WorldWideScience

Sample records for biliary bile acid

  1. Biliary Bile Acids in Primary Biliary Cirrhosis: Effect of Ursodeoxycholic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combes, Burton; Carithers, Robert L.; Maddrey, Willis C.; Munoz, Santiago; Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe; Bonner, Gregory F.; Boyer, James L.; Luketic, Velimir A.; Shiffman, Mitchell L.; Peters, Marion G.; White, Heather; Zetterman, Rowen K.; Risser, Richard; Rossi, Stephen S.; Hofmann, Alan F.

    2014-01-01

    Bile acid composition in fasting duodenal bile was assessed at entry and at 2 years in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) (10–12 mg/kg/d) taken as a single bedtime dose. Specimens were analyzed by a high-pressure liquid chromatography method that had been validated against gas chromatography. Percent composition in bile (mean ± SD) for 98 patients at entry for cholic (CA), chenodeoxycholic (CDCA), deoxycholic (DCA), lithocholic (LCA), and ursodeoxycholic (UDCA) acids, respectively, were 57.4 ± 18.6, 31.5 ± 15.5, 8.0 ± 9.3, 0.3 ± 1.0, and 0.6 ± 0.9. Values for CA were increased, whereas those for CDCA, DCA, LCA, and UDCA were decreased when compared with values in normal persons. Bile acid composition of the major bile acids did not change after 2 years on placebo medication. By contrast, in patients receiving UDCA for 2 years, bile became enriched with UDCA on average to 40.1%, and significant decreases were noted for CA (to 32.2%) and CDCA (to 19.5%). No change in percent composition was observed for DCA and LCA. Percent composition at entry and changes in composition after 2 years on UDCA were similar in patients with varying severity of PBC. In patients whose bile was not enriched in UDCA (entry and placebo-treated specimens), CA, CDCA, DCA, and the small amount of UDCA found in some of these specimens were conjugated to a greater extent with glycine (52%–64%) than with taurine (36%–48%). Treatment with UDCA caused the proportion of all endogenous bile acids conjugated with glycine to increase to 69% to 78%, while the proportion conjugated with taurine (22%–31%) fell (P < .05). Administered UDCA was also conjugated predominantly with glycine (87%). PMID:10347103

  2. Bile acid composition of gallbladder contents in dogs with gallbladder mucocele and biliary sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakimoto, Toshiaki; Kanemoto, Hideyuki; Fukushima, Kenjiro; Ohno, Koichi; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine bile acid composition of gallbladder contents in dogs with gallbladder mucocele and biliary sludge. ANIMALS 18 dogs with gallbladder mucocele (GBM group), 8 dogs with immobile biliary sludge (i-BS group), 17 dogs with mobile biliary sludge (m-BS group), and 14 healthy dogs (control group). PROCEDURES Samples of gallbladder contents were obtained by use of percutaneous ultrasound-guided cholecystocentesis or during cholecystectomy or necropsy. Concentrations of 15 bile acids were determined by use of highperformance liquid chromatography, and a bile acid compositional ratio was calculated for each group. RESULTS Concentrations of most bile acids in the GBM group were significantly lower than those in the control and m-BS groups. Compositional ratio of taurodeoxycholic acid, which is 1 of 3 major bile acids in dogs, was significantly lower in the GBM and i-BS groups, compared with ratios for the control and m-BS groups. The compositional ratio of taurocholic acid was significantly higher and that of taurochenodeoxycholic acid significantly lower in the i-BS group than in the control group. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In this study, concentrations and fractions of bile acids in gallbladder contents were significantly different in dogs with gallbladder mucocele or immobile biliary sludge, compared with results for healthy control dogs. Studies are needed to determine whether changes in bile acid composition are primary or secondary events of gallbladder abnormalities.

  3. Activation of PPARα decreases bile acids in livers of female mice while maintaining bile flow and biliary bile acid excretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Youcai; Lickteig, Andrew J; Csanaky, Iván L; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2018-01-01

    Fibrates are hypolipidemic drugs that act as activators of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). In both humans and rodents, females were reported to be less responsive to fibrates than males. Previous studies on fibrates and PPARα usually involved male mice, but little has been done in females. The present study aimed to provide the first comprehensive analysis of the effects of clofibrate (CLOF) and PPARα on bile acid (BA) homeostasis in female mice. Study in WT male mice showed that a 4-day CLOF treatment increased liver weight, bile flow, and biliary BA excretion, but decreased total BAs in both serum and liver. In contrast, WT female mice were less susceptible to these CLOF-mediated responses observed in males. In WT female mice, CLOF decreased total BAs in the liver, but had little effect on the mRNAs of hepatic BA-related genes. Next, a comparative analysis between WT and PPARα-null female mice showed that lack of PPARα in female mice decreased total BAs in serum, but had little effect on total BAs in liver or bile. However, lack of PPARα in female mice increased mRNAs of BA synthetic enzymes (Cyp7a1, Cyp8b1, Cyp27a1, and Cyp7b1) and transporters (Ntcp, Oatp1a1, Oatp1b2, and Mrp3). Furthermore, the increase of Cyp7a1 in PPARα-null female mice was associated with an increase in liver Fxr-Shp-Lrh-1 signaling. In conclusion, female mice are resistant to CLOF-mediated effects on BA metabolism observed in males, which could be attributed to PPARα-mediated suppression in females on genes involved in BA synthesis and transport. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of ursodeoxycholic acid on bile acid profiles and intestinal detoxification machinery in primary biliary cirrhosis and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilger, Karin; Hohenester, Simon; Winkler-Budenhofer, Ursula; Bastiaansen, Barbara A J; Schaap, Frank G; Rust, Christian; Beuers, Ulrich

    2012-07-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) exerts anticholestatic, antifibrotic and antiproliferative effects in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) via mechanisms not yet fully understood. Its adequate biliary enrichment is considered mandatory for therapeutic efficacy. However, precise determination of biliary enrichment of UDCA is not possible in clinical practice. Therefore, we investigated (i) the relationship between biliary enrichment and plasma pharmacokinetics of UDCA, (ii) the effect of UDCA on plasma and biliary bile acid composition and conjugation patterns, and (iii) on the intestinal detoxification machinery in patients with PBC and healthy controls. In 11 PBC patients and 11 matched healthy subjects, cystic bile and duodenal tissue were collected before and after 3 weeks of administration of UDCA (15 mg/kg/day). Extensive pharmacokinetic profiling of bile acids was performed. The effect of UDCA on the intestinal detoxification machinery was studied by quantitative PCR and Western blotting. The relative fraction of UDCA and its conjugates in plasma at trough level[x] correlated with their biliary enrichment[y] (r=0.73, p=0.0001, y=3.65+0.49x). Taurine conjugates of the major hydrophobic bile acid, chenodeoxycholic acid, were more prominent in bile of PBC patients than in that of healthy controls. Biliary bile acid conjugation patterns normalized after treatment with UDCA. UDCA induced duodenal expression of key export pumps, BCRP and P-glycoprotein. Biliary and trough plasma enrichment of UDCA are closely correlated in PBC and health. Taurine conjugation may represent an adaptive mechanism in PBC against chenodeoxycholic acid-mediated bile duct damage. UDCA may stabilize small intestinal detoxification by upregulation of efflux pumps. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Role of glucuronidation for hepatic detoxification and urinary elimination of toxic bile acids during biliary obstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Perreault

    Full Text Available Biliary obstruction, a severe cholestatic condition, results in a huge accumulation of toxic bile acids (BA in the liver. Glucuronidation, a conjugation reaction, is thought to protect the liver by both reducing hepatic BA toxicity and increasing their urinary elimination. The present study evaluates the contribution of each process in the overall BA detoxification by glucuronidation. Glucuronide (G, glycine, taurine conjugates, and unconjugated BAs were quantified in pre- and post-biliary stenting urine samples from 12 patients with biliary obstruction, using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. The same LC-MS/MS procedure was used to quantify intra- and extracellular BA-G in Hepatoma HepG2 cells. Bile acid-induced toxicity in HepG2 cells was evaluated using MTS reduction, caspase-3 and flow cytometry assays. When compared to post-treatment samples, pre-stenting urines were enriched in glucuronide-, taurine- and glycine-conjugated BAs. Biliary stenting increased the relative BA-G abundance in the urinary BA pool, and reduced the proportion of taurine- and glycine-conjugates. Lithocholic, deoxycholic and chenodeoxycholic acids were the most cytotoxic and pro-apoptotic/necrotic BAs for HepG2 cells. Other species, such as the cholic, hyocholic and hyodeoxycholic acids were nontoxic. All BA-G assayed were less toxic and displayed lower pro-apoptotic/necrotic effects than their unconjugated precursors, even if they were able to penetrate into HepG2 cells. Under severe cholestatic conditions, urinary excretion favors the elimination of amidated BAs, while glucuronidation allows the conversion of cytotoxic BAs into nontoxic derivatives.

  6. Modulation of hepatic biotransformation and biliary excretion of bile acid by age and sinusoidal bile acid load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgartner, U.; Miyai, K.; Hardison, W.G.M.

    1987-01-01

    Pericentral hepatocytes excrete bile acids more slowly and biotransform them more than periportal cells. This may reflect adaptation to low pericentral bile acid concentration or may be intrinsic. The authors studied two models in which pericentral bile acid concentrations are high: the 72-h choledocho-caval shunt (CCS) rat and the 3- to 4-wk-old rat. Livers were perfused forward or backward to assess periportal or pericentral hepatocyte function. Taurodeoxycholate (TDC) was infused at 32 nmol x min -1 x g liver -1 , and a bolus of [ 3 H]TDC was given to assess metabolism and excretion of bile acids. In CCS livers perfused backward, pericentral cells resembled periportal cells of controls in that time to excrete 50% of administered [ 3 H]-TDC (t 50 ) was reduced by two-thirds and [ 3 H]TDC biotransformation was reduced by about half. In young livers t 50 was half that of adult livers when perfused backward. Biotransformation, however, was not reduced. Young livers biotransformed more than adult controls for any given residence time of bile acid in the liver. They conclude that the difference between pericentral and perioportal cells as regards bile acid processing is adaptive. Livers from young rats biotransform more bile acid than those from controls under similar conditions

  7. Speed of change in biliary lipids and bile acids with chenodeoxycholic acid--is intermittent therapy feasible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iser, J H; Murphy, G M; Dowling, R H

    1977-01-01

    To see whehter intermittent chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) therapy is a potential alternative to continous treatment for gallstone dissolution, the speed of change in bile lipid composition was studied after starting and stopping CDCA therapy. In addition, the relationship between bile lipid composition and the proportions of the bile acids was examined. Bile-rich duodenal fluid was collected twice in the first week and then at approximately weekly intervals for four to six weeks, from six gallstone patients starting 13-15 mg CDCA.kg BW-1 day-1 and from another group of six patients whose treatment was stopped after gallstone dissolution. After starting treatment, the mean biliary cholesterol saturation index (based on criteria of Hegardt and Dam, 1971) decreased from 1-49 +/- SEM 0-17 to 0-92 +/- 0-13 at three weeks and 0-88 +/- 0-10 at four weeks, by which time bile lipid composition had become relatively constant. In patients whose treatment was stopped, bile reverted to its supersaturated state within one week, changing from an on-treatment mean saturation index of 0-74 +/- 0-10 to 1-15 +/- 0-15 in six to eight days after withdrawing CDCA. The proportion of conjugated CDCA in the biliary bile acids increased from 27-9 +/- 2-5% to 60-5 +/- 4-2% within four days and to 80-7 +/- 6-2% by four weeks after starting CDCA. When treatment was stopped, the proportion of CDCA reverted to pretreatment levels by two to three weeks. The saturation index was significantly related (P less than 0-001) to the percent of conjugated CDCA present, such that when the proportion of CDCA exceeded 70%, bile was almost invariably unsaturated. Since the mean time taken for bile to become unsaturated was not shorter than the time taken for bile to revert to its supersaturated state, it seems that intermittent treatment would not be adequate to maintain an unsaturated bile and is, therefore, unlikely to be as effective as continuous treatment in dissolving gallstones. PMID:838406

  8. Influence of dietary tender cluster beans (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba) on biliary proteins, bile acid synthesis and cholesterol crystal growth in rat bile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavendra, Chikkanna K; Srinivasan, Krishnapura

    2015-02-01

    Tender cluster beans (CBs; Cyamopsis tetragonoloba) are observed to possess anti-lithogenic potential in experimental mice. Formation of cholesterol gallstones in gallbladder is controlled by procrystallizing and anticrystallizing factors present in bile in addition to supersaturation of cholesterol. This study aimed at evaluating the influence of CB on biliary glycoproteins, low molecular weight (LMW) and high molecular weight (HMW) proteins, cholesterol nucleation time, and cholesterol crystal growth in rat hepatic bile. Groups of rats were fed for 10 weeks with 0.5% cholesterol to render the bile lithogenic. Experimental dietary interventions were: 10% freeze-dried CB, 1% garlic powder or their combination. Incorporation of CB into HCD decreased the cholesterol saturation index in bile, increased bile flow and biliary glycoproteins. Dietary CB prolonged cholesterol nucleation time in bile. Electrophoresis of biliary proteins showed the presence of high concentration of 27 kDa protein which might be responsible for the prolongation of cholesterol nucleation time in the CB fed group. Proteins of 20 kDa and 18 kDa were higher in CB treated animals, while the same were less expressed in HCD group. Biliary proteins from CB fed animals reduced cholesterol crystal growth index which was elevated in the presence of proteins from HCD group. Cholesterol-7α-hydroxylase and cholesterol-27-hydroxylase mRNA expression was increased in CB treated animals contributing to the bile acid synthesis. Thus, the beneficial anti-lithogenic effect of dietary CB which primarily is due to reduced cholesterol saturation index was additionally affected through a modulation of the nucleating and anti-nucleating proteins that affect cholesterol crystallization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Activation of Constitutive Androstane Receptor (CAR) in Mice Results in Maintained Biliary Excretion of Bile Acids Despite a Marked Decrease of Bile Acids in Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lickteig, Andrew J; Csanaky, Iván L; Pratt-Hyatt, Matthew; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2016-06-01

    Activation of Constitutive Androstane Receptor (CAR) protects against bile acid (BA)-induced liver injury. This study was performed to determine the effect of CAR activation on bile flow, BA profile, as well as expression of BA synthesis and transport genes. Synthetic CAR ligand 1,4-bis-[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene (TCPOBOP) was administered to mice for 4 days. BAs were quantified by UPLC-MS/MS (ultraperformance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry). CAR activation decreases total BAs in livers of male (49%) and female mice (26%), largely attributable to decreases of the 12α-hydroxylated BA taurocholic acid (T-CA) (males (M) 65%, females (F) 45%). Bile flow in both sexes was increased by CAR activation, and the increases were BA-independent. CAR activation did not alter biliary excretion of total BAs, but overall BA composition changed. Excretion of muricholic (6-hydroxylated) BAs was increased in males (101%), and the 12α-OH proportion of biliary BAs was decreased in both males (37%) and females (28%). The decrease of T-CA in livers of males and females correlates with the decreased mRNA of the sterol 12α-hydroxylase Cyp8b1 in males (71%) and females (54%). As a response to restore BAs to physiologic concentrations in liver, mRNA of Cyp7a1 is upregulated following TCPOBOP (males 185%, females 132%). In ilea, mRNA of the negative feedback regulator Fgf15 was unaltered by CAR activation, indicating biliary BA excretion was sufficient to maintain concentrations of total BAs in the small intestine. In summary, the effects of CAR activation on BAs in male and female mice are quite similar, with a marked decrease in the major BA T-CA in the liver. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. The bile acid composition of crane gallbladder bile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    1. The biliary bile acids of the whooping crane (Grus americana) and the Florida sandhill crane (G. canadensis pratensis) have been examined.2. Cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDOCA) and lithocholic acid were found in bile from both species of these North American cranes.3. CDOCA and CA were the primary bile acids in both species, together constituting 70% or more of the bile acids by weight.4. The primary bile acids of cranes appear to be the same as those that have been identified in other avian species.

  11. Bile Acid Metabolism and Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, John Y. L.

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are important physiological agents for intestinal nutrient absorption and biliary secretion of lipids, toxic metabolites, and xenobiotics. Bile acids also are signaling molecules and metabolic regulators that activate nuclear receptors and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling to regulate hepatic lipid, glucose, and energy homeostasis and maintain metabolic homeostasis. Conversion of cholesterol to bile acids is critical for maintaining cholesterol homeostasis and preventing accumulation of cholesterol, triglycerides, and toxic metabolites, and injury in the liver and other organs. Enterohepatic circulation of bile acids from the liver to intestine and back to the liver plays a central role in nutrient absorption and distribution, and metabolic regulation and homeostasis. This physiological process is regulated by a complex membrane transport system in the liver and intestine regulated by nuclear receptors. Toxic bile acids may cause inflammation, apoptosis, and cell death. On the other hand, bile acid-activated nuclear and GPCR signaling protects against inflammation in liver, intestine, and macrophages. Disorders in bile acid metabolism cause cholestatic liver diseases, dyslipidemia, fatty liver diseases, cardiovascular diseases, and diabetes. Bile acids, bile acid derivatives, and bile acid sequestrants are therapeutic agents for treating chronic liver diseases, obesity, and diabetes in humans. PMID:23897684

  12. Bile Acid Metabolism in Liver Pathobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, John Y. L.; Ferrell, Jessica M.

    2018-01-01

    Bile acids facilitate intestinal nutrient absorption and biliary cholesterol secretion to maintain bile acid homeostasis, which is essential for protecting liver and other tissues and cells from cholesterol and bile acid toxicity. Bile acid metabolism is tightly regulated by bile acid synthesis in the liver and bile acid biotransformation in the intestine. Bile acids are endogenous ligands that activate a complex network of nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor and membrane G protein-coupled bile acid receptor-1 to regulate hepatic lipid and glucose metabolic homeostasis and energy metabolism. The gut-to-liver axis plays a critical role in the regulation of enterohepatic circulation of bile acids, bile acid pool size, and bile acid composition. Bile acids control gut bacteria overgrowth, and gut bacteria metabolize bile acids to regulate host metabolism. Alteration of bile acid metabolism by high-fat diets, sleep disruption, alcohol, and drugs reshapes gut microbiome and causes dysbiosis, obesity, and metabolic disorders. Gender differences in bile acid metabolism, FXR signaling, and gut microbiota have been linked to higher prevalence of fatty liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma in males. Alteration of bile acid homeostasis contributes to cholestatic liver diseases, inflammatory diseases in the digestive system, obesity, and diabetes. Bile acid-activated receptors are potential therapeutic targets for developing drugs to treat metabolic disorders. PMID:29325602

  13. A novel varanic acid epimer--(24R,25S)-3α,7α,12α,24-tetrahydroxy-5β-cholestan-27-oic acid--is a major biliary bile acid in two varanid lizards and the Gila monster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagey, Lee R; Ogawa, Shoujiro; Kato, Narimi; Satoh née Okihara, Rika; Une, Mizuho; Mitamura, Kuniko; Ikegawa, Shigeo; Hofmann, Alan F; Iida, Takashi

    2012-11-01

    A key intermediate in the biosynthetic pathway by which C(24) bile acids are formed from cholesterol has long been considered to be varanic acid, (24ξ,25ξ)-3α,7α,12α-24-tetrahydroxy-5β-cholestan-27-oic acid. The (24R,25R)-epimer of this tetrahydroxy bile acid, in the form of its taurine N-acyl amidate, was thought to be the major biliary bile acid in lizards of the family Varanidae. We report here that a major biliary bile acid of three lizard species - the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis), Gray's monitor (Varanus olivaceus), and the Gila monster (Heloderma suspectum) - is a novel epimer of varanic acid. The epimer was shown to be (24R,25S)-3α,7α,12α,24-tetrahydroxy-5β-cholestan-27-oic acid (present in bile as its taurine conjugate). The structure was established by mass spectroscopy and by (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic spectroscopy, as well as by synthesis of the compound. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Heart and bile acids - Clinical consequences of altered bile acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasavan, Tharni; Ferraro, Elisa; Ibrahim, Effendi; Dixon, Peter; Gorelik, Julia; Williamson, Catherine

    2018-04-01

    Cardiac dysfunction has an increased prevalence in diseases complicated by liver cirrhosis such as primary biliary cholangitis and primary sclerosing cholangitis. This observation has led to research into the association between abnormalities in bile acid metabolism and cardiac pathology. Approximately 50% of liver cirrhosis cases develop cirrhotic cardiomyopathy. Bile acids are directly implicated in this, causing QT interval prolongation, cardiac hypertrophy, cardiomyocyte apoptosis and abnormal haemodynamics of the heart. Elevated maternal serum bile acids in intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, a disorder which causes an impaired feto-maternal bile acid gradient, have been associated with fatal fetal arrhythmias. The hydrophobicity of individual bile acids in the serum bile acid pool is of relevance, with relatively lipophilic bile acids having a more harmful effect on the heart. Ursodeoxycholic acid can reverse or protect against these detrimental cardiac effects of elevated bile acids. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The effect of taurocholate on canine bile flow, biliary excretion and concentration of ioglycamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toetterman, S.; Santavirta, S.; Mankinen, P.; Antila, H.; Lukkari, E.; Goethlin, J.; Korpi-Tommola, T.

    1983-01-01

    The bile acid taurocholate increases the biliary excretion of organic anions, such as sulfobromophthalein (BSP), bilirubin and iopanoic acid. In the present study has been investigated the effect of taurocholate on 1. Canine biliary excretion and concentration of the i.v. contrast medium ioglycamide and 2. Canine bile flow. The experimental model consisted of cholecystectomized, anaesthetized dogs with a fistula, through which the common bile duct could be catheterized and drained. One hour after cannulation, i.v. infusion of ioglycamide at a rate of 4 μmol/min./kg. was started. Two hours after the infusion start a control group received i.v. infusion of saline, while in another a 1.5% sodium taurocholate infusion was started with stepwise increases with 30 min. intervals from 0.4 to 0.8, 1.6 and 3.2 μmol/min./kg. Compared with control, all rates of taurocholate infusion increased bile flow and decreased biliary ioglycamide concentration. Although the bile flow with increasing taurocholate infusion rates was enhanced, the biliary ioglycamide excretion did not increase. The results indicate that ioglycamide and taurocholate are excreted into bile by separate excretion mechanisms. As taurocholate increases the biliary excretion of some other organic anions, it supports the hypothesis that organic anions are excreted into bile by more than two excretion mechanisms, taurocholate affecting only some of them. (orig.)

  16. Bile acid sequestrants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Sonne, David P; Knop, Filip K

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized in the liver from cholesterol and have traditionally been recognized for their role in absorption of lipids and in cholesterol homeostasis. In recent years, however, bile acids have emerged as metabolic signaling molecules that are involved in the regulation of lipid...... and glucose metabolism, and possibly energy homeostasis, through activation of the bile acid receptors farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and TGR5. Bile acid sequestrants (BASs) constitute a class of drugs that bind bile acids in the intestine to form a nonabsorbable complex resulting in interruption...... of the enterohepatic circulation. This increases bile acid synthesis and consequently reduces serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Also, BASs improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Despite a growing understanding of the impact of BASs on glucose metabolism, the mechanisms behind their glucose...

  17. Diagnosis of the bile reflux into the introhepatic biliary ducts using using radionuclide hepatocholecystography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mtvaradze, A.S.

    1984-01-01

    To reveal functional disorders of bile secretion 165 patients with diseases of gastrointestinal tract were examined. It was established that radionuclide hepatocholecystography enables to reveal dyskinesia of bile secretion, as well as bile reflux into the intrahepatic biliary ducts. Bile reflux into the intrahepatic biliary ducts is observed more often in patients with spasm of oddii sphincter and hyperkinetic dyskinesia of bile cyst

  18. Adult bile duct strictures: differentiating benign biliary stenosis from cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen Canh, Hiep; Harada, Kenichi

    2016-12-01

    Biliary epithelial cells preferentially respond to various insults under chronic pathological conditions leading to reactively atypical changes, hyperplasia, or the development of biliary neoplasms (such as biliary intraepithelial neoplasia, intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile duct, and cholangiocarcinoma). Moreover, benign biliary strictures can be caused by a variety of disorders (such as IgG4-related sclerosing cholangitis, eosinophilic cholangitis, and follicular cholangitis) and often mimic malignancies, despite their benign nature. In addition, primary sclerosing cholangitis is a well-characterized precursor lesion of cholangiocarcinoma and many other chronic inflammatory disorders increase the risk of malignancies. Because of these factors and the changes in biliary epithelial cells, biliary strictures frequently pose a diagnostic challenge. Although the ability to differentiate neoplastic from non-neoplastic biliary strictures has markedly progressed with the advance in radiological modalities, brush cytology and bile duct biopsy examination remains effective. However, no single modality is adequate to diagnose benign biliary strictures because of the low sensitivity. Therefore, understanding the underlying causes by compiling the entire clinical, laboratory, and imaging data; considering the under-recognized causes; and collaborating between experts in various fields including cytopathologists with multiple approaches is necessary to achieve an accurate diagnosis.

  19. Correlation Between Bile Reflux Gastritis and Biliary Excreted Contrast Media in the Stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Jong Jin; Yeom, Suk Keu; Shim, Euddeum; Cha, Jaehyung; Choi, Inyoung; Lee, Seung Hwa; Chung, Hwan Hoon; Cha, Sang Hoon; Lee, Chang Hee

    This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between biliary excreted contrast media in the stomach and the presence of bile reflux gastritis. Consecutive 111 patients who underwent both gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiography (gadoxetic MRC) and gastric endoscopy were included in this study. We performed a review of the gadoxetic-MRC image sets acquired 60 minutes after intravenous injection of contrast media and endoscopic images. We recorded amount of contrast media in the stomach. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of duodenogastric bile reflux diagnosis were evaluated for the gadoxetic MRC. Statistical analysis was performed using the Fisher exact test and the linear-by-linear association test. Among the 111 patients, 39 had 60-minute delayed images showing the presence of contrast media in the stomach. Of these 39 patients, 13 had bile reflux gastritis and 5 showed bile in the stomach without evidence of erythematous gastritis. Of the 72 patients who did not show contrast media in the stomach, none had bile reflux gastritis and 2 patients showed bile staining in the stomach without evidence of erythematous gastritis. Bile reflux gastritis was significantly more frequent in patients with contrast media in the stomach on gadoxetic MRC than in those without. Patients with high-grade extension of contrast media in the stomach had significantly frequent bile reflux gastritis than did those with low-grade extension. Biliary excreted contrast media in the stomach on 60-minute delayed gadoxetic MRC has a correlation with the presence of bile reflux gastritis on endoscopic examination.

  20. Bile acid metabolism and signaling in cholestasis, inflammation and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apte, Udayan

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver. Some cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes play key roles in bile acid synthesis. Bile acids are physiological detergent molecules, so are highly cytotoxic. They undergo enterohepatic circulation and play important roles in generating bile flow and facilitating biliary secretion of endogenous metabolites and xenobiotics and intestinal absorption of dietary fats and lipid soluble vitamins. Bile acid synthesis, transport and pool size are therefore tightly regulated under physiological conditions. In cholestasis, impaired bile flow leads to accumulation of bile acids in the liver, causing hepatocyte and biliary injury and inflammation. Chronic cholestasis is associated with fibrosis, cirrhosis and eventually liver failure. Chronic cholestasis also increases the risk of developing hepatocellular or cholangiocellular carcinomas. Extensive research in the last two decades has shown that bile acids act as signaling molecules that regulate various cellular processes. The bile acid-activated nuclear receptors are ligand-activated transcriptional factors that play critical roles in the regulation of bile acid, drug and xenobiotic metabolism. In cholestasis, these bile acid-activated receptors regulate a network of genes involved in bile acid synthesis, conjugation, transport and metabolism to alleviate bile acid-induced inflammation and injury. Additionally, bile acids are known to regulate cell growth and proliferation, and altered bile acid levels in diseased conditions have been implicated in liver injury/regeneration and tumorigenesis. We will cover the mechanisms that regulate bile acid homeostasis and detoxification during cholestasis, and the roles of bile acids in the initiation and regulation of hepatic inflammation, regeneration and carcinogenesis. PMID:26233910

  1. Abnormalities of intrahepatic bile ducts in extrahepatic biliary atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raweily, E A; Gibson, A A; Burt, A D

    1990-12-01

    The infantile cholangiopathies are a group of conditions associated with neonatal jaundice, which include extrahepatic biliary atresia, paucity of intra-hepatic bile ducts and disorders associated with persistence of fetal biliary structures, the so-called ductal plate malformations. Although previously regarded as distinct entities, it has recently been suggested that they may represent parts of a disease spectrum in which the principal process is one of bile duct destruction, the morphological manifestations in individual cases being influenced by the stage of intra-uterine development at which such injury occurs and by the site within the biliary system at which there is maximum damage. To further examine this concept, we have studied liver biopsy specimens from 37 neonates with extrahepatic biliary atresia, with particular reference to abnormalities of the intrahepatic bile ducts. Paucity of intrahepatic ducts, defined as a bile duct: portal tract ratio of less than 0.9, was identified in six cases (16.2%). In eight cases (21.6%) we found concentric tubular ductal structures similar to those observed in ductal plate malformations. In one case, both abnormalities could be demonstrated. Our findings support the concept that there is overlap between the various types of infantile cholangiopathy.

  2. Bile acids for viral hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Liu, J; Gluud, C

    2007-01-01

    Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus has been reached regarding their usefulness.......Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus has been reached regarding their usefulness....

  3. Bile acid analysis in human disorders of bile acid biosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaz, Frédéric M.; Ferdinandusse, Sacha

    2017-01-01

    Bile acids facilitate the absorption of lipids in the gut, but are also needed to maintain cholesterol homeostasis, induce bile flow, excrete toxic substances and regulate energy metabolism by acting as signaling molecules. Bile acid biosynthesis is a complex process distributed across many cellular

  4. Bile Acid Signaling in Metabolic Disease and Drug Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tiangang

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are the end products of cholesterol catabolism. Hepatic bile acid synthesis accounts for a major fraction of daily cholesterol turnover in humans. Biliary secretion of bile acids generates bile flow and facilitates hepatobiliary secretion of lipids, lipophilic metabolites, and xenobiotics. In the intestine, bile acids are essential for the absorption, transport, and metabolism of dietary fats and lipid-soluble vitamins. Extensive research in the last 2 decades has unveiled new functions of bile acids as signaling molecules and metabolic integrators. The bile acid–activated nuclear receptors farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, vitamin D receptor, and G protein–coupled bile acid receptor play critical roles in the regulation of lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism, inflammation, and drug metabolism and detoxification. Bile acid synthesis exhibits a strong diurnal rhythm, which is entrained by fasting and refeeding as well as nutrient status and plays an important role for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Recent research revealed an interaction of liver bile acids and gut microbiota in the regulation of liver metabolism. Circadian disturbance and altered gut microbiota contribute to the pathogenesis of liver diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes, and obesity. Bile acids and their derivatives are potential therapeutic agents for treating metabolic diseases of the liver. PMID:25073467

  5. Association of canalicular membrane enzymes with bile acid micelles and lipid aggregates in human and rat bile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accatino, L; Pizarro, M; Solís, N; Koenig, C S

    1995-01-18

    This study was undertaken to gain insights into the characteristics of the polymolecular association between canalicular membrane enzymes, bile acids, cholesterol and phospholipids in bile and into the celular mechanisms whereby the enzymes are secreted into bile. With this purpose, we studied the distribution of bile acids, cholesterol, phospholipids, proteins and representative canalicular membrane enzymes (alkaline phosphatase, 5'-nucleotidase and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase), which can be considered specific marker constituents, in bile fractions enriched in phospholipid-cholesterol lamellar structures (multilamellar and unilamellar vesicles) and bile acid-mixed micelles. These fractions were isolated by ultracentrifugation from human hepatic bile, normal rat bile and bile of rats treated with diosgenin, a steroid that induces a marked increase in biliary cholesterol secretion, and were characterized by density, lipid composition and transmission electron microscopy. These studies demonstrate that alkaline phosphatase, 5'-nucleotidase and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase are secreted into both human and rat bile where they are preferentially associated with bile acid-mixed micelles, suggesting a role for bile acids in both release of these enzymes and lipids from the canalicular membrane and solubilization in bile. In addition, heterogeneous association of these enzymes with nonmicellar, lamellar structures in human and rat bile is consistent with the hypothesis that processes independent of the detergent effects of bile acids might also result in the release of specific intrinsic membrane proteins into bile.

  6. Bile Duct Leaks from the Intrahepatic Biliary Tree: A Review of Its Etiology, Incidence, and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorabh Kapoor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bile leaks from the intrahepatic biliary tree are an important cause of morbidity following hepatic surgery and trauma. Despite reduction in mortality for hepatic surgery in the last 2 decades, bile leaks rates have not changed significantly. In addition to posted operative bile leaks, leaks may occur following drainage of liver abscess and tumor ablation. Most bile leaks from the intrahepatic biliary tree are transient and managed conservatively by drainage alone or endoscopic biliary decompression. Selected cases may require reoperation and enteric drainage or liver resection for management.

  7. Increased Bile Acid Synthesis and Impaired Bile Acid Transport in Human Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Haeusler, Rebecca A.; Camastra, Stefania; Nannipieri, Monica; Astiarraga, Brenno; Castro-Perez, Jose; Xie, Dan; Wang, Liangsu; Chakravarthy, Manu; Ferrannini, Ele

    2015-01-01

    We measured plasma bile acids, markers of bile acid synthesis, and expression of bile acid transporters in obese and nonobese subjects. We found that obesity was associated with increased bile acid synthesis and 12-hydroxylation, blunted response of plasma bile acids to insulin infusion or a mixed meal, and decreased expression of liver bile acid transporters.

  8. Bile acids for viral hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Liu, J; Gluud, C

    2003-01-01

    The viral hepatitides are common causes of liver diseases globally. Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus was reached regarding their usefulness.......The viral hepatitides are common causes of liver diseases globally. Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus was reached regarding their usefulness....

  9. Bile acid-induced necrosis in primary human hepatocytes and in patients with obstructive cholestasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolbright, Benjamin L.; Dorko, Kenneth [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Antoine, Daniel J.; Clarke, Joanna I. [MRC Centre for Drug Safety Science, Department of Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Gholami, Parviz [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Li, Feng [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Forster, Jameson [Department of Surgery, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Fan, Fang [Department of Pathology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Park, B. Kevin [MRC Centre for Drug Safety Science, Department of Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Hagenbuch, Bruno [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Olyaee, Mojtaba [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Jaeschke, Hartmut, E-mail: hjaeschke@kumc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Accumulation of bile acids is a major mediator of cholestatic liver injury. Recent studies indicate bile acid composition between humans and rodents is dramatically different, as humans have a higher percent of glycine conjugated bile acids and increased chenodeoxycholate content, which increases the hydrophobicity index of bile acids. This increase may lead to direct toxicity that kills hepatocytes, and promotes inflammation. To address this issue, this study assessed how pathophysiological concentrations of bile acids measured in cholestatic patients affected primary human hepatocytes. Individual bile acid levels were determined in serum and bile by UPLC/QTOFMS in patients with extrahepatic cholestasis with, or without, concurrent increases in serum transaminases. Bile acid levels increased in serum of patients with liver injury, while biliary levels decreased, implicating infarction of the biliary tracts. To assess bile acid-induced toxicity in man, primary human hepatocytes were treated with relevant concentrations, derived from patient data, of the model bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC). Treatment with GCDC resulted in necrosis with no increase in apoptotic parameters. This was recapitulated by treatment with biliary bile acid concentrations, but not serum concentrations. Marked elevations in serum full-length cytokeratin-18, high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), and acetylated HMGB1 confirmed inflammatory necrosis in injured patients; only modest elevations in caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 were observed. These data suggest human hepatocytes are more resistant to human-relevant bile acids than rodent hepatocytes, and die through necrosis when exposed to bile acids. These mechanisms of cholestasis in humans are fundamentally different to mechanisms observed in rodent models. - Highlights: • Cholestatic liver injury is due to cytoplasmic bile acid accumulation in hepatocytes. • Primary human hepatocytes are resistant to BA-induced injury

  10. Endocrine functions of bile acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houten, Sander M.; Watanabe, Mitsuhiro; Auwerx, Johan

    2006-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs), a group of structurally diverse molecules that are primarily synthesized in the liver from cholesterol, are the chief components of bile. Besides their well-established roles in dietary lipid absorption and cholesterol homeostasis, it has recently emerged that BAs are also

  11. Prediction of common bile duct stones in the earliest stages of acute biliary pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santvoort, H.C. van; Bakker, O.J.; Besselink, M.G.; Bollen, T.L.; Fischer, K.; Nieuwenhuijs, V.B.; Gooszen, H.G.; Erpecum, K.J. van

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIMS: Accurate prediction of common bile duct (CBD) stones in acute biliary pancreatitis is warranted to select patients for early therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). We evaluated commonly used biochemical and radiological predictors of CBD stones

  12. Prediction of common bile duct stones in the earliest stages of acute biliary pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Santvoort, H. C.; Bakker, O. J.; Besselink, M. G.; Bollen, T. L.; Fischer, K.; Nieuwenhuijs, V. B.; Gooszen, H. G.; Erpecum, K. J.

    Background and study aims: Accurate prediction of common bile duct (CBD) stones in acute biliary pancreatitis is warranted to select patients for early therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). We evaluated commonly used biochemical and radiological predictors of CBD stones

  13. Biliary reconstruction options for bile duct stricture in patients with prior Roux-en-Y reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mihir M; Martin, Benjamin M; Stetler, Jamil L; Patel, Ankit D; Davis, S Scott; Lin, Edward; Sarmiento, Juan M

    2017-09-01

    Comprehensive description with illustrations of the 4 biliary reconstruction options for bile duct injury in patients with history of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Bile acid sequestrants for cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000787.htm Bile acid sequestrants for cholesterol To use the sharing features on this page, ... are medicines that help lower your LDL (bad) cholesterol . Too much cholesterol in your blood can stick ...

  15. Mechanisms of bile acid mediated inflammation in the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Man; Cai, Shi-Ying; Boyer, James L

    2017-08-01

    Bile acids are synthesized in the liver and are the major component in bile. Impaired bile flow leads to cholestasis that is characterized by elevated levels of bile acid in the liver and serum, followed by hepatocyte and biliary injury. Although the causes of cholestasis have been extensively studied, the molecular mechanisms as to how bile acids initiate liver injury remain controversial. In this chapter, we summarize recent advances in the pathogenesis of bile acid induced liver injury. These include bile acid signaling pathways in hepatocytes as well as the response of cholangiocytes and innate immune cells in the liver in both patients with cholestasis and cholestatic animal models. We focus on how bile acids trigger the production of molecular mediators of neutrophil recruitment and the role of the inflammatory response in this pathological process. These advances point to a number of novel targets where drugs might be judged to be effective therapies for cholestatic liver injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Biomaterials made of bile acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG JiaWei; ZHU XiaoXia

    2009-01-01

    The use of natural compounds in the preparation of new materials can improve the biocompatibility of the materials and avoid any potential toxicity of the degradation products when used for biomedical applications.Bile acids are amphiphilic molecules biosynthesized in the liver.They are used to prepare various polymers and oligomers.These polymers made of bile acids are promising materials in both biomedical and pharmaceutical fields.

  17. Biomaterials made of bile acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The use of natural compounds in the preparation of new materials can improve the biocompatibility of the materials and avoid any potential toxicity of the degradation products when used for biomedical applications. Bile acids are amphiphilic molecules biosynthesized in the liver. They are used to prepare various polymers and oligomers. These polymers made of bile acids are promising materials in both biomedical and pharmaceutical fields.

  18. Bile acids in treatment of ocular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Boatright, Jeffrey H.; Nickerson, John M.; Moring, Anisha G.; Pardue, Machelle T.

    2009-01-01

    Bear bile has been included in Asian pharmacopeias for thousands of years in treatment of several diseases, ranging from sore throat to hemorrhoids. The hydrophilic bile acids tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) are the major bile acids of bear bile. Both of these are available as synthetic formulations and are approved by the health administrations of several countries for treatment of cirrhosis and gallstones. This review briefly covers the use of bear bile in ...

  19. Postoperative Biliary Leak Treated with Chemical Bile Duct Ablation Using Absolute Ethanol: A Report of Two Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Maho; Hori, Tomohide; Furuyama, Hiroaki; Machimoto, Takafumi; Hata, Toshiyuki; Kadokawa, Yoshio; Ito, Tatsuo; Kato, Shigeru; Yasukawa, Daiki; Aisu, Yuki; Kimura, Yusuke; Takamatsu, Yuichi; Kitano, Taku; Yoshimura, Tsunehiro

    2017-08-08

    BACKGROUND Postoperative bile duct leak following hepatobiliary and pancreatic surgery can be intractable, and the postoperative course can be prolonged. However, if the site of the leak is in the distal bile duct in the main biliary tract, the therapeutic options may be limited. Injection of absolute ethanol into the bile duct requires correct identification of the bile duct, and balloon occlusion is useful to avoid damage to the surrounding tissues, even in cases with non-communicating biliary fistula and bile leak. CASE REPORT Two cases of non-communicating biliary fistula and bile leak are presented; one case following pancreaticoduodenectomy (Whipple's procedure), and one case following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Both cases were successfully managed by chemical bile duct ablation with absolute ethanol. In the first case, the biliary leak occurred from a fistula of the right posterior biliary tract following pancreaticoduodenectomy. Cannulation of the leaking bile duct and balloon occlusion were achieved via a percutaneous route, and seven ablation sessions using absolute ethanol were required. In the second case, perforation of the bile duct branch draining hepatic segment V occurred following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Cannulation of the bile duct and balloon occlusion were achieved via a transhepatic route, and seven ablation sessions using absolute ethanol were required. CONCLUSIONS Chemical ablation of the bile duct using absolute ethanol is an effective treatment for biliary leak following hepatobiliary and pancreatic surgery, even in cases with non-communicating biliary fistula. Identification of the bile duct leak is required before ethanol injection to avoid damage to the surrounding tissues.

  20. The effect of theophylline on canine bile flow, biliary excretion and concentration of ioglycamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toetterman, S.

    1982-01-01

    Theophylline (TH), which has been shown in experimental dogs to increase bile-salt-independent bile flow, was studied in its effect on the biliary excretion and concentration of the intravenous contrast medium ioglycamide in cholecystectomized anesthetized dogs equipped with a Thomas cannula through which the common bile duct could be cannulated. One hour after cannulation, i.v. infusion of ioglycamide at the rate of 4 mol/min/kg was started. Two hours later, 10 mg/kg of TH was injected intravenously and the experiment continued for a further 75 minutes. Bile was collected at 15 min, intervals throughout the whole experiment and simultaneous intravenous blood samples were taken. In this study, TH increased bile flow and decreased biliary ioglycamide concentration. Although TH increased bile flow, it had no effect on the biliary excretion of ioglycamide. It may be postulated that the organic anion ioglycamide, and possibly other organic anions, are secreted into the bile by mechanisms, unaffected by drugs which increase bile-salt-independent bile flow in a similar manner to TH. (orig.)

  1. Biliary stenting and anti-cancer therapy for unresectable hilar bile duct carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Hiroya; Hokotate, Hirofumi; Takeuchi, Shyuhei; Takamura, Akio

    2007-01-01

    At present, although imaging diagnosis has been developed, most hilar bile duct cancer is still diagnosed at an advanced stage and its prognosis is generally poor. In hilar bile duct cancer, radiotherapy and other several therapies, for example-chemotherapy, arterial-infusion chemotherapy, photodynamic therapy, etc-are being performed for non-operative cases. But standard therapies for this cancer has not been established yet. On the other hand, metallic stents (MS) have been widely used to relieve biliary obstructions as an alternative to plastic prostheses and conventional drainage. The use of MS offers good palliation in hilar bile duct cancer, but patients selection is a key to obtain good results. In this article we reviewed previous studies and clinical trials regarding the anti-cancer therapy and biliary stenting for unresectable hilar bile duct cancer. And optimal therapeutic strategy for hilar bile duct cancer is proposed, primarily based on present views. (author)

  2. Efficacy of fibrin-sealants in reducing biliary leakage following laparoscopic common bile duct exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra-Membrives, Pablo; Martínez-Baena, Darío; Lorente-Herce, José Manuel; Martín-Balbuena, Ramón

    2018-05-21

    In spite of the acquired experience with laparoscopic common bile duct exploration (LCBDE) for choledocholithiasis management, there is still a risk of biliary leakage of 5% to 15% following choledochotomy closure. We evaluate the usefulness of fibrin-collagen sealants to reduce the incidence of biliary fistula after laparoscopic choledochorrhaphy. We report a retrospective analysis of 96 patients undergoing LCBDE from March 2009 to March 2017, whose closure of the bile duct was completed by antegrade stenting and choledochorraphy or by performing a primary suture. The study population was divided into two groups according to whether they received a collagen-fibrin sealant covering the choledochorrhaphy or not, analyzing the incidence of postoperative biliary fistula in each group. Thirty-nine patients (41%) received a fibrin-collagen sponge while the bile duct closure was not covered in the remaining 57 patients (59%). The incidence of biliary fistula was 7.7% (3 patients) in the first group and 14% (8 patients) in the second group (P=.338). In patients who underwent primary choledochorraphy, the fibrin-collagen sealant reduced the incidence of biliary leakage significantly (4.5% vs. 33%, P=.020), which was a protective factor with an odds ratio of 10.5. Fibrin-collagen sealants may decrease the incidence of biliary fistula in patients who have undergone primary bile duct closure following LCBDE. Copyright © 2018 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Non-Newtonian flow of pathological bile in the biliary system: experimental investigation and CFD simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchumov, Alex G.; Gilev, Valeriy; Popov, Vitaliy; Samartsev, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vasiliy

    2014-02-01

    The paper presents an experimental study of pathological human bile taken from the gallbladder and bile ducts. The flow dependences were obtained for different types of bile from patients with the same pathology, but of different age and sex. The parameters of the Casson's and Carreau's equations were found for bile samples. Results on the hysteretic bile behavior at loading-unloading tests are also presented, which proved that the pathologic bile is a non-Newtonian thixotropic liquid. The viscosity of the gallbladder bile was shown to be higher compared to the duct bile. It was found that at higher shear stress the pathological bile behaves like Newtonian fluid, which is explained by reorientation of structural components. Moreover, some pathological bile flow in the biliary system CFD simulations were performed. The velocity and pressure distributions as well as flow rates in the biliary segments during the gallbladder refilling and emptying phases are obtained. The results of CFD simulations can be used for surgeons to assess the patient's condition and choose an adequate treatment.

  4. Bile acids induce necrosis in pancreatic stellate cells dependent on calcium entry and sodium‐driven bile uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowska, Monika A.; Gerasimenko, Julia V.; Gerasimenko, Oleg V.; Petersen, Ole H.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Acute biliary pancreatitis is a sudden and severe condition initiated by bile reflux into the pancreas.Bile acids are known to induce Ca2+ signals and necrosis in isolated pancreatic acinar cells but the effects of bile acids on stellate cells are unexplored.Here we show that cholate and taurocholate elicit more dramatic Ca2+ signals and necrosis in stellate cells compared to the adjacent acinar cells in pancreatic lobules; whereas taurolithocholic acid 3‐sulfate primarily affects acinar cells.Ca2+ signals and necrosis are strongly dependent on extracellular Ca2+ as well as Na+; and Na+‐dependent transport plays an important role in the overall bile acid uptake in pancreatic stellate cells.Bile acid‐mediated pancreatic damage can be further escalated by bradykinin‐induced signals in stellate cells and thus killing of stellate cells by bile acids might have important implications in acute biliary pancreatitis. Abstract Acute biliary pancreatitis, caused by bile reflux into the pancreas, is a serious condition characterised by premature activation of digestive enzymes within acinar cells, followed by necrosis and inflammation. Bile acids are known to induce pathological Ca2+ signals and necrosis in acinar cells. However, bile acid‐elicited signalling events in stellate cells remain unexplored. This is the first study to demonstrate the pathophysiological effects of bile acids on stellate cells in two experimental models: ex vivo (mouse pancreatic lobules) and in vitro (human cells). Sodium cholate and taurocholate induced cytosolic Ca2+ elevations in stellate cells, larger than those elicited simultaneously in the neighbouring acinar cells. In contrast, taurolithocholic acid 3‐sulfate (TLC‐S), known to induce Ca2+ oscillations in acinar cells, had only minor effects on stellate cells in lobules. The dependence of the Ca2+ signals on extracellular Na+ and the presence of sodium–taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) indicate a Na

  5. Bile acids for primary sclerosing cholangitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Gluud, C

    2003-01-01

    Bile acids have been used for treating primary sclerosing cholangitis, but their beneficial and harmful effects remain unclear.......Bile acids have been used for treating primary sclerosing cholangitis, but their beneficial and harmful effects remain unclear....

  6. Altered intestinal bile salt biotransformation in a cystic fibrosis (Cftr-/-) mouse model with hepato-biliary pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodewes, Frank A J A; van der Wulp, Mariëtte Y M; Beharry, Satti; Doktorova, Marcela; Havinga, Rick; Boverhof, Renze; James Phillips, M; Durie, Peter R; Verkade, Henkjan J

    2015-07-01

    Cftr(-/-tm1Unc) mice develop progressive hepato-biliary pathology. We hypothesize that this liver pathology is related to alterations in biliary bile hydrophobicity and bile salt metabolism in Cftr(-/-tm1Unc) mice. We determined bile production, biliary and fecal bile salt- and lipid compositions and fecal bacterial composition of C57BL/6J Cftr(-/-tm1Unc) and control mice. We found no differences between the total biliary bile salt or lipid concentrations of Cftr(-/-) and controls. Compared to controls, Cftr(-/-) mice had a ~30% higher bile production and a low bile hydrophobicity, related to a ~7 fold higher concentration of the choleretic and hydrophilic bile salt ursocholate. These findings coexisted with a significantly smaller quantity of fecal Bacteroides bacteria. Liver pathology in Cftr(-/-tm1Unc) is not related to increased bile hydrophobicity. Cftr(-/-) mice do however display a biliary phenotype characterized by increased bile production and decreased biliary hydrophobicity. Our findings suggest Cftr dependent, alterations in intestinal bacterial biotransformation of bile salts. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Ursodeoxycholic acid choleresis: Relationship to biliary HCO-3 and effects of Na+-H+ exchange inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renner, E.L.; Lake, J.R.; Cragoe, E.J. Jr.; van Dyke, R.W.; Scharschmidt, B.F.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have recently shown that substitution of Li + for perfusate Na + eliminates the HCO 3 - -rich choleresis produced by ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in isolated perfused rat liver and that the increase in bile flow produced by both UDCA and taurocholic acid is partially inhibited by 1 mM amiloride. Although these findings are consistent with a role for Na + -H + exchange in the choleresis produced by these bile acids, both Li + substitution and amiloride affect other cellular processes, including Na + -K + -ATPase activity. They have now further explored both the relationship between UDCA-stimulated bile flow and biliary HCO 3 - secretion and the possible role of Na + -H + exchange in this process by comparing the effects of amiloride with two of its more potent and presumably more specific analogues, 5-(N,N-dimethyl)amiloride hydrochloride (DMA) and 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)amiloride (EIA). None of the inhibitors significantly altered biliary UDCA output or the relationship between UDCA-induced bile flow and either biliary [HCO 3 - ] or biliary HCO 3- output. Effects of these inhibitors did not appear attributable either to nonspecific toxicity, as reflected by hepatic release of lactate dehydrogenase or K + , or to inhibition of hepatic Na + -K + -ATPase, measured as Na + -dependent uptake of 86 Rb. These findings indicate that UDCA-induced but not basal bile formation is closely coupled to biliary HCO 3 - concentration and output, and they provide additional evidence that UDCA choleresis requires an intact Na + -H + exchange mechanism

  8. Laparoscopic common bile duct exploration and antegrade biliary stenting: Leaving behind the Kehr tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darío Martínez-Baena

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: single-stage laparoscopic surgery of cholelithiasis and associated common bile duct stones (CL-CBDS has shown similar results when compared to laparoscopic cholecystectomy combined with ERCP. Classically, choledochorrhaphy has been protected by a T-tube drain to allow external bypass of bile flow. However, its removal is associated with a significant complication rate. Use of antegrade biliary stents avoids T-tube removal associated morbidity. The aim of this study is to compare the results of choledochorrhaphy plus T-tube drainage versus antegrade biliary stenting in our series of laparoscopic common bile duct explorations (LCBDE. Material and methods: between 2004 and 2011, 75 patients underwent a LCBDE. Choledochorrhaphy was performed following Kehr tube placements in 47 cases and transpapillary biliary stenting was conducted in the remaining 28 patients. Results: postoperative hospital stay was shorter in the stent group (5 ± 10.26 days than in the Kehr group (12 ± 10.6 days, with a statistically significant difference. There was a greater trend to grade B complications in the stent group (10.7 vs. 4.3 % and to grade C complications in the Kehr group (6.4 vs. 3.6 %. There were 3 cases of residual common bile duct stones in the Kehr group (6.4 % and none in the stent group. Conclusions: antegrade biliary stenting following laparoscopic common bile duct exploration for CL-CBDS is an effective and safe technique that prevents T-tube related morbidity.

  9. Bile acids in regulation of intestinal physiology.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keating, Niamh

    2009-10-01

    In addition to their roles in facilitating lipid digestion and absorption, bile acids are recognized as important regulators of intestinal function. Exposure to bile acids can dramatically influence intestinal transport and barrier properties; in recent years, they have also become appreciated as important factors in regulating cell growth and survival. Indeed, few cells reside within the intestinal mucosa that are not altered to some degree by exposure to bile acids. The past decade saw great advances in the knowledge of how bile acids exert their actions at the cellular and molecular levels. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the role of bile acids in regulation of intestinal physiology.

  10. Normothermic machine perfusion reduces bile duct injury and improves biliary epithelial function in rat donor livers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Op den Dries, Sanna; Karimian, Negin; Westerkamp, Andrie C; Sutton, Michael E; Kuipers, Michiel; Wiersema-Buist, Janneke; Ottens, Petra J; Kuipers, Jeroen; Giepmans, Ben N; Leuvenink, Henri G D; Lisman, Ton; Porte, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    Bile duct injury may occur during liver procurement and transplantation, especially in livers from donation after circulatory death (DCD) donors. Normothermic machine perfusion (NMP) has been shown to reduce hepatic injury compared to static cold storage (SCS). However, it is unknown whether NMP provides better preservation of bile ducts. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of NMP on bile duct preservation in both DCD and non-DCD livers. DCD and non-DCD livers obtained from Lewis rats were preserved for 3 hours using either SCS or NMP, followed by 2 hours ex vivo reperfusion. Biomarkers of bile duct injury (gamma-glutamyltransferase and lactate dehydrogenase in bile) were lower in NMP-preserved livers compared to SCS-preserved livers. Biliary bicarbonate concentration, reflecting biliary epithelial function, was 2-fold higher in NMP-preserved livers (P bile was significantly higher in NMP-preserved livers (7.63 ± 0.02 and 7.74 ± 0.05 for non-DCD and DCD livers, respectively) compared with SCS-preserved livers (7.46 ± 0.02 and 7.49 ± 0.04 for non-DCD and DCD livers, respectively). Scanning and transmission electron microscopy of donor extrahepatic bile ducts demonstrated significantly decreased injury of the biliary epithelium of NMP-preserved donor livers (including the loss of lateral interdigitations and mitochondrial injury). Differences between NMP and SCS were most prominent in DCD livers. Compared to conventional SCS, NMP provides superior preservation of bile duct epithelial cell function and morphology, especially in DCD donor livers. By reducing biliary injury, NMP could have an important impact on the utilization of DCD livers and outcome after transplantation. Liver Transplantation 22 994-1005 2016 AASLD. © 2016 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  11. Complications of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage in patients with dilated and nondilated intrahepatic bile ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Andreas; Gaa, Jochen; Rosca, Bogdan; Born, Peter; Neu, Bruno; Schmid, Roland M.; Prinz, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) have been described as an effective technique to obtain biliary access. Between January 1996 and December 2006, a total of 419 consecutive patients with endoscopically inaccessible bile ducts underwent PTBD. The current retrospective study evaluated success and complication rates of this invasive technique. PTBD was successful in 410/419 patients (97%). The success rate was equal in patients with dilated and nondilated bile ducts (p = 0.820). In 39/419 patients (9%) procedure related complications could be observed. Major complications occurred in 17/419 patients (4%). Patients with nondilated intrahepatic bile ducts had significantly higher complication rates compared to patients with dilated intrahepatic bile ducts (14.5% vs. 6.9%, respectively [p = 0.022]). Procedure related deaths were observed in 3 patients (0.7%). In conclusion, percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage is an effective procedure in patients with dilated and nondilated intrahepatic bile ducts. However, patients with nondilated intrahepatic bile ducts showed a higher risk for procedure related complications.

  12. Bile Culture and Susceptibility Testing of Malignant Biliary Obstruction via PTBD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Haipeng; Guo Zhi, E-mail: jieruke@yahoo.com.cn; Xing Wenge; Guo Xiuying; Liu Fang; Li Baoguo [Tinajin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Department of Interventional Therapy, Tianjin Key Cancer Prevention and Treatment Laboratory (China)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To assess the information obtained by bile culture and susceptibility testing for malignant biliary obstruction by a retrospective one-center study. Methods: A total of 694 patients with malignant biliary obstruction received percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage during the period July 2003 to September 2010, and subsequently, bile specimens were collected during the procedure. Among the 694 patients, 485 were men and 209 were women, ranging in age from 38 to 78 years (mean age 62 years). Results: A total of 42.9% patients had a positive bile culture (298 of 694). Further, 57 species of microorganisms and 342 strains were identified; gram-positive bacteria accounted for 50.9% (174 of 342) and gram-negative bacteria accounted for 41.5% (142 of 342) of these strains. No anaerobes were obtained by culture during this study. The most common microorganisms were Enterococcus faecalis (41 of 342, 11.9%), Escherichia coli (34 of 342, 9.9%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (28 of 342, 8.2%), Staphylococcus epidermidis (19 of 342, 5.5%), Enterococcus (18 of 342, 5.3%), and Enterobacter cloacae (16 of 342, 4.7%). The percentage of {beta}-lactamase-producing gram-positive bacteria was 27.6% (48 of 174), and the percentage of gram-negative bacteria was 19.7% (28 of 142). The percentage of enzyme-producing Escherichia coli was 61.7% (21 of 34). Conclusion: The bile cultures in malignant biliary obstruction are different from those in the Tokyo Guidelines and other benign biliary obstruction researches, which indicates that a different antibacterial therapy should be applied. Thus, knowledge of the antimicrobial susceptibility data could aid in the better use of antibiotics for the empirical therapy of biliary infection combined with malignant biliary obstruction.

  13. Bile Culture and Susceptibility Testing of Malignant Biliary Obstruction via PTBD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Haipeng; Guo Zhi; Xing Wenge; Guo Xiuying; Liu Fang; Li Baoguo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the information obtained by bile culture and susceptibility testing for malignant biliary obstruction by a retrospective one-center study. Methods: A total of 694 patients with malignant biliary obstruction received percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage during the period July 2003 to September 2010, and subsequently, bile specimens were collected during the procedure. Among the 694 patients, 485 were men and 209 were women, ranging in age from 38 to 78 years (mean age 62 years). Results: A total of 42.9% patients had a positive bile culture (298 of 694). Further, 57 species of microorganisms and 342 strains were identified; gram-positive bacteria accounted for 50.9% (174 of 342) and gram-negative bacteria accounted for 41.5% (142 of 342) of these strains. No anaerobes were obtained by culture during this study. The most common microorganisms were Enterococcus faecalis (41 of 342, 11.9%), Escherichia coli (34 of 342, 9.9%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (28 of 342, 8.2%), Staphylococcus epidermidis (19 of 342, 5.5%), Enterococcus (18 of 342, 5.3%), and Enterobacter cloacae (16 of 342, 4.7%). The percentage of β-lactamase-producing gram-positive bacteria was 27.6% (48 of 174), and the percentage of gram-negative bacteria was 19.7% (28 of 142). The percentage of enzyme-producing Escherichia coli was 61.7% (21 of 34). Conclusion: The bile cultures in malignant biliary obstruction are different from those in the Tokyo Guidelines and other benign biliary obstruction researches, which indicates that a different antibacterial therapy should be applied. Thus, knowledge of the antimicrobial susceptibility data could aid in the better use of antibiotics for the empirical therapy of biliary infection combined with malignant biliary obstruction.

  14. Profiles of bile acids and their glucuronide and sulphate conjugates in the serum, urine and bile from patients undergoing bile drainage.

    OpenAIRE

    Takikawa, H; Beppu, T; Seyama, Y

    1985-01-01

    Bile acid profiles in serum, urine, and bile from patients undergoing bile drainage and the changes of serum bile acids after bile drainage were studied. Bile acids were separated into non-glucuronidate-non-sulphate, glucuronidated, and sulphated fractions and were measured by mass fragmentography using conjugates of deuterium labelled bile acids as internal standards. Glucuronidated and sulphated bile acids contribute 14-32% and 16-44% of serum bile acids, 4-11% and 61-82% of urine bile acid...

  15. Effects of ionizing radiation on the activity of the major hepatic enzymes implicated in bile acid biosynthesis in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souidi, M.; Scanff, P.; Grison, St.; Gourmelon, P.; Aigueperse, J.

    2007-01-01

    In the days following high-dose radiation exposure, damage to small intestinal mucosa is aggravated by changes in the bile acid pool reaching the gut. Intestinal bile acid malabsorption, as described classically, may be associated with altered hepatic bile acid biosynthesis, which was the objective of this work. The activity of the main rate-limiting enzymes implicated in the bile acid biosynthesis were evaluated in the days following an 8-Gy γ Co 60 total body irradiation of rats, with concomitant determination of biliary bile acid profiles and intestinal bile acid content. Modifications of biliary bile acid profiles, observed as early as the first post-irradiation day, were most marked at the third and fourth day, and resulted in an increased hydrophobicity index. In parallel, the intestinal bile acids' content was enhanced and hepatic enzymatic activities leading to bile acids were changed. A marked increase of sterol 12-hydroxylase and decrease of oxy-sterol 7-hydroxylase activity was observed at day 3, whereas both cholesterol 7-hydroxylase and oxy-sterol 7-hydroxylase activities were decreased at day 4 after irradiation. These results show, for the first time, radiation-induced modifications of hepatic enzymatic activities implicated in bile acid biosynthesis and suggest that they are mainly a consequence of radiation-altered intestinal absorption, which induces a physiological response of the entero-hepatic bile acid recirculation. (authors)

  16. Biliary bacteria, antibiotic use, and wound infection in surgery of the gallbladder and common bile duct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, R T; Goodall, R G; Marien, B; Park, M; Lloyd-Smith, W; Wiegand, F M

    1987-01-01

    That clinical risk groups predict postoperative infection in biliary operations has recently been challenged. To reevaluate the risk of infection, we studied 215 patients stratified by clinical risk factors. Of 100 patients having simple "low-risk" cholecystectomy, 11 had positive bile cultures (90% pure), and one with sterile bile got a staphylococcal wound infection (WI). Among 92 "high-risk" patients with acute cholecystitis, obstructive jaundice, or choledochal stones, 42 had positive bile cultures (44% pure, 12% anaerobes). One of 52 patients who received preoperative cefazolin got a staphylococcal WI, but ten of 40 patients without antibiotic therapy developed WIs, nine caused by organisms that also grew from the bile. Of 23 patients with obstructive cholangitis, 22 had positive bile cultures (88% mixed, 23% anaerobes). Despite antibiotic therapy, four developed WIs caused by these organisms. The concept of clinical risk factors is validated.

  17. Individual bile acids have differential effects on bile acid signaling in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Peizhen; Rockwell, Cheryl E.; Cui, Julia Yue; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are known to regulate BA synthesis and transport by the farnesoid X receptor in the liver (FXR-SHP) and intestine (FXR-Fgf15). However, the relative importance of individual BAs in regulating these processes is not known. Therefore, mice were fed various doses of five individual BAs, including cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxoycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA), and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in their diets at various concentrations for one week to increase the concentration of one BA in the enterohepatic circulation. The mRNA of BA synthesis and transporting genes in liver and ileum were quantified. In the liver, the mRNA of SHP, which is the prototypical target gene of FXR, increased in mice fed all concentrations of BAs. In the ileum, the mRNA of the intestinal FXR target gene Fgf15 was increased at lower doses and to a higher extent by CA and DCA than by CDCA and LCA. Cyp7a1, the rate-limiting enzyme in BA synthesis, was decreased more by CA and DCA than CDCA and LCA. Cyp8b1, the enzyme that 12-hydroxylates BAs and is thus responsible for the synthesis of CA, was decreased much more by CA and DCA than CDCA and LCA. Surprisingly, neither a decrease in the conjugated BA uptake transporter (Ntcp) nor increase in BA efflux transporter (Bsep) was observed by FXR activation, but an increase in the cholesterol efflux transporter (Abcg5/Abcg8) was observed with FXR activation. Thus in conclusion, CA and DCA are more potent FXR activators than CDCA and LCA when fed to mice, and thus they are more effective in decreasing the expression of the rate limiting gene in BA synthesis Cyp7a1 and the 12-hydroxylation of BAs Cyp8b1, and are also more effective in increasing the expression of Abcg5/Abcg8, which is responsible for biliary cholesterol excretion. However, feeding BAs do not alter the mRNA or protein levels of Ntcp or Bsep, suggesting that the uptake or efflux of BAs is not regulated by FXR at physiological and

  18. Individual bile acids have differential effects on bile acid signaling in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Peizhen, E-mail: songacad@gmail.com; Rockwell, Cheryl E., E-mail: rockwelc@msu.edu; Cui, Julia Yue, E-mail: juliacui@uw.edu; Klaassen, Curtis D., E-mail: curtisklaassenphd@gmail.com

    2015-02-15

    Bile acids (BAs) are known to regulate BA synthesis and transport by the farnesoid X receptor in the liver (FXR-SHP) and intestine (FXR-Fgf15). However, the relative importance of individual BAs in regulating these processes is not known. Therefore, mice were fed various doses of five individual BAs, including cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxoycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA), and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in their diets at various concentrations for one week to increase the concentration of one BA in the enterohepatic circulation. The mRNA of BA synthesis and transporting genes in liver and ileum were quantified. In the liver, the mRNA of SHP, which is the prototypical target gene of FXR, increased in mice fed all concentrations of BAs. In the ileum, the mRNA of the intestinal FXR target gene Fgf15 was increased at lower doses and to a higher extent by CA and DCA than by CDCA and LCA. Cyp7a1, the rate-limiting enzyme in BA synthesis, was decreased more by CA and DCA than CDCA and LCA. Cyp8b1, the enzyme that 12-hydroxylates BAs and is thus responsible for the synthesis of CA, was decreased much more by CA and DCA than CDCA and LCA. Surprisingly, neither a decrease in the conjugated BA uptake transporter (Ntcp) nor increase in BA efflux transporter (Bsep) was observed by FXR activation, but an increase in the cholesterol efflux transporter (Abcg5/Abcg8) was observed with FXR activation. Thus in conclusion, CA and DCA are more potent FXR activators than CDCA and LCA when fed to mice, and thus they are more effective in decreasing the expression of the rate limiting gene in BA synthesis Cyp7a1 and the 12-hydroxylation of BAs Cyp8b1, and are also more effective in increasing the expression of Abcg5/Abcg8, which is responsible for biliary cholesterol excretion. However, feeding BAs do not alter the mRNA or protein levels of Ntcp or Bsep, suggesting that the uptake or efflux of BAs is not regulated by FXR at physiological and

  19. Related issues in repair of bile duct injury and traumatic biliary stricture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Shuguang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Inappropriate treatment of bile duct injury and traumatic biliary stricture may cause serious consequences such as recurrent cholangitis, formation of hepatolithiasis, and biliary cirrhosis. This article elaborates on the influencing factors for the effect of the repair of bile duct injury and traumatic biliary stricture, repair principles, timing of repair or reconstruction, and related methods and techniques. It is pointed out that if there is no significant local infection and the bile duct wall defect is <2 cm, end-to-end anastomosis should be used for repair; if the bile duct wall defect is >2 cm, Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy should be used for reconstruction. If the upper wall of the bile duct had a large defect and the lower wall has an integral structure, pedicled umbilical vein graft, pedicled jejunal wall seromuscular flap, or gastric wall seromuscular flap should be used for repair. The patients with severe congestion and edema at the site of injury should be treated with sufficient external drainage of the injured bile duct and then selective repair or reconstruction. Patients with hepatic duct stenosis in the liver lobe or hepatic segments and liver tissue atrophy can be treated with hepalobectomy or segmental hepatectomy. The key to successful repair is exposure and removal of high hilar bile duct stricture, while segmental hepatectomy of the Ⅳb segment can fully expose the left and right hepatic pedicles and help with the incision of the left and right hepatic ducts and secondary hepatic ducts, and therefore, it is a good method for exposing high bile duct stricture.

