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Sample records for bile reflux

  1. Bile Reflux

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the upper part of your small intestine (duodenum). Bile reflux into the stomach Bile and food mix ... properly, and bile washes back into the stomach. Bile reflux into the esophagus Bile and stomach acid ...

  2. Diagnosis of the bile reflux into the introhepatic biliary ducts using using radionuclide hepatocholecystography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mtvaradze, A.S.

    1984-01-01

    To reveal functional disorders of bile secretion 165 patients with diseases of gastrointestinal tract were examined. It was established that radionuclide hepatocholecystography enables to reveal dyskinesia of bile secretion, as well as bile reflux into the intrahepatic biliary ducts. Bile reflux into the intrahepatic biliary ducts is observed more often in patients with spasm of oddii sphincter and hyperkinetic dyskinesia of bile cyst

  3. Scintigraphic demonstration of bile reflux after gastro-intestinal surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gratz, K.F.; Creutzig, H.; Lieth, U. von der; Hundeshagen, H.

    1983-04-01

    Bile reflux may occur after a variety of reconstructive procedures in the gastro-intestinal tract and biliary system. The present paper deals with reflux into the duodenum, jejunum, stomach, oesophagus and into blind loops. The demonstration of reflux by sup(99m)Tc labelled IDA acid derivatives, and a possible quantitative approach, are discussed. The advantages of isotope methods are: 1. Direct demonstration of bile reflux without any intervention in the physiological process and with little trouble to the patient. 2. The ability to use the method for various reconstructive procedures and 3. the additional information obtained which may help in the differential diagnosis of blind loops, biliary obstruction, cholecystitis or liver metastases if there has been a gastrectomy for a malignant tumour. In combination with a second administration of a radio-isotope tracer, one may be able to demonstrate abnormalities in the motility of the stomach or gut, or pyloric stenosis or gastro-oesophageal reflux.

  4. Correlation Between Bile Reflux Gastritis and Biliary Excreted Contrast Media in the Stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Jong Jin; Yeom, Suk Keu; Shim, Euddeum; Cha, Jaehyung; Choi, Inyoung; Lee, Seung Hwa; Chung, Hwan Hoon; Cha, Sang Hoon; Lee, Chang Hee

    This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between biliary excreted contrast media in the stomach and the presence of bile reflux gastritis. Consecutive 111 patients who underwent both gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiography (gadoxetic MRC) and gastric endoscopy were included in this study. We performed a review of the gadoxetic-MRC image sets acquired 60 minutes after intravenous injection of contrast media and endoscopic images. We recorded amount of contrast media in the stomach. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of duodenogastric bile reflux diagnosis were evaluated for the gadoxetic MRC. Statistical analysis was performed using the Fisher exact test and the linear-by-linear association test. Among the 111 patients, 39 had 60-minute delayed images showing the presence of contrast media in the stomach. Of these 39 patients, 13 had bile reflux gastritis and 5 showed bile in the stomach without evidence of erythematous gastritis. Of the 72 patients who did not show contrast media in the stomach, none had bile reflux gastritis and 2 patients showed bile staining in the stomach without evidence of erythematous gastritis. Bile reflux gastritis was significantly more frequent in patients with contrast media in the stomach on gadoxetic MRC than in those without. Patients with high-grade extension of contrast media in the stomach had significantly frequent bile reflux gastritis than did those with low-grade extension. Biliary excreted contrast media in the stomach on 60-minute delayed gadoxetic MRC has a correlation with the presence of bile reflux gastritis on endoscopic examination.

  5. Nocturnal weakly acidic reflux promotes aspiration of bile acids in lung transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondeau, Kathleen; Mertens, Veerle; Vanaudenaerde, Bart A; Verleden, Geert M; Van Raemdonck, Dirk E; Sifrim, Daniel; Dupont, Lieven J

    2009-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and aspiration of bile acids have been implicated as non-alloimmune risk factors for the development of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) after lung transplantation. The aim of our study was to investigate the association between GER and gastric aspiration of bile acids and to establish which reflux characteristics may promote aspiration of bile acids into the lungs and may feature as a potential diagnostic tool in identifying lung transplantation (LTx) patients at risk for aspiration. Twenty-four stable LTx recipients were studied 1 year after transplantation. All patients underwent 24-hour ambulatory impedance-pH recording for the detection of acid (pH acidic (pH 4 to 7) reflux. On the same day, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was collected and then analyzed for the presence of bile acids (Bioquant enzymatic assay). Increased GER was detected in 13 patients, of whom 9 had increased acid reflux and 4 had exclusively increased weakly acidic reflux. Sixteen patients had detectable bile acids in the BALF (0.6 [0.4 to 1.5] micromol/liter). The 24-hour esophageal volume exposure was significantly increased in patients with bile acids compared to patients without bile acids in the BALF. Acid exposure and the number of reflux events (total, acid and weakly acidic) were unrelated to the presence of bile acids in the BALF. However, both nocturnal volume exposure and the number of nocturnal weakly acidic reflux events were significantly higher in patients with bile acids in the BALF. Weakly acidic reflux events, especially during the night, are associated with the aspiration of bile acids in LTx recipients and may therefore feature as a potential risk factor for the development of BOS.

  6. Evaluation of bile reflux in HIDA images based on fluid mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Rong-Chin; Huang, Wen-Lin; Fan, Yu-Ming

    2015-05-01

    We propose a new method to help physicians assess, using a hepatobiliary iminodiacetic acid scan image, whether or not there is bile reflux into the stomach. The degree of bile reflux is an important index for clinical diagnosis of stomach diseases. The proposed method applies image-processing technology combined with a hydrodynamic model to determine the extent of bile reflux or whether the duodenum is also folded above the stomach. This condition in 2D dynamic images suggests that bile refluxes into the stomach, when endoscopy shows no bile reflux. In this study, we used optical flow to analyze images from Tc99m-diisopropyl iminodiacetic acid cholescintigraphy (Tc99m-DISIDA) to ascertain the direction and velocity of bile passing through the pylorus. In clinical diagnoses, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is the main clinical tool for evaluating functional images of hepatobiliary metabolism. Computed tomography (CT) shows anatomical images of the external contours of the stomach, liver, and biliary extent. By exploiting the functional fusion of the two kinds of medical image, physicians can obtain a more accurate diagnosis. We accordingly reconstructed 3D images from SPECT and CT to help physicians choose which cross sections to fuse with software and to help them more accurately diagnose the extent and quantity of bile reflux. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Milk /sup 99/Tcsup(m)-EHIDA test for enterogastric bile reflux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackie, C.R.; Wisbey, M.L.; Cuschieri, A. (Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee (UK))

    1982-02-01

    The study and clinical assessment of enterogastric bile reflux has been restricted for want of a simple non-invasive test for its detection and quantification. This paper describes such a test in which biliary excretion scintigraphy has been combined with a milk meal provocation. Two of 10 healthy volunteers studied showed probable reflux of approximately 5 per cent of total initial abdominal field activity. Among 73 patients studied, 37 patients showed definite reflux of up to 47 per cent. Reflux occurred in 19 of 22 post-gastric surgery patients and in 7 of 22 patients with peptic ulcer disease, gastritis or gastro-oesophageal reflux. None of 7 patients with 'non-specific' abdominal pain showed any reflux, but 11 of 22 patients with gallstone disease or previous cholecystectomy showed reflux of up to 35 per cent, including 9 of 11 patients with loss of gallbladder reservoir function.

  8. Enterogastric reflux and gastric clearance of refluxate in normal subjects and in patients with and without bile vomiting following peptic ulcer surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackie, C.; Hulks, G.; Cuschieri, A.

    1986-01-01

    A noninvasive scintigraphic technique was used to estimate enterogastric reflux and subsequent gastric evacuation of refluxate in 35 normal, healthy subjects and 55 patients previously treated by vagotomy or partial gastrectomy. Reflux was provoked by a milk drink and quantitated by counting 99Tcm-EHIDA activity within the gastric area during gamma camera imaging. Seven normal subjects (20%) showed reflux of 5-18% of initial activity (mean: 10%), with peak values occurring at 5-30 minutes (mean: 14 minutes) following the milk. Gastric evacuation of activity in these subjects was monoexponential (r = 0.993, T1/2 = 24.1 minutes). Reflux occurred more frequently than normal in patients with truncal vagotomy and drainage (22/28 patients) and partial gastrectomy (20/21 patients). All of 16 patients with Billroth II anastomoses exhibited reflux, which was excessive compared with refluxing normal subjects (mean: 25%; p less than 0.01) and occurred later into the study (mean: 34 minutes; p less than 0.01). Ten of 11 asymptomatic patients showed reflux of similar amounts of activity (mean: 21%) compared with 16 patients who complained of bile vomiting (mean: 22%). However, asymptomatic patients exhibited gastric evacuation of refluxate at a rate similar to that of refluxing normal subjects, while bile vomiters showed significant gastric retention of refluxate at 25-30 minutes following peak gastric activity (p less than 0.05). This result confirms that post-operative bile vomiting is essentially a problem of gastric emptying

  9. Pepsin and bile acids in saliva in patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux - a prospective comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sereg-Bahar, M; Jerin, A; Jansa, R; Stabuc, B; Hocevar-Boltezar, I

    2015-06-01

    Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) and biliary duodenogastric reflux can cause damage to the laryngeal mucosa and voice disorders. The aim of this study was to find out whether levels of pepsin and bile acids in the saliva can serve as diagnostic markers of LPR. A prospective comparative study. Twenty-eight patients with LPR proven via high-resolution manometry and combined multichannel intraluminal impedance and 24-h pH monitoring and 48 healthy controls without symptoms of LPR were included in the study. In the patients with LPR symptoms, oesophagogastroscopy with oesophageal biopsy was performed. The levels of total pepsin, active pepsin, bile acids and the pH of the saliva were determined in all participants and compared between the groups. Reflux symptom index (RSI) and reflux finding score (RFS) were also obtained and compared. The groups differed significantly in RSI (P = 0.00), RFS (P = 0.00), the levels of bile acids (P = 0.005) and total pepsin in saliva (P = 0.023). The levels of total pepsin and bile acids were about three times higher in the patients with LPR than in the healthy controls. There was a significant correlation between the RSI and RFS score and the level of total pepsin and bile acids in the saliva. Histopathological examination of the oesophageal biopsy taken 5 cm above the lower oesophageal sphincter confirmed reflux in almost 93% of patients with symptoms. The study results show that the levels of total pepsin and bile acids in saliva are significantly higher in patients with LPR than in the controls, thus suggesting this as a useful tool in the diagnosis of LPR and particularly biliary LPR. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Relation between reflux of bile acids into the stomach and gastric mucosal atrophy, intestinal metaplasia in biopsy specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuhisa, Takeshi; Tsukui, Taku

    2012-05-01

    During endoscopic examinations we collected fluid in the stomach that included reflux fluid from the duodenum, and assessed the effect of quantitatively determined bile acids on glandular atrophy and intestinal metaplasia using biopsy specimens. A total of 294 outpatients were enrolled in this study. Total bile acid concentration was measured by an enzyme immunoassay. Glandular atrophy and intestinal metaplasia scores were graded according to the Updated Sydney System. An effect of refluxed bile acids on atrophy and intestinal metaplasia was shown in the high-concentration reflux group in comparison with the control group. However, when the odds ratios (ORs) were calculated according to whether Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection was present, no significant associations were shown between reflux bile acids and atrophy in either the H. pylori-positive cases or -negative cases. The same was true for intestinal metaplasia in the H. pylori-positive cases, whereas intestinal metaplasia was more pronounced in the high-concentration reflux group in the H. pylori-negative cases (OR 2.4, 95%CI 1.1-5.6). We could not clarify the effect of the reflux of bile acids into the stomach in the progression of atrophy. High-concentration bile acids had an effect on the progression of intestinal metaplasia in the H. pylori-negative cases.

  11. Comparative evaluation of intragastric bile acids and hepatobiliary scintigraphy in the diagnosis of duodenogastric reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Teng-Fei; Yadav, Praveen K; Wu, Rui-Jin; Yu, Wei-Hua; Liu, Chang-Qin; Lin, Hui; Liu, Zhan-Ju

    2013-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic value of a combination of intragastric bile acids and hepatobiliary scintigraphy in the detection of duodenogastric reflux (DGR). The study contained 99 patients with DGR and 70 healthy volunteers who made up the control group. The diagnosis was based on the combination of several objective arguments: a long history of gastric symptoms (i.e., nausea, epigastric pain, and/or bilious vomiting) poorly responsive to medical treatment, gastroesophageal reflux symptoms unresponsive to proton-pump inhibitors, gastritis on upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy and/or at histology, presence of a bilious gastric lake at > 1 upper GI endoscopy, pathologic 24-h intragastric bile monitoring with the Bilitec device. Gastric juice was aspirated in the GI endoscopy and total bile acid (TBA), total bilirubin (TBIL) and direct bilirubin (DBIL) were tested in the clinical laboratory. Continuous data of gastric juice were compared between each group using the independent-samples Mann-Whitney U-test and their relationship was analysed by Spearman's rank correlation test and Fisher's linear discriminant analysis. Histopathology of DGR patients and 23 patients with chronic atrophic gastritis was compared by clinical pathologists. Using the Independent-samples Mann-Whitney U-test, DGR index (DGRi) was calculated in 28 patients of DGR group and 19 persons of control group who were subjected to hepatobiliary scintigraphy. Receiver operating characteristic curve was made to determine the sensitivity and specificity of these two methods in the diagnosis of DGR. The group of patients with DGR showed a statistically higher prevalence of epigastric pain in comparison with control group. There was no significant difference between the histology of gastric mucosa with atrophic gastritis and duodenogastric reflux. The bile acid levels of DGR patients were significantly higher than the control values (Z: TBA: -8.916, DBIL: -3.914, TBIL: -6.197, all P Reflux: Y = 0.012TBA + 0

  12. Experimental pancreatitis in the rat: role of bile reflux in sodium taurocholate-induced acute haemorrhagic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, J. F.; van Gool, J.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1986-01-01

    Mortality of sodium taurocholate-induced acute haemorrhagic pancreatitis in the rat was prevented by biliary diversion. Bile reflux into the pancreas after the induction of pancreatitis is postulated to be a major factor affecting mortality of this popular model of acute pancreatitis. The reduction

  13. Intestinal metaplasia in patients with duodenogastric reflux and high total bile acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinol Jimenez, Felipe; Paniagua Estevez, Manuel; Perez Sanchez, Gloria

    2010-01-01

    The cytotoxic and cancerous action of bile acids on gastric mucosa is a very interesting subject within the gastroduodenal diseases due to they are able to alter the membrane, the cellular metabolism, to give rise to a inflammatory process, to increase the proliferation, the cell apoptosis and the DNA damage, that according to its intensity and persistence, favor the appearance of failures and mutations in cell replication. With the discovery and characterization of Helicobacter pylori it is considered that according to its intensity and the time of persistence in gastric mucosa provokes damages with failures and cellular mutations. In this sense, a prospective and descriptive study was conducted in the Institute of Gastroenterology in patients presenting with duodenogastric and high total bile acids to know the association between the intestinal metaplasia and the presence or not of Helicobacter pylori. Metaplasia was present in the 48.7 % of the 39 study patients, that there was a statistically significant association (p< 0.05) in Helicobacter pylori distribution in patients with and without intestinal metaplasia; that patients with duodenogastric reflux, despite of a histological lesion also had a greater frequency of negative results as regards the presence of Helicobacter pylori. In samples with histological diagnosis of severe and atrophic chronic gastritis, 75 %, respectively, had Helicobacter pylori and in consequence, there was a significant association between presence or not of microorganism and the chronic gastritis intensity. Intestinal metaplasia location was higher in antral region (84.3 %) and also with a higher ratio of microorganism positivity. In patients with duodenogastric reflux, presence of Helicobacter pylori don't seems to be associated with intense degrees of intestinal metaplasia, although the microorganism is present in all categories, but when there is not Helicobacter pylori, intestinal metaplasia to tend to develop in its less severe

  14. /sup 99m/Tc-HIDA dynamic scintigraphy for the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux of bile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bortolotti, M.; Bersani, G.; Labo, G.; Abbati, A.; Turba, E.; Pozzoto, R.

    1985-06-01

    In 5 patients with partial gastric resection and esophagitis, in whom esophageal pH metry was unable to demonstrate significant gastroesophageal reflux (GER), we administered i.v. 5 mCi (185 MBq) of /sup 99m/Tc-HIDA, the patient lying under a computer-assisted LFOV gamma camera. When gallbladder image was evident, caerulein was administered i.v. at a physiologic dose in order to induce gallbladder contraction, and in the subsequent 45 min the patient was asked to perform a standard series of manoeuvres that increase the intraabdominal pressure (Valsalva, etc.) and favour GER. Scintigraphic images and time/activity curves obtained from areas of interest corresponding to gastric remnant and distal esophagus showed that at least one of these manoeuvres in each case was followed by the appearance of the radiocompound in the distal esophagus, indicating a /sup 99m/Tc-HIDA-tagged bile GER. Consequently, we believe that HIDA-GER dynamic scintigraphy may be more useful than esophageal pH metry in demonstrating the bilairy origin of an esophagitis.

  15. The role of an alginate suspension on pepsin and bile acids - key aggressors in the gastric refluxate. Does this have implications for the treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strugala, Vicki; Avis, Jeanine; Jolliffe, Ian G; Johnstone, Lesley M; Dettmar, Peter W

    2009-08-01

    During a reflux event the oesophagus is exposed to a heterogeneous mixture of gastric juice components. The role of non-acid components of the refluxate in causing damage to the oesophagus is now well established but no therapeutic option exists to address this. The role of Gaviscon Advance (GA), a raft-forming alginate suspension, in protecting the oesophagus from damage by pepsin and bile acids (aggressors) was investigated using a series of in-vitro models. GA was able to dose-dependently inhibit pepsin activity over and above the neutralisation effect of the formulation. This was evident against both protein and collagen substrates using two distinct colorimetric assays. GA was able to retard the diffusion of pepsin and multiple bile acids using a Franz cell model. Using the raft-forming mode of action GA was able to remove both pepsin and multiple bile acids from a simulated reflux event. There was capacity in the GA raft to accommodate aggressors from multiple reflux events. GA can specifically remove both pepsin and bile acids from the refluxate, limit their diffusion and affect enzymatic activity of pepsin. There is a role for GA to reduce the damaging potential of the refluxate and thus protect the oesophagus.

  16. Bile dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harding, L.K.; Donovan, I.A.

    1986-01-01

    The availability of new biliary radiopharamaceutical led to the expectation that the physiology and the pathophysiology of bile would be resolved. Some aspects of the physiology of bile have clarified and it has been shown that nasogastric intubation does not cause bile reflux. Careful analysis of excretion patterns has allowed detection of obstruction of the bile duct after cholecystectomy, and the radiopharmaceuticals have proved helpful in the diagnosis of acute colecystitis. In chronic cholecystitis, however, varying results have been obtained. Information on the incidence and amount of reflux in normal subjects is also confused, since several different techniques have been used with widely varying results. The clinical value of biliary dynamic studies is at present limited in patients with chronic cholecystitis, peptic ulcer, or symptoms suggestive of bile reflux. More data, with appropriate control subjects, is required to identify abnormal reflux, determine its effects, and decide on appropriate treatment

  17. Rate of duodenal-biliary reflux increases in patients with recurrent common bile duct stones: evidence from barium meal examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Luo, Hui; Pan, Yanglin; Zhao, Lina; Dong, Junqiang; Liu, Zhiguo; Wang, Xiangping; Tao, Qin; Lu, Guohua; Guo, Xuegang

    2015-10-01

    Stone recurrence is a common late adverse event after ERCP in patients with common bile duct stones (CBDS). Duodenal-biliary reflux (DBR) is considered a major cause of CBDS recurrence. However, specific evidence is still lacking. To investigate the DBR rate in patients with recurrent CBDS after ERCP. A prospective case-control study. A tertiary center. During follow-up, patients with a history of either recurrent CBDS (recurrence group) or nonrecurrent CBDS (control group) were invited to participate in the study. All patients had previously undergone successful CBDS removal by ERCP. Patients in the control group were matched with the recurrence group by age and gender in a 1:1 ratio. Patients with gallbladder stones, hepatolithiasis, remnant CBDS, CBD strictures, or stents were excluded. Standard barium meal examination, MRCP, and enhanced abdominal CT. DBR. Thirty-two patients with a history of recurrent CBDS and 32 matched control subjects were enrolled. Baseline characteristics and parameters regarding the first ERCP were comparable between the 2 groups. The DBR rate was significantly higher in the recurrent than in the control group (68.8% vs 15.6%, P < .001). Multivariate analysis indicated that DBR (OR, 9.59; 95% CI, 2.65-34.76) and acute distal CBD angulation (OR, 5.48; 95% CI, 1.52-19.78) were independent factors associated with CBDS recurrence. DBR rates in patients with no, single, or multiple recurrences were 15.6%, 60.9%, and 88.9%, respectively (P < .001). Intrahepatic bile duct reflux was more common in patients with multiple recurrences. Small sample size. DBR is correlated with CBDS recurrence in patients who had previously undergone ERCP. DBR and acute distal CBD angulation are 2 independent risk factors related to stone recurrence. ( NCT02329977.) Copyright © 2015 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Relation between bile acid reflux into the stomach and the risk of atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia: a multicenter study of 2283 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuhisa, Takeshi; Arakawa, Tetsuo; Watanabe, Tetsuo; Tokutomi, Tadashi; Sakurai, Kouichi; Okamura, Seisuke; Chono, Shinji; Kamada, Tomoari; Sugiyama, Atsushi; Fujimura, Yoshinori; Matsuzawa, Kenji; Ito, Masanori; Yasuda, Mitsugu; Ota, Hiroyoshi; Haruma, Ken

    2013-09-01

    The relationship between bile acid reflux into the stomach and the risk of atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia is still not well understood. Towards obtaining a better understanding, concentrations of bile acids were measured. This study was carried out with the participation of 14 facilities in Japan, and 2283 samples were collected. The subjects with bile acid concentrations equal to or higher than the limit of detection were divided into four groups of equal size (group A: 0-25%, group B: 26-50%, group C: 51-75%, and group D: 76-100%). Thus, including the control group, there were five groups in total. The odds that the control group would develop atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia was set as 1,and the odds ratios (OR) in groups A, B, C and D were calculated based on the odds in the control group. Regarding the development of atrophic gastritis, no increased risk was observed in either the Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-positive or -negative cases. The OR for the development of intestinal metaplasia were significantly higher, for both cases with and without H. pylori infection, in group D. High concentrations of bile acid seem to be associated with an elevated risk of intestinal metaplasia. © 2013 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2013 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  19. The diagnostic value of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms and detection of pepsin and bile acids in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and exhaled breath condensate for identifying lung transplantation patients with GERD-induced aspiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reder, Nicholas P; Davis, Christopher S; Kovacs, Elizabeth J; Fisichella, P Marco

    2014-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is thought to lead to aspiration and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome after lung transplantation. Unfortunately, the identification of patients with GERD who aspirate still lacks clear diagnostic indicators. The authors hypothesized that symptoms of GERD and detection of pepsin and bile acids in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) and exhaled breath condensate (EBC) are effective for identifying lung transplantation patients with GERD-induced aspiration. From November 2009 to November 2010, 85 lung transplantation patients undergoing surveillance bronchoscopy were prospectively enrolled. For these patients, self-reported symptoms of GERD were correlated with levels of pepsin and bile acids in BAL and EBC and with GERD status assessed by 24-h pH monitoring. The sensitivity and specificity of pepsin and bile acids in BAL and EBC also were compared with the presence of GERD in 24-h pH monitoring. The typical symptoms of GERD (heartburn and regurgitation) had modest sensitivity and specificity for detecting GERD and aspiration. The atypical symptoms of GERD (aspiration and bronchitis) showed better identification of aspiration as measured by detection of pepsin and bile acids in BAL. The sensitivity and specificity of pepsin in BAL compared with GERD by 24-h pH monitoring were respectively 60 and 45 %, whereas the sensitivity and specificity of bile acids in BAL were 67 and 80 %. These data indicate that the measurement of pepsin and bile acids in BAL can provide additional data for identifying lung transplantation patients at risk for GERD-induced aspiration compared with symptoms or 24-h pH monitoring alone. These results support a diagnostic role for detecting markers of aspiration in BAL, but this must be validated in larger studies.

  20. Enterogastric reflux detection with technetium-99m IDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, A.; Pavia, J.; Loomena, F.; Abello, R.; Herranz, R.; Setoain, J.

    1985-01-01

    A Tc-99m IDA scan was performed in a patient with severe alkaline esophagitis subsequent to a Billroth I gastroenterostomy. The scan showed enterogastric reflux simultaneously with gastroesophageal reflux of bile. The study was recorded in a computer and the reflux quantitated

  1. Gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peptic esophagitis; Reflux esophagitis; GERD; Heartburn - chronic; Dyspepsia - GERD ... into the esophagus. This is called reflux or gastroesophageal reflux. Reflux may cause symptoms. Harsh stomach acids can ...

  2. Bile Duct Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Health Library / Diagnostics & Testing / Bile Duct Exploration Bile Duct Exploration Common bile duct exploration is a ... Test Details Results and Follow-Up What is bile, and what is bile duct exploration? Bile is ...

  3. Gastroesophageal reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmud, L.S.; Vitti, R.A.; Fisher, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    This paper deals with detection and quantification of gastroesophageal reflux. Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) generally refers to a symptom complex consisting of heartburn, regurgitation, and chest pain, the latter of which is often confused with pain of cardiac origin. Gastroesophageal reflux occurs when gastric or duodenal contents enter the esophagus. This phenomenon of symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux has been attributed to a variety of anatomic abnormalities, including loss of the acute cardioesophageal Angle of Hiss, widening of the diaphragmatic hiatus, loss of a normal gastric rosette formed by apposition of the gastric mucosal folds, disruption of the phrenoesophageal ligament, and conversion of the distal paraesophageal pressure from an intra-abdominal to an intrathoracic level. Lower esophageal sphincter (LES) dysfunction has been suggested as a major determinant of gastroesophageal competence. Quantitative scintigraphic studies of gastroesophageal reflux suggest that the LES pressure is the important determinant of gastroesophageal reflux, although some investigators have failed to confirm this role of the LES in gastroesophageal competence

  4. Gastroesophageal reflux and lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Keith C

    2015-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) can cause respiratory symptoms and may trigger, drive and/or worsen airway disorders, interstitial lung diseases and lung allograft dysfunction. Whether lifestyle changes and acid suppression alone can counter and prevent the adverse effects of GER on the respiratory tract remains unclear. Recent data suggest that antireflux surgery may be more effective in preventing lung disease progression in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis or lung transplant recipients who have evidence of allograft dysfunction associated with the presence of excessive GER. Additional research and clinical trials are needed to determine the role of GER in various lung disorders and identify which interventions are most efficacious in preventing the respiratory consequences of gastroesophageal reflux disease. In addition, measuring biomarkers that indicate that gastric refluxate has been aspirated into the lower respiratory tract (e.g., pepsin and bile acid concentrations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) may prove helpful in both diagnosis and therapeutic decision making.

  5. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Alkaline Reflux: the Mechanisms of the Development and Therapeutic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.D. Zviahintseva

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD — a pathology, which occupies a leading place among all acid-related diseases. The main mechanism of GERD is a violation of the motor-evacuation function of the stomach — slowing gastric emptying and duodenogastric reflux. Slow gastric emptying contributes to more frequent reflux, and the presence of duodenal contents in refluxate — alkaline reflux — is aggressive for the esophageal mucosa (EM. This is due to the presence of bile acids, lysolecithin and pancreatic enzymes in the esophageal refluxate. A long existing contact of aggressive factors in the stomach and the esophagus leads to the development of inflammatory and destructive lesions of the mucous membrane of these organs. According to many researchers, bile acids play a key role in the pathogenesis of the damaging effects on the EM. Drug correction of GERD with alkaline reflux includes, along with the administration of proton pump inhibitors, prokinetics (itopride hydrochloride and ursodeoxycholic acid preparations.

  6. How reflux causes symptoms: reflux perception in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijenborg, Pim W.; Bredenoord, Albert J.

    2013-01-01

    In gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms arise due to reflux of gastric content into the oesophagus. However, the relation between magnitude and onset of reflux and symptom generation in GERD patients is far from simple; gastroesophageal reflux occurs several times a day in everyone and

  7. Vesicoureteral Reflux

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the ureter if a child’s valve doesn’t work properly. The doctor provides the treatment using general anesthesia and a child can usually go home the same day. Secondary vesicoureteral reflux Doctors treat secondary VUR after finding the exact cause of the condition . Treatment may include surgery to ...

  8. Reflux in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    What are reflux (GER) and GERD? The esophagus is the tube that carries food from your mouth to your stomach. If your child has reflux, his or ... into the esophagus. Another name for reflux is gastroesophageal reflux (GER). GERD stands for gastroesophageal reflux disease. It ...

  9. Reflux in Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    What are reflux (GER) and GERD? The esophagus is the tube that carries food from your mouth to your stomach. If your baby has reflux, his or ... into the esophagus. Another name for reflux is gastroesophageal reflux (GER). GERD stands for gastroesophageal reflux disease. It ...

  10. Bile culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture - bile ... is placed in a special dish called a culture medium to see if bacteria, viruses, or fungi ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Body fluid - anaerobic culture. In: ... . 6th ed. St Louis, MO: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:225-226. Kim AY, ...

  11. Gastric Reflux on Routine Tc-99m DISIDA hepatobiliary Scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kang Wook; Lee, Heon Young [Chungnam National University College of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-06-15

    Reflux of bile and digestive enzymes from the small bowel and duodenum into stomach has been observed in patients with various gastroduodenal diseases. Tc-99m iminodiacetic acid derivatives hepatobiliary scan has been used as a noninvasive method to detect duodenogastric reflux. Sometimes, gastric reflux can be observed incidentally on routine Tc-99m DISA hepatobiliary scintigraphy. To evaluate the clinical meaning of gastric reflux on routine Tc-99m DISIDA hepatobiliary scan, we analyzed 36 patients showed gastric reflux incidentally on the routine Tc-99m-DISIDA hepatobiliary scintigraphy from December 1991 to June 1995 in Chungnam National University Hospital. The results were as follows: 1) The gastric reflux was observed in 2.3% of 1,553 cases of routine Tc-99m DISIDA Hepatobiliary scintigraphy for 43 months. 2) Nineteen percent of patients with gastric reflux had the past medical history of operations on stomach or biliary system. And that history was more prevalent in patients with reflux than those without reflux, significantly (p<0.01). 3) On fiberoptic gastroduodenpscopic examination, 87% of the patients with gastric reflux had the gastroduodenal diseases such as gastritis, gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer, gastric cancer, duodenal cancer and ampullary diverticulosis. We thought that the gastric reflux can be observed considerably in patients without any operation history on stomach or duodenum, although the operation history is more prevalent in patients with gastric reflux than those without reflux, significantly and most of patients with gastric reflux on routine Tc-99m DISIDA scan has various gastroduodenal diseases.

  12. Gastric Reflux on Routine Tc-99m DISIDA hepatobiliary Scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kang Wook; Lee, Heon Young

    1995-01-01

    Reflux of bile and digestive enzymes from the small bowel and duodenum into stomach has been observed in patients with various gastroduodenal diseases. Tc-99m iminodiacetic acid derivatives hepatobiliary scan has been used as a noninvasive method to detect duodenogastric reflux. Sometimes, gastric reflux can be observed incidentally on routine Tc-99m DISA hepatobiliary scintigraphy. To evaluate the clinical meaning of gastric reflux on routine Tc-99m DISIDA hepatobiliary scan, we analyzed 36 patients showed gastric reflux incidentally on the routine Tc-99m-DISIDA hepatobiliary scintigraphy from December 1991 to June 1995 in Chungnam National University Hospital. The results were as follows: 1) The gastric reflux was observed in 2.3% of 1,553 cases of routine Tc-99m DISIDA Hepatobiliary scintigraphy for 43 months. 2) Nineteen percent of patients with gastric reflux had the past medical history of operations on stomach or biliary system. And that history was more prevalent in patients with reflux than those without reflux, significantly (p<0.01). 3) On fiberoptic gastroduodenpscopic examination, 87% of the patients with gastric reflux had the gastroduodenal diseases such as gastritis, gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer, gastric cancer, duodenal cancer and ampullary diverticulosis. We thought that the gastric reflux can be observed considerably in patients without any operation history on stomach or duodenum, although the operation history is more prevalent in patients with gastric reflux than those without reflux, significantly and most of patients with gastric reflux on routine Tc-99m DISIDA scan has various gastroduodenal diseases.

  13. Quantitative radioisotope measurement of duodenogastric reflux in patients with ulcer or gastrectomized for ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyoedynmaa, S.; Paeaekkoenen, A.; Laensimies, E.; Korhonen, K.; Paeaekkoenen, M.; Aukee, S.

    1985-01-01

    In this work the duodenogastric reflux was quantified as the amount of radioactivity entering the stomach after an i.v. administration of sup(99m)Tc-HIDA in ulcer patients and in patients who had undergone BI gastrectomy. The results were compared with visual evidence of gastric activity in the gamma camera images and biochemical determination of gastric bile reflux. The method is useful in quantifying the reflux if the activity is above the background activity. It allows the determination of an upper limit for the reflux when the reflux is evident visually. Only two or three images are needed for the quantitation. No correlation was found between biochemical measurements of fasting bile reflux in the stomach and radioisotopic quantification. (orig.) [de

  14. Quantitative radioisotope measurement of duodenogastric reflux in patients with ulcer or gastrectomized for ulcer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyoedynmaa, S.; Paeaekkoenen, A.; Laensimies, E.; Korhonen, K.; Paeaekkoenen, M.; Aukee, S.

    1985-06-01

    In this work the duodenogastric reflux was quantified as the amount of radioactivity entering the stomach after an i.v. administration of sup(99m)Tc-HIDA in ulcer patients and in patients who had undergone BI gastrectomy. The results were compared with visual evidence of gastric activity in the gamma camera images and biochemical determination of gastric bile reflux. The method is useful in quantifying the reflux if the activity is above the background activity. It allows the determination of an upper limit for the reflux when the reflux is evident visually. Only two or three images are needed for the quantitation. No correlation was found between biochemical measurements of fasting bile reflux in the stomach and radioisotopic quantification.

  15. Laryngopharyngeal reflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Šereg-Bahar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 4–10 % of patients with gastroesophageal reflux (GER some atypical symptoms are found (cough, hoarseness, globus pharyngeus, dyspnea which are characteristic for laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR. The signs of LPR can be detected in more than 50 % of dysphonic patients. In the diagnostics of LPR, a meticulous history and a videoendoscopy of the larynx and pharynx are the most important procedures. The diagnosis of LPR can be confirmed by the 24-hour double probe pH monitoring and the treatment test with proton pump inhibitors. The best diagnostic results can be obtained with a combination of several diagnostic procedures.Conclusions: An otorhinolaryngologist can start a treatment test with proton pump inhibitors in a patient in whom a laryngopharyngeal reflux is suspected on the basis of history and laryngopharyngeal endoscopy. A successful treatment requires at least 12 weeks regimen with high doses 20 mg twice a day. In the case of alarm signs and unsuccessful treatment a gastroenterologic intervention is necessary.

  16. [Gastritis associated with duodeno-gastric reflux].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diarra, M; Konate, A; Traore, C B; Drabo, M; Soukho, A espouse Diarra; Kalle, A; Dembele, M; Traore, H A; Maiga, M Y

    2007-01-01

    Our main objective was to study gastritis associated to duodeno-gastric reflux. It is about a longitudinal study case/witness, paired according to the sex and the age. It was unrolled from February 2005 to January 2006 in the digestive diseases department of the hospital Gabriél Touré, and endoscopic centers of Promenade des Angevins, and clinique Farako. The patients profited from an upper digestive endoscopy to appreciate endoscopic aspect of gastritis associated to bile in the stomach mucus lake. The gastric biopsies were systematic. This study included 50 patients having gastritis associated to bile in gastric mucus lake compared to 50 patients having gastritis associated to clearly gastric mucus lake. The sex-ratio was 1.26 in favour of men. The average age of the patients was of 41.30 +/- 15.43 years. On the symptomatic hand, fetid breath was significantly met in duodeno-gastric reflux (p = 0.013). Potash consumption in the "tô" (millet cake) was significantly reported in gastritis associated to bile in gastric mucus lake (p = 0.042). The endoscopic aspects were comparable. Histological aspects of nonatrophic chronic gastritis were significantly mint in witnesses as well into the antrum as into the fundus (p = 0.0001 and p = 0.00023). The reactional gastritis aspect was the prerogative of duodenogastric reflux (p ranging between 10(-6) and 3.10 (-6). Helicobacter pylori infection was found comparable in the two groups (p = 0.297). Dysplasia although rare was found only in gastritis associated to duodeno-gastric reflux. Gastritis associated to bile in gastric mucus does not se,nm to have specific clinical, endoscopic and histological presentation. However the presence of dysplasia must have an attentive monitoring.

  17. Bile acid effects are mediated by ATP release and purinergic signalling in exocrine pancreatic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowal, Justyna Magdalena; Haanes, Kristian Agmund; Christensen, Nynne

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In many cells, bile acids (BAs) have a multitude of effects, some of which may be mediated by specific receptors such the TGR5 or FXR receptors. In pancreas systemic BAs, as well as intra-ductal BAs from bile reflux, can affect pancreatic secretion. Extracellular ATP and purinergic...

  18. Vesicoureteral reflux and reflux nephropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomsen, H.S.

    1985-01-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is mainly a primary phenomenon due to incompetence of the ureterovesical junction, mostly affecting a pediatric population. During micturition cystourethrography (MCU) reflux into the kidney - intrarenal reflux (IRR) - is occasionally seen. In areas with IRR the kidney surface may subsequently be depressed and the papillae retracted (reflux nephropathy (RN)). VUR may lead to hypertension and/or end-stage renal failure. Most commonly, VUR is discovered during evaluation for urinary tract infection, but it may also be present in patients with hypertension, toxemia of pregnancy, chronic renal failure and proteinuria, and it may be found in siblings of patients with VUR. For the time being VUR is demonstrated at radiographic MCU, whereas RN is diagnosed by demonstration of focal scars and of abnormal parenchymal thickness at urography. In children with VUR and no abnormalities of calyces or parenchymal defects standardized measurement of the parenchymal thickness at three sites may identify kidneys which are likely to develop focal scars. Quantitation of focal scarring should be performed in connection with a measure of the overall kidney size. The occurrence of IRR is dependent of the papillary morphology, intrapelvic pressure and urine flow. There may be an important relationship between renal ischemia and IRR in producing a 'vicious circle of deleterious effects' which, combined with parenchymal extravasation, may lead to RN. Treatment of VUR includes medical and surgical management. Since renal scarring may occur in infancy, prevention should focus on infants and young children. Infants and young children with severe VUR may have normal urograms. Therefore a MCU should also be performed, preferably with the recommended standardized technique. (orig.)

  19. Bile duct stricture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... duct, the tube that moves bile from the liver to the small intestine. Bile is a substance that helps with digestion. ... causes of this condition include: Cancer of the bile duct, liver or pancreas Damage and scarring due to a ...

  20. Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma) Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma) This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma). Use the menu below to ...

  1. Clinical efficacy of sucralfate in reflux esophagitis. Comparison with cimetidine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tytgat, G. N.

    1987-01-01

    Sucralfate has been evaluated in reflux esophagitis, based on its protective adherence to denuded surfaces, its bile salt-binding properties, and its cytoprotective properties. Histamine (H2)-receptor blockers are currently considered the standard therapy. The goal of this study was to compare the

  2. Respiratory Pathogens Adopt a Chronic Lifestyle in Response to Bile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reen, F. Jerry; Woods, David F.; Mooij, Marlies J.; Adams, Claire; O'Gara, Fergal

    2012-01-01

    Chronic respiratory infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality, most particularly in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients. The recent finding that gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) frequently occurs in CF patients led us to investigate the impact of bile on the behaviour of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other CF-associated respiratory pathogens. Bile increased biofilm formation, Type Six Secretion, and quorum sensing in P. aeruginosa, all of which are associated with the switch from acute to persistent infection. Furthermore, bile negatively influenced Type Three Secretion and swarming motility in P. aeruginosa, phenotypes associated with acute infection. Bile also modulated biofilm formation in a range of other CF-associated respiratory pathogens, including Burkholderia cepacia and Staphylococcus aureus. Therefore, our results suggest that GER-derived bile may be a host determinant contributing to chronic respiratory infection. PMID:23049911

  3. Reflux and GERD (in Children)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition Nurses Print Share Reflux GERD Reflux occurs during or after a meal when ... tube connecting the mouth to the stomach). Reflux & GERD The Difference Between Reflux and GERD in Kids ...

  4. Impact of gastro-esophageal reflux on mucin mRNA expression in the esophageal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Roon, Aafke H C; Mayne, George C; Wijnhoven, Bas P L; Watson, David I; Leong, Mary P; Neijman, Gabriëlle E; Michael, Michael Z; McKay, Andrew R; Astill, David; Hussey, Damian J

    2008-08-01

    Changes in the expression of mucin genes in the esophageal mucosa associated with uncomplicated gastro-esophageal reflux disease have not been evaluated even though such changes could be associated with reflux-induced mucosal damage. We therefore sought to identify reflux-induced changes in mucin gene expression using a cell line and biopsies from the esophageal mucosa in patients with and without reflux. MUC-1, MUC-3, MUC-4, and MUC-5AC gene expressions were investigated in the HET-1A cell line following exposure to acid (pH 4) and/or bile (120 muM of a bile salt milieu), and in esophageal mucosal biopsies from controls, subjects with non-erosive gastro-esophageal reflux, and subjects with reflux associated with ulcerative esophagitis (erosive). The mucosal biopsies were also evaluated for IL-6 mRNA expression (inflammatory marker) and CK-14 mRNA expression (mucosal basal cell layer marker). Gene expression was determined using real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis. In the cell line studies, there were differences in mRNA levels for all of the evaluated mucins following treatment with either acid or the acid and bile combination. In the studies which evaluated tissue specimens, IL-6 and CK-14 mRNA levels increased according to degree of reflux pathology. The expression of MUC-1 and MUC-4 in mucosa from patients with erosive reflux was lower than in subjects without reflux and in patients with non-erosive reflux, whereas the expression of MUC-3 and MUC-5AC was increased (although these differences did not reach significance at p reflux groups. The correlation between IL-6 and MUC-3 was significant within the control and erosive reflux groups, and the correlation between MUC-1 and MUC-5AC was significant within the erosive reflux group. The results of this study suggest that the profile of mucin expression in the esophageal mucosa is influenced by the pH and composition of the gastro-esophageal reflux. Further work should explore the

  5. Management of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyawali, C Prakash; Fass, Ronnie

    2018-01-01

    Management of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) commonly starts with an empiric trial of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy and complementary lifestyle measures, for patients without alarm symptoms. Optimization of therapy (improving compliance and timing of PPI doses), or increasing PPI dosage to twice daily in select circumstances, can reduce persistent symptoms. Patients with continued symptoms can be evaluated with endoscopy and tests of esophageal physiology, to better determine their disease phenotype and optimize treatment. Laparoscopic fundoplication, magnetic sphincter augmentation, and endoscopic therapies can benefit patients with well-characterized GERD. Patients with functional diseases that overlap with or mimic GERD can also be treated with neuromodulators (primarily antidepressants), or psychological interventions (psychotherapy, hypnotherapy, cognitive and behavioral therapy). Future approaches to treatment of GERD include potassium-competitive acid blockers, reflux-reducing agents, bile acid binders, injection of inert substances into the esophagogastric junction, and electrical stimulation of the lower esophageal sphincter. Copyright © 2018 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Bile acids induce necrosis in pancreatic stellate cells dependent on calcium entry and sodium‐driven bile uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowska, Monika A.; Gerasimenko, Julia V.; Gerasimenko, Oleg V.; Petersen, Ole H.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Acute biliary pancreatitis is a sudden and severe condition initiated by bile reflux into the pancreas.Bile acids are known to induce Ca2+ signals and necrosis in isolated pancreatic acinar cells but the effects of bile acids on stellate cells are unexplored.Here we show that cholate and taurocholate elicit more dramatic Ca2+ signals and necrosis in stellate cells compared to the adjacent acinar cells in pancreatic lobules; whereas taurolithocholic acid 3‐sulfate primarily affects acinar cells.Ca2+ signals and necrosis are strongly dependent on extracellular Ca2+ as well as Na+; and Na+‐dependent transport plays an important role in the overall bile acid uptake in pancreatic stellate cells.Bile acid‐mediated pancreatic damage can be further escalated by bradykinin‐induced signals in stellate cells and thus killing of stellate cells by bile acids might have important implications in acute biliary pancreatitis. Abstract Acute biliary pancreatitis, caused by bile reflux into the pancreas, is a serious condition characterised by premature activation of digestive enzymes within acinar cells, followed by necrosis and inflammation. Bile acids are known to induce pathological Ca2+ signals and necrosis in acinar cells. However, bile acid‐elicited signalling events in stellate cells remain unexplored. This is the first study to demonstrate the pathophysiological effects of bile acids on stellate cells in two experimental models: ex vivo (mouse pancreatic lobules) and in vitro (human cells). Sodium cholate and taurocholate induced cytosolic Ca2+ elevations in stellate cells, larger than those elicited simultaneously in the neighbouring acinar cells. In contrast, taurolithocholic acid 3‐sulfate (TLC‐S), known to induce Ca2+ oscillations in acinar cells, had only minor effects on stellate cells in lobules. The dependence of the Ca2+ signals on extracellular Na+ and the presence of sodium–taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) indicate a Na

  7. Bile Formation and Secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Bile is a unique and vital aqueous secretion of the liver that is formed by the hepatocyte and modified down stream by absorptive and secretory properties of the bile duct epithelium. Approximately 5% of bile consists of organic and inorganic solutes of considerable complexity. The bile-secretory unit consists of a canalicular network which is formed by the apical membrane of adjacent hepatocytes and sealed by tight junctions. The bile canaliculi (~1 μm in diameter) conduct the flow of bile countercurrent to the direction of portal blood flow and connect with the canal of Hering and bile ducts which progressively increase in diameter and complexity prior to the entry of bile into the gallbladder, common bile duct, and intestine. Canalicular bile secretion is determined by both bile salt-dependent and independent transport systems which are localized at the apical membrane of the hepatocyte and largely consist of a series of adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transport proteins that function as export pumps for bile salts and other organic solutes. These transporters create osmotic gradients within the bile canalicular lumen that provide the driving force for movement of fluid into the lumen via aquaporins. Species vary with respect to the relative amounts of bile salt-dependent and independent canalicular flow and cholangiocyte secretion which is highly regulated by hormones, second messengers, and signal transduction pathways. Most determinants of bile secretion are now characterized at the molecular level in animal models and in man. Genetic mutations serve to illuminate many of their functions. PMID:23897680

  8. Quantitative measurement of duodeno-gastral reflux with 99mTc-HIDA in the framework of stomach secretion analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauke, U.

    1982-01-01

    99m Tc HIDA was put into use first under standardized conditions in the framework of routinely carried out stomach secretion analyses in order to study the importance of bile reflux in stomach disorders. With this procedure a simple possibility is given in the area of stomach secretion analysis to test if there is a bile reflux to the stomach. Patients with fresh duodenal ulcers had significantly higher reflux rates than those with chronic Ulcus duodeni. After selective proximal vagotomy with submucal pyloro plastic the reflux rates sank in comparison to those before the operation. The color of the aspirate and the reflux values, measured by the here presented procedure, are directly correlated. (TRV) [de

  9. A Fiber Optic System For The Detection Of Entero-Gastric Reflux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falciai, R.; Baldini, F.; Conforti, G.; Cosi, F.; Scheggi, A. M...; Bechi, P.

    1989-01-01

    The study and the development of an optical fiber sensor for entero-gastric and non-acid gastro-esophageal reflux is described. The working principle, based on the spectrophotometric properties of the bile, which constitutes the main part of the reflux, differs from the traditional measurement method, based on pH monitoring. The measuring apparatus is described as well as experimental "in vitro" and preliminary "in vivo" tests are reported.

  10. Physiology of bile secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteller, Alejandro

    2008-10-07

    The formation of bile depends on the structural and functional integrity of the bile-secretory apparatus and its impairment, in different situations, results in the syndrome of cholestasis. The structural bases that permit bile secretion as well as various aspects related with its composition and flow rate in physiological conditions will first be reviewed. Canalicular bile is produced by polarized hepatocytes that hold transporters in their basolateral (sinusoidal) and apical (canalicular) plasma membrane. This review summarizes recent data on the molecular determinants of this primary bile formation. The major function of the biliary tree is modification of canalicular bile by secretory and reabsorptive processes in bile-duct epithelial cells (cholangiocytes) as bile passes through bile ducts. The mechanisms of fluid and solute transport in cholangiocytes will also be discussed. In contrast to hepatocytes where secretion is constant and poorly controlled, cholangiocyte secretion is regulated by hormones and nerves. A short section dedicated to these regulatory mechanisms of bile secretion has been included. The aim of this revision was to set the bases for other reviews in this series that will be devoted to specific issues related with biliary physiology and pathology.

  11. Bile acid sequestrants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Sonne, David P; Knop, Filip K

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized in the liver from cholesterol and have traditionally been recognized for their role in absorption of lipids and in cholesterol homeostasis. In recent years, however, bile acids have emerged as metabolic signaling molecules that are involved in the regulation of lipid...... and glucose metabolism, and possibly energy homeostasis, through activation of the bile acid receptors farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and TGR5. Bile acid sequestrants (BASs) constitute a class of drugs that bind bile acids in the intestine to form a nonabsorbable complex resulting in interruption...... of the enterohepatic circulation. This increases bile acid synthesis and consequently reduces serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Also, BASs improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Despite a growing understanding of the impact of BASs on glucose metabolism, the mechanisms behind their glucose...

  12. Gastroesophageal reflux - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100181.htm Gastroesophageal reflux - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features ... junction of the esophagus and the stomach prevents reflux of food and acid from the stomach into the esophagus. Review Date ...

  13. Mechanisms of Reflux Perception in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredenoord, Albert J.

    2012-01-01

    Patients with reflux symptoms often do not have excessive esophageal acid exposure, and patients with severe gastroesophageal reflux often do not have reflux symptoms. Understanding why different types of reflux induce symptoms in different patients is vital for addressing therapeutic gaps in the

  14. Secretin-stimulating MRCP in patients with pancreatobiliary maljunction and occult pancreatobiliary reflux: direct demonstration of pancreatobiliary reflux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motosugi, Utaroh; Ichikawa, Tomoaki; Araki, Tsutomu [University of Yamanashi, Department of Radiology, Chuo-shi, Yamanashi (Japan); Kitahara, Fumiaki; Sato, Tadashi [University of Yamanashi, First Department of Internal Medicine, Chuo-shi, Yamanashi (Japan); Itakura, Jun; Fujii, Hideki [University of Yamanashi, First Department of Surgery, Chuo-shi, Yamanashi (Japan)

    2007-09-15

    We propose the hypothesis that the enlargement of the common bile duct (CBD) or gallbladder (GB) that is occasionally demonstrated on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) after secretin stimulation is caused by pancreatobiliary reflux. Recently, occult pancreatobiliary reflux (OPR) has been demonstrated in patients without morphological pancreatobiliary maljunction (MPBM). The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of secretin-stimulating MRCP (SMRCP) in the diagnosis of pancreatobiliary reflux. The study included 14 patients with MPBM and 32 patients with a normal pancreatobiliary junction. OPR was evaluated by bile collection and diagnosed in seven of the 32 patients. All the patients underwent SMRCP; the related findings were considered positive when enlargement of the CBD or GB was observed. Positive findings on SMRCP were observed in all MPBM patients. In the patients with normal pancreatobiliary junction, there was significant difference between the mean amylase levels in the patients with positive and negative SMRCP findings (mean, 4,755.7 and 29.7 IU/l). The sensitivity and specificity of SMRCP for diagnosing OPR was 85.7% and 68.0%, respectively. SMRCP provides a non invasive method for excluding PBR and can identify patients who could benefit from bile duct sampling to diagnose OPR. (orig.)

  15. Bile sensor: from the lab to the market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldini, Francesco

    1999-12-01

    In 1988 the idea of measuring bile in the stomach and in the oesophagus via optical fibers was conceived and patented in collaboration with physicians from the University of Florence. The working principle is based on the spectrophotometric properties of the bile which contains some pigments with definite absorption properties. Bilirubin is the main pigment and it is characterized by an absorption peak in the blue region: therefore it is possible to detect optically the bile in the stomach by optically detecting bilirubin. The possibility of measuring bile reflux directly measuring the presence of bile represented a winning aspect in comparison with the traditional techniques (pH-metry, cholescintigraphy, bile acid assessment in aspirates); on the contrary the new technique had to overcome the traditional 'cultural' barriers constituted by the conservative attitude of clinicians concerning any innovative technology. The realization of the first laboratory prototype demonstrates the feasibility and validity of the proposed optical method. Then many years were necessary to arrive at the definitive and marketable product. The history of Bilitec 2000 is described, with the purpose to stress how a laboratory prototype is still very far from the market.

  16. Effect of Ursodeoxycolicacid in Treatment of Bile Gastritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kazem Nezam

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bile gastritis (gastropathy is a kind of gastritis which is caused by reflux of bile contents through duodenum on stomach. It can occur spontaneously without any former gastric surgeries which affect sphincter of pylorus. The positive impact of some certain drugs such as prokinetic agents e.g. metoclopramide, Proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs, cholestyramine and sucralfate in treating bile gastritis has been confirmed. This study has been conducted in order to analyze the effect of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA, which is a harmless drug, on patients with the bile gastritis. Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial, all patients with dyspepsia who were qualified to undertake endoscopy were enrolled and then 60 patients with bile gastritis were selected for the study. The patients were divided into two groups; a group was treated by UDCA, omeprazole and sucralfate and another one was treated with placebo, omeprazole and sucralfate for two weeks. Finally, at the end of the third week of treatment patients were examined.Results: A total of sixty 19-70 year-old patients (Mean: 46 years old included in this study. At the end of the study, there was not found any meaningful difference between the two groups in terms of pain intensity, heartburn intensity, severity of bloating, vomiting and early satiety; however, each group independently showed improvement of the mentioned indices after termination of the treatment (p=0.0005.Conclusion: Adding UDCA to the standard treatment (sucralfate is not clinically effective in curing the bile gastritis.

  17. Reflux and GERD in Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gastroenterology and Nutrition Nurses Print Share Reflux and GERD : Reflux and GERD in Infants Reflux and GERD in Infants It’s not uncommon for a baby ... happy, healthy childhood. Quick Facts about Reflux and GERD in Infants The majority of infants do not ...

  18. Duodeno gastric reflux in peptic ulcer disease: gall bladder emptying provoked by cholecystokinin or a fatty meal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harding, L.K.; Donovan, I.A.; Mosimann, F.; Drumm, J.; Alexander-Williams, J.

    1986-01-01

    A wide range of incidence of diodeno-gastric bile reflux has been reported in patients with duodenal ulcer (DU) or gastric ulcer (GU). Using either 100 units of CCK i/v or a fatty meal of 320 Cal containing 20 g fat to contract the gall bladder, we have investigated the incidence of reflux in 170 subjects: CCK (Control: 20; DU: 60; GU: 19), Meal (Control: 19; DU: 37; GU: 15). The CCK or meal was given in the supine subject 30 minutes after injection of 75 MBq sup(99m)Tc diethyl Hida. Reflux was considered present if labelled bile was seen in the stomach on 3 successive 2 minute gamma camera pictures. The percentage of patients showing reflux was as follows: CCK (Control: 45%; DU: 53%; GU: 58%), Meal (Control: 11%; DU: 24%; GU: 40%). These results have been compared using the Chi-squared test. There was no significant difference in the incidence of reflux between control, DU or GU patients either in the group of patients given CCK or a meal. However, reflux was more common after CCK than the meal in control subjects (p<0.05) and in those with DU (p<0.01) but not in those with GU. We conclude that the stimulus given to contract the gall bladder affects the incidence of reflux, and that any significant difference in reflux incidence of DU or GU patients may become apparent when more patients are studied. (Author)

  19. Scintigraphic estimation of the duodeno-gastric reflux in the unclerous disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopanski, Z.; Cienciala, A.; Micherdzinski, J.; Brandys, J.; Zastepa, P.; Witkowska, B.

    1993-01-01

    The analysis includes 58 patients with an ulcer in the duodenum, 40 patients with an ulcer in the stomach, and 13 persons making up the control group. In all patients submitted to the ratio-isotopic estimation of the duodeno-gastric reflux as well as to the chromatographic determination of the concentration of bile acids and lysolecithin in the gastric juice, an almost identically frequent occurrence of the reflux of the duodeno gastric contents into the ulcer of the stomach and of the duodenum was confirmed. It was shown that half of the ulcers of the stomach originate without the participation of the duodeno gastric reflux. It was also established that the average total concentrations of bile acids and lysolecithin are very high in the gastric juice, and in some even statistically significant cases, in the ulcer of the stomach in comparison with the remaining analysed groups of patients. (author). 17 refs, 4 figs

  20. Anti-reflux surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery. You may need another surgery in the future if you develop new reflux symptoms or swallowing ... Diseases of the esophagus. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  1. Gastroesophageal reflux disease - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peptic esophagitis - children; Reflux esophagitis - children; GERD - children; Heartburn - chronic - children; Dyspepsia - GERD - children ... GERD. Certain factors can lead to GERD in children, including: Birth defects, such as hiatal hernia , a ...

  2. Computed tomography of limy bile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Shinichiro; Kimoto, Masatoshi; Gunge, Nobuharu; Sano, Kaizo; Yamashita, Sachiko; Hirano, Yutaka

    1983-01-01

    The computed tomographic appearance of three cases of limy bile was reported. The CT findings consist of uniform high density within gallbladder, niveau formation between limy bile and noncalcified bile. Sagittal reconstruction of CT images was especially useful in the differentiation of limy bile and gallstones. (author)

  3. Pathophysiology and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohof, W. O. A.; Hirsch, D. P.; Boeckxstaens, G. E. E.

    2009-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is a physiological phenomenon but becomes pathological if troublesome symptoms and/or complications occur. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has different phenotypes ranging from non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), through reflux esophagitis and Barrett's esophagus, and

  4. Bile duct obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tumors that have spread to the biliary system Liver and bile duct worms (flukes) The risk factors include: History of ... Increased bilirubin level Increased alkaline phosphatase level Increased liver enzymes The ... CT scan Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography ( ...

