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Sample records for bile acids and salts

  1. Effect of bile salts and bile acids on human gastric mucosal epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yinxue Song; Jun Gong

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To explore the effect of bile salt and bile acid on cultured eternalized human gastric mucosa epithelium GES-1 cells.Methods:Cultured eternalized human gastric mucosa epithelium GES-1 cells were treated with media containing 6 different kinds of bile salts and 3 different kinds of bile acids and their mixture with different concentrations: GCDC(glycochenodeoxycholate), GDC (glycodeoxycholate), GC(glycocholate), TCDC(taurochenodeoxycholate), TDC(taurodeoxycholate), TC (taurocholate), LCA (lithocholicacid), CA(cholic acid), DCA(deoxycholic acid)(50 μ mol/L,250 μ mol/L,500 μ mol/L, 1000 μ mol/L), DY(mixture of bile salts) and DS(mixture of bile acids)(250 μ mol/L,500 μ mol/L,1000 μ mol/L,1500 μ mol/L, 2000 μ mol/L), in comparison with thecontrol group(in normal media without bile salts and bile acids).Cell proliferation was assessed by MTT(3-[4,5-Dimethylthiaolyl]-2,5- diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide) assay for 72 hours with different concentrations and the apoptotic cells were assayed by flow cytometry (FCM) with Annex V-FITC conjugated with propidium iodide(PI) staining for 24 hours with different concentrations(1500,2000 μ mol/L).Results:There was no significant difference in morphology and cell proliferation in GC group after 24-72 h.Low concentration(50 μ mol/L) of GCDC, GDC, TCDC, TDC and TC accelerated gastric epithelial cell growth in a dosage-time dependent manner.At middle concentration (250-500 μ mol/L), it showed positive effect after 24-48 h, while negative effect after 72 h.At high concentration(1000 μ tool/L), it accelerated gastric epithelial cell growth after 24h and show consistent inhibition even leading to necrosis after 48-72 h.LCA and CA showed a positive effect on the concentration of 50 μ mol/L after 24-72 h, while 250-1000 It mol/L showed a trend towards apoptosis after 24-72 h.At 50-500 μ mol/L, DCA showed proliferation after 24 h and apoptosis after 48-72 h, but showed necrosis after 24-72 h at 1000 μ moiFL.DY and DS

  2. Adsorption of bile acid by chitosan salts prepared with cinnamic acid and analogue compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Yoshifumi; Nagaki, Kumiko; Kofuji, Kyouko; Sanae, Fujiko; Kontani, Hitoshi; Kawashima, Susumu

    2006-01-01

    A chitosan (CS) powder treated with cinnamic acid and an analogue compound (CN) was prepared as CS-CN. Using it, bile acid adsorption by CS-CN and the release of CN were investigated in vitro. When CS-CN was soaked in a taurocholate solution, it released CN and simultaneously adsorbed the bile acid. For CS-CN prepared with cinnamic acid, the amount of CN released was 0.286 +/- 0.001 mmol/g CS-CN; the amount of taurocholate adsorbed was 0.284 +/- 0.003 mmol/g CS-CN. These two functions were recognized on alginate or pectin gel beads containing CS-CN. The amount of released CN was altered extensively by the species of CN used for gel-bead preparation. Results suggest that CS-CN is a candidate for complementary medicine to prevent lifestyle-related diseases.

  3. The role of resistance to bile salts and acid tolerance of exopolysaccharides (EPSS produced by yogurt starter bacteria

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    Boke Hatice

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate a possible relation between EPS production and resistance to bile salts and tolerance to low pH. Eight strains which produced the highest and lowest amount of EPS (16- 211mg/l were selected among 54 bacteria isolated from yogurt. Additionally, they were tested for resistance to bile salts (0.15, 0.3 % and tolerance to low pH (2.0-3.0. After treatment with bile salts and acid, viable bacteria (log cfu ml-1 were determined by surface plating. The high EPS producing strains (B3, G12, W22 showed a significant (P<0.05 protective effect against low pH (pH 2.0. All Streptococcus thermophilus strains showed a higher tolerance to bile salts than the Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus strains. The high EPS-producing S. thermophilus (W22, T12 and L. bulgaricus (B3, G2 strains showed a significant (P<0.01 protective effect against bile salts (0.3 %.

  4. Gene expression changes associated with Barrett's esophagus and Barrett's-associated adenocarcinoma cell lines after acid or bile salt exposure

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    Sahbaie Peyman

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Esophageal reflux and Barrett's esophagus represent two major risk factors for the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma. Previous studies have shown that brief exposure of the Barrett's-associated adenocarcinoma cell line, SEG-1, or primary cultures of Barrett's esophageal tissues to acid or bile results in changes consistent with cell proliferation. In this study, we determined whether similar exposure to acid or bile salts results in gene expression changes that provide insights into malignant transformation. Methods Using previously published methods, Barrett's-associated esophageal adenocarcinoma cell lines and primary cultures of Barrett's esophageal tissue were exposed to short pulses of acid or bile salts followed by incubation in culture media at pH 7.4. A genome-wide assessment of gene expression was then determined for the samples using cDNA microarrays. Subsequent analysis evaluated for statistical differences in gene expression with and without treatment. Results The SEG-1 cell line showed changes in gene expression that was dependent on the length of exposure to pH 3.5. Further analysis using the Gene Ontology, however, showed that representation by genes associated with cell proliferation is not enhanced by acid exposure. The changes in gene expression also did not involve genes known to be differentially expressed in esophageal adenocarcinoma. Similar experiments using short-term primary cultures of Barrett's esophagus also did not result in detectable changes in gene expression with either acid or bile salt exposure. Conclusion Short-term exposure of esophageal adenocarcinoma SEG-1 cells or primary cultures of Barrett's esophagus does not result in gene expression changes that are consistent with enhanced cell proliferation. Thus other model systems are needed that may reflect the impact of acid and bile salt exposure on the esophagus in vivo.

  5. Effects of essential fatty acid deficiency on enterohepatic circulation of bile salts in mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukovac, S.; Los, L.; Stellaard, F.; Rings, E.H.; Verkade, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    Essential fatty acid (EFA) deficiency in mice has been associated with increased bile production, which is mainly determined by the enterohepatic circulation (EHC) of bile salts. To establish the mechanism underlying the increased bile production, we characterized in detail the EHC of bile salts in

  6. Molecular interactions between bile salts, phospholipids and cholesterol : relevance to bile formation, cholesterol crystallization and bile salt toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moschetta, Antonio

    2002-01-01

    Cholesterol is a nonpolar lipid dietary constituent, absorbed from the small intestine, transported in blood and taken up by the liver. In bile, the sterol is solubilized in mixed micelles by bile salts and phospholipids. In case of supersaturation, cholesterol is kept in vesicles with phospholipid

  7. Low retinol levels differentially modulate bile salt-induced expression of human and mouse hepatic bile salt transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.O. Hoeke; J.R.M. Plass; J. Heegsma; M. Geuken; D. van Rijsbergen; J.F.W. Baller; F. Kuipers; H. Moshage; P.L.M. Jansen; K.N. Faber

    2009-01-01

    The farnesoid X receptor/retinoid X receptor-alpha (FXR/RXRalpha) complex regulates bile salt homeostasis, in part by modulating transcription of the bile salt export pump (BSEP/ABCB11) and small heterodimer partner (SHP/NR0B2). FXR is activated by bile salts, RXRalpha by the vitamin A derivative 9-

  8. Low Retinol Levels Differentially Modulate Bile Salt-Induced Expression of Human and Mouse Hepatic Bile Salt Transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeke, Martijn O.; Plass, Jacqueline R. M.; Heegsma, Janette; Geuken, Mariska; van Rijsbergen, Duncan; Baller, Julius F. W.; Kuipers, Folkert; Moshage, Han; Jansen, Peter L. M.; Faber, Klaas Nico

    2009-01-01

    The farnesoid X receptor/retinoid X receptor-alpha (FXR/RXR alpha) complex regulates bile salt homeostasis, in part by modulating transcription of the bile salt export pump (BSEP/ABCB11 I) and small heterodimer partner (SHP/NR0B2). FXR is activated by bile salts, RXR alpha by the vitamin A derivativ

  9. Endocrine and paracrine role of bile acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Verena Keitel; Ralf Kubitz; Dieter H(a)ussinger

    2008-01-01

    Bile acids are not only important for the absorption of dietary lipids and fat soluble vitamins but are signalling molecules with diverse endocrine and paracrine functions.Bile acids regulate bile acid,lipid and glucose metabolism and modulate temperature and energy homeostasis.Furthermore,bile acids can not only promote cell proliferation and liver regeneration but can also induce programmed cell death.Bile acid functions are mediated through different pathways which comprise the activation of nuclear hormone receptors,of intracellular kinases and of the plasma membranebound,G-protein coupled bile acid receptor TGR5/Gpbar-1.

  10. [Structure and Activity of Fungal Lipases in Bile Salt Solutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanova, L R; Bakirova, D R; Valiullina, Yu A; Idiyatullin, B Z; Faizullin, D A; Zueva, O S; Zuev, Yu F

    2016-01-01

    The changes in structure and catalytic properties of fungal lipases (Candida rugosa, Rhizomucor miehei, Mucor javanicus) were investigated in micellar solutions of bile salts that differ in hydrophilic-lypophilic balance and reaction medium properties. The methods of circular dichroism and tryptophan fluorescence were applied to estimate the changes in peptide structure within complexes with bile salt micelles. Bile salts do not exert a significant influence on the structure of the enzymes under study: in Rh. miehei and M. javanicus lipases the alpha helix content slightly decreased, the influence of bile salts on the C. rugosa structure was not revealed. Despite negligible structural modifications in the enzymes, in bile salt solutions a considerable change in their catalytic properties was observed: an abrupt decrease in catalytic effectiveness. Substrate-bile salts micelles complex formation was demonstrated by the NMR self-diffusion method. The model of a regulation of fungal lipase activity was proposed.

  11. Purification and Characterization of Conjugated Bile Salt Hydrolase from Bifidobacterium longum BB536

    OpenAIRE

    Grill, J; Schneider, F.; Crociani, J.; Ballongue, J.

    1995-01-01

    Bifidobacterium species deconjugate taurocholic, taurodeoxycholic, taurochenodeoxycholic, glycocholic, glycodeoxycholic, and glycochenodeoxycholic acids. The enzyme level increases in the growth phase. No increase in activity is observed for the cytoplasmic enzyme after addition of conjugated bile acids to a stationary-phase culture. Conjugated bile salt hydrolase (BSH) was purified from Bifidobacterium longum BB536. Its apparent molecular mass in denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis...

  12. Bile acid biosynthesis and its regulation

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    Areta Hebanowska

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Bile acid biosynthesis is the main pathway of cholesterol catabolism. Bile acids are more soluble than cholesterol so are easier to excrete. As amphipathic molecules they participate in lipid digestion and absorption in the intestine and they help to excrete free cholesterol with bile. They are also ligands for nuclear receptors regulating the expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism. Interconversion of cholesterol into bile acids is an important point of its homeostasis. Seventeen enzymes are engaged in this process and many of them are cytochromes P450. Bile acid synthesis initiation may proceed with the “classical” pathway (starting with cholesterol hydroxylation at the C7α position or the “alternative” pathway (starting with cholesterol hydroxylation at the C27 position. Two additional pathways are possible, though their quantitative significance is small (initiated with cholesterol hydroxylations of C24 and C25 positions. Oxysterols produced are not only intermediates of bile acid biosynthesis but also important regulators of metabolism. Bile acid biosynthesis takes place in the liver, but some enzymes are also present in other organs, where they participate in regulation of cholesterol metabolism. Those enzymes are potential targets for new drugs against cholesterol metabolism disturbances. This article is a brief description of the bile acid biosynthesis pathway and participating enzymes.

  13. Cholesterol-Lowering Potentials of Lactic Acid Bacteria Based on Bile-Salt Hydrolase Activity and Effect of Potent Strains on Cholesterol Metabolism In Vitro and In Vivo

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    Cheng-Chih Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study collected different probiotic isolates from animal and plant sources to evaluate the bile-salt hydrolase activity of probiotics in vitro. The deconjugation potential of bile acid was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. HepG2 cells were cultured with probiotic strains with high BSH activity. The triglyceride (TG and apolipoprotein B (apo B secretion by HepG2 cells were evaluated. Our results show that the BSH activity and bile-acid deconjugation abilities of Pediococcus acidilactici NBHK002, Bifidobacterium adolescentis NBHK006, Lactobacillus rhamnosus NBHK007, and Lactobacillus acidophilus NBHK008 were higher than those of the other probiotic strains. The cholesterol concentration in cholesterol micelles was reduced within 24 h. NBHK007 reduced the TG secretion by 100% after 48 h of incubation. NBHK002, NBHK006, and NBHK007 could reduce apo B secretion by 33%, 38%, and 39%, respectively, after 24 h of incubation. The product PROBIO S-23 produced a greater decrease in the total concentration of cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, TG, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance in the serum or livers of hamsters with hypercholesterolemia compared with that of hamsters fed with a high-fat and high-cholesterol diet. These results show that the three probiotic strains of lactic acid bacteria are better candidates for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease.

  14. Evolutionary diversity of bile salts in reptiles and mammals, including analysis of ancient human and extinct giant ground sloth coprolites

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    Hofmann Alan F

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bile salts are the major end-metabolites of cholesterol and are also important in lipid and protein digestion and in influencing the intestinal microflora. We greatly extend prior surveys of bile salt diversity in both reptiles and mammals, including analysis of 8,000 year old human coprolites and coprolites from the extinct Shasta ground sloth (Nothrotherium shastense. Results While there is significant variation of bile salts across species, bile salt profiles are generally stable within families and often within orders of reptiles and mammals, and do not directly correlate with differences in diet. The variation of bile salts generally accords with current molecular phylogenies of reptiles and mammals, including more recent groupings of squamate reptiles. For mammals, the most unusual finding was that the Paenungulates (elephants, manatees, and the rock hyrax have a very different bile salt profile from the Rufous sengi and South American aardvark, two other mammals classified with Paenungulates in the cohort Afrotheria in molecular phylogenies. Analyses of the approximately 8,000 year old human coprolites yielded a bile salt profile very similar to that found in modern human feces. Analysis of the Shasta ground sloth coprolites (approximately 12,000 years old showed the predominant presence of glycine-conjugated bile acids, similar to analyses of bile and feces of living sloths, in addition to a complex mixture of plant sterols and stanols expected from an herbivorous diet. Conclusions The bile salt synthetic pathway has become longer and more complex throughout vertebrate evolution, with some bile salt modifications only found within single groups such as marsupials. Analysis of the evolution of bile salt structures in different species provides a potentially rich model system for the evolution of a complex biochemical pathway in vertebrates. Our results also demonstrate the stability of bile salts in coprolites

  15. Bile salt recognition by human liver fatty acid binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favretto, Filippo; Santambrogio, Carlo; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Molinari, Henriette; Grandori, Rita; Assfalg, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) act as intracellular carriers of lipid molecules, and play a role in global metabolism regulation. Liver FABP (L-FABP) is prominent among FABPs for its wide ligand repertoire, which includes long-chain fatty acids as well as bile acids (BAs). In this work, we performed a detailed molecular- and atomic-level analysis of the interactions established by human L-FABP with nine BAs to understand the binding specificity for this important class of cholesterol-derived metabolites. Protein-ligand complex formation was monitored using heteronuclear NMR, steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. BAs were found to interact with L-FABP with dissociation constants in the narrow range of 0.6-7 μm; however, the diverse substitution patterns of the sterol nucleus and the presence of side-chain conjugation resulted in complexes endowed with various degrees of conformational heterogeneity. Trihydroxylated BAs formed monomeric complexes in which single ligand molecules occupied similar internal binding sites, based on chemical-shift perturbation data. Analysis of NMR line shapes upon progressive addition of taurocholate indicated that the binding mechanism departed from a simple binary association equilibrium, and instead involved intermediates along the binding path. The co-linear chemical shift behavior observed for L-FABP complexes with cholate derivatives added insight into conformational dynamics in the presence of ligands. The observed spectroscopic features of L-FABP/BA complexes, discussed in relation to ligand chemistry, suggest possible molecular determinants of recognition, with implications regarding intracellular BA transport. Our findings suggest that human L-FABP is a poorly selective, universal BA binder.

  16. Bile acids in health and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, E; Thaysen, E H

    1996-01-01

    improved. Important physiological research on the mechanisms of hepatic bile flow was conducted. An intestinal perfusion model served as a tool providing information on absorption kinetics and on transmucosal water and electrolyte movements. The gallstone disease, liver diseases, inflammatory bowel disease...... to the understanding of the factors involved in the solubility of cholesterol in bile. The growing international understanding of the potential importance of the bile acids in health and disease gave raise to a substantial Danish contribution in the 1970s and 1980s in parallel with international achievements. Emphasis......, fat malabsorption, and other intestinal disorders were studied. The 'idiopathic ileopathy' as a cause for bile acid malabsorption causing diarrhoea was established as a new disorder. Thus, in the time period concerned, substantial Danish contributions emerged on major and minor topics of the bile acid...

  17. Transport and biological activities of bile acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwicker, Brittnee L; Agellon, Luis B

    2013-07-01

    Bile acids have emerged as important biological molecules that support the solubilization of various lipids and lipid-soluble compounds in the gut, and the regulation of gene expression and cellular function. Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver and eventually released into the small intestine. The majority of bile acids are recovered in the distal end of the small intestine and then returned to the liver for reuse. The components of the mechanism responsible for the recycling of bile acids within the enterohepatic circulation have been identified whereas the mechanism for intracellular transport is less understood. Recently, the ileal lipid binding protein (ILBP; human gene symbol FABP6) was shown to be needed for the efficient transport of bile acids from the apical side to the basolateral side of enterocytes in the distal intestine. This review presents an overview of the transport of bile acids between the liver and the gut as well as within hepatocytes and enterocytes. A variety of pathologies is associated with the malfunction of the bile acid transport system.

  18. Bile salts and their importance for drug absorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, René; Müllertz, Anette; Mu, Huiling

    2013-01-01

    in different animal species and an overview of the literature investigating the influence of bile salts on the in vivo performance of different compounds and drug formulations. Generally, there is a positive effect on bioavailability when bile is present in the gastro-intestinal tract, independent...... of the formulation systems, e.g. suspensions, solutions, cyclodextrin complexes or lipid based formulations, but a few exceptions have also been reported....

  19. Bile acid signaling and biliary functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Jones

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on various components of bile acid signaling in relation to cholangiocytes. Their roles as targets for potential therapies for cholangiopathies are also explored. While many factors are involved in these complex signaling pathways, this review emphasizes the roles of transmembrane G protein coupled receptor (TGR5, farnesoid X receptor (FXR, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA and the bicarbonate umbrella. Following a general background on cholangiocytes and bile acids, we will expand the review and include sections that are most recently known (within 5–7 years regarding the field of bile acid signaling and cholangiocyte function. These findings all demonstrate that bile acids influence biliary functions which can, in turn, regulate the cholangiocyte response during pathological events.

  20. Effects of essential fatty acid deficiency on enterohepatic circulation of bile salts in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukovac, S.; Los, E. L.; Stellaard, F.; Rings, E. H. H. M.; Verkade, H. J.

    2009-01-01

    Lukovac S, Los EL, Stellaard F, Rings EH, Verkade HJ. Effects of essential fatty acid deficiency on enterohepatic circulation of bile salts in mice. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 297: G520-G531, 2009. First published July 16, 2009; doi: 10.1152/ajpgi.00091.2009.-Essential fatty acid (EFA)

  1. Bile salts inhibit growth and induce apoptosis of human esophageal cancer cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ru Zhang; Jun Gong; Hui Wang; Li Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To explore the effect of six bile salts, including glycocholate (GC), glycochenodeoxycholate (GCDC), glycodeoxycholate (GDC), taurocholate (TC), taurochenodeoxycholate (TCDC), taurodeoxycholate (TDC), and two bile acids including cholic acid (CA) and deoxycholic acid (DCA) on esophageal cancer Eca109 cell line.METHODS: Eca109 cells were exposed to six bile salts, two bile acids and the mixed bile salts at different concentrations for 24-72 h. 3-[4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to detect the cell proliferation. Apoptotic morphology was observed by phase-contrast video microscopy and deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)assay. Sub-G1 DNA fragmentations and early apoptosis cells were assayed by flow cytometry (FCM) with propidium iodide (PI) staining and annexin V-FITC conjugated with PI staining. Apoptosis DNA ladders on agarose were observed. Activation of caspase-3 was assayed by FCM with FITC-conjugated monoclonal rabbit anti-active caspase3 antibody and expressions of Bcl-2 and Bax proteins were examined immunocytochemically in 500 μmol/L-TC-induced apoptosis cells.RESULTS: Five bile salts except for GC, and two bile acids and the mixed bile salts could initiate growth inhibition of Eca109 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner.TUNEL, FCM, and DNA ladder assays all demonstrated apoptosis induced by bile salts and bile acids at 500 μmol/L,except for GC. Early apoptosis cell percentages in Eca109 cells treated with GCDC, GDC, TC, TCDC, TDC,CA at 500 μmol/L for 12 h, DCA at 500 μmol/L for 6 h,and mixed bile salts at 1 000 μmol/L for 12 h were 7.5%,8.7%, 14.8%, 8.9%, 7.8%, 9.3%, 22.6% and 12.5%,respectively, all were significantly higher than that in control (1.9%). About 22% of the cell population treated with TC at 500 μmol/L for 24 h had detectable active caspase-3, and were higher than that in the control (1%). Immunocytochemical assay suggested that TC down-regulated Bcl

  2. Bile salt hydrolase of Bifidobacterium longum - Biochemical and genetic characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanaka, H; Hashiba, Honoo; Kok, Jan; Mierau, Igor

    2000-01-01

    A bile salt hydrolase (BSH) was isolated from Bifidobacterium longum SBT2928, purified, and characterized, Furthermore, we describe for the first time cloning and analysis of the gene encoding BSII (bsh) in a member of the genus Bifidobacterium. The enzyme has a native molecular weight of 125,000 to

  3. Differential expression of cholangiocyte and ileal bile acid transporters following bile acid supplementation and depletion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N. Sertac Kip; Konstantinos N. Lazaridis; Anatoliy I. Masyuk; Patrick L. Splinter; Robert C. Huebert; Nicholas F. LaRusso

    2004-01-01

    AIM: We have previously demonstrated that cholangiocytes,the epithelial cells lining intrahepatic bile ducts, encode two functional bile acid transporters via alternative splicing of a single gene to facilitate bile acid vectorial transport.Cholangiocytes possess ASBT, an apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter to take up bile acids, and t-ASBT, a basolateral alternatively spliced and truncated form of ASBT to efflux bile acids. Though hepatocyte and ileal bile acid transporters are in part regulated by the flux of bile acids,the effect of alterations in bile acid flux on the expression of t-ASBT in terminal ileocytes remains unclear. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that expression of ASBT and t-ASBT in cholangiocytes and ileocytes was regulated by bile acid flux. METHODS: Expression of ASBT and t-ASBT message and protein in cholangiocytes and ileocytes isolated from pairfed rats given control (C) and 1% taurocholate (TCA) or 5% cholestyramine (CY) enriched diets, were assessed by both quantitative RNase protection assays and quantitative immunoblotting. The data obtained from each of the control groups were pooled to reflect the changes observed following TCA and CY treatments with respect to the control diets.Cholangiocyte taurocholate uptake was determined using a novel microperfusion technique on intrahepatic bile duct units (IBDUs) derived from C, TCA and CY fed rats.RESULTS: In cholangiocytes, both ASBT and t-ASBT message RNA and protein were significantly decreased in response to TCA feeding compared to C diet. In contrast,message and protein of both bile acid transporters significantly increased following CY feeding compared to C diet. In the ileum, TCA feeding significantly up-regulated both ASBT and t-ASBT message and protein compared to C diet, while CY feeding significantly down-regulated message and protein of both bile acid transporters compared to C diet. As anticipated from alterations in cholangiocyte ASBT expression, the uptake of

  4. Hydroxycarboxylic acids and salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiely, Donald E; Hash, Kirk R; Kramer-Presta, Kylie; Smith, Tyler N

    2015-02-24

    Compositions which inhibit corrosion and alter the physical properties of concrete (admixtures) are prepared from salt mixtures of hydroxycarboxylic acids, carboxylic acids, and nitric acid. The salt mixtures are prepared by neutralizing acid product mixtures from the oxidation of polyols using nitric acid and oxygen as the oxidizing agents. Nitric acid is removed from the hydroxycarboxylic acids by evaporation and diffusion dialysis.

  5. Effects of encapsulation on the viability of potential probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum exposed to high acidity condition and presence of bile salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, W F; Nazaruddin, R; Tan, Y N; Ayob, M K

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated the survival of encapsulated potential probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum which isolated from fermented cocoa beans. κ-Carrageenan was used to encapsulate the probiotic. Encapsulation techniques such as emulsification, freeze-drying or extrusion were adopted to encapsulate the probiotic. Freeze-drying and extrusion methods showed higher (p < 0.05) efficiency (89.48 ± 3.21 and 92.26 ± 1.45%, respectively) in encapsulating the probiotic compared to the emulsification method (82.19 ± 0.71% efficiency). Freeze-dried encapsulated probiotic L. plantarum was selected for further survival analysis as greater amount of beads were produced compared to the extrusion method. Freeze-dried probiotic was found to have significantly (p < 0.05) higher tolerance to acid at pH 2 with higher survival percentage compared to non-encapsulated probiotic. However, freeze-drying encapsulation was proven not to enhance the resistance of the probiotic to bile salt as evidenced by the one log colony reduction as for the non-encapsulated probiotic. Further modification of freeze-drying encapsulation technique is needed to enhance the survival of the encapsulated potential probiotic L. plantarum toward bile salt in the future.

  6. Hepatic bile acids and bile acid-related gene expression in pregnant and lactating rats

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    Qiong N. Zhu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Significant physiological changes occur during pregnancy and lactation. Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP is a liver disease closely related to disruption of bile acid homeostasis. The objective of this study was to examine the regulation of bile acid synthesis and transport in normal pregnant and lactating rats.Materials and Methods. Livers from timed pregnant SD rats were collected on gestational days (GD 10, 14 and 19, and postnatal days (PND 1, 7, 14 and 21. Total bile acids were determined by the enzymatic method, total RNA was isolated and subjected to real time RT-PCR analysis. Liver protein was extracted for western-blot analysis.Results. Under physiological conditions hepatic bile acids were not elevated during pregnancy but increased during lactation in rats. Bile acid synthesis rate-limiting enzyme Cyp7a1 was unchanged on gestational days, but increased on PND14 and 21 at mRNA and protein levels. Expression of Cyp8b1, Cyp27a1 and Cyp7b1 was also higher during lactation. The mRNA levels of small heterodimer partner (SHP and protein levels of farnesoid X receptor (FXR were increased during pregnancy and lactation. Bile acid transporters Ntcp, Bsep, Mrp3 and Mrp4 were lower at gestation, but increased during lactation. Hepatic Oatp transporters were decreased during pregnancy and lactation.Conclusion. Hepatic bile acid homeostasis is maintained during normal pregnancy in rats, probably through the FXR-SHP regulation. The expression of bile acid synthesis genes and liver bile acid accumulation were increased during lactation, together with increased expression of bile acid efflux transporter Bsep, Mrp3 and Mrp4.

  7. Bile Acid Signaling in Liver Metabolism and Diseases

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    Tiangang Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndromes are increasingly recognized as health concerns worldwide. Overnutrition and insulin resistance are the major causes of diabetic hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia in humans. Studies in the past decade provide evidence that bile acids are not just biological detergents facilitating gut nutrient absorption, but also important metabolic regulators of glucose and lipid homeostasis. Pharmacological alteration of bile acid metabolism or bile acid signaling pathways such as using bile acid receptor agonists or bile acid binding resins may be a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of obesity and diabetes. On the other hand, bile acid signaling is complex, and the molecular mechanisms mediating the bile acid effects are still not completely understood. This paper will summarize recent advances in our understanding of bile acid signaling in regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism, and the potentials of developing novel therapeutic strategies that target bile acid metabolism for the treatment of metabolic disorders.

  8. Role of Bile Acids and Bile Acid Receptors in Metabolic Regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lefebvre, Philippe; Cariou, Bertrand; Lien, Fleur; Kuipers, Folkert; Staels, Bart

    2009-01-01

    Lefebvre P, Cariou B, Lien F, Kuipers F, Staels B. Role of Bile Acids and Bile Acid Receptors in Metabolic Regulation. Physiol Rev 89: 147-191,2009; doi: 10.1152/physrev.00010.2008. - The incidence of the metabolic syndrome has taken epidemic proportions in the past decades, contributing to an incre

  9. Metabolism of Cholesterol and Bile Acids by the Gut Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Gérard

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The human gastro-intestinal tract hosts a complex and diverse microbial community, whose collective genetic coding capacity vastly exceeds that of the human genome. As a consequence, the gut microbiota produces metabolites from a large range of molecules that host’s enzymes are not able to convert. Among these molecules, two main classes of steroids, cholesterol and bile acids, denote two different examples of bacterial metabolism in the gut. Therefore, cholesterol is mainly converted into coprostanol, a non absorbable sterol which is excreted in the feces. Moreover, this conversion occurs in a part of the human population only. Conversely, the primary bile acids (cholic and chenodeoxycholic acids are converted to over twenty different secondary bile acid metabolites by the gut microbiota. The main bile salt conversions, which appear in the gut of the whole human population, include deconjugation, oxidation and epimerization of hydroxyl groups at C3, C7 and C12, 7-dehydroxylation, esterification and desulfatation. If the metabolisms of cholesterol and bile acids by the gut microbiota are known for decades, their consequences on human health and disease are poorly understood and only start to be considered.

  10. Diversity of bile salts in fish and amphibians: evolution of a complex biochemical pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagey, Lee R; Møller, Peter R; Hofmann, Alan F; Krasowski, Matthew D

    2010-01-01

    Bile salts are the major end metabolites of cholesterol and are also important in lipid and protein digestion, as well as shaping of the gut microflora. Previous studies had demonstrated variation of bile salt structures across vertebrate species. We greatly extend prior surveys of bile salt variation in fish and amphibians, particularly in analysis of the biliary bile salts of Agnatha and Chondrichthyes. While there is significant structural variation of bile salts across all fish orders, bile salt profiles are generally stable within orders of fish and do not correlate with differences in diet. This large data set allowed us to infer evolutionary changes in the bile salt synthetic pathway. The hypothesized ancestral bile salt synthetic pathway, likely exemplified in extant hagfish, is simpler and much shorter than the pathway of most teleost fish and terrestrial vertebrates. Thus, the bile salt synthetic pathway has become longer and more complex throughout vertebrate evolution. Analysis of the evolution of bile salt synthetic pathways provides a rich model system for the molecular evolution of a complex biochemical pathway in vertebrates.

  11. Acidic bile salts modulate the squamous epithelial barrier function by modulating tight junction proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Oshima, Tadayuki; Tomita, Toshihiko; Fukui, Hirokazu; Watari, Jiro; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Miwa, Hiroto

    2011-08-01

    Experimental models for esophageal epithelium in vitro either suffer from poor differentiation or complicated culture systems. An air-liquid interface system with normal human bronchial epithelial cells can serve as a model of esophageal-like squamous epithelial cell layers. Here, we explore the influence of bile acids on barrier function and tight junction (TJ) proteins. The cells were treated with taurocholic acid (TCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), or deoxycholic acid (DCA) at different pH values, or with pepsin. Barrier function was measured by transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and the diffusion of paracellular tracers (permeability). The expression of TJ proteins, including claudin-1 and claudin-4, was examined by Western blotting of 1% Nonidet P-40-soluble and -insoluble fractions. TCA and GCA dose-dependently decreased TEER and increased paracellular permeability at pH 3 after 1 h. TCA (4 mM) or GCA (4 mM) did not change TEER and permeability at pH 7.4 or pH 4. The combination of TCA and GCA at pH 3 significantly decreased TEER and increased permeability at lower concentrations (2 mM). Pepsin (4 mg/ml, pH 3) did not have any effect on barrier function. DCA significantly decreased the TEER and increased permeability at pH 6, a weakly acidic condition. TCA (4 mM) and GCA (4 mM) significantly decreased the insoluble fractions of claudin-1 and claudin-4 at pH 3. In conclusion, acidic bile salts disrupted the squamous epithelial barrier function partly by modulating the amounts of claudin-1 and claudin-4. These results provide new insights for understanding the role of TJ proteins in esophagitis.

  12. Solubilization and Interaction Studies of Bile Salts with Surfactants and Drugs: a Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Nisar Ahmad

    2016-05-01

    In this review, bile salt, bile salt-surfactant, and bile salt-drug interactions and their solubilization studies are mainly focused. Usefulness of bile salts in digestion, absorption, and excretion of various compounds and their rare properties in ordering the shape and size of the micelles owing to the presence of hydrophobic and hydrophilic faces are taken into consideration while compiling this review. Bile salts as potential bio-surfactants to solubilize drugs of interest are also highlighted. This review will give an insight into the selection of drugs in different applications as their properties get modified by interaction with bile salts, thus influencing their solution behavior which, in turn, modifies the phase-forming behavior, microemulsion, and clouding phenomenon, besides solubilization. Finally, their future perspectives are taken into consideration to assess their possible uses as bio-surfactants without side effects to human beings.

  13. The gut microbiome, probiotics, bile acids axis, and human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Mitchell Lawrence; Tomaro-Duchesneau, Catherine; Prakash, Satya

    2014-06-01

    The human gut microbiome produces potent ligands to bile acid receptors, and probiotics could act as therapeutics of bile acid dysmetabolism. A recent study in Cell Reports demonstrates that probiotic VSL#3 affects bile acid deconjugation and excretion, as well as the gut-liver FXR-FGF15 axis.

  14. Molecular cloning, characterization and heterologous expression of bile salt hydrolase (Bsh) from Lactobacillus fermentum NCDO394.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Rajkumar, Hemalatha; Kumar, Manoj; Varikuti, Sudarshan Reddy; Athimamula, Ramakrishna; Shujauddin, Mohd; Ramagoni, Ramesh; Kondapalli, Narendrababu

    2013-08-01

    Bile salt hydrolase (Bsh) active probiotic strains hydrolyze bile acid amino conjugates in vivo, which triggers cholesterol consumption in liver to synthesize new bile leading to consequential cholesterol lowering. Hence, bile salt hydrolyzing potential was the criterion to select L. fermentum NCDO394 for this study and its gene encoding Bsh was identified and cloned. The resulting nucleotide sequence of bsh gene contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 978 nucleotides encoding a predicted protein of 325 amino acids with a theoretical pI of 6.39. Moreover, deduced Bsh protein had high similarity with the Bshs of L. fermentum only and also exhibited significant similarity to the Pencillin V amidases of other Lactobacillus spp. Five catalytically important amino acids were highly conserved in L. fermentum Bsh while four amino acid motifs around these active sites, were not as consistent as in other Bsh proteins. Furthermore, L. fermentum bsh gene was sub-cloned into pET-28b(+) vector, and its expression was induced with 0.05 mM isopropylthiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The recombinant Bsh (rBsh) was purified with homogeneity using Ni+2-NTA column and characterized for substrate specificity, pH and temperature. The rBsh hydrolyzed six major human bile salts with a slight preference towards glycine-conjugated bile salts. The optimum pH of rBsh was six, and its enzymatic activity declined below pH 5 and above pH 7. The enzyme was stable and functional even at 65 °C while showed its maximum activity at 37 °C. In conclusion, L. fermentum NCDO394 may be a promising candidate probiotic which may affect cholesterol metabolism in vivo.

  15. EVALUASI IN VITRO TERHADAP KEMAMPUAN ISOLAT BAKTERI ASAM LAKTAT ASAL AIR SUSU IBU UNTUK MENGASIMILASI KOLESTEROL DAN MENDEKONJUGASI GARAM EMPEDU [In Vitro Evaluation of Cholesterol Assimilation and Bile Salt Deconjugation by Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Breast Milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilis Nuraida1,2*

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Hypercholesterolemia is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death in many countries. Several studies have shown that reduction of excessive levels of cholesterol in the blood decreases the risk of cardiovascular disease. It is therefore important to develop ways of reducing serum cholesterol. Based on in vitro and in vivo studies, some of lactic acid bacteria (LAB having potential probiotic properties can reduce total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of LAB isolated from breast milk in reducing cholesterol by assimilation and by bile salt deconjugation activity in vitro.Thirteen strains of LABs were evaluated for their acid and bile salt resistance and selected to test their ability to assimilate cholesterol and to deconjugate bile salt (natrium taurocholate in vitro. Cholesterol assimilation activity was determined by measuring the difference between the remaining cholesterol in broth medium inoculated with LAB with cholesterol in control after incubation. Bile salt deconjugation activity was determined by measuring free cholic acid released in broth medium after incubation with LAB. The results shows that most of the isolates was susceptible to low pH and all isolates used were able to survive in the presence of 0.5% bile salt. The LAB were also able to assimilate cholesterol at varying levels ranging from 0.86-14.97 µg/ml, with the highest activity showed by Pediococcus pentosaceus 1-A38, Pediococcus pentosaceus 2-B2 and Pediococcus pentosaceus 2-A16. Taurocholate deconjugation assay showed that the isolates have weak bile salts deconjugation activity as indicated by free cholic acid released ranging from 0.06-0.25 µmol/ml, with the highest release in Pediococcus pentosaceus 1-A38 and Pediococcus pentosaceus 1-A22. The present study suggest that Pediococcus pentosaceus 1-A38 was potential for the development of probiotic products with

  16. Bile acids: Chemistry, physiology, and pathophysiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria J Monte; Jose JG Marin; Alvaro Antelo; Jose Vazquez-Tato

    2009-01-01

    The family of bile acids includes a group of molecular species of acidic steroids with very peculiar physicalchemical and biological characteristics. They are synthesized by the liver from cholesterol through several complementary pathways that are controlled by mechanisms involving fine-tuning by the levels of certain bile acid species. Although their bestknown role is their participation in the digestion and absorption of fat, they also play an important role in several other physiological processes. Thus, genetic abnormalities accounting for alterations in their synthesis, biotransformation and/or transport may result in severe alterations, even leading to lethal situations for which the sole therapeutic option may be liver transplantation. Moreover, the increased levels of bile acids reached during cholestatic liver diseases are known to induce oxidative stress and apoptosis, resulting in damage to the liver parenchyma and, ventually, extrahepatic tissues. When this occurs during pregnancy, the outcome of gestation may be challenged. In contrast, the physical-chemical and biological properties of these compounds have been used as the bases for the development of drugs and as pharmaceutical tools for the delivery of active agents.

  17. Herbert Falk: a vital force in the renaissance of bile acid research and bile acid therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Alan F

    2011-01-01

    Herbert Falk died on August 8, 2008, after a long illness. It was his vision that initiated the Bile Acid Meetings and brought to market chenodeoxycholic acid and ursodeoxycholic acid for the dissolution of cholesterol gallstones as well as the successful treatment of cholestatic liver disease. The 1st Bile Acid Meeting was a small workshop held at the University Hospital of Freiburg in 1970. Great interest in the topic was evident at that small meeting and led to a larger meeting in 1972, whose scope included both the basic and clinical aspects of bile acids. These meetings have continued at biennial intervals, the 2010 meeting being the 21st. The program has always included discussions of the most fundamental aspects of bile acid biosynthesis and metabolism as well as clinical applications of bile acid therapy. The meetings featured brief presentations, ample time for discussion, and imaginative social programs. They have always been flawlessly organized. Social programs usually included a hike through the beautiful countryside of the Black Forest followed by dinner in a rustic restaurant. Herbert Falk took part in these programs, personally welcoming every participant. In the warm glow of the 'Badische' hospitality, friendships developed, and scientific collaborations were often arranged. From a scientific standpoint, there has been enormous progress in understanding the chemistry and biology of bile acids. Herbert Falk established the Windaus Prize in 1978, and the prize has been given to individuals whose contributions moved the field forward. These bile acid meetings have been marvelous, rewarding experiences. We must all be grateful to Herbert Falk's vision in establishing the Falk Foundation that has so generously sponsored these meetings. We also express our gratitude to his widow, Ursula Falk, who continues this worthy tradition.

  18. Bile acid sequestrants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Sonne, David P; Knop, Filip K

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized in the liver from cholesterol and have traditionally been recognized for their role in absorption of lipids and in cholesterol homeostasis. In recent years, however, bile acids have emerged as metabolic signaling molecules that are involved in the regulation of lipid...... and glucose metabolism, and possibly energy homeostasis, through activation of the bile acid receptors farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and TGR5. Bile acid sequestrants (BASs) constitute a class of drugs that bind bile acids in the intestine to form a nonabsorbable complex resulting in interruption...... of the enterohepatic circulation. This increases bile acid synthesis and consequently reduces serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Also, BASs improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Despite a growing understanding of the impact of BASs on glucose metabolism, the mechanisms behind their glucose...

  19. Bile acid signaling in metabolic disease and drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tiangang; Chiang, John Y L

    2014-10-01

    Bile acids are the end products of cholesterol catabolism. Hepatic bile acid synthesis accounts for a major fraction of daily cholesterol turnover in humans. Biliary secretion of bile acids generates bile flow and facilitates hepatobiliary secretion of lipids, lipophilic metabolites, and xenobiotics. In the intestine, bile acids are essential for the absorption, transport, and metabolism of dietary fats and lipid-soluble vitamins. Extensive research in the last 2 decades has unveiled new functions of bile acids as signaling molecules and metabolic integrators. The bile acid-activated nuclear receptors farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, vitamin D receptor, and G protein-coupled bile acid receptor play critical roles in the regulation of lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism, inflammation, and drug metabolism and detoxification. Bile acid synthesis exhibits a strong diurnal rhythm, which is entrained by fasting and refeeding as well as nutrient status and plays an important role for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Recent research revealed an interaction of liver bile acids and gut microbiota in the regulation of liver metabolism. Circadian disturbance and altered gut microbiota contribute to the pathogenesis of liver diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes, and obesity. Bile acids and their derivatives are potential therapeutic agents for treating metabolic diseases of the liver.

  20. Self-assembly of micelles in organic solutions of lecithin and bile salt: Mesoscale computer simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markina, A.; Ivanov, V.; Komarov, P.; Khokhlov, A.; Tung, S.-H.

    2016-11-01

    We propose a coarse-grained model for studying the effects of adding bile salt to lecithin organosols by means of computer simulation. This model allows us to reveal the mechanisms of experimentally observed increasing of viscosity upon increasing the bile salt concentration. We show that increasing the bile salt to lecithin molar ratio induces the growth of elongated micelles of ellipsoidal and cylindrical shape due to incorporation of disklike bile salt molecules. These wormlike micelles can entangle into transient network displaying perceptible viscoelastic properties.

  1. Review article: the function and regulation of proteins involved in bile salt biosynthesis and transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pellicoro, Antonella; Faber, Klaas Nico

    2007-01-01

    Background Bile salts are produced and secreted by the liver and are required for intestinal absorption of fatty food components and excretion of endobiotics and xenobiotics. They are reabsorbed in the terminal ileum and transported back to the liver via the portal tract. Dedicated bile salt transpo

  2. Inhibition of bile salt transport by drugs associated with liver injury in primary hepatocytes from human, monkey, dog, rat, and mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; He, Kan; Cai, Lining; Chen, Yu-Chuan; Yang, Yifan; Shi, Qin; Woolf, Thomas F; Ge, Weigong; Guo, Lei; Borlak, Jürgen; Tong, Weida

    2016-08-05

    Interference of bile salt transport is one of the underlying mechanisms for drug-induced liver injury (DILI). We developed a novel bile salt transport activity assay involving in situ biosynthesis of bile salts from their precursors in primary human, monkey, dog, rat, and mouse hepatocytes in suspension as well as LC-MS/MS determination of extracellular bile salts transported out of hepatocytes. Glycine- and taurine-conjugated bile acids were rapidly formed in hepatocytes and effectively transported into the extracellular medium. The bile salt formation and transport activities were time‒ and bile-acid-concentration‒dependent in primary human hepatocytes. The transport activity was inhibited by the bile salt export pump (BSEP) inhibitors ketoconazole, saquinavir, cyclosporine, and troglitazone. The assay was used to test 86 drugs for their potential to inhibit bile salt transport activity in human hepatocytes, which included 35 drugs associated with severe DILI (sDILI) and 51 with non-severe DILI (non-sDILI). Approximately 60% of the sDILI drugs showed potent inhibition (with IC50 values drugs showed this strength of inhibition in primary human hepatocytes and these drugs are associated only with cholestatic and mixed hepatocellular cholestatic (mixed) injuries. The sDILI drugs, which did not show substantial inhibition of bile salt transport activity, are likely to be associated with immune-mediated liver injury. Twenty-four drugs were also tested in monkey, dog, rat and mouse hepatocytes. Species differences in potency were observed with mouse being less sensitive than other species to inhibition of bile salt transport. In summary, a novel assay has been developed using hepatocytes in suspension from human and animal species that can be used to assess the potential for drugs and/or drug-derived metabolites to inhibit bile salt transport and/or formation activity. Drugs causing sDILI, except those by immune-mediated mechanism, are highly associated with potent

  3. A Role of the Bile Salt Receptor FXR in Atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, Jurre; Herrema, Hilde; Groen, Albert K.; Kuipers, Folkert

    2010-01-01

    This study reviews current insights into the role of bile salts and bile salt receptors on the progression and regression of atherosclerosis. Bile salts have emerged as important modifiers of lipid and energy metabolism. At the molecular level, bile salts regulate lipid and energy homeostasis mainly

  4. Effects of bile salts on percolation and size of AOT reversed micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Erford, Karen; Kiserow, Douglas J; McGown, Linda B

    2003-06-15

    The effects of two trihydroxy bile salts, sodium taurocholate (NaTC) and 3-[(3-cholamidylpropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propane sulfonate (CHAPS), on the size, shape and percolation temperature of reversed micelles formed by sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT) in isooctane were studied. The percolation temperature of the reversed micelles decreased upon inclusion of bile salts, indicating increased water uptake. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements showed consistent enlargement of reversed micelles upon addition of the bile salts; the hydrodynamic radius increased sixfold in the presence of 10 mM CHAPS and doubled in the presence of 5 mM NaTC. Inclusion of the enzyme yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) increased the percolation temperature and distorted the spherical structure of the AOT reversed micelles. The spherical structure was restored upon addition of bile salt. These results may help to explain the increase in activity of YADH in AOT reversed micelles upon addition of bile salts.

  5. Bile salt hydrolase in Lactobacillus plantarum: functional analysis and delivery to the intestinal tract of the host

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambert, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    In the liver of mammals, bile salts are synthesised from cholesterol and conjugated to either taurine or glycine. Following release into the intestine, conjugated bile salts can be deconjugated by members of the endogenous microbiota that produce an enzyme called bile salt hydrolase (Bsh). Bsh appea

  6. Potency of individual bile acids to regulate bile acid synthesis and transport genes in primary human hepatocyte cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Lu, Hong; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Lei, Xiaohong; Cui, Julia Yue; Ellis, Ewa; Strom, Stephen C; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2014-10-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are known to regulate their own homeostasis, but the potency of individual bile acids is not known. This study examined the effects of cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) on expression of BA synthesis and transport genes in human primary hepatocyte cultures. Hepatocytes were treated with the individual BAs at 10, 30, and 100μM for 48 h, and RNA was extracted for real-time PCR analysis. For the classic pathway of BA synthesis, BAs except for UDCA markedly suppressed CYP7A1 (70-95%), the rate-limiting enzyme of bile acid synthesis, but only moderately (35%) down-regulated CYP8B1 at a high concentration of 100μM. BAs had minimal effects on mRNA of two enzymes of the alternative pathway of BA synthesis, namely CYP27A1 and CYP7B1. BAs increased the two major target genes of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), namely the small heterodimer partner (SHP) by fourfold, and markedly induced fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) over 100-fold. The BA uptake transporter Na(+)-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide was unaffected, whereas the efflux transporter bile salt export pump was increased 15-fold and OSTα/β were increased 10-100-fold by BAs. The expression of the organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B3 (OATP1B3; sixfold), ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter G5 (ABCG5; sixfold), multidrug associated protein-2 (MRP2; twofold), and MRP3 (threefold) were also increased, albeit to lesser degrees. In general, CDCA was the most potent and effective BA in regulating these genes important for BA homeostasis, whereas DCA and CA were intermediate, LCA the least, and UDCA ineffective.

  7. Effect of perfusion of bile salts solutions into the oesophagus of hiatal hernia patients and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachir, G S; Collis, J L

    1976-01-01

    Tests of the response to perfusion of the oesophagus were made in 54 patients divided into three groups. Group I consisted of patients with symptomatic hiatal hernia, group II hiatal hernia patients with peptic stricture, and group III normal individuals. Each individual oesophagus was perfused at a rate of 45-65 drops per minute over 25 minutes with six solutions: normal saline, N/10 HCl, taurine conjugates of bile salts in normal saline, taurine conjugates of bile salts in N/10 HCl, glycine conjugates of bile salts in normal saline, and taurine and glycine conjugates in a ratio of 1 to 2 in normal saline. It was found that acidified taurine solutions were more irritating than acid alone. With a 2mM/l solution of taurine in acid, symptoms are produced even in controls. With a 1 mM/l solution of the same conjugates, the majority of normal people feel slight heartburn or nothing, and therefore perfusion into the oesophagus of such a solution could be used as a test for oesophagitis. PMID:941112

  8. Effects of bile acid administration on bile acid synthesis and its circadian rhythm in man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pooler, P.A.; Duane, W.C.

    1988-09-01

    In man bile acid synthesis has a distinct circadian rhythm but the relationship of this rhythm to feedback inhibition by bile acid is unknown. We measured bile acid synthesis as release of 14CO2 from (26-14C)cholesterol every 2 hr in three normal volunteers during five separate 24-hr periods. Data were fitted by computer to a cosine curve to estimate amplitude and acrophase of the circadian rhythm. In an additional six volunteers, we measured synthesis every 2 hr from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. only. During the control period, amplitude (expressed as percentage of mean synthesis) averaged 52% and acrophase averaged 6:49 a.m. During administration of ursodeoxycholic acid (15 mg per kg per day), synthesis averaged 126% of baseline (p less than 0.1), amplitude averaged 43% and acrophase averaged 6:20 a.m. During administration of chenodeoxycholic acid (15 mg per kg per day), synthesis averaged 43% of baseline (p less than 0.001), amplitude averaged 53% and acrophase averaged 9:04 a.m. Addition of prednisone to this regimen of chenodeoxycholic acid to eliminate release of 14CO2 from corticosteroid hormone synthesis resulted in a mean amplitude of 62% and a mean acrophase of 6:50 a.m., values very similar to those in the baseline period. Administration of prednisone alone also did not significantly alter the baseline amplitude (40%) or acrophase (6:28 a.m.). We conclude that neither chenodeoxycholic acid nor ursodeoxycholic acid significantly alters the circadian rhythm of bile acid synthesis in man.

  9. Bile acid sequestrants and the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staels, Bart; Kuipers, Folkert

    2007-01-01

    Bile acids promote bile formation and facilitate dietary lipid absorption. Animal and human studies showing disturbed bile acid metabolism in diabetes mellitus suggest a link between bile acids and glucose control. Bile acids are activating ligands of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a nuclear recept

  10. Intestinal bile acid physiology and pathophysiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Olga Mart(I)nez-Augustin; Ferm(I)n Sánchez de Medina

    2008-01-01

    Bile acids (Bas) have a long established role in fat digestion in the intestine by acting as tensioactives,due to their amphipatic characteristics.Bas are reabsorbed very efficiently by the intestinal epithelium and recycled back to the liver v/a transport mechanisms that have been largely elucidated.The transport and synthesis of Bas are tightly regulated in part by specific plasma membrane receptors and nuclear receptors.In addition to their primary effect,Bas have been claimed to play a role in gastrointestinal cancer,intestinal inflammation and intestinal ionic transport.Bas are not equivalent in any of these biological activities,and structural requirements have been generally identified.In particular,some Bas may be useful for cancer chemoprevention and perhaps in inflammatory bowel disease,although further research is necessary in this field.This review covers the most recent developments in these aspects of BA intestinal biology.

  11. Isolation, Identification and Partial Characterization of a Lactobacillus casei Strain with Bile Salt Hydrolase Activity from Pulque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Vázquez, R; Azaola-Espinosa, A; Mayorga-Reyes, L; Reyes-Nava, L A; Shah, N P; Rivera-Espinoza, Y

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to isolate, from pulque, Lactobacillus spp. capable of survival in simulated gastrointestinal stress conditions. Nine Gram-positive rods were isolated; however, only one strain (J57) shared identity with Lactobacillus and was registered as Lactobacillus casei J57 (GenBank accession: JN182264). The other strains were identified as Bacillus spp. The most significant observation during the test of tolerance to simulated gastrointestinal conditions (acidity, gastric juice and bile salts) was that L. casei J57 showed a rapid decrease (p ≤ 0.05) in the viable population at 0 h. Bile salts were the stress condition that most affected its survival, from which deoxycholic acid and the mix of bile salts (oxgall) were the most toxic. L. casei J57 showed bile salt hydrolase activity over primary and secondary bile salts as follows: 44.91, 671.72, 45.27 and 61.57 U/mg to glycocholate, taurocholate, glycodeoxycholate and taurodeoxycholate. In contrast, the control strain (L. casei Shirota) only showed activity over tauroconjugates. These results suggest that L. casei J57 shows potential for probiotic applications.

  12. Purification and Characterization of Conjugated Bile Salt Hydrolase from Bifidobacterium longum BB536.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, J; Schneider, F; Crociani, J; Ballongue, J

    1995-07-01

    Bifidobacterium species deconjugate taurocholic, taurodeoxycholic, taurochenodeoxycholic, glycocholic, glycodeoxycholic, and glycochenodeoxycholic acids. The enzyme level increases in the growth phase. No increase in activity is observed for the cytoplasmic enzyme after addition of conjugated bile acids to a stationary-phase culture. Conjugated bile salt hydrolase (BSH) was purified from Bifidobacterium longum BB536. Its apparent molecular mass in denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was ca. 40,000 Da. The intact enzyme had a relative molecular weight of ca. 250,000 as determined by gel filtration chromatography, suggesting that the native BSH of B. longum is probably a hexamer. The purified enzyme is active towards both glycine and taurine conjugates of cholate, deoxycholate, and chenodeoxycholate. The pH optimum is in the range of 5.5 to 6.5. A loss of BSH activity is observed after incubation at temperatures higher than 42(deg)C; at 60(deg)C, 50% of the BSH activity is lost. The importance of free sulfhydryl groups at the enzyme active center is suggested. For B. longum BB536, no significant difference in the initial rate of deconjugation and enzymatic efficiency appears between bile salts. The enzymatic efficiency is higher for B. longum BB536 than for other genera. In this paper, a new method which permits a display of BSH activity directly on polyacrylamide gels is described; this method confirms the molecular weight obtained for B. longum BB536 BSH.

  13. Functional analysis of four bile salt hydrolase and penicillin acylase family members in Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambert, J.M.; Bongers, R.S.; Vos, de W.M.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2008-01-01

    Bile salts play an important role in the digestion of lipids in vertebrates and are synthesized and conjugated to either glycine or taurine in the liver. Following secretion of bile salts into the small intestine, intestinal microbes are capable of deconjugating the glycine or taurine from the bile

  14. NMR characterization of the interaction of the Salmonella type III secretion system protein SipD and bile salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Nordhues, Bryce A; Zhong, Dalian; De Guzman, Roberto N

    2010-05-18

    Salmonella and Shigella bacteria require the type III secretion system (T3SS) to inject virulence proteins into their hosts and initiate infections. The tip proteins SipD and IpaD are critical components of the Salmonella and Shigella T3SS, respectively. Recently, SipD and IpaD have been shown to interact with bile salts, which are enriched in the intestines, and are hypothesized to act as environmental sensors for these enteric pathogens. Bile salts activate the Shigella T3SS but repress the Salmonella T3SS, and the mechanism of this differing response to bile salts is poorly understood. Further, how SipD binds to bile salts is currently unknown. Computer modeling predicted that IpaD binds the bile salt deoxycholate in a cleft formed by the N-terminal domain and the long central coiled coil of IpaD. Here, we used NMR methods to determine which SipD residues are affected by the interaction with the bile salts deoxycholate, chenodeoxycholate, and taurodeoxcholate. The bile salts perturbed nearly the same set of SipD residues; however, the largest chemical shift perturbations occurred away from what was predicted for the bile salt binding site in IpaD. Our NMR results indicate that that bile salt interaction of SipD will be different from what was predicted for IpaD, suggesting a possible mechanism for the differing response of Salmonella and Shigella to bile salts.

  15. Bile acid interactions with cholangiocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuefeng Xia; Heather Francis; Shannon Glaser; Gianfranco Alpini; Gene LeSage

    2006-01-01

    Cholangiocytes are exposed to high concentrations of bile acids at their apical membrane. A selective transporter for bile acids, the Apical Sodium Bile Acid Cotransporter (ASBT) (also referred to as Ibat; gene name Slc10a2)is localized on the cholangiocyte apical membrane. On the basolateral membrane, four transport systems have been identified (t-ASBT, multidrug resistance (MDR)3,an unidentified anion exchanger system and organic solute transporter (Ost) heteromeric transporter, OstαOstβ. Together, these transporters unidirectionally move bile acids from ductal bile to the circulation. Bile acids absorbed by cholangiocytes recycle via the peribiliaryplexus back to hepatocytes for re-secretion into bile.This recycling of bile acids between hepatocytes and cholangiocytes is referred to as the cholehepatic shunt pathway. Recent studies suggest that the cholehepatic shunt pathway may contribute in overall hepatobiliary transport of bile acids and to the adaptation to chronic cholestasis due to extrahepatic obstruction. ASBT is acutely regulated by an adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent translocation to the apical membrane and by phosphorylation-dependent ubiquitination and proteasome degradation. ASBT is chronically regulated by changes in gene expression in response to biliary bile acid concentration and inflammatory cytokines.Another potential function of cholangiocyte ASBT is to allow cholangiocytes to sample biliary bile acids in order to activate intracellular signaling pathways. Bile acids trigger changes in intracellular calcium, protein kinase C (PKC), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), mitogenactivated protein (MAP) kinase and extracellular signalregulated protein kinase (ERK) intracellular signals.Bile acids significantly alter cholangiocyte secretion,proliferation and survival. Different bile acids have differential effects on cholangiocyte intracellular signals,and in some instances trigger opposing effects on cholangiocyte secretion

  16. Supramolecular Complexes Formed in Systems Bile Salt-Bilirubin-Silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasova, N. N.; Severinovskaya, O. V.; Golovkova, L. P.

    The formation of supramolecular complexes between bilirubin and primary micelles of bile salts has been studied. The association constants of bile salts and binding of bilirubin with these associates have been determined. The adsorption of bilirubin and bile salts from individual and mixed aqueous solutions onto hydrophobic silica surfaces has been investigated. The interaction of bilirubin with primary bile salt micelles and the strong retention in mixed micelles, which are supramolecular complexes, result in the adsorption of bilirubin in free state only.

  17. Ursodeoxycholic acid in the Ursidae: biliary bile acids of bears, pandas, and related carnivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagey, L R; Crombie, D L; Espinosa, E; Carey, M C; Igimi, H; Hofmann, A F

    1993-11-01

    The biliary bile acid composition of gallbladder bile obtained from six species of bears (Ursidae), the Giant panda, the Red panda, and 11 related carnivores were determined by reversed phase liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Bile acids were conjugated solely with taurine (in N-acyl linkage) in all species. Ursodeoxycholic acid (3 alpha, 7 beta-dihydroxy-5 beta-cholan-24-oic acid) was present in all Ursidae, averaging 1-39% of biliary bile acids depending on the species; it was not detected or present as a trace constituent (bears, and its proportion averaged 34% (range 0-62%). Ursodeoxycholic acid averaged 17% of biliary bile acids in the Polar bear (n = 4) and 18% in the Brown bear (n = 6). Lower proportions (1-8%) were present in the Sun bear (n = 2), Ceylon Sloth bear (n = 1), and the Spectacled bear (n = 1). Bile of all species contained taurine-conjugated chenodeoxycholic acid and cholic acid. In some related carnivores, deoxycholic acid, the 7-dehydroxylation product of cholic acid, was also present. To determine whether the 7 beta hydroxy group of ursodeoxycholic acid was formed by hepatic or bacterial enzymes, bile acids were determined in hepatic bile obtained from bears with chronic biliary fistulae. Fistula bile samples contained ursodeoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid, and a trace amount of cholic acid, all as taurine conjugates, indicating that ursodeoxycholic acid is a primary bile acid formed in the liver in Ursidae.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Liver Receptor Homolog-1 Is Critical for Adequate Up-regulation of Cyp7a1 Gene Transcription and Bile Salt Synthesis During Bile Salt Sequestration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Out, Carolien; Hageman, Jurre; Bloks, Vincent W.; Gerrits, Han; Gelpke, Maarten D. Sollewijn; Bos, Trijnie; Havinga, Rick; Smit, Martin J.; Kuipers, Folkert; Groen, Albert K.

    2011-01-01

    Liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1) is a nuclear receptor that controls a variety of metabolic pathways. In cultured cells, LRH-1 induces the expression of CYP7A1 and CYP8B1, key enzymes in bile salt synthesis. However, hepatic Cyp7a1 mRNA levels were not reduced upon hepatocyte-specific Lrh-1 deletion

  19. Thermodynamics of the interaction of γ-cyclodextrin and tauro- and glyco-conjugated bile salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schönbeck, Jens Christian Sidney; Westh, Peter; Holm, René;

    2013-01-01

    The structural differences in the interaction between natural γ-cyclodextrin and bile salts common in rat, dog and man was were investigated by 1H-ROESY and 13C NMR and molecular modeling and the thermodynamic parameters of the reaction by isothermal titration calorimetry. The γ-cyclodextrin was ......The structural differences in the interaction between natural γ-cyclodextrin and bile salts common in rat, dog and man was were investigated by 1H-ROESY and 13C NMR and molecular modeling and the thermodynamic parameters of the reaction by isothermal titration calorimetry. The γ...

  20. Urinary excretion of bile acid glucosides and glucuronides in extrahepatic cholestasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wietholtz, H; Marschall, H U; Reuschenbach, R; Matern, H; Matern, S

    1991-04-01

    Recently the formation of bile acid glucosides has been described as a novel conjugation mechanism in vitro and in vivo. In 10 patients with extrahepatic cholestasis caused by carcinoma of the head of the pancreas we investigated excretion rates and profiles of urinary bile acid glucosides. Urinary bile acid glucosides and, for comparison, bile acid glucuronides were extracted and characterized according to established methods. In controls total urinary bile acid glucoside excretion was 0.22 +/- 0.03 mumol/24 hr (mean +/- S.E.M.)-in the range of bile acid glucuronide excretion (0.41 +/- 0.06 mumol/24 hr; mean +/- S.E.M.). A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-characterized trihydroxy bile acid glucoside of still-unknown hydroxyl positions accounted for 65% of total urinary bile acid glucosides. In extrahepatic cholestasis total urinary bile acid glucoside excretion was 0.52 +/- 0.13 mumol/24 hr (mean +/- SEM), yet significantly lower than bile acid glucuronide excretion (1.53 +/- 0.13 mumol/24 hr; mean +/- SEM; p less than 0.001). In cholestasis the primary bile acid derivatives cholic and chenodeoxycholic acid glucosides amounted to 90%, whereas the trihydroxy bile acid glucoside had decreased to 5% of total bile acid glucoside excretion, indicating its alteration during enterohepatic circulation. The data establish the composition and quantity of urinary bile acid glucosides in healthy controls and cholestasis and constitute a quantitative comparison with another glycosidic conjugation reaction, bile acid glucuronidation.