  20. Biliary peritonitis after radiofrequency ablation diagnosed by gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuta, Akihiro; Isoda, Hiroyoshi; Togashi, Kaori [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Koyama, Takashi; Todo, Giro; Osaki, Yukio [Osaka Red Cross Hospital, Osaka (Japan)

    2013-12-15

    This study describes the first case of biliary peritonitis after radiofrequency ablation diagnosed by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA), a hepatocyte-specific MR imaging contrast agent. The image acquired 300 minutes after the administration of Gd-EOB-DTPA was useful to make a definite diagnosis and to identify the pathway of bile leakage. It is important to decide on the acquisition timing with consideration of the predicted location of bile duct injury.

  1. Intestinal transport and metabolism of bile acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Paul A.; Karpen, Saul J.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to their classical roles as detergents to aid in the process of digestion, bile acids have been identified as important signaling molecules that function through various nuclear and G protein-coupled receptors to regulate a myriad of cellular and molecular functions across both metabolic and nonmetabolic pathways. Signaling via these pathways will vary depending on the tissue and the concentration and chemical structure of the bile acid species. Important determinants of the size and composition of the bile acid pool are their efficient enterohepatic recirculation, their host and microbial metabolism, and the homeostatic feedback mechanisms connecting hepatocytes, enterocytes, and the luminal microbiota. This review focuses on the mammalian intestine, discussing the physiology of bile acid transport, the metabolism of bile acids in the gut, and new developments in our understanding of how intestinal metabolism, particularly by the gut microbiota, affects bile acid signaling. PMID:25210150

  2. Inhibition of intestinal bile acid absorption improves cholestatic liver and bile duct injury in a mouse model of sclerosing cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghdasaryan, Anna; Fuchs, Claudia D; Österreicher, Christoph H; Lemberger, Ursula J; Halilbasic, Emina; Påhlman, Ingrid; Graffner, Hans; Krones, Elisabeth; Fickert, Peter; Wahlström, Annika; Ståhlman, Marcus; Paumgartner, Gustav; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Trauner, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Approximately 95% of bile acids (BAs) excreted into bile are reabsorbed in the gut and circulate back to the liver for further biliary secretion. Therefore, pharmacological inhibition of the ileal apical sodium-dependent BA transporter (ASBT/SLC10A2) may protect against BA-mediated cholestatic liver and bile duct injury. Eight week old Mdr2(-/-) (Abcb4(-/-)) mice (model of cholestatic liver injury and sclerosing cholangitis) received either a diet supplemented with A4250 (0.01% w/w) - a highly potent and selective ASBT inhibitor - or a chow diet. Liver injury was assessed biochemically and histologically after 4weeks of A4250 treatment. Expression profiles of genes involved in BA homeostasis, inflammation and fibrosis were assessed via RT-PCR from liver and ileum homogenates. Intestinal inflammation was assessed by RNA expression profiling and immunohistochemistry. Bile flow and composition, as well as biliary and fecal BA profiles were analyzed after 1week of ASBT inhibitor feeding. A4250 improved sclerosing cholangitis in Mdr2(-/-) mice and significantly reduced serum alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase and BAs levels, hepatic expression of pro-inflammatory (Tnf-α, Vcam1, Mcp-1) and pro-fibrogenic (Col1a1, Col1a2) genes and bile duct proliferation (mRNA and immunohistochemistry for cytokeratin 19 (CK19)). Furthermore, A4250 significantly reduced bile flow and biliary BA output, which correlated with reduced Bsep transcription, while Ntcp and Cyp7a1 were induced. Importantly A4250 significantly reduced biliary BA secretion but preserved HCO3(-) and biliary phospholipid secretion resulting in an increased HCO3(-)/BA and PL/BA ratio. In addition, A4250 profoundly increased fecal BA excretion without causing diarrhea and altered BA pool composition, resulting in diminished concentrations of primary BAs tauro-β-muricholic acid and taurocholic acid. Pharmacological ASBT inhibition attenuates cholestatic liver and bile duct injury by reducing biliary BA

  3. Ursodeoxycholic acid for primary biliary cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, Y.; Huang, Z.B.; Christensen, Erik

    2008-01-01

    , and the references of identified studies. The last search was performed in January 2007. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised clinical trials evaluating UDCA versus placebo or no intervention in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: The primary outcomes were mortality and mortality......, trial duration, and patient's severity of primary biliary cirrhosis. We also used Bayesian meta-analytic approach to estimate the UDCA effect as sensitivity analysis. MAIN RESULTS: Sixteen randomised clinical trials evaluating UDCA against placebo or no intervention were identified. Data from three......BACKGROUND: Primary biliary cirrhosis is an uncommon autoimmune liver disease with unknown aetiology. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) has been used for primary biliary cirrhosis, but the effects remain controversial. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the benefits and harms of UDCA on patients with primary...

  4. Bile acid sequestrants : more than simple resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Out, Carolien; Groen, Albert K.; Brufau, Gemma

    Purpose of review Bile acid sequestrants (BAS) have been used for more than 50 years in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. The last decade, bile acids are emerging as integrated regulators of metabolism via induction of various signal transduction pathways. Consequently, BAS treatment may exert

  5. Bile acids in radiation-induced diarrhea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arlow, F.L.; Dekovich, A.A.; Priest, R.J.; Beher, W.T.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation-induced bowel disease manifested by debilitating diarrhea is an unfortunate consequence of therapeutic irradiation for pelvic malignancies. Although the mechanism for this diarrhea is not well understood, many believe it is the result of damage to small bowel mucosa and subsequent bile acid malabsorption. Excess amounts of bile acids, especially the dihydroxy components, are known to induce water and electrolyte secretion and increase bowel motility. We have directly measured individual and total bile acids in the stool samples of 11 patients with radiation-induced diarrhea and have found bile acids elevated two to six times normal in eight of them. Our patients with diarrhea and increased bile acids in their stools had prompt improvement when given cholestyramine. They had fewer stools and returned to a more normal life-style

  6. Stimulation of apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter expands the bile acid pool and generates bile acids with positive feedback properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudling, Mats; Bonde, Ylva

    2015-01-01

    Bile acid synthesis has been considered a prototype for how a physiological process is controlled by end product feedback inhibition. By this feedback inhibition, bile acid concentrations are kept within safe ranges. However, careful examination of published rodent data strongly suggests that bile acid synthesis is also under potent positive feedback control by hydrophilic bile acids. Current concepts on the regulation of bile acid synthesis are derived from mouse models. Recent data have shown that mice have farnesoid X receptor (FXR) antagonistic bile acids capable of quenching responses elicited by FXR agonistic bile acids. This is important to recognize to understand the regulation of bile acid synthesis in the mouse, and in particular to clarify if mouse model findings are valid also in the human situation. In addition to classic end product feedback inhibition, regulation of bile acid synthesis in the mouse largely appears also to be driven by changes in hepatic levels of murine bile acids such as α- and β-muricholic acids. This has not been previously recognized. Stimulated bile acid synthesis or induction of the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter in the intestine, increase the availability of chenodeoxycholic acid in the liver, thereby promoting hepatic conversion of this bile acid into muricholic acids. Recognition of these mechanisms is essential for understanding the regulation of bile acid synthesis in the mouse, and for our awareness of important species differences in the regulation of bile acid synthesis in mice and humans. 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Effect of Right Posterior Bile Duct Anatomy on Biliary Complications in Patients Undergoing Right Lobe Living Donor Liver Transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezcaner, Tugan; Dinç, Nadire; Y Karakayalı, Feza; Kırnap, Mahir; Coşkun, Mehmet; Moray, Gökhan; Haberal, Mehmet

    2017-01-27

    Our aim was to evaluate the influence of the localization of right posterior bile duct anatomy relative to portal vein of the donors on posttransplant bile duct complications. We retrospectively investigated 141 patients who had undergone living donor liver transplant using right hemiliver grafts. The patients were classified based on the pattern of the right posterior bile duct and divided into infraportal and supraportal types. Clinical donor and recipient risk factors and surgical outcomes were compared for their relationship with biliary complications using logistic regression analyses. The 2 groups were similar according to demographic and clinical features. The biliary complication rate was 23.7% (9/38) in the infraportal group and 47.4% (37/78) in the supraportal group (P = .014). An analysis of risk factors for the development of anastomotic bile leak using logistic regression showed that a supraportal right posterior bile duct anatomy was a statistically significant positive predictor, with odds ratio of 18.905 (P = .012; confidence interval, 1.922-185.967). The distance of the right posterior bile duct from confluence was significantly lower in patients with biliary complications than in those without (mean of 7.66 vs 0.40 mm; P = .044). According to receiver operating characteristic analyses, the cut-off point for the length of right bile duct to right posterior bile duct from the hepatic confluence was 9.5 mm regarding presence of complications. Factors influencing bile duct anastomosis leakage were supraportal-type donor bile duct anatomy and length of the right main bile duct from biliary confluence. Hepatic arterial complications were similarly a risk factor for biliary strictures. Because of the multiple factors leading to complications in living donor liver transplant, it is challenging to group these patients by operative risk; however, establishing risk models may facilitate the prediction of complications.

  8. Usefulness of the 'Rendezvous' Technique in Living Related Right Liver Donors with Postoperative Biliary Leakage from Bile Duct Anastomosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miraglia, R.; Traina, M.; Maruzzelli, L.; Caruso, S.; Di Pisa, M.; Gruttadauria, S.; Luca, A.; Gridelli, B.

    2008-01-01

    This is a report on two cases of large bile leak following right hepatectomy performed for living related liver transplantation, originating from the stump of the ligated right bile duct, and treated with the placement of large percutaneous biliary catheters through a combined percutaneous transhepatic and endoscopic approach (rendezvous technique).

  9. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage through the normal duct in patients with post-operative bile leakage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyun; Kim, Young Hwan; Kim, Yong Joo

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the technical feasibility and clinical efficacy of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) through the normal duct in patients with post-operative bile leakage. From January 1998 to December 2003, fourteen patients (male: 12, female: 2, mean age: 56) with biliary leak after laparoscopic cholecystectomy (n = 5), T-tube removal (n = 5), choledochojejunostomy due to small bowel perforation (n = 1), right lobectomy (n = 1), laparoscopic adrenalectomy (n = 1), and subtotal gastrectomy (n = 1) were treated by means of PTBD; this was performed with the two-step approach. The central bile duct was cannulated using a 21-G Chiba needle to map the intrahepatic biliary tree. An 8.5-F drainage catheter tip was positioned at the CBD after puncturing peripheral bile duct with an additional Chiba needle. We evaluated the technical feasibility, the procedure-related complications, clinical efficacy and the duration of catheter placement. PTBD of the normal duct with the two-step approach was successful in all but two cases. In these two cases, the two-step approach was failed due to the rapid disappearance of the targeted peripheral duct, and this was the result caused by biloportal fistula. PTBD was performed through the central bile duct in one patient, and through the remnant cystic duct in one patient. There were no procedure-related complications except for mild abdominal pain in seven patients. Bile leakage was demonstrated on cholangiogram in 10 of 14 patients; this occurred at the T-tube exit site (n = 4), cystic duct stump (n = 2), choledochojejunostomy site (n = 1), resection margin of liver (n = 1), caudate lobe (n = 1), and GB bed (n = 1). In 13 patients, the biliary leak stopped after drainage (mean duration: 32.1 days). In one patient, surgical management was performed one day after PTBD due to the excessive amount of bile leakage. PTBD is a technically feasible and clinically efficacious treatment for post-operative bile leakage, and it can

  10. Case series of ante-grade biliary stenting: An option during bile duct exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qaiser Jalal

    Full Text Available Background: Managing choledochotomy after bile duct clearance is an ongoing debate. T-tube insertion is not without complication and morbidity, requires significant post-operative care. Primary closure alone can result in a high pressure biliary system and bile leak. The placement of an ante-grade stent through the choledochotomy prior to primary closure is an option for ensuring biliary drainage after bile duct exploration. We reviewed our series of open bile duct explorations, where an ante-grade stent was placed when managing choledochotomy. Methods: Patients who had ante-grade stent placement, all performed by same senior hepatobiliary surgeon, were identified retrospectively. Case note review was used to gather demographic, complication, length of stay, post-operative clinic visits and readmission data. Results: 22 (M:F, 7:15 patients with a median age of 64 years (22–82. The indication for surgical stone clearance was failed ERCP in 20.2 patients were not suitable for ERCP. The median post-operative stay was 8 days (379 with the abdominal drain remaining for a median of 4 days (137. 16 (73% patients had no complications. 4 (18% had bile leaks, 5 (22% wound infections, 1 (5% cholangitis and 1 (5% pancreatitis. All complications were Clavien-Dindo grade 3 or less. Conclusion: In situations where primary CBD closure is not safe due to concern over high pressure in the biliary tree the placement of ante-grade stent may be preferred to T-tube placement. Keywords: Choledocholithiasis, Ante-grade stenting, Choledochotomy

  11. Fibrates suppress bile acid synthesis via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α-mediated downregulation of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase and sterol 27-hydroxylase expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, S.M.; Duez, H.; Gervois, P.P.; Staels, B.; Kuipers, F.; Princen, H.M.G.

    2001-01-01

    Fibrates are hypolipidemic drugs that affect the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism by activating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). Fibrate treatment causes adverse changes in biliary lipid composition and decreases bile acid excretion, leading to an increased

  12. Fibrates suppress bile acid synthesis via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha-mediated downregulation of cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase and sterol 27-hydroxylase expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, SM; Duez, H; Gervois, PP; Staels, B; Kuipers, F; Princen, HMG

    2001-01-01

    Fibrates are hypolipidemic drugs that affect the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism by activating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). Fibrate treatment causes adverse changes in biliary lipid composition and decreases bile acid excretion, leading to an increased

  13. Bile acids for liver-transplanted patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poropat, Goran; Giljaca, Vanja; Stimac, Davor

    2010-01-01

    Liver transplantation has become a widely accepted form of treatment for numerous end-stage liver diseases. Bile acids may decrease allograft rejection after liver transplantation by changing the expression of major histocompatibility complex class molecules in bile duct epithelium and central vein...

  14. The influence of bile acids homeostasis by cryptotanshinone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The homeostasis of bile acids can be tightly regulated through feed-back and feed-forward regula- tion pathways. Bile acids exert their toxicity towards cells at high concentrations, and the accumulation of bile acids can induce the severe damage towards liver cells 2. Bile acids have been reported to induce cell injury.

  15. [Analysis on replacement of traditional Chinese medicine bear bile with bile acids based on drug properties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bin; Ren, Ying-Long; Ma, Li; Gu, Hao; Wang, Yun; Qiao, Yan-Jiang

    2014-02-01

    To discuss the rationality of the clinical replacement of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) bear bile with bile acid constituents, and analyze the difference between these constituents and bear bile in drug properties. Summarizing the drug properties of bear bile by reference to medical literatures for drug properties of TCM bear bile and Science of Traditional Chinese Medicine (China Press of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 2007). Analyzing and summarizing the pharmacological effects of main bile acid constituents according to relevant literatures for studies on pharmacological effects of main bile acid constituents in CNKI database. Predicating the drug properties of these bile acid constituents by using the drug property predication model established by the study group according the pharmacological effects of main bile acid constituents in the paper, and compare the prediction results with the drug properties of bear bile. Bile acid constituents in bear bile were mostly cold in property, bitter in taste, and the combination of their drug properties could reflect the combined drug properties of bear bile. All of these bile acid constituents in bear bile could show part of effects of bear bile. Attention shall be given to regulate the medication scheme in clinical application according to actual conditions.

  16. [Endo-Lap method in the management of biliary lithiasis (gallbladder and common bile duct)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filip, V; Georgescu, St; Stanciu, C; Bălan, Gh; Târcoveanu, E; Neacşu, C N; Cîrdei, C; Drug, V L

    2004-01-01

    To present the results of the biliary endoscopic approach (ERCP) followed by laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) in the management of biliary lithiasis (gallbladder and common bile duct--CBD). From 1997 to March 2003 37 patients with biliary lithiasis were treated by endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES) with stone extraction, followed after 24-48 hours by LC. The indications for ERCP were presence of an obstructive jaundice (n=32) and a dilated CBD at the ultrasound examination (n=5). Selective biliary cannulation was obtained in 35 (94.6%) cases, in all of them with successful papillotomy. Stones were found in all patients. CBD clearances for calculi (from 1 to 8) was obtained in 33 of 35 patients (94.3%), the rest of 2 being managed by open laparotomy. Antibiotics were administrated in all patients. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed after 24-48 hours, with one conversion (3%). Postoperative morbidity was 12.1%: 2 transitory pancreatic reactions and 2 wound infections. Endo-Lap method is a useful management alternative for combined gallbladder and CBD lithiasis. It has all the advantages of the two mini-invasive procedures (fast recovery, short hospitalization, low costs) and a less postoperative morbidity in patients with high risk.

  17. 3α-6α-Dihydroxy-7α-fluoro-5β-cholanoate (UPF-680), physicochemical and physiological properties of a new fluorinated bile acid that prevents 17α-ethynyl-estradiol-induced cholestasis in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clerici, Carlo; Castellani, Danilo; Asciutti, Stefania; Pellicciari, Roberto; Setchell, Kenneth D.R.; O'Connell, Nancy C.; Sadeghpour, Bahman; Camaioni, Emidio; Fiorucci, Stefano; Renga, Barbara; Nardi, Elisabetta; Sabatino, Giuseppe; Clementi, Mattia; Giuliano, Vittorio; Baldoni, Monia; Orlandi, Stefano; Mazzocchi, Alessandro; Morelli, Antonio; Morelli, Olivia

    2006-01-01

    3α-6α-Dihydroxy-7α-fluoro-5β-cholanoate (UPF-680), the 7α-fluorine analog of hyodeoxycholic acid (HDCA), was synthesized to improve bioavailability and stability of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). Acute rat biliary fistula and chronic cholestasis induced by 17α-ethynyl-estradiol (17EE) models were used to study and compare the effects of UPF-680 (dose range 0.6-6.0 μmol/kg min) with UDCA on bile flow, biliary bicarbonate (HCO 3 - ), lipid output, biliary bile acid composition, hepatic enzymes and organic anion pumps. In acute infusion, UPF-680 increased bile flow in a dose-related manner, by up to 40.9%. Biliary HCO 3 - output was similarly increased. Changes were observed in phospholipid secretion only at the highest doses. Treatment with UDCA and UPF-680 reversed chronic cholestasis induced by 17EE; in this model, UDCA had no effect on bile flow in contrast to UPF-680, which significantly increased bile flow. With acute administration of UPF-680, the biliary bile acid pool became enriched with unconjugated and conjugated UPF-680 (71.7%) at the expense of endogenous cholic acid and muricholic isomers. With chronic administration of UPF-680 or UDCA, the main biliary bile acids were tauro conjugates, but modification of biliary bile acid pool was greater with UPF-680. UPF-680 increased the mRNA for cytochrome P450 7A1 (CYP7A1) and cytochrome P450 8B (CYP8B). Both UDCA and UPF-680 increased the mRNA for Na + taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NCTP). In conclusion, UPF-680 prevented 17EE-induced cholestasis and enriched the biliary bile acid pool with less detergent and cytotoxic bile acids. This novel fluorinated bile acid may have potential in the treatment of cholestatic liver disease

  18. Bile acids in health and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, E; Thaysen, E H

    1996-01-01

    Over the last quarter of a century Danish research on bile acids has comprised studies of their physical and chemical properties, their physiology, pathophysiology, metabolism, and kinetics, and their clinical applicability. In the beginning of the period a major contribution was made to the unde......Over the last quarter of a century Danish research on bile acids has comprised studies of their physical and chemical properties, their physiology, pathophysiology, metabolism, and kinetics, and their clinical applicability. In the beginning of the period a major contribution was made...... to the understanding of the factors involved in the solubility of cholesterol in bile. The growing international understanding of the potential importance of the bile acids in health and disease gave raise to a substantial Danish contribution in the 1970s and 1980s in parallel with international achievements. Emphasis...... was on the possible clinical implications of bile acids. Studies on physiology and pathophysiology were in focus. Patients who have had an intestinal bypass operation for obesity served as a model for obtaining new knowledge on various aspects of the properties of the bile acids. Also the analytical methods were...

  19. Biliary cystadenoma with bile duct communication depicted on liver-specific contrast agent-enhanced MRI in a child

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrone, Gianluca; Carollo, Vincenzo; Luca, Angelo [Mediterranean Institute of Transplantation and High Specialization Therapy (ISMETT), Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Palermo (Italy); Maggiore, Giuseppe [University Hospital S. Chiara, Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Paediatrics, Pisa (Italy); Sonzogni, Aurelio [Riuniti Hospital, Pathology Department, Bergamo (Italy)

    2011-01-15

    Biliary cystadenoma is a benign, but potentially malignant, cystic neoplasm of the biliary ducts occurring most commonly in middle-aged females and very rarely in children. We present a 9-year-old boy with biliary cystadenoma, diagnosed by MRI using a new liver-specific contrast agent (gadoxetic acid) that is eliminated by the biliary system. The images clearly demonstrate the communication between the multiloculated cystic mass and the biliary tree, suggesting the possibility of biliary cystadenoma. Due to the malignant potential of a cystadenoma, the lesion was resected. The resection was complete and the postoperative course was uneventful. (orig.)

  20. Role of the Intestinal Bile Acid Transporters in Bile Acid and Drug Disposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Membrane transporters expressed by the hepatocyte and enterocyte play critical roles in maintaining the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids, an effective recycling and conservation mechanism that largely restricts these potentially cytotoxic detergents to the intestinal and hepatobiliary compartments. In doing so, the hepatic and enterocyte transport systems ensure a continuous supply of bile acids to be used repeatedly during the digestion of multiple meals throughout the day. Absorption of bile acids from the intestinal lumen and export into the portal circulation is mediated by a series of transporters expressed on the enterocyte apical and basolateral membranes. The ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid cotransporter (abbreviated ASBT; gene symbol, SLC10A2) is responsible for the initial uptake of bile acids across the enterocyte brush border membrane. The bile acids are then efficiently shuttled across the cell and exported across the basolateral membrane by the heteromeric Organic Solute Transporter, OSTα-OSTβ. This chapter briefly reviews the tissue expression, physiology, genetics, pathophysiology, and transport properties of the ASBT and OSTα-OSTα. In addition, the chapter discusses the relationship between the intestinal bile acid transporters and drug metabolism, including development of ASBT inhibitors as novel hypocholesterolemic or hepatoprotective agents, prodrug targeting of the ASBT to increase oral bioavailability, and involvement of the intestinal bile acid transporters in drug absorption and drug-drug interactions. PMID:21103970

  1. Bile Acid Signaling in Liver Metabolism and Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiangang Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndromes are increasingly recognized as health concerns worldwide. Overnutrition and insulin resistance are the major causes of diabetic hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia in humans. Studies in the past decade provide evidence that bile acids are not just biological detergents facilitating gut nutrient absorption, but also important metabolic regulators of glucose and lipid homeostasis. Pharmacological alteration of bile acid metabolism or bile acid signaling pathways such as using bile acid receptor agonists or bile acid binding resins may be a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of obesity and diabetes. On the other hand, bile acid signaling is complex, and the molecular mechanisms mediating the bile acid effects are still not completely understood. This paper will summarize recent advances in our understanding of bile acid signaling in regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism, and the potentials of developing novel therapeutic strategies that target bile acid metabolism for the treatment of metabolic disorders.

  2. Suppressed hepatic bile acid signalling despite elevated production of primary and secondary bile acids in NAFLD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Na; Baker, Susan S; Chapa-Rodriguez, Adrian; Liu, Wensheng; Nugent, Colleen A; Tsompana, Maria; Mastrandrea, Lucy; Buck, Michael J; Baker, Robert D; Genco, Robert J; Zhu, Ruixin; Zhu, Lixin

    2017-08-03

    Bile acids are regulators of lipid and glucose metabolism, and modulate inflammation in the liver and other tissues. Primary bile acids such as cholic acid and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) are produced in the liver, and converted into secondary bile acids such as deoxycholic acid (DCA) and lithocholic acid by gut microbiota. Here we investigated the possible roles of bile acids in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) pathogenesis and the impact of the gut microbiome on bile acid signalling in NAFLD. Serum bile acid levels and fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19), liver gene expression profiles and gut microbiome compositions were determined in patients with NAFLD, high-fat diet-fed rats and their controls. Serum concentrations of primary and secondary bile acids were increased in patients with NAFLD. In per cent, the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) antagonistic DCA was increased, while the agonistic CDCA was decreased in NAFLD. Increased mRNA expression for cytochrome P450 7A1, Na + -taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide and paraoxonase 1, no change in mRNA expression for small heterodimer partner and bile salt export pump, and reduced serum FGF19 were evidence of impaired FXR and fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4)-mediated signalling in NAFLD. Taurine and glycine metabolising bacteria were increased in the gut of patients with NAFLD, reflecting increased secondary bile acid production. Similar changes in liver gene expression and the gut microbiome were observed in high-fat diet-fed rats. The serum bile acid profile, the hepatic gene expression pattern and the gut microbiome composition consistently support an elevated bile acid production in NAFLD. The increased proportion of FXR antagonistic bile acid explains, at least in part, the suppression of hepatic FXR-mediated and FGFR4-mediated signalling. Our study suggests that future NAFLD intervention may target the components of FXR signalling, including the bile acid converting gut microbiome. © Article

  3. The role of hepatobiliary scintigraphy and MR cholangiography in the assessment of bile duct obstruction after biliary surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Seung; Moon, Dae Hyuk; Lee, Moon Gyu; Lee, Sung Gyu; Lee, Hee Kyung

    1998-01-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the role of MR cholangiography (MRC) and hepatobiliary scintigraphy (HBS) in the assessemtn of recurrent bile duct obstruction after biliary surgery. Twenty-three patients (15 men and 8 women: mean age 49.8) with post-biliary operation state (16 biliary-enteric anastomoses and seven cholecystectomy) underwent a total of 28 MRC and 28 HBS using Tc-99m DISIDA within 3 days of each other. Interval between surgery and MRC or HBS ranged from 2 wk to 15 yr (median: 14 mon). MRC and HBS were analyzed for the presence of bile duct obstruction. The final diagnoses were cofirmed by percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage or surgical operation in 11 of 28 cases and by the follow-up clinical course in the rests. Of 14 instances with bile duct obstruction (13 intrahepatic bile duct obstruction and 1 common bile duct obstruction), HBS showed complete intrahepatic bile duct (IHD) obstruction in 7, incomplete IHD obstruction in 5, parenchymal dysfuction in 1, and IHD dilation without obstructon in 1, resulting in sensitivity of 86% (12/14). MRC showed stone in 6, stricture in 4, IHD dilatation in 3, and normal in 1. The sensitivity of MRC was 71% (10/14). Fourteen instances were without obstruction. HBS showed no evidence of obstruction in all 14 instances (specificity 100%). However, stricture on MRC was found in 4 instances, resulting in specificity of 71% (10/14). HBS is useful in the diagnosis of recurrent bile duct obstruction after surgery. MRC is a useful modality for assessing the diagnosis of obstruction itself as well as the cause and location of bile duct obstruction. However, the specificity of MRC appears to be lower because of possible overestimation of stricture

  4. Protective effect of bile acid derivatives in phalloidin-induced rat liver toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herraez, Elisa; Macias, Rocio I.R.; Vazquez-Tato, Jose; Hierro, Carlos; Monte, Maria J.; Marin, Jose J.G.

    2009-01-01

    Phalloidin causes severe liver damage characterized by marked cholestasis, which is due in part to irreversible polymerization of actin filaments. Liver uptake of this toxin through the transporter OATP1B1 is inhibited by the bile acid derivative BALU-1, which does not inhibit the sodium-dependent bile acid transporter NTCP. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether BALU-1 prevents liver uptake of phalloidin without impairing endogenous bile acid handling and hence may have protective effects against the hepatotoxicity induced by this toxin. In anaesthetized rats, i.v. administration of BALU-1 increased bile flow more than taurocholic acid (TCA). Phalloidin administration decreased basal (- 60%) and TCA-stimulated bile flow (- 55%) without impairing bile acid output. Phalloidin-induced cholestasis was accompanied by liver necrosis, nephrotoxicity and haematuria. In BALU-1-treated animals, phalloidin-induced cholestasis was partially prevented. Moreover haematuria was not observed, which was consistent with histological evidences of BALU-1-prevented injury of liver and kidney tissue. HPLC-MS/MS analysis revealed that BALU-1 was secreted in bile mainly in non-conjugated form, although a small proportion ( TCA > DHCA > UDCA. In conclusion, BALU-1 is able to protect against phalloidin-induced hepatotoxicity, probably due to an inhibition of the liver uptake and an enhanced biliary secretion of this toxin.

  5. Extracellular Vesicles in Bile as Markers of Malignant Biliary Stenoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severino, Valeria; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Delhaye, Myriam; Moll, Solange; Annessi-Ramseyer, Isabelle; Robin, Xavier; Frossard, Jean-Louis; Farina, Annarita

    2017-08-01

    Algorithms for diagnosis of malignant common bile duct (CBD) stenoses are complex and lack accuracy. Malignant tumors secrete large numbers of extracellular vesicles (EVs) into surrounding fluids; EVs might therefore serve as biomarkers for diagnosis. We investigated whether concentrations of EVs in bile could discriminate malignant from nonmalignant CBD stenoses. We collected bile and blood samples from 50 patients undergoing therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography at university hospitals in Europe for CBD stenosis of malignant (pancreatic cancer, n = 20 or cholangiocarcinoma, n = 5) or nonmalignant (chronic pancreatitis [CP], n = 15) origin. Ten patients with CBD obstruction due to biliary stones were included as controls. EV concentrations in samples were determined by nanoparticle tracking analyses. The discovery cohort comprised the first 10 patients with a diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, based on tissue analysis, and 10 consecutive controls. Using samples from these subjects, we identified a threshold concentration of bile EVs that could best discriminate between patients with pancreatic cancer from controls. We verified the diagnostic performance of bile EV concentration by analyzing samples from the 30 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of malignant (pancreatic cancer or cholangiocarcinoma, n = 15) or nonmalignant (CP, n = 15) CBD stenosis. Samples were compared using the Mann-Whitney test and nonparametric Spearman correlation analysis. Receiver operating characteristic area under the curve was used to determine diagnostic accuracy. In both cohorts, the median concentration of EVs was significantly higher in bile samples from patients with malignant CBD stenoses than controls or nonmalignant CBD stenoses (2.41 × 10 15 vs 1.60 × 10 14 nanoparticles/L in the discovery cohort; P bile best distinguished patients with malignant CBD from controls in the discovery cohort. In the verification cohort, this threshold discriminated

  6. Ursodeoxycholic acid for primary biliary cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudic, Jelena S; Poropat, Goran; Krstic, Miodrag N; Bjelakovic, Goran; Gluud, Christian

    2012-12-12

    Ursodeoxycholic acid is administered to patients with primary biliary cirrhosis, a chronic progressive inflammatory autoimmune-mediated liver disease with unknown aetiology. Despite its controversial effects, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved its usage for primary biliary cirrhosis. To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of ursodeoxycholic acid in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. We searched for eligible randomised trials in The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded, LILACS, Clinicaltrials.gov, and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. The literature search was performed until January 2012. Randomised clinical trials assessing the beneficial and harmful effects of ursodeoxycholic acid versus placebo or 'no intervention' in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. Two authors independently extracted data. Continuous data were analysed using mean difference (MD) and standardised mean difference (SMD). Dichotomous data were analysed using risk ratio (RR). Meta-analyses were conducted using both a random-effects model and a fixed-effect model, with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Random-effects model meta-regression was used to assess the effects of covariates across the trials. Trial sequential analysis was used to assess risk of random errors (play of chance). Risks of bias (systematic error) in the included trials were assessed according to Cochrane methodology bias domains. Sixteen randomised clinical trials with 1447 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis were included. One trial had low risk of bias, and the remaining fifteen had high risk of bias. Fourteen trials compared ursodeoxycholic acid with placebo and two trials compared ursodeoxycholic acid with 'no intervention'. The percentage of patients with advanced primary biliary cirrhosis at baseline varied

  7. Clinical value of bile acids radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breckwoldt, R.U.

    1981-01-01

    In 50 blood donors, 87 patients with various liver and bile disorders, 50 hemodialyse patients and 50 patients prior to and immediately after cardiac swigery, cholyl glycine (CG) and sulfolithocholyl glycine (SLCG) were determined. Long-term observations were carried out on a further 10 patients with non-A/non-B hepatitis and 10 patients without hepatitis. Correlations were found between the values of alkaline phosphatase, GPT, GOT and bilirubin. Consequently the determination of bile acid, here above all SLCG, constitutes a suitable means to detect subclinical functional liver disorders. The examination of the post-operative functional liver disorders following cardiac swigery showed that there is a distinct time shift between the mostly transitory increase in enzyme activity and the SLCG levels. Surprisingly, the long-term observations showed that increased bile acid levels are already measured during the hepatitis incubation period at normal enzyme activities. It was not possible, however to identify hepatitic patients already during incubation by assay of the bile acid level. Whereas the determination of standard laboratory parameters remains predominant in the description of liver cell damage, the importance of serum bile acid determination is seen in the description of functional liver disorders which are not characterized by increased enzyme activities. (orig.) [de

  8. Bile acids and cardiovascular function in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voiosu, Andrei; Wiese, Signe; Voiosu, Theodor

    2017-01-01

    Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy and the hyperdynamic syndrome are clinically important complications of cirrhosis, but their exact pathogenesis is still partly unknown. Experimental models have proven the cardiotoxic effects of bile acids and recent studies of their varied receptor-mediated functions...... offer new insight into their involvement in cardiovascular dysfunction in cirrhosis. Bile acid receptors such as farnesoid X-activated receptor and TGR5 are currently under investigation as potential therapeutic targets in a variety of pathological conditions. These receptors have also recently been...... identified in cardiomyocytes, vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells where they seem to play an important role in cellular metabolism. Chronic cholestasis leading to abnormal levels of circulating bile acids alters the normal signalling pathways and contributes to the development of profound...

  9. Biliary tract variations of the left liver with special reference to the left medial sectional bile duct in 500 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Norihiko; Kobayashi, Akira; Yokoyama, Takahide; Shimizu, Akira; Motoyama, Hiroaki; Kanai, Keita; Arakura, Norikazu; Yamada, Akira; Kitou, Yoshihiro; Miyagawa, Shin-Ichi

    2015-08-01

    Among the intrahepatic bile ducts, the biliary system of the left medial sectional bile duct (B4) is known to have relatively complex patterns. The records of 500 patients who had been diagnosed as having hepato-pancreatico-biliary disease were retrospectively studied for anatomical biliary variations of the left liver with special reference to the drainage system of B4 using magnetic resonance images. The left hepatic duct was present in 494 patients (98.8%), whereas it was lacking in 6 patients (1.2%), and these patients exhibited the following B4 confluence patterns: B4 drained into the common hepatic duct in 2 patients (.4%), the right anterior sectional bile duct in 3 patients (.6%), and the right posterior sectional bile duct in 1 patient (.2%). The left hepatic duct was absent more frequently in patients with portal venous variations than in patients with a common branching pattern (8.2% vs .4%, P = .0011). The presently reported data are useful for obtaining a better understanding of the surgical anatomy of the biliary system of the left liver. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Randomized controlled trial of perioperative antimicrobial therapy based on the results of preoperative bile cultures in patients undergoing biliary reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Kunishige; Tanaka, Kimitaka; Miura, Takumi; Nakanishi, Yoshitsugu; Noji, Takehiro; Nakamura, Toru; Tsuchikawa, Takahiro; Okamura, Keisuke; Shichinohe, Toshiaki; Hirano, Satoshi

    2017-07-01

    The high frequency of surgical site infections (SSIs) after hepato-pancreato-biliary (HPB) surgery is a problem that needs to be addressed. This prospective, randomized, controlled study examined whether perioperative prophylactic use of antibiotics based on preoperative bile culture results in HPB surgery could decrease SSI. Participants comprised 126 patients who underwent HPB (bile duct, gallbladder, ampullary, or pancreatic) cancer surgery with biliary reconstruction at Hokkaido University Hospital between August 2008 and March 2013 (UMIN Clinical Trial Registry #00001278). Before surgery, subjects were randomly allocated to a targeted group administered antibiotics based on bile culture results or a standard group administered cefmetazole. The primary endpoint was SSI rates within 30 days after surgery. Secondary endpoint was SSI rates for each operative procedure. Of the 126 patients, 124 were randomly allocated (targeted group, n = 62; standard group, n = 62). Frequency of SSI after surgery was significantly lower in the targeted group (27 patients, 43.5%) than in the standard group (44 patients, 71.0%; P = 0.002). Among patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy and hepatectomy, SSI occurred significantly less frequently in the targeted group (P = 0.001 and P = 0.025, respectively). This study demonstrated that preoperative bile culture-targeted administration of prophylactic antibiotics decreased SSIs following HBP surgery with biliary reconstruction. © 2017 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  11. The Preliminary Study on Procurement Biliary Convergence from Donors with Complicated Bile Duct Variant in Emergency Right Lobe Living Donor Liver Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Sheng; Dong, Jia-Hong; Duan, Wei-Dong; Ji, Wen-Bing; Liang, Yu-Rong

    2017-03-01

    The incidence of biliary complications after living donor adult liver transplantation (LDALT) is still high due to the bile duct variation and necessity reconstruction of multiple small bile ducts. The current surgical management of the biliary variants is unsatisfactory. We evaluated the role of a new surgical approach in a complicated hilar bile duct variant (Nakamura type IV and Nakamura type II) under emergent right lobe LDALT for high model for end-stage liver disease score patients. The common hepatic duct (CHD) and the left hepatic duct (LHD) of the donor were transected in a right-graft including short common trunks with right posterior and anterior bile ducts, whereas the LHD of the donor was anastomosed to the CHD and the common trunks of a right-graft bile duct and the recipient CHD was end-to-end anastomosed. Ten of 13 grafts (Nakamura types II, III, and IV) had two or more biliary orifices after right graft lobectomy; seven patients had biliary complications (53.8%). Later, the surgical innovation was carried out in five donors with variant bile duct (four Nakamura type IV and one type II), and, consequently, no biliary or other complications were observed in donors and recipients during 47-53 months of follow-up; significant differences ( P  ducts in a complicated donor bile duct variant may facilitate biliary reconstruction and reduce long-term biliary complications.

  12. Effect of bile acids on digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. O. Stremoukhov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Studying the effects of different bile acids in the body in recent years significantly increased the understanding of their physiological functions. The role of bile acids is to transfer to Striated border of enterocytes lipids in high micellar concentration and subsequent return them to the water layer in the molecular form. The rate of diffusion of molecules or particles is inversely proportional to the square root of the magnitude of their molecular weight. Main components of the glycoprotein complex (GPC allows to preserve the natural structure of mucosa. Previous physicochemical experiments on GPC established presence of bile acids (3,5 to 10 mg/ml, enzymes (amylase and lipase, amino acids (from 10150 to 29500 ug/ml in the complex. Objective. The aim was to study the influence of bile on fat filtration on the model of GPC. Method and Materials. Soaked filters were put on the tubes: with bile - the first, water - the second group, GPC bile at a dose of 25 mg/kg - the third group. Then on each filter was poured 2 ml of liquid fat. 30 minutes after the start of the experiment the amount of liquid fat that passes through the filter was measured. Results and Discussion. As established in the first group (bile medical, the amount of liquid fat, which passed through the filter amounted to 1,85±0,02 ml. In the second group (water - 0,30 ± 0,03 ml. In the third group (GPC 25 mg/kg - 1,75±0,02 ml. After that the impact of GPC bile in emulsification of fats was studied. 1 ml of vegetable oil and 1,5 ml of purified water were contributed in three series of tubes. The first series of test tubes left unchanged. In the other two 2 ml in 2 series - medical bile in 3 series - GPC bile were added. Tubes were shaken in all series. In the first (control series observed the formation of turbid fluid - emulsion. However, in a few seconds instability of the emulsion was detected. In the second and third series of tubes formation of stable emulsions which are

  13. Taurine ameliorates cholesterol metabolism by stimulating bile acid production in high-cholesterol-fed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Shigeru; Fujita, Michiko; Nakamura, Masakazu; Sakono, Masanobu; Nishizono, Shoko; Sato, Masao; Imaizumi, Katsumi; Mori, Mari; Fukuda, Nobuhiro

    2016-03-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of dietary taurine on cholesterol metabolism in high-cholesterol-fed rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two dietary groups (n = 6 in each group): a high-cholesterol diet containing 0.5% cholesterol and 0.15% sodium cholate, and a high-cholesterol diet with 5% (w/w) taurine. The experimental diets were given for 2 weeks. Taurine supplementation reduced the serum and hepatic cholesterol levels by 37% and 32%, respectively. Faecal excretion of bile acids was significantly increased in taurine-treated rats, compared with untreated rats. Biliary bile acid concentrations were also increased by taurine. Taurine supplementation increased taurine-conjugated bile acids by 61% and decreased glycine-conjugated bile acids by 53%, resulting in a significant decrease in the glycine/taurine (G/T) ratio. Among the taurine-conjugated bile acids, cholic acid and deoxycholic acid were significantly increased. In the liver, taurine supplementation increased the mRNA expression and enzymatic activity of hepatic cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the rate-limiting enzyme for bile acid synthesis, by three- and two-fold, respectively. Taurine also decreased the enzymatic activity of acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP). These observations suggest that taurine supplementation increases the synthesis and excretion of taurine-conjugated bile acids and stimulates the catabolism of cholesterol to bile acid by elevating the expression and activity of CYP7A1. This may reduce cholesterol esterification and lipoprotein assembly for very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) secretion, leading to reductions in the serum and hepatic cholesterol levels. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. Role of Fully Covered Self-Expandable Metal Stent for Treatment of Benign Biliary Strictures and Bile Leaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pausawasadi, Nonthalee [Department of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Soontornmanokul, Tanassanee; Rerknimitr, Rungsun [Department of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2012-02-15

    Endoscopic therapy by balloon dilation and placement of multiple large-bore plastic stents is the treatment of choice for benign biliary stricture. This approach is effective but it typically requires multiple endoscopic sessions given the short duration of stent patency. The endoscopic approach for treatment of bile leak involves the placement of a stent with or without biliary sphincterotomy. The self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) has traditionally been used for palliation of malignant biliary strictures given the long duration of stent patency owing to their larger stent diameter. Recently, SEMS has been used in a variety of benign biliary strictures and leaks, especially with the design of the covered self-expandable metal stent (CSEMS), which permits endoscopic-mediated stent removal. The use of CSEMS in benign biliary stricture could potentially result in a decrease in endoscopic sessions and it is technically easier when compared to placement of multiple plastic stents. However, complications such as cholecystitis due to blockage of cystic duct, stent migration, infection and pancreatitis have been reported. The potential subsegmental occlusion of contralateral intrahepatic ducts also limits the use of CSEMS in hilar stricture. Certain techniques and improvement of stent design may overcome these challenges in the future. Thus, CSEMS may be appropriate in only highly selected conditions, such as refractory benign biliary stricture, despite multiple plastic stent placement or difficult to treat bile duct stricture from chronic pancreatitis, and should not be used routinely. This review focuses on the use of fully covered self-expandable metal stent for benign biliary strictures and bile leaks.

  15. Role of Fully Covered Self-Expandable Metal Stent for Treatment of Benign Biliary Strictures and Bile Leaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pausawasadi, Nonthalee; Soontornmanokul, Tanassanee; Rerknimitr, Rungsun

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic therapy by balloon dilation and placement of multiple large-bore plastic stents is the treatment of choice for benign biliary stricture. This approach is effective but it typically requires multiple endoscopic sessions given the short duration of stent patency. The endoscopic approach for treatment of bile leak involves the placement of a stent with or without biliary sphincterotomy. The self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) has traditionally been used for palliation of malignant biliary strictures given the long duration of stent patency owing to their larger stent diameter. Recently, SEMS has been used in a variety of benign biliary strictures and leaks, especially with the design of the covered self-expandable metal stent (CSEMS), which permits endoscopic-mediated stent removal. The use of CSEMS in benign biliary stricture could potentially result in a decrease in endoscopic sessions and it is technically easier when compared to placement of multiple plastic stents. However, complications such as cholecystitis due to blockage of cystic duct, stent migration, infection and pancreatitis have been reported. The potential subsegmental occlusion of contralateral intrahepatic ducts also limits the use of CSEMS in hilar stricture. Certain techniques and improvement of stent design may overcome these challenges in the future. Thus, CSEMS may be appropriate in only highly selected conditions, such as refractory benign biliary stricture, despite multiple plastic stent placement or difficult to treat bile duct stricture from chronic pancreatitis, and should not be used routinely. This review focuses on the use of fully covered self-expandable metal stent for benign biliary strictures and bile leaks.

  16. Role of Fully Covered Self-Expandable Metal Stent for Treatment of Benign Biliary Strictures and Bile Leaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pausawasadi, Nonthalee; Soontornmanokul, Tanassanee

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic therapy by balloon dilation and placement of multiple large-bore plastic stents is the treatment of choice for benign biliary stricture. This approach is effective but it typically requires multiple endoscopic sessions given the short duration of stent patency. The endoscopic approach for treatment of bile leak involves the placement of a stent with or without biliary sphincterotomy. The self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) has traditionally been used for palliation of malignant biliary strictures given the long duration of stent patency owing to their larger stent diameter. Recently, SEMS has been used in a variety of benign biliary strictures and leaks, especially with the design of the covered self-expandable metal stent (CSEMS), which permits endoscopic-mediated stent removal. The use of CSEMS in benign biliary stricture could potentially result in a decrease in endoscopic sessions and it is technically easier when compared to placement of multiple plastic stents. However, complications such as cholecystitis due to blockage of cystic duct, stent migration, infection and pancreatitis have been reported. The potential subsegmental occlusion of contralateral intrahepatic ducts also limits the use of CSEMS in hilar stricture. Certain techniques and improvement of stent design may overcome these challenges in the future. Thus, CSEMS may be appropriate in only highly selected conditions, such as refractory benign biliary stricture, despite multiple plastic stent placement or difficult to treat bile duct stricture from chronic pancreatitis, and should not be used routinely. This review focuses on the use of fully covered self-expandable metal stent for benign biliary strictures and bile leaks. PMID:22563290

  17. The features of bile acids exchange in rats under the influence of corvitin

    OpenAIRE

    T. V. Vovkun; P. I. Yanchuk; L. Ya. Shtanova; S. P. Veselskiy; N. B. Filimonova; A. S. Shalamay; V. G. Vedmid

    2017-01-01

    Corvitin is a soluble form of quercetin (QUE) and its effects are based on the ability to inhibit the activity of 5-lipoxygenase and to block the formation of leukotrienes. Corvitin increases bloodflow in the stomach­, pancreas and liver, but its influence on the excretory liver function has not been studied. We investigated the effect of corvitin (2.5, 5, 10 mg/kg intraportally) on bile formation, determined the biliary content of total, free and conjugated bile acids (BAs). Free and conjuga...

  18. Bile acids for primary sclerosing cholangitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poropat, Goran; Giljaca, Vanja; Stimac, Davor

    2011-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis is a progressive chronic cholestatic liver disease that usually leads to the development of cirrhosis. Studies evaluating bile acids in the treatment of primary sclerosing cholangitis have shown a potential benefit of their use. However, no influence on patients...

  19. [Resection of juxtahilar bile duct carcinoma instead of palliative drainage of the biliary tract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichlmayr, R; Lehr, L; Ziegler, H

    1983-01-01

    Instead of the widely recommended approach of treating hilar carcinoma of the bile ducts by simple palliative biliary drainage, step by step a policy of primarily aiming at resection for cure has been adopted. So far in 11 out of 22 patients excision of the tumor was possible by resection of the hepatic duct confluence; in 4 cases a left hemihepatectomy had to be added because of carcinomatous infiltration of the left liver lobe or the left hepatic artery. The multiple bile duct openings remaining after resection of such tumors were reconstructed to one or two orifices and a bi- or unilateral Roux-en-Y cholangiojejunal anastomosis performed. In further 3 cases orthotopic liver transplantation was necessary to remove all visibly infiltrated tissue. In the remaining 8 patients because of documented extrahepatic carcinomatous spread palliative biliary drainage by a percutaneous U-tube or an endoprothesis was indeed considered the only reasonable measure. Despite the relatively high resectional rate of 60% and the extensive operations performed early mortality was confined to one patient who succumbed to septic endocarditis 6 weeks after the operation. At present the longest postoperative interval without recurrence amounts to 3 1/2 years. Nine patients free of recurrent disease are in perfect health; in 3 patients in whom a recurrence was observed after 1/2, 1 1/2 and 2 years meanwhile palliation was perfect. In contrast all patients with unresected tumors but carrying draining stents suffered from cholangitis and after 1 1/2 years all but one had died. In conclusion resectional therapy for hilar carcinoma seems possible with acceptable risk. Since only resection can provide potential cure and also palliation was better than that achieved by draining tubes a more aggressive attitude to the treatment of these lesions is advocated from our experience.

  20. Pepsin and bile acids in saliva in patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux - a prospective comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sereg-Bahar, M; Jerin, A; Jansa, R; Stabuc, B; Hocevar-Boltezar, I

    2015-06-01

    Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) and biliary duodenogastric reflux can cause damage to the laryngeal mucosa and voice disorders. The aim of this study was to find out whether levels of pepsin and bile acids in the saliva can serve as diagnostic markers of LPR. A prospective comparative study. Twenty-eight patients with LPR proven via high-resolution manometry and combined multichannel intraluminal impedance and 24-h pH monitoring and 48 healthy controls without symptoms of LPR were included in the study. In the patients with LPR symptoms, oesophagogastroscopy with oesophageal biopsy was performed. The levels of total pepsin, active pepsin, bile acids and the pH of the saliva were determined in all participants and compared between the groups. Reflux symptom index (RSI) and reflux finding score (RFS) were also obtained and compared. The groups differed significantly in RSI (P = 0.00), RFS (P = 0.00), the levels of bile acids (P = 0.005) and total pepsin in saliva (P = 0.023). The levels of total pepsin and bile acids were about three times higher in the patients with LPR than in the healthy controls. There was a significant correlation between the RSI and RFS score and the level of total pepsin and bile acids in the saliva. Histopathological examination of the oesophageal biopsy taken 5 cm above the lower oesophageal sphincter confirmed reflux in almost 93% of patients with symptoms. The study results show that the levels of total pepsin and bile acids in saliva are significantly higher in patients with LPR than in the controls, thus suggesting this as a useful tool in the diagnosis of LPR and particularly biliary LPR. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. [Correlations of bile acids in the bile of rats in conditions of alloxan induced diabetes melitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danchenko, N M; Vesel'skyĭ, S P; Tsudzevych, B O

    2014-01-01

    The ratio of bile acids in the bile of rats with alloxan diabetes was investigated using the method of thin-layer chromatography. Changes of coefficients of conjugation and hydroxylation of bile acids were calculated and analyzed in half-hour samples of bile obtained during the 3-hour experiment. It has been found that the processes of conjugation of cholic acid with glycine and taurine are inhibited in alloxan diabetes. At the same time a significant increase of free threehydroxycholic and dixydroxycholic bile acids and conjugates of the latter ones with taurine has been registered. Coefficients of hydroxylation in alloxan diabetes show the domination of "acidic" pathway in bile acid biosynthesis that is tightly connected with the activity of mitochondrial enzymes.

  2. Is ursodeoxycholic acid detrimental in obstructive cholestasis? A propos of a case of malignant biliary obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessone, Fernando; Roma, Marcelo Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is the first choice medication for most cholestatic hepatopathies, due to its capability to counteract inflammation and bile-acid-induced liver damage, two common features in cholestasis. However, UDCA is usually contraindicated in obstructive cholestasis, due to the alleged risk of biliary integrity disruption due to its choleretic effect. We report on an 83-year-old man with an unsuspected malignant biliary obstruction who received moderate doses of UDCA (8-12 mg/kg/day) for 5 weeks, because the preliminary evidence suggested he had chemotherapy-induced cholestasis. Liver integrity was extensively protected by UDCA, as indicated by a marked decrease in serum liver enzymes, despite a steady increase in the levels of bilirubin and serum bile acids due to the obstructive process. In conclusion, this report shows, for the first time in humans, that moderate UDCA doses can reduce liver injury associated with complete biliary obstruction. This may contribute to a better understanding of the risk-benefit ratio of the use of UDCA in obstructive cholangiopathies.

  3. Biliary tract enhancement in gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI correlates with liver function biomarkers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, Yoshifumi; Goshima, Satoshi; Kajita, Kimihiro; Kawada, Hiroshi; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Koyasu, Hiromi; Matsuo, Masayuki; Bae, Kyongtae T.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the association between gadoxetic-acid-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging measurements and laboratory and clinical biomarkers of liver function and fibrosis. Materials and methods: One hundred thirty nine consecutive patients with suspected liver disease or liver tumor underwent gadoxetic-acid-enhanced MR imaging. MR imaging measurements during the hepatobiliary phase included biliary tract structure-to-muscle signal intensity ratio (SIR). These measurements were compared with Child-Pugh classification, end-stage liver disease (MELD) score, and aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI). Results: The SIRs of cystic duct and common bile duct were significantly correlated with Child-Pugh classification (P = 0.012 for cystic duct and P < 0.0001 for common bile duct), MELD score (P = 0.0016 and P = 0.0033), and APRI (P = 0.0022 and P = 0.0015). The sensitivity, specificity, and area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve were: (74%, 88%, 0.86) with the SIR of common bile duct for the detection of patients with Child-Pugh class B or C; (100%, 87%, 0.94) with the SIR of cystic duct for MELD score (>10); (65%, 76%, 0.70) with the SIR of common bile duct for APRI (>1.5). Conclusion: Gadoxetic-acid contrast enhancement of cystic duct and common bile duct could be used as biomarkers to assess liver function.

  4. Biliary tract enhancement in gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI correlates with liver function biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Yoshifumi [Department of Radiology, Gifu University Hospital, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu, 501-1194 (Japan); Goshima, Satoshi, E-mail: gossy@par.odn.ne.jp [Department of Radiology, Gifu University Hospital, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu, 501-1194 (Japan); Kajita, Kimihiro [Radiology Services, Gifu University Hospital, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Kawada, Hiroshi; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Koyasu, Hiromi; Matsuo, Masayuki [Department of Radiology, Gifu University Hospital, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu, 501-1194 (Japan); Bae, Kyongtae T. [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the association between gadoxetic-acid-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging measurements and laboratory and clinical biomarkers of liver function and fibrosis. Materials and methods: One hundred thirty nine consecutive patients with suspected liver disease or liver tumor underwent gadoxetic-acid-enhanced MR imaging. MR imaging measurements during the hepatobiliary phase included biliary tract structure-to-muscle signal intensity ratio (SIR). These measurements were compared with Child-Pugh classification, end-stage liver disease (MELD) score, and aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI). Results: The SIRs of cystic duct and common bile duct were significantly correlated with Child-Pugh classification (P = 0.012 for cystic duct and P < 0.0001 for common bile duct), MELD score (P = 0.0016 and P = 0.0033), and APRI (P = 0.0022 and P = 0.0015). The sensitivity, specificity, and area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve were: (74%, 88%, 0.86) with the SIR of common bile duct for the detection of patients with Child-Pugh class B or C; (100%, 87%, 0.94) with the SIR of cystic duct for MELD score (>10); (65%, 76%, 0.70) with the SIR of common bile duct for APRI (>1.5). Conclusion: Gadoxetic-acid contrast enhancement of cystic duct and common bile duct could be used as biomarkers to assess liver function.

  5. Selenium- or tellurium- containing bile acids and derivatives thereof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monks, R.; Riley, A.L.M.

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to the preparation of selenium and tellurium derivatives, particularly γ-emitting radioactive derivatives of bile acids and bile salts. Such compounds are valuable in the examination of body function, especially small bowel function. (author)

  6. Ursodeoxycholic acid treatment of vanishing bile duct syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pusl, Thomas; Beuers, Ulrich

    2006-01-01

    Vanishing bile duct syndromes (VBDS) are characterized by progressive loss of small intrahepatic ducts caused by a variety of different diseases leading to chronic cholestasis, cirrhosis, and premature death from liver failure. The majority of adult patients with VBDS suffer from primary biliary

  7. Percutaneous transhepatic balloon dilation of biliary-enteric anastomotic strictures after surgical repair of iatrogenic bile duct injuries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Y Lee

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous balloon dilation of biliary-enteric anastomotic strictures resulting from surgical repair of laparoscopic cholecystectomy-related bile duct injuries. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 61 patients were referred to our institution from 1995 to 2010 for treatment of obstruction at the biliary-enteric anastomosis following surgical repair of laparoscopic cholecystectomy-related bile duct injuries. Of these 61 patients, 27 underwent surgical revision upon stricture diagnosis, and 34 patients were managed using balloon dilation. Of these 34 patients, 2 were lost to follow up, leaving 32 patients for analysis. The primary study objective was to determine the clinical success rate of balloon dilation of biliary-enteric anastomotic strictures. Secondary study objectives included determining anastomosis patency, rates of stricture recurrence following treatment, and morbidity. RESULTS: Balloon dilation of biliary-enteric anastomotic strictures was clinically successful in 21 of 32 patients (66%. Anastomotic stricture recurred in one of 21 patients (5% after an average of 13.1 years of follow-up. Patients who were unsuccessfully managed with balloon dilation required significantly more invasive procedures (6.8 v. 3.4; p = 0.02 and were left with an indwelling biliary catheter for a significantly longer period of time (8.8 v. 2.0 months; p = 0.02 than patients whose strictures could be resolved by balloon dilation. No significant differences in the number of balloon dilations performed (p = 0.17 or in the maximum balloon diameter used (p = 0.99 were demonstrated for patients with successful or unsuccessful balloon dilation outcomes. CONCLUSION: Percutaneous balloon dilation of anastomotic biliary strictures following surgical repair of laparoscopic cholecystectomy-related injuries may result in lasting patency of the biliary-enteric anastomosis.

  8. Bile acids in experimental colorectal cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Rainey, J. B.

    1986-01-01

    Cogent epidemiological and experimental data implicate bile acids as endogenous co-carcinogens in colorectal cancer. A series of experiments was designed to test the ability of sodium deoxycholate (SDC) to promote intestinal hyperplasia and neoplasia in rats (n = 265). The intermediary role of faecal anaerobes was explored in animals receiving oral metronidazole. Intrarectal instillation of SDC trebled tumour yield in functioning large bowel and increased both crypt depth and crypt cell produ...

  9. Usefulness of transpapillary bile duct brushing cytology and forceps biopsy for improved diagnosis in patients with biliary strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Yasuhiro; Ohara, Hirotaka; Nakazawa, Takahiro; Ando, Tomoaki; Hayashi, Kazuki; Takada, Hiroki; Tanaka, Hajime; Ogawa, Kanto; Sano, Hitoshi; Togawa, Shozo; Naito, Itaru; Hirai, Masaaki; Ueno, Koichiro; Ban, Tessin; Miyabe, Katuyuki; Yamashita, Hiroaki; Yoshimura, Norihiro; Akita, Shinji; Gotoh, Kazuo; Joh, Takashi

    2007-10-01

    Transpapillary bile duct brushing cytology and/or forceps biopsy was performed in the presence of an indwelling guidewire in patients with biliary stricture, and the treatment time, overall diagnosis rate, diagnosis rate of each disease, complications, and influences on subsequent biliary drainage were investigated. After endoscopic retrograde cholangiography, brushing cytology was performed, followed by forceps biopsy. In patients with obstructive jaundice, endoscopic biliary drainage (EBD) was subsequently performed. To investigate the influences of bile duct brushing cytology and forceps biopsy on EBD, patients who underwent subsequent EBD by plastic stent were compared with patients who underwent EBD alone. The samples for cytology were collected successfully in all cases, and the sensitivity for malignancy/benignity, specificity, and accuracy were 71.6%, 100%, and 75.0%, respectively. The biopsy sampling was successful in 51 patients, and samples applicable to the evaluation were collected in all 51 patients. The sensitivity for malignancy/benignity, specificity, and accuracy were 65.2%, 100%, and 68.6%, respectively. Combination of the two procedures increased the sensitivity and accuracy to 73.5% and 76.6%, respectively. The time required for cytology and biopsy was 11.7 min, which is relatively short. Cytology and biopsy did not affect drainage. Regarding accidents, bile duct perforation occurred during biopsy in one patient (1.9%), but was rapidly improved by endoscopic biliary drainage. Transpapillary brushing cytology and forceps biopsy could be performed in a short time. The diagnosis rate was high, and the incidence of complication was low, having no influence on subsequent biliary drainage.

  10. Serum bile acid concentrations in dairy cattle with hepatic lipidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garry, F B; Fettman, M J; Curtis, C R; Smith, J A

    1994-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate serum bile acid measurements as indicatory, of liver function and/or hepatic fat infiltration in dairy cattle. Serum bile acid concentrations were measured in healthy dairy cattle at different stages of lactation after fasting or feeding. Bile acid concentrations were compared with liver fat content and sulfobromophthalein (BSP) half-life (T 1/2). Serum bile acid concentrations were higher in cows in early lactation and with higher daily milk production. Compared with prefasting values, bile acid concentrations were decreased at 8, 14, and 24 hours of fasting. Blood samples from fed cows at 1- to 2-hour intervals had wide and inconsistent variations in bile acid concentration. Because serum bile acids correlated well with BSP T 1/2, it is suggested that both measurements evaluate a similar aspect of liver function. Neither bile acids nor BSP T 1/2 correlated with differences in liver fat content among cows. Because of large variability in serum bile acid concentrations in fed cows and the lack of correlation of measured values with liver fat content, bile acid determinations do not appear useful for showing changes in hepatic function in fed cows with subclinical hepatic lipidosis nor serve as a screening test for this condition.

  11. Amplification and sequence analysis of partial bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA gene in gallbladder bile from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, K; Harada, K; Tsuneyama, K; Sasaki, M; Fujita, S; Hashimoto, T; Kaneko, S; Kobayashi, K; Nakanuma, Y

    2000-07-01

    The etiopathogenesis of bile duct lesion in primary biliary cirrhosis is unknown, though the participation of bacteria and/or their components and products is suspected. In this study, we tried to detect and identify bacteria in the bile of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis by polymerase chain reaction using universal bacterial primers of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene. Gallbladder bile samples from 15 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis, 5 with primary sclerosing cholangitis, 5 with hepatitis C virus-related liver cirrhosis, 11 with cholecystolithiasis, and from 12 normal adult gallbladders were used. In addition to the culture study, partial bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) taking advantage of universal primers that can amplify the gene of almost all bacterial species, and the amplicons were cloned and sequenced. Sequence homology with specific bacterial species was analyzed by database research. Bacterial contamination at every step of the bile sampling, DNA extraction and PCR study was avoided. Furthermore, to confirm whether bacterial DNA is detectable in liver explants, the same analysis was performed using 10 liver explants of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. In primary biliary cirrhosis, 75% (p<0.0001) of 100 clones were identified as so-called gram-positive cocci while these cocci were positive in only 5% in cholecystolithiasis (p<0.0001). In cholecystolithiasis gram-negative rods were predominant instead. One bacterial species detected in a normal adult was not related to those detected in primary biliary cirrhosis and cholecystolithiasis patients. No bacterial DNA was detected by PCR amplification in 10 liver explants of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. The present results raise several possible roles of gram-positive bacteria in bile in the etiopathogenesis of primary biliary cirrhosis. However, these results could also reflect an epiphenomenon due to decreased bile flow in the

  12. Unusual binding of ursodeoxycholic acid to ileal bile acid binding protein: role in activation of FXRα[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Changming; Filipp, Fabian V.; Smith, Jeffrey W.

    2012-01-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA, ursodiol) is used to prevent damage to the liver in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. The drug also prevents the progression of colorectal cancer and the recurrence of high-grade colonic dysplasia. However, the molecular mechanism by which UDCA elicits its beneficial effects is not entirely understood. The aim of this study was to determine whether ileal bile acid binding protein (IBABP) has a role in mediating the effects of UDCA. We find that UDCA binds to a single site on IBABP and increases the affinity for major human bile acids at a second binding site. As UDCA occupies one of the bile acid binding sites on IBABP, it reduces the cooperative binding that is often observed for the major human bile acids. Furthermore, IBABP is necessary for the full activation of farnesoid X receptor α (FXRα) by bile acids, including UDCA. These observations suggest that IBABP may have a role in mediating some of the intestinal effects of UDCA. PMID:22223860

  13. Preparation of [3beta-3H] labeled bile acids and bile alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayal, B.; Baga, E.; Tint, G.S.; Shefer, S.; Salen, G.

    1979-01-01

    [3beta-3H]-bile acids and bile alcohols may be useful for metabolic studies in man and animals because the 3-position is invulnerable to bacterial attack. A number of tritium labeled bile acids and bile alcohols were prepared by selective oxidation of the hydroxyl group at carbon-3 followed by reduction with NaBT4. In each case, the bile acids and bile alcohols epimeric at carbon-3 were resolved by analytical and preparative thin-layer chromatography and characterized by gas liquid chromatography. The average yield was 60 to 65% and specific activities of the final products were in the range of 7.4 x 10 7 dpm/mg

  14. The usefulness of adding p53 immunocytochemistry to bile drainage cytology for the diagnosis of malignant biliary strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Min-Kyung; Kim, Kyung-Hee; Lee, Yong-Moon; Lee, Byung Seok; Choi, Song-Yi

    2017-07-01

    Obstructive jaundice is frequently caused by bile duct strictures. Determination of malignant strictures is crucial for the initiation of appropriate treatment. Cytologic examination of bile drainage fluid is an easy and reproducible method of detecting malignant cells. This method, however, frequently yields indeterminate results, such as atypia or suspicious of malignancy, due to difficulties in differentiating malignancy from benign atypia. Immunocytochemical assessment of p53 expression by cells in bile drainage fluid may enhance the ability to detect malignancy. A total of 139 samples of bile drainage fluid were obtained from 80 patients. Following cytologic examination, the samples were incubated with antibody to p53. The performance of cytology with and without p53 immunocytochemistry was evaluated, with reference to surgical or clinical findings of benign and malignant biliary strictures. Bile drainage cytology alone had a sensitivity of 31.6% and a specificity of 98.4% in the identification of malignant strictures, whereas the combination of p53 immunocytochemistry and bile drainage cytology had a sensitivity of 80.3% and a specificity of 92.1%. P53 immunocytochemistry alone had a sensitivity of 64.5% and a specificity of 92.7% for the identification of malignant strictures in bile drainage samples with atypical cytology, and a sensitivity of 85.0% and a specificity of 100.0% in samples with suspicious of malignancy. The addition of p53 immunocytochemistry to bile drainage cytology can be useful in identifying malignant strictures in samples showing indeterminate results on bile drainage cytology. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2017;45:592-597. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Short-Term Biliary Stent Placement Contributing Common Bile Duct Stone Disappearance with Preservation of Duodenal Papilla Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuki Ueda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To investigate the effect of biliary stent placement without endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST on common bile duct stones (CBDS disappearance and the contribution of preserving the duodenal papilla function to reduce recurrence of CBDS. Methods. Sixty-six patients admitted for acute obstructive cholangitis due to CBDS who underwent biliary stent placement without EST for 2 years from March 2011 were evaluated retrospectively. The second endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP was performed for treatment of CBDS 3 to 4 months after the first ERCP. We estimated the rate of stone disappearance at the time of second ERCP. Results. CBDS disappearance was observed in 32 (48.5% of 66 patients. The diameter of the bile ducts and the diameter of CBDS in patients with CBDS disappearance were significantly smaller than in those with CBDS requiring extraction (p=0.007 and p<0.001, resp.. Stone disappearance was evident when the diameter of bile ducts and that of CBDS were <10 and 7 mm, respectively (p=0.002. Conclusions. Short-term stent placement without EST eliminates CBDS while preserving duodenal papilla function and may be suitable for treating CBDS in patients with nondilated bile ducts and small CBDS.

