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Sample records for bile acid biosynthesis

  1. Bile acid biosynthesis and its regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Areta Hebanowska

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Bile acid biosynthesis is the main pathway of cholesterol catabolism. Bile acids are more soluble than cholesterol so are easier to excrete. As amphipathic molecules they participate in lipid digestion and absorption in the intestine and they help to excrete free cholesterol with bile. They are also ligands for nuclear receptors regulating the expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism. Interconversion of cholesterol into bile acids is an important point of its homeostasis. Seventeen enzymes are engaged in this process and many of them are cytochromes P450. Bile acid synthesis initiation may proceed with the “classical” pathway (starting with cholesterol hydroxylation at the C7α position or the “alternative” pathway (starting with cholesterol hydroxylation at the C27 position. Two additional pathways are possible, though their quantitative significance is small (initiated with cholesterol hydroxylations of C24 and C25 positions. Oxysterols produced are not only intermediates of bile acid biosynthesis but also important regulators of metabolism. Bile acid biosynthesis takes place in the liver, but some enzymes are also present in other organs, where they participate in regulation of cholesterol metabolism. Those enzymes are potential targets for new drugs against cholesterol metabolism disturbances. This article is a brief description of the bile acid biosynthesis pathway and participating enzymes.

  2. The role of peroxisomal fatty acyl-CoA beta-oxidation in bile acid biosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, H.; Miwa, A. (Josai Univ., Saitama (Japan))

    1989-11-01

    The physiological role of the peroxisomal fatty acyl-CoA beta-oxidizing system (FAOS) is not yet established. We speculated that there might be a relationship between peroxisomal degradation of long-chain fatty acids in the liver and the biosynthesis of bile acids. This was investigated using (1-{sup 14}C)butyric acid and (1-{sup 14}C)lignoceric acid as substrates of FAOS in mitochondria and peroxisomes, respectively. The incorporation of ({sup 14}C)lignoceric acid into primary bile acids was approximately four times higher than that of ({sup 14}C)butyric acid (in terms of C-2 units). The pools of these two fatty acids in the liver were exceedingly small. The incorporations of radioactivity into the primary bile acids were strongly inhibited by administration of aminotriazole, which is a specific inhibitor of peroxisomal FAOS in vivo. Aminotriazole inhibited preferentially the formation of cholate, the major primary bile acid, from both ({sup 14}C)lignoceric acid and ({sup 14}C)butyric acid, rather than the formation of chenodeoxycholate. The former inhibition was about 70% and the latter was approximately 40-50%. In view of reports that cholate is biosynthesized from endogenous cholesterol, the above results indicate that peroxisomal FAOS may have an anabolic function, supplying acetyl CoA for bile acid biosynthesis.

  3. Bile acid sequestrants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Sonne, David P; Knop, Filip K

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized in the liver from cholesterol and have traditionally been recognized for their role in absorption of lipids and in cholesterol homeostasis. In recent years, however, bile acids have emerged as metabolic signaling molecules that are involved in the regulation of lipid...... and glucose metabolism, and possibly energy homeostasis, through activation of the bile acid receptors farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and TGR5. Bile acid sequestrants (BASs) constitute a class of drugs that bind bile acids in the intestine to form a nonabsorbable complex resulting in interruption...... of the enterohepatic circulation. This increases bile acid synthesis and consequently reduces serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Also, BASs improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Despite a growing understanding of the impact of BASs on glucose metabolism, the mechanisms behind their glucose...

  4. Effects of ionizing radiation on the activity of the major hepatic enzymes implicated in bile acid biosynthesis in the rat; Effets de l'irradiation sur l'activite des cytochromes P450 hepatiques impliques dans la biosynthese des acides biliaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souidi, M.; Scanff, P.; Grison, St.; Gourmelon, P.; Aigueperse, J. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Dir. de la Radioprotection de l' Homme, Service de Radiobiologie et d' Epidemiologie (IRSN), 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France)

    2007-12-15

    In the days following high-dose radiation exposure, damage to small intestinal mucosa is aggravated by changes in the bile acid pool reaching the gut. Intestinal bile acid malabsorption, as described classically, may be associated with altered hepatic bile acid biosynthesis, which was the objective of this work. The activity of the main rate-limiting enzymes implicated in the bile acid biosynthesis were evaluated in the days following an 8-Gy {gamma} Co{sup 60} total body irradiation of rats, with concomitant determination of biliary bile acid profiles and intestinal bile acid content. Modifications of biliary bile acid profiles, observed as early as the first post-irradiation day, were most marked at the third and fourth day, and resulted in an increased hydrophobicity index. In parallel, the intestinal bile acids' content was enhanced and hepatic enzymatic activities leading to bile acids were changed. A marked increase of sterol 12-hydroxylase and decrease of oxy-sterol 7-hydroxylase activity was observed at day 3, whereas both cholesterol 7-hydroxylase and oxy-sterol 7-hydroxylase activities were decreased at day 4 after irradiation. These results show, for the first time, radiation-induced modifications of hepatic enzymatic activities implicated in bile acid biosynthesis and suggest that they are mainly a consequence of radiation-altered intestinal absorption, which induces a physiological response of the entero-hepatic bile acid recirculation. (authors)

  5. Bile acids for viral hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Liu, J; Gluud, C

    2007-01-01

    Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus has been reached regarding their usefulness.......Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus has been reached regarding their usefulness....

  6. Bile acid interactions with cholangiocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuefeng Xia; Heather Francis; Shannon Glaser; Gianfranco Alpini; Gene LeSage

    2006-01-01

    Cholangiocytes are exposed to high concentrations of bile acids at their apical membrane. A selective transporter for bile acids, the Apical Sodium Bile Acid Cotransporter (ASBT) (also referred to as Ibat; gene name Slc10a2)is localized on the cholangiocyte apical membrane. On the basolateral membrane, four transport systems have been identified (t-ASBT, multidrug resistance (MDR)3,an unidentified anion exchanger system and organic solute transporter (Ost) heteromeric transporter, OstαOstβ. Together, these transporters unidirectionally move bile acids from ductal bile to the circulation. Bile acids absorbed by cholangiocytes recycle via the peribiliaryplexus back to hepatocytes for re-secretion into bile.This recycling of bile acids between hepatocytes and cholangiocytes is referred to as the cholehepatic shunt pathway. Recent studies suggest that the cholehepatic shunt pathway may contribute in overall hepatobiliary transport of bile acids and to the adaptation to chronic cholestasis due to extrahepatic obstruction. ASBT is acutely regulated by an adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent translocation to the apical membrane and by phosphorylation-dependent ubiquitination and proteasome degradation. ASBT is chronically regulated by changes in gene expression in response to biliary bile acid concentration and inflammatory cytokines.Another potential function of cholangiocyte ASBT is to allow cholangiocytes to sample biliary bile acids in order to activate intracellular signaling pathways. Bile acids trigger changes in intracellular calcium, protein kinase C (PKC), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), mitogenactivated protein (MAP) kinase and extracellular signalregulated protein kinase (ERK) intracellular signals.Bile acids significantly alter cholangiocyte secretion,proliferation and survival. Different bile acids have differential effects on cholangiocyte intracellular signals,and in some instances trigger opposing effects on cholangiocyte secretion

  7. Therapeutic targeting of bile acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gores, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    The first objectives of this article are to review the structure, chemistry, and physiology of bile acids and the types of bile acid malabsorption observed in clinical practice. The second major theme addresses the classical or known properties of bile acids, such as the role of bile acid sequestration in the treatment of hyperlipidemia; the use of ursodeoxycholic acid in therapeutics, from traditional oriental medicine to being, until recently, the drug of choice in cholestatic liver diseases; and the potential for normalizing diverse bowel dysfunctions in irritable bowel syndrome, either by sequestering intraluminal bile acids for diarrhea or by delivering more bile acids to the colon to relieve constipation. The final objective addresses novel concepts and therapeutic opportunities such as the interaction of bile acids and the microbiome to control colonic infections, as in Clostridium difficile-associated colitis, and bile acid targeting of the farnesoid X receptor and G protein-coupled bile acid receptor 1 with consequent effects on energy expenditure, fat metabolism, and glycemic control. PMID:26138466

  8. Bile acids for viral hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Liu, J; Gluud, C

    2003-01-01

    The viral hepatitides are common causes of liver diseases globally. Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus was reached regarding their usefulness.......The viral hepatitides are common causes of liver diseases globally. Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus was reached regarding their usefulness....

  9. [Bile acids in the bile in diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slivka, O Ia; Zelinskiĭ, B A; Zelinskiĭ, S Ts

    1979-01-01

    Hepatic and gall bladder bile of healthy persons (8) and of patients with severe form of diabetes mellitus (17) was studied. Paer chromatography was applied for determination of cholic, chenodeoxycholic, deoxycholic bile acids and their conjugates with glycin and taurine. An absolute content and percentage of glycodeoxycholic and glycochenodeoxycholic bile acids were increased, and glycochenodeoxycholic acid content and taurates proportion were decreased in the gall bladder and hepatic bile of diabetic patients. The data obtained pointed to disturbed hepatic function in severe diabetes mellitus; it was expressed in suppression of bile acids synthesis and conjugation, and also in depression of transformation of deoxycholic into cholic acid.

  10. Bile acid sequestrants for cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000787.htm Bile acid sequestrants for cholesterol To use the sharing features on this page, ... are medicines that help lower your LDL (bad) cholesterol . Too much cholesterol in your blood can stick ...

  11. Bile acid transporters in health and disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kosters, Astrid; Karpen, Saul J

    2008-01-01

    In recent years the discovery of a number of major transporter proteins expressed in the liver and intestine specifically involved in bile acid transport has led to improved understanding of bile acid homeostasis and the enterohepatic circulation. Na+-dependent bile acid uptake from portal blood into the liver is mediated primarily by the Na+ taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP), while secretion across the canalicular membrane into bile is carried out by the Bile salt export pump (...

  12. Endocrine and paracrine role of bile acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Verena Keitel; Ralf Kubitz; Dieter H(a)ussinger

    2008-01-01

    Bile acids are not only important for the absorption of dietary lipids and fat soluble vitamins but are signalling molecules with diverse endocrine and paracrine functions.Bile acids regulate bile acid,lipid and glucose metabolism and modulate temperature and energy homeostasis.Furthermore,bile acids can not only promote cell proliferation and liver regeneration but can also induce programmed cell death.Bile acid functions are mediated through different pathways which comprise the activation of nuclear hormone receptors,of intracellular kinases and of the plasma membranebound,G-protein coupled bile acid receptor TGR5/Gpbar-1.

  13. Bile acids for primary sclerosing cholangitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Gluud, C

    2003-01-01

    Bile acids have been used for treating primary sclerosing cholangitis, but their beneficial and harmful effects remain unclear.......Bile acids have been used for treating primary sclerosing cholangitis, but their beneficial and harmful effects remain unclear....

  14. Bile acids in regulation of intestinal physiology.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keating, Niamh

    2009-10-01

    In addition to their roles in facilitating lipid digestion and absorption, bile acids are recognized as important regulators of intestinal function. Exposure to bile acids can dramatically influence intestinal transport and barrier properties; in recent years, they have also become appreciated as important factors in regulating cell growth and survival. Indeed, few cells reside within the intestinal mucosa that are not altered to some degree by exposure to bile acids. The past decade saw great advances in the knowledge of how bile acids exert their actions at the cellular and molecular levels. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the role of bile acids in regulation of intestinal physiology.

  15. Alteration of bile acid metabolism in the rat induced by chronic ethanol consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Guoxiang; Zhong, Wei; Li, Houkai; Li, Qiong; Qiu, Yunping; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Chen, Huiyuan; Zhao, Xueqing; Zhang, Shucha; Zhou, Zhanxiang; Zeisel, Steven H.; Jia, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Our understanding of the bile acid metabolism is limited by the fact that previous analyses have primarily focused on a selected few circulating bile acids; the bile acid profiles of the liver and gastrointestinal tract pools are rarely investigated. Here, we determined how chronic ethanol consumption altered the bile acids in multiple body compartments (liver, gastrointestinal tract, and serum) of rats. Rats were fed a modified Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet with 38% of calories as ethanol (the amount equivalent of 4–5 drinks in humans). While conjugated bile acids predominated in the liver (98.3%), duodenum (97.8%), and ileum (89.7%), unconjugated bile acids comprised the largest proportion of measured bile acids in serum (81.2%), the cecum (97.7%), and the rectum (97.5%). In particular, taurine-conjugated bile acids were significantly decreased in the liver and gastrointestinal tract of ethanol-treated rats, while unconjugated and glycine-conjugated species increased. Ethanol consumption caused increased expression of genes involved in bile acid biosynthesis, efflux transport, and reduced expression of genes regulating bile acid influx transport in the liver. These results provide an improved understanding of the systemic modulations of bile acid metabolism in mammals through the gut-liver axis.—Xie, G., Zhong, W., Li, H., Li, Q., Qiu, Y., Zheng, X., Chen, H., Zhao, X., Zhang, S., Zhou, Z., Zeisel, S. H., Jia, W. Alteration of bile acid metabolism in the rat induced by chronic ethanol consumption. PMID:23709616

  16. Bile acid dissolution therapy of gallbladder stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromm, H; Malavolti, M

    1992-11-01

    Oral cholelitholytic bile acid therapy has become established treatment for selected patients with cholesterol gallstones. The treatment finds its clinical application both alone and in combination with ESWL. UDCA alone or, less commonly, a combination of this bile acid with CDCA is used. Optimal results can be expected only in carefully selected patients. Bile acid dissolution therapy is most successful in patients with radiolucent gallstones which are OCG to be floating. Dissolution is seldom seen when the stones are > 1 cm in size. Cholelitholytic treatment in combination with ESWL yields optimal results in single radiolucent gallstones which are not greater than 2 cm. ESWL thus makes it possible to use medical treatment effectively in single 1-2 cm gallstones when bile acids alone would not be successful. Bile acid treatment is extremely safe, especially if UDCA is given without the addition of CDCA. PMID:1486209

  17. Biosynthesis and Trafficking of the Bile Salt Export Pump, BSEP: Therapeutic Implications of BSEP Mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Soroka, Carol J.; Boyer, James L.

    2013-01-01

    The bile salt export pump (BSEP, ABCB11) is the primary transporter of bile acids from the hepatocyte to the biliary system. This rate-limiting step in bile formation is essential to the formation of bile salt dependent bile flow, the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids, and the digestion of dietary fats. Mutations in BSEP are associated with cholestatic diseases such as progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 2 (PFIC2), benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis type 2 (BRIC2),...

  18. Bile acids in health and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, E; Thaysen, E H

    1996-01-01

    improved. Important physiological research on the mechanisms of hepatic bile flow was conducted. An intestinal perfusion model served as a tool providing information on absorption kinetics and on transmucosal water and electrolyte movements. The gallstone disease, liver diseases, inflammatory bowel disease...... to the understanding of the factors involved in the solubility of cholesterol in bile. The growing international understanding of the potential importance of the bile acids in health and disease gave raise to a substantial Danish contribution in the 1970s and 1980s in parallel with international achievements. Emphasis...... was on the possible clinical implications of bile acids. Studies on physiology and pathophysiology were in focus. Patients who have had an intestinal bypass operation for obesity served as a model for obtaining new knowledge on various aspects of the properties of the bile acids. Also the analytical methods were...

  19. Bile acids for liver-transplanted patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poropat, Goran; Giljaca, Vanja; Stimac, Davor;

    2010-01-01

    Liver transplantation has become a widely accepted form of treatment for numerous end-stage liver diseases. Bile acids may decrease allograft rejection after liver transplantation by changing the expression of major histocompatibility complex class molecules in bile duct epithelium and central vein...

  20. Bile acids for liver-transplanted patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Gluud, C

    2005-01-01

    Liver transplantation has become a widely accepted form of treatment for numerous end-stage liver diseases. Bile acids may decrease the degree of allograft rejection after liver transplantation by changing the expression of major histocompatibility complex class molecules in bile duct epithelium...

  1. Pharmacology of bile acid receptors: Evolution of bile acids from simple detergents to complex signaling molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copple, Bryan L; Li, Tiangang

    2016-02-01

    For many years, bile acids were thought to only function as detergents which solubilize fats and facilitate the uptake of fat-soluble vitamins in the intestine. Many early observations; however, demonstrated that bile acids regulate more complex processes, such as bile acids synthesis and immune cell function through activation of signal transduction pathways. These studies were the first to suggest that receptors may exist for bile acids. Ultimately, seminal studies by many investigators led to the discovery of several bile acid-activated receptors including the farnesoid X receptor, the vitamin D receptor, the pregnane X receptor, TGR5, α5 β1 integrin, and sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2. Several of these receptors are expressed outside of the gastrointestinal system, indicating that bile acids may have diverse functions throughout the body. Characterization of the functions of these receptors over the last two decades has identified many important roles for these receptors in regulation of bile acid synthesis, transport, and detoxification; regulation of glucose utilization; regulation of fatty acid synthesis and oxidation; regulation of immune cell function; regulation of energy expenditure; and regulation of neural processes such as gastric motility. Through these many functions, bile acids regulate many aspects of digestion ranging from uptake of essential vitamins to proper utilization of nutrients. Accordingly, within a short time period, bile acids moved beyond simple detergents and into the realm of complex signaling molecules. Because of the important processes that bile acids regulate through activation of receptors, drugs that target these receptors are under development for the treatment of several diseases, including cholestatic liver disease and metabolic syndrome. In this review, we will describe the various bile acid receptors, the signal transduction pathways activated by these receptors, and briefly discuss the physiological processes that

  2. Bile acid formation in primary human hepatocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Curt Einarsson; Ewa Ellis; Anna Abrahamsson; Bo-G6ran Ericzon; Ingemar Bj rkhem; Magnus Axelson

    2000-01-01

    AIM To evaluate a culture system for bile acid formation in primary human hepatocytes in comparison with HepG2 cells. METHODS Hepatocytes were isolated from normal human liver tissue and were cultured in serum-free William's E medium. The medium was collected and renewed every 24 h. Bile acids and their precursors in media were finally analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. RESULTS Cholic acid ( CA ) andchenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) conjugated with glycine or taurine accounted for 70% and 25% of total steroids. A third of CDCA was also conjugated with sulphuric acid. Dexamathasone and thyroid hormorm alone or in combination did not significantly effect bile acid formation. The addition of cyclosporin A (10 μmol/L) inhibited the synthesis of CA and CDCA by about 13% and 30%, respectively. CONCLUSION Isolated human hepatocytes in primary culture behave as in the intact liver by converting cholesterol to conjugated CA and CDCA. This is in contrast to cultured HepG2 cells, which release large amounts of bile acid precursors and unconjugated bile acids into the medium.

  3. Differential expression of cholangiocyte and ileal bile acid transporters following bile acid supplementation and depletion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N. Sertac Kip; Konstantinos N. Lazaridis; Anatoliy I. Masyuk; Patrick L. Splinter; Robert C. Huebert; Nicholas F. LaRusso

    2004-01-01

    AIM: We have previously demonstrated that cholangiocytes,the epithelial cells lining intrahepatic bile ducts, encode two functional bile acid transporters via alternative splicing of a single gene to facilitate bile acid vectorial transport.Cholangiocytes possess ASBT, an apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter to take up bile acids, and t-ASBT, a basolateral alternatively spliced and truncated form of ASBT to efflux bile acids. Though hepatocyte and ileal bile acid transporters are in part regulated by the flux of bile acids,the effect of alterations in bile acid flux on the expression of t-ASBT in terminal ileocytes remains unclear. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that expression of ASBT and t-ASBT in cholangiocytes and ileocytes was regulated by bile acid flux. METHODS: Expression of ASBT and t-ASBT message and protein in cholangiocytes and ileocytes isolated from pairfed rats given control (C) and 1% taurocholate (TCA) or 5% cholestyramine (CY) enriched diets, were assessed by both quantitative RNase protection assays and quantitative immunoblotting. The data obtained from each of the control groups were pooled to reflect the changes observed following TCA and CY treatments with respect to the control diets.Cholangiocyte taurocholate uptake was determined using a novel microperfusion technique on intrahepatic bile duct units (IBDUs) derived from C, TCA and CY fed rats.RESULTS: In cholangiocytes, both ASBT and t-ASBT message RNA and protein were significantly decreased in response to TCA feeding compared to C diet. In contrast,message and protein of both bile acid transporters significantly increased following CY feeding compared to C diet. In the ileum, TCA feeding significantly up-regulated both ASBT and t-ASBT message and protein compared to C diet, while CY feeding significantly down-regulated message and protein of both bile acid transporters compared to C diet. As anticipated from alterations in cholangiocyte ASBT expression, the uptake of

  4. Role of Bile Acids and Bile Acid Receptors in Metabolic Regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lefebvre, Philippe; Cariou, Bertrand; Lien, Fleur; Kuipers, Folkert; Staels, Bart

    2009-01-01

    Lefebvre P, Cariou B, Lien F, Kuipers F, Staels B. Role of Bile Acids and Bile Acid Receptors in Metabolic Regulation. Physiol Rev 89: 147-191,2009; doi: 10.1152/physrev.00010.2008. - The incidence of the metabolic syndrome has taken epidemic proportions in the past decades, contributing to an incre

  5. Hepatic bile acids and bile acid-related gene expression in pregnant and lactating rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong N. Zhu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Significant physiological changes occur during pregnancy and lactation. Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP is a liver disease closely related to disruption of bile acid homeostasis. The objective of this study was to examine the regulation of bile acid synthesis and transport in normal pregnant and lactating rats. Materials and Methods. Livers from timed pregnant SD rats were collected on gestational days (GD 10, 14 and 19, and postnatal days (PND 1, 7, 14 and 21. Total bile acids were determined by the enzymatic method, total RNA was isolated and subjected to real time RT-PCR analysis. Liver protein was extracted for western-blot analysis. Results. Under physiological conditions hepatic bile acids were not elevated during pregnancy but increased during lactation in rats. Bile acid synthesis rate-limiting enzyme Cyp7a1 was unchanged on gestational days, but increased on PND14 and 21 at mRNA and protein levels. Expression of Cyp8b1, Cyp27a1 and Cyp7b1 was also higher during lactation. The mRNA levels of small heterodimer partner (SHP and protein levels of farnesoid X receptor (FXR were increased during pregnancy and lactation. Bile acid transporters Ntcp, Bsep, Mrp3 and Mrp4 were lower at gestation, but increased during lactation. Hepatic Oatp transporters were decreased during pregnancy and lactation. Conclusion. Hepatic bile acid homeostasis is maintained during normal pregnancy in rats, probably through the FXR-SHP regulation. The expression of bile acid synthesis genes and liver bile acid accumulation were increased during lactation, together with increased expression of bile acid efflux transporter Bsep, Mrp3 and Mrp4.

  6. Bile acids: emerging role in management of liver diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Asgharpour, Amon; Kumar, Divya; Sanyal, Arun

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are well known for their effects on cholesterol homeostasis and lipid digestion. Since the discovery of bile acid receptors, of which there are farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a nuclear receptor, and the plasma membrane G-protein receptor, as well as Takeda G-protein coupled receptor clone 5, further roles have been elucidated for bile acids including glucose and lipid metabolism as well as inflammation. Additionally, treatment with bile acid receptor agonists has shown a decrease in t...

  7. Bile acids for primary sclerosing cholangitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poropat, Goran; Giljaca, Vanja; Stimac, Davor;

    2011-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis is a progressive chronic cholestatic liver disease that usually leads to the development of cirrhosis. Studies evaluating bile acids in the treatment of primary sclerosing cholangitis have shown a potential benefit of their use. However, no influence on patients...

  8. Hepatic bile acids and bile acid-related gene expression in pregnant and lactating rats

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Qiong N.; Xie, Hong M.; Dan Zhang; Jie Liu; Yuan F. Lu

    2013-01-01

    Background. Significant physiological changes occur during pregnancy and lactation. Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is a liver disease closely related to disruption of bile acid homeostasis. The objective of this study was to examine the regulation of bile acid synthesis and transport in normal pregnant and lactating rats. Materials and Methods. Livers from timed pregnant SD rats were collected on gestational days (GD) 10, 14 and 19, and postnatal days (PND) 1, 7, 14 and 21. T...

  9. Bile Acids Trigger GLP-1 Release Predominantly by Accessing Basolaterally Located G Protein-Coupled Bile Acid Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brighton, Cheryl A.; Rievaj, Juraj; Kuhre, Rune E.;

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are well-recognized stimuli of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. This action has been attributed to activation of the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor GPBAR1 (TGR5), although other potential bile acid sensors include the nuclear farnesoid receptor and the apical sodium...

  10. Selenium- or tellurium- containing bile acids and derivatives thereof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention relates to the preparation of selenium and tellurium derivatives, particularly γ-emitting radioactive derivatives of bile acids and bile salts. Such compounds are valuable in the examination of body function, especially small bowel function. (author)

  11. Bile acids: Chemistry, physiology, and pathophysiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria J Monte; Jose JG Marin; Alvaro Antelo; Jose Vazquez-Tato

    2009-01-01

    The family of bile acids includes a group of molecular species of acidic steroids with very peculiar physicalchemical and biological characteristics. They are synthesized by the liver from cholesterol through several complementary pathways that are controlled by mechanisms involving fine-tuning by the levels of certain bile acid species. Although their bestknown role is their participation in the digestion and absorption of fat, they also play an important role in several other physiological processes. Thus, genetic abnormalities accounting for alterations in their synthesis, biotransformation and/or transport may result in severe alterations, even leading to lethal situations for which the sole therapeutic option may be liver transplantation. Moreover, the increased levels of bile acids reached during cholestatic liver diseases are known to induce oxidative stress and apoptosis, resulting in damage to the liver parenchyma and, ventually, extrahepatic tissues. When this occurs during pregnancy, the outcome of gestation may be challenged. In contrast, the physical-chemical and biological properties of these compounds have been used as the bases for the development of drugs and as pharmaceutical tools for the delivery of active agents.

  12. Bile Acids Trigger GLP-1 Release Predominantly by Accessing Basolaterally Located G Protein–Coupled Bile Acid Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Brighton, Cheryl A.; Rievaj, Juraj; Kuhre, Rune E; Glass, Leslie L; Schoonjans, Kristina; Holst, Jens J.; Gribble, Fiona M.; Reimann, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are well-recognized stimuli of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. This action has been attributed to activation of the G protein–coupled bile acid receptor GPBAR1 (TGR5), although other potential bile acid sensors include the nuclear farnesoid receptor and the apical sodium-coupled bile acid transporter ASBT. The aim of this study was to identify pathways important for GLP-1 release and to determine whether bile acids target their receptors on GLP-1–secreting L-cells from t...

  13. Colesevelam: a new bile acid sequestrant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, N N

    2001-01-01

    Coronary heart disease is the most prevalent form of cardiovascular disease in the United States. Hyperlipidemia--specifically, increased total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels--positively correlates with the development of coronary heart disease. Colesevelam, a nonabsorbed, water-insoluble polymer, is a new bile acid sequestrant that is effective in lowering total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. In several short-term, placebo-controlled studies, colesevelam has decreased total cholesterol levels by approximately 6 to 10% and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels by approximately 9 to 20%. When given in combination with atorvastatin, lovastatin, or simvastatin, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were decreased more than with colesevelam alone. Its unique hydrogel formulation may also minimize the potential for gastrointestinal adverse effects, which are common with other bile acid sequestrants. There have been few published studies available concerning this drug; no long-term studies and few large-scale studies have been published.

  14. Effect of the bile-acid sequestrant colestipol on postprandial serum bile-acid concentration: evaluation by bioluminescent enzymic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, S S; Wayne, M L; Smith, R B; Wright, C E; Andreadis, N A; Hofmann, A F

    1989-02-01

    Chronic ingestion of bile-acid sequestrants has been shown to decrease the serum cholesterol concentration and coronary events in hypercholesterolaemic patients. To develop improved sequestrants, a rapid, convenient method for testing the bile-acid binding efficacy of sequestrants is needed. Serum bile-acid concentrations could be used to detect bile-acid binding by an administered sequestrant, since the serum bile-acid concentration is determined largely by the rate of intestinal absorption in healthy individuals. To test this, serum bile-acid concentrations were measured at frequent intervals over 24 h in five otherwise healthy hypercholesterolaemic subjects during the ingestion of three standard meals, with or without the addition of 5 g colestipol granules administered 30 min before each meal. Total serum bile-acid concentration was measured with a previously reported bioluminescent enzymic assay, that uses a 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, an oxido-reductase, and a bacterial luciferase co-immobilized on to Sepharose beads. Bile acids in 1 ml of serum were isolated by solid-phase extraction chromatography with reversed-phase C18 cartridges. Colestipol lowered the postprandial elevation of serum bile acids by one half, with a subsequent decrease in the cumulative area under the curve. The data suggest that measurement of serum bile-acid concentrations by bioluminescence is a rapid, simple way to document the efficacy of bile-acid sequestrants.

  15. Fatty acid biosynthesis in actinomycetes

    OpenAIRE

    Gago, Gabriela; Diacovich, Lautaro; Arabolaza, Ana; Tsai, Shiou-Chuan; Gramajo, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    All organisms that produce fatty acids do so via a repeated cycle of reactions. In mammals and other animals, these reactions are catalyzed by a type I fatty acid synthase (FAS), a large multifunctional protein to which the growing chain is covalently attached. In contrast, most bacteria (and plants) contain a type II system in which each reaction is catalyzed by a discrete protein. The pathway of fatty acid biosynthesis in Escherichia coli is well established and has provided a foundation fo...

  16. Bile salts of the West Indian manatee, Trichechus manatus latirostris: novel bile alcohol sulfates and absence of bile acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroki, S; Schteingart, C D; Hagey, L R; Cohen, B I; Mosbach, E H; Rossi, S S; Hofmann, A F; Matoba, N; Une, M; Hoshita, T

    1988-04-01

    The bile salts present in gallbladder bile of the West Indian manatee, Trichechus manatus latirostris, an herbivorous marine mammal of the tropical and subtropical margins of the Atlantic Ocean, were found to consist of a mixture of bile alcohol sulfates. Bile acids, previously believed to be present in all mammals, were not detected. Using chromatography, mass spectrometry, and 1H- and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, the major bile alcohol was identified as 5 beta-cholestane-3 alpha,6 beta,7 alpha-25,26-pentol; that is, it had the nuclear structure of alpha-muricholic acid and the side chain structure of bufol. This compound has not been described previously and the trivial name "alpha-trichechol" is proposed. The second most abundant compound was 5 beta-cholestane-3 alpha,7 alpha,25,26-tetrol. Other bile alcohols were tentatively identified as 5 beta-cholestane-3 alpha,6 beta,7 beta,25,26-pentol (named beta-trichechol), 3 alpha,6 alpha,7 beta, 25-26-pentol (named omega-trichechol) and 5 beta-cholestane-3 alpha,6 beta,7 alpha,26-tetrol. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra of the four 6,7 epimers of 3,6,7 trihydroxy bile acids are described and discussed. All bile alcohols were present as ester sulfates, the sulfate group being tentatively assigned to the 26-hydroxy group. 12-Hydroxy compounds were not detected. The manatee is the first mammal found to lack bile acids, presumably because it lacks the enzymes required for oxidation of the 26-hydroxy group to a carboxylic acid. Trichechols, like other bile salts, are water-soluble end products of cholesterol metabolism; whether they also function as biological surfactants in promoting biliary cholesterol secretion or lipid digestion is unknown. PMID:3392467

  17. Bile Acid Diarrhea: Prevalence, Pathogenesis, and Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Bile acid diarrhea (BAD) is usually seen in patients with ileal Crohn’s disease or ileal resection. However, 25% to 50% of patients with functional diarrhea or diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) also have evidence of BAD. It is estimated that 1% of the population may have BAD. The causes of BAD include a deficiency in fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF-19), a hormone produced in enterocytes that regulates hepatic bile acid (BA) synthesis. Other potential causes include genetic variations that affect the proteins involved in BA enterohepatic circulation and synthesis or in the TGR5 receptor that mediates the actions of BA in colonic secretion and motility. BAs enhance mucosal permeability, induce water and electrolyte secretion, and accelerate colonic transit partly by stimulating propulsive high-amplitude colonic contractions. There is an increased proportion of primary BAs in the stool of patients with IBS-D, and some changes in the fecal microbiome have been described. There are several methods of diagnosing BAD, such as 75selenium homotaurocholic acid test retention, serum C4, FGF-19, and fecal BA measurement; presently, therapeutic trials with BA sequestrants are most commonly used for diagnosis. Management involves the use of BA sequestrants including cholestyramine, colestipol, and colesevelam. FXR agonists such as obeticholic acid constitute a promising new approach to treating BAD. PMID:25918262

  18. The Adsorption Effect of Quaternized Chitosan Derivatives on Bile Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu Xian MENG; Ya Qing FENG; Wen Jin LI; Cai Xia YIN; Jin Ping DENG

    2006-01-01

    Three quaternized chitosan derivatives were synthesized and their adsorption performance of bile acid from aqueous solution was studied. The adsorption capacities and rates of bile acid onto quaternized chitosan derivatives were evaluated. The kinetic experimental data properly correlated with the second-order kinetic model, which indicated that the chemical sorption is the rate-limiting step. The results showed that the quaternized chitosan derivatives are favorable adsorbents for bile acid.

  19. Effects of feeding bile acids and a bile acid sequestrant on hepatic bile acid composition in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Youcai; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2010-11-01

    An improved ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS/MS) method was established for the simultaneous analysis of various bile acids (BA) and applied to investigate liver BA content in C57BL/6 mice fed 1% cholic acid (CA), 0.3% deoxycholic acid (DCA), 0.3% chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), 0.3% lithocholic acid (LCA), 3% ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), or 2% cholestyramine (resin). Results indicate that mice have a remarkable ability to maintain liver BA concentrations. The BA profiles in mouse livers were similar between CA and DCA feedings, as well as between CDCA and LCA feedings. The mRNA expression of Cytochrome P450 7a1 (Cyp7a1) was suppressed by all BA feedings, whereas Cyp7b1 was suppressed only by CA and UDCA feedings. Gender differences in liver BA composition were observed after feeding CA, DCA, CDCA, and LCA, but they were not prominent after feeding UDCA. Sulfation of CA and CDCA was found at the 7-OH position, and it was increased by feeding CA or CDCA more in male than female mice. In contrast, sulfation of LCA and taurolithocholic acid (TLCA) was female-predominant, and it was increased by feeding UDCA and LCA. In summary, the present systematic study on BA metabolism in mice will aid in interpreting BA-mediated gene regulation and hepatotoxicity.

  20. Fatty Acid Biosynthesis IX

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carey, E. M.; Hansen, Heinz Johs. Max; Dils, R.

    1972-01-01

    # 1. I. [I-14C]Acetate was covalently bound to rabbit mammary gland fatty acid synthetase by enzymic transacylation from [I-14C]acetyl-CoA. Per mole of enzyme 2 moles of acetate were bound to thiol groups and up to I mole of acetate was bound to non-thiol groups. # 2. 2. The acetyl-fatty acid...... synthetase complex was isolated free from acetyl-CoA. It was rapidly hydrolysed at 30°C, but hydrolysis was greatly diminished at o°C and triacetic lactone synthesis occurred. In the presence of malonyl-CoA and NADPH, all the acetate bound to fatty acid synthetase was incorporated into long-chain fatty acids....... Hydrolysis of bound acetate and incorporation of bound acetate into fatty acids were inhibited to the same extent by guanidine hydrochloride. # 3. 3. Acetate was also covalently bound to fatty acid synthetase by chemical acetylation with [I-14C]acetic anhydride in the absence of CoASH. A total of 60 moles...

  1. Differential diagnosis in patients with suspected bile acid synthesis defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dorothea Haas; Hongying Gan-Schreier; Claus-Dieter Langhans; Tilman Rohrer; Guido Engelmann; Maura Heverin; David W Russell

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the clinical presentations associated with bile acid synthesis defects and to describe identification of individual disorders and diagnostic pitfalls.METHODS:Authors describe semiquantitative determination of 16 urinary bile acid metabolites by electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.Sample preparation was performed by solid-phase extraction.The total analysis time was 2 min per sample.Authors determined bile acid metabolites in 363 patients with suspected defects in bile acid metabolism.RESULTS:Abnormal bile acid metabolites were found in 36 patients.Two patients had bile acid synthesis defects but presented with atypical presentations.In 2 other patients who were later shown to be affected by biliary atresia and cystic fibrosis the profile of bile acid metabolites was initially suggestive of a bile acid synthesis defect.Three adult patients suffered from cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis.Nineteen patients had peroxisomal disorders,and 10 patients had cholestatic hepatopathy of other cause.CONCLUSION:Screening for urinary cholanoids should be done in every infant with cholestatic hepatopathy as well as in children with progressive neurological disease to provide specific therapy.

  2. Impaired Bile Acid Homeostasis in Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Zhang

    Full Text Available Severe acute malnutrition (SAM is a major cause of mortality in children under 5 years and is associated with hepatic steatosis. Bile acids are synthesized in the liver and participate in dietary fat digestion, regulation of energy expenditure, and immune responses. The aim of this work was to investigate whether SAM is associated with clinically relevant changes in bile acid homeostasis.An initial discovery cohort with 5 healthy controls and 22 SAM-patients was used to identify altered bile acid homeostasis. A follow up cohort of 40 SAM-patients were then studied on admission and 3 days after clinical stabilization to assess recovery in bile acid metabolism. Recruited children were 6-60 months old and admitted for SAM in Malawi. Clinical characteristics, feces and blood were collected on admission and prior to discharge. Bile acids, 7α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4 and FGF-19 were quantified.On admission, total serum bile acids were higher in children with SAM than in healthy controls and glycine-conjugates accounted for most of this accumulation with median and interquartile range (IQR of 24.6 μmol/L [8.6-47.7] compared to 1.9 μmol/L [1.7-3.3] (p = 0.01 in controls. Total serum bile acid concentrations did not decrease prior to discharge. On admission, fecal conjugated bile acids were lower and secondary bile acids higher at admission compared to pre- discharge, suggesting increased bacterial conversion. FGF19 (Fibroblast growth factor 19, a marker of intestinal bile acid signaling, was higher on admission and was associated with decreased C4 concentrations as a marker of bile acid synthesis. Upon recovery, fecal calprotectin, a marker of intestinal inflammation, was lower.SAM is associated with increased serum bile acid levels despite reduced synthesis rates. In SAM, there tends to be increased deconjugation of bile acids and conversion from primary to secondary bile acids, which may contribute to the development of liver disease.

  3. Individual bile acids have differential effects on bile acid signaling in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Peizhen, E-mail: songacad@gmail.com; Rockwell, Cheryl E., E-mail: rockwelc@msu.edu; Cui, Julia Yue, E-mail: juliacui@uw.edu; Klaassen, Curtis D., E-mail: curtisklaassenphd@gmail.com

    2015-02-15

    Bile acids (BAs) are known to regulate BA synthesis and transport by the farnesoid X receptor in the liver (FXR-SHP) and intestine (FXR-Fgf15). However, the relative importance of individual BAs in regulating these processes is not known. Therefore, mice were fed various doses of five individual BAs, including cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxoycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA), and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in their diets at various concentrations for one week to increase the concentration of one BA in the enterohepatic circulation. The mRNA of BA synthesis and transporting genes in liver and ileum were quantified. In the liver, the mRNA of SHP, which is the prototypical target gene of FXR, increased in mice fed all concentrations of BAs. In the ileum, the mRNA of the intestinal FXR target gene Fgf15 was increased at lower doses and to a higher extent by CA and DCA than by CDCA and LCA. Cyp7a1, the rate-limiting enzyme in BA synthesis, was decreased more by CA and DCA than CDCA and LCA. Cyp8b1, the enzyme that 12-hydroxylates BAs and is thus responsible for the synthesis of CA, was decreased much more by CA and DCA than CDCA and LCA. Surprisingly, neither a decrease in the conjugated BA uptake transporter (Ntcp) nor increase in BA efflux transporter (Bsep) was observed by FXR activation, but an increase in the cholesterol efflux transporter (Abcg5/Abcg8) was observed with FXR activation. Thus in conclusion, CA and DCA are more potent FXR activators than CDCA and LCA when fed to mice, and thus they are more effective in decreasing the expression of the rate limiting gene in BA synthesis Cyp7a1 and the 12-hydroxylation of BAs Cyp8b1, and are also more effective in increasing the expression of Abcg5/Abcg8, which is responsible for biliary cholesterol excretion. However, feeding BAs do not alter the mRNA or protein levels of Ntcp or Bsep, suggesting that the uptake or efflux of BAs is not regulated by FXR at physiological and

  4. Intestinal bile acid physiology and pathophysiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Olga Mart(I)nez-Augustin; Ferm(I)n Sánchez de Medina

    2008-01-01

    Bile acids (Bas) have a long established role in fat digestion in the intestine by acting as tensioactives,due to their amphipatic characteristics.Bas are reabsorbed very efficiently by the intestinal epithelium and recycled back to the liver v/a transport mechanisms that have been largely elucidated.The transport and synthesis of Bas are tightly regulated in part by specific plasma membrane receptors and nuclear receptors.In addition to their primary effect,Bas have been claimed to play a role in gastrointestinal cancer,intestinal inflammation and intestinal ionic transport.Bas are not equivalent in any of these biological activities,and structural requirements have been generally identified.In particular,some Bas may be useful for cancer chemoprevention and perhaps in inflammatory bowel disease,although further research is necessary in this field.This review covers the most recent developments in these aspects of BA intestinal biology.

  5. Bile acids: emerging role in management of liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgharpour, Amon; Kumar, Divya; Sanyal, Arun

    2015-10-01

    Bile acids are well known for their effects on cholesterol homeostasis and lipid digestion. Since the discovery of bile acid receptors, of which there are farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a nuclear receptor, and the plasma membrane G-protein receptor, as well as Takeda G-protein coupled receptor clone 5, further roles have been elucidated for bile acids including glucose and lipid metabolism as well as inflammation. Additionally, treatment with bile acid receptor agonists has shown a decrease in the amount of atherosclerosis plaque formation and decreased portal vascular resistance and portal hypotension in animal models. Furthermore, rodent models have demonstrated antifibrotic activity using bile acid receptor agonists. Early human data using a FXR agonist, obeticholic acid, have shown promising results with improvement of histological activity and even a reduction of fibrosis. Human studies are ongoing and will provide further information on bile acid receptor agonist therapies. Thus, bile acids and their derivatives have the potential for management of liver diseases and potentially other disease states including diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. PMID:26320013

  6. Oleic acid biosynthesis in cyanobacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biosynthesis of fatty acids in cyanobacteria is very similar to the well characterized system found in green plants. However, the initial desaturation of stearic acid in cyanobacteria appears to represent a significant departure from plant systems in which stearoyl-ACP is the exclusive substrate for desaturation. In Anabaena variabilis, the substrate appears to be monoglucosyldiacylglycerol, a lipid not found in plants. The authors examined five different cyanobacteria to determine if the pathway in A. variabilis was generally present in other cyanobacteria. The cyanobacteria studied were A. variabilis, Chlorogloeopsis sp., Schizothrix calcicola, Anacystis marina, and Anacystis nidulans. Each were grown in liquid culture, harvested, and examined for stearoyl-ACP desaturase activity or incubated with 14CO2. None of the cyanobacteria contained any stearoyl-ACP desaturase activity in whole homogenates or 105,000g supernatants. All were capable of incorporating 14CO2 into monoglucosyldiacylglycerol and results from incubations of 20 min, 1 hr, 1 hr + 10 hr chase were consistent with monoglucosyldiacylglycerol serving as precursor for monogalctosyldiacylglycerol. Thus, initial evidence is consistent with oleic acid biosynthesis occurring by desaturation of stearoyl-monoglucosyldiacylglycerol in all cyanobacteria

  7. Synthesis of nucleoside and nucleotide conjugates of bile acids, and polymerase construction of bile acid-functionalized DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikonen, Satu; Macícková-Cahová, Hana; Pohl, Radek; Sanda, Miloslav; Hocek, Michal

    2010-03-01

    Aqueous Sonogashira cross-coupling reactions of 5-iodopyrimidine or 7-iodo-7-deazaadenine nucleosides with bile acid-derived terminal acetylenes linked via an ester or amide tether gave the corresponding bile acid-nucleoside conjugates. Analogous reactions of halogenated nucleoside triphosphates gave directly bile acid-modified dNTPs. Enzymatic incorporation of these modified nucleotides to DNA was successfully performed using Phusion polymerase for primer extension. One of the dNTPs (dCTP bearing cholic acid) was also efficient for PCR amplification. PMID:20165813

  8. Regulation of human class I alcohol dehydrogenases by bile acids

    OpenAIRE

    Langhi, Cédric; Pedraz-Cuesta, Elena; Haro, Diego; Marrero, Pedro F; Rodríguez, Joan C.

    2013-01-01

    Class I alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH1s) are the rate-limiting enzymes for ethanol and vitamin A (retinol) metabolism in the liver . Because previous studies have shown that human ADH1 enzymes may participate in bile acid metabolism, we investigated whether the bile acid-activated nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) regulates ADH1 genes. In human hepatocytes, both the endogenous FXR ligand chenodeoxycholic acid and synthetic FXR-specific agonist GW4064 increased ADH1 mRNA, protein, and ...

  9. Ursodeoxycholic acid treatment of vanishing bile duct syndromes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thomas Pusl; Ulrich Beuers

    2006-01-01

    Vanishing bile duct syndromes (VBDS) are characterized by progressive loss of small intrahepatic ducts caused by a variety of different diseases leading to chronic cholestasis, cirrhosis, and premature death from liver failure. The majority of adult patients with VBDS suffer from primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a hydrophilic dihydroxy bile acid, is the only drug currently approved for the treatment of patients with PBC, and anticholestatic effects have been reported for several other cholestatic syndromes. Several potential mechanisms of action of UDCA have been proposed including stimulation of hepatobiliary secretion, inhibition of apoptosis and protection of cholangiocytes against toxic effects of hydrophobic bile acids.

  10. Hormesis in Cholestatic Liver Disease; Preconditioning with Low Bile Acid Concentrations Protects against Bile Acid-Induced Toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther M Verhaag

    Full Text Available Cholestasis is characterized by accumulation of bile acids and inflammation, causing hepatocellular damage. Still, liver damage markers are highest in acute cholestasis and drop when this condition becomes chronic, indicating that hepatocytes adapt towards the hostile environment. This may be explained by a hormetic response in hepatocytes that limits cell death during cholestasis.To investigate the mechanisms that underlie the hormetic response that protect hepatocytes against experimental cholestatic conditions.HepG2.rNtcp cells were preconditioned (24 h with sub-apoptotic concentrations (0.1-50 μM of various bile acids, the superoxide donor menadione, TNF-α or the Farsenoid X Receptor agonist GW4064, followed by a challenge with the apoptosis-inducing bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA; 200 μM for 4 h, menadione (50 μM, 6 h or cytokine mixture (CM; 6 h. Levels of apoptotic and necrotic cell death, mRNA expression of the bile salt export pump (ABCB11 and bile acid sensors, as well as intracellular GCDCA levels were analyzed.Preconditioning with the pro-apoptotic bile acids GCDCA, taurocholic acid, or the protective bile acids (tauroursodeoxycholic acid reduced GCDCA-induced caspase-3/7 activity in HepG2.rNtcp cells. Bile acid preconditioning did not induce significant levels of necrosis in GCDCA-challenged HepG2.rNtcp cells. In contrast, preconditioning with cholic acid, menadione or TNF-α potentiated GCDCA-induced apoptosis. GCDCA preconditioning specifically reduced GCDCA-induced cell death and not CM- or menadione-induced apoptosis. The hormetic effect of GCDCA preconditioning was concentration- and time-dependent. GCDCA-, CDCA- and GW4064- preconditioning enhanced ABCB11 mRNA levels, but in contrast to the bile acids, GW4064 did not significantly reduce GCDCA-induced caspase-3/7 activity. The GCDCA challenge strongly increased intracellular levels of this bile acid, which was not lowered by GCDCA

  11. Genetics Home Reference: congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DEFECT, CONGENITAL, 2 Sources for This Page Clayton PT. Disorders of bile acid synthesis. J Inherit Metab ... J, Duran M, Overmars H, Scambler PJ, Clayton PT. Mutations in SRD5B1 (AKR1D1), the gene encoding delta( ...

  12. Perturbation of bile acid homeostasis is an early pathogenesis event of drug induced liver injury in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    liver's ability to uptake bile acid from the circulation. ► Oxidative stress induced by the toxins altered bile acid biosynthesis in the liver. ► Selected bile acids in the plasma and urine could be sensitive DILI biomarkers

  13. The Role of Diet1 in Bile Acid Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jessica Mei-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Elevated cholesterol levels are associated with increased risk for atherosclerosis, heart disease and stroke. Variations in plasma cholesterol levels among individuals are determined by the interaction of environmental and genetic factors, many of which remain to be identified. This dissertation presents the initial characterization of a novel gene Diet1, the product of which influences plasma cholesterol levels through its effects on bile acid metabolism. Bile acids are synthesized from c...

  14. Urinary excretion of bile acid glucosides and glucuronides in extrahepatic cholestasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wietholtz, H; Marschall, H U; Reuschenbach, R; Matern, H; Matern, S

    1991-04-01

    Recently the formation of bile acid glucosides has been described as a novel conjugation mechanism in vitro and in vivo. In 10 patients with extrahepatic cholestasis caused by carcinoma of the head of the pancreas we investigated excretion rates and profiles of urinary bile acid glucosides. Urinary bile acid glucosides and, for comparison, bile acid glucuronides were extracted and characterized according to established methods. In controls total urinary bile acid glucoside excretion was 0.22 +/- 0.03 mumol/24 hr (mean +/- S.E.M.)-in the range of bile acid glucuronide excretion (0.41 +/- 0.06 mumol/24 hr; mean +/- S.E.M.). A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-characterized trihydroxy bile acid glucoside of still-unknown hydroxyl positions accounted for 65% of total urinary bile acid glucosides. In extrahepatic cholestasis total urinary bile acid glucoside excretion was 0.52 +/- 0.13 mumol/24 hr (mean +/- SEM), yet significantly lower than bile acid glucuronide excretion (1.53 +/- 0.13 mumol/24 hr; mean +/- SEM; p less than 0.001). In cholestasis the primary bile acid derivatives cholic and chenodeoxycholic acid glucosides amounted to 90%, whereas the trihydroxy bile acid glucoside had decreased to 5% of total bile acid glucoside excretion, indicating its alteration during enterohepatic circulation. The data establish the composition and quantity of urinary bile acid glucosides in healthy controls and cholestasis and constitute a quantitative comparison with another glycosidic conjugation reaction, bile acid glucuronidation.

  15. Determination of conjugated bile acids in human bile and duodenal fluid by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, C A; Watkins, J B

    1978-05-01

    A simple mehtod using reverse-phase liquid chromatography is presented for resolution and quantitation of the major conjugated bile acids of man, including the glycine and taurine conjugates of the dihydroxy bile acids, chenodeoxycholic and deoxycholic acid. Using modern, high-performance chromatographic equipment, analysis time is less than 30 minutes. The quantitative range of the method, with detection by refractive index, is 0.05 to 0.1 mumol of bile acid and the limit of detection for an injection sample is 0.01 mumol. This provides a sensitivity sufficient for analysis of dilute duodenal and gallbladder bile with minimal sample preparation.

  16. Regulation of hepatic bile acid transporters Ntcp and Bsep expression

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Xingguo; Buckley, David; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2007-01-01

    Sodium-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (Ntcp) and bile salt export pump (Bsep) are two key transporters for hepatic bile acid uptake and excretion. Alterations in Ntcp and Bsep expression have been reported in pathophysiological conditions. In the present study, the effects of age, gender, and various chemicals on the regulation of these two transporters were characterized in mice. Ntcp and Bsep mRNA levels in mouse liver were low in the fetus, but increased to its highest expression ...

  17. Antibacterial Targets in Fatty Acid Biosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, H. Tonie; Reynolds, Kevin A.

    2007-01-01

    The fatty acid biosynthesis pathway is an attractive but still largely unexploited target for development of new anti-bacterial agents. The extended use of the anti-tuberculosis drug isoniazid and the antiseptic triclosan, which are inhibitors of fatty acid biosynthesis, validates this pathway as a target for anti-bacterial development. Differences in subcellular organization of the bacterial and eukaryotic multi-enzyme fatty acid synthase systems offer the prospect of inhibitors with host vs...

  18. Novel, major 2α- and 2β-hydroxy bile alcohols and bile acids in the bile of Arapaima gigas, a large South American river fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato née Okihara, Rika; Saito, Tetsuya; Ogata, Hiroaki; Nakane, Naoya; Namegawa, Kazunari; Sekiguchi, Shoutaro; Omura, Kaoru; Kurabuchi, Satoshi; Mitamura, Kuniko; Ikegawa, Shigeo; Raines, Jan; Hagey, Lee R; Hofmann, Alan F; Iida, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    Bile alcohols and bile acids from gallbladder bile of the Arapaima gigas, a large South American freshwater fish, were isolated by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The structures of the major isolated compounds were determined by electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance using (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectra. The novel bile salts identified were six variants of 2-hydroxy bile acids and bile alcohols in the 5α- and 5β-series, with 29% of all compounds having hydroxylation at C-2. Three C27 bile alcohols were present (as ester sulfates): (24ξ,25ξ)-5α-cholestan-2α,3α,7α,12α,24,26-hexol; (25ξ)-5β-cholestan-2β,3α,7α,12α,26,27-hexol, and (25ξ)-5α-cholestan-2α,3α,7α,12α,26,27-hexol. A single C27 bile acid was identified: (25ξ)-2α,3α,7α,12α-tetrahydroxy-5α-cholestan-26-oic acid, present as its taurine conjugate. Two novel C24 bile acids were identified: the 2α-hydroxy derivative of allochenodeoxycholic acid and the 2β-hydroxy derivative of cholic acid, both occurring as taurine conjugates. These studies extend previous work in establishing the natural occurrence of novel 2α- and 2β-hydroxy-C24 and C27 bile acids as well as C27 bile alcohols in both the normal (5β) as well as the (5α) "allo" A/B-ring juncture. The bile salt profile of A. gigas appears to be unique among vertebrates. PMID:26768415

  19. Bile acid-induced virulence gene expression of Vibrio parahaemolyticus reveals a novel therapeutic potential for bile acid sequestrants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuyoshi Gotoh

    Full Text Available Vibrio parahaemolyticus, a bacterial pathogen, causes human gastroenteritis. A type III secretion system (T3SS2 encoded in pathogenicity island (Vp-PAI is the main contributor to enterotoxicity and expression of Vp-PAI encoded genes is regulated by two transcriptional regulators, VtrA and VtrB. However, a host-derived inducer for the Vp-PAI genes has not been identified. Here, we demonstrate that bile induces production of T3SS2-related proteins under osmotic conditions equivalent to those in the intestinal lumen. We also show that bile induces vtrA-mediated vtrB transcription. Transcriptome analysis of bile-responsive genes revealed that bile strongly induces expression of Vp-PAI genes in a vtrA-dependent manner. The inducing activity of bile was diminished by treatment with bile acid sequestrant cholestyramine. Finally, we demonstrate an in vivo protective effect of cholestyramine on enterotoxicity and show that similar protection is observed in infection with a different type of V. parahaemolyticus or with non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae strains of vibrios carrying the same kind of T3SS. In summary, these results provide an insight into how bacteria, through the ingenious action of Vp-PAI genes, can take advantage of an otherwise hostile host environment. The results also reveal a new therapeutic potential for widely used bile acid sequestrants in enteric bacterial infections.

  20. Effect of bile salts and bile acids on human gastric mucosal epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yinxue Song; Jun Gong

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To explore the effect of bile salt and bile acid on cultured eternalized human gastric mucosa epithelium GES-1 cells.Methods:Cultured eternalized human gastric mucosa epithelium GES-1 cells were treated with media containing 6 different kinds of bile salts and 3 different kinds of bile acids and their mixture with different concentrations: GCDC(glycochenodeoxycholate), GDC (glycodeoxycholate), GC(glycocholate), TCDC(taurochenodeoxycholate), TDC(taurodeoxycholate), TC (taurocholate), LCA (lithocholicacid), CA(cholic acid), DCA(deoxycholic acid)(50 μ mol/L,250 μ mol/L,500 μ mol/L, 1000 μ mol/L), DY(mixture of bile salts) and DS(mixture of bile acids)(250 μ mol/L,500 μ mol/L,1000 μ mol/L,1500 μ mol/L, 2000 μ mol/L), in comparison with thecontrol group(in normal media without bile salts and bile acids).Cell proliferation was assessed by MTT(3-[4,5-Dimethylthiaolyl]-2,5- diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide) assay for 72 hours with different concentrations and the apoptotic cells were assayed by flow cytometry (FCM) with Annex V-FITC conjugated with propidium iodide(PI) staining for 24 hours with different concentrations(1500,2000 μ mol/L).Results:There was no significant difference in morphology and cell proliferation in GC group after 24-72 h.Low concentration(50 μ mol/L) of GCDC, GDC, TCDC, TDC and TC accelerated gastric epithelial cell growth in a dosage-time dependent manner.At middle concentration (250-500 μ mol/L), it showed positive effect after 24-48 h, while negative effect after 72 h.At high concentration(1000 μ tool/L), it accelerated gastric epithelial cell growth after 24h and show consistent inhibition even leading to necrosis after 48-72 h.LCA and CA showed a positive effect on the concentration of 50 μ mol/L after 24-72 h, while 250-1000 It mol/L showed a trend towards apoptosis after 24-72 h.At 50-500 μ mol/L, DCA showed proliferation after 24 h and apoptosis after 48-72 h, but showed necrosis after 24-72 h at 1000 μ moiFL.DY and DS

  1. Cholesterol and bile acids regulate cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase expression at the transcriptional level in culture and in transgenic mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Ramirez, M.I.; Karaoglu, D; Haro, D; Barillas, C; Bashirzadeh, R; Gil, G.

    1994-01-01

    Cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase (7 alpha-hydroxylase) is the rate-limiting enzyme in bile acid biosynthesis. It is subject to a feedback control, whereby high levels of bile acids suppress its activity, and cholesterol exerts a positive control. It has been suggested that posttranscriptional control plays a major part in that regulation. We have studied the mechanisms by which cholesterol and bile acids regulate expression of the 7 alpha-hydroxylase gene and found it to be solely at the trans...

  2. Metabolism of Cholesterol and Bile Acids by the Gut Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Gérard

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The human gastro-intestinal tract hosts a complex and diverse microbial community, whose collective genetic coding capacity vastly exceeds that of the human genome. As a consequence, the gut microbiota produces metabolites from a large range of molecules that host’s enzymes are not able to convert. Among these molecules, two main classes of steroids, cholesterol and bile acids, denote two different examples of bacterial metabolism in the gut. Therefore, cholesterol is mainly converted into coprostanol, a non absorbable sterol which is excreted in the feces. Moreover, this conversion occurs in a part of the human population only. Conversely, the primary bile acids (cholic and chenodeoxycholic acids are converted to over twenty different secondary bile acid metabolites by the gut microbiota. The main bile salt conversions, which appear in the gut of the whole human population, include deconjugation, oxidation and epimerization of hydroxyl groups at C3, C7 and C12, 7-dehydroxylation, esterification and desulfatation. If the metabolisms of cholesterol and bile acids by the gut microbiota are known for decades, their consequences on human health and disease are poorly understood and only start to be considered.

  3. Bile acids as endogenous etiologic agents in gastrointestinal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Harris Bernstein; Carol Bernstein; Claire M Payne; Katerina Dvorak

    2009-01-01

    Bile acids are implicated as etiologic agents in cancer of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, including cancer of the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, liver, biliary tract, pancreas and colon/rectum. Deleterious effects of bile acid exposure, likely related to carcinogenesis,include: induction of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species; induction of DNA damage; stimulation of mutation; induction of apoptosis in the short term,and selection for apoptosis resistance in the long term.These deleterious effects have, so far, been reported most consistently in relation to esophageal and colorectal cancer, but also to some extent in relation to cancer of other organs. In addition, evidence is reviewed for an association of increased bile acid exposure with cancer risk in human populations, in specific human genetic conditions, and in animal experiments. A model for the role of bile acids in GI carcinogenesis is presented from a Darwinian perspective that offers an explanation for how the observed effects of bile acids on cells contribute to cancer development.

  4. Gelation of self-assembed bile acid-PEG conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandman, Satu; Le Devedec, Frantz; Zhu, X. X.

    2012-02-01

    The aggregation of macromolecules and low-molar-mass compounds into elongated self-assemblies such as wormlike micelles, fibers, or tubules increases the viscosity of the solutions and often leads to gelation due to network formation, even in organic solvents. Such one-dimensional nanostructures are promising candidates for drug delivery vehicles, packing materials for separation, templates for metal nanowires, biocides, and photo- or biocatalysis. An interesting group of compounds capable of this type of self-organization are bile acids, which are endogeneous steroids known to form gels at high concentrations and appropriate pH conditions. Grafting poly(ethylene oxide) on bile acids via anionic polymerization brings along thermoresponsiveness represented by lower critical solution temperature (LCST), while self-assembling occurs below another threshold temperature leading to a gelation at high concentrations, as shown by rheological experiments. The latter transition is assigned to the nanotube formation of pegylated bile acids, visualized by electron microscopy.

  5. Bile acid nuclear receptor FXR and digestive system diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Ding

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Bile acids (BAs are not only digestive surfactants but also important cell signaling molecules, which stimulate several signaling pathways to regulate some important biological processes. The bile-acid-activated nuclear receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR, plays a pivotal role in regulating bile acid, lipid and glucose homeostasis as well as in regulating the inflammatory responses, barrier function and prevention of bacterial translocation in the intestinal tract. As expected, FXR is involved in the pathophysiology of a wide range of diseases of gastrointestinal tract, including inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer and type 2 diabetes. In this review, we discuss current knowledge of the roles of FXR in physiology of the digestive system and the related diseases. Better understanding of the roles of FXR in digestive system will accelerate the development of FXR ligands/modulators for the treatment of digestive system diseases.

  6. SK&F 97426-A: a novel bile acid sequestrant with higher affinities and slower dissociation rates for bile acids in vitro than cholestyramine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, G M; Alston, D R; Hickey, D M; Jaxa-Chamiec, A A; Whittaker, C M; Haynes, C; Glen, A; Blanchard, S; Cresswell, S R; Suckling, K E

    1997-01-01

    SK&F 97426-A is a novel bile acid sequestrant that is threefold more potent than cholestyramine at increasing bile acid excretion in the hamster. SK&F 97426-A is a quaternary alkylammonium polymethacrylate that was selected for comparison with cholestyramine in vivo because of its superior in vitro bile acid binding properties. Association, dissociation, affinity, and capacity experiments were performed under physiologically relevant conditions with the most abundant bile acids found in human bile. The bile acids came to equilibrium with SK&F 97426-A and cholestyramine within approximately 30 min and 6 min, respectively. SK&F 97426-A and cholestyramine had similar capacities for all the bile acids (between 2.5 and 4 mmol/g) and both had similar, very high affinities and slow dissociation rates for the dihydroxy bile acids. However, SK&F 97426-A had much higher affinities for the trihydroxy bile acids glycocholic acid and taurocholic acid than did cholestyramine. Dissociation of glycocholic acid and taurocholic acid from SK&F 97426-A was also much slower (27 and 25%, respectively, dissociated after 60 min) than from cholestyramine (89 and 84%, respectively, dissociated after 60 min). The higher affinities and slower dissociation rates of the trihydroxy bile acids for and from SK&F 97426-A probably account for the increased potency of SK&F 97426-A over cholestyramine in vivo.

  7. Obeticholic acid, a synthetic bile acid agonist of the farnesoid X receptor, attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    OpenAIRE

    Peggy P. Ho; Steinman, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids bind to the nuclear hormone receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR). This bile acid–FXR interaction regulates bile acid synthesis, transport, and cholesterol metabolism. Recently, drugs targeting FXR activation have been reported to treat both liver and intestinal inflammatory diseases in both animal models and human clinical trials. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system and serves as an animal model for ...

  8. A prospective study of faecal bile acids and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, A; Hill, M J; Thompson, M H; Owen, R W; Williams, R E; Meade, T W; Wilkes, H; Griffin, M

    2000-10-01

    A prospective study of 7079 people aged 45-74 recruited through general practices in South Wales, Herefordshire and Edinburgh, Scotland was undertaken to test the hypothesis that faecal bile acids are implicated in the causation of large bowel cancer. The population was recruited between 1974 and 1980 and the response rate for stool collection was 67%. Bile acid analyses were performed on those cases that presented by 1990. It was decided in advance to examine the hypothesis separately for left- and right-sided bowel cancer because of known epidemiological differences between the two sites and to exclude the cases presenting within 2 years of the stool sample from the analyses because the cancer could have been present at recruitment and might have possibly affected faecal bile acid concentrations. Each case (n = 51 left-sided and 8 right-sided) was matched with three controls by age (within 5 years), sex, place of residence and time of providing the stool sample (within 3 months). Statistical analyses using conditional logistic regression showed no significant differences between the left-sided cases and controls for any of the concentrations of individual bile acids, total bile acid concentrations, faecal neutral steroids, percentage bacterial conversion and the ratio of lithocholic acid to deoxycholic acid concentrations. There was a statistically significant (P = 0.021) association of the presence of chenodeoxycholic acid (5/8 samples) in the right-sided cases compared with the controls (3/23), odds ratio 6.26 (95% confidence interval 1.19, 32.84). A high proportion of primary bile acids has also been found in other studies of patients with a genetic predisposition to proximal bowel cancer, however this pattern may also occur in low risk groups, such as Indian vegetarians, suggesting that they may predispose to right-sided bowel cancer only in the presence of other, as yet unknown factors. If bile acids are involved in the causation of large bowel cancer, they

  9. Bile Acids Trigger GLP-1 Release Predominantly by Accessing Basolaterally Located G Protein-Coupled Bile Acid Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brighton, Cheryl A; Rievaj, Juraj; Kuhre, Rune E; Glass, Leslie L; Schoonjans, Kristina; Holst, Jens J; Gribble, Fiona M; Reimann, Frank

    2015-11-01

    Bile acids are well-recognized stimuli of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. This action has been attributed to activation of the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor GPBAR1 (TGR5), although other potential bile acid sensors include the nuclear farnesoid receptor and the apical sodium-coupled bile acid transporter ASBT. The aim of this study was to identify pathways important for GLP-1 release and to determine whether bile acids target their receptors on GLP-1-secreting L-cells from the apical or basolateral compartment. Using transgenic mice expressing fluorescent sensors specifically in L-cells, we observed that taurodeoxycholate (TDCA) and taurolithocholate (TLCA) increased intracellular cAMP and Ca(2+). In primary intestinal cultures, TDCA was a more potent GLP-1 secretagogue than taurocholate (TCA) and TLCA, correlating with a stronger Ca(2+) response to TDCA. Using small-volume Ussing chambers optimized for measuring GLP-1 secretion, we found that both a GPBAR1 agonist and TDCA stimulated GLP-1 release better when applied from the basolateral than from the luminal direction and that luminal TDCA was ineffective when intestinal tissue was pretreated with an ASBT inhibitor. ASBT inhibition had no significant effect in nonpolarized primary cultures. Studies in the perfused rat gut confirmed that vascularly administered TDCA was more effective than luminal TDCA. Intestinal primary cultures and Ussing chamber-mounted tissues from GPBAR1-knockout mice did not secrete GLP-1 in response to either TLCA or TDCA. We conclude that the action of bile acids on GLP-1 secretion is predominantly mediated by GPBAR1 located on the basolateral L-cell membrane, suggesting that stimulation of gut hormone secretion may include postabsorptive mechanisms. PMID:26280129

  10. Bile Acids Trigger GLP-1 Release Predominantly by Accessing Basolaterally Located G Protein–Coupled Bile Acid Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brighton, Cheryl A.; Rievaj, Juraj; Kuhre, Rune E.; Glass, Leslie L.; Schoonjans, Kristina; Holst, Jens J.

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are well-recognized stimuli of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. This action has been attributed to activation of the G protein–coupled bile acid receptor GPBAR1 (TGR5), although other potential bile acid sensors include the nuclear farnesoid receptor and the apical sodium-coupled bile acid transporter ASBT. The aim of this study was to identify pathways important for GLP-1 release and to determine whether bile acids target their receptors on GLP-1–secreting L-cells from the apical or basolateral compartment. Using transgenic mice expressing fluorescent sensors specifically in L-cells, we observed that taurodeoxycholate (TDCA) and taurolithocholate (TLCA) increased intracellular cAMP and Ca2+. In primary intestinal cultures, TDCA was a more potent GLP-1 secretagogue than taurocholate (TCA) and TLCA, correlating with a stronger Ca2+ response to TDCA. Using small-volume Ussing chambers optimized for measuring GLP-1 secretion, we found that both a GPBAR1 agonist and TDCA stimulated GLP-1 release better when applied from the basolateral than from the luminal direction and that luminal TDCA was ineffective when intestinal tissue was pretreated with an ASBT inhibitor. ASBT inhibition had no significant effect in nonpolarized primary cultures. Studies in the perfused rat gut confirmed that vascularly administered TDCA was more effective than luminal TDCA. Intestinal primary cultures and Ussing chamber–mounted tissues from GPBAR1-knockout mice did not secrete GLP-1 in response to either TLCA or TDCA. We conclude that the action of bile acids on GLP-1 secretion is predominantly mediated by GPBAR1 located on the basolateral L-cell membrane, suggesting that stimulation of gut hormone secretion may include postabsorptive mechanisms. PMID:26280129

  11. Hepatocyte transplantation in bile salt export pump-deficient mice: selective growth advantage of donor hepatocytes under bile acid stress

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Huey-Ling; Chen, Hui-Ling; Yuan, Ray-Hwang; Wu, Shang-Hsin; Chen, Ya-Hui; Chien, Chin-Sung; Chou, Shi-Ping; Wang, Renxue; Ling, Victor; Chang, Mei-Hwei

    2012-01-01

    The bile salt export pump (Bsep) mediates the hepatic excretion of bile acids, and its deficiency causes progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis. The current study aimed to induce bile acid stress in Bsep −/− mice and to test the efficacy of hepatocyte transplantation in this disease model. We fed Bsep −/− and wild-type mice cholic acid (CA) or ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). Both CA and UDCA caused cholestasis and apoptosis in the Bsep −/− mouse liver. Wild-type mice had minimal liver inj...

  12. Bile acid derivatives as ligands of the farnesoid x receptor: molecular determinants for bile acid binding and receptor modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioiello, Antimo; Cerra, Bruno; Mostarda, Serena; Guercini, Chiara; Pellicciari, Roberto; Macchiarulo, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are a peculiar class of steroidal compounds that never cease to amaze. From being simple detergents with a primary role in aiding the absorption of fats and fat-soluble vitamins, bile acids are now widely considered as crucial hormones endowed with genomic and non-genomic functions that are mediated by their interaction with several proteins including the nuclear receptor Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR). Taking advantages of the peculiar properties of bile acids in interacting with the FXR receptor, several biliary derivatives have been synthesized and tested as FXR ligands. The availability of these compounds has contributed to characterize the receptor from a structural, patho-physiological and therapeutic standpoint. Among these, obeticholic acid is a first-in-class FXR agonist that is demonstrating hepatoprotective effects upon FXR activation in patients with liver diseases such as primary biliary cirrhosis and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. This review provides an historical overview of the rationale behind the discovery of obeticholic acid and chemical tools generated to depict the molecular features and bio-pharmacological relevance of the FXR receptor, as well as to summarize structure-activity relationships of bile acid-based FXR ligands so far reported. PMID:25388535

  13. In Vitro Binding Capacity of Bile Acids by Defatted Corn Protein Hydrolysate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Claver Irakoze

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Defatted corn protein was digested using five different proteases, Alcalase, Trypsin, Neutrase, Protamex and Flavourzyme, in order to produce bile acid binding peptides. Bile acid binding capacity was analyzed in vitro using peptides from different proteases of defatted corn hydrolysate. Some crystalline bile acids like sodium glycocholate, sodium cholate and sodium deoxycholate were individually tested using HPLC to see which enzymes can release more peptides with high bile acid binding capacity. Peptides from Flavourzyme defatted corn hydrolysate exhibited significantly (p

  14. In Vitro Binding Capacity of Bile Acids by Defatted Corn Protein Hydrolysate

    OpenAIRE

    Pierre Claver Irakoze; Jauricque Ursulla Kongo-Dia-Moukala; Hui Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Defatted corn protein was digested using five different proteases, Alcalase, Trypsin, Neutrase, Protamex and Flavourzyme, in order to produce bile acid binding peptides. Bile acid binding capacity was analyzed in vitro using peptides from different proteases of defatted corn hydrolysate. Some crystalline bile acids like sodium glycocholate, sodium cholate and sodium deoxycholate were individually tested using HPLC to see which enzymes can release more peptides with high bile acid binding capa...

  15. Effect of bile acid sequestrants on glycaemic control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Sonne, David Peick; Mikkelsen, Kristian Hallundbæk;

    2012-01-01

    In addition to the lipid-lowering effect of bile acid sequestrants (BASs), they also lower blood glucose and, therefore, could be beneficial in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Three oral BASs are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 88(4):1833-41. Citation on PubMed Clayton PT. Disorders of bile acid synthesis. J Inherit Metab ... 13. Review. Citation on PubMed Subramaniam P, Clayton PT, Portmann BC, Mieli-Vergani G, Hadzić N. Variable ...