  1. Investigation of antibacterial, acid and bile tolerance properties of lactobacilli isolated from Koozeh cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Hassanzadazar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus strains are a major part of the probiotics, microflora of the intestine and of fermented dairy products, and are found in a variety of environments. The aim of this study was to find out the ability of bile and acid tolerance and antibacterial properties of the twenty eight isolates of three group lactobacilli namely Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus delbruki. For this purpose Twenty eight different Lactobacillus strains that isolated from Koozeh cheese as a traditional cheese were screened. The acid tolerance test was studied under pH 2.0 and 3.0 with 7.5 as control. The cell count for the acid tolerance test was obtained at an interval of 0, 1, 2 and 3 hours respectively and was pour plated on Man, Rogosa, and Sharpe (MRS agar to be incubated at 37 °C for 24 hours. All cells were selected for bile tolerance test in MRS broth containing bile concentrations of 0% as control and 0.3% as test. Then cell counts were enumerated after 24 hours of incubation on MRS agar. Results showed twenty seven isolates did not have ability to tolerate acid and bile salts and antimicrobial activity against four indicator bacteria included Eshirichia coli, Listeria monocytogenesis, bacillus cereus, Salmonella entritidis. Only one Isolate namely Lactobacillus casei could tolerate acid and bile salt and had antibacterial activity against of L. monocytogenesis. Therefore we can consider this strain as a native probiotic but extra examinations was required.

  2. Thermodynamics of complexes between nucleobase-modified {beta}-cyclodextrins and bile salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Yu [Department of Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Elemento-Organic Chemistry, Nankai University, 300071 Tianjin (China)], E-mail: yuliu@nankai.edu.cn; Zhang Qian; Guo Dongsheng; Zhuang Ruijie; Wang Lihua [Department of Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Elemento-Organic Chemistry, Nankai University, 300071 Tianjin (China)

    2008-04-10

    The binding of three nucleobase-modified {beta}-CDs, (i.e., mono(6-ade-6-deoxy)-{beta}-CD 2, mono(6-thy-6-deoxy)-{beta}-CD 3, and mono(6-ura-6-deoxy)-{beta}-CD 4) with four bile salts (deoxycholate, DCA; cholate, CA; glycocholate, GCA; and taurocholate, TCA) were investigated by means of circular dichroism, 2D NMR spectroscopy and calorimetric titration. The results show the binding of host 2 with bile salts is weaker and different from hosts 3 and 4. Enthalpy changes between hosts 2-4 and bile salts are much more favorable than those of native {beta}-CD 1, whereas the entropy changes are unfavorable.

  3. Determination of conjugated bile acids in human bile and duodenal fluid by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, C A; Watkins, J B

    1978-05-01

    A simple mehtod using reverse-phase liquid chromatography is presented for resolution and quantitation of the major conjugated bile acids of man, including the glycine and taurine conjugates of the dihydroxy bile acids, chenodeoxycholic and deoxycholic acid. Using modern, high-performance chromatographic equipment, analysis time is less than 30 minutes. The quantitative range of the method, with detection by refractive index, is 0.05 to 0.1 mumol of bile acid and the limit of detection for an injection sample is 0.01 mumol. This provides a sensitivity sufficient for analysis of dilute duodenal and gallbladder bile with minimal sample preparation.

  4. Hepatic Farnesoid X-Receptor Isoforms α2 and α4 Differentially Modulate Bile Salt and Lipoprotein Metabolism in Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesjes, Marije; Bloks, Vincent W.; Hageman, Jurre; Bos, Trijnie; van Dijk, Theo H.; Havinga, Rick; Wolters, Henk; Jonker, Johan W.; Kuipers, Folkert; Groen, Albert K.

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear receptor FXR acts as an intracellular bile salt sensor that regulates synthesis and transport of bile salts within their enterohepatic circulation. In addition, FXR is involved in control of a variety of crucial metabolic pathways. Four FXR splice variants are known, i.e. FXR alpha 1-4.

  5. A study of salt effects on the complexation between beta-cyclodextrins and bile salts based on the Hofmeister series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Rene; Schonbeck, Christian; Somprasirt, Pitchayanun;

    2014-01-01

    bound drug molecules. The influence of Hofmeister ions on the binding constants of complexes between CDs (β-CD and hydroxypropylated β-CD) and bile salts (glycocholate and glycochenodeoxycholate) were examined by isothermal titration calorimetry. The chaotropic anions tended to weaken these inclusion...

  6. A new insight into the physiological role of bile salt hydrolase among intestinal bacteria from the genus Bifidobacterium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Jarocki

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the occurrence of bile salt hydrolase in fourteen strains belonging to the genus Bifidobacterium. Deconjugation activity was detected using a plate test, two-step enzymatic reaction and activity staining on a native polyacrylamide gel. Subsequently, bile salt hydrolases from B. pseudocatenulatum and B. longum subsp. suis were purified using a two-step chromatographic procedure. Biochemical characterization of the bile salt hydrolases showed that the purified enzymes hydrolyzed all of the six major human bile salts under the pH and temperature conditions commonly found in the human gastrointestinal tract. Next, the dynamic rheometry was applied to monitor the gelation process of deoxycholic acid under different conditions. The results showed that bile acids displayed aqueous media gelating properties. Finally, gel-forming abilities of bifidobacteria exhibiting bile salt hydrolase activity were analyzed. Our investigations have demonstrated that the release of deconjugated bile acids led to the gelation phenomenon of the enzymatic reaction solution containing purified BSH. The presented results suggest that bile salt hydrolase activity commonly found among intestinal microbiota increases hydrogel-forming abilities of certain bile salts. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that bile salt hydrolase activity among Bifidobacterium is directly connected with the gelation process of bile salts. In our opinion, if such a phenomenon occurs in physiological conditions of human gut, it may improve bacterial ability to colonize the gastrointestinal tract and their survival in this specific ecological niche.

  7. Bile acid nuclear receptor FXR and digestive system diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Ding

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Bile acids (BAs are not only digestive surfactants but also important cell signaling molecules, which stimulate several signaling pathways to regulate some important biological processes. The bile-acid-activated nuclear receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR, plays a pivotal role in regulating bile acid, lipid and glucose homeostasis as well as in regulating the inflammatory responses, barrier function and prevention of bacterial translocation in the intestinal tract. As expected, FXR is involved in the pathophysiology of a wide range of diseases of gastrointestinal tract, including inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer and type 2 diabetes. In this review, we discuss current knowledge of the roles of FXR in physiology of the digestive system and the related diseases. Better understanding of the roles of FXR in digestive system will accelerate the development of FXR ligands/modulators for the treatment of digestive system diseases.

  8. [Bile acids in the bile in diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slivka, O Ia; Zelinskiĭ, B A; Zelinskiĭ, S Ts

    1979-01-01

    Hepatic and gall bladder bile of healthy persons (8) and of patients with severe form of diabetes mellitus (17) was studied. Paer chromatography was applied for determination of cholic, chenodeoxycholic, deoxycholic bile acids and their conjugates with glycin and taurine. An absolute content and percentage of glycodeoxycholic and glycochenodeoxycholic bile acids were increased, and glycochenodeoxycholic acid content and taurates proportion were decreased in the gall bladder and hepatic bile of diabetic patients. The data obtained pointed to disturbed hepatic function in severe diabetes mellitus; it was expressed in suppression of bile acids synthesis and conjugation, and also in depression of transformation of deoxycholic into cholic acid.

  9. Bile components and amino acids affect survival of the newly excysted juvenile Clonorchis sinensis in maintaining media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shunyu; Kim, Tae Im; Yoo, Won Gi; Cho, Pyo Yun; Kim, Tong-Soo; Hong, Sung-Jong

    2008-10-01

    Clonorchis sinensis thrives on bile juice. The effects of bile and bile acids on newly excysted juvenile C. sinensis (CsNEJ) were studied in terms of survival. Survival of CsNEJs maintained in 1x Locke's solution, Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium, NCTC 109, Eagle's, RPMI 1640, and 0.1% glucose was high, but dropped rapidly in 2x Locke's, 0.85% NaCl, and phosphate-buffered saline. Most amino acids in the media favored CsNEJ survival; however, aspartic and glutamic acids and adenine reduced survival. Survival was also significantly lower in media containing more than 0.1% bile. CsNEJs preconditioned in low bile media survived longer in higher bile media. All bile acids and conjugated bile salts were found to favor CsNEJ survival, except for lithocholic acid (LCA) which was toxic. NCTC 109 medium was found to be optimal for the in vitro maintenance of CsNEJs and 1x Locke's solution to be suitable for analyzing the biological effects of bioactive compounds and molecules. Based on these results, we propose that bile acids enhance activity of CsNEJs, but LCA deteriorate CsNEJs.

  10. Prebiotic oligosaccharides and the enterohepatic circulation of bile salts in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. van Meer (Hester); G. Boehm (Günther); F. Stellaard (Frans); A. Vriesema (Aldwin); J. Knol (Jan); R. Havinga (Rick); P.J.J. Sauer (Pieter); H.J. Verkade (Henkjan)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractHuman milk contains prebiotic oligosaccharides, which stimulate the growth of intestinal bifidobacteria and lactobacilli. It is unclear whether the prebiotic capacity of human milk contributes to the larger bile salt pool size and the more efficient fat absorption in infants fed human mi

  11. Structural transition in aqueous lipid/bile salt [DPPC/NaDC] supramolecular aggregates: SANS and DLS study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiselev, M.A. [Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Janich, M.; Hildebrand, A. [Martin-Luther-University, Halle (Saale) (Germany); Strunz, P. [Berlin Neutron Scattering Center, HZB, Berlin (Germany); Neubert, R.H.H. [Martin-Luther-University, Halle (Saale) (Germany); Lombardo, D., E-mail: lombardo@me.cnr.it [CNR–IPCF, Istituto per i Processi Chimico Fisici – (Sez. Messina), I-98158, Messina (Italy)

    2013-10-16

    Highlights: • Self-assembly in model DPPC lipids and NaDC bile salt by SANS and DLS experiments. • Bile salt creates structural interference against cohesive tendency of DPPC bilayers. • NaDC steric interactions cause transition toward different supramolecular structures. - Abstract: Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) were used to study different aggregation states in sodium deoxycholate (NaDC)-phosphatidylcholine systems at T = 60 °C. Size and shape of the aggregates investigated as a function of the NaDC bile salt concentration (at the constant DPPC concentration of 6 mM) indicate a strong dependence of the size and morphology of the generated aggregates on the relative amount of NaDC bile salt. More specifically large occupied area of the bile salt induces a steric interaction which promotes the transition toward a variety of supramolecular structures ranging from ellipsoidal vesicles, ribbon-like structures, up to final spherical mixed micelles at the large amount of bile salt of 10 mM NaDC. The findings of the obtained results give important insight for understanding the formation of different topologies in aqueous lipid–bile salt mixtures as well as stimulate new routes for liposome reconstitution–solubilisation processes suitable for technological applications.

  12. Xenobiotic, bile acid, and cholesterol transporters: function and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaassen, Curtis D; Aleksunes, Lauren M

    2010-03-01

    Transporters influence the disposition of chemicals within the body by participating in absorption, distribution, and elimination. Transporters of the solute carrier family (SLC) comprise a variety of proteins, including organic cation transporters (OCT) 1 to 3, organic cation/carnitine transporters (OCTN) 1 to 3, organic anion transporters (OAT) 1 to 7, various organic anion transporting polypeptide isoforms, sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide, apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter, peptide transporters (PEPT) 1 and 2, concentrative nucleoside transporters (CNT) 1 to 3, equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) 1 to 3, and multidrug and toxin extrusion transporters (MATE) 1 and 2, which mediate the uptake (except MATEs) of organic anions and cations as well as peptides and nucleosides. Efflux transporters of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily, such as ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), multidrug resistance proteins (MDR) 1 and 2, bile salt export pump, multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP) 1 to 9, breast cancer resistance protein, and ATP-binding cassette subfamily G members 5 and 8, are responsible for the unidirectional export of endogenous and exogenous substances. Other efflux transporters [ATPase copper-transporting beta polypeptide (ATP7B) and ATPase class I type 8B member 1 (ATP8B1) as well as organic solute transporters (OST) alpha and beta] also play major roles in the transport of some endogenous chemicals across biological membranes. This review article provides a comprehensive overview of these transporters (both rodent and human) with regard to tissue distribution, subcellular localization, and substrate preferences. Because uptake and efflux transporters are expressed in multiple cell types, the roles of transporters in a variety of tissues, including the liver, kidneys, intestine, brain, heart, placenta, mammary glands, immune cells, and testes are discussed. Attention is also placed upon a variety of

  13. Formation of liquid-crystalline structures in the bile salt-chitosan system and triggered release from lamellar phase bile salt-chitosan capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangso, Kristian J; Lindberg, Seth; Hartley, Patrick G; Knott, Robert; Spicer, Patrick; Boyd, Ben J

    2014-08-13

    Nanostructured capsules comprised of the anionic bile salt, sodium taurodeoxycholate (STDC), and the biocompatible cationic polymer, chitosan, were prepared to assess their potential as novel tailored release nanomaterials. For comparison, a previously studied system, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (polyDADMAC) was also investigated. Crossed-polarizing light microscopy (CPLM) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) identified the presence of lamellar and hexagonal phase at the surfactant-polymer interface of the respective systems. The hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions between the oppositely charged components were studied by varying temperature and salt concentration, respectively, and were found to influence the liquid-crystalline nanostructure formed. The hexagonal phase persisted at high temperatures, however the lamellar phase structure was lost above ca. 45 °C. Both mesophases were found to dissociate upon addition of 4% NaCl solution. The rate of release of the model hydrophilic drug, Rhodamine B (RhB), from the lamellar phase significantly increased in response to changes in the solution conditions studied, suggesting that modulating the drug release from these bile salt-chitosan capsules is readily achieved. In contrast, release from the hexagonal phase capsules had no appreciable response to the stimuli applied. These findings provide a platform for these oppositely charged surfactant and polymer systems to function as stimuli-responsive or sustained-release drug delivery systems.

  14. Formation of drug-bearing vesicles in mixed colloids of bile salts and phosphatidylcholine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjelm, R.P.; Mang, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Hofmann, A.F.; Schteingart, C. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Alkan-Onyuksel, H.; Ayd, S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1997-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors used small-angle neutron scattering to study drug interactions with mixed colloids of bile salt and phosphatidylcholine. Because the mixed colloids form liposomes spontaneously, this system is a model for drug-bile interactions that are important in understanding the efficacy of oral drug formulations and in advanced applications for liposome drug delivery systems. The authors studied particle formation in incorporation of enzymatic products formed in the gut and the effects of cholesteric drugs and taxol on vesicle formation. The studies show that particle morphology is not affected by inclusion of most cholesteric drugs and taxol, and is not affected by incorporation of the products of enzymatic action. The findings suggest that particle form is important for the physiological function of bile and they are beginning to show which drugs affect liposome formation.

  15. The Farnesoid X receptor - A molecular link between bile acid and lipid and glucose metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claudel, T; Staels, B; Kuipers, F

    2005-01-01

    Bile acids are the end products of cholesterol metabolism. They are synthesized in the liver and secreted via bile into the intestine, where they aid in the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins and dietary fat. Subsequently, bile acids return to the liver to complete their enterohepatic circulation. T

  16. Bile acids, farnesoid X receptor, atherosclerosis and metabolic control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Folkert; Stroeve, Johanna H. M.; Caron, Sandrine; Staels, Bart

    2007-01-01

    Purpose of review Bile acids are amphiphilic molecules synthesized from cholesterol exclusively in the liver that are essential for effective absorption of dietary fat. In addition to this classical role', bile acids act as signalling molecules that control their own metabolism by activating the nuc

  17. Bile acid-induced necrosis in primary human hepatocytes and in patients with obstructive cholestasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolbright, Benjamin L.; Dorko, Kenneth [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Antoine, Daniel J.; Clarke, Joanna I. [MRC Centre for Drug Safety Science, Department of Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Gholami, Parviz [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Li, Feng [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Forster, Jameson [Department of Surgery, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Fan, Fang [Department of Pathology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Park, B. Kevin [MRC Centre for Drug Safety Science, Department of Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Hagenbuch, Bruno [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Olyaee, Mojtaba [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Jaeschke, Hartmut, E-mail: hjaeschke@kumc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Accumulation of bile acids is a major mediator of cholestatic liver injury. Recent studies indicate bile acid composition between humans and rodents is dramatically different, as humans have a higher percent of glycine conjugated bile acids and increased chenodeoxycholate content, which increases the hydrophobicity index of bile acids. This increase may lead to direct toxicity that kills hepatocytes, and promotes inflammation. To address this issue, this study assessed how pathophysiological concentrations of bile acids measured in cholestatic patients affected primary human hepatocytes. Individual bile acid levels were determined in serum and bile by UPLC/QTOFMS in patients with extrahepatic cholestasis with, or without, concurrent increases in serum transaminases. Bile acid levels increased in serum of patients with liver injury, while biliary levels decreased, implicating infarction of the biliary tracts. To assess bile acid-induced toxicity in man, primary human hepatocytes were treated with relevant concentrations, derived from patient data, of the model bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC). Treatment with GCDC resulted in necrosis with no increase in apoptotic parameters. This was recapitulated by treatment with biliary bile acid concentrations, but not serum concentrations. Marked elevations in serum full-length cytokeratin-18, high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), and acetylated HMGB1 confirmed inflammatory necrosis in injured patients; only modest elevations in caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 were observed. These data suggest human hepatocytes are more resistant to human-relevant bile acids than rodent hepatocytes, and die through necrosis when exposed to bile acids. These mechanisms of cholestasis in humans are fundamentally different to mechanisms observed in rodent models. - Highlights: • Cholestatic liver injury is due to cytoplasmic bile acid accumulation in hepatocytes. • Primary human hepatocytes are resistant to BA-induced injury

  18. Bile acid receptors and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    With the high prevalence of obesity, diabetes, and otherfeatures of the metabolic syndrome in United States,nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has inevitablybecome a very prevalent chronic liver disease and isnow emerging as one of the leading indications for livertransplantation. Insulin resistance and derangementof lipid metabolism, accompanied by activation ofthe pro-inflammatory response and fibrogenesis, areessential pathways in the development of the moreclinically significant form of NAFLD, known as nonalcoholicsteatohepatitis (NASH). Recent advances inthe functional characterization of bile acid receptors,such as farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and transmembraneG protein-coupled receptor (TGR) 5, have providedfurther insight in the pathophysiology of NASH andhave led to the development of potential therapeutictargets for NAFLD and NASH. Beyond maintaining bileacid metabolism, FXR and TGR5 also regulate lipidmetabolism, maintain glucose homeostasis, increaseenergy expenditure, and ameliorate hepatic inflammation.These intriguing features have been exploitedto develop bile acid analogues to target pathways inNAFLD and NASH pathogenesis. This review providesa brief overview of the pathogenesis of NAFLD andNASH, and then delves into the biological functions ofbile acid receptors, particularly with respect to NASHpathogenesis, with a description of the associatedexperimental data, and, finally, we discuss the prospectsof bile acid analogues in the treatment of NAFLD andNASH.

  19. Bile acids for primary sclerosing cholangitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Gluud, C

    2003-01-01

    Bile acids have been used for treating primary sclerosing cholangitis, but their beneficial and harmful effects remain unclear.......Bile acids have been used for treating primary sclerosing cholangitis, but their beneficial and harmful effects remain unclear....

  20. Differentiation of various traditional Chinese medicines derived from animal bile and gallstone: simultaneous determination of bile acids by liquid chromatography coupled with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Xue; Ye, Min; Pan, De-lin; Miao, Wen-juan; Xiang, Cheng; Han, Jian; Guo, De-an

    2011-01-01

    Animal biles and gallstones are popularly used in traditional Chinese medicines, and bile acids are their major bioactive constituents. Some of these medicines, like cow-bezoar, are very expensive, and may be adulterated or even replaced by less expensive but similar species. Due to poor ultraviolet absorbance and structural similarity of bile acids, effective technology for species differentiation and quality control of bile-based Chinese medicines is still lacking. In this study, a rapid and reliable method was established for the simultaneous qualitative and quantitative analysis of 18 bile acids, including 6 free steroids (cholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid, deoxycholic acid, lithocholic acid, hyodeoxycholic acid, and ursodeoxycholic acid) and their corresponding glycine conjugates and taurine conjugates, by using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). This method was used to analyze six bile-based Chinese medicines: bear bile, cattle bile, pig bile, snake bile, cow-bezoar, and artificial cow-bezoar. Samples were separated on an Atlantis dC₁₈ column and were eluted with methanol-acetonitrile-water containing ammonium acetate. The mass spectrometer was monitored in the negative electrospray ionization mode. Total ion currents of the samples were compared for species differentiation, and the contents of bile acids were determined by monitoring specific ion pairs in a selected reaction monitoring program. All 18 bile acids showed good linearity (r² > 0.993) in a wide dynamic range of up to 2000-fold, using dehydrocholic acid as the internal standard. Different animal biles could be explicitly distinguished by their major characteristic bile acids: tauroursodeoxycholic acid and taurochenodeoxycholic acid for bear bile, glycocholic acid, cholic acid and taurocholic acid for cattle bile, glycohyodeoxycholic acid and glycochenodeoxycholic acid for pig bile, and taurocholic acid for snake bile. Furthermore, cattle bile, cow

  1. Interactions between selected bile salts and Triton X-100 or sodium lauryl ether sulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćirin Dejan M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to develop colloidal drug carriers with desired properties, it is important to determine physico-chemical characteristics of these systems. Bile salt mixed micelles are extensively studied as novel drug delivery systems. The objective of the present investigation is to develop and characterize mixed micelles of nonionic (Triton X-100 or anionic (sodium lauryl ether sulfate surfactant having oxyethylene groups in the polar head and following bile salts: cholate, deoxycholate and 7-oxodeoxycholate. Results The micellization behaviour of binary anionic-nonionic and anionic-anionic surfactant mixtures was investigated by conductivity and surface tension measurements. The results of the study have been analyzed using Clint's, Rubingh's, and Motomura's theories for mixed binary systems. The negative values of the interaction parameter indicate synergism between micelle building units. It was noticed that Triton X-100 and sodium lauryl ether sulfate generate the weakest synergistic interactions with sodium deoxycholate, while 7-oxodeoxycholate creates the strongest attractive interaction with investigated co-surfactants. Conclusion It was concluded that increased synergistic interactions can be attributed to the larger number of hydrophilic groups at α side of the bile salts. Additionally, 7-oxo group of 7-oxodeoxycholate enhance attractive interactions with selected co-surfactants more than 7-hydroxyl group of sodium cholate.

  2. Activation of CFTR by ASBT-mediated bile salt absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijvelds, MJC; Jorna, H; Verkade, HJ; Bot, AGM; Hofmann, F; Agellon, LB; Sinaasappel, M; de Jonge, HR

    2005-01-01

    In cholangiocytes, bile salt (BS) uptake via the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT) may evoke ductular flow by enhancing cAMP-mediated signaling to the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel. We considered that ASBT-mediated BS uptake in the distal

  3. Hydrolysis of human milk fat globules by pancreatic lipase: role of colipase, phospholipase A2, and bile salts.

    OpenAIRE

    Bläckberg, L; Hernell, O; Olivecrona, T

    1981-01-01

    Human milk fat globules were used to explore how dietary triglycerides are hydrolyzed by pancreatic lipase. These triglycerides were hydrolyzed very slowly by lipase alone as if the surface layer of proteins and phospholipids impeded the action of the enzyme. The inhibition of lipase activity could be overcome by addition either of colipase or of pancreatic phospholipase A2. Colipase enhanced triglyceride hydrolysis in a dose-dependent manner whether bile salts were present or not. Bile salts...

  4. Cloning and Expression of Bile Salt Hydrolase Gene from Lactobacillus plantarum M1-UVS29

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Chang-qing; Li Rong

    2015-01-01

    We cloned and expressed bile salt hydrolase gene ofLactobacillus plantarum M1-UVS29 inLactococcus lactis NZ9000 successfully. Gene-specific primers for amplification ofL. plantarum bsh were designed by using sequence which availabled from GenBank. The production of PCR amplicon was confirmed by sequencing and cloned into pMD18-T vector, and then recombined into expression vector pNZ8148 and yielding vector pNZ8148-BSH. pNZ8148-BSH was transferred intoLactococcus lactis NZ9000. Sequencing indicated that the clonedbsh fragment contained 995 nucleotides, and shared 99.3% sequence homology withbsh gene fromL. plantarum MBUL10. Clonedbsh fragment was successfully transduced into NICE expression system and confirmed by PCR and restriction digest. Recombinant BSH protein was analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The molecular weight of BSH protein was approximately 37 ku. Activity of the expressed protein was 0.77 µmol• min-1. The successfully expressed proteins by genetic engineering technology made the function of lactic acid bacteria be abundant and laid the foundation for further researches into cholesterol-lowering lactic acid bacterium food and probiotics.

  5. Different pathways of canalicular secretion of sulfated and non-sulfated fluorescent bile acids : a study in isolated hepatocyte couplets and TR- rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mills, CO; Milkiewicz, P; Muller, M; Roma, MG; Havinga, R; Coleman, R; Kuipers, F; Jansen, PLM; Elias, E

    1999-01-01

    Background/Aims: Fluorescent bile acids have proved useful for characterizing bile salt transport mechanisms, The aim of this study was to further validate the use of lysyl-fluorescein conjugated bile acid analogues as surrogate bile acids, Methods: We analyzed biliary excretion kinetics of cholyl l

  6. Raisin dietary fiber composition and in vitro bile acid binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camire, Mary E; Dougherty, Michael P

    2003-01-29

    Raisins are dried grapes that are popular shelf-stable snacks. Three commercially important types of raisins were studied: sun-dried (natural), artificially dried (dipped), and sulfur dioxide-treated (golden) raisins. Dietary fiber composition was analyzed by AACC method 32-25. Polysaccharides were hydrolyzed, and the resulting sugars were analyzed by colorimetric and gas chomatographic methods. Fructans were measured with a colorimetric kit assay. Total dietary fiber values agreed with published values, with pectins and neutral polysaccharides of mannose and glucose residues predominating. Dipped raisins had over 8% fructans. No fructans were found in fresh grapes. Raisin types varied in their ability to bind bile acids in vitro. Coarsely chopped raisins bound more bile than did finely chopped or whole raisins.

  7. Analysis of ileal sodium/bile acid cotransporter and related nuclear receptor genes in a family with multiple cases of idiopathic bile acid malabsorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marco Montagnani; Anna Abrahamsson; Cecilia G(a)lman; G(o)sta Eggertsen; Hanns-Ulrich Marschall; Elisa Ravaioli; Curt Einarsson; Paul A Dawson

    2006-01-01

    The etiology of most cases of idiopathic bile acid malabsorption (TBAM) is unknown. Tn this study, a Swedish family with bile acid malabsorption in three consecutive generations was screened for mutations in the ileal apical sodium-bile acid cotransporter gene (ASBT; gene symbol, SLC10A2) and in the genes for several of the nuclear receptors known to be important for ASBT expression: the farnesoid X receptor (FXR)and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα). The patients presented with a clinical history of idiopathic chronic watery diarrhea, which was responsive to cholestyramine treatment and consistent with IBAM. Bile acid absorption was determined using 75Se-homocholic acid taurine(SeHCAT); bile acid synthesis was estimated by measuring the plasma levels of 7α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4). The ASBT,FXR, and PPARα genes in the affected and unaffected family members were analyzed using single stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP), denaturing HPLC,and direct sequencing. No ASBT mutations were identified and the ASBT gene did not segregate with the bile acid malabsorption phenotype. Similarly, no mutations or polymorphisms were identified in the FXR or PPARα genes associated with the bile acid malabsorption phenotype. These studies indicate that the intestinal bile acid malabsorption in these patients cannot be attributed to defects in ASBT. In the absence of apparent ileal disease, alternative explanations such as accelerated transit through the small intestine may be responsible for the IBAM.

  8. Bile acids in regulation of intestinal physiology.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keating, Niamh

    2009-10-01

    In addition to their roles in facilitating lipid digestion and absorption, bile acids are recognized as important regulators of intestinal function. Exposure to bile acids can dramatically influence intestinal transport and barrier properties; in recent years, they have also become appreciated as important factors in regulating cell growth and survival. Indeed, few cells reside within the intestinal mucosa that are not altered to some degree by exposure to bile acids. The past decade saw great advances in the knowledge of how bile acids exert their actions at the cellular and molecular levels. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the role of bile acids in regulation of intestinal physiology.

  9. Bile acids for viral hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Liu, J; Gluud, C

    2007-01-01

    Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus has been reached regarding their usefulness.......Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus has been reached regarding their usefulness....

  10. Bile Acid Responses in Methane and Non-Methane Producers to Standard Breakfast Meals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bile acids and their conjugates are important regulators of glucose homeostasis. Previous research has revealed the ratio of cholic acid to deoxycholic acid to affect insulin resistance in humans. Bile acid de-conjugation and intestinal metabolism depend on gut microbes which may be affected by hos...

  11. Comparison of Bile Acids and Acetaminophen Protein Adducts in Children and Adolescents with Acetaminophen Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Laura; Yan, Ke; Pence, Lisa; Simpson, Pippa; Bhattacharyya, Sudeepa; Gill, Pritmohinder; Letzig, Lynda; Kearns, Gregory; Beger, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics approaches have enabled the study of new mechanisms of liver injury in experimental models of drug toxicity. Disruption of bile acid homeostasis is a known mechanism of drug induced liver injury. The relationship of individual bile acids to indicators of oxidative drug metabolism (acetaminophen protein adducts) and liver injury was examined in children with acetaminophen overdose, hospitalized children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and children with no recent exposure to acetaminophen. Nine bile acids were quantified through targeted metabolomic analysis in the serum samples of the three groups. Bile acids were compared to serum levels of acetaminophen protein adducts and alanine aminotransferase. Glycodeoxycholic acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, and glycochenodeoxycholic acid were significantly increased in children with acetaminophen overdose compared to healthy controls. Among patients with acetaminophen overdose, bile acids were higher in subjects with acetaminophen protein adduct values > 1.0 nmol/mL and modest correlations were noted for three bile acids and acetaminophen protein adducts as follows: taurodeoxycholic acid (R=0.604; pacetaminophen than in healthy children with no recent acetaminophen exposure. Compared to bile acids, acetaminophen protein adducts more accurately discriminated among children with acetaminophen overdose, children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and healthy control subjects. In children with acetaminophen overdose, elevations of conjugated bile acids were associated with specific indicators of acetaminophen metabolism and non-specific indicators of liver injury.

  12. Deconjugated Bile Salts Produced by Extracellular Bile-Salt Hydrolase-Like Activities from the Probiotic Lactobacillus johnsonii La1 Inhibit Giardia duodenalis In vitro Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travers, Marie-Agnès; Sow, Cissé; Zirah, Séverine; Deregnaucourt, Christiane; Chaouch, Soraya; Queiroz, Rayner M. L.; Charneau, Sébastien; Allain, Thibault; Florent, Isabelle; Grellier, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Giardiasis, currently considered a neglected disease, is caused by the intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia duodenalis and is widely spread in human as well as domestic and wild animals. The lack of appropriate medications and the spread of resistant parasite strains urgently call for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. Host microbiota or certain probiotic strains have the capacity to provide some protection against giardiasis. By combining biological and biochemical approaches, we have been able to decipher a molecular mechanism used by the probiotic strain Lactobacillus johnsonii La1 to prevent Giardia growth in vitro. We provide evidence that the supernatant of this strain contains active principle(s) not directly toxic to Giardia but able to convert non-toxic components of bile into components highly toxic to Giardia. By using bile acid profiling, these components were identified as deconjugated bile-salts. A bacterial bile-salt-hydrolase of commercial origin was able to mimic the properties of the supernatant. Mass spectrometric analysis of the bacterial supernatant identified two of the three bile-salt-hydrolases encoded in the genome of this probiotic strain. These observations document a possible mechanism by which L. johnsonii La1, by secreting, or releasing BSH-like activity(ies) in the vicinity of replicating Giardia in an environment where bile is present and abundant, can fight this parasite. This discovery has both fundamental and applied outcomes to fight giardiasis, based on local delivery of deconjugated bile salts, enzyme deconjugation of bile components, or natural or recombinant probiotic strains that secrete or release such deconjugating activities in a compartment where both bile salts and Giardia are present. PMID:27729900

  13. Effects of bile acids on proliferation and ultrastructural alteration of pancreatic cancer cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Wu; Yi Lüi; Bo Wang; Chang Liu; Zuo-Ren Wang,

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Pancreatic cancer in the head is frequently accompanied by jaundice and high bile acid level in serum. This study focused on the direct effects of bile acids on proliferation and ultrastructural alteration of pancreatic cancer.METHODS: Pancreatic cancer cell lines PANC-1, MIA PaCa2 and PGHAM-1 were explored in this study. The cell lines were cultured in media supplemented with certain bile acids,CA, DCA, LCA, TCDC, TDCA and GCA. Their influence on cell growth was measured with MTT assay after 72 h of incubation. Cell cycles of PANC-1 cells in 40 μM of bile acids media were analyzed by flow cytometry. Ultrastructural alteration of PANC-1 cells induced by DCA was observed using scanning and transmission electron microscope (SEM and TEM).RESULTS: At various concentrations of bile acids and incubation time, no enhanced effects of bile acids on cell proliferation were observed. Significant inhibitory effects were obtained in almost all media with bile acids. DCA and CA increased the percentage of G0+G1 phase cells, while GCA and TDCA elevated the S phase cell number. After 48 h of incubation in DCA medium, PANC-1 cells showed some structural damages such as loss of their microvilli and vacuolization of organelles in cytoplasm.CONCLUSION: Bile acids can reduce proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells due to their direct cytotoxicity. This result implies that elevation of bile acids in jaundiced serum may inhibit pancreatic cancer progression.

  14. Changes of gastrointestinal myoelectric activity and bile acid pool size after cholecystectomy in guinea pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Mei Zhang; Lei Dong; Li-Na Liu; Bi-Xia Chang; Qian He; Qian Li

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the bile acid pool size after cholecystectomy whether or not correlated to the gastrointestinal migrating myoelectric complex (MMC) in guinea pigs.METHODS: Gallbladder motilities were assessed before cholecystectomy. Furthermore, we continuously monitored interdigestive gastrointestinal motilities using bipolar electrodes in conscious guinea pigs before and after surgery at 4 wk in standard diet group and high cholesterol diet (cholesterol gallstone) group. Total bile acid pool sizes were measured by isotope dilution method at meantime.RESULTS: After cholecystectomy, there were parallel falls in duration of phase Ⅰ, Ⅱ, Ⅲ and MMC cycle duration but increase in amplitude in the guinea pigs with normal gallbladder function, and in the guinea pigs with cholesterol stones. However, There were not significantly differences. On the other hand, the bile acid pool was definitely small in the GS guinea pigs compared to normal guinea pigs and became slightly smaller after cholecystectomy. Similarly, bile acid in gallbladder bile, fecal bile acid was slightly increased in GS guinea pigs after cholecystectomy, to the same degree as normal. These differences, however, were not significant.CONCLUSION: It is concluded that in the guinea pigs with normal gallbladder function, and in the guinea pigs with cholesterol stones: (1) Cholecystectomy produce a similar but less marked trend in bile acid pool; and (2) MMC are linked to enterohepatic circulation of bile acids, rather than surgery, which is consistent with changes of the bile acid pool size. As a result, gastrointestinal dyskinesia is not involved in occurrence of postcholecystectomy syndrome.

  15. Gut microbiota, cirrhosis and alcohol regulate bile acid metabolism in the gut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridlon, Jason M.; Kang, Dae-Joong; Hylemon, Phillip B.; Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of the complex role of the bile acid-gut microbiome axis in health and disease processes is evolving rapidly. Our focus revolves around the interaction of the gut microbiota with liver diseases, especially cirrhosis. The bile acid pool size has recently been shown to be a function of microbial metabolism of bile acid and regulation of the microbiota by bile acids is important in the development and progression of several liver diseases. Humans produce a large, conjugated hydrophilic bile acid pool, maintained through positive-feedback antagonism of FXR in intestine and liver. Microbes use bile acids, and via FXR signaling this results in a smaller, unconjugated hydrophobic bile acid pool. This equilibrium is critical to maintain health. The challenge is to examine the manifold functions of gut bile acids as modulators of antibiotic, probiotic and disease progression in cirrhosis, metabolic syndrome and alcohol use. Recent studies have shown potential mechanisms explaining how perturbations in the microbiome affect bile acid pool size and composition. With advancing liver disease and cirrhosis, there is dysbiosis in the fecal, ileal and colonic mucosa, in addition to a decrease in bile acid concentration in the intestine due to the liver problems. This results in a dramatic shift toward the Firmicutes, particularly Clostridium cluster XIVa and increasing production of deoxycholic acid (DCA). Alcohol intake speeds up these processes in the subjects with and without cirrhosis without significant FXR feedback. Taken together, these pathways can impact intestinal and systemic inflammation while worsening dysbiosis. The interaction between bile acids, alcohol, cirrhosis and dysbiosis is an important relationship that influences intestinal and systemic inflammation, which in turn determines progression of the overall disease process. These interactions and the impact of commonly used therapies for liver disease can provide insight into the pathogenesis

  16. Bile resistance mechanisms in Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena eRuiz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. Most of the probiotic bacteria currently available in the market belong to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, and specific health-promoting activities, such as treatment of diarrhea or amelioration of gastrointestinal discomfort, have been attributed to them. In order to be able to survive the gastrointestinal transit and transiently colonise our gut, these bacteria must be able to counteract the deleterious action of bile salts, which are the main components of bile. Bile salts are detergent-like biological substances synthesised in the liver from cholesterol. Host enzymes conjugate the newly synthesised free bile acids in the liver with the amino acids glycine or taurine, generating conjugated bile salts. These compounds are stored in the gall bladder and they are released into the duodenum during digestion to perform their physiological function, which is the solubilisation of fat coming from diet. These bile salts possess strong antimicrobial activity, since they are able to disorganize the structure of the cell membrane, as well as trigger DNA damage. This means that bacteria inhabiting our intestinal tract must have intrinsic resistance mechanisms to cope with bile salts. To do that, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium display a variety of proteins devoted to the efflux of bile salts or protons, to modify sugar metabolism or to prevent protein misfolding. In this manuscript, we review and discuss specific bile resistance mechanisms, as well as the processes responsible for the adaptation of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli to bile.

  17. Membranolytic Activity of Bile Salts: Influence of Biological Membrane Properties and Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Blume

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The two main steps of the membranolytic activity of detergents: 1 the partitioning of detergent molecules in the membrane and 2 the solubilisation of the membrane are systematically investigated. The interactions of two bile salt molecules, sodium cholate (NaC and sodium deoxycholate (NaDC with biological phospholipid model membranes are considered. The membranolytic activity is analysed as a function of the hydrophobicity of the bile salt, ionic strength, temperature, membrane phase properties, membrane surface charge and composition of the acyl chains of the lipids. The results are derived from calorimetric measurements (ITC, isothermal titration calorimetry. A thermodynamic model is described, taking into consideration electrostatic interactions, which is used for the calculation of the partition coefficient as well as to derive the complete thermodynamic parameters describing the interaction of detergents with biological membranes (change in enthalpy, change in free energy, change in entropy etc. The solubilisation properties are described in a so-called vesicle-to-micelle phase transition diagram. The obtained results are supplemented and confirmed by data obtained from other biophysical techniques (DSC differential scanning calorimetry, DLS dynamic light scattering, SANS small angle neutron scattering.

  18. Comparison of Bile Acids and Acetaminophen Protein Adducts in Children and Adolescents with Acetaminophen Toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura James

    Full Text Available Metabolomics approaches have enabled the study of new mechanisms of liver injury in experimental models of drug toxicity. Disruption of bile acid homeostasis is a known mechanism of drug induced liver injury. The relationship of individual bile acids to indicators of oxidative drug metabolism (acetaminophen protein adducts and liver injury was examined in children with acetaminophen overdose, hospitalized children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and children with no recent exposure to acetaminophen. Nine bile acids were quantified through targeted metabolomic analysis in the serum samples of the three groups. Bile acids were compared to serum levels of acetaminophen protein adducts and alanine aminotransferase. Glycodeoxycholic acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, and glycochenodeoxycholic acid were significantly increased in children with acetaminophen overdose compared to healthy controls. Among patients with acetaminophen overdose, bile acids were higher in subjects with acetaminophen protein adduct values > 1.0 nmol/mL and modest correlations were noted for three bile acids and acetaminophen protein adducts as follows: taurodeoxycholic acid (R=0.604; p<0.001, glycodeoxycholic acid (R=0.581; p<0.001, and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (R=0.571; p<0.001. Variability in bile acids was greater among hospitalized children receiving low doses of acetaminophen than in healthy children with no recent acetaminophen exposure. Compared to bile acids, acetaminophen protein adducts more accurately discriminated among children with acetaminophen overdose, children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and healthy control subjects. In children with acetaminophen overdose, elevations of conjugated bile acids were associated with specific indicators of acetaminophen metabolism and non-specific indicators of liver injury.

  19. Metabolic Effects of Bile Acids in the Gut in Health and Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesjes, Marije; Brufau Dones, Gemma

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, it became clear that bile acids, in addition to their role in intestinal absorption of lipids and fat-soluble vitamins, are major regulators of metabolism. They activate signal transduction pathways through binding to the specific bile acid receptors TGR5 and FXR. Indirectly, bil

  20. Bile acids modulate glucocorticoid metabolism and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in obstructive jaundice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McNeilly, Alison D; Macfarlane, David P; O'Flaherty, Emmett

    2010-01-01

    Suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis occurs in cirrhosis and cholestasis and is associated with increased concentrations of bile acids. We investigated whether this was mediated through bile acids acting to impair steroid clearance by inhibiting glucocorticoid metabolism by 5beta-reductase....

  1. Bile Acids, FXR, and Metabolic Effects of Bariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier F. Noel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Overweight and obesity represent major risk factors for diabetes and related metabolic diseases. Obesity is associated with a chronic and progressive inflammatory response leading to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D mellitus, although the precise mechanism mediating this inflammatory process remains poorly understood. The most effective intervention for the treatment of obesity, bariatric surgery, leads to glucose normalization and remission of T2D. Recent work in both clinical studies and animal models supports bile acids (BAs as key mediators of these effects. BAs are involved in lipid and glucose homeostasis primarily via the farnesoid X receptor (FXR transcription factor. BAs are also involved in regulating genes involved in inflammation, obesity, and lipid metabolism. Here, we review the novel role of BAs in bariatric surgery and the intersection between BAs and immune, obesity, weight loss, and lipid metabolism genes.

  2. Effects of corn oil and wheat brans on bile acid metabolism in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallaher, D D; Franz, P M

    1990-11-01

    High concentrations of colonic bile acids may promote tumor formation. Some studies have found that high levels of dietary fat increase fecal bile acid excretion, whereas others report no effect. Wheat bran appears to reduce fecal bile acid concentration. This study was conducted to determine the effect of different dietary fat levels and types of wheat bran on bile acid metabolism. Rats were fed diets containing either no fiber, 2% cholestyramine (CHO) or brans of hard red spring, soft white winter or durum wheat--at both a 5 or 20% fat level. Animals were fed for 7 wk, and feces were collected in the last week. Wheat bran (all types) significantly increased fecal mass approximately fourfold, and CHO significantly increased fecal mass twofold compared to the fiber-free diet. Increasing the fat level did not increase fecal bile acid excretion, nor did the addition of wheat bran. Addition of CHO, however, more than doubled it. CHO increased fecal bile acid concentration, all wheat brans decreased it and fat level had no effect. Bile acid pool size was increased slightly by fat level and cholestyramine feeding but not by wheat brans. These results indicate that fat level slightly alters bile acid metabolism but that wheat brans do not.

  3. Pepsin and bile acid concentrations in sputum of mustard gas exposed patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Karbasi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Gastro-esophageal reflux has been suggested to be associated with several pulmonary complications such as asthma, and post-transplant bronchiolitis obliterans (BO. Pepsin or bile salts in the sputum is shown to be an optimal molecular marker of gastric contents macro/micro aspiration. In this study, we investigated sputum pepsin as a marker of micro-aspiration in sulfur mustard (SM exposed cases compared to healthy controls. Materials and Methods: In a case controlled study, 26 cases with BO and 12 matched healthy controls were recruited and all cases were symptomatic and their exposure to SM was previously documented during Iran-Iraq conflict. Pepsin levels in sputum and total bile acids were measured using enzymatic assay. The severity of respiratory disorder was categorized based upon the spirometric values. Result: The average concentration of pepsin in sputum was higher in the case group (0.29 ± 0.23 compared with healthy subjects (0.13 ± 0.07; P ± 0.003. Moreover, the average concentration of bile acids in the sputum cases was not significantly different in comparison to the controls ( P = 0.5. Conclusion: Higher pepsin concentrations in sputum of SM exposed patients compared with healthy control subjects indicate the occurrence of significantly more gastric micro-aspiration in SM exposed patients.

  4. Bile Salt Micelles and Phospholipid Vesicles Present in Simulated and Human Intestinal Fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elvang, Philipp A; Hinna, Askell H; Brouwers, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge about colloidal assemblies present in human intestinal fluids (HIFs), such as bile salt micelles and phospholipid vesicles, is regarded of importance for a better understanding of the in vivo dissolution and absorption behavior of poorly soluble drugs (Biopharmaceutics Classification...... distinct size fraction of colloidal assemblies, whereas FeSSIF contained 2 fractions of colloidal species with significantly different sizes. These size fractions likely represent (1) mixed taurocholate-phospholipid-micelles, as indicated by a size range up to 70 nm (in diameter) and a strong UV absorption...... sizes of approximately 50 and 200 nm, respectively (intensity-weighted mean diameter, Dz), likely representing mixed cholate/phospholipid micelles and phospholipid vesicles, respectively. The sizes of the smaller 2 fractions being below the size range of multiangle laser light scattering analysis (

  5. Microbiota transplantation restores normal fecal bile acid composition in recurrent Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingarden, Alexa R; Chen, Chi; Bobr, Aleh; Yao, Dan; Lu, Yuwei; Nelson, Valerie M; Sadowsky, Michael J; Khoruts, Alexander

    2014-02-15

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has emerged as a highly effective therapy for refractory, recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), which develops following antibiotic treatments. Intestinal microbiota play a critical role in the metabolism of bile acids in the colon, which in turn have major effects on the lifecycle of C. difficile bacteria. We hypothesized that fecal bile acid composition is altered in patients with recurrent CDI and that FMT results in its normalization. General metabolomics and targeted bile acid analyses were performed on fecal extracts from patients with recurrent CDI treated with FMT and their donors. In addition, 16S rRNA gene sequencing was used to determine the bacterial composition of pre- and post-FMT fecal samples. Taxonomic bacterial composition of fecal samples from FMT recipients showed rapid change and became similar to the donor after the procedure. Pre-FMT fecal samples contained high concentrations of primary bile acids and bile salts, while secondary bile acids were nearly undetectable. In contrast, post-FMT fecal samples contained mostly secondary bile acids, as did non-CDI donor samples. Therefore, our analysis showed that FMT resulted in normalization of fecal bacterial community structure and metabolic composition. Importantly, metabolism of bile salts and primary bile acids to secondary bile acids is disrupted in patients with recurrent CDI, and FMT corrects this abnormality. Since individual bile salts and bile acids have pro-germinant and inhibitory activities, the changes suggest that correction of bile acid metabolism is likely a major mechanism by which FMT results in a cure and prevents recurrence of CDI.

  6. Bile-acid-induced cell injury and protection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria J Perez; Oscar Briz

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have characterized the cellular and molecular mechanisms of hepatocyte injury caused by the retention of hydrophobic bile acids (BAs) in cholestatic diseases. BAs may disrupt cell membranes through their detergent action on lipid components and can promote the generation of reactive oxygen species that, in turn, oxidatively modify lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids, and eventually cause hepatocyte necrosis and apoptosis. Several pathways are involved in triggering hepatocyte apoptosis. Toxic BAs can activate hepatocyte death receptors directly and induce oxidative damage, thereby causing mitochondrial dysfunction, and induce endoplasmic reticulum stress. When these compounds are taken up and accumulate inside biliary cells, they can also cause apoptosis. Regarding extrahepatic tissues, the accumulation of BAs in the systemic circulation may contribute to endothelial injury in the kidney and lungs. In gastrointestinal cells, BAs may behave as cancer promoters through an indirect mechanism involving oxidative stress and DNA damage, as well as acting as selection agents for apoptosis-resistant cells. The accumulation of BAs may have also deleterious effects on placental and fetal cells. However, other BAs, such as ursodeoxycholic acid, have been shown to modulate BA-induced injury in hepatocytes. The major beneficial effects of treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid are protection against cytotoxicity due to more toxic BAs; the stimulation of hepatobiliary secretion; antioxidant activity, due in part to an enhancement in glutathione levels; and the inhibition of liver cell apoptosis. Other natural BAs or their derivatives, such as cholyl-Nmethylglycine or cholylsarcosine, have also aroused pharmacological interest owing to their protective properties.

  7. Endogenous bile acid disposition in rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marion, Tracy L., E-mail: tracylmarion@qualyst.com [Curriculum in Toxicology, UNC School of Medicine, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7270 (United States); Perry, Cassandra H., E-mail: cassandraperry@qualyst.com [Qualyst, Inc., Durham, NC 27713 (United States); St Claire, Robert L., E-mail: bobstclaire@qualyst.com [Qualyst, Inc., Durham, NC 27713 (United States); Brouwer, Kim L.R., E-mail: kbrouwer@unc.edu [Division of Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics, UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, CB 7569 Kerr Hall, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7569 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH) are used commonly to investigate hepatic transport protein-mediated uptake and biliary excretion of substrates. However, little is known about the disposition of endogenous bile acids (BAs) in SCH. In this study, four endogenous conjugated BAs common to rats and humans [taurocholic acid (TCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), taurochenodeoxycholic acid (TCDCA), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA)], as well as two BA species specific to rodents (α- and β-tauromuricholic acid; α/β TMCA), were profiled in primary rat and human SCH. Using B-CLEAR{sup ®} technology, BAs were measured in cells + bile canaliculi, cells, and medium of SCH by LC-MS/MS. Results indicated that, just as in vivo, taurine-conjugated BA species were predominant in rat SCH, while glycine-conjugated BAs were predominant in human SCH. Total intracellular BAs remained relatively constant over days in culture in rat SCH. Total BAs in control (CTL) cells + bile, cells, and medium were approximately 3.4, 2.9, and 8.3-fold greater in human than in rat. The estimated intracellular concentrations of the measured total BAs were 64.3 ± 5.9 μM in CTL rat and 183 ± 56 μM in CTL human SCH, while medium concentrations of the total BAs measured were 1.16 ± 0.21 μM in CTL rat SCH and 9.61 ± 6.36 μM in CTL human SCH. Treatment of cells for 24 h with 10 μM troglitazone (TRO), an inhibitor of the bile salt export pump (BSEP) and the Na{sup +}-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP), had no significant effect on endogenous BAs measured at the end of the 24-h culture period, potentially due to compensatory mechanisms that maintain BA homeostasis. These data demonstrate that BAs in SCH are similar to in vivo, and that SCH may be a useful in vitro model to study alterations in BA disposition if species differences are taken into account. -- Highlights: ► Bile acids (BAs) were measured in rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH). ► Cell and medium BA

  8. Multiparametric flow cytometry and cell sorting for the assessment of viable, injured, and dead bifidobacterium cells during bile salt stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ben Amor, K.; Breeuwer, P.; Verbaarschot, P.; Rombouts, F.M.; Akkermans, A.D.L.; Vos, de W.M.; Abee, T.

    2002-01-01

    Using a flow cytometry-based approach, we assessed the viability of Bifidobacterium lactis DSM 10140 and Bifidobacterium adolescentis DSM 20083 during exposure to bile salt stress. Carboxyfluorescein diacetate (cFDA), propidium iodide (PI), and oxonol [DiBAC4(3)] were used to monitor esterase activi

  9. Effects of bile acids and the bile acid receptor FXR agonist on the respiratory rhythm in the in vitro brainstem medulla slice of neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Zhao

    Full Text Available Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy is always accompanied by adverse fetal outcomes such as malfunctions of respiration. Farnesoid X receptor (FXR plays a critical role in the homeostasis of bile acids. Thus, we are determined to explore the effects of farnesoid X receptor (FXR and five bile acids on respiratory rhythm generation and modulation of neonatal rats. Spontaneous periodic respiratory-related rhythmical discharge activity (RRDA was recorded from hypoglossal nerves during the perfusion of modified Krebs solution. Group 1-6 was each given GW4064 and five bile acids of chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA, deoxycholic acid (DCA, lithocholic acid (LCA, cholic acid (CA as well as ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA at different concentrations to identify their specific functions on respiratory rhythm modulations. Group 7 was applied to receive FXR blocker Z-guggulsterone and Z-guggulsterone with the above bile acids separately to explore the role of FXR in the respiratory rhythm modulation. Group 8 was given dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO as controls. Apart from UDCA, CDCA, DCA LCA and CA all exerted effects on RRDA recorded from hypoglossal nerves in a concentration-dependent manner. Respiratory cycle (RC, Inspiratory time (TI, Expiratory Time (TE and Integral Amplitude (IA were influenced and such effects could be reversed by Z-guggulsterone. FXR may contribute to the effects on the modulation of respiratory rhythm exerted by bile acids.

  10. Antibiotic growth promoters enhance animal production by targeting intestinal bile salt hydrolase and its producers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The growth-promoting effect of antibiotic growth promoters (AGPs) was correlated with the decreased activity of bile salt hydrolase (BSH), an intestinal bacteria-produced enzyme that exerts negative impact on host fat digestion and utilization. Consistent with this finding, independent chicken studies have demonstrated that AGP usage significantly reduced population of Lactobacillus species, the major BSH-producers in the intestine. Recent finding also demonstrated that some AGPs, such as tetracycline and roxarsone, display direct inhibitory effect on BSH activity. Therefore, BSH is a promising microbiome target for developing novel alternatives to AGPs. Specifically, dietary supplementation of BSH inhibitor may promote host lipid metabolism and energy harvest, consequently enhancing feed efficiency and body weight gain in food animals. PMID:24575079

  11. Antibiotic growth promoters enhance animal production by targeting intestinal bile salt hydrolase and its producers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun eLin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The growth-promoting effect of antibiotic growth promoters (AGPs was correlated with the decreased activity of bile salt hydrolase (BSH, an intestinal bacteria-produced enzyme that exerts negative impact on host fat digestion and utilization. Consistent with this finding, independent chicken studies have demonstrated that AGP usage significantly reduced population of Lactobacillus species, the major BSH-producers in the intestine. Recent finding also demonstrated that some AGPs, such as tetracycline and roxarsone, display direct inhibitory effect on BSH activity. Therefore, BSH is a promising microbiome target for developing novel alternatives to AGPs. Specifically, dietary supplementation of BSH inhibitor may promote host lipid metabolism and energy harvest, consequently enhancing feed efficiency and body weight gain in food animals.

  12. Profiling of urinary bile acids in piglets by a combination of enzymatic deconjugation and targeted LC-MRM-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bile acids (BAs) have an important role in the control of fat, glucose and cholesterol metabolism. Synthesis of bile acids is the major pathway for the metabolism of cholesterol and for the excretion of excess cholesterol in mammals. Bile acid intermediates and/or their metabolites are excreted in...

  13. Bile acids for viral hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Liu, J; Gluud, C

    2003-01-01

    The viral hepatitides are common causes of liver diseases globally. Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus was reached regarding their usefulness.......The viral hepatitides are common causes of liver diseases globally. Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus was reached regarding their usefulness....

  14. Bile salt toxicity aggravates cold ischemic injury of bile ducts after liver transplantation in Mdr2+/- mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, H; Porte, RJ; Tian, Y; Jochum, W; Stieger, B; Moritz, W; Slooff, MJH; Graf, R; Clavien, PA

    2006-01-01

    Intrahepatic bile duct strictures are a serious complication after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). We examined the role of endogenous bile salt toxicity in the pathogenesis of bile duct injury after OLT. Livers from wild-type mice and mice heterozygous for disruption of the multidrug resista

  15. Bile acid metabolism in ileostomy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huibregtse, K; Hoek, F; Sanders, G T; Tytgat, G N

    1977-04-01

    In ten ileostomy patients, a 14C-cholylglycine breath test was performed. The 14CO2 in the exhaled air and the 14C bile acid quantity and composition and fat content in the subsequent 24 h ileostomy effluent were determined and compared to the values in twenty healthy controls. The results show that in ileostomy patients only minor bile acid-deconjugation occurs in vivo. Deconjugation in the ileostomy bags was found to be mainly responsible for the absence of conjugated bile acids in many of the ileostomy effluent samples. Secondary bile acids were not present in these patients, as determined by TLC. The fecal fat and bile acid excretion was found to be in the normal range in ileostomy patients provided no concomitant ileum resection was present.

  16. Bile Acid Scaffolds in Supramolecular Chemistry: The Interplay of Design and Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony P. Davis

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Since early work in the 1980s, the bile acids have become well established as building blocks for supramolecular chemistry. The author’s laboratory has specialised in converting cholic acid, the archetypal bile acid, into macrocyclic and acyclic receptors for anions and carbohydrates. This review highlights the synthetic aspects of this work, especially the use of modern synthetic methodology to perform less obvious structural transformations.

  17. Hydrogen-Abstraction, Energy Transfer and Exciplex Formation in Photoactive Systems Based on Bile Acids

    OpenAIRE

    Miró Richart, Paula

    2016-01-01

    [EN] Bile acids are a family of amphiphilic steroids that play a pivotal role in physiological functions such as elimination of cholesterol or solubilization of lipids. Chemically, they share a steroidal skeleton with an unusual cis fusion between rings A and B, a short lateral chain ending in a carboxylic acid moiety and different number of hydroxyl groups on the alpha-face. Hence, bile acids offer a versatile architecture that can be used to investigate photophysical processes of interest ...

  18. Bile acid and immunosuppressive therapy in primary biliary cirrhosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.H.J. Wolfhagen (Franciscus)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractPrimary Biliary Cirrhosis (PBC) is a chronic, cholestatic liver disease characterized by non-suppurative destruction of interlobular and septal bile ducts, with subsequent liver damage and eventually development of cirrhosis. The disease is relatively rare with an estimated annual incide

  19. Allelic variation of bile salt hydrolase genes in Lactobacillus salivarius does not determine bile resistance levels.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fang, Fang

    2009-09-01

    Commensal lactobacilli frequently produce bile salt hydrolase (Bsh) enzymes whose roles in intestinal survival are unclear. Twenty-six Lactobacillus salivarius strains from different sources all harbored a bsh1 allele on their respective megaplasmids. This allele was related to the plasmid-borne bsh1 gene of the probiotic strain UCC118. A second locus (bsh2) was found in the chromosomes of two strains that had higher bile resistance levels. Four Bsh1-encoding allele groups were identified, defined by truncations or deletions involving a conserved residue. In vitro analyses showed that this allelic variation was correlated with widely varying bile deconjugation phenotypes. Despite very low activity of the UCC118 Bsh1 enzyme, a mutant lacking this protein had significantly lower bile resistance, both in vitro and during intestinal transit in mice. However, the overall bile resistance phenotype of this and other strains was independent of the bsh1 allele type. Analysis of the L. salivarius transcriptome upon exposure to bile and cholate identified a multiplicity of stress response proteins and putative efflux proteins that appear to broadly compensate for, or mask, the effects of allelic variation of bsh genes. Bsh enzymes with different bile-degrading kinetics, though apparently not the primary determinants of bile resistance in L. salivarius, may have additional biological importance because of varying effects upon bile as a signaling molecule in the host.

  20. Bile acid diarrhoea and FGF19: new views on diagnosis, pathogenesis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Julian R F

    2014-07-01

    Chronic diarrhoea induced by bile acids is common and the underlying mechanisms are linked to homeostatic regulation of hepatic bile acid synthesis by fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19). Increasing evidence, including that from several large case series using SeHCAT (selenium homocholic acid taurine) tests for diagnosis, indicates that bile acid diarrhoea (BAD) accounts for a sizeable proportion of patients who would otherwise be diagnosed with IBS. Studies of other approaches for diagnosis of BAD have shown increased bile acid synthesis, increased faecal levels of primary bile acids, dysbiosis and different urinary volatile organic compounds when compared with healthy controls or with other diseases. The role of the ileal hormone FGF19 in BAD has been strengthened: a prospective clinical study has confirmed low FGF19 levels in BAD, and so a test to measure these levels could be developed for diagnosis. In animal models, FGF19 depletion by antibodies produces severe diarrhoea. Bile acids affect colonic function through farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and TGR5 receptors. As well as these effects in the colon, FXR-dependent stimulation of ileal FGF19 production could be a logical mechanism to provide therapeutic benefit in BAD. Further studies of FGF19 in humans hold promise in providing novel treatments for this cause of chronic diarrhoea.

  1. Oleanolic acid alters bile acid metabolism and produces cholestatic liver injury in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jie, E-mail: JLiu@kumc.edu [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Zunyi Medical College, Zunyi 563003 (China); Lu, Yuan-Fu [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Zunyi Medical College, Zunyi 563003 (China); Zhang, Youcai; Wu, Kai Connie [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Fan, Fang [Cytopathology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Klaassen, Curtis D. [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Oleanolic acid (OA) is a triterpenoids that exists widely in plants. OA is effective in protecting against hepatotoxicants. Whereas a low dose of OA is hepatoprotective, higher doses and longer-term use of OA produce liver injury. This study characterized OA-induced liver injury in mice. Adult C57BL/6 mice were given OA at doses of 0, 22.5, 45, 90, and 135 mg/kg, s.c., daily for 5 days, and liver injury was observed at doses of 90 mg/kg and above, as evidenced by increases in serum activities of alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase, increases in serum total bilirubin, as well as by liver histopathology. OA-induced cholestatic liver injury was further evidenced by marked increases of both unconjugated and conjugated bile acids (BAs) in serum. Gene and protein expression analysis suggested that livers of OA-treated mice had adaptive responses to prevent BA accumulation by suppressing BA biosynthetic enzyme genes (Cyp7a1, 8b1, 27a1, and 7b1); lowering BA uptake transporters (Ntcp and Oatp1b2); and increasing a BA efflux transporter (Ostβ). OA increased the expression of Nrf2 and its target gene, Nqo1, but decreased the expression of AhR, CAR and PPARα along with their target genes, Cyp1a2, Cyp2b10 and Cyp4a10. OA had minimal effects on PXR and Cyp3a11. Taken together, the present study characterized OA-induced liver injury, which is associated with altered BA homeostasis, and alerts its toxicity potential. - Highlights: • Oleanolic acid at higher doses and long-term use may produce liver injury. • Oleanolic acid increased serum ALT, ALP, bilirubin and bile acid concentrations. • OA produced feathery degeneration, inflammation and cell death in the liver. • OA altered bile acid homeostasis, affecting bile acid synthesis and transport.