  16. New developments in the treatment of primary biliary cholangitis – role of obeticholic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhaveri MA

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Manan A Jhaveri, Kris V Kowdley Liver Care Network, Swedish Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC is a chronic autoimmune cholestatic liver disease that predominantly affects women in early to middle age. It is typically associated with autoantibodies to mitochondrial antigens and results in immune-mediated destruction of small and medium-sized intrahepatic bile ducts leading to cholestasis, hepatic fibrosis and may progress to cirrhosis or hepatic failure and, in some cases, hepatocellular carcinoma. The clinical presentation and the natural history of PBC have improved over the years due to recognition of earlier widespread use of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA; about one-third of patients show suboptimal biochemical response to UDCA with poor prognosis. Until recently, UDCA was the only US Food and Drug Administration approved agent for this disease for more than two decades; obeticholic acid was approved in 2016 for treatment of patients with PBC with a suboptimal response or intolerance to UDCA. Currently, liver transplantation is the most effective treatment modality for PBC patients with end-stage liver disease. This review will focus on the recent advances in therapy of primary biliary cholangitis, with emphasis on obeticholic acid. Keywords: primary biliary cholangitis, obeticholic acid, ursodeoxycholic acid

  17. Bile Acids Trigger GLP-1 Release Predominantly by Accessing Basolaterally Located G Protein-Coupled Bile Acid Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brighton, Cheryl A.; Rievaj, Juraj; Kuhre, Rune E.

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are well-recognized stimuli of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. This action has been attributed to activation of the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor GPBAR1 (TGR5), although other potential bile acid sensors include the nuclear farnesoid receptor and the apical sodium......-coupled bile acid transporter ASBT. The aim of this study was to identify pathways important for GLP-1 release and to determine whether bile acids target their receptors on GLP-1-secreting L-cells from the apical or basolateral compartment. Using transgenic mice expressing fluorescent sensors specifically in L...... to either TLCA or TDCA. We conclude that the action of bile acids on GLP-1 secretion is predominantly mediated by GPBAR1 located on the basolateral L-cell membrane, suggesting that stimulation of gut hormone secretion may include postabsorptive mechanisms....

  18. DIETARY FISH-OIL POTENTIATES BILE ACID-INDUCED CHOLESTEROL SECRETION INTO BILE IN RATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SMIT, MJ; VERKADE, HJ; HAVINGA, R; VONK, RJ; SCHERPHOF, GL; TVELD, GI; KUIPERS, F

    Recently we demonstrated that dietary fish oil (FO) causes changes in intrahepatic cholesterol transport and hyper secretion of cholesterol into bile in rats V. Clin. Invest. 88: 943-951, 1991). We have now investigated in more detail the relationship between cholesterol and bile acid secretion in

  19. Role of cholangiocyte bile Acid transporters in large bile duct injury after rat liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Long; Zhao, Lijin; Li, Dajiang; Liu, Zipei; Chen, Geng; Tian, Feng; Li, Xiaowu; Wang, Shuguang

    2010-07-27

    The pathogenesis of nonanastomotic strictures with a patent hepatic artery remains to be investigated. This study focuses on the role of cholangiocyte bile acid transporters in bile duct injury after liver transplantation. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups (n=20 for each): the sham-operated group (Sham), the transplant group with 1-hr donor liver cold preservation (CP-1h), and the transplant group with 12-hr donor liver cold preservation (CP-12h). Bile was collected for biochemical analysis. The histopathologic evaluation of bile duct injury was performed and the cholangiocyte bile acid transporters apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT), ileal lipid binding protein (ILBP), and Ostalpha/Ostbeta were investigated. RESULTS.: The immunohistochemical assay suggested that ASBT and ILBP were expressed exclusively on large bile duct epithelial cells, whereas Ostalpha and Ostbeta were expressed on both small and large bile ducts. Western blot and quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that the expression levels of these transporters dramatically decreased after transplantation. It took seven to 14 days for ILBP, Ostalpha, and Ostbeta to recover, whereas ASBT recovered within 3 days and even reached a peak above the normal level seven days after operation. In the CP-12h group, the ratios of the ASBT/ILBP, ASBT/Ostalpha and ASBT/Ostbeta expression levels were correlated with the injury severity scores of large but not small bile ducts. The results suggest that the unparallel alteration of cholangiocyte bile acid transporters may play a potential role in large bile duct injury after liver transplantation with prolonged donor liver preservation.

  20. Intestinal uptake of bile acids: effect of external abdominal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, A.B.R.; Cheeseman, C.I.; Walker, K.

    1984-01-01

    Abdominal irradiation has recently been shown to influence the uptake of hexoses, amino acids, fatty acids and cholesterol into the jejunum of rats. The present studies were undertaken with a previously validated in vitro technique to determine the effect of abdominal irradiation from a cesium source on the rates of uptake of six bile acids into the jejunum, ileum, and colon. The results show that: 1) there likely are multiple ileal carriers for bile acids: 2) abdominal irradiation has a variable effect on these carriers; 3) the passive permeability to bile acids varies with the bile acid and with the site along the intestine; and 4) abdominal irradiation is associated with a rise in the colonic permeability to only some bile acids

  1. Effects of bile acid administration on bile acid synthesis and its circadian rhythm in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pooler, P.A.; Duane, W.C.

    1988-01-01

    In man bile acid synthesis has a distinct circadian rhythm but the relationship of this rhythm to feedback inhibition by bile acid is unknown. We measured bile acid synthesis as release of 14CO2 from [26-14C]cholesterol every 2 hr in three normal volunteers during five separate 24-hr periods. Data were fitted by computer to a cosine curve to estimate amplitude and acrophase of the circadian rhythm. In an additional six volunteers, we measured synthesis every 2 hr from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. only. During the control period, amplitude (expressed as percentage of mean synthesis) averaged 52% and acrophase averaged 6:49 a.m. During administration of ursodeoxycholic acid (15 mg per kg per day), synthesis averaged 126% of baseline (p less than 0.1), amplitude averaged 43% and acrophase averaged 6:20 a.m. During administration of chenodeoxycholic acid (15 mg per kg per day), synthesis averaged 43% of baseline (p less than 0.001), amplitude averaged 53% and acrophase averaged 9:04 a.m. Addition of prednisone to this regimen of chenodeoxycholic acid to eliminate release of 14CO2 from corticosteroid hormone synthesis resulted in a mean amplitude of 62% and a mean acrophase of 6:50 a.m., values very similar to those in the baseline period. Administration of prednisone alone also did not significantly alter the baseline amplitude (40%) or acrophase (6:28 a.m.). We conclude that neither chenodeoxycholic acid nor ursodeoxycholic acid significantly alters the circadian rhythm of bile acid synthesis in man

  2. Physiological and molecular biochemical mechanisms of bile formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetnyak, Vasiliy Ivanovich

    2013-01-01

    This review considers the physiological and molecular biochemical mechanisms of bile formation. The composition of bile and structure of a bile canaliculus, biosynthesis and conjugation of bile acids, bile phospholipids, formation of bile micellar structures, and enterohepatic circulation of bile acids are described. In general, the review focuses on the molecular physiology of the transporting systems of the hepatocyte sinusoidal and apical membranes. Knowledge of physiological and biochemical basis of bile formation has implications for understanding the mechanisms of development of pathological processes, associated with diseases of the liver and biliary tract. PMID:24259965

  3. Ursodeoxycholic Acid Ameliorates Intrahepatic Cholestasis Independent of Biliary Bicarbonate Secretion in Vil2kd/kd Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatano, Ryo; Kawaguchi, Kotoku; Togashi, Fumitaka; Sugata, Masato; Masuda, Shizuka; Asano, Shinji

    2017-01-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is a hydrophilic bile acid that possesses many pharmacological effects, including increasing bile flow, changing the hydrophobicity of the bile acid pool, and modulation of the immune response. UDCA has been approved for treating cholestatic liver disease, such as primary biliary cholangitis. However, several unanticipated severe side effects of UDCA are observed in cholestatic patients, and its pharmacological benefits remain controversial. We reported that ezrin-knockdown (Vil2 kd/kd ) mice exhibited severe hepatic injury because of a functional disorder in bile duct fluidity and alkalinity regulation, resembling human intrahepatic cholestatic disease. Here we used Vil2 kd/kd mice as a cholestatic model to investigate the pharmacological effects of UDCA. We investigated the effects of oral and parenteral administration of UDCA on Vil2 kd/kd mice. In Vil2 kd/kd mice, fed a 0.5% (w/w) UDCA diet for 3 weeks, hepatic injury was exacerbated, although oral administration of a lower dose of UDCA slightly improved hepatic function in Vil2 kd/kd mice. On the other hand, intraperitoneal administration of UDCA (50 mg/kg/d) ameliorated hepatic function and markedly reduced periductal fibrosis and cholangiocyte proliferation in Vil2 kd/kd mice although biliary pH and HCO 3 - concentration were not improved. The expression levels of inflammatory and profibrotic genes were also significantly decreased in these mice. Furthermore, UDCA prevented cholangiocytes from hydrophobic bile acid-induced cytotoxicity independent of extracellular pH in in vitro experiments. These results suggest that an appropriate dosage of UDCA can ameliorate the intrahepatic cholestasis in Vil2 kd/kd mice without changing the biliary bicarbonate secretion.

  4. Classical bile acids in animals, beta-phocaecholic acid in ducks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirsa, M; Klinot, J; Klinotová, E; Ubik, K; Kucera, K

    1989-01-01

    1. Bile samples of different animals were analysed and the percentage content of classical bile acids was determined. 2. Herbivorous birds mostly excreted a large proportion of chenodeoxycholic acid. 3. The anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla) excreted deoxycholic acid most probably as a primary bile acid. 4. In the bile of ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) a large amount of (23R)3 alpha, 7 alpha, 23-trihydroxy-5 beta-cholan-24-oic acid (beta-phocaecholic acid) was found.

  5. Bile acid sequestrants and the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staels, Bart; Kuipers, Folkert

    2007-01-01

    Bile acids promote bile formation and facilitate dietary lipid absorption. Animal and human studies showing disturbed bile acid metabolism in diabetes mellitus suggest a link between bile acids and glucose control. Bile acids are activating ligands of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a nuclear

  6. Novel minimally invasive chemoradiation therapy combined with biliary stenting for multidisciplinary approach to unresectable bile duct carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Masanori; Sato, Takeaki; Umino, Noriaki

    2001-01-01

    Multidisciplinary treatment is a useful approach to unresectable non-metastatic bile duct carcinoma with invasion of the hepatic artery and portal vein. The authors developed a multidisciplinary treatment consisting of chemoradiation therapy combined with intraluminal bile duct irradiation plus external irradiation and systemic or local chemotherapy. The aim of this regimen was to improve the ability to locally control bile duct carcinoma by intraluminal irradiation and to shorten the treatment period compared to external irradiation therapy alone. According to the treatment schedule whole-body irradiation is performed first and followed by systemic administration of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU, 600 mg/m 2 /day) and cisplatin (CDDP, 10 mg/m 2 /day) after biliary stenting plus simultaneously intraluminal irradiation (8 Gy/week x 3, total 24 Gy) administered with 192 Ir-RALS (Remote After Loading System). Two novel types of applicators specifically designed by the authors for intraluminal radiation of the bile duct were improved. The authors have used this multidisciplinary approach to treat 3 patients with bile duct carcinoma. Its application has shortened the course of multidisciplinary therapy to about 6 weeks, and the patients have surviveed more than 6-8 months without recurrence. (K.H.)

  7. The influence of bile acids homeostasis by cryptotanshinone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Herbs might affect the homeostasis of bile acids through influence of multiple metabolic pathways of bile acids. Aim: The present study aims to investigate the inhibition of cryptotanshinone towards the glucuronidation of LCA, trying to indicate the possible influence of cryptotanshinone-containing herbs towards ...

  8. The interrelationship between bile acid and vitamin A homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saeed, Ali; Hoekstra, Mark; Hoeke, Martijn Oscar; Heegsma, Janette; Faber, Klaas Nico

    Vitamin A is a fat-soluble vitamin important for vision, reproduction, embryonic development, cell differentiation, epithelial barrier function and adequate immune responses. Efficient absorption of dietary vitamin A depends on the fat-solubilizing properties of bile acids. Bile acids are

  9. Bile Reflux

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the upper part of your small intestine (duodenum). Bile reflux into the stomach Bile and food mix ... properly, and bile washes back into the stomach. Bile reflux into the esophagus Bile and stomach acid ...

  10. Bile acid aspiration in suspected ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Chung; Hsu, Po-Kuei; Su, Kang-Cheng; Liu, Lung-Yu; Tsai, Cheng-Chien; Tsai, Shu-Ho; Hsu, Wen-Hu; Lee, Yu-Chin; Perng, Diahn-Warng

    2009-07-01

    The aims of this study were to measure the levels of bile acids in patients with suspected ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and provide a possible pathway for neutrophilic inflammation to explain its proinflammatory effect on the airway. Bile acid levels were measured by spectrophotometric enzymatic assay, and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry was used to quantify the major bile acids. Alveolar cells were grown on modified air-liquid interface culture inserts, and bile acids were then employed to stimulate the cells. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blots were used to determine the involved gene expression and protein levels. The mean (+/- SE) concentration of total bile acids in tracheal aspirates was 6.2 +/- 2.1 and 1.1 +/- 0.4 mumol/L/g sputum, respectively, for patients with and without VAP (p VAP group (p aspiration may reduce the intensity of neutrophilic inflammation in intubated and mechanically ventilated patients in the ICU.

  11. Isotope derivative assay of human serum bile acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pageaux, J.F.; Duperray, B.; Dubois, M.; Pacheco, H.

    1981-01-01

    A new method for the selective determination of the main serum bile acids has been developed. Serum samples with added 14 C-labeled bile acid were submitted to deproteinization, alkaline hydrolysis, methylation, and were then chromatographed on alumina before acetylation with 2 microliters of [ 3 H]acetic anhydride. Excess reagent was eliminated by evaporation; elimination of residual tritiated contaminants and separation of the doubly labeled bile acid derivatives were obtained by thin-layer chromatography, column chromatography on Lipidex 5000, and crystallization. The sensitivity of the method is about 10 pmol of each bile acid. Analyses of seven sera with normal or elevated concentration of bile acids by the proposed method and gas-liquid chromatography showed a close correlation

  12. Dietary and biliary cholesterol absorption in rats. Effect of dietary cholesterol level and cholesterol saturation of bile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, M.D.

    1985-01-01

    The principal objective of this research was to determine if cholesterol introduced into the duodenum of rats in a micellar form as occurs with bile, is absorbed more efficiently than cholesterol presented in a nonmicellar form, as occurs with dietary cholesterol. Cholesterol absorption was measured during the constant intraduodenal infusion of liquid diets ([ 14 C] cholesterol) and artificial biles ([ 3 H] cholesterol) in thoracic lymph duct cannulated rats. Percentage absorption was calculated by dividing the rate of appearance of radiolabeled cholesterol in lymph by its rate of infusion when lymph cholesterol specific activity was constant. Results provide strong evidence that under certain conditions biliary cholesterol is more efficiently absorbed than is dietary cholesterol, and that this differential must be considered when evaluating the influence of diet or drug therapy on cholesterol absorption

  13. Profile of preoperative fecal organic acids closely predicts the incidence of postoperative infectious complications after major hepatectomy with extrahepatic bile duct resection: Importance of fecal acetic acid plus butyric acid minus lactic acid gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Yukihiro; Mizuno, Takashi; Sugawara, Gen; Asahara, Takashi; Nomoto, Koji; Igami, Tsuyoshi; Ebata, Tomoki; Nagino, Masato

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the association between preoperative fecal organic acid concentrations and the incidence of postoperative infectious complications in patients undergoing major hepatectomy with extrahepatic bile duct resection for biliary malignancies. The fecal samples of 44 patients were collected before undergoing hepatectomy with bile duct resection for biliary malignancies. The concentrations of fecal organic acids, including acetic acid, butyric acid, and lactic acid, and representative fecal bacteria were measured. The perioperative clinical characteristics and the concentrations of fecal organic acids were compared between patients with and without postoperative infectious complications. Among 44 patients, 13 (30%) developed postoperative infectious complications. Patient age and intraoperative bleeding were significantly greater in patients with postoperative infectious complications compared with those without postoperative infectious complications. The concentrations of fecal acetic acid and butyric acid were significantly less, whereas the concentration of fecal lactic acid tended to be greater in the patients with postoperative infectious complications. The calculated gap between the concentrations of fecal acetic acid plus butyric acid minus lactic acid gap was less in the patients with postoperative infectious complications (median 43.5 vs 76.1 μmol/g of feces, P = .011). Multivariate analysis revealed that an acetic acid plus butyric acid minus lactic acid gap acid profile (especially low acetic acid, low butyric acid, and high lactic acid) had a clinically important impact on the incidence of postoperative infectious complications in patients undergoing major hepatectomy with extrahepatic bile duct resection. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. A Systems Model for Ursodeoxycholic Acid Metabolism in Healthy and Patients With Primary Biliary Cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, P; Dobbins, R L; O'Connor-Semmes, R L; Young, M A

    2016-08-01

    A systems model was developed to describe the metabolism and disposition of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) and its conjugates in healthy subjects based on pharmacokinetic (PK) data from published studies in order to study the distribution of oral UDCA and potential interactions influencing therapeutic effects upon interruption of its enterohepatic recirculation. The base model was empirically adapted to patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) based on current understanding of disease pathophysiology and clinical measurements. Simulations were performed for patients with PBC under two competing hypotheses: one for inhibition of ileal absorption of both UDCA and conjugates and the other only of conjugates. The simulations predicted distinctly different bile acid distribution patterns in plasma and bile. The UDCA model adapted to patients with PBC provides a platform to investigate a complex therapeutic drug interaction among UDCA, UDCA conjugates, and inhibition of ileal bile acid transport in this rare disease population. © 2016 The Authors CPT: Pharmacometrics & Systems Pharmacology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  15. Colonization, resistance to bile, and virulence properties of Escherichia coli strains: Unusual characteristics associated with biliary tract diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razaghi, Maryam; Tajeddin, Elahe; Ganji, Leila; Alebouyeh, Masoud; Alizadeh, Amir Houshang Mohammad; Sadeghi, Amir; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2017-10-01

    Escherichia coli is the species that is most frequently isolated from bile of patients with biliary tract diseases. This study was aimed to investigate any association between resistance and virulence properties of these isolates with occurrence of the diseases. A total of 102 bile samples were obtained from patients subjected to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for different biliary diseases. Clinical data were collected and culture of the bile samples was done on selective media. Resistance of characterized Escherichia coli isolates to deoxycholate sodium (0-7%) and nineteen antibiotics was determined and PCR using 16 pairs of primers targeting stx1, stx2, exhA, eae, bfp, agg, pcvd432, lt, st, ipaH, pic, pet, ast, set, sen, and cdtB genes was done. Our results showed a statistically significant association between E. coli colonization and existence of common bile duct and gallbladder stones (p value 0.028). Out of the 22 E. coli strains (22/102) multidrug resistance phenotype was present in 95.45%. None of the strains belonged to common E. coli pathotypes. However, bfp + EhxA-hly, bfp + astA, bfp + EhxA-hly + pic, and EhxA-hly + pic + astA, bfp, and astA genotypes were detected in these strains. bfp (7/22, 31.8%) and astA (5/22, 22.7%) were among most frequent virulence factors in these strains. Results of this study showed significant association between colonization of E. coli and choledocholithiasis. Unusual existence of virulence gene combinations in these strains and their resistance to DOC and multiple classes of antibiotics could be considered as possible causes of their persistence in this harsh microenvironment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Bile acids: regulation of apoptosis by ursodeoxycholic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Joana D; Viana, Ricardo J S; Ramalho, Rita M; Steer, Clifford J; Rodrigues, Cecília M P

    2009-09-01

    Bile acids are a group of molecular species of acidic steroids with peculiar physical-chemical and biological characteristics. At high concentrations they become toxic to mammalian cells, and their presence is pertinent in the pathogenesis of several liver diseases and colon cancer. Bile acid cytoxicity has been related to membrane damage, but also to nondetergent effects, such as oxidative stress and apoptosis. Strikingly, hydrophilic ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), and its taurine-conjugated form (TUDCA), show profound cytoprotective properties. Indeed, these molecules have been described as potent inhibitors of classic pathways of apoptosis, although their precise mode of action remains to be clarified. UDCA, originally used for cholesterol gallstone dissolution, is currently considered the first choice therapy for several forms of cholestatic syndromes. However, the beneficial effects of both UDCA and TUDCA have been tested in other experimental pathological conditions with deregulated levels of apoptosis, including neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases. Here, we review the role of bile acids in modulating the apoptosis process, emphasizing the anti-apoptotic effects of UDCA and TUDCA, as well as their potential use as novel and alternate therapeutic agents for the treatment of apoptosis-related diseases.

  17. Bile acid receptor TGR5 overexpression is associated with decreased intestinal mucosal injury and epithelial cell proliferation in obstructive jaundice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Chen-Guang; Xie, Xiao-Li; Yin, Jie; Qi, Wei; Chen, Lei; Bai, Yun; Wang, Na; Zhao, Dong-Qiang; Jiang, Xiao-Yu; Jiang, Hui-Qing

    2017-04-01

    Bile acids stimulate intestinal epithelial proliferation in vitro. We sought to investigate the role of the bile acid receptor TGR5 in the protection of intestinal epithelial proliferation in obstructive jaundice. Intestinal tissues and serum samples were obtained from patients with malignant obstructive jaundice and from bile duct ligation (BDL) rats. Intestinal permeability and morphological changes in the intestinal mucosa were observed. The functions of TGR5 in cell proliferation in intestinal epithelial injury were determined by overexpression or knockdown studies in Caco-2 and FHs 74 Int cells pretreated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Internal biliary drainage was superior to external biliary drainage in recovering intestinal permeability and mucosal histology in patients with obstructive jaundice. In BDL rats, feeding of chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) decreased intestinal mucosa injury. The levels of PCNA, a marker of proliferation, increased in response to CDCA feeding and were paralleled by elevated TGR5 expression. CDCA upregulated TGR5 expression and promoted proliferation in Caco-2 and FHs 74 Int cells pretreated with LPS. Overexpression of TGR5 resulted in increased PCNA, cell viability, EdU incorporation, and the proportion of cells in S phase, whereas knockdown of TGR5 had the opposite effect. Our data indicate that bile acids promote intestinal epithelial cell proliferation and decrease mucosal injury by upregulating TGR5 expression in obstructive jaundice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of different pectin on bile acid biosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalikova, M.D.; Mukhiddinov, Z.K.; Nuraliev, Yu.N.; Khaydarov, K.Kh.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the effects of consumption of different pectins from peach, quince, and apricot on bile flow and bile secretion of bile acids, cholesterol, phospholipids and bilirubin in rats. Six groups of nine rats were fed diets containing pectin 20 mg/kg once a day for two weeks. These groups of rats were compared with the group fed on physiological solution as a control and two groups fed on flamenol. Results of our study indicate that pectins, by decreasing cholesterol levels and enhancing bile acid secretion may cause increased hepatic synthesis of bile acids, phospholipids and reduced bilirubin synthesis. Among the studied pectins the apricot pectin shows in a very consistent lowering of cholesterol and bilirubin levels

  19. Mig-6 plays a critical role in the regulation of cholesterol homeostasis and bile acid synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bon Jeong Ku

    Full Text Available The disruption of cholesterol homeostasis leads to an increase in cholesterol levels which results in the development of cardiovascular disease. Mitogen Inducible Gene 6 (Mig-6 is an immediate early response gene that can be induced by various mitogens, stresses, and hormones. To identify the metabolic role of Mig-6 in the liver, we conditionally ablated Mig-6 in the liver using the Albumin-Cre mouse model (Alb(cre/+Mig-6(f/f; Mig-6(d/d. Mig-6(d/d mice exhibit hepatomegaly and fatty liver. Serum levels of total, LDL, and HDL cholesterol and hepatic lipid were significantly increased in the Mig-6(d/d mice. The daily excretion of fecal bile acids was significantly decreased in the Mig-6(d/d mice. DNA microarray analysis of mRNA isolated from the livers of these mice showed alterations in genes that regulate lipid metabolism, bile acid, and cholesterol synthesis, while the expression of genes that regulate biliary excretion of bile acid and triglyceride synthesis showed no difference in the Mig-6(d/d mice compared to Mig-6(f/f controls. These results indicate that Mig-6 plays an important role in cholesterol homeostasis and bile acid synthesis. Mice with liver specific conditional ablation of Mig-6 develop hepatomegaly and increased intrahepatic lipid and provide a novel model system to investigate the genetic and molecular events involved in the regulation of cholesterol homeostasis and bile acid synthesis. Defining the molecular mechanisms by which Mig-6 regulates cholesterol homeostasis will provide new insights into the development of more effective ways for the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular disease.

  20. [Simultaneous determination of eight kinds of conjunct bile acids in human bile by R-HPLC].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Z; Tan, G; Qian, K; Chen, X

    1997-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of eight kinds of conjunct bile acids in human bile was developed by HPLC. They were separated on a YWG-C18 (3 microns) column at 30 degrees C, with methanol/water (65/35, V/V, pH3.0) as mobile phase, and detection wavelength at UV 210 nm. The linear ranges were 50-1,000 microns.ml-1, the recoveries were 91.2%-108.6%. The biles of 30 cases with cholelithiasis cholecystolithiasis and 20 cases without gallstone were detected by HPLC. The results showed that the constitution of bile acids was different between patients with cholelithiasis cholecystolithiasis and patients without gallstone.

  1. Hormesis in Cholestatic Liver Disease; Preconditioning with Low Bile Acid Concentrations Protects against Bile Acid-Induced Toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther M Verhaag

    Full Text Available Cholestasis is characterized by accumulation of bile acids and inflammation, causing hepatocellular damage. Still, liver damage markers are highest in acute cholestasis and drop when this condition becomes chronic, indicating that hepatocytes adapt towards the hostile environment. This may be explained by a hormetic response in hepatocytes that limits cell death during cholestasis.To investigate the mechanisms that underlie the hormetic response that protect hepatocytes against experimental cholestatic conditions.HepG2.rNtcp cells were preconditioned (24 h with sub-apoptotic concentrations (0.1-50 μM of various bile acids, the superoxide donor menadione, TNF-α or the Farsenoid X Receptor agonist GW4064, followed by a challenge with the apoptosis-inducing bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA; 200 μM for 4 h, menadione (50 μM, 6 h or cytokine mixture (CM; 6 h. Levels of apoptotic and necrotic cell death, mRNA expression of the bile salt export pump (ABCB11 and bile acid sensors, as well as intracellular GCDCA levels were analyzed.Preconditioning with the pro-apoptotic bile acids GCDCA, taurocholic acid, or the protective bile acids (tauroursodeoxycholic acid reduced GCDCA-induced caspase-3/7 activity in HepG2.rNtcp cells. Bile acid preconditioning did not induce significant levels of necrosis in GCDCA-challenged HepG2.rNtcp cells. In contrast, preconditioning with cholic acid, menadione or TNF-α potentiated GCDCA-induced apoptosis. GCDCA preconditioning specifically reduced GCDCA-induced cell death and not CM- or menadione-induced apoptosis. The hormetic effect of GCDCA preconditioning was concentration- and time-dependent. GCDCA-, CDCA- and GW4064- preconditioning enhanced ABCB11 mRNA levels, but in contrast to the bile acids, GW4064 did not significantly reduce GCDCA-induced caspase-3/7 activity. The GCDCA challenge strongly increased intracellular levels of this bile acid, which was not lowered by GCDCA

  2. Obeticholic acid for the treatment of primary biliary cholangitis in adult patients: clinical utility and patient selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowlus CL

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Christopher L Bowlus Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of California Davis, Davis, CA, USA Abstract: Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC, previously known as primary biliary “cirrhosis”, is a rare autoimmune liver disease characterized by the hallmark autoantibodies to mitochondrial antigens and immune-mediated destruction of small bile duct epithelial cells leading to cholestasis and cirrhosis. Surprisingly, while immune modulators have not been effective in the treatment of PBC, supplementation with the hydrophilic bile acid (BA ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA has been demonstrated to slow the disease progression. However, a significant minority of PBC patients do not have a complete response to UDCA and remain at risk of continued disease progression. Although the mechanisms of action are not well understood, UDCA provided proof of concept for BA therapy in PBC. Obeticholic acid (OCA, a novel derivative of the human BA chenodeoxycholic acid, is a potent agonist of the nuclear hormone receptor farnesoid X receptor, which regulates BA synthesis and transport. A series of clinical trials of OCA in PBC, primarily in combination with UDCA, have established that OCA leads to significant reductions in serum alkaline phosphatase that are predicted to lead to improved clinical outcomes, while dose-dependent pruritus has been the most common adverse effect. On the basis of these studies, OCA was given conditional approval by the US Food and Drug Administration with plans to establish the long-term clinical efficacy of OCA in patients with advanced PBC. Keywords: primary biliary cholangitis, nuclear receptors, farnesoid X receptor, bile acid, obeticholic acid, ursodeoxycholic acid

  3. Early effects of dietary orotic acid upon liver lipid synthesis and bile cholesterol secretion in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokmakjian, S.D.; Haines, D.S.

    1985-01-01

    Dietary orotic acid is known to cause impaired fatty acid synthesis and increased cholesterol synthesis in rats. The authors found that the impaired fatty acid synthesis occurs during the first day of orotic acid feeding and, in studies with albumin-bound [1- 14 C]palmitic acid, an associated decrease in the rate of esterification of this fatty acid into triacylglycerol, phospholipid, and cholesteryl ester was observed. These changes may result from the known decreases in liver levels of adenine nucleotides or, as reported here, from decreased liver CoASH levels in orotic acid-fed rats. The increase in hepatic cholesterol synthesis occurred during the second day of orotic acid feeding. It was detected by increased incorporation of [1,2- 14 C]acetate into cholesterol by liver slices and by a 7-fold increase in HMG-CoA reductase activity. At the same time the biliary output of cholesterol was increased 2-fold and studies using 3 H 2 O revealed that the output of newly synthesized cholesterol in bile was increased 5-fold. The content of cholesteryl ester in hepatic microsomes decreased during orotic acid feeding but free cholesterol was unchanged. The findings are interpreted to suggest that the increased bile cholesterol secretion caused by orotic acid is a result of impaired hepatic cholesterol esterification and that the increase in HMG-CoA reductase activity is a result of diminished negative feedback due to the depleted content of cholesteryl ester in the hepatic microsomes

  4. Identification of a novel bile acid in swans, tree ducks, and geese: 3alpha,7alpha,15alpha-trihydroxy-5beta-cholan-24-oic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakiyama, Genta; Iida, Takashi; Goto, Takaaki; Mano, Nariyasu; Goto, Junichi; Nambara, Toshio; Hagey, Lee R; Schteingart, Claudio D; Hofmann, Alan F

    2006-07-01

    By HPLC, a taurine-conjugated bile acid with a retention time different from that of taurocholate was found to be present in the bile of the black-necked swan, Cygnus melanocoryphus. The bile acid was isolated and its structure, established by (1)H and (13)C NMR and mass spectrometry, was that of the taurine N-acyl amidate of 3alpha,7alpha,15alpha-trihydroxy-5beta-cholan-24-oic acid. The compound was shown to have chromatographic and spectroscopic properties that were identical to those of the taurine conjugate of authentic 3alpha,7alpha,15alpha-trihydroxy-5beta-cholan-24-oic acid, previously synthesized by us from ursodeoxycholic acid. By HPLC, the taurine conjugate of 3alpha,7alpha,15alpha-trihydroxy-5beta-cholan-24-oic acid was found to be present in 6 of 6 species in the subfamily Dendrocygninae (tree ducks) and in 10 of 13 species in the subfamily Anserinae (swans and geese) but not in other subfamilies in the Anatidae family. It was also not present in species from the other two families of the order Anseriformes. 3alpha,7alpha,15alpha-Trihydroxy-5beta-cholan-24-oic acid is a new primary bile acid that is present in the biliary bile acids of swans, tree ducks, and geese and may be termed 15alpha-hydroxy-chenodeoxycholic acid.

  5. Bile salt tolerance of Lactococcus lactis is enhanced by expression of bile salt hydrolase thereby producing less bile acid in the cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Jie; Liu, Song; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2016-04-01

    Changes of bile salt tolerance, morphology and amount of bile acid within cells were studied to evaluate the exact effects of bile salt hydrolase (BSH) on bile salt tolerance of microorganism. The effect of BSHs on the bile salt tolerance of Lactococcus lactis was examined by expressing two BSHs (BSH1 and BSH2). Growth of L. lactis expressing BSH1 or BSH2 was better under bile salt stress compared to wild-type L. lactis. As indicated by transmission electron microscopy, bile acids released by the action of BSH induced the formation of micelles around the membrane surface of cells subject to conjugated bile salt stress. A similar micelle containing bile acid was observed in the cytoplasm by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. BSH1 produced fewer bile acid micelles in the cytoplasm and achieved better cell growth of L. lactis compared to BSH2. Expression of BSH improved bile salt tolerance of L. lactis but excessive production by BSH of bile acid micelles in the cytoplasm inhibited cell growth.

  6. Olfactory sensitivity of Pacific Lampreys to lamprey bile acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, T. Craig; Sorensen, Peter W.; Bayer, Jennifer M.; Seelye, James G.

    2009-01-01

    Pacific lampreys Lampetra tridentata are in decline throughout much of their historical range in the Columbia River basin. In support of restoration efforts, we tested whether larval and adult lamprey bile acids serve as migratory and spawning pheromones in adult Pacific lampreys, as they do in sea lampreys Petromyzon marinus. The olfactory sensitivity of adult Pacific lampreys to lamprey bile acids was measured by electro-olfactogram recording from the time of their capture in the spring until their spawning in June of the following year. As controls, we tested L-arginine and a non-lamprey bile acid, taurolithocholic acid 3-sulfate (TLS). Migrating adult Pacific lampreys were highly sensitive to petromyzonol sulfate (a component of the sea lamprey migratory pheromone) and 3-keto petromyzonol sulfate (a component of the sea lamprey sex pheromone) when first captured. This sensitivity persisted throughout their long migratory and overwinter holding period before declining to nearly unmeasurable levels by the time of spawning. The absolute magnitudes of adult Pacific lamprey responses to lamprey bile acids were smaller than those of the sea lamprey, and unlike the sea lamprey, the Pacific lamprey did not appear to detect TLS. No sexual dimorphism was noted in olfactory sensitivity. Thus, Pacific lampreys are broadly similar to sea lampreys in showing sensitivity to the major lamprey bile acids but apparently differ in having a longer period of sensitivity to those acids. The potential utility of bile acid-like pheromones in the restoration of Pacific lampreys warrants their further investigation in this species.

  7. The features of bile acids exchange in rats under the influence of corvitin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Vovkun

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Corvitin is a soluble form of quercetin (QUE and its effects are based on the ability to inhibit the activity of 5-lipoxygenase and to block the formation of leukotrienes. Corvitin increases bloodflow in the stomach­, pancreas and liver, but its influence on the excretory liver function has not been studied. We investigated the effect of corvitin (2.5, 5, 10 mg/kg intraportally on bile formation, determined the biliary content of total, free and conjugated bile acids (BAs. Free and conjugated BAs were separated by thin layer chromatography method. It was shown that corvitin increased the content of total BAs in the bile of rats in all tested groups. At a dose of 2.5 mg/kg flavonoid did not сhange free BAs secretion, but while elevated the content of conjugated BAs. Both free and conjugated BAs secretion was increased in rats treated with corvitin at a dose of 5 mg/kg. Increasing of corvitin dose to 10 mg/kg resulted in enhanced secretion of free BAs. Consequently, inhibition of leukotrienes synthesis by corvitin is followed by modulation of total, free and conjugated BAs formation and secretion into the bile.

  8. Hybrid Approach for Biliary Interventions Employing MRI-Guided Bile Duct Puncture with Near-Real-Time Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wybranski, Christian, E-mail: Christian.Wybranski@uk-koeln.de [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Pech, Maciej [Otto-von-Guericke University Medical School, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Germany); Lux, Anke [Otto-von-Guericke University Medical School, Institute of Biometry and Medical Informatics (Germany); Ricke, Jens; Fischbach, Frank; Fischbach, Katharina [Otto-von-Guericke University Medical School, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    ObjectiveTo assess the feasibility of a hybrid approach employing MRI-guided bile duct (BD) puncture for subsequent fluoroscopy-guided biliary interventions in patients with non-dilated (≤3 mm) or dilated BD (≥3 mm) but unfavorable conditions for ultrasonography (US)-guided BD puncture.MethodsA total of 23 hybrid interventions were performed in 21 patients. Visualization of BD and puncture needles (PN) in the interventional MR images was rated on a 5-point Likert scale by two radiologists. Technical success, planning time, BD puncture time and positioning adjustments of the PN as well as technical success of the biliary intervention and complication rate were recorded.ResultsVisualization even of third-order non-dilated BD and PN was rated excellent by both radiologists with good to excellent interrater agreement. MRI-guided BD puncture was successful in all cases. Planning and BD puncture times were 1:36 ± 2.13 (0:16–11:07) min. and 3:58 ± 2:35 (1:11–9:32) min. Positioning adjustments of the PN was necessary in two patients. Repeated capsular puncture was not necessary in any case. All biliary interventions were completed successfully without major complications.ConclusionA hybrid approach which employs MRI-guided BD puncture for subsequent fluoroscopy-guided biliary intervention is feasible in clinical routine and yields high technical success in patients with non-dilated BD and/or unfavorable conditions for US-guided puncture. Excellent visualization of BD and PN in near-real-time interventional MRI allows successful cannulation of the BD.

  9. Combined liver and extrahepatic bile duct resection for biliary invasion of colorectal metastasis: a case-cohort analysis and systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiggers, Jimme K.; te Riele, Wouter W.; van Dongen, Tristan H.; Verheij, Joanne; Busch, Olivier R. C.; van Gulik, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Colorectal liver metastases (CRLMs) with biliary invasion can be treated with a combined liver and extrahepatic bile duct resection. The aim of this study was to analyze outcomes of this procedure in a case-cohort analysis and systematic review. Methods: Consecutive patients who

  10. A Placebo-Controlled Trial of Obeticholic Acid in Primary Biliary Cholangitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nevens, Frederik; Andreone, Pietro; Mazzella, Giuseppe; Strasser, Simone I.; Bowlus, Christopher; Invernizzi, Pietro; Drenth, Joost P. H.; Pockros, Paul J.; Regula, Jaroslaw; Beuers, Ulrich; Trauner, Michael; Jones, David E.; Floreani, Annarosa; Hohenester, Simon; Luketic, Velimir; Shiffman, Mitchell; van Erpecum, Karel J.; Vargas, Victor; Vincent, Catherine; Hirschfield, Gideon M.; Shah, Hemant; Hansen, Bettina; Lindor, Keith D.; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Kowdley, Kris V.; Hooshmand-Rad, Roya; Marmon, Tonya; Sheeron, Shawn; Pencek, Richard; MacConell, Leigh; Pruzanski, Mark; Shapiro, David; Angus, Peter; Roberts, Stuart; Vogel, Wolfgang; Graziadei, Ivo; de Lédinghen, Victor; Berg, Thomas; Gotthardt, Daniel; Hartmann, Heinz; Kremer, Andreas E.; Lammert, Frank; Manns, Michael P.; Rust, Christian; Schramm, Christoph; Trautwein, Christian; Zeuzem, Stefan; Carbone, Marco; van Nieuwkerk, Carin C. M. J.; Celinski, Krzysztof; Gonciarz, Maciej; Hartleb, Marek; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Parés, Albert; Bramley, Peter; Thorburn, Douglas; Mookerjee, Rajeshwar P.; Burroughs, Andrew; Chapman, Roger; Dillon, John F.; Greer, John A.; Tripathi, Dhiraj; McCune, Anne; Ryder, Stephen; Bacon, Bruce R.; Naik, Jahnavi; Wang, Lan Sun; Bodenheimer, Henry C.; Bowlus, Christopher L.; Chalasani, Naga; Forman, Lisa M.; Gordon, Stuart C.; Luketic, Velimir A.; Mayo, Marlyn; Muir, Andrew J.; Reddy, K. Gautham; Talwalker, Jayant T.; Vierling, John M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Primary biliary cholangitis ( formerly called primary biliary cirrhosis) can progress to cirrhosis and death despite ursodiol therapy. Alkaline phosphatase and bilirubin levels correlate with the risk of liver transplantation or death. Obeticholic acid, a farnesoid X receptor agonist, has

  11. Experimental Study of Poly-l-Lactic Acid Biodegradable Stents in Normal Canine Bile Ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kiyosei; Yoshioka, Tetsuya; Furuichi, Kinya; Sakaguchi, Hiroshi; Anai, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Morimoto, Kengo; Uchida, Hideo; Kichikawa, Kimihiko

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to clarify the advantages of biodegradable stents in terms of mucosal reaction and biodegradation after placement. We designed a biodegradable stent and assessed stent degradation and changes in the normal bile ducts of dogs. Methods: The biodegradable stent is a balloon-expandable Z stent consisting of poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA) with a diameter of 6 mm and a length of 15 mm. We assessed four groups of three beagle dogs each at 1, 3, 6, and 9 months of follow-up. After evaluating stent migration by radiography and stent and bile duct patency by cholangiography, the dogs were sacrificed to remove the bile duct together with the stent. The bile duct lumen was examined macroscopically and histologically, and the stent degradation was examined macroscopically and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: Bile duct obstruction was absent and none of the stents migrated. Macroscopic evaluation showed moderate endothelial proliferation in the bile ducts at the implant sites at 3 and 6 months and a slight change at 9 months. Slight mononuclear cell infiltration was histologically identified at all time points and epithelial hyperplasia that was moderate at 3 months was reduced to slight at 6 and 9 months. Stent degradation was macroscopically evident in all animals at 9 months and was proven by SEM in two dogs at 6 months and in all of them at 9 months. Conclusions: Our results suggest that PLLA bioabsorbable stents seems to be useful for implantation in the biliary system with further investigation.

  12. Extracellular Vesicles in Bile as Markers of Malignant Biliary Stenoses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severino, Valeria; Dumonceau, Jean Marc; Delhaye, Myriam

    2017-01-01

    Background & Aims Algorithms for diagnosis of malignant common bile duct (CBD) stenoses are complex and lack accuracy. Malignant tumors secrete large numbers of extracellular vesicles (EVs) into surrounding fluids; EVs might therefore serve as biomarkers for diagnosis. We investigated whether...... concentrations of EVs in bile could discriminate malignant from nonmalignant CBD stenoses. Methods We collected bile and blood samples from 50 patients undergoing therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography at university hospitals in Europe for CBD stenosis of malignant (pancreatic cancer, n = 20...... with a diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, based on tissue analysis, and 10 consecutive controls. Using samples from these subjects, we identified a threshold concentration of bile EVs that could best discriminate between patients with pancreatic cancer from controls. We verified the diagnostic performance of bile EV...

  13. Are bile acid malabsorption and bile acid diarrhoea important causes of loose stool complicating cancer therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, F; Muls, A C G; Lalji, A; Andreyev, H J N

    2015-08-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms during and after cancer therapy can significantly affect quality of life and interfere with treatment. This study assessed whether bile acid malabsorption (BAM) or bile acid diarrhoea (BAD) are important causes of diarrhoea associated with cancer treatment. A retrospective analysis was carried out of consecutive patients assessed for BAM using ((75) Se) Selenium homocholic acid taurocholate (SeHCAT) scanning, after reporting any episodes of loose stool, attending a gastroenterology clinic in a cancer centre. Between 2009 and 2013, 506 consecutive patients (54.5% male; age range: 20-91 years), were scanned. BAM/BAD was diagnosed in 215 (42.5%). It was mild in 25.6%, moderate in 29.3% and severe in 45.1%. Pelvic chemoradiation had induced BAM in > 50% of patients. BAM was also frequent after treatment for conditions not previously associated with BAM, such as anal and colorectal cancer, and was present in > 75% of patients referred after pancreatic surgery. It was also unexpectedly frequent in patients who were treated for malignancy outside the GI tract, such as breast cancer and haematological malignancy. BAM/BAD are very common and under-appreciated causes of GI symptoms after cancer treatment. Health professionals should have a low threshold in suspecting this condition, as diagnosis and treatment can significantly improve quality of life. Colorectal Disease © 2015 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  14. Biliary albumin excretion induced by bile salts in rats is a pathological phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, M.; Kitani, K.; Kanai, S.

    1989-01-01

    The bile to plasma 125I-albumin concentration ratio (B/P ratio) was examined before and during various bile salt infusions in male Wistar rats that had previously received iv injection of 125I-albumin. Endogenous rat albumin and IgG concentrations in the bile were also determined by a single radial immunodiffusion method. Taurocholate (TC) infusion (1.0 mumol/min/100 g body wt) significantly increased the bile flow rate in the first hr but the flow began to decline in the second hr. The B/P ratio as well as rat albumin (and IgG) excretion into the bile significantly increased as early as 15 min after the start of TC infusion, and the increase became more pronounced in the second hr, when the bile flow began to decrease. Infusion of taurochenodeoxycholate (TCDC, 0.4 mumol/min/100 g) caused a reduction in bile flow 15 min after the start of infusion but the B/P ratio increased 40 times at its peak compared with the basal value before the bile salt infusion. Simultaneous infusion of tauroursodeoxycholate (TUDC, 0.6 mumol/min/100 g) and TCDC not only abolished the cholestasis induced by TCDC but maintained stable choleresis as long as for 2 hr. During this choleretic period, the B/P ration never exceeded the basal value. The choleresis induced by either taurodehydrocholate (TDHC) or bucolome was not accompanied by enhanced albumin excretion. In rats given TDHC infusion, albumin excretion started to increase only after the bile flow began to decline following the initial choleretic period. The enhanced excretion of albumin induced by TC and TCDC is therefore suggested to be caused not by the choleresis per se but by a possible concomitant increase in the communication between sinusoids and bile canaliculi, which eventually leads to cholestasis

  15. Hormesis in Cholestatic Liver Disease; Preconditioning with Low Bile Acid Concentrations Protects against Bile Acid-Induced Toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaag, Esther M.; Buist-Homan, Manon; Koehorst, Martijn; Groen, Albert K.; Moshage, Han; Faber, Klaas Nico

    2016-01-01

    Cholestasis is characterized by accumulation of bile acids and inflammation, causing hepatocellular damage. Still, liver damage markers are highest in acute cholestasis and drop when this condition becomes chronic, indicating that hepatocytes adapt towards the hostile environment. This may be

  16. Hormesis in Cholestatic Liver Disease; Preconditioning with Low Bile Acid Concentrations Protects against Bile Acid-Induced Toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaag, Esther M.; Buist-Homan, Manon; Koehorst, Martijn; Groen, Albert K.; Moshage, Han; Faber, Klaas Nico

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cholestasis is characterized by accumulation of bile acids and inflammation, causing hepatocellular damage. Still, liver damage markers are highest in acute cholestasis and drop when this condition becomes chronic, indicating that hepatocytes adapt towards the hostile environment. This

  17. Bile acids exert negative feedback control on bile acid synthesis in cultured pig hepatocytes by suppression of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwekkeboom, J.; Princen, H.M.G.; Voorthuizen, E.M. van; Kempen, H.J.M.

    1990-01-01

    Feedback regulation of bile acid synthesis by its end products was studied in cultured hepatocytes of young weaned pigs. We previously showed that conversion of exogenous [14C] cholesterol into bile acids was suppressed by addition of bile acids to the culture medium. In the present study, the

  18. Bile duct regeneration and immune response by passenger lymphocytes signals biliary recovery versus complications after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junger, Henrik H; Schlitt, Hans J; Geissler, Edward K; Fichtner-Feigl, Stefan; Brunner, Stefan M

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the impact of epithelial regenerative responses and immune cell infiltration on biliary complications after liver transplantation. Bile duct (BD) damage after cold storage was quantified by a BD damage score and correlated with patient outcome in 41 patients. Bacterial infiltration was determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). BD samples were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for E-cadherin, cytokeratin, CD56, CD14, CD4, CD8, and double-immunofluorescence for cytokine production and by messenger RNA (mRNA) microarray. Increased mRNA levels of adherens junctions (P Liver Transplantation 23 1422-1432 2017 AASLD. © 2017 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  19. Decompression of malignant biliary obstruction by duodenoscopic intubation of bile duct.

    OpenAIRE

    Laurence, B H; Cotton, P B

    1980-01-01

    Interest is increasing in non-operative methods of relieving malignant obstruction of the bile duct, and drainage tubes and prostheses may be placed in the bile duct via the percutaneous transhepatic route. Two cases are described, however, in which a duodenoscope was used and the approach was via the papilla of Vater. This method allows temporary or permanent drainage tubes to be placed through malignant strictures. This endoscopic approach is less invasive and should be safer than that by t...

  20. Silymarin retards collagen accumulation in early and advanced biliary fibrosis secondary to complete bile duct obliteration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boigk, G; Stroedter, L; Herbst, H; Waldschmidt, J; Riecken, E O; Schuppan, D

    1997-09-01

    Silymarin (SIL), a standardized plant extract containing about 60% polyphenole silibinin, is used as a hepatoprotective agent. Its antifibrotic potential in chronic liver diseases has not been explored. Therefore, we applied SIL to adult Wistar rats that were subjected to complete bile duct occlusion (BDO) by injection of sodium amidotrizoate (Ethibloc). This treatment induces progressive portal fibrosis without significant inflammation. Rats with sham-operation that received SIL at 50 mg/kg/d (n = 10) and rats with BDO alone (n = 20) served as controls, whereas groups of 20 animals were fed SIL at a dose of 25 and 50 mg/kg/d during weeks 1 through 6 or doses of 50 mg/kg/d during weeks 4 through 6 of BDO. Animals were sacrificed after 6 weeks for determination of blood chemistries, total and relative liver collagen (as hydroxyproline [HYP]), and the serum aminoterminal propeptide of procollagen type III (PIIINP). BDO in untreated rats caused an almost ninefold increase in total liver collagen (16.1 +/- 3.1 vs. 1.8 +/- 0.4 mg HYP, P liver tissue, it acted as a true antifibrotic agent. The single value of PIIINP at killing paralleled the antifibrotic activity of SIL with 11.6 +/- 3.8 and 9.9 +/- 3.7 vs. 15.3 +/- 5.2 microg/L in both high-dose groups (P fibrosis score in the groups that received SIL, clinical-chemical parameters were not different among all groups with BDO. We therefore conclude that 1) BDO with Ethibloc is a suitable model to test for pure antifibrotic drugs because it induces progressive rat secondary biliary fibrosis without major inflammation; 2) oral SIL can ameliorate hepatic collagen accumulation even in advanced (biliary) fibrosis; and 3) PIIINP appears to be a suitable serum marker to monitor the inhibition of hepatic fibrogenesis in this model of biliary fibrosis.

  1. Percutaneous Transhepatic Bile Duct Ablation with n-Butyl Cyanoacrylate in the Treatment of a Biliary Complication after Split Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Lauterio

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Biliary complications continue to be a major cause of morbidity after split-liver transplantation (SLT. In this report we describe an uncommon late biliary complication. One year after SLT the patient showed an intrahepatic bile dicy dilatation with severe cholangitis episodes. The segmentary bile duct of hepatic segment VI-VII draining in the left duct was unidentified and tied at the time of the in situ split-liver procedure. We perform a permanent obliteration of the dilated intrahepatic ducts by a percutaneous embolization using an n-butyl cyanoacrylate (NABC. The management of biliary complications after SLT requires a multidisciplinary approach. The use of NBCA in obliteration of a dilated bile duct seems to be a safe procedure with good results providing a less invasive option than hepatic resection and decreasing the morbidity associated with chronic external biliary drainage. Further studies are needed to determine whether this approach is effective and safe and whether it could reduce hospital stay and cost.

  2. Novel, major 2α- and 2β-hydroxy bile alcohols and bile acids in the bile of Arapaima gigas, a large South American river fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato née Okihara, Rika; Saito, Tetsuya; Ogata, Hiroaki; Nakane, Naoya; Namegawa, Kazunari; Sekiguchi, Shoutaro; Omura, Kaoru; Kurabuchi, Satoshi; Mitamura, Kuniko; Ikegawa, Shigeo; Raines, Jan; Hagey, Lee R; Hofmann, Alan F; Iida, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    Bile alcohols and bile acids from gallbladder bile of the Arapaima gigas, a large South American freshwater fish, were isolated by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The structures of the major isolated compounds were determined by electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance using (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectra. The novel bile salts identified were six variants of 2-hydroxy bile acids and bile alcohols in the 5α- and 5β-series, with 29% of all compounds having hydroxylation at C-2. Three C27 bile alcohols were present (as ester sulfates): (24ξ,25ξ)-5α-cholestan-2α,3α,7α,12α,24,26-hexol; (25ξ)-5β-cholestan-2β,3α,7α,12α,26,27-hexol, and (25ξ)-5α-cholestan-2α,3α,7α,12α,26,27-hexol. A single C27 bile acid was identified: (25ξ)-2α,3α,7α,12α-tetrahydroxy-5α-cholestan-26-oic acid, present as its taurine conjugate. Two novel C24 bile acids were identified: the 2α-hydroxy derivative of allochenodeoxycholic acid and the 2β-hydroxy derivative of cholic acid, both occurring as taurine conjugates. These studies extend previous work in establishing the natural occurrence of novel 2α- and 2β-hydroxy-C24 and C27 bile acids as well as C27 bile alcohols in both the normal (5β) as well as the (5α) "allo" A/B-ring juncture. The bile salt profile of A. gigas appears to be unique among vertebrates. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Bile acid malabsorption in patients with chronic diarrhoea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eusufzai, S. (Karolinska Inst., Huddinge Univ. Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden))

    1993-10-01

    The presence of bile acid malabsorption was studied in 24 patients with chronic diarrhoea without established cause despite extensive investigations. Bile acid absorption was evaluated with the [sup 75]Se-homocholic acid taurine (SeHCAT) test. A therapeutic trial of cholestyramine was performed in 11 patients. 14 of the patients showed evidence of bile acid malabsorption. Of the 11 patients who were treated with cholestyramine, 3 has no improvement of their diarrhoea and also had a normal SeHCAT test result. Of the other 8 patients, who also had pathologic SeHCAT test result, 5 improved on treatment, whereas 3 had no change of their diarrhoea. 7 of the 24 patients had a previous history of cholecystectomy. 4 of them showed bile acid malabsorption; 3 of these were treated with cholestyramine and responded favourably. The results suggest that bile acid malabsorption may be common in chronic diarrhoea patients, but may not always be the primary cause of diarrhoea. 28 refs., 2 tabs.

  4. Comparison of the composition of bile acids in bile of patients with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas and benign disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, David O; Crick, Peter J; Jenkins, Gareth J; Wang, Yuqin; Griffiths, William J; Brown, Tim H; Al-Sarireh, Bilal

    2017-11-01

    Bile acids have been implicated in the development of gastrointestinal malignancies. Both the specific nature of individual bile acids and their concentration appear key factors in the carcinogenic potency of bile. Using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) we performed quantitative profiling of bile extracted directly from the common bile duct in 30 patients (15 patients with pancreatic cancer and 15 patients with benign disease). Separation and detection of bile acids was performed using a 1.7μm particle size reversed-phase C 18 LC column at a flow rate of 200μL/min with negative electrospray ionization MS. A significant difference (p=0.018) was seen in the concentration of unconjugated cholic acid in the malignant group (0.643mmol/L) compared to the benign group (0.022mmol/L), with an overall significant difference (p=0.04) seen in the level of total unconjugated bile acids in the malignant group (1.816mmol/L) compared to the benign group (0.069mmol/L). This finding may offer the possibility of both understanding the biology of cancer development in the pancreas, as well as offering a potential diagnostic avenue to explore. However, a larger study is necessary to confirm the alterations in bile acid profiles reported here and explore factors such as diet and microbial populations on the bile acid profiles of these patient groups. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. α7-nAChR Knockout Mice Decreases Biliary Hyperplasia and Liver Fibrosis in Cholestatic Bile-Duct Ligated Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Laurent; O'Brien, April; Hall, Chad; White, Tori; Chen, Lixian; Wu, Nan; Venter, Julie; Scrushy, Marinda; Mubarak, Muhammad; Meng, Fanyin; Dostal, David; Wu, Chaodong; Lairmore, Terry C; Alpini, Gianfranco; Glaser, Shannon

    2018-03-26

    α7-nAChR is a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (specifically expressed on hepatic stellate cells, Kupffer cells, and cholangiocytes) that regulates inflammation and apoptosis in the liver. Thus, targeting α7-nAChR may be therapeutic in biliary diseases. Bile-duct ligation (BDL) was performed on wild-type (WT) and α7-nAChR-/- mice. We first evaluated the expression of α7-nAChR by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in liver sections. IHC was also performed to assess intrahepatic bile-duct mass (IBDM), and Sirius Red staining was performed to quantify the amount of collagen deposition. Immunofluorescence was performed to assess co-localization of α7-nAChR with bile ducts (co-stained with CK-19) and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) (co-stained with desmin). The mRNA expression of α7-nAChR, Ki67/PCNA (proliferation), fibrosis genes (TGF-β1, Fibronectin-1, Col1α1, and α-SMA), and inflammatory markers (IL-6, IL-1β, and TNFα) was measured by real-time PCR. Biliary TGF-β1 and hepatic CD68 (Kupffer cell marker) expression was assessed using IHC. α7-nAChR immunoreactivity was observed in both bile ducts and HSCs and increased following BDL. α7-nAChR-/- BDL mice exhibited decreased: (i) bile duct mass, liver fibrosis, and inflammation; and (ii) immunoreactivity of TGF-1 as well as expression of fibrosis genes compared to WT BDL mice. α7-nAChR activation triggers biliary proliferation and liver fibrosis and may be a therapeutic target in managing extra-hepatic biliary obstruction.

  6. Nocturnal weakly acidic reflux promotes aspiration of bile acids in lung transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondeau, Kathleen; Mertens, Veerle; Vanaudenaerde, Bart A; Verleden, Geert M; Van Raemdonck, Dirk E; Sifrim, Daniel; Dupont, Lieven J

    2009-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and aspiration of bile acids have been implicated as non-alloimmune risk factors for the development of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) after lung transplantation. The aim of our study was to investigate the association between GER and gastric aspiration of bile acids and to establish which reflux characteristics may promote aspiration of bile acids into the lungs and may feature as a potential diagnostic tool in identifying lung transplantation (LTx) patients at risk for aspiration. Twenty-four stable LTx recipients were studied 1 year after transplantation. All patients underwent 24-hour ambulatory impedance-pH recording for the detection of acid (pH acidic (pH 4 to 7) reflux. On the same day, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was collected and then analyzed for the presence of bile acids (Bioquant enzymatic assay). Increased GER was detected in 13 patients, of whom 9 had increased acid reflux and 4 had exclusively increased weakly acidic reflux. Sixteen patients had detectable bile acids in the BALF (0.6 [0.4 to 1.5] micromol/liter). The 24-hour esophageal volume exposure was significantly increased in patients with bile acids compared to patients without bile acids in the BALF. Acid exposure and the number of reflux events (total, acid and weakly acidic) were unrelated to the presence of bile acids in the BALF. However, both nocturnal volume exposure and the number of nocturnal weakly acidic reflux events were significantly higher in patients with bile acids in the BALF. Weakly acidic reflux events, especially during the night, are associated with the aspiration of bile acids in LTx recipients and may therefore feature as a potential risk factor for the development of BOS.

  7. Is ursodeoxycholic acid effective in primary biliary cirrhosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Rada

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Ursodeoxycholic acid is considered as first line treatment in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. Its mechanism of action in this disease is unknown and there is controversy about its clinical impact. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 19 databases, we identified four systematic reviews including 16 studies. We combined the evidence using tables with summary of findings following the GRADE approach and concluded ursodeoxycholic acid may not have any effect on pruritus, and there is uncertainty about its effect on mortality, need for liver transplantation or on any other important outcome for the patient.

  8. Biliary drainage of the common bile duct with an enteral metal stent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dek, Irene M.; van den Elzen, Bram D. J.; Fockens, Paul; Rauws, Erik A. J.

    2009-01-01

    In this case report we present an elderly patient who was referred to our hospital with recurrent episodes of cholangitis that persisted after placement of five metal stents for a distal common bile duct (CBD) stenosis. All metal stents were endoscopically removed from the CBD by forceps after

  9. Endogenous bile acid disposition in rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marion, Tracy L.; Perry, Cassandra H.; St Claire, Robert L.; Brouwer, Kim L.R.

    2012-01-01

    Sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH) are used commonly to investigate hepatic transport protein-mediated uptake and biliary excretion of substrates. However, little is known about the disposition of endogenous bile acids (BAs) in SCH. In this study, four endogenous conjugated BAs common to rats and humans [taurocholic acid (TCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), taurochenodeoxycholic acid (TCDCA), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA)], as well as two BA species specific to rodents (α- and β-tauromuricholic acid; α/β TMCA), were profiled in primary rat and human SCH. Using B-CLEAR ® technology, BAs were measured in cells + bile canaliculi, cells, and medium of SCH by LC-MS/MS. Results indicated that, just as in vivo, taurine-conjugated BA species were predominant in rat SCH, while glycine-conjugated BAs were predominant in human SCH. Total intracellular BAs remained relatively constant over days in culture in rat SCH. Total BAs in control (CTL) cells + bile, cells, and medium were approximately 3.4, 2.9, and 8.3-fold greater in human than in rat. The estimated intracellular concentrations of the measured total BAs were 64.3 ± 5.9 μM in CTL rat and 183 ± 56 μM in CTL human SCH, while medium concentrations of the total BAs measured were 1.16 ± 0.21 μM in CTL rat SCH and 9.61 ± 6.36 μM in CTL human SCH. Treatment of cells for 24 h with 10 μM troglitazone (TRO), an inhibitor of the bile salt export pump (BSEP) and the Na + -taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP), had no significant effect on endogenous BAs measured at the end of the 24-h culture period, potentially due to compensatory mechanisms that maintain BA homeostasis. These data demonstrate that BAs in SCH are similar to in vivo, and that SCH may be a useful in vitro model to study alterations in BA disposition if species differences are taken into account. -- Highlights: ► Bile acids (BAs) were measured in rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH). ► Cell and medium BA concentrations

  10. Endogenous bile acid disposition in rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marion, Tracy L., E-mail: tracylmarion@qualyst.com [Curriculum in Toxicology, UNC School of Medicine, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7270 (United States); Perry, Cassandra H., E-mail: cassandraperry@qualyst.com [Qualyst, Inc., Durham, NC 27713 (United States); St Claire, Robert L., E-mail: bobstclaire@qualyst.com [Qualyst, Inc., Durham, NC 27713 (United States); Brouwer, Kim L.R., E-mail: kbrouwer@unc.edu [Division of Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics, UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, CB 7569 Kerr Hall, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7569 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH) are used commonly to investigate hepatic transport protein-mediated uptake and biliary excretion of substrates. However, little is known about the disposition of endogenous bile acids (BAs) in SCH. In this study, four endogenous conjugated BAs common to rats and humans [taurocholic acid (TCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), taurochenodeoxycholic acid (TCDCA), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA)], as well as two BA species specific to rodents (α- and β-tauromuricholic acid; α/β TMCA), were profiled in primary rat and human SCH. Using B-CLEAR{sup ®} technology, BAs were measured in cells + bile canaliculi, cells, and medium of SCH by LC-MS/MS. Results indicated that, just as in vivo, taurine-conjugated BA species were predominant in rat SCH, while glycine-conjugated BAs were predominant in human SCH. Total intracellular BAs remained relatively constant over days in culture in rat SCH. Total BAs in control (CTL) cells + bile, cells, and medium were approximately 3.4, 2.9, and 8.3-fold greater in human than in rat. The estimated intracellular concentrations of the measured total BAs were 64.3 ± 5.9 μM in CTL rat and 183 ± 56 μM in CTL human SCH, while medium concentrations of the total BAs measured were 1.16 ± 0.21 μM in CTL rat SCH and 9.61 ± 6.36 μM in CTL human SCH. Treatment of cells for 24 h with 10 μM troglitazone (TRO), an inhibitor of the bile salt export pump (BSEP) and the Na{sup +}-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP), had no significant effect on endogenous BAs measured at the end of the 24-h culture period, potentially due to compensatory mechanisms that maintain BA homeostasis. These data demonstrate that BAs in SCH are similar to in vivo, and that SCH may be a useful in vitro model to study alterations in BA disposition if species differences are taken into account. -- Highlights: ► Bile acids (BAs) were measured in rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH). ► Cell and medium BA

  11. En Bloc Hilar Dissection of the Right Hepatic Artery in Continuity with the Bile Duct: a Technique to Reduce Biliary Complications After Adult Living-Donor Liver Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Gazala, Samir; Olthoff, Kim M; Goldberg, David S; Shaked, Abraham; Abt, Peter L

    2016-04-01

    Techniques that preserve the right hepatic artery and the common bile duct in continuity during the dissection may be associated with lower rates of biliary complications in living-donor liver transplants. This study sought to determine whether en bloc hilar dissections were associated with fewer biliary complications in living-donor liver transplants. This was a retrospective review of 41 adult LDLTs performed in a single, liver transplant center between February 2007 and September 2014. The primary outcome of interest was the occurrence of at least one of the following biliary complications: anastomotic leak, stricture, or biloma. The primary predictor of interest was the hilar dissection technique: conventional hilar dissection vs. en bloc hilar dissection. A total of 41 LDLTs were identified, 24 had a conventional, and 17 an en bloc hilar biliary dissection. The occurrence of any biliary complication was significantly more common in the conventional hilar dissection group compared to the en bloc hilar dissection group (66.7 vs. 35.3%, respectively, p = 0.047). In particularly, anastomotic strictures were significantly more common in the conventional hilar dissection group compared to the en bloc hilar dissection group (54.2 vs. 23.5%., respectively, p = 0.049). En bloc hilar dissection technique may decrease biliary complication rates in living donor liver transplants.

  12. Strong activation of bile acid-sensitive ion channel (BASIC) by ursodeoxycholic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiemuth, Dominik; Sahin, Hacer; Lefèvre, Cathérine M.T.; Wasmuth, Hermann E.; Gründer, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Bile acid-sensitive ion channel (BASIC) is a member of the DEG/ENaC gene family of unknown function. Rat BASIC (rBASIC) is inactive at rest. We have recently shown that cholangiocytes, the epithelial cells lining the bile ducts, are the main site of BASIC expression in the liver and identified bile acids, in particular hyo- and chenodeoxycholic acid, as agonists of rBASIC. Moreover, it seems that extracellular divalent cations stabilize the resting state of rBASIC, because removal of extracellular divalent cations opens the channel. In this addendum, we demonstrate that removal of extracellular divalent cations potentiates the activation of rBASIC by bile acids, suggesting an allosteric mechanism. Furthermore, we show that rBASIC is strongly activated by the anticholestatic bile acid ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), suggesting that BASIC might mediate part of the therapeutic effects of UDCA. PMID:23064163

  13. Rapid Determination of Bile Acids in Bile from Various Mammals by Reversed-Phase Ultra-Fast Liquid Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Gu Leng Ri; Yao, Peng; Shi, Luwen

    2015-08-01

    A valid and efficient reversed-phase ultra-fast liquid chromatography method was developed for the simultaneous determination of 13 bile acids in the bile of three mammal species, including rat, pig and human gallstone patients. Chromatographic separation was performed with a Shim-pack XR-ODS column, and the mobile phase consisted of acetonitrile and potassium phosphate buffer (pH 2.6) at a flow rate of 0.5 mL min(-1). The linear detection range of most bile acids ranged from 2 to 600 ng µL(-1) with a good correlation coefficient (>0.9995). The precision of each bile acid was bile acids were separated in 15 min with satisfactory resolution, and the total analysis time was 18 min, including equilibration. The method was successfully applied in rapid screening of bile samples from the three mammals. Significant metabolic frameworks of bile acids among various species were observed, whereas considerable quantitative variations in both inter- and intraspecies were also observed, especially for gallstone patients. Our results suggest that detecting the change of bile acid profiles could be applied for the diagnosis of gallstone disease. © Crown copyright 2014.

  14. MALDI Mass Spectral Imaging of Bile Acids Observed as Deprotonated Molecules and Proton-Bound Dimers from Mouse Liver Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzagalinski, Ignacy; Hainz, Nadine; Meier, Carola; Tschernig, Thomas; Volmer, Dietrich A.