  17. Bile acid malabsorption in patients with chronic diarrhoea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildt, S; Nørby Rasmussen, S; Lysgård Madsen, Jan;

    2003-01-01

    Bile acid malabsorption (BAM), a cause of chronic diarrhoea, can be diagnosed by the SeHCAT test. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of SeHCAT testing by assessing the extent of BAM and describing the clinical characteristics in a group of patients with chronic diarrhoea...

  18. Individual bile acids have differential effects on bile acid signaling in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Peizhen; Rockwell, Cheryl E; Cui, Julia Yue; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2015-02-15

    Bile acids (BAs) are known to regulate BA synthesis and transport by the farnesoid X receptor in the liver (FXR-SHP) and intestine (FXR-Fgf15). However, the relative importance of individual BAs in regulating these processes is not known. Therefore, mice were fed various doses of five individual BAs, including cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxoycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA), and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in their diets at various concentrations for one week to increase the concentration of one BA in the enterohepatic circulation. The mRNA of BA synthesis and transporting genes in liver and ileum were quantified. In the liver, the mRNA of SHP, which is the prototypical target gene of FXR, increased in mice fed all concentrations of BAs. In the ileum, the mRNA of the intestinal FXR target gene Fgf15 was increased at lower doses and to a higher extent by CA and DCA than by CDCA and LCA. Cyp7a1, the rate-limiting enzyme in BA synthesis, was decreased more by CA and DCA than CDCA and LCA. Cyp8b1, the enzyme that 12-hydroxylates BAs and is thus responsible for the synthesis of CA, was decreased much more by CA and DCA than CDCA and LCA. Surprisingly, neither a decrease in the conjugated BA uptake transporter (Ntcp) nor increase in BA efflux transporter (Bsep) was observed by FXR activation, but an increase in the cholesterol efflux transporter (Abcg5/Abcg8) was observed with FXR activation. Thus in conclusion, CA and DCA are more potent FXR activators than CDCA and LCA when fed to mice, and thus they are more effective in decreasing the expression of the rate limiting gene in BA synthesis Cyp7a1 and the 12-hydroxylation of BAs Cyp8b1, and are also more effective in increasing the expression of Abcg5/Abcg8, which is responsible for biliary cholesterol excretion. However, feeding BAs do not alter the mRNA or protein levels of Ntcp or Bsep, suggesting that the uptake or efflux of BAs is not regulated by FXR at physiological and

  19. Impact of Dry Solids and Bile Acid Concentrations on Bile Acid Binding Capacity of Extruded Oat Cereals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extruded breakfast cereals (EBC), processed from two oat lines, N979-5-2-4 (N979) and ‘Jim’, with beta-glucan concentrations of 8.7 and 4.9%, respectively, were used to determine the impact of dry solids (DS) and bile acid (BA) concentrations on in vitro BA binding efficiency. A full fractional fact...

  20. Bile acid-induced necrosis in primary human hepatocytes and in patients with obstructive cholestasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolbright, Benjamin L.; Dorko, Kenneth [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Antoine, Daniel J.; Clarke, Joanna I. [MRC Centre for Drug Safety Science, Department of Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Gholami, Parviz [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Li, Feng [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Forster, Jameson [Department of Surgery, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Fan, Fang [Department of Pathology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Park, B. Kevin [MRC Centre for Drug Safety Science, Department of Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Hagenbuch, Bruno [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Olyaee, Mojtaba [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Jaeschke, Hartmut, E-mail: hjaeschke@kumc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Accumulation of bile acids is a major mediator of cholestatic liver injury. Recent studies indicate bile acid composition between humans and rodents is dramatically different, as humans have a higher percent of glycine conjugated bile acids and increased chenodeoxycholate content, which increases the hydrophobicity index of bile acids. This increase may lead to direct toxicity that kills hepatocytes, and promotes inflammation. To address this issue, this study assessed how pathophysiological concentrations of bile acids measured in cholestatic patients affected primary human hepatocytes. Individual bile acid levels were determined in serum and bile by UPLC/QTOFMS in patients with extrahepatic cholestasis with, or without, concurrent increases in serum transaminases. Bile acid levels increased in serum of patients with liver injury, while biliary levels decreased, implicating infarction of the biliary tracts. To assess bile acid-induced toxicity in man, primary human hepatocytes were treated with relevant concentrations, derived from patient data, of the model bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC). Treatment with GCDC resulted in necrosis with no increase in apoptotic parameters. This was recapitulated by treatment with biliary bile acid concentrations, but not serum concentrations. Marked elevations in serum full-length cytokeratin-18, high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), and acetylated HMGB1 confirmed inflammatory necrosis in injured patients; only modest elevations in caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 were observed. These data suggest human hepatocytes are more resistant to human-relevant bile acids than rodent hepatocytes, and die through necrosis when exposed to bile acids. These mechanisms of cholestasis in humans are fundamentally different to mechanisms observed in rodent models. - Highlights: • Cholestatic liver injury is due to cytoplasmic bile acid accumulation in hepatocytes. • Primary human hepatocytes are resistant to BA-induced injury

  1. Bile acid-induced necrosis in primary human hepatocytes and in patients with obstructive cholestasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accumulation of bile acids is a major mediator of cholestatic liver injury. Recent studies indicate bile acid composition between humans and rodents is dramatically different, as humans have a higher percent of glycine conjugated bile acids and increased chenodeoxycholate content, which increases the hydrophobicity index of bile acids. This increase may lead to direct toxicity that kills hepatocytes, and promotes inflammation. To address this issue, this study assessed how pathophysiological concentrations of bile acids measured in cholestatic patients affected primary human hepatocytes. Individual bile acid levels were determined in serum and bile by UPLC/QTOFMS in patients with extrahepatic cholestasis with, or without, concurrent increases in serum transaminases. Bile acid levels increased in serum of patients with liver injury, while biliary levels decreased, implicating infarction of the biliary tracts. To assess bile acid-induced toxicity in man, primary human hepatocytes were treated with relevant concentrations, derived from patient data, of the model bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC). Treatment with GCDC resulted in necrosis with no increase in apoptotic parameters. This was recapitulated by treatment with biliary bile acid concentrations, but not serum concentrations. Marked elevations in serum full-length cytokeratin-18, high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), and acetylated HMGB1 confirmed inflammatory necrosis in injured patients; only modest elevations in caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 were observed. These data suggest human hepatocytes are more resistant to human-relevant bile acids than rodent hepatocytes, and die through necrosis when exposed to bile acids. These mechanisms of cholestasis in humans are fundamentally different to mechanisms observed in rodent models. - Highlights: • Cholestatic liver injury is due to cytoplasmic bile acid accumulation in hepatocytes. • Primary human hepatocytes are resistant to BA-induced injury

  2. Differentiation of various traditional Chinese medicines derived from animal bile and gallstone: simultaneous determination of bile acids by liquid chromatography coupled with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Xue; Ye, Min; Pan, De-lin; Miao, Wen-juan; Xiang, Cheng; Han, Jian; Guo, De-an

    2011-01-01

    Animal biles and gallstones are popularly used in traditional Chinese medicines, and bile acids are their major bioactive constituents. Some of these medicines, like cow-bezoar, are very expensive, and may be adulterated or even replaced by less expensive but similar species. Due to poor ultraviolet absorbance and structural similarity of bile acids, effective technology for species differentiation and quality control of bile-based Chinese medicines is still lacking. In this study, a rapid and reliable method was established for the simultaneous qualitative and quantitative analysis of 18 bile acids, including 6 free steroids (cholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid, deoxycholic acid, lithocholic acid, hyodeoxycholic acid, and ursodeoxycholic acid) and their corresponding glycine conjugates and taurine conjugates, by using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). This method was used to analyze six bile-based Chinese medicines: bear bile, cattle bile, pig bile, snake bile, cow-bezoar, and artificial cow-bezoar. Samples were separated on an Atlantis dC₁₈ column and were eluted with methanol-acetonitrile-water containing ammonium acetate. The mass spectrometer was monitored in the negative electrospray ionization mode. Total ion currents of the samples were compared for species differentiation, and the contents of bile acids were determined by monitoring specific ion pairs in a selected reaction monitoring program. All 18 bile acids showed good linearity (r² > 0.993) in a wide dynamic range of up to 2000-fold, using dehydrocholic acid as the internal standard. Different animal biles could be explicitly distinguished by their major characteristic bile acids: tauroursodeoxycholic acid and taurochenodeoxycholic acid for bear bile, glycocholic acid, cholic acid and taurocholic acid for cattle bile, glycohyodeoxycholic acid and glycochenodeoxycholic acid for pig bile, and taurocholic acid for snake bile. Furthermore, cattle bile, cow

  3. Potency of individual bile acids to regulate bile acid synthesis and transport genes in primary human hepatocyte cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Lu, Hong; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Lei, Xiaohong; Cui, Julia Yue; Ellis, Ewa; Strom, Stephen C; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2014-10-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are known to regulate their own homeostasis, but the potency of individual bile acids is not known. This study examined the effects of cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) on expression of BA synthesis and transport genes in human primary hepatocyte cultures. Hepatocytes were treated with the individual BAs at 10, 30, and 100μM for 48 h, and RNA was extracted for real-time PCR analysis. For the classic pathway of BA synthesis, BAs except for UDCA markedly suppressed CYP7A1 (70-95%), the rate-limiting enzyme of bile acid synthesis, but only moderately (35%) down-regulated CYP8B1 at a high concentration of 100μM. BAs had minimal effects on mRNA of two enzymes of the alternative pathway of BA synthesis, namely CYP27A1 and CYP7B1. BAs increased the two major target genes of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), namely the small heterodimer partner (SHP) by fourfold, and markedly induced fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) over 100-fold. The BA uptake transporter Na(+)-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide was unaffected, whereas the efflux transporter bile salt export pump was increased 15-fold and OSTα/β were increased 10-100-fold by BAs. The expression of the organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B3 (OATP1B3; sixfold), ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter G5 (ABCG5; sixfold), multidrug associated protein-2 (MRP2; twofold), and MRP3 (threefold) were also increased, albeit to lesser degrees. In general, CDCA was the most potent and effective BA in regulating these genes important for BA homeostasis, whereas DCA and CA were intermediate, LCA the least, and UDCA ineffective.

  4. Perturbation of bile acid homeostasis is an early pathogenesis event of drug induced liver injury in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, Makoto; Miyake, Manami; Sato, Hiroko; Masutomi, Naoya; Tsutsui, Naohisa [Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma Corporation, Kisarazu, Chiba 292-0818 (Japan); Adam, Klaus-Peter; Alexander, Danny C.; Lawton, Kay A.; Milburn, Michael V.; Ryals, John A.; Wulff, Jacob E. [Metabolon Inc., 617 Davis Drive, Suite 400, Durham, NC 27713 (United States); Guo, Lining, E-mail: lguo@metabolon.com [Metabolon Inc., 617 Davis Drive, Suite 400, Durham, NC 27713 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    liver's ability to uptake bile acid from the circulation. ► Oxidative stress induced by the toxins altered bile acid biosynthesis in the liver. ► Selected bile acids in the plasma and urine could be sensitive DILI biomarkers.

  5. Bile acid receptors and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    With the high prevalence of obesity, diabetes, and otherfeatures of the metabolic syndrome in United States,nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has inevitablybecome a very prevalent chronic liver disease and isnow emerging as one of the leading indications for livertransplantation. Insulin resistance and derangementof lipid metabolism, accompanied by activation ofthe pro-inflammatory response and fibrogenesis, areessential pathways in the development of the moreclinically significant form of NAFLD, known as nonalcoholicsteatohepatitis (NASH). Recent advances inthe functional characterization of bile acid receptors,such as farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and transmembraneG protein-coupled receptor (TGR) 5, have providedfurther insight in the pathophysiology of NASH andhave led to the development of potential therapeutictargets for NAFLD and NASH. Beyond maintaining bileacid metabolism, FXR and TGR5 also regulate lipidmetabolism, maintain glucose homeostasis, increaseenergy expenditure, and ameliorate hepatic inflammation.These intriguing features have been exploitedto develop bile acid analogues to target pathways inNAFLD and NASH pathogenesis. This review providesa brief overview of the pathogenesis of NAFLD andNASH, and then delves into the biological functions ofbile acid receptors, particularly with respect to NASHpathogenesis, with a description of the associatedexperimental data, and, finally, we discuss the prospectsof bile acid analogues in the treatment of NAFLD andNASH.

  6. Pantothenic acid biosynthesis in zymomonas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Luan; Tomb, Jean-Francois; Viitanen, Paul V.

    2014-07-01

    Zymomonas is unable to synthesize pantothenic acid and requires this essential vitamin in growth medium. Zymomonas strains transformed with an operon for expression of 2-dehydropantoate reductase and aspartate 1-decarboxylase were able to grow in medium lacking pantothenic acid. These strains may be used for ethanol production without pantothenic acid supplementation in seed culture and fermentation media.

  7. Optimum bile acid treatment for rapid gall stone dissolution.

    OpenAIRE

    Jazrawi, R P; Pigozzi, M G; Galatola, G; Lanzini, A; Northfield, T. C.

    1992-01-01

    To determine the optimum bile acid regimen for rapid gall stone dissolution, 48 gall stone patients were divided into four groups of 12 according to stone diameter and were randomly allocated to receive one of four treatment regimens: bedtime or mealtime chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA, 12 mg/kg/day) and bedtime or mealtime ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA, 12 mg/kg/day). An additional 10 patients treated with a combination of CDCA plus UDCA (each 6 mg/kg/day) at bedtime were matched with the 10 patien...

  8. Analysis of ileal sodium/bile acid cotransporter and related nuclear receptor genes in a family with multiple cases of idiopathic bile acid malabsorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marco Montagnani; Anna Abrahamsson; Cecilia G(a)lman; G(o)sta Eggertsen; Hanns-Ulrich Marschall; Elisa Ravaioli; Curt Einarsson; Paul A Dawson

    2006-01-01

    The etiology of most cases of idiopathic bile acid malabsorption (TBAM) is unknown. Tn this study, a Swedish family with bile acid malabsorption in three consecutive generations was screened for mutations in the ileal apical sodium-bile acid cotransporter gene (ASBT; gene symbol, SLC10A2) and in the genes for several of the nuclear receptors known to be important for ASBT expression: the farnesoid X receptor (FXR)and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα). The patients presented with a clinical history of idiopathic chronic watery diarrhea, which was responsive to cholestyramine treatment and consistent with IBAM. Bile acid absorption was determined using 75Se-homocholic acid taurine(SeHCAT); bile acid synthesis was estimated by measuring the plasma levels of 7α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4). The ASBT,FXR, and PPARα genes in the affected and unaffected family members were analyzed using single stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP), denaturing HPLC,and direct sequencing. No ASBT mutations were identified and the ASBT gene did not segregate with the bile acid malabsorption phenotype. Similarly, no mutations or polymorphisms were identified in the FXR or PPARα genes associated with the bile acid malabsorption phenotype. These studies indicate that the intestinal bile acid malabsorption in these patients cannot be attributed to defects in ASBT. In the absence of apparent ileal disease, alternative explanations such as accelerated transit through the small intestine may be responsible for the IBAM.

  9. Hormesis in Cholestatic Liver Disease; Preconditioning with Low Bile Acid Concentrations Protects against Bile Acid-Induced Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Verhaag, Esther M.; Manon Buist-Homan; Martijn Koehorst; Groen, Albert K; Han Moshage; Klaas Nico Faber

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cholestasis is characterized by accumulation of bile acids and inflammation, causing hepatocellular damage. Still, liver damage markers are highest in acute cholestasis and drop when this condition becomes chronic, indicating that hepatocytes adapt towards the hostile environment. This may be explained by a hormetic response in hepatocytes that limits cell death during cholestasis. Aim To investigate the mechanisms that underlie the hormetic response that protect hepatocytes agai...

  10. Role of bile acids in carcinogenesis of pancreatic cancer: An old topic with new perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Hui-Yi; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-09-01

    The role of bile acids in colorectal cancer has been well documented, but their role in pancreatic cancer remains unclear. In this review, we examined the risk factors of pancreatic cancer. We found that bile acids are associated with most of these factors. Alcohol intake, smoking, and a high-fat diet all lead to high secretion of bile acids, and bile acid metabolic dysfunction is a causal factor of gallstones. An increase in secretion of bile acids, in addition to a long common channel, may result in bile acid reflux into the pancreatic duct and to the epithelial cells or acinar cells, from which pancreatic adenocarcinoma is derived. The final pathophysiological process is pancreatitis, which promotes dedifferentiation of acinar cells into progenitor duct-like cells. Interestingly, bile acids act as regulatory molecules in metabolism, affecting adipose tissue distribution, insulin sensitivity and triglyceride metabolism. As a result, bile acids are associated with three risk factors of pancreatic cancer: obesity, diabetes and hypertriglyceridemia. In the second part of this review, we summarize several studies showing that bile acids act as cancer promoters in gastrointestinal cancer. However, more question are raised than have been solved, and further oncological and physiological experiments are needed to confirm the role of bile acids in pancreatic cancer carcinogenesis. PMID:27672269

  11. Mutational Characterization of the Bile Acid Receptor TGR5 in Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hov, Johannes R.; Keitel, Verena; Laerdahl, Jon K.; Spomer, Lina; Ellinghaus, Eva; ElSharawy, Abdou; Melum, Espen; Boberg, Kirsten M.; Manke, Thomas; Balschun, Tobias; Schramm, Christoph; Bergquist, Annika; Weismueller, Tobias; Gotthardt, Daniel; Rust, Christian; Henckaerts, Liesbet; Onnie, Clive M.; Weersma, Rinse K.; Sterneck, Martina; Teufel, Andreas; Runz, Heiko; Stiehl, Adolf; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Vatn, Morten H.; Stokkers, Pieter C. F.; Vermeire, Severine; Mathew, Christopher G.; Lie, Benedicte A.; Beuers, Ulrich; Manns, Michael P.; Schreiber, Stefan; Schrumpf, Erik; Haeussinger, Dieter; Franke, Andre; Karlsen, Tom H.

    2010-01-01

    Background: TGR5, the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor 1 (GPBAR1), has been linked to inflammatory pathways as well as bile homeostasis, and could therefore be involved in primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) a chronic inflammatory bile duct disease. We aimed to extensively investigate TGR5 sequ

  12. Metformin interferes with bile acid homeostasis through AMPK-FXR crosstalk

    OpenAIRE

    Lien, Fleur; Berthier, Alexandre; Bouchaert, Emmanuel; Gheeraert, Céline; Alexandre, Jeremy; Porez, Geoffrey; Prawitt, Janne; Dehondt, Hélène; Ploton, Maheul; Colin, Sophie; Lucas, Anthony; Patrice, Alexandre; Pattou, François; Diemer, Hélène; Dorsselaer, Alain Van

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear bile acid receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is an important transcriptional regulator of bile acid, lipid, and glucose metabolism. FXR is highly expressed in the liver and intestine and controls the synthesis and enterohepatic circulation of bile acids. However, little is known about FXR-associated proteins that contribute to metabolic regulation. Here, we performed a mass spectrometry–based search for FXR-interacting proteins in human hepatoma cells and identified AMPK as a cor...

  13. Cheese intake lowers plasma cholesterol concentrations without increasing bile acid excretion

    OpenAIRE

    Hjerpsted, Julie Bousgaard; Dragsted, Lars Ove; Tholstrup, Tine

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cheese is a dairy product with high calcium content. It has been suggested that calcium intake may increase fecal excretion of bile acids that would cause a regeneration of bile acids from hepatic cholesterol and thereby result in a lowering of plasma cholesterol concentrations. We aimed to test this hypothesis by assessing bile acid and calcium concentrations in fecal samples from humans after intake of cheese and butter. Methods The study was a randomized, 2 × 6 weeks crossover, die...

  14. Suppression of the HPA Axis During Cholestasis Can Be Attributed to Hypothalamic Bile Acid Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillin, Matthew; Frampton, Gabriel; Quinn, Matthew; Divan, Ali; Grant, Stephanie; Patel, Nisha; Newell-Rogers, Karen; DeMorrow, Sharon

    2015-12-01

    Suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been shown to occur during cholestatic liver injury. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that in a model of cholestasis, serum bile acids gain entry into the brain via a leaky blood brain barrier and that hypothalamic bile acid content is increased. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to determine the effects of bile acid signaling on the HPA axis. The data presented show that HPA axis suppression during cholestatic liver injury, specifically circulating corticosterone levels and hypothalamic corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) expression, can be attenuated by administration of the bile acid sequestrant cholestyramine. Secondly, treatment of hypothalamic neurons with various bile acids suppressed CRH expression and secretion in vitro. However, in vivo HPA axis suppression was only evident after the central injection of the bile acids taurocholic acid or glycochenodeoxycholic acid but not the other bile acids studied. Furthermore, we demonstrate that taurocholic acid and glycochenodeoxycholic acid are exerting their effects on hypothalamic CRH expression after their uptake through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and subsequent activation of the glucocorticoid receptor. Taken together with previous studies, our data support the hypothesis that during cholestatic liver injury, bile acids gain entry into the brain, are transported into neurons through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and can activate the glucocorticoid receptor to suppress the HPA axis. These data also lend themselves to the broader hypothesis that bile acids may act as central modulators of hypothalamic peptides that may be altered during liver disease.

  15. Bile acid promotes liver regeneration via farnesoid X receptor signaling pathways in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Long; Yang, Yu; Qu, Yikun; Yang, Ting; Wang, Kaifeng; Liu, Weixin; Xia, Weibin

    2015-06-01

    Bile acids, which are synthesized from cholesterol in the hepatocytes of the liver, are amphipathic molecules with a steroid backbone. Studies have shown that bile acid exhibits important effects on liver regeneration. However, the mechanism underlying these effects remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of bile acid and the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) on hepatic regeneration and lipid metabolism. Rats were fed with 0.2% bile acid or glucose for 7 days and then subjected to a 50 or 70% hepatectomy. Hepatic regeneration rate, serum and liver levels of bile acid, and expression of FXR and Caveolin‑1, were detected at 24, 48 or 72 h following hepatectomy. The expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in the liver was measured using immunohistochemistry at the end of the study. Hepatocytes isolated from rats were treated with bile acid, glucose, FXR agonist and FXR antagonist, separately or in combination. Lipid metabolism, the expression of members of the FXR signaling pathway and energy metabolism‑related factors were measured using ELISA kits or western blotting. Bile acid significantly increased the hepatic regeneration rate and the expression of FXR, Caveolin‑1 and PCNA. Levels of total cholesterol and high density lipoprotein were increased in bile acid‑ or FXR agonist‑treated hepatocytes in vitro. Levels of triglyceride, low density lipoprotein and free fatty acid were decreased. In addition, bile acid and FXR agonists increased the expression of bile salt export pump and small heterodimer partner, and downregulated the expression of apical sodium‑dependent bile acid transporter, Na+/taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide and cholesterol 7α‑hydroxylase. These results suggested that physiological concentrations of bile acid may promote liver regeneration via FXR signaling pathways, and may be associated with energy metabolism. PMID:25634785

  16. Effects of bile acids on proliferation and ultrastructural alteration of pancreatic cancer cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Wu; Yi Lüi; Bo Wang; Chang Liu; Zuo-Ren Wang,

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Pancreatic cancer in the head is frequently accompanied by jaundice and high bile acid level in serum. This study focused on the direct effects of bile acids on proliferation and ultrastructural alteration of pancreatic cancer.METHODS: Pancreatic cancer cell lines PANC-1, MIA PaCa2 and PGHAM-1 were explored in this study. The cell lines were cultured in media supplemented with certain bile acids,CA, DCA, LCA, TCDC, TDCA and GCA. Their influence on cell growth was measured with MTT assay after 72 h of incubation. Cell cycles of PANC-1 cells in 40 μM of bile acids media were analyzed by flow cytometry. Ultrastructural alteration of PANC-1 cells induced by DCA was observed using scanning and transmission electron microscope (SEM and TEM).RESULTS: At various concentrations of bile acids and incubation time, no enhanced effects of bile acids on cell proliferation were observed. Significant inhibitory effects were obtained in almost all media with bile acids. DCA and CA increased the percentage of G0+G1 phase cells, while GCA and TDCA elevated the S phase cell number. After 48 h of incubation in DCA medium, PANC-1 cells showed some structural damages such as loss of their microvilli and vacuolization of organelles in cytoplasm.CONCLUSION: Bile acids can reduce proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells due to their direct cytotoxicity. This result implies that elevation of bile acids in jaundiced serum may inhibit pancreatic cancer progression.

  17. Liquid crystal based biosensors for bile acid detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Sihui; Liang, Wenlang; Tanner, Colleen; Fang, Jiyu; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2013-03-01

    The concentration level of bile acids is a useful indicator for early diagnosis of liver diseases. The prevalent measurement method in detecting bile acids is the chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, which is precise yet expensive. Here we present a biosensor platform based on liquid crystal (LC) films for the detection of cholic acid (CA). This platform has the advantage of low cost, label-free, solution phase detection and simple analysis. In this platform, LC film of 4-Cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl (5CB) was hosted by a copper grid supported with a polyimide-coated glass substrate. By immersing into sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution, the LC film was coated with SDS which induced a homeotropic anchoring of 5CB. Addition of CA introduced competitive adsorption between CA and SDS at the interface, triggering a transition from homeotropic to homogeneous anchoring. The detection limit can be tuned by changing the pH value of the solution from 12uM to 170uM.

  18. Metformin protects rat hepatocytes against bile acid-induced apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titia E Woudenberg-Vrenken

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Metformin is used in the treatment of Diabetes Mellitus type II and improves liver function in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Metformin activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, the cellular energy sensor that is sensitive to changes in the AMP/ATP-ratio. AMPK is an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR. Both AMPK and mTOR are able to modulate cell death. AIM: To evaluate the effects of metformin on hepatocyte cell death. METHODS: Apoptotic cell death was induced in primary rat hepatocytes using either the bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA or TNFα in combination with actinomycin D (actD. AMPK, mTOR and phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K/Akt were inhibited using pharmacological inhibitors. Apoptosis and necrosis were quantified by caspase activation, acridine orange staining and Sytox green staining respectively. RESULTS: Metformin dose-dependently reduces GCDCA-induced apoptosis, even when added 2 hours after GCDCA, without increasing necrotic cell death. Metformin does not protect against TNFα/ActD-induced apoptosis. The protective effect of metformin is dependent on an intact PI3-kinase/Akt pathway, but does not require AMPK/mTOR-signaling. Metformin does not inhibit NF-κB activation. CONCLUSION: Metformin protects against bile acid-induced apoptosis and could be considered in the treatment of chronic liver diseases accompanied by inflammation.

  19. Comparison of Bile Acids and Acetaminophen Protein Adducts in Children and Adolescents with Acetaminophen Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Laura; Yan, Ke; Pence, Lisa; Simpson, Pippa; Bhattacharyya, Sudeepa; Gill, Pritmohinder; Letzig, Lynda; Kearns, Gregory; Beger, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics approaches have enabled the study of new mechanisms of liver injury in experimental models of drug toxicity. Disruption of bile acid homeostasis is a known mechanism of drug induced liver injury. The relationship of individual bile acids to indicators of oxidative drug metabolism (acetaminophen protein adducts) and liver injury was examined in children with acetaminophen overdose, hospitalized children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and children with no recent exposure to acetaminophen. Nine bile acids were quantified through targeted metabolomic analysis in the serum samples of the three groups. Bile acids were compared to serum levels of acetaminophen protein adducts and alanine aminotransferase. Glycodeoxycholic acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, and glycochenodeoxycholic acid were significantly increased in children with acetaminophen overdose compared to healthy controls. Among patients with acetaminophen overdose, bile acids were higher in subjects with acetaminophen protein adduct values > 1.0 nmol/mL and modest correlations were noted for three bile acids and acetaminophen protein adducts as follows: taurodeoxycholic acid (R=0.604; pacetaminophen than in healthy children with no recent acetaminophen exposure. Compared to bile acids, acetaminophen protein adducts more accurately discriminated among children with acetaminophen overdose, children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and healthy control subjects. In children with acetaminophen overdose, elevations of conjugated bile acids were associated with specific indicators of acetaminophen metabolism and non-specific indicators of liver injury.

  20. Changes of gastrointestinal myoelectric activity and bile acid pool size after cholecystectomy in guinea pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Mei Zhang; Lei Dong; Li-Na Liu; Bi-Xia Chang; Qian He; Qian Li

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the bile acid pool size after cholecystectomy whether or not correlated to the gastrointestinal migrating myoelectric complex (MMC) in guinea pigs.METHODS: Gallbladder motilities were assessed before cholecystectomy. Furthermore, we continuously monitored interdigestive gastrointestinal motilities using bipolar electrodes in conscious guinea pigs before and after surgery at 4 wk in standard diet group and high cholesterol diet (cholesterol gallstone) group. Total bile acid pool sizes were measured by isotope dilution method at meantime.RESULTS: After cholecystectomy, there were parallel falls in duration of phase Ⅰ, Ⅱ, Ⅲ and MMC cycle duration but increase in amplitude in the guinea pigs with normal gallbladder function, and in the guinea pigs with cholesterol stones. However, There were not significantly differences. On the other hand, the bile acid pool was definitely small in the GS guinea pigs compared to normal guinea pigs and became slightly smaller after cholecystectomy. Similarly, bile acid in gallbladder bile, fecal bile acid was slightly increased in GS guinea pigs after cholecystectomy, to the same degree as normal. These differences, however, were not significant.CONCLUSION: It is concluded that in the guinea pigs with normal gallbladder function, and in the guinea pigs with cholesterol stones: (1) Cholecystectomy produce a similar but less marked trend in bile acid pool; and (2) MMC are linked to enterohepatic circulation of bile acids, rather than surgery, which is consistent with changes of the bile acid pool size. As a result, gastrointestinal dyskinesia is not involved in occurrence of postcholecystectomy syndrome.

  1. Gut microbiota, cirrhosis and alcohol regulate bile acid metabolism in the gut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridlon, Jason M.; Kang, Dae-Joong; Hylemon, Phillip B.; Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of the complex role of the bile acid-gut microbiome axis in health and disease processes is evolving rapidly. Our focus revolves around the interaction of the gut microbiota with liver diseases, especially cirrhosis. The bile acid pool size has recently been shown to be a function of microbial metabolism of bile acid and regulation of the microbiota by bile acids is important in the development and progression of several liver diseases. Humans produce a large, conjugated hydrophilic bile acid pool, maintained through positive-feedback antagonism of FXR in intestine and liver. Microbes use bile acids, and via FXR signaling this results in a smaller, unconjugated hydrophobic bile acid pool. This equilibrium is critical to maintain health. The challenge is to examine the manifold functions of gut bile acids as modulators of antibiotic, probiotic and disease progression in cirrhosis, metabolic syndrome and alcohol use. Recent studies have shown potential mechanisms explaining how perturbations in the microbiome affect bile acid pool size and composition. With advancing liver disease and cirrhosis, there is dysbiosis in the fecal, ileal and colonic mucosa, in addition to a decrease in bile acid concentration in the intestine due to the liver problems. This results in a dramatic shift toward the Firmicutes, particularly Clostridium cluster XIVa and increasing production of deoxycholic acid (DCA). Alcohol intake speeds up these processes in the subjects with and without cirrhosis without significant FXR feedback. Taken together, these pathways can impact intestinal and systemic inflammation while worsening dysbiosis. The interaction between bile acids, alcohol, cirrhosis and dysbiosis is an important relationship that influences intestinal and systemic inflammation, which in turn determines progression of the overall disease process. These interactions and the impact of commonly used therapies for liver disease can provide insight into the pathogenesis

  2. Review article: the function and regulation of proteins involved in bile salt biosynthesis and transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pellicoro, Antonella; Faber, Klaas Nico

    2007-01-01

    Background Bile salts are produced and secreted by the liver and are required for intestinal absorption of fatty food components and excretion of endobiotics and xenobiotics. They are reabsorbed in the terminal ileum and transported back to the liver via the portal tract. Dedicated bile salt transpo

  3. Bile Acids Reduce Endocytosis of High-Density Lipoprotein (HDL) in HepG2 Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Clemens Röhrl; Karin Eigner; Stefanie Fruhwürth; Herbert Stangl

    2014-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) transports lipids to hepatic cells and the majority of HDL-associated cholesterol is destined for biliary excretion. Cholesterol is excreted into the bile directly or after conversion to bile acids, which are also present in the plasma as they are effectively reabsorbed through the enterohepatic cycle. Here, we provide evidence that bile acids affect HDL endocytosis. Using fluorescent and radiolabeled HDL, we show that HDL endocytosis was reduced in the presence...

  4. NMR characterization of a novel bile acid sequestrant, DMP 504.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerke, S A; Nemeth, G; Schubert, E; Hovsepian, P K

    2001-02-01

    DMP 504, a potential bile acid sequestrant for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, is a highly insoluble, cross-linked polymer which does not lend itself to ordinary means of characterization used for drug substances in the pharmaceutical industry. Therefore, alternative characterization techniques have been sought. As part of an effort into extensive characterization of DMP 504 drug substance, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was employed to provide insight into details of the DMP 504 polymer structure. The primary motivation for determining the structure of the polymer chain is to relate the DMP 504 structure to its performance properties as a bile acid sequestrant. Characterization of the polymer chain and understanding of the structural basis of its properties is essential in optimizing and controlling the manufacture of reproducible drug substance. NMR has proven a versatile tool for the description of polymer structure and dynamics because of the wide range of nuclear interactions affecting the NMR signal. This allows the design of experiments to elicit information about specific polymer interactions or properties. The methods of sample preparation utilized to obtain NMR spectra of the insoluble polymer, as well as a discussion and comparison of results for the characterization of DMP 504 obtained using several different NMR techniques will be presented.

  5. The effect of chenodeoxycholic acid and the bile acid sequestrant colesevelam on glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Scheltema, Matthijs J; Sonne, David P;

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: In patients with type 2 diabetes, rectal administration of bile acids increases glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion and reduces plasma glucose. In addition, oral bile acid sequestrants (BASs) reduce blood glucose by an unknown mechanism. In this study we evaluated the effects of the p......AIMS: In patients with type 2 diabetes, rectal administration of bile acids increases glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion and reduces plasma glucose. In addition, oral bile acid sequestrants (BASs) reduce blood glucose by an unknown mechanism. In this study we evaluated the effects...

  6. Effects of Bile Acids and the Bile Acid Receptor FXR Agonist on the Respiratory Rhythm in the In Vitro Brainstem Medulla Slice of Neonatal Sprague-Dawley Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Cong Zhao; Xianbao Wang; Yuling Cong; Yi Deng; Yijun Xu; Aihua Chen; Yanru Yin

    2014-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy is always accompanied by adverse fetal outcomes such as malfunctions of respiration. Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) plays a critical role in the homeostasis of bile acids. Thus, we are determined to explore the effects of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and five bile acids on respiratory rhythm generation and modulation of neonatal rats. Spontaneous periodic respiratory-related rhythmical discharge activity (RRDA) was recorded from hypoglossal nerves during the pe...

  7. Fish oil increases bile acid synthesis in male patients with hypertriglyceridemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkers, IJAM; Smelt, AHM; Princen, HMG; Kuipers, F; Romijn, JA; Boverhof, R; Masclee, AAM; Stellaard, F

    2006-01-01

    Fibrates are drugs of choice in patients with hypertriglyceridemia (HTG), but may increase the risk for gallstones by decreasing bile acid synthesis. Fish oil might be a therapeutic alternative, but its effect on bile acid metabolism in humans is unknown. We compared the effects of triglyceride-lowe

  8. Metabolic Effects of Bile Acids in the Gut in Health and Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesjes, Marije; Brufau Dones, Gemma

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, it became clear that bile acids, in addition to their role in intestinal absorption of lipids and fat-soluble vitamins, are major regulators of metabolism. They activate signal transduction pathways through binding to the specific bile acid receptors TGR5 and FXR. Indirectly, bil

  9. Bile acids modulate glucocorticoid metabolism and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in obstructive jaundice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McNeilly, Alison D; Macfarlane, David P; O'Flaherty, Emmett;

    2010-01-01

    Suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis occurs in cirrhosis and cholestasis and is associated with increased concentrations of bile acids. We investigated whether this was mediated through bile acids acting to impair steroid clearance by inhibiting glucocorticoid metabolism by 5beta-reductase....

  10. Auxin Biosynthesis: Are the Indole-3-Acetic Acid and Phenylacetic Acid Biosynthesis Pathways Mirror Images?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Sam D; Nichols, David S; Smith, Jason; Chourey, Prem S; McAdam, Erin L; Quittenden, Laura; Ross, John J

    2016-06-01

    The biosynthesis of the main auxin in plants (indole-3-acetic acid [IAA]) has been elucidated recently and is thought to involve the sequential conversion of Trp to indole-3-pyruvic acid to IAA However, the pathway leading to a less well studied auxin, phenylacetic acid (PAA), remains unclear. Here, we present evidence from metabolism experiments that PAA is synthesized from the amino acid Phe, via phenylpyruvate. In pea (Pisum sativum), the reverse reaction, phenylpyruvate to Phe, is also demonstrated. However, despite similarities between the pathways leading to IAA and PAA, evidence from mutants in pea and maize (Zea mays) indicate that IAA biosynthetic enzymes are not the main enzymes for PAA biosynthesis. Instead, we identified a putative aromatic aminotransferase (PsArAT) from pea that may function in the PAA synthesis pathway. PMID:27208245

  11. Effects of bile acids and the bile acid receptor FXR agonist on the respiratory rhythm in the in vitro brainstem medulla slice of neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Zhao

    Full Text Available Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy is always accompanied by adverse fetal outcomes such as malfunctions of respiration. Farnesoid X receptor (FXR plays a critical role in the homeostasis of bile acids. Thus, we are determined to explore the effects of farnesoid X receptor (FXR and five bile acids on respiratory rhythm generation and modulation of neonatal rats. Spontaneous periodic respiratory-related rhythmical discharge activity (RRDA was recorded from hypoglossal nerves during the perfusion of modified Krebs solution. Group 1-6 was each given GW4064 and five bile acids of chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA, deoxycholic acid (DCA, lithocholic acid (LCA, cholic acid (CA as well as ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA at different concentrations to identify their specific functions on respiratory rhythm modulations. Group 7 was applied to receive FXR blocker Z-guggulsterone and Z-guggulsterone with the above bile acids separately to explore the role of FXR in the respiratory rhythm modulation. Group 8 was given dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO as controls. Apart from UDCA, CDCA, DCA LCA and CA all exerted effects on RRDA recorded from hypoglossal nerves in a concentration-dependent manner. Respiratory cycle (RC, Inspiratory time (TI, Expiratory Time (TE and Integral Amplitude (IA were influenced and such effects could be reversed by Z-guggulsterone. FXR may contribute to the effects on the modulation of respiratory rhythm exerted by bile acids.

  12. Structural basis of the alternating-access mechanism in a bile acid transporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoming; Levin, Elena J.; Pan, Yaping; McCoy, Jason G.; Sharma, Ruchika; Kloss, Brian; Bruni, Renato; Quick, Matthias; Zhou, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in hepatocytes and secreted through the biliary tract into the small intestine, where they aid in absorption of lipids and fat-soluble vitamins. Through a process known as enterohepatic recirculation, more than 90% of secreted bile acids are then retrieved from the intestine and returned to the liver for resecretion. In humans, there are two Na+-dependent bile acid transporters involved in enterohepatic recirculation, the Na+-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP; also known as SLC10A1) expressed in hepatocytes, and the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; also known as SLC10A2) expressed on enterocytes in the terminal ileum. In recent years, ASBT has attracted much interest as a potential drug target for treatment of hypercholesterolaemia, because inhibition of ASBT reduces reabsorption of bile acids, thus increasing bile acid synthesis and consequently cholesterol consumption. However, a lack of three-dimensional structures of bile acid transporters hampers our ability to understand the molecular mechanisms of substrate selectivity and transport, and to interpret the wealth of existing functional data. The crystal structure of an ASBT homologue from Neisseria meningitidis (ASBTNM) in detergent was reported recently, showing the protein in an inward-open conformation bound to two Na+ and a taurocholic acid. However, the structural changes that bring bile acid and Na+ across the membrane are difficult to infer from a single structure. To understand the structural changes associated with the coupled transport of Na+ and bile acids, here we solved two structures of an ASBT homologue from Yersinia frederiksenii (ASBTYf) in a lipid environment, which reveal that a large rigid-body rotation of a substrate-binding domain gives the conserved `crossover' region, where two discontinuous helices cross each other, alternating accessibility from either side of the cell membrane. This result has implications

  13. Comparison of Bile Acids and Acetaminophen Protein Adducts in Children and Adolescents with Acetaminophen Toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura James

    Full Text Available Metabolomics approaches have enabled the study of new mechanisms of liver injury in experimental models of drug toxicity. Disruption of bile acid homeostasis is a known mechanism of drug induced liver injury. The relationship of individual bile acids to indicators of oxidative drug metabolism (acetaminophen protein adducts and liver injury was examined in children with acetaminophen overdose, hospitalized children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and children with no recent exposure to acetaminophen. Nine bile acids were quantified through targeted metabolomic analysis in the serum samples of the three groups. Bile acids were compared to serum levels of acetaminophen protein adducts and alanine aminotransferase. Glycodeoxycholic acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, and glycochenodeoxycholic acid were significantly increased in children with acetaminophen overdose compared to healthy controls. Among patients with acetaminophen overdose, bile acids were higher in subjects with acetaminophen protein adduct values > 1.0 nmol/mL and modest correlations were noted for three bile acids and acetaminophen protein adducts as follows: taurodeoxycholic acid (R=0.604; p<0.001, glycodeoxycholic acid (R=0.581; p<0.001, and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (R=0.571; p<0.001. Variability in bile acids was greater among hospitalized children receiving low doses of acetaminophen than in healthy children with no recent acetaminophen exposure. Compared to bile acids, acetaminophen protein adducts more accurately discriminated among children with acetaminophen overdose, children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and healthy control subjects. In children with acetaminophen overdose, elevations of conjugated bile acids were associated with specific indicators of acetaminophen metabolism and non-specific indicators of liver injury.

  14. Intestinal Crosstalk between Bile Acids and Microbiota and Its Impact on Host Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlström, Annika; Sayin, Sama I; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Bäckhed, Fredrik

    2016-07-12

    The gut microbiota is considered a metabolic "organ" that not only facilitates harvesting of nutrients and energy from the ingested food but also produces numerous metabolites that signal through their cognate receptors to regulate host metabolism. One such class of metabolites, bile acids, is produced in the liver from cholesterol and metabolized in the intestine by the gut microbiota. These bioconversions modulate the signaling properties of bile acids via the nuclear farnesoid X receptor and the G protein-coupled membrane receptor 5, which regulate numerous metabolic pathways in the host. Conversely, bile acids can modulate gut microbial composition both directly and indirectly through activation of innate immune genes in the small intestine. Thus, host metabolism can be affected through microbial modifications of bile acids, which lead to altered signaling via bile acid receptors, but also by altered microbiota composition. PMID:27320064

  15. Colesevelam: a new and improved bile acid sequestrant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Karagiannis, Asterios; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Athyros, Vasilios G

    2013-01-01

    Treatment with statins represents an essential component both of primary and secondary cardiovascular prevention strategies. However, a proportion of patients cannot reach low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) targets with the highest tolerable dose of a potent statin or is intolerant to statins. Several treatment options are available for these patients. Colesevelam is a relatively new bile acid sequestrant that decreases serum LDL-C levels. Moreover, colesevelam improves glycemic control and seems to be well-tolerated, at least in short-term studies. Therefore, colesevelam seems to be a useful tool for the management of high-risk patients who cannot achieve LDL-C targets with monotherapy with a potent statin.

  16. Bile Acids, FXR, and Metabolic Effects of Bariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier F. Noel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Overweight and obesity represent major risk factors for diabetes and related metabolic diseases. Obesity is associated with a chronic and progressive inflammatory response leading to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D mellitus, although the precise mechanism mediating this inflammatory process remains poorly understood. The most effective intervention for the treatment of obesity, bariatric surgery, leads to glucose normalization and remission of T2D. Recent work in both clinical studies and animal models supports bile acids (BAs as key mediators of these effects. BAs are involved in lipid and glucose homeostasis primarily via the farnesoid X receptor (FXR transcription factor. BAs are also involved in regulating genes involved in inflammation, obesity, and lipid metabolism. Here, we review the novel role of BAs in bariatric surgery and the intersection between BAs and immune, obesity, weight loss, and lipid metabolism genes.

  17. Chronic intermittent psychological stress promotes macrophage reverse cholesterol transport by impairing bile acid absorption in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvennoinen, Reija; Quesada, Helena; Kareinen, Ilona; Julve, Josep; Kaipiainen, Leena; Gylling, Helena; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Escola-Gil, Joan Carles; Kovanen, Petri T; Lee-Rueckert, Miriam

    2015-05-11

    Psychological stress is a risk factor for atherosclerosis, yet the pathophysiological mechanisms involved remain elusive. The transfer of cholesterol from macrophage foam cells to liver and feces (the macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport, m-RCT) is an important antiatherogenic pathway. Because exposure of mice to physical restraint, a model of psychological stress, increases serum levels of corticosterone, and as bile acid homeostasis is disrupted in glucocorticoid-treated animals, we investigated if chronic intermittent restraint stress would modify m-RCT by altering the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids. C57Bl/6J mice exposed to intermittent stress for 5 days exhibited increased transit through the large intestine and enhanced fecal bile acid excretion. Of the transcription factors and transporters that regulate bile acid homeostasis, the mRNA expression levels of the hepatic farnesoid X receptor (FXR), the bile salt export pump (BSEP), and the intestinal fibroblast growth factor 15 (FGF15) were reduced, whereas those of the ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT), responsible for active bile acid absorption, remained unchanged. Neither did the hepatic expression of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the key enzyme regulating bile acid synthesis, change in the stressed mice. Evaluation of the functionality of the m-RCT pathway revealed increased fecal excretion of bile acids that had been synthesized from macrophage-derived cholesterol. Overall, our study reveals that chronic intermittent stress in mice accelerates m-RCT specifically by increasing fecal excretion of bile acids. This novel mechanism of m-RCT induction could have antiatherogenic potential under conditions of chronic stress. PMID:25969465

  18. Lowering Bile Acid Pool Size with a Synthetic Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR) Agonist Induces Obesity and Diabetes through Reduced Energy Expenditure*

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Mitsuhiro; Horai, Yasushi; Houten, Sander M; Morimoto, Kohkichi; Sugizaki, Taichi; Arita, Eri; Mataki, Chikage; Sato, Hiroyuki; Tanigawara, Yusuke; Schoonjans, Kristina; Itoh, Hiroshi; Auwerx, Johan

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the metabolic impact of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) activation by administering a synthetic FXR agonist (GW4064) to mice in which obesity was induced by a high fat diet. Administration of GW4064 accentuated body weight gain and glucose intolerance induced by the high fat diet and led to a pronounced worsening of the changes in liver and adipose tissue. Mechanistically, treatment with GW4064 decreased bile acid (BA) biosynthesis, BA pool size, and energy expenditure, whereas recons...

  19. Profiling of urinary bile acids in piglets by a combination of enzymatic deconjugation and targeted LC-MRM-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bile acids (BAs) have an important role in the control of fat, glucose and cholesterol metabolism. Synthesis of bile acids is the major pathway for the metabolism of cholesterol and for the excretion of excess cholesterol in mammals. Bile acid intermediates and/or their metabolites are excreted in...

  20. Decreased bile-acid synthesis in livers of hepatocyte-conditional NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase-null mice results in increased bile acids in serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xingguo; Zhang, Youcai; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2014-10-01

    NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (Cpr) is essential for the function of microsomal cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450), including those P450s involved in bile acid (BA) synthesis. Mice with hepatocyte-specific deletion of NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (H-Cpr-null) have been engineered to understand the in vivo function of hepatic P450s in the metabolism of xenobiotics and endogenous compounds. However, the impact of hepatic Cpr on BA homeostasis is not clear. The present study revealed that H-Cpr-null mice had a 60% decrease in total BA concentration in liver, whereas the total BA concentration in serum was almost doubled. The decreased level of cholic acid (CA) in both serum and livers of H-Cpr-null mice is likely due to diminished enzyme activity of Cyp8b1 that is essential for CA biosynthesis. Feedback mechanisms responsible for the reduced liver BA concentrations and/or increased serum BA concentrations in H-Cpr-null mice included the following: 1) enhanced alternative BA synthesis pathway, as evidenced by the fact that classic BA synthesis is diminished but chenodeoxycholic acid still increases in both serum and livers of H-Cpr-null mice; 2) inhibition of farnesoid X receptor activation, which increased the mRNA of Cyp7a1 and 8b1; 3) induction of intestinal BA transporters to facilitate BA absorption from the intestine to the circulation; 4) induction of hepatic multidrug resistance-associated protein transporters to increase BA efflux from the liver to blood; and 5) increased generation of secondary BAs. In summary, the present study reveals an important contribution of the alternative BA synthesis pathway and BA transporters in regulating BA concentrations in H-Cpr-null mice.

  1. Characterization of the role of ABCG2 as a bile acid transporter in liver and placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazquez, Alba G; Briz, Oscar; Romero, Marta R; Rosales, Ruben; Monte, Maria J; Vaquero, Javier; Macias, Rocio I R; Cassio, Doris; Marin, Jose J G

    2012-02-01

    ABCG2 is involved in epithelial transport/barrier functions. Here, we have investigated its ability to transport bile acids in liver and placenta. Cholylglycylamido fluorescein (CGamF) was exported by WIF-B9/R cells, which do not express the bile salt export pump (BSEP). Sensitivity to typical inhibitors suggested that CGamF export was mainly mediated by ABCG2. In Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells), coexpression of rat Oatp1a1 and human ABCG2 enhanced the uptake and efflux, respectively, of CGamF, cholic acid (CA), glycoCA (GCA), tauroCA, and taurolithocholic acid-3-sulfate. The ability of ABCG2 to export these bile acids was confirmed by microinjecting them together with inulin in Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing this pump. ABCG2-mediated bile acid transport was inhibited by estradiol 17β-d-glucuronide and fumitremorgin C. Placental barrier for bile acids accounted for 14-fold increased maternal cholanemia induced by obstructive cholestasis in pregnant rats. In rat placenta, the expression of Abcg2, which was much higher than that of Bsep, was not affected by short-term cholestasis. In pregnant rats, fumitremorgin C did not affect uptake/secretion of GCA by the liver but inhibited its fetal-maternal transfer. Compared with wild-type mice, obstructive cholestasis in pregnant Abcg2(-/-) knockout mice induced similar bile acid accumulation in maternal serum but higher accumulation in placenta, fetal serum, and liver. In conclusion, ABCG2 is able to transport bile acids. The importance of this function depends on the relative expression in the same epithelium of other bile acid exporters. Thus, ABCG2 may play a key role in bile acid transport in placenta, as BSEP does in liver. PMID:22096226

  2. Use of Cassette Dosing in Sandwich-Cultured Rat and Human Hepatocytes to Identify Drugs that Inhibit Bile Acid Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Kristina K Wolf; Vora, Sapana; Webster, Lindsey O.; Generaux, Grant T.; Polli, Joseph W; Brouwer, Kim L.R.

    2009-01-01

    Hepatocellular accumulation of bile acids due to inhibition of the canalicular bile salt export pump (BSEP/ABCB11) is one proposed mechanism of drug-induced liver injury (DILI). Some hepatotoxic compounds also are potent inhibitors of bile acid uptake by Na+-dependent taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP/SLC10A1). This study used a cassette dosing approach in rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH) to determine whether known or suspected hepatotoxic drugs inhibit bile acid ...

  3. Combination Lopinavir and Ritonavir Alter Exogenous and Endogenous Bile Acid Disposition in Sandwich-Cultured Rat Hepatocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Griffin, LaToya M.; Watkins, Paul B.; Perry, Cassandra H.; Robert L St Claire; Brouwer, Kim L.R.

    2013-01-01

    Inhibition of the bile salt export pump (BSEP) can cause intracellular accumulation of bile acids and is a risk factor for drug-induced liver injury in humans. Antiretroviral protease inhibitors lopinavir (LPV) and ritonavir (RTV) are reported BSEP inhibitors. However, the consequences of LPV and RTV, alone and combined (LPV/r), on hepatocyte viability, bile acid transport, and endogenous bile acid disposition in rat hepatocytes have not been examined. The effect of LPV, RTV, and LPV/r on cel...

  4. Alteration of the enterohepatic recirculation of bile acids in rats after exposure to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scanff, P.; Souidi, M.; Grison, S.; Griffiths, N.M.; Gourmelon, P. [Inst. de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, (IRSN), Direction de la RadioProtection de l' Homme, Service de Radiobiologie et d' Epidemiologie, Fontenay-aux-Roses, CEDEX (France)]. E-mail: pascale.scanff@irsn.fr

    2004-02-01

    The aim of this work was to study acute alterations of the enterohepatic recirculation (EHR) of bile acids 3 days after an 8-Gy radiation exposure in vivo in the rat by a washout technique. Using this technique in association with HPLC analysis, the EHR of the major individual bile acids was determined in control and irradiated animals. Ex vivo ileal taurocholate absorption was also studied in Ussing chambers. Major hepatic enzyme activities involved in bile acid synthesis were also measured. Measurements of bile acid intestinal content and intestinal absorption efficiency calculation from washout showed reduced intestinal absorption with significant differences from one bile acid to another: absorption of taurocholate and tauromuricholate was decreased, whereas absorption of the more hydrophobic taurochenodeoxycholate was increased, suggesting that intestinal passive diffusion was enhanced, whereas ileal active transport might be reduced. Basal hepatic secretion was increased only for taurocholate, in accordance with the marked increase of CYP8B1 activity in the liver. The results are clearly demonstrate that concomitantly with radiation-induced intestinal bile acid malabsorption, hepatic bile acid synthesis and secretion are also changed. A current working model for pathophysiological changes in enterohepatic recycling after irradiation is thus proposed. (author)

  5. Biosynthesis of the Aromatic Amino Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittard, James; Yang, Ji

    2008-09-01

    This chapter describes in detail the genes and proteins of Escherichia coli involved in the biosynthesis and transport of the three aromatic amino acids tyrosine, phenylalanine, and tryptophan. It provides a historical perspective on the elaboration of the various reactions of the common pathway converting erythrose-4-phosphate and phosphoenolpyruvate to chorismate and those of the three terminal pathways converting chorismate to phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan. The regulation of key reactions by feedback inhibition, attenuation, repression, and activation are also discussed. Two regulatory proteins, TrpR (108 amino acids) and TyrR (513 amino acids), play a major role in transcriptional regulation. The TrpR protein functions only as a dimer which, in the presence of tryptophan, represses the expression of trp operon plus four other genes (the TrpR regulon). The TyrR protein, which can function both as a dimer and as a hexamer, regulates the expression of nine genes constituting the TyrR regulon. TyrR can bind each of the three aromatic amino acids and ATP and under their influence can act as a repressor or activator of gene expression. The various domains of this protein involved in binding the aromatic amino acids and ATP, recognizing DNA binding sites, interacting with the alpha subunit of RNA polymerase, and changing from a monomer to a dimer or a hexamer are all described. There is also an analysis of the various strategies which allow TyrR in conjunction with particular amino acids to differentially affect the expression of individual genes of the TyrR regulon. PMID:26443741

  6. New method for the determination of bile acid turnover using /sup 75/Se-homocholic acid taurine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delhez, H.; Meerwaldt, J.H.; van den Berg, J.W.O.; van Blankenstein, M.

    1982-06-01

    The introduction of /sup 75/Se-homocholic acid taurine (/sup 75/SeHCAT) greatly facilitates the investigation of diarrhoea of unknown origin. By using gamma-labelled bile acids, daily faecal bile acid loss can be measured in total collected stools, thus circumventing laborious mixing and sampling. The /sup 75/SeHCAT method proved to be reliable for the determination of bile acid turnover, giving results identical to the established turnover method using /sup 14/C-taurocholic acid. The new method however, is simpler and faster.

  7. Cheese intake lowers plasma cholesterol concentrations without increasing bile acid excretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjerpsted, Julie Bousgaard; Dragsted, Lars Ove; Tholstrup, Tine

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cheese is a dairy product with high calcium content. It has been suggested that calcium intake may increase fecal excretion of bile acids that would cause a regeneration of bile acids from hepatic cholesterol and thereby result in a lowering of plasma cholesterol concentrations. We aimed...... with 13% energy from cheese or butter. Results After 6 weeks of intervention cheese resulted in higher amounts of calcium excreted in feces compared to butter. However, no difference was observed in fecal bile acid output despite lower serum total, LDL and HDL cholesterol concentrations observed...

  8. Steam Cooking Significantly Improves in Vitro Bile Acid Binding of Beets, Eggplant, Asparagus, Carrots, Green Beans and Cauliflower

    Science.gov (United States)

    The relative healthful potential of cooked beets, okra, eggplant, asparagus, carrots, green beans, cauliflower and turnips was evaluated by determining their in vitro bile acid binding using a mixture of bile acids secreted in human bile at a duodenal physiological pH of 6.3. Six treatments and two...

  9. Reference standard for serum bile acids in pregnancy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-01-31

    Please cite this paper as: Egan N, Bartels A, Khashan A, Broadhurst D, Joyce C, O\\'Mullane J, O\\'Donoghue K. Reference standard for serum bile acids in pregnancy. BJOG 2012;00:000-000. DOI: 10.1111\\/j.1471-0528.2011.03245.x. Objective Obstetric cholestasis (OC) is a liver disorder characterised by pruritus and elevated serum bile acids (SBA) that affects one in 200 pregnant women. It is associated with adverse perinatal outcomes such as premature delivery and stillbirth. Mild OC is defined as SBA levels of 10-39 mumol\\/l, and severe OC is defined by levels >40 mumol\\/l. SBA levels in normal pregnancy have not been investigated. We aimed to establish reference values for SBA in healthy pregnant women across different trimesters of pregnancy. Design Cross-sectional analysis of SBA levels. Setting A large tertiary referral university teaching maternity hospital. Population Healthy pregnant women with a singleton pregnancy and a body mass index (BMI) < 40, excluding women with significant alcohol intake, history of liver disease, prior cholecystectomy and OC. Methods Cross-sectional analysis of SBA levels at 12, 20, 28 and 36 weeks of gestation, and on days 1-3 postpartum. Main outcome measures SBA levels in mumol\\/l. Results A total of 219 women attending for antenatal care were recruited, and SBA levels were assayed at 12, 20, 28 and 36 weeks of gestation, and up to 72 hours postpartum (n = 44-49 cases at each stage). The majority were white European women, with a median age of 30 years (range 17-46 years) and median BMI of 25 (range 18-38). Values of SBA ranged from 0.3 to 9.8 mumol\\/l in 216 women, with only three measurements outside this range. There were no significant changes throughout pregnancy. Conclusions SBA values in uncomplicated pregnancies are consistent, regardless of gestation, and are not elevated in pregnancy. The current reference values for the diagnosis of OC appear to be appropriate.

  10. Oleanolic acid alters bile acid metabolism and produces cholestatic liver injury in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jie, E-mail: JLiu@kumc.edu [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Zunyi Medical College, Zunyi 563003 (China); Lu, Yuan-Fu [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Zunyi Medical College, Zunyi 563003 (China); Zhang, Youcai; Wu, Kai Connie [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Fan, Fang [Cytopathology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Klaassen, Curtis D. [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Oleanolic acid (OA) is a triterpenoids that exists widely in plants. OA is effective in protecting against hepatotoxicants. Whereas a low dose of OA is hepatoprotective, higher doses and longer-term use of OA produce liver injury. This study characterized OA-induced liver injury in mice. Adult C57BL/6 mice were given OA at doses of 0, 22.5, 45, 90, and 135 mg/kg, s.c., daily for 5 days, and liver injury was observed at doses of 90 mg/kg and above, as evidenced by increases in serum activities of alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase, increases in serum total bilirubin, as well as by liver histopathology. OA-induced cholestatic liver injury was further evidenced by marked increases of both unconjugated and conjugated bile acids (BAs) in serum. Gene and protein expression analysis suggested that livers of OA-treated mice had adaptive responses to prevent BA accumulation by suppressing BA biosynthetic enzyme genes (Cyp7a1, 8b1, 27a1, and 7b1); lowering BA uptake transporters (Ntcp and Oatp1b2); and increasing a BA efflux transporter (Ostβ). OA increased the expression of Nrf2 and its target gene, Nqo1, but decreased the expression of AhR, CAR and PPARα along with their target genes, Cyp1a2, Cyp2b10 and Cyp4a10. OA had minimal effects on PXR and Cyp3a11. Taken together, the present study characterized OA-induced liver injury, which is associated with altered BA homeostasis, and alerts its toxicity potential. - Highlights: • Oleanolic acid at higher doses and long-term use may produce liver injury. • Oleanolic acid increased serum ALT, ALP, bilirubin and bile acid concentrations. • OA produced feathery degeneration, inflammation and cell death in the liver. • OA altered bile acid homeostasis, affecting bile acid synthesis and transport.

  11. Obeticholic acid, a synthetic bile acid agonist of the farnesoid X receptor, attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Peggy P; Steinman, Lawrence

    2016-02-01

    Bile acids are ligands for the nuclear hormone receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR). The bile acid-FXR interaction regulates bile acid synthesis, transport, and cholesterol metabolism. Recently, bile acid-FXR regulation has been reported to play an integral role in both hepatic and intestinal inflammation, and in atherosclerosis. In this study, we found that FXR knockout mice had more disease severity in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Obeticholic acid (6α-ethyl-chenodeoxycholic acid, 6-ECDCA), a synthetic FXR agonist, is an orally available drug that is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of inflammatory diseases such as alcoholic hepatitis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, and primary biliary cirrhosis. When we treated mice exhibiting established EAE with 6-ECDCA, or the natural FXR ligand chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), clinical disease was ameliorated by (i) suppressing lymphocyte activation and proinflammatory cytokine production; (ii) reducing CD4(+) T cells and CD19(+) B cell populations and their expression of negative checkpoint regulators programmed cell death protein 1 (PD1), programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1), and B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA); (iii) increasing CD8(+) T cells and PD1, PDl-1, and BTLA expression; and (iv) reducing VLA-4 expression in both the T- and B-cell populations. Moreover, adoptive transfer of 6-ECDCA- or CDCA-treated donor cells failed to transfer disease in naive recipients. Thus, we show that FXR functions as a negative regulator in neuroinflammation and we highlight that FXR agonists represent a potential previously unidentified therapy for MS. PMID:26811456

  12. Distinct Plasma Bile Acid Profiles of Biliary Atresia and Neonatal Hepatitis Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kejun; Wang, Jun; Xie, Guoxiang; Zhou, Ying; Yan, Weihui; Pan, Weihua; Che, Yanran; Zhang, Ting; Wong, Linda; Kwee, Sandi; Xiao, Yongtao; Wen, Jie; Cai, Wei; Jia, Wei

    2015-11-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is a severe chronic cholestasis disorder of infants that leads to death if not treated on time. Neonatal hepatitis syndrome (NHS) is another leading cause of neonatal cholestasis confounding the diagnosis of BA. Recent studies indicate that altered bile acid metabolism is closely associated with liver injury and cholestasis. In this study, we systematically measured the bile acid metabolome in plasma of BA, NHS, and healthy controls. Liver bile acids were also measured using biopsy samples from 48 BA and 16 NHS infants undergoing operative cholangiography as well as 5 normal adjacent nontumor liver tissues taken from hepatoblastoma patients as controls. Both BA and NHS samples had significantly elevated bile acid levels in plasma compared to normal controls. BA patients showed a distinct bile acid profile characterized by the higher taurochenodeoxycholic acid (TCDCA) level and lower chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) level than those in NHS patients. The ratio of TCDCA to CDCA in plasma was significantly higher in BA compared to healthy infants (p BSEP), and multidrug resistant protein 3 (MDR3) in BA compared to NHS. Taken together, the plasma bile acid profiles are distinct in BA, NHS, and normal infants, as characterized by the ratio of TCDCA/CDCA differentially distributed among the three groups of infants. PMID:26449593

  13. Bile salt recognition by human liver fatty acid binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favretto, Filippo; Santambrogio, Carlo; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Molinari, Henriette; Grandori, Rita; Assfalg, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) act as intracellular carriers of lipid molecules, and play a role in global metabolism regulation. Liver FABP (L-FABP) is prominent among FABPs for its wide ligand repertoire, which includes long-chain fatty acids as well as bile acids (BAs). In this work, we performed a detailed molecular- and atomic-level analysis of the interactions established by human L-FABP with nine BAs to understand the binding specificity for this important class of cholesterol-derived metabolites. Protein-ligand complex formation was monitored using heteronuclear NMR, steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. BAs were found to interact with L-FABP with dissociation constants in the narrow range of 0.6-7 μm; however, the diverse substitution patterns of the sterol nucleus and the presence of side-chain conjugation resulted in complexes endowed with various degrees of conformational heterogeneity. Trihydroxylated BAs formed monomeric complexes in which single ligand molecules occupied similar internal binding sites, based on chemical-shift perturbation data. Analysis of NMR line shapes upon progressive addition of taurocholate indicated that the binding mechanism departed from a simple binary association equilibrium, and instead involved intermediates along the binding path. The co-linear chemical shift behavior observed for L-FABP complexes with cholate derivatives added insight into conformational dynamics in the presence of ligands. The observed spectroscopic features of L-FABP/BA complexes, discussed in relation to ligand chemistry, suggest possible molecular determinants of recognition, with implications regarding intracellular BA transport. Our findings suggest that human L-FABP is a poorly selective, universal BA binder. PMID:25639618

  14. Bile salt recognition by human liver fatty acid binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favretto, Filippo; Santambrogio, Carlo; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Molinari, Henriette; Grandori, Rita; Assfalg, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) act as intracellular carriers of lipid molecules, and play a role in global metabolism regulation. Liver FABP (L-FABP) is prominent among FABPs for its wide ligand repertoire, which includes long-chain fatty acids as well as bile acids (BAs). In this work, we performed a detailed molecular- and atomic-level analysis of the interactions established by human L-FABP with nine BAs to understand the binding specificity for this important class of cholesterol-derived metabolites. Protein-ligand complex formation was monitored using heteronuclear NMR, steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. BAs were found to interact with L-FABP with dissociation constants in the narrow range of 0.6-7 μm; however, the diverse substitution patterns of the sterol nucleus and the presence of side-chain conjugation resulted in complexes endowed with various degrees of conformational heterogeneity. Trihydroxylated BAs formed monomeric complexes in which single ligand molecules occupied similar internal binding sites, based on chemical-shift perturbation data. Analysis of NMR line shapes upon progressive addition of taurocholate indicated that the binding mechanism departed from a simple binary association equilibrium, and instead involved intermediates along the binding path. The co-linear chemical shift behavior observed for L-FABP complexes with cholate derivatives added insight into conformational dynamics in the presence of ligands. The observed spectroscopic features of L-FABP/BA complexes, discussed in relation to ligand chemistry, suggest possible molecular determinants of recognition, with implications regarding intracellular BA transport. Our findings suggest that human L-FABP is a poorly selective, universal BA binder.

  15. K+ and Ca2+ modified Na-X zeolites as possible bile acids sequestrant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Carlos F; Valenzuela, Elymar; Ocanto, Freddy; Pérez, Víctor; Valbuena, Oscar; Goldwasser, Mireya R

    2008-05-01

    Modified zeolite X, previously exchanged with K+ and Ca2+ cations were characterized by XRD, FT-IR, chemical analysis and BET techniques. Different masses of these solids were mixed with an ox bile solution at different reaction times. The supernatants obtained by centrifugations were submitted to bile acid and phospholipids quantitative determinations. The amount of bile acids adsorbed was 65, 28 and 77% and for phospholipids was 45, 67 and 98% for KX, NaX and CaX respectively. As expected, as the amount of mass used increases more bile acids and phospholipids are adsorbed due to a larger surface of the solid being available for adsorption. On the other hand, 120 min of reaction time were sufficient for the adsorption of both components. The solids, after incubations with bile solutions were treated with abundant distilled water and dried at room temperature. The FT-IR analysis of these solids did not detect any bile and on the zeolite surface with suggested that the bile acid adsorption on the exchanged zeolites is moderated by weak and non covalent interactions.

  16. Postprandial Plasma Concentrations of Individual Bile Acids and FGF-19 in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, David P; van Nierop, F Samuel; Kulik, Willem;

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: Bile acids regulate lipid and carbohydrate metabolism by interaction with membrane or intracellular proteins including the nuclear farnesoid X receptor (FXR). Postprandial activation of ileal FXR leads to secretion of fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF-19), a gut hormone that may...... be implicated in postprandial glucose metabolism. OBJECTIVE: To describe postprandial plasma concentrations of 12 individual bile acids and FGF-19 in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and healthy controls. DESIGN AND SETTING: Descriptive study, performed at the Center for Diabetes Research, Gentofte Hospital...... controls, but differences were not statistically significant due to considerable variation. CONCLUSION: Postprandial plasma patterns of bile acids with FXR agonistic properties (CDCA, DCA, and CA) and FXR antagonistic properties (UDCA) in T2D patients support the notion of a "T2D-bile acid-FGF-19...

  17. A Molecular Necklace: Threading β-Cyclodextrins onto Polymers Derived from Bile Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yong-Guang; Malveau, Cedric; Mezour, Mohamed A; Perepichka, Dmitrii F; Zhu, X X

    2016-09-19

    A molecular necklace of polypseudorotaxanes was prepared by threading β-cyclodextrins (β-CD) onto biodegradable and thermoresponsive polyurethanes derived from bile acids. These polyurethanes were synthesized via a simple step condensation of bile acid-based dicarbonate with poly(ethylene glycol)-diamine. The β-CD rings slide onto the poly(ethylene glycol) segments and selectively recognize the bile acid units of the polyurethane chains, whereas the poly(ethylene glycol) segments remain crystalline with a lower crystallinity. This bio-compound-derived molecular necklace can be visualized by scanning tunneling microscopy. The polypseudorotaxanes show thermosensitivity in water and the phase transition temperature may be fine-tuned by varying the molar ratios of β-CD to the bile acid units. Such an interesting necklace model of polypseudorotaxane constructed from natural compounds may lead to the further exploration of their applications, such as as an enzyme model, due to their biological nature. PMID:27558980

  18. Impact of oral vancomycin on gut microbiota, bile acid metabolism, and insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrieze, Anne; Out, Carolien; Fuentes, Susana;

    2014-01-01

    in humans would affect fecal microbiota composition and subsequently bile acid and glucose metabolism. METHODS: In this single blinded randomized controlled trial, 20 male obese subjects with metabolic syndrome were randomized to 7 days of amoxicillin 500 mg t.i.d. or 7 days of vancomycin 500 mg t.......i.d. At baseline and after 1 week of therapy, fecal microbiota composition (Human Intestinal Tract Chip phylogenetic microarray), fecal and plasma bile acid concentrations as well as insulin sensitivity (hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp using [6,6-(2)H2]-glucose tracer) were measured. RESULTS: Vancomycin reduced...... fecal microbial diversity with a decrease of gram-positive bacteria (mainly Firmicutes) and a compensatory increase in gram-negative bacteria (mainly Proteobacteria). Concomitantly, vancomycin decreased fecal secondary bile acids with a simultaneous postprandial increase in primary bile acids in plasma...

  19. Review: Mechanisms of How the Intestinal Microbiota Alters the Effects of Drugs and Bile Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaassen, Curtis D; Cui, Julia Yue

    2015-10-01

    Information on the intestinal microbiota has increased exponentially this century because of technical advancements in genomics and metabolomics. Although information on the synthesis of bile acids by the liver and their transformation to secondary bile acids by the intestinal microbiota was the first example of the importance of the intestinal microbiota in biotransforming chemicals, this review will discuss numerous examples of the mechanisms by which the intestinal microbiota alters the pharmacology and toxicology of drugs and other chemicals. More specifically, the altered pharmacology and toxicology of salicylazosulfapridine, digoxin, l-dopa, acetaminophen, caffeic acid, phosphatidyl choline, carnitine, sorivudine, irinotecan, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, heterocyclic amines, melamine, nitrazepam, and lovastatin will be reviewed. In addition, recent data that the intestinal microbiota alters drug metabolism of the host, especially Cyp3a, as well as the significance and potential mechanisms of this phenomenon are summarized. The review will conclude with an update of bile acid research, emphasizing the bile acid receptors (FXR and TGR5) that regulate not only bile acid synthesis and transport but also energy metabolism. Recent data indicate that by altering the intestinal microbiota, either by diet or drugs, one may be able to minimize the adverse effects of the Western diet by altering the composition of bile acids in the intestine that are agonists or antagonists of FXR and TGR5. Therefore, it may be possible to consider the intestinal microbiota as another drug target.