  2. Gut microbiota and nuclear receptors in bile acid and lipid metabolism : bile acids, more than soaps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Out, Carolien

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome refers to the combination of obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. Metabolic syndrome increases the chance on cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Strategies to prevent and treat these metabolic derangements are therefore urgently needed. For this purp

  3. Steam Cooking Significantly Improves in Vitro Bile Acid Binding of Beets, Eggplant, Asparagus, Carrots, Green Beans and Cauliflower

    Science.gov (United States)

    The relative healthful potential of cooked beets, okra, eggplant, asparagus, carrots, green beans, cauliflower and turnips was evaluated by determining their in vitro bile acid binding using a mixture of bile acids secreted in human bile at a duodenal physiological pH of 6.3. Six treatments and two...

  4. Catalytic Interactions and Molecular Docking of Bile Salt Hydrolase (BSH) from L. plantarum RYPR1 and Its Prebiotic Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Ruby; Singh, Puneet K.; Puniya, Anil K.; Shukla, Pratyoosh

    2017-01-01

    Prebiotics are the non-digestible carbohydrate, which passes through the small intestine into unmetabolized form, reaches the large intestine and undergoes fermentation by the colonic bacteria thus; prebiotics stimulate the growth of probiotic bacteria. Further, bile salt hydrolase (BSH) is an enzyme that catalyses the deconjugation of bile salt, so it has enormous potential toward utilizing such capability of Lactobacillus plantarum RYPR1 toward detoxifying through BSH enzyme activity. In the present study, six isolates of Lactobacillus were evaluated for the co-aggregation assay and the isolate Lactobacillus plantarum RYPR1 was further selected for studies of prebiotic utilization, catalytic interactions and molecular docking. The prebiotic utilization ability was assessed by using commercially available prebiotics lactulose, inulin, xylitol, raffinose, and oligofructose P95. The results obtained revealed that RYPR1 is able to utilize these probiotics, maximum with lactulose by showing an increase in viable cell count (7.33 ± 0.02 to 8.18 ± 0.08). In addition, the molecular docking of BSH from Lactobacillus plantarum RYPR1 was performed which revealed the binding energy –4.42 and 7.03 KJ/mol. This proves a considerably good interactions among BSH and its substrates like Taurocholic acid (–4.42 KJ/mol) and Glycocholic acid (–7.03 KJ/mol). These results from this study establishes that Lactobacillus plantarum RYPR1 possesses good probiotic effects so it could be used for such applications. Further, molecular dynamics simulations were used to analyze the dynamic stability of the of modeled protein to stabilize it for further protein ligand docking and it was observed that residues Asn12, Ile8, and Leu6 were interacting among BSH and its substrates, i.e., Taurocholic acid and Lys88 and Asp126 were interacting with Glycocholic acid. These residues were interacting when the docking was carried out with stabilized BSH protein structure, thus, these residues may

  5. Effects of dietary fiber from wheat, corn, and soy hull bran on excretion of fecal bile acids in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, E W; Emken, E A; Klevay, L M; Sandstead, H H

    1981-06-01

    Effects of dietary fiber on bile acid excretion and fecal bile acid concentration have been studied for seven subjects fed 26 g of either soft white wheat bran, corn bran, soybean hulls, or hard red spring wheat bran. Results indicate that even in a controlled study using a metabolic word, individual subject variation has a major impact on fecal bile acid excretion. This observation has not been fully appreciated in previous human studies. No significant change in the composition of fecal bile acids could be associated with the decrease in serum lipid levels previously reported. A method for the isolation and quantitation of fecal bile acids is described which does not require purification by thin-layer chromatography. A preliminary study of lyophilized fecal samples stored at -10 to -30 degrees C showed very little or no change in bile acid content. Samples stored at room temperatures for 11 months showed a substantial reduction in bile acid content.

  6. Postprandial Plasma Concentrations of Individual Bile Acids and FGF-19 in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, David P; van Nierop, F Samuel; Kulik, Willem

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: Bile acids regulate lipid and carbohydrate metabolism by interaction with membrane or intracellular proteins including the nuclear farnesoid X receptor (FXR). Postprandial activation of ileal FXR leads to secretion of fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF-19), a gut hormone that may be implic......CONTEXT: Bile acids regulate lipid and carbohydrate metabolism by interaction with membrane or intracellular proteins including the nuclear farnesoid X receptor (FXR). Postprandial activation of ileal FXR leads to secretion of fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF-19), a gut hormone that may...... be implicated in postprandial glucose metabolism. OBJECTIVE: To describe postprandial plasma concentrations of 12 individual bile acids and FGF-19 in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and healthy controls. DESIGN AND SETTING: Descriptive study, performed at the Center for Diabetes Research, Gentofte Hospital...... and FGF-19 concentrations. RESULTS: Postprandial total bile acid concentrations increased with increasing meal fat content (P

  7. Review: Mechanisms of How the Intestinal Microbiota Alters the Effects of Drugs and Bile Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaassen, Curtis D; Cui, Julia Yue

    2015-10-01

    Information on the intestinal microbiota has increased exponentially this century because of technical advancements in genomics and metabolomics. Although information on the synthesis of bile acids by the liver and their transformation to secondary bile acids by the intestinal microbiota was the first example of the importance of the intestinal microbiota in biotransforming chemicals, this review will discuss numerous examples of the mechanisms by which the intestinal microbiota alters the pharmacology and toxicology of drugs and other chemicals. More specifically, the altered pharmacology and toxicology of salicylazosulfapridine, digoxin, l-dopa, acetaminophen, caffeic acid, phosphatidyl choline, carnitine, sorivudine, irinotecan, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, heterocyclic amines, melamine, nitrazepam, and lovastatin will be reviewed. In addition, recent data that the intestinal microbiota alters drug metabolism of the host, especially Cyp3a, as well as the significance and potential mechanisms of this phenomenon are summarized. The review will conclude with an update of bile acid research, emphasizing the bile acid receptors (FXR and TGR5) that regulate not only bile acid synthesis and transport but also energy metabolism. Recent data indicate that by altering the intestinal microbiota, either by diet or drugs, one may be able to minimize the adverse effects of the Western diet by altering the composition of bile acids in the intestine that are agonists or antagonists of FXR and TGR5. Therefore, it may be possible to consider the intestinal microbiota as another drug target.

  8. Gut microbiota inhibit Asbt-dependent intestinal bile acid reabsorption via Gata4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Out, Carolien; Patankar, Jay V.; Doktorova, Marcela; Boesjes, Marije; Bos, Trijnie; de Boer, Sanna; Havinga, Rick; Wolters, Henk; Boverhof, Renze; van Dijk, Theo H.; Smoczek, Anna; Bleich, André; Sachdev, Vinay; Kratky, Dagmar; Kuipers, Folkert; Verkade, Henkjan J.; Groen, Albert K.

    2017-01-01

    Background & Aims Regulation of bile acid homeostasis in mammals is a complex process regulated via extensive cross-talk between liver, intestine and intestinal microbiota. Here we studied the effects of gut microbiota on bile acid homeostasis in mice. Methods Bile acid homeostasis was assessed in four mouse models. Germfree mice, conventionally-raised mice, Asbt-KO mice and intestinal-specific Gata4-iKO mice were treated with antibiotics (bacitracin, neomycin and vancomycin; 100 mg/kg) for five days and subsequently compared with untreated mice. Results Attenuation of the bacterial flora by antibiotics strongly reduced fecal excretion and synthesis of bile acids, but increased the expression of the bile acid synthesis enzyme CYP7A1. Similar effects were seen in germfree mice. Intestinal bile acid absorption was increased and accompanied by increases in plasma bile acid levels, biliary bile acid secretion and enterohepatic cycling of bile acids. In the absence of microbiota, the expression of the intestinal bile salt transporter Asbt was strongly increased in the ileum and was also expressed in more proximal parts of the small intestine. Most of the effects of antibiotic treatment on bile acid homeostasis could be prevented by genetic inactivation of either Asbt or the transcription factor Gata4. Conclusions Attenuation of gut microbiota alters Gata4-controlled expression of Asbt, increasing absorption and decreasing synthesis of bile acids. Our data support the concept that under physiological conditions microbiota stimulate Gata4, which suppresses Asbt expression, limiting the expression of this transporter to the terminal ileum. Our studies expand current knowledge on the bacterial control of bile acid homeostasis. PMID:26022694

  9. Multiparametric Flow Cytometry and Cell Sorting for the Assessment of Viable, Injured, and Dead Bifidobacterium Cells during Bile Salt Stress

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Using a flow cytometry-based approach, we assessed the viability of Bifidobacterium lactis DSM 10140 and Bifidobacterium adolescentis DSM 20083 during exposure to bile salt stress. Carboxyfluorescein diacetate (cFDA), propidium iodide (PI), and oxonol [DiBAC4(3)] were used to monitor esterase activity, membrane integrity, and membrane potential, respectively, as indicators of bacterial viability. Single staining with these probes rapidly and noticeably reflected the behavior of the two strain...

  10. Bile salts inhibit growth and induce apoptosis of culture human normal esophageal mucosal epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ru Zhang; Jun Gong; Hui Wang; Li Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of six bile salts:glycocholate (GC), glycochenodeoxycholate (GCDC),glycodeoxycholate (GDC), taurocholate (TC),taurochenodeoxycholate (TCDC), taurodeoxycholate (TDC), and their mixture on cultured human normal esophageal mucosal epithelial cells.METHODS: Human normal esophageal mucosal epithelial cells were cultured with serum-free keratinocyte medium. 3-[4,5-Dimethylthiaolyl]-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay was applied to the detection of cell proliferation. Apoptotic morphology was observed by phase-contrast video microscopy and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Sub-G1 DNA fragmentations and early apoptotic cells were assayed by flow cytometry (FCM) with propidium iodide (PI) staining and annexin V-FITC conjugated with PI staining.Apoptotic DNA ladders on agarose gel electrophoresis were observed.RESULTS: Except for GC, GCDC, GDC, TC, TCDC, TDC and their mixture could initiate growth inhibition of esophageal mucosal epithelial cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. TUNEL and FCM assays demonstrated that the bile salts at 500 μmol/L and their mixture at 1 500 μmol/L induced apoptosis except for GC. The percentage of sub-G1 detected by FCM with PI staining was 83.5% in cells treated with 500μmol/L TC for 2 h, and 19.8%, 20.4%, 25.6%, 13.5%, and 75.8% in cells treated with 500 μmol/L GCDC, TCDC, GDC,TDC, and 1 500 μmol/L mixture for 24 h, respectively,which were higher than that of the control (1.5%). The percentage was 1.4% in cells with 500 μmol/L GC for 24 h.DNA ladders on agarose gel electrophoresis were seen in cells treated with 500 μmol/L TC for 2 h and 1 500 μmol/Lmixture for 24 h.CONCLUSION: All GCDC, GDC, TC, TCDC, TDC and their mixture can inhibit growth and induce apoptosis of cultured human normal esophageal mucosal epithelial cells, but GC is well tolerated by the cells.

  11. Circadian dysregulation disrupts bile acid homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bile acids are potentially toxic compounds and their levels of hepatic production, uptake and export are tightly regulated by many inputs, including circadian rhythm. We tested the impact of disrupting the peripheral circadian clock on integral steps of bile acid homeostasis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Both restricted feeding, which phase shifts peripheral clocks, and genetic ablation in Per1(-/-/Per2(-/- (PERDKO mice disrupted normal bile acid control and resulted in hepatic cholestasis. Restricted feeding caused a dramatic, transient elevation in hepatic bile acid levels that was associated with activation of the xenobiotic receptors CAR and PXR and elevated serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST, indicative of liver damage. In the PERDKO mice, serum bile acid levels were elevated and the circadian expression of key bile acid synthesis and transport genes, including Cyp7A1 and NTCP, was lost. This was associated with blunted expression of a primary clock output, the transcription factor DBP, which transactivates the promoters of both genes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that disruption of the circadian clock results in dysregulation of bile acid homeostasis that mimics cholestatic disease.

  12. The potential influence of genetic variants in genes along bile acid and bile metabolic pathway on blood cholesterol levels in the population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Y.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Boer, J.M.A.; Müller, M.R.

    2010-01-01

    The liver is currently known to be the major organ to eliminate excess cholesterol from our body. It accomplishes this function in two ways: conversion of cholesterol molecules into bile acids (BAs) and secretion of unesterified cholesterol molecules into bile. BAs are synthesized in the hepatocytes

  13. Bile acid sequestrants for cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000787.htm Bile acid sequestrants for cholesterol To use the sharing features on this page, ... are medicines that help lower your LDL (bad) cholesterol . Too much cholesterol in your blood can stick ...

  14. The Escherichia coli SOS gene dinF protects against oxidative stress and bile salts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerónimo Rodríguez-Beltrán

    Full Text Available DNA is constantly damaged by physical and chemical factors, including reactive oxygen species (ROS, such as superoxide radical (O(2(-, hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 and hydroxyl radical (•OH. Specific mechanisms to protect and repair DNA lesions produced by ROS have been developed in living beings. In Escherichia coli the SOS system, an inducible response activated to rescue cells from severe DNA damage, is a network that regulates the expression of more than 40 genes in response to this damage, many of them playing important roles in DNA damage tolerance mechanisms. Although the function of most of these genes has been elucidated, the activity of some others, such as dinF, remains unknown. The DinF deduced polypeptide sequence shows a high homology with membrane proteins of the multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE family. We describe here that expression of dinF protects against bile salts, probably by decreasing the effects of ROS, which is consistent with the observed decrease in H(2O(2-killing and protein carbonylation. These results, together with its ability to decrease the level of intracellular ROS, suggests that DinF can detoxify, either direct or indirectly, oxidizing molecules that can damage DNA and proteins from both the bacterial metabolism and the environment. Although the exact mechanism of DinF activity remains to be identified, we describe for the first time a role for dinF.

  15. Niosomal carriers enhance oral bioavailability of carvedilol: effects of bile salt-enriched vesicles and carrier surface charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzani, Gelareh; Haeri, Azadeh; Daeihamed, Marjan; Bakhtiari-Kaboutaraki, Hamid; Dadashzadeh, Simin

    2015-01-01

    Carvedilol (CRV) is an antihypertensive drug with both alpha and beta receptor blocking activity used to preclude angina and cardiac arrhythmias. To overcome the low, variable oral bioavailability of CRV, niosomal formulations were prepared and characterized: plain niosomes (without bile salts), bile salt-enriched niosomes (bilosomes containing various percentages of sodium cholate or sodium taurocholate), and charged niosomes (negative, containing dicetyl phosphate and positive, containing hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide). All formulations were characterized in terms of encapsulation efficiency, size, zeta potential, release profile, stability, and morphology. Various formulations were administered orally to ten groups of Wistar rats (n=6 per group). The plasma levels of CRV were measured by a validated high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method and pharmacokinetic properties of different formulations were characterized. Contribution of lymphatic transport to the oral bioavailability of niosomes was also investigated using a chylomicron flow-blocking approach. Of the bile salt-enriched vesicles examined, bilosomes containing 20% sodium cholate (F2) and 30% sodium taurocholate (F5) appeared to give the greatest enhancement of intestinal absorption. The relative bioavailability of F2 and F5 formulations to the suspension was estimated to be 1.84 and 1.64, respectively. With regard to charged niosomes, the peak plasma concentrations (Cmax) of CRV for positively (F7) and negatively charged formulations (F10) were approximately 2.3- and 1.7-fold higher than after a suspension. Bioavailability studies also revealed a significant increase in extent of drug absorption from charged vesicles. Tissue histology revealed no signs of inflammation or damage. The study proved that the type and concentration of bile salts as well as carrier surface charge had great influences on oral bioavailability of niosomes. Blocking the lymphatic absorption pathway

  16. Influence of Phosphatidylcholine and Calcium on Self-Association and Bile Salt Mixed Micellar Binding of the Natural Bile Pigment, Bilirubin Ditaurate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubrand, Michael W; Carey, Martin C; Laue, Thomas M

    2015-11-17

    Recently [Neubrand, M. W., et al. (2015) Biochemistry 54, 1542-1557], we determined a concentration-dependent monomer-dimer-tetramer equilibrium in aqueous bilirubin ditaurate (BDT) solutions and explored the nature of high-affinity binding of BDT monomers with monomers and micelles of the common taurine-conjugated bile salts (BS). We now investigate, employing complementary physicochemical methods, including fluorescence emission spectrophotometry and quasi-elastic light scattering spectroscopy, the influence of phosphatidylcholine (PC), the predominant phospholipid of bile and calcium, the major divalent biliary cation, on these self-interactions and heterointeractions. We have used short-chain, lyso and long-chain PC species as models and contrasted our results with those of parallel studies employing unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) as the fully charged dianion. Both bile pigments interacted with the zwitterionic headgroup of short-chain lecithins, forming water-soluble (BDT) and insoluble ion-pair complexes (UCB), respectively. Upon micelle formation, BDT monomers apparently remained at the headgroup mantle of short-chain PCs, but the ion pairs with UCB became internalized within the micelle's hydrophobic core. BDT interacted with the headgroups of unilamellar egg yolk (EY) PC vesicles; however, with the simultaneous addition of CaCl2, a reversible aggregation took place, but not vesicle fusion. With mixed EYPC/BS micelles, BDT became bound to the hydrophilic surface (as with simple BS micelles), and in turn, both BDT and BS bound calcium, but not other divalent cations. The calcium complexation of BDT and BS was enhanced strongly with increases in micellar EYPC, suggesting calcium-mediated cross-bridging of hydrophilic headgroups at the micelle's surface. Therefore, the physicochemical binding of BDT to BS in an artificial bile medium is influenced not only by BS species and concentration but also by long-chain PCs and calcium ions that exert a specific rather

  17. Influence of acid and bile acid on ERK activity, PPARY expression and cell proliferation in normal human esophageal epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Ru Jiang; Jun Gong; Zhen-Ni Zhang; Zhe Qiao

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To observe the effects of acid and bile acid exposure on cell proliferation and the expression of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor Y (PPARy) in normal human esophageal epithelial cells in vitro.METHODS: In vitro cultured normal human esophageal epithelial cells were exposed to acidic media (pH 4.0-6.5), media containing different bile acid (250 μmol/L), media containing acid and bile acid, respectively.Cell proliferation was assessed using MTT and flow cytometry. The expressions of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and PPARy protein were determined by the immunoblotting technique.RESULTS: Acid-exposed (3 min) esophageal cells exhibited a significant increase in proliferation ratio,S phase of the cell cycle (P<0.05) and the level of phosphorylated ERK1/2 protein. When the acid-exposure period exceeded 6 min, we observed a decrease in proliferation ratio and S phase of the cell cycle, with an increased apoptosis ratio (P<0.05). Bile acid exposure (3-12 min) also produced an increase in proliferation ratio, S phase of the cell cycle (P<0.05)and phosphorylated ERK1/2 expression. On the contrary,deoxycholic acid (DCA) exposure (>20 min) decreased proliferation ratio. Compared with bile acid exposure (pH 7.4), bile acid exposure (pH 6.5, 4) significantly decreased proliferation ratio (P<0.05). There was no expression of PPARY in normal human esophageal epithelial cells.CONCLUSION: The rapid stimuli of acid or bile acid increase proliferation in normal human esophageal epithelial cells by activating the ERK pathway.

  18. Bile salt-stimulated lipase of human milk: characterization of the enzyme from preterm and term milk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freed, L.M.; Hamosh, P.; Hamosh, M.

    1986-03-01

    The bile salt-stimulated lipase (BSSL) of human milk is an important digestive enzyme in the newborn whose pancreatic function is immature. Milk from mothers delivering premature infants (preterm milk) has similar levels of BSSL activity to that of mothers of term infants (term milk). This study has determined whether the BSSL in preterm milk has the same characteristics as that in term milk. Milk samples were collected during the first 12 wk of lactation from seven mothers of infants born at 26-30 wk (very preterm, VPT), 31-37 wk (preterm, PT) and 37-42 wk (term, T) gestation. BSSL activity was measured using /sup 3/H-triolein emulsion as substrate. Time course, bile salt and enzyme concentration, pH and pH stability were studied, as well as inhibition of BSSL by eserine. The characteristics of BSSL from preterm and term milk were identical as were comparisons between colostrum and mature milk BSSL. BSSL from all milk sources had a neutral-to-alkaline pH optimum (pH 7.3-8.9), was stable at low pH for 60 min, and was 95-100% inhibited by eserine (greater than or equal to 0.6 mM). BSSL activity, regardless of enzyme source, was bile-salt dependent and was stimulated only by primary bile salts (taurocholate, glycocholate). The data indicate that the BSSL in milks of mothers delivering as early as 26 wk gestation is identical to that in term milk.

  19. New chitosan salt in gastro-resistant oral formulation could interfere with enteric bile salts emulsification of diet fats: preliminary laboratory observations and physiologic rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratter, Andrea; Frare, Carmen; Uras, Giovanni; Bonini, Mauro; Casari Bariani, Enrico; Ragazzo, Barbara; Gaballo, Paolo; Longobardi, Pasquale; Codemo, Carlo; Paoli, Antonio

    2014-06-01

    Chitosan (CH) is a polymer of glucosamine that is extracted from the shells of several sea fruits. It is well recognized as a nutritional supplement that is used to reduce body weight and blood lipid levels, but its clinical efficacy has not been clearly demonstrated. The true mechanism of action and physiological processes involved in these properties of CH are not yet understood or explained. The most accepted theories assume that CH reduces dietary fat absorption by trapping the fat in the gastric lumen. The very low pH of the gastric lumen induces CH jellification and, therefore, entrapment of the fats. This article describes the most plausible mechanism by which CH interferes with fat absorption in the first part of the enteric tract while interacting with cholic acids. We emphasize the weak points of the classic CH-containing formulations, which are unable to prove this theory. We also report preliminary experimental data of a new CH salt-containing formulation that is capable of effectively interfering with bile salt emulsification processes and, as a result, reducing dietary fat absorption.

  20. The cell surface protein Ag43 facilitates phage infection of Escherichia coli in the presence of bile salts and carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabig, Magdalena; Herman-Antosiewicz, Anna; Kwiatkowska, Marta; Los, Marcin; Thomas, Mark S; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz

    2002-05-01

    It was found that infection of Escherichia coli by bacteriophage lambda is inhibited in the presence of certain bile salts and carbohydrates when cells are in the "OFF" state for production of the phase-variable cell surface protein antigen 43 (Ag43). The inhibition of phage growth was found to be due to a significant impairment in the process of phage adsorption. Expression of the gene encoding Ag43 (agn43) from a plasmid or inactivation of the oxyR gene (encoding an activator of genes important for defence against oxidative stress) suppressed this inhibition. A mutation, rpoA341, in the gene encoding the alpha subunit of RNA polymerase also facilitated phage adsorption in the presence of bile salts and carbohydrates. The rpoA341 mutation promoted efficient production of Ag43 in a genetic background that would otherwise be in the "OFF" phase for expression of the agn43 gene. Analysis of a reporter gene fusion demonstrated that the promoter for the agn43 gene was more active in the rpoA341 mutant than in the otherwise isogenic rpoA(+) strain. The combined inhibitory action of bile salts and carbohydrates on phage adsorption and the abolition of this inhibition by production of Ag43 was not restricted to lambda, as a similar phenomenon was observed for the coliphages P1 and T4.

  1. Altered intestinal bile salt biotransformation in a cystic fibrosis (Cftr(-/-)) mouse model with hepato-biliary pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodewes, Frank A. J. A.; van der Wulp, Mariette Y. M.; Beharry, Satti; Doktorova, Marcela; Havinga, Rick; Boverhof, Renze; Phillips, M. James; Durie, Peter R.; Verkade, Henkjan J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cftr(-/-tm1UC) mice develop progressive hepato-biliary pathology. We hypothesize that this liver pathology is related to alterations' in biliary bile hydrophobicity and bile salt metabolism in Cftr(-/-tm1Unc) mice. Methods: We determined bile production, biliary and fecal bile salt- and

  2. Data for the size of cholesterol-fat micelles as a function of bile salt concentration and the physico-chemical properties of six liquid experimental pine-derived phytosterol formulations in a cholesterol-containing artificial intestine fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinsoo Yi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The data in this paper are additional information to the research article entiltled “Inhibition of cholesterol transport in an intestine cell model by pine-derived phytosterols” (Yi et al.,2016 [1]. The data derived from the measurement on six liquid formulations of commercial pine-derived phytosterol (CPP by dynamic light scattering. The data cover micelle size and the zeta-potential for formulations with cholesterol including monoglyceride, oleic acid, and bile salt. The data demonstrate the critical effect of the bile salt concentration on the size of cholesterol-digested fat micelles.

  3. Probing interactions between B-glucan and bile salts at atomic detail by 1H-13C NMR assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Mette Skau; Cornali, Sofia Bolvig; Jensen, Morten G;

    2014-01-01

    Polysaccharides are prospective hosts for the delivery and sequestration of bioactive guest molecules. Polysaccharides of dietary fiber, specifically cereal (1 → 3)(1 → 4)-β-glucans, play a role in lowering the blood plasma cholesterol level in humans. Direct host-guest interactions between β......-glucans and conjugated bile salts are among the possible molecular mechanisms explaining the hypocholesterolemic effects of β-glucans. The present study shows that 1H-13C NMR assays on a time scale of minutes detect minute signal changes in both bile salts and β-glucans, thus indicating dynamic interactions between bile...

  4. Dexamethasone exposure of neonatal rats modulates biliary lipid secretion and hepatic expression of genes controlling bile acid metabolism in adulthood without interfering with primary bile acid kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Yan; Havinga, Rick; Van der Leij, Feike R.; Boverhof, Renze; Sauer, Pieter J. J.; Kuipers, Folkert; Stellaard, Frans

    2008-01-01

    Literature suggests that glucocorticoid (GC) exposure during early life may have long-term consequences into adult life. GCs are known to influence hepatic bile acid synthesis and their transport within the enterohepatic circulation. This study addresses effects of early postnatal exposure to GC on

  5. Biliary lipid, bile acid composition, and dietary correlations in Micmac Indian women. A population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C N; Johnston, J L; McCarthy, S; Field, C A

    1981-01-01

    The precursor state for cholesterol gallstone formation is cholesterol-saturated bile. We studied a high-risk group for cholesterol gallstones to determine whether dietary variables affect bile cholesterol. Bile samples were analyzed from 46 Micmac Indian women without gallstones and 13 with gallstones for molar percentage cholesterol (MPC) and bile acid composition. The data were analyzed by multiple regression analysis with MPC as the dependent variable and the dietary variables, obtained from four consecutive-day food records, and biliary bile acid composition as the independent variables. In the 46 women without gallstones, obesity, calorie range/calorie intake, and iron and calcium intake were, in their order of importance, significant factors. In normal weight subjects (ponderal index > 12.5) relative obesity was still a significant correlate. Obesity and iron intake were positive correlates while calorie range/calorie intake and calcium intake varied inversely. When the effect of obesity was controlled, these factors were still significant in this group, as they were in the gallstone group. In addition, the duration of overnight fast obtained by history, together with the proportions of deoxycholic and chenodeoxycholic acids in bile were correlates of the biliary molar percentage cholesterol.

  6. Between peptides and bile acids: self-assembly of phenylalanine substituted cholic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travaglini, Leana; D'Annibale, Andrea; di Gregorio, Maria Chiara; Schillén, Karin; Olsson, Ulf; Sennato, Simona; Pavel, Nicolae V; Galantini, Luciano

    2013-08-01

    Biocompatible molecules that undergo self-assembly are of high importance in biological and medical applications of nanoscience. Peptides and bile acids are among the most investigated due to their ability to self-organize into many different, often stimuli-sensitive, supramolecular structures. With the aim of preparing molecules mixing the aggregation properties of bile acid and amino acid-based molecules, we report on the synthesis and self-association behavior of two diastereomers obtained by substituting a hydroxyl group of cholic acid with a l-phenylalanine residue. The obtained molecules are amphoteric, and we demonstrate that they show a pH-dependent self-assembly. Both molecules aggregate in globular micelles at high pH, whereas they form tubular superstructures under acid conditions. Unusual narrow nanotubes with outer and inner cross-section diameters of about 6 and 3 nm are formed by the derivatives. The diasteroisomer with α orientation of the substituent forms in addition a wider tubule (17 nm cross-section diameter). The ability to pack in supramolecular tubules is explained in terms of a wedge-shaped bola-form structure of the derivatives. Parallel or antiparallel face-to-face dimers are hypothesized as fundamental building blocks for the formation of the narrow and wide nanotubes, respectively.

  7. Bile Acids in Polycystic Liver Diseases: Triggers of Disease Progression and Potential Solution for Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perugorria, Maria J; Labiano, Ibone; Esparza-Baquer, Aitor; Marzioni, Marco; Marin, Jose J G; Bujanda, Luis; Banales, Jesús M

    2017-01-01

    Polycystic liver diseases (PLDs) are a group of genetic hereditary cholangiopathies characterized by the development and progressive growth of cysts in the liver, which are the main cause of morbidity. Current therapies are based on surgical procedures and pharmacological strategies, which show short-term and modest beneficial effects. Therefore, the determination of the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis appears to be crucial in order to find new potential targets for pharmacological therapy. Ductal plate malformation during embryogenesis and abnormal cystic cholangiocyte growth and secretion are some of the key mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of PLDs. However, the discovery of the presence of bile acids in the fluid collected from human cysts and the intrahepatic accumulation of cytotoxic bile acids in an animal model of PLD (i.e. polycystic kidney (PCK) rat) suggest a potential role of impaired bile acid homeostasis in the pathogenesis of these diseases. On the other hand, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) has emerged as a new potential therapeutic tool for PLDs by promoting the inhibition of cystic cholangiocyte growth in both PCK rats and highly symptomatic patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD: most common type of PLD), and improving symptoms. Chronic treatment with UDCA normalizes the decreased intracellular calcium levels in ADPKD human cholangiocytes in vitro, which results in the reduction of their baseline-stimulated proliferation. Moreover, UDCA decreases the liver concentration of cytotoxic bile acids in PCK rats and the bile acid-dependent enhanced proliferation of cystic cholangiocytes. Here, the role of bile acids in the pathogenesis of PLDs and the potential therapeutic value of UDCA for the treatment of these diseases are reviewed and future lines of investigation in this field are proposed.

  8. CYP2E1-dependent elevation of serum cholesterol, triglycerides, and hepatic bile acids by isoniazid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Jie; Krausz, Kristopher W. [Laboratory of Metabolism, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Li, Feng; Ma, Xiaochao [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, The University of Kansas Medical Center, 4089 KLSIC, MS 1018, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Gonzalez, Frank J., E-mail: fjgonz@helix.nih.gov [Laboratory of Metabolism, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Isoniazid is the first-line medication in the prevention and treatment of tuberculosis. Isoniazid is known to have a biphasic effect on the inhibition–induction of CYP2E1 and is also considered to be involved in isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity. However, the full extent and mechanism of involvement of CYP2E1 in isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity remain to be thoroughly investigated. In the current study, isoniazid was administered to wild-type and Cyp2e1-null mice to investigate the potential toxicity of isoniazid in vivo. The results revealed that isoniazid caused no hepatotoxicity in wild-type and Cyp2e1-null mice, but produced elevated serum cholesterol and triglycerides, and hepatic bile acids in wild-type mice, as well as decreased abundance of free fatty acids in wild-type mice and not in Cyp2e1-null mice. Metabolomic analysis demonstrated that production of isoniazid metabolites was elevated in wild-type mice along with a higher abundance of bile acids, bile acid metabolites, carnitine and carnitine derivatives; these were not observed in Cyp2e1-null mice. In addition, the enzymes responsible for bile acid synthesis were decreased and proteins involved in bile acid transport were significantly increased in wild-type mice. Lastly, treatment of targeted isoniazid metabolites to wild-type mice led to similar changes in cholesterol, triglycerides and free fatty acids. These findings suggest that while CYP2E1 is not involved in isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity, while an isoniazid metabolite might play a role in isoniazid-induced cholestasis through enhancement of bile acid accumulation and mitochondria β-oxidation. -- Highlights: ► Isoniazid metabolites were elevated only in wild-type mice. ► Isoniazid caused no hepatotoxicity in wild-type and Cyp2e1-null mice. ► Isoniazid elevated serum cholesterol and triglycerides, and hepatic bile acids. ► Bile acid transporters were significantly decreased in isoniazid-treated mice.

  9. Bile acid formation in primary human hepatocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Curt Einarsson; Ewa Ellis; Anna Abrahamsson; Bo-G ran Ericzon; Ingemar Bj rkhem; Magnus Axelson

    2000-01-01

    AIM To evaluate a system for bile acid formation in human hepatocytes in comparison with HepG2 cells.METHODS Hepatocytes were isolated from normal human liver tissue and were cultured in serum-freeWilliam's E medium. The medium was collected and renewed every 24 h. Bile acids and their precursors inmedia were finally analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.RESULTS Cholic acid (CA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) conjugated with glycine or taurineaccounted for 70% and 25% of total steroids. One third of CDCA was also conjugated with sulphuric acid.Dexamethasone and thyroid hormone alone or in combination did not significantly affect bile acid formation.The addition of cyclosporin A (10 tm) inhibited the synthesis of CA and CDCA by about 13% and 30%,respectively.CONCLUSION Isolated human hepatocytes in primary culture behave as in the intact liver by convertingalmost quantitatively cholesterol to conjugated CA and CDCA. This is in contrast to cultured HepG2 cells,which release large amounts of bile acid precursors and unconjugated bile acids into the medium.

  10. Differential proteomic analysis of outer membrane enriched extracts of Bacteroides fragilis grown under bile salts stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boente, Renata F; Pauer, Heidi; Silva, Deborah N S; Filho, Joaquim Santos; Sandim, Vanessa; Antunes, Luis Caetano M; Ferreira, Rosana Barreto Rocha; Zingali, Russolina B; Domingues, Regina M C P; Lobo, Leandro A

    2016-06-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is the most commonly isolated anaerobic bacteria from infectious processes. Several virulence traits contribute to the pathogenic nature of this bacterium, including the ability to tolerate the high concentrations of bile found in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The activity of bile salts is similar to detergents and may lead to membrane permeabilization and cell death. Modulation of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) is considered a crucial event to bile salts resistance. The primary objective of the current work was to identify B. fragilis proteins associated with the stress induced by high concentration of bile salts. The outer membrane of B. fragilis strain 638R was isolated after growth either in the presence of 2% conjugated bile salts or without bile salts. The membrane fractions were separated on SDS-PAGE and analyzed by ESI-Q/TOF tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 37 proteins were identified; among them nine were found to be expressed exclusively in the absence of bile salts whereas eight proteins were expressed only in the presence of bile salts. These proteins are related to cellular functions such as transport through membrane, nutrient uptake, and protein-protein interactions. This study demonstrates the alteration of OMPs composition in B. fragilis during bile salts stress resistance and adaptation to environmental changes. Proteomics of OMPs was also shown to be a useful approach in the identification of new targets for functional analyses.

  11. Bile acid formation in primary human hepatocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Curt Einarsson; Ewa Ellis; Anna Abrahamsson; Bo-G6ran Ericzon; Ingemar Bj rkhem; Magnus Axelson

    2000-01-01

    AIM To evaluate a culture system for bile acid formation in primary human hepatocytes in comparison with HepG2 cells. METHODS Hepatocytes were isolated from normal human liver tissue and were cultured in serum-free William's E medium. The medium was collected and renewed every 24 h. Bile acids and their precursors in media were finally analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. RESULTS Cholic acid ( CA ) andchenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) conjugated with glycine or taurine accounted for 70% and 25% of total steroids. A third of CDCA was also conjugated with sulphuric acid. Dexamathasone and thyroid hormorm alone or in combination did not significantly effect bile acid formation. The addition of cyclosporin A (10 μmol/L) inhibited the synthesis of CA and CDCA by about 13% and 30%, respectively. CONCLUSION Isolated human hepatocytes in primary culture behave as in the intact liver by converting cholesterol to conjugated CA and CDCA. This is in contrast to cultured HepG2 cells, which release large amounts of bile acid precursors and unconjugated bile acids into the medium.

  12. Breast milk composition and bile salt-stimulated lipase in well-nourished and under-nourished Nigerian mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gindler, J; Nwankwo, M U; Omene, J A; Roberts, I M; LaRocca, G M; Glew, R H

    1987-03-01

    Breast milk was analysed in 9 under-nourished Nigerian mothers and 23 well-nourished mothers who served as controls. Milk from the under-nourished mothers contained adequate amounts of lactose and total triglycerides, but had significantly lower bile salt-stimulated lipase activity (BSSL); their mean BSSL activity was only about 50% of the activity in milk from the control group. Total milk protein was also significantly lower than for the controls (1.45 vs. 1.09 g/dl, respectively; P less than 0.01). Our findings may have nutritional implications for breast-fed infants of under-nourished nursing mothers.

  13. Decreased hepatotoxic bile acid composition and altered synthesis in progressive human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lake, April D. [University of Arizona, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Novak, Petr [Biology Centre ASCR, Institute of Plant Molecular Biology, Ceske Budejovice 37001 (Czech Republic); Shipkova, Petia; Aranibar, Nelly; Robertson, Donald; Reily, Michael D. [Pharmaceutical Candidate Optimization, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Lu, Zhenqiang [The Arizona Statistical Consulting Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D. [Pharmaceutical Candidate Optimization, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Cherrington, Nathan J., E-mail: cherrington@pharmacy.arizona.edu [University of Arizona, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Bile acids (BAs) have many physiological roles and exhibit both toxic and protective influences within the liver. Alterations in the BA profile may be the result of disease induced liver injury. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a prevalent form of chronic liver disease characterized by the pathophysiological progression from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The hypothesis of this study is that the ‘classical’ (neutral) and ‘alternative’ (acidic) BA synthesis pathways are altered together with hepatic BA composition during progression of human NAFLD. This study employed the use of transcriptomic and metabolomic assays to study the hepatic toxicologic BA profile in progressive human NAFLD. Individual human liver samples diagnosed as normal, steatosis, and NASH were utilized in the assays. The transcriptomic analysis of 70 BA genes revealed an enrichment of downregulated BA metabolism and transcription factor/receptor genes in livers diagnosed as NASH. Increased mRNA expression of BAAT and CYP7B1 was observed in contrast to decreased CYP8B1 expression in NASH samples. The BA metabolomic profile of NASH livers exhibited an increase in taurine together with elevated levels of conjugated BA species, taurocholic acid (TCA) and taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA). Conversely, cholic acid (CA) and glycodeoxycholic acid (GDCA) were decreased in NASH liver. These findings reveal a potential shift toward the alternative pathway of BA synthesis during NASH, mediated by increased mRNA and protein expression of CYP7B1. Overall, the transcriptomic changes of BA synthesis pathway enzymes together with altered hepatic BA composition signify an attempt by the liver to reduce hepatotoxicity during disease progression to NASH. - Highlights: ► Altered hepatic bile acid composition is observed in progressive NAFLD. ► Bile acid synthesis enzymes are transcriptionally altered in NASH livers. ► Increased levels of taurine and conjugated bile acids

  14. INHIBITION OF BILE ACID ACCUMULATION DECREASED THE EXCESSIVE HEPATOCYTE APOPTOSIS AND IMPROVED THE LIVER SECRETION FUNCTIONS ON OBSTRUCTIVE JAUNDICE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akmal Taher

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Excessive hepatocyte apoptosis induced by bile acid accumulation occurred in severe obstructive jaundice, and impair the liver secretion function. The objective of this study is to determine whether the inhibition of bile acid accumulation through bile duct decompression affect the excessive hepatocyte apoptosis and caused improvement the liver secretion functions on human model. In this study we use a before and after study on severe obstructive jaundice patients due to extra hepatic bile duct tumor was decompressed. Bile duct decompression was performed as a model of the role of inhibition of bile acid accumulation inhibition bile acid accumulation and excessive hepatocyte apoptosis. Bile acid and marker of liver secretion functions were serially measured. Liver biopsy pre and post decompression was performed for Hepatocyte apoptosis pathologic examination by TUNEL fluorescing, which measured by 2 people in double blinded system. Total bile acid, and liver secretion functions were measured by automated chemistry analyzer. The result of this study shows that twenty one severe obstructive jaundice patients were included. After decompression the hepatocyte apoptosis index decreased from an average of 53.1 (SD 105 to 11.7 (SD 13.6 (p < 0.05. Average of bile acid serum decreased from 96.4 (SD 53.8 to 19.9 (SD 39.5 until 13.0 (SD 12.6 μmol/L (p < 0.05 Total ilirubin decreased from 20.0 (SD 8.9 to 13.3 (SD 5.0 until 6.2 (SD 4.0 mg/dL (p < 0.05, while the phosphates alkaline (ALP and γ-glutamil transpeptidase (γ-GT activities also decreased ignificantly. In conclusion, bile acids accumulation and excessive hepatocyte poptosis through bile duct decompression improve the liver secretion functions by inhibition mechanism.

  15. Impact of oral vancomycin on gut microbiota, bile acid metabolism, and insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrieze, Anne; Out, Carolien; Fuentes, Susana

    2014-01-01

    in humans would affect fecal microbiota composition and subsequently bile acid and glucose metabolism. METHODS: In this single blinded randomized controlled trial, 20 male obese subjects with metabolic syndrome were randomized to 7 days of amoxicillin 500 mg t.i.d. or 7 days of vancomycin 500 mg t.i.d....... At baseline and after 1 week of therapy, fecal microbiota composition (Human Intestinal Tract Chip phylogenetic microarray), fecal and plasma bile acid concentrations as well as insulin sensitivity (hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp using [6,6-(2)H2]-glucose tracer) were measured. RESULTS: Vancomycin reduced...

  16. In vitro model systems to investigate bile salt export pump (BSEP) activity and drug interactions: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yaofeng; Woolf, Thomas F; Gan, Jinping; He, Kan

    2016-08-05

    The bile salt export pump protein (BSEP), expressed on the canalicular membranes of hepatocytes, is primarily responsible for the biliary excretion of bile salts. The inhibition of BSEP transport activity can lead to an increase in intracellular bile salt levels and liver injury. This review discusses the various in vitro assays currently available for assessing the effect of drugs or other chemical entities to modulate BSEP transport activity. BSEP transporter assays use one of the following platforms: Xenopus laevis oocytes; canalicular membrane vesicles (CMV); BSEP-expressed membrane vesicles; cell lines expressing BSEP; sandwich cultured hepatocytes (SCH); and hepatocytes in suspension. Two of these, BSEP-expressed insect membrane vesicles and sandwich cultured hepatocytes, are the most commonly used assays. BSEP membrane vesicles prepared from transfected insect cells are useful for assessing BSEP inhibition or substrate specificity and exploring mechanisms of BSEP-associated genetic diseases. This model can be applied in a high-throughput format for discovery-drug screening. However, experimental results from use of membrane vesicles may lack physiological relevance and the model does not allow for investigation of in situ metabolism in modulation of BSEP activity. Hepatocyte-based assays that use the SCH format provide results that are generally more physiologically relevant than membrane assays. The SCH model is useful in detailed studies of the biliary excretion of drugs and BSEP inhibition, but due to the complexity of SCH preparation, this model is used primarily for determining biliary clearance and BSEP inhibition in a limited number of compounds. The newly developed hepatocyte in suspension assay avoids many of the complexities of the SCH method. The use of pooled cryopreserved hepatocytes in suspension minimizes genetic variance and individual differences in BSEP activity and also provides the opportunity for higher throughput screening and cross

  17. Beyond intestinal soap-bile acids in metabolic control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Folkert; Bloks, Vincent W.; Groen, Albert K.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, it has become apparent that bile acids are involved in a host of activities beyond their classic functions in bile formation and fat absorption. The identification of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) as a nuclear receptor directly activated by bile acids and the discovery that bi

  18. Pyrene appended bile acid conjugates: Synthesis and a structure-gelation property study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shreedhar Bhat; Arto Valkonen; Juha Koivukorpi; Anupama Ambika; Erkki Kolehmainen; Uday Maitra; Kari Rissanen

    2011-07-01

    A wide variety of novel compounds obtained by combining two types of known organogelators, viz., bile acid alkyl amides and pyrene alkanoic acids, were synthesized and screened for their gelation ability. The 3 esters of 1-pyrene butyric acid (PBA) of alkylamides of deoxycholic acid (DCA) turned out to be effective in the gel formation with many organic solvents although the gelation has to be triggered by the addition of a charge transfer (CT) agent 2,4,7-trinitrofluorenone (TNF). The special feature of these molecules is that the organogelation is achieved only after derivatizing the acid moiety of the 1-pyrenealkanoic acids. Additionally, the gelation properties can be fine-tuned by inserting different functional groups at the bile acid side chain. The gels obtained are deep red in colour and optically transparent up to 2% w/v. The SEM studies of the obtained xerogels revealed bundled rod-like morphology without specialized branching.

  19. Detection of atypical bile acids in disease states and their identification by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-computer techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szczepanik-Van Leeuwen, P. A.; Stellaard, F.

    1978-01-01

    The study of the bile acid constituents of serum, bile, urine, and stool of patients exhibiting liver disease has increased in importance with the availability of newer methods for their detection and identification. A cogent question for study has been whether specific bile acids are toxic and thus are the cause of liver disease, or whether they accumulate as a result of disease-induced alteration in metabolism. Examining a wide variety of clinical samples, we have observed that many patients with diagnosed cholestasis show the presence of atypical bile acids due to metabolic aberrations in either the side chain or in the steroid ring. Because cholestasis represents a spectrum of diseases with differing metabolic and/or anatomic defects and because our studies cover a variety of cholestatic states, we have sought to establish a correlation between the presence of these atypical bile acids and the disease state. The complexity of the bile acid mixtures to be examined requires that gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric-computer techniques be used to provide a reliable analysis. It is believed that atypical bile acids can be readily identified by GC/CI mass spectrometry with great sensitivity. It is also believed that such bile acid analysis may prove useful to the study and diagnosis of liver disease. Present data suggest that the identification of atypical bile acids in biological samples may enable differentiation between different types of intrahepatic cholestasis. Such analyses may prove useful to distinguish specific diseases, such as Byler's disease (and Byler's-like cholestasis) from other types of cholestasis and may distinguish diseases involving mitochondrial defects. Finally, the presence of atypical bile acids may indicate, by the particular compounds formed, where and what kind of damage occurs in a disease and may ultimately establish if these atypical bile acids are a cause or effect of the liver damage.

  20. Multiparametric flow cytometry and cell sorting for the assessment of viable, injured, and dead bifidobacterium cells during bile salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor, Kaouther Ben; Breeuwer, Pieter; Verbaarschot, Patrick; Rombouts, Frank M; Akkermans, Antoon D L; De Vos, Willem M; Abee, Tjakko

    2002-11-01

    Using a flow cytometry-based approach, we assessed the viability of Bifidobacterium lactis DSM 10140 and Bifidobacterium adolescentis DSM 20083 during exposure to bile salt stress. Carboxyfluorescein diacetate (cFDA), propidium iodide (PI), and oxonol [DiBAC4(3)] were used to monitor esterase activity, membrane integrity, and membrane potential, respectively, as indicators of bacterial viability. Single staining with these probes rapidly and noticeably reflected the behavior of the two strains during stress exposure. However, the flow cytometry results tended to overestimate the viability of the two strains compared to plate counts, which appeared to be related to the nonculturability of a fraction of the population as a result of sublethal injury caused by bile salts. When the cells were simultaneously stained with cFDA and PI, flow cytometry and cell sorting revealed a striking physiological heterogeneity within the stressed bifidobacterium population. Three subpopulations could be identified based on their differential uptake of the probes: cF-stained, cF and PI double-stained, and PI-stained subpopulations, representing viable, injured, and dead cells, respectively. Following sorting and recovery, a significant fraction of the double-stained subpopulation (40%) could resume growth on agar plates. Our results show that in situ assessment of the physiological activity of stressed bifidobacteria using multiparameter flow cytometry and cell sorting may provide a powerful and sensitive tool for assessment of the viability and stability of probiotics.

  1. [Correlations of bile acids in the bile of rats in conditions of alloxan induced diabetes melitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danchenko, N M; Vesel'skyĭ, S P; Tsudzevych, B O

    2014-01-01

    The ratio of bile acids in the bile of rats with alloxan diabetes was investigated using the method of thin-layer chromatography. Changes of coefficients of conjugation and hydroxylation of bile acids were calculated and analyzed in half-hour samples of bile obtained during the 3-hour experiment. It has been found that the processes of conjugation of cholic acid with glycine and taurine are inhibited in alloxan diabetes. At the same time a significant increase of free threehydroxycholic and dixydroxycholic bile acids and conjugates of the latter ones with taurine has been registered. Coefficients of hydroxylation in alloxan diabetes show the domination of "acidic" pathway in bile acid biosynthesis that is tightly connected with the activity of mitochondrial enzymes.

  2. Interaction of a dietary fiber (pectin) with gastrointestinal components (bile salts, calcium, and lipase): a calorimetry, electrophoresis, and turbidity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinal-Ruiz, Mauricio; Parada-Alfonso, Fabián; Restrepo-Sánchez, Luz-Patricia; Narváez-Cuenca, Carlos-Eduardo; McClements, David Julian

    2014-12-31

    An in vitro gastrointestinal model consisting of oral, gastric, and intestinal phases was used to elucidate the impact of pectin on the digestion of emulsified lipids. Pectin reduced the extent of lipid digestion, which was attributed to its binding interactions with specific gastrointestinal components. The interaction of pectin with bile salts, lipase, CaCl2, and NaCl was therefore investigated by turbidity, microstructure, electrophoresis, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) at pH 7.0 and 37 °C. ITC showed that the interaction of pectin was endothermic with bile salts, but exothermic with CaCl2, NaCl, and lipase. Electrophoresis, microstructure, and turbidity measurements showed that anionic pectin formed electrostatic complexes with calcium ions, which may have decreased lipid digestion due to increased lipid flocculation or microgel formation because this would reduce the surface area of lipid exposed to the lipase. This research provides valuable insights into the physicochemical and molecular mechanisms of the interaction of pectin with gastrointestinal components that may affect the rate and extent of lipid digestion.

  3. Biofilm Formation and Detachment in Gram-Negative Pathogens Is Modulated by Select Bile Acids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M Sanchez

    Full Text Available Biofilms are a ubiquitous feature of microbial community structure in both natural and host environments; they enhance transmission and infectivity of pathogens and provide protection from human defense mechanisms and antibiotics. However, few natural products are known that impact biofilm formation or persistence for either environmental or pathogenic bacteria. Using the combination of a novel natural products library from the fish microbiome and an image-based screen for biofilm inhibition, we describe the identification of taurine-conjugated bile acids as inhibitors of biofilm formation against both Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Taurocholic acid (1 was isolated from the fermentation broth of the fish microbiome-derived strain of Rhodococcus erythropolis and identified using standard NMR and MS methods. Screening of the twelve predominant human steroidal bile acid components revealed that a subset of these compounds can inhibit biofilm formation, induce detachment of preformed biofilms under static conditions, and that these compounds display distinct structure-activity relationships against V. cholerae and P. aeruginosa. Our findings highlight the significance of distinct bile acid components in the regulation of biofilm formation and dispersion in two different clinically relevant bacterial pathogens, and suggest that the bile acids, which are endogenous mammalian metabolites used to solubilize dietary fats, may also play a role in maintaining host health against bacterial infection.

  4. Biofilm Formation and Detachment in Gram-Negative Pathogens Is Modulated by Select Bile Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Laura M; Cheng, Andrew T; Warner, Christopher J A; Townsley, Loni; Peach, Kelly C; Navarro, Gabriel; Shikuma, Nicholas J; Bray, Walter M; Riener, Romina M; Yildiz, Fitnat H; Linington, Roger G

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are a ubiquitous feature of microbial community structure in both natural and host environments; they enhance transmission and infectivity of pathogens and provide protection from human defense mechanisms and antibiotics. However, few natural products are known that impact biofilm formation or persistence for either environmental or pathogenic bacteria. Using the combination of a novel natural products library from the fish microbiome and an image-based screen for biofilm inhibition, we describe the identification of taurine-conjugated bile acids as inhibitors of biofilm formation against both Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Taurocholic acid (1) was isolated from the fermentation broth of the fish microbiome-derived strain of Rhodococcus erythropolis and identified using standard NMR and MS methods. Screening of the twelve predominant human steroidal bile acid components revealed that a subset of these compounds can inhibit biofilm formation, induce detachment of preformed biofilms under static conditions, and that these compounds display distinct structure-activity relationships against V. cholerae and P. aeruginosa. Our findings highlight the significance of distinct bile acid components in the regulation of biofilm formation and dispersion in two different clinically relevant bacterial pathogens, and suggest that the bile acids, which are endogenous mammalian metabolites used to solubilize dietary fats, may also play a role in maintaining host health against bacterial infection.

  5. Lipid binding protein response to a bile acid library: a combined NMR and statistical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaselli, Simona; Pagano, Katiuscia; Boulton, Stephen; Zanzoni, Serena; Melacini, Giuseppe; Molinari, Henriette; Ragona, Laura

    2015-11-01

    Primary bile acids, differing in hydroxylation pattern, are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver and, once formed, can undergo extensive enzyme-catalysed glycine/taurine conjugation, giving rise to a complex mixture, the bile acid pool. Composition and concentration of the bile acid pool may be altered in diseases, posing a general question on the response of the carrier (bile acid binding protein) to the binding of ligands with different hydrophobic and steric profiles. A collection of NMR experiments (H/D exchange, HET-SOFAST, ePHOGSY NOESY/ROESY and (15) N relaxation measurements) was thus performed on apo and five different holo proteins, to monitor the binding pocket accessibility and dynamics. The ensemble of obtained data could be rationalized by a statistical approach, based on chemical shift covariance analysis, in terms of residue-specific correlations and collective protein response to ligand binding. The results indicate that the same residues are influenced by diverse chemical stresses: ligand binding always induces silencing of motions at the protein portal with a concomitant conformational rearrangement of a network of residues, located at the protein anti-portal region. This network of amino acids, which do not belong to the binding site, forms a contiguous surface, sensing the presence of the bound lipids, with a signalling role in switching protein-membrane interactions on and off.

  6. In Vitro bile acid binding of kale, mustard greens, broccoli, cabbage and green bell pepper improves with microwave cooking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bile acid binding potential of foods and food fractions has been related to lowering the risk of heart disease and that of cancer. Sautéing or steam cooking has been observed to significantly improve bile acid binding of green/leafy vegetables. It was hypothesized that microwave cooking could impr...

  7. Phosphatidylcholine mobility in bile salt depleted rat liver microsomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oliveira Filgueiras, O.M. de; Defize, B.; Echteld, C.J.A. van; Bosch, H. van den

    1980-01-01

    Rat liver microsomes prepared by differential centrifugation are known to contain measurable levels of bile salts. More than 90% of these can be removed by passing the microsomal preparation through a Bio-Gel A-150m column. Bile salt depleted microsomes show a high level (> 95%) of mannose-6-phospha

  8. Suppression of sterol 27-hydroxylase mRNA and transcriptional activity by bile acids in cultured rat hepatocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Twisk, J.; Wit, E.C.M. de; Princen, H.M.G.

    1995-01-01

    In previous work we have demonstrated suppression of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase by bile acids at the level of mRNA and transcription, resulting in a similar decline in bile acid synthesis in cultured rat hepatocytes. In view of the substantial contribution of the 'alternative' or '27-hydroxylase' ro

  9. Bile Acid-Induced Suicidal Erythrocyte Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Lang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In nucleated cells, bile acids may activate cation channels subsequently leading to entry of Ca2+. In erythrocytes, increase of cytosolic Ca2+ activity triggers eryptosis, the suicidal death of erythrocytes characterized by phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface and cell shrinkage. Eryptosis is triggered by bile duct ligation, an effect partially attributed to conjugated bilirubin. The present study explored, whether bile acids may stimulate eryptosis. Methods: Phosphatidylserine exposing erythrocytes have been identified utilizing annexin V binding, cell volume estimated from forward scatter, cytosolic Ca2+ activity determined using Fluo-3 fluorescence, and ceramide abundance at the erythrocyte surface utilizing specific antibodies. Results: The exposure of human erythrocytes to glycochenodesoxycholic (GCDC and taurochenodesoxycholic (TCDC acid was followed by a significant decrease of forward scatter and significant increase of Fluo-3 fluorescence, ceramide abundance as well as annexin V binding. The effect on annexin V binding was significantly blunted, but not abolished by removal of extracellular Ca2+. Conclusion: Bile acids stimulate suicidal cell death, an effect paralleled by and in part due to Ca2+ entry and ceramide. The bile acid induced eryptosis may in turn lead to accelerated clearance of circulating erythrocytes and, thus, may contribute to anemia in cholestatic patients.

  10. Investigation on bile acid receptor regulators. Discovery of cholanoic acid derivatives with dual G-protein coupled bile acid receptor 1 (GPBAR1) antagonistic and farnesoid X receptor (FXR) modulatory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepe, Valentina; Renga, Barbara; Festa, Carmen; Finamore, Claudia; Masullo, Dario; Carino, Adriana; Cipriani, Sabrina; Distrutti, Eleonora; Fiorucci, Stefano; Zampella, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids, the end products of cholesterol metabolism, activate multiple mechanisms through the interaction with membrane G-protein coupled receptors including the bile acid receptor GPBAR1 and nuclear receptors such as the bile acid sensor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR). Even if dual FXR/GPBAR1 agonists are largely considered a novel opportunity in the treatment of several liver and metabolic diseases, selective targeting of one of these receptors represents an attractive therapeutic approach for a wide range of disorders in which dual modulation is associated to severe side effects. In the present study we have investigated around the structure of LCA generating a small library of cholane derivatives, endowed with dual FXR agonism/GPBAR1 antagonism. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of bile acid derivatives able to antagonize GPBAR1.

  11. Deconjugation of Bile Acids with Immobilized Genetically Engineered Lactobacillus plantarum 80(pCBH1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Jones

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Bile acids are important to normal human physiology. However, bile acids can be toxic when produced in pathologically high concentrations in hepatobileary and other diseases. This study shows that immobilized genetically engineered Lactobacillus plantarum 80 (pCBH1 (LP80 (pCBH1 can efficiently hydrolyze bile acids and establishes a basis for their use. Results show that immobilized LP80 (pCBH1 is able to effectively break down the conjugated bile acids into glycodeoxycholic acid (GDCA and taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA with bile salt hydrolase (BSH activities of 0.17 and 0.07 μmol DCA/mg CDW/h, respectively. The deconjugation product, deoxycholic acid (DCA, was diminished by LP80 (pCBH1 within 4 h of initial BSH activity. This in-vitro study suggests that immobilized genetically engineered bacterial cells have important potential for deconjugation of bile acids for lowering of high levels of bile acids for therapy.

  12. Investigation of side chain liquid crystal polymers bearing cholesterol and bile acid derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Junhua; Stephen Freiberg; Francois Brisse; C.Géraldine Bazuin; Zhu Xiaoxia

    2004-01-01

    Cholic acid (or 3a,7a,12a-trihydoxyl-5a-cholan-24-oic acid) and lithocholic acid (or 3a-hydroxyl-5a-cholanic-24-oic acid) are commonly occurring bile acids synthesized from cholesterol in the liver in mammals. They all possess a steroid skeleton containing four rings, three with six carbons and one with five carbons. The transformation of cholesterol to cholic acid results in two major structural changes that affect the steroid skeleton. The first is the hydrogenation of the double bond between C5 and C6 and the second is a conformational flip of ring A from the 5a-position to the 5a-position. In addition, one or more hydroxyl groups are added to the steroid skeleton. Outside of the ring system, C24 is converted from a saturated alkyl to a carboxylic acid group.Side chain polymers based on cholesterol moiety have been made as reported in the literature.Since bile acids and cholesterol are all in the family of steroid molecules, it is of interest to investigate whether bile acids may also act as mesogenic groups.Therefore, flexible spacer groups with 10 carbons are introduced between bile acid skeleton and the poymerizable double bonds. The monomers and polymers are compared with cholesterol and dihydrocholesterol monomers and polymers with the same spacers. Dihydrocholesterol is chosen to investigate the influence of the double bond in the formation of LC, given that both cholesterol and dihydrocholesterol have a planar structure but there is no double bond in the latter. These monomers and their corresponding polymers were characterized for their liquid crystalline (LC) properties by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), polarizing optical microscopy (POM) and X-ray diffraction.It was found that only the compounds bearing the planar cholesterol moieties possess LC phases. It is concluded that the 5a-configuration between the first and second cycles on the steroid skeleton of bile acids does not favor proper alignment of the rigid part of the bile acid moieties

  13. Bile acids are "homeotrophic" sensors of the functional hepatic capacity and regulate adaptive growth during liver regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier, Andreas; Trautwein, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Liver mass depends on one or more unidentified humoral signals that drive regeneration when liver functional capacity is diminished. Bile acids are important liver products, and their levels are tightly regulated. Here, we identify a role for nuclear receptor-dependent bile acid signaling in normal liver regeneration. Elevated bile acid levels accelerate regeneration, and decreased levels inhibit liver regrowth, as does the absence of the primary nuclear bile acid receptor FXR. We propose that FXR activation by increased bile acid flux is a signal of decreased functional capacity of the liver. FXR, and possibly other nuclear receptors, may promote homeostasis not only by regulating expression of appropriate metabolic target genes but also by driving homeotrophic liver growth.

  14. Conserved Aspartic Acid Residues Lining the Extracellular Loop I of Sodium-coupled Bile Acid Transporter ASBT Interact with Na+ and 7α-OH Moieties on the Ligand Cholestane Skeleton*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussainzada, Naissan; Da Silva, Tatiana Claro; Zhang, Eric Y.; Swaan, Peter W.

    2008-01-01

    Functional contributions of residues Val-99—Ser-126 lining extracellular loop (EL) 1 of the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter were determined via cysteine-scanning mutagenesis, thiol modification, and in silico interpretation. Despite membrane expression for all but three constructs (S112C, Y117C, S126C), most EL1 mutants (64%) were inactivated by cysteine mutation, suggesting a functional role during sodium/bile acid co-transport. A negative charge at conserved residues Asp-120 and Asp-122 is required for transport function, whereas neutralization of charge at Asp-124 yields a functionally active transporter. D124A exerts low affinity for common bile acids except deoxycholic acid, which uniquely lacks a 7α-hydroxyl (OH) group. Overall, we conclude that (i) Asp-122 functions as a Na+ sensor, binding one of two co-transported Na+ ions, (ii) Asp-124 interacts with 7α-OH groups of bile acids, and (iii) apolar EL1 residues map to hydrophobic ligand pharmacophore features. Based on these data, we propose a comprehensive mechanistic model involving dynamic salt bridge pairs and hydrogen bonding involving multiple residues to describe sodium-dependent bile acid transporter-mediated bile acid and cation translocation. PMID:18508772

  15. Effect of cholecystectomy on bile acid synthesis and circulating levels of fibroblast growth factor 19

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrera, Francisco; Azocar, Lorena; Molina, Hector; Schalper, Kurt A.; Ocares, Marcia; Liberona, Jessica; Villarroel, Luis; Pimentel, Fernando; Perez-Ayuso, Rosa M.; Nervi, Flavio; Groen, Albert K.; Miquel, Juan F.

