhir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac surgery exerts a significant strain on the blood bank services and is a model example in which a multi-modal blood-conservation strategy is recommended. Significant bleeding during cardiac surgery, enough to cause re-exploration and/or blood transfusion, increases morbidity and mortality. Hyper-fibrinolysis is one of the important contributors to increased bleeding. This knowledge has led to the use of anti-fibrinolytic agents especially in procedures performed under cardiopulmonary bypass. Nothing has been more controversial in recent times than the aprotinin controversy. Since the withdrawal of aprotinin from the world market, the choice of antifibrinolytic agents has been limited to lysine analogues either tranexamic acid (TA or epsilon amino caproic acid (EACA. While proponents of aprotinin still argue against its non-availability. Health Canada has approved its use, albeit under very strict regulations. Antifibrinolytic agents are not without side effects and act like double-edged swords, the stronger the anti-fibrinolytic activity, the more serious the side effects. Aprotinin is the strongest in reducing blood loss, blood transfusion, and possibly, return to the operating room after cardiac surgery. EACA is the least effective, while TA is somewhere in between. Additionally, aprotinin has been implicated in increased mortality and maximum side effects. TA has been shown to increase seizure activity, whereas, EACA seems to have the least side effects. Apparently, these agents do not differentiate between pathological and physiological fibrinolysis and prevent all forms of fibrinolysis leading to possible thrombotic side effects. It would seem prudent to select the right agent knowing its risk-benefit profile for a given patient, under the given circumstances.

  10. Workplace Bullying in Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Mary; Young, Christopher J; Shepherd, Heather L; Mak, Cindy; Saw, Robyn P M

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the extent and nature of workplace bullying among General Surgery trainees and consultants in Australia. An online questionnaire survey of General Surgery trainees and consultant surgeons in Australia was conducted between March and May 2012. Prevalence of bullying was measured using both a definition of workplace bullying and the revised Negative Acts Questionnaire (NAQ-R). Sources of bullying were also examined, as well as the barriers and outcomes of formal reporting of bullying. The response rate was 34 % (370/1084) with 41 % (n = 152) of respondents being trainees. Overall, 47 % (n = 173) of respondents reported having been bullied to some degree and 68 % (n = 250) reported having witnessed bullying of surgical colleagues in the last 12 months. The prevalence of bullying was significantly higher in trainees and females, with 64 % of trainees and 57 % of females experiencing some degree of bullying. The majority of respondents (83 %) had experienced at least one negative behavior in the last 12 months, but 38 % experienced at least one negative behavior on a weekly or daily basis. The persistent negative behaviors that represent work-related bullying most commonly experienced were 'having opinions ignored' and 'being exposed to an unmanageable workload.' Consultant surgeons were the most common source of bullying for both trainees and consultants, with administration the next common source. Of those who reported being bullied, only 18 % (n = 32) made a formal complaint. Despite increased awareness and interventions, workplace bullying remains a significant problem within General Surgery in Australia. The findings in this study serve as a baseline for future questionnaires to monitor the effectiveness of implemented anti-bullying interventions.

  11. Cosmetic Surgery Training in Plastic Surgery Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNichols, Colton H L; Diaconu, Silviu; Alfadil, Sara; Woodall, Jhade; Grant, Michael; Lifchez, Scott; Nam, Arthur; Rasko, Yvonne

    2017-09-01

    Over the past decade, plastic surgery programs have continued to evolve with the addition of 1 year of training, increase in the minimum number of required aesthetic cases, and the gradual replacement of independent positions with integrated ones. To evaluate the impact of these changes on aesthetic training, a survey was sent to residents and program directors. A 37 question survey was sent to plastic surgery residents at all Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-approved plastic surgery training programs in the United States. A 13 question survey was sent to the program directors at the same institutions. Both surveys were analyzed to determine the duration of training and comfort level with cosmetic procedures. Eighty-three residents (10%) and 11 program directors (11%) completed the survey. Ninety-four percentage of residents had a dedicated cosmetic surgery rotation (an increase from 68% in 2015) in addition to a resident cosmetic clinic. Twenty percentage of senior residents felt they would need an aesthetic surgery fellowship to practice cosmetic surgery compared with 31% in 2015. Integrated chief residents were more comfortable performing cosmetic surgery cases compared with independent chief residents. Senior residents continue to have poor confidence with facial aesthetic and body contouring procedures. There is an increase in dedicated cosmetic surgery rotations and fewer residents believe they need a fellowship to practice cosmetic surgery. However, the comfort level of performing facial aesthetic and body contouring procedures remains low particularly among independent residents.