  20. Dysregulated hepatic bile acids collaboratively promote liver carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Guoxiang; Wang, Xiaoning; Huang, Fengjie; Zhao, Aihua; Chen, Wenlian; Yan, Jingyu; Zhang, Yunjing; Lei, Sha; Ge, Kun; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Liu, Jiajian; Su, Mingming; Liu, Ping; Jia, Wei

    2016-10-15

    Dysregulated bile acids (BAs) are closely associated with liver diseases and attributed to altered gut microbiota. Here, we show that the intrahepatic retention of hydrophobic BAs including deoxycholate (DCA), taurocholate (TCA), taurochenodeoxycholate (TCDCA), and taurolithocholate (TLCA) were substantially increased in a streptozotocin and high fat diet (HFD) induced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis-hepatocellular carcinoma (NASH-HCC) mouse model. Additionally chronic HFD-fed mice spontaneously developed liver tumors with significantly increased hepatic BA levels. Enhancing intestinal excretion of hydrophobic BAs in the NASH-HCC model mice by a 2% cholestyramine feeding significantly prevented HCC development. The gut microbiota alterations were closely correlated with altered BA levels in liver and feces. HFD-induced inflammation inhibited key BA transporters, resulting in sustained increases in intrahepatic BA concentrations. Our study also showed a significantly increased cell proliferation in BA treated normal human hepatic cell lines and a down-regulated expression of tumor suppressor gene CEBPα in TCDCA treated HepG2 cell line, suggesting that several hydrophobic BAs may collaboratively promote liver carcinogenesis. PMID:27273788

  1. Amino acid-bile acid based molecules: extremely narrow surfactant nanotubes formed by a phenylalanine-substituted cholic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travaglini, Leana; D'Annibale, Andrea; Schillén, Karin; Olsson, Ulf; Sennato, Simona; Pavel, Nicolae V; Galantini, Luciano

    2012-12-21

    An amino acid-substituted bile acid forms tubular aggregates with inner and outer diameters of about 3 and 6 nm. The diameters are unusually small for surfactant self-assembled tubes. The results enhance the spectrum of applications of supramolecular tubules and open up possibilities for investigating a novel class of biological amphiphiles.

  2. Dietary ɛ-Polylysine Decreased Serum and Liver Lipid Contents by Enhancing Fecal Lipid Excretion Irrespective of Increased Hepatic Fatty Acid Biosynthesis-Related Enzymes Activities in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    HOSOMI, Ryota; Yamamoto, Daiki; Otsuka, Ren; Nishiyama, Toshimasa; Yoshida, Munehiro; Fukunaga, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    ɛ-Polylysine (EPL) is used as a natural preservative in food. However, few studies have been conducted to assess the beneficial functions of dietary EPL. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanism underlying the inhibition of neutral and acidic sterol absorption and hepatic enzyme activity-related fatty acid biosynthesis following EPL intake. EPL digest prepared using an in vitro digestion model had lower lipase activity and micellar lipid solubility and higher bile acid binding...

  3. Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy and Serum Bile Acids in HIV-Infected Pregnant Women

    OpenAIRE

    Weinberg, Adriana; Allshouse, Amanda; Kinzie, Kay; Cho, Alice; Davies, Jill K.; Mc Farland, Elizabeth J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Intra-hepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is uncommon, but has severe effects on pregnancy outcomes. ICP is characterized by elevated serum bile acids and liver enzymes and preferentially affects women with liver disorders. We compared bile acids and pregnancy outcomes of HIV-infected pregnant women, who commonly have elevated live enzymes, with uninfected controls. Methods Twenty-four HIV-infected, including 2 co-infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), and 25 uninfected women we...

  4. Bile Acid-Induced Arrhythmia Is Mediated by Muscarinic M2 Receptors in Neonatal Rat Cardiomyocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Sheikh Abdul Kadir, Siti H; Michele Miragoli; Shadi Abu-Hayyeh; Moshkov, Alexey V.; Qilian Xie; Verena Keitel; Viacheslav O. Nikolaev; Catherine Williamson; Julia Gorelik

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is a common disease affecting up to 5% of pregnancies and which can cause fetal arrhythmia and sudden intrauterine death. We previously demonstrated that bile acid taurocholate (TC), which is raised in the bloodstream of ICP, can acutely alter the rate and rhythm of contraction and induce abnormal calcium destabilization in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCM). Apart from their hepatic functions bile acids are ubiquitous signallin...

  5. Impact of bile acids on the growth of human cholangiocarcinoma via FXR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yinxin

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of different types of bile acids on proliferation of cholangiocarcinoma and the potential molecular mechanisms. Methods PCR assay and Western blot were performed to detect the expression of farnesoid × receptor (FXR in mRNA and protein level. Immunohistochemical analysis was carried out to monitor the expression of FXR in cholangiocarcinoma tissues from 26 patients and 10 normal controls. The effects on in vivo tumor growth were also studied in nude mouse model. Results Free bile acids induced an increased expression of FXR; on the contrary, the conjugated bile acids decreased the expression of FXR. The FXR effect has been illustrated with the use of the FXR agonist GW4064 and the FXR antagonist GS. More specifically, when the use of free bile acids combined with FXR agonist GW4064, the tumor cell inhibitory effect was even more pronounced. But adding FXR antagonist GS into the treatment attenuated the tumor inhibitory effect caused by free bile acids. Combined treatment of GS and CDCA could reverse the regulating effect of CDCA on the expression of FXR. Administration of CDCA and GW 4064 resulted in a significant inhibition of tumor growth. The inhibitory effect in combination group (CDCA plus GW 4064 was even more pronounced. Again, the conjugated bile acid-GDCA promoted the growth of tumor. We also found that FXR agonist GW4064 effectively blocked the stimulatory effect of GDCA on tumor growth. And the characteristic and difference of FXR expressions were in agreement with previous experimental results in mouse cholangiocarcinoma tissues. There was also significant difference in FXR expression between normal and tumor tissues from patients with cholangiocarcinoma. Conclusions The imbalance of ratio of free and conjugated bile acids may play an important role in tumorigenesis of cholangiocarcinoma. FXR, a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, may mediate the

  6. Mechanisms Underlying the Anti-Aging and Anti-Tumor Effects of Lithocholic Bile Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Anthony Arlia-Ciommo; Amanda Piano; Veronika Svistkova; Sadaf Mohtashami; Titorenko, Vladimir I

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are cholesterol-derived bioactive lipids that play essential roles in the maintenance of a heathy lifespan. These amphipathic molecules with detergent-like properties display numerous beneficial effects on various longevity- and healthspan-promoting processes in evolutionarily distant organisms. Recent studies revealed that lithocholic bile acid not only causes a considerable lifespan extension in yeast, but also exhibits a substantial cytotoxic effect in cultured cancer cells deri...

  7. Reconstitution of bile acid transport in the rat hepatoma McArdle RH-7777 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torchia, E C; Shapiro, R J; Agellon, L B

    1996-07-01

    The liver recovers bile acids from the portal circulation primarily via an active process that is dependent on sodium ions. Hepatocytes lose the ability to transport bile acids in culture, and, in liver-derived permanent cell lines, this ability is severely reduced or absent. To study the importance of bile acids in regulating liver-specific functions (e.g., cellular bile acid and cholesterol metabolism), we have re-established active bile acid transport in cultured cells. The complementary DNA (cDNA) encoding the rat sodium/taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (ntcp) was placed under the control of a cytomegalovirus promoter and transfected into the rat hepatoma cell line, McArdle RH-7777. Transfected cells were screened for the ability to take up [3H]-taurocholate. Clones that displayed the ability to take up taurocholate were expanded (designated McNtcp) and further characterized. The apparent Michaelis constant (Km) for taurocholate uptake was similar among the different clones. The observed maximum velocity (Vmax), however, differed and was positively correlated with the abundance of recombinant ntcp messenger RNA (mRNA). The highest level of taurocholate uptake activity observed in McNtcp cells was comparable with that of freshly isolated hepatocytes. Efflux of accumulated taurocholate from McNtcp cells proceeded in a manner similar to primary hepatocytes, indicating that McArdle RH-7777 cells have retained the ability to secrete bile acids. Moreover, taurocholate uptake in McNtcp cells was inhibited by other bile acid species. Based on the observed kinetic parameters, the reconstituted McArdle RH-7777 cells mimic the ability of primary hepatocytes to transport bile acids.

  8. Methods for diagnosis of bile acid malabsorption in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayvargiya, Priya; Camilleri, Michael; Shin, Andrea; Saenger, Amy

    2013-10-01

    Altered concentrations of bile acid (BA) in the colon can cause diarrhea or constipation. More than 25% of patients with irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea or chronic diarrhea in Western countries have BA malabsorption (BAM). As BAM is increasingly recognized, proper diagnostic methods are needed to help direct the most effective course of treatment for the chronic bowel dysfunction. We review the methodologies, advantages, and disadvantages of tools that directly measure BAM: the (14)C-glycocholate breath and stool test, the (75)selenium homotaurocholic acid test (SeHCAT), and measurements of 7 α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4) and fecal BAs. The (14)C-glycocholate test is laborious and no longer widely used. The (75)SeHCAT has been validated but is not available in the United States. Measurement of serum C4 is a simple and accurate method that can be used for most patients but requires further clinical validation. Assays to quantify fecal BA (total and individual levels) are technically cumbersome and not widely available. Regrettably, none of these tests are routinely available in the United States; assessment of the therapeutic effects of a BA binder is used as a surrogate for diagnosis of BAM. Recent data indicate the advantages to studying fecal excretion of individual BAs and their role in BAM; these could support the use of the fecal BA assay, compared with other tests. Measurement of fecal BA levels could become a routine addition to the measurement of fecal fat in patients with unexplained diarrhea. Availability ultimately determines whether the C4, SeHCAT, or fecal BA test is used; more widespread availability of such tests would enhance clinical management of these patients.

  9. Diagnostic Methods for Bile Acid Malabsorption in Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayvargiya, Priya; Camilleri, Michael; Shin, Andrea; Saenger, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Altered bile acid (BA) concentrations in the colon may cause diarrhea or constipation. BA malabsorption (BAM) accounts for >25% of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea and chronic diarrhea in Western countries. As BAM is increasingly recognized, proper diagnostic methods are desired in clinical practice to help direct the most effective treatment course for the chronic bowel dysfunction. This review appraises the methodology, advantages and disadvantages of 4 tools that directly measure BAM: 14C-glycocholate breath and stool test, 75Selenium HomotauroCholic Acid Test (SeHCAT), 7 α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4) and fecal BAs. 14C-glycocholate is a laborious test no longer widely utilized. 75SeHCAT is validated, but not available in the United States. Serum C4 is a simple, accurate method that is applicable to a majority of patients, but requires further clinical validation. Fecal measurements to quantify total and individual fecal BAs are technically cumbersome and not widely available. Regrettably, none of these tests are routinely available in the U.S., and a therapeutic trial with a BA binder is used as a surrogate for diagnosis of BAM. Recent data suggest there is an advantage to studying fecal excretion of the individual BAs and their role in BAM; this may constitute a significant advantage of the fecal BA method over the other tests. Fecal BA test could become a routine addition to fecal fat measurement in patients with unexplained diarrhea. In summary, availability determines the choice of test among C4, SeHCAT and fecal BA; more widespread availability of such tests would enhance clinical management of these patients. PMID:23644387

  10. Dysregulation of bile acid homeostasis in parenteral nutrition mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Le; Yang, Ill; Kong, Bo; Shen, Jianliang; Gorczyca, Ludwik; Memon, Naureen; Buckley, Brian T; Guo, Grace L

    2016-01-15

    Long-term parenteral nutrition (PN) administration can lead to PN-associated liver diseases (PNALD). Although multiple risk factors have been identified for PNALD, to date, the roles of bile acids (BAs) and the pathways involved in BA homeostasis in the development and progression of PNALD are still unclear. We have established a mouse PN model with IV infusion of PN solution containing soybean oil-based lipid emulsion (SOLE). Our results showed that PN altered the expression of genes involved in a variety of liver functions at the mRNA levels. PN increased liver gene expression of Cyp7a1 and markedly decreased that of Cyp8b1, Cyp7b1, Bsep, and Shp. CYP7A1 and CYP8B1 are important for synthesizing the total amount of BAs and regulating the hydrophobicity of BAs, respectively. Consistently, both the levels and the percentages of primary BAs as well as total non-12α-OH BAs increased significantly in the serum of PN mice compared with saline controls, whereas liver BA profiles were largely similar. The expression of several key liver-X receptor-α (LXRα) target genes involved in lipid synthesis was also increased in PN mouse livers. Retinoid acid-related orphan receptor-α (RORα) has been shown to induce the expression of Cyp8b1 and Cyp7b1, as well as to suppress LXRα function. Western blot showed significantly reduced nuclear migration of RORα protein in PN mouse livers. This study shows that continuous PN infusion with SOLE in mice leads to dysregulation of BA homeostasis. Alterations of liver RORα signaling in PN mice may be one of the mechanisms implicated in the pathogenesis of PNALD. PMID:26564717

  11. Impact of Inhibiting Ileal Apical Versus Basolateral Bile acid Transport on Cholesterol Metabolism and Atherosclerosis in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Bile acid sequestrants have been used for many years to treat hypercholesterolemia by increasing hepatic conversion of cholesterol to bile acids, thereby inducing hepatic LDL receptor expression and clearance of apoB-containing particles. In order to further understand the underlying molecular mechanisms linking gut-liver signaling and cholesterol homeostasis, mouse models defective in ileal apical membrane bile acid transport (Asbt null) and ileal basolateral membrane bile acid transport (Ostα null) were studied under basal and hypercholesterolemic conditions. Key Messages Hepatic conversion of cholesterol to bile acids is the major pathway for cholesterol catabolism and a major mechanism for cholesterol elimination. Blocking ileal apical membrane bile acid transport (Asbt null mice) increases fecal bile acid excretion, hepatic Cyp7a1 expression and the relative proportion of taurocholate in the bile acid pool, but decreases ileal FGF15 expression, bile acid pool size, and hepatic cholesterol content. In contrast, blocking ileal basolateral membrane bile acid transport (Ostα null mice) increases ileal FGF15 expression, reduces hepatic Cyp7a1 expression, and increases the proportion of tauro-β-muricholic acid in the bile acid pool. In the hypercholesterolemic apoE null background, plasma cholesterol levels and measurements of atherosclerosis were reduced in Asbt/apoE null mice but not in Ostα/apoE null mice. Conclusions Blocking intestinal absorption of bile acids at the apical versus basolateral membrane differentially affects bile acid and cholesterol metabolism, including the development of hypercholesterolemia-associated atherosclerosis. The molecular mechanism likely involves altered regulation of ileal FGF15 expression. PMID:26045273

  12. Association between Circulating Vitamin D Metabolites and Fecal Bile Acid Concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Elizabeth T; Haussler, Mark R; Alberts, David S; Kohler, Lindsay N; Lance, Peter; Martínez, María Elena; Roe, Denise J; Jurutka, Peter W

    2016-07-01

    Although hydrophobic bile acids have been demonstrated to exhibit cytotoxic and carcinogenic effects in the colorectum, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) has been investigated as a potential chemopreventive agent. Vitamin D has been shown to play a role in both bile acid metabolism and in the development of colorectal neoplasia. Using a cross-sectional design, we sought to determine whether baseline circulating concentrations of the vitamin D metabolites 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D were associated with baseline fecal bile acid concentrations in a trial of UDCA for the prevention of colorectal adenoma recurrence. We also prospectively evaluated whether vitamin D metabolite concentrations modified the effect of UDCA on adenoma recurrence. After adjustment for age, sex, BMI, physical activity, and calcium intake, adequate concentrations of 25(OH)D (≥30 ng/mL) were statistically significantly associated with reduced odds for high levels of total [OR, 0.61; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.38-0.97], and primary (OR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.38-0.96) bile acids, as well as individually with chenodeoxycholic acid (OR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.24-0.63) and cholic acid (OR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.36-0.90). No significant associations were observed for 1,25(OH)2D and high versus low fecal bile acid concentrations. In addition, neither 25(OH)D nor 1,25(OH)2D modified the effect of UDCA on colorectal adenoma recurrence. In conclusion, this is the first study to demonstrate an inverse relationship between circulating levels of 25(OH)D and primary fecal bile acid concentrations. These results support prior data demonstrating that vitamin D plays a key role in bile acid metabolism, and suggest a potential mechanism of action for 25(OH)D in colorectal cancer prevention. Cancer Prev Res; 9(7); 589-97. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27138789

  13. Clavulanic acid biosynthesis and genetic manipulation for its overproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ju Yeon; Jensen, Susan E; Lee, Kye Joon

    2010-10-01

    Clavulanic acid, a β-lactamase inhibitor, is used together with β-lactam antibiotics to create drug mixtures possessing potent antimicrobial activity. In view of the clinical and industrial importance of clavulanic acid, identification of the clavulanic acid biosynthetic pathway and the associated gene cluster(s) in the main producer species, Streptomyces clavuligerus, has been an intriguing research question. Clavulanic acid biosynthesis was revealed to involve an interesting mechanism common to all of the clavam metabolites produced by the organism, but different from that of other β-lactam compounds. Gene clusters involved in clavulanic acid biosynthesis in S. clavuligerus occupy large regions of nucleotide sequence in three loci of its genome. In this review, clavulanic acid biosynthesis and the associated gene clusters are discussed, and clavulanic acid improvement through genetic manipulation is explained.

  14. Bile acids reduce endocytosis of high-density lipoprotein (HDL in HepG2 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemens Röhrl

    Full Text Available High-density lipoprotein (HDL transports lipids to hepatic cells and the majority of HDL-associated cholesterol is destined for biliary excretion. Cholesterol is excreted into the bile directly or after conversion to bile acids, which are also present in the plasma as they are effectively reabsorbed through the enterohepatic cycle. Here, we provide evidence that bile acids affect HDL endocytosis. Using fluorescent and radiolabeled HDL, we show that HDL endocytosis was reduced in the presence of high concentrations of taurocholate, a natural non-cell-permeable bile acid, in human hepatic HepG2 and HuH7 cells. In contrast, selective cholesteryl-ester (CE uptake was increased. Taurocholate exerted these effects extracellularly and independently of HDL modification, cell membrane perturbation or blocking of endocytic trafficking. Instead, this reduction of endocytosis and increase in selective uptake was dependent on SR-BI. In addition, cell-permeable bile acids reduced HDL endocytosis by farnesoid X receptor (FXR activation: chenodeoxycholate and the non-steroidal FXR agonist GW4064 reduced HDL endocytosis, whereas selective CE uptake was unaltered. Reduced HDL endocytosis by FXR activation was independent of SR-BI and was likely mediated by impaired expression of the scavenger receptor cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36. Taken together we have shown that bile acids reduce HDL endocytosis by transcriptional and non-transcriptional mechanisms. Further, we suggest that HDL endocytosis and selective lipid uptake are not necessarily tightly linked to each other.

  15. Different pathways of canalicular secretion of sulfated and non-sulfated fluorescent bile acids : a study in isolated hepatocyte couplets and TR- rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mills, CO; Milkiewicz, P; Muller, M; Roma, MG; Havinga, R; Coleman, R; Kuipers, F; Jansen, PLM; Elias, E

    1999-01-01

    Background/Aims: Fluorescent bile acids have proved useful for characterizing bile salt transport mechanisms, The aim of this study was to further validate the use of lysyl-fluorescein conjugated bile acid analogues as surrogate bile acids, Methods: We analyzed biliary excretion kinetics of cholyl l

  16. Influence of acid and bile acid on ERK activity, PPARY expression and cell proliferation in normal human esophageal epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Ru Jiang; Jun Gong; Zhen-Ni Zhang; Zhe Qiao

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To observe the effects of acid and bile acid exposure on cell proliferation and the expression of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor Y (PPARy) in normal human esophageal epithelial cells in vitro.METHODS: In vitro cultured normal human esophageal epithelial cells were exposed to acidic media (pH 4.0-6.5), media containing different bile acid (250 μmol/L), media containing acid and bile acid, respectively.Cell proliferation was assessed using MTT and flow cytometry. The expressions of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and PPARy protein were determined by the immunoblotting technique.RESULTS: Acid-exposed (3 min) esophageal cells exhibited a significant increase in proliferation ratio,S phase of the cell cycle (P<0.05) and the level of phosphorylated ERK1/2 protein. When the acid-exposure period exceeded 6 min, we observed a decrease in proliferation ratio and S phase of the cell cycle, with an increased apoptosis ratio (P<0.05). Bile acid exposure (3-12 min) also produced an increase in proliferation ratio, S phase of the cell cycle (P<0.05)and phosphorylated ERK1/2 expression. On the contrary,deoxycholic acid (DCA) exposure (>20 min) decreased proliferation ratio. Compared with bile acid exposure (pH 7.4), bile acid exposure (pH 6.5, 4) significantly decreased proliferation ratio (P<0.05). There was no expression of PPARY in normal human esophageal epithelial cells.CONCLUSION: The rapid stimuli of acid or bile acid increase proliferation in normal human esophageal epithelial cells by activating the ERK pathway.

  17. Ileal mucosal bile acid absorption is increased in Cftr knockout mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somasundaram Sivagurunathan

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excessive loss of bile acids in stool has been reported in patients with cystic fibrosis. Some data suggest that a defect in mucosal bile acid transport may be the mechanism of bile acid malabsorption in these individuals. However, the molecular basis of this defect is unknown. This study examines the expression of the ileal bile acid transporter protein (IBAT and rates of diffusional (sodium independent and active (sodium dependent uptake of the radiolabeled bile acid taurocholate in mice with targeted disruption of the cftr gene. Methods Wild-type, heterozygous cftr (+/- and homozygous cftr (-/- mice were studied. Five one-cm segments of terminal ileum were excised, everted and mounted onto thin stainless steel rods and incubated in buffer containing tracer 3H-taurocholate. Simultaneously, adjacent segments of terminal ileum were taken and processed for immunohistochemistry and Western blots using an antibody against the IBAT protein. Results In all ileal segments, taurocholate uptake rates were fourfold higher in cftr (-/- and two-fold higher in cftr (+/- mice compared to wild-type mice. Passive uptake was not significantly higher in cftr (-/- mice than in controls. IBAT protein was comparably increased. Immuno-staining revealed that the greatest increases occurred in the crypts of cftr (-/- animals. Conclusions In the ileum, IBAT protein densities and taurocholate uptake rates are elevated in cftr (-/- mice > cftr (+/- > wild-type mice. These findings indicate that bile acid malabsorption in cystic fibrosis is not caused by a decrease in IBAT activity at the brush border. Alternative mechanisms are proposed, such as impaired bile acid uptake caused by the thick mucus barrier in the distal small bowel, coupled with a direct negative regulatory role for cftr in IBAT function.

  18. Bile Acids Induce Cdx2 Expression Through the Farnesoid X Receptor in Gastric Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yingji; Watanabe, Toshio; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Machida, Hirohisa; Okazaki, Hirotoshi; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Kenji; Tominaga, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Oshitani, Nobuhide; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2009-01-01

    Clinical and experimental studies showed that the reflux of bile into the stomach contributes to the induction of intestinal metaplasia of the stomach and gastric carcinogenesis. Caudal-type homeobox 2 (Cdx2) plays a key role in the exhibition of intestinal phenotypes by regulating the expression of intestine-specific genes such as goblet-specific gene mucin 2 (MUC2). We investigated the involvement of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a nuclear receptor for bile acids, in the chenodeoxycholic ...

  19. High level of deoxycholic acid in human bile does not promote cholesterol gallstone formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ulf Gustafsson; Staffan Sahlin; Curt Einarsson

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study whether patients with excess deoxycholic acid (DCA) differ from those with normal percentage of DCA with respect to biliary lipid composition and cholesterol saturation of gallbladder bile.METHODS: Bile was collected during operation through puncturing into the gallbladder from 122 cholesterol gallstone patients and 46 gallstone-free subjects undergoing cholecystectomy. Clinical data, biliary lipids, bile acid composition,presence of crystals and nucleation time were analyzed.RESULTS: A subgroup of gallstone patients displayeda higher proportion of DCA in bile than gallstone free subjects.By choosing a cut-off level of the 90th percentile, a group of 13 gallstone patients with high DCA levels (mean 50percent of total bile acids) and a large group of 109 patients with normal DCA levels (mean 21 percent of total bile acids)were obtained. The mean age of the patients with high DCA levels was higher than that of the group with normal levels (mean age: 62 years vs45 years) and so was the mean BMI (28.3 vs. 24.7). Plasma levels of cholesterol and triglycerides were slightly higher in the DCA excess groups compared with those in the normal DCA group. There was no difference in biliary lipid composition, cholesterol saturation, nucleation time or occurrence of cholesterol crystals in bile between patients with high and normal levels of DCA.CONCLUSION: Gallstone patients with excess DCA were of older age and had higher BMI than patients with normal DCA. The two groups of patients did not differ with respect to biliary lipid composition, cholesterol saturation, nucleation time or occurrence of cholesterol crystals. It is concluded that DCA in bile does not seem to contribute to gallstone formation in cholesterol gallstone patients.

  20. Between peptides and bile acids: self-assembly of phenylalanine substituted cholic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travaglini, Leana; D'Annibale, Andrea; di Gregorio, Maria Chiara; Schillén, Karin; Olsson, Ulf; Sennato, Simona; Pavel, Nicolae V; Galantini, Luciano

    2013-08-01

    Biocompatible molecules that undergo self-assembly are of high importance in biological and medical applications of nanoscience. Peptides and bile acids are among the most investigated due to their ability to self-organize into many different, often stimuli-sensitive, supramolecular structures. With the aim of preparing molecules mixing the aggregation properties of bile acid and amino acid-based molecules, we report on the synthesis and self-association behavior of two diastereomers obtained by substituting a hydroxyl group of cholic acid with a l-phenylalanine residue. The obtained molecules are amphoteric, and we demonstrate that they show a pH-dependent self-assembly. Both molecules aggregate in globular micelles at high pH, whereas they form tubular superstructures under acid conditions. Unusual narrow nanotubes with outer and inner cross-section diameters of about 6 and 3 nm are formed by the derivatives. The diasteroisomer with α orientation of the substituent forms in addition a wider tubule (17 nm cross-section diameter). The ability to pack in supramolecular tubules is explained in terms of a wedge-shaped bola-form structure of the derivatives. Parallel or antiparallel face-to-face dimers are hypothesized as fundamental building blocks for the formation of the narrow and wide nanotubes, respectively.

  1. Bile acid and immunosuppressive therapy in primary biliary cirrhosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.H.J. Wolfhagen (Franciscus)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractPrimary Biliary Cirrhosis (PBC) is a chronic, cholestatic liver disease characterized by non-suppurative destruction of interlobular and septal bile ducts, with subsequent liver damage and eventually development of cirrhosis. The disease is relatively rare with an estimated annual incide

  2. Dietary hyodeoxycholic acid exerts hypolipidemic effects by reducing farnesoid X receptor antagonist bile acids in mouse enterohepatic tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shiro; Fujita, Kyosuke

    2014-10-01

    Mice were fed a control diet or a diet supplemented with hyodeoxycholic acid, the most abundant bile acid contained in pig bile, for 4 weeks, after which their serum and livers were collected. The contents of total fatty acids of serum and liver cholesteryl esters, and of liver triglycerides, were reduced following the administration of the hyodeoxycholic acid-supplemented diet, which was mainly due to the reductions in the contents of monounsaturated fatty acids. Free cholesterol contents in the serum and liver were not changed by hyodeoxycholic acid administration. Hyodeoxycholic acid administration reduced the gene expression levels of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase, and stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1. Hyodeoxycholic acid administration markedly changes the ratio of FXR-antagonist/FXR-agonist bile acids in the enterohepatic tissues of the mice (1.13 and 7.60 in hyodeoxycholic acid and control diet groups, respectively). Our findings demonstrate that hyodeoxycholic acid administration exerts the hypolipidemic effect in mice, in which downregulations of de novo lipogenesis and desaturation of saturated fatty acids are suggested to play important roles. In addition, regulation of FXR activation through the selective modification of the enterohepatic bile acid pool may be involved in the hypolipidemic effect of hyodeoxycholic acid administration. PMID:25189147

  3. Loss of Nuclear Receptor SHP Impairs but Does Not Eliminate Negative Feedback Regulation of Bile Acid Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Kerr, Thomas A.; Saeki, Shigeru; Schneider, Manfred; Schaefer, Karen; Berdy, Sara; Redder, Thadd; Shan, Bei; Russell, David W.; Schwarz, Margrit

    2002-01-01

    The in vivo role of the nuclear receptor SHP in feedback regulation of bile acid synthesis was examined. Loss of SHP in mice caused abnormal accumulation and increased synthesis of bile acids due to derepression of rate-limiting CYP7A1 and CYP8B1 hydroxylase enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway. Dietary bile acids induced liver damage and restored feedback regulation. A synthetic agonist of the nuclear receptor FXR was not hepatotoxic and had no regulatory effects. Reduction of the bile acid p...

  4. Cholesterol and bile acids regulate cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase expression at the transcriptional level in culture and in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, M I; Karaoglu, D; Haro, D; Barillas, C; Bashirzadeh, R; Gil, G

    1994-04-01

    Cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase (7 alpha-hydroxylase) is the rate-limiting enzyme in bile acid biosynthesis. It is subject to a feedback control, whereby high levels of bile acids suppress its activity, and cholesterol exerts a positive control. It has been suggested that posttranscriptional control plays a major part in that regulation. We have studied the mechanisms by which cholesterol and bile acids regulate expression of the 7 alpha-hydroxylase gene and found it to be solely at the transcriptional level by using two different approaches. First, using a tissue culture system, we localized a liver-specific enhancer located 7 kb upstream of the transcriptional initiation site. We also showed that low-density lipoprotein mediates transcriptional activation of chimeric genes, containing either the 7 alpha-hydroxylase or the albumin enhancer in front of the 7 alpha-hydroxylase proximal promoter, to the same extent as the in vivo cholesterol-mediated regulation of 7 alpha-hydroxylase mRNA. In a second approach, using transgenic mice, we have found that expression of an albumin enhancer-7 alpha-hydroxylase-lacZ fusion gene is restricted to the liver and is regulated by cholesterol and bile acids in a manner quantitatively similar to that of the endogenous gene. We also found, that a liver-specific enhancer is necessary for expression of the rat 7 alpha-hydroxylase gene, in agreement with the tissue culture experiments. Together, these results demonstrate that cholesterol and bile acids regulate the expression of the 7 alpha-hydroxylase gene solely at the transcriptional level. PMID:8139578

  5. Investigation of antibacterial, acid and bile tolerance properties of lactobacilli isolated from Koozeh cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Hassanzadazar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus strains are a major part of the probiotics, microflora of the intestine and of fermented dairy products, and are found in a variety of environments. The aim of this study was to find out the ability of bile and acid tolerance and antibacterial properties of the twenty eight isolates of three group lactobacilli namely Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus delbruki. For this purpose Twenty eight different Lactobacillus strains that isolated from Koozeh cheese as a traditional cheese were screened. The acid tolerance test was studied under pH 2.0 and 3.0 with 7.5 as control. The cell count for the acid tolerance test was obtained at an interval of 0, 1, 2 and 3 hours respectively and was pour plated on Man, Rogosa, and Sharpe (MRS agar to be incubated at 37 °C for 24 hours. All cells were selected for bile tolerance test in MRS broth containing bile concentrations of 0% as control and 0.3% as test. Then cell counts were enumerated after 24 hours of incubation on MRS agar. Results showed twenty seven isolates did not have ability to tolerate acid and bile salts and antimicrobial activity against four indicator bacteria included Eshirichia coli, Listeria monocytogenesis, bacillus cereus, Salmonella entritidis. Only one Isolate namely Lactobacillus casei could tolerate acid and bile salt and had antibacterial activity against of L. monocytogenesis. Therefore we can consider this strain as a native probiotic but extra examinations was required.

  6. Colesevelam hydrochloride: usefulness of a specifically engineered bile acid sequestrant for lowering LDL-cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsini, Alberto; Windler, Eberhard; Farnier, Michel

    2009-02-01

    Several recent meta-analyses of numerous lipid-lowering outcome trials confirm the direct relationship between low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) lowering and cardiovascular risk reduction. As a consequence, LDL-C goals are continuously being set lower. To achieve lipid lowering, several efficient drugs are available, however, the current pharmacopoeia remains limited for some critical patient situations. Colesevelam hydrochloride is a specifically engineered bile acid sequestrant that features a more favourable tolerability and drug interaction profile than traditional bile acid sequestrants, because of a better affinity and binding capacity to bile acids. In addition, colesevelam retains the nonsystemic mode of action of bile acid sequestrants. Moreover, colesevelam lowers LDL-C by 15-19% and 10-16%, respectively, in monotherapy and in combination to various lipid-lowering drugs, such as statins, ezetimibe and fenofibrates. Along with an efficient and sustainable effect on lipid profiles, colesevelam - as other bile acid sequestrants - has been shown to lower the glycosylated haemoglobin HbA1c by 0.5% on average in patients with type 2 diabetes. Overall, colesevelam represents an interesting add-on treatment to be used in high-risk patients with hypercholesterolaemia for whom standard lipid-lowering therapies are not enough or not well tolerated.

  7. A systematic review of bile acid sequestrant therapy in children with familial hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Michael H

    2011-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia, which arises as a result of a mutation in the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene, is characterized by elevated levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), regardless of dietary and lifestyle modifications. Pharmacological therapy is often required to adequately control the elevated LDL-C levels associated with familial hypercholesterolemia. However, children with this genetic condition present many challenges for physicians, who must weigh the benefits of lipid-lowering therapy against the risks associated with the various treatment options. Furthermore, because familial hypercholesterolemia is a chronic condition, children will likely require long-term lipid-lowering therapy. As such, the potential effect of pharmacological treatment on development is of paramount importance in this population. Bile acid sequestrants represent a unique treatment option for children with familial hypercholesterolemia in that these agents are not systemically absorbed but rather exert their lipid-lowering effects via binding to bile acids within the gastrointestinal tract. A literature search was performed to identify clinical data related to the use of bile acid sequestrant therapy in children (sequestrant monotherapy, whereas two studies were identified that evaluated combination therapy with a bile acid sequestrant and low-dose statin. This review summarizes the clinical data regarding the efficacy and safety of bile acid sequestrants in this specialized population.

  8. Clinical relevance of the bile acid receptor TGR5 in metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Nierop, F Samuel; Scheltema, Matthijs J; Eggink, Hannah M;

    2016-01-01

    The bile acid receptor TGR5 (also known as GPBAR1) is a promising target for the development of pharmacological interventions in metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes, obesity, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. TGR5 is expressed in many metabolically active tissues, but complex enterohep......The bile acid receptor TGR5 (also known as GPBAR1) is a promising target for the development of pharmacological interventions in metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes, obesity, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. TGR5 is expressed in many metabolically active tissues, but complex...... enterohepatic bile acid cycling limits the exposure of some of these tissues to the receptor ligand. Profound interspecies differences in the biology of bile acids and their receptors in different cells and tissues exist. Data from preclinical studies show promising effects of targeting TGR5 on outcomes...... such as weight loss, glucose metabolism, energy expenditure, and suppression of inflammation. However, clinical studies are scarce. We give a summary of key concepts in bile acid metabolism; outline different downstream effects of TGR5 activation; and review available data on TGR5 activation, with a focus...

  9. Inhibitors of amino acids biosynthesis as antifungal agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrzębowska, Kamila; Gabriel, Iwona

    2015-02-01

    Fungal microorganisms, including the human pathogenic yeast and filamentous fungi, are able to synthesize all proteinogenic amino acids, including nine that are essential for humans. A number of enzymes catalyzing particular steps of human-essential amino acid biosynthesis are fungi specific. Numerous studies have shown that auxotrophic mutants of human pathogenic fungi impaired in biosynthesis of particular amino acids exhibit growth defect or at least reduced virulence under in vivo conditions. Several chemical compounds inhibiting activity of one of these enzymes exhibit good antifungal in vitro activity in minimal growth media, which is not always confirmed under in vivo conditions. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the present knowledge on pathways of amino acids biosynthesis in fungi, with a special emphasis put on enzymes catalyzing particular steps of these pathways as potential targets for antifungal chemotherapy.

  10. Chemoprotective effects of curcumin in esophageal epithelial cells exposed to bile acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthew; R; Bower; Harini; S; Aiyer; Robert; CG; Martin

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the ability of curcumin to counteract the impact of bile acids on gene expression of esophageal epithelial cells.METHODS:An esophageal epithelial cell line(HET1A)was treated with curcumin in the presence of deoxycholic acid.Cell proliferation and viability assays were used to establish an appropriate dose range for curcumin.The combined and individual effects of curcumin and bile acid on cyclooxygenase-2(COX-2)and superoxide dismutase(SOD-1 and SOD-2)gene expression were also assessed.RES...

  11. Direct measurement of first-pass ileal clearance of a bile acid in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a method of directly measuring ileal bile acid absorption efficiency during a single enterohepatic cycle (first-pass ileal clearance). This has become feasible for the first time because of the availability of the synthetic gamma-labeled bile acid 75Selena-homocholic acid-taurine (75SeHCAT). Together with the corresponding natural bile acid cholic acid-taurine (labeled with 14C), SeHCAT was infused distal to an occluding balloon situated beyond the ampulla of Vater in six healthy subjects. Completion of a single enterohepatic cycle was assessed by obtaining a plateau for 75SeHCAT activity proximal to the occluding balloon, which prevented further cycles. Unabsorbed 75SeHCAT was collected after total gut washout, which was administered distal to the occluding balloon. 75SeHCAT activity in the rectal effluent measured by gamma counter was compared with that of absorbed 75SeHCAT level measured by gamma camera and was used to calculate first-pass ileal clearance. This was very efficient (mean value, 96%) and showed very little variation in the six subjects studied (range, 95%-97%). A parallel time-activity course in hepatic bile for 14C and 75Se during a single enterohepatic cycle, together with a ratio of unity for 14C/75Se in samples obtained at different time intervals, suggests that 75SeHCAT is handled by the ileum like the natural bile acid cholic acid-taurine. Extrapolation of 75SeHCAT first-pass ileal clearance to that of the natural bile acid therefore seems justifiable. In a subsidiary experiment, ileal absorption efficiency per day for 75SeHCAT was also measured by scanning the gallbladder area on 5 successive days after the measurement of first-pass ileal clearance. In contrast with absorption efficiency per cycle, absorption efficiency per day varied widely (49%-86%)

  12. CYP2E1-dependent elevation of serum cholesterol, triglycerides, and hepatic bile acids by isoniazid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Jie; Krausz, Kristopher W. [Laboratory of Metabolism, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Li, Feng; Ma, Xiaochao [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, The University of Kansas Medical Center, 4089 KLSIC, MS 1018, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Gonzalez, Frank J., E-mail: fjgonz@helix.nih.gov [Laboratory of Metabolism, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Isoniazid is the first-line medication in the prevention and treatment of tuberculosis. Isoniazid is known to have a biphasic effect on the inhibition–induction of CYP2E1 and is also considered to be involved in isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity. However, the full extent and mechanism of involvement of CYP2E1 in isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity remain to be thoroughly investigated. In the current study, isoniazid was administered to wild-type and Cyp2e1-null mice to investigate the potential toxicity of isoniazid in vivo. The results revealed that isoniazid caused no hepatotoxicity in wild-type and Cyp2e1-null mice, but produced elevated serum cholesterol and triglycerides, and hepatic bile acids in wild-type mice, as well as decreased abundance of free fatty acids in wild-type mice and not in Cyp2e1-null mice. Metabolomic analysis demonstrated that production of isoniazid metabolites was elevated in wild-type mice along with a higher abundance of bile acids, bile acid metabolites, carnitine and carnitine derivatives; these were not observed in Cyp2e1-null mice. In addition, the enzymes responsible for bile acid synthesis were decreased and proteins involved in bile acid transport were significantly increased in wild-type mice. Lastly, treatment of targeted isoniazid metabolites to wild-type mice led to similar changes in cholesterol, triglycerides and free fatty acids. These findings suggest that while CYP2E1 is not involved in isoniazid-induced hepatotoxicity, while an isoniazid metabolite might play a role in isoniazid-induced cholestasis through enhancement of bile acid accumulation and mitochondria β-oxidation. -- Highlights: ► Isoniazid metabolites were elevated only in wild-type mice. ► Isoniazid caused no hepatotoxicity in wild-type and Cyp2e1-null mice. ► Isoniazid elevated serum cholesterol and triglycerides, and hepatic bile acids. ► Bile acid transporters were significantly decreased in isoniazid-treated mice.

  13. Bile Salt and Acid Tolerant of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Proventriculus of Broiler Chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Damayanti

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to obtain the lactic acid bacteria (LAB as probiotic candidates which have resistance to bile salt and acid condition. LAB was obtained using isolation method from proventriculus of broiler chicken. Selective MRS media with 0.2% CaCO3 addition were used for LAB isolation using pour plate sampling method under anaerobic condition. The result showed that four selected isolates had morphological and biochemical characteristics as LAB. The selected LAB was characterized as follow: antibacterial activities, antibiotic sensitivity, resistance on bile salt, gastric juice and acid condition, and biochemical identification. Antibacterial activities assay of cell free supernatant was confirmed using disc paper diffusion method which was arranged on factorial design and each treatment consisted of three replications. The cell free supernatant of LAB isolates had antibacterial activities against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aerugenosa, and Salmonella pullorum. Molecular identification procedure using 16S rRNA sequence analysis showed that R01 and R02 as Pediococcus acidilactici. The viability of the two isolates were tested by acid pH (pH 1, 2, and 3, gastric juice pH 2, and bile salt condition for digestives tract simulation. The result showed that R01 and R02 had a high viability percentages at pH 1, 2, and 3 (95.45%, 99.49%, 104.01%, and 67.17%, 120.74%, 103.4%, respectively and at bile salt simulation for 1-2 hours (100.35%-102.71% and 100.02%-102.65%, respectively, but at gastric juice simulation for 1-2 hours, the P. acidilactici R01 had higher viability than P. acidilactici R02 (59.69%-76.53% versus 43.57%-40.69%, respectively. In the antibiotic sensitivity test for three antibiotics (i.e. erythromicin 15 µg, penicillin G 10 µg, and streptomycin 10 µg, the P. acidilactici R02 showed resistance to Streptomycin and Penicillin. It is concluded that P. acidilactici R01 and P. acidilactici R02 isolated from proventriculus

  14. INHIBITION OF BILE ACID ACCUMULATION DECREASED THE EXCESSIVE HEPATOCYTE APOPTOSIS AND IMPROVED THE LIVER SECRETION FUNCTIONS ON OBSTRUCTIVE JAUNDICE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akmal Taher

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Excessive hepatocyte apoptosis induced by bile acid accumulation occurred in severe obstructive jaundice, and impair the liver secretion function. The objective of this study is to determine whether the inhibition of bile acid accumulation through bile duct decompression affect the excessive hepatocyte apoptosis and caused improvement the liver secretion functions on human model. In this study we use a before and after study on severe obstructive jaundice patients due to extra hepatic bile duct tumor was decompressed. Bile duct decompression was performed as a model of the role of inhibition of bile acid accumulation inhibition bile acid accumulation and excessive hepatocyte apoptosis. Bile acid and marker of liver secretion functions were serially measured. Liver biopsy pre and post decompression was performed for Hepatocyte apoptosis pathologic examination by TUNEL fluorescing, which measured by 2 people in double blinded system. Total bile acid, and liver secretion functions were measured by automated chemistry analyzer. The result of this study shows that twenty one severe obstructive jaundice patients were included. After decompression the hepatocyte apoptosis index decreased from an average of 53.1 (SD 105 to 11.7 (SD 13.6 (p < 0.05. Average of bile acid serum decreased from 96.4 (SD 53.8 to 19.9 (SD 39.5 until 13.0 (SD 12.6 μmol/L (p < 0.05 Total ilirubin decreased from 20.0 (SD 8.9 to 13.3 (SD 5.0 until 6.2 (SD 4.0 mg/dL (p < 0.05, while the phosphates alkaline (ALP and γ-glutamil transpeptidase (γ-GT activities also decreased ignificantly. In conclusion, bile acids accumulation and excessive hepatocyte poptosis through bile duct decompression improve the liver secretion functions by inhibition mechanism.

  15. Biosynthesis of resorcylic acid lactone lasiodiplodin in Lasiodiplodia theobromae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashima, Takasumi; Takahashi, Kosaku; Matsuura, Hideyuki; Nabeta, Kensuke

    2009-05-01

    The biosynthesis of lasiodiplodin (1) and its (5S)-5-hydroxylated derivative (2) were investigated by the administration of (13)C-labeled acetates to Lasiodiplodia theobromae. The labeling patterns of biosynthetically (13)C-labeled 1 and 2 were determined by (13)C-NMR and INADEQUATE spectra, demonstrating the octaketide origins of 1 and 2. Taking into account the biosynthetic study of resorcylic acid lactones, the involvement of highly reduced acyl intermediates in the biosynthesis of lasiodiplodins was presumed; thus, we synthesized (2)H-labeled hypothetical acyl intermediates of 1, 9-hydroxydecanoic acid (4) and its N-acetylcysteamine thioester (SNAC, 5). When L. theobromae was incubated with 5 mM of a (2)H-labeled intermediate, the (2)H-label from the intermediate was incorporated at the expected position of 1. These incorporation studies revealed that 1 was produced via a pathway which closely resembles that of resorcylic acid lactone biosynthesis. PMID:19420710

  16. Decreased hepatotoxic bile acid composition and altered synthesis in progressive human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lake, April D. [University of Arizona, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Novak, Petr [Biology Centre ASCR, Institute of Plant Molecular Biology, Ceske Budejovice 37001 (Czech Republic); Shipkova, Petia; Aranibar, Nelly; Robertson, Donald; Reily, Michael D. [Pharmaceutical Candidate Optimization, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Lu, Zhenqiang [The Arizona Statistical Consulting Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D. [Pharmaceutical Candidate Optimization, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Cherrington, Nathan J., E-mail: cherrington@pharmacy.arizona.edu [University of Arizona, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Bile acids (BAs) have many physiological roles and exhibit both toxic and protective influences within the liver. Alterations in the BA profile may be the result of disease induced liver injury. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a prevalent form of chronic liver disease characterized by the pathophysiological progression from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The hypothesis of this study is that the ‘classical’ (neutral) and ‘alternative’ (acidic) BA synthesis pathways are altered together with hepatic BA composition during progression of human NAFLD. This study employed the use of transcriptomic and metabolomic assays to study the hepatic toxicologic BA profile in progressive human NAFLD. Individual human liver samples diagnosed as normal, steatosis, and NASH were utilized in the assays. The transcriptomic analysis of 70 BA genes revealed an enrichment of downregulated BA metabolism and transcription factor/receptor genes in livers diagnosed as NASH. Increased mRNA expression of BAAT and CYP7B1 was observed in contrast to decreased CYP8B1 expression in NASH samples. The BA metabolomic profile of NASH livers exhibited an increase in taurine together with elevated levels of conjugated BA species, taurocholic acid (TCA) and taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA). Conversely, cholic acid (CA) and glycodeoxycholic acid (GDCA) were decreased in NASH liver. These findings reveal a potential shift toward the alternative pathway of BA synthesis during NASH, mediated by increased mRNA and protein expression of CYP7B1. Overall, the transcriptomic changes of BA synthesis pathway enzymes together with altered hepatic BA composition signify an attempt by the liver to reduce hepatotoxicity during disease progression to NASH. - Highlights: ► Altered hepatic bile acid composition is observed in progressive NAFLD. ► Bile acid synthesis enzymes are transcriptionally altered in NASH livers. ► Increased levels of taurine and conjugated bile acids

  17. Bile components and amino acids affect survival of the newly excysted juvenile Clonorchis sinensis in maintaining media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shunyu; Kim, Tae Im; Yoo, Won Gi; Cho, Pyo Yun; Kim, Tong-Soo; Hong, Sung-Jong

    2008-10-01

    Clonorchis sinensis thrives on bile juice. The effects of bile and bile acids on newly excysted juvenile C. sinensis (CsNEJ) were studied in terms of survival. Survival of CsNEJs maintained in 1x Locke's solution, Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium, NCTC 109, Eagle's, RPMI 1640, and 0.1% glucose was high, but dropped rapidly in 2x Locke's, 0.85% NaCl, and phosphate-buffered saline. Most amino acids in the media favored CsNEJ survival; however, aspartic and glutamic acids and adenine reduced survival. Survival was also significantly lower in media containing more than 0.1% bile. CsNEJs preconditioned in low bile media survived longer in higher bile media. All bile acids and conjugated bile salts were found to favor CsNEJ survival, except for lithocholic acid (LCA) which was toxic. NCTC 109 medium was found to be optimal for the in vitro maintenance of CsNEJs and 1x Locke's solution to be suitable for analyzing the biological effects of bioactive compounds and molecules. Based on these results, we propose that bile acids enhance activity of CsNEJs, but LCA deteriorate CsNEJs.

  18. Detection of atypical bile acids in disease states and their identification by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-computer techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szczepanik-Van Leeuwen, P. A.; Stellaard, F.

    1978-01-01

    The study of the bile acid constituents of serum, bile, urine, and stool of patients exhibiting liver disease has increased in importance with the availability of newer methods for their detection and identification. A cogent question for study has been whether specific bile acids are toxic and thus are the cause of liver disease, or whether they accumulate as a result of disease-induced alteration in metabolism. Examining a wide variety of clinical samples, we have observed that many patients with diagnosed cholestasis show the presence of atypical bile acids due to metabolic aberrations in either the side chain or in the steroid ring. Because cholestasis represents a spectrum of diseases with differing metabolic and/or anatomic defects and because our studies cover a variety of cholestatic states, we have sought to establish a correlation between the presence of these atypical bile acids and the disease state. The complexity of the bile acid mixtures to be examined requires that gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric-computer techniques be used to provide a reliable analysis. It is believed that atypical bile acids can be readily identified by GC/CI mass spectrometry with great sensitivity. It is also believed that such bile acid analysis may prove useful to the study and diagnosis of liver disease. Present data suggest that the identification of atypical bile acids in biological samples may enable differentiation between different types of intrahepatic cholestasis. Such analyses may prove useful to distinguish specific diseases, such as Byler's disease (and Byler's-like cholestasis) from other types of cholestasis and may distinguish diseases involving mitochondrial defects. Finally, the presence of atypical bile acids may indicate, by the particular compounds formed, where and what kind of damage occurs in a disease and may ultimately establish if these atypical bile acids are a cause or effect of the liver damage.

  19. Pyrene appended bile acid conjugates: Synthesis and a structure-gelation property study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shreedhar Bhat; Arto Valkonen; Juha Koivukorpi; Anupama Ambika; Erkki Kolehmainen; Uday Maitra; Kari Rissanen

    2011-07-01

    A wide variety of novel compounds obtained by combining two types of known organogelators, viz., bile acid alkyl amides and pyrene alkanoic acids, were synthesized and screened for their gelation ability. The 3 esters of 1-pyrene butyric acid (PBA) of alkylamides of deoxycholic acid (DCA) turned out to be effective in the gel formation with many organic solvents although the gelation has to be triggered by the addition of a charge transfer (CT) agent 2,4,7-trinitrofluorenone (TNF). The special feature of these molecules is that the organogelation is achieved only after derivatizing the acid moiety of the 1-pyrenealkanoic acids. Additionally, the gelation properties can be fine-tuned by inserting different functional groups at the bile acid side chain. The gels obtained are deep red in colour and optically transparent up to 2% w/v. The SEM studies of the obtained xerogels revealed bundled rod-like morphology without specialized branching.

  20. Bile acids via FXR initiate the expression of major transporters involved in the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids in newborn mice

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Julia Yue; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Tanaka, Yuji; Fu, Zidong Donna; Guo, Ying; Guo, Grace Liejun; Lu, Hong; Zhong, Xiao-bo; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2012-01-01

    The enterohepatic circulation (EHC) of bile acids (BAs) plays a pivotal role in facilitating lipid absorption. Therefore, initiation of the EHC in newborns is of crucial importance for lipid absorption from milk. The purpose of this study was to determine at what age BA transporters in liver are expressed, and the mechanism for their initiation. Serum and liver samples were collected from C57BL/6 mice at 2 days before birth and various postnatal ages. Messenger RNA assays revealed a dramatic ...

  1. In Vitro bile acid binding of kale, mustard greens, broccoli, cabbage and green bell pepper improves with microwave cooking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bile acid binding potential of foods and food fractions has been related to lowering the risk of heart disease and that of cancer. Sautéing or steam cooking has been observed to significantly improve bile acid binding of green/leafy vegetables. It was hypothesized that microwave cooking could impr...

  2. Intestinal FXR-mediated FGF15 production contributes to diurnal control of hepatic bile acid synthesis in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroeve, Johanna H. M.; Brufau, Gemma; Stellaard, Frans; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Staels, Bart; Kuipers, Folkert

    2010-01-01

    Hepatic bile acid synthesis is subject to complex modes of transcriptional control, in which the bile acid-activated nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) in liver and intestine-derived, FXR-controlled fibroblast growth factor 15 (Fgf15) are involved. The Fgf15 pathway is assumed to contribute

  3. Serum bile acids are higher in humans with prior gastric bypass: potential contribution to improved glucose and lipid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patti, Mary-Elizabeth; Houten, Sander M; Bianco, Antonio C;

    2009-01-01

    index cohort (n = 10). Total serum bile acid concentrations were higher in GB (8.90 +/- 4.84 micromol/l) than in both overweight (3.59 +/- 1.95, P = 0.005, Ov) and severely obese (3.86 +/- 1.51, P = 0.045, MOb). Bile acid subfractions taurochenodeoxycholic, taurodeoxycholic, glycocholic...

  4. Biliary bile acids in birds of the Cotingidae family: taurine-conjugated (24R,25R)-3α,7α,24-trihydroxy-5β-cholestan-27-oic acid and two epimers (25R and 25S) of 3α,7α-dihydroxy-5β-cholestan-27-oic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagey, Lee R; Iida, Takashi; Ogawa, Shoujiro; Adachi, Yuuki; Une, Mizuho; Mushiake, Kumiko; Maekawa, Masamitsu; Shimada, Miki; Mano, Nariyasu; Hofmann, Alan F

    2011-01-01

    Three C(27) bile acids were found to be major biliary bile acids in the capuchinbird (Perissocephalus tricolor) and bare-throated bellbird (Procnias nudicollis), both members of the Cotingidae family of the order Passeriformes. The individual bile acids were isolated by preparative RP-HPLC, and their structures were established by RP-HPLC, LC/ESI-MS/MS and NMR as well as by a comparison of their chromatographic properties with those of authentic reference standards of their 12α-hydroxy derivatives. The most abundant bile acid present in the capuchinbird bile was the taurine conjugate of C(27) (24R,25R)-3α,7α,24-trihydroxy-5β-cholestan-27-oic acid, a diastereomer not previously identified as a natural bile acid. The four diastereomers of taurine-conjugated (24ξ,25ξ)-3α,7α,24-trihydroxy-5β-cholestan-27-oic acid could be distinguished by NMR and were resolved by RP-HPLC. The RRT of the diastereomers (with taurocholic acid as 1.0) were found to be increased in the following order: (24R,25R)taurine conjugates) in both bird species. Epimers of the two compounds could be distinguished by their NMR spectra and resolved by RP-HPLC with the (25S)-epimer eluting before the (25R)-epimer. Characterization of the taurine-conjugated (24R,25R)-3α,7α,24-trihydroxy-5β-cholestan-27-oic acid and two epimers (25R and 25S) of 3α,7α-dihydroxy-5β-cholestan-27-oic acid should facilitate their detection in peroxisomal disease and inborn errors of bile acid biosynthesis. PMID:21600907

  5. Biliary bile acids in birds of the Cotingidae family: taurine-conjugated (24R,25R)-3α,7α,24-trihydroxy-5β-cholestan-27-oic acid and two epimers (25R and 25S) of 3α,7α-dihydroxy-5β-cholestan-27-oic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagey, Lee R; Iida, Takashi; Ogawa, Shoujiro; Adachi, Yuuki; Une, Mizuho; Mushiake, Kumiko; Maekawa, Masamitsu; Shimada, Miki; Mano, Nariyasu; Hofmann, Alan F

    2011-01-01

    Three C(27) bile acids were found to be major biliary bile acids in the capuchinbird (Perissocephalus tricolor) and bare-throated bellbird (Procnias nudicollis), both members of the Cotingidae family of the order Passeriformes. The individual bile acids were isolated by preparative RP-HPLC, and their structures were established by RP-HPLC, LC/ESI-MS/MS and NMR as well as by a comparison of their chromatographic properties with those of authentic reference standards of their 12α-hydroxy derivatives. The most abundant bile acid present in the capuchinbird bile was the taurine conjugate of C(27) (24R,25R)-3α,7α,24-trihydroxy-5β-cholestan-27-oic acid, a diastereomer not previously identified as a natural bile acid. The four diastereomers of taurine-conjugated (24ξ,25ξ)-3α,7α,24-trihydroxy-5β-cholestan-27-oic acid could be distinguished by NMR and were resolved by RP-HPLC. The RRT of the diastereomers (with taurocholic acid as 1.0) were found to be increased in the following order: (24R,25R)taurine conjugates) in both bird species. Epimers of the two compounds could be distinguished by their NMR spectra and resolved by RP-HPLC with the (25S)-epimer eluting before the (25R)-epimer. Characterization of the taurine-conjugated (24R,25R)-3α,7α,24-trihydroxy-5β-cholestan-27-oic acid and two epimers (25R and 25S) of 3α,7α-dihydroxy-5β-cholestan-27-oic acid should facilitate their detection in peroxisomal disease and inborn errors of bile acid biosynthesis.

  6. Dietary ɛ-Polylysine Decreased Serum and Liver Lipid Contents by Enhancing Fecal Lipid Excretion Irrespective of Increased Hepatic Fatty Acid Biosynthesis-Related Enzymes Activities in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosomi, Ryota; Yamamoto, Daiki; Otsuka, Ren; Nishiyama, Toshimasa; Yoshida, Munehiro; Fukunaga, Kenji

    2015-03-01

    ɛ-Polylysine (EPL) is used as a natural preservative in food. However, few studies have been conducted to assess the beneficial functions of dietary EPL. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanism underlying the inhibition of neutral and acidic sterol absorption and hepatic enzyme activity-related fatty acid biosynthesis following EPL intake. EPL digest prepared using an in vitro digestion model had lower lipase activity and micellar lipid solubility and higher bile acid binding capacity than casein digest. Male Wistar rats were fed an AIN-93G diet containing 1% (wt/wt) EPL or l-lysine. After 4 weeks of feeding these diets, the marked decrease in serum and liver triacylglycerol contents by the EPL diet was partly attributed to increased fecal fatty acid excretion. The activities of hepatic acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, which are key enzymes of fatty acid biosynthesis, were enhanced in rats fed EPL diet. The increased fatty acid biosynthesis activity due to dietary EPL may be prevented by the enhancement of fecal fatty acid excretion. The hypocholesterolemic effect of EPL was mediated by increased fecal neutral and acidic sterol excretions due to the EPL digest suppressing micellar lipid solubility and high bile acid binding capacity. These results show that dietary EPL has beneficial effects that could help prevent lifestyle-related diseases such as hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis. PMID:25866749

  7. Oxidative stress markers, secondary bile acids and sulfated bile acids classify the clinical liver injury type: Promising diagnostic biomarkers for cholestasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masubuchi, Noriko; Sugihara, Masahiro; Sugita, Tomonori; Amano, Katsushi; Nakano, Masanori; Matsuura, Tomokazu

    2016-08-01

    Clinicians sometimes encounter difficulty in choosing a therapeutic strategy due to the uncertainty regarding the type of liver injury. In particular, cholestasis is difficult to diagnose by conventional markers at an early stage of disease. The aim of this study was to identify promising biomarkers for distinguishing the symptom-based types of liver injury (e.g. hepatocellular injury, cholestasis), which was derived from a rigorously statistical perspective. The associations between diagnostic biomarkers (e.g. bile acid components, oxidative stress markers and liver fibrosis markers) and the liver injury types were assessed by a multiple logistic regression analysis using 304 blood samples from patients with liver disease. As a result, reductions in the lithocholic acid (LCA) and deoxycholic acid (DCA) levels, and elevation of the serum sulfated bile acid (SSBA), liver fibrosis marker IV collagen (type IV collagen), hyaluronic acid (HA) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were all significantly associated with cholestasis. On the other hand, elevations in the LCA and type IV collagen levels, and a reduction in the ursodeoxy cholic acid (UDCA) level, were significantly associated with hepatocellular injury. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses showed that the largest area under the ROC curve (AUC) was found for ROS, followed by DCA, HA, LCA, SSBA and type IV collagen in the cholestatic-type cases. These results indicated that ROS, the secondary bile acid levels such as DCA and LCA, and SSBA are promising biomarkers for cholestasis and for classifying the type of liver injuries. This comprehensive approach will allow for an accurate diagnosis, which will facilitate the selection of an appropriate therapy at the onset of disease. PMID:26325587

  8. Lipid binding protein response to a bile acid library: a combined NMR and statistical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaselli, Simona; Pagano, Katiuscia; Boulton, Stephen; Zanzoni, Serena; Melacini, Giuseppe; Molinari, Henriette; Ragona, Laura

    2015-11-01

    Primary bile acids, differing in hydroxylation pattern, are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver and, once formed, can undergo extensive enzyme-catalysed glycine/taurine conjugation, giving rise to a complex mixture, the bile acid pool. Composition and concentration of the bile acid pool may be altered in diseases, posing a general question on the response of the carrier (bile acid binding protein) to the binding of ligands with different hydrophobic and steric profiles. A collection of NMR experiments (H/D exchange, HET-SOFAST, ePHOGSY NOESY/ROESY and (15) N relaxation measurements) was thus performed on apo and five different holo proteins, to monitor the binding pocket accessibility and dynamics. The ensemble of obtained data could be rationalized by a statistical approach, based on chemical shift covariance analysis, in terms of residue-specific correlations and collective protein response to ligand binding. The results indicate that the same residues are influenced by diverse chemical stresses: ligand binding always induces silencing of motions at the protein portal with a concomitant conformational rearrangement of a network of residues, located at the protein anti-portal region. This network of amino acids, which do not belong to the binding site, forms a contiguous surface, sensing the presence of the bound lipids, with a signalling role in switching protein-membrane interactions on and off.

  9. Biofilm Formation and Detachment in Gram-Negative Pathogens Is Modulated by Select Bile Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Laura M; Cheng, Andrew T; Warner, Christopher J A; Townsley, Loni; Peach, Kelly C; Navarro, Gabriel; Shikuma, Nicholas J; Bray, Walter M; Riener, Romina M; Yildiz, Fitnat H; Linington, Roger G

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are a ubiquitous feature of microbial community structure in both natural and host environments; they enhance transmission and infectivity of pathogens and provide protection from human defense mechanisms and antibiotics. However, few natural products are known that impact biofilm formation or persistence for either environmental or pathogenic bacteria. Using the combination of a novel natural products library from the fish microbiome and an image-based screen for biofilm inhibition, we describe the identification of taurine-conjugated bile acids as inhibitors of biofilm formation against both Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Taurocholic acid (1) was isolated from the fermentation broth of the fish microbiome-derived strain of Rhodococcus erythropolis and identified using standard NMR and MS methods. Screening of the twelve predominant human steroidal bile acid components revealed that a subset of these compounds can inhibit biofilm formation, induce detachment of preformed biofilms under static conditions, and that these compounds display distinct structure-activity relationships against V. cholerae and P. aeruginosa. Our findings highlight the significance of distinct bile acid components in the regulation of biofilm formation and dispersion in two different clinically relevant bacterial pathogens, and suggest that the bile acids, which are endogenous mammalian metabolites used to solubilize dietary fats, may also play a role in maintaining host health against bacterial infection.

  10. Development of a bile acid-based newborn screen for Niemann-Pick disease type C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xuntian; Sidhu, Rohini; Mydock-McGrane, Laurel; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Covey, Douglas F; Scherrer, David E; Earley, Brian; Gale, Sarah E; Farhat, Nicole Y; Porter, Forbes D; Dietzen, Dennis J; Orsini, Joseph J; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Zhang, Xiaokui; Reunert, Janice; Marquardt, Thorsten; Runz, Heiko; Giugliani, Roberto; Schaffer, Jean E; Ory, Daniel S

    2016-05-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) is a fatal, neurodegenerative, cholesterol storage disorder. With new therapeutics in clinical trials, it is imperative to improve diagnostics and facilitate early intervention. We used metabolomic profiling to identify potential markers and discovered three unknown bile acids that were increased in plasma from NPC but not control subjects. The bile acids most elevated in the NPC subjects were identified as 3β,5α,6β-trihydroxycholanic acid and its glycine conjugate, which were shown to be metabolites of cholestane-3β,5α,6β-triol, an oxysterol elevated in NPC. A high-throughput mass spectrometry-based method was developed and validated to measure the glycine-conjugated bile acid in dried blood spots. Analysis of dried blood spots from 4992 controls, 134 NPC carriers, and 44 NPC subjects provided 100% sensitivity and specificity in the study samples. Quantification of the bile acid in dried blood spots, therefore, provides the basis for a newborn screen for NPC that is ready for piloting in newborn screening programs. PMID:27147587

  11. Biofilm Formation and Detachment in Gram-Negative Pathogens Is Modulated by Select Bile Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Laura M; Cheng, Andrew T; Warner, Christopher J A; Townsley, Loni; Peach, Kelly C; Navarro, Gabriel; Shikuma, Nicholas J; Bray, Walter M; Riener, Romina M; Yildiz, Fitnat H; Linington, Roger G

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are a ubiquitous feature of microbial community structure in both natural and host environments; they enhance transmission and infectivity of pathogens and provide protection from human defense mechanisms and antibiotics. However, few natural products are known that impact biofilm formation or persistence for either environmental or pathogenic bacteria. Using the combination of a novel natural products library from the fish microbiome and an image-based screen for biofilm inhibition, we describe the identification of taurine-conjugated bile acids as inhibitors of biofilm formation against both Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Taurocholic acid (1) was isolated from the fermentation broth of the fish microbiome-derived strain of Rhodococcus erythropolis and identified using standard NMR and MS methods. Screening of the twelve predominant human steroidal bile acid components revealed that a subset of these compounds can inhibit biofilm formation, induce detachment of preformed biofilms under static conditions, and that these compounds display distinct structure-activity relationships against V. cholerae and P. aeruginosa. Our findings highlight the significance of distinct bile acid components in the regulation of biofilm formation and dispersion in two different clinically relevant bacterial pathogens, and suggest that the bile acids, which are endogenous mammalian metabolites used to solubilize dietary fats, may also play a role in maintaining host health against bacterial infection. PMID:26992172

  12. Biofilm Formation and Detachment in Gram-Negative Pathogens Is Modulated by Select Bile Acids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M Sanchez

    Full Text Available Biofilms are a ubiquitous feature of microbial community structure in both natural and host environments; they enhance transmission and infectivity of pathogens and provide protection from human defense mechanisms and antibiotics. However, few natural products are known that impact biofilm formation or persistence for either environmental or pathogenic bacteria. Using the combination of a novel natural products library from the fish microbiome and an image-based screen for biofilm inhibition, we describe the identification of taurine-conjugated bile acids as inhibitors of biofilm formation against both Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Taurocholic acid (1 was isolated from the fermentation broth of the fish microbiome-derived strain of Rhodococcus erythropolis and identified using standard NMR and MS methods. Screening of the twelve predominant human steroidal bile acid components revealed that a subset of these compounds can inhibit biofilm formation, induce detachment of preformed biofilms under static conditions, and that these compounds display distinct structure-activity relationships against V. cholerae and P. aeruginosa. Our findings highlight the significance of distinct bile acid components in the regulation of biofilm formation and dispersion in two different clinically relevant bacterial pathogens, and suggest that the bile acids, which are endogenous mammalian metabolites used to solubilize dietary fats, may also play a role in maintaining host health against bacterial infection.

  13. Is biliary bile acid a good predictor for acute cellular rejection in living donor liver transplantation?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammed Saied Hedaya; Walid M. El Moghazy; YamamotoYasutomo; Tomioka Kiyoshi; Toshimi Kaido; Hiroto Egawa; Shinji Uemoto; Yasutsugu Takada

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In liver transplantation, acute cellular rejection (ACR) is still a major complication that can lead to mortality. Bile secretion has been considered as a marker of early graft function. METHODS: The study included 41 adults who received living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) at Kyoto University Hospital between April 2007 and February 2008. The patients were stratified according to the presence or absence of ACR. Bile samples were collected from donors once and from recipients every other day for the first 2 weeks after transplantation. Total bile acid (BA) and taurine-conjugated bile acid (TCBA) in bile were measured by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The recipient/donor (R/D) BA ratio and R/D TCBA ratio were calculated. RESULTS: The ACR group (n=12) showed a greater decrease in BA post-transplantation than the non-ACR group, but this difference was not statistically significant. On both day 7 and day 9 post-transplantation the R/D TCBA was significantly different between the two groups (P=0.038 on day 7 and P=0.036 on day 9). The R/D TCBA ratio ≥0.5 on days 7 and 9, and ≥0.38 on day 11 post-transplantation were associated with better ACR-free survival. CONCLUSION: The recipient/donor TCBA ratio can be a predictor for ACR after LDLT as early as post-transplantation day 7.

  14. Bile acids are "homeotrophic" sensors of the functional hepatic capacity and regulate adaptive growth during liver regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier, Andreas; Trautwein, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Liver mass depends on one or more unidentified humoral signals that drive regeneration when liver functional capacity is diminished. Bile acids are important liver products, and their levels are tightly regulated. Here, we identify a role for nuclear receptor-dependent bile acid signaling in normal liver regeneration. Elevated bile acid levels accelerate regeneration, and decreased levels inhibit liver regrowth, as does the absence of the primary nuclear bile acid receptor FXR. We propose that FXR activation by increased bile acid flux is a signal of decreased functional capacity of the liver. FXR, and possibly other nuclear receptors, may promote homeostasis not only by regulating expression of appropriate metabolic target genes but also by driving homeotrophic liver growth.

  15. Fecal free and conjugated bile acids and neutral sterols in vegetarians, omnivores, and patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpela, J T; Adlercreutz, H; Turunen, M J

    1988-04-01

    Increased excretion and intestinal bacterial metabolism of bile acids and neutral sterols have been suggested to be associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer. We determined fecal neutral sterol and bile acid profiles by new capillary column gas-liquid chromatographic methods in 18 patients with colorectal cancer, 10 omnivores, and 10 vegetarians. The methods also determine concentrations of esterified neutral sterols and saponifiable bile acids formed by intestinal bacterial action. Patients with colorectal cancer had the highest concentrations of neutral animal sterols, the lowest degree of esterification of neutral sterols, the lowest relative amount of saponifiable bile acids, and the highest concentrations of unconjugated primary bile acids. These differences were statistically significant (p less than 0.05) and more profound when the patients were compared with vegetarians than with omnivores. Since epidemiologic studies suggest that vegetarians have a lower risk of colorectal cancer than omnivores, these differences are discussed as possible risk factors for colorectal cancer. PMID:3387891

  16. Suppression of bile acid synthesis by thyroid hormone in primary human hepatocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ewa Cristine Siljevik Ellis

    2006-01-01

    AIM: It is known that thyroid hormones alter the bile acid metabolism in humans, however the effect on individual enzymes has been difficult to elucidate.This is mainly due to the lack of human liver cell lines producing bile acids. We used cultures of primary human hepatocytes to study the effects of triiodothyronine (T3) on bile acid synthesis.METHODS: Primary hepatocytes were isolated from liver tissue obtained from three different patients undergoing liver resection due to underlying malignancy. The hepatocytes were cultured under serum-free conditions and treated from d 1 to d 5 with culture containing 0.1-1000 nmol/L of T3. Bile acid formation and mRNA levels of key enzymes were analysed.RESULTS: The lowest concentration of T3 decreased cholic acid (CA) formation to 43%-53% of controls and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) to 52%-75% of controls on d 5. The highest dose further decreased CA formation to 16%-48% of controls while CDCA formation remained at 50%-117% of controls. Expression of mRNA levels of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) and sterol 12α-hydroxylase (CYP8B1) dose-dependently decreased.Sterol 27-hydroxylase (CYP27A1) levels also decreased,but not to the same extent.CONCLUSION: T3 dose-dependently decreased total bile acid formation in parallel with decreased expression of CYP7A1 and CYP8B1. CA formation is inhibited to a higher degree than CDCA, resulting in a marked decrease in the CA/CDCA ratio.