    2015-01-01

    Background and rationale for the study. FGF19/15 is a gut-derived hormone presumably governing bile acid (BA) synthesis and gallbladder (GB) refilling. FGF19 mRNA is present in human GB cholangiocytes (hGBECs); however, the physiological significance of GB-derived FGF19 remains unknown. We investiga

  16. Analysis of fecal bile acids and neutral steroids using gas-liquid chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Srikumar, T.S.; Wezendonk, B.; Dokkum, W. van

    1998-01-01

    In the present pilot study, for investigating the physiological effects of different types of nondigestible oligosaccharides, we have validated the application of methodologies for the analysis of bile acids and neutral steroids in feces of human subjects. The accuracy of the extraction and chromato

  17. Spontaneous gallstone formation in deer mice: interaction of cholesterol, bile acids, and dietary fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginnett, Dorothy A; Theis, Jerold H; Kaneko, J Jerry

    2003-01-01

    A study of the physiologic and ecologic factors involved in a spontaneous seasonal gallstone cycle of deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus gambelii) was conducted at the Tulelake National Wildlife Refuge (California, USA) from March 1991 to June 1992. The specific hypothesis examined was whether or not seasonal increases in dietary fiber intake provides the necessary conditions for a solubility defect, or supersaturation mechanism, resulting in precipitation of cholesterol gallstones. Results indicated that in addition to the seasonal gallstone prevalence cycle, these deer mice exhibit significant seasonal cycling in serum cholesterol, serum bile acids, fecal bile acids, and diet composition. These physiologic and dietary cycles were phase-advanced 3 mo over the gallstone prevalence cycle, indicating an approximate 3 mo time period for gallstone formation under field conditions. Further, seasonal dietary fiber (plant material and seeds) was positively correlated with both serum cholesterol and the fecal bile acids. This suggests that in wild deer mice, variations in dietary fiber may significantly affect the resorption of bile acids, thereby providing a potential physiologic and nutritional mechanism for spontaneous cholesterol gallstone formation.

  18. PENGIKATAN GARAM EMPEDU OLEH SUSU KEDELAI TERFERMENTASI DAN STABILITASNYA TERHADAP PEPSIN DAN PANKREATIN [Binding of Bile Salts by Fermented Soymilk and Its Stability Against Pepsin and Pancreatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusmarini1*

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Processed soybean products especially the fermented ones have beneficial health effects since they are capable of reducing the level of plasmacholesterol (hypocholesterolemic effect. One of the mechanisms is by increasing the binding of bile salt. This research was aimed to assess the ability of soymilk, fermented soymilk products and fermented soymilk products combined with enzymatic hydrolysis to bind bile salts. The stability of the binding against hydrolysis by digestive enzymes (pepsin and pancreatin was also evaluated. Fermented soybean products inoculated with isolates of L. plantarum 1 R.11.1.2 was be able to bind 1.40 μmol/100 mg protein (62.26% of natrium taurocholate. This binding ability is slightly higher than that of soymilk to natrium taurocholate, i.e.1.33 μmol/100 mg protein (59.04%. Addition of a protease enzyme specific to hydrophobic amino acid (thermolysin on fermented soymilk products was able to enhance the ability of bind natrium taurocholate. Enzymatic hydrolysis products having a molecular weight of <7 kDa could bind 1.51 μmol/100 mg protein natrium taurocholate (67.4%. There was a significant increase in the binding, i.e. 7.9% by the fermented products or an increase of 13.5% from soymilk. Meanwhile peptides measuring ≥7 kDa showed no binding ability against natrium taurocholate.

  19. Mixed micelles of 7,12-dioxolithocholic acid and selected hydrophobic bile acids: interaction parameter, partition coefficient of nitrazepam and mixed micelles haemolytic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poša, Mihalj; Tepavčević, Vesna

    2011-09-01

    The formation of mixed micelles built of 7,12-dioxolithocholic and the following hydrophobic bile acids was examined by conductometric method: cholic (C), deoxycholic (D), chenodeoxycholic (CD), 12-oxolithocholic (12-oxoL), 7-oxolithocholic (7-oxoL), ursodeoxycholic (UD) and hiodeoxycholic (HD). Interaction parameter (β) in the studied binary mixed micelles had negative value, suggesting synergism between micelle building units. Based on β value, the hydrophobic bile acids formed two groups: group I (C, D and CD) and group II (12-oxoL, 7-oxoL, UD and HD). Bile acids from group II had more negative β values than bile acids from group I. Also, bile acids from group II formed intermolecular hydrogen bonds in aggregates with both smaller (2) and higher (4) aggregation numbers, according to the analysis of their stereochemical (conformational) structures and possible structures of mixed micelles built of these bile acids and 7,12-dioxolithocholic acid. Haemolytic potential and partition coefficient of nitrazepam were higher in mixed micelles built of the more hydrophobic bile acids (C, D, CD) and 7,12-dioxolithocholic acid than in micelles built only of 7,12-dioxolithocholic acid. On the other hand, these mixed micelles still had lower values of haemolytic potential than micelles built of C, D or CD. The mixed micelles that included bile acids: 12-oxoL, 7-oxoL, UD or HD did not significantly differ from the micelles of 7,12-dioxolithocholic acid, observing the values of their haemolytic potential.

  20. Bile acids and bariatric surgery%胆汁酸与减重手术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘光耀; 王群伟; 刘威

    2015-01-01

    As an essential metabolic molecule, bile acids regulate triglyceride, cholesterol, energy metabolism. Bariatric surgery offers a treatment that can reduce weight and induce metabolic syndrome, but the mechanism is still unclear. New researches reveal that serum bile acids are elevated after surgery, as well as the improvement of metabolic disease. The surgery changes gastrointestinal tract, resulting in a short circuiting of the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids. Here we review the bile acids metabolism and their effect after bariatric surgery.%胆汁酸作为机体的重要代谢信号分子,参与了糖类、脂肪及能量的代谢。减重手术目前是治疗治疗肥胖症和代谢综合征有效途径之一,但其机制尚不明确。研究发现,减重手术后胆汁酸水平明显升高,并且与代谢综合征改善正相关。由于减重手术后胃肠道生理结构发生变化,必然会对胆汁酸代谢产生影响。本文对胆汁酸对代谢和对减重手术的影响作一综述。

  1. Determination of stability constants of tauro- and glyco-conjugated bile salts with the negatively charged sulfobutylether-β-cyclodextrin: comparison of affinity capillary electrophoresis and isothermal titration calorimetry and thermodynamic analysis of the interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, René; Østergaard, Jesper; Schönbeck, Jens Christian Sidney;

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the interaction between bile salts present in the intestine of man, dog and rat with the negatively charged cyclodextrin (CD), sulfobutylether-β-cyclodextrin (SBEβCD). The interactions between bile salts and CDs are of importance for the release of C...

  2. Effect of various antibiotics on modulation of intestinal microbiota and bile acid profile in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Youcai; Limaye, Pallavi B.; Renaud, Helen J.; Klaassen, Curtis D., E-mail: curtisklaassenphd@gmail.com

    2014-06-01

    Antibiotic treatments have been used to modulate intestinal bacteria and investigate the role of intestinal bacteria on bile acid (BA) homeostasis. However, knowledge on which intestinal bacteria and bile acids are modified by antibiotics is limited. In the present study, mice were administered various antibiotics, 47 of the most abundant bacterial species in intestine, as well as individual BAs in plasma, liver, and intestine were quantified. Compared to the two antibiotic combinations (vancomycin + imipenem and cephalothin + neomycin), the three single antibiotics (metronidazole, ciprofloxacin and aztreonam) have less effect on intestinal bacterial profiles, and thus on host BA profiles and mRNA expression of genes that are important for BA homeostasis. The two antibiotic combinations decreased the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes in intestine, as well as most secondary BAs in serum, liver and intestine. Additionally, the two antibiotic combinations significantly increased mRNA of the hepatic BA uptake transporters (Ntcp and Oatp1b2) and canalicular BA efflux transporters (Bsep and Mrp2), but decreased mRNA of the hepatic BA synthetic enzyme Cyp8b1, suggesting an elevated enterohepatic circulation of BAs. Interestingly, the two antibiotic combinations tended to have opposite effect on the mRNAs of most intestinal genes, which tended to be inhibited by vancomycin + imipenem but stimulated by cephalothin + neomycin. To conclude, the present study clearly shows that various antibiotics have distinct effects on modulating intestinal bacteria and host BA metabolism. - Highlights: • Various antibiotics have different effects on intestinal bacteria. • Antibiotics alter bile acid composition in mouse liver and intestine. • Antibiotics influence genes involved in bile acid homeostasis. • Clostridia appear to be important for secondary bile acid formation.

  3. Hydrophobicity and Retention Coefficient of Selected Bile Acid Oxo Derivatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posa, Mihalj; Pilipovic, Ana; Lalic, Mladena; Popovic, Jovan

    2010-01-01

    Retention coefficients (k) of cholic acid and its keto derivatives are determined by means of Reversed Phase High Pressure Liquid Chromatography at different temperatures (303K, 309K, and 313K). At each studied temperature, retention factor decreases if the hydroxyl group in the cholic acid molecule

  4. Effect of bile acids on digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. O. Stremoukhov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Studying the effects of different bile acids in the body in recent years significantly increased the understanding of their physiological functions. The role of bile acids is to transfer to Striated border of enterocytes lipids in high micellar concentration and subsequent return them to the water layer in the molecular form. The rate of diffusion of molecules or particles is inversely proportional to the square root of the magnitude of their molecular weight. Main components of the glycoprotein complex (GPC allows to preserve the natural structure of mucosa. Previous physicochemical experiments on GPC established presence of bile acids (3,5 to 10 mg/ml, enzymes (amylase and lipase, amino acids (from 10150 to 29500 ug/ml in the complex. Objective. The aim was to study the influence of bile on fat filtration on the model of GPC. Method and Materials. Soaked filters were put on the tubes: with bile - the first, water - the second group, GPC bile at a dose of 25 mg/kg - the third group. Then on each filter was poured 2 ml of liquid fat. 30 minutes after the start of the experiment the amount of liquid fat that passes through the filter was measured. Results and Discussion. As established in the first group (bile medical, the amount of liquid fat, which passed through the filter amounted to 1,85±0,02 ml. In the second group (water - 0,30 ± 0,03 ml. In the third group (GPC 25 mg/kg - 1,75±0,02 ml. After that the impact of GPC bile in emulsification of fats was studied. 1 ml of vegetable oil and 1,5 ml of purified water were contributed in three series of tubes. The first series of test tubes left unchanged. In the other two 2 ml in 2 series - medical bile in 3 series - GPC bile were added. Tubes were shaken in all series. In the first (control series observed the formation of turbid fluid - emulsion. However, in a few seconds instability of the emulsion was detected. In the second and third series of tubes formation of stable emulsions which are

  5. Calcium in milk products precipitates intestinal fatty acids and secondary bile acids and thus inhibits colonic cytotoxicity in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Govers, MJAP; Termont, DSML; Lapre, JA; Kleibeuker, JH; Vonk, RJ; VanderMeer, R

    1996-01-01

    Dietary calcium may reduce the risk of colon cancer, probably by precipitating cytotoxic surfactants, such as secondary bile acids, in the colonic lumen. We previously showed that milk mineral, an important source of calcium, decreases metabolic risk factors and colonic proliferation in rats, We non

  6. Mechanisms underlying the anti-aging and anti-tumor effects of lithocholic bile acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlia-Ciommo, Anthony; Piano, Amanda; Svistkova, Veronika; Mohtashami, Sadaf; Titorenko, Vladimir I

    2014-09-18

    Bile acids are cholesterol-derived bioactive lipids that play essential roles in the maintenance of a heathy lifespan. These amphipathic molecules with detergent-like properties display numerous beneficial effects on various longevity- and healthspan-promoting processes in evolutionarily distant organisms. Recent studies revealed that lithocholic bile acid not only causes a considerable lifespan extension in yeast, but also exhibits a substantial cytotoxic effect in cultured cancer cells derived from different tissues and organisms. The molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the robust anti-aging and anti-tumor effects of lithocholic acid have emerged. This review summarizes the current knowledge of these mechanisms, outlines the most important unanswered questions and suggests directions for future research.

  7. The Adsorption Effect of Quaternized Chitosan Derivatives on Bile Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu Xian MENG; Ya Qing FENG; Wen Jin LI; Cai Xia YIN; Jin Ping DENG

    2006-01-01

    Three quaternized chitosan derivatives were synthesized and their adsorption performance of bile acid from aqueous solution was studied. The adsorption capacities and rates of bile acid onto quaternized chitosan derivatives were evaluated. The kinetic experimental data properly correlated with the second-order kinetic model, which indicated that the chemical sorption is the rate-limiting step. The results showed that the quaternized chitosan derivatives are favorable adsorbents for bile acid.

  8. Serum bile acids are higher in humans with prior gastric bypass: potential contribution to improved glucose and lipid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patti, Mary-Elizabeth; Houten, Sander M; Bianco, Antonio C;

    2009-01-01

    .02) and peak glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) (r = 0.58, P lipid metabolism in patients......The multifactorial mechanisms promoting weight loss and improved metabolism following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (GB) surgery remain incompletely understood. Recent rodent studies suggest that bile acids can mediate energy homeostasis by activating the G-protein coupled receptor TGR5 and the type 2...... thyroid hormone deiodinase. Altered gastrointestinal anatomy following GB could affect enterohepatic recirculation of bile acids. We assessed whether circulating bile acid concentrations differ in patients who previously underwent GB, which might then contribute to improved metabolic homeostasis. We...

  9. The Vibrio cholerae Mrp system: cation/proton antiport properties and enhancement of bile salt resistance in a heterologous host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzioba-Winogrodzki, Judith; Winogrodzki, Olga; Krulwich, Terry A; Boin, Markus A; Häse, Claudia C; Dibrov, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    The mrp operon from Vibrio cholerae encoding a putative multisubunit Na(+)/H(+) antiporter was cloned and functionally expressed in the antiporter-deficient strain of Escherichia coli EP432. Cells of EP432 expressing Vc-Mrp exhibited resistance to Na(+) and Li(+) as well as to natural bile salts such as sodium cholate and taurocholate. When assayed in everted membrane vesicles of the E. coli EP432 host, Vc-Mrp had sufficiently high antiport activity to facilitate the first extensive analysis of Mrp system from a Gram-negative bacterium encoded by a group 2 mrp operon. Vc-Mrp was found to exchange protons for Li(+), Na(+), and K(+) ions in pH-dependent manner with maximal activity at pH 9.0-9.5. Exchange was electrogenic (more than one H(+) translocated per cation moved in opposite direction). The apparent K(m) at pH 9.0 was 1.08, 1.30, and 68.5 mM for Li(+), Na(+), and K(+), respectively. Kinetic analyses suggested that Vc-Mrp operates in a binding exchange mode with all cations and protons competing for binding to the antiporter. The robust ion antiport activity of Vc-Mrp in sub-bacterial vesicles and its effect on bile resistance of the heterologous host make Vc-Mrp an attractive experimental model for the further studies of biochemistry and physiology of Mrp systems.

  10. Importance of two Enterococcus faecium loci encoding Gls-like proteins for in vitro bile salts stress response and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Tina; Singh, Kavindra V; Sillanpää, Jouko; Nallapareddy, Sreedhar R; Murray, Barbara E

    2011-04-15

    General stress proteins, Gls24 and GlsB, were previously shown to be involved in bile salts resistance of Enterococcus faecalis and in virulence. Here, we identified 2 gene clusters in Enterococcus faecium each encoding a homolog of Gls24 (Gls33 and Gls20; designated on the basis of their predicted sizes) and of GlsB (GlsB and GlsB1). The sequences of the gls33 and gls20 gene clusters from available genomes indicate distinct lineages, with those of hospital-associated CC17 isolates differing from non-CC17 by ∼7% and ∼3.5%, respectively. Deletion of an individual locus did not have a significant effect on virulence in a mouse peritonitis model, whereas a double-deletion mutant was highly attenuated (Pimportant for adaptation to the intestinal environment, in addition to being important for virulence functions.

  11. Effect of Bile Salt Hydrolase Inhibitors on a Bile Salt Hydrolase from Lactobacillus acidophilus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Lin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bile salt hydrolase (BSH, a widely distributed function of the gut microbiota, has a profound impact on host lipid metabolism and energy harvest. Recent studies suggest that BSH inhibitors are promising alternatives to antibiotic growth promoters (AGP for enhanced animal growth performance and food safety. Using a high-purity BSH from Lactobacillus salivarius strain, we have identified a panel of BSH inhibitors. However, it is still unknown if these inhibitors also effectively inhibit the function of the BSH enzymes from other bacterial species with different sequence and substrate spectrum. In this study, we performed bioinformatics analysis and determined the inhibitory effect of identified BSH inhibitors on a BSH from L. acidophilus. Although the L. acidophilus BSH is phylogenetically distant from the L. salivarius BSH, sequence analysis and structure modeling indicated the two BSH enzymes contain conserved, catalytically important amino residues and domain. His-tagged recombinant BSH from L. acidophilus was further purified and used to determine inhibitory effect of specific compounds. Previously identified BSH inhibitors also exhibited potent inhibitory effects on the L. acidophilus BSH. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the BSH from L. salivarius is an ideal candidate for screening BSH inhibitors, the promising alternatives to AGP for enhanced feed efficiency, growth performance and profitability of food animals.

  12. Hypercholesterolemia and changes in lipid and bile acid metabolism in male and female cyp7A1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Sandra K; Lear, Steven R; Deane, Sean; Dubrac, Sandrine; Huling, Sandra L; Nguyen, Lien; Bollineni, Jaya S; Shefer, Sarah; Hyogo, Hideyuki; Cohen, David E; Shneider, Benjamin; Sehayek, Ephraim; Ananthanarayanan, Meena; Balasubramaniyan, Natarajan; Suchy, Fredrick J; Batta, Ashok K; Salen, Gerald

    2003-05-01

    Cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase, a rate-limiting enzyme for bile acid synthesis, has been implicated in genetic susceptibility to atherosclerosis. The gene, CYP7A1, encoding a protein with this activity, is expressed normally only in hepatocytes and is highly regulated. Our cyp7A1 gene knockout mouse colony, as young adults on a chow diet, is hypercholesterolemic. These mice were characterized extensively to understand how cyp7A1 affects lipid and bile acid homeostasis in different tissue compartments and whether gender plays a modifying role. Both male and female cyp7A1-deficient mice had decreased hepatic LDL receptors, unchanged hepatic cholesterol synthesis, increased intestinal cholesterol synthesis and bile acid transporters, and decreased fecal bile acids but increased fecal sterols. In females, cyp7A1 deficiency also caused changes in hepatic fatty acid metabolism, decreased hepatic canalicular bile acid transporter, Bsep, and gallbladder bile composition altered to a lithogenic profile. Taken together, the data suggest that cyp7A1 deficiency results in a proatherogenic phenotype in both genders and leads to a prolithogenic phenotype in females.

  13. PGC-1alpha activates CYP7A1 and bile acid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong-Ju; Campos, Jose A; Gil, Gregorio; Osborne, Timothy F

    2003-12-12

    Cholesterol 7-alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) is the key enzyme that commits cholesterol to the neutral bile acid biosynthesis pathway and is highly regulated. In the current studies, we have uncovered a role for the transcriptional co-activator PGC-1alpha in CYP7A1 gene transcription. PGC-1alpha plays a vital role in adaptive thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue and stimulates genes important to mitochondrial function and oxidative metabolism. It is also involved in the activation of hepatic gluconeogenesic gene expression during fasting. Because the mRNA for CYP7A1 was also induced in mouse liver by fasting, we reasoned that PGC-1alpha might be an important co-activator for CYP7A1. Here we show that PGC-1alpha and CYP7A1 are also co-induced in livers of mice in response to streptozotocin induced diabetes. Additionally, infection of cultured HepG2 cells with a recombinant adenovirus expressing PGC-1alpha directly activates CYP7A1 gene expression and increases bile acid biosynthesis as well. Furthermore, we show that PGC-1alpha activates the CYP7A1 promoter directly in transient transfection assays in cultured cells. Thus, PGC-1alpha is a key activator of CYP7A1 and bile acid biosynthesis and is likely responsible for the fasting and diabetes dependent induction of CYP7A1. PGC-1alpha has already been shown to be a critical activator of several other oxidative processes including adaptive thermogenesis and fatty acid oxidation. Our studies provide further evidence of the fundamental role played by PGC-1alpha in oxidative metabolism and define PGC-1alpha as a link between diabetes and bile acid metabolism.

  14. Unconjugated secondary bile acids activate the unfolded protein response and induce golgi fragmentation via a src-kinase-dependant mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ruchika; Quilty, Francis; Gilmer, John F.; Long, Aideen; Byrne, Anne-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Bile acids are components of gastro-duodenal refluxate and regarded as causative agents in oesophageal disease but the precise mechanisms are unknown. Here we demonstrate that a specific subset of physiological bile acids affect the protein secretory pathway by inducing ER stress, activating the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) and causing disassembly of the Golgi apparatus in oesophageal cells. Deoxycholic acid (DCA), Chemodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) and Lithocholic acid (LCA) activated the PERK arm of the UPR, via phosphorylation of eIF2α and up-regulation of ATF3, CHOP and BiP/GRP78. UPR activation by these bile acids is mechanistically linked with Golgi fragmentation, as modulating the UPR using a PERK inhibitor (GSK2606414) or salubrinal attenuated bile acid-induced effects on Golgi structure. Furthermore we demonstrate that DCA, CDCA and LA activate Src kinase and that inhibition of this kinase attenuated both bile acid-induced BiP/GRP78 expression and Golgi fragmentation. This study highlights a novel mechanism whereby environmental factors (bile acids) impact important cellular processes regulating cell homeostasis, including the UPR and Golgi structure, which may contribute to cancer progression in the oesophagus. PMID:27888615

  15. Bile Acids Trigger GLP-1 Release Predominantly by Accessing Basolaterally Located G Protein-Coupled Bile Acid Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brighton, Cheryl A.; Rievaj, Juraj; Kuhre, Rune E.;

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are well-recognized stimuli of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. This action has been attributed to activation of the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor GPBAR1 (TGR5), although other potential bile acid sensors include the nuclear farnesoid receptor and the apical sodium......-coupled bile acid transporter ASBT. The aim of this study was to identify pathways important for GLP-1 release and to determine whether bile acids target their receptors on GLP-1-secreting L-cells from the apical or basolateral compartment. Using transgenic mice expressing fluorescent sensors specifically in L...... to either TLCA or TDCA. We conclude that the action of bile acids on GLP-1 secretion is predominantly mediated by GPBAR1 located on the basolateral L-cell membrane, suggesting that stimulation of gut hormone secretion may include postabsorptive mechanisms....

  16. Coordinated induction of bile acid detoxification and alternative elimination in mice: role of FXR-regulated organic solute transporter-alpha/beta in the adaptive response to bile acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollner, Gernot; Wagner, Martin; Moustafa, Tarek; Fickert, Peter; Silbert, Dagmar; Gumhold, Judith; Fuchsbichler, Andrea; Halilbasic, Emina; Denk, Helmut; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Trauner, Michael

    2006-05-01

    The bile acid receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a key regulator of hepatic defense mechanisms against bile acids. A comprehensive study addressing the role of FXR in the coordinated regulation of adaptive mechanisms including biosynthesis, metabolism, and alternative export together with their functional significance is lacking. We therefore fed FXR knockout (FXR(-/-)) mice with cholic acid (CA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). Bile acid synthesis and hydroxylation were assessed by real-time RT-PCR for cytochrome P-450 (Cyp)7a1, Cyp3a11, and Cyp2b10 and mass spectrometry-gas chromatography for determination of bile acid composition. Expression of the export systems multidrug resistance proteins (Mrp)4-6 in the liver and kidney and the recently identified basoalteral bile acid transporter, organic solute transporter (Ost-alpha/Ost-beta), in the liver, kidney, and intestine was also investigated. CA and UDCA repressed Cyp7a1 in FXR(+/+) mice and to lesser extents in FXR(-/-) mice and induced Cyp3a11 and Cyp2b10 independent of FXR. CA and UDCA were hydroxylated in both genotypes. CA induced Ost-alpha/Ost-beta in the liver, kidney, and ileum in FXR(+/+) but not FXR(-/-) mice, whereas UDCA had only minor effects. Mrp4 induction in the liver and kidney correlated with bile acid levels and was observed in UDCA-fed and CA-fed FXR(-/-) animals but not in CA-fed FXR(+/+) animals. Mrp5/6 remained unaffected by bile acid treatment. In conclusion, we identified Ost-alpha/Ost-beta as a novel FXR target. Absent Ost-alpha/Ost-beta induction in CA-fed FXR(-/-) animals may contribute to increased liver injury in these animals. The induction of bile acid hydroxylation and Mrp4 was independent of FXR but could not counteract liver toxicity sufficiently. Limited effects of UDCA on Ost-alpha/Ost-beta may jeopardize its therapeutic efficacy.

  17. Role of farnesoid X receptor and bile acids in alcoholic liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Manley

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Alcoholic liver disease (ALD is one of the major causes of liver morbidity and mortality worldwide. Chronic alcohol consumption leads to development of liver pathogenesis encompassing steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and in extreme cases, hepatocellular carcinoma. Moreover, ALD may also associate with cholestasis. Emerging evidence now suggests that farnesoid X receptor (FXR and bile acids also play important roles in ALD. In this review, we discuss the effects of alcohol consumption on FXR, bile acids and gut microbiome as well as their impacts on ALD. Moreover, we summarize the findings on FXR, FoxO3a (forkhead box-containing protein class O3a and PPARα (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha in regulation of autophagy-related gene transcription program and liver injury in response to alcohol exposure.

  18. Increased cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase expression and size of the bile acid pool in the lactating rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooton-Kee, Clavia Ruth; Cohen, David E.; Vore, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Maximal bile acid secretory rates and expression of bile acid transporters in liver and ileum are increased in lactation, possibly to facilitate increased enterohepatic recirculation of bile acids. We determined changes in the size and composition of the bile acid pool and key enzymes of the bile acid synthetic pathway [cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1), sterol 27-hydroxylase (Cyp27a1), and sterol 12α-hydroxylase (Cyp8b1)] in lactating rats relative to female virgin controls. The bile acid pool increased 1.9 to 2.5-fold [postpartum (PP) days 10, 14, and 19–23], compared with controls. A 1.5-fold increase in cholic acids and a 14 to 20% decrease in muricholic acids in lactation significantly increased the hydrophobicity index. In contrast, the hepatic concentration of bile acids and small heterodimer partner mRNA were unchanged in lactation. A 2.8-fold increase in Cyp7a1 mRNA expression at 16 h (10 h of light) demonstrated a shift in the diurnal rhythm at day 10 PP; Cyp7a1 protein expression and cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase activity were significantly increased at this time and remained elevated at day 14 PP but decreased to control levels by day 21 PP. There was an overall decrease in Cyp27a1 mRNA expression and a 20% decrease in Cyp27a1 protein expression, but there was no change in Cyp8b1 mRNA or protein expression at day 10 PP. The increase in Cyp7a1 expression PP provides a mechanism for the increase in the bile acid pool. PMID:18292185

  19. Independent repression of bile acid synthesis and activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) by activated hepatocyte fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) and bile acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chundong; Wang, Fen; Jin, Chengliu; Huang, Xinqiang; McKeehan, Wallace L

    2005-05-06

    The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor complex is a regulator of adult organ homeostasis in addition to its central role in embryonic development and wound healing. FGF receptor 4 (FGFR4) is the sole FGFR receptor kinase that is significantly expressed in mature hepatocytes. Previously, we showed that mice lacking mouse FGFR4 (mR4(-/-)) exhibited elevated fecal bile acids, bile acid pool size, and expression of liver cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the rate-limiting enzyme for canonical neutral bile acid synthesis. To prove that hepatocyte FGFR4 was a negative regulator of cholesterol metabolism and bile acid synthesis independent of background, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing a constitutively active human FGFR4 (CahR4) in hepatocytes and crossed them with the FGFR4-deficient mice to generate CahR4/mR4(-/-) mice. In mice expressing active FGFR4 in liver, fecal bile acid excretion was 64%, bile acid pool size was 47%, and Cyp7a1 expression was 10-30% of wild-type mice. The repressed level of Cyp7a1 expression was resistant to induction by a high cholesterol diet relative to wild-type mice. Expression of CahR4 in mR4(-/-) mouse livers depressed bile acid synthesis below wild-type levels from the elevated levels observed in mR4(-/-). Levels of phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), which is part of a pathway implicated in bile acid-mediated repression of synthesis, was 30% of wild-type levels in mR4(-/-) livers, whereas CahR4 livers exhibited an average 2-fold increase. However, cholate still strongly induced phospho-JNK in mR4(-/-) livers. These results confirm that hepatocyte FGFR4 regulates bile acid synthesis by repression of Cyp7a1 expression. Hepatocyte FGFR4 may contribute to the repression of bile acid synthesis through JNK signaling but is not required for activation of JNK signaling by bile acids.

  20. FGF15/FGFR4 integrates growth factor signaling with hepatic bile acid metabolism and insulin action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong-Ju; Osborne, Timothy F

    2009-04-24

    The current studies show FGF15 signaling decreases hepatic forkhead transcription factor 1 (FoxO1) activity through phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase-dependent phosphorylation. The bile acid receptor FXR (farnesoid X receptor) activates expression of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 15 in the intestine, which acts through hepatic FGFR4 to suppress cholesterol-7alpha hydroxylase (CYP7A1) and limit bile acid production. Because FoxO1 activity and CYP7A1 gene expression are both increased by fasting, we hypothesized CYP7A1 might be a FoxO1 target gene. Consistent with recently reported results, we show CYP7A1 is a direct target of FoxO1. Additionally, we show that the PI 3-kinase pathway is key for both the induction of CYP7A1 by fasting and the suppression by FGF15. FGFR4 is the major hepatic FGF receptor isoform and is responsible for the hepatic effects of FGF15. We also show that expression of FGFR4 in liver was decreased by fasting, increased by insulin, and reduced by streptozotocin-induced diabetes, implicating FGFR4 as a primary target of insulin regulation. Because insulin and FGF both target the PI 3-kinase pathway, these observations suggest FoxO1 is a key node in the convergence of FGF and insulin signaling pathways and functions as a key integrator for the regulation of glucose and bile acid metabolism.

  1. Relationship between entero-hepatic bile acid circulation and interdigestive migrating myoelectrical activity in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Fang; Lei Dong; Wei-Jin Zhang; Jin-Yan Luo

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of entero-hepatic bile acid circulation on the inter-digestive migrating myoelectrical complex (MMC) in rats.METHODS: Thirty-two rats were divided into four groups.Three pairs of bipolar silver electrodes were chronically implanted in the antrum, duodenum and jejunum. Three groups of them were ligated around the upper part of common bile duct (CBD). The experiments were performed in conscious and fasting state. The gastrointestinal myoelectrical activity was recorded. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) and saline were then perfused into stomachs of two groups with CBD obstruction and the effects of them on the MMC were observed.RESULTS: A typical pattern of MMC was observed in normal fasting rats. MMC of antral and duodenal origin disappeared temporarily in earlier stage of CBD obstruction. While MMC of jejunum origin appeared.increased MMC cycle duration was seen after 4 d in rats with CBD obstruction. The MMC after CBD obstruction was characterized by an increased duration of phase Ⅱ-like activity and decreased duration of phase Ⅰ & Ⅲ activity.Perfusion into stomachs with UDCA resulted in a shorter MMC cycle duration and a longer duration of phase Ⅲ of duodenal origin compared to the normal group.CONCLUSION: Entero-hepatic bile acid circulation initiates inter-digestive MMC of duodenal origin.

  2. Characterization of N- and O-linked glycosylation of recombinant human bile salt-stimulated lipase secreted by Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, Robert B; Lubowski, Catherine; Hauer, Charles R; Stack, Robert; McNaughton, Lynn; Gemmill, Trent R; Kumar, S Anand

    2004-03-01

    Recombinant human bile salt-stimulated lipase (hBSSL) was expressed in and secreted by Pichia pastoris, an organism exploited for the large-scale production of recombinant (glyco)proteins by bioprocessing technology. The 76.3-kDa glycoprotein was associated with 75-80 Man and a small amount of GlcNAc. hBSSL has one N-glycosylation site at Asn187, which was 38-40% occupied with a Man(10)GlcNAc(2) structure defined previously in Pichia as the oligosaccharide-lipid form of Man(9)GlcNAc(2) trimmed of the middle-arm terminal alpha 1,2-Man and elongated with Man alpha 1,2Man alpha 1,6-disaccharide attached to the lower-arm core alpha 1,3-Man (Trimble et al. [1991], J. Biol. Chem., 266, 22807-22817). The C-terminal 192 residues of hBSSL contain 16 Pro-rich 11-amino-acid repeats, which include 32 Ser/Thr residues as potential O-glycosylation sites. Using hBSSL as a platform to study Pichia's O-glycosylation capabilities, we found that nearly all of these sites were occupied by mannose-containing O-glycans, whose structures, after beta-elimination and purification, were assigned by (1)H NMR and, in some cases, by linkage-specific exoglycosidases and methylation analysis. The most abundant O-glycan was alpha 1,2-mannobiitol (55%), followed by alpha 1,2-mannotriitol (16%) and mannitol (10%) and a lesser amount was alpha 1,2-mannotetraitol. Unexpectedly, Man(5) and Man(6) O-glycans were present, which had the structure Man beta 1,2Man beta 1,2Man alpha 1,2(Man alpha 1,2)(1,2)mannitol. Also a small amount of a phosphorylated Man(6) O-glycan was characterized by MALDI-TOF MS postsource decay analysis as having the reducing-end mannitol disubstituted with a glycosidically linked phosphorylated Man and an unbranched Man(4) polymer elongated from a different mannitol carbon. This is the first report of the synthesis of beta-Man- and phosphate-containing O-linked constituents on glycoproteins synthesized by P. pastoris.

  3. Complete mapping of crystallization pathways during cholesterol precipitation from model bile: influence of physical-chemical variables of pathophysiologic relevance and identification of a stable liquid crystalline state in cold, dilute and hydrophilic bile salt-containing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D Q; Carey, M C

    1996-03-01

    Using complementary physical-chemical techniques we defined five different crystallization pathways as functions of time (30 days) and increasing lecithin (egg yolk) content in pathophysiologically relevant model biles super-saturated (cholesterol saturation indices, 1.2 - 2.7) by dilution of approximately equal to 29 g/dl bile salt-lecithin-cholesterol micellar solutions. As evidenced by quasi-elastic light-scattering spectroscopy, supersaturation was heralded by the appearance of unilamellar vesicles. With the lowest lecithin contents, arc-like crystals with habit and density (d 1.030 g/mL) consistent with anhydrous cholesterol appeared first and evolved via helical and tubular crystals to form plate-like cholesterol monohydrate crystals (d 1.045 g/mL). With higher lecithin fractions, cholesterol monohydrate crystals appeared earlier than arc and other transitional crystals. With typical physiological lecithin contents, early liquid crystals (d 1.020 g/mL) were followed by cholesterol monohydrate crystals and subsequent appearances of arc and other intermediate crystals. With higher lecithin contents, liquid crystals were followed by cholesterol monohydrate crystals only, and at the highest lecithin mole fractions, liquid crystals appeared that did not generate solid crystals. Added calcium increased solid crystal number in proportion to its concentration (5 - 20 mM) but did not influence appearance times, crystallization pathways, or micellar cholesterol solubilities. Decreases in temperature (37 degrees --> 4 degrees C), total lipid concentration (7.3 --> 2.4 g/dL), and bile salt hydrophobicity (3 alpha, 12 alpha --> 3 alpha, 7 alpha, 12 alpha --> 3 alpha, 7 beta hydroxylated taurine conjugates) progressively shifted all crystallization pathways to lower lecithin contents, retarded crystallization, and decreased micellar cholesterol solubilities. The lecithin content of mother biles decreased markedly during crystallization especially where liquid crystals were

  4. Oral administration of Bifidobacterim bifidum for modulating microflora, acid and bile resistance, and physiological indices in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bao-Gui; Xu, Hai-Bo; Wei, Hua; Zeng, Zhe-Ling; Xu, Feng

    2015-02-01

    Bifidobacteria are generally acknowledged as major gut microflora used as probiotics, which promote human health. In this study, the effects of the administration of Bifidobacterim bifidum on modulating gastrointestinal (GI) tract microflora, acid and bile resistance, and physiological indices in BALB/c mice were investigated. Results showed that B. bifidum can significantly improve the ecosystem of the GI tract by increasing the amount of probiotics and reducing the populations of pathogenic bacteria, as measured by plate count and real-time PCR. After exposure to simulated GI tract conditions, the growth of gut microflora in the B. bifidum group was higher than that in the control group when incubated for 12 h in MRS or nutrient broth adjusted to pH 2.0 or 3.0 or in the presence of a concentration of bile salt (0.45% m/v). The blood biochemical index was examined, and the physiological effect of the cell-free extract of gut microflora was evaluated by measuring the activity of various enzymes, including α-glucosidases, esterase, and lactate dehydrogenase. This study suggested that a B. bifidum strain can stabilize blood sugar, lower cholesterol levels in serum, and improve metabolic activity. Moreover, B. bifidum was a promising enhancer of microbial diversity in mouse intestine and played a vital role in human physiological processes, which can benefit the health of a host.

  5. Fecal excretion pattern of bile acids in rats fed high fat diets and neomycin in induced colon tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, S K; Broitman, S A

    1999-09-06

    Neomycin augments colon tumorigenesis in 1,2 - dimethylhydrazine treated rats fed polyunsaturated fat diet and decreases fecal cholic acid excretion, while it inhibits tumorigenesis with increased cholic acid and decreased deoxycholic acid excretions in rats fed high cholesterol diet. Participation of other fecal bile acids seems to be insignificant in relation to colon carcinogenesis.

  6. Metal salts of alkyl catechol dithiophosphoric acids and oil compositions containing the salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, E.S.; Liston, T.V.

    1988-03-08

    Metal salts of alkyl catechol esters of dithiophosphoric acid suitable as additives in oil compositions are disclosed in this patent. Oil compositions containing the salts of such esters show improved extreme pressure/anti-wear and anit-oxidant properties.

  7. In vitro bile acid binding of mustard greens, kale, broccoli, cabbage and green bell pepper improves with sautéing compared with raw or other methods of preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bile acid binding capacity has been related to cholesterol-lowering potential of foods and food fractions. Lowered recirculating bile acids results in utilization of cholesterol to synthesize bile acid and reduced fat absorption. Secondary bile acids have been associated with increased risk of can...

  8. Antibacterial drug treatment increases intestinal bile acid absorption via elevated levels of ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter but not organic solute transporter α protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Masaaki; Hayashi, Kenjiro; Yamakawa, Hiroki; Yamazoe, Yasushi; Yoshinari, Kouichi

    2015-01-01

    Antibacterial drug treatment increases the bile acid pool size and hepatic bile acid concentration through the elevation of hepatic bile acid synthesis. However, the involvement of intestinal bile acid absorption in the increased bile acid pool size remains unclear. To determine whether intestinal bile acid absorption contributes to the increased bile acid pool in mice treated with antibacterial drugs, we evaluated the levels of bile acid transporter proteins and the capacity of intestinal bile acid absorption. Ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT) mRNA and protein levels were significantly increased in ampicillin (ABPC)-treated mice, whereas organic solute transporter α (OSTα) mRNA levels, but not protein levels, significantly decreased in mice. Similar alterations in the expression levels of bile acid transporters were observed in mice treated with bacitracin/neomycin/streptomycin. The capacity for intestinal bile acid absorption was evaluated by an in situ loop method. Increased ileal absorption of taurochenodeoxycholic acid was observed in mice treated with ABPC. These results suggest that intestinal bile acid absorption is elevated in an ASBT-dependent manner in mice treated with antibacterial drugs.

  9. Relative gene expression of bile salt hydrolase and surface proteins in two putative indigenous Lactobacillus plantarum strains under in vitro gut conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duary, Raj Kumar; Batish, Virender Kumar; Grover, Sunita

    2012-03-01

    Probiotic bacteria must overcome the toxicity of bile salts secreted in the gut and adhere to the epithelial cells to enable their better colonization with extended transit time. Expression of bile salt hydrolase and other proteins on the surface of probiotic bacteria can help in better survivability and optimal functionality in the gut. Two putative Lactobacillus plantarum isolates i.e., Lp9 and Lp91 along with standard strain CSCC5276 were used. A battery of six housekeeping genes viz. gapB, dnaG, gyrA, ldhD, rpoD and 16S rRNA were evaluated by using geNorm 3.4 excel based application for normalizing the expression of bile salt hydrolase (bsh), mucus-binding protein (mub), mucus adhesion promoting protein (mapA), and elongation factor thermo unstable (EF-Tu) in Lp9 and Lp91. The maximal level of relative bsh gene expression was recorded in Lp91 with 2.89 ± 0.14, 4.57 ± 0.37 and 6.38 ± 0.19 fold increase at 2% bile salt concentration after 1, 2 and 3 h, respectively. Similarly, mub and mapA genes were maximally expressed in Lp9 at the level of 20.07 ± 1.28 and 30.92 ± 1.51 fold, when MRS was supplemented with 0.05% mucin and 1% each of bile and pancreatin (pH 6.5). However, in case of EF-Tu, the maximal expression of 42.84 ± 5.64 fold was recorded in Lp91 in the presence of mucin alone (0.05%). Hence, the expression of bsh, mub, mapA and EF-Tu could be considered as prospective biomarkers for screening of novel probiotic lactobacillus strains for optimal functionality in the gut.

  10. Fish protein hydrolysate elevates plasma bile acids and reduces visceral adipose tissue mass in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liaset, Bjørn; Madsen, Lise; Hao, Qin

    2009-01-01

    varying in taurine and glycine contents alter BA metabolism, and thereby modulate the recently discovered systemic effects of BAs. Here we show that rats fed a diet containing saithe fish protein hydrolysate (saithe FPH), rich in taurine and glycine, for 26 days had markedly elevated fasting plasma BA......Conjugation of bile acids (BAs) to the amino acids taurine or glycine increases their solubility and promotes liver BA secretion. Supplementing diets with taurine or glycine modulates BA metabolism and enhances fecal BA excretion in rats. However, it is still unclear whether dietary proteins...

  11. Implication of sortase-dependent proteins of Streptococcus thermophilus in adhesion to human intestinal epithelial cell lines and bile salt tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebouchi, Mounira; Galia, Wessam; Genay, Magali; Soligot, Claire; Lecomte, Xavier; Awussi, Ahoefa Ablavi; Perrin, Clarisse; Roux, Emeline; Dary-Mourot, Annie; Le Roux, Yves

    2016-04-01

    Streptococcus thermophilus (ST) is a lactic acid bacterium widely used in dairy industry and displays several properties which could be beneficial for host. The objective of this study was to investigate, in vitro, the implication of sortase A (SrtA) and sortase-dependent proteins (SDPs) in the adhesion of ST LMD-9 strain to intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and resistance to bile salt mixture (BSM; taurocholoate, deoxycholate, and cholate). The effect of mutations in prtS (protease), mucBP (MUCin-Binding Protein), and srtA genes in ST LMD-9 in these mechanisms were examined. The HT29-MTX, HT29-CL.16E, and Caco-2 TC7 cell lines were used. HT29-MTX and HT29-CL.16E cells express different mucins found in the gastro intestinal tract; whereas, Caco-2 TC7 express cell surface proteins found in the small intestine. All mutants showed different adhesion profiles depending on cell lines. The mutation in genes srtA and mucBP leads to a significant decrease in LMD-9 adhesion capacity to Caco-2 TC7 cells. A mutation in mucBP gene has also shown a significant decrease in LMD-9 adhesion capacity to HT29-CL.16E cells. However, no difference was observed using HT29-MTX cells. Furthermore, ST LMD-9 and srtA mutant were resistant to BSM up to 3 mM. Contrariwise, no viable bacteria were detected for prtS and mucBP mutants at this concentration. Two conclusions could be drawn. First, SDPs could be involved in the LMD-9 adhesion depending on the cell lines indicating the importance of eukaryotic-cell surface components in adherence. Second, SDPs could contribute to resistance to bile salts probably by maintaining the cell membrane integrity.

  12. Oleanolic acid alters bile acid metabolism and produces cholestatic liver injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Zhang, Youcai; Wu, Kai Connie; Fan, Fang; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2013-11-01

    Oleanolic acid (OA) is a triterpenoids that exists widely in plants. OA is effective in protecting against hepatotoxicants. Whereas a low dose of OA is hepatoprotective, higher doses and longer-term use of OA produce liver injury. This study characterized OA-induced liver injury in mice. Adult C57BL/6 mice were given OA at doses of 0, 22.5, 45, 90, and 135 mg/kg, s.c., daily for 5 days, and liver injury was observed at doses of 90 mg/kg and above, as evidenced by increases in serum activities of alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase, increases in serum total bilirubin, as well as by liver histopathology. OA-induced cholestatic liver injury was further evidenced by marked increases of both unconjugated and conjugated bile acids (BAs) in serum. Gene and protein expression analysis suggested that livers of OA-treated mice had adaptive responses to prevent BA accumulation by suppressing BA biosynthetic enzyme genes (Cyp7a1, 8b1, 27a1, and 7b1); lowering BA uptake transporters (Ntcp and Oatp1b2); and increasing a BA efflux transporter (Ostβ). OA increased the expression of Nrf2 and its target gene, Nqo1, but decreased the expression of AhR, CAR and PPARα along with their target genes, Cyp1a2, Cyp2b10 and Cyp4a10. OA had minimal effects on PXR and Cyp3a11. Taken together, the present study characterized OA-induced liver injury, which is associated with altered BA homeostasis, and alerts its toxicity potential.

  13. Differential diagnosis in patients with suspected bile acid synthesis defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dorothea Haas; Hongying Gan-Schreier; Claus-Dieter Langhans; Tilman Rohrer; Guido Engelmann; Maura Heverin; David W Russell

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the clinical presentations associated with bile acid synthesis defects and to describe identification of individual disorders and diagnostic pitfalls.METHODS:Authors describe semiquantitative determination of 16 urinary bile acid metabolites by electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.Sample preparation was performed by solid-phase extraction.The total analysis time was 2 min per sample.Authors determined bile acid metabolites in 363 patients with suspected defects in bile acid metabolism.RESULTS:Abnormal bile acid metabolites were found in 36 patients.Two patients had bile acid synthesis defects but presented with atypical presentations.In 2 other patients who were later shown to be affected by biliary atresia and cystic fibrosis the profile of bile acid metabolites was initially suggestive of a bile acid synthesis defect.Three adult patients suffered from cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis.Nineteen patients had peroxisomal disorders,and 10 patients had cholestatic hepatopathy of other cause.CONCLUSION:Screening for urinary cholanoids should be done in every infant with cholestatic hepatopathy as well as in children with progressive neurological disease to provide specific therapy.

  14. Impaired Bile Acid Homeostasis in Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Zhang

    Full Text Available Severe acute malnutrition (SAM is a major cause of mortality in children under 5 years and is associated with hepatic steatosis. Bile acids are synthesized in the liver and participate in dietary fat digestion, regulation of energy expenditure, and immune responses. The aim of this work was to investigate whether SAM is associated with clinically relevant changes in bile acid homeostasis.An initial discovery cohort with 5 healthy controls and 22 SAM-patients was used to identify altered bile acid homeostasis. A follow up cohort of 40 SAM-patients were then studied on admission and 3 days after clinical stabilization to assess recovery in bile acid metabolism. Recruited children were 6-60 months old and admitted for SAM in Malawi. Clinical characteristics, feces and blood were collected on admission and prior to discharge. Bile acids, 7α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4 and FGF-19 were quantified.On admission, total serum bile acids were higher in children with SAM than in healthy controls and glycine-conjugates accounted for most of this accumulation with median and interquartile range (IQR of 24.6 μmol/L [8.6-47.7] compared to 1.9 μmol/L [1.7-3.3] (p = 0.01 in controls. Total serum bile acid concentrations did not decrease prior to discharge. On admission, fecal conjugated bile acids were lower and secondary bile acids higher at admission compared to pre- discharge, suggesting increased bacterial conversion. FGF19 (Fibroblast growth factor 19, a marker of intestinal bile acid signaling, was higher on admission and was associated with decreased C4 concentrations as a marker of bile acid synthesis. Upon recovery, fecal calprotectin, a marker of intestinal inflammation, was lower.SAM is associated with increased serum bile acid levels despite reduced synthesis rates. In SAM, there tends to be increased deconjugation of bile acids and conversion from primary to secondary bile acids, which may contribute to the development of liver disease.

  15. Submicellar bile salts stimulate phosphatidylcholine transfer activity of sterol carrier protein 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, A N; Cohen, D E

    1998-10-01

    To explore a potential role for sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP2, also known as non-specific lipid transfer protein) in hepatocellular phospholipid trafficking, we examined the influence of submicellar bile salt concentrations on phosphatidylcholine (PC) transfer activity of SCP2. We measured rate constants for first-order transfer of sn-1 palmitoyl, sn-2 parinaroyl PC, a naturally fluorescent self-quenching phospholipid between model membranes. Purified bovine liver SCP2 promoted transfer of PC from donor to acceptor small unilamellar vesicles. Taurine- and glycine-conjugated bile salts (anionic steroid detergent-like molecules), at concentrations well below their critical micellar concentrations, stimulated PC transfer activity of SCP2 80- to 140-fold. Rate constants increased in proportion to bile salt concentration, temperature, and bile salt-membrane binding affinity. Sodium taurofusidate, a conjugated fungal bile salt analog, also activated PC transfer whereas no effect was observed with the anionic and non-ionic straight chain detergents sodium dodecyl sulfate and octylglucoside, respectively. Thermodynamic and kinetic analyses of PC transfer support a mechanism in which bile salts stimulate SCP2 activity by partitioning into donor vesicles and enhancing membrane association of SCP2. These results imply that under physiological conditions, SCP2 may contribute to hepatocellular selection and transport of biliary PCs.

  16. Megalin and cubilin expression in gallbladder epithelium and regulation by bile acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erranz, Benjamín; Miquel, Juan Francisco; Argraves, W Scott; Barth, Jeremy L; Pimentel, Fernando; Marzolo, María-Paz

    2004-12-01

    Cholesterol crystal formation in the gallbladder is a key step in gallstone pathogenesis. Gallbladder epithelial cells might prevent luminal gallstone formation through a poorly understood cholesterol absorption process. Genetic studies in mice have highlighted potential gallstone susceptibility alleles, Lith genes, which include the gene for megalin. Megalin, in conjunction with the large peripheral membrane protein cubilin, mediates the endocytosis of numerous ligands, including HDL/apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I). Although the bile contains apoA-I and several cholesterol-binding megalin ligands, the expression of megalin and cubilin in the gallbladder has not been investigated. Here, we show that both proteins are expressed by human and mouse gallbladder epithelia. In vitro studies using a megalin-expressing cell line showed that lithocholic acid strongly inhibits and cholic and chenodeoxycholic acids increase megalin expression. The effects of bile acids (BAs) were also demonstrated in vivo, analyzing gallbladder levels of megalin and cubilin from mice fed with different BAs. The BA effects could be mediated by the farnesoid X receptor, expressed in the gallbladder. Megalin protein was also strongly increased after feeding a lithogenic diet. These results indicate a physiological role for megalin and cubilin in the gallbladder and provide support for a role for megalin in gallstone pathogenesis.

  17. Bile acids stimulate chloride secretion through CFTR and calcium-activated Cl- channels in Calu-3 airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrick, Siobhán M; Mroz, Magdalena S; Greene, Catherine M; Keely, Stephen J; Harvey, Brian J

    2014-09-01

    Bile acids resulting from the aspiration of gastroesophageal refluxate are often present in the lower airways of people with cystic fibrosis and other respiratory distress diseases. Surprisingly, there is little or no information on the modulation of airway epithelial ion transport by bile acids. The secretory effect of a variety of conjugated and unconjugated secondary bile acids was investigated in Calu-3 airway epithelial cells grown under an air-liquid interface and mounted in Ussing chambers. Electrogenic transepithelial ion transport was measured as short-circuit current (Isc). The taurine-conjugated secondary bile acid, taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA), was found to be the most potent modulator of basal ion transport. Acute treatment (5 min) of Calu-3 cells with TDCA (25 μM) on the basolateral side caused a stimulation of Isc, and removal of extracellular Cl(-) abolished this response. TDCA produced an increase in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-dependent current that was abolished by pretreatment with the CFTR inhibitor CFTRinh172. TDCA treatment also increased Cl(-) secretion through calcium-activated chloride (CaCC) channels and increased the Na(+)/K(+) pump current. Acute treatment with TDCA resulted in a rapid cellular influx of Ca(2+) and increased cAMP levels in Calu-3 cells. Bile acid receptor-selective activation with INT-777 revealed TGR5 localized at the basolateral membrane as the receptor involved in TDCA-induced Cl(-) secretion. In summary, we demonstrate for the first time that low concentrations of bile acids can modulate Cl(-) secretion in airway epithelial cells, and this effect is dependent on both the duration and sidedness of exposure to the bile acid.

  18. Role of bile acids, prostaglandins and COX inhibitors in chronic esophagitis in a mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C Poplawski; D Sosnowski; A Szaflarska-Poplawska; J Sarosiek; R McCallum; Z Bartuzi

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To develop a new experimental model of esophagitis that serves a complementary tool to clinical investigation in an insight into the mechanism of the damage to the esophagus mucosa by aggressive factors, and role of COX inhibitors in this process.METHODS: The study was conducted in 56 male mice.Animals were divided into seven groups: (1) perfused with HCl, (2) perfused with HCl and physiologic concentration of pepsin (HCl/P), (3) perfused with similar HCl/P solution enriched with conjugated bile acids (glycho- and tauro-sodium salts) designated esophageal infusion catheter under the general anesthesia, (4) perfused as in group 2 treated with indometacin, (5) perfused as in group 2 treated with NS-398, (6) perfused as in group 3 treated with indometacin, and (7) perfused as in group 3 treated with NS-398.The esophagus was divided into 3 parts: upper, middle and lower. The PGE2 concentration was measured in all parts of esophagus using RIA method. Esophagus of sacrificed animals was macroscopically evaluated using a low power dissecting microscope (20x). Specimeris, representing the most frequently seen changes were fixed,stained with H&E and assessed microscopically using the damage score, and inflammatory score.RESULTS: The macroscopic changes were significantly severer in HCl/P than those in HCl animals (77%) and in HCl/P/BA group (43%). In HCl/P NS-398 group we noticed significantly less changes than those in not treated group (42%) and in analogical group treated with indometacine (45%). In HCl/P/BA INDO group we observed significantly severer changes than that in not treated group (52%). We noticed less changes in HCl/P NS-398 than that in group with indometacine (46%). In HCl/P/BA NS-398 group we had less changes than that in indometacin group (34%). The microscopic changes observed in HCl/P/BA INDO group were severer than that in not treated group (48%). Esophagitis index in HCl group was significantly lower than in HCl/P and also HCl/P/BA group (32% and

  19. Intestinal absorption and postabsorptive metabolism of linoleic acid in rats with short-term bile duct ligation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minich, DM; Havinga, R; Stellaard, F; Vonk, RJ; Kuipers, F; Verkade, HJ

    2000-01-01

    We investigated in bile duct-ligated (BDL) and sham-operated control rats whether the frequent presence of essential fatty acid deficiency in cholestatic liver disease could be related to linoleic acid malabsorption, altered linoleic acid metabolism, or both. In plasma of BDL rats, the triene-to-tet

  20. [Raman spectrometry of several saturated fatty acids and their salts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Man; Guan, Ping; Liu, Wen-hui; Liu, Yan

    2006-11-01

    Saturated fatty acids and their salts widely exist in the nature, and they are well known as important chemical materials. Their infrared spectra have been studied in detail. Nevertheless, few works on the Raman spectra characteristics of saturated fatty acids and their salts have been published before. Man-made crystals of acetic acid, stearic acid, calcium acetate, magnesium acetate, calcium stearate and magnesium stearate were investigated by means of Fourier transform Raman spectrometry for purpose of realizing their Raman spectra. Positive ions can cause the distinctions between the spectra of saturated fatty acids and their salts. The differences in mass and configuration between Ca2+ and Mg2+ result in the Raman spectra's diversity between calcium and magnesium salts of saturated fatty acids. Meanwhile, it is considered that the long carbon chain weakened the influence of different positive ions on the salts of saturated fatty acids.

  1. HPLC and ELISA analyses of larval bile acids from Pacific and western brook lampreys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, S.-S.; Scott, A.P.; Bayer, J.M.; Seelye, J.G.; Close, D.A.; Li, W.

    2003-01-01

    Comparative studies were performed on two native lamprey species, Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) and western brook lamprey (Lampetra richardsoni) from the Pacific coast along with sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) from the Great Lakes, to investigate their bile acid production and release. HPLC and ELISA analyses of the gall bladders and liver extract revealed that the major bile acid compound from Pacific and western brook larval lampreys was petromyzonol sulfate (PZS), previously identified as a migratory pheromone in larval sea lamprey. An ELISA for PZS has been developed in a working range of 20pg-10ng per well. The tissue concentrations of PZS in gall bladder were 127.40, 145.86, and 276.96??g/g body mass in sea lamprey, Pacific lamprey, and western brook lamprey, respectively. Releasing rates for PZS in the three species were measured using ELISA to find that western brook and sea lamprey released PZS 20 times higher than Pacific lamprey did. Further studies are required to determine whether PZS is a chemical cue in Pacific and western brook lampreys. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM affects vitamin E acetate metabolism and intestinal bile acid signature in monocolonized mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roager, Henrik Munch; Sulek, Karolina; Skov, Kasper

    2014-01-01

    by deconjugation and dehydroxylation of bile acids. Furthermore, we confirmed that carbohydrate metabolism is affected by NCFM in the mouse intestine. Especially, the digestion of larger carbohydrates (penta- and tetrasaccharides) was increased in MC mice. Interestingly, we also found vitamin E (α......-tocopherol acetate) in higher levels in the intestine of GF mice compared to MC mice, suggesting that NCFM either metabolizes the compound orindirectly affects the absorption by changing the metabolome in the intestine. The use of NCFM to increase the uptake of vitamin E supplements in humans and animals is a highly...

  3. Dietary cholesterol supplementation to a plant-based diet suppresses the complete pathway of cholesterol synthesis and induces bile acid production in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortner, Trond M; Björkhem, Ingemar; Krasnov, Aleksei; Timmerhaus, Gerrit; Krogdahl, Åshild

    2014-06-28

    Plants now supply more than 50 % of protein in Norwegian salmon aquafeeds. The inclusion of plant protein in aquafeeds may be associated with decreased lipid digestibility and cholesterol and bile salt levels, indicating that the replacement of fishmeal with plant protein could result in inadequate supplies of cholesterol in fish. A reduction in feed efficiency, fish growth and pathogen resistance is often observed in parallel to alterations in sterol metabolism. Previous studies have indicated that the negative effects induced by plant components can be attenuated when diets are supplemented with cholesterol. The present study evaluated the effects of dietary cholesterol supplementation (1·5 %) in Atlantic salmon fed a plant-based diet for 77 d. The weights of body, intestines and liver were recorded and blood, tissues, faeces, chyme and bile were sampled for the evaluation of effects on growth, nutrient utilisation and metabolism, and transcriptome and metabolite levels, with particular emphasis on sterol metabolism and organ structure and function. Cholesterol supplementation did not affect the growth or organ weights of Atlantic salmon, but seemed to promote the induction of cholesterol and plant sterol efflux in the intestine while suppressing sterol uptake. Cholesterol biosynthesis decreased correspondingly and conversion into bile acids increased. The marked effect of cholesterol supplementation on bile acid synthesis suggests that dietary cholesterol can be used to increase bile acid synthesis in fish. The present study clearly demonstrated how Atlantic salmon adjusted their metabolic functions in response to the dietary load of cholesterol. It has also expanded our understanding of sterol metabolism and turnover, adding to the existing, rather sparse, knowledge of these processes in fish.

  4. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based method for the simultaneous determination of hydroxy sterols and bile acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Clara; Werner, Philipp; Worthmann, Anna; Wegner, Katrin; Tödter, Klaus; Scheja, Ludger; Rohn, Sascha; Heeren, Joerg; Fischer, Markus

    2014-12-01

    Recently, hydroxy sterols and bile acids have gained growing interest as they are important regulators of energy homoeostasis and inflammation. The high number of different hydroxy sterols and bile acid species requires powerful analytical tools to quantify these structurally and chemically similar analytes. Here, we introduce a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based method for rapid quantification of 34 sterols (hydroxy sterols, primary, secondary bile acids as well as their taurine and glycine conjugates). Chromatographic baseline separation of isomeric hydroxy sterols and bile acids is obtained using a rugged amide embedded C18 (polar embedded) stationary phase. The current method features a simple extraction protocol validated for blood plasma, urine, gall bladder, liver, feces, and adipose tissue avoiding solid phase extraction as well as derivatization procedures. The total extraction recovery for representative analytes ranged between 58-86% in plasma, 85% in urine, 79-92% in liver, 76-98% in adipose tissue, 93-104% in feces and 62-79% in gall bladder. The validation procedure demonstrated that the calibration curves were linear over the selected concentration ranges for 97% of the analytes, with calculated coefficients of determination (R2) of greater than 0.99. A feeding study in wild type mice with a standard chow and a cholesterol-enriched Western type diet illustrated that the protocol described here provides a powerful tool to simultaneously quantify cholesterol derivatives and bile acids in metabolically active tissues and to follow the enterohepatic circulation.

  5. Determination of thermodynamic potentials and the aggregation number for micelles with the mass-action model by isothermal titration calorimetry: A case study on bile salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Niels Erik; Westh, Peter; Holm, René

    2015-09-01

    The aggregation number (n), thermodynamic potentials (ΔG, ΔH, ΔS) and critical micelle concentration (CMC) for 6 natural bile salts were determined on the basis of both original and previously published isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) data. Different procedures to estimate parameters of micelles with ITC were compared to a mass-action model (MAM) of reaction type: n⋅S⇌Mn. This analysis can provide guidelines for future ITC studies of systems behaving in accordance with this model such as micelles and proteins that undergo self-association to oligomers. Micelles with small aggregation numbers, as those of bile salts, are interesting because such small aggregates cannot be characterized as a separate macroscopic phase and the widely applied pseudo-phase model (PPM) is inaccurate. In the present work it was demonstrated that the aggregation number of micelles was constant at low concentrations enabling determination of the thermodynamic potentials by the MAM. A correlation between the aggregation number and the heat capacity was found, which implies that the dehydrated surface area of bile salts increases with the aggregation number. This is in accordance with Tanford's principles of opposing forces where neighbouring molecules in the aggregate are better able to shield from the surrounding hydrophilic environment when the aggregation number increases.