    2018-02-01

    Bile acids (BAs) play two vital roles in living organisms, as they are involved in (1) the secretion of cholesterol from liver, and (2) the lipid digestion/absorption in the intestine. Abnormal bile acid synthesis or secretion can lead to severe liver disorders. Even though there is extensive literature on the mass spectrometric determination of BAs in biofluids and tissue homogenates, there are no reports on the spatial distribution in the biliary network of the liver. Here, we demonstrate the application of high mass resolution/mass accuracy matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) to MS imaging (MSI) of BAs at high spatial resolutions (pixel size, 25 μm). The results show chemical heterogeneity of the mouse liver sections with a number of branching biliary and blood ducts. In addition to ion signals from deprotonation of the BA molecules, MALDI-MSI generated several further intense signals at larger m/z for the BAs. These signals were spatially co-localized with the deprotonated molecules and easily misinterpreted as additional products of BA biotransformations. In-depth analysis of accurate mass shifts and additional electrospray ionization and MALDI-FTICR experiments, however, confirmed them as proton-bound dimers. Interestingly, dimers of bile acids, but also unusual mixed dimers of different taurine-conjugated bile acids and free taurine, were identified. Since formation of these complexes will negatively influence signal intensities of the desired [M - H]- ions and significantly complicate mass spectral interpretations, two simple broadband techniques were proposed for non-selective dissociation of dimers that lead to increased signals for the deprotonated BAs. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  15. Accumulation of Bile in the Gallbladder: Evaluation by means of Serial Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Cholangiography with Gadolinium Ethoxybenzyl Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsutomu Tamada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the process of biliary excretion of gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA into the biliary tract and to assess the accumulation patterns in the gallbladder using MR cholangiography obtained with Gd-EOB-DTPA which is a liver-specific hepatobiliary contrast agent. Seventy-five patients underwent Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced MR imaging. Serial multiphasic hepatobiliary phase imaging was qualitatively reviewed to evaluate the process of the biliary excretion of contrast agent into the bile duct and the gallbladder. The accumulation pattern of contrast agent into gallbladder was classified into two groups (group 1 = orthodromic type and group 2 = delayed type. Furthermore, the results in differences of the presence of T1 hyperintense bile or sludge of gallbladder, gall stones, wall thickening of gallbladder, chronic liver disease, and liver cirrhosis between two groups were compared. Forty-eight of 75 patients (64% were included in group 1, and remaining 27 (36% were in group 2. The frequency of the presence of T1 hyperintense bile or sludge of gallbladder was significantly higher in patients with group 2 than that in patients with group 1 (P=0.041. MR cholangiography obtained with Gd-EOB-DTPA showed that there may be an association between the biliary accumulation pattern in the gallbladder and the pathological condition.

  16. Comparison of endogenous and radiolabeled bile acid excretion in patients with idiopathic chronic diarrhea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiller, L.R.; Bilhartz, L.E.; Santa Ana, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    Fecal recovery of radioactivity after ingestion of a bolus of radiolabeled bile acid is abnormally high in most patients with idiopathic chronic diarrhea. To evaluate the significance of this malabsorption, concurrent fecal excretion of both exogenous radiolabeled bile acid and endogenous (unlabeled) bile acid were measured in patients with idiopathic chronic diarrhea. Subjects received a 2.5-microCi oral dose of taurocholic acid labeled with 14C in the 24th position of the steroid moiety. Endogenous bile acid excretion was measured by a hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase assay on a concurrent 72-h stool collection. Both radiolabeled and endogenous bile acid excretion were abnormally high in most patients with chronic diarrhea compared with normal subjects, even when equivoluminous diarrhea was induced in normal subjects by ingestion of osmotically active solutions. The correlation between radiolabeled and endogenous bile acid excretion was good. However, neither radiolabeled nor endogenous bile acid excretion was as abnormal as is typically seen in patients with ileal resection, and none of these diarrhea patients responded to treatment with cholestyramine with stool weights less than 200 g. These results suggest (a) that this radiolabeled bile acid excretion test accurately reflects excess endogenous bile acid excretion; (b) that excess endogenous bile acid excretion is not caused by diarrhea per se; (c) that spontaneously occurring idiopathic chronic diarrhea is often associated with increased endogenous bile acid excretion; and (d) that bile acid malabsorption is not likely to be the primary cause of diarrhea in most of these patients

  17. Synthesis, physicochemical properties, and biological activity of bile acids 3-glucuronides: Novel insights into bile acid signalling and detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostarda, Serena; Passeri, Daniela; Carotti, Andrea; Cerra, Bruno; Colliva, Carolina; Benicchi, Tiziana; Macchiarulo, Antonio; Pellicciari, Roberto; Gioiello, Antimo

    2018-01-20

    Glucuronidation is considered an important detoxification pathway of bile acids especially in cholestatic conditions. Glucuronides are less toxic than the parent free forms and are more easily excreted in urine. However, the pathophysiological significance of bile acid glucuronidation is still controversial and debated among the scientific community. Progress in this field has been strongly limited by the lack of appropriate methods for the preparation of pure glucuronides in the amount needed for biological and pharmacological studies. In this work, we have developed a new synthesis of bile acid C3-glucuronides enabling the convenient preparation of gram-scale quantities. The synthesized compounds have been characterized in terms of physicochemical properties and abilities to modulate key nuclear receptors including the farnesoid X receptor (FXR). In particular, we found that C3-glucuronides of chenodeoxycholic acid and lithocholic acid, respectively the most abundant and potentially cytotoxic species formed in patients affected by cholestasis, behave as FXR agonists and positively regulate the gene expression of transporter proteins, the function of which is critical in human conditions related to imbalances of bile acid homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. The effects of ferulic acid on the pharmacokinetics of warfarin in rats after biliary drainage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li H

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Haigang Li,1,2 Yang Wang,1 Rong Fan,1 Huiying Lv,3 Hua Sun,4 Haitang Xie,4 Tao Tang,1 Jiekun Luo,1 Zian Xia1 1Department of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, Laboratory of Ethnopharmacology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, 2Department of Pharmacy, Changsha Medical University, 3Hunan Agricultural Product Processing Institute, Hunan Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Changsha, 4Anhui Provincial Centre for Drug Clinical Evaluation, Yijishan Hospital of Wannan Medical College, Wuhu, People’s Republic of China Abstract: According to previous research studies, warfarin can be detected in human bile after oral administration. Ferulic acid (FA is the main bioactive component of many Chinese herbs for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. To elucidate the effects of FA on the pharmacokinetics of warfarin in rats after biliary drainage is necessary. Twenty rats were randomly divided into four groups: Group 1 (WN: healthy rats after the administration of warfarin sodium, Group 2 (WO: a rat model of biliary drainage after the administration of warfarin sodium, Group 3 (WFN: healthy rats after the administration of warfarin sodium and FA, and Group 4 (WFO: a rat model of biliary drainage after the administration of warfarin sodium and FA. Blood samples were collected at different time points after administration. The concentrations of blood samples were determined by ultraperformance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Comparisons between groups were performed according to the main pharmacokinetic parameters calculated by the DAS 2.1.1 software. The pharmacokinetic parameters showed a significant difference between the WN and WO groups, the WO group showed a decrease of 51% and 41.6% in area under the curve from 0 to time (AUC0–t and peak plasma concentration (Cmax, respectively, whereas time to Cmax (Tmax was delayed 3.27 folds. There were significant differences between the WFO and WFN groups, the WFO

  19. Rate of duodenal-biliary reflux increases in patients with recurrent common bile duct stones: evidence from barium meal examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Luo, Hui; Pan, Yanglin; Zhao, Lina; Dong, Junqiang; Liu, Zhiguo; Wang, Xiangping; Tao, Qin; Lu, Guohua; Guo, Xuegang

    2015-10-01

    Stone recurrence is a common late adverse event after ERCP in patients with common bile duct stones (CBDS). Duodenal-biliary reflux (DBR) is considered a major cause of CBDS recurrence. However, specific evidence is still lacking. To investigate the DBR rate in patients with recurrent CBDS after ERCP. A prospective case-control study. A tertiary center. During follow-up, patients with a history of either recurrent CBDS (recurrence group) or nonrecurrent CBDS (control group) were invited to participate in the study. All patients had previously undergone successful CBDS removal by ERCP. Patients in the control group were matched with the recurrence group by age and gender in a 1:1 ratio. Patients with gallbladder stones, hepatolithiasis, remnant CBDS, CBD strictures, or stents were excluded. Standard barium meal examination, MRCP, and enhanced abdominal CT. DBR. Thirty-two patients with a history of recurrent CBDS and 32 matched control subjects were enrolled. Baseline characteristics and parameters regarding the first ERCP were comparable between the 2 groups. The DBR rate was significantly higher in the recurrent than in the control group (68.8% vs 15.6%, P < .001). Multivariate analysis indicated that DBR (OR, 9.59; 95% CI, 2.65-34.76) and acute distal CBD angulation (OR, 5.48; 95% CI, 1.52-19.78) were independent factors associated with CBDS recurrence. DBR rates in patients with no, single, or multiple recurrences were 15.6%, 60.9%, and 88.9%, respectively (P < .001). Intrahepatic bile duct reflux was more common in patients with multiple recurrences. Small sample size. DBR is correlated with CBDS recurrence in patients who had previously undergone ERCP. DBR and acute distal CBD angulation are 2 independent risk factors related to stone recurrence. ( NCT02329977.) Copyright © 2015 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Bile acids cycle disruption in patients with nasopharyngeal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-12-31

    Dec 31, 2014 ... promotes the elevation of interleukin-10 secretion. Cheng-Shi Wang1 ... Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is uncommon in the ... Immune function has close relationship with the patho- genesis of ... Liver is the major organ responsible for the synthesis of primary bile acids, and the function of bacteria in the ...

  1. The synthesis and biological activity of some bile acid derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadirov, A.Kh.; Khaydarov, K.Kh.; Giyosov, A.Sh.

    2000-01-01

    In this monograph authors present the modified technologic scheme of receiving of 3α, 7α, 12α-three hydro xi cholanic acid with using of available raw materials for the synthesis products and for receiving on its base drugs diluent cholesterol gallstones of gall-bladder and bile-ducts

  2. Bile acid malabsorption in patients with chronic diarrhoea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildt, S; Nørby Rasmussen, S; Lysgård Madsen, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Bile acid malabsorption (BAM), a cause of chronic diarrhoea, can be diagnosed by the SeHCAT test. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of SeHCAT testing by assessing the extent of BAM and describing the clinical characteristics in a group of patients with chronic diarrhoea...

  3. Acid resistance, bile tolerance and antimicrobial properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maari is a fermented food condiment obtained by spontaneous fermentation of seeds from the baobab tree (Adansonia digitata). Nine dominant lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains, isolated from traditional maari fermentation were examined for their resistance to pH 2.5, their tolerance to 0.3% bile and their antimicrobial ...

  4. Black bile of melancholy or gallstones of biliary colics: historical perspectives on cholelithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielefeldt, Klaus

    2014-11-01

    Barely 130 years after its first description, cholecystectomies are among the most commonly performed surgeries in the USA. The success of this operation with subsequent technical improvements, such as laparoscopic approaches, caused a paradigm shift in the management of gallstone disease. However, symptoms persist in 10-40 % of successfully operated patients. Reviewing monographs, textbooks, and articles published during the last 300 years, several important factors emerge as likely contributors to limited or poor treatment responses. Early on, clinicians recognized that cholelithiasis is quite common and thus often an incidental finding, especially if patients present with vague or atypical symptoms. Consistent with these observations, patients with such atypical symptoms are less likely to benefit from cholecystectomy. Similarly, lasting improvements are more reliably seen in patients with symptoms of presumed biliary origin and documented gallstones compared to individuals without stones, an important point in view of increasing rates of surgery for biliary dyskinesia. While cholelithiasis can cause serious complications, the overall incidence of clinically relevant problems is so low that prophylactic cholecystectomy cannot be justified. This conclusion corresponds to epidemiologic data showing that the rise in elective cholecystectomies decreased hospitalizations due to gallstone disease, but was associated with a higher volume of postoperative complications, ultimately resulting in stable combined mortality due to gallstone disease and its treatment. These trends highlight the tremendous gains in managing gallstone disease, while at the same time reminding us that the tightening rather than expanding indications for cholecystectomy may improve outcomes.

  5. Crosstalk between Bile Acids and Gut Microbiota and Its Impact on Farnesoid X Receptor Signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlström, Annika; Kovatcheva-Datchary, Petia; Ståhlman, Marcus

    2017-01-01

    Background: The gut microbiota has a substantial impact on health and disease. The human gut microbiota influences the development and progression of metabolic diseases; however, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. The nuclear farnesoid X receptor (FXR), which regulates bile acid...... homeostasis and glucose and lipid metabolism, is activated by primary human and murine bile acids, chenodeoxycholic acid and cholic acid, while rodent specific primary bile acids tauromuricholic acids antagonise FXR activation. The gut microbiota deconjugates and subsequently metabolises primary bile acids...... into secondary bile acids in the gut and thereby changes FXR activation and signalling. Key Message: Mouse models have been used to study the crosstalk between bile acids and the gut microbiota, but the substantial differences in bile acid composition between humans and mice need to be considered when...

  6. Voluntary wheel running increases bile acid as well as cholesterol excretion and decreases atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Maxi; Lombardo, Elisa; Havinga, Rick; Tietge, Uwe J F; Kuipers, Folkert; Groen, Albert K

    2011-10-01

    Regular physical activity decreases the risk for atherosclerosis but underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We questioned whether voluntary wheel running provokes specific modulations in cholesterol turnover that translate into a decreased atherosclerotic burden in hypercholesterolemic mice. Male LDLR-deficient mice (8 weeks old) had either access to a voluntary running wheel for 12 weeks (RUN) or remained sedentary (CONTROL). Both groups were fed a western-type/high cholesterol diet. Running activity and food intake were recorded. At 12 weeks of intervention, feces, bile and plasma were collected to determine fecal, biliary and plasma parameters of cholesterol metabolism and plasma cytokines. Atherosclerotic lesion size was determined in the aortic root. RUN weighed less (∼13%) while food consumption was increased by 17% (p=0.004). Plasma cholesterol levels were decreased by 12% (p=0.035) and plasma levels of pro-atherogenic lipoproteins decreased in RUN compared to control. Running modulated cholesterol catabolism by enhancing cholesterol turnover: RUN displayed an increased biliary bile acid secretion (68%, p=0.007) and increased fecal bile acid (93%, p=0.009) and neutral sterol (33%, p=0.002) outputs compared to control indicating that reverse cholesterol transport was increased in RUN. Importantly, aortic lesion size was decreased by ∼33% in RUN (p=0.033). Voluntary wheel running reduces atherosclerotic burden in hypercholesterolemic mice. An increased cholesterol turnover, specifically its conversion into bile acids, may underlie the beneficial effect of voluntary exercise in mice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Radioimmunoassay compared to an enzymatic method for serum bile acid determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuelson, K.

    1980-01-01

    Radioimmunoassay (RIA) of cholic and chenodeoxycholic acid was compared to a total bile acid determination with 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3α HSD) and a gas liquid chromatographic (GLC) determination of individual bile acids. When sera from patients with increased bile acid concentration were analysed the results indicated a good correlation between GLC and the other methods. Analysis of sera from healthy subjects indicated a good correlation between GLC and RIA. No correlation existed between RIA and 3α-HSD when serum bile acids were analysed in healthy subjects partly due to the presence of varying amounts of secondary bile acids. (author)

  8. Bile acid metabolism in cirrhosis. VIII. Quantitative evaluation of bile acid synthesis from [7 beta-3H]7 alpha-hydroxycholesterol and [G-3H]26-hydroxycholesterol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, M.; Vlahcevic, Z.R.; Schwartz, C.C.; Gustafsson, J.; Swell, L.

    1982-01-01

    In order to evaluate more definitively the observed aberrations in the synthesis of cholic and chenodeoxycholic acids in patients with advanced cirrhosis, two bile acid biosynthesis pathways were examined by determining the efficiency of conversion of [ 3 H]7 alpha-hydroxycholesterol and [ 3 H] 26-hydroxycholesterol to primary bile acids. Bile acid kinetics were determined by administration of [ 14 C]cholic and [ 14 C]chenodeoxycholic acids. Cholic acid synthesis in cirrhotic patients was markedly depressed (170 vs 927 μmoles per day)( while chenodeoxycholic acid synthesis was reduced to a much lesser degree (227 vs 550 μmoles per day). The administration of [ 3 H]7 alpha-hydroxycholesterol allowed for an evaluation of the major pathway of bile acid synthesis via the 7 alpha-hydroxylation of cholesterol. This compound was efficiently incorporated into primary bile acids by the two normal subjects (88 and 100%) and two cirrhotic patients (77 and 91%). However, the recovery of the label in cholic acid was slightly less in cirrhotic patients than in normal subjects. [ 3 H]26-hydroxycholesterol was administered to ascertain the contribution of the 26-hydroxylation pathway to bile acid synthesis. All study subjects showed poor conversion (9 to 22%) of this intermediate into bile acids. The results of this study suggest that a major block in the bile acid synthesis pathway in cirrhosis is at the level of 7 alpha-hydroxylation of cholesterol (impairment of 7 alpha-hydroxylase) and/or in the feedback triggering mechanism regulating bile acid synthesis. The data also suggest that the 26-hydroxylation pathway in normal subjects and patients with cirrhosis is a minor contributor to synthesis of the primary bile acids. Therefore, the relative sparing of chenodeoxycholic acid synthesis observed in cirrhotic patients is not due to preferential synthesis of this bile acid via the 26-hydroxylation pathway

  9. Bile acid treatment alters hepatic disease and bile acid transport in peroxisome-deficient PEX2 Zellweger mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keane, Megan H.; Overmars, Henk; Wikander, Thomas M.; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Duran, Marinus; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Faust, Phyllis L.

    2007-01-01

    The marked deficiency of peroxisomal organelle assembly in the PEX2(-/-) mouse model for Zellweger syndrome provides a unique opportunity to developmentally and biochemically characterize hepatic disease progression and bile acid products. The postnatal survival of homozygous mutants enabled us to

  10. What Comes after Ursodeoxycholic Acid in Primary Biliary Cholangitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Lin Lee; Hegade, Vinod S; Jones, David E J

    2017-01-01

    Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) is a rare autoimmune liver disease characterized by chronic cholestasis. Treatment with the accepted primary therapy ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) has been shown to be associated with delayed disease progression probably through reduced impact of cholestatic injury on the target biliary epithelial cells. Patients with inadequate response to UDCA (which can be identified through validated biochemical criteria) are at increased risk of disease progression, need for liver transplantation, and death. Obeticholic acid (OCA) is a farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonist which has been evaluated as a second-line therapy in PBC and has been recently licensed by the Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency for use in patients showing an inadequate response to UDCA or who are unable to tolerate it. Although evidence for biochemical improvement by OCA is compelling, there is, as yet, no evidence that OCA improves hard clinical outcomes or quality of life. In addition, OCA may not be suitable for PBC patients with pruritus as it can worsen the symptom. Other novel agents currently in clinical development may have better side-effect profile. Fibrates have the potential but currently lack high quality evidence to support their routine clinical use in PBC. Symptom management of PBC is challenging and ASBT inhibitors and rituximab are being evaluated for pruritus and fatigue, respectively. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Colesevelam attenuates cholestatic liver and bile duct injury in Mdr2-/- mice by modulating composition, signalling and excretion of faecal bile acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Claudia Daniela; Paumgartner, Gustav; Mlitz, Veronika; Kunczer, Victoria; Halilbasic, Emina; Leditznig, Nadja; Wahlström, Annika; Ståhlman, Marcus; Thüringer, Andrea; Kashofer, Karl; Stojakovic, Tatjana; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Trauner, Michael

    2018-04-10

    Interruption of the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids (BAs) may protect against BA-mediated cholestatic liver and bile duct injury. BA sequestrants are established to treat cholestatic pruritus, but their impact on the underlying cholestasis is still unclear. We aimed to explore the therapeutic effects and mechanisms of the BA sequestrant colesevelam in a mouse model of sclerosing cholangitis. Mdr2 -/- mice received colesevelam for 8 weeks. Gene expression profiles of BA homeostasis, inflammation and fibrosis were explored in liver, intestine and colon. Hepatic and faecal BA profiles and gut microbiome were analysed. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) levels in portal blood were measured by ELISA. Furthermore, Mdr2 -/- mice as well as wild-type 3,5-diethoxy-carbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine-fed mice were treated with GLP-1-receptor agonist exendin-4 for 2 weeks prior to analysis. Colesevelam reduced serum liver enzymes, BAs and expression of proinflammatory and profibrogenic markers. Faecal BA profiling revealed increased levels of secondary BAs after resin treatment, while hepatic and biliary BA composition showed a shift towards more hydrophilic BAs. Colonic GLP-1 secretion, portal venous GLP-1 levels and intestinal messenger RNA expression of gut hormone Proglucagon were increased, while ileal Fgf15 expression was abolished by colesevelam. Exendin-4 treatment increased bile duct mass without promoting a reactive cholangiocyte phenotype in mouse models of sclerosing cholangitis. Microbiota analysis showed an increase of the phylum δ-Proteobacteria after colesevelam treatment and a shift within the phyla Firmicutes from Clostridiales to Lactobacillus . Colesevelam increases faecal BA excretion and enhances BA conversion towards secondary BAs, thereby stimulating secretion of GLP-1 from enteroendocrine L-cells and attenuates liver and bile duct injury in Mdr2 -/- mice. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article

  12. Metabolic Effects of Cholecystectomy: Gallbladder Ablation Increases Basal Metabolic Rate through G-Protein Coupled Bile Acid Receptor Gpbar1-Dependent Mechanisms in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Víctor; Amigo, Ludwig; Zanlungo, Silvana; Galgani, José; Robledo, Fermín; Arrese, Marco; Bozinovic, Francisco; Nervi, Flavio

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Bile acids (BAs) regulate energy expenditure by activating G-protein Coupled Bile Acid Receptor Gpbar1/TGR5 by cAMP-dependent mechanisms. Cholecystectomy (XGB) increases BAs recirculation rates resulting in increased tissue exposure to BAs during the light phase of the diurnal cycle in mice. We aimed to determine: 1) the effects of XGB on basal metabolic rate (BMR) and 2) the roles of TGR5 on XGB-dependent changes in BMR. Methods BMR was determined by indirect calorimetry in wild type and Tgr5 deficient (Tgr5-/-) male mice. Bile flow and BAs secretion rates were measured by surgical diversion of biliary duct. Biliary BAs and cholesterol were quantified by enzymatic methods. BAs serum concentration and specific composition was determined by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Gene expression was determined by qPCR analysis. Results XGB increased biliary BAs and cholesterol secretion rates, and elevated serum BAs concentration in wild type and Tgr5-/- mice during the light phase of the diurnal cycle. BMR was ~25% higher in cholecystectomized wild type mice (p <0.02), whereas no changes were detected in cholecystectomized Tgr5-/- mice compared to wild-type animals. Conclusion XGB increases BMR by TGR5-dependent mechanisms in mice. PMID:25738495

  13. Metabolism of Oxo-Bile Acids and Characterization of Recombinant 12α-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenases from Bile Acid 7α-Dehydroxylating Human Gut Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doden, Heidi; Sallam, Lina A; Devendran, Saravanan; Ly, Lindsey; Doden, Greta; Daniel, Steven L; Alves, João M P; Ridlon, Jason M

    2018-05-15

    Bile acids are important cholesterol-derived nutrient signaling hormones, synthesized in the liver, that act as detergents to solubilize dietary lipids. Bile acid 7α-dehydroxylating gut bacteria generate the toxic bile acids deoxycholic acid and lithocholic acid from host bile acids. The ability of these bacteria to remove the 7-hydroxyl group is partially dependent on 7α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSDH) activity, which reduces 7-oxo-bile acids generated by other gut bacteria. 3α-HSDH has an important enzymatic activity in the bile acid 7α-dehydroxylation pathway. 12α-HSDH activity has been reported for the low-activity bile acid 7α-dehydroxylating bacterium Clostridium leptum ; however, this activity has not been reported for high-activity bile acid 7α-dehydroxylating bacteria, such as Clostridium scindens , Clostridium hylemonae , and Clostridium hiranonis Here, we demonstrate that these strains express bile acid 12α-HSDH. The recombinant enzymes were characterized from each species and shown to preferentially reduce 12-oxolithocholic acid to deoxycholic acid, with low activity against 12-oxochenodeoxycholic acid and reduced activity when bile acids were conjugated to taurine or glycine. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that 12α-HSDH is widespread among Firmicutes , Actinobacteria in the Coriobacteriaceae family, and human gut Archaea IMPORTANCE 12α-HSDH activity has been established in the medically important bile acid 7α-dehydroxylating bacteria C. scindens , C. hiranonis , and C. hylemonae Experiments with recombinant 12α-HSDHs from these strains are consistent with culture-based experiments that show a robust preference for 12-oxolithocholic acid over 12-oxochenodeoxycholic acid. Phylogenetic analysis identified novel members of the gut microbiome encoding 12α-HSDH. Future reengineering of 12α-HSDH enzymes to preferentially oxidize cholic acid may provide a means to industrially produce the therapeutic bile acid ursodeoxycholic acid. In

  14. Functional discrepancy between two liver lobes after hemilobe biliary drainage in patients with jaundice and bile duct cancer: an appraisal using (99m)Tc-GSA SPECT/CT fusion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumiyoshi, Tatsuaki; Shima, Yasuo; Okabayashi, Takehiro; Noda, Yoshihiro; Hata, Yasuhiro; Murata, Yoriko; Kozuki, Akihito; Tokumaru, Teppei; Nakamura, Toshio; Uka, Kiminori

    2014-11-01

    To determine the functional discrepancy between the two liver lobes using technetium 99m ((99m)Tc) diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid-galactosyl human serum albumin ( GSA diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid-galactosyl human serum albumin ) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) fusion imaging following preoperative biliary drainage and portal vein embolization ( PVE portal vein embolization ) in patients with jaundice who have bile duct cancer ( BDC bile duct cancer ). This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board, with waiver of informed consent. Preoperative (99m)Tc- GSA diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid-galactosyl human serum albumin SPECT/CT fusion images from 32 patients with extrahepatic BDC bile duct cancer were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were classified into four groups according to the extent of biliary drainage and presence of a preoperative right PVE portal vein embolization : right lobe drainage group (right drainage), bilateral lobe drainage group (bilateral drainage), left lobe drainage group (left drainage), and left lobe drainage with right PVE portal vein embolization group (left drainage with right PVE portal vein embolization ). Percentage volume and percentage function were measured in each lobe using fusion imaging. The ratio between percentage function and percentage volume (the function-to-volume ratio) was calculated for each lobe, and the results were compared among the four groups. Statistical analysis was performed with Wilcoxon signed-rank tests and Mann-Whitney U tests. The median values for the function-to-volume ratio in the right drainage, bilateral drainage, left drainage, and left drainage with right PVE portal vein embolization group were 1.12, 1.05, 1.02, and 0.81 in the right lobe; and 0.51, 0.88, 0.96, and 1.17 in the left lobe. Significant differences in the function-to-volume ratio were observed among the four groups (right drainage vs bilateral

  15. Evidence connecting old, new and neglected glucose-lowering drugs to bile acid-induced GLP-1 secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kårhus, Martin L; Brønden, Andreas; Sonne, David P

    2017-01-01

    Bile acids are amphipathic water-soluble steroid-based molecules best known for their important lipid-solubilizing role in the assimilation of fat. Recently, bile acids have emerged as metabolic integrators with glucose-lowering potential. Among a variety of gluco-metabolic effects, bile acids have...... current evidence connecting established glucose-lowering drugs to bile acid-induced GLP-1 secretion and discusses whether bile acid-induced GLP-1 secretion may constitute a new basis for understanding how metformin, inhibitors of the apical sodium-dependent bile acids transporter, and bile acid...... sequestrants - old, new and neglected glucose-lowering drugs - improve glucose metabolism....

  16. Efficient generation of biliary epithelial cells from rabbit intrahepatic bile duct by Y-27632 and Matrigel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lifang; Ji, Shaohui; Sun, Aijing

    2013-06-01

    Efficient culture of primary biliary epithelial cells (BECs) from adult liver is useful for both experimental studies and clinical applications of tissue engineering. However, an effective culture system for long-term proliferation of adult BECs is still unachieved. Laboratory rabbit has been used in a large number of studies; however, there are no reports of BECs from normal adult rabbit. As little as 5 g of normal rabbit liver tissue were minced, digested, and then clonally cultured in medium containing FBS and ITS. Cells were characterized by cell morphology, immunoassaying, and growth rate assay. Different combination of growth factors and substrates, including Y-27632 and Matrigel, were employed to assess their effect on cell proliferation. In the primary culture, the BECs cellular sheets consisting of cuboidal cells, as well as fibroblast-like cells and other hepatic cells, emerged with time of culture. The BECs cellular sheets were then manually split into cells clumps for further characterization. The subcultured cells had typical cell morphology of cholangiocytes, expressed the specific markers of BECs, including GGT, cytokeratin (CK18), and CK19, and possessed the capacity to form duct-like structure in three-dimensional Matrigel. Y-27632 and Matrigel-treated BECs had a steady growth rate as well as colony-formation capacity. The BECs were maintained in Y-27632 and Matrigel culture system for more than 3 mo. This is the first example, to our knowledge, of the successful culture of BECs from normal adult rabbit liver. Furthermore, our results indicate that treatment of BECs with Y-27632 and Matrigel is a simple method for efficient output of BECs.

  17. The Helicobacter pylori L-form: formation and isolation in the human bile cultures in vitro and in the gallbladders of patients with biliary diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan N; Ding, Wen J; Pan, Yao Z; Tang, Ke L; Wang, Tao; She, Xiao L; Wang, He

    2015-04-01

    The Helicobacter pylori is considered the important causative agent causing biliary diseases, but the H. pylori can be isolated from very few gallbladder specimens with diseases. We studied the formation of H. pylori L-forms in bile in vitro and isolated the H. pylori L-forms from gallbladder of patients with biliary diseases. We inoculated the H. pylori into the human bile to induce the L-form in vitro. The gallbladder specimens were collected from patients with biliary diseases to isolate the bacterial L-forms by the nonhigh osmotic isolation technique, and the H. pylori L-forms in the L-form isolates were identified by the gene assay for the H. pylori-specific genes 16S rRNA and UreA. The H. Pylori cannot be isolated from the bile-induced cultures, but the H. pylori L-form can be isolated from the H. pylori-negative bile-induced cultures. The L-form isolates of bile-induced cultures showed a positive reaction of the H. pylori-specific genes by PCR, and the coincidence ratio of the nucleotide sequences between the L-forms and the H. pylori is 99%. The isolation rate of bacteria L-form is 93.2% in the gallbladder specimens with bacteria-negative isolation culture by the nonhigh osmotic isolation technique, and the positive rate of the H. pylori-specific genes in the L-form isolates is 7.1% in the bacterial L-form-positive isolation cultures by the PCR. H. pylori can be rapidly induced into the L-form in the human bile; the L-form, as the latent bacteria, can live in the host gallbladder for a long times, and they made the host became a latent carrier of the H. pylori L-form. The H. pylori L-form can be isolated by the nonhigh osmotic isolation technique, and the variant can be identified by the gene assay for the H. pylori-specific genes 16S rRNA and reA. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Bile acids cycle disruption in patients with nasopharyngeal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-12-31

    Dec 31, 2014 ... Cite as: Wang C-S, Liu S-H, Peng J, Tang C, Zhu W-G. Bile acids cycle disruption in patients .... stein-Barr virus in the development of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Chin. J. Cancer 2014; 33(11): 556 PubMed. -568. 2. Mrizak D, Martin N, Barjon C, Jimenez-Pailhes AS,. Mustapha R, Niki T, Guigay J, Pancre V, ...

  19. Boldine enhances bile production in rats via osmotic and Farnesoid X receptor dependent mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cermanova, Jolana; Kadova, Zuzana; Zagorova, Marie; Hroch, Milos; Tomsik, Pavel; Nachtigal, Petr; Kudlackova, Zdenka; Pavek, Petr; Dubecka, Michaela; Ceckova, Martina; Staud, Frantisek; Laho, Tomas; Micuda, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    Boldine, the major alkaloid from the Chilean Boldo tree, is used in traditional medicine to support bile production, but evidence to support this function is controversial. We analyzed the choleretic potential of boldine, including its molecular background. The acute- and long-term effects of boldine were evaluated in rats either during intravenous infusion or after 28-day oral treatment. Infusion of boldine instantly increased the bile flow 1.4-fold in healthy rats as well as in animals with Mrp2 deficiency or ethinylestradiol induced cholestasis. This effect was not associated with a corresponding increase in bile acid or glutathione biliary excretion, indicating that the effect is not related to stimulation of either bile acid dependent or independent mechanisms of bile formation and points to the osmotic activity of boldine itself. We subsequently analyzed bile production under conditions of changing biliary excretion of boldine after bolus intravenous administration and found strong correlations between both parameters. HPLC analysis showed that bile concentrations of boldine above 10 μM were required for induction of choleresis. Importantly, long-term pretreatment, when the bile collection study was performed 24-h after the last administration of boldine, also accelerated bile formation despite undetectable levels of the compound in bile. The effect paralleled upregulation of the Bsep transporter and increased biliary clearance of its substrates, bile acids. We consequently confirmed the ability of boldine to stimulate the Bsep transcriptional regulator, FXR receptor. In conclusion, our study clarified the mechanisms and circumstances surrounding the choleretic activity of boldine. - Highlights: • Boldine may increase bile production by direct as well as indirect mechanisms. • Biliary concentrations of boldine above 10 μM directly stimulate bile production. • Long-term oral boldine administration increases bile acid (BA) biliary secretion. • Boldine

  20. Boldine enhances bile production in rats via osmotic and Farnesoid X receptor dependent mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cermanova, Jolana [Department of Pharmacology, Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Medicine in Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Kadova, Zuzana [Department of Pharmacology, Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Medicine in Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Deparment of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Pharmacy in Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Zagorova, Marie [Department of Pharmacology, Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Medicine in Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Hroch, Milos [Department of Pharmacology, Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Medicine in Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Department of Medical Biochemistry, Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Medicine in Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Tomsik, Pavel [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Medicine in Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Nachtigal, Petr; Kudlackova, Zdenka [Department of Biological and Medical Sciences, Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Pharmacy in Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Pavek, Petr; Dubecka, Michaela; Ceckova, Martina; Staud, Frantisek [Deparment of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Pharmacy in Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Laho, Tomas [Department of Pharmacology, Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Medicine in Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Micuda, Stanislav, E-mail: micuda@lfhk.cuni.cz [Department of Pharmacology, Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Medicine in Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)

    2015-05-15

    Boldine, the major alkaloid from the Chilean Boldo tree, is used in traditional medicine to support bile production, but evidence to support this function is controversial. We analyzed the choleretic potential of boldine, including its molecular background. The acute- and long-term effects of boldine were evaluated in rats either during intravenous infusion or after 28-day oral treatment. Infusion of boldine instantly increased the bile flow 1.4-fold in healthy rats as well as in animals with Mrp2 deficiency or ethinylestradiol induced cholestasis. This effect was not associated with a corresponding increase in bile acid or glutathione biliary excretion, indicating that the effect is not related to stimulation of either bile acid dependent or independent mechanisms of bile formation and points to the osmotic activity of boldine itself. We subsequently analyzed bile production under conditions of changing biliary excretion of boldine after bolus intravenous administration and found strong correlations between both parameters. HPLC analysis showed that bile concentrations of boldine above 10 μM were required for induction of choleresis. Importantly, long-term pretreatment, when the bile collection study was performed 24-h after the last administration of boldine, also accelerated bile formation despite undetectable levels of the compound in bile. The effect paralleled upregulation of the Bsep transporter and increased biliary clearance of its substrates, bile acids. We consequently confirmed the ability of boldine to stimulate the Bsep transcriptional regulator, FXR receptor. In conclusion, our study clarified the mechanisms and circumstances surrounding the choleretic activity of boldine. - Highlights: • Boldine may increase bile production by direct as well as indirect mechanisms. • Biliary concentrations of boldine above 10 μM directly stimulate bile production. • Long-term oral boldine administration increases bile acid (BA) biliary secretion. • Boldine

  1. The role of bile acids in the pathogenesis of bowel diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Panek-Jeziorna

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Bile acids not only play a cardinal role in the digestion and absorption of fat and fat-soluble vitamins, but also significantly affect gastrointestinal motor, sensory and secretory functions, intestinal barrier permeability and the regulation of the inflammatory response. The results of recent studies have revealed complex interactions between bile acids and the gut microbiota. In addition, bile acids also play a role of signaling molecules regulating the activity of lipid and glucose metabolic pathways, as well as a role of ligands for transcription factors. Genetic factors associated with the regulation of bile acid synthesis, transport and action may significantly influence gastrointestinal function and predispose to diarrhea resulting from bile acid malabsorption. Methods used in the diagnosis of bile acid malabsorption include 75selenium-homotaurocholic acid test, serum C4 and fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19, as well as fecal bile acid levels. The paper presents the latest data on the role of bile acid in the pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel diseases and colorectal cancer. Advances in the treatment of disturbances in bile acids absorption and synthesis are also presented. A better understanding of molecular mechanisms regulating bile acid action may have implication for colorectal cancer prevention.

  2. The bile acid-sequestering resin sevelamer eliminates the acute GLP-1 stimulatory effect of endogenously released bile acids in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønden, Andreas; Albér, Anders; Rohde, Ulrich

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: The discovery of the specific bile acid receptors farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and Takeda G protein-coupled receptor 5 (TGR5) in enteroendocrine L cells has prompted research focusing on the impact of bile acids on glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion and glucose metabolism. The aim of t...

  3. Acid and bile tolerance of spore-forming lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyronimus, B; Le Marrec, C; Sassi, A H; Deschamps, A

    2000-11-01

    Criteria for screening probiotics such as bile tolerance and resistance to acids were studied with 13 spore-forming lactic acid producing bacteria. Different strains of Sporolactobacillus, Bacillus laevolacticus, Bacillus racemilacticus and Bacillus coagulans grown in MRS broth were subjected to low pH conditions (2, 2.5 and 3) and increasing bile concentrations. Among these microorganisms, Bacillus laevolacticus DSM 6475 and all Sporolactobacillus strains tested except Sporolactobacillus racemicus IAM 12395, were resistant to pH 3. Only Bacillus racemilacticus and Bacillus coagulans strains were tolerant to bile concentrations over 0.3% (w/v).

  4. The bile acids, deoxycholic acid and ursodeoxycholic acid, regulate colonic epithelial wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroz, Magdalena S; Lajczak, Natalia K; Goggins, Bridie J; Keely, Simon; Keely, Stephen J

    2018-03-01

    The intestinal epithelium constitutes an innate barrier which, upon injury, undergoes self-repair processes known as restitution. Although bile acids are known as important regulators of epithelial function in health and disease, their effects on wound healing processes are not yet clear. Here we set out to investigate the effects of the colonic bile acids, deoxycholic acid (DCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), on epithelial restitution. Wound healing in T 84 cell monolayers grown on transparent, permeable supports was assessed over 48 h with or without bile acids. Cell migration was measured in Boyden chambers. mRNA and protein expression were measured by RT-PCR and Western blotting. DCA (50-150 µM) significantly inhibited wound closure in cultured epithelial monolayers and attenuated cell migration in Boyden chamber assays. DCA also induced nuclear accumulation of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), whereas an FXR agonist, GW4064 (10 µM), inhibited wound closure. Both DCA and GW4064 attenuated the expression of CFTR Cl - channels, whereas inhibition of CFTR activity with either CFTR- inh -172 (10 µM) or GlyH-101 (25 µM) also prevented wound healing. Promoter/reporter assays revealed that FXR-induced downregulation of CFTR is mediated at the transcriptional level. In contrast, UDCA (50-150 µM) enhanced wound healing in vitro and prevented the effects of DCA. Finally, DCA inhibited and UDCA promoted mucosal healing in an in vivo mouse model. In conclusion, these studies suggest bile acids are important regulators of epithelial wound healing and are therefore good targets for development of new drugs to modulate intestinal barrier function in disease treatment. NEW & NOTEWORTHY The secondary bile acid, deoxycholic acid, inhibits colonic epithelial wound healing, an effect which appears to be mediated by activation of the nuclear bile acid receptor, FXR, with subsequent downregulation of CFTR expression and activity. In contrast, ursodeoxycholic acid promotes

  5. Bile acids induce arrhythmias in human atrial myocardium--implications for altered serum bile acid composition in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainer, Peter P; Primessnig, Uwe; Harenkamp, Sandra; Doleschal, Bernhard; Wallner, Markus; Fauler, Guenter; Stojakovic, Tatjana; Wachter, Rolf; Yates, Ameli; Groschner, Klaus; Trauner, Michael; Pieske, Burkert M; von Lewinski, Dirk

    2013-11-01

    High bile acid serum concentrations have been implicated in cardiac disease, particularly in arrhythmias. Most data originate from in vitro studies and animal models. We tested the hypotheses that (1) high bile acid concentrations are arrhythmogenic in adult human myocardium, (2) serum bile acid concentrations and composition are altered in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and (3) the therapeutically used ursodeoxycholic acid has different effects than other potentially toxic bile acids. Multicellular human atrial preparations ('trabeculae') were exposed to primary bile acids and the incidence of arrhythmic events was assessed. Bile acid concentrations were measured in serum samples from 250 patients and their association with AF and ECG parameters analysed. Additionally, we conducted electrophysiological studies in murine myocytes. Taurocholic acid (TCA) concentration-dependently induced arrhythmias in atrial trabeculae (14/28 at 300 µM TCA, pursodeoxycholic acid did not. Patients with AF had significantly decreased serum levels of ursodeoxycholic acid conjugates and increased levels of non-ursodeoxycholic bile acids. In isolated myocytes, TCA depolarised the resting membrane potential, enhanced Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) tail current density and induced afterdepolarisations. Inhibition of NCX prevented arrhythmias in atrial trabeculae. High TCA concentrations induce arrhythmias in adult human atria while ursodeoxycholic acid does not. AF is associated with higher serum levels of non-ursodeoxycholic bile acid conjugates and low levels of ursodeoxycholic acid conjugates. These data suggest that higher levels of toxic (arrhythmogenic) and low levels of protective bile acids create a milieu with a decreased arrhythmic threshold and thus may facilitate arrhythmic events.

  6. Emergencies in neonatal management: jaundice and biliary atresia

    OpenAIRE

    Clemente, Maria Grazia; Dessanti, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Biliary atresia is a severe and progressive inflammatory process of unknown cause, which initially involves the extrahepatic bile ducts but which quickly proceeds towards the intrahepatic bile tree leading rapidly to biliary cirrhosis. Biliary atresia is the major reason for liver transplantation during childhood. The extrahepatic bile ducts in biliary atresia become connective fibrotic cords which is irreversibly damaged.

  7. Bile dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harding, L.K.; Donovan, I.A.

    1986-01-01

    The availability of new biliary radiopharamaceutical led to the expectation that the physiology and the pathophysiology of bile would be resolved. Some aspects of the physiology of bile have clarified and it has been shown that nasogastric intubation does not cause bile reflux. Careful analysis of excretion patterns has allowed detection of obstruction of the bile duct after cholecystectomy, and the radiopharmaceuticals have proved helpful in the diagnosis of acute colecystitis. In chronic cholecystitis, however, varying results have been obtained. Information on the incidence and amount of reflux in normal subjects is also confused, since several different techniques have been used with widely varying results. The clinical value of biliary dynamic studies is at present limited in patients with chronic cholecystitis, peptic ulcer, or symptoms suggestive of bile reflux. More data, with appropriate control subjects, is required to identify abnormal reflux, determine its effects, and decide on appropriate treatment

  8. CHANGES IN THE BILE-ACIDS COMPOSITION OF BILE JUICE AFTER FAT INTAKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CRISTINA DINU

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available A high fat intake increases the flow of bile or changes the composition of bile acids in refluxed duodenal contents, and then plays an important role in the developmental precancerous lesion of BE and leading to esophageal adenocarcinoma EAC. Wistar rats were divided into three groups based on their diet: a control group (fed with standard diet, containing 4.20% soybean oil, a second group (fed with a low cowfat diet, containing 4.20% cow fat and the third group (fed with a high cow-fat diet, containing 16.8% cow fat. The TCA value detected in the animals fed the high cowfat diet (median concentration, 13.8 ± 2.42 mmol/L was significant increased comparative with those detected of animals fed the standard diet (8.15 ± 1.22 mmol/L. The TDCA value in the high cow-fat group (2.64 ± 0.97 mmol/L was significantly increased comparative with those detected of animals fed the standard diet (1.66 ± 0.50 mmol/L.

  9. In vitro digestion with bile acids enhances the bioaccessibility of kale polyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Isabelle; Jayaprakasha, Guddarangavvanahally K; Patil, Bhimanagouda

    2018-02-21

    Kale (Brassica oleracea) is a leafy green vegetable belonging to the Brassicaceae family, and kale leaves have large amounts of dietary fiber and polyphenolics. Dietary fiber can bind bile acids, thus potentially decreasing cholesterol levels; however, whether the polyphenols from kale contribute to in vitro bile acid binding capacity remains unclear. In the present study, kale was extracted with hexane, acetone, and MeOH : water and the dried extracts, as well as the fiber-rich residue, were tested for their bile acid binding capacity. The fiber-rich residue bound total bile acids in amounts equivalent to that bound by raw kale. The lyophilized acetone extract bound significantly more glycochenodeoxycholate and glycodeoxycholate and less of other bile acids. To test whether bile acid binding enhanced the bioaccessibility of polyphenolic compounds from kale, we used ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization/quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry to identify chemical constituents and measure their bioaccessibility in an in vitro digestion reaction. This identified 36 phenolic compounds in kale, including 18 kaempferol derivatives, 13 quercetin derivatives, 4 sinapoyl derivatives, and one caffeoylquinic acid. The bioaccessibility of these phenolics was significantly higher (69.4%) in digestions with bile acids. Moreover, bile acids enhanced the bioaccessibility of quercetin by 25 times: only 2.7% of quercetin derivatives were bioaccessible in the digestion without bile acids, but with bile acids, their accessibility increased to 69.5%. Bile acids increased the bioaccessibility of kaempferol from 37.7% to 69.2%. The extractability and biostability of total phenolics in the digested residue increased 1.8 fold in the digestions with bile acids. These results demonstrated the potential use of kale to improve human health.

  10. Effects of clofibric acid on the biliary excretion of benoxaprofen glucuronide and taurine conjugate in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, K; Kanoh, H; Mohri, K

    2011-10-01

    Benoxaprofen (BOP) is a 2-methyl propionic acid derivative with anti-inflammatory activity. BOP has an asymmetric carbon, and receives chiral inversion from R to S in vivo. BOP is metabolized to glucuronide (BOP-G) and taurine conjugate (BOP-T). The configuration of BOP-G is mainly S, and that of BOP-T is R. Chiral inversion of R to S of the propionic acid moiety and amino acid conjugation of carboxyl compounds proceed via an acyl CoA intermediate. It is known that fibrates, used in hyperlipidemia, induce acyl CoA synthetase and increase CoA concentration. We administered racemic BOP (10 mg/kg body weight) to rats (CFA+) pre-administered clofibric acid (CFA, 280 mg/kg/day), and studied BOP, BOP-G, and BOP-T enantiomer concentrations in plasma and bile up to 12 h after administration. The findings were compared with those in rats (CFA-) that had not received CFA. Furthermore, we studied the amounts of BOP-G enantiomer produced by glucuronidation in vitro using microsomes pretreated with CFA. The amounts of (S)-BOP-G in CFA+ rats were 2.7-fold larger than that in CFA- rats. Although (R)-BOP-T was excreted in CFA- rats, BOP-T could not be detected in CFA+ rats. Plasma clearance values of racemic BOP and (S)-BOP in CFA+ rats were 5-fold and 6-fold larger than those in CFA- rats, respectively. (S)-BOP-G formation activities were higher than (R)-BOP-G formation activities in both CFA+and CFA- microsomes. These findings suggest that CFA increases biliary excretion of (S)-BOP-G and facilitates plasma elimination of BOP, and further suggests that CFA predominantly induces chiral inversion to S rather than metabolic reaction to (R)-BOP-T, resulting in an increase of (S)-BOP-G.

  11. The role of membrane cholesterol in determining bile acid cytotoxicity and cytoprotection of ursodeoxycholic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Doyen, Rand; Lichtenberger, Lenard M.

    2013-01-01

    In cholestatic liver diseases, the ability of hydrophobic bile acids to damage membranes of hepatocytes/ductal cells contributes to their cytotoxicity. However, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDC), a hydrophilic bile acid, is used to treat cholestasis because it protects membranes. It has been well established that bile acids associate with and solubilize free cholesterol (CHOL) contained within the lumen of the gallbladder because of their structural similarities. However, there is a lack of understanding of how membrane CHOL, which is a well-established membrane stabilizing agent, is involved in cytotoxicity of hydrophobic bile acids and the cytoprotective effect of UDC. We utilized phospholipid liposomes to examine the ability of membrane CHOL to influence toxicity of individual bile acids, such as UDC and the highly toxic sodium deoxycholate (SDC), as well as the cytoprotective mechanism of UDC against SDC-induced cytotoxicity by measuring membrane permeation and intramembrane dipole potential. The kinetics of bile acid solubilization of phosphatidylcholine liposomes containing various levels of CHOL was also characterized. It was found that the presence of CHOL in membranes significantly reduced the ability of bile acids to damage synthetic membranes. UDC effectively prevented damaging effects of SDC on synthetic membranes only in the presence of membrane CHOL, while UDC enhances the damaging effects of SDC in the absence of CHOL. This further demonstrates that the cytoprotective effects of UDC depend upon the level of CHOL in the lipid membrane. Thus, changes in cell membrane composition, such as CHOL content, potentially influence the efficacy of UDC as the primary drug used to treat cholestasis. PMID:19150330

  12. [Effect of high blood levels of bile acid on respiratory functions of New Zealand rabbits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Zhao, Cong; Tian, Yinghong; Yin, Yanru

    2013-08-01

    To compare the patterns of respiratory function variations resulting from the classical reflex of blood pressure fall and high blood levels of bile acid, so as to provide evidence for the regulation of respiratory function via bile acids. Seventy New Zealand male Rabbits, under general anesthesia with 20% urethane, were subjected to tracheal intubations and carotid artery cannulations via median incisions of the neck. Using a biological signal acquisition system, the changes in the breathing and blood pressure were observed in response to stimulation of the pneumogastric nerves or to ear vein injections of diluted bile acids or the water solutions of 5 dissociated bile acids. Stimulation of the pneumogastric nerves and injections of diluted bile acids both lowered the blood pressure without significant differences in the total reaction time (T). However, the total respiratory reaction time of bile acids, RT(bile acids), was 9-10 times longer than the total reaction time of blood pressure T(bile acids) (Pacids) were higher than that RR(pneumogastric nerves)resulting from the classical reflex (Pacids), the values of RR(bile acids) were significantly higher than those of RR(bile acids) in RT2(bile acids) interval. UDCA produced no significant influence on blood pressure or respiratory function (Pacid reagents did (Pacids not only act through reflex factors but also have direct effects on respiratory function regulation. Under our experimental conditions, UDCA has no effect on blood pressure or respiratory function, but the other 4 dissociated bile acid reagents can all dose-dependently lower blood pressure and significantly affect respiratory function.

  13. Comparative potency of obeticholic acid and natural bile acids on FXR in hepatic and intestinal in vitro cell models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; LaCerte, Carl; Kansra, Sanjay; Jackson, Jonathan P; Brouwer, Kenneth R; Edwards, Jeffrey E

    2017-12-01

    Obeticholic acid (OCA) is a semisynthetic farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonist, an analogue of chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) which is indicated for the treatment of primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) in combination with ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). OCA efficiently inhibits bile acid synthesis and promotes bile acid efflux via activating FXR-mediated mechanisms in a physiologically relevant in vitro cell system, Sandwich-cultured Transporter Certified ™ human primary hepatocytes (SCHH). The study herein evaluated the effects of UDCA alone or in combination with OCA in SCHH. UDCA (≤100 μmol/L) alone did not inhibit CYP7A1 mRNA, and thus, no reduction in the endogenous bile acid pool observed. UDCA ≤100 μmol/L concomitantly administered with 0.1 μmol/L OCA had no effect on bile acid synthesis beyond what was observed with OCA alone. Furthermore, this study evaluated human Caco-2 cells (clone C2BBe1) as in vitro intestinal models. Glycine conjugate of OCA increased mRNA levels of FXR target genes in Caco-2 cells, FGF-19, SHP, OSTα/β, and IBABP, but not ASBT, in a concentration-dependent manner, while glycine conjugate of UDCA had no effect on the expression of these genes. The results suggested that UDCA ≤100 μmol/L did not activate FXR in human primary hepatocytes or intestinal cell line Caco-2. Thus, co-administration of UDCA with OCA did not affect OCA-dependent pharmacological effects. © 2017 The Authors. Pharmacology Research & Perspectives published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd, British Pharmacological Society and American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  14. 3 alpha-Hydroxylated bile acid profiles in clinically normal cats, cats with severe hepatic lipidosis, and cats with complete extrahepatic bile duct occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center, S A; Thompson, M; Guida, L

    1993-05-01

    Concentrations of 3 alpha-hydroxylated bile acids were measured in serum and urine of clinically normal (healthy) cats (n = 6), cats with severe hepatic lipidosis (n = 9), and cats with complete bile duct occlusion (n = 4). Bile acid concentrations were measured by use of a gradient flow high-performance liquid chromatography procedure with an acetonitrile and ammonium phosphate mobile phase and an in-line postanalytic column containing 3 alpha-hydroxy-steroid dehydrogenase and a fluorescence detector. Specific identification of all bile acid peaks was not completed; unidentified moieties were represented in terms of their elution time (in minutes). Significant differences in serum and urine bile acid concentrations, quantitative and proportional, were determined among groups of cats. Cats with hepatic lipidosis and bile duct occlusion had significantly (P > or = 0.05) greater total serum and urine bile acids concentrations than did healthy cats. The proportion of hydrophobic bile acids in serum, those eluting at > or = 400 minutes, was 1.9% for healthy cats, 3.3% for cats with lipidosis, and 5.4% for bile duct-obstructed cats. Both groups of ill cats had a broader spectrum of unidentified late-eluting serum bile acids than did healthy cats; the largest spectrum developed in bile duct-occluded cats.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. The reversed feto-maternal bile acid gradient in intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy is corrected by ursodeoxycholic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geenes, Victoria; Lövgren-Sandblom, Anita; Benthin, Lisbet; Lawrance, Dominic; Chambers, Jenny; Gurung, Vinita; Thornton, Jim; Chappell, Lucy; Khan, Erum; Dixon, Peter; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Williamson, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is a pregnancy-specific liver disorder associated with an increased risk of adverse fetal outcomes. It is characterised by raised maternal serum bile acids, which are believed to cause the adverse outcomes. ICP is commonly treated with ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). This study aimed to determine the fetal and maternal bile acid profiles in normal and ICP pregnancies, and to examine the effect of UDCA treatment. Matched maternal and umbilical cord serum samples were collected from untreated ICP (n = 18), UDCA-treated ICP (n = 46) and uncomplicated pregnancy (n = 15) cases at the time of delivery. Nineteen individual bile acids were measured using HPLC-MS/MS. Maternal and fetal serum bile acids are significantly raised in ICP compared with normal pregnancy (p = acid. There are no differences between the umbilical cord artery and cord vein levels of the major bile acid species. The feto-maternal gradient of bile acids is reversed in ICP. Treatment with UDCA significantly reduces serum bile acids in the maternal compartment (p = acid (LCA) concentrations. ICP is associated with significant quantitative and qualitative changes in the maternal and fetal bile acid pools. Treatment with UDCA reduces the level of bile acids in both compartments and reverses the qualitative changes. We have not found evidence to support the suggestion that UDCA treatment increases fetal LCA concentrations to deleterious levels.

  16. Molecular Mechanisms of Bile Duct Development

    OpenAIRE

    Zong, Yiwei; Stanger, Ben Z.

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian biliary system, consisting of the intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile ducts, is responsible for transporting bile from the liver to the intestine. Bile duct dysfunction, as is seen in some congenital biliary diseases such as Alagille syndrome and biliary atresia, can lead to the accumulation of bile in the liver, preventing the excretion of detoxification products and ultimately leading to liver damage. Bile duct formation requires coordinated cell-cell interactions, resulting in...

  17. Topochemical approach to efficiently produce main-chain poly(bile acid)s with high molecular weights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weina; Li, Xuesong; Zhu, Wei; Li, Changxu; Xu, Dan; Ju, Yong; Li, Guangtao

    2011-07-21

    Based on a topochemical approach, a strategy for efficiently producing main-chain poly(bile acid)s in the solid state was developed. This strategy allows for facile and scalable synthesis of main-chain poly(bile acid)s not only with high molecular weights, but also with quantitative conversions and yields.

  18. Mechanisms of triglyceride metabolism in patients with bile acid diarrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Nidhi Midhu; McFarlane, Michael; Nwokolo, Chuka; Bardhan, Karna Dev; Arasaradnam, Ramesh Pulendran

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are essential for the absorption of lipids. BA synthesis is inhibited through intestinal farnesoid X receptor (FXR) activity. BA sequestration is known to influence BA metabolism and control serum lipid concentrations. Animal data has demonstrated a regulatory role for the FXR in triglyceride metabolism. FXR inhibits hepatic lipogenesis by inhibiting the expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c via small heterodimer primer activity. Conversely, FXR promotes free fatty acids oxidation by inducing the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α. FXR can reduce the expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, which regulates the assembly of very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL). FXR activation in turn promotes the clearance of circulating triglycerides by inducing apolipoprotein C-II, very low-density lipoproteins receptor (VLDL-R) and the expression of Syndecan-1 together with the repression of apolipoprotein C-III, which increases lipoprotein lipase activity. There is currently minimal clinical data on triglyceride metabolism in patients with bile acid diarrhoea (BAD). Emerging data suggests that a third of patients with BAD have hypertriglyceridemia. Further research is required to establish the risk of hypertriglyceridaemia in patients with BAD and elicit the mechanisms behind this, allowing for targeted treatment. PMID:27570415

  19. Metformin protects rat hepatocytes against bile acid-induced apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titia E Woudenberg-Vrenken

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Metformin is used in the treatment of Diabetes Mellitus type II and improves liver function in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Metformin activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, the cellular energy sensor that is sensitive to changes in the AMP/ATP-ratio. AMPK is an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR. Both AMPK and mTOR are able to modulate cell death. AIM: To evaluate the effects of metformin on hepatocyte cell death. METHODS: Apoptotic cell death was induced in primary rat hepatocytes using either the bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA or TNFα in combination with actinomycin D (actD. AMPK, mTOR and phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K/Akt were inhibited using pharmacological inhibitors. Apoptosis and necrosis were quantified by caspase activation, acridine orange staining and Sytox green staining respectively. RESULTS: Metformin dose-dependently reduces GCDCA-induced apoptosis, even when added 2 hours after GCDCA, without increasing necrotic cell death. Metformin does not protect against TNFα/ActD-induced apoptosis. The protective effect of metformin is dependent on an intact PI3-kinase/Akt pathway, but does not require AMPK/mTOR-signaling. Metformin does not inhibit NF-κB activation. CONCLUSION: Metformin protects against bile acid-induced apoptosis and could be considered in the treatment of chronic liver diseases accompanied by inflammation.

  20. Metformin impacts cecal bile acid profiles in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillner, Nina; Walker, Alesia; Koch, Wendelin; Witting, Michael; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2018-04-15

    Bile acids (BAs) are major components of bile synthesized from cholesterol and take part in the digestion of dietary lipids, as well as having signaling functions. They undergo extensive microbial metabolism inside the gastrointestinal tract. Here, we present a method of ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography coupled to ion trap mass spectrometry for quantification of 45 BAs in mouse cecum. The system was validated in regard to sensitivity with limits of detection and quantification (0.6-24.9 nM), interday accuracy (102.4%), interday precision (15.2%), recovery rate (74.7%), matrix effect (98.2%) and carry-over effect (mice were treated with metformin for 1 day or 14 days. One day of treatment resulted in a significant increase of total BA concentration (2.7-fold increase; db/db metformin 5.32 μmol/g, db/db control mice 1.95 μmol/g), most notable in levels of 7-oxodeoxycholic, 3-dehydrocholic and cholic acid. We observed only minor impact on BA metabolism after 14 days of metformin treatment, compared to the single treatment. Furthermore, healthy wild type mice had elevated concentrations of allocholic and ω-muricholic acid compared to diabetic mice. Our method proved the applicability of profiling BAs in cecum to investigate intestinal BA metabolism in diabetes and pharmacological applications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Mechanisms of triglyceride metabolism in patients with bile acid diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Nidhi Midhu; McFarlane, Michael; Nwokolo, Chuka; Bardhan, Karna Dev; Arasaradnam, Ramesh Pulendran

    2016-08-14

    Bile acids (BAs) are essential for the absorption of lipids. BA synthesis is inhibited through intestinal farnesoid X receptor (FXR) activity. BA sequestration is known to influence BA metabolism and control serum lipid concentrations. Animal data has demonstrated a regulatory role for the FXR in triglyceride metabolism. FXR inhibits hepatic lipogenesis by inhibiting the expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c via small heterodimer primer activity. Conversely, FXR promotes free fatty acids oxidation by inducing the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α. FXR can reduce the expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, which regulates the assembly of very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL). FXR activation in turn promotes the clearance of circulating triglycerides by inducing apolipoprotein C-II, very low-density lipoproteins receptor (VLDL-R) and the expression of Syndecan-1 together with the repression of apolipoprotein C-III, which increases lipoprotein lipase activity. There is currently minimal clinical data on triglyceride metabolism in patients with bile acid diarrhoea (BAD). Emerging data suggests that a third of patients with BAD have hypertriglyceridemia. Further research is required to establish the risk of hypertriglyceridaemia in patients with BAD and elicit the mechanisms behind this, allowing for targeted treatment.

  2. Discrimination of bile acids by the rainbow trout olfactory system: Evidence as potential pheromone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PERCILIA C GIAQUINTO

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Electro-olfactogram recording was used to determine whether the olfactory epithelium of adult rainbow trout is specifically sensitive to bile acids, some of which have been hypothesized to function as pheromones. Of 38 bile acids that had been pre-screened for olfactory activity, 6 were selected. The rainbow trout-specific bile acids, taurocholic acid (TCA, and taurolithocholic acid 3-sulfate (TLS were the most potent compounds tested. TLS had a distinctive dose-response curve. Cross-adaptation experiments demonstrated that sensitivity to bile acids is attributable to at least 3 independent classes of olfactory receptor sites. Our data suggest that bile acids are discriminated by olfaction in rainbow trout, supporting the possibility that these compounds function as pheromones

  3. Bile acid flux through portal but not peripheral veins inhibits CYP7A1 expression without involvement of ileal FGF19 in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Quan; Guo, Grace L; Honda, Akira; Shi, Daniel; Saumoy, Monica; Salen, Gerald; Xu, Guorong

    2014-08-15

    It was proposed that CYP7A1 expression is suppressed through the gut-hepatic signaling pathway fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 15/19-fibroblast growth factor receptor 4, which is initiated by activation of farnesoid X receptor in the intestine rather than in the liver. The present study tested whether portal bile acid flux alone without ileal FGF19 could downregulate CYP7A1 expression in rabbits. A rabbit model was developed by infusing glycodeoxycholic acid (GDCA) through the splenic vein to bypass ileal FGF19. Study was conducted in four groups of rabbits: control; bile fistula + bovine serum albumin solution perfusion (BF); BF + GDCA (by portal perfusion); and BF + GDCA-f (by femoral perfusion). Compared with only BF, BF + GDCA (6 h portal perfusion) suppressed CYP7A1 mRNA, whereas BF + GDCA-f (via femoral vein) with the same perfusion rate of GDCA did not show inhibitory effects. Meanwhile, there was a decrease in ileal FGF19 expression and portal FGF19 protein levels, but an equivalent increase in biliary bile acid outputs in both GDCA perfusion groups. This study demonstrated that portal bile acid flux alone downregulated CYP7A1 expression with diminished FGF19 expression and protein levels, whereas the same bile acid flux reaching the liver through the hepatic artery via femoral vein had no inhibitory effect on CYP7A1. We propose that bile acid flux through the portal venous system may be a kind of "intestinal factor" that suppresses CYP7A1 expression. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Lytic effects of mixed micelles of fatty acids and bile acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lapré, J. A.; Termont, D. S.; Groen, A. K.; van der Meer, R.

    1992-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that bile acids and fatty acids promote colon cancer. A proposed mechanism is a lytic effect of these surfactants on colonic epithelium, resulting in a compensatory proliferation of colonic cells. To investigate the first step of this hypothesis, we studied the lytic

  5. Novel ex vivo model for hands-on teaching of and training in EUS-guided biliary drainage: creation of "Mumbai EUS" stereolithography/3D printing bile duct prototype (with videos)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhir, Vinay; Itoi, Takao; Fockens, Paul; Perez-Miranda, Manuel; Khashab, Mouen A.; Seo, Dong Wan; Yang, Ai Ming; Lawrence, Khek Yu; Maydeo, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Background: EUS-guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) has emerged as an alternative rescue method in patients with failed ERCP. Opportunities for teaching and training are limited because of a low case volume at most centers. Objective: To evaluate a stereolithography/3-dimensional (3D) printing bile

  6. A Standard Structure for Bile Acids and Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Meijide

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structures of two ester compounds (a monomer in its methyl ester form, with an amino isophthalic group, and a dimer in which the two steroid units are linked by a urea bridge recrystallized from ethyl acetate/methanol derived from cholic acid are described. Average bond lengths and bond angles from the crystal structures of 26 monomers and four dimers (some of them in several solvents of bile acids and esters (and derivatives are used for proposing a standard steroid nucleus. The hydrogen bond network and conformation of the lateral chain are also discussed. This standard structure was used to compare with the structures of both progesterone and cholesterol.

  7. Bile Acid Signaling Pathways from the Enterohepatic Circulation to the Central Nervous System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, Kim L.; Kalsbeek, Andries; Soeters, Maarten R.; Eggink, Hannah M.

    2017-01-01

    Bile acids are best known as detergents involved in the digestion of lipids. In addition, new data in the last decade have shown that bile acids also function as gut hormones capable of influencing metabolic processes via receptors such as FXR (farnesoid X receptor) and TGR5 (Takeda G

  8. Bile acids modulate glucocorticoid metabolism and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in obstructive jaundice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McNeilly, Alison D; Macfarlane, David P; O'Flaherty, Emmett

    2010-01-01

    Suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis occurs in cirrhosis and cholestasis and is associated with increased concentrations of bile acids. We investigated whether this was mediated through bile acids acting to impair steroid clearance by inhibiting glucocorticoid metabolism by 5bet...

  9. Ion-neutral Clustering of Bile Acids in Electrospray Ionization Across UPLC Flow Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Patrick; Broeckling, Corey D.; Murphy, James; Prenni, Jessica E.

    2018-02-01

    Bile acid authentic standards were used as model compounds to quantitatively evaluate complex in-source phenomenon on a UPLC-ESI-TOF-MS operated in the negative mode. Three different diameter columns and a ceramic-based microfluidic separation device were utilized, allowing for detailed descriptions of bile acid behavior across a wide range of flow regimes and instantaneous concentrations. A custom processing algorithm based on correlation analysis was developed to group together all ion signals arising from a single compound; these grouped signals produce verified compound spectra for each bile acid at each on-column mass loading. Significant adduction was observed for all bile acids investigated under all flow regimes and across a wide range of bile acid concentrations. The distribution of bile acid containing clusters was found to depend on the specific bile acid species, solvent flow rate, and bile acid concentration. Relative abundancies of each cluster changed non-linearly with concentration. It was found that summing all MS level (low collisional energy) ions and ion-neutral adducts arising from a single compound improves linearity across the concentration range (0.125-5 ng on column) and increases the sensitivity of MS level quantification. The behavior of each cluster roughly follows simple equilibrium processes consistent with our understanding of electrospray ionization mechanisms and ion transport processes occurring in atmospheric pressure interfaces. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. The synthesis of taurine-conjugated bile acids and bile acid sulfates labeled with {sup 14}C or {sup 3}H in the taurine moiety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jie Zhang; Griffiths, W.J.; Sjoevall, Jan [Karolinska Inst., Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics Dept., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-02-01

    Studies of bile acid transport systems require radio-labeled taurine-conjugated bile acids with high specific activity. An established procedure was optimized to provide mild, fast, and effective conjugation of radio-labeled taurine with different types of bile acids, including those with labile 7{alpha}-hydroxy-3-oxo-{Delta}{sup 4} or 3{beta}, 7{alpha}-dihydroxy-{Delta}{sup 5} structures. Taurine labeled with {sup 14}C or {sup 3}H was reacted with excess bile acid anhydride formed from the tributylamine salt and ethylchloroformate (2/1 M/M) in aqueous dioxane for 15 min at room temperature. The yields were higher than 95% and less than 2% side products were formed. Bile acid sulfates were conjugated with {sup 14}C- or {sup 3}H-labeled taurine by using N-ethoxycarbonyl-2-ethoxy-1,2-dihydroquinoline as the coupling reagent. The products were effectively purified by chromatography of the sodium salts on Sephadex LH-20. The yields of taurine-conjugated bile acid sulfates were 65-70%. (author).