  17. Basal efflux of bile acids contributes to drug-induced bile acid-dependent hepatocyte toxicity in rat sandwich-cultured hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susukida, Takeshi; Sekine, Shuichi; Ogimura, Eiichiro; Aoki, Shigeki; Oizumi, Kumiko; Horie, Toshiharu; Ito, Kousei

    2015-10-01

    The bile salt export pump (BSEP or Bsep) functions as an apical transporter to eliminate bile acids (BAs) from hepatocytes into the bile. BSEP or Bsep inhibitors engender BA retention, suggested as an underlying mechanism of cholestatic drug-induced liver injury. We previously reported a method to evaluate BSEP-mediated BA-dependent hepatocyte toxicity by using sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCHs). However, basal efflux transporters, including multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP or Mrp) 3 and 4, also participate in BA efflux. This study examined the contribution of basal efflux transporters to BA-dependent hepatocyte toxicity in rat SCHs. The apical efflux of [(3)H]taurocholic acid (TC) was potently inhibited by 10 μM cyclosporine A (CsA), with later inhibition of basal [(3)H]TC efflux, while MK571 simultaneously inhibited both apical and basal [(3)H]TC efflux. CsA-induced BA-dependent hepatocyte toxicity was 30% at most at 10 μM CsA and ∼60% at 50 μM, while MK571 exacerbated hepatocyte toxicity at concentrations of ≥50 μM. Quinidine inhibited only basal [(3)H]TC efflux and showed BA-dependent hepatocyte toxicity in rat SCHs. Hence, inhibition of basal efflux transporters as well as Bsep may precipitate BA-dependent hepatocyte toxicity in rat SCHs. PMID:26055650

  18. Studies of cholesterol and bile acid metabolism, and early atherogenesis in hamsters fed GT16-239, a novel bile acid sequestrant (BAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, T A; Nicolosi, R J; Rogers, E J; Sacchiero, R; Goldberg, D J

    1998-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of GT16-239, an alkylated, cross-linked poly(allylamine) bile acid sequestrant with cholestyramine on cholesterol and bile acid metabolism, and early aortic atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic male F1B Golden Syrian hamsters. In this controlled study, 42 hamsters were divided into six groups and were fed a chow-based hypercholesterolemic diet supplemented with a 10% oil blend (55% coconut/45% corn), 0.1% cholesterol (w/w) (control) and either 0.9 or 1.2% cholestyramine or 0.2, 0.4 or 0.6% GT16-239 for 13 weeks. Laboratory analyses included evaluating plasma lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations, hepatic HMG-CoA reductase and 7 alpha-hydroxylase activities, fecal excretion of bile acids and neutral sterols, hepatic cholesterol concentrations, and early atherosclerosis (aortic fatty streak area). Relative to the control diet, the 0.6% GT16-239 versus the 1.2% cholestyramine significantly inhibited the elevation of plasma lipoprotein total cholesterol (TC) (-69% vs -40%), high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) (-49% vs -30%), and non-HDL-C (-81 vs -48%) concentrations; increased the activities of both HMG-CoA reductase (1492% vs 62%) and 7 alpha-hydroxylase (175% vs 86%); lowered the concentration of hepatic cholesteryl ester (-94% vs -59%); increased fecal cholesterol concentration (+28% vs -10%); and decreased aortic fatty streak area (-100% vs -86%). Unexpected findings of this comparison were increased fecal concentrations of cholic acid (533%) and chenodeoxycholic acid (400%) and the reduction in lithocholic acid (-50%) in the 0.6% GT16-239 compared to the 1.2% cholestyramine group. In summary, GT16-239 had a greater impact on cholesterol metabolism and early atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic hamsters than cholestyramine.

  19. Investigation of side chain liquid crystal polymers bearing cholesterol and bile acid derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Junhua; Stephen Freiberg; Francois Brisse; C.Géraldine Bazuin; Zhu Xiaoxia

    2004-01-01

    Cholic acid (or 3a,7a,12a-trihydoxyl-5a-cholan-24-oic acid) and lithocholic acid (or 3a-hydroxyl-5a-cholanic-24-oic acid) are commonly occurring bile acids synthesized from cholesterol in the liver in mammals. They all possess a steroid skeleton containing four rings, three with six carbons and one with five carbons. The transformation of cholesterol to cholic acid results in two major structural changes that affect the steroid skeleton. The first is the hydrogenation of the double bond between C5 and C6 and the second is a conformational flip of ring A from the 5a-position to the 5a-position. In addition, one or more hydroxyl groups are added to the steroid skeleton. Outside of the ring system, C24 is converted from a saturated alkyl to a carboxylic acid group.Side chain polymers based on cholesterol moiety have been made as reported in the literature.Since bile acids and cholesterol are all in the family of steroid molecules, it is of interest to investigate whether bile acids may also act as mesogenic groups.Therefore, flexible spacer groups with 10 carbons are introduced between bile acid skeleton and the poymerizable double bonds. The monomers and polymers are compared with cholesterol and dihydrocholesterol monomers and polymers with the same spacers. Dihydrocholesterol is chosen to investigate the influence of the double bond in the formation of LC, given that both cholesterol and dihydrocholesterol have a planar structure but there is no double bond in the latter. These monomers and their corresponding polymers were characterized for their liquid crystalline (LC) properties by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), polarizing optical microscopy (POM) and X-ray diffraction.It was found that only the compounds bearing the planar cholesterol moieties possess LC phases. It is concluded that the 5a-configuration between the first and second cycles on the steroid skeleton of bile acids does not favor proper alignment of the rigid part of the bile acid moieties

  20. Artificial Lignification of Maize Cell Walls Does Not Affect Bile Acid Adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bile acid adsorption by lignified dietary fiber in the human intestine is proposed as a mechanism for lowering blood cholesterol level and reducing colon cancer risk. In this study, we investigated how the concentration and composition of lignin in fiber influences the in vitro adsorption of primary...

  1. Metformin interferes with bile acid homeostasis through AMPK-FXR crosstalk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Fleur; Berthier, Alexandre; Bouchaert, Emmanuel; Gheeraert, Céline; Alexandre, Jeremy; Porez, Geoffrey; Prawitt, Janne; Dehondt, Hélène; Ploton, Maheul; Colin, Sophie; Lucas, Anthony; Patrice, Alexandre; Pattou, François; Diemer, Hélène; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Rachez, Christophe; Kamilic, Jelena; Groen, Albert K; Staels, Bart; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2014-03-01

    The nuclear bile acid receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is an important transcriptional regulator of bile acid, lipid, and glucose metabolism. FXR is highly expressed in the liver and intestine and controls the synthesis and enterohepatic circulation of bile acids. However, little is known about FXR-associated proteins that contribute to metabolic regulation. Here, we performed a mass spectrometry-based search for FXR-interacting proteins in human hepatoma cells and identified AMPK as a coregulator of FXR. FXR interacted with the nutrient-sensitive kinase AMPK in the cytoplasm of target cells and was phosphorylated in its hinge domain. In cultured human and murine hepatocytes and enterocytes, pharmacological activation of AMPK inhibited FXR transcriptional activity and prevented FXR coactivator recruitment to promoters of FXR-regulated genes. Furthermore, treatment with AMPK activators, including the antidiabetic biguanide metformin, inhibited FXR agonist induction of FXR target genes in mouse liver and intestine. In a mouse model of intrahepatic cholestasis, metformin treatment induced FXR phosphorylation, perturbed bile acid homeostasis, and worsened liver injury. Together, our data indicate that AMPK directly phosphorylates and regulates FXR transcriptional activity to precipitate liver injury under conditions favoring cholestasis. PMID:24531544

  2. Transmembrane domain II of the human bile acid transporter SLC10A2 coordinates sodium translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabit, Hairat; Mallajosyula, Sairam S; MacKerell, Alexander D; Swaan, Peter W

    2013-11-01

    Human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (hASBT, SLC10A2) is responsible for intestinal reabsorption of bile acids and plays a key role in cholesterol homeostasis. We used a targeted and systematic approach to delineate the role of highly conserved transmembrane helix 2 on the expression and function of hASBT. Cysteine mutation significantly depressed transport activity for >60% of mutants without affecting cell surface localization of the transporter. All mutants were inaccessible toward chemical modification by membrane-impermeant MTSET reagent, strongly suggesting that transmembrane 2 (TM2) plays an indirect role in bile acid substrate translocation. Both bile acid uptake and sodium dependence of TM2 mutants revealed a distinct α-helical periodicity. Kinetic studies with conservative and non-conservative mutants of sodium sensitive residues further underscored the importance of Gln(75), Phe(76), Met(79), Gly(83), Leu(86), Phe(90), and Asp(91) in hASBT function. Computational analysis indicated that Asp(91) may coordinate with sodium during the transport cycle. Combined, our data propose that a consortium of sodium-sensitive residues along with previously reported residues (Thr(134), Leu(138), and Thr(149)) from TM3 may form the sodium binding and translocation pathway. Notably, residues Gln(75), Met(79), Thr(82), and Leu(86) from TM2 are highly conserved in TM3 of a putative remote bacterial homologue (ASBTNM), suggesting a universal mechanism for the SLC10A transporter family.

  3. Role of amidation in bile acid effect on DNA synthesis by regenerating mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbero, E R; Herrera, M C; Monte, M J; Serrano, M A; Marin, J J

    1995-06-01

    Effect of bile acids on DNA synthesis by the regenerating liver was investigated in mice in vivo after partial hepatectomy (PH). Radioactivity incorporation into DNA after [14C]thymidine intraperitoneal administration peaked at 48 h after PH. At this time a significant taurocholate-induced dose-dependent reduction in DNA synthesis without changes in total liver radioactivity content was found (half-maximal effect at approximately 0.1 mumol/g body wt). Effect of taurocholate (0.5 mumol/g body wt) was mimicked by chocolate, ursodeoxycholate, deoxycholate, dehydrocholate, tauroursodeoxycholate, taurochenodeoxycholate, and taurodeoxycholate. In contrast, chenodeoxycholate, glycocholate, glycochenodeoxycholate, glycoursodeoxycholate, glycodeoxycholate, 5 beta-cholestane, bromosulfophthalein, and free taurine lacked this effect. No relationship between hydrophobic-hydrophilic balance and inhibitory effect was observed. Analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography indicated that inhibition of thymidine incorporation into DNA was not accompanied by an accumulation of phosphorylated DNA precursors in the liver but rather by a parallel increase in nucleotide catabolism. Bile acid-induced modifications in DNA synthesis were observed in vivo even in the absence of changes in toxicity tests, which suggests that the inhibitory effect shared by most unconjugated and tauroconjugated bile acids but not by glycoconjugated bile acids should be accounted for by mechanisms other than nonselective liver cell injury. PMID:7611405

  4. Bile acids induce hepatic stellate cell proliferation via activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svegliati-Baroni, G; Ridolfi, F; Hannivoort, R; Saccomanno, S; Homan, M; De Minicis, S; Jansen, PLM; Candelaresi, C; Benedetti, A; Moshage, H

    2005-01-01

    Background B Aims: Hepatic stellate cell (HSC) proliferation is a key event in the development of liver fibrosis. In many liver diseases, HSCs are exposed to inflammatory cytokines, reactive oxygen species, and bile acids. Although inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species are known to prom

  5. Analysis of fecal bile acids and neutral steroids using gas-liquid chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Srikumar, T.S.; Wezendonk, B.; Dokkum, W. van

    1998-01-01

    In the present pilot study, for investigating the physiological effects of different types of nondigestible oligosaccharides, we have validated the application of methodologies for the analysis of bile acids and neutral steroids in feces of human subjects. The accuracy of the extraction and chromato

  6. Plasma bile acids are not associated with energy metabolism in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brufau, Gemma; Bahr, Matthias J.; Staels, Bart; Claudel, Thierry; Ockenga, Johann; Boker, Klaus H. W.; Murphy, Elizabeth J.; Prado, Kris; Stellaard, Frans; Manns, Michael P.; Kuipers, Folkert; Tietge, Uwe J. F.

    2010-01-01

    Bile acids (BA) have recently been shown to increase energy expenditure in mice, but this concept has not been tested in humans. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between plasma BA levels and energy expenditure in humans. Type 2 diabetic (T2DM) patients (n = 12) and gender, age and BMI-mat

  7. Bile acid malabsorption in patients with chronic diarrhoea: clinical value of SeHCAT test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildt, Signe; Nørby Rasmussen, S; Madsen, Jan Lysgård;

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bile acid malabsorption (BAM), a cause of chronic diarrhoea, can be diagnosed by the SeHCAT test. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of SeHCAT testing by assessing the extent of BAM and describing the clinical characteristics in a group of patients with chronic...

  8. Bile acids and bariatric surgery%胆汁酸与减重手术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘光耀; 王群伟; 刘威

    2015-01-01

    As an essential metabolic molecule, bile acids regulate triglyceride, cholesterol, energy metabolism. Bariatric surgery offers a treatment that can reduce weight and induce metabolic syndrome, but the mechanism is still unclear. New researches reveal that serum bile acids are elevated after surgery, as well as the improvement of metabolic disease. The surgery changes gastrointestinal tract, resulting in a short circuiting of the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids. Here we review the bile acids metabolism and their effect after bariatric surgery.%胆汁酸作为机体的重要代谢信号分子,参与了糖类、脂肪及能量的代谢。减重手术目前是治疗治疗肥胖症和代谢综合征有效途径之一,但其机制尚不明确。研究发现,减重手术后胆汁酸水平明显升高,并且与代谢综合征改善正相关。由于减重手术后胃肠道生理结构发生变化,必然会对胆汁酸代谢产生影响。本文对胆汁酸对代谢和对减重手术的影响作一综述。

  9. High-fat-induced intestinal permeability dysfunction associated with altered fecal bile acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lotta K Stenman; Reetta Holma; Riitta Korpela

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate whether high-fat-feeding is associated with increased intestinal permeability via alterations in bile acid metabolism.METHODS:Male C57B1/6J mice were fed on a high-fat (n =26) or low-fat diet (n =24) for 15 wk.Intestinal permeability was measured from duodenum,jejunum,ileum and colon in an Ussing chamber system using 4 kDa FITC-labeled dextran as an indicator.Fecal bile acids were analyzed with gas chromatography.Segments of jejunum and colon were analyzed for the expression of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF).RESULTS:Intestinal permeability was significantly increased by high-fat feeding in jejunum (median 0.334 for control vs 0.393 for high-fat,P =0.03) and colon (0.335 for control vs 0.433 for high-fat,P =0.01),but not in duodenum or ileum.The concentration of nearly all identified bile acids was significantly increased by high-fat feeding (P < 0.001).The proportion of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in all bile acids was decreased (1.4% ± 0.1% in high-fat vs 2.8% ± 0.3% in controls,P < 0.01) and correlated inversely with intestinal permeability (r =-0.72,P =0.01).High-fat feeding also increased jejunal FXR expression,as well as TNF expression along the intestine,especially in the colon.CONCLUSION:High-fat-feeding increased intestinal permeability,perhaps by a mechanism related to bile acid metabolism,namely a decreased proportion of fecal UDCA and increased FXR expression.

  10. An optimized probucol microencapsulated formulation integrating a secondary bile acid (deoxycholic acid as a permeation enhancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mooranian A

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Armin Mooranian,1 Rebecca Negrulj,1 Nigel Chen-Tan,2 Gerald F Watts,3 Frank Arfuso,4 Hani Al-Salami11Biotechnology and Drug Development Research Laboratory, School of Pharmacy, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Biosciences Research Precinct, Curtin University, 2Faculty of Science and Engineering, Curtin University, 3School of Medicine and Pharmacology, Royal Perth Hospital, University of Western Australia, 4School of Biomedical Science, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Biosciences Research Precinct, Curtin University, Perth, AustraliaAbstract: The authors have previously designed, developed, and characterized a novel microencapsulated formulation as a platform for the targeted delivery of therapeutics in an animal model of type 2 diabetes, using the drug probucol (PB. The aim of this study was to optimize PB microcapsules by incorporating the bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA, which has good permeation-enhancing properties, and to examine its effect on microcapsules’ morphology, rheology, structural and surface characteristics, and excipients’ chemical and thermal compatibilities. Microencapsulation was carried out using a BÜCHI-based microencapsulating system established in the authors’ laboratory. Using the polymer sodium alginate (SA, two microencapsulated formulations were prepared: PB-SA (control and PB-DCA-SA (test at a constant ratio (1:30 and 1:3:30, respectively. Complete characterization of the microcapsules was carried out. The incorporation of DCA resulted in better structural and surface characteristics, uniform morphology, and stable chemical and thermal profiles, while size and rheological parameters remained similar to control. In addition, PB-DCA-SA microcapsules showed good excipients’ compatibilities, which were supported by data from differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray studies, suggesting

  11. Hydroxycholesterols in serum from hypercholesterolaemic patients with and without bile acid sequestrant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Doormaal, J J; Smit, N; Koopman, B J; van der Molen, J C; Wolthers, B G; Doorenbos, H

    1989-05-31

    To assess the effect of bile acid sequestrant therapy on bile acid precursors in plasma, we determined hydroxycholesterols in serum from patients with primary hypercholesterolaemia. Compared with a group of 5 male and 12 female patients without any lipid-lowering drug therapy, which has normal to slightly elevated 7 alpha-hydroxycholesterol, normal 7 beta-hydroxycholesterol and high normal to elevated 26-hydroxycholesterol levels, a group of 5 male and 9 female patients, using colestipol had higher 7 alpha-hydroxycholesterol without overlap, and higher 7 beta-hydroxycholesterol levels, but similar levels of 26-hydroxycholesterol. In the latter group, the ratio between 7 alpha-hydroxycholesterol and total cholesterol in serum was also higher without overlap. Both groups did not differ for age, body weight, body mass index and serum lipid levels. In the group of patients without lipid-lowering drug therapy, 7 alpha-hydroxycholesterol correlated positively with total and low-densitylipoprotein cholesterol, 7 beta-hydroxycholesterol negatively with body weight and body mass index, and 26-hydroxycholesterol positively with body weight. In both groups, 7 alpha-hydroxycholesterol correlated positively with 7 beta-hydroxycholesterol. These results suggest that (1) bile acid sequestrants enhance bile acid synthesis via the 7 alpha-hydroxylation but not via the 26-hydroxylation pathway, (2) serum 7 alpha-hydroxycholesterol level and the ratio between this hydroxycholesterol and total cholesterol in serum might be suitable parameters to check intake of bile acid sequestrants irrespective of dose, and (3) 7 beta-hydroxycholesterol is unlikely to be the result of cholesterol auto-oxidation in vitro.

  12. Effect of various antibiotics on modulation of intestinal microbiota and bile acid profile in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Youcai; Limaye, Pallavi B.; Renaud, Helen J.; Klaassen, Curtis D., E-mail: curtisklaassenphd@gmail.com

    2014-06-01

    Antibiotic treatments have been used to modulate intestinal bacteria and investigate the role of intestinal bacteria on bile acid (BA) homeostasis. However, knowledge on which intestinal bacteria and bile acids are modified by antibiotics is limited. In the present study, mice were administered various antibiotics, 47 of the most abundant bacterial species in intestine, as well as individual BAs in plasma, liver, and intestine were quantified. Compared to the two antibiotic combinations (vancomycin + imipenem and cephalothin + neomycin), the three single antibiotics (metronidazole, ciprofloxacin and aztreonam) have less effect on intestinal bacterial profiles, and thus on host BA profiles and mRNA expression of genes that are important for BA homeostasis. The two antibiotic combinations decreased the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes in intestine, as well as most secondary BAs in serum, liver and intestine. Additionally, the two antibiotic combinations significantly increased mRNA of the hepatic BA uptake transporters (Ntcp and Oatp1b2) and canalicular BA efflux transporters (Bsep and Mrp2), but decreased mRNA of the hepatic BA synthetic enzyme Cyp8b1, suggesting an elevated enterohepatic circulation of BAs. Interestingly, the two antibiotic combinations tended to have opposite effect on the mRNAs of most intestinal genes, which tended to be inhibited by vancomycin + imipenem but stimulated by cephalothin + neomycin. To conclude, the present study clearly shows that various antibiotics have distinct effects on modulating intestinal bacteria and host BA metabolism. - Highlights: • Various antibiotics have different effects on intestinal bacteria. • Antibiotics alter bile acid composition in mouse liver and intestine. • Antibiotics influence genes involved in bile acid homeostasis. • Clostridia appear to be important for secondary bile acid formation.

  13. Bile acids activate fibroblast growth factor 19 signaling in human hepatocytes to inhibit cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Kwang-Hoon; Li, Tiangang; Owsley, Erika; Strom, Stephen; Chiang, John Y. L.

    2009-01-01

    Mouse fibroblast growth factor 15 (FGF15) and human ortholog FGF19 have been identified as the bile acid-induced intestinal factors that mediate bile acid feedback inhibition of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase gene transcription in mouse liver. The mechanism underlying FGF15/FGF19 inhibition of bile acid synthesis in hepatocytes remains unclear. Chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) and a farnesoid X receptor (FXR)-specific agonist GW4064 strongly induced FGF19 but inhibited CYP7A1 mRNA levels in primary h...

  14. Overexpression of Cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase promotes hepatic bile acid synthesis and secretion and maintains cholesterol homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Tiangang; Matozel, Michelle; Boehme, Shannon; Kong, Bo; Nilsson, Lisa-Mari; Guo, Grace; Ellis, Ewa; Chiang, John Y. L.

    2011-01-01

    We reported previously that mice overexpressing Cyp7a1 (Cyp7a1-tg) are protected against high fat diet-induced hypercholesterolemia, obesity and insulin resistance (1). Here we investigated the underlying mechanism of bile acid signaling in maintaining cholesterol homeostasis in Cyp7a1-tg mice. Cyp7a1-tg mice had 2-fold higher Cyp7a1 activity and bile acid pool than wild type mice. Gallbladder bile acid composition changed from predominantly cholic acid (57%) in wild type to chenodeoxycholic ...

  15. Auxin Biosynthesis: Are the Indole-3-Acetic Acid and Phenylacetic Acid Biosynthesis Pathways Mirror Images?1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, David S.; Smith, Jason; Chourey, Prem S.; McAdam, Erin L.; Quittenden, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The biosynthesis of the main auxin in plants (indole-3-acetic acid [IAA]) has been elucidated recently and is thought to involve the sequential conversion of Trp to indole-3-pyruvic acid to IAA. However, the pathway leading to a less well studied auxin, phenylacetic acid (PAA), remains unclear. Here, we present evidence from metabolism experiments that PAA is synthesized from the amino acid Phe, via phenylpyruvate. In pea (Pisum sativum), the reverse reaction, phenylpyruvate to Phe, is also demonstrated. However, despite similarities between the pathways leading to IAA and PAA, evidence from mutants in pea and maize (Zea mays) indicate that IAA biosynthetic enzymes are not the main enzymes for PAA biosynthesis. Instead, we identified a putative aromatic aminotransferase (PsArAT) from pea that may function in the PAA synthesis pathway. PMID:27208245

  16. Changes in Colonic Bile Acid Composition following Fecal Microbiota Transplantation Are Sufficient to Control Clostridium difficile Germination and Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingarden, Alexa R.; Dosa, Peter I.; DeWinter, Erin; Steer, Clifford J.; Shaughnessy, Megan K.; Johnson, James R.; Khoruts, Alexander; Sadowsky, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a highly effective therapy for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (R-CDI), but its mechanisms remain poorly understood. Emerging evidence suggests that gut bile acids have significant influence on the physiology of C. difficile, and therefore on patient susceptibility to recurrent infection. We analyzed spore germination of 10 clinical C. difficile isolates exposed to combinations of bile acids present in patient feces before and after FMT. Bile acids at concentrations found in patients’ feces prior to FMT induced germination of C. difficile, although with variable potency across different strains. However, bile acids at concentrations found in patients after FMT did not induce germination and inhibited vegetative growth of all C. difficile strains. Sequencing of the newly identified germinant receptor in C. difficile, CspC, revealed a possible correspondence of variation in germination responses across isolates with mutations in this receptor. This may be related to interstrain variability in spore germination and vegetative growth in response to bile acids seen in this and other studies. These results support the idea that intra-colonic bile acids play a key mechanistic role in the success of FMT, and suggests that novel therapeutic alternatives for treatment of R-CDI may be developed by targeted manipulation of bile acid composition in the colon. PMID:26789728

  17. Increased serum bile acid concentration following low-dose chronic administration of thioacetamide in rats, as evidenced by metabolomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Eun Sook; Kim, Gabin; Shin, Ho Jung; Park, Se-Myo; Oh, Jung-Hwa; Kim, Yong-Bum; Moon, Kyoung-Sik; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon; Jeong, Jayoung; Shin, Jae-Gook; Kim, Dong Hyun

    2015-10-15

    A liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOF-MS)-based metabolomics approach was employed to identify endogenous metabolites as potential biomarkers for thioacetamide (TAA)-induced liver injury. TAA (10 and 30mg/kg), a well-known hepatotoxic agent, was administered daily to male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats for 28days. We then conducted untargeted analyses of endogenous serum and liver metabolites. Partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was performed on serum and liver samples to evaluate metabolites associated with TAA-induced perturbation. TAA administration resulted in altered levels of bile acids, acyl carnitines, and phospholipids in serum and in the liver. We subsequently demonstrated and confirmed the occurrence of compromised bile acid homeostasis. TAA treatment significantly increased serum levels of conjugated bile acids in a dose-dependent manner, which correlated well with toxicity. However, hepatic levels of these metabolites were not substantially changed. Gene expression profiling showed that the hepatic mRNA levels of Ntcp, Bsep, and Oatp1b2 were significantly suppressed, whereas those of basolateral Mrp3 and Mrp4 were increased. Decreased levels of Ntcp, Oatp1b2, and Ostα proteins in the liver were confirmed by western blot analysis. These results suggest that serum bile acids might be increased due to the inhibition of bile acid enterohepatic circulation rather than increased endogenous bile acid synthesis. Moreover, serum bile acids are a good indicator of TAA-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:26222700

  18. Bile Acids Function Synergistically To Repress Invasion Gene Expression in Salmonella by Destabilizing the Invasion Regulator HilD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eade, Colleen R; Hung, Chien-Che; Bullard, Brian; Gonzalez-Escobedo, Geoffrey; Gunn, John S; Altier, Craig

    2016-08-01

    Salmonella spp. are carried by and can acutely infect agricultural animals and humans. After ingestion, salmonellae traverse the upper digestive tract and initiate tissue invasion of the distal ileum, a virulence process carried out by the type III secretion system encoded within Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1). Salmonellae coordinate SPI-1 expression with anatomical location via environmental cues, one of which is bile, a complex digestive fluid that causes potent repression of SPI-1 genes. The individual components of bile responsible for SPI-1 repression have not been previously characterized, nor have the bacterial signaling processes that modulate their effects been determined. Here, we characterize the mechanism by which bile represses SPI-1 expression. Individual bile acids exhibit repressive activity on SPI-1-regulated genes that requires neither passive diffusion nor OmpF-mediated entry. By using genetic methods, the effects of bile and bile acids were shown to require the invasion gene transcriptional activator hilD and to function independently of known upstream signaling pathways. Protein analysis techniques showed that SPI-1 repression by bile acids is mediated by posttranslational destabilization of HilD. Finally, we found that bile acids function synergistically to achieve the overall repressive activity of bile. These studies demonstrate a common mechanism by which diverse environmental cues (e.g., certain short-chain fatty acids and bile acids) inhibit SPI-1 expression. These data provide information relevant to Salmonella pathogenesis during acute infection in the intestine and during chronic infection of the gallbladder and inform the basis for development of therapeutics to inhibit invasion as a means of repressing Salmonella pathogenicity.

  19. Kinetics for the synthetic bile acid 75-selenohomocholic acid-taurine in humans: comparison with [14C]taurocholate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The apparent fractional turnover rate of the gamma-labeled bile acid analogue 75-selenohomocholic acid-taurine (75-SeHCAT) was assessed from decline in radioactivity over the gallbladder area on 4 successive days using a gamma-camera, and was compared in the same subjects with the fractional turnover rate of the corresponding natural bile acid, cholic acid-taurine, labeled with 14C ([14C]CAT) using the classical Lindstedt technique. Very similar results were obtained in 5 healthy individuals (coefficient of variation 4.8%, medians 0.35 and 0.34, respectively). By contrast, the fractional deconjugation rate assessed from zonal scanning of glycine- and taurine-conjugated bile acids on thin-layer chromatography was much less for 75-SeHCAT than for [14C]CAT (0.02 and 0.13, respectively; p less than 0.05). The fractional rate for deconjugation plus dehydroxylation was also determined by zonal scanning, and gave lower values for 75-SeHCAT than for [14C]CAT (0.02 and 0.12, respectively; p less than 0.05). There was a striking similarity between the fractional rate for deconjugation alone and that for deconjugation plus dehydroxylation for both bile acids in individual samples (r = 0.999, p less than 0.001), suggesting that these two processes might occur simultaneously and probably involve the same bacteria. We conclude that our scintiscanning technique provides an accurate, noninvasive method of measuring fractional turnover rate of a bile acid in humans, and that the finding that 75SeHCAT remains conjugated with taurine during enterohepatic recycling means that absorption should be specific for the ileal active transport site, thus rendering it an ideal substance for assessing ileal function

  20. Stress-induced biosynthesis of dicaffeoylquinic acids in globe artichoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moglia, Andrea; Lanteri, Sergio; Comino, Cinzia; Acquadro, Alberto; de Vos, Ric; Beekwilder, Jules

    2008-09-24

    Leaf extracts from globe artichoke ( Cynara cardunculus L. var. scolymus) have been widely used in medicine as hepatoprotectant and choleretic agents. Globe artichoke leaves represent a natural source of phenolic acids with dicaffeoylquinic acids, such as cynarin (1,3-dicaffeoylquinic acid), along with its biosynthetic precursor chlorogenic acid (5-caffeoylquinic acid) as the most abundant molecules. This paper reports the development of an experimental system to induce caffeoylquinic acids. This system may serve to study the regulation of the biosynthesis of (poly)phenolic compounds in globe artichoke and the genetic basis of this metabolic regulation. By means of HPLC-PDA and accurate mass LC-QTOF MS and MS/MS analyses, the major phenolic compounds in globe artichoke leaves were identified: four isomers of dicaffeoylquinic acid, three isomers of caffeoylquinic acid, and the flavone luteolin 7-glucoside. Next, plant material was identified in which the concentration of phenolic compounds was comparable in the absence of particular treatments, with the aim to use this material to test the effect of stress application on the regulation of biosynthesis of caffeoylquinic acids. Using this material, the effect of UV-C, methyl jasmonate, and salicylic acid treatments on (poly)phenolic compounds was tested in different globe artichoke genotypes. UV-C exposure consistently increased the levels of dicaffeoylquinic acids in all genotypes, whereas the effect on compounds from the same biosynthetic pathway, for example, chlorogenic acid and luteolin-7-glucoside, was much less pronounced and was not statistically significant. No effect of methyl jasmonate or salicylic acid was found. Time-response experiments indicated that the level of dicaffeoylquinic acids reached a maximum at 24 h after UV radiation. On the basis of these results a role of dicaffeoylquinic acids in UV protection in globe artichoke is hypothesized. PMID:18710252

  1. Modification on ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) scaffold. discovery of bile acid derivatives as selective agonists of cell-surface G-protein coupled bile acid receptor 1 (GP-BAR1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepe, Valentina; Renga, Barbara; Festa, Carmen; D'Amore, Claudio; Masullo, Dario; Cipriani, Sabrina; Di Leva, Francesco Saverio; Monti, Maria Chiara; Novellino, Ettore; Limongelli, Vittorio; Zampella, Angela; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2014-09-25

    Bile acids are signaling molecules interacting with the nuclear receptor FXR and the G-protein coupled receptor 1 (GP-BAR1/TGR5). GP-BAR1 is a promising pharmacological target for the treatment of steatohepatitis, type 2 diabetes, and obesity. Endogenous bile acids and currently available semisynthetic bile acids are poorly selective toward GP-BAR1 and FXR. Thus, in the present study we have investigated around the structure of UDCA, a clinically used bile acid devoid of FXR agonist activity, to develop a large family of side chain modified 3α,7β-dihydroxyl cholanoids that selectively activate GP-BAR1. In vivo and in vitro pharmacological evaluation demonstrated that administration of compound 16 selectively increases the expression of pro-glucagon 1, a GP-BAR1 target, in the small intestine, while it had no effect on FXR target genes in the liver. Further, compound 16 results in a significant reshaping of bile acid pool in a rodent model of cholestasis. These data demonstrate that UDCA is a useful scaffold to generate novel and selective steroidal ligands for GP-BAR1. PMID:25162837

  2. Involvement of snapdragon benzaldehyde dehydrogenase in benzoic acid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Michael C; Nagegowda, Dinesh A; Kaminaga, Yasuhisa; Ho, Kwok Ki; Kish, Christine M; Schnepp, Jennifer; Sherman, Debra; Weiner, Henry; Rhodes, David; Dudareva, Natalia

    2009-07-01

    Benzoic acid (BA) is an important building block in a wide spectrum of compounds varying from primary metabolites to secondary products. Benzoic acid biosynthesis from L-phenylalanine requires shortening of the propyl side chain by two carbons, which can occur via a beta-oxidative pathway or a non-beta-oxidative pathway, with benzaldehyde as a key intermediate. The non-beta-oxidative route requires benzaldehyde dehydrogenase (BALDH) to convert benzaldehyde to BA. Using a functional genomic approach, we identified an Antirrhinum majus (snapdragon) BALDH, which exhibits 40% identity to bacterial BALDH. Transcript profiling, biochemical characterization of the purified recombinant protein, molecular homology modeling, in vivo stable isotope labeling, and transient expression in petunia flowers reveal that BALDH is capable of oxidizing benzaldehyde to BA in vivo. GFP localization and immunogold labeling studies show that this biochemical step occurs in the mitochondria, raising a question about the role of subcellular compartmentalization in BA biosynthesis.

  3. Activation of Constitutive Androstane Receptor (CAR) in Mice Results in Maintained Biliary Excretion of Bile Acids Despite a Marked Decrease of Bile Acids in Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lickteig, Andrew J; Csanaky, Iván L; Pratt-Hyatt, Matthew; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2016-06-01

    Activation of Constitutive Androstane Receptor (CAR) protects against bile acid (BA)-induced liver injury. This study was performed to determine the effect of CAR activation on bile flow, BA profile, as well as expression of BA synthesis and transport genes. Synthetic CAR ligand 1,4-bis-[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene (TCPOBOP) was administered to mice for 4 days. BAs were quantified by UPLC-MS/MS (ultraperformance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry). CAR activation decreases total BAs in livers of male (49%) and female mice (26%), largely attributable to decreases of the 12α-hydroxylated BA taurocholic acid (T-CA) (males (M) 65%, females (F) 45%). Bile flow in both sexes was increased by CAR activation, and the increases were BA-independent. CAR activation did not alter biliary excretion of total BAs, but overall BA composition changed. Excretion of muricholic (6-hydroxylated) BAs was increased in males (101%), and the 12α-OH proportion of biliary BAs was decreased in both males (37%) and females (28%). The decrease of T-CA in livers of males and females correlates with the decreased mRNA of the sterol 12α-hydroxylase Cyp8b1 in males (71%) and females (54%). As a response to restore BAs to physiologic concentrations in liver, mRNA of Cyp7a1 is upregulated following TCPOBOP (males 185%, females 132%). In ilea, mRNA of the negative feedback regulator Fgf15 was unaltered by CAR activation, indicating biliary BA excretion was sufficient to maintain concentrations of total BAs in the small intestine. In summary, the effects of CAR activation on BAs in male and female mice are quite similar, with a marked decrease in the major BA T-CA in the liver.

  4. Hydrophobicity and Retention Coefficient of Selected Bile Acid Oxo Derivatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posa, Mihalj; Pilipovic, Ana; Lalic, Mladena; Popovic, Jovan

    2010-01-01

    Retention coefficients (k) of cholic acid and its keto derivatives are determined by means of Reversed Phase High Pressure Liquid Chromatography at different temperatures (303K, 309K, and 313K). At each studied temperature, retention factor decreases if the hydroxyl group in the cholic acid molecule

  5. Serum bile acids and risk factors for colorectal cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faassen, A. van; Tangerman, A.; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H.B.

    2004-01-01

    The ratio of deoxycholic acid to chenodeoxycholic acid in the serum of 62 men was inversely related to body mass index and to saturated fat intake after adjustment for body mass index, smoking, and age conversely, this ratio was associated positively with the intake of fibre from grains.

  6. Increased cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase expression and size of the bile acid pool in the lactating rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooton-Kee, Clavia Ruth; Cohen, David E.; Vore, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Maximal bile acid secretory rates and expression of bile acid transporters in liver and ileum are increased in lactation, possibly to facilitate increased enterohepatic recirculation of bile acids. We determined changes in the size and composition of the bile acid pool and key enzymes of the bile acid synthetic pathway [cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1), sterol 27-hydroxylase (Cyp27a1), and sterol 12α-hydroxylase (Cyp8b1)] in lactating rats relative to female virgin controls. The bile acid pool increased 1.9 to 2.5-fold [postpartum (PP) days 10, 14, and 19–23], compared with controls. A 1.5-fold increase in cholic acids and a 14 to 20% decrease in muricholic acids in lactation significantly increased the hydrophobicity index. In contrast, the hepatic concentration of bile acids and small heterodimer partner mRNA were unchanged in lactation. A 2.8-fold increase in Cyp7a1 mRNA expression at 16 h (10 h of light) demonstrated a shift in the diurnal rhythm at day 10 PP; Cyp7a1 protein expression and cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase activity were significantly increased at this time and remained elevated at day 14 PP but decreased to control levels by day 21 PP. There was an overall decrease in Cyp27a1 mRNA expression and a 20% decrease in Cyp27a1 protein expression, but there was no change in Cyp8b1 mRNA or protein expression at day 10 PP. The increase in Cyp7a1 expression PP provides a mechanism for the increase in the bile acid pool. PMID:18292185

  7. Cholesterol-lowering effect of rice bran protein containing bile acid-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jilite; Shimada, Masaya; Kato, Yukina; Kusada, Mio; Nagaoka, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Dietary plant protein is well known to reduce serum cholesterol levels. Rice bran is a by-product of rice milling and is a good source of protein. The present study examined whether feeding rats a high-cholesterol diet containing 10% rice bran protein (RBP) for 10 d affected cholesterol metabolism. Rats fed dietary RBP had lower serum total cholesterol levels and increased excretion of fecal steroids, such as cholesterol and bile acids, than those fed dietary casein. In vitro assays showed that RBP strongly bound to taurocholate, and inhibited the micellar solubility of cholesterol, compared with casein. Moreover, the bile acid-binding proteins of the RBP were eluted by a chromatographic column conjugated with cholic acid, and one of them was identified as hypothetical protein OsJ_13801 (NCBI accession No. EAZ29742) using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis. These results suggest that the hypocholesterolemic action of the RBP may be caused by the bile acid-binding proteins. PMID:25374002

  8. Bile acid-binding ability of kaki-tannin from young fruits of persimmon (Diospyros kaki) in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Kenji; Kadowaki, Akio; Ozaki, Natsumi; Takenaka, Makiko; Ono, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Shin-ichiro; Gato, Nobuki

    2011-04-01

    The bile acid-binding ability of a highly polymerized tannin (kaki-tannin) extracted from dried-young fruits of persimmon (Diospyros kaki) was examined. The kaki-tannin was composed mainly of epicatechin, epigallocatechin, epicatechin-3-O-gallate and epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate. Bile acid-binding ability of kaki-tannin was examined against cholic acid, glycocholic acid, taurocholic acid and deoxycholic acid in vitro, and its effect on fecal bile acid excretion in mice was also examined. Although the bile acid-binding ability of kaki-tannin was weaker than that of cholestyramine, kaki-tannin adsorbed all the bile acids tested and significantly promoted fecal bile acid excretion in mice when supplied at 1% (w/w) in the diet. PMID:20922818

  9. Navigation in bile acid chemical space: discovery of novel FXR and GPBAR1 ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finamore, Claudia; Festa, Carmen; Renga, Barbara; Sepe, Valentina; Carino, Adriana; Masullo, Dario; Biagioli, Michele; Marchianò, Silvia; Capolupo, Angela; Monti, Maria Chiara; Fiorucci, Stefano; Zampella, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids are signaling molecules interacting with nuclear receptors and membrane G-protein-coupled receptors. Among these receptors, the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and the membrane G-coupled receptor (GPBAR1) have gained increasing consideration as druggable receptors and their exogenous dual regulation represents an attractive strategy in the treatment of enterohepatic and metabolic disorders. However, the therapeutic use of dual modulators could be associated to severe side effects and therefore the discovery of selective GPBAR1 and FXR agonists is an essential step in the medicinal chemistry optimization of bile acid scaffold. In this study, a new series of 6-ethylcholane derivatives modified on the tetracyclic core and on the side chain has been designed and synthesized and their in vitro activities on FXR and GPBAR1 were assayed. This speculation resulted in the identification of compound 7 as a potent and selective GPBAR1 agonist and of several derivatives showing potent dual agonistic activity. PMID:27381677

  10. Role of farnesoid X receptor and bile acids in alcoholic liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Manley

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Alcoholic liver disease (ALD is one of the major causes of liver morbidity and mortality worldwide. Chronic alcohol consumption leads to development of liver pathogenesis encompassing steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and in extreme cases, hepatocellular carcinoma. Moreover, ALD may also associate with cholestasis. Emerging evidence now suggests that farnesoid X receptor (FXR and bile acids also play important roles in ALD. In this review, we discuss the effects of alcohol consumption on FXR, bile acids and gut microbiome as well as their impacts on ALD. Moreover, we summarize the findings on FXR, FoxO3a (forkhead box-containing protein class O3a and PPARα (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha in regulation of autophagy-related gene transcription program and liver injury in response to alcohol exposure.

  11. Impact of bile acids on the growth of human cholangiocarcinoma via FXR

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Yinxin; Dong Ying; Shi Yihui; Wang Hongxia; Dai Jiaqi; Wang Jian

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of different types of bile acids on proliferation of cholangiocarcinoma and the potential molecular mechanisms. Methods PCR assay and Western blot were performed to detect the expression of farnesoid × receptor (FXR) in mRNA and protein level. Immunohistochemical analysis was carried out to monitor the expression of FXR in cholangiocarcinoma tissues from 26 patients and 10 normal controls. The effects on in vivo tumo...

  12. Potent stimulation of fibroblast growth factor 19 expression in the human ileum by bile acids

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Justine H.; Nolan, Jonathan D.; Kennie, Sarah L.; Johnston, Ian M.; Dew, Tracy; Dixon, Peter H.; Williamson, Catherine; Walters, Julian R.F.

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) is proposed to be a negative feedback regulator of hepatic bile acid (BA) synthesis. We aimed to clarify the distribution of FGF19 expression in human intestine and to investigate induction in a novel explant system. Ileal and colonic mucosal biopsies were obtained at endoscopy and analyzed for FGF19 transcript expression. Primary explants were incubated with physiological concentrations of various BA for up to 6 h, and expression of FGF19 and other genes w...

  13. Bile acid-induced arrhythmia is mediated by muscarinic M2 receptors in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti H Sheikh Abdul Kadir

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP is a common disease affecting up to 5% of pregnancies and which can cause fetal arrhythmia and sudden intrauterine death. We previously demonstrated that bile acid taurocholate (TC, which is raised in the bloodstream of ICP, can acutely alter the rate and rhythm of contraction and induce abnormal calcium destabilization in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCM. Apart from their hepatic functions bile acids are ubiquitous signalling molecules with diverse systemic effects mediated by either the nuclear receptor FXR or by a recently discovered G-protein coupled receptor TGR5. We aim to investigate the mechanism of bile-acid induced arrhythmogenic effects in an in-vitro model of the fetal heart. METHODS AND RESULTS: Levels of bile acid transporters and nuclear receptor FXR were studied by quantitative real time PCR, western blot and immunostaining, which showed low levels of expression. We did not observe functional involvement of the canonical receptors FXR and TGR5. Instead, we found that TC binds to the muscarinic M(2 receptor in NRCM and serves as a partial agonist of this receptor in terms of inhibitory effect on intracellular cAMP and negative chronotropic response. Pharmacological inhibition and siRNA-knockdown of the M(2 receptor completely abolished the negative effect of TC on contraction, calcium transient amplitude and synchronisation in NRCM clusters. CONCLUSION: We conclude that in NRCM the TC-induced arrhythmia is mediated by the partial agonism at the M(2 receptor. This mechanism might serve as a promising new therapeutic target for fetal arrhythmia.

  14. Meconium Impairs Pulmonary Surfactant by a Combined Action of Cholesterol and Bile Acids

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez-Rodriguez, Elena; Echaide, Mercedes; Cruz, Antonio; Taeusch, H. William; Perez-Gil, Jesus

    2011-01-01

    Mechanisms for meconium-induced inactivation of pulmonary surfactant as part of the meconium aspiration syndrome in newborn infants, to our knowledge, are not clearly understood. Here we have studied the biophysical mechanisms of how meconium affects surface activity of pulmonary surfactant and whether the membrane-perturbing effects of meconium can be mimicked by exposure of surfactant to a mixture of bile acids and cholesterol. Surface activity of pulmonary surfactant complexes purified fro...

  15. Evaluation of a semiquantitative SNAP test for measurement of bile acids in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel L. Seibert

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Serum bile acids (SBA are used as a routine screening tool of liver function in dogs. Serum samples are usually shipped to a referral laboratory for quantitative analysis with an enzymatic chemistry analyzer. The canine SNAP Bile Acids Test (SNAP-BAT provides an immediate, semi-quantitative measurement of bile acid concentrations in-house. With the SNAP-BAT, bile acids concentrations of 5–30 µmol/L are quantified, and results outside of that range are classified as 30 µmol/L. Agreement of the SNAP-BAT with the enzymatic method has not been extensively investigated. Objectives. The purposes of this prospective clinical study were to assess the precision of the SNAP-BAT and determine agreement of SNAP-BAT with results from an in-house chemistry analyzer. Methods. After verifying intra-assay precision of the SNAP-BAT, a prospective analysis was performed using blood samples collected from 56 dogs suspected to have liver disease. Each sample was analyzed with an enzymatic, in-house chemistry analyzer and the SNAP-BAT. Agreement between the two methods was statistically assessed using the κ index of agreement. Results. Intra-assay variability was minimal. The κ index for agreement between the SNAP-BAT and routine chemistry analyzer was between 0.752 and 0.819, indicating substantial to near perfect agreement. Conclusions. The SNAP-BAT is a highly accurate, semi-quantitative test that yields immediate results, and has very little intra-assay variability, particularly for results >30 µmol/L.

  16. Evaluation of a semiquantitative SNAP test for measurement of bile acids in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, Rachel L; Tobias, Karen M; Reed, Ann; Snyder, Karl R

    2014-01-01

    Background. Serum bile acids (SBA) are used as a routine screening tool of liver function in dogs. Serum samples are usually shipped to a referral laboratory for quantitative analysis with an enzymatic chemistry analyzer. The canine SNAP Bile Acids Test (SNAP-BAT) provides an immediate, semi-quantitative measurement of bile acid concentrations in-house. With the SNAP-BAT, bile acids concentrations of 5-30 µmol/L are quantified, and results outside of that range are classified as 30 µmol/L. Agreement of the SNAP-BAT with the enzymatic method has not been extensively investigated. Objectives. The purposes of this prospective clinical study were to assess the precision of the SNAP-BAT and determine agreement of SNAP-BAT with results from an in-house chemistry analyzer. Methods. After verifying intra-assay precision of the SNAP-BAT, a prospective analysis was performed using blood samples collected from 56 dogs suspected to have liver disease. Each sample was analyzed with an enzymatic, in-house chemistry analyzer and the SNAP-BAT. Agreement between the two methods was statistically assessed using the κ index of agreement. Results. Intra-assay variability was minimal. The κ index for agreement between the SNAP-BAT and routine chemistry analyzer was between 0.752 and 0.819, indicating substantial to near perfect agreement. Conclusions. The SNAP-BAT is a highly accurate, semi-quantitative test that yields immediate results, and has very little intra-assay variability, particularly for results >30 µmol/L.

  17. The Interplay of the Gut Microbiome, Bile Acids, and Volatile Organic Compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Nidhi M. Sagar; Cree, Ian A; James A. Covington; Ramesh P Arasaradnam

    2015-01-01

    Background. There has been an increasing interest in the use of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as potential surrogate markers of gut dysbiosis in gastrointestinal disease. Gut dysbiosis occurs when pathological imbalances in gut bacterial colonies precipitate disease and has been linked to the dysmetabolism of bile acids (BA) in the gut. BA metabolites as a result of microbial transformations act as signaling molecules and have demonstrated regulation of intestinal homeostasis through the ...

  18. Effects of dietary cholesterol on cholesterol and bile acid homeostasis in patients with cholesterol gallstones.

    OpenAIRE

    Kern, F

    1994-01-01

    We examined changes in cholesterol and bile acid metabolism produced by dietary cholesterol in gallstone subjects and matched controls. Healthy women were recruited and, after confirming the presence or absence of radiolucent gallstones, they were studied on regular diets and again on the same diet supplemented with five eggs daily for 15-18 d. Studies included plasma lipids, lipoproteins and apolipoproteins, dietary records, cholesterol absorption, cholesterol synthesis, plasma clearance of ...

  19. Fish protein hydrolysate elevates plasma bile acids and reduces visceral adipose tissue mass in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liaset, Bjørn; Madsen, Lise; Hao, Qin;

    2009-01-01

    levels relative to rats fed soy protein or casein. Concomitantly, the saithe FPH fed rats had reduced liver lipids and fasting plasma TAG levels. Furthermore, visceral adipose tissue mass was reduced and expression of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation and energy expenditure was induced in perirenal....../retroperitoneal adipose tissues of rats fed saithe FPH. Our results provide the first evidence that dietary protein sources with different amino acid compositions can modulate the level of plasma bile acids and our data suggest potential novel mechanisms by which dietary protein sources can affect energy metabolism....

  20. Endogenous bile acid disposition in rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH) are used commonly to investigate hepatic transport protein-mediated uptake and biliary excretion of substrates. However, little is known about the disposition of endogenous bile acids (BAs) in SCH. In this study, four endogenous conjugated BAs common to rats and humans [taurocholic acid (TCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), taurochenodeoxycholic acid (TCDCA), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA)], as well as two BA species specific to rodents (α- and β-tauromuricholic acid; α/β TMCA), were profiled in primary rat and human SCH. Using B-CLEAR® technology, BAs were measured in cells + bile canaliculi, cells, and medium of SCH by LC-MS/MS. Results indicated that, just as in vivo, taurine-conjugated BA species were predominant in rat SCH, while glycine-conjugated BAs were predominant in human SCH. Total intracellular BAs remained relatively constant over days in culture in rat SCH. Total BAs in control (CTL) cells + bile, cells, and medium were approximately 3.4, 2.9, and 8.3-fold greater in human than in rat. The estimated intracellular concentrations of the measured total BAs were 64.3 ± 5.9 μM in CTL rat and 183 ± 56 μM in CTL human SCH, while medium concentrations of the total BAs measured were 1.16 ± 0.21 μM in CTL rat SCH and 9.61 ± 6.36 μM in CTL human SCH. Treatment of cells for 24 h with 10 μM troglitazone (TRO), an inhibitor of the bile salt export pump (BSEP) and the Na+-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP), had no significant effect on endogenous BAs measured at the end of the 24-h culture period, potentially due to compensatory mechanisms that maintain BA homeostasis. These data demonstrate that BAs in SCH are similar to in vivo, and that SCH may be a useful in vitro model to study alterations in BA disposition if species differences are taken into account. -- Highlights: ► Bile acids (BAs) were measured in rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH). ► Cell and medium BA concentrations were

  1. Endogenous bile acid disposition in rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marion, Tracy L., E-mail: tracylmarion@qualyst.com [Curriculum in Toxicology, UNC School of Medicine, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7270 (United States); Perry, Cassandra H., E-mail: cassandraperry@qualyst.com [Qualyst, Inc., Durham, NC 27713 (United States); St Claire, Robert L., E-mail: bobstclaire@qualyst.com [Qualyst, Inc., Durham, NC 27713 (United States); Brouwer, Kim L.R., E-mail: kbrouwer@unc.edu [Division of Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics, UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, CB 7569 Kerr Hall, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7569 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH) are used commonly to investigate hepatic transport protein-mediated uptake and biliary excretion of substrates. However, little is known about the disposition of endogenous bile acids (BAs) in SCH. In this study, four endogenous conjugated BAs common to rats and humans [taurocholic acid (TCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), taurochenodeoxycholic acid (TCDCA), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA)], as well as two BA species specific to rodents (α- and β-tauromuricholic acid; α/β TMCA), were profiled in primary rat and human SCH. Using B-CLEAR{sup ®} technology, BAs were measured in cells + bile canaliculi, cells, and medium of SCH by LC-MS/MS. Results indicated that, just as in vivo, taurine-conjugated BA species were predominant in rat SCH, while glycine-conjugated BAs were predominant in human SCH. Total intracellular BAs remained relatively constant over days in culture in rat SCH. Total BAs in control (CTL) cells + bile, cells, and medium were approximately 3.4, 2.9, and 8.3-fold greater in human than in rat. The estimated intracellular concentrations of the measured total BAs were 64.3 ± 5.9 μM in CTL rat and 183 ± 56 μM in CTL human SCH, while medium concentrations of the total BAs measured were 1.16 ± 0.21 μM in CTL rat SCH and 9.61 ± 6.36 μM in CTL human SCH. Treatment of cells for 24 h with 10 μM troglitazone (TRO), an inhibitor of the bile salt export pump (BSEP) and the Na{sup +}-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP), had no significant effect on endogenous BAs measured at the end of the 24-h culture period, potentially due to compensatory mechanisms that maintain BA homeostasis. These data demonstrate that BAs in SCH are similar to in vivo, and that SCH may be a useful in vitro model to study alterations in BA disposition if species differences are taken into account. -- Highlights: ► Bile acids (BAs) were measured in rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH). ► Cell and medium BA

  2. Biosynthesis of the halogenated auxin, 4-chloroindole-3-acetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tivendale, Nathan D; Davidson, Sandra E; Davies, Noel W; Smith, Jason A; Dalmais, Marion; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid I; Quittenden, Laura J; Sutton, Lily; Bala, Raj K; Le Signor, Christine; Thompson, Richard; Horne, James; Reid, James B; Ross, John J

    2012-07-01

    Seeds of several agriculturally important legumes are rich sources of the only halogenated plant hormone, 4-chloroindole-3-acetic acid. However, the biosynthesis of this auxin is poorly understood. Here, we show that in pea (Pisum sativum) seeds, 4-chloroindole-3-acetic acid is synthesized via the novel intermediate 4-chloroindole-3-pyruvic acid, which is produced from 4-chlorotryptophan by two aminotransferases, TRYPTOPHAN AMINOTRANSFERASE RELATED1 and TRYPTOPHAN AMINOTRANSFERASE RELATED2. We characterize a tar2 mutant, obtained by Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes, the seeds of which contain dramatically reduced 4-chloroindole-3-acetic acid levels as they mature. We also show that the widespread auxin, indole-3-acetic acid, is synthesized by a parallel pathway in pea. PMID:22573801

  3. GENETIC ANALYSIS OF ABSCISIC ACID BIOSYNTHESIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCCARTY D R

    2012-01-10

    The carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCD) catalyze synthesis of a variety of apo-carotenoid secondary metabolites in plants, animals and bacteria. In plants, the reaction catalyzed by the 11, 12, 9-cis-epoxy carotenoid dioxygenase (NCED) is the first committed and key regulated step in synthesis of the plant hormone, abscisic acid (ABA). ABA is a key regulator of plant stress responses and has critical functions in normal root and seed development. The molecular mechanisms responsible for developmental control of ABA synthesis in plant tissues are poorly understood. Five of the nine CCD genes present in the Arabidopsis genome encode NCED's involved in control of ABA synthesis in the plant. This project is focused on functional analysis of these five AtNCED genes as a key to understanding developmental regulation of ABA synthesis and dissecting the role of ABA in plant development. For this purpose, the project developed a comprehensive set of gene knockouts in the AtNCED genes that facilitate genetic dissection of ABA synthesis. These mutants were used in combination with key molecular tools to address the following specific objectives: (1) the role of ABA synthesis in root development; (2) developmental control of ABA synthesis in seeds; (3) analysis of ATNCED over-expressers; (4) preliminary crystallography of the maize VP14 protein.

  4. Relationship between entero-hepatic bile acid circulation and interdigestive migrating myoelectrical activity in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Fang; Lei Dong; Wei-Jin Zhang; Jin-Yan Luo

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of entero-hepatic bile acid circulation on the inter-digestive migrating myoelectrical complex (MMC) in rats.METHODS: Thirty-two rats were divided into four groups.Three pairs of bipolar silver electrodes were chronically implanted in the antrum, duodenum and jejunum. Three groups of them were ligated around the upper part of common bile duct (CBD). The experiments were performed in conscious and fasting state. The gastrointestinal myoelectrical activity was recorded. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) and saline were then perfused into stomachs of two groups with CBD obstruction and the effects of them on the MMC were observed.RESULTS: A typical pattern of MMC was observed in normal fasting rats. MMC of antral and duodenal origin disappeared temporarily in earlier stage of CBD obstruction. While MMC of jejunum origin appeared.increased MMC cycle duration was seen after 4 d in rats with CBD obstruction. The MMC after CBD obstruction was characterized by an increased duration of phase Ⅱ-like activity and decreased duration of phase Ⅰ & Ⅲ activity.Perfusion into stomachs with UDCA resulted in a shorter MMC cycle duration and a longer duration of phase Ⅲ of duodenal origin compared to the normal group.CONCLUSION: Entero-hepatic bile acid circulation initiates inter-digestive MMC of duodenal origin.

  5. Bile acid-activated nuclear receptor FXR suppresses apolipoprotein A-I transcription via a negative FXR response element

    OpenAIRE

    Claudel, Thierry; Sturm, Ekkehard; Duez, Hélène; Torra, Inés Pineda; Sirvent, Audrey; Kosykh, Vladimir; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; Dallongeville, Jean; Hum, Dean W; Kuipers, Folkert; Staels, Bart

    2002-01-01

    Serum levels of HDL are inversely correlated with the risk of coronary heart disease. The anti-atherogenic effect of HDL is partially mediated by its major protein constituent apoA-I. In this study, we identify bile acids that are activators of the nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) as negative regulators of human apoA-I expression. Intrahepatocellular accumulation of bile acids, as seen in patients with progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis and biliary atresia, was associate...

  6. Farnesylation mediates brassinosteroid biosynthesis to regulate abscisic acid responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northey, Julian G B; Liang, Siyu; Jamshed, Muhammad; Deb, Srijani; Foo, Eloise; Reid, James B; McCourt, Peter; Samuel, Marcus A

    2016-01-01

    Protein farnesylation is a post-translational modification involving the addition of a 15-carbon farnesyl isoprenoid to the carboxy terminus of select proteins(1-3). Although the roles of this lipid modification are clear in both fungal and animal signalling, many of the mechanistic functions of farnesylation in plant signalling are still unknown. Here, we show that CYP85A2, the cytochrome P450 enzyme that performs the last step in brassinosteroid biosynthesis (conversion of castasterone to brassinolide)(4), must be farnesylated to function in Arabidopsis. Loss of either CYP85A2 or CYP85A2 farnesylation results in reduced brassinolide accumulation and increased plant responsiveness to the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) and overall drought tolerance, explaining previous observations(5). This result not only directly links farnesylation to brassinosteroid biosynthesis but also suggests new strategies to maintain crop yield under challenging climatic conditions. PMID:27455172

  7. Perturbation of bile acid homeostasis is an early pathogenesis event of drug induced liver injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Makoto; Miyake, Manami; Sato, Hiroko; Masutomi, Naoya; Tsutsui, Naohisa; Adam, Klaus-Peter; Alexander, Danny C; Lawton, Kay A; Milburn, Michael V; Ryals, John A; Wulff, Jacob E; Guo, Lining

    2013-04-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a significant consideration for drug development. Current preclinical DILI assessment relying on histopathology and clinical chemistry has limitations in sensitivity and discordance with human. To gain insights on DILI pathogenesis and identify potential biomarkers for improved DILI detection, we performed untargeted metabolomic analyses on rats treated with thirteen known hepatotoxins causing various types of DILI: necrosis (acetaminophen, bendazac, cyclosporine A, carbon tetrachloride, ethionine), cholestasis (methapyrilene and naphthylisothiocyanate), steatosis (tetracycline and ticlopidine), and idiosyncratic (carbamazepine, chlorzoxasone, flutamide, and nimesulide) at two doses and two time points. Statistical analysis and pathway mapping of the nearly 1900 metabolites profiled in the plasma, urine, and liver revealed diverse time and dose dependent metabolic cascades leading to DILI by the hepatotoxins. The most consistent change induced by the hepatotoxins, detectable even at the early time point/low dose, was the significant elevations of a panel of bile acids in the plasma and urine, suggesting that DILI impaired hepatic bile acid uptake from the circulation. Furthermore, bile acid amidation in the hepatocytes was altered depending on the severity of the hepatotoxin-induced oxidative stress. The alteration of the bile acids was most evident by the necrosis and cholestasis hepatotoxins, with more subtle effects by the steatosis and idiosyncratic hepatotoxins. Taking together, our data suggest that the perturbation of bile acid homeostasis is an early event of DILI. Upon further validation, selected bile acids in the circulation could be potentially used as sensitive and early DILI preclinical biomarkers. PMID:23360887

  8. Red Yeast Rice Increases Excretion of Bile Acids in Hamsters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KA-YING MA; ZE-SHENG ZHANG; SHU-XIN ZHAO; QI CHANG; YIN-MEI WONG; SAI YING VENUS YEUNG; YU HUANG; ZHEN-YU CHEN

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the hypocholesterolemic activity of red yeast rice (RYR) and its underlying mechanism. Methods Three groups of hamsters were fed either the control diet or one of the two experimental diets containing by weight 0.1% RYR (0.1RYR) or 0.3% RYR (0.3RYR). Blood (0.5 mL) was collected from the retro-orbital sinus into a heparinized capillary tube at the end of week 0,3, and 6.Plasma lipoproteins were measured using enzymatic kits, while fecal neutral and acidic sterols were quantified using a gas-liquid chromatography. Results Plasma total cholesterol was reduced by 12% in 0.1RYR group and by 18% in 0.3RYR group compared with the control value. Similarly, plasma triacylglycerol was decreased by ll% in 0.1RYR group and by 24% in 0.3RYR group. Western blotting analysis demonstrated that RYR had no effect on sterol regulatory element binding protein 2, liver X receptor, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutary-CoA reductase, LDL receptor, and cholesterol-7α-hydroxylase. HPLC analysis confirmed that RYR contained 0.88% monacolin K.It was recently found that RYR supplementation increased excretion of fecal acidic sterols by 3-4 folds compared with the control value. Conclusion Hypocholesterolemic activity of RYR is mediated at least partially by enhancement of acidic sterol excretion.

  9. Pepsin and bile acid concentrations in sputum of mustard gas exposed patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Karbasi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Gastro-esophageal reflux has been suggested to be associated with several pulmonary complications such as asthma, and post-transplant bronchiolitis obliterans (BO. Pepsin or bile salts in the sputum is shown to be an optimal molecular marker of gastric contents macro/micro aspiration. In this study, we investigated sputum pepsin as a marker of micro-aspiration in sulfur mustard (SM exposed cases compared to healthy controls. Materials and Methods: In a case controlled study, 26 cases with BO and 12 matched healthy controls were recruited and all cases were symptomatic and their exposure to SM was previously documented during Iran-Iraq conflict. Pepsin levels in sputum and total bile acids were measured using enzymatic assay. The severity of respiratory disorder was categorized based upon the spirometric values. Result: The average concentration of pepsin in sputum was higher in the case group (0.29 ± 0.23 compared with healthy subjects (0.13 ± 0.07; P ± 0.003. Moreover, the average concentration of bile acids in the sputum cases was not significantly different in comparison to the controls ( P = 0.5. Conclusion: Higher pepsin concentrations in sputum of SM exposed patients compared with healthy control subjects indicate the occurrence of significantly more gastric micro-aspiration in SM exposed patients.

  10. Bile acid effects are mediated by ATP release and purinergic signalling in exocrine pancreatic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowal, Justyna Magdalena; Haanes, Kristian Agmund; Christensen, Nynne;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In many cells, bile acids (BAs) have a multitude of effects, some of which may be mediated by specific receptors such the TGR5 or FXR receptors. In pancreas systemic BAs, as well as intra-ductal BAs from bile reflux, can affect pancreatic secretion. Extracellular ATP and purinergic......) and duct cells (Capan-1). Taurine and glycine conjugated forms of CDCA had smaller effects on ATP release in Capan-1 cells. In duct monolayers, CDCA stimulated ATP release mainly from the luminal membrane; the releasing mechanisms involved both vesicular and non-vesicular secretion pathways. Duct cells...... increase [Ca(2+)]i. The TGR5 receptor is not involved in these processes but can play a protective role at high intracellular Ca(2+) conditions. We propose that purinergic signalling could be taken into consideration in other cells/organs, and thereby potentially explain some of the multifaceted effects...

  11. Fibroblast Growth Factor 19 and 7α-Hydroxy-4-Cholesten-3-one in the Diagnosis of Patients With Possible Bile Acid Diarrhea

    OpenAIRE

    Pattni, Sanjeev S; Brydon, W Gordon; Dew, Tracy; Walters, Julian R.F.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Increased colonic bile acids can cause chronic diarrhea. Bile acid diarrhea (BAD) is treatable by sequestrants, and may be secondary to ileal disease or primary BAD. It is underdiagnosed, partly because the selenium-75-homocholic acid taurine (SeHCAT) retention test is not available in many countries, and is underutilized in others. Serum 7α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4), a measure of bile acid synthesis, is available for diagnosis in specialist centers. Recently, deficiency of t...

  12. Semisynthetic bile acid FXR and TGR5 agonists: physicochemical properties, pharmacokinetics, and metabolism in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roda, Aldo; Pellicciari, Roberto; Gioiello, Antimo; Neri, Flavia; Camborata, Cecilia; Passeri, Daniela; De Franco, Francesca; Spinozzi, Silvia; Colliva, Carolina; Adorini, Luciano; Montagnani, Marco; Aldini, Rita

    2014-07-01

    We report on the relationship between the structure-pharmacokinetics, metabolism, and therapeutic activity of semisynthetic bile acid analogs, including 6α-ethyl-3α,7α-dihydroxy-5β-cholan-24-oic acid (a selective farnesoid X receptor [FXR] receptor agonist), 6α-ethyl-23(S)-methyl-3α,7α,12α-trihydroxy-5β-cholan-24-oic acid (a specific Takeda G protein-coupled receptor 5 [TGR5] receptor agonist), and 6α-ethyl-3α,7α-dihydroxy-24-nor-5β-cholan-23-sulfate (a dual FXR/TGR5 agonist). We measured the main physicochemical properties of these molecules, including ionization constants, water solubility, lipophilicity, detergency, and protein binding. Biliary secretion and metabolism and plasma and hepatic concentrations were evaluated by high-pressure liquid chromatography-electrospray-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry in bile fistula rat and compared with natural analogs chenodeoxycholic, cholic acid, and taurochenodexycholic acid and intestinal bacteria metabolism was evaluated in terms of 7α-dehydroxylase substrate-specificity in anaerobic human stool culture. The semisynthetic derivatives detergency, measured in terms of their critical micellar concentration, was quite similar to the natural analogs. They were slightly more lipophilic than the corresponding natural analogs, evaluated by their 1-octanol water partition coefficient (log P), because of the ethyl group in 6 position, which makes these molecules very stable toward bacterial 7-dehydroxylation. The hepatic metabolism and biliary secretion were different: 6α-ethyl-3α,7α-dihydroxy-5β-cholan-24-oic acid, as chenodeoxycholic acid, was efficiently conjugated with taurine in the liver and, only in this form, promptly and efficiently secreted in bile. 6α-Ethyl-23(S)-methyl-3α,7α,12α-trihydroxy-5β-cholan-24-oic acid was poorly conjugated with taurine because of the steric hindrance of the methyl at C23(S) position metabolized to the C23(R) isomer and partly conjugated with taurine. Conversely, 6

  13. Chemical Synthesis of Uncommon Natural Bile Acids: The 9α-Hydroxy Derivatives of Chenodeoxycholic and Lithocholic Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Takashi; Namegawa, Kazunari; Nakane, Naoya; Iida, Kyoko; Hofmann, Alan Frederick; Omura, Kaoru

    2016-09-01

    The chemical synthesis of the 9α-hydroxy derivatives of chenodeoxycholic and lithocholic acids is reported. For initiating the synthesis of the 9α-hydroxy derivative of chenodeoxycholic acid, cholic acid was used; for the synthesis of the 9α-hydroxy derivative of lithocholic acid, deoxycholic acid was used. The principal reactions involved were (1) decarbonylation of conjugated 12-oxo-Δ(9(11))-derivatives using in situ generated monochloroalane (AlH2Cl) prepared from LiAlH4 and AlCl3, (2) epoxidation of the deoxygenated Δ(9(11))-enes using m-chloroperbenzoic acid catalyzed by 4,4'-thiobis-(6-tert-butyl-3-methylphenol), (3) subsequent Markovnikov 9α-hydroxylation of the Δ(9(11))-enes with AlH2Cl, and (4) selective oxidation of the primary hydroxyl group at C-24 in the resulting 3α,9α,24-triol and 3α,7α,9α,24-tetrol to the corresponding C-24 carboxylic acids using sodium chlorite (NaClO2) in the presence of a catalytic amount of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl free radical (TEMPO) and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). The (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectra are reported. The 3α,7α,9α-trihydroxy-5β-cholan-24-oic acid has been reported to be present in the bile of the Asian bear, and its 7-deoxy derivative is likely to be a bacterial metabolite. These bile acids are now available as authentic reference standards, permitting their identification in vertebrate bile acids. PMID:27319285

  14. Effect of Methyl Jasmonic Acid on Baccatin Ⅲ Biosynthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jianfeng; GUO Zhigang

    2006-01-01

    As baccatin Ⅲ is an immediate diterpenoid precursor of taxol, the increase of baccatin Ⅲ is beneficial to the biosynthesis of taxol. Addition of methyl jasmonic acid (M J) enhances the activity of 10- deaceyle baccatin (DAB) Ⅲ acetyl transferase which catalyzes the bioconversion from 10-DAB Ⅲ to beccatin Ⅲ. In this paper, the baccatin Ⅲ content was increased by 174% by the addition of 100 μmol/L MJ in suspension cultures of Taxus cuspidate. Induction by MJ also increased the expression of a 49.0-kDa protein. This paper describes the cell free acetylation of 10-DAB Ⅲ in crude extracts of enzyme from the suspension cultures of Taxus cuspidate. The reaction product was confirmed by high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC). About 25.0% of the 10-DAB Ⅲ was acetylized into baccatin Ⅲ on the 4th day with 100 μmol/L MJ.The 10-DAB Ⅲ acetyl transferase activity reached a peak on the 2nd day with 100 μmol/L M J, with 54.7% of the 10-DAB Ⅲ transformed into baccatin Ⅲ. The baccatin Ⅲ content increased with the increase of 10-DAB Ⅲ acetyl transferase activity, although the biosynthesis was delayed by more than 24 h. The remarkable induction of MJ on baccatin Ⅲ biosynthesis shows a promising way to increase the production of taxol.

  15. SeHCAT [tauroselcholic (selenium-75) acid] for the investigation of bile acid malabsorption and measurement of bile acid pool loss: A systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Riemsma; M.J. Al (Maiwenn); I. Corro Ramos (Isaac); S.N. Deshpande; N. Armstrong (Nigel); S. Ryder; C. Noake; M. Krol; M. Oppe (Mark); J. Kleijnen (Jos); J.L. Severens (Hans)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstractBackground The principal diagnosis/indication for this assessment is chronic diarrhoea due to bile acid malabsorption (BAM). Diarrhoea can be defined as the abnormal passage of loose or liquid stools more than three times daily and/or a daily stool weight > 200 g per day and is con

  16. Oleanolic acid alters bile acid metabolism and produces cholestatic liver injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Zhang, Youcai; Wu, Kai Connie; Fan, Fang; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2013-11-01

    Oleanolic acid (OA) is a triterpenoids that exists widely in plants. OA is effective in protecting against hepatotoxicants. Whereas a low dose of OA is hepatoprotective, higher doses and longer-term use of OA produce liver injury. This study characterized OA-induced liver injury in mice. Adult C57BL/6 mice were given OA at doses of 0, 22.5, 45, 90, and 135 mg/kg, s.c., daily for 5 days, and liver injury was observed at doses of 90 mg/kg and above, as evidenced by increases in serum activities of alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase, increases in serum total bilirubin, as well as by liver histopathology. OA-induced cholestatic liver injury was further evidenced by marked increases of both unconjugated and conjugated bile acids (BAs) in serum. Gene and protein expression analysis suggested that livers of OA-treated mice had adaptive responses to prevent BA accumulation by suppressing BA biosynthetic enzyme genes (Cyp7a1, 8b1, 27a1, and 7b1); lowering BA uptake transporters (Ntcp and Oatp1b2); and increasing a BA efflux transporter (Ostβ). OA increased the expression of Nrf2 and its target gene, Nqo1, but decreased the expression of AhR, CAR and PPARα along with their target genes, Cyp1a2, Cyp2b10 and Cyp4a10. OA had minimal effects on PXR and Cyp3a11. Taken together, the present study characterized OA-induced liver injury, which is associated with altered BA homeostasis, and alerts its toxicity potential.