  6. Role of AMACR (α-methylacyl-CoA racemase) and MFE-1 (peroxisomal multifunctional enzyme-1) in bile acid synthesis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autio, Kaija J; Schmitz, Werner; Nair, Remya R; Selkälä, Eija M; Sormunen, Raija T; Miinalainen, Ilkka J; Crick, Peter J; Wang, Yuqin; Griffiths, William J; Reddy, Janardan K; Baes, Myriam; Hiltunen, J Kalervo

    2014-07-01

    Cholesterol is catabolized to bile acids by peroxisomal β-oxidation in which the side chain of C27-bile acid intermediates is shortened by three carbon atoms to form mature C24-bile acids. Knockout mouse models deficient in AMACR (α-methylacyl-CoA racemase) or MFE-2 (peroxisomal multifunctional enzyme type 2), in which this β-oxidation pathway is prevented, display a residual C24-bile acid pool which, although greatly reduced, implies the existence of alternative pathways of bile acid synthesis. One alternative pathway could involve Mfe-1 (peroxisomal multifunctional enzyme type 1) either with or without Amacr. To test this hypothesis, we generated a double knockout mouse model lacking both Amacr and Mfe-1 activities and studied the bile acid profiles in wild-type, Mfe-1 and Amacr single knockout mouse line and Mfe-1 and Amacr double knockout mouse lines. The total bile acid pool was decreased in Mfe-1-/- mice compared with wild-type and the levels of mature C24-bile acids were reduced in the double knockout mice when compared with Amacr-deficient mice. These results indicate that Mfe-1 can contribute to the synthesis of mature bile acids in both Amacr-dependent and Amacr-independent pathways.

  7. Bile Acid Determination after Standardized Glucose Load in Pregnant Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, April; Jacobs, Katherine; Vogel, Rachel Isaksson; Lupo, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Objective Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is a rare liver disorder, usually manifesting in the third trimester and associated with increased perinatal morbidity and mortality. The hallmark laboratory abnormality in ICP is elevated fasting serum bile acids; however, there are limited data on whether a nonfasting state affects a pregnant woman's total bile acids. This study assesses fasting and nonfasting bile acid levels in 10 healthy pregnant women after a standardized glucose load to provide insight into the effects of a glucose load on bile acid profiles. Study Design Pilot prospective cohort analysis of serum bile acids in pregnant women. A total of 10 healthy pregnant women from 28 to 32 weeks' gestation were recruited for the study before undergoing a glucose tolerance test. Total serum bile acids were collected for each subject in the overnight fasting state, and 1 and 3 hours after the 100-g glucose load. Results There was a statistically significant difference between fasting versus 3-hour values. There was no statistically significant difference between fasting versus 1-hour and 1-hour versus 3-hour values. Conclusion There is a difference between fasting and nonfasting total serum bile acids after a 100-g glucose load in healthy pregnant women. PMID:26495178

  8. Alterations in nanoparticle protein corona by biological surfactants: impact of bile salts on β-lactoglobulin-coated gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winuprasith, Thunnalin; Chantarak, Sirinya; Suphantharika, Manop; He, Lili; McClements, David Julian

    2014-07-15

    The impact of biological surfactants (bile salts) on the protein (β-lactoglobulin) corona surrounding gold nanoparticles (200 nm) was studied using a variety of analytical techniques at pH 7: dynamic light scattering (DLS); particle electrophoresis (ζ-potential); UV-visible (UV) spectroscopy; transmission electron microscopy (TEM); and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The bile salts adsorbed to the protein-coated nanoparticle surfaces and altered their interfacial composition, charge, and structure. SERS spectra of protein-coated nanoparticles after bile salt addition contained bands from both protein and bile salts, indicating that the protein was not fully displaced by the bile salts. UV, DLS and TEM techniques also indicated that the protein coating was not fully displaced from the nanoparticle surfaces. The impact of bile salts could be described by an orogenic mechanism: mixed interfaces were formed that consisted of islands of aggregated proteins surrounded by a sea of bile salts. This knowledge is useful for understanding the interactions of bile salts with protein-coated colloidal particles, which may be important for controlling the fate of colloidal delivery systems in the human gastrointestinal tract, or the gastrointestinal fate of ingested inorganic nanoparticles.

  9. Effect of various antibiotics on modulation of intestinal microbiota and bile acid profile in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Youcai; Limaye, Pallavi B; Renaud, Helen J; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2014-06-01

    Antibiotic treatments have been used to modulate intestinal bacteria and investigate the role of intestinal bacteria on bile acid (BA) homeostasis. However, knowledge on which intestinal bacteria and bile acids are modified by antibiotics is limited. In the present study, mice were administered various antibiotics, 47 of the most abundant bacterial species in intestine, as well as individual BAs in plasma, liver, and intestine were quantified. Compared to the two antibiotic combinations (vancomycin+imipenem and cephalothin+neomycin), the three single antibiotics (metronidazole, ciprofloxacin and aztreonam) have less effect on intestinal bacterial profiles, and thus on host BA profiles and mRNA expression of genes that are important for BA homeostasis. The two antibiotic combinations decreased the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes in intestine, as well as most secondary BAs in serum, liver and intestine. Additionally, the two antibiotic combinations significantly increased mRNA of the hepatic BA uptake transporters (Ntcp and Oatp1b2) and canalicular BA efflux transporters (Bsep and Mrp2), but decreased mRNA of the hepatic BA synthetic enzyme Cyp8b1, suggesting an elevated enterohepatic circulation of BAs. Interestingly, the two antibiotic combinations tended to have opposite effect on the mRNAs of most intestinal genes, which tended to be inhibited by vancomycin+imipenem but stimulated by cephalothin+neomycin. To conclude, the present study clearly shows that various antibiotics have distinct effects on modulating intestinal bacteria and host BA metabolism.

  10. In vitro bile acid-binding capacity of dietary fibre sources and their effects with bile acid on broiler chicken performance and lipid digestibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemati Matin, H R; Shariatmadari, F; Karimi Torshizi, M A; Chiba, L I

    2016-06-01

    A 4 × 2 factorial experiment was conducted to study the effect of feeding diets-containing dietary fibre (DF) sources and a source of bile acid (BA) on growth performance and lipid metabolism. In addition, in vitro BA-binding capacity of fibre sources was investigated. A total of 256 one-d-old male broiler chickens (Ross 308) were assigned to DF sources [maize-soybean meal (control, C), or 30 g/kg of wheat bran (WB), barley bran (BB) or soybean hulls (SH)] and BA (with or without 1.5 g Na-deoxycholate/kg). Each treatment was replicated 4 times with 8 broiler chickens per cage. The highest in vitro BA-binding capacity was observed with BB (8.76 mg/g BB). From 0 to 21 d, with the addition of BA, the average daily feed intake (ADFI) decreased in broiler chickens fed on the C, WB or BB diets, while there was no difference with the SH diet. With added BA, the average daily gain decreased in broiler chickens fed on the C or SH diets, but it did not change in those fed on the other diets. The addition of BA decreased feed conversion ratio (FCR) in broiler chickens fed on the BB or WB diets, but it increased in those fed on the C or SH diets. Interaction results indicated that the apparent ileal digestibility of lipid increased in broiler chickens fed the C and other DF diets with BA compared to those fed the diets without BA. The addition of BA decreased the pancreas lipase activity (PLA) in broiler chickens fed on the C diet compared to those fed the C diet without BA, while no changes observed in those fed the DF diets with or without BA. No interaction was observed in total liver bile acid (TLBA). The WB, BB and SH with little Na-deoxycholate-binding capacity (chickens. The magnitude of improvement in digestibility of lipid with the addition of BA depends on the source of fibre used and the addition of BA in DF diets had little effect on growth performance in young broiler chicken diets.

  11. Opposing effects of bile acids deoxycholic acid and ursodeoxycholic acid on signal transduction pathways in oesophageal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Latif, Mohamed M; Inoue, Hiroyasu; Reynolds, John V

    2016-09-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) was reported to reduce bile acid toxicity, but the mechanisms underlying its cytoprotective effects are not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of UDCA on the modulation of deoxycholic acid (DCA)-induced signal transduction in oesophageal cancer cells. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) activity was assessed using a gel shift assay. NF-κB activation and translocation was performed using an ELISA-based assay and immunofluorescence analysis. COX-2 expression was analysed by western blotting and COX-2 promoter activity was assessed by luciferase assay. DCA induced NF-κB and AP-1 DNA-binding activities in SKGT-4 and OE33 cells. UDCA pretreatment inhibited DCA-induced NF-κB and AP-1 activation and NF-κB translocation. This inhibitory effect was coupled with a blockade of IκB-α degradation and inhibition of phosphorylation of IKK-α/β and ERK1/2. Moreover, UDCA pretreatment inhibited COX-2 upregulation. Using transient transfection of the COX-2 promoter, UDCA pretreatment abrogated DCA-induced COX-2 promoter activation. In addition, UDCA protected oesophageal cells from the apoptotic effects of deoxycholate. Our findings indicate that UDCA inhibits DCA-induced signalling pathways in oesophageal cancer cells. These data indicate a possible mechanistic role for the chemopreventive actions of UDCA in oesophageal carcinogenesis.

  12. Developments in bile acid kinetic measurements using C-13 and H-2 : 10(5) times improved sensitivity during the last 40 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stellaard, Frans; Brufau, Gemma; Boverhof, Renze; Jonkers, Elles Zwanet; Boer, Theo; Kuipers, Folkert

    2009-01-01

    Bile acid kinetics involve the measurement of pool sizes and turnover rates of individual bile acids. The technique is based on isotope dilution and was first described in the 1950s using radioactive C-14-labelled cholic acid (CA). It took until the 1970s before stable isotopes were introduced for t

  13. Effect of rye bran on excretion of bile acids, cholesterol, nitrogen, and fat in human subjects with ileostomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J X; Lundin, E; Hallmans, G; Adlercreutz, H; Andersson, H; Bosaeus, I; Aman, P; Stenling, R; Dahlgren, S

    1994-02-01

    The excretion of bile acids, cholesterol, dry matter, nitrogen, fat, and energy in ileostomy effluent, and plasma lipid concentrations were studied in eight subjects with ileostomies. The subjects consumed a wheat bread-based, low-fiber diet (LFD) for 3 wk and a rye bran bread-based, high-fiber diet (HFD) for 3 wk. The ileal excretion of dry matter, nitrogen, fat, and energy was higher during the HFD period. The daily excretion and the percentage of conjugated bile acids were significantly higher and the percentage of free bile acids lower in the ileostomy effluents during the HFD as compared with the LFD period. No significant difference in the excretion of cholesterol, net cholesterol, sterol, or net sterol was noted between the HFD and LFD periods. No significant differences in plasma concentrations of HDL-, LDL-, and total cholesterol, and apolipoprotein A-I and B were observed between the two 3-wk dietary periods.

  14. Bile Acids and Dysbiosis in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marialena Mouzaki

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is characterized by dysbiosis. The bidirectional effects between intestinal microbiota (IM and bile acids (BA suggest that dysbiosis may be accompanied by an altered bile acid (BA homeostasis, which in turn can contribute to the metabolic dysregulation seen in NAFLD. This study sought to examine BA homeostasis in patients with NAFLD and to relate that with IM data.This was a prospective, cross-sectional study of adults with biopsy-confirmed NAFLD (non-alcoholic fatty liver: NAFL or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis: NASH and healthy controls (HC. Clinical and laboratory data, stool samples and 7-day food records were collected. Fecal BA profiles, serum markers of BA synthesis 7-alpha-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4 and intestinal BA signalling, as well as IM composition were assessed.53 subjects were included: 25 HC, 12 NAFL and 16 NASH. Levels of total fecal BA, cholic acid (CA, chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA and BA synthesis were higher in patients with NASH compared to HC (p<0.05 for all comparisons. The primary to secondary BA ratio was higher in NASH compared to HC (p = 0.004, but ratio of conjugated to unconjugated BAs was not different between the groups. Bacteroidetes and Clostridium leptum counts were decreased in in a subset of 16 patients with NASH compared to 25 HC, after adjusting for body mass index and weight-adjusted calorie intake (p = 0.028 and p = 0.030, respectively. C. leptum was positively correlated with fecal unconjugated lithocholic acid (LCA (r = 0.526, p = 0.003 and inversely with unconjugated CA (r = -0.669, p<0.0001 and unconjugated CDCA (r = - 0.630, p<0.0001. FGF19 levels were not different between the groups (p = 0.114.In adults with NAFLD, dysbiosis is associated with altered BA homeostasis, which renders them at increased risk of hepatic injury.

  15. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM affects vitamin E acetate metabolism and intestinal bile acid signature in monocolonized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roager, Henrik M; Sulek, Karolina; Skov, Kasper; Frandsen, Henrik L; Smedsgaard, Jørn; Wilcks, Andrea; Skov, Thomas H; Villas-Boas, Silas G; Licht, Tine R

    2014-01-01

    Monocolonization of germ-free (GF) mice enables the study of specific bacterial species in vivo. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM(TM) (NCFM) is a probiotic strain; however, many of the mechanisms behind its health-promoting effect remain unknown. Here, we studied the effects of NCFM on the metabolome of jejunum, cecum, and colon of NCFM monocolonized (MC) and GF mice using liquid chromatography coupled to mass-spectrometry (LC-MS). The study adds to existing evidence that NCFM in vivo affects the bile acid signature of mice, in particular by deconjugation. Furthermore, we confirmed that carbohydrate metabolism is affected by NCFM in the mouse intestine as especially the digestion of oligosaccharides (penta- and tetrasaccharides) was increased in MC mice. Additionally, levels of α-tocopherol acetate (vitamin E acetate) were higher in the intestine of GF mice than in MC mice, suggesting that NCFM affects the vitamin E acetate metabolism. NCFM did not digest vitamin E acetate in vitro, suggesting that direct bacterial metabolism was not the cause of the altered metabolome in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest that NCFM affects intestinal carbohydrate metabolism, bile acid metabolism and vitamin E metabolism, although it remains to be investigated whether this effect is unique to NCFM.

  16. Ursodeoxycholic acid treatment of vanishing bile duct syndromes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thomas Pusl; Ulrich Beuers

    2006-01-01

    Vanishing bile duct syndromes (VBDS) are characterized by progressive loss of small intrahepatic ducts caused by a variety of different diseases leading to chronic cholestasis, cirrhosis, and premature death from liver failure. The majority of adult patients with VBDS suffer from primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a hydrophilic dihydroxy bile acid, is the only drug currently approved for the treatment of patients with PBC, and anticholestatic effects have been reported for several other cholestatic syndromes. Several potential mechanisms of action of UDCA have been proposed including stimulation of hepatobiliary secretion, inhibition of apoptosis and protection of cholangiocytes against toxic effects of hydrophobic bile acids.

  17. Exploitation of Bile Acid Transport Systems in Prodrug Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina Sievänen

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The enterohepatic circulation of bile acids is one of the most efficient recycling routes in the human body. It is a complex process involving numerous transport proteins, which serve to transport bile acids from the small intestine into portal circulation, from the portal circulation into the hepatocyte, from the hepatocyte into the bile, and from the gall bladder to the small intestine. The tremendous transport capacity and organ specificity of enterohepatic circulation combined with versatile derivatization possibilities, rigid steroidal backbone, enantiomeric purity, availability, and low cost have made bile acids attractive tools in designing pharmacological hybrid molecules and prodrugs with the view of improving intestinal absorption, increasing the metabolic stability of pharmaceuticals, specifically targeting drugs to organs involved in enterohepatic circulation, as well as sustaining therapeutically reasonable systemic concentrations of active agents. This article briefly describes bile acid transport proteins involved in enterohepatic circulation, summarizes the key factors affecting on the transport by these proteins, and reviews the use of bile acids and their derivatives in designing prodrugs capable of exploiting the bile acid transport system.

  18. Bile salt receptor complex activates a pathogenic type III secretion system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Peng; Rivera-Cancel, Giomar; Kinch, Lisa N.; Salomon, Dor; Tomchick, Diana R.; Grishin, Nick V.; Orth, Kim

    2016-07-05

    Bile is an important component of the human gastrointestinal tract with an essential role in food absorption and antimicrobial activities. Enteric bacterial pathogens have developed strategies to sense bile as an environmental cue to regulate virulence genes during infection. We discovered thatVibrio parahaemolyticusVtrC, along with VtrA and VtrB, are required for activating the virulence type III secretion system 2 in response to bile salts. The VtrA/VtrC complex activates VtrB in the presence of bile salts. The crystal structure of the periplasmic domains of the VtrA/VtrC heterodimer reveals a β-barrel with a hydrophobic inner chamber. A co-crystal structure of VtrA/VtrC with bile salt, along with biophysical and mutational analysis, demonstrates that the hydrophobic chamber binds bile salts and activates the virulence network. As part of a family of conserved signaling receptors, VtrA/VtrC provides structural and functional insights into the evolutionarily conserved mechanism used by bacteria to sense their environment.

  19. Ablating L-FABP in SCP-2/SCP-x null mice impairs bile acid metabolism and biliary HDL-cholesterol secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gregory G; Atshaves, Barbara P; Landrock, Kerstin K; Landrock, Danilo; Storey, Stephen M; Howles, Philip N; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2014-12-01

    On the basis of their abilities to bind bile acids and/or cholesterol, the physiological role(s) of liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) and sterol carrier protein (SCP) 2/SCP-x (SCP-2/SCP-x) gene products in biliary bile acid and cholesterol formation was examined in gene-ablated male mice. L-FABP (LKO) or L-FABP/SCP-2/SCP-x [triple-knockout (TKO)] ablation markedly decreased hepatic bile acid concentration, while SCP-2/SCP-x [double-knockout (DKO)] ablation alone had no effect. In contrast, LKO increased biliary bile acid, while DKO and TKO had no effect on biliary bile acid levels. LKO and DKO also altered biliary bile acid composition to increase bile acid hydrophobicity. Furthermore, LKO and TKO decreased hepatic uptake and biliary secretion of high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-derived 22-(N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino)-23,24-bisnor-5-cholen-3β-ol (NBD-cholesterol), while DKO alone had no effect. Finally, LKO and, to a lesser extent, DKO decreased most indexes contributing to cholesterol solubility in biliary bile. These results suggest different, but complementary, roles for L-FABP and SCP-2/SCP-x in biliary bile acid and cholesterol formation. L-FABP appears to function more in hepatic retention of bile acids as well as hepatic uptake and biliary secretion of HDL-cholesterol. Conversely, SCP-2/SCP-x may function more in formation and biliary secretion of bile acid, with less impact on hepatic uptake or biliary secretion of HDL-cholesterol.

  20. Species-specific mechanisms for cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) regulation by drugs and bile acids

    OpenAIRE

    C. Handschin.; Gnerre, C; Fraser, D. J.; Martinez-Jimenez, C.; Jover, R; Meyer, U A

    2005-01-01

    The gene encoding cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) is tightly regulated in order to control intrahepatic cholesterol and bile acid levels. Ligands of the xenobiotic-sensing pregnane X receptor inhibit CYP7A1 expression. To retrace the evolution of the molecular mechanisms underlying CYP7A1 inhibition, we used a chicken hepatoma cell system that retains the ability to be induced by phenobarbital and other drugs. Whereas bile acids regulate CYP7A1 via small heterodimer partner and liver ...

  1. Plasma bile acids show a positive correlation with body mass index and are negatively associated with cognitive restraint of eating in obese patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, Philip; Hofmann, Tobias; Ahnis, Anne; Elbelt, Ulf; Goebel-Stengel, Miriam; Klapp, Burghard F.; Rose, Matthias; Stengel, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids may be involved in the regulation of food intake and energy metabolism. The aim of the study was to investigate the association of plasma bile acids with body mass index (BMI) and the possible involvement of circulating bile acids in the modulation of physical activity and eating behavior. Blood was obtained in a group of hospitalized patients with normal weight (BMI 18.5–25 kg/m2), underweight (anorexia nervosa, BMI 50 kg/m2, n = 14–15/group) and plasma bile acid concentrations assessed. Physical activity and plasma bile acids were measured in a group of patients with anorexia nervosa (BMI 14.6 ± 0.3 kg/m2, n = 43). Lastly, in a population of obese patients (BMI 48.5 ± 0.9 kg/m2, n = 85), psychometric parameters related to disordered eating and plasma bile acids were assessed. Plasma bile acids showed a positive correlation with BMI (r = 0.26, p = 0.03) in the population of patients with broad range of BMI (9–85 kg/m2, n = 74). No associations were observed between plasma bile acids and different parameters of physical activity in anorexic patients (p > 0.05). Plasma bile acids were negatively correlated with cognitive restraint of eating (r = −0.30, p = 0.008), while no associations were observed with other psychometric eating behavior-related parameters (p > 0.05) in obese patients. In conclusion, these data may point toward a role of bile acids in the regulation of body weight. Since plasma bile acids are negatively correlated with the cognitive restraint of eating in obese patients, this may represent a compensatory adaptation to prevent further overeating. PMID:26089773

  2. Plasma bile acids show a positive correlation with body mass index and are negatively associated with cognitive restraint of eating in obese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip ePrinz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bile acids may be involved in the regulation of food intake and energy metabolism. The aim of the study was to investigate the association of plasma bile acids with body mass index (BMI and the possible involvement of circulating bile acids in the modulation of physical activity and eating behavior. Blood was obtained in a group of hospitalized patients with normal weight (BMI 18.5-25 kg/m2, underweight (anorexia nervosa, BMI 50 kg/m2, n=14-15/group and plasma bile acid concentrations assessed. Physical activity and plasma bile acids were measured in a group of patients with anorexia nervosa (BMI 14.6±0.3 kg/m2, n=43. Lastly, in a population of obese patients (BMI 48.5±0.9 kg/m2, n=85, psychometric parameters related to disordered eating and plasma bile acids were assessed. Plasma bile acids showed a positive correlation with BMI (r=0.26, p=0.03 in the population of patients with broad range of BMI (9-85 kg/m2, n=74. No associations were observed between plasma bile acids and different parameters of physical activity in anorexic patients (p>0.05. Plasma bile acids were negatively correlated with cognitive restraint of eating (r=-0.30, p=0.008, while no associations were observed with other psychometric eating behavior-related parameters (p>0.05 in obese patients. In conclusion, these data may point towards a role of bile acids in the regulation of body weight. Since plasma bile acids are negatively correlated with the cognitive restraint of eating in obese patients, this may represent a compensatory adaptation to prevent further overeating.

  3. Promotion of classic neutral bile acids synthesis pathway is responsible for cholesterol-lowing effect of Si-miao-yong-an decoction: Application of LC-MS/MS method to determine 6 major bile acids in rat liver and plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ziying; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Ruowen; Gu, Liqiang; Chen, Xiaohui

    2017-02-20

    Si-miao-yong-an decoction (SMYAD), a traditional Chinese medicine formula, significantly reduced plasma TC, LDL-c levels and increased HDL-c level in hyperlipidemia rats. Liver function test and tissue section examination indicated that SMYAD improved liver function and reduced fat accumulation in hyperlipidemia rat liver. A LC-MS/MS method was established and well validated to evaluate major bile acids derived from cholesterol metabolism through the classic neutral pathway and the alternative acidic pathway (cholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid and their taurine and glycine conjugates) in liver and plasma. Increased total 6 bile acids concentrations in both liver and plasma were observed after oral administration of 12g/kg/d, 24g/kg/d and 36g/kg/d of SMYAD in a dose dependent manner which contributed to eliminate of cholesterol. Cholic acid, taurocholic acid and glycocholic acid act as the main products of bile acid classic neutral synthesis pathway and show sharp increase (p<0.01) after treatment of SMYAD at dosage of 24-36g/kg/d. For liver samples, taurocholic acid level act as the largest growth section, while in plasma samples, cholic acid act as the largest growth section after SMYAD treatment, compared with Model group. By contrast, the main products of alternative acidic pathway (chenodeoxycholic acid and its glycine and taurine conjugates) show no significant increase after treatment of SMYAD. In conclusion, the cholesterol lowing effect of SMYAD may be related with the accelerated transformation of cholesterol into bile acids through the classic neutral pathway.

  4. Bile salts induce expression of the afimbrial LDA adhesin of atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Alfredo G; Tutt, Christopher B; Duval, Lisabeth; Popov, Vsevolod; Nasr, Abdelhakim Ben; Michalski, Jane; Scaletsky, Isabel C A

    2007-04-01

    Atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC) strains are frequently implicated in infant diarrhoea in developing countries. Not much is known about the adherence properties of aEPEC; however, it has been shown that these strains can adhere to tissue-cultured cells. A chromosomal region designated the locus for diffuse adherence (LDA) confers aEPEC strain 22 the ability to adhere to culture cells. LDA is an afimbrial adhesin that contains a major subunit, LdaG, whose expression is induced on MacConkey agar at 37 degrees C. We hypothesized that the bile salts found in this culture media induce the expression of LdaG. Strain 22 and the LdaG mutant were grown in Luria-Bertani (LB) media in the presence or absence of bile salts and heat-extracted surface-expressed proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE to determine whether expression of the 25 kDa LdaG protein was induced. Western blot analysis with anti-LdaG confirmed that bile salts enhance LdaG expression at 37 degrees C. Adhesion assays on HeLa cells revealed that adhesion in a diffuse pattern of strain 22 increased in the presence of bile salts. We also confirmed that expression of the localized adherence pattern observed in the ldaG mutant required the presence of a large cryptic plasmid found in strain 22 and that this phenotype was not induced by bile salts. At the transcriptional level, the ldaG-lacZ promoter fusion displayed maximum beta-galactosidase activity when the parent strain was grown in LB supplemented with bile salts. Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting analysis, immunogold labelling electron microscopy and immunofluorescence using anti-LdaG sera confirmed that LDA is a bile salts-inducible surface-expressed afimbrial adhesin. Finally, LdaG expression was induced in presence of individual bile salts but not by other detergents. We concluded that bile salts increase expression of LDA, conferring a diffuse adherence pattern and having an impact on the adhesion properties of this aEPEC strain.

  5. Metabolism of bile salts in mice influences spore germination in Clostridium difficile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Giel

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile, a spore-forming bacterium, causes antibiotic-associated diarrhea. In order to produce toxins and cause disease, C. difficile spores must germinate and grow out as vegetative cells in the host. Although a few compounds capable of germinating C. difficile spores in vitro have been identified, the in vivo signal(s to which the spores respond were not previously known. Examination of intestinal and cecal extracts from untreated and antibiotic-treated mice revealed that extracts from the antibiotic-treated mice can stimulate colony formation from spores to greater levels. Treatment of these extracts with cholestyramine, a bile salt binding resin, severely decreased the ability of the extracts to stimulate colony formation from spores. This result, along with the facts that the germination factor is small, heat-stable, and water-soluble, support the idea that bile salts stimulate germination of C. difficile spores in vivo. All extracts able to stimulate high level of colony formation from spores had a higher proportion of primary to secondary bile salts than extracts that could not. In addition, cecal flora from antibiotic-treated mice was less able to modify the germinant taurocholate relative to flora from untreated mice, indicating that the population of bile salt modifying bacteria differed between the two groups. Taken together, these data suggest that an in vivo-produced compound, likely bile salts, stimulates colony formation from C. difficile spores and that levels of this compound are influenced by the commensal gastrointestinal flora.

  6. Hepatocyte MyD88 affects bile acids, gut microbiota and metabolome contributing to regulate glucose and lipid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duparc, Thibaut; Plovier, Hubert; Marrachelli, Vannina G

    2016-01-01

    performed microarrays and quantitative PCRs in the liver. In addition, we investigated the gut microbiota composition, bile acid profile and both liver and plasma metabolome. We analysed the expression pattern of genes in the liver of obese humans developing non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). RESULTS...

  7. Improvements in glucose metabolism early after gastric bypass surgery are not explained by increases in total bile acids and fibroblast growth factor 19 concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Nils B; Dirksen, Carsten; Bojsen-Møller, Kirstine N;

    2015-01-01

    Context: Bile acids and fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) have been suggested as key mediators of the improvements in glucose metabolism after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). Objective: To describe fasting and postprandial state total bile acid (TBA) and FGF19 concentrations before and after...

  8. Cholesterol-lowering effects and mechanisms in view of bile acid pathway of resveratrol and resveratrol-glucuronides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resveratrol (Res) was previously reported to be capable of lowering plasma TC and LDL-C. The mechanism behind Res is not clearly understood, although it is presumed to have an effect on bile acid metabolism in the liver: a significant way in eliminating cholesterol from the body. As one of the major...

  9. A STUDY ON DETECTION OF SERUMFASTING TOTAL BILE ACID AND CHOLOYGLYCIN IN NEONATE FOR CHOLESTASIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭文; 吴明昌; 裴学义; 关德华; 徐洛

    1996-01-01

    Enzyme-linked colorimetric analysis and radioimmunossay were employed to detect serum fasting total bile acids(FBA) and choloyglyein (CG) respectively in eases of 32 neonatal hepatitis, 33 cases of neona-tal uneonjugated hyperbilirubinemia and 34 cases of breast milk jaundice(BMJ). FBA and CG in acute period of neonatal hepatitis were obviously elevated and decreased gradually in convalescent and recovered period. The difference was significant for each stage as compared with controls. Acute FBA correlated strongly with the course. Both neonatal unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia and BMJ differed significantlyfrom controls in FBA and CG. The results suggested that serum FBA and CGr were helpful in judging the course and state of neonatal hepatitis, and eholestasls might existed in neonatal unconjngated hyperbilirubinemia.

  10. Bile acids in regulation of inflammation and immunity: friend or foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ci; Fuchs, Claudia D; Halilbasic, Emina; Trauner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Apart from their pivotal role in dietary lipid absorption and cholesterol homeostasis, bile acids (BAs) are increasingly recognised as important signalling molecules in the regulation of systemic endocrine functions. As such BAs are natural ligands for several nuclear hormone receptors and G-protein-coupled receptors. Through activating various signalling pathways, BAs not only regulate their own synthesis, enterohepatic recirculation and metabolism, but also immune homeostasis. This makes BAs attractive therapeutic agents for managing metabolic and inflammatory liver disorders. Recent experimental and clinical evidence indicates that BAs exert beneficial effects in cholestatic and metabolically driven inflammatory diseases. This review elucidates how different BAs function as pathogenetic factors and potential therapeutic agents for inflammation-driven liver diseases, focusing on their role in regulation of inflammation and immunity.

  11. Enhanced oral bioavailability of silymarin using liposomes containing a bile salt: preparation by supercritical fluid technology and evaluation in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gang; Zhao, Yaping; Zhang, Yongtai; Dang, Beilei; Liu, Ying; Feng, Nianping

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to develop a procedure to improve the dissolution and bioavailability of silymarin (SM) by using bile salt-containing liposomes that were prepared by supercritical fluid technology (ie, solution-enhanced dispersion by supercritical fluids [SEDS]). The process for the preparation of SM-loaded liposomes containing a bile salt (SM-Lip-SEDS) was optimized using a central composite design of response surface methodology with the ratio of SM to phospholipids (w/w), flow rate of solution (mL/min), and pressure (MPa) as independent variables. Particle size, entrapment efficiency (EE), and drug loading (DL) were dependent variables for optimization of the process and formulation variables. The particle size, zeta potential, EE, and DL of the optimized SM-Lip-SEDS were 160.5 nm, -62.3 mV, 91.4%, and 4.73%, respectively. Two other methods to produce SM liposomes were compared to the SEDS method. The liposomes obtained by the SEDS method exhibited the highest EE and DL, smallest particle size, and best stability compared to liposomes produced by the thin-film dispersion and reversed-phase evaporation methods. Compared to the SM powder, SM-Lip-SEDS showed increased in vitro drug release. The in vivo AUC(0-t) of SM-Lip-SEDS was 4.8-fold higher than that of the SM powder. These results illustrate that liposomes containing a bile salt can be used to enhance the oral bioavailability of SM and that supercritical fluid technology is suitable for the preparation of liposomes.

  12. Alteration of bile acid metabolism in the rat induced by chronic ethanol consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Guoxiang; Zhong, Wei; Li, Houkai; Li, Qiong; Qiu, Yunping; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Chen, Huiyuan; Zhao, Xueqing; Zhang, Shucha; Zhou, Zhanxiang; Zeisel, Steven H.; Jia, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Our understanding of the bile acid metabolism is limited by the fact that previous analyses have primarily focused on a selected few circulating bile acids; the bile acid profiles of the liver and gastrointestinal tract pools are rarely investigated. Here, we determined how chronic ethanol consumption altered the bile acids in multiple body compartments (liver, gastrointestinal tract, and serum) of rats. Rats were fed a modified Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet with 38% of calories as ethanol (the amount equivalent of 4–5 drinks in humans). While conjugated bile acids predominated in the liver (98.3%), duodenum (97.8%), and ileum (89.7%), unconjugated bile acids comprised the largest proportion of measured bile acids in serum (81.2%), the cecum (97.7%), and the rectum (97.5%). In particular, taurine-conjugated bile acids were significantly decreased in the liver and gastrointestinal tract of ethanol-treated rats, while unconjugated and glycine-conjugated species increased. Ethanol consumption caused increased expression of genes involved in bile acid biosynthesis, efflux transport, and reduced expression of genes regulating bile acid influx transport in the liver. These results provide an improved understanding of the systemic modulations of bile acid metabolism in mammals through the gut-liver axis.—Xie, G., Zhong, W., Li, H., Li, Q., Qiu, Y., Zheng, X., Chen, H., Zhao, X., Zhang, S., Zhou, Z., Zeisel, S. H., Jia, W. Alteration of bile acid metabolism in the rat induced by chronic ethanol consumption. PMID:23709616

  13. Self-assembly of aqueous bilirubin ditaurate, a natural conjugated bile pigment, to contraposing enantiomeric dimers and M(-) and P(+) tetramers and their selective hydrophilic disaggregation by monomers and micelles of bile salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubrand, Michael W; Carey, Martin C; Laue, Thomas M

    2015-02-24

    The solution behavior of bilirubin ditaurate (BDT), the first naturally occurring conjugated bile pigment to be physically and chemically characterized, was assessed in aqueous solution and in monomeric and micellar solutions of common taurine-conjugated bile salts (BS). Analytical ultracentrifugation revealed that BDT self-associates in monomer-dimer equilibria between 1 and 500 μM, forming limiting tetramers at low millimolar concentrations. Self-association was enthalpically driven with ΔG values of ≈5 kcal/mol, suggesting strong hydrophobic interactions. Added NaCl and decreases in temperature shifted the oligomerization to lower BDT concentrations. On the basis of circular dichroism spectra and the limiting size of the self-aggregates, we infer that the tetramers are composed of 2P(+) and 2M(-) enantiomeric BDT pairs in "ridge-tile" conformations interacting in a "double-bookend" structure. With added monomeric BS, blue shifts in the UV-vis spectra and tight isosbestic points revealed that BDT/BS heterodimers form, followed by BDT "decorating" BS micelles mostly via hydrophilic interactions. Conformational enantiomerism, fluorescence intensities, and anisotropy, as well as resistance of the hybrid particles to disaggregation in 6 M urea, suggested that two or three hydrogen-bonding sites bound BDT monomers to the hydroxyl groups of BS, possibly via pyrrole-π-orbital-OH interactions. BDT stabilized these interactions by enveloping the BS in its "ridge-tile" pincers with variable strain that maximized van der Waals interactions. Possibly because the BDT molecule becomes highly strained with BS subtending a 7β-hydroxyl group, BDT became totally resistant to oxidation in air. This work predicts that, because of BS dissolution of the BDT self-aggregates, BS/bilirubin hybrid particles, which are stabilized hydrophilically, are likely to be the dominant mode of transport for all conjugated bilirubins in bile.

  14. Buccal transport of flecainide and sotalol : effect of a bile salt and ionization state

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deneer, VHM; Drese, GB; Roemele, PEH; Verhoef, JC; Lie-A-Huen, L; Kingma, JH; Brouwers, JRBJ; Junginger, HE

    2002-01-01

    Patients with infrequent attacks of supraventricular arrhythmia may benefit from self administration of antiarrhythmic drugs on an 'as required' basis. The oral cavity is easily accessible and the potential for rapid absorption exists. The effects of ionization state and sodium glycocholate on the e

  15. Gut microbiota inhibit Asbt-dependent intestinal bile acid reabsorption via Gata4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Out, Carolien; Patankar, Jay V.; Doktorova, Marcela; Boesjes, Marije; Bos, Trijnie; de Boer, Sanna; Havinga, Rick; Wolters, Henk; Boverhof, Renze; van Dijk, Theo H.; Smoczek, Anna; Bleich, Andre; Sachdev, Vinay; Kratky, Dagmar; Kuipers, Folkert; Verkade, Henkjan J.; Groen, Albert K.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims: Regulation of bile acid homeostasis in mammals is a complex process regulated via extensive cross-talk between liver, intestine and intestinal microbiota. Here we studied the effects of gut microbiota on bile acid homeostasis in mice. Methods: Bile acid homeostasis was assessed in

  16. Individual bile acids have differential effects on bile acid signaling in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Peizhen, E-mail: songacad@gmail.com; Rockwell, Cheryl E., E-mail: rockwelc@msu.edu; Cui, Julia Yue, E-mail: juliacui@uw.edu; Klaassen, Curtis D., E-mail: curtisklaassenphd@gmail.com

    2015-02-15

    Bile acids (BAs) are known to regulate BA synthesis and transport by the farnesoid X receptor in the liver (FXR-SHP) and intestine (FXR-Fgf15). However, the relative importance of individual BAs in regulating these processes is not known. Therefore, mice were fed various doses of five individual BAs, including cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxoycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA), and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in their diets at various concentrations for one week to increase the concentration of one BA in the enterohepatic circulation. The mRNA of BA synthesis and transporting genes in liver and ileum were quantified. In the liver, the mRNA of SHP, which is the prototypical target gene of FXR, increased in mice fed all concentrations of BAs. In the ileum, the mRNA of the intestinal FXR target gene Fgf15 was increased at lower doses and to a higher extent by CA and DCA than by CDCA and LCA. Cyp7a1, the rate-limiting enzyme in BA synthesis, was decreased more by CA and DCA than CDCA and LCA. Cyp8b1, the enzyme that 12-hydroxylates BAs and is thus responsible for the synthesis of CA, was decreased much more by CA and DCA than CDCA and LCA. Surprisingly, neither a decrease in the conjugated BA uptake transporter (Ntcp) nor increase in BA efflux transporter (Bsep) was observed by FXR activation, but an increase in the cholesterol efflux transporter (Abcg5/Abcg8) was observed with FXR activation. Thus in conclusion, CA and DCA are more potent FXR activators than CDCA and LCA when fed to mice, and thus they are more effective in decreasing the expression of the rate limiting gene in BA synthesis Cyp7a1 and the 12-hydroxylation of BAs Cyp8b1, and are also more effective in increasing the expression of Abcg5/Abcg8, which is responsible for biliary cholesterol excretion. However, feeding BAs do not alter the mRNA or protein levels of Ntcp or Bsep, suggesting that the uptake or efflux of BAs is not regulated by FXR at physiological and

  17. REV-ERBalpha participates in circadian SREBP signaling and bile acid homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwendal Le Martelot

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, many aspects of behavior and physiology, and in particular cellular metabolism, are coordinated by the circadian timing system. Molecular clocks are thought to rely on negative feedback loops in clock gene expression that engender oscillations in the accumulation of transcriptional regulatory proteins, such as the orphan receptor REV-ERBalpha. Circadian transcription factors then drive daily rhythms in the expression of clock-controlled output genes, for example genes encoding enzymes and regulators of cellular metabolism. To gain insight into clock output functions of REV-ERBalpha, we carried out genome-wide transcriptome profiling experiments with liver RNA from wild-type mice, Rev-erbalpha knock-out mice, or REV-ERBalpha overexpressing mice. On the basis of these genetic loss- and gain-of-function experiments, we concluded that REV-ERBalpha participates in the circadian modulation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP activity, and thereby in the daily expression of SREBP target genes involved in cholesterol and lipid metabolism. This control is exerted via the cyclic transcription of Insig2, encoding a trans-membrane protein that sequesters SREBP proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum membranes and thereby interferes with the proteolytic activation of SREBPs in Golgi membranes. REV-ERBalpha also participates in the cyclic expression of cholesterol-7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1, the rate-limiting enzyme in converting cholesterol to bile acids. Our findings suggest that this control acts via the stimulation of LXR nuclear receptors by cyclically produced oxysterols. In conclusion, our study suggests that rhythmic cholesterol and bile acid metabolism is not just driven by alternating feeding-fasting cycles, but also by REV-ERBalpha, a component of the circadian clockwork circuitry.

  18. Quercetin solubilisation in bile salts: A comparison with sodium dodecyl sulphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchweitz, Maria; Kroon, Paul A; Rich, Gillian T; Wilde, Peter J

    2016-11-15

    To understand the bioaccessibility of the flavonoid quercetin we studied its interaction with bile salt micelles. The environmental sensitivity of quercetin's UV-visible absorption spectrum gave information about quercetin partitioning. Two quercetin absorption peaks gave complementary information: Peak A (240-280nm) on the intermicellar phase and Peak B (340-440nm) on the micellar phase. Thus, by altering pH, we showed that only non-ionised quercetin partitions into micelles. We validated our interpretation by studying quercetin's interaction with SDS micelles. Pyrene fluorescence and the quercetin UV-visible spectra show that the adsorption site for pyrene and quercetin in bile salt micelles is more hydrophobic than that for SDS micelles. Also, both quercetin and pyrene reported a higher critical micelle concentration for bile salts than for SDS. Our method of using a flavonoid as an intrinsic probe, is generally applicable to other lipophilic bioactives, whenever they have observable environmental dependent properties.

  19. Effects of CYP7A1 overexpression on cholesterol and bile acid homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandak, W M; Schwarz, C; Hylemon, P B; Mallonee, D; Valerie, K; Heuman, D M; Fisher, R A; Redford, K; Vlahcevic, Z R

    2001-10-01

    The initial and rate-limiting step in the classic pathway of bile acid biosynthesis is 7alpha-hydroxylation of cholesterol, a reaction catalyzed by cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1). The effect of CYP7A1 overexpression on cholesterol homeostasis in human liver cells has not been examined. The specific aim of this study was to determine the effects of overexpression of CYP7A1 on key regulatory steps involved in hepatocellular cholesterol homeostasis, using primary human hepatocytes (PHH) and HepG2 cells. Overexpression of CYP7A1 in HepG2 cells and PHH was accomplished by using a recombinant adenovirus encoding a CYP7A1 cDNA (AdCMV-CYP7A1). CYP7A1 overexpression resulted in a marked activation of the classic pathway of bile acid biosynthesis in both PHH and HepG2 cells. In response, there was decreased HMG-CoA-reductase (HMGR) activity, decreased acyl CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activity, increased cholesteryl ester hydrolase (CEH) activity, and increased low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) mRNA expression. Changes observed in HMGR, ACAT, and CEH mRNA levels paralleled changes in enzyme specific activities. More specifically, LDLR expression, ACAT activity, and CEH activity appeared responsive to an increase in cholesterol degradation after increased CYP7A1 expression. Conversely, accumulation of the oxysterol 7alpha-hydroxycholesterol in the microsomes after CYP7A1 overexpression was correlated with a decrease in HMGR activity.

  20. Risk modification of colorectal adenoma by CYP7A1 polymorphisms and the role of bile acid metabolism in carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertheim, Betsy C; Smith, Jeffrey W; Fang, Changming; Alberts, David S; Lance, Peter; Thompson, Patricia A

    2012-02-01

    Cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the rate-limiting enzyme in the conversion of cholesterol to bile acids, is a postulated gene modifier of colorectal cancer risk and target for the therapeutic bile acid, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). We investigated associations between CYP7A1 polymorphisms and fecal bile acids, colorectal adenoma (CRA), and UDCA efficacy for CRA prevention. Seven tagging, single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in CYP7A1 were measured in 703 (355 UDCA, 348 placebo) participants of a phase III chemoprevention trial, of which 495 had known baseline fecal bile acid concentrations. In the placebo arm, participants with two minor G(rs8192871) alleles (tag for a low activity promoter polymorphism at -204) had lower odds of high secondary bile acids (OR = 0.26, 95% CI: 0.10-0.69), and CRA at 3 years' follow-up (OR = 0.41, 95% CI: 0.19-0.89), than AA carriers. Haplotype construction from the six polymorphic SNPs showed participants with the third most common haplotype (C(rs10957057)C(rs8192879)G(rs8192877)T(rs11786580)A(rs8192871)G(rs13251096)) had higher odds of high primary bile acids (OR = 2.34, 95% CI: 1.12-4.89) and CRA (OR = 1.89, 95% CI: 1.00-3.57) than those with the most common CTACAG haplotype. Furthermore, three SNPs (rs8192877, rs8192871, and rs13251096) each modified UDCA efficacy for CRA prevention, and CCGTAG-haplotype carriers experienced 71% lower odds of CRA recurrence with UDCA treatment, an effect not present for other haplotypes (test for UDCA-haplotype interaction, P = 0.020). Our findings support CYP7A1 polymorphisms as determinants of fecal bile acids and risk factors for CRA. Furthermore, UDCA efficacy for CRA prevention may be modified by genetic variation in CYP7A1, limiting treatment benefit to a subgroup of the population.

  1. Enteral bile acid treatment improves parenteral nutrition-related liver disease and intestinal mucosal atrophy in neonatal pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is essential for patients with impaired gut function but leads to parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). TPN disrupts the normal enterohepatic circulation of bile acids, and we hypothesized that it would decrease intestinal expression of the newly des...

  2. Synthesis, Characterization, and Saccharide Binding Studies of Bile Acid − Porphyrin Conjugates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimír Král

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis and characterization of bile acid-porphyrin conjugates (BAPs are reported. Binding of saccharides with BAPs in aqueous methanol was studied by monitoring changes in the visible absorption spectral of the porphyrin-moieties. Although these studies clearly showed absorbance changes, suggesting quite high if non-selective binding, the mass spectral studies do not unambiguously support these results.

  3. Enteral bile acid treatment improves parenteral nutrition-related liver disease and intestinal mucosal atrophy in neonatal pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Ajay Kumar; Stoll, Barbara; Burrin, Douglas G

    2012-01-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is essential for patients with impaired gut function but leads to parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). TPN disrupts the normal enterohepatic circulation of bile acids, and we hypothesized that it would decrease intestinal expression of the newly...

  4. Direct Measurement of the Thermodynamics of Chiral Recognition in Bile Salt Micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Shauna L; Rovnyak, David; Strein, Timothy G

    2016-04-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is shown to be a sensitive reporter of bile salt micellization and chiral recognition. Detailed ITC characterization of bile micelle formation as well as the chiral recognition capabilities of sodium cholate (NaC), deoxycholate (NaDC), and taurodeoxycholate (NaTDC) micelle systems are reported. The ΔH(demic) of these bile salt micelle systems is directly observable and is strongly temperature-dependent, allowing also for the determination of ΔCp(demic). Using the pseudo-phase separation model, ΔG(demic) and TΔS(demic) were also calculated. Chirally selective guest-host binding of model racemic compounds 1,1'-bi-2-napthol (BN) and 1,1'-binaphthyl-2,2'-diylhydrogenphosphate (BNDHP) to bile salt micelles was then investigated. The S-isomer was shown to bind more tightly to the bile salt micelles in all cases. A model was developed that allows for the quantitative determination of the enthalpic difference in binding affinity that corresponds to chiral selectivity, which is on the order of 1 kJ mol(-1).

  5. GROWTH-REGULATING ACTIVITY OF SOME SALTS OF 1-NAPHTHALENACETIC ACID AND 2-NAPHTHOXYACETIC ACID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Laichici

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The salts of 1-naphthalene acetic acid and 2-naphthoxyacetic acid with ethanolamine have been synthetized. The two salts have been assessed using Tsibulskaya-Vassiliev biological test using agar-agar as the medium. Statistical processing of the data has been carried out. The good results of the bioassay indicate an auxinic growth-regulating activity of the two salts.

  6. Bile Acid Pool Dynamics in Progressive Familial lntrahepatic Cholestasis With Partial External Bile Diversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jericho, Hilary S.; Kaurs, Elizabeth; Boverhof, Renze; Knisely, Alex; Shneider, Benjamin L.; Verkade, Henkjan J.; Whitington, Peter F.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Partial external bile diversion (PEBD) is an established therapy for low-gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC). This study sought to determine whether the dynamics of the cholic acid (CA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) pools in subjects w

  7. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibition potentiates amino acid- and bile acid-induced bicarbonate secretion in rat duodenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takuya; Wang, Joon-Ho; Higashiyama, Masaaki; Rudenkyy, Sergiy; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Guth, Paul H; Engel, Eli; Kaunitz, Jonathan D; Akiba, Yasutada

    2012-10-01

    Intestinal endocrine cells release gut hormones, including glucagon-like peptides (GLPs), in response to luminal nutrients. Luminal L-glutamate (L-Glu) and 5'-inosine monophosphate (IMP) synergistically increases duodenal HCO3- secretion via GLP-2 release. Since L cells express the bile acid receptor TGR5 and dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) IV rapidly degrades GLPs, we hypothesized that luminal amino acids or bile acids stimulate duodenal HCO3- secretion via GLP-2 release, which is enhanced by DPPIV inhibition. We measured HCO3- secretion with pH and CO2 electrodes using a perfused rat duodenal loop under isoflurane anesthesia. L-Glu (10 mM) and IMP (0.1 mM) were luminally coperfused with or without luminal perfusion (0.1 mM) or intravenous (iv) injection (3 μmol/kg) of the DPPIV inhibitor NVP728. The loop was also perfused with a selective TGR5 agonist betulinic acid (BTA, 10 μM) or the non-bile acid type TGR5 agonist 3-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-(4-chlorophenyl)-N,5-dimethylisoxazole-4-carboxamide (CCDC; 10 μM). DPPIV activity visualized by use of the fluorogenic substrate was present on the duodenal brush border and submucosal layer, both abolished by the incubation with NVP728 (0.1 mM). An iv injection of NVP728 enhanced L-Glu/IMP-induced HCO3- secretion, whereas luminal perfusion of NVP728 had no effect. BTA or CCDC had little effect on HCO3- secretion, whereas NVP728 iv markedly enhanced BTA- or CCDC-induced HCO3- secretion, the effects inhibited by a GLP-2 receptor antagonist. Coperfusion of the TGR5 agonist enhanced L-Glu/IMP-induced HCO3- secretion with the enhanced GLP-2 release, suggesting that TGR5 activation amplifies nutrient sensing signals. DPPIV inhibition potentiated luminal L-Glu/IMP-induced and TGR5 agonist-induced HCO3- secretion via a GLP-2 pathway, suggesting that the modulation of the local concentration of the endogenous secretagogue GLP-2 by luminal compounds and DPPIV inhibition helps regulate protective duodenal HCO3- secretion.

  8. Bile acids regulate intestinal cell proliferation by modulating EGFR and FXR signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossa, Avafia Y; Escobar, Oswaldo; Golden, Jamie; Frey, Mark R; Ford, Henri R; Gayer, Christopher P

    2016-01-15

    Bile acids (BAs) are synthesized in the liver and secreted into the intestine. In the lumen, enteric bacteria metabolize BAs from conjugated, primary forms into more toxic unconjugated, secondary metabolites. Secondary BAs can be injurious to the intestine and may contribute to disease. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the nuclear farnesoid X receptor (FXR) are known to interact with BAs. In this study we examined the effects of BAs on intestinal epithelial cell proliferation and investigated the possible roles for EGFR and FXR in these effects. We report that taurine-conjugated cholic acid (TCA) induced proliferation, while its unconjugated secondary counterpart deoxycholic acid (DCA) inhibited proliferation. TCA stimulated phosphorylation of Src, EGFR, and ERK 1/2. Pharmacological blockade of any of these pathways or genetic ablation of EGFR abrogated TCA-stimulated proliferation. Interestingly, Src or EGFR inhibitors eliminated TCA-induced phosphorylation of both molecules, suggesting that their activation is interdependent. In contrast to TCA, DCA exposure diminished EGFR phosphorylation, and pharmacological or siRNA blockade of FXR abolished DCA-induced inhibition of proliferation. Taken together, these results suggest that TCA induces intestinal cell proliferation via Src, EGFR, and ERK activation. In contrast, DCA inhibits proliferation via an FXR-dependent mechanism that may include downstream inactivation of the EGFR/Src/ERK pathway. Since elevated secondary BA levels are the result of specific bacterial modification, this may provide a mechanism through which an altered microbiota contributes to normal or abnormal intestinal epithelial cell proliferation.

  9. Interaction of Cytotoxic and Cytoprotective Bile Acids with Model Membranes: Influence of the Membrane Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, M; Ferreira, M J; Kozica, A; Fernandes, A C; Gonçalves da Silva, A; Saramago, B

    2015-08-18

    To understand the role of bile acids (BAs) in cell function, many authors have investigated their effect on biomembrane models which are less complex systems, but there are still many open questions. The present study aims to contribute for the deepening of the knowledge of the interaction between BAs and model membranes, in particular, focusing on the effect of BA mixtures. The cytotoxic deoxycholic acid (DCA), the cytoprotective ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), and the equimolar mixture (DCA + UDCA) were investigated. Monolayers and liposomes were taken as model membranes with two lipid compositions: an equimolar mixture of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), sphingomyelin (SM), and cholesterol (Chol)) traditionally associated with the formation of lipid rafts and an equimolar POPC/SM binary mixture. The obtained results showed that DCA causes the fluidization of monolayers and bilayers, leading to the eventual rupture of POPC/SM liposomes at high concentration. UDCA may provide a stabilization of POPC/SM membranes but has a negligible effect on the Chol-containing liposomes. In the case of equimolar mixture DCA/UDCA, the interactions depend not only on the lipid composition but also on the design of the experiment. The BA mixture has a greater impact on the monolayers than do pure BAs, suggesting a cooperative DCA-UDCA interaction that enhances the penetration of UDCA in both POPC/SM and POPC/SM/Chol monolayers. For the bilayers, the presence of UDCA in the mixture decreases the disturbing effect of DCA.

  10. Ménage-à-trois of bariatric surgery, bile acids and the gutmicrobiome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rajendra Raghow

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgeries have emerged as highly effectivetreatments for obesity associated type-2 diabetesmellitus. Evidently, the desired therapeutic endpointssuch as rates of weight loss, lower levels of glycatedhemoglobin and remission of diabetes are achievedmore rapidly and last longer following bariatric surgery,as opposed to drug therapies alone. In light of thesefindings, it has been suspected that in addition tocausing weight loss dependent glucose intolerance,bariatric surgery induces other physiological changesthat contribute to the alleviation of diabetes. However,the putative post-surgical neuro-hormonal pathwaysthat underpin the therapeutic benefits of bariatricsurgery remain undefined. In a recent report, Ryan andcolleagues shed new light on the potential mechanismsthat determine the salutary effects of bariatric surgeryin mice. The authors demonstrated that the improvedglucose tolerance and weight loss in mice after verticalsleeve gastrectomy (VSG) surgery were likely to becaused by post-surgical changes in circulating bileacids and farnesoid-X receptor (FXR) signaling, both ofwhich were also mechanistically linked to changes inthe microbial ecology of the gut. The authors arrivedat this conclusion from a comparison of genome-wide,metabolic consequences of VSG surgery in obese wildtype (WT) and FXR knockout mice. Gene expressionin the distal small intestines of WT and FXR knockoutmice revealed that the pathways regulating bile acidcomposition, nutrient metabolism and anti-oxidantdefense were differentially altered by VSG surgeryin WT and FXR-/- mice. Based on these data Ryanet al , hypothesized that bile acid homeostasis andFXR signaling were mechanistically linked to the gutmicrobiota that played a role in modulating post-surgicalchanges in total body mass and glucose tolerance.The authors' data provide a plausible explanation forputative weight loss-independent benefits of bariatricsurgery and its relationship with metabolism of bileacids.

  11. Production of recombinant human bile salt stimulated lipase and its variant in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahasrabudhe, A V; Solapure, S M; Khurana, R; Suryanarayan, V; Ravishankar, S; deSousa, S M; Das, G

    1998-12-01

    hBSSL and its truncated variant hBSSL-C cDNA clones were expressed in Pichia pastoris using two different signal peptides, native signal peptide and invertase signal peptide, respectively, to facilitate secretion of the recombinant proteins into the culture medium. Both recombinant proteins were secreted into the culture medium to a level of 45-50 mg/liter in shake flask cultures. Native signal peptide of hBSSL was recognized in P. pastoris and was cleaved at the same site as in humans. The level of expression of the hBSSL gene was found to be dependent on the number of its copies integrated into the host chromosome. The multicopy transformant clone was found to be very stable. When grown and induced in a fermentor, the level of accumulation of the recombinant hBSSL in the culture medium improved from 50 mg/liter in shake flask cultures to 300 mg/liter. The recombinant hBSSL purified from the culture supernatant was found to be similar to the native hBSSL in its biochemical properties except for the lectin-binding profile.

  12. 直物乳杆菌ST—III胆盐水解酶的表达及其酶活力分析%Expression and Activity Analysis of Bile Salt Hydrolases from LactobaciUus plantarum ST- III

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任婧; 姚晶

    2012-01-01

    以植物乳杆菌(Lactobacillus plantarum)ST-III4种胆盐水解酶(BsHs)的编码序列(bsh1~4),将其克隆至表达载体pET.28b(+)上,在原核系统进行表达,并对其酶活力进行测定,结果发现4种BSHs的酶活力分别为29.00、20.49、24.90、21.13U/mL。同时BSH1比其他3种BSHs表现出更高的水解能力。%In vertebrates, bile salt hydrolysis plays an essential role in fat metabolism. Bile salts are synthesized in the liver. In the small intestine, glycine or taurine are de-conjugated from bile salts by the enzyme bile salt hydrolase (BSH, EC 3.5.1.24) from intestinal microbes, which reduces the serum cholesterol level. In this study, four predicted bile salt hydrolase (bsh) genes from Lactobacillus plantarum ST-III were cloned into pET-28b(+) vector and expressed in Escherichia coli. The hydrolysis activity of these enzymes was 29.00, 20.49, 24.90 U/mL and 21.13 U/mL, respectively.

  13. Reduction in Bile Acid Pool Causes Delayed Liver Regeneration Accompanied by Down-regulated Expression of FXR and C-Jun mRNA in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董秀山; 赵浩亮; 马晓明; 王世明

    2010-01-01

    The present study attempted to examine the effects of bile acid pool size on liver regeneration after hepatectomy.The rats were fed on 0.2% cholic acid(CA)or 2% cholestyramine for 7 days to induce a change in the bile acid size,and then a partial hepatectomy(PH)was performed.Rats fed on the normal diet served as the controls.Measurements were made on the rate of liver regeneration,the labeling indices of PCNA,the plasma total bile acids(TBA),and the mRNA expression of cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase(CYP7A1),...

  14. Bile Acid Malabsorption After Pelvic and Prostate Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: An Uncommon but Treatable Condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Victoria [Academic Urology Unit, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London and Sutton (United Kingdom); Benton, Barbara [Gastroenterology Unit, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London and Sutton (United Kingdom); Sohaib, Aslam [Department of Radiology, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London and Sutton (United Kingdom); Dearnaley, David [Academic Urology Unit, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London and Sutton (United Kingdom); Andreyev, H. Jervoise N., E-mail: j@andreyev.demon.co.uk [Gastroenterology Unit, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London and Sutton (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a significant therapeutic advance in prostate cancer, allowing increased tumor dose delivery and increased sparing of normal tissues. IMRT planning uses strict dose constraints to nearby organs to limit toxicity. Bile acid malabsorption (BAM) is a treatable disorder of the terminal ileum (TI) that presents with symptoms similar to radiation therapy toxicity. It has not been described in patients receiving RT for prostate cancer in the contemporary era. We describe new-onset BAM in men after IMRT for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Diagnosis of new-onset BAM was established after typical symptoms developed, selenium-75 homocholic acid taurine (SeHCAT) scanning showed 7-day retention of <15%, and patients' symptoms unequivocally responded to a bile acid sequestrant. The TI was identified on the original radiation therapy plan, and the radiation dose delivered was calculated and compared with accepted dose-volume constraints. Results: Five of 423 men treated in a prospective series of high-dose prostate and pelvic IMRT were identified with new onset BAM (median age, 65 years old). All reported having normal bowel habits before RT. The volume of TI ranged from 26-141 cc. The radiation dose received by the TI varied between 11.4 Gy and 62.1 Gy (uncorrected). Three of 5 patients had TI treated in excess of 45 Gy (equivalent dose calculated in 2-Gy fractions, using an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 3) with volumes ranging from 1.6 cc-49.0 cc. One patient had mild BAM (SeHCAT retention, 10%-15%), 2 had moderate BAM (SeHCAT retention, 5%-10%), and 2 had severe BAM (SeHCAT retention, <5%). The 3 patients whose TI received {>=}45 Gy developed moderate to severe BAM, whereas those whose TI received <45 Gy had only mild to moderate BAM. Conclusions: Radiation delivered to the TI during IMRT may cause BAM. Identification of the TI from unenhanced RT planning computed tomography scans is difficult and may impede

  15. Bile acid-induced virulence gene expression of Vibrio parahaemolyticus reveals a novel therapeutic potential for bile acid sequestrants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuyoshi Gotoh

    Full Text Available Vibrio parahaemolyticus, a bacterial pathogen, causes human gastroenteritis. A type III secretion system (T3SS2 encoded in pathogenicity island (Vp-PAI is the main contributor to enterotoxicity and expression of Vp-PAI encoded genes is regulated by two transcriptional regulators, VtrA and VtrB. However, a host-derived inducer for the Vp-PAI genes has not been identified. Here, we demonstrate that bile induces production of T3SS2-related proteins under osmotic conditions equivalent to those in the intestinal lumen. We also show that bile induces vtrA-mediated vtrB transcription. Transcriptome analysis of bile-responsive genes revealed that bile strongly induces expression of Vp-PAI genes in a vtrA-dependent manner. The inducing activity of bile was diminished by treatment with bile acid sequestrant cholestyramine. Finally, we demonstrate an in vivo protective effect of cholestyramine on enterotoxicity and show that similar protection is observed in infection with a different type of V. parahaemolyticus or with non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae strains of vibrios carrying the same kind of T3SS. In summary, these results provide an insight into how bacteria, through the ingenious action of Vp-PAI genes, can take advantage of an otherwise hostile host environment. The results also reveal a new therapeutic potential for widely used bile acid sequestrants in enteric bacterial infections.