  5. Food and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surdea-Blaga, Teodora; Negrutiu, Dana E; Palage, Mariana; Dumitrascu, Dan L

    2017-05-15

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a chronic condition with a high prevalence in western countries. Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation episodes and a decreased lower esophageal sphincter pressure are the main mechanisms involved. Currently used drugs are efficient on reflux symptoms, but only as long as they are administered, because they do not modify the reflux barrier. Certain nutrients or foods are generally considered to increase the frequency of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, therefore physicians recommend changes in diet and some patients avoid bothering foods. This review summarizes current knowledge regarding food and gastroesophageal reflux. For example, fat intake increases the perception of reflux symptoms. Regular coffee and chocolate induce gastroesophageal reflux and increase the lower esophageal exposure to acid. Spicy foods might induce heartburn, but the exact mechanism is not known. Beer and wine induce gastroesophageal reflux, mainly in the first hour after intake. For other foods, like fried food or carbonated beverages data on gastroesophageal reflux is scarce. Similarly, there is few data about the type of diet and gastroesophageal reflux. Mediterranean diet and a very low carbohydrate diet protect against reflux. Regarding diet-related practices, consistent data showed that a "short-meal-to-sleep interval" favors reflux episodes, therefore some authors recommend that dinner should be at least four hours before bedtime. All these recommendations should consider patient's weight, because several meta-analysis showed a positive association between increased body mass index and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Anti-reflux surgery - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stomach). Problems with these muscles can lead to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This surgery can also be done during a ... Anti-reflux surgery is usually done to treat GERD in children only after medicines have not worked ...

  7. Infant Reflux: Diagnosis and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and children, endoscopy is usually done under general anesthesia. Treatment Infant reflux usually clears up by itself. ... Has evidence of an inflamed esophagus Has chronic asthma and reflux Surgery Rarely, the lower esophageal sphincter ...

  8. Vesicoureteral reflux: A historical perspective

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    K.N. DeCotiis

    2016-12-28

    Dec 28, 2016 ... Abstract. The management of vesicoureteral reflux is a mainstay of pediatric urology. ... exponential relationship between number of urinary tract infections, .... dysfunction as an independent predictor of low reflux resolution.

  9. Radiologic studies on gastroesophageal reflux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Seung Gi; Kim, Kun Sang; Park, Soo Soung [College of Medicine, Chung Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1980-12-15

    Gastroesophageal reflux is generally recognized as the preponderant factor in the causation of the most cases of esophagitis and the accompanying symptom of pyrosis. In has been known that free gastroesophageal reflux is infrequent phenomenon but we observed gastroesophageal reflux during U. G. I. examination in 111 cases among 152 patients (73.3%) who had various gastrointestinal symptoms. Gastroesophageal reflux was most frequently induced in supine LAO position. The next frequent positions are erect position, RAO and supine position.

  10. Bile acid analysis in human disorders of bile acid biosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaz, Frédéric M.; Ferdinandusse, Sacha

    2017-01-01

    Bile acids facilitate the absorption of lipids in the gut, but are also needed to maintain cholesterol homeostasis, induce bile flow, excrete toxic substances and regulate energy metabolism by acting as signaling molecules. Bile acid biosynthesis is a complex process distributed across many cellular

  11. Bile acids for viral hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Liu, J; Gluud, C

    2007-01-01

    Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus has been reached regarding their usefulness.......Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus has been reached regarding their usefulness....

  12. [Update on gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra Pueyo, Jordi

    2014-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a highly frequent disorder classically characterized by the presence of heartburn and/or acid regurgitation that improves with drug therapy that reduces acid content in the stomach. However, especially in patients with non-erosive disease, response to proton pump inhibitors is unsatisfactory in approximately 1 out of 3 patients, and consequently, in these patients, it is important to establish a definitive diagnosis and an alternative therapeutic strategy. In the last few years, advances have been made in knowledge of the physiopathology of reflux, such as identification of the role of the acid pocket in producing reflux, technological advances that allow differentiation among acid reflux, non-acid reflux and slightly acid reflux, and advances in the treatment of reflux with drugs that attempt to act on the barrier function of the esophagogastric junction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  13. Gastroesophageal reflux disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kault, B.; Halvorsen, T.; Petersen, H.; Grette, K.; Myrvold, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    Radionucleotide scintigraphy and esophagoscopy with biopsy were carried out in 101 patients with symptoms strongly suggestive of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease. GER was visualized by scintigraphy in 86.1% of the patients. Endoscopic and histologic esophagitis were found in 68.1% and 58.4% of the patients, respectively, whereas both examinations taken together showed evidence of esophagitis in 82%. Histologic evidence of esophagitis was found in nearly all patients with severe endoscopic changes, and in 43.7% of the patients with no endoscopic abnormality. Scintigraphic reflux was demonstrated more frequently (p<0.05) in the patients with severe endoscopic esophagitis (97.5%) than in those with no or only mild endoscopic changes (78.6%). Scintigraphic reflux was found in 91.5% and 78.5% of the patients with and without histologic evidence of esophagitis (p=0.07). 15 of the 18 patients (83.3%) without endoscopic and histologic abnormalities in the esophagus had scintigraphic evidence of reflux. The present study strongly supports the clinical significance of scintigraphy in GER disease and confirms that esophageal biopsy specimens increase the sensitivity of endoscopic evaluation

  14. The bile acid composition of crane gallbladder bile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    1. The biliary bile acids of the whooping crane (Grus americana) and the Florida sandhill crane (G. canadensis pratensis) have been examined.2. Cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDOCA) and lithocholic acid were found in bile from both species of these North American cranes.3. CDOCA and CA were the primary bile acids in both species, together constituting 70% or more of the bile acids by weight.4. The primary bile acids of cranes appear to be the same as those that have been identified in other avian species.

  15. Refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Charumathi Raghu; Triadafilopoulos, George

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a condition that develops when the reflux of stomach contents into the esophagus causes troublesome symptoms, esophageal injury, and/or complications. Use of proton pump inhibitors (PPI) remains the standard therapy for GERD and is effective in most patients. Those whose symptoms are refractory to PPIs should be evaluated further and other treatment options should be considered, according to individual patient characteristics. Response to PPIs could be total (no symptoms), partial (residual breakthrough symptoms), or absent (no change in symptoms). Patients experiencing complete response do not usually need further management. Patients with partial response can be treated surgically or by using emerging endoscopic therapies. Patients who exhibit no response to PPI need further evaluation to rule out other causes. PMID:25274499

  16. Gastroesophageal reflux and pharyngeal function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekberg, O.; Lindgren, S.; Malmoe Allmaenna Sjukhus

    1986-01-01

    Pharyngeal function and gastroesophageal reflux were compared in 84 dysphagic patients examined clinically and radiologically. Cricopharyngeal muscle incoordination, assessed cineradiographically, was revealed in 5 of 41 patients (12%) without and 17 of 43 patients (40%) with gastroesophageal reflux assessed clinically (p<0.05). Thus, there was a postive correlation between dysfunction of the cricopharyngeal muscle and gastroesophageal reflux. There was no correlation with other types of pharyngeal dysfunction. Our results support the assumption of a positive relationship between gastroesophageal reflux and pharyngeal function in terms of cricopharyngeal dysfunction. The pathogenesis of this relation was, however, not revealed. (orig.)

  17. Gastroesophageal reflux and pharyngeal function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekberg, O.; Lindgren, S.

    Pharyngeal function and gastroesophageal reflux were compared in 84 dysphagic patients examined clinically and radiologically. Cricopharyngeal muscle incoordination, assessed cineradiographically, was revealed in 5 of 41 patients (12%) without and 17 of 43 patients (40%) with gastroesophageal reflux assessed clinically (p<0.05). Thus, there was a postive correlation between dysfunction of the cricopharyngeal muscle and gastroesophageal reflux. There was no correlation with other types of pharyngeal dysfunction. Our results support the assumption of a positive relationship between gastroesophageal reflux and pharyngeal function in terms of cricopharyngeal dysfunction. The pathogenesis of this relation was, however, not revealed.

  18. Bile Acid Metabolism and Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, John Y. L.

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are important physiological agents for intestinal nutrient absorption and biliary secretion of lipids, toxic metabolites, and xenobiotics. Bile acids also are signaling molecules and metabolic regulators that activate nuclear receptors and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling to regulate hepatic lipid, glucose, and energy homeostasis and maintain metabolic homeostasis. Conversion of cholesterol to bile acids is critical for maintaining cholesterol homeostasis and preventing accumulation of cholesterol, triglycerides, and toxic metabolites, and injury in the liver and other organs. Enterohepatic circulation of bile acids from the liver to intestine and back to the liver plays a central role in nutrient absorption and distribution, and metabolic regulation and homeostasis. This physiological process is regulated by a complex membrane transport system in the liver and intestine regulated by nuclear receptors. Toxic bile acids may cause inflammation, apoptosis, and cell death. On the other hand, bile acid-activated nuclear and GPCR signaling protects against inflammation in liver, intestine, and macrophages. Disorders in bile acid metabolism cause cholestatic liver diseases, dyslipidemia, fatty liver diseases, cardiovascular diseases, and diabetes. Bile acids, bile acid derivatives, and bile acid sequestrants are therapeutic agents for treating chronic liver diseases, obesity, and diabetes in humans. PMID:23897684

  19. Pulmonary Complications of Gastric Fluid and Bile Salts Aspiration, an Experimental Study in Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Samareh Fekri, Mitra; Poursalehi, Hamid Reza; Najafipour, Hamid; Dabiri, Shahriar; Shokoohi, Mostafa; Siahposht Khacheki, Ali; Shahrokhi, Nader; Malekpour Afshar, Reza; Lashkarizadeh, Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) is one of the most common digestive disorders that frequently lead to pulmonary complications due to gastric fluid aspiration. In the present experimental study, chronic aspiration of gastric fluid, its components and bile salts in rat lung was performed to find out the main factor(s) causing pulmonary complications of gastric fluid aspiration. Materials and Methods: Forty eight male rats weighted 250-300 g were selected in six groups. Afte...

  20. CHANGES IN THE BILE-ACIDS COMPOSITION OF BILE JUICE AFTER FAT INTAKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CRISTINA DINU

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available A high fat intake increases the flow of bile or changes the composition of bile acids in refluxed duodenal contents, and then plays an important role in the developmental precancerous lesion of BE and leading to esophageal adenocarcinoma EAC. Wistar rats were divided into three groups based on their diet: a control group (fed with standard diet, containing 4.20% soybean oil, a second group (fed with a low cowfat diet, containing 4.20% cow fat and the third group (fed with a high cow-fat diet, containing 16.8% cow fat. The TCA value detected in the animals fed the high cowfat diet (median concentration, 13.8 ± 2.42 mmol/L was significant increased comparative with those detected of animals fed the standard diet (8.15 ± 1.22 mmol/L. The TDCA value in the high cow-fat group (2.64 ± 0.97 mmol/L was significantly increased comparative with those detected of animals fed the standard diet (1.66 ± 0.50 mmol/L.

  1. EKSTRAHEPATIC BILE DUCT CANCER

    OpenAIRE

    Aleš Tomažič; Dragan Stanisavljevič; Valentin Sojar; Blaž Trotovšek

    2003-01-01

    Background. Malignant strictures involving the bile ducts remain a major challenge in biliary surgery. It is an uncommon cancer. The etiology is unknown, most cases are sporadic, but several conditions confer an incrised risk of developing cholangiocarcinoma.Clinical presentation and preoperative evaluation. The early simptoms are nonspecific. In the past computed tomography, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and angiography were considered standard investigations, but currently magne...

  2. Role of non-acid reflux in patients with non-erosive reflux disease

    OpenAIRE

    Karamanolis, Georgios P.; Tutuian, Radu

    2013-01-01

    Non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) is the most common presentation of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Although acid reflux is the most important cause of symptom generation in NERD patients, non-acid reflux is also associated with reflux symptoms. The temporal relation between symptoms and reflux episodes is of importance in evaluating the results of combined pH-impedance monitoring in NERD patients. Mucosal hypersensitivity and mechanical stimulation due to great volume of non-acid reflux ar...

  3. Profiles of bile acids and their glucuronide and sulphate conjugates in the serum, urine and bile from patients undergoing bile drainage.

    OpenAIRE

    Takikawa, H; Beppu, T; Seyama, Y

    1985-01-01

    Bile acid profiles in serum, urine, and bile from patients undergoing bile drainage and the changes of serum bile acids after bile drainage were studied. Bile acids were separated into non-glucuronidate-non-sulphate, glucuronidated, and sulphated fractions and were measured by mass fragmentography using conjugates of deuterium labelled bile acids as internal standards. Glucuronidated and sulphated bile acids contribute 14-32% and 16-44% of serum bile acids, 4-11% and 61-82% of urine bile acid...

  4. Increased Bile Acid Synthesis and Impaired Bile Acid Transport in Human Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Haeusler, Rebecca A.; Camastra, Stefania; Nannipieri, Monica; Astiarraga, Brenno; Castro-Perez, Jose; Xie, Dan; Wang, Liangsu; Chakravarthy, Manu; Ferrannini, Ele

    2015-01-01

    We measured plasma bile acids, markers of bile acid synthesis, and expression of bile acid transporters in obese and nonobese subjects. We found that obesity was associated with increased bile acid synthesis and 12-hydroxylation, blunted response of plasma bile acids to insulin infusion or a mixed meal, and decreased expression of liver bile acid transporters.

  5. Proton pump inhibitor-refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease: challenges and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mermelstein, Joseph; Chait Mermelstein, Alanna; Chait, Maxwell M

    2018-01-01

    A significant percentage of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) will not respond to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. The causes of PPI-refractory GERD are numerous and diverse, and include adherence, persistent acid, functional disorders, nonacid reflux, and PPI bioavailability. The evaluation should start with a symptom assessment and may progress to imaging, endoscopy, and monitoring of esophageal pH, impedance, and bilirubin. There are a variety of pharmacologic and procedural interventions that should be selected based on the underlying mechanism of PPI failure. Pharmacologic treatments can include antacids, prokinetics, alginates, bile acid binders, reflux inhibitors, and antidepressants. Procedural options include laparoscopic fundoplication and LINX as well as endoscopic procedures, such as transoral incisionless fundoplication and Stretta. Several alternative and complementary treatments of possible benefit also exist. PMID:29606884

  6. Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredenoord, Albert J.; Pandolfino, John E.; Smout, André J. P. M.

    2013-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is one of the most common disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Over past decades, considerable shifts in thinking about the disease have taken place. At a time when radiology was the only diagnostic test available, reflux disease was regarded as synonymous with

  7. Gastroesophageal and biliary reflux. 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bares, Roland; Buell, Udalrich

    1991-01-01

    After a brief recapitulation of reflux pathogenesis, this review presents the state of the art of nuclear medicine techniques to diagnose gastroesophageal or duodenogastric reflux, as well as a summary of clinical results and considerations about indication. (author).53 refs.; 5 figs.; 8 tabs

  8. Infant apnea and gastroesophageal reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, H.; Lallemand, P.

    1992-01-01

    The value of a combination of ultrasound studies and barium swallow examination in the analysis of temporal relationships between apnea and reflux is demonstrated. The two techniques allow acute apneic spells induced by gastrosophageal reflux to be documented and underlying specific digestive tract disorders demonstrated. The high incidence of digestive tract disorders in this area has been identified. (orig.)

  9. Infant apnea and gastroesophageal reflux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, H.; Lallemand, P. (AMH, 51 - Reims (France). Service d' Imagerie Pediatrique)

    1992-04-01

    The value of a combination of ultrasound studies and barium swallow examination in the analysis of temporal relationships between apnea and reflux is demonstrated. The two techniques allow acute apneic spells induced by gastrosophageal reflux to be documented and underlying specific digestive tract disorders demonstrated. The high incidence of digestive tract disorders in this area has been identified. (orig.).

  10. Pathophysiology of gastro-esophageal reflux disease: a role for mucosa integrity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré, R

    2013-10-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is very prevalent and has a high burden on health security system costs. Nevertheless, pathophysiology is complex and not well-understood. Several mechanisms have been proposed: decreased salivation, impaired esophageal clearance, decreased lower esophageal sphincter pressure resting tone, presence of hiatal hernia, increased number of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs), increased acid, and pepsin secretion, pyloric incompetence provoking duodeno-gastro-esophageal reflux of bile acids and trypsin. Independent of the relevance of each mechanism, the ultimate phenomenon is that mucosal epithelium is exposed for a longer time to agents as acid and pepsin or is in contact to luminal agents not commonly present in gastric refluxate as trypsin or bile acids. This leads to a visible damage of the epithelium (erosive esophagitis -EE) or impairing mucosal integrity without any sign of macroscopic alteration as occurs in non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). Luminal factors are not the only responsible for such impairment; more recent data indicate that endogenous factors may also play a role. This review will update the most recent findings on the putative pathophysiological mechanisms and specially will focus on the role of esophageal mucosal integrity in GERD. Methodologies used for the evaluation of mucosal integrity, its relevance in EE and NERD, its involvement in symptoms perception and the effect of luminal and endogenous factors will be discussed. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Vesicoureteric reflux in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jameela A Kari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed to identify the differences between primary and secondary vesicoureteric reflux (VUR and the effect of associated bladder abnormalities on kidney function. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of children with VUR who were followed up at King Abdulaziz University Hospital from January 2005 to December 2010. The review included results of radiological investigations and kidney function tests. We used Chi-square test for statistical analysis and paired t-test to compare group means for initial and last creatinine levels. Results: Ninety-nine children were included in this study. Twenty (20.2% had primary VUR, 11 had high-grade VUR, while 9 had low-grade reflux. All children with low-grade VUR had normal dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA. Renal scars were present in 72% of the children with high-grade VUR. The mean creatinine levels (initial and last for both groups were normal. Seventy-nine (79.8% children had secondary VUR, which was due to posterior urethral valves (PUV (46.8%, neurogenic bladder caused by meningomyelocele (25.3%, non-neurogenic neurogenic bladder (NNB (21.5%, or neurogenic bladder associated with prune belly syndrome (6.3%. Children with NNB, meningomyelocele and PUV had high creatinine at presentation with no considerable worsening of their kidney functions during the last visit. Renal scars were present in 49.4% of the children with secondary VUR. Conclusion: Children with primary VUR and normal bladder had good-functioning kidneys, while those with secondary VUR associated with abnormal bladder caused by NNB, spina bifida or PUV had abnormal kidney functions. DMSA scans were useful in predicting higher grades of VUR in children with primary reflux.

  12. Bile Gastritis Following Laparoscopic Single Anastomosis Gastric Bypass: Pilot Study to Assess Significance of Bilirubin Level in Gastric Aspirate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenouda, Michael M; Harb, Shady ElGhazaly; Mikhail, Sameh A A; Mokhtar, Sherif M; Osman, Ayman M A; Wassef, Arsany T S; Rizkallah, Nayer N H; Milad, Nader M; Anis, Shady E; Nabil, Tamer Mohamed; Zaki, Nader Sh; Halepian, Antoine

    2018-02-01

    Laparoscopic single anastomosis gastric bypass (SAGB) is increasingly performed for morbidly obese patients. This pilot study aims primarily at evaluating the incidence of bile gastritis after SAGB. The occurrence of reflux oesophagitis and reflux symptoms were also assessed. This study included 20 patients having no reflux symptoms. All patients underwent a SAGB as a primary bariatric procedure by a single surgeon. Patients included consented to have an upper GI endoscopy done at 6 months postoperatively. Gastric aspirate was sent for bilirubin level assessment. Gastric and esophageal biopsies were submitted for histopathology and campylobacter-like organism (CLO) test. In our study, the rate of bile gastritis was 30%. In 18 patients, the level of bilirubin in gastric aspirate seems to be related to the degree of mucosal inflammation. The remaining two patients had microscopic moderate to severe gastritis with normal aspirate bilirubin level. Two patients with bilirubin level in aspirate more than 20 mg/dl had severe oesophagitis, gastritis with erosions, and metaplasia. Relationship between bilirubin level and histopathological findings of gastric biopsy examination was statistically significant with a P value of 0.001. The incidence of bile gastritis in this cohort is higher than reported in the literature, and this may be worrying. The correlation between endoscopic findings and patients' symptoms is poor. Bilirubin level and pH in aspirate might be useful tools to confirm alkaline reflux. Its level might help to choose candidates for revision surgery after SAGB. This needs further validation with larger sample size.

  13. Bile produced in the liver (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... duct system that creates, transports, stores, and releases bile into the duodenum for digestion includes the liver, gallbladder, and bile ducts (named the cystic, hepatic, common, and pancreatic ...

  14. Two distinct etiologies of gastric cardia adenocarcinoma: interactions among pH, Helicobacter pylori, and bile acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-ichi eMukaisho

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer can be classified as cardia and noncardia subtypes according to the anatomic site. Although the gastric cancer incidence has decreased steadily in several countries over the past 50 years, the incidence of cardia cancers and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC continue to increase. The etiological factors involved in the development of both cardia cancers and EACs are associated with high animal fat intake, which causes severe obesity. Central obesity plays roles in cardiac-type mucosa lengthening and partial hiatus hernia development. There are two distinct etiologies of cardia cancer subtypes: one associated with gastroesophageal reflux (GER, which predominantly occurs in patients without Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection and resembles EAC, and the other associated with H. pylori atrophic gastritis, which resembles noncardia cancer. The former can be developed in the environment of high volume duodenal content reflux, including bile acids and a higher acid production in H. pylori–negative patients. N-nitroso compounds, which are generated from the refluxate that includes a large volume of bile acids and are stabilized in the stomach (which has high levels of gastric acid, play a pivotal role in this carcinogenesis. The latter can be associated with the changing colonization of H. pylori from the distal to the proximal stomach with atrophic gastritis because a high concentration of soluble bile acids in an environment of low acid production is likely to act as a bactericide or chemorepellent for H. pylori in the distal stomach with H. pylori infection. The manuscript introduces new insights in causative factors of adenocarcinoma of the cardia about the role of bile acids in gastro-esophageal refluxate based upon robust evidences supporting interactions among pH, H. pylori, and bile acids.

  15. Bile acids for viral hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Liu, J; Gluud, C

    2003-01-01

    The viral hepatitides are common causes of liver diseases globally. Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus was reached regarding their usefulness.......The viral hepatitides are common causes of liver diseases globally. Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus was reached regarding their usefulness....

  16. Endocrine functions of bile acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houten, Sander M.; Watanabe, Mitsuhiro; Auwerx, Johan

    2006-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs), a group of structurally diverse molecules that are primarily synthesized in the liver from cholesterol, are the chief components of bile. Besides their well-established roles in dietary lipid absorption and cholesterol homeostasis, it has recently emerged that BAs are also

  17. [Impact of reflux on the kidney].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollard, P; Louis, D; Basset, T

    1984-03-01

    Description of the reflux nephropathy. Pyelonephritis lesions are undoubtedly linked to the vesico-ureteric reflux. The role of the intra-renal reflux ( Hodson ) and the Big Bang Theory ( Ransley ) are discussed as the data from animal experiments. The role of the sterile reflux and of the segmental hypoplasia is relatively less important. The actual management of vesico-ureteric reflux treatment is questioned.

  18. Symptom perception in gastroesophageal reflux disease is dependent on spatiotemporal reflux characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weusten, B. L.; Akkermans, L. M.; vanBerge-Henegouwen, G. P.; Smout, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: The mechanisms responsible for the development of symptoms in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are poorly understood. The aims of this study were to identify differences in spatiotemporal reflux characteristics (proximal extent and duration of reflux episodes, ascending

  19. Proinflammatory cytokines and bile acids upregulate ΔNp73 protein, an inhibitor of p53 and p73 tumor suppressors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Zaika

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is the main etiological factor behind the recent rapid increase in the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma. During reflux, esophageal cells are exposed to bile at low pH resulting in cellular damage and inflammation, which are known to facilitate cancer development. In this study, we investigated the regulation of p73 isoform, ΔNp73α, in the reflux condition. Previous studies have reported that ΔNp73 exhibits anti-apoptotic and oncogenic properties through inhibition of p53 and p73 proteins. We found that direct exposure of esophageal cells to bile acids in an acidic environment alters the phosphorylation of ΔNp73, its subcellular localization and increases ΔNp73 protein levels. Upregulation of ΔNp73 was also observed in esophageal tissues collected from patients with GERD and Barrett's metaplasia, a precancerous lesion in the esophagus associated with gastric reflux. c-Abl, p38 MAPK, and IKK protein kinases were identified to interact in the regulation of ΔNp73. Their inhibition with chemotherapeutic agents and siRNA suppresses ΔNp73. We also found that pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-1β and TNFα, are potent inducers of ΔNp73α, which further enhance the bile acids/acid effect. Combined, our studies provide evidence that gastroesophageal reflux alters the regulation of oncogenic ΔNp73 isoform that may facilitate tumorigenic transformation of esophageal metaplastic epithelium.

  20. Bile Acid Metabolism in Liver Pathobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, John Y. L.; Ferrell, Jessica M.

    2018-01-01

    Bile acids facilitate intestinal nutrient absorption and biliary cholesterol secretion to maintain bile acid homeostasis, which is essential for protecting liver and other tissues and cells from cholesterol and bile acid toxicity. Bile acid metabolism is tightly regulated by bile acid synthesis in the liver and bile acid biotransformation in the intestine. Bile acids are endogenous ligands that activate a complex network of nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor and membrane G protein-coupled bile acid receptor-1 to regulate hepatic lipid and glucose metabolic homeostasis and energy metabolism. The gut-to-liver axis plays a critical role in the regulation of enterohepatic circulation of bile acids, bile acid pool size, and bile acid composition. Bile acids control gut bacteria overgrowth, and gut bacteria metabolize bile acids to regulate host metabolism. Alteration of bile acid metabolism by high-fat diets, sleep disruption, alcohol, and drugs reshapes gut microbiome and causes dysbiosis, obesity, and metabolic disorders. Gender differences in bile acid metabolism, FXR signaling, and gut microbiota have been linked to higher prevalence of fatty liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma in males. Alteration of bile acid homeostasis contributes to cholestatic liver diseases, inflammatory diseases in the digestive system, obesity, and diabetes. Bile acid-activated receptors are potential therapeutic targets for developing drugs to treat metabolic disorders. PMID:29325602

  1. Scintigraphic estimation of the duodeno-gastric reflux in the unclerous disease; Scyntygraficzna ocena refluksu dwunastniczo-zoladkowego w chorobie wrzodowej

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopanski, Z.; Cienciala, A.; Micherdzinski, J. [Szpital Wojskowy, Cracow (Poland); Brandys, J. [Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, Cracow (Poland); Zastepa, P.; Witkowska, B.

    1993-12-31

    The analysis includes 58 patients with an ulcer in the duodenum, 40 patients with an ulcer in the stomach, and 13 persons making up the control group. In all patients submitted to the ratio-isotopic estimation of the duodeno-gastric reflux as well as to the chromatographic determination of the concentration of bile acids and lysolecithin in the gastric juice, an almost identically frequent occurrence of the reflux of the duodeno gastric contents into the ulcer of the stomach and of the duodenum was confirmed. It was shown that half of the ulcers of the stomach originate without the participation of the duodeno gastric reflux. It was also established that the average total concentrations of bile acids and lysolecithin are very high in the gastric juice, and in some even statistically significant cases, in the ulcer of the stomach in comparison with the remaining analysed groups of patients. (author). 17 refs, 4 figs.

  2. Scintigraphic evaluation of gastroesophageal reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmud, L.S.; Fisher, R.S.

    1983-01-01

    When patients have symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease, their symptoms usually respond to conventional therapeutic measures. In some patients, however, the symptoms may persist despite the application of standard treatment regimens. It is in these instances that the clinician may employ extensive diagnostic tests to determine the cause of the patient's complaints. Because the introduction of gastroesophageal scintigraphy, a number of other techniques were employed to evaluate gastroesophageal reflux. These include barium esophagography, barium cineesophagography; endoscopy; esophageal mucosal biopsy; esophageal manometry; the acid-clearance test; and acid-reflux testing. Each of the nonscintigraphic techniques has a limitation either in its sensitivity or in the requirement for endogastric intubation. In addition, with the exception of the scintigraphic method, none of the tests permits quantitation of reflux

  3. Changes in cholangiocyte bile salt transporter expression and bile duct injury after orthotopic liver transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, H.; Op Den Dries, S.; Buis, C.I.; Khan, A.A.; Gouw, A.S.H.; Groothuis, G.M.M.; Lisman, T.; Porte, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Bile salts have been shown to contribute to bile duct injury after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Cholangiocytes modify bile composition by reabsorption of bile salts (cholehepatic shunt) and contribute to bile flow by active secretion of sodium and water via cystic fibrosis

  4. Electro-chromograms of human bile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschure, J.C.M.

    1956-01-01

    Fivefold diagrams of concentrated samples of human bile were obtained with paper electrophoresis. In these diagrams were distinguished by means of various staining methods: proteins, lipids, bile pigments, bile acids and cholesterol. The series of diagrams from each bile sample thus obtained is

  5. Gastroesophageal reflux after esophageal surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Osamu; Yokoi, Hideki; Maebeya, Shinji

    1989-01-01

    By means of esophageal transit scintigram using 99m Tc-DTPA, 15 patients (13 esophageal carcinomas and 2 cardia carcinomas) were studied, in whom esophagogastric anastomosis was done according to the posterior invagination anastomosis technique we had devised. In all 8 patients with anastomosis at cervical region, gastroesophageal reflux was not seen on both scintigrams before and after meals, and the average pressure gradient of high pressure zone at anastomosis was 39.8 cmH 2 O. In 2 of 7 patients with intrathoracic anastomosis, the scintigram before meals showed severe reflux. and the endoscopic findings showed diffuse and moderate erosion in the esophageal mucosa. The average pressure gradient across the anastomosis was 6.5 cmH 2 O. In these 2 patients, the new fornix with a sharp angle of His was not formed. In the remaining 5 patients with intrathoracic anastomosis, reflux was not seen on the scintigram before meals. However, in 2 of them, the scintigram after meal and endoscopic examination revealed mild reflux and mild esophagitis respectively. Furthermore in one patient very mild reflux was observed only on the scintigram after meals but the endoscopic findings showed the normal esophageal mucosa. In these 5 patients, the average pressure gradient across the anastomosis was 17.0 cmH 2 O, which was significantly higher (p<0.01) than that in 2 patients with severe reflux and was significantly lower (p<0.01) than the mean value of high pressure zone in 8 patients with cervical anastomosis. In conclusion, it is presumed that the formation of a large fornix enough to store food and a sharp angle of His are important factors in maintaining an anti-reflux mechanism. The esophageal transit scintigram was proved to be an excellent technique in detecting and evaluating quantitatively gastroesophageal reflux. (author)

  6. Vesicoureteral Reflux and Duplex Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, John C.

    2008-01-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is the most common anomaly associated with duplex systems. In addition to an uncomplicated duplex system, reflux can also be secondary in the presence of an ectopic ureterocele with duplex systems. Controversy exists in regard to the initial and most definitive management of these anomalies when they coexist. This paper will highlight what is currently known about duplex systems and VUR, and will attempt to provide evidence supporting the various surgical approa...

  7. Parenchymal reflux in renal dysplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinckney, L.E.; Currarino, G.; Weinberg, A.G.

    1981-01-01

    Primitive ducts, tubules, and cysts often communicate with the pelvocalyceal systems of dysplastic kidneys, and may sometimes be filled in retrograde fashion with radiographic contrast material. Their size, shape, and distribution provide a variable radiographic appearance that must be distinguished from other causes of intrarenal reflux. When reflux filling of dysplastic structures is incomplete, the radiographic findings do not fully represent the severity of anatomic abnormality

  8. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart, Douglas C

    2016-08-01

    Despite the frequency with which antireflux procedures are performed, decisions about gastroesophageal reflux disease treatment remain challenging. Several factors contribute to the difficulties in managing gastroesophageal reflux. First, the distinction between physiologic and pathologic gastroesophageal reflux (gastroesophageal reflux disease-GERD) is not always clear. Second, measures of the extent of gastroesophageal reflux often poorly correlate to symptoms or other complications attributed to reflux in infants and children. A third challenge is that the outcome of antireflux procedures, predominately fundoplications, are relatively poorly characterized. All of these factors contribute to difficulty in knowing when to recommend antireflux surgery. One of the manifestations of the uncertainties surrounding GERD is the high degree of variability in the utilization of pediatric antireflux procedures throughout the United States. Pediatric surgeons are frequently consulted for GERD and fundoplication, uncertainties notwithstanding. Although retrospective series and anecdotal observations support fundoplication in some patients, there are many important questions for which sufficient high-quality data to provide a clear answer is lacking. In spite of this, surgeons need to provide guidance to patients and families while awaiting the development of improved evidence to aid in these recommendations. The purpose of this article is to define what is known and what is uncertain, with an emphasis on the most recent evidence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular Mechanisms of Bile Duct Development

    OpenAIRE

    Zong, Yiwei; Stanger, Ben Z.

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian biliary system, consisting of the intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile ducts, is responsible for transporting bile from the liver to the intestine. Bile duct dysfunction, as is seen in some congenital biliary diseases such as Alagille syndrome and biliary atresia, can lead to the accumulation of bile in the liver, preventing the excretion of detoxification products and ultimately leading to liver damage. Bile duct formation requires coordinated cell-cell interactions, resulting in...

  10. Bile acids in treatment of ocular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Boatright, Jeffrey H.; Nickerson, John M.; Moring, Anisha G.; Pardue, Machelle T.

    2009-01-01

    Bear bile has been included in Asian pharmacopeias for thousands of years in treatment of several diseases, ranging from sore throat to hemorrhoids. The hydrophilic bile acids tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) are the major bile acids of bear bile. Both of these are available as synthetic formulations and are approved by the health administrations of several countries for treatment of cirrhosis and gallstones. This review briefly covers the use of bear bile in ...

  11. Gallbladder and Bile Duct Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... digestion by making cholesterol, fats, and fat-soluble vitamins easier to absorb from the intestine. Bile also helps eliminate certain waste products (mainly bilirubin and excess cholesterol) and by-products of drugs from the ...

  12. Bile acid sequestrants for cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000787.htm Bile acid sequestrants for cholesterol To use the sharing features on this page, ... are medicines that help lower your LDL (bad) cholesterol . Too much cholesterol in your blood can stick ...

  13. Correlation between chemical components of billary calculi and bile & sera and bile of gallstone patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Prasheeda; Garg, Pradeep; Pundir, Chandra S

    2005-07-01

    Total cholesterol, total bilirubin, calcium, oxalate, inorganic phosphate, magnesium, iron, copper, sodium and potassium were analyzed quantitatively in gallstones, bile of gall bladder and sera of 200 patients of cholelithiasis (52 cholesterol, 76 mixed and 72 pigment stone patients) and their contents were correlated between calculi and bile and sera and bile in these three type of stone patients. A significant positive correlation was observed between total cholesterol, total bilirubin of calculi and bile, copper of bile and sera of cholesterol stone patients, copper of calculi and bile, total bilirubin, oxalate, magnesium, potassium of sera and bile of pigment stone patients and oxalate and iron of stone and bile, total bilirubin, oxalate, sodium of sera and bile of mixed stone patients. A significant negative correlation was found between magnesium of serum and bile of cholesterol stone patients, oxalate of calculi and bile of pigment stone patients and magnesium of serum and bile of mixed stone patients.

  14. Dual-radionuclide simultaneous gastric emptying and bile transit study after gastric surgery with double-tract reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Kenichi; Kawano, Masaya; Kinami, Shinichi; Fujimura, Takashi; Miwa, Koichi; Tonami, Norihisa

    2005-01-01

    The physiology of gastrointestinal transfer function after proximal gastrectomy with bypass-tract reconstruction is not well understood. We applied a simultaneous dual-radionuclide method with a hepatobiliary imaging and gastric emptying study to evaluate physiologic alterations occurring after surgery. Nineteen patients with early gastric cancer, including 9 preoperative control patients and 10 who had proximal gastrectomy and double-tract reconstruction surgery were examined by dual-radionuclide hepatobiliary and gastric emptying studies ( 99m Tc PMT and 111 In DTPA). Retention fraction in the stomach at 3 minutes (R3) and 60 minutes (R60) and gastric emptying half-time (GET) were calculated. Bile reflux and mixture of bile and food were also evaluated. The retention fractions of R3 and R60 were significantly lower in the double-tract reconstruction group than those in the preoperative group. GET differed significantly between the double-tract and preoperative groups (20.7 min±7.1 min and 36.2 min±11.0 min, p=0.0018). The mixture of bile and food was not good in the double-tract reconstruction group (p=0.014 vs. preoperative). Patients with a large residual stomach showed slower initial emptying (p=0.0068) and a better mixture of bile and food (p=0.058) compared to those with a small residual stomach. The bile reflux was not significantly increased after surgery. The dual-radionuclide gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary imaging was feasible and could demonstrate characteristic transit patterns of the foods and bile in the double-tract reconstruction procedure. A larger residual stomach, if possible, is desirable to provide better transfer and mixing of bile and foods. (author)

  15. Biomaterials made of bile acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG JiaWei; ZHU XiaoXia

    2009-01-01

    The use of natural compounds in the preparation of new materials can improve the biocompatibility of the materials and avoid any potential toxicity of the degradation products when used for biomedical applications.Bile acids are amphiphilic molecules biosynthesized in the liver.They are used to prepare various polymers and oligomers.These polymers made of bile acids are promising materials in both biomedical and pharmaceutical fields.

  16. Biomaterials made of bile acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The use of natural compounds in the preparation of new materials can improve the biocompatibility of the materials and avoid any potential toxicity of the degradation products when used for biomedical applications. Bile acids are amphiphilic molecules biosynthesized in the liver. They are used to prepare various polymers and oligomers. These polymers made of bile acids are promising materials in both biomedical and pharmaceutical fields.

  17. Effects of bile acids on human airway epithelial cells: implications for aerodigestive diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adil Aldhahrani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Gastro-oesophageal reflux and aspiration have been associated with chronic and end-stage lung disease and with allograft injury following lung transplantation. This raises the possibility that bile acids may cause lung injury by damaging airway epithelium. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of bile acid challenge using the immortalised human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B. The immortalised human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B was cultured. A 48-h challenge evaluated the effect of individual primary and secondary bile acids. Post-challenge concentrations of interleukin (IL-8, IL-6 and granulocyte−macrophage colony-stimulating factor were measured using commercial ELISA kits. The viability of the BEAS-2B cells was measured using CellTiter-Blue and MTT assays. Lithocholic acid, deoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid and cholic acid were successfully used to stimulate cultured BEAS-2B cells at different concentrations. A concentration of lithocholic acid above 10 μmol·L−1 causes cell death, whereas deoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid and cholic acid above 30 μmol·L−1 was required for cell death. Challenge with bile acids at physiological levels also led to a significant increase in the release of IL-8 and IL6 from BEAS-2B. Aspiration of bile acids could potentially cause cell damage, cell death and inflammation in vivo. This is relevant to an integrated gastrointestinal and lung physiological paradigm of chronic lung disease, where reflux and aspiration are described in both chronic lung diseases and allograft injury.

  18. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Aerodigestive Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Asim; Ryan, Matthew J

    2018-03-01

    This relationship between gastroesophageal reflux and airway disorders is complex, possibly bidirectional, and not clearly defined. The tools used to investigate gastroesophageal reflux are mostly informative about involvement of gastroesophageal reflux within the gastrointestinal tract, although they are often utilized to study the relationship between gastroesophageal reflux and airway issues with are suspected to occur in relation to reflux. These modalities often lack specificity for reflux-related airway disorders. Co-incidence of gastroesophageal reflux and airway disorders does not necessarily infer causality. While much of our focus has been on managing acidity, controlling refluxate is an area that has not been traditionally aggressively pursued. Our management approach is based on some of the evidence presented, but also often from a lack of adequate study to provide further guidance. Copyright © 2018 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Children & Teens Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Infants Definition & ...

  20. Gastro-oesophageal reflux and cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulqawi, Rayid; Houghton, Lesley A; Smith, Jaclyn A

    2013-05-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux, either singly or in association with postnasal drip and/or asthma is considered to be a cause of chronic cough. The amount and nature of gastro-oesophageal reflux however is often normal with acid suppression having very little, if any therapeutic effect in these patients. This review examines the challenges posed when exploring the reflux-cough link, and discusses the merits and limitations of the proposed mechanisms of reflux leading to cough.

  1. Influence of bromoprid on pathological gastroesophageal reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leisner, B.; Brueckner, W.L.; Luderschmidt, C.

    1982-01-01

    In 20 out of 28 patients with pathological reflux, decreased reflux intensity was found in the functional scintiscan after i.v. injection of 10 mg Bromoprid. This way, reflux cases in which successful therapy with so-called motility-influencing substances is highly probable can be identified already during primary diagnosis. In two thirds of all patients with affected oesophagus and pathological reflux accompanying sclerodermatitis, the lower oesophagal sphincter still responded to Bromoprid. (orig.) [de

  2. Qualitative evaluation of the enterogastric reflux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez Garcia, A.; Ortega Bevia, J.M.; Garcia Fernandez, S.; Bonet Padilla, R.; Jimenez Garcia, E.; Rodrigues de Quesada, B. (Hospital Universitario da Faculdade de Medicina, Sevilla (Spain)); Szego, T. (Sao Paulo Univ. (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina)

    Using Tc/sup 99/ - labeled HIDA, enterogastric reflux was studied in 24 subjects - six asymptomatic individuals and 18 previously submitted to gastric surgery for ulcers, through truncular vagotomy + pyloroplasty, gastrectomy with either BI or BII reconstruction. In the control group there was no evidence of reflux. In the subject group, seven of the 18 patients showed clearly enterogastric reflux. It is concluded that method is readily performed, without morbidity in these series, with a clear picture of the enterogastric reflux.

  3. Qualitative evaluation of the enterogastric reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez Garcia, A.; Ortega Bevia, J.M.; Garcia Fernandez, S.; Bonet Padilla, R.; Jimenez Garcia, E.; Rodrigues de Quesada, B.; Szego, T.

    1982-01-01

    Using Tc 99 - labeled HIDA, enterogastric reflux was studied in 24 subjects - six asymptomatic individuals and 18 previously submitted to gastric surgery for ulcers, through truncular vagotomy + pyloroplasty, gastrectomy with either BI or BII reconstruction. In the control group there was no evidence of reflux. In the subject group, seven of the 18 patients showed clearly enterogastric reflux. It is concluded that method is readily performed, without morbility in these series, with a clear picture of the enterogastric reflux. (Author) [pt

  4. Influence of bromoprid on pathological gastroesophageal reflux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leisner, B.; Brueckner, W.L.; Luderschmidt, C.

    1982-10-28

    In 20 out of 28 patients with pathological reflux, decreased reflux intensity was found in the functional scintiscan after i.v. injection of 10 mg Bromoprid. This way, reflux cases in which successful therapy with so-called motility-influencing substances is highly probable can be identified already during primary diagnosis. In two thirds of all patients with affected oesophagus and pathological reflux accompanying sclerodermatitis, the lower oesophagal sphincter still responded to Bromoprid.

  5. Role of Acid and Weakly Acidic Reflux in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Off Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Hea Jung; Moon, Sung Jin; Kim, Jin Su; Lim, Chul Hyun; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In Seok; Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Myung-Gye

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims Available data about reflux patterns and symptom determinants in the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) subtypes off proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy are lacking. We aimed to evaluate reflux patterns and determinants of symptom perception in patients with GERD off PPI therapy by impedance-pH monitoring. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the impedance-pH data in patients diagnosed as GERD based on results of impedance-pH monitoring, endoscopy and/or typical symptoms. The characteristics of acid and weakly acidic reflux were evaluated. Symptomatic and asymptomatic reflux were compared according to GERD subtypes and individual symptoms. Results Forty-two patients (22 males, mean age 46 years) were diagnosed as GERD (17 erosive reflux disease, 9 pH(+) non-erosive reflux disease [NERD], 9 hypersensitive esophagus and 7 symptomatic NERD). A total of 1,725 reflux episodes were detected (855 acid [50%], 857 weakly acidic [50%] and 13 weakly alkaline reflux [reflux was more frequently symptomatic and bolus clearance was longer compared with weakly acidic reflux. In terms of globus, weakly acidic reflux was more symptomatic. Symptomatic reflux was more frequently acid and mixed reflux; these associations were more pronounced in erosive reflux disease and symptomatic NERD. The perception of regurgitation was related to acid reflux, while that of globus was more related to weakly acidic reflux. Conclusions In patients not taking PPI, acid reflux was more frequently symptomatic and had longer bolus clearance. Symptomatic reflux was more frequently acid and mixed type; however, weakly acidic reflux was associated more with globus. These data suggest a role for impedance-pH data in the evaluation of globus. PMID:22837877

  6. Role of Acid and weakly acidic reflux in gastroesophageal reflux disease off proton pump inhibitor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Hea Jung; Cho, Yu Kyung; Moon, Sung Jin; Kim, Jin Su; Lim, Chul Hyun; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In Seok; Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Myung-Gye

    2012-07-01

    Available data about reflux patterns and symptom determinants in the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) subtypes off proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy are lacking. We aimed to evaluate reflux patterns and determinants of symptom perception in patients with GERD off PPI therapy by impedance-pH monitoring. We retrospectively reviewed the impedance-pH data in patients diagnosed as GERD based on results of impedance-pH monitoring, endoscopy and/or typical symptoms. The characteristics of acid and weakly acidic reflux were evaluated. Symptomatic and asymptomatic reflux were compared according to GERD subtypes and individual symptoms. Forty-two patients (22 males, mean age 46 years) were diagnosed as GERD (17 erosive reflux disease, 9 pH(+) non-erosive reflux disease [NERD], 9 hypersensitive esophagus and 7 symptomatic NERD). A total of 1,725 reflux episodes were detected (855 acid [50%], 857 weakly acidic [50%] and 13 weakly alkaline reflux [Acid reflux was more frequently symptomatic and bolus clearance was longer compared with weakly acidic reflux. In terms of globus, weakly acidic reflux was more symptomatic. Symptomatic reflux was more frequently acid and mixed reflux; these associations were more pronounced in erosive reflux disease and symptomatic NERD. The perception of regurgitation was related to acid reflux, while that of globus was more related to weakly acidic reflux. In patients not taking PPI, acid reflux was more frequently symptomatic and had longer bolus clearance. Symptomatic reflux was more frequently acid and mixed type; however, weakly acidic reflux was associated more with globus. These data suggest a role for impedance-pH data in the evaluation of globus.

  7. [Congenital bladder diverticula and vesicoureteral reflux].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garat, José María; Angerri, Oriol; Caffaratti, Jorge; Moscatiello, Pietro

    2008-03-01

    To analyze our series of primary congenital diverticula (PCD) and their association with vesicoureteral reflux. We have taken care of 23 children with PCD. Eleven of them had big diverticula (> 2 cm) and twelve small. In the first group, 4 children had vesicoureteral reflux and 5 in the second group. In group A, ureteral reimplantation was performed at the time of diverticulum excision. Nor diverticula neither refluxes were operated in group B. We analyze separately results in both groups. Group A: Patients were operated including diverticulum excision. There were not recurrences except in one case with Ehler-Danlos Syndrome. No reimplanted ureter showed postoperative reflux. Nevertheless, one case with multiple bladder diverticula without reflux presented reflux after the excision of several diverticula without reimplantation. Group B: Small diverticula did not undergo surgery Spontaneous outcome of reflux was similar to that of the general population without diverticula. Bladder diverticula are frequently associated with vesicoureteral reflux. The presence of reflux is not an absolute condition for surgical or endoscopic treatment. When diverticula are big in size (Group A) the indication for surgery comes from recurrent infection or voiding disorders, not from reflux. If they undergo surgery, ureteral reimplantation is performed in the case they had reflux or for technical reasons like bladder wall weakness. When diverticula are small (Group B) the presence of reflux does not condition treatment, being the rate of spontaneous resolution similar to the general population.

  8. Pathophysiology of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2003-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD), defined as symptoms or mucosal damage caused by reflux of gastric contents into the esophageal body, is a multifactorial disorder. Malfunctioning of the anti-reflux barrier at the esophagogastric junction, consisting of the right diaphragmatic crus and the

  9. Treatment Options for Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Liver Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version Treatment ... are different types of treatment for patients with bile duct cancer. Different types of treatments are available ...

  10. Treatment Option Overview (Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Liver Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version Treatment ... are different types of treatment for patients with bile duct cancer. Different types of treatments are available ...

  11. General Information about Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Liver Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version Treatment ... are different types of treatment for patients with bile duct cancer. Different types of treatments are available ...

  12. Bile acids for primary sclerosing cholangitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Gluud, C

    2003-01-01

    Bile acids have been used for treating primary sclerosing cholangitis, but their beneficial and harmful effects remain unclear.......Bile acids have been used for treating primary sclerosing cholangitis, but their beneficial and harmful effects remain unclear....

  13. Quantitative evaluation of bile diversion surgery utilizing /sup 99m/Tc HIDA scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickremesinghe, P.C.; Dayrit, P.Q.; Manfredi, O.L.; Fazio, R.A.; Fagel, V.L.

    1983-01-01

    This is a report of 21 patients presenting with epigastric pain, bilious vomiting, upper gastrointestinal bleeding, iron-deficiency anemia, and weight loss, who had undergone Billroth II gastrectomy from 3 to 35 yr earlier. Eighteen of 21 patients were found to have significant enterogastric reflux indices varying from 60% to 95% demonstrated by /sup 99m/Tc HIDA scintigraphy. Thirteen patients had diversion antireflux surgery in the form of a Roux-en-Y procedure, and 1 patient had a Henley loop jejunal interposition. Postoperative /sup 99m/Tc HIDA scintigraphic studies showed the enterogastric reflux indices to have decreased significantly to a range of 2%-26% (p less than 0.00001). There was marked improvement of symptoms, including correction of anemia and weight gain in those patients who had been anemic or who had sustained earlier weight loss. The enterogastric reflux indices of 10 asymptomatic control patients after Billroth II gastrectomy ranged from 4% to 45%. /sup 99m/Tc HIDA scintigraphy is useful in evaluating patients before and after bile diversion surgery, and demonstrates the quantitative decrease in enterogastric reflux after such surgery

  14. [Analysis on replacement of traditional Chinese medicine bear bile with bile acids based on drug properties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bin; Ren, Ying-Long; Ma, Li; Gu, Hao; Wang, Yun; Qiao, Yan-Jiang

    2014-02-01

    To discuss the rationality of the clinical replacement of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) bear bile with bile acid constituents, and analyze the difference between these constituents and bear bile in drug properties. Summarizing the drug properties of bear bile by reference to medical literatures for drug properties of TCM bear bile and Science of Traditional Chinese Medicine (China Press of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 2007). Analyzing and summarizing the pharmacological effects of main bile acid constituents according to relevant literatures for studies on pharmacological effects of main bile acid constituents in CNKI database. Predicating the drug properties of these bile acid constituents by using the drug property predication model established by the study group according the pharmacological effects of main bile acid constituents in the paper, and compare the prediction results with the drug properties of bear bile. Bile acid constituents in bear bile were mostly cold in property, bitter in taste, and the combination of their drug properties could reflect the combined drug properties of bear bile. All of these bile acid constituents in bear bile could show part of effects of bear bile. Attention shall be given to regulate the medication scheme in clinical application according to actual conditions.

  15. Detection of common bile duct stone by hepatobiliary scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Hisao; Sakai, Toyohiko; Takahashi, Norio

    1991-01-01

    Hepatobiliary scintigraphy and direct X-ray cholangiography were compared in 29 patients with common bile duct (CBD) stones confirmed at surgery. The scintigraphic findings included no visualization of the biliary system (NV), pooling of bile in the biliary system (PB), prolonged transit time over 60 min (PTT), filling defect in the CBD image (FD), and reflux of bile toward the intrahepatic ducts after gallbladder stimulation (RB). The positive rates of NV, PB, PTT, FD, and RB in patients with CBD stones were 7%, 31%, 17%, 48%, and 14%, respectively. One or more of these five findings was found in 83%. Although the NV was a useful finding suggesting complete obstruction of the CBD, it shared little in the diagnosis of CBD stone. The positive rate of the PB was relatively high and it would be a useful finding as an indication of the presence of passage disturbance of the CBD. The PB was usually accompanied by the FD. The PTT had some usefulness in the detection of incomplete obstruction of the CBD in patients with a visualized gallbladder. In patients with no visualization of the gallbladder, however, the transit time tended to be shorter than that of gallbladder visualized patients. Therefore, the judgement of PTT in patients with no visualized gallbladder needed another criteria. The FD was the most frequent among the five findings and the sites of FD correlated well with CBD stones on direct X-ray cholangiography. The FD would be a reliable finding indicating CBD stone or CBD stenosis. Although the RB was a finding limited in patients with a visualized gallbladder, it seemed to be a helpful findings for the detection of CBD stone in patients with a mildly dilated CBD. (author)

  16. The spectrum of motor function abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, D; Blondeau, K; Sifrim, D; Tack, J

    2009-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus has traditionally been regarded as the most severe end of the spectrum of gastroesophageal reflux disease and is of great clinical importance in view of the association with esophageal adenocarcinoma. Studies have documented high levels of esophageal acid exposure in Barrett's esophagus. Various pathogenetic mechanisms underlie this phenomenon. These include abnormalities in esophageal peristalsis, defective lower esophageal sphincter pressures, gastric dysmotility and bile reflux. Whilst these factors provide evidence for an acquired cause of Barrett's esophagus, an underlying genetic predisposition cannot be ruled out. Although the past decade has brought about many new discoveries in the pathogenesis of Barrett's esophagus, it has also added further controversy to this complex disorder. A detailed analysis of the gastrointestinal motor abnormalities occurring in Barrett's esophagus follows, with a review of the currently available literature and an update on this condition that continues to be of interest to the gastroenterologist.

  17. Radiologic diagnosis of gastro-oesophageal reflux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fransson, S.G.; Soekjer, H.; Johansson, K.E.; Tibbling, L.

    In 149 patients, a standardized radiologic method for the detection of gastro-oesophageal reflux was applied and compared with the results obtained at endoscopy and by a manometric reflux test. Radiologic reflux was recorded in 53 patients, of whom 25 had reflux without abdominal compression and 51 with compression. At least one of the other two types of examination disclosed pathologic conditions in all but 2 of 53 patients. Oesophagitis was significantly more severe among the patients with reflux observed at radiography. The presence of hiatal incompetence with reflux only to the hiatal hernia but not to the oesophagus was not a strong indicator of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Hiatal hernia was present in a significantly larger number of the patients with reflux at radiography than in those without reflux. Increased width of the hiatus gave stronger evidence for reflux disease than in patients with a normal hiatus. Thus, the width of the hiatus also had a bearing on the diagnosis of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

  18. Radiologic quantitation of gastro-oesophageal reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, T.; Funch-Jensen, P.; Jacobsen, N.O.; Thommesen, P.; Kommunehospitalet, Aarhus; Kommunehospitalet, Aarhus

    1987-01-01

    In a prospective study, 26 patients with symptoms of reflux oesophagitis underwent a barium examination for gastro-oesophageal reflux after food stimulation, and endoscopy with biopsy from different levels of the oesophagus. Radiologic grading of the gastro-oesophageal reflux depending on the height of the reflux into the oesophagus was performed, and this was correlated to the microscopic appearance at different levels in the oesophagus. Complete agreement between the radiologic grading and the histology was found in 69 per cent of the cases, and when gastro-oesophageal reflux was demonstrated the agreement was 75 per cent. Accordingly, the results showed a good accordance between the two variants, indicating that the height of the reflux during the food stimulated test may be truly indicative of the reflux height under non-test conditions. (orig.)

  19. Pathophysiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; Rohof, Wout O.

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most common digestive diseases in the Western world, with typical symptoms, such as heartburn, regurgitation, or retrosternal pain, reported by 15% to 20% of the general population. The pathophysiology of GERD is multifactorial. Our understanding

  20. Nuclear imaging in reflux diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bares, R.

    1988-12-01

    Duodenogastric and gastroesophageal refluxes can be accurately detected by hepatobiliary and gastroesophageal scintigraphy. These procedures are non-invasive and easy to perform. Practical details and evaluation are described. Subsequent to a review of diagnostic results, indications are discussed. Both techniques should be applied in cases where morphological examinations did not yield any pathologic result and clinical symptoms are suggestive for functional disturbances.

  1. Clinical characteristics and psychosocial impact of different reflux time in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiann-Hwa; Wen, Shu-Hui; Hsu, Ching-Sheng; Yi, Chih-Hsun; Liu, Tso-Tsai; Chen, Chien-Lin; Wang, Chia-Chi

    2017-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is an emerging disease, and can impair quality of life and sleep. This study aimed to investigate whether GERD patients with different timings of reflux symptoms have different clinical characteristics. This study prospectively enrolled individuals who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy during a health checkup. Each participant completed all questionnaires including Reflux Disease Questionnaire, Nighttime GERD questionnaire, Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index, Taiwanese Depression Questionnaire, and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Combined reflux was defined as the timing of reflux symptoms occurring at both daytime and nighttime. A total of 2604 participants were enrolled. Of them, 651 symptomatic GERD patients, according to the Reflux Disease Questionnaire score, were recruited for final analysis. Of them, 224 (34.4%) had erosive esophagitis on endoscopy. According to the timing of reflux symptoms, 184 (28.3%) were assigned to the daytime reflux group, 71 (10.9%) to the nighttime reflux group, and 396 (60.8%) to the combined reflux group. In post hoc analysis, the combined reflux group had a significantly higher Reflux Disease Questionnaire score than the daytime reflux group (p reflux groups had higher body mass index and longer duration (> 12 years) of education than the daytime reflux group (p reflux of have more troublesome symptoms than those with daytime reflux. GERD patients with different timings of reflux symptoms have different clinical characteristics in terms of body mass index and duration of education, but not in terms of esophageal inflammation, quality of sleep, and psychosocial status. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Bile duct proliferation associated with bile salt-induced hypercholeresis in Mdr2 P-glycoprotein-deficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulzebos, CV; Voshol, PJ; Wolters, H; Kruit, JK; Ottenhof, R; Groen, AK; Stellaard, F; Verkade, HJ; Kuipers, F

    Baekground/Aims: Bile flow consists of bile salt-dependent bile flow (BSDF), generated by canalicular secretion of bile salts, and bile salt-independent flow (BSIF), probably of combined canalicular and ductular origin. Bile salt transport proteins have been identified in cholangiocytes suggesting a

  3. [Advances in studies on bear bile powder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chao-fan; Gao, Guo-jian; Liu, Ying

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, a detailed analysis was made on relevant literatures about bear bile powder in terms of chemical component, pharmacological effect and clinical efficacy, indicating bear bile powder's significant pharmacological effects and clinical application in treating various diseases. Due to the complex composition, bear bile powder is relatively toxic. Therefore, efforts shall be made to study bear bile powder's pharmacological effects, clinical application, chemical composition and toxic side-effects, with the aim to provide a scientific basis for widespread reasonable clinical application of bear bile powder.

  4. Bile acids in regulation of intestinal physiology.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keating, Niamh

    2009-10-01

    In addition to their roles in facilitating lipid digestion and absorption, bile acids are recognized as important regulators of intestinal function. Exposure to bile acids can dramatically influence intestinal transport and barrier properties; in recent years, they have also become appreciated as important factors in regulating cell growth and survival. Indeed, few cells reside within the intestinal mucosa that are not altered to some degree by exposure to bile acids. The past decade saw great advances in the knowledge of how bile acids exert their actions at the cellular and molecular levels. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the role of bile acids in regulation of intestinal physiology.