  17. Grape Seed Procyanidins and Cholestyramine Differentially Alter Bile Acid and Cholesterol Homeostatic Gene Expression in Mouse Intestine and Liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca M Heidker

    Full Text Available Bile acid (BA sequestrants, lipid-lowering agents, may be prescribed as a monotherapy or combination therapy to reduce the risk of coronary artery disease. Over 33% of adults in the United States use complementary and alternative medicine strategies, and we recently reported that grape seed procyanidin extract (GSPE reduces enterohepatic BA recirculation as a means to reduce serum triglyceride (TG levels. The current study was therefore designed to assess the effects on BA, cholesterol and TG homeostatic gene expression following co-administration with GSPE and the BA sequestrant, cholestyramine (CHY. Eight-week old male C57BL/6 mice were treated for 4 weeks with either a control or 2% CHY-supplemented diet, after which, they were administered vehicle or GSPE for 14 hours. Liver and intestines were harvested and gene expression was analyzed. BA, cholesterol, non-esterified fatty acid and TG levels were also analyzed in serum and feces. Results reveal that GSPE treatment alone, and co-administration with CHY, regulates BA, cholesterol and TG metabolism differently than CHY administration alone. Notably, GSPE decreased intestinal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (Asbt gene expression, while CHY significantly induced expression. Administration with GSPE or CHY robustly induced hepatic BA biosynthetic gene expression, especially cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1, compared to control, while co-administration further enhanced expression. Treatment with CHY induced both intestinal and hepatic cholesterologenic gene expression, while co-administration with GSPE attenuated the CHY-induced increase in the liver but not intestine. CHY also induced hepatic lipogenic gene expression, which was attenuated by co-administration with GSPE. Consequently, a 25% decrease in serum TG levels was observed in the CHY+GSPE group, compared to the CHY group. Collectively, this study presents novel evidence demonstrating that GSPE provides additive and

  18. Grape Seed Procyanidins and Cholestyramine Differentially Alter Bile Acid and Cholesterol Homeostatic Gene Expression in Mouse Intestine and Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidker, Rebecca M; Caiozzi, Gianella C; Ricketts, Marie-Louise

    2016-01-01

    Bile acid (BA) sequestrants, lipid-lowering agents, may be prescribed as a monotherapy or combination therapy to reduce the risk of coronary artery disease. Over 33% of adults in the United States use complementary and alternative medicine strategies, and we recently reported that grape seed procyanidin extract (GSPE) reduces enterohepatic BA recirculation as a means to reduce serum triglyceride (TG) levels. The current study was therefore designed to assess the effects on BA, cholesterol and TG homeostatic gene expression following co-administration with GSPE and the BA sequestrant, cholestyramine (CHY). Eight-week old male C57BL/6 mice were treated for 4 weeks with either a control or 2% CHY-supplemented diet, after which, they were administered vehicle or GSPE for 14 hours. Liver and intestines were harvested and gene expression was analyzed. BA, cholesterol, non-esterified fatty acid and TG levels were also analyzed in serum and feces. Results reveal that GSPE treatment alone, and co-administration with CHY, regulates BA, cholesterol and TG metabolism differently than CHY administration alone. Notably, GSPE decreased intestinal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (Asbt) gene expression, while CHY significantly induced expression. Administration with GSPE or CHY robustly induced hepatic BA biosynthetic gene expression, especially cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1), compared to control, while co-administration further enhanced expression. Treatment with CHY induced both intestinal and hepatic cholesterologenic gene expression, while co-administration with GSPE attenuated the CHY-induced increase in the liver but not intestine. CHY also induced hepatic lipogenic gene expression, which was attenuated by co-administration with GSPE. Consequently, a 25% decrease in serum TG levels was observed in the CHY+GSPE group, compared to the CHY group. Collectively, this study presents novel evidence demonstrating that GSPE provides additive and complementary

  19. Kinetic Modeling of Sunflower Grain Filling and Fatty Acid Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durruty, Ignacio; Aguirrezábal, Luis A N; Echarte, María M

    2016-01-01

    Grain growth and oil biosynthesis are complex processes that involve various enzymes placed in different sub-cellular compartments of the grain. In order to understand the mechanisms controlling grain weight and composition, we need mathematical models capable of simulating the dynamic behavior of the main components of the grain during the grain filling stage. In this paper, we present a non-structured mechanistic kinetic model developed for sunflower grains. The model was first calibrated for sunflower hybrid ACA855. The calibrated model was able to predict the theoretical amount of carbohydrate equivalents allocated to the grain, grain growth and the dynamics of the oil and non-oil fraction, while considering maintenance requirements and leaf senescence. Incorporating into the model the serial-parallel nature of fatty acid biosynthesis permitted a good representation of the kinetics of palmitic, stearic, oleic, and linoleic acids production. A sensitivity analysis showed that the relative influence of input parameters changed along grain development. Grain growth was mostly affected by the specific growth parameter (μ') while fatty acid composition strongly depended on their own maximum specific rate parameters. The model was successfully applied to two additional hybrids (MG2 and DK3820). The proposed model can be the first building block toward the development of a more sophisticated model, capable of predicting the effects of environmental conditions on grain weight and composition, in a comprehensive and quantitative way. PMID:27242809

  20. Kinetic Modeling of Sunflower Grain Filling and Fatty Acid Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durruty, Ignacio; Aguirrezábal, Luis A. N.; Echarte, María M.

    2016-01-01

    Grain growth and oil biosynthesis are complex processes that involve various enzymes placed in different sub-cellular compartments of the grain. In order to understand the mechanisms controlling grain weight and composition, we need mathematical models capable of simulating the dynamic behavior of the main components of the grain during the grain filling stage. In this paper, we present a non-structured mechanistic kinetic model developed for sunflower grains. The model was first calibrated for sunflower hybrid ACA855. The calibrated model was able to predict the theoretical amount of carbohydrate equivalents allocated to the grain, grain growth and the dynamics of the oil and non-oil fraction, while considering maintenance requirements and leaf senescence. Incorporating into the model the serial-parallel nature of fatty acid biosynthesis permitted a good representation of the kinetics of palmitic, stearic, oleic, and linoleic acids production. A sensitivity analysis showed that the relative influence of input parameters changed along grain development. Grain growth was mostly affected by the specific growth parameter (μ′) while fatty acid composition strongly depended on their own maximum specific rate parameters. The model was successfully applied to two additional hybrids (MG2 and DK3820). The proposed model can be the first building block toward the development of a more sophisticated model, capable of predicting the effects of environmental conditions on grain weight and composition, in a comprehensive and quantitative way. PMID:27242809

  1. Effect of lacking intestinal bile acid on liver regeneration in rats%肠道缺乏胆汁酸对大鼠肝再生的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董秀山; 赵浩亮

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of the lack of intestinal bile on liver regeneration after hepatectomy.Methods The model of interference with intestinal bile acid metabolism in rats was established by feeding rats with 0.2% cholic acid(cholic acid loading group), 2% cholestyramine resin(lack of bile group)and feeding the standard diet as the control group.Liver regeneration was compared among the 3 groups at 0, 1, 2, 3, and 7 d after 70% partial hepatectomy(PH)in rats and mRNA expression of the rate-limiting enzyme of bile acid biosynthesis(CYP7a1)and farnesoid X receptor (FXR)were detected.Results The rate of liver regeneration was significantly lower on days 3 and 7after PH in the lack of bile group than in the other groups(P<0.05).On day 1, the labeling indices of PCNA and Ki-67 in the lack of bile group(22.21% ±2.31%、 17.25 % ± 6.50 %)were lower than those in the cholic acid loading group(44.4%±4.92%、 30.83% ± 3.91%)and control group (38.74% ±6.42% 、27.04% ±7.22%)and the peaking of labeling indices was delayed.After PH, the mRNA expression of FXR was significantly lower in the lack of bile group than in other groups.However, CYP7al mRNA had a trend towards increase after PH and was higher than that in other groups.Conclusion Lack of intestinal bile results in delayed liver regeneration of normal rat liver accompanied by decreased expression of FXR mRNA after hepatectomy.%目的 探索肠道缺乏胆汁酸对肝再生的影响.方法 通过喂养大鼠0.2%胆酸(胆酸负荷组)、2%考来烯胺(胆酸缺乏组)建立干扰肠道胆汁酸代谢的动物模型,以喂养标准饲料作为对照组,所有大鼠均行70%肝部分切除术(PH).比较PH后0、1、2、3、7 d三组大鼠的肝脏再生情况,并检测法尼酯衍生物X受体FXR及其靶基因胆汁酸合成限速酶CYP7a1的mRNA表达.结果 胆酸缺乏组的肝再生率在PH后3、7 d显著低于胆酸负荷组和对照组(P<0.05),1 d时PCNA和Ki-67标记指数(22.21%±2.31%、17

  2. The biosynthesis of salicylic acid in potato plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spraying potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) leaves with arachidonic acid (AA) at 1500 micrograms mL-1 led to a rapid local synthesis of salicylic acid (SA) and accumulation of a SA conjugate, which was shown to be 2-O-beta-glucopyranosylsalicylic acid. Radiolabeling studies with untreated leaves showed that SA was synthesized from phenylalanine and that both cinnamic and benzoic acid were intermediates in the biosynthesis pathway. Using radiolabeled phenylalanine as a precursor, the specific activity of SA was found to be lower when leaves were treated with AA than in control leaves. Similar results were obtained when leaves were fed with the labeled putative intermediates cinnamic acid and benzoic acid. Application of 2-aminoindan-2-phosphonic acid at 40 micromolar, an inhibitor of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, prior to treatment with AA inhibited the local accumulation of SA. When the putative intermediates were applied to leaves in the presence of 2-aminoindan-2-phosphonic acid, about 40% of the expected accumulation of free SA was recovered, but the amount of the conjugate remained constant

  3. Intestinal absorption and postabsorptive metabolism of linoleic acid in rats with short-term bile duct ligation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minich, DM; Havinga, R; Stellaard, F; Vonk, RJ; Kuipers, F; Verkade, HJ

    2000-01-01

    We investigated in bile duct-ligated (BDL) and sham-operated control rats whether the frequent presence of essential fatty acid deficiency in cholestatic liver disease could be related to linoleic acid malabsorption, altered linoleic acid metabolism, or both. In plasma of BDL rats, the triene-to-tet

  4. Diurnal variations of mouse plasma and hepatic bile acid concentrations as well as expression of biosynthetic enzymes and transporters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Kun Jennifer Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diurnal fluctuation of bile acid (BA concentrations in the enterohepatic system of mammals has been known for a long time. Recently, BAs have been recognized as signaling molecules beyond their well-established roles in dietary lipid absorption and cholesterol homeostasis. METHODS AND RESULTS: The current study depicted diurnal variations of individual BAs detected by ultra-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS in serum and livers collected from C57BL/6 mice fed a regular chow or a chow containing cholestyramine (resin. Circadian rhythms of mRNA of vital BA-related nuclear receptors, enzymes, and transporters in livers and ilea were determined in control- and resin-fed mice, as well as in farnesoid X receptor (FXR null mice. The circadian profiles of BAs showed enhanced bacterial dehydroxylation during the fasting phase and efficient hepatic reconjugation of BAs in the fed phase. The resin removed more than 90% of BAs with β-hydroxy groups, such as muricholic acids and ursodeoxycholic acid, from serum and livers, but did not exert as significant influence on CA and CDCA in both compartments. Both resin-fed and FXR-null mouse models indicate that BAs regulate their own biosynthesis through the FXR-regulated ileal fibroblast growth factor 15. BA flux also influences the daily mRNA levels of multiple BA transporters. CONCLUSION: BA concentration and composition exhibit circadian variations in mouse liver and serum, which influences the circadian rhythms of BA metabolizing genes in liver and ileum. The diurnal variations of BAs appear to serve as a signal that coordinates daily nutrient metabolism in mammals.

  5. The Association between Bile Salt Export Pump Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Primary Biliary Cirrhosis Susceptibility and Ursodeoxycholic Acid Response

    OpenAIRE

    Rui-rui Chen; Yuan-jun Li; Xin-min Zhou; Lu Wang; Juan Xing; Shuang Han; Li-na Cui; Lin-hua Zheng; Kai-chun Wu; Yong-quan Shi; Zhe-yi Han; Ying Han; Dai-ming Fan

    2014-01-01

    Background. Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a chronic and progressive cholestasis liver disease. Bile salt export pump (BSEP) is the predominant bile salt efflux system of hepatocytes. BSEP gene has been attached great importance in the susceptibility of PBC and the response rate of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) treatment of PBC patients. Methods. In this study, TaqMan assay was used to genotype four variants of BSEP, and the Barcelona criteria were used for evaluating the response rate of U...

  6. Bile acids and pH values in total feces and in fecal water from habitually omnivorous and vegetarian subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Faassen, A; Hazen, M J; van den Brandt, P A; van den Bogaard, A E; Hermus, R J; Janknegt, R A

    1993-12-01

    Twenty habitually omnivorous subjects and 19 habitually lactoovovegetarian subjects aged 59-65 y collected feces during 4 consecutive days. The concentrations of bile acids in total feces did not differ between the omnivores and vegetarians, but the bile acid concentrations in fecal water were significantly lower in the vegetarians. The concentration of the colorectal cancer-predicting bile acid deoxycholic acid in fecal water was explained by the intake of saturated fat and the daily fecal wet weight (r2 = 0.50). Fecal pH did not differ between the omnivores and vegetarians. This variable was significantly (P vegetarians. In conclusion, our vegetarian subjects had a lower concentration of deoxycholic acid in fecal water, higher fecal wet weight, and higher defecation frequency than the omnivorous subjects. PMID:8249879

  7. Biosynthesis of highly unsaturated fatty acids by hydrocarbon degrading microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MEHDI GHASEMI

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Disruption of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA metabolism leads to many diseases. In this study, producers of γ-linolenic acid (GLA, arachidonic acid (ARA and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA were selected: Cephalosporium humicola IE (on glucose, dry biomass – 14 g/l, total lipids – 18-20%, GLA in lipids – 12.0%, Mucor globosus 11 (respectively – 15 g/l, 18% and 5% and Pythium irregulare LX (on glucose, dry biomass – 14.5 g/l, total lipids – 18-20%, 9.2 and 7.8% of ARA and EPA, respectively. On crude oil as the only source of carbon, the amount of biomass of the specified fungi decreases by 3-4 times, whereas the quantity of lipids and highly unsaturated fatty acids increases in four and 1.2 - 3.4 times, respectively. The maximum γ-linolenic acid in M. globosus and C. humicola was detected at neutral рН. Optimum volume of inoculate was 2.0-4.0%, nitrogen source NH4NO3, a carbon-nitrogen ratio 34:1. For biosynthesis of ARA and EPA by P. irregulare, the optimum nitrogen source was NH4Cl, рН 7.0- 8.0 and С/N - 50:1 at 28°C. The process of adaptation to stressful situation under crude oil motivated the increase of the rate of membrane phospholipids with high quantity of unsaturated fatty acids.

  8. Carboxy-terminal mutations of bile acid CoA:N-acyltransferase alter activity and substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styles, Nathan A; Shonsey, Erin M; Falany, Josie L; Guidry, Amber L; Barnes, Stephen; Falany, Charles N

    2016-07-01

    Bile acid CoA:amino acid N-acyltransferase (BAAT) is the terminal enzyme in the synthesis of bile salts from cholesterol and catalyzes the conjugation of taurine or glycine to bile acid CoA thioesters to form bile acid N-acylamidates. BAAT has a dual localization to the cytosol and peroxisomes, possibly due to an inefficient carboxy-terminal peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS), -serine-glutamine-leucine (-SQL). Mutational analysis was used to define the role of the carboxy terminus in peroxisomal localization and kinetic activity. Amidation activity of BAAT and BAAT lacking the final two amino acids (AAs) (BAAT-S) were similar, whereas the activity of BAAT with a canonical PTS sequence (BAAT-SKL) was increased >2.5-fold. Kinetic analysis of BAAT and BAAT-SKL showed that BAAT-SKL had a lower Km for taurine and glycine as well as a greater Vmax There was no difference in the affinity for cholyl-CoA. In contrast to BAAT, BAAT-SKL forms bile acid N-acylamidates with β-alanine. BAAT-S immunoprecipitated when incubated with peroxisomal biogenesis factor 5 (Pex5) and rabbit anti-Pex5 antibodies; however, deleting the final 12 AAs prevented coimmunoprecipitation with Pex5, indicating the Pex5 interaction involves more than the -SQL sequence. These results indicate that even small changes in the carboxy terminus of BAAT can have significant effects on activity and substrate specificity. PMID:27230263

  9. Utility of bilirubins and bile acids as endogenous biomarkers for the inhibition of hepatic transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Tomoko; Miyake, Manami; Shimizu, Toshinobu; Kamezawa, Miho; Masutomi, Naoya; Shimura, Takesada; Ohashi, Rikiya

    2015-04-01

    It is useful to identify endogenous substrates for the evaluation of drug-drug interactions via transporters. In this study, we investigated the utility of bilirubins, substrates of OATPs and MRP2, and bile acids and substrates of NTCP and BSEP, as biomarkers for the inhibition of transporters. In rats administered 20 and 80 mg/kg rifampicin, the plasma levels of bilirubin glucuronides were elevated, gradually decreased, and almost returned to the baseline level at 24 hours after administration without an elevation of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST). This result indicates the transient inhibition of rOatps and/or rMrp2. Although the correlation between free plasma concentrations and IC50 values of rOatps depended on the substrates used in the in vitro studies, the inhibition of rOatps by rifampicin was confirmed in the in vivo study using valsartan as a substrate of rOatps. In rats administered 10 and 30 mg/kg cyclosporin A, the plasma levels of bile acids were elevated and persisted for up to 24 hours after administration without an elevation of ALT and AST. This result indicates the continuous inhibition of rNtcp and/or rBsep, although there were differences between the free plasma or liver concentrations and IC50 values of rNtcp or rBsep, respectively. This study suggests that the monitoring of bilirubins and bile acids in plasma is useful in evaluating the inhibitory potential of their corresponding transporters. PMID:25581390

  10. Role of AMACR (α-methylacyl-CoA racemase) and MFE-1 (peroxisomal multifunctional enzyme-1) in bile acid synthesis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autio, Kaija J; Schmitz, Werner; Nair, Remya R; Selkälä, Eija M; Sormunen, Raija T; Miinalainen, Ilkka J; Crick, Peter J; Wang, Yuqin; Griffiths, William J; Reddy, Janardan K; Baes, Myriam; Hiltunen, J Kalervo

    2014-07-01

    Cholesterol is catabolized to bile acids by peroxisomal β-oxidation in which the side chain of C27-bile acid intermediates is shortened by three carbon atoms to form mature C24-bile acids. Knockout mouse models deficient in AMACR (α-methylacyl-CoA racemase) or MFE-2 (peroxisomal multifunctional enzyme type 2), in which this β-oxidation pathway is prevented, display a residual C24-bile acid pool which, although greatly reduced, implies the existence of alternative pathways of bile acid synthesis. One alternative pathway could involve Mfe-1 (peroxisomal multifunctional enzyme type 1) either with or without Amacr. To test this hypothesis, we generated a double knockout mouse model lacking both Amacr and Mfe-1 activities and studied the bile acid profiles in wild-type, Mfe-1 and Amacr single knockout mouse line and Mfe-1 and Amacr double knockout mouse lines. The total bile acid pool was decreased in Mfe-1-/- mice compared with wild-type and the levels of mature C24-bile acids were reduced in the double knockout mice when compared with Amacr-deficient mice. These results indicate that Mfe-1 can contribute to the synthesis of mature bile acids in both Amacr-dependent and Amacr-independent pathways.

  11. Effect of low temperature on highly unsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis in activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Su; Ding, Li-Li; Xu, Ke; Geng, Jin-Ju; Ren, Hong-Qiang

    2016-07-01

    Low temperature is a limiting factor for the microbial activity of activated sludge for sewage treatment plant in winter. Highly unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) biosynthesis, phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) constituents and microbial structure in activated sludge at low temperature were investigated. Over 12 gigabases of metagenomic sequence data were generated with the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. The result showed 43.11% of phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) in the activated sludge participated in UFA biosynthesis, and γ-Linolenic could be converted to Arachidonic acid at low temperature. The highly UFA biosynthesis in activated sludge was n-6 highly UFA biosynthesis, rather than n-3 highly UFA biosynthesis. The microbial community structures of activated sludge were analyzed by PLFA and high-throughput sequencing (HiSeq) simultaneously. Acidovorax, Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium and Polaromonas occupied higher percentage at 5°C, and genetic changes of highly UFA biosynthesis derived from microbial community structures change.

  12. Effect of low temperature on highly unsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis in activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Su; Ding, Li-Li; Xu, Ke; Geng, Jin-Ju; Ren, Hong-Qiang

    2016-07-01

    Low temperature is a limiting factor for the microbial activity of activated sludge for sewage treatment plant in winter. Highly unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) biosynthesis, phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) constituents and microbial structure in activated sludge at low temperature were investigated. Over 12 gigabases of metagenomic sequence data were generated with the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. The result showed 43.11% of phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) in the activated sludge participated in UFA biosynthesis, and γ-Linolenic could be converted to Arachidonic acid at low temperature. The highly UFA biosynthesis in activated sludge was n-6 highly UFA biosynthesis, rather than n-3 highly UFA biosynthesis. The microbial community structures of activated sludge were analyzed by PLFA and high-throughput sequencing (HiSeq) simultaneously. Acidovorax, Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium and Polaromonas occupied higher percentage at 5°C, and genetic changes of highly UFA biosynthesis derived from microbial community structures change. PMID:27035483

  13. Bile acids induce glucagon-like peptide 2 secretion with limited effects on intestinal adaptation in early weaned pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ipharraguerre, Ignacio R; Tedó, Gemma; Menoyo, David;

    2013-01-01

    Early weaning is a stressful event characterized by a transient period of intestinal atrophy that may be mediated by reduced secretion of glucagon-like peptide (GLP) 2. We tested whether enterally fed bile acids or plant sterols could increase nutrient-dependent GLP-2 secretion and improve...... intestinal adaptation in weanling pigs. During the first 6 d after weaning, piglets were intragastrically infused once daily with either deionized water (control), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDC; 60 mg/kg body weight), or β-sitoesterol (BSE; 100 mg/kg body weight). Infusing CDC increased plasma GLP-2 (P ....05) but did not affect plasma GLP-1 and feed intake. The intestinal expression of glucagon-like peptide 2 receptor, sodium-dependent bile acid transporter, farnesoid X receptor, and guanosine protein-coupled bile acid receptor genes were not affected by CDC treatment. The intragastric administration of CDC...

  14. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based method for the simultaneous determination of hydroxy sterols and bile acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Clara; Werner, Philipp; Worthmann, Anna; Wegner, Katrin; Tödter, Klaus; Scheja, Ludger; Rohn, Sascha; Heeren, Joerg; Fischer, Markus

    2014-12-01

    Recently, hydroxy sterols and bile acids have gained growing interest as they are important regulators of energy homoeostasis and inflammation. The high number of different hydroxy sterols and bile acid species requires powerful analytical tools to quantify these structurally and chemically similar analytes. Here, we introduce a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based method for rapid quantification of 34 sterols (hydroxy sterols, primary, secondary bile acids as well as their taurine and glycine conjugates). Chromatographic baseline separation of isomeric hydroxy sterols and bile acids is obtained using a rugged amide embedded C18 (polar embedded) stationary phase. The current method features a simple extraction protocol validated for blood plasma, urine, gall bladder, liver, feces, and adipose tissue avoiding solid phase extraction as well as derivatization procedures. The total extraction recovery for representative analytes ranged between 58-86% in plasma, 85% in urine, 79-92% in liver, 76-98% in adipose tissue, 93-104% in feces and 62-79% in gall bladder. The validation procedure demonstrated that the calibration curves were linear over the selected concentration ranges for 97% of the analytes, with calculated coefficients of determination (R2) of greater than 0.99. A feeding study in wild type mice with a standard chow and a cholesterol-enriched Western type diet illustrated that the protocol described here provides a powerful tool to simultaneously quantify cholesterol derivatives and bile acids in metabolically active tissues and to follow the enterohepatic circulation.

  15. Quantifying bile acid malabsorption helps predict response and tailor sequestrant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orekoya, Oluwafikunayo; McLaughlin, John; Leitao, Eugenia; Johns, Wendy; Lal, Simon; Paine, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Although recognised as a cause of chronic diarrhoea for over forty years, diagnostic tests and treatments for bile acid malabsorption (BAM) remain controversial. Recent National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines highlighted the lack of evidence in the field, and called for further research. This retrospective study explores the BAM subtype and severity, the use and response to bile acid sequestrants (BAS) and the prevalence of abnormal colonic histology. 264 selenium-75-labelled homocholic acid conjugated taurine (SeHCAT)-tested patient records were reviewed and the severity and subtype of BAM, presence of colonic histopathology and response to BAS were recorded. 53% of patients tested had BAM, with type-2 BAM in 45% of patients with presumed irritable bowel syndrome. Colonic histological abnormalities were similar overall between patients with (29%) or without (23%) BAM (p = 0.46) and between BAM subtypes, with no significant presence of inflammatory changes. 63% of patients with BAM had a successful BAS response which showed a trend to decreased response with reduced severity. Colestyramine was unsuccessful in 44% (38/87) and 45% of these (17/38) were related to medication intolerance, despite a positive SeHCAT. 47% (7/15) of colestyramine failures had a successful colesevelam response. No patient reported colesevelam intolerance. Quantifying severity of BAM appears to be useful in predicting BAS response. Colesevelam was better tolerated than colestyramine and showed some efficacy in colestyramine failures. Colestyramine failure should not be used to exclude BAM. Colonic histology is of no relevance.

  16. Development and validation of a cholate binding capacity method for DMP 504, a bile acid sequestrant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, M A; Moyer, K L; Mueller, B J; Ramos, M A; Green, J S; White, L; Hedgepeth, W; Juliano, K; Scull, J R; Hovsepian, P K

    2001-06-01

    DMP 504, a highly cross-linked insoluble polymer, is a bile acid sequestrant developed by the DuPont Pharmaceuticals Company for serum cholesterol reduction. Since DMP 504 is insoluble, it was necessary to develop unique specific analytical methods to measure and control the quality of different lots of the drug. Since the mechanism of action of DMP 504 is believed to be by sequestration of bile acids, the in-vitro binding capacity of the polymer for cholic acid was chosen as a surrogate of in-vivo performance and used to assess potency of the compound. In this method, individual aliquots of DMP 504 at three different levels were incubated with a cholate solution of known concentration. The residual cholate solution was filtered and analyzed by a reversed-phase HPLC method using refractive index detection. When the bound cholate was plotted versus the mass of DMP 504, the resulting curve was linear. The slope of this curve is the cholate binding capacity of DMP 504. This method has been shown to be precise and robust. Precision of the method was shown to have an RSD of 2.0% with injection precision of 0.4% and stability of cholate solutions up to 73 h. It is also a unique binding capacity method due to its multi-point determination, and it has been shown to be a suitable quality control method for ensuring lot-to-lot consistency of drug substance.

  17. In Vivo Performance of a Novel Fluorinated Magnetic Resonance Imaging Agent for Functional Analysis of Bile Acid Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Vivian, Diana; Cheng, Kunrong; Khurana, Sandeep; Xu, Su; Kriel, Edwin H; Dawson, Paul A.; Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Polli, James E.

    2014-01-01

    A novel trifluorinated cholic acid derivative, CA-lys-TFA, was designed and synthesized for use as a tool to measure bile acid transport noninvasively using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In the present study, the in vivo performance of CA-lys-TFA for measuring bile acid transport by MRI was investigated in mice. Gallbladder CA-lys-TFA content was quantified using MRI and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Results in wild-type (WT) C57BL/6J mice were compared to those in mice ...

  18. Developments in bile acid kinetic measurements using C-13 and H-2 : 10(5) times improved sensitivity during the last 40 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stellaard, Frans; Brufau, Gemma; Boverhof, Renze; Jonkers, Elles Zwanet; Boer, Theo; Kuipers, Folkert

    2009-01-01

    Bile acid kinetics involve the measurement of pool sizes and turnover rates of individual bile acids. The technique is based on isotope dilution and was first described in the 1950s using radioactive C-14-labelled cholic acid (CA). It took until the 1970s before stable isotopes were introduced for t

  19. Inhibitors of fatty acid biosynthesis in sunflower seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleite, Rafael; Martínez-Force, Enrique; Garcés, Rafael

    2006-09-01

    During de novo fatty acid synthesis in sunflower seeds, saturated fatty acid production is influenced by the competition between the enzymes of the principal pathways and the saturated acyl-ACP thioesterases. Genetic backgrounds with more efficient saturated acyl-ACP thioesterase alleles only express their phenotypic effects when the alleles for the enzymes in the main pathway are less efficient. For this reason, we studied the incorporation of [2-(14)C]acetate into the lipids of developing sunflower seeds (Helianthus annuus L.) from several mutant lines in vivo. The labelling of different triacylglycerol fatty acids in different oilseed mutants reflects the fatty acid composition of the seed and supports the channelling theory of fatty acid biosynthesis. Incubation with methyl viologen diminished the conversion of stearoyl-ACP to oleoyl-ACP in vivo through a decrease in the available reductant power. In turn, this led to the accumulation of stearoyl-ACP to the levels detected in seeds from high stearic acid mutants. The concomitant reduction of oleoyl-ACP content inside the plastid allowed us to study the activity of acyl-ACP thioesterases on saturated fatty acids. In these mutants, we verified that the accumulation of saturated fatty acids requires efficient thioesterase activity on saturated-ACPs. By studying the effects of cerulenin on the in vivo incorporation of [2-(14)C]acetate into lipids and on the in vitro activity of beta-ketoacyl-ACP synthase II, we found that elongation to very long chain fatty acids can occur both inside and outside of the plastid in sunflower seeds. PMID:16500723

  20. Restoration of nucleic acid biosynthesis after clinical death and factors stimulating the process in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konikova, A S; Petukhova, L M; Pogossova, A V; Vinarskaya, A A; Nikulin, V I

    1975-01-01

    The biosynthesis of RNA and DNA falls almost to zero in 60 min after the death of rabbits from anoxia, in all the organs of the body. Rapid artificial cooling of the rabbits to 20 degrees C undertaken within 10 min after death preserved nucleic acid biosynthesis and permitted restoration of life 3-4 h after death, with recovery beginning in 60 min. During the reanimation the addition of ATP to the blood stimulated the restoration of RNA biosynthesis in the spinal cord to a considerable extent; the addition of cocarboxylase to the blood promoted cardiac RNA biosynthesis as well as cardiac and pancreatic DNA biosynthesis during recovery. PMID:1197938

  1. Opposing effects of bile acids deoxycholic acid and ursodeoxycholic acid on signal transduction pathways in oesophageal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Latif, Mohamed M; Inoue, Hiroyasu; Reynolds, John V

    2016-09-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) was reported to reduce bile acid toxicity, but the mechanisms underlying its cytoprotective effects are not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of UDCA on the modulation of deoxycholic acid (DCA)-induced signal transduction in oesophageal cancer cells. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) activity was assessed using a gel shift assay. NF-κB activation and translocation was performed using an ELISA-based assay and immunofluorescence analysis. COX-2 expression was analysed by western blotting and COX-2 promoter activity was assessed by luciferase assay. DCA induced NF-κB and AP-1 DNA-binding activities in SKGT-4 and OE33 cells. UDCA pretreatment inhibited DCA-induced NF-κB and AP-1 activation and NF-κB translocation. This inhibitory effect was coupled with a blockade of IκB-α degradation and inhibition of phosphorylation of IKK-α/β and ERK1/2. Moreover, UDCA pretreatment inhibited COX-2 upregulation. Using transient transfection of the COX-2 promoter, UDCA pretreatment abrogated DCA-induced COX-2 promoter activation. In addition, UDCA protected oesophageal cells from the apoptotic effects of deoxycholate. Our findings indicate that UDCA inhibits DCA-induced signalling pathways in oesophageal cancer cells. These data indicate a possible mechanistic role for the chemopreventive actions of UDCA in oesophageal carcinogenesis.

  2. Presence of bile acids in human follicular fluid and their relation with embryo development in modified natural cycle IVF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagy, R. A.; van Montfoort, A. P. A.; Dikkers, A.; van Echten-Arends, J.; Homminga, I.; Land, J. A.; Hoek, A.; Tietge, U. J. F.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Are bile acids (BA) and their respective subspecies present in human follicular fluid (FF) and do they relate to embryo quality in modified natural cycle IVF (MNC-IVF)? SUMMARY ANSWER: BAconcentrations are 2-fold higher in follicular fluid than in serum and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA

  3. In vitro bile acid-binding capacity of dietary fibre sources and their effects with bile acid on broiler chicken performance and lipid digestibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemati Matin, H R; Shariatmadari, F; Karimi Torshizi, M A; Chiba, L I

    2016-06-01

    A 4 × 2 factorial experiment was conducted to study the effect of feeding diets-containing dietary fibre (DF) sources and a source of bile acid (BA) on growth performance and lipid metabolism. In addition, in vitro BA-binding capacity of fibre sources was investigated. A total of 256 one-d-old male broiler chickens (Ross 308) were assigned to DF sources [maize-soybean meal (control, C), or 30 g/kg of wheat bran (WB), barley bran (BB) or soybean hulls (SH)] and BA (with or without 1.5 g Na-deoxycholate/kg). Each treatment was replicated 4 times with 8 broiler chickens per cage. The highest in vitro BA-binding capacity was observed with BB (8.76 mg/g BB). From 0 to 21 d, with the addition of BA, the average daily feed intake (ADFI) decreased in broiler chickens fed on the C, WB or BB diets, while there was no difference with the SH diet. With added BA, the average daily gain decreased in broiler chickens fed on the C or SH diets, but it did not change in those fed on the other diets. The addition of BA decreased feed conversion ratio (FCR) in broiler chickens fed on the BB or WB diets, but it increased in those fed on the C or SH diets. Interaction results indicated that the apparent ileal digestibility of lipid increased in broiler chickens fed the C and other DF diets with BA compared to those fed the diets without BA. The addition of BA decreased the pancreas lipase activity (PLA) in broiler chickens fed on the C diet compared to those fed the C diet without BA, while no changes observed in those fed the DF diets with or without BA. No interaction was observed in total liver bile acid (TLBA). The WB, BB and SH with little Na-deoxycholate-binding capacity (<10 mg/g of DF) under in vitro conditions had particular effects with BA on the measured criteria in broiler chickens. The magnitude of improvement in digestibility of lipid with the addition of BA depends on the source of fibre used and the addition of BA in DF diets had little effect on growth

  4. Insights on FXR selective modulation. Speculation on bile acid chemical space in the discovery of potent and selective agonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepe, Valentina; Festa, Carmen; Renga, Barbara; Carino, Adriana; Cipriani, Sabrina; Finamore, Claudia; Masullo, Dario; del Gaudio, Federica; Monti, Maria Chiara; Fiorucci, Stefano; Zampella, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids are the endogenous modulators of the nuclear receptor FXR and the membrane receptor GPBAR1. FXR represents a promising pharmacological target for the treatment of cholestatic liver disorders. Currently available semisynthetic bile acid derivatives cover the same chemical space of bile acids and therefore they are poorly selective toward BA receptors, increasing patient risk for adverse side effects. In this report, we have investigated around the structure of CDCA describing the synthesis and the in vitro and in vivo pharmacological characterization of a novel family of compounds modified on the steroidal tetracyclic core and on the side chain. Pharmacological characterization resulted in the identification of several potent and selective FXR agonists. These novel agents might add utility in the treatment of cholestatic disorders by potentially mitigating side effects linked to unwanted activation of GPBAR1. PMID:26740187

  5. Hepatocyte MyD88 affects bile acids, gut microbiota and metabolome contributing to regulate glucose and lipid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duparc, Thibaut; Plovier, Hubert; Marrachelli, Vannina G;

    2016-01-01

    performed microarrays and quantitative PCRs in the liver. In addition, we investigated the gut microbiota composition, bile acid profile and both liver and plasma metabolome. We analysed the expression pattern of genes in the liver of obese humans developing non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). RESULTS...... proliferator activator receptor-α, farnesoid X receptor (FXR), liver X receptors and STAT3) and bile acid profiles involved in glucose, lipid metabolism and inflammation. In addition to these alterations, the genetic deletion of MyD88 in hepatocytes changes the gut microbiota composition and their metabolomes......, resembling those observed during diet-induced obesity. Finally, obese humans with NASH displayed a decreased expression of different cytochromes P450 involved in bioactive lipid synthesis. CONCLUSIONS: Our study identifies a new link between innate immunity and hepatic synthesis of bile acids and bioactive...

  6. Risk Factors for Development of Cholestatic Drug-Induced Liver Injury: Inhibition of Hepatic Basolateral Bile Acid Transporters Multidrug Resistance-Associated Proteins 3 and 4

    OpenAIRE

    Köck, Kathleen; Ferslew, Brian C.; Netterberg, Ida; Yang, Kyunghee; Urban, Thomas J.; Swaan, Peter W.; Stewart, Paul W.; Brouwer, Kim L.R.

    2014-01-01

    Impaired hepatic bile acid export may contribute to development of cholestatic drug-induced liver injury (DILI). The multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP) 3 and 4 are postulated to be compensatory hepatic basolateral bile acid efflux transporters when biliary excretion by the bile salt export pump (BSEP) is impaired. BSEP inhibition is a risk factor for cholestatic DILI. This study aimed to characterize the relationship between MRP3, MRP4, and BSEP inhibition and cholestatic potentia...

  7. Antibiotic-Induced Alterations of the Gut Microbiota Alter Secondary Bile Acid Production and Allow for Clostridium difficile Spore Germination and Outgrowth in the Large Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theriot, Casey M; Bowman, Alison A; Young, Vincent B

    2016-01-01

    It is hypothesized that the depletion of microbial members responsible for converting primary bile acids into secondary bile acids reduces resistance to Clostridium difficile colonization. To date, inhibition of C. difficile growth by secondary bile acids has only been shown in vitro. Using targeted bile acid metabolomics, we sought to define the physiologically relevant concentrations of primary and secondary bile acids present in the murine small and large intestinal tracts and how these impact C. difficile dynamics. We treated mice with a variety of antibiotics to create distinct microbial and metabolic (bile acid) environments and directly tested their ability to support or inhibit C. difficile spore germination and outgrowth ex vivo. Susceptibility to C. difficile in the large intestine was observed only after specific broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment (cefoperazone, clindamycin, and vancomycin) and was accompanied by a significant loss of secondary bile acids (deoxycholate, lithocholate, ursodeoxycholate, hyodeoxycholate, and ω-muricholate). These changes were correlated to the loss of specific microbiota community members, the Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae families. Additionally, physiological concentrations of secondary bile acids present during C. difficile resistance were able to inhibit spore germination and outgrowth in vitro. Interestingly, we observed that C. difficile spore germination and outgrowth were supported constantly in murine small intestinal content regardless of antibiotic perturbation, suggesting that targeting growth of C. difficile will prove most important for future therapeutics and that antibiotic-related changes are organ specific. Understanding how the gut microbiota regulates bile acids throughout the intestine will aid the development of future therapies for C. difficile infection and other metabolically relevant disorders such as obesity and diabetes. IMPORTANCE Antibiotics alter the gastrointestinal microbiota

  8. Effect of various antibiotics on modulation of intestinal microbiota and bile acid profile in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Youcai; Limaye, Pallavi B; Renaud, Helen J; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2014-06-01

    Antibiotic treatments have been used to modulate intestinal bacteria and investigate the role of intestinal bacteria on bile acid (BA) homeostasis. However, knowledge on which intestinal bacteria and bile acids are modified by antibiotics is limited. In the present study, mice were administered various antibiotics, 47 of the most abundant bacterial species in intestine, as well as individual BAs in plasma, liver, and intestine were quantified. Compared to the two antibiotic combinations (vancomycin+imipenem and cephalothin+neomycin), the three single antibiotics (metronidazole, ciprofloxacin and aztreonam) have less effect on intestinal bacterial profiles, and thus on host BA profiles and mRNA expression of genes that are important for BA homeostasis. The two antibiotic combinations decreased the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes in intestine, as well as most secondary BAs in serum, liver and intestine. Additionally, the two antibiotic combinations significantly increased mRNA of the hepatic BA uptake transporters (Ntcp and Oatp1b2) and canalicular BA efflux transporters (Bsep and Mrp2), but decreased mRNA of the hepatic BA synthetic enzyme Cyp8b1, suggesting an elevated enterohepatic circulation of BAs. Interestingly, the two antibiotic combinations tended to have opposite effect on the mRNAs of most intestinal genes, which tended to be inhibited by vancomycin+imipenem but stimulated by cephalothin+neomycin. To conclude, the present study clearly shows that various antibiotics have distinct effects on modulating intestinal bacteria and host BA metabolism.

  9. HPLC and ELISA analyses of larval bile acids from Pacific and western brook lampreys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, S.-S.; Scott, A.P.; Bayer, J.M.; Seelye, J.G.; Close, D.A.; Li, W.

    2003-01-01

    Comparative studies were performed on two native lamprey species, Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) and western brook lamprey (Lampetra richardsoni) from the Pacific coast along with sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) from the Great Lakes, to investigate their bile acid production and release. HPLC and ELISA analyses of the gall bladders and liver extract revealed that the major bile acid compound from Pacific and western brook larval lampreys was petromyzonol sulfate (PZS), previously identified as a migratory pheromone in larval sea lamprey. An ELISA for PZS has been developed in a working range of 20pg-10ng per well. The tissue concentrations of PZS in gall bladder were 127.40, 145.86, and 276.96??g/g body mass in sea lamprey, Pacific lamprey, and western brook lamprey, respectively. Releasing rates for PZS in the three species were measured using ELISA to find that western brook and sea lamprey released PZS 20 times higher than Pacific lamprey did. Further studies are required to determine whether PZS is a chemical cue in Pacific and western brook lampreys. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The nuclear bile acid receptor FXR controls the liver derived tumor suppressor histidine-rich glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuschle, Ulrich; Birkel, Manfred; Hambruch, Eva; Hornberger, Martin; Kinzel, Olaf; Perović-Ottstadt, Sanja; Schulz, Andreas; Hahn, Ulrike; Burnet, Michael; Kremoser, Claus

    2015-06-01

    The nuclear bile acid receptor Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is strongly expressed in liver and intestine, controls bile acid and lipid homeostasis and exerts tumor-protective functions in liver and intestine. Histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG) is an abundant plasma protein produced by the liver with the proposed function as a pattern recognition molecule involved in the clearance of immune complexes, necrotic cells and pathogens, the modulation of angiogenesis, the normalization of deranged endothelial vessel structure in tumors and tumor suppression. FXR recognition sequences were identified within a human HRG promoter fragment that mediated FXR/FXR-agonist dependent reporter gene activity in vitro. We show that HRG is a novel transcriptional target gene of FXR in human hepatoma cells, human upcyte® primary hepatocytes and 3D human liver microtissues in vitro and in mouse liver in vivo. Prolonged administration of the potent nonsteroidal FXR agonist PX20606 increases HRG levels in mouse plasma. Finally, daily oral administration of this FXR agonist for seven days resulted in a significant increase of HRG levels in the plasma of healthy human male volunteers during a clinical Phase I safety study. HRG might serve as a surrogate marker indicative of liver-specific FXR activation in future human clinical studies. Furthermore, potent FXR agonists might be beneficial in serious health conditions where HRG is reduced, for example, in hepatocellular carcinoma but also other solid cancers, liver failure, sepsis and pre-eclampsia. PMID:25363753

  11. Precision microbiome reconstitution restores bile acid mediated resistance to Clostridium difficile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffie, Charlie G.; Bucci, Vanni; Stein, Richard R.; McKenney, Peter T.; Ling, Lilan; Gobourne, Asia; No, Daniel; Liu, Hui; Kinnebrew, Melissa; Viale, Agnes; Littmann, Eric; van den Brink, Marcel R. M.; Jenq, Robert R.; Taur, Ying; Sander, Chris; Cross, Justin R.; Toussaint, Nora C.; Xavier, Joao B.; Pamer, Eric G.

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tracts of mammals are colonized by hundreds of microbial species that contribute to health, including colonization resistance against intestinal pathogens. Many antibiotics destroy intestinal microbial communities and increase susceptibility to intestinal pathogens. Among these, Clostridium difficile, a major cause of antibiotic-induced diarrhoea, greatly increases morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. Which intestinal bacteria provide resistance to C. difficile infection and their in vivo inhibitory mechanisms remain unclear. Here we correlate loss of specific bacterial taxa with development of infection, by treating mice with different antibiotics that result in distinct microbiota changes and lead to varied susceptibility to C. difficile. Mathematical modelling augmented by analyses of the microbiota of hospitalized patients identifies resistance-associated bacteria common to mice and humans. Using these platforms, we determine that Clostridium scindens, a bile acid 7α-dehydroxylating intestinal bacterium, is associated with resistance to C. difficile infection and, upon administration, enhances resistance to infection in a secondary bile acid dependent fashion. Using a workflow involving mouse models, clinical studies, metagenomic analyses, and mathematical modelling, we identify a probiotic candidate that corrects a clinically relevant microbiome deficiency. These findings have implications for the rational design of targeted antimicrobials as well as microbiome-based diagnostics and therapeutics for individuals at risk of C. difficile infection.

  12. Radiological bile acid absorption test 75SeHCAT in patients with diarrhoea of unknown cause

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose with this study was to investigate the usefulness of the 75SeHCAT test in patients suffering from 'functional' diarrhoea and to disclose earlier radiological investigations performed in the course of disease. Material and Methods: Twenty patients with chronic diarrhoea of unknown cause were investigated with the 75SeHCAT test. The cholestyramine test and an estimation of oro-caecal transit time (OCTT) were also performed in 13 and 10 patients respectively. Results: Ten patients had low 7-day retention (≤15%). Nine of these were tested with cholestyramine and 8 showed complete relief from the diarrhoea. The cholestyramine test had no effect on the 4 patients with normal bile acid retention. No correlation was found between the retention of 75SeHCAT and OCCT. A total of 80 inconclusive gastrointestinal barium examinations were performed during the course of disease. Conclusion: Pathological bile acid retention, studied with the radiological 75SeHCAT test, is common in patients with diarrhoea of unknown cause. The test should be performed earlier in the course of disease in order to prevent unnecessary radiological investigations and to reduce patient suffering and distress. (orig.)

  13. Effect of Bile Acid on Fetal Lung in Rat Model of Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the correlation between maternal bile acid (BA level and fetal pulmonary surfactant in rats and study the effects of BA on fetal lung in rat model of intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy. Methods. Forty pregnant rats were treated with (A 5.5 mg/kg BA, (B 1.4 mg/kg BA, and (C 1 ml physiological saline. Levels of total bile acid (TBA, ALT, AST, TBIL, DBIL, and SP-A were determined and the lungs of fetal rats were analyzed for pathological changes. Results. Groups A and B intervened with BA showed significant higher level of TBA in both maternal and fetal serum, more mortality rate of fetal rats, more concentration of SP-A in fetal serum, and wider alveolus mesenchyme of fetal rats than the control Group C. Higher level of BA associated with increased fetal risk and lower numerical density of mitochondria in type II alveolar epithelial cells. The levels of TBA in maternal serum were found to have significant positive correlation with those in fetal serum and SP-A level but negatively with the area of alveolus and the numerical density of lamellar body. Conclusions. The TBA level in maternal serum showed significant association with lung pathological changes in fetal rats.

  14. Novel 3,4-seco bile acid diamides as selective anticancer proliferation and migration agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Shi-Wei; Chen, Huang; Yu, Li-Fang; Lv, Fang; Xing, Ya-Jing; Liu, Ting; Xie, Jia; Tang, Jie; Yi, Zhengfang; Yang, Fan

    2016-10-21

    A series of new seco-A ring bile acid diamides were synthesized, and their antiproliferative activities against PC3M (prostate), HT29 (colon) and ES-2 (ovarian) cancer cell lines were investigated using SRB assays. Most synthesized compounds presented improved antiproliferative activities compared to the parent bile acids (IC50 > 80 μM), especially the piperazine conjugated compound 27 with IC50 values of 1.07, 4.58 and 3.86 μM against PC3M, HT29 and ES-2 cancer cell lines, respectively. In addition, all the tested compounds showed less cytotoxic activity on a noncancerous cell line (HAF), and the most active compound 27 exhibited the highest selectivity (Selectivity Index, SI(PC3M) = 26.3). Furthermore, 27 could also enhance G1 arrest in PC3M cell, revealed by cell cycle analysis, and increase anti-migration activity on PC3M cells, confirmed by transwell migration assay. PMID:27448915

  15. Plasma bile acids show a positive correlation with body mass index and are negatively associated with cognitive restraint of eating in obese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip ePrinz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bile acids may be involved in the regulation of food intake and energy metabolism. The aim of the study was to investigate the association of plasma bile acids with body mass index (BMI and the possible involvement of circulating bile acids in the modulation of physical activity and eating behavior. Blood was obtained in a group of hospitalized patients with normal weight (BMI 18.5-25 kg/m2, underweight (anorexia nervosa, BMI 50 kg/m2, n=14-15/group and plasma bile acid concentrations assessed. Physical activity and plasma bile acids were measured in a group of patients with anorexia nervosa (BMI 14.6±0.3 kg/m2, n=43. Lastly, in a population of obese patients (BMI 48.5±0.9 kg/m2, n=85, psychometric parameters related to disordered eating and plasma bile acids were assessed. Plasma bile acids showed a positive correlation with BMI (r=0.26, p=0.03 in the population of patients with broad range of BMI (9-85 kg/m2, n=74. No associations were observed between plasma bile acids and different parameters of physical activity in anorexic patients (p>0.05. Plasma bile acids were negatively correlated with cognitive restraint of eating (r=-0.30, p=0.008, while no associations were observed with other psychometric eating behavior-related parameters (p>0.05 in obese patients. In conclusion, these data may point towards a role of bile acids in the regulation of body weight. Since plasma bile acids are negatively correlated with the cognitive restraint of eating in obese patients, this may represent a compensatory adaptation to prevent further overeating.

  16. Ablating L-FABP in SCP-2/SCP-x null mice impairs bile acid metabolism and biliary HDL-cholesterol secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gregory G; Atshaves, Barbara P; Landrock, Kerstin K; Landrock, Danilo; Storey, Stephen M; Howles, Philip N; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2014-12-01

    On the basis of their abilities to bind bile acids and/or cholesterol, the physiological role(s) of liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) and sterol carrier protein (SCP) 2/SCP-x (SCP-2/SCP-x) gene products in biliary bile acid and cholesterol formation was examined in gene-ablated male mice. L-FABP (LKO) or L-FABP/SCP-2/SCP-x [triple-knockout (TKO)] ablation markedly decreased hepatic bile acid concentration, while SCP-2/SCP-x [double-knockout (DKO)] ablation alone had no effect. In contrast, LKO increased biliary bile acid, while DKO and TKO had no effect on biliary bile acid levels. LKO and DKO also altered biliary bile acid composition to increase bile acid hydrophobicity. Furthermore, LKO and TKO decreased hepatic uptake and biliary secretion of high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-derived 22-(N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino)-23,24-bisnor-5-cholen-3β-ol (NBD-cholesterol), while DKO alone had no effect. Finally, LKO and, to a lesser extent, DKO decreased most indexes contributing to cholesterol solubility in biliary bile. These results suggest different, but complementary, roles for L-FABP and SCP-2/SCP-x in biliary bile acid and cholesterol formation. L-FABP appears to function more in hepatic retention of bile acids as well as hepatic uptake and biliary secretion of HDL-cholesterol. Conversely, SCP-2/SCP-x may function more in formation and biliary secretion of bile acid, with less impact on hepatic uptake or biliary secretion of HDL-cholesterol.

  17. Ablating L-FABP in SCP-2/SCP-x null mice impairs bile acid metabolism and biliary HDL-cholesterol secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gregory G; Atshaves, Barbara P; Landrock, Kerstin K; Landrock, Danilo; Storey, Stephen M; Howles, Philip N; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2014-12-01

    On the basis of their abilities to bind bile acids and/or cholesterol, the physiological role(s) of liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) and sterol carrier protein (SCP) 2/SCP-x (SCP-2/SCP-x) gene products in biliary bile acid and cholesterol formation was examined in gene-ablated male mice. L-FABP (LKO) or L-FABP/SCP-2/SCP-x [triple-knockout (TKO)] ablation markedly decreased hepatic bile acid concentration, while SCP-2/SCP-x [double-knockout (DKO)] ablation alone had no effect. In contrast, LKO increased biliary bile acid, while DKO and TKO had no effect on biliary bile acid levels. LKO and DKO also altered biliary bile acid composition to increase bile acid hydrophobicity. Furthermore, LKO and TKO decreased hepatic uptake and biliary secretion of high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-derived 22-(N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino)-23,24-bisnor-5-cholen-3β-ol (NBD-cholesterol), while DKO alone had no effect. Finally, LKO and, to a lesser extent, DKO decreased most indexes contributing to cholesterol solubility in biliary bile. These results suggest different, but complementary, roles for L-FABP and SCP-2/SCP-x in biliary bile acid and cholesterol formation. L-FABP appears to function more in hepatic retention of bile acids as well as hepatic uptake and biliary secretion of HDL-cholesterol. Conversely, SCP-2/SCP-x may function more in formation and biliary secretion of bile acid, with less impact on hepatic uptake or biliary secretion of HDL-cholesterol. PMID:25277800

  18. Carnosic acid biosynthesis elucidated by a synthetic biology platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignea, Codruta; Athanasakoglou, Anastasia; Ioannou, Efstathia; Georgantea, Panagiota; Trikka, Fotini A; Loupassaki, Sofia; Roussis, Vassilios; Makris, Antonios M; Kampranis, Sotirios C

    2016-03-29

    Synthetic biology approaches achieving the reconstruction of specific plant natural product biosynthetic pathways in dedicated microbial "chassis" have provided access to important industrial compounds (e.g., artemisinin, resveratrol, vanillin). However, the potential of such production systems to facilitate elucidation of plant biosynthetic pathways has been underexplored. Here we report on the application of a modular terpene production platform in the characterization of the biosynthetic pathway leading to the potent antioxidant carnosic acid and related diterpenes in Salvia pomifera and Rosmarinus officinalis.Four cytochrome P450 enzymes are identified (CYP76AH24, CYP71BE52, CYP76AK6, and CYP76AK8), the combined activities of which account for all of the oxidation events leading to the biosynthesis of the major diterpenes produced in these plants. This approach develops yeast as an efficient tool to harness the biotechnological potential of the numerous sequencing datasets that are increasingly becoming available through transcriptomic or genomic studies. PMID:26976595

  19. Diet1 functions in the FGF15/19 enterohepatic signaling axis to modulate bile acid and lipid levels

    OpenAIRE

    Vergnes, Laurent; Lee, Jessica M.; Chin, Robert G.; Auwerx, Johan; Reue, Karen

    2013-01-01

    We identified a mutation in the Diet1 gene in a mouse strain that is resistant to hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis. Diet1 encodes a 236 kD protein consisting of tandem low density lipoprotein receptor and MAM (meprin-A5-protein tyrosine phosphatase mu) domains, and is expressed in enterocytes of the small intestine. Diet1-deficient mice exhibited an elevated bile acid pool size and impaired feedback regulation of hepatic Cyp7a1, which encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in bile acid synthesis....

  20. Mutational characterization of the bile acid receptor TGR5 in primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes R Hov

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: TGR5, the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor 1 (GPBAR1, has been linked to inflammatory pathways as well as bile homeostasis, and could therefore be involved in primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC a chronic inflammatory bile duct disease. We aimed to extensively investigate TGR5 sequence variation in PSC, as well as functionally characterize detected variants. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Complete resequencing of TGR5 was performed in 267 PSC patients and 274 healthy controls. Six nonsynonymous mutations were identified in addition to 16 other novel single-nucleotide polymorphisms. To investigate the impact from the nonsynonymous variants on TGR5, we created a receptor model, and introduced mutated TGR5 constructs into human epithelial cell lines. By using confocal microscopy, flow cytometry and a cAMP-sensitive luciferase assay, five of the nonsynonymous mutations (W83R, V178M, A217P, S272G and Q296X were found to reduce or abolish TGR5 function. Fine-mapping of the previously reported PSC and UC associated locus at chromosome 2q35 in large patient panels revealed an overall association between the TGR5 single-nucleotide polymorphism rs11554825 and PSC (odds ratio = 1.14, 95% confidence interval: 1.03-1.26, p = 0.010 and UC (odds ratio = 1.19, 95% confidence interval 1.11-1.27, p = 8.5 x 10(-7, but strong linkage disequilibrium precluded demarcation of TGR5 from neighboring genes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Resequencing of TGR5 along with functional investigations of novel variants provided unique insight into an important candidate gene for several inflammatory and metabolic conditions. While significant TGR5 associations were detected in both UC and PSC, further studies are needed to conclusively define the role of TGR5 variation in these diseases.

  1. Mutational Characterization of the Bile Acid Receptor TGR5 in Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hov, Johannes R.; Keitel, Verena; Laerdahl, Jon K.; Spomer, Lina; Ellinghaus, Eva; ElSharawy, Abdou; Melum, Espen; Boberg, Kirsten M.; Manke, Thomas; Balschun, Tobias; Schramm, Christoph; Bergquist, Annika; Weismüller, Tobias; Gotthardt, Daniel; Rust, Christian; Henckaerts, Liesbet; Onnie, Clive M.; Weersma, Rinse K.; Sterneck, Martina; Teufel, Andreas; Runz, Heiko; Stiehl, Adolf; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Vatn, Morten H.; Stokkers, Pieter C. F.; Vermeire, Severine; Mathew, Christopher G.; Lie, Benedicte A.; Beuers, Ulrich; Manns, Michael P.; Schreiber, Stefan; Schrumpf, Erik; Häussinger, Dieter; Franke, Andre; Karlsen, Tom H.

    2010-01-01

    Background TGR5, the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor 1 (GPBAR1), has been linked to inflammatory pathways as well as bile homeostasis, and could therefore be involved in primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) a chronic inflammatory bile duct disease. We aimed to extensively investigate TGR5 sequence variation in PSC, as well as functionally characterize detected variants. Methodology/Principal Findings Complete resequencing of TGR5 was performed in 267 PSC patients and 274 healthy controls. Six nonsynonymous mutations were identified in addition to 16 other novel single-nucleotide polymorphisms. To investigate the impact from the nonsynonymous variants on TGR5, we created a receptor model, and introduced mutated TGR5 constructs into human epithelial cell lines. By using confocal microscopy, flow cytometry and a cAMP-sensitive luciferase assay, five of the nonsynonymous mutations (W83R, V178M, A217P, S272G and Q296X) were found to reduce or abolish TGR5 function. Fine-mapping of the previously reported PSC and UC associated locus at chromosome 2q35 in large patient panels revealed an overall association between the TGR5 single-nucleotide polymorphism rs11554825 and PSC (odds ratio  = 1.14, 95% confidence interval: 1.03–1.26, p = 0.010) and UC (odds ratio  = 1.19, 95% confidence interval 1.11–1.27, p = 8.5×10−7), but strong linkage disequilibrium precluded demarcation of TGR5 from neighboring genes. Conclusions/Significance Resequencing of TGR5 along with functional investigations of novel variants provided unique insight into an important candidate gene for several inflammatory and metabolic conditions. While significant TGR5 associations were detected in both UC and PSC, further studies are needed to conclusively define the role of TGR5 variation in these diseases. PMID:20811628

  2. Plasma bile acids are not associated with energy metabolism in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brufau Gemma

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bile acids (BA have recently been shown to increase energy expenditure in mice, but this concept has not been tested in humans. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between plasma BA levels and energy expenditure in humans. Type 2 diabetic (T2DM patients (n = 12 and gender, age and BMI-matched healthy controls (n = 12 were studied before and after 8 weeks of treatment with a BA sequestrant. In addition, patients with liver cirrhosis (n = 46 were investigated, since these display elevated plasma BA together with increased energy expenditure. This group was compared to gender-, age- and BMI-matched healthy controls (n = 20. Fasting plasma levels of total BA and individual BA species as well as resting energy expenditure were determined. In response to treatment with the BA sequestrant, plasma deoxycholic acid (DCA levels decreased in controls (-60%, p

  3. Hepatic handling of a synthetic gamma-labeled bile acid (75SeHCAT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    75Se-homocholic acid-taurine (75SeHCAT) is the first available gamma-labeled bile acid, and should therefore be handled more efficiently and specifically by the liver than previous hepatoscintigraphic agents. We have measured serum and hepatic kinetics for 75SeHCAT, and compared them with those for the conventional hepatobiliary scintigraphic agent 99mTc-hepatoiminodiacetic acid, and with serum kinetics for the corresponding natural bile acid, [14C]cholic acid-taurine. We used a dynamic scintigraphic technique and serial blood sampling in 8 subjects. Initial hepatic uptake rate was identical to initial serum disappearance rate (14% dose/min) for 75SeHCAT, but significantly lower for 99mTc-hepatoiminodiacetic acid (6% vs. 14% dose/min, p less than 0.001). Hepatic transit time was shorter for 75SeHCAT (13 min vs. 22 min, p less than 0.02), net hepatic excretory rate was more rapid (1.4% vs. 0.8% dose/min, p less than 0.001), and urinary excretion was lower (1.0% vs. 9.0% dose, p less than 0.001). Initial and late-plasma disappearance rates were significantly lower for 75SeHCAT (14.3% and 1.5% dose/min) than for [14C]cholic acid-taurine (21.3% and 2.8% dose/min, respectively), and plasma clearance was also lower (275 vs. 670 ml/min). In vitro, 75SeHCAT was bound to serum proteins more completely than [14C]cholic acid-taurine (90.4% vs. 86.5%, p less than 0.005). We conclude that 75SeHCAT provides a hepatoscintigraphic agent that is handled more efficiently and specifically by the liver than the conventionally used agent 99mTc-hepatoiminodiacetic acid. It is not cleared from the serum as rapidly as [14C]cholic acid-taurine, probably due to its stronger protein binding. The clinical value of 75SeHCAT in assessing liver disease should be investigated

  4. Role of glucuronidation for hepatic detoxification and urinary elimination of toxic bile acids during biliary obstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Perreault

    Full Text Available Biliary obstruction, a severe cholestatic condition, results in a huge accumulation of toxic bile acids (BA in the liver. Glucuronidation, a conjugation reaction, is thought to protect the liver by both reducing hepatic BA toxicity and increasing their urinary elimination. The present study evaluates the contribution of each process in the overall BA detoxification by glucuronidation. Glucuronide (G, glycine, taurine conjugates, and unconjugated BAs were quantified in pre- and post-biliary stenting urine samples from 12 patients with biliary obstruction, using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. The same LC-MS/MS procedure was used to quantify intra- and extracellular BA-G in Hepatoma HepG2 cells. Bile acid-induced toxicity in HepG2 cells was evaluated using MTS reduction, caspase-3 and flow cytometry assays. When compared to post-treatment samples, pre-stenting urines were enriched in glucuronide-, taurine- and glycine-conjugated BAs. Biliary stenting increased the relative BA-G abundance in the urinary BA pool, and reduced the proportion of taurine- and glycine-conjugates. Lithocholic, deoxycholic and chenodeoxycholic acids were the most cytotoxic and pro-apoptotic/necrotic BAs for HepG2 cells. Other species, such as the cholic, hyocholic and hyodeoxycholic acids were nontoxic. All BA-G assayed were less toxic and displayed lower pro-apoptotic/necrotic effects than their unconjugated precursors, even if they were able to penetrate into HepG2 cells. Under severe cholestatic conditions, urinary excretion favors the elimination of amidated BAs, while glucuronidation allows the conversion of cytotoxic BAs into nontoxic derivatives.

  5. Activation of transmembrane bile acid receptor TGR5 stimulates insulin secretion in pancreatic {beta} cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Divya P.; Rajagopal, Senthilkumar; Mahavadi, Sunila [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA (United States); Mirshahi, Faridoddin [Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Department of Internal Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA (United States); Grider, John R. [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA (United States); Murthy, Karnam S., E-mail: skarnam@vcu.edu [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA (United States); Sanyal, Arun J., E-mail: asanyal@mcvh-vcu.edu [Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Department of Internal Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA (United States)

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer G protein coupled receptor TGR5 is expressed in mouse and human islets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGR5 is coupled to activation of Gs and Ca{sup 2+} release via cAMP/Epac/PLC-{epsilon} pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation of TGR5 by bile salts and selective ligands causes insulin secretion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGR5 could be a potential therapeutic target to treat diabetes. -- Abstract: Bile acids act as signaling molecules and stimulate the G protein coupled receptor, TGR5, in addition to nuclear farnesoid X receptor to regulate lipid, glucose and energy metabolism. Bile acid induced activation of TGR5 in the enteroendocrine cells promotes glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) release, which has insulinotropic effect in the pancreatic {beta} cells. In the present study, we have identified the expression of TGR5 in pancreatic {beta} cell line MIN6 and also in mouse and human pancreatic islets. TGR5 selective ligands, oleanolic acid (OA) and INT-777 selectively activated G{alpha}{sub s} and caused an increase in intracellular cAMP and Ca{sup 2+}. OA and INT-777 also increased phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis and the increase was blocked by NF449 (a selective G{alpha}{sub s} inhibitor) or (U73122) (PI hydrolysis inhibitor). OA, INT-777 and lithocholic acid increased insulin release in MIN6 and human islets and the increase was inhibited by treatment with NF449, (U73122) or BAPTA-AM (chelator of calcium), but not with myristoylated PKI (PKA inhibitor), suggesting that the release is dependent on G{sub s}/cAMP/Ca{sup 2+} pathway. 8-pCPT-2 Prime -O-Me-cAMP, a cAMP analog, which activates Epac, but not PKA also stimulated PI hydrolysis. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the TGR5 expressed in the pancreatic {beta} cells regulates insulin secretion and highlights the importance of ongoing therapeutic strategies targeting TGR5 in the control of glucose homeostasis.

  6. Improved annotation of conjugated bile acid hydrolase superfamily members in Gram-positive bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambert, J.M.; Siezen, R.J.; Vos, de W.M.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2008-01-01

    Most Gram-positive bacteria inhabiting the gastrointestinal tract are capable of hydrolysing bile salts. Bile salt hydrolysis is thought to play an important role in various biological processes in the host. Therefore, correct annotation of bacterial bile salt hydrolases (Bsh) in public databases (E

  7. Improvements in glucose metabolism early after gastric bypass surgery are not explained by increases in total bile acids and fibroblast growth factor 19 concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Nils B; Dirksen, Carsten; Bojsen-Møller, Kirstine N;

    2015-01-01

    Context: Bile acids and fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) have been suggested as key mediators of the improvements in glucose metabolism after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). Objective: To describe fasting and postprandial state total bile acid (TBA) and FGF19 concentrations before and after...

  8. Biosynthesis of 2-hydroxyisobutyric acid (2-HIBA from renewable carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Roland H

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nowadays a growing demand for green chemicals and cleantech solutions is motivating the industry to strive for biobased building blocks. We have identified the tertiary carbon atom-containing 2-hydroxyisobutyric acid (2-HIBA as an interesting building block for polymer synthesis. Starting from this carboxylic acid, practically all compounds possessing the isobutane structure are accessible by simple chemical conversions, e. g. the commodity methacrylic acid as well as isobutylene glycol and oxide. During recent years, biotechnological routes to 2-HIBA acid have been proposed and significant progress in elucidating the underlying biochemistry has been made. Besides biohydrolysis and biooxidation, now a bioisomerization reaction can be employed, converting the common metabolite 3-hydroxybutyric acid to 2-HIBA by a novel cobalamin-dependent CoA-carbonyl mutase. The latter reaction has recently been discovered in the course of elucidating the degradation pathway of the groundwater pollutant methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE in the new bacterial species Aquincola tertiaricarbonis. This discovery opens the ground for developing a completely biotechnological process for producing 2-HIBA. The mutase enzyme has to be active in a suitable biological system producing 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA, which is the precursor of the well-known bacterial bioplastic polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB. This connection to the PHB metabolism is a great advantage as its underlying biochemistry and physiology is well understood and can easily be adopted towards producing 2-HIBA. This review highlights the potential of these discoveries for a large-scale 2-HIBA biosynthesis from renewable carbon, replacing conventional chemistry as synthesis route and petrochemicals as carbon source.

  9. Two distinct etiologies of gastric cardia adenocarcinoma: interactions among pH, Helicobacter pylori, and bile acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-ichi eMukaisho

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer can be classified as cardia and noncardia subtypes according to the anatomic site. Although the gastric cancer incidence has decreased steadily in several countries over the past 50 years, the incidence of cardia cancers and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC continue to increase. The etiological factors involved in the development of both cardia cancers and EACs are associated with high animal fat intake, which causes severe obesity. Central obesity plays roles in cardiac-type mucosa lengthening and partial hiatus hernia development. There are two distinct etiologies of cardia cancer subtypes: one associated with gastroesophageal reflux (GER, which predominantly occurs in patients without Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection and resembles EAC, and the other associated with H. pylori atrophic gastritis, which resembles noncardia cancer. The former can be developed in the environment of high volume duodenal content reflux, including bile acids and a higher acid production in H. pylori–negative patients. N-nitroso compounds, which are generated from the refluxate that includes a large volume of bile acids and are stabilized in the stomach (which has high levels of gastric acid, play a pivotal role in this carcinogenesis. The latter can be associated with the changing colonization of H. pylori from the distal to the proximal stomach with atrophic gastritis because a high concentration of soluble bile acids in an environment of low acid production is likely to act as a bactericide or chemorepellent for H. pylori in the distal stomach with H. pylori infection. The manuscript introduces new insights in causative factors of adenocarcinoma of the cardia about the role of bile acids in gastro-esophageal refluxate based upon robust evidences supporting interactions among pH, H. pylori, and bile acids.

  10. Two distinct etiologies of gastric cardia adenocarcinoma: interactions among pH, Helicobacter pylori, and bile acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukaisho, Ken-Ichi; Nakayama, Takahisa; Hagiwara, Tadashi; Hattori, Takanori; Sugihara, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer can be classified as cardia and non-cardia subtypes according to the anatomic site. Although the gastric cancer incidence has decreased steadily in several countries over the past 50 years, the incidence of cardia cancers and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) continue to increase. The etiological factors involved in the development of both cardia cancers and EACs are associated with high animal fat intake, which causes severe obesity. Central obesity plays roles in cardiac-type mucosa lengthening and partial hiatus hernia development. There are two distinct etiologies of cardia cancer subtypes: one associated with gastroesophageal reflux (GER), which predominantly occurs in patients without Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and resembles EAC, and the other associated with H. pylori atrophic gastritis, which resembles non-cardia cancer. The former can be developed in the environment of high volume duodenal content reflux, including bile acids and a higher acid production in H. pylori-negative patients. N-nitroso compounds, which are generated from the refluxate that includes a large volume of bile acids and are stabilized in the stomach (which has high levels of gastric acid), play a pivotal role in this carcinogenesis. The latter can be associated with the changing colonization of H. pylori from the distal to the proximal stomach with atrophic gastritis because a high concentration of soluble bile acids in an environment of low acid production is likely to act as a bactericide or chemorepellent for H. pylori in the distal stomach. The manuscript introduces new insights in causative factors of adenocarcinoma of the cardia about the role of bile acids in gastro-esophageal refluxate based upon robust evidences supporting interactions among pH, H. pylori, and bile acids. PMID:26029176

  11. Increased bile acids in enterohepatic circulation by short-term calorie restriction in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zidong Donna; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2013-12-15

    Previous studies showed glucose and insulin signaling can regulate bile acid (BA) metabolism during fasting or feeding. However, limited knowledge is available on the effect of calorie restriction (CR), a well-known anti-aging intervention, on BA homeostasis. To address this, the present study utilized a "dose-response" model of CR, where male C57BL/6 mice were fed 0, 15, 30, or 40% CR diets for one month, followed by BA profiling in various compartments of the enterohepatic circulation by UPLC-MS/MS technique. This study showed that 40% CR increased the BA pool size (162%) as well as total BAs in serum, gallbladder, and small intestinal contents. In addition, CR "dose-dependently" increased the concentrations of tauro-cholic acid (TCA) and many secondary BAs (produced by intestinal bacteria) in serum, such as tauro-deoxycholic acid (TDCA), DCA, lithocholic acid, ω-muricholic acid (ωMCA), and hyodeoxycholic acid. Notably, 40% CR increased TDCA by over 1000% (serum, liver, and gallbladder). Interestingly, 40% CR increased the proportion of 12α-hydroxylated BAs (CA and DCA), which correlated with improved glucose tolerance and lipid parameters. The CR-induced increase in BAs correlated with increased expression of BA-synthetic (Cyp7a1) and conjugating enzymes (BAL), and the ileal BA-binding protein (Ibabp). These results suggest that CR increases BAs in male mice possibly through orchestrated increases in BA synthesis and conjugation in liver as well as intracellular transport in ileum.

  12. Bile acid-binding activity of young persimmon (Diospyros kaki) fruit and its hypolipidemic effect in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Kenji; Yokoyama, Shin-ichiro; Gato, Nobuki

    2010-02-01

    The hypolipidemic effects and bile acid-binding properties of young persimmon (Diospyros kaki) fruit were examined. In an animal experiment, male C57BL/6.Cr mice (n = 5) were fed an AIN-76-modified high fat diet supplemented with 2% or 5% (w/w) dried young persimmon fruit (YP) for 10 weeks. The intake of YP significantly enhanced fecal bile acid excretion and lowered the concentration of hepatic lipids and plasma cholesterol. Analysis of gene expression in liver tissue showed that 2% or 5% YP up-regulated the expression of the sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2 gene. In the 5% group, there were increased expressions of the genes for cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase and the low-density lipoprotein receptor. Next, the bile acid-binding ability of YP was analysed in vitro using cholic acid (CA). In 100-2000 microM CA solutions, 1% (w/v) YP adsorbed approximately 60% of CA, while dried mature persimmon fruit adsorbed approximately 20% of CA. The positive control, cholestyramine, adsorbed approximately 80% of CA in the 100-2000 microM CA solutions. A crude tannin extract from YP, which contained 54.7% condensed tannins, adsorbed approximately 78% of CA in the 2000 microM CA solutions. These results suggest that the ability of YP to bind bile acid contributes to its hypolipidemic effect in mice. PMID:19585467

  13. Abscisic acid biosynthesis in leaves and roots of Xanthium strumarium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creelman, R.A.; Gage, D.A.; Stults, J.T.; Zeevaart, J.A.D.