  16. Bile acid signaling through farnesoid X and TGR5 receptors in hepatobiliary and intestinal diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bojan Stanimirov; Karmen Stankovand Momir Mikov

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The well-known functions of bile acids (BAs) are the emulsification and absorption of lipophilic xenobiotics. However, the emerging evidences in the past decade showed that BAs act as signaling molecules that not only autoregulate their own metabolism and enterohepatic recirculation, but also as important regulators of integrative metabolism by ac-tivating nuclear and membrane-bound G protein-coupled re-ceptors. The present review was to get insight into the role of maintenance of BA homeostasis and BA signaling pathways in development and management of hepatobiliary and intestinal diseases. DATA SOURCES: Detailed and comprehensive search of PubMed and Scopus databases was carried out for original and review articles. RESULTS: Disturbances in BA homeostasis contribute to the development of several hepatobiliary and intestinal disorders, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, liver cirrhosis, choles-terol gallstone disease, intestinal diseases and both hepatocel-lular and colorectal carcinoma. CONCLUSION: Further efforts made in order to advance the understanding of sophisticated BA signaling network may be promising in developing novel therapeutic strategies related not only to hepatobiliary and gastrointestinal but also sys-temic diseases.

  17. Caveolin-1 is necessary for hepatic oxidative lipid metabolism: evidence for crosstalk between caveolin-1 and bile acid signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Rojo, Manuel A; Gongora, Milena; Fitzsimmons, Rebecca L; Martel, Nick; Martin, Sheree D; Nixon, Susan J; Brooks, Andrew J; Ikonomopoulou, Maria P; Martin, Sally; Lo, Harriet P; Myers, Stephen A; Restall, Christina; Ferguson, Charles; Pilch, Paul F; McGee, Sean L; Anderson, Robin L; Waters, Michael J; Hancock, John F; Grimmond, Sean M; Muscat, George E O; Parton, Robert G

    2013-07-25

    Caveolae and caveolin-1 (CAV1) have been linked to several cellular functions. However, a model explaining their roles in mammalian tissues in vivo is lacking. Unbiased expression profiling in several tissues and cell types identified lipid metabolism as the main target affected by CAV1 deficiency. CAV1-/- mice exhibited impaired hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα)-dependent oxidative fatty acid metabolism and ketogenesis. Similar results were recapitulated in CAV1-deficient AML12 hepatocytes, suggesting at least a partial cell-autonomous role of hepatocyte CAV1 in metabolic adaptation to fasting. Finally, our experiments suggest that the hepatic phenotypes observed in CAV1-/- mice involve impaired PPARα ligand signaling and attenuated bile acid and FXRα signaling. These results demonstrate the significance of CAV1 in (1) hepatic lipid homeostasis and (2) nuclear hormone receptor (PPARα, FXRα, and SHP) and bile acid signaling.

  18. Caveolin-1 Is Necessary for Hepatic Oxidative Lipid Metabolism: Evidence for Crosstalk between Caveolin-1 and Bile Acid Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel A. Fernández-Rojo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Caveolae and caveolin-1 (CAV1 have been linked to several cellular functions. However, a model explaining their roles in mammalian tissues in vivo is lacking. Unbiased expression profiling in several tissues and cell types identified lipid metabolism as the main target affected by CAV1 deficiency. CAV1−/− mice exhibited impaired hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα-dependent oxidative fatty acid metabolism and ketogenesis. Similar results were recapitulated in CAV1-deficient AML12 hepatocytes, suggesting at least a partial cell-autonomous role of hepatocyte CAV1 in metabolic adaptation to fasting. Finally, our experiments suggest that the hepatic phenotypes observed in CAV1−/− mice involve impaired PPARα ligand signaling and attenuated bile acid and FXRα signaling. These results demonstrate the significance of CAV1 in (1 hepatic lipid homeostasis and (2 nuclear hormone receptor (PPARα, FXRα, and SHP and bile acid signaling.

  19. Bile acids for primary sclerosing cholangitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poropat, Goran; Giljaca, Vanja; Stimac, Davor

    2011-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis is a progressive chronic cholestatic liver disease that usually leads to the development of cirrhosis. Studies evaluating bile acids in the treatment of primary sclerosing cholangitis have shown a potential benefit of their use. However, no influence on patients...

  20. The ileal lipid binding protein is required for efficient absorption and transport of bile acids in the distal portion of the murine small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praslickova, Dana; Torchia, Enrique C; Sugiyama, Michael G; Magrane, Elijah J; Zwicker, Brittnee L; Kolodzieyski, Lev; Agellon, Luis B

    2012-01-01

    The ileal lipid binding protein (ilbp) is a cytoplasmic protein that binds bile acids with high affinity. However evidence demonstrating the role of this protein in bile acid transport and homeostasis is missing. We created a mouse strain lacking ilbp (Fabp6(-/-) mice) and assessed the impact of ilbp deficiency on bile acid homeostasis and transport in vivo. Elimination of ilbp increased fecal bile acid excretion (54.2%, Pexcreted by 24 h after oral administration was 102% (Psmall and large intestines was increased by 22% (P<0.02) and decreased by 62.7% (P<0.01), respectively, in male Fabp6(-/-) mice relative wild-type mice, whereas no changes were seen in female Fabp6(-/-) mice. Mucosal to serosal bile acid transport using everted distal gut sacs was decreased by 74% (P<0.03) in both sexes of Fabp6(-/-) mice as compared to wild-type mice. The results demonstrate that ilbp is involved in the apical to basolateral transport of bile acids in ileal enterocytes, and is vital for the maintenance of bile acid homeostasis in the enterohepatic circulation (EHC) in mice.

  1. Diagnosis of bile acid diarrhoea by fasting and postprandial measurements of fibroblast growth factor 19

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Christian; Syversen, Charlotte; Bouchelouche, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A deficiency in the ileal hormone fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) has been described in patients with bile acid diarrhoea (BAD), but fasting FGF19 levels have insufficient diagnostic power. We assess whether single postprandial sampling of FGF19 has greater discriminative value than...... fasting FGF19 for detection of BAD and we evaluate the reproducibility of fasting FGF19. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-six patients consecutively referred to Se homocholic acid retention test (SeHCAT) were included. Serum FGF19 was measured after an overnight fast and again 1 h postprandially and again...... in the fasting state 1 week later. RESULTS: Nine of 26 patients had SeHCAT less than 10% and fasting FGF19 was lower [median 62 pg/ml, interquartile range (IQR): 47-67] than in the 17 diarrhoea controls with SeHCAT at least 10% (median 103 pg/ml, IQR: 77-135, P=0.006). Postprandial FGF19 in BAD patients (61 pg...

  2. Preparation and Characterization of Amino Acids-Based Trimethoprim Salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afzal R. Mohammed

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Trimethoprim (TMP is a dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR inhibitor which prevents the conversion of dihydrofolic acid into tetrahydrofolic acid, resulting in the depletion of the latter and leading to bacterial death. Oral bioavailability of TMP is hindered by both its low solubility and low permeability. This study aims to prepare novel salts of TMP using anionic amino acids; aspartic and glutamic acid as counter ions in order to improve solubility and dissolution. TMP salts were prepared by lyophilisation and characterized using FT-IR spectroscopy, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1HNMR, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC and Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. Both the amino acids formed salts with TMP in a 1:1 molar ratio and showed a 280 fold improvement in solubility. Investigation of the microbiological activity of the prepared salts against TMP sensitive Escherichia coli showed that the new salts not only retained antibacterial activity but also exhibited higher zone of inhibition which was attributed to improved physicochemical characters such as higher solubility and dissolution. The results are an important finding that could potentially impact on faster onset of antibacterial activity and reduced therapeutic dose when administered to patients. Studies are underway investigating the effect of ion-pairing TMP with amino acids on the permeability profile of the drug.

  3. Novel mouse model of combined hyperlipidemia associated with steatosis and liver injury by a single-dose intragastric administration of schisandrin B/cholesterol/bile salts mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Si-Yuan; Jia, Zhan-Hong; Zhang, Yi; Yu, Qing; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Nan; Zhu, Pei-Li; Yu, Zhi-Ling; Ko, Kam-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia is referred to as hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, or both in combined hyperlipidemia. Here, a novel mouse model of combined hyperlipidemia is described. Mice were orally given a single dose of a modeling agent (MA) made of a mixture of schisandrin B/cholesterol/bile salts (1/2/0.5 g/kg) suspended in olive oil. MA treatment increased serum triglycerides (TG) and total cholesterol (TC) (up to 422% and 100% at 12 - 96 h post-treatment, respectively) and hepatic TG and TC (up to 220% and 26%, respectively) in a time- and dose-dependent manner, associated with elevation of high-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein levels. Serum alanine/aspartate aminotransferase activities, indicators of liver cell damage, were also elevated (up to 198%) at 48 and 72 h post-MA treatment. Fenofibrate blocks MA-induced hyperlipidemia, lipid accumulation in the liver, as well as liver injury. Oral administration of a mixture of schisandrin B, cholesterol, and bile salt could generate an interesting mouse model of combined hyperlipidemia associated with hepatic steatosis and steatohepatitis.

  4. The bile acid-sensitive ion channel (BASIC), the ignored cousin of ASICs and ENaC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiemuth, Dominik; Assmann, Marc; Gründer, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The DEG/ENaC gene family of ion channels is characterized by a high degree of structural similarity and an equally high degree of diversity concerning the physiological function. In humans and rodents, the DEG/ENaC family comprises 2 main subgroups: the subunits of the epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) and the subunits of the acid sensing ion channels (ASICs). The bile acid-sensitive channel (BASIC), previously known as BLINaC or INaC, represents a third subgroup within the DEG/ENaC family. Although BASIC was identified more than a decade ago, very little is known about its physiological function. Recent progress in the characterization of this neglected member of the DEG/ENaC family, which is summarized in this focused review, includes the discovery of surprising species differences, its pharmacological characterization, and the identification of bile acids as putative natural activators.

  5. Crystal structure of axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) liver bile acid-binding protein bound to cholic and oleic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capaldi, Stefano; Guariento, Mara; Perduca, Massimiliano; Di Pietro, Santiago M; Santomé, José A; Monaco, Hugo L

    2006-07-01

    The family of the liver bile acid-binding proteins (L-BABPs), formerly called liver basic fatty acid-binding proteins (Lb-FABPs) shares fold and sequence similarity with the paralogous liver fatty acid-binding proteins (L-FABPs) but has a different stoichiometry and specificity of ligand binding. This article describes the first X-ray structure of a member of the L-BABP family, axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) L-BABP, bound to two different ligands: cholic and oleic acid. The protein binds one molecule of oleic acid in a position that is significantly different from that of either of the two molecules that bind to rat liver FABP. The stoichiometry of binding of cholate is of two ligands per protein molecule, as observed in chicken L-BABP. The cholate molecule that binds buried most deeply into the internal cavity overlaps well with the analogous bound to chicken L-BABP, whereas the second molecule, which interacts with the first only through hydrophobic contacts, is more external and exposed to the solvent.

  6. Interaction between fatty acid salts and the elastin network.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeswijk, van J.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the interaction between salts of fatty acids (FAS) and elastin. Absorption of fatty acids in elastin may affect the elasticity of elastin-containing tissue. Such phenomena could, for instance, be of relevance for the understanding of the formation of a

  7. Bile acids as endogenous etiologic agents in gastrointestinal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Harris Bernstein; Carol Bernstein; Claire M Payne; Katerina Dvorak

    2009-01-01

    Bile acids are implicated as etiologic agents in cancer of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, including cancer of the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, liver, biliary tract, pancreas and colon/rectum. Deleterious effects of bile acid exposure, likely related to carcinogenesis,include: induction of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species; induction of DNA damage; stimulation of mutation; induction of apoptosis in the short term,and selection for apoptosis resistance in the long term.These deleterious effects have, so far, been reported most consistently in relation to esophageal and colorectal cancer, but also to some extent in relation to cancer of other organs. In addition, evidence is reviewed for an association of increased bile acid exposure with cancer risk in human populations, in specific human genetic conditions, and in animal experiments. A model for the role of bile acids in GI carcinogenesis is presented from a Darwinian perspective that offers an explanation for how the observed effects of bile acids on cells contribute to cancer development.

  8. Techno-functional properties and in vitro bile acid-binding capacities of tamarillo (Solanum betaceum Cav.) hydrocolloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannasin, Sri Puvanesvari; Adzahan, Noranizan Mohd; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Muhammad, Kharidah

    2016-04-01

    Hydrocolloids were extracted from seed mucilage and the pulp fractions from red tamarillo (Solanum betaceum Cav.) mesocarp, and characterisation of their techno-functional properties and in vitro bile acid-binding capacities was performed. The seed mucilage hydrocolloids that were extracted, using either 1% citric acid (THC) or water (THW), had a good foaming capacity (32-36%), whereas the pulp hydrocolloids that were extracted, using 72% ethanol (THE) or 20mM HEPES buffer (THH), had no foaming capacity. The pulp hydrocolloid, however, possessed high oil-holding and water-holding capacities in the range of 3.3-3.6 g oil/g dry sample and 25-27 g water/g dry sample, respectively. This enabled the pulp hydrocolloid to entrap more bile acids (35-38% at a hydrocolloid concentration of 2%) in its gelatinous network in comparison to commercial oat fibre and other hydrocolloids studied. The exceptional emulsifying properties (80-96%) of both hydrocolloids suggest their potential applications as food emulsifiers and bile acid binders.

  9. Ambazone-lipoic acid salt: Structural and thermal characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kacso, Irina [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath street, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Racz, Csaba-Pal; Santa, Szabolcs [Babes-Bolyai' University, Faculty of Chemistry, 11 Arany Janos street, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Rus, Lucia [' Iuliu Hatieganu' University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, 6 Louis Pasteur street, 400349 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Dadarlat, Dorin; Borodi, Gheorghe [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath street, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Bratu, Ioan, E-mail: ibratu@gmail.com [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath street, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2012-12-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Salt of Ambazone with lipoic acid obtained by solvent-drop grinding. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ambazone lipoate salt crystallizes in monoclinic system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FTIR data suggest the deprotonation of the lipoic acid. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal behaviour different of ambazone salt as compared to the starting compounds. - Abstract: A suitable method for increasing the solubility, dissolution rate and consequently the bioavailability of poor soluble acidic or basic drugs is their salt formation. The aim of this study is to investigate the structural and thermal properties of the compound obtained by solvent drop grinding (SDG) method at room temperature, starting from the 1:1 molar ratios of ambazone (AMB) and {alpha}-lipoic acid (LA). The structural characterization was performed with X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The thermal behaviour of the obtained compound (AMB{center_dot}LA) was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry (TG). The photopyroelectric calorimetry, in front detection configuration (FPPE), was applied to measure and compare the room temperature values of one dynamic thermal parameter (thermal effusivity) for starting and resulting compounds. Both structural and supporting calorimetric techniques pointed out a salt structure for AMB{center_dot}LA compound as compared to those of the starting materials.

  10. Is bile salt-dependent lipase concentration in serum of any help in pancreatic cancer diagnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, D; Montalto, G; Roudani, S; Mas, E; Laugier, R; Sbarra, V; Abouakil, N

    1993-09-01

    The diagnostic value of bile salt-dependent lipase for pancreatic diseases was tested in sera of 187 patients. Of these patients, 76 suffered from pancreatic carcinoma, 43 from nonmalignant liver diseases (cirrhosis and chronic hepatitis), 18 from acute pancreatitis, and 20 from chronic pancreatitis. The remaining subjects were controls without pancreatic pathology. Bile salt-dependent lipase was determined by a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using polyclonal antibodies. Amylase and CA 19-9 antigen were also determined. In sera from control patients, the mean level of bile salt-dependent lipase was 1.5 micrograms/L. This level is quite similar to that of patients with benign liver diseases (1.1 micrograms/L) and with chronic pancreatitis (1.4 micrograms/L), but it was raised to 3.5 micrograms/L in patients with acute pancreatitis and decreased to 0.5 microgram/L in subjects with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Thirty percent of control subjects and 73% of cancer patients had a bile salt-dependent lipase serum level below the cutoff value of 0.5 microgram/L. In acute pancreatitis, 11 of 16 subjects had levels above 1.5 micrograms/L. Amylase level largely increased in acute pancreatitis but was normal in all other groups. Concerning CA 19-9 antigen, 65% of control patients and > 80% of patients with nonmalignant pancreatic or liver diseases had normal levels. In sera from cancer patients, 80% presented with high levels. Accordingly, 36 of 38 patients with pancreatic cancer had either low serum levels of bile salt-dependent lipase ( 37 U/ml; sensitivity 95%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Antibacterial and Antioxidant Activities of Acid and Bile Resistant Strains of Lactobacillus fermentum Isolated from Miang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srikanjana Klayraung

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Miang is a kind of traditional fermented tea leaves, widely consumed in northern Thailand as a snack. It contains several kinds of Lactobacilli spp. The aim of this study was to isolate strains of Lactobacillus fermentum from miang and to investigate their antibacterial and antioxidant activities. The agar spot and well assays were used for determination of antibacterial power. The antibacterial mechanism was investigated by cell morphologic change under scanning electron microscope (SEM. Antioxidant activity was studied by means of free radical scavenging and ferric reducing power assays. The acid and bile screening tests indicated that L. fermentum FTL2311 and L. fermentum FTL10BR presented antibacterial activity against several pathogenic bacteria: Listeria monocytogenes DMST 17303, Salmonella Typhi DMST 5784, Shigella sonnei DMST 561 (ATCC 11060and Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus DMST 6512 (ATCC 6538Ptm. The results from SEM suggested that the antibacterial action was due to the destruction of cell membrane which consequently caused the pathogenic cell shrinking or cracking. The antioxidant study suggested that both L. fermentum FTL2311 and L. fermentum FTL10BR strains could liberate certain substances that possessed antioxidant activity expressed as trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC and equivalent concentration (EC values for free radical scavenging and reducing mechanisms, respectively. The supernatant of L. fermentum FTL2311 broth revealed TEAC and EC values of 22.54±0.12 and 20.63±0.17 µM.mg-1 respectively, whereas that of L. fermentum FTL10BR yielded TEAC and EC values of 24.09±0.12 and 21.26±0.17 µM.mg-1 respectively. These two strains isolated from miang present high potential as promising health-promoting probiotics.

  12. The ileal lipid binding protein is required for efficient absorption and transport of bile acids in the distal portion of the murine small intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Praslickova

    Full Text Available The ileal lipid binding protein (ilbp is a cytoplasmic protein that binds bile acids with high affinity. However evidence demonstrating the role of this protein in bile acid transport and homeostasis is missing. We created a mouse strain lacking ilbp (Fabp6(-/- mice and assessed the impact of ilbp deficiency on bile acid homeostasis and transport in vivo. Elimination of ilbp increased fecal bile acid excretion (54.2%, P<0.05 in female but not male Fabp6(-/- mice. The activity of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (cyp7a1, the rate-controlling enzyme of the classical bile acid biosynthetic pathway, was significantly increased in female (63.5%, P<0.05 but not in male Fabp6(-/- mice. The amount of [(3H]taurocholic acid (TCA excreted by 24 h after oral administration was 102% (P<0.025 higher for female Fabp6(-/- mice whereas it was 57.3% (P<0.01 lower for male Fabp6(-/- mice, compared to wild-type mice. The retained fraction of the [(3H]TCA localized in the small and large intestines was increased by 22% (P<0.02 and decreased by 62.7% (P<0.01, respectively, in male Fabp6(-/- mice relative wild-type mice, whereas no changes were seen in female Fabp6(-/- mice. Mucosal to serosal bile acid transport using everted distal gut sacs was decreased by 74% (P<0.03 in both sexes of Fabp6(-/- mice as compared to wild-type mice. The results demonstrate that ilbp is involved in the apical to basolateral transport of bile acids in ileal enterocytes, and is vital for the maintenance of bile acid homeostasis in the enterohepatic circulation (EHC in mice.

  13. Diagnosis in bile acid-CoA: Amino acid N-acyltransferase deficiency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nedim Had(z)i(c); Laura N Bull; Peter T Clayton; AS Knisely

    2012-01-01

    Cholate-CoA ligase (CCL) and bile acid-CoA:amino acid N-acyltransferase (BAAT) sequentially mediate bile-acid amidation.Defects can cause intrahepatic cholestasis.Distinction has required gene sequencing.We assessed potential clinical utility of immunostaining of liver for CCL and BAAT.Using commercially available antibodies against BAAT and CCL,we immunostained liver from an infant with jaundice,deficiency of amidated bile acids,and transcription-terminating mutation in BAAT.CCL was normally expressed.BAAT expression was not detected.Immunostaining may facilitate diagnosis in bileacid amidation defects.

  14. The inhibitory effect of carboxymethylcellulose with high viscosity on lipid absorption in broiler chickens coincides with reduced bile salt concentration and raised microbial numbers in the small intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, CHM; Veldman, A; Verkade, HJ; Beynen, AC

    1998-01-01

    Two diets, with or without a nonfermentable carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) with high viscosity, were fed to broiler chickens beginning at 2 wk of age to study whether the anti-nutritive effect of gelling fibers on Lipid digestibility maybe associated with reduced intestinal bile salt concentration. Mo

  15. CLA-enriched diet containing t10,c12-CLA alters bile acid homeostasis and increases the risk of cholelithiasis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letona, Amaia Zabala; Niot, Isabelle; Laugerette, Fabienne; Athias, Anne; Monnot, Marie-Claude; Portillo, Maria P; Besnard, Philippe; Poirier, Hélène

    2011-08-01

    Mice fed a mixture of CLA containing t10,c12-CLA lose fat mass and develop hyperinsulinemia and hepatic steatosis due to an accumulation of TG and cholesterol. Because cholesterol is the precursor in bile acid (BA) synthesis, we investigated whether t10,c12-CLA alters BA metabolism. In Expt. 1, female C57Bl/6J mice were fed a standard diet for 28 d supplemented with a CLA mixture (1 g/100 g) or not (controls). In Expt. 2, the feeding period was reduced to 4, 6, and 10 d. In Expt. 3, mice were fed a diet supplemented with linoleic acid, c9,t11-CLA, or t10,c12-CLA (0.4 g/100 g) for 28 d. In Expt. 1, the BA pool size was greater in CLA-fed mice than in controls and the entero-hepatic circulation of BA was altered due to greater BA synthesis and ileal reclamation. This resulted from higher hepatic cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) and ileal apical sodium BA transporter expressions in CLA-fed mice. Furthermore, hepatic Na(+)/taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP) (-52%) and bile salt export pump (BSEP) (-77%) protein levels were lower in CLA-fed mice than in controls, leading to a greater accumulation of BA in the plasma (+500%); also, the cholesterol saturation index and the concentration of hydrophobic BA in the bile were greater in CLA-fed mice, changes associated with the presence of cholesterol crystals. Expt. 2 suggests that CLA-mediated changes were caused by hyperinsulinemia, which occurred after 6 d of the CLA diet before NTCP and BSEP mRNA downregulation (10 d). Expt. 3 demonstrated that only t10,c12-CLA altered NTCP and BSEP mRNA levels. In conclusion, t10,c12-CLA alters BA homeostasis and increases the risk of cholelithiasis in mice.

  16. Quercetin regulates hepatic cholesterol metabolism by promoting cholesterol-to-bile acid conversion and cholesterol efflux in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Xie, Zongkai; Gao, Weina; Pu, Lingling; Wei, Jingyu; Guo, Changjiang

    2016-03-01

    Quercetin, a common member of the flavonoid family, is widely present in plant kingdom. Despite that quercetin is implicated in regulating cholesterol metabolism, the molecular mechanism is poorly understood. We hypothesized that quercetin regulates cholesterol homeostasis through regulating the key enzymes involved in hepatic cholesterol metabolism. To test this hypothesis, we compared the profile of key enzymes and transcription factors involved in the hepatic cholesterol metabolism in rats with or without quercetin supplementation. Twenty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into control and quercetin-supplemented groups. Serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and total bile acids in feces and bile were measured. Hepatic enzymatic activities were determined by activity assay kit and high-performance liquid chromatography-based analyses. The messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expressions were determined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses, respectively. The results showed that the activity of hepatic cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, a critical enzyme in the conversion of cholesterol to bile acids, was significantly elevated by quercetin. The expression of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, as well as liver X receptor α, an important transcription factor, was also increased at both mRNA and protein levels by quercetin. However, quercetin exposure had no impact on the activity of hepatic HMG-CoA reductase, a rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of cholesterol. We also found that quercetin treatment significantly increased ATP binding cassette transporter G1 mRNA and protein expression in the liver, suggesting that quercetin may increase hepatic cholesterol efflux. Collectively, the results presented here indicate that quercetin regulates hepatic cholesterol metabolism mainly through the pathways that promote cholesterol-to-bile acid conversion and

  17. Dysfunction of organic anion transporting polypeptide 1a1 alters intestinal bacteria and bile acid metabolism in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youcai Zhang

    Full Text Available Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1a1 (Oatp1a1 is predominantly expressed in liver and is able to transport bile acids (BAs in vitro. Male Oatp1a1-null mice have increased concentrations of taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA, a secondary BA generated by intestinal bacteria, in both serum and livers. Therefore, in the present study, BA concentrations and intestinal bacteria in wild-type (WT and Oatp1a1-null mice were quantified to investigate whether the increase of secondary BAs in Oatp1a1-null mice is due to alterations in intestinal bacteria. The data demonstrate that Oatp1a1-null mice : (1 have similar bile flow and BA concentrations in bile as WT mice; (2 have a markedly different BA composition in the intestinal contents, with a decrease in conjugated BAs and an increase in unconjugated BAs; (3 have BAs in the feces that are more deconjugated, desulfated, 7-dehydroxylated, 3-epimerized, and oxidized, but less 7-epimerized; (4 have 10-fold more bacteria in the small intestine, and 2-fold more bacteria in the large intestine which is majorly due to a 200% increase in Bacteroides and a 30% reduction in Firmicutes; and (5 have a different urinary excretion of bacteria-related metabolites than WT mice. In conclusion, the present study for the first time established that lack of a liver transporter (Oatp1a1 markedly alters the intestinal environment in mice, namely the bacteria composition.

  18. Retinoic acid regulates several genes in bile acid and lipid metabolism via upregulation of small heterodimer partner in hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamoon, Abulkhair; Subauste, Angela; Subauste, Maria C; Subauste, Jose

    2014-10-25

    Retinoic acid (RA) affects multiple aspects of development, embryogenesis and cell differentiation processes. The liver is a major organ that stores RA suggesting that retinoids play an important role in the function of hepatocytes. In our previous studies, we have demonstrated the involvement of small heterodimer partner (SHP) in RA-induced signaling in a non-transformed hepatic cell line AML 12. In the present study, we have identified several critical genes in lipid homeostasis (Apoa1, Apoa2 and ApoF) that are repressed by RA-treatment in a SHP dependent manner, in vitro and also in vivo with the use of the SHP null mice. In a similar manner, RA also represses several critical genes involved in bile acid metabolism (Cyp7a1, Cyp8b1, Mdr2, Bsep, Baat and Ntcp) via upregulation of SHP. Collectively our data suggest that SHP plays a major role in RA-induced potential changes in pathophysiology of metabolic disorders in the liver.

  19. A possible role for bile acid in the control of methanogenesis and the accumulation of hydrogen gas in the human colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florin, T H; Jabbar, I A

    1994-01-01

    This study investigated a possible role for primary bile acid in the control of methanogenesis in the human colon. Production of hydrogen and methane was measured in anaerobic faecal cultures derived from faeces of six 'non-methanogenic' and three methanogenic healthy humans. Using a sensitive technique for gas measurement, methane was detected in all faecal cultures, including those from 'non-methanogenic' humans. Bile acid inhibited methanogenesis in a dose-response fashion in the in vitro 'non-methanogenic' and methanogenic faecal cultures. Inhibition was significant at bile acid concentrations > 0.05%. Methanogenesis correlated with methanogen (methanogenic bacteria) numbers. If this inhibition occurs in vivo, then it would explain much of the epidemiology of non-methanogenesis in humans. From an analysis of net hydrogen production by the faecal cultures, it is inferred that bile acid inhibits other hydrogen-consuming bacteria in addition to methanogens. These in vitro data suggest a major role for bile acid in the accumulation of hydrogen gas in the colon. Possible links between bile acid induced accumulation of gas and irritable bowel syndrome are discussed.

  20. Synthesis and Fungicidal Activities of Pyrimethanil Heterocyclic Acid Salt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN,Xiao-Hong; LIU,Yuan-Fa; CHEN,Bang; JIA,Ying-Qi; YANG,Jian-Wu

    2007-01-01

    Seven pyrimethanil salts were synthesized by organic base containing nitrogen atom reacting with substituted pyridine acids. They are reported for the first time. Their structures have been confirmed by IR, 1H NMR and elemental analysis. The preliminary toxicity tests indicated that most of them exhibited excellent fungicidal activities.The relationship between the structures and the fungicidal activities of the compounds was discussed.

  1. Synthesis of 24-phenyl-24-oxo steroids derived from bile acids by palladium-catalyzed cross coupling with phenylboronic acid. NMR characterization and X-ray structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorquín-Torres, Martha C; Romero-Ávila, Margarita; Flores-Álamo, Marcos; Iglesias-Arteaga, Martin A

    2013-11-01

    Palladium-catalyzed cross coupling of phenyboronic acid with acetylated bile acids in which the carboxyl functions have been activated by formation of a mixed anhydride with pivalic anhydride afforded moderate to good yield of 24-phenyl-24-oxo-steroids. Unambiguous assignments of the NMR signals were made with the aid of combined 1D and 2D NMR techniques. X-ray diffraction studies confirmed the obtained structures.

  2. Bile canalicular changes and defective bile secretion in Opisthorchis viverrini-infected hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charoensuk, Lakhanawan; Pinlaor, Porntip; Laothong, Umawadee; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Pairojkul, Chawalit; Nawa, Yukifumi; Pinlaor, Somchai

    2014-12-01

    Infection with the liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini (Digenea) (Poirier, 1886) causes bile duct injury and periductal fibrosis by chronic overproduction of inflammatory-mediators and eventually results in cholangiocarcinoma development. While extensive research works have been done on O. viverrini infection-associated changes of bile ducts and periductal fibrosis, little attention was paid on morphological and biochemical changes of the bile canaliculi (BC), the origin of bile flow. We aimed to investigate the morphological and functional alterations of BC in the liver of hamsters infected with O. viverrini at one and three months post-infection. Ultrastructural changes of BC showed dilatation of BC and significant reduction of the density of microvilli as early as at one month post-infection. Immunohistochemistry revealed that CD10, a BC marker, expression was reduced early as one month post-infection. The mRNA expression of the genes encoding molecules related to bile secretion including bile acid uptake transporters (slc10a1 and slco1a1), bile acid dependent (abcb11) and independent (abcc2) bile flow and bile acid biosynthesis (cyp7a1 and cyp27a1) were significantly decreased at one month post-infection in association with the reduction of bile volume. In contrast, the expression of the mRNA of bile acid regulatory genes (fxr and shp-1) was significantly increased. These changes essentially persisted up to three months post-infection. In conclusion, O. viverrini infection induces morphological and functional changes of BC in association with the decrease of bile volume.

  3. Cheese intake lowers plasma cholesterol concentrations without increasing bile acid excretion

    OpenAIRE

    Hjerpsted, Julie Bousgaard; Dragsted, Lars Ove; Tholstrup, Tine

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cheese is a dairy product with high calcium content. It has been suggested that calcium intake may increase fecal excretion of bile acids that would cause a regeneration of bile acids from hepatic cholesterol and thereby result in a lowering of plasma cholesterol concentrations. We aimed to test this hypothesis by assessing bile acid and calcium concentrations in fecal samples from humans after intake of cheese and butter. Methods The study was a randomized, 2 × 6 weeks crossover, die...

  4. 75 FR 78243 - Propionic Acid and Salts, Urea Sulfate, Methidathion, and Methyl Parathion; Registration Review...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-15

    ... AGENCY Propionic Acid and Salts, Urea Sulfate, Methidathion, and Methyl Parathion; Registration Review... pesticides propionic acid and salts, case no. 4078, urea sulfate, case no. 7213, methidathion, case no. 0034... pesticides in the table below--propionic acid and salts, case 4078, urea sulfate, case no. 7213,...

  5. Suppression of the HPA Axis During Cholestasis Can Be Attributed to Hypothalamic Bile Acid Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillin, Matthew; Frampton, Gabriel; Quinn, Matthew; Divan, Ali; Grant, Stephanie; Patel, Nisha; Newell-Rogers, Karen; DeMorrow, Sharon

    2015-12-01

    Suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been shown to occur during cholestatic liver injury. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that in a model of cholestasis, serum bile acids gain entry into the brain via a leaky blood brain barrier and that hypothalamic bile acid content is increased. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to determine the effects of bile acid signaling on the HPA axis. The data presented show that HPA axis suppression during cholestatic liver injury, specifically circulating corticosterone levels and hypothalamic corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) expression, can be attenuated by administration of the bile acid sequestrant cholestyramine. Secondly, treatment of hypothalamic neurons with various bile acids suppressed CRH expression and secretion in vitro. However, in vivo HPA axis suppression was only evident after the central injection of the bile acids taurocholic acid or glycochenodeoxycholic acid but not the other bile acids studied. Furthermore, we demonstrate that taurocholic acid and glycochenodeoxycholic acid are exerting their effects on hypothalamic CRH expression after their uptake through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and subsequent activation of the glucocorticoid receptor. Taken together with previous studies, our data support the hypothesis that during cholestatic liver injury, bile acids gain entry into the brain, are transported into neurons through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and can activate the glucocorticoid receptor to suppress the HPA axis. These data also lend themselves to the broader hypothesis that bile acids may act as central modulators of hypothalamic peptides that may be altered during liver disease.

  6. 75Se HCAT test in the detection of bile acid malabsorption in functional diarrhoea and its correlation with small bowel transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciarretta, G; Fagioli, G; Furno, A; Vicini, G; Cecchetti, L; Grigolo, B; Verri, A; Malaguti, P

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether bile acid malabsorption assessed by the 75SeHCAT test, had a pathogenetic role in functional chronic diarrhoea and to ascertain whether the small bowel transit time (SBTT) could be correlated with the 75SeHCAT test results. The test was based on the counting of the abdominal retention of a 75-selenium labelled homotaurocholic acid. The 75SeHCAT test was carried out in a control group of 23 healthy adults and in 46 patients, 38 of whom were suffering from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) of diarrhoeic form and eight patients who had undergone cholecystectomy and were suffering from chronic diarrhoea. Faecal bile acid loss was determined in nine patients, and in 14, serum bile acid increase after a standard meal was measured. In 17, SBTT was studied by hydrogen breath test after lactulose administration (21 g in 300 ml water). In 15 patients, choledochocaecal transit time was estimated by Tc99m-HIDA (111 MBq) cholescintigraphy. In 20 of 46 subjects, 75SeHCAT retention was below normal level, and in 19 cholestyramine administration relieved diarrhoea. 75SeHCAT results were related to faecal bile acid loss, while no correlation was found with serum bile acids and SBTT. The data suggest a possible wider use of the 75SeHCAT test in chronic diarrhoea to estimate bile acid malabsorption in irritable bowel syndrome, diarrhoeic form, and provide an effective treatment. In our patients small bowel transit velocity does not seem to be a pathogenetic factor of bile acid malabsorption. PMID:3666565

  7. FGF19 Regulates Cell Proliferation, Glucose and Bile Acid Metabolism via FGFR4-Dependent and Independent Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Ai-Luen Wu; Sally Coulter; Christopher Liddle; Anne Wong; Jeffrey Eastham-Anderson; French, Dorothy M.; Peterson, Andrew S.; Junichiro Sonoda

    2011-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) is a hormone-like protein that regulates carbohydrate, lipid and bile acid metabolism. At supra-physiological doses, FGF19 also increases hepatocyte proliferation and induces hepatocellular carcinogenesis in mice. Much of FGF19 activity is attributed to the activation of the liver enriched FGF Receptor 4 (FGFR4), although FGF19 can activate other FGFRs in vitro in the presence of the coreceptor βKlotho (KLB). In this report, we investigate the role of FGFR4...

  8. Effect of loperamide and delay of bowel motility on bile acid malabsorption caused by late radiation damage and ileal resection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdes Olmos, R. (Nederlands Kanker Inst., Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Hartog Jager, F. den; Hoefnagel, C.; Taal, B. (Nederlands Kanker Inst., Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Gastroenterology)

    1991-05-01

    Selenium-75 homocholic acid conjugated with taurine ({sup 75}Se-HCAT) was used during loperamide administration in seven patients suspected of having bile acid malabsorption due to late radiation damage and small-bowel resection in order to document the aetiology of ileal dysfunction and to adjust therapeutic mamagement. In two patients with ileal resection up to 50 cm and in one patient without resection, a reduction of bowel motility by loperamide resulted in marked normalization of the {sup 75}Se-HCAT retention measurements. Sequential scintigraphic {sup 75}Se-HCAT imaging demonstrated a significant improvement in the {sup 75}Se-HCAT reabsorption and recirculation, accompanied in one case by prolongation of colonic retention of the radiopharmaceutical. In four patients with more than 80 cm resection, the {sup 75}Se-HCAT test was abnormal during loperamide administration. In two of these patients for whom baseline values were available, no improvement in the pattern of {sup 75}Se-HCAT absorption was observed. In conclusion, the first results of loperamide {sup 75}Se-HCAT in patients suspected of having bile acid malabsorption and abnormal baseline {sup 75}Se-HCAT are promising. Intervention with loperamide is easy and seems to improve the clinical value of the test with direct therapeutic implications. Sequential {sup 75}Se-HCAT imaging is essential for interpreting changes in the {sup 75}Se-HCAT retention measurements. (orig.).

  9. Evaluation of a semiquantitative SNAP test for measurement of bile acids in dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Rachel L. Seibert; Tobias, Karen M.; Ann Reed; Karl R. Snyder

    2014-01-01

    Background. Serum bile acids (SBA) are used as a routine screening tool of liver function in dogs. Serum samples are usually shipped to a referral laboratory for quantitative analysis with an enzymatic chemistry analyzer. The canine SNAP Bile Acids Test (SNAP-BAT) provides an immediate, semi-quantitative measurement of bile acid concentrations in-house. With the SNAP-BAT, bile acids concentrations of 5–30 µmol/L are quantified, and results outside of that range are classified as 30 µmol/L. Ag...

  10. Importance of Large Intestine in Regulating Bile Acids and Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 in Germ-Free Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selwyn, Felcy Pavithra; Csanaky, Iván L; Zhang, Youcai; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2015-10-01

    It is known that 1) elevated serum bile acids (BAs) are associated with decreased body weight, 2) elevated glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels can decrease body weight, and 3) germ-free (GF) mice are resistant to diet-induced obesity. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a lack of intestinal microbiota results in more BAs in the body, resulting in increased BA-mediated transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor 5 (TGR5) signaling and increased serum GLP-1 as a mechanism of resistance of GF mice to diet-induced obesity. GF mice had 2- to 4-fold increased total BAs in the serum, liver, bile, and ileum. Fecal excretion of BAs was 63% less in GF mice. GF mice had decreased secondary BAs and increased taurine-conjugated BAs, as anticipated. Surprisingly, there was an increase in non-12α-OH BAs, namely, β-muricholic acid, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), and their taurine conjugates, in GF mice. Further, in vitro experiments confirmed that UDCA is a primary BA in mice. There were minimal changes in the mRNA of farnesoid X receptor target genes in the ileum (Fibroblast growth factor 15, small heterodimer protein, and ileal bile acid-binding protein), in the liver (small heterodimer protein, liver receptor homolog-1, and cytochrome P450 7a1), and BA transporters (apical sodium dependent bile acid transporter, organic solute transporter α, and organic solute transporter β) in the ileum of GF mice. Surprisingly, there were marked increases in BA transporters in the large intestine. Increased GLP-1 levels and gallbladder size were observed in GF mice, suggesting activation of TGR5 signaling. In summary, the GF condition results in increased expression of BA transporters in the colon, resulting in 1) an increase in total BA concentrations in tissues, 2) a change in BA composition to favor an increase in non-12α-OH BAs, and 3) activation of TGR5 signaling with increased gallbladder size and GLP-1.

  11. NOVEL SALTS OF FUMARIC ACID MONOALKYLESTERS AND THEIR PHARMACEUTICAL USE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    The present invention relates to novel strontium salts of fumaric acid monoalkylesters. The salts are suitable for use as active subtances in the treatment of e.g. psoriasis or other hyperproliferative, inflammatory or autoimmune disorders either alone or in combination with another fumaric acid ...

  12. Predicting human intestinal absorption in the presence of bile salt with micellar liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Laura J; Shokry, Dina S; Parkes, Gareth M B

    2016-10-01

    Understanding intestinal absorption for pharmaceutical compounds is vital to estimate the bioavailability and therefore the in vivo potential of a drug. This study considers the application of micellar liquid chromatography (MLC) to predict passive intestinal absorption with a selection of model compounds. MLC is already known to aid prediction of absorption using simple surfactant systems; however, with this study the focus was on the presence of a more complex, bile salt surfactant, as would be encountered in the in vivo environment. As a result, MLC using a specific bile salt has been confirmed as an ideal in vitro system to predict the intestinal permeability for a wide range of drugs, through the development of a quantitative partition-absorption relationship. MLC offers many benefits including environmental, economic, time-saving and ethical advantages compared with the traditional techniques employed to obtain passive intestinal absorption values. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. The influence of bile salt on the chemotherapeutic response of docetaxel-loaded thermosensitive nanomicelles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim DW

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Dong Wuk Kim,1,* Thiruganesh Ramasamy,2,* Ju Yeon Choi,2 Jeong Hwan Kim,2 Chul Soon Yong,2 Jong Oh Kim,2 Han-Gon Choi1 1College of Pharmacy, Institute of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Hanyang University, Ansan, South Korea; 2College of Pharmacy, Yeungnam University, Gyongsan, South Korea *These two authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The primary aim of this work was to investigate the potential of bile salt, sodium taurocholate (NaTC, in improving the bioavailability and anti-tumor efficacy of docetaxel (DCT upon rectal administration. Poloxamer-based nanomicelles with thermosensitive and mucoadhesive properties were prepared using the cold method. The optimized nanomicellar formulation was evaluated in terms of physicochemical and viscoelastic parameters. Nanomicelles containing bile salt maintained sufficient gelation strength (234×102 mPa·s and mucoadhesive force (17.3×102 dyne/cm2 to be retained in the upper part of the rectum. They significantly enhanced the DCT internalization across the rectal mucosa and showed a high plasma level during the first 4 hours of the study period, compared to nanomicelles with no bile salt. As a result, a slightly higher rectal bioavailability of ~33% was observed in nanomicelles containing bile salt, compared to ~28% from the latter system. The higher pharmacokinetic parameters for rectally administered DCT/P407/P188/Tween 80/NaTC (0.25%/11%/15%/10%/0.1% by weight, respectively resulted in significant anti-tumor efficacy. However, the tumor regression rate for the NaTC group was not statistically different from that for nanomicelles without NaTC. Therefore, overall results suggest that thermosensitive nanomicelles could be a potential dosage form for improvement of the bioavailability and chemotherapeutic profile of DCT. Keywords: anti-cancer efficiency, bioavailability, docetaxel, liquid suppository, rectal delivery, thermosensitive

  14. Colipase enhances hydrolysis of dietary triglycerides in the absence of bile salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bläckberg, L; Hernell, O; Bengtsson, G; Olivecrona, T

    1979-11-01

    This study explores how dietary lipids are digested when intraduodenal bile salts are low or absent. Long-chain triglycerides emulsified with phosphatidylcholine were found to be hydrolyzed very slowly by pancreatic lipase alone, as if the surface layer of phospholipids enveloping the triglycerides impeded the action of the enzyme. Colipase enhanced triglyceride hydrolysis severalfold, both when added before or after the lipase. Hydrolysis became even more rapid when the emulsion was first incubated with pancreatic phospholipase. Hydrolysis of long-chain triglycerides was also severely impeded when other proteins were added to the system, probably because they adsorbed to the oil-water interface of the emulsion droplets. It was previously known that bile salts can relieve such inhibition, presumably by desorbing the adsorbed proteins. Colipase was found to enhance hydrolysis severalfold in a dose-dependent manner even in the absence of bile salts, i.e., it could partially or completely relieve the inhibition depending upon the amount and the type of inhibitory protein added to the system. Prior exposure of a protein-coated triglyceride emulsion to another lipase also enhanced the rate at which pancreatic lipase could then hydrolyze the lipids. Most dietary triglycerides are probably presented for intestinal digestion in emulsions covered by proteins and/or phospholipids. These emulsions would be hydrolyzed slowly by pancreatic lipase alone. However, through the action of the lipase in stomach contents and of pancreatic phospholipase and through the lipolysis-promoting effects of collipase, these triglycerices can be rather efficiently hydrolyzed, even in the absence of bile salts.

  15. In Vitro and in Vivo Evaluation of Novel Cross-Linked Saccharide Based Polymers as Bile Acid Sequestrants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Lopez-Jaramillo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Bile acid sequestrants (BAS represent a therapeutic approach for the management of hypercholesterolemia that relies on the cationic polymeric nature of BAS to selectively bind negatively charged bile acids. We hypothesized that the cross-linking of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD and saccharides such as starch or dextrin with divinyl sulfone (DVS yields homo- and hetero-polymeric materials with the ability to trap sterols. Our hypothesis was put to test by synthesizing a library of 22 polymers that were screened to evaluate their capability to sequester both cholesterol (CHOL and cholic and deoxycholic acids (CA and DCA. Three polymers synthesized in high yield were identified as promising. Two were neutral hetero-polymers of β-CD and starch or dextrin and the third was a weakly cationic homo-polymer of starch, highlighting the importance of the cavity effect. They were tested in hypercholesterolemic male Wistar rats and their ability to regulate hypercholesterolemia was similar to that for the reference BAS cholestyramine, but with two additional advantages: (i they normalized the TG level and (ii they did not increase the creatinine level. Neither hepatotoxicity nor kidney injury was detected, further supporting them as therapeutical candidates to manage hypercholesterolemia.

  16. Gallbladder and bile duct

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930559 An experimental study on effective hep-atic blood flow and hepatic energy metabolismfollowing acute obstructive cholangitis and bil-iary obstruction.SUN Wenbing (孙文兵),et al.Hepatobili Surg,Center,Southwest Hosp,Chongqing 630000.Chin J Digest 1992;12(5):261—263.The changes of effective hepatic blood flow(E-HBF)and hepatic energy metabolism were stud-ied following acutc obstructive cholangitis(AOC)and bile duct ligation(BDL)in rats.The resultsshowed that EHBF was significantly decreased at24hs after and further decreased at 48hs afterBDL.And EHBF was significantly decreased at

  17. 21 CFR 172.725 - Gibberellic acid and its potassium salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.725 Gibberellic acid and its potassium salt. The... diluted with substances generally recognized as safe in foods or with salts of fatty acids conforming to... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Gibberellic acid and its potassium salt....

  18. Low-fat, high-carbohydrate and high-fat, low-carbohydrate diets decrease primary bile acid synthesis in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisschop, PH; Bandsma, RHJ; Stellaard, F; Meijer, AJ; Sauerwein, HP; Kuipers, F; Romijn, JA

    2004-01-01

    Background: Dietary fat content influences bile salt metabolism, but quantitative data from controlled studies in humans are scarce. Objective: The objective of the study was to establish the effect of dietary fat content on the metabolism of primary bile salts. Design: The effects of eucaloric extr

  19. FGF19 regulates cell proliferation, glucose and bile acid metabolism via FGFR4-dependent and independent pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Luen Wu

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19 is a hormone-like protein that regulates carbohydrate, lipid and bile acid metabolism. At supra-physiological doses, FGF19 also increases hepatocyte proliferation and induces hepatocellular carcinogenesis in mice. Much of FGF19 activity is attributed to the activation of the liver enriched FGF Receptor 4 (FGFR4, although FGF19 can activate other FGFRs in vitro in the presence of the coreceptor βKlotho (KLB. In this report, we investigate the role of FGFR4 in mediating FGF19 activity by using Fgfr4 deficient mice as well as a variant of FGF19 protein (FGF19v which is specifically impaired in activating FGFR4. Our results demonstrate that FGFR4 activation mediates the induction of hepatocyte proliferation and the suppression of bile acid biosynthesis by FGF19, but is not essential for FGF19 to improve glucose and lipid metabolism in high fat diet fed mice as well as in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice. Thus, FGF19 acts through multiple receptor pathways to elicit pleiotropic effects in regulating nutrient metabolism and cell proliferation.

  20. FGF19 regulates cell proliferation, glucose and bile acid metabolism via FGFR4-dependent and independent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ai-Luen; Coulter, Sally; Liddle, Christopher; Wong, Anne; Eastham-Anderson, Jeffrey; French, Dorothy M; Peterson, Andrew S; Sonoda, Junichiro

    2011-03-18

    Fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) is a hormone-like protein that regulates carbohydrate, lipid and bile acid metabolism. At supra-physiological doses, FGF19 also increases hepatocyte proliferation and induces hepatocellular carcinogenesis in mice. Much of FGF19 activity is attributed to the activation of the liver enriched FGF Receptor 4 (FGFR4), although FGF19 can activate other FGFRs in vitro in the presence of the coreceptor βKlotho (KLB). In this report, we investigate the role of FGFR4 in mediating FGF19 activity by using Fgfr4 deficient mice as well as a variant of FGF19 protein (FGF19v) which is specifically impaired in activating FGFR4. Our results demonstrate that FGFR4 activation mediates the induction of hepatocyte proliferation and the suppression of bile acid biosynthesis by FGF19, but is not essential for FGF19 to improve glucose and lipid metabolism in high fat diet fed mice as well as in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice. Thus, FGF19 acts through multiple receptor pathways to elicit pleiotropic effects in regulating nutrient metabolism and cell proliferation.

  1. Supplementary dietary calcium stimulates faecal fat and bile acid excretion, but does not protect against obesity and insulin resistance in C57BL/6J mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, de N.J.W.; Bosch-Vermeulen, H.; Oosterink, E.; Müller, M.R.; Meer, van der R.

    2011-01-01

    There is increased interest in the potential protective role of dietary Ca in the development of metabolic disorders related to the metabolic syndrome. Ca-induced intestinal precipitation of fatty acids and bile acids as well as systemic metabolic effects of Ca on adipose tissue is proposed to play

  2. Molecular field analysis and 3D-quantitative structure-activity relationship study (MFA 3D-QSAR) unveil novel features of bile acid recognition at TGR5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchiarulo, Antonio; Gioiello, Antimo; Thomas, Charles; Massarotti, Alberto; Nuti, Roberto; Rosatelli, Emiliano; Sabbatini, Paola; Schoonjans, Kristina; Auwerx, Johan; Pellicciari, Roberto

    2008-09-01

    Bile acids regulate nongenomic actions through the activation of TGR5, a membrane receptor that is G protein-coupled to the induction of adenylate cyclase. In this work, a training set of 43 bile acid derivatives is used to develop a molecular interaction field analysis (MFA) and a 3D-quantitative structure-activity relationship study (3D-QSAR) of TGR5 agonists. The predictive ability of the resulting model is evaluated using an external set of compounds with known TGR5 activity, and six bile acid derivatives whose unknown TGR5 activity is herein assessed with in vitro luciferase assay of cAMP formation. The results show a good predictive model and indicate a statistically relevant degree of correlation between the TGR5 activity and the molecular interaction fields produced by discrete positions of the bile acid scaffold. This information is instrumental to extend on a quantitative basis the current structure-activity relationships of bile acids as TGR5 modulators and will be fruitful to design new potent and selective agonists of the receptor.

  3. Determination and importance of temperature dependence of retention coefficient (RPHPLC) in QSAR model of nitrazepams' partition coefficient in bile acid micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posa, Mihalj; Pilipović, Ana; Lalić, Mladena; Popović, Jovan

    2011-02-15

    Linear dependence between temperature (t) and retention coefficient (k, reversed phase HPLC) of bile acids is obtained. Parameters (a, intercept and b, slope) of the linear function k=f(t) highly correlate with bile acids' structures. Investigated bile acids form linear congeneric groups on a principal component (calculated from k=f(t)) score plot that are in accordance with conformations of the hydroxyl and oxo groups in a bile acid steroid skeleton. Partition coefficient (K(p)) of nitrazepam in bile acids' micelles is investigated. Nitrazepam molecules incorporated in micelles show modified bioavailability (depo effect, higher permeability, etc.). Using multiple linear regression method QSAR models of nitrazepams' partition coefficient, K(p) are derived on the temperatures of 25°C and 37°C. For deriving linear regression models on both temperatures experimentally obtained lipophilicity parameters are included (PC1 from data k=f(t)) and in silico descriptors of the shape of a molecule while on the higher temperature molecular polarisation is introduced. This indicates the fact that the incorporation mechanism of nitrazepam in BA micelles changes on the higher temperatures. QSAR models are derived using partial least squares method as well. Experimental parameters k=f(t) are shown to be significant predictive variables. Both QSAR models are validated using cross validation and internal validation method. PLS models have slightly higher predictive capability than MLR models.

  4. Influence of dietary sugar on cholesterol and bile acid metabolism in the rat: Marked reduction of hepatic Abcg5/8 expression following sucrose ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apro, Johanna; Beckman, Lena; Angelin, Bo; Rudling, Mats

    2015-06-12

    Previous studies have indicated that dietary intake of sugar may lower bile acid production, and may promote cholesterol gallstone formation in humans. We studied the influence of dietary sucrose on cholesterol and bile acid metabolism in the rat. In two different experiments, rats received high-sucrose diets. In the first, 60% of the weight of standard rat chow was replaced with sucrose (high-sucrose diet). In the second, rats received a diet either containing 65% sucrose (controlled high-sucrose diet) or 65% complex carbohydrates, in order to keep other dietary components constant. Bile acid synthesis, evaluated by measurements of the serum marker 7-alpha-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4) and of the hepatic mRNA expression of Cyp7a1, was markedly reduced by the high-sucrose diet, but not by the controlled high-sucrose diet. Both diets strongly reduced the hepatic - but not the intestinal - mRNA levels of Abcg5 and Abcg8. The differential patterns of regulation of bile acid synthesis induced by the two sucrose-enriched diets indicate that it is not sugar per se in the high-sucrose diet that reduces bile acid synthesis, but rather the reduced content of fiber or fat. In contrast, the marked reduction of hepatic Abcg5/8 observed is an effect of the high sugar content of the diets.

  5. Hepatic bile acid metabolism in the neonatal hamster: expansion of the bile acid pool parallels increased Cyp7a1 expression levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Katie T; Horn, Paul S; Tso, Patrick; Heubi, James E; Woollett, Laura A

    2009-07-01

    Intraluminal concentrations of bile acids are low in newborn infants and increase rapidly after birth, at least partly owing to increased bile acid synthesis rates. The expansion of the bile acid pool is critical since bile acids are required to stimulate bile flow and absorb lipids, a major component of newborn diets. The purpose of the present studies was to determine the mechanism responsible for the increase in bile acid synthesis rates and the subsequent enlargement of bile acid pool sizes (BAPS) during the neonatal period, and how changes in circulating hormone levels might affect BAPS. In the hamster, pool size was low just after birth and increased modestly until 10.5 days postpartum (dpp). BAPS increased more significantly ( approximately 3-fold) between 10.5 and 15.5 dpp. An increase in mRNA and protein levels of cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1), the rate-limiting step in classical bile acid synthesis, immediately preceded an increase in BAPS. In contrast, levels of oxysterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (Cyp7b1), a key enzyme in bile acid synthesis by the alternative pathway, were relatively elevated by 1.5 dpp. farnesyl X receptor (FXR) and short heterodimeric partner (SHP) mRNA levels remained relatively constant at a time when Cyp7a1 levels increased. Finally, although simultaneous increases in circulating cortisol and Cyp7a1 levels occurred, precocious expression of Cyp7a1 could not be induced in neonatal hamsters with dexamethasone. Thus the significant increase in Cyp7a1 levels in neonatal hamsters is due to mechanisms independent of the FXR and SHP pathway and cortisol.

  6. Species-specific mechanisms for cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) regulation by drugs and bile acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handschin, Christoph; Gnerre, Carmela; Fraser, David J; Martinez-Jimenez, Celia; Jover, Ramiro; Meyer, Urs A

    2005-02-01

    The gene encoding cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) is tightly regulated in order to control intrahepatic cholesterol and bile acid levels. Ligands of the xenobiotic-sensing pregnane X receptor inhibit CYP7A1 expression. To retrace the evolution of the molecular mechanisms underlying CYP7A1 inhibition, we used a chicken hepatoma cell system that retains the ability to be induced by phenobarbital and other drugs. Whereas bile acids regulate CYP7A1 via small heterodimer partner and liver receptor homolog-1, mRNA expression of these nuclear receptors is unchanged by xenobiotics. Instead, drugs repress chicken hepatic nuclear factor 4alpha (HNF4alpha) transcript levels concomitant with a reduction in CYP7A1 expression. Importantly, no reduction of HNF4alpha levels is found in mouse liver in vivo and in human primary hepatocyte cultures, respectively. Thus, besides the importance of HNF4alpha in CYP7A1 regulation in all species, birds and mammals use different signaling pathways to adjust CYP7A1 levels after exposure to xenobiotics.

  7. Hypoglycemic activity and oral bioavailability of insulin-loaded liposomes containing bile salts in rats: the effect of cholate type, particle size and administered dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Mengmeng; Lu, Yi; Hovgaard, Lars; Guan, Peipei; Tan, Yanan; Lian, Ruyue; Qi, Jianping; Wu, Wei

    2012-06-01

    Oral delivery of protein or polypeptide drugs remains a challenge due to gastric and enzymatic degradation as well as poor permeation across the intestinal epithelia. In this study, liposomes containing bile salts were developed as a new oral insulin delivery system. The primary goal was to investigate the effect of cholate type, particle size and dosage of the liposomes on the hypoglycemic activity and oral bioavailability. Liposomes containing sodium glycocholate (SGC), sodium taurocholate (STC) or sodium deoxycholate (SDC) were prepared by a reversed-phase evaporation method. After oral administration, all liposomes elicited a certain degree of hypoglycemic effect in parallel with an increase in blood insulin level. The highest oral bioavailability of approximately 8.5% and 11.0% could be observed with subcutaneous insulin as reference for SGC-liposomes in non-diabetic and diabetic rats, respectively. Insulin-loaded liposomes showed slower and sustained action over a period of over 20 h with peak time around 8-12h. SGC-liposomes showed higher oral bioavailability than liposomes containing STC or SDC and conventional liposomes. The hypoglycemic effect was size-dependent with the highest at 150 nm or 400 nm and was proportionally correlated to the administered dose. The results supported the hypothesis of insulin absorption as intact liposomes.

  8. Long-term effect of wholemeal bread on stool weight, transit time, fecal bile acids, fats, and neutral sterols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, M A; Elton, R A; Smith, J H

    1986-03-01

    Stool weight, fecal constituents, bile acids, fat, neutral sterols, and intestinal transit time were recorded in 28 subjects over 18 mo. During the first 12 mo the subjects ate white bread. They were studied for an initial period of 7 days, and after 6 mo (study period 1). For the first 6 mo they ate their usual intake of bread, they then increased their white bread intake by 62 g/day for 6 mo (study period 2). The subjects ate a self-selected diet throughout the 18 mo study. During the last 6 mo (study period 3) the subjects replaced white bread by the same amount of wholemeal bread as in study period 2. No increase in stool weight occurred until study period 3 when there was an increase of 20%. There developed a linear relationship between stool weight and intestinal transit time which was not found during the initial first and second study periods. A seasonal influence on serum cholesterol was not observed during the wholemeal bread period. Fecal bile acid excretion was unchanged throughout the experiment.

  9. Properties of lignin, cellulose, and hemicelluloses isolated from olive cake and olive stones: binding of water, oil, bile acids, and glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, Guillermo; Rubio-Senent, Fátima; Lama-Muñoz, Antonio; García, Aránzazu; Fernández-Bolaños, Juan

    2014-09-10

    A process based on a steam explosion pretreatment and alkali solution post-treatment was applied to fractionate olive stones (whole and fragmented, without seeds) and olive cake into their main constitutive polymers of cellulose (C), hemicelluloses (H), and lignin (L) under optimal conditions for each fraction according to earlier works. The chemical characterization (chromatographic method and UV and IR spectroscopy) and the functional properties (water- and oil-holding capacities, bile acid binding, and glucose retardation index) of each fraction were analyzed. The in vitro studies showed a substantial bile acid binding activity in the fraction containing lignin from olive stones (L) and the alkaline extractable fraction from olive cake (Lp). Lignin bound significantly more bile acid than any other fraction and an amount similar to that bound by cholestyramine (a cholesterol-lowering, bile acid-binding drug), especially when cholic acid (CA) was tested. These results highlight the health-promoting potential of lignin from olive stones and olive cake extracted from olive byproducts.

  10. Structural basis of the alternating-access mechanism in a bile acid transporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoming; Levin, Elena J.; Pan, Yaping; McCoy, Jason G.; Sharma, Ruchika; Kloss, Brian; Bruni, Renato; Quick, Matthias; Zhou, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in hepatocytes and secreted through the biliary tract into the small intestine, where they aid in absorption of lipids and fat-soluble vitamins. Through a process known as enterohepatic recirculation, more than 90% of secreted bile acids are then retrieved from the intestine and returned to the liver for resecretion. In humans, there are two Na+-dependent bile acid transporters involved in enterohepatic recirculation, the Na+-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP; also known as SLC10A1) expressed in hepatocytes, and the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; also known as SLC10A2) expressed on enterocytes in the terminal ileum. In recent years, ASBT has attracted much interest as a potential drug target for treatment of hypercholesterolaemia, because inhibition of ASBT reduces reabsorption of bile acids, thus increasing bile acid synthesis and consequently cholesterol consumption. However, a lack of three-dimensional structures of bile acid transporters hampers our ability to understand the molecular mechanisms of substrate selectivity and transport, and to interpret the wealth of existing functional data. The crystal structure of an ASBT homologue from Neisseria meningitidis (ASBTNM) in detergent was reported recently, showing the protein in an inward-open conformation bound to two Na+ and a taurocholic acid. However, the structural changes that bring bile acid and Na+ across the membrane are difficult to infer from a single structure. To understand the structural changes associated with the coupled transport of Na+ and bile acids, here we solved two structures of an ASBT homologue from Yersinia frederiksenii (ASBTYf) in a lipid environment, which reveal that a large rigid-body rotation of a substrate-binding domain gives the conserved `crossover' region, where two discontinuous helices cross each other, alternating accessibility from either side of the cell membrane. This result has implications

  11. Promotion of PDT efficacy by bile acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelli, Michelle; Reiners, John, Jr.; Kessel, David

    2003-06-01

    We had previously described the use of relatively hydrophobic bile acids, notably UDCA (ursodeoxycholate) for the promotion of the apoptotic response to photodynamic therapy. Further study revealed that this effect occurred only when the target for photodamage was the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. The efficacy of lysosomal photodamage, leading to a cleavage of the protein Bid, was not influenced by UDCA. Moreover, the apoptotic cell death resulting from treatment of cells with the non-peptidic Bcl-2 inhibitor HA 14-1 was also promoted by UDCA. These results are consistent with the proposal that the pro-apoptotic effects of UDCA are directed against Bcl-2, promoting inactivation by HA 14-1 or photodamage.

  12. Improved annotation of conjugated bile acid hydrolase superfamily members in Gram-positive bacteria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambert, J.M.; Siezen, R.J.; Vos, W.M. de; Kleerebezem, M.