  5. Deoxycholic acid promotes development of gastroesophageal reflux disease and Barrett's oesophagus by modulating integrin-αv trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prichard, David O; Byrne, Anne Marie; Murphy, James O; Reynolds, John V; O'Sullivan, Jacintha; Feighery, Ronan; Doyle, Brendan; Eldin, Osama Sharaf; Finn, Stephen P; Maguire, Aoife; Duff, Deirdre; Kelleher, Dermot P; Long, Aideen

    2017-12-01

    The fundamental mechanisms underlying erosive oesophagitis and subsequent development of Barrett's oesophagus (BO) are poorly understood. Here, we investigated the contribution of specific components of the gastric refluxate on adhesion molecules involved in epithelial barrier maintenance. Cell line models of squamous epithelium (HET-1A) and BO (QH) were used to examine the effects of bile acids on cell adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins (Collagen, laminin, vitronectin, fibronectin) and expression of integrin ligands (α 3 , α 4, α 5 , α 6 and α ν ). Experimental findings were validated in human explant oesophageal biopsies, a rat model of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD) and in patient tissue microarrays. The bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) specifically reduced adhesion of HET-1A cells to vitronectin and reduced cell-surface expression of integrin-α ν via effects on endocytic recycling processes. Increased expression of integrin-α v was observed in ulcerated tissue in a rat model of GORD and in oesophagitis and Barrett's intestinal metaplasia patient tissue compared to normal squamous epithelium. Increased expression of integrin-α ν was observed in QH BO cells compared to HET-1A cells. QH cells were resistant to DCA-mediated loss of adhesion and reduction in cell-surface expression of integrin-α ν . We demonstrated that a specific component of the gastric refluxate, DCA, affects the epithelial barrier through modulation of integrin α ν expression, providing a novel mechanism for bile acid-mediated erosion of oesophageal squamous epithelium and promotion of BO. Strategies aimed at preventing bile acid-mediated erosion should be considered in the clinical management of patients with GORD. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  6. Bile salts as semiochemicals in fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchinger, Tyler J.; Li, Weiming; Johnson, Nicholas S.

    2014-01-01

    Bile salts are potent olfactory stimuli in fishes; however the biological functions driving such sensitivity remain poorly understood. We provide an integrative review of bile salts as semiochemicals in fish. First, we present characteristics of bile salt structure, metabolism, and function that are particularly relevant to chemical communication. Bile salts display a systematic pattern of structural variation across taxa, are efficiently synthesized, and are stable in the environment. Bile salts are released into the water via the intestine, urinary tract, or gills, and are highly water soluble. Second, we consider the potential role of bile salts as semiochemicals in the contexts of detecting nearby fish, foraging, assessing risk, migrating, and spawning. Lastly, we suggest future studies on bile salts as semiochemicals further characterize release into the environment, behavioral responses by receivers, and directly test the biological contexts underlying olfactory sensitivity.

  7. Clinical curative effect of electroacupuncture combined with zhizhukuanzhong capsules for treating gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chaoxian; Guo, Like; Guo, Xiaofeng; Guo, Xiaohe; Li, Guangyan

    2012-09-01

    To study the clinical curative effect, safety and mechanism of action of electroacupuncture combined with Zhizhukuanzhong capsules (ZZKZC) in treating gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). A total of 480 patients with confirmed GERD were randomly divided into four groups: the electroacupuncture group, the ZZKZC group, the combined therapy group, and the control group, with 120 cases in each group. Each case in the electroacupuncture group was treated with electroacupuncture on Zusanli (ST 36), Zhongwan (CV 12), Neiguan (PC 6),Taichong (LR 3) and Gongsun (SP 4) once daily for 6 weeks. Each case in the ZZKZC group was treated with oral administration of 1.29 g ZZKZC three times daily. The combined therapy group had electroacupuncture and ZZKZC. The control group was given oral administration of 5 mg mosapride three times and 20 mg pantoprazole twice daily. The 24-hour intraesophageal total number of reflux episodes with pH or = 0.14), the number of long-term (> or = 5 min) reflux episodes, the percentage of upright time, the percentage of supine time, the percentage of total time of pH or = 0.14), endoscopic grading score, symptom score, quality of life score, and adverse reactions were observed before treatment, at the end of treatment and 54 weeks after treatment in the four groups. The 24-hour intraesophageal pH and bile reflux, endoscopic grading score and symptom score were all significantly decreased at the end of treatment in every group, while the scores of 8 dimensions of quality of life were all increased compared with those before treatment (Pelectroacupuncture group 54 weeks after treatment compared with the end of treatment (P>0.05); however, these indices all significantly deteriorated in the ZZKZC and control groups (P>0.05). The short and long-term total efficacy rates in the combined therapy group showed significant superiority to those in the other groups (PElectroacupuncture and ZZKZC play an important role in inhibiting intraesophageal acid and

  8. Detection of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, T.; Ravnsbaek, J.; Toettrup, A.; Funch-Jensen, P.; Thommesen, P.; Aarhus Kommunehospital

    1986-01-01

    In a prospective study a barium examination combined with food stimulation was compared with the acid reflux test in 30 consecutive patients with symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux. Both methods were further compared with endoscopy and histology. Gastro-oesophageal reflux could be demonstrated by the radiologic examination in 22 patients and by the acid reflux test in 23 patients. By combining the two methods gastro-oesophageal reflux could be demonstrated in 27 patients. Comparing the two methods with symptoms, endoscopy, and histology they seemed to be of equal value. Accordingly, a food-stimulated barium examination is recommended as the first method for demonstrating gastro-oesophageal reflux because it is simple and well-tolerated by the patient. (orig.)

  9. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Metabolic Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Olinichenko, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the research is to study the features of gastroesophageal reflux disease, combined with the metabolic syndrome. Materials and methods. The study involved 490 patients (250 have got gastroesophageal reflux disease, combined with the metabolic syndrome and 240 have got gastroesophageal reflux disease without the metabolic syndrome). The patients besides general clinical examination were carried out video-fibro-gastro-duodeno-skopy, pH-monitoring in the esophagus, anthropometry, deter...

  10. Gastroesophageal scintigraphy in patients with gastroesophageal reflux: comparison with manometry and with acid reflux test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouvard, G.; Baptiste, J.C.; Peres, J.C.; Segol, P.; Fernandez, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Gastroesophageal scintiscanning offers several advantages: it is more physiological and more convenient than acid reflux test, does not require nasogastric intubation or installation of hydrochloric acid into the stomach; its diagnostic value is satisfactory (very good specificity and sensitivity); it can be easily repeated and permits a semi-quantitative evaluation of the reflux and a discrimination between physiological and pathological gastroesophageal reflux [fr

  11. Mechanisms of acid, weakly acidic and gas reflux after anti-reflux surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredenoord, A. J.; Draaisma, W. A.; Weusten, B. L. A. M.; Gooszen, H. G.; Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Whereas it is well documented that fundoplication reduces acid reflux, the effects of the procedure on non-acid and gas reflux and the mechanisms through which this is achieved have not been fully elucidated. METHODS: In 14 patients, reflux was measured with impedance-pH monitoring

  12. Gastroesophageal scintigraphy in patients with gastroesophageal reflux: comparison with manometry and with acid reflux test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouvard, G.; Baptiste, J.C.; Peres, J.C.; Segol, P.; Fernandez, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Gastroesophageal scintiscanning offers several advantages: it is more physiological and more convenient than acid reflux test, does not require nasogastric intubation or installation of hydrochloric acid into the stomach; its diagnostic value is satisfactory (very good specificity and sensitivity); it can be easily repeated and permits a semi-quantitative evaluation of the reflux and a discrimination between physiological and pathological gastroesophageal reflux.

  13. Reflux perception and the esophageal mucosal barrier in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijenborg, P.W.

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most common disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Heartburn, regurgitation and chest pain are the key symptoms. Patients with reflux symptoms often have more than average reflux of acidic contents in the esophagus. However, frequently there is

  14. Characteristics of symptomatic reflux episodes in Japanese proton pump inhibitor-refractory non-erosive reflux disease patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Kenichiro; Koike, Tomoyuki; Iijima, Katsunori; Saito, Masahiro; Kikuchi, Hiroki; Hatta, Waku; Ara, Nobuyuki; Uno, Kaname; Asano, Naoki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To clarify the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms in non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) patients. METHODS: Thirty-five NERD patients with persistent symptoms, despite taking rabeprazole 10 mg twice daily for at least 8 wk, were included in this study. All patients underwent 24 h combined impedance - pH on rabeprazole. The symptom index (SI) was considered to be positive if ≥ 50%, and proximal reflux episodes were determined when reflux reached 15 cm above the proximal margin of the lower esophageal sphincter. RESULTS: In 14 (40%) SI-positive patients, with liquid weakly acid reflux, the occurrence rate of reflux symptoms was significantly more frequent in proximal reflux episodes (46.7%) than in distal ones (5.7%) (P acid reflux, there were no significant differences in the occurrence rate of reflux symptoms between proximal reflux episodes (38.5%) and distal ones (20.5%) (NS). With mixed liquid-gas weakly acid reflux, the occurrence rate of reflux symptoms in proximal reflux episodes was significantly more frequent (31.0%) than in distal reflux ones (3.3%) (P acid reflux, there were no significant differences in the occurrence rate of reflux symptoms between proximal reflux episodes (29.4%) and distal ones (14.3%) (NS). CONCLUSION: The proximal extent of weakly acidic liquid and mixed liquid-gas reflux is a major factor associated with reflux perception in SI-positive patients on proton pump inhibitor therapy. PMID:26715820

  15. Gastroesophageal reflux in children: radionuclide gastroesophagography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumhagen, J.D.; Rudd, T.G.; Christie, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    Sixty-five symptomatic infants and children underwent radionuclide gastroesophagography, acid reflux testing, and barium esophagography with water-siphon testing to evaluate the clinical efficacy of the scintigraphic technique in detecting gastroesophageal reflux. After ingesting /sup 99m/Tc sulfur colloid in fruit juice, patients rested beneath the gamma camera for 30 to 60 min while esophageal activity was monitored continuously. By using the acid reflux test as a standard of comparison, the senstivity of radionuclide gastroesophagography was 75%. Because of its physiologic nature, low radiation exposure, and convenience, radionuclide gastroesophagography warrants further evaluation as a screening test for gastroesophageal reflux

  16. Contemporary Management of Vesicoureteral Reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajiyev, Perviz; Burgu, Berk

    2017-04-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) remains the most interesting topic of pediatric urology due to the dynamic nature of recent controversial publications. Starting from the need for a diagnosis to the necessity and effectiveness of treatment in preventing scars, VUR remains in the mist. Although recent strong evidence helped as fog lights in this blurriness, more data are required for achieving crystal clearance. This article aims to summarize and discuss the current state of the evidence regarding VUR management. To provide a comprehensive synthesis of the main evidence in the literature on the current and contemporary management of VUR in children; to discuss conservative management with continuous antibiotic prophylaxis (CAP), especially its effectiveness and safety; and to review the current evidence regarding contemporary surgical techniques. We conducted a nonsystematic review of the literature using the recent guidelines and PubMed database regarding surveillance, CAP, endoscopic, open, laparoscopic, and robot-assisted ureteral surgical treatment. Despite the striking results of previous studies revealing the ineffectiveness of CAP, more recent studies and their two fresh meta-analyses revealed a positive role for CAP in the contemporary management of VUR. One of the most interesting findings is the redundant rising of endoscopic correction and its final settlement to real indicated cases. Patient individualization in the contemporary management of VUR seems to be the keyword. The evidence in the literature showed a safe and effective use of laparoscopic and robot-assisted laparoscopic reimplantations. The goal of VUR treatment is to prevent the occurrence of febrile urinary tract infections and formation of scars in the renal parenchyma. The approach should be risk adapted and individualized according to current knowledge. Individual risk is influenced by the presentation age, sex, history of pyelonephritis and renal damage, grade of reflux, bladder bowel

  17. State of Motor-Evacuation Function of the Stomach According to 13C-Octanoate Breath Test in Patients with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.G. Mishchuk

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We examined 58 patients with erosive form of gastroesophageal reflux disease and 10 healthy volunteers. All patients underwent fibrogastroduodenoscopy, 24 hour pH monitoring in the lower third of esophagus, 13C-octanoate breath test, identified concentration of cholecystokinin-pankreozymin in blood serum. It is found that 44.83 % of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease have delayed, 36.21 % — rapid and 18.97 % — normal motor-e­vacuation function of the stomach. In patients with delayed gastric motility we observed prevalence of bile reflux with pH over 6 in the lower third of the esophagus, amounting to 42 % (p = 0.044, and increased concentration in the blood of cholecystokinin-pankreozymin up to (7.12 ± 0.21 ng/ml (p < 0.05, in healthy subjects — (5.91 ± 0.34 ng/ml. In patients with accelerated motility number of refluxes under 4 was 45 %, and cholecystokinin-pankreozymin le­vel — (4.4 ± 1.2 ng/ml. These data support the view of other authors that causes of heartburn as a leading symptom of gastroesophageal reflux disease can be duodenogastric reflux and visceral hyperalgesia.

  18. Bile ascites in adults. Diagnosis using hepatobiliary scintigraphy and paracentesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagle, C.E.; Fink-Bennett, D.; Freitas, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Hepatobiliary scintigraphy has been recognized as a useful diagnostic tool in detecting the presence and site of bile leaks. The authors report a case of bile ascites secondary to a postsurgical biliary leak, the scintigraphic findings in bile ascites, and the potential use of paracentesis, in combination with hepatobiliary scintigraphy, in confirming the presence of bile ascites and a bile leak

  19. Mechanisms of acid reflux and how refluxed Acid extends proximally in patients with non-erosive reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Hirohito; Iwakiri, Katsuhiko; Kawami, Noriyuki; Tanaka, Yuriko; Sakamoto, Choitsu

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms that cause acid reflux in patients with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), including those that determine how acid extends proximally, are not yet clear. Concurrent esophageal manometry and pH monitoring were performed for 3 h after a meal in 13 patients with NERD, 12 with mild reflux esophagitis (RE), and 13 healthy subjects (HS). Transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation (TLESR) was the major mechanism of acid reflux in all three groups. LES pressure did not differ between the groups. At 2 cm above the LES, there were no differences between the three groups in the number of TLESR-related acid reflux episodes, rate of TLESRs and rate of acid reflux during TLESR. However, at 7 cm above the LES, the rate of acid reflux during TLESRs was significantly higher in patients with NERD (mean ± SEM 42.3 ± 4.8) than in those with mild RE (28.0 ± 3.8) and HS (10.8 ± 2.5). TLESRs are the sole motor events underlying acid reflux episodes in patients with NERD. Acid extends proximally more readily in patients with NERD than in HS and those with mild RE.

  20. Heart and bile acids - Clinical consequences of altered bile acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasavan, Tharni; Ferraro, Elisa; Ibrahim, Effendi; Dixon, Peter; Gorelik, Julia; Williamson, Catherine

    2018-04-01

    Cardiac dysfunction has an increased prevalence in diseases complicated by liver cirrhosis such as primary biliary cholangitis and primary sclerosing cholangitis. This observation has led to research into the association between abnormalities in bile acid metabolism and cardiac pathology. Approximately 50% of liver cirrhosis cases develop cirrhotic cardiomyopathy. Bile acids are directly implicated in this, causing QT interval prolongation, cardiac hypertrophy, cardiomyocyte apoptosis and abnormal haemodynamics of the heart. Elevated maternal serum bile acids in intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, a disorder which causes an impaired feto-maternal bile acid gradient, have been associated with fatal fetal arrhythmias. The hydrophobicity of individual bile acids in the serum bile acid pool is of relevance, with relatively lipophilic bile acids having a more harmful effect on the heart. Ursodeoxycholic acid can reverse or protect against these detrimental cardiac effects of elevated bile acids. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Intestinal transport and metabolism of bile acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Paul A.; Karpen, Saul J.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to their classical roles as detergents to aid in the process of digestion, bile acids have been identified as important signaling molecules that function through various nuclear and G protein-coupled receptors to regulate a myriad of cellular and molecular functions across both metabolic and nonmetabolic pathways. Signaling via these pathways will vary depending on the tissue and the concentration and chemical structure of the bile acid species. Important determinants of the size and composition of the bile acid pool are their efficient enterohepatic recirculation, their host and microbial metabolism, and the homeostatic feedback mechanisms connecting hepatocytes, enterocytes, and the luminal microbiota. This review focuses on the mammalian intestine, discussing the physiology of bile acid transport, the metabolism of bile acids in the gut, and new developments in our understanding of how intestinal metabolism, particularly by the gut microbiota, affects bile acid signaling. PMID:25210150

  2. [Association between acid reflux and esophageal dysmotility in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zhi-hui; Feng, Li; Wen, Mao-yao; Liu, Jian-rong; Yang, Li

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the association between esophageal motility and acid reflux in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). A total of 94 patients with typical reflux symptoms such as heartburn, regurgitation and chest pain, whose score (Sc) of reflux diagnostic questionnaire (RDQ) was greater than or equal to 12 were enrolled in the study. Each participant was evaluated by upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, high resolution manometry (HRM) of esophagus and 24 h esophageal pH monitoring. The participants were divided into groups of reflux esophagitis (RE) and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) on the basis of endoscopy findings. The 24 h esophageal pH monitoring categorized participants into physiologic reflux (pH) and pathologic reflux (pH+). The characteristics of esophageal motility and acid reflux were compared between the two groups of participants. Lower but non-significant differences (P > 0.05) were found in pressure of lower esophageal sphincter (LESP), length of lower esophageal sphincter (LESL), esophageal contraction amplitude (CA), distal contractile integral (DCI) and effective peristalsis proportion (EPP) in the participants in the RE group compared with those in the NERD group. Participants in the RE group had significantly higher prevalence of reduced LESP (63.0% vs. 31.7%, P 0.05). RE is closely associated with acid reflux and hiatus hernia. Esophageal dysmotility is more likely to appear in patients with pH+. The interaction of acid reflux and esophageal dysmotility may play a role in GERD.

  3. Crystal Structure of the Substrate-Binding Domain from Listeria monocytogenes Bile-Resistance Determinant BilE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz, Stephanie J.; Schuurman-Wolters, Gea K.; Poolman, Bert

    2016-01-01

    BilE has been reported as a bile resistance determinant that plays an important role in colonization of the gastrointestinal tract by Listeria monocytogenes, the causative agent of listeriosis. The mechanism(s) by which BilE mediates bile resistance are unknown. BilE shares significant sequence

  4. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy in patients with bile leaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carichner, S.L.; Nagle, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    Hepatobiliary scintigraphy has been recognized as a useful tool in detecting the presence and sites of bile leaks. The clinical settings in which bile leaks are likely to occur, as well as some of the scintigraphic patterns seen in patients with bile leaks, are reviewed here. Tips for technologists are offered on interventions that might enhanced the quality of information available to the nuclear physician

  5. Nocturnal Gastroesophageal Reflux Revisited by Impedance-pH Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondeau, Kathleen; Mertens, Veerle; Tack, Jan; Sifrim, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims Impedance-pH monitoring allows detailed characterization of gastroesophageal reflux and esophageal activity associated with reflux. We assessed the characteristics of nocturnal reflux and esophageal activity preceding and following reflux. Methods Impedance-pH tracings from 11 healthy subjects and 76 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease off acid-suppressive therapy were analyzed. Characteristics of nocturnal supine reflux, time distribution and esophageal activity seen on impedance at 2 minute intervals preceding and following reflux were described. Results Patients had more nocturnal reflux events than healthy subjects (8 [4-12] vs 2 [1-5], P = 0.002), with lower proportion of weakly acidic reflux (57% [35-78] vs 80% [60-100], P = 0.044). Nocturnal reflux was mainly liquid (80%) and reached the proximal esophagus more often in patients (6% vs 0%, P = 0.047). Acid reflux predominated in the first 2 hours (66%) and weakly acidic reflux in the last 3 hours (70%) of the night. Most nocturnal reflux was preceded by aboral flows and cleared by short lasting volume clearance. In patients, prolonged chemical clearance was associated with less esophageal activity. Conclusions Nocturnal weakly acidic reflux is as common as acid reflux in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, and predominates later in the night. Impedance-pH can predict prolonged chemical clearance after nocturnal acid reflux. PMID:21602991

  6. Vomiting and gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, J Y; Nanayakkhara, C S; Simpson, H

    1988-01-01

    During radionuclide scans in 82 infants and children gastro-oesophageal reflux extending to the upper oesophageal/laryngeal level was detected in 636 one minute frames. Only 61 (9.6%) of these frames were associated with vomiting, defined as the appearance of milk at the mouth. Thus the absence of vomiting does not preclude appreciable gastro-oesophageal reflux. PMID:3415303

  7. Gastro-oesophageal reflux and belching revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredenoord, Albert Jan

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis recent studies into the pathophysiology of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and belching are described. The thesis is divided into four parts. Part I describes studies in which the technique of impedance monitoring is validated. With impedance monitoring reflux of liquid and gas can

  8. A proteomic analysis of human bile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Troels Zakarias; Bunkenborg, Jakob; Gronborg, Mads

    2004-01-01

    We have carried out a comprehensive characterization of human bile to define the bile proteome. Our approach involved fractionation of bile by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis and lectin affinity chromatography followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Overall, we identified 87...... unique proteins, including several novel proteins as well as known proteins whose functions are unknown. A large majority of the identified proteins have not been previously described in bile. Using lectin affinity chromatography and enzymatically labeling of asparagine residues carrying glycan moieties...

  9. Rapid increase of bile salt secretion is associated with bile duct injury after human liver transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuken, Erwin; Visser, Dorien; Kuipers, Folkert; Blokzijl, Hans; Leuvenink, Henri G. D.; de Jong, Koert P.; Peeters, Paul M. J. G.; Jansen, Peter L. M.; Slooff, Maarten J. H.; Gouw, Annette S. H.; Porte, Robert J.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Biliary strictures are a serious cause of morbidity after liver transplantation. We have studied the role of altered bile composition as a mechanism of bile duct injury after human liver transplantation. METHODS: In 28 liver transplant recipients, bile samples were collected daily

  10. Rapid increase of bile salt secretion is associated with bile duct injury after human liver transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuken, E; Visser, D; Kuipers, F; Blokzijl, H; Leuvenink, HGD; de Jong, KP; Peeters, PMJG; Jansen, PLM; Slooff, MJH; Gouw, ASH; Porte, RJ

    2004-01-01

    Background/Aims: Biliary strictures are a serious cause of morbidity after liver transplantation. We have studied the role of altered bile composition as a mechanism of bile duct injury after human liver transplantation. Methods: In 28 liver transplant recipients, bile samples were collected daily

  11. Achalasia following gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, H L; Mayberry, J F; Atkinson, M

    1986-01-01

    Five patients initially presenting with symptomatic gastro-oesophageal reflux, proven by radiology or pH monitoring, subsequently developed achalasia, confirmed by radiology and manometry, after an interval of 2-10 years. During this period dysphagia, present as a mild and intermittent symptom accompanying the initial reflux in 3 of the 5, became severe and resulted in oesophageal stasis of food in all. Three of the 5 had a demonstrable hiatal hernia. In none was reflux a troublesome symptom after Rider-Moeller dilatation or cardiomyotomy undertaken for the achalasia. Gastro-oesophageal reflux does not protect against the subsequent development of achalasia. It is suggested that the autonomic damage eventually leading to achalasia may in its initial phases cause gastro-oesophageal reflux. Images Figure 1. A Figure 1. B Figure 2. PMID:3950898

  12. Esophageal abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Marc S; Carucci, Laura R

    2018-06-01

    Fluoroscopic esophagography is a widely available, safe, and inexpensive test for detecting gastroesophageal reflux disease. In this article, we review the technique for performing a high-quality esophagram, including upright, double-contrast views of the esophagus and cardia with high-density barium; prone, single-contrast views of the esophagus with low-density barium; and evaluation of gastroesophageal reflux. We then discuss the radiographic findings associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease, including esophageal dysmotility, reflux esophagitis, peptic strictures, and Barrett's esophagus. Finally, we consider the differential diagnosis for the various radiographic findings associated with this condition. When carefully performed and interpreted, the esophagram is a useful test for evaluating gastroesophageal reflux disease and its complications.

  13. Reflux Revisited: Advancing the Role of Pepsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karna Dev Bardhan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease is mediated principally by acid. Today, we recognise reflux reaches beyond the esophagus, where pepsin, not acid, causes damage. Extraesophageal reflux occurs both as liquid and probably aerosol, the latter with a further reach. Pepsin is stable up to pH 7 and regains activity after reacidification. The enzyme adheres to laryngeal cells, depletes its defences, and causes further damage internally after its endocytosis. Extraesophageal reflux can today be detected by recognising pharyngeal acidification using a miniaturised pH probe and by the identification of pepsin in saliva and in exhaled breath condensate by a rapid, sensitive, and specific immunoassay. Proton pump inhibitors do not help the majority with extraesophageal reflux but specifically formulated alginates, which sieve pepsin, give benefit. These new insights may lead to the development of novel drugs that dramatically reduce pepsinogen secretion, block the effects of adherent pepsin, and give corresponding clinical benefit.

  14. Acid reflux management: ENT perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Ijaz; Batch, A J G

    2004-01-01

    Otolaryngological manifestations of acid reflux include a wide range of pharyngeal and laryngeal symptoms; and the constellation of symptoms has been called laryngopharyngeal reflux. This is a prospective study in a cohort of patients with various throat symptoms suggestive of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) who underwent flexible oesophago-gastroscopy, as a principal investigation. The aims were to look at the most reliable symptom(s) and sign(s), the diagnostic role of flexible oesophago-gastroscopy and the treatment response in these patients. The endoscopy score of 0 to 3 was based on endoscopic findings and the treatment response was measured from 0 to 100 per cent improvement of symptoms, as described by the patients. There were a total of 303 patients, 174 females and 129 males with ages ranging from 19 to 88 years. Seventy-five per cent had had symptoms for more than a year. Fifteen per cent were smokers. Globus, voice change, sore throat, dysphagia and cough were the predominant symptoms. Most patients, however, presented with a complex of various other secondary symptoms. The endoscopic findings were abnormal in 98 per cent of patients. Apart from the finding of non-specific hyperaemia, usually of the posterior larynx (13 per cent), lesions of the larynx and vocal folds were surprisingly uncommon. Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) were prescribed in 90 per cent of patients. A total of 233 (76.8 per cent) responded to treatment. The improvement of symptoms ranged from 25 per cent in 36 (23 per cent), 50 per cent in 60 (20 per cent), 75 per cent in 59 (19 per cent) and 100 per cent in 78 (26 per cent) patients. Accumulative analysis of variance showed a significant difference between treatment responders and non-responders (p <0.04). In a logistic regression model patients with globus, voice change and gastric prolapse were more likely to respond to treatment (p <0.04). It can be concluded that voice change, sore throat, globus and cough choking are the most

  15. Gastrointestinal transit and reflux studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, R.L.; Kochan, J.

    1988-01-01

    Current imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography provide anatomic resolution far beyond that achievable with the current methods of scintigraphic imaging. Consequently, the strength of nuclear medicine has shifted and now lies in its ability to provide physiologic data noninvasively and simply. This ability is well illustrated by the scintigraphic techniques developed for evaluation of the alimentary tract. Studies of esophageal transit, gastroesophageal reflux, and gastric emptying are now widely available. Evaluation of small and large intestinal transit have also been investigated. These techniques are discussed in the present chapter

  16. Gastroesophageal reflux and gastric emptying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, P.; Treves, S.T.

    1985-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) may be defined as a dysfunction of the distal esophagus causing return of gastric contents into the esophagus. GER is a rather common problem during infancy, with an incidence estimated as 1 in 500 infants. Several methods are available to diagnose and quantitate GER. These include fluoroscopy after barium feedings, in conjunction with an upper gastrointestinal series; esophageal manometry; endoscopy; pH probe monitoring, in conjunction with a Tuttle Test; and extended pH probe evaluation for a 24-h period. Gastroesophageal scintigraphy has been advocated as an alternative noninvasive study requiring no sedation. Scintigraphy offers the advantages of prolonged observation, high sensitivity, and low radiation exposure

  17. Molecular interactions between bile salts, phospholipids and cholesterol : relevance to bile formation, cholesterol crystallization and bile salt toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moschetta, Antonio

    2001-01-01

    Cholesterol is a nonpolar lipid dietary constituent, absorbed from the small intestine, transported in blood and taken up by the liver. In bile, the sterol is solubilized in mixed micelles by bile salts and phospholipids. In case of supersaturation, cholesterol is kept in vesicles with phospholipid

  18. Heartburn, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and non-erosive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heartburn, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and non-erosive reflux disease. Haley Smith. Abstract. Reflux is a normal process that occurs in healthy infants, children and adults. Most episodes are short-lived and do not cause bothersome symptoms of complications. Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) develops ...

  19. Physiological and molecular biochemical mechanisms of bile formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetnyak, Vasiliy Ivanovich

    2013-01-01

    This review considers the physiological and molecular biochemical mechanisms of bile formation. The composition of bile and structure of a bile canaliculus, biosynthesis and conjugation of bile acids, bile phospholipids, formation of bile micellar structures, and enterohepatic circulation of bile acids are described. In general, the review focuses on the molecular physiology of the transporting systems of the hepatocyte sinusoidal and apical membranes. Knowledge of physiological and biochemical basis of bile formation has implications for understanding the mechanisms of development of pathological processes, associated with diseases of the liver and biliary tract. PMID:24259965

  20. Vesicoureteral Reflux in Kidney Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, Nina M; Minnee, Robert C; Bemelman, Frederike J; Idu, Mirza M

    2017-06-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is frequently found after transplantation, but its impact on graft function, urine tract infection, and graft loss remains uncertain. Therefore our objective was to evaluate the effects of VUR on the outcome of renal transplantation. We included 1008 adult renal transplant recipients of whom a 1-week posttransplant voiding cystourethrogram was available. Study end points included occurrence of bacteriuria, renal function, and graft survival. In total, 106 (10.5%) of 1008 graft recipients had a diagnosis of VUR on voiding cystography. The incidence of bacteriuria was comparable in the reflux and nonreflux group (17% vs 17.4%, P = .91). There was no significant difference in renal function at 3 months and 1 year in patients with and without VUR. One- and 5-year graft survival in patients with VUR was 85.8% and 82.1% compared to 87.3% and 83.0% in patients without VUR ( P = .68 and P = .80). Posttransplant VUR has no correlations with early bacteriuria, renal function, and graft survival.

  1. Bile acid sequestrants : more than simple resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Out, Carolien; Groen, Albert K.; Brufau, Gemma

    Purpose of review Bile acid sequestrants (BAS) have been used for more than 50 years in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. The last decade, bile acids are emerging as integrated regulators of metabolism via induction of various signal transduction pathways. Consequently, BAS treatment may exert

  2. Successful Endoscopic Therapy of Traumatic Bile Leaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P. Spinn

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic bile leaks often result in high morbidity and prolonged hospital stay that requires multimodality management. Data on endoscopic management of traumatic bile leaks are scarce. Our study objective was to evaluate the efficacy of the endoscopic management of a traumatic bile leak. We performed a retrospective case review of patients who were referred for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP after traumatic bile duct injury secondary to blunt (motor vehicle accident or penetrating (gunshot trauma for management of bile leaks at our tertiary academic referral center. Fourteen patients underwent ERCP for the management of a traumatic bile leak over a 5-year period. The etiology included blunt trauma from motor vehicle accident in 8 patients, motorcycle accident in 3 patients and penetrating injury from a gunshot wound in 3 patients. Liver injuries were grade III in 1 patient, grade IV in 10 patients, and grade V in 3 patients. All patients were treated by biliary stent placement, and the outcome was successful in 14 of 14 cases (100%. The mean duration of follow-up was 85.6 days (range 54-175 days. There were no ERCP-related complications. In our case review, endoscopic management with endobiliary stent placement was found to be successful and resulted in resolution of the bile leak in all 14 patients. Based on our study results, ERCP should be considered as first-line therapy in the management of traumatic bile leaks.

  3. Bile acids for liver-transplanted patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poropat, Goran; Giljaca, Vanja; Stimac, Davor

    2010-01-01

    Liver transplantation has become a widely accepted form of treatment for numerous end-stage liver diseases. Bile acids may decrease allograft rejection after liver transplantation by changing the expression of major histocompatibility complex class molecules in bile duct epithelium and central vein...

  4. Endoscopic and laparoscopic treatment of gastroesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, David I; Immanuel, Arul

    2010-04-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is extremely common in Western countries. For selected patients, there is an established role for the surgical treatment of reflux, and possibly an emerging role for endoscopic antireflux procedures. Randomized trials have compared medical versus surgical management, laparoscopic versus open surgery and partial versus total fundoplications. However, the evidence base for endoscopic procedures is limited to some small sham-controlled studies, and cohort studies with short-term follow-up. Laparoscopic fundoplication has been shown to be an effective antireflux operation. It facilitates quicker convalescence and is associated with fewer complications, but has a similar longer term outcome compared with open antireflux surgery. In most randomized trials, antireflux surgery achieves at least as good control of reflux as medical therapy, and these studies support a wider application of surgery for the treatment of moderate-to-severe reflux. Laparoscopic partial fundoplication is an effective surgical procedure with fewer side effects, and it may achieve high rates of patient satisfaction at late follow-up. Many of the early endoscopic antireflux procedures have failed to achieve effective reflux control, and they have been withdrawn from the market. Newer procedures have the potential to fashion a surgical fundoplication. However, at present there is insufficient evidence to establish the safety and efficacy of endoscopic procedures for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux, and no endoscopic procedure has achieved equivalent reflux control to that achieved by surgical fundoplication.

  5. Motor disorders of the oesophagus in gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    OpenAIRE

    Mahony, M J; Migliavacca, M; Spitz, L; Milla, P J

    1988-01-01

    Mechanisms of gastro-oesophageal reflux were studied by oesophageal manometry and pH monitoring in 33 children: nine controls, 15 with gastro-oesophageal reflux alone, and nine with reflux oesophagitis. A total of 122 episodes of reflux were analysed in detail: 82 (67%) were synchronous with swallowing and 40 (33%) asynchronous. Infants with trivial symptoms had gastro-oesophageal reflux synchronous with swallowing, whereas those with serious symptoms had slower acid clearance and asynchronou...

  6. Bile acids in radiation-induced diarrhea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arlow, F.L.; Dekovich, A.A.; Priest, R.J.; Beher, W.T.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation-induced bowel disease manifested by debilitating diarrhea is an unfortunate consequence of therapeutic irradiation for pelvic malignancies. Although the mechanism for this diarrhea is not well understood, many believe it is the result of damage to small bowel mucosa and subsequent bile acid malabsorption. Excess amounts of bile acids, especially the dihydroxy components, are known to induce water and electrolyte secretion and increase bowel motility. We have directly measured individual and total bile acids in the stool samples of 11 patients with radiation-induced diarrhea and have found bile acids elevated two to six times normal in eight of them. Our patients with diarrhea and increased bile acids in their stools had prompt improvement when given cholestyramine. They had fewer stools and returned to a more normal life-style

  7. Acute bile nephropathy secondary to anabolic steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhunaizi, Ahmed M; ElTigani, Mohamed A; Rabah, Rola S; Nasr, Samih H

    2016-02-01

    Renal dysfunction in cholestatic liver disease is multifactorial. Acute kidney injury may develop secondary to renal vasoconstriction in the setting of peripheral vasodilation and relative hypovolemia, tubular obstruction by bile casts, and direct tubular toxicity from bile. Anabolic steroids are frequently used by athletes to boost endurance and increase muscle mass. These agents are a recently recognized cause of hepatotoxicity and jaundice and may lead to acute kidney injury. To increase awareness about this growing problem and to characterize the pathology of acute kidney injury in this setting, we report on a young male who developed acute kidney injury in the setting of severe cholestatic jaundice related to ingestion of anabolic steroids used for bodybuilding. Kidney biopsy showed bile casts within distal tubular lumina, filamentous bile inclusions within tubular cells, and signs of acute tubular injury. This report supports the recently re-emerged concept of bile nephropathy cholemic nephrosis.

  8. Esophageal motility abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinucci, Irene; de Bortoli, Nicola; Giacchino, Maria; Bodini, Giorgia; Marabotto, Elisa; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Vincenzo; Savarino, Edoardo

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal motility abnormalities are among the main factors implicated in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The recent introduction in clinical and research practice of novel esophageal testing has markedly improved our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease, allowing a better management of patients with this disorder. In this context, the present article intends to provide an overview of the current literature about esophageal motility dysfunctions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal manometry, by recording intraluminal pressure, represents the gold standard to diagnose esophageal motility abnormalities. In particular, using novel techniques, such as high resolution manometry with or without concurrent intraluminal impedance monitoring, transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations, hypotensive LES, ineffective esophageal peristalsis and bolus transit abnormalities have been better defined and strongly implicated in gastroesophageal reflux disease development. Overall, recent findings suggest that esophageal motility abnormalities are increasingly prevalent with increasing severity of reflux disease, from non-erosive reflux disease to erosive reflux disease and Barrett’s esophagus. Characterizing esophageal dysmotility among different subgroups of patients with reflux disease may represent a fundamental approach to properly diagnose these patients and, thus, to set up the best therapeutic management. Currently, surgery represents the only reliable way to restore the esophagogastric junction integrity and to reduce transient LES relaxations that are considered to be the predominant mechanism by which gastric contents can enter the esophagus. On that ground, more in depth future studies assessing the pathogenetic role of dysmotility in patients with reflux disease are warranted. PMID:24868489

  9. Stimulation of apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter expands the bile acid pool and generates bile acids with positive feedback properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudling, Mats; Bonde, Ylva

    2015-01-01

    Bile acid synthesis has been considered a prototype for how a physiological process is controlled by end product feedback inhibition. By this feedback inhibition, bile acid concentrations are kept within safe ranges. However, careful examination of published rodent data strongly suggests that bile acid synthesis is also under potent positive feedback control by hydrophilic bile acids. Current concepts on the regulation of bile acid synthesis are derived from mouse models. Recent data have shown that mice have farnesoid X receptor (FXR) antagonistic bile acids capable of quenching responses elicited by FXR agonistic bile acids. This is important to recognize to understand the regulation of bile acid synthesis in the mouse, and in particular to clarify if mouse model findings are valid also in the human situation. In addition to classic end product feedback inhibition, regulation of bile acid synthesis in the mouse largely appears also to be driven by changes in hepatic levels of murine bile acids such as α- and β-muricholic acids. This has not been previously recognized. Stimulated bile acid synthesis or induction of the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter in the intestine, increase the availability of chenodeoxycholic acid in the liver, thereby promoting hepatic conversion of this bile acid into muricholic acids. Recognition of these mechanisms is essential for understanding the regulation of bile acid synthesis in the mouse, and for our awareness of important species differences in the regulation of bile acid synthesis in mice and humans. 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Pluronic®-bile salt mixed micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vijay; Ray, Debes; Bahadur, Anita; Ma, Junhe; Aswal, V K; Bahadur, Pratap

    2018-06-01

    The present study was aimed to examine the interaction of two bile salts viz. sodium cholate (NaC) and sodium deoxycholate (NaDC) with three ethylene polyoxide-polypropylene polyoxide (PEO-PPO-PEO) triblock copolymers with similar PPO but varying PEO micelles with a focus on the effect of pH on mixed micelles. Mixed micelles of moderately hydrophobic Pluronic ® P123 were examined in the presence of two bile salts and compared with those from very hydrophobic L121 and very hydrophilic F127. Both the bile salts increase the cloud point (CP) of copolymer solution and decreased apparent micelle hydrodynamic diameter (D h ). SANS study revealed that P123 forms small spherical micelles showing a decrease in size on progressive addition of bile salts. The negatively charged mixed micelles contained fewer P123 molecules but progressively rich in bile salt. NaDC being more hydrophobic displays more pronounced effect than NaC. Interestingly, NaC shows micellar growth in acidic media which has been attributed to the formation of bile acids by protonation of carboxylate ion and subsequent solubilization. In contrast, NaDC showed phase separation at higher concentration. Nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) experiments provided information on interaction and location of bile salts in micelles. Results are discussed in terms of hydrophobicity of bile salts and Pluronics ® and the site of bile salt in polymer micelles. Proposed molecular interactions are useful to understand more about bile salts which play important role in physiological processes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Role of Acid and Weakly Acidic Reflux in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Off Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Sung, Hea Jung; Cho, Yu Kyung; Moon, Sung Jin; Kim, Jin Su; Lim, Chul Hyun; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In Seok; Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Myung-Gye

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims Available data about reflux patterns and symptom determinants in the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) subtypes off proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy are lacking. We aimed to evaluate reflux patterns and determinants of symptom perception in patients with GERD off PPI therapy by impedance-pH monitoring. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the impedance-pH data in patients diagnosed as GERD based on results of impedance-pH monitoring, endoscopy and/or typical symptoms. T...

  12. Acid reflux episodes sensitize the esophagus to perception of weakly acidic and mixed reflux in non-erosive reflux disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerenziani, S; Ribolsi, M; Guarino, M P L; Balestrieri, P; Altomare, A; Rescio, M P; Cicala, M

    2014-01-01

    Non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) patients are more sensitive than erosive esophagitis patients to weakly acidic reflux and to the presence of gas in the refluxate. Intra-esophageal acid perfusion sensitizes esophageal receptors to mechanical and chemical stimuli. To establish whether acid sensitization plays a role in the perception of weakly acidic and mixed reflux episodes, 29 NERD patients, responders and 14 non-responders to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), underwent pH-impedance monitoring. Non-responders repeated the study while on PPIs. To assess the effect of acid exposure on symptom perception, the time period with pH below 4 was measured in 15- and 30-minute time-windows preceding the onset of each reflux episode. Considering weakly acidic and mixed refluxes, both in responder and non-responder patients (off PPIs), the symptomatic refluxes were preceded by a significantly higher cumulative acid exposure than the asymptomatic refluxes. In all patients, following acid reflux, the percentage of symptomatic weakly acidic reflux episodes was significantly higher than that of asymptomatic refluxes. Non-responder patients, off-treatment, were characterized by a lower proportion of weakly acidic reflux and mixed reflux episodes. In the non-responder patients on PPI, only mixed and weakly symptomatic reflux episodes were preceded by a higher cumulative acid exposure. In NERD patients, spontaneous acid reflux enhances subsequent reflux perception, regardless of acidity or liquid/mixed composition of episodes; in non-responder patients on PPIs, only the perception of mixed and weakly acidic reflux episodes seems to be mediated by a preceding acid exposure. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Reflux esophagitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease: a cross-sectional study of gastroesophageal reflux disease patients by age group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora Filho Rowilson

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between the intensity of acid reflux and severity of esophageal tissue damage in a cross-sectional study of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. Seventy-eight patients with were selected in accordance with the strict 24-hour ambulatory esophageal pHmetry (24h-pHM criteria and distributed into three age groups: Group A: 14 - 24 years of age. Group B: 25 - 54; and Group C: 55 - 64. The 24h-pHM was carried out in accordance with DeMeester standardization, and the Savary-Miller classification for the diagnosis of reflux esophagitis was used. The groups were similar in 24h-pHM parameters (p > 0.05, having above normal values. For the study group as a whole, there was no correlation between age group and intensity of acid reflux, and there was no correlation between intensity of acid reflux and severity of esophageal tissue damage. However, when the same patients were sub-grouped in accordance with the depth of their epithelial injury and then distributed into age groups, there was a significant difference in esophagitis without epithelial discontinuity. Younger patients had less epithelial damage than older patients. Additionally, although there was a significant progression from the least severe to the moderate stages of epithelial damage among the age groups, there was no apparent difference among the age groups in the distribution between the moderate stages and most severe stages. The findings support the conclusion that the protective response of individuals to acid reflux varies widely. Continued aggression by acid reflux appears to lead to the exhaustion of individual mechanisms of epithelial protection in some patients, but not others, regardless of age or duration of the disease. Therefore, the diagnosis and follow-up of GERD should include both measurements of the quantity of refluxed acid and an assessment of the damage to the esophageal epithelium.

  14. Laparoscopic Anti-Reflux (GERD) Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Humanitarian Efforts Login Laparoscopic Anti-Reflux (GERD) Surgery Patient Information from SAGES Download PDF Find a SAGES Surgeon Surgery for “Heartburn” If you suffer from moderate to ...

  15. [Gastro-oesophageal reflux in infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Trudy; Kamphuis, Mascha; Kivit-Schwengle, Lilly

    2014-01-01

    A more prominent role for the youth healthcare physician: Youth Healthcare physicians reflect on the Dutch Paediatric Association (NVK) guideline entitled 'Gastro-oesophageal reflux (disease) in children aged 0-18 years'. This guideline states that medicinal treatment is given to these children too often. Dutch Youth Healthcare physicians see a large number of children with gastro-oesophageal reflux, with or without additional symptoms. The most common symptoms (crying and diminished weight gain) might be present even in the absence of reflux. Parents should be given advice and support when they are worried about reflux, crying or low weight gain. A lower weight gain curve on the growth chart is normal in breastfed children, and crying might be due to factors such as lack of routine or stimulus reduction. Overfeeding might also be the cause. Parents should be supported and followed up, with or without treatment, as necessary. Youth Healthcare professionals could perform this task.

  16. EAU Guidelines on Vesicoureteral Reflux in Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tekgul, Serdar; Riedmiller, Hubertus; Hoebeke, Piet; Kocvara, Radim; Nijman, Rien J. M.; Radmayr, Christian; Stein, Raimund; Dogan, Hasan Serkan

    Context: Primary vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is a common congenital urinary tract abnormality in children. There is considerable controversy regarding its management. Preservation of kidney function is the main goal of treatment, which necessitates identification of patients requiring early

  17. Pediatric GERD (Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Pediatric GERD (Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease) Pediatric GERD (Gastro-Esophageal ... What symptoms are displayed by a child with GERD? While GER and EER in children often cause ...

  18. Quantitation of esophageal transit and gastroesophageal reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmud, L.S.; Fisher, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    Scintigraphic techniques are the only quantitative methods for the evaluation of esophageal transit and gastroesophageal reflux. By comparison, other techniques are not quantitative and are either indirect, inconvenient, or less sensitive. Methods, such as perfusion techniques, which measure flow, require the introduction of a tube assembly into the gastrointestinal tract with the possible introduction of artifacts into the measurements due to the indwelling tubes. Earlier authors using radionuclide markers, introduced a method for measuring gastric emptying which was both tubeless and quantitative in comparison to other techniques. More recently, a number of scintigraphic methods have been introduced for the quantitation of esophageal transit and clearance, the detection and quantitation of gastroesophageal reflux, the measurement of gastric emptying using a mixed solid-liquid meal, and the quantitation of enterogastric reflux. This chapter reviews current techniques for the evaluation of esophageal transit and gastroesophageal reflux

  19. Grading of vesicoureteral reflux by radionuclide cystography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fretzayas, A.; Karpathios, T.; Dimitriou, P.; Nicolaidou, P.; Matsaniotis, N.

    1984-01-01

    Thirty-six children with urinary tract infection aged 6 months to 14 years (mean age 4 1/2 years) were studied sequentially using direct radionuclide (RNC) and conventional voiding cystourethrography (VCU). Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) was detected equally well by both methods. Twenty-seven refluxing ureters were found by RNC, 23 by VCU and 22 by both methods. Radiologic grade of reflux may be determined approximately with the isotope technique from the volume of regurgitating urine und duration of reflux, at a much decreased radiation exposure. Residual urine was also measured by RNC and found to be higher in children with VUR. RNC is a reliable method for detecting and grading VUR and should effectively replace VCU as the follow-up examination of choice. (orig.)

  20. Bile Duct Adenoma with Oncocytic Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. J. Johannesen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bile duct adenomas are benign bile duct proliferations usually encountered as an incidental finding. Oncocytic bile duct neoplasms are rare and the majority are malignant. A 61-year-old male with a diagnosis of colorectal adenocarcinoma was undergoing surgery when a small white nodule was discovered on the surface of the right lobe of his liver. This lesion was composed of cytologically bland cells arranged in tightly packed glands. These cells were immunopositive for cytokeratin 7, negative for Hep Par 1, contained mucin, and had a Ki67 proliferation index of 8%. The morphology, immunophenotype, presence of mucin, and normal appearing bile ducts, as well as the increased Ki67 proliferation rate, were consistent with a bile duct adenoma with oxyphilic (oncocytic change. Oncocytic tumors in the liver are rare; the first described in 1992. Only two bile duct adenomas with oncocytic change have been reported and neither of them had reported mucin production or the presence of normal appearing bile ducts within the lesion.

  1. History of Hepatic Bile Formation: Old Problems, New Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javitt, Norman B.

    2014-01-01

    Studies of hepatic bile formation reported in 1958 established that it was an osmotically generated water flow. Intravenous infusion of sodium taurocholate established a high correlation between hepatic bile flow and bile acid excretion. Secretin, a hormone that stimulates bicarbonate secretion, was also found to increase hepatic bile flow. The…

  2. The influence of bile acids homeostasis by cryptotanshinone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The homeostasis of bile acids can be tightly regulated through feed-back and feed-forward regula- tion pathways. Bile acids exert their toxicity towards cells at high concentrations, and the accumulation of bile acids can induce the severe damage towards liver cells 2. Bile acids have been reported to induce cell injury.

  3. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: A Population Based Study

    OpenAIRE

    Nwokediuko, Sylvester

    2009-01-01

    Background The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease varies in different parts of the world. There are no population based studies in Nigeria. The main objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence and risk factors for gastroesophageal reflux disease in a population of Nigerian medical students. Methods The Carlsson-Dent questionnaire was administered to medical students in the clinical phase of their training at the University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus. Some putative risk ...

  4. Motor disorders of the oesophagus in gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahony, M J; Migliavacca, M; Spitz, L; Milla, P J

    1988-01-01

    Mechanisms of gastro-oesophageal reflux were studied by oesophageal manometry and pH monitoring in 33 children: nine controls, 15 with gastro-oesophageal reflux alone, and nine with reflux oesophagitis. A total of 122 episodes of reflux were analysed in detail: 82 (67%) were synchronous with swallowing and 40 (33%) asynchronous. Infants with trivial symptoms had gastro-oesophageal reflux synchronous with swallowing, whereas those with serious symptoms had slower acid clearance and asynchronous reflux. There were significant differences in lower oesophageal sphincter pressure and amplitude of oesophageal contractions between controls and patients with both gastro-oesophageal reflux and reflux oesophagitis. In reflux oesophagitis there was a decrease in lower oesophageal sphincter pressure and the contractions had a bizarre waveform suggesting a neuropathic process. PMID:3202640

  5. Structure of plant bile pigments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenleber, R.W.

    1983-12-01

    Selective peptide cleavage has provided a general procedure for the study of the structure, including stereochemistry, of plant bile pigments. The information derived from the synthesis and spectral analysis of a series of 2,3-dihydrodioxobilins allows the determination of the trans relative stereochemistry for ring A of the ..beta../sub 1/-phycocyanobilin from C-phycocyanin as well as for ring A of phytochrome. A complete structure proof of the five phycoerythrobilins attached to the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of B-phycoerythrin is described. One of these tetrapyrroles is doubly-peptide linked to a single peptide chain through two thioethers at the C-3' and C-18' positions. The four remaining phycoerythrobilins are singly-linked to the protein through thioethers at the C-3' position and all possess the probable stereochemistry C-2(R), C-3(R), C-3'(R), and C-16(R).

  6. Influence of exercise testing in gastroesophageal reflux in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes-Filho, Antonio Moreira; Moraes-Filho, Joaquim Prado Pinto; Nasi, Ary; Eisig, Jaime Natan; Rodrigues, Tomas Navarro; Barbutti, Ricardo Correa; Campos, Josemberg Marins; Chinzon, Decio

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a worldwide prevalent condition that exhibits a large variety of signs and symptoms of esophageal or extra-esophageal nature and can be related to the esophagic adenocarcinoma. In the last few years, greater importance has been given to the influence of physical exercises on it. Some recent investigations, though showing conflicting results, point to an exacerbation of gastroesophageal reflux during physical exercises. To evaluate the influence of physical activities in patients presenting with erosive and non erosive disease by ergometric stress testing and influence of the lower esophageal sphincter tonus and body mass index during this situation. Twenty-nine patients with erosive disease (group I) and 10 patients with non-erosive disease (group II) were prospectively evaluated. All the patients were submitted to clinical evaluation, followed by upper digestive endoscopy, manometry and 24 h esophageal pH monitoring. An ergometric testing was performed 1 h before removing the esophageal pH probe. During the ergometric stress testing, the following variables were analyzed: test efficacy, maximum oxygen uptake, acid reflux duration, gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, influence of the lower esophageal sphincter tonus and influence of body mass index in the occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux during these physical stress. Maximum oxigen consumption or VO 2 max, showed significant correlation when it was 70% or higher only in the erosive disease group, evaluating the patients with or without acid reflux during the ergometric testing (p=0,032). The other considered variables didn't show significant correlations between gastroesophageal reflux and physical activity (p>0,05). 1) Highly intensive physical activity can predispose the occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux episodes in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients with erosive disease; 2) light or short sessions of physical activity have no influence on reflux, regardless of body

  7. The effect of dietary carbohydrate on gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Keng-Liang; Kuo, Chung-Mou; Yao, Chih-Chien; Tai, Wei-Chen; Chuah, Seng-Kee; Lim, Chee-Sang; Chiu, Yi-Chun

    2018-01-12

    Acid changes in gastroesophageal reflux with vary component in the food have less been studied, especially carbohydrate. We plan to clarify the effect of different carbohydrate density on low esophageal acid and reflux symptoms of patients with gastroesophgeal reflux disease. Twelve patients (52 ± 12 years old; five female) with gastroesophageal reflux disease were recruited for the prospective crossover study. Each patient was invited for panendoscope, manometry and 24 h pH monitor. The two formulated liquid meal, test meal A: 500 ml liquid meal (containing 84.8 g carbohydrate) and B: same volume liquid meal (but 178.8 g carbohydrate) were randomized supplied as lunch or dinner. Reflux symptoms were recorded. There are significant statistic differences in more Johnson-DeMeester score (p = 0.019), total reflux time (%) (p = 0.028), number of reflux periods (p = 0.026) and longest reflux (p = 0.015) after high carbohydrate diet than low carbohydrate. Total reflux time and number of long reflux periods more than 5 min are significant more after high carbohydrate diet. More acid reflux symptoms are found after high carbohydrate diet. High carbohydrate diet could induce more acid reflux in low esophagus and more reflux symptoms in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Preparation of [3beta-3H] labeled bile acids and bile alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayal, B.; Baga, E.; Tint, G.S.; Shefer, S.; Salen, G.

    1979-01-01

    [3beta-3H]-bile acids and bile alcohols may be useful for metabolic studies in man and animals because the 3-position is invulnerable to bacterial attack. A number of tritium labeled bile acids and bile alcohols were prepared by selective oxidation of the hydroxyl group at carbon-3 followed by reduction with NaBT4. In each case, the bile acids and bile alcohols epimeric at carbon-3 were resolved by analytical and preparative thin-layer chromatography and characterized by gas liquid chromatography. The average yield was 60 to 65% and specific activities of the final products were in the range of 7.4 x 10 7 dpm/mg

  9. [Correlations of bile acids in the bile of rats in conditions of alloxan induced diabetes melitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danchenko, N M; Vesel'skyĭ, S P; Tsudzevych, B O

    2014-01-01

    The ratio of bile acids in the bile of rats with alloxan diabetes was investigated using the method of thin-layer chromatography. Changes of coefficients of conjugation and hydroxylation of bile acids were calculated and analyzed in half-hour samples of bile obtained during the 3-hour experiment. It has been found that the processes of conjugation of cholic acid with glycine and taurine are inhibited in alloxan diabetes. At the same time a significant increase of free threehydroxycholic and dixydroxycholic bile acids and conjugates of the latter ones with taurine has been registered. Coefficients of hydroxylation in alloxan diabetes show the domination of "acidic" pathway in bile acid biosynthesis that is tightly connected with the activity of mitochondrial enzymes.

  10. Association of canalicular membrane enzymes with bile acid micelles and lipid aggregates in human and rat bile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accatino, L; Pizarro, M; Solís, N; Koenig, C S

    1995-01-18

    This study was undertaken to gain insights into the characteristics of the polymolecular association between canalicular membrane enzymes, bile acids, cholesterol and phospholipids in bile and into the celular mechanisms whereby the enzymes are secreted into bile. With this purpose, we studied the distribution of bile acids, cholesterol, phospholipids, proteins and representative canalicular membrane enzymes (alkaline phosphatase, 5'-nucleotidase and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase), which can be considered specific marker constituents, in bile fractions enriched in phospholipid-cholesterol lamellar structures (multilamellar and unilamellar vesicles) and bile acid-mixed micelles. These fractions were isolated by ultracentrifugation from human hepatic bile, normal rat bile and bile of rats treated with diosgenin, a steroid that induces a marked increase in biliary cholesterol secretion, and were characterized by density, lipid composition and transmission electron microscopy. These studies demonstrate that alkaline phosphatase, 5'-nucleotidase and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase are secreted into both human and rat bile where they are preferentially associated with bile acid-mixed micelles, suggesting a role for bile acids in both release of these enzymes and lipids from the canalicular membrane and solubilization in bile. In addition, heterogeneous association of these enzymes with nonmicellar, lamellar structures in human and rat bile is consistent with the hypothesis that processes independent of the detergent effects of bile acids might also result in the release of specific intrinsic membrane proteins into bile.

  11. Correlation between chemical components of billary calculi and bile & sera and bile of gallstone patients

    OpenAIRE

    Chandran, Prasheeda; Garg, Pradeep; Pundir, Chandra S.

    2005-01-01

    Total cholesterol, total bilirubin, calcium, oxalate, inorganic phosphate, magnesium, iron, copper, sodium and potassium were analyzed quantitatively in gallstones, bile of gall bladder and sera of 200 patients of cholelithiasis (52 cholesterol, 76 mixed and 72 pigment stone patients) and their contents were correlated between calculi and bile and sera and bile in these three type of stone patients. A significant positive correlation was observed between total cholesterol, total bilirubin of ...

  12. Regional oesophageal sensitivity to acid and weakly acidic reflux in patients with non-erosive reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerenziani, S; Ribolsi, M; Sifrim, D; Blondeau, K; Cicala, M

    2009-03-01

    The mechanisms underlying symptoms in non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) remain to be elucidated. Non-erosive reflux disease patients appear to be more sensitive to intraluminal stimula than erosive patients, the proximal oesophagus being the most sensitive. In order to assess regional oesophageal changes in reflux acidity and sensitivity to reflux, according either to the acidity or the composition of the refluxate, combined multiple pH and multiple pH-impedance (pH-MII) was performed in 16 NERD patients. According to multiple pH-metry, 29% and 12% of reflux events reached the middle and proximal oesophagus respectively, and 35% and 19% according to conventional pH-MII (P acid reflux became weakly acidic at the proximal oesophagus. In all patients, the frequency of symptomatic refluxes, both acid and weakly acidic, was significantly higher at the proximal, compared with distal oesophagus (25 +/- 8%vs 11 +/- 2% for acid reflux and 27 +/- 8%vs 8 +/- 2% for weakly acidic reflux; P reflux. As approximately 30% of acid reflux becomes weakly acidic along the oesophageal body, to better characterize proximal reflux, in clinical practice, combined proximal pH-impedance monitoring should be used. In NERD patients, the proximal oesophagus seems to be more sensitive to both acid and weakly acidic reflux.