    1987-11-01

    Research on the biosynthesis of abscisic acid (ABA) has focused primarily on two pathways: (a) the direct pathway from farnesyl pyrophosphate, and (b) the indirect pathway involving a carotenoid precursor. The authors have investigated which biosynthetic pathway is operating in turgid and stressed Xanthium leaves, and in stressed Xanthium roots using long-term incubations in /sup 18/O/sub 2/. It was found that in stressed leaves three atoms of /sup 18/O from /sup 18/O/sub 2/ are incorporated into the ABA molecule, and that the amount of /sup 18/O incorporated increases with time. One /sup 18/O atom is incorporated rapidly into the carboxyl group of ABA, whereas the other two atoms are very slowly incorporated into the ring oxygens. The fourth oxygen atom in the carboxyl group of ABA is derived from water. ABA from stressed roots of Xanthium incubated in /sup 18/O/sub 2/ shows a labeling pattern similar to that of ABA in stressed leaves, but with incorporation of more /sup 18/O into the tertiary hydroxyl group at C-1' after 6 and 12 hours than found in ABA from stressed leaves. It is proposed that the precursors to stress-induced ABA are xanthophylls, and that a xanthophyll lacking an oxygen function at C-6 plays a crucial role in ABA biosynthesis in Xanthium roots. In turgid Xanthium leaves, /sup 18/O is incorporated into ABA to a much lesser extent that it is in stressed leaves, whereas exogenously applied /sup 14/C-ABA is completely catabolized within 48 hours. This suggests that ABA in turgid leaves is either (a) made via a biosynthetic pathway which is different from the one in stressed leaves, or (b) has a half-life on the order of days as compared with a half-life of 15.5 hours in water-stressed Xanthium leaves. Phaseic acid showed a labeling pattern similar to that of ABA, but with an additional /sup 18/O incorporated during 8'-hydroxylation of ABA to phaseic acid.

  14. Influence of the intake and composition of elemental diets on bile acid metabolism and hepatic lipids in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, L M; Russell, R I

    1986-01-01

    The effects of the elemental diets Vivonex (V) and Flexical (F) on bile acid metabolism and hepatic lipids in the rat has been investigated both with ad libitum feeding and when calorie intake was limited to that of control rats (C) fed a standard diet (Oxoid 41B). Ad libitum feeding of V and F for 9 weeks resulted in a weight gain in excess of that for the control diet. After 9 weeks of isocaloric feeding the V-fed rats were significantly lighter than those fed F and C. Fecal bile acid excretion (FBA) and the fractional turnover rates for cholic acid (CA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDC) were measured. The elemental diets significantly reduced FBA when fed both ad libitum and isocalorically compared with the control diet, the reduction with V being significantly greater than for F. In the isocaloric feeding study both elemental diets significantly increased the half life of CA and CDC. The increase for CA was significantly greater for V than F but for CDC the effect of the two diets was the same. Thus the percentage of CDC-derived 6 substituted bile acids was greater with V than F feeding. There was a strong negative correlation between bile acid half-life and fecal excretion of metabolites for the three dietary groups indicating that bile acid pool size was unchanged by the elemental diets. A gross increase in liver lipid both histologically and chemically was found for the ad libitum fed V rats with a marked but lesser increase for F.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3755773

  15. Bile acids override steatosis in farnesoid X receptor deficient mice in a model of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Weibin; Liu, Xijun; Peng, Xiaomin [Gene Research Center, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Xue, Ruyi [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Zhongshan Hospital, Shanghai Institute of Liver Disease, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Ji, Lingling [Gene Research Center, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Shen, Xizhong [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Zhongshan Hospital, Shanghai Institute of Liver Disease, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Chen, She, E-mail: shechen@fudan.edu.cn [Gene Research Center, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Gu, Jianxin [Gene Research Center, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zhang, Si, E-mail: zhangsi@fudan.edu.cn [Gene Research Center, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2014-05-23

    Highlights: • FXR deficiency enhanced MCD diet-induced hepatic fibrosis. • FXR deficiency attenuated MCD diet-induced hepatic steatosis. • FXR deficiency repressed genes involved in fatty acid uptake and triglyceride accumulation. - Abstract: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common liver diseases, and the pathogenesis is still not well known. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily and plays an essential role in maintaining bile acid and lipid homeostasis. In this study, we study the role of FXR in the pathogenesis of NFALD. We found that FXR deficient (FXR{sup −/−}) mice fed methionine- and choline-deficient (MCD) diet had higher serum ALT and AST activities and lower hepatic triglyceride levels than wild-type (WT) mice fed MCD diet. Expression of genes involved in inflammation (VCAM-1) and fibrosis (α-SMA) was increased in FXR{sup −/−} mice fed MCD diet (FXR{sup −/−}/MCD) compared to WT mice fed MCD diet (WT/MCD). Although MCD diet significantly induced hepatic fibrosis in terms of liver histology, FXR{sup −/−}/MCD mice showed less degree of hepatic steatosis than WT/MCD mice. Moreover, FXR deficiency synergistically potentiated the elevation effects of MCD diet on serum and hepatic bile acids levels. The super-physiological concentrations of hepatic bile acids in FXR{sup −/−}/MCD mice inhibited the expression of genes involved in fatty acid uptake and triglyceride accumulation, which may be an explanation for less steatosis in FXR{sup −/−}/MCD mice in contrast to WT/MCD mice. These results suggest that hepatic bile acids accumulation could override simple steatosis in hepatic injury during the progression of NAFLD and further emphasize the role of FXR in maintaining hepatic bile acid homeostasis in liver disorders and in hepatic protection.

  16. Mitochondrial genome depletion in human liver cells abolishes bile acid-induced apoptosis: role of the Akt/mTOR survival pathway and Bcl-2 family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Jose J G; Hernandez, Alicia; Revuelta, Isabel E; Gonzalez-Sanchez, Ester; Gonzalez-Buitrago, Jose M; Perez, Maria J

    2013-08-01

    Acute accumulation of bile acids in hepatocytes may cause cell death. However, during long-term exposure due to prolonged cholestasis, hepatocytes may develop a certain degree of chemoresistance to these compounds. Because mitochondrial adaptation to persistent oxidative stress may be involved in this process, here we have investigated the effects of complete mitochondrial genome depletion on the response to bile acid-induced hepatocellular injury. A subline (Rho) of human hepatoma SK-Hep-1 cells totally depleted of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was obtained, and bile acid-induced concentration-dependent activation of apoptosis/necrosis and survival signaling pathways was studied. In the absence of changes in intracellular ATP content, Rho cells were highly resistant to bile acid-induced apoptosis and partially resistant to bile acid-induced necrosis. In Rho cells, both basal and bile acid-induced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion, was decreased. Bile acid-induced proapoptotic signals were also decreased, as evidenced by a reduction in the expression ratios Bax-α/Bcl-2, Bcl-xS/Bcl-2, and Bcl-xS/Bcl-xL. This was mainly due to a downregulation of Bax-α and Bcl-xS. Moreover, in these cells the Akt/mTOR pathway was constitutively activated in a ROS-independent manner and remained similarly activated in the presence of bile acid treatment. In contrast, ERK1/2 activation was constitutively reduced and was not activated by incubation with bile acids. In conclusion, these results suggest that impaired mitochondrial function associated with mtDNA alterations, which may occur in liver cells during prolonged cholestasis, may activate mechanisms of cell survival accounting for an enhanced resistance of hepatocytes to bile acid-induced apoptosis. PMID:23597504

  17. Bile acid-activated nuclear receptor FXR suppresses apolipoprotein A-I transcription via a negative FXR response element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudel, Thierry; Sturm, Ekkehard; Duez, Hélène; Torra, Inés Pineda; Sirvent, Audrey; Kosykh, Vladimir; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; Dallongeville, Jean; Hum, Dean W.; Kuipers, Folkert; Staels, Bart

    2002-01-01

    Serum levels of HDL are inversely correlated with the risk of coronary heart disease. The anti-atherogenic effect of HDL is partially mediated by its major protein constituent apoA-I. In this study, we identify bile acids that are activators of the nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) as negative regulators of human apoA-I expression. Intrahepatocellular accumulation of bile acids, as seen in patients with progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis and biliary atresia, was associated with diminished apoA-I serum levels. In human apoA-I transgenic mice, treatment with the FXR agonist taurocholic acid strongly decreased serum concentrations and liver mRNA levels of human apoA-I, which was associated with reduced serum HDL levels. Incubation of human primary hepatocytes and hepatoblastoma HepG2 cells with bile acids resulted in a dose-dependent downregulation of apoA-I expression. Promoter mutation analysis and gel-shift experiments in HepG2 cells demonstrated that bile acid–activated FXR decreases human apoA-I promoter activity by a negative FXR response element mapped to the C site. FXR bound this site and repressed transcription in a manner independent of retinoid X receptor. The nonsteroidal synthetic FXR agonist GW4064 likewise decreased apoA-I mRNA levels and promoter activity in HepG2 cells. PMID:11927623

  18. Reflux of bile acids from the duodenum into the rumen of cows with a reduced intestinal passage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, U; Hausammann, K; Forrer, R

    1989-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out whether the concentration of bile acids in the rumen of healthy cows differs from that of cows with a reduced gastrointestinal passage. The investigations were performed on 277 heifers and cows of the Swiss Braunvieh, Simmental and Swiss Holstein breeds. Forty of these had traumatic reticuloperitonitis, 30 had right or left abomasal displacement, 14 had an ileus of the duodenum, 36 had an ileus of the jejunum and 54 had a caecal dilatation. The other 103 animals had disorders which did not affect the digestive system and were used as controls. The mean (+/- se) bile acid concentration in the rumen fluid of the control animals was 1.0 +/- 0.30 mumol/litre. The bile acid concentrations in the rumen fluid of the cows with a duodenal or jejunal ileus were significantly higher than those of the other groups, demonstrating that bile acids may reflux from the duodenum into the rumen of cows with an ileus in the small intestine.

  19. Bile Acid Sequestration Reduces Plasma Glucose Levels in db/db Mice by Increasing Its Metabolic Clearance Rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meissner, M.; Herrema, H.J.; Dijk, van Th.; Gerding, A.; Havinga, R.; Boer, T.; Müller, M.R.; Reijngoud, D.J.; Groen, A.K.; Kuipers, F.

    2011-01-01

    Aims/Hypothesis: Bile acid sequestrants (BAS) reduce plasma glucose levels in type II diabetics and in murine models of diabetes but the mechanism herein is unknown. We hypothesized that sequestrant-induced changes in hepatic glucose metabolism would underlie reduced plasma glucose levels. Therefore

  20. Cholesterol-lowering effects and mechanisms in view of bile acid pathway of resveratrol and resveratrol-glucuronides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resveratrol (Res) was previously reported to be capable of lowering plasma TC and LDL-C. The mechanism behind Res is not clearly understood, although it is presumed to have an effect on bile acid metabolism in the liver: a significant way in eliminating cholesterol from the body. As one of the major...

  1. Gene expression changes associated with Barrett's esophagus and Barrett's-associated adenocarcinoma cell lines after acid or bile salt exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahbaie Peyman

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Esophageal reflux and Barrett's esophagus represent two major risk factors for the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma. Previous studies have shown that brief exposure of the Barrett's-associated adenocarcinoma cell line, SEG-1, or primary cultures of Barrett's esophageal tissues to acid or bile results in changes consistent with cell proliferation. In this study, we determined whether similar exposure to acid or bile salts results in gene expression changes that provide insights into malignant transformation. Methods Using previously published methods, Barrett's-associated esophageal adenocarcinoma cell lines and primary cultures of Barrett's esophageal tissue were exposed to short pulses of acid or bile salts followed by incubation in culture media at pH 7.4. A genome-wide assessment of gene expression was then determined for the samples using cDNA microarrays. Subsequent analysis evaluated for statistical differences in gene expression with and without treatment. Results The SEG-1 cell line showed changes in gene expression that was dependent on the length of exposure to pH 3.5. Further analysis using the Gene Ontology, however, showed that representation by genes associated with cell proliferation is not enhanced by acid exposure. The changes in gene expression also did not involve genes known to be differentially expressed in esophageal adenocarcinoma. Similar experiments using short-term primary cultures of Barrett's esophagus also did not result in detectable changes in gene expression with either acid or bile salt exposure. Conclusion Short-term exposure of esophageal adenocarcinoma SEG-1 cells or primary cultures of Barrett's esophagus does not result in gene expression changes that are consistent with enhanced cell proliferation. Thus other model systems are needed that may reflect the impact of acid and bile salt exposure on the esophagus in vivo.

  2. Bile acid malabsorption in patients with chronic diarrhoea: clinical value of SeHCAT test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildt, Signe; Nørby Rasmussen, S; Madsen, Jan Lysgård;

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bile acid malabsorption (BAM), a cause of chronic diarrhoea, can be diagnosed by the SeHCAT test. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of SeHCAT testing by assessing the extent of BAM and describing the clinical characteristics in a group of patients with chronic...... diarrhoea. Clinical outcome after treatment with cholestyramine was also evaluated. METHODS: During a 5-year period (1997-2001) the SeHCAT test was performed in 135 patients in whom a primary programme for diagnostic evaluation of chronic diarrhoea had not revealed a cause. File data from 133 patients could...... as a second-line investigation with a high diagnostic yield. The only a priori parameter to predict BAM was the existence of ileocaecal resections. The result of the SeHCAT test seems to predict the benefit of treatment with cholestyramine....

  3. Bile acids in regulation of inflammation and immunity: friend or foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ci; Fuchs, Claudia D; Halilbasic, Emina; Trauner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Apart from their pivotal role in dietary lipid absorption and cholesterol homeostasis, bile acids (BAs) are increasingly recognised as important signalling molecules in the regulation of systemic endocrine functions. As such BAs are natural ligands for several nuclear hormone receptors and G-protein-coupled receptors. Through activating various signalling pathways, BAs not only regulate their own synthesis, enterohepatic recirculation and metabolism, but also immune homeostasis. This makes BAs attractive therapeutic agents for managing metabolic and inflammatory liver disorders. Recent experimental and clinical evidence indicates that BAs exert beneficial effects in cholestatic and metabolically driven inflammatory diseases. This review elucidates how different BAs function as pathogenetic factors and potential therapeutic agents for inflammation-driven liver diseases, focusing on their role in regulation of inflammation and immunity. PMID:27586800

  4. Glucose-lowering effects of intestinal bile acid sequestration through enhancement of splanchnic glucose utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prawitt, Janne; Caron, Sandrine; Staels, Bart

    2014-05-01

    Intestinal bile acid (BA) sequestration efficiently lowers plasma glucose concentrations in type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients. Because BAs act as signaling molecules via receptors, including the G protein-coupled receptor TGR5 and the nuclear receptor FXR (farnesoid X receptor), to regulate glucose homeostasis, BA sequestration, which interrupts the entero-hepatic circulation of BAs, constitutes a plausible action mechanism of BA sequestrants. An increase of intestinal L-cell glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion upon TGR5 activation is the most commonly proposed mechanism, but recent studies also argue for a direct entero-hepatic action to enhance glucose utilization. We discuss here recent findings on the mechanisms of sequestrant-mediated glucose lowering via an increase of splanchnic glucose utilization through entero-hepatic FXR signaling.

  5. Determination of a novel bile acid sequestrant in rodent diet by near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scull, J R; Moyer, K L; Green, J S; Woodeshick, R W; Alasandro, M S

    1999-05-01

    DMP 504 is a high molecular weight polymer currently under development by The DuPont Merck Pharmaceutical Company as a novel bile acid sequestrant to lower serum cholesterol. To assess its safety, DMP 504 is incorporated into rodent diet for oral administration to rats and mice. An analytical method was developed to determine the accuracy and homogeneity of the blends. Since a physical separation or extraction of DMP 504 from the diet was not feasible, near-infrared spectroscopy (near-IR) was employed. The near-IR method provides accurate and precise results for blends containing 1.5-8.0% of DMP 504. Comparison of results at the 1.5% level with a cholate binding referee method is also presented. Both methods provided equivalent results for the 1.5% level.

  6. The fate of the orally administered bile acid sequestrant, polidexide, in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, L A

    1976-01-01

    1. The metabolic fate of the insoluble bile acid sequestrant polidexide, (poly-[2-(diethylamino)ethyl] polyglycerylenedextran hydrochloride), was studied in four adult humans following the oral administration of the 14C-labelled substance. 2. The mean cumulative recovery of 14C in faeces was 95-3% (s.e.m. = 1-1) of the administered dose, while mean cumulative recovery in urine was 0-37% (s.e.m. = 0-13) of the oral dose. 3. Only background levels of radioactivity were detectable in plasma samples taken 1-3 days after administration of tracer. 4. The findings suggested that polidexide was not absorbed from the gastrointestinal in man to any significant degree.

  7. SK&F 97426-A a more potent bile acid sequestrant and hypocholesterolaemic agent than cholestyramine in the hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, G M; Alston, D R; Bond, B C; Gee, A N; Glen, A; Haynes, C; Hickey, D M; Iqbal, S; Jackson, B; Jaxa-Chamiec, A A

    1993-06-01

    SK&F 97426-A is a novel bile acid sequestrant which was selected for comparison with cholestyramine in vivo because of its superior in vitro bile acid binding properties. The effects of the two sequestrants on faecal bile acid excretion, plasma total cholesterol, VLDL + LDL and HDL cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations and on liver enzymes involved in the synthesis and metabolism of cholesterol were investigated in normocholesterolaemic hamsters. Four studies were conducted to determine the relative potencies of the two resins using a range of doses of the sequestrants over treatment periods of up to 2 weeks. Curves fitted to the resulting data allowed common maximum responses and separate ED50s to be calculated for each sequestrant. The maximum response of both sequestrants was to increase bile acid excretion by 352% and lower plasma total cholesterol by 37-58%. LDL + VLDL and HDL cholesterol were reduced by 56-75% and 25-41%, respectively. SK&F 97426-A was 3 times more potent than cholestyramine at increasing the excretion of bile acids in the faeces and 2.1-3.4-fold and 2.3-3.2-fold more potent at lowering total plasma cholesterol and LDL plus VLDL cholesterol, respectively. In some of the experiments SK&F 97426-A was also more potent than cholestyramine at lowering HDL cholesterol. Plasma triglycerides were also lowered by both sequestrants by up to 31% after 1 week but the relative potency could not be determined. These HDL cholesterol and total triglyceride lowering effects of bile acid sequestrants in the hamster are known not to occur in people treated with cholestyramine. There were minimal differences between hamsters treated for 1 or 2 weeks in the relative potencies or ED50s calculated for the total plasma cholesterol, LDL + VLDL and HDL cholesterol. Both sequestrants may have been slightly more efficacious on these parameters after 2 weeks of treatment. Liver weights were reduced by about 15% by both sequestrants at 2% (w/w) in the diet for 1

  8. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibition potentiates amino acid- and bile acid-induced bicarbonate secretion in rat duodenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takuya; Wang, Joon-Ho; Higashiyama, Masaaki; Rudenkyy, Sergiy; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Guth, Paul H; Engel, Eli; Kaunitz, Jonathan D; Akiba, Yasutada

    2012-10-01

    Intestinal endocrine cells release gut hormones, including glucagon-like peptides (GLPs), in response to luminal nutrients. Luminal L-glutamate (L-Glu) and 5'-inosine monophosphate (IMP) synergistically increases duodenal HCO3- secretion via GLP-2 release. Since L cells express the bile acid receptor TGR5 and dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) IV rapidly degrades GLPs, we hypothesized that luminal amino acids or bile acids stimulate duodenal HCO3- secretion via GLP-2 release, which is enhanced by DPPIV inhibition. We measured HCO3- secretion with pH and CO2 electrodes using a perfused rat duodenal loop under isoflurane anesthesia. L-Glu (10 mM) and IMP (0.1 mM) were luminally coperfused with or without luminal perfusion (0.1 mM) or intravenous (iv) injection (3 μmol/kg) of the DPPIV inhibitor NVP728. The loop was also perfused with a selective TGR5 agonist betulinic acid (BTA, 10 μM) or the non-bile acid type TGR5 agonist 3-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-(4-chlorophenyl)-N,5-dimethylisoxazole-4-carboxamide (CCDC; 10 μM). DPPIV activity visualized by use of the fluorogenic substrate was present on the duodenal brush border and submucosal layer, both abolished by the incubation with NVP728 (0.1 mM). An iv injection of NVP728 enhanced L-Glu/IMP-induced HCO3- secretion, whereas luminal perfusion of NVP728 had no effect. BTA or CCDC had little effect on HCO3- secretion, whereas NVP728 iv markedly enhanced BTA- or CCDC-induced HCO3- secretion, the effects inhibited by a GLP-2 receptor antagonist. Coperfusion of the TGR5 agonist enhanced L-Glu/IMP-induced HCO3- secretion with the enhanced GLP-2 release, suggesting that TGR5 activation amplifies nutrient sensing signals. DPPIV inhibition potentiated luminal L-Glu/IMP-induced and TGR5 agonist-induced HCO3- secretion via a GLP-2 pathway, suggesting that the modulation of the local concentration of the endogenous secretagogue GLP-2 by luminal compounds and DPPIV inhibition helps regulate protective duodenal HCO3- secretion.

  9. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibition potentiates amino acid- and bile acid-induced bicarbonate secretion in rat duodenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takuya; Wang, Joon-Ho; Higashiyama, Masaaki; Rudenkyy, Sergiy; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Guth, Paul H; Engel, Eli; Kaunitz, Jonathan D; Akiba, Yasutada

    2012-10-01

    Intestinal endocrine cells release gut hormones, including glucagon-like peptides (GLPs), in response to luminal nutrients. Luminal L-glutamate (L-Glu) and 5'-inosine monophosphate (IMP) synergistically increases duodenal HCO3- secretion via GLP-2 release. Since L cells express the bile acid receptor TGR5 and dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) IV rapidly degrades GLPs, we hypothesized that luminal amino acids or bile acids stimulate duodenal HCO3- secretion via GLP-2 release, which is enhanced by DPPIV inhibition. We measured HCO3- secretion with pH and CO2 electrodes using a perfused rat duodenal loop under isoflurane anesthesia. L-Glu (10 mM) and IMP (0.1 mM) were luminally coperfused with or without luminal perfusion (0.1 mM) or intravenous (iv) injection (3 μmol/kg) of the DPPIV inhibitor NVP728. The loop was also perfused with a selective TGR5 agonist betulinic acid (BTA, 10 μM) or the non-bile acid type TGR5 agonist 3-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-(4-chlorophenyl)-N,5-dimethylisoxazole-4-carboxamide (CCDC; 10 μM). DPPIV activity visualized by use of the fluorogenic substrate was present on the duodenal brush border and submucosal layer, both abolished by the incubation with NVP728 (0.1 mM). An iv injection of NVP728 enhanced L-Glu/IMP-induced HCO3- secretion, whereas luminal perfusion of NVP728 had no effect. BTA or CCDC had little effect on HCO3- secretion, whereas NVP728 iv markedly enhanced BTA- or CCDC-induced HCO3- secretion, the effects inhibited by a GLP-2 receptor antagonist. Coperfusion of the TGR5 agonist enhanced L-Glu/IMP-induced HCO3- secretion with the enhanced GLP-2 release, suggesting that TGR5 activation amplifies nutrient sensing signals. DPPIV inhibition potentiated luminal L-Glu/IMP-induced and TGR5 agonist-induced HCO3- secretion via a GLP-2 pathway, suggesting that the modulation of the local concentration of the endogenous secretagogue GLP-2 by luminal compounds and DPPIV inhibition helps regulate protective duodenal HCO3- secretion. PMID:22821947

  10. The role of resistance to bile salts and acid tolerance of exopolysaccharides (EPSS produced by yogurt starter bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boke Hatice

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate a possible relation between EPS production and resistance to bile salts and tolerance to low pH. Eight strains which produced the highest and lowest amount of EPS (16- 211mg/l were selected among 54 bacteria isolated from yogurt. Additionally, they were tested for resistance to bile salts (0.15, 0.3 % and tolerance to low pH (2.0-3.0. After treatment with bile salts and acid, viable bacteria (log cfu ml-1 were determined by surface plating. The high EPS producing strains (B3, G12, W22 showed a significant (P<0.05 protective effect against low pH (pH 2.0. All Streptococcus thermophilus strains showed a higher tolerance to bile salts than the Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus strains. The high EPS-producing S. thermophilus (W22, T12 and L. bulgaricus (B3, G2 strains showed a significant (P<0.01 protective effect against bile salts (0.3 %.

  11. Ablating L-FABP in SCP-2/SCP-x null mice impairs bile acid metabolism and biliary HDL-cholesterol secretion

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Gregory G.; Atshaves, Barbara P.; Landrock, Kerstin K.; Landrock, Danilo; Storey, Stephen M.; HOWLES, PHILIP N.; Kier, Ann B.; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of their abilities to bind bile acids and/or cholesterol, the physiological role(s) of liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) and sterol carrier protein (SCP) 2/SCP-x (SCP-2/SCP-x) gene products in biliary bile acid and cholesterol formation was examined in gene-ablated male mice. L-FABP (LKO) or L-FABP/SCP-2/SCP-x [triple-knockout (TKO)] ablation markedly decreased hepatic bile acid concentration, while SCP-2/SCP-x [double-knockout (DKO)] ablation alone had no effect. In cont...

  12. Reduction in Bile Acid Pool Causes Delayed Liver Regeneration Accompanied by Down-regulated Expression of FXR and C-Jun mRNA in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董秀山; 赵浩亮; 马晓明; 王世明

    2010-01-01

    The present study attempted to examine the effects of bile acid pool size on liver regeneration after hepatectomy.The rats were fed on 0.2% cholic acid(CA)or 2% cholestyramine for 7 days to induce a change in the bile acid size,and then a partial hepatectomy(PH)was performed.Rats fed on the normal diet served as the controls.Measurements were made on the rate of liver regeneration,the labeling indices of PCNA,the plasma total bile acids(TBA),and the mRNA expression of cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase(CYP7A1),...

  13. Metabolic engineering of chloroplasts for artemisinic acid biosynthesis and impact on plant growth

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bhawna Saxena; Mayavan Subramaniyan; Karan Malhotra; Neel Sarovar Bhavesh; Shobha Devi Potlakayala; Shashi Kumar

    2014-03-01

    Chloroplasts offer high-level transgene expression and transgene containment due to maternal inheritance, and are ideal hosts for biopharmaceutical biosynthesis via multigene engineering. To exploit these advantages, we have expressed 12 enzymes in chloroplasts for the biosynthesis of artemisinic acid (precursor of artemisinin, antimalarial drug) in an alternative plant system. Integration of transgenes into the tobacco chloroplast genome via homologous recombination was confirmed by molecular analysis, and biosynthesis of artemisinic acid in plant leaf tissues was detected with the help of 13C NMR and ESI-mass spectrometry. The excess metabolic flux of isopentenyl pyrophosphate generated by an engineered mevalonate pathway was diverted for the biosynthesis of artemisinic acid. However, expression of megatransgenes impacted the growth of the transplastomic plantlets. By combining two exogenous pathways, artemisinic acid was produced in transplastomic plants, which can be improved further using better metabolic engineering strategies for commercially viable yield of desirable isoprenoid products.

  14. Hydrophobic bile acids relax rat detrusor contraction via inhibiting the opening of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger

    OpenAIRE

    Jingzhen Zhu; Xingyou Dong; Qian Liu; Chao Wu; Qingqing Wang; Zhou Long; Longkun Li

    2016-01-01

    Hydrophobic bile acids (BAs) are thought to inhibit smooth muscle contractility in several organs. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of hydrophobic BAs on the detrusor contractility of rat bladder and to explore the possible mechanism. Lithocholic acid (LCA) treatment increased the micturition interval and induced a concentration-dependent relaxation of bladder detrusor strips. In addition, LCA reduced the concentration of intracellular free Ca2+([Ca2+]i) and inhibit...

  15. Bile acid metabolism in hereditary forms of hypertriglyceridemia: evidence for an increased synthesis rate in monogenic familial hypertriglyceridemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Angelin, B; Hershon, K S; Brunzell, J D

    1987-01-01

    This study was undertaken to characterize bile acid metabolism in hereditary forms of hypertriglyceridemia. Ten hypertriglyceridemic patients (type IV phenotype) with familial combined hyperlipidemia and 7 patients with monogenic familial hypertriglyceridemia (FHTG) were compared with 18 healthy controls; all subjects were males. Pool size, synthesis rate, and fractional catabolic rate of cholic and chenodeoxycholic acids were determined with an isotope dilution technique. Patients with FHTG ...

  16. Bile-acid-activated farnesoid X receptor regulates hydrogen sulfide production and hepatic microcirculation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Barbara Renga; Andrea Mencarelli; Marco Migliorati; Eleonora Distrutti; Stefano Fiorucci

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) regulates expression of liver cystathionase (CSE), a gene involved in hydrogen sulfide (H2S) generation. METHODS: The regulation of CSE expression in response to FXR ligands was evaluated in HepG2 cells and in wild-type and FXR null mice treated with 6-ethyl chenodeoxycholic acid (6E-CDCA), a synthetic FXR ligand. The analysis demonstrated an FXR responsive element in the 5'-flanking region of the human CSE gene. The function of this site was investigated by luciferase reporter assays, chromatin immunoprecipitation and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Livers obtained from rats treated with carbon tetrachloride alone, or in combination with 6-ethyl chenodeoxycholic acid, were studied for hydrogen sulphide generation and portal pressure measurement. RESULTS: Liver expression of CSE is regulated by bile acids by means of an FXR-mediated mechanism. Western blotting, qualitative and quantitative polymerase chain reaction, as well as immunohistochemical analysis, showed that expression of CSE in HepG2 cells and in mice is induced by treatment with an FXR ligand. Administration of 6E-CDCA to carbon tetrachloride treated rats protected against the down-regulation of CSE expression, increased H2S generation, reduced portal pressure and attenuated the endothelial dysfunction of isolated and perfused cirrhotic rat livers. CONCLUSION: These results demonstrate that CSE is an FXR-regulated gene and provide a new molecular explanation for the pathophysiology of portal hypertension.

  17. Human Insulin Resistance Is Associated With Increased Plasma Levels of 12α-Hydroxylated Bile Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeusler, Rebecca A.; Astiarraga, Brenno; Camastra, Stefania; Accili, Domenico; Ferrannini, Ele

    2013-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) exert pleiotropic metabolic effects, and physicochemical properties of different BAs affect their function. In rodents, insulin regulates BA composition, in part by regulating the BA 12α-hydroxylase CYP8B1. However, it is unclear whether a similar effect occurs in humans. To address this question, we examined the relationship between clamp-measured insulin sensitivity and plasma BA composition in a cohort of 200 healthy subjects and 35 type 2 diabetic (T2D) patients. In healthy subjects, insulin resistance (IR) was associated with increased 12α-hydroxylated BAs (cholic acid, deoxycholic acid, and their conjugated forms). Furthermore, ratios of 12α-hydroxylated/non–12α-hydroxylated BAs were associated with key features of IR, including higher insulin, proinsulin, glucose, glucagon, and triglyceride (TG) levels and lower HDL cholesterol. In T2D patients, BAs were nearly twofold elevated, and more hydrophobic, compared with healthy subjects, although we did not observe disproportionate increases in 12α-hydroxylated BAs. In multivariate analysis of the whole dataset, controlling for sex, age, BMI, and glucose tolerance status, higher 12α-hydroxy/non–12α-hydroxy BA ratios were associated with lower insulin sensitivity and higher plasma TGs. These findings suggest a role for 12α-hydroxylated BAs in metabolic abnormalities in the natural history of T2D and raise the possibility of developing insulin-sensitizing therapeutics based on manipulations of BA composition. PMID:23884887

  18. Bile acids regulate intestinal cell proliferation by modulating EGFR and FXR signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossa, Avafia Y; Escobar, Oswaldo; Golden, Jamie; Frey, Mark R; Ford, Henri R; Gayer, Christopher P

    2016-01-15

    Bile acids (BAs) are synthesized in the liver and secreted into the intestine. In the lumen, enteric bacteria metabolize BAs from conjugated, primary forms into more toxic unconjugated, secondary metabolites. Secondary BAs can be injurious to the intestine and may contribute to disease. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the nuclear farnesoid X receptor (FXR) are known to interact with BAs. In this study we examined the effects of BAs on intestinal epithelial cell proliferation and investigated the possible roles for EGFR and FXR in these effects. We report that taurine-conjugated cholic acid (TCA) induced proliferation, while its unconjugated secondary counterpart deoxycholic acid (DCA) inhibited proliferation. TCA stimulated phosphorylation of Src, EGFR, and ERK 1/2. Pharmacological blockade of any of these pathways or genetic ablation of EGFR abrogated TCA-stimulated proliferation. Interestingly, Src or EGFR inhibitors eliminated TCA-induced phosphorylation of both molecules, suggesting that their activation is interdependent. In contrast to TCA, DCA exposure diminished EGFR phosphorylation, and pharmacological or siRNA blockade of FXR abolished DCA-induced inhibition of proliferation. Taken together, these results suggest that TCA induces intestinal cell proliferation via Src, EGFR, and ERK activation. In contrast, DCA inhibits proliferation via an FXR-dependent mechanism that may include downstream inactivation of the EGFR/Src/ERK pathway. Since elevated secondary BA levels are the result of specific bacterial modification, this may provide a mechanism through which an altered microbiota contributes to normal or abnormal intestinal epithelial cell proliferation.

  19. Increased bile acids in enterohepatic circulation by short-term calorie restriction in male mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Zidong Donna [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, 66160 (United States); Klaassen, Curtis D., E-mail: cklaasse@kumc.edu [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, 66160 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Previous studies showed glucose and insulin signaling can regulate bile acid (BA) metabolism during fasting or feeding. However, limited knowledge is available on the effect of calorie restriction (CR), a well-known anti-aging intervention, on BA homeostasis. To address this, the present study utilized a “dose–response” model of CR, where male C57BL/6 mice were fed 0, 15, 30, or 40% CR diets for one month, followed by BA profiling in various compartments of the enterohepatic circulation by UPLC-MS/MS technique. This study showed that 40% CR increased the BA pool size (162%) as well as total BAs in serum, gallbladder, and small intestinal contents. In addition, CR “dose-dependently” increased the concentrations of tauro-cholic acid (TCA) and many secondary BAs (produced by intestinal bacteria) in serum, such as tauro-deoxycholic acid (TDCA), DCA, lithocholic acid, ω-muricholic acid (ωMCA), and hyodeoxycholic acid. Notably, 40% CR increased TDCA by over 1000% (serum, liver, and gallbladder). Interestingly, 40% CR increased the proportion of 12α-hydroxylated BAs (CA and DCA), which correlated with improved glucose tolerance and lipid parameters. The CR-induced increase in BAs correlated with increased expression of BA-synthetic (Cyp7a1) and conjugating enzymes (BAL), and the ileal BA-binding protein (Ibabp). These results suggest that CR increases BAs in male mice possibly through orchestrated increases in BA synthesis and conjugation in liver as well as intracellular transport in ileum. - Highlights: • Dose response effects of short-term CR on BA homeostasis in male mice. • CR increased the BA pool size and many individual BAs. • CR altered BA composition (increased proportion of 12α-hydroxylated BAs). • Increased mRNAs of BA enzymes in liver (Cyp7a1 and BAL) and ileal BA binding protein.

  20. The ileal lipid binding protein is required for efficient absorption and transport of bile acids in the distal portion of the murine small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praslickova, Dana; Torchia, Enrique C; Sugiyama, Michael G; Magrane, Elijah J; Zwicker, Brittnee L; Kolodzieyski, Lev; Agellon, Luis B

    2012-01-01

    The ileal lipid binding protein (ilbp) is a cytoplasmic protein that binds bile acids with high affinity. However evidence demonstrating the role of this protein in bile acid transport and homeostasis is missing. We created a mouse strain lacking ilbp (Fabp6(-/-) mice) and assessed the impact of ilbp deficiency on bile acid homeostasis and transport in vivo. Elimination of ilbp increased fecal bile acid excretion (54.2%, Pexcreted by 24 h after oral administration was 102% (Psmall and large intestines was increased by 22% (P<0.02) and decreased by 62.7% (P<0.01), respectively, in male Fabp6(-/-) mice relative wild-type mice, whereas no changes were seen in female Fabp6(-/-) mice. Mucosal to serosal bile acid transport using everted distal gut sacs was decreased by 74% (P<0.03) in both sexes of Fabp6(-/-) mice as compared to wild-type mice. The results demonstrate that ilbp is involved in the apical to basolateral transport of bile acids in ileal enterocytes, and is vital for the maintenance of bile acid homeostasis in the enterohepatic circulation (EHC) in mice.

  1. Ménage-à-trois of bariatric surgery, bile acids and the gutmicrobiome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rajendra Raghow

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgeries have emerged as highly effectivetreatments for obesity associated type-2 diabetesmellitus. Evidently, the desired therapeutic endpointssuch as rates of weight loss, lower levels of glycatedhemoglobin and remission of diabetes are achievedmore rapidly and last longer following bariatric surgery,as opposed to drug therapies alone. In light of thesefindings, it has been suspected that in addition tocausing weight loss dependent glucose intolerance,bariatric surgery induces other physiological changesthat contribute to the alleviation of diabetes. However,the putative post-surgical neuro-hormonal pathwaysthat underpin the therapeutic benefits of bariatricsurgery remain undefined. In a recent report, Ryan andcolleagues shed new light on the potential mechanismsthat determine the salutary effects of bariatric surgeryin mice. The authors demonstrated that the improvedglucose tolerance and weight loss in mice after verticalsleeve gastrectomy (VSG) surgery were likely to becaused by post-surgical changes in circulating bileacids and farnesoid-X receptor (FXR) signaling, both ofwhich were also mechanistically linked to changes inthe microbial ecology of the gut. The authors arrivedat this conclusion from a comparison of genome-wide,metabolic consequences of VSG surgery in obese wildtype (WT) and FXR knockout mice. Gene expressionin the distal small intestines of WT and FXR knockoutmice revealed that the pathways regulating bile acidcomposition, nutrient metabolism and anti-oxidantdefense were differentially altered by VSG surgeryin WT and FXR-/- mice. Based on these data Ryanet al , hypothesized that bile acid homeostasis andFXR signaling were mechanistically linked to the gutmicrobiota that played a role in modulating post-surgicalchanges in total body mass and glucose tolerance.The authors' data provide a plausible explanation forputative weight loss-independent benefits of bariatricsurgery and its relationship with metabolism of bileacids.

  2. Electrostatic and potential cation-pi forces may guide the interaction of extracellular loop III with Na+ and bile acids for human apical Na+-dependent bile acid transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Antara; Hussainzada, Naissan; Khandelwal, Akash; Swaan, Peter W

    2008-03-01

    The hASBT (human apical Na(+)-dependent bile acid transporter) constitutes a key target of anti-hypercholesterolaemic therapies and pro-drug approaches; physiologically, hASBT actively reclaims bile acids along the terminal ileum via Na(+) co-transport. Previously, TM (transmembrane segment) 7 was identified as part of the putative substrate permeation pathway using SCAM (substitute cysteine accessibility mutagenesis). In the present study, SCAM was extended through EL3 (extracellular loop 3; residues Arg(254)-Val(286)) that leads into TM7 from the exofacial matrix. Activity of most EL3 mutants was significantly hampered upon cysteine substitution, whereas ten (out of 31) were functionally inactive (<10% activity). Since only E282C lacked plasma membrane expression, EL3 amino acids predominantly fulfill critical functional roles during transport. Oppositely charged membrane-impermeant MTS (methanethiosulfonate) reagents {MTSET [(2-trimethylammonium) ethyl MTS] and MTSES [(2-sulfonatoethyl) MTS]} produced mostly similar inhibition profiles wherein only middle and descending loop segments (residues Thr(267)-Val(286)) displayed significant MTS sensitivity. The presence of bile acid substrate significantly reduced the rates of MTS modification for all MTS-sensitive mutants, suggesting a functional association between EL3 residues and bile acids. Activity assessments at equilibrative [Na(+)] revealed numerous Na(+)-sensitive residues, possibly performing auxiliary functions during transport such as transduction of protein conformational changes during translocation. Integration of these data suggests ligand interaction points along EL3 via electrostatic interactions with Arg(256), Glu(261) and probably Glu(282) and a potential cation-pi interaction with Phe(278). We conclude that EL3 amino acids are essential for hASBT activity, probably as primary substrate interaction points using long-range electrostatic attractive forces. PMID:18028035

  3. Physical and chemical properties of DMP 504, a polyalkylammonium-based bile acid sequestrant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, K S; Chang, R K; Pang, J; Figuly, G D; Hussain, M A

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the physicochemical properties of DMP 504 and lay the foundation for formulation development. Thermal properties were characterized by DSC and TGA and moisture sorption and desorption by TGA. The association rate and equilibrium binding capacity of the polymer for a prototype bile acid was evaluated using cholic acid, and solid state stability was examined at 25 degrees C, 40 degrees C (with and without 5% added water), 60 degrees C, and 600 foot candles/25 degrees C. The solid state excipient compatibility of binary mixtures of DMP 504 and several commonly used pharmaceutical excipients was also evaluated. Thermal analysis of the polymer showed a glass transition temperature at approximately 95 degrees C and no melting point, indicating a highly amorphous macromolecular structure with thermal stability up to 250 degrees C. Moisture sorption and desorption isotherms at controlled humidity ranging from 11% to 97% RH did not display hysteresis. Cholic acid associated with DMP 504 extremely rapidly so that binding was essentially complete within 5 min. Scatchard analysis of the equilibrium binding of cholic acid to DMP 504 was unconventional, and indicated that the system was exhibiting positive cooperative behavior. Modeling the binding curve for a system exhibiting cooperative behavior indicated a maximum binding capacity of DMP 504 for cholic acid in phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.0) of 4.9 mumol/mg, and a cooperativity value, P, of 2.2 implying that binding of one molecule promotes the binding of additional molecules. DMP 504, a hygroscopic, amorphous cross-linked polymer with a tendency to gain or lose moisture with ease, is stable in the solid state, either drug substance alone or in presence of excipients, at normal storage temperatures and light, and under controlled conditions of humidity.

  4. Bile Acid Malabsorption After Pelvic and Prostate Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: An Uncommon but Treatable Condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Victoria [Academic Urology Unit, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London and Sutton (United Kingdom); Benton, Barbara [Gastroenterology Unit, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London and Sutton (United Kingdom); Sohaib, Aslam [Department of Radiology, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London and Sutton (United Kingdom); Dearnaley, David [Academic Urology Unit, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London and Sutton (United Kingdom); Andreyev, H. Jervoise N., E-mail: j@andreyev.demon.co.uk [Gastroenterology Unit, Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London and Sutton (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a significant therapeutic advance in prostate cancer, allowing increased tumor dose delivery and increased sparing of normal tissues. IMRT planning uses strict dose constraints to nearby organs to limit toxicity. Bile acid malabsorption (BAM) is a treatable disorder of the terminal ileum (TI) that presents with symptoms similar to radiation therapy toxicity. It has not been described in patients receiving RT for prostate cancer in the contemporary era. We describe new-onset BAM in men after IMRT for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Diagnosis of new-onset BAM was established after typical symptoms developed, selenium-75 homocholic acid taurine (SeHCAT) scanning showed 7-day retention of <15%, and patients' symptoms unequivocally responded to a bile acid sequestrant. The TI was identified on the original radiation therapy plan, and the radiation dose delivered was calculated and compared with accepted dose-volume constraints. Results: Five of 423 men treated in a prospective series of high-dose prostate and pelvic IMRT were identified with new onset BAM (median age, 65 years old). All reported having normal bowel habits before RT. The volume of TI ranged from 26-141 cc. The radiation dose received by the TI varied between 11.4 Gy and 62.1 Gy (uncorrected). Three of 5 patients had TI treated in excess of 45 Gy (equivalent dose calculated in 2-Gy fractions, using an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 3) with volumes ranging from 1.6 cc-49.0 cc. One patient had mild BAM (SeHCAT retention, 10%-15%), 2 had moderate BAM (SeHCAT retention, 5%-10%), and 2 had severe BAM (SeHCAT retention, <5%). The 3 patients whose TI received {>=}45 Gy developed moderate to severe BAM, whereas those whose TI received <45 Gy had only mild to moderate BAM. Conclusions: Radiation delivered to the TI during IMRT may cause BAM. Identification of the TI from unenhanced RT planning computed tomography scans is difficult and may impede

  5. Structure-based drug design targeting the cell membrane receptor GPBAR1: exploiting the bile acid scaffold towards selective agonism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Leva, Francesco Saverio; Festa, Carmen; Renga, Barbara; Sepe, Valentina; Novellino, Ettore; Fiorucci, Stefano; Zampella, Angela; Limongelli, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids can regulate nutrient metabolism through the activation of the cell membrane receptor GPBAR1 and the nuclear receptor FXR. Developing an exogenous control over these receptors represents an attractive strategy for the treatment of enterohepatic and metabolic disorders. A number of dual GPBAR1/FXR agonists are known, however their therapeutic use is limited by multiple unwanted effects due to activation of the diverse downstream signals controlled by the two receptors. On the other hand, designing selective GPBAR1 and FXR agonists is challenging since the two proteins share similar structural requisites for ligand binding. Here, taking advantage of our knowledge of the two targets, we have identified through a rational drug design study a series of amine lithocholic acid derivatives as selective GPBAR1 agonists. The presence of the 3α-NH2 group on the steroidal scaffold is responsible for the selectivity over FXR unveiling unprecedented structural insights into bile acid receptors activity modulation. PMID:26567894

  6. Identification of novel bile acids as biomarkers for the early diagnosis of Niemann-Pick C disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzacuva, Francesca; Mills, Philippa; Mills, Kevin; Camuzeaux, Stephane; Gissen, Paul; Nicoli, Elena-Raluca; Wassif, Christopher; Te Vruchte, Danielle; Porter, Forbes D; Maekawa, Masamitsu; Mano, Nariyasu; Iida, Takashi; Platt, Frances; Clayton, Peter T

    2016-06-01

    This article describes a rapid UPLC-MS/MS method to quantitate novel bile acids in biological fluids and the evaluation of their diagnostic potential in Niemann-Pick C (NPC). Two new compounds, NPCBA1 (3β-hydroxy,7β-N-acetylglucosaminyl-5-cholenoic acid) and NPCBA2 (probably 3β,5α,6β-trihydroxycholanoyl-glycine), were observed to accumulate preferentially in NPC patients: median plasma concentrations of NPCBA1 and NPCBA2 were 40- and 10-fold higher in patients than in controls. However, NPCBA1 concentrations were normal in some patients because they carried a common mutation inactivating the GlcNAc transferase required for the synthesis of this bile acid. NPCBA2, not containing a GlcNAc moiety, is thus a better NPC biomarker. PMID:27139891

  7. The bile acid-sensitive ion channel (BASIC), the ignored cousin of ASICs and ENaC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiemuth, Dominik; Assmann, Marc; Gründer, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The DEG/ENaC gene family of ion channels is characterized by a high degree of structural similarity and an equally high degree of diversity concerning the physiological function. In humans and rodents, the DEG/ENaC family comprises 2 main subgroups: the subunits of the epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) and the subunits of the acid sensing ion channels (ASICs). The bile acid-sensitive channel (BASIC), previously known as BLINaC or INaC, represents a third subgroup within the DEG/ENaC family. Although BASIC was identified more than a decade ago, very little is known about its physiological function. Recent progress in the characterization of this neglected member of the DEG/ENaC family, which is summarized in this focused review, includes the discovery of surprising species differences, its pharmacological characterization, and the identification of bile acids as putative natural activators.

  8. Structure-based drug design targeting the cell membrane receptor GPBAR1: exploiting the bile acid scaffold towards selective agonism

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Leva, Francesco Saverio; Festa, Carmen; Renga, Barbara; Sepe, Valentina; Novellino, Ettore; Fiorucci, Stefano; Zampella, Angela; Limongelli, Vittorio

    2015-11-01

    Bile acids can regulate nutrient metabolism through the activation of the cell membrane receptor GPBAR1 and the nuclear receptor FXR. Developing an exogenous control over these receptors represents an attractive strategy for the treatment of enterohepatic and metabolic disorders. A number of dual GPBAR1/FXR agonists are known, however their therapeutic use is limited by multiple unwanted effects due to activation of the diverse downstream signals controlled by the two receptors. On the other hand, designing selective GPBAR1 and FXR agonists is challenging since the two proteins share similar structural requisites for ligand binding. Here, taking advantage of our knowledge of the two targets, we have identified through a rational drug design study a series of amine lithocholic acid derivatives as selective GPBAR1 agonists. The presence of the 3α-NH2 group on the steroidal scaffold is responsible for the selectivity over FXR unveiling unprecedented structural insights into bile acid receptors activity modulation.

  9. Enteral bile acid treatment improves parenteral nutrition-related liver disease and intestinal mucosal atrophy in neonatal pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Ajay Kumar; Stoll, Barbara; Burrin, Douglas G;

    2012-01-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is essential for patients with impaired gut function but leads to parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). TPN disrupts the normal enterohepatic circulation of bile acids, and we hypothesized that it would decrease intestinal expression of the newly...... described metabolic hormone fibroblast growth factor-19 (FGF19) and also glucagon-like peptides-1 and -2 (GLP-1 and GLP-2). We tested the effects of restoring bile acids by treating a neonatal piglet PNALD model with chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA). Neonatal pigs received enteral feeding (EN), TPN, or TPN...... growth marked by weight and villus/crypt ratio was significantly reduced in the TPN group compared with the EN group, and CDCA treatment increased both parameters. These results suggest that decreased circulating FGF19 during TPN may contribute to PNALD. Moreover, we show that enteral CDCA not only...

  10. Caveolin-1 Is Necessary for Hepatic Oxidative Lipid Metabolism: Evidence for Crosstalk between Caveolin-1 and Bile Acid Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel A. Fernández-Rojo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Caveolae and caveolin-1 (CAV1 have been linked to several cellular functions. However, a model explaining their roles in mammalian tissues in vivo is lacking. Unbiased expression profiling in several tissues and cell types identified lipid metabolism as the main target affected by CAV1 deficiency. CAV1−/− mice exhibited impaired hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα-dependent oxidative fatty acid metabolism and ketogenesis. Similar results were recapitulated in CAV1-deficient AML12 hepatocytes, suggesting at least a partial cell-autonomous role of hepatocyte CAV1 in metabolic adaptation to fasting. Finally, our experiments suggest that the hepatic phenotypes observed in CAV1−/− mice involve impaired PPARα ligand signaling and attenuated bile acid and FXRα signaling. These results demonstrate the significance of CAV1 in (1 hepatic lipid homeostasis and (2 nuclear hormone receptor (PPARα, FXRα, and SHP and bile acid signaling.

  11. Do sensory neurons mediate adaptive cytoprotection of gastric mucosa against bile acid injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, D W; Ritchie, W P; Dempsey, D T

    1992-01-01

    Pretreatment with the mild irritant 1 mmol acidified taurocholate protects the gastric mucosa from the injury induced by the subsequent application of 5 mmol acidified taurocholate, a phenomenon referred to as "adaptive cytoprotection." How this occurs remains an enigma. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of sensory neurons and mucus secretion in this phenomenon. Prior to injury with 5 mmol acidified taurocholate (pH 1.2), the stomachs of six groups of rats were subjected to the following protocol. Two groups were topically pretreated with either saline or the mild irritant 1 mmol acidified taurocholate. Two other groups received the topical anesthetic 1% lidocaine prior to pretreatment with either saline or 1 mmol acidified taurocholate. The last two groups got the mucolytic agent 10% N-acetylcysteine (NAC) after pretreatment with either saline or 1 mmol acidified taurocholate. Injury was assessed by measuring net transmucosal ion fluxes, luminal appearance of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), and gross and histologic injury. Pretreatment with the mild irritant 1 mmol acidified taurocholate significantly decreased bile acid-induced luminal ion fluxes and DNA accumulation, suggesting mucosal protection (corroborated by gross and histologic injury analysis). This effect was negated by lidocaine but not by NAC. Thus, it appears that sensory neurons, and not increased mucus secretion, play a critical role in adaptive cytoprotection.

  12. Do sensory neurons mediate adaptive cytoprotection of gastric mucosa against bile acid injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, D W; Ritchie, W P; Dempsey, D T

    1992-01-01

    Pretreatment with the mild irritant 1 mmol acidified taurocholate protects the gastric mucosa from the injury induced by the subsequent application of 5 mmol acidified taurocholate, a phenomenon referred to as "adaptive cytoprotection." How this occurs remains an enigma. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of sensory neurons and mucus secretion in this phenomenon. Prior to injury with 5 mmol acidified taurocholate (pH 1.2), the stomachs of six groups of rats were subjected to the following protocol. Two groups were topically pretreated with either saline or the mild irritant 1 mmol acidified taurocholate. Two other groups received the topical anesthetic 1% lidocaine prior to pretreatment with either saline or 1 mmol acidified taurocholate. The last two groups got the mucolytic agent 10% N-acetylcysteine (NAC) after pretreatment with either saline or 1 mmol acidified taurocholate. Injury was assessed by measuring net transmucosal ion fluxes, luminal appearance of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), and gross and histologic injury. Pretreatment with the mild irritant 1 mmol acidified taurocholate significantly decreased bile acid-induced luminal ion fluxes and DNA accumulation, suggesting mucosal protection (corroborated by gross and histologic injury analysis). This effect was negated by lidocaine but not by NAC. Thus, it appears that sensory neurons, and not increased mucus secretion, play a critical role in adaptive cytoprotection. PMID:1733359

  13. Bile acid-surfactant interactions at the liquid crystal/aqueous interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Sihui; Liang, Wenlang; Cheng, Kung-Lung; Fang, Jiyu; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2014-07-14

    The interaction between bile acids and surfactants at interfaces plays an important role in fat digestion. In this paper, we study the competitive adsorption of cholic acid (CA) at the sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-laden liquid crystal (LC)/aqueous interface formed with cyanobiphenyl (nCB, n = 5-8) and the mixture of 5CB with 4-(4-pentylcyclohexyl)benzonitrile (5PCH). We find that the critical concentration of CA required to displace SDS from the interface linearly decreases from 160 μM to 16 μM by reducing the alkyl chain length of nCB from n = 8 to n = 5 and from 16 μM to 1.5 μM by increasing the 5PCH concentration from 0 wt% to 19 wt% in the 5PCH-5CB binary mixture. Our results clearly demonstrate that the sensitivity of 5PCH-5CB mixtures for monitoring the interaction between CA and SDS at the LC/aqueous interface can be increased by one order of magnitude, compared to 5CB.

  14. Pyrazinamide Induced Rat Cholestatic Liver Injury through Inhibition of FXR Regulatory Effect on Bile Acid Synthesis and Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hong-Li; Hassan, Hozeifa M; Zhang, Yun; Dong, Si-Zhe; Ding, Ping-Ping; Wang, Tao; Sun, Li-Xin; Zhang, Lu-Yong; Jiang, Zhen-Zhou

    2016-08-01

    Pyrazinamide (PZA) is an indispensable first-line drug used for the treatment of tuberculosis which may cause serious hepatotoxicity; however, the mechanisms underlying these toxicities are poorly understood. Cholestasis plays an important role in drug-induced liver injury. Since there were no previous published works reported cholestasis and PZA hepatotoxicity relationship, this study aimed to identify whether PZA can induce liver injury with characterized evidences of cholestasis and to clarify expression changes of proteins related to both bile acid synthesis and transport in PZA-induced liver injury. PZA (2 g/kg) was administered for 7 consecutive days by oral gavage. Results showed there were 2-fold elevation in both ALT and AST serum levels in PZA-treated rats. In addition, a 10-fold increment in serum total bile acid was observed after PZA administration. The mRNA and protein expressions of bile acid synthesis and transport parameters were markedly altered, in which FXR, Bsep, Mrp2, Mdr2, Ostα/β, Oatp1a1, Oatp1b2, and Cyp8b1 were decreased (P < .05), while Mrp3, Ntcp, Oatp1a4, and Cyp7a1 were increased (P < .05). Moreover, treatment with the FXR agonist obeticholic acid (OCA) generated obvious reductions in serum ALT, AST, and TBA levels in PZA-treated rats. Those effects were due to transcriptional regulation of pre-mentioned target genes by OCA. Taken together, these results suggested that PZA-induced cholestatic liver injury was related to FXR inhibition, leading to the dysfunction in bile acid synthesis and transport. PMID:27255380

  15. Techno-functional properties and in vitro bile acid-binding capacities of tamarillo (Solanum betaceum Cav.) hydrocolloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannasin, Sri Puvanesvari; Adzahan, Noranizan Mohd; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Muhammad, Kharidah

    2016-04-01

    Hydrocolloids were extracted from seed mucilage and the pulp fractions from red tamarillo (Solanum betaceum Cav.) mesocarp, and characterisation of their techno-functional properties and in vitro bile acid-binding capacities was performed. The seed mucilage hydrocolloids that were extracted, using either 1% citric acid (THC) or water (THW), had a good foaming capacity (32-36%), whereas the pulp hydrocolloids that were extracted, using 72% ethanol (THE) or 20mM HEPES buffer (THH), had no foaming capacity. The pulp hydrocolloid, however, possessed high oil-holding and water-holding capacities in the range of 3.3-3.6 g oil/g dry sample and 25-27 g water/g dry sample, respectively. This enabled the pulp hydrocolloid to entrap more bile acids (35-38% at a hydrocolloid concentration of 2%) in its gelatinous network in comparison to commercial oat fibre and other hydrocolloids studied. The exceptional emulsifying properties (80-96%) of both hydrocolloids suggest their potential applications as food emulsifiers and bile acid binders. PMID:26593571

  16. The ileal lipid binding protein is required for efficient absorption and transport of bile acids in the distal portion of the murine small intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Praslickova

    Full Text Available The ileal lipid binding protein (ilbp is a cytoplasmic protein that binds bile acids with high affinity. However evidence demonstrating the role of this protein in bile acid transport and homeostasis is missing. We created a mouse strain lacking ilbp (Fabp6(-/- mice and assessed the impact of ilbp deficiency on bile acid homeostasis and transport in vivo. Elimination of ilbp increased fecal bile acid excretion (54.2%, P<0.05 in female but not male Fabp6(-/- mice. The activity of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (cyp7a1, the rate-controlling enzyme of the classical bile acid biosynthetic pathway, was significantly increased in female (63.5%, P<0.05 but not in male Fabp6(-/- mice. The amount of [(3H]taurocholic acid (TCA excreted by 24 h after oral administration was 102% (P<0.025 higher for female Fabp6(-/- mice whereas it was 57.3% (P<0.01 lower for male Fabp6(-/- mice, compared to wild-type mice. The retained fraction of the [(3H]TCA localized in the small and large intestines was increased by 22% (P<0.02 and decreased by 62.7% (P<0.01, respectively, in male Fabp6(-/- mice relative wild-type mice, whereas no changes were seen in female Fabp6(-/- mice. Mucosal to serosal bile acid transport using everted distal gut sacs was decreased by 74% (P<0.03 in both sexes of Fabp6(-/- mice as compared to wild-type mice. The results demonstrate that ilbp is involved in the apical to basolateral transport of bile acids in ileal enterocytes, and is vital for the maintenance of bile acid homeostasis in the enterohepatic circulation (EHC in mice.

  17. Gender-divergent profile of bile acid homeostasis during aging of mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zidong Donna Fu

    Full Text Available Aging is a physiological process with a progressive decline of adaptation and functional capacity of the body. Bile acids (BAs have been recognized as signaling molecules regulating the homeostasis of glucose, lipid, and energy. The current study characterizes the age-related changes of individual BA concentrations by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS in serum and liver of male and female C57BL/6 mice from 3 to 27 months of age. Total BA concentrations in serum increased 340% from 3 to 27 months in female mice, whereas they remained relatively constant with age in male mice. During aging, male and female mice shared the following changes: (1 BA concentrations in liver remained relatively constant; (2 the proportions of beta-muricholic acid (βMCA increased and deoxycholic acid (DCA decreased between 3 and 27 months in serum and liver; and (3 total BAs in serum and liver became more hydrophilic between 3 and 27 months. In female mice, (1 the mRNAs of hepatic BA uptake transporters, the Na(+/taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (Ntcp and the organic anion transporting polypeptide 1b2 (Oatp1b2, decreased after 12 months, and similar trends were observed for their proteins; (2 the mRNA of the rate-limiting enzyme for BA synthesis, cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1, increased from 3 to 9 months and remained high thereafter. However, in male mice, Ntcp, Oatp1b2, and Cyp7a1 mRNAs remained relatively constant with age. In summary, the current study shows gender-divergent profiles of BA concentrations and composition in serum and liver of mice during aging, which is likely due to the gender-divergent expression of BA transporters Ntcp and Oatp1b2 as well as the synthetic enzyme Cyp7a1.

  18. Bile Acids Acutely Stimulate Insulin Secretion of Mouse β-Cells via Farnesoid X Receptor Activation and KATP Channel Inhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Düfer, Martina; Hörth, Katrin; Wagner, Rebecca; Schittenhelm, Björn; Prowald, Susanne; Wagner, Thomas F. J.; Oberwinkler, Johannes; Lukowski, Robert; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Krippeit-Drews, Peter; Drews, Gisela

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with alterations in bile acid (BA) signaling. The aim of our study was to test whether pancreatic β-cells contribute to BA-dependent regulation of glucose homeostasis. Experiments were performed with islets from wild-type, farnesoid X receptor (FXR) knockout (KO), and β-cell ATP-dependent K+ (KATP) channel gene SUR1 (ABCC8) KO mice, respectively. Sodium taurochenodeoxycholate (TCDC) increased glucose-induced insulin secretion. This effect was mimicked by...

  19. Microbiota Modification with Probiotics Induces Hepatic Bile Acid Synthesis via Downregulation of the Fxr-Fgf15 Axis in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Chiara Degirolamo; Stefania Rainaldi; Fabiola Bovenga; Stefania Murzilli; Antonio Moschetta

    2014-01-01

    Gut microbiota influences host health status by providing trophic, protective, and metabolic functions, including bile acid (BA) biotransformation. Microbial imprinting on BA signature modifies pool size and hydrophobicity, thus contributing to BA enterohepatic circulation. Microbiota-targeted therapies are now emerging as effective strategies for preventing and/or treating gut-related diseases. Here, we show that gut microbiota modulation induced by VSL#3 probiotics enhances BA deconjugation...

  20. The synthesis of [[sup 14]C]SK and F 97426A; A novel bile acid sequestrant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrie, K.W.M.; Aggarawal, P.; Saunders, D. (SmithKline Beecham Pharmaceuticals Research and Development, Harlow (United Kingdom))

    1994-02-01

    SK and F 97426A, a 1% crosslinked 11-trimethylammonioundecylmethacrylate chloride ethylene glycol dimethacrylate co-polymer bile acid sequestrant, has been prepared in two carbon-14 labelled forms, namely in the 1-position of the undecyl side chain and the pendant N-methyl group. 11-Bromo[1-[sup 14]C]undecyl methacrylate has been prepared and conditions developed for its small scale suspension polymerisation. (author).

  1. Elevated First-Trimester Total Bile Acid is Associated with the Risk of Subsequent Gestational Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Wolin; Meng, Xiyan; Zhao, Weijing; Pan, Jiemin; Tang, Junling; Huang, Yajuan; Tao, Minfang; Liu, Fang; Jia, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study is to assess whether total bile acid (TBA) level in first trimester pregnancy is associated with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Biochemical parameters including serum TBA of 742 pregnant women were collected within 12 weeks of gestation and compared. At 24–28th weeks of gestation, 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed. The perinatal data of 330 women were collected. The results demonstrated women with GDM (n = 268) had higher first-trimester serum levels of TBA compared with healthy subjects (n = 474) (2.3 ± 1.4 μmol/L vs. 1.9 ± 1.0 μmol/L, P < 0.001). TBA was independently associated with GDM [adjusted odds ratio (AOR), 1.38; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.18–1.61, P < 0.001]. Compared to the first category of TBA, women in the highest category had a marked increase in risk for GDM (AOR, 7.72; 95% CI, 3.22–18.50, P < 0.001). In conclusion, higher first-trimester TBA levels, even within normal range, may help indicate increased risk of GDM. PMID:27667090

  2. Bile acid signaling through farnesoid X and TGR5 receptors in hepatobiliary and intestinal diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bojan Stanimirov; Karmen Stankovand Momir Mikov

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The well-known functions of bile acids (BAs) are the emulsification and absorption of lipophilic xenobiotics. However, the emerging evidences in the past decade showed that BAs act as signaling molecules that not only autoregulate their own metabolism and enterohepatic recirculation, but also as important regulators of integrative metabolism by ac-tivating nuclear and membrane-bound G protein-coupled re-ceptors. The present review was to get insight into the role of maintenance of BA homeostasis and BA signaling pathways in development and management of hepatobiliary and intestinal diseases. DATA SOURCES: Detailed and comprehensive search of PubMed and Scopus databases was carried out for original and review articles. RESULTS: Disturbances in BA homeostasis contribute to the development of several hepatobiliary and intestinal disorders, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, liver cirrhosis, choles-terol gallstone disease, intestinal diseases and both hepatocel-lular and colorectal carcinoma. CONCLUSION: Further efforts made in order to advance the understanding of sophisticated BA signaling network may be promising in developing novel therapeutic strategies related not only to hepatobiliary and gastrointestinal but also sys-temic diseases.

  3. Farnesoid X receptor, the bile acid sensing nuclear receptor, in liver regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guodong Li

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The liver is unique in regenerative potential, which could recover the lost mass and function after injury from ischemia and resection. The underlying molecular mechanisms of liver regeneration have been extensively studied in the past using the partial hepatectomy (PH model in rodents, where 2/3 PH is carried out by removing two lobes. The whole process of liver regeneration is complicated, orchestrated event involving a network of connected interactions, which still remain fully elusive. Bile acids (BAs are ligands of farnesoid X receptor (FXR, a nuclear receptor of ligand-activated transcription factor. FXR has been shown to be highly involved in liver regeneration. BAs and FXR not only interact with each other but also regulate various downstream targets independently during liver regeneration. Moreover, recent findings suggest that tissue-specific FXR also contributes to liver regeneration significantly. These novel findings suggest that FXR has much broader role than regulating BA, cholesterol, lipid and glucose metabolism. Therefore, these researches highlight FXR as an important pharmaceutical target for potential use of FXR ligands to regulate liver regeneration in clinic. This review focuses on the roles of BAs and FXR in liver regeneration and the current underlying molecular mechanisms which contribute to liver regeneration.

  4. Effects of niacin combination therapy with statin or bile acid resin on lipoproteins and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambon, Alberto; Zhao, Xue-Qiao; Brown, B Greg; Brunzell, John D

    2014-05-01

    Two large studies in populations selected for cardiovascular disease (CVD) demonstrated that raising high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol with niacin added to statin therapy did not decrease CVD. We examine the association of lipoprotein subfractions with niacin and changes in coronary stenosis and CVD event risk. One hundred and seven patients from 2 previous studies using niacin in combination with either statin or bile acid-binding resin were selected to evaluate changes in lipoproteins separated by density-gradient ultracentrifugation to progression of coronary artery disease as assessed by quantitative coronary angiography. Improvement in coronary stenosis was significantly associated with the decrease of cholesterol in the dense low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles and across most of the intermediate density lipoprotein (IDL) and very low density lipoprotein particle density range, but, not with any of the HDL fraction or of the more buoyant LDL fractions. Event-free survival was significantly associated with the decrease of cholesterol in the dense LDL and IDL; there was no association with changes in cholesterol in the HDL and buoyant LDL fractions. Niacin combination therapy raises HDL cholesterol and decreases dense LDL and IDL cholesterol levels. Changes in LDL and IDL are related to improvement in CVD. Lipoprotein subfraction analysis should be performed in larger studies utilizing niacin in combination with statins.

  5. Phosphate limitation promotes unsaturated fatty acids and arachidonic acid biosynthesis by microalgae Porphyridium purpureum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Gaomin; Jiao, Kailin; Li, Zheng; Guo, Xiaoyi; Chang, Jingyu; Ndikubwimana, Theoneste; Sun, Yong; Zeng, Xianhai; Lu, Yinghua; Lin, Lu

    2016-07-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are highly appreciated on their nutritive value for human health and aquaculture. P. purpureum, one of the red microalgae acknowledged as a promising accumulator of ARA, was chosen as the target algae in the present research. Effects of sodium bicarbonate (0.04-1.2 g/L), temperature (25, 30 and 33 °C) and phosphate (0.00-0.14 g/L) on biomass yield, total fatty acids (TFA) and arachidonic acid (ARA) accumulation were investigated systemically. NaHCO3 dose of 0.8 g/L and moderate temperature of 30 °C were preferred. In addition, TFA and ARA production were significantly enhanced by an appropriate concentration of phosphate, and the highest TFA yield of 666.38 mg/L and ARA yield of 159.74 mg/L were obtained at a phosphate concentration of 0.035 g/L. Interestingly, with phosphate concentration continuing to fall, UFA/TFA and ARA/EPA ratios were increased accordingly, suggesting that phosphate limitation promoted unsaturated fatty acids and arachidonic acid biosynthesis. Low concentration of phosphate may be favored to increase the enzymatic activities of ∆6-desaturase, which played a key role in catalyzing the conversion of C16:0 to C18:2, and thus the selectivity of UFA increased. Meanwhile, the increase of ARA selectivity could be attributed to ω6 pathway promotion and ∆17-desaturase activity inhibition with phosphate limitation. Phosphate limitation strategy enhanced unsaturated fatty acids and ARA biosynthesis in P. purpureum, and can be applied in commercial scale manufacturing and commercialization of ARA. PMID:27004948

  6. Differential regulation of bile acid and cholesterol metabolism by the farnesoid X receptor in Ldlr −/− mice versus hamsters[S

    OpenAIRE

    Gardès, Christophe; Chaput, Evelyne; Staempfli, Andreas; Blum, Denise; Richter, Hans; Benson, G. Martin

    2013-01-01

    Modulating bile acid synthesis has long been considered a good strategy by which to improve cholesterol homeostasis in humans. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR), the key regulator of bile acid synthesis, was, therefore, identified as an interesting target for drug discovery. We compared the effect of four, structurally unrelated, synthetic FXR agonists in two fat-fed rodent species and observed that the three most potent and selective agonists decreased plasma cholesterol in LDL receptor-deficie...

  7. Bile-acid-mediated decrease in endoplasmic reticulum stress: a potential contributor to the metabolic benefits of ileal interposition surgery in UCD-T2DM rats

    OpenAIRE

    Cummings, Bethany P.; Ahmed Bettaieb; Graham, James L.; Jaehyoung Kim; Fangrui Ma; Noreene Shibata; Stanhope, Kimber L.; Cecilia Giulivi; Frederik Hansen; Jacob Jelsing; Niels Vrang; Mark Kowala; Chouinard, Michael L.; Haj, Fawaz G.; Havel, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Post-operative increases in circulating bile acids have been suggested to contribute to the metabolic benefits of bariatric surgery; however, their mechanistic contributions remain undefined. We have previously reported that ileal interposition (IT) surgery delays the onset of type 2 diabetes in UCD-T2DM rats and increases circulating bile acids, independently of effects on energy intake or body weight. Therefore, we investigated potential mechanisms by which post-operative increas...

  8. Evolution of the biosynthesis of the branched-chain amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Anthony D.; Lazcano, Antonio; Miller, Stanley L.

    1995-06-01

    The origin of the biosynthetic pathways for the branched-chain amino acids cannot be understood in terms of the backwards development of the present acetolactate pathway because it contains unstable intermediates. We propose that the first biosynthesis of the branched-chain amino acids was by the reductive carboxylation of short branched chain fatty acids giving keto acids which were then transaminated. Similar reaction sequences mediated by nonspecific enzymes would produce serine and threonine from the abundant prebiotic compounds glycolic and lactic acids. The aromatic amino acids may also have first been synthesized in this way, e.g. tryptophan from indole acetic acid. The next step would have been the biosynthesis of leucine from α-ketoisovaleric acid. The acetolactate pathway developed subsequently. The first version of the Krebs cycle, which was used for amino acid biosynthesis, would have been assembled by making use of the reductive carboxylation and leucine biosynthesis enzymes, and completed with the development of a single new enzyme, succinate dehydrogenase. This evolutionary scheme suggests that there may be limitations to inferring the origins of metabolism by a simple back extrapolation of current pathways.

  9. Evolution of the biosynthesis of the branched-chain amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Anthony D.; Lazcano, Antonio; Miller, Stanley L.

    1995-01-01

    The origins of the biosynthetic pathways for the branched-chain amino acids cannot be understood in terms of the backwards development of the present acetolactate pathway because it contains unstable intermediates. We propose that the first biosynthesis of the branched-chain amino acids was by the reductive carboxylation of short branched chain fatty acids giving keto acids which were then transaminated. Similar reaction sequences mediated by nonspecific enzymes would produce serine and threomine from the abundant prebiotic compounds glycolic and lactic acids. The aromatic amino acids may also have first been synthesized in this way, e.g. tryptophan from indole acetic acid. The next step would have been the biosynthesis of leucine from alpha-ketoisovalerc acid. The acetolactate pathway developed subsequently. The first version of the Krebs cycle, which was used for amino acid biosynthesis, would have been assembled by making use fo the reductive carboxylation and leucine biosynthesis enzymes, and completed with the development of a single new enzyme, succinate dehydrogenase. This evolutionary scheme suggests that there may be limitations to inferring the origins of metabolism by a simple back extrapolation of current pathways.