  12. [Robotics in pediatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps, J I

    2011-10-01

    Despite the extensive use of robotics in the adult population, the use of robotics in pediatrics has not been well accepted. There is still a lack of awareness from pediatric surgeons on how to use the robotic equipment, its advantages and indications. Benefit is still controversial. Dexterity and better visualization of the surgical field are one of the strong values. Conversely, cost and a lack of small instruments prevent the use of robotics in the smaller patients. The aim of this manuscript is to present the controversies about the use of robotics in pediatric surgery.

  13. [Temporomandibular joint disc surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potier, J; Maes, J-M; Nicot, R; Dumousseau, T; Cotelle, M; Ferri, J

    2016-09-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders are a common disease and may be responsible for major functional and painful repercussions. Treatment is not consensual. The literature highlights the role of conservative treatments (physiotherapy, analgesics, splints) in a first attempt. Minimally invasive surgical techniques (arthroscopy, arthrocentesis) have developed rapidly in recent decades. They have proven effective and reliable, especially in patients suffering from irreducible or reducible anterior disc dislocation or presenting with arthopathies. The goal of our work was to make an update about disk surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Revisional Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzer, Noah J; Karmali, Shahzeer; Gill, Richdeep S; Sherman, Vadim

    2016-08-01

    Revisional bariatric procedures are increasingly common. With more primary procedures being performed to manage severe obesity and its complications, 5% to 8% of these procedures will fail, requiring revisional operation. Reasons for revisional bariatric surgery are either primary inadequate weight loss, defined as less than 25% excess body weight loss, or weight recidivism, defined as a gain of more than 10 kg based on the nadir weight; however, each procedure also has inherit specific complications that can also be indications for revision. This article reviews the history of each primary bariatric procedure, indications for revision, surgical options, and subsequent outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Anesthesia for thoracoscopic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conacher I

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Anesthesia for thoracoscopy is based on one lung ventilation. Lung separators in the airway are essential tools. An anatomical shunt as a result of the continued perfusion of a non-ventilated lung is the principal intraoperative concern. The combination of equipment, technique and process increase risks of hypoxia and dynamic hyperinflation, in turn, potential factors in the development of an unusual form of pulmonary edema. Analgesia management is modelled on that shown effective and therapeutic for thoracotomy. Perioperative management needs to reflect the concern for these complex, and complicating, processes to the morbidity of thoracoscopic surgery.

  16. Surgery and transfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.O. Ramos-Peñafiel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Even though blood transfusion saves thousands of lives worldwide, it causes complications in some patients, and must therefore be correctly administered. As there is no universally accepted consensus on blood transfusion in surgical patients, we have reviewed the latest studies and gathered the best available evidence on blood management strategies. In this study, we discuss indicators for transfusion of erythrocytes and other blood products, haemostatic agents for cardiothoracic and orthopaedic interventions where it is imperative to regulate blood loss, and alternatives in specific situations such as Jehovah's Witnesses patients. Finally, we put forward an algorithm for the preoperative management of surgery patients with low haemoglobin levels.

  17. Oncoplastic breast surgery in Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ava Kwong

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Oncoplastic breast conservation surgery has given a new light to the options of performing breast conserving surgery by combining oncological principles of breast cancer surgery with plastic surgery techniques. The ultimate oncoplastic achievement would be the conversion of what normally would be considered as an oncologic and/or cosmetic failure when using standard techniques of breast conserving surgery into both oncological and cosmetic success and to avoid mastectomy where possible. Most Techniques are fairly well established. However surgical techniques may also need to be adjusted based on the cohorts that the treatment is offered to. For example, for larger breasts, the technique is more forgiving. However for smaller breast, there is still a limitation of the cosmetic outcome when a high percentage of breast volume has been excised no matter how good the technique or the surgeon is. Various aspects of oncoplastic breast surgery technique will be discussed and its applicability to Asian Cohorts.