  13. Postprandial gastro-oesophageal reflux demonstrated by radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, P.R.; Mohr Madsen, K.; Naeser, A.; Thommesen, P. (Aarhus Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology)

    1991-05-01

    An investigation to detect food-stimulated gastro-oesophageal (GE) reflux was carried out in 54 consecutive fasting patients, 35 of whom experienced reflux while 19 did not. All patients then received a standard meal (566 kcal), and the investigation was repeated 1 h afterward. Of the 35 with GE reflux in the fasting state, 33 also had GE reflux in the postprandial state, and 17 of the 19 patients with no GE reflux while fasting also had none in the postprandial state. It is concluded that the radiological method can identify most patients in whom food-stimulated GE reflux could be of clinical significance. (orig.).

  14. Detection of endogenous DNA adducts, O-carboxymethyl-2'-deoxyguanosine and 3-ethanesulfonic acid-2'-deoxycytidine, in the rat stomach after duodenal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasaki, Masaru; Totsuka, Yukari; Nishimura, Koichi; Mukaisho, Ken-Ichi; Chen, Kuan-Hao; Hattori, Takanori; Takamura-Enya, Takeji; Sugimura, Takashi; Wakabayashi, Keiji

    2008-09-01

    The endogenous DNA adducts O(6)-carboxymethyl-deoxyguanosine (O(6)-CM-dG) and 3-ethanesulfonic acid-deoxycytidine (3-ESA-dC) are produced from N-nitroso bile acid conjugates, such as N-nitrosoglycocholic acid (NO-GCA) and N-nitrosotaurocholic acid (NO-TCA), respectively. Formation of these DNA adducts in vivo was here analyzed by 32P-postlabeling in the glandular stomach of rats subjected to duodenal content reflux surgery. In this model, all duodenal contents, including bile acid conjugates, flow back from the jejunum into the gastric corpus. The levels of O(6)-CM-dG found at 4 and 8 weeks after surgery were 40.9 +/- 9.4 and 56.3 +/- 3.2 per 10(8) nucleotides, respectively, whereas the sham operation groups had values of 5.8 +/- 2.3 and 5.9 +/- 0.5 per 10(8) nucleotides. Moreover, adduct spots corresponding to 3-ESA-dC were detected in both duodenal reflux and sham operation groups and levels in the duodenal reflux groups were around four-fold elevated at 11.2 +/- 1.0 and 8.9 +/- 1.0 per 10(8) nucleotides after 4 and 8 weeks, respectively. When the duodenal reflux animals were treated with a nitrite trapping agent, thiazolidine- 4-carboxylic acid (thioproline, TPRO), the levels of O(6)-CM-dG and 3-ESA-dC were reduced to the same levels as in the sham operation animals. These observations suggest that NO-TCA and NO-GCA are formed by nitrosation of glycocholic acid and taurocholic acid, respectively, and these nitroso compounds produce DNA adducts in the glandular stomach of rats subjected to duodenal content reflux surgery.

  15. Effect of coffee on gastro-oesophageal reflux in patients with reflux disease and healthy controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekema, P. J.; Samsom, M.; Smout, A. J.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) report that coffee aggravates their symptoms and doctors tend to discourage its use in GORD. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of coffee ingestion on gastro-oesophageal acid reflux. DESIGN: A randomized, controlled, crossover

  16. Patterns of reflux in gastroesophageal reflux disease in pediatric population of New South Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sarath Kumar; Cohen, Ralph Clinton; Karpelowsky, Jonathan Saul

    2017-02-01

    This study is to determine the association of ambulatory pH monitoring (24hr pH) with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux and its other investigations. The clinical and epidemiological profiles of subjects referred for reflux disorders are also studied. Symptoms or group of symptoms, profiles and prior investigations of 1259 consecutive pediatric subjects (with 1332 24hr pH studies performed) referred for evaluation of reflux disorders between 1988 and 2012 were retrospectively studied. Chi-square or fisher exact test was used for hypothesis testing, student t-test for the comparison of means and the Wilcoxon rank-sum test for comparing medians of continuous variables. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), defined as reflux causing major symptoms and complications, was diagnosed in 57.5% subjects of the total sample. Forty-three percent were girls and 56.7% were boys. The most common age group was between 4 months and 2 years (51.2%). Vomiting (64.4%) and irritability (74%) were the most common symptoms with the neurological conditions (23.2%) being the most frequent underlying condition. The parameters used in 24hr pH were significantly higher in those diagnosed with GERD (P reflux disorders. 24hr pH is reliable and should be considered routine in reflux disorders, as it identifies patients with pathologic reflux and avoids a needless surgery. © 2016 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  17. Air swallowing, belching, and reflux in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredenoord, Albert J.; Weusten, Bas L. A. M.; Timmer, Robin; Smout, André J. P. M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Belching and gastroesophageal reflux share a common physiological mechanism. The aim of this study was to investigate whether air swallowing leads to both belching and reflux. METHODS: Esophageal impedance, pH, and pressure were measured during two 20-min recording periods in 12 controls

  18. Effects of lesogaberan on reflux and lower esophageal sphincter function in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; Beaumont, Hanneke; Mertens, Veerle; Denison, Hans; Ruth, Magnus; Adler, John; Silberg, Debra G.; Sifrim, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) are a major mechanism behind reflux. This study assessed the effects of lesogaberan (AZD3355), a novel gamma-aminobutyric acid type B receptor agonist, on reflux and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) function when used as

  19. Do laryngoscopic findings reflect the characteristics of reflux in patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y C; Kwon, O E; Park, J M; Eun, Y G

    2018-02-01

    To analyse the association between 24-hour multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH (24-h MII-pH) parameters and each item of the reflux finding score (RFS) to determine whether the laryngoscopic findings of the RFS could reflect the characteristics of reflux in patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR). Prospective cohort study. Tertiary care referral medical centre. Patients complaining of LPR symptoms were evaluated via a 24-hour MII-pH. Among them, 99 patients whose LPR was confirmed via 24-hour MII-pH were enrolled in this study. Correlations between RFS ratings and 24-hour MII-pH parameters were evaluated and compared between patients with or without each laryngoscopic finding used in the RFS. Subglottic oedema had a statistically significant positive correlation with number of non-acid LPR and non-acid full column reflux events. Ventricular obliteration and posterior commissure hypertrophy showed a significant correlation with non-acid exposure time and total reflux exposure time. We also found a significant correlation between granuloma/granulation score and number of acid LPR events. The numbers of non-acid LPR and full column reflux events in patients with subglottic oedema were significantly higher than those without subglottic oedema. Among the laryngoscopic findings used in the RFS, subglottic oedema is specific for non-acid reflux episodes, and granuloma/granulation is specific for acid reflux episodes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Allelic variation of bile salt hydrolase genes in Lactobacillus salivarius does not determine bile resistance levels.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fang, Fang

    2009-09-01

    Commensal lactobacilli frequently produce bile salt hydrolase (Bsh) enzymes whose roles in intestinal survival are unclear. Twenty-six Lactobacillus salivarius strains from different sources all harbored a bsh1 allele on their respective megaplasmids. This allele was related to the plasmid-borne bsh1 gene of the probiotic strain UCC118. A second locus (bsh2) was found in the chromosomes of two strains that had higher bile resistance levels. Four Bsh1-encoding allele groups were identified, defined by truncations or deletions involving a conserved residue. In vitro analyses showed that this allelic variation was correlated with widely varying bile deconjugation phenotypes. Despite very low activity of the UCC118 Bsh1 enzyme, a mutant lacking this protein had significantly lower bile resistance, both in vitro and during intestinal transit in mice. However, the overall bile resistance phenotype of this and other strains was independent of the bsh1 allele type. Analysis of the L. salivarius transcriptome upon exposure to bile and cholate identified a multiplicity of stress response proteins and putative efflux proteins that appear to broadly compensate for, or mask, the effects of allelic variation of bsh genes. Bsh enzymes with different bile-degrading kinetics, though apparently not the primary determinants of bile resistance in L. salivarius, may have additional biological importance because of varying effects upon bile as a signaling molecule in the host.

  1. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and vocal disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida Coelho de Arruda Henry

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a chronic disease in which gastroduodenal contents reflux into the esophagus. The clinical picture of gastroesophageal reflux disease is usually composed by heartburn and regurgitation (typical manifestations. Atypical manifestations (vocal disturbances and asthma may also be complaint. OBJECTIVE: To analyse the clinical, endoscopic, manometric and pHmetric aspects of patients suffering from gastroesophageal reflux disease associated with vocal disturbances. METHODS: Fifty patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease were studied, including 25 with vocal disturbances (group 1 - G1 and 25 without these symptoms (group 2 - G2. All patients were submitted to endoscopy, manometry and esophageal pHmetry (2 probes. The group 1 patients were submitted to videolaryngoscopy. RESULTS: Endoscopic findings: non-erosive reflux disease was observed in 95% of G1 patients and 88% of G2. Videolaryngoscopy: vocal fold congestion, asymmetry, nodules and polyps were observed in G1 patients. Manometric findings: pressure in the lower esophageal sphincter (mm Hg: 11.6 ± 5.2 in G1 and 14.0 ± 6.2 in G2 (P = 0.14; pressure in the upper esophageal sphincter (mm Hg: 58.4 ± 15.9 in G1 and 69.5 ± 30.7 in the controls. pHmetric findings: De Meester index: 34.0 ± 20.9 in G1 and 15.4 ± 9.4 in G2 (P<0.001; number of reflux episodes in distal probe: 43.0 ± 20.4 in G1 and 26.4 ± 17.2 in G2 (P = 0.003; percentage of time with esophageal pH value lower than 4 units (distal sensor: 9.0% ± 6.4% in G1 and 3.4% ± 2.1% in G2 (P<0.001; number of reflux episodes in proximal probe: 7.5 ± 10.9 in G1 and 5.3 ± 5.7 in G2 (P = 0.38; percentage of time with esophageal pH values lower than 4 units (Proximal probe: 1.2 ± 2.7 in G1 and 0.5 ± 0.7 in G2 (P = 0.21. CONCLUSIONS: 1 The clinical, endoscopic, and manometric findings observed in patients with vocal disturbance do not differ from those without these symptoms; 2 gastroesophageal

  2. Reproducibility of gastroesophageal reflux scintigraphy and the standard acid reflux test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, B.; Petersen, H.; Grette, K.; Myrvold, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    Patients with symptoms compatible with gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease and asymptomatic controls were evaluated three times for GER by gastroesophageal reflux scintigraphy (GES) at intervals ranging from 6 h to 15 days and after various periods of fasting. Similarly, in patients and controls, pH monitoring at the distal esophagus was conducted three times by applying the standard reflux test (SART) at intervals ranging from 4 h to 3 days after different fasting periods. In 18 of 19 patients and 14 of 15 controls the results of SART were indentical on all three occations. A similar agreement was found for GES in 23 of 25 patients and 20 of 21 controls. The reproducibility of the induced type of reflux after ingestion of acidified organic juce was significantly better than that of the spontaneous types or the induced type of reflux after ingestion of saline. It is concluded that the reproducibility of GES and SART is similatly good

  3. Reproducibility of gastroesophageal reflux scintigraphy and the standard acid reflux test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaul, B.; Petersen, H.; Grette, K.; Myrvold, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    Patients with symptoms compatible with gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease and asymptomatic controls were evaluated three times for GER by gastroesophageal reflux scintigraphy (GES) at intervals ranging from 6 h to 15 days and after various periods of fasting. Similarly, in patients and controls, pH monitoring at the distal esophagus was conducted three times by applying the standard reflux test (SART) at intervals ranging from 4 h to 3 days after different fasting periods. In 18 of 19 patients and 14 of 15 controls the results of SART were indentical on all three occations. A similar agreement was found for GES in 23 of 25 patients and 20 of 21 controls. The reproducibility of the induced type of reflux after ingestion of acidified organic juce was significantly better than that of the spontaneous types or the induced type of reflux after ingestion of saline. It is concluded that the reproducibility of GES and SART is similatly good.

  4. Cholangiographic evaluation of bile duct carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, D.A.; MacCarty, R.L.; Gaffey, T.A.

    1983-01-01

    Cholangiograms and clinical histories of 82 patients with biopsy-proved bile duct carcinoma were reviewed. The carcinomas were classified according to morphologic findings and clinical outcome. Ulcerative colitis and antecedent inflammatory disease of the biliary tree, particularly primary sclerosing cholangitis, seem to predispose to the development of bile duct carcinoma. Focal stenotic lesions were the most common morphologic type (62/82). Polypoid carcinomas and diffuse sclerosing carcinomas were less common and of about equal frequency. Prognosis was best for patients with polypoid carcinomas and worst for those with diffuse sclerosing carcinomas. In 69 cases (84%), the tumors involved the intrahepatic or proximal extrahepatic ducts, makin curative resection difficult or impossible. Patients with carcinomas limited to the more distal extrahepatic bile ducts had a longer average survival and a higher probability of surgical cure. Proper management of patients with bile duct carcinoma requires a complete and accurate cholangiographic evaluation of the morphology, location, and extent of the disease

  5. Endoscopic management of bile leaks after laparoscopic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Endoscopic management of bile leaks after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. ... endoscopic management at a median of 12 days (range 2 - 104 days) after surgery. Presenting features included intra-abdominal collections with pain in 58 cases ...

  6. Crystal Structure of the Substrate-Binding Domain from Listeria monocytogenes Bile-Resistance Determinant BilE

    OpenAIRE

    Stephanie J. Ruiz; Gea K. Schuurman-Wolters; Bert Poolman

    2016-01-01

    BilE has been reported as a bile resistance determinant that plays an important role in colonization of the gastrointestinal tract by Listeria monocytogenes, the causative agent of listeriosis. The mechanism(s) by which BilE mediates bile resistance are unknown. BilE shares significant sequence similarity with ATP-binding cassette (ABC) importers that contribute to virulence and stress responses by importing quaternary ammonium compounds that act as compatible solutes. Assays using related co...

  7. Financial Aspects of Bile Duct Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaz Alı, Ozgkıour; Ibis, Abdil Cem; Gurtekin, Basak

    2017-11-04

    BACKGROUND Major bile duct injury is the most worrisome complication of cholecystectomy. There is no detailed data about the incidence or treatment-related costs of bile duct injuries in Turkey. We aimed to determine prevalence and therapeutic costs of patients with major biliary duct injuries managed in our department, and further estimate a projection of these parameters at the national level. MATERIAL AND METHODS All patients admitted due to bile duct injury during cholecystectomy from 2011 to 2014 were included. Healthcare costs were calculated by summing of their all treatment-related costs in Istanbul Medical Faculty. We collected 2014-2015 data on number of patients diagnosed with cholecystitis in Turkey, the number of cholecystectomies, and the number of the interventions performed following these initial surgeries, which were obtained from the Turkish Social Security Institution. RESULTS Forty-nine patients were enrolled and bilioenteric diversion was performed in 39 patients: 20.4% of patients had Bismuth II, 38.8% had Bismuth III, and 40.8% had Bismuth IV biliary stricture. Comparison of stricture types with total costs, days of hospitalization, and outpatient clinic costs revealed significant differences. Mean total cost of corrective surgeries was 9199 TRY. We estimated that 1.5% to 2.4% of patients who underwent cholecystectomy in Turkey have bile duct injury (including 0.3% with major bile duct injury). CONCLUSIONS New preventive strategies should be used to avoid bile duct injuries, which have a huge financial impact on the national economy.

  8. Bile acids in health and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, E; Thaysen, E H

    1996-01-01

    Over the last quarter of a century Danish research on bile acids has comprised studies of their physical and chemical properties, their physiology, pathophysiology, metabolism, and kinetics, and their clinical applicability. In the beginning of the period a major contribution was made to the unde......Over the last quarter of a century Danish research on bile acids has comprised studies of their physical and chemical properties, their physiology, pathophysiology, metabolism, and kinetics, and their clinical applicability. In the beginning of the period a major contribution was made...... to the understanding of the factors involved in the solubility of cholesterol in bile. The growing international understanding of the potential importance of the bile acids in health and disease gave raise to a substantial Danish contribution in the 1970s and 1980s in parallel with international achievements. Emphasis...... was on the possible clinical implications of bile acids. Studies on physiology and pathophysiology were in focus. Patients who have had an intestinal bypass operation for obesity served as a model for obtaining new knowledge on various aspects of the properties of the bile acids. Also the analytical methods were...

  9. Role of cholangiocyte bile Acid transporters in large bile duct injury after rat liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Long; Zhao, Lijin; Li, Dajiang; Liu, Zipei; Chen, Geng; Tian, Feng; Li, Xiaowu; Wang, Shuguang

    2010-07-27

    The pathogenesis of nonanastomotic strictures with a patent hepatic artery remains to be investigated. This study focuses on the role of cholangiocyte bile acid transporters in bile duct injury after liver transplantation. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups (n=20 for each): the sham-operated group (Sham), the transplant group with 1-hr donor liver cold preservation (CP-1h), and the transplant group with 12-hr donor liver cold preservation (CP-12h). Bile was collected for biochemical analysis. The histopathologic evaluation of bile duct injury was performed and the cholangiocyte bile acid transporters apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT), ileal lipid binding protein (ILBP), and Ostalpha/Ostbeta were investigated. RESULTS.: The immunohistochemical assay suggested that ASBT and ILBP were expressed exclusively on large bile duct epithelial cells, whereas Ostalpha and Ostbeta were expressed on both small and large bile ducts. Western blot and quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that the expression levels of these transporters dramatically decreased after transplantation. It took seven to 14 days for ILBP, Ostalpha, and Ostbeta to recover, whereas ASBT recovered within 3 days and even reached a peak above the normal level seven days after operation. In the CP-12h group, the ratios of the ASBT/ILBP, ASBT/Ostalpha and ASBT/Ostbeta expression levels were correlated with the injury severity scores of large but not small bile ducts. The results suggest that the unparallel alteration of cholangiocyte bile acid transporters may play a potential role in large bile duct injury after liver transplantation with prolonged donor liver preservation.

  10. [Recommended diet for reflux spectrophotometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Valter Nilton; Viebig, Ricardo Guilherme

    2003-01-01

    The spectrophotometric probe, which uses bilirubin as a marker for the detection of duodenoesophagic reflux is subject to interference from strongly colored foods, which can cause erroneously high bilirubin absorbance readings. To overcome this problem it is necessary to ingest a diet that is free from such substances. To test the absorbance of 48 different food substances in an in vitro environment. Dry foods were blended with water or milk and non-dry solid foods were blended undiluted. It was utilized the proper calibration recipient to test them. The absorbance of weakly colored foods was usually lesser than the commonly accepted threshold of 0.14, and the absorbance of strongly colored foods was usually above this. Thirty-two from the 48 substances tested are suitable when the absorbance threshold is set at 0.14, but scrambled eggs, lacteous flour mush, green beans, beetroot, carrot, chayote, squash, "baroa" potato, boiled corn, orange, cashew, purple grape, avocado, mango, papaya and peach can alter the results and must be avoided. From the foods evaluated, enough are suitable at the 0.14 threshold to enable a suitable diet to be constructed for most patients during Bilitec studies.

  11. Bladder Dysfunction and Vesicoureteral Reflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulla Sillén

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this overview the influence of functional bladder disturbances and of its treatment on the resolution of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR in children is discussed. Historically both bladder dysfunction entities, the overactive bladder (OAB and the dysfunctional voiding (DV, have been described in conjunction with VUR. Treatment of the dysfunction was also considered to influence spontaneous resolution in a positive way. During the last decades, however, papers have been published which could not support these results. Regarding the OAB, a prospective study with treatment of the bladder overactivity with anticholinergics, did not influence spontaneous resolution rate in children with a dysfunction including also the voiding phase, DV and DES (dysfunctional elimination syndrome, most studies indicate a negative influence on the resolution rate of VUR in children, both before and after the age for bladder control, both with and without treatment. However, a couple of uncontrolled studies indicate that there is a high short-term resolution rate after treatment with flow biofeedback. It should be emphasized that the voiding phase dysfunctions (DV and DES are more severe than the genuine filling phase dysfunction (OAB, with an increased frequency of UTI and renal damage in the former groups. To be able to answer the question if treatment of bladder dysfunction influence the resolution rate of VUR in children, randomized controlled studies must be performed.

  12. Radiologic quantitation of gastro-oesophageal reflux. Correlation between height of food stimulated gastro-oesophageal reflux and level of histologic changes in reflux oesophagitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christiansen, T.; Funch-Jensen, P.; Jacobsen, N.O.; Thommesen, P.

    In a prospective study, 26 patients with symptoms of reflux oesophagitis underwent a barium examination for gastro-oesophageal reflux after food stimulation, and endoscopy with biopsy from different levels of the oesophagus. Radiologic grading of the gastro-oesophageal reflux depending on the height of the reflux into the oesophagus was performed, and this was correlated to the microscopic appearance at different levels in the oesophagus. Complete agreement between the radiologic grading and the histology was found in 69 per cent of the cases, and when gastro-oesophageal reflux was demonstrated the agreement was 75 per cent. Accordingly, the results showed a good accordance between the two variants, indicating that the height of the reflux during the food stimulated test may be truly indicative of the reflux height under non-test conditions.

  13. Parent's Take Home Guide to GERD (Gastroesophogeal Reflux Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or recurrent pneumonia •Hoarseness •Asthma If you have concerns, speak to your healthcare provider. SICK AND TIRED OF BEING SICK (13+ years) Reflux and your Teen Gastroesophageal Reflux (GER) occurs during or after a ...

  14. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Sleep Quality in a Chinese Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Jyh Chen

    2009-01-01

    Conclusion: The present study highlights the adverse effect of gastroesophageal reflux on sleep, even in the absence of reflux symptoms. This finding has therapeutic implications in patients with silent erosive disease, and future trials are warranted.

  15. if, when and how to treat gastro-oesophageal reflux

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    persistent occult gastro-oesophageal reflux; (iiz) persistence ... deterioration of bronchopulmonary disease. From this the reader ... problem by means of simple barium studies, to management ... Gastroesophageal reflux in the preterm infant.

  16. Heartburn, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and non-erosive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-01-31

    Jan 31, 2010 ... hypersensitivity.7,8. Management of GORD. Depending on how ... reflux include lifestyle changes, dietary modification and using non-prescription ... acid clearance, minimising the incidence of reflux events, or both.8 Lifestyle ...

  17. Gastropharyngeal and gastroesophageal reflux in globus and hoarseness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, C. F.; van Leeuwen, J. A.; Mathus-Vliegen, L. M.; Devriese, P. P.; Semin, A.; Tan, J.; Schouwenburg, P. F.

    2000-01-01

    The role of gastropharyngeal reflux in patients with globus pharyngeus and hoarseness remains unclear. To evaluate patients with complaints of globus, hoarseness, or globus and hoarseness combined for the presence of gastropharyngeal and gastroesophageal reflux. Prospective clinical cohort study of

  18. Scintigraphic diagnosis of the gastro-esophageal reflux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfluecke, F.; Krueger, M.; Reinke, R.; Groth, P. (Rostock Univ. (German Democratic Republic). Radiologische Klinik)

    1982-09-01

    Patients with peptic esophagitis or typical complaints with respect to reflux without esophagitis and control persons (n = 68) were comparatively examined for gastroesophageal reflux by means of scintigraphy (after administration of test solutions labelled with /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA or after intravenous application of /sup 99m/Tc-pertechnetate) and by means of continuous intraesophageal p/sub H/ measurement. The scintigraphic test of the reflux was successful for very few patients only with reflux disease and a reflux detectable by measuring the p/sub H/. The application of pentagastrin failed in improving the scintigraphic detection of the reflux. The cause of the unsuccessful scintigraphic evidence for the majority of the reflux patients seems to be the relatively small reflux volume.

  19. Scintigraphic diagnosis of the gastro-esophageal reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfluecke, F.; Krueger, M.; Reinke, R.; Groth, P.

    1982-01-01

    Patients with peptic esophagitis or typical complaints with respect to reflux without esophagitis and control persons (n = 68) were comparatively examined for gastroesophageal reflux by means of scintigraphy (after administration of test solutions labelled with /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA or after intravenous application of /sup 99m/Tc-pertechnetate) and by means of continuous intraesophageal p/sub H/ measurement. The scintigraphic test of the reflux was successful for very few patients only with reflux disease and a reflux detectable by measuring the p/sub H/. The application of pentagastrin failed in improving the scintigraphic detection of the reflux. The cause of the unsuccessful scintigraphic evidence for the majority of the reflux patients seems to be the relatively small reflux volume

  20. Radiosynthesis of N-¹¹C-Methyl-Taurine-Conjugated Bile Acids and Biodistribution Studies in Pigs by PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schacht, Anna Christina; Sørensen, Michael; Munk, Ole Lajord; Frisch, Kim

    2016-04-01

    During cholestasis, accumulation of conjugated bile acids may occur in the liver and lead to hepatocellular damage. Inspired by our recent development of N-(11)C-methyl-glycocholic acid-that is, (11)C-cholylsarcosine-a tracer for PET of the endogenous glycine conjugate of cholic acid, we report here a radiosynthesis of N-(11)C-methyl-taurine-conjugated bile acids and biodistribution studies in pigs by PET/CT. A radiosynthesis of N-(11)C-methyl-taurine-conjugated bile acids was developed and used to prepare N-(11)C-methyl-taurine conjugates derived from cholic, chenodeoxycholic, deoxycholic, ursodeoxycholic, and lithocholic acid. The lipophilicity of these new tracers was determined by reversed-phase thin-layer chromatography. The effect of lipophilicity and structure on the biodistribution was investigated in pigs by PET/CT using the tracers derived from cholic acid (3α-OH, 7α-OH, 12α-OH), ursodeoxycholic acid (3α-OH, 7β-OH), and lithocholic acid (3α-OH). The radiosyntheses of the N-(11)C-methyl-taurine-conjugated bile acids proceeded with radiochemical yields of 61% (decay-corrected) or greater and radiochemical purities greater than 99%. PET/CT in pigs revealed that the tracers were rapidly taken up by the liver and secreted into bile. There was no detectable radioactivity in urine. Significant reflux of N-(11)C-methyl-taurolithocholic acid into the stomach was observed. We have successfully developed a radiosynthesis of N-(11)C-methyl-taurine-conjugated bile acids. These tracers behave in a manner similar to endogenous taurine-conjugated bile acids in vivo and are thus promising for functional PET of patients with cholestatic diseases. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  1. Bile Acid Signaling in Liver Metabolism and Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiangang Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndromes are increasingly recognized as health concerns worldwide. Overnutrition and insulin resistance are the major causes of diabetic hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia in humans. Studies in the past decade provide evidence that bile acids are not just biological detergents facilitating gut nutrient absorption, but also important metabolic regulators of glucose and lipid homeostasis. Pharmacological alteration of bile acid metabolism or bile acid signaling pathways such as using bile acid receptor agonists or bile acid binding resins may be a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of obesity and diabetes. On the other hand, bile acid signaling is complex, and the molecular mechanisms mediating the bile acid effects are still not completely understood. This paper will summarize recent advances in our understanding of bile acid signaling in regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism, and the potentials of developing novel therapeutic strategies that target bile acid metabolism for the treatment of metabolic disorders.

  2. Gastro-oesophageal Reflux Disease: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Murphy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a disorder in which reflux of stomach contents causes troublesome symptoms and/or complications and which affects health-related quality of life. It is one of the commonest disorders and appears to be increasing in incidence. The mechanisms leading to reflux are complex and multifactorial. The lower oesophageal sphincter (LES is an important part of the gastro-oesophageal barrier. Transient LES relaxations (TLESRs lead to reflux as these vagally mediated motor patterns cause relaxation of the LES and also result in oesophageal shortening and inhibition of the crural diaphragm. Heartburn and regurgitation are the characteristic symptoms of GERD. A clinical diagnosis of GERD can be made with typical symptoms. Oesophagitis is seen in a minority of patients with GERD. Lifestyle modification is widely advocated for patients with GERD. For short-term relief of symptoms of mild GERD, antacids/alginates are frequently used but they do not heal oesophagitis. Both histamine 2 receptor antagonists (H2RA and proton pump inhibitors (PPI have been shown to heal and prevent relapse of oesophagitis, although PPIs have been shown to be superior. The PPIs are the recommended first-line therapy for erosive oesophagitis and initial management of non-erosive reflux disease. Maintenance PPI therapy should be given to patients with oesophagitis, those who have recurrence of symptoms after discontinuation of medication and for those with complications of GERD.

  3. Gastroesophageal reflux disease burden in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delavari, Alireza; Moradi, Ghobad; Elahi, Elham; Moradi-Lakeh, Maziar

    2015-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is one of the most common disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. The prevalence of this disease ranges from 5% to 20% in Asia, Europe, and North America. The aim of this study was to estimate the burden of gastroesophageal reflux disease in Iran. Burden of gastroesophageal reflux disease in Iran was estimated for one year from 21 March 2006 to 20 March 2007. The definition was adjusted with ICD-code of K21. Incident-based disability-adjusted life year (DALY) was used as the unit of analysis to quantify disease burden. A simplified disease model and DisMod II software were used for modeling. The annual incidence for total population of males and females in Iran was estimated 17.72 and 28.06 per 1000, respectively. The average duration of gastroesophageal reflux disease as a chronic condition was estimated around 10 years in both sexes. Total DALYs for an average of 59 symptomatic days per year was estimated 153,554.3 (60,330.8 for males and 93,223.5 for females).   The results of this study showed that reflux imposes high burden and high financial costs on the Iranian population. The burden of this disease in Iran is more similar to that of European countries rather than Asian countries. It is recommended to consider the disease as a public health problem and make decisions and public health plans to reduce the burden and financial costs of the disease in Iran.

  4. Association between follicular tracheitis and gastroesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Melanie; Meier, Jeremy; Asfour, Fadi; Jackson, Daniel; Grimmer, J Fredrik; Muntz, Harlan R; Park, Albert H

    2016-03-01

    Follicular tracheitis (also known as tracheal cobblestoning) is an entity that is poorly described and of unclear significance. The objective of this study was to better define follicular tracheitis and determine the association between the clinical finding of follicular tracheitis on bronchoscopy and objective evidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Retrospective chart review of children with recurrent croup having undergone a rigid bronchoscopy and an investigation for gastroesophageal reflux between 2001 and 2013. 117 children with recurrent croup children age 6-144 months were included in the study. Follicular tracheitis was noted on 41% of all bronchoscopies. Fifty-nine percent of all children who underwent bronchoscopy were diagnosed with gastroesophageal reflux on at least one investigation. Forty-nine of 117 children underwent a pH probe study, and 51% were found to have evidence of reflux on this study. Nine children were diagnosed with eosinophilic esophagitis. Three patients underwent a biopsy of the follicular tracheitis lesions, which revealed chronic inflammation. There was no evidence of an association between findings of follicular tracheitis and a positive test for gastroesophageal reflux (p=0.52) or a positive pH probe study (p=0.64). There was no association between follicular tracheitis and subglottic stenosis (p=0.33) or an history of asthma and/or atopy (p=0.19). In children with recurrent croup, follicular tracheitis remains an unspecific finding associated with an inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Reflux revisited: advancing the role of pepsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Karna Dev; Strugala, Vicki; Dettmar, Peter W

    2012-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is mediated principally by acid. Today, we recognise reflux reaches beyond the esophagus, where pepsin, not acid, causes damage. Extraesophageal reflux occurs both as liquid and probably aerosol, the latter with a further reach. Pepsin is stable up to pH 7 and regains activity after reacidification. The enzyme adheres to laryngeal cells, depletes its defences, and causes further damage internally after its endocytosis. Extraesophageal reflux can today be detected by recognising pharyngeal acidification using a miniaturised pH probe and by the identification of pepsin in saliva and in exhaled breath condensate by a rapid, sensitive, and specific immunoassay. Proton pump inhibitors do not help the majority with extraesophageal reflux but specifically formulated alginates, which sieve pepsin, give benefit. These new insights may lead to the development of novel drugs that dramatically reduce pepsinogen secretion, block the effects of adherent pepsin, and give corresponding clinical benefit."For now we see through a glass, darkly."-First epistle, Chapter 13, Corinthians.

  6. Bile salt tolerance of Lactococcus lactis is enhanced by expression of bile salt hydrolase thereby producing less bile acid in the cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Jie; Liu, Song; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2016-04-01

    Changes of bile salt tolerance, morphology and amount of bile acid within cells were studied to evaluate the exact effects of bile salt hydrolase (BSH) on bile salt tolerance of microorganism. The effect of BSHs on the bile salt tolerance of Lactococcus lactis was examined by expressing two BSHs (BSH1 and BSH2). Growth of L. lactis expressing BSH1 or BSH2 was better under bile salt stress compared to wild-type L. lactis. As indicated by transmission electron microscopy, bile acids released by the action of BSH induced the formation of micelles around the membrane surface of cells subject to conjugated bile salt stress. A similar micelle containing bile acid was observed in the cytoplasm by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. BSH1 produced fewer bile acid micelles in the cytoplasm and achieved better cell growth of L. lactis compared to BSH2. Expression of BSH improved bile salt tolerance of L. lactis but excessive production by BSH of bile acid micelles in the cytoplasm inhibited cell growth.

  7. Gene expression changes associated with Barrett's esophagus and Barrett's-associated adenocarcinoma cell lines after acid or bile salt exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahbaie Peyman

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Esophageal reflux and Barrett's esophagus represent two major risk factors for the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma. Previous studies have shown that brief exposure of the Barrett's-associated adenocarcinoma cell line, SEG-1, or primary cultures of Barrett's esophageal tissues to acid or bile results in changes consistent with cell proliferation. In this study, we determined whether similar exposure to acid or bile salts results in gene expression changes that provide insights into malignant transformation. Methods Using previously published methods, Barrett's-associated esophageal adenocarcinoma cell lines and primary cultures of Barrett's esophageal tissue were exposed to short pulses of acid or bile salts followed by incubation in culture media at pH 7.4. A genome-wide assessment of gene expression was then determined for the samples using cDNA microarrays. Subsequent analysis evaluated for statistical differences in gene expression with and without treatment. Results The SEG-1 cell line showed changes in gene expression that was dependent on the length of exposure to pH 3.5. Further analysis using the Gene Ontology, however, showed that representation by genes associated with cell proliferation is not enhanced by acid exposure. The changes in gene expression also did not involve genes known to be differentially expressed in esophageal adenocarcinoma. Similar experiments using short-term primary cultures of Barrett's esophagus also did not result in detectable changes in gene expression with either acid or bile salt exposure. Conclusion Short-term exposure of esophageal adenocarcinoma SEG-1 cells or primary cultures of Barrett's esophagus does not result in gene expression changes that are consistent with enhanced cell proliferation. Thus other model systems are needed that may reflect the impact of acid and bile salt exposure on the esophagus in vivo.

  8. Role of the Intestinal Bile Acid Transporters in Bile Acid and Drug Disposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Membrane transporters expressed by the hepatocyte and enterocyte play critical roles in maintaining the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids, an effective recycling and conservation mechanism that largely restricts these potentially cytotoxic detergents to the intestinal and hepatobiliary compartments. In doing so, the hepatic and enterocyte transport systems ensure a continuous supply of bile acids to be used repeatedly during the digestion of multiple meals throughout the day. Absorption of bile acids from the intestinal lumen and export into the portal circulation is mediated by a series of transporters expressed on the enterocyte apical and basolateral membranes. The ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid cotransporter (abbreviated ASBT; gene symbol, SLC10A2) is responsible for the initial uptake of bile acids across the enterocyte brush border membrane. The bile acids are then efficiently shuttled across the cell and exported across the basolateral membrane by the heteromeric Organic Solute Transporter, OSTα-OSTβ. This chapter briefly reviews the tissue expression, physiology, genetics, pathophysiology, and transport properties of the ASBT and OSTα-OSTα. In addition, the chapter discusses the relationship between the intestinal bile acid transporters and drug metabolism, including development of ASBT inhibitors as novel hypocholesterolemic or hepatoprotective agents, prodrug targeting of the ASBT to increase oral bioavailability, and involvement of the intestinal bile acid transporters in drug absorption and drug-drug interactions. PMID:21103970

  9. DIETARY FISH-OIL POTENTIATES BILE ACID-INDUCED CHOLESTEROL SECRETION INTO BILE IN RATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SMIT, MJ; VERKADE, HJ; HAVINGA, R; VONK, RJ; SCHERPHOF, GL; TVELD, GI; KUIPERS, F

    Recently we demonstrated that dietary fish oil (FO) causes changes in intrahepatic cholesterol transport and hyper secretion of cholesterol into bile in rats V. Clin. Invest. 88: 943-951, 1991). We have now investigated in more detail the relationship between cholesterol and bile acid secretion in

  10. Adaptation and Preadaptation of Salmonella enterica to Bile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Sara B.; Cota, Ignacio; Ducret, Adrien; Aussel, Laurent; Casadesús, Josep

    2012-01-01

    Bile possesses antibacterial activity because bile salts disrupt membranes, denature proteins, and damage DNA. This study describes mechanisms employed by the bacterium Salmonella enterica to survive bile. Sublethal concentrations of the bile salt sodium deoxycholate (DOC) adapt Salmonella to survive lethal concentrations of bile. Adaptation seems to be associated to multiple changes in gene expression, which include upregulation of the RpoS-dependent general stress response and other stress responses. The crucial role of the general stress response in adaptation to bile is supported by the observation that RpoS− mutants are bile-sensitive. While adaptation to bile involves a response by the bacterial population, individual cells can become bile-resistant without adaptation: plating of a non-adapted S. enterica culture on medium containing a lethal concentration of bile yields bile-resistant colonies at frequencies between 10−6 and 10−7 per cell and generation. Fluctuation analysis indicates that such colonies derive from bile-resistant cells present in the previous culture. A fraction of such isolates are stable, indicating that bile resistance can be acquired by mutation. Full genome sequencing of bile-resistant mutants shows that alteration of the lipopolysaccharide transport machinery is a frequent cause of mutational bile resistance. However, selection on lethal concentrations of bile also provides bile-resistant isolates that are not mutants. We propose that such isolates derive from rare cells whose physiological state permitted survival upon encountering bile. This view is supported by single cell analysis of gene expression using a microscope fluidic system: batch cultures of Salmonella contain cells that activate stress response genes in the absence of DOC. This phenomenon underscores the existence of phenotypic heterogeneity in clonal populations of bacteria and may illustrate the adaptive value of gene expression fluctuations. PMID:22275872

  11. Effect of bile acids on digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. O. Stremoukhov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Studying the effects of different bile acids in the body in recent years significantly increased the understanding of their physiological functions. The role of bile acids is to transfer to Striated border of enterocytes lipids in high micellar concentration and subsequent return them to the water layer in the molecular form. The rate of diffusion of molecules or particles is inversely proportional to the square root of the magnitude of their molecular weight. Main components of the glycoprotein complex (GPC allows to preserve the natural structure of mucosa. Previous physicochemical experiments on GPC established presence of bile acids (3,5 to 10 mg/ml, enzymes (amylase and lipase, amino acids (from 10150 to 29500 ug/ml in the complex. Objective. The aim was to study the influence of bile on fat filtration on the model of GPC. Method and Materials. Soaked filters were put on the tubes: with bile - the first, water - the second group, GPC bile at a dose of 25 mg/kg - the third group. Then on each filter was poured 2 ml of liquid fat. 30 minutes after the start of the experiment the amount of liquid fat that passes through the filter was measured. Results and Discussion. As established in the first group (bile medical, the amount of liquid fat, which passed through the filter amounted to 1,85±0,02 ml. In the second group (water - 0,30 ± 0,03 ml. In the third group (GPC 25 mg/kg - 1,75±0,02 ml. After that the impact of GPC bile in emulsification of fats was studied. 1 ml of vegetable oil and 1,5 ml of purified water were contributed in three series of tubes. The first series of test tubes left unchanged. In the other two 2 ml in 2 series - medical bile in 3 series - GPC bile were added. Tubes were shaken in all series. In the first (control series observed the formation of turbid fluid - emulsion. However, in a few seconds instability of the emulsion was detected. In the second and third series of tubes formation of stable emulsions which are

  12. Association Between Nocturnal Acid Reflux and Sleep Disturbance in Patients With Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Jui-Sheng; Lei, Wei-Yi; Yi, Chih-Hsun; Liu, Tso-Tsai; Chen, Chien-Lin

    2016-08-01

    This study was conducted to investigate whether there is a direct association between subjective sleep quality and esophageal acid reflux in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. We enrolled patients with classic reflux symptoms for endoscopy and ambulatory pH monitoring. The severity of esophageal mucosal injury was assessed by upper endoscopy. Distal esophageal acid exposure was determined by ambulatory 24-hour pH monitoring. Sleep disturbance was assessed by using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. In total, 103 patients (53 patients without sleep dysfunction and 50 patients with sleep dysfunction) were studied. Erosive esophagitis was found more in patients with sleep disturbance than in those without sleep disturbance (45% versus 31%, P = 0.04). Abnormal esophageal pH was found more in patients with dysfunction (22%) than in patients without sleep dysfunction (5.7%, P = 0.03). Recumbent acid contact time (%) was greater in patients with sleep disturbance than in those without sleep disturbance (3.7 ± 2.4 versus 1.9 ± 0.9, P = 0.04). Sleep quality score positively correlated with acid contact time (r = 0.32, P = 0.02), prolonged reflux events (r = 0.45, P = 0.008) and longer reflux event (r = 0.28, P = 0.03) during recumbent period. Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease along with sleep dysfunction are characterized with greater nocturnal acid reflux and more erosive esophagitis. Our study suggests that increased nocturnal acid reflux may play a role in inducing sleep disturbance in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Copyright © 2016 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Intra-renal reflux: A new cause of medullary hyperechogenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diard, F.; Nicolau, A.; Bernard, S.

    1987-01-01

    A 5-month-old infant with untreated severe urinary tract infection and bilateral vesico-ureteral reflux, had diffuse intrarenal reflux and hyperechogenicity of the medulla of two normal sized kidneys. We discuss the hyperechogenicity of the medulla in relationship to the intrarenal reflux. (orig.)

  14. The Mystery and Misery of Acid Reflux in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Mike; Davenport, Tracy

    2006-01-01

    When a child is sick, parents want answers. They want to know what is wrong, what they can do, and how to get their child healthy--pronto. Regrettably, there are some puzzling illnesses affecting children that are surrounded by mystery. One of them is gastroesophageal reflux (GER), otherwise known as acid reflux--or "reflux" for short. Reflux…

  15. Bile salts and their importance for drug absorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, René; Müllertz, Anette; Mu, Huiling

    2013-01-01

    Bile salts are present in the intestines of humans as well as the animals used during the development of pharmaceutical products. This review provides a short introduction into the physical chemical properties of bile salts, a description of the bile concentration and composition of bile...... in different animal species and an overview of the literature investigating the influence of bile salts on the in vivo performance of different compounds and drug formulations. Generally, there is a positive effect on bioavailability when bile is present in the gastro-intestinal tract, independent...

  16. Extravesical detrusorrhaphy for vesicoureteral reflux in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, H M; Yu, T J

    1998-03-01

    Extravesical detrusorrhaphy is a simple and safe approach to antireflux surgery; however, its use in Taiwan has seldom been reported. We report the outcomes of 15 patients (23 ureters) with primary vesicoureteral reflux who underwent extravesical detrusorrhaphy between January 1995 and April 1996, and describe the surgical technique. Overall, vesicoureteral reflux was cured in 22 of 23 ureters. Postoperative morbidity and complications were minimal. None of the patients had obstruction or significant hematuria. The discomfort related to bladder spasms during the postoperative period was subjectively decreased compared to the conventional transvesical technique. There was transient voiding inefficiency in three patients, as well as urinary retention in one, which resolved spontaneously after 4 weeks of Foley catheter drainage. Our experience showed that detrusorrhaphy is an effective way to correct vesicoureteral reflux with minimal morbidity and discomfort. Proper patient selection and strict adherence to the surgical principle are important for high success rates.

  17. Vesicoureteral reflux and continuous prophylactic antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted Lee

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR management must be tailored based on the risk for further infections and renal scarring, gender, likelihood of spontaneous resolution, and parental preferences. Because we now understand that sterile VUR is benign and most reflux spontaneously resolves over time, the initial approach in majority of children is non-surgical with continuous antibiotic prophylaxis (CAP and correction of bladder and bowel dysfunction. Despite increasing utilization of CAP over the past four decades, the efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis has been questioned due to conflicting results of studies plagued with design flaws and inadequate subject sample size. The Randomized Intervention for Children with Vesicoureteral Reflux (RIVUR trial, which was designed to address many of the limitations from previous studies, provided much needed answers. In this review, we sought to describe the controversy surrounding VUR management, highlight the results of RIVUR trial, and discuss how the RIVUR findings impact our understanding of CAP in the management of VUR.

  18. Vesical-ureteral reflux in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desvignes, V.; Palcoux, J.B.; Cochat, P.

    1995-01-01

    The vesical-ureteral reflux is the most frequent uropathy in children. The diagnosis is made by uretero-cystography, often after pyelonephritis, sometimes after ante-natal diagnosis from echographic abnormalities. Spontaneous recovery is possible in 50 to 80% of cases. This is especially true in grade 1, 2 and 3, however complications may occur. They are more frequent in the case of reflux nephropathy with a resulting risk of hypertension and chronic renal failure. The therapeutic choice is between the conservative management with urinary antiseptics ad the surgical treatment with ureters re-implantation or endoscopic treatment. The therapeutic indications take into account vesical-ureteral reflux grades, the child's age, the associated diseases and the child's and parents' compliance. (authors). 22 refs., 2 figs

  19. Airway Reflux, Cough and Respiratory Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molyneux, Ian D.; Morice, Alyn H.

    2011-01-01

    It is increasingly accepted that the effects of gastro-oesophageal reflux are not limited to the gastrointestinal tract. The adjacent respiratory structures are also at risk from material ejected from the proximal oesophagus as a result of the failure of anatomical and physiological barriers. There is evidence of the influence of reflux on several respiratory and otorhinological conditions and although in many cases the precise mechanism has yet to be elucidated, the association alone opens potential novel avenues of therapy to clinicians struggling to treat patients with apparently intractable respiratory complaints. This review provides a description of the airway reflux syndrome, its effects on the lung and current and future therapeutic options. PMID:23251752

  20. Gastroesophageal reflux - correlation between diagnostic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, Maria das Gracas de Almeida; Penas, Maria Exposito; Fonseca, Lea Mirian Barbosa; Lemme, Eponina Maria O.; Martinho, Maria Jose Ribeiro

    1999-01-01

    A group of 97 individuals with typical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) was submitted to gastroesophageal reflux scintigraphy (GES) and compared to the results obtained from endoscopy, histopathology and 24 hours pHmetry. Twenty-four healthy individuals were used as a control group and they have done only the GERS. The results obtained showed that: a) the difference int he reflux index (RI) for the control group and the sick individuals was statistically significant (p < 0.0001); b) the correlation between GERS and the other methods showed the following results: sensitivity, 84%; specificity, 95%; positive predictive value, 98%; negative predictive value, 67%; accuracy, 87%. We have concluded that the scintigraphic method should be used to confirm the diagnosis of GERD and also recommended as initial investiative procedure. (author)

  1. Hiatial hernia in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaul, B.; Petersen, H.; Myrvold, H.E.; Grette, K.; Roeysland, P.; Halvorsen, T.

    1986-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and radiologic examination were performed in 101 patients with symptoms strongly suggestive of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease. Hiatus hernia (HH) was found in 50 patients diagnosed by radiography or endoscopy, or both, in 22, 19, and 9 patients respectively. Severe endoscopic esophagitis (grades III and IV) was found more often in the patients with HH than in those without. The same was true for the early positive timed acid perfusion tests. Furthermore, the patients with HH more often had reflux by the standard acid reflux test (42 og 50 versus 28 of 51, gastroesophageal scintigraphy (47 of 50 versus 40 of 51; and radiography (20 of 50 versus 2 of 51; than the patients without HH. The results show that severe GER disease can occur without an associated HH and indicate that patients with symptoms of GER disease and associated HH are likely to have a more severe GER disease than those without HH.

  2. Treatment of Post-Stent Gastroesophageal Reflux by Anti-Reflux Z-Stent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, Roger Philip; Kew, Jacqueline; Byrne, Peter D.

    2000-01-01

    Severe symptoms of heartburn and retrosternal pain consistent with gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) developed in a patient following placement of a conventional self-expanding 16-24-mm-diameter x 12-cm-long esophageal stent across the gastroesophageal junction to treat an obstructing esophageal carcinoma. A second 18-mm-diameter x 10-cm-long esophageal stent with anti-reflux valve was deployed coaxially and reduced symptomatic GER immediately. Improvement was sustained at 4-month follow-up. An anti-reflux stent can be successfully used to treat significant symptomatic GER after conventional stenting

  3. Treatment of reflux gastritis: double blind comparison between clebopride and domperidone. A preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelini, G; Castagnini, A; Rizzoli, R; Pasini, A F; Lavarini, E; Brocco, G; Scuro, L A

    1990-02-01

    Altered gastro-duodenal motility seems to be a major factor of alkaline gastritis. Therefore prokinetic drugs have been extensively used for the treatment of this disease. Aim of this study has been to compare the effects of domperidone with those of a more recent drug of the orthopramide class, clebopride. Thirty patients affected by reflux gastritis have been randomly allocated to one of the two treatments. Clinical symptoms, endoscopic and histologic appearance of gastric mucosa, gastric pH and bile acid concentration in gastric juice have been evaluated before and after a four week course of therapy. A statistically significant improvement was observed for the clinical symptoms in the subjects treated with clebopride. Even if no statistical difference has been pointed out for the other parameters between and within the two groups, a slight trend in favour of clebopride was observed. It is concluded that clebopride is at least as effective as domperidone for the treatment of reflux gastritis but that more prolonged studies and different administration schedules are requested for a better evaluation.

  4. Association between nocturnal bruxism and gastroesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyawaki, Shouichi; Tanimoto, Yuko; Araki, Yoshiko; Katayama, Akira; Fujii, Akihito; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko

    2003-11-01

    To examine the relationship between nocturnal bruxism and gastroesophageal reflux. Controlled descriptive study and double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical study. Portable pH monitoring, electromyography, and audio-video recordings were conducted during the night in the subjects' home. Ten patients with bruxism and 10 normal subjects were matched for height, weight, age, and sex. They did not have symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Medication with a proton pump inhibitor (ie, a gastric-acid-inhibiting drug). The bruxism group showed a significantly higher frequency of nocturnal rhythmic masticatory muscle activity (RMMA) episodes (mean +/- SD: 6.7 +/- 2.2 times per hour) and a higher frequency and percentage of time of gastroesophageal reflux episodes with a pH less than 4.0 and 5.0 (0.5 +/- 0.9 and 3.6 +/- 1.6 times per hour and 1.3% +/- 2.5% and 7.4% +/- 12.6%, respectively) than the control group (RMMA episodes: 2.4 +/- 0.9 times per hour; gastroesophageal reflux episodes: 0.0 +/- 0.0 and 0.1 +/- 0.3 times per hour and 0.0% +/- 0.0% and 0.0% +/- 0.0%, respectively). In the bruxism group, 100% of the gastroesophageal reflux episodes with a pH less than 3.0 and 4.0 included both an RMMA episode and an electromyographic burst, the duration of which was approximately 0.5 to 1.0 seconds, probably representing swallowing of saliva. The majority of gastroesophageal reflux episodes with a pH of 4.0 to 5.0 also included both an RMMA episode and an electromyographic burst in the control and bruxism groups (100% +/- 0.0% vs 70.7% +/- 16.5%), again probably due to swallowing of saliva. The remaining minority of gastroesophageal reflux episodes with a pH of 4.0 to 5.0 contained only an electromyographic burst (swallowing of saliva). The frequency of RMMA episodes after the release of the medication from the proton pump inhibitor, which increased the gastric and esophageal pH, was significantly lower than that after administration of the placebo in the control

  5. Physiology and pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Dean J; Murayama, Kenric M

    2015-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most common problems treated by primary care physicians. Almost 20% of the population in the United States experiences occasional regurgitation, heartburn, or retrosternal pain because of GERD. Reflux disease is complex, and the physiology and pathogenesis are still incompletely understood. However, abnormalities of any one or a combination of the three physiologic processes, namely, esophageal motility, lower esophageal sphincter function, and gastric motility or emptying, can lead to GERD. There are many diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to GERD today, but more studies are needed to better understand this complex disease process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Gastroesophageal Reflux: Regurgitation in the Infant Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Teresa D

    2018-03-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is common in infancy and mainly treated through nonpharmacological interventions. Knowing the early warning signs of GER is important for nursing assessment. Untreated GER can become acute when an infant fails to gain weight and has recurrent, forceful vomiting. Further investigation of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is indicated when failure to gain weight, irritability, swallowing difficulties, regurgitation, and respiratory complications occur and should trigger referral to pediatric specialists. This article will share information about uncomplicated GER, GERD, and symptoms of these diagnoses, common screening tests, and treatment options. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Gastroesophageal reflux and respiratory diseases in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatima, S.; Saeed, M.A.; Jafri, S.R.A.; Raza, M.; Kundi, Z.U.; Hyder, S.W.

    2002-01-01

    The association of gastroesophageal reflux disease and its pulmonary manifestation is well known however the exact underlying mechanism is unclear. The medical literature is deluged with studies on relationship between Gear and its pulmonary manifestations. The aim of this study was to 1) determine prevalence of GER in children with rLRTI, wheezing and asthma. 2) determine prevalence of asymptomatic respiratory anomalies in children with clinical reflux 3) determine effectiveness of anti-reflux therapy in clinical control of asthma, wheezing and rLRTI. Children were included in the study if they presented either with rLRTI, wheezing, Bronchial asthma or Clinical suspicion of GER without any respiratory symptoms. The GER study comprised esophageal transit, gastroesophageal reflux and lung aspiration studies. Acquisition and processing were according to predetermined protocol. Segmental and global esophageal transit times, GER according to duration of episode and volume of refluxed liquid, Reflux severity, Gastric retention at 30 minutes, Gastric emptying time, Presence of lung aspiration were calculated for each study. All children underwent Barium studies on a separate day. Clinical follow-up was done every 3 months and GER study was repeated every 6 months up to one year. The patient's therapy was determined by local protocols at discretion of clinicians. GER scintigraphy was performed in 43 patients (age range 5 months -12 years). Gastroesophageal reflux of varying degrees was observed in 10 children (23.25%) in all groups. The severity of clinical symptoms was directly related to severity of GER. The direct correlation was found between GER and reflux index. The results of GER scintigraphy were compared with Barium studies and results were found to be superior in terms of sensitivity, specificity and accuracy in detecting disease. It was possible to objectively evaluate and monitor response to therapy after medical treatment in few cases with help of follow

  8. Gastroesophageal scintigraphy for diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishihara, Michiomi; Aoki, Nobuhiko; Imura, Souichi; Eguchi, Hiroyuki; Tamamoto, Humihiko [Tokyo Metropolitan Otsuka Hospital (Japan)

    1995-06-01

    {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA is a sensitive technique for the detection of gastro-esophageal reflux in children. Forty-eight children with gastro-esophageal reflux are scored by the results of the time activity curve of gastro-esophageal scintiscanning and the 24 hr esophageal pH tests. The score of gastro-esophageal scintiscanning is compared with the 24 hr esophageal pH score. There is a correlation in the score between the gastro-esophageal scintiscanning and the 24 hr esophageal pH test. (author).

  9. Gastroesophageal scintigraphy for diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Michiomi; Aoki, Nobuhiko; Imura, Souichi; Eguchi, Hiroyuki; Tamamoto, Humihiko

    1995-01-01

    99m Tc-DTPA is a sensitive technique for the detection of gastro-esophageal reflux in children. Forty-eight children with gastro-esophageal reflux are scored by the results of the time activity curve of gastro-esophageal scintiscanning and the 24 hr esophageal pH tests. The score of gastro-esophageal scintiscanning is compared with the 24 hr esophageal pH score. There is a correlation in the score between the gastro-esophageal scintiscanning and the 24 hr esophageal pH test. (author)

  10. Systematic review: role of acid, weakly acidic and weakly alkaline reflux in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckxstaens, G. E.; Smout, A.

    2010-01-01

    The importance of weakly acidic and weakly alkaline reflux in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is gaining recognition. To quantify the proportions of reflux episodes that are acidic (pH <4), weakly acidic (pH 4-7) and weakly alkaline (pH >7) in adult patients with GERD, and to evaluate their

  11. Bile acid metabolism and signaling in cholestasis, inflammation and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apte, Udayan

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver. Some cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes play key roles in bile acid synthesis. Bile acids are physiological detergent molecules, so are highly cytotoxic. They undergo enterohepatic circulation and play important roles in generating bile flow and facilitating biliary secretion of endogenous metabolites and xenobiotics and intestinal absorption of dietary fats and lipid soluble vitamins. Bile acid synthesis, transport and pool size are therefore tightly regulated under physiological conditions. In cholestasis, impaired bile flow leads to accumulation of bile acids in the liver, causing hepatocyte and biliary injury and inflammation. Chronic cholestasis is associated with fibrosis, cirrhosis and eventually liver failure. Chronic cholestasis also increases the risk of developing hepatocellular or cholangiocellular carcinomas. Extensive research in the last two decades has shown that bile acids act as signaling molecules that regulate various cellular processes. The bile acid-activated nuclear receptors are ligand-activated transcriptional factors that play critical roles in the regulation of bile acid, drug and xenobiotic metabolism. In cholestasis, these bile acid-activated receptors regulate a network of genes involved in bile acid synthesis, conjugation, transport and metabolism to alleviate bile acid-induced inflammation and injury. Additionally, bile acids are known to regulate cell growth and proliferation, and altered bile acid levels in diseased conditions have been implicated in liver injury/regeneration and tumorigenesis. We will cover the mechanisms that regulate bile acid homeostasis and detoxification during cholestasis, and the roles of bile acids in the initiation and regulation of hepatic inflammation, regeneration and carcinogenesis. PMID:26233910

  12. Americium-241 in bile and feces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LoSasso, T.; Cohen, N.; Wrenn, M.E.