    2008-01-01

    Most Gram-positive bacteria inhabiting the gastrointestinal tract are capable of hydrolysing bile salts. Bile salt hydrolysis is thought to play an important role in various biological processes in the host. Therefore, correct annotation of bacterial bile salt hydrolases (Bsh) in public databases (E

  13. Improved annotation of conjugated bile acid hydrolase superfamily members in Gram-positive bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambert, J.M.; Siezen, R.J.; Vos, de W.M.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2008-01-01

    Most Gram-positive bacteria inhabiting the gastrointestinal tract are capable of hydrolysing bile salts. Bile salt hydrolysis is thought to play an important role in various biological processes in the host. Therefore, correct annotation of bacterial bile salt hydrolases (Bsh) in public databases (E

  14. Proliposomes containing a bile salt for oral delivery of Ginkgo biloba extract: Formulation optimization, characterization, oral bioavailability and tissue distribution in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Bin; Teng, Lirong; Xing, Gaoyang; Bi, Ye; Yang, Shuang; Hao, Fei; Yan, Guodong; Wang, Xinmei; Lee, Robert J; Teng, Lesheng; Xie, Jing

    2015-09-18

    Proliposomes containing a bile salt were developed to improve the oral bioavailability of Ginkgo biloba extract (GbE). GbE loaded proliposomes (P-GbE) were successfully prepared by spray drying method. The formulation was optimized using the response surface methodology. FE-SEM, DSC, and FT-IR were used to study the surface morphology and molecular state of proliposomes, and demonstrated key interactions between the formulation ingredients. In vitro studies showed delayed release and enhanced dissolution of Ginkgo flavonoids and terpene lactones from GbE proliposomes. Proliposomes significantly enhanced GbE absorption in the gastrointestinal tract and decreased its elimination. The bioavailabilities of quercetin, kaempferol, isorhmnetin, ginkgolide A, ginkgolide B and ginkgolide C from proliposomes relative to the control were 245%, 211%, 264%, 203%, 333%, and 294%, respectively. Proliposomes were shown to selectively deliver GbE to critical target tissues. In conclusion, development of proliposomes formulation for GbE solved the problem of its poor oral bioavailability, prolonged its duration of action, and increased drug distribution in critical tissues, especially in the brain, therefore, warrant further investigation.

  15. Use of Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids to Treat Inspissated Bile Syndrome: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Woo Young; Cho, Min Jeng; Han, Hye Seung

    2016-01-01

    Inspissated bile syndrome (IBS) is a rare condition in which thick intraluminal bile, including bile plugs, sludge, or stones, blocks the extrahepatic bile ducts in an infant. A 5-week-old female infant was admitted for evaluation of jaundice and acholic stool. Diagnostic tests, including ultrasound sonography, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, and a hepatobiliary scan, were not conclusive. Although the diagnosis was unclear, the clinical and laboratory findings improved gradually on administration of urodeoxycholic acid and lipid emulsion containing omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) for 3 weeks. However, a liver biopsy was suggestive of biliary atresia. This finding forced us to perform intraoperative cholangiography, which revealed a patent common bile duct with impacted thick bile. We performed normal saline irrigation and the symptom was improved, the final diagnosis was IBS. Thus, we herein report that IBS can be treated with omega-3 PUFAs as an alternative to surgical intervention. PMID:28090475

  16. In vitro lipid peroxidation of intestinal bile salt-based nanoemulsions: potential role of antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courraud, J; Charnay, C; Cristol, J P; Berger, J; Avallone, S

    2013-12-01

    Over the last decades, oxidative stress has been described as a deleterious phenomenon contributing to numerous noncommunicable diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancers. As many authors ascribed the healthy effect of fruit and vegetable consumption mainly to their antioxidant contents, it has been hypothesized that their protection could occur from the gut. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop an original and physiological model of nanoemulsions to study lipid peroxidation within the intestine and to assess the properties of potential antioxidants in this setting. Several nanoemulsions were compared in terms of physical characteristics and reactivity to 2,2'-azobis-(2-amidinopropane) hydrochloride (AAPH)-induced oxidation. Formulations included different types of lipids, a detergent (a conjugated bile salt or sodium dodecyl sulfate) and, finally, lipophilic antioxidants. Hemin and myoglobin were also tested as relevant potential oxidants. Fatty acid (FA) peroxidation was monitored by gas chromatography while malondialdehyde and antioxidant contents were measured by HPLC. Investigated nanoemulsions were composed of spherical or cylindrical mixed micelles, the latter being the least resistant to oxidation. In the experimental conditions, AAPH was the only efficient oxidant. Alpha-tocopherol and lutein significantly slowed FA degradation from 4 to 1 μM, respectively. On the contrary, beta-carotene did not show any protective capacity at 4 μM. In conclusion, the tested nanoemulsions were appropriate to assess antioxidant capacity during the intestinal phase of digestion.

  17. Effects of tegaserod on bile composition and hepatic secretion in Richardson ground squirrels on an enriched cholesterol diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pfannkuche Hans-Juergen

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tegaserod is effective in treating IBS patients with constipation, and does not alter gallbladder motility in healthy individuals or in patients with IBS. However, it is not known if tegaserod affects the biliary tract in gallstone disease, so to this end the effects of tegaserod on bile composition and hepatic secretion of Richardson ground squirrels maintained on an enriched cholesterol diet were examined. Results Animals were fed either a control (0.03% or enriched (1% cholesterol diet for 28 days, and treated s.c. with tegaserod (0.1 mg/kg BID or vehicle. Bile flow, bile acid, phospholipids and cholesterol secretion were measured with standard methods. Tegaserod treatment or enriched cholesterol diet, alone or combination, did not alter body or liver weights. The enriched cholesterol diet increased cholesterol saturation index (CSI, cholesterol concentrations in gallbladder and hepatic duct bile by ~50% and decreased bile acids in gallbladder bile by 17%. Tegaserod treatment reversed these cholesterol-induced changes. None of the treatments, drug or diet, altered fasting gallbladder volume, bile flow and bile salts or phospholipid secretion in normal diet and cholesterol-fed animals. However, tegaserod treatment prevented the decreases in bile acid pool size and cycling frequency caused by the enriched cholesterol diet, consequent to re-establishing normal bile acid to concentrations in the gall bladder. Tegaserod had no effect on these parameters with normal diet animals. Conclusion Tegaserod treatment results in increased enterohepatic cycling and lowers cholesterol saturation in the bile of cholesterol-fed animals. These effects would decrease conditions favorable to cholesterol gallstone formation.

  18. 78 FR 34338 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From Canada: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-07

    ...: Antidumping Duty Orders, 74 FR 25703 (May 29, 2009) (Citric Acid Duty Orders). Methodology The Department has... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From Canada: Preliminary Results of... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on citric acid and certain citrate salts (citric acid)......

  19. Modulation of fibroblast growth factor 19 expression by bile acids, meal replacement and energy drinks, milk, and coffee.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda M Styer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The enterohepatic pathway involving the fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19 and bile acids (BA has been linked with the etiology and remission of type 2 diabetes (T2D following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB surgery. Specifically, diabetic patients had lower FGF19 circulating levels but postoperative FGF19 and BA levels were higher in diabetic patients that experience remission of T2D, as compared to non-diabetic patients and diabetic patients that do not experience remission. It has been proposed that this may be due to the direct flow of digestate-free bile acids into the ileum benefiting mostly T2D patients without severe diabetes. METHODS/RESULTS: We used a human colorectal cell line (LS174T that endogenously expresses FGF19, real time PCR, and Elisas for precise quantitation of FGF19 mRNA and secreted protein levels. We report here that BA and fractions of BA stimulated FGF19 in vitro but this effect was partially blocked when BA were pre-incubated with a lipoprotein mix which emulates digested food. In addition, we show that FGF19 mRNA was stimulated by meal replacement drinks (Ensure, Glucerna, SlimFast, non-fat milk, and coffee which has been linked with reduced risk for developing diabetes. Pure caffeine and the 5-hour Energy drink, on the other hand, decreased FGF19 mRNA. CONCLUSIONS: In summary, FGF19 expression in vitro is modifiable by popular drinks suggesting that such approaches could potentially be used for modulating FGF19 expression in humans.

  20. Strategies to improve the solubility and stability of stilbene antioxidants: a comparative study between cyclodextrins and bile acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Filomena; Figueiras, Ana; Gallardo, Eugenia; Nerín, Cristina; Domingues, Fernanda C

    2014-02-15

    Aiming at the development of an active food packaging, the goal of this study was to increase stilbenes (resveratrol (RV), pterostilbene (PT) and pinosylvin (PS)) aqueous solubility and stability using hydropropyl-cyclodextrins (HP-CDs) and bile salts. To evaluate stilbene concentration, an HPLC-DAD method was validated. Stilbene solubility was improved by the formation of inclusion complexes and micellar systems with higher solubility values obtained for the inclusion complexes with cyclodextrins. Inclusion complexes revealed a 1:1 stoichiometry for RV and PT and a 1:2 for PS. Solid state characterisation was carried out using X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. (1)H NMR studies were also performed to characterise the prepared complexes. Photostability studies revealed that CDs were able to increase stilbene photostability at 4 °C. This work showed that stable stilbene solutions can be achieved using hydroxypropyl-CDs, contributing for their incorporation in several materials for the food and pharmaceutical industries.

  1. Resveratrol Attenuates Trimethylamine-N-Oxide (TMAO-Induced Atherosclerosis by Regulating TMAO Synthesis and Bile Acid Metabolism via Remodeling of the Gut Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-liang Chen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The gut microbiota is found to be strongly associated with atherosclerosis (AS. Resveratrol (RSV is a natural phytoalexin with anti-AS effects; however, its mechanisms of action remain unclear. Therefore, we sought to determine whether the anti-AS effects of RSV were related to changes in the gut microbiota. We found that RSV attenuated trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO-induced AS in ApoE−/− mice. Meanwhile, RSV decreased TMAO levels by inhibiting commensal microbial trimethylamine (TMA production via gut microbiota remodeling in mice. Moreover, RSV increased levels of the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, which increased the bile salt hydrolase activity, thereby enhancing bile acid (BA deconjugation and fecal excretion in C57BL/6J and ApoE−/− mice. This was associated with a decrease in ileal BA content, repression of the enterohepatic farnesoid X receptor (FXR-fibroblast growth factor 15 (FGF15 axis, and increased cholesterol 7a-hydroxylase (CYP7A1 expression and hepatic BA neosynthesis. An FXR antagonist had the same effect on FGF15 and CYP7A1 expression as RSV, while an FXR agonist abolished RSV-induced alterations in FGF15 and CYP7A1 expression. In mice treated with antibiotics, RSV neither decreased TMAO levels nor increased hepatic BA synthesis. Additionally, RSV-induced inhibition of TMAO-caused AS was also markedly abolished by antibiotics. In conclusion, RSV attenuated TMAO-induced AS by decreasing TMAO levels and increasing hepatic BA neosynthesis via gut microbiota remodeling, and the BA neosynthesis was partially mediated through the enterohepatic FXR-FGF15 axis.

  2. Production of recombinant human bile salt-stimulated lipase in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murasugi, A; Asami, Y; Mera-Kikuchi, Y

    2001-11-01

    Recombinant human bile salt-stimulated lipase (rhBSSL) was efficiently expressed under the control of the AOX1 gene promoter in Pichia pastoris. Human BSSL has 16 successively repeated sequences in the carboxy terminal region. The sequence consists of 11 amino acid residues. The coding sequence for the middle 11 of the 16 repeats was removed from hBSSL cDNA to facilitate efficient secretory expression. The clone used for fermentation was a transformant of GS115 (his4) integrated with four copies of the expression cassette containing the modified hBSSL cDNA. Unique fermentation conditions were required for efficient expressions of rhBSSL in the high cell-density fermentation. A sufficient glycerol feed at 30 degrees C and pH 4 under an adequate concentration of dissolved oxygen in the growth phase make the cells active over a long induction period of approximately 15 days. On methanol induction, the concentration of dissolved oxygen should be maintained very low in the presence of sorbitol and skimmed milk at 20 degrees C and pH 5.7. Under these conditions, 0.8-1 g of rhBSSL was secreted in 1 liter of the medium. By immunoelectron microscopy, rhBSSL-tagged gold particles were located in secretion microbodies after the beginning of methanol induction. The secreted rhBSSL was efficiently captured and purified by expanded bed adsorption chromatography.

  3. The effect of dietary prebiotics and probiotics on body weight, large intestine indices, and fecal bile acid profile in wild type and IL10-/- mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiu-Ming Kuo

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested roles of probiotics and prebiotics on body weight management and intestinal function. Here, the effects of a dietary prebiotic, inulin (50 mg/g diet, and probiotic, Bfidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (Bb12 (final dose verified at 10(5 colony forming unit (cfu/g diet, comparable to human consumption, were determined separately and in combination in mice using cellulose-based AIN-93G diets under conditions allowed for the growth of commensal bacteria. Continuous consumption of Bb12 and/or inulin did not affect food intake or body, liver, and spleen weights of young and adult mice. Fecal bile acid profiles were determined by nanoESI-MS/MS tandem mass spectrometry. In the presence of inulin, more bacterial deconjugation of taurine from primary bile acids was observed along with an increased cecal weight. Consumption of inulin in the absence or presence of Bb12 also increased the villus cell height in the proximal colon along with a trend of higher bile acid sulfation by intestinal cells. Feeding Bb12 alone at the physiological dose did not affect bile acid deconjugation and had little effect on other intestinal indices. Although interleukin (IL10-null mice are susceptible to enterocolitis, they maintained the same body weight as the wild type mice under our specific pathogen-free housing condition and showed no signs of inflammation. Nevertheless, they had smaller cecum suggesting a mildly compromised intestinal development even before the disease manifestation. Our results are consistent with the notion that dietary factors such as prebiotics play important roles in the growth of intestinal microbiota and may impact on the intestinal health. In addition, fecal bile acid profiling could potentially be a non-invasive tool in monitoring the intestinal environment.

  4. The effect of dietary prebiotics and probiotics on body weight, large intestine indices, and fecal bile acid profile in wild type and IL10-/- mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Shiu-Ming; Merhige, Patricia M; Hagey, Lee R

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested roles of probiotics and prebiotics on body weight management and intestinal function. Here, the effects of a dietary prebiotic, inulin (50 mg/g diet), and probiotic, Bfidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (Bb12) (final dose verified at 10(5) colony forming unit (cfu)/g diet, comparable to human consumption), were determined separately and in combination in mice using cellulose-based AIN-93G diets under conditions allowed for the growth of commensal bacteria. Continuous consumption of Bb12 and/or inulin did not affect food intake or body, liver, and spleen weights of young and adult mice. Fecal bile acid profiles were determined by nanoESI-MS/MS tandem mass spectrometry. In the presence of inulin, more bacterial deconjugation of taurine from primary bile acids was observed along with an increased cecal weight. Consumption of inulin in the absence or presence of Bb12 also increased the villus cell height in the proximal colon along with a trend of higher bile acid sulfation by intestinal cells. Feeding Bb12 alone at the physiological dose did not affect bile acid deconjugation and had little effect on other intestinal indices. Although interleukin (IL)10-null mice are susceptible to enterocolitis, they maintained the same body weight as the wild type mice under our specific pathogen-free housing condition and showed no signs of inflammation. Nevertheless, they had smaller cecum suggesting a mildly compromised intestinal development even before the disease manifestation. Our results are consistent with the notion that dietary factors such as prebiotics play important roles in the growth of intestinal microbiota and may impact on the intestinal health. In addition, fecal bile acid profiling could potentially be a non-invasive tool in monitoring the intestinal environment.

  5. Current Status of Research on the Structure and Function of Bile Salt Hydrolase Gene%胆盐水解酶基因结构与功能研究现状

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄艳娜; 任婧

    2015-01-01

    胆盐水解酶是微生物生长、繁殖过程中产生的一种胞内酶,因其可能与降低血胆固醇、预防心血管疾病有关而受到广泛关注。本文从胆盐水解酶的特性出发,综述了胆盐水解酶的生理功能、酶学活性、微生物菌群的来源及特征,以及胆盐水解酶的氨基酸结构等方面的研究进展,以期为进一步深入研究胆盐水解酶的作用机理及相关制品的开发利用提供参考。%Bile salt hydrolase (BSH) is considered to be especially relevant for microbes that reside in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, which also helps to reduce the blood cholesterol level of the host. This review focuses on the occurrence of bile salt hydrolase among different microorganisms and its physiological characterization, enzyme activity, substrate specificity and genetics involved with recent updates. The current perspective reveals a huge market potential of probiotics with bile salt hydrolase.

  6. Novel potent and selective bile acid derivatives as TGR5 agonists: biological screening, structure-activity relationships, and molecular modeling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiroyuki; Macchiarulo, Antonio; Thomas, Charles; Gioiello, Antimo; Une, Mizuho; Hofmann, Alan F; Saladin, Régis; Schoonjans, Kristina; Pellicciari, Roberto; Auwerx, Johan

    2008-03-27

    TGR5, a metabotropic receptor that is G-protein-coupled to the induction of adenylate cyclase, has been recognized as the molecular link connecting bile acids to the control of energy and glucose homeostasis. With the aim of disclosing novel selective modulators of this receptor and at the same time clarifying the molecular basis of TGR5 activation, we report herein the biological screening of a collection of natural occurring bile acids, bile acid derivatives, and some steroid hormones, which has resulted in the discovery of new potent and selective TGR5 ligands. Biological results of the tested collection of compounds were used to extend the structure-activity relationships of TGR5 agonists and to develop a binary classification model of TGR5 activity. This model in particular could unveil some hidden properties shared by the molecular shape of bile acids and steroid hormones that are relevant to TGR5 activation and may hence be used to address the design of novel selective and potent TGR5 agonists.

  7. Alisol B 23-acetate protects against ANIT-induced hepatotoxity and cholestasis, due to FXR-mediated regulation of transporters and enzymes involved in bile acid homeostasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Qiang; Chen, Xin-li; Wang, Chang-yuan; Liu, Qi; Sun, Hui-jun; Sun, Peng-yuan; Huo, Xiao-kui; Liu, Zhi-hao; Yao, Ji-hong; Liu, Ke-xin, E-mail: kexinliu@dlmedu.edu.cn

    2015-03-15

    Intrahepatic cholestasis is a clinical syndrome with systemic and intrahepatic accumulation of excessive toxic bile acids that ultimately cause hepatobiliary injury. Appropriate regulation of bile acids in hepatocytes is critically important for protection against liver injury. In the present study, we characterized the protective effect of alisol B 23-acetate (AB23A), a natural triterpenoid, on alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT)-induced liver injury and intrahepatic cholestasis in mice and further elucidated the mechanisms in vivo and in vitro. AB23A treatment dose-dependently protected against liver injury induced by ANIT through reducing hepatic uptake and increasing efflux of bile acid via down-regulation of hepatic uptake transporters (Ntcp) and up-regulation of efflux transporter (Bsep, Mrp2 and Mdr2) expression. Furthermore, AB23A reduced bile acid synthesis through repressing Cyp7a1 and Cyp8b1, increased bile acid conjugation through inducing Bal, Baat and bile acid metabolism through an induction in gene expression of Sult2a1. We further demonstrate the involvement of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) in the hepatoprotective effect of AB23A. The changes in transporters and enzymes, as well as ameliorative liver histology in AB23A-treated mice were abrogated by FXR antagonist guggulsterone in vivo. In vitro evidences also directly demonstrated the effect of AB23A on FXR activation in a dose-dependent manner using luciferase reporter assay in HepG2 cells. In conclusion, AB23A produces protective effect against ANIT-induced hepatotoxity and cholestasis, due to FXR-mediated regulation of transporters and enzymes. - Highlights: • AB23A has at least three roles in protection against ANIT-induced liver injury. • AB23A decreases Ntcp, and increases Bsep, Mrp2 and Mdr2 expression. • AB23A represses Cyp7a1 and Cyp8b1 through inducing Shp and Fgf15 expression. • AB23A increases bile acid metabolism through inducing Sult2a1 expression. • FXR activation is involved

  8. Effects of gomisin A on the promotor action and serum bile acid concentration in hepatocarcinogenesis induced by 3'-methyl-4-dimethylamino-azobenzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, K; Hiramatsu, K; Ohtaki, Y; Kanitani, M; Nomura, M; Aburada, M

    1995-10-01

    The effects of gomisin A, a lignan component of Schizandra fruits, on the promotion stage of hepatocarcinogenesis initiated by 3'-methyl-4-dimethylamino-azobenzene (3'-MeDAB) in male Donryu rats were investigated. When different types of tumor promotors, phenobarbital (PB) and deoxycholic acid (DCA), were administered for 5 weeks after initiation by 3'-MeDAB, preneoplastic alterations in the liver, determined by glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P), were markedly increased. Gomisin A significantly inhibited the increase in number and size of GST-P positive foci, regardless of the promotor. This lignan inhibited the increase in serum bile acid concentration by administration of DCA, but hardly influenced the serum bile acids in the PB-combined group. These results suggest that the inhibitory effect of gomisin A on the promotive action of DCA is based on improving bile acid metabolism, but regarding the action of PB, the effect could not be elucidated from the metabolism of bile acids.

  9. Grape Seed Procyanidins and Cholestyramine Differentially Alter Bile Acid and Cholesterol Homeostatic Gene Expression in Mouse Intestine and Liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca M Heidker

    Full Text Available Bile acid (BA sequestrants, lipid-lowering agents, may be prescribed as a monotherapy or combination therapy to reduce the risk of coronary artery disease. Over 33% of adults in the United States use complementary and alternative medicine strategies, and we recently reported that grape seed procyanidin extract (GSPE reduces enterohepatic BA recirculation as a means to reduce serum triglyceride (TG levels. The current study was therefore designed to assess the effects on BA, cholesterol and TG homeostatic gene expression following co-administration with GSPE and the BA sequestrant, cholestyramine (CHY. Eight-week old male C57BL/6 mice were treated for 4 weeks with either a control or 2% CHY-supplemented diet, after which, they were administered vehicle or GSPE for 14 hours. Liver and intestines were harvested and gene expression was analyzed. BA, cholesterol, non-esterified fatty acid and TG levels were also analyzed in serum and feces. Results reveal that GSPE treatment alone, and co-administration with CHY, regulates BA, cholesterol and TG metabolism differently than CHY administration alone. Notably, GSPE decreased intestinal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (Asbt gene expression, while CHY significantly induced expression. Administration with GSPE or CHY robustly induced hepatic BA biosynthetic gene expression, especially cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1, compared to control, while co-administration further enhanced expression. Treatment with CHY induced both intestinal and hepatic cholesterologenic gene expression, while co-administration with GSPE attenuated the CHY-induced increase in the liver but not intestine. CHY also induced hepatic lipogenic gene expression, which was attenuated by co-administration with GSPE. Consequently, a 25% decrease in serum TG levels was observed in the CHY+GSPE group, compared to the CHY group. Collectively, this study presents novel evidence demonstrating that GSPE provides additive and

  10. Adverse reactions of Achilles tendon xanthomas in three hypercholesterolemic patients after treatment intensification with niacin and bile acid sequestrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakey, Wanda C; Greyshock, Nicole; Guyton, John R

    2013-01-01

    Multiple cholesterol-reducing therapies have been shown to induce the regression of tendon xanthoma in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia. We present 3 cases of adverse reactions in Achilles tendon xanthomas after the addition of niacin and bile acid sequestrants to ongoing statin therapy. Reduction in tendon dimensions and marked softening of xanthomas were interpreted as cholesterol removal from heavily infiltrated tissue sites. In 2 cases, changes in the xanthomas occurred despite only minor lipoprotein improvements, raising the possibility of direct drug effects in cholesterol-infiltrated tissue. Intriguingly, recent studies have described niacin receptor-mediated effects in macrophages. In summary, although adverse reactions in Achilles tendon xanthomas appear to be infrequent, clinicians should be aware of this phenomenon in their patients after intensifying lipid treatments, especially with the use of niacin in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia. Xanthoma responses may provide clues to new pharmacologic effects in cholesterol-infiltrated tissues.

  11. Individual bile acids have differential effects on bile acid signaling in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Peizhen; Rockwell, Cheryl E; Cui, Julia Yue; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2015-02-15

    Bile acids (BAs) are known to regulate BA synthesis and transport by the farnesoid X receptor in the liver (FXR-SHP) and intestine (FXR-Fgf15). However, the relative importance of individual BAs in regulating these processes is not known. Therefore, mice were fed various doses of five individual BAs, including cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxoycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA), and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in their diets at various concentrations for one week to increase the concentration of one BA in the enterohepatic circulation. The mRNA of BA synthesis and transporting genes in liver and ileum were quantified. In the liver, the mRNA of SHP, which is the prototypical target gene of FXR, increased in mice fed all concentrations of BAs. In the ileum, the mRNA of the intestinal FXR target gene Fgf15 was increased at lower doses and to a higher extent by CA and DCA than by CDCA and LCA. Cyp7a1, the rate-limiting enzyme in BA synthesis, was decreased more by CA and DCA than CDCA and LCA. Cyp8b1, the enzyme that 12-hydroxylates BAs and is thus responsible for the synthesis of CA, was decreased much more by CA and DCA than CDCA and LCA. Surprisingly, neither a decrease in the conjugated BA uptake transporter (Ntcp) nor increase in BA efflux transporter (Bsep) was observed by FXR activation, but an increase in the cholesterol efflux transporter (Abcg5/Abcg8) was observed with FXR activation. Thus in conclusion, CA and DCA are more potent FXR activators than CDCA and LCA when fed to mice, and thus they are more effective in decreasing the expression of the rate limiting gene in BA synthesis Cyp7a1 and the 12-hydroxylation of BAs Cyp8b1, and are also more effective in increasing the expression of Abcg5/Abcg8, which is responsible for biliary cholesterol excretion. However, feeding BAs do not alter the mRNA or protein levels of Ntcp or Bsep, suggesting that the uptake or efflux of BAs is not regulated by FXR at physiological and

  12. Quantitative profiling of bile acids in biofluids and tissues based on accurate mass high resolution LC-FT-MS: Compound class targeting in a metabolomics workflow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobeldijk, I.; Hekman, M.; Vries de- Weij, J.van der; Coulier, L.; Ramaker, R.; Kleemann, R.; Kooistra, T.; Rubingh, C.; Freidig, A.; Verheij, E.

    2008-01-01

    We report a sensitive, generic method for quantitative profiling of bile acids and other endogenous metabolites in small quantities of various biological fluids and tissues. The method is based on a straightforward sample preparation, separation by reversed-phase high performance liquid-chromatograp

  13. Gallbladder and Bile Duct Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disorders Overview of Gallbladder and Bile Duct Disorders Cholecystitis Gallstones Biliary Pain Without Gallstones Narrowing of the ... ducts are blocked, the gallbladder may become inflamed ( cholecystitis ). Biliary pain without gallstones (acalculous biliary pain) can ...

  14. New method for the determination of bile acid turnover using /sup 75/Se-homocholic acid taurine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delhez, H.; Meerwaldt, J.H.; van den Berg, J.W.O.; van Blankenstein, M.

    1982-06-01

    The introduction of /sup 75/Se-homocholic acid taurine (/sup 75/SeHCAT) greatly facilitates the investigation of diarrhoea of unknown origin. By using gamma-labelled bile acids, daily faecal bile acid loss can be measured in total collected stools, thus circumventing laborious mixing and sampling. The /sup 75/SeHCAT method proved to be reliable for the determination of bile acid turnover, giving results identical to the established turnover method using /sup 14/C-taurocholic acid. The new method however, is simpler and faster.

  15. 78 FR 34648 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts: Preliminary Results of Countervailing Duty Administrative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-10

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts: Preliminary Results of Countervailing... review of the countervailing duty (CVD) order on citric acid and citrate salts from the People's Republic... (202) 482-1503. Scope of the Order The merchandise subject to the order is citric acid and...

  16. Alteration of the enterohepatic recirculation of bile acids in rats after exposure to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scanff, P.; Souidi, M.; Grison, S.; Griffiths, N.M.; Gourmelon, P. [Inst. de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, (IRSN), Direction de la RadioProtection de l' Homme, Service de Radiobiologie et d' Epidemiologie, Fontenay-aux-Roses, CEDEX (France)]. E-mail: pascale.scanff@irsn.fr

    2004-02-01

    The aim of this work was to study acute alterations of the enterohepatic recirculation (EHR) of bile acids 3 days after an 8-Gy radiation exposure in vivo in the rat by a washout technique. Using this technique in association with HPLC analysis, the EHR of the major individual bile acids was determined in control and irradiated animals. Ex vivo ileal taurocholate absorption was also studied in Ussing chambers. Major hepatic enzyme activities involved in bile acid synthesis were also measured. Measurements of bile acid intestinal content and intestinal absorption efficiency calculation from washout showed reduced intestinal absorption with significant differences from one bile acid to another: absorption of taurocholate and tauromuricholate was decreased, whereas absorption of the more hydrophobic taurochenodeoxycholate was increased, suggesting that intestinal passive diffusion was enhanced, whereas ileal active transport might be reduced. Basal hepatic secretion was increased only for taurocholate, in accordance with the marked increase of CYP8B1 activity in the liver. The results are clearly demonstrate that concomitantly with radiation-induced intestinal bile acid malabsorption, hepatic bile acid synthesis and secretion are also changed. A current working model for pathophysiological changes in enterohepatic recycling after irradiation is thus proposed. (author)

  17. Salts of phenylacetic acid and 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid with Cinchona alkaloids: Crystal structures, thermal analysis and FTIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amombo Noa, Francoise M.; Jacobs, Ayesha

    2016-06-01

    Seven salts were formed with phenylacetic acid (PAA), 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (HPAA) and the Cinchona alkaloids; cinchonidine (CIND), quinidine (QUID) and quinine (QUIN). For all the structures the proton was transferred from the carboxylic acid of the PAA/HPAA to the quinuclidine nitrogen of the respective Cinchona alkaloid. For six of the salts, water was included in the crystal structures with one of these also incorporating an isopropanol solvent molecule. However HPAA co-crystallised with quinine to form an anhydrous salt, (HPAA-)(QUIN+). The thermal stability of the salts were determined and differential scanning calorimetry revealed that the (HPAA-)(QUIN+) salt had the highest thermal stability compared to the other salt hydrates. The salts were also characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. (PAA-)(QUID+)·H2O and (PAA-)(QUIN+)·H2O are isostructural and Hirshfeld surface analysis was completed to compare the intermolecular interactions in these two structures.

  18. Bile salt/phospholipid mixed micelle precursor pellets prepared by fluid-bed coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong F

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Fuxia Dong,1,2 Yunchang Xie,1 Jianping Qi,1 Fuqiang Hu,3 Yi Lu,1 Sanming Li,2 Wei Wu1 1School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, Key Laboratory of Smart Drug Delivery of Ministry of Education and PLA, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2School of Pharmacy, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Liaoning, People’s Republic of China; 3School of Pharmacy, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Bile salt/phospholipid mixed micelles (MMs are potent carriers used for oral absorption of drugs that are poorly soluble in water; however, there are many limitations associated with liquid formulations. In the current study, the feasibility of preparing bile salt/phospholipid MM precursor (preMM pellets with high oral bioavailability, using fluid-bed coating technology, was examined. In this study, fenofibrate (FB and sodium deoxycholate (SDC were used as the model drug and the bile salt, respectively. To prepare the MMs and to serve as the micellular carrier, a weight ratio of 4:6 was selected for the sodium deoxycholate/phospholipids based on the ternary phase diagram. Polyethylene glycol (PEG 6000 was selected as the dispersion matrix for precipitation of the MMs onto pellets, since it can enhance the solubilizing ability of the MMs. Coating of the MMs onto the pellets using the fluid-bed coating technology was efficient and the pellets were spherical and intact. MMs could be easily reconstituted from preMM pellets in water. Although they existed in a crystalline state in the preMM pellets, FB could be encapsulated into the reconstituted MMs, and the MMs were redispersed better than solid dispersion pellets (FB:PEG = 1:3 and Lipanthyl®. The redispersibility of the preMM pellets increased with the increase of the FB/PEG/micellar carrier. PreMM pellets with a FB:PEG:micellar carrier ratio of 1:1.5:1.5 showed 284% and 145% bioavailability relative to Lipanthyl® and solid dispersion pellets (FB:PEG = 1:3, respectively. Fluid

  19. Bile salt-induced intermolecular disulfide bond formation activates Vibrio cholerae virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Menghua; Liu, Zhi; Hughes, Chambers; Stern, Andrew M; Wang, Hui; Zhong, Zengtao; Kan, Biao; Fenical, William; Zhu, Jun

    2013-02-01

    To be successful pathogens, bacteria must often restrict the expression of virulence genes to host environments. This requires a physical or chemical marker of the host environment as well as a cognate bacterial system for sensing the presence of a host to appropriately time the activation of virulence. However, there have been remarkably few such signal-sensor pairs identified, and the molecular mechanisms for host-sensing are virtually unknown. By directly applying a reporter strain of Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, to a thin layer chromatography (TLC) plate containing mouse intestinal extracts, we found two host signals that activate virulence gene transcription. One of these was revealed to be the bile salt taurocholate. We then show that a set of bile salts cause dimerization of the transmembrane transcription factor TcpP by inducing intermolecular disulfide bonds between cysteine (C)-207 residues in its periplasmic domain. Various genetic and biochemical analyses led us to propose a model in which the other cysteine in the periplasmic domain, C218, forms an inhibitory intramolecular disulfide bond with C207 that must be isomerized to form the active C207-C207 intermolecular bond. We then found bile salt-dependent effects of these cysteine mutations on survival in vivo, correlating to our in vitro model. Our results are a demonstration of a mechanism for direct activation of the V. cholerae virulence cascade by a host signal molecule. They further provide a paradigm for recognition of the host environment in pathogenic bacteria through periplasmic cysteine oxidation.

  20. Identification of the bile salt binding site on ipad from Shigella flexneri and the influence of ligand binding on IpaD structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barta, Michael L.; Guragain, Manita; Adam, Philip; Dickenson, Nicholas E.; Patil, Mrinalini; Geisbrecht, Brian V.; Picking, Wendy L.; Picking, William D. (UMKC); (OKLU)

    2012-10-25

    Type III secretion (TTS) is an essential virulence factor for Shigella flexneri, the causative agent of shigellosis. The Shigella TTS apparatus (TTSA) is an elegant nano-machine that is composed of a basal body, an external needle to deliver effectors into human cells, and a needle tip complex that controls secretion activation. IpaD is at the tip of the nascent TTSA needle where it controls the first step of TTS activation. The bile salt deoxycholate (DOC) binds to IpaD to induce recruitment of the translocator protein IpaB into the maturing tip complex. We recently used spectroscopic analyses to show that IpaD undergoes a structural rearrangement that accompanies binding to DOC. Here, we report a crystal structure of IpaD with DOC bound and test the importance of the residues that make up the DOC binding pocket on IpaD function. IpaD binds DOC at the interface between helices {alpha}3 and {alpha}7, with concomitant movement in the orientation of helix {alpha}7 relative to its position in unbound IpaD. When the IpaD residues involved in DOC binding are mutated, some are found to lead to altered invasion and secretion phenotypes. These findings suggest that adoption of a DOC-bound structural state for IpaD primes the Shigella TTSA for contact with host cells. The data presented here and in the studies leading up to this work provide the foundation for developing a model of the first step in Shigella TTS activation.

  1. Identification of the bile salt binding site on IpaD from Shigella flexneri and the influence of ligand binding on IpaD structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barta, Michael L; Guragain, Manita; Adam, Philip; Dickenson, Nicholas E; Patil, Mrinalini; Geisbrecht, Brian V; Picking, Wendy L; Picking, William D

    2012-03-01

    Type III secretion (TTS) is an essential virulence factor for Shigella flexneri, the causative agent of shigellosis. The Shigella TTS apparatus (TTSA) is an elegant nanomachine that is composed of a basal body, an external needle to deliver effectors into human cells, and a needle tip complex that controls secretion activation. IpaD is at the tip of the nascent TTSA needle where it controls the first step of TTS activation. The bile salt deoxycholate (DOC) binds to IpaD to induce recruitment of the translocator protein IpaB into the maturing tip complex. We recently used spectroscopic analyses to show that IpaD undergoes a structural rearrangement that accompanies binding to DOC. Here, we report a crystal structure of IpaD with DOC bound and test the importance of the residues that make up the DOC binding pocket on IpaD function. IpaD binds DOC at the interface between helices α3 and α7, with concomitant movement in the orientation of helix α7 relative to its position in unbound IpaD. When the IpaD residues involved in DOC binding are mutated, some are found to lead to altered invasion and secretion phenotypes. These findings suggest that adoption of a DOC bound structural state for IpaD primes the Shigella TTSA for contact with host cells. The data presented here and in the studies leading up to this work provide the foundation for developing a model of the first step in Shigella TTS activation.

  2. Inhibition of ileal bile acid transporter: An emerging therapeutic strategy for chronic idiopathic constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosińska, Paula; Fichna, Jakub; Storr, Martin

    2015-06-28

    Chronic idiopathic constipation is a common disorder of the gastrointestinal tract that encompasses a wide profile of symptoms. Current treatment options for chronic idiopathic constipation are of limited value; therefore, a novel strategy is necessary with an increased effectiveness and safety. Recently, the inhibition of the ileal bile acid transporter has become a promising target for constipation-associated diseases. Enhanced delivery of bile acids into the colon achieves an accelerated colonic transit, increased stool frequency, and relief of constipation-related symptoms. This article provides insight into the mechanism of action of ileal bile acid transporter inhibitors and discusses their potential clinical use for pharmacotherapy of constipation in chronic idiopathic constipation.

  3. Cheese intake lowers plasma cholesterol concentrations without increasing bile acid excretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjerpsted, Julie Bousgaard; Dragsted, Lars Ove; Tholstrup, Tine

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cheese is a dairy product with high calcium content. It has been suggested that calcium intake may increase fecal excretion of bile acids that would cause a regeneration of bile acids from hepatic cholesterol and thereby result in a lowering of plasma cholesterol concentrations. We aimed...... with 13% energy from cheese or butter. Results After 6 weeks of intervention cheese resulted in higher amounts of calcium excreted in feces compared to butter. However, no difference was observed in fecal bile acid output despite lower serum total, LDL and HDL cholesterol concentrations observed...

  4. Conjugated primary bile salts reduce permeability of endotoxin through bacteria-stimulated intestinal epithelial cells and synergize with lecithin in suppression of inflammatory cytokine production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parlesak, Alexandr; Schaeckeler, Simone; Moser, Lydia

    2007-01-01

    : The effect of CPBS (0.5 mM and 1.5 mM), phosphatidylcholine(0.38 mM), and human bile (0.5% vol/vol) on the barrier function was assessed by the measurement of transepithelial electrical resistance, by endotoxin permeability through the intestinal epithelial cell layer, and by basolateral cytokine enzyme...

  5. Conjugated primary bile salts reduce permeability of endotoxin through intestinal epithelial cells and synergize with phosphatidylcholine in suppression of inflammatory cytokine production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parlesak, Alexandr; Schaeckeler, S.; Moser, L.

    2007-01-01

    : The effect of CPBS (0.5 mM and 1.5 mM), phosphatidylcholine (0.38 mM), and human bile (0.5% vol/vol) on the barrier function was assessed by the measurement of transepithelial electrical resistance, by endotoxin permeability through the intestinal epithelial cell layer, and by basolateral cytokine enzyme...

  6. Combined quantification of faecal sterols, stanols, stanones and bile acids in soils and terrestrial sediments by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birk, Jago Jonathan; Dippold, Michaela; Wiesenberg, Guido L B; Glaser, Bruno

    2012-06-15

    Faeces incorporation can alter the concentration patterns of stanols, stanones, Δ(5)-sterols and bile acids in soils and terrestrial sediments. A joint quantification of these substances would give robust and specific information about the faecal input. Therefore, a method was developed for their purification and determination via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) based on a total lipid extract (TLE) of soils and terrestrial sediments. Stanols, stanones, Δ(5)-steroles and bile acids were extracted by a single Soxhlet extraction yielding a TLE. The TLE was saponified with KOH in methanol. Sequential liquid-liquid extraction was applied to recover the biomarkers from the saponified extract and to separate the bile acids from the neutral stanoles, stanones and Δ(5)-steroles. The neutral fraction was directly purified using solid phase extraction (SPE) columns packed with 5% deactivated silica gel. The bile acids were methylated in dry HCl in methanol and purified on SPE columns packed with activated silica gel. A mixture of hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS), trimethylchlorosilane (TMCS) and pyridine was used to silylate the hydroxyl groups of the stanols and Δ(5)-sterols avoiding a silylation of the keto groups of the stanones in their enol-form. Silylation of the bile acids was carried out with N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) containing N-trimethylsilylimidazole (TSIM). TLEs from a set of soils with different physico-chemical properties were used for method evaluation and for comparison of amounts of faecal biomarkers analysed with saponification and without saponification of the TLE. Therefore, a Regosol, a Podzol and a Ferralsol were sampled. To proof the applicability of the method for faecal biomarker analyses in archaeological soils and sediments, additional samples were taken from pre-Columbian Anthrosols in Amazonia and an Anthrosol from a site in central Europe settled since the Neolithic. The comparison of the amounts of steroids

  7. 胆汁酸诱导的肠道激素与肝脏糖代谢%Bile acid induced gut hormones and hepatic glucose metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹宏伟; 姜崴

    2015-01-01

    [Summary] Bile acid is a main component of bile ,which plays a key role in keeping cholesterol metabolism balance in vivo and promoting lipids digestion in intestine. Recently ,more and more researches focus on bile acid for its regulating effect on glucose ,lipid and energy metabolism as a signal molecule. The reabsorbed bile acid stimulates the secretion of fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) and glucagon-like peptide-1(GLP-1) in the intestine by activating a nuclear receptor farnesoid X-activated receptor (FXR) and a membrane receptor TGR5. FGF19 and GLP-1 regulate hepatic glucose metabolism through different pathways. Here ,we briefly summarize the research progress and relationship between bile acid induced gut hormones and hepatic glucose metabolism.%胆汁酸是胆汁的主要成分,其主要作用是维持体内胆固醇代谢的平衡和促进肠道脂肪的消化。近年,胆汁酸作为一种信号分子,对葡萄糖、脂质及能量代谢的调节作用日趋受到重视。胆汁酸在肠道重吸收时分别通过核受体法呢醇X受体(FXR)、膜受体TGR5促进肠道细胞分泌成纤维细胞生长因子19(FGF19)及胰升血糖素样肽-1(GLP-1)。FGF19和GLP-1通过不同的作用途径影响肝脏的糖代谢。本文就胆汁酸诱导的肠道激素与肝脏糖代谢的关系及研究进展进行综述。

  8. 胆汁酸的代谢、生理作用及其临床意义%Bile acids: Metabolism,physiology and clinical significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹凯歌; 冯志杰

    2012-01-01

    胆汁酸通过肠肝循环代谢,具有促进脂类消化吸收、防止胆道结石生成、增加胆汁分泌、排泄等多种生物学作用,血清胆汁酸测定可反映急性肝炎慢性化、慢性肝炎炎症和纤维化程度、肝硬化门脉高压以及重症肝炎的病情演变,是梗阻性黄疸患者梗阻解除的早期敏感指标.另外,血清胆汁酸测定对炎症性肠病、妊娠期肝内胆汁淤积、先天性胆道疾病、肝移植等疾病的诊断也有一定价值.%Enterohepatic circulation of bile acids can promote lipid digestion and absorption, prevent gallstone formation, and increase the secretion of bile. Measurement of serum bile acids can be used to predict the progression from acute hepatitis to chronic hepatitis and evaluate the degree of inflammation and fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis and the degree of portal hypertension and severe hepatitis. Serum bile acids are also an early and sensitive predictor of the relief of biliary obstruction in patients with obstructive jaundice. In addition, serum bile acids can be used for the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease, intra-hepatic cholestasis during pregnancy, congenital biliary tract disease, and liver transplantation.

  9. Preparation, spectral and thermal studies of pyrazinecarboxylic acids and their hydrazinium salts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Premkumar; S Govindarajan; Wei-Ping Pan

    2003-04-01

    Some new hydrazinium 2-pyrazinecarboxylate and 2,3-pyrazinedicarboxylate salts of the formulae N2H5pc, N2H5pc.H2O (Hpc = 2-pyrazinecarboxylic acid), N2H5Hpdc, (N2H5)2pdc.H2O and N2H5(Hpdc).H2pdc (H2pdc = 2,3-pyrazinedicarboxylic acid) have been prepared by neutralization of aqueous hydrazine hydrate with the respective acids in appropriate molar ratios. The free acids and their hydrazinium salts have been characterized by analytical, IR spectroscopic and thermal studies. IR spectra of all the salts show N-N stretching frequencies of the N2H$_{5}^{+}$ ion in the region 975-960 cm-1. The thermoanalytical behaviour of the free acids and their salts has been investigated by simultaneous TG and DTA. While pyrazinecarboxylic acid shows single-step endothermic (229°C) complete decomposition, pyrazindicarboxylic acid shows exothermic decarboxylation followed by identical endothermic decomposition as that of the former. Similarly, salts of the monocarboxylic acid show endothermic effects during pyrolysis, whereas salts of the dicarboxylic acid show endothermic followed by exothermic decomposition. The acids and their salts both undergo complete decomposition to gaseous products.

  10. Effect of bile acids on glucose and lipid metabolism%胆汁酸对糖脂代谢影响的研究现状

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙逊; 杨刚毅

    2008-01-01

    胆汁酸是胆汁的重要成分,主要在肝脏合成,在膳食脂肪的消化吸收和胆固醇的代谢调节中发挥重要作用.近年来研究发现,胆汁酸还可激活法尼酯X受体-α、TGK5等信号分子,通过多种信号途径反馈调节自身的肠肝循环,同时还有降低血浆高密度脂蛋白和甘油三酯的作用,并且还参与糖代谢的调节,与体内糖脂代谢的动态平衡密切相关.因此,一些胆汁酸相关的信号途径很有希望成为治疗代谢性疾病的新靶点.%Bile acids,synthesized in liver,is a primary component of bile.It plays an important role in the digestion and absorption of dietary lipid as well as in cholesterol homeostasis.Recently,many studies showed that bile acids could activate several signaling molecules,such as farnesoid X receptor α and TGR5.Through these mechanisms,bile acids regulates its entero-hepatic circulation,brings down plasma levels of high density lipoprotein,triglyceride and regulates glucose metabolism.So it is closely related to glucose and lipid homeostasis.Thus,several bile acids-related pathways are promising targets of metabolic disease therapy.

  11. Cystathionine γ-lyase, a H2S-generating enzyme, is a GPBAR1-regulated gene and contributes to vasodilation caused by secondary bile acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renga, Barbara; Bucci, Mariarosaria; Cipriani, Sabrina; Carino, Adriana; Monti, Maria Chiara; Zampella, Angela; Gargiulo, Antonella; d'Emmanuele di Villa Bianca, Roberta; Distrutti, Eleonora; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2015-07-01

    GPBAR1 is a bile acid-activated receptor (BAR) for secondary bile acids, lithocholic (LCA) and deoxycholic acid (DCA), expressed in the enterohepatic tissues and in the vasculature by endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Despite that bile acids cause vasodilation, it is unclear why these effects involve GPBAR1, and the vascular phenotype of GPBAR1 deficient mice remains poorly defined. Previous studies have suggested a role for nitric oxide (NO) in regulatory activity exerted by GPBAR1 in liver endothelial cells. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a vasodilatory agent generated in endothelial cells by cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE). Here we demonstrate that GPBAR1 null mice had increased levels of primary and secondary bile acids and impaired vasoconstriction to phenylephrine. In aortic ring preparations, vasodilation caused by chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), a weak GPBAR1 ligand and farnesoid-x-receptor agonist (FXR), was iberiotoxin-dependent and GPBAR1-independent. In contrast, vasodilation caused by LCA was GPBAR1 dependent and abrogated by propargyl-glycine, a CSE inhibitor, and by 5β-cholanic acid, a GPBAR1 antagonist, but not by N(5)-(1-iminoethyl)-l-ornithine (l-NIO), an endothelial NO synthase inhibitor, or iberiotoxin, a large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BKCa) channels antagonist. In venular and aortic endothelial (HUVEC and HAEC) cells GPBAR1 activation increases CSE expression/activity and H2S production. Two cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) sites (CREs) were identified in the CSE promoter. In addition, TLCA stimulates CSE phosphorylation on serine residues. In conclusion we demonstrate that GPBAR1 mediates the vasodilatory activity of LCA and regulates the expression/activity of CSE. Vasodilation caused by CDCA involves BKCa channels. The GPBAR1/CSE pathway might contribute to endothelial dysfunction and hyperdynamic circulation in liver cirrhosis.

  12. Alteration of bile acid metabolism in pseudo germ-free rats [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmik, Salil Kumar; An, Ji Hye; Lee, Soo Hyun; Jung, Byung Hwa

    2012-11-01

    To characterize the impact of gut microbiota on host bile acid metabolism, we investigated the metabolic profiles of oxysterols and bile acids (BAs) in a conventional rat model (SD) (n=5) and its pseudo germ-free (GF) equivalent (n=5). GF rats were developed by the oral administration of bacitracin, neomycin and streptomycin (200 mg/kg, each) twice a day for 6 days. Urinary levels of oxysterols and bile acid metabolites were quantified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The activity levels of enzymes involved in the bile acid metabolic pathway were determined through urinary concentration ratio between product to precursor. Cholic acid (CA) and α-/β-muricholic acid (α-/β-MCA) were significantly elevated at pseudo germ-free condition. An increase of hydroxylase (cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, oxysterol 7α-hydroxylase and cytochrome P450 scc) and a significant decrease of 7α-dehydroxylase were observed. The urinary concentration ratio of primary bile acids, a marker for hepatotoxicity, increased in pseudo germfree conditions. Therefore, it was found that gut microbiota could play a significant role in the bile acids homeostasis and metabolism.

  13. Diurnal variations of mouse plasma and hepatic bile acid concentrations as well as expression of biosynthetic enzymes and transporters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Kun Jennifer Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diurnal fluctuation of bile acid (BA concentrations in the enterohepatic system of mammals has been known for a long time. Recently, BAs have been recognized as signaling molecules beyond their well-established roles in dietary lipid absorption and cholesterol homeostasis. METHODS AND RESULTS: The current study depicted diurnal variations of individual BAs detected by ultra-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS in serum and livers collected from C57BL/6 mice fed a regular chow or a chow containing cholestyramine (resin. Circadian rhythms of mRNA of vital BA-related nuclear receptors, enzymes, and transporters in livers and ilea were determined in control- and resin-fed mice, as well as in farnesoid X receptor (FXR null mice. The circadian profiles of BAs showed enhanced bacterial dehydroxylation during the fasting phase and efficient hepatic reconjugation of BAs in the fed phase. The resin removed more than 90% of BAs with β-hydroxy groups, such as muricholic acids and ursodeoxycholic acid, from serum and livers, but did not exert as significant influence on CA and CDCA in both compartments. Both resin-fed and FXR-null mouse models indicate that BAs regulate their own biosynthesis through the FXR-regulated ileal fibroblast growth factor 15. BA flux also influences the daily mRNA levels of multiple BA transporters. CONCLUSION: BA concentration and composition exhibit circadian variations in mouse liver and serum, which influences the circadian rhythms of BA metabolizing genes in liver and ileum. The diurnal variations of BAs appear to serve as a signal that coordinates daily nutrient metabolism in mammals.

  14. Cysteine modified and bile salt based micelles: preparation and application as an oral delivery system for paclitaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Fan, Xiaohui; Zhao, Yanli; Li, Lingbing

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study is to construct a cysteine modified polyion complex micelles made of Pluronic F127-chitosan (PF127-CS), Pluronic F127-cysteine (PF127-cysteine) and sodium cholate (NaC) and to evaluate the potential of the micelles as an oral drug delivery system for paclitaxel. Systematic studies on physicochemical properties including size distribution, zeta-potential and morphology were conducted to validate the formation of micelle structure. Compared with Pluronic micelles, drug-loading capacity of PF127-CS/PF127-cysteine/NaC micelles was increased from 3.35% to 12.77%. Both the critical micelle concentration and the stability test confirmed that the PF127-CS/PF127-cysteine/NaC micelles were more stable in aqueous solution than sodium cholate micelles. Pharmacokinetic study demonstrated that when oral administration the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0-∞) and the absolute bioavailability of paclitaxel-loaded micelles were five times greater than that of the paclitaxel solution. In general, PF127-CS/PF127-cysteine/NaC micelles were proven to be a potential oral drug delivery system for paclitaxel.

  15. Molecular Properties of Guar Gum and Pectin Modify Cecal Bile Acids, Microbiota, and Plasma Lipopolysaccharide-Binding Protein in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffarzadegan, Tannaz; Marungruang, Nittaya; Fåk, Frida; Nyman, Margareta

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) act as signaling molecules in various physiological processes, and are related to colonic microbiota composition as well as to different types of dietary fat and fiber. This study investigated whether guar gum and pectin-two fibers with distinct functional characteristics-affect BA profiles, microbiota composition, and gut metabolites in rats. Low- (LM) or high-methoxylated (HM) pectin, and low-, medium-, or high-molecular-weight (MW) guar gum were administered to rats that were fed either low- or high-fat diets. Cecal BAs, short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and microbiota composition, and plasma lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) levels were analyzed, by using novel methodologies based on gas chromatography (BAs and SCFAs) and 16S rRNA gene sequencing on the Illumina MiSeq platform. Strong correlations were observed between cecal BA and SCFA levels, microbiota composition, and portal plasma LBP levels in rats on a high-fat diet. Notably, guar gum consumption with medium-MW increased the cecal amounts of cholic-, chenodeoxycholic-, and ursodeoxycholic acids as well as α-, β-, and ω-muricholic acids to a greater extent than other types of guar gum or the fiber-free control diet. In contrast, the amounts of cecal deoxycholic- and hyodeoxycholic acid were reduced with all types of guar gum independent of chain length. Differences in BA composition between pectin groups were less obvious, but cecal levels of α- and ω-muricholic acids were higher in rats fed LM as compared to HM pectin or the control diet. The inflammatory marker LBP was downregulated in rats fed medium-MW guar gum and HM pectin; these two fibers decreased the cecal abundance of Oscillospira and an unclassified genus in Ruminococcaceae, and increased that of an unclassified family in RF32. These results indicate that the molecular properties of guar gum and pectin are important for their ability to modulate cecal BA formation, gut microbiota composition, and high-fat diet induced

  16. Effect of bile acid sequestrants on glycaemic control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Sonne, David Peick; Mikkelsen, Kristian Hallundbæk;

    2012-01-01

    In addition to the lipid-lowering effect of bile acid sequestrants (BASs), they also lower blood glucose and, therefore, could be beneficial in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Three oral BASs are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment...... of hypercholesterolaemia: colestipol, cholestyramine and colesevelam. The BAS colestimide/colestilan is used in Japan. Colesevelam was recently approved by the FDA for the treatment of T2DM. We plan to provide a systematic review with meta-analysis of the glucose-lowering effect of BASs with the aim to evaluate...

  17. Bile acid effects are mediated by ATP release and purinergic signalling in exocrine pancreatic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowal, Justyna Magdalena; Haanes, Kristian Agmund; Christensen, Nynne;

    2015-01-01

    signalling are other important regulators of similar secretory mechanisms in pancreas. The aim of our study was to elucidate whether there is interplay between ATP and BA signalling. RESULTS: Here we show that CDCA (chenodeoxycholic acid) caused fast and concentration-dependent ATP release from acini (AR42J...

  18. Tris(2-butoxyethyl)phosphate and triethyl phosphate alter embryonic development, hepatic mRNA expression, thyroid hormone levels, and circulating bile acid concentrations in chicken embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egloff, Caroline [National Wildlife Research Centre, Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON K1A 0H3 (Canada); Crump, Doug, E-mail: doug.crump@ec.gc.ca [National Wildlife Research Centre, Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON K1A 0H3 (Canada); Porter, Emily; Williams, Kim L.; Letcher, Robert J.; Gauthier, Lewis T. [National Wildlife Research Centre, Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON K1A 0H3 (Canada); Kennedy, Sean W. [National Wildlife Research Centre, Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON K1A 0H3 (Canada); Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2014-09-15

    The organophosphate flame retardants tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP) and triethyl phosphate (TEP) are used in a wide range of applications to suppress or delay the ignition and spread of fire. Both compounds have been detected in the environment and TBOEP was recently measured in free-living avian species. In this study, TBOEP and TEP were injected into the air cell of chicken embryos at concentrations ranging from 0 to 45,400 ng/g and 0 to 241,500 ng/g egg, respectively. Pipping success, development, hepatic mRNA expression of 9 target genes, thyroid hormone levels, and circulating bile acid concentrations were determined. Exposure to the highest doses of TBOEP and TEP resulted in negligible detection of the parent compounds in embryonic contents at pipping indicating their complete metabolic degradation. TBOEP exposure had limited effects on chicken embryos, with the exception of hepatic CYP3A37 mRNA induction. TEP exposure decreased pipping success to 68%, altered growth, increased liver somatic index (LSI) and plasma bile acids, and modulated genes associated with xenobiotic and lipid metabolism and the thyroid hormone pathway. Plasma thyroxine levels were decreased at all TEP doses, including an environmentally-relevant concentration (8 ng/g), and gallbladder hypotrophy was evident at ≥ 43,200 ng/g. Tarsus length and circulating thyroxine concentration emerged as potential phenotypic anchors for the modulation of transthyretin mRNA. The increase in plasma bile acids and LSI, gallbladder hypotrophy, and discoloration of liver tissue represented potential phenotypic outcomes associated with modulation of hepatic genes involved with xenobiotic and lipid metabolism. - Highlights: • TBOEP is not embryolethal to chicken embryos. • TEP affected embryonic viability, morphometric endpoints, and thyroid hormone levels. • TEP altered mRNA levels of xenobiotic and lipid metabolism genes. • TEP increased plasma bile acids and caused gallbladder hypotrophy

  19. Metformin protects rat hepatocytes against bile acid-induced apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titia E Woudenberg-Vrenken

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Metformin is used in the treatment of Diabetes Mellitus type II and improves liver function in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Metformin activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, the cellular energy sensor that is sensitive to changes in the AMP/ATP-ratio. AMPK is an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR. Both AMPK and mTOR are able to modulate cell death. AIM: To evaluate the effects of metformin on hepatocyte cell death. METHODS: Apoptotic cell death was induced in primary rat hepatocytes using either the bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA or TNFα in combination with actinomycin D (actD. AMPK, mTOR and phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K/Akt were inhibited using pharmacological inhibitors. Apoptosis and necrosis were quantified by caspase activation, acridine orange staining and Sytox green staining respectively. RESULTS: Metformin dose-dependently reduces GCDCA-induced apoptosis, even when added 2 hours after GCDCA, without increasing necrotic cell death. Metformin does not protect against TNFα/ActD-induced apoptosis. The protective effect of metformin is dependent on an intact PI3-kinase/Akt pathway, but does not require AMPK/mTOR-signaling. Metformin does not inhibit NF-κB activation. CONCLUSION: Metformin protects against bile acid-induced apoptosis and could be considered in the treatment of chronic liver diseases accompanied by inflammation.

  20. Analyses of bile from gallbladders of Arius platystomus, Arius tenuispinis, Pomadasys commersonni and Kishinoella tonggol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Amir; Ahmed, Mansoor; Rasheed, Munawwer; Mansoor, Najia; Khan, Rafeeq Alam; Kamal, Mustafa; Rashid, Mohammad Abdur

    2015-07-01

    Bile from gallbladders of Arius platystomus (Singhara), Arius tenuispinis (Khagga), Pomadasys commersonni (Holoola) and Kishinoella tonggol (Dawan) were derivatised and analysed by GC-MS for identification of bile acids and bile alcohols. Cholic acid and Chenodeoxycholic acid were found as major bile acids in Arius platystomus, Arius tenuispinis and Pomadasys commersonni. Other bile acids identified in Arius platystomus were allochenodeoxycholic acid, allodeoxycholic acid, 3α,7α,12α-trihydroxy-24-methyl-5β-cholestane-26-oic acid, and 3α,7α,12α, 24-tetrahydroxy-5α-cholestane-26-oic acid. Cholesterol was found as major bile alcohol in Arius platystomus, Arius tenuispinis and Pomadasys commersonni. Cholic acid was the major bile acid identified in the bile of Kishinoella tonggol while other bile acids included 3α,7α,12α-tridydroxy-5α-cholestanoic acid and 3α,7α,12α-tridydroxy-5β-cholestanoic acid. Bile alcohol 5β-cyprinol was present in significant amounts with 5β-cholestane-3α,7α,12α,24-tetrol being the other contributors in the bile of Kishinoella tonggol.