  18. Laparoscopic surgery in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bressler Hernandez, Norlan; Martinez Perez, Elliot; Fernandez Rodriguez, Leopoldo; Torres Core, Ramiro

    2011-01-01

    In the current age of minimally invasive surgery, laparoscopic surgery for colon cancer has been established as oncologically equivalent to conventional open surgery. The advantages of laparoscopic surgery have translated into smaller incisions and shorter recovery. Since the advent of laparoscopy, surgeons have been fueled to develop less invasive operative methods as feasible alternatives to traditional procedures. As techniques evolved and technology advanced, laparoscopy became more widely accepted and is now more commonly used in many institutions. Recently, a trend toward less invasive surgery, driven by patient and surgeon alike, has been a major objective for many institutions because of the ability of laparoscopic surgery to reduce postoperative pain, achieve a quicker recovery time, and improve cosmetic outcomes. Although still evolving, traditional laparoscopy has served as a foundation for even further refinements in the minimally invasive approach and as a result, more advanced equipment and newer techniques have arisen

  19. Robotic Surgery in Gynecologic Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBernardo, Robert; Starks, David; Barker, Nichole; Armstrong, Amy; Kunos, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    Robotic surgery for the management of gynecologic cancers allows for minimally invasive surgical removal of cancer-bearing organs and tissues using sophisticated surgeon-manipulated, robotic surgical instrumentation. Early on, gynecologic oncologists recognized that minimally invasive surgery was associated with less surgical morbidity and that it shortened postoperative recovery. Now, robotic surgery represents an effective alternative to conventional laparotomy. Since its widespread adoption, minimally invasive surgery has become an option not only for the morbidly obese but for women with gynecologic malignancy where conventional laparotomy has been associated with significant morbidity. As such, this paper considers indications for robotic surgery, reflects on outcomes from initial robotic surgical outcomes data, reviews cost efficacy and implications in surgical training, and discusses new roles for robotic surgery in gynecologic cancer management. PMID:22190946

  20. Oncoplastic breast surgery in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klit, Anders; Henriksen, Trine Foged; Siersen, Hans Erik

    2014-01-01

    With improved survival rates after breast cancer treatment, more attention is drawn to improve the cosmetic outcome after surgical treatment of breast cancer. In this process the oncoplastic breast surgery was conceived. It supplements the traditional surgical treatments (mastectomy and breast...... conserving surgery) with increased focus on individualized therapy. The ambition is to obtain the best possible cosmetic outcome without compromising recurrence rates and survival. This article provides an overview of the current oncoplastic breast surgery treatment offered in Denmark....

  1. Computed tomography, after abdominal surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, H.; Toedt, H.C.

    1985-09-01

    The CT-examinations of 131 patients were analyzed after abdominal surgery. After nephrectomy, splenectomy, partial hepatectomy and pancreatectomy a displacement of the neighbouring intraabdominal and retroperitoneal organs was seen. Scar-tissue was observed containing fat, which faciltated the differential diagnosis to tumor recurrency. The changes of the roentgenmorphology were not so obvious after gastrointestinal surgery. After vascular surgery the permeability of an anastomosis or an operated artery could be demonstrated by bolus injection. (orig.).

  2. Computed tomography, after abdominal surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, H.; Toedt, H.C.; Hamburg Univ.

    1985-01-01

    The CT-examinations of 131 patients were analyzed after abdominal surgery. After nephrectomy, splenectomy, partial hepatectomy and pancreatectomy a displacement of the neighbouring intraabdominal and retroperitoneal organs was seen. Scar-tissue was observed containing fat, which fascilated the differentialdiagnosis to tumorrecurrency. The changes of the roentgenmorphology were not so abvious after gastro-intestinal surgery. After vascular surgery the permeability of an anastomosis or an operated artery could be demonstrated by bolusinjection. (orig.) [de

  3. New Trends in General Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Bautista Iturrizaga, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Currently, with the advance of science, more and more basic disciplines are associated with surgery exerting some influence and giving rise to the concept of Medical-Surgical Science. Besides that, surgery has evolved in paralel with immunology (in the field of transplants), interventional radiology and diagnostic-therapeutic endoscopy. Indeed, many of changes in surgery, such as the use of new diagnostic tools, approaches with shorter incisions, and the colaboration -still in an evaluative p...

  4. Parathyroid transplantation in thyroid surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Barczyński, Marcin; Gołkowski, Filip; Nawrot, Ireneusz

    2017-01-01

    Permanent hypoparathyroidism following thyroid surgery is rare. Its prevalence is reported to be below 1–2% if surgery is performed by experienced thyroid surgeons. Parathyroid identification and preservation in situ with good vascular supply is the mainstay of safe thyroid surgery. However, if the parathyroid glands are damaged, autotransplantation should be undertaken to preserve their function. Parathyroid transplantation can be considered in three distinct modes of application: (I) fresh ...