    1977-01-01

    In order to investigate the relationship between the excretion of Am-241 in bile and in feces, two young adult female baboons underwent cholecystopexy surgery to facilitate gallbladder bile sampling by needle puncture through the abdominal wall. Am-241 was injected intravenously in citrate form at dose levels of 0.090 and 0.098 μCi/kg. It has been observed that concentrations of Am-241 in bile increase gradually at early times post injection, reach a peak at 3 to 5 weeks and then decrease slowly over a period of several months, similar to the pattern of Am-241 excretion in feces. At times greater than one week post Am-241 injection, there is a 1 : 1 correlation between the activity measured in bile and that which appears in the feces a few days later, indicating that Am-241 excreted in feces represents elimination primarily from liver and that significant reabsorption by the intestines does not occur as is true for other bile constituents. At earlier times, less than one week post injection, Am-241 appears in feces via other pathways in addition to the biliary route

  13. Clinical value of bile acids radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breckwoldt, R.U.

    1981-01-01

    In 50 blood donors, 87 patients with various liver and bile disorders, 50 hemodialyse patients and 50 patients prior to and immediately after cardiac swigery, cholyl glycine (CG) and sulfolithocholyl glycine (SLCG) were determined. Long-term observations were carried out on a further 10 patients with non-A/non-B hepatitis and 10 patients without hepatitis. Correlations were found between the values of alkaline phosphatase, GPT, GOT and bilirubin. Consequently the determination of bile acid, here above all SLCG, constitutes a suitable means to detect subclinical functional liver disorders. The examination of the post-operative functional liver disorders following cardiac swigery showed that there is a distinct time shift between the mostly transitory increase in enzyme activity and the SLCG levels. Surprisingly, the long-term observations showed that increased bile acid levels are already measured during the hepatitis incubation period at normal enzyme activities. It was not possible, however to identify hepatitic patients already during incubation by assay of the bile acid level. Whereas the determination of standard laboratory parameters remains predominant in the description of liver cell damage, the importance of serum bile acid determination is seen in the description of functional liver disorders which are not characterized by increased enzyme activities. (orig.) [de

  14. Suppressed hepatic bile acid signalling despite elevated production of primary and secondary bile acids in NAFLD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Na; Baker, Susan S; Chapa-Rodriguez, Adrian; Liu, Wensheng; Nugent, Colleen A; Tsompana, Maria; Mastrandrea, Lucy; Buck, Michael J; Baker, Robert D; Genco, Robert J; Zhu, Ruixin; Zhu, Lixin

    2017-08-03

    Bile acids are regulators of lipid and glucose metabolism, and modulate inflammation in the liver and other tissues. Primary bile acids such as cholic acid and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) are produced in the liver, and converted into secondary bile acids such as deoxycholic acid (DCA) and lithocholic acid by gut microbiota. Here we investigated the possible roles of bile acids in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) pathogenesis and the impact of the gut microbiome on bile acid signalling in NAFLD. Serum bile acid levels and fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19), liver gene expression profiles and gut microbiome compositions were determined in patients with NAFLD, high-fat diet-fed rats and their controls. Serum concentrations of primary and secondary bile acids were increased in patients with NAFLD. In per cent, the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) antagonistic DCA was increased, while the agonistic CDCA was decreased in NAFLD. Increased mRNA expression for cytochrome P450 7A1, Na + -taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide and paraoxonase 1, no change in mRNA expression for small heterodimer partner and bile salt export pump, and reduced serum FGF19 were evidence of impaired FXR and fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4)-mediated signalling in NAFLD. Taurine and glycine metabolising bacteria were increased in the gut of patients with NAFLD, reflecting increased secondary bile acid production. Similar changes in liver gene expression and the gut microbiome were observed in high-fat diet-fed rats. The serum bile acid profile, the hepatic gene expression pattern and the gut microbiome composition consistently support an elevated bile acid production in NAFLD. The increased proportion of FXR antagonistic bile acid explains, at least in part, the suppression of hepatic FXR-mediated and FGFR4-mediated signalling. Our study suggests that future NAFLD intervention may target the components of FXR signalling, including the bile acid converting gut microbiome. © Article

  15. Pulmonary Complications of Gastric Fluid and Bile Salts Aspiration, an Experimental Study in Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Samareh Fekri

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available   Objective(s: Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD is one of the most common digestive disorders that frequently lead to pulmonary complications due to gastric fluid aspiration. In the present experimental study, chronic aspiration of gastric fluid, its components and bile salts in rat lung was performed to find out the main factor(s causing pulmonary complications of gastric fluid aspiration.   Materials and Methods: Forty eight male rats weighted 250-300 g were selected in six groups. After anesthesia and tracheal cannulation, the animals received 0.5 ml/kg normal saline, 0.5 ml/kg of whole gastric fluid, 0.5 ml/kg pepsin (2.5 μg/ml, 0.5 ml/kg hydrochloric acid (pH=1.5 or 0.5 ml/kg bile salts (2.5 μg/ml by injection into their trachea and lungs. In sham group nothing was injected. Results: Parenchymal and airways inflammation and fibrosis of bronchi, bronchioles and parenchyma were significantly more in the test groups compared to saline and sham groups (P

  16. The comparison of upper endoscopy and scintigraphy results in the diagnostics of duodenogastric reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leja, M.; Lejnieks, A.; Pokrotnieks, J.; Sosare, L.; Reinholds, E.; Brezinskis, G.; Aboltins, A.

    2002-01-01

    The results of upper endoscopy in respect to the symptoms potentially indicative for duodenogastric reflux (DGR) have been compared to the results obtained by a scintigraphic method, elaborated by the group of the authors. Altogether 89 patients (48 women, 41 men) have been studied. For the analysis of signs indicative for functional disturbances of the upper digestive symptoms (status of the lower esophageal sphincter, gastric tone, presence of bile in the gastric content, status of the pyloric sphincter, influx of the duodenal content observed during the upper endoscopy, presence of the bile in the duodenum) the maximum accepted interval between the two investigations was 24 hours, while 1 month interval was accepted for the evaluations of structural changes (esophagitis, presence of hiatal hernis, gastritis and duodenitis, deformation of the pyloric sphincter and duodenal bulb. No statistically significant correlations has been found between any of the above mentioned parameters at upper endoscopy and the presence or absence of DGR as determined by the scintigraphic method. If a influx of the duodenal content into the stomach during the upper endoscopy, this could be considered as a specific indicator (specificity - 91,3%0, while the sensitivity (16,7%) is very low. There has been a trend to decreased DGR in patients with an atrophic gastritis, still this correlation was not statistically significant. The conclusion is made that the intubation of the stomach during the upper endoscopy could be causative for artificial DGR therefore leading to incorrect data interpretation and hyper diagnostics. (authors)

  17. Scintigraphic evaluation of enterogastric reflux using 75Se-HCAT: Methodology and first clinical observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furno, A.; Sciarretta, G.; Malaguti, P.; Fagioli, G.; Pozzato, R.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the possibility of detecting enterogastric reflux (EGR) by 75 Se-HCAT cholescintigraphy. The lowest detectable activity in the gastric area at different concentrations of the radiotracer in the gallbladder was preliminary measured both in a plastic phantom and in an in vivo model. Ten patients were studied after a single oral administration of 1480 KBq 75 Se-HCAT. Gamma camera imaging was carried out for five consecutive days during both fasting and after meal ingestion. In our in vivo model an EGR corresponding to 1% of gallbladder content on day one and 8% on day five was detected. In three out of five patients in whom bile was present in the stomach at endoscopy, 75 Se-HCAT cholescintigraphy demonstrated an EGR, while in three out of five patients in whom endoscopy was negative, 75 Se-HCAT cholescintigrahy detected EGR either during fasting or after meal ingestion. As EGR is not constant, Se-HCAT may be a useful tracer of bile to detect EGR over a prolonged period of time and in different physiological conditions. (orig.)

  18. Scintigraphic evaluation of enterogastric reflux using /sup 75/Se-HCAT: Methodology and first clinical observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furno, A; Sciarretta, G; Malaguti, P; Fagioli, G; Pozzato, R

    1987-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the possibility of detecting enterogastric reflux (EGR) by /sup 75/Se-HCAT cholescintigraphy. The lowest detectable activity in the gastric area at different concentrations of the radiotracer in the gallbladder was preliminary measured both in a plastic phantom and in an in vivo model. Ten patients were studied after a single oral administration of 1480 KBq /sup 75/Se-HCAT. Gamma camera imaging was carried out for five consecutive days during both fasting and after meal ingestion. In our in vivo model an EGR corresponding to 1% of gallbladder content on day one and 8% on day five was detected. In three out of five patients in whom bile was present in the stomach at endoscopy, /sup 75/Se-HCAT cholescintigraphy demonstrated an EGR, while in three out of five patients in whom endoscopy was negative, /sup 75/Se-HCAT cholescintigrahy detected EGR either during fasting or after meal ingestion. As EGR is not constant, Se-HCAT may be a useful tracer of bile to detect EGR over a prolonged period of time and in different physiological conditions.

  19. MicroRNA-196a & microRNA-101 expression in Barrett's oesophagus in patients with medically and surgically treated gastro-oesophageal reflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bright Tim

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proton pump inhibitor (PPI medication and surgical fundoplication are used for the control of gastro-oesophageal reflux in patients with Barrett's oesophagus, but differ in their effectiveness for both acid and bile reflux. This might impact on the inflammatory processes that are associated with progression of Barrett's oesophagus to cancer, and this may be evident in the gene expression profile and microRNA expression pattern in Barrett's oesophagus mucosa. We hypothesised that two miRNAs with inflammatory and oncogenic roles, miR-101 and miR-196a, are differentially expressed in Barrett's oesophagus epithelium in patients with reflux treated medically vs. surgically. Findings Mucosal tissue was obtained at endoscopy from patients with Barrett's oesophagus whose reflux was controlled by proton pump inhibitor (PPI therapy (n = 20 or by fundoplication (n = 19. RNA was extracted and the expression of miR-101 and miR-196a was measured using real-time reverse transcription - polymerase chain reaction. There were no significant differences in miR-101 and miR-196a expression in Barrett's oesophagus epithelium in patients treated by PPI vs. fundoplication (p = 0.768 and 0.211 respectively. Secondary analysis showed a correlation between miR-196a expression and Barrett's oesophagus segment length (p = 0.014. Conclusion The method of reflux treatment did not influence the expression of miR-101 and miR-196a in Barrett's oesophagus. This data does not provide support to the hypothesis that surgical treatment of reflux better prevents cancer development in Barrett's oesophagus. The association between miR-196a expression and Barrett's oesophagus length is consistent with a tumour promoting role for miR-196a in Barrett's oesophagus.

  20. MicroRNA-196a & microRNA-101 expression in Barrett's oesophagus in patients with medically and surgically treated gastro-oesophageal reflux

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) medication and surgical fundoplication are used for the control of gastro-oesophageal reflux in patients with Barrett's oesophagus, but differ in their effectiveness for both acid and bile reflux. This might impact on the inflammatory processes that are associated with progression of Barrett's oesophagus to cancer, and this may be evident in the gene expression profile and microRNA expression pattern in Barrett's oesophagus mucosa. We hypothesised that two miRNAs with inflammatory and oncogenic roles, miR-101 and miR-196a, are differentially expressed in Barrett's oesophagus epithelium in patients with reflux treated medically vs. surgically. Findings Mucosal tissue was obtained at endoscopy from patients with Barrett's oesophagus whose reflux was controlled by proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy (n = 20) or by fundoplication (n = 19). RNA was extracted and the expression of miR-101 and miR-196a was measured using real-time reverse transcription - polymerase chain reaction. There were no significant differences in miR-101 and miR-196a expression in Barrett's oesophagus epithelium in patients treated by PPI vs. fundoplication (p = 0.768 and 0.211 respectively). Secondary analysis showed a correlation between miR-196a expression and Barrett's oesophagus segment length (p = 0.014). Conclusion The method of reflux treatment did not influence the expression of miR-101 and miR-196a in Barrett's oesophagus. This data does not provide support to the hypothesis that surgical treatment of reflux better prevents cancer development in Barrett's oesophagus. The association between miR-196a expression and Barrett's oesophagus length is consistent with a tumour promoting role for miR-196a in Barrett's oesophagus. PMID:21352563

  1. Scintimetric objectification of the pathological gastro-oesophageal reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strobl, R.

    1981-01-01

    In this investigation, the author initially made animal experiments to find out: - if and how the gastro-oesophageal reflux in a cardiac insufficiency caused by cardiomyotomy could be proven quantitatively by scintiscanning as often as wanted and how the course of the arising oesophagitis correlated with the findings of the scintiscanning. For the clinical examinations, he referred to patients complaining the reflux difficulties or patients who had had a Balanced Operation because of a reflux disease. The main concern was to clarify the special characteristics and the reliability of reflux scintiscanning and to compare them to conventional methods of radiological and endoscopic reflux diagnostics. (orig./MG) [de

  2. Liver and Bile Duct Cancer—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver cancer includes two major types: hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and intrahepatic bile duct cancer, also known as cholangiocarcinoma. Find evidence-based information on liver and bile duct cancer treatment, causes and prevention, screening, research, genomics and statistics.

  3. Consequences of bile salt biotransformations by intestinal bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridlon, Jason M.; Harris, Spencer C.; Bhowmik, Shiva; Kang, Dae-Joong; Hylemon, Phillip B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Emerging evidence strongly suggest that the human “microbiome” plays an important role in both health and disease. Bile acids function both as detergents molecules promoting nutrient absorption in the intestines and as hormones regulating nutrient metabolism. Bile acids regulate metabolism via activation of specific nuclear receptors (NR) and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). The circulating bile acid pool composition consists of primary bile acids produced from cholesterol in the liver, and secondary bile acids formed by specific gut bacteria. The various biotransformation of bile acids carried out by gut bacteria appear to regulate the structure of the gut microbiome and host physiology. Increased levels of secondary bile acids are associated with specific diseases of the GI system. Elucidating methods to control the gut microbiome and bile acid pool composition in humans may lead to a reduction in some of the major diseases of the liver, gall bladder and colon. PMID:26939849

  4. Selenium- or tellurium- containing bile acids and derivatives thereof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monks, R.; Riley, A.L.M.

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to the preparation of selenium and tellurium derivatives, particularly γ-emitting radioactive derivatives of bile acids and bile salts. Such compounds are valuable in the examination of body function, especially small bowel function. (author)

  5. Bile acids and cardiovascular function in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voiosu, Andrei; Wiese, Signe; Voiosu, Theodor

    2017-01-01

    Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy and the hyperdynamic syndrome are clinically important complications of cirrhosis, but their exact pathogenesis is still partly unknown. Experimental models have proven the cardiotoxic effects of bile acids and recent studies of their varied receptor-mediated functions...... offer new insight into their involvement in cardiovascular dysfunction in cirrhosis. Bile acid receptors such as farnesoid X-activated receptor and TGR5 are currently under investigation as potential therapeutic targets in a variety of pathological conditions. These receptors have also recently been...... identified in cardiomyocytes, vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells where they seem to play an important role in cellular metabolism. Chronic cholestasis leading to abnormal levels of circulating bile acids alters the normal signalling pathways and contributes to the development of profound...

  6. Sexual activity does not predispose to reflux episodes in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bor, Serhat; Valytova, Elen; Yildirim, Esra; Vardar, Rukiye

    2014-01-01

    Background The role of sexual activity on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is an under-recognized concern of patients, and one rarely assessed by physicians. Objective The objective of this article is to determine the influence of sexual activity on the intraesophageal acid exposure and acid reflux events in GERD patients. Methods Twenty-one patients with the diagnosis of GERD were prospectively enrolled. Intraesophageal pH monitoring was recorded for 48 hours with a Bravo capsule. All patients were instructed to have sexual intercourse or abstain in a random order two hours after the same refluxogenic dinner within two consecutive nights. Patients were requested to have sex in the standard “missionary position” and women were warned to avoid abdominal compression. The patients completed a diary reporting the time of the sexual intercourse and GERD symptoms. The percentage of reflux time and acid reflux events were compared in two ways: within 30 and 60 minutes prior to and after sexual intercourse on the day of sexual intercourse and in the same time frame of the day without sexual intercourse. Results Fifteen of 21 GERD patients were analyzed. The percentage of reflux time and number of acid reflux events did not show a significant difference within the 30- and 60-minute periods prior to and after sexual intercourse on the day of sexual intercourse and on the day without sexual intercourse, as well. Conclusion Sexual activity does not predispose to increased intraesophageal acid exposure and acid reflux events. Larger studies are needed to confirm our findings in patients who define reflux symptoms during sexual intercourse. PMID:25452843

  7. Gastroesophageal Reflux Management with the LINX® System for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Following Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desart, Kenneth; Rossidis, Georgios; Michel, Michael; Lux, Tamara; Ben-David, Kfir

    2015-10-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) has gained significant popularity in the USA, and consequently resulted in patients experiencing new-onset gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) following this bariatric procedure. Patients with GERD refractory to medical therapy present a more challenging situation limiting the surgical options to further treat the de novo GERD symptoms since the gastric fundus to perform a fundoplication is no longer an option. The aim of this study is to determine if the LINX® magnetic sphincter augmentation system is a safe and effective option for patients with new gastroesophageal reflux disease following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. This study was conducted at the University Medical Center. This is a retrospective review of seven consecutive patients who had a laparoscopic LINX® magnetic sphincter device placement for patients with refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy between July 2014 and April 2015. All patients were noted to have self-reported greatly improved gastroesophageal reflux symptoms 2-4 weeks after their procedure. They were all noted to have statistically significant improved severity and frequency of their reflux, regurgitation, epigastric pain, sensation of fullness, dysphagia, and cough symptoms in their postoperative GERD symptoms compared with their preoperative evaluation. This is the first reported pilot case series, illustrating that the LINX® device is a safe and effective option in patients with de novo refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease after a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy despite appropriate weight loss.

  8. Solitary intrahepatic bile-duct cyst presenting with Jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeong Mi; Chun, Ki Sung; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Shinn, Kyung Sub; Bahk, Yong Whee; Kim, Jun Gi

    1989-01-01

    Caroli's disease is an uncommon condition, and characterized by congenital segmental saccular dilatation of intrahepatic bile ducts. A case of Caroli's disease, manifested by only a large communicating cystic dilatation of left intrahepatic bile duct and causing extrinsic pressure over the extrahepatic bile duct, is presented. The patient was 43-year-old housewife, hospitalized because of abdominal distension and severe jaundice. To relieve jaundice and alleviate surgical intervention, percutaneous drainage of the bile-duct cyst preceded surgery

  9. Supramolecular Complexes Formed in Systems Bile Salt-Bilirubin-Silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasova, N. N.; Severinovskaya, O. V.; Golovkova, L. P.

    The formation of supramolecular complexes between bilirubin and primary micelles of bile salts has been studied. The association constants of bile salts and binding of bilirubin with these associates have been determined. The adsorption of bilirubin and bile salts from individual and mixed aqueous solutions onto hydrophobic silica surfaces has been investigated. The interaction of bilirubin with primary bile salt micelles and the strong retention in mixed micelles, which are supramolecular complexes, result in the adsorption of bilirubin in free state only.

  10. 21 CFR 184.1560 - Ox bile extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ox bile extract. 184.1560 Section 184.1560 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1560 Ox bile extract. (a) Ox bile extract (CAS Reg. No. 8008-63-7), also..., partly bitter, disagreeable taste. It is the purified portion of the bile of an ox obtained by...

  11. Comparison of Endoscopic Findings with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Questionnaires (GerdQ) and Reflux Disease Questionnaire (RDQ) for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Medan

    OpenAIRE

    Siregar, Gontar Alamsyah; Halim, Sahat; Sitepu, Ricky Rivalino

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: There are many questionnaires that have been developed to diagnose gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), i.e. reflux disease questionnaire (RDQ), and the recently developed, gastroesophageal reflux disease questionnaires (GerdQ). In this study, we tried to compare GerdQ and RDQ in terms of sensitivity and specificity to diagnose GERD and its relationship with endoscopic findings. Method: This study was a cross sectional analytical study. Subsequently, all the subj...

  12. Esophageal Sphincter Device for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganz, Robert A.; Peters, Jeffrey H.; Horgan, Santiago; Bemelman, Willem A.; Dunst, Christy M.; Edmundowicz, Steven A.; Lipham, John C.; Luketich, James D.; Melvin, W. Scott; Oelschlager, Brant K.; Schlack-Haerer, Steven C.; Smith, C. Daniel; Smith, Christopher C.; Dunn, Dan; Taiganides, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease who have a partial response to proton-pump inhibitors often seek alternative therapy. We evaluated the safety and effectiveness of a new magnetic device to augment the lower esophageal sphincter. METHODS We prospectively assessed 100 patients

  13. Emerging drugs for gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckxstaens, G. E.

    2009-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are very effective and safe drugs for the treatment of erosive and non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Nevertheless, a significant proportion of GERD patients (30 - 40%) continue to suffer from symptoms during PPI treatment, which has stimulated the

  14. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and Barrett's Esophagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergman, J. J. G. H. M.

    2005-01-01

    Several articles have been published during the last year that may affect the management of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and/or Barrett's esophagus in the near future. A new method of measuring esophageal pH has been introduced that does not require an indwelling transnasal

  15. Spatiotemporal characteristics of physiological gastroesophageal reflux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weusten, B. L.; Akkermans, L. M.; vanBerge-Henegouwen, G. P.; Smout, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    Recent technological developments have made it possible to measure intraluminal pH simultaneously at multiple sites using one single small-caliber catheter. The aim of this study was to investigate the dynamics of physiological gastroesophageal reflux in eight ambulatory healthy volunteers (age

  16. Common Bile Duct Perforation Due to Tuberculosis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razman Jarmin

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available A young man with HIV presented with biliary peritonitis secondary to spontaneous common bile duct perforation. Investigation revealed that the perforation was due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Tuberculosis of the bile duct is uncommon and usually presents with obstructive jaundice due to stricture. Bile duct perforation due to tuberculosis is extremely rare. Its management is discussed.

  17. Common Bile Duct Perforation Due to Tuberculosis: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Razman Jarmin; Shaharin Shaharuddin

    2004-01-01

    A young man with HIV presented with biliary peritonitis secondary to spontaneous common bile duct perforation. Investigation revealed that the perforation was due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Tuberculosis of the bile duct is uncommon and usually presents with obstructive jaundice due to stricture. Bile duct perforation due to tuberculosis is extremely rare. Its management is discussed.

  18. A case of fascioliasis in common bile duct

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Soo Youn; Park, Cheol Min; Chung, Kyu Byung; Lee, Chang Hong; Park, Seung Chul; Choi, Sang Yong; Lim, Han Jong [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-10-15

    A case of Fascioliasis of common bile duct is confirmed by visualization of adult fluke. Fascioliasis caused by Fasciola hepatica, is common parasitic disease in cattle and sheep. Human is an accidental host. ERCP demonstrated irregular linear conglomerated filling defects in common bile duct. Through surgical intervention, we found adult flukes of F. hepatica and adenomatous hyperplasia of common bile duct.

  19. A case of fascioliasis in common bile duct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ham, Soo Youn; Park, Cheol Min; Chung, Kyu Byung; Lee, Chang Hong; Park, Seung Chul; Choi, Sang Yong; Lim, Han Jong

    1989-01-01

    A case of Fascioliasis of common bile duct is confirmed by visualization of adult fluke. Fascioliasis caused by Fasciola hepatica, is common parasitic disease in cattle and sheep. Human is an accidental host. ERCP demonstrated irregular linear conglomerated filling defects in common bile duct. Through surgical intervention, we found adult flukes of F. hepatica and adenomatous hyperplasia of common bile duct

  20. Experimental and theoretical study of reflux condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakke, Knut

    1997-12-31

    This thesis studies the separation of gas mixtures in a reflux condenser. also called a dephlegmator. Reflux condensation is separation of a gas mixture, in reflux flow with condensing liquid, under continuous heat removal. A numerical model of a dephlegmator for binary mixtures was developed. The model may readily be extended to multi-component mixtures, as the solution method is based on a matrix solver. Separation of a binary mixture in a reflux condenser test rig is demonstrated. The test facility contains a single-tube test section that was designed and built as part of the project. Test mixtures of propane and n-butane were used, and a total of 15 experiments are reported. Limited degree of separation was achieved due to limited heat transfer area and narrow boiling point range of the test mixture. The numerical model reproduces the experimental data within reasonable accuracy. Deviation between calculated and measured properties is less than 6% of the measured temperature and less than 5% of the measured flow rate. The model is based on mechanistic models of physical processes and is not calibrated or tuned to fit the experimental data. The numerical model is applied to a number of separation processes. These case studies show that the required heat transfer area increases rapidly with increments in top product composition (light component). Flooding limits the amount of reflux liquid. The dephlegmator is suitable for separation of feed mixtures that are rich in light components. The gliding temperature in the dephlegmation process enables utilization of top product as refrigerant, with subsequent energy saving as a result. 61 refs., 50 figs., 34 tabs.

  1. The "flying" bile duct: avulsion of the common bile duct in a plane crash survivor.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mohan, H

    2012-02-01

    Blunt trauma is an unusual cause of extrahepatic bile duct injury. This is a case of a 51-year-old gentleman who sustained a significant seatbelt injury in a plane crash. Laparotomy, performed due to persistent abdominal pain, revealed that the common bile duct (CBD) was completely avulsed from the duodenum. Following insertion of drains and transfer to a hepatobiliary centre, the devascularised CBD was excised and replaced with a roux-en-y hepaticojejunostomy. Necrotic tissue was debrided from the pancreatic head. A persistent bile leak developed from the sub-hepatic drain. Repeat laparotomy revealed a bile leak from small ducts on the liver surface. Ligation of the ducts and bioglue sealing of the area were successfully performed. Subsequent to this a pancreatic fistula developed from the main pancreatic duct, which has since resolved. This unusual case illustrates the need for prompt recognition and early repair to optimise outcomes in traumatic CBD injury.

  2. [Simultaneous determination of eight kinds of conjunct bile acids in human bile by R-HPLC].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Z; Tan, G; Qian, K; Chen, X

    1997-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of eight kinds of conjunct bile acids in human bile was developed by HPLC. They were separated on a YWG-C18 (3 microns) column at 30 degrees C, with methanol/water (65/35, V/V, pH3.0) as mobile phase, and detection wavelength at UV 210 nm. The linear ranges were 50-1,000 microns.ml-1, the recoveries were 91.2%-108.6%. The biles of 30 cases with cholelithiasis cholecystolithiasis and 20 cases without gallstone were detected by HPLC. The results showed that the constitution of bile acids was different between patients with cholelithiasis cholecystolithiasis and patients without gallstone.

  3. Bile salt toxicity aggravates cold ischemic injury of bile ducts after liver transplantation in Mdr2+/- mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, H; Porte, RJ; Tian, Y; Jochum, W; Stieger, B; Moritz, W; Slooff, MJH; Graf, R; Clavien, PA

    Intrahepatic bile duct strictures are a serious complication after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). We examined the role of endogenous bile salt toxicity in the pathogenesis of bile duct injury after OLT. Livers from wild-type mice and mice heterozygous for disruption of the multidrug

  4. Long-term follow-up after choledochojejunostomy for bile duct stones with complex clearance of the bile duct

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouma, D. J.; Konsten, J.; Soeters, P. B.; Von Meyenfeldt, M.; Obertop, H.

    1989-01-01

    In this retrospective study, the long-term follow-up of patients undergoing choledochojejunostomy (Roux-en-Y) for bile duct stones with complex clearance of the bile duct is evaluated. Bile duct exploration and subsequent choledochojejunostomy (Roux-en-Y) was performed in 43 patients (median age 67

  5. Internal radiotherapy for hilar bile duct cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Munemasa; Ogino, Takashi; Konishi, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    By December 1998, 24 patients with non-resected hilar bile duct cancer (mean age of 74) had received bile duct intracavitary irradiation and 13 patients with residual cancer after resection of hilar bile duct cancer had received postoperative intracavitary irradiation. After they were externally irradiated 30 Gy in total by 15 fractions (2 Gy/time, 5 times in a week), intracavitary irradiation using 192-Ir was given 5 times in total (2 times in a week) from 3 weeks after external irradiation under the condition which dose became 8 Gy in depth of 10 mm from radiation source. The cases of postoperative irradiation had 3 times in total. As for 20 patients of non-resected hilar bile duct cancer without metastasis, 50% survival time was 265 days and there was no 5 year survivor. Fifty percents survival time of 4 patients with metastasis was 113 days. The effect of local control was recognized in 20 patients (83.3%). In 13 patients of postoperative irradiation, 50% survival time was 554 days, and survival rate of 3 years was 28%. (K.H.)

  6. Bile acids for primary sclerosing cholangitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poropat, Goran; Giljaca, Vanja; Stimac, Davor

    2011-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis is a progressive chronic cholestatic liver disease that usually leads to the development of cirrhosis. Studies evaluating bile acids in the treatment of primary sclerosing cholangitis have shown a potential benefit of their use. However, no influence on patients...

  7. Different risk factors between reflux symptoms and mucosal injury in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chung-Hsien; Hsieh, Tsung-Cheng; Hsiao, Tsung-Hsien; Wang, Pin-Chao; Tseng, Tai-Chung; Lin, Hans Hsienhong; Wang, Chia-Chi

    2015-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is diagnosed based on typical symptoms in clinical practice. It can be divided into two groups using endoscopy: erosive and nonerosive reflux disease (NERD). This study aims to determine the risk factors of reflux symptoms and mucosal injury. This was a two-step case-control study derived from a cohort of 998 individuals having the data of reflux disease questionnaire (RDQ) and endoscopic findings. Those with minor reflux symptoms were excluded. The first step compared symptomatic GERD patients with healthy controls. The 2(nd) step compared patients with erosive esophagitis with healthy controls. In this study, the prevalence of symptomatic GERD and erosive esophagitis were 163 (16.3%) and 166 (16.6%), respectively. A total of 507 asymptomatic individuals without mucosal injury of the esophagus on endoscopy were selected as healthy controls. Compared with healthy controls, multivariate analyses showed that symptomatic GERD patients had a higher prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia [odds ratio (OR), 1.83; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.13-2.96] and obesity (OR, 1.85; 95% CI 1.08-3.02). By contrast, male sex (OR, 2.24; 95% CI 1.42-3.52), positive Campylo-like organism (CLO) test (OR, 0.56; 95% CI 0.37-0.84), and hiatus hernia (OR, 14.36; 95% CI 3.05-67.6) were associated with erosive esophagitis. In conclusion, obesity and hypertriglyceridemia were associated with reflux symptoms. By contrast, male sex, negative infection of Helicobacter pylori, and hiatus hernia were associated with mucosal injury. Our results suggested that risk factors of reflux symptoms or mucosal injury might be different in GERD patients. The underlying mechanism awaits further studies to clarify. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  8. Different risk factors between reflux symptoms and mucosal injury in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hsien Li

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is diagnosed based on typical symptoms in clinical practice. It can be divided into two groups using endoscopy: erosive and nonerosive reflux disease (NERD. This study aims to determine the risk factors of reflux symptoms and mucosal injury. This was a two-step case-control study derived from a cohort of 998 individuals having the data of reflux disease questionnaire (RDQ and endoscopic findings. Those with minor reflux symptoms were excluded. The first step compared symptomatic GERD patients with healthy controls. The 2nd step compared patients with erosive esophagitis with healthy controls. In this study, the prevalence of symptomatic GERD and erosive esophagitis were 163 (16.3% and 166 (16.6%, respectively. A total of 507 asymptomatic individuals without mucosal injury of the esophagus on endoscopy were selected as healthy controls. Compared with healthy controls, multivariate analyses showed that symptomatic GERD patients had a higher prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia [odds ratio (OR, 1.83; 95% confidence interval (CI 1.13–2.96] and obesity (OR, 1.85; 95% CI 1.08–3.02. By contrast, male sex (OR, 2.24; 95% CI 1.42–3.52, positive Campylo-like organism (CLO test (OR, 0.56; 95% CI 0.37–0.84, and hiatus hernia (OR, 14.36; 95% CI 3.05–67.6 were associated with erosive esophagitis. In conclusion, obesity and hypertriglyceridemia were associated with reflux symptoms. By contrast, male sex, negative infection of Helicobacter pylori, and hiatus hernia were associated with mucosal injury. Our results suggested that risk factors of reflux symptoms or mucosal injury might be different in GERD patients. The underlying mechanism awaits further studies to clarify.

  9. Systematic review: relationships between sleep and gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dent, J; Holloway, R H; Eastwood, P R

    2013-10-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) adversely impacts on sleep, but the mechanism remains unclear. To review the literature concerning gastro-oesophageal reflux during the sleep period, with particular reference to the sleep/awake state at reflux onset. Studies identified by systematic literature searches were assessed. Overall patterns of reflux during the sleep period show consistently that oesophageal acid clearance is slower, and reflux frequency and oesophageal acid exposure are higher in patients with GERD than in healthy individuals. Of the 17 mechanistic studies identified by the searches, 15 reported that a minority of reflux episodes occurred during stable sleep, but the prevailing sleep state at the onset of reflux in these studies remains unclear owing to insufficient temporal resolution of recording or analysis methods. Two studies, in healthy individuals and patients with GERD, analysed sleep and pH with adequate resolution for temporal alignment of sleep state and the onset of reflux: all 232 sleep period reflux episodes evaluated occurred during arousals from sleep lasting less than 15 s or during longer duration awakenings. Six mechanistic studies found that transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations were the most common mechanism of sleep period reflux. Contrary to the prevailing view, subjective impairment of sleep in GERD is unlikely to be due to the occurrence of reflux during stable sleep, but could result from slow clearance of acid reflux that occurs during arousals or awakenings from sleep. Definitive studies are needed on the sleep/awake state at reflux onset across the full GERD spectrum. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Endoscopic Management of Bile Leakage after Liver Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Dongwook; Lee, Sung Koo; Song, Tae Jun; Park, Do Hyun; Lee, Sang Soo; Seo, Dong-Wan; Kim, Myung-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) can be an effective treatment for bile leakage after liver transplantation. We evaluated the efficacy of endoscopic treatment in liver transplantation in patients who developed bile leaks. Methods Forty-two patients who developed bile leaks after liver transplantation were included in the study. If a bile leak was observed on ERCP, a sphincterotomy was performed, and a nasobiliary catheter was then inserted. If a bile leak was accompanied by a bile duct stricture, either the stricture was dilated with balloons, followed by nasobiliary catheter insertion across the bile duct stricture, or endoscopic retrograde biliary drainage was performed. Results In the bile leakage alone group (22 patients), endoscopic treatment was technically successful in 19 (86.4%) and clinically successful in 17 (77.3%) cases. Among the 20 patients with bile leaks with bile duct strictures, endoscopic treatment was technically successful in 13 (65.0%) and clinically successful in 10 (50.0%) cases. Among the 42 patients who underwent ERCP, technical success was achieved in 32 (76.2%) cases and clinical success was achieved in 27 (64.3%) cases. Conclusions ERCP is an effective and safe therapeutic modality for bile leaks after liver transplantation. ERCP should be considered as an initial therapeutic modality in post-liver transplantation patients. PMID:25717048

  11. A study on CT features of intrahepatic bile duct abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min Pengqiu; Li Peng; He Zhiyan; Chen Weixia; Liu Yan

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate CT features of intrahepatic bile duct abscess (IBDA) and its pathologic basis. Methods: The CT imaging data of 31 consecutive cases of intrahepatic bile duct abscess proved by surgery or clinical treatments from October 1989 to February 1999 were retrospectively studied. The causes included acute obstructive suppurative cholangitis and retrograde infection due to different etiologies. For all the cases, the CT manifestations of liver abscess, bile duct abnormalities, and their relationship were observed respectively. Results: Manifestations of liver abscess were revealed in all cases (31/31, 100%). The CT manifestations of bile duct abnormalities included signs of etiologies caused bile duct obstruction and other signs including cholangiectasis (29/31, 93.5%), the dilated bile ducts communicated with (5/31, 16.1%) or abut on (8/31, 25.8%) the abscesses, and gas collection in bile ducts (10/31, 32.2%). The signs showing the relationship between liver abscess and bile duct abnormalities were that the abscesses complied with the obstructive site and the dilated bile ducts (15/31, 48.4%), and the liver abscesses located in different (7/31, 22.6%) or same (4/31, 12.9%) liver lobes or segments with gas collection in the dilated bile ducts. Conclusion: The CT manifestations of IBDA included signs of liver abscess, abnormalities of bile ducts, and signs showing their relationship. CT scanning was helpful in making comprehensive and accurate diagnosis of IBDA

  12. Radiologic imaging of bile duct changes by clonorchiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myung Joon; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Lee, Jong Tae; Jung, Soon Hee

    1988-01-01

    The changes of the bile ducts were reviewed retrospectively in 38 patients of clonorchiasis by ultrasonography and/or CT. Diagnosis was made in 13 patients by cholecystectomy and exploration of the common bile duct, another 2 patients by segmentectomy and wedge resection of the liver, and 23 patients by stool examination. 14 of 36 cases done ultrasonography showed the parallel channel sign, and small nodular echoes around the dilated bile ducts. And 3 cases showed the echoes of worm of clonorchis sinensis in the common bile duct. 22 of 36 cases showed the parallel channel signs only. All cases (11) done CT showed diffuse dilatation of the peripheral bile ducts. 5 of 11 cases showed ring or tubular contrast enhancement around the dilated bile ducts. In 2 cases of liver resection, the bile ducts showed adenomatous hyperplasia and severe periductal fibrosis. Proliferation of blood vessels and infiltration of inflammatory cells were also seen. So we consider that the increased echoes of the bile duct wall, small nodular echoes around the bile ducts were attributed to the bile duct dilatation, severe adenomatous hyperplasia and periductal fibrosis. The ring or tubular contrast enhancement of the dilated bile ducts seems to be caused by the marked periductal inflammation resulting in capillary proliferation and the periductal fibrosis.

  13. Radiologic imaging of bile duct changes by clonorchiasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myung Joon; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Lee, Jong Tae; Jung, Soon Hee [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-10-15

    The changes of the bile ducts were reviewed retrospectively in 38 patients of clonorchiasis by ultrasonography and/or CT. Diagnosis was made in 13 patients by cholecystectomy and exploration of the common bile duct, another 2 patients by segmentectomy and wedge resection of the liver, and 23 patients by stool examination. 14 of 36 cases done ultrasonography showed the parallel channel sign, and small nodular echoes around the dilated bile ducts. And 3 cases showed the echoes of worm of clonorchis sinensis in the common bile duct. 22 of 36 cases showed the parallel channel signs only. All cases (11) done CT showed diffuse dilatation of the peripheral bile ducts. 5 of 11 cases showed ring or tubular contrast enhancement around the dilated bile ducts. In 2 cases of liver resection, the bile ducts showed adenomatous hyperplasia and severe periductal fibrosis. Proliferation of blood vessels and infiltration of inflammatory cells were also seen. So we consider that the increased echoes of the bile duct wall, small nodular echoes around the bile ducts were attributed to the bile duct dilatation, severe adenomatous hyperplasia and periductal fibrosis. The ring or tubular contrast enhancement of the dilated bile ducts seems to be caused by the marked periductal inflammation resulting in capillary proliferation and the periductal fibrosis.

  14. Bile Acid Signaling in Metabolic Disease and Drug Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tiangang

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are the end products of cholesterol catabolism. Hepatic bile acid synthesis accounts for a major fraction of daily cholesterol turnover in humans. Biliary secretion of bile acids generates bile flow and facilitates hepatobiliary secretion of lipids, lipophilic metabolites, and xenobiotics. In the intestine, bile acids are essential for the absorption, transport, and metabolism of dietary fats and lipid-soluble vitamins. Extensive research in the last 2 decades has unveiled new functions of bile acids as signaling molecules and metabolic integrators. The bile acid–activated nuclear receptors farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, vitamin D receptor, and G protein–coupled bile acid receptor play critical roles in the regulation of lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism, inflammation, and drug metabolism and detoxification. Bile acid synthesis exhibits a strong diurnal rhythm, which is entrained by fasting and refeeding as well as nutrient status and plays an important role for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Recent research revealed an interaction of liver bile acids and gut microbiota in the regulation of liver metabolism. Circadian disturbance and altered gut microbiota contribute to the pathogenesis of liver diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes, and obesity. Bile acids and their derivatives are potential therapeutic agents for treating metabolic diseases of the liver. PMID:25073467

  15. Expression of the bile acid receptor FXR in Barrett's esophagus and enhancement of apoptosis by guggulsterone in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frossard Jean-Louis

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Barrett's esophagus, a risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma, is associated with reflux disease. The aim of this study was to assess the expression of bile acid receptors in the esophagus (normal, esophagitis, Barrett's esophagus and adenocarcinoma and to investigate their possible function. Results the expression of the bile acid receptors FXR and VDR in esophageal biopsies from patients with a normal mucosa, esophagitis, Barrett's esophagus or adenocarcinoma (n = 6 per group and in cell lines derived from Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma, was assessed by real time Q-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The effect of guggulsterone, an antagonist of bile acid receptors, on apoptosis of Barrett's esophagus-derived cells was assessed morphologically, by flow cytometry and by measuring caspase 3 activity. The expression of FXR was increased in esophagitis, Barrett's esophagus and adenocarcinoma compared to normal mucosa by a mean of 44, 84 and 16, respectively. Immunohistochemistry showed a weak expression in normal esophagus, a strong focal reactivity in Barrett's esophagus, and was negative in adenocarcinoma. VDR expression did not significantly differ between groups. In cell cultures, the expression of FXR was high in Barrett's esophagus-derived cells and almost undetectable in adenocarcinoma-derived cells, whereas VDR expression in these cell lines was not significantly different. In vitro treatment with guggulsterone was associated with a significant increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells and of the caspase 3 activity. Conclusion the bile acid receptor FXR is significantly overexpressed in Barrett's esophagus compared to normal mucosa, esophagitis and esophageal adenocarcinoma. The induction of apoptosis by guggulsterone in a Barrett's esophagus-derived cell line suggests that FXR may contribute to the regulation of apoptosis.

  16. Novel, major 2α- and 2β-hydroxy bile alcohols and bile acids in the bile of Arapaima gigas, a large South American river fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato née Okihara, Rika; Saito, Tetsuya; Ogata, Hiroaki; Nakane, Naoya; Namegawa, Kazunari; Sekiguchi, Shoutaro; Omura, Kaoru; Kurabuchi, Satoshi; Mitamura, Kuniko; Ikegawa, Shigeo; Raines, Jan; Hagey, Lee R; Hofmann, Alan F; Iida, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    Bile alcohols and bile acids from gallbladder bile of the Arapaima gigas, a large South American freshwater fish, were isolated by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The structures of the major isolated compounds were determined by electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance using (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectra. The novel bile salts identified were six variants of 2-hydroxy bile acids and bile alcohols in the 5α- and 5β-series, with 29% of all compounds having hydroxylation at C-2. Three C27 bile alcohols were present (as ester sulfates): (24ξ,25ξ)-5α-cholestan-2α,3α,7α,12α,24,26-hexol; (25ξ)-5β-cholestan-2β,3α,7α,12α,26,27-hexol, and (25ξ)-5α-cholestan-2α,3α,7α,12α,26,27-hexol. A single C27 bile acid was identified: (25ξ)-2α,3α,7α,12α-tetrahydroxy-5α-cholestan-26-oic acid, present as its taurine conjugate. Two novel C24 bile acids were identified: the 2α-hydroxy derivative of allochenodeoxycholic acid and the 2β-hydroxy derivative of cholic acid, both occurring as taurine conjugates. These studies extend previous work in establishing the natural occurrence of novel 2α- and 2β-hydroxy-C24 and C27 bile acids as well as C27 bile alcohols in both the normal (5β) as well as the (5α) "allo" A/B-ring juncture. The bile salt profile of A. gigas appears to be unique among vertebrates. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. The effect of baclofen on gastro-oesophageal reflux, lower oesophageal sphincter function and reflux symptoms in patients with reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Herwaarden, M. A.; Samsom, M.; Rydholm, H.; Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Baclofen decreases gastro-oesophageal reflux episodes in healthy subjects by reducing the incidence of transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations. AIM: To investigate the effect of baclofen on reflux symptoms, oesophageal pH and lower oesophageal sphincter manometry in patients

  18. Respiratory and laryngeal symptoms secondary to gastro-oesophageal reflux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafferty, G; Mainie, I; McGarvey, L P A

    2011-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux may cause a range of laryngeal and respiratory symptoms. Mechanisms responsible include the proximal migration of gastric refluxate beyond the upper oesophageal sphincter causing direct irritation of the larynx and lower airway. Alternatively, refluxate entering the distal oesophagus alone may stimulate oesophageal sensory nerves and indirectly activate airway reflexes such as cough and bronchospasm. Recognising reflux as a cause for these extraoesophageal symptoms can be difficult as many patients do not have typical oesophageal symptoms (eg, heartburn) and clinical findings on laryngoscopy are not very specific. Acid suppression remains an effective treatment in the majority of patients but there is growing appreciation of the need to consider and treat non-acid and volume reflux. New opinions about the role of existing medical and surgical (laparoscopic techniques) treatment are emerging and a number of novel anti-reflux treatments are under development. PMID:28839612

  19. Gastroesophageal Reflux and Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Fahim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The histological counterpart of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is usual interstitial pneumonia, in which areas of fibrosis of various ages are interspersed with normal lung. This pattern could be explained by repeated episodes of lung injury followed by abnormal wound healing responses. The cause of the initiating alveolar epithelial injury is unknown, but postulated mechanisms include immunological, microbial, or chemical injury, including aspirated gastric refluxate. Reflux is promoted by low basal pressure in the lower oesophageal sphincter and frequent relaxations, potentiated by hiatus hernia or oesophageal dysmotility. In susceptible individuals, repeated microaspiration of gastric refluxate may contribute to the pathogenesis of IPF. Microaspiration of nonacid or gaseous refluxate is poorly detected by current tests for gastroesophageal reflux which were developed for investigating oesophageal symptoms. Further studies using pharyngeal pH probes, high-resolution impedance manometry, and measurement of pepsin in the lung should clarify the impact of reflux and microaspiration in the pathogenesis of IPF.

  20. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Sleeve Gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melissas, John; Braghetto, Italo; Molina, Juan Carlos; Silecchia, Gianfranco; Iossa, Angelo; Iannelli, Antonio; Foletto, Mirto

    2015-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and/or hiatus hernia (HH) are one of the most common disorders of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Despite the positive effect of sleeve gastrectomy (SG) regarding weight loss and improvement in obesity co-morbidities, there are concerns about the development of de novo gastroesophageal reflux disease or worsening the existing GERD after this bariatric operation. Furthermore, controversy exists on the consequences of SG in lower esophageal sphincter function and about the ideal procedure when a hiatus hernia is preoperatively diagnosed or discovered during the laparoscopic SG. This review systematically investigates the incidence, the pathophysiology of GERD and/or HH in morbidly obese individuals before and after SG, and the treatment options for concomitant HH repair during laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

  1. Gastro-Esophageal Reflux in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rybak

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Gastro-esophageal reflux (GER is common in infants and children and has a varied clinical presentation: from infants with innocent regurgitation to infants and children with severe esophageal and extra-esophageal complications that define pathological gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD. Although the pathophysiology is similar to that of adults, symptoms of GERD in infants and children are often distinct from classic ones such as heartburn. The passage of gastric contents into the esophagus is a normal phenomenon occurring many times a day both in adults and children, but, in infants, several factors contribute to exacerbate this phenomenon, including a liquid milk-based diet, recumbent position and both structural and functional immaturity of the gastro-esophageal junction. This article focuses on the presentation, diagnosis and treatment of GERD that occurs in infants and children, based on available and current guidelines.

  2. Gastro-Esophageal Reflux in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybak, Anna; Pesce, Marcella; Thapar, Nikhil; Borrelli, Osvaldo

    2017-08-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) is common in infants and children and has a varied clinical presentation: from infants with innocent regurgitation to infants and children with severe esophageal and extra-esophageal complications that define pathological gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). Although the pathophysiology is similar to that of adults, symptoms of GERD in infants and children are often distinct from classic ones such as heartburn. The passage of gastric contents into the esophagus is a normal phenomenon occurring many times a day both in adults and children, but, in infants, several factors contribute to exacerbate this phenomenon, including a liquid milk-based diet, recumbent position and both structural and functional immaturity of the gastro-esophageal junction. This article focuses on the presentation, diagnosis and treatment of GERD that occurs in infants and children, based on available and current guidelines.

  3. Demonstration of gastroesophageal reflux in children by radionuclide gastroesophagography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudd, T.G.; Christie, D.L.

    1979-01-01

    Twenty-five infants and children with proved gastroesophageal reflux were studied by radionuclide gastroesophagography to determine its sensitivity in detecting reflux. Patients swallowed an inert radiotracer (Tc-99m sulfur colloid) and gamma camera images of the stomach and esophagus were made with and without abdominal pressure. The test was easy to perform and was well tolerated. Reflux was demonstrated in 20 patients (80%); this compared favorably with barium gastroesophagography

  4. Mitochondrial dysfunction in children with reflux esophagitis

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    A. A. Ziganshina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate cellular energy metabolism in children with pathological gastroesophageal reflux, by determining the levels of free and bound carnitine in dry blood spot specimens and lactate and pyruvate in plasma.Characterization of children and methods. A total of 49 patients from the Diagnostic Department, Republican Children’s Clinical Hospital, Ministry of Health of the Republic of Tatarstan, were examined. A study group included 29 patients diagnosed as having reflux esophagitis. A control group consisted of 20 somatically healthy children without signs of gastrointestinal tract diseases. The investigators determined the levels of lactate and pyruvate in plasma by the Umbreit method and those of free and bound carnitine in the dried blood spot specimens by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.Results. There were significant changes in the lactate-to-pyruvate ratio in children with reflux esophagitis accompanied by motility disorders. The values of free carnitine were higher than normal in 41% of the study group representatives. The mean values of lactate, pyruvate, and carnitines were within the acceptable range in the examined groups with significantly high values in the children with pathological gastroesophageal reflux.Conclusion. Gastrointestinal tract motility disorders are an indication for the detection of  energy-deficient diathesis in children and the early correction with energy-rich medications that will potentially affect the rate of recurrences and the severity of clinical manifestations of the disease. 

  5. Diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badillo, Raul; Francis, Dawn

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disease with a prevalence as high as 10%-20% in the western world. The disease can manifest in various symptoms which can be grouped into typical, atypical and extra-esophageal symptoms. Those with the highest specificity for GERD are acid regurgitation and heartburn. In the absence of alarm symptoms, these symptoms can allow one to make a presumptive diagnosis and initiate empiric therapy. In certain situations, further diagnostic testing is needed to confirm the diagnosis as well as to assess for complications or alternate causes for the symptoms. GERD complications include erosive esophagitis, peptic stricture, Barrett’s esophagus, esophageal adenocarcinoma and pulmonary disease. Management of GERD may involve lifestyle modification, medical therapy and surgical therapy. Lifestyle modifications including weight loss and/or head of bed elevation have been shown to improve esophageal pH and/or GERD symptoms. Medical therapy involves acid suppression which can be achieved with antacids, histamine-receptor antagonists or proton-pump inhibitors. Whereas most patients can be effectively managed with medical therapy, others may go on to require anti-reflux surgery after undergoing a proper pre-operative evaluation. The purpose of this review is to discuss the current approach to the diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease. PMID:25133039

  6. Hiatus hernia in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, B.; Petersen, H.; Myrvold, H.E.; Grette, K.; Roeysland, P.; Halvorsen, T.

    1986-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and radiologic examination were performed in 101 patients with symptoms strongly suggestive of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease. Hiatus hernia (HH) was found in 50 patients diagnosed by radiography or endoscopy, or both, in 22, 19, and 9 patients respectively. Severe endoscopic esophagitis (grades III and IV) was found more often (p<0.05) in the patients with HH than in those without. The same was true for the early positive timed acid perfusion tests (p<0.02). Furthermore, the patients with HH more often had reflux by the standard acid reflux test (42 og 50 versus 28 of 51; p<0.01), gastroesophageal scintigraphy (47 of 50 versus 40 of 51; p<0.05), and radiography (20 of 50 versus 2 of 51; p<0.001) than the patients without HH. The results show that severe GER disease can occur without an associated HH and indicate that patients with symptoms of GER disease and associated HH are likely to have a more severe GER disease than those without HH

  7. Laryngopharyngeal Reflux: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Latest Research

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    Campagnolo, Andrea Maria

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR is a highly prevalent disease and commonly encountered in the otolaryngologist's office. Objective To review the literature on the diagnosis and treatment of LPR. Data Synthesis LPR is associated with symptoms of laryngeal irritation such as throat clearing, coughing, and hoarseness. The main diagnostic methods currently used are laryngoscopy and pH monitoring. The most common laryngoscopic signs are redness and swelling of the throat. However, these findings are not specific of LPR and may be related to other causes or can even be found in healthy individuals. Furthermore, the role of pH monitoring in the diagnosis of LPR is controversial. A therapeutic trial with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs has been suggested to be cost-effective and useful for the diagnosis of LPR. However, the recommendations of PPI therapy for patients with a suspicion of LPR are based on the results of uncontrolled studies, and high placebo response rates suggest a much more complex and multifactorial pathophysiology of LPR than simple acid reflux. Molecular studies have tried to identify biomarkers of reflux such as interleukins, carbonic anhydrase, E-cadherin, and mucin. Conclusion Laryngoscopy and pH monitoring have failed as reliable tests for the diagnosis of LPR. Empirical therapy with PPIs is widely accepted as a diagnostic test and for the treatment of LPR. However, further research is needed to develop a definitive diagnostic test for LPR.

  8. Radionuclide voiding cystography in intrarenal reflux detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizzoni, G.; Perale, R.; Bui, F.; Pitter, M.; Pavanello, L.; Boscolo, R.; Passerini Glazel, G.; Macri, C.

    1986-01-01

    In order to evaluate the possibility of detecting intra-renal reflux (IRR) with a more sensitive procedure, 48 children with recurrent urinary tract infections underwent intravenous urography (IVU) and voiding cystourethrogram (VCU) using a solution containing contrast medium and sup(99m)Tc-sulfur colloid particles which are known to persist in the renal parenchyma for a long time. Scintigraphic images were taken at 5 and 20 hours after VCU. 18 children had no vesico-ureteral reflux, 11 showed unilateral and 19 bilateral VUR, which was therefore present in 49 renal units. Among the 49 renal refluxing units (RRUs) IRR was detected radiologically in 8; of these isotopic activity in the renal area was present in all 6 RRUs who were examined at 20 hours. Of the remaining 41 RRUs with no radiologically detectable IRR 24 were evaluated at 20 hours and 5 (21%) showed renal radioactivity. Renal scars were significantly more frequent in kidneys with radioisotopic activity at 20 hours. The results of this study indicate that radionuclide cystography using sup(99m)Tc-sulfur colloid is a reliable procedure for demonstrating IRR, and to this end is more sensitive than X-ray VCU. Radionuclide cystography with sulfur colloid particles should therefore be considered a simple and useful complementary procedure, which is more sensitive than X-ray VCU in the diagnosis and follow-up of IRR

  9. Surgery for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in the Morbidly Obese Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Meredith C; Farrell, Timothy M

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has mirrored the increase in obesity, and GERD is now recognized as an obesity-related comorbidity. There is growing evidence that obesity, specifically central obesity, is associated with the complications of chronic reflux, including erosive esophagitis, Barrett's esophagus, and esophageal adenocarcinoma. While fundoplication is effective in creating a competent gastroesophageal junction and controlling reflux in most patients, it is less effective in morbidly obese patients. In these patients a bariatric operation has the ability to correct both the obesity and the abnormal reflux. The Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is the preferred procedure.

  10. Comparison between the Reflux Finding Score and the Reflux Symptom Index in the Practice of Otorhinolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Heloisa Sobreira; Pinto, José Antonio; Zavanela, Adma Roberta; Cavallini, André Freitas; Freitas, Gabriel Santos; Garcia, Fabiola Esteves

    2016-07-01

    The Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease has a prevalence of ∼12% of the urban population in Brazil. Koufman proposed the term to designate Laryngeal Pharyngeal Reflux (LPR) symptoms, signs or tissue damage resulting from aggression of the gastrointestinal contents in the upper aerodigestive tract. Belafsky et al proposed a score that points to inflammatory laryngeal signs through videolaryngoscopic findings, the Reflux Finding Score (RFS). Moreover, in 2002, they published the Reflux Symptom Index (RSI). The objective of this study is to provide a comparison between the Reflux Finding Score and the Reflux Symptom Index in the practice of Otorhinolaryngology. Our study involved a total of 135 patients who visited the Ear, Nose, and Throat (ENT) clinic Núcleo de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia de Cabeça e Pescoço de São Paulo between April 2014 and May 2015 with suspected LPR. We excluded nine patients and the study group was 126 patients. All patients were ranked by their RSI and RFS scores. The study group consisted of 126 patients (88 women and 38 men). Their main complaints were cough (40.4%), globus (21.4%), dysphonia (19.8%), throat clearing (15.8%), postnasal drip (3.17%), snoring (1.5%), dysphagia (1.5%), cacosmia (0.7%), and regurgitation (1.5%). The RSI ranges from 13 to 42 with a mean of 20.7 (SD = 6.67). The RFS ranged from 3 to 19 with a mean of 9.53 (SD = 2.64). The RSI and RFS can easily be included in ENT routines as objective parameters, with low cost and high practicality. Based on the clinical index, the specialist can evaluate the need for further tests.

  11. Bear bile: dilemma of traditional medicinal use and animal protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yibin; Siu, Kayu; Wang, Ning; Ng, Kwan-Ming; Tsao, Sai-Wah; Nagamatsu, Tadashi; Tong, Yao

    2009-01-01

    Bear bile has been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) for thousands of years. Modern investigations showed that it has a wide range of pharmacological actions with little toxicological side effect and the pure compounds have been used for curing hepatic and biliary disorders for decades. However, extensive consumption of bear bile made bears endangered species. In the 1980's, bear farming was established in China to extract bear bile from living bears with "Free-dripping Fistula Technique". Bear farming is extremely inhumane and many bears died of illness such as chronic infections and liver cancer. Efforts are now given by non-governmental organizations, mass media and Chinese government to end bear farming ultimately. At the same time, systematic research has to be done to find an alternative for bear bile. In this review, we focused on the literature, laboratory and clinical results related to bear bile and its substitutes or alternative in English and Chinese databases. We examined the substitutes or alternative of bear bile from three aspects: pure compounds derived from bear bile, biles from other animals and herbs from TCM. We then discussed the strategy for stopping the trading of bear bile and issues of bear bile related to potential alternative candidates, existing problems in alternative research and work to be done in the future. PMID:19138420

  12. Bear bile: dilemma of traditional medicinal use and animal protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagamatsu Tadashi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bear bile has been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM for thousands of years. Modern investigations showed that it has a wide range of pharmacological actions with little toxicological side effect and the pure compounds have been used for curing hepatic and biliary disorders for decades. However, extensive consumption of bear bile made bears endangered species. In the 1980's, bear farming was established in China to extract bear bile from living bears with "Free-dripping Fistula Technique". Bear farming is extremely inhumane and many bears died of illness such as chronic infections and liver cancer. Efforts are now given by non-governmental organizations, mass media and Chinese government to end bear farming ultimately. At the same time, systematic research has to be done to find an alternative for bear bile. In this review, we focused on the literature, laboratory and clinical results related to bear bile and its substitutes or alternative in English and Chinese databases. We examined the substitutes or alternative of bear bile from three aspects: pure compounds derived from bear bile, biles from other animals and herbs from TCM. We then discussed the strategy for stopping the trading of bear bile and issues of bear bile related to potential alternative candidates, existing problems in alternative research and work to be done in the future.