  11. The synthesis of taurine-conjugated bile acids and bile acid sulfates labeled with 14C or 3H in the taurine moiety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jie Zhang; Griffiths, W.J.; Sjoevall, Jan

    1997-01-01

    Studies of bile acid transport systems require radio-labeled taurine-conjugated bile acids with high specific activity. An established procedure was optimized to provide mild, fast, and effective conjugation of radio-labeled taurine with different types of bile acids, including those with labile 7α-hydroxy-3-oxo-Δ 4 or 3β, 7α-dihydroxy-Δ 5 structures. Taurine labeled with 14 C or 3 H was reacted with excess bile acid anhydride formed from the tributylamine salt and ethylchloroformate (2/1 M/M) in aqueous dioxane for 15 min at room temperature. The yields were higher than 95% and less than 2% side products were formed. Bile acid sulfates were conjugated with 14 C- or 3 H-labeled taurine by using N-ethoxycarbonyl-2-ethoxy-1,2-dihydroquinoline as the coupling reagent. The products were effectively purified by chromatography of the sodium salts on Sephadex LH-20. The yields of taurine-conjugated bile acid sulfates were 65-70%. (author)

  12. Comparison of Bile Acids and Acetaminophen Protein Adducts in Children and Adolescents with Acetaminophen Toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura James

    Full Text Available Metabolomics approaches have enabled the study of new mechanisms of liver injury in experimental models of drug toxicity. Disruption of bile acid homeostasis is a known mechanism of drug induced liver injury. The relationship of individual bile acids to indicators of oxidative drug metabolism (acetaminophen protein adducts and liver injury was examined in children with acetaminophen overdose, hospitalized children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and children with no recent exposure to acetaminophen. Nine bile acids were quantified through targeted metabolomic analysis in the serum samples of the three groups. Bile acids were compared to serum levels of acetaminophen protein adducts and alanine aminotransferase. Glycodeoxycholic acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, and glycochenodeoxycholic acid were significantly increased in children with acetaminophen overdose compared to healthy controls. Among patients with acetaminophen overdose, bile acids were higher in subjects with acetaminophen protein adduct values > 1.0 nmol/mL and modest correlations were noted for three bile acids and acetaminophen protein adducts as follows: taurodeoxycholic acid (R=0.604; p<0.001, glycodeoxycholic acid (R=0.581; p<0.001, and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (R=0.571; p<0.001. Variability in bile acids was greater among hospitalized children receiving low doses of acetaminophen than in healthy children with no recent acetaminophen exposure. Compared to bile acids, acetaminophen protein adducts more accurately discriminated among children with acetaminophen overdose, children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and healthy control subjects. In children with acetaminophen overdose, elevations of conjugated bile acids were associated with specific indicators of acetaminophen metabolism and non-specific indicators of liver injury.

  13. Effect of administration of antibiotics peripartum to wistar rats on bile acid profiles in offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clement Thaarup, Ida; Roager, Henrik Munch; Tulstrup, Monica Vera-Lise

    2016-01-01

    Vertical transmission of the maternal microbiota is assumed to be crucial for the offspring’s development. A disrupted microbiota composition leading to an altered metabolic activity of the microbiota can affect bile acid profiles, which are known to influence host metabolism. Here, we examined...... whether perturbation of the maternal gut microbiota during pregnancy, induced by administration of either amoxicillin or vancomycin to pregnant rats, influenced bile acid profiles in the offspring. The dams were treated with antibiotics from 8 days before the dams gave birth and continued until weaning (4...... weeks later). Blood samples were collected from offspring at ages 2, 4 and 14 weeks, and from dams at the end of treatment. From these blood samples, bile acids were extracted and 22 bile acids were quantified by targeted liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Comparing the serum bile acid profiles...

  14. Intestinal Crosstalk between Bile Acids and Microbiota and Its Impact on Host Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlström, Annika; Sayin, Sama I; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota is considered a metabolic "organ" that not only facilitates harvesting of nutrients and energy from the ingested food but also produces numerous metabolites that signal through their cognate receptors to regulate host metabolism. One such class of metabolites, bile acids......, is produced in the liver from cholesterol and metabolized in the intestine by the gut microbiota. These bioconversions modulate the signaling properties of bile acids via the nuclear farnesoid X receptor and the G protein-coupled membrane receptor 5, which regulate numerous metabolic pathways in the host....... Conversely, bile acids can modulate gut microbial composition both directly and indirectly through activation of innate immune genes in the small intestine. Thus, host metabolism can be affected through microbial modifications of bile acids, which lead to altered signaling via bile acid receptors, but also...

  15. Efficacy of obeticholic acid in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis and inadequate response to ursodeoxycholic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfield, Gideon M; Mason, Andrew; Luketic, Velimir; Lindor, Keith; Gordon, Stuart C; Mayo, Marlyn; Kowdley, Kris V; Vincent, Catherine; Bodhenheimer, Henry C; Parés, Albert; Trauner, Michael; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Adorini, Luciano; Sciacca, Cathi; Beecher-Jones, Tessa; Castelloe, Erin; Böhm, Olaf; Shapiro, David

    2015-04-01

    We evaluated the efficacy and safety of obeticholic acid (OCA, α-ethylchenodeoxycholic acid) in a randomized controlled trial of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis who had an inadequate response to ursodeoxycholic acid therapy. We performed a double-blind study of 165 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (95% women) and levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) 1.5- to 10-fold the upper limit of normal. Patients were randomly assigned to groups given 10 mg, 25 mg, or 50 mg doses of OCA or placebo, once daily for 3 months. Patients maintained their existing dose of ursodeoxycholic acid throughout the study. The primary outcome was change in level of ALP from baseline (day 0) until the end of the study (day 85 or early termination). We also performed an open-label extension of the trial in which 78 patients were enrolled and 61 completed the first year. OCA was superior to placebo in achieving the primary end point. Subjects given OCA had statistically significant relative reductions in mean ALP from baseline to the end of the study (P ursodeoxycholic acid. The incidence and severity of pruritus were lowest among patients who received 10 mg/d OCA. Biochemical responses to OCA were maintained in a 12-month open-label extension trial. ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT00550862. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Bile Acids, FXR, and Metabolic Effects of Bariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier F. Noel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Overweight and obesity represent major risk factors for diabetes and related metabolic diseases. Obesity is associated with a chronic and progressive inflammatory response leading to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D mellitus, although the precise mechanism mediating this inflammatory process remains poorly understood. The most effective intervention for the treatment of obesity, bariatric surgery, leads to glucose normalization and remission of T2D. Recent work in both clinical studies and animal models supports bile acids (BAs as key mediators of these effects. BAs are involved in lipid and glucose homeostasis primarily via the farnesoid X receptor (FXR transcription factor. BAs are also involved in regulating genes involved in inflammation, obesity, and lipid metabolism. Here, we review the novel role of BAs in bariatric surgery and the intersection between BAs and immune, obesity, weight loss, and lipid metabolism genes.

  17. Bile Acids in the Treatment of Cardiometabolic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vítek, Libor

    2017-11-01

    Bile acids (BA), for decades considered only to have fat-emulsifying functions in the gut lumen, have recently emerged as novel cardio-metabolic modulators. They have real endocrine effects, acting via multiple intracellular receptors in various organs and tissues. BA affect energy homeostasis through the modulation of glucose and lipid metabolism, predominantly by activating the nuclear farnesoid X receptor (FXR), as well as the cytoplasmic membrane G protein-coupled BA receptor TGR5 in a variety of tissues; although numerous other intracellular targets of BA are also in play.The roles of BA in the pathogenesis of diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular diseases are seriously being considered, and BA and their derivatives seem to represent novel potential therapeutics to treat these diseases of civilization.

  18. Effect of bile acid sequestrants on glycaemic control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Sonne, David Peick; Mikkelsen, Kristian Hallundbæk

    2012-01-01

    of hypercholesterolaemia: colestipol, cholestyramine and colesevelam. The BAS colestimide/colestilan is used in Japan. Colesevelam was recently approved by the FDA for the treatment of T2DM. We plan to provide a systematic review with meta-analysis of the glucose-lowering effect of BASs with the aim to evaluate......In addition to the lipid-lowering effect of bile acid sequestrants (BASs), they also lower blood glucose and, therefore, could be beneficial in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Three oral BASs are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment...... their potential as glucose-lowering agents in patients with T2DM....

  19. Bile canaliculi formation and biliary transport in 3D sandwich-cultured hepatocytes in dependence of the extracellular matrix composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deharde, Daniela; Schneider, Christin; Hiller, Thomas; Fischer, Nicolas; Kegel, Victoria; Lübberstedt, Marc; Freyer, Nora; Hengstler, Jan G; Andersson, Tommy B; Seehofer, Daniel; Pratschke, Johann; Zeilinger, Katrin; Damm, Georg

    2016-10-01

    Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are still considered as gold standard for investigation of in vitro metabolism and hepatotoxicity in pharmaceutical research. It has been shown that the three-dimensional (3D) cultivation of PHH in a sandwich configuration between two layers of extracellular matrix (ECM) enables the hepatocytes to adhere three dimensionally leading to formation of in vivo like cell-cell contacts and cell-matrix interactions. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of different ECM compositions on morphology, cellular arrangement and bile canaliculi formation as well as bile excretion processes in PHH sandwich cultures systematically. Freshly isolated PHH were cultured for 6 days between two ECM layers made of collagen and/or Matrigel in four different combinations. The cultures were investigated by phase contrast microscopy and immunofluorescence analysis with respect to cell-cell connections, repolarization as well as bile canaliculi formation. The influence of the ECM composition on cell activity and viability was measured using the XTT assay and a fluorescent dead or alive assay. Finally, the bile canalicular transport was analyzed by live cell imaging to monitor the secretion and accumulation of the fluorescent substance CDF in bile canaliculi. Using collagen and Matrigel in different compositions in sandwich cultures of hepatocytes, we observed differences in morphology, cellular arrangement and cell activity of PHH in dependence of the ECM composition. Sandwich-cultured hepatocytes with an underlay of collagen seem to represent the best in vivo tissue architecture in terms of formation of trabecular cell arrangement. Cultures overlaid with collagen were characterized by the formation of abundant bile canaliculi, while the bile canaliculi network in hepatocytes cultured on a layer of Matrigel and overlaid with collagen showed the most branched and stable canalicular network. All cultures showed a time-dependent leakage of

  20. Obeticholic acid, a selective farnesoid X receptor agonist, regulates bile acid homeostasis in sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Jackson, Jonathan P; St Claire, Robert L; Freeman, Kimberly; Brouwer, Kenneth R; Edwards, Jeffrey E

    2017-08-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a master regulator of bile acid homeostasis through transcriptional regulation of genes involved in bile acid synthesis and cellular membrane transport. Impairment of bile acid efflux due to cholangiopathies results in chronic cholestasis leading to abnormal elevation of intrahepatic and systemic bile acid levels. Obeticholic acid (OCA) is a potent and selective FXR agonist that is 100-fold more potent than the endogenous ligand chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA). The effects of OCA on genes involved in bile acid homeostasis were investigated using sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes. Gene expression was determined by measuring mRNA levels. OCA dose-dependently increased fibroblast growth factor-19 (FGF-19) and small heterodimer partner (SHP) which, in turn, suppress mRNA levels of cholesterol 7-alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the rate-limiting enzyme for de novo synthesis of bile acids. Consistent with CYP7A1 suppression, total bile acid content was decreased by OCA (1 μmol/L) to 42.7 ± 20.5% relative to control. In addition to suppressing de novo bile acids synthesis, OCA significantly increased the mRNA levels of transporters involved in bile acid homeostasis. The bile salt excretory pump (BSEP), a canalicular efflux transporter, increased by 6.4 ± 0.8-fold, and the basolateral efflux heterodimer transporters, organic solute transporter α (OST α ) and OST β increased by 6.4 ± 0.2-fold and 42.9 ± 7.9-fold, respectively. The upregulation of BSEP and OST α and OST β, by OCA reduced the intracellular concentrations of d 8 -TCA, a model bile acid, to 39.6 ± 8.9% relative to control. These data demonstrate that OCA does suppress bile acid synthesis and reduce hepatocellular bile acid levels, supporting the use of OCA to treat bile acid-induced toxicity observed in cholestatic diseases. © 2017 Intercept Pharmaceuticals. Pharmacology Research & Perspectives published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd, British Pharmacological Society and

  1. Alteration of the enterohepatic recirculation of bile acids in rats after exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanff, P.; Souidi, M.; Grison, S.; Griffiths, N.M.; Gourmelon, P.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study acute alterations of the enterohepatic recirculation (EHR) of bile acids 3 days after an 8-Gy radiation exposure in vivo in the rat by a washout technique. Using this technique in association with HPLC analysis, the EHR of the major individual bile acids was determined in control and irradiated animals. Ex vivo ileal taurocholate absorption was also studied in Ussing chambers. Major hepatic enzyme activities involved in bile acid synthesis were also measured. Measurements of bile acid intestinal content and intestinal absorption efficiency calculation from washout showed reduced intestinal absorption with significant differences from one bile acid to another: absorption of taurocholate and tauromuricholate was decreased, whereas absorption of the more hydrophobic taurochenodeoxycholate was increased, suggesting that intestinal passive diffusion was enhanced, whereas ileal active transport might be reduced. Basal hepatic secretion was increased only for taurocholate, in accordance with the marked increase of CYP8B1 activity in the liver. The results are clearly demonstrate that concomitantly with radiation-induced intestinal bile acid malabsorption, hepatic bile acid synthesis and secretion are also changed. A current working model for pathophysiological changes in enterohepatic recycling after irradiation is thus proposed. (author)

  2. Use of D(acid)-, D(bile)-, z(acid)-, and z(bile)-values in evaluating Bifidobacteria with regard to stomach pH and bile salt sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Li; Shigwedha, Nditange; Mwandemele, Osmund D

    2010-01-01

    The survival of bifidobacteria in simulated conditions of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract was studied based on the D- and z-value concept. Some Bifidobacterium spp. are probiotics that improve microbial balance in the human GI tract. Because they are sensitive to low pH and bile salt concentrations, their viability in the GI tract is limited. The D- and z-value approach was therefore adopted as a result of observing constant log-cell reduction (90%) when Bifidobacterium spp. were exposed to these 2 different stressing factors. Survivals of one strain each or 4 species of Bifidobacterium was studied at pH between 3.0 and 4.5 and in ox-bile between 0.15% and 0.60% for times up to 41 h. From the D(acid)- and D(bile)-values, the order of resistance to acid and bile was B. bifidum > B. infantis > B. longum > B. adolescentis. While the former 3 strains retained high cell viability at pH 3.5 (>5.5 log CFU/mL after 5 h) and at elevated bile salt concentration of 0.6% (>4.5 log CFU/mL after 3 h), B. adolescentis was less resistant (pH units and 0.40% to 0.49%, respectively. The results suggest that the D(acid)-, D(bile)-, z(acid)-, and z(bile)-value approach could be more appropriate than the screening and selection method in evaluating survival of probiotic bacteria, and in measuring their tolerance or resistance to gastric acidity and the associated bile salt concentration in the small intestine. The evaluation of the tolerance of bifidobacteria to bile salts and low pH has been made possible by use of D- and z-value concept. The calculated z(acid)- and z(bile)-values were all fairly similar for the strains used and suggest the effect of increasing the bile salt concentration or decreasing the pH on the D(acid)- and D(bile)-values. This approach would be useful for predicting the suitability of bifidobacteria and other lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as probiotics for use in real-life situations.

  3. New method for the determination of bile acid turnover using /sup 75/Se-homocholic acid taurine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delhez, H.; Meerwaldt, J.H.; van den Berg, J.W.O.; van Blankenstein, M.

    1982-06-01

    The introduction of /sup 75/Se-homocholic acid taurine (/sup 75/SeHCAT) greatly facilitates the investigation of diarrhoea of unknown origin. By using gamma-labelled bile acids, daily faecal bile acid loss can be measured in total collected stools, thus circumventing laborious mixing and sampling. The /sup 75/SeHCAT method proved to be reliable for the determination of bile acid turnover, giving results identical to the established turnover method using /sup 14/C-taurocholic acid. The new method however, is simpler and faster.

  4. Bile acid effects are mediated by ATP release and purinergic signalling in exocrine pancreatic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowal, Justyna Magdalena; Haanes, Kristian Agmund; Christensen, Nynne

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In many cells, bile acids (BAs) have a multitude of effects, some of which may be mediated by specific receptors such the TGR5 or FXR receptors. In pancreas systemic BAs, as well as intra-ductal BAs from bile reflux, can affect pancreatic secretion. Extracellular ATP and purinergic...

  5. Bile acids for liver-transplanted patients. Protocol for a Cochrane Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, W; Gluud, C

    2003-01-01

    Liver transplantation has become a widely accepted form of treatment for numerous end-stage liver diseases. Bile acids may decrease the degree of allograft rejection after liver transplantation by changing the expression of major histocompatibility complex class molecules in bile duct epithelium...

  6. Urinary Elimination of Bile Acid Glucuronides under Severe Cholestatic Situations: Contribution of Hepatic and Renal Glucuronidation Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Perreault

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Biliary obstruction, a severe cholestatic complication, causes accumulation of toxic bile acids (BAs in liver cells. Glucuronidation, catalyzed by UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT enzymes, detoxifies cholestatic BAs. Using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, 11 BA glucuronide (-G species were quantified in prebiliary and postbiliary stenting serum and urine samples from 17 patients with biliary obstruction. Stenting caused glucuronide- and fluid-specific changes in BA-G levels and BA-G/BA metabolic ratios. In vitro glucuronidation assays with human liver and kidney microsomes revealed that even if renal enzymes generally displayed lower KM values, the two tissues shared similar glucuronidation capacities for BAs. By contrast, major differences between the two tissues were observed when four human BA-conjugating UGTs 1A3, 1A4, 2B4, and 2B7 were analyzed for mRNA and protein levels. Notably, the BA-24G producing UGT1A3 enzyme, abundant in the liver, was not detected in kidney microsomes. In conclusion, the circulating and urinary BA-G profiles are hugely impacted under severe cholestasis. The similar BA-glucuronidating abilities of hepatic and renal extracts suggest that both the liver and kidney may contribute to the urine BA-G pool.

  7. Bile acids destabilise HIF-1α and promote anti-tumour phenotypes in cancer cell models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelan, J. P.; Reen, F. J.; Dunphy, N.; O'Connor, R.; O'Gara, F.

    2016-01-01

    The role of the microbiome has become synonymous with human health and disease. Bile acids, as essential components of the microbiome, have gained sustained credibility as potential modulators of cancer progression in several disease models. At physiological concentrations, bile acids appear to influence cancer phenotypes, although conflicting data surrounds their precise physiological mechanism of action. Previously, we demonstrated bile acids destabilised the HIF-1α subunit of the Hypoxic-Inducible Factor-1 (HIF-1) transcription factor. HIF-1 overexpression is an early biomarker of tumour metastasis and is associated with tumour resistance to conventional therapies, and poor prognosis in a range of different cancers. Here we investigated the effects of bile acids on the cancer growth and migratory potential of cell lines where HIF-1α is known to be active under hypoxic conditions. HIF-1α status was investigated in A-549 lung, DU-145 prostate and MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines exposed to bile acids (CDCA and DCA). Cell adhesion, invasion, migration was assessed in DU-145 cells while clonogenic growth was assessed in all cell lines. Intracellular HIF-1α was destabilised in the presence of bile acids in all cell lines tested. Bile acids were not cytotoxic but exhibited greatly reduced clonogenic potential in two out of three cell lines. In the migratory prostate cancer cell line DU-145, bile acids impaired cell adhesion, migration and invasion. CDCA and DCA destabilised HIF-1α in all cells and significantly suppressed key cancer progression associated phenotypes; clonogenic growth, invasion and migration in DU-145 cells. These findings suggest previously unobserved roles for bile acids as physiologically relevant molecules targeting hypoxic tumour progression

  8. An inproved synthesis of 24- 13C-labeled bile acids using formyl esters and a modified lead tetraacetate procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tserng, K.Y.; Klein, P.D.

    1977-01-01

    An improved synthesis of 24- 13 C-labeled bile acids has been achieved using formyl derivatives of bile acids and a modified lead tetraacetate procedure. The formylated bile acids were degraded by lead tetraacetate and lithium chloride to formylated 23-chloronorcholanes in 72 to 83% yield. Formylated 23-chloronorcholanes were converted to nitriles in dimethylformamide, which were then hydrolyzed to obtain C-24 labeled bile acids in yield of 80 to 90% of labeled sodium cyanide used. This method results in a higher yield and a purer product with less manipulation than previously reported procedures for synthesis of labeled bile acids

  9. Comparison of bile acid synthesis determined by isotope dilution versus fecal acidic sterol output in human subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duane, W.C.; Holloway, D.E.; Hutton, S.W.; Corcoran, P.J.; Haas, N.A.

    1982-01-01

    Fecal acidic sterol output has been found to be much lower than bile acid synthesis determined by isotope dilution. Because of this confusing discrepancy, we compared these 2 measurements done simultaneously on 13 occasions in 5 normal volunteers. In contrast to previous findings, bile acid synthesis by the Lindstedt isotope dilution method averaged 16.3% lower than synthesis simultaneously determined by fecal acidic sterol output (95% confidence limit for the difference - 22.2 to -10.4%). When one-sample determinations of bile acid pools were substituted for Lindstedt pools, bile acid synthesis by isotope dilution averaged 5.6% higher than synthesis by fecal acidic sterol output (95% confidence limits -4.9 to 16.1%). These data indicate that the 2 methods yield values in reasonably close agreement with one another. If anything, fecal acidic sterol outputs are slightly higher than synthesis by isotope dilution

  10. Binding of bile acids by pastry products containing bioactive substances during in vitro digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziedzic, Krzysztof; Górecka, Danuta; Szwengiel, Artur; Smoczyńska, Paulina; Czaczyk, Katarzyna; Komolka, Patrycja

    2015-03-01

    The modern day consumer tends to choose products with health enhancing properties, enriched in bioactive substances. One such bioactive food component is dietary fibre, which shows a number of physiological properties including the binding of bile acids. Dietary fibre should be contained in everyday, easily accessible food products. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine sorption capacities of primary bile acid (cholic acid - CA) and secondary bile acids (deoxycholic - DCA and lithocholic acids - LCA) by muffins (BM) and cookies (BC) with bioactive substances and control muffins (CM) and cookies (CC) in two sections of the in vitro gastrointestinal tract. Variations in gut flora were also analysed in the process of in vitro digestion of pastry products in a bioreactor. Enzymes: pepsin, pancreatin and bile salts: cholic acid, deoxycholic acid and lithocholic acid were added to the culture. Faecal bacteria, isolated from human large intestine, were added in the section of large intestine. The influence of dietary fibre content in cookies and concentration of bile acids in two stages of digestion were analysed. Generally, pastry goods with bioactive substances were characterized by a higher content of total fibre compared with the control samples. These products also differ in the profile of dietary fibre fractions. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) showed that the bile acid profile after two stages of digestion depends on the quality and quantity of fibre. The bile acid profile after digestion of BM and BC forms one cluster, and with the CM and CC forms a separate cluster. High concentration of H (hemicellulose) is positively correlated with LCA (low binding effect) and negatively correlated with CA and DCA contents. The relative content of bile acids in the second stage of digestion was in some cases above the content in the control sample, particularly LCA. This means that the bacteria introduced in the 2nd stage of digestion synthesize the LCA.

  11. Impact of oral vancomycin on gut microbiota, bile acid metabolism, and insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrieze, Anne; Out, Carolien; Fuentes, Susana

    2014-01-01

    .i.d. At baseline and after 1 week of therapy, fecal microbiota composition (Human Intestinal Tract Chip phylogenetic microarray), fecal and plasma bile acid concentrations as well as insulin sensitivity (hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp using [6,6-(2)H2]-glucose tracer) were measured. RESULTS: Vancomycin reduced...... (pinsulin sensitivity (p... of vancomycin significantly impacts host physiology by decreasing intestinal microbiota diversity, bile acid dehydroxylation and peripheral insulin sensitivity in subjects with metabolic syndrome. These data show that intestinal microbiota, particularly of the Firmicutes phylum contributes to bile acid...

  12. The reversed feto-maternal bile acid gradient in intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy is corrected by ursodeoxycholic acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Geenes

    Full Text Available Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP is a pregnancy-specific liver disorder associated with an increased risk of adverse fetal outcomes. It is characterised by raised maternal serum bile acids, which are believed to cause the adverse outcomes. ICP is commonly treated with ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA. This study aimed to determine the fetal and maternal bile acid profiles in normal and ICP pregnancies, and to examine the effect of UDCA treatment. Matched maternal and umbilical cord serum samples were collected from untreated ICP (n = 18, UDCA-treated ICP (n = 46 and uncomplicated pregnancy (n = 15 cases at the time of delivery. Nineteen individual bile acids were measured using HPLC-MS/MS. Maternal and fetal serum bile acids are significantly raised in ICP compared with normal pregnancy (p = <0.0001 and <0.05, respectively, predominantly due to increased levels of conjugated cholic and chenodeoxycholic acid. There are no differences between the umbilical cord artery and cord vein levels of the major bile acid species. The feto-maternal gradient of bile acids is reversed in ICP. Treatment with UDCA significantly reduces serum bile acids in the maternal compartment (p = <0.0001, thereby reducing the feto-maternal transplacental gradient. UDCA-treatment does not cause a clinically important increase in lithocholic acid (LCA concentrations. ICP is associated with significant quantitative and qualitative changes in the maternal and fetal bile acid pools. Treatment with UDCA reduces the level of bile acids in both compartments and reverses the qualitative changes. We have not found evidence to support the suggestion that UDCA treatment increases fetal LCA concentrations to deleterious levels.

  13. Postnatal development of bile secretory physiology in the dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavoloni, N.; Jones, M.J.; Berk, P.D.

    1985-01-01

    To determine whether bile formation in the dog is an immature process at birth, several determinants of bile secretion were studied in anesthetized, bile duct-cannulated puppies of 0-42 days of age and adult dogs. Basal canalicular bile flow rate, estimated by 14 C-erythritol biliary clearance, averaged 0.182 microliter/min/g liver in 0-3 day-old puppies and increased to 0.324 and 0.461 microliter/min/g in puppies 7-21 and 28-42 days of age, respectively. Calculated ductular bile water reabsorption ( 14 C-erythritol biliary clearance-bile flow) was virtually absent in 0-3 day-old puppies, and averaged 0.017 and 0.092 microliter/min/g in puppies of 7-21 and 28-42 days of age, respectively. In adult dogs, ductular bile water reabsorption was 0.132 microliter/min/g. These functional deficiencies of the newborn dog were associated with an increased biliary permeability to 3 H-inulin which could not be accounted for solely by an increased solute diffusion due to the lower rate of canalicular bile flow. Administration of taurocholate up to 2000 nmol/min/kg produced in all animals a similar increase in canalicular bile flow and bile acid excretion, and was not associated with changes in ductular bile water reabsorption rate. These findings are interpreted to indicate that, in the dog, bile secretory function is immature at birth and develops during postnatal life

  14. Oleanolic acid alters bile acid metabolism and produces cholestatic liver injury in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jie, E-mail: JLiu@kumc.edu [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Zunyi Medical College, Zunyi 563003 (China); Lu, Yuan-Fu [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Zunyi Medical College, Zunyi 563003 (China); Zhang, Youcai; Wu, Kai Connie [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Fan, Fang [Cytopathology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Klaassen, Curtis D. [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Oleanolic acid (OA) is a triterpenoids that exists widely in plants. OA is effective in protecting against hepatotoxicants. Whereas a low dose of OA is hepatoprotective, higher doses and longer-term use of OA produce liver injury. This study characterized OA-induced liver injury in mice. Adult C57BL/6 mice were given OA at doses of 0, 22.5, 45, 90, and 135 mg/kg, s.c., daily for 5 days, and liver injury was observed at doses of 90 mg/kg and above, as evidenced by increases in serum activities of alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase, increases in serum total bilirubin, as well as by liver histopathology. OA-induced cholestatic liver injury was further evidenced by marked increases of both unconjugated and conjugated bile acids (BAs) in serum. Gene and protein expression analysis suggested that livers of OA-treated mice had adaptive responses to prevent BA accumulation by suppressing BA biosynthetic enzyme genes (Cyp7a1, 8b1, 27a1, and 7b1); lowering BA uptake transporters (Ntcp and Oatp1b2); and increasing a BA efflux transporter (Ostβ). OA increased the expression of Nrf2 and its target gene, Nqo1, but decreased the expression of AhR, CAR and PPARα along with their target genes, Cyp1a2, Cyp2b10 and Cyp4a10. OA had minimal effects on PXR and Cyp3a11. Taken together, the present study characterized OA-induced liver injury, which is associated with altered BA homeostasis, and alerts its toxicity potential. - Highlights: • Oleanolic acid at higher doses and long-term use may produce liver injury. • Oleanolic acid increased serum ALT, ALP, bilirubin and bile acid concentrations. • OA produced feathery degeneration, inflammation and cell death in the liver. • OA altered bile acid homeostasis, affecting bile acid synthesis and transport.

  15. Determination of Bile Acids in Piglet Bile by Solid Phase Extraction and Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Si; Lim, David W; Turner, Justine M; Wales, Paul W; Curtis, Jonathan M

    2016-03-01

    An LC/MS/MS-based method was developed for the determination of individual bile acids (BA) and their conjugates in porcine bile samples. The C18-based solid-phase extraction (SPE) procedure was optimized so that all 19 target BA and their glycine and taurine conjugates were collected with high recoveries for standards (89.1-100.2%). Following this, all 19 compounds were separated and quantified in a single 12 min chromatographic run. The method was validated in terms of linearity, sensitivity, accuracy, precision, and recovery. An LOD in the low ppb range with measured precisions in the range of 0.5-9.3% was achieved. The recoveries for all of the 19 analytes in bile samples were all >80%. The validated method was successfully applied to the profiling of BA and their conjugates in the bile from piglets treated with exogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) in a preclinical model of neonatal parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). The method developed is rapid and could be easily implemented for routine analysis of BA and their conjugates in other biofluids or tissues.

  16. The role of peroxisomal fatty acyl-CoA beta-oxidation in bile acid biosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, H.; Miwa, A.

    1989-01-01

    The physiological role of the peroxisomal fatty acyl-CoA beta-oxidizing system (FAOS) is not yet established. We speculated that there might be a relationship between peroxisomal degradation of long-chain fatty acids in the liver and the biosynthesis of bile acids. This was investigated using [1- 14 C]butyric acid and [1- 14 C]lignoceric acid as substrates of FAOS in mitochondria and peroxisomes, respectively. The incorporation of [ 14 C]lignoceric acid into primary bile acids was approximately four times higher than that of [ 14 C]butyric acid (in terms of C-2 units). The pools of these two fatty acids in the liver were exceedingly small. The incorporations of radioactivity into the primary bile acids were strongly inhibited by administration of aminotriazole, which is a specific inhibitor of peroxisomal FAOS in vivo. Aminotriazole inhibited preferentially the formation of cholate, the major primary bile acid, from both [ 14 C]lignoceric acid and [ 14 C]butyric acid, rather than the formation of chenodeoxycholate. The former inhibition was about 70% and the latter was approximately 40-50%. In view of reports that cholate is biosynthesized from endogenous cholesterol, the above results indicate that peroxisomal FAOS may have an anabolic function, supplying acetyl CoA for bile acid biosynthesis

  17. The role of peroxisomal fatty acyl-CoA beta-oxidation in bile acid biosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, H.; Miwa, A. (Josai Univ., Saitama (Japan))

    1989-11-01

    The physiological role of the peroxisomal fatty acyl-CoA beta-oxidizing system (FAOS) is not yet established. We speculated that there might be a relationship between peroxisomal degradation of long-chain fatty acids in the liver and the biosynthesis of bile acids. This was investigated using (1-{sup 14}C)butyric acid and (1-{sup 14}C)lignoceric acid as substrates of FAOS in mitochondria and peroxisomes, respectively. The incorporation of ({sup 14}C)lignoceric acid into primary bile acids was approximately four times higher than that of ({sup 14}C)butyric acid (in terms of C-2 units). The pools of these two fatty acids in the liver were exceedingly small. The incorporations of radioactivity into the primary bile acids were strongly inhibited by administration of aminotriazole, which is a specific inhibitor of peroxisomal FAOS in vivo. Aminotriazole inhibited preferentially the formation of cholate, the major primary bile acid, from both ({sup 14}C)lignoceric acid and ({sup 14}C)butyric acid, rather than the formation of chenodeoxycholate. The former inhibition was about 70% and the latter was approximately 40-50%. In view of reports that cholate is biosynthesized from endogenous cholesterol, the above results indicate that peroxisomal FAOS may have an anabolic function, supplying acetyl CoA for bile acid biosynthesis.

  18. Key discoveries in bile acid chemistry and biology and their clinical applications: history of the last eight decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Alan F.; Hagey, Lee R.

    2014-01-01

    During the last 80 years there have been extraordinary advances in our knowledge of the chemistry and biology of bile acids. We present here a brief history of the major achievements as we perceive them. Bernal, a physicist, determined the X-ray structure of cholesterol crystals, and his data together with the vast chemical studies of Wieland and Windaus enabled the correct structure of the steroid nucleus to be deduced. Today, C24 and C27 bile acids together with C27 bile alcohols constitute most of the bile acid “family”. Patterns of bile acid hydroxylation and conjugation are summarized. Bile acid measurement encompasses the techniques of GC, HPLC, and MS, as well as enzymatic, bioluminescent, and competitive binding methods. The enterohepatic circulation of bile acids results from vectorial transport of bile acids by the ileal enterocyte and hepatocyte; the key transporters have been cloned. Bile acids are amphipathic, self-associate in solution, and form mixed micelles with polar lipids, phosphatidylcholine in bile, and fatty acids in intestinal content during triglyceride digestion. The rise and decline of dissolution of cholesterol gallstones by the ingestion of 3,7-dihydroxy bile acids is chronicled. Scientists from throughout the world have contributed to these achievements. PMID:24838141

  19. Key discoveries in bile acid chemistry and biology and their clinical applications: history of the last eight decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Alan F; Hagey, Lee R

    2014-08-01

    During the last 80 years there have been extraordinary advances in our knowledge of the chemistry and biology of bile acids. We present here a brief history of the major achievements as we perceive them. Bernal, a physicist, determined the X-ray structure of cholesterol crystals, and his data together with the vast chemical studies of Wieland and Windaus enabled the correct structure of the steroid nucleus to be deduced. Today, C24 and C27 bile acids together with C27 bile alcohols constitute most of the bile acid "family". Patterns of bile acid hydroxylation and conjugation are summarized. Bile acid measurement encompasses the techniques of GC, HPLC, and MS, as well as enzymatic, bioluminescent, and competitive binding methods. The enterohepatic circulation of bile acids results from vectorial transport of bile acids by the ileal enterocyte and hepatocyte; the key transporters have been cloned. Bile acids are amphipathic, self-associate in solution, and form mixed micelles with polar lipids, phosphatidylcholine in bile, and fatty acids in intestinal content during triglyceride digestion. The rise and decline of dissolution of cholesterol gallstones by the ingestion of 3,7-dihydroxy bile acids is chronicled. Scientists from throughout the world have contributed to these achievements. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Evaluating Hepatobiliary Transport with 18F-Labeled Bile Acids: The Effect of Radiolabel Position and Bile Acid Structure on Radiosynthesis and In Vitro and In Vivo Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stef De Lombaerde

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. An in vivo determination of bile acid hepatobiliary transport efficiency can be of use in liver disease and preclinical drug development. Given the increased interest in bile acid Positron Emission Tomography- (PET- imaging, a further understanding of the impact of 18-fluorine substitution on bile acid handling in vitro and in vivo can be of significance. Methods. A number of bile acid analogues were conceived for nucleophilic substitution with [18F]fluoride: cholic acid analogues of which the 3-, 7-, or 12-OH function is substituted with a fluorine atom (3α-[18F]FCA; 7β-[18F]FCA; 12β-[18F]FCA; a glycocholic and chenodeoxycholic acid analogue, substituted on the 3-position (3β-[18F]FGCA and 3β-[18F]FCDCA, resp.. Uptake by the bile acid transporters NTCP and OATP1B1 was evaluated with competition assays in transfected CHO and HEK cell lines and efflux by BSEP in membrane vesicles. PET-scans with the tracers were performed in wild-type mice (n=3 per group: hepatobiliary transport was monitored and compared to a reference tracer, namely, 3β-[18F]FCA. Results. Compounds 3α-[18F]FCA, 3β-[18F]FGCA, and 3β-[18F]FCDCA were synthesized in moderate radiochemical yields (4–10% n.d.c. and high radiochemical purity (>99%; 7β-[18F]FCA and 12β-[18F]FCA could not be synthesized and included further in this study. In vitro evaluation showed that 3α-FCA, 3β-FGCA, and 3β-FCDCA all had a low micromolar Ki-value for NTCP, OATP1B1, and BSEP. In vivo, 3α-[18F]FCA, 3β-[18F]FGCA, and 3β-[18F]FCDCA displayed hepatobiliary transport with varying efficiency. A slight yet significant difference in uptake and efflux rate was noticed between the 3α-[18F]FCA and 3β-[18F]FCA epimers. Conjugation of 3β-[18F]FCA with glycine had no significant effect in vivo. Compound 3β-[18F]FCDCA showed a significantly slower hepatic uptake and efflux towards gallbladder and intestines. Conclusion. A set of 18F labeled bile acids was synthesized that are

  1. Reference standard for serum bile acids in pregnancy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-01-31

    Please cite this paper as: Egan N, Bartels A, Khashan A, Broadhurst D, Joyce C, O\\'Mullane J, O\\'Donoghue K. Reference standard for serum bile acids in pregnancy. BJOG 2012;00:000-000. DOI: 10.1111\\/j.1471-0528.2011.03245.x. Objective Obstetric cholestasis (OC) is a liver disorder characterised by pruritus and elevated serum bile acids (SBA) that affects one in 200 pregnant women. It is associated with adverse perinatal outcomes such as premature delivery and stillbirth. Mild OC is defined as SBA levels of 10-39 mumol\\/l, and severe OC is defined by levels >40 mumol\\/l. SBA levels in normal pregnancy have not been investigated. We aimed to establish reference values for SBA in healthy pregnant women across different trimesters of pregnancy. Design Cross-sectional analysis of SBA levels. Setting A large tertiary referral university teaching maternity hospital. Population Healthy pregnant women with a singleton pregnancy and a body mass index (BMI) < 40, excluding women with significant alcohol intake, history of liver disease, prior cholecystectomy and OC. Methods Cross-sectional analysis of SBA levels at 12, 20, 28 and 36 weeks of gestation, and on days 1-3 postpartum. Main outcome measures SBA levels in mumol\\/l. Results A total of 219 women attending for antenatal care were recruited, and SBA levels were assayed at 12, 20, 28 and 36 weeks of gestation, and up to 72 hours postpartum (n = 44-49 cases at each stage). The majority were white European women, with a median age of 30 years (range 17-46 years) and median BMI of 25 (range 18-38). Values of SBA ranged from 0.3 to 9.8 mumol\\/l in 216 women, with only three measurements outside this range. There were no significant changes throughout pregnancy. Conclusions SBA values in uncomplicated pregnancies are consistent, regardless of gestation, and are not elevated in pregnancy. The current reference values for the diagnosis of OC appear to be appropriate.

  2. Molecular interactions between selected sodium salts of bile acids and morphine hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poša, Mihalj; Csanádi, János; Kövér, Katalin E; Guzsvány, Valéria; Batta, Gyula

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to understand the prolonged analgesic action of morphine hydrochloride observed in the presence of sodium 12-oxochenodeoxycholanate. Based on literature, this phenomenon may be due to the formation of aggregates in the cell between the molecules of bile acids and morphine. In addition to the sodium 12-oxochenodeoxycholanate, the present investigation also included salts of cholic and 7-oxodeoxycholic acids. Saturation transfer difference NMR experiments showed that morphine binds to the bile acid molecule close to the aromatic protons H1 and H2 provided that the concentration of the bile acid salt approaches the critical micellar concentration (CMC). The spin-lattice relaxation times (T(1)) of the affected protons decrease significantly in the presence of micellar solutions of the bile acid salts, and the most pronounced change in T(1) was observed for sodium 7-oxodeoxycholate. Diffusion-ordered NMR experiments suggested that morphine hydrochloride can interact only with sodium 7-oxochenodeoxycholate. It can be supposed that the molecular ratio of sodium 7-oxodeoxycholate and morphine hydrochloride in the mixed micelle is 2:1. The CMC values of mixed micelles do not differ from the CMC values of the micelle constituents, which suggests that the binding of morphine hydrochloride does not perturb the hydrophobic domain of the bile acid molecule. In the presence of bile acids, the transfer rate constant (k(12)) of morphine hydrochloride from the buffered aqueous solution to chloroform (model of the cell membrane) shows a decrease. A significant decrease of the k(12) was also observed in the presence of micellar solutions. Kinetic measurements indicated that, in addition to micellar interaction between morphine hydrochloride and sodium salts of bile acids, a complex may also be formed in chloroform via hydrogen bonds formed between the drug and bile acid molecules. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The potential influence of genetic variants in genes along bile acid and bile metabolic pathway on blood cholesterol levels in the population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Y.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Boer, J.M.A.; Müller, M.R.

    2010-01-01

    The liver is currently known to be the major organ to eliminate excess cholesterol from our body. It accomplishes this function in two ways: conversion of cholesterol molecules into bile acids (BAs) and secretion of unesterified cholesterol molecules into bile. BAs are synthesized in the

  4. Ursodeoxycholic and deoxycholic acids: A good and a bad bile acid for intestinal calcium absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Valeria; Rivoira, María; Marchionatti, Ana; Pérez, Adriana; Tolosa de Talamoni, Nori

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) on intestinal Ca(2+) absorption and to find out whether the inhibition of this process caused by NaDOC could be prevented by UDCA. Chicks were employed and divided into four groups: (a) controls, (b) treated with 10mM NaDOC, (c) treated with 60 μg UDCA/100g of b.w., and (d) treated with 10mM NaDOC and 60 μg UDCA/100g of b.w. UDCA enhanced intestinal Ca(2+) absorption, which was time and dose-dependent. UDCA avoided the inhibition of intestinal Ca(2+) absorption caused by NaDOC. Both bile acids altered protein and gene expression of molecules involved in the transcellular pathway of intestinal Ca(2+) absorption, but in the opposite way. UDCA aborted the oxidative stress produced by NaDOC in the intestine. UDCA and UDCA plus NaDOC increased vitamin D receptor protein expression. In conclusion, UDCA is a beneficial bile acid for intestinal Ca(2+) absorption. Contrarily, NaDOC inhibits the intestinal cation absorption through triggering oxidative stress. The use of UDCA in patients with cholestasis would be benefited because of the protective effect on the intestinal Ca(2+) absorption, avoiding the inhibition caused by hydrophobic bile acids and neutralizing the oxidative stress. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of Bile Alcohols on the Microbial 7α-dehydroxylation of Chenodeoxycholic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Lindqvist, A.; Midtvedt, T.; Skrede, S.; Sjövall, J.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of bile alcohols on the microbial 7α-dehydroxylation of chenodeoxycholic acid was investigated. Bile alcohols isolated from urine of patients with cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis were added to anaerobic incubations of rat faecal microflora or isolated 'Strain II' with [14C]chenodeoxycholic acid, and the formation of labelled metabolites was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography after 7 d of incubation. The 7α-dehydroxylation by rat faecal microflora was inhi...

  6. The farnesoid X receptor agonist obeticholic acid upregulates biliary excretion of asymmetric dimethylarginine via MATE-1 during hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berardo, Clarissa; Siciliano, Veronica; Rizzo, Vittoria; Adorini, Luciano; Richelmi, Plinio

    2018-01-01

    Background We previously showed that increased asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) biliary excretion occurs during hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), prompting us to study the effects of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonist obeticholic acid (OCA) on bile, serum and tissue levels of ADMA after I/R. Material and methods Male Wistar rats were orally administered 10mg/kg/day of OCA or vehicle for 5 days and were subjected to 60 min partial hepatic ischemia or sham-operated. After a 60 min reperfusion, serum, tissue and bile ADMA levels, liver mRNA and protein expression of ADMA transporters (CAT-1, CAT-2A, CAT-2B, OCT-1, MATE-1), and enzymes involved in ADMA synthesis (protein-arginine-N-methyltransferase-1, PRMT-1) and metabolism (dimethylarginine-dimethylaminohydrolase-1, DDAH-1) were measured. Results OCA administration induced a further increase in biliary ADMA levels both in sham and I/R groups, with no significant changes in hepatic ADMA content. A reduction in CAT-1, CAT-2A or CAT-2B transcripts was found in OCA-treated sham-operated rats compared with vehicle. Conversely, OCA administration did not change CAT-1, CAT-2A or CAT-2B expression, already reduced by I/R. However, a marked decrease in OCT-1 and increase in MATE-1 expression was observed. A similar trend occurred with protein expression. Conclusion The reduced mRNA expression of hepatic CAT transporters suggests that the increase in serum ADMA levels is probably due to decreased liver uptake of ADMA from the systemic circulation. Conversely, the mechanism involved in further increasing biliary ADMA levels in sham and I/R groups treated with OCA appears to be MATE-1-dependent. PMID:29346429

  7. Simultaneous determination of nine kinds of dominating bile acids in various snake bile by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography with triple quadrupole linear iontrap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Fan, Yeqin; Gong, Yajun; Chen, Xiaoyong; Wan, Luosheng; Zhou, Chenggao; Zhou, Jiewen; Ma, Shuangcheng; Wei, Feng; Chen, Jiachun; Nie, Jing

    2017-11-15

    Snake bile is one of the most expensive traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs). However, due to the complicated constitutes of snake bile and the poor ultraviolet absorbance of some trace bile acids (BAs), effective analysis methods for snake bile acids were still unavailable, making it difficult to solve adulteration problems. In present study, ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography with triple quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QqQ-MS/MS) was applied to conduct a quantitative analysis on snake BAs. The mass spectrometer was monitored in the negative ion mode, and multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) program was used to determine the contents of BAs in snake bile. In all, 61 snake bile from 17 commonly used species of three families (Elapidae, Colubridae and Viperidae), along with five batches of commercial snake bile from four companies, were collected and detected. Nine components, Tauro-3α,12α-dihydroxy-7-oxo-5β-cholenoic acid (T1), Tauro-3α,7α,12α,23R-tetrahydroxy-5β-cholenoic acid (T2), taurocholic acid (TCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), taurochenodeoxycholic acid (TCDCA), taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA), cholic acid (CA), Tauro-3α,7α-dihydroxy-12-oxo-5β-cholenoic acid (T3), and Tauro-3α,7α,9α,16α-tetrahydroxy-5β-cholenoic acid (T4) were simultaneously and rapidly determined for the first time. In these BAs, T1 and T2, self-prepared with purity above 90%, were first reported with their quantitative determination, and the latter two (T3 and T4) were tentatively determined by quantitative analysis multi-components by single marker (QAMS) method for roughly estimating the components without reference. The developed method was validated with acceptable linearity (r 2 ≥0.995), precision (RSD<6.5%) and recovery (RSD<7.5%). It turned out that the contents of BAs among different species were also significantly different; T1 was one of the principle bile acids in some common snake bile, and also was the characteristic one in Viperidae

  8. Bile duct obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tumors that have spread to the biliary system Liver and bile duct worms (flukes) The risk factors include: History of ... Increased bilirubin level Increased alkaline phosphatase level Increased liver enzymes The ... CT scan Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography ( ...

  9. Application of a Novel Tool for Diagnosing Bile Acid Diarrhoea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karna D. Bardhan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Bile acid diarrhoea (BAD is a common disease that requires expensive imaging to diagnose. We have tested the efficacy of a new method to identify BAD, based on the detection of differences in volatile organic compounds (VOC in urine headspace of BAD vs. ulcerative colitis and healthy controls. A total of 110 patients were recruited; 23 with BAD, 42 with ulcerative colitis (UC and 45 controls. Patients with BAD also received standard imaging (Se75HCAT for confirmation. Urine samples were collected and the headspace analysed using an AlphaMOS Fox 4000 electronic nose in combination with an Owlstone Lonestar Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometer (FAIMS. A subset was also tested by gas chromatography, mass spectrometry (GCMS. Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA was used to explore both the electronic nose and FAIMS data. LDA showed statistical differences between the groups, with reclassification success rates (using an n-1 approach at typically 83%. GCMS experiments confirmed these results and showed that patients with BAD had two chemical compounds, 2-propanol and acetamide, that were either not present or were in much reduced quantities in the ulcerative colitis and control samples. We believe that this work may lead to a new tool to diagnose BAD, which is cheaper, quicker and easier that current methods.

  10. Application of a Novel Tool for Diagnosing Bile Acid Diarrhoea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covington, James A.; Westenbrink, Eric W.; Ouaret, Nathalie; Harbord, Ruth; Bailey, Catherine; O'Connell, Nicola; Cullis, James; Williams, Nigel; Nwokolo, Chuka U.; Bardhan, Karna D.; Arasaradnam, Ramesh P.

    2013-01-01

    Bile acid diarrhoea (BAD) is a common disease that requires expensive imaging to diagnose. We have tested the efficacy of a new method to identify BAD, based on the detection of differences in volatile organic compounds (VOC) in urine headspace of BAD vs. ulcerative colitis and healthy controls. A total of 110 patients were recruited; 23 with BAD, 42 with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 45 controls. Patients with BAD also received standard imaging (Se75HCAT) for confirmation. Urine samples were collected and the headspace analysed using an AlphaMOS Fox 4000 electronic nose in combination with an Owlstone Lonestar Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometer (FAIMS). A subset was also tested by gas chromatography, mass spectrometry (GCMS). Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) was used to explore both the electronic nose and FAIMS data. LDA showed statistical differences between the groups, with reclassification success rates (using an n-1 approach) at typically 83%. GCMS experiments confirmed these results and showed that patients with BAD had two chemical compounds, 2-propanol and acetamide, that were either not present or were in much reduced quantities in the ulcerative colitis and control samples. We believe that this work may lead to a new tool to diagnose BAD, which is cheaper, quicker and easier that current methods. PMID:24018955

  11. The role of bile acids in metabolic regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vítek, Libor; Haluzík, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Bile acids (BA), long believed to only have lipid-digestive functions, have emerged as novel metabolic modulators. They have important endocrine effects through multiple cytoplasmic as well as nuclear receptors in various organs and tissues. BA affect multiple functions to control energy homeostasis, as well as glucose and lipid metabolism, predominantly by activating the nuclear farnesoid X receptor and the cytoplasmic G protein-coupled BA receptor TGR5 in a variety of tissues. However, BA also are aimed at many other cellular targets in a wide array of organs and cell compartments. Their role in the pathogenesis of diabetes, obesity and other 'diseases of civilization' becomes even more clear. They also interact with the gut microbiome, with important clinical implications, further extending the complexity of their biological functions. Therefore, it is not surprising that BA metabolism is substantially modulated by bariatric surgery, a phenomenon contributing favorably to the therapeutic effects of these surgical procedures. Based on these data, several therapeutic approaches to ameliorate obesity and diabetes have been proposed to affect the cellular targets of BA. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  12. Rapid analysis of bile acids in different biological matrices using LC-ESI-MS/MS for the investigation of bile acid transformation by mammalian gut bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Katrin; Just, Sarah; Gau, Laura; Mueller, Henrike; Gérard, Philippe; Lepage, Patricia; Clavel, Thomas; Rohn, Sascha

    2017-02-01

    Bile acids are important signaling molecules that regulate cholesterol, glucose, and energy homoeostasis and have thus been implicated in the development of metabolic disorders. Their bioavailability is strongly modulated by the gut microbiota, which contributes to generation of complex individual-specific bile acid profiles. Hence, it is important to have accurate methods at hand for precise measurement of these important metabolites. Here, a rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for simultaneous identification and quantitation of primary and secondary bile acids as well as their taurine and glycine conjugates was developed and validated. Applicability of the method was demonstrated for mammalian tissues, biofluids, and cell culture media. The analytical approach mainly consists of a simple and rapid liquid-liquid extraction procedure in presence of deuterium-labeled internal standards. Baseline separation of all isobaric bile acid species was achieved and a linear correlation over a broad concentration range was observed. The method showed acceptable accuracy and precision on intra-day (1.42-11.07 %) and inter-day (2.11-12.71 %) analyses and achieved good recovery rates for representative analytes (83.7-107.1 %). As a proof of concept, the analytical method was applied to mouse tissues and biofluids, but especially to samples from in vitro fermentations with gut bacteria of the family Coriobacteriaceae. The developed method revealed that the species Eggerthella lenta and Collinsella aerofaciens possess bile salt hydrolase activity, and for the first time that the species Enterorhabdus mucosicola is able to deconjugate and dehydrogenate primary bile acids in vitro.

  13. Effect of chenodeoxycholic acid and the bile acid sequestrant colesevelam on glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Scheltema, Matthijs J; Sonne, David P

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: In patients with type 2 diabetes, rectal administration of bile acids increases glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion and reduces plasma glucose. In addition, oral bile acid sequestrants (BASs) reduce blood glucose by an unknown mechanism. In this study we evaluated the effects...... of the primary human bile acid, chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), and the BAS, colesevelam, instilled into the stomach, on plasma levels of GLP-1, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, glucose, insulin, C-peptide, glucagon, cholecystokinin and gastrin as well as gastric emptying, gallbladder volume, appetite......, and delayed gastric emptying. We speculate that bile acid-induced activation of TGR5 on L cells increases GLP-1 secretion, which in turn may result in amplification of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Furthermore our data suggest that colesevelam does not have an acute effect on GLP-1 secretion in humans....

  14. Case report: Retroperitoneal biliary fluid collections secondary to common bile duct rupture - an unusual complication of choledocholithiasis in a child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rastogi, Rajul; Rastogi, Vaibhav

    2008-01-01

    Rupture of the common bile duct (CBD) in a child secondary to choledocholithiasis is a rare event. In this article, the authors describe a child who presented with an acute abdomen due to CBD rupture, with subsequent acute retroperitoneal fluid collections, all diagnosed preoperatively on CT scan. The aim of this article is to show the pathways that such collections can take in the retroperitoneum

  15. Genetics Home Reference: congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... result in softening and weakening of the bones ( rickets ) in some individuals. If left untreated, congenital bile ... Encyclopedia: Cholestasis Health Topic: Liver Diseases Health Topic: Rickets Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) ...

  16. Mutations in the nuclear bile acid receptor FXR cause progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Ospina, Natalia; Potter, Carol J.; Xiao, Rui; Manickam, Kandamurugu; Kim, Mi-Sun; Kim, Kang Ho; Shneider, Benjamin L.; Picarsic, Jennifer L.; Jacobson, Theodora A.; Zhang, Jing; He, Weimin; Liu, Pengfei; Knisely, A. S.; Finegold, Milton J.; Muzny, Donna M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Lupski, James R.; Plon, Sharon E.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Eng, Christine M.; Yang, Yaping; Washington, Gabriel C.; Porteus, Matthew H.; Berquist, William E.; Kambham, Neeraja; Singh, Ravinder J.; Xia, Fan; Enns, Gregory M.; Moore, David D.

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal cholestasis is a potentially life-threatening condition requiring prompt diagnosis. Mutations in several different genes can cause progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis, but known genes cannot account for all familial cases. Here we report four individuals from two unrelated families with neonatal cholestasis and mutations in NR1H4, which encodes the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a bile acid-activated nuclear hormone receptor that regulates bile acid metabolism. Clinical features of severe, persistent NR1H4-related cholestasis include neonatal onset with rapid progression to end-stage liver disease, vitamin K-independent coagulopathy, low-to-normal serum gamma-glutamyl transferase activity, elevated serum alpha-fetoprotein and undetectable liver bile salt export pump (ABCB11) expression. Our findings demonstrate a pivotal function for FXR in bile acid homeostasis and liver protection. PMID:26888176

  17. Liver ischemia and ischemia-reperfusion induces and trafficks the multi-specific metal transporter Atp7b to bile duct canaliculi: possible preferential transport of iron into bile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, John A; Barshes, Neal R; Karpen, Saul J; Gao, Feng-Qin; Wyllie, Samuel

    2008-04-01

    Both Atp7b (Wilson disease gene) and Atp7a (Menkes disease gene) have been reported to be trafficked by copper. Atp7b is trafficked to the bile duct canaliculi and Atp7a to the plasma membrane. Whether or not liver ischemia or ischemia-reperfusion modulates Atp7b expression and trafficking has not been reported. In this study, we report for the first time that the multi-specific metal transporter Atp7b is significantly induced and trafficked by both liver ischemia alone and liver ischemia-reperfusion, as judged by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses. Although hepatocytes also stained for Atp7b, localized intense staining of Atp7b was found on bile duct canaliculi. Inductive coupled plasma-mass spectrometry analysis of bile copper, iron, zinc, and manganese found a corresponding significant increase in biliary iron. In our attempt to determine if the increased biliary iron transport observed may be a result of altered bile flow, lysosomal trafficking, or glutathione biliary transport, we measured bile flow, bile acid phosphatase activity, and glutathione content. No significant difference was found in bile flow, bile acid phosphatase activity, and glutathione, between control livers and livers subjected to ischemia-reperfusion. Thus, we conclude that liver ischemia and ischemia-reperfusion induction and trafficking Atp7b to the bile duct canaliculi may contribute to preferential iron transport into bile.

  18. Crystal structure of a bacterial homologue of the bile acid sodium symporter ASBT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Nien-Jen; Iwata, So; Cameron, Alexander D.; Drew, David

    2011-01-01

    High cholesterol levels greatly increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. By its conversion into bile acids, about 50% of cholesterol is eliminated from the body. However bile acids released from the bile duct are constantly recycled, being reabsorbed in the intestine via the Apical Sodium dependent Bile acid Transporter (ASBT). It has been shown in animal models that plasma cholesterol levels are significantly lowered by specific inhibitors of ASBT1,2, thus ASBT is a target for hypercholesterolemia drugs. Here, we describe the crystal structure of a bacterial homologue of ASBT from Neisseria meningitidis (ASBTNM) at 2.2Å. ASBTNM contains two inverted structural repeats of five transmembrane helices. A Core domain of six helices harbours two sodium ions while the remaining helices form a Panel-like domain. Overall the architecture of the protein is remarkably similar to the sodium-proton antiporter NhaA3 despite no detectable sequence homology. A bile acid molecule is situated between the Core and Panel domains in a large hydrophobic cavity. Residues near to this cavity have been shown to affect the binding of specific inhibitors of human ASBT4. The position of the bile acid together with the molecular architecture suggests the rudiments of a possible transport mechanism. PMID:21976025

  19. Differential effects of 17 alpha-ethinylestradiol on the neutral and acidic pathways of bile salt synthesis in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopen, NR; Post, SM; Wolters, H; Havinga, R; Stellaard, F; Boverhof, R; Kuipers, F; Princen, HMG

    Effects of 17 alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE) on the neutral and acidic biosynthetic pathways of bile salt (BS) synthesis were evaluated in rats with an intact enterohepatic circulation and in rats with long-term bile diversion to induce BS synthesis, For this purpose, bile salt pool composition,

  20. Ursodeoxycholic acid lowers bile lithogenicity by regulating SCP2 expression in rabbit cholesterol gallstone models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yunfeng; Li, Zhonglian; Zhao, Erpeng; Zhang, Ju; Cui, Naiqiang

    2012-01-01

    Aims: We designed this study to get insight into the disorder of lipid metabolism during cholesterol gallstone formation and evaluate the effect of ursodeoxycholic acid on the improvement of bile lithogenicity and on expression of lipid related genes. Methods: Rabbit cholesterol gallstone models were induced by high cholesterol diet. Bile, blood and liver tissues were obtained from rabbits after 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 weeks. Bile and blood lipids were measured enzymatically. 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), cytochrome P450, family 7, subfamily A, polypeptide 1 (CYP7A1) and sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP2) mRNA expressions were detected by using quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Cholesterol saturation index (CSI) was calculated by using Carey table to represent the bile lithogenicity. Results: Rates of gallstone formation of the 4 and 5 week treatment groups were 100 %, but that of the ursodeoxycholic acid treatment group was only 33.3 %. Expression of HMGCR and SCP2 mRNA in the 4 week group was upregulated and that of CYP7A1 mRNA decreased as compared with the 0 week group. Ursodeoxycholic acid could significantly extend nucleation time of bile and lower CSI. Ursodeoxycholic acid could reduce the expression of SCP2, but couldn't influence expression of HMGCR and CYP7A1. Conclusions: Abnormal expression of HMGCR, CYP7A1 and SCP2 might lead to high lithogenicity of bile. Ursodeoxycholic acid could improve bile lipids and lower bile lithogenicity, thereby reducing the incidence of gallstones. So it might be a good preventive drug for cholesterol gallstones. PMID:27847447

  1. Synthesis of new, UV-photoactive dansyl derivatives for flow cytometric studies on bile acid uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohacova, Jana; Marin, M Luisa; Martínez-Romero, Alicia; O'Connor, José-Enrique; Gomez-Lechon, M Jose; Donato, M Teresa; Castell, Jose V; Miranda, Miguel A

    2009-12-07

    Four new fluorescent derivatives of cholic acid have been synthesized; they incorporate a dansyl moiety at 3alpha-, 3beta-, 7alpha- or 7beta- positions. These cholic acid analogs are UV photoactive and also exhibit green fluorescence. In addition, they have been demonstrated to be suitable for studying the kinetics of bile acid transport by flow cytometry.

  2. Circulating bile acids in healthy adults respond differently to a dietary pattern characterized by whole grains, legumes and fruits and vegetables compared to a diet high in refined grains and added sugars: a randomized, controlled, crossover feeding study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginos, Bigina N R; Navarro, Sandi L; Schwarz, Yvonne; Gu, Haiwei; Wang, Dongfang; Randolph, Timothy W; Shojaie, Ali; Hullar, Meredith A J; Lampe, Paul D; Kratz, Mario; Neuhouser, Marian L; Raftery, Daniel; Lampe, Johanna W

    2018-02-16

    The effects of diets high in refined grains on biliary and colonic bile acids have been investigated extensively. However, the effects of diets high in whole versus refined grains on circulating bile acids, which can influence glucose homeostasis and inflammation through activation of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and G protein-coupled bile acid receptor 1 (TGR5), have not been studied. We conducted a secondary analysis from a randomized controlled crossover feeding trial (NCT00622661) in 80 healthy adults (40 women/40 men, age 18-45 years) from the greater Seattle Area, half of which were normal weight (BMI 18.5-25.0 kg/m 2 ) and half overweight to obese (BMI 28.0-39.9 kg/m 2 ). Participants consumed two four-week controlled diets in randomized order: 1) a whole grain diet (WG diet), designed to be low in glycemic load (GL), high in whole grains, legumes, and fruits and vegetables, and 2) a refined grain diet (RG diet), designed to be high GL, high in refined grains and added sugars, separated by a four-week washout period. Quantitative targeted analysis of 55 bile acid species in fasting plasma was performed using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Concentrations of glucose, insulin, and CRP were measured in fasting serum. Linear mixed models were used to test the effects of diet on bile acid concentrations, and determine the association between plasma bile acid concentrations and HOMA-IR and CRP. Benjamini-Hochberg false discovery rate (FDR) < 0.05 was used to control for multiple testing. A total of 29 plasma bile acids were reliably detected and retained for analysis. Taurolithocholic acid (TLCA), taurocholic acid (TCA) and glycocholic acid (GCA) were statistically significantly higher after the WG compared to the RG diet (FDR < 0.05). There were no significant differences by BMI or sex. When evaluating the association of bile acids and HOMA-IR, GCA, taurochenodeoxycholic acid, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), 5β-cholanic acid-3β,12

  3. Serum Bile Acids in Repaired Tetralogy of Fallot: A Marker for Liver and Heart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grangl, Gernot; Zöhrer, Evelyn; Köstenberger, Martin; Jud, Alexandra; Fauler, Günter; Scharnagl, Hubert; Stojakovic, Tatjana; Marterer, Robert; Gamillscheg, Andreas; Jahnel, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot may develop chronic right ventricular dysfunction and hepatic congestion over time. We hypothesized that bile acid metabolism is altered in repaired tetralogy of Fallot patients and therefore sought to correlate right ventricular indices with serum bile acid levels. Indexed right ventricular end diastolic volume, as assessed by cardiac magnetic-resonance imaging, was classified as 150ml/m2 (Group 3, n = 6) in 29 patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot. Pulmonary regurgitation fraction and right ventricular ejection fraction were calculated. The serum bile acid profile, including 15 species, in these patients was determined by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Serum bile acid levels increased from Group 1 to Group 3 (2.5 ± 0.7; 4.1 ± 2.5; 6.0 ± 2.8 μmol/l, respectively) with significantly increased bile acid values in Group 3 compared to Group 1 (p≤0.05). In Group 3, but not in Group 1 and 2, a significant increase in glycine-conjugated bile acids was observed. Pulmonary regurgitation fraction increased (12 ± 1; 28 ± 16; 43 ± 3%, Groups 1-3, respectively) and right ventricular ejection fraction decreased (48.4 ± 6.4; 48.5 ± 6.5; 42.1 ± 5.3%, Groups 1-3, respectively) with rising indexed right ventricular end diastolic volume. These preliminary results suggest that serum bile acid levels are positively correlated with indexed right ventricular end-diastolic volume in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot; however, this needs to be confirmed in a larger patient cohort.

  4. Influence of the structure of bile acids on their partition coefficient in dibutyl ether and chloroform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebenji Ana S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bile acids are well known natural surfactants able to modify the per­meability of biological membranes. The logarithm of partition coefficient between, tradi­tionally used, n-octanol and water is a measure of lipophilicity as a predictor of solute membrane partitioning. The aim of this work was to determine partition coefficients of bile acids in a mixture of water and chloroform and dibutyl ether at different pH values and with addition of different concentrations of sodium ions, and to examine the influence of the structure of bile acid nucleus on measured partition coefficients. Partition coefficients of three bile acid salts were determined using shake-flask method and the concentration of bile acids was determined after twelve hours of shaking at the room temperature in aqueous and organic layer using reversed phase HPLC with DAD detector on 210 nm. For all three analysed bile acid salts values of logP are lower in dibutyl ether than in chloroform. At certain pH values, curves representing the dependence of partition coeffi­cient on pH value intersect, and these are the pH values for which partition coefficients are the same for both solvents. Increasing the solution ionic strength, this intersection is shifted toward lower pH values. It is found that, for both organic solvents, after the addition of hy­droxyl group in the steroid nucleus (i.e. if the bile acid is less hydrophobic the value of logP falls, especially if more hydroxyl groups are present. With chloroform as a solvent, system quickly comes to excess with electrolyte ions than with dibutyl ether. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172021

  5. Clinicopathological features and prognosis of mucin-producing bile duct tumor and mucinous cystic tumor of the liver: a multi-institutional study by the Japan Biliary Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Keiichi; Nakanuma, Yasuni; Kondo, Fukuo; Hachiya, Hiroyuki; Miyazaki, Masaru; Nagino, Masato; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Tabata, Masami; Kinoshita, Hisafumi; Kamisawa, Terumi; Inui, Kazuo

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the clinicopathological features and surgical outcomes of mucinous cystic neoplasm of the liver (MCN) and mucin-producing intraductal papillary neoplasm of the intrahepatic bile duct (M-IPNB). We performed a multi-institutional, retrospective study of patients with MCN or M-IPNB pathologically defined by the presence or absence of an ovarian-like stroma. The M-IPNB and MCN were diagnosed in 119 and nine patients, respectively. MCN was observed in female patients, while M-IPNB produced symptoms of cholangitis. M-IPNBs were classed as low or intermediate grade in 53 cases, high grade in 23 and invasive carcinoma in 43. Fifty-one of the M-IPNBs were the pancreatobiliary type (PT), 33 were the intestinal type (IT), 23 were the oncocytic type (OT), and 12 were the gastric type (GT). The 1-, 5- and 10-year survival rates for the 105 patients with M-IPNB were 96%, 84% and 81%, respectively, while the 5-year survival rate for patients with MCN was 100%. OT and GT M-IPNB had better 10-year survival rates than PT and IT M-IPNB. Although MCN has different features from M-IPNB, both diseases have a good prognosis after resection. The cellular type of M-IPNB appears to predict outcome. © 2013 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  6. The effect of acetaminophen on the expression of BCRP in trophoblast cells impairs the placental barrier to bile acids during maternal cholestasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blazquez, Alba G.; Briz, Oscar; Gonzalez-Sanchez, Ester; Perez, Maria J.; Ghanem, Carolina I.; Marin, Jose J.G.