  5. Surgery for psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, G R

    2000-10-01

    The modern therapeutic approach to most psychiatric diseases involves a combination of well-supervised psychotherapy, pharmacotherapy, and electroconvulsive therapy. Patients who fail to adequately respond to these modern treatment methods and remain severely disabled may be considered for surgical intervention. Cingulotomy, capsulotomy, subcaudate tractotomy, and limbic leucotomy are the most common psychosurgical procedures performed today, with response rates in the 35% to 65% range. Modern stereotactic techniques have reduced complication rates, but controversy remains regarding the optimal surgical procedure. The major psychiatric diagnostic categories that might respond to surgery include treatment-refractory major affective disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and chronic anxiety states. Surgery should be considered as one part of an entire treatment plan and must be followed by an appropriate psychiatric rehabilitation program. It should only be carried out by an expert multidisciplinary team consisting of a neurologist a neurosurgeon, and a psychiatrist with experience in these disorders. Surgical intervention remains a reasonable therapeutic option for select patients with a disabling psychiatric disease and may be underutilized.

  6. Eye Surgery Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    During eye surgery, the surgeon uses an illuminating instrument called an opthalmoscope for close examination of the retina or the interior of the eye. Ordinarily, electric power for the head-mounted light is supplied through a cord from an overhead swivel arm or a floor pedestal. Within limits of cord length and swivel arm movement, the surgeon has considerable freedom of motion. But when more than one opthalmoscope is involved, tangling and interference of the power cords becomes a problem. St. Luke's Hospital, Cleveland, Ohio asked Lewis Research Center for assistance in finding a solution. Lewis responded with a battery-powered system that totally frees the surgeon of attached cords and swivels. Borrowing from space technology, Lewis used small, lightweight nickel-cadmium batteries that can deliver high intensity light for an hour and can be recharged overnight. The Opthalmoscope Powerpack consists of eight batteries in three containers affixed to a webbed belt, and a novel on-off switch equipped with a springloaded plexiglass "flapper." The belt pack is worn underneath the surgical gown and the flapper permits the doctor to activate the switch by elbow pressure. Lewis built five units and they have been in service at St. Luke's Hospital for a year. Used for routine examinations as well as for surgery, they have demonstrated excellent reliability.

  7. [Cosmetic eyelid surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruban, J-M; Barbier, J; Malet, T; Baggio, E

    2014-01-01

    Cosmetic eyelid surgery is becoming increasingly popular. It can rejuvenate the patient's appearance with relatively minor side effects. Its risk/benefit ratio is one of the best in facial cosmetic surgery. However, the patient does not always accurately assess the aesthetic appearance of his or her eyelids. This underscores the importance of clinical examination in order to determine the patient's wishes, and then make an accurate diagnosis and potential surgical plan. We currently oppose, in general, surgical techniques involving tissue removal (skin-muscle and/or fat) in favor of those involving tissue repositioning and grafting (autologous fat pearl transposition, obtained by liposuction, and lipostructure). Furthermore, the place of adjuvant therapies to blepharoplasty is steadily increasing. They mainly include surface treatments (peels and lasers), dermal fillers and anti-wrinkle botulinum toxin injections. They are also increasingly used in isolation in novel ways. In all cases, a perfect knowledge of anatomy and relevant skills and experience remain necessary. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Female cosmetic genital surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Michael P

    2009-01-01

    Genital plastic surgery for women has come under scrutiny and has been the topic of discussion in the news media, online, and in medical editorials. In the absence of measurable standards of care, lack of evidence-based outcome norms, and little standardization either in nomenclature or training requirements, concern has been raised by both ethicists and specialty organizations.Some women request alteration of their vulvas and vaginas for reasons of cosmesis, increasing self-esteem, and improving sexual function. Patients must be assured their surgeon is properly trained and should understand that few validated long-term safety or outcome data are presently available in this relatively new field. Women also should be made aware that, although they may wish to cosmetically or physically alter their external genitalia, this does not mean that they are developmentally or structurally "abnormal." It is important that training guidelines for practitioners be established and that long-term outcome, psychosexual, and safety data be published. The genital plastic surgeon must have sufficient training in sexual medicine to withhold these procedures from women with sexual dysfunction, mental impairment, or body dysmorphic disorder. In an atmosphere in which trademarked marketing terms are becoming part of the lexicon, a more descriptive terminology is suggested, incorporating the terms "labiaplasty," "reduction of clitoral hood," "perineoplasty," "hymenoplasty," and "vaginoplasty." The term "female cosmetic genital surgery" is presented as a descriptive umbrella encompassing these genital plastic procedures.