  13. Serum bile acid concentrations in dairy cattle with hepatic lipidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garry, F B; Fettman, M J; Curtis, C R; Smith, J A

    1994-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate serum bile acid measurements as indicatory, of liver function and/or hepatic fat infiltration in dairy cattle. Serum bile acid concentrations were measured in healthy dairy cattle at different stages of lactation after fasting or feeding. Bile acid concentrations were compared with liver fat content and sulfobromophthalein (BSP) half-life (T 1/2). Serum bile acid concentrations were higher in cows in early lactation and with higher daily milk production. Compared with prefasting values, bile acid concentrations were decreased at 8, 14, and 24 hours of fasting. Blood samples from fed cows at 1- to 2-hour intervals had wide and inconsistent variations in bile acid concentration. Because serum bile acids correlated well with BSP T 1/2, it is suggested that both measurements evaluate a similar aspect of liver function. Neither bile acids nor BSP T 1/2 correlated with differences in liver fat content among cows. Because of large variability in serum bile acid concentrations in fed cows and the lack of correlation of measured values with liver fat content, bile acid determinations do not appear useful for showing changes in hepatic function in fed cows with subclinical hepatic lipidosis nor serve as a screening test for this condition.

  14. Imaging manifestation of hepatocellular carcinoma with bile duct tumor thrombi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qingyu; Chen Jianyu; Liang Biling; Hu Tao

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the imaging features of hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC) with bile duct tumor thrombi. Methods: Thirteen patients with bile duct tumor thrombi proved pathologically underwent imaging examination. MR and CT were performed in 3 cases, and 2 cases had CT only and 8 cases had MRI only. Ultrasonography(US) was performed in all 13 patients. The accuracy of bile duct tumor thrombi detection was compared between US, CT and MRI with Fisher test. Results: Liver tumors and bile duct tumor thrombi were demonstrated in all patients on CT or MRI. Presence of intraluminal soft tissue mass was found in four of five cases on CT, and mild enhancement of the intraluminal mass in the arterial phase was noted, dilated bile duct distal to tumor thrombi was detected in all five patients. Eleven Tumor thrombi showed slight low signal intensity on T 1 WI, slight high signal intensity on T 2 WI, and mild to moderate contrast enhancement on the contrast-enhanced MR images. The MRCP findings of tumor thrombi were as follows: interruption, stricture of the bile ducts or irregular filling defect in the bile ducts with dilated intrahepatic ducts, bile duet was abruptly interrupted or showed a 'rat-tail' stricture (n=5); the common bile duct was filled with tumor thrombi, intrahepatic bile duct dilatation and missing common bile duct was noted on MRCP (n=2). Bile duct tumor thrombi were correctly diagnosed in 7 cases on US, and 12 cases on CT or MRI. Six cases were misdiagnosed or miss-diagnosed on US, and 4 cases were misdiagnosed on CT or MRI. There was no significant difference between US and CT/MRI in diagnosis of bile duct tumor thrombi (P=0.270). Conclusion: CT or MR imaging is useful for the diagnosis of HCC with biliary tumor thrombi and for evaluating the extension of thrombi. (authors)

  15. Percutaneous treatment of benign bile duct strictures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koecher, Martin [Department of Radiology, University Hospital, I.P.Pavlova 6, 775 20 Olomouc (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: martin.kocher@seznam.cz; Cerna, Marie [Department of Radiology, University Hospital, I.P.Pavlova 6, 775 20 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Havlik, Roman [Department of Surgery, University Hospital, I.P.Pavlova 6, 775 20 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Kral, Vladimir [Department of Surgery, University Hospital, I.P.Pavlova 6, 775 20 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Gryga, Adolf [Department of Surgery, University Hospital, I.P.Pavlova 6, 775 20 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Duda, Miloslav [Department of Surgery, University Hospital, I.P.Pavlova 6, 775 20 Olomouc (Czech Republic)

    2007-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term results of treatment of benign bile duct strictures. Materials and methods: From February 1994 to November 2005, 21 patients (9 men, 12 women) with median age of 50.6 years (range 27-77 years) were indicated to percutaneous treatment of benign bile duct stricture. Stricture of hepatic ducts junction resulting from thermic injury during laparoscopic cholecystectomy was indication for treatment in one patient, stricture of hepaticojejunostomy was indication for treatment in all other patients. Clinical symptoms (obstructive jaundice, anicteric cholestasis, cholangitis or biliary cirrhosis) have appeared from 3 months to 12 years after surgery. Results: Initial internal/external biliary drainage was successful in 20 patients out of 21. These 20 patients after successful initial drainage were treated by balloon dilatation and long-term internal/external drainage. Sixteen patients were symptoms free during the follow-up. The relapse of clinical symptoms has appeared in four patients 9, 12, 14 and 24 months after treatment. One year primary clinical success rate of treatment for benign bile duct stricture was 94%. Additional two patients are symptoms free after redilatation (15 and 45 months). One patient is still in treatment, one patient died during secondary treatment period without interrelation with biliary intervention. The secondary clinical success rate is 100%. Conclusion: Benign bile duct strictures of hepatic ducts junction or biliary-enteric anastomosis are difficult to treat surgically and endoscopically inaccessible. Percutaneous treatment by balloon dilatation and long-term internal/external drainage is feasible in the majority of these patients. It is minimally invasive, safe and effective.

  16. Bile acids in experimental colorectal cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Rainey, J. B.

    1986-01-01

    Cogent epidemiological and experimental data implicate bile acids as endogenous co-carcinogens in colorectal cancer. A series of experiments was designed to test the ability of sodium deoxycholate (SDC) to promote intestinal hyperplasia and neoplasia in rats (n = 265). The intermediary role of faecal anaerobes was explored in animals receiving oral metronidazole. Intrarectal instillation of SDC trebled tumour yield in functioning large bowel and increased both crypt depth and crypt cell produ...

  17. A CASE SERIES ON FISH BILE TOXICITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwijen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A case series of 3 cases of fish bile poisoning are reported. After ingestion of gall bladder of Labeo rohita for alleged vision improvement, generally presented with gastrointestinal symptoms such as cramping pain abdomen, nausea and vomiting within 12 hours after ingestion. Subsequently rena l and hepatic dysfunctions were found in all the three cases. The patient recovered fully with conservative treatment and supportive haemodialysis.

  18. Bile acid sequestrants and the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staels, Bart; Kuipers, Folkert

    2007-01-01

    Bile acids promote bile formation and facilitate dietary lipid absorption. Animal and human studies showing disturbed bile acid metabolism in diabetes mellitus suggest a link between bile acids and glucose control. Bile acids are activating ligands of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a nuclear

  19. Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma) Symptoms, Tests, Prognosis, and Stages (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bile duct cancer, or cholangiocarcinoma, is rare. Bile ducts are tubes that carry bile between the liver, gallbladder, and small intestine. Bile duct cancer can occur in the intrahepatic, perihilar (Klatskin tumor), or distal extrahepatic area. Learn about tests to diagnose and the stages of bile duct cancer.

  20. The canalicular bile salt export pump BSEP (ABCB11) as a potential therapeutic target

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stieger, Bruno; Beuers, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Bile formation is a key function of the liver and is driven by active secretion of bile salts and other organic compounds into the biliary tree. Bile salts represent the major organic constituent of bile. They are released with bile into the small intestine, where they are almost quantitatively

  1. Recirculation and reutilization of micellar bile lecithin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, S J

    1975-09-01

    Bile lecithins, solubilized in micellar bile salt and radiolabeled in the 1-acyl fatty acid, phosphorus, and choline positions, were infused in the small bowel of fasted rats. Absorption of each label was virtually complete after 24 h. However, these lecithins were extensively hydrolyzed in the bowel lumen as well as after absorption, and neither the fatty acid nor phosphorus was significantly retained in the enterohepatic circulation or reutilized for biliary lecithin synthesis. In contrast, while choline was also dissociated from absorbed lecithin, choline was instead retained in the liver, reincorporated into newly synthesized hepatic lecithin, and sercreted in biliary lecithin in 10-fold greater amounts than either the fatty acid or phosphorus. However, the extent of choline incorporation into bile lecithin was limited and was not further increased when free choline was directly injected into the portal vein. The data therefore suggest that although only choline of absorbed lecithin is retained in the enterohepatic circulation and preserved for new biliary lecithin synthesis, exogenous choline utilization is regulated by the size of the available hepatic pool.

  2. Crystal Structure of the Substrate-Binding Domain from Listeria monocytogenes Bile-Resistance Determinant BilE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie J. Ruiz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BilE has been reported as a bile resistance determinant that plays an important role in colonization of the gastrointestinal tract by Listeria monocytogenes, the causative agent of listeriosis. The mechanism(s by which BilE mediates bile resistance are unknown. BilE shares significant sequence similarity with ATP-binding cassette (ABC importers that contribute to virulence and stress responses by importing quaternary ammonium compounds that act as compatible solutes. Assays using related compounds have failed to demonstrate transport mediated by BilE. The putative substrate-binding domain (SBD of BilE was expressed in isolation and the crystal structure solved at 1.5 Å. Although the overall fold is characteristic of SBDs, the binding site varies considerably relative to the well-characterized homologs ProX from Archaeoglobus fulgidus and OpuBC and OpuCC from Bacillus subtilis. This suggests that BilE may bind an as-yet unknown ligand. Elucidation of the natural substrate of BilE could reveal a novel bile resistance mechanism.

  3. Gastro-oesophageal reflux. Part 1: smoking and alcohol reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Talalwah, Narmeen; Woodward, Sue

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is defined as an abnormal reflux of the stomach contents into the oesophagus, which provokes symptoms and impairs the quality of life. GORD has a high prevalence and incurs costs to the healthcare system. This is the first paper in a series of three exploring the conservative, medical and surgical treatment of GORD. This first paper presents a review of the effect of smoking and alcohol on reflux symptoms and the impact of smoking and alcohol reduction on symptoms of GORD. A search for English language studies on adults was conducted using three databases, MEDLINE, Embase and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL). Eleven relevant studies were included in the review. The effect of alcohol on the stimulation of reflux has been debated over the years in different studies. Some studies state that alcohol consumption induces reflux and moderate amounts exacerbate nocturnal gastro-oesophageal heartburn reflux. However, other studies have found no association between alcohol consumption and reflux. Most reflux occurs during smoking because nicotine causes the lower oesophageal sphincter to relax, which increases the risk of reflux. Similarly, the number of cigarettes smoked is associated with the risk of reflux. Nurses need to be aware of the effect of smoking and alcohol on reflux to provide evidence-based advice to empower patients to change their lifestyle, which results in increased therapeutic compliance and a better clinical status. There is no evidence that reducing alcohol consumption decreases symptoms and only limited evidence on the effectiveness of smoking cessation. Further research into the effectiveness of these lifestyle modifications is therefore required.

  4. Gastro-esophageal reflux time parameters and esophagitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baulieu, F.; Baulieu, J.; Maurage, C.; Casset, D.; Itti, R.

    1985-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the correlation between the reflux timing and the presence of esophagitis, an inconstant but serious complication of gastro-esophageal reflux (GER). The hypothesis was that reflux occurring late after meal can be incriminated more than early reflux in esophagitis genesis. 32 children with GER (mean age = 10.5 months, 2 to 30 months) had esophagoscopy and scintigraphy in the same week. The children were classified in two groups according to esophagoscopy: group 1 (n = 18) no esophagitis, group 2 (n = 14) esophaqgitis. The scintigraphy involved the ingestion of 0.5 mCi Tc-99m sulfur colloid milk mixture, followed by esophageal and gastric activity recording (one image per minute for 1 hour). The reflux was assessed from contrast enhanced images and esophageal time activity curves. Reflux intensity was quantitated by reflux index (Re). Mean reflux time was calculated as the mean esophageal activity peaks time (t-bar). Finally a composite parameter was calculated as the mean reflux time weighted by the relative intensity of each reflux peak (t-barw). Re was not found to be different between the two groups. t-bar was significantly higher in group 2: t-bar = 29.6 +- 3.0 mn (mean +- SD) than in group 1: t-bar = 24.5 +- 6.8 mn; rho <0.02. The difference between the two groups was enhanced by intensity weighting: group 1: t-barw = 16.6 +- 6.3 mn, group 2: t-barw = 33.5 +- 7.1 mn rho <0.001. t-barw value was not correlated to esophagitis grade. These results suggest that late reflux is more likely responsible of esophagitis

  5. A Case of Adenomyomatous Hyperplasia of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masakatsu Numata

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Adenomyomatous hyperplasia is rarely found in the extrahepatic bile duct. A 54-year-old man was referred to our center with a diagnosis of extrahepatic bile duct stenosis which had been detected by endoscopic retrograde choloangiopancreatography. Abdominal computed tomography revealed thickening of the wall of the middle extrahepatic bile duct, however no malignant cells were detected by cytology. Since bile duct carcinoma could not be ruled out, we performed resection of the extrahepatic duct accompanied by lymph node dissection. Histopathologically, the lesion was diagnosed as adenomyomatous hyperplasia of the extrahepatic bile duct. Present and previously reported cases showed the difficulty of making a diagnosis of adenomyomatous hyperplasia of the extrahepatic bile duct preoperatively or intraoperatively. Therefore, when adenomyomatous hyperplasia is suspected, a radical surgical procedure according to malignant disease may be necessary for definitive diagnosis.

  6. Displacement of Drugs From Cyclodextrin Complexes by Bile Salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Niels Erik; Westh, Peter; Holm, Rene

    2016-01-01

    of drug from the cyclodextrin cavity by bile salts present in the small intestine. As bile salts in the intestine are present at concentrations above the critical micelle concentration, an understanding of the interaction between cyclodextrins and bile salts at such supramicellar concentrations (SMC......) is required for a better biopharmaceutical understanding of the release mechanism from orally dosed cyclodextrin complexes. To address this, experiments were conducted by isothermal titration calorimetry to determine how various b-cyclodextrins and bile salt interacts at SMC. Combined analysis of the current...... results and earlier data demonstrated that direct interactions between bile salt micelles and cyclodextrin were negligible. From this knowledge, an extended form of the UCD was suggested to describe the concentration of cyclodextrins to achieve full drug solubilization in the intestine where bile salts...

  7. In vivo multiphoton imaging of bile duct ligation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Li, Feng-Chieh; Chen, Hsiao-Chin; Chang, Po-shou; Yang, Shu-Mei; Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2008-02-01

    Bile is the exocrine secretion of liver and synthesized by hepatocytes. It is drained into duodenum for the function of digestion or drained into gallbladder for of storage. Bile duct obstruction is a blockage in the tubes that carry bile to the gallbladder and small intestine. However, Bile duct ligation results in the changes of bile acids in serum, liver, urine, and feces1, 2. In this work, we demonstrate a novel technique to image this pathological condition by using a newly developed in vivo imaging system, which includes multiphoton microscopy and intravital hepatic imaging chamber. The images we acquired demonstrate the uptake, processing of 6-CFDA in hepatocytes and excretion of CF in the bile canaliculi. In addition to imaging, we can also measure kinetics of the green fluorescence intensity.

  8. Supraesophageal Reflux: Correlation of Position and Occurrence of Acid Reflux-Effect of Head-of-Bed Elevation on Supine Reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, David R; Simon, Ronald A

    2015-01-01

    Supraesophageal reflux of gastric contents can contribute to perennial nasopharyngitis, cough, and asthma. However, effective treatment strategies for supraesophageal reflux disease (SERD) remain inadequately defined. The purpose of this study is to assess the prevalence and timing of SERD and to investigate the efficacy of head-of-bed elevation in its treatment. A retrospective chart review of patients seen at Scripps Clinic Division of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology was performed who had undergone overnight nasopharyngeal pH monitoring with a commercially available nasopharyngeal pH-monitoring device, Dx-pH Measurement System from Restech, San Diego, Calif. Subjects with reflux were classified based on the position of reflux as either supine only, upright only, or both supine and upright. In a subset of subjects with supine-only reflux, pH monitoring was compared before and after elevating the head of bed 6 inches. Adequate nasopharyngeal pH-monitoring data were obtained for 235 patients. Reflux was detected in 113 (48%) patients. The pattern of reflux observed was 62 (55%) supine only, 4 (4%) upright only, and 47 (42%) upright and supine. Sequential overnight nasopharyngeal pH monitoring before and after head-of-bed elevation was obtained in 13 individuals with supine-only reflux. Ten subjects demonstrated significant improvement, 8 of whom demonstrated complete resolution of supine reflux with 6 inches of head-of-bed elevation. This study provides new evidence that SERD frequently occurs in the supine position and that 6 inches of head-of-bed elevation is effective in reducing supine SERD. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Postnatal development of bile secretory physiology in the dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavoloni, N.; Jones, M.J.; Berk, P.D.

    1985-01-01

    To determine whether bile formation in the dog is an immature process at birth, several determinants of bile secretion were studied in anesthetized, bile duct-cannulated puppies of 0-42 days of age and adult dogs. Basal canalicular bile flow rate, estimated by 14 C-erythritol biliary clearance, averaged 0.182 microliter/min/g liver in 0-3 day-old puppies and increased to 0.324 and 0.461 microliter/min/g in puppies 7-21 and 28-42 days of age, respectively. Calculated ductular bile water reabsorption ( 14 C-erythritol biliary clearance-bile flow) was virtually absent in 0-3 day-old puppies, and averaged 0.017 and 0.092 microliter/min/g in puppies of 7-21 and 28-42 days of age, respectively. In adult dogs, ductular bile water reabsorption was 0.132 microliter/min/g. These functional deficiencies of the newborn dog were associated with an increased biliary permeability to 3 H-inulin which could not be accounted for solely by an increased solute diffusion due to the lower rate of canalicular bile flow. Administration of taurocholate up to 2000 nmol/min/kg produced in all animals a similar increase in canalicular bile flow and bile acid excretion, and was not associated with changes in ductular bile water reabsorption rate. These findings are interpreted to indicate that, in the dog, bile secretory function is immature at birth and develops during postnatal life

  10. Sucralfate maintenance therapy in reflux esophagitis. Sucralfate Investigational Working Team

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tytgat, G. N.; Koelz, H. R.; Vosmaer, G. D.

    1995-01-01

    to prove in a double-blind placebo-controlled multinational trial the effects of sucralfate suspension 2 g BID and placebo in the prevention of recurrent reflux esophagitis. One hundred and eighty-four patients from 16 centers with reflux esophagitis Savary grade 1 and 2 were initially healed with

  11. Mosapride for gastroesophageal reflux disease in neurologically impaired patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komura, Makoto; Kanamori, Yutaka; Tanaka, Yujiro; Kodaka, Tetsuro; Sugiyama, Masahiko; Terawaki, Kan; Suzuki, Kan; Iwanaka, Tadashi

    2017-03-01

    The prokinetic agent cisapride is effective for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in infants and children, but is no longer used for this purpose because of safety concerns. Therefore, other pharmacological agents need to be investigated for efficacy in GERD treatment. In this study, we examined the effectiveness and safety of mosapride for the treatment of neurologically impaired children and adolescents with GERD. Mosapride (0.3 mg/kg/day) was administered to 11 neurologically impaired patients with GERD (five male; median age, 12.3 years). Esophageal acid exposure was measured using esophageal pH monitoring before and at >5 days after the start of mosapride treatment. The pressure and length of the lower esophageal sphincter were compared before and after mosapride treatment. In the 11 patients, median reflux index (percentage of the total monitoring period during which recorded pH was reflux (range, 0.5-2.1 min/reflux) before and 0.7 min/reflux (range, 0.4-1.2 min/reflux) after treatment with mosapride (P = 0.02). The median number of reflux episodes before (219) and after (122) drug treatment did not differ significantly. The decreased reflux index in neurologically impaired patients with GERD is due to mosapride, therefore mosapride may be a candidate for GERD treatment. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  12. [Underlying Mechanisms and Management of Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang Jae

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in South Korea has increased over the past 10 years. Patients with erosive reflux disease (ERD) shows better response to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) than those with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). NERD is a heterogeneous condition, showing pathological gastroesophageal reflux or esophageal hypersensitivity to reflux contents. NERD patients with pathological gastroesophageal reflux or hypersensitivity to acid may respond to PPIs. However, many patients with esophageal hypersensitivity to nonacid or functional heartburn do not respond to PPIs. Therefore, careful history and investigations are required when managing patients with refractory GERD who show poor response to conventional dose PPIs. Combined pH-impedance studies and a PPI diagnostic trial are recommended to reveal underlying mechanisms of refractory symptoms. For those with ongoing reflux-related symptoms, split dose administration, change to long-acting PPIs or PPIs less influenced by CYP2C19 genotypes, increasing dose of PPIs, and the addition of alginate preparations, prokinetics, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or tricyclic antidepressants can be considered. Pain modulators, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or tricyclic antidepressants are more likely to be effective for those with reflux-unrelated symptoms. Surgery or endoscopic per oral fundoplication may be effective in selected patients.

  13. Pediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease: Current diagnosis and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Pol, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a disorder difficult to diagnose and to treat. Due to the current definition of GERD, i.e. gastroesophageal reflux (GER) causing bothersome symptoms and/or complications, diagnosis is subject to broad interpretation. This thesis consists of studies

  14. Laparoscopic anti-reflux surgery : indications, techniques and physiological effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeders, J.A.J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is a highly prevalent chronic disorder in which retrograde flow of gastric contents into the oesophagus causes troublesome symptoms or lesions. Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy controls reflux disease in 95% of the patients and the remaining 5% have

  15. Reflux oesophagitis and Helicobacter pylori infection in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liston, R.; Pitt, M. A.; Banerjee, A. K.

    1996-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is associated with gastritis, peptic ulcers and gastric malignancies. Little attention has been paid to the possibility that it may also have a role in the pathogenesis of reflux oesophagitis. This is especially true in elderly patients who have life-long infection and provide an ideal group to study the mucosal changes associated with the organism. The aim of this study was to determine if H pylori is associated with reflux oesophagitis in elderly patients. Consecutive gastroscopy patients were recruited. Multiple biopsies were taken from oesophagus, stomach, antrum and duodenum for histology and rapid urease tests. Patients also had IgG ELISA antibodies and 13C-urea breath tests performed. Patients with macroscopic or microscopic evidence of reflux oesophagitis were compared to patients with macroscopically normal upper gastrointestinal tracts and no microscopic evidence of reflux. A total of 114 patients were recruited, average age 78.9 years (+/- 5.4). There were 37 refluxers and 33 non-refluxers. We found no evidence for an association between the presence of H pylori and reflux oesophagitis in elderly patients. The high prevalence of H pylori in patients with reflux oesophagitis can be explained by the presence of incidental gastritis. PMID:8733530

  16. Laparoscopic surgery for gastro-esophageal acid reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijven, Marlies P.; Gisbertz, Suzanne S.; van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I.

    2014-01-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease is a troublesome disease for many patients, severely affecting their quality of life. Choice of treatment depends on a combination of patient characteristics and preferences, esophageal motility and damage of reflux, symptom severity and symptom correlation to acid

  17. Detection of gastro-oesophageal reflux in the neonatal unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossor, Thomas; Lingam, Ingran; Douiri, Abdel; Bhat, Ravindra; Greenough, Anne

    2018-03-13

    To determine whether a pH probe or multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII) more frequently detected gastro-oesophageal reflux and test the hypothesis that acid reflux was associated with lower baseline impedance. A prospective study of infants in whom reflux was suspected and evaluated using combined pH and multichannel impedance. Studies were considered abnormal if the acid index was >10% or there were >79MII reflux events in 24 hours. The acid index was the percentage of total study time with a pHacid clearance time (ACT) the time from the pH falling below four to rising above four. Forty-two infants [median gestational age 31 (range 23-42) weeks] were assessed. Only nine infants (21%) had abnormal studies, seven detected by pH monitoring, one by MII monitoring and one by both techniques (p = 0.04). After correcting for gestational age and post-natal age, baseline impedance remained negatively correlated with the acid index (r = -0.34, p = 0.038) and the maximum ACT (r = -0.44, p = 0.006). Clinical suspicion of reflux was frequently incorrect, and reflux was more frequently detected by a pH probe. The inverse relationship of acid reflux to baseline impedance suggests that mucosal disruption may result from acid reflux in this population. ©2018 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Respiratory repercussions of gastroesophageal reflux and Cine-esophagogastroscintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillemeteau, C.; Saudubray, F. (Hopital des Enfants, 33 - Bordeaux (France)); Guillet, J. (Hopital Pellegrin, 33 - Bordeaux (France))

    1985-04-01

    Asthma and recurrent bronchopneumopathies in children are often associated with gastroesophageal reflux. Cine-esogastroscintigraphy is proposed for demonstrating reflux and establishing its direct or indirect responsibility in respiratory disease. 133 patients aged 5 months to 16 years were studied. Reflux was found in 65.5% of cases, either severe (44.4% of cases) or minor (21.1%). Episodes of reflux produced respiratory manifestations in 7% of patients. Inhalation of refluxed material was proved in 3% by demonstration of pulmonary contamination. Sensitivity of cine-esophagogastroscintigraphy is comparable to that of esophageal pH measurement for detection of reflux. It does not require positioning of a probe in the esophageal lumen. It provides quantitative parameters on esophageal transit, reflux and gastric voiding, and demonstrates pulmonary contamination. It is easy to perform and can be readily included in an outpatient clinic workup. Its sensitivity and reliability make it a useful tool for evaluation of therapeutic efficiency. The interlocking of various physiopathologic factors contributes to the polymorphism of respiratory manifestations of reflux.

  19. Respiratory repercussions of gastroesophageal reflux and cine-esophagogastroscintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillemeteau, C.; Saudubray, F. (Hopital des Enfants, 33 - Bordeaux (France)); Guillet, J. (Hopital Pellegrin, 33 - Bordeaux (France))

    1984-10-01

    Asthma and recurrent bronchopneumopathies in children are often associated with gastroesophageal reflux. Cine-esophagogastroscintigraphy is proposed for demonstrating reflux and establishing its direct or indirect responsibility in respiratory disease. 133 patients aged 5 months to 16 years were studied. Reflux was found in 65.5% of cases, either severe (44.4% of cases) or minor (21.1%). Episodes of reflux produced respiratory manifestations in 7% of patients. Inhalation of refluxed material was proved in 3% by demonstration of pulmonary contamination. Sensitivity of cine-esophagogastroscintigraphy is comparable to that of esophageal pH measurement for detection of reflux. It does not require positioning of a probe in the esophageal lumen. It provides quantitative parameters on esophageal transit, reflux and gastric voiding, and demonstrates pulmonary contamination. It is easy to perform and can be readily included in an outpatient clinic workup. Its sensitivity and reliability make it a useful tool for evaluation of therapeutic efficiency. The interlocking of various physiopathologic factors contributes to the polymorphism of respiratory manifestations of reflux.

  20. Dental approach to erosive tooth wear in gastroesophageal reflux ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The duration of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), the frequency of reflux, the pH and type of acid, and the quality and quantity of saliva affect the severity of dental erosion due to GERD. Objective: To summarize the diagnostic protocol and treatment of dental erosion due to GERD. Methods: A Medline ...

  1. Respiratory repercussions of gastroesophageal reflux and cine-esophagogastroscintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillemeteau, C.; Saudubray, F.; Guillet, J.

    1984-01-01

    Asthma and recurrent bronchopneumopathies in children are often associated with gastroesophageal reflux. Cine-esogastroscintigraphy is proposed for demonstrating reflux and establishing its direct or indirect responsibility in respiratory disease. 133 patients aged 5 months to 16 years were studied. Reflux was found in 65.5% of cases, either severe (44.4% of cases) or minor (21.1%). Episodes of reflux produced respiratory manifestations in 7% of patients. Inhalation of refluxed material was proved in 3% by demonstration of pulmonary contamination. Sensitivity of cine-esophagogastroscintigraphy is comparable to that of esophageal pH measurement for detection of reflux. It does not require positioning of a probe in the esophageal lumen. It provides quantitative parameters on esophageal transit, reflux and gastric voiding, and demonstrates pulmonary contamination. It is easy to perform and can be readily included in an outpatient clinic workup. Its sensitivity and reliability make it a useful tool for evaluation of therapeutic efficiency. The interlocking of various physiopathologic factors contributes to the polymorphism of respiratory manifestations of reflux [fr

  2. Out-patient radiology in gastro-esophageal reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alessi, G.; Risi, D.; Accordino, M.E.; Meli, C.; Iascone, C.

    1987-01-01

    A retrospective analysis is reported of 131 symptomatic patients for gastro-esophageal reflux, comparing the radiological diagnosis to endoscopic, manometric and pH-metric results. A low incidence of x-ray examination is found. The role of radiology in gastro-esophageal reflux is considered and discussed

  3. Respiratory repercussions of gastroesophageal reflux and cine-esophagogastroscintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillemeteau, C.; Saudubray, F.; Guillet, J.

    1985-01-01

    Asthma and recurrent bronchopneumopathies in children are often associated with gastroesophageal reflux. Cine-esogastroscintigraphy is proposed for demonstrating reflux and establishing its direct or indirect responsibility in respiratory disease. 133 patients aged 5 months to 16 years were studied. Reflux was found in 65.5% of cases, either severe (44.4% of cases) or minor (21.1%). Episodes of reflux produced respiratory manifestations in 7% of patients. Inhalation of refluxed material was proved in 3% by demonstration of pulmonary contamination. Sensitivity of cine-esophagogastroscintigraphy is comparable to that of esophageal pH measurement for detection of reflux. It does not require positioning of a probe in the esophageal lumen. It provides quantitative parameters on esophageal transit, reflux and gastric voiding, and demonstrates pulmonary contamination. It is easy to perform and can be readily included in an outpatient clinic workup. Its sensitivity and reliability make it a useful tool for evaluation of therapeutic efficiency. The interlocking of various physiopathologic factors contributes to the polymorphism of respiratory manifestations of reflux [fr

  4. Computed tomography of hepatocellular carcinoma. Dilatation of intrahepatic bile duct

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Soomi; Nakamura, Hitonobu; Tanaka, Ken; Hori, Shinichi; Tokunaga, Kou [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1983-10-01

    Based on a series of CT of the liver in 125 patients with hepatoma and 45 patients with metastatic hepatic tumors, the mode of dilatation of the intrahepatic bile duct was examined. In patients with hepatoma, partia dilatations of intrahepatic bile duct were more commonly seen than general dilatations. On the other hand, there was no case of partial dilatation of the intrahepatic bile duct in patients with metastatic hepatic tumors. It could be concluded that partial dilatation of the intrahepatic bile duct is an useful CT finding to make a diagnosis of hepatoma, particularly to differentiate hepatoma from metastatic hepatic tumor.

  5. Bile Acids Trigger GLP-1 Release Predominantly by Accessing Basolaterally Located G Protein-Coupled Bile Acid Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brighton, Cheryl A.; Rievaj, Juraj; Kuhre, Rune E.

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are well-recognized stimuli of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. This action has been attributed to activation of the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor GPBAR1 (TGR5), although other potential bile acid sensors include the nuclear farnesoid receptor and the apical sodium......-coupled bile acid transporter ASBT. The aim of this study was to identify pathways important for GLP-1 release and to determine whether bile acids target their receptors on GLP-1-secreting L-cells from the apical or basolateral compartment. Using transgenic mice expressing fluorescent sensors specifically in L...... to either TLCA or TDCA. We conclude that the action of bile acids on GLP-1 secretion is predominantly mediated by GPBAR1 located on the basolateral L-cell membrane, suggesting that stimulation of gut hormone secretion may include postabsorptive mechanisms....

  6. Risk factors, treatment and impact on outcomes of bile leakage after hemihepatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Si-Ming; Li, Hong; Li, Gen-Cong; Yu, Dan-Song; Ying, Dong-Jian; Zhang, Bin; Lu, Cai-De; Zhou, Xin-Hua

    2017-07-01

    Risk factors for bile leakage after hemihepatectomy are unknown. A prospectively maintained database review identified patients undergoing hemihepatectomy between 1 January 2009 and 30 September 2014. Patients were divided into B/C and non-B/C bile leakage groups. Risk factors for bile leakage were predicted and assessments of their impact on patients were made. Bile leakage occurred in 91 of the 297 patients (30.6%); 64 cases were classified as grade B bile leakage (21.5%) and three cases as grade C bile leakage (1.0%). Multivariate analysis confirmed that elevated preoperative alanine transaminase (ALT), positive bile culture during surgery, hilar bile duct plasty, bilioenteric anastomosis and laparoscopic surgery were risk factors for B/C grade bile leakage (P bile leakage (P bile leakage (P bile leakage group were higher than those in the non-B/C bile leakage group (P bile leakage group also required prolonged hospitalization (P 0.05). Patient with elevated preoperative ALT, positive bile cultures during surgery, hilar bile duct plasty, bilioenteric anastomosis and laparoscopic surgery are more likely to complicate bile leakage. We should use biliary drainage such as preoperative PTBD, ENBD or intraoperative Kehr's T-tube drainage to reduce and treat bile leakage in patients with high risk of bile leakage. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  7. Esophageal Mucosal Impedance Pattern is Distinct in Patients With Extraesophageal Reflux Symptoms and Pathologic Acid Reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavitt, Robert T; Lal, Pooja; Yuksel, Elif Saritas; Ates, Fehmi; Slaughter, James C; Garrett, C Gaelyn; Higginbotham, Tina; Vaezi, Michael F

    2017-05-01

    Current diagnostic tests for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) do not consistently measure chronicity of reflux. Mucosal impedance (MI) is a minimally invasive measurement to assess esophageal conductivity changes due to GERD. We aimed to investigate MI pattern in patients with symptoms of extraesophageal reflux (EER) in a prospective longitudinal cohort study. Patients with potential symptoms of EER undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) with wireless pH monitoring were studied. Participants included those with erosive esophagitis (E+), normal EGD/abnormal pH (E-/pH+), and normal EGD/normal pH (E-/pH-). MI was measured from the site of injury in patients with E+, as well as at 2, 5, and 10 cm above the squamocolumnar junction (SCJ) in all participants. Forty-one patients with symptoms of EER were studied. MI measurements at 2 cm above the SCJ were significantly (P = 0.04) different among the three groups, with MI lowest for E+ and greatest for E-/pH- patients. Although not statistically significant, there is a graded increase in median (interquartile range) MI axially along the esophagus at 5 cm (P = 0.20) and at 10 cm (P = 0.27) above the SCJ, with those with reflux (E+ and E-/pH+) having a lower MI than those without. Patients with symptoms of EER and evidence of acid reflux have an MI lower than those without at 2 cm above the SCJ, with a trend at 5 cm and 10 cm as well. MI may be a tool to assess presence of GERD in patients presenting with EER symptoms. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Diagnostic tests in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hani de Ardila, Albis

    2009-01-01

    The true prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is difficult to establish despite that an estimated 11% of the U.S. population experiencing heartburn daily or 30% every three days (1), perhaps due to that the disease can cause many symptoms, both typical and atypical as heartburn or chest pain, among others. Multiple techniques for measuring reflux have been used, and many authors (1-3) have asked why this situation, possibly because the techniques measure and quantify the basic pathophysiologic problem disease, the time of exposure of the esophagus distal to the gastric juice, because the measures are quantitatively related to the degree of esophageal mucosal injury, or because the episodes of exposure to gastric juice correlated with the patient's symptoms. As said Richter (4) m any times these studies are unnecessary because the history is sufficiently revealing to identify the presence of GERD. But the clinician must decide which test you choose to carry a diagnosis of a reliable, timely and cost-effective . But we cannot rely on the presence of symptoms to diagnosis, because we incur the overdiagnosis in a considerable number of individuals, the sensitivity set for the typical symptoms as heartburn is 68% and specificity was 63% (2), which leads us to conclude that atypical symptoms should be investigated as they may relate to functional dyspepsia rather than GERD. It is also clear that the severity and frequency of symptoms in any way correlates with the presence or absence of esophagitis, patients with erosive esophagitis are more severe disease and increased risk of developing complications. The persistent exposure of the esophagus to gastric juice does not cause mucosal injury in all individuals, therefore, it is possible to define the disease by the presence of mucosal injury, while endoscopy is able to define the mucosal injury caused by the reflux can also lead to false conclusions, such as those patients with symptoms of GERD who have no

  9. Vesicoureteral refluxed volume and renal function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markovic, V.; Capkun, V.; Eterovic, D.; Stanicic, A.; Saraga, M.

    1994-01-01

    The therapeutical approach to vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) depends on assessment of the renal involvement. The effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) and parenchymal mean transit time of radiotracer (pMTT) of the affected kidney are sensitive functional parameters. We investigated the association of these functional indices with the volume of refluxed urine. In 64 children (mean age 6.4 yrs) the presence of VUR was confirmed with direct radionuclide cystography in 80 ureters (48 unilateral and 32 bilateral) and the maximal volume of refluxed urine (MVRU) was determined for each uretero-renal unit. All patients also underwent dynamic renal scintigraphy with I-131-hippuran, providing the values of pMTT and relative renal hippuran clearances of the respective kidneys by deconvolution analysis. In 37 of the affected kidneys ERPF was also determined by combining the latter results with total ERPF, determined by plasma clearance of hippuran. Using the borderline value of MVRU of 4 ml, the group with higher MVRU exhibited significantly lower ERPF of the affected kidney (194±93 vs. 270±77 ml/min/1.73 m2, p=.002) and significantly higher proportion of pMTT's over 3.5 min (31/33 vs. 17/47, p=.003). The negative linear correlation between MVRU and ERPF was found (r=-.45, p=.006). We conclude that quantitative radionuclide cystography, aside from diagnosis and follow-up of VUR, may also provide insight in the function of the affected kidney and thus contribute in designing the therapeutical approach. (author)

  10. Role of endoscopy in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Rai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a condition due to reflux of stomach content in the esophagus causing trouble symptoms or complications or both. GERD is a clinical diagnosis and typically presents with a heartburn and/or regurgitation and a positive response to antacid secretory medications. GERD is the leading outpatient diagnosis among all gastrointestinal disorders in the United States. Approximately 40% of population report occasional symptoms of GERD whereas 10-20% of patients will have symptoms at least once in a week. Recent guidelines from gastrointestinal societies such as American College of Gastroenterology, American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy and American College of Physicians have laid out specific indications regarding role of esophagogastroduodenoscopy in GERD. Despite these recommendations, studies have revealed that one-fifth to two-fifth EGDs may not be clinically indicated, especially where open access endoscopy referral system is used. Traditionally, GERD has been thought to be a disease of the western world. Prevalence rates had been estimated to be lower in Asia when compared to that of the Western Countries. Few recent epidemiological studies in India showed the prevalence of reflux disease in India to be between 8-24%, which is comparable to the western world. The use of EGDs becomes more critical for developing countries such as India where prevalence of GERD and BE is comparable to the western countries but have limited resources. In addition to direct cost for an EGD, it burdens economy with indirect costs such as time off from the work, transportation and any procedural complications. Risk stratifying patients with GERD may therefore prevent unnecessary procedures, harms and costs. The aim of this paper is to review the existing evidence on the role of endoscopy in GERD.

  11. Tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness-Jensen, Eivind; Lagergren, Jesper

    2017-10-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) develops when reflux of gastric content causes troublesome symptoms or complications. The main symptoms are heartburn and acid regurgitation and complications include oesophagitis, strictures, Barrett's oesophagus and oesophageal adenocarcinoma. In addition to hereditary influence, GORD is associated with lifestyle factors, mainly obesity. Tobacco smoking is regarded as an aetiological factor of GORD, while alcohol consumption is considered a triggering factor of reflux episodes and not a causal factor. Yet, both tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption can reduce the lower oesophageal sphincter pressure, facilitating reflux. In addition, tobacco smoking reduces the production of saliva rich in bicarbonate, which is important for buffering and clearance of acid in the oesophagus. Alcohol also has a direct noxious effect on the oesophageal mucosa, which predisposes to acidic injury. Tobacco smoking cessation reduces the risk of GORD symptoms and avoidance of alcohol is encouraged in individuals where alcohol consumption triggers reflux. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Proton Pump Inhibitors in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: Friend or Foe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyawali, C Prakash

    2017-09-01

    Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been redefined, in light of recent advances highlighting GERD phenotypes that respond to PPIs, and fresh revelations of potential risks of long-term PPI therapy. Erosive esophagitis predicts excellent response to PPI therapy, but non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) with abnormal reflux parameters on ambulatory reflux monitoring also demonstrates a similar response. In contrast, response is suboptimal in the absence of abnormal reflux parameters. In this setting, if an alternate appropriate indication for PPI therapy does not coexist, risks may outweigh benefits of PPI therapy. Adverse events from long-term PPI therapy continue to be reported, most based on association rather than cause-and-effect. Appropriate indications need to be established before embarking on long-term PPI therapy. Future research will define true risks of long-term PPI therapy, and develop alternate management options for acid peptic diseases.

  13. Gastroesophageal scintigraphy to assess the severity of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menin, R.A.; Malmud, L.S.; Petersen, R.P.; Maier, W.P.; Fisher, R.S.

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-six (36) patients with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux were studied. Symptoms of heartburn, regurgitation, and dysphagia were scored as to their severity and compared to quantitative tests of gastroesophageal reflux. Patients were studied with the acid reflux test, fiberoptic endoscopy, exophageal mucosal biopsy with a pinch forceps, esophageal manometry, and radioisotopic gastroesophgeal scintigraphy. Symptoms were scored according to an arbitrary grading system as mild, moderate, or severe. There were significant correlations between symptoms scores and both the degree of endoscopic esophagitis and the gastroesophageal reflux indices as measured by the radioisotopic scintiscan, but not with the degree of histologic esophagitis or lower esophageal sphincter pressure. Review of the findings suggest the following profile for patients who might require antireflux surgery: severe symptoms; presence of endoscopic esophagitis; resting lower esophageal sphincter pressure below 10 mmHg; and gastroesophageal reflux index above 10%

  14. Correlation of obstructive sleep apnoea and laryngopharyngeal reflux: phmetry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhennawi, D M; Ahmed, M R; Abou-Halawa, A S

    2016-12-01

    To study the correlation of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR). A descriptive study. Suez Canal University Hospital, Ismailia, Egypt. 62 patients with polysomnography confirmed OSA. Patients were evaluated with ambulatory 24-h double channel pH monitoring. Mean reflux symptom index in the study group was 9 ± 5.5, and it was > 13 in all patients with severe OSA. Signs of LPR reflux were present in 34 (55%) patients. Abnormal reflux was detected in the distal oesophagus in 41 patients (66%) and in the proximal oesophagus in 21 patients (34%). Patients with severe OSA had significantly higher nocturnal LPR reflux episodes compared to patients with mild disease (P .05). LPR is common in patients with OSA. Patients with severe OSA have significantly higher nocturnal LPR. This should be considered when treating this group of patients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Activation of PPARα decreases bile acids in livers of female mice while maintaining bile flow and biliary bile acid excretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Youcai; Lickteig, Andrew J; Csanaky, Iván L; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2018-01-01

    Fibrates are hypolipidemic drugs that act as activators of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). In both humans and rodents, females were reported to be less responsive to fibrates than males. Previous studies on fibrates and PPARα usually involved male mice, but little has been done in females. The present study aimed to provide the first comprehensive analysis of the effects of clofibrate (CLOF) and PPARα on bile acid (BA) homeostasis in female mice. Study in WT male mice showed that a 4-day CLOF treatment increased liver weight, bile flow, and biliary BA excretion, but decreased total BAs in both serum and liver. In contrast, WT female mice were less susceptible to these CLOF-mediated responses observed in males. In WT female mice, CLOF decreased total BAs in the liver, but had little effect on the mRNAs of hepatic BA-related genes. Next, a comparative analysis between WT and PPARα-null female mice showed that lack of PPARα in female mice decreased total BAs in serum, but had little effect on total BAs in liver or bile. However, lack of PPARα in female mice increased mRNAs of BA synthetic enzymes (Cyp7a1, Cyp8b1, Cyp27a1, and Cyp7b1) and transporters (Ntcp, Oatp1a1, Oatp1b2, and Mrp3). Furthermore, the increase of Cyp7a1 in PPARα-null female mice was associated with an increase in liver Fxr-Shp-Lrh-1 signaling. In conclusion, female mice are resistant to CLOF-mediated effects on BA metabolism observed in males, which could be attributed to PPARα-mediated suppression in females on genes involved in BA synthesis and transport. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The role of bile salt toxicity in the pathogenesis of bile duct injury after non-heart-beating porcine liver transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yska, Marit J.; Buis, Carlijn I.; Monbaliu, Diethard; Schuurs, Theo A.; Gouw, Annette S. H.; Kahmann, Olivier N. H.; Visser, Dorien S.; Pirenne, Jacques; Porte, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Background. Intrahepatic bile duct strictures are a serious complication after non-heart-beating (NHB) liver transplantation. Bile salt toxicity has been identified as an important factor in the pathogenesis of bile duct injury and cholangiopathies. The role of bile salt toxicity in the development

  17. Sphingomyelin exhibits greatly enhanced protection compared with egg yolk phosphatidylcholine against detergent bile salts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moschetta, A.; vanBerge-Henegouwen, G. P.; Portincasa, P.; Palasciano, G.; Groen, A. K.; van Erpecum, K. J.

    2000-01-01

    Inclusion of phosphatidylcholine within bile salt micelles protects against bile salt-induced cytotoxicity. In addition to phosphatidylcholine, bile may contain significant amounts of sphingomyelin, particularly under cholestatic conditions. We compared protective effects of egg yolk

  18. Investigation of extraesophageal gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoukali, Emmanouela; Sifrim, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The most common extraesophageal manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) include chronic cough, asthma and laryngitis. There are two mechanisms proposed to explain extraesophageal syndromes caused by GERD. The first one is a direct way via irritation and/or microaspiration and the second one is an indirect, vagally mediated way. The investigation of extraesophageal manifestations of GERD is difficult and the empirical therapy with proton pump inhibitors usually double dose for at least three months is still the most common approach. PMID:24714277

  19. Multicenter assessment of venous reflux by duplex ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurie, Fedor; Comerota, Anthony; Eklof, Bo; Kistner, Robert L; Labropoulos, Nicos; Lohr, Joann; Marston, William; Meissner, Mark; Moneta, Gregory; Neglén, Peter; Neuhardt, Diana; Padberg, Frank; Welsh, Harold J

    2012-02-01

    This prospective multicenter investigation was conducted to define the repeatability of duplex-based identification of venous reflux and the relative effect of key parameters on the reproducibility of the test. Repeatability was studied by having the same technologist perform duplicate tests, at the same time of the day, using the same reflux-provoking maneuver and with the patient in the same position. Reproducibility was examined by having two different technologists perform the test at the same time of the day, using the same reflux-provoking maneuver and with the patient in the same position. Facilitated reproducibility was studied by having two different technologists examine the same patients immediately after an educational intervention. Limits of agreement between two duplex scans were studied by changing three elements of the test: time of the day (morning vs afternoon), patient's position (standing vs supine), and reflux initiation (manual vs automatic compression-decompression). The study enrolled 17 healthy volunteers and 57 patients with primary chronic venous disease. Repeatability of reflux time measurements in deep veins did not significantly differ with the time of day, the patient's position, or the reflux-provoking maneuver. Reflux measurements in the superficial veins were more repeatable (P ultrasound detection of venous reflux. Reports should include information on the time of the test, the patient's position, and the provoking maneuver used. Adopting a uniform cut point of 0.5 second for pathologic reflux can significantly improve the reliability of reflux detection. Implementation of a standard protocol should elevate the minimal standard for agreement between repeated tests from the current 70% to at least 80% and with more rigid standardization, to 90%. Copyright © 2012 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Dynamic characteristic of gastro-oesophageal reflux in ambulatory patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and normal control subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weusten, B. L.; Akkermans, L. M.; vanBerge-Henegouwen, G. P.; Smout, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to investigate the dynamic characteristics of pathologic gastro-oesophageal reflux. METHODS: Five-channel ambulatory 24-h oesophageal pH monitoring was performed in 19 gastro-oesophageal reflux disease patients (age, 21-74 years) and in 19 healthy volunteers

  1. Acid suppressants for managing gastro-oesophageal reflux and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in infants: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jane C; Schneuer, Francisco J; Harrison, Christopher; Trevena, Lyndal; Hiscock, Harriet; Elshaug, Adam G; Nassar, Natasha

    2018-02-22

    To evaluate the diagnosis and management of reflux and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) in infants aged reflux and GORD and their management including prescribing of acid-suppressant medicines (proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and histamine receptor antagonists (H2RAs)) and counselling, advice or education. Of all infants' visits, 512 (2.7%) included a diagnosis of reflux (n=413, 2.2%) or GORD (n=99, 0.5%). From 2006 to 2016, diagnostic rates decreased for reflux and increased for GORD. Prescribing of acid suppressants occurred in 43.6% visits for reflux and 48.5% visits for GORD, similar to rates of counselling, advice or education (reflux: 38.5%, GORD: 43.4% of visits). Prescribing of PPIs increased (statistically significant only for visits for reflux), while prescribing of H2RAs decreased. Overprescribing of acid suppressants to infants may be occurring. In infants, acid-suppressant medicines are no better than placebo and may have significant negative side effects; however, guidelines are inconsistent. Clear, concise and consistent guidance is needed. GPs and parents need to understand what is normal and limitations of medical therapy. We need a greater understanding of the influences on GP prescribing practices, of parents' knowledge and attitudes and of the pressures on parents of infants with these conditions. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. Allelic Variation of Bile Salt Hydrolase Genes in Lactobacillus salivarius Does Not Determine Bile Resistance Levels▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Fang; Li, Yin; Bumann, Mario; Raftis, Emma J.; Casey, Pat G.; Cooney, Jakki C.; Walsh, Martin A.; O'Toole, Paul W.

    2009-01-01

    Commensal lactobacilli frequently produce bile salt hydrolase (Bsh) enzymes whose roles in intestinal survival are unclear. Twenty-six Lactobacillus salivarius strains from different sources all harbored a bsh1 allele on their respective megaplasmids. This allele was related to the plasmid-borne bsh1 gene of the probiotic strain UCC118. A second locus (bsh2) was found in the chromosomes of two strains that had higher bile resistance levels. Four Bsh1-encoding allele groups were identified, defined by truncations or deletions involving a conserved residue. In vitro analyses showed that this allelic variation was correlated with widely varying bile deconjugation phenotypes. Despite very low activity of the UCC118 Bsh1 enzyme, a mutant lacking this protein had significantly lower bile resistance, both in vitro and during intestinal transit in mice. However, the overall bile resistance phenotype of this and other strains was independent of the bsh1 allele type. Analysis of the L. salivarius transcriptome upon exposure to bile and cholate identified a multiplicity of stress response proteins and putative efflux proteins that appear to broadly compensate for, or mask, the effects of allelic variation of bsh genes. Bsh enzymes with different bile-degrading kinetics, though apparently not the primary determinants of bile resistance in L. salivarius, may have additional biological importance because of varying effects upon bile as a signaling molecule in the host. PMID:19592587

  3. Comparison of the composition of bile acids in bile of patients with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas and benign disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, David O; Crick, Peter J; Jenkins, Gareth J; Wang, Yuqin; Griffiths, William J; Brown, Tim H; Al-Sarireh, Bilal

    2017-11-01

    Bile acids have been implicated in the development of gastrointestinal malignancies. Both the specific nature of individual bile acids and their concentration appear key factors in the carcinogenic potency of bile. Using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) we performed quantitative profiling of bile extracted directly from the common bile duct in 30 patients (15 patients with pancreatic cancer and 15 patients with benign disease). Separation and detection of bile acids was performed using a 1.7μm particle size reversed-phase C 18 LC column at a flow rate of 200μL/min with negative electrospray ionization MS. A significant difference (p=0.018) was seen in the concentration of unconjugated cholic acid in the malignant group (0.643mmol/L) compared to the benign group (0.022mmol/L), with an overall significant difference (p=0.04) seen in the level of total unconjugated bile acids in the malignant group (1.816mmol/L) compared to the benign group (0.069mmol/L). This finding may offer the possibility of both understanding the biology of cancer development in the pancreas, as well as offering a potential diagnostic avenue to explore. However, a larger study is necessary to confirm the alterations in bile acid profiles reported here and explore factors such as diet and microbial populations on the bile acid profiles of these patient groups. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Inside the adaptation process of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis to bile

    OpenAIRE

    Burns, Patricia; Sánchez García, Borja; Vinderola, Gabriel; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Ruíz García, Lorena; Margolles Barros, Abelardo; Reinheimer, Jorge A.; González de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara

    2010-01-01

    Progressive adaptation to bile might render some lactobacilli able to withstand physiological bile salt concentrations. In this work, the adaptation to bile was evaluated on previously isolated dairy strains of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis 200 and L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis 200+, a strain derived thereof with stable bile-resistant phenotype. The adaptation to bile was obtained by comparing cytosolic proteomes of both strains grown in the presence or absence of bile. Proteomics we...

  5. Common bile duct cancer with massive necrosis mimicking choledochal dilatation on CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyake, H.; Matsumoto, S.; Ueda, S.; Maeda, T.; Aikawa, H.; Mori, H.

    1991-01-01

    Carcinomas of the common bile duct are usually seen as dilatation of the bile duct proximal to a solid mass on CT. In the case reported here, the common bile duct cancer itself mimicked dilated common bile duct on CT because of massive necrosis. In a case of simulating dilated common bile duct on CT, and discrepancy between CT and ultrasonography or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, a common bile duct cancer with massive necrosis should be included in the differential diagnosis. (orig.)

  6. Causes of, and Therapeutic Approaches for, Proton Pump Inhibitor-Resistant Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Ishihara, Shunji

    2008-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are the most widely used drugs for treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease. However, approximately 20% of patients with reflux esophagitis and 40% of those with nonerosive reflux diseases complain of troublesome symptoms, even during treatment with PPIs. In patients with reflux esophagitis, dose escalation and co-administration with a histamine ...

  7. Tolerance of bile duct to intraoperative irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sindelar, W.F.; Tepper, J.; Travis, E.L.

    1982-01-01

    In order to determine the effects of intraoperative radiation therapy of the bile duct and surrounding tissues, seven adult dogs were subjected to laparotomy and intraoperative irradiation with 11 MeV electrons. Two animals were treated at each dose level of 2000, 3000, and 4500 rads. A single dog which received a laparotomy and sham irradiation served as a control. The irradiation field consisted of a 5 cm diameter circle encompassing the extrahepatic bile duct, portal vein, hepatic artery, and lateral duodenal wall. The animals were followed clinically for mor than 18 months after treatment, and autopsies were performed on dogs that died to assess radiation-induced complications or tissue damage. All dogs developed fibrosis and mural thickening of the common duct, which appeared by 6 weeks following irradiation and which was dose-related, being mild at low doses and more severe at high doses. Hepatic changes were seen as early as 6 weeks after irradiation, consisting of periportal inflammation and fibrosis. The hepatic changes appeared earliest at the highest doses. Frank biliary cirrhosis eventually developed at all dose levels. Duodenal fibrosis appeared in the irradiation portal, being most severe at the highest doses and in some animals resulting in duodenal obstruction. No changes were observed in irradiated portions of portal vein and hepatic artery at any dose level. It was concluded that intraoperative radiation therapy delivered to the region of the common duct leads to ductal fibrosis, partial biliary obstruction with secondary hepatic changes, and duodenal fibrosis if bowel wall is included in the field. Clinical use of intraoperative radiation therapy to the bile duct in humans may require routine use of biliary and duodenal bypass to prevent obstructive complications

  8. Characterization of basal hepatic bile flow and the effects of intravenous cholecystokinin on the liver, sphincter, and gallbladder in patients with sphincter of Oddi spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Gerbail T; Krishnamurthy, Shakuntala; Watson, Randy D

    2004-01-01

    The major objectives of this project were to establish the pattern of basal hepatic bile flow and the effects of intravenous administration of cholecystokinin on the liver, sphincter of Oddi, and gallbladder, and to identify reliable parameters for the diagnosis of sphincter of Oddi spasm (SOS). Eight women with clinically suspected sphincter of Oddi spasm (SOS group), ten control subjects (control group), and ten patients who had recently received an opioid (opioid group) were selected for quantitative cholescintigraphy with cholecystokinin. Each patient was studied with 111-185 MBq (3-5 mCi) technetium-99m mebrofenin after 6-8 h of fasting. Hepatic phase images were obtained for 60 min, followed by gallbladder phase images for 30 min. During the gallbladder phase, 10 ng/kg octapeptide of cholecystokinin (CCK-8) was infused over 3 min through an infusion pump. Hepatic extraction fraction, excretion half-time, basal hepatic bile flow into the gallbladder, gallbladder ejection fraction, and post-CCK-8 paradoxical filling (>30% of basal counts) were identified. Seven of the patients with SOS were treated with antispasmodics (calcium channel blockers), and one underwent endoscopic sphincterotomy. Mean (+/-SD) hepatic bile entry into the gallbladder (versus GI tract) was widely variable: it was lower in SOS patients (32%+/-31%) than in controls (61%+/-36%) and the opioid group (61%+/-25%), but the difference was not statistically significant. Hepatic extraction fraction, excretion half-time, and pattern of bile flow through both intrahepatic and extrahepatic ducts were normal in all three groups. Gallbladder mean ejection fraction was 9%+/-4% in the opioid group; this was significantly lower (Pgallbladder refluxed into intrahepatic ducts; it reentered the gallbladder after cessation of CCK-8 infusion (paradoxical gallbladder filling) in all eight patients with SOS, but in none of the patients in the other two groups. Mean paradoxical filling was 204% (+/-193%) in the

  9. Complications of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parasa, S; Sharma, P

    2013-06-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is on the rise with more than 20% of the western population reporting symptoms and is the most common gastrointestinal disorder in the United States. This increase in GORD is not exactly clear but has been attributed to the increasing prevalence of obesity, changing diet, and perhaps the decreasing prevalence of H. pylori infection. Complications of GORD could be either benign or malignant. Benign complications include erosive oesophagitis, bleeding and peptic strictures. Premalignant and malignant lesions include Barrett's metaplasia, and oesophageal cancer. Management of both the benign and malignant complications can be challenging. With the use of proton-pump inhibitors, peptic strictures (i.e., strictures related to reflux) have significantly declined. Several aspects of Barrett's management remain controversial including the stage in the disease process which needs to be intervened, type of the intervention and surveillance of these lesions to prevent development of high grade dysplasia and oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Esophageal motor function of gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Tian, Yuan; Ding, Yan

    2010-08-01

    To study the relationship between esophageal motor functional disorder [decreased lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP)and ineffective motility (IEM)] and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Totally 89 patients with GERD were enrolled in this study. All of them underwent 24-hour pH monitoring with dual-channel probe and stationary esophageal manometry. In addition, 77 of these patients underwent upper endoscopy. IEM and LES, 10 mmHg were common disturbances in patients with GERD (54% and 48%, respectively). The number of the acid reflux events of distal esophagus and prevalence of moderate or severe erosive esophagitis (EE) were significantly higher in patients with low LESP and IEM than patients without low LESP ( Pesophagus was significantly correlated with the severity of esophagitis, distal esophagus amplitude, and LESP, while no such correlation was found between IEM and degree of esophageal acid exposure or esophagitis. The pathophysiology of GERD is probably multifactorial. Lower LESP or IEM is not a independent pathophysiological factor for GERD. However,one single factor is insufficient to explain all the pathogenic mechanism of GERD.