  1. A Grape Seed Procyanidin Extract Ameliorates Fructose-Induced Hypertriglyceridemia in Rats via Enhanced Fecal Bile Acid and Cholesterol Excretion and Inhibition of Hepatic Lipogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E Downing

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine whether a grape seed procyanidin extract (GSPE exerts a triglyceride-lowering effect in a hyperlipidemic state using the fructose-fed rat model and to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms. Rats were fed either a starch control diet or a diet containing 65% fructose for 8 weeks to induce hypertriglyceridemia. During the 9th week of the study, rats were maintained on their respective diet and administered vehicle or GSPE via oral gavage for 7 days. Fructose increased serum triglyceride levels by 171% after 9 weeks, compared to control, while GSPE administration attenuated this effect, resulting in a 41% decrease. GSPE inhibited hepatic lipogenesis via down-regulation of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c and stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 in the fructose-fed animals. GSPE increased fecal bile acid and total lipid excretion, decreased serum bile acid levels and increased the expression of genes involved in cholesterol synthesis. However, bile acid biosynthetic gene expression was not increased in the presence of GSPE and fructose. Serum cholesterol levels remained constant, while hepatic cholesterol levels decreased. GSPE did not modulate expression of genes responsible for esterification or biliary export of the newly synthesized cholesterol, but did increase fecal cholesterol excretion, suggesting that in the presence of GSPE and fructose, the liver may secrete more free cholesterol into the plasma which may then be shunted to the proximal small intestine for direct basolateral to apical secretion and subsequent fecal excretion. Our results demonstrate that GSPE effectively lowers serum triglyceride levels in fructose-fed rats after one week administration. This study provides novel insight into the mechanistic actions of GSPE in treating hypertriglyceridemia and demonstrates that it targets hepatic de novo lipogenesis, bile acid homeostasis and non-biliary cholesterol excretion as

  2. A Grape Seed Procyanidin Extract Ameliorates Fructose-Induced Hypertriglyceridemia in Rats via Enhanced Fecal Bile Acid and Cholesterol Excretion and Inhibition of Hepatic Lipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Laura E; Heidker, Rebecca M; Caiozzi, Gianella C; Wong, Brian S; Rodriguez, Kelvin; Del Rey, Fernando; Ricketts, Marie-Louise

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether a grape seed procyanidin extract (GSPE) exerts a triglyceride-lowering effect in a hyperlipidemic state using the fructose-fed rat model and to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms. Rats were fed either a starch control diet or a diet containing 65% fructose for 8 weeks to induce hypertriglyceridemia. During the 9th week of the study, rats were maintained on their respective diet and administered vehicle or GSPE via oral gavage for 7 days. Fructose increased serum triglyceride levels by 171% after 9 weeks, compared to control, while GSPE administration attenuated this effect, resulting in a 41% decrease. GSPE inhibited hepatic lipogenesis via down-regulation of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c and stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 in the fructose-fed animals. GSPE increased fecal bile acid and total lipid excretion, decreased serum bile acid levels and increased the expression of genes involved in cholesterol synthesis. However, bile acid biosynthetic gene expression was not increased in the presence of GSPE and fructose. Serum cholesterol levels remained constant, while hepatic cholesterol levels decreased. GSPE did not modulate expression of genes responsible for esterification or biliary export of the newly synthesized cholesterol, but did increase fecal cholesterol excretion, suggesting that in the presence of GSPE and fructose, the liver may secrete more free cholesterol into the plasma which may then be shunted to the proximal small intestine for direct basolateral to apical secretion and subsequent fecal excretion. Our results demonstrate that GSPE effectively lowers serum triglyceride levels in fructose-fed rats after one week administration. This study provides novel insight into the mechanistic actions of GSPE in treating hypertriglyceridemia and demonstrates that it targets hepatic de novo lipogenesis, bile acid homeostasis and non-biliary cholesterol excretion as important mechanisms for

  3. Reconstitution of bile acid transport in the rat hepatoma McArdle RH-7777 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torchia, E C; Shapiro, R J; Agellon, L B

    1996-07-01

    The liver recovers bile acids from the portal circulation primarily via an active process that is dependent on sodium ions. Hepatocytes lose the ability to transport bile acids in culture, and, in liver-derived permanent cell lines, this ability is severely reduced or absent. To study the importance of bile acids in regulating liver-specific functions (e.g., cellular bile acid and cholesterol metabolism), we have re-established active bile acid transport in cultured cells. The complementary DNA (cDNA) encoding the rat sodium/taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (ntcp) was placed under the control of a cytomegalovirus promoter and transfected into the rat hepatoma cell line, McArdle RH-7777. Transfected cells were screened for the ability to take up [3H]-taurocholate. Clones that displayed the ability to take up taurocholate were expanded (designated McNtcp) and further characterized. The apparent Michaelis constant (Km) for taurocholate uptake was similar among the different clones. The observed maximum velocity (Vmax), however, differed and was positively correlated with the abundance of recombinant ntcp messenger RNA (mRNA). The highest level of taurocholate uptake activity observed in McNtcp cells was comparable with that of freshly isolated hepatocytes. Efflux of accumulated taurocholate from McNtcp cells proceeded in a manner similar to primary hepatocytes, indicating that McArdle RH-7777 cells have retained the ability to secrete bile acids. Moreover, taurocholate uptake in McNtcp cells was inhibited by other bile acid species. Based on the observed kinetic parameters, the reconstituted McArdle RH-7777 cells mimic the ability of primary hepatocytes to transport bile acids.

  4. 76 FR 17835 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    ... International Trade Administration A-570-937] Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic... order on citric acid and certain citrate salts (``citric acid'') from the People's Republic of China.... See Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China: Notice of Extension...

  5. 77 FR 9891 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China: Amended Final Results...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China... antidumping duty order on citric acid and certain citrate salts (``citric acid'') from the People's Republic... Act of 1930, as amended (``the Act''). \\1\\ See Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the...

  6. [The identification of several saturated fatty acids and their salts by means of infrared spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Man; Guan, Ping; Liu, Wen-hui

    2007-02-01

    It is considered that saturated fatty acids and their salts may be potential hydrocarbon-generation matters in carbonate rocks. However, there is no effective method to distinguish them from natural sediments, making recognizing their distribution in sediments a challenge. Formic acid, acetic acid, stearic acid, calcium formate, calcium acetate, magnesium acetate, calcium stearate, and magnesium stearate from some chemical plants were investigated by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Their infrared spectra were obtained and the distinctions of the infrared spectra between saturated fatty acids and their salts were studied in detail. The differences in the group's electron-releasing ability, molecular reduced mass, ion configuration and the length of carbon chain can cause wavelength shifts of infrared absorption peaks of the saturated fatty acids and their salts. The research provides a method for the identification of saturated fatty acids and their salts in samples from nature.

  7. Bile Salts Modulate the Mucin-Activated Type VI Secretion System of Pandemic Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Verena; Kostiuk, Benjamin; Unterweger, Daniel; Diaz-Satizabal, Laura; Ogg, Stephen; Pukatzki, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The causative agent of cholera, Vibrio cholerae, regulates its diverse virulence factors to thrive in the human small intestine and environmental reservoirs. Among this pathogen's arsenal of virulence factors is the tightly regulated type VI secretion system (T6SS). This system acts as an inverted bacteriophage to inject toxins into competing bacteria and eukaryotic phagocytes. V. cholerae strains responsible for the current 7th pandemic activate their T6SS within the host. We established that T6SS-mediated competition occurs upon T6SS activation in the infant mouse, and that this system is functional under anaerobic conditions. When investigating the intestinal host factors mucins (a glycoprotein component of mucus) and bile for potential regulatory roles in controlling the T6SS, we discovered that once mucins activate the T6SS, bile acids can further modulate T6SS activity. Microbiota modify bile acids to inhibit T6SS-mediated killing of commensal bacteria. This interplay is a novel interaction between commensal bacteria, host factors, and the V. cholerae T6SS, showing an active host role in infection.

  8. Bile Salts Modulate the Mucin-Activated Type VI Secretion System of Pandemic Vibrio cholerae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Bachmann

    Full Text Available The causative agent of cholera, Vibrio cholerae, regulates its diverse virulence factors to thrive in the human small intestine and environmental reservoirs. Among this pathogen's arsenal of virulence factors is the tightly regulated type VI secretion system (T6SS. This system acts as an inverted bacteriophage to inject toxins into competing bacteria and eukaryotic phagocytes. V. cholerae strains responsible for the current 7th pandemic activate their T6SS within the host. We established that T6SS-mediated competition occurs upon T6SS activation in the infant mouse, and that this system is functional under anaerobic conditions. When investigating the intestinal host factors mucins (a glycoprotein component of mucus and bile for potential regulatory roles in controlling the T6SS, we discovered that once mucins activate the T6SS, bile acids can further modulate T6SS activity. Microbiota modify bile acids to inhibit T6SS-mediated killing of commensal bacteria. This interplay is a novel interaction between commensal bacteria, host factors, and the V. cholerae T6SS, showing an active host role in infection.

  9. Colonic mucosal gene expression and genotype in irritable bowel syndrome patients with normal or elevated fecal bile acid excretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Michael; Carlson, Paula; Acosta, Andres; Busciglio, Irene

    2015-07-01

    The mucosal gene expression in rectosigmoid mucosa (RSM) in irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea (IBS-D) is unknown. Our objectives were, first, to study mRNA expression [by RT(2) PCR of 19 genes pertaining to tight junctions, immune activation, intestinal ion transport and bile acid (BA) homeostasis] in RSM in IBS-D patients (n = 47) and healthy controls (n = 17) and study expression of a selected protein (PDZD3) in 10 IBS-D patients and 4 healthy controls; second, to assess RSM mRNA expression according to genotype and fecal BA excretion (high ≥ 2,337 μmol/48 h); and third, to determine whether genotype or mucosal mRNA expression is associated with colonic transit or BA parameters. Fold changes were corrected for false detection rate for 19 genes studied (P colonic transit. We concluded that mucosal ion transport mRNA (for several genes and PDZD3 protein) is upregulated and barrier protein mRNA downregulated in IBS-D compared with healthy controls, independent of genotype. There are no differences in gene expression in IBS-D with high compared with normal fecal BA excretion.

  10. Synthesis, characterization and biological evaluation of bile acid-aromatic/heteroaromatic amides linked via amino acids as anti-cancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Devesh S; Anantaraju, Hasitha Shilpa; Sriram, Dharmarajan; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Nanjegowda, Shankara H; Mallu, P; Sakhuja, Rajeev

    2016-03-01

    A series of bile acid (Cholic acid and Deoxycholic acid) aryl/heteroaryl amides linked via α-amino acid were synthesized and tested against 3 human cancer cell-lines (HT29, MDAMB231, U87MG) and 1 human normal cell line (HEK293T). Some of the conjugates showed promising results to be new anticancer agents with good in vitro results. More specifically, Cholic acid derivatives 6a (1.35 μM), 6c (1.41 μM) and 6m (4.52 μM) possessing phenyl, benzothiazole and 4-methylphenyl groups showed fairly good activity against the breast cancer cell line with respect to Cisplatin (7.21 μM) and comparable with respect to Doxorubicin (1 μM), while 6e (2.49μM), 6i (2.46 μM) and 6m (1.62 μM) showed better activity against glioblastoma cancer cell line with respect to both Cisplatin (2.60 μM) and Doxorubicin (3.78 μM) drugs used as standards. Greater than 65% of the compounds were found to be safer on human normal cell line.

  11. Bile acids reduce endocytosis of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhrl, Clemens; Eigner, Karin; Fruhwürth, Stefanie; Stangl, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) transports lipids to hepatic cells and the majority of HDL-associated cholesterol is destined for biliary excretion. Cholesterol is excreted into the bile directly or after conversion to bile acids, which are also present in the plasma as they are effectively reabsorbed through the enterohepatic cycle. Here, we provide evidence that bile acids affect HDL endocytosis. Using fluorescent and radiolabeled HDL, we show that HDL endocytosis was reduced in the presence of high concentrations of taurocholate, a natural non-cell-permeable bile acid, in human hepatic HepG2 and HuH7 cells. In contrast, selective cholesteryl-ester (CE) uptake was increased. Taurocholate exerted these effects extracellularly and independently of HDL modification, cell membrane perturbation or blocking of endocytic trafficking. Instead, this reduction of endocytosis and increase in selective uptake was dependent on SR-BI. In addition, cell-permeable bile acids reduced HDL endocytosis by farnesoid X receptor (FXR) activation: chenodeoxycholate and the non-steroidal FXR agonist GW4064 reduced HDL endocytosis, whereas selective CE uptake was unaltered. Reduced HDL endocytosis by FXR activation was independent of SR-BI and was likely mediated by impaired expression of the scavenger receptor cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36). Taken together we have shown that bile acids reduce HDL endocytosis by transcriptional and non-transcriptional mechanisms. Further, we suggest that HDL endocytosis and selective lipid uptake are not necessarily tightly linked to each other.

  12. Photoactive bile salts with critical micellar concentration in the micromolar range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Mendoza, Miguel; Marin, M Luisa; Miranda, Miguel A

    2016-05-14

    The aggregation behavior of bile salts is strongly dependent on the number of hydroxyl groups. Thus, cholic acid (CA), with three hydroxyls, starts forming aggregates at 15 mM, while deoxycholic, chenodeoxycholic or ursodeoxycholic acids, with two hydroxyls, start aggregating at 5-10 mM; for lithocholic acid, with only one hydroxyl group, aggregation is observed at lower concentration (2-3 mM). Here, the singular self-assembling properties of dansyl and naproxen derivatives of CA (3β-Dns-CA and 3β-NPX-CA, respectively) have been demonstrated on the basis of their photoactive properties. Thus, the emission spectra of 3β-Dns-CA registered at increasing concentrations (25-140 μM) showed a remarkable non-linear enhancement in the emission intensity accompanied by a hypsochromic shift of the maximum and up to a three-fold increase in the singlet lifetime. The inflection point at around 50-70 μM pointed to the formation of unprecedented assemblies at such low concentrations. In the case of 3β-NPX-CA, when the NPX relative triplet lifetime was plotted against concentration, a marked increase (up to two-fold) was observed at 40-70 μM, indicating the formation of new 3β-NPX-CA assemblies at ca. 50 μM. Additional evidence supporting the formation of new 3β-Dns-CA or 3β-NPX-CA assemblies at 40-70 μM was obtained from singlet excited state quenching experiments using iodide. Moreover, to address the potential formation of hybrid assemblies, 1 : 1 mixtures of 3β-Dns-CA and 3β-NPX-CA (2-60 μM, total concentration) were subjected to steady-state fluorescence experiments, and their behavior was compared to that of the pure photoactive derivatives. A lower increase in the emission was observed for 3β-NPX-CA in the mixture, while a huge increase was experienced by 3β-Dns-CA in the same concentration range (up to 60 μM total). A partial intermolecular energy transfer from NPX to Dns, consistent with their reported singlet energies, was revealed, pointing to the

  13. Acidity and mineral composition of precipitation in Moscow: Influence of deicing salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremina, I. D.; Aloyan, A. E.; Arutyunyan, V. O.; Larin, I. K.; Chubarova, N. E.; Yermakov, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    Monitoring data and analysis of the variation in acidity and mineral composition of atmospheric precipitation in Moscow in 2012 are presented. We have found that the chloride anions in the precipitation are largely caused by chlorides of deicing salts. Here, the chloride anions, along with metal chlorides (components of deicing salts), are partly caused by dissolved hydrogen chloride. The appearance of hydrogen chloride in the atmosphere of Moscow has been shown to result from heterophase chemical reactions involving deicing salts. We have obtained preliminary estimates for the scales of the effect of these salts on the mineral composition and acidity of precipitations in Moscow.

  14. Bile acid metabolites in serum: intraindividual variation and associations with coronary heart disease, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carine Steiner

    Full Text Available Bile acids (BAs regulate glucose and lipid metabolism. In longitudinal and case-control-studies, we investigated the diurnal variation of serum concentrations of the 15 major BAs as well as the biosynthetic precursor 7α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4 and their associations, respectively, with coronary artery disease (CAD, diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM, and non-diabetic metabolic syndrome (MetS. In hourly taken blood samples of four healthy probands, the intraindividual 24 h variation of C4, conjugated and unconjugated BAs ranged from 42% to 72%, from 23% to 91%, and from 49% to 90%, respectively. Conjugated BA concentrations mainly increased following food intake. Serum levels of C4 and unconjugated BAs changed with daytime with maxima varying interindividually between 20h00 and 1h00 and between 3h00 and 8h00, respectively. Comparisons of data from 75 CAD patients with 75 CAD-free controls revealed no statistically significant association of CAD with BAs or C4. Comparisons of data from 50 controls free of T2DM or MetS, 50 MetS patients, and 50 T2DM patients revealed significantly increased fasting serum levels of C4 in patients with MetS and T2DM. Multiple regression analysis revealed body mass index (BMI and plasma levels of triglycerides (TG as independent determinants of C4 levels. Upon multivariate and principle component analyses the association of C4 with T2DM and/or MetS was not independent of or superior to the canonical MetS components. In conclusion, despite large intra- and interindividual variation, serum levels of C4 are significantly increased in patients with MetS and T2DM but confounded with BMI and TG.

  15. Simultaneous quantification of the major bile acids in artificial Calculus bovis by high-performance liquid chromatography with precolumn derivatization and its application in quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yan; Xiong, Jing; Sun, Dongmei; Liu, Wei; Wei, Feng; Ma, Shuangcheng; Lin, Ruichao

    2015-08-01

    An accurate and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography method coupled with ultralviolet detection and precolumn derivatization was developed for the simultaneous quantification of the major bile acids in Artificial Calculus bovis, including cholic acid, hyodeoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid, and deoxycholic acid. The extraction, derivatization, chromatographic separation, and detection parameters were fully optimized. The samples were extracted with methanol by ultrasonic extraction. Then, 2-bromine-4'-nitroacetophenone and 18-crown ether-6 were used for derivatization. The chromatographic separation was performed on an Agilent SB-C18 column (250 × 4.6 mm id, 5 μm) at a column temperature of 30°C and liquid flow rate of 1.0 mL/min using water and methanol as the mobile phase with a gradient elution. The detection wavelength was 263 nm. The method was extensively validated by evaluating the linearity (r(2) ≥ 0.9980), recovery (94.24-98.91%), limits of detection (0.25-0.31 ng) and limits of quantification (0.83-1.02 ng). Seventeen samples were analyzed using the developed and validated method. Then, the amounts of bile acids were analyzed by hierarchical agglomerative clustering analysis and principal component analysis. The results of the chemometric analysis showed that the contents of these compounds reflect the intrinsic quality of artificial Calculus bovis, and two compounds (hyodeoxycholic acid and chenodeoxycholic acid) were the most important markers for quality evaluating.

  16. Effective Treatment of Unconjugated Hyperbilirubinemia With Oral Bile Salts in Gunn Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuperus, Frans J. C.; Hafkamp, Anja M.; Havinga, Rick; Vitek, Libor; Zelenka, Jaroslav; Tiribelli, Claudio; Ostrow, J. Donald; Verkade, Henkjan J.

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims: we tested the hypothesis that oral administration of bile salts, which are known to increase the biliary excretion of unconjugated bilirubin (UCB), decreases unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia in the Gunn rat model. Methods: Adult Gunn rats were fed a standard diet or the same diet s

  17. Amino acid-bile acid based molecules: extremely narrow surfactant nanotubes formed by a phenylalanine-substituted cholic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travaglini, Leana; D'Annibale, Andrea; Schillén, Karin; Olsson, Ulf; Sennato, Simona; Pavel, Nicolae V; Galantini, Luciano

    2012-12-21

    An amino acid-substituted bile acid forms tubular aggregates with inner and outer diameters of about 3 and 6 nm. The diameters are unusually small for surfactant self-assembled tubes. The results enhance the spectrum of applications of supramolecular tubules and open up possibilities for investigating a novel class of biological amphiphiles.

  18. Bile acid mediated effects on gut integrity and performance of early-weaned piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Diego-Cabero, Nuria; Mereu, Alessandro; Menoyo, David;

    2015-01-01

    of the study on day 35. On days 1, 7 and 14 blood samples were collected from 6 pigs per treatment to measure plasma GLP-2. On day 15, 6 pigs per treatment were euthanized to obtain intestinal tissue samples for later histological and gene expression analyses. Results Supplementing the diet with CDC tended...... small intestine. Conclusions This study showed that the oral administration of CDC to early-weaned pigs has the potential to improve the protection......Background Early weaning (EW) results in a transient period of impaired integrity of the intestinal mucosa that may be associated with reduced plasma concentration of glucagon-like peptide-(GLP) 2. We have previously shown that intragastric infusion of chenodeoxycholic acid (CDC) increases...

  19. Effect of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery on bile acid metabolism in normal and obese diabetic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hina Y Bhutta

    Full Text Available In addition to classic functions of facilitating hepatobiliary secretion and intestinal absorption of lipophilic nutrients, bile acids (BA are also endocrine factors and regulate glucose and lipid metabolism. Recent data indicate that antiobesity bariatric procedures e.g. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB, which also remit diabetes, increase plasma BAs in humans, leading to the hypothesis that BAs may play a role in diabetes resolution following surgery. To investigate the effect of RYGB on BA physiology and its relationship with glucose homeostasis, we undertook RYGB and SHAM surgery in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF and normoglycemic Sprague Dawley (SD rats and measured plasma and fecal BA levels, as well as plasma glucose, insulin, Glucagon like peptide 1 (GLP-1 and Peptide YY (PYY, 2 days before and 3, 7, 14 and 28 days after surgery. RYGB decreased body weight and increased plasma GLP-1 in both SD and ZDF rats while decreasing plasma insulin and glucose in ZDF rats starting from the first week. Compared to SHAM groups, both SD-RYGB and ZDF-RYGB groups started to have increases in plasma total BAs in the second week, which might not contribute to early post-surgery metabolic changes. While there was no significant difference in fecal BA excretion between SD-RYGB and SD-SHAM groups, the ZDF-RYGB group had a transient 4.2-fold increase (P<0.001 in 24-hour fecal BA excretion on post-operative day 3 compared to ZDF-SHAM, which paralleled a significant increase in plasma PYY. Ratios of plasma and fecal cholic acid/chenodeoxycholic acid derived BAs were decreased in RYGB groups. In addition, tissue mRNA expression analysis suggested early intestinal BA reabsorption and potentially reduced hepatic cholic acid production in RYGB groups. In summary, we present novel data on RYGB-mediated changes in BA metabolism to further understand the role of BAs in RYGB-induced metabolic effects in humans.

  20. Postprandial response and tissue distribution of the bile acid synthesis-related genes, cyp7a1, cyp8b1 and shp, in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murashita, Koji; Yoshiura, Yasutoshi; Chisada, Shin-ichi; Furuita, Hirofumi; Sugita, Tsuyoshi; Matsunari, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Takeshi

    2013-10-01

    In mammals, cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) and sterol 12α-hydroxylase (CYP8B1) are rate-limiting enzymes in bile acid synthesis. In addition, a small heterodimer partner (SHP) is also known to inhibit bile acid synthesis via the suppression of CYP7A1 and CYP8B1 expression. However, little information is currently available regarding primary structure of the genes involved in bile acid synthesis in fish. We therefore cloned cyp7a1, cyp8b1 and shp genes from rainbow trout and obtained cDNAs encoding two isoforms each of Cyp7a1 (-1 and -2), Cyp8b1 (-1 and -2) and Shp (-1 and -2). Both cyp7a1-1 and -2 encoded proteins of 512 amino acids. Trout cyp7a1-1 was expressed not only primarily in the kidney, pyloric caecum and mid-gut, but also weakly in the liver, eye, gill and ovary. cyp7a1-2 was highly expressed in the liver, pyloric caecum and mid-gut. cyp8b1-1 and -2, which encoded proteins of 512 and 509 amino acids, respectively, were principally expressed in the liver. Both shp-1 and -2, which encoded proteins of 288 and 290 amino acids, respectively, were strongly expressed in the liver, but shp-2 was also highly expressed in the gallbladder and digestive tract. The temporal changes in the expression of cyp7a1-1/-2, cyp8b1-1/-2 and shp-1/-2 in the liver were assessed after consumption of a single meal. Expression of cyp7a1-1/-2 and cyp8b1-1/-2 increased within 3h post feeding (hpf) when the stomach was still approximately 84% full and the gallbladder was almost completely empty. Although the expression of shp-1 did not change after feeding, the expression pattern of shp-2 was inversely related to the expression patterns of cyp7a1-1/-2 and cyp8b1-1/-2. Specifically, shp-2 expression decreased until 3 hpf before returning to initial levels at 24 hpf. These findings suggest that Cyp7a1s/8b1s and Shp-2 function antagonistically in bile acid synthesis in rainbow trout.

  1. Synthesis, Crystal Structure, and Hirshfeld Surface Analysis of Ciprofloxacin-Salicylic Acid Molecular Salt

    OpenAIRE

    Ravikumar Nagalapalli; Shankar Yaga Bheem

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, ciprofloxacin-salicylic acid molecular salt has been synthesized and preliminarily characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy. The single crystal X-ray diffraction (SCXRD) reveals the proton transfer from carboxylic acid group of salicylic acid to piperazine moiety in ciprofloxacin confirming the formation of new molecular salt. The molecular packing of the molecular salt is mainly supported by N+–H⋯O−, O–H⋯O, C–H⋯F, C–H⋯π, and π-π interactions. The 3D Hirshfeld surfaces and th...

  2. Synthesis, Crystal Structure, and Hirshfeld Surface Analysis of Ciprofloxacin-Salicylic Acid Molecular Salt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravikumar Nagalapalli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, ciprofloxacin-salicylic acid molecular salt has been synthesized and preliminarily characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy. The single crystal X-ray diffraction (SCXRD reveals the proton transfer from carboxylic acid group of salicylic acid to piperazine moiety in ciprofloxacin confirming the formation of new molecular salt. The molecular packing of the molecular salt is mainly supported by N+–H⋯O−, O–H⋯O, C–H⋯F, C–H⋯π, and π-π interactions. The 3D Hirshfeld surfaces and the associated 2D fingerprint plots were investigated for intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions.

  3. Intestinal FXR-mediated FGF15 production contributes to diurnal control of hepatic bile acid synthesis in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroeve, Johanna H. M.; Brufau, Gemma; Stellaard, Frans; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Staels, Bart; Kuipers, Folkert

    2010-01-01

    Hepatic bile acid synthesis is subject to complex modes of transcriptional control, in which the bile acid-activated nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) in liver and intestine-derived, FXR-controlled fibroblast growth factor 15 (Fgf15) are involved. The Fgf15 pathway is assumed to contribute

  4. Ileal mucosal bile acid absorption is increased in Cftr knockout mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somasundaram Sivagurunathan

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excessive loss of bile acids in stool has been reported in patients with cystic fibrosis. Some data suggest that a defect in mucosal bile acid transport may be the mechanism of bile acid malabsorption in these individuals. However, the molecular basis of this defect is unknown. This study examines the expression of the ileal bile acid transporter protein (IBAT and rates of diffusional (sodium independent and active (sodium dependent uptake of the radiolabeled bile acid taurocholate in mice with targeted disruption of the cftr gene. Methods Wild-type, heterozygous cftr (+/- and homozygous cftr (-/- mice were studied. Five one-cm segments of terminal ileum were excised, everted and mounted onto thin stainless steel rods and incubated in buffer containing tracer 3H-taurocholate. Simultaneously, adjacent segments of terminal ileum were taken and processed for immunohistochemistry and Western blots using an antibody against the IBAT protein. Results In all ileal segments, taurocholate uptake rates were fourfold higher in cftr (-/- and two-fold higher in cftr (+/- mice compared to wild-type mice. Passive uptake was not significantly higher in cftr (-/- mice than in controls. IBAT protein was comparably increased. Immuno-staining revealed that the greatest increases occurred in the crypts of cftr (-/- animals. Conclusions In the ileum, IBAT protein densities and taurocholate uptake rates are elevated in cftr (-/- mice > cftr (+/- > wild-type mice. These findings indicate that bile acid malabsorption in cystic fibrosis is not caused by a decrease in IBAT activity at the brush border. Alternative mechanisms are proposed, such as impaired bile acid uptake caused by the thick mucus barrier in the distal small bowel, coupled with a direct negative regulatory role for cftr in IBAT function.

  5. Fecal bile acid excretion and messenger RNA expression levels of ileal transporters in high risk gallstone patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miquel Juan

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholesterol gallstone disease (GS is highly prevalent among Hispanics and American Indians. In GS, the pool of bile acids (BA is decreased, suggesting that BA absorption is impaired. In Caucasian GS patients, mRNA levels for ileal BA transporters are decreased. We aimed to determine fecal BA excretion rates, mRNA levels for ileal BA transporter genes and of regulatory genes of BA synthesis in Hispanic GS patients. Results Excretion of fecal BA was measured in seven GS females and in ten GS-free individuals, all with a body mass index 2O3 (300 mg/day for 10 days, and fecal specimens were collected on the last 3 days. Chromium was measured by a colorimetric method, and BA was quantitated by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy. Intake of calories, nutrients, fiber and cholesterol were similar in the GS and GS-free subjects. Mean BA excretion levels were 520 ± 80 mg/day for the GS-free group, and 461 ± 105 mg/day for the GS group. Messenger RNA expression levels were determined by RT-PCR on biopsy samples obtained from ileum during diagnostic colonoscopy (14 GS-free controls and 16 GS patients and from liver during surgery performed at 8 and 10 AM (12 GS and 10 GS-free patients operated on for gastrointestinal malignancies, all with a body mass index Conclusion Hispanics with GS have fecal BA excretion rates and mRNA levels of genes for ileal BA transporters that are similar to GS-free subjects. However, mRNA expression levels of Cyp7A1 are increased in GS, indicating that regulation of BA synthesis is abnormal in Hispanics with GS.

  6. High level of deoxycholic acid in human bile does not promote cholesterol gallstone formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ulf Gustafsson; Staffan Sahlin; Curt Einarsson

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study whether patients with excess deoxycholic acid (DCA) differ from those with normal percentage of DCA with respect to biliary lipid composition and cholesterol saturation of gallbladder bile.METHODS: Bile was collected during operation through puncturing into the gallbladder from 122 cholesterol gallstone patients and 46 gallstone-free subjects undergoing cholecystectomy. Clinical data, biliary lipids, bile acid composition,presence of crystals and nucleation time were analyzed.RESULTS: A subgroup of gallstone patients displayeda higher proportion of DCA in bile than gallstone free subjects.By choosing a cut-off level of the 90th percentile, a group of 13 gallstone patients with high DCA levels (mean 50percent of total bile acids) and a large group of 109 patients with normal DCA levels (mean 21 percent of total bile acids)were obtained. The mean age of the patients with high DCA levels was higher than that of the group with normal levels (mean age: 62 years vs45 years) and so was the mean BMI (28.3 vs. 24.7). Plasma levels of cholesterol and triglycerides were slightly higher in the DCA excess groups compared with those in the normal DCA group. There was no difference in biliary lipid composition, cholesterol saturation, nucleation time or occurrence of cholesterol crystals in bile between patients with high and normal levels of DCA.CONCLUSION: Gallstone patients with excess DCA were of older age and had higher BMI than patients with normal DCA. The two groups of patients did not differ with respect to biliary lipid composition, cholesterol saturation, nucleation time or occurrence of cholesterol crystals. It is concluded that DCA in bile does not seem to contribute to gallstone formation in cholesterol gallstone patients.

  7. Ultrafast fluorescence resonance energy transfer in a bile salt aggregate: Excitation wavelength dependence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ujjwal Mandal; Subhadip Ghosh; Dibyendu Kumar Das; Aniruddha Adhikari; Shantanu Dey; Kankan Bhattacharyya

    2008-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from Coumarin 153 (C153) to Rhodamine 6G (R6G) in a secondary aggregate of a bile salt (sodium deoxycholate, NaDC) is studied by femtosecond up-conversion. The emission spectrum of C153 in NaDC is analysed in terms of two spectra-one with emission maximum at 480 nm which corresponds to a non-polar and hydrophobic site and another with maximum at ∼ 530 nm which arises from a polar hydrophilic site. The time constants of FRET were obtained from the rise time of the emission of the acceptor (R6G). In the NaDC aggregate, FRET occurs in multiple time scales -4 ps and 3700 ps. The 4 ps component is assigned to FRET from a donor (D) to an acceptor (A) held at a close distance (DA ∼ 17 Å) inside the bile salt aggregate. The 3700 ps component corresponds to a donor-acceptor distance ∼ 48 Å. The long (3700 ps) component may involve diffusion of the donor. With increase in the excitation wavelength (ex) from 375 to 435 nm, the relative contribution of the ultrafast component of FRET (∼ 4 ps) increases from 3 to 40% with a concomitant decrease in the contribution of the ultraslow component (∼3700 ps) from 97 to 60%. The ex dependence is attributed to the presence of donors at different locations. At a long ex (435 nm) donors in the highly polar peripheral region are excited. A short ex (375 nm) `selects’ donor at a hydrophobic location.

  8. 77 FR 6061 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From Canada: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-07

    ... United States Pharmacopeia and has been mixed with a functional excipient, such as dextrose or starch... Notice; Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from Canada and the People's Republic of China:...

  9. Impact of physiological levels of chenodeoxycholic acid supplementation on intestinal and hepatic bile acid and cholesterol metabolism in Cyp7a1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ryan D; Lopez, Adam M; Tong, Ernest Y; Posey, Kenneth S; Chuang, Jen-Chieh; Repa, Joyce J; Turley, Stephen D

    2015-01-01

    Mice deficient in cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1) have a diminished bile acid pool (BAP) and therefore represent a useful model for investigating the metabolic effects of restoring the pool with a specific BA. Previously we carried out such studies in Cyp7a1(-/-) mice fed physiological levels of cholic acid (CA) and achieved BAP restoration, along with an increased CA enrichment, at a dietary level of just 0.03% (w/w). Here we demonstrate that in Cyp7a1(-/-) mice fed chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) at a level of 0.06% (w/w), the BAP was restored to normal size and became substantially enriched with muricholic acid (MCA) (>70%), leaving the combined contribution of CA and CDCA to be Cyp7a1 deficiency such as an elevated rate of intestinal sterol synthesis, an enhanced level of mRNA for Cyp8b1 in the liver, and depressed mRNA levels for Ibabp, Shp and Fgf15 in the distal small intestine. When Cyp7a1(-/-) and matching Cyp7a1(+/+) mice were fed a diet with added cholesterol (0.2%) (w/w), either alone, or also containing CDCA (0.06%) (w/w) or CA (0.03%) (w/w) for 18days, the hepatic total cholesterol concentrations (mg/g) in the Cyp7a1(-/-) mice were 26.9±3.7, 16.4±0.9 and 47.6±1.9, respectively, vs. 4.9±0.4, 5.0±0.7 and 6.4±1.9, respectively in the corresponding Cyp7a1(+/+) controls. These data affirm the importance of using moderate levels of dietary BA supplementation to elicit changes in hepatic cholesterol metabolism through shifts in BAP size and composition.

  10. Determination of bile salt critical micellization concentration on the road to drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natalini, Benedetto; Sardella, Roccaldo; Gioiello, Antimo; Ianni, Federica; Di Michele, Alessandro; Marinozzi, Maura

    2014-01-01

    With the discovery of the bile acid (BA)-activated nuclear and membrane receptors, the role of BAs as signalling molecules in important paracrine and endocrine networks has been fully documented in the last decade. Besides regulating their own synthesis and transport, BAs have been demonstrated being involved in triggering the adaptive response to cholestasis and other insults to liver. More to the point, their recognized ability to control the general energy-related metabolism and inflammation processes has contributed to justify the renewed interest towards this class of amphiphilic steroidal compounds. All these evidences feed a continuing interest in the BA research aimed at designing and synthesizing new side chain- and body-modified derivatives endowed with improved biological and physico-chemical profiles, as well as with proper ADMET behaviour. In this context, the micellar aggregation of BAs, and the respective critical micellization concentration (CMC) value (determined on the BA sodium salt, BS), is considered a key parameter that needs to be determined in the preliminary phase of compound characterization, being implicated in cytotoxicity issues. An extraordinary variety of different analytical techniques and methods have been proposed along the years with the aim of better identifying the start of the self-aggregation process of BS monomers. The unicity of the physico-chemical nature of such class of compounds can be invoked to explain this unusual interest. Accordingly, a number of both invasive and non-invasive approaches have been developed along with a limited number of indirect chromatographic-based estimation strategies. Worth to be mentioned among the non-invasive determination methods are those based on potentiometry, freezing point depression, surface tension, nuclear magnetic resonance, viscosimetry, turbidimetry, microcalorimetry, refractometry, conductimetry, spectrophotometry, cholesterol solubilization, and monoglucuronide solubilization

  11. Activation of transmembrane bile acid receptor TGR5 stimulates insulin secretion in pancreatic {beta} cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Divya P.; Rajagopal, Senthilkumar; Mahavadi, Sunila [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA (United States); Mirshahi, Faridoddin [Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Department of Internal Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA (United States); Grider, John R. [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA (United States); Murthy, Karnam S., E-mail: skarnam@vcu.edu [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA (United States); Sanyal, Arun J., E-mail: asanyal@mcvh-vcu.edu [Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Department of Internal Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA (United States)

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer G protein coupled receptor TGR5 is expressed in mouse and human islets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGR5 is coupled to activation of Gs and Ca{sup 2+} release via cAMP/Epac/PLC-{epsilon} pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation of TGR5 by bile salts and selective ligands causes insulin secretion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGR5 could be a potential therapeutic target to treat diabetes. -- Abstract: Bile acids act as signaling molecules and stimulate the G protein coupled receptor, TGR5, in addition to nuclear farnesoid X receptor to regulate lipid, glucose and energy metabolism. Bile acid induced activation of TGR5 in the enteroendocrine cells promotes glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) release, which has insulinotropic effect in the pancreatic {beta} cells. In the present study, we have identified the expression of TGR5 in pancreatic {beta} cell line MIN6 and also in mouse and human pancreatic islets. TGR5 selective ligands, oleanolic acid (OA) and INT-777 selectively activated G{alpha}{sub s} and caused an increase in intracellular cAMP and Ca{sup 2+}. OA and INT-777 also increased phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis and the increase was blocked by NF449 (a selective G{alpha}{sub s} inhibitor) or (U73122) (PI hydrolysis inhibitor). OA, INT-777 and lithocholic acid increased insulin release in MIN6 and human islets and the increase was inhibited by treatment with NF449, (U73122) or BAPTA-AM (chelator of calcium), but not with myristoylated PKI (PKA inhibitor), suggesting that the release is dependent on G{sub s}/cAMP/Ca{sup 2+} pathway. 8-pCPT-2 Prime -O-Me-cAMP, a cAMP analog, which activates Epac, but not PKA also stimulated PI hydrolysis. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the TGR5 expressed in the pancreatic {beta} cells regulates insulin secretion and highlights the importance of ongoing therapeutic strategies targeting TGR5 in the control of glucose homeostasis.

  12. Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Compression Molded Poly (acrylic acid) Salts with Multivalent Metal Ions

    OpenAIRE

    Gotoh, Y.; Ohkoshi, Y; Nagura, M

    1999-01-01

    Films of zinc, calcium and aluminum salts of poly (acrylic acid) (PAA) were prepared from their powdery salts by compression molding at 190_??_200°C, 600MPa for 0.5hr and their mechanical and thermal properties were investigated. From the results of the dynamic mechanical thermal analysis the storage modulus of each PAA salts exhibited about 20GPa at room temperature because of highly intermolecular crosslinking of PAA by metal ions. Modulus of PAA calcium salt was 7GPa even at 400°C, while m...

  13. How we have learned about the complexity of physiology,pathobiology and pharmacology of bile acids and biliary secretion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jose JG Marin

    2008-01-01

    During the last decades the concept of bile secretion as merely a way to add detergent components to the intestinal mixture to facilitate fat digestion/absorption and to eliminate side products of heme metabolism has evolved considerably.In the series of mini-reviews that the World Journal of Gastroenterology is to publish in its section of "Highlight Topics",we will intend to give a brief but updated overview of our knowledge in this field.This introductory letter is intended to thank all scientists who have contributed to the development of this area of knowledge in gastroenterology.

  14. 78 FR 64914 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From Canada: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-30

    ... China: Antidumping Duty Orders, 74 FR 25703 (May 29, 2009) (Citric Acid Duty Orders). Period of Review...-others rate made effective by the LTFV investigation. See Citric Acid Duty Orders, 74 FR 25703. These... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From Canada: Final Results...

  15. Chemoprotective effects of curcumin in esophageal epithelial cells exposed to bile acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthew; R; Bower; Harini; S; Aiyer; Robert; CG; Martin

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the ability of curcumin to counteract the impact of bile acids on gene expression of esophageal epithelial cells.METHODS:An esophageal epithelial cell line(HET1A)was treated with curcumin in the presence of deoxycholic acid.Cell proliferation and viability assays were used to establish an appropriate dose range for curcumin.The combined and individual effects of curcumin and bile acid on cyclooxygenase-2(COX-2)and superoxide dismutase(SOD-1 and SOD-2)gene expression were also assessed.RES...

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF TRANSPORT IN ISOLATED HUMAN HEPATOCYTES - A STUDY WITH THE BILE-ACID TAUROCHOLIC ACID, THE UNCHARGED OUABAIN AND THE ORGANIC CATIONS VECURONIUM AND ROCURONIUM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SANDKER, GW; WEERT, B; OLINGA, P; WOLTERS, H; SLOOFF, MJH; MEIJER, DKF; GROOTHUIS, GMM

    1994-01-01

    The uptake and efflux of three categories of substrates were measured in isolated human hepatocytes and compared to those in rat hepatocytes. In addition, the extent to which the in vitro experiments quantitatively reflect liver function in vivo in both species was investigated. The anionic bile aci

  17. Glucagon and cAMP inhibit cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) gene expression in human hepatocytes: discordant regulation of bile acid synthesis and gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kwang-Hoon; Chiang, John Y L

    2006-01-01

    The gene encoding cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) is tightly regulated to control bile acid synthesis and maintain lipid homeostasis. Recent studies in mice suggest that bile acid synthesis is regulated by the fasted-to-fed cycle, and fasting induces CYP7A1 gene expression in parallel to the induction of peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor gamma co-activator 1alpha (PGC-1alpha) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK). How glucagon regulates CYP7A1 gene expression in the human liver is not clear. Here we show that glucagon and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) strongly repressed CYP7A1 mRNA expression in human primary hepatocytes. Reporter assays confirmed that cAMP and protein kinase A (PKA) inhibited human CYP7A1 gene transcription, in contrast to their stimulation of the PEPCK gene. Mutagenesis analysis identified a PKA-responsive region located within the previously identified HNF4alpha binding site in the human CYP7A1 promoter. Glucagon and cAMP increased HNF4alpha phosphorylation and reduced the amount of HNF4alpha present in CYP7A1 chromatin. Our findings suggest that glucagon inhibited CYP7A1 gene expression via PKA phosphorylation of HNF4alpha, which lost its ability to bind the CYP7A1 gene and resulted in inhibition of human CYP7A1 gene transcription. In conclusion, this study unveils a species difference in nutrient regulation of the human and mouse CYP7A1 gene and suggests a discordant regulation of bile acid synthesis and gluconeogenesis by glucagon in human livers during fasting.

  18. Effects of bile acids on human airway epithelial cells: implications for aerodigestive diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adil Aldhahrani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Gastro-oesophageal reflux and aspiration have been associated with chronic and end-stage lung disease and with allograft injury following lung transplantation. This raises the possibility that bile acids may cause lung injury by damaging airway epithelium. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of bile acid challenge using the immortalised human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B. The immortalised human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B was cultured. A 48-h challenge evaluated the effect of individual primary and secondary bile acids. Post-challenge concentrations of interleukin (IL-8, IL-6 and granulocyte−macrophage colony-stimulating factor were measured using commercial ELISA kits. The viability of the BEAS-2B cells was measured using CellTiter-Blue and MTT assays. Lithocholic acid, deoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid and cholic acid were successfully used to stimulate cultured BEAS-2B cells at different concentrations. A concentration of lithocholic acid above 10 μmol·L−1 causes cell death, whereas deoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid and cholic acid above 30 μmol·L−1 was required for cell death. Challenge with bile acids at physiological levels also led to a significant increase in the release of IL-8 and IL6 from BEAS-2B. Aspiration of bile acids could potentially cause cell damage, cell death and inflammation in vivo. This is relevant to an integrated gastrointestinal and lung physiological paradigm of chronic lung disease, where reflux and aspiration are described in both chronic lung diseases and allograft injury.

  19. Krill protein hydrolysate reduces plasma triacylglycerol level with concurrent increase in plasma bile acid level and hepatic fatty acid catabolism in high-fat fed mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie S. Ramsvik

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Krill powder, consisting of both lipids and proteins, has been reported to modulate hepatic lipid catabolism in animals. Fish protein hydrolysate diets have also been reported to affect lipid metabolism and to elevate bile acid (BA level in plasma. BA interacts with a number of nuclear receptors and thus affects a variety of signaling pathways, including very low density lipoprotein (VLDL secretion. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether a krill protein hydrolysate (KPH could affect lipid and BA metabolism in mice. Method: C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat (21%, w/w diet containing 20% crude protein (w/w as casein (control group or KPH for 6 weeks. Lipids and fatty acid composition were measured from plasma, enzyme activity and gene expression were analyzed from liver samples, and BA was measured from plasma. Results: The effect of dietary treatment with KPH resulted in reduced levels of plasma triacylglycerols (TAG and non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs. The KPH treated mice had also a marked increased plasma BA concentration. The increased plasma BA level was associated with induction of genes related to membrane canalicular exporter proteins (Abcc2, Abcb4 and to BA exporters to blood (Abcc3 and Abcc4. Of note, we observed a 2-fold increased nuclear farnesoid X receptor (Fxr mRNA levels in the liver of mice fed KPH. We also observed increased activity of the nuclear peroxiosme proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα target gene carnitine plamitoyltransferase 2 (CPT-2. Conclusion: The KPH diet showed to influence lipid and BA metabolism in high-fat fed mice. Moreover, increased mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and elevation of BA concentration may regulate the plasma level of TAGs and NEFAs.

  20. Inhibition of intestinal bile acid transporter Slc10a2 improves triglyceride metabolism and normalizes elevated plasma glucose levels in mice.

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    Thomas Lundåsen

    Full Text Available Interruption of the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids increases cholesterol catabolism, thereby stimulating hepatic cholesterol synthesis from acetate. We hypothesized that such treatment should lower the hepatic acetate pool which may alter triglyceride and glucose metabolism. We explored this using mice deficient of the ileal sodium-dependent BA transporter (Slc10a2 and ob/ob mice treated with a specific inhibitor of Slc10a2. Plasma TG levels were reduced in Slc10a2-deficient mice, and when challenged with a sucrose-rich diet, they displayed a reduced response in hepatic TG production as observed from the mRNA levels of several key enzymes in fatty acid synthesis. This effect was paralleled by a diminished induction of mature sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (Srebp1c. Unexpectedly, the SR-diet induced intestinal fibroblast growth factor (FGF 15 mRNA and normalized bile acid synthesis in Slc10a2-/- mice. Pharmacologic inhibition of Slc10a2 in diabetic ob/ob mice reduced serum glucose, insulin and TGs, as well as hepatic mRNA levels of Srebp1c and its target genes. These responses are contrary to those reported following treatment of mice with a bile acid binding resin. Moreover, when key metabolic signal transduction pathways in the liver were investigated, those of Mek1/2-Erk1/2 and Akt were blunted after treatment of ob/ob mice with the Slc10a2 inhibitor. It is concluded that abrogation of Slc10a2 reduces hepatic Srebp1c activity and serum TGs, and in the diabetic ob/ob model it also reduces glucose and insulin levels. Hence, targeting of Slc10a2 may be a promising strategy to treat hypertriglyceridemia and diabetes.

  1. Pertussis toxin, an inhibitor of G(αi PCR, inhibits bile acid- and cytokine-induced apoptosis in primary rat hepatocytes.

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    Golnar Karimian

    Full Text Available Excessive hepatocyte apoptosis is a common event in acute and chronic liver diseases leading to loss of functional liver tissue. Approaches to prevent apoptosis have therefore high potential for the treatment of liver disease. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR play crucial roles in cell fate (proliferation, cell death and act through heterotrimeric G-proteins. G(αiPCRs have been shown to regulate lipoapoptosis in hepatocytes, but their role in inflammation- or bile acid-induced apoptosis is unknown. Here, we analyzed the effect of inhibiting G(αiPCR function, using pertussis toxin (PT, on bile acid- and cytokine-induced apoptosis in hepatocytes. Primary rat hepatocytes, HepG2-rNtcp cells (human hepatocellular carcinoma cells or H-4-II-E cells (rat hepatoma cells were exposed to glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA or tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα/actinomycin D (ActD. PT (50-200 nmol/L was added 30 minutes prior to the apoptotic stimulus. Apoptosis (caspase-3 activity, acridine orange staining and necrosis (sytox green staining were assessed. PT significantly reduced GCDCA- and TNFα/ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes (-60%, p<0.05 in a dose-dependent manner (with no shift to necrosis, but not in HepG2-rNtcp cells or rat H-4-II-E cells. The protective effect of pertussis toxin was independent of the activation of selected cell survival signal transduction pathways, including ERK, p38 MAPK, PI3K and PKC pathways, as specific protein kinase inhibitors did not reverse the protective effects of pertussis toxin in GCDCA-exposed hepatocytes.Pertussis toxin, an inhibitor of G(αiPCRs, protects hepatocytes, but not hepatocellular carcinoma cells, against bile acid- and cytokine-induced apoptosis and has therapeutic potential as primary hepatoprotective drug, as well as adjuvant in anti-cancer therapy.

  2. Dietary Karaya Saponin and Rhodobacter capsulatus Exert Hypocholesterolemic Effects by Suppression of Hepatic Cholesterol Synthesis and Promotion of Bile Acid Synthesis in Laying Hens

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    Sadia Afrose

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to elucidate the mechanism underlying the hypolipidemic action of karaya saponin or Rhodobacter (R. capsulatus. A total of 40 laying hens (20-week-old were assigned into four dietary treatment groups and fed a basal diet (as a control or basal diets supplemented with either karaya saponin, R. capsulatus, or both for 60 days. The level of serum low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and the levels of cholesterol and triglycerides in the serum, liver, and egg yolk were reduced by all the supplementations (<.05. Liver bile acid concentration and fecal concentrations of cholesterol, triacylglycerol, and bile acid were simultaneously increased by the supplementation of karaya saponin, R. capsulatus, and the combination of karaya saponin and R. capsulatus (<.05. The supplementation of karaya saponin, R. capsulatus, and the combination of karaya saponin and R. capsulatus suppressed the incorporation of 14C from 1-14C-palmitic acid into the fractions of total lipids, phospholipids, triacylglycerol, and cholesterol in the liver in vitro (<.05. These findings suggest that the hypocholesterolemic effects of karaya saponin and R. capsulatus are caused by the suppression of the cholesterol synthesis and the promotion of cholesterol catabolism in the liver.

  3. Effect of omeprazole on symptoms and ultrastructural esophageal damage in acid bile reflux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carlo Calabrese; Anna Fabbri; Mauro Bortolotti; Giovanna Cenacchi; Scialpi Carlo; Desiree Zahlane; Mario Miglioli; Giulio Di Febo

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To value whether omeprazole could induce the healing of DIS and regression of symptoms in patients with DGER.METHODS: We enrolled 15 symptomatic patients with a pathological esophageal 24-h pH-metry and bilimetry.Patients underwent endoscopy and biopsies were taken from the distal esophagus. Specimens were analyzed at histology and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).Patients were treated with omeprazole 40 mg/d for 3 mo and then endoscopy with biopsies was repeated. Patients with persistent heartburn and/or with an incomplete recovery of DIS were treated for 3 more months and endoscopy with biopsies was performed.RESULTS: Nine patients had a non-erosive reflux disease at endoscopy (NERD) while 6 had erosive esophagitis (ERD). At histology, of the 6 patients with erosive esophagus,5 had mild esophagitis and 1 moderate esophagitis. No patients with NERD showed histological signs of esophagitis.After 3 mo of therapy, 13/15 patients (86.7%, P<0.01)showed a complete recovery of DIS and disappearance of heartburn. Of the 2 patients treated for 3 more months,complete recovery of DIS and heartburn were achieved in one.CONCLUSION: Three or 6 mo of omeprazole therapy led to a complete regression of the ultrastructural esophageal damage in 86.7% and in 93% of patients with DGER, NERD and ERD respectively. The ultrastructural recovery of the epithelium was accompanied by regression of heartburn in all cases.

  4. Specific inhibition of bile acid transport alters plasma lipids and GLP-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudling, Mats; Camilleri, Michael; Graffner, Hans;

    2015-01-01

    : In the dyslipidemia study LDL cholesterol was reduced by 7.4 % (p = 0.044), and the LDL/HDL ratio was decreased by 18 % (p = 0.004). Serum C4 increased, indicating that BA synthesis was induced. No serious adverse events were recorded. In the CC study, GLP-1 increased significantly in both the 15 mg (20.7 ± 2.4 pmol....../L; p = 0.03) and the 20 mg group (25.6 ± 4.9 pmol/L; p = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: Elobixibat reduces LDL cholesterol and LDL/HDL ratio and increase circulating peak GLP-1 levels, the latter in line with increased intestinal BA mediated responses in humans. TRIAL REGISTRATIONS: ClinicalTrial.gov: NCT01069783...... from a 14 day high-dose elobixibat study in patients with CC. METHODS: Thirty-six dyslipidemic patients, 21 females, mean age 63 years, were randomized to 2.5 mg or 5 mg elobixibat or placebo once daily for four weeks. The primary endpoint was the change in low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol...

  5. Cystic fibrosis liver disease and the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodewes, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the most frequently occurring life threatening congenital diseases. This progressive disease manifests itself in several organ systems. The disease is caused by a mutation in the CFTR protein. The studies in the thesis focused on the development and treatment of CF in

  6. Biliary bile acids in birds of the Cotingidae family: taurine-conjugated (24R,25R)-3α,7α,24-trihydroxy-5β-cholestan-27-oic acid and two epimers (25R and 25S) of 3α,7α-dihydroxy-5β-cholestan-27-oic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagey, Lee R; Iida, Takashi; Ogawa, Shoujiro; Adachi, Yuuki; Une, Mizuho; Mushiake, Kumiko; Maekawa, Masamitsu; Shimada, Miki; Mano, Nariyasu; Hofmann, Alan F

    2011-01-01

    Three C(27) bile acids were found to be major biliary bile acids in the capuchinbird (Perissocephalus tricolor) and bare-throated bellbird (Procnias nudicollis), both members of the Cotingidae family of the order Passeriformes. The individual bile acids were isolated by preparative RP-HPLC, and their structures were established by RP-HPLC, LC/ESI-MS/MS and NMR as well as by a comparison of their chromatographic properties with those of authentic reference standards of their 12α-hydroxy derivatives. The most abundant bile acid present in the capuchinbird bile was the taurine conjugate of C(27) (24R,25R)-3α,7α,24-trihydroxy-5β-cholestan-27-oic acid, a diastereomer not previously identified as a natural bile acid. The four diastereomers of taurine-conjugated (24ξ,25ξ)-3α,7α,24-trihydroxy-5β-cholestan-27-oic acid could be distinguished by NMR and were resolved by RP-HPLC. The RRT of the diastereomers (with taurocholic acid as 1.0) were found to be increased in the following order: (24R,25R)taurine conjugates) in both bird species. Epimers of the two compounds could be distinguished by their NMR spectra and resolved by RP-HPLC with the (25S)-epimer eluting before the (25R)-epimer. Characterization of the taurine-conjugated (24R,25R)-3α,7α,24-trihydroxy-5β-cholestan-27-oic acid and two epimers (25R and 25S) of 3α,7α-dihydroxy-5β-cholestan-27-oic acid should facilitate their detection in peroxisomal disease and inborn errors of bile acid biosynthesis.

  7. 76 FR 4288 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Notice of Extension of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-25

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China... review of the antidumping duty order on citric acid and certain citrate salts (``citric acid'') from the... administrative review of citric acid from the PRC within this time limit. Among other things, additional time...

  8. 77 FR 1455 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-10

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China... acid and certain citrate salts (``citric acid'') from the People's Republic of China (``PRC''). See... of the administrative review of citric acid from the PRC within this time limit....

  9. Solubility of fumaric acid and its monosodium salt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roa Engel, C.A.; Horst, J.H. ter; Pieterse, M.; Wielen, L.A.M. van der; Straathof, A.J.J.

    2013-01-01

    Fumaric acid is a dicarboxylic acid applied in food industry and in some polymers. Currently, its fermentative production from renewable resources is receiving much attention, and crystallization is used to recover it. To determine the window of operation for crystallization from multicomponent ferm

  10. Perilla Oil Supplementation Ameliorates High-Fat/High-Cholesterol Diet Induced Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Rats via Enhanced Fecal Cholesterol and Bile Acid Excretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yu; He, Lei; Shao, Yang; Li, Na

    2016-01-01

    Recent experimental studies and clinical trials have shown that hepatic cholesterol metabolic disorders are closely related to the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The main goal of this study was to investigate the efficacy of the perilla oil rich in alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) against NASH and gain a deep insight into its potential mechanisms. Rats were fed a high-fat/high-cholesterol diet (HFD) supplement with perilla oil (POH) for 16 weeks. Routine blood biochemical tests and histological staining illustrated that the perilla oil administration improved HFD-induced hyperlipidemia, reduced hepatic steatosis, and inhibited hepatic inflammatory infiltration and fibrosis. Perilla oil also increased fecal bile acid and cholesterol excretion. Hepatic RNA-Seq analysis found that the long time perilla oil supplement notably modified the gene expression involved in cholesterol metabolism. Our results implicate that, after long-term high level dietary cholesterol feeding, rat liver endogenous synthesis of cholesterol and cholesterol-rich low density lipoprotein uptake was significantly inhibited, and perilla oil did not modulate expression of genes responsible for cholesterol synthesis but did increase cholesterol removed from hepatocytes by conversion to bile acids and increased fecal cholesterol excretion. PMID:27642591

  11. Perilla Oil Supplementation Ameliorates High-Fat/High-Cholesterol Diet Induced Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Rats via Enhanced Fecal Cholesterol and Bile Acid Excretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting; Yuan, Fahu; Wang, Hualin; Tian, Yu; He, Lei; Shao, Yang; Li, Na; Liu, Zhiguo

    2016-01-01

    Recent experimental studies and clinical trials have shown that hepatic cholesterol metabolic disorders are closely related to the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The main goal of this study was to investigate the efficacy of the perilla oil rich in alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) against NASH and gain a deep insight into its potential mechanisms. Rats were fed a high-fat/high-cholesterol diet (HFD) supplement with perilla oil (POH) for 16 weeks. Routine blood biochemical tests and histological staining illustrated that the perilla oil administration improved HFD-induced hyperlipidemia, reduced hepatic steatosis, and inhibited hepatic inflammatory infiltration and fibrosis. Perilla oil also increased fecal bile acid and cholesterol excretion. Hepatic RNA-Seq analysis found that the long time perilla oil supplement notably modified the gene expression involved in cholesterol metabolism. Our results implicate that, after long-term high level dietary cholesterol feeding, rat liver endogenous synthesis of cholesterol and cholesterol-rich low density lipoprotein uptake was significantly inhibited, and perilla oil did not modulate expression of genes responsible for cholesterol synthesis but did increase cholesterol removed from hepatocytes by conversion to bile acids and increased fecal cholesterol excretion.

  12. Pathogenesis of salt retention in dogs with chronic bile-duct ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaimovitz, C; Alon, U; Better, O S

    1982-01-01

    1. The present study investigates the role of mineralocorticoids in the pathogenesis of salt retention and ascites in dogs with chronic ligation of the common bile duct (CBDL). 2. After CBDL the natriuretic response to an intravenous sodium load [0.9% sodium chloride solution (150 mmol/l): saline; 10% of body weight] was markedly depressed. Urinary sodium excretion was 285 +/- 62 vs 960 +/- 58 mumol/min in the control period before CBDL (P less than 0.001). This antinatriuresis was associated with a significant rise in plasma aldosterone concentration, from 52.5 +/- 5.5 pg/ml before CBDL to 177 +/- 50 pg/ml after CBDL (P less than 0.02). Ascites was present in all salt-retaining CBDL dogs. 3. Bilateral adrenalectomy resulted in disappearance of ascites and in a rise in the natriuretic response to extracellular volume expansion. Urinary sodium excretion was 770 +/- 124 mumol/min, a value significantly higher than in the CBDL dogs with intact adrenals (P less than 0.001). Sodium balance studies in the adrenalectomized CBDL dogs during chronic deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA) treatment (25 mg/day) showed that in these animals there was failure to escape from the mineralocorticoid-induced sodium retention. Glomerular filtration rate and renal plasma flow did not change during the studies. 4. The present evidence supports the thesis that sodium retention in the CBDL dog results from a dual mechanism: (a) excess of circulating aldosterone and (b) and extra-adrenal factor which prevents escape from the salt-retaining effect of mineralocorticoids, in the CBDL dogs, thereby perpetuating the antinatriuresis in these animals.

  13. Bile Acids Function Synergistically To Repress Invasion Gene Expression in Salmonella by Destabilizing the Invasion Regulator HilD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eade, Colleen R; Hung, Chien-Che; Bullard, Brian; Gonzalez-Escobedo, Geoffrey; Gunn, John S; Altier, Craig

    2016-08-01

    Salmonella spp. are carried by and can acutely infect agricultural animals and humans. After ingestion, salmonellae traverse the upper digestive tract and initiate tissue invasion of the distal ileum, a virulence process carried out by the type III secretion system encoded within Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1). Salmonellae coordinate SPI-1 expression with anatomical location via environmental cues, one of which is bile, a complex digestive fluid that causes potent repression of SPI-1 genes. The individual components of bile responsible for SPI-1 repression have not been previously characterized, nor have the bacterial signaling processes that modulate their effects been determined. Here, we characterize the mechanism by which bile represses SPI-1 expression. Individual bile acids exhibit repressive activity on SPI-1-regulated genes that requires neither passive diffusion nor OmpF-mediated entry. By using genetic methods, the effects of bile and bile acids were shown to require the invasion gene transcriptional activator hilD and to function independently of known upstream signaling pathways. Protein analysis techniques showed that SPI-1 repression by bile acids is mediated by posttranslational destabilization of HilD. Finally, we found that bile acids function synergistically to achieve the overall repressive activity of bile. These studies demonstrate a common mechanism by which diverse environmental cues (e.g., certain short-chain fatty acids and bile acids) inhibit SPI-1 expression. These data provide information relevant to Salmonella pathogenesis during acute infection in the intestine and during chronic infection of the gallbladder and inform the basis for development of therapeutics to inhibit invasion as a means of repressing Salmonella pathogenicity.

  14. Chronic Over-expression of Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Increases Bile Acid Biosynthesis by Opposing FGF15/19 Action

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    Jun Zhang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacological doses of fibroblast growth factor (FGF 21 effectively normalize glucose, lipid and energy homeostasis in multiple animal models with many benefits translating to obese humans with type 2 diabetes. However, a role for FGF21 in the regulation of bile acid metabolism has not been reported. Herein, we demonstrate AAV-mediated FGF21 overexpression in mice increases liver expression of the key bile acid producing enzyme, Cyp7a1, resulting in an increased bile acid pool. Furthermore, in cholecystectomized mice, FGF21-mediated bile acid pool increase led to increased transit of bile acids into colon. We elucidate that the mechanism of FGF21 induced bile acid changes is mainly through antagonizing FGF15/19 function on liver βKlotho/FGFR4 receptor complex; thus inhibiting FGF15/19-mediated suppression of Cyp7a1 expression. In conclusion, these data reveal a previously unidentified role for FGF21 on bile acid metabolism and may be relevant to understand the effects of FGF21 analogs in clinical studies.

  15. Clinical relevance of the bile acid receptor TGR5 in metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Nierop, F Samuel; Scheltema, Matthijs J; Eggink, Hannah M

    2016-01-01

    The bile acid receptor TGR5 (also known as GPBAR1) is a promising target for the development of pharmacological interventions in metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes, obesity, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. TGR5 is expressed in many metabolically active tissues, but complex enterohep......The bile acid receptor TGR5 (also known as GPBAR1) is a promising target for the development of pharmacological interventions in metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes, obesity, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. TGR5 is expressed in many metabolically active tissues, but complex...

  16. Delineation of biochemical, molecular, and physiological changes accompanying bile acid pool size restoration in Cyp7a1(-/-) mice fed low levels of cholic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ryan D; Repa, Joyce J; Russell, David W; Dietschy, John M; Turley, Stephen D

    2012-07-15

    Cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) is the initiating and rate-limiting enzyme in the neutral pathway that converts cholesterol to primary bile acids (BA). CYP7A1-deficient (Cyp7a1(-/-)) mice have a depleted BA pool, diminished intestinal cholesterol absorption, accelerated fecal sterol loss, and increased intestinal cholesterol synthesis. To determine the molecular and physiological effects of restoring the BA pool in this model, adult female Cyp7a1(-/-) mice and matching Cyp7a1(+/+) controls were fed diets containing cholic acid (CA) at modest levels [0.015, 0.030, and 0.060% (wt/wt)] for 15-18 days. A level of just 0.03% provided a CA intake of ~12 μmol (4.8 mg) per day per 100 g body wt and was sufficient in the Cyp7a1(-/-) mice to normalize BA pool size, fecal BA excretion, fractional cholesterol absorption, and fecal sterol excretion but caused a significant rise in the cholesterol concentration in