  9. Bariatric metabolic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scopinaro, N

    2014-08-01

    According to the WHO, the worldwide prevalence of obesity body mass index (BMI) 30 kg/m² nearly doubled between 1980 and 2008, with 10% of men and 14% of women and a total of more than half a billion adults (aged >20 years old) being classed as obese. At least 2.8 million people die each year worldwide as a result of being overweight or obese, usually from the inevitable related comorbidities. It has been reported that approximately 65% of the worlds population inhabits countries where overweight and obesity are responsible for higher mortality than underweight. The recently published Interdisciplinary European Guidelines on Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery note that despite the WHO stating that excess weight is considered the fifth leading risk for deaths worldwide, it has not yet been possible to successfully curb the obesity epidemic. Moreover, severe obesity (BMI>35 kg/m²) represents a rapidly growing segment of the epidemic in which the negative effects on health and disability are especially marked. Excess weight drastically elevates a persons risk of developing a number of non-communicable diseases, such as diabetes, hypertension, stroke, dyslipidaemia, sleep apnoea, cancer, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, and other serious comorbidities. The WHO emphasises that 44% of type 2 diabetes mellitus, 23% of ischaemic heart disease and around 741% of certain cancers are attributable to overweight and obesity. In the majority of European countries, overweight and obesity are responsible for about 80% of cases of type 2 diabetes, 35% of cases of ischaemic heart disease and 55% of cases of hypertensive disease among adults. Additionally, a range of debilitating conditions such as osteoarthritis, respiratory difficulties, gallbladder disease, infertility, and psychosocial problems, among others, which lead to reduced life expectancy, quality of life and disability, are extremely costly in terms of both absence from work and use of health resources. Noteworthy, the

  10. How Is Adrenal Surgery Performed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Office visit worksheet ALSO SEE: NEUROENDOCRINE SYSTEM PARATHYROID GLANDS THYROID GLANDS How is adrenal surgery performed? This document is available in ... Parathyroid Glands | Thyroid Gland

  11. Surgery Risk Assessment (SRA) Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Surgery Risk Assessment (SRA) database is part of the VA Surgical Quality Improvement Program (VASQIP). This database contains assessments of selected surgical...

  12. Evaluation of Mandibular Condylar Changes in Patients Following ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Condylar resorption as a cause of relapse after orthognathic surgery is well known. Several authors have presented evidence of the relation between orthognathic surgery and condylar remodeling and resorption. This study was done to appraise the condylar changes along with the form and function following ...

  13. Additional Surgery after Breast-Conserving Surgery Varies Widely

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study published in the Feb. 1, 2012, issue of JAMA found that the number of women who have one or more additional surgeries to remove suspected residual tumor tissue (re-excisions) following breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for breast cancer varies widely across surgeons and hospitals.

  14. Clinical trials in Surgery | Mwachaka | Annals of African Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Annals of African Surgery. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 11, No 2 (2014) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Clinical trials in Surgery. P Mwachaka, JWM Kigera. Abstract.

  15. Oncoplastic surgery: pushing the limits of breast-conserving surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, Krishna B; Benyahi, Djazia; Nos, Claude; Charles, Caroline; Sarfati, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, the surgical management of breast cancer has steadily and considerably improved. Mutilating procedures have given way to more individualized surgical approaches aiming to preserve the breast as much as possible. For large tumors, preoperative chemotherapy is a major tool, but emerging oncoplastic surgery techniques are also a new approach in the armamentarium of breast cancer surgery, as a third option between conventional breast-conserving surgery and mastectomy. As this new treatment modality allows wider margin excision, it reduces the need for re-excision procedures and possibly increases breast conservation rates by extending the indications of breast-conserving surgery. This review will provide an overview of current practices and clinical data available to date on oncoplastic surgery. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Surgery in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukerjee, S; Gupta, T