  11. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Tooth Erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarbin Ranjitkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD in children and adults, and of “silent refluxers” in particular, increases the responsibility of dentists to be alert to this potentially severe condition when observing unexplained instances of tooth erosion. Although gastroesophageal reflux is a normal physiologic occurrence, excessive gastric and duodenal regurgitation combined with a decrease in normal protective mechanisms, including an adequate production of saliva, may result in many esophageal and extraesophageal adverse conditions. Sleep-related GERD is particularly insidious as the supine position enhances the proximal migration of gastric contents, and normal saliva production is much reduced. Gastric acid will displace saliva easily from tooth surfaces, and proteolytic pepsin will remove protective dental pellicle. Though increasing evidence of associations between GERD and tooth erosion has been shown in both animal and human studies, relatively few clinical studies have been carried out under controlled trial conditions. Suspicion of an endogenous source of acid being associated with observed tooth erosion requires medical referral and management of the patient as the primary method for its prevention and control.

  12. Lipid aspiration pneumonia due to gastroesophageal reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfson, B.J.; Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA; Allen, J.L.; Panitch, H.B.; Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA; Karmazin, N.; Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA

    1989-01-01

    The development of lipid aspiration pneumonia after chronic nasopharyngeal installation of mineral oil was first described in 1925 by Laughlin. Since that time this entity has been well recognized and numerous substances have been identified or implicated as the aspirated material. The classic radiographic appearance of severe chronic lipid aspiration pneumonia has been described as consisting of intense perihilar infiltrates. However, the radiographic findings are more often non-specific and usually consist of varying degrees of diffuse interstitial infiltrates that tend to be more prominent in the perihilar regions and the right lung. We are reporting a case of biopsy-proven lipid aspiration pneumonia in an infant with known gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) who had medium-chain triglyceride oil administered via nasogastric tube. Serial roentgenograms demonstrated a changing pulmonary pattern from diffuse bilateral interstitial infiltrates initially to a diffuse alveolar pattern at the time of the lung biopsy. Modern medicine has developed new methods for providing nourishment to sick newborns and infants to improve their nutritional status and help them to grow. One such method involves the administration of medium-chain triglycerides (MCT oil) into the GI tract via a nasogastric or nasoenteral tube. The purpose of this report is to describe a significant complication of this method of providing nutrition to an infant with gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and the diagnostic dilemma it presented. (orig.)

  13. Activation of CFTR by ASBT-mediated bile salt absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijvelds, MJC; Jorna, H; Verkade, HJ; Bot, AGM; Hofmann, F; Agellon, LB; Sinaasappel, M; de Jonge, HR

    2005-01-01

    In cholangiocytes, bile salt (BS) uptake via the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT) may evoke ductular flow by enhancing cAMP-mediated signaling to the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel. We considered that ASBT-mediated BS uptake in the distal

  14. Liver and Bile Duct Cancer—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver cancer includes hepatocellular carcinoma and bile duct cancer (cholangiocarcinoma). Risk factors for HCC include chronic infection with hepatitis B or C and cirrhosis of the liver. Start here to find information on liver and bile duct cancer treatment, causes and prevention, screening, research, and statistics.

  15. The influence of bile acids homeostasis by cryptotanshinone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Herbs might affect the homeostasis of bile acids through influence of multiple metabolic pathways of bile acids. Aim: The present study aims to investigate the inhibition of cryptotanshinone towards the glucuronidation of LCA, trying to indicate the possible influence of cryptotanshinone-containing herbs towards ...

  16. The interrelationship between bile acid and vitamin A homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saeed, Ali; Hoekstra, Mark; Hoeke, Martijn Oscar; Heegsma, Janette; Faber, Klaas Nico

    Vitamin A is a fat-soluble vitamin important for vision, reproduction, embryonic development, cell differentiation, epithelial barrier function and adequate immune responses. Efficient absorption of dietary vitamin A depends on the fat-solubilizing properties of bile acids. Bile acids are

  17. On the appearance of bile in clinical MR cholangiopancreatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haakansson, K.; Christoffersson, J.O.; Leander, P.; Ekberg, O.; Haakansson, H.O.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To study the appearance of bile in clinical MR cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) with special reference to its chemical and physical properties. Material and Methods: Gallbladder bile was collected during surgery from 38 patients and studied with respect to chemical constituents. The relaxation rates 1/T1 and 1/T2 of bile were also determined in vitro. In 16 of these 38 patients, abdominal imaging was performed using MRCP as well as T1-weighted GE sequences. Results: For 9 of the 13 chemical parameters studied, a positive significant correlation with 1/T1 as well as 1/T2 was found. The median relaxation rates 1/T1 and 1/T2 were 0.76 and 1.48/s, respectively. The corresponding ranges were 0.38-3.13/s and 0.70-5.75/s, respectively. On the MRCP images a few patients showed gallbladder of poor visibility due to low signal-to-noise ratio. This coincided with a high relaxation rate 1/T2 of bile. On the T1-weighted GE sequences a few patients showed hyperintense gallbladder relative to liver, coinciding with high relaxation rates 1/T1 of bile. Conclusion: Bile was found to show a large interindividual variation with respect to relaxation rates 1/T1 and 1/T2. The relaxation rates increased with increasing amounts of substances in the bile. For some patients (11%) MRCP imaging is unsuccessful due to high relaxation rate of bile

  18. State of the art in bile analysis in forensic toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bévalot, F; Cartiser, N; Bottinelli, C; Guitton, J; Fanton, L

    2016-02-01

    In forensic toxicology, alternative matrices to blood are useful in case of limited, unavailable or unusable blood sample, suspected postmortem redistribution or long drug intake-to-sampling interval. The present article provides an update on the state of knowledge for the use of bile in forensic toxicology, through a review of the Medline literature from 1970 to May 2015. Bile physiology and technical aspects of analysis (sampling, storage, sample preparation and analytical methods) are reported, to highlight specificities and consequences from an analytical and interpretative point of view. A table summarizes cause of death and quantification in bile and blood of 133 compounds from more than 200 case reports, providing a useful tool for forensic physicians and toxicologists involved in interpreting bile analysis. Qualitative and quantitative interpretation is discussed. As bile/blood concentration ratios are high for numerous molecules or metabolites, bile is a matrix of choice for screening when blood concentrations are low or non-detectable: e.g., cases of weak exposure or long intake-to-death interval. Quantitative applications have been little investigated, but small molecules with low bile/blood concentration ratios seem to be good candidates for quantitative bile-based interpretation. Further experimental data on the mechanism and properties of biliary extraction of xenobiotics of forensic interest are required to improve quantitative interpretation. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Mechanisms of bile acid mediated inflammation in the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Man; Cai, Shi-Ying; Boyer, James L

    2017-08-01

    Bile acids are synthesized in the liver and are the major component in bile. Impaired bile flow leads to cholestasis that is characterized by elevated levels of bile acid in the liver and serum, followed by hepatocyte and biliary injury. Although the causes of cholestasis have been extensively studied, the molecular mechanisms as to how bile acids initiate liver injury remain controversial. In this chapter, we summarize recent advances in the pathogenesis of bile acid induced liver injury. These include bile acid signaling pathways in hepatocytes as well as the response of cholangiocytes and innate immune cells in the liver in both patients with cholestasis and cholestatic animal models. We focus on how bile acids trigger the production of molecular mediators of neutrophil recruitment and the role of the inflammatory response in this pathological process. These advances point to a number of novel targets where drugs might be judged to be effective therapies for cholestatic liver injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. How useful is gastroesophageal reflux scintigraphy in suspected childhood aspiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fawcett, H.D.; Adams, J.C.; Hayden, C.K.; Swischuk, L.E.

    1988-05-01

    It has been suggested that gastroesophageal reflux scintigraphy might be useful in assisting one in determining therapy for patients suspected of aspirating or becoming apneic secondary to gastroesophageal reflux. This, however, has not been our experience and in reviewing 23 patients with recurrent pneumonia and/or apnea who had gastroesophageal reflux scintigraphy, we were able to detect aspiration in only one. This was especially significant since 13 (59%) of these patients had demonstrable reflux, and of these, eight were treated successfully for suspected aspiration even though none was demonstrated isotopically. To be sure, the demonstration of pulmonary aspiration with gastroesophageal reflux scintigraphy had little influence on patient selection and response to therapy. For this reason we feel there is little justification in depending on the GRS for the specific purpose of trying to document pulmonary aspiration in infants and children who are refluxing. One of the more serious complications of gastroesophageal (GE) reflux is aspiration leading to recurrent pulmonary infections and/or apnea. However, it always has been difficult to demonstrate actual aspiration into the lungs, and to be sure, barium studies of the upper GI tract seldom reveal this complication. Recently, however, considerable interest has been generated in gastroesophageal scintigraphy (GRS) as a possible means of documenting such aspiration. Rationale for this stems from the fact that suspected patients can be studied over a longer period of time and in addition, delayed and overnight images can be obtained. However, our experience does not support GRS as being an adequate method for demonstrating aspiration.

  1. Correlation of Gastroesophageal reflux disease Assessment Symptom Questionnaire to impedance-pH measurements in children

    OpenAIRE

    Prachuapthunyachart, Sittichoke; Jarasvaraparn, Chaowapong; Gremse, David A

    2017-01-01

    Background: Esophageal multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring has become one of the preferred tests to correlate observed reflux-like behaviors with esophageal reflux events. The Gastroesophageal reflux disease Assessment Symptom Questionnaire is a validated tool used to distinguish infants with gastroesophageal reflux disease from healthy children. The aim of this study was to determine whether the Gastroesophageal reflux disease Assessment Symptom Questionnaire composite symptom ...

  2. The Role of Esophageal PH-metri Test on Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Setyawati, Katharina; Abdullah, Murdani; Syam, Ari Fahrial; Fauzi, Achmad; Makmun, Dadang; Simadibrata, Marcellus; Manan, Chudahman; Rani, Abdul Aziz

    2008-01-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease is a pathological condition of esophagus which is caused by gastric content reflux into esophagus. There is an increased prevalence of gastro-esophageal reflux disease. The roles of esophageal pH-metry in clinical application include looking for abnormal acid exposure on esophagus with no abnormality found in endoscopy; evaluating patients following the anti-reflux surgery who are being suspected for abnormal esophageal reflux; evaluating patients with normal ...

  3. Positive predictive value of cholescintigraphy in common bile duct obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecklitner, M.L.; Austin, A.R.; Benedetto, A.R.; Growcock, G.W.

    1986-01-01

    Technetium-99m DISIDA imaging was employed in 400 patients to differentiate obstruction of the common bile duct from medical and other surgical causes of hyperbilirubinemia. Sequential anterior images demonstrated variable degrees of liver uptake, yet there was no evidence of intrabiliary or extrabiliary radioactivity for at least 4 hr after injection in 25 patients. Twenty-three patients were surgically documented to have complete obstruction of the common bile duct. One patient had hepatitis, and another had sickle cell crisis without bile duct obstruction. The remaining patients had either partial or no obstruction of the common bile duct. We conclude that the presence of liver uptake without evident biliary excretion by 4 hr on cholescintigraphy is highly sensitive and predictive of total obstruction of the common bile duct

  4. A Review of Double Common Bile Duct and Its Sequelae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolli, Sindhura; Etienne, Denzil; Reddy, Madhavi; Shahzad, Ghulamullah

    2018-02-01

    A double or accessory common bile duct (ACBD) is a rare congenital anomaly. We report the case of a 60-year-old American Asian male, who was found to have a double or duplicated common bile duct after being admitted for evaluation of a pancreatic mass. A duplicated bile duct has the same mucosa histologically as a single bile duct. However, the opening of a duplicated bile duct lacks a sphincter allowing retrograde flow of gut contents which results in a higher probability of intraductal calculus formation. On rare occasions, it can predispose to liver abscesses, pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer, gallbladder cancer, gastric cancer, and ampullary cancer depending on the location of the opening of the ACBD. We present an integrative review of the limited cases of ACBD with correlation to the current case and discussion regarding the aspects of diagnosis and management.

  5. Bile Sensing: The Activation of Vibrio parahaemolyticus Virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bey-Hing Goh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria must develop resistance to various inhospitable conditions in order to survive in the human gastrointestinal tract. Bile, which is secreted by the liver, and plays an important role in food digestion also has antimicrobial properties and is able to disrupt cellular homeostasis. Paradoxically, although bile is one of the guts defenses, many studies have reported that bacteria such as Vibrio parahaemolyticus can sense bile and use its presence as an environmental cue to upregulate virulence genes during infection. This article aims to discuss how bile is detected by V. parahaemolyticus and its role in regulating type III secretion system 2 leading to human infection. This bile–bacteria interaction pathway gives us a clearer understanding of the biochemical and structural analysis of the bacterial receptors involved in mediating a response to bile salts which appear to be a significant environmental cue during initiation of an infection.

  6. Bile acid aspiration in suspected ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Chung; Hsu, Po-Kuei; Su, Kang-Cheng; Liu, Lung-Yu; Tsai, Cheng-Chien; Tsai, Shu-Ho; Hsu, Wen-Hu; Lee, Yu-Chin; Perng, Diahn-Warng

    2009-07-01

    The aims of this study were to measure the levels of bile acids in patients with suspected ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and provide a possible pathway for neutrophilic inflammation to explain its proinflammatory effect on the airway. Bile acid levels were measured by spectrophotometric enzymatic assay, and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry was used to quantify the major bile acids. Alveolar cells were grown on modified air-liquid interface culture inserts, and bile acids were then employed to stimulate the cells. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blots were used to determine the involved gene expression and protein levels. The mean (+/- SE) concentration of total bile acids in tracheal aspirates was 6.2 +/- 2.1 and 1.1 +/- 0.4 mumol/L/g sputum, respectively, for patients with and without VAP (p VAP group (p aspiration may reduce the intensity of neutrophilic inflammation in intubated and mechanically ventilated patients in the ICU.

  7. Intestinal uptake of bile acids: effect of external abdominal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, A.B.R.; Cheeseman, C.I.; Walker, K.

    1984-01-01

    Abdominal irradiation has recently been shown to influence the uptake of hexoses, amino acids, fatty acids and cholesterol into the jejunum of rats. The present studies were undertaken with a previously validated in vitro technique to determine the effect of abdominal irradiation from a cesium source on the rates of uptake of six bile acids into the jejunum, ileum, and colon. The results show that: 1) there likely are multiple ileal carriers for bile acids: 2) abdominal irradiation has a variable effect on these carriers; 3) the passive permeability to bile acids varies with the bile acid and with the site along the intestine; and 4) abdominal irradiation is associated with a rise in the colonic permeability to only some bile acids

  8. Effect of different pectin on bile acid biosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalikova, M.D.; Mukhiddinov, Z.K.; Nuraliev, Yu.N.; Khaydarov, K.Kh.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the effects of consumption of different pectins from peach, quince, and apricot on bile flow and bile secretion of bile acids, cholesterol, phospholipids and bilirubin in rats. Six groups of nine rats were fed diets containing pectin 20 mg/kg once a day for two weeks. These groups of rats were compared with the group fed on physiological solution as a control and two groups fed on flamenol. Results of our study indicate that pectins, by decreasing cholesterol levels and enhancing bile acid secretion may cause increased hepatic synthesis of bile acids, phospholipids and reduced bilirubin synthesis. Among the studied pectins the apricot pectin shows in a very consistent lowering of cholesterol and bilirubin levels

  9. Scintigraphy of cysts of the common bile duct in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mironov, S.P.; Akopyan, V.G.; Murieva, Z.D.; Tumanyan, G.T.; Mironova, E.S.

    1984-01-01

    Cyst of the common bile duct, the most frequent variant of cystic dilatation of the extrahepatic biliary tract, represents a serious diagnostic problem. 13 children with cysts of the common bile duct were studied by the method of dynamic scintigraphy with sup(99m)Tc-HIDA. The scintigraphic picture was characterized by the following signs: sacculated or spheroidal dilatation of the common bile duct, dilatation of the left or both lobular bile ducts, absence of the gall bladder visualization. Change of indicators of the hepatic function and the time of interstinal visualization reflects both the disorder of distal parts permeability and the degree of cyst drainage. An experience of radioisotropic cholegraphy application reveals, that the efficiency of preoperational diagnosis of cysts of the common bile duct increases as a result of the more accurate evaluation of the dynamic of improvement of absorptive-excretory hepatic function after different variants of operations

  10. Physical Chemistry of Bile: Detailed Pathogenesis of Cholelithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itani, Malak; Dubinsky, Theodore J

    2017-09-01

    Despite the overwhelming prevalence of cholelithiasis, many health care professionals are not familiar with the basic pathophysiology of gallstone formation. This article provides an overview of the biochemical pathways related to bile, with a focus on the physical chemistry of bile. We describe the important factors in bile synthesis and secretion that affect the composition of bile and consequently its liquid state. Within this biochemical background lies the foundation for understanding the clinical and sonographic manifestation of cholelithiasis, including the pathophysiology of cholesterol crystallization, gallbladder sludge, and gallstones. There is a brief discussion of the clinical manifestations of inflammatory and obstructive cholestasis and the impact on bile metabolism and subsequently on liver function tests. Despite being the key modality in diagnosing cholelithiasis, ultrasound has a limited role in the characterization of stone composition.

  11. Isotope derivative assay of human serum bile acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pageaux, J.F.; Duperray, B.; Dubois, M.; Pacheco, H.

    1981-01-01

    A new method for the selective determination of the main serum bile acids has been developed. Serum samples with added 14 C-labeled bile acid were submitted to deproteinization, alkaline hydrolysis, methylation, and were then chromatographed on alumina before acetylation with 2 microliters of [ 3 H]acetic anhydride. Excess reagent was eliminated by evaporation; elimination of residual tritiated contaminants and separation of the doubly labeled bile acid derivatives were obtained by thin-layer chromatography, column chromatography on Lipidex 5000, and crystallization. The sensitivity of the method is about 10 pmol of each bile acid. Analyses of seven sera with normal or elevated concentration of bile acids by the proposed method and gas-liquid chromatography showed a close correlation

  12. [Bile duct lesions in laparoscopic cholecystectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewert, J R; Ungeheuer, A; Feussner, H

    1994-09-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is both resulting in a slightly higher incidence of biliary lesions and a change of prevalence of the type of lesions. Damage to the biliary system occurs in 4 different types: The most severe case is the lesion with a structural defect of the hepatic or common bile duct with (IVa) or without (IVb) vascular injury. Tangential lesions without structural loss of the duct should be denominated as type III (IIIa with additional lesion to the vessels, type IIIb without). Type II comprehends late strictures without obvious intraoperative trauma to the duct. Type I includes immediate biliary fistulae of usually good prognosis. The increasing prevalence of structural defects of the bile ducts appears to be a peculiarity of laparoscopic cholecystectomy necessitating highly demanding operative repair. In the majority of cases, hepatico-jejunostomy or even intraparenchymatous anastomoses are required. Adaptation of well proven principles of open surgery is the best prevention of biliary lesions in laparoscopic cholecystectomy as well as the readiness to convert early to the open procedure.

  13. Bile pigments in pulmonary and vascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan W. Ryter

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The bile pigments, biliverdin and bilirubin, are endogenously-derived substances generated during enzymatic heme degradation. These compounds have been shown to act as chemical antioxidants in vitro. Bilirubin formed in tissues circulates in the serum, prior to undergoing hepatic conjugation and biliary excretion. The excess production of bilirubin has been associated with neurotoxicity, in particular to the newborn. Nevertheless, clinical evidence suggests that mild states of hyperbilirubinemia may be beneficial in protecting against cardiovascular disease in adults. Pharmacological application of either bilirubin and/or its biological precursor biliverdin, can provide therapeutic benefit in several animal models of cardiovascular and pulmonary disease. Furthermore, biliverdin and bilirubin can confer protection against ischemia/reperfusion injury and graft rejection secondary to organ transplantation in animal models. Several possible mechanisms for these effects have been proposed, including direct antioxidant and scavenging effects, and modulation of signaling pathways regulating inflammation, apoptosis, cell proliferation, and immune responses. The practicality and therapeutic-effectiveness of bile pigment application to humans remains unclear.

  14. Substitutes for Bear Bile for the Treatment of Liver Diseases: Research Progress and Future Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sha; Tan, Hor Yue; Wang, Ning; Hong, Ming; Li, Lei; Cheung, Fan; Feng, Yibin

    2016-01-01

    Bear bile has been a well-known Chinese medicine for thousands of years. Because of the endangered species protection, the concept on substitutes for bear bile was proposed decades ago. Based on their chemical composition and pharmacologic actions, artificial bear bile, bile from other animals, synthetic compounds, and medicinal plants may be the promising candidates to replace bear bile for the similar therapeutic purpose. Accumulating research evidence has indicated that these potential substitutes for bear bile have displayed the same therapeutic effects as bear bile. However, stopping the use of bear bile is a challenging task. In this review, we extensively searched PubMed and CNKI for literatures, focusing on comparative studies between bear bile and its substitutes for the treatment of liver diseases. Recent research progress in potential substitutes for bear bile in the last decade is summarized, and a strategy for the use of substitutes for bear bile is discussed carefully. PMID:27087822

  15. Radiological evaluation of esophageal motility and gastroesophageal reflux disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schima, W.; Pokieser, P.; Schober, E.

    1995-01-01

    Radiological evaluation of esophageal motility and the lower esophageal sphincter has gained increased attention in recent years. Videofluoroscopic investigation of esophageal motor function is superior to static film radiography, as repeated analysis of the videotaped recordings is possible. With emphasis on radiological techniques, normal esophagel physiology and motility and a variety of esophageal motor disorders are discussed in this review paper. Radiological evaluation of gastroesophageal reflux and reflux esophagitis is described. Clinical and radiological findings in esophageal motility disorders and gastroesophageal reflux disease and the radiological efficacy compared to that of manometry and pH-metry are discussed. (orig.) [de

  16. [Intraesophageal pH in children with suspected reflux].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calva-Rodríguez, R; García-Aranda, J A; Bendimez-Cano, A; Estrada-Saavedra, R

    1989-05-01

    We study 22 children with clinical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux. The main manifestations were: frequent vomiting, failure to thrive and repetitive pneumonia. In all of them we perform barium esophagogram (SEGD) with fluoroscopy, esophageal manometry (EM) and a four hours intraesophageal pH measurement. Thirteen of the twenty two children present a pathologic reflux (ERGE); in 16 we found SEGD that show reflux; three of them had an abnormal EM, the other 13 were normal. Seven patients showed alteration of the intraesophageal pH measurement. In conclusion the intraesophageal pH measurement in short period of time (4 hours) is a good method in the diagnosis of patients with ERGE.

  17. Malacoplakia associated with vesicoureteral reflux and selective immunoglobulin A deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherington, R; Branan, W J; Wray, B B; Best, G K

    1984-11-01

    A case of malacoplakia involving the lower urinary tract of a young black boy, with associated bilateral vesicoureteral reflux, hydronephrosis and selective immunoglobulin A deficiency is reported. Reflux was caused by the malacoplakia. Reflux and hydronephrosis persisted despite elimination of bacterial infection and malacoplakia by drug therapy. These abnormalities were corrected by a conventional antireflux operation. Malacoplakia appears to be related to immunologic incompetence and diminished levels of intracellular cyclic 3',5' guanine monophosphate. Cholinergic agonists reverse or prevent the pathological changes of malacoplakia.

  18. Sulindac is excreted into bile by a canalicular bile salt pump and undergoes a cholehepatic circulation in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolder, U.; Trang, N. V.; Hagey, L. R.; Schteingart, C. D.; Ton-Nu, H. T.; Cerrè, C.; Elferink, R. P.; Hofmann, A. F.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Dihydroxy bile acids induce a bicarbonate-rich hypercholeresis when secreted into canalicular bile in unconjugated form; the mechanism is cholehepatic shunting. The aim of this study was to identify a xenobiotic that induces hypercholeresis by a similar mechanism. METHODS: Five

  19. Effects of bile salt flux variations on the expression of hepatic bile salt transporters in vivo in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, H; Elzinga, BM; Baller, JFW; Boverhof, R; Schwarz, M; Stieger, B; Verkade, HJ; Kuipers, F

    2002-01-01

    Background/Aims: Expression of hepatic bile salt transporters is partly regulated by bile salts via activation of nuclear farnesoid X-activated receptor (Fxr). We investigated the physiological relevance of this regulation by evaluating transporter expression in mice experiencing different

  20. Rapid Determination of Bile Acids in Bile from Various Mammals by Reversed-Phase Ultra-Fast Liquid Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Gu Leng Ri; Yao, Peng; Shi, Luwen

    2015-08-01

    A valid and efficient reversed-phase ultra-fast liquid chromatography method was developed for the simultaneous determination of 13 bile acids in the bile of three mammal species, including rat, pig and human gallstone patients. Chromatographic separation was performed with a Shim-pack XR-ODS column, and the mobile phase consisted of acetonitrile and potassium phosphate buffer (pH 2.6) at a flow rate of 0.5 mL min(-1). The linear detection range of most bile acids ranged from 2 to 600 ng µL(-1) with a good correlation coefficient (>0.9995). The precision of each bile acid was bile acids were separated in 15 min with satisfactory resolution, and the total analysis time was 18 min, including equilibration. The method was successfully applied in rapid screening of bile samples from the three mammals. Significant metabolic frameworks of bile acids among various species were observed, whereas considerable quantitative variations in both inter- and intraspecies were also observed, especially for gallstone patients. Our results suggest that detecting the change of bile acid profiles could be applied for the diagnosis of gallstone disease. © Crown copyright 2014.

  1. Self-retaining small-looped catheter for narrow bile ducts in high common bile duct obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, R.W.; Daehnert, W.

    1985-01-01

    A new self-retaining catheter was devised for percutaneous drainage of small bile ducts. The device allows safe external drainage without the risk of catheter dislocation even in high bile duct obstruction. The catheter is also suitable for percutaneous nephrostomy in non-dilated pyelocaliceal system. (orig.)

  2. Effects of bile salt flux variations on the expression of hepatic bile salt transporters in vivo in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, H; Elzinga, BM; Baller, JFW; Boverhof, R; Schwarz, M; Stieger, B; Verkade, HJ; Kuipers, F

    Background/Aims: Expression of hepatic bile salt transporters is partly regulated by bile salts via activation of nuclear farnesoid X-activated receptor (Fxr). We investigated the physiological relevance of this regulation by evaluating transporter expression in mice experiencing different

  3. Persistent reflux symptoms cause anxiety, depression, and mental health and sleep disorders in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yoshihide; Kamiya, Takeshi; Senoo, Kyouji; Tsuchida, Kenji; Hirano, Atsuyuki; Kojima, Hisayo; Yamashita, Hiroaki; Yamakawa, Yoshihiro; Nishigaki, Nobuhiro; Ozeki, Tomonori; Endo, Masatsugu; Nakanishi, Kazuhisa; Sando, Motoki; Inagaki, Yusuke; Shikano, Michiko; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Kubota, Eiji; Tanida, Satoshi; Kataoka, Hiromi; Katsumi, Kohei; Joh, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    Some patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease experience persistent reflux symptoms despite proton pump inhibitor therapy. These symptoms reduce their health-related quality of life. Our aims were to evaluate the relationship between proton pump inhibitor efficacy and health-related quality of life and to evaluate predictive factors affecting treatment response in Japanese patients. Using the gastroesophageal reflux disease questionnaire, 145 gastroesophageal reflux disease patients undergoing proton pump inhibitor therapy were evaluated and classified as responders or partial-responders. Their health-related quality of life was then evaluated using the 8-item Short Form Health Survey, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale questionnaires. Sixty-nine patients (47.6%) were partial responders. These patients had significantly lower scores than responders in 5/8 subscales and in the mental health component summary of the 8-item Short Form Health Survey. Partial responders had significantly higher Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores, including anxiety and depression scores, than those of responders. Non-erosive reflux disease and double proton pump inhibitor doses were predictive factors of partial responders. Persistent reflux symptoms, despite proton pump inhibitor therapy, caused mental health disorders, sleep disorders, and psychological distress in Japanese gastroesophageal reflux disease patients.

  4. Diagnosis of intrarenal reflux and its role in pathogenesis of reflux nephropathy in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimatsu, Akiko [Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-06-01

    We compared newly developed radionuclide cystography with conventional contrast voiding cystography (VCG) with regard to their diagnostic usefulness of intrarenal reflux (IRR) in children. Based on the imaging findings, we assessed the role of IRR in the pathogenesis of reflux nephropathy (RN). Among the ureters which revealed IRR diagnosed by radionuclide cystography, 38.9% (7 out of 18 ureters) of the cases examined by VCG had IRR. In the case of VCG, the sensitivity and specificity of IRR detection were 33.3% and 100%, respectively. There was a statistical correlation between the presence/absence of IRR and vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). RN was significantly correlated with advanced grade of VUR associated with IRR. Among 9 kidneys of the subjects who had suffered from urinary tract infection (UTI) only once, IRR was detected in 33.3% (3/9) and RN in 66.7% (2/3). From these findings, conventional contrast VCG is considered not effective for the diagnosis of IRR. Moreover, it is suggested that VUR complicated with IRR is deeply associated with the development of RN. In addition, it is suggested that UTI might be related to the onset of IRR. (author)

  5. Diagnosis of intrarenal reflux and its role in pathogenesis of reflux nephropathy in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimatsu, Akiko

    2000-01-01

    We compared newly developed radionuclide cystography with conventional contrast voiding cystography (VCG) with regard to their diagnostic usefulness of intrarenal reflux (IRR) in children. Based on the imaging findings, we assessed the role of IRR in the pathogenesis of reflux nephropathy (RN). Among the ureters which revealed IRR diagnosed by radionuclide cystography, 38.9% (7 out of 18 ureters) of the cases examined by VCG had IRR. In the case of VCG, the sensitivity and specificity of IRR detection were 33.3% and 100%, respectively. There was a statistical correlation between the presence/absence of IRR and vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). RN was significantly correlated with advanced grade of VUR associated with IRR. Among 9 kidneys of the subjects who had suffered from urinary tract infection (UTI) only once, IRR was detected in 33.3% (3/9) and RN in 66.7% (2/3). From these findings, conventional contrast VCG is considered not effective for the diagnosis of IRR. Moreover, it is suggested that VUR complicated with IRR is deeply associated with the development of RN. In addition, it is suggested that UTI might be related to the onset of IRR. (author)

  6. Endoscopic augmentation of the lower esophageal sphincter for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease: Multicenter study of the gatekeeper reflux repair system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fockens, P.; Bruno, M. J.; Gabbrielli, A.; Odegaard, S.; Hatlebakk, J.; Allescher, H. D.; Rösch, T.; Rhodes, M.; Bastid, C.; Rey, J.; Boyer, J.; Muehldorffer, S.; van den Hombergh, U.; Costamagna, G.

    2004-01-01

    Background and Study Aims: The safety and effectiveness of the Gatekeeper Reflux Repair System (Medtronic Europe, Tolochenaz, Switzerland) in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) was evaluated. This new, reversible treatment modality involves the endoscopic introduction of

  7. Long-term follow-up of reflux nephropathy in adults with vesicoureteral reflux - radiological and pathoanatomical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, J.; Thysell, H.; Tencer, J.; Forsberg, L.; Hellstroem, M.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To study the long-term development of urographic renal morphology in adults with vesicoureteral reflux, to investigate the relationship between renal damage and reflux grade, and to analyse the association between the long-term urographic outcome and the occurrence of acute pyelonephritis and reflux during follow-up. The purpose was also to try to distinguish between acquired and developmental renal damage, based on analyses of renal histological specimens and urographic features, and to analyse associated congenital urogenital abnormalities and family history of reflux, reflux nephropathy, urological malformation or death from end-stage renal disease. Material and Methods: Renal damage was identified in 100 (83 women) of 115 adults, selected because of documented reflux. Eighty-seven patients had two urographies done (median interval 14.3 years). The extent and progression of renal damage were assessed and features of developmental renal damage were determined. Histological renal specimens were available in 23 patients with renal damage. Results and Conclusions: The extent of renal damage correlated positively with the severity of reflux. No renal damage developed during the follow-up in 45 previously undamaged kidneys and progression of renal damage was rare (4 of 120 previously damaged kidneys), despite persisting reflux in half of the cases and episodes of acute pyelonephritis during follow-up. Thus, repeated renal imaging is rarely justified in adults with reflux nephropathy. Histological examination showed 'chronic pyelonephritis' in all 23 cases and co-existing renal dysplasia in 1 case. The detailed urographic analysis did not reveal support for developmental renal damage. High frequencies of associated congenital urogenital abnormalities and of a positive family history were found. Thus, congenital and/or hereditary factors cannot be discarded as background factors for the development of renal damage

  8. An alginate-antacid formulation localizes to the acid pocket to reduce acid reflux in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohof, Wout O; Bennink, Roel J; Smout, Andre J P M; Thomas, Edward; Boeckxstaens, Guy E

    2013-12-01

    Alginate rafts (polysaccharide polymers that precipitate into a low-density viscous gel when they contact gastric acid) have been reported to form at the acid pocket, an unbuffered pool of acid that floats on top of ingested food and causes postprandial acid reflux. We studied the location of an alginate formulation in relation to the acid pocket and the corresponding effects on reflux parameters and acid pocket positioning in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). We randomly assigned patients with symptomatic GERD and large hiatal hernias to groups who were given either (111)In-labeled alginate-antacid (n = 8, Gaviscon Double Action Liquid) or antacid (n = 8, Antagel) after a standard meal. The relative positions of labeled alginate and acid pocket were analyzed for 2 hours by using scintigraphy; reflux episodes were detected by using high-resolution manometry and pH-impedance monitoring. The alginate-antacid label localized to the acid pocket. The number of acid reflux episodes was significantly reduced in patients receiving alginate-antacid (3.5; range, 0-6.5; P = .03) compared with those receiving antacid (15; range, 5-20), whereas time to acid reflux was significantly increased in patients receiving alginate-antacid (63 minutes; range, 23-92) vs those receiving antacid (14 minutes; range, 9-23; P = .01). The acid pocket was located below the diaphragm in 71% of patients given alginate-antacid vs 21% of those given antacid (P = .08). There was an inverse correlation between a subdiaphragm position of the acid pocket and acid reflux (r = -0.76, P acid pocket and displaces it below the diaphragm to reduce postprandial acid reflux. These findings indicate the importance of the acid pocket in GERD pathogenesis and establish alginate-antacid as an appropriate therapy for postprandial acid reflux. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Gastroesophageal reflux disease and respiratory disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioli, G; Caffarena, P E; Battistini, E; Fregonese, B; Barabino, A; Jasonni, V

    1995-01-01

    The patients treated for oesophageal atresia present a correlation between the clinical sintomatology after recanalization characterized by disfagia, dispnea, recurrent cough, chronic pneumopaties and oesophageal anomalies. Where morphological alterations accounting for the presence of gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) were not evident, possible functional alterations of the motility were considered. The incidence of GOR was considerably high and, expression of a congenital alteration of the lower oesophageal sphincter and of oesophageal peristalsis, becomes even more severe due to further stretching of the gastro-esophageal junction. The authors underline that the early demonstration of histological changes, even before recanalization, and the motility disorders of the oesophagus have to be well studied, while the LES is normalized, in order to prevent and treat the possible appearance of the well-known complications of GOR.

  10. Idiopathic gastroesophageal reflux disease in an adult horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Shannon J; Johnson, Philip J; David, Andrew; Cook, Cristi Reeves

    2004-06-15

    Chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease was diagnosed in a 22-year-old female Tennessee Walking Horse that had signs of bruxism and ptyalism. Esophageal ulceration was detected via endoscopy. Compared with the damage to the proximal portions of the esophagus, the severity of the ulceration increased toward the gastroesophageal junction. Esophageal ulceration attributable to chronic gastric acid reflux is usually secondary to pyloric outflow obstruction in horses. In the horse of this report, there was no evidence of either a chronic pyloric or duodenal obstruction that could have resulted in esophageal ulceration. Esophageal ulceration in this horse was attributed to gastroesophageal reflux disease, a common condition in humans in which the underlying abnormality is functional incompetence of the gastroesophageal junction. Treatment is directed at decreasing gastric acidity and protecting the ulcerated mucosa. In the horse of this report, treatment was unsuccessful and the horse was euthanatized; a physical cause of gastroesophageal reflux disease was not identified during an extensive postmortem examination.

  11. Upper aerodigestive tract disorders and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciorba, Andrea; Bianchini, Chiara; Zuolo, Michele; Feo, Carlo Vittorio

    2015-02-16

    A wide variety of symptoms and diseases of the upper aerodigestive tract are associated to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). These disorders comprise a large variety of conditions such as asthma, chronic otitis media and sinusitis, chronic cough, and laryngeal disorders including paroxysmal laryngospasm. Laryngo-pharyngeal reflux disease is an extraoesophageal variant of GORD that can affect the larynx and pharynx. Despite numerous research efforts, the diagnosis of laryngopharyngeal reflux often remains elusive, unproven and controversial, and its treatment is then still empiric. Aim of this paper is to review the current literature on upper aerodigestive tract disorders in relation to pathologic gastro-oesophageal reflux, focusing in particular on the pathophysiology base and results of the surgical treatment of GORD.

  12. Cineoesophagogastroscintigraphy and positioning therapy of infant gastroesophageal reflux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyraud, J.; Guillet, J.; Bouix, G.; Brendel, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    During this prospective study, using cineoesophagogastroscintigraphy carried out in 27 infants under seven months of age, the positioning of the infants in the infant seat for the treatment of the gastroesophageal reflux was not detrimental in comparison to prone positioning.

  13. Novel therapeutics for gastro-esophageal reflux symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbib, Frank; Simon, Mireille

    2012-09-01

    Approximately 20-30% of patients with gastro-esophageal reflux symptoms report inadequate symptom relief while on proton-pump inhibitor therapy. The mechanisms involved are failure of the antireflux barrier (transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations), high proximal extent of the refluxate, esophageal hypersensitivity and impaired mucosal integrity. Persisting acid or nonacid reflux can be demonstrated in 40-50% of cases, suggesting that there is room for antireflux therapy in these patients. New antireflux compounds have been shown to decrease the occurrence of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations. The most promising classes of compounds are GABA type B agonists and metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 antagonists, which can reduce both reflux episodes and symptoms, but the development of these compounds has been abandoned for either safety issues or lack of efficacy. Esophageal hypersensitivity and impaired mucosal integrity may prove to be relevant therapeutic targets in the future.

  14. Acid and non-acid reflux patterns in patients with erosive esophagitis and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD): a study using intraluminal impedance monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conchillo, José M.; Schwartz, Matthijs P.; Selimah, Mohamed; Samsom, Melvin; Sifrim, Daniel; Smout, André J.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) and erosive esophagitis (EE) are the most common phenotypic presentations of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). AIM: To assess acid and non-acid reflux patterns in patients with EE and NERD using combined esophageal pH-impedance monitoring. METHODS:

  15. Acid and non-acid reflux patterns in patients with erosive esophagitis and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) : A study using intraluminal impedance monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conchillo, Jose M.; Schwartz, Matthijs P.; Selimah, Mohamed; Samsom, Melvin; Sifrim, Daniel; Smout, Andre J.

    Background Non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) and erosive esophagitis (EE) are the most common phenotypic presentations of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Aim To assess acid and non-acid reflux patterns in patients with EE and NERD using combined esophageal pH-impedance monitoring. Methods A

  16. A PROPOSITION FOR THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE IN CHILDREN - A REPORT FROM A WORKING GROUP ON GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDENPLAS, Y; ASHKENAZI, A; BELLI, D; BOIGE, N; BOUQUET, J; CADRANEL, S; CEZARD, JP; CUCCHIARA, S; DUPONT, C; GEBOES, K; GOTTRAND, F; HEYMANS, HSA; JASINSKI, C; KNEEPKENS, CMF; KOLETZKO, S; MILLA, P; MOUGENOT, JF; NUSSLE, D; NAVARRO, J; NEWELL, SJ; OLAFSDOTTIR, E; PEETERS, S; RAVELLI, A; POLANCO, [No Value; SANDHU, BK; TOLBOOM, J

    In this paper, a Working Group on Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux discusses recommendations for the first line diagnostic and therapeutic approach of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in infants and children. All members of the Working Group agreed that infants with uncomplicated gastro-oesophageal reflux

  17. Effects of bile acid administration on bile acid synthesis and its circadian rhythm in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pooler, P.A.; Duane, W.C.

    1988-01-01

    In man bile acid synthesis has a distinct circadian rhythm but the relationship of this rhythm to feedback inhibition by bile acid is unknown. We measured bile acid synthesis as release of 14CO2 from [26-14C]cholesterol every 2 hr in three normal volunteers during five separate 24-hr periods. Data were fitted by computer to a cosine curve to estimate amplitude and acrophase of the circadian rhythm. In an additional six volunteers, we measured synthesis every 2 hr from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. only. During the control period, amplitude (expressed as percentage of mean synthesis) averaged 52% and acrophase averaged 6:49 a.m. During administration of ursodeoxycholic acid (15 mg per kg per day), synthesis averaged 126% of baseline (p less than 0.1), amplitude averaged 43% and acrophase averaged 6:20 a.m. During administration of chenodeoxycholic acid (15 mg per kg per day), synthesis averaged 43% of baseline (p less than 0.001), amplitude averaged 53% and acrophase averaged 9:04 a.m. Addition of prednisone to this regimen of chenodeoxycholic acid to eliminate release of 14CO2 from corticosteroid hormone synthesis resulted in a mean amplitude of 62% and a mean acrophase of 6:50 a.m., values very similar to those in the baseline period. Administration of prednisone alone also did not significantly alter the baseline amplitude (40%) or acrophase (6:28 a.m.). We conclude that neither chenodeoxycholic acid nor ursodeoxycholic acid significantly alters the circadian rhythm of bile acid synthesis in man

  18. Anatomic relationship of intrahepatic bile ducts to portal veins revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bret, P.M.; Stempel, J.; Atri, M.; Lough, J.O.; Illescas, F.F.

    1987-01-01

    It is well accepted that intrahepatic bile ducts lie in front of corresponding portal vein branches. Since the authors' clinical experience with US was different, they studied 18 normal necropsy cadaver livers. The common bile duct, main portal vein, and hepatic artery were cannulated and injected respectively with air, dilute contrast medium, and mineral oil. The livers were then examined in anatomic position with CT. In the left lobe of the liver, the bile ducts were anterior to the portal vein in seven cases, posterior in seven cases, and were tortuous both anterior and posterior in three cases. In the right lobe, the bile ducts were anterior in nine cases, posterior in five cases, tortuous in one case, and not seen in two cases. In the porta hepatis, the bile ducts were anterior in eight cases, posterior in one case, tortuous in five cases, and not seen in three cases. Histologic specimens confirmed the anterior and posterior location of the bile ducts relative to the portal veins. In conclusion, intrahepatic bile ducts can be either anterior or posterior to the corresponding portal vein branches

  19. Human bile sorption by cancrinite-type zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linares, Carlos F.; Colmenares, Maryi; Ocanto, Freddy; Valbuena, Oscar

    2009-01-01

    A nitrated cancrinite-type zeolite was synthesized from zeolite X, NaOH and NaNO 3 solutions under autogeneous pressure at 80 deg. C for 48 h. This zeolite was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), FT-IR-spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and BET surface area. XRD, SEM and FT-IR confirmed the presence of nitrated cancrinite-type zeolite without other collateral phases as sodalite. Then, this sodium zeolite was exchanged with potassium and calcium cations and finally, these modified zeolites were reacted with biliar solutions from human gallbladder. Several factors such as: mass of used cancrinite, nature of the exchanged cation and reaction time of the cancrinite-bile solution interactions were studied. The composition of bile solutions (bile acids, phospholipids and bilirubin) was analyzed before and after the cancrinite-bile solution reaction. Results showed that the components of the bile were notably reduced after the contact with solids. Ca-cancrinite, 120 min of reaction time and 500 mg of solids were the best conditions determined for the bile acid reduction in human bile. When the modified zeolites were compared with the commercial cholestyramine, it was found that zeolites were more active than the latter. These zeolites may be an alternative choice to diminish cholesterol levels in hypercholesterolemic patients

  20. The correlation between the dilated extent of bile duct and gallbladder and low bile duct obstructive jaundice diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhongqiu; Lu Guangming; Li Jieshou; Li Weiqin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic value about the dilated extent of bile duct and gallbladder in low biliary obstructive diseases. Methods: CT and ERCP findings of 105 patients with low biliary obstructive disease were retrospectively analyzed. The dilated extent of intrahepatic and extra- hepatic bile duct and gallbladder were classified into seven types: Type I: severe dilatation of intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile duct and gallbladder; Type II: severe dilatation of extrahepatic bile duct and gallbladder and slight dilated intrahapetic bile duct; Type III: severe dilatation of intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile duct without or slight dilatation of gallbladder; Type IV: severe extrahepatic bile duct dilatation without or slight dilatation of intrahepatic bile duct and gallbladder; Type V: severe intrahepatic bile duct dilatation without or with slight dilatation of extrahepatic bile duct and gallbladder; Type VI: severe gallbladder dilatation without or with slight intrahepatic and extra- hepatic bile duct dilatation; Type VII: without or with slight dilatation of intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile duct and gallbladder. The biliary system dilated extent of low biliary obstructive disease on CT and ERCP were compared with results of clinical, operation, and pathology. Results: Thirty-three cases of tumor and 72 cases of non-tumor were proved by clinical and operation in 105 patients with low biliary obstructive disease. In 33 tumor patients, 16 patients were identified as Type I, 10 patients Type II, 4 patients Type III, 1 patient Type IV, 2 patients Type VII. In 72 non-tumor patients, 4 patients were identified as Type I, 4 patients Type II, 9 patients Type III, 33 patients Type IV, 2 patients Type V, 11 patients Type VI, 19 patients Type VII. A large difference between I, II type and III-VII type biliary dilatation existed in tumor and non-tumor group (χ 2 =47.33, P<0.01). Conclusion:Low obstructive biliary diseases are closely correlated with the dilated

  1. Administration of phosphatidylcholine-cholesterol liposomes partially reconstitutes fat absorption in chronically bile-diverted rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nishioka, T; Havinga, R; Tazuma, S; Stellaard, F; Kuipers, F; Verkade, HJ

    2004-01-01

    Background and aims: Intestinal bile deficiency in cholestatic patients leads to fat malabsorption. We addressed the potency of model bile, bile salts and phosphatidylcholine (PC)-cholesterol (CH) liposomes to reconstitute fat absorption in permanently bile-diverted (BD) rats. Methods: The plasma

  2. Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma) Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bile duct cancer (also called cholangiocarcinoma) can occur in the bile ducts in the liver (intrahepatic) or outside the liver (perihilar or distal extrahepatic). Learn about the types of bile duct cancer, risk factors, clinical features, staging, and treatment for bile duct cancer in this expert-reviewed summary.

  3. Risk factors for central bile duct injury complicating partial liver resection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, E. A.; de Boer, M. T.; Sieders, E.; Peeters, P. M. J. G.; de Jong, K. P.; Slooff, M. J. H.; Porte, R. J.

    Background: Bile duct injury is a serious complication following liver resection. Few studies have differentiated between leakage from small peripheral bile ducts and central bile duct injury (CBDI), defined as an injury leading to leakage or stenosis of the common bile duct, common hepatic duct,

  4. Bile Routing Modification Reproduces Key Features of Gastric Bypass in Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, Daisy; Barataud, Aude; De Vadder, Filipe; Vinera, Jennifer; Zitoun, Carine; Duchampt, Adeline; Mithieux, Gilles

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the role of bile routing modification on the beneficial effects of gastric bypass surgery on glucose and energy metabolism. Gastric bypass surgery (GBP) promotes early improvements in glucose and energy homeostasis in obese diabetic patients. A suggested mechanism associates a decrease in hepatic glucose production to an enhanced intestinal gluconeogenesis. Moreover, plasma bile acids are elevated after GBP and bile acids are inhibitors of gluconeogenesis. In male Sprague-Dawley rats, we performed bile diversions from the bile duct to the midjejunum or the mid-ileum to match the modified bile delivery in the gut occurring in GBP. Body weight, food intake, glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and food preference were analyzed. The expression of gluconeogenesis genes was evaluated in both the liver and the intestine. Bile diversions mimicking GBP promote an increase in plasma bile acids and a marked improvement in glucose control. Bile bioavailability modification is causal because a bile acid sequestrant suppresses the beneficial effects of bile diversions on glucose control. In agreement with the inhibitory role of bile acids on gluconeogenesis, bile diversions promote a blunting in hepatic glucose production, whereas intestinal gluconeogenesis is increased in the gut segments devoid of bile. In rats fed a high-fat-high-sucrose diet, bile diversions improve glucose control and dramatically decrease food intake because of an acquired disinterest in fatty food. This study shows that bile routing modification is a key mechanistic feature in the beneficial outcomes of GBP.

  5. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Children with Interstitial Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziekiewicz, M A; Karolewska-Bochenek, K; Dembiński, Ł; Gawronska, A; Krenke, K; Lange, J; Banasiuk, M; Kuchar, E; Kulus, M; Albrecht, P; Banaszkiewicz, A

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is common in adult patients with interstitial lung disease. However, no data currently exist regarding the prevalence and characteristics of the disease in pediatric patients with interstitial lung disease. The aim of the present study was to prospectively assess the incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease and characterize its features in children with interstitial lung disease. Gastroesophageal reflux disease was established based on 24 h pH-impedance monitoring (MII-pH). Gastroesophageal reflux episodes (GERs) were classified according to widely recognized criteria as acid, weakly acid, weakly alkaline, or proximal. Eighteen consecutive patients (15 boys, aged 0.2-11.6 years) were enrolled in the study. Gastroesophageal reflux disease was diagnosed in a half (9/18) of children. A thousand GERs were detected by MII-pH (median 53.5; IQR 39.0-75.5). Of these, 585 (58.5 %) episodes were acidic, 407 (40.7 %) were weakly acidic, and eight (0.8 %) were weakly alkaline. There were 637 (63.7 %) proximal GERs. The patients in whom gastroesophageal reflux disease was diagnosed had a significantly higher number of proximal and total GERs. We conclude that the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease in children with interstitial lung disease is high; thus, the disease should be considered regardless of presenting clinical symptoms. A high frequency of non-acid and proximal GERs makes the MII-pH method a preferable choice for the detection of reflux episodes in this patient population.

  6. Dental erosion caused by gastroesophageal reflux disease: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Cengiz, Seda; Cengiz, M ?nan?; Sara?, Y ?inasi

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Chronic regurgitation of gastric acids in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease may cause dental erosion, which can lead in combination with attrition or bruxism to extensive loss of coronal tooth tissue. Case presentation This clinical report describes treatment of severe tooth wear of a gastroesophageal reflux disease patient who is 54-year-old Turkish male patient. After his medical treatment, severe tooth wear, bruxism and decreased vertical dimensions were determined...

  7. The Effect of Oxygen on Bile Resistance in Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Morgan L; Pendarvis, Ken; Nanduri, Bindu; Edelmann, Mariola J; Jenkins, Haley N; Reddy, Joseph S; Wilson, Jessica G; Ding, Xuan; Broadway, Paul R; Ammari, Mais G; Paul, Oindrila; Roberts, Brandy; Donaldson, Janet R

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive facultative anaerobe that is the causative agent of the disease listeriosis. The infectious ability of this bacterium is dependent upon resistance to stressors encountered within the gastrointestinal tract, including bile. Previous studies have indicated bile salt hydrolase activity increases under anaerobic conditions, suggesting anaerobic conditions influence stress responses. Therefore, the goal of this study was to determine if reduced oxygen availability increased bile resistance of L. monocytogenes. Four strains representing three serovars were evaluated for changes in viability and proteome expression following exposure to bile in aerobic or anaerobic conditions. Viability for F2365 (serovar 4b), EGD-e (serovar 1/2a), and 10403S (serovar 1/2a) increased following exposure to 10% porcine bile under anaerobic conditions (P 0.05) in bile resistance between aerobic and anaerobic conditions, indicating that oxygen availability does not influence resistance in this strain. The proteomic analysis indicated F2365 and EGD-e had an increased expression of proteins associated with cell envelope and membrane bioenergetics under anaerobic conditions, including thioredoxin-disulfide reductase and cell division proteins. Interestingly, HCC23 had an increase in several dehydrogenases following exposure to bile under aerobic conditions, suggesting that the NADH:NAD+ is altered and may impact bile resistance. Variations were observed in the expression of the cell shape proteins between strains, which corresponded to morphological differences observed by scanning electron microscopy. These data indicate that oxygen availability influences bile resistance. Further research is needed to decipher how these changes in metabolism impact pathogenicity in vivo and also the impact that this has on susceptibility of a host to listeriosis. PMID:27274623

  8. Hepatocellular carcinoma with bile duct involvement : computed Tomographic (CT) findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Joon Woo; Han, Joon Koo; Kim, Tae Kyoung; And others

    2000-01-01

    To describe the radiologic features of computed tomography (CT) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with bile duct involvement. We retrospectively analyzed the two phase spiral CT findings of 31 patients in whom HCC with bile duct invasion (n=3D28) or compression (n=3D3), was diagnosed. Eight of these underwent follow up CT after transarterial chemoembolization. We analyzed the size, type, location, enhancement pattern, and lipiodol retention of parenchymal and intraductal masses, as well as their lymphadenopathy. In all patients with bile duct invasion, single or multiple masses were demonstrated in the bile ducts. Intraductal masses showed the same enhancement characteristics as the parenchymal mass (kappa 0.550, p less than 0.001), and were contiguous to this mass. In 14 of 28 patients, intraductal masses filled the peripheral intrahepatic bile ducts and extended to the common bile ducts. In the other 14, the parenchymal mass extended to the area of the porta hepatis and then directly invaded the large ducts. In nine of the 28 patients, there was a hypoattenuated cleft between the intraductal mass and ductal wall. In six, a parenchymal mass was not apparent (n=3D2), or was smaller than 2cm (n=3D4). In five of eight patients (62.5%), follow-up CT after transarterial chemoembolization showed compact or partial lipiodol retention within the intraductal mass. In patients with bile duct compression, perihilar lymph nodes were noted along with the dilated intrahepatic duct but no intra ductal mass was demonstrated in the duct. Hepatocellular carcinomas cause bile duct dilatation either by direct invasion or by extrinsic compression of the bile duct with surrounding enlarged nodes. For the diagnosis of this condition, CT is helpful. (author)

  9. Pyelonephritis, renal scarring, and reflux nephropathy: a pediatric urologist's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Edwin A.

    2008-01-01

    Imaging of children with a clinical diagnosis of pyelonephritis is performed to characterize the extent of the infection, to identify associated renal injury and to uncover risk factors for future infections and renal damage. Although there is general agreement regarding the need for parenchymal imaging and the need to exclude processes that are either functionally or anatomically obstructive, there is controversy regarding the need for routine cystography, especially when parenchymal involvement has not been documented. A protocol that limits the use of cystography for evaluation of urinary tract infections must assume that the diagnosis of reflux is at least of variable clinical significance. It is now clear that vesicoureteral reflux and reflux nephropathy represent a diverse population that includes both congenital and acquired processes. MR imaging will improve our understanding of vesicoureteral reflux, pyelonephritis and renal scarring and might help us to identify and manage those patients most at risk for recurrent infections and renal injury. To recognize the potential contributions of this newer imaging technique it is helpful to look at our understanding of the pathophysiology of pyelonephritis, reflux and reflux nephropathy. (orig.)

  10. Gastro-oesophageal reflux in children--what's the worry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Katie; Ho, Shaun S C

    2012-05-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux is common and benign in children, especially during infancy. Distinguishing between gastrooesophageal reflux, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and other illnesses presenting as chronic vomiting can be difficult. The general practitioner has a key role to play in identifying if a child requires referral for further investigation. This article outlines the main differential diagnoses to be considered in children presenting with chronic vomiting and/ or regurgitation. We also discuss key management decisions regarding gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in children and when to refer to a specialist for further investigation. Chronic vomiting and regurgitation frequently occurs in infancy and is most commonly due to simple, benign gastrooesophageal reflux, which is usually self limiting without requirement for further investigation. In contrast, gastrooesophageal reflux disease requires considered management and may be a presenting symptom of food allergy requiring more intensive therapy than simple acid suppression. Regular review by the general practitioner to ascertain warning signs will ensure that other serious illnesses are not overlooked and that appropriate investigation and specialist referral are made.

  11. The Changing Impact of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akst, Lee M; Haque, Omar J; Clarke, John O; Hillel, Alexander T; Best, Simon R A; Altman, Kenneth W

    2017-03-01

    The National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) database was utilized to understand evolving national trends in diagnosis and management of reflux. The NAMCS database was queried for visits related to gastroesophageal reflux diagnosis and management. Analysis performed for time periods 1998-2001, 2002-2005, and 2006-2009 was weighted to provide national estimates of care. Results were compared to previously reported time periods from 1990 to 2001 to evaluate patterns in overall visits, age and ethnicity of patients, provider type, and prescriptions provided. The number of ambulatory visits for reflux increased from 8 684 000 in 1998-2001 to 15 750 000 in 2006-2009. Visits increased across each time period for internal medicine, family, and gastroenterology physicians. Among otolaryngologists, absolute visits increased from 1998-2001 to 2002-2005 but decreased in 2006-2009; difference between these time periods did not reach statistical significance. From 1998-2001 to 2006-2009, reflux medication use increased 233%, with continuing trends toward increased proton pump inhibitor use. Reflux visits have increased across all demographic subgroups studied. Knowledge of these trends may inform further paradigm shifts in diagnosis and management of reflux.

  12. Preoperative intraluminal irradiation of the extrahepatic bile duct tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Arimoto, Takuro; Irie, Goro.

    1991-01-01

    From 1984 through 1986, six patients with extrahepatic bile duct tumor were treated preoperatively with intraluminal irradiation of the bile duct. There were no unresectable cases and pathological examination of the surgical specimens showed moderate to remarkable tumor regression in all cases. Postoperative biliary tract hemorrhage occurred in 2 of 3 patients who received 60 Gy at a point 7.5 mm from the center of the source. With accurate preoperative diagnosis of the tumor extent and careful setting of the target area of intraluminal irradiation, improved local tumor control of extrahepatic bile duct tumor can be expected with this method. (author)

  13. Modulation of hepatic biotransformation and biliary excretion of bile acid by age and sinusoidal bile acid load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgartner, U.; Miyai, K.; Hardison, W.G.M.