    2014-01-01

    Acetaminophen is used as first-choice drug for pain relief during pregnancy. Here we have investigated the effect of acetaminophen at subtoxic doses on the expression of ABC export pumps in trophoblast cells and its functional repercussion on the placental barrier during maternal cholestasis. The incubation of human choriocarcinoma cells (JAr, JEG-3 and BeWo) with acetaminophen for 48 h resulted in no significant changes in the expression and/or activity of MDR1 and MRPs. In contrast, in JEG-3 cells, BCRP mRNA, protein, and transport activity were reduced. In rat placenta, collected at term, acetaminophen administration for the last three days of pregnancy resulted in enhanced mRNA, but not protein, levels of Mrp1 and Bcrp. In fact, a decrease in Bcrp protein was found. Using in situ perfused rat placenta, a reduction in the Bcrp-dependent fetal-to-maternal bile acid transport after treating the dams with acetaminophen was found. Complete biliary obstruction in pregnant rats induced a significant bile acid accumulation in fetal serum and tissues, which was further enhanced when the mothers were treated with acetaminophen. This drug induced increased ROS production in JEG-3 cells and decreased the total glutathione content in rat placenta. Moreover, the NRF2 pathway was activated in JEG-3 cells as shown by an increase in nuclear NRF2 levels and an up-regulation of NRF2 target genes, NQO1 and HMOX-1, which was not observed in rat placenta. In conclusion, acetaminophen induces in placenta oxidative stress and a down-regulation of BCRP/Bcrp, which may impair the placental barrier to bile acids during maternal cholestasis. - Highlights: • Acetaminophen induces changes in placental BCRP expression in vitro. • This drug reduces the ability of placental cells to export BCRP substrates. • Acetaminophen induces changes in Bcrp expression in rat placenta. • Placental barrier to bile acids is impaired in rats treated with this drug

  7. The effect of acetaminophen on the expression of BCRP in trophoblast cells impairs the placental barrier to bile acids during maternal cholestasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazquez, Alba G., E-mail: albamgb@usal.es [Laboratory of Experimental Hepatology and Drug Targeting (HEVEFARM), IBSAL, University of Salamanca, Salamanca (Spain); CIBERehd, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid (Spain); Briz, Oscar, E-mail: obriz@usal.es [Laboratory of Experimental Hepatology and Drug Targeting (HEVEFARM), IBSAL, University of Salamanca, Salamanca (Spain); CIBERehd, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid (Spain); Gonzalez-Sanchez, Ester, E-mail: u60343@usal.es [Laboratory of Experimental Hepatology and Drug Targeting (HEVEFARM), IBSAL, University of Salamanca, Salamanca (Spain); Perez, Maria J., E-mail: mjperez@usal.es [Laboratory of Experimental Hepatology and Drug Targeting (HEVEFARM), IBSAL, University of Salamanca, Salamanca (Spain); University Hospital of Salamanca, IECSCYL-IBSAL, Salamanca (Spain); CIBERehd, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid (Spain); Ghanem, Carolina I., E-mail: cghanem@ffyb.uba.ar [Instituto de Investigaciones Farmacologicas, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquimica, CONICET, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Marin, Jose J.G., E-mail: jjgmarin@usal.es [Laboratory of Experimental Hepatology and Drug Targeting (HEVEFARM), IBSAL, University of Salamanca, Salamanca (Spain); CIBERehd, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-05-15

    Acetaminophen is used as first-choice drug for pain relief during pregnancy. Here we have investigated the effect of acetaminophen at subtoxic doses on the expression of ABC export pumps in trophoblast cells and its functional repercussion on the placental barrier during maternal cholestasis. The incubation of human choriocarcinoma cells (JAr, JEG-3 and BeWo) with acetaminophen for 48 h resulted in no significant changes in the expression and/or activity of MDR1 and MRPs. In contrast, in JEG-3 cells, BCRP mRNA, protein, and transport activity were reduced. In rat placenta, collected at term, acetaminophen administration for the last three days of pregnancy resulted in enhanced mRNA, but not protein, levels of Mrp1 and Bcrp. In fact, a decrease in Bcrp protein was found. Using in situ perfused rat placenta, a reduction in the Bcrp-dependent fetal-to-maternal bile acid transport after treating the dams with acetaminophen was found. Complete biliary obstruction in pregnant rats induced a significant bile acid accumulation in fetal serum and tissues, which was further enhanced when the mothers were treated with acetaminophen. This drug induced increased ROS production in JEG-3 cells and decreased the total glutathione content in rat placenta. Moreover, the NRF2 pathway was activated in JEG-3 cells as shown by an increase in nuclear NRF2 levels and an up-regulation of NRF2 target genes, NQO1 and HMOX-1, which was not observed in rat placenta. In conclusion, acetaminophen induces in placenta oxidative stress and a down-regulation of BCRP/Bcrp, which may impair the placental barrier to bile acids during maternal cholestasis. - Highlights: • Acetaminophen induces changes in placental BCRP expression in vitro. • This drug reduces the ability of placental cells to export BCRP substrates. • Acetaminophen induces changes in Bcrp expression in rat placenta. • Placental barrier to bile acids is impaired in rats treated with this drug.

  8. Research progress in roles of gut microbiota and bile acid metabolism in development and progression of NAFLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LU Xu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available With the prevalence of obesity and metabolic syndrome, the incidence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is increasing year by year. Studies have uncovered the important roles of gut microbiota and bile acid metabolism in the development and progression of NAFLD. The roles of gut microbiota, as well bile acid and bile acid receptors, in the development and progression of NAFLD are highlighted.

  9. Fluorescence properties of Schiff base - N,N‧-bis(salicylidene) - 1,2-Phenylenediamine in presence of bile acid host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Nayan; Paul, Pradip C.; Singh, T. Sanjoy

    2015-05-01

    Fluorescence properties of Schiff base - N,N‧-bis(salicylidene) - 1,2-phenylenediamine (LH2) is used to study the micelles formed by aggregation of different important bile acids like cholic acid, deoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid and glycocholic acid by steady state and picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The fluorescence band intensity was found out to increase with concomitant red shift with gradual addition of different bile acids. Binding constant of the probe with different bile acids as well as critical micelle concentration was obtained from the variation of fluorescence intensity on increasing concentration of bile acids in the medium. The increase in fluorescence quantum yields, fluorescence decay times and substantial decrease in nonradiative decay rate constants in bile acids micellar environment points to the restricted motion of the fluorophore inside the micellar subdomains.

  10. Effect of a high-fat-high-cholesterol diet on gallbladder bile acid composition and gallbladder motility in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakimoto, Toshiaki; Kanemoto, Hideyuki; Fukushima, Kenjiro; Ohno, Koichi; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2017-12-01

    OBJCTIVE To investigate the effects of dietary lipid overload on bile acid metabolism and gallbladder motility in healthy dogs. ANIMALS 7 healthy Beagles. PROCEDURES In a crossover study, dogs were fed a high-fat-high-cholesterol diet (HFCD) or a low-fat diet (LFD) for a period of 2 weeks. After a 4-month washout period, dogs were fed the other diet for 2 weeks. Before and at the end of each feeding period, the concentrations of each of the gallbladder bile acids, cholecystokinin (CCK)-induced gallbladder motility, and bile acid metabolism-related hepatic gene expression were examined in all dogs. RESULTS The HFCD significantly increased plasma total cholesterol concentrations. The HFCD also increased the concentration of taurochenodeoxycholic acid and decreased the concentration of taurocholic acid in bile and reduced gallbladder contractility, whereas the LFD significantly decreased the concentration of taurodeoxycholic acid in bile. Gene expression analysis revealed significant elevation of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase mRNA expression after feeding the HFCD for 2 weeks, but the expression of other genes was unchanged. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Feeding the HFCD and LFD for 2 weeks induced changes in gallbladder bile acid composition and gallbladder motility in dogs. In particular, feeding the HFCD caused an increase in plasma total cholesterol concentration, an increase of hydrophobic bile acid concentration in bile, and a decrease in gallbladder sensitivity to CCK. These results suggested that similar bile acid compositional changes and gallbladder hypomotility might be evident in dogs with hyperlipidemia.

  11. Acid, bile, and heat tolerance of free and microencapsulated probiotic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, W K; Shah, N P

    2007-11-01

    Eight strains of probiotic bacteria, including Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Bifidobacterium longum, L. salivarius, L. plantarum, L. acidophilus, L. paracasei, B. lactis type Bl-O4, and B. lactis type Bi-07, were studied for their acid, bile, and heat tolerance. Microencapsulation in alginate matrix was used to enhance survival of the bacteria in acid and bile as well as a brief exposure to heat. Free probiotic organisms were used as a control. The acid tolerance of probiotic organisms was tested using HCl in MRS broth over a 2-h incubation period. Bile tolerance was tested using 2 types of bile salts, oxgall and taurocholic acid, over an 8-h incubation period. Heat tolerance was tested by exposing the probiotic organisms to 65 degrees C for up to 1 h. Results indicated microencapsulated probiotic bacteria survived better (P strains. At 30 min of heat treatment, microencapsulated probiotic bacteria survived with an average loss of only 4.17-log CFU/mL, compared to 6.74-log CFU/mL loss with free probiotic bacteria. However, after 1 h of heating both free and microencapsulated probiotic strains showed similar losses in viability. Overall microencapsulation improved the survival of probiotic bacteria when exposed to acidic conditions, bile salts, and mild heat treatment.

  12. Effect of fat intake on cholesterol turnover and bile acid formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iritani, Nobuko; Fukuda, Eiko; Ibamoto, Kazuko

    1977-01-01

    Three groups of male rats were maintained on diets containing different amounts of fat. After one week on such regimens, they were injected intraperitoneally with cholesterol- 3 H. During the following 28 days, the radioactivity and quantity of fecal cholesterol and its metabolites were determined. The coprostanol excretion was the about same in all groups and the bile acids excretion increased with increasing fat intake; however, compared to the fat-free group, the excretion of the injected cholesterol- 3 H was greater in the 3% fat group and less in the 10% fat group. Consequently, the specific radioactivity of bile acids was lower in the 10% group than in the others. The half-life of labelled cholesterol was 12.6, 16.0 and 22.2 days for the 3%, 10% fat and fat-free groups, respectively. Rather than a fat-free diet, a low-fat diet of 3% or so, would be of more advantage in eliminating cholesterol by increasing the formation of bile acids to emulsify the fat. In the 10% fat group, however, the enlarged pool size of bile acid probably delayed cholesterol metabolism to bile acids. (auth.)

  13. Clinical relevance of the bile acid receptor TGR5 in metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Nierop, F Samuel; Scheltema, Matthijs J; Eggink, Hannah M

    2017-01-01

    The bile acid receptor TGR5 (also known as GPBAR1) is a promising target for the development of pharmacological interventions in metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes, obesity, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. TGR5 is expressed in many metabolically active tissues, but complex enterohep......The bile acid receptor TGR5 (also known as GPBAR1) is a promising target for the development of pharmacological interventions in metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes, obesity, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. TGR5 is expressed in many metabolically active tissues, but complex...... enterohepatic bile acid cycling limits the exposure of some of these tissues to the receptor ligand. Profound interspecies differences in the biology of bile acids and their receptors in different cells and tissues exist. Data from preclinical studies show promising effects of targeting TGR5 on outcomes...... such as weight loss, glucose metabolism, energy expenditure, and suppression of inflammation. However, clinical studies are scarce. We give a summary of key concepts in bile acid metabolism; outline different downstream effects of TGR5 activation; and review available data on TGR5 activation, with a focus...

  14. Effects of bile acids on human airway epithelial cells: implications for aerodigestive diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adil Aldhahrani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Gastro-oesophageal reflux and aspiration have been associated with chronic and end-stage lung disease and with allograft injury following lung transplantation. This raises the possibility that bile acids may cause lung injury by damaging airway epithelium. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of bile acid challenge using the immortalised human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B. The immortalised human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B was cultured. A 48-h challenge evaluated the effect of individual primary and secondary bile acids. Post-challenge concentrations of interleukin (IL-8, IL-6 and granulocyte−macrophage colony-stimulating factor were measured using commercial ELISA kits. The viability of the BEAS-2B cells was measured using CellTiter-Blue and MTT assays. Lithocholic acid, deoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid and cholic acid were successfully used to stimulate cultured BEAS-2B cells at different concentrations. A concentration of lithocholic acid above 10 μmol·L−1 causes cell death, whereas deoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid and cholic acid above 30 μmol·L−1 was required for cell death. Challenge with bile acids at physiological levels also led to a significant increase in the release of IL-8 and IL6 from BEAS-2B. Aspiration of bile acids could potentially cause cell damage, cell death and inflammation in vivo. This is relevant to an integrated gastrointestinal and lung physiological paradigm of chronic lung disease, where reflux and aspiration are described in both chronic lung diseases and allograft injury.

  15. Microbiome-mediated bile acid modification: Role in intestinal drug absorption and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enright, Elaine F; Griffin, Brendan T; Gahan, Cormac G M; Joyce, Susan A

    2018-04-13

    Once regarded obscure and underappreciated, the gut microbiota (the microbial communities colonizing the gastrointestinal tract) is gaining recognition as an influencer of many aspects of human health. Also increasingly apparent is the breadth of interindividual variation in these co-evolved microbial-gut associations, presenting novel quests to explore implications for disease and therapeutic response. In this respect, the unearthing of the drug-metabolizing capacity of the microbiota has provided impetus for the integration of microbiological and pharmacological research. This review considers a potential mechanism, 'microbial bile acid metabolism', by which the intricate interplay between the host and gut bacteria may influence drug pharmacokinetics. Bile salts traditionally regarded as biological surfactants, synthesized by the host and biotransformed by gut bacteria, are now also recognized as signalling molecules that affect diverse physiological processes. Accumulating data indicate that bile salts are not equivalent with respect to their physicochemical properties, micellar solubilization capacities for poorly water-soluble drugs, crystallization inhibition tendencies nor potencies for bile acid receptor activation. Herein, the origin, physicochemical properties, physiological functions, plasticity and pharmaceutical significance of the human bile acid pool are discussed. Microbial dependant differences in the composition of the human bile acid pool, simulated intestinal media and commonly used preclinical species is highlighted to better understand in vivo performance predictiveness. While the precise impact of an altered gut microbiome, and consequently bile acid pool, in the biopharmaceutical setting remains largely elusive, the objective of this article is to aid knowledge acquisition through a detailed review of the literature. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Ageing sensitized by iPLA2β deficiency induces liver fibrosis and intestinal atrophy involving suppression of homeostatic genes and alteration of intestinal lipids and bile acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Li; Gan-Schreier, Hongying; Zhu, Xingya; Wei, Wang; Tuma-Kellner, Sabine; Liebisch, Gerhard; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Chamulitrat, Walee

    2017-12-01

    Ageing is a major risk factor for various forms of liver and gastrointestinal (GI) disease and genetic background may contribute to the pathogenesis of these diseases. Group VIA phospholipase A2 or iPLA 2 β is a homeostatic PLA 2 by playing a role in phospholipid metabolism and remodeling. Global iPLA 2 β -/- mice exhibit aged-dependent phenotypes with body weight loss and abnormalities in the bone and brain. We have previously reported the abnormalities in these mutant mice showing susceptibility for chemical-induced liver injury and colitis. We hypothesize that iPLA 2 β deficiency may sensitize with ageing for an induction of GI injury. Male wild-type and iPLA 2 β -/- mice at 4 and 20-22months of age were studied. Aged, but not young, iPLA 2 β -/- mice showed increased hepatic fibrosis and biliary ductular expansion as well as severe intestinal atrophy associated with increased apoptosis, pro-inflammation, disrupted tight junction, and reduced number of mucin-containing globlet cells. This damage was associated with decreased expression of intestinal endoplasmic stress XBP1 and its regulator HNF1α, FATP4, ACSL5, bile-acid transport genes as well as nuclear receptors LXRα and FXR. By LC/MS-MS profiling, iPLA 2 β deficiency in aged mice caused an increase of intestinal arachidonate-containing phospholipids concomitant with a decrease in ceramides. By the suppression of intestinal FXR/FGF-15 signaling, hepatic bile-acid synthesis gene expression was increased leading to an elevation of secondary and hydrophobic bile acids in liver, bile, and intestine. In conclusions, ageing sensitized by iPLA 2 β deficiency caused a decline of key intestinal homeostatic genes resulting in the development of GI disease in a gut-to-liver manner. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Direct measurement of first-pass ileal clearance of a bile acid in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galatola, G.; Jazrawi, R.P.; Bridges, C.; Joseph, A.E.; Northfield, T.C.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a method of directly measuring ileal bile acid absorption efficiency during a single enterohepatic cycle (first-pass ileal clearance). This has become feasible for the first time because of the availability of the synthetic gamma-labeled bile acid 75Selena-homocholic acid-taurine (75SeHCAT). Together with the corresponding natural bile acid cholic acid-taurine (labeled with 14C), SeHCAT was infused distal to an occluding balloon situated beyond the ampulla of Vater in six healthy subjects. Completion of a single enterohepatic cycle was assessed by obtaining a plateau for 75SeHCAT activity proximal to the occluding balloon, which prevented further cycles. Unabsorbed 75SeHCAT was collected after total gut washout, which was administered distal to the occluding balloon. 75SeHCAT activity in the rectal effluent measured by gamma counter was compared with that of absorbed 75SeHCAT level measured by gamma camera and was used to calculate first-pass ileal clearance. This was very efficient (mean value, 96%) and showed very little variation in the six subjects studied (range, 95%-97%). A parallel time-activity course in hepatic bile for 14C and 75Se during a single enterohepatic cycle, together with a ratio of unity for 14C/75Se in samples obtained at different time intervals, suggests that 75SeHCAT is handled by the ileum like the natural bile acid cholic acid-taurine. Extrapolation of 75SeHCAT first-pass ileal clearance to that of the natural bile acid therefore seems justifiable. In a subsidiary experiment, ileal absorption efficiency per day for 75SeHCAT was also measured by scanning the gallbladder area on 5 successive days after the measurement of first-pass ileal clearance. In contrast with absorption efficiency per cycle, absorption efficiency per day varied widely (49%-86%)

  18. Bile Acids Increase Independently From Hypocaloric Restriction After Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahansouz, Cyrus; Xu, Hongliang; Hertzel, Ann V; Serrot, Federico J; Kvalheim, Nicholas; Cole, Abigail; Abraham, Anasooya; Luthra, Girish; Ewing, Kristin; Leslie, Daniel B; Bernlohr, David A; Ikramuddin, Sayeed

    2016-12-01

    To measure changes in the composition of serum bile acids (BA) and the expression of Takeda G-protein-coupled receptor 5 (TGR5) acutely after bariatric surgery or caloric restriction. Metabolic improvement after bariatric surgery occurs before substantial weight loss. BA are important metabolic regulators acting through the farnesoid X receptor and TGR5 receptor. The acute effects of surgery on BA and the TGR5 receptor in subcutaneous white adipose tissue (WAT) are unknown. A total of 27 obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus were randomized to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) or to hypocaloric diet (HC diet) restriction (NCT 1882036). A cohort of obese patients with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus undergoing vertical sleeve gastrectomy was also recruited (n = 12) as a comparison. After vertical sleeve gastrectomy, the level of BA increased [total: 1.17 ± 1.56 μmol/L to 4.42 ± 3.92 μmol/L (P = 0.005); conjugated BA levels increased from 0.99 ± 1.42 μmol/L to 3.59 ± 3.70 μmol/L (P = 0.01) and unconjugated BA levels increased from 0.18 ± 0.24 μmol/L to 0.83 ± 0.70 μmol/L (P = 0.009)]. With RYGB, there was a trend toward increased BA [total: 1.37 ± 0.97 μmol/L to 3.26 ± 3.01 μmol/L (P = 0.07); conjugated: 1.06 ± 0.81 μmol/L to 2.99 ± 3.02 μmol/L (P = 0.06)]. After HC diet, the level of unconjugated BA decreased [0.92 ± 0.55 μmol/L to 0.32 ± 0.43 μmol/L (P = 0.05)]. The level of WAT TGR5 gene expression decreased after surgery, but not in HC diet. Protein levels did not change. The levels of serum BA increase after bariatric surgery independently from caloric restriction, whereas the level of WAT TGR5 protein is unaffected.

  19. Bile Salt and Acid Tolerant of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Proventriculus of Broiler Chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Damayanti

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to obtain the lactic acid bacteria (LAB as probiotic candidates which have resistance to bile salt and acid condition. LAB was obtained using isolation method from proventriculus of broiler chicken. Selective MRS media with 0.2% CaCO3 addition were used for LAB isolation using pour plate sampling method under anaerobic condition. The result showed that four selected isolates had morphological and biochemical characteristics as LAB. The selected LAB was characterized as follow: antibacterial activities, antibiotic sensitivity, resistance on bile salt, gastric juice and acid condition, and biochemical identification. Antibacterial activities assay of cell free supernatant was confirmed using disc paper diffusion method which was arranged on factorial design and each treatment consisted of three replications. The cell free supernatant of LAB isolates had antibacterial activities against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aerugenosa, and Salmonella pullorum. Molecular identification procedure using 16S rRNA sequence analysis showed that R01 and R02 as Pediococcus acidilactici. The viability of the two isolates were tested by acid pH (pH 1, 2, and 3, gastric juice pH 2, and bile salt condition for digestives tract simulation. The result showed that R01 and R02 had a high viability percentages at pH 1, 2, and 3 (95.45%, 99.49%, 104.01%, and 67.17%, 120.74%, 103.4%, respectively and at bile salt simulation for 1-2 hours (100.35%-102.71% and 100.02%-102.65%, respectively, but at gastric juice simulation for 1-2 hours, the P. acidilactici R01 had higher viability than P. acidilactici R02 (59.69%-76.53% versus 43.57%-40.69%, respectively. In the antibiotic sensitivity test for three antibiotics (i.e. erythromicin 15 µg, penicillin G 10 µg, and streptomycin 10 µg, the P. acidilactici R02 showed resistance to Streptomycin and Penicillin. It is concluded that P. acidilactici R01 and P. acidilactici R02 isolated from proventriculus

  20. CYP2E1-dependent elevation of serum cholesterol, triglycerides, and hepatic bile acids by isoniazid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Jie; Krausz, Kristopher W. [Laboratory of Metabolism, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Li, Feng; Ma, Xiaochao [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, The University of Kansas Medical Center, 4089 KLSIC, MS 1018, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Gonzalez, Frank J., E-mail: fjgonz@helix.nih.gov [Laboratory of Metabolism, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Isoniazid is the first-line medication in the prevention and treatment of tuberculosis. Isoniazid is known to have a biphasic effect on the inhibition–induction of CYP2E1 and is also considered to be involved in isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity. However, the full extent and mechanism of involvement of CYP2E1 in isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity remain to be thoroughly investigated. In the current study, isoniazid was administered to wild-type and Cyp2e1-null mice to investigate the potential toxicity of isoniazid in vivo. The results revealed that isoniazid caused no hepatotoxicity in wild-type and Cyp2e1-null mice, but produced elevated serum cholesterol and triglycerides, and hepatic bile acids in wild-type mice, as well as decreased abundance of free fatty acids in wild-type mice and not in Cyp2e1-null mice. Metabolomic analysis demonstrated that production of isoniazid metabolites was elevated in wild-type mice along with a higher abundance of bile acids, bile acid metabolites, carnitine and carnitine derivatives; these were not observed in Cyp2e1-null mice. In addition, the enzymes responsible for bile acid synthesis were decreased and proteins involved in bile acid transport were significantly increased in wild-type mice. Lastly, treatment of targeted isoniazid metabolites to wild-type mice led to similar changes in cholesterol, triglycerides and free fatty acids. These findings suggest that while CYP2E1 is not involved in isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity, while an isoniazid metabolite might play a role in isoniazid-induced cholestasis through enhancement of bile acid accumulation and mitochondria β-oxidation. -- Highlights: ► Isoniazid metabolites were elevated only in wild-type mice. ► Isoniazid caused no hepatotoxicity in wild-type and Cyp2e1-null mice. ► Isoniazid elevated serum cholesterol and triglycerides, and hepatic bile acids. ► Bile acid transporters were significantly decreased in isoniazid-treated mice.

  1. CYP2E1-dependent elevation of serum cholesterol, triglycerides, and hepatic bile acids by isoniazid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Jie; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Li, Feng; Ma, Xiaochao; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2013-01-01

    Isoniazid is the first-line medication in the prevention and treatment of tuberculosis. Isoniazid is known to have a biphasic effect on the inhibition–induction of CYP2E1 and is also considered to be involved in isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity. However, the full extent and mechanism of involvement of CYP2E1 in isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity remain to be thoroughly investigated. In the current study, isoniazid was administered to wild-type and Cyp2e1-null mice to investigate the potential toxicity of isoniazid in vivo. The results revealed that isoniazid caused no hepatotoxicity in wild-type and Cyp2e1-null mice, but produced elevated serum cholesterol and triglycerides, and hepatic bile acids in wild-type mice, as well as decreased abundance of free fatty acids in wild-type mice and not in Cyp2e1-null mice. Metabolomic analysis demonstrated that production of isoniazid metabolites was elevated in wild-type mice along with a higher abundance of bile acids, bile acid metabolites, carnitine and carnitine derivatives; these were not observed in Cyp2e1-null mice. In addition, the enzymes responsible for bile acid synthesis were decreased and proteins involved in bile acid transport were significantly increased in wild-type mice. Lastly, treatment of targeted isoniazid metabolites to wild-type mice led to similar changes in cholesterol, triglycerides and free fatty acids. These findings suggest that while CYP2E1 is not involved in isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity, while an isoniazid metabolite might play a role in isoniazid-induced cholestasis through enhancement of bile acid accumulation and mitochondria β-oxidation. -- Highlights: ► Isoniazid metabolites were elevated only in wild-type mice. ► Isoniazid caused no hepatotoxicity in wild-type and Cyp2e1-null mice. ► Isoniazid elevated serum cholesterol and triglycerides, and hepatic bile acids. ► Bile acid transporters were significantly decreased in isoniazid-treated mice.

  2. Recirculation and reutilization of micellar bile lecithin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, S J

    1975-09-01

    Bile lecithins, solubilized in micellar bile salt and radiolabeled in the 1-acyl fatty acid, phosphorus, and choline positions, were infused in the small bowel of fasted rats. Absorption of each label was virtually complete after 24 h. However, these lecithins were extensively hydrolyzed in the bowel lumen as well as after absorption, and neither the fatty acid nor phosphorus was significantly retained in the enterohepatic circulation or reutilized for biliary lecithin synthesis. In contrast, while choline was also dissociated from absorbed lecithin, choline was instead retained in the liver, reincorporated into newly synthesized hepatic lecithin, and sercreted in biliary lecithin in 10-fold greater amounts than either the fatty acid or phosphorus. However, the extent of choline incorporation into bile lecithin was limited and was not further increased when free choline was directly injected into the portal vein. The data therefore suggest that although only choline of absorbed lecithin is retained in the enterohepatic circulation and preserved for new biliary lecithin synthesis, exogenous choline utilization is regulated by the size of the available hepatic pool.

  3. Increased serum bile acid concentration following low-dose chronic administration of thioacetamide in rats, as evidenced by metabolomic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Eun Sook; Kim, Gabin; Shin, Ho Jung [Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacogenomics Research Center, Inje University, College of Medicine, Bokjiro 75, Busanjin-Gu, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Se-Myo; Oh, Jung-Hwa; Kim, Yong-Bum; Moon, Kyoung-Sik [Korea Institute of Toxicology, 141 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hyung-Kyoon [College of Pharmacy, Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jayoung [Ministry of Food and Drug Safety, Osong-eup, Heungdeok-gu, Cheongju-si, Chungcheongbuk-do 361-951 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jae-Gook [Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacogenomics Research Center, Inje University, College of Medicine, Bokjiro 75, Busanjin-Gu, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Hyun, E-mail: dhkim@inje.ac.kr [Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacogenomics Research Center, Inje University, College of Medicine, Bokjiro 75, Busanjin-Gu, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    A liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOF-MS)-based metabolomics approach was employed to identify endogenous metabolites as potential biomarkers for thioacetamide (TAA)-induced liver injury. TAA (10 and 30 mg/kg), a well-known hepatotoxic agent, was administered daily to male Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats for 28 days. We then conducted untargeted analyses of endogenous serum and liver metabolites. Partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was performed on serum and liver samples to evaluate metabolites associated with TAA-induced perturbation. TAA administration resulted in altered levels of bile acids, acyl carnitines, and phospholipids in serum and in the liver. We subsequently demonstrated and confirmed the occurrence of compromised bile acid homeostasis. TAA treatment significantly increased serum levels of conjugated bile acids in a dose-dependent manner, which correlated well with toxicity. However, hepatic levels of these metabolites were not substantially changed. Gene expression profiling showed that the hepatic mRNA levels of Ntcp, Bsep, and Oatp1b2 were significantly suppressed, whereas those of basolateral Mrp3 and Mrp4 were increased. Decreased levels of Ntcp, Oatp1b2, and Ostα proteins in the liver were confirmed by western blot analysis. These results suggest that serum bile acids might be increased due to the inhibition of bile acid enterohepatic circulation rather than increased endogenous bile acid synthesis. Moreover, serum bile acids are a good indicator of TAA-induced hepatotoxicity. - Highlights: • Endogenous metabolic profiles were assessed in rat after treatment of thioacetamide. • It significantly increased the levels of bile acids in serum but not in the liver. • Expression of the genes related to bile acid secretion and reuptake was decreased. • Increased serum bile acids result from block of enterohepatic circulation of bile acids.

  4. Increased serum bile acid concentration following low-dose chronic administration of thioacetamide in rats, as evidenced by metabolomic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Eun Sook; Kim, Gabin; Shin, Ho Jung; Park, Se-Myo; Oh, Jung-Hwa; Kim, Yong-Bum; Moon, Kyoung-Sik; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon; Jeong, Jayoung; Shin, Jae-Gook; Kim, Dong Hyun

    2015-01-01

    A liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOF-MS)-based metabolomics approach was employed to identify endogenous metabolites as potential biomarkers for thioacetamide (TAA)-induced liver injury. TAA (10 and 30 mg/kg), a well-known hepatotoxic agent, was administered daily to male Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats for 28 days. We then conducted untargeted analyses of endogenous serum and liver metabolites. Partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was performed on serum and liver samples to evaluate metabolites associated with TAA-induced perturbation. TAA administration resulted in altered levels of bile acids, acyl carnitines, and phospholipids in serum and in the liver. We subsequently demonstrated and confirmed the occurrence of compromised bile acid homeostasis. TAA treatment significantly increased serum levels of conjugated bile acids in a dose-dependent manner, which correlated well with toxicity. However, hepatic levels of these metabolites were not substantially changed. Gene expression profiling showed that the hepatic mRNA levels of Ntcp, Bsep, and Oatp1b2 were significantly suppressed, whereas those of basolateral Mrp3 and Mrp4 were increased. Decreased levels of Ntcp, Oatp1b2, and Ostα proteins in the liver were confirmed by western blot analysis. These results suggest that serum bile acids might be increased due to the inhibition of bile acid enterohepatic circulation rather than increased endogenous bile acid synthesis. Moreover, serum bile acids are a good indicator of TAA-induced hepatotoxicity. - Highlights: • Endogenous metabolic profiles were assessed in rat after treatment of thioacetamide. • It significantly increased the levels of bile acids in serum but not in the liver. • Expression of the genes related to bile acid secretion and reuptake was decreased. • Increased serum bile acids result from block of enterohepatic circulation of bile acids.

  5. Postprandial Plasma Concentrations of Individual Bile Acids and FGF-19 in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, David P; van Nierop, F Samuel; Kulik, Willem

    2016-01-01

    and FGF-19 concentrations. RESULTS: Postprandial total bile acid concentrations increased with increasing meal fat content (P vs controls (oral glucose tolerance test, low and medium fat meals, P fat meal, P = .30). Differences......, Hellerup, Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: Fifteen patients with T2D and 15 healthy matched controls with normal glucose tolerance. INTERVENTIONS: A 75-g oral glucose tolerance test and three isocaloric and isovolemic liquid meals with low, medium, and high fat content, respectively. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Bile acid......CONTEXT: Bile acids regulate lipid and carbohydrate metabolism by interaction with membrane or intracellular proteins including the nuclear farnesoid X receptor (FXR). Postprandial activation of ileal FXR leads to secretion of fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF-19), a gut hormone that may...

  6. Novel two-step synthesis of gold nanoparticles capped with bile acid conjugates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noponen, Virpi; Bhat, Shreedhar; Sievaenen, Elina; Kolehmainen, Erkki

    2008-01-01

    Bile acids and their conjugates are physiologically important molecules. Syntheses and structure elucidation combined with investigation of properties and applications of bile acids and their derivatives are of academic interest. The concept of using bile acids and their conjugates in nanoscience is a novel idea, which opens up fascinating prospects. In this article, an easy and simple route for obtaining N-lithocholyl-L-(cysteine ethyl ester) (3), capable of effectively capping and stabilizing metal nanoparticles, is described. The whole synthetic route needs only two steps giving a moderate to good yield. The gold NPs are characterized by elemental analysis, UV spectroscopy, and TEM. Additionally, 13 C CP/MAS NMR studies for different ligand/Au ratios have been performed

  7. Formation of C21 bile acids from plant sterols in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boberg, K.M.; Lund, E.; Olund, J.; Bjoerkhem, I.

    1990-01-01

    Formation of bile acids from sitosterol in bile-fistulated female Wistar rats was studied with use of 4-14C-labeled sitosterol and sitosterol labeled with 3H in specific positions. The major part (about 75%) of the 14C radioactivity recovered as bile acids in bile after intravenous administration of [4-14C]sitosterol was found to be considerably more polar than cholic acid, and only trace amounts of radioactivity had chromatographic properties similar to those of cholic acid and chenodeoxycholic acid. It was shown that polar metabolites were formed by intermediate oxidation of the 3 beta-hydroxyl group (loss of 3H from 3 alpha-3H-labeled sitosterol) and that the most polar fraction did not contain a hydroxyl group at C7 (retention of 3H in 7 alpha,7 beta-3H2-labeled sitosterol). Furthermore, the polar metabolites had lost at least the terminal 6 or 7 carbon atoms of the side chain (loss of 3H from 22,23-3H2- and 24,28-3H2-labeled sitosterol). Experiments with 3H-labeled 7 alpha-hydroxysitosterol and 4-14C-labeled 26-hydroxysitosterol showed that none of these compounds was an efficient precursor to the polar metabolites. By analysis of purified most polar products of [4-14C] sitosterol by radio-gas chromatography and the same products of 7 alpha,7 beta-[2H2]sitosterol by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, two major metabolites could be identified as C21 bile acids. One metabolite had three hydroxyl groups (3 alpha, 15, and unknown), and one had two hydroxyl groups (3 alpha, 15) and one keto group. Considerably less C21 bile acids were formed from [4-14C]sitosterol in male than in female Wistar rats. The C21 bile acids formed in male rats did not contain a 15-hydroxyl group. Conversion of a [4-14C]sitosterol into C21 bile acids did also occur in adrenalectomized and ovariectomized rats, indicating that endocrine tissues are not involved

  8. Decreased hepatotoxic bile acid composition and altered synthesis in progressive human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lake, April D.; Novak, Petr; Shipkova, Petia; Aranibar, Nelly; Robertson, Donald; Reily, Michael D.; Lu, Zhenqiang; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D.; Cherrington, Nathan J.

    2013-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) have many physiological roles and exhibit both toxic and protective influences within the liver. Alterations in the BA profile may be the result of disease induced liver injury. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a prevalent form of chronic liver disease characterized by the pathophysiological progression from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The hypothesis of this study is that the ‘classical’ (neutral) and ‘alternative’ (acidic) BA synthesis pathways are altered together with hepatic BA composition during progression of human NAFLD. This study employed the use of transcriptomic and metabolomic assays to study the hepatic toxicologic BA profile in progressive human NAFLD. Individual human liver samples diagnosed as normal, steatosis, and NASH were utilized in the assays. The transcriptomic analysis of 70 BA genes revealed an enrichment of downregulated BA metabolism and transcription factor/receptor genes in livers diagnosed as NASH. Increased mRNA expression of BAAT and CYP7B1 was observed in contrast to decreased CYP8B1 expression in NASH samples. The BA metabolomic profile of NASH livers exhibited an increase in taurine together with elevated levels of conjugated BA species, taurocholic acid (TCA) and taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA). Conversely, cholic acid (CA) and glycodeoxycholic acid (GDCA) were decreased in NASH liver. These findings reveal a potential shift toward the alternative pathway of BA synthesis during NASH, mediated by increased mRNA and protein expression of CYP7B1. Overall, the transcriptomic changes of BA synthesis pathway enzymes together with altered hepatic BA composition signify an attempt by the liver to reduce hepatotoxicity during disease progression to NASH. - Highlights: ► Altered hepatic bile acid composition is observed in progressive NAFLD. ► Bile acid synthesis enzymes are transcriptionally altered in NASH livers. ► Increased levels of taurine and conjugated bile acids

  9. Decreased hepatotoxic bile acid composition and altered synthesis in progressive human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lake, April D. [University of Arizona, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Novak, Petr [Biology Centre ASCR, Institute of Plant Molecular Biology, Ceske Budejovice 37001 (Czech Republic); Shipkova, Petia; Aranibar, Nelly; Robertson, Donald; Reily, Michael D. [Pharmaceutical Candidate Optimization, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Lu, Zhenqiang [The Arizona Statistical Consulting Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D. [Pharmaceutical Candidate Optimization, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Cherrington, Nathan J., E-mail: cherrington@pharmacy.arizona.edu [University of Arizona, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Bile acids (BAs) have many physiological roles and exhibit both toxic and protective influences within the liver. Alterations in the BA profile may be the result of disease induced liver injury. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a prevalent form of chronic liver disease characterized by the pathophysiological progression from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The hypothesis of this study is that the ‘classical’ (neutral) and ‘alternative’ (acidic) BA synthesis pathways are altered together with hepatic BA composition during progression of human NAFLD. This study employed the use of transcriptomic and metabolomic assays to study the hepatic toxicologic BA profile in progressive human NAFLD. Individual human liver samples diagnosed as normal, steatosis, and NASH were utilized in the assays. The transcriptomic analysis of 70 BA genes revealed an enrichment of downregulated BA metabolism and transcription factor/receptor genes in livers diagnosed as NASH. Increased mRNA expression of BAAT and CYP7B1 was observed in contrast to decreased CYP8B1 expression in NASH samples. The BA metabolomic profile of NASH livers exhibited an increase in taurine together with elevated levels of conjugated BA species, taurocholic acid (TCA) and taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA). Conversely, cholic acid (CA) and glycodeoxycholic acid (GDCA) were decreased in NASH liver. These findings reveal a potential shift toward the alternative pathway of BA synthesis during NASH, mediated by increased mRNA and protein expression of CYP7B1. Overall, the transcriptomic changes of BA synthesis pathway enzymes together with altered hepatic BA composition signify an attempt by the liver to reduce hepatotoxicity during disease progression to NASH. - Highlights: ► Altered hepatic bile acid composition is observed in progressive NAFLD. ► Bile acid synthesis enzymes are transcriptionally altered in NASH livers. ► Increased levels of taurine and conjugated bile acids

  10. Irinotecan (CPT-11)-induced elevation of bile acids potentiates suppression of IL-10 expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Zhong-Ze; Zhang, Dunfang; Cao, Yun-Feng; Xie, Cen; Lu, Dan; Sun, Dong-Xue; Tanaka, Naoki; Jiang, Changtao; Chen, Qianming; Chen, Yu; Wang, Haina; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    Irinotecan (CPT-11) is a first-line anti-colon cancer drug, however; CPT-11-induced toxicity remains a key factor limiting its clinical application. To search for clues to the mechanism of CPT-11-induced toxicity, metabolomics was applied using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Intraperitoneal injection of 50 mg/kg of CPT-11 induced loss of body weight, and intestine toxicity. Changes in gallbladder morphology suggested alterations in bile acid metabolism, as revealed at the molecular level by analysis of the liver, bile, and ileum metabolomes between the vehicle-treated control group and the CPT-11-treated group. Analysis of immune cell populations further showed that CPT-11 treatment significantly decreased the IL-10-producing CD4 T cell frequency in intestinal lamina propria lymphocytes, but not in spleen or mesenteric lymph nodes. In vitro cell culture studies showed that the addition of bile acids deoxycholic acid and taurodeoxycholic acid accelerated the CPT-11-induced suppression of IL-10 secretion by activated CD4 + naive T cells isolated from mouse splenocytes. These results showed that CPT-11 treatment caused metabolic changes in the composition of bile acids that altered CPT-11-induced suppression of IL-10 expression. - Highlights: • CPT-11 is an effective anticancer drug, but induced toxicity limits its application in the clinic. • CPT-11 decreased IL-10-producing CD4 T cell frequency in intestinal lamina propria lymphocytes. • CPT-11 altered the composition of bile acid metabolites, notably DCA and TDCA in liver, bile and intestine. • DCA and TDCA potentiated CPT-11-induced suppression of IL-10 secretion by active CD4 + naive T cells.

  11. Irinotecan (CPT-11)-induced elevation of bile acids potentiates suppression of IL-10 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Zhong-Ze [Laboratory of Metabolism, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Department of Toxicology, School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin (China); Joint Center for Translational Medicine, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences and First Affiliated Hospital of Liaoning Medical University, Dalian (China); Zhang, Dunfang [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Cao, Yun-Feng [Joint Center for Translational Medicine, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences and First Affiliated Hospital of Liaoning Medical University, Dalian (China); Xie, Cen [Laboratory of Metabolism, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Lu, Dan [Department of Immunology, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Immunology, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin (China); Sun, Dong-Xue; Tanaka, Naoki; Jiang, Changtao [Laboratory of Metabolism, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Chen, Qianming; Chen, Yu [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Wang, Haina [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shandong University, Jinan (China); Gonzalez, Frank J., E-mail: gonzalef@mail.nih.gov [Laboratory of Metabolism, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Irinotecan (CPT-11) is a first-line anti-colon cancer drug, however; CPT-11-induced toxicity remains a key factor limiting its clinical application. To search for clues to the mechanism of CPT-11-induced toxicity, metabolomics was applied using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Intraperitoneal injection of 50 mg/kg of CPT-11 induced loss of body weight, and intestine toxicity. Changes in gallbladder morphology suggested alterations in bile acid metabolism, as revealed at the molecular level by analysis of the liver, bile, and ileum metabolomes between the vehicle-treated control group and the CPT-11-treated group. Analysis of immune cell populations further showed that CPT-11 treatment significantly decreased the IL-10-producing CD4 T cell frequency in intestinal lamina propria lymphocytes, but not in spleen or mesenteric lymph nodes. In vitro cell culture studies showed that the addition of bile acids deoxycholic acid and taurodeoxycholic acid accelerated the CPT-11-induced suppression of IL-10 secretion by activated CD4{sup +} naive T cells isolated from mouse splenocytes. These results showed that CPT-11 treatment caused metabolic changes in the composition of bile acids that altered CPT-11-induced suppression of IL-10 expression. - Highlights: • CPT-11 is an effective anticancer drug, but induced toxicity limits its application in the clinic. • CPT-11 decreased IL-10-producing CD4 T cell frequency in intestinal lamina propria lymphocytes. • CPT-11 altered the composition of bile acid metabolites, notably DCA and TDCA in liver, bile and intestine. • DCA and TDCA potentiated CPT-11-induced suppression of IL-10 secretion by active CD4{sup +} naive T cells.

  12. Long-term effect of medical treatment of diarrhoea in 594 patients with SeHCAT scan diagnosed bile acid malabsorption from 2003 to 2016; a retrospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, B; Dalby, H R; Krogh, K

    2018-01-01

    Background Excessive amounts of bile acids entering the colon due to bile acid malabsorption cause chronic bile acid diarrhoea. Diagnosis is possible by measuring the retention fraction of orally ingested 75Selenium homotaurocholic acid (SeHCAT). The knowledge of long-term effects of medical trea...

  13. Survival of Four Probiotic Strains in Acid, Bile Salt and After Spray Drying

    OpenAIRE

    Rawichar Chaipojjana; Suttipong Phosuksirikul; Arunsri Leejeerajumnean

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to select the survival of probiotic strains when exposed to acidic and bile salts condition. Four probiotic strains Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus TISTR 047, Lactobacillus casei TISTR 1500, Lactobacillus acidophilus TISTR 1338 and Lactobacillus plantarum TISTR 1465 were cultured in MRS broth and incubated at 35ºC for 15 hours before being inoculated into acidic condition 5 M HCl, pH 2 for 2 hours and bile salt 0.3%, pH 5.8 for 8 hour. ...

  14. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM affects vitamin E acetate metabolism and intestinal bile acid signature in monocolonized mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roager, Henrik Munch; Sulek, Karolina; Skov, Kasper

    2014-01-01

    (NCFM) on the intestinal metabolome (jejunum, caecum, and colon) in mice by comparing NCFM mono-colonized (MC) mice with GF mice using liquid chromatography coupled to mass-spectrometry (LC-MS). The study adds to existing evidence that NCFM in vivo affects the bile acid signature of mice...... by deconjugation and dehydroxylation of bile acids. Furthermore, we confirmed that carbohydrate metabolism is affected by NCFM in the mouse intestine. Especially, the digestion of larger carbohydrates (penta- and tetrasaccharides) was increased in MC mice. Interestingly, we also found vitamin E (α...

  15. Boldine enhances bile production in rats via osmotic and farnesoid X receptor dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cermanova, Jolana; Kadova, Zuzana; Zagorova, Marie; Hroch, Milos; Tomsik, Pavel; Nachtigal, Petr; Kudlackova, Zdenka; Pavek, Petr; Dubecka, Michaela; Ceckova, Martina; Staud, Frantisek; Laho, Tomas; Micuda, Stanislav

    2015-05-15

    Boldine, the major alkaloid from the Chilean Boldo tree, is used in traditional medicine to support bile production, but evidence to support this function is controversial. We analyzed the choleretic potential of boldine, including its molecular background. The acute- and long-term effects of boldine were evaluated in rats either during intravenous infusion or after 28-day oral treatment. Infusion of boldine instantly increased the bile flow 1.4-fold in healthy rats as well as in animals with Mrp2 deficiency or ethinylestradiol induced cholestasis. This effect was not associated with a corresponding increase in bile acid or glutathione biliary excretion, indicating that the effect is not related to stimulation of either bile acid dependent or independent mechanisms of bile formation and points to the osmotic activity of boldine itself. We subsequently analyzed bile production under conditions of changing biliary excretion of boldine after bolus intravenous administration and found strong correlations between both parameters. HPLC analysis showed that bile concentrations of boldine above 10 μM were required for induction of choleresis. Importantly, long-term pretreatment, when the bile collection study was performed 24-h after the last administration of boldine, also accelerated bile formation despite undetectable levels of the compound in bile. The effect paralleled upregulation of the Bsep transporter and increased biliary clearance of its substrates, bile acids. We consequently confirmed the ability of boldine to stimulate the Bsep transcriptional regulator, FXR receptor. In conclusion, our study clarified the mechanisms and circumstances surrounding the choleretic activity of boldine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The composition of bile acids in patients with cholelithiasis according to the data of liquid chromatography with mass spectrometric detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Klymenko

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Bile acids play a leading role in the physical and colloidal properties of bile stabilization. Lack of bile acids consequences result in the formation of cholesterol stones in the gall bladder, diarrhea and steatorrhea, fat-soluble vitamins impaired absorption, and kidney stones formation (oxalates. Investigation of altered bile composition, especially the content of bile acids, in patients with gallstone disease by means of modern analytical analysis methods (liquid chromatography with mass spectrometric detection would complement the modern ideas about mechanisms of lithogenesis and aim efforts at prevention of stone formation in the gall bladder, that was the purpose of our work. Materials and methods. Bile samples were tested for bile acid content using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. 14 samples of bile from patients with cholelithiasis were included in the main group, and control group consisted of 7 bile samples from practically healthy persons. Results. In patients with cholelithiasis there is an increase in the content of conjugated forms of bile acids – glycolic acid in 2 times (p = 0.002, taurocholic acid in 1.57 times (p = 0.062 compared with practically healthy persons. In patients with cholelithiasis, the ratio of taurocholic to glycolic acidі content (0.95 vs. 1.27, p = 0.0179, as well as glycogenodeoxycholic to glycodeoxycholic acid (1.11 vs. 1.58, p = 0.027 is significantly less than that in practically healthy persons. In addition, one in two patients with cholelithiasis does not reveal the presence of ursodeoxycholic acid in the bile. Conclusions. The lithogenic properties of bile are primarily caused by conjugated forms of cholic acid with glycine and taurine content violation. The ratio of taurocholic to glycolic acid content in patients with cholelithiasis is significantly lower than the similar index in practically healthy persons (0.95 vs. 1.27, p = 0.0179. The ratio of glycine conjugated bile acids

  17. Suppression of sterol 27-hydroxylase mRNA and transcriptional activity by bile acids in cultured rat hepatocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Twisk, J.; Wit, E.C.M. de; Princen, H.M.G.

    1995-01-01

    In previous work we have demonstrated suppression of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase by bile acids at the level of mRNA and transcription, resulting in a similar decline in bile acid synthesis in cultured rat hepatocytes. In view of the substantial contribution of the 'alternative' or '27-hydroxylase'

  18. In Vitro bile acid binding of kale, mustard greens, broccoli, cabbage and green bell pepper improves with microwave cooking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bile acid binding potential of foods and food fractions has been related to lowering the risk of heart disease and that of cancer. Sautéing or steam cooking has been observed to significantly improve bile acid binding of green/leafy vegetables. It was hypothesized that microwave cooking could impr...

  19. Bile acid changes after high-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment in primary sclerosing cholangitis: relation to disease progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinakos, Emmanouil; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Kowdley, Kris V.; Befeler, Alex; Keach, Jill; Lindor, Keith

    2010-01-01

    High-dose (28-30mg/kg/day) ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) treatment improves serum liver tests in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) but does not improve survival and is associated with increased rates of serious adverse events. The mechanism for the latter undesired effect remains unclear. High-dose UDCA could result in the production of hepatotoxic bile acids, such as lithocholic acid (LCA), due to limited small bowel absorption of UDCA and conversion of UDCA by bacteria in the colon. We determined the serum bile acid composition in 56 patients with PSC previously enrolled in a randomized, double-blind controlled trial of high dose UDCA versus placebo. Samples for analysis were obtained at baseline and at the end of treatment. The mean changes in UDCA (16.86 vs 0.05 μmol/L) and total bile acid (17.21 vs −0.55 μmol/L) levels were significantly higher in the UDCA group (n=29) compared to placebo (n=27) when pretreatment levels were compared (pacid (CA), deoxycholic acid (DCA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA). Patients (n=9) in the UDCA group who reached clinical endpoints of disease progression (development of cirrhosis, varices, liver transplantation or death) tend to have greater increase in their post-treatment total bile acid levels (34.99 vs 9.21 μmol/L) (pacid pool including lithocholic acid. PMID:20564380

  20. Critical role of RanBP2-mediated SUMOylation of Small Heterodimer Partner in maintaining bile acid homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kwon, Sanghoon; Byun, Sangwon; Xiao, Zhen; Park, Sean; Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Chiang, Cheng-Ming; Kemper, Byron; Kemper, Jongsook Kim

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are recently recognized signalling molecules that profoundly affect metabolism. Because of detergent-like toxicity, BA levels must be tightly regulated. An orphan nuclear receptor, Small Heterodimer Partner (SHP), plays a key role in this regulation, but how SHP senses the BA signal for feedback transcriptional responses is not clearly understood. We show an unexpected function of a nucleoporin, RanBP2, in maintaining BA homoeostasis through SUMOylation of SHP. Upon BA signalling, RanBP2 co-localizes with SHP at the nuclear envelope region and mediates SUMO2 modification at K68, which facilitates nuclear transport of SHP and its interaction with repressive histone modifiers to inhibit BA synthetic genes. Mice expressing a SUMO-defective K68R SHP mutant have increased liver BA levels, and upon BA- or drug-induced biliary insults, these mice exhibit exacerbated cholestatic pathologies. These results demonstrate a function of RanBP2-mediated SUMOylation of SHP in maintaining BA homoeostasis and protecting from the BA hepatotoxicity. PMID:27412403

  1. Percutaneous biliary drainage in acute suppurative cholangitis with biliary sepsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyung Lyul; Cho, June Sik; Kwon, Soon Tae; Lee, Sang Jin; Rhee, Byung Chull

    1993-01-01

    Acute suppurative cholangitis is a severe inflammatory process of the bile duct occurred as result of partial or complete obstruction of the bile duct, and may manifest clinically severe form of disease, rapidly deteriorating to life-threatening condition. We analyzed emergency percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage in 20 patients of acute suppurative cholangitis with biliary sepsis to evaluate the therapeutic effect and complication of the procedure. The underlying cause were 12 benign disease(stones) and eight malignant tumors and among eight malignant tumors, bile duct stones(n=4) and clonorchiasis(n=1) were combined. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage was performed successfully in 17 of 20 patients resulting in improvement of general condition and failed in three patients. The procedure were preterminated due to the patient's condition in two and biliary-proto fistula was developed in one. After biliary decompression by percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage, effective and successful elective surgery was performed in nine cases, which were seven biliary stones and two biliary cancer with stones. Our experience suggest that emergency percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage is an initial and effective treatment of choice for acute suppurative cholangitis with sepsis and a safe alternative for nonsurgical treatment

  2. Determination of total bile acids in serum. A comparison of a radioimmunoassay with an enzymatic-fluorimetric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starkey, B.J.; Marks, V.

    1982-01-01

    A solid phase radioimmunoassay kit method for total conjugated bile acids has been compared to an enzymatic fluorimetric method for total serum bile acids. The methods were compared with respect to: precision, cross-reactivity (molar equivalence) of different bile salts, recovery of different bile salts from serum, the reference range for a healthy population, linearity, coefficient of correlation, diagnostic effectiveness, cost and ease of assay. Both assays seemed equally capable of predicting the presence or absence of liver disease. Radioimmunoassay had little advantage over the enzymatic-fluorimetric method. Its relative ease was far outweighed by its greater cost and poorer analytical performance. (Auth.)

  3. Experimental Protoporphyria: Effect of Bile Acids on Liver Damage Induced by Griseofulvin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Carmen Martinez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of bile acids administration to an experimental mice model of Protoporphyria produced by griseofulvin (Gris was investigated. The aim was to assess whether porphyrin excretion could be accelerated by bile acids treatment in an attempt to diminish liver damage induced by Gris. Liver damage markers, heme metabolism, and oxidative stress parameters were analyzed in mice treated with Gris and deoxycholic (DXA, dehydrocholic (DHA, chenodeoxycholic, or ursodeoxycholic (URSO. The administration of Gris alone increased the activities of glutathione reductase (GRed, superoxide dismutase (SOD, alkaline phosphatase (AP, gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT, and glutathione-S-transferase (GST, as well as total porphyrins, glutathione (GSH, and cytochrome P450 (CYP levels in liver. Among the bile acids studied, DXA and DHA increased PROTO IX excretion, DXA also abolished the action of Gris, reducing lipid peroxidation and hepatic GSH and CYP levels, and the activities of GGT, AP, SOD, and GST returned to control values. However, porphyrin accumulation was not prevented by URSO; instead this bile acid reduced ALA-S and the antioxidant defense enzymes system activities. In conclusion, we postulate that DXA acid would be more effective to prevent liver damage induced by Gris.

  4. Lecithin inhibits fatty acid and bile salt absorption from rat small intestine in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, D R; Sillery, J

    1976-12-01

    During digestion of a fatty meal, long chain free fatty acids (FFA) and lecithin are among the lipids solubilized in intestinal contents as mixed micelles with bile salts. We hypothesized that if lecithin were not hydrolyzed, the mixed micelles would be abnormal, and absorption of FFA and bile salts would be depressed. To test this hypothesis, isolated segments of rat small intestine were infused in vivo with micellar solutions of 2 mMolar linoleic acid and 10 mMolar taurocholate to which was added 3 mMolar 1-palmitoyl, 2-oleoyl lecithin (a common lecithin in bile and food), or 1-palmitoyl lysolecithin (the hydrolytic product of lecithin). Absorption of FFA and bile salt was measured under steady state conditions using a single-pass technique. Lecithin depressed the rate of FFA absorption by 40% (p less than 0.025) in jejunal and ileal segments whereas lysolecithin was associated with normal rates of FFA absorption. Lecithin also reduced taurocholate absorption from the ileum by 30% (p less than 0.05). These data support the idea that lecithin may depress FFA and bile salt absorption from the small intestine in pancreatic insufficiency.

  5. Physiology of bile secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteller, Alejandro

    2008-10-07

    The formation of bile depends on the structural and functional integrity of the bile-secretory apparatus and its impairment, in different situations, results in the syndrome of cholestasis. The structural bases that permit bile secretion as well as various aspects related with its composition and flow rate in physiological conditions will first be reviewed. Canalicular bile is produced by polarized hepatocytes that hold transporters in their basolateral (sinusoidal) and apical (canalicular) plasma membrane. This review summarizes recent data on the molecular determinants of this primary bile formation. The major function of the biliary tree is modification of canalicular bile by secretory and reabsorptive processes in bile-duct epithelial cells (cholangiocytes) as bile passes through bile ducts. The mechanisms of fluid and solute transport in cholangiocytes will also be discussed. In contrast to hepatocytes where secretion is constant and poorly controlled, cholangiocyte secretion is regulated by hormones and nerves. A short section dedicated to these regulatory mechanisms of bile secretion has been included. The aim of this revision was to set the bases for other reviews in this series that will be devoted to specific issues related with biliary physiology and pathology.

  6. Effect of ursodeoxycholic acid on the kinetics of the major hydrophobic bile acids in health and in chronic cholestatic liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beuers, U.; Spengler, U.; Zwiebel, F. M.; PAULETZKI, J.; Fischer, S.; Paumgartner, G.

    1992-01-01

    Beneficial effects of ursodeoxycholic acid in chronic cholestatic liver diseases have been attributed to displacement of hydrophobic bile acids from the endogenous bile acid pool. To test this hypothesis, we determined pool sizes, fractional turnover rates, synthesis/input rates and serum levels of

  7. Independent Activation of Hepatitis B Virus Biosynthesis by Retinoids, Peroxisome Proliferators, and Bile Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Vanessa C.; Oropeza, Claudia E.

    2013-01-01

    In the human hepatoma cell line HepG2, retinoic acid, clofibric acid, and bile acid treatment can only modestly increase hepatitis B virus (HBV) biosynthesis. Utilizing the human embryonic kidney cell line 293T, it was possible to demonstrate that the retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) plus its ligand can support viral biosynthesis independently of additional nuclear receptors. In addition, RXRα/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) and RXRα/farnesoid X receptor α (FXRα) heterodimeric nuclear receptors can also mediate ligand-dependent HBV transcription and replication when activated by clofibric acid and bile acid, respectively, independently of a requirement for the ligand-dependent activation of RXRα. These observations indicate that there are at least three possible modes of ligand-mediated activation of HBV transcription and replication existing within hepatocytes, suggesting that multiple independent mechanisms control viral production in the livers of infected individuals. PMID:23135717

  8. Differential feedback regulation of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase mRNA and transcriptional activity by rat bile acids in primary monolayer cultures of rat hepatocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Twisk, J.; Lehmann, E.M.; Princen, H.M.G.

    1993-01-01

    We have used primary monolayer cultures of rat hepatocytes to study the effects of physiological concentrations of various bile acids, commonly found in bile of normal rats, on the mechanism of regulation of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase and bile acid synthesis. Addition of taurocholic acid, the most

  9. Dysfunctional families: Clostridium scindens and secondary bile acids inhibit the growth of Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greathouse, K Leigh; Harris, Curtis C; Bultman, Scott J

    2015-01-06

    C. difficile infection is a deadly disease that is influenced by the microbiome. In a recent article in Nature, Buffie et al. (2014) demonstrate that the ability of C. scindens to synthesize secondary bile acids is crucial to providing resistance to C. difficile infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Greater bile acid excretion with soy bean than with cow milk in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, J M; Nestel, P J

    1976-05-01

    The excretion of fecal sterols and bile acids was measured in five infants from the 1st week of life to 2 or 3 months of age as the composition of their diet was changed from cow milk to soy bean milk. Bile acid excretion, adjusted for body weight, was initially lower during the 1st than during the 3rd week, when it reached adult values. The average excretion of bile acids was 6.8 mg/kg per day with soy bean milk and 3.6 mg/kg per day with cow milk. Net sterol excretion (total sterol output minus cholesterol intake) was also twice as high with soy bean milk and probably reflected enhancement of cholesterol re-excretion as well as of synthesis since the cholesterol content of soy beans is nil. However, net sterol excretion remained higher with soy bean than with cow milk even when egg yolk cholesterol was added to the soy bean milk. It is concluded that the substitution of soy bean milk for cow milk, which lowered the plasma cholesterol in all infants (even in the presence of dietary cholesterol) leads to an increase in bile acids and probably also in cholesterol excretion in young infants.

  11. Complex interaction between circadian rhythm and diet on bile acid homeostasis in male rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggink, Hannah M; Oosterman, Johanneke E; de Goede, Paul; de Vries, Emmely M; Foppen, Ewout; Koehorst, Martijn; Groen, Albert K; Boelen, Anita; Romijn, Johannes A; la Fleur, Susanne E; Soeters, Maarten R; Kalsbeek, A.

    2017-01-01

    Desynchronization between the master clock in the brain, which is entrained by (day) light, and peripheral organ clocks, which are mainly entrained by food intake, may have negative effects on energy metabolism. Bile acid metabolism follows a clear day/night rhythm. We investigated whether in rats

  12. Decreased hepatotoxic bile acid composition and altered synthesis in progressive human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lake, A.D.; Novák, Petr; Shipkova, P.; Aranibar, N.; Robertson, D.; Reily, M.D.; Lu, Z.; Lehman-McKeeman, L.D.; Cherrington, N.J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 268, č. 2 (2013), s. 132-140 ISSN 0041-008X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Bile Acids * Liver * Metabolomics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.630, year: 2013

  13. The role of bile acids in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Monica D; Lee, Yi-Horng; Guo, Grace L

    2017-08-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is growing in prevalence worldwide. It is marked by the presence of macrosteatosis on liver histology but is often clinically asymptomatic. However, it can progress into nonalcoholic steatohepatitis which is a more severe form of liver disease characterized by inflammation and fibrosis. Further progression leads to cirrhosis, which predisposes patients to hepatocellular carcinoma or liver failure. The mechanism by which simple steatosis progresses to steatohepatitis is not entirely clear. However, multiple pathways have been proposed. A common link amongst many of these pathways is disruption of the homeostasis of bile acids. Other than aiding in the absorption of lipids and lipid-soluble vitamins, bile acids act as ligands. For example, they bind to farnesoid X receptor, which is critically involved in many of the pathways responsible for maintaining bile acid, glucose, and lipid homeostasis. Alterations to these pathways can lead to dysregulation of energy balance and increased inflammation and fibrosis. Repeated insults over time may be the key to development of steatohepatitis. For this reason, current drug therapies target aspects of these pathways to try to reduce and halt inflammation and fibrosis. This review will focus on the role of bile acids in these various pathways and how changes in these pathways may result in steatohepatitis. While there is no approved pharmaceutical treatment for either hepatic steatosis or steatohepatitis, this review will also touch upon the multitude of potential therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Postprandial Plasma Concentrations of Individual Bile Acids and FGF-19 in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonne, David P.; van Nierop, F. Samuel; Kulik, Willem; Soeters, Maarten R.; Vilsbøll, Tina; Knop, Filip K.

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids regulate lipid and carbohydrate metabolism by interaction with membrane or intracellular proteins including the nuclear farnesoid X receptor (FXR). Postprandial activation of ileal FXR leads to secretion of fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF-19), a gut hormone that may be implicated in

  15. How bad is bile acid diarrhoea: an online survey of patient-reported symptoms and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannaga, Ayman; Kelman, Lawrence; O'Connor, Michelle; Pitchford, Claire; Walters, Julian R F; Arasaradnam, Ramesh P

    2017-01-01

    Bile acid diarrhoea (BAD) is an underdiagnosed condition producing diarrhoea, urgency and fear of faecal incontinence. How patients experience these symptoms has not previously been studied. Bile Acid Malabsorption (BAM) Support UK was established in 2015 as a national charity with objectives including to provide details regarding how BAD affects patients, to improve earlier recognition and clinical management. A questionnaire was collected anonymously by BAM Support UK and the Bile Salt Malabsorption Facebook group over 4 weeks at the end of 2015. It comprised 56 questions and aimed to inform patients and clinicians about how BAD affects the respondents. The first 100 responses were analysed. 91% of the respondents reported a diagnosis of BAD. 58% of total respondents diagnosed following a Selenium-homocholic acid taurine scan, 69% were diagnosed by a gastroenterologist, with type 2 and 3 BAD comprising 38% and 37%, respectively, of total respondents. Symptoms had been experienced for more than 5 years before diagnosis in 44% of respondents. Following treatment, usually with bile acid sequestrants, 60% of participants reported improvement of diarrhoea and most reported their mental health has been positively impacted. Just over half of the cohort felt as though their symptoms had been dismissed during clinical consultations and 28% felt their GPs were unaware of BAD. BAD requires more recognition by clinicians to address the current delays in diagnosis. Treatment improves physical and mental symptoms in the majority of participants.

  16. Ursodeoxycholic acid reduces protein levels and nucleation-promoting activity in human gallbladder bile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Erpecum, K. J.; Portincasa, P.; Eckhardt, E.; Go, P. M.; vanBerge-Henegouwen, G. P.; Groen, A. K.

    1996-01-01

    Background & Aims: Ursodeoxycholic acid prevents gallstone formation in selected patients. The aim of this study was to examine whether decreased concentration and nucleation-promoting activity of various proteins contribute to this beneficial effect. Methods: Gallbladder bile of 13 patients with

  17. Bile acids induce hepatic stellate cell proliferation via activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svegliati-Baroni, G; Ridolfi, F; Hannivoort, R; Saccomanno, S; Homan, M; De Minicis, S; Jansen, PLM; Candelaresi, C; Benedetti, A; Moshage, H

    Background B Aims: Hepatic stellate cell (HSC) proliferation is a key event in the development of liver fibrosis. In many liver diseases, HSCs are exposed to inflammatory cytokines, reactive oxygen species, and bile acids. Although inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species are known to

  18. Bile acids induce hepatic stellate cell proliferation via activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svegliati-Baroni, Gianluca; Ridolfi, Francesco; Hannivoort, Rebekka; Saccomanno, Stefania; Homan, Manon; de Minicis, Samuele; Jansen, Peter L. M.; Candelaresi, Cinzia; Benedetti, Antonio; Moshage, Han

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Hepatic stellate cell (HSC) proliferation is a key event in the development of liver fibrosis. In many liver diseases, HSCs are exposed to inflammatory cytokines, reactive oxygen species, and bile acids. Although inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species are known to

  19. Plasma bile acids are not associated with energy metabolism in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brufau, Gemma; Bahr, Matthias J.; Staels, Bart; Claudel, Thierry; Ockenga, Johann; Boker, Klaus H. W.; Murphy, Elizabeth J.; Prado, Kris; Stellaard, Frans; Manns, Michael P.; Kuipers, Folkert; Tietge, Uwe J. F.

    2010-01-01

    Bile acids (BA) have recently been shown to increase energy expenditure in mice, but this concept has not been tested in humans. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between plasma BA levels and energy expenditure in humans. Type 2 diabetic (T2DM) patients (n = 12) and gender, age and

  20. Glucose-lowering effects and mechanisms of the bile acid-sequestering resin sevelamer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønden, Andreas; Mikkelsen, Kristian; Sonne, David P

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: Sevelamer, a non-absorbable amine-based resin used for treatment of hyperphosphatemia, has been demonstrated to hold a marked bile acid-binding potential alongside beneficial effects on lipid and glucose metabolism. The aim of this study was to investigate the glucose-lowering effect and me...