    1997-06-01

    Surgical practice in India is mostly managed by the central and state governments and is totally government financed, offering free medical aid. However, with the economic growth and affluence of the middle-class population in urban areas, more and more hospitals, nursing homes, and clinics managed by the private sector are arising in cities and towns. Privately owned hospitals are built and managed by large industrial houses and trusts. It is essential, according to government directives, for these hospitals to have certain numbers of general beds that will provide for the economically weaker sections of the population. Medical insurance is popular amongst the urban population; in addition to well-established insurance companies, many new medical service reimbursement organizations are forming. Surgical care standards are uniformly high in the larger teaching institutions and hospitals run by the private sector in major cities in India, in which superspecialty surgical care that meets worldwide standards is available in addition to general surgical care. These hospitals are manned by surgeons holding master's degrees in general surgery, superspecialties, and subspecialties. In the hospitals and dispensaries in rural areas, only basic surgical facilities are available; for major surgical procedures, the patients are referred to the closest urban hospitals. Therefore, the government of India is placing more and more emphasis on building hospitals that offer better surgical facilities away from the cities and towns. A diploma course in surgery is run by the National Board of Surgery, and these diplomates are encouraged to practice more in rural areas and small hospitals. Economic constraints and the population explosion are the biggest hurdles to progress in surgical care, teaching, and research activities. With the advancement in education and growth of the economy, more and more multinationals are walking into the field of medical care, which is proving to be a

  17. Bariatric surgery patients: reasons to visit emergency department after surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Sánchez, Juan A; Corujo-Vázquez, Omar; Sahai-Hernández, Mrisa

    2007-01-01

    Morbid obesity prevalence is reaching epidemic proportions in Western society. Long-term weight loss can be achieved by bariatric surgery. This surgery also has a positive impact in the reduction of obesity related co-morbid conditions. The purpose of this study is to determine the reasons that bariatric surgery patients had to visit the emergency department within a three month period after surgery. A retrospective chart review study was performed at the UPR Hospital in Carolina. Patients with the diagnosis of morbid obesity who had bariatric surgery were identified. Of the 283 patients who met the criteria, the following information was obtained: gender, age, height, weight, pre-operative BMI, obesity-related comorbid conditions, post operative length of stay (LOS), and reasons and length of stay of Emergency Department (ED) visits within a 3 month period after surgery. Statistical analysis was done with Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) Program. The same profile of gender and BMI was obtained between the population that had the surgery and the sample that visited the ED, the group of patients between 20-29 years old was more likely to visit the ED. No correlation was found between a longer post operative length of stay and an increased probability of visiting the ED. Of the population, 5% had to visit ED within a three month period. The most common post operative complications were: Abdominal Pain (46.2%), Emesis (38.5%), and Dehydration (30.8%). Other less frequent complications were nausea, DVT, pneumonia, dizziness, gastritis, infected wound and upper GI bleeding. The most common reasons that bariatric surgery patients had to visit the emergency department within a three month period after surgery were: abdominal pain, emesis, dehydration and nausea. These complications could most likely be attributed to patient poor compliance with diet, resulting in the classical symptoms of the dumping syndrome which is common in patients that have undergone

  18. Oral Abstract Session 3: Orthognathic/Implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartlev, Jens

    Immediate Placement And Provisionalization Of Single-tooth Implants Involving A Final Individual Abutment. A 3-year Clinical And Radiographic Retrospektive Study......Immediate Placement And Provisionalization Of Single-tooth Implants Involving A Final Individual Abutment. A 3-year Clinical And Radiographic Retrospektive Study...

  19. Urogenital Reconstructive Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Lotte Kaasgaard

    Urogenital reconstructive surgery Lotte Kaasgaard Jakobsen1 Professor Henning Olsen1 Overlæge Gitte Hvistendahl1 Professor Karl-Erik Andersson2 1 – Dept. of Urology, Aarhus University Hospital 2 – Dept. of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Aarhus University hospital Background: Congenital obstruction...... 3, and intermittent unloading by urethrostomy in group 4. Group 2 will not be unloaded and serve as continously obstructed controls, whilst group 1 serves as sham-operated, non-obstructed controls. Urodynamic assessment will be performed and samples of urine, blood and bladder tissue...... or intermittent means, we hope to make it easier to choose which treatment to offer the patients. By establishing a solid animal model of congenital infravesical obstruction, we expect to make way for development of better treatments of a rare, but serious condition....

  20. Smartphones in Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ara A. Salibian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Smartphones have the capability of enhancing many aspects of the continuum of surgical care by providing an efficient means of multimedia communication among surgeons and healthcare personnel. The ability for mobile Internet and email access, along with features such as built-in cameras and video calling, allow surgeons to rapidly access, send and receive patient information without being restricted by issues of connectivity. Smartphones create an unrestricted network of data sharing, improving the flexibility of patient consultation, timeliness of preoperative preparation, efficiency of post-operative care and the effectiveness of a surgical team. Furthermore, smartphones provide mobile access to a multitude of surgical resources to bolster continued surgical education. This article presents a review of the current literature on the utilizations of smartphones in surgery, discusses their benefits and limitations, and addresses the possibility of incorporating smartphones into the protocol of surgical care.