  10. Bile acid metabolism by fresh human colonic contents: a comparison of caecal versus faecal samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, L; Veysey, M; French, G; Hylemon, P; Murphy, G; Dowling, R

    2001-01-01

    differences in bile acid metabolism between the right and left halves of the colon, (ii) suggest that caecal and faecal 7α-DH influence per cent DCA in serum (and, by inference, in bile), and (iii) show that the substrate CA induces the enzyme 7α-DH in the caecum.


Keywords: deoxycholic acid; 7α-dehydroxylation; gall stones; colorectal cancer PMID:11709519

  11. pfaB products determine the molecular species produced in bacterial polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Orikasa, Yoshitake; TANAKA, Mika; Sugihara, Shinji; Hori, Ryuji; Nishida, Takanori; Ueno, Akio; Morita, Naoki; Yano, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Kouhei; SHIBAHARA, Akira; Hayashi, Hidenori; Yamada, Yohko; Yamada, Akiko; Yu, Reiko; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    When pDHA4, a vector carrying all five pfaA-pfaE genes responsible for docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6) biosynthesis in Moritella marina MP-1, was coexpressed in Escherichia coli with the individual pfaA-pfaD genes for eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5) biosynthesis from Shewanella pneumatophori SCRC-2738, both polyunsaturated fatty acids were synthesized only in the recombinant carrying pfaB for EPA synthesis. Escherichia coli coexpressing a deleted construct comprising pfaA, pfaC, pfaD and p...

  12. A possible role for bile acid in the control of methanogenesis and the accumulation of hydrogen gas in the human colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florin, T H; Jabbar, I A

    1994-01-01

    This study investigated a possible role for primary bile acid in the control of methanogenesis in the human colon. Production of hydrogen and methane was measured in anaerobic faecal cultures derived from faeces of six 'non-methanogenic' and three methanogenic healthy humans. Using a sensitive technique for gas measurement, methane was detected in all faecal cultures, including those from 'non-methanogenic' humans. Bile acid inhibited methanogenesis in a dose-response fashion in the in vitro 'non-methanogenic' and methanogenic faecal cultures. Inhibition was significant at bile acid concentrations > 0.05%. Methanogenesis correlated with methanogen (methanogenic bacteria) numbers. If this inhibition occurs in vivo, then it would explain much of the epidemiology of non-methanogenesis in humans. From an analysis of net hydrogen production by the faecal cultures, it is inferred that bile acid inhibits other hydrogen-consuming bacteria in addition to methanogens. These in vitro data suggest a major role for bile acid in the accumulation of hydrogen gas in the colon. Possible links between bile acid induced accumulation of gas and irritable bowel syndrome are discussed.

  13. Viability, Acid and Bile Tolerance of Spray Dried Probiotic Bacteria and Some Commercial Probiotic Supplement Products Kept at Room Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dianawati, Dianawati; Mishra, Vijay; Shah, Nagendra P

    2016-06-01

    Production of probiotic food supplements that are shelf-stable at room temperature has been developed for consumer's convenience, but information on the stability in acid and bile environment is still scarce. Viability and acid and bile tolerance of microencapsulated Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus acidophilus and 4 commercial probiotic supplements were evaluated. Bifidobacterium and L. acidophilus were encapsulated with casein-based emulsion using spray drying. Water activity (aw ) of the microspheres containing Bifidobacterium or L. acidophilus (SD GM product) was adjusted to 0.07 followed by storage at 25 °C for 10 wk. Encapsulated Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus acidophilus and 4 commercial probiotic supplement products (AL, GH, RE, and BM) were tested. Since commercial probiotic products contained mixed bacteria, selective media MRS-LP (containing L-cysteine and Na-propionate) and MRS-clindamycin agar were used to grow Bifidobacterium spp. or L. acidophilus, respectively, and to inhibit the growth of other strains. The results showed that aw had a strong negative correlation with the viability of dehydrated probiotics of the 6 products. Viable counts of Bifidobacterium spp. and L. acidophilus of SD GM, AL, and GH were between 8.3 and 9.2 log CFU/g, whereas that of BM and RE were between 6.7 and 7.3 log CFU/g. Bifidobacterium in SD GM, in AL, and in GH products and L. acidophilus in SD GM, in AL, and in BM products demonstrated high tolerance to acid. Most of dehydrated probiotic bacteria were able to survive in bile environment except L. acidophilus in RE product. Exposure to gastric juice influenced bacterial survivability in subsequent bile environment. PMID:27145163

  14. Disruption of BSEP Function in HepaRG Cells Alters Bile Acid Disposition and Is a Susceptive Factor to Drug-Induced Cholestatic Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xi; Zhang, Yueping; Liu, Tongtong; Shen, Hong; Xiao, Yongling; Bourner, Maureen J; Pratt, Jennifer R; Thompson, David C; Marathe, Punit; Humphreys, W Griffith; Lai, Yurong

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, we characterized in vitro biosynthesis and disposition of bile acids (BAs) as well as hepatic transporter expression followed by ABCB11 (BSEP) gene knockout in HepaRG cells (HepaRG-KO cells). BSEP KO in HepaRG cells led to time-dependent BA accumulation, resulting in reduced biosynthesis of BAs and altered BA disposition. In HepaRG-KO cells, the expression of NTCP, OATP1B1, OATP2B1, BCRP, P-gp, and MRP2 were reduced, whereas MRP3 and OCT1 were up-regulated. As a result, BSEP KO altered the disposition of BAs and subsequently underwent adaptive regulations of BA synthesis and homeostasis to enable healthy growth of the cells. Although BSEP inhibitors caused no or slight increase of BAs in HepaRG wild type cells (HepaRG-WT cells), excessive intracellular accumulation of BAs was observed in HepaRG-KO cells exposed to bosentan and troglitazone, but not dipyridamole. LDH release in the medium was remarkably increased in HepaRG-KO cultures exposed to troglitazone (50 μM), suggesting drug-induced cellular injury. The results revealed that functional impairment of BSEP predisposes the cells to altered BA disposition and is a susceptive factor to drug-induced cholestatic injury. In total, BSEP inhibition might trigger the processes but is not a sole determinant of cholestatic cellular injury. As intracellular BA accumulation is determined by BSEP function and the subsequent adaptive gene regulation, assessment of intracellular BA accumulation in HepaRG-KO cells could be a useful approach to evaluate drug-induced liver injury (DILI) potentials of drugs that could disrupt other BA homeostasis pathways beyond BSEP inhibition. PMID:26910619

  15. Oxalic acid biosynthesis is encoded by an operon in Burkholderia glumae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although the biosynthesis of oxalic acid is known to occur in a number of bacteria, the mechanism(s) regulating its production remains largely unknown. To date, there is no report on the identification of an oxalic acid biosynthetic pathway gene from bacteria. In an attempt to identify such a gene...

  16. Novel artificial cell microencapsulation of a complex gliclazide-deoxycholic bile acid formulation: a characterization study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mooranian A

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Armin Mooranian,1 Rebecca Negrulj,1 Nigel Chen-Tan,2 Hesham S Al-Sallami,3 Zhongxiang Fang,4 Trilochan Mukkur,5 Momir Mikov,6,7 Svetlana Golocorbin-Kon,6,7 Marc Fakhoury,8 Frank Arfuso,5 Hani Al-Salami1 1Biotechnology and Drug Development Research Laboratory, School of Pharmacy, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Biosciences Research Precinct, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia; 2Faculty of Science and Engineering, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia; 3School of Pharmacy, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand; 4School of Public Health, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia; 5Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Biosciences Research Precinct, School of Biomedical Science, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia; 6Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Clinical Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Novi Sad, Novi Sad, Serbia; 7Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montenegro, Podgorica, Montenegro; 8Faculty of Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada Abstract: Gliclazide (G is an antidiabetic drug commonly used in type 2 diabetes. It has extrapancreatic hypoglycemic effects, which makes it a good candidate in type 1 diabetes (T1D. In previous studies, we have shown that a gliclazide-bile acid mixture exerted a hypoglycemic effect in a rat model of T1D. We have also shown that a gliclazide-deoxycholic acid (G-DCA mixture resulted in better G permeation in vivo, but did not produce a hypoglycemic effect. In this study, we aimed to develop a novel microencapsulated formulation of G-DCA with uniform structure, which has the potential to enhance G pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects in our rat model of T1D. We also aimed to examine the effect that DCA will have when formulated with our new G microcapsules, in terms of morphology, structure, and excipients' compatibility. Microencapsulation was carried out using the Büchi-based microencapsulating system

  17. Bile-acid-mediated decrease in endoplasmic reticulum stress: a potential contributor to the metabolic benefits of ileal interposition surgery in UCD-T2DM rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany P. Cummings

    2013-03-01

    Post-operative increases in circulating bile acids have been suggested to contribute to the metabolic benefits of bariatric surgery; however, their mechanistic contributions remain undefined. We have previously reported that ileal interposition (IT surgery delays the onset of type 2 diabetes in UCD-T2DM rats and increases circulating bile acids, independently of effects on energy intake or body weight. Therefore, we investigated potential mechanisms by which post-operative increases in circulating bile acids improve glucose homeostasis after IT surgery. IT, sham or no surgery was performed on 2-month-old weight-matched male UCD-T2DM rats. Animals underwent an oral fat tolerance test (OFTT and serial oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT. Tissues were collected at 1.5 and 4.5 months after surgery. Cell culture models were used to investigate interactions between bile acids and ER stress. IT-operated animals exhibited marked improvements in glucose and lipid metabolism, with concurrent increases in postprandial glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 secretion during the OFTT and OGTTs, independently of food intake and body weight. Measurement of circulating bile acid profiles revealed increases in circulating total bile acids in IT-operated animals, with a preferential increase in circulating cholic acid concentrations. Gut microbial populations were assessed as potential contributors to the increases in circulating bile acid concentrations, which revealed proportional increases in Gammaproteobacteria in IT-operated animals. Furthermore, IT surgery decreased all three sub-arms of ER stress signaling in liver, adipose and pancreas tissues. Amelioration of ER stress coincided with improved insulin signaling and preservation of β-cell mass in IT-operated animals. Incubation of hepatocyte, adipocyte and β-cell lines with cholic acid decreased ER stress. These results suggest that postoperative increases in circulating cholic acid concentration contribute to improvements in

  18. The Arabidopsis Vacuolar Sorting Receptor1 Is Required for Osmotic Stress-Induced Abscisic Acid Biosynthesis

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Zhen-Yu

    2014-11-21

    Osmotic stress activates the biosynthesis of the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) through a pathway that is rate limited by the carotenoid cleavage enzyme 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED). To understand the signal transduction mechanism underlying the activation of ABA biosynthesis, we performed a forward genetic screen to isolate mutants defective in osmotic stress regulation of the NCED3 gene. Here, we identified the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Vacuolar Sorting Receptor1 (VSR1) as a unique regulator of ABA biosynthesis. The vsr1 mutant not only shows increased sensitivity to osmotic stress, but also is defective in the feedback regulation of ABA biosynthesis by ABA. Further analysis revealed that vacuolar trafficking mediated by VSR1 is required for osmotic stress-responsive ABA biosynthesis and osmotic stress tolerance. Moreover, under osmotic stress conditions, the membrane potential, calcium flux, and vacuolar pH changes in the vsr1 mutant differ from those in the wild type. Given that manipulation of the intracellular pH is sufficient to modulate the expression of ABA biosynthesis genes, including NCED3, and ABA accumulation, we propose that intracellular pH changes caused by osmotic stress may play a signaling role in regulating ABA biosynthesis and that this regulation is dependent on functional VSR1.

  19. Dysfunction of organic anion transporting polypeptide 1a1 alters intestinal bacteria and bile acid metabolism in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youcai Zhang

    Full Text Available Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1a1 (Oatp1a1 is predominantly expressed in liver and is able to transport bile acids (BAs in vitro. Male Oatp1a1-null mice have increased concentrations of taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA, a secondary BA generated by intestinal bacteria, in both serum and livers. Therefore, in the present study, BA concentrations and intestinal bacteria in wild-type (WT and Oatp1a1-null mice were quantified to investigate whether the increase of secondary BAs in Oatp1a1-null mice is due to alterations in intestinal bacteria. The data demonstrate that Oatp1a1-null mice : (1 have similar bile flow and BA concentrations in bile as WT mice; (2 have a markedly different BA composition in the intestinal contents, with a decrease in conjugated BAs and an increase in unconjugated BAs; (3 have BAs in the feces that are more deconjugated, desulfated, 7-dehydroxylated, 3-epimerized, and oxidized, but less 7-epimerized; (4 have 10-fold more bacteria in the small intestine, and 2-fold more bacteria in the large intestine which is majorly due to a 200% increase in Bacteroides and a 30% reduction in Firmicutes; and (5 have a different urinary excretion of bacteria-related metabolites than WT mice. In conclusion, the present study for the first time established that lack of a liver transporter (Oatp1a1 markedly alters the intestinal environment in mice, namely the bacteria composition.

  20. Inhibition of Human Hepatic Bile Acid Transporters by Tolvaptan and Metabolites: Contributing Factors to Drug-Induced Liver Injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slizgi, Jason R; Lu, Yang; Brouwer, Kenneth R; St Claire, Robert L; Freeman, Kimberly M; Pan, Maxwell; Brock, William J; Brouwer, Kim L R

    2016-01-01

    Tolvaptan is a vasopressin V(2)-receptor antagonist that has shown promise in treating Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD). Tolvaptan was, however, associated with liver injury in some ADPKD patients. Inhibition of bile acid transporters may be contributing factors to drug-induced liver injury. In this study, the ability of tolvaptan and two metabolites, DM-4103 and DM-4107, to inhibit human hepatic transporters (NTCP, BSEP, MRP2, MRP3, and MRP4) and bile acid transport in sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes (SCHH) was explored. IC(50) values were determined for tolvaptan, DM-4103 and DM-4107 inhibition of NTCP (∼41.5, 16.3, and 95.6 μM, respectively), BSEP (31.6, 4.15, and 119 μM, respectively), MRP2 (>50, ∼51.0, and >200 μM, respectively), MRP3 (>50, ∼44.6, and 61.2 μM, respectively), and MRP4 (>50, 4.26, and 37.9 μM, respectively). At the therapeutic dose of tolvaptan (90 mg), DM-4103 exhibited a C(max)/IC(50) value >0.1 for NTCP, BSEP, MRP2, MRP3, and MRP4. Tolvaptan accumulation in SCHH was extensive and not sodium-dependent; intracellular concentrations were ∼500 μM after a 10-min incubation duration with tolvaptan (15 μM). The biliary clearance of taurocholic acid (TCA) decreased by 43% when SCHH were co-incubated with tolvaptan (15 μM) and TCA (2.5 μM). When tolvaptan (15 μM) was co-incubated with 2.5 μM of chenodeoxycholic acid, taurochenodeoxycholic acid, or glycochenodeoxycholic acid in separate studies, the cellular accumulation of these bile acids increased by 1.30-, 1.68-, and 2.16-fold, respectively. Based on these data, inhibition of hepatic bile acid transport may be one of the biological mechanisms underlying tolvaptan-associated liver injury in patients with ADPKD. PMID:26507107

  1. Role of bile acids, prostaglandins and COX inhibitors in chronic esophagitis in a mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C Poplawski; D Sosnowski; A Szaflarska-Poplawska; J Sarosiek; R McCallum; Z Bartuzi

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To develop a new experimental model of esophagitis that serves a complementary tool to clinical investigation in an insight into the mechanism of the damage to the esophagus mucosa by aggressive factors, and role of COX inhibitors in this process.METHODS: The study was conducted in 56 male mice.Animals were divided into seven groups: (1) perfused with HCl, (2) perfused with HCl and physiologic concentration of pepsin (HCl/P), (3) perfused with similar HCl/P solution enriched with conjugated bile acids (glycho- and tauro-sodium salts) designated esophageal infusion catheter under the general anesthesia, (4) perfused as in group 2 treated with indometacin, (5) perfused as in group 2 treated with NS-398, (6) perfused as in group 3 treated with indometacin, and (7) perfused as in group 3 treated with NS-398.The esophagus was divided into 3 parts: upper, middle and lower. The PGE2 concentration was measured in all parts of esophagus using RIA method. Esophagus of sacrificed animals was macroscopically evaluated using a low power dissecting microscope (20x). Specimeris, representing the most frequently seen changes were fixed,stained with H&E and assessed microscopically using the damage score, and inflammatory score.RESULTS: The macroscopic changes were significantly severer in HCl/P than those in HCl animals (77%) and in HCl/P/BA group (43%). In HCl/P NS-398 group we noticed significantly less changes than those in not treated group (42%) and in analogical group treated with indometacine (45%). In HCl/P/BA INDO group we observed significantly severer changes than that in not treated group (52%). We noticed less changes in HCl/P NS-398 than that in group with indometacine (46%). In HCl/P/BA NS-398 group we had less changes than that in indometacin group (34%). The microscopic changes observed in HCl/P/BA INDO group were severer than that in not treated group (48%). Esophagitis index in HCl group was significantly lower than in HCl/P and also HCl/P/BA group (32% and

  2. The Role of Sirt1 in Bile Acid Regulation during Calorie Restriction in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zidong Donna Fu

    Full Text Available Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1 is an NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase that is proposed to mediate many health-promoting effects of calorie restriction (CR. We recently reported that short-term CR increased the bile acid (BA pool size in mice, likely due to increased BA synthesis in liver. Given the important role of Sirt1 in the regulation of glucose, lipid, as well as BA metabolism, we hypothesized that the CR-induced increase in BAs is Sirt1-dependent. To address this, the present study utilized genetically-modified mice that were Sirt1 loss of function (liver knockout, LKO or Sirt1 gain of function (whole body-transgenic, TG. Three genotypes of mice (Sirt1-LKO, wild-type, and Sirt1-TG were each randomly divided into ad libitum or 40% CR feeding for one month. BAs were extracted from various compartments of the enterohepatic circulation, followed by BA profiling by UPLC-MS/MS. CR increased the BA pool size and total BAs in serum, gallbladder, and small intestine. The CR-induced increase in BA pool size correlated with the tendency of increase in the expression of the rate-limiting BA-synthetic enzyme Cyp7a1. However, in contrast to the hypothesis, the CR-induced increase in BA pool size and Cyp7a1 expression was still observed with ablated expression of Sirt1 in liver, and completely suppressed with whole-body overexpression of Sirt1. Furthermore, in terms of BA composition, CR increased the ratio of 12α-hydroxylated BAs regardless of Sirt1 genotypes. In conclusion, the CR-induced alterations in BA pool size, BA profiles, and expression of BA-related genes do not appear to be dependent on Sirt1.

  3. The Role of Sirt1 in Bile Acid Regulation during Calorie Restriction in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zidong Donna; Cui, Julia Yue; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) is an NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase that is proposed to mediate many health-promoting effects of calorie restriction (CR). We recently reported that short-term CR increased the bile acid (BA) pool size in mice, likely due to increased BA synthesis in liver. Given the important role of Sirt1 in the regulation of glucose, lipid, as well as BA metabolism, we hypothesized that the CR-induced increase in BAs is Sirt1-dependent. To address this, the present study utilized genetically-modified mice that were Sirt1 loss of function (liver knockout, LKO) or Sirt1 gain of function (whole body-transgenic, TG). Three genotypes of mice (Sirt1-LKO, wild-type, and Sirt1-TG) were each randomly divided into ad libitum or 40% CR feeding for one month. BAs were extracted from various compartments of the enterohepatic circulation, followed by BA profiling by UPLC-MS/MS. CR increased the BA pool size and total BAs in serum, gallbladder, and small intestine. The CR-induced increase in BA pool size correlated with the tendency of increase in the expression of the rate-limiting BA-synthetic enzyme Cyp7a1. However, in contrast to the hypothesis, the CR-induced increase in BA pool size and Cyp7a1 expression was still observed with ablated expression of Sirt1 in liver, and completely suppressed with whole-body overexpression of Sirt1. Furthermore, in terms of BA composition, CR increased the ratio of 12α-hydroxylated BAs regardless of Sirt1 genotypes. In conclusion, the CR-induced alterations in BA pool size, BA profiles, and expression of BA-related genes do not appear to be dependent on Sirt1.

  4. Bile acids modulate signaling by functional perturbation of plasma membrane domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Maxwell, Kelsey N; Sezgin, Erdinc; Lu, Maryia; Liang, Hong; Hancock, John F; Dial, Elizabeth J; Lichtenberger, Lenard M; Levental, Ilya

    2013-12-13

    Eukaryotic cell membranes are organized into functional lipid and protein domains, the most widely studied being membrane rafts. Although rafts have been associated with numerous plasma membrane functions, the mechanisms by which these domains themselves are regulated remain undefined. Bile acids (BAs), whose primary function is the solubilization of dietary lipids for digestion and absorption, can affect cells by interacting directly with membranes. To investigate whether these interactions affected domain organization in biological membranes, we assayed the effects of BAs on biomimetic synthetic liposomes, isolated plasma membranes, and live cells. At cytotoxic concentrations, BAs dissolved synthetic and cell-derived membranes and disrupted live cell plasma membranes, implicating plasma membrane damage as the mechanism for BA cellular toxicity. At subtoxic concentrations, BAs dramatically stabilized domain separation in Giant Plasma Membrane Vesicles without affecting protein partitioning between coexisting domains. Domain stabilization was the result of BA binding to and disordering the nonraft domain, thus promoting separation by enhancing domain immiscibility. Consistent with the physical changes observed in synthetic and isolated biological membranes, BAs reorganized intact cell membranes, as evaluated by the spatial distribution of membrane-anchored Ras isoforms. Nanoclustering of K-Ras, related to nonraft membrane domains, was enhanced in intact plasma membranes, whereas the organization of H-Ras was unaffected. BA-induced changes in Ras lateral segregation potentiated EGF-induced signaling through MAPK, confirming the ability of BAs to influence cell signal transduction by altering the physical properties of the plasma membrane. These observations suggest general, membrane-mediated mechanisms by which biological amphiphiles can produce their cellular effects.

  5. The effect of a bile acid sequestrant on glucose metabolism in subjects with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smushkin, Galina; Sathananthan, Matheni; Piccinini, Francesca; Dalla Man, Chiara; Law, Jennie H; Cobelli, Claudio; Zinsmeister, Alan R; Rizza, Robert A; Vella, Adrian

    2013-04-01

    We designed an experiment to examine the effect of bile acid sequestration with Colesevelam on fasting and postprandial glucose metabolism in type 2 diabetes. To do so, we tested the hypothesis that Colesevelam increases the disposition index (DI), and this increase is associated with increased glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) concentrations. Thirty-eight subjects on metformin monotherapy were studied using a double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group design. Subjects were studied before and after 12 weeks of Colesevelam or placebo using a labeled triple-tracer mixed meal to measure the rate of meal appearance (Meal Ra), endogenous glucose production (EGP), and glucose disappearance (Rd). Insulin sensitivity and β-cell responsivity indices were estimated using the oral minimal model and then used to calculate DI. Therapy with Colesevelam was associated with a decrease in fasting (7.0 ± 0.2 vs. 6.6 ± 0.2 mmol/L; P = 0.004) and postprandial glucose concentrations (3,145 ± 138 vs. 2,896 ± 127 mmol/6 h; P = 0.01) in the absence of a change in insulin concentrations. Minimal model-derived indices of insulin secretion and action were unchanged. Postprandial GLP-1 concentrations were not altered by Colesevelam. Although EGP and Rd were unchanged, integrated Meal Ra was decreased by Colesevelam (5,191 ± 204 vs. 5,817 ± 204 μmol/kg/6 h; P = 0.04), suggesting increased splanchnic sequestration of meal-derived glucose.

  6. Antibacterial and Antioxidant Activities of Acid and Bile Resistant Strains of Lactobacillus fermentum Isolated from Miang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srikanjana Klayraung

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Miang is a kind of traditional fermented tea leaves, widely consumed in northern Thailand as a snack. It contains several kinds of Lactobacilli spp. The aim of this study was to isolate strains of Lactobacillus fermentum from miang and to investigate their antibacterial and antioxidant activities. The agar spot and well assays were used for determination of antibacterial power. The antibacterial mechanism was investigated by cell morphologic change under scanning electron microscope (SEM. Antioxidant activity was studied by means of free radical scavenging and ferric reducing power assays. The acid and bile screening tests indicated that L. fermentum FTL2311 and L. fermentum FTL10BR presented antibacterial activity against several pathogenic bacteria: Listeria monocytogenes DMST 17303, Salmonella Typhi DMST 5784, Shigella sonnei DMST 561 (ATCC 11060and Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus DMST 6512 (ATCC 6538Ptm. The results from SEM suggested that the antibacterial action was due to the destruction of cell membrane which consequently caused the pathogenic cell shrinking or cracking. The antioxidant study suggested that both L. fermentum FTL2311 and L. fermentum FTL10BR strains could liberate certain substances that possessed antioxidant activity expressed as trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC and equivalent concentration (EC values for free radical scavenging and reducing mechanisms, respectively. The supernatant of L. fermentum FTL2311 broth revealed TEAC and EC values of 22.54±0.12 and 20.63±0.17 µM.mg-1 respectively, whereas that of L. fermentum FTL10BR yielded TEAC and EC values of 24.09±0.12 and 21.26±0.17 µM.mg-1 respectively. These two strains isolated from miang present high potential as promising health-promoting probiotics.

  7. Disturbances in cholesterol, bile acid and glucose metabolism in peroxisomal 3-ketoacylCoA thiolase B deficient mice fed diets containing high or low fat contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas-Francès, Valérie; Arnauld, Ségolène; Kaminski, Jacques; Ver Loren van Themaat, Emiel; Clémencet, Marie-Claude; Chamouton, Julie; Athias, Anne; Grober, Jacques; Gresti, Joseph; Degrace, Pascal; Lagrost, Laurent; Latruffe, Norbert; Mandard, Stéphane

    2014-03-01

    The peroxisomal 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase B (ThB) catalyzes the thiolytic cleavage of straight chain 3-ketoacyl-CoAs. Up to now, the ability of ThB to interfere with lipid metabolism was studied in mice fed a laboratory chow enriched or not with the synthetic agonist Wy14,643, a pharmacological activator of the nuclear hormone receptor PPARα. The aim of the present study was therefore to determine whether ThB could play a role in obesity and lipid metabolism when mice are chronically fed a synthetic High Fat Diet (HFD) or a Low Fat Diet (LFD) as a control diet. To investigate this possibility, wild-type (WT) mice and mice deficient for Thb (Thb(-/-)) were subjected to either a synthetic LFD or a HFD for 25 weeks, and their responses were compared. First, when fed a normal regulatory laboratory chow, Thb(-/-) mice displayed growth retardation as well as a severe reduction in the plasma level of Growth Hormone (GH) and Insulin Growth Factor-I (IGF-I), suggesting alterations in the GH/IGF-1 pathway. When fed the synthetic diets, the corrected energy intake to body mass was significantly higher in Thb(-/-) mice, yet those mice were protected from HFD-induced adiposity. Importantly, Thb(-/-) mice also suffered from hypoglycemia, exhibited reduction in liver glycogen stores and circulating insulin levels under the LFD and the HFD. Thb deficiency was also associated with higher levels of plasma HDL (High Density Lipoproteins) cholesterol and increased liver content of cholesterol under both the LFD and the HFD. As shown by the plasma lathosterol to cholesterol ratio, a surrogate marker for cholesterol biosynthesis, whole body cholesterol de novo synthesis was increased in Thb(-/-) mice. By comparing liver RNA from WT mice and Thb(-/-) mice using oligonucleotide microarray and RT-qPCR, a coordinated decrease in the expression of critical cholesterol synthesizing genes and an increased expression of genes involved in bile acid synthesis (Cyp7a1, Cyp17a1, Akr1d1) were

  8. Influence of diet or intrarectal bile acid injections on colon epithelial cell proliferation in rats previously injected with 1,2-dimethylhydrazine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of varying colon bile acid concentrations on rat colon epithelial cell proliferation were studied. Bile acid concentrations were altered by intrarectally injecting either deoxycholic or lithocholic acid for 4 weeks or by increasing the dietary fat or fiber (wheat bran, agar, or carrageenan) intake for 4 weeks. 1,2-Dimethylhydrazine (DMH) was s.c. injected into half of the rats 1 week before treatments began. Colon epithelial cell proliferation was measured by [3H]thymidine autoradiography of colon crypts. Rats injected with DMH had more DNA-synthesizing cells per crypt. Neither bile acid injection nor any of the diets altered the number of DNA-synthesizing cells per crypt. DMH injections, deoxycholic and lithocholic acid intrarectal injections, and dietary agar and wheat bran all increased the total number of cells per crypt. High fat diets and dietary carrageenan did not affect cell number. All diets containing fiber lowered total fecal bile acid concentrations, but increasing the fat content of the diet did not affect them. These results indicate that the bile acid injections and dietary agar and wheat bran induce a slight hyperplasia in the colon

  9. Hormonal Regulation and Expression Profiles of Wheat Genes Involved during Phytic Acid Biosynthesis Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Sipla Aggarwal; Vishnu Shukla; Kaushal Kumar Bhati; Mandeep Kaur; Shivani Sharma; Anuradha Singh; Shrikant Mantri; Ajay Kumar Pandey

    2015-01-01

    Phytic acid (PA) biosynthesis pathway genes were reported from multiple crop species. PA accumulation was enhanced during grain filling and at that time, hormones like Abscisic acid (ABA) and Gibberellic acid (GA3) interplay to control the process of seed development. Regulation of wheat PA pathway genes has not yet been reported in seeds. In an attempt to find the clues for the regulation by hormones, the promoter region of wheat PA pathway genes was analyzed for the presence of cis-elements...

  10. The hypocholesterolemic and antiatherogenic effects of Cholazol H, a chemically functionalized insoluble fiber with bile acid sequestrant properties in hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, T A; Romano, C; Liang, J; Nicolosi, R J

    1998-08-01

    Cholazol H (Alpha-Beta Technology, Worcester, MA), a chemically functionalized, insoluble dietary fiber with bile acid sequestrant properties, was studied in 30 male F1 B Golden Syrian hamsters for its effect on plasma lipid concentrations and early atherogenesis in experiment 1. In experiment 2, 30 male Golden Syrian hamsters were studied for the effects on plasma lipids and fecal excretion of bile acids. In experiment 1, three groups of 10 hamsters each were fed a chow-based hypercholesterolemic diet supplemented with 5% coconut oil and 0.1% cholesterol for 6 weeks. After 6 weeks, hamsters were continued on the diet with either 0% drug (hypercholesterolemic diet [HCD]), 0.5% cholestyramine (CSTY), or 0.5% Cholazol H for 8 weeks. Fasting plasma lipids were measured at weeks 6, 10, and 14, and early atherosclerosis (fatty streak formation) was measured at week 14. Relative to HCD, CSTY and Cholazol H significantly lowered plasma total cholesterol (TC) (-37%, P < .03, and -30%, P < .04, respectively) and plasma very-low and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (nonHDL-C) (-45%, P < .02, and -36%, P < .03, respectively) with no significant effects on plasma HDL-C or triglycerides (TG). Despite similar reductions in nonHDL-C, only Cholazol H significantly prevented early atherosclerosis (-38%, P < .02) relative to HCD. In experiment 2, three groups of 10 hamsters each were fed a chow-based hypercholesterolemic diet supplemented with 10% coconut oil and 0.05% cholesterol and either 0% drug HCD, 0.5% CSTY, or 0.5% Cholazol H for 4 weeks. Fasting plasma lipids were measured at weeks 2 and 4, and fecal bile acids were measured at week 4. Both Cholazol H and CSTY were equally effective in significantly lowering plasma TC (-16%, P < .003, and -13%, P < .01, respectively) and nonHDL-C (-22%, P < .004, and -18%, P < .02, respectively), with no significant effect on HDL-C and TG relative to HCD. Cholazol H and CSTY produced a significantly greater concentration of fecal total

  11. Bile acid retention after Roux-en-Y biliary reconstruction demonstrated by tauro-23-(75Se)selena-25-homocholic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study of 65 laboratory rats, the influence of biliary Roux-en-Y anastomosis on the enterohepatic circulation was investigated. Three different types of Roux-en-Y limbs were studied and compared with sham-operated controls. To collect information about the influence of the length and motility of the Roux limb, 10 cm and 3 cm isoperistaltic Roux segments and 10 cm anisoperistaltic Roux limbs were investigated. 75SeHCAT, a τ-labelled synthetic bile acid, was used for assessment of enterohepatic circulation. Intestinal transit time was evaluated by measuring the decrease of whole-body counts of 51Cr-labelled ethylenediamintetraacetic acid (EDTA), an inert marker of intraluminal contents. 99mTc-labelled dimethyl-iminodiacetic acid (HIDA) was used to detect possible alterations of bile flow. 75SeHCAT results showed marked retention of bile acids in all Roux-en-Y animals compared with controls. Results of short and long Roux limbs did not differ significantly from each other. The anisoperistaltic Roux limbs showed prolonged etention even when compared with isoperistaltic limbs. 51Cr-EDTA results did not show significant differences between all groups. 99mTc-HIDA showed undelayed excretion in all animals but increase of radioactivity at the site of the Roux-en-Y enteroanastomosis, indicating marked stasis in the biliodigestive Roux limb. The results demontrate the impact of biliary Roux-en-Y anastomosis on bile acid retention due to stasis in the defunctioning jejunal segment. 23 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Importance of Large Intestine in Regulating Bile Acids and Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 in Germ-Free Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selwyn, Felcy Pavithra; Csanaky, Iván L; Zhang, Youcai; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2015-10-01

    It is known that 1) elevated serum bile acids (BAs) are associated with decreased body weight, 2) elevated glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels can decrease body weight, and 3) germ-free (GF) mice are resistant to diet-induced obesity. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a lack of intestinal microbiota results in more BAs in the body, resulting in increased BA-mediated transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor 5 (TGR5) signaling and increased serum GLP-1 as a mechanism of resistance of GF mice to diet-induced obesity. GF mice had 2- to 4-fold increased total BAs in the serum, liver, bile, and ileum. Fecal excretion of BAs was 63% less in GF mice. GF mice had decreased secondary BAs and increased taurine-conjugated BAs, as anticipated. Surprisingly, there was an increase in non-12α-OH BAs, namely, β-muricholic acid, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), and their taurine conjugates, in GF mice. Further, in vitro experiments confirmed that UDCA is a primary BA in mice. There were minimal changes in the mRNA of farnesoid X receptor target genes in the ileum (Fibroblast growth factor 15, small heterodimer protein, and ileal bile acid-binding protein), in the liver (small heterodimer protein, liver receptor homolog-1, and cytochrome P450 7a1), and BA transporters (apical sodium dependent bile acid transporter, organic solute transporter α, and organic solute transporter β) in the ileum of GF mice. Surprisingly, there were marked increases in BA transporters in the large intestine. Increased GLP-1 levels and gallbladder size were observed in GF mice, suggesting activation of TGR5 signaling. In summary, the GF condition results in increased expression of BA transporters in the colon, resulting in 1) an increase in total BA concentrations in tissues, 2) a change in BA composition to favor an increase in non-12α-OH BAs, and 3) activation of TGR5 signaling with increased gallbladder size and GLP-1.

  13. Hepatobiliary Secretion Kinetics of Conjugated Bile Acids Measured in Pigs by 11C-Cholylsarcosine PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M.; Munk, O.L.; Ørntoft, N.W.;

    2016-01-01

    the liver with simultaneous measurements of hepatic blood perfusion and 11C-CSar concentrations in arterial, portal, and hepatic venous blood. In 3 pigs (7 experiments), bile was collected from a catheter in the common hepatic duct. PET data were analyzed with a 2-tissue compartmental model with...

  14. Hepatobiliary Secretion Kinetics of Conjugated Bile Acids Measured in Pigs by 11C-Cholylsarcosine PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Michael; Munk, Ole Lajord; Oerntoft, Nikolaj;

    2016-01-01

    liver with measurements of hepatic blood perfusion and (11)C-CSar concentrations in arterial, portal and hepatic venous blood. In three pigs (seven experiments) bile was collected from a catheter in the common hepatic duct (CHD). PET data were analyzed by a two-tissue compartmental model with...

  15. Screening of Cholesterol-lowering Bifidobacterium from Guizhou Xiang Pigs, and Evaluation of Its Tolerance to Oxygen, Acid, and Bile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rujiao; He, Laping; Zhang, Ling; Li, Cuiqin; Zhu, Qiujin

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases seriously harm human health, and Bifidobacterium is the most beneficial probiotic in the gastrointestinal tract of humans. This work aimed to screen cholesterol-lowering Bifidobacterium from Guizhou Xiang Pig and evaluate its tolerance to oxygen, acid, and bile. Twenty-seven aerotolerant strains with similar colony to Bifidobacterium were isolated through incubation at 37℃ in 20% (v/v) CO2-80% (v/v) atmospheric air by using Mupirocin lithium modified MRS agar medium, modified PTYG with added CaCO3, and modified PTYG supplemented with X-gal. Ten strains with cholesterol-lowering rates above 20% (w/w) were used for further screening. The selected strains’ tolerance to acid and bile was then determined. A combination of colony and cell morphology, physiological, and biochemical experiments, as well as 16S rRNA gene-sequence analysis, was performed. Results suggested that BZ25 with excellent characteristics of high cholesterol-removal rate of 36.32% (w/w), as well as tolerance to acid and bile, was identified as Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis. To further evaluate Bifidobacterium BZ25’s growth characteristic and tolerance to oxygen, culture experiments were performed in liquid medium and an agar plate. Findings suggested that BZ25 grew well both in environmental 20% (v/v) CO2-80% (v/v) atmospheric air and in 100% atmospheric air because BZ25 reached an absorbance of 1.185 at 600 nm in 100% atmospheric air. Moreover, BZ25 was aerotolerant and can grow in an agar medium under the environmental condition of 100% atmospheric air. This study can lay a preliminary foundation for the potential industrial applications of BZ25.

  16. Screening of Cholesterol-lowering Bifidobacterium from Guizhou Xiang Pigs, and Evaluation of Its Tolerance to Oxygen, Acid, and Bile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rujiao; He, Laping; Zhang, Ling; Li, Cuiqin; Zhu, Qiujin

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases seriously harm human health, and Bifidobacterium is the most beneficial probiotic in the gastrointestinal tract of humans. This work aimed to screen cholesterol-lowering Bifidobacterium from Guizhou Xiang Pig and evaluate its tolerance to oxygen, acid, and bile. Twenty-seven aerotolerant strains with similar colony to Bifidobacterium were isolated through incubation at 37℃ in 20% (v/v) CO2-80% (v/v) atmospheric air by using Mupirocin lithium modified MRS agar medium, modified PTYG with added CaCO3, and modified PTYG supplemented with X-gal. Ten strains with cholesterol-lowering rates above 20% (w/w) were used for further screening. The selected strains' tolerance to acid and bile was then determined. A combination of colony and cell morphology, physiological, and biochemical experiments, as well as 16S rRNA gene-sequence analysis, was performed. Results suggested that BZ25 with excellent characteristics of high cholesterol-removal rate of 36.32% (w/w), as well as tolerance to acid and bile, was identified as Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis. To further evaluate Bifidobacterium BZ25's growth characteristic and tolerance to oxygen, culture experiments were performed in liquid medium and an agar plate. Findings suggested that BZ25 grew well both in environmental 20% (v/v) CO2-80% (v/v) atmospheric air and in 100% atmospheric air because BZ25 reached an absorbance of 1.185 at 600 nm in 100% atmospheric air. Moreover, BZ25 was aerotolerant and can grow in an agar medium under the environmental condition of 100% atmospheric air. This study can lay a preliminary foundation for the potential industrial applications of BZ25. PMID:27499662

  17. Regulation of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis in the ribulose monophosphate cycle methylotroph Nocardia sp. 239

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, L. de; Vrijbloed, J.W.; Grobben, G.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    1989-01-01

    The regulation of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis in Nocardia sp. 239 was studied. In cell-free extracts 3-deoxy-D-arabinoheptulosonate 7-phosphate (DAHP) synthase activity was inhibited in a cumulative manner by tryptophan, phenylalanine and tyrosine. Chorismate mutase was inhibited by both phenyl

  18. Functional analyses of three acyl-CoA synthetases involved in bile acid degradation in Pseudomonas putida DOC21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos, Álvaro; Merino, Estefanía; Casabon, Israël; Rodríguez, Joaquín; Crowe, Adam M; Holert, Johannes; Philipp, Bodo; Eltis, Lindsay D; Olivera, Elías R; Luengo, José M

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida DOC21, a soil-dwelling proteobacterium, catabolizes a variety of steroids and bile acids. Transposon mutagenesis and bioinformatics analyses identified four clusters of steroid degradation (std) genes encoding a single catabolic pathway. The latter includes three predicted acyl-CoA synthetases encoded by stdA1, stdA2 and stdA3 respectively. The ΔstdA1 and ΔstdA2 deletion mutants were unable to assimilate cholate or other bile acids but grew well on testosterone or 4-androstene-3,17-dione (AD). In contrast, a ΔstdA3 mutant grew poorly in media containing either testosterone or AD. When cells were grown with succinate in the presence of cholate, ΔstdA1 accumulated Δ(1/4) -3-ketocholate and Δ(1,4) -3-ketocholate, whereas ΔstdA2 only accumulated 7α,12α-dihydroxy-3-oxopregna-1,4-diene-20-carboxylate (DHOPDC). When incubated with testosterone or bile acids, ΔstdA3 accumulated 3aα-H-4α(3'propanoate)-7aβ-methylhexahydro-1,5-indanedione (HIP) or the corresponding hydroxylated derivative. Biochemical analyses revealed that StdA1 converted cholate, 3-ketocholate, Δ(1/4) -3-ketocholate, and Δ(1,4) -3-ketocholate to their CoA thioesters, while StdA2 transformed DHOPDC to DHOPDC-CoA. In contrast, purified StdA3 catalysed the CoA thioesterification of HIP and its hydroxylated derivatives. Overall, StdA1, StdA2 and StdA3 are acyl-CoA synthetases required for the complete degradation of bile acids: StdA1 and StdA2 are involved in degrading the C-17 acyl chain, whereas StdA3 initiates degradation of the last two steroid rings. The study highlights differences in steroid catabolism between Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria.

  19. Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Revisited: Structure Elucidation and Metabolic Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Beld, Joris; Lee, D. John; Burkart, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acids are primary metabolites synthesized by complex, elegant, and essential biosynthetic machinery. Fatty acid synthases resemble an iterative assembly line, with an acyl carrier protein conveying the growing fatty acid to necessary enzymatic domains for modification. Each catalytic domain is a unique enzyme spanning a wide range of folds and structures. Although they harbor the same enzymatic activities, two different types of fatty acid synthase architectures are observed in nature. ...

  20. Stress -induced biosynthesis of dicaffeoylquinic acids in globe artichoke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moglia, A.; Lanteri, S.; Comino, C.; Acquadro, A.; Vos, de C.H.; Beekwilder, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Leaf extracts from globe artichoke (Cynara cardunculus L. var. scolymus) have been widely used in medicine as hepatoprotectant and choleretic agents. Globe artichoke leaves represent a natural source of phenolic acids with dicaffeoylquinic acids, such as cynarin (1,3-dicaffeoylquinic acid), along wi

  1. Influence of dietary sugar on cholesterol and bile acid metabolism in the rat: Marked reduction of hepatic Abcg5/8 expression following sucrose ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apro, Johanna; Beckman, Lena; Angelin, Bo; Rudling, Mats

    2015-06-12

    Previous studies have indicated that dietary intake of sugar may lower bile acid production, and may promote cholesterol gallstone formation in humans. We studied the influence of dietary sucrose on cholesterol and bile acid metabolism in the rat. In two different experiments, rats received high-sucrose diets. In the first, 60% of the weight of standard rat chow was replaced with sucrose (high-sucrose diet). In the second, rats received a diet either containing 65% sucrose (controlled high-sucrose diet) or 65% complex carbohydrates, in order to keep other dietary components constant. Bile acid synthesis, evaluated by measurements of the serum marker 7-alpha-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4) and of the hepatic mRNA expression of Cyp7a1, was markedly reduced by the high-sucrose diet, but not by the controlled high-sucrose diet. Both diets strongly reduced the hepatic - but not the intestinal - mRNA levels of Abcg5 and Abcg8. The differential patterns of regulation of bile acid synthesis induced by the two sucrose-enriched diets indicate that it is not sugar per se in the high-sucrose diet that reduces bile acid synthesis, but rather the reduced content of fiber or fat. In contrast, the marked reduction of hepatic Abcg5/8 observed is an effect of the high sugar content of the diets.

  2. Hydrophobic bile acids relax rat detrusor contraction via inhibiting the opening of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jingzhen; Dong, Xingyou; Liu, Qian; Wu, Chao; Wang, Qingqing; Long, Zhou; Li, Longkun

    2016-01-01

    Hydrophobic bile acids (BAs) are thought to inhibit smooth muscle contractility in several organs. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of hydrophobic BAs on the detrusor contractility of rat bladder and to explore the possible mechanism. Lithocholic acid (LCA) treatment increased the micturition interval and induced a concentration-dependent relaxation of bladder detrusor strips. In addition, LCA reduced the concentration of intracellular free Ca2+([Ca2+]i) and inhibited both the outward and inward Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) current (INCX) in primary isolated smooth muscle cells (SMCs). To further investigate the mechanism of action of LCA, several pharmacologic agents were used. We found that the NCX inhibitor 3′,4′-Dichlorobenzamil (DCB) can significantly inhibit the relaxation of detrusor strips and a reduction of the [Ca2+]i induced by LCA, while the antagonist of muscarinic receptor and the agonist of the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor (TGR5) and the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) had no effect. In conclusion, these data suggest that the relaxation of rat detrusor induced by hydrophobic BAs is mediated by NCX. Further research is needed to carry out to demonstrate the possible pathway and provide a potential new strategy to investigation for the treatment of the low urinary tract syndromes. PMID:26892434

  3. Effect of loperamide and delay of bowel motility on bile acid malabsorption caused by late radiation damage and ileal resection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdes Olmos, R. (Nederlands Kanker Inst., Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Hartog Jager, F. den; Hoefnagel, C.; Taal, B. (Nederlands Kanker Inst., Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Gastroenterology)

    1991-05-01

    Selenium-75 homocholic acid conjugated with taurine ({sup 75}Se-HCAT) was used during loperamide administration in seven patients suspected of having bile acid malabsorption due to late radiation damage and small-bowel resection in order to document the aetiology of ileal dysfunction and to adjust therapeutic mamagement. In two patients with ileal resection up to 50 cm and in one patient without resection, a reduction of bowel motility by loperamide resulted in marked normalization of the {sup 75}Se-HCAT retention measurements. Sequential scintigraphic {sup 75}Se-HCAT imaging demonstrated a significant improvement in the {sup 75}Se-HCAT reabsorption and recirculation, accompanied in one case by prolongation of colonic retention of the radiopharmaceutical. In four patients with more than 80 cm resection, the {sup 75}Se-HCAT test was abnormal during loperamide administration. In two of these patients for whom baseline values were available, no improvement in the pattern of {sup 75}Se-HCAT absorption was observed. In conclusion, the first results of loperamide {sup 75}Se-HCAT in patients suspected of having bile acid malabsorption and abnormal baseline {sup 75}Se-HCAT are promising. Intervention with loperamide is easy and seems to improve the clinical value of the test with direct therapeutic implications. Sequential {sup 75}Se-HCAT imaging is essential for interpreting changes in the {sup 75}Se-HCAT retention measurements. (orig.).

  4. Precursor directed biosynthesis of odd-numbered fatty acids by different yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Řezanka, Tomáš; Kolouchová, Irena; Sigler, Karel

    2015-09-01

    Precursor-directed biosynthesis was used for directed preparation of positional isomers of heptadecanoic acid (17:1), which have convenient pharmacological properties. Cultivation of Candida sp., Kluyveromyces polysporus, Rhodotorula glutinis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Torulaspora delbrueckii, Trichosporon cutaneum, and Yarrowia lipolytica on 20 g/L glucose, 4 g/L acetic, or 4 g/L propionic acids yielded different proportions of 17:1. Cultivation on carbon sources with even numbers of carbon atoms (glucose and acetic acid) produced preferentially 8Z- and 10Z-heptadecenoic acids in about equal amounts, in agreement with the proposed biosynthesis of fatty acids, whereas cultivation on propionic acid as the only carbon source produced over 90 % of total fatty acids of 9-17:1 out of all possible positional isomers. The structures of positional isomers of 17:1 acid were determined using dimethyl disulfides of fatty acid methyl esters. In cultivation of Candida sp. on propionic acid, the yield of heptadecenoic acid reached 111 mg/L cultivation medium. Principal component analysis was used for identifying the effect of cultivation conditions on the production of the 17:1 acid by individual yeast strains. PMID:25813199

  5. Evolution of Mycolic Acid Biosynthesis Genes and Their Regulation during Starvation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Jamet, Stevie; Quentin, Yves; Coudray, Coralie; Texier, Pauline; Laval, Françoise; Daffé, Mamadou; Fichant, Gwennaele; Cam, Kaymeuang

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiological agent of tuberculosis, is a Gram-positive bacterium with a unique cell envelope composed of an essential outer membrane. Mycolic acids, which are very-long-chain (up to C100) fatty acids, are the major components of this mycomembrane. The enzymatic pathways involved in the biosynthesis and transport of mycolates are fairly well documented and are the targets of the major antituberculous drugs. In contrast, only fragmented information is available on...

  6. Biosynthesis of vanillin via ferulic acid in Vanilla planifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negishi, Osamu; Sugiura, Kenji; Negishi, Yukiko

    2009-11-11

    (14)C-Labeled phenylalanine, 4-coumaric acid, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol, ferulic acid, and methionine were applied to disks of green vanilla pods 3 and 6 months after pollination (immature and mature pods), and the conversion of these compounds to vanillin or glucovanillin was investigated. In mature green vanilla pods, radioactivities of 11, 15, 29, and 24% from (14)C-labeled phenylalanine, 4-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, and methionine, respectively, were incorporated into glucovanillin within 24 h. In the incorporation processes of methionine and phenylalanine into glucovanillin, some of the (14)C labels were also trapped by the unlabeled ferulic acid. However, (14)C-labeled 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde and 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol were not converted to glucovanillin. On the other hand, in immature green vanilla pods radioactivities of the above six compounds were not incorporated into glucovanillin. Although 4-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, and 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol were converted to the respective glucose esters or glucosides and vanillin was converted to glucovanillin, their conversions were believed to be from the detoxication of the aglycones. These results suggest that the biosynthetic pathway for vanillin is 4-coumaric acid --> --> ferulic acid --> --> vanillin --> glucovanillin in mature vanilla pods.

  7. Strategies For 2-Heptanone Biosynthesis From Octanoic Acid By Penicillium Roqueforti Spores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Arpah

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews two strategies of 2-heptanone (blue cheese aroma compound biosynthesis from octanoic acid by Penicillium roqueforti spores. First, the production and preparation of fungal spores are discussed a long with effect of spores treatment on their biocatalytic activity. Following this the first strategy of 2-heptanone production i.e batch production of 2-heptanone by submerged bioconversion process is discussed. Furthermore 2-heptanone loss by air stream stripping due to its hight volatility is evaluated and then the second strategy, that is continuous biosynthesis in aerated stirred reactor, is addressed. An option for controlling pH of biosynthesis medium is also discussed. Finally, in the concluding paragraphs, utility of the strategies are presented.

  8. Structural elucidation of the hormonal inhibition mechanism of the bile acid cholate on human carbonic anhydrase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boone, Christopher D. [University of Florida, PO Box 100267, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Tu, Chingkuang [University of Florida, PO Box 100245, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); McKenna, Robert, E-mail: rmckenna@ufl.edu [University of Florida, PO Box 100267, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The structure of human carbonic anhydrase II in complex with cholate has been determined to 1.54 Å resolution. Elucidation of the novel inhibition mechanism of cholate will aid in the development of a nonsulfur-containing, isoform-specific therapeutic agent. The carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are a family of mostly zinc metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible hydration/dehydration of CO{sub 2} into bicarbonate and a proton. Human isoform CA II (HCA II) is abundant in the surface epithelial cells of the gastric mucosa, where it serves an important role in cytoprotection through bicarbonate secretion. Physiological inhibition of HCA II via the bile acids contributes to mucosal injury in ulcerogenic conditions. This study details the weak biophysical interactions associated with the binding of a primary bile acid, cholate, to HCA II. The X-ray crystallographic structure determined to 1.54 Å resolution revealed that cholate does not make any direct hydrogen-bond interactions with HCA II, but instead reconfigures the well ordered water network within the active site to promote indirect binding to the enzyme. Structural knowledge of the binding interactions of this nonsulfur-containing inhibitor with HCA II could provide the template design for high-affinity, isoform-specific therapeutic agents for a variety of diseases/pathological states, including cancer, glaucoma, epilepsy and osteoporosis.

  9. In vitro bile-acid binding and fermentation of high, medium, and low molecular weight beta-glucan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Jung; White, Pamela J

    2010-01-13

    The impact of beta-glucan molecular weight (MW) on in vitro bile-acid binding and in vitro fermentation with human fecal flora was evaluated. beta-Glucan extracted from oat line 'N979-5-4' was treated with lichenase (1,3-1,4-beta-D-glucanase) to yield high (6.87x10(5) g/mol), medium (3.71x10(5) g/mol), and low (1.56x10(5) g/mol) MW fractions. The low MW beta-glucan bound more bile acid than did the high MW beta-glucan (pbeta-glucan with high, medium, and low MW was 15, 27, 24, and 21%, respectively. Significant effects of high, medium, and low MW beta-glucans on total SCFA were observed compared to the blank without substrate (pbeta-glucans, and lactulose. The low MW beta-glucan produced greater amounts of SCFA than the high MW after 24 h of fermentation. Among the major SCFA, more propionate was produced from all MW fractions of extracted beta-glucans than from lactulose. In vitro fermentation of extracted beta-glucan fractions with different MW lowered pH and produced SCFA, providing potential biological function. PMID:20020684

  10. Long-term effect of wholemeal bread on stool weight, transit time, fecal bile acids, fats, and neutral sterols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, M A; Elton, R A; Smith, J H

    1986-03-01

    Stool weight, fecal constituents, bile acids, fat, neutral sterols, and intestinal transit time were recorded in 28 subjects over 18 mo. During the first 12 mo the subjects ate white bread. They were studied for an initial period of 7 days, and after 6 mo (study period 1). For the first 6 mo they ate their usual intake of bread, they then increased their white bread intake by 62 g/day for 6 mo (study period 2). The subjects ate a self-selected diet throughout the 18 mo study. During the last 6 mo (study period 3) the subjects replaced white bread by the same amount of wholemeal bread as in study period 2. No increase in stool weight occurred until study period 3 when there was an increase of 20%. There developed a linear relationship between stool weight and intestinal transit time which was not found during the initial first and second study periods. A seasonal influence on serum cholesterol was not observed during the wholemeal bread period. Fecal bile acid excretion was unchanged throughout the experiment.

  11. Alisol B 23-acetate protects against ANIT-induced hepatotoxity and cholestasis, due to FXR-mediated regulation of transporters and enzymes involved in bile acid homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qiang; Chen, Xin-Li; Wang, Chang-Yuan; Liu, Qi; Sun, Hui-Jun; Sun, Peng-Yuan; Huo, Xiao-Kui; Liu, Zhi-Hao; Yao, Ji-Hong; Liu, Ke-Xin

    2015-03-15

    Intrahepatic cholestasis is a clinical syndrome with systemic and intrahepatic accumulation of excessive toxic bile acids that ultimately cause hepatobiliary injury. Appropriate regulation of bile acids in hepatocytes is critically important for protection against liver injury. In the present study, we characterized the protective effect of alisol B 23-acetate (AB23A), a natural triterpenoid, on alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT)-induced liver injury and intrahepatic cholestasis in mice and further elucidated the mechanisms in vivo and in vitro. AB23A treatment dose-dependently protected against liver injury induced by ANIT through reducing hepatic uptake and increasing efflux of bile acid via down-regulation of hepatic uptake transporters (Ntcp) and up-regulation of efflux transporter (Bsep, Mrp2 and Mdr2) expression. Furthermore, AB23A reduced bile acid synthesis through repressing Cyp7a1 and Cyp8b1, increased bile acid conjugation through inducing Bal, Baat and bile acid metabolism through an induction in gene expression of Sult2a1. We further demonstrate the involvement of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) in the hepatoprotective effect of AB23A. The changes in transporters and enzymes, as well as ameliorative liver histology in AB23A-treated mice were abrogated by FXR antagonist guggulsterone in vivo. In vitro evidences also directly demonstrated the effect of AB23A on FXR activation in a dose-dependent manner using luciferase reporter assay in HepG2 cells. In conclusion, AB23A produces protective effect against ANIT-induced hepatotoxity and cholestasis, due to FXR-mediated regulation of transporters and enzymes. PMID:25655198

  12. Transcriptome analysis of bitter acid biosynthesis and precursor pathways in hop (Humulus lupulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark Shawn M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bitter acids (e.g. humulone are prenylated polyketides synthesized in lupulin glands of the hop plant (Humulus lupulus which are important contributors to the bitter flavour and stability of beer. Bitter acids are formed from acyl-CoA precursors derived from branched-chain amino acid (BCAA degradation and C5 prenyl diphosphates from the methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP pathway. We used RNA sequencing (RNA-seq to obtain the transcriptomes of isolated lupulin glands, cones with glands removed and leaves from high α-acid hop cultivars, and analyzed these datasets for genes involved in bitter acid biosynthesis including the supply of major precursors. We also measured the levels of BCAAs, acyl-CoA intermediates, and bitter acids in glands, cones and leaves. Results Transcripts encoding all the enzymes of BCAA metabolism were significantly more abundant in lupulin glands, indicating that BCAA biosynthesis and subsequent degradation occurs in these specialized cells. Branched-chain acyl-CoAs and bitter acids were present at higher levels in glands compared with leaves and cones. RNA-seq analysis showed the gland-specific expression of the MEP pathway, enzymes of sucrose degradation and several transcription factors that may regulate bitter acid biosynthesis in glands. Two branched-chain aminotransferase (BCAT enzymes, HlBCAT1 and HlBCAT2, were abundant, with gene expression quantification by RNA-seq and qRT-PCR indicating that HlBCAT1 was specific to glands while HlBCAT2 was present in glands, cones and leaves. Recombinant HlBCAT1 and HlBCAT2 catalyzed forward (biosynthetic and reverse (catabolic reactions with similar kinetic parameters. HlBCAT1 is targeted to mitochondria where it likely plays a role in BCAA catabolism. HlBCAT2 is a plastidial enzyme likely involved in BCAA biosynthesis. Phylogenetic analysis of the hop BCATs and those from other plants showed that they group into distinct biosynthetic (plastidial and

  13. Biosynthesis of pyruvic acid from glucose by Blastobotrys adeninivorans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamzolova, Svetlana V; Morgunov, Igor G

    2016-09-01

    The ability of taxonomically different yeasts to synthesize pyruvic acid (PA) from glucose was studied. The study showed that many yeasts are able to produce PA from glucose under the condition of growth limitation by thiamine. This ability was found in the yeast Blastobotrys adeninivorans for the first time. The production (oversynthesis) of PA in this yeast can be explained by disturbance in the function of thiamine-dependent pyruvate dehydrogenase. Namely, the partial inhibition of this enzyme brings about the excretion of PA from the yeast cells. Due to incomplete inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase, the formation of acetyl-CoA continues, although at a lower level, maintaining the synthesis of α-ketoglutaric acid (KGA) in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. KGA is no longer oxidized in the TCA cycle, because thiamine limitation inhibits α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase. As a result, KGA is excreted from the yeast cells as a byproduct of PA oversynthesis. Furthermore, the increased level of KGA in the yeast cells inhibits NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase in the TCA cycle and enhances the production and excretion of citric acid, another byproduct of PA oversynthesis. During cultivation in a fermentor, the strain Blastobotrys adeninivorans VKM Y-2677 produced 43.2 g l(-1) PA from glucose with a product yield (YPA) of 0.77 g PA/g glucose. The proportion of PA to byproducts was 18:1 for KGA and 8:1 for citric acid.

  14. Oleanolic acid attenuates obstructive cholestasis in bile duct-ligated mice, possibly via activation of NRF2-MRPs and FXR antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pan; Li, Jingjie; Fan, Xiaomei; Zeng, Hang; Deng, Rongrong; Li, Dongshun; Huang, Min; Bi, Huichang

    2015-10-15

    Obstructive cholestasis is characterized by impairment of hepatic canalicular bile efflux and there are no clinically effective drugs to cure except surgeries. Previously we revealed that oleanolic acid (OA) protected against lithocholic acid (LCA)-induced intrahepatic cholestasis in mice. Cholestasis caused by LCA is characterized by segmental bile duct obstruction, whether OA possesses the beneficial effect on completed obstructive cholestasis induced by bile duct ligation (BDL) remains unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that BDL-induced mice liver pathological change, and increase in serum levels of ALT, AST and ALP were all significantly reduced by OA (20 mg/kg, i.p.). Meanwhile, OA also lowered total bilirubin and total bile acids levels in serum, as well as total bile acids level in liver, in contrast, urinary total bile acids output was remarkably up-regulated by OA. Gene expression analysis showed that OA caused significant increased mRNA expression of MRP3 and MRP4 located at hepatic basolateral membrane, and restoration of MRP2 and BSEP located at hepatic cannalicular membrane. Furthermore, significant NRF2 protein accumulation in nucleus was also observed in OA treated mice. In mice primary cultured hepatocytes, the effects of OA on MRP2, MRP3 and MRP4 expression were directly proved to be mediated via NRF2 activation, and BSEP downregulation induced by OA was in part due to FXR antagonism. Luciferase assay performed in Hep G2 cells also illustrated that OA was a partial FXR antagonist. Taken together, we conclude that OA attenuates obstructive cholestasis in BDL mice, possibly via activation of NRF2-MRPs and FXR antagonism. PMID:26297978

  15. The biosynthesis of erucic acid in developing embryos of Brassica rapus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prevailing hypothesis on the biosynthesis of erucic acid in developing seeds is that oleic acid, produced in the plastid, is activated to oleoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) for malonyl-CoA-dependent elongation to erucic acid in the cytosol. Several in vivo-labeling experiments designed to probe and extend this hypothesis are reported here. To examine whether newly synthesized oleic acid is directly elongated to erucic acid in developing seeds of Brassica rapa L., embryos were labeled with [14C]acetate, and the ratio of radioactivity of carbon atoms C-5 to C-22 (de novo fatty acid synthesis portion) to carbon atoms C-1 to C-4 (elongated portion) of erucic acid was monitored with time. If newly synthesized 18:1 (oleate) immediately becomes a substrate for elongation to erucic acid, this ratio would be expected to remain constant with incubation time. However, if erucic acid is produced from a pool of preexisting oleic acid, the ratio of 14C in the 4 elongation carbons to 14C in the methyl-terminal 18 carbons would be expected to decrease with time. This labeling ratio decreased with time and, therefore, suggests the existence of an intermediate pool of 18:1, which contributes at least part of the oleoyl precursor for the production of erucic acid. The addition of 2-[(3-chloro-5-(trifluromethyl)-2-pyridinyl) oxyphenoxy]propanoic acid, which inhibits the homodimeric acetyl-CoA carboxylase, severely inhibited the synthesis of [14C]erucic acid, indicating that essentially all malonyl-CoA for elongation of 18:1 to erucate was produced by homodimeric acetyl-CoA carboxylase. Both light and 2-[(3-chloro-5(trifluromethyl)-2-pyridinyl) oxyphenoxy]-propanoic acid increased the accumulation of [14C]18:1 and the parallel accumulation of [14C]phosphatidylcholine. Taken together, these results show an additional level of complexity in the biosynthesis of erucic acid

  16. Salicylic acid induces mitochondrial injury by inhibiting ferrochelatase heme biosynthesis activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vipul; Liu, Shujie; Ando, Hideki; Ishii, Ryohei; Tateno, Shumpei; Kaneko, Yuki; Yugami, Masato; Sakamoto, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Nureki, Osamu; Handa, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    Salicylic acid is a classic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Although salicylic acid also induces mitochondrial injury, the mechanism of its antimitochondrial activity is not well understood. In this study, by using a one-step affinity purification scheme with salicylic acid-immobilized beads, ferrochelatase (FECH), a homodimeric enzyme involved in heme biosynthesis in mitochondria, was identified as a new molecular target of salicylic acid. Moreover, the cocrystal structure of the FECH-salicylic acid complex was determined. Structural and biochemical studies showed that salicylic acid binds to the dimer interface of FECH in two possible orientations and inhibits its enzymatic activity. Mutational analysis confirmed that Trp301 and Leu311, hydrophobic amino acid residues located at the dimer interface, are directly involved in salicylic acid binding. On a gel filtration column, salicylic acid caused a shift in the elution profile of FECH, indicating that its conformational change is induced by salicylic acid binding. In cultured human cells, salicylic acid treatment or FECH knockdown inhibited heme synthesis, whereas salicylic acid did not exert its inhibitory effect in FECH knockdown cells. Concordantly, salicylic acid treatment or FECH knockdown inhibited heme synthesis in zebrafish embryos. Strikingly, the salicylic acid-induced effect in zebrafish was partially rescued by FECH overexpression. Taken together, these findings illustrate that FECH is responsible for salicylic acid-induced inhibition of heme synthesis, which may contribute to its antimitochondrial and anti-inflammatory function. This study establishes a novel aspect of the complex pharmacological effects of salicylic acid.

  17. Coordination of glycerol utilization and clavulanic acid biosynthesis to improve clavulanic acid production in Streptomyces clavuligerus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dekun; Zhao, Youbao; Yang, Keqian

    2013-07-01

    The glycerol utilization (gyl) operon is involved in clavulanic acid (CA) production by Streptomyces clavuligerus, and possibly supplies the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (G3P) precursor for CA biosynthesis. The gyl operon is regulated by GylR and is induced by glycerol. To enhance CA production in S. clavuligerus, an extra copy of ccaR expressed from Pgyl (the gyl promoter) was integrated into the chromosome of S. clavuligerus NRRL 3585. This construct coordinated the transcription of CA biosynthetic pathway genes with expression of the gyl operon. In the transformants carrying the Pgyl-controlled regulatory gene ccaR, CA production was enhanced 3.19-fold in glycerol-enriched batch cultures, relative to the control strain carrying an extra copy of ccaR controlled by its own promoter (PccaR). Consistent with enhanced CA production, the transcription levels of ccaR, ceas2 and claR were significantly up-regulated in the transformants containing Pgyl-controlled ccaR.

  18. Biosynthesis of jasmonic acid in a plant pathogenic fungus, Lasiodiplodia theobromae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukada, Kohei; Takahashi, Kosaku; Nabeta, Kensuke

    2010-12-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) is a plant hormone that plays an important role in a wide variety of plant physiological processes. The plant pathogenic fungus, Lasiodiplodia theobromae also produces JA; however, its biosynthesis in this fungus has yet to be explored. Administration of [1-(13)C] and [2-(13)C] NaOAc into L. theobromae established that JA in this fungus originates from a fatty acid synthetic pathway. The methyl ester of 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) was detected in the culture extracts of L. theobromae by GC-MS analysis. This finding indicates the presence of OPDA (a known intermediate of JA biosynthesis in plants) in L. theobromae. (2)H NMR spectroscopic data of JA produced by L. theobromae with the incorporation of [9,10,12,13,15,16-(2)H(6)] linolenic acid showed that five deuterium atoms remained intact. In plants, this is speculated to arise from JA being produced by the octadecanoid pathway. However, the observed stereoselectivity of the cyclopentenone olefin reduction in L. theobromae was opposite to that observed in plants. These data suggest that JA biosynthesis in L. theobromae is similar to that in plants, but differing in the facial selectivity of the enone reduction. PMID:20952041

  19. Water stress responses of tomato mutants impaired in hormone biosynthesis reveal abscisic acid, jasmonic acid and salicylic acid interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria eMuñoz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the putative crosstalk between JA and ABA in Solanum lycopersicum plants in response to drought, suppressor of prosystemin-mediated responses2 (spr2, JA-deficient and flacca (flc, ABA-deficient mutants together with the naphthalene/salicylate hydroxylase (NahG transgenic (SA-deficient line were used. Hormone profiling and gene expression of key enzymes in ABA, JA and SA biosynthesis were analyzed during early stages of drought. ABA accumulation was comparable in spr2 and wild type (WT plants whereas expression of 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase 1 (NCED1 and NCED2 was different, implying a compensation mechanism between NCED genes and an organ-specific regulation of NCED1 expression. JA levels and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid reductase 3 (OPR3 expression in flc plants suggest that ABA regulates the induction of the OPR3 gene in roots. By contrast, ABA treatment to flc plants leads to a reduction of JA and SA contents. Furthermore, different pattern of SA accumulation (and expression of isochorismate synthase and phenylalanine ammonia lyase 1 was observed between WT seedlings and mutants, suggesting that SA plays an important role on the early response of tomato plants to drought and also that JA and ABA modulate its biosynthesis. Finally, hormone profiling in spr2 and NahG plants indicate a crosstalk between JA and SA that could enhance tolerance of tomato to water stress.

  20. Water Stress Responses of Tomato Mutants Impaired in Hormone Biosynthesis Reveal Abscisic Acid, Jasmonic Acid and Salicylic Acid Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Espinoza, Valeria A; López-Climent, María F; Casaretto, José A; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the putative crosstalk between JA and ABA in Solanum lycopersicum plants in response to drought, suppressor of prosystemin-mediated responses2 (spr2, JA-deficient) and flacca (flc, ABA-deficient) mutants together with the naphthalene/salicylate hydroxylase (NahG) transgenic (SA-deficient) line were used. Hormone profiling and gene expression of key enzymes in ABA, JA and SA biosynthesis were analyzed during early stages of drought. ABA accumulation was comparable in spr2 and wild type (WT) plants whereas expression of 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase 1 (NCED1) and NCED2 was different, implying a compensation mechanism between NCED genes and an organ-specific regulation of NCED1 expression. JA levels and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid reductase 3 (OPR3) expression in flc plants suggest that ABA regulates the induction of the OPR3 gene in roots. By contrast, ABA treatment to flc plants leads to a reduction of JA and SA contents. Furthermore, different pattern of SA accumulation (and expression of isochorismate synthase and phenylalanine ammonia lyase 1) was observed between WT seedlings and mutants, suggesting that SA plays an important role on the early response of tomato plants to drought and also that JA and ABA modulate its biosynthesis. Finally, hormone profiling in spr2 and NahG plants indicate a crosstalk between JA and SA that could enhance tolerance of tomato to water stress. PMID:26635826

  1. Overexpression of a Gene Involved in Phytic Acid Biosynthesis Substantially Increases Phytic Acid and Total Phosphorus in Rice Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Tagashira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The manipulation of seed phosphorus is important for seedling growth and environmental P sustainability in agriculture. The mechanism of regulating P content in seed, however, is poorly understood. To study regulation of total P, we focused on phytic acid (inositol hexakisphosphate; InsP6 biosynthesis-related genes, as InsP6 is a major storage form of P in seeds. The rice (Oryza sativa L. low phytic acid mutant lpa1-1 has been identified as a homolog of archael 2-phosphoglycerate kinase. The homolog might act as an inositol monophosphate kinase, which catalyzes a key step in InsP6 biosynthesis. Overexpression of the homolog in transgenic rice resulted in a significant increase in total P content in seed, due to increases in InsP6 and inorganic phosphates. On the other hand, overexpression of genes that catalyze the first and last steps of InsP6 biosynthesis could not increase total P levels. From the experiments using developing seeds, it is suggested that the activation of InsP6 biosynthesis in both very early and very late periods of seed development increases the influx of P from vegetative organs into seeds. This is the first report from a study attempting to elevate the P levels of seed through a transgenic approach.

  2. Activation of bile acid signaling improves metabolic phenotypes in high-fat diet-induced obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Joseph F; Martinez, Kristina B; Ye, Honggang; Nadimpalli, Anuradha; Morton, Timothy C; Yang, Jinghui; Wang, Qiang; Patno, Noelle; Chang, Eugene B; Yin, Deng Ping

    2016-08-01

    The metabolic benefits induced by gastric bypass, currently the most effective treatment for morbid obesity, are associated with bile acid (BA) delivery to the distal intestine. However, mechanistic insights into BA signaling in the mediation of metabolic benefits remain an area of study. The bile diversion () mouse model, in which the gallbladder is anastomosed to the distal jejunum, was used to test the specific role of BA in the regulation of glucose and lipid homeostasis. Metabolic phenotype, including body weight and composition, glucose tolerance, energy expenditure, thermogenesis genes, total BA and BA composition in the circulation and portal vein, and gut microbiota were examined. BD improves the metabolic phenotype, which is in accord with increased circulating primary BAs and regulation of enterohormones. BD-induced hypertrophy of the proximal intestine in the absence of BA was reversed by BA oral gavage, but without influencing BD metabolic benefits. BD-enhanced energy expenditure was associated with elevated TGR5, D2, and thermogenic genes, including UCP1, PRDM16, PGC-1α, PGC-1β, and PDGFRα in epididymal white adipose tissue (WAT) and inguinal WAT, but not in brown adipose tissue. BD resulted in an altered gut microbiota profile (i.e., Firmicutes bacteria were decreased, Bacteroidetes were increased, and Akkermansia was positively correlated with higher levels of circulating primary BAs). Our study demonstrates that enhancement of BA signaling regulates glucose and lipid homeostasis, promotes thermogenesis, and modulates the gut microbiota, which collectively resulted in an improved metabolic phenotype. PMID:27340128

  3. The Association between Bile Salt Export Pump Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Primary Biliary Cirrhosis Susceptibility and Ursodeoxycholic Acid Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-rui Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC is a chronic and progressive cholestasis liver disease. Bile salt export pump (BSEP is the predominant bile salt efflux system of hepatocytes. BSEP gene has been attached great importance in the susceptibility of PBC and the response rate of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA treatment of PBC patients. Methods. In this study, TaqMan assay was used to genotype four variants of BSEP, and the Barcelona criteria were used for evaluating the response rate of UDCA treatment. Results. Variant A allele of BSEP rs473351 (dominant model, OR = 2.063; 95% CI, 1.254–3.393; P=0.004 was highly associated with PBC susceptibility. On the contrary, variant A allele of BSEP rs2287618 (dominant model, OR = 0.617; 95% CI, 0.411–0.928; P=0.020 provided a protective role and Barcelona evaluation criterion indicated that the frequency of variant allele at BSEP rs2287618 was significantly decreased in UDCA-responsive PBC patients (P=0.021. Conclusion. These results suggested that BSEP rs473351 was closely associated with the susceptibility of PBC and if people with BSEP rs2287618 were diagnosed as PBC, the UDCA treatment was not satisfactory. Larger studies with mixed ethnicity subjects and stratified by clinical and subclinical characteristics are needed to validate our findings.