  1. Plasma Bile Acids Are Associated with Energy Expenditure and Thyroid Function in Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ockenga, Johann; Valentini, Luzia; Schuetz, Tatjana; Wohlgemuth, Franziska; Glaeser, Silja; Omar, Ajmal; Kasim, Esmatollah; duPlessis, Daniel; Featherstone, Karen; Davis, Julian R.; Tietge, Uwe J. F.; Kroencke, Thomas; Biebermann, Heike; Koehrle, Josef; Brabant, Georg

    Background/Aims: Animal studies implicate a role of bile acids (BA) in thyroid-regulated energy expenditure (EE) via activation of the TGR-5/adenylate cyclase/deiodinase type 2 pathway. Here we investigated these possible associations in humans. Methods: EE, BA, and thyroid hormone status were

  2. Serum bile acids and leptin interact with glucose metabolism in patients with liver cirrhosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentini, Luzia; Glaeser, Silja; Schuetz, Tatjana; Omar, Ajmal; Kasim, Esmatollah; Kroencke, Thomas; Tietge, Uwe J. F.; Lochs, Herbert; Schulzke, Joerg-Dieter; Brabant, Georg; Ockenga, Johann

    Background & aims: We investigated possible involvements of bile acids (BA) and leptin in hepatogenous insulin resistance being present in up to 90% of cirrhotic patients. Methods: Blood was analysed in 10 cirrhotic patients (8m/2f, 48 +/- 10.4 yrs) and 10 controls (8m/2f, 43 +/- 9.3 yrs) after oral

  3. An optimized probucol microencapsulated formulation integrating a secondary bile acid (deoxycholic acid as a permeation enhancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mooranian A

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Armin Mooranian,1 Rebecca Negrulj,1 Nigel Chen-Tan,2 Gerald F Watts,3 Frank Arfuso,4 Hani Al-Salami11Biotechnology and Drug Development Research Laboratory, School of Pharmacy, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Biosciences Research Precinct, Curtin University, 2Faculty of Science and Engineering, Curtin University, 3School of Medicine and Pharmacology, Royal Perth Hospital, University of Western Australia, 4School of Biomedical Science, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Biosciences Research Precinct, Curtin University, Perth, AustraliaAbstract: The authors have previously designed, developed, and characterized a novel microencapsulated formulation as a platform for the targeted delivery of therapeutics in an animal model of type 2 diabetes, using the drug probucol (PB. The aim of this study was to optimize PB microcapsules by incorporating the bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA, which has good permeation-enhancing properties, and to examine its effect on microcapsules’ morphology, rheology, structural and surface characteristics, and excipients’ chemical and thermal compatibilities. Microencapsulation was carried out using a BÜCHI-based microencapsulating system established in the authors’ laboratory. Using the polymer sodium alginate (SA, two microencapsulated formulations were prepared: PB-SA (control and PB-DCA-SA (test at a constant ratio (1:30 and 1:3:30, respectively. Complete characterization of the microcapsules was carried out. The incorporation of DCA resulted in better structural and surface characteristics, uniform morphology, and stable chemical and thermal profiles, while size and rheological parameters remained similar to control. In addition, PB-DCA-SA microcapsules showed good excipients’ compatibilities, which were supported by data from differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray studies, suggesting

  4. Effect of Wheat Dietary Fiber Particle Size during Digestion In Vitro on Bile Acid, Faecal Bacteria and Short-Chain Fatty Acid Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziedzic, Krzysztof; Szwengiel, Artur; Górecka, Danuta; Gujska, Elżbieta; Kaczkowska, Joanna; Drożdżyńska, Agnieszka; Walkowiak, Jarosław

    2016-06-01

    The influence of bile acid concentration on the growth of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. bacteria was demonstrated. Exposing these bacteria to the environment containing bile acid salts, and very poor in nutrients, leads to the disappearance of these microorganisms due to the toxic effect of bile acids. A multidimensional analysis of data in the form of principal component analysis indicated that lactic acid bacteria bind bile acids and show antagonistic effect on E. coli spp. bacteria. The growth in E. coli spp. population was accompanied by a decline in the population of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. with a simultaneous reduction in the concentration of bile acids. This is direct proof of acid binding ability of the tested lactic acid bacteria with respect to cholic acid, lithocholic acid and deoxycholic acid. This research demonstrated that the degree of fineness of wheat dietary fibre does not affect the sorption of bile acids and growth of some bacteria species; however, it has an impact on the profile of synthesized short-chained fatty acids. During the digestion of a very fine wheat fibre fraction (WF 90), an increase in the concentration of propionic and butyric acids, as compared with the wheat fiber fraction of larger particles - WF 500, was observed. Our study suggested that wheat fibre did not affect faecal bacteria growth, however, we observed binding of bile acids by Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp.

  5. Bile ascites in adults. Diagnosis using hepatobiliary scintigraphy and paracentesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagle, C.E.; Fink-Bennett, D.; Freitas, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Hepatobiliary scintigraphy has been recognized as a useful diagnostic tool in detecting the presence and site of bile leaks. The authors report a case of bile ascites secondary to a postsurgical biliary leak, the scintigraphic findings in bile ascites, and the potential use of paracentesis, in combination with hepatobiliary scintigraphy, in confirming the presence of bile ascites and a bile leak

  6. Molecular interactions between lecithin and bile salts/acids in oils and their effects on reverse micellization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njauw, Ching-Wei; Cheng, Chih-Yang; Ivanov, Viktor A; Khokhlov, Alexei R; Tung, Shih-Huang

    2013-03-26

    It has been known that the addition of bile salts to lecithin organosols induces the formation of reverse wormlike micelles and that the worms are similar to long polymer chains that entangle each other to form viscoelastic solutions. In this study, we further investigated the effects of different bile salts and bile acids on the growth of lecithin reverse worms in cyclohexane and n-decane. We utilized rheological and small-angle scattering techniques to analyze the properties and structures of the reverse micelles. All of the bile salts can transform the originally spherical lecithin reverse micelles into wormlike micelles and their rheological behaviors can be described by the single-relaxation-time Maxwell model. However, their efficiencies to induce the worms are different. In contrast, before phase separation, bile acids can induce only short cylindrical micelles that are not long enough to impart viscoelasticity. We used Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to investigate the interactions between lecithin and bile salts/acids and found that different bile salts/acids employ different functional groups to form hydrogen bonds with lecithin. Such effects determine the relative positions of the bile salts/acids in the headgroups of lecithin, thus resulting in varying efficiencies to alter the effective critical packing parameter for the formation of wormlike micelles. This work highlights the importance of intermolecular interactions in molecular self-assembly.

  7. Effect of various antibiotics on modulation of intestinal microbiota and bile acid profile in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Youcai; Limaye, Pallavi B.; Renaud, Helen J.; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic treatments have been used to modulate intestinal bacteria and investigate the role of intestinal bacteria on bile acid (BA) homeostasis. However, knowledge on which intestinal bacteria and bile acids are modified by antibiotics is limited. In the present study, mice were administered various antibiotics, 47 of the most abundant bacterial species in intestine, as well as individual BAs in plasma, liver, and intestine were quantified. Compared to the two antibiotic combinations (vancomycin + imipenem and cephalothin + neomycin), the three single antibiotics (metronidazole, ciprofloxacin and aztreonam) have less effect on intestinal bacterial profiles, and thus on host BA profiles and mRNA expression of genes that are important for BA homeostasis. The two antibiotic combinations decreased the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes in intestine, as well as most secondary BAs in serum, liver and intestine. Additionally, the two antibiotic combinations significantly increased mRNA of the hepatic BA uptake transporters (Ntcp and Oatp1b2) and canalicular BA efflux transporters (Bsep and Mrp2), but decreased mRNA of the hepatic BA synthetic enzyme Cyp8b1, suggesting an elevated enterohepatic circulation of BAs. Interestingly, the two antibiotic combinations tended to have opposite effect on the mRNAs of most intestinal genes, which tended to be inhibited by vancomycin + imipenem but stimulated by cephalothin + neomycin. To conclude, the present study clearly shows that various antibiotics have distinct effects on modulating intestinal bacteria and host BA metabolism. - Highlights: • Various antibiotics have different effects on intestinal bacteria. • Antibiotics alter bile acid composition in mouse liver and intestine. • Antibiotics influence genes involved in bile acid homeostasis. • Clostridia appear to be important for secondary bile acid formation

  8. Receptor-mediated uptake of low density lipoprotein stimulates bile acid synthesis by cultured rat hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junker, L.H.; Davis, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    The cellular mechanisms responsible for the lipoprotein-mediated stimulation of bile acid synthesis in cultured rat hepatocytes were investigated. Adding 280 micrograms/ml of cholesterol in the form of human or rat low density lipoprotein (LDL) to the culture medium increased bile acid synthesis by 1.8- and 1.6-fold, respectively. As a result of the uptake of LDL, the synthesis of [14C]cholesterol from [2-14C]acetate was decreased and cellular cholesteryl ester mass was increased. Further studies demonstrated that rat apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich high density lipoprotein (HDL) both stimulated bile acid synthesis 1.5-fold, as well as inhibited the formation of [14C]cholesterol from [2-14C]acetate. Reductive methylation of LDL blocked the inhibition of cholesterol synthesis, as well as the stimulation of bile acid synthesis, suggesting that these processes require receptor-mediated uptake. To identify the receptors responsible, competitive binding studies using 125I-labeled apoE-free LDL and 125I-labeled apoE-rich HDL were performed. Both apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich HDL displayed an equal ability to compete for binding of the other, suggesting that a receptor or a group of receptors that recognizes both apolipoproteins is involved. Additional studies show that hepatocytes from cholestyramine-treated rats displayed 2.2- and 3.4-fold increases in the binding of apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich HDL, respectively. These data show for the first time that receptor-mediated uptake of LDL by the liver is intimately linked to processes activating bile acid synthesis

  9. Effect of various antibiotics on modulation of intestinal microbiota and bile acid profile in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Youcai; Limaye, Pallavi B.; Renaud, Helen J.; Klaassen, Curtis D., E-mail: curtisklaassenphd@gmail.com

    2014-06-01

    Antibiotic treatments have been used to modulate intestinal bacteria and investigate the role of intestinal bacteria on bile acid (BA) homeostasis. However, knowledge on which intestinal bacteria and bile acids are modified by antibiotics is limited. In the present study, mice were administered various antibiotics, 47 of the most abundant bacterial species in intestine, as well as individual BAs in plasma, liver, and intestine were quantified. Compared to the two antibiotic combinations (vancomycin + imipenem and cephalothin + neomycin), the three single antibiotics (metronidazole, ciprofloxacin and aztreonam) have less effect on intestinal bacterial profiles, and thus on host BA profiles and mRNA expression of genes that are important for BA homeostasis. The two antibiotic combinations decreased the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes in intestine, as well as most secondary BAs in serum, liver and intestine. Additionally, the two antibiotic combinations significantly increased mRNA of the hepatic BA uptake transporters (Ntcp and Oatp1b2) and canalicular BA efflux transporters (Bsep and Mrp2), but decreased mRNA of the hepatic BA synthetic enzyme Cyp8b1, suggesting an elevated enterohepatic circulation of BAs. Interestingly, the two antibiotic combinations tended to have opposite effect on the mRNAs of most intestinal genes, which tended to be inhibited by vancomycin + imipenem but stimulated by cephalothin + neomycin. To conclude, the present study clearly shows that various antibiotics have distinct effects on modulating intestinal bacteria and host BA metabolism. - Highlights: • Various antibiotics have different effects on intestinal bacteria. • Antibiotics alter bile acid composition in mouse liver and intestine. • Antibiotics influence genes involved in bile acid homeostasis. • Clostridia appear to be important for secondary bile acid formation.

  10. Nutritional regulation of bile acid metabolism is associated with improved pathological characteristics of the metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liaset, Bjørn; Hao, Qin; Jørgensen, Henry Johs. Høgh

    2011-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are powerful regulators of metabolism, and mice treated orally with cholic acid are protected from diet-induced obesity, hepatic lipid accumulation, and increased plasma triacylglycerol (TAG) and glucose levels. Here, we show that plasma BA concentration in rats was elevated by e...... metabolism can be modulated by diet and that such modulation may prevent/ameliorate the characteristic features of the metabolic syndrome.......Bile acids (BAs) are powerful regulators of metabolism, and mice treated orally with cholic acid are protected from diet-induced obesity, hepatic lipid accumulation, and increased plasma triacylglycerol (TAG) and glucose levels. Here, we show that plasma BA concentration in rats was elevated...... with induction of genes involved in energy metabolism and uncoupling, Dio2, Pgc-1a, and Ucp1, in interscapular brown adipose tissue. Interestingly, the same transcriptional pattern was found in white adipose tissue depots of both abdominal and subcutaneous origin. Accordingly, rats fed SPH-based diet exhibited...

  11. Intestinal absorption and biliary elimination of glycyrrhizic acid diethyl ester in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koga K

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Kenjiro Koga,1 Mayuri Kawamura,1 Hiroshi Iwase,2 Nobuji Yoshikawa31Department of Clinical Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokuriku University, Kanazawa, 2Research Division, 3Research and Development Division, Cokey Systems Co, Ltd, Matsusaka, JapanBackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate absorption and elimination from the gastrointestinal tract of glycyrrhizic acid diethyl ester (GZ-DE which was prepared as a prodrug of glycyrrhizic acid (a poorly absorbed compound in rats.Methods: After the GZ-DE solution was administered via the intravenous, intraduodenal, intraileal, and stomach routes, GZ-DE and GZ concentrations in bile were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. The stability of GZ-DE was estimated from residual GZ-DE and GZ produced in GZ-DE solutions prepared with distilled water, a pH 1.2 solution, 0.9% NaCl solution, and phosphate-buffered solution (pH 7.4 at 37°C.Results: GZ-DE was eliminated into bile by the pharmacokinetic parameters of apparent distribution rate constant (4.56 ± 0.36 per hour and apparent elimination rate constant (0.245 ± 0.042 per hour. After intravenous and intraduodenal administration of GZ-DE, the concentration ratio of GZ-DE to GZ in bile was approximately 4:1, and the bioavailability of GZ containing GZ-DE was three-fold higher compared with the bioavailability of GZ after intraduodenal administration. GZ-DE was immediately precipitated in pH 1.2 solution and was converted to GZ by hydrolysis in pH 7.4 solution.Conclusion: Improvement of intestinal absorption of GZ was made possible by administration of GZ-DE into the intestine where absorption of GZ is lower than in the strong acidic environment of the stomach. However, because the elimination rate in bile simulated from kinetic parameters of GZ-DE was higher than the conversion rate from GZ-DE to GZ by hydrolysis, it is thought that the availability of GZ as a revolutionary prodrug was not high from the

  12. Hepatic uptake of conjugated bile acids is mediated by both sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide and organic anion transporting polypeptides and modulated by intestinal sensing of plasma bile acid levels in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slijepcevic, Davor; Roscam Abbing, Reinout L P; Katafuchi, Takeshi; Blank, Antje; Donkers, Joanne M; van Hoppe, Stéphanie; de Waart, Dirk R; Tolenaars, Dagmar; van der Meer, Jonathan H M; Wildenberg, Manon; Beuers, Ulrich; Oude Elferink, Ronald P J; Schinkel, Alfred H; van de Graaf, Stan F J

    2017-11-01

    The Na + -taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP/SLC10A1) is believed to be pivotal for hepatic uptake of conjugated bile acids. However, plasma bile acid levels are normal in a subset of NTCP knockout mice and in mice treated with myrcludex B, a specific NTCP inhibitor. Here, we elucidated which transport proteins mediate the hepatic uptake of conjugated bile acids and demonstrated intestinal sensing of elevated bile acid levels in plasma in mice. Mice or healthy volunteers were treated with myrcludex B. Hepatic bile acid uptake kinetics were determined in wild-type (WT), organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) knockout mice (lacking Slco1a/1b isoforms), and human OATP1B1-transgenic mice. Effects of fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) on hepatic transporter mRNA levels were assessed in rat hepatoma cells and in mice by peptide injection or adeno-associated virus-mediated overexpression. NTCP inhibition using myrcludex B had only moderate effects on bile acid kinetics in WT mice, but completely inhibited active transport of conjugated bile acid species in OATP knockout mice. Cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase Cyp7a1 expression was strongly down-regulated upon prolonged inhibition of hepatic uptake of conjugated bile acids. Fgf15 (mouse counterpart of FGF19) expression was induced in hypercholanemic OATP and NTCP knockout mice, as well as in myrcludex B-treated cholestatic mice, whereas plasma FGF19 was not induced in humans treated with myrcludex B. Fgf15/FGF19 expression was induced in polarized human enterocyte-models and mouse organoids by basolateral incubation with a high concentration (1 mM) of conjugated bile acids. NTCP and OATPs contribute to hepatic uptake of conjugated bile acids in mice, whereas the predominant uptake in humans is NTCP mediated. Enterocytes sense highly elevated levels of (conjugated) bile acids in the systemic circulation to induce FGF15/19, which modulates hepatic bile acid synthesis and uptake. (Hepatology 2017;66:1631-1643).

  13. Specific bile acid radioimmunoassays for separate determinations of unconjugated cholic acid, conjugated cholic acid and conjugated deoxycholic acid in serum and their clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matern, S.; Gerok, W.

    1977-01-01

    Specific radioimmunoassays for separate determinations of serum unconjugated cholic, conjugated cholic and conjugated deoxycholic acids have been developed. Prior to the radioimmunoassay, extraction of serum bile acids was performed with Amberlite XAD-2. Unconjugated cholic acid was separated from glyco- and taurocholic acids by thin-layer chromatography. At 50% displacement of bound labeled glyco[ 3 H]cholic acid using antiserum obtained after immunization with cholic acid-bovine serum albumin-conjugate the cross-reactivity of taurocholic acid was 100%, cholic acid 80%, glycochenodeoxycholic acid 10%, chenodeoxycholic acid 7%, conjugated deoxycholic acid 3%, and conjugated lithocholic acid 3 H]cholic acid was linear on a logit-log plot from 5 to 80 pmol of unlabeled glycocholic acid. Fasting serum conjugated cholic acid in healthy subjects was 0.68 +- 0.34 μmol/l. Unconjugated cholic acid was determined by a solid phase radioimmunoassay using the cholic acid antibody chemically bound to Sepharose. The displacement curve of [ 3 H]cholic acid in the solid phase radioimmunoassay was linear on a logit-log plot from 5 to 200 pmol of unlabeled cholic acid. The coefficient of variation between samples was 5%. Fasting serum conjugated deoxycholic acid concentrations in 10 healthy subjects ranged from 0.18 to 0.92 μmol/l determined by a radioimmunoassay using antiserum obtained after immunization with deoxycholic acid-bovine serum albumin-conjugate. The clinical application of these bile acid radioimmunoassays is shown by an 'oral cholate tolerance test' as a sensitive indicator of liver function and by an 'oral cholyglycine tolerance test' as a useful test for bile acid absorption. (orig.) [de

  14. Effect of common polymorphisms of the farnesoid X receptor and bile acid transporters on the pharmacokinetics of ursodeoxycholic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Miao; Fok, Benny S P; Wo, Siu-Kwan; Lee, Vincent H L; Zuo, Zhong; Tomlinson, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a natural, dihydroxy bile acid, promotes gallstone dissolution and has been attributed with several other beneficial effects. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) may influence the pharmacokinetics of UDCA by modulating the expression of bile acid transporters. This exploratory study examined whether common functional polymorphisms in FXR and in bile acid transporter genes affect the pharmacokinetics of exogenous UDCA. Polymorphisms in genes for transporters involved in bile acid transport, solute carrier organic anion 1B1 (SLCO1B1) 388A>G and 521T>C, solute carrier 10A1 (SLC10A1) 800 C>T and ATP-binding cassette B11 (ABCB11) 1331T>C, and the FXR -1G>T polymorphism were genotyped in 26 male Chinese subjects who ingested single oral 500-mg doses of UDCA. Plasma concentrations of UDCA and its major conjugate metabolite glycoursodeoxycholic acid (GUDCA) were determined. The mean systemic exposure of UDCA was higher in the five subjects with one copy of the FXR -1G>T variant allele than in those homozygous for the wild-type allele (n = 21) (AUC0-24 h : 38.5 ± 28.2 vs. 20.9 ± 8.0 μg h/mL, P = 0.021), but this difference appeared mainly due to one outlier with the -1GT genotype and elevated baseline and post-treatment UDCA concentrations. After excluding the outlier, body weight was the only factor associated with plasma concentrations of UDCA and there were no significant associations with the other polymorphisms examined. None of the polymorphisms affected the pharmacokinetics of GUDCA. This study showed that the common polymorphisms in bile acid transporters had no significant effect on the pharmacokinetics of exogenous UDCA but an effect of the FXR polymorphism cannot be excluded. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Kinetics for the synthetic bile acid 75-selenohomocholic acid-taurine in humans: comparison with [14C]taurocholate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jazrawi, R.P.; Ferraris, R.; Bridges, C.; Northfield, T.C.

    1988-01-01

    The apparent fractional turnover rate of the gamma-labeled bile acid analogue 75-selenohomocholic acid-taurine (75-SeHCAT) was assessed from decline in radioactivity over the gallbladder area on 4 successive days using a gamma-camera, and was compared in the same subjects with the fractional turnover rate of the corresponding natural bile acid, cholic acid-taurine, labeled with 14C ([14C]CAT) using the classical Lindstedt technique. Very similar results were obtained in 5 healthy individuals (coefficient of variation 4.8%, medians 0.35 and 0.34, respectively). By contrast, the fractional deconjugation rate assessed from zonal scanning of glycine- and taurine-conjugated bile acids on thin-layer chromatography was much less for 75-SeHCAT than for [14C]CAT (0.02 and 0.13, respectively; p less than 0.05). The fractional rate for deconjugation plus dehydroxylation was also determined by zonal scanning, and gave lower values for 75-SeHCAT than for [14C]CAT (0.02 and 0.12, respectively; p less than 0.05). There was a striking similarity between the fractional rate for deconjugation alone and that for deconjugation plus dehydroxylation for both bile acids in individual samples (r = 0.999, p less than 0.001), suggesting that these two processes might occur simultaneously and probably involve the same bacteria. We conclude that our scintiscanning technique provides an accurate, noninvasive method of measuring fractional turnover rate of a bile acid in humans, and that the finding that 75SeHCAT remains conjugated with taurine during enterohepatic recycling means that absorption should be specific for the ileal active transport site, thus rendering it an ideal substance for assessing ileal function

  16. Increases in plasma motilin follow each episode of gallbladder emptying during the interdigestive period, and changes in serum bile acid concentration correlate to plasma motilin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, N; Oster-Jørgensen, E; Pedersen, S A

    1995-01-01

    concentration of bile acids also showed a cyclic variation in relation to gallbladder motility. During periods of gallbladder emptying serum bile acid concentration had a median value of 1.78 mumol/l, as compared with a median value of 1.17 mumol/l during periods of gallbladder filling. This difference did......, and in cases of two or more emptying periods during the MMC cycle the concentration decreased in between. The shape of the serum bile acid profile is dependent on the intestinal transport and absorption of bile acids, and the significance of the cyclic variation in serum concentration of bile acids in relation...

  17. Modification on ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) scaffold. discovery of bile acid derivatives as selective agonists of cell-surface G-protein coupled bile acid receptor 1 (GP-BAR1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepe, Valentina; Renga, Barbara; Festa, Carmen; D'Amore, Claudio; Masullo, Dario; Cipriani, Sabrina; Di Leva, Francesco Saverio; Monti, Maria Chiara; Novellino, Ettore; Limongelli, Vittorio; Zampella, Angela; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2014-09-25

    Bile acids are signaling molecules interacting with the nuclear receptor FXR and the G-protein coupled receptor 1 (GP-BAR1/TGR5). GP-BAR1 is a promising pharmacological target for the treatment of steatohepatitis, type 2 diabetes, and obesity. Endogenous bile acids and currently available semisynthetic bile acids are poorly selective toward GP-BAR1 and FXR. Thus, in the present study we have investigated around the structure of UDCA, a clinically used bile acid devoid of FXR agonist activity, to develop a large family of side chain modified 3α,7β-dihydroxyl cholanoids that selectively activate GP-BAR1. In vivo and in vitro pharmacological evaluation demonstrated that administration of compound 16 selectively increases the expression of pro-glucagon 1, a GP-BAR1 target, in the small intestine, while it had no effect on FXR target genes in the liver. Further, compound 16 results in a significant reshaping of bile acid pool in a rodent model of cholestasis. These data demonstrate that UDCA is a useful scaffold to generate novel and selective steroidal ligands for GP-BAR1.

  18. Bile acids induce glucagon-like peptide 2 secretion with limited effects on intestinal adaptation in early weaned pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ipharraguerre, Ignacio R; Tedó, Gemma; Menoyo, David

    2013-01-01

    Early weaning is a stressful event characterized by a transient period of intestinal atrophy that may be mediated by reduced secretion of glucagon-like peptide (GLP) 2. We tested whether enterally fed bile acids or plant sterols could increase nutrient-dependent GLP-2 secretion and improve.......05) but did not affect plasma GLP-1 and feed intake. The intestinal expression of glucagon-like peptide 2 receptor, sodium-dependent bile acid transporter, farnesoid X receptor, and guanosine protein-coupled bile acid receptor genes were not affected by CDC treatment. The intragastric administration of CDC...

  19. Calcium in milk products precipitates intestinal fatty acids and secondary bile acids and thus inhibits colonic cytotoxicity in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Govers, MJAP; Termont, DSML; Lapre, JA; Kleibeuker, JH; Vonk, RJ; VanderMeer, R

    1996-01-01

    Dietary calcium may reduce the risk of colon cancer, probably by precipitating cytotoxic surfactants, such as secondary bile acids, in the colonic lumen. We previously showed that milk mineral, an important source of calcium, decreases metabolic risk factors and colonic proliferation in rats, We non

  20. Mechanisms Underlying the Anti-Aging and Anti-Tumor Effects of Lithocholic Bile Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Arlia-Ciommo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bile acids are cholesterol-derived bioactive lipids that play essential roles in the maintenance of a heathy lifespan. These amphipathic molecules with detergent-like properties display numerous beneficial effects on various longevity- and healthspan-promoting processes in evolutionarily distant organisms. Recent studies revealed that lithocholic bile acid not only causes a considerable lifespan extension in yeast, but also exhibits a substantial cytotoxic effect in cultured cancer cells derived from different tissues and organisms. The molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the robust anti-aging and anti-tumor effects of lithocholic acid have emerged. This review summarizes the current knowledge of these mechanisms, outlines the most important unanswered questions and suggests directions for future research.

  1. In vitro bile acid binding of mustard greens, kale, broccoli, cabbage and green bell pepper improves with sautéing compared with raw or other methods of preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bile acid binding capacity has been related to cholesterol-lowering potential of foods and food fractions. Lowered recirculating bile acids results in utilization of cholesterol to synthesize bile acid and reduced fat absorption. Secondary bile acids have been associated with increased risk of can...

  2. Effects of Bariatric Surgery on Serum Bile Acid Composition and Conjugation in a Diabetic Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qunzheng; Zhang, Xiang; Zhong, Mingwei; Han, Haifeng; Liu, Shaozhuang; Liu, Teng; Wei, Meng; Guo, Wei; Xie, Haibin; Hu, Sanyuan; Zhang, Guangyong

    2016-10-01

    Serum bile acids (BAs) are elevated following bariatric surgery and have emerged as a potential glucose-lowering beneficial factor. The change of BA components and its underlying mechanisms may be of great significance during bariatric surgery. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of different bariatric procedures on serum BA composition and explore the potential mechanisms using a diabetic rat model. Duodenal-jejunal bypass (DJB), sleeve gastrectomy (SG), and sham operation were performed in diabetic rats induced by high-fat diet (HFD) and streptozotocin (STZ). Body weight, food intake, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), and insulin tolerance test (ITT) were measured at indicated time points. Serum BAs composition and the expression of cholesterol 7α hydroxylase (CYP7A1), bile acid: CoA synthase (BACS) and bile acid-CoA: amino acid N-acyltransferase (BAAT) at both transcriptional and protein levels in the liver were evaluated at 12 weeks postoperatively. Compared with sham group, DJB and SG both achieved rapid and sustained improvements in glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. They also resulted in increased serum BAs, especially the taurine-conjugated BAs by elevated conjugation. No obvious difference was detected between DJB and SG except that SG achieved decreased weight gain and food intake. The preferentially elevated serum taurine-conjugated BAs were similar after different bariatric surgeries, and the enhanced conjugation of BAs in the liver might account for the changed serum BAs profiles.

  3. Serum Bile Acids Are Higher in Humans With Prior Gastric Bypass: Potential Contribution to Improved Glucose and Lipid Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patti, Mary-Elizabeth; Houten, Sander M.; Bianco, Antonio C.; Bernier, Raquel; Larsen, P. Reed; Holst, Jens J.; Badman, Michael K.; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria; Mun, Edward C.; Pihlajamaki, Jussi; Auwerx, Johan; Goldfine, Allison B.

    2015-01-01

    The multifactorial mechanisms promoting weight loss and improved metabolism following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (GB) surgery remain incompletely understood. Recent rodent studies suggest that bile acids can mediate energy homeostasis by activating the G-protein coupled receptor TGR5 and the type 2 thyroid hormone deiodinase. Altered gastrointestinal anatomy following GB could affect enterohepatic recirculation of bile acids. We assessed whether circulating bile acid concentrations differ in patients who previously underwent GB, which might then contribute to improved metabolic homeostasis. We performed cross-sectional analysis of fasting serum bile acid composition and both fasting and post-meal metabolic variables, in three subject groups: (i) post-GB surgery (n = 9), (ii) without GB matched to preoperative BMI of the index cohort (n = 5), and (iii) without GB matched to current BMI of the index cohort (n = 10). Total serum bile acid concentrations were higher in GB (8.90 ± 4.84 µmol/l) than in both overweight (3.59 ± 1.95, P = 0.005, Ov) and severely obese (3.86 ± 1.51, P = 0.045, MOb). Bile acid subfractions taurochenodeoxycholic, taurodeoxycholic, glycocholic, glycochenodeoxycholic, and glycodeoxycholic acids were all significantly higher in GB compared to Ov (P fasting triglycerides (r = −0.40, P = 0.05), and positively correlated with adiponectin (r = −0.48, P < 0.02) and peak glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) (r = 0.58, P < 0.003). Total bile acids strongly correlated inversely with thyrotropic hormone (TSH) (r = −0.57, P = 0.004). Together, our data suggest that altered bile acid levels and composition may contribute to improved glucose and lipid metabolism in patients who have had GB. PMID:19360006

  4. Metabolic Profile of Obeticholic Acid and Endogenous Bile Acids in Rats with Decompensated Liver Cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roda, A; Aldini, R; Camborata, C; Spinozzi, S; Franco, P; Cont, M; D'Errico, A; Vasuri, F; Degiovanni, A; Maroni, L; Adorini, L

    2017-07-01

    Obeticholic acid (OCA) is a semisynthetic bile acid (BA) analog and potent farnesoid X receptor agonist approved to treat cholestasis. We evaluated the biodistribution and metabolism of OCA administered to carbon tetrachloride-induced cirrhotic rats. This was to ascertain if plasma and hepatic concentrations of OCA are potentially more harmful than those of endogenous BAs. After administration of OCA (30 mg/kg), we used liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to measure OCA, its metabolites, and BAs at different timepoints in various organs and fluids. Plasma and hepatic concentrations of OCA and BAs were higher in cirrhotic rats than in controls. OCA and endogenous BAs had similar metabolic pathways in cirrhotic rats, although OCA hepatic and intestinal clearance were lower than in controls. BAs' qualitative and quantitative compositions were not modified by a single administration of OCA. In all the matrices studied, OCA concentrations were significantly lower than those of endogenous BAs, potentially much more cytotoxic. © 2017 The Authors. Clinical and Translational Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  5. Role of farnesoid X receptor and bile acids in alcoholic liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Manley

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Alcoholic liver disease (ALD is one of the major causes of liver morbidity and mortality worldwide. Chronic alcohol consumption leads to development of liver pathogenesis encompassing steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and in extreme cases, hepatocellular carcinoma. Moreover, ALD may also associate with cholestasis. Emerging evidence now suggests that farnesoid X receptor (FXR and bile acids also play important roles in ALD. In this review, we discuss the effects of alcohol consumption on FXR, bile acids and gut microbiome as well as their impacts on ALD. Moreover, we summarize the findings on FXR, FoxO3a (forkhead box-containing protein class O3a and PPARα (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha in regulation of autophagy-related gene transcription program and liver injury in response to alcohol exposure.

  6. Studies of Se-75 labelled bile acid analogue absorption in different forms of gastrointestinal diseases using a whole body counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebe, S.F.; Sattler, E.L.; Rinkenberger, C.; Bodenmueller, D.; Grebe, S.K.G.; Mueller, K.D.; Mueller, H.; Faengewisch, G.L.; Heckers, H.; Steckenmesser, R.

    1996-01-01

    It is possible to detect disturbances of bile acid absorption using a whole body counter after administration of Se-75 labelled bile acid analogues. We scrutinized the benefit of a modification of the test method. We investigated 77 patients with different forms of a gastrointestinal disease. After application of Se 75 homotaurocholic acid we measured patient-activity up to 7 days later including whole-body profile scans in the first 6 h. The fractional retention after 7 days was between 20 and 67%. In cases of impaired absorption it was below 12%. Patients with liver diseases and afer cholecystectomy (without bile acid resorption disturbance) showed normal values. Patients with Crohn's disease of the ileum or with intestinal ileas by-pass or with colestyramine treatment or with disturbance of vitamin B12-absorption or with cystic fibrosis showed a disturbance of bile acid absorption. The normal whole-body half-life was more than 2.8 days. The 24 and 72 h values were 62 and 31% in cases with normal absorption. Smaller values are signs of bile acid malabsorption. Impulse rates measured with the whole body counter are of an order of magnitude that allows to reduce the usually administered dose of 37 kBq to 9.25 kBq. This is an efficient method to detect disturbances of bile acid absorption. The usually adminstered activity of 37 kBq can be reduced to 9.25 kBq. (orig./MG) [de

  7. Fish protein hydrolysate elevates plasma bile acids and reduces visceral adipose tissue mass in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liaset, Bjørn; Madsen, Lise; Hao, Qin

    2009-01-01

    levels relative to rats fed soy protein or casein. Concomitantly, the saithe FPH fed rats had reduced liver lipids and fasting plasma TAG levels. Furthermore, visceral adipose tissue mass was reduced and expression of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation and energy expenditure was induced in perirenal....../retroperitoneal adipose tissues of rats fed saithe FPH. Our results provide the first evidence that dietary protein sources with different amino acid compositions can modulate the level of plasma bile acids and our data suggest potential novel mechanisms by which dietary protein sources can affect energy metabolism....

  8. Ustekinumab for patients with primary biliary cholangitis who have an inadequate response to ursodeoxycholic acid: A proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfield, Gideon M; Gershwin, M Eric; Strauss, Richard; Mayo, Marlyn J; Levy, Cynthia; Zou, Bin; Johanns, Jewel; Nnane, Ivo P; Dasgupta, Bidisha; Li, Katherine; Selmi, Carlo; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Jones, David; Lindor, Keith

    2016-07-01

    The interleukin (IL)-12 signaling cascade has been associated with primary biliary cholangitis (PBC). This multicenter, open-label, proof-of-concept study evaluated the anti-IL12/23 monoclonal antibody, ustekinumab (90 mg subcutaneous at weeks 0 and 4, then every 8 weeks through week 20), in adults with PBC and an inadequate response to ursodeoxycholic acid therapy (i.e., alkaline phosphatase [ALP] >1.67× upper limit of normal [ULN] after ≥6 months). ALP response was defined as a >40% decrease from baseline and ALP remission as ALP normalization (if baseline ALP 1.67×-2.8× ULN) or 2.8× ULN). Changes in Enhanced Liver Fibrosis (ELF) scores and serum bile acids were also assessed. At baseline, patients had median disease duration of 3.2 years, median ELF score of 9.8, and highly elevated total bile acid concentration (median, 43.3 μmol/L); 13 of 20 (65%) patients had baseline ALP >3× ULN. Although steady-state serum ustekinumab concentrations were reached by week 12, no patient achieved ALP response or remission. Median percent ALP reduction from baseline to week 28 was 12.1%. ELF score decreased slightly from baseline to week 28 (median reduction: 0.173), and total serum bile acid concentrations decreased from baseline to week 28 (median reduction: 8.8 μmol/L). No serious infections or discontinuations resulting from adverse events were reported through week 28. One patient had a serious upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage considered unrelated to test agent by the investigator. Open-label ustekinumab therapy, though associated with a modest decrease in ALP after 28 weeks of therapy, did not otherwise appreciably change ALP and overt proof-of-concept was not established as per prespecified primary endpoint of proposed efficacy. No new ustekinumab safety signals were observed. (Hepatology 2016;64:189-199). © 2015 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  9. Polymeric bile acid sequestrants: review of design, in vitro binding activities, and hypocholesterolemic effects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heřmánková, Eva; Žák, A.; Poláková, Lenka; Hobzová, Radka; Hromádka, R.; Širc, Jakub

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 144, 20 January (2018), s. 300-317 ISSN 0223-5234 R&D Projects: GA MPO(CZ) FV10380; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : review * bile acid sequestrant * pleiotropic effect Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry OBOR OECD: Medicinal chemistry Impact factor: 4.519, year: 2016

  10. Thyroid hormone reduces PCSK9 and stimulates bile acid synthesis in humans[S

    OpenAIRE

    Bonde, Ylva; Breuer, Olof; L?tjohann, Dieter; Sj?berg, Stefan; Angelin, Bo; Rudling, Mats

    2014-01-01

    Reduced plasma LDL-cholesterol is a hallmark of hyperthyroidism and is caused by transcriptional stimulation of LDL receptors in the liver. Here, we investigated whether thyroid hormone (TH) actions involve other mechanisms that may also account for the reduction in LDL-cholesterol, including effects on proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) and bile acid synthesis. Twenty hyperthyroid patients were studied before and after clinical normalization, and the responses to hyperthyr...

  11. Bezafibrate for primary biliary cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudic, Jelena S; Poropat, Goran; Krstic, Miodrag N

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of primary biliary cirrhosis is complicated. There are studies suggesting that bezafibrate, alone or in combination with ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), is effective in the treatment of primary biliary cirrhosis, but no systematic review has summarised the evidence yet....

  12. SeHCAT. A new radiopharmaceutical for evaluating ileal function and the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrick, M.V.; Boyd, G.S.; Eastwood, M.A.; Monks, R.

    1982-01-01

    SeHCAT( 75 Se-23-selena-25-homotaurocholate) is the taurine conjugate of a synthetic trihydroxy-bile acid, containing the gamma-ray emitting radionuclide 75 Se. Studies in the laboratory, and initial clinical experience, indicate that SeHCAT is a potentially useful clinical tool. Work to date has concentrated on its ability to detect malfunction of the terminal ileum. It is however the first radiopharmaceutical which facilitates study of the complete cycle of the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids

  13. A Multicenter, Prospective Study of a New Fully Covered Expandable Metal Biliary Stent for the Palliative Treatment of Malignant Bile Duct Obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bret T. Petersen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Study Aims. Endoscopic placement of self-expanding metal stents (SEMSs is indicated for palliation of inoperable malignant biliary obstruction. A fully covered biliary SEMS (WallFlex Biliary RX Boston Scientific, Natick, USA was assessed for palliation of extrahepatic malignant biliary obstruction. Patients and Methods. 58 patients were included in this prospective, multicenter series conducted under an FDA-approved IDE. Main outcome measurements included (1 absence of stent occlusion within six months or until death, whichever occurred first and (2 technical success, need for reintervention, bilirubin levels, stent patency, time to stent occlusion, and adverse events. Results. Technical success was achieved in 98% (57/58, with demonstrated acute removability in two patients. Adequate clinical palliation until completion of followup was achievedin 98% (54/55 of evaluable patients, with 1 reintervention due to stent obstruction after 142 days. Mean total bilirubin decreased from 8.9 mg/dL to 1.2 mg/dL at 1 month. Device-related adverse events were limited and included 2 cases of cholecystitis. One stent migrated following radiation therapy. Conclusions. The WallFlex Biliary fully covered stent yielded technically successful placement with uncomplicated acute removal where required, appropriate reduction in bilirubin levels, and low rates of stent migration and occlusion. This SEMS allows successful palliation of malignant extrahepatic biliary obstruction.

  14. Thyroid hormone reduces PCSK9 and stimulates bile acid synthesis in humans[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonde, Ylva; Breuer, Olof; Lütjohann, Dieter; Sjöberg, Stefan; Angelin, Bo; Rudling, Mats

    2014-01-01

    Reduced plasma LDL-cholesterol is a hallmark of hyperthyroidism and is caused by transcriptional stimulation of LDL receptors in the liver. Here, we investigated whether thyroid hormone (TH) actions involve other mechanisms that may also account for the reduction in LDL-cholesterol, including effects on proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) and bile acid synthesis. Twenty hyperthyroid patients were studied before and after clinical normalization, and the responses to hyperthyroidism were compared with those in 14 healthy individuals after 14 days of treatment with the liver-selective TH analog eprotirome. Both hyperthyroidism and eprotirome treatment reduced circulating PCSK9, lipoprotein cholesterol, apoB and AI, and lipoprotein(a), while cholesterol synthesis was stable. Hyperthyroidism, but not eprotirome treatment, markedly increased bile acid synthesis and reduced fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 19 and dietary cholesterol absorption. Eprotirome treatment, but not hyperthyroidism, reduced plasma triglycerides. Neither hyperthyroidism nor eprotirome treatment altered insulin, glucose, or FGF21 levels. TH reduces circulating PSCK9, thereby likely contributing to lower plasma LDL-cholesterol in hyperthyroidism. TH also stimulates bile acid synthesis, although this response is not critical for its LDL-lowering effect. PMID:25172631

  15. The antifibrinolytic drug tranexamic acid reduces liver injury and fibrosis in a mouse model of chronic bile duct injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Nikita; Kopec, Anna K; Towery, Keara; Williams, Kurt J; Luyendyk, James P

    2014-06-01

    Hepatic fibrin deposition has been shown to inhibit hepatocellular injury in mice exposed to the bile duct toxicant α-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT). Degradation of fibrin clots by fibrinolysis controls the duration and extent of tissue fibrin deposition. Thus, we sought to determine the effect of treatment with the antifibrinolytic drug tranexamic acid (TA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) deficiency on ANIT-induced liver injury and fibrosis in mice. Plasmin-dependent lysis of fibrin clots was impaired in plasma from mice treated with TA (1200 mg/kg i.p., administered twice daily). Prophylactic TA administration reduced hepatic inflammation and hepatocellular necrosis in mice fed a diet containing 0.025% ANIT for 2 weeks. Hepatic type 1 collagen mRNA expression and deposition increased markedly in livers of mice fed ANIT diet for 4 weeks. To determine whether TA treatment could inhibit this progression of liver fibrosis, mice were fed ANIT diet for 4 weeks and treated with TA for the last 2 weeks. Interestingly, TA treatment largely prevented increased deposition of type 1 collagen in livers of mice fed ANIT diet for 4 weeks. In contrast, biliary hyperplasia/inflammation and liver fibrosis were significantly increased in PAI-1(-/-) mice fed ANIT diet for 4 weeks. Overall, the results indicate that fibrinolytic activity contributes to ANIT diet-induced liver injury and fibrosis in mice. In addition, these proof-of-principle studies suggest the possibility that therapeutic intervention with an antifibrinolytic drug could form a novel strategy to prevent or reduce liver injury and fibrosis in patients with liver disease.

  16. Highly Sensitive Luminescence Assessment of Bile Acid Using a Balofloxacin-Europium(III) Probe in Micellar Medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Huan; Zhao, Fang; Si, Hailin; Zhang, Shuaishuai; Wang, Chunchun; Qi, Peirong

    2012-01-01

    A novel and simple method of luminescence enhancement effect for the determination of trace amounts of bile acid was proposed. The procedure was based on the luminescence intensity of the balofloxacin-europium(III) complex that could be strongly enhanced by bile acid in the presence of sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS). Under the optimum conditions, the enhanced luminescence intensity of the system exhibited a good linear relationship with the bile acid concentration in the range 5.0 Χ 10 -9 - 7.0 Χ 10 -7 mol L -1 with a detection limit of 1.3 Χ 10 -9 mol L.1 (3σ). The relative standard deviation (RSD) was 1.7% (n = 11) for 5.0 Χ 10 -8 mol L -1 bile acid. The applicability of the method to the determination of bile acid was demonstrated by investigating the effect of potential interferences and by analyzing human serum and urine samples. The possible enhancement mechanism of luminescence intensity in balofloxacin-europium(III)-bile acid-SDBS system was also discussed briefly

  17. Relation between reflux of bile acids into the stomach and gastric mucosal atrophy, intestinal metaplasia in biopsy specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuhisa, Takeshi; Tsukui, Taku

    2012-05-01

    During endoscopic examinations we collected fluid in the stomach that included reflux fluid from the duodenum, and assessed the effect of quantitatively determined bile acids on glandular atrophy and intestinal metaplasia using biopsy specimens. A total of 294 outpatients were enrolled in this study. Total bile acid concentration was measured by an enzyme immunoassay. Glandular atrophy and intestinal metaplasia scores were graded according to the Updated Sydney System. An effect of refluxed bile acids on atrophy and intestinal metaplasia was shown in the high-concentration reflux group in comparison with the control group. However, when the odds ratios (ORs) were calculated according to whether Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection was present, no significant associations were shown between reflux bile acids and atrophy in either the H. pylori-positive cases or -negative cases. The same was true for intestinal metaplasia in the H. pylori-positive cases, whereas intestinal metaplasia was more pronounced in the high-concentration reflux group in the H. pylori-negative cases (OR 2.4, 95%CI 1.1-5.6). We could not clarify the effect of the reflux of bile acids into the stomach in the progression of atrophy. High-concentration bile acids had an effect on the progression of intestinal metaplasia in the H. pylori-negative cases.

  18. Effects of Bile Acids and Nisin on the Production of Enterotoxin by Clostridium perfringens in a Nutrient-Rich Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miseon Park

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens is the second most common cause of bacterial foodborne illness in the United States, with nearly a million cases each year. C. perfringens enterotoxin (CPE, produced during sporulation, damages intestinal epithelial cells by pore formation, which results in watery diarrhea. The effects of low concentrations of nisin and bile acids on sporulation and toxin production were investigated in C. perfringens SM101, which carries an enterotoxin gene on the chromosome, in a nutrient-rich medium. Bile acids and nisin increased production of enterotoxin in cultures; bile acids had the highest effect. Both compounds stimulated the transcription of enterotoxin and sporulation-related genes and production of spores during the early growth phase. They also delayed spore outgrowth and nisin was more inhibitory. Bile acids and nisin enhanced enterotoxin production in some but not all other C. perfringens isolates tested. Low concentrations of bile acids and nisin may act as a stress signal for the initiation of sporulation and the early transcription of sporulation-related genes in some strains of C. perfringens, which may result in increased strain-specific production of enterotoxin in those strains. This is the first report showing that nisin and bile acids stimulated the transcription of enterotoxin and sporulation-related genes in a nutrient-rich bacterial culture medium.

  19. Effects of Bile Acids and Nisin on the Production of Enterotoxin by Clostridium perfringens in a Nutrient-Rich Medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Miseon; Rafii, Fatemeh

    2018-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is the second most common cause of bacterial foodborne illness in the United States, with nearly a million cases each year. C. perfringens enterotoxin (CPE), produced during sporulation, damages intestinal epithelial cells by pore formation, which results in watery diarrhea. The effects of low concentrations of nisin and bile acids on sporulation and toxin production were investigated in C. perfringens SM101, which carries an enterotoxin gene on the chromosome, in a nutrient-rich medium. Bile acids and nisin increased production of enterotoxin in cultures; bile acids had the highest effect. Both compounds stimulated the transcription of enterotoxin and sporulation-related genes and production of spores during the early growth phase. They also delayed spore outgrowth and nisin was more inhibitory. Bile acids and nisin enhanced enterotoxin production in some but not all other C. perfringens isolates tested. Low concentrations of bile acids and nisin may act as a stress signal for the initiation of sporulation and the early transcription of sporulation-related genes in some strains of C. perfringens , which may result in increased strain-specific production of enterotoxin in those strains. This is the first report showing that nisin and bile acids stimulated the transcription of enterotoxin and sporulation-related genes in a nutrient-rich bacterial culture medium.

  20. In Vivo Performance of a Novel Fluorinated Magnetic Resonance Imaging Agent for Functional Analysis of Bile Acid Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    A novel trifluorinated cholic acid derivative, CA-lys-TFA, was designed and synthesized for use as a tool to measure bile acid transport noninvasively using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In the present study, the in vivo performance of CA-lys-TFA for measuring bile acid transport by MRI was investigated in mice. Gallbladder CA-lys-TFA content was quantified using MRI and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Results in wild-type (WT) C57BL/6J mice were compared to those in mice lacking expression of Asbt, the ileal bile acid transporter. 19F signals emanating from the gallbladders of WT mice 7 h after oral gavage with 150 mg/kg CA-lys-TFA were reproducibly detected by MRI. Asbt-deficient mice administered the same dose had undetectable 19F signals by MRI, and gallbladder bile CA-lys-TFA levels were 30-fold lower compared to WT animals. To our knowledge, this represents the first report of in vivo imaging of an orally absorbed drug using 19F MRI. Fluorinated bile acid analogues have potential as tools to measure and detect abnormal bile acid transport by MRI. PMID:24708306

  1. [Blood serum level of primary bile acids in cattle, horses, swine and dogs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsai, F; Szaniszló, F; Pethes, G

    1991-02-01

    The levels of the two primary bile acids, cholic acid (CA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), were determined by radioimmunoassay in cattle, horse, pig and dog serum. The mean serum cholic acid (SCA) and deoxycholic acid (SCDCA) levels of cows varied with their reproductive status, being 7.8 (+/- 3.3) and 1.5 (+/- 1.0) mumol/l in dry cows, 17.8 (+/- 6.9) and 2.3 (+/- 1.0) mumol/l in freshly calved dams, and 15.8 (+/- 5.7) and 2.3 (+/- 0.8) mumol/l, respectively, in lactating cows. The SCA level found in the immediate prepartal period and also on the day of calving corresponded to those found during the dry period, then, they tended to rise 2 days after calving and attained the peak characteristic for freshly calved dams on day 3 or 4 post partum. Feed consumption had no influence on the serum levels of primary bile acids, and circadian variations of SCA and SCDCA were also negligible. Suckling calves had much lower SCA levels (2.3 (+/- 1.0) mumol/l before feeding than cows. This initial concentration rose to 10.3 (+/- 2.9) mumol/l 1 h after feeding and returned to 5.0 (+/- 2.1) mumol/l 3 h later. Like cows, horses showed no appreciate difference between pre- and post-feeding levels of SCA (2.2 (+/- 1.2) mumol/l) and SCDCA (1.1 (+/- 0.3) mumol/l). Unlike bovines, pigs and dogs showed a considerable increase in the serum levels of the primary bile acids after feeding.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Comparison of commercially available radioimmunoassays for the determination of bile acids in serum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wildgrube, H.J.; Schiller, W.; Winkler, M.; Weber, J.; Campana, H.; Mauritz, G.

    1982-05-01

    Three commercially available radioimmunoassays for the determination of bile acids in serum were evaluated with respect to specificity and precision. The SLCG-radioimmunoassay (Abbott) measures only sulphated glycolithocholic acid, the CG-radioimmunoassay (Abbott) measures chiefly cholic acid conjugates, and the CBA-radioimmunoassay (Becton-Dickinson) measures all conjugated bile acids, with an over-response to taurine metabolites. With respect to cross reactions, the performances of the CG-and the CBA-radioimmunoassays differed significantly from those stated by the manufacturers, the former showing a 32% response to taurocholic acid, the latter responding only 118% to taurochenodeoxycholic acid. At physiological concentrations of albumin + globulin, the recovery of defined cholanic acids was 85-101%. Good reproducibility was shown by the CG-radioimmunoassay in the range 0.5-10.9 ..mu..mol/l, by the CBA-radioimmunoassay in the range 1.0-25.0 ..mu..mol/l, and by the SLCG-radioimmunoassay in the range 0.5-3.0 ..mu..mol/l. There were no important differences in the inter- and intra-assay precision of the three methods.

  3. Biliary sphincterotomy dilation for the extraction of difficult common bile duct stones Dilatación de la esfinterotomía biliar para la extracción de coledocolitiasis difíciles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. García-Cano

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP with biliary sphincterotomy (BS is the usual method for extracting common bile duct stones. However, following BS and by means of extraction balloons and Dormia baskets a complete bile duct clearance cannot be achieved in all cases. We present a study on the impact that hydrostatic balloon dilation of a previous BS (BSD may have in the extraction rate of choledocholithiasis. Patients and methods: a prospective study which included 91 consecutive patients diagnosed with choledocholithiasis who underwent ERCP. For stone removal, extraction balloons and Dormia baskets were used, and when necessary BSD was employed. Results: complete bile duct clearance was achieved in 86/91 (94.5% patients. BSD was used in 30 (33% cases. In these cases, extraction was complete in 29/30 (97%; 23 (76% patients in the BSD group had anatomic difficulties or bleeding disorders. The most frequently used hydrostatic balloon diameter was 15 mm (60%. There were 7 (7.6% complications: two self-limited hemorrhage episodes in the BSD group and one episode of cholangitis, one of pancreatitis, and three of bleeding in the group in which BSD was not used. Conclusions: BSD is a very valuable tool for extracting common bile duct stones. In our experience, there has been an increase in the extraction rate from 73% (Rev Esp Enferm Dig 2002; 94: 340-50 to 94.5% (p = 0.0001, OR 0.1, CI 0.05-0.45, with no increase in complications.

  4. Barley β-glucan reduces blood cholesterol levels via interrupting bile acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanan; Harding, Scott V; Thandapilly, Sijo J; Tosh, Susan M; Jones, Peter J H; Ames, Nancy P

    2017-11-01

    Underlying mechanisms responsible for the cholesterol-lowering effect of β-glucan have been proposed, yet have not been fully demonstrated. The primary aim of this study was to determine whether the consumption of barley β-glucan lowers cholesterol by affecting the cholesterol absorption, cholesterol synthesis or bile acid synthesis. In addition, this study was aimed to assess whether the underlying mechanisms are related to cholesterol 7α hydroxylase (CYP7A1) SNP rs3808607 as proposed by us earlier. In a controlled, randomised, cross-over study, participants with mild hypercholesterolaemia (n 30) were randomly assigned to receive breakfast containing 3 g high-molecular weight (HMW), 5 g low-molecular weight (LMW), 3 g LMW barley β-glucan or a control diet, each for 5 weeks. Cholesterol absorption was determined by assessing the enrichment of circulating 13C-cholesterol over 96 h following oral administration; fractional rate of synthesis for cholesterol was assessed by measuring the incorporation rate of 2H derived from deuterium oxide within the body water pool into the erythrocyte cholesterol pool over 24 h; bile acid synthesis was determined by measuring serum 7α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one concentrations. Consumption of 3 g HMW β-glucan decreased total cholesterol (TC) levels (P=0·029), but did not affect cholesterol absorption (P=0·25) or cholesterol synthesis (P=0·14). Increased bile acid synthesis after consumption of 3 g HMW β-glucan was observed in all participants (P=0·049), and more pronounced in individuals carrying homozygous G of rs3808607 (P=0·033). In addition, a linear relationship between log (viscosity) of β-glucan and serum 7α-HC concentration was observed in homozygous G allele carriers. Results indicate that increased bile acid synthesis rather than inhibition of cholesterol absorption or synthesis may be responsible for the cholesterol-lowering effect of barley β-glucan. The pronounced TC reduction in G allele carriers of rs

  5. Bile Acid-Mediated Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor 2 Signaling Promotes Neuroinflammation during Hepatic Encephalopathy in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew McMillin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy (HE is a neuropsychiatric complication that occurs due to deteriorating hepatic function and this syndrome influences patient quality of life, clinical management strategies and survival. During acute liver failure, circulating bile acids increase due to a disruption of the enterohepatic circulation. We previously identified that bile acid-mediated signaling occurs in the brain during HE and contributes to cognitive impairment. However, the influences of bile acids and their downstream signaling pathways on HE-induced neuroinflammation have not been assessed. Conjugated bile acids, such as taurocholic acid (TCA, can activate sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1PR2, which has been shown to promote immune cell infiltration and inflammation in other models. The current study aimed to assess the role of bile-acid mediated S1PR2 signaling in neuroinflammation and disease progression during azoxymethane (AOM-induced HE in mice. Our findings demonstrate a temporal increase of bile acids in the cortex during AOM-induced HE and identified that cortical bile acids were elevated as an early event in this model. In order to classify the specific bile acids that were elevated during HE, a metabolic screen was performed and this assay identified that TCA was increased in the serum and cortex during AOM-induced HE. To reduce bile acid concentrations in the brain, mice were fed a diet supplemented with cholestyramine, which alleviated neuroinflammation by reducing proinflammatory cytokine expression in the cortex compared to the control diet-fed AOM-treated mice. S1PR2 was expressed primarily in neurons and TCA treatment increased chemokine ligand 2 mRNA expression in these cells. The infusion of JTE-013, a S1PR2 antagonist, into the lateral ventricle prior to AOM injection protected against neurological decline and reduced neuroinflammation compared to DMSO-infused AOM-treated mice. Together, this identifies that reducing bile acid

  6. Ultrastructural changes in the isolated rat kidney induced by conjugated bilirubin and bile acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollan, J L; Billing, B H; Huang, S N

    1976-10-01

    The effects of bilirubin and bile acids on the ultrastructure of proximal renal tubules have been studied using an isolated rat kidney preparation, perfused with a protein-free dextran medium. Control kidneys perfused for 1 h had a normal glomerular filtration rate and effective renal plasma flow; the ultrastructure of proximal tubular cells was well preserved, with normal mitochondria, nuclear and plasma membranes, and microvilli of the brush border. When conjugated bilirubin, prepared from human hepatic bile, was added to the perfusion medium (5-0-7-5 mg/100 ml), marked alterations were observed in some cells, particularly with regard to the mitochondria and plasma membranes. These changes were greatly diminished by the inclusion of bovine albumin in the medium, indicating that the unbound fraction was primarily responsible for the tubular damage. The addition of taurocholate (450 muM), taurochenodeoxycholate (550 muM) or taurolithocholate (250 muM, bound to albumin) also produced plasma membrane changes, but only slight abnormalities were seen in the mitochondria and other structures. These ultrastructural observations support the concept that the elevated plasma levels of conjugated bilirubin and to a lesser extent bile acids are related to the renal failure associated with obstructive jaundice.

  7. Structural requirements of the human sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (hASBT): Role of 3- and 7-OH moieties on binding and translocation of bile acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Pablo M.; Lagos, Carlos F.; Ward, Weslyn C.; Polli, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are the end products of cholesterol metabolism. One of the critical steps in their biosynthesis involves the isomerization of the 3β-hydroxyl (-OH) group on the cholestane ring to the common 3α-configuration on BAs. BAs are actively recaptured from the small intestine by the human Apical Sodium-dependent Bile Acid Transporter (hASBT) with high affinity and capacity. Previous studies have suggested that no particular hydroxyl group on BAs is critical for binding or transport by hASBT, even though 3β-hydroxylated BAs were not examined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of the 3α-OH group on BAs binding and translocation by hASBT. Ten 3β-hydroxylated BAs (Iso-bile acids, iBAs) were synthesized, characterized, and subjected to hASBT inhibition and uptake studies. hASBT inhibition and uptake kinetics of iBAs were compared to that of native 3α-OH BAs. Glycine conjugates of native and isomeric BAs were subjected to molecular dynamics simulations in order to identify topological descriptors related to binding and translocation by hASBT. Iso-BAs bound to hASBT with lower affinity and exhibited reduced translocation than their respective 3α-epimers. Kinetic data suggests that, in contrast to native BAs where hASBT binding is the rate-limiting step, iBAs transport was rate-limited by translocation and not binding. Remarkably, 7-dehydroxylated iBAs were not hASBT substrates, highlighting the critical role of 7-OH group on BA translocation by hASBT, especially for iBAs. Conformational analysis of gly-iBAs and native BAs identified topological features for optimal binding as: concave steroidal nucleus, 3-OH “on-” or below-steroidal plane, 7-OH below-plane, and 12-OH moiety towards-plane. Our results emphasize the relevance of the 3α-OH group on BAs for proper hASBT binding and transport and revealed the critical role of 7-OH group on BA translocation, particularly in the absence of a 3α-OH group. Results have implications for BA

  8. Mixed micelles of 7,12-dioxolithocholic acid and selected hydrophobic bile acids: interaction parameter, partition coefficient of nitrazepam and mixed micelles haemolytic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poša, Mihalj; Tepavčević, Vesna

    2011-09-01

    The formation of mixed micelles built of 7,12-dioxolithocholic and the following hydrophobic bile acids was examined by conductometric method: cholic (C), deoxycholic (D), chenodeoxycholic (CD), 12-oxolithocholic (12-oxoL), 7-oxolithocholic (7-oxoL), ursodeoxycholic (UD) and hiodeoxycholic (HD). Interaction parameter (β) in the studied binary mixed micelles had negative value, suggesting synergism between micelle building units. Based on β value, the hydrophobic bile acids formed two groups: group I (C, D and CD) and group II (12-oxoL, 7-oxoL, UD and HD). Bile acids from group II had more negative β values than bile acids from group I. Also, bile acids from group II formed intermolecular hydrogen bonds in aggregates with both smaller (2) and higher (4) aggregation numbers, according to the analysis of their stereochemical (conformational) structures and possible structures of mixed micelles built of these bile acids and 7,12-dioxolithocholic acid. Haemolytic potential and partition coefficient of nitrazepam were higher in mixed micelles built of the more hydrophobic bile acids (C, D, CD) and 7,12-dioxolithocholic acid than in micelles built only of 7,12-dioxolithocholic acid. On the other hand, these mixed micelles still had lower values of haemolytic potential than micelles built of C, D or CD. The mixed micelles that included bile acids: 12-oxoL, 7-oxoL, UD or HD did not significantly differ from the micelles of 7,12-dioxolithocholic acid, observing the values of their haemolytic potential. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Supra-molecular Association and Polymorphic Behaviour In Systems Containing Bile Acid Salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camillo La Mesa

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A wide number of supra-molecular association modes are observed in mixtures containing water and bile salts, BS, (with, eventually, other components. Molecular or micellar solutions transform into hydrated solids, fibres, lyotropic liquid crystals and/or gels by raising the concentration, the temperature, adding electrolytes, surfactants, lipids and proteins. Amorphous or ordered phases may be formed accordingly. The forces responsible for this very rich polymorphism presumably arise from the unusual combination of electrostatic, hydrophobic and hydrogen-bond contributions to the system stability, with subsequent control of the supra-molecular organisation modes. The stabilising effect due to hydrogen bonds does not occur in almost all surfactants or lipids and is peculiar to bile acids and salts. Some supra-molecular organisation modes, supposed to be related to malfunctions and dis-metabolic diseases in vivo, are briefly reported and discussed.

  10. SeHCAT [tauroselcholic (selenium-75) acid] for the investigation of bile acid malabsorption and measurement of bile acid pool loss: A systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Riemsma (Rob); M.J. Al (Maiwenn); I. Corro Ramos (Isaac); S.N. Deshpande; N. Armstrong (Nigel); S. Ryder; C. Noake; M. Krol; M. Oppe (Mark); J. Kleijnen (Jos); J.L. Severens (Hans)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstractBackground The principal diagnosis/indication for this assessment is chronic diarrhoea due to bile acid malabsorption (BAM). Diarrhoea can be defined as the abnormal passage of loose or liquid stools more than three times daily and/or a daily stool weight > 200 g per day and is

  11. Comparative evaluation of intragastric bile acids and hepatobiliary scintigraphy in the diagnosis of duodenogastric reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Teng-Fei; Yadav, Praveen K; Wu, Rui-Jin; Yu, Wei-Hua; Liu, Chang-Qin; Lin, Hui; Liu, Zhan-Ju

    2013-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic value of a combination of intragastric bile acids and hepatobiliary scintigraphy in the detection of duodenogastric reflux (DGR). The study contained 99 patients with DGR and 70 healthy volunteers who made up the control group. The diagnosis was based on the combination of several objective arguments: a long history of gastric symptoms (i.e., nausea, epigastric pain, and/or bilious vomiting) poorly responsive to medical treatment, gastroesophageal reflux symptoms unresponsive to proton-pump inhibitors, gastritis on upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy and/or at histology, presence of a bilious gastric lake at > 1 upper GI endoscopy, pathologic 24-h intragastric bile monitoring with the Bilitec device. Gastric juice was aspirated in the GI endoscopy and total bile acid (TBA), total bilirubin (TBIL) and direct bilirubin (DBIL) were tested in the clinical laboratory. Continuous data of gastric juice were compared between each group using the independent-samples Mann-Whitney U-test and their relationship was analysed by Spearman's rank correlation test and Fisher's linear discriminant analysis. Histopathology of DGR patients and 23 patients with chronic atrophic gastritis was compared by clinical pathologists. Using the Independent-samples Mann-Whitney U-test, DGR index (DGRi) was calculated in 28 patients of DGR group and 19 persons of control group who were subjected to hepatobiliary scintigraphy. Receiver operating characteristic curve was made to determine the sensitivity and specificity of these two methods in the diagnosis of DGR. The group of patients with DGR showed a statistically higher prevalence of epigastric pain in comparison with control group. There was no significant difference between the histology of gastric mucosa with atrophic gastritis and duodenogastric reflux. The bile acid levels of DGR patients were significantly higher than the control values (Z: TBA: -8.916, DBIL: -3.914, TBIL: -6.197, all P Reflux: Y = 0.012TBA + 0

  12. Effect of pelvic irradiation on the absorption of bile acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stryker, J.A.; Demers, L.M.

    1979-01-01

    The pathophysiology of radiation-induced diarrhea was evaluated in 17 patients undergoing pelvic irradiation for gynecological malignancies. The glycine conjugates of cholic acid (GC) and chenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC) were measured in serum by radioimmunoassay. Fasting and 2 hour post prandial (pp) determinations were performed prior to and in the fifth week of radiotherapy. The pre-treatment fasting and 2 hour pp GC levels were 0.20 +- 0.29 (mean +- SD) and 0.48 +- 0.47 μM. In the fifth week the fasting and 2 hour pp GC levels were 0.16 +- 0.23 and 0.25 +- 0.27 μM. The first week fasting and 2 hour pp GCDC levels were 0.32 +- 0.47 and 0.80 +- 0.83 μM: in the fifth week they were 0.10 +- 0.06 and 0.33 +- 0.27 μM. The differences between the first and the fifth week post prandial increases in serum GC and GCDC levels were significant (P<0.02). The reduced post prandial increases in serum GC and GCDC in the fifth week of radiotherapy occurred at a time when the patients' daily stool frequencies were significantly increased (P<0.01). The data suggest that a cholerrheic enteropathy is the major determinant in the pathophysiology of radiation-induced diarrhea

  13. Diurnal variation in the biliary excretion of flomoxef in patients with percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hishikawa, S; Kobayashi, E; Sugimoto , K; Miyata, M; Fujimura, A

    2001-07-01

    To examine diurnal variation in biliary excretion of flomoxef. Flomoxef (1 g) was injected intravenously in eight patients with percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography with drainage at 09.00 h and 21.00 h by a cross-over design with a 36 h washout period. Drained biliary fluid was collected for 6 h after each dosing. These patients still had mild to moderate hepatic dysfunction. Bile flow and bile acid excretion for 6 h after dosing did not differ significantly between the 09.00 h and 21.00 h treatments. The maximum concentration of biliary flomoxef was significantly greater and its total excretion for 6 h tended to be greater after the 21.00 h dose [maximum concentration (microg ml(-1)): 34.2 +/- 29.9 (09.00 h dose) vs 43.5 +/- 28.3 (21.00 h dose) (95% confidence interval for difference: 2.6 approximately 15.9, P = 0.013); total excretion (mg 6 h(-1)): 1.4 +/- 1.3 (09.00 h dose) vs 1.6 +/- 1.2 (21.00 h dose) (95% confidence interval for difference: -26.8, 313.7, P = 0.087)]. The period that biliary flomoxef remained above the minimal inhibitory concentration did not differ significantly between the two treatment times. These results suggest that biliary excretion of flomoxef shows diurnal variation. However, as the difference was relatively small, flomoxef could be given at any time of day without any dosage adjustments.

  14. Biliary Innate Immunity: Function and Modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Harada

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Biliary innate immunity is involved in the pathogenesis of cholangiopathies in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC and biliary atresia. Biliary epithelial cells possess an innate immune system consisting of the Toll-like receptor (TLR family and recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs. Tolerance to bacterial PAMPs such as lipopolysaccharides is also important to maintain homeostasis in the biliary tree, but tolerance to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA is not found. In PBC, CD4-positive Th17 cells characterized by the secretion of IL-17 are implicated in the chronic inflammation of bile ducts and the presence of Th17 cells around bile ducts is causally associated with the biliary innate immune responses to PAMPs. Moreover, a negative regulator of intracellular TLR signaling, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ, is involved in the pathogenesis of cholangitis. Immunosuppression using PPARγ ligands may help to attenuate the bile duct damage in PBC patients. In biliary atresia characterized by a progressive, inflammatory, and sclerosing cholangiopathy, dsRNA viruses are speculated to be an etiological agent and to directly induce enhanced biliary apoptosis via the expression of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL. Moreover, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT of biliary epithelial cells is also evoked by the biliary innate immune response to dsRNA.