    1987-01-01

    Pericentral hepatocytes excrete bile acids more slowly and biotransform them more than periportal cells. This may reflect adaptation to low pericentral bile acid concentration or may be intrinsic. The authors studied two models in which pericentral bile acid concentrations are high: the 72-h choledocho-caval shunt (CCS) rat and the 3- to 4-wk-old rat. Livers were perfused forward or backward to assess periportal or pericentral hepatocyte function. Taurodeoxycholate (TDC) was infused at 32 nmol x min -1 x g liver -1 , and a bolus of [ 3 H]TDC was given to assess metabolism and excretion of bile acids. In CCS livers perfused backward, pericentral cells resembled periportal cells of controls in that time to excrete 50% of administered [ 3 H]-TDC (t 50 ) was reduced by two-thirds and [ 3 H]TDC biotransformation was reduced by about half. In young livers t 50 was half that of adult livers when perfused backward. Biotransformation, however, was not reduced. Young livers biotransformed more than adult controls for any given residence time of bile acid in the liver. They conclude that the difference between pericentral and perioportal cells as regards bile acid processing is adaptive. Livers from young rats biotransform more bile acid than those from controls under similar conditions

  14. Lower pH values of weakly acidic refluxes as determinants of heartburn perception in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients with normal esophageal acid exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bortoli, N; Martinucci, I; Savarino, E; Franchi, R; Bertani, L; Russo, S; Ceccarelli, L; Costa, F; Bellini, M; Blandizzi, C; Savarino, V; Marchi, S

    2016-01-01

    Multichannel impedance pH monitoring has shown that weakly acidic refluxes are able to generate heartburn. However, data on the role of different pH values, ranging between 4 and 7, in the generation of them are lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether different pH values of weakly acidic refluxes play a differential role in provoking reflux symptoms in endoscopy-negative patients with physiological esophageal acid exposure time and positive symptom index and symptom association probability for weakly acidic refluxes. One hundred and forty-three consecutive patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, nonresponders to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), were allowed a washout from PPIs before undergoing: upper endoscopy, esophageal manometry, and multichannel impedance pH monitoring. In patients with both symptom index and symptom association probability positive for weakly acidic reflux, each weakly acidic reflux was evaluated considering exact pH value, extension, physical characteristics, and correlation with heartburn. Forty-five patients with normal acid exposure time and positive symptom association probability for weakly acidic reflux were identified. The number of refluxes not heartburn related was higher than those heartburn related. In all distal and proximal liquid refluxes, as well as in distal mixed refluxes, the mean pH value of reflux events associated with heartburn was significantly lower than that not associated. This condition was not confirmed for proximal mixed refluxes. Overall, a low pH of weakly acidic reflux represents a determinant factor in provoking heartburn. This observation contributes to better understand the pathophysiology of symptoms generated by weakly acidic refluxes, paving the way toward the search for different therapeutic approaches to this peculiar condition of esophageal hypersensitivity. © 2014 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  15. Reflux episodes and esophageal impedance levels in patients with typical and atypical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Bi Xing; Jiang, Liu Qin; Lin, Lin; Wang, Ying; Wang, Meifeng

    2017-01-01

    Abstract To determine the relationship between baseline impedance levels and gastroesophageal reflux, we retrospectively enrolled 110 patients (54 men and 56 female; mean age, 51 ± 14 years) with suspected gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) who underwent 24-h multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH monitoring. Patients were stratified according to symptom (typical or atypical) and reflux types (acid reflux, nonacid reflux [NAR], or no abnormal reflux). Mean nocturnal baseline impedance (MNBI) were measured 3 cm (distal esophagus) and 17 cm (proximal esophagus) above the lower esophageal sphincter. Median distal esophageal MNBI was lower in the acid reflux group (1244 Ω; 647–1969 Ω) than in the NAR (2586 Ω; 1368–3666 Ω) or no abnormal reflux groups (3082 Ω; 2495–4472 Ω; all P < .05). Distal MNBI were negatively correlated with DeMeester score and acid exposure time. Atypical symptoms were more frequently associated with NAR than typical symptoms (P < .01). Among patients with positive symptom-association probability (SAP) for NAR, median proximal MNBI tended to be lower in patients with typical symptoms (median, 3013 Ω; IQR, 2535–3410 Ω) than in those with atypical symptoms (median, 3386 Ω; IQR, 3044–3730 Ω, P = .05). Thus, atypical GERD symptoms were more likely to be associated with NAR. The mucosal integrity of the proximal esophagus might be relatively impaired in GERD patients with typical symptoms for NAR. PMID:28906377

  16. Usefulness of gastroesophageal reflux scintigraphy using the knee-chest position for the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asakura, Yasushi; Imai, Yukinori; Ota, Shinichi; Fujiwara, Kenji; Miyamae, Tatsuya

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) scintigraphy using the knee-chest (KC) position for the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The study subjects were 37 patients with GERD and 8 healthy volunteers (control group). Endoscopically observed esophageal mucosal breaks were evaluated with the Los Angeles classification. For GER scintigraphy, the subjects ingested liquid yogurt labeled with 99m Tc-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid ( 99m Tc-DTPA) and water. Imaging was performed in the supine and KC position, and GER was graded as 1-4 according to the extent of GER assessed by scintigraphy. GER scintigraphy revealed no reflux in the control group (specificity: 100%). In the supine position, gastroesophageal reflux was observed in 49% of the patients with GERD, compared to 76% in the KC position. 21 of 23 (91%) patients with erosive esophagitis were shown to have GER with scintigraphy. GER scintigraphy revealed severe reflux (grade 3 or 4) (83%, 10/12) in the patients who had severe mucosal breaks (the Los Angels classification grade C or D). GER scintigraphy detected grade 1 or 2 reflux in 7 of the 14 patients who were endoscopically negative. There was a correlation between the endoscopically determined severity of mucosa and the reflux grade which was determined with GER scintigraphy. GER scintigraphy can detect gastroesophageal reflux with a high sensitivity in the KC position and might be a useful method in the screening and assessment of the severity of this disease. This method would be useful for the diagnosis of GERD in endoscopically negative patients. (author)

  17. Association between respiratory events and nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux events in patients with coexisting obstructive sleep apnea and gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaimchariyatam, Nattapong; Tantipornsinchai, Warangkana; Desudchit, Tayard; Gonlachanvit, Sutep

    2016-06-01

    Literature has addressed the increased prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Significant improvement of GERD has been found after OSA treatment. However, precise mechanisms underlying this correlation remain unclear. We examined the association between nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and sleep events in patients with coexisting OSA and GERD. A case-crossover study among 12 patients with coexisting moderate-severe OSA and GERD was conducted. Participants underwent simultaneous polysomnography and esophageal impedance and pH monitoring. GER subtypes (ie, acid reflux, non-acid reflux) were defined as outcomes. Respective control time points were selected in all eligible control periods. Each sleep event was assessed individually. Estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were analyzed. A p-value of reflux and 28 non-acid reflux. Arousals and awakenings were significantly associated with subsequent GER events. The OR for GER following an arousal was 2.31 (95% CI 1.39-3.68; p  0.05). Both awakening and arousal appear to precipitate any subtype of GER events in patients with coexisting GERD and moderate to severe OSA. However, GER events were significantly less likely to occur after other respiratory events and did not appear to cause sleep-related events. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Hormesis in Cholestatic Liver Disease; Preconditioning with Low Bile Acid Concentrations Protects against Bile Acid-Induced Toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther M Verhaag

    Full Text Available Cholestasis is characterized by accumulation of bile acids and inflammation, causing hepatocellular damage. Still, liver damage markers are highest in acute cholestasis and drop when this condition becomes chronic, indicating that hepatocytes adapt towards the hostile environment. This may be explained by a hormetic response in hepatocytes that limits cell death during cholestasis.To investigate the mechanisms that underlie the hormetic response that protect hepatocytes against experimental cholestatic conditions.HepG2.rNtcp cells were preconditioned (24 h with sub-apoptotic concentrations (0.1-50 μM of various bile acids, the superoxide donor menadione, TNF-α or the Farsenoid X Receptor agonist GW4064, followed by a challenge with the apoptosis-inducing bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA; 200 μM for 4 h, menadione (50 μM, 6 h or cytokine mixture (CM; 6 h. Levels of apoptotic and necrotic cell death, mRNA expression of the bile salt export pump (ABCB11 and bile acid sensors, as well as intracellular GCDCA levels were analyzed.Preconditioning with the pro-apoptotic bile acids GCDCA, taurocholic acid, or the protective bile acids (tauroursodeoxycholic acid reduced GCDCA-induced caspase-3/7 activity in HepG2.rNtcp cells. Bile acid preconditioning did not induce significant levels of necrosis in GCDCA-challenged HepG2.rNtcp cells. In contrast, preconditioning with cholic acid, menadione or TNF-α potentiated GCDCA-induced apoptosis. GCDCA preconditioning specifically reduced GCDCA-induced cell death and not CM- or menadione-induced apoptosis. The hormetic effect of GCDCA preconditioning was concentration- and time-dependent. GCDCA-, CDCA- and GW4064- preconditioning enhanced ABCB11 mRNA levels, but in contrast to the bile acids, GW4064 did not significantly reduce GCDCA-induced caspase-3/7 activity. The GCDCA challenge strongly increased intracellular levels of this bile acid, which was not lowered by GCDCA

  19. Reflux condensation behavior in SBLOCA tests of ATLAS facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeon-Sik; Park, Hyun-Sik; Cho, Seok; Choi, Ki-Yong; Kang, Kyoung-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Behavior of a reflux condensation heat transfer was investigated for SBLOCA tests. • Behavior of the reflux condensate in HL, SG inlet plenum, and U-tubes were evaluated. • Concept of a steam moisturizing phenomenon was introduced and discussed. • Test data and MARS calculations were compared and discussed on the reflux condensate. - Abstract: The behavior of the reflux condensation heat transfer in a hot side steam generator (SG) U-tubes during a cold leg (CL) pipe and a direct vessel injection (DVI) line break in small break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) tests of the ATLAS facility was investigated including MARS code calculations. Among the SBLOCA tests, a 6″-CL pipe and 50%-DVI line break SBLOCA test were selected to investigate the behavior of the reflux condensation. A reflux condensation heat transfer seemed to occur from the time the SG U-tubes were half-empty to near the loop seal clearing (LSC). It was found that a transition regime existed between the reflux condensation heat transfer and reverse heat transfer. The remaining reflux condensate in SG U-tubes owing to the counter-current flow limit (CCFL) phenomenon and a separating effect of liquid carry-over and/or entrainment with steam moisturizing seemed to affect the thermal-hydraulic behavior of the transition regime. It was also found that the steam flowrate of the loop pipings and SG U-tubes seemed to have a strong effect on the duration time of the transition regime, e.g., a larger steam flowrate results in a longer duration. From a comparison of the reflux condensation behavior between the ATLAS tests and MARS code calculations, overall qualitative agreements were found between the two cases. The largest discrepancies were found in the SG inlet plenum water level between the two cases, and the authors suggest that the combination effects of the remaining reflux condensate in SG U-tubes and a separating effect of liquid carry-over and/or entrainment with steam

  20. Clinical study of anti-reflux surgery for pediatric patients with primary vesico-ureteral reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamae, Koichi; Kitani, Kosuke; Miyamoto, Kenji; Nakakuma, Kensuke; Hamada, Yasuyuki; Nagano, Koji; Kawano, Tomoyasu; Nakamura, Toshiro

    2012-01-01

    We reviewed the characteristics of 25 pediatric patients (41 ureters) with primary vesico-ureteral reflux (VUR) who underwent anti-reflux surgery. The patients comprised 14 males and 11 females. The median age at diagnosis and at operation was 5 years 3 months and 6 years 5 months, respectively. VUR grade comprised grade I, 4 cases, grade II, 3 cases, grade III, 11 cases, grade IV, 11 cases and grade V, 12 cases. We utilized the Cohen method as the anti-reflux surgery technique. VUR recurrence was detected in 1 case (2.9%) during follow-up. Moreover, there were no cases with progressive renal dysfunction or breakthrough infection. The rate of kidney with renal scar on scintigraphy before the operation was 48.9%, and the rate of kidney with renal dysfunction before the operation was 60.0%. As a result of Fisher's exact probability test, the risk factors of breakthrough infection (BTI) were high grade VUR and renal scar on scintigraphy. Based on our clinical results, our future strategy for the management of pediatric patients with primary VUR is proposed as follows. In all patients younger than 1 year old, antibacterial prophylaxis should be applied. For patients younger than 6 years old, the initial treatment should be antibacterial prophylaxis, but for patients with VUR of grade III or more, in cases of breakthrough infection or in cases with progressive renal dysfunction, surgical treatment should be considered. For patients older than 6 years with VUR of grade III or more, surgical treatment is strongly recommended. (author)

  1. Genetics Home Reference: congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... result in softening and weakening of the bones ( rickets ) in some individuals. If left untreated, congenital bile ... Encyclopedia: Cholestasis Health Topic: Liver Diseases Health Topic: Rickets Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) ...

  2. Improvement in the management of bile duct injuries?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulemans, Y. C.; Bergman, J. J.; de Wit, L. T.; Rauws, E. A.; Huibregtse, K.; Tytgat, G. N.; Gouma, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have suggested that improvements in diagnostic workup and treatment of bile duct injuries (BDI) sustained during laparoscopic cholecystectomy can be expected as experience increases with the laparoscopic procedure. Many published articles reported that early diagnosis,

  3. Spontaneous common bile duct perforation—A rare clinical entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Amberger

    Full Text Available Introduction: Spontaneous common bile duct perforation is an uncommon clinical entity in both adults and children. Few case reports have been published since the first clinical description in 1882. Our work has been reported in line with SCARE criteria. Presentation of case: Herein, we describe the case of a 28 year-old female who suffered spontaneous common bile duct perforation while admitted for choledocholithiasis. Discussion: The perforation occurred while in-hospital, and extensive imaging and laboratory tests characterized the disease in detail. To our knowledge, this is the first report of spontaneous common bile duct perforation witnessed from pre-perforation through definitive management. Conclusion: Physicians and Surgeons should seek out this uncommon diagnosis in the patient with suspected Choledocholithiasis who suddenly become peritoneal on physical exam so that definitive care can be expedited. Keywords: Common bile duct, Biliary peritonitis, Choledocholithiasis

  4. Dynamic measurements of reflux for quantifying gastroesophageal reflux in patients with prolonged esophageal transit time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gratz, K.F.; Creutzig, H.; Schmiedt, W.; Oelert, H.; Hundeshagen, H.; Medizinische Hochschule Hannover

    1985-01-01

    A combination of a radionuclide transit test and a dynamic gastroesophageal scan was evaluated in normal volunteers, in patients with achalasia treated by pneumatic dilatation (n=34) or Heller myotomy (n=21). Interpretation of 31 of 57 examinations done with usual scintiscan was not possible because of too high esophageal tracer retention. Only one case could not be interpreted with the modified technique. Gastroesophageal reflux was detected and quantified in this manner in 8 patients, 6 more than with the usual scintiscan. 7 of these 8 patients have had Heller procedure, 1 patient even combined with fundoplasty. (orig.) [de

  5. Dynamic measurements of reflux for quantifying gastroesophageal reflux in patients with prolonged esophageal transit time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gratz, K.F.; Creutzig, H.; Schmiedt, W.; Oelert, H.; Hundeshagen, H.

    1985-05-01

    A combination of a radionuclide transit test and a dynamic gastroesophageal scan was evaluated in normal volunteers, in patients with achalasia treated by pneumatic dilatation (n=34) or Heller myotomy (n=21). Interpretation of 31 of 57 examinations done with usual scintiscan was not possible because of too high esophageal tracer retention. Only one case could not be interpreted with the modified technique. Gastroesophageal reflux was detected and quantified in this manner in 8 patients, 6 more than with the usual scintiscan. 7 of these 8 patients have had Heller procedure, 1 patient even combined with fundoplasty.

  6. Bile Duct Obstruction Secondary to Chronic Pancreatitis in Seven Dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Cribb, Alastair E.; Burgener, David C.; Reimann, Keith A.

    1988-01-01

    Seven icteric dogs were determined to have bile duct obstruction secondary to chronic pancreatitis. All dogs had histories of intermittent vomiting and diarrhea. Alkaline phosphatase and alanine aminotransferase activities and total bilirubin concentrations were markedly elevated. Diagnosis was based on exploratory laparotomy and histological examination. Each dog had a 3 to 10 cm mass in the body of the pancreas and obstruction of the common bile duct. Three dogs treated with pancreatectomy,...

  7. Endoscopic stenting in bile duct cancer increases liver volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang Hun; Kim, Seong Hun; Kim, In Hee; Kim, Sang Wook; Lee, Soo Teik; Kim, Dae Ghon; Yang, Jae Do; Yu, Hee Chul; Cho, Baik Hwan; Lee, Seung Ok

    2014-09-01

    Objective evaluation tools for assessing the effectiveness of stenting in palliative treatment of malignant biliary obstruction are not satisfactory. Effects of biliary stenting on liver volume change have never been studied. We aimed to use volumetry to analyze liver volume changes after endoscopic stenting in bile duct cancer according to the location and number of stents. Retrospective review. University hospital. Patients with a diagnosis of hilar or distal bile duct cancer and who underwent biliary metal stenting. ERCP with self-expandable metal stent placement. Liver volume change after biliary stenting and its comparison according to the location (hilar vs distal common bile duct) and number (hilar bilateral vs hilar unilateral). There were 60 patients; 31 were treated for hilar bile duct cancer (13 for bilateral stent and 18 for unilateral stent) and 29 for distal bile duct cancer. Overall mean follow-up duration was 11.7 ± 4.9 weeks. Liver volume increased 17.4 ± 24.1%. The rate of liver growth was rapid during the early period from 4 to 8 weeks. Stenting in hilar bile duct cancer tended to increase liver volume more than distal biliary stents (22.5% vs 11.9%, P = .091). In hilar bile duct cancer, unilateral and bilateral stents showed similar liver volume increases (20.1% and 25.8%, respectively; P = .512). Single center, retrospective. Biliary stenting markedly increased liver volume in both hilar and distal bile duct cancer. Our data suggest that liver volume assessment could be a useful tool for evaluating stent efficacy. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Surgical versus endoscopic treatment of bile duct stones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, D J; Vernon, D R; Toouli, J

    2006-01-01

    10% to 18% of patients undergoing cholecystectomy for gallstones have common bile duct (CBD) stones. Treatment options for these stones include pre- or post-operative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) or open or laparoscopic surgery.......10% to 18% of patients undergoing cholecystectomy for gallstones have common bile duct (CBD) stones. Treatment options for these stones include pre- or post-operative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) or open or laparoscopic surgery....

  9. How useful is gastroesophageal reflux scintigraphy in suspected childhood aspiration?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fawcett, H.D.; Adams, J.C.; Hayden, C.K.; Swischuk, L.E.

    1988-01-01

    It has been suggested that gastroesophageal reflux scintigraphy might be useful in assisting one in determining therapy for patients suspected of aspirating or becoming apneic secondary to gastroesophageal reflux. This, however, has not been our experience and in reviewing 23 patients with recurrent pneumonia and/or apnea who had gastroesophageal reflux scintigraphy, we were able to detect aspiration in only one. This was especially significant since 13 (59%) of these patients had demonstrable reflux, and of these, eight were treated successfully for suspected aspiration even though none was demonstrated isotopically. To be sure, the demonstration of pulmonary aspiration with gastroesophageal reflux scintigraphy had little influence on patient selection and response to therapy. For this reason we feel there is little justification in depending on the GRS for the specific purpose of trying to document pulmonary aspiration in infants and children who are refluxing. One of the more serious complications of gastroesophageal (GE) reflux is aspiration leading to recurrent pulmonary infections and/or apnea. However, it always has been difficult to demonstrate actual aspiration into the lungs, and to be sure, barium studies of the upper GI tract seldom reveal this complication. Recently, however, considerable interest has been generated in gastroesophageal scintigraphy (GRS) as a possible means of documenting such aspiration. Rationale for this stems from the fact that suspected patients can be studied over a longer period of time and in addition, delayed and overnight images can be obtained. However, our experience does not support GRS as being an adequate method for demonstrating aspiration. (orig.)

  10. Sex and Gender Differences in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Sun; Kim, Nayoung; Kim, Gwang Ha

    2016-01-01

    It is important to understand sex and gender-related differences in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) because gender-related biologic factors might lead to better prevention and therapy. Non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) affects more women than men. GERD symptoms are more frequent in patients with NERD than in those with reflux esophagitis. However, men suffer pathologic diseases such as reflux esophagitis, Barrett’s esophagus (BE), and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) more frequently than women. The prevalence of reflux esophagitis is significantly increased with age in women, especially after their 50s. The mean age of EAC incidence in women is higher than in men, suggesting a role of estrogen in delaying the onset of BE and EAC. In a chronic rat reflux esophagitis model, nitric oxide was found to be an aggravating factor of esophageal injury in a male-predominant way. In addition, the expression of esophageal occludin, a tight junction protein that plays an important role in the esophageal defense mechanism, was up-regulated in women. This explains the male predominance of reflux esophagitis and delayed incidence of BE or EAC in women. Moreover, the symptoms such as heartburn, regurgitation, and extra-esophageal symptoms have been more frequently reported by women than by men, suggesting that sex and gender play a role in symptom perception. Differential sensitivity with augmented symptoms in women might have diagnostic and therapeutic influence. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that hormone replacement therapy has a protective effect against esophageal cancer. However, an anti-inflammatory role of estrogen remains compelling, which means further study is necessary in this area. PMID:27703114

  11. Characterization of basal hepatic bile flow and the effects of intravenous cholecystokinin on the liver, sphincter, and gallbladder in patients with sphincter of Oddi spasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurthy, Gerbail T.; Krishnamurthy, Shakuntala; Watson, Randy D.

    2004-01-01

    The major objectives of this project were to establish the pattern of basal hepatic bile flow and the effects of intravenous administration of cholecystokinin on the liver, sphincter of Oddi, and gallbladder, and to identify reliable parameters for the diagnosis of sphincter of Oddi spasm (SOS). Eight women with clinically suspected sphincter of Oddi spasm (SOS group), ten control subjects (control group), and ten patients who had recently received an opioid (opioid group) were selected for quantitative cholescintigraphy with cholecystokinin. Each patient was studied with 111-185 MBq (3-5 mCi) technetium-99m mebrofenin after 6-8 h of fasting. Hepatic phase images were obtained for 60 min, followed by gallbladder phase images for 30 min. During the gallbladder phase, 10 ng/kg octapeptide of cholecystokinin (CCK-8) was infused over 3 min through an infusion pump. Hepatic extraction fraction, excretion half-time, basal hepatic bile flow into the gallbladder, gallbladder ejection fraction, and post-CCK-8 paradoxical filling (>30% of basal counts) were identified. Seven of the patients with SOS were treated with antispasmodics (calcium channel blockers), and one underwent endoscopic sphincterotomy. Mean (±SD) hepatic bile entry into the gallbladder (versus GI tract) was widely variable: it was lower in SOS patients (32%±31%) than in controls (61%±36%) and the opioid group (61%±25%), but the difference was not statistically significant. Hepatic extraction fraction, excretion half-time, and pattern of bile flow through both intrahepatic and extrahepatic ducts were normal in all three groups. Gallbladder mean ejection fraction was 9%±4% in the opioid group; this was significantly lower (P<0.0001) than the values in the control group (54%±18%) and the SOS group (48%±29%). Almost all of the bile emptied from the gallbladder refluxed into intrahepatic ducts; it reentered the gallbladder after cessation of CCK-8 infusion (paradoxical gallbladder filling) in all eight

  12. Characterization of basal hepatic bile flow and the effects of intravenous cholecystokinin on the liver, sphincter, and gallbladder in patients with sphincter of Oddi spasm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnamurthy, Gerbail T.; Krishnamurthy, Shakuntala [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Tuality Community Hospital, 335 SE 8th Avenue, OR 97123, Hillsboro (United States); Watson, Randy D. [Department of Gastroenterology, Tuality Community Hospital, Hillsboro, OR (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The major objectives of this project were to establish the pattern of basal hepatic bile flow and the effects of intravenous administration of cholecystokinin on the liver, sphincter of Oddi, and gallbladder, and to identify reliable parameters for the diagnosis of sphincter of Oddi spasm (SOS). Eight women with clinically suspected sphincter of Oddi spasm (SOS group), ten control subjects (control group), and ten patients who had recently received an opioid (opioid group) were selected for quantitative cholescintigraphy with cholecystokinin. Each patient was studied with 111-185 MBq (3-5 mCi) technetium-99m mebrofenin after 6-8 h of fasting. Hepatic phase images were obtained for 60 min, followed by gallbladder phase images for 30 min. During the gallbladder phase, 10 ng/kg octapeptide of cholecystokinin (CCK-8) was infused over 3 min through an infusion pump. Hepatic extraction fraction, excretion half-time, basal hepatic bile flow into the gallbladder, gallbladder ejection fraction, and post-CCK-8 paradoxical filling (>30% of basal counts) were identified. Seven of the patients with SOS were treated with antispasmodics (calcium channel blockers), and one underwent endoscopic sphincterotomy. Mean ({+-}SD) hepatic bile entry into the gallbladder (versus GI tract) was widely variable: it was lower in SOS patients (32%{+-}31%) than in controls (61%{+-}36%) and the opioid group (61%{+-}25%), but the difference was not statistically significant. Hepatic extraction fraction, excretion half-time, and pattern of bile flow through both intrahepatic and extrahepatic ducts were normal in all three groups. Gallbladder mean ejection fraction was 9%{+-}4% in the opioid group; this was significantly lower (P<0.0001) than the values in the control group (54%{+-}18%) and the SOS group (48%{+-}29%). Almost all of the bile emptied from the gallbladder refluxed into intrahepatic ducts; it reentered the gallbladder after cessation of CCK-8 infusion (paradoxical gallbladder filling

  13. The efficacy of the upright position on gastro-esophageal reflux and reflux-related respiratory symptoms in infants with chronic respiratory symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Woo Jin; Yang, Hyeon Jong; Min, Taek Ki; Jeon, You Hoon; Lee, Hae Won; Lee, Jun Sung; Pyun, Bok Yang

    2012-01-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux (GER), particularly non-acid reflux, is common in infants and is a known cause of chronic respiratory symptoms in infancy. Recent guidelines recommended empirical acid suppression therapy and the head-up position in patients with suspected GER. However, the efficacy of the upright position in relieving GER and reflux-related respiratory symptoms in infants is unclear. We conducted this study to investigate the efficacy of the upright position on GER and reflux-related respiratory symptoms in infants with chronic respiratory symptoms. Thirty-two infants (21 male; median age, 5 months; range, 0 to 19 months) with unexplained chronic respiratory symptoms underwent multi-channel intraluminal esophageal impedance and pH monitoring. We retrospectively compared the frequencies of GER and reflux-related symptoms according to body position. A mean of 3.30 episodes of reflux per hour was detected. Overall, refluxes were more frequent during the postprandial period than the emptying period (3.77 vs. 2.79 episodes/hour, respectively; P=0.01). Although there was no significant difference in the total refluxes per hour between the upright and recumbent positions (6.12 vs. 3.77 episodes, P=0.10), reflux-related respiratory symptoms per reflux were significantly fewer in infants kept in an upright position than in a recumbent position during the postprandial period (3.07% vs. 14.75%, P=0.016). Non-acid reflux was the predominant type of reflux in infants, regardless of body position or meal time. The upright position may reduce reflux-related respiratory symptoms, rather than reflux frequency. Thus, it may be a useful non-pharmacological treatment for infantile GER disease resistant to acid suppressants.

  14. Olfactory sensitivity of Pacific Lampreys to lamprey bile acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, T. Craig; Sorensen, Peter W.; Bayer, Jennifer M.; Seelye, James G.

    2009-01-01

    Pacific lampreys Lampetra tridentata are in decline throughout much of their historical range in the Columbia River basin. In support of restoration efforts, we tested whether larval and adult lamprey bile acids serve as migratory and spawning pheromones in adult Pacific lampreys, as they do in sea lampreys Petromyzon marinus. The olfactory sensitivity of adult Pacific lampreys to lamprey bile acids was measured by electro-olfactogram recording from the time of their capture in the spring until their spawning in June of the following year. As controls, we tested L-arginine and a non-lamprey bile acid, taurolithocholic acid 3-sulfate (TLS). Migrating adult Pacific lampreys were highly sensitive to petromyzonol sulfate (a component of the sea lamprey migratory pheromone) and 3-keto petromyzonol sulfate (a component of the sea lamprey sex pheromone) when first captured. This sensitivity persisted throughout their long migratory and overwinter holding period before declining to nearly unmeasurable levels by the time of spawning. The absolute magnitudes of adult Pacific lamprey responses to lamprey bile acids were smaller than those of the sea lamprey, and unlike the sea lamprey, the Pacific lamprey did not appear to detect TLS. No sexual dimorphism was noted in olfactory sensitivity. Thus, Pacific lampreys are broadly similar to sea lampreys in showing sensitivity to the major lamprey bile acids but apparently differ in having a longer period of sensitivity to those acids. The potential utility of bile acid-like pheromones in the restoration of Pacific lampreys warrants their further investigation in this species.

  15. Hormesis in Cholestatic Liver Disease; Preconditioning with Low Bile Acid Concentrations Protects against Bile Acid-Induced Toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaag, Esther M.; Buist-Homan, Manon; Koehorst, Martijn; Groen, Albert K.; Moshage, Han; Faber, Klaas Nico

    2016-01-01

    Cholestasis is characterized by accumulation of bile acids and inflammation, causing hepatocellular damage. Still, liver damage markers are highest in acute cholestasis and drop when this condition becomes chronic, indicating that hepatocytes adapt towards the hostile environment. This may be

  16. Hormesis in Cholestatic Liver Disease; Preconditioning with Low Bile Acid Concentrations Protects against Bile Acid-Induced Toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaag, Esther M.; Buist-Homan, Manon; Koehorst, Martijn; Groen, Albert K.; Moshage, Han; Faber, Klaas Nico

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cholestasis is characterized by accumulation of bile acids and inflammation, causing hepatocellular damage. Still, liver damage markers are highest in acute cholestasis and drop when this condition becomes chronic, indicating that hepatocytes adapt towards the hostile environment. This

  17. Bile acids exert negative feedback control on bile acid synthesis in cultured pig hepatocytes by suppression of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwekkeboom, J.; Princen, H.M.G.; Voorthuizen, E.M. van; Kempen, H.J.M.

    1990-01-01

    Feedback regulation of bile acid synthesis by its end products was studied in cultured hepatocytes of young weaned pigs. We previously showed that conversion of exogenous [14C] cholesterol into bile acids was suppressed by addition of bile acids to the culture medium. In the present study, the

  18. Gastric emptying in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Lin; Yang Xiaochuan; Kuang Anren; Li Lixia; Ouyang Qin

    2000-01-01

    Objective: The relationship between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and gastric emptying rate was investigated. Results of endoscopy, 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring were also evaluated. Methods: 15 patients were evaluated with endoscopy, pH monitoring and radionuclide gastric emptying. The results were compared with that of 17 control subjects. Correlations of gastric emptying rate and esophagitis, 24-hour pH monitoring between GERD patients and control subjects were also analyzed. Results: Liquid gastric emptying rate of GERD patients was significantly lower than that of control subjects at 15 and 30 min (P 0.05), but there exhibited a linear correlation between 50% solid emptying time and esophagus pH total score (r=0.643, P<0.05). Conclusions: The results indicate a delayed liquid and solid gastric emptying in GERD patients. There is a linear correlation between 50% solid emptying time and esophagus pH total score. Delayed gastric emptying may be an important factor in the pathogenesis of GERD

  19. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: Medical or Surgical Treatment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore Liakakos

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a common condition with increasing prevalence worldwide. The disease encompasses a broad spectrum of clinical symptoms and disorders from simple heartburn without esophagitis to erosive esophagitis with severe complications, such as esophageal strictures and intestinal metaplasia. Diagnosis is based mainly on ambulatory esophageal pH testing and endoscopy. There has been a long-standing debate about the best treatment approach for this troublesome disease. Methods and Results. Medical treatment with PPIs has an excellent efficacy in reversing the symptoms of GERD, but they should be taken for life, and long-term side effects do exist. However, patients who desire a permanent cure and have severe complications or cannot tolerate long-term treatment with PPIs are candidates for surgical treatment. Laparoscopic antireflux surgery achieves a significant symptom control, increased patient satisfaction, and complete withdrawal of antireflux medications, in the majority of patients. Conclusion. Surgical treatment should be reserved mainly for young patients seeking permanent results. However, the choice of the treatment schedule should be individualized for every patient. It is up to the patient, the physician and the surgeon to decide the best treatment option for individual cases.

  20. Acid perfusion test in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaul, B.; Petersen, H.; Grette, K.; Myrvold, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    An acid perfusion test, isotope scanning, endoscopy, and esophageal biopsy were performed in 101 patients with symptoms strongly suggestive of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease. A positive acid perfusion test within 30 min (APT) and within 5 min (TAPT) was found in 70.2% and 37.6% of the patients, respectively. A positive APT was found significantly more often in patients with than without endoscopic esophagitis, whereas a positive TAPT was found significantly more often in patients with severe symptoms than in patients with moderate symptoms, and in a significantly higher proportion of patients with than without GER by scintigraphy. Neither the APT nor the TAPT showed any dependency on the presence of histologic esophagitis. Most (97%) patients with a negative acid perfusion test, in addition to typical symptoms, also presented with scintigraphic, endoscopic, or histologic evidence of GER disease. Although it shows that the acid perfusion test, particularly when early positive, may serve as a weak predictor of the severity of GER disease, the present study gives little support to the test's clinical usefulness.

  1. Individual bile acids have differential effects on bile acid signaling in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Peizhen; Rockwell, Cheryl E.; Cui, Julia Yue; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are known to regulate BA synthesis and transport by the farnesoid X receptor in the liver (FXR-SHP) and intestine (FXR-Fgf15). However, the relative importance of individual BAs in regulating these processes is not known. Therefore, mice were fed various doses of five individual BAs, including cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxoycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA), and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in their diets at various concentrations for one week to increase the concentration of one BA in the enterohepatic circulation. The mRNA of BA synthesis and transporting genes in liver and ileum were quantified. In the liver, the mRNA of SHP, which is the prototypical target gene of FXR, increased in mice fed all concentrations of BAs. In the ileum, the mRNA of the intestinal FXR target gene Fgf15 was increased at lower doses and to a higher extent by CA and DCA than by CDCA and LCA. Cyp7a1, the rate-limiting enzyme in BA synthesis, was decreased more by CA and DCA than CDCA and LCA. Cyp8b1, the enzyme that 12-hydroxylates BAs and is thus responsible for the synthesis of CA, was decreased much more by CA and DCA than CDCA and LCA. Surprisingly, neither a decrease in the conjugated BA uptake transporter (Ntcp) nor increase in BA efflux transporter (Bsep) was observed by FXR activation, but an increase in the cholesterol efflux transporter (Abcg5/Abcg8) was observed with FXR activation. Thus in conclusion, CA and DCA are more potent FXR activators than CDCA and LCA when fed to mice, and thus they are more effective in decreasing the expression of the rate limiting gene in BA synthesis Cyp7a1 and the 12-hydroxylation of BAs Cyp8b1, and are also more effective in increasing the expression of Abcg5/Abcg8, which is responsible for biliary cholesterol excretion. However, feeding BAs do not alter the mRNA or protein levels of Ntcp or Bsep, suggesting that the uptake or efflux of BAs is not regulated by FXR at physiological and

  2. Individual bile acids have differential effects on bile acid signaling in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Peizhen, E-mail: songacad@gmail.com; Rockwell, Cheryl E., E-mail: rockwelc@msu.edu; Cui, Julia Yue, E-mail: juliacui@uw.edu; Klaassen, Curtis D., E-mail: curtisklaassenphd@gmail.com

    2015-02-15

    Bile acids (BAs) are known to regulate BA synthesis and transport by the farnesoid X receptor in the liver (FXR-SHP) and intestine (FXR-Fgf15). However, the relative importance of individual BAs in regulating these processes is not known. Therefore, mice were fed various doses of five individual BAs, including cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxoycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA), and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in their diets at various concentrations for one week to increase the concentration of one BA in the enterohepatic circulation. The mRNA of BA synthesis and transporting genes in liver and ileum were quantified. In the liver, the mRNA of SHP, which is the prototypical target gene of FXR, increased in mice fed all concentrations of BAs. In the ileum, the mRNA of the intestinal FXR target gene Fgf15 was increased at lower doses and to a higher extent by CA and DCA than by CDCA and LCA. Cyp7a1, the rate-limiting enzyme in BA synthesis, was decreased more by CA and DCA than CDCA and LCA. Cyp8b1, the enzyme that 12-hydroxylates BAs and is thus responsible for the synthesis of CA, was decreased much more by CA and DCA than CDCA and LCA. Surprisingly, neither a decrease in the conjugated BA uptake transporter (Ntcp) nor increase in BA efflux transporter (Bsep) was observed by FXR activation, but an increase in the cholesterol efflux transporter (Abcg5/Abcg8) was observed with FXR activation. Thus in conclusion, CA and DCA are more potent FXR activators than CDCA and LCA when fed to mice, and thus they are more effective in decreasing the expression of the rate limiting gene in BA synthesis Cyp7a1 and the 12-hydroxylation of BAs Cyp8b1, and are also more effective in increasing the expression of Abcg5/Abcg8, which is responsible for biliary cholesterol excretion. However, feeding BAs do not alter the mRNA or protein levels of Ntcp or Bsep, suggesting that the uptake or efflux of BAs is not regulated by FXR at physiological and

  3. Prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease symptoms and reflux-associated respiratory symptoms in asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Silva H Janaka

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD symptoms are common in asthma and have been extensively studied, but less so in the Asian continent. Reflux-associated respiratory symptoms (RARS have, in contrast, been little-studied globally. We report the prevalence of GORD symptoms and RARS in adult asthmatics, and their association with asthma severity and medication use. Methods A cross-sectional analytical study. A validated interviewer-administered GORD scale was used to assess frequency and severity of seven GORD symptoms. Subjects were consecutive asthmatics attending medical clinics. Controls were matched subjects without respiratory symptoms. Results The mean (SD composite GORD symptom score of asthmatics was significantly higher than controls (21.8 (17.2 versus 12.0 (7.6; P P Conclusions GORD symptoms and RARS were more prevalent in a cohort of Sri Lankan adult asthmatics compared to non-asthmatics. Increased prevalence of RARS is associated with both typical and atypical symptoms of GORD. Asthma disease and its severity, but not asthma medication, appear to influence presence of GORD symptoms.

  4. Coexpression of bile salt hydrolase gene and catalase gene remarkably improves oxidative stress and bile salt resistance in Lactobacillus casei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guohong; Yin, Sheng; An, Haoran; Chen, Shangwu; Hao, Yanling

    2011-08-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) encounter various types of stress during industrial processes and gastrointestinal transit. Catalase (CAT) and bile salt hydrolase (BSH) can protect bacteria from oxidative stress or damage caused by bile salts by decomposing hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) or deconjugating the bile salts, respectively. Lactobacillus casei is a valuable probiotic strain and is often deficient in both CAT and BSH. In order to improve the resistance of L. casei to both oxidative and bile salts stress, the catalase gene katA from L. sakei and the bile salt hydrolase gene bsh1 from L. plantarum were coexpressed in L. casei HX01. The enzyme activities of CAT and BSH were 2.41 μmol H(2)O(2)/min/10(8) colony-forming units (CFU) and 2.11 μmol glycine/min/ml in the recombinant L. casei CB, respectively. After incubation with 8 mM H(2)O(2), survival ratio of L. casei CB was 40-fold higher than that of L. casei CK. Treatment of L. casei CB with various concentrations of sodium glycodeoxycholate (GDCA) showed that ~10(5) CFU/ml cells survived after incubation with 0.5% GDCA, whereas almost all the L. casei CK cells were killed when treaded with 0.4% GDCA. These results indicate that the coexpression of CAT and BSH confers high-level resistance to both oxidative and bile salts stress conditions in L. casei HX01.

  5. Eversion Bile Duct Anastomosis: A Safe Alternative for Bile Duct Size Discrepancy in Deceased Donor Liver Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal-Leyte, Pilar; McKenna, Greg J; Ruiz, Richard M; Anthony, Tiffany L; Saracino, Giovanna; Giuliano, Testa; Klintmalm, Goran B; Kim, Peter Tw

    2018-04-10

    Introduction Bile duct size discrepancy in liver transplantation may increase the risk of biliary complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and outcomes of the eversion bile duct anastomosis technique in deceased donor liver transplantation (DDLT) with duct to duct anastomosis. Methods A total of 210 patients who received a DDLT with duct to duct anastomosis from 2012 to 2017 were divided into two groups: those who had eversion bile duct anastomosis (N=70) and standard bile duct anastomosis (N=140). Biliary complications rates were compared between the two groups. Results There was no difference in the cumulative incidence of biliary strictures (P=0.20) and leaks (P=0.17) between the two groups. The biliary complication rate in the eversion group was 14.3% and 11.4% in the standard anastomosis group. All the biliary complications in the eversion group were managed with endoscopic stenting. A severe size mismatch (≥3:1 ratio) was associated with a significantly higher incidence of biliary strictures (44.4%) compared to 2:1 ratio (8.2%), (P=0.002). Conclusion The use of the eversion technique is a safe alternative for bile duct discrepancy in deceased donor liver transplantation; however, severe bile duct size mismatch may be a risk factor for biliary strictures with such technique. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  6. The evaluation of gastroesophageal reflux before and after medical therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmud, L.S.; Fisher, R.S.

    1981-01-01

    Gastroesophageal scintigraphy is a quantitative technique that can be employed to detect and quantitate gastroesophageal reflux before and after the application of therapeutic modalities, including change in body position, bethanechol, atropine, antacids, and antacid-alginate compounds. Five groups of 10-15 patients each were studied before and after using each therapeutic modality and before and after atropine. The results were compared to the patient's symptomatology and to the acid reflux test. Gastroesophageal scintigraphy was performed following oral administration of 300 microCi 99mTc-sulfur colloid in 300 ml acidified orange juice. Thirty-second gamma camera images were obtained as the gastroesophageal gradient was increased from approximately 10 to 35 mm Hg at 5 mm Hg increments using an inflatable abdominal binder. Data were processed using a digital computer. Reflux was reduced by change in position from recumbent to upright, and by the use of subcutaneous bethanechol, oral antacid, or oral antacidalginate compound. Atropine increased reflux. Gastroesophageal scintigraphy is more sensitive than fluoroscopy, correlates well with clinical symptomatology, and is a reliable and convenient technique for the quantitative estimation of reflux before and after therapy

  7. The Role of the Acid Pocket in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, David R; Derakhshan, Mohammad H; Robertson, Elaine V; McColl, Kenneth E L

    2016-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is one of the commonest chronic conditions in the western world and its prevalence is increasing worldwide. The discovery of the acid pocket explained the paradox of acid reflux occurring more frequently in the postprandial period despite intragastric acidity being low due to the buffering effect of the meal. The acid pocket was first described in 2001 when it was detected as an area of low pH immediately distal to the cardia using dual pH electrode pull-through studies 15 minutes after a meal. It was hypothesized that there was a local pocket of acid close to the gastroesophageal junction that escapes the buffering effect of the meal, and that this is the source of postprandial acidic reflux. The presence of the acid pocket has been confirmed in other studies using different techniques including high-resolution pHmetry, Bravo capsule, magnetic resonance imaging, and scintigraphy. This review aims to describe what we know about the acid pocket including its length, volume, fluid constituents, and its relationship to the lower esophageal sphincter and squamocolumnar junction. We will discuss the possible mechanisms that lead to the formation of the acid pocket and examine what differences exist in patients who suffer from acid reflux. Treatments for reflux disease that affect the acid pocket will also be discussed.

  8. Role of gastroesophageal reflux disease in lung transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathorn, Kelly E; Chan, Walter W; Lo, Wai-Kit

    2017-01-01

    Lung transplantation is one of the highest risk solid organ transplant modalities. Recent studies have demonstrated a relationship between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and lung transplant outcomes, including acute and chronic rejection. The aim of this review is to discuss the pathophysiology, evaluation, and management of GERD in lung transplantation, as informed by the most recent publications in the field. The pathophysiology of reflux-induced lung injury includes the effects of aspiration and local immunomodulation in the development of pulmonary decline and histologic rejection, as reflective of allograft injury. Modalities of reflux and esophageal assessment, including ambulatory pH testing, impedance, and esophageal manometry, are discussed, as well as timing of these evaluations relative to transplantation. Finally, antireflux treatments are reviewed, including medical acid suppression and surgical fundoplication, as well as the safety, efficacy, and timing of such treatments relative to transplantation. Our review of the data supports an association between GERD and allograft injury, encouraging a strategy of early diagnosis and aggressive reflux management in lung transplant recipients to improve transplant outcomes. Further studies are needed to explore additional objective measures of reflux and aspiration, better compare medical and surgical antireflux treatment options, extend follow-up times to capture longer-term clinical outcomes, and investigate newer interventions including minimally invasive surgery and advanced endoscopic techniques. PMID:28507913

  9. The diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Mouzan, Mohammad I.; Abdullah, Asaad M.

    2002-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a common disorder affecting children worldwide. The objective of this study is to report our experience on the accuracy of tests used for the diagnosis ofgastroesophageal reflux disease with emphasis on the advantages and disadvantages of each of them. This study took place in the Pediatric Gastroenterology Division, Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine and King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, during the period of 1994 through to 1999. Results of barium meal, 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring, endoscopy, and gastrointestinal scintigraphy are analyzed and compared in children with and without gastroesophageal reflux disease. One hundred and forty-four children were investigated. The diagnosis was confirmed in 85 and excluded in 59 children, who will be considered as patients without gastroesophageal reflux disease. The results of barium meal, 24 hour pH monitoring, endoscopy, and gastrointestinal scintigraphy were positive in 80%, 78%, 92%, and 70% of the patients with gastroesophageal disease. The same studies were falsely positive in 29%, 9%, 19%, and 0% of those without gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal pH was the most specific diagnostic study (91%), whereas endoscopy was the most sensitive (92%) and had the best positive predictive value (95%). The results of this study are similar to reports from other parts of the world. It is stressed that all procedures have important advantages and disadvantages indicating that the selection of procedures should be individualized and based on the clinical situation. (author)

  10. Gastroesophageal reflux disease: Update on inflammation and symptom perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altomare, Annamaria; Guarino, Michele Pier Luca; Cocca, Silvia; Emerenziani, Sara; Cicala, Michele

    2013-10-21

    Although gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disorder in Western countries, with a significant impact on quality of life and healthcare costs, the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of symptoms remain to be fully elucidated. GERD symptoms and complications may result from a multifactorial mechanism, in which acid and acid-pepsin are the important noxious factors involved. Prolonged contact of the esophageal mucosa with the refluxed content, probably caused by a defective anti-reflux barrier and luminal clearance mechanisms, would appear to be responsible for macroscopically detectable injury to the esophageal squamous epithelium. Receptors on acid-sensitive nerve endings may play a role in nociception and esophageal sensitivity, as suggested in animal models of chronic acid exposure. Meanwhile, specific cytokine and chemokine profiles would appear to underlie the various esophageal phenotypes of GERD, explaining, in part, the genesis of esophagitis in a subset of patients. Despite these findings, which show a significant production of inflammatory mediators and neurotransmitters in the pathogenesis of GERD, the relationship between the hypersensitivity and esophageal inflammation is not clear. Moreover, the large majority of GERD patients (up to 70%) do not develop esophageal erosions, a variant of the condition called non-erosive reflux disease. This summary aims to explore the inflammatory pathway involved in GERD pathogenesis, to better understand the possible distinction between erosive and non-erosive reflux disease patients and to provide new therapeutic approaches.

  11. Gastric emptying of solid food in patients with gastroesophageal reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shay, S.; Eggli, D.; Van Nostrand, D.; Johnson, L.

    1985-01-01

    While delayed solid gastric emptying (GE) has been reported in patients with gastroesophageal reflux (GER), the relationship of GE to daytime and/or nighttime reflux patterns, and the severity of endoscopic esophagitis are unknown. The authors measured GE in a study population of symptomatic patients (n=33) with abnormal 24 hour pH monitoring (24 hr pH). The study population was divided into two groups by esophagoscopy; those with (E+=22); and 2) those without (E-=11) erosive esophagitis and/or Barrett's esophagus. GE was measured in all patients and in 15 normal volunteers (NL) by the in vivo labelling of chicken liver with Tc-99m-SC, which was in turn diced into 1 cm. cubes and given in 7 1/2 oz. of beef stew. Upright one minute anterior and posterior digital images were obtained every 15 min. for 2.5 hours. 24 hour pH was divided into daytime (upright) and nighttime (supine) segments, and acid exposure was defined as % time pH < 4 for that posture. There was no correlation between GE T 1/2 and acid exposure, daytime or nighttime, for the patient population as a whole. However, patients with the longest GE T1/2 tended to have severe daytime reflux. The authors rarely found delayed solid food gastric emptying in patients with reflux; moreover, they found no association between GE and either diurnal reflux patterns on 24 hr pH or the severity of endoscopic esophagitis

  12. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in 2006. The imperfect diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, John T.

    2006-01-01

    There continues to be significant controversy related to diagnostic testing for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Clearly, barium contrast fluoroscopy is superior to any other test in defining the anatomy of the upper gastrointestinal (UGI) tract. Although fluoroscopy can demonstrate gastroesophageal reflux (GER), this observation does not equate to GERD. Fluoroscopy time should not be prolonged to attempt to demonstrate GER during barium contrast radiography. There are no data to justify prolonging fluoroscopy time to perform provocative maneuvers to demonstrate reflux during barium contrast UGI series. Symptoms of GERD may be associated with physiologic esophageal acid exposure measured by intraesophageal pH monitoring, and a significant percentage of patients with abnormal esophageal acid exposure have no or minimal clinical symptoms of reflux. Abnormal acid exposure defined by pH monitoring over a 24-h period does not equate to GERD. In clinical practice presumptive diagnosis of GERD is reasonably assumed by substantial reduction or elimination of suspected reflux symptoms during therapeutic trial of acid reduction therapy. (orig.)

  13. Protective Effect of ECQ on Rat Reflux Esophagitis Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyeon-Soon; Han, Jeong Hoon; Jeong, Jun Yeong; Sohn, Uy Dong

    2012-12-01

    This study was designed to determine the protective effect of Rumex Aquaticus Herba extracts containing quercetin-3-β-D-glucuronopyranoside (ECQ) on experimental reflux esophagitis. Reflux esophagitis was induced by surgical procedure. The rats were divided into seven groups, namely normal group, control group, ECQ (1, 3, 10, 30 mg/kg) group and omeprazole (30 mg/kg) group. ECQ and omeprazole groups received intraduodenal administration. The Rats were starved for 24 hours before the experiments, but were freely allowed to drink water. ECQ group attenuated the gross esophagitis significantly compared to that treated with omeprazole in a dose-dependent manner. ECQ decreased the volume of gastric juice and increased the gastric pH, which are similar to those of omeprazole group. In addition, ECQ inhibited the acid output effectively in reflux esophagitis. Significantly increased amounts of malondialdehyde (MDA), myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and the mucosal depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH) were observed in the reflux esophagitis. ECQ administration attenuated the decrement of the GSH levels and affected the MDA levels and MPO activity. These results suggest that the ECQ has a protective effect which may be attributed to its multiple effects including anti-secretory, anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory actions on reflux esophagitis in rats.

  14. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in 2006. The imperfect diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, John T. [Children' s Hospital of Alabama, Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama-Birmingham School of Medicine, Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2006-09-15

    There continues to be significant controversy related to diagnostic testing for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Clearly, barium contrast fluoroscopy is superior to any other test in defining the anatomy of the upper gastrointestinal (UGI) tract. Although fluoroscopy can demonstrate gastroesophageal reflux (GER), this observation does not equate to GERD. Fluoroscopy time should not be prolonged to attempt to demonstrate GER during barium contrast radiography. There are no data to justify prolonging fluoroscopy time to perform provocative maneuvers to demonstrate reflux during barium contrast UGI series. Symptoms of GERD may be associated with physiologic esophageal acid exposure measured by intraesophageal pH monitoring, and a significant percentage of patients with abnormal esophageal acid exposure have no or minimal clinical symptoms of reflux. Abnormal acid exposure defined by pH monitoring over a 24-h period does not equate to GERD. In clinical practice presumptive diagnosis of GERD is reasonably assumed by substantial reduction or elimination of suspected reflux symptoms during therapeutic trial of acid reduction therapy. (orig.)

  15. Bile cystadenocarcinoma: MRI findings with pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jing; Ye Huiyi; Cai Youquan; Ma Lin; Guo Xinggao; Yu Guo

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To describe the MRI features and pathologic findings of biliary cystadenocarcinoma (BCAC) and to assess the diagnostic value of MRI in those tumors. Methods: Five cases of BCAC were collected. All cases were proved by pathology. Non-enhanced and multiphase-enhanced MRI were performed in all cases. MRCP were performed in two cases. The MRI features of the five cases were reviewed retrospectively and correlated with pathologic findings. Results: Histological evidence demonstrated five cases of BCAC. Four cases were solitary, whereas the other case was multif0cal. All cases were solid and cystic lesions. Two cases were unilocular, whereas the other three cases were multilocular. Multiple mural nodules and irregular thickening cystic walls were presented in all cases. The cystic parts of the lesions were homogeneous in signal intensity and showed no enhancement after contrast administration in the five BCAC. Septa were present in three BCAC with multilocular cyst. On MRCP the bile duct dilatation was found in two BCAC. Conclusion: MRI can reveal the characteristic findings of BCAC and accurate preoperative diagnosis can be made. (authors)

  16. The usefulness of esophagography as a screening test for laryngopharyngeal reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Chung, Phil Sang

    2006-01-01

    There are many articles about the role of barium esophagography for the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. However, there are only rare articles reporting on laryngopharyngeal reflux disease. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of performing esophagography with the water-siphon test as an initial screening test for patients with suspected laryngopharyngeal reflux. From October 2002 to December 2004, barium esophagography with the water-siphon test was performed for 707 patients who had the typical symptoms and telescopic findings of laryngopharyngeal reflux. The results of the 707 esophagograms (the group with laryngopharyngeal reflux) were compared with those of 122 patients who were confirmed as having gastroesophageal reflux upon performing pH-metry (the group with gastroesophageal reflux) and the 324 patients without laryngopharyngeal reflux symptoms (the control group). The results of the water-siphon test were classified into normal, mild, moderate and severe degrees of gastroesophageal reflux. On the water-siphon test for the laryngopharyneal reflux group patients, 71 patients had normal (10.0%), 207 had mild (29.2%), 201 had moderate (28.4%) and 228 had severe (32.2%) degrees of reflux. The positive rates of the water-siphon test were 90.0%, 89.3% and 54.6% for the groups with laryngopharyngeal reflux, gastroesophageal reflux and the control group, respectively. A statistically significant difference was observed between the group with laryngopharyngeal reflux and the control group, and between the group with gastroesophageal reflux and the control group, respectively (ρ < 0.05). Esophagography with the water-siphon test is useful as an initial screening test for laryngopharyngeal reflux disease

  17. The relationship between helicobacter pylori infection and gastro-esophageal reflux disease

    OpenAIRE

    Batool M Mahdi

    2011-01-01

    Background : Gastro-esophageal reflux disease is a common condition, affecting 25%-40% of the population. Increasing attention has been paid to the relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and reflux esophagitis. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between CagA+ H. pylori and endoscopically proven gastro-esophageal reflux disease. Patients and Methods: The study group included 60 hospital patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease between 2007 and 2009 ...

  18. The usefulness of esophagography as a screening test for laryngopharyngeal reflux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Chung, Phil Sang [Dankook University Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-04-15

    There are many articles about the role of barium esophagography for the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. However, there are only rare articles reporting on laryngopharyngeal reflux disease. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of performing esophagography with the water-siphon test as an initial screening test for patients with suspected laryngopharyngeal reflux. From October 2002 to December 2004, barium esophagography with the water-siphon test was performed for 707 patients who had the typical symptoms and telescopic findings of laryngopharyngeal reflux. The results of the 707 esophagograms (the group with laryngopharyngeal reflux) were compared with those of 122 patients who were confirmed as having gastroesophageal reflux upon performing pH-metry (the group with gastroesophageal reflux) and the 324 patients without laryngopharyngeal reflux symptoms (the control group). The results of the water-siphon test were classified into normal, mild, moderate and severe degrees of gastroesophageal reflux. On the water-siphon test for the laryngopharyneal reflux group patients, 71 patients had normal (10.0%), 207 had mild (29.2%), 201 had moderate (28.4%) and 228 had severe (32.2%) degrees of reflux. The positive rates of the water-siphon test were 90.0%, 89.3% and 54.6% for the groups with laryngopharyngeal reflux, gastroesophageal reflux and the control group, respectively. A statistically significant difference was observed between the group with laryngopharyngeal reflux and the control group, and between the group with gastroesophageal reflux and the control group, respectively ({rho} < 0.05). Esophagography with the water-siphon test is useful as an initial screening test for laryngopharyngeal reflux disease.

  19. Acid Secretion and Its Relationship to Esophageal Reflux Symptom in Patients with Subtotal Gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyun Jin; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Park, Jae Myung; Song, Kyo Young; Yoo, Han Mo

    2018-03-01

    Esophageal reflux symptom has been reported as common in patients with subtotal gastrectomy. Management of postoperative esophageal reflux symptom is not satisfactory. The aim of this study is to investigate prevalence of esophageal reflux symptom after subtotal gastrectomy and assess factors affecting esophageal reflux symptom in subtotal gastrectomy patients. We prospectively enrolled 100 consecutive patients with subtotal gastrectomy who were regularly followed up by endoscopic examination. Acid secretory capacity was assessed by measuring messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of H + /K + -adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) via real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in biopsy specimens. In total, 47 % of patients had typical esophageal reflux symptom, where heartburn or regurgitation was experienced at least weekly. Age, sex, body mass index, and type of reconstruction did not differ between esophageal reflux and non-esophageal-reflux groups. The esophageal reflux group had longer duration from time of operation until study (median 5.0 versus 3.6 years; P = 0.017). Hill grade for gastroesophageal (GE) flap valve was higher in the esophageal reflux group than in the non-esophageal-reflux group (P = 0.027). H + /K + -ATPase mRNA expression was higher in the esophageal reflux group than in the non-esophageal-reflux group [3967.6 (± 7583.7) versus 896.2 (± 1456.0); P = 0.006]. Multivariate analysis revealed that postoperative duration, H + /K + -ATPase mRNA expression level, and GE flap valve disruption were significantly associated with esophageal reflux symptom development. Esophageal reflux symptom is common in patients after subtotal gastrectomy, possibly because of anti-reflux-barrier impairment and preservation of acid secretory capacity following surgery. Optimal acid suppression may be helpful in managing postoperative esophageal reflux symptom.

  20. There is no correlation between signs of reflux laryngitis and reflux oesophagitis in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenik, K; Kajzrlikova, I M; Vitek, P; Urban, O; Hanousek, M; Kominek, P

    2017-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine if there is correlation between signs of reflux laryngitis (RL) and reflux oesophagitis (RE) in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) symptoms. Laryngeal photography obtained from patients during oesophagogastroduodenoscopy were examined by two otolaryngologists experienced in the field of extra-oesophageal reflux regarding the presence and severity of RL. The presence of RE was evaluated by gastroenterologist. Smokers, heavy drinkers and patients with bronchial asthma were excluded from the statistical analysis. A total of 681 patients were analysed. RL was diagnosed in 367 (53.9%) cases, of whom 182 patients had mild, 118 moderate and 67 severe (Reflux Finding Score > 7) RL. RE was diagnosed in 103 (28.1%) patients with RL and in 80 (25.7%) patients without RL. Neither the difference between the overall group of patients with RL and those without (OR 1.141, 95% CI 0.811-1.605, p = 0.448), nor the differences between the respective subgroups of patients with mild, moderate and severe RL and those without RL were statistically significant. The OR and 95% CI for mild, moderate and severe RL were 1.042, 95% CI 0.712-1.526, p = 0.834, 1.182, 95% CI 0.764-1.831, p = 0.453 and 1.0, 95% CI 0.566-1.766, p = 0.999 respectively. It can be concluded that there is no correlation between RL and RE in patients with GORD symptoms. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale, Rome, Italy.