  4. Oral administration of Bifidobacterim bifidum for modulating microflora, acid and bile resistance, and physiological indices in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bao-Gui; Xu, Hai-Bo; Wei, Hua; Zeng, Zhe-Ling; Xu, Feng

    2015-02-01

    Bifidobacteria are generally acknowledged as major gut microflora used as probiotics, which promote human health. In this study, the effects of the administration of Bifidobacterim bifidum on modulating gastrointestinal (GI) tract microflora, acid and bile resistance, and physiological indices in BALB/c mice were investigated. Results showed that B. bifidum can significantly improve the ecosystem of the GI tract by increasing the amount of probiotics and reducing the populations of pathogenic bacteria, as measured by plate count and real-time PCR. After exposure to simulated GI tract conditions, the growth of gut microflora in the B. bifidum group was higher than that in the control group when incubated for 12 h in MRS or nutrient broth adjusted to pH 2.0 or 3.0 or in the presence of a concentration of bile salt (0.45% m/v). The blood biochemical index was examined, and the physiological effect of the cell-free extract of gut microflora was evaluated by measuring the activity of various enzymes, including α-glucosidases, esterase, and lactate dehydrogenase. This study suggested that a B. bifidum strain can stabilize blood sugar, lower cholesterol levels in serum, and improve metabolic activity. Moreover, B. bifidum was a promising enhancer of microbial diversity in mouse intestine and played a vital role in human physiological processes, which can benefit the health of a host.

  5. Properties of lignin, cellulose, and hemicelluloses isolated from olive cake and olive stones: binding of water, oil, bile acids, and glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, Guillermo; Rubio-Senent, Fátima; Lama-Muñoz, Antonio; García, Aránzazu; Fernández-Bolaños, Juan

    2014-09-10

    A process based on a steam explosion pretreatment and alkali solution post-treatment was applied to fractionate olive stones (whole and fragmented, without seeds) and olive cake into their main constitutive polymers of cellulose (C), hemicelluloses (H), and lignin (L) under optimal conditions for each fraction according to earlier works. The chemical characterization (chromatographic method and UV and IR spectroscopy) and the functional properties (water- and oil-holding capacities, bile acid binding, and glucose retardation index) of each fraction were analyzed. The in vitro studies showed a substantial bile acid binding activity in the fraction containing lignin from olive stones (L) and the alkaline extractable fraction from olive cake (Lp). Lignin bound significantly more bile acid than any other fraction and an amount similar to that bound by cholestyramine (a cholesterol-lowering, bile acid-binding drug), especially when cholic acid (CA) was tested. These results highlight the health-promoting potential of lignin from olive stones and olive cake extracted from olive byproducts.

  6. Properties of lignin, cellulose, and hemicelluloses isolated from olive cake and olive stones: binding of water, oil, bile acids, and glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, Guillermo; Rubio-Senent, Fátima; Lama-Muñoz, Antonio; García, Aránzazu; Fernández-Bolaños, Juan

    2014-09-10

    A process based on a steam explosion pretreatment and alkali solution post-treatment was applied to fractionate olive stones (whole and fragmented, without seeds) and olive cake into their main constitutive polymers of cellulose (C), hemicelluloses (H), and lignin (L) under optimal conditions for each fraction according to earlier works. The chemical characterization (chromatographic method and UV and IR spectroscopy) and the functional properties (water- and oil-holding capacities, bile acid binding, and glucose retardation index) of each fraction were analyzed. The in vitro studies showed a substantial bile acid binding activity in the fraction containing lignin from olive stones (L) and the alkaline extractable fraction from olive cake (Lp). Lignin bound significantly more bile acid than any other fraction and an amount similar to that bound by cholestyramine (a cholesterol-lowering, bile acid-binding drug), especially when cholic acid (CA) was tested. These results highlight the health-promoting potential of lignin from olive stones and olive cake extracted from olive byproducts. PMID:25140731

  7. An Integrative Analysis of the Effects of Auxin on Jasmonic Acid Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Liu; Xiu-Jie Wang

    2006-01-01

    Auxin and jasmonic acid (JA) are two plant phytohormones that both participate in the regulation of many developmental processes. Jasmonic acid also plays important roles in plant stress response reactions.Although extensive investigations have been undertaken to study the biological functions of auxin and JA,little attention has been paid to the cross-talk between their regulated pathways. In the few available reports examining the effects of auxin on the expression of JA or JA-responsive genes, both synergetic and antagonistic results have been found. To further investigate the relationship between auxin and JA, we adopted an integrative method that combines microarray expression data with pathway information to study the behavior of the JA biosynthesis pathway under auxin treatment. Our results showed an overall downregulation of genes involved in JA biosynthesis, providing the first report of a relationship between auxin and the JA synthesis pathway in Arabidopsis seedlings.

  8. 先天性胆汁酸合成障碍%Inborn errors of bile acid synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    代东伶

    2015-01-01

    由酶缺陷引起的先天性胆汁酸合成障碍是罕见的遗传代谢性疾病,大多属于常染色体隐性遗传病,临床表现为进行性胆汁淤积性肝病、神经系统病变及脂溶性维生素吸收不良等。其中进行性胆汁淤积性肝病的特点是结合胆红素升高、转氨酶升高、γ谷氨酸转移酶正常,组织活检显示为巨细胞性肝炎;神经系统病变在儿童晚期或成年后出现,即痉挛性瘫痪。胆汁酸替代治疗对上述两种病变有效,因此早期诊断十分重要。文章总结胆汁酸合成障碍的病理生理、临床特点以及各种酶缺陷的特点。%Inborn errors of bile acid synthesis caused by enzyme defects are inherited metabolic rare diseases and mostly belong to the autosomal recessive hereditary diseases. They are clinically manifested as progressive cholestasis liver disease, neurological disorders, and fat-soluble vitamin malabsorption. The progressive cholestasis liver disease is characterized by conju-gated hyperbilirubinaemia with raised transaminase, but normal γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (γ-GT), and a biopsy specimen shows giant cell hepatitis. The neurological disorders usually present with childhood-onset or adult-onset spastic paraplegia. Early diag-nosis is important because oral administration of bile acids is effective for two disorders above. This article reviews pathophyso-logy, clinical features and various enzyme defects of inborn errors of bile acid synthesis.

  9. Retinoic Acid Biosynthesis Is Impaired in Human and Murine Endometriosis1

    OpenAIRE

    Pierzchalski, Keely; Taylor, Robert N.; Nezhat, Ceana; Jones, Jace W.; Napoli, Joseph L.; Yang, Guixiang; Kane, Maureen A.; Sidell, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Endometriosis is characterized by the presence of endometrial glands and stroma in extrauterine sites. Our objective was to determine whether endometriotic lesions (ELs) from women with endometriosis have altered retinoid levels compared with their eutopic endometrium, and to test the hypothesis that defects in all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) biosynthesis in EL is related to reduced expression of cellular retinol-binding protein type 1 (RBP1). Retinoids were evaluated by liquid chromatography-...

  10. Regulation of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis in the ribulose monophosphate cycle methylotroph Nocardia sp. 239

    OpenAIRE

    de Boer, L; Vrijbloed, J W; Grobben, G.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    1989-01-01

    The regulation of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis in Nocardia sp. 239 was studied. In cell-free extracts 3-deoxy-D-arabinoheptulosonate 7-phosphate (DAHP) synthase activity was inhibited in a cumulative manner by tryptophan, phenylalanine and tyrosine. Chorismate mutase was inhibited by both phenylalanine and tyrosine, whereas prephenate dehydratase was very sensitive to inhibition by phenylalanine. Tyrosine was a strong activator of the latter enzyme, whereas anthranilate synthase was inhib...

  11. Isolation of 14C labelled amino acids by biosynthesis in maize plants (Zea mais L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of obtaining 14C labelled amino acids by biosynthesis in maize plants which had assimilated 14CO2, has been assayed. The plants were labelled for 60 minutes with 14CO2 produced from Ba 14CO3 (specific activity of 148 KBq/μmol). An extract of the soluble compounds was obtained with 80% ethanol and the amino acids were separated from the rest of the soluble compounds by ion exchange chromatography on column of Dowex 50-X8 resin. Finally, seventeen amino acids were isolated and identified from the purified extract. The acid amino acids were separated in anionic column (Dowex 1-X8) and the neutral and basic amino acids in cationic column (Dowex 50-X4). (Author) 56 refs

  12. Traumatic Acid Reduces Oxidative Stress and Enhances Collagen Biosynthesis in Cultured Human Skin Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabłońska-Trypuć, Agata; Pankiewicz, Walentyn; Czerpak, Romuald

    2016-09-01

    Traumatic acid (TA) is a plant hormone (cytokinin) that in terms of chemical structure belongs to the group of fatty acids derivatives. It was isolated from Phaseolus vulgaris. TA activity and its influence on human cells and organism has not previously been the subject of research. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of TA on collagen content and basic oxidative stress parameters, such as antioxidative enzyme activity, reduced glutathione, thiol group content, and lipid peroxidation in physiological conditions. The results show a stimulatory effect of TA on tested parameters. TA caused a decrease in membrane phospholipid peroxidation and exhibited protective properties against ROS production. It also increases protein and collagen biosynthesis and its secretion into the culture medium. The present findings reveal that TA exhibits multiple and complex activity in fibroblast cells in vitro. TA, with its activity similar to unsaturated fatty acids, shows antioxidant and stimulatory effects on collagen biosynthesis. It is a potentially powerful agent with applications in the treatment of many skin diseases connected with oxidative stress and collagen biosynthesis disorders. PMID:27423205

  13. Functional characterization of amyrin synthase involved in ursolic acid biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus leaf epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fang; Thamm, Antje M K; Reed, Darwin; Villa-Ruano, Nemesio; Quesada, Alfonso Lara; Gloria, Edmundo Lozoya; Covello, Patrick; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2013-07-01

    Catharanthus roseus accumulates high levels of the pentacyclic triterpene, ursolic acid, as a component of its wax exudate on the leaf surface. Bioinformatic analyses of transcripts derived from the leaf epidermis provide evidence for the specialized role of this tissue in the biosynthesis of ursolic acid. Cloning and functional expression in yeast of a triterpene synthase derived from this tissue showed it to be predominantly an α-amyrin synthase (CrAS), since the α-amyrin to β-amyrin reaction products accumulated in a 5:1 ratio. Expression analysis of CrAS showed that triterpene biosynthesis occurs predominantly in the youngest leaf tissues and in the earliest stages of seedling development. Further studies using laser capture microdissection to harvest RNA from epidermis, mesophyll, idioblasts, laticifers and vasculature of leaves showed the leaf epidermis to be the preferred sites of CrAS expression and provide conclusive evidence for the involvement of this tissue in the biosynthesis of ursolic acid in C. roseus. PMID:22652241

  14. Downregulation of p63 upon exposure to bile salts and acid in normal and cancer esophageal cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Sabine; Pétré, Aurélia; Thépot, Amélie; Hautefeuille, Agnès; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Mion, François; Hainaut, Pierre

    2007-07-01

    p63 is a member of the p53 protein family that regulates differentiation and morphogenesis in epithelial tissues and is required for the formation of squamous epithelia. Barrett's mucosa is a glandular metaplasia of the squamous epithelium that develops in the lower esophagus in the context of chronic, gastroesophageal reflux and is considered as a precursor for adenocarcinoma. Normal or squamous cancer esophageal cells were exposed to deoxycholic acid (DCA, 50, 100, or 200 microM) and chenodeoxycholic and taurochenodeoxycholic acid at pH 5. p63 and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expressions were studied by Western blot and RT-PCR. DCA exposure at pH 5 led to a spectacular decrease in the levels of all isoforms of the p63 proteins. This decrease was observed within minutes of exposure, with a synergistic effect between DCA and acid. Within the same time frame, levels of p63 mRNA were relatively unaffected, whereas levels of COX-2, a marker of stress responses often induced in Barrett's mucosa, were increased. Similar results were obtained with chenodeoxycholic acid but not its taurine conjugate at pH 5. Proteasome inhibition by lactacystin or MG-132 partially blocked the decrease in p63, suggesting a posttranslational degradation mechanism. These results show that combined exposure to bile salt and acid downregulates a critical regulator of squamous differentiation, providing a mechanism to explain the replacement of squamous epithelium by a glandular metaplasia upon exposure of the lower esophagus to gastric reflux. PMID:17615180

  15. BnWRI1 coordinates fatty acid biosynthesis and photosynthesis pathways during oil accumulation in rapeseed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Long Wu; Zhi-Hong Liu; Zhang-Hua Hu; Rui-Zhi Huang

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthesis in“green”seeds, such as rapeseed, soybean, and Arabidopsis, plays a substantial role in the improved efficiency of oil accumulation. However, the molecular mecha-nism underpinning the coordinated expression of fatty acid (FA) biosynthesis-and photosynthesis-related genes in such develop-ing seeds remains to be elucidated. Here, we found that seed-specific overexpression of BnWRI1, a WRI1 homolog from rapeseed (Brassica napus cv. ZGY2), results in enhanced chlorophyl content in developing seeds and increased oil content and seed mass in matured seeds. BnWRI1 was co-expressed with BnBCCP and BnCAB, two marker genes of FA biosynthesis and photosynthesis during seed development, respectively. Over-expression of BnWRI1 increased expression of both marker genes. Further, the nuclear-localized BnWRI1 protein was found to act as a transcription activator. It could bind to the GT1-element and/or GCC-box, which are widespread in the upstream regions of genes involved in FA biosynthesis and photosynthesis pathways. Accordingly, BnWRI1 could interact with promoters of BCCP2 and LHB1B2 in vivo. These results suggested that BnWRI1 may coordinate FA biosynthesis and photosynthesis pathways in developing seeds via directly stimulating expression of GT1-element and/or GCC-box containing genes.

  16. BnWRI1 coordinates fatty acid biosynthesis and photosynthesis pathways during oil accumulation in rapeseed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xue-Long; Liu, Zhi-Hong; Hu, Zhang-Hua; Huang, Rui-Zhi

    2014-06-01

    Photosynthesis in "green" seeds, such as rapeseed, soybean, and Arabidopsis, plays a substantial role in the improved efficiency of oil accumulation. However, the molecular mechanism underpinning the coordinated expression of fatty acid (FA) biosynthesis- and photosynthesis-related genes in such developing seeds remains to be elucidated. Here, we found that seed-specific overexpression of BnWRI1, a WRI1 homolog from rapeseed (Brassica napus cv. ZGY2), results in enhanced chlorophyll content in developing seeds and increased oil content and seed mass in matured seeds. BnWRI1 was co-expressed with BnBCCP and BnCAB, two marker genes of FA biosynthesis and photosynthesis during seed development, respectively. Overexpression of BnWRI1 increased expression of both marker genes. Further, the nuclear-localized BnWRI1 protein was found to act as a transcription activator. It could bind to the GT1-element and/or GCC-box, which are widespread in the upstream regions of genes involved in FA biosynthesis and photosynthesis pathways. Accordingly, BnWRI1 could interact with promoters of BCCP2 and LHB1B2 in vivo. These results suggested that BnWRI1 may coordinate FA biosynthesis and photosynthesis pathways in developing seeds via directly stimulating expression of GT1-element and/or GCC-box containing genes.

  17. Biosynthesis of car1ssol and carissic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizami, S S; Khan, M A; Naim, Z; Islam, M N; Azeem, S W

    1993-01-01

    Carissa carandas belongs to family apocynaceae which consists of 300 genera and 1000 species. It is a large shrub with simple thorn and commonly cultivated throughout Pakistan for hedges and is called "Kakronda". The different parts of this plant have been used for various systems of medicine (Kirtikar et al., 1993). Cardiotonic activity was found in root of this plant (Rastogi et al., 1966; Rastogi et al., 1967; Vohra et al., 1963). This plant has been mentioned in the old chemical literature as purgative, stomachic, antihelmintics and antidote for snake-bite (Kirtikar., 1933). The physical characteristics of oil from the fruits of Carissa carandas were determined by using standard methods. In addition to this a study of sugars and amino acids from the fruits of this plant was also undertaken by the present authors (Naim et al., 1986). Our studies in the chemical investigation on this plant had led to the isolation of two new triterpene carissol Ia (Naim et al., 1985) and carissic acid lb (Naim et al., 1988).

  18. Novel potent and selective bile acid derivatives as TGR5 agonists: biological screening, structure-activity relationships, and molecular modeling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiroyuki; Macchiarulo, Antonio; Thomas, Charles; Gioiello, Antimo; Une, Mizuho; Hofmann, Alan F; Saladin, Régis; Schoonjans, Kristina; Pellicciari, Roberto; Auwerx, Johan

    2008-03-27

    TGR5, a metabotropic receptor that is G-protein-coupled to the induction of adenylate cyclase, has been recognized as the molecular link connecting bile acids to the control of energy and glucose homeostasis. With the aim of disclosing novel selective modulators of this receptor and at the same time clarifying the molecular basis of TGR5 activation, we report herein the biological screening of a collection of natural occurring bile acids, bile acid derivatives, and some steroid hormones, which has resulted in the discovery of new potent and selective TGR5 ligands. Biological results of the tested collection of compounds were used to extend the structure-activity relationships of TGR5 agonists and to develop a binary classification model of TGR5 activity. This model in particular could unveil some hidden properties shared by the molecular shape of bile acids and steroid hormones that are relevant to TGR5 activation and may hence be used to address the design of novel selective and potent TGR5 agonists.

  19. The Potent Bile Acid Sequestrant Colesevelam Is Not Effective in Cholestatic Pruritus: Results of a Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M.M. Kuiper; K.J. van Erpecum; U. Beuers; B.E. Hansen; H.B. Thio; R.A. de Man; H.L.A. Janssen; H.R. van Buuren

    2010-01-01

    Colesevelam is an anion-exchange resin with a 7-fold higher bile acid binding capacity and fewer side effects than cholestyramine, the current first-line treatment option for cholestatic pruritus. The aim of this trial was to compare the effects of colesevelam and a placebo in patients with cholesta

  20. Improved Glycemic Control with Colesevelam Treatment in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Is Not Directly Associated with Changes in Bile Acid Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brufau Dones, Gemma; Stellaard, Frans; Prado, Kris; Bloks, Vincent W.; Jonkers, Elles; Boverhof, Renze; Kuipers, Folkert; Murphy, Elizabeth J.

    2010-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are essential for fat absorption and appear to modulate glucose and energy metabolism. Colesevelam, a BA sequestrant, improves glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We aimed to characterize the alterations in BA metabolism associated with T2DM and colesevelam treatmen

  1. Upregulation of the oncogene c-myc in Barrett’s adenocarcinoma: induction of c-myc by acidified bile acid in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Tselepis, C; C. D. Morris; Wakelin, D; Hardy, R; Perry, I.; Luong, Q T; Harper, E.; Harrison, R.; Attwood, S E A; Jankowski, J.A.Z.

    2003-01-01

    Background and aims: C-myc over expression is implicated in malignancy although to date this has not been studied in Barrett’s metaplasia. We sought to determine c-myc expression in the malignant progression of Barrett’s metaplasia and whether it may be induced by bile acids seen in gastro-oesophageal refluxate.

  2. Quantitative profiling of bile acids in biofluids and tissues based on accurate mass high resolution LC-FT-MS: Compound class targeting in a metabolomics workflow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobeldijk, I.; Hekman, M.; Vries de- Weij, J.van der; Coulier, L.; Ramaker, R.; Kleemann, R.; Kooistra, T.; Rubingh, C.; Freidig, A.; Verheij, E.

    2008-01-01

    We report a sensitive, generic method for quantitative profiling of bile acids and other endogenous metabolites in small quantities of various biological fluids and tissues. The method is based on a straightforward sample preparation, separation by reversed-phase high performance liquid-chromatograp

  3. Alisol B 23-acetate protects against ANIT-induced hepatotoxity and cholestasis, due to FXR-mediated regulation of transporters and enzymes involved in bile acid homeostasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Qiang; Chen, Xin-li; Wang, Chang-yuan; Liu, Qi; Sun, Hui-jun; Sun, Peng-yuan; Huo, Xiao-kui; Liu, Zhi-hao; Yao, Ji-hong; Liu, Ke-xin, E-mail: kexinliu@dlmedu.edu.cn

    2015-03-15

    Intrahepatic cholestasis is a clinical syndrome with systemic and intrahepatic accumulation of excessive toxic bile acids that ultimately cause hepatobiliary injury. Appropriate regulation of bile acids in hepatocytes is critically important for protection against liver injury. In the present study, we characterized the protective effect of alisol B 23-acetate (AB23A), a natural triterpenoid, on alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT)-induced liver injury and intrahepatic cholestasis in mice and further elucidated the mechanisms in vivo and in vitro. AB23A treatment dose-dependently protected against liver injury induced by ANIT through reducing hepatic uptake and increasing efflux of bile acid via down-regulation of hepatic uptake transporters (Ntcp) and up-regulation of efflux transporter (Bsep, Mrp2 and Mdr2) expression. Furthermore, AB23A reduced bile acid synthesis through repressing Cyp7a1 and Cyp8b1, increased bile acid conjugation through inducing Bal, Baat and bile acid metabolism through an induction in gene expression of Sult2a1. We further demonstrate the involvement of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) in the hepatoprotective effect of AB23A. The changes in transporters and enzymes, as well as ameliorative liver histology in AB23A-treated mice were abrogated by FXR antagonist guggulsterone in vivo. In vitro evidences also directly demonstrated the effect of AB23A on FXR activation in a dose-dependent manner using luciferase reporter assay in HepG2 cells. In conclusion, AB23A produces protective effect against ANIT-induced hepatotoxity and cholestasis, due to FXR-mediated regulation of transporters and enzymes. - Highlights: • AB23A has at least three roles in protection against ANIT-induced liver injury. • AB23A decreases Ntcp, and increases Bsep, Mrp2 and Mdr2 expression. • AB23A represses Cyp7a1 and Cyp8b1 through inducing Shp and Fgf15 expression. • AB23A increases bile acid metabolism through inducing Sult2a1 expression. • FXR activation is involved

  4. Co-expression Analysis Identifies CRC and AP1 the Regulator of Arabidopsis Fatty Acid Biosynthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinxin Han; Linlin Yin; Hongwei Xue

    2012-01-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) play crucial rules in signal transduction and plant development,however,the regulation of FA metabolism is still poorly understood.To study the relevant regulatory network,fifty-eight FA biosynthesis genes including de novo synthases,desaturases and elongases were selected as "guide genes" to construct the co-expression network.Calculation of the correlation between all Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) genes with each guide gene by Arabidopsis co-expression dating mining tools (ACT)identifies 797 candidate FA-correlated genes.Gene ontology (GO) analysis of these co-expressed genes showed they are tightly correlated to photosynthesis and carbohydrate metabolism,and function in many processes.Interestingly,63 transcription factors (TFs) were identified as candidate FA biosynthesis regulators and 8 TF families are enriched.Two TF genes,CRC and AP1,both correlating with 8 FA guide genes,were further characterized.Analyses of the ap1 and crc mutant showed the altered total FA composition of mature seeds.The contents of palmitoleic acid,stearic acid,arachidic acid and eicosadienoic acid are decreased,whereas that of oleic acid is increased in ap1 and crc seeds,which is consistent with the qRT-PCR analysis revealing the suppressed expression of the corresponding guide genes.In addition,yeast one-hybrid analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) revealed that CRC can bind to the promoter regions of KCS7 and KCS15,indicating that CRC may directly regulate FA biosynthesis.

  5. Organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1a4 (Oatp1a4) is important for secondary bile acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Youcai; Csanaky, Iván L; Selwyn, Felcy Pavithra; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2013-08-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptides (human: OATPs; rodent: Oatps) were thought to have important functions in bile acid (BA) transport. Oatp1a1, 1a4, and 1b2 are the three major Oatp1 family members in rodent liver. Our previous studies have characterized the BA homeostasis in Oatp1a1-null and Oatp1b2-null mice. The present study investigated the physiological role of Oatp1a4 in BA homeostasis by using Oatp1a4-null mice. Oatp1a4 expression is female-predominant in livers of mice, and thereby it was expected that female Oatp1a4-null mice will have more prominent changes than males. Interestingly, the present study demonstrated that female Oatp1a4-null mice had no significant alterations in BA concentrations in serum or liver, though they had increased mRNA of hepatic BA efflux transporters (Mrp4 and Ostα/β) and ileal BA transporters (Asbt and Ostα/β). In contrast, male Oatp1a4-null mice showed significantly altered BA homeostasis, including increased concentrations of deoxycholic acid (DCA) in serum, liver and intestinal contents. After feeding a DCA-supplemented diet, male but not female Oatp1a4-null mice had higher concentrations of DCA in serum and livers than their WT controls. This suggested that Oatp1a4 is important for intestinal absorption of secondary BAs in male mice. Furthermore, loss of Oatp1a4 function did not decrease BA accumulation in serum or livers of bile-duct-ligated mice, suggesting that Oatp1a4 is not likely a BA uptake transporter. In summary, the present study for the first time demonstrates that Oatp1a4 does not appear to mediate the hepatic uptake of BAs, but plays an important male-predominant role in secondary BA metabolism in mice.

  6. Transmembrane domain V plays a stabilizing role in the function of human bile acid transporter SLC10A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Robyn H; Chothe, Paresh; Swaan, Peter W

    2013-07-30

    The human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (hASBT, SLC10A2), primarily expressed in the ileum, is involved in both the recycling of bile acids and cholesterol homeostasis. In this study, the structure-function relationship of transmembrane domain 5 (TM5) residues involved in transport is elucidated. Cysteine scanning mutagenesis of each consecutive residue on TM5 resulted in 96% of mutants having a significantly decreased transport activity, although each was expressed at the cell surface. Specifically, G197 and I208 were no longer functional, and G201 and G212 functioned at a level of Conservative alanine mutations of the four residues displayed a higher activity in all but G197A, indicating its functional importance. G197 and G201 form a GxxxG motif, which has been found to be important in helix-helix interactions. According to our model, G197 and G201 face transmembrane domain 4 (TM4) residues G179 and P175, respectively. Similarly, G212 faces G237, which forms part of a GxxxG domain in transmembrane domain 6 (TM6). It is possible that these GxxxG domains and their interacting partners are responsible for maintaining the structure of the helices and their interactions with one another. I205 and I208 are both in positions to anchor the GxxxG domains and direct the change in interaction of TM5 from TM4 to TM6. Combined, the results suggest that residues along TM5 are critical for ASBT function but are not directly involved in substrate translocation.

  7. Generation of reactive oxygen species by a novel berberine–bile acid analog mediates apoptosis in hepatocarcinoma SMMC-7721 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Anticancer effects of B4, a novel berberine–bile acid analog, were tested. • B4 inhibited cell proliferation in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. • It also stimulated mitochondrial ROS production and membrane depolarization. • Effects of B4 were inhibited by a non-specific ROS scavenger. • Regulation of ROS generation may be a strategy for treating hepatic carcinoma. - Abstract: 2,3-Methenedioxy-9-O-(3′α,7′α-dihydroxy-5′β-cholan-24′-propy-lester) berberine (B4) is a novel berberine–bile acid analog synthesized in our laboratory. Previously, we showed that B4 exerted greater cytotoxicity than berberine in several human cancer cell lines. Therefore, we further evaluated the mechanism governing its anticancer actions in hepatocellular carcinoma SMMC-7721 cells. B4 inhibited the proliferation of SMMC-7721 cells, and stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial membrane depolarization; anti-oxidant capacity was reduced. B4 also induced the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol and an increase in poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage products, reflective of caspase-3 activation. Moreover, B4 induced the nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and a rise in DNA fragmentation. Pretreatment with the anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) inhibited B4-mediated effects, including cytotoxicity, ROS production, mitochondrial membrane depolarization increase in intracellular Ca2+, cytochrome c release, PARP cleavage, and AIF translocation. Our data suggest that B4 induces ROS-triggered caspase-dependent and caspase-independent apoptosis pathways in SMMC-7721 cells and that ROS production may be a specific potential strategy for treating hepatic carcinoma

  8. Generation of reactive oxygen species by a novel berberine–bile acid analog mediates apoptosis in hepatocarcinoma SMMC-7721 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qingyong, E-mail: li_qingyong@126.com [Key Laboratory of Forest Plant Ecology (Northeast Forestry University), Ministry of Education (China); Zhang, Li; Zu, Yuangang; Liu, Tianyu; Zhang, Baoyou; He, Wuna [Key Laboratory of Forest Plant Ecology (Northeast Forestry University), Ministry of Education (China)

    2013-04-19

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Anticancer effects of B4, a novel berberine–bile acid analog, were tested. • B4 inhibited cell proliferation in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. • It also stimulated mitochondrial ROS production and membrane depolarization. • Effects of B4 were inhibited by a non-specific ROS scavenger. • Regulation of ROS generation may be a strategy for treating hepatic carcinoma. - Abstract: 2,3-Methenedioxy-9-O-(3′α,7′α-dihydroxy-5′β-cholan-24′-propy-lester) berberine (B4) is a novel berberine–bile acid analog synthesized in our laboratory. Previously, we showed that B4 exerted greater cytotoxicity than berberine in several human cancer cell lines. Therefore, we further evaluated the mechanism governing its anticancer actions in hepatocellular carcinoma SMMC-7721 cells. B4 inhibited the proliferation of SMMC-7721 cells, and stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial membrane depolarization; anti-oxidant capacity was reduced. B4 also induced the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol and an increase in poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage products, reflective of caspase-3 activation. Moreover, B4 induced the nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and a rise in DNA fragmentation. Pretreatment with the anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) inhibited B4-mediated effects, including cytotoxicity, ROS production, mitochondrial membrane depolarization increase in intracellular Ca{sup 2+}, cytochrome c release, PARP cleavage, and AIF translocation. Our data suggest that B4 induces ROS-triggered caspase-dependent and caspase-independent apoptosis pathways in SMMC-7721 cells and that ROS production may be a specific potential strategy for treating hepatic carcinoma.

  9. Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids alleviate hyperlipidemia in B6 mice by modulating gut microbiota and bile acid pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Kai; Hu, Yinran; Ma, Hang; Zou, Zongyao; Xiao, Yubo; Yang, Yong; Feng, Min; Li, Xuegang; Ye, Xiaoli

    2016-09-01

    It is hypothesized that Rhizoma Coptidis (RC) alkaloids exert their hypolipidemic effects primarily by targeting the gastrointestinal tract and liver. Thus, this study was conducted to evaluate the antihyperlipidemic mechanisms of RC alkaloids (at a daily dose of 140mg/kg for 35days) in high-fat and high-cholesterol induced hyperlipidemic B6 mice. After treatment, serum lipid parameters were determined, the expression of lipid metabolism related genes and pathways such as the sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) and bile acid signaling in mice were also investigated. Meanwhile, Illumina sequencing was used to investigate the differences in gut microbiota of B6 mice. The results indicated that RC alkaloids reduced the body weight gain and serum total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), total bile acids (TBA) and lipopolysaccharide of B6 mice. Liver fat deposition and epididymal adipose cell size were also deceased in therapy group. RC alkaloids feeding significantly promoted the abundance of Sporobacter termitidis, Alcaligenes faecalis, Akkermansia muciniphila in the gut of mice, whereas, the abundance of Escherichia coli, Desulfovibrio C21_c20, Parabacteroides distasonis was suppressed. The observed antihyperlipidemic effects of RC alkaloids can also be attributed to their action as agonists of FXR and TGR5, activators for SREBP2, LDLR, UCP2 and CYP7A1, inhibitors of HMGCR, TXNIP, TLR4 and JNK. Therefore, this study expands current knowledge on hypolipidemic mechanisms of RC alkaloids and presents new evidence supporting a key role for RC alkaloids as regulators of lipid homeostasis by modulation gut microbiota and hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:27287254

  10. TO THE QUESTION OF BIOSYNTHESIS OF CROTONALDEHYDE OF WINE YEAST AND LACTIC ACID BACTERIA DURING VINIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushnereva E. V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates the possible pathways for the formation of crotonaldehyde in wine production in the result of the activity of wine yeast and lactic acid bacteria. It established that exposure to exhaust gases, noble rot, pathogens and pests on grape plant does not lead to the biosynthesis of crotonaldehyde in grape berry. The experimental data to identify probable pathways for the formation of crotonaldehyde during vinification has been presented. The effect of the test substance on the life of yeasts and lactic acid bacteria has been estimated

  11. Iduronic Acid in Chondroitin/Dermatan Sulfate: Biosynthesis and Biological Function

    OpenAIRE

    Malmström, Anders; Bartolini, Barbara; Thelin, Martin A.; Pacheco, Benny; Maccarana, Marco

    2012-01-01

    The ability of chondroitin/dermatan sulfate (CS/DS) to convey biological information is enriched by the presence of iduronic acid. DS-epimerases 1 and 2 (DS-epi1 and 2), in conjunction with DS-4-O-sulfotransferase 1, are the enzymes responsible for iduronic acid biosynthesis and will be the major focus of this review. CS/DS proteoglycans (CS/DS-PGs) are ubiquitously found in connective tissues, basement membranes, and cell surfaces or are stored intracellularly. Such wide distr...

  12. Arabidopsis Acetyl-Amido Synthetase GH3.5 Involvement in Camalexin Biosynthesis through Conjugation of Indole-3-Carboxylic Acid and Cysteine and Upregulation of Camalexin Biosynthesis Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mu-Yang Wang; Xue-Ting Liu; Ying Chen; Xiao-Jing Xu; Biao Yu; Shu-Qun Zhang; Qun Li; Zu-Hua He

    2012-01-01

    Camalexin (3-thiazol-2'-yl-indole) is the major phytoalexin found in Arabidopsis thaliana.Several key intermediates and corresponding enzymes have been identified in camalexin biosynthesis through mutant screening and biochemical experiments.Camalexin is formed when indole-3-acetonitrile (IAN)is catalyzed by the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase CYP71A13.Here,we demonstrate that the Arabidopsis GH3.5 protein,a multifunctional acetyl-amido synthetase,is involved in camalexin biosynthesis via conjugating indole-3-carboxylic acid (ICA) and cysteine (Cys) and regulating camalexin biosynthesis genes.Camalexin levels were increased in the activation-tagged mutant gh3.5-1D in both Col-0 and cyp71A13-2 mutant backgrounds after pathogen infection.The recombinant GH3.5 protein catalyzed the conjugation of ICA and Cys to form a possible intermediate indole-3-acyl-cysteinate (ICA(Cys)) in vitro.In support of the in vitro reaction,feeding with ICA and Cys increased camalexin levels in Col-0 and gh3.5-1D.Dihydrocamalexic acid (DHCA),the precursor of camalexin and the substrate for PAD3,was accumulated in gh3.5-1Dlpad3-1,suggesting that ICA(Cys) could be an additional precursor of DHCA for camalexin biosynthesis.Furthermore,expression of the major camalexin biosynthesis genes CYP79B2,CYP71A12,CYP71A13 and PAD3 was strongly induced in gh3.5-1D.Our study suggests that GH3.5 is involved in camalexin biosynthesis through direct catalyzation of the formation of ICA(Cys),and upregulation of the major biosynthetic pathway genes.

  13. The effect of dietary prebiotics and probiotics on body weight, large intestine indices, and fecal bile acid profile in wild type and IL10-/- mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiu-Ming Kuo

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested roles of probiotics and prebiotics on body weight management and intestinal function. Here, the effects of a dietary prebiotic, inulin (50 mg/g diet, and probiotic, Bfidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (Bb12 (final dose verified at 10(5 colony forming unit (cfu/g diet, comparable to human consumption, were determined separately and in combination in mice using cellulose-based AIN-93G diets under conditions allowed for the growth of commensal bacteria. Continuous consumption of Bb12 and/or inulin did not affect food intake or body, liver, and spleen weights of young and adult mice. Fecal bile acid profiles were determined by nanoESI-MS/MS tandem mass spectrometry. In the presence of inulin, more bacterial deconjugation of taurine from primary bile acids was observed along with an increased cecal weight. Consumption of inulin in the absence or presence of Bb12 also increased the villus cell height in the proximal colon along with a trend of higher bile acid sulfation by intestinal cells. Feeding Bb12 alone at the physiological dose did not affect bile acid deconjugation and had little effect on other intestinal indices. Although interleukin (IL10-null mice are susceptible to enterocolitis, they maintained the same body weight as the wild type mice under our specific pathogen-free housing condition and showed no signs of inflammation. Nevertheless, they had smaller cecum suggesting a mildly compromised intestinal development even before the disease manifestation. Our results are consistent with the notion that dietary factors such as prebiotics play important roles in the growth of intestinal microbiota and may impact on the intestinal health. In addition, fecal bile acid profiling could potentially be a non-invasive tool in monitoring the intestinal environment.

  14. Structural and mechanistic studies of the orf12 gene product from the clavulanic acid biosynthesis pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valegård, Karin; Iqbal, Aman; Kershaw, Nadia J; Ivison, David; Généreux, Catherine; Dubus, Alain; Blikstad, Cecilia; Demetriades, Marina; Hopkinson, Richard J; Lloyd, Adrian J; Roper, David I; Schofield, Christopher J; Andersson, Inger; McDonough, Michael A

    2013-08-01

    Structural and biochemical studies of the orf12 gene product (ORF12) from the clavulanic acid (CA) biosynthesis gene cluster are described. Sequence and crystallographic analyses reveal two domains: a C-terminal penicillin-binding protein (PBP)/β-lactamase-type fold with highest structural similarity to the class A β-lactamases fused to an N-terminal domain with a fold similar to steroid isomerases and polyketide cyclases. The C-terminal domain of ORF12 did not show β-lactamase or PBP activity for the substrates tested, but did show low-level esterase activity towards 3'-O-acetyl cephalosporins and a thioester substrate. Mutagenesis studies imply that Ser173, which is present in a conserved SXXK motif, acts as a nucleophile in catalysis, consistent with studies of related esterases, β-lactamases and D-Ala carboxypeptidases. Structures of wild-type ORF12 and of catalytic residue variants were obtained in complex with and in the absence of clavulanic acid. The role of ORF12 in clavulanic acid biosynthesis is unknown, but it may be involved in the epimerization of (3S,5S)-clavaminic acid to (3R,5R)-clavulanic acid.

  15. Overexpression of a Gene Involved in Phytic Acid Biosynthesis Substantially Increases Phytic Acid and Total Phosphorus in Rice Seeds

    OpenAIRE

    Yusuke Tagashira; Tomoe Shimizu; Masanobu Miyamoto; Sho Nishida; Yoshida, Kaoru T.

    2015-01-01

    The manipulation of seed phosphorus is important for seedling growth and environmental P sustainability in agriculture. The mechanism of regulating P content in seed, however, is poorly understood. To study regulation of total P, we focused on phytic acid (inositol hexakisphosphate; InsP6) biosynthesis-related genes, as InsP6 is a major storage form of P in seeds. The rice (Oryza sativa L.) low phytic acid mutant lpa1-1 has been identified as a homolog of archael 2-phosphoglycerate kinase. Th...

  16. An evaluation of the use of serum 7-alpha-hydroxycholestenone as a diagnostic test of bile acid malabsorption causing watery diarrhea

    OpenAIRE

    Brydon, W Gordon; Culbert, Pearl; Kingstone, Kathleen; Jarvie, Ann; Iacucci, Marietta; Tenhage, Merel; Ghosh, Subrata

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bile acid malabsorption (BAM) is a recognized cause of watery diarrhea, often diagnosed empirically based on clinical response to cholestyramine. The radionuclide selenium-labelled homocholic acid-taurine whole body retention test is expensive, labour intensive and of limited availability.OBJECTIVE: To report on the clinical performance of serum 7-alpha-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (7HCO) as a test of BAM in adult patients with unexplained diarrhea.METHODS: Patients with unexplained ...

  17. Functional Characterization of the Semisynthetic Bile Acid Derivative INT-767, a Dual Farnesoid X Receptor and TGR5 AgonistS⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Rizzo, Giovanni; Passeri, Daniela; Franco, Francesca; Ciaccioli, Gianmario; Donadio, Loredana; Rizzo, Giorgia; Orlandi, Stefano; Sadeghpour, Bahman; Wang, Xiaoxin X.; Jiang, Tao; Levi, Moshe; Pruzanski, Mark; Adorini, Luciano

    2010-01-01

    Two dedicated receptors for bile acids (BAs) have been identified, the nuclear hormone receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and the G protein-coupled receptor TGR5, which represent attractive targets for the treatment of metabolic and chronic liver diseases. Previous work characterized 6α-ethyl-3α,7α-dihydroxy-5β-cholan-24-oic acid (INT-747), a potent and selective FXR agonist, as well as ...

  18. THE EFFECT OF PANTETHINE, A PRECURSOR OF COENZYME A, ON BILE ACIDS AND LIPIDS IN RATS FED WITH A CHOLESTEROL DIET

    OpenAIRE

    Kajiyama, Goro; Kawamoto, Toshio; Fukuhara, Choho; Horiuchi, Itaru; Nakagawa, Masahiro; Miyoshi, Akima

    1981-01-01

    The effect of pantethine on bile acids and lipids was studied by the washout technique in Wistar female rats fed for four weeks with a 1% cholesterol diet supplemented with 0.5% cholic acid, either containing or not containing 1% pantethine. Pantethine caused a slight increase in the biliary cholesterol concentration with a significant decrease in the serum cholesterol, β-lipoprotein and triglyceride levels. An increase in the pool size, secretion rate and enterohepatic circulation rate ...

  19. THE EFFECT OF PANTETHINE, A PRECURSOR OF COENZYME A, ON BILE ACIDS AND LIPIDS IN RATS FED WITH A CHOLESTEROL DIET

    OpenAIRE

    Kajiyama, Goro; Kawamoto, Toshio; Fukuhara, Choho; Horiuchi, Itaru; Nakagawa, Masahiro; Miyoshi, Akima

    1981-01-01

    The effect of pantethine on bile acids and lipids was studied by the washout technique in Wistar female rats fed for four weeks with a 1% cholesterol diet supplemented with 0.5% cholic acid, either containing or not containing 1% pantethine. Pantethine caused a slight increase in the biliary cholesterol concentration with a significant decrease in the serum cholesterol, β-lipoprotein and triglyceride levels. An increase in the pool size, secretion rate and enterohepatic circulation rate of pr...

  20. [Effect of organic acids on the biosynthesis of macrotetralide antibiotics by an Actinomyces chrysomallus var. carotenoides strain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nefelova, M V; Sverdlova, A N; Silaev, A B

    1978-07-01

    The biosynthesis of macrotetrolides by Actinomyces chrysomalus var. carotenoides was stimulated by acetic, succinic, propionic, oxalic, malic, tartaric, citric, pyruvic, alpha-ketoglutaric and fumaric acids. Incorporation of 14C-acetate into the molecule of the antibiotic and the data on dependence of the stimulating effect upon the quantitative ratio and time of the organic acid addition were indicative of the role of acetic, succinic and propionic acids as precursors of macrotetrolides. The other organic acids increased the biosynthesis of macrotetolides when added to the culture within wide time ranges of the culture development and prolonged the period of the mycelium productive state.

  1. Hydrogen isotopic fractionations during desaturation and elongation associated with polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis in marine macroalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Suzuki, Yaeko; Naraoka, Hiroshi

    2004-08-01

    Compound-specific hydrogen isotopic compositions (deltaD) of saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids have been determined for natural marine macroalgae including two brown algae (Heterokontophyta) and two red algae (Rhodophyta). deltaD values of individual fatty acids from four macroalgae exhibit a wide variation ranging from -189% to +48%. Generally, stearic (18:0), arachidic (20:0) and behenic acids (22:0) are much more enriched in D by up to approximately 180% relative to myristic (14:0), palmitic (16:0), octatetraenoic [18:4(n-3)] and eicosapentaenoic acids [20:5(n-3)]. Other fatty acids such as oleic [18:1(n-9)], lenoleic [18:2(n-6)] and linolenic acids [18:3(n - 3)] fall isotopically between these fatty acids. This wide deltaD variation of fatty acids is probably explained by the hydrogen isotopic fractionation during desaturation being much larger than that during elongation in the network of polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis. A large hydrogen isotopic fractionation during desaturation may cause D-enrichment in the remaining hydrogen of the residual fatty acids, which could be controlled by the relative flux into their desaturates. PMID:15587713

  2. Bile acids-mediated overexpression of MUC4 via FAK-dependent c-Jun activation in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Suhasini; Cruz, Eric; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Guha, Sushovan; Brand, Randall E; Ponnusamy, Moorthy P; Kumar, Sushil; Batra, Surinder K

    2016-08-01

    The majority of pancreatic cancer (PC) patients are clinically presented with obstructive jaundice with elevated levels of circulatory bilirubin and alkaline phosphatases. In the current study, we examined the implications of bile acids (BA), an important component of bile, on the pathophysiology of PC and investigated their mechanistic association in tumor-promoting functions. Integration of results from PC patient samples and autochthonous mouse models showed an elevated levels of BA (p < 0.05) in serum samples compared to healthy controls. Similarly, an elevated BA levels was observed in pancreatic juice derived from PC patients (p < 0.05) than non-pancreatic non-healthy (NPNH) controls, further establishing the clinical association of BA with the pathogenesis of PC. The tumor-promoting functions of BA were established by observed transcriptional upregulation of oncogenic MUC4 expression. Luciferase reporter assay revealed distal MUC4 promoter as the primary responsive site to BA. In silico analysis recognized two c-Jun binding sites at MUC4 distal promoter, which was biochemically established using ChIP assay. Interestingly, BA treatment led to an increased transcription and activation of c-Jun in a FAK-dependent manner. Additionally, BA receptor, namely FXR, which is also upregulated at transcriptional level in PC patient samples, was demonstrated as an upstream molecule in BA-mediated FAK activation, plausibly by regulating Src activation. Altogether, these results demonstrate that elevated levels of BA increase the tumorigenic potential of PC cells by inducing FXR/FAK/c-Jun axis to upregulate MUC4 expression, which is overexpressed in pancreatic tumors and is known to be associated with progression and metastasis of PC. PMID:27185392

  3. Auxin Biosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Yunde

    2014-01-01

    lndole-3-acetic acid (IAA), the most important natural auxin in plants, is mainly synthesized from the amino acid tryptophan (Trp). Recent genetic and biochemical studies in Arabidopsis have unambiguously established the first complete Trp-dependent auxin biosynthesis pathway. The first chemical step of auxin biosynthesis is the removal of the amino group from Trp by the TRYPTOPHAN AMINOTRANSFERASE OF ARABIDOPSIS (TAA) family of transaminases to generate indole-3-pyruvate (IPA). IPA then unde...

  4. Cystathionine γ-lyase, a H2S-generating enzyme, is a GPBAR1-regulated gene and contributes to vasodilation caused by secondary bile acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renga, Barbara; Bucci, Mariarosaria; Cipriani, Sabrina; Carino, Adriana; Monti, Maria Chiara; Zampella, Angela; Gargiulo, Antonella; d'Emmanuele di Villa Bianca, Roberta; Distrutti, Eleonora; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2015-07-01

    GPBAR1 is a bile acid-activated receptor (BAR) for secondary bile acids, lithocholic (LCA) and deoxycholic acid (DCA), expressed in the enterohepatic tissues and in the vasculature by endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Despite that bile acids cause vasodilation, it is unclear why these effects involve GPBAR1, and the vascular phenotype of GPBAR1 deficient mice remains poorly defined. Previous studies have suggested a role for nitric oxide (NO) in regulatory activity exerted by GPBAR1 in liver endothelial cells. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a vasodilatory agent generated in endothelial cells by cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE). Here we demonstrate that GPBAR1 null mice had increased levels of primary and secondary bile acids and impaired vasoconstriction to phenylephrine. In aortic ring preparations, vasodilation caused by chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), a weak GPBAR1 ligand and farnesoid-x-receptor agonist (FXR), was iberiotoxin-dependent and GPBAR1-independent. In contrast, vasodilation caused by LCA was GPBAR1 dependent and abrogated by propargyl-glycine, a CSE inhibitor, and by 5β-cholanic acid, a GPBAR1 antagonist, but not by N(5)-(1-iminoethyl)-l-ornithine (l-NIO), an endothelial NO synthase inhibitor, or iberiotoxin, a large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BKCa) channels antagonist. In venular and aortic endothelial (HUVEC and HAEC) cells GPBAR1 activation increases CSE expression/activity and H2S production. Two cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) sites (CREs) were identified in the CSE promoter. In addition, TLCA stimulates CSE phosphorylation on serine residues. In conclusion we demonstrate that GPBAR1 mediates the vasodilatory activity of LCA and regulates the expression/activity of CSE. Vasodilation caused by CDCA involves BKCa channels. The GPBAR1/CSE pathway might contribute to endothelial dysfunction and hyperdynamic circulation in liver cirrhosis. PMID:25934094

  5. Oleanolic acid and ursolic acid inhibit peptidoglycan biosynthesis in Streptococcus mutans UA159

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soon-Nang Park

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we revealed that OA and UA significantly inhibited the expression of most genes related to peptidoglycan biosynthesis in S. mutans UA159. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to introduce the antimicrobial mechanism of OA and UA against S. mutans.

  6. Nitric oxide metabolism and indole acetic acid biosynthesis cross-talk in Azospirillum brasilense SM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koul, Vatsala; Tripathi, Chandrakant; Adholeya, Alok; Kochar, Mandira

    2015-04-01

    Production of nitric oxide (NO) and the presence of NO metabolism genes, nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ), nitrous oxide reductase regulator (nosR) and nitric oxide reductase (norB) were identified in the plant-associated bacterium (PAB) Azospirillum brasilense SM. NO presence was confirmed in all overexpressing strains, while improvement in the plant growth response of these strains was mediated by increased NO and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) levels in the strains. Electron microscopy showed random distribution to biofilm, with surface colonization of pleiomorphic Azospirilla. Quantitative IAA estimation highlighted a crucial role of nosR and norBC in regulating IAA biosynthesis. The NO quencher and donor reduced/blocked IAA biosynthesis by all strains, indicating their common regulatory role in IAA biosynthesis. Tryptophan (Trp) and l-Arginine (Arg) showed higher expression of NO genes tested, while in the case of ipdC, only Trp and IAA increased expression, while Arg had no significant effect. The highest nosR expression in SMnosR in the presence of IAA and Trp, along with its 2-fold IAA level, confirmed the relationship of nosR overexpression with Trp in increasing IAA. These results indicate a strong correlation between IAA and NO in A. brasilense SM and suggest the existence of cross-talk or shared signaling mechanisms in these two growth regulators.

  7. Expanding the modular ester fermentative pathways for combinatorial biosynthesis of esters from volatile organic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layton, Donovan S; Trinh, Cong T

    2016-08-01

    Volatile organic acids are byproducts of fermentative metabolism, for example, anaerobic digestion of lignocellulosic biomass or organic wastes, and are often times undesired inhibiting cell growth and reducing directed formation of the desired products. Here, we devised a general framework for upgrading these volatile organic acids to high-value esters that can be used as flavors, fragrances, solvents, and biofuels. This framework employs the acid-to-ester modules, consisting of an AAT (alcohol acyltransferase) plus ACT (acyl CoA transferase) submodule and an alcohol submodule, for co-fermentation of sugars and organic acids to acyl CoAs and alcohols to form a combinatorial library of esters. By assembling these modules with the engineered Escherichia coli modular chassis cell, we developed microbial manufacturing platforms to perform the following functions: (i) rapid in vivo screening of novel AATs for their catalytic activities; (ii) expanding combinatorial biosynthesis of unique fermentative esters; and (iii) upgrading volatile organic acids to esters using single or mixed cell cultures. To demonstrate this framework, we screened for a set of five unique and divergent AATs from multiple species, and were able to determine their novel activities as well as produce a library of 12 out of the 13 expected esters from co-fermentation of sugars and (C2-C6) volatile organic acids. We envision the developed framework to be valuable for in vivo characterization of a repertoire of not-well-characterized natural AATs, expanding the combinatorial biosynthesis of fermentative esters, and upgrading volatile organic acids to high-value esters. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1764-1776. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26853081

  8. Combined quantification of faecal sterols, stanols, stanones and bile acids in soils and terrestrial sediments by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birk, Jago Jonathan; Dippold, Michaela; Wiesenberg, Guido L B; Glaser, Bruno

    2012-06-15

    Faeces incorporation can alter the concentration patterns of stanols, stanones, Δ(5)-sterols and bile acids in soils and terrestrial sediments. A joint quantification of these substances would give robust and specific information about the faecal input. Therefore, a method was developed for their purification and determination via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) based on a total lipid extract (TLE) of soils and terrestrial sediments. Stanols, stanones, Δ(5)-steroles and bile acids were extracted by a single Soxhlet extraction yielding a TLE. The TLE was saponified with KOH in methanol. Sequential liquid-liquid extraction was applied to recover the biomarkers from the saponified extract and to separate the bile acids from the neutral stanoles, stanones and Δ(5)-steroles. The neutral fraction was directly purified using solid phase extraction (SPE) columns packed with 5% deactivated silica gel. The bile acids were methylated in dry HCl in methanol and purified on SPE columns packed with activated silica gel. A mixture of hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS), trimethylchlorosilane (TMCS) and pyridine was used to silylate the hydroxyl groups of the stanols and Δ(5)-sterols avoiding a silylation of the keto groups of the stanones in their enol-form. Silylation of the bile acids was carried out with N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) containing N-trimethylsilylimidazole (TSIM). TLEs from a set of soils with different physico-chemical properties were used for method evaluation and for comparison of amounts of faecal biomarkers analysed with saponification and without saponification of the TLE. Therefore, a Regosol, a Podzol and a Ferralsol were sampled. To proof the applicability of the method for faecal biomarker analyses in archaeological soils and sediments, additional samples were taken from pre-Columbian Anthrosols in Amazonia and an Anthrosol from a site in central Europe settled since the Neolithic. The comparison of the amounts of steroids

  9. A study of the relationship between serum bile acids and propranolol pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in patients with liver cirrhosis and in healthy controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne B Taegtmeyer

    Full Text Available The main objectives of the study were to determine the exposure and bioavailability of oral propranolol and to investigate their associations with serum bile acid concentration in patients with liver cirrhosis and in healthy controls. A further objective was to study the pharmacodynamics of propranolol. An open-label crossover study was performed to determine the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of propranolol after oral (40 mg and intravenous (1 mg administration as well as the concentration of total and individual fasting serum bile acids in 15 patients with liver cirrhosis and 5 healthy controls. After intravenous propranolol, patients showed a 1.8-fold increase in the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0-∞, a 1.8-fold increase in volume of distribution and a 3-fold increase in the elimination half-life (mean ± SEM: 641±100 vs. 205±43 minutes compared to controls. After oral application, AUC0-∞ and elimination half-life of propranolol were increased 6- and 4-fold, respectively, and bioavailability 3-fold (83±8 vs. 27±9.2%. Maximal effects on blood pressure and heart rate occurred during the first 4 and first 2 hours, respectively, after intravenous and oral application in both patients and controls. Total serum bile acid concentrations were higher in patients than controls (42±11 vs. 2.7±0.3 µmol/L and were linearly correlated with the serum chenodeoxycholic acid concentration. There was a linear correlation between the SBA concentration and propranolol oral AUC0-∞ in subjects not receiving interacting drugs (r2 = 0.73, n = 18. The bioavailability of and exposure to oral propranolol are increased in patients with cirrhosis. Fasting serum bile acid concentration may be helpful in predicting the exposure to oral propranolol in these patients.

  10. Deficient liver biosynthesis of docosahexaenoic acid correlates with cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Astarita

    Full Text Available Reduced brain levels of docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6n-3, a neurotrophic and neuroprotective fatty acid, may contribute to cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. Here, we investigated whether the liver enzyme system that provides docosahexaenoic acid to the brain is dysfunctional in this disease. Docosahexaenoic acid levels were reduced in temporal cortex, mid-frontal cortex and cerebellum of subjects with Alzheimer's disease, compared to control subjects (P  =  0.007. Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE scores positively correlated with docosahexaenoic/α-linolenic ratios in temporal cortex (P =  0.005 and mid-frontal cortex (P  =  0.018, but not cerebellum. Similarly, liver docosahexaenoic acid content was lower in Alzheimer's disease patients than control subjects (P  =  0.011. Liver docosahexaenoic/α-linolenic ratios correlated positively with MMSE scores (r  =  0.78; P<0.0001, and negatively with global deterioration scale grades (P  =  0.013. Docosahexaenoic acid precursors, including tetracosahexaenoic acid (C24:6n-3, were elevated in liver of Alzheimer's disease patients (P  =  0.041, whereas expression of peroxisomal d-bifunctional protein, which catalyzes the conversion of tetracosahexaenoic acid into docosahexaenoic acid, was reduced (P  = 0.048. Other genes involved in docosahexaenoic acid metabolism were not affected. The results indicate that a deficit in d-bifunctional protein activity impairs docosahexaenoic acid biosynthesis in liver of Alzheimer's disease patients, lessening the flux of this neuroprotective fatty acid to the brain.

  11. Cholesterol-Lowering Potentials of Lactic Acid Bacteria Based on Bile-Salt Hydrolase Activity and Effect of Potent Strains on Cholesterol Metabolism In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chih Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study collected different probiotic isolates from animal and plant sources to evaluate the bile-salt hydrolase activity of probiotics in vitro. The deconjugation potential of bile acid was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. HepG2 cells were cultured with probiotic strains with high BSH activity. The triglyceride (TG and apolipoprotein B (apo B secretion by HepG2 cells were evaluated. Our results show that the BSH activity and bile-acid deconjugation abilities of Pediococcus acidilactici NBHK002, Bifidobacterium adolescentis NBHK006, Lactobacillus rhamnosus NBHK007, and Lactobacillus acidophilus NBHK008 were higher than those of the other probiotic strains. The cholesterol concentration in cholesterol micelles was reduced within 24 h. NBHK007 reduced the TG secretion by 100% after 48 h of incubation. NBHK002, NBHK006, and NBHK007 could reduce apo B secretion by 33%, 38%, and 39%, respectively, after 24 h of incubation. The product PROBIO S-23 produced a greater decrease in the total concentration of cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, TG, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance in the serum or livers of hamsters with hypercholesterolemia compared with that of hamsters fed with a high-fat and high-cholesterol diet. These results show that the three probiotic strains of lactic acid bacteria are better candidates for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease.

  12. Proinflammatory cytokines and bile acids upregulate ΔNp73 protein, an inhibitor of p53 and p73 tumor suppressors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Zaika

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is the main etiological factor behind the recent rapid increase in the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma. During reflux, esophageal cells are exposed to bile at low pH resulting in cellular damage and inflammation, which are known to facilitate cancer development. In this study, we investigated the regulation of p73 isoform, ΔNp73α, in the reflux condition. Previous studies have reported that ΔNp73 exhibits anti-apoptotic and oncogenic properties through inhibition of p53 and p73 proteins. We found that direct exposure of esophageal cells to bile acids in an acidic environment alters the phosphorylation of ΔNp73, its subcellular localization and increases ΔNp73 protein levels. Upregulation of ΔNp73 was also observed in esophageal tissues collected from patients with GERD and Barrett's metaplasia, a precancerous lesion in the esophagus associated with gastric reflux. c-Abl, p38 MAPK, and IKK protein kinases were identified to interact in the regulation of ΔNp73. Their inhibition with chemotherapeutic agents and siRNA suppresses ΔNp73. We also found that pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-1β and TNFα, are potent inducers of ΔNp73α, which further enhance the bile acids/acid effect. Combined, our studies provide evidence that gastroesophageal reflux alters the regulation of oncogenic ΔNp73 isoform that may facilitate tumorigenic transformation of esophageal metaplastic epithelium.

  13. Biosynthesis of caffeic acid in Escherichia coli using its endogenous hydroxylase complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Yuheng

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Caffeic acid (3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid is a natural phenolic compound derived from the plant phenylpropanoid pathway. Caffeic acid and its phenethyl ester (CAPE have attracted increasing attention for their various pharmaceutical properties and health-promoting effects. Nowadays, large-scale production of drugs or drug precursors via microbial approaches provides a promising alternative to chemical synthesis and extraction from plant sources. Results We first identified that an Escherichia coli native hydroxylase complex previously characterized as the 4-hydroxyphenylacetate 3-hydroxylase (4HPA3H was able to convert p-coumaric acid to caffeic acid efficiently. This critical enzymatic step catalyzed in plants by a membrane-associated cytochrome P450 enzyme, p-coumarate 3-hydroxylase (C3H, is difficult to be functionally expressed in prokaryotic systems. Moreover, the performances of two tyrosine ammonia lyases (TALs from Rhodobacter species were compared after overexpression in E. coli. The results indicated that the TAL from R. capsulatus (Rc possesses higher activity towards both tyrosine and L-dopa. Based on these findings, we further designed a dual pathway leading from tyrosine to caffeic acid consisting of the enzymes 4HPA3H and RcTAL. This heterologous pathway extended E. coli native tyrosine biosynthesis machinery and was able to produce caffeic acid (12.1 mg/L in minimal salt medium. Further improvement in production was accomplished by boosting tyrosine biosynthesis in E. coli, which involved the alleviation of tyrosine-induced feedback inhibition and carbon flux redirection. Finally, the titer of caffeic acid reached 50.2 mg/L in shake flasks after 48-hour cultivation. Conclusion We have successfully established a novel pathway and constructed an E. coli strain for the production of caffeic acid. This work forms a basis for further improvement in production, as well as opens the possibility of microbial synthesis

  14. Metabolic carbon fluxes and biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates in Ralstonia eutropha on short chain fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jian; Si, Yingtao

    2004-01-01

    Short chain fatty acids such as acetic, propionic, and butyric acids can be synthesized into polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) by Ralstonia eutropha. Metabolic carbon fluxes of the acids in living cells have significant effect on the yield, composition, and thermomechanical properties of PHA bioplastics. Based on the general knowledge of central metabolism pathways and the unusual metabolic pathways in R. eutropha, a metabolic network of 41 bioreactions is constructed to analyze the carbon fluxes on utilization of the short chain fatty acids. In fed-batch cultures with constant feeding of acid media, carbon metabolism and distribution in R. eutropha were measured involving CO2, PHA biopolymers, and residual cell mass. As the cells underwent unsteady state metabolism and PHA biosynthesis under nitrogen-limited conditions, accumulative carbon balance was applied for pseudo-steady-state analysis of the metabolic carbon fluxes. Cofactor NADP/NADPH balanced between PHA synthesis and the C3/C4 pathway provided an independent constraint for solution of the underdetermined metabolic network. A major portion of propionyl-CoA was directed to pyruvate via the 2-methylcitrate cycle and further decarboxylated to acetyl-CoA. Only a small amount of propionate carbon (acetic acid in the medium. Malate is the node of the C3/C4 pathway and TCA cycle and its decarboxylation to dehydrogenation ranges from 0.33 to 1.28 in response to the demands on NADPH and oxaloacetate for short chain fatty acids utilization. PMID:15296425

  15. 7-deoxyloganetic acid synthase catalyzes a key 3 step oxidation to form 7-deoxyloganetic acid in Catharanthus roseus iridoid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Vonny; Wiens, Brent; Masada-Atsumi, Sayaka; Yu, Fang; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2014-05-01

    Iridoids are key intermediates required for the biosynthesis of monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (MIAs), as well as quinoline alkaloids. Although most iridoid biosynthetic genes have been identified, one remaining three step oxidation required to form the carboxyl group of 7-deoxyloganetic acid has yet to be characterized. Here, it is reported that virus-induced gene silencing of 7-deoxyloganetic acid synthase (7DLS, CYP76A26) in Catharanthus roseus greatly decreased levels of secologanin and the major MIAs, catharanthine and vindoline in silenced leaves. Functional expression of this gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae confirmed its function as an authentic 7DLS that catalyzes the 3 step oxidation of iridodial-nepetalactol to form 7-deoxyloganetic acid. The identification of CYP76A26 removes a key bottleneck for expression of iridoid and related MIA pathways in various biological backgrounds. PMID:24594312

  16. The plant cuticle is required for osmotic stress regulation of abscisic acid biosynthesis and osmotic stress tolerance in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Zhenyu

    2011-05-01

    Osmotic stress activates the biosynthesis of abscisic acid (ABA). One major step in ABA biosynthesis is the carotenoid cleavage catalyzed by a 9-cis epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED). To understand the mechanism for osmotic stress activation of ABA biosynthesis, we screened for Arabidopsis thaliana mutants that failed to induce the NCED3 genee xpression in response to osmotic stress treatments. The ced1 (for 9-cis epoxycarotenoid dioxy genase defective 1) mutant isolated in this study showed markedly reduced expression of NCED3 in response to osmotic stress (polyethylene glycol)treatments compared with the wild type. Other ABA biosynthesis genes are also greatly reduced in ced1 under osmotic stress. ced1 mutant plants are very sensitive to even mild osmotic stress. Map-based cloning revealed unexpectedly thatCED1 encodes a putative a/b hydrolase domain-containing protein and is allelic to the BODYGUARD gene that was recently shown to be essential for cuticle biogenesis. Further studies discovered that other cut in biosynthesis mutants are also impaired in osmotic stress induction of ABA biosynthesis genes and are sensitive to osmotic stress. Our work demonstrates that the cuticle functions not merely as a physical barrier to minimize water loss but also mediates osmotic stress signaling and tolerance by regulating ABA biosynthesis and signaling. © 2011 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  17. [Computed X-ray tomography in predicting the efficacy of oral cholelithiasis with bile acids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, X B

    1993-02-01

    The efficacy of oral cholelitholytic therapy with chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in 137 patients with gallstones was compared with their CT patterns. The best dissolving results were obtained from patients with the stones in isodense and faint category (OCG). Besides, gallstones, which showed no obvious filling defect on OCG but distinct echo and shadow on B-type ultrasonography, were also insoluble. PMID:8391902

  18. Bile acid induced colonic irritation stimulates intracolonic nitric oxide release in humans.

    OpenAIRE

    F. Casellas; Mourelle, M; Papo, M; Guarner, F; Antolin, M; Armengol, J R; J. R. Malagelada

    1996-01-01

    AIM--To measure the intracolonic release of nitric oxide end products (nitrates plus nitrites) and eicosanoids in response to intraluminal irritation with deoxycholic acid (DCA). PATIENTS--Seven patients with irritable bowel syndrome. METHODS--The left colon was perfused with a solution with or without 3 mM deoxycholic acid. Aspirates were assayed for eicosanoids by specific radioimmuno-assay, and for nitrates plus nitrites by the Griess reaction. To confirm that stimulated colonic mucosa can...

  19. The effect of acetaminophen on the expression of BCRP in trophoblast cells impairs the placental barrier to bile acids during maternal cholestasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acetaminophen is used as first-choice drug for pain relief during pregnancy. Here we have investigated the effect of acetaminophen at subtoxic doses on the expression of ABC export pumps in trophoblast cells and its functional repercussion on the placental barrier during maternal cholestasis. The incubation of human choriocarcinoma cells (JAr, JEG-3 and BeWo) with acetaminophen for 48 h resulted in no significant changes in the expression and/or activity of MDR1 and MRPs. In contrast, in JEG-3 cells, BCRP mRNA, protein, and transport activity were reduced. In rat placenta, collected at term, acetaminophen administration for the last three days of pregnancy resulted in enhanced mRNA, but not protein, levels of Mrp1 and Bcrp. In fact, a decrease in Bcrp protein was found. Using in situ perfused rat placenta, a reduction in the Bcrp-dependent fetal-to-maternal bile acid transport after treating the dams with acetaminophen was found. Complete biliary obstruction in pregnant rats induced a significant bile acid accumulation in fetal serum and tissues, which was further enhanced when the mothers were treated with acetaminophen. This drug induced increased ROS production in JEG-3 cells and decreased the total glutathione content in rat placenta. Moreover, the NRF2 pathway was activated in JEG-3 cells as shown by an increase in nuclear NRF2 levels and an up-regulation of NRF2 target genes, NQO1 and HMOX-1, which was not observed in rat placenta. In conclusion, acetaminophen induces in placenta oxidative stress and a down-regulation of BCRP/Bcrp, which may impair the placental barrier to bile acids during maternal cholestasis. - Highlights: • Acetaminophen induces changes in placental BCRP expression in vitro. • This drug reduces the ability of placental cells to export BCRP substrates. • Acetaminophen induces changes in Bcrp expression in rat placenta. • Placental barrier to bile acids is impaired in rats treated with this drug

  20. A Grape Seed Procyanidin Extract Ameliorates Fructose-Induced Hypertriglyceridemia in Rats via Enhanced Fecal Bile Acid and Cholesterol Excretion and Inhibition of Hepatic Lipogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E Downing

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine whether a grape seed procyanidin extract (GSPE exerts a triglyceride-lowering effect in a hyperlipidemic state using the fructose-fed rat model and to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms. Rats were fed either a starch control diet or a diet containing 65% fructose for 8 weeks to induce hypertriglyceridemia. During the 9th week of the study, rats were maintained on their respective diet and administered vehicle or GSPE via oral gavage for 7 days. Fructose increased serum triglyceride levels by 171% after 9 weeks, compared to control, while GSPE administration attenuated this effect, resulting in a 41% decrease. GSPE inhibited hepatic lipogenesis via down-regulation of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c and stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 in the fructose-fed animals. GSPE increased fecal bile acid and total lipid excretion, decreased serum bile acid levels and increased the expression of genes involved in cholesterol synthesis. However, bile acid biosynthetic gene expression was not increased in the presence of GSPE and fructose. Serum cholesterol levels remained constant, while hepatic cholesterol levels decreased. GSPE did not modulate expression of genes responsible for esterification or biliary export of the newly synthesized cholesterol, but did increase fecal cholesterol excretion, suggesting that in the presence of GSPE and fructose, the liver may secrete more free cholesterol into the plasma which may then be shunted to the proximal small intestine for direct basolateral to apical secretion and subsequent fecal excretion. Our results demonstrate that GSPE effectively lowers serum triglyceride levels in fructose-fed rats after one week administration. This study provides novel insight into the mechanistic actions of GSPE in treating hypertriglyceridemia and demonstrates that it targets hepatic de novo lipogenesis, bile acid homeostasis and non-biliary cholesterol excretion as

  1. A Grape Seed Procyanidin Extract Ameliorates Fructose-Induced Hypertriglyceridemia in Rats via Enhanced Fecal Bile Acid and Cholesterol Excretion and Inhibition of Hepatic Lipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Laura E; Heidker, Rebecca M; Caiozzi, Gianella C; Wong, Brian S; Rodriguez, Kelvin; Del Rey, Fernando; Ricketts, Marie-Louise

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether a grape seed procyanidin extract (GSPE) exerts a triglyceride-lowering effect in a hyperlipidemic state using the fructose-fed rat model and to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms. Rats were fed either a starch control diet or a diet containing 65% fructose for 8 weeks to induce hypertriglyceridemia. During the 9th week of the study, rats were maintained on their respective diet and administered vehicle or GSPE via oral gavage for 7 days. Fructose increased serum triglyceride levels by 171% after 9 weeks, compared to control, while GSPE administration attenuated this effect, resulting in a 41% decrease. GSPE inhibited hepatic lipogenesis via down-regulation of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c and stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 in the fructose-fed animals. GSPE increased fecal bile acid and total lipid excretion, decreased serum bile acid levels and increased the expression of genes involved in cholesterol synthesis. However, bile acid biosynthetic gene expression was not increased in the presence of GSPE and fructose. Serum cholesterol levels remained constant, while hepatic cholesterol levels decreased. GSPE did not modulate expression of genes responsible for esterification or biliary export of the newly synthesized cholesterol, but did increase fecal cholesterol excretion, suggesting that in the presence of GSPE and fructose, the liver may secrete more free cholesterol into the plasma which may then be shunted to the proximal small intestine for direct basolateral to apical secretion and subsequent fecal excretion. Our results demonstrate that GSPE effectively lowers serum triglyceride levels in fructose-fed rats after one week administration. This study provides novel insight into the mechanistic actions of GSPE in treating hypertriglyceridemia and demonstrates that it targets hepatic de novo lipogenesis, bile acid homeostasis and non-biliary cholesterol excretion as important mechanisms for

  2. The effect of acetaminophen on the expression of BCRP in trophoblast cells impairs the placental barrier to bile acids during maternal cholestasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazquez, Alba G., E-mail: albamgb@usal.es [Laboratory of Experimental Hepatology and Drug Targeting (HEVEFARM),