  15. Gemfibrozil disrupts lysophosphatidylcholine and bile acid homeostasis via PPARα and its relevance to hepatotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Aiming; Krausz, Kristopher W; Fang, Zhong-Ze; Brocker, Chad; Qu, Aijuan; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2014-04-01

    Gemfibrozil, a ligand of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), is one of the most widely prescribed anti-dyslipidemia fibrate drugs. Among the adverse reactions observed with gemfibrozil are alterations in liver function, cholestatic jaundice, and cholelithiasis. However, the mechanisms underlying these toxicities are poorly understood. In this study, wild-type and Ppara-null mice were dosed with a gemfibrozil-containing diet for 14 days. Ultra-performance chromatography electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry-based metabolomics and traditional approaches were used to assess the mechanism of gemfibrozil-induced hepatotoxicity. Unsupervised multivariate data analysis revealed four lysophosphatidylcholine components in wild-type mice that varied more dramatically than those in Ppara-null mice. Targeted metabolomics revealed taurocholic acid and tauro-α-muricholic acid/tauro-β-muricholic acid were significantly increased in wild-type mice, but not in Ppara-null mice. In addition to the above perturbations in metabolite homeostasis, phenotypic alterations in the liver were identified. Hepatic genes involved in metabolism and transportation of lysophosphatidylcholine and bile acid compounds were differentially regulated between wild-type and Ppara-null mice, in agreement with the observed downstream metabolic alterations. These data suggest that PPARα mediates gemfibrozil-induced hepatotoxicity in part by disrupting phospholipid and bile acid homeostasis.

  16. Irritable bowel syndrome-diarrhea: characterization of genotype by exome sequencing, and phenotypes of bile acid synthesis and colonic transit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, Eric W.; Shin, Andrea; Carlson, Paula; Li, Ying; Grover, Madhusudan; Zinsmeister, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    The study objectives were: to mine the complete exome to identify putative rare single nucleotide variants (SNVs) associated with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)-diarrhea (IBS-D) phenotype, to assess genes that regulate bile acids in IBS-D, and to explore univariate associations of SNVs with symptom phenotype and quantitative traits in an independent IBS cohort. Using principal components analysis, we identified two groups of IBS-D (n = 16) with increased fecal bile acids: rapid colonic transit or high bile acids synthesis. DNA was sequenced in depth, analyzing SNVs in bile acid genes (ASBT, FXR, OSTα/β, FGF19, FGFR4, KLB, SHP, CYP7A1, LRH-1, and FABP6). Exome findings were compared with those of 50 similar ethnicity controls. We assessed univariate associations of each SNV with quantitative traits and a principal components analysis and associations between SNVs in KLB and FGFR4 and symptom phenotype in 405 IBS, 228 controls and colonic transit in 70 IBS-D, 71 IBS-constipation. Mining the complete exome did not reveal significant associations with IBS-D over controls. There were 54 SNVs in 10 of 11 bile acid-regulating genes, with no SNVs in FGF19; 15 nonsynonymous SNVs were identified in similar proportions of IBS-D and controls. Variations in KLB (rs1015450, downstream) and FGFR4 [rs434434 (intronic), rs1966265, and rs351855 (nonsynonymous)] were associated with colonic transit (rs1966265; P = 0.043), fecal bile acids (rs1015450; P = 0.064), and principal components analysis groups (all 3 FGFR4 SNVs; P transit (P = 0.066). Thus exome sequencing identified additional variants in KLB and FGFR4 associated with bile acids or colonic transit in IBS-D. PMID:24200957

  17. Scintigraphic demonstration of bile reflux after gastro-intestinal surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gratz, K.F.; Creutzig, H.; Lieth, U. von der; Hundeshagen, H.

    1983-04-01

    Bile reflux may occur after a variety of reconstructive procedures in the gastro-intestinal tract and biliary system. The present paper deals with reflux into the duodenum, jejunum, stomach, oesophagus and into blind loops. The demonstration of reflux by sup(99m)Tc labelled IDA acid derivatives, and a possible quantitative approach, are discussed. The advantages of isotope methods are: 1. Direct demonstration of bile reflux without any intervention in the physiological process and with little trouble to the patient. 2. The ability to use the method for various reconstructive procedures and 3. the additional information obtained which may help in the differential diagnosis of blind loops, biliary obstruction, cholecystitis or liver metastases if there has been a gastrectomy for a malignant tumour. In combination with a second administration of a radio-isotope tracer, one may be able to demonstrate abnormalities in the motility of the stomach or gut, or pyloric stenosis or gastro-oesophageal reflux.

  18. Activation of transmembrane bile acid receptor TGR5 stimulates insulin secretion in pancreatic β cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Divya P.; Rajagopal, Senthilkumar; Mahavadi, Sunila; Mirshahi, Faridoddin; Grider, John R.; Murthy, Karnam S.; Sanyal, Arun J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► G protein coupled receptor TGR5 is expressed in mouse and human islets. ► TGR5 is coupled to activation of Gs and Ca 2+ release via cAMP/Epac/PLC-ε pathway. ► Activation of TGR5 by bile salts and selective ligands causes insulin secretion. ► TGR5 could be a potential therapeutic target to treat diabetes. -- Abstract: Bile acids act as signaling molecules and stimulate the G protein coupled receptor, TGR5, in addition to nuclear farnesoid X receptor to regulate lipid, glucose and energy metabolism. Bile acid induced activation of TGR5 in the enteroendocrine cells promotes glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) release, which has insulinotropic effect in the pancreatic β cells. In the present study, we have identified the expression of TGR5 in pancreatic β cell line MIN6 and also in mouse and human pancreatic islets. TGR5 selective ligands, oleanolic acid (OA) and INT-777 selectively activated Gα s and caused an increase in intracellular cAMP and Ca 2+ . OA and INT-777 also increased phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis and the increase was blocked by NF449 (a selective Gα s inhibitor) or (U73122) (PI hydrolysis inhibitor). OA, INT-777 and lithocholic acid increased insulin release in MIN6 and human islets and the increase was inhibited by treatment with NF449, (U73122) or BAPTA-AM (chelator of calcium), but not with myristoylated PKI (PKA inhibitor), suggesting that the release is dependent on G s /cAMP/Ca 2+ pathway. 8-pCPT-2′-O-Me-cAMP, a cAMP analog, which activates Epac, but not PKA also stimulated PI hydrolysis. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the TGR5 expressed in the pancreatic β cells regulates insulin secretion and highlights the importance of ongoing therapeutic strategies targeting TGR5 in the control of glucose homeostasis.

  19. [Biliary dysfunction in obese children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleshina, E I; Gubonina, I V; Novikova, V P; Vigurskaia, M Iu

    2014-01-01

    To examine the state of the biliary system, a study of properties of bile "case-control") 100 children and adolescents aged 8 to 18 years, held checkup in consultative and diagnostic center for chronic gastroduodenitis. BMI children were divided into 2 groups: group 1-60 children with obesity (BMI of 30 to 40) and group 2-40 children with normal anthropometric indices. Survey methods included clinical examination pediatrician, endocrinologist, biochemical parameters (ALT, AST, alkaline phosphatase level, total protein, bilirubin, lipidogram, glucose, insulin, HOMA-index), ultrasound of the abdomen and retroperitoneum, EGD with aspiration of gallbladder bile. Crystallography bile produced by crystallization of biological substrates micromethods modification Prima AV, 1992. Obese children with chronic gastroduodenita more likely than children of normal weight, had complaints and objective laboratory and instrumental evidence of insulin resistance and motor disorders of the upper gastrointestinal and biliary tract, liver enlargement and biliary "sludge". Biochemical parameters of obese children indicate initial metabolic changes in carbohydrate and fat metabolism and cholestasis, as compared to control children. Colloidal properties of bile in obese children with chronic gastroduodenita reduced, as indicated by the nature of the crystallographic pattern. Conclusions: Obese children with chronic gastroduodenitis often identified enlarged liver, cholestasis and biliary dysfunction, including with the presence of sludge in the gallbladder; most often--hypertonic bile dysfunction. Biochemical features of carbohydrate and fat metabolism reflect the features of the metabolic profile of obese children. Crystallography bile in obese children reveals the instability of the colloidal structure of bile, predisposing children to biliary sludge, which is a risk factor for gallstones.

  20. Reactivity of Biliatresone, a Natural Biliary Toxin, with Glutathione, Histamine, and Amino Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Kyung A; Waisbourd-Zinman, Orith; Wells, Rebecca G; Pack, Michael; Porter, John R

    2016-02-15

    In our previous work, we identified a natural toxin, biliatresone, from Dysphania glomulifera and D. littoralis, endemic plants associated with outbreaks of biliary atresia in Australian neonatal livestock. Biliatresone is a very rare isoflavonoid with an α-methylene ketone between two phenyls, 1,2-diaryl-2-propenone, along with methylenedioxy, dimethoxyl, and hydroxyl functional groups, that causes extrahepatic biliary toxicity in zebrafish. The toxic core of biliatresone is a methylene in the α-position relative to the ketone of 1,2-diaryl-2-propenone that serves as an electrophilic Michael acceptor. The α-methylene of biliatresone spontaneously conjugated with water and methanol (MeOH), respectively, via Michael addition in a reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) analysis. We here report the reactivity of biliatresone toward glutathione (GSH), several amino acids, and other thiol- or imidazole-containing biomolecules. LC-MS and HPLC analysis of the conjugation reaction showed the reactivity of biliatresone to be in the order histidine > N-acetyl-d-cysteine (D-NAC) = N-acetyl-l-cysteine (L-NAC) > histamine > glutathione ≥ cysteine ≫ glycine > glutamate > phenylalanine, while serine and adenine had no reactivity due to intramolecular hydrogen bonding in the protic solvents. The reactivity of ethyl vinyl ketone (EVK, 1-penten-3-one), an example of a highly reactive α,ß-unsaturated ketone, toward GSH gave a 6.7-fold lower reaction rate constant than that of biliatresone. The reaction rate constant of synthetic 1,2-diaryl-2-propen-1-one (DP), a core structure of the toxic molecule, was 10-fold and 1.5-fold weaker in potency compared to the reaction rate constants of biliatresone and EVK, respectively. These results demostrated that the methylenedioxy, dimethoxyl, and hydroxyl functional groups of biliatresone contribute to the stronger reactivity of the Michael acceptor α-methylene ketone toward nucleophiles compared to that of DP

  1. Effect of ursodeoxycholic acid treatment on the altered progesterone and bile acid homeostasis in the mother-placenta-foetus trio during cholestasis of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estiú, Maria C; Monte, Maria J; Rivas, Laura; Moirón, Maria; Gomez-Rodriguez, Laura; Rodriguez-Bravo, Tomas; Marin, Jose J G; Macias, Rocio I R

    2015-02-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is characterized by pruritus and elevated bile acid concentrations in maternal serum. This is accompanied by an enhanced risk of intra-uterine and perinatal complications. High concentrations of sulphated progesterone metabolites (PMS) have been suggested to be involved in the multifactorial aetiopathogenesis of ICP. The aim of this study was to investigate further the mechanism accounting for the beneficial effect of oral administration of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), which is the standard treatment, regarding bile acid and PMS homeostasis in the mother-placenta-foetus trio. Using HPLC-MS/MS bile acids and PMS were determined in maternal and foetal serum and placenta. The expression of ABC proteins in placenta was determined by real time quantitative PCR (RT-QPCR) and immunofluorescence. In ICP, markedly increased concentrations of bile acids (tauroconjugates > glycoconjugates > unconjugated), progesterone and PMS in placenta and maternal serum were accompanied by enhanced concentrations in foetal serum of bile acids, but not of PMS. UDCA treatment reduced bile acid accumulation in the mother-placenta-foetus trio, but had no significant effect on progesterone and PMS concentrations. ABCG2 mRNA abundance was increased in placentas from ICP patients vs. controls and remained stable following UDCA treatment, despite an apparent further increase in ABCG2. UDCA administration partially reduces ICP-induced bile acid accumulation in mothers and foetuses despite the lack of effect on concentrations of progesterone and PMS in maternal serum. Up-regulation of placental ABCG2 may play an important role in protecting the foetus from high concentrations of bile acids and PMS during ICP. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  2. Pharmacokinetics and Biliary Excretion of Fisetin in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Miao-Chan; Hsueh, Thomas Y; Cheng, Yung-Yi; Lin, Lie-Chwen; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2018-06-14

    The hypothesis of this study is that fisetin and phase II conjugated forms of fisetin may partly undergo biliary excretion. To investigate this hypothesis, male Sprague-Dawley rats were used for the experiment, and their bile ducts were cannulated with polyethylene tubes for bile sampling. The pharmacokinetic results demonstrated that the average area-under-the-curve (AUC) ratios ( k (%) = AUC conjugate /AUC free-form ) of fisetin, its glucuronides, and its sulfates were 1:6:21 in plasma and 1:4:75 in bile, respectively. Particularly, the sulfated metabolites were the main forms that underwent biliary excretion. The biliary excretion rate ( k BE (%) = AUC bile /AUC plasma ) indicates the amount of fisetin eliminated by biliary excretion. The biliary excretion rates of fisetin, its glucuronide conjugates, and its sulfate conjugates were approximately 144, 109, and 823%, respectively, after fisetin administration (30 mg/kg, iv). Furthermore, biliary excretion of fisetin is mediated by P-glycoprotein.

  3. Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy with Severe Elevation of Bile Acids in the Setting of Acute Hepatitis C Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan L. Lawlor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP is a complication of pregnancy resulting in elevation of serum bile acid levels. ICP is often associated with underlying liver disease, including hepatitis C. Bile acids in relationship to the acute infection of hepatitis C virus have not yet been delineated in the literature. A 26-year-old gravida 4 para 2103 with dichorionic, diamniotic twin gestation and history of intravenous drug abuse developed ICP in the setting of acute hepatitis C infection. In addition to clinical symptoms of pruritus and right upper quadrant pain, she developed severe elevation in bile acids, 239 micromol/L, and transaminitis aspartate aminotransferase 1033 U/L, and alanine aminotransferase 448 U/L. She received ursodeoxycholic acid and antenatal testing was performed. Patient delivered vaginally at 33-week gestation following preterm rupture of membranes. Neonates were admitted to NICU and had uncomplicated neonatal courses. In the setting of ICP with significant transaminitis and severe elevation of bile acids, consideration of acute viral hepatitis is important, especially considering the worsening opioid epidemic and concurrent increase in intravenous drug use in the United States. Further study is needed regarding the acute form of HCV infection and its effect on ICP and associated bile acids.

  4. Enhanced dispersion of boron nitride nanosheets in aqueous media by using bile acid-based surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Ari; Park, Soo-Jin; Min, Byunggak; In, Insik

    2018-01-01

    Facile noncovalent surface functionalization of hydroxylated boron nitride nanosheet (BNNS-OH) was attempted through the sonication-assisted exfoliation of h-BN in aqueous media in the presence of bile acid-based surfactants such as sodium cholic acid (SC) or sodium deoxycholic acid (SDC), resulting in SC- or SDC-BNNS-OH dispersion with high up to 2 mg ml-1 and enhanced dispersion stability due to the increased negative zeta potential. While prepared SC-BNNS-OH revealed multi-layered BNNS structures, the large lateral sizes of hundreds nanometers and clear h-BN lattice structures are very promising for the preparation and application of water-processable BNNS-based nanomaterials. It is regarded that noncovalent functionalization of BNNS-OH based on σ-π interaction between with σ-rich bile acid-based amphiphiles and π-rich BNNS is very effective to formulate multi-functional BNNS-based nanomaterials or hybrids that can be utilized in various applications where both the pristine properties of BNNS and the extra functions are simultaneously required.

  5. Rapid increase of bile salt secretion is associated with bile duct injury after human liver transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuken, Erwin; Visser, Dorien; Kuipers, Folkert; Blokzijl, Hans; Leuvenink, Henri G. D.; de Jong, Koert P.; Peeters, Paul M. J. G.; Jansen, Peter L. M.; Slooff, Maarten J. H.; Gouw, Annette S. H.; Porte, Robert J.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Biliary strictures are a serious cause of morbidity after liver transplantation. We have studied the role of altered bile composition as a mechanism of bile duct injury after human liver transplantation. METHODS: In 28 liver transplant recipients, bile samples were collected daily

  6. Rapid increase of bile salt secretion is associated with bile duct injury after human liver transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuken, E; Visser, D; Kuipers, F; Blokzijl, H; Leuvenink, HGD; de Jong, KP; Peeters, PMJG; Jansen, PLM; Slooff, MJH; Gouw, ASH; Porte, RJ

    2004-01-01

    Background/Aims: Biliary strictures are a serious cause of morbidity after liver transplantation. We have studied the role of altered bile composition as a mechanism of bile duct injury after human liver transplantation. Methods: In 28 liver transplant recipients, bile samples were collected daily

  7. Promoting effect of bile acids on neoplastic transformation of x-irradiated 10T1/2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, A.; Hill, C.K.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental studies have raised a concern about a role of bile acids in colo-rectal carcinogenesis. Studies in vivo suggest that bile acids may act as tumor promoters. Using 10T1/2 mouse cells as a model system, the authors explored the effects of cholic and cheno-deoxycholic acid on x-ray-induced neoplastic transformation in these cells. Addition of either cheno-deoxycholic acid or cholic acid to 10T1/2 cells, 24 hours after exposure to x-rays (50kv) increases significantly the frequencies of transformation. The compounds were present in the medium throughout the entire postirradiation refeeding period. At the concentrations used (0.5μg/ml), neither acid was cytotoxic and did not have any effect on cell survival. The enhancement of radiation-induced transformation seems to be greater in the presence of cholic acid, as compared to the effect of cheno-deoxycholic acid. Increase in transformation was relatively greater after low compared to high doses of radiation. The effect of bile acids on transformation of 10T1/2 cells is similar to that of a known tumor promoter TPA. The authors' observations support the conclusion that promotional effect of bile acids is not because of their specific effect on colonic epithelium, but rather due to their general properties as tumor promoters

  8. Role of AMACR (α-methylacyl-CoA racemase) and MFE-1 (peroxisomal multifunctional enzyme-1) in bile acid synthesis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autio, Kaija J; Schmitz, Werner; Nair, Remya R; Selkälä, Eija M; Sormunen, Raija T; Miinalainen, Ilkka J; Crick, Peter J; Wang, Yuqin; Griffiths, William J; Reddy, Janardan K; Baes, Myriam; Hiltunen, J Kalervo

    2014-07-01

    Cholesterol is catabolized to bile acids by peroxisomal β-oxidation in which the side chain of C27-bile acid intermediates is shortened by three carbon atoms to form mature C24-bile acids. Knockout mouse models deficient in AMACR (α-methylacyl-CoA racemase) or MFE-2 (peroxisomal multifunctional enzyme type 2), in which this β-oxidation pathway is prevented, display a residual C24-bile acid pool which, although greatly reduced, implies the existence of alternative pathways of bile acid synthesis. One alternative pathway could involve Mfe-1 (peroxisomal multifunctional enzyme type 1) either with or without Amacr. To test this hypothesis, we generated a double knockout mouse model lacking both Amacr and Mfe-1 activities and studied the bile acid profiles in wild-type, Mfe-1 and Amacr single knockout mouse line and Mfe-1 and Amacr double knockout mouse lines. The total bile acid pool was decreased in Mfe-1-/- mice compared with wild-type and the levels of mature C24-bile acids were reduced in the double knockout mice when compared with Amacr-deficient mice. These results indicate that Mfe-1 can contribute to the synthesis of mature bile acids in both Amacr-dependent and Amacr-independent pathways.

  9. The utility of 5-aminolevulinic acid-mediated photodynamic diagnosis in the detection of intraoperative bile leakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yoshihiro; Imai, Yoshiro; Fujii, Kensuke; Hirokawa, Fumitoshi; Hayashi, Michihiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhisa

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the utility of the new intraoperative bile leakage test as a preventive measure of postoperative bile leakage. 737 patients were retrospectively analyzed with respect to the management of intra- and post-operative bile leakage. Nine (8.3%) of 109 patients evaluated using conventional white light fluorescent imaging were recognized as having intra-operative bile leakage. However, performance of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA)-mediated PDD detected bile leakage intraoperatively not only in these 9 patients, but also in an additional 6 patients, such that 'red fluorescence' at the cut surface of the liver, was visualized in a total of 15 patients. The postoperative courses of most patients were uneventful, and postoperative bile leakages occurred in only one (0.9%) patient. 5-ALA fluorescence imaging may be needed to prevent postoperative bile leakage in patients at high risk for this surgical complication after hepatic resection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Preoperative biliary drainage for pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heek, N. T.; Busch, O. R.; van Gulik, T. M.; Gouma, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    This review is to summarize the current knowledge about preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) in patients with biliary obstruction caused by pancreatic cancer. Most patients with pancreatic carcinoma (85%) will present with obstructive jaundice. The presence of toxic substances as bilirubin and bile

  11. Analysis of U2 small nuclear RNA fragments in the bile differentiates cholangiocarcinoma from primary sclerosing cholangitis and other benign biliary disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraniskin, Alexander; Nöpel-Dünnebacke, Stefanie; Schumacher, Brigitte; Gerges, Christian; Bracht, Thilo; Sitek, Barbara; Meyer, Helmut E; Gerken, Guido; Dechene, Alexander; Schlaak, Jörg F; Schroers, Roland; Pox, Christian; Schmiegel, Wolff; Hahn, Stephan A

    2014-07-01

    Up to now the diagnosis of early stage cholangiocarcinoma (CC) has remained difficult, with low sensitivities reported for current diagnostic methods. Based on recent promising findings about circulating U2 small nuclear RNA fragments (RNU2-1f) as novel blood-based biomarkers for pancreatic and colorectal adenocarcinoma, we studied the utility of RNU2-1f as a diagnostic marker of CC in bile fluid. Bile fluid was collected from patients with CC (n = 12), controls (patients with choledocholithiasis) (n = 11) and with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC; n = 11). RNU2-1f levels were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction normalized to cel-54. Measurement of RNU2-1f levels in bile fluids enabled the differentiation of patients with CC from controls in all cases. Furthermore, RNU2-1f levels in bile fluids of patients with CC were significantly higher than in patients with PSC, resulting in a receiver-operating characteristic curve area of 0.856, with sensitivity of 67 % and specificity of 91 %. Our data suggest that the measurement of RNU2-1 fragments detected in the bile fluid can be used as a diagnostic marker for CC and should be included in future prospective diagnostic studies for this disease entity.

  12. The mechanism of biliary lipid secretion and its defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink, R. P.; Groen, A. K.

    1999-01-01

    Biliary lipid secretion is an important physiological event; not only for the disposal of cholesterol from the body, but also for the protection of cells lining the biliary tree against bile salts. Insight into the (patho)physiological role of biliary lipid secretion has been recently expanded

  13. Perturbation of bile acid homeostasis is an early pathogenesis event of drug induced liver injury in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, Makoto; Miyake, Manami; Sato, Hiroko; Masutomi, Naoya; Tsutsui, Naohisa [Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma Corporation, Kisarazu, Chiba 292-0818 (Japan); Adam, Klaus-Peter; Alexander, Danny C.; Lawton, Kay A.; Milburn, Michael V.; Ryals, John A.; Wulff, Jacob E. [Metabolon Inc., 617 Davis Drive, Suite 400, Durham, NC 27713 (United States); Guo, Lining, E-mail: lguo@metabolon.com [Metabolon Inc., 617 Davis Drive, Suite 400, Durham, NC 27713 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a significant consideration for drug development. Current preclinical DILI assessment relying on histopathology and clinical chemistry has limitations in sensitivity and discordance with human. To gain insights on DILI pathogenesis and identify potential biomarkers for improved DILI detection, we performed untargeted metabolomic analyses on rats treated with thirteen known hepatotoxins causing various types of DILI: necrosis (acetaminophen, bendazac, cyclosporine A, carbon tetrachloride, ethionine), cholestasis (methapyrilene and naphthylisothiocyanate), steatosis (tetracycline and ticlopidine), and idiosyncratic (carbamazepine, chlorzoxasone, flutamide, and nimesulide) at two doses and two time points. Statistical analysis and pathway mapping of the nearly 1900 metabolites profiled in the plasma, urine, and liver revealed diverse time and dose dependent metabolic cascades leading to DILI by the hepatotoxins. The most consistent change induced by the hepatotoxins, detectable even at the early time point/low dose, was the significant elevations of a panel of bile acids in the plasma and urine, suggesting that DILI impaired hepatic bile acid uptake from the circulation. Furthermore, bile acid amidation in the hepatocytes was altered depending on the severity of the hepatotoxin-induced oxidative stress. The alteration of the bile acids was most evident by the necrosis and cholestasis hepatotoxins, with more subtle effects by the steatosis and idiosyncratic hepatotoxins. Taking together, our data suggest that the perturbation of bile acid homeostasis is an early event of DILI. Upon further validation, selected bile acids in the circulation could be potentially used as sensitive and early DILI preclinical biomarkers. - Highlights: ► We used metabolomics to gain insights on drug induced liver injury (DILI) in rats. ► We profiled rats treated with thirteen hepatotoxins at two doses and two time points. ► The toxins decreased the

  14. Use of technetium-99m-di-isopropyl-iminodiacetic acid imaging in the demonstration of a biliary-bronchial fistula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savitch, I.; Esser, J.D.; Levin, J. (University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Krige, L.P.; Kew, M.C. (University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa). Dept. of Medicine)

    1984-05-12

    A case is described in which technetium-99m-di-isopropyl-iminodiacetic acid imaging was used to trace the passage of bile from its site of leakage into an amoebic liver abscess, through a fistulous tract connecting the liver abscess with an abscess in the right lower lobe of the lung, and into the upper respiratory tract.

  15. Reversal of metabolic disorders by pharmacological activation of bile acid receptors TGR5 and FXR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita Jadhav

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Activation of the bile acid (BA receptors farnesoid X receptor (FXR or G protein-coupled bile acid receptor (GPBAR1; TGR5 improves metabolic homeostasis. In this study, we aim to determine the impact of pharmacological activation of bile acid receptors by INT-767 on reversal of diet-induced metabolic disorders, and the relative contribution of FXR vs. TGR5 to INT-767's effects on metabolic parameters. Methods: Wild-type (WT, Tgr5−/−, Fxr−/−, Apoe−/− and Shp−/− mice were used to investigate whether and how BA receptor activation by INT-767, a semisynthetic agonist for both FXR and TGR5, could reverse diet-induced metabolic disorders. Results: INT-767 reversed HFD-induced obesity dependent on activation of both TGR5 and FXR and also reversed the development of atherosclerosis and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Mechanistically, INT-767 improved hypercholesterolemia by activation of FXR and induced thermogenic genes via activation of TGR5 and/or FXR. Furthermore, INT-767 inhibited several lipogenic genes and de novo lipogenesis in the liver via activation of FXR. We identified peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor γ (PPARγ and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (CEBPα as novel FXR-regulated genes. FXR inhibited PPARγ expression by inducing small heterodimer partner (SHP whereas the inhibition of CEBPα by FXR was SHP-independent. Conclusions: BA receptor activation can reverse obesity, NAFLD, and atherosclerosis by specific activation of FXR or TGR5. Our data suggest that, compared to activation of FXR or TGR5 only, dual activation of both FXR and TGR5 is a more attractive strategy for treatment of common metabolic disorders. Keywords: Farnesoid X receptor, TGR5, Atherosclerosis, Obesity, NAFLD

  16. [Endoscopic ultrasound guided rendezvous for biliary drainage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Marie Høxbro; Vilmann, Peter; Hassan, Hazem; Karstensen, John Gésdal

    2015-04-27

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP) is currently standard treatment for biliary drainage. Endoscopic ultrasound guided rendezvous (EUS-RV) is a novel method to overcome an unsuccessful biliary drainage procedure. Under endoscopic ultrasound guidance a guidewire is passed via a needle from the stomach or duodenum to the common bile duct and from there on to the duodenum enabling ERCP. With a relatively high rate of success EUS-RV should be considered as an alternative to biliary drainage and surgical intervention.

  17. Enteral bile acid treatment improves parenteral nutrition-related liver disease and intestinal mucosal atrophy in neonatal pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Ajay Kumar; Stoll, Barbara; Burrin, Douglas G

    2012-01-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is essential for patients with impaired gut function but leads to parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). TPN disrupts the normal enterohepatic circulation of bile acids, and we hypothesized that it would decrease intestinal expression of the newly...... described metabolic hormone fibroblast growth factor-19 (FGF19) and also glucagon-like peptides-1 and -2 (GLP-1 and GLP-2). We tested the effects of restoring bile acids by treating a neonatal piglet PNALD model with chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA). Neonatal pigs received enteral feeding (EN), TPN, or TPN...... + CDCA for 14 days, and responses were assessed by serum markers, histology, and levels of key regulatory peptides. Cholestasis and steatosis were demonstrated in the TPN group relative to EN controls by elevated levels of serum total and direct bilirubin and also bile acids and liver triglyceride (TG...

  18. Serum bile acids are higher in humans with prior gastric bypass: potential contribution to improved glucose and lipid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patti, Mary-Elizabeth; Houten, Sander M; Bianco, Antonio C

    2009-01-01

    , glycochenodeoxycholic, and glycodeoxycholic acids were all significantly higher in GB compared to Ov (P glucose (r = -0.59, P triglycerides (r = -0.40, P = 0.05), and positively correlated with adiponectin (r = -0.48, P ... performed cross-sectional analysis of fasting serum bile acid composition and both fasting and post-meal metabolic variables, in three subject groups: (i) post-GB surgery (n = 9), (ii) without GB matched to preoperative BMI of the index cohort (n = 5), and (iii) without GB matched to current BMI...... of the index cohort (n = 10). Total serum bile acid concentrations were higher in GB (8.90 +/- 4.84 micromol/l) than in both overweight (3.59 +/- 1.95, P = 0.005, Ov) and severely obese (3.86 +/- 1.51, P = 0.045, MOb). Bile acid subfractions taurochenodeoxycholic, taurodeoxycholic, glycocholic...

  19. Changes in the absorption of bile acids after total colectomy in patients with an ileostomy or pouch-anal anastomosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasmyth, D.G.; Johnston, D.; Williams, N.S.; King, R.F.; Burkinshaw, L.; Brooks, K.

    1989-01-01

    Bile acid absorption was investigated using 75 Se Taurohomocholate (SeHCAT) in controls and patients who had undergone total colectomy with either conventional ileostomy or pouch-anal anastomosis for ulcerative colitis or adenomatous polyposis. Whole-body retention of SeHCAT after 168 hours was greater in the controls than the patients who had undergone colectomy (P less than .05). Retention of SeHCAT did not differ significantly between patients with an ileostomy and patients with pouch-anal anastomosis, but patients with an ileostomy and ileal resection of more than 20 cm retained less SeHCAT than patients with a pouch-anal anastomosis (P less than .01). Analysis of fecal bile acids from ileostomies and pouches showed that bacterial metabolism of primary conjugated bile acids was greater in patients with a pouch. It was concluded that bile acid absorption was not significantly impaired by construction of a pouch compared with conventional ileostomy, but bacterial metabolism of bile acids was greater in the pouches

  20. Changes in the absorption of bile acids after total colectomy in patients with an ileostomy or pouch-anal anastomosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasmyth, D.G.; Johnston, D.; Williams, N.S.; King, R.F.; Burkinshaw, L.; Brooks, K.

    1989-03-01

    Bile acid absorption was investigated using /sup 75/Se Taurohomocholate (SeHCAT) in controls and patients who had undergone total colectomy with either conventional ileostomy or pouch-anal anastomosis for ulcerative colitis or adenomatous polyposis. Whole-body retention of SeHCAT after 168 hours was greater in the controls than the patients who had undergone colectomy (P less than .05). Retention of SeHCAT did not differ significantly between patients with an ileostomy and patients with pouch-anal anastomosis, but patients with an ileostomy and ileal resection of more than 20 cm retained less SeHCAT than patients with a pouch-anal anastomosis (P less than .01). Analysis of fecal bile acids from ileostomies and pouches showed that bacterial metabolism of primary conjugated bile acids was greater in patients with a pouch. It was concluded that bile acid absorption was not significantly impaired by construction of a pouch compared with conventional ileostomy, but bacterial metabolism of bile acids was greater in the pouches.

  1. Binding domain-driven intracellular trafficking of sterols for synthesis of steroid hormones, bile acids and oxysterols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midzak, Andrew; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2014-09-01

    Steroid hormones, bioactive oxysterols and bile acids are all derived from the biological metabolism of lipid cholesterol. The enzymatic pathways generating these compounds have been an area of intense research for almost a century, as cholesterol and its metabolites have substantial impacts on human health. Owing to its high degree of hydrophobicity and the chemical properties that it confers to biological membranes, the distribution of cholesterol in cells is tightly controlled, with subcellular organelles exhibiting highly divergent levels of cholesterol. The manners in which cells maintain such sterol distributions are of great interest in the study of steroid and bile acid synthesis, as limiting cholesterol substrate to the enzymatic pathways is the principal mechanism by which production of steroids and bile acids is regulated. The mechanisms by which cholesterol moves within cells, however, remain poorly understood. In this review, we examine the subcellular machinery involved in cholesterol metabolism to steroid hormones and bile acid, relating it to both lipid- and protein-based mechanisms facilitating intracellular and intraorganellar cholesterol movement and delivery to these pathways. In particular, we examine evidence for the involvement of specific protein domains involved in cholesterol binding, which impact cholesterol movement and metabolism in steroidogenesis and bile acid synthesis. A better understanding of the physical mechanisms by which these protein- and lipid-based systems function is of fundamental importance to understanding physiological homeostasis and its perturbation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Opposing effects of bile acids deoxycholic acid and ursodeoxycholic acid on signal transduction pathways in oesophageal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Latif, Mohamed M; Inoue, Hiroyasu; Reynolds, John V

    2016-09-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) was reported to reduce bile acid toxicity, but the mechanisms underlying its cytoprotective effects are not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of UDCA on the modulation of deoxycholic acid (DCA)-induced signal transduction in oesophageal cancer cells. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) activity was assessed using a gel shift assay. NF-κB activation and translocation was performed using an ELISA-based assay and immunofluorescence analysis. COX-2 expression was analysed by western blotting and COX-2 promoter activity was assessed by luciferase assay. DCA induced NF-κB and AP-1 DNA-binding activities in SKGT-4 and OE33 cells. UDCA pretreatment inhibited DCA-induced NF-κB and AP-1 activation and NF-κB translocation. This inhibitory effect was coupled with a blockade of IκB-α degradation and inhibition of phosphorylation of IKK-α/β and ERK1/2. Moreover, UDCA pretreatment inhibited COX-2 upregulation. Using transient transfection of the COX-2 promoter, UDCA pretreatment abrogated DCA-induced COX-2 promoter activation. In addition, UDCA protected oesophageal cells from the apoptotic effects of deoxycholate. Our findings indicate that UDCA inhibits DCA-induced signalling pathways in oesophageal cancer cells. These data indicate a possible mechanistic role for the chemopreventive actions of UDCA in oesophageal carcinogenesis.

  3. Improved synthesis of glycine, taurine and sulfate conjugated bile acids as reference compounds and internal standards for ESI-MS/MS urinary profiling of inborn errors of bile acid synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donazzolo, Elena; Gucciardi, Antonina; Mazzier, Daniela; Peggion, Cristina; Pirillo, Paola; Naturale, Mauro; Moretto, Alessandro; Giordano, Giuseppe

    2017-04-01

    Bile acid synthesis defects are rare genetic disorders characterized by a failure to produce normal bile acids (BAs), and by an accumulation of unusual and intermediary cholanoids. Measurements of cholanoids in urine samples by mass spectrometry are a gold standard for the diagnosis of these diseases. In this work improved methods for the chemical synthesis of 30 BAs conjugated with glycine, taurine and sulfate were developed. Diethyl phosphorocyanidate (DEPC) and diphenyl phosphoryl azide (DPPA) were used as coupling reagents for glycine and taurine conjugation. Sulfated BAs were obtained by sulfur trioxide-triethylamine complex (SO 3 -TEA) as sulfating agent and thereafter conjugated with glycine and taurine. All products were characterized by NMR, IR spectroscopy and high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). The use of these compounds as internal standards allows an improved accuracy of both identification and quantification of urinary bile acids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. In Barrett's esophagus patients and Barrett's cell lines, ursodeoxycholic acid increases antioxidant expression and prevents DNA damage by bile acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Sui; Huo, Xiaofang; Rezaei, Davood; Zhang, Qiuyang; Zhang, Xi; Yu, Chunhua; Asanuma, Kiyotaka; Cheng, Edaire; Pham, Thai H; Wang, David H; Chen, Minhu; Souza, Rhonda F; Spechler, Stuart Jon

    2014-07-15

    Hydrophobic bile acids like deoxycholic acid (DCA), which cause oxidative DNA damage and activate NF-κB in Barrett's metaplasia, might contribute to carcinogenesis in Barrett's esophagus. We have explored mechanisms whereby ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA, a hydrophilic bile acid) protects against DCA-induced injury in vivo in patients and in vitro using nonneoplastic, telomerase-immortalized Barrett's cell lines. We took biopsies of Barrett's esophagus from 21 patients before and after esophageal perfusion with DCA (250 μM) at baseline and after 8 wk of oral UDCA treatment. DNA damage was assessed by phospho-H2AX expression, neutral CometAssay, and phospho-H2AX nuclear foci formation. Quantitative PCR was performed for antioxidants including catalase and GPX1. Nrf2, catalase, and GPX1 were knocked down with siRNAs. Reporter assays were performed using a plasmid construct containing antioxidant responsive element. In patients, baseline esophageal perfusion with DCA significantly increased phospho-H2AX and phospho-p65 in Barrett's metaplasia. Oral UDCA increased GPX1 and catalase levels in Barrett's metaplasia and prevented DCA perfusion from inducing DNA damage and NF-κB activation. In cells, DCA-induced DNA damage and NF-κB activation was prevented by 24-h pretreatment with UDCA, but not by mixing UDCA with DCA. UDCA activated Nrf2 signaling to increase GPX1 and catalase expression, and protective effects of UDCA pretreatment were blocked by siRNA knockdown of these antioxidants. UDCA increases expression of antioxidants that prevent toxic bile acids from causing DNA damage and NF-κB activation in Barrett's metaplasia. Elucidation of this molecular pathway for UDCA protection provides rationale for clinical trials on UDCA for chemoprevention in Barrett's esophagus. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Endoscopic management of biliary injuries and leaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T S Chandrasekar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bile duct injuries and subsequent leaks can occur following laparoscopic and open cholecystectomies and also during other hepatobiliary surgeries. Various patient related and technical factors are implicated in the causation of biliary injuries. Over a period of twenty five years managing such patients of biliary injuries our team has found a practical approach to assess the cause of biliary injuries based on the symptoms, clinical examination and imaging. Bismuth classification is helpful in most of the cases. Immediate referral to a centre experienced in the management of bile duct injury and timely intervention is associated with improved outcomes. Resuscitation, correcting dyselectrolytemia, aspiration of undrained biloma and antibiotics take the priority in the management. The goal is to restore the bile conduit, and to prevent short and longterm complications such as biliary fistula, intra-abdominal abscess, biliary stricture, recurrent cholangitis and secondary biliary cirrhosis. Endoscopic therapy by reducing the transpapillary pressure gradient helps in reducing the leak. Endoscopic therapy with biliary sphincterotomy alone or with additional placement of a biliary stent/ nasobiliary drainage is advocated. In our tertiary care referral unit, we found endoscopic interventions are useful in situations where there is leak with associated CBD calculus or a foreign body, peripheral bile duct injury, cystic duct stump leak and partial bile duct injury with leak/ narrowing of the lumen. Endotherapy is not useful in case of complete transection (total cut off and complete stricture involving common hepatic or common bile ducts. In conclusion, endoscopic treatment can be considered a highly effective therapy and should be the first-line therapy in such patients. Though less successful, an endoscopic attempt is warranted in patients suffering from central bile duct leakages failing which surgical management is recommended.

  6. Interaction of conjugated bile acids and detergents with a radiosorbent assay of vitamin B-12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, K.-J.; Romslo, I.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of conjugated bile acids and detergents on the radiosorbent technique for the determination of vitamin B-12 activity is reported. It is shown that whereas the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100 has no effect on the vitamin B-12-radiosorbent assay, the addition of ionic detergents, e.g. glycocholic acid, taurocholic acid or sodium lauryl sulfate, results in a falsely-elevated vitamin B-12 activity presumably due to the disruption of the binding of vitamin B-12 to the intrinsic factor-Sephadex complex. This effect may be of importance not only to the radiosorbent assaying of vitamin B-12, but to the in vivo intestinal absorption of vitamin B-12 as well

  7. Presence of bile acids in human follicular fluid and their relation with embryo development in modified natural cycle IVF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagy, R. A.; van Montfoort, A. P. A.; Dikkers, A.; van Echten-Arends, J.; Homminga, I.; Land, J. A.; Hoek, A.; Tietge, U. J. F.

    STUDY QUESTION: Are bile acids (BA) and their respective subspecies present in human follicular fluid (FF) and do they relate to embryo quality in modified natural cycle IVF (MNC-IVF)? SUMMARY ANSWER: BAconcentrations are 2-fold higher in follicular fluid than in serum and ursodeoxycholic acid

  8. DIETARY FISH OIL-INDUCED CHANGES IN INTRAHEPATIC CHOLESTEROL TRANSPORT AND BILE-ACID SYNTHESIS IN RATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SMIT, MJ; TEMMERMAN, AM; WOLTERS, H; KUIPERS, F; BEYNEN, AC; VONK, RJ

    Hepatic cholesterol metabolism was studied in rats fed purified diets supplemented (9% wt/wt) with either fish oil (FO) (n-3 fatty acids) or corn oil (CO) (n-6 fatty acids) for 4 wk. Rats were equipped with permanent catheters in heart, bile duct, and duodenum to allow studies under normal feeding

  9. The bile acid deoxycholate elicits defences in Arabidopsis and reduces bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarattini, Marco; Launay, Alban; Farjad, Mahsa; Wénès, Estelle; Taconnat, Ludivine; Boutet, Stéphanie; Bernacchia, Giovanni; Fagard, Mathilde

    2017-05-01

    Disease has an effect on crop yields, causing significant losses. As the worldwide demand for agricultural products increases, there is a need to pursue the development of new methods to protect crops from disease. One mechanism of plant protection is through the activation of the plant immune system. By exogenous application, 'plant activator molecules' with elicitor properties can be used to activate the plant immune system. These defence-inducing molecules represent a powerful and often environmentally friendly tool to fight pathogens. We show that the secondary bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) induces defence in Arabidopsis and reduces the proliferation of two bacterial phytopathogens: Erwinia amylovora and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. We describe the global defence response triggered by this new plant activator in Arabidopsis at the transcriptional level. Several induced genes were selected for further analysis by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. We describe the kinetics of their induction and show that abiotic stress, such as moderate drought or nitrogen limitation, does not impede DCA induction of defence. Finally, we investigate the role in the activation of defence by this bile acid of the salicylic acid biosynthesis gene SID2, of the receptor-like kinase family genes WAK1-3 and of the NADPH oxidase-encoding RbohD gene. Altogether, we show that DCA constitutes a promising molecule for plant protection which can induce complementary lines of defence, such as callose deposition, reactive oxygen species accumulation and the jasmonic acid and salicylic acid signalling pathways. © 2016 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  10. The canalicular bile salt export pump BSEP (ABCB11) as a potential therapeutic target

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stieger, Bruno; Beuers, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Bile formation is a key function of the liver and is driven by active secretion of bile salts and other organic compounds into the biliary tree. Bile salts represent the major organic constituent of bile. They are released with bile into the small intestine, where they are almost quantitatively

  11. Plasma bile acids show a positive correlation with body mass index and are negatively associated with cognitive restraint of eating in obese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip ePrinz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bile acids may be involved in the regulation of food intake and energy metabolism. The aim of the study was to investigate the association of plasma bile acids with body mass index (BMI and the possible involvement of circulating bile acids in the modulation of physical activity and eating behavior. Blood was obtained in a group of hospitalized patients with normal weight (BMI 18.5-25 kg/m2, underweight (anorexia nervosa, BMI 50 kg/m2, n=14-15/group and plasma bile acid concentrations assessed. Physical activity and plasma bile acids were measured in a group of patients with anorexia nervosa (BMI 14.6±0.3 kg/m2, n=43. Lastly, in a population of obese patients (BMI 48.5±0.9 kg/m2, n=85, psychometric parameters related to disordered eating and plasma bile acids were assessed. Plasma bile acids showed a positive correlation with BMI (r=0.26, p=0.03 in the population of patients with broad range of BMI (9-85 kg/m2, n=74. No associations were observed between plasma bile acids and different parameters of physical activity in anorexic patients (p>0.05. Plasma bile acids were negatively correlated with cognitive restraint of eating (r=-0.30, p=0.008, while no associations were observed with other psychometric eating behavior-related parameters (p>0.05 in obese patients. In conclusion, these data may point towards a role of bile acids in the regulation of body weight. Since plasma bile acids are negatively correlated with the cognitive restraint of eating in obese patients, this may represent a compensatory adaptation to prevent further overeating.

  12. Bile acids deoxycholic acid and ursodeoxycholic acid differentially regulate human β-defensin-1 and -2 secretion by colonic epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajczak, Natalia K; Saint-Criq, Vinciane; O'Dwyer, Aoife M; Perino, Alessia; Adorini, Luciano; Schoonjans, Kristina; Keely, Stephen J

    2017-09-01

    Bile acids and epithelial-derived human β-defensins (HβDs) are known to be important factors in the regulation of colonic mucosal barrier function and inflammation. We hypothesized that bile acids regulate colonic HβD expression and aimed to test this by investigating the effects of deoxycholic acid (DCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid on the expression and release of HβD1 and HβD2 from colonic epithelial cells and mucosal tissues. DCA (10-150 µM) stimulated the release of both HβD1 and HβD2 from epithelial cell monolayers and human colonic mucosal tissue in vitro In contrast, ursodeoxycholic acid (50-200 µM) inhibited both basal and DCA-induced defensin release. Effects of DCA were mimicked by the Takeda GPCR 5 agonist, INT-777 (50 μM), but not by the farnesoid X receptor agonist, GW4064 (10 μM). INT-777 also stimulated colonic HβD1 and HβD2 release from wild-type, but not Takeda GPCR 5 -/- , mice. DCA stimulated phosphorylation of the p65 subunit of NF-κB, an effect that was attenuated by ursodeoxycholic acid, whereas an NF-κB inhibitor, BMS-345541 (25 μM), inhibited DCA-induced HβD2, but not HβD1, release. We conclude that bile acids can differentially regulate colonic epithelial HβD expression and secretion and discuss the implications of our findings for intestinal health and disease.-Lajczak, N. K., Saint-Criq, V., O'Dwyer, A. M., Perino, A., Adorini, L., Schoonjans, K., Keely, S. J. Bile acids deoxycholic acid and ursodeoxycholic acid differentially regulate human β-defensin-1 and -2 secretion by colonic epithelial cells. © FASEB.

  13. The Xenobiotic Transporter Mdr1 Enforces T Cell Homeostasis in the Presence of Intestinal Bile Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wei; Kayama, Hisako; Chen, Mei Lan; Delmas, Amber; Sun, Amy; Kim, Sang Yong; Rangarajan, Erumbi S; McKevitt, Kelly; Beck, Amanda P; Jackson, Cody B; Crynen, Gogce; Oikonomopoulos, Angelos; Lacey, Precious N; Martinez, Gustavo J; Izard, Tina; Lorenz, Robin G; Rodriguez-Palacios, Alex; Cominelli, Fabio; Abreu, Maria T; Hommes, Daniel W; Koralov, Sergei B; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Sundrud, Mark S

    2017-12-19

    CD4 + T cells are tightly regulated by microbiota in the intestine, but whether intestinal T cells interface with host-derived metabolites is less clear. Here, we show that CD4 + T effector (Teff) cells upregulated the xenobiotic transporter, Mdr1, in the ileum to maintain homeostasis in the presence of bile acids. Whereas wild-type Teff cells upregulated Mdr1 in the ileum, those lacking Mdr1 displayed mucosal dysfunction and induced Crohn's disease-like ileitis following transfer into Rag1 -/- hosts. Mdr1 mitigated oxidative stress and enforced homeostasis in Teff cells exposed to conjugated bile acids (CBAs), a class of liver-derived emulsifying agents that actively circulate through the ileal mucosa. Blocking ileal CBA reabsorption in transferred Rag1 -/- mice restored Mdr1-deficient Teff cell homeostasis and attenuated ileitis. Further, a subset of ileal Crohn's disease patients displayed MDR1 loss of function. Together, these results suggest that coordinated interaction between mucosal Teff cells and CBAs in the ileum regulate intestinal immune homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. HPLC and ELISA analyses of larval bile acids from Pacific and western brook lampreys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, S.-S.; Scott, A.P.; Bayer, J.M.; Seelye, J.G.; Close, D.A.; Li, W.

    2003-01-01

    Comparative studies were performed on two native lamprey species, Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) and western brook lamprey (Lampetra richardsoni) from the Pacific coast along with sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) from the Great Lakes, to investigate their bile acid production and release. HPLC and ELISA analyses of the gall bladders and liver extract revealed that the major bile acid compound from Pacific and western brook larval lampreys was petromyzonol sulfate (PZS), previously identified as a migratory pheromone in larval sea lamprey. An ELISA for PZS has been developed in a working range of 20pg-10ng per well. The tissue concentrations of PZS in gall bladder were 127.40, 145.86, and 276.96??g/g body mass in sea lamprey, Pacific lamprey, and western brook lamprey, respectively. Releasing rates for PZS in the three species were measured using ELISA to find that western brook and sea lamprey released PZS 20 times higher than Pacific lamprey did. Further studies are required to determine whether PZS is a chemical cue in Pacific and western brook lampreys. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The effect of BAY o 2752 on bile acid absorption and cholesterol esterification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harnett, K.M.

    1988-01-01

    BAY o 2752 [N,N-(1,11-undecandiyl)bis(2,3-dihydro-2-methyl-1H-indole-1-carboxamide)] has been demonstrated to inhibit intestinal cholesterol absorption in rats. Studies were carried out on male Wistar rats to determine if this drug alters intestinal bile acid absorption or cholesterol esterification by acyl CoA: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) or cholesterol ester hydrolase (CEH). BAY o 2752 did not affect intestinal absorption of taurocholic acid (TC) from ileal segments perfused in vivo with a tragacanth suspension in phosphate buffer containing NaCl, TC, and 24- 14 C-TC as determined by the excretory rate of radioactivity in bile. BAY o 2752 also did not affect the uptake of TC into ileal everted sacs incubated in stirred, gassed Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer with 1 mM TC, 24- 14 C-TC and 3 H-inulin. BAY o 2752 also did not bind TC; TG, in a filtrate of the above solutions remained at 92-98% of control

  16. The effect of BAY o 2752 on bile acid absorption and cholesterol esterification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harnett, K.M.

    1988-01-01

    BAY o 2752 (N,N-(1,11-undecandiyl)bis(2,3-dihydro-2-methyl-1H-indole-1-carboxamide)) has been demonstrated to inhibit intestinal cholesterol absorption in rats. Studies were carried out on male Wistar rats to determine if this drug alters intestinal bile acid absorption or cholesterol esterification by acyl CoA: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) or cholesterol ester hydrolase (CEH). BAY o 2752 did not affect intestinal absorption of taurocholic acid (TC) from ileal segments perfused in vivo with a tragacanth suspension in phosphate buffer containing NaCl, TC, and 24-{sup 14}C-TC as determined by the excretory rate of radioactivity in bile. BAY o 2752 also did not affect the uptake of TC into ileal everted sacs incubated in stirred, gassed Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer with 1 mM TC, 24-{sup 14}C-TC and {sup 3}H-inulin. BAY o 2752 also did not bind TC; TG, in a filtrate of the above solutions remained at 92-98% of control.

  17. Pancreaticobiliary maljunction and biliary cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Kuruma, Sawako; Tabata, Taku; Chiba, Kazuro; Iwasaki, Susumu; Koizumi, Satomi; Kurata, Masanao; Honda, Goro; Itoi, Takao

    2015-03-01

    Pancreaticobiliary maljunction (PBM) is a congenital malformation in which the pancreatic and bile ducts join anatomically outside the duodenal wall. Japanese clinical practice guidelines on how to deal with PBM were made in 2012, representing a world first. According to the 2013 revision to the diagnostic criteria for PBM, in addition to direct cholangiography, diagnosis can be made by magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), 3-dimensional drip infusion cholangiography computed tomography, endoscopic ultrasonography (US), or multiplanar reconstruction images by multidetector row computed tomography. In PBM, the common channel is so long that sphincter action does not affect the pancreaticobiliary junction, and pancreatic juice frequently refluxes into the biliary tract. Persistence of refluxed pancreatic juice injures epithelium of the biliary tract and promotes cancer development, resulting in higher rates of carcinogenesis in the biliary tract. In a nationwide survey, biliary cancer was detected in 21.6% of adult patients with congenital biliary dilatation (bile duct cancer, 32.1% vs. gallbladder cancer, 62.3%) and in 42.4% of PBM patients without biliary dilatation (bile duct cancer, 7.3% vs. gallbladder cancer, 88.1%). Pathophysiological conditions due to pancreatobiliary reflux occur in patients with high confluence of pancreaticobiliary ducts, a common channel ≥6 mm long, and occlusion of communication during contraction of the sphincter. Once the diagnosis of PBM is established, immediate prophylactic surgery is recommended. However, the surgical strategy for PBM without biliary dilatation remains controversial. To detect PBM without biliary dilatation early, MRCP is recommended for patients showing gallbladder wall thickening on screening US under suspicion of PBM.

  18. Influence of the Biliary System on Biliary Bacteria Revealed by Bacterial Communities of the Human Biliary and Upper Digestive Tracts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuqiang Ye

    Full Text Available Biliary bacteria have been implicated in gallstone pathogenesis, though a clear understanding of their composition and source is lacking. Moreover, the effects of the biliary environment, which is known to be generally hostile to most bacteria, on biliary bacteria are unclear. Here, we investigated the bacterial communities of the biliary tract, duodenum, stomach, and oral cavity from six gallstone patients by using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. We found that all observed biliary bacteria were detectable in the upper digestive tract. The biliary microbiota had a comparatively higher similarity with the duodenal microbiota, versus those of the other regions, but with a reduced diversity. Although the majority of identified bacteria were greatly diminished in bile samples, three Enterobacteriaceae genera (Escherichia, Klebsiella, and an unclassified genus and Pyramidobacter were abundant in bile. Predictive functional analysis indicated enhanced abilities of environmental information processing and cell motility of biliary bacteria. Our study provides evidence for the potential source of biliary bacteria, and illustrates the influence of the biliary system on biliary bacterial communities.

  19. Sortilin 1 Loss-of-Function Protects Against Cholestatic Liver Injury by Attenuating Hepatic Bile Acid Accumulation in Bile Duct Ligated Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jibiao; Woolbright, Benjamin L; Zhao, Wen; Wang, Yifeng; Matye, David; Hagenbuch, Bruno; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Li, Tiangang

    2018-01-01

    Sortilin 1 (Sort1) is an intracellular trafficking receptor that mediates protein sorting in the endocytic or secretory pathways. Recent studies revealed a role of Sort1 in the regulation of cholesterol and bile acid (BA) metabolism. This study further investigated the role of Sort1 in modulating BA detoxification and cholestatic liver injury in bile duct ligated mice. We found that Sort1 knockout (KO) mice had attenuated liver injury 24 h after bile duct ligation (BDL), which was mainly attributed to less bile infarct formation. Sham-operated Sort1 KO mice had about 20% larger BA pool size than sham-operated wildtype (WT) mice, but 24 h after BDL Sort1 KO mice had significantly attenuated hepatic BA accumulation and smaller BA pool size. After 14 days BDL, Sort1 KO mice showed significantly lower hepatic BA concentration and reduced expression of inflammatory and fibrotic marker genes, but similar degree of liver fibrosis compared with WT mice. Unbiased quantitative proteomics revealed that Sort1 KO mice had increased hepatic BA sulfotransferase 2A1, but unaltered phase-I BA metabolizing cytochrome P450s or phase-III BA efflux transporters. Consistently, Sort1 KO mice showed elevated plasma sulfated taurocholate after BDL. Finally, we found that liver Sort1 was repressed after BDL, which may be due to BA activation of farnesoid x receptor. In conclusion, we report a role of Sort1 in the regulation of hepatic BA detoxification and cholestatic liver injury in mice. The mechanisms underlying increased hepatic BA elimination in Sort1 KO mice after BDL require further investigation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Hepatocyte MyD88 affects bile acids, gut microbiota and metabolome contributing to regulate glucose and lipid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duparc, Thibaut; Plovier, Hubert; Marrachelli, Vannina G

    2017-01-01

    performed microarrays and quantitative PCRs in the liver. In addition, we investigated the gut microbiota composition, bile acid profile and both liver and plasma metabolome. We analysed the expression pattern of genes in the liver of obese humans developing non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). RESULTS...... proliferator activator receptor-α, farnesoid X receptor (FXR), liver X receptors and STAT3) and bile acid profiles involved in glucose, lipid metabolism and inflammation. In addition to these alterations, the genetic deletion of MyD88 in hepatocytes changes the gut microbiota composition and their metabolomes...

  1. Outcomes and risk factors for cancer patients undergoing endoscopic intervention of malignant biliary obstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Haag, Georg-Martin; Herrmann, Thomas; Jäger, Dirk; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Schemmer, Peter; Sauer, Peter; Gotthardt, Daniel Nils

    2015-01-01

    Background: Malignant bile duct obstruction is a common problem among cancer patients with hepatic or lymphatic metastases. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) with the placement of a stent is the method of choice to improve biliary flow. Only little data exist concerning the outcome of patients with malignant biliary obstruction in relationship to microbial isolates from bile. Methods: Bile samples were taken during the ERC procedure in tumor patients with biliary obstruction. Clin...

  2. Plasma bile acids are not associated with energy metabolism in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brufau Gemma

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bile acids (BA have recently been shown to increase energy expenditure in mice, but this concept has not been tested in humans. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between plasma BA levels and energy expenditure in humans. Type 2 diabetic (T2DM patients (n = 12 and gender, age and BMI-matched healthy controls (n = 12 were studied before and after 8 weeks of treatment with a BA sequestrant. In addition, patients with liver cirrhosis (n = 46 were investigated, since these display elevated plasma BA together with increased energy expenditure. This group was compared to gender-, age- and BMI-matched healthy controls (n = 20. Fasting plasma levels of total BA and individual BA species as well as resting energy expenditure were determined. In response to treatment with the BA sequestrant, plasma deoxycholic acid (DCA levels decreased in controls (-60%, p

  3. Insulin suppresses bile acid synthesis in cultured rat hepatocytes by down-regulation of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase and sterol 27-hydroxylase gene transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Twisk, J.; Hoekman, M.F.M.; Lehmann, E.M.; Meijer, P.; Mager, W.H.; Princen, H.M.G.

    1995-01-01

    Evidence from in vivo studies indicates that the bile acid pool and bile acid excretion are increased in humans with diabetes mellitus and in experimental diabetic animals, and that both parameters return to normal levels after administration of insulin. To investigate the biochemical background of

  4. Lipoprotein cholesterol uptake mediates upregulation of bile acid synthesis by increasing cholesterol 7a-hydroxylase but not sterol 27- hydroxylase gene expression in cultured rat hepatocytes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, S.M.; Twisk, J.W.R.; van der Fits, L.T.E.; Wit, E.C.M.; Hoekman, M.F.M.; Mager, W.H.; Princen, H.M.G.

    1999-01-01

    Lipoproteins may supply substrate for the formation of bile acids, and the amount of hepatic cholesterol can regulate bile-acid synthesis and increase cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase expression. However, the effect of lipoprotein cholesterol on sterol 27-hydroxylase expression and the role of different

  5. Hepatic handling of a synthetic gamma-labeled bile acid (75SeHCAT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galatola, G.; Jazrawi, R.P.; Bridges, C.; Joseph, A.E.; Northfield, T.C.

    1988-01-01

    75 Se-homocholic acid-taurine ( 75 SeHCAT) is the first available gamma-labeled bile acid, and should therefore be handled more efficiently and specifically by the liver than previous hepatoscintigraphic agents. We have measured serum and hepatic kinetics for 75 SeHCAT, and compared them with those for the conventional hepatobiliary scintigraphic agent 99mTc-hepatoiminodiacetic acid, and with serum kinetics for the corresponding natural bile acid, [ 14 C]cholic acid-taurine. We used a dynamic scintigraphic technique and serial blood sampling in 8 subjects. Initial hepatic uptake rate was identical to initial serum disappearance rate (14% dose/min) for 75 SeHCAT, but significantly lower for 99mTc-hepatoiminodiacetic acid (6% vs. 14% dose/min, p less than 0.001). Hepatic transit time was shorter for 75 SeHCAT (13 min vs. 22 min, p less than 0.02), net hepatic excretory rate was more rapid (1.4% vs. 0.8% dose/min, p less than 0.001), and urinary excretion was lower (1.0% vs. 9.0% dose, p less than 0.001). Initial and late-plasma disappearance rates were significantly lower for 75 SeHCAT (14.3% and 1.5% dose/min) than for [ 14 C]cholic acid-taurine (21.3% and 2.8% dose/min, respectively), and plasma clearance was also lower (2 75 vs. 670 ml/min). In vitro, 75 SeHCAT was bound to serum proteins more completely than [ 14 C]cholic acid-taurine (90.4% vs. 86.5%, p less than 0.005). We conclude that 75 SeHCAT provides a hepatoscintigraphic agent that is handled more efficiently and specifically by the liver than the conventionally used agent 99mTc-hepatoiminodiacetic acid. It is not cleared from the serum as rapidly as [ 14 C]cholic acid-taurine, probably due to its stronger protein binding. The clinical value of 75 SeHCAT in assessing liver disease should be investigated

  6. Activation of transmembrane bile acid receptor TGR5 stimulates insulin secretion in pancreatic {beta} cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Divya P.; Rajagopal, Senthilkumar; Mahavadi, Sunila [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA (United States); Mirshahi, Faridoddin [Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Department of Internal Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA (United States); Grider, John R. [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA (United States); Murthy, Karnam S., E-mail: skarnam@vcu.edu [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA (United States); Sanyal, Arun J., E-mail: asanyal@mcvh-vcu.edu [Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Department of Internal Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA (United States)

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer G protein coupled receptor TGR5 is expressed in mouse and human islets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGR5 is coupled to activation of Gs and Ca{sup 2+} release via cAMP/Epac/PLC-{epsilon} pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation of TGR5 by bile salts and selective ligands causes insulin secretion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGR5 could be a potential therapeutic target to treat diabetes. -- Abstract: Bile acids act as signaling molecules and stimulate the G protein coupled receptor, TGR5, in addition to nuclear farnesoid X receptor to regulate lipid, glucose and energy metabolism. Bile acid induced activation of TGR5 in the enteroendocrine cells promotes glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) release, which has insulinotropic effect in the pancreatic {beta} cells. In the present study, we have identified the expression of TGR5 in pancreatic {beta} cell line MIN6 and also in mouse and human pancreatic islets. TGR5 selective ligands, oleanolic acid (OA) and INT-777 selectively activated G{alpha}{sub s} and caused an increase in intracellular cAMP and Ca{sup 2+}. OA and INT-777 also increased phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis and the increase was blocked by NF449 (a selective G{alpha}{sub s} inhibitor) or (U73122) (PI hydrolysis inhibitor). OA, INT-777 and lithocholic acid increased insulin release in MIN6 and human islets and the increase was inhibited by treatment with NF449, (U73122) or BAPTA-AM (chelator of calcium), but not with myristoylated PKI (PKA inhibitor), suggesting that the release is dependent on G{sub s}/cAMP/Ca{sup 2+} pathway. 8-pCPT-2 Prime -O-Me-cAMP, a cAMP analog, which activates Epac, but not PKA also stimulated PI hydrolysis. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the TGR5 expressed in the pancreatic {beta} cells regulates insulin secretion and highlights the importance of ongoing therapeutic strategies targeting TGR5 in the control of glucose homeostasis.

  7. Two distinct etiologies of gastric cardia adenocarcinoma: interactions among pH, Helicobacter pylori, and bile acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-ichi eMukaisho

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer can be classified as cardia and noncardia subtypes according to the anatomic site. Although the gastric cancer incidence has decreased steadily in several countries over the past 50 years, the incidence of cardia cancers and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC continue to increase. The etiological factors involved in the development of both cardia cancers and EACs are associated with high animal fat intake, which causes severe obesity. Central obesity plays roles in cardiac-type mucosa lengthening and partial hiatus hernia development. There are two distinct etiologies of cardia cancer subtypes: one associated with gastroesophageal reflux (GER, which predominantly occurs in patients without Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection and resembles EAC, and the other associated with H. pylori atrophic gastritis, which resembles noncardia cancer. The former can be developed in the environment of high volume duodenal content reflux, including bile acids and a higher acid production in H. pylori–negative patients. N-nitroso compounds, which are generated from the refluxate that includes a large volume of bile acids and are stabilized in the stomach (which has high levels of gastric acid, play a pivotal role in this carcinogenesis. The latter can be associated with the changing colonization of H. pylori from the distal to the proximal stomach with atrophic gastritis because a high concentration of soluble bile acids in an environment of low acid production is likely to act as a bactericide or chemorepellent for H. pylori in the distal stomach with H. pylori infection. The manuscript introduces new insights in causative factors of adenocarcinoma of the cardia about the role of bile acids in gastro-esophageal refluxate based upon robust evidences supporting interactions among pH, H. pylori, and bile acids.

  8. Effects of endogenous hydrogen peroxide and glutathione on the stability of arsenic metabolites in rat bile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yayoi; Hirano, Seishiro

    2008-01-01

    Trivalent arsenicals such as arsenite (iAs III ), monomethylarsonous acid (MMA III ) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA III ) are more toxic than analogous pentavalent compounds such as arsenate (iAs V ), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA V ) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA V ). It has been reported that arsenic-glutathione (As-GSH) complexes such as arsenic triglutathione (ATG) and methylarsenic diglutathione (MADG) are major metabolites in rat bile following intravenous administration of iAs III . Recently, we have shown that both ATG and MADG are unstable and easily hydrolyzed to iAs III and MMA III , respectively, and that MMA III is oxidized to MMA V in bile. In the present study we report the effects of H 2 O 2 and GSH on the stability of As-GSH complexes in rat bile. Male SD rats were injected intravenously with saline or iAs III at a dose of 0.2 or 2.0 mg As/kg body weight, and bile fluid was collected on ice for 30 min. To estimate the stability of As-GSH complexes in bile, ATG or MADG was added to untreated, heat-treated, catalase-treated, or dialyzed bile, and then incubated at 37 deg. C for 10 min. Concentrations of biliary H 2 O 2 and GSH in the higher dose group were 12.6- and 4.5-times higher than the control value, respectively. Exogenously added trivalent arsenicals were oxidized to pentavalent arsenicals in the bile depending on the biliary concentration of H 2 O 2 . Both catalase and dialysis prevented oxidation of trivalent arsenicals to the corresponding pentavalent compounds. Exogenously added GSH stabilized As-GSH complexes in bile. These results suggest that H 2 O 2 converts trivalent arsenicals to less toxic pentavalent arsenicals, whereas GSH prevents hydrolysis of As-GSH complexes and the generation of unconjugated toxic trivalent arsenicals

  9. Effect of ursodeoxycholic acid on bile secretion after endoscopic nasobiliary drainage in patients with cholestatic liver disease of various causes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Lei

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo observe the effect of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA on bile secretion in patients with cholestatic liver disease of various causes. MethodsA total of 48 patients who underwent endoscopic nasobiliary drainage (ENBD in Beijing You′an Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University from July 2013 to May 2014 were enrolled and divided into UDCA treatment group (n=36 and control group (n=12. The patients in the UDCA group were further divided into common bile duct stone group (n=9, cholangiocarcinoma group (n=7, sclerosing cholangitis group (n=7, and post-liver transplantation group (n=13. The patients in the UDCA treatment group received oral UDCA capsules (250 mg, 3 times/day since the second day after surgery, and the daily volume of bile drainage was recorded for 7 days after surgery. Serum levels of total bilirubin (TBil, total bile acid (TBA, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP were measured on the day before surgery and the 7th day after surgery, and the effects of UDCA on volume of bile drainage, TBil, TBA, GGT, and ALP were compared between groups. The t-test was applied for comparison between groups, comparison of continuous data between these groups was made by analysis of variance; the chi-square test was applied for comparison of categorical data between groups. ResultsCompared with the control group, the UDCA treatment group had a significantly increased volume of bile drainage on the 3rd, 4th, and 5th days after sur